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CONTENTS Calendar of League Events 2  3 President’s Message  A mplify Your Community’s Voice by Fostering Future Leaders

2017

COMMUNITIES

By Dan Carrigg

DEVELOPMENT

 ith over 2,500 bills introduced W during the session, the League represented city interests on many issues to protect local control, revenue and flexibility.

Upcoming Leadership Training Opportunities

By Jennifer Whiting

 he League offers a range of T professional development sessions featuring current research, model programs and best practices.

7 News From the Institute for Local Government

 Guide to Practical A Public Engagement for Local Government

By Madeline Henry

 he TIERS Framework and T Learning Lab support the use of deliberative planning to better engage the public.

Legislative Year in Review

AUTHORITY

21 California Cities Helen Putnam Award for Excellence

 itrus Heights Addresses C Homelessness in a Suburban Community

 he city launched a pilot program T after local homelessness-related services were reduced or cut.

6 City Forum

STATEWIDE

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By Rich Garbarino

California cities use a variety of methods, including citizens’ academies and similar programs, to engage residents in civic life and give them a voice.

CALIFORNIA

22 California Cities Helen Putnam Award for Excellence

 anta Clarita Focuses on S Employee Development

 raining and mentoring employees T on the job and investing in their growth saves time and money.

Job Opportunities 23  Professional Services 30  Directory

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On the Record

 Advice for newly elected council members.

Providing California’s local governments with an effective tool for the timely financing of community-based public benefit projects. Since 1988, more than 500 cities, counties and special districts use CSCDA as their conduit issuer and PACE funding provider.

 Cover photo: Dszc

Sponsored by:

(800) 531-7476 www.cscda.org


®

President Rich Garbarino Council Member South San Francisco

1400 K Street Sacramento, CA 95814 (916) 658-8200 Fax (916) 658-8240

Second Vice President Jan Arbuckle Council Member Grass Valley

Immediate Past President JoAnne Mounce Council Member Lodi

Executive Director Carolyn Coleman

For a complete list of the League board of directors, visit www.cacities.org/board.

Magazine Staff Editor in Chief Jude Hudson, Hudson + Associates (916) 658-8234; email: editor@westerncity.com Managing Editor Norman Coppinger (916) 658-8277; email: ncoppinger@cacities.org Contributing Editor Eva Spiegel (916) 658-8228; email: espiegel@cacities.org Advertising Sales Manager Pam Maxwell-Blodgett (916) 658-8256; email: maxwellp@cacities.org Administrative Assistant Kimberly Brady (916) 658-8223; email: kbrady@cacities.org Contributors Rony Berdugo Tim Cromartie Erin Evans-Fudem Dane Hutchings Melissa Kuehne Jason Rhine

leaguevents January 17–19

New Mayors and Council Members’ Academy, Sacramento This vitally important training prepares newly elected officials for the demands of office and introduces them to the legal constraints on city councils. Attendees also have an opportunity to meet their legislators at the Legislative Reception on Wednesday evening.

18–19

Policy Committee Meetings, Sacramento The League’s policy committees review issues of interest to cities statewide and make recommendations to the League board of directors as part of the organization’s policy-making process. Learn how to join a League policy committee at www.cacities.org/joinpolicy.

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Legal Advocacy Committee Meeting, Sacramento The committee reviews and recommends friend-of-the-court efforts on cases of statewide significant interest to California cities.

Associate Editors Carol Malinowski Carolyn Walker Design Taber Creative Group

31–February 2

City Managers’ Department Meeting, Newport Beach Geared to the unique needs of city managers, this conference covers issues affecting cities throughout California.

Advertising Design ImagePoint Design For photo credits, see page 26. Western City (ISSN 0279-5337) is published monthly by the League of California Cities, 1400 K St., Sacramento, CA 95814. Subscriptions: $39.00/1 year; $63.00/2 years; student: $26.50; foreign: $52.00; single copies: $4.00, including sales tax. Entered as periodical mail January 30, 1930, at the Post Office, Los Angeles, CA 90013, under the Act of April 13, 1879. Periodical postage paid at Sacramento, Calif.

NT RI

MARCH 28–30

Public Works Officers’ Institute and Expo, Monterey Designed for professionals at every career level, this conference covers the latest developments in public works.

GY

Event and registration information is available at www.cacities.org/events.

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Board of Directors’ Meeting, Redondo Beach The League board reviews, discusses and takes action on a variety of issues affecting cities, including legislation, legal advocacy, education and training, and more.

ED US IN

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FEBRUARY 22–23

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Postmaster: Send address changes to Western City, 1400 K Street, Sacramento, CA 95814. Western City Trademark Reg. U.S. Pat. Off. ©2018 League of California Cities. All rights reserved. Material may not be reprinted without written permission. This issue is Volume XCIV, No. 1.

IND E

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Supplied by Community Energy

FSC ® is an independent, not-for-profit organization that promotes environmentally appropriate, socially beneficial and economically viable forest management worldwide. Products with the FSC label are independently certified to ensure that they come from forests managed to meet the needs of present and future generations.

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First Vice President Mark Kersey Council Member San Diego

League of California Cities

For the latest information on League conferences and events, follow us on Twitter @CaCitiesLearn. For legislative and policy updates and more, follow @CaCities. Follow Western City @WesternCityMag. Join us on Facebook. www.facebook.com/westerncity www.facebook.com/LeagueofCaCities www.cacities.org


President’s Message by Rich Garbarino

Amplify Your Community’s Voice by

Fostering Future Leaders As elected leaders, mayors and city council members have a vested interest in fostering leadership skills as part of the effort to engage residents, build dynamic communities and improve the quality of life for all. In my city, South San Francisco, we are focusing on outreach and inclusion. Our city offers residents a variety of programs to learn about local government and opportunities for involvement. These programs include a Citizens’ Academy, a Citizens’ Police Academy and, most recently, a Women’s Networking Forum

program. We strive to engage younger residents and people of color in civic life, and these programs encourage them to consider serving on a local board or commission and running for the city council.

The Citizens’ Academy Participants in the 16-week Citizens’ Academy visit nine city departments to hear each director explain how that department functions and serves the community. The city conducts the academy every other year, and typically about 40 residents enroll. The academy provides a

behind-the-scenes look at city operations that include the: • City Manager’s Office and the city council; • Economic and Community Development Department; • Public Works Department; • Water Quality Control Plant; • Parks and Recreation Department; and • Library. continued

www.westerncity.com

Western City, January 2018

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Amplify Your Community’s Voice by Fostering Future Leaders, continued

The portion of the academy that focuses on the City Manager’s Office and the city council emphasizes leadership. First, we help participants understand what the city council does and how it operates. We share information about all aspects of serving on the council. Council members candidly discuss both the advantages and disadvantages of public service. The advantages include opportunities to build community and the ability to make a positive difference in the city; the disadvantages include the loss of privacy in public places, potential public humiliation and exposure to public conflict.

a half hours long, held for 12 weeks from August to November. Each class covers a different aspect of police work, including recruiting, hiring and training officers; SWAT team and K-9 team demonstrations; and firearms training. In addition, the Police Department conducts a Spanishlanguage Citizens’ Police Academy for the Latino community. The academies help build public trust and confidence in local law enforcement and provide insight into police career paths.

We also encourage participants to cultivate a relationship with their local leaders, attend city events, get involved in boards and commissions and tell their council member what’s happening in their neighborhood and what they need. We explain how participating in boards and commissions can be a stepping stone to serving on the council. Our goal is to convey what each individual can do to effect positive change and create an understanding of the first steps toward leadership positions, with an emphasis on the value of being active in the community — for example, through homeowners’ associations, the school district and parks and recreation programs.

In 2017, Vice Mayor Liza Normandy launched the South San Francisco Women’s Networking Forum program, which comprises six sessions:

As part of our effort to get participants thinking about running for the council, we tell them, “The community needs a voice. When you feel strongly about an issue that affects your neighborhood or community, you have tools at your disposal to help you make a difference. That’s how you become a leader.”

Vice Mayor Normandy says, “We need to encourage and inspire women to seek leadership positions, and we need to educate women about what it means to serve on the council. This program is designed to do that and to reach the women in our community who are looking for opportunities to make a difference locally.”

Citizens’ Police Academy Builds Bridges With Community The city also reaches out to the community through its Citizens’ Police Academy, which provides an inside look at the South San Francisco Police Department, its values, how it functions and more. The weekly academy classes are two and

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League of California Cities

Encouraging Women to Run for Office

1. Meet Your Elected Women Officials; 2. Communications: Social Media and Making Effective Presentations; 3. Beyond Networking; 4. Boards and Commissions Interview Process; 5. Commitment, Support and Lots of Patience; and 6. Conclusion — Recap, Reception.

The 2017 program featured trustees and former trustees of the South San Francisco Unified School District, a former parks and recreation commissioner, the city’s communications director, a city clerk, the South San Francisco fire chief, a city commissioner, the president of the library board of trustees, the chair of the South San

Francisco Parks & Recreation Commission, the former co-chair of the South San Francisco Community Outreach Program, a planning commissioner and president of the South San Francisco Public Library Foundation. Approximately 30 women attended the sessions, which proved popular. The city plans to offer the program again in 2018.

The Importance of Diversity South San Francisco celebrates diversity in its many forms: gender, race, religion, sexual orientation, age, culture, ethnicity and socioeconomic background. The city council unanimously passed a resolution stating its commitment to “recognize, value and proactively work to promote diversity and inclusion within South San Francisco.” In conjunction with cities nationwide, South San Francisco proclaimed June as Immigrant Heritage Month and Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) Pride Month and celebrated LGBT Pride Month by lighting up City Hall with the LGBT pride flag colors. A section on the city website titled “Diversity: It’s in the City’s DNA” promotes city-sponsored diversity-related events, including an Asian Heritage Celebration that shares the world of Asian culture with residents through art, dance, music and food. The city recently participated in a community forum with Mexican Consul General Gemi José González, City Manager Mike Futrell and Police Chief Jeff Azzopardi. In addition, South San Francisco is conducting a series of public forums titled “A Community Conversation.” In the first forum, area experts and community representatives addressed and provided information on topics such as bullying, immigration status and gender identity. Future forums will feature issues relevant to the community’s diverse populations and cultures.

www.cacities.org


Seeking Tomorrow’s Leaders Today Strong communities require dedicated leaders who listen carefully to the people they represent and welcome opportunities to promote leadership and inclusion in their communities. Cities throughout California use a variety of methods, including citizens academies and similar programs, to reach out to their residents, engage them in civic life and give them a voice in local government. It’s incumbent on local elected officials to build on those efforts and help educate people from our diverse communities, especially women and people of color, about the ways they can become involved and drive positive change in their cities. Then we must encourage

We strive to engage younger residents and people of color in civic life.

them to take action and seek positions on local boards and commissions — and the city council. The League and the Institute for Local Government provide numerous resources for cities related to public engagement, promoting leadership and developing the next generation of leaders. You can find links to these resources in the online

version of this article at www.westerncity. com. I urge you to take advantage of these resources and to consider how your city can strengthen its efforts to reach residents interested in making a difference. It benefits all of us to foster strong future leaders who will succeed us and serve their communities with integrity, passion and determination. ■

Speakers at the Women’s Networking Forum share insights: left to right Kristy Camacho, chairperson, South San Francisco Parks and Recreation Commission; Elaine Garbarino, member, South San Francisco Sister Cities Association; Kumkum Gupta, planning commissioner, District 1, San Mateo County; and Ariel Sallee, resident.

www.westerncity.com

Western City, January 2018

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City officials and staff attend the 2017 Annual Conference & Expo.

Upcoming

Leadership Training Opportunities by Jennifer Whiting “What’s our best option now?” “What have other cities done?” “How do I learn more about that?” No doubt you have asked yourself at least one of these questions. Whether you are an elected official or a member of the city staff, you are a leader to whom your community looks for direction — whether you have expertise in a particular area or not. To support our city leaders and help them stay informed, the League offers a range of training opportunities throughout the year featuring current research, lessons learned, model programs and best practices.

Mark Your Calendar Now In a few weeks, city managers and assistant city managers will gather for their annual City Managers’ Department Meeting to keep up to date on a wide range of issues of current concern. Among the 15 sessions offered for 2018, key issues such as succession planning, addressing homelessness and ethics will be covered. Every January the League holds the New Mayors & Council Members’ Academy, designed for both newly elected officials and city council veterans wanting a refresher course on the basic legal and practical framework in which city officials operate. This wildly popular training typically sells out in years following general elections. Starting in 2019, the academy will be held in both Northern and Southern California in odd-numbered years.

The League recently revived the Mayors and Council Members’ Executive Forum, held in June. With sessions crafted by a committee of volunteer city officials, the forum features cutting-edge approaches to challenges facing cities. Attendees gain insight into a wide range of topics, including trends in economic development, labor negotiations, city finance, council-manager relations, election year issues, water-related innovation and more. Immediately following the Executive Forum, elected officials and staff have the opportunity to attend Advanced Leadership Workshops. These six-hour workshops provide a deeper dive into a specific topic. In 2017, attendees chose between “City Finances” and “Creating a Governance Culture of Civility and Purpose.” Topics for June 2018 will be announced in February. The League is also exploring options to expand this training to be offered more frequently. Other sectors of city government can also benefit from their individual, annual department meetings, including the: • City Attorneys’ Spring Conference in May; • City Clerks’ New Law and Elections Seminar in December; • Fire Chiefs’ Leadership Seminar in December; • Municipal Finance Institute in December;

Jennifer Whiting is director of education and training for the League and can be reached at jwhiting@cacities.org.

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League of California Cities

• Public Works Officers’ Institute, held in conjunction with county engineers, in March; and • Planning Commissioners’ Academy in April. Furthermore, the League supports city leaders’ efforts to promote local priority issues during Legislative Action Day in April. This one-day gathering of California city officials in Sacramento begins with a briefing on current topics before they visit with legislators and representatives from the governor’s administration. Networking events are also an important feature of this day’s program. Beyond conferences, the League offers a variety of short-notice webinars on emerging issues plus other in-person events throughout the year. One of the most popular webinars is the Legislative Briefing. Held each November, this webinar provides an overview of new laws that will affect cities in the coming months. Because 2018 will be a busy year legislatively, we encourage all members and interested parties to sign up for the League’s electronic newsletter (at www. cacities.org/cacitiesAdvocate) for weekly announcements on these additional online training opportunities.

Your Go-To Resource So the next time you ask, “What’s our best option now?” “What have other cities done?” or “How do I learn more about that?” remember to visit www.cacities. org/events to find an upcoming leadership training event geared specifically for you. ■

www.cacities.org


A Guide to Practical Public Engagement for Local Government by Madeline Henry The Institute for Local Government (ILG) has developed a framework any city can use to plan and implement its public engagement efforts. The TIERS Public Engagement Framework for Local Governments and TIERS Learning Lab support city officials and staff ’s use of deliberative planning to better engage the public.

Multiple Benefits of Engagement Your city benefits from effective public engagement in a number of ways: 1. Better understanding of the public’s values, beliefs and priorities; 2. More informed residents; 3. Improved city decision-making; 4. More community buy-in and support with less contentiousness; 5. More civil discussion and decision-making; 6. Faster project implementation with less need to revisit; 7. Greater trust among staff and between the community and local government; and 8. Higher rates of community participation and leadership development.

TIERS Public Engagement Framework The TIERS Public Engagement Framework for Local Governments contains five “pillars” — Think, Initiate, Engage, Review and Shift. Each pillar provides step-by-step directions and companion resources to build a comprehensive public engagement plan. Think. The first pillar guides cities through the initial planning stages of a public engagement effort. This includes conducting a self-assessment, considering the appropriate public engagement approach and building connections in your community. Initiate. Using the Initiate pillar, cities begin to develop their public engagement approach and outreach plan. It is important to consider a mix of in-person and online activities to ensure representation from target audiences. Engage. The Engage pillar walks cities through implementing

the outreach and public engagement plans and ensuring roles are clear and adjusting as appropriate. It is important to consider potential internal, organizational and external challenges that may arise. Review. After conducting a public engagement effort, reviewing the effort is essential, beginning with an evaluation of the public engagement approach and outreach plan. This phase includes considering what worked, what could have been better and what, if any, training is needed to improve the effort. The review also comprises reflecting on the barriers the city faced and sharing lessons learned with others. Shift. The final pillar, Shift, encourages organizational changes that would support future success, shifts in external relations and the implementation of policies or resolutions related to public engagement.

TIERS Learning Lab The TIERS Learning Lab is a training and coaching program for local government teams of two to five individuals. In the lab, city officials and staff: • Learn to use the TIERS Public Engagement Framework to successfully plan and implement public engagement, whether it is a one-time event or an ongoing, holistic approach; • Discuss strategies to overcome a wide variety of common barriers and challenges in public engagement efforts; • Work through a relevant local public engagement example to better understand resource-related choices such as staffing, money and time; • Connect with other cities, counties and special districts in the region to provide mutual support for successful public engagement efforts; and • Benefit from customized technical assistance and coaching before, during and after the lab. ILG will conduct a TIERS Learning Lab in March 2018 in Sacramento. To learn more, contact Madeline Henry at mhenry@ca-ilg.org or (916) 658-8205. Find the complete framework and information about future training opportunities at www.ca-ilg.org/TIERS. ■

Madeline Henry is a program coordinator for the Institute for Local Government and can be reached at mhenry@ca-ilg.org. www.westerncity.com

Western City, January 2018

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2017

Legislative Year in The 2017 California legislative session became one of the most productive in memory, influenced in part by the disruptive tension created by the unanticipated outcome of the 2016 presidential election. The divisions between California’s Democratic-dominated Legislature and the U.S. president on immigration, health care, federal budget proposals and climate change were stark, deep and emotional. The differences became evident the morning after the general election, when Assembly Speaker Anthony Rendon

(D-Lakewood) and Senate President pro Tem Kevin de León (D-Los Angeles) issued this statement: “Today, we woke up feeling like strangers in a foreign land, because yesterday Americans expressed their views on a pluralistic and democratic society that are clearly inconsistent with the values of the people of California.” As the fervor over proposed presidential executive orders and policies increased and congressional action stalled, state legislative leaders proclaimed that they would demonstrate how California and Democrats would continue to lead. And

lead they did — enacting a massive transportation funding package in the spring, extending the cap-and-trade carbon reduction program in the summer and approving an affordable housing package and a park and water bond at the end of session. These ambitious and significant accomplishments required two-thirds votes and major efforts by Governor Jerry Brown and legislative leaders. These accomplishments also matched city priorities. For a decade, the League had been advocating for additional transportation funding for local street and road

Dan Carrigg is deputy executive director and legislative director for the League and can be reached at dcarrigg@cacities.org.

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League of California Cities


17

Review

by Dan Carrigg

maintenance. Obtaining affordable housing funding matched another League strategic priority, and many communities will benefit from the park and water infrastructure bond. Yet all was not positive for cities as local control came under significant threat. The League successfully battled bills seeking to restrict local contracting authority and allow wireless companies to dictate uses of public property. With over 2,500 bills introduced during the session, the League represented city interests on many other issues to protect local control, revenue and flexibility. continued

Western City, January 2018

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2017 Legislative Year in Review, continued

Return of Democratic Supermajority and Other Legislative Changes The presidential election was not the only disruptive change affecting the 2017 session. In California, Democrats regained a two-thirds supermajority control of both houses. In the 80-member Assembly, Democrats added three seats from 52 to 55, surpassing the two-thirds threshold of 54. In the 40-member Senate, they secured the necessary 27 seats. Democrats had also obtained supermajority status following the 2014 election, but it eroded quickly when criminal scandals caused the suspension of three senators. With supermajority control, Democrats could enact tax increases, approve urgency measures and place items on the ballot without having to rely on Republican votes. Maintaining unity within

the caucus, however, proved challenging. Swing districts were vulnerable on tax votes, moderates were sensitive to business concerns and individuals could leverage other demands. Republicans had little power, but they served as a conduit to their colleagues in control of Congress; this influence became increasingly valuable as Democrats sought to blunt President Trump’s aggressive proposals.

by conservatives for voting to extend the cap-and-trade program. His critics did not seem to appreciate how — despite a weak bargaining position — Mayes was able to secure concessions supported by business groups and bolster Republican leverage on future cap-and-trade allocations by placing ACA 1 on the June 2017 ballot, requiring a two-thirds vote on post-2024 allocations of auction revenues.

While Democratic leadership remained stable, Republican turnover occurred. Sen. Patricia Bates (R-Laguna Niguel), who can serve until 2022, became Senate Republican leader, replacing Sen. Jean Fuller (R-Bakersfield), who terms out in 2018. Assembly Republican Leader Chad Mayes (R-Yucca Valley) lost his position late in the session to Assembly Member Brian Dahle (R-Bieber). Mayes attempted to establish a moderate and pragmatic approach for his party but was criticized

Factions also emerged among the Democrats. Tensions between progressives and pragmatists, evident in the presidential primary between Sen. Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton, surfaced again in a heated contest for party leadership. Rifts became personal when single-payer health care advocates attacked Assembly Speaker Rendon for requiring additional legislative review of their proposal estimated to cost $400 billion — double the funds in the state budget.

In the final weeks of the session, an agreement was reached with Gov. Brown on SB 5, a $4 billion park and water bond.

• • • • • • • •

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League of California Cities


Transparency improved with the new “three-day print” rule required by Prop. 54 (2016) limiting “gut-and-amend” bills. With such antics blocked, some veteran lobbyists appeared disoriented during the final nights of the session. Nevertheless, this minimal level of transparency improves the legislative process and benefits policy-advocacy groups like the League by providing opportunities to react to harmful proposals.

State Budget Normal, But Concerns Remain Over Possible Federal Actions With healthy state revenues, the budget reflected Gov. Brown’s proposals with minor modifications. Legislators were more worried about the impacts of the president’s agenda than quibbling over trivial details. California’s budget was vulnerable to a $20 billion annual cost increase due to the state’s prior decision to expand

health-care benefits to millions of poor residents under the Affordable Care Act. The president’s proposed elimination of many programs, including Community Development Block Grants (CDBG) and HOME Investment Partnerships, generated additional concerns. With action stalled in Washington, D.C., the Legislature adopted its FY 2017–18 budget package with total General Fund spending of $125.1 billion and $8.5 billion in the Rainy-Day Reserve. To address growing concerns over the state’s unfunded public pension liabilities, the state also made a $6 billion prepayment from cash reserves to the California Public Employees’ Retirement System (CalPERS). The Legislature also took other higherprofile actions. Continued frustration with mismanagement at the state Board of Equalization (BOE) led to the transfer of most BOE tax programs, including the collection and allocation of local sales and use taxes, to a newly created Department of Tax and Fee Administration. Another trailer bill imposed rigorous signature verification and other process requirements on legislative recalls, responding to efforts by conservative activists to recall Sen. Josh Newman (D-Fullerton) over his vote for transportation funding. For cities, larger issues included the allocation of $2.8 billion in transportation funds under the recently passed SB 1, the Road Repair and Accountability Act. The League and California Police Chiefs Association secured amendments to SB 94 (a cannabis trailer bill reconciling medical marijuana law with the recently enacted Prop. 64) that preserved as much as possible the integrity of the regulatory structure for cities and law enforcement. In addition, the League and police chiefs secured changes to AB 133, a follow-up cannabis trailer bill, that underscored the continuing need for local control after state licensing begins. The League also protected smaller cities’ interests by opposing a trailer bill that proposed cutting the economic development set-aside for small cities under the state’s CDBG program. The Legislature adopted a revised version of the bill, SB 106, that did not contain the proposed cut, and the state

Department of Housing and Community Development (HCD) formed a task force with the affected cities on CDBG program issues.

Development and Passage of the Transportation Funding Package The development of the transportation funding package took years of work. California’s streets and roads were deteriorating due to inadequate maintenance funding. The League and the California State Association of Counties (CSAC) had documented the decline for a decade through biennial surveys of local street and road conditions. Consumers were seeing more potholes and cracks while incurring an estimated $762 dollars per year in related vehicle repairs. Ignoring this problem made things worse because it costs eight times more to rebuild a road than to properly maintain it. The reasons for the funding deficits were well known. Revenues dedicated to road maintenance were eroding. The state gas tax, which had last been increased in the 1990s, was not indexed for inflation. Fuel economy improvements also reduced consumption and per-gallon revenues. Drivers of electric and hybrid vehicles were not contributing equitably to road maintenance needs. Maintaining roads is not an exciting topic, so the League, CSAC and other organizations joined forces as part of the Fix Our Roads Coalition and embarked on a multi-year effort to both educate and advocate for a comprehensive solution. The coalition also worked closely with Sen. Jim Beall (D-San José) and Assembly Member Jim Frazier (D-Discovery Bay), the chairs of the two legislative transportation committees, who led an effort to help their colleagues develop an understanding of the issues. In addition, the coalition convened meetings with various stakeholders, legislative leaders and state transportation representatives. The coalition also developed a website with educational resources, authored editorials and held regional press conferences to build awareness of the problems and support for additional investments.

continued

Western City, January 2018

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2017 Legislative Year in Review, continued

Finally, an agreement materialized in 2017. The Road Repair and Accountability Act of 2017, SB 1 (Beall, Chapter 5, Statutes of 2017) and ACA 5 (Frazier, Chapter 30, Statutes of 2017), combines dedicated funding with strong accountability measures. SB 1 provides an additional $5.4 billion annually for the state and local transportation system, of which $1.5 billion is dedicated to city and county street and road repairs. For cities, it doubles the amount of road maintenance funds they will receive to fix their streets. ACA 5, scheduled to appear on the June 2018 ballot, provides constitutional protection to ensure several new revenue sources will be used only for transportation purposes. Securing the final votes for this package proved difficult. Gov. Brown’s leadership was critical, along with the efforts of Assembly Speaker Rendon and Senate President pro Tem de León who made developing a solution a priority for their caucuses. Sen. Anthony Cannella (R-Ceres) provided the 27th vote in the Senate. The League thanks all legislators who cast the courageous votes to address this growing problem. When presented with the League’s Distinguished Legislative Leadership Award before 1,800 city officials at the League’s annual conference, both Sen. Beall and Assembly Member Frazier recognized the work of the League and city officials in accomplishing the transportation package deal. Sen. Beall said, “Thanks to the effective advocacy of the League of California Cities and other partners, we are now able to increase our investment in transportation infrastructure maintenance to ensure California’s highways, streets and bridges

The development of the transportation funding package took years of work.

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League of California Cities

will meet the demands of a 21st century economy.” Assembly Member Frazier added, “The League of California Cities was an integral part of a coalition that worked hard to get the package passed.” Since the passage of SB 1 in April, the League worked closely with the California Transportation Commission and other state entities on the rollout of new transportation revenues. Updates, webinars and annual conference panels conveyed the details to city officials. The League and CSAC also sponsored helpful cleanup language to SB 1 in AB 135 (Chapter 255, Statutes of 2017), a budget trailer bill passed in September. New revenues will begin flowing to local agencies early in 2018. But the League’s advocacy work on transportation funding is not over. ACA 5, which contains various constitutional protections for the new funding, is scheduled for the June ballot. Regrettably, several proposed ballot measures seeking to repeal SB 1, while proposing no alternative funding solutions to address the problem, have also been filed. The League and the Fix Our Roads Coalition will continue to educate and advocate on the importance of funding to support local road maintenance needs.

Recent Battles Expose Ongoing Threats to Local Authority The idea of eliminating cities’ and counties’ ability to contract for service delivery or of allowing private telecommunications companies to install their equipment on public property and without local community input and approvals would not make sense to the average voter. But in

the halls of the state Capitol, when such ideas are backed by powerful interests, they can prove difficult to stop. Examples of this include: • AB 1250 (Jones-Sawyer). After a major battle led by the League in partnership with the California Contract Cities Association to remove the application of this labor-sponsored bill to cities’ contracting authority, this bill still continued (applying only to counties) all the way through the Senate, where it is pending in the Senate Rules Committee as a two-year bill that can be acted upon in 2018. • SB 649 (Hueso). Despite opposition by the League, hundreds of cities and many counties and editorial boards, the bill moved through the Legislature with little resistance. Backed by the powerful telecom industry, which hired many lobbyists for the effort, the bill passed the Senate Floor 32-1 in May, passed the Assembly Local Government Committee 6-2 in June, passed the Assembly Communications and Conveyance Committee 10-0 in July and the Assembly Appropriations Committee 12-1 in September. The presence of 1,800 city officials in Sacramento attending the League’s 2017 Annual Conference & Expo during the final three days of the legislative session helped limit the floor votes to 46-16 in the Assembly and 22-10 in the Senate. Rather than the Legislature holding the flawed measure, it took the experience and leadership of Gov. Brown to state in his veto message what many legislators already knew: “I believe that the interest which localities have in managing rights of way requires a more balanced solution than the one achieved in this bill.” One of the arguments for expanding legislative term limits was that the Legislature would become a more deliberative and thoughtful policy-making body. The rapid passage of bills such as AB 1250 and SB 649 through the Legislature raises questions about when that will occur and underscores the continued vulnerability of local authority in a legislative environment www.cacities.org


to require inclusion of affordable units in new rental housing developments. Other measures focused on the local planning and approval process: where the desire to appease a powerful interest group can erode public policy. City officials should urge their legislators to resist taking hasty action on policy proposals of such importance and consequence to their communities. The successful efforts to protect city authority on these bills demonstrate the collective power of cities when they work together.

Affordable Housing Package: Funding, Tools and Incentives On a bright September morning in San Francisco, a group of legislators and housing advocates gathered on a hilltop to celebrate Gov. Brown’s signing a 15bill package responding to California’s affordable housing crisis. The ceremony capped an active legislative year, with over 130 housing-related bills introduced. Many San Francisco Bay Area legislators attended the ceremony, reflecting the intense regional housing demand driven by a booming economy. Highly skilled technology workers earning generous salaries were bidding up rents and home prices. Housing prices had also rebounded in Southern California’s coastal regions but less so in the Central Valley and Inland Empire, which experienced the brunt of the foreclosure crisis during the Great Recession and a slower economic recovery. For cities, major positive developments included the restoration of affordable housing funding via two League-supported measures. SB 2 (Chapter 364, Statutes of 2017) by Sen. Toni Atkins (D-San Diego) will generate approximately $250 million per year for affordable housing from a $75 to $225 tax on certain real estaterelated transactions. Initial funding will be available to assist local governments with updates to their General Plans, with an ongoing 70 percent dedicated to local government housing programs.

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SB 3 (Chapter 365, Statutes of 2017) by Sen. Beall places a $4 billion affordable housing bond on the November 2018 ballot. Another helpful measure, AB 1598 (Chapter 764, Statutes of 2017) by Assembly Member Kevin Mullin (D-South San Francisco), authorizes a city/county to create an affordable housing authority with various powers and dedicate a portion of its property-tax increment, sales tax and other revenues to develop affordable housing. AB 1568 (Chapter 562, Statutes of 2017) by Assembly Member Richard Bloom (D-Santa Monica) authorizes enhanced infrastructure financing districts to use sales tax revenue under certain conditions to help fund affordable housing. These investments and tools, however, only partially fill the vacuum created by the elimination in 2011 of local redevelopment agencies that provided over $1 billion annually for affordable housing. The League appreciates Sen. Richard Roth (D-Riverside) for authoring Leaguesponsored SB 540 (Chapter 369, Statutes of 2017), which strikes a balance between inclusive local planning and improved certainty for housing developers. The measure authorizes the creation of Workforce Housing Opportunity Zones, where upfront local planning and environmental analysis under the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) will provide housing developers additional certainty. Another option is provided by League-supported AB 73 (Chapter 371, Statutes of 2017), by Assembly Member David Chiu (D-San Francisco), which offers state financial incentives to local agencies that adopt Housing Sustainability Districts approved for a 10-year period by HCD. Leaguesupported AB 1505 (Chapter 376, Statutes of 2017) by Assembly Member Bloom contained a long-sought legislative fix to the 2009 Palmer v. City of Los Angeles decision, restoring local authority

• SB 35 (Chapter 366, Statutes of 2017) by Sen. Scott Wiener (DSan Francisco) requires multifamily developments consistent with existing local planning requirements that meet specific conditions to be approved in a “ministerial” fashion, which means lacking project-level environmental review and public input, in jurisdictions where housing is not developed for all income levels at sufficient volume to match state-generated regional housing need allocations; • AB 72 (Chapter 370, Statutes of 2017) by Assembly Member Miguel Santiago (D-Los Angeles) provides HCD with broad authority to review any action by a city or county that it determines is inconsistent with an adopted housing element; • AB 1397 (Chapter 375, Statutes of 2017) by Assembly Member Evan Low (D-Campbell) limits sites that can be designated in a housing element to those that meet a debatable “realistic and demonstrated potential”; • SB 167 (Chapter 368, Statutes of 2017) by Sen. Nancy Skinner (D-Berkeley) and AB 678 (Chapter 373, Statutes of 2017) by former Assembly Member Raul Bocanegra (D-San Fernando) make numerous changes to the Housing Accountability Act that include requiring findings to be based on “a preponderance of evidence” and imposing ($10,000) fines on cities that fail to comply with a judge’s order; and • AB 879 (Chapter 374, Statutes of 2017) by Assembly Member Tim Grayson (D-Concord) requires HCD to study and make recommendations to substantially reduce developer fees via potential amendments to the Mitigation Fee Act, the law that outlines the constitutional baseline local governments use to establish fees. continued Western City, January 2018

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2017 Legislative Year in Review, continued

Other Economic and Policy Issues Affecting Housing Production While many view the 2017 housing package as helpful, its passage certainly does not signal the end of the policy discussion. Aside from various incentive and funding measures, a portion of the housing package

responded to a theme, championed by several advocacy groups and academics, that the local planning and approval process is the major cause of the state currently producing 100,000 fewer units per year than pre-recession levels. From a local government perspective, that assertion is incomplete and inaccurate. Going forward, it is time to dig a bit deeper.

Recreational marijuana regulations take effect in 2018.

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This legislative focus lacked an exploration of other economic factors affecting the housing market. The foreclosure crisis resulted in displaced homeowners with damaged credit, increasingly stringent lending criteria and widespread investor conversions of foreclosed single-family units into rentals. Demographic factors may also affect demand as baby boomers with limited retirement savings and increased health-care costs approach retirement age. Younger residents, saddled with student debt, face challenges saving for home down payments. Manufacturing and other higher-wage jobs are stagnating and being replaced via automation and conversion to a lower-wage service economy. And fewer skilled construction workers are available after many switched occupations during the recession. Housing production and costs can also be affected by other state laws intended to advance important policies: • Local Agency Formation Commissions tighten annexation and service provision requirements; • The Coastal Act subjects coastal development to rigorous regulatory review; • The Williamson Act (the California Land Conservation Act) discourages development on agricultural lands; • Other laws ensure adequate water supplies, protect oak trees and avoid construction in floodplains; • Residents displaced by governmental repairs of dilapidated housing stock are provided relocation benefits; • Prevailing wages are required for affordable housing construction; • New energy, seismic, fire, access for people with disabilities and other code requirements increase building costs; • CEQA compliance can result in delays and costly litigation; and • Propositions 13 (1978), 218 (1996) and 26 (2010) limit local ability to fund and maintain infrastructure and provide services to new residents.

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Regarding funding for affordable housing, SB 2 and SB 3 will certainly be helpful, yet additional funding is sorely needed. Historically, the federal government funded most of the affordable housing available to lower-income households constructed nationwide. Since the 1980s, however, much of that funding has dried up, leaving states and local agencies to fill the void. In California, the funding once available from local redevelopment agencies is gone. Local governments need additional tools and options. ACA 4 (Aguiar-Curry) would lower the vote threshold for local infrastructure and affordable housing investments to 55 percent, and ACA 11 (Caballero) proposes placing before the voters a proposed quarter-cent sales tax increase for affordable housing, which would generate another $1.7 billion per year, an amount that would begin to move the needle on this issue. The state could also support local investments in affordable housing and infrastructure by more fully restoring the tax-increment financing tool.

$4 Billion Parks and Water Bond Approved for June Ballot The affordable housing crisis was not the only legislative priority with respect to bonds. Senate President pro Tem de León had worked on a park bond proposal for several legislative sessions. In 2016, Assembly Member Eduardo Garcia (D-Coachella) also authored a park bond proposal that made it all the way to the Senate floor. But apart from a water bond, the governor had resisted new bond proposals after spending years paying down the state’s accumulated debts. Thus, without the governor’s agreement, the state ballot presented the only available path.

collapse of the Oroville Dam’s spillway increased the possibility of an agreement. Throughout the year, the League was active in hearings and discussions and lobbied for the inclusion of $425 million for per capita allocations for individual cities with a $200,000 minimum. In the final weeks of the session, an agreement was reached with Gov. Brown on SB 5 (de León, Chapter 852, Statutes of 2017), a $4 billion park and water bond that contains a minimum of $200,000 per city in park funding, $725 million for “park-poor” communities and additional funding for state park improvements, nature conservancies, climate and environmental programs, flood control, Salton Sea improvements and drought and drinking water projects. The bond will be placed before voters on the June 2018 ballot.

Cap-and-Trade Program Extended to 2030 Gov. Brown, reflecting a national trend, also used Twitter as he lobbied for the holdout votes needed to extend the state’s cap-andtrade program. In mid-July, the 79-year old governor — who has spent nearly 40 years in California politics — tweeted: “This isn’t about some cockamamie legacy. This isn’t for me, I’m going to be dead. It’s for you & it’s damn real.” California leadership in the carbon reduction effort began with the passage of

AB 32 (Chapter 488, Statutes of 2006), authored by then-Assembly Speaker Fabian Núñez and signed by Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, which established the goal to reduce the state’s carbon emission levels to 1990 levels by 2020. As a centerpiece of its compliance strategy, the California Air Resources Board (CARB) enacted the cap-and-trade program, holding auctions where carbon-emitting industries could bid for emissions credits under a progressively lowering statewide cap. The auctions produced billions in revenue that the Legislature allocated to various programs, including high-speed rail. Litigation filed by the California Chamber of Commerce, however, challenged the program as an illegal tax because it had not been enacted with a two-thirds vote. Uncertainties grew over whether the program would continue given the pending litigation and a failed legislative effort to extend the program in 2015. Nevertheless, in the waning hours of the 2016 session, Gov. Brown and legislative Democrats crafted an agreement by majority vote to approve SB 32 (Pavley, Chapter 249, Statutes of 2016), which expanded the state’s carbon reduction goal to 40 percent below 1990 levels by 2030. A concurrent effort, however, to extend the cap-and-trade program by a two-thirds vote stalled. continued

Efforts to address affordable housing and homelessness will continue.

In 2017, both Sen. de León and Assembly Member Eduardo Garcia introduced school bond proposals in the $3 to $4 billion range, while outside groups began crafting park bond initiative proposals for much larger amounts. Pressure for a housing bond and broader concerns over infrastructure conditions following the www.westerncity.com

Western City, January 2018

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2017 Legislative Year in Review, continued

In 2017, the political dynamics changed. The California Chamber of Commerce’s case lost at the appellate level in April. SB 32 provided CARB the authority to impose reductions, and business and industry preferred a market-based program rather than CARB regulations. Also, given the warming interest of the business community in a compromise, some Republicans indicated a willingness to vote for a package addressing business priorities. The Legislature reached bipartisan compromise on a three-bill package prior to the summer recess:

Four recently incorporated cities finally received a long-needed permanent fix to their revenues.

• AB 398 (E. Garcia, Chapter 135, Statutes of 2017) extends the cap-andtrade system through Dec. 31, 2030, with various modifications;

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• AB 617 (C. Garcia, Chapter 136, Statutes of 2017) requires CARB to develop a uniform statewide system for annual reporting and monitoring stationary sources of emissions and toxic air contaminants and provides CARB and air districts additional enforcement powers; and • ACA 1 (Mayes, Chapter 105, Statutes of 2017), is set to appear on the June ballot and requires a legislative twothirds vote to allocate cap-and-trade auction proceeds after Jan. 1, 2024. With the cap-and-trade program extended, an agreement to allocate accumulated auction revenues occurred with the passage of budget bills AB 109 and AB 134. These measures distribute $1.5 billion to various carbon-reducing activities including urban greening, waste diversion, fleet modernization and clean vehicle rebates. Sixty percent of the funding will continue to be allocated per established formula for the Affordable Housing and Sustainable Communities program, high-speed rail, the Transit and Intercity Rail Capital program and Low Carbon Transit Operations.

Local Authority Trimmed Over Transportation: Taxis and TNCs The League engaged on two measures reflecting the effects of disruptive change on taxis and transportation network companies (TNCs). State law required taxis to be subject to significant local regula-

tion. Then TNCs like Uber and Lyft came along offering services provided by individuals and promoting them as better, faster, cheaper and unconstrained by local regulation. Predictably, TNCs rapidly expanded and taxi use nosedived. AB 1069 (Low, Chapter 753, Statutes of 2017), sponsored by taxi companies, was aimed at reducing what they perceived as the excessive costs and duplicative and restrictive local regulations that applied to their industry while TNCs that were providing a similar service were virtually unregulated. The League proposed amendments — supported by the cities active on the bill — to limit local regulation and licensing requirements to the top three jurisdictions where a taxi operates. The author and sponsors, however, rejected that approach and limited the licensing requirement to jurisdictions where the primary business address of the company or driver is located and to the jurisdiction within a single county where the largest share of trips originate for the company or driver. To protect other cities impacted by the taxi’s activities, the League unsuccessfully requested a veto. The new law takes effect in 2019. SB 182 (Bradford, Chapter 769, Statutes of 2017) was sponsored by TNCs concerned that individual cities and counties would impose a patchwork of local business license requirements on their drivers who operate as independent contractors. In California, however, only

Major positive developments included the restoration of affordable housing funding via two League-supported measures.

a handful of cities had sought to impose business license requirements on drivers. San Francisco was a major exception. With an estimated 40,000 TNCs operating on its streets, the city had imposed business license requirements on drivers and engaged in various regulatory and legal disputes with the TNCs. Fearing that such regulatory efforts could spread to other cities, SB 182 was aimed at limiting the application of business license authority to TNC drivers. The League opposed the bill and requested a veto after amendments limited local business license authority to areas where the drivers lived, because of the lack of nexus to where actual business activity — as in San Francisco — was occurring. Unfortunately for cities, Gov. Brown signed the measure.

Long-Sought Fix for Struggling Newly Incorporated Cities After many prior attempts supported by the League, four recently incorporated cities in Riverside County — Eastvale, Wildomar, Menifee and Jurupa Valley — finally received a long-needed permanent fix to their revenues with the passage of SB 130 (Chapter 9, Statutes of 2017), a budget trailer bill. These cities have experienced severe financial hardship since 2011, when the state swept away all remaining shares of city vehicle license fee (VLF) revenues with the passage of SB 89 (Chapter 35, Statutes of 2011). While all cities were affected by the loss of city shares of the VLF, these four cities were particularly hard hit because they relied much more on the VLF revenues than other cities. Restoring funding and avoiding the potential disincorporation of these new cities also provides long-term policy benefits to the state. The four affected cities are in one of the fastest-growing regions of California. City land-use patterns are urban and dense, and their future growth is regulated by Local Agency Formation Commission (LAFCO) policies. In contrast, continued on page 19

Western City, January 2018

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Thank you to all of our 2018 League Partners Platinum ($15,000+) 2

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Renne Sloan Holtzman Sakai LLP1,2 Republic Services Inc.2 Sherwin-Williams Western States Petroleum Association Young Homes2

Silver ($5,000+) ABM AMR2 Albertsons American Fidelity Assurance Company Charles Abbott Associates2 California Contract Cities Association2 Californians for Energy Independence Dart Container Corp.2 Dividend Finance LLC EMS Management2

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Commercial Bank of California DW Development2 Desert Valley Medical Group Inc./ Prime Healthcare2 E&J Gallo2 Edgewood Partners Insurance Center Fieldman Rolapp & Associates ForeFront Power Genentech Geo-Logic Associates2 George K. Baum & Company Griswold LaSalle Cobb Dowd & Gin LLP2 Hill International2

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Jones Hall2 Jones & Mayer Kasdan Lippsmith Weber Turner LLP Leibold McClendon & Mann Livermore Sanitation2 MCE Clean Energy Marchetti Construction Inc.2 Napa Recycling2 Newport Pacific Capital Company Inc. Norton Rose Fulbright2 Ponderosa Homes II Inc.2 Riverside Construction2 San Jose POA

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1 – Institute for Local Government supporter 2 – CITIPAC supporter Partial list as of 12/6/2017


2017 Legislative Year in Review, continued from page 17

unincorporated development patterns are typically less dense and not regulated by LAFCOs. The League thanks Sen. Roth and Assembly Member Sabrina Cervantes (D-Riverside) for their lobbying efforts with Gov. Brown. Although SB 130 does not resolve issues associated with future incorporations and annexations of inhabited territory caused by SB 89, it establishes a policy platform to do so going forward.

Lack of Action on Public Safety Concerns With Recently Released Offenders It is becoming harder to find a city official who does not express concerns over an uptick in crime related to a series of state actions and recently adopted policy changes that are resulting in more offenders being released onto the streets and limiting the deterrent effects of laws related to various crimes. The League supported several measures in response to these concerns, but most failed to move in the Legislature. Gov. Brown’s veto of AB 1408 (Calderon), which sought to improve public safety through better management of ex-offenders subject to post-release community supervision, disappointed the League. Frustrations are building on this issue as local officials

continue to face demands for a response to public safety concerns in their communities.

Issues for 2018 Many factors will influence the 2018 legislative session. Gov. Brown will be in the final year of his term and is expected to finish strongly, leaving his imprint on the state’s budget and policy matters. Campaigns to replace him are well underway with candidates offering voters potential directions for the state’s future. Senate President pro Tem de León is facing term limits and running for the U.S. Senate, so Sen. Toni Atkins will transition into the Senate leadership role, and the Democrats’ supermajority status depends on the outcome of the recall of Sen. Josh Newman. Continued tensions over federal government policy proposals and actions remain a certainty. Ballot proposals will also occupy political space. Three significant measures are qualified for the June ballot, each with its own politics: ACA 5 (Frazier) provides additional protection to recently enacted transportation funds; ACA 1 (Mayes) imposes a two-thirds vote of post-2024 allocations of cap-and-trade funds; and SB 5 (de León) proposes a $4 billion park and water bond. The housing bond, SB 3 (Beall), is qualified

for the November ballot, but interest groups have many other proposals in development, including efforts to repeal recently enacted transportation funding and protect public safety. In the policy arena, continued efforts to address affordable housing and homelessness can be expected, including reviving options for local rent control. Recreational marijuana regulations take effect in 2018. Financial difficulties for cities are increasing as pension costs escalate and affect fiscal sustainability and service delivery. Discussions are expected on water conservation and energy policy, responding to the devastating 2017 wildfires and crafting a more balanced telecom bill. Unknown elements for 2018 include the state budget. Besides the major vulnerabilities with federal tax reform proposals and potential changes to the Affordable Care Act, at some point the economy will slow and reduce state revenues. Whatever comes, the League remains a staunch advocate for the benefits of local control and flexibility and will continue to support cities in their efforts to address urgent needs, provide vital services and enhance the quality of life for their residents. As always, cities are stronger when they work together. ■

The divisions between California’s Democratic-dominated Legislature and the U.S. president on immigration, health care, federal budget proposals and climate change were stark, deep and emotional.

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Citrus Heights Addresses

Homelessness

in a Suburban Community

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clockwise from left

A police officer responds to a homelessness-related call for service; a Navigator Program staffer helps clients with housing referrals; and police officers connect homeless individuals with services through the Navigator Program.

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ities nationwide are grappling with how to positively impact homelessness in their communities. Given that most programs are tailored to urban communities’ needs, how does a suburban community geographically separated from available resources provide services with limited funding? The City of Citrus Heights (pop. 87,013), located in Sacramento County on I-80 northeast of Sacramento, faced this issue in 2015. “Homelessness was a growing concern for our residents and businesses alike. We knew we needed to take action,” says Mayor Jeff Slowey. To assess the extent of the problem, the city’s Police Department conducted a survey of the homeless community and found that most of those queried wanted to stay in Citrus Heights even though most homeless resources were not available within the city limits. In the 2015 survey, officers found that 54 percent of homeless individuals in the city had ties to the community, citing such factors as “I grew up here” or “My daughter lives here.” Following the Great Recession, homelessnessrelated services provided locally were reduced or eliminated; for example, a Sacramento County Department of Health and Human Services local satellite office closed. Resources such as the state Department of Motor Vehicles and respite mental health providers lack presence within the city limits as well.

Building Community Relationships Through the city’s partnership with Citrus Heights Homeless Assistance Resource Team (HART), a local volunteer-run nonprofit organization, the need for a case manager or “navigator” for the local homeless population became apparent. Other communities use the navigator model to facilitate enrollment in the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD)-coordinated entry wait-list and ranking system for available housing. The city’s Police Department also expressed a need to partner with experts in homelessness resources, similar to its arrangements with both child protective and domestic violence services. Police officers, who are typically the primary contact with homeless individuals, expressed a desire to provide information and resources but lacked the expertise to do so, and it is not their primary job function. HART applied to the city for funding to launch a pilot Navigator Program in partnership with another local nonprofit, Sacramento Self-Help Housing, whose staff would implement the effort. Citrus Heights awarded the funds, and the cooperative work began. “From the start, this was a collaborative effort,” says City Manager Christopher Boyd. “Members of our Police Department, business improvement district and nonprofits joined residents to have a positive, constructive conversation about this

issue. It’s not solely an effort of the city, the Police Department or our churches — it’s a true partnership.”

Removing Barriers to Housing When Citrus Heights started the Navigator Program, the city and its partners wanted to holistically address participants’ barriers to housing and include services beyond HUD-coordinated entry enrollment. In addition to a lack of affordable housing, homeless individuals face systemic barriers such as having no phone with which to schedule appointments, a poor rental history and inadequate transportation. The city expanded the Navigator Program’s role to include all actions that would facilitate removing barriers to housing. This comprehensive approach means all Navigator Program actions focus on helping an individual become as stable as possible and obtain the resources with which to access available opportunities. “Yes, we enroll people in housing, but services can also include helping someone get an ID, enrolling them in mental health services or helping them get general assistance. There’s no ‘silver bullet’ to solving homelessness — it’s a challenge and everyone’s situation is different — but our navigator examines each person’s issues to best determine the underlying cause of their homelessness and work on that,” says Mayor Slowey. continued on page 30

The City of Citrus Heights won the Award for Excellence in the Housing Programs and Innovations category of the 2017 Helen Putnam Award for Excellence program. For more about the award program, visit www.helenputnam.org. www.westerncity.com

Western City, January 2018

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The city’s Job Shadowing Program offers employees an opportunity to learn more about their colleagues’ work.

Santa Clarita Focuses on

Employee Development The baby boomer generation is transitioning into retirement, leaving a gaping hole in many municipal organizations. This challenge has been a top priority for the City of Santa Clarita’s leadership team for the past decade. “When these employees leave work, they take with them decades of experience, historical knowledge and technical competencies,” says City of Santa Clarita Human Resources Manager Kristi Hobrecker. “The challenge is: Who will be stepping up to fill these vital roles in the organization?” Using a forward-thinking approach, the City of Santa Clarita has created and implemented a plan to ensure the municipality will continue to thrive and provide essential community services to its residents.

“The Santa Clarita Way is a key element of the city’s organizational culture. It’s our name for the way employees are selected, developed and given the opportunity to reach their full potential within the city organization,” says Hobrecker. The Santa Clarita Way also helps the city retain and transfer its historical knowledge. Santa Clarita City Manager Kenneth W. Striplin’s experience offers an example. In 1995, Striplin began an internship at the city, where his potential and devotion to the community were quickly recognized. After becoming a full-time

employee, he earned several promotions during the next eight years, overseeing various departments and divisions. In 2004, the city promoted Striplin to assistant city manager, and he became city manager in 2012. Striplin’s story illustrates the City of Santa Clarita’s commitment to the profession of public administration and developing the next generation of employees. “The entire leadership team is expected to serve as role models and mentors for staff and young professionals seeking a career in public administration,” says Striplin. “We also expect managers to know that their role includes coaching current and future public sector professionals.” Several programs implemented to encourage employee development are producing positive results. continued on page 27

The City of Santa Clarita won the Award for Excellence in the Internal Administration category of the 2017 Helen Putnam Award for Excellence program. For more about the award program, visit www.helenputnam.org.

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Chief Technology Officer City of Fremont, CA

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erving as the eastern anchor of the Silicon Valley, the City of Fremont is home to an ethnically and culturally diverse population of 231,664. The city’s Innovation District is known as the hottest new address for start-ups and Fremont’s housing market is regarded as one of the strongest in California. The Chief Technology Officer (CTO) oversees the Information Technology Services Department, which is supported by 23 FTE and a budget of $10 million. The ideal candidate will be an inspiring and versatile leader who adheres to admirable standards and a superior customer orientation. A high-level problem solver and forward thinking strategist, he/she will have the proven ability to implement transformational technology-based solutions that maximize individual and organizational capacity. Outstanding communications and interpersonal skills will also be expected. Seven (7) years of progressively responsible and relevant experience in the public and/or private sector, including at least three (3) years of supervisory experience, and a Bachelor’s degree are required. Salary range $158,873 - $ 214,479; salary supplemented by an attractive benefits package. Please visit www.tbcrecruiting.com for detailed brochure and to apply online. This recruitment will close on Sunday, February 4, 2018. Teri Black • 424.296.3111 Bradley Wardle • 650.450.3299

Western City, January 2018

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Current & Upcoming Opportunities Cooperative Agricultural Support Services Authority (CASS), CA Executive Officer The Cooperative Agricultural Support Services Authority (“CASS” or “Authority”) is a local public agency that partners with State and county agencies and the agricultural industry to protect California’s supply of food and fiber; protect the environment and natural resources; and maintain the economic vitality of the State’s agricultural industry. CASS is seeking a hands-on, fiscally minded, self-motivated, and entrepreneurial Executive Officer with strong analytical skills, a thorough understanding of human resources management, and a customer-service orientation. CASS is seeking an individual who can work independently and provide strong leadership in a professional, collegial environment. The ideal candidate will also demonstrate understanding of the enterprise nature of CASS’s organization and the ability to manage this aspect of the Authority. Strong candidates will possess excellent communication and interpersonal skills, an accessible and responsive nature, and a desire to build and maintain strong working relationships with CASS’s staff and Board, as well as with CASS’s public agency partners and other external stakeholders. Exposure to the use of a temporary or seasonal workforce is a plus. A typical candidate for this position will possess a Bachelor’s degree in Business Administration, Biology, Agricultural Science, or a related field. Candidates with five (5) or more years of mid-level and/or senior-level management experience are strongly encouraged to apply. The salary for the Executive Officer is competitive and open, DOQ. Contact: Joel Bryden

City of Littleton, CO Human Resources Director The City of Littleton, CO (population over 44,000) is a well-educated, historical, and residential community located south of the Denver Metropolitan area with unique business and commercial interests. Littleton embodies a strong sense of community through its historic downtown, active trail system, and numerous community events. The City is seeking a Human Resources Director who is committed to the vision, goals, and values of the City’s leadership team and the community. Candidates must possess a Bachelor’s degree in Public or Business Management, Public Administration, Human Resource Management, or a closely related field. A Master’s degree in Public or Business Management, Public Administration, or Human Resource Management is desirable. Qualification requires a minimum of five (5) years progressively responsible public management experience at the local or state level or an equivalent amount of experience in private business, which must include supervisory responsibilities. Professional in Human Resources (PHR), Senior Professional in Human Resources (SPHR), or Associate in Risk Management (ARM) professional certifications are preferred. The annual salary range for the Human Resources Director is $112,200$145,900; DOQ. Contact: Regan Williams Filing deadline: January 26, 2018

Filing deadline: January 12, 2018

Fallbrook Public Utility District General Manager

City of Santa Paula, CA Public Works Director

Located in northern San Diego County, the Fallbrook Public Utility District (FPUD) operates and maintains facilities to supply water and sewer services to the Town of Fallbrook and water and reclaimed water to the surrounding residential and agricultural areas. FPUD is seeking a steady, proven leader with a finance background and leadership capabilities to serve as General Manager. The District is seeking an outside the box thinker who can take a creative approach to problem solving while maintaining fiscal prudence. He or she will be approachable, with an open and honest communication style, and will communicate directly and proactively with the Board of Directors, staff, and the general public. The ideal candidate will lead by example, set a high standard of ethics and integrity, and inspire confidence in others. An individual with experience working in a small district and a successful track record in establishing a positive work environment will be ideal. Qualified candidates will have a background in finance, engineering experience, and be skilled in both employee and labor relations. Any combination of training, education, and experience which demonstrates possession of the knowledge and ability to perform the duties of the position is qualifying. Typically, five (5) years of responsible, executive-level experience in water utility or public works management in a municipal or special district setting; and a Bachelor’s degree in a related field; or, experience at or equivalent to the level of Assistant General Manager in the FPUD, would provide such opportunity. The annual salary range for the incoming General Manager is $190,000–$244,000, DOQ. Contact: Regan Williams

The City of Santa Paula, California (population 31,000) is situated in the rich agricultural Santa Clara River Valley and is the geographical center of Ventura County. The City is a major distribution point for citrus fruits in the United States and is also noted for avocado producing and processing. The community has a quaint, small town image, ideal climate, and reasonable priced housing, which is why Santa Paulans refer to their community as “Hometown USA.” The City is seeking an experienced Public Works Director with technical expertise and strong leadership skills to effectively manage and guide the Department towards established goals. A collaborative and responsive, service-minded individual with an open communication style will be a good fit for the position. The ideal candidate will be a results-oriented individual with excellent communication and relationship-building skills who will be a positive change agent and a champion of the Department’s commitment to service. A candidate with significant experience presenting to councils, commissions, and community groups, who is comfortable engaging with internal and external stakeholders at all levels on a regular basis is being sought. At a minimum, candidates must possess a Bachelor’s degree from an accredited four-year college or university with a major in Civil Engineering, or a closely related field, and have five (5) years of increasingly responsible experience in the administration and supervision of municipal public works and engineering projects. A Master’s degree and possession of a valid certificate of registration as a Civil Engineer issued by the California State Board of Registration for Civil and Professional Engineers is highly desirable. The annual salary range for the incoming Public Works Director is $113,929–$138,488, DOQ. Contact: Valerie Phillips

Filing deadline: January 26, 2018

Filing deadline: January 19, 2018


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CITY OF MERCED Merced is a dynamic community with a population of approximately 85,000. Merced’s Valley location southeast of San Francisco provides easy access to the central California coast, Sierra Nevada Mountains, national parks and major cities. Residents enjoy short drives to skiing, beaches, fishing and other outdoor attractions. The community offers abundant shopping, pleasant neighborhoods and tree-lined streets. Even with recent increases in prices, Merced’s housing remains affordable compared to many other California locations.

CITY OF SELMA

CITY MANAGER EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

The City of Selma is a city of 25,000 residents located in Fresno County, California, approximately 15 miles south of the City of Fresno. The City Manager is appointed by City Council and serves as the operational head of city government directing all functions of the City and activities of all City departments. The City Manager must be a proactive manager and become actively involved in the community. Experience as a City Manager, Assistant or Deputy City Manager or as an Executive Director or department head of a complex public sector organization is required with strong financial and budget background, expertise in Economic Development, and strong interpersonal skills. A BA/BS in a related field is required and Master’s degree is desirable. The salary is negotiable up to $170,000, depending on qualifications; with additional $8,000 compensation in deferred compensation, car allowance and cell phone stipend along with excellent benefit package. Candidates are encouraged to submit a letter of interest and resume to the City of Selma, Personnel Department, 1710 Tucker Street, Selma, California 93662, on or before January 31, 2018. For more information about this employment opportunity, please visit the City’s website at www.cityofselma.com.

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The City Attorney is appointed by and serves at the pleasure of the City Council and acts as legal advisor and counsel for legal issues involving City matters. The City Attorney represents the Council, City Manager, City administrative staff and others as required to CITY represent the City in litigation and to direct the William Avery & Associates ATTORNEY City’s legal service. The City Attorney’s office Management Consultants provides expert legal advice and advocacy to and on behalf of the City Council, the Public Financing Authority, their 31/2 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Suite A Los Gatos, CA 95030 committees and commissions, as well as to the City Manager and all city departments, so that policies are established and programs administered 408.399.4424 within the guidelines established by city, state and federal laws. Fax: 408.399.4423

The new City Attorney will have broad and extensive professional civil email: jobs@averyassoc.net www.averyassoc.net legal experience, including experience in providing legal services for a government agency and two years in a supervisory or management capacity. A Juris Doctor degree from an accredited law school with current membership in the California State Bar is also required. To be considered, please visit our website at www.averyassoc.net/current-searches/ for a detailed job announcement and how to apply on the Avery Associates Career Portal.

Police Chief PARADISE, CALIFORNIA

The Town of Paradise is seeking a highly qualified Police Chief who is interested in the opportunity to work as part of a high functioning management team, with a supportive Council and Community. The Police Chief position offers a comprehensive salary and benefits package, including lifetime retiree medical benefits. The Paradise Police Department proudly serves a supportive community. The citizens of the Town of Paradise support its Police Department as evident in the passage of Measure C, which is a half percent sales tax for Paradise to preserve public services such as police protection, fire suppression, street maintenance and animal control.

Police Chief salary range: $8,781.35 to $11,146.27* per month * Includes POST Cert. pay at 2.5%, max School incentive, Uniform, Holiday and Admin Incentive pay. Does not include the contracted 3% Salary Increase effective July 9, 2018.

Recruitment incentives • One-time Sign-on bonus of $10,000. • 80 hours vacation & 80 hours sick leave upon hire. • Relocation assistance of $1,000. Visit www.townofparadise. com for detailed job posting and application form. Final filing date: 5:00pm January 31, 2018.

Photo/art credits Cover: Dszc Page 3: Gmast3r Page 5: Courtesy of the City of South San Francisco Page 6: Photo, Jeremy Sykes, courtesy of the League of California Cities Page 7: Graphic, courtesy of the Institute for Local Government Pages 8–9: PictureLake Pages 10–11: Ron_Thomas Page 12: Jill_InspiredByDesign Page 13: Kozmoat98

Page 14: Juhla Page 15: FrozenShutter Page 16: Dszc Page 17: Golero Page 19: Drnadig Pages 20–21 & 30: Courtesy of the City of Citrus Heights and the League of California Cities Pages 22 & 28: Courtesy of the City of Santa Clarita and the League of California Cities Page 33: Jude Hudson, Hudson + Associates

www.cacities.org


Santa Clarita Focuses on Employee Development, continued from page 22

Mentoring Program The city’s management team created and launched a Mentoring Program (which won a 2006 Helen Putnam Award for Excellence in Internal Administration) to institutionalize mentoring and to address leadership development and succession planning. The program allows employees to select a fellow employee to be their mentor. As part of being mentored, the employee receives professional development training on topics including leadership, business etiquette, conflict management and project management. “Through mentoring, I’ve learned so much about the importance of building relationships and overcoming the fear of taking on new opportunities,” says Street Maintenance Worker Gonzalo Hernandez.

Leadership Academy The City of Santa Clarita’s Leadership Academy is an 18-month program designed for emerging leaders and employees currently in leadership positions. Participants gain fundamental skills essential to a successful leader, with a unique emphasis on how to thrive in the city organization. They also gain insight into their personal leadership style, become familiar with the city’s expectations for leaders and learn the city’s three leadership competencies: Leads, Develops and Achieves.

Other Opportunities The city offers specialized courses created to provide growth opportunities to all staff. These include the Professional Support Series, which covers building and strengthening communication, organizational and interpersonal competencies, and the inaugural Trade Specialist Series, which focuses on city structure, goals and fine-tuning professional skills. Those already in management roles can hone their leadership skills by taking the Supervisor Series. Employees interested in learning more about their colleagues’ work can participate in the Job Shadowing Program. “I love the job shadowing experience! I always learn something

www.westerncity.com

new and get to see all the great work that city staff does for our community,” says Neighborhood Services Department Project Technician Laura Jardine.

topics including conflict management and purchasing. The city’s Education Assistance Program encourages employees to continue their education and covers 75 percent of school fees for an associate’s, bachelor’s, master’s or doctoral degree.

In addition, the city regularly offers information sessions on a variety of

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Current searches . . .

Director of Development Services Deputy Director – Human Resources City of Long Beach

Assistant Public Works Director/City Engineer City of Santa Clara

Deputy Director of Development Services – Economic Development City of Murrieta 424.296.3111

CITY OF REDWOOD CITY PUBLIC WORKS SUPERINTENDENT(S) The City of Redwood City is a San Francisco Bay Area community located in the heart of Silicon Valley, the technology-rich region extending from the San Francisco shoreline to the foothills of the Santa Cruz Mountains. Redwood City is the third largest city within the County of San Mateo, with over 85,000 residents. The city enjoys an average of 255 sunny days a year, which it boasts via the city slogan: “Climate Best by Government Test”. The community believes in working together to maintain and improve the City’s quality of life. In fact, the City Council of Redwood City has formally adopted a “Core Purpose” - Build a Great Community Together. This represents its commitment to community building, which is a crucial part of how Redwood City does business every day. The City is currently recruiting for two Public Works Superintendents, one to oversee Fleet and Facilities and the second to manage Utilities including the sanitary sewer and storm water systems. Both positions report to the Assistant Director of Public Works. Both positions will require creative and seasoned managers with strong, hands-on knowledge of their respective disciplines and excellent administration and leadership skills. A Bachelor’s degree in a related field is required and a Master’s degree is preferred.

William Avery & Associates Management Consultants

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To be considered, please visit our website at www.averyassoc.net/current-searches/ for detailed job announcements and how to apply on the Avery Associates Career Portal.

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Santa Clarita Focuses on Employee Development, continued

Participants gain fundamental

Just as the current city manager was brought up and developed within the organization, leaders are asked to identify those who are apt to follow in their footsteps and succeed. Through training, mentoring, knowledge transfer strategies and focused career development opportunities, the city has placed a strong emphasis on looking ahead and retaining top talent.

skills essential to a successful leader, with a unique emphasis on how to thrive in the city organization.

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The City of Salinas

Fire Chief

The City of Salinas (pop. 161,042) is the 34th largest city in California and the largest city in beautiful Monterey County. The City is seeking a strong and committed Fire Chief who will provide exceptional management of the Fire Department. The ideal candidate will be a fair and ethical leader and be willing to make decisions for the greater good of the Department and the Community. The incoming Chief should be team-oriented, progressive and open to change. Candidates should have experience in administration, management, strategic planning, succession planning, and community outreach. A Bachelor’s Degree in Fire Science, Business Administration, Public Administration or related field, and seven years of responsible administrative experience in fire service. Fire Chief experience and Spanish bilingual skills desirable. The annual salary range is $164,192 to $199,592. To apply, please visit www.calopps.org by the filing deadline, February 9, 2018. A complete application packet includes a City Employment Application, letter of interest and resume. Please contact City of Salinas, Human Resources Office at (831) 758-7259 with questions.

Director of Human Resources Annual Salary $127,372-$ 155,394 DOQE plus a competitive benefits package

The ideal candidate will be a knowledgeable HR generalist with excellent verbal and written communication skills and outstanding interpersonal and relationship skills. The ability to resolve complex organizational issues in a resourceful and positive manner will be a key attribute in this role. The ideal candidate will have a track record of success in labor relations issues including contract negotiations. Experience working within a full service agency, including public safety fire and police is required. Effective presentation skills along with strong administration experience will be expected as well as strong focus on customer service. The candidate will possess five years of public sector experience in a professional personnel management role including two years direct supervisory experience and a Bachelor’s degree in a related field. A Master’s degree is desired. For consideration, an online application and resume with 3 year salary history must be received by first review date of Mon., 1/22/18. For information regarding the position, please visit http://www.downeyca.org/depts/hr/.

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The City of Santa Clarita’s robust employee development programs have had significant participation and tangible successes: • Over 320 employees have voluntarily participated in the Mentoring Program, many have taken advantage of promotional opportunities within the organization and 100 percent of participants say they benefited from the program; • Since the Leadership Academy started in 2009, 67 employees have graduated from the program, and many have become leaders in the city organization; and • Thanks to the Education Assistance Program, more than 230 employees have earned degrees. The Santa Clarita Way has been a positive approach for the city’s succession planning. Out of the 377 current city employees, 209 have been promoted internally, including 17 of the 18 division managers and one executive manager. By training and mentoring employees on the job and investing in their growth over the course of their careers, the City of Santa Clarita saves time and money in recruitment, onboarding and acclimating new employees. It allows promoted employees to step into their new role and be effective and efficient from day one. Although internally it is called the Santa Clarita Way, this strategy could be replicated by any city. By implementing plans to cultivate young talent, cities can secure a strong future for their organization and the communities they serve. Contact: Kristi Hobrecker, human resources manager, City Manager’s Office, City of Santa Clarita; phone: (661) 255-4908; email: khobrecker@santa-clarita.com. ■ www.cacities.org


PeckhamMcKenney &

Presents Outstanding Career Opportunities

City Manager

City of American Canyon, CA

Located in world-famous wine-growing Napa County, American Canyon is home to an engaged, diverse community exceeding 20,000 residents. It is also a destination for outdoor recreation and natural beauty as well as a hub of opportunity and economic vitality. This general law city has a general fund 2017/18 budget of $21.7M and approximately 75 FTE’s. Appointed by the five-member City Council, the City Manager will focus on major infrastructure projects, economic development, and intergovernmental collaboration. The ideal candidate possesses a solid knowledge and understanding of municipal finance and budget, economic development, and labor relations and negotiations. A Bachelor’s degree with major coursework in public or business administration or a related field is required. A Master’s degree is preferred. Competitive salary DOQE. Filing deadline is February 12, 2018. Contact Bobbi Peckham.

Assistant City Manager City of Thousand Oaks, CA

More than 50 years of achievement have made Thousand Oaks one of the most sought after places to live, work, and recreate in California. The community of 132,000 residents is home to excellent schools, outstanding parks, numerous corporate headquarters, diverse retail opportunities, cultural amenities, and over 15,500 acres of open space. The Assistant City Manager will play a key role in delivering exceptionally high levels of service to the community. The ideal candidate must be an innovative and proactive individual with proven leadership experience, excellent communication skills, and the ability to work in a fast-paced and challenging environment. The Assistant City Manager will play a pivotal role in community relations, providing Council support, intergovernmental collaboration, legislative affairs, and assisting the City Manager with the implementation of key City Council priorities and objectives throughout the community and within the organization. The position requires at least eight years’ increasingly responsible experience in the management and administration of municipal government operations including substantial high-level staff administrative and supervisory experience. A Bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university with major course work in public administration, business administration or a related field is required; Master’s degree preferred. Experience within a City Manager’s office is highly desirable. Annual salary range is $166,592-$249,889 DOQE with appointment expected below the range mid-point. Filing deadline is February 12, 2018. Contact Bobbi Peckham.

City Engineer Salt Lake City, UT

With the incomparable Wasatch Mountains to the east , Salt Lake City, Utah, (pop. 192,672) is one of the most scenic, vibrant cities in the West. Open, diverse, and progressive, the City was named No. 10 of the top 100 Best Places to Live by U.S. News and World Report. Residents enjoy major metropolitan area amenities, plus year-round outdoor recreation, with world-class skiing nearby. The City Engineer heads the Engineering Division, one of five divisions within the Department of Community and Neighborhoods, and reports to the CAN Director. The Division (43 FTEs in five work groups) has a FY 2017-18 budget of $4.85 million. Bachelor’s degree in engineering, plus certification as a Professional Engineer in Utah (registration within one year if out-of-state), and ten years’ experience are required. Public sector, public works, and three years’ supervisory experience preferred. Salary range $110,000 to $130,000, with comprehensive benefits. Filing deadline is January 23, 2018. Contact Andrew Gorgey, (970) 987-1238 (direct).

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Citrus Heights Addresses Homelessness in a Suburban Community, continued from page 21

In the 2015 survey, officers found that 54 percent of homeless individuals in the city had ties to the community.

Measurable Results The city worked closely with HART and Sacramento Self-Help Housing to conduct this pilot program, and because of its success it grew into a full-time program in fiscal year 2016–17. Due to its comprehensive approach to client service, the program to date has experienced a success rate of 52 percent, with 56 participants accessing either temporary or permanent housing. Of those, 27 were permanently housed in a variety of housing options available countywide. Clients also received motel vouchers while permanent housing options were being processed, and others participated in the new temporary Winter Sanctuary program operated by HART.

service club and business improvement district members to spread the word about the grassroots program. The community makes donations in the form of gift cards, prepaid phones and cash with which to purchase bus passes, motel vouchers and pet supplies. The city has recently expanded the program’s reach to cooperatively partner with Volunteers of America in providing referrals and orientation within the city limits for HUD’s Emergency Solutions Grants Rapid Rehousing Program. More than 12 individuals have been housed through this collaborative partnership in a matter of months.

Collaborative Partnerships Are Essential Much of the Navigator Program’s success can be attributed to the robust partnership between Citrus Heights HART and the program. The Navigator Program staff and more than 30 residents, business owners and representatives of nonprofit and faith-based organizations interact at HART meetings on a monthly basis, sharing resources, tips and client referrals. Although these nonprofits may not have a physical presence in the city, these working relationships have been essential to the program’s success. City staff, in partnership with the Navigator Program staff, have made presentations to the local chamber of commerce, Rotary P

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The problem of homelessness has no single solution and knows no boundaries, but the City of Citrus Heights has found a way to tackle the issue through strong community partnerships and a network of resources. Although some of these resources may not be available within the city limits, this program demonstrates that connections can be made through a network of individuals dedicated to positively impacting their community.

While the city is experiencing positive results in terms of individuals being housed, the Police Department is also experiencing the program’s effects. “This program has brought positive and measurable results to our city. In 2016, homelessness-related calls for service to our department represented as much as 35 percent of our total calls. In 2017, this dropped to 22 percent,” says Police Chief Ron Lawrence. And because the N

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city was able to show a proactive response to homelessness, Sacramento County Department of Human Assistance now provides a part-time mental health counselor to work with the Navigator Program and Police Department for 30 hours per week in FY 2017–18, which is significant because many of the city’s homeless individuals experience mental health issues.

Contact: Katherine Cooley, development specialist, City of Citrus Heights; phone: (916) 727-4952; email: kcooley@ citrusheights.net. ■

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866.912.1919

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What advice would you offer newly elected council members?

Read more “On the Record” at www.westerncity.com.

Melissa Hurtado Council Member Sanger

Ed Smith Vice Mayor Monterey

Avelina Torres Mayor Pro Tem Greenfield

www.westerncity.com

Take the time to learn from city staff, follow up with your community, determine your priorities and start planning for the budget process.

Know the issues, get to know your community, find mentors to help you and don’t be afraid to learn.

Connect with the community. Meet as many people as you can, and always keep an open mind.

Lucas Frerichs Council Member Davis

Linda Molina Council Member Calimesa

Julio Martinez Council Member Beaumont

Approach governing like Abe Lincoln, who said, “Public sentiment is everything. With public sentiment, nothing can fail. Without it, nothing can succeed.”

Be aware of confidentiality issues — learn what you can talk about and when it’s OK to do so.

Exercise patience and open-mindedness and listen to the public.

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Western City January 2018  
Western City January 2018  

Leadership issue.

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