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JANUARY 2013 |

The Monthly Magazine of the League of California Cities

2012 Legislative Year In Review p.11 Taking Leadership to the Next Level p.5 Peer Network Advances Sustainability p.7

www.westerncity.com


CONTENTS 2 3

Calendar of League Events

7

Executive Director’s Message

League Leadership Sets Strategic Path for 2013

The Sustainable Communities Learning Network links nonprofit, governmental, private sector and community organizations statewide. It provides a way to share best practices and seek information from others engaged in areas related to sustainability.

More than 100 city officials worked together to develop the League’s strategic goals for 2013, which include building partnerships, continuing pension reform, expanding community and economic development tools, and implementing effective branding.

City Forum

11

Helping Mayors and Council Members Take Leadership to the Next Level

While the past few years have presented major challenges for cities, the events of 2012 included some bright spots as well. This article presents an overview of the

The League provides a wide range of resources to help local elected officials build their capacity to better serve their residents.

year’s legislative developments and the League’s achievements. It also poses some questions to keep in mind as the new session begins.

News from the Institute for Local Government

In Case We Haven’t Met: ILG Provides Tools and Resources for Local Leaders The ILG website offers a broad array of tools for newly elected local officials and their staff as well as seasoned officials.

2012 Legislative Year In Review By Dan Carrigg

By Eva Spiegel

6

Peer Learning Network Advances Leadership in Sustainability By Karalee Browne

By Chris McKenzie

5

Sustainable Cities

16

Job Opportunities

23

Professional Services Directory Cover Photo: Espiegle/istockphoto.com


President Bill Bogaard Mayor Pasadena

1400 K Street Sacramento, CA 95814 (916) 658-8200 Fax (916) 658-8240

First Vice President José Cisneros Treasurer San Francisco

Second Vice President Tony Ferrara Mayor Arroyo Grande

Immediate Past President Michael Kasperzak Mayor Mountain View

Executive Director Chris McKenzie

For a complete list of the League board of directors, visit www.cacities.org/board.

leaguevents

Magazine Staff Editor in Chief Jude Hudson (916) 658-8234 email: editor@westerncity.com

JANUARY

Managing Editor Eva Spiegel (916) 658-8228 email: espiegel@cacities.org

16 – 18

New Mayors and Council Members’ Academy, Sacramento This vitally important training prepares newly elected officials for the demands of office and introduces them to the legal constraints on city councils.

Advertising Sales Manager Pam Maxwell-Blodgett (916) 658-8256 email: maxwellp@cacities.org

17 – 18

Policy Committee Meetings, Sacramento The League’s policy committees review issues of interest to cities statewide and make recommendations to the League board of directors.

Administrative Assistant Anita Lopez (916) 658-8223 email: alopez@cacities.org Contributors Samantha Caygill Kirstin Kolpitcke JoAnne Speers Randi Kay Stephens Jennifer Whiting Patrick Whitnell

18

Legal Advocacy Committee Meeting, Sacramento The committee reviews and recommends friend-of-the-court efforts on cases of significant statewide interest to California cities.

30 – February 1

Associate Editors Carol Malinowski Carolyn Walker

City Managers’ Department Meeting, San Francisco Geared to the unique needs of city managers, this conference covers issues affecting cities throughout California.

Design Taber Creative Group For photo credits, see page 17.

February

7–8 Western City (ISSN 0279-5337) is published monthly by the League of California Cities, 1400 K St., Sacramento, CA 95814. Subscriptions: $39.00/1 year; $63.00/2 years; student: $26.50; foreign: $52.00; single copies: $4.00, including sales tax. Entered as periodical mail January 30, 1930, at the Post Office, Los Angeles, CA 90013, under the Act of April 13, 1879. Periodical postage paid at Sacramento, Calif.

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Postmaster: Send address changes to Western City, 1400 K Street, Sacramento, CA 95814. Western City Trademark Reg. U.S. Pat. Off. ©2013 League of California Cities. All rights reserved. Material may not be reprinted without written permission. This issue is Volume LXXXIX, No. 1.

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League of California Cities

Board of Directors’ Meeting, Pasadena The League board reviews, discusses and takes action on a variety of issues affecting cities, including legislation, legal advocacy, education and training, and more.

27 – March 1

Public Works Officers’ Institute, Pasadena Designed for professionals at every career level, this conference covers the latest developments in public works.

27 – March 1

Planning Commissioners’ Academy, Pasadena Tailored to meet the needs of planning commissioners, planning directors, planning staff and other interested officials, the academy offers sessions on the major planning and land-use issues facing cities.

Event and registration information is available at www.cacities.org/events. For the latest information on League conferences and events, follow us on Twitter @CaCitiesLearn. For legislative and policy updates and more, follow @CaCities. Follow Western City @WesternCityMag. Join us on Facebook! www.facebook.com/westerncity www.facebook.com/LeagueofCaCities www.cacities.org


Executive Director’s Message by Chris McKenzie

League Leadership Sets Strategic Path for 2013 Adopts Goals Grounded in Advocacy Recommendations of Special Task Force

With the November elections in the rearview mirror, the League board of directors met Nov. 15–16, 2012, in Sacramento. The board joined approximately 50 officers and directors of the League’s divisions, departments, diversity caucuses and policy committees to review the organization’s progress over the past year and chart a strategic path for 2013. More than 100 city officials participated in the two-day process. They examined the League’s strategic accomplishments, debated its challenges and adopted strategic goals to guide the organization in the year ahead. The timing of the two-day retreat couldn’t have been more appropriate. After two years of both significant achievements and serious setbacks for local control and revenues, the League board of directors recently appointed a special task force of city officials representing the League’s 16 regional divisions, City Managers’ Department and City Attorneys’ Department. Titled the Strategic Initiatives Task Force, its purpose is to carefully evaluate the advocacy strategies the League should employ over the next few years to expand and protect local control and funding for cities and the vital services they provide. League First Vice President José Cisneros, San Francisco’s treasurer, chairs the task force, and League Second Vice President Tony Ferrara, mayor of Arroyo Grande, serves as vice chair. Identifying Collaborative Strategies Recognizing that state and local governments have important and complementary roles to play in our governmental system, the task force examined a range of possible strategies the League can and should consider to collaborate more closely with the Legislature, governor, counties, schools and special districts to meet the important service needs of Californians. At the same time, the www.westerncity.com

task force reaffirmed that collaboration with the state and other local agencies can’t be pursued at the expense of consistency with the League’s mission “to expand and protect local control for cities … .” The task force has developed a package of multi-year advocacy options. At the November meeting, the League board of directors reviewed and approved these options for distribution to the League membership. The recommendations have now been widely distributed among the League membership for review and comment. As described in the recommendations, members may comment through their League regional public affairs manager or directly to the League’s Sacramento office. The task force will carefully consider any member feedback before submitting its final recommendations to the League board early this year. Strategic Priorities Using the work of the Strategic Initiatives Task Force as a framework for discussion, the League’s leadership adopted four strategic goals for 2013. These goals will inform and guide the work of the League’s staff and subunits in the coming year. 1. Build Lasting Partnerships. Develop and strengthen longterm relationships and partnerships with new and returning state policy-makers and other stakeholders with common interests to better serve and enhance the quality of life for all Californians. Comment: The task force report outlines a number of very specific recommendations for outreach to state officials and our continued

Western City, January 2013

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League Leadership Sets Strategic Path for 2013, continued

The strength of the League will always depend on the grassroots involvement of city officials.

counterparts in local government. League divisions and diversity caucuses would play key roles in outreach to current and future state legislators. The task force recommendations contemplate a significant effort to build strong relationships with state and other local government officials. These partnerships will guide many future League legislative and ballot measure initiatives. 2. Expand Community and Economic Development Tools and Funding Options for City Services. Develop and advocate for new tools and funding options for community and economic development to support job creation, investment in public infrastructure, expansion of affordable housing, and increased funding for essential local services. Comment: Significant strides were made last year in drafting these types of legislation that will be pursued in collaboration with other stakeholders who have similar interests in local government, as well as housing and business groups. 3. Continue Pension and Other Post-Employment Benefits (OPEB) Reform. Continue and expand upon recent efforts at pension and OPEB reform to ensure the long-term affordability and responsiveness of public services for city residents. Comment: While progress was made on pension reform last year, which the League helped lead, more remains to be done on both pension and OPEB reform. Efforts focusing on this goal will build on the great work of the City Managers’ Department on these issues, including the work of its current OPEB Task Force. 4. Implement an Effective League Branding Strategy. Develop and implement a marketing and branding strategy that effectively communicates the League’s identity along with the unique benefits that city officials, our partners and the public can expect from the League, its products and services. 

exploring low-cost ways to expand the impact of the League’s advocacy and educational work of protecting and enhancing local control for cities. Such efforts could include careful survey work with city officials. As always, the League board and staff welcome your feedback on these goals and the work of the organization. The strength of the League will always depend on the grassroots involvement of city officials that has made it an effective voice for municipal governments and local control over the years. The League’s continued effectiveness will depend on that same involvement. Thank you for your support, ideas and suggestions on how we can improve. ■

State and local governments have important and complementary roles to play in our governmental system.

Comment: This internal operations goal will build on the recent upgrades of the League website and publications by

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League of California Cities

www.cacities.org


Helping Mayors and Council Members Take Leadership to the Next Level by Eva Spiegel For many mayors and council members the new year marks the beginning of their next chapter of public service — an opportunity to focus on their leadership goals in the coming 12 months. The League provides a wide range of resources, tools and training to help local elected officials build their capacity to better serve their residents. Upcoming Events The New Mayors and Council Members’ Academy, Jan. 16–18 in Sacramento, is the League’s premier training for newly elected city officials. This three-day conference features seasoned experts who present the nuts and bolts of council operations, including laws and regulations, municipal finance, the council-manager form of government, running effective meetings, communication and more. State-mandated AB 1234 ethics training is offered in conjunction with the New Mayors and Council Members’ Academy. Presented by the Institute for Local Government, this two-hour session covers public service ethics laws and principles. The League’s annual Legislative Action Day, April 24 in Sacramento, offers a unique opportunity to hone leadership skills. Local officials join colleagues to hear from key state-level policy-makers and League staff about the top policy issues as well as legislation that affects cities. The event provides information and tools to help local officials lobby effectively on their cities’ behalf. Staying Current on Important Issues Throughout the year, city officials can access a variety of League resources to help build leadership and advocacy skills. Understanding state and federal policies that impact their city is just one of an elected official’s many responsibilities. This information is covered on an almost daily basis in CA Cities Advocate, the League’s electronic newsletter. In addition, Western City examines big-picture policy issues and offers an easily searchable archive of articles on its website at www.westerncity.com. Policy briefings, presented both in-person and through webinars year round, give city officials and staff a convenient way to stay current on developments in the state Capitol and hear insights from the League’s legislative staff.

More Ways to Build Skills The Institute for Local Government, the nonprofit research affiliate of the League and the California State Association of Counties, offers practical, impartial and easy-to-use resources. At www.ca-ilg.org, local officials can find helpful information on a variety of topics. A comprehensive web portal (www.ca-ilg.org/ NewlyElecteds) specifically designed for newly elected officials and their staff provides materials about key aspects of local governance. For more information, see “In Case We Haven’t Met: ILG Provides Tools and Resources for Local Leaders” on page 6. The League’s 16 geographic divisions serve as the regional “homes” for League members throughout California. Sharing information and knowledge with colleagues within their division is another way that mayors and council members build their leadership skills. Division meetings offer policy updates as well as a chance to network and connect with others to discuss common issues. Mayors and council members’ work encompasses regional issues, so developing strong working relationships with other local elected officials in the region is essential. The League’s division meetings and activities make this task easier. Preparing for the Next Step Mayors and council members who are ready to take their leadership to the next level will want to participate in the League’s California Civic Leadership Institute®. Sponsored by the League Partners, the California Civic Leadership Institute serves as an exclusive educational program for local government elected officials who are thinking about running for the state Legislature. Each year, a top faculty comprising former legislators, members of the media, and political and policy experts educates local officials preparing to take the next step in their public service careers. Leadership isn���t typically a skill that people are born with. It is developed over many years through numerous experiences and opportunities. Elected city officials have chosen to devote a considerable amount of time and energy to improving their communities. The League recognizes the importance of this responsibility and understands that it requires skills and expertise. We welcome our newly elected city officials to public service and look forward to helping both new and returning council members meet the demands of leadership. ■

Eva Spiegel is director of communications for the League and can be reached at espiegel@cacities.org. www.westerncity.com

Western City, January 2013

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News from the Institute for Local Government

In Case We Haven’t Met: ILG Provides Tools and Resources for Local Leaders Many local agencies had elections in 2012. As 2013 dawns, hundreds of new local officials are taking office and hitting their strides as elected leaders in their communities. Among the many resources available to support these officials in serving their communities is the Institute for Local Government (ILG), the nonprofit 501(c)(3) research affiliate of both the League and California State Association of Counties (CSAC). ILG’s mission is to promote good government at the local level with practical, impartial and easy-touse materials. The ILG Website Is Ready to Serve You The ILG website (www.ca-ilg.org) provides a key way to access these resources. For newly elected officials, ILG has collected a number of resources designed to get their local public service off to a strong start. By visiting www.ca-ilg. org/NewlyElecteds, those new to public service can access information on local agency responsibilities and powers, budget and finance, land use, working with staff and other need-to-know topics. The website offers a wealth of resources for more seasoned officials and staff as well. Sustainability (www.ca-ilg.org/ SustainableCommunities). This section of the website helps local officials find policy ideas and resources related to:

• Health and the built environment; • Sustainability and economic development; • Financing sustainability efforts; and • Other issues. Public Engagement (www.ca-ilg.org/ Engagement). ILG’s online resources help local officials and their communities make good decisions about when and how to involve the public in local agency decision-making. The “basics” section of this page includes information about public engagement benefits, principles, design and evaluation. Other sections address broadening participation, using technology in public engagement and sustaining public engagement efforts. Ethics and Transparency (www.ca-ilg. org/Trust). This section offers practical information on principles of public service ethics, as well as plain-language explanations of California’s ethics laws. It also examines dilemmas commonly faced by local officials and provides policy tools for promoting public trust and confidence in local officials. Local Government 101 (www.ca-ilg. org/LocalGovt101). ILG also offers nuts-and-bolts information through its Local Government 101 resources that

local officials can use to help the public and the media understand local agency structures and processes. ILG welcomes links from local agency websites to its information. Funding In addition to the League and CSAC, a variety of sources fund ILG’s work. They include grants, contracts with universities, state and private-sector funding and individual donations. In fact, more than 80 percent of ILG’s annual budget of $1.9 million comes from sources other than its parent organizations. ILG is proud to be able to leverage the League’s and CSAC’s investment to such an extent. Leadership ILG’s work is guided by a board of directors that includes liaisons to key League and CSAC groups, including each organization’s board of directors, the League’s City Managers’ Department, the County Administrative Officers Association of California and, most recently, the Municipal Management Associations of Southern and Northern California. Other current and former local government leaders round out ILG’s brain trust. For more information, visit www.ca-ilg.org. ■

• Energy efficiency and conservation; • Land use; • Waste reduction and recycling; • Transportation (including SB 375 implementation);

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League of California Cities

“Leadership and learning are indispensable to each other.” — John F. Kennedy

www.cacities.org


Peer Learning Network Advances Leadership In Sustainability by Karalee Browne

L

ocal officials face a deluge of data, studies and reports on a variety of topics such as the economic, social, fiscal and environmental impacts of programs and activities. Finding the most relevant information from trusted sources can be challenging. Furthermore, public expectations for efficient and effective programs are growing, and agency staff increasingly needs to gather good ideas and information quickly. In a time of staff layoffs and budget constraints, local agencies need to do a lot more with a lot less — and it can be overwhelming.

become aware and adopt sustainable innovations, the universe of best practices and lessons learned in sustainability and climate action will continue to grow.

With this in mind, the Institute for Local Government (ILG) launched the Sustainable Communities Learning Network (SCLN) (www.ca-ilg.org/sustainable-communities-learningnetwork) in partnership with the Information Center for the Environment at the University of California, Davis, and with support from the Strategic Growth Council. The SCLN includes nearly 2,300 individuals from nonprofit, governmental, privatesector and community organizations throughout California who are engaged in a variety of areas related to sustainability.

• The network helps local government officials and staff members learn how to apply effective policies and best practices related to land-use planning, the environment, healthy communities and climate change through informational articles and webinars.

A Catalyst for Collaboration Like other social networks, the Sustainable Communities Learning Network does not employ a top-down approach directed by any one group or individual. Rather, it is guided by its participants and is intended to “meet local officials where they are” by focusing on their priority issues and concerns. The network serves as a means for effective collaboration and communication among the participants and provides a place to share best practices and lessons learned related to local agencies’ day-to-day operations. It helps its members become leaders by sharing their expertise, learning from one another and expanding opportunities for peer-to-peer learning. The idea is that as more communities

Because cities and counties are in various stages of implementing sustainability policies and programs, the SCLN is divided into four main areas — Learn, Share, Connect and Lead — reflecting the unique knowledge, perspectives and needs of individual participants.

• Local officials and staff possess sustainability expertise that is a valuable resource and is helpful for others interested in undertaking similar programs, so members are encouraged to share their accomplishments, hardships and best practices. • In addition to representatives from local agencies, the network also comprises professionals with expertise on specific sustainability topics. Local government staff and officials can connect with their peers in local agencies as well as representatives from nonprofit organizations that provide technical assistance, along with major utility companies that can help cities and counties save energy and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. • Cities and counties that lead in sustainability are encouraged to apply to participate in the Beacon Award recognition program (www.ca-ilg.org/BeaconAward). As participants they receive recognition for their voluntary sustainable activities. continued

Karalee Browne is a program coordinator for the Institute for Local Government and can be reached at kbrowne@ca-ilg.org. www.westerncity.com

Western City, January 2013

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Peer Learning Network Advances Leadership in Sustainability, continued

The network provides a place to share best practices and lessons learned. Best Practices Framework Prior to launching the learning network, ILG released the Climate Action and Sustainability Best Practices Framework (www.ca-ilg.org/climatepractices) in 2009 to help local officials and others become familiar with the range of activities that local agencies can pursue to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and promote sustainability. ILG worked with an advisory group of leading sustainability practitioners from the public and private sectors to craft the best practices framework, which includes policies, programs and activities in 10 topic areas:

1

Energy efficiency;

2

Water and wastewater systems;

3

Green building;

4

Waste reduction and recycling;

5

Climate-friendly purchasing;

6

Renewable and low-carbon fuels;

7

Efficient transportation;

8

Land use and community design;

9

Open space and offsetting carbon emissions; and

10

Promoting community and indi- vidual action.

The best practices framework is currently being updated with assistance from participants in the learning network, local agency staff members who have helped implement unique voluntary sustainable activities and experts with specific knowledge in areas such as energy efficiency, waste management and green building. Individual best practice activities can be used to undertake stand-alone programs or can be part of a broad-based climate action plan.

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League of California Cities

To foster learning, sharing, connecting and leading on these sustainability best practices, the network recently set up a LinkedIn group where members are encouraged to initiate and contribute to discussions, ask questions and connect with peers and professionals working on sustainability policies and programs locally and statewide. The Sustainable Communities LinkedIn group now boasts more than 300 participants, including many from cities and counties participating in the Beacon Award sustainability and climate change recognition program and the Statewide Energy Efficiency Collaborative (www.CaliforniaSEEC.org).

Drawing on Colleagues’ Knowledge Alana Rivadeneyra serves as sustainability coordinator in the City of Rancho Cucamonga, which is participating in the Beacon Award program. Rivadeneyra has worked in the City Manager’s Office for less than two years. In that time she has helped calculate emissions for a greenhouse gas inventory report, developed a new green business recognition program and utilized a new guidebook to help streamline the city’s solar permitting process.

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When the Rancho Cucamonga City Council became interested in creating an electric vehicle-charging ordinance, Rivadeneyra turned to the network for help. Just minutes after she posted an inquiry on the SCLN LinkedIn site, participants from Santa Clarita, Redlands, Irvine, Sacramento and Manhattan Beach came to her aid with suggestions and resources. A dialogue quickly followed with her counterparts working on similar projects — some of them in communities close to Rancho Cucamonga and others from communities hundreds of miles away. With shrinking travel budgets and a growing desire to make local communities more efficient, Rivadeneyra is always seeking new sources of ideas. “We have a lot on our plates. To make sure we are using the best practices to develop our programs, I often turn to my colleagues or search the Internet for help,” she says. Dave Peterson, an assistant planner in Santa Clarita, was among those who responded to Rivadeneyra’s request for help, and the responses made a significant difference for her. “Our electric vehiclecharging ordinance should be approved in the next two months,” says Rivadeneyra. “I think it would have taken much longer if we didn’t have the opportunity to connect with other agencies.”

More Resources Online For more information and links to related resources, read the online version of this article at www.westerncity.com.

www.westerncity.com

The Sustainable Communities Learning Network includes nearly 2,300 individuals engaged in areas related to sustainability.

The comments of network participants reflect its Learn-Share-Connect-Lead philosophy. Peterson believes that sharing experiences with participants in the LinkedIn group can help make it easier for other local governments to adopt

sustainability practices. “If my accomplishments can help another city or county implement sustainable practices better or more quickly, that’s really exciting,” says Peterson. “We are all in this together.” ■

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Western City, January 2013

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League of California Cities

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by Dan Carrigg The past few years have not been the best of times for the Golden State. A grueling economy caused a painful setback for both the private and public sectors. Job and revenue losses forced many tough decisions at kitchen tables and in city council chambers and the state Legislature. But perhaps the worst is behind us. With foreclosure rates falling, revenues stabilizing and employment slowly improving, the state’s economic decline has stopped, which provides a foundation for recovery.

In 2012 cities began to move on after redevelopment was eliminated. The League focused on protecting and assisting its membership with redevelopment dissolution issues, which included filing a lawsuit to protect city sales and property tax and to improve due process for successor agencies dealing with the Department of Finance (DOF). Early in 2012 the League Task Force on the Next Generation of Economic Development Tools began work to identify a variety of options for cities, and the League collaborated with several legislators on alterna-

tive tools for infrastructure and economic development. A vigorous defense of local control was also launched on a variety of fronts, and a bright spot emerged with the passage of pension reform.

Redevelopment and Its Aftermath A few days prior to the start of 2012 the California Supreme Court issued its ruling in California Redevelopment Association v. Matosantos upholding AB 1X 26, the redevelopment elimination measure. This ruling meant redevelopment agencies were

eliminated Feb. 1, 2012. The California Redevelopment Association (CRA) and the League made a legislative effort in January through SB 659 (Padilla) to delay the elimination date so that alternatives could be explored, but that effort failed to gain traction in the governor’s administration. Thus, Gov. Jerry Brown achieved his objective of eliminating redevelopment agencies, the tool that had so extensively supported urban development and affordable housing in California. continued

Dan Carrigg is legislative director for the League and can be reached at dcarrig@cacities.org. www.westerncity.com

Western City, January 2013

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2012 Legislative Year in Review, continued

Losing redevelopment devastated many communities, but cities accepted the court’s decision and prepared to move on. The League worked on AB 1585 with Assembly Speaker John Pérez on cleanup to AB 1X 26 to address local implementation issues, which included preserving the remaining affordable housing funds and requiring the repayment of city-agency loans. However, after the measure passed the Assembly in March with an urgency clause and bipartisan support, it did not receive a hearing in that form in the Senate. The dissolution of redevelopment agencies also meant closing the doors of CRA and dissolving its staff of 13, who had for years served as chief representatives and information conduits. The League stepped in to fill the void, and its general counsel convened a working group of city attorneys and redevelopment specialists that meets weekly to compare notes on various pending legal actions and activities of DOF. In addition, the League hosted several webinars to provide information and guidance, where possible, to successor agencies. The League also retained CRA’s former lobbyist to assist with redevelopmentrelated lobbying efforts. After the Senate failed to hear AB 1585, the redevelopment issue was folded into the budget process. In conjunction with the governor’s “May Revise,” DOF released redevelopment trailer bill language aimed primarily at improving the state’s leverage over successor agencies. The League testified against this proposal and submitted alternative language to legislators to expand due process and promote equitable resolution of outstanding disputes, repay city-agency loans, and allow for the use of unexpended bond funds and other provisions. DOF staff and representatives of Senate and Assembly Democratic leaders began meeting privately to draft language. The result of these discussions was disappointing when AB 1484 was released on June 25. Despite severe time constraints, the League reviewed the language, identified

Promoting and defending cities’ local authority is the cornerstone principle of the League. “Local control” means local democracy in its purest form; this core tenet unites all cities.

problems and drafted proposed amendments. Cities’ greatest concerns included the policy and constitutional issues raised by the clawback provisions and unrealistic deadlines for successor agencies to make payments (including a provision for billing the agencies on July 9 and imposing penalties for payments not made by July 11). It was also unclear whether the “benefits” — such as loan repayment and expenditure of unspent bond proceeds — would actually be realized. The Senate Budget Committee convened for an evening session on June 26. Legis-

lators raised concerns and said that they would not vote for the bill without specific changes. The bill was then put over. After some overnight arm-twisting by the governor, the principled statements and objections made the evening before vanished the next morning. The bill was approved without change and signed into law on June 27. Without viable legislative recourse, the League filed litigation against the state on Sept. 24 over various aspects of AB 1484, including the clawback mechanisms that could divert local sales or property tax.

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Next Steps on Economic Development and Infrastructure Creating new tools that cities could use for economic development and infrastructure became a top priority. The League Task Force on the Next Generation of Economic Development Tools, chaired by League President Bill Bogaard, mayor of Pasadena, met several times in the spring to develop options and ideas. Beyond accumulating and distributing information to cities on possible options and alternatives, the task force focused on examining making the Infrastructure Financing District (IFD) law a useful tool. The IFD law, which had been on the books for 22 years and rarely used, had many problems. While it allowed the use of tax increment to fund infrastructure, it required two public votes at the two-thirds vote threshold, both to establish a district and issue debt. These dual vote requirements deterred most agencies from looking further. In addition, legal questions remained unresolved over whether the constitutional debt limit applied to these districts and the fact that the law did not permit funding rehabilitation and maintenance of infrastructure. Thus, much had to be done to make the law functional. The League worked internally with its attorneys and in partnership with the California Building Industry Association to craft a series of changes to SB 214 (Wolk)

www.westerncity.com

to make IFD law a useful tool. Ultimately the League supported the measure and requested a signature from the governor. However, Gov. Brown vetoed the measure along with several other measures, including SB 1156 (Steinberg), which would have reauthorized redevelopment in a more limited form. The governor’s veto messages stressed his desire to keep cities focused on dissolving redevelopment. While disappointing in the short run, the veto messages leave room for returning to these issues in 2013.

with 200-year flood plain issues, and help small cities with a regulatory problem with a state agency. These issues are summarized briefly below.

Progress in Other Areas

Cap-and-Trade Revenues. The League worked on developing policy to guide future distribution of expected future revenues derived from cap-and-trade auctions of allowances for greenhouse gas emissions. AB 1532 (Pérez), supported by the League, contains guidance for an investment plan for cap-and-trade

The League worked proactively to craft and support a major pension reform package, position cities to receive future funding from cap-and-trade revenues, provide enhanced communication opportunities with water boards, assist jurisdictions in the Central Valley in addressing concerns

Pension Reform. Achieving substantive pension reform was a top League priority and reflects the culmination of several years of internal work developing and refining policies. While implementation issues with AB 340 (Furutani) will naturally occur, this is a positive step toward restoring state and local fiscal stability over the long term.

continued

We are proud to advise California Municipalities and look forward to continue working with you to

2013

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Western City, January 2013

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2012 Legislative Year in Review, continued

revenues that will likely include funding for local government transportation, energy efficiency and SB 375 implementation. Water Boards. The League supported several bills addressing issues with state and regional water quality control boards. SB 965 (Wright) addresses the Administrative Procedure Act exemptions and prohibitions on ex parte communication between members of the state and regional boards and the regulated community. Flood Control. Implementation of recent flood control mapping was creating much concern for cities in the Central Valley. The League worked extensively with the Department of Water Resources to help its staff understand the impacts of their proposed regulations and supported SB 1278 (Wolk) to address these issues.

Art Hartinger

Steven Meyers

800.464.3559

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Small Cities and Community Development Block Grants. Eighteen small cities were facing difficulty after their applications for state Community Development Block Grants had been incorrectly scored by the Department of Housing and

Community Development (HCD). The League led a lobbying effort to help them get their applications rescored, which included drafting and circulating a letter to the HCD director signed by all the affected legislators and meeting with the director.

Meyers Nave Congratulates Steven Meyers and Art Hartinger on Being Named to the Daily Journal’s Top 25 Municipal Law Attorneys list

www.meyersnave.com

League of California Cities

www.cacities.org


When dealing with a Legislature that introduces more than 2,000 bills each year, the League must maintain a strong and sustained defense of local control.

Evaluating League Progress On Strategic Goals The League board of directors outlined three strategic goals for the 2012 legislative session: 1. Support sustainable and secure public employee pensions and benefits; 2. Promote local control for strong cities; and 3. Build strong partnerships for a stronger Golden State. As always, the cornerstone of the League’s political strength and success begins with the commitment and dedication of the many city officials who devote their time and energy to serving within the League’s divisions, policy committees, special task forces and board of directors.

Support Sustainable and Secure Public Employee Pensions And Benefits The League has been concerned about the sustainability of public pensions in California since 2005, when it published its White Paper on Pension Reform. Cities were dedicating increased revenue to cover retirement and other benefit costs — and reducing current services to pay for them. The crisis expanded in 2008 when a collapsing economy dramatically reduced local revenue and earnings on retirement investments.

Unfinished Business In every legislative session significant work is expended on projects that will be continued in the coming year. Here are several areas of the League’s unfinished business. City Vehicle License Fee (VLF) and Incorporations and Annexations. Through SB 89 of 2011, the Legislature swept $130 million in city VLF funding as part of a budget plan to fund realignment. This raid caused severe hardships for recently incorporated cities and cities that had annexed inhabited areas. The League assisted the recently incorporated cities in various legislative efforts including an end-of-session push on AB 1098 (Carter), which the governor vetoed. Meanwhile the League is awaiting a decision on its litigation that is pending in Sacramento Superior Court challenging the constitutionality of the 2011 VLF funding sweep in SB 89. Future legislative action on this issue is expected. Local Utility User’s Taxes (UUT) Revenues and Augmentation. The League has been involved in a discussion involving wireless companies and retailers over the challenges of collecting both state add-on rates and local UUT from the sales of prepaid wireless services. Cities may be losing $100 million in local UUT revenue due to the difficulties of collection. After significant consultation with UUT cities, the League developed and submitted amendments to AB 1050 (Ma), the vehicle for the discussion, but that measure ultimately did not move. Negotiations are expected to resume in 2013. Any agreement needs to be structured in a way that protects affected local agencies from legal and political risks over the long term. California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA). After 18 bills were introduced on CEQA reform, the League worked with city attorneys to identify issues and convey concerns to legislative staff and other stakeholders. No major legislation on CEQA passed in 2012, but action is expected in 2013. Enterprise Zones. Gov. Brown was unsuccessful in his 2011 effort to eliminate enterprise zones due to the opposition of many groups — including the League — and a legislative two-thirds vote hurdle. The state Department of Housing and Community Development launched a regulatory effort in 2012 to alter enterprise zone requirements, and the League supported legislation that would have provided temporary extension to two expiring zones. The League will remain active continued in reviewing HCD regulations and supporting enterprise zones.

continued on page 18

www.westerncity.com

Western City, January 2013

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Western City magazine’s job opportunity section is the source for job seekers looking for positions in local government. When you place a job opportunity ad in Western City magazine, it will be posted at no additional charge on our website. For rates and deadlines, visit www.westerncity. com and click on the “Advertise” link.

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Display Advertising Call Pam Maxwell-Blodgett at (800) 262-1801 to place a display (boxed) ad or for rate and deadline information, or email admanager@westerncity.com. Website Job Postings Display ads are posted on our website at no additional charge. But if you miss the deadline for getting your job opportunity ad into the magazine, you can post it on the Western City website right away. To post your job opportunity ad on our automated website, visit www.westerncity.com or contact Anita Lopez, administrative assistant; email: alopez@cacities.org; phone: (916) 658-8223.

Did You Miss the December Issue? Read it online at www.westerncity.com

We are passionate about local government and recruiting talented professionals with an affinity for public service! n n n

Don’t Miss the Top Hits on Our Website! 1 The Power of Groupthink: The New Denial – March 2012

2 San Carlos Adopts Innovative Contracting Techniques to Maintain Service Levels – November 2012

3 GASB's New Defined Benefit Pension Standards: Sunshine or Rain for Cities? – November 2012

4 The “Front Page” Test: An Easy Ethics Standard – February 2012

5 How the Second Amendment Right To Bear Arms Affects the Local Police Power to Regulate Firearms – November 2010

Read these articles today at www.westerncity.com

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League of California Cities

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MuniTemps will Save Your City Money! Assistant Director of Public Utilities, Water Quality Branch, San Diego, CA With more than 1.3 million people, the City of San Diego is the eighth largest city in the United States and the second largest in California. The City of San Diego, through the Public Utilities Department, owns and operates the Water and Wastewater Systems. The Water Quality Branch has a workforce of over 500 full time and hourly employees and an annual Budget of over $350 million. Under the general direction of the Public Utilities Department Director, the Water Quality Branch Assistant Director is responsible for the management and performance of the following divisions within the Public Utilities Department: Environmental Monitoring and Technical Services, Wastewater Treatment and Disposal, and the Water System Operations. The ideal candidate will possess strong water/wastewater utility experience; the ability to establish positive working relationships with departmental divisions, other City departments, policy makers, the City Council and Mayor, and external stakeholders. A Bachelor’s Degree in Business Administration, Public Administration, Engineering, Chemistry or the equivalent is required, as is five or more years of executive-level management experience. An Engineering Degree, Master’s Degree and a current Professional Engineer license are preferable. The salary for this position is flexible up to $140,000 and is dependent upon qualifications and experience of the selected candidate. The City also offers an attractive benefits package. If you are interested in this outstanding opportunity, please apply online at www.bobmurrayassoc.com. Please contact Mr. Bob Murray at (916) 784-9080 should you have any questions. Brochure available. Closing date February 6, 2013.

phone 916•784•9080 fax 916•784•1985 www.bobmurrayassoc.com

www.cacities.org


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New Year, New Opportunities! City Manager, City of Burbank, CA City Attorney, City of Brisbane, CA City Manager, City of Indian Wells, CA Assistant General Manager, Midpeninsula Regional Open Space District, Los Altos, CA

Public Works Director/City Engineer, City of Milpitas, CA Assistant City Attorney, City of Milpitas, CA

Please visit our website

www.peckhamandmckenney.com or call (866)

912-1919 for more information.

City Attorney, City of Morgan Hill, CA Known as the “Countryside of Silicon Valley,” Morgan Hill, CA (population 40,000) is located in southern Santa Clara Valley approximately 12 miles south of San Jose and 15 miles inland from the Pacific Coast. Morgan Hill is now seeking an experienced municipal attorney to serve as the new City Attorney. Key to the success of the new City Attorney will be the selected candidate’s ability to work effectively in a collaborative fashion with the City Council and staff; the City Attorney is a key participant, along with the City Manager and Department Heads, in the City’s executive team. Candidates should possess a solid background in all aspects of municipal law. Experience in land use, redevelopment agency dissolution, real estate, and housing issues will distinguish successful candidates. It is anticipated that candidates will have served as a City Attorney or Assistant City Attorney or in an equivalent position with a city, county, or law firm serving local government. Candidates should be members of the California Bar. The salary for the City Attorney is open and dependent upon qualifications. If you are interested in this outstanding opportunity, please apply online at www.bobmurrayassoc.com. Please contact Bob Murray at (916) 784-9080 should you have any questions. Brochure available. Closing date January 11, 2013. phone 916•784•9080 fax 916•784•1985 www.bobmurrayassoc.com

Photo/art credits Cover: Espiegle/istockphoto.com

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Page 23: Office of the Governor

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Looking for Information?

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Getting up to speed on city issues can be challenging. Western City magazine makes it easier to get a handle on the issues affecting your city. Our website gives you a way to easily locate recent articles that address:

» Community Services » Economic Development & Redevelopment

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» Governance, Legislation & Law

» Municipal Finance » Land Use & Planning » Personnel » Public Safety » Public Trust & Ethics » Public Works & Infrastructure » Youth Visit www.westerncity.com and click on “Topics” to read helpful articles that give you both the big picture on statewide issues and detailed examples from cities throughout California.

Western City, January 2013

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2012 Legislative Year in Review, continued from page 15

In 2011 the League updated its pension policies in the Pension Reform Action Plan, an effort spearheaded by the League’s City Managers’ Department and refined by the League policy committees and board of directors. Pension reform was a League strategic priority in both 2011 and 2012. J

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But could the Legislature deliver? Despite the dire fiscal forecasts of pension systems, concerns of taxpayer groups, admonishment by editorial boards and indefensible examples of pension spiking and bloated compensation packages, most political observers doubted whether the Legislature could ever muster the R T

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CITY OF HERMOSA BEACH The City of Hermosa Beach is a quaint and beautiful seaside community on the California coast, 18 miles south of downtown Los Angeles, with a population of 19,648. The City encourages community involvement and is committed to providing a safe and healthy environment within a sound economic atmosphere. The Hermosa Beach Police Department is currently 1 of 17 Police agencies in California that are accredited by the Commission of Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies Inc.. The department POLICE has an annual budget of $13M and is made up of William Avery & Associates a Chief of Police, one captain, two lieutenants, Management Consultants CHIEF eight sergeants and 24 officers. There is also a 1 3 /2 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Suite A Reserve Officer Corps and parking enforcement division. The department Los Gatos, CA 95030 enjoys a very good reputation with the citizens and business community 408.399.4424 due to quick response times and efforts to solve community problems.

fortitude to make substantial reforms to state and local pensions. An opportunity appeared, however, with Gov. Brown’s push for voter approval of a tax increase. Realizing that voters were skeptical, the governor said the Legislature had to enact tough cuts to state programs and make real reforms to public pensions. The governor produced a 12-point plan for pension reform in 2011. This plan matched the League’s principles in many respects. After various stalled attempts, negotiations became serious at the end of the 2012 session. The Governor’s Office asked the League to help shape portions of the final agreement. The passage of AB 340 (Furutani) is a major step forward and is expected to save billions of dollars for taxpayers and state and local agencies over the long term. As expected, there will be many implementation issues and future cleanup, but progress was achieved on

Fax: 408.399.4423 email: jobs@averyassoc.net

The ideal candidate will have a well-rounded law enforcement background www.averyassoc.net and familiarity with CALEA and the unique aspects of enforcement and prevention in a beach town. This position requires a BS/BA degree in a closely related field. An MBA/ MPA is ideal and experience with community policing and grants is highly desirable. Salary is up to $143,700 annually, DOQ. To apply, submit cover letter, resume with current salary, and five work related references (email preferred) by January 25, 2013. A formal job announcement is available at http://www. averyassoc.net/jobs.

City of Chino, California

CITY ENGINEER City Manager, City of El Monte, CA Located approximately 12 miles east of downtown Los Angeles, El Monte is the hub of the San Gabriel Valley, where two major freeways – Interstates 605 and 10 – intersect and is the ninth largest city (out of 88) in Los Angeles County with a population of approximately 120,000. The ideal candidate will be committed to being pro-active in the community, to attract new businesses and expand opportunities for both entrepreneurs and residents alike. The incoming Manager must be dedicated to providing quality service to all residents and businesses in the community, and to insure that municipal services are furnished promptly and efficiently throughout the city. Please visit our website at www.bobmurrayassoc.com in January for more details about this outstanding opportunity. Please contact Mr. Regan Williams at (916) 784-9080 should you have any questions. phone 916•784•9080 fax 916•784•1985 www.bobmurrayassoc.com

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League of California Cities

$8,365 - $10,875 per month The City Engineer is responsible for managing the Public Works Engineering Division in the areas of land development, capital projects, and water systems. A Bachelor’s degree in Civil Engineering, registration as a Civil Engineer and certification to practice Land Surveying in the State of California are required.

— Apply Immediately — This position is open until a sufficient number of qualified applications have been received. A detailed job announcement and employment application are available at www.cityofchino.org or by calling (909) 591-9807. EOE.

www.cacities.org


a major League priority. Looming next on the horizon are the massive state and local liabilities for other post-employment benefits (OPEB) for public employees — another area where the League will focus.

Promote Local Control for Strong Cities Promoting and defending cities’ local authority is the cornerstone principle of the League. “Local control” means local democracy in its purest form; this core tenet unites all cities. City officials believe that solutions to problems are best addressed by letting the local democratic process work at the community level, where the people have direct access to their government and can hold their elected representatives accountable for decisions and the quality of local services. Cities resist rigid, top-down, “one-size-fits-all” solutions that cannot be changed or adjusted to match local circumstances. When dealing with a Legislature that introduces more than 2,000 bills each year, the League must maintain a strong and sustained defense of local control. It is always important to keep as many problematic bills as possible off the governor’s desk and to limit the number of requested vetoes. In 2012 the League successfully defended local flexibility on many fronts. The following are examples of bills that were either stopped or amended to address League concerns during the session. Protecting Local Flexibility: SB 375 Implementation. The League worked on several fronts to defend local flexibility under SB 375. Prior to 2012 the League met with the California Air Resources Board (ARB) staff to reiterate its position that regions should have local flexibility in deciding how to meet assigned greenhouse gas reduction targets. Western City published an article, “Trailblazing a Sustainable Path,” (online at www. westerncity.com) that describes how local flexibility was critical to the success of plans developed by the San Diego Association of Governments, and the League sent a copy of the article to all legislators and key administration officials. The League also helped stop two bills — www.westerncity.com

Land Use. As always, it was a busy year on land-use matters. AB 2231 (Fuentes) sought to shift liability for sidewalk repairs to cities, but it was defeated. Amendments were secured to AB 1897 (Campos) to remove provisions that would have imposed an unworkable

AB 1627 (Dickinson), which prohibited local land-use approvals unless they complied with state vehicle miles traveled (VMT) reduction criteria; and AB 904 (Skinner), which imposed a uniform parking standard in all local transitintensive areas.

continued

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City Manager, City of Concord, CA The City of Concord, California (population 122,000) is located 29 miles east of San Francisco, adjacent to beautiful Mt. Diablo. Concord is now seeking a City Manager. The ideal candidate for this position is expected to provide effective leadership, skilled administration, and a vision for achieving the goals of the Council and the community. A strong background in financial management is essential, and the Council is looking for someone with the ability to manage available funding with forward-looking effectiveness and the ability to find new resources to meet the City’s goals despite external constraints. An ideal candidate will have thorough knowledge and experience in municipal budgeting. Strong candidates for this position will have prior experience as a City Manager or Assistant City Manager in an organization comparable to Concord. Candidates for this position must possess a Bachelor’s degree in Public Administration, Business Administration, or a closely related field; a master’s degree is desirable. The salary for the City Manager is open and dependent upon qualifications. If you are interested in this outstanding opportunity, please apply online at www.bobmurrayassoc.com. Please contact Bob Murray at (916) 784-9080 should you have any questions. Brochure available. Closing date January 25, 2013. phone 916•784•9080 fax 916•784•1985 www.bobmurrayassoc.com

New opportunities . . . Administrative Services Director/Director of Finance City of Dublin

Director, Office of Management & Budget City of Palo Alto

Director of Finance & IT City of San Luis Obispo

Community Planning & Building Director City of Carmel-by-the-Sea

Teri Black-Brann • 310.377.2612 Carolyn Seeley • 949.487.7606

Western City, January 2013

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2012 Legislative Year in Review, continued

one-size-fits-all planning requirement for local agencies to identify “food deserts” in their community. In addition, the League initially sponsored SB 1498 (Emmerson) to address some costly planning requirements for disadvantaged communities imposed on cities, then later worked to insert language into an omniJ

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bus bill that will reduce planning costs for cities. Finally, the League stopped AB 2312 (Ammiano), which proposed a problematic structure for marijuana regulation to override local zoning and building and business license ordinances. Municipal Bankruptcy. The League worked to stop AB 1692 (Wieckowski), R T

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Human Resources Manager City of Encinitas, CA

Located along six miles of Pacific coastline in northern San Diego County, Encinitas (pop. 60,000) is characterized by coastal beaches, cliffs, flat-topped coastal areas, steep mesa bluffs, and rolling hills. With 237 FTE’s, Encinitas is blessed with a supportive Council and organizational culture, AA+ bond rating, and reputation as an employer of choice within the region. The City Manager is seeking an energetic and enthusiastic manager and leader to oversee 5.35 FTE’s and division budget of $914,000. Continuous improvement, best practices, and effective customer service are keys to the success of this position. Supervisory and labor relations experience in a local government agency as well as a Bachelor’s degree is required. Salary range: $90,000 to $146,000 annually.

Please send your cover letter and resume electronically to:

Peckham & McKenney apply@peckhamandmckenney.com Resumes acknowledged within two business days. Call Bobbi Peckham at (866) 912-1919 for more information. A detailed brochure is available at www.peckhamandmckenney.com. Filing deadline is February 15, 2013.

Administrative Services Director

Salary:  $116,256 - $141,312 annually, depending on qualifications. Priding itself of a balanced budget, the City of Stanton, located in Northern Orange County, is home to 39,000 residents. Currently, we are searching for a dynamic, technically proficient, adaptable and team-oriented professional with a proven record of achievement in planning and directing the activities of the Finance Department. The ideal candidate must have five years of administrative, municipal and financial management experience and possess excellent communication and leadership skills. Requirement for this position is a Bachelor’s degree in Accounting, Finance or related field (MBA/MPA/CPA is highly desirable). A generous benefits and highly competitive compensation package await the successful candidate. Please submit a completed City application form, cover letter, resume and three work-related references to Personnel, City of Stanton, 7800 Katella Ave., Stanton, CA 90680. Filing deadline is January 17, 2013. For a detailed employment announcement, visit the city’s website: www.ci.stanton.ca.us or Stanton City Hall, Monday through Thursday, 7:00 AM to 12 Noon and 1:00 PM to 6:00 PM. For questions regarding this recruitment, please contact Patricia Vazquez at (714) 890-4245 or via e-mail at pvazquez@ci.stanton.ca.us. EOE

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an effort to unravel the pre-bankruptcy mediation process under AB 506 of 2011. Public Records Act. The League opposed earlier versions of SB 1002 (Yee) to amend the California Public Records Act (PRA) in a way that changed its fundamental premise and imposed costly burdens on public agencies. Amendments later removed League concerns. The Brown Act and Litigation. Early versions of SB 1003 (Yee) exposed local agencies to needless litigation by allowing lawsuits under the Brown Act about alleged “past actions” — even if the alleged violation was no longer occurring. The League worked with expert city and county counsel to craft amendments to the bill that addressed these concerns. Employment Applications and Criminal History. The League took an “oppose unless amended” position on AB 1831 (Dickinson), which prohibited cities and counties from inquiring into criminal history on employment applications. The bill later died in the Senate. Local Coastal Program Mandate Repeal. The League worked with other organizations to successfully oppose a budget proposal by the governor that would have removed local approval authority for projects in the coastal zone.

Build Strong Partnerships for A Stronger Golden State While building partnerships to reform state governance and promote transparency was a League strategic goal, opportunities were limited in a year when most of the organization’s resources were expended defending and assisting cities on post-redevelopment issues and protecting local authority in a volatile legislative climate. Several meetings of the League’s policy committees and board of directors were dedicated to reviewing California Forward’s proposed ballot initiative. Titled the “Government Performance and Accountability Act” and labeled Prop. 31 on the November 2012 ballot, the measure proposed many changes to state and local budgeting. California Forward

www.cacities.org


incorporated some suggestions, but opted not to accept several major League amendments. Based on concerns over how future implementation could affect local governments, the League adopted a “No Position” on Prop. 31. With regard to transparency, the League worked to resolve issues with SB 186 (Kehoe), sponsored by the state controller. The legislation would have given the controller new authority to investigate and audit local agencies under specific circumstances and establish a voluntary financial review committee composed of state and local government representatives. This measure was later held up over unrelated matters, but its content could be revisited in 2013. The most significant legislative reform measures for 2012, however, were implemented in the November legislative and congressional elections. Three measures enacted in recent years are now at work for the first time: 1. Legislative redistricting by an independent panel; 2. The open primary system, which places the two candidates receiving the most votes in the primary on the General Election ballot; and 3. The results of recently enacted Prop. 28, which expands term limits and enables all newly elected legislators to serve up to 12 years in one house.

With redevelopment eliminated, creating new tools that cities could use for economic development and infrastructure became a top priority. J

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The passage of Prop. 30, the governor’s tax measure, establishes an improved tone for the 2013 legislative session. While state budgetary challenges are not completely resolved, the Legislative Analyst’s Office (LAO) projects a budget gap of less than $2 billion — a significant improvement from the $26 billion deficit two years ago when Gov. Brown took office. According to the LAO, if the governor and legislators hold the line on continued www.westerncity.com

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CITY OF FRESNO Fresno is centrally located in the heart of California between San Francisco and Los Angeles and serves as the business, financial, cultural and entertainment capital of the San Joaquin Valley. From the agricultural fields on the valley floor to the snow-capped peaks of the Sierra Nevadas, the Fresno area truly offers something for everyone.

DIRECTOR OF PERSONNEL SERVICES

This role provides leadership to a staff of 29, directing the activities of the Department of Personnel Services including labor relations, employee training and development, recruitment, compensation and classification, risk management and employee benefit programs. The ideal candidate will have a track record of successful contract negotiations and will be a collaborative, innovative and participative leader with a focus on service and partnership.

William Avery & Associates Management Consultants 31/2 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Suite A Los Gatos, CA 95030 408.399.4424 Fax: 408.399.4423 email: jobs@averyassoc.net www.averyassoc.net

A background that includes five years of increasingly responsible management experience in public sector administration, personnel, risk management, or other related field, including three years at the supervisory level, and a Bachelor’s degree in human resources, public or business administration or related field is required. A Master’s degree is highly desirable. Salary is $125,000 - $145,000 annually, DOQ. To apply, submit letter of interest, resume with current salary and five work references (email preferred) by February 8, 2013. A formal job announcement is available at www.averyassoc.net/jobs.

Public Works Director/City Engineer (An at-will position)

The 2013–14 session will reveal if these reform proposals combine to produce a more accountable and less partisan Legislature.

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City of Carson, California Salary: $10,785 - $13,763/month Plus superior benefits Final Filing Date is Thursday, 1/24/13, by 6:00 p.m. A completed original City of Carson employ­ ment application is required. For additional infor­ mation regarding this excellent career opportunity, please call City of Carson Human Resources @ 310.952.1736 Monday­Thursday, 7:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m.

Under general direction of the City Manager, plans, directs, and oversees a broad range of City Engineering, public works maintenance services, including, but not limited to, engineering, landscape and building maintenance, and public works (streets, trees, concrete and equipment maintenance). This position also serves as the City Engineer and responsible for overseeing and directing the design, construction, operation, and maintenance of the City’s infrastructure system as well as the processing of entitlements for all private development. QUALIFICATION: Bachelor’s degree in public administration, business administration and/or engineering and seven years of full time senior management experience in an operations department in a government agency including at least two years of experience managing a professional engineering department. A valid California Land Surveyor registration and master’s degree in a related field is preferred. Possession of a valid certificate of Registration as a Professional Civil Engineer to practice in the State of California is required.

Western City, January 2013

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spending it can lead to revenue surpluses in the near future and permit the state to establish a prudent reserve fund. Maintaining such discipline will be a challenge. How will Democratic legislators exercise their complete budgetary and policy dominance in the Capitol in the 2013–14 session? For the past two years, as a result J

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CITY ENGINEER — City of Daly City The City of Daly City is seeking an enthusiastic and experienced leader with exceptional administrative, management, civil engineering and interpersonal skills to serve as City Engineer. The successful candidate will enjoy a challenging opportunity to identify key issues in complex situations, evaluate options and demonstrate creative problem solving while leading a division with a $2 million operating budget, $35 million capital budget and a full-time staff of ten. The ideal candidate should be an engaged, resultsoriented manager who is accessible, responsive and collaborative, with a management style that emphasizes teamwork, communication, accountability and staff development. Competitive candidates will possess experience in land development review and capital project delivery, outstanding communication skills and broad experience working with elected and appointed officials, other departments, outside agencies, and the public. Applicants possessing State of California Registration as a Professional Engineer with a Bachelor’s degree in Civil Engineering and at least six years of increasingly responsible civil engineering experience, at least three years in a supervisory capacity are encouraged to apply. Master’s Degree desirable. Final filing date: February 8, 2013. Apply online at www.calopps.org.

City of Baldwin Park, CA

FINANCE DIRECTOR Salary DOQ, plus the City offers a competitive benefits package which includes CalPERS retirement, a generous cafeteria plan ($1200/mo) and vehicle allowance ($300/mo). The City of Baldwin Park is seeking a “hands on” seasoned Finance professional to plan, manage and direct the programs and activities of the Finance Department. The ideal candidate will possess effective administrative and leadership strengths in finance and accounting, along with proven experience in fiscal management and budget. Experience in preparing CAFR, along with experience with more complex aspects of implementing GAAP are essential to the success of this incumbent. A professional background, which includes at least ten years of increasingly responsible experience in finance, accounting, and public administration including five years of supervisory and management experience is a must. A Bachelor’s degree in finance, accounting, business/public administration, or related field is required and a CPA or Master’s degree is preferred. Final Filing Date: Thursday January 24, 2013 Submit resume, current salary, and five professional references to the City of Baldwin Park Human Resources Department, 14403 E. Pacific Ave, Baldwin Park, CA 91706. For a detailed description, please visit our website www.baldwinpark.com or email Leticia Lara, Human Resources Manager, at llara@baldwinpark.com

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Whatever challenges lie ahead, cities must remain unified. the Legislature. This gives the Democrats the ability to adopt tax and fee increases, enact urgency legislation, reduce existing tax exemptions, override a governor’s veto and place measures on the state ballot. And how will a new class of legislators — elected from redrawn districts and from top-two primaries with the opportunity to spend up to 12 years in the Assembly or Senate — conduct themselves? Will they be more focused on developing policy expertise and working in a bipartisan fashion than their predecessors? Or will it be more of the same, where legislators vote in lockstep with their caucuses most of the time? For cities, unwinding their redevelopment agencies will continue to play out both in the DOF administrative process and numerous pending court actions. At some point, legislators and the governor may also awaken to the serious policy problems created by sweeping the Vehicle License Fee from newly incorporated cities and inhabited annexations. Those clamoring for sustainable development and affordable housing will have to become much more serious about developing solutions and tools to address the loss of redevelopment and challenges of rebuilding existing urban areas. Whatever challenges lie ahead, cities must remain unified. For 114 years, the League’s strength has been the power of cities working together with a common voice and agenda. While the past several years have tested those bonds, they have not broken. By maintaining our internal strength and building strategic alliances we will regain lost ground and shape a better future for our communities and California. n

www.cacities.org


Governor’s Final Bill-Signing Decisions: Waiting for Consistent “Subsidiarity” The ability to sign and veto legislation is a powerful tool. Governors set a policy tone with their decisions. Veto messages are always read closely, and a governor’s propensity for vetoing bills is also evaluated. In 2011 Gov. Brown vetoed approximately 14 percent of bills, but in 2012 that percentage dropped to 12 percent. Some vetoes can be attributed to avoiding decisions that could undermine the governor’s tax measure at the ballot box. Whether Gov. Brown reverts to his track record of the 1970s, when he vetoed only 4 percent of all bills over eight years, remains to be seen. Should he return to such practices, keeping bills harmful to local control off of his desk will be even more critical. The first half of this governor’s term has had one notable high (pension reform) and some deep lows (for example, redevelopment dissolution) for cities. In 2011 the governor’s sign-veto decisions were consistent with the League’s request just 56 percent of the time, and he signed some of the most controversial League-opposed bills, such as AB 438 (Williams), limiting contracting for library staffing and AB 646 (Atkins) requiring compulsory fact-finding. In 2012 the governor’s decisions were improved, but this also reflects that the

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League was more successful in keeping controversial items from reaching his desk. The League appreciated his veto of AB 2451 (Pérez), which proposed costly, expanded death benefits to the descendants of firefighters and police. Yet the governor also vetoed SB 214 (Wolk) and several other bills that would have provided additional tools to local governments to develop infrastructure and pursue economic development.

subsidiarity” when vetoing AB 2242 (Dickinson), a measure that would have undercut the ability of school districts to handle disruptive students. About that bill he wrote, “The principle of subsidiarity calls for greater, not less, deference to our elected school boards, which are directly accountable to the citizenry.” To city officials, this mirrors a definition of “local control.” It would be welcome if the governor applied this principle to bills on his desk in a consistent manner during the final two years of his term.

Each year Gov. Brown shares concepts derived from his Jesuit education. In 2012 he described the “principle of

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Thank you to all of the 2013 League Partners

Platinum ($15,000+) 2

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1 BUILDING AMERICA®

Gold ($10,000+) Burke Williams & Sorensen LLP1,2 Hanson Bridgett LLP1,2

Jenkins & Hogin LLP2 Lewis Investment Company2 Liebert Cassidy Whitmore1

Renne Sloan Holtzman Sakai LLP1 Richards Watson & Gershon1,2

Union Pacific Railroad Wells Fargo

Silver ($5,000+) Charles Abbott Associates Athens California/Nevada Soft Drink Association2 Cardenas Markets Inc.2 DW Development2 Dart Container Corp.

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Dokken Engineering Greenwaste Recovery Inc.2 ITRON Interwest Consulting Group Inc. JPMorgan Chase & Co. 2

Kronick Moskovitz Tiedemann & Girard1 Majestic Realty Co.2 Management Partners Meyers Nave1,2 Northrop Grumman Peña’s Disposal2

Prometheus Real Estate Group Inc.2 Republic Services Inc.2 San Manuel Band of Mission Indians2 Santa Ynez Band of Mission Indians2

Starbucks TRANE2 Tribal Alliance of Sovereign Indian Nations2 Union Bank US Bank

Morongo Band of Mission Indians2 Bob Murray & Associates National Community Neoteric Entertainment Inc.2 Pacific Code Compliance2 PARS/Phase II Piper Jaffray2 Recology2 Regis Homes2

Riverside Construction2 Janice Rutherford for Supervisor2 San Bernardino Police Officers Association Solution Strategies2 SummerHill Homes2 Urban Housing Group2 Young Homes2 Zarc Recycling2

Livermore Sanitation Inc.2 Marchetti Construction Inc.2 NASA Services2 Gary Ovitt2 Pacific Code Compliance Pacific Water Quality Association Parsons2 Peters Engineering2 Precision Concrete Cutting Quad Knopf2 RJP Framing2 Robson Homes LLC2 SNW Securities Corp. S&S Drywall2 Santa Monica Police Officers Association

ServPro Severn Trent Enviromental2 Sobrato Organization2 Southern California Concrete Producers Southwest Water Co.2 Swinerton Management Teichert Construction2 Top Grade Construction2 Urban Futures2 Vali Cooper & Associates Inc. Waste Management2 WaterMarke Properties2 Zero Waste Energy LLC

Bronze ($3,000+) 4 Creeks Amador Valley Industries2 AndersonPenna Partners Inc. Atkins Best Way Disposal2 California Dental Association-PAC California Grocers Association2 2

California & Nevada IBEW/ NECA Labor-Management Cooperation Trust Cerrell Associates Colantuono & Levin Desert Valley Medical Group Inc./Prime Healthcare2 Garaventa Enterprises2 Ghilotti Construction2 Jose Gonzales2

HMC + Beverly Prior Architects Herum\Crabtree Attorneys Hill International2 Holliday Rock Company Kinsell Newcomb & De Dios Inc.2 Library Systems & Services LLC Morley Brothers LLC2

Basic ($1,000+) Advance America Alcal2 Ashwood Construction Alameda County Industries2 Alvarez-Glasman & Colvin2 Arnold and Associates2 Avery Associates2 Blue Line Transfer Inc.2 CH2M Hill California Association of Physician Groups California Building Industry Association California Contract Cities Association California Hotel Lodging

California Refuse Recycling Council California Water Service Company Check into Cash California Christiani Architects2 Civil Justice Association of California Continental Development Corporation Paul Cook for Assembly2 Cost Control Associates Inc. DiMare Van Vleck & Brown LLC E&J Gallo Ecology Auto Parts Emanuels Jones and Associates

Food 4 Less2 Fresno Police Officers Association GHD Inc. Giacalone Design Gresham Savage Nolan & Tilden PC Hall & Foreman Inc. Harris & Associates HydroPoint Data Systems Inc. Johnstone Moyer Jones Hall Jones & Mayer Kasdan Simonds Weber & Vaughan LLP LaBarge Industries2 Largo Concrete2

Join the Partners Program Today! Contact Mike Egan | (916) 658-8271 | egan@cacities.org

Partial list as of 12/1/2012

1 – Institute for Local Government supporter 2 – CITIPAC supporter


Western City January 2013