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APRIL 2020 |

The Monthly Magazine of the League of California Cities

Fontana Motivates Residents to Walk More and Improve Health p.10  West Sacramento’s On-Demand Ride-Share Service Addresses Transit Needs p.8 Census 2020: What’s at Stake and Why Every City Needs to Drive Participation p.3

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CONTENTS 2 Calendar of League Events Executive Director’s Message 3 

 Census 2020: What’s at Stake and Why Every City Needs to Drive Participation

By Carolyn Coleman

 alifornia faces unique challenges to C achieving an accurate count — 75 percent of its residents are considered “hard to count” and have been historically undercounted in the census.

Legal Notes 9 

New Law Expands Workplace Lactation Accommodation Requirements for Employers

By Gage Dungy and Savana Manglona

 ew legislation significantly expands N the obligation of all California employers to provide lactation accommodations for employees. As a result, cities should be aware of these new obligations to ensure their worksites are compliant.

#LocalWorks 6 

League Launches Initiative Showing City Projects Making a Difference in Their Communities

By Jill Oviatt

 ollectively, California cities are C creating hundreds, if not thousands, of projects each year that improve the lives of residents. While many people often lament that other levels of government do not always seem to work, California cities can show powerfully through #LocalWorks that local government works.

Helen Putnam Award 8  for Excellence

West Sacramento’s On-Demand Ride-Share Service Addresses Transit Needs

Helen Putnam Award 10  for Excellence

Fontana Motivates Residents to Walk More and Improve Health  The city faced alarming rates of obesity in its community and launched an innovative effort to improve fitness among residents of all ages. The program exceeded its goals, and its popularity continues to increase.

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 over photo: Fontana Mayor C Acquanetta Warren (in blue shirt) accompanies residents on a walk. Courtesy of the City of Fontana.

Simple Enrollment Trusted Investors Industry Leading Liquidity 138+ Years of Expertise

 he ride-share service improves T access to critical daily amenities and is helping to change the lives of transit-dependent residents. The program has improved mobility for all, especially seniors and youths.

Visit online or give us a call:

CALTRUST.ORG | (888) CAL-TRUST


President John F. Dunbar Mayor Yountville

1400 K Street, Sacramento, CA 95814 (916) 658-8200; Fax (916) 658-8240

Magazine Staff Editor in Chief Jill Oviatt (916) 658-8228; email: joviatt@cacities.org Managing Editor Jude Lemons, Citrus 3 Communications (916) 658-8234; email: editor@westerncity.com Contributing Editor Kayla Woods (916) 658-8213; email: kwoods@cacities.org Business and Creative Manager Amanda Cadelago (916) 658-8226; email: acadelago@cacities.org Advertising Sales Cici Trino Association Outsource Services, Inc. (916) 961-9999; email: cicit@aosinc.biz Administrative Assistant Savannah Cobbs (916) 658-8223; email: scobbs@cacities.org Contributors Corrie Manning Katie Pebler Jennifer Whiting

Second Vice President Cindy Silva Council Member Walnut Creek

Immediate Past President Jan Arbuckle Council Member Grass Valley

Executive Director Carolyn Coleman

For a complete list of the League board of directors, visit www.cacities.org/board.

leaguevents APRIL 2–3

Policy Committee Meetings The League’s policy committees review issues of interest to cities statewide and make recommendations to the League board of directors.

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Legal Advocacy Committee Meeting The committee reviews and recommends friend-of-the-court efforts on cases of significant statewide interest to California cities.

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Legislative Action Day, Sacramento Get the latest updates on legislation affecting your city and meet with your legislators.

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Board of Directors Meeting, Sacramento The League board reviews, discusses, and takes action on a variety of issues affecting cities, including legislation, legal advocacy, education and training, and more.

Associate Editors Carol Malinowski Carolyn Walker Design Taber Creative Group

MAY

Advertising Design ImagePoint Design

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For photo credits, see page 16. Western City (ISSN 0279-5337) is published monthly by the League of California Cities, 1400 K St., Sacramento, CA 95814. Subscriptions: $39.00/1 year; $63.00/2 years; student: $26.50; foreign: $52.00; single copies: $4.00, including sales tax. Entered as periodical mail January 30, 1930, at the Post Office, Los Angeles, CA 90013, under the Act of April 13, 1879. Periodical postage paid at Sacramento, Calif.

NT RI

Mayors and Council Members Executive Forum, Monterey The forum’s sessions keep elected officials up to date on key issues.

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Mayors and Council Members Advanced Leadership Workshops, Monterey The workshops offer elected officials who attended the preceding Executive Forum an opportunity to explore in greater detail topics such as managing municipal finances and resources.

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Event and registration information is available at www.cacities.org.

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JUNE 17–18

ED US IN

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City Attorneys’ Spring Conference, Carlsbad This meeting covers trends and issues affecting public law practitioners and provides an opportunity to connect with colleagues.

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Postmaster: Send address changes to Western City, 1400 K Street, Sacramento, CA 95814. Western City Trademark Reg. U.S. Pat. Off. ©2020 League of California Cities. All rights reserved. Material may not be reprinted without written permission. This issue is Volume XCVI, No. 4.

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FSC ® is an independent, not-for-profit organization that promotes environmentally appropriate, socially beneficial and economically viable forest management worldwide. Products with the FSC label are independently certified to ensure that they come from forests managed to meet the needs of present and future generations.

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First Vice President Cheryl Viegas Walker Council Member El Centro

For legislative and policy updates and more, follow @CaCities. Follow Western City @WesternCityMag. Join us on Facebook. www.facebook.com/westerncity www.facebook.com/LeagueofCaCities Visit us on LinkedIn at Western City Magazine.

League of California Cities

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Executive Director’s Message by Carolyn Coleman

Census takers will follow up between May and July with households that haven’t responded to the 2020 census. Cities can take steps now to help residents understand how their participation benefits the community.

Census 2020: What’s at Stake and Why Every City Needs to Drive Participation he federal census is underway, and a great deal is at stake for California. Full participation in the census affects all of us — it shapes the magnitude of our voice in Washington, D.C., and has a profound impact on how much money our state and local governments receive from federal agencies.

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Many residents are unaware of what’s at stake with the census. Others — especially hard-to-count groups — face cultural or language barriers to participation, are concerned about their privacy, or are fearful of answering questions about citizenship, which the census does not ask.

Yet California faces unique challenges to achieving an accurate count. Seventy-five percent of residents in the Golden State are considered “hard to reach,” which means they have been historically undercounted in the census. Non-English-speaking, minority, low-income, rural residents, those experiencing homelessness, and children under five — are just some of the populations that fall into these historically undercounted groups.

Research shows that U.S. residents have a much higher level of trust in their local government than in the federal government. That’s why the leadership of cities throughout California is critically important to educating residents about what the census is, why it’s important, and how they can participate.

An inaccurate population count could result in California losing a congressional seat and receiving less funding for essential programs such as Community Development Block Grants, transportation and infrastructure projects, school programs and lunches, children’s health insurance, Head Start, foster care, emergency services, and more. These impacts will further marginalize hard-to-count populations and erode their faith that government cares about their well-being.

By now, all U.S. residents should have received an invitation to participate in the census, which for the first time includes an online option. Data security is a high priority, and extensive safeguards are in place to protect the integrity of the census. All of residents’ personal information will be kept safe and confidential, and there is no reason to be worried about answering the questions.

www.westerncity.com

What Residents Need to Know

continued on page 5

Western City, April 2020

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Laborers’ International Union of North America

BUILDS PEOPLE BUILDS PROJECTS BUILDS CALIFORNIA The Laborers’ International Union of North America (LIUNA) partners with public and private entities, elected officials, community groups, and responsible contractors to build and maintain the infrastructure needs of communities throughout California while providing residents a career in the construction industry.

Find out more @ www.LIUNAbuildsCA.org

Oscar De La Torre Northern CA District Council (925) 469-6800 www.ncdclaborers.org

Jon P. Preciado Southern CA District Council (626) 350-6900 www.scdcl.org


Census 2020: What’s at Stake and Why Every City Needs to Drive Participation, continued from page 3

Because 75 percent of its residents are considered “hard to count,” California has much at stake in the 2020 census. An undercount can have serious consequences, including reduced funding.

The online and phone census questionnaire is available in 13 languages.

Other ways to respond to the census include by phone or mail. From May through July, census takers will visit households that haven’t responded to the census to help make sure everyone is counted; residents should not be afraid to talk to them. And English-language proficiency is not required to participate — the online and phone census questionnaire is available in 12 languages in addition to English. Cities can affirm the importance of the census by highlighting that federal funding is based on census data and local government’s ability to provide essential services depends on adequate funding. Participation is simple, confidential, and required. A complete and accurate census count is essential.

How Cities Can Drive Participation in the Census It’s critical that information about the census is accessible and easy to understand and that it is shared through a multifaceted communications and outreach effort. Information about how to participate should be delivered through trusted messengers, especially when trying to reach historically undercounted residents. Here are some ways your city can increase participation in the census. Enlist trusted messengers to share culturally appropriate information. Engage business, community, and faith-based groups in your community, and secure their help in reaching hard-tocount populations. Amplify census messages through city communications channels. Include information on how to participate in the census

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and key deadlines in council member or city e-newsletters and social media platforms, and incorporate census messages in Town Hall meetings and coffee chats. Dispel fear and misinformation about the census. Add a link on your city website to the frequently asked questions section of the CA Census 2020 website (at https://census.ca.gov/census-101). Share information with the media. Issue a press release to local media outlets to encourage them to report on how residents can participate in the census, and provide media interviews as needed. Distribute information through existing communications channels. Work with your municipal utilities to include alerts and reminders in monthly mailings and connect with schools to share information with students and their families. Given the concerns about coronavirus transmission, the Census Bureau in March started reinforcing the message that it has never been easier to respond to the census on your own, whether online, over the phone, or by mail — all without having to meet a census taker. Having an accurate count of California’s population in the 2020 census is essential to cities’ ability to serve their constituents. Educating our communities about the census will not only ensure fair federal representation and distribution of funding, it will also strengthen trust in local government and reaffirm that everyone counts. ■

Western City, April 2020

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The Lyman Gilmore Middle School Marching Band performs at the field’s opening event.

A video on the League website tells the story of how five cities and a county took action to increase affordable housing for local workers.

League Launches Initiative Showing City Projects Making a Difference in by Jill Oviatt Their Communities Every day, local leaders work to make their cities better places in which to live, work, and play. They approve projects to increase affordable housing, address homelessness, improve streets and roads, spur economic growth, and deliver essential services to protect residents. Stories about these local projects and initiatives may be celebrated at city council meetings, in a press release, or sometimes covered by a shrinking local media, but often these stories are not shared at all.

New Magazine Section Highlights Success Stories That’s why the League is launching #LocalWorks, an initiative to shine the spotlight on examples of local actions that are making a positive difference in their communities. This section of Western City is now called #LocalWorks and will be dedicated to telling stories of city-initiated or partner projects that make local leaders most proud — efforts that bring value and a higher quality of life to their residents.

League President John F. Dunbar kicked off #LocalWorks at the February 2020 board meeting in Yountville with a #LocalWorks example of a regional partnership in Napa County to address a serious workforce housing shortage in the area. Five cities and the county came together to design a solution, and each jurisdiction put a measure on the November 2018 ballot to increase the transient occupancy tax on hotel visits to raise money for affordable housing projects.

Jill Oviatt is director of communications and marketing for the League and can be reached at joviatt@cacities.org.

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League of California Cities

www.cacities.org


Youths participating in sports enjoy the level, even surface of Grass Valley’s newly refurbished all-weather playing field.

#LocalWorks is a new way to spotlight the great work being done by cities. This story was told through an animated video and shared on YouTube, Twitter, Instagram, and the League website. “We have 482 cities and therefore that many avenues to tell California city success stories,” Dunbar explained to board members during the meeting. “It’s time for all of us to make sure we are telling our #LocalWorks stories to show that local government works, and let’s share those stories far and wide.” Collectively, California cities are creating hundreds, if not thousands, of projects each year that directly or indirectly improve the lives of their residents. While many people often lament that other levels of government do not always seem to work, California cities can show powerfully through #LocalWorks that local government works.

Focus on Housing and Homelessness Given the pressures on cities to plan and zone for more affordable housing and address the state’s homelessness crisis, the initial focus for #LocalWorks will be on collecting stories about successful affordable housing and homelessness initiatives. Housing and homelessness are two of the League’s five 2020 Strategic Priorities, which also include fiscal and pension sustainability; community and disaster preparedness and resiliency; and public safety. City projects that fall under those priorities will also be a focus for #LocalWorks stories.

www.westerncity.com

Grass Valley Mayor Lisa Swarthout, second from right, smiles after cutting the ribbon to open the new turf field, joined by Grass Valley City Council Member Jan Arbuckle, right, and county and school district leaders celebrating the $1.5 million project.

However, many other types of city projects also deserve to be highlighted and shared. Consequently, #LocalWorks will also be a platform for successful city projects that could include infrastructure and public works, economic development, parks and recreation, and more.

Grass Valley’s Story Kicks Off the Effort A new year-round turf field in the City of Grass Valley offers a perfect example of a #LocalWorks success story that shows an innovative way to provide high-quality recreation resources, while also managing costs. California droughts heavily impacted Grass Valley’s playing fields and parks, resulting in uneven dirt surfaces and high costs to water and maintain turf and landscaping. The city heard the cry of unhappy residents and proposed a 1-cent sales tax to fund police and fire services, road improvements, and parks. After voters approved the tax, the city partnered with the Grass Valley School District to create a $1.5 million all-weather 84,000-square-foot sports field for school and public use. This story was shared on the League’s newly created Instagram account, its Facebook page, and the League website. As these stories are gathered and catalogued, one story will be chosen for publication each month in Western City. “Affordable Housing: More Than a Mandate in San Marcos” features a housing project in one of San Diego County’s fastest growing cities and will appear as

the first #LocalWorks story in the May 2020 issue.

How Cities Can Participate in #LocalWorks Many cities have already produced stories that are just waiting to be shared. These may be in the form of press releases, videos, and newsletter stories, or posted on a city’s website. Such stories may have been covered by the local media or included in a department staff report to the city council. Cities are encouraged to submit their stories or story ideas directly to Western City (email editor@westerncity.com), to the city’s regional public affairs manager at the League (find yours at www.cacities. org/regionalmanagers), or to the League’s communications department (email communications@cacities.org). After the story is received, it will be catalogued and assessed to determine the best medium and platform for telling it. It’s also important to emphasize that #LocalWorks is not a campaign. Rather, it’s a new way to spotlight the great work being done by cities — not only to show that local government works, but also to share best practices with other cities for improving services and community resources. It’s time to get the word out to the public and state and federal governments that cities are doing the work every day, and they have phenomenal examples to show for it. #LocalWorks. ■

Western City, April 2020

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The innovative municipal service, which is a public-private partnership, uses vans to serve West Sacramento residents who need a ride.

West Sacramento’s

On-Demand Ride-share Service

Addresses Transit Needs

In the City of West Sacramento (pop. 53,911), located on the Sacramento River in Yolo County, residents expressed their frustration with mobility challenges in 2017. Comments included: • “Buses take too long, and routes don’t always go where I want to go.” • “Taxis and ride-hailing services are too expensive.” • “I can’t afford to own a car, but I need to get groceries and visit the doctor.”

In response, the city launched West Sacramento On-Demand, a public transportation program developed in partnership with a private ride-sharing company, Via Transportation Inc. This innovative service brings convenience and a safe, reliable user experience to previously underserved or transit-dependent residents. A municipality contracting with a private ride-share operator to offer flat-rate public transit service was unprecedented locally, and the project marked Via’s entry into California and first public-private partnership of this kind.

“We are providing mobility and public transportation in a completely different way that proves it’s possible to have a customized, reliable, and efficient service anywhere in a community like ours,” says West Sacramento Mayor Christopher Cabaldon.

Low Cost and Flexibility Appeal to Riders of All Ages For a flat fare, users can request a shared ride and travel citywide. Rides are booked through an app or a phone call. To help reduce single-occupancy vehicle trips, all community members traveling in the continued on page 14

The City of West Sacramento won the Award for Excellence in the Public Works, Infrastructure, and Transportation category of the 2019 Helen Putnam Award for Excellence program. For more about the award program, visit www.helenputnam.org.

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League of California Cities

www.cacities.org


New Law Expands Workplace Lactation Accommodation Requirements for Employers by Gage Dungy and Savana Manglona About Legal Notes

In late 2019, Gov. Gavin Newsom signed SB 142 (Chapter 720, Statutes of 2019) into law. This legislation significantly expands an employer’s obligation to provide lactation accommodations for employees — and provides consequences for noncompliance. The law took effect Jan. 1, 2020, and follows the lead of the City and County of San Francisco’s 2017 Lactation in the Workplace Ordinance, which expanded lactation accommodation requirements for San Francisco employers. SB 142 now applies similar requirements to all California employers, including cities. As a result, cities should be aware of these new obligations to ensure their worksites are compliant.

New Requirements of the Law Under existing law, employers are required to give employees a reasonable amount of break time to express milk. This break time shall run concurrently with any break time already provided to the employee or otherwise be unpaid. SB 142 now also clarifies that a reasonable amount of time be provided each time the employee has a need to express milk. While providing lactation accommodations is not new to California employers, this new law requires each employer to provide a private lactation space — either permanent or temporary — that must: • Be shielded from view and free from intrusion while the employee expresses milk. • Be safe, clean, and free of hazardous materials. • Contain a surface on which to place a breast pump and personal items. • Contain a place to sit. • Have access to electricity or alternative devices (such as extension cords or charging stations) needed to operate an electric or battery-powered breast pump.

This column is provided as general information and not as legal advice. The law is constantly evolving, and attorneys can and do disagree about what the law requires. Local agencies interested in determining how the law applies in a particular situation should consult their local agency attorneys.

Employers are also required to provide access to a sink with running water and a refrigerator or cooler suitable for storing milk in close proximity to the employee’s workspace. While the requirement to provide a sink and refrigerator does not necessarily require that they be provided in the lactation room, the new law is unclear on whether providing these in a bathroom will satisfy this requirement. Furthermore, if an employer designates a multipurpose room for a lactation room, then lactation purposes must take precedence over the other uses during the time the room is used for lactation purposes.

Shared Workspace Accommodations and Limited Exemptions Cities that have offices in multi-employer worksites, such as an office building shared by multiple tenants, can comply with SB 142 by using a shared space within the worksite if the city cannot provide a lactation location in its own workspace. A limited exemption to the requirement that an employer provide a room for the lactation accommodation may exist for employers with fewer than 50 employees. For example, under this provision, if a city with fewer than 50 employees can show that making a space available for breast pumping would impose an undue hardship by causing significant difficulty or expense related to the size, financial resources, nature, or structure of the employer’s business, it may qualify for an exemption. However, such smaller cities are still expected to make reasonable efforts to provide a lactation accommodation other than a restroom stall to the employee. continued on page 13

Gage Dungy is a partner and Savana Manglona is an associate with the law firm of Liebert Cassidy Whitmore; they can be reached at gdungy@lcwlegal.com and smanglona@lcwlegal.com respectively.

www.westerncity.com

Western City, April 2020

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Fontana Motivates Residents to

Walk More Improve Nestled against the San Bernardino Mountains, the City of Fontana (pop. 212,078) offers its residents and visitors a wealth of community activities, a thriving local economy, and easy access to major business centers. Fontana is the second largest city in San Bernardino County and the 20th largest in California.

was my desire to bring [our residents] a program that focuses on health — because without a physically healthy community, we can’t be a healthy city. Healthy Fontana is now a robust program aimed at bringing the community together with a common goal of reducing the factors that negatively impact health.”

City Takes Action by Launching Healthy Fontana

In its first 15 years, Healthy Fontana reached more than 100,000 residents (or about half of its population) through diverse programming. Despite these successes, Fontana residents still face rates of obesity higher than the state average (28.5 percent compared with 25 percent statewide).

In 2003, Fontana was among the nation’s 10 fastest growing cities, but it was also grappling with high rates of obesity. Over three-quarters of its adults and nearly half of its youths were identified as obese, and 78 percent of Fontana’s students did not meet state fitness standards.

Mayor Acquanetta Warren helped launch the Healthy Fontana program in 2004 to address these challenges. In an interview with AARP, Mayor Warren said, “It

The City of Fontana won the Award for Excellence in the Health and Wellness category of the 2019 Helen Putnam Award for Excellence program. For more about the award program, visit www.helenputnam.org.

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League of California Cities

www.cacities.org


and Health And the California Healthy Places Index ranks Fontana in the state’s bottom third of residents who do not participate in physical activities or exercise during leisure time.

Inspiring the Community to Get Moving Fontana offers residents of all ages many opportunities to take part in free and convenient fitness activities through numerous events and classes sponsored by the city and access to miles of municipal trails. But many residents didn’t know how to tap into these opportunities or they needed additional motivation to take advantage of available options and achieve personal health benefits.

www.westerncity.com

To inspire residents to engage in free and easy forms of physical activity, the city created the “Fontana Walks!” program. Launched in August 2017, Fontana Walks! is a community challenge to encourage and motivate residents to walk a cumulative total of 2 billion steps (or 1 million miles) in 365 days. Designed for residents of all ages, the program focuses on adding physical activity to daily routines. The city identified four goals for the initial launch of Fontana Walks!: 1. Motivate 1,100 or more residents to walk a minimum of 5,000 steps daily for one year. 2. Collectively reach 2 billion steps within one year.

Mayor Acquanetta Warren, left center, offers encouragement to residents before the start of a monthly Fontana Walks! event.

3. Increase the average participant’s step count by 10 percent. 4. Communicate a simple but effective message to the community — walking is fun, easy, and free and delivers a lifetime of benefits through making small, deliberate changes.

Building Community Involvement The Fontana Walks! campaign was created as an extension of the city’s existing Healthy Fontana brand that accompanies all health and recreation activities in the continued

Western City, April 2020

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Fontana Motivates Residents to Walk More and Improve Health, continued

The Fontana Walks! program also introduces residents to amenities throughout the community, from walking and biking trails to parks and community centers.

city. The Community Services Department designed and launched the Fontana Walks! program in just over two months. During that time, the team developed a comprehensive marketing campaign with flyers, social media posts, press releases, event outreach, advertisements, a mobile app, website, email blasts, pamphlets, and public service announcements. Extensive promotion and coordination with Healthy Fontana helped ensure the visibility and familiarity of Fontana Walks! throughout the city for residents and businesses. Fontana also teamed with local fitness groups, retailers, and athletic equipment stores to encourage and support participation in the initiative. The city recruited fitness instructors to lead warm-up stretches before walking events. Staff also provided educational materials to Fontana Walks! community partners to help raise awareness of the important role that walking plays in building good health for people of all ages. During the first year of implementation, the city hosted monthly walks at parks and trails throughout the community. Fontana Walks! recognized the top “step getter”

Everyone who registers for the Fontana Walks! program receives a free Healthy Fontana t-shirt, water bottle, and pedometer, along with instructions for logging their steps on the Fontana Walks! web page or mobile app.

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participants at these events and on the website. Raffles, giveaways, and ongoing marketing and promotion continued to draw new participants.

Popular Program Surpasses Targets Fontana Walks! participants met the program’s initial goal and logged 2 billion steps by April 2018, four months ahead of schedule. At the 12-month mark, more than 1,200 individuals were registered as participants. Together they logged 3.2 billion steps — exceeding the original goal by more than 50 percent. Community Services Department Coordinator Jasmine Sarsadias said, “It’s amazing to see the community come together for this common cause: improving health! I’m so proud of the initiative they took toward improving the quality of life for themselves and their families.” In the program’s second year, results again exceeded expectations as Fontana Walks! participants averaged a 15 percent increase in steps.

Residents’ continued enthusiasm beyond the one-year milestone signals the program’s success. Participants cite a variety of reasons for their ongoing interest. One participant said, “I’m diabetic, and this program really gets me out to do my exercise. I just love it.” “Fontana Walks! is so important to the community for improving the quality of life,” said Felix Jones, the city’s parks, community, and human services commissioner. “We want to be a healthy city where people are living much longer. And Fontana Walks! is about community.” With support from many local partners, the city continues hosting monthly walks. Locations include the Mary Vagle Nature Center on the city’s southern edge, Fontana Park on the city’s north side, and the Steelworkers’ Auditorium in central Fontana. Fontana Walks! has now logged more than 7.5 billion steps in its ongoing efforts to improve the quality of life for the city’s residents. Contact: Michael Wright, community services manager, City of Fontana; phone: (909) 3496966; email: mwright@fontana.org. ■

The Fontana Walks! program is part of the Healthy Fontana brand, which the city launched in 2004 as part of its efforts to fight obesity.

www.cacities.org


New Law Expands Workplace Lactation Accommodation Requirements for Employers, continued from page 9

Employers Must Develop a Specific Lactation Accommodation Policy

Penalties for Noncompliance Employers not in compliance with SB 142 are subject to consequences. An employer who fails to provide reasonable break time or adequate lactation accommodations may be fined $100 for each day that an employee is denied reasonable break time or adequate space to express milk. In addition, an employer that discharges, discriminates, or retaliates against an employee for exercising her rights under the lactation accommodation law is in violation of SB 142, and that employee may file a complaint with the state labor commissioner as a result.

SB 142 also requires that California employers develop and implement a policy regarding lactation accommodation requirements that includes: • A statement about an employee’s right to request lactation accommodation. • The process by which an employee makes the request. • An employer’s obligation to respond to the request.

The Path Forward for Cities

• A statement about an employee’s right to file a complaint with the state labor commissioner for any violation of the law. Therefore, cities need to revise their personnel rules and policies to include the lactation accommodation policies listed and make them readily available to all employees. Cities are also now required to distribute the policy to new employees at the time of hire and whenever an employee makes an inquiry about or requests parental leave. If for some reason a city cannot provide a break time or location that complies with its policy, the city must provide a written response to the employee.

This new law requires each employer — including public agencies — to provide a private lactation space.

In response to SB 142, California cities should review each of their worksites to determine which potential on-site locations can be used for lactation accommodations and make any necessary changes to the workplace to comply with the new requirements. In addition, cities should implement the new lactation accommodation policy required under SB 142 and properly disseminate the policy to its employees as required by the law. ■

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Western City, April 2020

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West Sacramento’s On-Demand Ride-Share Service Addresses Transit Needs, continued from page 8

same direction share rides. Using a smart algorithm, Via balances the speed of the service with optimized vehicle occupancies to predict demand and pick up multiple passengers along the way in brightly marked passenger vans. Rider Gail Hoffman is enthusiastic and says, “The service is spot-on. When I need them, they’re available.”

West Sacramento Mayor Christopher Cabaldon explains to a TV news reporter why the service makes fiscal sense as a transit option for the city.

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League of California Cities

With rides costing just $1.75 for seniors and riders with disabilities and $3.50 for the general population, the service improves access to critical daily amenities and is helping to change the lives of transit-dependent residents. Companions can accompany riders for a “plus one” $1 fare, which encourages pooled trips, and a $15 weekly pass ($7.50 for seniors and riders with disabilities) covers up to four rides daily. “The weekly deal for teenagers is super cheap,” says resident Matthew Hargrove. “My 15-year-old daughter is using it to get to work. It’s awesome that she has a ride and is learning that independence is a fun thing.” The program has improved mobility for all, especially seniors and youths. “We have so many different segments of our community using it — teens, seniors, people without cars, and folks who want to visit a restaurant and not worry about parking,” says resident Christy Jourdan. “It’s wonderful.”

Project Offers Solutions for Multiple Challenges The city developed West Sacramento On-Demand in 2018 as part of its Mobility Action Plan that aims to streamline and enhance transit, create multimodal “mobility hubs,” and leverage smart technology, all of which contribute to an eco-friendly environment. In recent years, local transit ridership has declined while costs have risen, especially in low-density suburban neighborhoods. In addition, residents in the city’s expanding Riverfront district were reluctant to give up car ownership due to a lack of transit alternatives, which exacerbated issues related to parking demand. continued on page 18

www.cacities.org


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Display Advertising

Western City magazine’s job opportunity section is the source for job seekers looking for positions in local government. When you place a job opportunity ad in Western City

Call Cici Trino, Association Outsource Services, at (916) 961-9999 to place a display (boxed) ad or for rate and deadline information, or email cicit@aosinc.biz.

Website Job Postings Display ads are posted on our website at no additional charge. But if you miss the deadline for getting your job opportunity ad into the magazine, you can post it on the Western City website right away. To post your job opportunity ad on our automated website, visit www.westerncity.com or contact Savannah Cobbs, Western City administrative assistant; email: scobbs@ cacities.org; phone: (916) 658-8223.

magazine, it will be posted at no additional charge on our website. For rates and deadlines, visit www.westerncity. com and click on the Advertise link.

BUDGET 2020 Budget Manager

Helping you to the finish line.

City of Milpitas, California

1-866-406-MUNI (6864) www.munitemps.com

$117,755.16 – $155,000.04 annually The Budget Manager will be responsible for planning, organizing, directing and personally performing professional budgeting activities involving public finance, budgeting, and budgetary control. The Manager will develop, coordinate, and maintain the City’s Annual Budget and all non-departmental budgets. The City desires a professional, detail-oriented individual that has the ability to develop long-range financial forecasts and models using various data sources and assumptions. Additionally, the Budget Manager is responsible for the oversight of the City’s investment, debt management and risk management functions. This person will have a Bachelor’s degree in business or public administration with major coursework in finance, accounting or closely related field. An advance degree, supervisory experience, and designation as a Certified Public Accountant are highly desirable. Submit application and resume online at www.governmentjobs.com/careers/milpitas or the HR Department 455 E. Calaveras Blvd, Milpitas, CA 95035, (408) 586-3090.

www.westerncity.com

Current opportunities . . .

City Librarian

City of Santa Clara

Chief Procurement Officer Assistant to the City Manager City of Palo Alto

Community Engagement Division Director City of Santa Rosa

Please visit www.tbcrecruiting.com for details. tel 424.296.3111 • info@tbcrecruiting.com

Western City, April 2020

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For your consideration . . .

Public Works Director City of Huntington Beach

Assistant Public Works Director/ Transportation & Business Services Assistant Public Works Director/Public Services City of Mountain View

Please visit www.tbcrecruiting.com for details. • tel 424.296.3111 • Suzanne Mason • Teri Black • Tina White

Looking for Information?

We Can Help!

Getting up to speed on city issues can be challenging. Western City magazine makes it easier to get a handle on the issues affecting your city. Our website gives you a way to easily locate recent articles that address:

» Community Services » Economic Development

& Tax-Increment Financing

» Environment, Energy & Climate Change

» Governance, Legislation & Law

» Municipal Finance » Land Use & Planning » Personnel » Public Safety » Public Trust & Ethics » Public Works & Infrastructure » Youth Visit www.westerncity.com and click on “Topics” to read helpful articles that give you both the big picture on statewide issues and detailed examples from cities throughout California.

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League of California Cities

AVERY ASSOCIATES Current and Upcoming Opportunities: Butte Choice Energy – Chief Executive Officer City of Martinez – City Engineer Monterey County – Principal Risk Analyst Monterey County – Safety Officer William Avery & Associates City of Oxnard – Assistant HR Director Management Consultants 1 3 / 2 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Suite A City of Pinole – Fire Battalion Chief Los Gatos, CA 95030 San Diego Community Power – Chief Executive Officer 408.399.4424 Fax: 408.399.4423 City of Soledad – Chief of Police email: jobs@averyassoc.net Town of Timnath, CO – Police Chief www.averyassoc.net City of Vallejo – Assistant City Attorney Ventura County Community College District – Vice Chancellor-Human Resources Please check our website at http://www.averyassoc.net/current-searches/ for formal position announcements.

Photo/art credits Cover: Courtesy of the City of Fontana Page 3: Adamkaz Page 5: Alantobey Pages 6–7: Courtesy of the League of California Cities Page 8: Courtesy of the City of West Sacramento Page 9: Track5

Pages 10–12: Courtesy of the City of Fontana Pages 14, 18: Courtesy of the City of West Sacramento

www.cacities.org


Current & Upcoming Opportunities City of Chico, CA – Chief of Police The City of Chico is seeking a Police Chief who is well-rounded and has experience with all aspects of modern and municipal policing. The candidate will be expected to demonstrate a proven history of creative and effective problem solving and collaborative teamwork. The Chief of Police will be challenged by a dynamic and engaged community with many security needs and limited resources. The Chief will be expected to be an effective communicator and should be able to easily interact with a very diverse socio-economic, political, and educational community. A Bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university; A California POST Management Certificate is required or must be obtained within twelve months if an out-of-state equivalent certificate is furnished. POST Command College, FBI National Academy and POST Executive Development course certification and a Master’s degree in a related field is desirable. The salary is dependent upon qualifications. Contact: Gary Phillips, (916) 784-9080 – Filing Deadline: April 10, 2020

Family Justice Center Sonoma County, CA – Executive Director The Family Justice Center Sonoma County (FJCSC) is seeking a service-minded professional with proven management capabilities and a broad range of knowledge and experience. FJCSC is a place for healing, advocacy, and change, contributing to a region, state, and nation free from family violence. The Executive Director provides key leadership to the FJCSC in the areas of sustainability planning, revenue generation, community outreach, and partnership development. Any combination of education, training, and experience which would likely provide the required knowledge and abilities is qualifying. A typical candidate will possess a Bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university with a major in Social Sciences, Business Administration, Public Administration, Marketing, or a closely related field, and at least four (4) years of professional experience in strategic business development and/or marketing, with at least one (1) year of experience supervising staff. The annual salary range for the Executive Director position is $100,849.64-$122,597.43, DOQ. Apply online at http://www.governmentjobs.com/careers/sonoma. Contact: Valerie Phillips, (916) 784-9080 – Filing Deadline: April 12, 2020

City of Healdsburg, CA – Administrative Services Director The City of Healdsburg is seeking a confident, approachable leader and skilled administrator to serve as the Administrative Services Director. The ideal candidate will possess a solid background in all aspects of municipal finance, coupled with a general understanding of all city operations. Excellent project management and communication skills are essential to this position; the ideal candidate will exhibit an aptitude for clear, concise, and direct communication. Any combination of education, experience, and training equivalent to a Bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university with major coursework in public administration, finance, or a related field; and seven (7) years of increasingly responsible experience in finance, accounting, human resources, information technology, and general services in a municipal or public agency setting, including three (3) years of administrative and management responsibility, is qualifying. A Master’s degree is preferred. The monthly salary range for the Administrative Services Director is $12,869.94-$15,643.76, DOQ. Contact: Valerie Phillips, (916) 784-9080 – Filing Deadline: April 19, 2020

California State University, Chico Chief of Police

City of Jurupa Valley, CA Economic Development Manager

City of Pleasant Hill, CA Maintenance Superintendent

McCarran International Airport, NV (Clark County) Airport Chief Information Technology Officer City of San Clemente, CA City Manager

If you are interested in these outstanding opportunities, visit our website to apply online.

www.bobmurrayassoc.com


West Sacramento’s On-Demand Ride-Share Service Addresses Transit Needs, continued from page 14

Along with the challenges of reducing greenhouse gas emissions from transportation and single-rider occupancy, West Sacramento also faced the broader task of providing affordable and convenient mobility for underserved members of the community. The city’s 2017–2020 Age-Friendly Action Plan revealed that over 25 percent of adults age 65 and older were living alone, and about 27 percent were living at or just above the poverty level. As an age-friendly city, West Sacramento was acutely concerned about mitigating the impacts of limited mobility on its growing senior population. These impacts include social isolation and access to healthy foods.

“For the first time in years, I was able to buy ice cream and get it home while it was still frozen,” says passenger Robin Werneck. “The drivers are wonderful, the vans are clean, the service is prompt — and I couldn’t ask for more.”

Ridership Numbers Reflect Program’s Success West Sacramento On-Demand has demonstrated measurable success. Women, lower-income households, youths, and seniors have enjoyed the greatest positive results. As of December 2019:

Contact: Sarah Strand, senior transportation planner, City of West Sacramento Capital Projects & Transportation Department; phone: (916) 617-5310; email: sarahs@cityofwestsacramento.org. ■

• Over 10 percent of the city’s population (more than 6,200 unique users) have created an account. • The service has provided over 160,000 rides since launching.

The service improves access to critical daily amenities and is helping to change the lives of transitdependent residents.

• Close to 3,500 rides are completed each week (roughly 500 rides are completed daily).

In addition, the rise of ride-hailing services like Uber and Lyft spurred the city’s decision to leverage the convenience and flexibility of this technology.

The reliability of the city’s on-demand ride-share service makes it popular with residents.

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Coming Next Month

Encinitas Housing for Generations: how the city overcame challenges to provide housing for a diverse workforce. Dublin Valor Crossing: how a public-private-nonprofit partnership created affordable housing for veterans. And more!

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New Opportunities! Finance Director, American Canyon, CA Human Resources Director, Milpitas, CA Fire Chief, Rocklin, CA Administrative Services Director, Westlake Village, CA Please visit our website to learn more about all of our active recruitments.

Peckham & McKenney www.peckhamandmckenney.com

www.westerncity.com

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League of California Cities

www.cacities.org


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www.westerncity.com

Western City, April 2020

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League of California Cities

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Profile for Western City Magazine

Western City April 2020  

Western City April 2020  

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