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MARCH 2019 |

The Monthly Magazine of the League of California Cities®

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Housing Supply and Affordability: Challenges for 2019 p.10 Rental Resources Program Addresses Housing Issues in Davis p.17 Patterson’s HOST House Tackles Homelessness p.13

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CONTENTS 2 Calendar of League Events 3 Executive Director’s Message Responding to the Ongoing Threat of Pre-Emption

By Carolyn Coleman

 tate legislatures nationwide have S become more aggressive in wielding pre-emption to interfere with local democracy. Pre-emption is also alive and well at the federal level.

6 City Forum

New Administration, New Legislature: Amplify Your Voice

By Amanda Cadelago

 ne of the most powerful ways O to make your city’s voice heard happens at the League’s Legislative Action Day, April 24 in Sacramento.

Accessory Dwelling Units 7  Help Increase Housing Supply

By Melissa Kuehne

 ccessory dwelling units, also A known as granny flats, provide a lower-cost option than traditional market-rate construction to increase the housing supply in existing residential neighborhoods.

CALIFORNIA STATEWIDE

Housing Supply 10 

COMMUNITIES

By Jason Rhine

AUTHORITY

 he Legislature remains focused on T housing policy, with keen interest in local government land-use authority and new state involvement in helping to finance affordable housing and related infrastructure.

and Affordability: Challenges for 2019

DEVELOPMENT

13 California Cities Helen Putnam Award for Excellence

 Patterson’s HOST House Tackles Homelessness

 he city financed a transitional resiT dence for its homeless population.

14 California Cities Helen Putnam Award for Excellence

 Garden Grove Empowers Residents and Improves a Neighborhood

 ommunicating with residents was C key to developing solutions.

17 California Cities Helen Putnam Award for Excellence

 Rental Resources Program Addresses Housing Issues in Davis

 he program helps tenants, T landlords and neighbors.

Providing California’s local governments with an effective tool for the timely financing of community-based public benefit projects. Since 1988, more than 500 cities, counties and special districts use CSCDA as their conduit issuer and PACE funding provider.

Job Opportunities 19  Professional Services 27  Directory

Sponsored by: Cover photo: Buzbuzzer

(800) 531-7476 www.cscda.org


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President Jan Arbuckle Council Member Grass Valley

1400 K Street Sacramento, CA 95814 (916) 658-8200 Fax (916) 658-8240

First Vice President Randon Lane Mayor pro Tem Murrieta

Second Vice President John Dunbar Mayor Yountville

Immediate Past President Rich Garbarino Vice Mayor South San Francisco

Executive Director Carolyn Coleman

For a complete list of the League board of directors, visit www.cacities.org/board.

Magazine Staff Editor in Chief Jude Hudson Lemons, Hudson + Associates (916) 658-8234; email: editor@westerncity.com Managing Editor Norman Coppinger (916) 658-8277; email: ncoppinger@cacities.org Advertising Sales Manager Pam Maxwell-Blodgett (916) 658-8256; email: maxwellp@cacities.org Administrative Assistant Savannah Cobbs (916) 658-8223; email: scobbs@cacities.org

leaguevents MARCH 6–8

Planning Commissioners’ Academy, Long Beach Tailored to meet the needs of planning commissioners, planning directors, planning staff and other interested officials, the academy offers sessions on the major planning and land-use issues facing cities.

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Policy Committee Meetings, Costa Mesa The League’s policy committees review issues of interest to cities statewide and make recommendations to the League board of directors.

Contributors Dan Carrigg Corrie Manning Erica Manuel Jennifer Whiting Kayla Woods

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Legal Advocacy Committee Meeting, Costa Mesa The committee reviews and recommends friend-of-the-court efforts on cases of significant statewide interest to California cities.

Associate Editors Carol Malinowski Carolyn Walker Design Taber Creative Group

APRIL

Advertising Design ImagePoint Design

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For photo credits, see page 20. Western City (ISSN 0279-5337) is published monthly by the League of California Cities, 1400 K St., Sacramento, CA 95814. Subscriptions: $39.00/1 year; $63.00/2 years; student: $26.50; foreign: $52.00; single copies: $4.00, including sales tax. Entered as periodical mail January 30, 1930, at the Post Office, Los Angeles, CA 90013, under the Act of April 13, 1879. Periodical postage paid at Sacramento, Calif. Postmaster: Send address changes to Western City, 1400 K Street, Sacramento, CA 95814. Western City Trademark Reg. U.S. Pat. Off. ©2019 League of California Cities. All rights reserved. Material may not be reprinted without written permission. This issue is Volume XCV, No. 3.

Public Works Officers’ Institute & Expo, San Diego Designed for professionals at every career level, this conference covers current developments in public works.

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Legislative Action Day, Sacramento Get the latest updates on legislation affecting your city and meet with your legislators.

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Board of Directors’ Meeting, Sacramento The League board reviews, discusses and takes action on a variety of issues affecting cities, including legislation, legal advocacy, education and training and more.

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Supplied by Community Energy

FSC ® is an independent, not-for-profit organization that promotes environmentally appropriate, socially beneficial and economically viable forest management worldwide. Products with the FSC label are independently certified to ensure that they come from forests managed to meet the needs of present and future generations.

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City Attorneys’ Spring Conference, Monterey This meeting covers trends and issues affecting public law practitioners and provides an opportunity to connect with colleagues.

League of California Cities

Event and registration information is available at www.cacities.org/events. Join us on Facebook. www.facebook.com/westerncity www.facebook.com/LeagueofCaCities

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Executive Director’s Message by Carolyn Coleman

Responding to the Ongoing

Threat of Pre-Emption California city officials work tirelessly every day to serve their residents and to represent the values of their communities. They represent the level of government closest to the people — the one Americans view most favorably. Over the years, I’ve attended my fair share of council meetings or viewed them on local public access channels, and in the words from the musical Hamilton, “Winning is easy, governing is harder.” Because they reflect the diversity of perspectives in communities, the debates and public hearings can be contentious at times — but that’s how local democracy works, and it deserves deference.

An Alarming Trend In recent years, state legislatures nationwide have become more aggressive in wielding pre-emption to interfere with local democracy. Pre-emption is the use of state law to override a municipal ordinance or local authority. It can touch on many policy areas, including environmental regulations, immigration, employment and labor, public safety and land use; it can take the form of a statute, regulation or constitutional amendment. In some cases, court rulings can force cities to roll back ordinances already in place.

Pre-emption is also alive and well at the federal level. When I was director of federal advocacy for the National League of Cities in Washington, D.C., I worked to defeat federal efforts to pre-empt local authority in several areas including telecommunications, labor and local taxes. In California, several recent efforts have been made in the Legislature to pre-empt local authority; some have succeeded and other have failed as a result of the League and city officials’ strong advocacy. One such effort involved the Tax Fairness, Transparency and Accountability Act ballot measure sponsored by the California continued

www.westerncity.com

Western City, March 2019

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Responding to the Ongoing Threat of Pre-emption, continued

Business Roundtable. Originally slated to appear on the November 2018 ballot, this measure would have limited local ability to fund services by requiring all local taxes to be subject to a two-thirds vote and placing onerous conditions on the imposition of local fees. In response, the League helped form an opposition coalition of local government and union groups, and pressure generated by our opposition yielded results. Several days before the deadline to remove a measure from the ballot, the proponents offered a legislative deal to pull the mea-

sure in exchange for the passage of a budget trailer bill, AB 1838, which pre-empted the ability of cities and other local agencies to levy any new tax, fee or assessment on groceries and soda for 12 years. The legislation passed and is now law. In another example, in 2017, the telecommunications industry aggressively advocated for SB 649 (Hueso), a bill that would have made a major shift in state telecommunications policy by pre-empting local authority over the installation and siting

of “small cell” wireless equipment. The Legislature sent the bill to the governor’s desk for his signature, but in the face of unwavering opposition by the League and nearly 300 cities, Gov. Jerry Brown vetoed it. He said, “There is something of real value in having a process that results in extending this innovative technology rapidly and efficiently. Nevertheless, I believe that the interest which localities have in managing rights of way requires a more balanced solution than the one achieved in this bill.” Despite our successful efforts to defeat this pre-emption at the state level, regulations that have the intended effect of SB 649 have now been adopted at the federal level. We are challenging the constitutionality of these regulations.

The Legislature, Pre-Emption and Local Land-Use Authority

Local democracy works, and it deserves deference.

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In the area of land-use authority, despite public sentiment the Legislature has shown a growing appetite for preemption to solve the state’s housing affordability challenges. In a University of Southern California (USC)-Los Angeles Times poll conducted in October 2018 on the causes contributing to the state’s housing crisis, California voters rejected more state intervention in local land use; only 9 percent agreed that local zoning rules were a major cause of the state’s housing affordability crisis. Yet, last year’s SB 827 (Wiener) would have effectively usurped


local authority and rezoned all land within a half-mile radius of a “major transit stop” or a quarter-mile radius of a transit stop on a “high quality transit corridor.” This bill didn’t make it out of committee but an amended version has been introduced this year.

Constitutional Protection for Local Control Some pre-emption supporters argue that “local control” is not biblical. It may not be, but local democracy ensures that residents have an opportunity to participate in an open and transparent process with local decisionmakers about the issues that are central to quality of life in a community. It also ensures that cities will be able to tailor laws that are responsive to the specific needs and interests of the residents and businesses in their communities. The California Constitution contains strong protections for local control. Since 1970, when the voters approved a new and improved version of Article XI of the California Constitution, which addresses local government, California voters have adopted many constitutional amendments, chiefly related to the financial relationship of cities to the state and the process local governments must use to increase revenues. Key victories for local control occurred in 2004 and in 2010 when voters overwhelmingly

approved Propositions 1A and 22 respectively. These propositions prohibit the state from raiding funds allocated to local government, public safety and transportation. The strong protections for local control provided by the state Constitution reflect the practical reality that California is not a state in which one-size-fits-all solutions will meet the needs of all communities. Just as states serve as laboratories of democracy and innovation for our nation and regularly resist intrusion by the federal government, cities play the same role in our states.

The League Stands Ready Local democracy continues to be central to the League’s core mission, which is “to expand and protect local control for cities.” We will continue to seek opportunities to partner with the state and federal governments to find solutions that address the challenges in our communities, our state and our country. We will also be vigilant in preserving local control, and when faced with a fundamental threat to local democracy, the League will aggressively advocate against an unreasonable or unwarranted intrusion into local affairs. As a state that is known for celebrating its diversity, let’s embrace local democracy and the diversity of our communities. We are a stronger state for it. ■

Related Resources For more information about pre-emption and city governance, read these articles online at www.westerncity.com: • Courtroom Clashes Seek to Elevate City and Citizens’ Rights Over Telecom Company Profits; • Preparing for the Drone Age in Your City: Potential Benefits and Issues; • Celebrating Our Accomplishments — and Protecting Local Control; • Sober Living Businesses in Residential Zones; • The Origins of California City Powers; • Why Home Rule Is the Birthright of California’s Cities; • A Growing Risk: Oil Trains Raise Safety and Environmental Concerns; • Group Homes in the Neighborhood; and • Coping With the Paroled Sex Offender Next Door.

Pre-emption presents a challenge for cities at both the state and the federal levels.

Western City, March 2019

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New Administration, New Legislature: Amplify Your Voice by Amanda Cadelago

Engaging with state lawmakers throughout the budget and lawmaking processes is critically important for city officials, who provide a powerful network of voices to advocate for resources and preserve decisions at the local level. The new administration and a host of new faces in the California Legislature underscore the need for city officials to be actively involved with the League. New bills with the potential to greatly impact our local communities will be introduced, reviewed by policy and appropriation committees, make their way to each house and if passed, will await the governor’s veto or signature in October. The budget process, running on a parallel track, is equally important to local government. Gov. Gavin Newsom’s first budget proposal, released in January 2019, shows his intent to address major issues in California, some of which align with the League’s member-driven advocacy priorities, including housing and homelessness, emergency preparedness and response, pension sustainability and public safety. Conversely, the proposed budget could impede local city officials’ abilities to make decisions for their communities and could threaten local transportation infrastructure funding already approved by voters.

Take Action The League’s advocacy efforts work in concert with its members. Calls, letters, visits to legislators and testimony from city officials expressing their positions on bills are critical to ensure that we protect local funding and decisionmaking. League subject matter experts send action alerts, outlining ways members can communicate their support or opposition to legislators on bills that have far-reaching impacts on city government.

Attend Legislative Action Day on April 24 One of the most powerful ways to make your city’s voice heard happens at the League’s Legislative Action Day, April 24 in Sacramento. Before city officials meet with state lawmakers to talk about how state-level decisions affect local communities, League staff conducts briefings on the year’s most pressing legislative issues. Legislative Action Day offers the premier opportunity to unify and amplify the voice of California cities in great numbers. Pre-register for Legislative Action Day, a free event for League members, at www.cacities.org/events. Amanda Cadelago is marketing manager for the League and can be reached at acadelago@cacities.org.

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Get to Know the League’s Legislative Team 1. Dan Carrigg, legislative director and deputy executive director; Revenue and Taxation; dcarrigg@ cacities.org; (916) 658-8222 2. Jason Rhine, assistant legislative director; Housing, Community and Economic Development; jrhine@ cacities. org; (916) 658-8264 3. Rony Berdugo, legislative representative; Transportation, Communication & Public Works; rberdugo@ cacities.org; (916) 658-8283 4. Charles Harvey, legislative representative; Public Safety; charvey@ cacities.org; (916) 658-8252 5. Dane Hutchings, legislative representative; Governance, Transparency and Labor Relations; dhutchings@ cacities. org; (916) 658-8210 As Western City went to press, the position of legislative representative for community services and environmental quality was temporarily vacant. For an updated listing, visit www.cacities.org/ Top/About-Us/Staff-Directory.

Additional Ways to Get Involved A key way to become engaged in the state-level political process is by appointing a legislative liaison within your city. For more information, contact your regional public affairs manager online at www.cacities.org/regionalmanagers. Find League priority bills, legislative contacts and additional information at www.cacities.org/legresources. The League’s online bill tracking tool is available at www.cacities.org/billsearch. To receive the League’s electronic newsletter, CA Cities Advocate, and stay current on important legislation, sign up at www.cacities. org/cacitiesadvocate.

2019 Legislative Season Key Dates April 24 — The League’s Legislative Action Day in Sacramento Mid-May — Governor releases his revised budget (the “May Revise”) May 31 — House of origin deadline for bills to cross houses June 15 — Budget bill must go to the governor July 12 through Aug. 11 — Summer recess Oct. 13 — Governor’s deadline to sign or veto bills To view the complete legislative calendar, visit www.assembly. ca.gov/legislativedeadlines. ■ www.cacities.org


Accessory Dwelling Units Help Increase Housing Supply by Melissa Kuehne

As California’s affordable housing crisis affects communities statewide, policymakers are examining alternative ways to increase the supply and affordability of housing. Accessory dwelling units (ADUs), also known as granny flats, have recently received a great deal of attention because they provide a lower-cost option than traditional market-rate construction to increase the housing supply in existing residential neighborhoods. ADUs are a secondary housing unit with completely independent living facilities, including a kitchen, bathroom and bedroom. These units can be attached to or detached from the primary residence.

The Appeal of ADUs The U.S. Census Bureau determined that in 2017, California had a rental housing vacancy rate of just 4.3 percent, with only five other states reporting lower vacancy rates. California cities are looking for ways to bring new housing units online

quickly and affordably, and in some cases, ADUs fit that bill. Compared with new single-family homes and large multifamily housing projects, ADUs are affordable to build because their construction does not require paying for land or building structured parking or elevators. In addition, ADUs are typically built as one- or twostory wood frame dwellings that do not require major new infrastructure upgrades, thus reducing overall construction costs. ADUs also offer benefits to residents, such as supplemental income from unit rent and the ability to house members of the extended family.

passing an ordinance that precludes ADUs. In January 2018, two additional bills — SB 229 (Wieckowski), Chapter 594, Statutes of 2017 and AB 494 (Bloom), Chapter 602, Statutes of 2017 — that impact the development of ADUs took effect. These two bills include provisions for:

Three bills that made changes to ADU laws — including parking requirements and fees — took effect in January 2017: SB 1069 (Wieckowski), Chapter 720, Statutes of 2016; AB 2299 (Bloom), Chapter 735, Statutes of 2016 and AB 2406 (Thurmond), Chapter 755, Statutes of 2016. Most importantly, these bills prohibit local governments from

• Modifying fees from utilities, such as special districts and water corporations; and

• Allowing ADUs to be built concurrently with a single-family home; • Expanding areas where ADUs can be built to include all zoning districts that allow single-family and multi-family uses;

• Reducing parking requirements. Although state law does not allow cities to preclude ADU construction, it also does not require cities to adopt an continued

Melissa Kuehne is communications and development manager for the Institute for Local Government and can be reached at mkuehne@ca-ilg.org.

www.westerncity.com

Western City, March 2019

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Accessory Dwelling Units Help Increase Housing Supply, continued

ordinance specific to ADUs. Local governments have control over a number of components that include: • Owner occupancy requirements; • The number of ADUs allowed per lot; • Minimum and maximum unit sizes; and • Development standards — however, ADUs must be allowed in all singlefamily and multi-family residential zones. Cities may also choose to encourage ADU development by reducing fees, making parking less restrictive and amending General Plan policies. If a city chooses not to adopt an ADU ordinance, an ADU built in that jurisdiction would be required to comply with the state standards. The state Department of Housing

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and Community Development (HCD) offers a number of resources to help cities navigate this process. For links to these resources, read the online version of this article at www.westerncity.com.

Santa Cruz Fine-Tunes Its ADU Approach: Lessons Learned The City of Santa Cruz has been experimenting with ADUs since the early 2000s. Santa Cruz currently has approximately 475 ADUs, with about 50 more units coming online each year. In addition, roughly 400 units are going through the process of legalization, which includes submitting plans for approval, paying fees and undergoing city inspections. Senior City Planner Sarah Neuse shared the following lessons learned from Santa Cruz’s experience.

Pre-approved prototype plans don’t always work as planned. The city engaged seven architects to create a range of ADU prototypes, which the city’s Planning Department then pre-approved. The city intended that these prototypes would save the homeowner money and speed up the permit process. However, the city has encountered two challenges with these prototypes. First, the state building codes change every two years, creating the potential need to update the pre-approved plans. Second, many homeowners wanted to modify the prototypes to better fit their property or tastes. This required the plans to go through the full approval process and defeated the original reason for supplying pre-approved prototype plans. continued on page 22

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Housing Supply and Affordability:

Challenges for 2019 by Jason Rhine

E

ven though California housing laws have changed significantly over the past two years, housing supply and affordability remain critical issues in many regions of California, particularly in coastal areas where job growth has outpaced the production of new housing. Homeownership rates have recently increased to 55 percent, but they remain at a level not seen since the 1950s. Renters also face significant challenges, where a majority — over 3 million households — pay more than 30 percent of their income toward rent and nearly one-third — over 1.5 million households — spend more than 50 percent of their income on rent. These stark figures make it abundantly clear that the Legislature and Gov. Gavin Newsom will likely seek additional solutions to the housing crisis.

Changes to Housing Law: An Overview To understand the current situation, it’s helpful to review the changes made to California housing law during the 2017–18 legislative session related to local government land-use policies, decisionmaking processes and available funding for affordable housing. Most importantly, cities now have access to much-needed new funding. SB 2 (Atkins, Chapter 364, Statutes of 2017), the Building Homes and Jobs Act, generated over $200 million in 2018 for affordable housing, supportive housing, emergency shelters, transitional housing

and other housing needs via a $75 recording fee on certain real estate documents. And in November 2018, voters approved Proposition 1, the $4 billion Veterans and Affordable Housing Bond Act that allocates funding to affordable housing programs and the veterans homeownership program (CalVet). Prop.1 funds should be available to cities and counties in 2019. The Legislature and former Gov. Jerry Brown made numerous changes to local government land-use policies and decisionmaking processes: • SB 35 (Wiener, Chapter 366, Statutes of 2017) streamlines the housing approval process and requires nearly every city to ministerially approve — without any new project-level analysis or California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) review — multifamily housing developments that are consistent with existing locally adopted plans and zoning ordinances; • SB 167 (Skinner, Chapter 368, Statutes of 2017) and AB 678 (Bocanegra, Chapter 373, Statutes of 2017) require housing project denials to be supported by findings that are based on “a preponderance of evidence” rather than “substantial evidence” and impose mandatory fines of $10,000 on cities that fail to comply with a judge’s order within 60 days. These laws also provide for enhanced fines (multiplied by a factor of five) if a city acts in bad faith;

Jason Rhine is a legislative representative for the League and can be reached at jrhine@cacities.org.

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• AB 72 (Santiago, Chapter 370, Statutes of 2017) provides the state Department of Housing and Community Development (HCD) new broad authority to review any action by a city or county that HCD determines is inconsistent with an adopted housing element. It allows HCD to review and refer to the attorney general alleged violations of state law, including the Housing Accountability Act and the No Net Loss, Density Bonus and antihousing discrimination statutes; and

How will Gov. Newsom reach his goal of 3.5 million new housing units by 2025 if the building industry is projecting significantly lower production?


• AB 1771 (Bloom, Chapter 989, Statutes of 2018) and SB 828 (Wiener, Chapter 974, Statutes of 2018) make numerous changes to the regional housing needs allocation (RHNA) process, including the plan objectives, methodology, distribution and appeals process.

112,000 units per year were constructed between 2016 and 2018. Gov. Newsom believes that housing is a fundamental human need and bold action should be taken to move the needle on production. He has proposed addressing this issue on multiple fronts by:

Outlook for 2019

• Generating more funding for affordable housing;

It’s likely 2019 will be a very active year in many policy areas, including single-payer health care, early childhood education, workforce development and homelessness. However, interest is growing related to housing and local government land-use authority. Gov. Newsom has made tackling housing affordability and the lack of housing production a top priority; he has stated on numerous occasions that as governor, he will oversee the production of 3.5 million new housing units by 2025. Developers would need to construct roughly 500,000 units per year to achieve this production goal. To put this into perspective, housing construction has averaged around 80,000 units per year over the past decade. However, production has increased. An average of

• Implementing regulatory reform; and • Creating new financial incentives for local jurisdictions that produce housing, while penalizing those that fall short of state goals. In addition to the governor’s very ambitious housing production goal, the Legislature remains focused on housing policy, with keen interest in local government land-use authority and new state involvement in helping to finance affordable housing and related infrastructure. Sen. Wiener (D-San Francisco) has introduced a revamped version of SB 827 (2018), which would require upzoning around existing rail stations and ferry terminals and greater housing density along

bus corridors with frequent service and in communities with close proximity to jobs and high quality schools. Sen. Beall (D-San José) and Sen. McGuire (D-Healdsburg) have teamed up to introduce legislation to re-engage the state in local efforts to finance affordable housing and infrastructure. Their measure would authorize the state to partner with local governments and allocate up to $2 billion annually for affordable housing projects and infrastructure that meet state and local government policy objectives. In addition, Assembly Member Chiu (D-San Francisco) has introduced legislation to expand the low-income tax credit program by $500 million annually. It is clear that both carrots and sticks are on the menu for the 2019–20 session, and cities will need to engage strongly in the legislative process. Whether the Legislature will address new trends in the housing market or continue to focus mainly on local government land-use authority remains to be seen. continued

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Housing Supply and Affordability: Challenges for 2019, continued

A 2018 Guide to

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New Housing Law

in California

In recent months, the Legislative Analyst’s Office (LAO) has warned that housing price growth has fallen by 1.5 percent and is projected to decrease to 5 percent by December 2020. Though this may sound good for some homebuyers, the trend could have significant impacts on the housing market. The LAO has attributed the slowing of home price growth to a modestly increased housing supply, tighter mortgage lending standards and higher interest rates. If home prices continue to fall and fewer people can obtain mortgages, it is reasonable to conclude that homebuilders will likely build fewer units rather than flood the market with more homes and drive prices even lower. New Development in California 2018: Principal Projects Across the State, a report released in December 2017

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by the California Economic Forecast and the California Homebuilding Foundation, acknowledges that residential homebuilders are currently building or awaiting building permits on over 450,000 new homes and it will likely take five years to complete construction. How will Gov. Newsom reach his goal of 3.5 million new housing units by 2025 if the building industry is projecting significantly lower production?

Finding Solutions Regardless of the causes of the housing supply and affordability crisis, Gov. Newsom, lawmakers, local elected officials, homebuilders and other stakeholders must partner to find real solutions that meaningfully increase the number of available housing units at all income levels — and reduce the amount of money that hardworking Californians spend on housing. ■

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The League offers a publication titled A 2018 Guide to New Housing Law in California to help city officials understand the recent changes to the state’s housing laws and actions that can be taken to respond to these changes. For a link to the publication and additional housing-related resources, visit www.cacities.org/housing.

www.cacities.org


The city collaborated with a nonprofit to offer shelter, education and services.

Patterson’s HOST

House Tackles Homelessness

The City of Patterson (pop. 22,679) lies at the heart of the Central Valley. Known as the Apricot Capital of the World, the city also hopes to become known for taking strides toward ending the homelessness crisis in its community. Since 2012, the city has supported Helping Others Sleep Tonight (HOST) House, a nonprofit organization dedicated to addressing the homelessness epidemic in the City of Patterson and other Stanislaus County cities by offering rest, food and opportunities to those experiencing homelessness and to working, low-income residents. Putting the Problem in Context In 2018, a New York Times article highlighted that more than one-quarter of the nation’s total homeless population lives in California. The majority of these individuals are “unsheltered” — living on the streets, under freeways and in fields and parks in cities throughout the state. The homelessness crisis affects cities of all sizes in California. According to a 2017 count, California has nearly 135,000 homeless people. The City of Patterson, located in Stanislaus County, had over 60 homeless people — a population composed of 62 percent men, 15 percent women and 23 percent children under the age of 15. And as in most cities, this number is growing due to the scarcity of affordable housing. For smaller cities like Patterson, the problem is not so much a lack of awareness, but a lack of resources.

Looking for Local Solutions HOST was established in 2009 as a faithbased organization, supported by members of 18 churches in the Patterson area. “The citizens of Patterson have a long history of helping those who are homeless, but as the problem grew, they realized they needed the local government to help resolve this issue,” says Patterson City Council Member Dennis McCord.

In 2012, HOST approached the city for assistance. Patterson provided HOST with a low-interest loan to purchase a house that could be used as a transitional residence for the city’s homeless population. HOST House opened in 2013; however, due to funding limitations the facility was open only during the cold and often deadly winter months. As a result, in 2016, the Patterson City Council again provided funding to help HOST House stay open for more months during the year. Council Member McCord says, “As HOST and the City of Patterson have worked together, the relationship has continued to grow and benefit the homeless population of Patterson.” In another example of this reciprocal relationship, the council provided additional funds to construct a large shade structure used to host food-sharing events for individuals and families experiencing homelessness. These events are designed to attract the homeless population to HOST House and help connect them with needed support services.

Adding an Educational Component In 2017, Patterson and HOST collaborated to provide educational classes at HOST House. HOST and the city

teamed with Cambridge Academies Enterprise Centers, a nonprofit focused on creating a positive difference in the lives of individuals who desire a better future, to develop the Enterprise Restart Program. The goal is to help each participant transform their life and develop the personal mindset, skills, competencies and work habits that result in healthy personal and financial self-sufficiency. “Enterprise Restart is the heart of our homeless students’ transformation,” says Laura Elkinton, director of programs at Cambridge Academies. “We have seen amazing results after six months — 80 percent are now employed or attending college full time. The program teaches them how to think and live in a different way. Many of our students have lived on the streets for most of their lives and haven’t acquired the skills to do anything else. Enterprise Restart gives them hope and transforms them into successful individuals.” The year-long program is broken into two phases. Phase 1 consists of the transformative curriculum developed by Cambridge Academies and work experience, and Phase 2 provides work support and training for independent living. Participants attend both phases of the program three times a week for five hours each day. By extending HOST House’s services to education, the city is not only taking homeless individuals off the street and giving them a clean bed and warm food, but also providing them with the means to support themselves and escape homelessness. continued on page 25

The City of Patterson won the Award of Excellence in the Housing Programs and Innovations category of the 2018 Helen Putnam Award for Excellence program. For more about the award program, visit www.helenputnam.org. www.westerncity.com

Western City, March 2019

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Garden Grove

Empowers Residents Improves a Neighborh Garden Grove (pop. 176,896) is the fifthlargest city in Orange County and home to the Palma Vista neighborhood. In 2016, Palma Vista became the focus of a multi-year community engagement project aimed at revitalizing the area through a partnership with residents, businesses, service organizations, volunteers and other key stakeholders. To lead the effort, the City of Garden Grove formed the Neighborhood Improvement Committee (NIC). Chaired by Police Chief Todd Elgin, the committee comprised representatives from departments throughout the city. NIC focused on ways to engage, empower and revitalize the community as part of the broader effort.

A Neighborhood in Transition Palma Vista is a multifamily community made up of 26 eight-plex apartment buildings and is home to about 600 residents. Over time, residents had become

accustomed to increasingly run-down conditions, with unkempt buildings and unsightly surroundings — and numerous building and code violations. Crime and gang activity were rising, and high tenant turnover compounded the overall situation. “Clearly, Palma Vista was in transition,” says Garden Grove Neighborhood Improvement Manager Allison Wilson. “But the neighborhood had definite potential to change things for the better.” NIC launched its community engagement effort with a kickoff event in late 2016 to connect with residents, followed by a series of smaller meetings to solicit input and a series of neighborhood activities designed in response to those discussions.

Connecting With Palma Vista Residents First, a family-friendly resource fair featuring a food pantry — held exclusively for residents of Palma Vista and the

adjacent El Dorado mobile home park — introduced residents to city staff and NIC. The fair also connected residents with several social service agencies, including the Migrant Education Program and Community Health Initiative of Orange County. The Fair Housing Foundation (FHF) also hosted a booth at the resource fair. FHF is a nonprofit corporation dedicated to eliminating discrimination in housing and promoting equal access to housing choices for all. The resource fair leveraged the city’s continuing partnership with Second Harvest Food Bank of Orange County, which provided 5,000 pounds of fresh produce and dry goods to residents attending the kickoff event. The food bank continued to supply food for NIC events throughout the year and distributed a total of 30,000 pounds of food at six events from November 2016 through 2017.

The City of Garden Grove won the Award for Excellence in the Enhancing Public Trust, Ethics and Community Involvement category of the 2018 Helen Putnam Award for Excellence program. For more about the award program, visit www.helenputnam.org.

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Residents paint murals, plant trees and haul away trash to help beautify Palma Vista.

and ood At the fair and subsequent events, volunteers asked residents as they stood in line for food what they considered to be the community’s biggest challenges and greatest needs. The volunteers, who spoke a variety of languages including Spanish and Vietnamese, filled out surveys noting the responses. Residents identified graffiti, gang activity and illicit drugs as the neighborhood’s top challenges and afterschool programs as its greatest need. Subsequently, NIC conducted two series of monthly meetings — one with apartment owners and on-site property managers and one with tenants. The meetings focused on gaining voluntary compliance in correcting existing code and building violations and engaging the community in discussing opportunities for revitalization and improving the quality of life in the neighborhood. The Fair Housing Foundation shared best practices in managing multifamily residential properties with the property owners and managers.

Addressing Crime: Fostering a Proactive Approach In response to NIC’s survey findings, the Garden Grove Police Department launched community outreach efforts that included regular Neighborhood Watch meetings. Residents responded by keeping police officers informed about problems and potentially troublesome issues. As residents began to perceive officers as community partners, calls for service became more proactive. “Changing residents’ perceptions about city government and law enforcement was one of the biggest successes that came out of the NIC efforts,” says Police Chief Elgin. “We’re all in this together, so gaining mutual trust was essential.”

Developing an AfterSchool Program In response to Palma Vista residents’ need for after-school programs, NIC initiated discussions with a local Garden Grove

nonprofit, the Orange County Asian and Pacific Islander Community Alliance, to facilitate an after-school homework club for predominantly higher-risk youth. Finding a permanent facility to house the program proved challenging, and the effort to identify a suitable location is ongoing.

Volunteers and NIC Step Up In 2017, NIC organized a community cleanup day. Scores of volunteers, including local elected officials and Palma Vista residents, pitched in to beautify the neighborhood. They planted donated trees and filled dumpsters with bulky items disposed from within and around the apartments. And a local tattoo artist and children from the neighborhood painted a colorful mural on Palma Vista’s most heavily vandalized wall. Garden Grove Mayor Steve Jones, who participated in the cleanup, noted that the mural would serve as an enduring symbol of pride for residents. continued on page 27

www.westerncity.com

Western City, March 2019

15


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Rental Resources Program

Addresses Housing Issues in Davis The City of Davis (pop. 68,704) is home to a University of California campus. The city’s housing stock totals over 27,000 dwelling units, and 60 percent are rentals. This rental housing market is greatly impacted by a low vacancy rate, which was 0.4 percent in 2017. Due to the low vacancy rate and absentee landlords, concerns about rental practices and conditions have increased. The city had been fielding ongoing complaints about tenant-landlord disputes as well as neighbor-landlord disputes, with no existing city mechanism to deal directly with the majority of these issues — unlike building code violations that have a longestablished city regulatory framework. The city identified a number of concerns related to renters, landlords and rental units: • Issues around renter and landlord rights and responsibilities, security deposits, property conditions, visual blight, code and noise violations and the reporting of problems were addressed in a piecemeal fashion and typically involved multiple parties, agencies and sources of information and resources. • Due to budget reductions over the years, the city’s mediation services had been eliminated and the UC Davis Student Housing Services Program was significantly reduced.

• Single-family dwelling units generated the majority of complaints. Many units were purchased for a family member attending UC Davis; those students have since graduated, and now the property owner rents the unit despite a lack of experience in property management. • Due to the extremely low vacancy rate in Davis, renters are not comfortable reporting problems because they fear losing their housing. Some feel intimidated and uninformed about their rights. Over 39,000 students with an average age of 21 are enrolled at UC Davis. These students live both on and off campus. Most are living on their own for the first time. Davis Mayor Brett Lee and City Council Member Lucas Frerichs convened a local stakeholders’ group that included single-family and multi-family apartment managers, Rental Housing Association of Sacramento Valley (now the California Apartment Association), Legal Services of Northern California, Associated Students of UC Davis and neighborhood representatives to discuss concerns and potential solutions. The group met for over a year and developed a draft ordinance that struck a balance between the needs and concerns of renters, property owners and managers and neighbors.

In March 2017, the Davis City Council adopted the Rental Registration, Education, and Inspection Program (Article 18.11 of the Davis Municipal Code). Soon after, the city launched the Rental Resources program to ensure that rental housing is maintained, meets minimum building, housing, fire and nuisance standards and is safe to occupy. With this program, the city intends to abate ongoing nuisances and comply with state and local laws governing rental properties. “Many other cities and college towns have some type of rental regulations in place,” says Council Member Frerichs. “The programs vary from simple property registration to annual inspections of every rental unit in a city. The City of Davis program focuses on education and registration and includes an inspection component.” The Rental Resources program established a one-stop shop to address education, rental property registration requirements and inspections. “The program is intended to preserve and enhance the quality of life for residents living in rental housing, as well as the neighborhoods in which they reside,” says Davis Mayor Brett Lee. continued

The City of Davis won the League Partners Award for Excellence in City-Business Relations in the 2018 Helen Putnam Award for Excellence program. For more about the award program, visit www.helenputnam.org.

To learn about making the transition from dorm life to off-campus living, UC Davis students attend an event held in their dorm lobby, where the Rental Resources program hosted an informational table.

Western City, March 2019

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Rental Resources Program Addresses Housing Issues in Davis, continued

Website Educates Tenants, Landlords and Neighbors The city established a website to provide a Rental Resources program educational portal for tenants, landlords and neighbors. The website offers resources for: UC Davis Aggies mascot Gunrock hands out Rental Resources refrigerator magnets at a Housing Day event for students.

• Tenants — with information on security deposits, rights and responsibilities, fair housing services and food pantry resources; • Property owners — with program requirements, sample forms, information related to building and housing codes that assist in complying with state laws and links to training opportunities, such as a Security Deposit Workshop; and • Neighbors — including information on noise and visual blight reporting and the city’s neighborhood partnership program. The website also provides information for the entire community on mediation and legal service resources and forms for move-in/move-out inspections and renter’s rights and responsibilities.

Rental Property Registration Requirements

inspected by the city as part of the program to ensure they are safe and habitable.

All rental units must be registered with the city and have a local contact within 50 miles of Davis for emergencies.

Inspections may occur on a periodic basis with random audits if a complaint is received or at the direction of city staff.

Before a tenancy begins, the owner must provide tenants with information regarding tenant rights and responsibilities and conduct an inspection of the property using a form provided or approved by the city.

The city conducts a random compliance audit for each property to determine if all required documents and fees have been completed and properly submitted or retained, including the registration form, the completed and signed movein inspection form and registration and inspection fees. In addition, the city may verify that the property has no record of outstanding code violations. If the city determines that an owner is not in compliance with any of these items as a result of a random compliance audit, the rental unit will be inspected.

Rental Property Inspection Program Components In addition to registering with the City of Davis, single-family units must be

Moving Forward The program is completing its first year of implementation. City staff are working with the local rental housing association, Yolo County Housing, and Legal Services of Northern California on ways to assist each other in these efforts. The Rental Resources staff participates in many UC Davis housing events and workshops and provides information on the program to students. For more information, visit www.cityofdavis.org/rentalresources. Contact: Stacey Winton, media and communications officer, City Manager’s Office, City of Davis; phone: (530) 757-5661; email: swinton@cityofdavis.org. ■

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www.cacities.org


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Western City magazine’s job opportunity section is the source for job seekers looking for positions in local government. When you place a job opportunity ad in Western City

Call Pam Maxwell-Blodgett at (800) 262-1801 to place a display (boxed) ad or for rate and deadline information, or email admanager@westerncity.com. Website Job Postings Display ads are posted on our website at no additional charge. But if you miss the deadline for getting your job opportunity ad into the magazine, you can post it on the Western City website right away. To post your job opportunity ad on our automated website, visit www.westerncity.com or contact Savannah Cobbs, Western City administrative assistant; email: scobbs@ cacities.org; phone: (916) 658-8223.

magazine, it will be posted at no additional

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Administrative and Office Assistants

Fire Chief

City of Santa Clara Opening soon!

Assistant City Manager City of Napa

Call Us Today: 1-866-406-MUNI (6864) www.munitemps.com

Assistant Director - Planning & Community Environment City of Palo Alto, CA

R

ecognized as the global leader in cutting-edge technology, medicine and green innovation, Palo Alto (pop. 70,000) is the birthplace of the Silicon Valley. The city’s creative economy causes the population to double during the daytime as the community is home to Stanford University as well as approximately 100,000 jobs. Supported by more than 30 team members, the Planning & Community Environment Department currently encompasses Long Range Planning, Current Planning, Historic Preservation, and Code Enforcement. In the coming months, the City’s Development Services functions will be restructured into a new division within the Department.

Closes 3/10/19

The Assistant Director will be charged with overseeing Current and Long Range Planning. A professional who excels in a dynamic and demanding environment, the ideal candidate will be a superior people manager with exceptional interpersonal skills and extensive urban planning expertise. Eight years of relevant experience that includes at least five years of management experience and a bachelor’s degree is required. Master’s degree and/or AICP certification preferred.

LA Headquarters 424.296.3111

The salary range goes up to $207,272; salary is supplemented by a competitive benefits package. This recruitment will close on Sunday, March 24, 2019. Visit www.tbcrecruiting.com for detailed recruitment brochure and to apply online. Teri Black • 424.296.3111 Bradley Wardle • 650.450.3299

www.westerncity.com

Western City, March 2019

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CITY OF TULARE The City of Tulare is an exceptional community with a population of 63,515, situated in the Central San Joaquin Valley along Highway 99, just 47 miles south of Fresno and 64 miles north of Bakersfield. Our mid-state location benefits businesses needing same-day access to key California markets as well as residents seeking recreational opportunities in the beautiful Sierra Nevada Mountains to the east and the spectacular California coastline to the west.

DO YOU WANT TO COUNT? Finance Director/ City Treasurer $146,612 - $196,475

Development Services Director $139,547 - $187,006 Your contributions will count at the City of Pomona. There are many opportunities for an innovative, resourceful, and collaborative leader to make a positive impact on our diverse and engaged community. You will be part of a dynamic team dedicated to improving the economic vitality of Pomona while valuing its history. Learn more about these positions at: www.governmentjobs. com/careers/Pomona Phone: 909-620-2291

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League of California Cities

Tulare is seeking a City Manager that will assist the City Council in addressing issues relating to mutually agreed upon policies and projects relating to well managed growth, infrastructure CITY improvements, economic development, budget MANAGER and financing strategies. It is expected that William Avery & Associates Management Consultants the City Manager will proactively assess the organization and, using a fresh perspective, identify creative opportunities 31/2 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Suite A for budgetary and operational efficiencies. Los Gatos, CA 95030 408.399.4424 The new City Manager must be experienced in municipal finance and Fax: 408.399.4423 maintaining a sustainable financial structure. Prior experience as a City email: jobs@averyassoc.net Manager, Assistant/Deputy City Manager, or as an Executive Director of www.averyassoc.net a complex public sector organization is preferred. A Bachelor’s degree in a related field is essential and an MS/MA/MPA/MBA is highly desirable. To be considered, please visit the Avery Associates Career Portal at www.averyassoc.net/current-searches/ to upload your letter of interest, resume and contact information including email addresses for five work-related references to Bill Avery by March 29, 2019.

Water Director

City of Santa Rosa, CA

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anta Rosa (pop 175,000) located 55 miles north of San Francisco and 30 miles west of the Pacific Ocean, is the County seat for Sonoma County, encompassing 41.5 square miles in the heart of Sonoma’s wine country. The City is made up of 13 Departments and approximately 1,300 staff. With a staff of 252.5 FTE and an annual budget of $144 million, the Water Department provides water service to over 53,000 customer accounts and a regional reuse system to a population of 230,000. The ideal candidate will be an experienced manager with an understanding of municipal water operations and innovative water conservation and sustainability practices. He/she will be a team player and a strategic thinker with six to eight years of management experience in a public water agency. A Bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university with major course work in administration, engineering or related field is required. A Master’s Degree is highly desirable. The salary range for this position goes up to $202,126 annually. Salary is supplemented by a competitive benefits package. Closing date: Sunday, March 17, 2019. Visit www.tbcrecruiting.com for detailed brochure and to apply online. Suzanne Mason • 562.631.2500 Teri Black • 424.296.3111

Photo/Art Credits Cover: Buzbuzzer Page 3: Flag, Thomas Shanahan; woman, CentrallTAlliance Page 4: PeopleImages Pages 4–5: Drnadig Page 6: Top, Espiegle; staff, courtesy of the League of California Cities Page 7: Bortonia Page 10: Top, RoschetzkylstockPhoto Pages 10–11: Davidf Pages 10, 11, 12: Tile, 31moonlight31

Page 13: Polaroid template, Rouzes; other images courtesy of the City of Patterson and the League of California Cities Pages 13, 25: Wood texture, ivo_13 Pages 14–15, 27: Courtesy of the City of Garden Grove and the League of California Cities Page 17: Courtesy of the City of Davis and the League of California Cities Page 22: Dane_mark Page 24: Enisaksoy

www.cacities.org


Current & Upcoming Opportunities County of Sacramento, CA – County Counsel

The County of Sacramento (approximate population 1.5 million) is seeking a new County Counsel. The position offers the unique opportunity to join an extremely well-managed organization that is known for its innovation, creativity, and stability. The County Counsel oversees an office which has a current full and part-time staff of 78 employees. It is anticipated that the new County Counsel will be a highly competent attorney with extensive local government law experience. Typical candidates include county counsels, assistant county counsels, city attorneys, and other public and private attorneys who have the necessary expertise and personal characteristics desired by the Board. Candidates must possess a Juris Doctorate degree from an accredited school of law. Extensive experience practicing law, knowledge of local government law, and the ability to manage a large office is required, as well as an active membership in the State Bar of California. The approximate annual salary range for the County Counsel is $235,906-$260,097 which includes a 3.35% management incentive; placement within this range is dependent upon qualifications. Additionally, the following salary increases have been approved by the Board of Supervisors: Cost of Living Adjustments (COLA) 2%-4%, depending on the Consumer Price Index (CPI) for both FY19/20 and FY20/21; 1% salary adjustment FY19/20; and 2.5% salary adjustment effective FY20/21. Contact: Joel Bryden – Filing deadline: April 5, 2019

Portland Community Reinvestment Initiatives, OR – Executive Director

Portland Community Reinvestment Initiatives, Inc. (PCRI) is a non-profit agency formed by neighborhood and government leaders in 1993 with a mission to preserve, expand and manage affordable housing in the City of Portland and provide access to and advocacy for the services to their residents. PCRI serves low-income communities and communities of color, providing culturally specific services focused on working with families and individuals displaced from African-American communities in North and Northeast Portland. PCRI will benefit from an Executive Director with a strong financial background and understanding of funding and grants. The minimum requirements for this position are possession of a Bachelor’s degree, and a minimum of ten (10) years senior management experience with increasing levels of responsibility and management of staff within a nonprofit or government agency involved or related to Property Management and Housing Development; advanced degree is preferred. Familiarity with the Portland area and a Property Management License for the State of Oregon will also be desirable. The annual salary range for the Executive Director is open, DOQ. Contact: Ms. Valerie Phillips – Filing deadline: March 31, 2019

Southern California Public Power Authority, CA Chief Financial and Administrative Officer

City of National City, CA City Manager

• City of Fairfield, CA – Community Development Director • City of Hayward, CA – Deputy Director of Finance If you are interested in these outstanding opportunities, visit our website to apply online.

www.bobmurrayassoc.com


Accessory Dwelling Units Help Increase Housing Supply, continued from page 8

The city is considering options to update the prototypes and/or develop a list of pre-approved architects who successfully navigated the ADU permitting process.

waivers to be a gift of public funds, which triggers prevailing wage requirements. Since this decision went into effect, fewer homeowners have taken advantage of the waiver. The city is now exploring other ways to reduce fees and other associated costs — including parking, sidewalks

The fee waiver was effective. However, the city attorney recently deemed the fee

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Director of Transportation City of Pasadena

Chief Transportation Officer City of Palo Alto

Chief Technology Officer City of Fremont

Teri Black • 424.296.3111 Bob McFall • 818.429.4699 Suzanne Mason • 562.631.2500

and utility connection requirements — to help facilitate construction while maintaining the attributes that allow for increased density and walkability. Education is an important component of the process. Because Santa Cruz requires owner occupancy of ADUs, the vast majority of ADUs are built by novices. This underscores the need for guidance documents to explain the process and requirements and knowledgeable staff to answer questions and help guide residents through the process. In early 2019, the Santa Cruz City Council approved some changes to its ADU ordinance, which include: • Modifying the definition of owneroccupant to include immediate family. This amendment allows an ADU’s continued operation as long as a member of the homeowner’s immediate family (limited to spouses, siblings, parents and adult children) is living on the property either in the main house or the ADU; and • Removing the minimum parcel size. ADUs can now be added to any size lot. The city council will continue to consider additional proposals to update the ordinance, including:

DEPUTY PUBLIC WORKS DIRECTOR City of Merced, California The Deputy Public Works Director will assist the Public Works Director in managing the day-to-day operations of the essential functions of the Public Works Department, including refuse, water, wastewater, and storm drain services; maintenance of streets and traffic signals, fleet and facilities maintenance; and maintenance of City parks and trees. Possession of a current California registration as a Professional Civil, Electrical, Mechanical, or Traffic Engineer is required. Visit www.cityofmerced.org/PWDeputyDirector to view the job flyer or www.cityofmerced.org and click on “City Jobs” to read the full job description and to apply. SALARY: $105,476 - $128,211 (annually), CalPERS retirement benefit FINAL FILING DATE: Continuous

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• Allowing two ADUs on large lots (over 10,000 square feet). The maximum unit size threshold would still apply — the combined size of the ADUs (up to 1,200 square feet) cannot exceed 10 percent of the lot size; and • Eliminating the parking requirement for the first ADU on a parcel. This would eliminate the off-street parking requirement for the first ADU building on a parcel regardless of the parcel’s location or how it is constructed. Parking requirements for the primary residence and additional ADUs remain in place. For the full proposal text, read the online version of this article at www. westerncity.com. In addition to updating its ADU ordinance, the City of Santa Cruz is also updating the “how to” manuals to reflect any updates to the ordinance, provide a more user-friendly online interface and distill the dense building codes and permitting processes into easy-to-understand language. “ADUs have been successful in Santa Cruz because they fit in with the city’s land-use pattern and how our community sees itself,” says Neuse. “We also held a number of community outreach events — one specifically on ADUs — to help the community understand the process and why we are pursuing ADU development.” continued

Involved residents who have helped to shape a proposed policy, project or program will better understand the reasons for decisions that are made.

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CITY OF SAN BERNARDINO The City of San Bernardino is located approximately 60 miles east of Los Angeles, 120 miles northeast of metropolitan San Diego, and 55 miles northwest of Palm Springs. The City has a variety of recreational opportunities, entertainment attractions and top performing schools. San Bernardino has a bright future, with new exciting projects, special events and new ways of doing business just over the horizon. San Bernardino is, now more than ever, a city of opportunity. The Finance Director will oversee the activities and operations of the City’s Finance Department. As a key member of the City’s executive management team, the new FINANCE Finance Director will bring exceptional proactive management and DIRECTOR leadership, excellent communication skills to the organization. He/she is expected to bring a fresh new perspective and a new “set of eyes” in optimizing departmental operations.

William Avery & Associates Management Consultants 31/2 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Suite A Los Gatos, CA 95030

The position requires at least 10 years of progressively responsible 408.399.4424 experience in governmental financial planning and administration, Fax: 408.399.4423 including five years of managerial and supervisory responsibility, email: jobs@averyassoc.net coupled with a Bachelor’s degree with major coursework in finance, www.averyassoc.net accounting, business/public administration or a closely related field. The salary range is $164,712 - $200,208 annually, DOQ. To be considered, please visit the Avery Associates Career Portal at www.averyassoc.net/current-searches/ to upload your letter of interest, resume and contact information including email addresses for five work-related references to Bill Avery by March 15, 2019.

CITY OF MILPITAS DIRECTOR OF FINANCE City of Milpitas, California (Approximate Population 78,106) (City’s Budget: $191 Million with 400 FTEs of which 27.5 staff the Finance Department) $157,445.60 - $220,406.42 Supplemented by an attractive benefit package including CalPERS Retirement Classic (2 Tiers) and PEPRA

Seek Legal Counsel Cities are encouraged to work closely with their attorneys when considering options and interpretations related to accessory dwelling units and deciding how to change local ordinances in response to these measures. Prior to taking action, cities should carefully examine issues such as how the proposed changes interact with other ordinances and applicable laws.

The Director of Finance will be an experienced finance professional with significant leadership experience in a diverse and complex organization. In addition, the City desires an executive with outstanding interpersonal and managerial skills, as well as a willingness to work cooperatively and William Avery & Associates collaboratively with all City departments. It is expected the new Director Management Consultants will be well balanced in all areas of municipal finance, have excellent 1 oral, written and presentation skills, and be able to develop solutions 3 /2 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Suite A Los Gatos, CA 95030 to problems collaboratively. The Director will serve as a consultant and advisor to the City Manager, City Council and Executive Staff. The 408.399.4424 incumbent must provide the following: sound financial vision, competence, Fax: 408.399.4423 creativity, sound judgement, and sensitivity. The Director will have the email: jobs@averyassoc.net www.averyassoc.net responsibility for the development of the annual budget and provide expert advice on the development, updates and implementation of the City’s fiscal policies, in areas of reserves, debt management, investments, expenditure practices and internal controls. To be considered, please visit our website at www.averyassoc.net/current-searches/ for a detailed job announcement and how to apply on the Avery Associates Career Portal.

www.westerncity.com

Western City, March 2019

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Accessory Dwelling Units Help Increase Housing Supply, continued

Santa Cruz currently has approximately 475 ADUs, with about 50 more units coming online each year. J

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The City of Salinas

Library & Community Services Director The City is seeking an energetic, collaborative, and inclusionary Library & Community Services Director who will provide exceptional management of the Library & Community Services Department. This Executive Management position plans, organizes, and directs the operations and activities of the Library and Community Services Department and its impact on the City and community members. The Department is supported by 57 staff and the combined General Fund and Measure V operating budget for FY 18/19 is $8.6 million. The incoming Library & Community Services Director should be team-oriented and have exceptional people management skills. Candidates should have experience in administration, management, strategic planning, succession planning, and community outreach. A Bachelor’s degree in Public Administration, Parks Management, Recreation Management, Library Services, Business Administration, Social Services or a related field, and seven (7) years of increasingly responsible experience in parks, recreation, and/or library operations including at least three years of administrative and management responsibility are required. The annual salary range is $135,108 – $164,232. To apply, please visit https://www.calopps.org/ city-of-salinas or contact Patricia Peñaloza at (831) 758-7416.

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT DIRECTOR City of Greenfield | Salary: $135,200

DISTINGUISHING FEATURES OF THE CLASS: Assist the City Manager in the daily administration of intergovernmental related activities. Direct City of Greenfield Building & Planning. Supervise the Community Development division and Direct the preparation of planning and grant documents for community-based programs. Coordinate City-wide community development planning activities.

Tips for Success Know your community. What is the rental vacancy rate in your city? What types of housing are your residents comfortable with: single-family homes, multi-family housing or mixed-use development? If your city requires owner occupancy, do homeowners typically have the start-up capital needed to build ADUs? The answers to these questions can help determine how successful ADUs will be in your community. Engage your residents. Sharing information and inviting feedback from your community can generate more support for the final decisions reached by your planning commission and city council. Put simply, participation helps generate ownership. Involved residents who have helped to shape a proposed policy, project or program will better understand the issue and the reasons for decisions that are made. Good communication about the public’s involvement in the decision can increase the support of the broader community as well. Consider financing options and forging partnerships with banks and other financial institutions. ADUs are expensive to build (ranging on average from $100,000 to $400,000), so having financing options available for interested homeowners can help stimulate interest in developing ADUs. The Institute for Local Government offers a number of resources to help cities engage their communities on housing, planning and other issues. For more information, visit www.ca-ilg.org/engagement. ■

Education and/or Experience: Master’s degree in Planning, Public Administration, Business Administration or related field and four (4) years’ experience in Community Development or Public Administration in a management position. A Bachelor’s degree with two (2) additional years of experience will substitute. Knowledge of Federal and state law and regulations governing community development, planning principles, housing development finances, statistical research methodology, business principles, and contract administration. License: Must possess a valid California class C driver’s license and have a driving record acceptable with the City’s insurance carrier. For complete JD, please visit: www.ci.greenfield.ca.us | Submit your application, DMV record, résumé to: Nina Aguayo, naguayo@ci.greenfield.ca.us or turn it in personally at: 599 El Camino Real, Greenfield, CA 93927. INCOMPLETE APPLICATIONS WILL NOT BE CONSIDERED. Publish: closing date of March 29, 2019 | We are an Equal Opportunity Employer.

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Patterson’s HOST House Tackles Homelessness, continued from page 13

City’s Approach Produces Positive Results After years of funding HOST programs, the city council unanimously voted to revise its loan promissory note in March 2018. The city agreed to waive HOST’s monthly loan for every month it is open, essentially forgiving the organization’s debt and giving it a way to stay open year-round. Since opening its doors in 2013, the HOST House has helped over 28 individuals get off the street and into permanent housing — a small number to some, but nearly half of the estimated homeless population in Patterson. Marlon was homeless for over 10 years and recently completed the Enterprise Restart program. He says, “I learned through Enterprise Restart to think outside my old ways — to think of the positive I can do and not the bad, running amuck in the streets. I’ve become the productive person I can be and learned to contribute to society, family, friends and even associates.” Marlon is now attending school full time and studying sociology. He plans to work with troubled youth and help them understand that they can achieve their dreams. Reducing the city’s homeless population by 50 percent has increased community engagement. The City of Patterson has provided funding, and the larger community has come together to volunteer time and donate needed items. Perhaps the key factor in this solution is that HOST offers services beyond those typically provided by a food bank or homeless shelter. By combining those elements with Enterprise Restart, HOST is developing a long-term solution to the homelessness crisis, while the city essentially reinvests money into the community. Director of Programs Elkinton says, “We have found the key to helping the homeless people in our community have a second chance, and we look forward to continued success.” Contact: Ken Irwin, city manager, Patterson; phone: (209) 895-8015; email: kirwin@ci.patterson.ca.us. ■

Patterson provided a low-interest loan to purchase a house that could be used as a transitional residence for the city’s homeless population.

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CITY OF SAND CITY Sand City is a truly unique and ambitious community on the verge of transforming its identity through coastal and infill development designed to enhance the quality of life for its residents. Sand City encompasses 350 land acres situated along the Monterey Peninsula, approximately 120 miles south of San Francisco. With 1½ miles of coastal frontage along the Monterey Bay, the City lies on the scenic Highway One freeway. The City has a clear and unified vision of its future as a progressive, sustainable community that encourages economic and mixeduse development resulting in a vibrant, CITY friendly, and walk able community. The MANAGER long-term goal is to capitalize on the City’s existing qualities to create a vibrant destination community. To achieve this goal, Sand City seeks a dynamic, “get it done” leader to shepherd these projects to fruition.

William Avery & Associates Management Consultants 31/2 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Suite A Los Gatos, CA 95030

408.399.4424 The new City Manager will possess excellent budget and financial Fax: 408.399.4423 skills, strong project and contract management skills along with the email: jobs@averyassoc.net relationship skills to effectively work with the City Council, staff, the www.averyassoc.net community and a wide array of regional partners. Prior experience as a City Manager, Assistant/Deputy City Manager, or Executive Director of a complex public sector organization combined with a solid foundation in an city operational role will provide an ideal background. To be considered, please visit our website at www.averyassoc.net/current-searches/ for a detailed job announcement and how to apply on the Avery Associates Career Portal.

CITY OF RIALTO CITY Administrator Join a City destined for greatness! The City of Rialto, California invites applications for this exciting career opportunity to serve as its next City Administrator. Widely recognized as a city on the move, the City of Rialto is seeking an energetic, experienced, highly respected professional to lead the day-to-day operations of the organization as it traverses through a well-planned renaissance period. The City of Rialto is a full-service city located in San Bernardino County and is comprised of 22.4 square miles and has a culturally diverse population of over 100,000 residents. This position requires a bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university. A master’s degree in public administration or business administration is preferred but not required. Seven years of increasingly responsible experience in municipal government, including five years of executive management experience. Prior or current experience as a City Administrator, Assistant City Administrator, City Manager or Assistant City Manager, Department Director, or a similar capacity in an engaged, diverse community would be considered a plus. The City is offering a salary up to $235,000 annually and will be DOQ. The City offers an attractive benefits package including CalPERS retirement. Candidates are encouraged to apply immediately and prior to March 25, 2019, and should email a compelling cover letter and comprehensive resume to apply@ralphandersen.com. Confidential inquiries are welcomed to P. Lamont Ewell, Ralph Andersen & Associates, at (916) 630-4900. Detailed brochure available at www.ralphandersen.com.

Ralph Andersen & Associates

www.westerncity.com

Western City, March 2019

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Garden Grove Empowers Residents and Improves a Neighborhood, continued from page 15

The cleanup concluded with a barbecue and prize raffle to celebrate the day’s accomplishments.

Redeveloping a Deteriorated Commercial Center In tandem with the Palma Vista initiative, the Garden Grove Office of Economic Development facilitated the redevelopment of a nearby vacant commercial center, located in one of the city’s busiest intersections. Over the years, the once-thriving center had deteriorated, and a national retailer that had been a 37-year tenant vacated the 90,000-square-foot building. Due to the high vacancy rate, the property had become a magnet for illegal activities, adding to the negative elements in the neighborhood.

Members of the community pitched in enthusiastically to clean up the neighborhood.

Community-Based Efforts Yield Results

“The building was acquired by Red Mountain Group, which implemented an aggressive 18-month plan to reposition the center with two anchor tenants and two additional inline retail uses. The property that had once contributed to the instability of the area became the crown jewel of the commercial center, housing a new Smart & Final, Gold’s Gym and Octapharma Plasma,” says Community and Economic Development Director Lisa Kim.

Overall, NIC’s community engagement efforts succeeded on several fronts. Laying the groundwork with residents was key to addressing both immediate and long-term solutions. Palma Vista residents’ desire to improve their homes and surroundings and elevate their sense of neighborhood pride played an essential role in creating fundamental change. Listening to community input, developing collaborative efforts and working alongside neighbors in equal partnership forged a strong relationship of mutual trust and commitment.

When the revitalization work was completed, NIC held a thank-you event for residents to acknowledge their hard work and celebrate the newly redeveloped center.

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“There’s so much truth behind the saying that it takes a village to make things happen,” says Garden Grove City Manager Scott Stiles. “The work that the city has done with Palma Vista and its partners was hard, yet deeply rewarding.” Contact: Allison Wilson, neighborhood improvement manager, City of Garden Grove; phone: (714) 741-5139; email: allisonj@ggcity.org. ■

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Bobbi C. Peckham • Phil McKenney

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Roseville, CA

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Western City, March 2019

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William Avery & Associates, Inc. Labor Relations / Executive Search / Human Resources Consulting 31/2 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Suite A Los Gatos, CA 95030 408.399.4424 Fax: 408.399.4423 email: jobs@averyassoc.net www.averyassoc.net

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