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J U LY 2 019 |

The Monthly Magazine of the League of California Cities

Exceptional Efforts: Local Streets and Roads Awards Recognize Innovation p.12 Small Cities Fund Public Works Infrastructure Projects With Clean Energy Savings p.17 E-commerce, Energy and the Environment: The Effects of Freight and Warehousing on Our Communities p.7

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CONTENTS 2 Calendar of League Events 3 Executive Director’s Message Making Strides Toward a Sustainable Future

By Carolyn Coleman

 ities are leading the way in finding C innovative methods to leverage local assets, protect natural resources and ensure a sustainable future for their communities.

6 City Forum

Good News for Cities: Producer-Paid Medication and Needle Collection Is Coming

By Heidi Sanborn and Jordan Wells

 A new law requires a statewide system of drop-off kiosks for unwanted medications and a fully funded mail-back system for sharps. It also includes education, oversight and data tracking mechanisms to ensure successful implementation.

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E-commerce, Energy and the Environment: The Effects of Freight and Warehousing on Our Communities By Karalee Browne

Local government leaders face a dilemma in balancing economic opportunities with consumer needs and the environmental impacts of a booming e-commerce industry.

Exceptional Efforts: Local 12  Streets and Roads Awards Recognize Innovation

 he awards program honors counT ties and cities throughout California for creative and cost-effective projects that improve local streets, roads and bridges. It also showcases projects that promote fiscal and environmental sustainability in the local transportation system.

Small Cities Fund Public 17  Works Infrastructure Projects With Clean Energy Savings

By Brian Haddix

 ow can a city shift its power supH ply to clean energy, create jobs, complete projects on its deferred maintenance list and improve its bond rating — without raising taxes or local water and sewer utility rates? Two small cities offer a model.

ANNUAL CONFERENCE & EXPO | 2019 Explore best practices and innovative solutions Over 40 leadership educational sessions Hundreds of networking opportunities

Job Opportunities 19  Professional Services 24  Directory

Cover image: LeoPatrizi

Register Now www.cacities.org/AC

October 16–18, 2019 Long Beach Convention Center


President Jan Arbuckle Council Member Grass Valley

1400 K Street Sacramento, CA 95814 (916) 658-8200 Fax (916) 658-8240

First Vice President Randon Lane Mayor pro Tem Murrieta

Second Vice President John Dunbar Mayor Yountville

Immediate Past President Rich Garbarino Vice Mayor South San Francisco

Executive Director Carolyn Coleman

For a complete list of the League board of directors, visit www.cacities.org/board.

Magazine Staff Editor in Chief Jude Hudson Lemons, Hudson + Associates (916) 658-8234; email: editor@westerncity.com Managing Editor Norman Coppinger (916) 658-8277; email: ncoppinger@cacities.org Advertising Sales Cici Trino Association Outsource Services, Inc. (916) 961-9999; email: cicit@aosinc.biz Administrative Assistant Savannah Cobbs (916) 658-8223; email: scobbs@cacities.org Contributors Rony Berdugo Brandon Black Dan Carrigg Melissa Kuehne Erica Manuel Kayla Woods

leaguevents OCTOBER 16

Policy Committee Meetings, Long Beach The League’s policy committees review issues of interest to cities statewide and make recommendations to the League board of directors.

16

Legal Advocacy Committee Meeting, Long Beach The committee reviews and recommends friend-of-the-court efforts on cases of significant statewide interest to California cities.

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League Board of Directors’ Meeting, Long Beach This brief meeting has an abbreviated agenda tailored to the Annual Conference.

16–18

Associate Editors Carol Malinowski Carolyn Walker

League of California Cities Annual Conference & Expo, Long Beach The conference offers dozens of educational sessions, numerous professional development opportunities, hundreds of exhibits and a chance to participate in the League’s policymaking activities.

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NOVEMBER

For photo credits, see page 20. Western City (ISSN 0279-5337) is published monthly by the League of California Cities, 1400 K St., Sacramento, CA 95814. Subscriptions: $39.00/1 year; $63.00/2 years; student: $26.50; foreign: $52.00; single copies: $4.00, including sales tax. Entered as periodical mail January 30, 1930, at the Post Office, Los Angeles, CA 90013, under the Act of April 13, 1879. Periodical postage paid at Sacramento, Calif.

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Postmaster: Send address changes to Western City, 1400 K Street, Sacramento, CA 95814. Western City Trademark Reg. U.S. Pat. Off. ©2019 League of California Cities. All rights reserved. Material may not be reprinted without written permission. This issue is Volume XCV, No. 7.

28–30

League Board of Directors’ Meeting, Napa The League board reviews, discusses and takes action on a variety of issues affecting cities, including legislation, legal advocacy, education and training and more.

DECEMBER 11–12

Fire Chiefs’ Leadership Seminar, Garden Grove Designed for fire services leaders including but not limited to fire chiefs, chief officers and union leaders, this seminar covers such topics as succession planning, labor relations, emergency response and more.

11–12

Municipal Finance Institute, Garden Grove This conference provides essential information for city officials and staff involved in fiscal planning for municipalities.

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Supplied by Community Energy

FSC ® is an independent, not-for-profit organization that promotes environmentally appropriate, socially beneficial and economically viable forest management worldwide. Products with the FSC label are independently certified to ensure that they come from forests managed to meet the needs of present and future generations.

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City Clerks’ New Law & Elections Seminar, Garden Grove The seminar covers laws affecting elections as well as other aspects of clerks’ responsibilities.

Event and registration information is available at www.cacities.org/events. Join us on Facebook. www.facebook.com/westerncity www.facebook.com/LeagueofCaCities

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Executive Director’s Message by Carolyn Coleman

Making Strides Toward a

Sustainable Future

California is known worldwide for its natural beauty, which includes mountain ranges, deserts, beaches, coastline, redwood forests and more. This diverse landscape plays a central role in attracting people and businesses to the Golden State in pursuit of the California dream. California also receives worldwide attention for its bold leadership in efforts to address the impacts of climate change. In September 2016, the California Legislature passed SB 32 (Chapter 249, Statutes of 2016), which set a new greenhouse gas (GHG) target of at least 40 percent below 1990 emissions by 2030. The Legislature followed up in July 2017 by passing AB 398

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(Chapter 135, Statutes of 2017), which extended the state’s economywide GHG reduction program until 2030. Despite limited resources, California’s 482 cities have accomplished much to preserve the health and vitality of our environment. They are pacesetters in terms of developing comprehensive plans and taking action to help reduce GHG emissions. These innovative strategies not only help meet GHG targets but also enhance the overall quality of life for community residents. Transportation is one of the most significant generators of GHG emissions in California. That is why so many Califor-

nia cities are encouraging alternatives to single-occupancy vehicles and reducing the miles that vehicles travel. Beyond reducing GHG emissions, these initiatives also provide the added benefits of: • Helping conserve fuel and cut fuel costs; • Improving air quality; • Reducing traffic congestion; • Making streets safer for pedestrians, bicyclists, transit users and motorists; and • Contributing to neighborhood revitalization.

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Western City, July 2019

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Making Strides Toward a Sustainable Future, continued

Ontario Together: A Transformative Climate Communities Initiative Downtown Ontario is located in a hightraffic corridor with untapped potential for commercial and retail revitalization. This predominantly Latino community faces housing affordability challenges and high rates of poverty. Its residents need safe transit access, workforce training, affordable housing and an outdoor environment where families can safely commute and play. After years of planning and collaboration that featured a diverse, community-led

initiative with input from the housing, environmental justice, public health, transit, workforce and economic development, business and education sectors, the City of Ontario applied for and was awarded a $33 million grant in 2018 through the state Strategic Growth Council’s Transformative Climate Communities (TCC) Program to implement the Ontario Together Initiative. The TCC Program funds community-led development and infrastructure projects that achieve major environmental, health and economic benefits in California’s most disadvantaged communities. Funded by California’s Cap-and-Trade Program,

TCC empowers the communities most impacted by pollution to choose their own goals, strategies and projects to enact transformational change — using data-driven milestones and measurable outcomes. The Ontario Together Initiative aims to revitalize the city’s historic core by enhancing public transportation, bike lanes and sidewalks and promoting energy efficiency, affordable housing and new green spaces to improve health outcomes and the quality of life for Ontario residents. Reflecting the broad diversity of the stakeholders involved, the project is comprehensive in scope and includes transportation enhancements with over five miles of bike lanes and three miles of sidewalk construction and enhancements, transit passes for local residents and increased frequency in bus services. In addition, the project contributes to other community goals through activities such as: • Building 101 new affordable housing units; • Planting 365 trees;

The Golden State’s diverse natural beauty is one of its unique assets.

• Installing solar panels on affordable multifamily developments and single-family homes; • Establishing new small-business incubator space; and • Creating the Ontario Carbon Farm, which will compost green waste from local restaurants and provide job training and fresh produce opportunities for the community.

Dealing With a

Toxic Air Quality Issue

When a reporter called the City of Paramount about an abnormal level of a carcinogenic toxin in the air, city leaders were unaware of the problem and lacked authority to enforce air quality laws. Learn how Paramount addressed the problem — this month on the Western City website.

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League of California Cities

The project will help Ontario reduce GHG emissions and increase its energy efficiency, key factors that address the community’s sustainability goals and health needs. “We are proud of the local, regional and state partnerships that led to our Transformative Climate Communities grant,” said Ontario Mayor Paul Leon. “As a longtime advocate of collective initiatives in our community, I know that this investment will transform downtown Ontario while helping improve the region’s air quality and the overall quality of life.”

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Communities statewide are taking action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Sacramento’s Comprehensive Transportation Strategy for Zero-Emission Vehicles and More The City of Sacramento adopted its first-ever Electric Vehicle Strategy Plan in 2017. The plan establishes clear targets and priorities for the city to advance the adoption of electric vehicles (EVs) and zero-emission vehicles (ZEVs). Sacramento Mayor Darrell Steinberg said, “The city’s first electric vehicle strategy lays the foundation to electrify transportation and makes Sacramento a hub for advanced vehicle technologies. Not only do EVs reduce greenhouse gas emissions, they also improve air quality, protect public health and are increasingly affordable for everyday residents — a win-win for the environment and the economy.” In the same year, the city and Electrify America announced a public-private partnership and revealed a full slate of projects to increase the number of ZEVs in the greater Sacramento region. Electrify America, a subsidiary of Volkswagen Group of America, is investing $44 million in Sacramento to accelerate the use of shared “clean mobility” transportation (Volkswagen is providing the funds as part of the penalty for installing software in its diesel cars that allowed them to cheat on smog tests). Other partners in the Sacramento effort include the companies GIG (Get in Go) Car Share and Envoy Technologies. The program includes new EV car-sharing services, new ZEV bus and shuttle routes and the installation of EV-charging systems throughout the area. www.westerncity.com

In March 2019, Sacramento launched Sac-to-Zero, an EV car-sharing program that is on track to become one of the nation’s largest with over 260 vehicles. The program offers an app-based service that allows Sacramento residents to pick up and drop off an EV car-share within a 13-square-mile area covering the central city and several neighborhoods to the south and east. The service is ideally suited for a first-mile/last-mile connection. The user pays either for rental time or distance traveled, whichever is less expensive. Using the GIG app, users can locate the nearest car to reserve it for up to 30 minutes in advance or to initiate a trip on the spur of the moment. GIG cars have a roof-mounted bike rack, giving users the option of combining two different modes of transportation, bike and car, for daily commutes or weekend adventures. More than 70 percent of the census tracts in GIG’s car-sharing area are low-income or disadvantaged communities. “The city’s electric vehicle car-share program lays the foundation to electrify transportation and make Sacramento a hub for advanced vehicle technologies,” said City Sustainability Manager Jennifer Venema. “EVs reduce greenhouse gas emissions, improve air quality, protect public health and are increasingly affordable for everyday residents.”

Strengthen Your City’s Sustainability Efforts: Join the Beacon Program

their communities and offers resources to invigorate this work. One such resource is the Beacon Program (www.ca-ilg.org/ beacon-program). Launched in 2010 by the League’s nonprofit affiliate, the Institute for Local Government, the Beacon Program provides a robust framework that helps local agencies reach aggressive state climate goals in a way that makes sense for each individual city participating in the voluntary program. More than 140 cities and counties currently benefit from the Beacon Program’s support and recognition for reducing GHG emissions and implementing policies that promote more sustainable communities. If your city is not already participating in the Beacon Program, I encourage you to consider doing so. In a state as beautiful as ours, we owe it to ourselves and future generations to protect and nurture our natural resources. Cities are leading the way in finding innovative ways to leverage local assets and ensure a sustainable future for their communities. Let’s continue building on that momentum. ■

Find More Information Online For additional information and links to related resources, read the online version of this article at www.westerncity.org.

The League supports the efforts of local officials pursuing innovative and community-tailored ways to reduce GHGs in Western City, July 2019

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Good News for Cities: Producer-Paid Medication and Needle Collection Is Coming by Heidi Sanborn and Jordan Wells Despite warnings to lock up prescription medications and state law mandating proper disposal of injection needles, millions of sharps and medications continue to be improperly stored and discarded, which pollutes the environment and directly threatens public health and safety. But help is on the way. SB 212 (Chapter 1004, Statutes of 2018) requires manufacturers to pay for the safe disposal of medications and needles. SB 212 is the product of years of negotiations with the pharmaceutical and sharps manufacturers, retailers and others in the product chain and the California Product Stewardship Council (CPSC). Action by Cities and Counties Drives Change Local governments have successfully championed the issue jurisdiction by jurisdiction. Nine counties and three cities passed ordinances that led to the negotiations and successful passage of the bill. Without these efforts, it’s highly unlikely that the industry would have come to the table to negotiate. High-profile incidents, like the one in which thousands of dirty and bloodied diabetics’ needles were discovered by passersby on a Stockton roadside, also helped raise awareness about the issue. Manufacturers were initially reluctant to step up. “The pharmaceutical industry said, ‘We don’t want to do this,’” said Senator Hannah-Beth Jackson (D-Santa Barbara), who authored the bill. “But as counties and cities started implementing their own rules, the industry began realizing it’s better off having one standard. Now, we are working together because if there is no statewide program, there will be 58 counties and 400 cities that will be all over the place in how they handle pharmaceuticals.” SB 212 established a uniform take-back program to provide safe and convenient disposal statewide of medication and sharps. The program requires the manufacturers of needles and medications to provide for disposal and the program’s promotion. This “producer pays” policy approach has been very successfully implemented in Canada, Europe and Mexico for pharmaceuticals and in France for needles. Its success is well-documented.

Reimbursements for Local Governments’ Disposal Costs The new law requires a statewide system of drop-off kiosks for unwanted medications and a fully funded mail-back system for sharps — with prepaid mail-in container and materials to be provided at the point of sale — and includes a variety of education, oversight and data tracking mechanisms to ensure successful implementation. SB 212 also sets a precedent. It is the first bill in California to provide reimbursements to local governments for disposal-related costs — in this case, for home-generated sharps. CalRecycle is currently finalizing the regulations. The state Department of Health Services (DHS) awarded a $3 million grant to the CPSC, which will distribute over 300 medication collection bins to communities in California on a first-come, first-served basis in 2019. The bins will be located only in pharmacies, hospitals and law enforcement facilities. In addition, the grant will pay for the bin disposal until the grant ends in September 2020. At that time, no more disposal costs will be paid until the drug manufacturers assume control of the bins under SB 212 implementation, sometime in late 2021 or early 2022. However, there are currently more bins in California communities than ever before. Walgreens has bins throughout California, as do the counties that already passed local ordinances (which SB 212 protected and did not preempt). For a list of current bin locations, read the online version of this article at www.westerncity.com. Grant-Funded Medication Disposal Bins Available If your city is interested in obtaining a grant-funded medication disposal bin, email Jordan Wells at jordan@calpsc.org and you will be notified when the bin applications are released. CPSC is working to obtain more grant funds to underwrite the bin disposal and promotion during the gap period that falls between the time when DHS grant funding ends and the SB 212 program begins in late 2021 or in 2022. ■

Heidi Sanborn is executive director of the National Stewardship Action Council and can be reached at Heidi@nsaction.us. Jordan Wells is special projects manager for the California Product Stewardship Council and can be reached at jordan@calpsc.org.

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League of California Cities

www.cacities.org


E-commerce, Energy and the Environment: The Effects of Freight and Warehousing on Our Communities by Karalee Browne With the click of a button, Californians can have a book or a designer handbag delivered to their doorstep. Although such easy access to items is convenient, it often comes at the expense of the environment and local public health. As online sales increase, so do the size and number of distribution warehouses that must stock vast selections of goods to be delivered directly to shoppers. As a result, more trucks are clogging local streets and freeways and causing traffic, pollution and adverse health impacts, particularly in disadvantaged communities. Now a group of researchers is examining the location of these warehouses, truck routes and types of trucks used to help them understand how California communities can better facilitate healthy goods movement that does not hinder local governments’ efforts to meet climate action goals.

In the past, companies sought to locate warehouses on the outskirts of cities, isolated from high population centers so that suppliers could move goods without disruption to communities. Warehouses served as storage facilities where products were held for weeks or even months, until distributors needed to bring stock to storefronts. Today, with the growth of e-commerce sales, locating these warehouses closer to homes is becoming more attractive because it facilitates next-day or even same-day shipments. When such operations are closer to population centers, deliveries cost less and companies can be more competitive in courting shoppers who desire bargains and free shipping.

The Economics of Freight, Warehouses and Land Use

This new way of doing business is creating a dilemma for local government leaders who must balance economic opportunities with consumer needs and the environmental impacts of this booming e-commerce industry.

Because land is less expensive and more abundant in the Inland Empire compared with Los Angeles, the Inland Empire has

As the sixth largest economy in the world and the biggest gateway for the movement of both domestic and international goods in the United States, California continues to provide an ideal location for goods distribution. In Southern California alone, nearly 600 million tons of freight valued at approximately $1.7 trillion moves through the region annually. More than half of the goods movement comes through the Port of Los Angeles and neighboring Port of Long Beach. The easy access to these seaports, local airports, roads and rail makes the Southern California region desirable for warehousing.

continued

Karalee Browne is a program manager for the Institute for Local Government and can be reached at kbrowne@ca-ilg.org.

The Port of Long Beach, below, and the Port of Los Angeles are major gateways for freight.

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Western City, July 2019

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E-commerce, Energy and the Environment: The Effects of Freight and Warehousing on Our Communities, continued

With the growth of e-commerce sales, locating warehouses closer to homes is more attractive because it facilitates next-day shipments.

become one of the nation’s most desirable regions for building mammoth warehouses. Between 2001 and 2016, developers proposed and built 13 mega warehouses (1 million square feet or more) in the Inland Empire. To date, these warehouses have brought more than 55,000 jobs to the area, which accounts for about 22 percent of the region’s employment. But the expansion of these facilities also brings increased pollution at freight hubs and in communities located near ports and warehouses.

Moreno Valley Weighs Economic and Environmental Impacts

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In 2015, the Moreno Valley City Council approved a 40 million-square-foot warehouse project — the size of about 700 football fields — on the eastern edge of town. The council was divided on the project, which passed with a 3-2 vote. The proposed distribution center, slated to be the largest such facility in the country, would cover 2,610 acres. With the promise of 20,000 jobs, the mega warehouse offered city leaders a solution to high unemployment rates and a growing population; however, the distribution center vote sparked a massive debate. Some people defended the need to bring jobs to the struggling community, and others argued it would generate serious traffic, negative public health impacts and environmental consequences. Environmental groups and neighboring local governments immediately filed lawsuits. Nearly four years later, the project’s future is still unclear as the courts weigh in on the numerous lawsuits, including claims that the environmental analysis was incomplete. According to the project’s environmental impact report, the warehouse would likely draw about 14,000 trucks a day into the city in a region plagued with some of the worst air pollution in the nation. While air quality agencies and health advocates continue to raise concerns, local elected officials point out the project’s sustainable features, including Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification, solar generation and 2010 truck standards that reduce emissions.

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The growth of e-commerce is driving a demand for ever-larger warehouse facilities near residential communities.

Moreno Valley City Manager Tom DeSantis believes that economic development and environmental stewardship go hand in hand in Moreno Valley. He says, “This city was developed as a bedroom community, so we have always struggled with a job-to-housing balance. The project offers 20,000 new jobs, which equates to 20,000 opportunities for our residents to get off the freeway and work closer to home.”

Investments in Research Inform Policymakers Genevieve Giuliano, Ph.D., of the University of Southern California, heads the Pacific Southwest Region University Transportation Center, a consortium of leading universities. One of its goals is to advance an environmentally sustainable transportation system. The group recently published research illustrating that California’s investment in building and maintaining freight infrastructure is “far outpaced by the rapid growth in both passenger and freight demand.” The report also acknowledges that arterial freight impact is not limited to the urban core, and that the impact of freight affects suburban locations as well. Giuliano says although local elected officials have limited influence on the freeway impacts caused by freight transport, they can design their communities to better accommodate freight in the last mile. “We have to get over thinking that trucks are the enemy and learn how to manage them better,” she says. “As online shopping increases, so will the demand for trucks. If we can design complete streets and building codes to better accommodate freight, we can increase safety and decrease the amount of pollution caused by these trucks.” Giuliano’s report recommends 15 strategies to reduce the impacts of freight, including making improvements to truck parking facilities, integrated freight information systems, portwide terminal appointment systems and on-site parking and loading facilities. The group is continuing its efforts to inform policymakers through an expanded collaboration recently funded by the Climate Change Research Program of

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the Strategic Growth Council. Giuliano’s group is now part of the Climate Smart Communities Consortium (CSCC), funded by the Strategic Growth Council to advance more sustainable transportation and climate-smart communities through direct collaboration with government agencies, community members, non-governmental organizations and the private sector. The Institute for Local Government is working with CSCC to increase local engagement in the projects and ensure that the research reaches local leaders in a relevant way. The group is in the early stages of designing its research projects and hopes to have findings in summer 2020.

State Agencies Invest Locally to Expand Clean Fleets The state will use the CSCC research to continue informing its policies and programs designed to minimize community health impacts from freight and other types of transportation. The California Air Resources Board (CARB) is creating a freight handbook to help provide pollution-control best practices to local communities as freight projects are developed. This handbook will be another product of CARB’s Sustainable Freight Transport Program, which was created in 2016 to implement a broad program that includes regulations, incentives and policies to support a transformation to a more sustainable freight system. From 2018–19, CARB awarded $205 million in grants for projects designed to accelerate

the adoption of clean freight technologies and reduce air pollution caused by the movement of goods throughout the state. The projects range from electric locomotives, trucks and refrigeration trailers at railyards in Stockton and San Bernardino to a hybrid tugboat and electric cranes and forklifts at the Port of Long Beach. All 11 projects are located within disadvantaged communities heavily impacted by air pollution from freight facilities. The program granted the City of San Francisco $4.6 million to purchase 30 electric medium-sized and heavy-duty vehicles and fast-charging infrastructure aimed at reducing pollution emissions caused by the movement of produce along trade corridors between the Bay Area and the Sacramento Valley. Clean-air advocates say stronger state rules and guidance and more investment are needed to ensure that increasing freight infrastructure doesn’t create more pollution in California’s most disadvantaged communities. “There is a clear need to protect the health of local residents as local communities consider expanding or building freight facilities,” says Will Barrett, clean air advocacy director with the American Lung Association in California. “Without incorporating zero-emission infrastructure and equipment, informed land-use decisions and other strategies to protect local residents — coupled with consistent funding support to ensure clean technologies — these facilities can add significant new health burdens.” continued on page 11 Western City, July 2019

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1 – Institute for Local Government supporter 2 – CITIPAC supporter Partial list as of 6/6/2019


E-commerce, Energy and the Environment: The Effects of Freight and Warehousing on Our Communities, continued from page 9

What’s Ahead The amount of funding allocated for transportation equity projects and fleet modernization programs is an ongoing source of debate in the Legislature, given competing priorities for cap-and-trade revenues. Although the actual allocations are still in flux, most legislators favor a significant investment to support clean transportation projects and programs. Meanwhile, state agencies and legislators continue outlining policies to help the state reach its greenhouse gas reduction targets by addressing issues in the transportation sector. Sen. Nancy Skinner (D-Berkeley) recently proposed legislation, SB 44, which would require CARB to develop a comprehensive plan to reduce diesel truck pollution aligned with achieving federal clean air standards and California’s climate requirements to reduce greenhouse

The convenience of online shopping is changing the landscape of local communities in numerous ways.

gas emissions 40 percent by 2030 and 80 percent by 2050. Given the increasing need to move goods through California, many say the only way to reduce the pollution and greenhouse gas emissions from freight transport is to electrify the trucks carrying products to their destination, but even that is not a silver bullet to the problems stemming from the massive increase in e-commerce sales. Local agencies need

to diligently analyze environmental and public health impacts before seeking to attract or plan for freight facilities. Only by understanding these costs and benefits can public officials properly evaluate how freight facilities align with the community goals — and prepare accordingly. For additional information and links to related resources, read the online version of this article at www.westerncity.com. ■

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Western City, July 2019

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Exceptional Efforts: Roads Awards Reco The League and the County Engineers Association of California (CEAC) announced the winners of the 2019 Outstanding Local Streets and Roads Project Awards at their annual Public Works Officers’ Institute in April. The awards program recognizes counties and cities throughout California for creative and cost-effective projects that improve local streets, roads and bridges. Sponsored by the California State Association of Counties (CSAC), the League and CEAC, the Outstanding Local Streets and Roads Project Awards program also showcases cities and counties that promote fiscal and environmental sustainability in the local transportation system.

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“The great work that California’s cities and counties are doing on their local streets and roads offers examples for others to emulate,” said Charles Herbertson, Culver City public works director and president of the League’s Public Works Officers’ Department. “These projects help keep all road users safe, including bicyclists and pedestrians, and support goods movement and commerce. We are proud to showcase this work and commend all the cities and counties that competed in the awards program this year.” “Local streets and roads are among the many services provided by counties and local governments that impact our daily lives,” said Jim Porter, San Mateo County director of public works and CEAC

president. “These awards highlight the innovation in sustainability happening on a local level that can be replicated across the state and the nation.” Los Angeles County’s Ballentine Place project, which used sustainable pavement treatments to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, is this year’s top winner. “Nearly everyone in the state utilizes local streets and roads, but few realize the amount of effort that goes into maintaining them,” said David Leamon, Stanislaus County director of public works and chair of the Local Streets and Roads Oversight Committee. “Over the past five years, recognizing the hard work and innovation of counties and cities through this awards program has helped convince legislators to www.cacities.org


Los Angeles County Public Works Department crews make progress on reconstructing 5.5 miles of pavement for the Ballentine Place project.

Local Streets and gnize Innovation further invest taxpayer dollars in projects that keep California moving.” For more information about the program and links to related resources, read the online version of this article at www.westerncity.com.

Overall Winner Los Angeles County Ballentine Place In a residential area of the unincorporated community of Covina Islands, nearly 5.5 miles of roads (903,000 square feet) had pavement rated in poor condition. Reconstructing the roads was considered the best solution for the neighborhood, but the traditional reconstruction method of removing and replacing the existing road materials was estimated to cost $5.8 million. www.westerncity.com

Instead, Los Angeles County Public Works Department used a sustainable, three-pronged approach to replace the road surface. This approach preserves roads in good condition, uses recycled materials in pavement treatments and reuses materials in-place when reconstructing roads. The Ballentine Place project included removing the top three inches of the existing asphalt concrete and using a cold central plant recycling process, which required fewer construction workdays and mitigated traffic impacts. Its environmental benefits included a 47 percent reduction in GHG emissions, a 61 percent reduction in energy consumption and diversion of 33,000 cubic yards of waste from landfill. The asphalt rubber hot

mix used in the surface diverted 15,500 scrap tires from a landfill. In addition, the project incorporated vegetated bioswales to facilitate stormwater infiltration that reduces the volume of water entering the storm drain system. The county saved $3.3 million, which it reinvested to upgrade other county roads. The project improved the overall quality of the county’s road network in a cost-effective and environmentally friendly way. Los Angeles County’s three-pronged approach offers a straightforward formula for addressing the issues of limited funding and reducing GHG emissions in a practical manner. Contact: Leslie Schenk, email: lschenk@ dpw.lacounty.gov; phone: (626) 458-5946. continued Western City, July 2019

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Exceptional Efforts: Local Streets and Roads Awards Recognize Innovation, continued

A roundabout solved numerous problems associated with a complicated intersection in San Juan Capistrano.

Safety or Intelligent Transportation System Projects City of San Juan Capistrano I-5/La Novia Roundabout For nearly 20 years, the awkward, offset I-5 freeway off-ramp intersection in the City of San Juan Capistrano was the subject of many alternative improvement concepts. Controlled by stop signs, the intersection was frequently congested, and its complicated geometric design created confusion among commuters, which increased traffic incidents. The city’s $2.2 million I-5/La Novia Roundabout project improved the traffic pattern and flow by realigning the northbound I-5 exit and entrance ramps, Valle Road and La Novia Avenue with a sustainable, modern roundabout design. A steep hillside landform and the close proximity of a local roadway constrained

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the project design. The contractor hired by the city developed an eight-phase construction staging and traffic handling plan to keep the intersection open to traffic during construction. The plan and its execution were so successful that the intersection operated more efficiently during construction than prior to construction. The roundabout was designed to address both existing and projected operational deficiencies by improving traffic direction, easing congestion and accommodating future local and regional growth. The project reduced the number of vehicleto-pedestrian conflicts at the La Novia intersection by 67 percent. This is the first roundabout on the state highway system in Orange County and the first to have been formally analyzed and approved through Caltrans’ intersection control evaluation process in District 12. In addition, the Federal Highway

Administration profiled the I-5/La Novia Roundabout project on an informational poster used nationally to communicate the benefits of roundabout intersections. Contact: George Alvarez; email: galvarez@sanjuancapistrano.org; phone: (949) 493-1171.

Complete Streets Project City of Seaside West Broadway Urban Village Improvements Project The City of Seaside is experiencing a transformation as its West Broadway Urban Village Specific Plan project begins to revitalize the downtown area. The first phase of this $7 million project made pedestrian, bicycle, streetscape, roadway and intersection improvements that included wider sidewalks, new bike lanes and bike boxes, bulb-outs to

www.cacities.org


The Crystal Springs Dam Bridge Replacement Project (shown here prior to construction) in San Mateo County addressed structural challenges related to flooding.

improve safety at pedestrian crossings, a new signal light and a “road diet” that reduced the width of the roadway from a four-lane roadway with two lanes in each direction to a two-lane road with one lane in each direction. The project also made storm drain improvements and constructed bioswales, infiltrators and a new sewer main for a future sanitary sewer connection. New planters, lighting, landscaping, benches and other streetscape improvements enhance the economic, social, cultural and recreational fabric of the area and encourage pedestrian activity in the revitalized downtown commercial area. The project was funded through a federal Active Transportation Program grant, Regional Surface Transportation Program grant and Transportation Development Act grant. Contact: Leslie Llantero; email: lllantero@ ci.seaside.ca.us; phone: (831) 899-6832.

Efficient and Sustainable Bridge Maintenance, Construction and Reconstruction Projects San Mateo County Crystal Springs Dam Bridge Replacement Project The Lower Crystal Springs Dam across San Mateo Creek is owned and operated by the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission and forms the Crystal Springs Reservoirs, which have a combined capacity of 22.5 billion gallons of water and also receive water from the Hetch Hetchy Reservoir. San Mateo County owns and operates the bridge that carries traffic over the dam along Skyline Boulevard, also known as Highway 35. The dam, which was constructed in 1888, is a gravity arch dam and served as a model for Hoover Dam. In 1988, the California Department of Water Resources Division of Safety of Dams reevaluated

the reservoir’s Probable Maximum Flood (the flood that may be expected from the most severe combination of critical meteorological and hydrologic conditions that are reasonably possible in a particular drainage area) and found the dam’s existing spillway was too small. To construct the spillway improvements, it was necessary to remove the bridge, widen the spillway and build a new bridge on the dam structure. The county demolished the 1920s-era bridge in 2011, and the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission modified the spillway, parapet wall and stilling basin. Because the work area provided habitat for endangered species, many environmental studies and multiple approvals from respective regulatory agencies were required. Engineering design approvals were also required from Caltrans and the Division of Safety of Dams in close coordination with the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission. continued

www.westerncity.com

Western City, July 2019

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Exceptional Efforts: Local Streets and Roads Awards Recognize Innovation, continued

Construction on San Mateo County’s Crystal Springs Dam Bridge Replacement Project required approvals from multiple agencies.

Construction of the new bridge began in February 2016 and was completed in October 2018. The cast-in-place, concrete box girder bridge is 626 feet long and 51.5 feet wide and was built approximately 7 feet higher than the former bridge to accommodate the dam parapet wall modifications. Replacing the former seismically deficient bridge with one able to withstand the maximum credible earthquake was a top sustainability goal — especially considering its location within 1,000 feet of the San Andreas fault. The new bridge also includes a 15-footwide recreational trail that is separated from vehicular traffic to provide improved connectivity for Crystal Springs Regional Trail users for years to come. Contact: Carter Choi; email: cchoi@ smcgov.org; phone: (650) 363-4100.

Efficient and Sustainable Road Maintenance, Construction and Reconstruction Projects City of Roseville 2018 Roller Compacted Concrete Pilot Project Roller compacted concrete (RCC) is a revolutionary pavement that blends the speed and cost of asphalt with the longevity and benefits of concrete pavement. In 2018, the City of Roseville reconstructed

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more than two miles of existing asphalt pavement road plagued by potholes and roughness using the RCC method. In addition to reduced lifetime maintenance (first recommended maintenance is not until year 20 as compared to every seven years with asphalt), the costs for the pavement on this project were about 10 percent lower than a comparable asphalt pavement. In addition, this method allows roadways to be open for traffic in as little as two days (with cross traffic allowed in as quickly as one paving work shift) versus the 10 days typically required for concrete. The reduced maintenance also reduces road closures, which increases safety for drivers and road crews that no longer need to be on the roadways as often. The pavement is also lighter in color than asphalt, requiring less lighting and

enabling better visibility at night. Building RCC roadways will ultimately reduce the city’s maintenance costs and save money for the city’s taxpayers. Contact: Noah Siviglia; email: NSiviglia@ roseville.ca.us; phone: (916) 746-1300. ■

Does Your City Have an Innovative Project? The Outstanding Local Streets and Roads Project Awards program is conducted annually. If your city has an innovative project underway, consider submitting it for 2020. More information about the awards program is available at www.savecaliforniastreets.org.

Numerous improvements made by the City of Seaside as part of revitalizing downtown are helping to improve safety and enhance the quality of life.


Small Cities Fund Public Works Infrastructure Projects With Clean Energy Savings by Brian Haddix

How can a city shift its power supply to clean energy, create jobs, complete projects on its deferred maintenance list and improve its bond rating — without raising taxes or local water and sewer utility rates? Simple: issue bonds against the savings created by using solar power versus staying on the traditional route of using increasingly expensive power from the investor-owned utility. This is exactly what the cities of Sanger and Chowchilla did.

Rising Rates, a Recession and Lackluster Revenues Drive Change In 2011, the City of Sanger (pop. 27,094) was struggling financially. It was grappling with deferred maintenance to its wastewater treatment plant and city water system and did not have the funds to make needed repairs. Implementing energy and operational efficiencies in its facilities offered the only solution. If done right, this strategy could also meet the city council’s goal of enhancing services to residents while moving forward on environmental stewardship.

The catalyst was an ever-increasing Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) power bill of $1.5 million per year. An inefficient wastewater treatment plant consumed approximately 40 percent of the total bill. Electricity rates were rising 5 to 8 percent annually, revenue growth was less than 1 percent per year and the city had exhausted all traditional options for cutting costs. In addition, Sanger was struggling in the face of the Great Recession, burdened by a 25 percent unemployment rate and a community unable to afford a local utility rate increase. “The City of Sanger was at a financial crossroad,” says former Sanger Mayor Joshua Mitchell. “We needed to be smarter in how we spent the people’s money while fostering economic development. This started with a classic public-private partnership business venture designed to construct one of the largest municipal solar arrays in the region that would produce cheap, clean power for city operations — all done with absolutely no increase to local utility bills.”

Reducing Financial Risk for the City Sanger used energy savings performance contracting as the vehicle for clean energy conversion to power the city and control its energy costs. This involved hiring an energy service company (ESCO) that identifies specific energy efficiency projects, costs and savings achieved through the efficiency projects. The ESCO planned to replace traditional PG&E electricity supplies with lower-cost clean energy. This information was compiled into an energy audit that was provided to the financial market as a basis for funding. That allowed bond companies to document the future savings achieved through the energy efficiency and clean energy power, compared with staying with PG&E. With the savings identified, the city sold lease-revenue bonds backed by the quantified future savings to fund construction of the project, paid off the bonds and established a reserve. Another important part of the performance contract required the ESCO to guarantee the energy savings; if the actual savings fell short of projections, the ESCO would continued

Brian Haddix is the former city manager of the cities of Sanger and Chowchilla and can be reached at brian530@comcast.net.

Workers seal the inside of a 750,000-gallon water tank, one of two built in Chowchilla in response to a water supply crisis. Western City, July 2019

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Small Cities Fund Public Works Infrastructure Projects With Clean Energy Savings, continued

pay the difference. This shifted the financial risk from the city to the ESCO. In short, the city was funding today’s projects with tomorrow’s savings, the ESCO assumed the risk and residents saw no increase in local utility rates. Sanger used $13.48 million in future energy savings to: • Construct a 1.1 megawatt groundmounted solar array with tracking technology; • Install 6,040 automated water meters and a leak detection system that telemetrically relays data directly to City Hall; • Make extensive wastewater treatment plant improvements; • Replace all roofs and heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems on city buildings; • Install new LED exterior lights at city facilities; • Replace pump controls for the community swimming pool; • Upgrade city water wells with variable frequency drives so that they were no longer either running at full speed or not at all; and • Develop a maintenance strategy to ensure that operational savings are achieved. Sanger’s approach succeeded in several ways. The contract with the ESCO

required that it hire 75 percent of its labor locally. The ESCO partnered with an employment service to train residents to install solar panels, HVAC systems and more. By the conclusion of the contract, the project’s local employment rate was 89 percent, and many residents had acquired new marketable skills.

Water-Related Infrastructure Issues Threaten Chowchilla The City of Chowchilla (pop. 18,742) modeled its clean energy program on Sanger’s approach. Like Sanger, the community was economically disadvantaged and had an aging infrastructure. But Chowchilla’s water table was dropping at an average rate of 10 feet per year, causing well casings to twist and crack and wells to run dry. The city had also deferred maintenance on numerous old wells. Chowchilla depended entirely on groundwater for residential, commercial and public safety needs and faced a crisis when multiple wells failed and water pressure dropped to precarious levels. “It was a nightmare,” says Chowchilla Public Works Director Jason Rogers. “We just didn’t have the money for repairs.” In 2015, Chowchilla was spending $850,000 per year on electric utilities. The city could capture $28 million in savings by shifting its power supply from PG&E to solar and bonding against the

savings spread over the next 20 years (with the assumption that PG&E rates would continue to climb at 5 to 8 percent annually). As in Sanger, these bonds would be repaid with future power savings. As PG&E power rates climbed and annual bond payments stayed relatively constant, the city realized future savings and applied them to much-needed infrastructure. In addition to bond proceeds, the City of Chowchilla utilized Proposition 1 funding, state incentives and rebates. Making the financing even more compelling was the use of federal Clean Renewable Energy Bonds, which provided buyers with a tax credit in lieu of interest payments. That reduced Chowchilla’s cost of borrowing by 4.8 percent and freed more money to be applied to infrastructure.

Self-Supporting System Avoids Need for Rate Increases Like Sanger’s clean energy program, Chowchilla’s system paid for itself without any increases in local utility rates to subsidize capital improvements. Today, Chowchilla’s wastewater treatment plant services 80 percent of its power demands with solar energy. The remaining 20 percent is captured through increased efficiencies that will be funded with the energy savings from the solar array. continued on page 22

Solar panels provide clean power and help to offset the power demands of city facilities.

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www.cacities.org


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CITY MANAGER City of Hanford, CA

The City of Hanford is seeking a City Manager who is a natural leader of people. The ideal candidate will communicate well at all levels in the organization and have the knowledge and ethics to earn the trust and respect of the City Council, staff and the community-at-large. The ideal background will include experience as a City/County Manager, Deputy City/County Manager or Department Head. Bachelor’s degree in Public Administration, Business Administration or a related field is required. Master’s degree highly desirable. Salary DOE. For full job description, application process and deadline, please visit the City of Hanford’s website: https://www.ci.hanford.ca.us/ departments/human_resources/index.php

Call Cici Trino, Association Outsource Services, at (916) 961-9999 to place a display (boxed) ad or for rate and deadline information, or email cicit@aosinc.biz. Website Job Postings Display ads are posted on our website at no additional charge. But if you miss the deadline for getting your job opportunity ad into the magazine, you can post it on the Western City website right away. To post your job opportunity ad on our automated website, visit www.westerncity.com or contact Savannah Cobbs, Western City administrative assistant; email: scobbs@ cacities.org; phone: (916) 658-8223.

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CHIEF OF POLICE

The BART Police Department is comprised of 206 sworn peace, whose mission is to provide a safe and secure environment for all passengers within the transit system. The ideal candidate will possess a leadership style and value system that embodies ethics, integrity and an uncompromising dedication to public service, the employees and the community.

William Avery & Associates Management Consultants 31/2 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Suite A Los Gatos, CA 95030 408.399.4424 Fax: 408.399.4423 email: jobs@averyassoc.net www.averyassoc.net

To be considered, please visit our website at www.averyassoc.net/current-searches/ for a detailed job announcement, including ideal candidate profile, and how to apply on the Avery Associates Career Portal.

Western City, July 2019

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CITY OF CUPERTINO The City of Cupertino is located against the foothills of the Santa Cruz Mountains at the west end of world famous Silicon Valley. Various corporate headquarters, including Apple Computer, blend with tree-shrouded residential neighborhoods that climb into the foothills of the Santa Cruz Mountain range. Extremely high quality schools and proximity to high-tech jobs and beautiful open spaces make Cupertino a desirable location for a highly educated and culturally diverse population.

CITY OF SOUTH EL MONTE

Finance Director

$10,000 – $12,155 per month APPLY BY: July 11, 2019 by 5:30 P.M.

THE POSITION: The City is looking to hire a team-oriented individual who is interested in joining a city which values individuality and creativity. The ideal candidate has a cooperative outlook with a can-do attitude, is self-motivated and has a proactive approach to problem solving. The Finance Director will plan, organize, and administer the activities of the Finance Department; will establish appropriate systems, policies and procedures for effective operation of departmental functions to include but not limited to data processing, business licensing, central purchasing, and grant administration; directs the development and preparation of the City’s annual budget; IT oversight; and performs related duties as required. Applications are available at South El Monte City Hall and on-line at www.ci.south-el-monte.ca.us/. On-line applications and or resumes will not be accepted. Applications may be submitted in person or by mail to City Hall with attention to the Human Resources Division. For the detailed job announcement please go to: www.ci.south-el-monte.ca.us/ or call (626) 579-6540.

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ASSISTANT CITY MANAGER

The Assistant City Manager (ACM) reports to the City Manager and is part of the City’s Executive Management team. In conjunction with the City Manager, the ACM oversees and directs all activities of the City’s operations. The ideal candidate will have at least nine years of administrative experience within local government, five of which must be in a management capacity along with a Bachelor’s degree from an accredited college in public/ business administration, public policy, finance, or a related field.

William Avery & Associates Management Consultants 31/2 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Suite A Los Gatos, CA 95030 408.399.4424 Fax: 408.399.4423 email: jobs@averyassoc.net www.averyassoc.net

To be considered, please visit our website at www.averyassoc.net/current-searches/ for a detailed job announcement and how to apply on the Avery Associates Career Portal.

CITY OF PORT HUENEME The City of Port Hueneme (pronounced “Wy-nee’mee”) is a charming, friendly and relaxed seaside community in Ventura County, California. The City is ideally located along the County’s renowned Gold Coast, 60 miles northwest of Los Angeles and 40 miles south of Santa Barbara. The Human Resources Manager oversees all human resources functions for the City, reporting to the Deputy City Manager within the City Manager’s Office. The Human Resources Manager will be expecting HUMAN build close working relationships RESOURCES to with the executive team, the Joint MANAGER Powers Insurance Authority, Police Department and the City Attorney’s Office. The new Manager will work closely with all Directors and Division heads on matters relating to recruitment and staffing, compensation and benefits, human resources programs and employee relations, as well as overseeing risk management.

William Avery & Associates Management Consultants 31/2 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Suite A Los Gatos, CA 95030 408.399.4424 Fax: 408.399.4423 email: jobs@averyassoc.net www.averyassoc.net

To be considered, please visit our website at www.averyassoc.net/current-searches/ for a detailed job announcement, including ideal candidate profile, and how to apply on the Avery Associates Career Portal.

Photo/Art Credits Cover: LeoPatrizi Page 3: Ron and Patty Thomas Page 4: Top, fotoVoyager; snow, GomezDavid; vineyard, Spondylolithesis Page 5: Left, peeterv; right, Art Wager Page 6: Top, DanielAzocar; bottom, stockcam Page 7: Adamkaz Page 9: MarioGuti Page 11: Jorge Villalba

Page 12: LeoPatrizi Page 13: Courtesy of Los Angeles County Page 14: Courtesy of the City of San Juan Capistrano Page 15: DanCardiff Page 16: Top, Courtesy of San Mateo County; bottom, courtesy of the City of Seaside Pages 17–18: Courtesy of Brian Haddix

www.cacities.org


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Small Cities Fund Public Works Infrastructure Projects With Clean Energy Savings, continued from page 18

Electricity rates were rising 5 to 8 percent annually, revenue growth was less than 1 percent per year and the city had exhausted all traditional options for cutting costs. J

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• Powering city facilities and water wells with clean energy; • Installing booster pumps that increased municipal water pressure citywide;

City of Tracy

Finance Director

• Immediately drilling a new well and setting aside money for a second well later; and

City of Tustin

Fire Marshal

City of Mountain View

Director of Library & Community Services City of Sunnyvale

Please visit www.tbcrecruiting.com for details. tel 424.296.3111 • info@tbcrecruiting.com

SAN DIEGO COUNTY WATER AUTHORITY The San Diego County Water Authority sustains a $231 billion regional economy and the quality of life for 3.3 million residents through a multi-decade water supply diversification plan, major infrastructure investments and forward-thinking policies that promote fiscal and environmental responsibility. A public agency created in 1944, the Water Authority delivers a safe and reliable wholesale water supply at an affordable cost to 24 retail water agencies, including cities, special districts and a military base. The General Manager is appointed by the Board of Directors and is expected to provide positive and progressive leadership and direction through active and regular communication with the Board and the District organization. Organizational leadership, communications and intergovernmental relations skills are key components of this position.

William Avery & Associates Management Consultants 31/2 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Suite A Los Gatos, CA 95030 408.399.4424 Fax: 408.399.4423 email: jobs@averyassoc.net www.averyassoc.net

To be considered, please visit our website at www.averyassoc.net/current-searches/ for a detailed job announcement, including ideal candidate profile, and how to apply on the Avery Associates Career Portal.

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Electricity from the 5,058 solar panels was also used to offset other city facility power demands. These projects included: • Retrofitting city facilities to become more energy efficient;

Police Chief

GENERAL MANAGER

In addition, Chowchilla’s wastewater treatment plant utilizes a microgrid battery system that serves as an “arbitrageur,” storing off-peak PG&E power and power generated by the solar array, then feeding it back into the plant’s grid during times when PG&E’s peak demand rates spike. In this way, the $3.3 million facility returns $8 million in savings.

• Building two 750,000-gallon water tanks.

Additional Benefits and a Model Approach The approach also benefited economic development and public safety. The second water well and storage tank were constructed in the city’s industrial area, and the upgraded infrastructure and increased water pressure helped lower insurance rates through an improved rating. As in Sanger, none of the cost for Chowchilla’s projects required increases in local utility rates; all were paid through energy savings using solar power and a microgrid. Furthermore, the clean energy produced by the solar array reduces carbon dioxide emissions by 5.2 million pounds per year or 104 million pounds over the program’s 20-year lifespan. The clean energy conversions not only generated savings for the city treasury, but also improved air quality and enhanced the quality of life enjoyed by all residents. These projects offer examples of innovative thinking and serve as models for other cities grappling with similar challenges. ■

www.cacities.org


“All about fit” City Manager City of Aspen, CO

Aspen, Colorado (3.87 sq. mi., elev. 7,908 ft.) is a premier, internationally-acclaimed resort community set high in Colorado’s Rocky Mountains in the heart of the White River National Forest. With historic roots as a silver mining and ranching community, Aspen was transformed into a world-class ski, cultural and arts center in the 1940s. A four-year college degree with major course work in public administration, management, or business administration, and seven years of progressively responsible government experience, including five years of executive or senior management experience (preferably as a City Manager or as an Assistant/Deputy City Manager or similar position) are required. The hiring range for this opportunity is $180,000 to $214,000 DOQE. Comprehensive benefits. Housing allowance and relocation assistance are subject to negotiation. Filing deadline is July 8, 2019. Contact Andrew Gorgey.

Chief Administrative Officer

Cosumnes Community Services District, Elk Grove, CA

Located in California’s Central Valley about 15 miles south of Sacramento, the Cosumnes Community Services District (CSD) is an exciting, specialized autonomous special district that provides parks, recreation, fire protection, and emergency medical services to an estimated 220,000 persons. The CSD’s 157 square-mile service area includes the cities of Elk Grove and Galt, CA, and the unincorporated area of south Sacramento County. The CSD employs 301 full-time and over 500 parttime staff, and has a 2018/19 FY budget of $118 million. The salary range for this position is $142,152 - $156,732 DOQE. Relocation assistance subject to negotiation. Filing deadline is July 10, 2019. Contact Andrew Gorgey.

Community Development Director City of Gilroy, CA

Gilroy’s peaceful residential setting, award winning parks and recreational opportunities, excellent schools and easy access to the entire Bay Area has made it one of the most affordable and fastest growing communities in southern Santa Clara County. The City Administrator seeks a visionary leader to lead the department and instill a culture in which development is facilitated and streamlined and who will be able to resolve highly complex issues, identify alternative solutions, project consequences of proposed actions, implement recommendations and respond to sensitive operational and/or policy issues, concerns and needs. A Bachelor’s degree required; Master’s degree highly desirable. Also required is 10 years of increasingly responsible professional-level experience in a city planning, community development, redevelopment, or closely related field including at least 5 years at a management level. AICP certification is highly desirable as is being bilingual English/Spanish. Filing deadline is July 15, 2019. Contact Phil McKenney.

Upcoming Opportunities Chief Marshal (Police Chief), Town of Telluride, CO Police Chief, Town of Prescott Valley, AZ To apply, please visit our website at: www.peckhamandmckenney.com Resumes acknowledged within two business days. Call (866) 912-1919 for more information.


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Bobbi C. Peckham • Phil McKenney

Peckham&McKenney www.peckhamandmckenney.com

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866.912.1919

William Avery & Associates, Inc. Labor Relations / Executive Search / Human Resources Consulting 31/2 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Suite A Los Gatos, CA 95030 408.399.4424 Fax: 408.399.4423 email: jobs@averyassoc.net www.averyassoc.net

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League of California Cities

www.cacities.org


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Contact: Allan Crecelius or Sandra Comrie

12707 High Bluff Dr., Ste 200 San Diego, CA 92130 Tel 858.259.3800 fax 858.792.7465 acrecelius@rewardstrategy.com

Exceeding clients’ expectations since 1987. Classification | Compensation Special Surveys | Performance Management

matrix consulting group

Over 130 Public Agencies across California put their TRUST in us, because we check all the boxes when it comes to managing their investments.

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www.westerncity.com

Brentwood Village, 149 S. Barrington Ave., #726, Los Angeles, CA 90049-2950 1-888-522-7772 • www.compensationconsulting.com Offices in various major cities

Western City, July 2019

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Profile for Western City Magazine

Western City July 2019  

Western City July 2019  

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