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FEBRUARY 2018 |

The Monthly Magazine of the League of California Cities®

®

Challenges of Electric Vehicle Infrastructure p.9 Farmersville’s Innovative Dual Roundabouts Welcome Visitors p.18 New Housing Laws Change How Cities Process Housing Applications p.7

www.westerncity.com


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CONTENTS Calendar of League Events 2  3 Executive Director’s Message  League Leaders Build on 2017 Successes to Shape 2018 Strategic Goals

California cities.

6 City Forum

 ocal Streets and Roads L Remain a League Priority in 2018

By Eva Spiegel

 ities’ active engagement on C transportation issues will be vitally important on several fronts, including documenting road conditions and protecting existing transportation funding.

7 Legal Notes

 ew Housing Laws N Change How Cities Process Housing Applications

By Barbara Kautz

 alifornia’s new housing laws C create additional requirements and new compliance rules for cities.

STATEWIDE

9

Challenges

COMMUNITIES

By Karalee Browne

DEVELOPMENT

 ities are tackling the need for C charging infrastructure to power electric vehicles. This article highlights pilot programs, lessons learned and more.

13

Contract Provisions Expedite Flood Cleanup in San José

By Aaron Kinney

 n unusual emergency services A agreement yielded significant benefits when disaster struck.

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Los

By Gary Lee Moore

 he nation’s largest sidewalk T repair effort gets underway.

By Carolyn Coleman

An inclusive and interactive gathering of highly engaged city leaders from throughout the state ensures that the League’s highest priorities reflect the common interests of

CALIFORNIA

of Electric Vehicle Infrastructure

Angeles Launches a $1.4 Billion Sidewalk Repair Program

18 California Cities Helen Putnam Award for Excellence

 armersville’s Innovative F Dual Roundabouts Welcome Visitors

 he project’s safety and traffic T improvements helped secure over $3.8 million in grant funds.

AUTHORITY

Providing California’s local governments with an effective tool for the timely financing of community-based public benefit projects. Since 1988, more than 500 cities, counties and special districts use CSCDA as their conduit issuer and PACE funding provider.

Job Opportunities 20  Professional Services 27  Directory

 Cover photo: Wakila

Sponsored by:

(800) 531-7476 www.cscda.org


®

President Rich Garbarino Council Member South San Francisco

1400 K Street Sacramento, CA 95814 (916) 658-8200 Fax (916) 658-8240

Second Vice President Jan Arbuckle Council Member Grass Valley

Immediate Past President JoAnne Mounce Council Member Lodi

Executive Director Carolyn Coleman

For a complete list of the League board of directors, visit www.cacities.org/board.

Magazine Staff Editor in Chief Jude Hudson, Hudson + Associates (916) 658-8234; email: editor@westerncity.com Managing Editor Norman Coppinger (916) 658-8277; email: ncoppinger@cacities.org Contributing Editor Eva Spiegel (916) 658-8228; email: espiegel@cacities.org Advertising Sales Manager Pam Maxwell-Blodgett (916) 658-8256; email: maxwellp@cacities.org Administrative Assistant Kimberly Brady (916) 658-8223; email: kbrady@cacities.org Contributors Rony Berdugo Dan Carrigg Melissa Kuehne Corrie Manning Jason Rhine Patrick Whitnell

leaguevents FEBRUARY 22–23

Board of Directors’ Meeting, Redondo Beach The League board reviews, discusses and takes action on a variety of issues affecting cities, including legislation, legal advocacy, education and training, and more.

MARCH 28–30

Public Works Officers’ Institute and Expo, Monterey Designed for professionals at every career level, this conference covers the latest developments in public works.

APRIL 4–6

Planning Commissioners’ Academy, Monterey Tailored to meet the needs of planning commissioners, planning directors, planning staff and other interested officials, the academy offers sessions on the major planning and land-use issues facing cities.

Associate Editors Carol Malinowski Carolyn Walker Design Taber Creative Group

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Advertising Design ImagePoint Design For photo credits, see page 21. Western City (ISSN 0279-5337) is published monthly by the League of California Cities, 1400 K St., Sacramento, CA 95814. Subscriptions: $39.00/1 year; $63.00/2 years; student: $26.50; foreign: $52.00; single copies: $4.00, including sales tax. Entered as periodical mail January 30, 1930, at the Post Office, Los Angeles, CA 90013, under the Act of April 13, 1879. Periodical postage paid at Sacramento, Calif.

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Postmaster: Send address changes to Western City, 1400 K Street, Sacramento, CA 95814. Western City Trademark Reg. U.S. Pat. Off. ©2018 League of California Cities. All rights reserved. Material may not be reprinted without written permission. This issue is Volume XCIV, No. 2.

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First Vice President Mark Kersey Council Member San Diego

League of California Cities

Policy Committee Meetings, Pomona The League’s policy committees review issues of interest to cities statewide and make recommendations to the League board of directors as part of the organization’s policy-making process. Learn how to join a League policy committee at www.cacities.org/joinpolicy.

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Legal Advocacy Committee Meeting, Pomona The committee reviews and recommends friend-of-the-court efforts on cases of significant statewide interest to California cities.

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Legislative Action Day, Sacramento Get the latest updates on legislation affecting your city and meet with your legislators.

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Board of Directors’ Meeting, Sacramento The League board reviews, discusses and takes action on a variety of issues affecting cities, including legislation, legal advocacy, education and training, and more.

Event and registration information is available at www.cacities.org/events. For the latest information on League conferences and events, follow us on Twitter @CaCitiesLearn. For legislative and policy updates and more, follow @CaCities. Follow Western City @WesternCityMag. Join us on Facebook. www.facebook.com/westerncity www.facebook.com/LeagueofCaCities

www.cacities.org


City leaders and the League’s Executive Committee, far right, work together to set the organization’s priorities for 2018.

Executive Director’s Message by Carolyn Coleman

League Leaders Build on 2017 Successes to Shape 2018 Strategic Goals At the annual League Leaders’ Planning Workshop and subsequent League board meeting in Santa Cruz, Nov. 28—–Dec. 1, 2017, nearly 160 leaders from the League’s divisions, departments, policy committees, diversity caucuses and board of directors met to develop the organization’s strategic priorities for 2018. They also reviewed the League’s progress on its 2017 strategic goals and other legislative accomplishments over the past year. This inclusive and interactive annual gathering of highly engaged city leaders from throughout the state ensures that the League’s top priorities reflect the common interests of California cities. Progress on 2017 Goals The initial part of the meeting involved an assessment of progress toward accomplishing the organization’s 2017 goals (listed below). For more details on these efforts, see the “2017 Legislative Year in Review” article at www.westerncity.com. 1. Increase Funding for Critical Transportation and Water Infrastructure. Provide additional state and federal funding and local financing tools — such as reducing the vote threshold for local initiatives — to support California’s economy, transportation (streets, bridges, trade corridors, active transportation and transit) and water-related needs (supply, sewer, stormwater, flood control, beach erosion, etc.), including maintenance and construction. Support appropriate streamlining of stormwater regulations and the California Environmental Quality

www.westerncity.com

Act (CEQA) to avoid duplication and reduce litigation. Progress: Following a multi-year effort by the League, the California State Association of Counties (CSAC) and other organizations in the Fix Our Roads Coalition to both educate about and advocate for a comprehensive transportation infrastructure funding solution, an agreement finally materialized in 2017. The Road Repair and Accountability Act of 2017, which comprises SB 1 (Beall, Chapter 5, Statutes of 2017) and ACA 5 (Frazier, Chapter 30, Statutes of 2017), combines dedicated funding with strong accountability measures. SB 1 provides an additional $5.4 billion annually for the state and local transportation system, of which $1.5 billion is dedicated to city and county street and road repairs. For cities, it doubles the amount of road maintenance funds they will receive to

fix their streets. ACA 5, which is scheduled to appear on the June 2018 ballot, extends constitutional protection to new funding sources to ensure they will be used for transportation purposes only. The passage of SB 5 (de León, Chapter 852, Statutes of 2017), a $4 billion parks and water bond scheduled to appear on the June 2018 ballot, is another win for cities that the League helped secure in 2017. It includes $425 million for per capita allocations with a $200,000 minimum for each city for park funding, $725 million for “park-poor” communities and additional funding for state park improvements, nature conservancies, climate and environmental programs, flood control, Salton Sea improvements and drought and drinking water projects.

continued Western City, February 2018

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League Leaders Build on 2017 Successes to Shape 2018 Strategic Goals, continued

2. Develop Realistic Responses to the Homelessness Crisis. Increase state and federal funding and support to provide additional shelter and services to California’s homeless and advance the recommendations of the CSAC-League Homelessness Task Force. Progress: In addition to supporting SB 2 and SB 3, which include funding for homelessness prevention, the CSACLeague Homelessness Task Force continued its efforts in 2017 to identify practical solutions city leaders can implement. The Task Force recommendations will be released in the first quarter of 2018. 3. Improve the Affordability of Workforce Housing and Secure Additional Funds for Affordable Housing. Increase state and federal financial support, reduce regulatory barriers, and provide additional incentives and local financial tools to address the affordability of workforce housing and increase the availability of affordable housing.

Progress: When Gov. Jerry Brown signed the “housing package” of bills in September 2017, it capped a legislative year focused on housing production for families of all income levels. During the session, lawmakers introduced more than 130 housing-related bills, many of which targeted local discretion and landuse authority.

Provide tools and resources cities need to respond to recent changes in statewide criminal sentencing policies. Protect local priorities during the development of regulations and legislation to implement the AUMA. In addition, continue to preserve city rights to deliver emergency medical services (California Health and Safety Code 1797.201).

Although the League opposed some of the 15 bills that made up the housing package, it strongly supported the measures that call for increases in funding for affordable housing — SB 2 (Atkins, Chapter 364, Statutes of 2017) and SB 3 (Beall, Chapter 365, Statutes of 2017) — and appropriately streamline local housing approvals, SB 540 (Roth, Chapter 369, Statutes of 2017).

Progress: The League supported several measures to help address the concerns of local officials over the new sentencing laws; however, these measures either failed to move or, in the case of AB 1408, Gov. Brown vetoed the bill. This measure sought to improve the management of ex-offenders subject to post-release community supervision.

4. Address Public Safety Impacts of Reduced Sentencing Laws, Protect Local Priorities in the Implementation of the Adult Use of Marijuana Act (AUMA) and Preserve City Rights to Deliver Emergency Medical Services.

Work groups collaborate to identify issues of greatest concern for their cities and regions.

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League of California Cities

Throughout 2017, the League opposed and was successful in obtaining amendments to multiple cannabis trailer bills. As implementation of the AUMA proceeds, the League will continue to be vigilant in protecting local authority and local revenues.


Other Accomplishments Despite significant progress on our strategic priorities, local control continued to be under threat in the Legislature. One measure would have forced local governments to lease public property to industry and dictated the rents that the local government could charge the user. Another measure would have virtually outlawed local governments’ ability to contract out for city services. The League and hundreds of city officials opposed both bills. Ultimately, Gov. Brown listened to cities and vetoed the first one, and cities were carved out of the second one.

2018 Strategic Goals League leaders and staff enjoy short breaks between sessions of intense discussion.

The interactive goal-setting process is an important responsibility of the League’s leadership each year. The discussion and debate provide an opportunity for all the League’s leaders to examine the most pressing priorities for California cities and set the League’s direction for the coming year. The goals focus the organization by providing a framework for our advocacy priorities. At the board meeting following the workshop, the League board of directors approved four strategic goals for 2018: 1. Address Public Safety Concerns of California Cities. • Address public safety concerns arising from recently enacted reduced sentencing laws; • Protect local funding and authority in the implementation of the Adult Use of Marijuana Act; • Continue to preserve city rights to deliver emergency medical services (Health and Safety Code 1797.201); and • Seek additional tools and resources to address critical community challenges such as homelessness, mental health, domestic violence, drug rehabilitation, ex-offender re-entry and human trafficking.

www.westerncity.com

2. Ensure Sustainability of Public Pension and Retirement Health Benefits. • Consistent with the League’s adopted pension sustainability principles, work with affected stakeholders, employees, the California Public Employees’ Retirement System (CalPERS), legislators and the governor to achieve meaningful options for cities to address growing unfunded pension liabilities that will ensure cities remain solvent and provide services to residents while continuing to offer employees meaningful and sustainable pension and health benefits. 3. Protect Existing Transportation Funding for Local Priorities. • Protect existing transportation funding for local priorities and oppose efforts that would reduce or eliminate funding for cities.

4. Improve Housing Affordability and Support Additional Resources to Address the Homelessness Crisis. • Increase state and federal financial support and provide additional local incentives and tools to improve housing affordability and develop more workforce and affordable housing. Support additional resources and tools to address the homelessness crisis and advance the recommendations of the CSAC-League Homelessness Task Force. More information on the 2018 goals is available at www.cacities.org/priorities. Thank you to all the League leaders who participated in this year’s priority-setting process. The League is effective on behalf of its city members because of you and your commitment to serve as a leader in the organization. Let’s have a great 2018! ■

Western City, February 2018

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Local Streets and Roads Remain a League Priority in 2018 by Eva Spiegel Over the past decade, California cities placed increasing transportation funding high on the list of the League’s legislative objectives. The focus on transportation infrastructure needs, which started in 2008 with the launch of the first Local Streets and Roads Needs Assessment, remains a priority in 2018. Thanks to SB 1 (Beall, Chapter 5, Statutes of 2017), cities are now receiving double the amount of transportation dollars from the state to repair and maintain the local transportation system. Cities’ active engagement on transportation issues in 2018 will be vitally important on several fronts including documenting road improvements and protecting existing transportation funding.

Local Streets and Roads Needs Assessment Data Collection One of the first opportunities to participate with the League in 2018 on transportation is by submitting your city’s street condition data for the upcoming Local Streets and Roads Needs Assessment. Scheduled for release in the fall, this year marks the 10th anniversary of the biennial report that documents the local transportation system’s current status and the funding needed to bring streets and roads into good condition. The survey, supported through a partnership with the California State Association of Counties (CSAC) and regional transportation agencies, captures data from approximately 99 percent of the local transportation network statewide. Engineers conduct the technical study, which has been instrumental in raising awareness of the system’s shortfalls and ensuring that cities received funding through the successful effort to pass new transportation revenues under SB 1 in April 2017. The survey uses a zero to 100 scale to measure the Pavement Condition Index (PCI). The 2016 report found that California’s local streets and roads had an average PCI of 65, which reflects a $70 billion unmet funding need over the next 10 years. Without the passage of SB 1, this unmet need would have grown by $20 billion with road conditions dropping to 56 on the PCI scale. Every city and county in California received the survey in January. March 30 is the deadline for your city to submit its information. Surveys include a special code for each local agency and must be submitted with this identifying information through the interactive link provided in the original survey communication.

Awards Program Showcases Infrastructure and Transportation Best Practices The upcoming Public Works Officers’ Institute & Expo, March 28–30 in Monterey, brings together city and county public works officers for educational sessions, networking and resource gathering. The conference emphasizes transportation infrastructure innovation through the annual Outstanding Local Streets and Roads Project Awards program. The Save California Streets coalition (www.SaveCaliforniaStreets. org), which includes the League, CSAC, County Engineers Association of California and other organizations, sponsors the Outstanding Local Streets and Roads Project Awards. The awards highlight infrastructure programs and projects that demonstrate a significant improvement to a city or county’s streets and roads. Winning construction and rehabilitation projects utilize new technologies and sustainable features and use public resources efficiently to achieve maximum return on investment. The awards do more than just celebrate the successes of the winning cities and counties. They also serve as a collection of best practices that other agencies can implement in their communities when moving forward on street repair and maintenance. Each year, one city or county receives recognition as the overall winner. Additional awards are given in four categories: 1. Efficient and sustainable road maintenance, construction and reconstruction; 2. Complete streets; 3. Safety or intelligent transportation system; and 4. Efficient and sustainable bridge maintenance, construction and reconstruction. It’s not too early to start thinking about projects in your city that may deserve a nomination for the 2019 award. The nomination period for the 2019 awards will open in October 2018 and close in January 2019. Articles featuring the winning projects from previous years can be found at www.westerncity.com (search for “Local Streets and Roads Project Awards”) and www.savecali forniastreets.org/award-program/award-winners. ■

Previous editions of the report are available at www.SaveCalifornia Streets.org. Eva Spiegel is communications director for the League and can be reached at espiegel@cacities.org.

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League of California Cities

www.cacities.org


New Housing Laws Change how Cities Process Housing Applications by Barbara Kautz On Sept. 15, the last day of its 2017 session, the California Legislature responded to the state’s housing crisis by passing a landmark housing package of 15 bills. Gov. Jerry Brown signed the package on Sept. 29, 2017. The bills provide funds for affordable housing — much of it designated for local government — in exchange for requirements to streamline housing development approvals. Though the December issue of Western City included a brief description of all of the bills in the housing package, this article provides a more extensive overview of the additional requirements the bills impose on cities and highlights the changes cities must make in the way they process housing applications.

Plan, subdivision and zoning standards unless specific findings can be made. AB 678 (Bocanegra, Chapter 373, Statutes of 2017) and SB 167 (Skinner, Chapter 368, Statutes of 2017), which are identical bills, further require that local governments provide developers with a list of any inconsistencies between a proposed project and all local plans, ordinances, guidelines and standards within 30 to 60 days after the housing application is deemed complete or the project will be “deemed consistent” with all local policies. These two bills and AB 1515 (Daly, Chapter 378, Statutes of 2017) give much less deference to local governments’ findings of consistency with local plans, requiring that all findings be supported

by a “preponderance of the evidence” and allowing the courts to give just as much weight to an applicant’s evidence of consistency. continued on page 22

Processing of Housing Applications AB 678, SB 167 and AB 1515: Changes to Housing Accountability Act Affect All Housing Development Projects. Cities are prohibited from denying or reducing in density any housing project conforming with all “objective” General

About Legal Notes This column is provided as general information and not as legal advice. The law is constantly evolving, and attorneys can and do disagree about what the law requires. Local agencies interested in determining how the law applies in a particular situation should consult their local agency attorneys.

Barbara Kautz is a partner with Goldfarb & Lipman LLP and can be reached at bkautz@goldfarblipman.com or (510) 836-6336. www.westerncity.com

Western City, February 2018

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Challenges of

Electric

Electric Vehicle Charger Basics A Level 1 charger is a basic 120-volt plug-in that charges at a slow rate, requiring many hours to recharge an electric vehicle’s battery. Most vehicles come with a basic Level 1 charger included. A Level 2 charger is faster and the most common type of public charger on the market. It charges at 6.6 kilowatts (kW), which translates to 20 to 25 miles of range for an hour of charging. Direct-current fast-chargers, sometimes called Level 3 chargers, can charge an electric vehicle to about 80 percent of its full charge in 30 minutes. High-power chargers are recent additions to the market. These typically start at 150 kW, with some reaching 350 kW. High-power chargers are expected to recharge electric cars for a range of 200 to 300 miles after a 15-minute charge.

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League of California Cities

www.cacities.org


Vehicle

An electric vehicle charges at a station in the City of Claremont.

Infrastructure by Karalee Browne An increasing number of electric vehicles (EVs) are traveling California roads, pushing the state closer to achieving Governor Brown’s goal of 1.5 million electric cars on the road by 2025. However, the infrastructure to support these vehicles is arriving at a much slower pace. Although the California Energy Commission has awarded more than $25 million in grants to expand the growth of the state’s EV charging network, the state is still exploring the best path forward to support a market transition to EVs and create the infrastructure needed to support them. In 2017, the Legislature addressed EV infrastructure through several bills. AB 1452 (Muratsuchi, Chapter 635, Statutes of 2017) authorizes exclusive EV charging and parking on public streets, along with AB 1083 (Burke, Chapter 638, Statutes of 2017), which now requires the California Public Utility Commission (CPUC) to review proposals to determine which state parks and beaches are suitable for EV charging stations. However, lawmakers dramatically rewrote AB 1184 (Ting), which would have authorized $3 billion in funding for EV incentives, instead calling for the California Air Resources Board to create a report “regarding the operation of the vehicle incentive pro-

grams.” The bill has been moved to the inactive file. Meanwhile, all of the major investorowned utilities (IOUs) have begun rolling out pilot programs approved by the CPUC to help increase the EV charging station infrastructure statewide. All three IOU programs focus on businesses and multifamily housing, with an emphasis on those in disadvantaged communities. The City of Lynwood, one such community, worked with Southern California Edison to install six EV charge ports at its city complex to accommodate the city’s new EV fleet and another eight charge points in its civic center public parking lot for public use. “Being a disadvantaged community, the city wanted to bring charging infrastructure to its residents that may not have resources available to provide these stations on their own,” says Lynwood Mayor Maria Santillan-Beas. Similarly, the City of Chula Vista is collaborating with San Diego Gas & Electric to install 123 chargers in three locations including City Hall, the public works yard and the police station. The process from concept to installation took a year, but Police Captain Vern Sallee says it was well worth the wait. “Investing in the in-

frastructure now allows us to accommodate our current employees’ needs, help the city reach its sustainability goals and prepare our operations for the future,” says Sallee. “Infrastructure is everything,” says San Diego City Council President pro Tem and League First Vice President Mark Kersey. “Having the chargers available in locations where people need to use them is going to be key in the adoption of electric vehicles.” In 2017, the City of San Diego increased its EV ports from 32 to 68 and now has charging available at 15 popular landmarks throughout the city. These utility-led programs seek to provide a cost-effective, turnkey approach to EV infrastructure installation that expands access and opportunity. Eighty percent of EV drivers charge at home, but those who live in apartments don’t have that option. In an effort to provide access to these people, Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) will install 7,500 Level 2 EV charging stations throughout its service territory over the next three years. PG&E is the only utility currently accepting applications for its first round of CPUC funding. For more information about how to apply for PG&E’s program, read the online version of this article at www.westerncity.com. continued

Karalee Browne is sustainability program manager for the Institute for Local Government and can be reached at kbrowne@ca-ilg.org.

www.westerncity.com

Western City, February 2018

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Challenges of Electric Vehicle Infrastructure, continued

The Actual Cost and Who Pays Prior to the utility pilot programs, many cities installed EV charging stations on their own and found that the total project cost can vary dramatically depending on the location and type of charger installed. In some cases, the cost of the actual charging station is the least expensive part of the project — about $1,500 to $3,000. Most cities funded stations using grants or rebates like those offered by regional air quality management districts, the California Energy Commission or the

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. However, many cities found that certain circumstances can significantly increase the project cost. For example, a typical Level 2 charger requires only a 240-volt connection, which is the most common power input connection to residential and small commercial buildings, but direct-current fast chargers require much more power access and can cost up to $300,000 per installation. In some cases, cities found that installing an EV charging station involves

Eighty percent of EV drivers charge at home, but those who live in apartments don’t have that option.

Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) compliance regulations, which can double the cost of the project. Maintenance has also been an issue for many cities because many did not account for that in the original contracts with the providers. Moorpark City Council Member David Pollock, who drives an EV, says his city got a surprise expense after installing four EV chargers. “We discovered that after a year of service, the vendors come back with an annual maintenance fee,” says Pollock. “One vendor tried to charge us $3,000 per year for two chargers.” Half Moon Bay Public Works Director John Doughty says that cities should have a clear understanding of the total and ongoing costs of EV infrastructure and who is going to pay for it. The City of Half Moon Bay owns its EV charging stations and charges $1 per hour for the public to use them. Though the rate does not cover the city’s entire energy or

with

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operational costs, Doughty says the council set the rate as part of an effort to be good stewards of public funds, while ensuring that the community and its visitors have the amenities they need. “Our council sees this as a sustainability and an economic development opportunity,” says Doughty. “We want people to have the choice to purchase environmentally responsible cars and still know that they can visit our city and not have to worry about getting stranded.” Like Half Moon Bay, the cities of San Mateo, Santa Barbara, Claremont and San Diego recoup costs by charging 25 cents, 35 cents, $1.25 and $1.75 per hour, respectively. However, some cities such as Simi Valley, Moorpark, Santa Cruz and Santa Monica do not charge patrons for EV charging in hopes of encouraging EV ownership. “Santa Monica is aggressively pursuing policies and programs that reduce carbon emissions,” says Mayor Ted Winterer. “This is why we’ve long supported electric vehicles and the charging infrastructure that makes them a realistic alternative.” The City of Santa Monica recently approved an EV Action Plan (bit.ly/2CiV7tu) that addresses public and private infrastructure, public policy and community outreach. Garrett Wong, the city’s senior

sustainability analyst, says cities often underestimate the time and effort that goes into planning and installing EV infrastructure. “EV charging touches many departments like few other projects do, from public works and legal to parking operators and the utility companies,” says Wong. “We have done a lot of research and learned a lot through our experience. We hope this plan can serve as a template for a more strategic approach that is needed to help speed up the process and implementation.”

Sacramento Selected to Be the First Green City The City of Sacramento also has an Electric Vehicle Strategy. The city worked with Sacramento County, Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality Management District, Sacramento Municipal Utility District and other stakeholder groups to build on the countywide EV Readiness Plan, which outlines forecasted demand for EV charging infrastructure and prioritizes locations throughout the Sacramento area. In July 2017, Volkswagen’s subsidiary, Electrify America, chose the City of Sacramento to be its first Green City as part of a court-ordered settlement. The award will bring $44 million to Sacramento by 2020 to expand its EV infrastructure and

increase access to zero-emission technologies in low-income communities in the coming years. “Electrify America’s Green City Initiative provides an unparalleled opportunity to electrify transportation and enhance the mobility options of all residents, particularly those who live in disadvantaged communities,” says Mayor Darrell Steinberg. “It is ultimately about how to get more people where they need to go in a manner that reduces emissions and advances the technology, while creating jobs and economic opportunity in the process.” Meanwhile, in May 2017, the Sacramento region launched the state's first EV carshare program that placed eight shared EVs at public housing sites. Residents can now apply for on-demand access to the vehicles with no charge for maintenance, insurance or charging the battery. The program is funded through a $1.3 million grant from the California Air Resources Board using cap-and-trade funds.

The Road Ahead As utility companies implement pilot programs and the state works on a comprehensive report, cities are preparing to take advantage of current funding opportunities to help transform their continued

The cities of Torrance, left, and Half Moon Bay, right, offer convenient charging stations for electric vehicles.

www.westerncity.com

Western City, February 2018

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Challenges of Electric Vehicle Infrastructure, continued

EV-related operations and their communities. Joseph Oldham, director of the San Joaquin Valley Clean Transportation Center, says cities can do several things immediately to make sure they are promoting EV ownership and the charging infrastructure. “Cities should take a look at all of their policies, streamline permitting processes and update building, parking and zoning codes,” Oldham says. “The market is changing rapidly, and cities need to be prepared to access opportunities quickly.” Oldham encourages cities to think beyond what is in front of them and plan for regional and statewide connectivity. For links to additional resources and information to help local governments considering how to bring electric vehicle infrastructure into communities, read the online version of this article at www.westerncity.com. ■

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League of California Cities

The City of Santa Monica uses photovoltaic solar panels to power an electric vehicle charging station.

www.cacities.org


On Feb. 21, 2017, the latest in a series of rainstorms caused severe flooding in several neighborhoods in the City of San José, displacing hundreds of vulnerable residents and causing at least $73 million in property damage. The crisis prompted a massive emergency deployment that involved rescuing citizens by boat, establishing overnight shelters, inspecting damaged homes, distributing disaster relief and connecting residents with essential services. For San José’s Environmental Services Department (ESD), the focus during the first days and weeks was cleaning up flood debris, including damaged property from people’s homes. Hundreds of tons of trash were collected and hauled to a landfill at no cost to residents.

Planning Ahead Pays Off In responding to the Coyote Creek flood, ESD benefited from previous experience. After a similar flood in 1997, the city

wrote provisions into its waste-hauling contracts that required the haulers to provide equipment and personnel during emergencies. That meant the city could get debris bins, loaders and drivers out into the flood-ravaged neighborhoods within a few days to help building owners and tenants get off to a fast start in cleaning up and repairing their properties. This sort of emergency services agreement is unusual for waste contracts, according to ESD Deputy Director Jo Zientek, but it can yield significant benefits when disaster strikes. Sang Ngo, who owns a four-unit apartment building in the Rock Springs neighborhood, says he appreciated the free debris bin service because he had so many other expenses. This landlord had to pay for the walls, floors and appliances to be removed and replaced in two

ground-floor units. His insurer ultimately reimbursed him, but he lost four months of rent from the tenants who were displaced. “It was a painful process,” Ngo says. “The city put out a lot of effort to help the owners.”

Time Spent in the Field Proves Valuable Zientek, whose division oversees the city’s recycling and garbage contracts, was at the Emergency Operations Center after the flood when the discussion turned to debris removal. She quickly realized that providing 40-cubicyard trash bins would not be enough. And she knew the city’s residential yard waste contractor had the right array of equipment to do the job, particularly “the claw,” a custom-built loader designed for grabbing loose plant material. continued

Aaron Kinney is the public information representative for the Communications Division of the City of San José’s Environmental Services Department and can be reached at aaron.kinney@sanjoseca.gov.

www.westerncity.com

Western City, February 2018

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Contract Provisions Expedite Flood Cleanup in San José, continued

Zientek had seen the claw loader in action while out on ride-alongs with the waste contractor. That sort of hands-on knowledge is a useful resource during a crisis, says ESD Director Kerrie Romanow. “A big emphasis for our leadership team is spending time in the field, seeing what we do,” says Romanow. “And that helps during these catastrophic events, because

you have a more intimate knowledge of your capabilities as an organization. There’s a big difference between reading it and seeing it.” That’s especially important in a large department like the ESD, which has 540 employees and a budget of more than $300 million. In addition to managing garbage and recycling contracts,

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Collaboration and Flexibility Aid Response It didn’t take long to realize that the claw, with its powerful pincer-like grasp, was perfectly suited for the job of hauling flood debris. “We called for two claws, which rapidly showed the need for about a dozen claws,” says Zientek. “The deployment evolved quickly as we saw how effective it was.” That sort of flexibility was critical to the city’s response, as was coordination between various departments. The ESD worked closely during the cleanup with the Transportation and Planning, Building and Code Enforcement departments.

Help From the Community San José Mayor Sam Liccardo has placed a strong emphasis on cleaning up the city through his Beautify San José initiative, or #BeautifySJ, which aims to boost civic pride through aesthetic improvements. In the days after the flood, the #BeautifySJ team worked with city staff and community

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the department provides drinking water to roughly 100,000 San José households, operates one of the largest wastewater treatment facilities in the state, recycles 12 million gallons of water a day for commercial customers, prevents pollution from entering the stormwater system and runs sustainability and habitat-protection programs.

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partners to recruit more than 4,000 volunteers to help clean up hard-hit neighborhoods. Over the next several weekends, the volunteers helped the city haul more than 2,000 tons of debris and ruined materials to a landfill.

Remaining Nimble Is Part of Resiliency The ESD’s Illegal Dumping Rapid Response Team also played a key role in the flood recovery. The unit supports the #BeautifySJ goals by removing couches, appliances and other large items discarded on city streets. In addition, the team was certified in 2016 to handle household hazardous waste, from paint and pesticides to batteries and fluorescent tubes. After the flood hit, the city dispatched the five-person team to remove accumulating household hazardous waste rather than paying a contractor. That enabled the city to get the waste off the streets quickly and prevent toxic material from entering storm drains. The team disposed of roughly 6,000 gallons of hazardous liquids and 21,000 pounds of toxic solids. “The quick action of our Illegal Dumping Rapid Response Team played a critical role in our post-flood cleanup effort,” Mayor Liccardo says. “By removing tons of waste, the response team cleared the

way for residents to begin to rebuild and kept garbage and pollutants out of our waterways.” For Zientek, the team’s versatility showed the value of keeping some core services in-house — at a time when many cities face tough decisions to outsource essential functions. “If your city or agency outsources everything,” she said, “you may lose some of that internal resiliency to respond when emergencies strike.”

Lessons Learned Officials at the Emergency Operations Center worked diligently to inform residents during the recovery. As the debris bin service got underway, for example, the city distributed flyers and staff knocked on doors to let residents know what was happening. Equip field staff who aid in recovery efforts with FAQs to disseminate during recovery efforts. When residents encounter a city employee in the aftermath of a disaster, they see a source of information, regardless of the employee’s department or normal responsibilities, and typically ask questions. Give employees tools like FAQs to help them respond to residents’ concerns. Time services to match residents’ schedules. The ESD could have timed the free debris bin service better to

match residents’ schedules, says Zientek. The service typically began at dawn and wrapped up by mid-afternoon, in keeping with the schedule of regular volunteer cleanups. But residents, many of whom were living in shelters or with family, typically got started later in the morning, and their activity peaked in the afternoon as city workers and volunteers were wrapping up. The department is looking at other ways it could help disaster-stricken residents and how to make sure volunteers have all the equipment they need. And additional training may be warranted so that more staff have the knowledge and expertise to lead during emergencies. “We were lucky Jo Zientek was at the command center — she is likely one of a few staff who knew about the contract provision,” says Romanow. “We need better and broader understanding.”

Connecting the Dots California cities deal with emergencies that include wildfires, floods, mudslides and earthquakes. As city officials and staff help their communities recover from the latest in a series of disasters statewide and think about the next round of preparedness training, San José’s experience serves as a reminder that awareness of a seemingly minor detail can pay off when it matters most — when residents are waiting for help. ■

The city mobilized staff, contractors and community volunteers to haul tons of debris. Western City, February 2018

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los Angeles Launches a $1.4 Billion Sidewalk Repair Program by Gary Lee Moore

A comprehensive 30-year effort to fix sidewalks is underway in Los Angeles — and is the largest such program in the United States.

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Many of us rely on sidewalks to travel through our cities — and as in many cities, the sidewalks in Los Angeles are in desperate need of repair. Los Angeles has approximately 11,000 miles of sidewalks stretched over 472 square miles, and many are cracked, broken and upheaved. A group of concerned residents decided this was unacceptable and sued the city. In 2016, the city and the group reached a settlement, which included a $1.4 billion commitment over the next 30 years to fix sidewalks throughout Los Angeles. For the first five years, the city will spend $31 million annually, gradually ramping up to $63 million each year for the final five years.

Requesting a Repair The Los Angeles City Council designated the Bureau of Engineering to lead the program. In the final week of 2016, the bureau launched Safe Sidewalks LA, the largest sidewalk repair program nationwide. Its goal is to repair sidewalks and make them comply with the Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) and the California Building Code. The city established three programs for people who want to request a repair. 1. The Access Request Program makes repairs requested by and for people with mobility disabilities who encounter physical barriers such as broken sidewalks, missing and broken curb ramps or other barriers in the public right of way. These repairs are a priority; 2. The city is also offering a limitedtime Rebate Program. Residential and commercial property owners can receive a rebate of up to $10,000 and also get their sidewalks repaired sooner if they share in the cost of the repairs; and 3. The Report a Sidewalk Repair program is for people who do not fall into the other two categories. This allows the general public to place a sidewalk on the list for future repairs as funding becomes available. The city is also leading by example by repairing sidewalks at municipal facilities

and expects to complete approximately 3,000 of those sites in the next five years. After a sidewalk is either repaired or designated ADA-compliant, the city issues a certificate that warranties the sidewalk for 20 years for residential properties and five years for commercial properties. If something goes wrong, the city will fix it one more time. After that time, the owner will be responsible for maintaining the repairs. This is referred to as “fix and release.”

Making the System Easy to Use Los Angeles created an electronic intake system to maximize staff time and standardize the program. The system leverages the city’s existing 311 system, the non-emergency number that helps residents access services in 150 languages and includes capability for those with hearing or speaking impairment. Applicants can submit requests through the 311 website, 311 mobile app and the Safe Sidewalks LA website (www.sidewalks.lacity.org) or by calling live operators at 311.

Mapping the Sidewalks Prior to the launch of Safe Sidewalks LA, the city had never mapped all its sidewalks. So simply finding each one presented a major challenge. To tackle that piece of the program, the city is using a combination of geographic information system (GIS) software, aerial imagery and a geographic dataset of property lines to digitize sidewalk features, including sidewalks, curbs, parkways and driveways. The property lines are overlaid on the aerial imagery, allowing the city to trace and construct sidewalk feature boundaries.

Keeping the Community Informed and Involved Community interest in Safe Sidewalks LA is understandably high. In the program’s early weeks, concerned environmental and mobility advocates reached out to Los Angeles asking for a way to maintain a continued dialogue about how the program and the environmental review process would work. In response, the city established the Safe Sidewalk LA Community Advisory

Committee, which meets on a regular basis to discuss related issues of importance to the community.

Making Trees a Priority Trees are an extremely valuable resource, and the city’s goal is to minimize tree removal when repairing sidewalks upheaved by roots. To do this, crews trim the canopy, trim roots, put in root barriers and find creative ways to build around trees, such as installing curved or “meandering” sidewalks along the base. If a tree must be removed, the city replaces it with at least two new trees. Crews are building larger tree wells to give roots more room to grow. This proactive approach helps the city manage the urban canopy and makes it more sustainable in the long term.

Determining Best Materials for Sustainable, LongLasting Repairs The city’s innovations don’t end with trees. Los Angeles is also pursuing the use of alternative materials in sidewalk repairs and has established a pilot project to determine the best materials for sustainable and long-lasting repairs. The program is installing sidewalks constructed of alternative materials at city facilities and will monitor and assess performance. Results from this demonstration pilot will be used for further analysis as part of a product approval process. ■

A Note About Sidewalk Maintenance This article focuses on unique circumstances affecting the City of Los Angeles. Cities throughout the state have various policies affecting sidewalk maintenance, which often include requiring individual property owners to be responsible for maintenance of sidewalks serving their properties. In the past, the League has opposed several legislative proposals that attempted to shift responsibility for sidewalk maintenance to local agencies.

Gary Lee Moore is city engineer for the City of Los Angeles and can be reached at Gary.Lee.Moore@lacity.org. www.westerncity.com

Western City, February 2018

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Farmersville’s Innovative

Dual Roundabouts Farmersville, a rural city of 11,248 residents located a few miles from Visalia, faced major circulation challenges at its main entrance from Highway 198. Traffic often backed up at multiple stop signs. Pedestrians lacked sidewalks to reach businesses and restaurants. The substandard conditions discouraged developers from investing in potential industrial and commercial sites. “It was congested. It wasn’t easy to traverse and needed improvement,” says Ted Smalley, executive director of the Tulare County Association of Governments. The city’s gateway also lacked a sense of place to let visitors know they had arrived in Farmersville. But the improvements originally recommended for the Farmersville Boulevard and Highway 198 interchange would be costly — estimated at $30 million to widen a bridge, install traffic signals and build other necessary infrastructure. And the improvements were not scheduled until decades later in 2030. Smalley remembers when the initial idea was proposed for the Farmersville roundabouts. He says, “We got together with the city council and county leaders and asked, ‘What if we could do roundabouts

at the city entrance intersection?’” From an engineering perspective, roundabouts were feasible at this location and much less costly than the improvements recommended earlier. The City of Farmersville was willing to try something new. This decision led to a complete overhaul of the city’s gateway from the Highway 198 corridor overpass and connecting streets leading into Farmersville. The innovative project used a novel approach: dual roundabouts to move traffic into the city from the highway. It included sidewalks, bicycle lanes, retaining walls and sustainable landscaping that provided “complete streets.”

Sending a Signal: Open for Business The roundabouts also created a new grand entry into Farmersville. “Now, when people first see our city, they are really impressed,” says Farmersville Mayor Paul Boyer. He explains that the project helps the city showcase the vacant parcels at the gateway. “They can see that we have ample area for commercial and possibly industrial development,” he says. “It’s inviting and accessible now; it says Farmersville is open for business.”

The City of Farmersville won the Award for Excellence in the Public Works, Infrastructure and Transportation category of the 2017 Helen Putnam Award for Excellence program. For more about the awards program, visit www.helenputnam.org.

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Welcome Visitors City leaders expect the improvements to encourage future job growth and commercial investments that will allow residents to shop for more goods and services close to home. The project opens the door for development of 65 acres at the southeast quadrant of the interchange and another 65 acres along the west side of Farmersville Boulevard, south of Noble Avenue.

Costs and Benefits The $5.5 million project was a cost-effective and attractive solution to address multiple transportation-related issues, especially when compared with the original $30 million improvement estimate. Roundabouts are a sustainable transportation improvement that eliminates ongoing costs of hardware, maintenance and electrical work associated with an intersection that uses traffic signals. By reducing traffic congestion, the roundabouts have resulted in shorter driving times for motorists and reduced fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions, which help improve air quality. Roundabouts also provide safety benefits. “A roundabout removes 90 percent of the fatal collisions that occur at intersections because it eliminates ‘T-bone’ crashes,” says Smalley. “We love the safety aspects of roundabouts. The Farmersville project is the first of its kind in Tulare County, and it shows that roundabouts work.”

www.westerncity.com

The project’s safety and traffic improvements helped Farmersville secure more than $3.8 million in grant funds from the Highway Safety Improvement and Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Improvement programs. In addition, Tulare County’s Measure R (a half-cent sales tax for transportation funding) provided over $1 million toward the project. The project was the first of its kind not only in Farmersville but in Tulare County. “It’s one of the things I will remember for my entire career — how government came together to do something new,” says Smalley. Public reaction to the dual roundabouts has been overwhelmingly positive. Interim City Manager Mario Krstic says, “Traffic moves beautifully, conditions are safer, and we have a sense of pride as we enter our city.” Mayor Paul Boyer notes that the project offers an excellent example of what the city can accomplish when it is able to secure outside funding, “We are a severely disadvantaged community,” he says. “But that doesn’t mean that we can’t get things done.” Contact: Mario Krstic, interim city manager, City of Farmersville; phone: (559) 747-0458; email: MKrstic@Farmersvillepd.com. ■

Western City, February 2018

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Display Advertising

Western City magazine’s job opportunity section is the source for job seekers looking for positions in local government. When you place a job opportunity ad in Western City

Call Pam Maxwell-Blodgett at (800) 262-1801 to place a display (boxed) ad or for rate and deadline information, or email admanager@westerncity.com. Website Job Postings Display ads are posted on our website at no additional charge. But if you miss the deadline for getting your job opportunity ad into the magazine, you can post it on the Western City website right away. To post your job opportunity ad on our automated website, visit www.westerncity.com or contact Kimberly Brady, Western City’s administrative assistant; email: kbrady@ cacities.org; phone: (916) 658-8223.

magazine, it will be posted at no additional charge on our website. For rates and deadlines, visit www.westerncity. com and click on the Advertise link.

Independent City Auditor The City of Beverly Hills is seeking a proactive and dedicated individual to serve as the City’s first Independent City Auditor. Reporting directly to the City Council, the Independent City Auditor will be responsible for building a robust and active auditing office that will provide a variety of services such as performance audits, financial audits, operate the waste and fraud hotline, and conduct special studies. Bachelor’s degree is required; Master’s degree preferred. Significant experience in developing, leading, and issuing performance audits as well as financial related audits is also required. Salary will be competitive in the region and DOQ. The City also offers an excellent benefits package including CalPERS retirement. Apply by submitting a compelling cover letter and comprehensive resume to apply@ralphandersen.com by 2/26/2018. Confidential inquiries are welcomed to Heather Renschler at (916) 630-4900. Detailed brochure available at www.ralphandersen.com.

Ralph Andersen & Associates

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District Director, Palos Verdes Library District, CA The Palos Verdes Library District serves a culturally diverse population of 69,000 people who comprise a well-educated, highly engaged, and affluent bedroom community located 25 miles southwest of downtown Los Angeles. Bordered by the picturesque Pacific Ocean, the Palos Verdes Peninsula is defined by breathtaking coastline vistas, multi-layered steep cliffs, gracefully rolling hills, deep canyons, and a semi-rural feel. The District is now seeking a visionary and collaborative leader to serve as its District Director. The ideal candidate will be passionate about libraries and the future of library services and will bring strong management skills and a commitment to employee engagement. As the District’s ambassador, the Director will enjoy and be skilled at building goodwill relationships in the local community; with the local school district; with local, state, and federal elected officials; and in local, state, and national library communities. The selected candidate will be a forward thinker who has an accredited degree in library/ information science, public administration, business administration, or a related field. At least five (5) years of broad management experience in a library system or other customer-oriented environments is required. Experience in a broad spectrum of library services including overseeing a multi-branch library system is desirable. The salary for the position is open depending on qualifications and experience. If you are interested in this outstanding opportunity, please apply online at www.bobmurrayassoc.com. Contact Bob Murray at (916) 784-9080 with questions. Closing date February 18, 2018. phone 916•784•9080 fax 916•784•1985 www.bobmurrayassoc.com

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Chief Technology Officer City of Fremont, CA

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erving as the eastern anchor of the Silicon Valley, the City of Fremont is home to an ethnically and culturally diverse population of 231,664. The city’s Innovation District is known as the hottest new address for start-ups and Fremont’s housing market is regarded as one of the strongest in California. The Chief Technology Officer (CTO) oversees the Information Technology Services Department, which is supported by 23 FTE and a budget of $10 million. The ideal candidate will be an inspiring and versatile leader who adheres to admirable standards and a superior customer orientation. A high-level problem solver and forward thinking strategist, he/she will have the proven ability to implement transformational technology-based solutions that maximize individual and organizational capacity. Outstanding communications and interpersonal skills will also be expected. Seven (7) years of progressively responsible and relevant experience in the public and/or private sector, including at least three (3) years of supervisory experience, and a Bachelor’s degree are required. Salary range $158,873 - $ 214,479; salary supplemented by an attractive benefits package. Please visit www.tbcrecruiting.com for detailed brochure and to apply online. This recruitment will close on Sunday, February 4, 2018. Teri Black • 424.296.3111 Bradley Wardle • 650.450.3299

DIRECTOR OF DEVELOPMENT SERVICES/CITY ENGINEER Salary: $10,720.00 – $13,029.00 The City of Turlock is accepting applications for the position of Director of Development Services/ City Engineer. This individual will plan, direct, organize and review the Engineering, Planning and Building & Safety divisions. The incumbent will also direct the delivery of highly responsible and responsive professional technical expertise, guidance and support to ensure compliance with standards to safeguard public safety and property related to engineering, design and construction in a manner that facilitates development that enhances the high quality of life in Turlock. Please see job announcement for additional information and job requirements by utilizing the following link, cityofturlock.org. If you are interested in this outstanding opportunity, please submit a cover letter and a detailed resume as soon as possible to: City of Turlock, Human Resources, 156 S Broadway, Suite 235, Turlock, CA 95380 Telephone: (209)668-5542 Facsimile: (209)668-5529 This position is open until filled.

Photo/art credits Cover: Wakila Pages 3–5: Courtesy of League of California Cities & Eva Spiegel Page 6: Nastasic Page 7: Beklaus Page 8: Wakila Page 9: Courtesy of the City of Claremont Page 11: Courtesy of the cities of Torrance and Half Moon Bay Page 12: Courtesy of the City of Santa Monica Page 13: DJPerry

www.westerncity.com

Pages 14–15: Courtesy of the City of San José Page 16: Courtesy of the City of Los Angeles Pages 18–19: Photos, courtesy of the City of Farmersville and the League of California Cities; graphic, Olgastocker/Shutterstock.com Page 23: NTZolov Page 25: Alacatr Page 27: TTTuna

Senior Planner Salary: $7,316 – 9,366 monthly

Brief description of duties: Under direct supervision of the Community Development Director or designee, the Senior Planner performs a variety of planning activities including the review of developmental and land use applications; zoning, site plan, environmental review, and provides technical assistance to the general public. Qualifications, closing date and contact information: A minimum of a Bachelor’s Degree with an emphasis in urban or regional planning, business administration or a related field. Minimum of six (6) years full time of progressively responsible experience in city or regional planning, community development, zoning administration or a closely related field. Any combination of education and experience sufficient to provide the requisite knowledge, skills and abilities. One year of graduate study in city planning or closely related field can be substituted for one year experience. Contact: Human Resources Department, Attn: Kari Mendoza, 951-769-8520, karim@beaumont-ca.gov, www.ci.beaumont.ca.us/jobs

Western City, February 2018

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New Housing Laws Change How Cities Process Housing Applications, continued from page 7

SB 35: Streamlined Approval for Some Housing Projects. SB 35 (Wiener, Chapter 366, Statutes of 2017) seeks to streamline the approval process for some housing developments. A multifamily housing project proposed in a city that has not issued enough building permits

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to satisfy its regional housing allocation for lower- or above moderate-income housing may be eligible for ministerial approval with no review required under the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA). The city must provide an initial

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Director of Administrative Services City of Marysville, CA The City of Marysville (population 12,800) is a unique and charming city located in Yuba County and part of the Greater Sacramento area. One of California’s historic Gold Rush cities, Marysville is a vibrant center of distinctive shopping, dining, and entertainment. The City is seeking a Director to serve as the principal financial and administrative officer for the Administrative Services Department. With talented and dedicated staff, the Director of Administrative Services is a working department head, responsible for and extensively involved in all aspects of budgeting, accounting and financial reporting, debt management, revenue generation, cost allocation, and budget development and control, as well as benefits and claims management, animal licensing, parking citation payments, and boat launch permits. The City seeks a highly collaborative candidate with a strong commitment to customer service and a history of applying creative solutions to financial, programmatic, and operational challenges encountered on the job. The ideal candidate will possess a solid background in all aspects of municipal finance, coupled with a general understanding of city operations. Any combination of education, training, and experience which provides the required knowledge, skills, and abilities to perform the job is qualifying. A Bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university is required preferably in Accounting, Finance, Economics, Mathematics, Public or Business Administration, or a related field. Five (5) years of broad and extensive experience is also required including administration and management of a comprehensive finance program of the sort required by municipal governments, including at least four (4) years of project management and supervision of others engaged in such work. A Master’s degree and/or CPA license is also preferred. The annual salary range for this position is $99,348–$115,572, DOQ. Please visit our website at www.bobmurrayassoc.com to apply online. Contact Mr. Gary Phillips at (916) 784-9080, should you have questions. Closing date February 16, 2018.

phone 916•784•9080 fax 916•784•1985 www.bobmurrayassoc.com

Development Services Director City of Long Beach, CA

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ne of the nation’s largest and most desirable urban coastal communities, the City of Long Beach, is home to a diverse population of 485,000. Located in Los Angeles County and spanning 50-square miles, Long Beach is a full-service municipality with its own commercial airport, convention and entertainment center, and one of the busiest seaports in the world. Supported by 180 staff, the Development Services Department consists of Planning, Building and Safety, Code Enforcement, Housing and Neighborhood Services, and Administration and Financial Services. The ideal candidate will be a visionary and entrepreneurial planning professional with a proven history of leading change. He/she will be a skilled manager of people as well as an exceptional mentor who displays an optimistic and supportive style. A minimum of seven (7) years of increasingly responsible management experience and a Bachelor’s degree are required. Prior or current experience in a community of similar complexity is strongly preferred. A Bachelor’s degree is required. A Master’s degree and/or AICP will be considered favorably. Starting salary $215,000 - $225,000. Competitive executive benefits package is also included. Filing deadline is Sunday, February 11, 2018. For detailed recruitment brochure and to apply online, visit www.tbcrecruiting.com. Teri Black • 424.296.3111 Bradley Wardle • 650.450.3299

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list of any inconsistencies within 60 to 90 days of application submittal and reach a final decision within 90 to 180 days of application submittal. To be eligible for streamlined approval, the project must: • Comply with “objective” zoning and General Plan standards; • Provide either 10 percent or 50 percent lower-income housing; • Be located in an urban area; and • Commit to paying prevailing wages or, in some cases, using a “skilled and trained workforce.” However, SB 35 excludes numerous sites from this streamlined review, including sites in the coastal zone and properties that have contained housing occupied by tenants within the last 10 years. SB 166: Maintaining Sites to Meet Affordable Housing Needs. The No Net Loss provision in state law does not allow cities and counties to downzone sites or approve projects with fewer units than shown in their housing elements unless enough sites remain to meet the housing need assigned to the city or other sites are made available for housing. SB 166 (Skinner, Chapter 367, Statutes of 2017) extends this requirement to projects where sites are not developed for the income category shown in the housing element, such as when a market-rate project is proposed on a site shown as suitable for lower-income housing. This statute applies only to general law cities and counties.

Return of Rental Inclusionary Housing] AB 1505: The Palmer Fix. Since the Court of Appeal’s 2009 decision in Palmer/ Sixth Street Properties L.P. v. City of Los Angeles, local agencies have not been able to require affordable housing in rental projects. AB 1505 (Bloom, Chapter 376, Statutes of 2017) provides specific authorization for these requirements, as long as alternate means of compliance, such as in-lieu fees or land dedication, are also provided. If local ordinances are adopted or amended after Sept.15, 2017,

www.cacities.org


and require more than 15 percent lowincome housing, the state Department of Housing and Community Development (HCD) under certain circumstances may review the ordinance and require an economic feasibility study.

Accessory Dwelling Unit “Cleanup” Legislation] AB 494 and SB 229: Further Easing Restrictions on Accessory Dwelling Unit Construction. AB 494 (Bloom, Chapter 602, Statutes of 2017) and SB 229 (Wieckowski, Chapter 594, Statutes of 2017) make a number of clarifying edits to Government Code Section 65852.2, which was significantly overhauled last year to reduce restrictions on

Cities must review projects within the deadlines and limits set by the Legislature if they wish to retain as much discretion as possible.

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Current & Upcoming Opportunities • Ross Valley Fire Department, California • City of Delano, California Fire Chief Police Chief Jackson County, Oregon • Santa Clara County Central Fire • Protection District, California Human Resources Director Director of Communications City of Lompoc, California • City Manager • Santa Clara Valley Water District, California Deputy Operating Officer-Watersheds • City of Marysville, California Design & Construction Director of Administrative Services • City of South San Francisco, California • Palos Verdes Library District, California District Director

Fire Chief

Communications Manager

If you are interested in these outstanding opportunities, visit our website to apply online.

• City of Rancho Cucamonga, California

www.westerncity.com

www.bobmurrayassoc.com

Western City, February 2018

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New Housing Laws Change How Cities Process Housing Applications, continued

the construction of second units or accessory dwelling units (ADUs). AB 494 reduces the maximum parking that a city may require to one space per unit regardless of the number of bedrooms; it also eliminates a city’s ability to prohibit tandem parking or parking in setback

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areas unless health or safety findings can be made. SB 229 requires a city to permit ADUs within existing structures in all zones where a city permits single-family use. Most significantly, SB 229 restricts the ability of special districts and water

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New opportunities . . .

Police Chief City of Napa

Human Resources Director City of Vallejo

Deputy Director of Human Resources City of Long Beach

Visit www.tbcrecruiting.com for the latest info! Teri Black • 424.296.3111 Bradley Wardle • 650.450.3299

City Manager CITY OF CRESCENT CITY

Salary $98,795–$126,238 DOE plus competitive benefit package. Crescent City is a coastal community in the Redwood National and State Parks. The City occupies 1.6 square miles with a population of 4,260. The area offers an abundance of outdoor activities due to the proximity of the Pacific Ocean and the Smith and Klamath Rivers and is surrounded by beautiful Redwoods. Crescent City is currently seeking a City Manager who is service oriented, productive, hands on, promotes teamwork and is capable of having clear and open communication with the City Council. The top candidate will be assertive, action-oriented and skilled at facilitating open discussions with different agencies and governing bodies. Candidates should possess a strong background in financial and economic development issues. Five years of increasingly responsible administrative or managerial experience in a municipality or public agency involving a strong level of management ability, with graduation from a four year college or university with major coursework in public administration or related degree is required. Salary range is $98,795-$126,238 DOE. Filing Deadline is March 30, 2018. www.crescentcity.org Contact Sunny Valero, HR Administrator at 707-464-7483 ext. 233, svalero@crescentcity.org.

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corporations to impose utility connection fees and capacity charges on new ADUs.

Housing Element Annual Report Requirements SB 35 and AB 879: Enhanced Annual Reporting. SB 35 requires cities and counties to prepare annual reports that include the number of housing units receiving all discretionary entitlements, building permits and certificates of occupancy. AB 879 (Grayson, Chapter 374, Statutes of 2017) includes additional technical requirements for annual housing element reports and directs HCD to evaluate the reasonableness of local fees charged under the Mitigation Fee Act by June 30, 2019. Requirements for annual reports have been extended to charter cities.

Funding for Planning and Affordable Housing] SB 2: Permanent Source for Housing — Recording Fee. SB 2 (Atkins, Chapter 364, Statutes of 2017) provides a “permanent source” of funding for affordable housing by imposing a $75 to $225 recording fee on certain real estate documents, projected to raise $200 to $300 million per year. Significantly, in 2018, half of the funds generated by the fees will be provided to local government for planning to streamline review of housing projects. In 2019 and thereafter, 70 percent of the funds will be provided to cities and counties for affordable housing. HCD is directed to provide guidelines for use of the funds.

What Cities Should Do to Comply With the New Housing Laws Educating Decision-Makers and the Community. Cities should inform city council members, planning commissioners and the public about changes that may need to be made in processing housing applications and limitations on local discretion. Processing Housing Applications. Most critically, cities must process housing

www.cacities.org


AB 678 and SB 167 give much less deference to local governments’ findings of consistency with local plans. J

applications according to the new statutes. In particular, agencies must: • Provide applicants for housing projects with a list of inconsistencies with all “plans, programs, policies, ordinances, standards, and requirements” within 30 days after the application is deemed complete for projects with 150 units or less or within 60 days for larger projects. Cities should assemble a complete packet of these requirements and may want to require applicants to demonstrate consistency as part of a complete application package; • Evaluate requests for SB 35 streamlined review and meet the bill’s strict deadlines for reviewing projects. A checklist of SB 35 requirements, which are lengthy and complex, should be prepared so that it can be determined within a few days whether a project requesting SB 35 review is in fact eligible for such review. The short deadlines for reviewing these applications are triggered by the date of submittal, not the date of completeness, so any application requesting SB 35 review needs to be given highest priority; • Develop new information required for annual reports. Charter cities should consider whether they want to submit annual reports to HCD for the past two years; and • Begin discussions about potential planning activities that the city might fund using the 2018 funds generated by SB 2. Some funds may become available later in 2018, but most will be available in 2019.

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Communications Manager City of Rancho Cucamonga, CA The City of Rancho Cucamonga is a forward-looking, progressive organization dedicated to the delivery of superior service to all those who live, work, and play in the community. The City of almost 177,000 is now seeking a Communications Manager with a strong leadership background and collaborative work style that fosters teamwork, high motivations, and commitment. The Communications Manager provides accurate, open, and comprehensive information about the City of Rancho Cucamonga and its programs, policies, services, and future plans in a timely manner to those who live in the City. A champion for community engagement, the Communications Manager leads and/or supports public involvement, creating opportunities for dialog to help guide the policy decisions and actions of the local government. The ideal candidate will be a creative and talented problem solver, a strategic thinker who displays natural ingenuity and a passion for high-quality service and products. Graduation from an accredited college with a Bachelor’s degree in Public Administration, Business Administration, Marketing, Communications, Journalism, or a related field is required; a Master’s degree is highly desirable. Candidates must possess five (5) years of increasingly responsible administrative experience with prime responsibility for promoting and presenting public information of a public agency, non-profit organization, college, or corporation or any combination of training and experience that provides the desired knowledge, skills, and abilities. The salary range for the Communications Manager is $89,988-$121,380; placement within this range is dependent upon qualifications. If you are interested in this outstanding opportunity, please apply online at www.bobmurrayassoc.com. Contact Valerie Phillips at (916) 784-9080 with questions. Closing date February 18, 2018.

phone 916•784•9080 fax 916•784•1985 www.bobmurrayassoc.com

Police Captain

City of Pleasanton, CA

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ocated in Northern California’s East Bay, the City of Pleasanton (pop. 75,600) excels as a livable community with an exceptional quality of life marked by a low crime rate, moderate climate, award winning schools, well-planned business areas, abundant parks and recreational areas, and a charming downtown. The Pleasanton Police Department is staffed by 120 sworn and professional personnel and supported by a FY2017-18 budget of $28 million. The ideal candidate will be an inspiring and team-oriented leader with an incredible work ethic known for adhering to high standards and service excellence. He/she will be an innovative and resourceful manager who displays a relentless commitment to professionalism. Extensive community engagement experience and a sophisticated understanding of contemporary policing practices will be expected. At least one year of experience at the rank of Lieutenant at the time of appointment and a Bachelor’s degree are required. A Master’s degree and/or completion of formal leadership training is desirable. Pleasanton offers competitive compensation and benefits, as well as an outstanding work environment. Visit www.tbcrecruiting.com for latest information and to apply online. Teri Black • 424.296.3111 Bradley Wardle • 650.450.3299

continued on page 27

www.westerncity.com

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PeckhamMcKenney &

Presents Outstanding Career Opportunities

City of Yuba City, CA

Assistant Fire Chief

The Yuba City Fire Department, with its 54 personnel, has built a positive reputation for serving the citizens of Yuba City and adjacent unincorporated areas of Sutter County with excellent service since its’ founding in 1908. The Department staffs five stations throughout the city that respond to over 10,000 calls per year, and in addition to providing fire suppression, prevention and education services, the department also has specialized teams that include an Advanced Technical Rescue Team, Hazardous Materials Team, and a Tactical Emergency Medical Services Team, as well as a Fire Investigation Team and a Public Education Team. Fire Chief Daley is seeking a strong leader that understands the importance of the necessary relationships, collaboration and communication between them and the Chief, command staff, department staff, union, city staff, City Council members, and the community to be successful and add value to the Department. Significant education, operational, and supervisory experience desired, as are Chief Fire Officer and/or Executive Fire Officer designations. Annual Salary range from $114,546 to $139,235 with excellent benefits. Contact Phil McKenney. Resume filing deadline is February 19, 2018.

Other Actively Open Recruitments City Manager, City of American Canyon, CA Filing date is February 12, 2018.

Assistant City Manager, City of Thousand Oaks, CA Filing date is February 12, 2018.

Upcoming Recruitments City of Stockton, CA

Assistant Director of Community Development Deputy Community Development Director, Planning & Engineering Deputy Building Official

Please send your cover letter and resume electronically to:

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Resumes acknowledged within two business days. Detailed brochures are available at

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New Housing Laws Change How Cities Process Housing Applications, continued from page 25

General law cities subject to SB 166 must review applications on sites listed in the housing element to determine if they contain both the number of units and the income level shown in the housing element. If not, any deficit must be made up either by other sites listed in the housing element or other properly zoned housing sites in the city. To avoid the need to constantly upzone sites when market-rate projects are proposed on sites suitable for

affordable housing, cities may wish to consider strategies to make up any deficit in advance of reviewing specific projects. Such strategies could include zoning more sites than needed and requiring construction of affordable units through an inclusionary ordinance.

if desired. Any local ADU ordinance inconsistent with state law is “null and void.”

Revising Ordinances. Cities may need to revisit ordinances to comply with the new ADU regulations and to reinstate inclusionary requirements for rental housing,

The many bills passed by the Legislature in 2017 seek to solve the state’s housing shortage by, in part, limiting local discretion over and review of housing developments. Cities must review projects within the deadlines and limits set by the Legislature if they wish to retain as much discretion as possible. ■

SB 2 provides a permanent source of funding for affordable housing.

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William Avery & Associates, Inc. Labor Relations / Executive Search / Human Resources Consulting 31/2 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Suite A Los Gatos, CA 95030 408.399.4424 Fax: 408.399.4423 email: jobs@averyassoc.net www.averyassoc.net

www.westerncity.com

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Bobbi C. Peckham • Phil McKenney

Peckham&McKenney www.peckhamandmckenney.com

Roseville, CA

866.912.1919

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Western City February 2018  

Public works and infrastructure issue.

Western City February 2018  

Public works and infrastructure issue.

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