Page 1

APRIL 2018 |

The Monthly Magazine of the League of California CitiesÂŽ

ÂŽ

Mill Valley Recreation Expands to Serve Special Needs Families p.10 Democracy in Action: City and University Join Forces in San Marcos p.13 Lessons for Local Governments About ADA Lawsuits p.7

www.westerncity.com


keenan health care full page ad 4c


CONTENTS Calendar of League Events 2  3 Executive Director’s Message By Carolyn Coleman

 new report from the League and A its partners showcases existing and emerging approaches that are having a positive impact on homelessness in California communities.

6 City Forum

COMMUNITIES

DEVELOPMENT

Award for Excellence

 ill Valley Recreation M Expands to Serve Special Needs Families

Democracy in Action: City 13  and University Join Forces in San Marcos

 onnecting Youth C With Democracy

By Sarah Macdonald

By Alex Padilla

 he secretary of state sponsors T programs to inform students about upcoming elections while providing unique hands-on opportunities to participate in the voting process.

 he Democracy in Action program T provides benefits for students and the community.

Spanish-Language 14 

Leadership Academies Build Trust and Civic Participation

7 Legal Notes

 essons for Local L Governments About ADA Lawsuits

By Jimmie Johnson

 recent court decision offers clarifiA cation on which standards and regulations apply to which government facilities and how local government agencies can implement preventive measures to reduce the possibility of ADA violations.

AUTHORITY

 hen families needed better W options, the city partnered with a local nonprofit to deliver thoughtful and inclusive communitybased programing.

STATEWIDE

10 California Cities Helen Putnam

 Fighting Homelessness: Effective Strategies

CALIFORNIA

By Sarah Rubin

 rogram leaders report that P these academies are a worthwhile investment and they produce positive outcomes.

Job Opportunities 17  Professional Services 26 

Providing California’s local governments with an effective tool for the timely financing of community-based public benefit projects. Since 1988, more than 500 cities, counties and special districts use CSCDA as their conduit issuer and PACE funding provider.

Directory

29

On the Record

 Mayors and council members talk about the appeal of public service.  On the cover: Mill Valley’s Adaptive Needs Program; photo courtesy of Stacey Ward/ZSs Design and the City of Mill Valley

Sponsored by:

(800) 531-7476 www.cscda.org


®

President Rich Garbarino Council Member South San Francisco

1400 K Street Sacramento, CA 95814 (916) 658-8200 Fax (916) 658-8240

Immediate Past President JoAnne Mounce Mayor pro Tem Lodi

Executive Director Carolyn Coleman

For a complete list of the League board of directors, visit www.cacities.org/board.

Magazine Staff Editor in Chief Jude Hudson, Hudson + Associates (916) 658-8234; email: editor@westerncity.com Managing Editor Norman Coppinger (916) 658-8277; email: ncoppinger@cacities.org Contributing Editor Eva Spiegel (916) 658-8228; email: espiegel@cacities.org Advertising Sales Manager Pam Maxwell-Blodgett (916) 658-8256; email: maxwellp@cacities.org Administrative Assistant Savannah Cobbs (916) 658-8223; email: scobbs@cacities.org Contributors Melissa Kuehne Corrie Manning Patrick Whitnell

leaguevents APRIL 4–6

Planning Commissioners’ Academy, Monterey Tailored to meet the needs of planning commissioners, planning directors, planning staff and other interested officials, the academy offers sessions on the major planning and land-use issues facing cities.

12–13

Policy Committee Meetings, Pomona The League’s policy committees review issues of interest to cities statewide and make recommendations to the League board of directors as part of the organization’s policy-making process. Learn how to join a League policy committee at www.cacities.org/joinpolicy.

13

Associate Editors Carol Malinowski Carolyn Walker

Legal Advocacy Committee Meeting, Pomona The committee reviews and recommends friend-of-the-court efforts on cases of significant statewide interest to California cities.

Design Taber Creative Group

18

Advertising Design ImagePoint Design

Legislative Action Day, Sacramento Get the latest updates on legislation affecting your city and meet with your legislators.

For photo credits, see page 18.

19

Postmaster: Send address changes to Western City, 1400 K Street, Sacramento, CA 95814. Western City Trademark Reg. U.S. Pat. Off. ©2018 League of California Cities. All rights reserved. Material may not be reprinted without written permission. This issue is Volume XCIV, No. 4.

City Attorneys’ Spring Conference, San Diego This meeting covers the latest trends and issues affecting public law practitioners and provides an opportunity to connect with colleagues.

NT RI

ED US IN

W

R

0

GY

10

%

IND EN

E

FSC ® is an independent, not-for-profit organization that promotes environmentally appropriate, socially beneficial and economically viable forest management worldwide. Products with the FSC label are independently certified to ensure that they come from forests managed to meet the needs of present and future generations.

League of California Cities

Board of Directors’ Meeting, Sacramento The League board reviews, discusses and takes action on a variety of issues affecting cities, including legislation, legal advocacy, education and training, and more.

may 2–4

Event and registration information is available at www.cacities.org/events.

G

P

Western City (ISSN 0279-5337) is published monthly by the League of California Cities, 1400 K St., Sacramento, CA 95814. Subscriptions: $39.00/1 year; $63.00/2 years; student: $26.50; foreign: $52.00; single copies: $4.00, including sales tax. Entered as periodical mail January 30, 1930, at the Post Office, Los Angeles, CA 90013, under the Act of April 13, 1879. Periodical postage paid at Sacramento, Calif.

Supplied by Community Energy

2

Second Vice President Jan Arbuckle Council Member Grass Valley

For the latest information on League conferences and events, follow us on Twitter @CaCities. For legislative and policy updates and more, follow @CaCities. Follow Western City @WesternCityMag. Join us on Facebook. www.facebook.com/westerncity www.facebook.com/LeagueofCaCities

www.cacities.org


Executive Director’s Message by Carolyn Coleman

Fighting Homelessness:

Effective Strategies The numbers are staggering. According to the 2017 count conducted by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), homelessness has surged statewide with nearly 135,000 homeless people in the Golden State. California reported the largest increase in overall homelessness in 2017 with 16,136 additional people experiencing homelessness; New York was second with an increase of 3,151. The actual number is likely higher and continues to increase here while it is declining in other states — 30 states and Washington, D.C., reported decreases in overall homelessness from 2016–17. On the single night in January 2017 when the HUD count was taken, half of all people experiencing homelessness were in one

www.westerncity.com

of five states: California, New York, Florida, Texas and Washington. California also had one of the top two highest rates of homelessness: 34 people per 10,000, compared with the national average of 17 people per 10,000. More than half of all people experiencing homelessness lived in unsheltered locations in just four states: California, Nevada, Oregon and Hawaii — and nearly half of those people are Californians. Unsheltered means they are living on the streets, under freeways and tucked into grassy embankments and parks in cities throughout the state. Homelessness presents a challenge not only in urban jurisdictions — it is also increasing in California's rural communities, its heavily forested areas and the suburbs.

The Demographics of Homelessness The homeless are individuals, single parents and families with children, young adults and children without a parent or guardian, and veterans. They include the chronically homeless, which means they are either an unaccompanied homeless individual with a disabling condition who has been continuously homeless for a year or more or an unaccompanied individual with a disabling condition who has had at least four episodes of homelessness in the past three years. They are male, female, all races, young and old. They are parents, siblings, daughters and sons. continued

Western City, April 2018

3


Fighting Homelessness: Effective Strategies, continued

Individuals and families are homeless for reasons as diverse as the state. Some are struggling with substance abuse disorders and mental illness. Domestic violence, lack of quality affordable housing and employment opportunities and rising health-care costs have also pushed individuals into homelessness. Natural disasters, such as wildfires, floods and earthquakes, displace people and contribute to homelessness. California is home to 21 of the 30 most expensive rental markets in the country and continues to fall short of the housing stock needed to meet the demand of low-income households. The state’s 2.2 million extremely low-income and very low-income renter households compete for 664,000 affordable rental units. Cuts in federal funding to support local housing initiatives and the effects of the Great Recession have only exacerbated the problem. But whatever the reason, as the problem grows, so does the pressure on cities and counties to allocate a greater share of local resources to address the crisis. Recognizing the need to examine the drivers of homelessness in our communities and to explore collaborative approaches to address the challenge, the League and the California State Association of Counties (CSAC) formed the Joint Homelessness Task Force in 2016. Task force members, which comprised city and county local officials and staff, met over the course of a year to better understand homelessness in California and to identify best and promising new practices that cities and counties are using to address it. The Homelessness Task Force Report, prepared by the Institute for Local Government and released in March 2018, provides practical tools for cities and counties to use in dealing with homelessness in their communities, including how to: • Create a plan and implementation strategies; • Identify resources and funding; and • Build community support to confront the challenges associated with homelessness.

4

League of California Cities

The report also outlines a comprehensive list of federal, state and local funding sources that cities can access for homelessness response, programs and services. It can be found at www.ca-ilg.org/homelessness.

The overall cost of the project was $152,238 — $6,000 less than expected. The City of West Sacramento and Yolo County provided most of the funding, and donations covered the balance.

In addition, the report showcases existing and emerging approaches that are having a positive impact in California communities now, including the following examples.

“Housing Our Heroes” Provides Assistance for Veterans

“Bridge to Housing” Offers Services and Rapid Rehousing Yolo County, the City of West Sacramento and Yolo County Housing Authority collaborated on a pilot project in 2014 to relocate an entire homeless encampment from a West Sacramento riverbank. The project relocated the encampment to a single motel where participants were offered temporary housing, case management and services. Spearheaded by the West Sacramento Police Department, the pilot project featured a highly collaborative and comprehensive planning process with multiple stakeholders. The planning group, composed of public, private and nonprofit entities, met over the course of two months to develop the best strategy for relocating the encampment. After the planning process was completed, the pilot included three assessments to ascertain the needs and challenges of the homeless population living in the encampment. In addition, coordinated outreach was conducted to build relationships with the homeless population. The program placed an emphasis on providing frequent and consistent on-site services. Through access to four months of temporary housing and intensive case management, participants stabilized their lives, addressed health issues and secured housing vouchers. Other on-site services included daily lunches, haircuts, mental health services and harm reduction classes. Of the 53 participants who completed the program, 42 remained engaged in services with case managers a year after exiting the program. Furthermore, 68 percent of participants were able to secure permanent housing.

In 2016, the City of San Diego and the San Diego Housing Commission (SDHC) partnered to launch the Housing Our Heroes initiative with the goal of getting 1,000 homeless veterans off the streets and into shelters or housing. This initiative is part of Housing First — San Diego, the SDHC’s three-year homelessness action plan launched in 2014. The initiative involves a $12.5 million investment to provide housing opportunities for homeless veterans through coordinated efforts with landlords, financial assistance and supportive services. The program comprises four key components: 1. Landlord outreach provides incentives to encourage more landlords to rent units to homeless veterans and includes a monetary payment for each unit rented to veterans; 2. Rapid rehousing assistance offers help to homeless veterans and families who may become homeless due to unforeseen circumstances and includes funds to cover upfront move-in costs and, at times, rental assistance; 3. SDHC federal Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing (VASH) vouchers help chronically homeless veterans, who have both a disability and an honorable discharge, with rental assistance and supportive health services; and 4. SDHC federal housing vouchers with supportive services make vouchers available to homeless veterans who are not eligible for the federal VASH vouchers. Over a two-year period, funds are allocated to these four components to help the City of San Diego provide housing for up to 1,000 homeless military veterans. Since 2016, the initiative has enrolled more than 700 homeless veterans.

www.cacities.org


Helping all residents find a safe place to call home is an ongoing effort in cities statewide.

A combination of federal resources (VASH vouchers), the City of San Diego General Fund and SDHC provides funding for the initiative.

“Coming Home Anaheim” Offers Practical Support Since 2014, the City of Anaheim has transitioned 960 people from homelessness, with 92 percent still housed a year later. Anaheim launched its comprehensive homelessness program, Coming Home Anaheim, in 2013. It focuses on weekly outreach, case management, access to services and stable, lasting housing. Since 2014, Anaheim has contracted with a nonprofit partner, City Net, to lead weekly outreach with the help of over 100 supporting churches and other nonprofits. Known as the Anaheim Homeless Collaborative, the group pools resources to find shelter space, transitional housing and long-term housing and supportive services. The Anaheim Police Department’s Homelessness Outreach Team plays a key role in Coming Home Anaheim and works alongside City Net on weekly outreach. Anaheim police respond to 15,000 homelessness-related calls annually. Where necessary, the city turns to enforcement to address public safety and quality of life concerns, but enforcement is not seen as a solution to homelessness. Rather, it is another tool in a larger, comprehensive program. In some cases, enforcement — or the prospect of it — can be an impetus for someone accepting help and services and transitioning out of homelessness.

www.westerncity.com

Anaheim’s annual contract with City Net totals $150,000. In December 2017, the city council allocated an additional $100,000 in funding to address homelessness. Anaheim uses its General Fund to support these efforts. The city also runs the Anaheim Housing Authority, which provides $580,000 annually in rentalassistance vouchers from HUD.

City of Bakersfield Steps Up With Job and Skills Training In May 2013, the City of Bakersfield partnered with the Bakersfield Homeless Center (BHC) to help solve the problem of highway litter after state budget cuts reduced Caltrans’ resources to clean up highways. The partnership developed an innovative freeway litter cleanup program that employed members of the homeless community. The program provided job training and increased employment opportunities for the homeless population. Through this partnership, BHC clients received paying jobs to clean the freeways. As a result, over 50 homeless individuals were employed at minimum wage, about 250 family members obtained housing and approximately 64 percent paid their rent without needing a subsidy. Local businesses have also begun participating in similar efforts. This successful program not only addressed the highway litter problem but also decreased the homeless population and created an emerging labor force eager to work. Many of the individuals who participated in the program subsequently

secured better paying jobs in the private sector and the city. (This project won a Helen Putnam Award for Excellence and was featured in the December 2016 issue of Western City; read “Bakersfield Creates Jobs for Homeless People” at www.westerncity.com.) Caltrans, the Kern Council of Governments and the City of Bakersfield funded the project for a total of $908,000.

Ending This Crisis California enjoys a global reputation as a leader in innovation and problem-solving. The communities described here and in the task force report exemplify these traits. While each is leveraging different assets to address homelessness challenges, the willingness to collaborate across jurisdictional and departmental boundaries, engagement of diverse stakeholders, creative blending of financial resources from all levels of government — and committed and proactive leadership — are central themes in the progress they are making to end this crisis in their communities. Many cities are already engaged in the hard work of helping all of their residents find a safe place to call home. I commend you, and the League supports your efforts. Share your story with us (at www.ca-ilg.org/homelessness) so that others can learn from your experiences. Community by community and collectively, we can make a difference and reverse the trend of homelessness in our state. Let’s lead in addressing this challenge. ■

Western City, April 2018

5


Secretary of State Alex Padilla meets with high school students.

Connecting Youth With Democracy by Alex Padilla It’s never too early to get our youth engaged in the democratic process. That’s why my office sponsors programs each year to inform students about upcoming elections while providing unique hands-on opportunities to participate. Students can pre-register to vote, participate in a mock election and even get paid to be a poll worker. Pre-Registering Makes Voting Easier

Young people have the potential to be a powerful force in elections, but only if they get involved and make voting a habit. To encourage students to be active voters once they are old enough to cast a ballot, we launched online pre-registration for 16and 17-year-olds in 2017. Pre-registration does not change the voting age, which is 18. Instead, it allows eligible Californians ages 16 or 17 to complete the online voter registration form, thus providing sufficient time and opportunity to get ready to vote. Their voter registration automatically becomes active on their 18th birthday. Pre-registration is easy. Students can visit RegisterToVote.ca.gov and complete the voter pre-registration application. Since the program was launched in March 2017, more than 80,000 students have pre-registered. Activities Help Build Students’ Interest in Civic Engagement

Encouraging youth participation in our democracy requires collaboration among parents, teachers and schools statewide.

That’s why we partner with the Superintendent of Public Instruction’s Office twice a year to promote civic engagement and voter registration through High School Voter Education Weeks. During the last two weeks of April and September, school districts provide information about voter registration and upcoming elections to each of their students. Over the past three years, I’ve visited dozens of high schools throughout California and spoken with over 13,000 excited students who are eager to get involved. For students who prefer to learn by doing, we invite high school and middle school students, teachers and principals to participate in the California Student Mock Election, which will take place in fall 2018, for the gubernatorial general election. Students get to experience voter participation up close by casting a mock ballot for candidates on the California Gubernatorial ballot. It’s a practical way to educate young people about the importance of civic participation.  High School Poll Workers Gain Experience

For students who want a behind-thescenes look at election administration, we invite eligible high school students to serve as poll workers on Election Day. Student poll workers learn firsthand how elections are run and provide muchneeded support at polling place locations. They end their day with a better understanding of the importance of voting and

the vital role poll workers play in making our elections run smoothly. County elections officials may assign up to five high school students to serve as poll workers in each election precinct. Students work under the direct supervision of appointed adult poll workers. To serve as a high school poll worker, a student must: • Be a U.S. citizen and at least 16 years old on Election Day; • Attend a public or private high school; • Have at least a 2.5 grade point average; • Get permission from their parents and school; and • Attend a training session. Student poll workers also receive a stipend that generally ranges between $65 and $150, depending on the county. To encourage high school students to serve as poll workers, the secretary of state invites students, teachers, school activities directors and others to post, email or hand out the high school poll worker recruitment flyer. We take public education and engagement seriously, including for our young Californians. We will continue to work with partners statewide to find new and innovative ways to connect our youth with their democracy. For links to related resources, including the recruitment flyer, read the online version of this article at www.westerncity.com. ■

Alex Padilla is California secretary of state, a former council member for the city of Los Angeles, a former legislator and a past president of the League. He can be reached at alex.padilla@sos.ca.gov.

6

League of California Cities

www.cacities.org

L


Lessons About ADA Lawsuits Lawsuits Lessons for Local Governments

by Jimmie Johnson

The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals issued a decision in 2017 that further clarifies for local governments in California their obligations under the Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA). In Kirola v. City and County of San Francisco, Ivana Kirola — a person with cerebral palsy — filed a class-action lawsuit against San Francisco alleging that the city’s public libraries, pools, recreation and park facilities and pedestrian rights of way were not readily accessible to and usable by individuals with mobility impairment and were thus in violation of Title II of the ADA. The trial court ruled in favor of San Francisco, but the Ninth Circuit reversed in part, permitting Kirola to proceed with some of her claims.

the city, she had personally visited only a few of them. Additionally, the barriers she had encountered were limited to:

Cities can learn some specific lessons from the Ninth Circuit’s decision. This article highlights some of these lessons.

• Steep paths at one park.

Lesson 1. A Qualified Individual With a Disability Who Encounters an Access Barrier Can File a Class Action Lawsuit.

• Three stretches of sidewalk containing bumps; • A sidewalk where her wheelchair became stuck in a tree well; • A street corner that lacked curb ramps; • A street corner that provided only a single curb ramp; • Errant step stools at three of the city’s libraries; • Three inaccessible pools; and The trial court held that Kirola did not have standing to bring the lawsuit because the evidence presented failed to establish that she had been deprived of “meaningful access” to the public facilities in question. However, the Ninth Circuit reversed that decision, holding that a plaintiff bringing a claim under Title II of the ADA can establish standing by providing evidence that he or she encountered an access barrier of any degree and either

Although Kirola’s lawsuit covered all public libraries, pools, recreation and park facilities and pedestrian rights of way throughout

About Legal Notes

continued

This column is provided as general information and not as legal advice. The law is constantly evolving, and attorneys can and do disagree about what the law requires. Local agencies interested in determining how the law applies in a particular situation should consult their local agency attorneys.

Jimmie Johnson is an attorney with the law firm of Leone & Alberts and can be reached at jjohnson@leonealberts.com.

www.westerncity.com

Western City, April 2018

7


Lessons for Local Governments About ADA Lawsuits, continued

intends to return to that facility or is deterred from returning due to the barrier. Furthermore, the Ninth Circuit held that after a plaintiff has established standing to bring an ADA accessibility claim, that plaintiff can proceed with a class action lawsuit even against barriers not personally encountered as long as the prerequisites for class certification have been met. Lesson 2. City Facilities Must Meet Certain Standards, Depending on When They Are Built or Altered. In addition to identifying the various access and use barriers she encountered, Kirola also argued that the city facilities violated the ADA because they were not fully compliant with certain standards and federal regulations. In addressing this argument, the Ninth Circuit clarified which standards and regulations apply to which government facilities. Facilities Unaltered Since Jan. 26, 1992, Must Provide “Meaningful Access.” The Ninth Circuit confirmed that in relation to facilities unaltered before or since Jan. 26, 1992,

8

League of California Cities

government agencies need only “operate each service, program or activity so that the service, program or activity, when viewed in its entirety, is readily accessible to and usable by individuals with disabilities.” This standard does not “[n]ecessarily require a public entity to make each of its existing facilities accessible to and usable by individuals with disabilities.” Rather, an ADA violation will be found only if a facility is inaccessible or unusable when viewed in its entirety. For example, the Kirola court found no ADA violation based on uneven sidewalks, cracked pavement and potholes. Likewise, the Kirola court found no ADA violation based upon 1,358 allegedly inaccessible curb ramps in a city of 7,200 intersections. Nor did the Kirola court find ADA violations due to the alleged inaccessibility of some portions of some city parks. At the same time, however, it is important to note that ADA regulations do require government entities to undertake efforts to make their programs readily accessible to individuals with disabilities where doing so would not fundamentally alter the nature of the program and would not impose an undue financial or administrative burden — such as potentially moving a program from an inaccessible building to an accessible one, assigning aids to assist individuals with disabilities regarding accessibility, etc.

www.cacities.org


In addition, the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) has recently encouraged local government agencies to conduct a new selfevaluation of their facilities similar to the one required by federal law in 1991. Because DOJ often encourages today what it will require tomorrow, local government agencies should consider getting ahead of the game and conduct a new self-evaluation consistent with the 1991 federal requirements — by reviewing all current services, policies and practices and providing an opportunity for public comment to identify access barriers and potential remedies. In addition, because government employees sometimes face public or political pressure regarding the results of self-evaluations, local government agencies may want to consider hiring an independent third party, such as a licensed certified access specialist inspector, to perform the evaluation. Facilities Newly Constructed or Altered After Jan. 26, 1992, — Including Parks, Playgrounds and Public Rights of Way — Must Comply With Certain Regulations Designed to Ensure That Each Facility Is “Readily Accessible to and Usable by Individuals With Disabilities.” While recognizing that a “meaningful access” standard applies to government facilities unaltered before or since Jan. 26, 1992, the Ninth Circuit held that any failure to satisfy the applicable federal ADA regulations at a facility built or altered after Jan. 26, 1992 — even a slight failure that does not meaningfully affect access — constitutes a violation redressable in civil court. The Kirola court further held that federal ADA regulations apply to public rights of way, parks and playground facilities even though such government facilities are not expressly governed in the regulations (as are other types of facilities). The Ninth Circuit determined that because those government facilities

Looking for Footnotes? For a fully footnoted version, read this article online at www.westerncity.com.

include “features” such as ramps that are expressly governed in the federal ADA regulations, the government facilities are also governed by the ADA regulations.

ADA Guidelines for Buildings and Facilities Regarding which regulations apply to which facilities, the ADA requires the Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board to issue compliance guidelines, known as the Americans With Disabilities Act Accessibility Guidelines (ADAAG) for buildings and facilities. In turn, DOJ is required to implement federal regulations consistent with the ADAAG. As explained in Kirola, the ADAAG are not binding. The DOJ regulations, on the other hand, are binding and must be consistent with the ADAAG — but not necessarily identical to them. In 1991, the Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board issued the first ADAAG, and DOJ adopted those guidelines in full as federal ADA regulations. Afterward, the continued on page 26

CITY DATA SERVICES, LLC CITY DATA SERVICES, LLC, a HUD, “Best Practice”, takes the “work” out of paperwork. Comprehensive cloud-based data management solutions for managing Community Service, Single Family and Multi-family programs & projects — any and all funding sources (ie, General Funds, CDBG, HOME, RDA, ESG & State ESG), INCLUDING tenant and borrower certification — efficiently from your desktop. Best of all, CDS provides full time support for you AND your funded agencies. At a price we guarantee is far less than the cost of additional 3.5 people required to manage a medium sized city’s programs and projects. Proposals are free! CALL: 415.572.4572 or EMAIL: citydataservices@yahoo.com

NEW from CDS, EASY TO USE!! HOME and HQS, Monitoring/Compliance, Inspection Software, SpectR©

Western City, April 2018

9


Mill Valley Recreation

Expands to Serve

Special Needs Families Located 14 miles north of the Golden Gate Bridge, Mill Valley (pop. 14,910) is a close-knit town with a welcoming atmosphere. But community outreach efforts conducted for the city and Marin County identified a growing need for recreational programming and workplace training for young people with disabilities. Historically, schools and a few local nonprofit organizations offered programs to meet these needs, but available and affordable programming, especially within the city’s Recreation and Community Services departments, was significantly lacking. Consequently, local families had few options, and most were extraordinarily expensive and difficult to access. The concept for Mill Valley’s Adaptive Needs Program began when newly hired Recreation Director Jenny Rogers attended a city council meeting honoring the nonprofit organization Project Awareness and Special Sports (PAASS) as part of National Autism Awareness Month in April 2013. PAASS Director Janet Miller

spoke to the council about the importance of employment opportunities for young people with disabilities. The Mill Valley Community Center had been struggling to recruit good employees, and Rogers recognized a potential opportunity to partner with PAASS to address these needs and initiated discussions with Miller to explore options.

Partnership Creates New Opportunities The city’s Recreation Department, known as Mill Valley Recreation, was already engaged in several strategic partnerships with local nonprofit organizations to build awareness, understanding and local capacity to best serve young people with disabilities — and provide a more inclusive and enriching recreational experience for the entire community. Its mission was to: • Adapt current recreation offerings to make them more accessible and inclusive; and • Develop a wide range of new “adaptive needs” programs specifically designed for youth with special needs. In February 2015, Mill Valley Recreation combined forces with PAASS to offer the city’s first Adaptive Needs Swim Lessons Program.

The City of Mill Valley won the League Partners Award for Excellence in City-Business Relations in the 2017 Helen Putnam Award for Excellence program. For more about the awards program, visit www.helenputnam.org.

10

League of California Cities

www.cacities.org


Children and youth in Mill Valley enjoy a variety of recreational programs and a summer camp designed to meet their specific needs.

“PAASS started as a baseball league, but our families asked us for more opportunities,” says Miller. “Mill Valley Recreation contacted us not only to partner on creating many adaptive classes and a summer camp, but also with an interest in hiring young adults with disabilities. This is a community effort — thanks to support from the city, our participants and families are being included and afforded opportunities that have not been available in Marin County until now. Our volunteers are also benefitting, and everyone is standing side by side, grateful to be helping one another.”

Summer Camp Pilot Proves Popular Based on the success of the Mill Valley Community Center Work Training and Adaptive Needs Swim Lessons programs, the city and PAASS expanded their

www.westerncity.com

partnership by offering a unique summer camp experience, Camp PAASS Without Boundaries. In the past, Mill Valley Recreation had frequently adapted its offerings to include those with disabilities, but the community wanted this new camp tailored to the specific needs of a wide cross section of youth with special needs. “Families were looking for a traditional summer camp experience for their kids in a camp all their own,” says Rogers. “This format helped to foster community, camaraderie and inspiration among the kids. They had the opportunity to participate in regular day camp activities in a camp environment specifically designed for them.” In summer 2016, Mill Valley Recreation and PAASS launched the new pilot camp. The Mill Valley Community Center hosted camp participants engaged in a

wide variety of fun and enriching summer activities that included swimming, martial arts, cooking, dance, arts and crafts, natural sciences, sports and recreational games. The highlight of the week was a special session devoted to animals and titled “Furs, Scales, and Tales.” It featured a variety of live animals and a camp favorite: an 8-footlong albino boa constrictor. The following summer, Camp PAASS expanded from a single session to three sessions. “Our goal is to use this summer’s success to help educate other cities about how best to offer adaptive needs programs,” says Recreation Supervisor Kathryn Reisinger. “The camp experience was heartwarming and reminded me why I wanted to work in recreation in the first place.”

continued

Western City, April 2018

11


Mill Valley Recreation Expands to Serve Special Needs Families, continued

Sharing the Model With Others Public response to the city’s Adaptive Needs Program has been so positive that staff has been invited to create training specifically for recreation agencies throughout California. In May 2015, the Mill Valley Community Center hosted an Adaptive Needs Training Seminar, which provided aquatics staff with training on how best to offer adaptive needs swim lessons and inclusive aquatics programming. Staff has also made presentations about the city’s Adaptive Needs Program at several professional conferences and workshops. “We hope to share our adaptive needs professional training program with League members at a future conference session,” says Rogers. With the support of its nonprofit partners, Mill Valley Recreation has provided over 548 hours of Adaptive Needs Swim Lessons through 728 separate classes since September 2014. Mill Valley Recreation also expanded its offerings in 2018 to include an array of adaptive after-school enrichment activities during the school year and will conduct sessions of Camp PAASS throughout the entire summer.

“The city’s Adaptive Needs Program offers a perfect example of the thoughtful, inclusive, community-based programing that Mill Valley Recreation staff consistently deliver,” says City Manager Jim McCann. “I’m proud to have this particular program honored with a Helen Putnam Award, because it provides such a beneficial and much-needed service to special needs children. Recreation Director Jenny Rogers’s energy and enthusiasm for public service shine through in the programs that she and her staff have developed for the community. The city is lucky to have her on its team!”

Making a Critically Important Difference Parents whose children attend Adaptive Needs Program classes and Camp PAASS agree with McCann. Tammy Herndon has two daughters, Reese (age 10) and Bellamy (age 7), who participate in the Adaptive Needs Program at the Mill Valley Community Center. Herndon says, “Reese has autism, along with severe anxiety and sensory issues. She also has selective mutism, which makes it very hard for her to speak outside our home. Finding the right activities for her to attend has been a big challenge. I am incredibly grateful for the Adaptive Needs Program, where Reese has been taking swim lessons and martial arts and dance classes. Her younger sister Bellamy has attended these classes with her, and it has

been wonderful for both of them. The girls are looking forward to the upcoming dance class.” Kristine Murray’s son Nico (age 10) has been participating in many of the adaptive programs at the Mill Valley Rec Center for the past few years. “He loves it,” she says. “It has given him the opportunity to develop new friendships with peers of all abilities. He is developing confidence and skills for life, and he’s already talking about going to summer camp again.” “Just knowing that my son Henry has a place to go to participate in activities that typical children get to do — such as swimming, day camp and more — is the absolute best,” says Stacey Appleton. “I can’t even begin to explain what it means to know that I have these options for activities and classes. The best part is the community center and the staff, who are always so welcoming, encouraging and respectful of all our children.” Thanks to the commitment of the city’s staff, its nonprofit partners and volunteers, Mill Valley hopes to continue expanding these critically important programs for years to come. To learn more about the program, visit www.millvalleyrecreation.org. Contact: Jenny Rogers, director of recreation, Mill Valley Recreation Department; phone: (415) 383-1370; email: jrogers@ cityofmillvalley.org. ■

Activities include lessons in swimming, cooking and more.

12

League of California Cities

www.cacities.org


Democracy in Action: City and

University Join Forces in San Marcos by Sarah MacDonald

The City of San Marcos is one of San Diego County’s fastest growing cities, and it is an educational hub generating a regional workforce.

Democracy in Action, a pilot program in which college students spend a semester working on city projects using a handson approach.

“With world-class educational institutions and a skilled workforce, the city is a pipeline for regional talent and home to high-paying industries,” says San Marcos Mayor Jim Desmond.

“Some of the region’s brightest minds are on that campus and right down the street from City Hall, so this partnership felt like a natural win-win,” says the city’s Economic Development Manager Tess Sangster, who helped oversee the effort.

And thanks to a new collaboration with California State University San Marcos (CSUSM), the city has found a way to harvest some of that homegrown talent to better serve the public. The city and CSUSM recently joined forces to launch

University Students Pitch in on City Projects

During the first cycle of projects in spring 2017, about 100 students worked with

city staff to tackle projects that included finding ways to curb unnecessary 911 calls, developing a marketing and sponsorship plan for a city-sponsored race, analyzing data to help reduce stormwater pollution and creating a promotional video about the city. “Democracy in Action is designed to meet city needs while deepening the learning experience for students,” says Elizabeth Matthews, CSUSM faculty director for civic learning. “The projects put our students’ critical thinking and problem-solving skills to work to help address issues for our city partner. continued on page 21

Sarah Macdonald is communications officer for the City of San Marcos and can be reached at SMacdonald@san-marcos.net.

Democracy in Action offers a model for cities in the region. Students at California State University San Marcos receive an orientation to the Democracy in Action program. www.westerncity.com

Western City, April 2018

13


Mountain View residents learn about city operations and civic participation.

Spanish-Language Leadership Academies Build Trust and Civic Participation by Sarah Rubin

A

ctive civic participation creates opportunities for state and local governments to understand constituents’ needs and concerns. But people of color are typically less empowered to participate at the state and local levels, according to Unequal Voices, Part II: Who Speaks for California?, a 2017 report from the Advancement Project, a nonpartisan, nonprofit civil rights organization. Cities throughout California are conducting Spanish-language leadership academies to build the civic knowledge and participation of Latino residents. Some of these academies originate in the City Manager’s Office or are initiated through the enthusiasm of an elected official or by the local Police Department. Program leaders say Spanish-language leadership academies are a worthwhile investment and they produce positive outcomes, which include: • More trust between residents and the city; • A pipeline to commissions, boards and elected positions for interested residents;

• New understanding of issues of concern among residents; • Increased community pride and civic engagement; and • Broad support of two-way communication between residents and city staff.

Half Moon Bay Fosters Discussion of Local Issues The City of Half Moon Bay (pop 12,591) in San Mateo County holds a community academy titled Half Moon Bay NET (Network, Engage, Transform) twice each year. The academy’s objectives are to: • Engage the community; • Help participants understand the roles and responsibilities of city government; and • Establish relationships among the residents and between the residents and city staff. The city’s population is approximately one-third Latino, and Half Moon Bay NET’s fall session is conducted entirely in Spanish. Among Latino participants,

many have had minimal or no previous contact with the city. The academy provides a way for the city to disseminate information, offer resources and share ways residents can be more involved with the city and their community. Half Moon Bay promotes the program using flyers at selected locations, including a local adult school and clinic, and via its website, electronic newsletter and other digital means. Half Moon Bay NET’s Spanish-language academy also provides insight into the interests of underserved communities. Several key themes emerged during the four weekly Spanish-language sessions: affordable housing, the minimum wage, processes for requesting government services and local law enforcement’s role in immigration matters. “The participants’ increased understanding of the deliberation that goes into our efforts and the nuances of the choices we make helps build trust in the community,” says Magda González, former city manager of Half Moon Bay. “That’s especially important for our Spanish-speaking residents.”

Sarah Rubin is public engagement program director for the Institute for Local Government (ILG) and can be reached at srubin@ca-ilg.org. Hanna Stelmakhovych, public engagement program assistant for ILG, also contributed to this article.

14

League of California Cities

www.cacities.org


The city’s program costs, including staff time, total approximately $6,000.

Mountain View Residents “Realize They Can Impact City Decisions” The City of Mountain View (pop 79,278), located in Santa Clara County’s Silicon Valley, held its first Spanish-language Civic Academy in May 2017. The city council allocated $4,000 from its General Fund to support the program. Graduates have been eager to continue their involvement with the city, and the city recently launched a follow-up Ambassadors Program with a grant from the Grove Foundation. An estimated 20.3 percent of Mountain View’s residents are Latino, according to 2015 data from the U.S. Census Bureau. “The program provides a safe place where people can learn and participate,” says Nancy Ducos, the city’s multilingual community outreach coordinator. “Participants identified their own power and realized they can impact the city’s decision-making process.” The nine-week interactive course included presentations by city council members, the city manager, staff from the Finance, Building, Public Works and Housing departments, and firefighters and police officers. The city promotes the academy through presentations at community meetings and outreach to local community leaders. Ambassadors Program graduates also recruit participants. Graduate Marco Cedillo says, “Knowledge is power. I can be the eyes and ears of the people. Now I help my neighbors understand what is happening with the city.” Cedillo, along with all 12 of his fellow Civic Academy graduates, plans to be actively involved in the Ambassadors Program. “I’m bowled over by the enthusiasm for follow-up the academy participants have shown,” says Ducos.

Tustin Police Department officers congratulate Beatriz Camacho on graduating from the Spanish Citizens’ Academy.

Using grant funding from the Grove Foundation, the Heising-Simons Foundation and the Silicon Valley Community Foundation, the City Manager’s Office worked closely with staff from the Institute for Local Government to plan, develop, design and implement the Civic Academy.

Tustin Builds Community Engagement and Trust in Police About 40 percent of the City of Tustin’s (pop. 82,372) residents are Latino. The city is located in Orange County, east of Santa Ana and north of Irvine. Building on a leadership program that began 20 years ago and was conducted in English, the city launched its first Spanish Citizens’ Academy in April 2017. Police Officer Diego Gomez initially proposed the idea when he learned about similar efforts in Orange County communities. The program teaches residents how they can help make their neighborhoods safer. “I am excited about the Spanish Citizens’ Academy because for too long we have unintentionally neglected that portion of our community,” says Chief of Police Charles Celano Jr. “We cannot police alone — we need their input, and we value their input.” The 10-week program includes tours of the Police Department and provides an overview of a wide variety of aspects of policing, including information on

domestic violence, gangs, crime scene investigation, the traffic division, the K9 unit and resources for victims of crime. Officer Gomez and two other bilingual police officers, Officer Jorge Sanchez and Detective Gus Gonzalez, continue to lead the academy sessions. The Tustin Police Department advertised the opportunity on social media, at local events and by word of mouth. The program generated much more interest than initially expected and enrollment quickly reached capacity. Participant Jaime Sanchez, a 42-year-old bookkeeper, says even though he speaks English well, he preferred taking the course in his “first tongue.” Participants report that the program motivated them to be more active in the community. Officer Sanchez notes that continually emphasizing that residents should feel at ease approaching police — regardless of their immigration status — made a difference in building trust over time. The Police Department budgets $5,000 annually to underwrite the cost of the program, not including staff time. A portion of this budget supports a graduation party to celebrate the completion of the Spanish Citizens’ Academy. Chief Celano says, “It’s important to break bread together. Supporting these deeper connections helps us bridge the gap that can exist between the police and the community.” continued

www.westerncity.com

Western City, April 2018

15


Spanish-Language Leadership Academies Build Trust and Civic Participation, continued

Tips for Launching an Effective Spanish-Language Leadership Academy Local officials who are interested in establishing a Spanish-language leadership academy may want to consider these tips, which are based on the experiences of cities with existing programs. Before launching the program: • Engage both community partners and city departments. Connect during the program design and planning phase to ensure understanding, collaboration and buy-in from staff;

• Invest in a skilled and trusted facilitator who can design an interactive curriculum and navigate thorny issues; and • Develop and review detailed flow of meeting/facilitation plans to clarify roles and expectations. After the program begins: • Host a welcome session and/or final graduation ceremony with the mayor and other leaders. This helps build trust in the community beyond the participants;

• Prepare the presenters for effective and culturally responsive public speaking; • Invest in a trained interpreter and allocate time in the agenda for simultaneous interpretation; and • Consider including a session on municipal finance to ensure transparency and support realistic expectations from participants and the community. After participants have completed the academy program: • Create a feedback loop between staff and program graduates; and • Evaluate each session and use this information to refine future sessions.

Find More Resources Online The Institute for Local Government offers numerous resources to support the active civic engagement of residents. For links to these resources, related Western City articles and additional information, read the online version of this article at www.westerncity.com. ■

left Tustin

police officers serve food to graduates to celebrate their success; Mountain View Civic Academy participants work on a city budget exercise, right.

Coming soon! 2018 City Hall Directory

2018

CITY HALL DIRECTORY Complete Listings for Every City

in California

Find-it-fast information for every city in California

3 Mayors, Council Members and

City Department Head Information

3 City Addresses, Phone, Fax and Websites 3 Advertisers with Products and Services That Your City Needs

CITY OFFICIALS: $37, SKU#1041 | NON-CITY OFFICIALS: $86, SKU#1042 WWW.CACITIES.ORG | (916) 658-8200

With the 2018 City Hall Directory, the information you need is right at your fingertips. Order online at: www.cacities.org/publications or call (916) 658-8217.

16

League of California Cities

Tools to Support Language Access Nearly 44 percent of California residents speak a language other than English at home, and 6.8 million of these residents have limited English proficiency. People with limited English proficiency may not be able to understand information an agency wants the public to know, use public services or communicate their point of view at a public meeting. The Institute for Local Government (ILG) provides resources to help local governments navigate language access issues at www.ca-ilg.org/ immigrant-engagement. ILG also offers interpretation equipment on a loan basis that is easy for interpreters and meeting participants to use. The headsets support simultaneous translation at meetings or workshops. For more information, contact Hanna Stelmakhovych, public engagement program assistant, at hstelmakhovych@ ca-ilg.org.

www.cacities.org


J

O

B

O

P

P

O

R

T

U

N

I

T

I

E

S

Display Advertising

Western City magazine’s job opportunity section is the source for job seekers looking for positions in local government. When you place a job opportunity ad in Western City

Call Pam Maxwell-Blodgett at (800) 262-1801 to place a display (boxed) ad or for rate and deadline information, or email admanager@westerncity.com. Website Job Postings Display ads are posted on our website at no additional charge. But if you miss the deadline for getting your job opportunity ad into the magazine, you can post it on the Western City website right away. To post your job opportunity ad on our automated website, visit www.westerncity.com or contact Savannah Cobbs, Western City’s administrative assistant; email: scobbs@ cacities.org; phone: (916) 658-8223.

magazine, it will be posted at no additional charge on our website. For rates and deadlines, visit www.westerncity.

MUNICIPAL PENSIONS P.R.E.P.

Pension Compliance

com and click on the

For Temporary Workers

Advertise link.

Police Chief SUSANVILLE

Susanville is located in Lassen County in the heart of North East California. Nestled at the base of the Sierra Nevadas, residents enjoy four seasons and easy access to a wealth of year-round outdoor recreation opportunities including mountain biking, fishing, hiking, skiing, horseback riding and many other off road activities. The City of Susanville is seeking a new Police Chief that can provide leadership to the department, be an integral part of the city’s executive management team and maintain a good relationship with the community. For a complete list of qualifications, salary and benefits please visit www. cityofsusanville.net/employment/. Filing deadline April 26, 2018.

www.westerncity.com

Pension Risk Examination Program Call to P.R.E.P. Your Staff: (866) 406-6864 Assistant City Manager City of Menlo Park, CA

M

enlo Park is home to 32,000+ residents and is conveniently located between San Francisco and San Jose. This fiscally strong and stable city is known for its beautiful tree-lined neighborhoods and active commercial districts. Menlo Park is supported by 276 FTE and a total FY2017-18 budget of $117 million and is organized across seven departments – Administrative Services, City Manager’s Office, Community Development, Community Services, Library, Police, and Public Works. The City Manager’s Office includes the City Clerk, Housing & Economic Development and Sustainability divisions. The ideal candidate will thrive in an exciting and fun environment and be well-versed in the functions of a highly regarded premier municipality. Previous experience working in a complex municipal environment with dynamic priorities is desirable. Outstanding people and project management abilities will be expected. Any combination of experience, skills and knowledge that serves as preparation for such a rare opportunity will be considered. Bachelor and Master’s degrees are preferred. The salary range is $160,578 - $236,969; placement within the range DOQE. Salary is supplemented by a competitive benefits package. Closing date: Sunday, April 22, 2018. Visit www.tbcrecruiting.com to download recruitment brochure and apply online. Teri Black • 424.296.3111 • Bob McFall Suzanne Mason • 562.631.2500

Western City, April 2018

17


J

O

B

O

P

P

O

R

T

U

N

I

T

I

E

S

Open in April . . .

Assistant Directors of Library & Recreation City of Pleasanton

The City of Salinas

PUBLIC WORKS DIRECTOR

Housing Administrator City of Healdsburg

Director of Parks & Community Services City of Dublin

The City of Salinas (pop. 161,042) is the 34th largest city in California and the largest city in beautiful Monterey County. The City is seeking an energetic, collaborative, and inclusionary Public Works Director who will provide exceptional management of the Public Works Department. This Executive Management position plans, organizes, and directs the activities of various divisions to include Engineering & Transportation, Street and Sewer Maintenance, Wastewater Treatment, Landscape Construction Inspection, Parks and Forestry Operations, Building and Vehicle/Equipment Maintenance, and the Salinas Municipal Airport which hosts the annual California International Airshow. The Department is the third largest in the City, and supported by 89 staff. The FY 17/18 budget is $14 million and the CIP is $34 million. The incoming Public Works Director should be team-oriented and have exceptional people management skills. Candidates should have experience in administration, management, strategic planning, succession planning, and community outreach. A Bachelor’s degree in Public Administration, Organizational Behavior, Business Management, or a related field, and eight years of responsible experience administering public works operations are required. Spanish bilingual skills desirable. The annual salary range is $137,076– $166,620. To apply, please visit www. bobmurrayassoc.com. Please contact Ms. Valerie Phillips at (916) 784-9090, should you have any questions.

18

League of California Cities

Teri Black • 424.296.3111 Suzanne Mason • 562.631.2500 Julie Yuan-Miu • 650.450.3299 Bob McFall • 424.296.3111

CITY OF

MALIBU

DEPUTY CITY MANAGER

Salary Range: $145,869–$189,630 annually, Plus excellent benefits

The City is seeking a Deputy City Manager who will oversee and participate in all activities and operations of the City. This position regularly interacts with the City Manager, Assistant City Manager, City Council and departmental representatives in coordinating projects and information. Successful performance of the work requires knowledge of public policy, municipal functions and activities, including the role of an elected City Council, and the ability to develop and implement projects, programs and legislation. The Deputy City Manager will be a vital member of the City’s Executive Management Team. The culture of the management team is strongly cohesive and supports open communication and mutual respect. Minimum Qualifications: A Bachelor’s degree and three to five years of management or administrative experience in administration and/or City government is required. Master’s degree is highly desirable. Please visit www.malibucity.org/jobs for more information, including benefits, and to apply online. Brochure available. EOE/ADA. Closing date is April 13, 2018, at 4:00PM.

Photo/art credits Cover: Courtesy of Stacey Ward/ZSs Design and the City of Mill Valley Page 3: photo, Diane Bentley Raymond; graphic, Alexey Pushkin/Shutterstock.com Page 5: left, Phil Augustavo; center, Steve Debenport; right, Kaisersosa67 Page 6: Courtesy of the California Secretary of State’s Office Page 7: Relaxphoto.de Page 9: left, Ktaylorg; right, RapidEye

Pages 10, 11 & 12: Courtesy of Stacey Ward/ZSs Design and the City of Mill Valley Page 13, 21 & 22: Courtesy of California State University San Marcos & the City of San Marcos Page 14: Courtesy of the City of Mountain View Page 15: Courtesy of the City of Tustin Page 16: left, Courtesy of the City of Tustin; right, Courtesy of the City of Mountain View Page 26: Relaxphoto.de Page 29: Jude Hudson, Hudson+Associates

www.cacities.org


OPEN LEADERSHIP ROLES

Finance Director Public Works Director We are recruiting for two highly-qualified and forward thinking Directors in Finance and Public Works at the City of South Pasadena. The City of South Pasadena, California, 130 years-young, has embarked on continuous organizational and procedural transformation to further proclaim a well-deserved place on the list of the most highly-desired, efficiently-run, and progressive cities. City leaders are setting trends in strategic economic development, culture and the arts, fiscal transparency, and environmental sustainability, as well as in solving regional transportation challenges. In addition, City leaders are steadfastly committed to important initiatives and are consistently devoted to process improvements and greater efficiencies.

Finance Director The Finance Director oversees the City fund accounting, purchasing, and payroll system, and represents financial services of City administration to key stakeholders. A fulfilling experience awaits the right candidate who, as leader of the fiscally responsible team, will serve as liaison to the Finance Commission and assist the City Treasurer with investment of City funds and revenue bonds. This individual will have a pivotal role in the development of new and creative solutions to financial, programmatic and operational challenges of the future. Candidates must possess a Bachelor’s Degree in Accounting, Business Administration or related field. Must also possess increasingly responsible financial experience in accounting and financial work, including experience in a public agency. Salary range: $106,728 to $143,016; salary supplemented by a comprehensive benefits package.

Public Works Director The Public Works Director oversees traffic engineering, design construction of streets, sewers, storm drains, water systems, the administration of federal, state, and local transportation grants, storm water management, and Caltrans projects. This individual will have the opportunity to shape the future of the community of South Pasadena through the management of infrastructure projects, refuse/recycling programs, NPDES/Water Quality programs and the CDBG program. Candidates must possess a Bachelor’s Degree in Civil Engineering and a valid certificate of registration as a Civil Engineer issued by the California State Board of Registration for Professional Engineers. A Master’s Degree is preferred. Must have five (5) years of increasingly responsible supervisory or administrative experience in a major public works setting. Salary range: $117,456 to $157,404; salary supplemented by a comprehensive benefits package. If you possess a high degree of professionalism, enjoy working in a high functioning collaborative team environment, are a hands-on, detail-oriented individual with superior communication and customer service skills, have successfully managed multi-million dollar budgets and projects, and have experience fostering engagement with all City stakeholders, we can’t wait to hear from you.

For more detailed and latest information and to apply online, visit: www.southpasadenaca.gov/employment


Democracy in Action: City and University Join Forces in San Marcos, continued from page 13

Our students demonstrate connecting academic knowledge to civic engagement while also expanding their own sense of civic identity and responsibility.” And in some cases, students also have an opportunity to demonstrate creativity. The city’s communications staff witnessed this firsthand in the polished, professionalquality video that students produced, which has attracted more than 40,000 views on the city’s Facebook page, making it a powerful marketing tool that resonates with residents. Beyond these benefits to the community, students are learning how to connect with their local government — an overarching goal of the partnership. “Graduating students leave with a deeper understanding of a how a local community works — and with that, they can influence outcomes down the road,” says Scott Gross, CSUSM associate vice president of community engagement. Democracy in Action was inspired by the University of Oregon’s Sustainable City Year Program, which works in largely the same way but, as the name suggests, focuses on boosting sustainability. The Oregon program was so successful it evolved into the Educational Partnerships for Innovation in Communities Network (EPIC-N), an organization that supports collaborations among universities and government in an effort to help meet community needs while developing the future workforce. More than 25 EPIC-N programs operate throughout the United States and in Israel, along with ongoing efforts to make it a worldwide model. Using the EPIC-N framework, CSUSM staff tailored the Democracy in Action program to focus more on civic engagement. Fostering more civic-minded graduates is especially important in San Marcos because many of them remain in the city well after graduation. About 80 percent of CSUSM alumni continue living in the region, compared with 60 percent of nearby California State University San Diego alumni who stay in the region. The same is true for only about 25 percent of University of California San Diego alumni. www.westerncity.com

“We wanted students to realize they can inform and impact their local government,” Gross says. “They’re not just sitting in a classroom talking about theories — they’re actually putting their knowledge to work in a meaningful way.”

Students in the program help address city challenges.

continued

J

O

B

O

P

P

O

R

T

U

N

I

T

I

E S

CITY OF RANCHO SANTA MARGARITA Rancho Santa Margarita is a small city with the soul of a village. Community events and public gathering places promote a family-oriented community and encourage community spirit and participation. A mix of land uses and a balance of jobs and housing provide a planned community oasis in which people live, work, shop, and play. As the community looks toward the future, Rancho Santa Margarita will strive to ensure its small-town village character is protected and enhanced by well-designed and well-maintained neighborhoods that complement the natural environment.

PUBLIC WORKS DIRECTOR/ CITY ENGINEER

The Public Works Director/City Engineer reports directly to the City Manager, serves as a member of the executive management team, and is William Avery & Associates responsible for overseeing and guiding Management Consultants the daily functions and long-term vision of the Department. Customer service is a critical component to this role. The need is to deliver top notch 31/2 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Suite A Los Gatos, CA 95030 and responsive services that create and foster positive community and internal support for the operation. The Director is expected to serve as a 408.399.4424 role model who embodies the commitment to efficient service delivery and Fax: 408.399.4423 engages the entire organization towards this sense of mission. email: jobs@averyassoc.net

www.averyassoc.net This position requires Registration as a Professional Civil Engineer in California, and a Bachelor’s degree in Civil Engineering or a closely related field with four or more years of progressively responsible experience in PW operations including three years of management/administrative experience. The annual salary is $121,116-$175,020, DOQ. To be considered, please visit the Avery Associates Career Portal at www.averyassoc.net/current-searches/ to upload your letter of interest, resume and contact information including email addresses for five work-related references to Bill Avery by April 18, 2018.

Public Works Director City of Lomita, CA

L

ocated in Los Angeles County in the popular South Bay region, the City of Lomita (pop. 20,693) is a vibrant urban contract city known for its friendly hometown charm and convenient proximity to all the amenities Southern California has to offer. The Department encompasses the divisions of Street Maintenance, Tree Maintenance, Water System Operations and Maintenance, Safety Compliance, and Public Works Administration. Lomita Public Works is supported by 16.5 employees and an FY2017-18 budget of $ 5.1 million and an annual CIP of approximately $4 million. The ideal candidate will be a high energy leader with exceptional people management skills. He/she will be a well-rounded public works professional who prefers contributing in a smaller environment where results are realized without the burden of bureaucracy. A solid understanding of water production, treatment and distribution is strongly preferred. Five (5) years of relevant experience along with a Bachelor’s degree are required. Please visit www.tbcrecruiting.com for more detailed information and to apply online. Salary range goes up to $143,040. Compensation also includes competitive benefits package. Closing date: Sunday, April 15, 2018. Teri Black • 424.296.3111 • Bob McFall

Western City, April 2018

21


Democracy in Action: City and University Join Forces in San Marcos, continued

Participation builds Students’ Skills and Confidence

scorer on the promotional video. “I am proud to include the video in my reel. And the experience has made me more confident to work in the professional world; I feel ready for the workplace.”

“It was so great being able to work on a project that actually impacts people,” says CSUSM student Kristina Kalchev, who worked as cinematographer and musical J

O

B

O

P

P

O

Kalchev, who plans to earn her graduate degree, says that as a San Marcos resident, she now appreciates more deeply what R

T

U

N

I

T

I

E

S

Spring opportunities . . .

Police Commander Assistant Community Services Director Assistant Community Development Director City of Menlo Park

Assistant Finance Director City of Santa Clara

Teri Black • 424.296.3111 Suzanne Mason • 562.631.2500 Bradley Wardle • 650.450.3299

CITY OF HERMOSA BEACH A unique and vibrant small beach community, Hermosa Beach sits at the center of Los Angeles County’s desirable South Bay coastline along the Santa Monica Bay. Hermosa Beach is the very essence of the Southern California lifestyle, with an average of 283 sunny days per year. The small-town charm of Hermosa Beach is highlighted in commercial areas, like Pier Avenue, which is well-known for its many diverse restaurants and local retailers. The City Manager provides direction and oversight for the department heads in addition to ongoing responsibilities that include managing the budget, preparing Council meeting agendas and reports, initiating and implementing opportunities to enhance municipal service delivery, and striving for continuous CITY William Avery & Associates in all core City functions. The City is Management Consultants MANAGER improvement searching for a strong and visionary leader with an affinity for the beach lifestyle who is ready to take on both challenges and 31/2 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Suite A Los Gatos, CA 95030 opportunities to bring forth significant accomplishments. Given the new master plan and the dynamic projects in the queue for Hermosa Beach, 408.399.4424 the next City Manager will have the opportunity to build a lasting legacy. Fax: 408.399.4423

The new City Manager must be experienced in municipal finance and email: jobs@averyassoc.net www.averyassoc.net maintaining a sustainable financial structure. Prior experience as a City Manager, Assistant or Deputy City Manager, or as an Executive Director of a complex public sector organization is preferred. A BS/BA in a related field is essential and an Masters is highly desired. The salary and benefits are negotiable depending on qualifications and experience. To be considered, please visit our website at www.averyassoc.net/current-searches/ for a detailed job announcement and how to apply on the Avery Associates Career Portal.

22

League of California Cities

the local government staff does behind the scenes. San Marcos Stormwater Program Manager Reed Thornberry also witnessed students “connecting the dots.” He worked with students to curb the amount of trash flowing into local lakes, creeks and ponds. A large portion of that work involved analyzing street-sweeping data to map the most significant sources of litter. Thornberry also made a point of getting the students into the field. “I wanted to take them beyond the data, so they could see what we really do,” Thornberry says. “A lot of them live in San Marcos — some have even grown up in this city — but they’ve never explored our creek system. Once they were out there with me, they spotted bullfrogs, turtles and crawfish. They saw entire ecosystems thriving. “After seeing the impacts of trash in our waterways, these students got a real sense of why they’re worth protecting. I think that drove home the mission,” Thornberry says, adding that this project will now help city staff meet new environmental guidelines from the state, further underscoring how this collaboration has real-world implications.

Economic Development, the Workforce Pipeline and Entrepreneurship

The students in this program will soon be part of the approximately 3,000 graduates CSUSM produces every year, which is why San Marcos has become a regional educational hub. About 10 percent of the

The program connects students with the community where they live.

www.cacities.org


region’s total academic program completions occur in the city. “San Marcos is fueling a workforce pipeline that will strengthen our region for generations to come,” says San Marcos City Manager Jack Griffin. “Beyond that, our partnership with Cal State San Marcos underscores how we can collaborate to benefit our community, and we are proud of that.” In spring 2018, the city and CSUSM will begin the next round of Democracy in Action projects. One will focus on boosting volunteerism at the senior center, and another will explore how to attract more entrepreneurs. Professor Eliza Bigham and human development research students will partner with the San Marcos Senior Center to research aspects such as volunteer intake processes and opportunities, program administration, economical volunteer software programs and more. Another team of students will research how to support entrepreneurs through community systems and government policies. Using their research, students will propose activities, events, technologies, organizations and institutions that can help develop an attractive entrepreneurial environment for San Marcos. “Economic development is a relatively new priority for the City of San Marcos. While we’ve made some great progress in recent years, I am eager to see what these students produce,” Sangster says. “I have no doubt they will help our city take things up a notch and earn some meaningful experience in the process.”

More Information Online For links to related resources and additional information, read the online version of this article at www.westerncity.com.

Partnership Offers a Model for Other Cities

This partnership demonstrates what is possible when local government and higher education institutions work together. The Democracy in Action partners are excited about inspiring similar efforts in other cities and hope to see many more partnerships like these. ■

Democracy in Action offers a model for cities in the region. The nearby City of Escondido is exploring a collaboration with CSUSM, and other cities have also expressed an interest. J

O

B

O

P

P

O

R

T

U

N

I

T

I

E S

Assistant City Manager City of Healdsburg, CA

T

ucked away in beautiful Sonoma County, the City of Healdsburg (pop. 11,800) encompasses approximately 4.1 square miles in a region known for its wineries, natural beauty, mild climate, outdoor recreation opportunities and award-winning schools. Healdsburg is a full-service municipality and services are carried out and supported by 134 full-time staff. The Assistant City Manager will be dedicated to facilitating numerous community development priorities and helping to ensure the success of other city departments involved in the development process. The ideal candidate will be an experienced local government professional with impressive experience overseeing sophisticated and complex development projects. Viable candidates will have served in a department director capacity, or have experience serving as an Assistant or Deputy City Manager in a similar size community. Ideal candidates will possess at least six years of increasingly responsible and relevant local government experience. Four years of supervisory/ management experience and a Bachelor’s degree are also required. A Master’s degree is preferred. Salary range up to $180,474; salary supplemented by a generous benefits package. Visit www.tbcrecruiting.com for extensive info and to apply online by Sunday, April 15, 2018. Teri Black • 424.296.3111 Suzanne Mason • 562.631.2500

Director of Design & Development City of La Quinta, CA

N

estled between the Santa Rosa and San Bernardino mountains, the City of La Quinta (pop. 39,000 perm. + 15,000 seasonal) is a natural paradise in the Coachella Valley. World-renowned as a destination for art, health, golf, living and well-being, the City values a seamless integration and delivery of services to its residents and development community. The Design & Development Department is supported by 30 staff and is organized across five divisions: Administration, Building, Engineering/Development Services, Planning and The Hub (Customer Service Center). The ideal candidate will embrace entrepreneurial qualities that complement the values of this high performing municipality. He/she will be a passionate and visionary leader known for requiring and demonstrating high quality work products and providing exemplary customer service. They must have a proven track record of growing and developing staff. The ideal candidate will measure his/her professional success not by demonstrating technical skills and abilities but by successfully accomplishing projects through staff. At least five (5) years of progressively responsible and relevant public and/or private sector experience, which includes a minimum of three (3) years of leadership experience, and a Bachelor’s degree are required. Salary range goes up to $155,578. Compensation also includes competitive benefits package. Closing date: Sunday, April 15, 2018. Please visit www.tbcrecruiting.com for recruitment brochure and to apply online. Teri Black • 424.296.3111 • Bob McFall

www.westerncity.com

Western City, April 2018

23


PeckhamMcKenney &

Executive Officer Marin County LAFCO, CA

The Marin Local Agency Formation Commission (LAFCO) serves picturesque Marin County in the northern San Francisco Bay area. One of the most prestigious and sought-after counties in the nation, Marin County is located just across the Golden Gate Bridge. The County includes 11 incorporated cities: Belvedere, Corte Madera, Fairfax, Larkspur, Mill Valley, Novato, Ross, San Anselmo, San Rafael, Sausalito and Tiburon as well as unincorporated areas. Mandated by the State legislature, every county in California has a Local Agency Formation Commission to encourage the orderly formation of local governmental agencies. The eleven-member Commission consists of seven regular commissioners and four alternates that represent the county, cities or special districts within the County of Marin. The Commission is seeking a new Executive Officer that is stable, innovative and dynamic with exemplary professional qualifications. The successful candidate will have outstanding oral and written communication skills, excellent judgment, strong follow-through, impeccable work ethics, and a proven management, budgetary and supervisory track record. The position requires a Bachelor’s degree in Public Policy, Planning, Political Science, Geography or other related area. A graduate degree in related field is desirable. Four years experience in planning, environmental affairs, economic development, utility or city/county government, two years of which were in a progressive, more responsible supervisory or management capacity. Salary is competitive and will be commensurate with qualifications. Filing deadline is May 4, 2018. Call Clay Phillips.

General Manager

Midpeninsula Regional Open Space District; Los Altos, CA

Through the determined and heartfelt efforts of local conservationists, the Midpeninsula Regional Open Space District was created by a voter initiative in 1972. Since then, the District has permanently preserved over 63,000 acres of mountainous, foothill, coastal, and bayland open space, creating 26 open space preserves visited by over two million people per year. The District covers an area of more than 550 square miles and includes 17 cities and adjoining unincorporated areas in San Mateo, Santa Clara, and Santa Cruz counties. Known as a cutting-edge leader in the industry, the District enjoys a stable, professional, and dedicated seven-member Board and a passionate and talented staff of 175 FTEs. The FY 2017/18 budget is $61.4M, and the overall financial health of the District is strong and stable. The District seeks a General Manager who has the vision, dedication, and drive to lead the organization into the next phase of successful development. The ideal candidate will be committed to the District and passionate about its mission. Experience in, or a sound understanding of, local government and governmental affairs is desired. At least eight years of management experience is required. A Bachelor’s degree with major coursework in public administration, business administration, or a closely related field is required; a Master’s degree is preferred. Salary DOQE and competitive benefit package. Filing deadline is April 16, 2018. Call Bobbi Peckham.

City Attorney City of Pittsburg, CA

Pittsburg is a culturally rich and diverse community of 70,000 residents and is one of the fastest growing cities in Contra Costa County. With planned housing, business and commercial development ongoing, Pittsburg is expected to reach a population of nearly 80,000 by 2025 and as part of this planned growth BART’s newest station in Pittsburg is just a short walk to City Hall. The City has opted to transition from an outside law firm to an in-house attorney to ensure that the City Attorney’s focus will be solely on the City of Pittsburg. The ability to practice law in California is preferred, and all applicants need at least five years of experience practicing public law in the following areas: planning and policy, environment, public safety, land use, CEQA, Brown Act, contract development and review, ordinance and resolution preparation, property rights and acquisition, housing, economic development, utilities (water/sewer/electric), labor, post-redevelopment, personnel, elections, code enforcement and cannabis. The hiring of the City Attorney is the first step in creating internal legal representation for the City and the potential to grow your own department over time is rare in the public sector, and that combined with the variety of public services performed by the current organization makes this a very unique opportunity. The overarching desire of the City Council and Senior Executive Management Team is to have a City Attorney that is accessible, incredibly responsive, and adept at helping people solve problems. The salary range for this new opportunity has not yet been determined. Starting salary is expected to be between $165,000 to $185,000 DOQE with excellent benefits. Filing deadline is April 30, 2018. Call Phil McKenney.


“All about fit” Planning Director

City of Sebastopol, CA

Sebastopol is a small semi-urban community ideally situated in Northern California 50 miles north of San Francisco. The City currently has a population of about 7,800 residents yet serves a trade area population in excess of 50,000 people. The Planning Department provides planning and environmental review assistance to the City Council, and has responsibility for staffing the Planning Commission, Design Review Board, Tree Board, and Public Arts Committee, as well as providing service to residents and the real estate, development and construction industries. Current planning includes staffing a public counter, responding to questions from potential applicants and members of the public, assisting the Building Official in enforcement efforts, receiving and processing applications for land use permits, subdivision and other development permits, preparing staff reports for the Council and City boards and commissions, preparing agenda packets and minutes for assigned committees, and performing inspections to assure compliance with zoning, environmental, and other planning regulations. Advance planning includes preparation of long-range planning documents, including the General Plan, Specific Plans, grant preparation, park and community facility planning, special studies, and new policy documents and ordinances. The Department also takes a lead role in formulation of park policy, applies for and administers park-related grants, and has managed park development projects. The ideal candidate will have extensive knowledge of the principles, theories, legal requirements, and methodologies of City Planning and the functioning of City Government. Bachelor’s degree from a four-year college or university; and three years related experience; or equivalent combination of education and experience in planning, environmental studies, geography or related field with at least two years in a supervisory capacity. The salary range is from $110,652 to $134,496 DOQE with excellent benefits and a 4% salary increase is scheduled for July 1, 2018. Filing deadline is April 23, 2018. Call Phil McKenney.

Building & Public Works Director/City Engineer City of Suisun City, CA

Located nearly halfway between San Francisco and Sacramento, Suisun City is accessible from Interstate 80 via Highway 12 and Amtrak’s Capitol Corridor commuter rail stop at the Train Depot, right in the heart of the City’s historic Waterfront District, making it a prime location for homeowners as well as job seekers, particularly with its reverse commute for inner Bay Area residents. The next Director will be an innovative, inspiring, and energetic leader with a successful track record in all aspects of public works, facilities, and infrastructure planning, management and maintenance; have demonstrated project management skills; and decisive and consistent leadership, management, and mentoring skills. The core job responsibilities include overseeing maintenance of public works infrastructure, parks and landscaping, and building and marina facilities; building inspection; engineering services; and working closely with the City’s partners including STA (transportation), SSWA (water), and FSSD (sewer). Preferred candidates are Registered Engineers in the State of California and/or Certified Building Officials, and if not other creative ideas will be explored to ensure effective delivery of these services. First and foremost, the successful candidate must work well within a committed, focused, and customer service oriented organization under general direction from the City Manager. Bachelor’s degree with major course work in civil engineering, construction, public administration, facility management or a closely related field desired, as well as eight years of broad and extensive experience in public works development, professional engineering, and maintenance activities or related service delivery operations, including at least three years in a responsible management capacity. The salary range is from $97,668 to $131,856 DOQE with excellent benefits. Filing deadline is April 30, 2018. Call Phil McKenney.

Executive Director

Loveland Downtown Development Authority, Loveland, CO

The City of Loveland, CO, sits at an elevation of nearly 5,000 feet with panoramic views of the snow-capped Rocky Mountains and fertile plains. Approximately 46 miles north of Denver, the city has the amenities of an urban population center, yet retains its smalltown charm. The Boards of Directors of the Loveland Downtown Partnership and Downtown Development Authority (DDA) seek an Executive Director to advance the DDA from a start-up to a mature entity. A bachelor’s degree plus three years of experience in one or more of the following areas is desirable: downtown district management, economic development, building and planning, and business administration. Knowledge of municipal government and the ability to build and maintain strong, collaborative relationships between member businesses, the City, and the development community are essential. Annual salary range $80,000 to $100,000, dependent on qualifications. Filing deadline is April 30, 2018. Call Andrew Gorgey.

To view a detailed brochure and apply, please visit:

Peckham & McKenney

www.peckhamandmckenney.com

Resumes acknowledged within two business days. Call (866) 912-1919 for more information.


Lessons for Local Governments About ADA Lawsuits, continued from page 9

board issued several supplementary guidelines, but DOJ never adopted them and therefore the supplementary guidelines never became binding. In 2004, the board issued more supplementary guidelines. Eventually, in 2010, DOJ adopted the 2004 guidelines with slight revisions. The 2010 ADA regulations adopted by DOJ established a three-tier system of compliance. Based on this three-tier system, government facilities are subject to different standards depending on when they were built or altered: • Government facilities unaltered since before Sept. 15, 2010. At the option of the government agency, these facilities are subject to either the original 1991 ADA standards adopted by DOJ or another set of federal standards called the Uniform Federal Accessibility Standards (UFAS). • Government facilities altered or built between Sept. 15, 2010, and March 15, 2012. At the option of the government agency, these facilities are subject to either the original 1991 ADA standards adopted by DOJ, the UFAS or the 2010 ADA standards adopted by DOJ.

P

R

O

F

E

S

S

I

O

N

A

L

S

E

• Government facilities altered on or after March 15, 2012. These facilities are subject to the 2010 standards. Because these standards vary, it is important that local government agencies expressly elect which sets of standards they are adopting. Without an express election, a court could ultimately decide which standards apply, and that decision could result in significant liability that otherwise could have been avoided.

Conclusion As the Kirola decision makes clear, even the slightest access barrier in a government facility may serve as the basis for a class action lawsuit against the local government agency. Therefore, it is important for local government agencies to take preventive measures to reduce the possibility of ADA violations. A local government agency can adopt strategies such as conducting a self-evaluation similar to that required in 1991 and expressly electing a set of federal regulation standards for each facility that has remained unaltered since before March 15, 2012. After the local government has identified the applicable standards, it should ensure strict compliance. ■

R V

I

C

William Avery & Associates, Inc. Labor Relations / Executive Search / Human Resources Consulting 31/2 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Suite A Los Gatos, CA 95030 408.399.4424 Fax: 408.399.4423 email: jobs@averyassoc.net www.averyassoc.net

26

League of California Cities

E

S

D

I

R

E

C

T O

R Y

Bobbi C. Peckham • Phil McKenney

Peckham&McKenney www.peckhamandmckenney.com

Roseville, CA

866.912.1919

www.cacities.org


P

R

O

F

E

S

S

I

O

N

A

L

S

E

R V

I

C

E

HF&H CONSULTANTS, LLC

S

D

I

R

E

C

T O

R Y

HELPING LOCAL GOVERNMENT LEADERS

Managing Tomorrow’s Resources Today Providing Consulting Services to Recycling, Solid Waste, Water and Wastewater Management for more than 20 Years

• Planning • Procurement • Management

• Financial/Rates • AB939 Compliance • Litigation Support

www.hfh-consultants.com Walnut Creek (925) 977-6950

Irvine (949) 251-8628

managementpartners.com Budget Strategies ∙ Service Sharing Organization Analysis ∙ Performance Management Process Improvement ∙ Strategic Planning Executive Recruitment ∙ Facilitation/Team Building

E XPERIENCE , T ALENT , COMMITMENT TO PUBLIC SERVICE San Jose ∙ Orange County ∙ Cincinnati ∙ 408-437-5400

WRITTEN TESTS

Elevate Your ExpectaƟons

Sales and Use Tax Property Tax SoŌware SoluƟons Cannabis Compliance Business Tax AdministraƟon TOT and Short Term Rental Compliance

888.861.0220 I www.hdlcompanies.com 888.861.0220  I   hdlcompanies.com 

www.westerncity.com

Over 70 stock tests available for jobs in public agencies. Toll Free (877) 22-EXAMS exams@donnoe.com www.donnoe.com

Western City, April 2018

27


P

R

O

F

E

S

S

I

O

N

A

L

S

E

R V

I

C

E

S

D

I

R

E

C

T O

R Y

Still comparing apples to oranges? U.S. Communities delivers cooperative purchasing solutions that can’t be matched.

www.uscommunities.org/lcc

Providing innovative and practical solutions for Cities, Counties and Special Districts

• Leadership & Organizational Assessments • Project Management • Human Resource Services • Chief Executive Officer Evaluations • City Council & Board Governance • Financial Management & Fiscal Sustainability • Workplace Investigations • Planning, Community & Economic Development • Recreation, Parks & Community Services • Public Safety Studies

675 Hartz Avenue, Suite 300 • Danville, CA 94526 866-774-3222 • www.municipalresourcegroup.com

Contact: Allan Crecelius or Sandra Comrie

12707 High Bluff Dr., Ste 200 San Diego, CA 92130 Tel 858.259.3800 fax 858.792.7465 acrecelius@rewardstrategy.com

Exceeding clients’ expectations since 1987. Classification | Compensation Special Surveys | Performance Management

matrix consulting group

Reach New Clients For advertising information, call (800) 262-1801.

Over 130 Public Agencies across California put their TRUST in us, because we check all the boxes when it comes to managing their investments.

201 SAN ANTONIO Circle, Suite 148 MOUNTAIN VIEW, CA 94040 650.858.0507 • www.matrixcg.net

Offices in SF Bay Area (Headquarters), Boston, Dallas, St. Louis, Portland, Charlotte, Salt Lake City

Management and operations studies Feasibility studies User fees and cost allocation Police • Fire • Public Works • Utilities Parks & Recreation • Administration Planning & Building

CALTRUST.ORG (888) 225-8787

Sponsored by the League of California Cities

SPECIALISTS IN CLASSIFICATION, JOB EVALUATION AND COMPENSATION

5663 Balboa Ave., #399, San Diego, CA 92111-2705 915 L Street, #C-102, Sacramento, CA 95814 Brentwood Village, 149 S. Barrington Ave., #726, Los Angeles, CA 90049-2950 1-888-522-7772 • www.compensationconsulting.com Offices in various major cities

28

League of California Cities

www.cacities.org


Which aspect of public service appeals most to you? Read more “On the Record” at www.westerncity.com.

Juan Carrillo Mayor pro Tem Palmdale

Kenneth Henderson Council Member Grand Terrace

Brigette Mansell Mayor Healdsburg

www.westerncity.com

Serving a community that has been underrepresented. I’m the first Hispanic elected to the council, and I represent a district that has been left behind.

I’ve been in public service for 37 years. As a council member, implementing ideas that have been percolating for some time is tremendously fulfilling.

Learning communication styles — how people see an issue and what they want changed in terms of policy.

Cathy Murillo Mayor Santa Barbara

Rico E. Medina Mayor San Bruno

John Minto Mayor Santee

Talking to our workingclass families and looking out for everyone, especially those without power. I’m the first Latina elected to the council.

Leaving things better than I found them. I’ve lived in my city all my life, as did my parents and grandparents. The community has shaped me.

Making a difference in my community by ensuring that we have amenities that improve our quality of life.

Western City, April 2018

29


THE TOAST OF OUR TOWNS. It’s an office tradition to frequently raise our glasses to new milestones, both professional and personal, and in the past year we were fortunate to have a lot to celebrate. We begin 2018 with yet another reason to propose a toast. As familiar faces and dependable sources of advice, to both clients and coworkers, we are proud to welcome Nubia Goldstein and Robin Baral as Churchwell White LLP partners. Their exceptional work and ability to make the best of any situation, make our cities—and office—a better place. At Churchwell White, we understand that results are created by people. Together, our team of lawyers and legislative advocates combine unexpected ideas with decades of proven experience. If you need a strategic partner with creative solutions, call to see what we can do for you.

PUBLIC LAW

| GOVERNMENT RELATIONS | REGULATORY ADVOCACY | CHURCHWELLWHITE.COM

Western City April 2018  

Community Services Issue

Western City April 2018  

Community Services Issue

Advertisement