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M AY 2017 |

The Monthly Magazine of the League of California CitiesÂŽ

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Palm Desert Capitalizes on Arts and Culture p.14 Fight Blight in Your City With Brownfields Tools p.9 Immigrants, the Economy and Civic Engagement p.11

www.westerncity.com


CONTENTS Calendar of League Events 2  3 Executive Director’s Message  Changing How We Think About Economic Development

COMMUNITIES

Palm Desert Capitalizes 

DEVELOPMENT

Award for Excellence

on Arts and Culture

By Carolyn Coleman

 New Website Matches Businesses With Government Incentives

 he California Business Incentives T Gateway gives local governments a cost-free way to expand outreach to businesses.

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 ight Blight in Your City F With Brownfields Tools

By Michelle Stephens

 n underused set of funding A resources offers tools that cities can use for virtually any site.

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 Immigrants, the Economy

 irst Weekend Palm Desert helps F increase the city’s tax revenues and makes it a regional center for the arts by drawing crowds to lively events from November through May.

By Sarah Rubin and Mahvash Hassan

Immigrants contribute significantly to California’s economy, both as employers and workers. The cities of Brawley, Oakley and Mountain View offer examples of how engaging immigrant communities creates local opportunities.

AUTHORITY

Local Leaders Make the 16  Leap to the Legislature

Part 2 of 2

 he California Civic Leadership T Institute® is an educational program sponsored by the League Partners and designed for local government elected officials interested in running for the Legislature. Legislators from local government reflect on the value of the institute.

Job Opportunities 20  Professional Services 31  Directory

and Civic Engagement

STATEWIDE

14 California Cities Helen Putnam

Economic development is both a strategy and a process involving a web of interdependent factors.

8 City Forum

CALIFORNIA

On the cover: First Weekend Palm Desert draws large crowds.

Providing California’s local governments with an effective tool for the timely financing of community-based public benefit projects. Since 1988, more than 500 cities, counties and special districts use CSCDA as their conduit issuer and PACE funding provider.

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President JoAnne Mounce Council Member Lodi

1400 K Street Sacramento, CA 95814 (916) 658-8200 Fax (916) 658-8240

First Vice President Rich Garbarino Council Member South San Francisco

Second Vice President Mark Kersey Council Member San Diego

Immediate Past President L. Dennis Michael Mayor Rancho Cucamonga

Executive Director Carolyn Coleman

For a complete list of the League board of directors, visit www.cacities.org/board.

Magazine Staff Editor in Chief Jude Hudson, Hudson + Associates (916) 658-8234; email: editor@westerncity.com Managing Editor Norman Coppinger (916) 658-8277; email: ncoppinger@cacities.org Contributing Editor Eva Spiegel (916) 658-8228; email: espiegel@cacities.org Advertising Sales Manager Pam Maxwell-Blodgett (916) 658-8256; email: maxwellp@cacities.org Administrative Assistant Kimberly Brady (916) 658-8223; email: kbrady@cacities.org Contributors Dan Carrigg Melissa Kuehne Jason Rhine Nicholas Romo Sara Rounds

leaguevents MAY 3–5

City Attorneys’ Spring Conference, San Francisco This meeting covers the latest trends and issues affecting public law practitioners and provides an opportunity to connect with colleagues.

JUNE 8–9

Policy Committee Meetings, Sacramento The League’s policy committees review issues of interest to cities statewide and make recommendations to the League board of directors.

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Legal Advocacy Committee Meeting, Sacramento The committee reviews and recommends friend-of-the-court efforts on cases of significant statewide interest to California cities.

Associate Editors Carol Malinowski Carolyn Walker Design Taber Creative Group

28–29

Advertising Design ImagePoint Design

Mayors and Council Members’ Executive Forum, Monterey The forum offers sessions to keep elected officials up to date on key issues.

For photo credits, see page 22.

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Western City (ISSN 0279-5337) is published monthly by the League of California Cities, 1400 K St., Sacramento, CA 95814. Subscriptions: $39.00/1 year; $63.00/2 years; student: $26.50; foreign: $52.00; single copies: $4.00, including sales tax. Entered as periodical mail January 30, 1930, at the Post Office, Los Angeles, CA 90013, under the Act of April 13, 1879. Periodical postage paid at Sacramento, Calif.

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Postmaster: Send address changes to Western City, 1400 K Street, Sacramento, CA 95814. Western City Trademark Reg. U.S. Pat. Off. ©2017 League of California Cities. All rights reserved. Material may not be reprinted without written permission. This issue is Volume XCIII, No. 5.

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30–July 1

Board of Directors’ Meeting, Monterey The League board reviews, discusses and takes action on a variety of issues affecting cities, including legislation, legal advocacy, education and training, and more.

SEPTEMBER 13–15

League of California Cities 2017 Annual Conference & Expo, Sacramento The conference offers dozens of educational sessions, numerous professional development opportunities, hundreds of exhibits and a chance to participate in the League’s policy-making activities.

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Mayors and Council Members’ Advanced Leadership Workshops, Monterey The workshops offer local elected officials who attended the preceding Executive Forum an opportunity to explore in greater detail topics such as managing municipal finances and resources.

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Event and registration information is available at www.cacities.org/events.

www.cacities.org


Executive Director’s Message by Carolyn Coleman

The quality of local schools plays a major role in how communities attract investment as well as workers and their families. Highly ranked schools can act as a magnet for economic growth.

Changing How We Think About

Economic Development

Economic development is a perennially hot topic, but what does the term really mean? Searching online yields many definitions that differ significantly. Most city officials would likely agree that economic development aims to improve a community’s economic well-being by creating and/or retaining jobs and boosting the tax base, thus enhancing the quality of life for its residents — but economic development is more than just creating or retaining jobs and the tax base. It’s also about creating a climate that’s attractive for investors and businesses and a place where workers and their families can flourish. To attract and retain investment, a community must have cultural amenities, modern infrastructure, quality schools, broadband and a trained workforce with skills that match business needs. We often talk about retaining existing businesses as an important component of economic development, and while that is certainly true, it is also about retaining residents — especially young people who want jobs and seek opportunities.

Cities Use a Variety of Approaches What does economic development look like in our cities? In some smaller California cities, where the city manager (or another city employee) is typically wearing many hats and doing work that spans multiple departments or disciplines, economic development may www.westerncity.com

consist of simply showing up to represent the city at the local chamber of commerce breakfast every month. At the next level, if a city has staff whose job responsibilities include economic development, such activities may include working more directly with the business community and reviewing ordinances to reduce costs by streamlining permitting or inspection processes while maintaining safety and environmental standards. For many cities, it’s important to ensure they are not part of the problem — that is to say, local regulations do not inadvertently impede or constrain business development and economic activities.

Some communities without staff for economic development activities rely on economic development consultants, whose services may be funded with Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) dollars. If a city’s population is greater than 50,000, it receives CDBG funding directly from the federal government. Cities with a population of less than 50,000 can apply to the state’s Department of Housing and Community Development for an allocation of CDBG dollars. An effective consultant knows how the state’s program works and helps their client city navigate the state system.

New Tools Offer Opportunities The state’s redevelopment program was a very effective tool for economic development, but when the State of California eliminated it several years ago, it left a vacuum in cities’ economic development toolkit. continued

Western City, May 2017

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Changing How We Think About Economic Development, continued

The Enhanced Infrastructure Financing District (EIFD) and Community Revitalization Investment Authority (CRIA) are relatively new tools that offer opportunities for communities seeking ways to stimulate economic activity in the absence of redevelopment. These tools offer access to tax-increment financing in different ways with new authority attached (see “More About the New Tools” on page 7). Compared with redevelopment, however, the new tools have reduced financial capacity — so innovative approaches and new partnerships between local governments and the business community are needed to maximize their potential.

Leveraging Federal Funds City officials nationwide understand the importance of leveraging federal funds to maximize the return on investment. For

example, every $1 of CDBG typically generates $3 to $4 in other funding. When I served as deputy mayor in Indianapolis (from 2001–05), the city used a $4 million Home Ownership Zone grant from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development to transform a historic neighborhood long plagued by blight, high crime rates and decades of disinvestment. Vacant lots and abandoned and dilapidated homes were acquired; new streets, sidewalks, lighting and utilities were installed and trees planted; four new parks were built; and special financing packages were assembled for homebuyers. Over 400 families moved in, joining many longtime residents, and now call the neighborhood home. More than $50 million in private investment revitalized the neighborhood, now known as Fall Creek Place.

This project: • Brought $18 million in annual household income to the area; • Created 14,000 square feet of new retail space; and • Generates $1.2 million in annual tax revenue for the city. Local officials know that leveraging federal dollars can provide a very healthy return on investment, as the Fall Creek Place project illustrates. It’s critically important to maintain these tools that create strong environments for investment in our communities, and that is why cities are fighting now to preserve federal funding for programs like CDBG.

Building a Tax Base “We need more tax base” is frequently heard in local government circles. It’s a goal for local officials nationwide, and it presents a major challenge. Without an adequate tax base, cities won’t have the resources to support the delivery of basic services that residents expect like public safety, roads and bridges, and schools. For example, if I want to live in Emerald City, I must feel safe there, my kids need quality schools to attend, and I need a secure place to live and a job that pays a competitive salary. If the resources to create these things don’t exist, the city is less attractive to investors and employers.

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Annexation is one method cities use to increase their tax base. Another new economic development tool, the Annexation Development Plan (ADP), offers a way for consenting local agencies (city and/ or a county or special district) to adopt tax-increment financing to improve or upgrade structures, roads, sewer or water facilities or other infrastructure as part of annexing a disadvantaged unincorporated community. An ADP can be implemented by a special district either formed for this purpose or incorporated into the duties of an existing special district. After the Local Agency Formation Commission (LAFCO) approves the annexation, the special district can issue debt without an additional vote. Cities can use an ADP to make the infrastructure improvements www.cacities.org


that are essential elements of attracting and retaining jobs and investments, which are especially needed in disadvantaged communities. Any discussion of the tax base must consider that our present system of state and local taxation is outdated. Data from the California State Board of Equalization and California Bureau of Labor Statistics personal income data demonstrate that local sales tax collections as a percentage of personal income have fallen from 0.50 percent in 1980 to 0.32 percent in 2016. Many retail sales avoid taxation due to two major factors:

Economic development is also about retaining jobs and opportunity.

1. The shift in consumer consumption from taxable retail goods to untaxed services; and 2. The growth of e-commerce that largely escapes taxation. Since 2005, e-commerce as a share of total retail sales has increased from 2.4 percent to 8.3 percent, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. In the fourth quarter of 2016, total retail sales nationwide increased 2.9 percent from 2015 — and e-commerce sales increased 15.1 percent. California’s composite sales tax rate is among the highest in the nation and its base among the narrowest. Services and intangible goods are not taxed, but that is where the growth in the economy is occurring. This issue will continue to present challenges for our local and state governments, and it’s an area that requires strong leadership to craft responsive solutions.

Inclusion as an Economic Development Factor On the private sector’s side of economic development, location and the ability to expand in the future are key components of a growth strategy. As mentioned earlier, businesses look for communities that have robust infrastructure, broadband, schools, a trained workforce and cultural amenities. These community assets also correlate with quality of life for employees and are therefore a prime concern for businesses when making decisions about where to locate or expand. continued www.westerncity.com

Cultural amenities, modern infrastructure and a trained workforce are some key assets needed to attract and retain investment. Western City, May 2017

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Changing How We Think About Economic Development, continued

Cities have traditionally approached economic development in terms of providing tax incentives for businesses they sought to attract or retain. However, cultural and social issues that affect the quality of life are now playing a central role in a community’s ability to attract or keep businesses. Before it was repealed in 2017, North Carolina’s passage of House Bill 2 (HB 2) in 2016 cost the state millions of dollars in lost revenue. HB 2 barred local governments from passing nondiscrimination ordinances and mandated that in government facilities, transgender people must use the bathroom that corresponds with their biological gender rather than their gender identity. Major corporations, including Bank of America, PayPal and Deutsche Bank, canceled plans to locate or expand in the state, resulting in a net loss of $297 million. Major

sporting events moved elsewhere, taking with them $246 million. North Carolina lost $18 million in convention business. Numerous entertainers and musical acts, including Bruce Springsteen, Cirque du Soleil, Itzhak Perlman and Ringo Starr, refused to perform there. Film companies, including A&E Studios, Turner Broadcasting and Lionsgate, canceled future productions in North Carolina, and at least five states, 21 cities and the United Kingdom banned governmentfunded travel to the state. The repeal of HB 2 in 2017, however, did not change the provision that barred local governments from adopting nondiscrimination ordinances; thus, while the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) “reluctantly agreed” to bring sporting events back to North Carolina, it is not yet clear whether the repeal’s provisions are sufficient to satisfy the concerns of the entertainment industry and others.

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ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

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Arizona’s refusal in 1987 to observe the Martin Luther King, Jr. Day holiday caused dozens of groups — including the National League of Cities — to cancel conventions in Phoenix. The NFL pulled the 1993 Super Bowl out of Tempe and said it would bring the 1996 Super Bowl to Arizona if the law was changed. Arizona did not change its law to observe the King holiday until five years later in November 1992, after it had lost hundreds of millions of dollars worth of business over the preceding five years. And more recently, Arizona’s anti-immigration law, passed in 2010, generated a wave of business boycotts totaling $141 million in just the first few months after its passage. These examples illustrate that beyond the traditional factors that businesses might consider when deciding to locate or expand, the degree to which a community is or is perceived to be inclusive or welcoming to their employees is also a factor. As city leaders go forward to build strong communities with healthy economies, inclusivity will be a key consideration. Existing and potential employers want to know: What kind of community do you offer my workers and their families, and how inclusive is it? It will become incumbent on local leaders to monitor, manage and lead in that framework.

A Web of Interdependent Factors Economic development is about creating a place where people want to put their dollars and businesses want to invest. It involves a web of interdependent factors. Without investment, there are no jobs, and without jobs, little incentive exists for young people and workers to remain in the community. To attract and retain jobs and investments from the private sector, a city must have infrastructure, services, cultural amenities, quality schools and a trained workforce. A robust community needs an adequate tax base to support essential services and infrastructure, and an adequate tax base requires workers and job opportunities. It may be helpful for city officials to think of economic development as both a strategy and a process. In addition, it may www.cacities.org


More About the New Tools Read the online version of this article at www.westerncity.com for links to articles about the new economic development tools available to California communities and related resources: • New Economic Development Tools Offer Opportunities for Creativity; • What You Need to Know About AB 2 and Community Revitalization Tools; and • Prospects for Community Economic Development Are Finally Looking Up.

be constructive to take a holistic approach in which all the essential public services that comprise a healthy, thriving city are valued for the direct benefits they offer the community and for the way their contributions support the city’s ability to retain and attract new investments. For example, considering the value of parks and recreation as not only central to a city’s quality of life — but also an integral component of its attractiveness and appeal for businesses and investors — may provide a fresh perspective for policymakers and residents alike. The quality of local schools also plays a major role in how communities attract investment as well as workers and their families. Highly ranked schools can act as a magnet for economic growth. Local officials should work with their school districts as part of the effort to make the community appealing to families and employers. California’s 482 cities span a broad spectrum ranging from modest to highly sophisticated in their economic development efforts. The League supports these efforts through its Housing, Community and Economic Development Policy Committee, education and conferences, and advocacy on behalf of its member cities. We welcome your ideas and encourage you to share your city’s economic development best practices and innovative approaches as part of our collective work to enhance the quality of life for all Californians. ■ www.westerncity.com

Parks and recreation opportunities for workers are among the amenities that businesses and investors consider when making decisions related to expanding or relocating in a community.

Coming soon! 2017 City Hall Directory Find-it-fast information for every city in California

3 Mayors, Council Members and

City Department Head Information

3 City Addresses, Phone, Fax and Websites 3 Advertisers with Products and Services That Your City Needs

With the 2017 City Hall Directory, the information you need is right at your fingertips. Order online at: www.cacities.org/publications or call (916) 658-8217.

Western City, May 2017

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New Website Matches Businesses With Government Incentives California has led the nation for more than half a century in creating the modern technology economy, generating jobs and building strong communities. Now a new economic development tool for business supports the state’s reputation for innovation.

the user is directed to the government agency’s website for more information and to complete the process. The CBIG portal can also suggest additional incentives to consider and lets users save search results and wish lists.

Local governments and the State of California manage thousands of programs and incentives designed to help businesses, but such incentives work as intended only if they are used. If businesses can’t find them, these economic development tools are often underutilized.

How to Participate

The California Business Incentives Gateway (CBIG) is the state’s first digital marketplace focused on automatically pairing businesses with thousands of economic development programs and incentives offered by state and local governments.

Statewide Associations Encourage Participation

• Register your city at cbig.ca.gov; • Upload incentives to your city profile; • Engage local businesses and let them know you are on CBIG; and

A letter from several statewide associations inviting California cities to participate in the CBIG website was sent to city managers in December 2016. Supporting organizations that signed the letter include the League, California State Association of Counties, California Association for Local Economic Development, California Manufacturers & Technology Association, California Business Roundtable, state Franchise Tax Board and National Federation of Independent Business, California.

• Keep incentives updated and current.

Practical Solution Addresses Statewide Need

“The site will be made available to businesses later in summer 2017,” says Chiang. “This will allow them to conduct searches that will generate focused economic development opportunities geared to their interests and business profile.”

State Treasurer John Chiang conceived the CBIG project in response to a question posed by the Little Hoover Commission in a 2015 letter to Gov. Jerry Brown and the Legislature that said, “As home to Silicon Valley, California is synonymous worldwide with innovation. California companies have set the gold standard for customer service. But why — when Californians interact with their government — is their experience so much different?” Chiang’s answer is a website that can automatically guide business decision-makers to government incentives. CBIG’s goal is to list all business opportunities from the state and local governments in one easy-to-use application. Using intelligent automation software, CBIG takes information entered by a business and matches its need with accessible tax credits, fee waivers, training grants, loan guarantees and many other pro-business, job-growth tools. After the business selects items of greatest interest, the incentives are placed in a “shopping cart” and

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By uploading details of their programs to CBIG, local governments can — at no cost — expand their outreach to businesses seeking opportunities. To participate in CBIG:

League of California Cities

Timeframe for Launch The CBIG website entered a “soft launch” phase earlier this year, with cities and counties and other public agencies having until June 30 to register and post programs to the CBIG portal. Thirtynine government partners, offering more than 110 incentives, are already participating.

For more information on CBIG, email cbig@treasurer.ca.gov or call the Treasurer’s Office at (916) 651-0260. ■

Cities are invited to upload descriptions of their programs to CBIG, which will link interested businesses with local incentive programs.


Fight Blight in Your City With Brownfields Tools by Michelle Stephens

California cities are littered with properties that discourage economic activity, attract crime, depress property values, and degrade quality of life. Communities seeking to convert blighted areas to commercial, industrial, residential, mixed-use, open space or other productive uses lost their primary tool when the state eliminated redevelopment agencies. However, Enhanced Infrastructure Financing Districts (EIFDs) and Community Revitalization Investment Authorities (CRIAs) are new economic development tools that offer the use of tax-increment financing. Communities statewide are exploring ways to use these tools, which require innovative approaches and new partnerships to maximize their potential. In addition to EIFDs and CRIAs, the California Association for Local Economic Development (CALED) encourages cities to consider and utilize an underused set of resources in federal and state brownfields funds. A brownfield is real property whose reuse is compromised by real or perceived contamination. Under this definition, practically all sites in any community can use brownfields resources.

What Constitutes a Brownfield? Any property with a history unknown to prospective purchasers and developers may harbor contaminants in its buildings, soil or groundwater — or on adjacent properties — that could expose future owners, developers and lenders to liability. This is true for agricultural land, open space, suburban property and land historically used for industrial purposes.

How Brownfields Affect Cities Brownfields sites impact communities: • In neighborhoods — These sites affect neighborhoods and main streets. Many downtown areas, in both small towns and large cities, have sites that were once used as churches, theaters or stores. Development tends to leapfrog sites suspected of contamination, which creates land-use challenges and a checkerboard effect of vacant and often unsightly properties; • In lost tax revenue — Cities lose potential sales, property and business tax revenue from unused sites, and city

coffers are drained because these sites tend to attract crime, vagrancy and vandalism and drive up public safety costs; and • In development decisions — Federal and state laws impose enormous financial responsibilities (costs that may far exceed the economic value of a clean property) and legal challenges on responsible parties for contamination on a site. For these reasons, cities can use state and federal resources (see “Funding Sources” on page 24) to protect communities from these liabilities on practically any site, with a few exceptions. The assistance can be as modest as $5,000 for an All Appropriate Inquiry Phase I site assessment, required by lenders and grantors, or may run to millions of dollars in site cleanup funds. The technical assistance that accompanies these grants accelerates the eventual reuse of such sites.

continued on page 24

Michelle Stephens is program manager for the California Association for Local Economic Development and can be reached at michelle@caled.org.

The City of San Pablo transformed a former 4.5-acre railyard into Rumrill Sports Park, using funds from an EPA brownfields grant, Bank of America, California State Parks, CalRecycle and East Bay Regional Park District. Project financing included New Market Tax Credits. www.westerncity.com

Western City, May 2017

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Thank you to all of the 2017 League Partners Platinum ($15,000+) 2

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Oakley Mountain View

Immigrants, the Economy and Civic Engagement

Brawley

by Sarah Rubin and Mahvash Hassan Immigrants are a critical part of the economy in California, which is home to over 10 million foreign-born residents who contribute $715 billion — about one third — of its gross domestic product each year. These individuals comprise 35 percent of the state’s civilian workforce. Their entrepreneurialism and innovative efforts are a driving force from Silicon Valley to the Central Valley and beyond. Immigrants work in enterprises that span Fortune 500 companies and small Main Street businesses revitalizing downtown corridors throughout the state. California cities use a variety of strategies to engage their residents in civic life and foster inclusive, welcoming communities. Cities with policies and practices focused on inclusion build trust and relationships that lead to increased economic and civic engagement of immigrants and

the broader community. Such welcoming efforts also lay the groundwork for innovative cross-sector partnerships that support workforce development and economic prosperity.

Border Travel and Transit Station Spur Economic Development The City of Brawley (pop. 26,566) in Imperial County remains close to its rural roots. Farmers, ranchers and generations of Mexican-Americans call Brawley home. Those who traverse the U.S. border with Mexico to work, study or shop keep many traditional values alive in the Imperial Valley, and the U.S.-Mexico border plays a central role in the city’s economic activity. Mayor Sam Couchman describes this dynamic as “a unique symbiotic relationship.”

To improve access to services and air quality in the region, Brawley recently expanded its public transportation network. The city partnered with the Imperial County Transportation Commission and engaged local community groups, including the Latino Comite Civico Del Valle (Civic Committee of the Valley), to design a system that meets the community’s needs. Brawley’s Transit Transfer Station now serves as the city’s central hub for Imperial Valley Transit and Gold Line buses for transit riders traveling to and from destinations within Brawley and throughout the Imperial Valley. The destinations span 22 new stops throughout the city and include retail destinations and the One Stop Employment Center. continued

Sarah Rubin is public engagement program manager for the Institute for Local Government (ILG) and can be reached at srubin@ca-ilg.org. Mahvash Hassan is an immigrant integration and civic engagement consultant for ILG and can be reached at mhassanconsulting@gmail.com.

www.westerncity.com

Western City, May 2017

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Immigrants, the Economy and Civic Engagement, continued

The transit station was built on a previously vacant lot. City Manager Rosanna Bayon Moore says, “Soon after work began, we discovered buried fuel tanks on the site, which was identified as a brownfield. We worked with the transportation community to rapidly address these findings, and the brownfields status gave us access to additional funding.” The project’s overall budget was $1.5 million, with funding from many sources including the California Transit Security Grant program, American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, Federal Transit Administration and others. “Residents were fearful at first that the transit station would make things worse and increase congestion. But the facility is very attractive and provides a nice enhancement for the area,” says Moore. The transit station gives city residents better access to existing businesses. This stimulated

economic activity and encouraged the development of an immigrant-owned gas station, convenience store and Del Taco on a prominent but long vacant parcel of land. It also helped the city attract more businesses, including a General Nutrition Center, AT&T and Starbucks. This investment, along with new construction of a Sun Community Federal Credit Union building, signaled confidence in the Highway 86 corridor that spurred additional capital investment.

Bilingual Support Brawley has fostered an inclusive, welcoming environment for all its residents. “We are committed to stretching our public resources as far as they can reach to serve all of our residents,” says Mayor Couchman. For example, bilingual capacity is part of all city operations, which demonstrates the city’s commitment to

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League of California Cities

Founding Sponsor of U.S. Communities

making its services and outreach accessible for residents who may not be fluent in English. On matters of major significance, the city provides simultaneous translation of public meetings in Spanish, using professional interpreters and sound equipment on loan from San Diego State University’s Imperial Valley campus. The city also partners with the Mexican Consulate, which is based in El Centro, to offer mobile services at a city facility in Brawley. This effort provides assistance to Mexican nationals on a wide range of needs, including Mexican passports and consular IDs; birth certificates; information on immigration, family, civil and penal law; education and scholarships. The mobile consulate brings services to an easily accessible location and encourages resolution of issues commonly

ILG Offers Interpretation Equipment to Cities Language barriers are a frequent challenge to increasing public engagement. Providing accurate and culturally informed interpretation that makes sense and reflects cultural nuances, including humor — as opposed to just a literal interpretation — can broaden community participation and improve the meeting outcome. The Institute for Local Government lends interpretation equipment at no cost to cities. The digital meeting interpretation equipment supports simultaneous interpretation of public meetings. Each set consists of 40 receivers and headsets as well as the transmitter and speaker/headset for the person interpreting. The equipment is easy for interpreters and meeting participants to use, and each set contains instructions in both English and Spanish. For more information, contact Hanna Stelmakhovych, public engagement program assistant, at hstelmakhovych@ca-ilg.org.

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1.4 million people in California are employed at companies owned by immigrants.

affecting local residents. The city acts as a co-convener, waives its usual insurance requirement and provides in-kind staff support for the event in a community room at the city library.

Community-Building and Economic Activity in the Heart of the Delta You, Me, We = Oakley! is a multi-sector collaboration coordinated by the City of Oakley (pop. 40,141) in Contra Costa County. The program creates opportunities for its diverse residents (35 percent Latino, 7 percent African-American and 6 percent Asian) to come together, better understand one another, appreciate each other’s stories and recognize their common desire to build a stronger, safer and more vibrant community. “We have had the fastest growing Hispanic population in the county since the year 2000. We want all our residents to feel welcome and a part of the community fabric and to be civically engaged,” says Oakley City Manager Bryan Montgomery. “The You, Me, We = Oakley! program has helped build stronger relationships between the city and community members.” The City of Oakley and Oakley schools, businesses, faith congregations and community-based organizations collaborated to create the program. Its initiatives include police-community youth sporting events, citizenship workshops in partnership with community-based organizations and an advisory committee that addresses the needs of English-language learners and their families. A recent event brought together parents of students and active community members for a meal and to discuss the changing community. Parents talked about their common values and

their goals for helping their children succeed in school as well as strategies for schools to increase communication with and engagement of parents. “Improved communication between the city, residents and the business community set the stage for partnerships to build and expand some of the local retail establishments as part of the city’s downtown revitalization efforts,” says Montgomery. In addition to in-kind and other indirect cash funding from the city, Oakley received approximately $500,000 in grant funding from Welcoming America, Y&H Soda Foundation and the Zellerbach Foundation to help fund these efforts.

Embracing Inclusion in Mountain View Statewide, immigrant workers comprise 57 percent of software developers. “If we didn’t have immigrants, we wouldn’t have Silicon Valley,” says Alex Andrade, economic development manager for the City of Mountain View (pop. 77,925), which is often described as the “start-up” community of Silicon Valley. The city’s downtown area is home to many earlystage tech and biotech/life science companies. Locally based firms include Google, Intuit, Symantec, LinkedIn and others. In addition to embracing innovation, the City of Mountain View is committed

38% of California’s entrepreneurs are immigrants.

to fostering mutual understanding and promoting respect, inclusiveness and involvement. As part of that commitment, the city recently launched a Spanish Language Civic Leadership Academy as a pilot project. Over 21 percent of Mountain View’s population and 41 percent of the students in its public schools come from Hispanic families. The Spanish Language Civic Leadership Academy’s goal is to improve residents’ understanding of government and city services and increase civic engagement, leadership and volunteerism in the city. Conversations with community members identified the topics to be covered, and city staff from numerous departments helped design and are facilitating the eight-session curriculum. Participants in the pilot: • Learn how Mountain View’s city government functions; • Gain a basic understanding of services and programs provided by each department; • Meet elected officials and staff; • Learn how residents can become engaged and involved in issues that affect their community; • Get to know their neighbors; and • Serve as role models and a resource for other community residents. Participants who complete the academy program also learn how to obtain a business license, report a crime, access city services and inform local decisionmaking processes. The pilot’s budget of $4,000 came from the city’s General Fund. continued on page 23

www.westerncity.com

Western City, May 2017

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Arts and

Palm Desert Capitalizes on

The City of Palm Desert is located in the heart of the Coachella Valley, a fastgrowing Southern California region that includes the cities of Palm Springs, La Quinta and Indio. In addition to Palm Desert’s 49,335 year-round residents, about 32,000 seasonal visitors and part-time residents come to bask in the sunshine that the community typically enjoys 350 days of each year. Since incorporating in 1973, the city has become an educational, retail and cultural center for the region.

The Arts and Culture: A Key Resource

Like many California cities, Palm Desert faced economic challenges due to the 2008 economic downturn and the state’s dissolution of redevelopment in 2012. In response, the Palm Desert City Council made economic development a priority through its 2012 Economic Development Strategic Plan and a 2013 citywide strategic plan titled Envision Palm Desert — Forward Together. Both

plans spotlight arts and culture as integral to the city and as strong resources for economic development.

Palm Desert has a wide range of cultural assets and events, and the city identified several that could be augmented to create a monthly event. The overarching goal was to increase economic activity by attracting tourists who would shop, dine and stay in Palm Desert, generating revenue for local businesses and for the city through sales and transient occupancy taxes.

The City of Palm Desert won the Award for Excellence in the Economic Development Through the Arts category of the 2016 Helen Putnam Award for Excellence program. For more about the award program, visit www.helenputnam.org.

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First Weekend Palm Desert events include live music by the Jennifer Keith Quintet at the Swing ‘N Hops Street Party; art exhibits at the Palm Springs Art Museum in Palm Desert and other galleries; and vintage automobiles at the El Paseo Cruise Night celebration. left to right

Culture The Evolution of a Collaborative Event

Called First Weekend Palm Desert, the event is held Friday through Sunday on the first weekend of each month from November through May. Launched in 2013–14, First Weekend built on existing art gallery receptions, performing arts events, festivals, concerts, classic car shows and culinary programming occurring on a monthly basis in the city. Some of these regularly scheduled events were already being held on the first weekend of the month, and others were adjusted to coincide with First Weekend.

www.westerncity.com

Since its launch, First Weekend has grown to include unique large-scale events. In addition to providing direct economic benefits, First Weekend and its many free monthly activities have made Palm Desert a more desirable place to live, work and visit.

As part of the 2013–14 fiscal year budget, the city’s Economic Development, Marketing and Promotions and Public Art departments, along with a representative from the Palm Springs Art Museum in Palm Desert, worked with a local marketing firm to develop the initial

framework, branding and marketing materials for First Weekend. The team identified potential community partners and invited them to cross-promote and share programming.

Diverse Programming Attracts Crowds For the 2015–16 season, the city and its partners developed featured events. These large-scale events conceived and produced specifically for First Weekend have played continued on page 30

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Local Leaders Make the Leap to the Legislature part 2 of 2 On Dec. 5, 2016, the Capitol welcomed legislators who won their seats in the November 2016 elections. The Assembly swore in 22 new members, four of whom have previously served in the Legislature. In the Senate, three legislators with no former Capitol experience took their oath of office alongside six who had served in the Assembly. In the Assembly alone, 74 percent of members have roots in local government. Twenty-seven members of this Legislature and nine members of this freshman class are alumni of the League’s California Civic Leadership InstituteŽ (CCLI) or have participated in aspects of it.

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CCLI is a League Partner-sponsored educational program designed for local government elected officials who are interested in running for the Legislature. The program offers local officials indepth policy and political briefings as well as numerous networking opportunities. Western City recently checked in with the nine new members who previously participated in CCLI to learn more about them. These legislators are profiled in a two-part series in the April and May issues. For more information about CCLI, contact Sara Rounds, regional public affairs manager; phone: (916) 658-8243; email: srounds@cacities.org.

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Assembly Member Todd Gloria (D-San Diego)

Which of your district’s top two or three issues will be a priority for you?

Former council member, San Diego

Perhaps the most prevalent issues facing my district are housing and homelessness. After the loss of redevelopment, which was the primary funding source for affordable housing, I am hopeful that I can use my local government experience to help finance the production of new housing units for vulnerable populations like seniors, individuals with disabilities, veterans and foster children. I think another pressing issue centers on our state’s crumbling transportation infrastructure. I want to ensure that California invests not only in the maintenance of our current infrastructure, but also in transportation modes other than freeway expansion. Such efforts could help reduce traffic and greenhouse gas emissions as well as provide more choice for commuters.

What do you bring to the Legislature from your experience in local government? The most valuable asset I bring to the state Legislature following my service on the San Diego City Council is the perspective of my constituents. As a council member, I developed relationships and a deep understanding of the needs and desires of the people in my district, which are invaluable to an elected representative. Additionally, my city council tenure afforded me the ability to develop a strong public governance background. I served as the city council president and also had the opportunity to serve as the city’s interim mayor. For a majority of my tenure, I chaired the city’s Budget Committee and served as Transportation Committee chair as part of the San Diego Association of Governments (SANDAG). All of these experiences allowed me to represent my constituents effectively and provided the foundational knowledge to deliver results for them as a state Assembly member. How was your experience with CCLI helpful in deciding to run for office? Participating in CCLI was very beneficial to me during my campaign for state Assembly. Coming from a local jurisdiction, suddenly you have purview over a host of new policy issues in the state Legislature, and each of these issues has an array of stakeholders to meet and get to know. CCLI helped bridge that gap by providing opportunities to network with these stakeholders as well as leaders from throughout the state. Furthermore, CCLI helped me to better understand the opportunities and future challenges for California.

www.westerncity.com

Assembly Member Tim Grayson (D-Concord) Former mayor, Concord What do you bring to the Legislature from your experience in local government? My experience as a council member and mayor of the City of Concord was invaluable and taught me to be pragmatic, thoughtful and creative when crafting solutions to problems. Budget deficits are among the issues governments regularly face. In Concord I gained experience in balancing the city’s budget without cutting core services, and there were ample opportunities to make government operations and services more efficient without impacting their effectiveness. continued

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Local Leaders Make the Leap to the Legislature, Part 2 of 2, continued

This experience and the knowledge that comes with it are great assets in Sacramento. Understanding how local government works is a critical component of creating effective, solution-oriented policy. My understanding of diverse perspectives at the local level will help to strengthen and inform my decisions at the statewide level. From my public service, I also know that collaboration and consensusbuilding are at the core of successful public policy. How was your experience with CCLI helpful in deciding to run for office? CCLI was vital in helping me decide to run for office. It gave me a sense of the most crucial issues that California faces as a state, and it equipped me with the tools to relate those issues to my experience in local government. I came away with a better understanding of how state issues relate to and impact local issues and vice versa. My experience with CCLI helped build the confidence I needed to face the challenges that come with running for higher office. Which of your district’s top two or three issues will be a priority for you? I am passionate about ensuring that qualified California students have access to our state’s higher education institutions. Another of my top priorities is to address the dire housing situation, including the lack of affordable housing in my district, the

San Francisco Bay Area and the state. Transportation and infrastructure, along with job creation and economic development, are equally important so we can make it possible for people to live, work and play in the same area. Addressing these challenges will require perseverance and patience.

Assembly Member Monique Limón (D-Santa Barbara) Former trustee, Santa Barbara Unified School District What do you bring to the Legislature from your experience in local government? When I served on the Santa Barbara Unified School District Board and in my work at the University of California, Santa Barbara, I saw the complexity of the public education system, which is compounded by funding challenges and a greater need for services for various student populations. However, I also learned the ways in which the public sector can work in partnership with

ENHANCING COMMUNITIES. IMPROVING LIVES.

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community organizations and private entities to provide services, while using creativity to maximize resources. I understand that there is no perfect policy. All ideas impact multiple constituencies, and flaws are inevitable. Sometimes those imperfections are too great to overcome; at other times, the benefits outweigh the drawbacks. It’s all about striking a balance. How was your experience with CCLI helpful in deciding to run for office? The skills and knowledge I gained from CCLI have further developed my understanding and ability to be a more engaged representative in the Assembly. I can apply these tools in my outreach with constituents. To make informed decisions and take a position on any policy, it’s important for me to hear different perspectives and learn how the policy impacts the lives of my constituents. Which of your district’s top two or three issues will be a priority for you? As a former school board member, education remains a priority for me. Early education is fundamental to the development of student success. There is a growing need for science, technology, engineering, art and math (STEAM) and these subjects should be expanded for students at an earlier stage in their education. I live in a prime location — the Santa Barbara and Ventura counties’ coast is treasured, and these natural resources must be protected, whether it’s the local beach or our backyards. With the various higher education institutions in my district and a large workforce, there is a need to invest in jobs and professional opportunities. To keep families in the area and offer quality work opportunities, we also need affordable housing.

senator Anthony Portantino (D-La Cañada Flintridge) Former mayor, La Cañada Flintridge What do you bring to the Legislature from your experience in local government? The most important lesson I learned from serving in local government is the importance of explaining my votes and actions to my constituents. In a small town, a council member invariably faces a contentious issue where folks on both sides of the aisle are friends or acquaintances. You can’t flip a coin when deciding the fate of people who have trusted and believed in you to represent them. Too often, legislators fall back on the explanations “it was a party vote” or “I needed to be a team player.” For our constituents, even those of our own party, these are unacceptable reasons for casting a vote, and they expose one to criticism for having no convictions. People can agree or disagree but will usually respect your thoughts if they understand the rationale of your decision. Whether I’m voting consistently with my party or not, it is imperative that my decisions are based on my beliefs.

www.westerncity.com

Considering your previous tenure in the Assembly, how was your experience with CCLI helpful to you in deciding to run for office in the past? The biggest benefit of being active with the League and attending CCLI was meeting other elected officials from throughout California. Sharing mutual concerns and understanding that other politicians face the same challenges served to ground me. Which of your district’s top two or three issues will be a priority for you? K–16 education currently tops my list, followed by accountability and supporting the growth of small business in my district. Folks are still looking for a slice of the American dream, quiet communities, great schools and easy access to myriad recreational activities nearby. Small businesses thrive in these communities. I aim to support small business investment in any way I can. We need to strengthen our education system and feed the schoolto-work pipeline. Parenting needs today differ from when I was growing up. We have parents as young as 14 years of age on one end of the spectrum and on the other we have grandparents who are now parenting again. I can work to improve accessibility to quality education so our kids can learn at an early age to make better life choices and have the opportunity to see their dreams become reality.

Assembly Member Blanca Rubio (D-West Covina) Former school board member, Baldwin Park Unified School District What do you bring to the Legislature from your experience in local government? As a former water board member for eight years and school board member for 12 years, I understand firsthand how decisions in Sacramento affect local government as well as the difficulties associated with implementing state legislation at the local level. How was your experience with CCLI helpful in deciding to run for office? CCLI provided useful information and a network of fellow candidates who are now close colleagues. Which of your district’s top two or three issues will be a priority for you? Human services, public safety and water. ■

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Display Advertising

Western City magazine’s job opportunity section is the source for job seekers looking for positions in local government. When you place a job opportunity ad in Western City

Call Pam Maxwell-Blodgett at (800) 262-1801 to place a display (boxed) ad or for rate and deadline information, or email admanager@westerncity.com. Website Job Postings Display ads are posted on our website at no additional charge. But if you miss the deadline for getting your job opportunity ad into the magazine, you can post it on the Western City website right away. To post your job opportunity ad on our automated website, visit www.westerncity.com or contact Kimberly Brady, Western City’s administrative assistant; email: kbrady@ cacities.org; phone: (916) 658-8223.

magazine, it will be posted at no additional charge on our website.

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Incorporated in 1893, Grass Valley is a historic, northern Gold Country city born from the California Gold Rush. Situated at roughly 2,500 feet elevation in the western foothills of the Sierra Nevada mountain range at the intersection of Highways 49 and 20, the City is 75 miles by car from the state capital of Sacramento, 90 miles west of Reno, Nevada, and 140 miles northeast of San Francisco. The City Council is now seeking a smart, energetic, and forward thinking City Manager to provide effective leadership while coordinating the activities of a municipal organization. The ideal candidate will be a creative problem solver with excellent diplomacy, presentation, service, and relationshipbuilding skills who is politically astute, yet apolitical. A collaborative leader capable of empowering and inspiring staff, who will encourage an open and transparent relationship with the Council and staff is sought. A strong candidate for this position will have knowledge and experience in the areas of community engagement, economic development, infrastructure, municipal budgeting, finance, and marketing. At minimum, candidates must possess a Bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university in Public Administration, Business, Accounting/Finance, or a closely related field, and have eight (8) years of progressively responsible administrative experience in municipal government, including significant administrative, financial, and personnel management responsibilities. Any combination of related experience and education, including experience in an assistant city or town manager role, as approved by the City Council, may be considered qualifying. Candidates must possess a valid Class C California Driver’s License with an acceptable driving record. The annual salary range for the incoming City Manager is DOQ. If you are interested in this outstanding opportunity, please visit our website at www.bobmurrayassoc.com to apply online. Please contact Mr. Gary Phillips at (916) 784-9080 should you have any questions. Closing date May 19, 2017.

phone 916•784•9080 fax 916•784•1985 www.bobmurrayassoc.com

www.cacities.org


Serving the Public Sector for over 25 years!

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Current and Upcoming Opportunities

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• East Bay Regional Park District, CA – Fire Chief • El Centro, CA – City Manager • Fresno, CA – Independent Reviewer • Grass Valley, CA – City Manager • Hidden Valley Lake Association – General Manager • Marysville, CA – Director of Community Development and Services • Montebello, CA – Fire Chief • San Fernando, CA – City Manager • San Jose, CA – Independent Police Auditor • San Pablo, CA – Police Chief • Santa Clara Valley Water District, CA – Deputy Administrative Officer-General Services – Emergency and Security Manager • St. Helena, CA – City Manager • Sunnyvale, CA – Environmental Services Director • University of San Diego, CA – Assistant Vice President/Chief of Public Safety • West Covina, CA – Police Chief • Windsor, CA – Town Manager

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At least five years of experience managing public works projects which includes supervising construction, maintenance, professional, technical and administrative staff is required. The equivalent to at least a Bachelor’s Degree with a major in civil engineering is also required. Graduate study in civil engineering or public administration is desirable. Registration as a Professional Civil Engineer in California is required and possession of a Licensed Land Surveyor Certificate is desirable. For more information and to apply, please visit: https://www. cityofelcajon.us/jobs

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Chief of Police, City of West Covina, CA The City of West Covina (population 110,000) is a dynamic Southern California city, located 19 miles east of downtown Los Angeles in the San Gabriel Valley. The City’s well-designed parks and recreational facilities, its businesses, and residents, make West Covina a great place to live, work, and play. The City is now seeking a proven leader and effective manager to serve as its Chief of Police. The Chief is a member of the City’s Manager’s Executive Management Team and actively works with community leaders and citizens to promote public safety. The new Chief will also be a creative problem solver and a mentor to all staff. He or she will have a successful track record of leadership, team building, and conflict resolution, and experience working in a similarly situated agency with comparable challenges and structure. At minimum, candidates must possess a Bachelor’s degree in Police Science, or a closely related field, and have six years of progressively responsible administrative and supervisory experience in municipal law enforcement. Completion of P.O.S.T. Command College or FBI National Academy, and a Master’s degree in Public or Business Administration are highly desirable. Candidates must possess a valid California Driver’s License with a satisfactory driving record. The annual salary range for the Chief of Police is $162,528 - $204,792. The salary is currently under review and will be dependent upon qualifications. The City also offers an attractive benefits package. If you are interested in this outstanding opportunity, please visit our website at www.bobmurrayassoc.com to apply online. Please contact Mr. Regan Williams at (916) 784-9080, should you have any questions. Closing date June 2, 2017. phone 916•784•9080 fax 916•784•1985 www.bobmurrayassoc.com

$139,360.00 – $169,790.40 with Relevant Master’s Degree The City of El Cajon is currently searching for a highly skilled and experienced individual to direct and manage the City’s Public Works Department. The Department consists of seven divisions and programs that include Engineering, Maintenance Operations, Parks, Recycling, Sewer/Waste Water, Storm Water, and Traffic. The ideal candidate should have the ability to build meaningful relationships across city government and with the general public, the business community and community partners, neighborhood associations, contractors and with employees.

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Police Chiefs

TB&Co. is currently seeking Police Chiefs for the following cities:

City of Palo Alto City of Milpitas Provo City, Utah Check our website for detailed information – www.tbcrecruiting.com. Teri Black • 424.296.3111 Bradley Wardle • 650.450.3299

Photo/art credits Cover: Courtesy of the City of Palm Desert and the League of California Cities Page 3: Photo, Monkey Business Images/ Shutterstock.com; pattern, Nickolay Grigoriev/ Shutterstock.com Page 5: MTaira/Shutterstock.com Page 7: BondRocketImages/Shutterstock.com Page 8: Graphics, top, 1ZiMa/Shutterstock.com; bottom, 13ree.design/Shutterstock.com Page 9: Photo, top, Nine_Tomorrows/Shutterstock. com; bottom, courtesy of the City of San Pablo Page 11: Map, iQoncept/Shutterstock.com and Taber Creative Group; crowd graphic, Web icon/ Shutterstock.com

Pages 14–15: photos, courtesy of the City of Palm Desert and the League of California Cities; watercolor texture in headline, AlexTanya/Shutterstock.com Page 16: Photo, Photo.ua/Shutterstock.com Page 17: Capitol, Nagel Photography/Shutterstock.com Page 23: Icon, BomSymbol,TH/thenounproject.com Page 25: Photo, courtesy of Loren Townsley/Asian Journal Pages 26–27: Purple Line Winery photos, ©2016 Chico Enterprise-Record, reprinted with permission Page 31: Courtesy of the City of Palm Desert and the League of California Cities

www.cacities.org


Immigrants, the Economy and Civic Engagement, continued from page 13

Tips for Engaging Immigrants in Civic Life Understand who lives in your city. Analyze local populations to help understand the economic potential in your community. Using the latest census data can be useful, but demographic changes may outpace this information. Immigrant organizations and leaders, including ethnic chambers of commerce, ethnic media and local clergy, can help identify your new residents’ countries of origin, the languages spoken, the print and electronic media of choice and business and cultural norms. Overcome language and cultural barriers. Build on your understanding of cultural and business norms to enhance city staff’s language and cultural capacity, and create workforce or business development practices to minimize barriers to the full economic participation of all residents. Build leadership capacity of newcomers. Provide training and leadership opportunities for immigrant groups, such as citizen academies, English language classes, leadership training and appointments to local boards and commissions. As appropriate for your community, consider leadership academies or training directed to specific communities and held in residents’ native language or interpreted. Foster an inclusive, welcoming community. Recruit support from leaders in faith-based congregations, schools, ethnic media, the immigrant business community, cultural organizations and service providers in reaching out to immigrants. Your engagement efforts will be more successful if someone known and trusted by each immigrant community invites community members to participate.

Find Best Practices and More Resources Online For tips on how to better engage and integrate immigrants in your community, best practices, examples of successful city efforts and links to related resources, read the online version of this article at www.westerncity.com. ■

www.westerncity.com

In 2014, immigrants in California earned $323 billion and paid $26 billion in state and local taxes. J

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Assistant City Manager www.toaks.org •

805.449.2144

More than fifty years of achievement have made Thousand Oaks one of the most sought after places to live, work and recreate in California. The community of 132,000 residents is home to excellent schools, outstanding parks, numerous corporate headquarters, diverse retail opportunities, cultural amenities and over 15,500 acres of open space.

The City is seeking an innovative professional with a proven track record of establishing and maintaining positive working relationships with the community, elected officials, governmental agencies and City staff. The Assistant City Manager will promote the delivery of high quality municipal services; excel in community relations and project management; lead process improvement initiatives; and support the implementation of key City Council priorities and objectives. The position requires at least eight years of increasingly responsible experience in the management/administration of municipal government operations including substantial highlevel staff administrative and supervisory experience and a Bachelor’s Degree (Master’s preferred). Experience in the office of a City Manager is highly desirable. Salary range $164,130 - $246,196. For more information please visit www.toaks.org or contact Sandra Bill at 805-449-2144. Closing Date: June 2, 2017, 5:00 p.m.

Deputy Administrative Officer-General Services Santa Clara Valley Water District, CA The Santa Clara Valley Water District strives to provide Silicon Valley with safe, clean water for a healthy life, environment, and economy. The District is now seeking a Deputy Administrative Officer for General Services. The ideal candidate is a progressive, forward-thinking individual who is creative, collaborative, and leads with a hands-on approach. Candidates must have education and experience including graduation from an accredited college or university with a Bachelor’s degree with major coursework in business/public administration, architecture, or a closely related field or a field specifically related to the work group assigned. A Master’s degree is highly desirable. A minimum of six (6) years of increasingly responsible administrative, managerial, or professional experience in a field related to the assignment in the public sector, water, or related industry within the most recent ten (10) years; four of the six years must have included management and supervisory authority. The salary for the Deputy Administrative Officer is $168,708-$240,448 annually; placement within this range will be dependent upon qualifications. If you are interested in this outstanding opportunity, please apply online at www.bobmurrayassoc.com. Contact Valerie Phillips at (916) 784-9080 with questions. Closing date May 28, 2017. phone 916•784•9080 fax 916•784•1985 www.bobmurrayassoc.com

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Fight Blight in Your City With Brownfields Tools, continued from page 9

35,380 square miles. In 2016, Maine communities received 19 grants totaling over $7 million under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s brownfields program. In contrast, California has a population of 39.2 million and a land area of 163,695 square miles but its communities received only five grants

Federal and State Funding: How California Compares California communities lag behind other states in utilizing federal financial resources for brownfields. For example, the state of Maine has a population of less than 1.4 million and a land area of J

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estled between the Santa Rosa and San Bernardino mountains, the City of La Quinta (pop. 39,000 perm. + 15,000 seasonal) is a natural paradise in the Coachella Valley. World-renowned as a destination for art, health, golf, living and well-being, the City values a seamless integration and delivery of services to its residents and development community. The Design & Development Department is supported by 27 staff and is organized across six divisions: Administration, Building, Development Services, Engineering Services, Planning and The Hub (Customer Service Center). The leadership style of the ideal candidate will reflect entrepreneurial attributes that complement this high performing municipality. Known for promoting high standards for quality work and results, he/she will be an exceptional people and project manager who is guided by a customer centric mindset. At least five (5) years of progressively responsible and relevant public and/or private sector experience, which includes a minimum of three (3) years of leadership experience, and a Bachelor’s degree are required. Salary range goes up to $151,046. Compensation also includes competitive benefits package. This recruitment will close at midnight on Sunday, May 14, 2017. For detailed brochure and to apply online, visit www.tbcrecruiting.com. Teri Black • 424.296.3111 Julie Yuan-Miu • 925.820.8436

totaling $1.7 million in 2016. There was a slight increase in California applications for 2017, which may improve the grant allocation to the state. The main factor in the small number of applications from California is lack of staff capacity to write and manage grants.

Funding Sources The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency provides grants for site assessments, planning and cleanup, and revolving loan programs and environmental workforce development programs. Additional resources used for brownfields redevelopment include funds from the federal agencies of Housing and Urban Development, Agriculture, Energy, Commerce (Economic Development Administration) and several others. The State Water Resources Control Board offers several grant programs to assess and clean up sites that are contaminated with petroleum and other chemicals that threaten groundwater quality. The Department of Toxic Substances Control provides grants for assessment and lowinterest loans and grants for cleanup. Infill and redevelopment projects commonly leverage other state funds from agencies including the Strategic Growth Council, Department of Transportation, Department of Housing and Community Development and California Infrastructure and Economic Development Bank. Financing tools commonly used for land revitalization include New Markets Tax Credits and housing tax credits. The Enhanced Infrastructure Financing District (EIFD) and Community Revitalization Investment Authority (CRIA) are tax-increment financing tools that can be used for land revitalization.

Links to Related Resources For more information and links to related resources, read the online version of this article at www.westerncity.com.

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www.cacities.org


In 2016, the state Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC) awarded four assessment grants totaling $300,000. The California Environmental Protection Agency awarded five grants to cities in 2016 totaling $1.74 million.

The Pilipino Workers Center in the Larry Itliong Village was built on a site in Los Angeles where oil wells operated from 1930 to 1970. Little Tokyo Service Center, a nonprofit community development corporation, developed 45 transit-oriented units, a community space and small grocery retail space. The project used EPA and DTSC grants for assessment and cleanup and received funding from several county, city, state, federal and private sources, including tax credits.

The State Water Resources Control Board introduced two new grant programs in 2016 and awarded $19 million for assessment and remediation through 26 grants under its Site Cleanup Subaccount Program (SCAP), with most of the grants going to the Los Angeles and Central Valley regions. These grants are specifically designed for sites with serious threats to groundwater quality. In 2017, continued

About the California Association for Local Economic Development The California Association for Local Economic Development (CALED) is the premier statewide professional economic development organization dedicated to advancing and delivering economic development. Its members comprise public and private organizations and individuals involved in economic development — the business of creating and retaining jobs. CALED established two technical committees to advance this work. The Tax-Increment Financing (TIF) Committee shares knowledge on new TIF tools created after the state eliminated redevelopment agencies. The Brownfields and Land Revitalization Committee (BLRC) identifies funds, tools and expertise to revive and redevelop blighted sites. The committee comprises seasoned professionals who work on a wide variety of brownfields issues and includes redevelopment and finance experts, attorneys and environmental consultants. The BLRC education subcommittee educates communities and practitioners about best practices in the development of brownfields properties and informs CALED’s Legislative Action Committee and board members about brownfields regulations and legislation that impact economic development. For more information, visit www.caled.org.

www.westerncity.com

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Police Chief The City of Marina (pop. 21,000), a seaside community located on the beautiful Monterey Bay coast is seeking a new Chief of Police. Marina is a growing diverse community, offering a safe and friendly living environment in a beautiful natural setting and is ideally suited for recreational and cultural opportunities. The Chief of Police will be an innovative, knowledgeable, and committed leader who can manage Marina’s Police Department as a community-oriented policing agency dedicated to serving the citizens of Marina. A minimum of six years progressive responsible police experience with a related BA Degree is required. A master’s degree is preferred. Current or prior California law enforcement experience is highly desirable. Salary is $131,784 - $183,264 DOQ. If interested in this outstanding opportunity please submit application, resume and cover letter to Human Resouces. 211 Hillcrest Ave., Marina CA 93933. cscharf@cityofmarina.org (831) 8841283. Deadline to apply is 5:00pm May 12, 2017.

Community & Economic Development Director City of Carlsbad, CA

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panning nearly 40-square miles, the City of Carlsbad is known for offering an outstanding quality of life that is evidenced by beautiful beaches, world-class resorts, well-planned neighborhoods and abundant open space. Located in North San Diego County, Carlsbad is a community of approximately 110,000. Supported by 69 staff and a FY2016-17 budget of $19.2 million, the Community & Economic Development Department encompasses Planning, Development Services, Economic Development, Housing and Neighborhood Services, Building, and Land Development Engineering. The ideal candidate will be an inspiring and nimble leader who is committed to high standards and an exceptional customer orientation. He/she will be a superior mentor who values strong cohesive teams and is known for a strong work ethic. A combination of public and private sector experience will be considered favorably. A minimum of five (5) years of progressively responsible relevant experience at the management/supervisory level in a comparable setting and a Bachelor’s degree are required. A Master’s degree is preferred. Salary range up to $162,300 (currently under review). Salary is supplemented by an attractive benefits package. Detailed information and closing date available at www.tbcrecruiting.com. Teri Black • 424.296.3111 Bradley Wardle • 650.450.3299

Western City, May 2017

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Fight Blight in Your City With Brownfields Tools, continued

California communities lag behind other states in utilizing federal financial resources for brownfields. J

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Fire Chief

City of Berkeley

Assistant Community Development Director – Building Official

the program prioritized sites with chlorinated solvent contamination (typically associated with dry cleaners) and a long regulatory history.

Accessing Resources for Brownfields While federal and state guidelines vary, most public entities qualify to receive grants and nonprofit developers qualify for some of the grants. Private entities may access this assistance in partnership with public and nonprofit organizations. The League and CALED share the goal of improving the economic outlook for all cities and are partnering to bring brownfields expertise to all communities interested in receiving assistance. For more information, contact: Michelle Stephens, program manager, CALED; email: michelle@caled.org; or visit the Brownfields and Land Revitalization Committee web page at www.caled.org/ caled-brownfields-committee. ■

City of Burbank

Visit www.tbcrecruiting.com for up-to-date information. Teri Black • 424.296.3111 Julie Yuan-Miu • 925.820.8436 Bradley Wardle • 650.450.3299

Independent Police Auditor, City of San José, CA San José, CA is a unique place, playing a vital economic and cultural role within North America. San José is fortunate to be the largest and most urban city within Silicon Valley, known for the nation’s largest number of leading innovative companies. San José is also home to an energetic, talented, and diverse population estimated at 1.04 million and is located within the beautiful San Francisco Bay Area with an abundance of good weather. The City Council is now seeking a strong leader and effective manager to oversee and direct the activities of the Office of the Independent Police Auditor (IPA). This office provides civilian oversight of the San José Police Department. A smart, hardworking, politically savvy yet apolitical, candidate with unquestionable integrity and objectivity is sought. The ideal candidate will be a highly motivated and organized individual who demonstrates a balance of technical and interpersonal skills, excellent diplomacy, and a successful track record of developing and maintaining effective working relationships with internal and external stakeholders including elected officials, the Police Department, other agencies, and a diverse and wide array of community members and representatives. At minimum, the qualified candidate will possess five (5) years’ knowledge and experience in criminal law and criminal procedure and be a member in good standing with a State Bar, has not been a sworn law enforcement officer (e.g., police officer, reserve officer, probation officer, parole officer, or DEA agent) for at least ten years prior to appointment as the IPA, and does not have any immediate family members (defined as a spouse, parent, sibling, child, or grandparent) who are sworn law enforcement officers with any law enforcement agency. The annual salary for the IPA is dependent upon qualifications and experience. If you are interested in this outstanding opportunity, please visit our website at www.bobmurrayassoc.com to apply online. Please contact Ms. Valerie Phillips or Mr. Joel Bryden at (916) 784-9080, should you have any questions. Closing date June 2, 2017.

phone 916•784•9080 fax 916•784•1985 www.bobmurrayassoc.com

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Find More Information Online For more information and links to related resources, read the online version of this article at www.westerncity.com.

www.cacities.org


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The Purple Line Winery in downtown Oroville was once used as a blacksmith’s shop. The city used an EPA brownfields grant to clear the site for reuse. The winery now showcases a working wine cellar, tasting room and event venue. Most of its wines are made from grapes from the northern Sierra Foothill region.

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City Manager City of Santa Clara Annual Salary: Open and negotiable depending on qualifications and experience Preferred Filing Date: Wednesday, May 31, 2017 or open until filled. Please visit our website for application, job announcement and how to apply details: www.santaclaraca.gov

The City of Santa Clara (pop. 123,752) lies at the center of the Silicon Valley just 45 miles south of San Francisco. Incorporated in 1852, it is a city rich with history. The City Manager is the Chief Administrative Officer and is the head of the Administrative Branch of the City government as well as the Stadium Authority Executive Director, and shall be responsible to the City Council for the proper administration of all affairs of the City including Silicon Valley Power and the Water and Sewer Utilities. The City Manager is the ex officio member of all boards and commissions and serves as chief liaison officer between such bodies and the City Council. S/he shall represent the City in its dealings with the various municipalities and other levels of government unless otherwise provided by the City Council. The ideal candidate will be an experienced City Manager who at a minimum possesses a Bachelor’s Degree in Public or Business Administration or a related field (Master’s Degree in Public Administration preferred) and a minimum of five years progressively responsible executive level experience in local government (Counties, Special Districts and other Public Agencies will also be considered)

ASSISTANT FIRE CHIEF City of West Covina, CA Salary: $105,948 – $143,076 annually The City of West Covina (Pop. 110,000) is a Southern California city, located 19 miles east of downtown Los Angeles. The City seeks an exceptional leader to serve as Assistant Fire Chief. The Assistant Chief is an integral member of the Department’s Command Staff which is comprised of the Fire Chief and 3 Assistant Chiefs. The ideal candidate will be a proven leader, skilled at conflict resolution; a professional and forward-thinker will be highly valued. Candidates must have completed 64 units in Fire Science or a related field or Certification by the State Fire Marshal as a Certified Fire Officer; five years of fire suppression/prevention experience (2 as a Fire Captain). Valid EMT & CPR certifications and a valid CDL are required. Compensation is $105,948 – $143,076 annually, including an attractive benefits package. Interested candidates can visit our website at www.westcovina.org or contact Tom Bokosky, HR Director at (626) 939-8711. Filing Deadline is to be determined.

www.westerncity.com

Western City, May 2017

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PeckhamMcKenney &

Presents Outstanding Career Opportunities

General Counsel

South San Joaquin Irrigation District, Manteca, CA

The South San Joaquin Irrigation District (SSJID) is a model of financial and organizational stability in California’s north central valley, just south of Stockton in Manteca, CA. With 100 employees and a budget around $25 million, SSJID delivers high-quality water services and generates hydro-electric power, essential to the agricultural, urban, and business communities it serves. The General Counsel reports directly to a five-member, elected Board of Directors and is an integral part of SSJID’s executive team. This is a premiere opportunity in an excellent organization (senior water rights and ample financial resources). The next General Counsel has common sense, strong interpersonal skills, a love of learning, and the ability to manage outside counsel on major litigation. The successful candidate will serve as understudy to the outgoing General Counsel through December 31, 2017, assuming the position outright on January 1, 2018, successful performance presumed. California law license, integrity, and demonstrated excellent legal skills required. Strong foundation in California water law, public contracts, and utilities strongly preferred. Salary range $152,228 to $207,000, with comprehensive benefits. Filing deadline is May 30, 2017. Contact Bobbi Peckham or Andrew Gorgey.

Executive Director

Western Eagle County Metropolitan Recreation District, Gypsum, CO The Western Eagle County Metropolitan Recreation District (WECMRD) is a “model” recreation district in Colorado’s exceptional Vail Valley, located 14 miles west of Vail, and including the communities of Edwards, Eagle, and Gypsum. Founded in 1980, WECMRD operates the Edwards Field House, the Eagle Pool and Ice Rink, and the Gypsum Recreation Center, and related programs, with no debt, “in the black,” and with a healthy reserve. The Executive Director manages 15 full-time employees (100 part-time, seasonal) and a budget of just under $7 million and reports to an elected, five-member board of directors. WECMRD’s next Executive Director will be an engaged, visionary leader and effective manager, with a knowledge of local government, the ability to maximize collaboration with community partners, and a demonstrated passion for community recreation. Bachelor’s or Master’s degree (recreation administration, physical education, public or business administration or related) required. Salary range $115,000 to $150,000, with comprehensive benefits. Filing Deadline is May 30, 2017. Contact Andrew Gorgey.

Fire Chief

City of Bothell, WA

The City of Bothell, WA, population 44,000, is located in the Seattle metropolitan area, in King and Snohomish Counties, close to Mt. Rainier, Puget Sound, and the incomparable Olympic Peninsula. The Fire Chief oversees 57 full-time employees, all unionized, and coordinates fire services for two fire stations, plus a third station in partnership with a neighboring fire district, and EMS services through the renowned King County Medic One program. The Fire Chief reports directly to the City Manager and serves as a member of the city’s Executive Leadership Team (ELT). A rapidly growing community with a fast-developing downtown core, the City of Bothell seeks a strong, politically capable leader, who can both maintain close team relations with the City Manager, Police Chief, Public Works Director, and the ELT, and advocate effectively for the department and its firefighters. Bachelor’s Degree (Fire Administration or related), and seven years of management-level fire department experience, or equivalent, required. Salary range $130,548 to $165,984, with comprehensive benefits. Filing deadline is June 2, 2017. Contact Bobbi Peckham or Andrew Gorgey.

Please send your cover letter and resume electronically to:

Peckham & McKenney

apply@peckhamandmckenney.com

Resumes acknowledged within two business days. Detailed brochures are available at

www.peckhamandmckenney.com (866) 912-1919


“All about fit” Development Services Director City of Oceanside, CA

Centrally located in the heart of the beautiful Southern California coastline, Oceanside (pop. 176,000) offers a unique combination of outstanding location, affordable housing, excellent schools, and multiple resources. This full-service agency provides a vast array of services through 949 FTEs and overall budget of $422 million. Appointed by the City Manager and reporting to the Assistant City Manager, the Director will serve as part of the Executive Management Team and oversee a $16M budget and 57 staff in the divisions of Planning, Building, and Engineering. The Director must have a significant breadth of development services experience with personal experience in one or more of these areas, not just oversight experience. A strong background in land use planning is essential including CEQA experience and familiarity with the Coastal Act. A Bachelor’s degree in Public or Business Administration, Urban Planning, or a related field is required; Master’s degree is highly desirable. Salary range is $145,764 to $194,376 annually (DOQ). Filing Deadline is June 19, 2017. Contact Bobbi Peckham.

Transportation Manager

City of Concord, CA

The City of Concord, population 127,500, is located just 29 miles east of San Francisco adjacent to beautiful Mt. Diablo. The city offers a high quality of life and has been recognized as the best place in California to raise a family. Concord is seeking an innovative and highly accomplished professional to oversee all aspects of transportation matters for the city including the implementation of strategies consistent with the Transportation and Growth Management Elements of the 2030 General Plan. The ideal candidate will be well networked in the profession and have a strong understanding of regional transportation planning, partnerships, and funding sources, as well as local transportation planning, traffic operations and safety. Bachelor’s degree in an engineering curriculum plus eight to ten years of experience involving the supervision of traffic/transportation staff required, Master’s degree desired. Also required is the possession of a valid Certificate of Registration for any two of the following three: Traffic Engineer/ Civil Engineer/Professional Traffic Operations Engineer. Salary range is $119,704 to $164,590 DOQE with excellent benefits. Filing Deadline is May 22, 2017. Contact Phil McKenney.

General Manager

Redwood Empire Municipal Insurance Fund (REMIF), Sonoma, CA REMIF is a self-insured JPA created in 1976 to handle the liability insurance and workers’ compensation claims, benefit programs and risk management needs for its 15 members (14 Cities and 1 Town). REMIF also acts as a contract third party claims administrator for two additional cities. With a staff of 11 and annual revenues of $4.8 million, REMIF’s goal is to protect members’ assets by helping moderate the effects of claims, lawsuits and losses through the use of education, prevention, training, advocacy, and insurance/ self-insurance programs. REMIF also provides cost effective employee benefit programs through the use of group coverage purchasing or self-insurance. The General Manager, a working manager, is responsible for the planning and direction of REMIF’s day-to-day operations to meet the organization’s fiscal and service goals. This is a lean, high performing organization that takes great pride in the work that they do. Excellent communication and interpersonal skills are necessary as is direct experience with insurance, risk management and/or pooling as well as a Bachelor’s degree and four years of increasingly responsible administrative experience. An ARM or CPCU designation is preferred. Salary range from $150,000 to $185,000 DOQE with excellent benefits. Filing Deadline is May 22, 2017. Contact Phil McKenney.


Palm Desert Capitalizes on Arts and Culture, continued from page 15

a key role in its success. The city’s partners typically produce the featured events, which serve as the anchor of each First Weekend. These events are spotlighted in each month’s marketing and public relations campaigns, increasing visibility and brand recognition for First Weekend.

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Director of Public Works City of Santa Clara

Preferred Filing Date: Wednesday, May 31, 2017 Please visit our website for application, job announcement and how to apply details: www.santaclaraca.gov

Annual Salary: $224,064 to $263,604 with a potential to go up to $289,968 The Director of Public Works is responsible for the overall operation and performance of the Department of Public Works, including the engineering, streets, sanitary sewer, parks, storm drain, solid waste, median islands, and fleet and building maintenance functions. This position also oversees traffic operations, traffic planning and participates in land entitlement functions including review/approval of plans prepared by developers. The ideal candidate will possess a Bachelor’s Degree in Civil Engineering or a related field from a college or university that is accredited by the Accreditation Board of Engineering and Technology; and eight years of increasingly responsible experience in engineering work, four years of which must have been in a management capacity. A Certificate of Registration as a civil engineer issued by the California Board for Professional Engineers, Land Surveyors, and Geologists is required.

Director of Public Works City of Vernon, California

SALARY: $15,314–$18,614/month – excellent benefits.

The City of Vernon is an industrial city of 5.2 square miles located about five miles southeast of downtown Los Angeles. Founded in 1905 as the first exclusively industrial city in the Southwestern U.S. The City of Vernon is offering an outstanding career opportunity for a motivated, organized, and experienced leader to reimagine and lead a unique Public Works Department that includes Engineering, Planning, Building, and Public Works maintenance functions including infrastructure and street maintenance, City garage, warehouse operations, and facility and housing maintenance. If you are interested in this exciting and challenging opportunity, please apply online at www.cityofvernon.org by June 4, 2017. Candidates must possess a Bachelor’s Degree in Civil Engineering or related field with ten years of experience, including five years of supervisory or management experience, in public works, engineering, and/or Community Development. License and Certification Requirements: Registration as a Professional Engineer and possession of a valid California driver’s license are required. For questions please contact Lisette Grizzelle (323) 583-8811 ext. 166.

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increased revenues and partnerships with local arts organizations. It also launched the mall’s Westfield Walls mural program, which showcases regionally inspired art by renowned artists. Westfield Palm Desert General Manager Diana Grasso says, “STREET gives us a fun and innovative way to offer added value for our existing customers and provide an engaging introduction to first-time visitors. It’s been an exciting success for Westfield and the community.” The city produced the Swing ’N Hops Street Party in February 2016. One block of El Paseo, Palm Desert’s shopping thoroughfare, was closed to traffic for a street festival featuring music, swing dancing, food, beverages, art and more. The lively event attracted more than 2,500 people, who shopped and dined on El Paseo and created a spike in sales for many local businesses.

First Weekend Reaches New Audiences The Palm Springs Art Museum in Palm Desert hosts monthly First Weekend events on Fridays, when it averages a 450 percent increase in visitors compared with other Fridays. Museum Managing Director Arlene Amick says, “This collaboration has offered us a unique opportunity to engage directly with the community through First Weekend programming and reach an entirely new audience.” Other featured events have included the Coachella Valley Wildflower Festival; Galen 5K; Passport to Art, Design and Food; and Brew at the Zoo. More than 20 smaller-scale events each month augment the featured events. To date, the city has partnered annually with nearly 40 organizations of all sizes, including nonprofit organizations, universities and commercial entities. Palm Desert’s partners include Coachella Valley Art Scene, Desert Willow Golf Resort, El Paseo Business District, El Paseo Cruise Night, Living Desert Zoo and Gardens, McCallum Theatre, Palm Springs Art Museum in Palm Desert and more than 25 art galleries and businesses.

www.cacities.org


Event Helps Generate Additional Revenue Palm Desert Mayor Jan Harnik describes First Weekend as a natural fit for Palm Desert. “Our community’s abundant arts and cultural offerings were already adding value and beauty to our lives,” says Harnik. “Now it is becoming clear that arts and culture can also provide significant economic benefits. First Weekend Palm Desert is a big part of that.”

The goal was to attract tourists who would shop, dine and stay in Palm Desert, boosting revenue for local businesses and the city.

First Weekend Palm Desert has helped increase the city’s sales tax and transient occupancy tax (TOT) revenues. In fiscal year 2012–13, sales tax revenue totaled $16.7 million; in FY 2015–16, sales tax revenue increased by 13 percent to $18.9 million. The gains in TOT were even greater — in FY 2012–13, TOT revenue totaled $9.2 million; in FY 2015–16 it increased by 22 percent to $11.3 million.

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As First Weekend plans its fifth season for 2017–18, this successful economic development tool has promoted the city’s visibility as a cultural center in the Coachella Valley. It has also enhanced a sense of community for people of all ages and interests through innovative cultural programming. The collaborative efforts of the city and its First Weekend partN

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William Avery & Associates, Inc. Labor Relations / Executive Search / Human Resources Consulting 31/2 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Suite A Los Gatos, CA 95030 408.399.4424 Fax: 408.399.4423 email: jobs@averyassoc.net www.averyassoc.net

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ners have distinguished Palm Desert as a monthly destination for arts and culture that draws people from throughout the region and beyond. Contact: Deborah S. Glickman, management analyst, public art, City of Palm Desert; email: dglickman@cityofpalmdesert.org; phone: (760) 346-0611, ext. 664. ■

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Bobbi C. Peckham • Phil McKenney

Peckham&McKenney www.peckhamandmckenney.com

Roseville, CA

866.912.1919

Western City, May 2017

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Western City, May 2017

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A MAN OF ACTION SPEAKS LOUDER THAN WORDS. If you ever walk over to the Capitol with Partner Randy Pollack, everyone you meet will respond with, “Oh, you know Randy? He’s the best!” While that’s a nice affirmation of Randy’s personality, nothing beats actually seeing his abilities at work. When one of the firm’s municipal clients nearly fell victim to a sophisticated fraud scheme involving the city’s vendor numbers, Randy jumped into action. To prevent this from happening to other public agencies, he worked with State Senator Lois Wolk to develop a bill to safeguard key financial information from misuse under the California Public Records Act. SB 441 quickly made its way through all levels of the Capitol and was signed into law by Governor Brown, just months later. It’s not for nothing that Randy Pollack was voted the most underrated lobbyist working at the Capitol. At Churchwell White, we understand that results are created by people. Together, our team of lawyers and legislative advocates combine unexpected ideas with decades of proven experience. If you need a strategic partner with creative solutions, call to see what we can do for you.

PUBLIC LAW

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Western City May 2017  

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