Page 1

APR IL 2017 |

The Monthly Magazine of the League of California CitiesÂŽ

ÂŽ

cities fight hunger and improve youth health with CHAMPs p.9 HEAL Cities Campaign Helps Build Complete Parks Systems p.6 Local Leaders Make the Leap to the Legislature p.12

www.westerncity.com


CONTENTS Calendar of League Events 2  3 President’s Message  How Volunteerism Enriches Communities

Cities Fight Hunger and 9 

6 City Forum

 The HEAL Cities Campaign Helps Build Complete Parks Systems

By Charlotte Dickson and Kanat Tibet

 omplete parks systems foster C accessible, well-utilized and wellfunded parks that contribute to community and economic health.

7 News From the Institute for Local Government

 Cities and Schools Partner for Positive, Transformational Outcomes

STATEWIDE COMMUNITIES

Improve Youth Health With CHAMPs

DEVELOPMENT

By Patrice Chamberlain

 he Cities Combating Hunger T Through After-School and Summer Meal Programs (CHAMPs) initiative supports city-led efforts that increase access to summer and after-school meal programs.

AUTHORITY

By JoAnne Mounce

The small-town feeling of community that many of us experienced as youngsters has become more elusive. Volunteering gives us a sense of connectedness and offers multiple benefits.

CALIFORNIA

Local Leaders Make the 12  Leap to the Legislature

Part 1 of 2

 he California Civic Leadership T Institute® is an educational program designed for local government elected officials interested in running for the Legislature.

16 Legal Notes

 Workplace Protections for Transgender Employees

By Gage C. Dungy

 tate and federal laws expressly proS tect a person’s transgender status.

19 California Cities Helen Putnam Award for Excellence

By Randi Kay Stephens

Rancho Cucamonga’s 

 ulver City offers a model for C successful community-schools partnerships.

Kitten Nursery Steps Up  nimal shelters nationwide are A inundated during “kitten season.”

Providing California’s local governments with an effective tool for the timely financing of community-based public benefit projects. Since 1988, more than 500 cities, counties and special districts use CSCDA as their conduit issuer and PACE funding provider.

Job Opportunities 20  Professional Services 27  Directory

Sponsored by:

 n the cover: left to right Eddy Jara, program coordinator, Nutrition Education Obesity O Prevention (NEOP), City of Riverside; Fay Kazzi, NEOP coordinator, Alvord Unified School District; and Morgan McGhee, former nutrition specialist, Riverside Unified School District

(800) 531-7476 www.cscda.org


®

President JoAnne Mounce Council Member Lodi

1400 K Street Sacramento, CA 95814 (916) 658-8200 Fax (916) 658-8240

First Vice President James Goodhart Council Member Palos Verdes Estates

Second Vice President Rich Garbarino Council Member South San Francisco

Immediate Past President L. Dennis Michael Mayor Rancho Cucamonga

Executive Director Carolyn Coleman

For a complete list of the League board of directors, visit www.cacities.org/board.

Magazine Staff Editor in Chief Jude Hudson, Hudson + Associates (916) 658-8234; email: editor@westerncity.com Managing Editor Norman Coppinger (916) 658-8277; email: ncoppinger@cacities.org Contributing Editor Eva Spiegel (916) 658-8228; email: espiegel@cacities.org Advertising Sales Manager Pam Maxwell-Blodgett (916) 658-8256; email: maxwellp@cacities.org Administrative Assistant Kimberly Brady (916) 658-8223; email: kbrady@cacities.org Contributors Melissa Kuehne Corrie Manning Sara Rounds Patrick Whitnell

leaguevents April 19

Legislative Action Day, Sacramento Get the latest updates on legislation affecting your city and meet with your legislators.

20

Board of Directors’ Meeting, Sacramento The League board reviews, discusses and takes action on a variety of issues affecting cities, including legislation, legal advocacy, education and training, and more.

MAY 3–5

City Attorneys’ Spring Conference, San Francisco This meeting covers the latest trends and issues affecting public law practitioners and provides an opportunity to connect with colleagues.

Associate Editors Carol Malinowski Carolyn Walker Design Taber Creative Group

JUNE

Advertising Design ImagePoint Design

8–9

For photo credits, see page 21. Western City (ISSN 0279-5337) is published monthly by the League of California Cities, 1400 K St., Sacramento, CA 95814. Subscriptions: $39.00/1 year; $63.00/2 years; student: $26.50; foreign: $52.00; single copies: $4.00, including sales tax. Entered as periodical mail January 30, 1930, at the Post Office, Los Angeles, CA 90013, under the Act of April 13, 1879. Periodical postage paid at Sacramento, Calif.

NT RI

ED US IN G

P

Postmaster: Send address changes to Western City, 1400 K Street, Sacramento, CA 95814. Western City Trademark Reg. U.S. Pat. Off. ©2017 League of California Cities. All rights reserved. Material may not be reprinted without written permission. This issue is Volume XCIII, No. 4.

Policy Committee Meetings, Sacramento The League’s policy committees review issues of interest to cities statewide and make recommendations to the League board of directors.

9

Legal Advocacy Committee Meeting, Sacramento The committee reviews and recommends friend-of-the-court efforts on cases of significant statewide interest to California cities.

28–29

Mayors and Council Members’ Executive Forum, Monterey The forum offers sessions to keep elected officials up to date on key issues.

30

Mayors and Council Members’ Advanced Leadership Workshops, Monterey The workshops offer local elected officials who attended the preceding Executive Forum an opportunity to explore in greater detail topics such as managing municipal finances and resources.

30–July 1 W

R

0

GY

10

%

IND E

NE

Supplied by Community Energy

FSC ® is an independent, not-for-profit organization that promotes environmentally appropriate, socially beneficial and economically viable forest management worldwide. Products with the FSC label are independently certified to ensure that they come from forests managed to meet the needs of present and future generations.

2

League of California Cities

Board of Directors’ Meeting, Monterey The League board reviews, discusses and takes action on a variety of issues affecting cities, including legislation, legal advocacy, education and training, and more.

Event and registration information is available at www.cacities.org/events.

www.cacities.org


A volunteer with the Lodi Police Department Partners program helps with traffic control at a community event.

President’s Message by JoAnne Mounce

How Volunteerism

Enriches Communities Sometimes the smallest things make the biggest difference. As a young adult, I left my hometown of Lodi to live and work in the Lake Tahoe area. After 10 years, I returned to Lodi in 1990 and moved into a “granny flat” belonging to my great-aunt and greatuncle, who had lived in their home for 50 years. I was dismayed to see that their neighborhood in the older part of the city had deteriorated over the previous decade. Gangs, crime and blight were on the rise.

www.westerncity.com

Bridging the Cultural Divide A local newspaper article highlighted these concerns, and the city responded by establishing a committee to help residents organize and address neighborhood issues. My neighbors and I asked the city for code enforcement sweeps and began advocating to get the broken sidewalks, curbs and gutters repaired. We applied for grants to install motion-sensor lighting in

dark areas to deter crime. As the momentum grew, the grassroots campaign adopted a slogan: “If everyone swept in front of their own house, the entire city would be clean!” My neighborhood reflected the area’s history and its growth, with an aging German-American community and a younger Latino community. Bringing people together around a common desire to improve their neighborhood was unprecedented in this multicultural part of town, but over time its success led to broader efforts, including a plan to continued

Western City, April 2017

3


How Volunteerism Enriches Communities, continued

replace the old, crumbling sewer and water lines and install water meters. (Funding for these improvements came from an extra line item on residents’ utility bills, and the new infrastructure will be completed in 2018 without the city incurring any additional debt.) Working side by side with my neighbors changed my perspective about the community’s ability to bridge the cultural divide. Block by block and with the help of the city, we made positive changes that improved the quality of life in our neighborhoods. We celebrated by organizing a family fun event with a fair in conjunction with National Night Out.

Expanding the Effort Neighborhood-based efforts continued to produce results. This process was enhanced by the contributions of the City of Lodi’s community development

manager, who oversees and coordinates community outreach and advocacy. The Community Services Department works with local nonprofit organizations and community groups to serve the needs of all our residents. In the early 1990s, the city launched the Lodi Police Department Partners program. Residents age 55 and older complete a training course and volunteer their time. They help with vehicle tagging, code enforcement, traffic at special events, and office and clerical work. This program was so popular that the city expanded it to allow residents age 30 and older to volunteer. This enables the Police Department to draw upon a larger pool of volunteer assistance, and it’s a win-win for the community and the department. The city reached out to the Lodi Chamber of Commerce in 1994 to gauge its members’ interest in supporting community

Ask the community, “How can I help you, and what do you need?”

Coming soon! 2017 City Hall Directory Find-it-fast information for every city in California

3 Mayors, Council Members and

City Department Head Information

3 City Addresses, Phone, Fax and Websites 3 Advertisers with Products and Services That Your City Needs

With the 2017 City Hall Directory, the information you need is right at your fingertips. Order online at: www.cacities.org/publications or call (916) 658-8217.

4

League of California Cities

improvements. Essentially the community development manager’s pitch was, “If you don’t have a healthy community as a whole, it’s not good for tourism and the local wineries, which drive economic activity in Lodi. Your workers deserve to live in a safe, clean environment where they are not afraid for their kids to walk to school.” Ultimately, in 2016, chamber members concurred, and the chamber paid for a professional facilitator to work with the community. This sparked new interest in making local improvements and was the catalyst for future efforts. Recently, a group of Latino residents wanted a community garden and approached the city with their request. Many of them did not speak English, so the city borrowed translation equipment provided by the Institute for Local Government. The city provided an interpreter, and the equipment allowed the non-English speakers to participate in a discussion with non-Spanish speakers. The city agreed to establish the garden and located it at the Loel (Lodi Elderly) Senior Center. This process provided a positive way to connect with the senior Latino community and their families, who now understand that the center is a resource for them, too.

Creating Healthy, Vibrant Communities As our cities and communities have grown and people have become more mobile over the past half century, the small-town feeling of community that many of us experienced as youngsters has become more elusive and harder to sustain. Volunteering gives us a sense of connectedness with our neighbors and our community at large — the feeling of being part of a broader effort that helps to make a positive difference for all can provide profound satisfaction. Volunteer work helped me better understand my community in many ways. In addition to volunteering in my neighborhood, I participated in the municipal Budget and Finance Committee, which provided insight into the details of how

www.cacities.org


In 2016, Lodi residents participated in a walk to promote peace in the community. The event was coordinated by the City of Lodi, the Lodi Police Department, the Salvation Army and numerous faith-based congregations, including the First Baptist Church of Lodi, California Islamic Center, Lodi Sikh Temple, Buddhist Church of Lodi and others. Volunteers from the Breakers, a predominantly Latino group that is part of the Lodi Gang Reduction, Intervention and Prevention (GRIP) program, reached out to the participants as part of an effort to educate the community about its work and reach a broader demographic.

the city operates. My involvement in these efforts ultimately led to my running for a seat on the city council in 2004, and I have had the privilege of serving on the council since then. One of the most important things council members can do for their community is to empower city staff to help residents and neighborhoods identify needed changes and improvements. The city staff should ask the community, “How can I help you, and what do you need?” Such discussions can produce a list of projects for consideration and kindle the interest of potential volunteers. When people get involved in civic affairs because they care about a certain issue and want to make a positive difference, everyone benefits. These simple steps are the building blocks that help create healthy, vibrant communities.

We Specialize In Local Government Real Estate Representation

● Acquisitions ● Dispositions ● Parking Solutions ● Project Management ● Bid Process Management “Unique Solutions To Complex Real Estate Issues”

Tom Hixson/Alyce Rados

Youth services, seniors, gardening, public safety — whatever your individual passion or local need, the key message to our residents is this: The city stands ready to work with you to improve the quality of life for all. ■

thixson@crcre.com arados@crcre.com 925-866-1300

CalBRE License 01280981

www.westerncity.com

www.crcre.com Western City, April 2017

5


About the HEAL Cities Campaign A 2006 League Annual Conference Resolution calling for resources dedicated to helping cities address the childhood obesity epidemic was the catalyst for the Healthy Eating Active Living (HEAL) Cities Campaign. The League and the California Center for Public Health Advocacy (now known as Public Health Advocates) partnered to create the HEAL Cities Campaign in 2007. Kaiser Permanente has supported the campaign since 2008, and Public Health Advocates acts as the campaign’s parent organization. California’s campaign has spurred state municipal leagues in Colorado, Oregon, Maryland and Virginia to launch their own HEAL Cities and Towns Campaigns with support from Kaiser Permanente.

Placentia residents offer ideas in workshops designed to boost park infrastructure and recreational programming.

The HEAL Cities Campaign

Helps Build Complete Parks Systems by Charlotte Dickson and Kanat Tibet The HEAL (Healthy Eating Active Living) Cities Campaign helps League member cities create healthier neighborhoods. Parks and open space are among cities’ most valuable assets and contribute to community physical and emotional health. One HEAL Cities Campaign program — focusing on developing complete parks systems — fosters accessible, well-utilized and well-funded parks that contribute to community and economic health. The HEAL Cities Campaign developed two key resources: the Complete Parks Playbook, a toolkit that contains sample policies, and “Local Agency Strategies for Funding the Development and Maintenance of Parks and Recreation Facilities in California,” a white paper that provides resources

for funding park development, maintenance and recreational programming. (Find these resources at www.healcitiescampaign. org and www.changelabsolutions.org.) Colton and Placentia Engage Residents on Parks Issues The cities of Colton and Placentia are working closely with the HEAL Cities Campaign to implement complete parks systems in neighborhoods lacking access to physical activity opportunities. Leaders and staff of the cities’ Community Services departments are leading year-long processes to engage residents and develop and implement policies to boost park infrastructure and recreational programming. Kaiser Permanente and The California

Wellness Foundation are providing funding to support this work. In November 2016, Colton and Placentia community services staff conducted local complete parks advocacy workshops with community members in partnership with the HEAL Cities Campaign and Kounkuey Design Initiative, a nonprofit design and community development organization. Most of the workshop participants live in low-income neighborhoods and speak predominantly Spanish. To boost participation, the workshops provided translation services, food, refreshments and child care.

continued on page 27

Charlotte Dickson is the Northern California senior director of local policy and leadership development for Public Health Advocates and director of the National HEAL Cities Campaign; she can be reached at cd@PHadvocates.org. Kanat Tibet is director of the California HEAL Cities Campaign and can be reached at kt@PHadvocates.org.

6

League of California Cities

www.cacities.org


Cities and Schools Partner for Positive, Transformational Outcomes by Randi Kay Stephens After years of addressing youth issues such as homelessness, hunger and public safety as isolated, individual problems, Culver City has developed a strong collaborative effort that is having a transformational impact. Two years after adopting the Culver City Compact, a partnership among the city, schools, local businesses and community organizations, the city is now sharing data and streamlining services to better serve youth in need from “cradle to career.” The partnership has helped secure grant funding from sources such as Upward Bound House (a nonprofit focused on eliminating homelessness in families with children in the Los Angeles area) to assist in homeless outreach and establish shelters for youth who are homeless. In addition, the partnership received $3.7 million to establish a Safe Routes to School program and the infrastructure to support this program. Other partnership outcomes include a student summer jobs program and the installation of fiber optic cable connections to all schools to improve communications and internet access. “Building partnerships is incredibly positive for all of us in Culver City,” says Culver City Council Member Meghan Sahli-Wells. “It wasn’t always the case, and it took effort to work together cooperatively. The partnership has become transformational. The school district recognizes that children have needs beyond the classroom, and the relationship is fruitful because the city provides services that the entire community relies upon.” The Culver City Compact identifies 10 key strategies: 1. Build collaborative leadership capacity; 2. Share data; 3. Map resources; 4. Identify, celebrate and expand successful practices; 5. Invest in, develop and reinforce high-quality teaching and learning in all classrooms; 6. Develop interagency professional learning communities focused on student learning; 7. Engage in a purposeful evaluation and assessment of current practices; 8. Coordinate advocacy for educational policy and funding issues;

Culver City’s Safe Routes to School program makes walking and biking to school easier.

9. Partner, create and enhance student pathways for workforce and career; and 10. Ensure support services for all students and families.

Collaborative Solutions: Community-Schools Partnerships Community-schools partnerships such as the Culver City Compact offer communities the opportunity to support the needs of children and families with an intentional, enhanced and supportive academic, social and emotional health experience. Leadership and administration for these joint services and other efforts can be housed at city facilities or community-based sites, such as libraries and community centers. Successful community-schools partnerships begin by evaluating current programs and services to determine what’s working and what can be done more efficiently or effectively. It’s best to start small and scale up by leveraging current funding sources to create additional funding opportunities. When developing the partnership’s goals and strategies, engage communities and the families that will receive the services to ensure that community needs are addressed, and then tailor the partnership to utilize community assets and strengths. Strategies to create community-schools partnerships are not onesize-fits-all solutions. The Institute for Local Government’s Cities Counties Schools Partnership developed an online toolkit about community-schools partnerships where officials and staff can learn about strategies and models in California. For links to these resources and the Culver City Compact, read the online version of this article at www.westerncity.com. ■

Randi Kay Stephens is program coordinator for the Local Government Basics and CCS Partnership programs at the Institute for Local Government and can be reached at rstephens@ca-ilg.org. www.westerncity.com

Western City, April 2017

7


Eddy Jara, program coordinator, Nutrition Education Obesity Prevention (NEOP), City of Riverside; Fay Kazzi, NEOP coordinator, Alvord Unified School District; and Morgan McGhee, former nutrition specialist, Riverside Unified School District, participate in a Riverside event for youth and families. The event included recreational activities, informational materials for families, healthy snacks and access to fresh food, opposite.

left to right

Find Links to Related Resources Online For more information, including links to related resources, read the online version of this article at www.westerncity.com.

cities fight hunger and improve youth health with CHAMPs by patrice chamberlain

Patrice Chamberlain is program manager of the California Summer Meal Coalition, a program of the Institute for Local Government (ILG), and can be reached at pchamberlain@ca-ilg.org. For more about ILG, visit www.ca-ilg.org.

8

League of California Cities

www.cacities.org


Access to healthy food can have far-reaching impacts on a city’s workforce and on the well-being of families who live there. Many cities are targeting their efforts at their youngest residents by focusing collaboratively on out-of-school time. The National League of Cities’ (NLC) Institute for Youth, Education and Families is helping these efforts through its Cities Combating Hunger Through After-School and Summer Meal Programs (CHAMPs) initiative. With support from the Walmart Foundation and in partnership with the Food Research and Action Center based in Washington, D.C., NLC developed the CHAMPs initiative to support city-led efforts that improve the health and well-being of low-income youth by increasing access to U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) summer and after-school meal programs. The Institute for Local Government’s California Summer Meal Coalition is working closely with NLC’s Institute for Youth, Education and Families and the Food Research and Action Center to provide technical assistance to cities interested in

www.westerncity.com

launching projects to address childhood hunger and promote healthy eating. The USDA Summer Food Service Program and Child and Adult Care Food Program enable schools, cities, counties and nonprofit agencies to serve free, healthy meals to youths ages 18 and under in low-income neighborhoods when school is out of session. The California Department of Education reimburses agencies for the cost of meals. In many communities, schools operate these programs and city agencies play a supporting role by designating city facilities as meal sites or assisting with promotion and activities at sites. In other cities, municipal agencies act as the operator and administrative agent, providing meals at city-run youth programs and at locations throughout the community. Over the past five years, NLC has helped more than 41 cities nationwide distribute over 10 million meals to children in need. In 2015, Pasadena, El Centro and Fontana received CHAMPs grants to reach youths in need.

“Cities have a major stake in combating childhood hunger by ensuring that the most vulnerable youth in their communities have access to healthy meals both in school and during out-of-school hours,” says Clifford M. Johnson, executive director of NLC’s Institute for Youth, Education and Families. “Through the CHAMPs initiative, NLC provides support to city leaders as they seek to expand access to much-needed meal programs during after-school hours and the summer months.” In 2016, NLC sought to magnify its impact by focusing on three states with low participation in summer and after-school meal programs and selected California, Alabama and Kansas. In summer 2015 alone, less than 20 percent of California children who received a subsidized lunch during the school year visited a summer meal site in their community. If California could reach at least 40 percent of the lowincome students who received a subsidized continued

Western City, April 2017

9


Cities Fight Hunger and Improve Youth Health With CHAMPs, continued

lunch during the school year and provide them summer meals, California and its communities would be eligible to receive at least $40 million in federal reimbursements. CHAMPs offers cities technical assistance and grant funding to offset program operation costs, initiate new partnerships or run promotional campaigns. Exploring innovative approaches to meet the interconnected needs of low-income youth and their families via the meal programs was a major objective. The cities of Stockton and Riverside were among the first in California selected to join the 2016–17 CHAMPs cities. Other cities that followed included Glendale, Lemon Grove, Oceanside, Oroville, Palmdale, Redlands, Rialto, San Diego and San Francisco.

stockton’s commitment to its youth The City of Stockton (pop. 315,592) is San Joaquin County’s major metropolitan center, California’s 13th-largest city and a community with significant income disparity. Nearly 26 percent of San Joaquin County’s children live in households that are “food insecure” or do not have consistent access to affordable, nutritious food. City leaders recognized that addressing this high level of food insecurity was essential to realizing its vision of a healthy city. Stockton is no stranger to health-oriented collaboration. The city participates in the Let’s Move! Cities, Towns and Counties Program in addition to its leadership as a Healthy Eating Active Living (HEAL) city. The national Let’s Move! Program (launched by Michelle Obama in 2010) encourages cities to set and achieve health-focused benchmarks, which include supporting healthy food access for students before, during and after school.

The city adopted the conceptual framework of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s Promise Zones program to help improve coordination of services and resources, particularly those serving lower-income neighborhoods and residents. Perhaps Stockton’s boldest move has been developing its own Children’s Bill of Rights to signify the city’s commitment to its children and youth. The resolution, adopted in early 2016, articulates the city’s pledge to “Work toward a community that helps its children and youths grow up with healthy bodies, minds, and spirits that enable them to maximize their full potential and become thriving and contributing members of their community.” But as in all communities, no one agency holds sole responsibility for overseeing coordination and “connecting the dots” in out-of-school time. The city recognized an opportunity to lead the collaborative charge to change that situation. In Stockton, a community served by four school districts, effective communication and collaboration are crucial — particularly when school is out — to ensure that there are no gaps in coordination to support the city’s low-income youth. “The City of Stockton is committed to creating and sustaining a community where all of our residents thrive,” says John Alita, Stockton’s director of community services. “But we can’t do it alone. We know that collaboration with school, county and nonprofit partners is essential. Focusing on an achievable goal like making sure that all kids have access to opportunities and healthy food when school is out is a good place to start.” Initial CHAMPs meetings in 2016 included representatives from the Institute for Local Government, Stockton

NLC has helped more than 41 cities nationwide distribute over 1 million meals to children in need. 10

League of California Cities

Community Services, Stockton Unified School District, Lodi Unified School District, USDA, Housing Authority of San Joaquin County, Visionary Home Builders and Public Health Advocates. The meetings identified food-access gaps in the community. A summer lunch service was launched at several low-income housing sites through collaboration among the city, Lodi Unified School District and Public Health Advocates, whose REACH 4 Health initiative — in conjunction with Public Health Services of San Joaquin County — provides families and children with a positive environment through healthy eating, physical activity and safe neighborhoods. At Emerald Pointe Townhomes, activities to promote healthy food and beverage choices and physical activity for families complemented the lunch service. In 2017, Stockton’s CHAMPs activities will include: • Conducting a coordinated, multilingual citywide campaign to promote the availability of summer meal sites throughout the city. Lack of awareness of the program among families is a primary reason that this free resource goes underutilized throughout California; • Identifying city facilities and locations where summer and afterschool meals can be offered. In addition to providing meals at library branches, the city will explore options to provide meals at community centers, city and county facilities and locations identified as communities of concern in the San Joaquin County Community Health Needs Assessment. • Providing wrap-around enrichment programs in conjunction with the meal programs through interagency collaboration. Supplementary programming brings together agencies and existing resources to address other community needs, such as parent education, health, nutrition and literacy. It also presents opportunities for community engagement at a time when many agencies and elected officials have few channels to truly connect with families. www.cacities.org


Healthy snacks are part of the fun at a Riverside CHAMPs event.

riverside reaches out to underserved students CHAMPs goals in the City of Riverside (pop. 321,696) include implementing innovative ways of reaching low-income youth not currently served by summer meal sites in the city and exploring ways to enhance the long-term sustainability of its local food system. The city has been a longtime champion of out-of-school-time nutrition, working closely with Riverside Unified School District, Alvord Unified School District and Riverside University Health SystemPublic Health. Nearly 22 percent of Riverside County’s children live in food-insecure households. And although more than 4,000 lunches are served each day during the summer at the city’s parks, libraries and other locations, many more children remain in need. As chair of Fit, Fresh, Fun Riverside, a public-private collaborative program that promotes community health, Riverside Mayor Rusty Bailey has been committed

www.westerncity.com

to including out-of-school time in the city’s vision. The mayor’s office hosts Riverside’s Summerfest to kick off summer, in partnership with county leaders, the school districts, Riverside County Public Health Department, various city agencies and over 40 other community partners. This community barbeque, which draws an estimated 2,000 residents, promotes summer meal programs in the city, educates residents about the importance of healthy eating and physical activity and connects families with community resources. Riverside is working to boost the number of meal sites and promotional efforts in summer 2017 and exploring new ways of meal delivery, including the possibility of using mobile taco carts.

conclusion The collaborations sparked by the CHAMPs initiative give cities a starting point for developing a shared vision with county, schools and community partners to benefit one of the community’s most important constituent groups: kids.

About the Summer Meal Coalition The Summer Meal Coalition is a statewide, cross-disciplinary collaborative working to combat childhood hunger and support the well-being of children when school is out by increasing access to U.S. Department of Agriculture child nutrition programs. To learn more, visit www.ca-ilg.org/summermealcoalition.

These efforts contribute to a vision of a connected city, where coordination and collaboration create a community where individuals and families want to live and businesses thrive. Stockton and Riverside’s leadership demonstrates that addressing the fundamental human need for healthy food is also helping to meet a fundamental need for a healthy city. ■

Western City, April 2017

11


Local Leaders Make the Leap to the Legislature part 1 of 2 On Dec. 5, 2016, the Capitol welcomed legislators who won their seats in the November 2016 elections. The Assembly swore in 22 new members, four of whom have previously served in the Legislature. In the Senate, three legislators with no former Capitol experience took their oath of office alongside six who had served in the Assembly. In the Assembly alone, 74 percent of members have roots in local government. Twenty-seven members of this Legislature and nine members of this freshman class are alumni of the League’s California Civic Leadership InstituteŽ (CCLI) or have participated in aspects of it.

12

League of California Cities

CCLI is a League Partner-sponsored educational program designed for local government elected officials who are interested in running for the Legislature. The program offers local officials indepth policy and political briefings as well as numerous networking opportunities. Western City recently checked in with the nine new members who previously participated in CCLI to learn more about them. These legislators are profiled in a two-part series in the April and May issues. For more information about CCLI, contact Sara Rounds, regional public affairs manager; phone: (916) 658-8243; email: srounds@cacities.org.

www.cacities.org


Assembly Member Cecilia Aguiar-Curry (D-Winters) Former mayor, Winters What do you bring to the Legislature from your experience in local government? As the mayor of a small city, I’ve had to learn how to accomplish great things for my constituents with very limited resources. I’ll bring that experience to our Legislature, where many members from major urban areas don’t understand the challenges facing local government generally and know even less about how small cities struggle to piece together expertise to get important projects done. It was also critically important to work with different personalities and perspectives to collaborate successfully on delivering services and to reinvigorate Winters’ downtown. In a rural community, you learn to find partners everywhere. We’ve lost some of that sensitivity in our state and federal governments. I know a lot of people say this and fail, but I hope to prove that we can still truly come together to solve problems in government instead of defaulting to party and geographical lines. How was your experience with CCLI helpful in deciding to run for office? I remember quite distinctly when I was approached to attend the CCLI training in 2008. I was relatively new to local government and was just learning the ropes of local and regional issues. I knew that our community needed its voice heard, and I immediately

www.westerncity.com

asked to serve on the League leadership committees and board of directors. Shortly thereafter I attended the CCLI training, and I was taken aback when it was suggested that I should consider running for state office in the future. At that time I had absolutely no intention of seeking higher office, but in October 2015 I had the confidence and knowledge that I could be successful as an Assembly member. The CCLI training provided me the initial nudge to pursue leadership roles, to set myself apart from other electeds and be true to my constituents. Which of your district’s top two or three issues will be a priority for you? First, infrastructure finance. Creating jobs means having affordable housing and transportation that support our people and businesses. My constitutional initiative will give local governments a 55 percent vote threshold for infrastructure and housing bonds and special taxes. These tools are critical for cities to pursue local priorities and participate in regional economies. Second, modern communications. One big problem facing rural California is a lack of quality connectivity to education, health care and internet commerce. I will jointly author the reauthorization of the California Advanced Services Fund to meet the goal of broadband access for at least 98 percent of Californians. Third, working together. In local and regional government, I’ve had the greatest success when my group of partners — government, private sector and community members — was largest. At a time when our national government seems irrevocably divided, our state’s leaders must work together toward our common goal of providing for all Californians — regardless of party or geography. continued

Western City, April 2017

13


Local Leaders Make the Leap to the Legislature, Part 1 of 2, continued

Assembly Member Marc Berman (D-Palo alto) Former council member, Palo Alto What do you bring to the Legislature from your experience in local government? As both an appointee to a citizen oversight commission for a special district and a former elected member of the Palo Alto City Council, I have a strong appreciation for the challenges and opportunities that come with serving in local government in California. In reaction to neglect and a lack of funding at both the state and local levels, I became heavily involved in the need to improve my city’s infrastructure, including streets and sidewalks. After six years of work, first as a citizen member of the Infrastructure Blue Ribbon Commission and then as a member of the Infrastructure Committee on the city council, Palo Alto now has a fully funded plan to have the highest quality streets in the San Francisco Bay Area. Now that I am a member of the Transportation Committee in the state Assembly, I look forward to drawing on my local experience to try to address the state’s transportation infrastructure backlog. How was your experience with CCLI helpful in deciding to run for office? By the time I participated in CCLI, I’d already decided to run for higher office. But my participation in CCLI’s retreat at the Big Creek Hydroelectric Project in the Sierra Nevada gave me an

opportunity to take a deep dive into complex policy issues, including the drought, the budget and forestry management, among others. In addition and as importantly, it gave me the opportunity to begin developing relationships with other local elected officials with whom I’m now proud to serve in the state Assembly. Which of your district’s top two or three issues will be a priority for you? Our economy is strong, many communities have high-performing public schools, and our open space and coastline are breathtaking. But these positive qualities have combined to create an affordable housing crisis, as well as severe traffic congestion and a strained public transportation system. Addressing housing affordability and transportation infrastructure are top priorities for me in Sacramento. Another issue is the digital divide. In 2014, only 44 percent of high-school students had access to computer science instruction. This digital divide is often felt most in low-income communities and school districts. Universal preschool and access to computer science and information technology instruction would help ensure that all students are prepared for success in the 21st century economy, no matter where they grow up. California has also experienced the devastating effects of climate change by way of increased wildfires, flooding and a historic drought. To protect our spectacular coastline and the communities along the San Francisco Bay, I introduced legislation to combat sea-level rise, and I will continue to promote climate change mitigation initiatives and clean technology.

In the Assembly alone, 74 percent of members have roots in local government.

14

League of California Cities


Assembly Member Anna Caballero (D-Salinas)

Assembly Member Steven Choi (R-Irvine)

Former mayor, Salinas

Former mayor, Irvine

What do you bring to the Legislature from your experience in local government?

What do you bring to the Legislature from your experience in local government?

I spent 15 years as a city council member and mayor. During this time, I lived through the ups and downs of the state economy and struggled to get the city through the impacts of state budget decisions that affected our local budget. I am aware of the need for the state legislators to work together with cities and counties to achieve important state priorities. Communication and dialogue are important, and our mutual constituents expect nothing less.

I bring to Sacramento the abundance of my local government experience — specifically, six years with the Irvine Unified School District Governing Board, eight years on the Irvine City Council and four years as mayor of the City of Irvine. Understanding the issues and operation of local government entities is very helpful to me at the state Legislature in forming ideas for bills and taking positions on statewide issues that are often relevant to local issues.

How was your experience with CCLI helpful in deciding to run for office?

How was your experience with CCLI helpful in deciding to run for office?

Establishing relationships with leaders who worked in their communities prior to joining the Legislature has helped me identify other leaders who are cognizant of the issues we face in local government. My experience with CCLI helped me create a network composed of state legislators who came from local government and are now part of the backbone of legislators pushing for policies benefiting local governments — policies that, in turn, focus on bringing long-term solutions to crucial issues we face statewide.

In my case, the CCLI experience came in the middle of the campaign, so it did not affect my decision to run for the office. However, the media training was very relevant and helpful in that effective messaging with media is a key in any campaign.

Which of your district’s top two or three issues will be a priority for you? Over the past year, I heard loud and clear the message that rural California has not benefited from the improved economy. I have requested that the Assembly speaker establish a Select Committee on Economic Development and Investment in Rural California. My bills will reflect concerns that have been expressed to me — affordable housing, access to potable water and quality educational opportunities for all. These are the current top priorities for the 30th Assembly District.

Which of your district’s top two or three issues will be a priority for you? This is a question I hear often. I have a wide range of interests, and I have met with many people so far in my Sacramento office, representing diverse interests. With my background in education, I will definitely pay attention to education issues. Fortunately, I am assigned to the Higher Education Committee, which may partially fulfill my interest. I am very interested in changing California policies to welcome businesses that will create jobs. That is the key to the state revenue. I am introducing a bill to welcome back all types of businesses to California from within the United States or from abroad by providing tax credits. I have also introduced several bills to enhance public safety and to help crime victims collect restitution, among other legislation. ■

Western City, April 2017

15


Workplace Protections For

Transgender by Gage C. Dungy

Legal protections for transgender individuals have been in place in California since 2003, but have recently been garnering increased attention. Transgender is an umbrella term used to describe individuals whose gender identity and/ or gender expression differs from what is typically associated with their assigned sex at birth. A person’s gender identity, gender expression and transgender status are expressly protected in the workplace under California’s Fair Employment and Housing Act (FEHA), and employers need to be prepared to enforce such protections. This article outlines the legal protections for transgender individuals in the workplace, recent guidance on transgender issues in the workplace and new legal developments expanding the use of single-user restrooms to all genders under California law.

Gender Identity and Gender Expression: Protected Classifications FEHA bans discrimination on the basis of “sex, gender, gender identity [and] gender expression.” Since 2003, the definition of sex discrimination under FEHA has been expanded to include discrimination on the basis of a person’s gender identity or gender-related appearance or behavior. In 2012, the California Legislature also enacted the Gender Nondiscrimination Act to expressly define “gender identity” and add “gender expression” as a protected classification to FEHA. Gender identity refers to a person’s self-identification as male, female, a gender different from the person’s sex at birth, or transgender. Gender expression is defined by law to mean a “person’s gender-related appearance and behavior whether or not stereotypically associated

with the person’s assigned sex at birth” — for example, an employee of the male sex who wears make-up and clothing traditionally worn by women or behaves in a manner more commonly associated with women. As a result, California law protects transgender persons — as well as persons undergoing gender transition — from discrimination, harassment and retaliation in the workplace.

State Guidance on Transgender Rights in the Workplace Although transgender rights have been protected under FEHA for the past 14 years, the application of such protections has not always been clear. In February 2016, the California Department of Fair Employment and Housing (DFEH) issued new guidance on transgender rights in the workplace, titled Transgender Rights

Gage C. Dungy is a partner with the law firm of Liebert Cassidy Whitmore and can be reached at gdungy@lcwlegal.com.

16

League of California Cities

www.cacities.org


About Legal Notes This column is provided as general information and not as legal advice. The law is constantly evolving, and attorneys can and do disagree about what the law requires. Local agencies interested in determining how the law applies in a particular situation should consult their local agency attorneys.

Employees in the Workplace: FAQ for Employers (DFEH FAQ), which identifies two kinds of gender transition: 1. Social transition, where an individual “socially align[s]” their gender with their “internal sense of self” — for example, by changing their name, pronoun or bathroom facility usage; and 2. Physical transition, where an individual undergoes medical treatments “to physically align their body with internal sense of self ” — for example, by hormone therapies or surgical procedures. The DFEH FAQ also clarifies that the FEHA transgender protections apply regardless of an individual’s state of gender transition, stating: “A transgender person does not need to complete any particular step in a gender transition … to be protected by the law. An employer may not condition its treatment or accommodation of a transitioning employee on completion of a particular step in the transition.” www.westerncity.com

In addition, the DFEH FAQ provides guidance to employers on impermissible inquiries, dress code and grooming standards, and restrooms and locker rooms, as follows.

Impermissible Inquiries Employers should not ask questions designed to detect a job applicant’s sexual orientation or gender identity, including asking about his or her marital status, spouse’s name or relation of household members to one another. Employers should not ask questions about a person’s body or whether they plan to have surgery, because this information is generally protected by the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPPA).

Dress Code and Grooming Standards While employers are still allowed to have and enforce reasonable dress code policies, a transgender person must be allowed to dress in the same manner as

a nontransgender person of the same sex or gender. For example, employers must allow a transgender employee who is presenting as a male to dress in the same manner as a nontransgender man. A transgender person’s compliance with a dress code cannot be judged more harshly than that of a nontransgender person.

Restrooms and Locker Rooms All employees have a right to safe and appropriate restroom and locker room facilities. This includes the right to use a restroom or locker room that corresponds to the employee’s gender identity, regardless of the employee’s assigned sex at birth. Where possible, an employer should provide an easily accessible unisex single-user restroom for use by any employee who desires increased privacy, regardless of the underlying reason. Employees who do not wish to share a restroom with a transgender co-worker can use this type of restroom. continued on page 22 Western City, April 2017

17


Rancho Cucamonga’s

Kitten Nursery Steps Up

The City of Rancho Cucamonga won the Award for Excellence in the Enhancing Public Trust, Ethics & Community Involvement category of the 2016 Helen Putnam Award for Excellence program. For more about the award program, visit www.HelenPutnam.org.

18

League of California Cities

www.cacities.org


opposite page A rescued kitten is fed at the Rancho Cucamonga kitten nursery; dinner time for hundreds of kittens keeps volunteers busy, at left.

Innovation and Community Support Play Key Roles “We designed incubators for young kittens using plastic storage containers with heating pads and retrofitted large dog cages so tiny kittens could play and exercise without escaping,” says veterinarian Victoria Impett. “It was a work project of love.”

The City of Rancho Cucamonga (pop. 175,251) is located 45 miles east of Los Angeles and operates its own Animal Care and Services program, whose mission is “Building a community in which every adoptable pet finds a home.” Animal shelters nationwide are inundated during “kitten season,” which typically runs from April through October. Rancho Cucamonga’s Animal Center anticipated receiving nearly 1,000 orphaned kittens between the ages of 1 day and 8 weeks during the 2015 kitten season. Prior to 2015, city staff did not have enough volunteer foster homes or resources to provide 24-hour specialized care for the underage kittens. As a result, at least 20 percent of them were humanely euthanized. “We were committed to finding a better way,” says Veronica Fincher, director of Animal Services. “We wanted to create a safe place for every kitten that entered our center. Homeless animals are a community issue, and we were determined to save more lives and engage our community to help us.”

until they can be spayed or neutered and adopted by a new family at 8 weeks of age. “While there are a handful of existing kitten nursery programs in the country, many are operated by large nonprofit organizations,” says veterinarian Cindy Servantez. “We adapted our own nursery model, which is one of the first to open in a municipal animal shelter.”

24-Hour Nursery Provides Care

“We are a city Animal Center, and asking for more General Fund money can be difficult,” says Fincher. “We had to be creative and find alternative options.”

After exploring several options, the city’s Animal Center opened a 24-hour neonatal kitten nursery to provide care for kittens

www.westerncity.com

Funding such a large project challenged the Animal Center to be innovative in accomplishing its vision. Staff restructured job duties, reallocated funding from existing operations and reached out to the community to solicit private donations. Social media served to expand the donor base and recognize local businesses who supported the Animal Center by providing monetary and in-kind donations. Staff also implemented an animal ambassador program that encouraged students from elementary school to high school and local Girl Scout and Boy Scout troops to collect donations for the nursery, either as individuals or as community groups.

The Animal Center attributed the 24-hour neonatal kitten nursery’s success to the assistance received from other city departments and the community response. “Our Public Works Department was a huge help in donating facility space for the off-site nursery and assisting us with the logistics of setting up,” says Fincher. Employees citywide came together for the common cause, donating supplies and volunteering on their lunch breaks to bottle-feed kittens and visit with nursery staff and volunteers. The Sheriff ’s Department stopped by during routine patrols to ensure staff and volunteers were safe around the clock. The “kitten patrol stop” served a dual function as a morale booster and a stress reliever for the officers. The kitten nursery was staff managed but largely volunteer supported. The Animal Center launched a Pet Cadet Program, where children between the ages of 12 and 16 could volunteer in the nursery with a parent or guardian. “It was heartwarming to see parents and children bond while saving kittens,” says Elsa Tristan, foster caretaker. “The pet cadets took their responsibilities seriously and gained a better appreciation of what it means to be compassionate and the importance of the human-animal bond.” The senior community played a vital role by bottle-feeding kittens and sewing fleece blankets, hammocks and toys. And the Animal Center expanded its partnership with the local veterinary technician schools to provide internship opportunities, which helped offset staffing expenses and gave students an invaluable learning experience. continued on page 26

Western City, April 2017

19


J

O

B

O

P

P

O

R

T

U

N

I

T

I

E

S

Display Advertising

Western City magazine’s job opportunity section is the source for job seekers looking for positions in local government. When you place a job opportunity ad in Western City

Call Pam Maxwell-Blodgett at (800) 262-1801 to place a display (boxed) ad or for rate and deadline information, or email admanager@westerncity.com. Website Job Postings Display ads are posted on our website at no additional charge. But if you miss the deadline for getting your job opportunity ad into the magazine, you can post it on the Western City website right away. To post your job opportunity ad on our automated website, visit www.westerncity.com or contact Kimberly Brady, Western City’s administrative assistant; email: kbrady@ cacities.org; phone: (916) 658-8223.

magazine, it will be posted at no additional charge on our website.

Creating Staffing Solutions in 2017!

For rates and deadlines,

›› Test drive workers before you hire.

visit www.westerncity.

›› Most of our temps are hired as

com and click on the Advertise link.

City employees.

›› Call us to discuss creative staffing

solutions!

“Your inquiry handled with utmost confidentiality”

Temp help in 48 hours!

FROM MAINTENANCE WORKER TO CITY MANAGER We Fill All Positions in Municipal Government!

Call Us Toll Free 1-866-406-MUNI (6864) www.munitemps.com

Now open . . .

Chief of Police City of Milpitas

Coming soon . . .

Assistant Director of Administrative Services City of Palo Alto

Teri Black • 424.296.3111 Bradley Wardle • 650.450.3299 Julie Yuan-Miu • 925.820.8436

Fire Chief, East Bay Regional Park District, CA The East Bay Regional Park District (EBRPD) is a system of beautiful parklands and trails in Alameda and Contra Costa counties east of San Francisco. The East Bay Regional Fire Department is a branch of the Public Safety Division within the East Bay Regional Parks District that is comprised of fire and lifeguard services. EBRPD is seeking a Fire Chief who will maintain a high level of discipline and morale, but remain approachable and maintain an open-door policy with all staff. Candidates for the position should have knowledge pertinent to current District operations (including administration, fuels management, fire prevention and suppression, safety management, training, and public relations), as well as laws, regulations, taxation, and funding methods pertaining to California Special Districts. Candidates must possess a Bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university with major coursework in fire science/ administration, business or public administration, or a closely related field and five (5) years of increasingly responsible supervisory experience in full time fire suppression and prevention, with three (3) years in a command position. The monthly salary range for the Fire Chief is $11,052.13-$17,158.27 and is dependent upon qualifications with future performance-based merit steps. If you are interested in this outstanding opportunity, please apply online at www.bobmurrayassoc.com. If you have any questions, contact Joel Bryden at (916) 784-9080. Closing date May 5, 2017. phone 916•784•9080 fax 916•784•1985 www.bobmurrayassoc.com

20

League of California Cities

www.cacities.org


J

O

B

O

P

P

O

R

T

U

N

I

T

I

E

S

CITY OF EL CAJON

Finance Director

City of Piedmont, CA

O

verlooking San Francisco Bay from beautiful Oakland Hills, the City of Piedmont offers its 11,000 residents established, high quality and historical homes in landscaped surroundings. In addition to exceptional quality of life amenities, Piedmont is known for its school district, ranked number 1 in Northern California. Due to relocation of previous incumbent, the City is recruiting for a Finance Director to work closely with the City Administrator to manage the City’s General Fund budget ($24.5 million). This visionary professional with extensive financial expertise, will continue the City’s successful tradition of prudent fiscal administration. The Director has responsibility for budgeting, accounting, auditing, purchasing and investment functions. The highly ethical candidate, with excellent interpersonal, communication and presentation skills, who enjoys engaging with a sophisticated community and collaborative colleagues will find the position rewarding. A Bachelor’s degree in finance or equivalent and 3 years of responsible experience in the profession are strongly preferred.

City Clerk

Salary is negotiated at the time of employment (previous incumbent received $168,000) and supplemented by an attractive benefits package. Closing date: Sunday, April 23, 2017 or when sufficient applications are received. Detailed recruitment brochure available at www.tbcrecruiting.com. Julie Yuan-Miu • 925.820.8436 Teri Black • 424.296.3111

$99,590.40 – $121,326.40 Annually

Police Chief, City of San Pablo, CA Historically one of the oldest Spanish settlements in the region, San Pablo has become a thriving residential and business community with a population of about 30,000 in an area of approximately 2.6 square miles. The City’s Police Department is in need of a proactive and forward-looking leader for their new Police Chief. Candidates interested in this opportunity are being sought for their professional and personal investment in a progressive and forward-thinking organization focused on maintaining a high-level of service delivery, community to community service, and engagement. Graduation from a four-year accredited college or university with major coursework in criminal justice, police science, public administration, or a related field is required, as well as five years of command or supervisory experience in law enforcement equivalent to the rank of Lieutenant, Commander, Captain, or above. A Master’s degree in an appropriate field is desirable as is graduation from the FBI Academy and/or Command College. The monthly salary range for the Police Chief is up to $17,600 ($211,200/year); placement within this range is dependent upon qualifications and experience. If you are interested in this outstanding opportunity, please visit our website at www.bobmurrayassoc.com to apply online. Please contact Mr. Joel Bryden at (916) 784-9080 should you have any questions. Closing date May 5, 2017. phone 916•784•9080 fax 916•784•1985 www.bobmurrayassoc.com

Photo/art credits Cover: Courtesy of the City of Riverside and the Institute for Local Government Pages 3–5: Photos courtesy of the City of Lodi; safety vest texture, B Calkins/Shutterstock.com Page 6: Courtesy of the HEAL Cities Campaign Page 7: Courtesy of the Institute for Local Government and Culver City Pages 8–11: Photos, courtesy of the City of Riverside and the Institute for Local Government; background texture, Benjamas/Shutterstock.com Page 12: Feoktistoff/Shutterstock.com

www.westerncity.com

Page 13: Trekandshoot/Shutterstock.com Pages 14–15: Lowe Llaguno/Shutterstock.com Pages 13–15: Legislator photos, courtesy of their respective offices Page 16: Photo, Cha cha cha studio/Shutterstock.com Pages 16–17: Graphic, ExFlow/Shutterstock.com Page 17: Photo, Juli_Ash/Shutterstock.com Pages 18, 19, 26: Courtesy of the City of Rancho Cucamonga and the League of California Cities Page 27: Courtesy of the HEAL Cities Campaign

The City Clerk plans, organizes and directs the operations and activities of the City Clerk’s Office, maintains custody of official City documents and records, and facilitates Federal, State, Local and School elections. The ideal candidate must have knowledge of: the Brown Act, Fair Political Practices Commission and Political Reform Act, and California Public Records Act. At least five years of experience performing executive or legal administrative duties, including office management, supervision and records management is required. The equivalent to completion of high school, including additional college level coursework or advanced training in administrative support, office management, and/or records management is also required. Certified Municipal Clerk (CMC) designation is highly desirable. To apply, please visit: https:// www.cityofelcajon.us/jobs

Western City, April 2017

21


Workplace Protections for Transgender Employees, continued from page 17

Federal Guidance

Use of a unisex single-user restroom should always be a matter of choice. No employee should be forced to use one either as a matter of policy or due to continuing harassment in a genderdesignated facility.

J

O

B

O

P

P

Although federal law is in a state of transition under the new administration, numerous federal agencies have also provided guidance on issues pertaining to transgender workers. Examples include the Equal Employment Opportunity

O

R

T

U

N

I

T

I

E

S

Fire Chief, City of Montebello, CA The City of Montebello, with a population of just over 63,000, is a balance of quiet residential neighborhoods and industrial commercial centers. The City is seeking a strong leader with vision and creativity to serve as the new Fire Chief. The incoming Chief will be looked upon to motivate, encourage, and establish a strong working environment with staff, other organizations, and agencies. The new Chief will be expected to use an inclusive management style while preserving the chain of command system. A candidate who is both sensitive to the Department’s existing culture and open to new approaches would be highly valued. Any combination of training and experience which would likely provide the required knowledge and abilities is qualifying. A typical way to obtain the knowledge and abilities would be a Bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university with major coursework in fire science or a closely related field and/or seven (7) years of progressively responsible and varied professional experience in the provision of fire and other emergency services, including five years of experience in a supervisory, management, or administrative position. The annual salary range for the Fire Chief is $126,756-$169,008; placement within this range is dependent upon qualifications. If you are interested in this outstanding opportunity, please visit our website at www.bobmurrayassoc.com to apply online. Please contact Mr. Fred Freeman at (916) 784-9080 should you have any questions. Filing deadline is to be determined. phone 916•784•9080 fax 916•784•1985 www.bobmurrayassoc.com

CITY OF REDDING The City of Redding is a thriving, dynamic community of over 90,000 residents located at the north end of the Sacramento Valley. The community offers an impressive complement of housing in all areas and housing types: riverfront, mountain view, country acreage and traditional subdivision. Housing is much less costly than in many other urban areas in California and the City has excellent high-performing public, private and charter schools. Redding successfully combines the ambiance of a small town with the amenities of a large city. The new City Manager will join a city with CITY many positive attributes and great potential, MANAGER and will operate in an environment that’s both exciting and challenging. The City Manager William Avery & Associates will assist the City Council as they work collaboratively on a variety of Management Consultants issues affecting the City and its residents. The Manager will be someone who leads by including others. He/she will make our staff and citizens 31/2 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Suite A feel they are included and invested in the important decisions of the City. Los Gatos, CA 95030 408.399.4424

The new City Manager will have at least 10 years of progressively Fax: 408.399.4423 responsible experience and a proven track record as a city manager, email: jobs@averyassoc.net assistant city manager, or senior executive for a comparable public sector www.averyassoc.net organization. A combination of training and experience that provides the required knowledge, skills and abilities is qualifying. A typical education would include a Bachelor’s degree in public/business administration or a closely related field. To be considered, please visit the Avery Associates Career Portal at www.averyassoc.net to upload your letter of interest, resume, salary history and contact information including email addresses for five work-related references to Bill Avery by April 11, 2017.

22

League of California Cities

Commission’s (EEOC) brochure titled Preventing Employment Discrimination Against LGBT Workers, the Department of Labor’s Best Practices: A Guide to Restroom Access for Transgender Workers, and a Department of Justice legal memorandum titled “Treatment of Transgender Employment Discrimination Claims.” Although not expressly stated under Title VII of the federal Civil Rights Act of 1964, the EEOC has interpreted the provision that prohibits discrimination “based on sex” to also include sexual orientation and gender identity. Similar to the DFEH FAQ, the EEOC provides the following guidance to employers regarding transgender rights in the workplace under federal law: • Denying an employee equal access to a common restroom corresponding to the employee’s gender identity is sex discrimination; • An employer cannot condition this right on the employee undergoing or providing proof of surgery or any other medical procedure; and • An employer cannot avoid the requirement to provide equal access to a common restroom by restricting a transgender employee to a single-user restroom instead (though the employer can make a single-user restroom available to all employees who might choose to use it). However, it is unclear whether the new administration will modify any of this federal guidance.

New California Legislation on Single-User Restrooms On a related issue involving transgender access to restrooms, the California Legislature enacted and Gov. Jerry Brown signed into law Assembly Bill 1732 (Ting, Chapter 818, Statutes of 2016), effective March 1, 2017. This new law requires all single-user toilet facilities (rooms with a toilet and/or urinal and sink) in any business establishment, place of public accommodation or state or local government agency to be identi-

www.cacities.org


California law protects transgender fied as all-gender toilet facilities. The purpose of this law is to allow single-user occupancy restrooms to be convenient, fair and equally accessible for everybody. Employers should immediately designate single-user restrooms as “all gender” to comply with this new law if they have not already done so.

persons from discrimination, harassment and retaliation in the workplace.

Conclusion The issues related to employees who are transgender or transitioning are complex and evolving. The DFEH FAQ serves as a reminder to California employers, including cities, that FEHA protects transgender employees and those employees who may not be transgender but do not comport with traditional or stereotypical gender roles. Furthermore, a transgender person does not need to have sex reassignment surgery or complete any particular step in a gender transition to be protected by the law. The DFEH’s enforcement message is clear — employers should avoid discriminatory conduct, apply workplace rules consistently and accommodate transgender employees with respect to their gender identity and expression. Employers should therefore be prepared to address issues presented by transgender employees in the ever-evolving workplace. Employers should ensure that their policies and practices are updated to include transgender protections in accordance with California law. Furthermore, employers must communicate with, train and educate supervisors, managers and all employees regarding such policies. Legal counsel can help formulate workplace policies and procedures and bring cities into compliance in this area. ■

Looking for Footnotes? For a fully footnoted version, read this article online at www.westerncity.com.

www.westerncity.com

J

O

B

O

P

P

O

R

T

U

N

I

T

I

E S

Planning Manager City of Napa, CA

N

apa (pop. 80,000) is the dynamic and vibrant hub of the idyllic Napa Valley. This fiscally strong and stable full-service municipality is renowned as the seat of California’s premier winemaking region. The City is also recognized for its residential quality of life, hospitality, fine food, and luxury hotels. Supported by a team of 11 and reporting to the Community Development Director, the Planning Manager oversees the Planning and Code Enforcement Divisions of the of the Community Development Department. The selected candidate will be involved in the upcoming General Plan Update as well as master planning key downtown and underdeveloped infill sites. The ideal candidate will be an exceptional people manager with outstanding technical abilities. He/she will exhibit a passion for quality work along with a strong team orientation. Excellent communications skills will also be expected. Four years of professional experience in urban and environmental planning in a management or supervisory role is desirable. A Bachelor’s degree in urban planning or related field is required. Salary range goes up to $130,957. A competitive benefits package supplements salary. Closing date: Sunday, April 30, 2017. For detailed brochure and to apply online, visit www.tbcrecruiting.com. Julie Yuan-Miu • 925.820.8436 Teri Black • 424.296.3111

City of Westlake Village

FINANCE DIRECTOR Salary: $130,980-$188,232 DOQ annually, plus excellent benefits The City of Westlake Village (population 8,384) is ideally located just 38 miles west of downtown Los Angeles and only 8 miles from the Pacific Ocean. Westlake Village is a master-planned community with a special small town charm characterized by an incredibly high quality of life, picturesque setting, strong sense of identity, and high expectations and standards. Westlake Village relies on the “contract city model” for the delivery of services. Westlake Village is seeking an experienced finance professional who is interested in being part of a team that emphasizes high levels of trust and cooperation. The City’s current consolidated budget is $23 million with general fund expenditures of $8.8 million and a capital improvement budget of $11.5 million. The City’s revenue base is extremely diversified and balanced. For a detailed job brochure, visit www.wlv.org. Preliminary screening begins April 21, 2017, open until filled. Confidential inquiries about the position can be made by contacting Ray Taylor, City Manager at ray@wlv.org or 818-706-1613.

Western City, April 2017

23


PeckhamMcKenney &

Presents Outstanding Career Opportunities

Budget Officer

City of Concord, CA

Concord, population 127,500, is located just 29 miles east of San Francisco adjacent to beautiful Mt. Diablo. Concord offers a high quality of life and has been recognized as the best place in California to raise a family. The purpose of the Budget Officer position is to develop, prepare, and coordinate the annual City-wide budget (currently $89.4 million) and the Two-year Capital budget (currently $32.4 million) that meet GFOA and CSMFO standards as well as preparing long-term financial documents and monitoring budgets with multiple funds. The Budget Officer reports directly to the Director of Finance, yet also works closely with the City Manager. Although technical skills are critical for this opportunity, excellent interpersonal skills will be the foundation for success. Bachelor’s degree plus six years of experience in finance, budgeting, or accounting with at least two years as a Financial Analyst or Senior Administrative Assistant required, Master’s degree and/or a CPA license are highly desirable and experience serving a municipality will be considered favorably. Salary range is $110,053 to $151,320 DOQE with excellent benefits. Filing Deadline is April 26, 2017. Contact Phil McKenney.

City Manager City of Orinda, CA

The beautiful City of Orinda is a family-oriented community of approximately 18,500 residents that enjoys a semi-rural suburban setting surrounded by majestic tree-studded hillsides within its 12.8 square miles. Located in Contra Costa County, within 20 minutes of downtown San Francisco, Orinda residents enjoy natural beauty, excellent schools, safety, history, and abundant cultural opportunities. A BART station is situated in the center of the community allowing a convenient commute within the Bay area. A General Law city, Orinda has a reputation as a well-managed and stable municipal government with a five-member City Council, 38 FTEs, and a projected $13.2 million general fund operating budget in FY 2017/2018. The City received a AAA bond rating from Standard & Poor’s for a GO Bond issue to be sold in April 2017. The City Manager will bring proven management and leadership abilities, an open communication style, strong interpersonal skills, and generalist knowledge/experience in local government. Bachelor’s degree is required; Master’s preferred. The previous City Manager’s annual salary was $232,000. The City contributes to a 401(a) defined compensation plan. The City does not participate in CalPERS or Social Security. Filing deadline is June 5, 2017. Contact Bobbi Peckham.

County Administrative Officer County of Santa Cruz, CA

With its natural beauty apparent in pristine coastal beaches, lush redwood forests, and rich farmland, Santa Cruz County enjoys an ideal Mediterranean climate with low humidity and 300 days of sunshine a year. The County’s approximately 270,000 residents enjoy an excellent quality of living. Santa Cruz County has a workforce of 2,452 and FY 2016/17 all fund budget of $720.7 million. Appointed by a dynamic fivemember Board of Supervisors, the County Administrative Officer is responsible for the administration of all County services and activities and provides direct and indirect administrative direction to department heads and general direction to the CAO’s Office staff. A Bachelor’s degree in public or business administration or a related field required; Master’s degree preferred. Annual salary up to $290,040; appointment DOQE. Filing deadline is May 8, 2017. Contact Bobbi Peckham.

Please send your cover letter and resume electronically to:

Peckham & McKenney

apply@peckhamandmckenney.com

Resumes acknowledged within two business days. Detailed brochures are available at

www.peckhamandmckenney.com (866) 912-1919


“All about fit” Town Manager Town of Truckee, CA

Settled high in California’s spectacular Sierra Nevada mountain range, Truckee is a historic mountain town located 12 miles north of Lake Tahoe and is within minutes of eight world-class ski resorts. Truckee is a safe, close-knit community of over 16,000 residents who share a passion for breathtaking scenery, an abundance of year-round outdoor activities, and the preservation of the town’s Old West character and authenticity. Truckee is a thriving, genuine community where people live, work, play, and are actively engaged in civic life. Since its incorporation in 1993, the Town has had only two Town Managers. A broad understanding of municipal operations, particularly in the areas of community development and sustainability and the willingness to learn “The Truckee Way” are required. The next Town Manager must be a strong leader, self-confident, and capable of assisting elected officials and the community in shaping the Town’s future and assisting them in getting there. Bachelor’s degree, nine years of increasingly responsible experience in municipal government including five years of management and supervisory experience necessary, Master’s degree highly desirable. Salary range is currently under review with excellent benefits. Filing Deadline is April 19, 2017. Contact Phil McKenney.

Upcoming Searches Fire Chief, City of Bothell, WA Assistant General Counsel, South San Joaquin Irrigation District, CA

Congratulations to our Recent Placements! Cathy Capriola, City Manager, City of Sonoma, CA Brian Loventhal, City Manager, City of Campbell, CA Gabe Engeland, City Manager, City of Sierra Madre, CA Maria Hurtado, Assistant City Manager, City of Hayward, CA Lisa Lopez, Human Resources Director, City of Emeryville, CA Bob Hall, Association Manager, Rancho Santa Fe Association, CA Steve Akres, Fire Chief, Sonoma Valley Fire & Rescue Authority, CA Sukari Beshears, Human Resources Director, City of Brentwood, CA Kathleen Salguero Trepa, Assistant City Manager, City of Concord, CA Nancy Newton, Assistant County Administrator, Sacramento County, CA


at left The city council recognizes the young volunteers whose work supports the nursery.

Rancho Cucamonga’s Kitten Nursery Steps Up, continued from page 19

Meeting the Demand: Finding Homes for More Kittens

J

O

B

O

P

P

O

R

T

U

N

I

T

I

E

S

Fire Chief, City of Davis, CA Located in Yolo County, twenty minutes from the state capitol and set between the coastal range to the west and towering Sierra Nevada Mountains to the east, the City of Davis (population nearly 68,000) is a classic college town known for its desirable quality of life, excellent schools, a small-town atmosphere, and an emphasis on parks and open spaces. Davis is now seeking a creative, entrepreneurial, and seasoned leader to serve as its new Fire Chief. He or she will be an expansive and forward thinker, diplomatic and fair in dealings with others, and serve as a mentor to all staff. The ideal candidate will practice transparency and an open-door policy and have a successful track record of consensus building. A Chief that engages the community and understands and values the small-town culture of Davis will be ideal. Candidates must possess the equivalent to a Bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university with major course work in fire science, fire administration, public administration, business administration, political science, or a related field, and have eight (8) years of increasingly responsible command and supervisory experience in an organized paid fire department, including five (5) years of administrative and supervisory responsibility in fire protection programs. Any combination of education and experience that would likely provide the required knowledge and skills is qualifying. A Master’s degree in public or business administration and the possession of a California State Fire Marshall Fire Chief Certification are highly desired. Candidates must possess, or have the ability to obtain, an appropriate and valid California driver’s license. The annual salary range for this position is $134,832 – $163,884, DOQ. If you are interested in this outstanding opportunity, please visit our website at www.bobmurrayassoc.com to apply online. Please contact Mr. Gary Phillips at (916) 784-9080, should you have any questions.

Closing date April 14, 2017.

phone 916•784•9080 fax 916•784•1985 www.bobmurrayassoc.com

Public Works Director City of Burbank, CA

H

ome to 105,000 residents, the City of Burbank is known as the “Media Capital of the World” as its strong entertainment base includes some of the biggest names in the business. Located in Los Angeles County with easy access to numerous transportation options, Burbank’s increasingly popular destination points attract more than 10 million visitors a year. The Public Works Department is supported by a staff of 111 organized across six divisions: Administration, Engineering Design and Construction, Traffic, Fleet and Building Maintenance, Street and Sanitation, and Water Reclamation and Sewer. The ideal candidate will be a visionary leader and empowering people manager who excels at project management and delivery. Motivated by high standards, he/she will be a visible and engaged professional who maintains a strong connection with his/her team. The individual selected will also be a superior communicator and relationship builder. At least seven years of public works experience that includes supervisory and management responsibilities and a Bachelor’s degree are required. Salary goes up to $202,899 and is supplemented by an attractive benefits package. This recruitment will close on Sunday, April 9, 2017. Visit www.tbcrecruiting.com for detailed brochure and to apply. Teri Black • 424.296.3111 Bradley Wardle • 650.450.3299

26

League of California Cities

Volunteers donated more than 3,000 hours of service, and 100 new volunteers and pet cadets joined the team to assist with the kitten nursery project. By the end of 2015, the nursery had cared for over 800 kittens and placed another 150 kittens in foster homes. The nursery program provided care for 400 more kittens than in the previous year and decreased the euthanasia rate of kittens from 20 percent to 12 percent. In 2016, a total of 912 kittens received care at the nursery. The project also facilitated growth in the number of new donors and supporters and improved the program’s social media presence. Success presented new challenges as the city’s Animal Center now had a significantly larger number of kittens available for adoption. Once again, the Animal Center reached out to the community to enhance partnerships with local veterinary hospitals and boarding facilities to serve as off-site adoption locations, thus increasing the visibility to potential adopters. Assembly Member Marc Steinorth (R-Rancho Cucamonga) hosted an event, the #Steinorth100, which sponsored adoption fees for the first 100 pets placed in new homes. The event drew large crowds of families from Rancho Cucamonga and surrounding communities who were interested in adopting kittens and other shelter pets. “It was a lot of work, and there was much to learn to implement best practices in animal husbandry and medical management for this fragile group of animals. It was so rewarding to see them thrive, graduate and find their forever home,” says Fincher. The 24-hour kitten nursery is now an annual project that is expected to continue increasing the number of kittens cared for and adopted each year. Contact: Veronica Fincher, director, Animal Care and Services, City of Rancho Cucamonga; phone: (909) 466-7387, ext. 2091; email: Veronica.Fincher@CityofRC.us. ■

www.cacities.org


The HEAL Cities Campaign Helps Build Complete Parks Systems, continued from page 6

The workshops used hands-on activities to help residents identify:

of workshops with residents and staff will address the issues identified in the November 2016 workshops by developing policy recommendations, which will be compiled and shared with city staff and residents in June 2017.

• The most popular parks in their community; • Neighborhoods that need additional park facilities;

In partnership with the Institute for Local Government, the HEAL Cities Campaign will also conduct resident workshops in 2017 in the City of Merced to assess community needs and identify policy and park priorities with the help of city staff. Ultimately, residents will present the findings and suggest policy solutions at parks commission and city council meetings.

• Safe, well-maintained parks and those needing maintenance and safety measures; • The types of safety measures that will work best for the community and the city; • Routes to parks that need improvements to make walking and biking safer; and

Model Resolution for Complete Parks System

• Park recreational programming and amenities that can be added or improved.

In addition to the Complete Parks Playbook and white paper, the HEAL Cities Campaign offers a Complete Parks System Resolution that cities can use to create a roadmap for improving their parks systems.

Participants discussed how best to elicit resident feedback on park design, maintenance and programming. The next round P

R

O

F

E

S

S

I

O

N

A

L

S

E

R V

I

C

William Avery & Associates, Inc. Labor Relations / Executive Search / Human Resources Consulting 31/2 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Suite A Los Gatos, CA 95030 408.399.4424 Fax: 408.399.4423 email: jobs@averyassoc.net www.averyassoc.net

www.westerncity.com

E

S

Placentia residents discuss improvements they would like to see made in local parks.

The City of Lynwood adopted a Safe and Healthy Parks Resolution last year after compiling resident concerns and priorities. Put the HEAL Cities Campaign to Work for Your City The HEAL Cities Campaign staff is available to talk with cities about its complete parks systems program and provide assistance in identifying and creating policy priorities. For more information, visit www.HEALCitiesCampaign.org or contact Kanat Tibet, director, HEAL Cities Campaign; phone: (916) 213-6380; email: kt@PHAdvocates.org. ■ D

I

R

E

C

T O

R Y

Bobbi C. Peckham • Phil McKenney

Peckham&McKenney www.peckhamandmckenney.com

Roseville, CA

866.912.1919

Western City, April 2017

27


P

R

O

F

E

S

S

I

O

N

A

L

S

E

R V

I

C

E

S

D

I

R

E

C

T O

R Y

Public & Private Sector Ph.D Level Personnel Consultants

HR & ASSOCIATES

Organizational Assessments City Management Evaluations Strategic Planning & Team Building Performance Management

(805) 458-6351

www.drhalleymoore.com

Staffing Solutions:

HF&H CONSULTANTS, LLC

Building & Safety Code Enforcement ■ Public Works ■ Planning Dept ■ Executive Recruiting ■ ■

37+ Years of Stability and Service

HELPING LOCAL GOVERNMENT LEADERS

Managing Tomorrow’s Resources Today Providing Consulting Services to Recycling, Solid Waste, Water and Wastewater Management for more than 20 Years

Code Services:

• Planning • Procurement • Management

Plan Check Green Compliance ■ CASp Services ■ Fire-Life Safety ■ ■

• Financial/Rates • AB939 Compliance • Litigation Support

www.hfh-consultants.com Walnut Creek (925) 977-6950

www.vcacode.com | (714) 363-4700

Irvine (949) 251-8628

managementpartners.com Budget Strategies ∙ Service Sharing Organization Analysis ∙ Performance Management Process Improvement ∙ Strategic Planning Executive Recruitment ∙ Facilitation/Team Building

E XPERIENCE , T ALENT , COMMITMENT TO PUBLIC SERVICE San Jose ∙ Orange County ∙ Cincinnati ∙ 408-437-5400

WRITTEN TESTS

Elevate Your ExpectaƟons

Sales and Use Tax Property Tax SoŌware SoluƟons Cannabis Compliance Business Tax AdministraƟon TOT

888.861.0220 I www.hdlcompanies.com 888.861.0220  I   hdlcompanies.com 

28

League of California Cities

Over 70 stock tests available for jobs in public agencies. Toll Free (877) 22-EXAMS exams@donnoe.com www.donnoe.com

www.cacities.org


P

R

O

F

E

S

S

I

O

Still comparing apples to oranges? U.S. Communities delivers cooperative purchasing solutions that can’t be matched.

N

A

L

S

E

R V

I

C

E

S

D

I

R

E

C

T O

R Y

Contact: Allan Crecelius or Sandra Comrie

12707 High Bluff Dr., Ste 200 San Diego, CA 92130 Tel 858.259.3800 fax 858.792.7465 acrecelius@rewardstrategy.com

Exceeding clients’ expectations since 1987.

www.uscommunities.org/lcc

Providing a Complete Range of Services to Cities, Counties and Special Districts

Classification | Compensation Special Surveys | Performance Management

• Management, Leadership & Organizational Assessments • Financial Management, Fee Studies & Fiscal Sustainability • Human Resource Management, Labor Relations & Investigations • Recreation, Parks & Community Services • Police, Fire & Communication System Studies • Public Works & Engineering • Library Operations • Planning, Community & Economic Development • Project Management

675 Hartz Avenue, Suite 300 • Danville, CA 94526 866-774-3222 • www.municipalresourcegroup.com

matrix consulting group 201 SAN ANTONIO Circle, Suite 148 MOUNTAIN VIEW, CA 94040 650.858.0507 • www.matrixcg.net Offices in California, Texas, Illinois, Massachusetts & Washington

Management and operations studies Feasibility studies User fees and cost allocation Police • Fire • Public Works • Utilities Parks & Recreation • Administration Planning & Building

SPECIALISTS IN CLASSIFICATION, JOB EVALUATION AND COMPENSATION

5663 Balboa Ave., #399, San Diego, CA 92111-2705 915 L Street, #C-102, Sacramento, CA 95814 Brentwood Village, 149 S. Barrington Ave., #726, Los Angeles, CA 90049-2950 1-888-522-7772 • www.compensationconsulting.com Offices in various major cities

www.westerncity.com

Western City, April 2017

29


THINKING THAT HOLDS WATER. From large cities to small districts and private landowners, Barbara Brenner has assisted a wide range of clients across California with water rights and water quality issues. As a partner at Churchwell White LLP, thought-leader and recognized figure in the California water community for over 20 years, Barbara has the experience to back up her reputation. That’s why the City of Dixon knew they were in good hands when they decided they wanted greater control over their own water rates and supply. Sure enough, Barbara was able to guide the project through the development of a new water code, transfer agreement negotiations, and securing the necessary permits from the State Water Resources Control Board—on time and without breaking a sweat. At Churchwell White, we understand that results are created by people. Together, our team of lawyers and legislative advocates combine unexpected ideas with decades of proven experience. If you need a strategic partner with creative solutions, call to see what we can do for you.

PUBLIC LAW

| GOVERNMENT RELATIONS | REGULATORY ADVOCACY | CHURCHWELLWHITE.COM

Western City April 2017  

Community Services Issue

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you