Page 1

MARCH 2017 |

The Monthly Magazine of the League of California CitiesÂŽ

ÂŽ

Mather Veterans Village: A Place to Call Home p.11 Finding Solutions to the Affordable Housing Shortage p.3 Fairfield Reverses Crime and Neglect in Parkway Gardens p.15

www.westerncity.com


CONTENTS Calendar of League Events 2  3 Executive Director’s Message

Mather Veterans Village: 11  A Place to Call Home

 Finding Solutions to the Affordable Housing Shortage

By Carolyn Coleman

Significant barriers and disincentives constrain the production of housing. These include local and national economic and job market conditions, challenges for developers and a lack of funding and subsidies needed to support housing that low- and moderate-income families can afford.

15 California Cities Helen Putnam Award for Excellence

Fairfield Reverses  Crime and Neglect in Parkway Gardens

9 City Forum

 Funds Coming to Help Chronically Homeless Californians With Mental Illness  Partner Now With Counties to Prepare Programming

By Eva Spiegel

 lthough the No Place Like Home A program funds will not be available until 2018, the California Department of Housing and Community Development has released the Notice of Funding Availability for $6.2 million in grants for technical assistance. These funds will help counties — and the cities and developers they partner with — start developing their programming.

 new community for formerly A homeless veterans with disabilities comprises 50 apartments, with plans underway to expand the project, add more housing and provide permanent supportive services on-site.

 he city took legal action to help T property owners effect change and address the shootings, illegal drug sales, traffic and other problems that plagued the complex.

Job Opportunities 17  Professional Services 26  Directory

29

On the Record

 Mayors and council members describe the biggest change in their city in the past decade. On the cover: Mather Veterans Village, Rancho Cordova Cover photo: Yvonne Hunter


®

President JoAnne Mounce Council Member Lodi

1400 K Street Sacramento, CA 95814 (916) 658-8200 Fax (916) 658-8240

Second Vice President Rich Garbarino Council Member South San Francisco

Immediate Past President L. Dennis Michael Mayor Rancho Cucamonga

Executive Director Carolyn Coleman

For a complete list of the League board of directors, visit www.cacities.org/board.

Magazine Staff Editor in Chief Jude Hudson, Hudson + Associates (916) 658-8234; email: editor@westerncity.com Managing Editor Norman Coppinger (916) 658-8277; email: ncoppinger@cacities.org Contributing Editor Eva Spiegel (916) 658-8228; email: espiegel@cacities.org Advertising Sales Manager Pam Maxwell-Blodgett (916) 658-8256; email: maxwellp@cacities.org Administrative Assistant Kimberly Brady (916) 658-8223; email: kbrady@cacities.org Contributors Jason Rhine Dan Carrigg Melissa Kuehne Jennifer Whiting

leaguevents March 1–3

Planning Commissioners’ Academy, Los Angeles Tailored to meet the needs of planning commissioners, planning directors, planning staff and other interested officials, the academy offers sessions on the major planning and land-use issues facing cities.

22–24

Public Works Officers’ Institute & Expo, San Diego Designed for professionals at every career level, this conference covers the latest developments in public works.

30–31

Policy Committee Meetings, Ontario The League’s policy committees review issues of interest to cities statewide and make recommendations to the League board of directors.

Associate Editors Carol Malinowski Carolyn Walker

31

Design Taber Creative Group

Legal Advocacy Committee Meeting, Ontario The committee reviews and recommends friend-of-the-court efforts on cases of significant statewide interest to California cities.

Advertising Design ImagePoint Design For photo credits, see page 18. Western City (ISSN 0279-5337) is published monthly by the League of California Cities, 1400 K St., Sacramento, CA 95814. Subscriptions: $39.00/1 year; $63.00/2 years; student: $26.50; foreign: $52.00; single copies: $4.00, including sales tax. Entered as periodical mail January 30, 1930, at the Post Office, Los Angeles, CA 90013, under the Act of April 13, 1879. Periodical postage paid at Sacramento, Calif.

NT RI

ED US IN G

P

Postmaster: Send address changes to Western City, 1400 K Street, Sacramento, CA 95814. Western City Trademark Reg. U.S. Pat. Off. ©2017 League of California Cities. All rights reserved. Material may not be reprinted without written permission. This issue is Volume XCIII, No. 3.

April 19

Legislative Action Day, Sacramento Get the latest updates on legislation affecting your city and meet with your legislators.

20

Board of Directors’ Meeting, Sacramento The League board reviews, discusses and takes action on a variety of issues affecting cities, including legislation, legal advocacy, education and training, and more.

MAY 3–5

City Attorneys’ Spring Conference, San Francisco This meeting covers the latest trends and issues affecting public law practitioners and provides an opportunity to connect with colleagues.

W

R

0

GY

10

%

IND EN

E

Supplied by Community Energy

FSC ® is an independent, not-for-profit organization that promotes environmentally appropriate, socially beneficial and economically viable forest management worldwide. Products with the FSC label are independently certified to ensure that they come from forests managed to meet the needs of present and future generations.

2

First Vice President James Goodhart Council Member Palos Verdes Estates

Event and registration information is available at www.cacities.org/events. For the latest information on League conferences and events, follow us on Twitter @CaCitiesLearn. For legislative and policy updates and more, follow @CaCities. Follow Western City @WesternCityMag. Join us on Facebook. www.facebook.com/westerncity www.facebook.com/LeagueofCaCities

League of California Cities

www.cacities.org


Executive Director’s Message by Carolyn Coleman

Finding Solutions to the Affordable Housing Shortage

Links to Related Resources Online Read the online version of this article at www.westerncity.com for links to the newest report from the state Department of Housing and Community Development, California’s Housing Future: Challenges and Opportunities, and recent Western City articles, including “What You Need to Know About AB 2 and Community Revitalization Tools.”

www.westerncity.com

Housing affordability is an urgent issue in California, where a majority of renters (over 3 million households) pay more than 30 percent of their income toward rent and nearly one-third (over 1.5 million households) spend more than 50 percent of their income on rent. In addition, California’s homeownership rates are at the lowest point since the 1940s. That’s why improving the affordability of workforce housing and securing additional funds for affordable housing is a strategic priority for the League in 2017.

Principal Causes of the Affordable Housing Shortage Local governments are just one piece of the complex scenario that comprises the housing development process. Cities don’t build homes — the private sector does. In California, local governments must zone enough land in their General

Plans to meet the state’s projected housing demand; however, cities don’t control local market realities or the availability of state and federal funding needed to support the development of affordable housing. This is true not just in California but nationwide, as I have observed firsthand in my work with the National League of Cities in Washington, D.C., and as a former deputy mayor for the City of Indianapolis. Significant barriers and disincentives constrain the production of housing. These include: • Local and national economic and job market conditions; • Lack of funding and subsidies needed to support housing that low- and moderate-income families can afford; and • Challenges for developers.

continued

Western City, March 2017

3


Finding Solutions to the Affordable Housing Shortage, continued

It’s important for city officials to understand these constraints so they can increase awareness among our residents and other stakeholders as to why California has an affordable housing crisis and invite them to participate fully in identifying and crafting solutions.

Local and National Economic and Job Market Conditions Numerous factors contribute to local and national market conditions that affect the availability of affordable housing. The economic recovery from the Great Recession, when many middle-income families lost their homes to foreclosures, has occurred at different rates in communities throughout California. Areas with high-tech industry and some coastal areas recovered more rapidly than other regions. Overall, the recovery has been uneven. Jobs in manufacturing and blue-collar industries have not fully rebounded, and jobs in the expanding service sector pay lower wages.

Many households are still struggling to recover from the recession and home foreclosure crisis, and many recent college graduates are carrying significant debt — reducing their ability to purchase a home or pay rent. Mortgage underwriting standards became more stringent in the aftermath of the foreclosure crisis, which can make it more difficult for potential homebuyers to qualify for the needed financing. Some of the state’s major homebuilders went out of business during the recession, leaving fewer companies to meet the demand for housing. Production of housing fell dramatically during the recession, which contributed significantly to a shortage of homes across the affordability spectrum. As the chart “Annual Production of Housing Units 2000–2015”(below) shows, housing “starts” statewide are at about half of pre-recession levels and fall far short of the state’s projected need for 180,000 new homes per year.

Housing values also reflect the uneven recovery happening throughout the state. The Wall Street Journal recently compared home prices today to those of 2004. In San Jose, which is part of Silicon Valley where tech jobs pay top wages, prices are 54 percent higher than 2004 levels, but this is not so in areas hindered by a slower recovery from the recession. In Central Valley cities such as Stockton and Merced, housing prices are 21 and 16 percent lower respectively.

Lack of Funding and Subsidies In addition to private sector financing, funding and subsidies to support the development of affordable housing come from two primary sources: federal and state government housing programs. It’s extremely rare for a single affordable housing program to provide enough funding to finance an entire development, due to the costs of development and funding constraints and criteria that

Annual Production of Housing Units 2000–2015

PERMITS 240,000 220,000 200,000 180,000 160,000 140,000 120,000 100,000 80,000 60,000 40,000 20,000 0

Compared to Projected Statewide Need for Additional Homes

2015–2025

Projected Housing Need 180,000 Homes Annually

2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015

SINGLE FAMILY

MULTIFAMILY (2+ UNITS)

Source: California Department of Housing and Community Development, California’s Housing Future: Challenges and Opportunities

4

League of California Cities

www.cacities.org


encourage developers to leverage other funds. The developer will typically apply for funding from multiple programs and private sector lenders that have overlapping policy goals and requirements. Private-sector lenders may also have additional criteria. The process of applying for and securing funding from multiple sources can add significantly to the lead time needed to start construction. One multifamily development can easily need five to 10 funding sources to finance its construction. Developers generally layer financing from state and federal tax credits, state housing programs, local land donation and other local grants, federal housing programs and private loans from financial institutions. The chart “Sample Funding Mixes for Affordable Multifamily Developments� (below) offers an example of funding mixes for affordable multifamily developments.

Federal Funding Details 2. HOME Investment Partnerships Program (HOME) supports affordable housing, particularly for low- and very low-income individuals;

Federal funding for affordable housing works to increase the supply of affordable housing by providing tax credits, grants or loans to support housing production or rehabilitation. Some federal programs can also lower the cost of rental housing by providing rental assistance that reduces the rent paid by an income-eligible household, but allows the property owner to collect rents that are closer to market-rate levels.

3. Emergency Solutions Grant Program helps individuals and families quickly regain stability in permanent housing after experiencing a housing crisis or homelessness; and

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) allocates funding for affordable housing directly to larger cities and urbanized counties through four main grant programs:

1. Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) Program is designed to benefit low- and moderate-income families and funds local community development activities such as affordable housing, anti-poverty programs and infrastructure development;

4. Housing Opportunities for Persons With AIDS (HOPWA) provides housing assistance and related supportive services to meet the housing needs of lowincome individuals living with HIV/AIDS and their families. HUD also provides funding through these programs to the states that, in turn, make subgrants to smaller cities.

continued

Sample Funding Mixes for Affordable Multifamily Developments 6%

11%

State housing tax credits Federal housing tax credits

19%

Private bank loans Federal HOME funds Local funds

3% 4% 43%

5% 9%

Federal Home Loan Bank Affordable Housing Program State housing funds State Mental Health Services Act Housing funds

Source: California Department of Housing and Community Development, California’s Housing Future: Challenges and Opportunities

www.westerncity.com

Western City, March 2017

5


Finding Solutions to the Affordable Housing Shortage, continued

HUD Program Allocations to California 2003–2015 (Adjusted for Inflation)

$729,523,986

$800 $700 $600 $500 $400 $300 $200 $100 0

$356,864,263

$351,175,191

$120,549,096

2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 Community Development Block Grant

HOME

Emergency Solutions Grant

Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS

Source: HUD Formula Program Allocations by State: 2003–2015 and California Department of Housing and Community Development, California’s Housing Future: Challenges and Opportunities

Federal funding for affordable housing comprises a significant portion of California’s resources to support affordable housing. However, due to pressures to cut federal spending and reduce the deficit, federal funding for housing has declined in recent years despite the increase in the

number of severely cost-burdened, lowincome renter households (which rose from 1.2 million in 2007 to 1.7 million in 2014). Between 2003 and 2015, CDBG and HOME funds allocated to California to produce affordable housing units have declined by 51 percent and 66 percent

Health Care Reform Solutions Keenan’s Health Care Reform Consulting Services help you understand the Affordable Care Act’s (ACA) potential impact on your health care benefit plan. • Analysis of your plan and employee workforce • Prioritizing next steps in alignment with your objectives • Creating a recommended action plan • Evaluating and modeling plan design and contribution strategies • Developing employee wellness and condition management approaches • Identifying cost-savings alternatives to Covered California, including PACE, a unique Joint Powers Authority medical benefits program for public agencies For more information about our Health Care Reform Consulting Services, please contact Steve Gedestad, sgedestad@keenan.com.

License No. 0451271

6

League of California Cities

Innovative Solutions. Enduring Principles.

www.keenan.com

respectively (see “HUD Program Allocations to California 2003–2015” above). Furthermore, few sources of affordable housing funding are stable or growing from year to year despite an increasing population and demand for housing. This funding uncertainty deters both efforts to address housing challenges in a sustained manner and developers’ ability to build affordable housing. At the state level, the elimination of redevelopment agencies and the subsequent loss of over $5 billion in funding since 2011 compounded California’s affordable housing challenges. The state has never had a significant permanent source of affordable housing funding, and proceeds from the 2006 housing bond that helped create and preserve affordable apartments, urban infill infrastructure and single-family homes have been expended. With pressure continuing in Washington, D.C., to close the deficit, the limited resources that cities have relied on from the federal government are likely to continue to be under attack or at risk for the foreseeable future. At the state level, Gov. Brown’s proposed budget for

www.cacities.org


2017–18 does not include any additional state funding for affordable housing. This decline in federal funding and the lack of state funding continue to have a profound impact on the availability of affordable housing. A recent report from the state Department of Housing and Community Development (HCD), California’s Housing Future: Challenges and Opportunities, examines in detail many of the issues described here. However, policy responses must start with restoring a sufficient source of funding for affordable housing.

Challenges for Developers In addition to funding challenges to develop affordable housing, other challenges further exacerbate the obstacles to development, including: • Identifying an adequate supply of water; • Complying with state regulations and energy standards, greenhouse gas reduction requirements and other environmental conditions; • Competing with other developers to build high-end, more expensive housing;

Impacts of the Affordable Housing Shortage The shortage of affordable housing and the rising costs of developing affordable housing for the workforce are compounding a growing inequality statewide. This also limits employment opportunities for California workers and advancement opportunities for younger adults who can’t afford to live near their place of work or in areas where jobs are available.

Although California comprises 12 percent of the nation’s population, it is home to 22 percent of the nation’s homeless population. The need for affordable housing for these individuals and families is urgent and relentless; it affects virtually every community in the state. And for people with disabilities and our most vulnerable residents, according to HCD, “Discrimination and inadequate accommodations are worsening housing cost and affordability challenges.” continued

Specialty Land Use Law Expertise for Complex, Large-Scale Development Projects

• Infrastructure deficits; • Market conditions, such as those described earlier; and • The cost of land and construction.

Other Factors In addition — but to a far lesser degree — factors at the local level can also impact the development of affordable housing. In some cities, new development requires a referendum and voter approval. Community concerns about growth, density and preserving the character of an area may affect local development. Project opponents can use the environmental permitting process and litigation to limit or stop a project. However, the process of complying with the California Environmental Quality Act also serves to protect communities by ensuring that important environmental issues are identified and addressed.

Meyers Nave proudly serves as land use transaction and/or litigation counsel on many of the most innovative and highest profile development projects undertaken by public entities and public-private partnerships throughout California. Please visit meyersnave.com to learn more. City of Rancho Cordova: Transformation of 3,828-acre mine tailings site into master-planned community with homes, schools, parks and commercial space City of South San Francisco: New 2.25 million-square-foot mixed-use life sciences campus with offices and research facilities, hotel, retail marina and open space University of California Los Angeles: New $162 million Conference and Guest Center Los Angeles World Airports: $1.3 billion expansion of Los Angeles International Airport City of Inglewood: Mixed-use redevelopment of 238-acre Hollywood Park racetrack OAKLAND | LOS ANGELES | SACRAMENTO | SANTA ROSA | SAN DIEGO | MEYERSNAVE.COM | 800.464.3559

www.westerncity.com

Western City, March 2017

7


Finding Solutions to the Affordable Housing Shortage, continued

What Is Needed to Craft Solutions We can waste time pointing the finger of blame at local governments and others for the housing shortage or we can ensure that the tools we have are robust, efficient and effective. Three relatively new tools (see “New Tools for Building Communities” at right) offer innovative opportunities for communities to build affordable housing — however, unlike the redevelopment tools of the past, these require collaborative, creative approaches. The League’s strategic priority on affordable housing calls for us to: “Increase state and federal financial support, reduce regulatory barriers, and provide additional incentives and local financial tools to address the affordability of workforce housing and increase the availability of affordable housing.”

The affordable housing shortage is a quality-of-life issue that affects each of us. Local governments stand ready to be part of the solution, and we invite the state and affordable housing stakeholders to join us. We take our responsibility seriously. As mentioned earlier, it’s vitally important to raise our residents’ awareness of the underlying causes of the affordable housing shortage so they can be active participants in developing solutions. Public engagement in local and state policy-making is a core value for California, and our residents deserve and expect to have a voice in decisions that impact their community. Their participation enriches and informs the process — it is essential. To address the affordable housing crisis and develop viable solutions, we need all the players and stakeholders at the table — developers, the financial community, residents, business owners and

We Specialize In Local Government Real Estate Representation

● Acquisitions ● Dispositions ● Parking Solutions ● Project Management ● Bid Process Management “Unique Solutions To Complex Real Estate Issues”

Tom Hixson/Alyce Rados thixson@crcre.com arados@crcre.com 925-866-1300

CalBRE License 01280981

8

League of California Cities

www.crcre.com

representatives from local government and state government — to begin discussing innovation and creativity. A real solution must involve everyone at the table. We welcome your ideas, suggestions and input. Let’s get to work. ■

New Tools for Building Communities The following three tools, created to help local governments with affordable housing development, offer new ways to develop affordable housing. Recent legislation, AB 2031 (Bonta, Chapter 453, Statutes of 2016), established Affordable Housing Beneficiary Districts within the same geographical boundaries of the jurisdiction’s redevelopment agency successor agencies. This law allows a jurisdiction to redirect its distribution of property tax revenue payable to the city or county from the Redevelopment Property Tax Trust Fund to the affordable housing beneficiary district for as long as the successor agency exists. The jurisdiction is then authorized to issue bonds against the property tax revenue to provide financial assistance in the form of loans, grants and other incentives to develop affordable housing. Enhanced Infrastructure Financing Districts (EIFDs), enacted via SB 628 (Beall, Chapter 785, Statutes of 2014) are a relatively new tool that can fund housing, transit priority projects, sustainable communities strategies, military base reuse, brownfields restoration and more using tax-increment financing. They may not redirect property tax revenue from K–14 schools, but can provide funding for a wide range of uses similar to redevelopment agencies if the participating affected taxing entities agree to provide their tax-increment revenue to the EIFD. Community Revitalization and Investment Authorities (CRIAs), enacted via AB 2 (Alejo, Chapter 319, Statutes of 2015), provide another new way for local governments to fund various types of economic revitalization programs, including low- and moderate-income housing, using tax-increment financing. For more information about these tools, read the online version of this article at www.westerncity.com.

www.cacities.org


Funds Coming to Help Chronically Homeless Californians With Mental Illness Partner Now With Counties to Prepare Programming by Eva Spiegel California cities celebrated last summer when Gov. Jerry Brown signed the No Place Like Home program into law. It provides $2 billion over several years to build and rehabilitate housing for California’s chronically homeless residents with mental illness. Cities are working with their colleagues in county government and local nonprofit and faithbased organizations to connect homeless individuals with housing and supportive services, and the No Place Like Home program represents a positive step toward creating much-needed housing. The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) reported that California in 2016 had 118,000 homeless people — 22 percent of the nation’s entire homeless population. Los Angeles alone accounts for 7 percent of the nation’s homeless. Although San Diego, San Francisco and San Jose rank in the top 10 cities nationwide with the largest homeless populations, smaller cities and rural areas are also experiencing an influx of homeless individuals. The lack of adequate resources to build permanent housing that is paired with

services is one of the greatest challenges facing communities working to address the issue of homelessness. Championed by Senate President Pro Tempore Kevin de León, the No Place Like Home program could ultimately fund an estimated 10,000 housing units.

The Housing First Model According to HUD and other experts, Housing First programs are highly effective in ending homelessness and helping affected men, women and children get back on their feet. In this model, homeless people are first given permanent housing and then receive supportive services, including substance abuse treatment, health care and job training. No Place Like Home, which supports a Housing First model, directs funding from Proposition 63 (2004) to housing construction and rehabilitation with the goal of freeing up counties’ other Prop. 63 funds for the wrap-around services. (Prop. 63 levies an additional 1 percent tax on incomes of $1 million or more and directs the proceeds to mental health service programs.)

The California Department of Housing and Community Development (HCD) is administering the No Place Like Home program. Zach Olmstead, who serves as HCD’s assistant deputy director for homeless and housing policy, believes that at least one-third of the state’s homeless residents have mental illness. For the chronically homeless, he says, that number is even higher. “The most critical need in our communities is for more affordable, permanent housing, especially for those who are our most vulnerable. The No Place Like Home program provides a significant, targeted investment that will create new permanent supportive housing for some of our most vulnerable Californians who suffer from mental illness and are chronically homeless,” says Olmstead. “The $2 billion from this program is a significant down payment on our efforts to reduce and end homelessness in California.”

Funding Details HCD is working to get the program up and running so funding distribution can begin in early 2018. The agency launched continued on page 24

Eva Spiegel is communications director for the League and can be reached at espiegel@cacities.org. www.westerncity.com

Western City, March 2017

9


Mather Veterans

A Place


Formerly homeless veterans Joe Qualls, Jerry Bradbury and Ernesto Hayles and their respective dogs Molly, Twoface and Shadow welcome a visitor to their community.

left to right

Village:

to Call Home The first permanent supportive housing for homeless veterans with disabilities in the Sacramento region opened Aug. 31, 2016, in the City of Rancho Cordova on a 3.65-acre lot that was formerly part of Mather Air Force Base. The base was decommissioned in 1993. Mather Veterans Village is a three-story, garden-style community with 50 apartment homes and 3,500 square feet of meeting rooms, staff offices, a kitchen and lounge area and a computer lab. In addition to exceeding California’s energy and water usage standards, the site features drought-tolerant landscaping and drip irrigation using 100 percent on-site gray water and rooftop solar panels that generate power for the hot water system and provide electric generation for tenant net metering. The village’s community hub is located in a portion of a repurposed 1950s military building.

Partnership Makes Project Possible “The City of Rancho Cordova, once the site of an active Air Force base, is still home to more than 5,000 veterans and their families. In 2006, we began to explore the feasibility of creating a village dedicated to the care and housing of our nation’s veterans,” says City Council Member Robert McGarvey. “This city project, 10 years in the making, is the result of a partnership between our city, Mercy Housing, Veterans Resource Centers of America (VRC) and the County of Sacramento.”

continued

Western City, March 2017

11


Mather Veterans Village: A Place to Call Home, continued

“The County of Sacramento is pleased to be a partner in helping make Mather Veterans Village a reality,” says County Supervisor Don Nottoli. “Our veterans will benefit from this outstanding and much-needed project, which provides a

safe and welcoming home and supportive services for their overall well-being.” “Everyone at Mercy Housing California feels enormous pride whenever we complete a new affordable housing com-

The 50 permanent supportive

homes are just the first of three phases planned for Mather

Veterans Village.

munity for low-income residents,” says Doug Shoemaker, president of Mercy Housing California, which is the master developer of this project and part of a larger national nonprofit organization focused on providing affordable hous-

The Road From Hopelessness to Home Joe Qualls served in the U.S. Navy from 1987–91. He returned to Placerville, his hometown, after completing his service. “I went from Desert Storm to Placerville,” he says. “It’s hard to describe how that felt — it was like going from a major roller coaster to a kiddie ride at the fair.” Qualls worked in construction, but found it increasingly difficult to hold a job. He was suffering from posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and didn’t realize it. “I was angry all the time,” he says. “I would get upset and quit. I went through dozens of jobs. And then the economy tanked, and there was no work in construction.”

IS IT TIME TO UPDATE YOUR PERSONNEL POLICIES?

California laws change every year - make sure that your City’s Personnel Handbook keeps up! Our Model Personnel Policy Portal (LMP3) enables you to make the necessary updates yourself, including: Paid Sick Leave and Other Leaves, Drug and Alcohol Testing, Harassment/Discrimination, Reasonable Accommodation, and many more...

Get Started Today: LiebertLibrary.com/Timeline

12

League of California Cities

Without a job, Qualls became homeless. “I was living on the river in Sacramento, and I was suicidal,” he says. “Finally, a friend told me to go to the Veterans Administration (VA), and it was the best thing I ever did. I got a nice doctor who did a physical evaluation and talked to me about mental health. They gave me anger management classes for my PTSD and helped me find work.” With assistance from the VA and the Veterans Resource Centers of America, Qualls found temporary housing and applied for a slot at Mather Veterans Village, where he now makes his home. He shows his tidy apartment and kitchen to visitors and explains, “I love to cook.” Today, Qualls works in a veterans’ support program. He says, “I go out on the streets to look for homeless vets and help them get the services they need.” Qualls offers his fellow veterans help — and hope.

www.cacities.org


ing for low-income families, seniors and people with special needs. “But there is an extra-special feeling we all share when we open a new community for formerly homeless and disabled veterans,” he adds. “Mather Veterans Village would not have been possible without the amazing group of collaborative partners who worked tirelessly to turn this concept into a beautiful reality.” George Thomas couldn’t agree more. George, now a resident at Mather Veterans Village, is just one of 50 formerly homeless veterans who now have a place to call home. continued on page 20

Mather Veterans Village Case Manager Kevin Walker, left, helped Robert St. Clair navigate the application process.

A New Lease on Life Robert St. Clair served in the U.S. Army from 1980–83. After his service concluded, he struggled with methamphetamine addiction and homelessness for years. In 2013, he entered a substance abuse treatment program with the help of the Veterans Resource Centers of America (VRC) and the Mather VA Hospital (VA). “It took two rounds of rehab,” says St. Clair. “And I’ve stayed clean and sober for two years now.” In 2016, St. Clair learned about Mather Veterans Village and applied for housing there. “The wait was a time of extreme anxiety,” he says. “Kevin Walker was assigned as my case worker, and I called every day about my application.” When he got the OK to move in, St. Clair was joyful and relieved. He says, “God gave me a new lease on life through VRC and the VA’s inpatient drug treatment program — and the support of my fellow veterans.”

www.westerncity.com

George Thomas, a former U.S. Army sergeant, speaks at the opening ceremony for Mather Veterans Village, where he now lives.

STRENGTHEN YOUR SKILLS AND CAREER UC Davis Extension Land Use and Natural Resources connects professionals with California’s experts in land use and environmental planning and law, resource management, sustainability, and community development and design. Our programs are designed for working professionals at all career levels and will help you develop the skills necessary to effectively address the critical issues currently facing communities and local governments. AICP and MCLE credits available. Select courses are taught online. extension.ucdavis.edu/landuse

Western City, March 2017

13


Thank you to all of the 2017 League Partners Platinum ($15,000+) 1,2

1,2

2

1,2

2

2

2 2

2

2

1 1,2

1

1

2

2

2

2 BUILDING AMERICA®

Gold ($10,000+) Hanson Bridgett LLP1,2 Kronick Moskovitz Tiedemann & Girard LECET Southwest Lewis Investment Company2

Meyers Nave1,2 Morongo Band of Mission Indians2 Murphy Austin Adams Schoenfeld LLP1 Opterra Energy Services Renne Sloan Holtzman Sakai LLP1,2

Republic Services Inc.2 Sherwin-Williams Western States Petroleum Association Young Homes2

Silver ($5,000+) ABM AMR2 American Fidelity Assurance Company Charles Abbott Associates2 California Charter Schools Association Californians for Energy Independence DW Development2 Dart Container Corp.2 EMS Management2 Fascination Ranch2

Goldfarb & Lipman LLP Joe A. Gonsalves & Son2 Greenwaste Recovery Inc.2 HR Green2 Harris & Associates2 Interwest Consulting Group Inc. Kaufman Legal Group1 LiveStories1 Mintier Harnish1 Mt. Diablo Recycling2

Northrop Grumman Prometheus Real Estate Group Inc.2 Public Financial Management Inc. James Ramos Redflex Robson Homes LLC2 San Manuel Band of Mission Indians2 Sares Regis Group2 ServPro2

Bronze ($3,000+)

Accela2 Advanced Disposal2 Alvarez-Glasman & Colvin2 Amador Valley Industries2 American Forest & Paper Association Association For Los Angeles Deputy Sheriffs2 Atkins Best Way Disposal2 Brookfield Norcal Builders Inc2 California Contract Cities Association2 CalPortland2

Carpenter/Robbins Commercial Real Estate Inc.2 Colantuono Highsmith & Whatley PC2 Desert Valley Medical Group Inc./Prime Healthcare2 E&J Gallo2 Edgewood Partners Insurance Center Fieldman Rolapp & Associates Genentech Geo-Logic Associates2 Greystar2 Griswold LaSalle Cobb Dowd & Gin LLP

Hill International2 Holliday Rock Company ISES Corporation Library Systems & Services LLC Los Angeles Yellow Cab Madaffer Enterprises1 Marin Sanitary Service2 Matarango Inc.2 McKinstry Mid Valley Disposal2 Mitsubishi Cement2 Bob Murray & Associates

Accretive Realtors Acquisition Partners of America LLC AndersonPenna Partners Inc.2 Athens Services2 Avery Associates2 Blue Line Transfer Inc.2 CARE2 CR&R2 CSAC EIA California Consulting, LLC California Debt and Investment Advisory Commission

California Independent Petroleum Association California Refuse Recycling Council Civil Engineering Associates2 Classic Communities2 Cost Control Associates Inc. Cunningham Davis2 Desert Valleys Builders Dokken Engineering2 Emanuels Jones and Associates Fard Engineers2 Fresno Police Officers Association

GHD Inc.2 Gilton Solid Waste2 Josie Gonzales2 Hospital Council of Northern California Innisfree Ventures2 J.R. Roberts/Deacon Inc.2 Jamboree Housing Corporation Jones Hall2 Jones & Mayer Kasdan Lippsmith Weber Turner LLP Kosmont Companies LaBarge Industries2

2

Stradling Yocca Carlson & Rauth Transtech Tribal Alliance of Sovereign Indian Nations Tripepi Smith & Associates1,2 Union Bank2 Vavrinek Trine Day & Co. LLP Walgreens Waste Management1 Willdan Ygrene2

NL Industries Inc. Nixon Peabody Norton Rose Fulbright2 PARS2 Peters Engineering2 Precision Engineering2 Prime Healthcare2 Psomas2 Quad Knopf 2 Kenneth Ramirez2 Recology2 Rutan & Tucker LLP SCI Consulting Group

SGI Construction Management2 San Bernardino County Safety Employees2 San Bernardino Police Officers Association San Diego County Water Authority Santa Ynez Band of Mission Indians2 SummerHill Homes2 TREH Development2 Townsend Public Affairs Inc.2 USA Properties Fund Inc. Zanker Green Waste2

Leibold McClendon & Mann Livermore Sanitation2 MCE Clean Energy Marchetti Construction Inc.2 NV5 Inc. Napa Recycling2 Newport Pacific Capital Company Inc. Probolsky Research Riverside Construction2 San Jose POA San Mateo County Association of Realtors2

Santa Monica Police Officers Association Seifel Consulting Inc. Sobrato Organization2 South San Francisco Scavengers2 Specialty Solid Waste & Recycling2 Studio T SQ2 Swinerton Management Vali Cooper & Associates Inc.2 Van Scoyoc Associates2 West Builders2

Basic ($1,000+)

Join the Partners Program Today! Contact Mike Egan | (916) 658-8271 | egan@cacities.org

1 – Institute for Local Government supporter 2 – CITIPAC supporter Partial list as of 1/26/2017


Fairfield Reverses Crime and Neglect in Parkway Gardens The quality of life for residents of Parkway Gardens, a private 240-unit condominium community, and the neighboring area declined significantly over several years prior to 2013. Residents didn’t feel safe. The complex had deteriorated, and serious crime reached a disproportionate level. In 2013, Parkway Gardens was plagued with shootings, illegal drug sales and the traffic that accompanies such activity. Fairfield is located on the I-80 corridor between San Francisco and Sacramento, and Parkway Gardens was becoming a magnet for regional crime. Calls for police service to Parkway Gardens averaged 2.55 per unit during 2013, compared with the rest of Fairfield, which averaged 1.66 calls per household.

Contributing Causes of the Decline Renters occupied 70 percent of the complex, which suffered from inattention from absentee landlords. The Homeowners Association (HOA) board of directors had collapsed, and Parkway Gardens lacked adequate property management. These deficiencies contributed to a lack of enforcement of the HOA’s conditions, covenants and restrictions for the units. About half of the owners owed a total of $500,000 in outstanding dues to the HOA. Most of the HOA board of directors had quit, and the remaining two were suing each other over control of the HOA.

An innovative approach restored order and peace in the complex.

The city convinced the parties in the lawsuit to participate in mediation and brokered an agreement under which the city and an attorney, hired by one of the parties, would select a receiver, hire a qualified property manager and seat a functional HOA board. “Although we could not find much precedent to guide us, we knew we had to act,” says Toussaint S. Bailey, deputy city attorney for the City of Fairfield. In December 2014, the city and the designated attorney identified a professional receiver, who hired a reputable property management company. With the support of the city, changes began to occur. “I’m really proud of the creative thinking from our legal team and the hundreds of staff hours from multiple departments that transformed this area,” says City Manager David White. City department staff met extensively with the receiver and select members of the Parkway Gardens community to identify challenges and actions that would address the ongoing problems, with the goal of improving the quality of life for residents. As a result of these discussions, the city: • Conducted a Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design study to identify physical property improvements that included installing better lighting, monitoring closed-circuit television surveillance and cutting back tall vegetation;

Residents in the complex displayed little interest in their surroundings, and the quality of life was highly compromised for residents and the surrounding community.

• Augmented a Community Safety Ordinance;

City Takes Unprecedented Action

• Increased the frequency of the uniformed foot patrol in the complex;

In an unprecedented move, the City of Fairfield took action to help Parkway Gardens owners use the courts to effect change.

• Participated in 22 public events that brought residents together with city staff, elected officials and faith-based groups;

The city intervened in the HOA lawsuit on the grounds that dysfunctional management of the HOA posed a substantial threat to the health and safety of Parkway Gardens residents, the surrounding community and the entire city.

• Identified problem tenants and used the improved Community Safety Ordinance to serve notice on the owners of units where problem tenants resided; continued

The City of Fairfield won the Award of Excellence in the Housing Programs and Innovation category of the 2016 Helen Putnam Award for Excellence program. For more about the award program, visit www.helenputnam.org.

www.westerncity.com

Western City, March 2017

15


Fairfield Reverses Crime and Neglect in Parkway Gardens, continued

Broken windows and exposed electrical wiring were among many hazards at the complex.

• Conducted an 18-hour code enforcement inspection to address exterior defects on the property that posed hazards to residents and their guests and issued 137 individual and five HOA citations; • Installed a license-plate reader on the one community entrance/ exit to serve as a virtual gate, which reduced nonresident traffic; and • Enrolled the complex in the Fairfield Police Department Crime Free Multi-Housing program, which is designed to help rental property tenants, owners and property managers keep illicit drug dealing and other illegal activity off their property. Simultaneously, the receiver and management company took complementary actions by: • Soliciting court orders to prohibit previous board members from running for seats; • Appointing HOA board members if balloting was unsuccessful;

• Spending seven months modeling good HOA practices before appointing the new board of directors in November 2015; • Updating bylaws and enforcing HOA rules for parking, property appearance, dogs on property and payment of dues; • Addressing deferred maintenance; and • Re-establishing the rule of law. continued on page 19

Laborers’ International Union of North America

BUILDS PEOPLE BUILDS PROJECTS BUILDS CALIFORNIA

The Laborers’ International Union of North America (LiUNA) partners with public and private entities, elected officials, community groups, and responsible contractors to build and maintain the infrastructure needs of communities throughout California while providing residents a career in the construction industry. (855) 532-3879 www.LiUNAbuildsCA.org

16

League of California Cities

www.cacities.org


J

O

B

O

P

P

O

R

T

U

N

I

T

I

E

S

Display Advertising

Western City magazine’s job opportunity section is the source for job seekers looking for positions in local government. When you place a job opportunity ad in Western City

Call Pam Maxwell-Blodgett at (800) 262-1801 to place a display (boxed) ad or for rate and deadline information, or email admanager@westerncity.com. Website Job Postings Display ads are posted on our website at no additional charge. But if you miss the deadline for getting your job opportunity ad into the magazine, you can post it on the Western City website right away. To post your job opportunity ad on our automated website, visit www.westerncity.com or contact Kimberly Brady, Western City’s administrative assistant; email: kbrady@ cacities.org; phone: (916) 658-8223.

magazine, it will be posted at no additional charge on our website.

Creating Staffing Solutions in 2017!

For rates and deadlines,

›› Test drive workers before you hire.

visit www.westerncity.

›› Most of our temps are hired as

com and click on the Advertise link.

City employees.

›› Call us to discuss creative staffing

solutions!

“Your inquiry handled with utmost confidentiality”

FIRE CHIEF City of Porterville

Temp help in 48 hours!

FROM MAINTENANCE WORKER TO CITY MANAGER We Fill All Positions in Municipal Government!

Call Us Toll Free 1-866-406-MUNI (6864) www.munitemps.com Chief of Police, Port of Seattle, WA

For information on this opportunity, please visit our website at www.ci.porterville.ca.us ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES DEPARTMENT

Phone: 559-782-7441 Fax: 559-782-7452 The City of Porterville is an Equal Opportunity Employer

www.westerncity.com

Located in Seattle, Washington (population nearly 689,000), the Port of Seattle owns and operates Seattle-Tacoma International Airport, two cruise ship terminals, Fishermen’s Terminal – home of the North Pacific fishing fleet, one grain terminal, a public cargo terminal, four public marinas, and manages a number of real estate assets for financial return and economic advantage. The Port’s operations currently help create nearly 200,000 jobs and $7 billion in wages throughout the region. The Port of Seattle is now seeking a well-rounded, experienced, law enforcement professional with excellent interpersonal skills and proven leadership capabilities. The ideal candidate will be a strategic thinker and a visionary leader with a demonstrated track record as a collaborative business partner. An individual with a history of creating effective working relationships across functional lines and with internal and external stakeholders, who will positively represent and promote the good work of the Port while demonstrating a commitment to serving the needs of the local community is sought. At minimum, candidates must possess a Bachelor’s Degree in a related field and have a minimum of three years of command or management level experience in a Police Department, including supervision of other Police supervisors, and day-to-day management of one or more major programs or assignments. Completion of relevant police management training also required. Preferred qualifications include three years at the command level, with one of these three years commanding or managing an investigative or administrative assignment; experience as a Deputy Chief of Police or the equivalent; and completion of a graduate degree in a related field. The annual salary for this position is DOQ. If you are interested in this outstanding opportunity, apply online at www.bobmurrayassoc.com. Please contact Mr. Bryden at (916) 784-9080, should you have any questions. Closing date is March 17, 2017. The Port of Seattle is an Equal Opportunity Employer, Affirmative Action employer and is committed to diversity in the workplace. Minorities, women, veterans and individuals with disabilities are encouraged to apply.

phone 916•784•9080 fax 916•784•1985 www.bobmurrayassoc.com

Western City, March 2017

17


J

O

B

O

P

P

O

R

T

U

N

I

T

I

E

S

CITY OF FULLERTON Fullerton is located 22 miles southeast of metropolitan Los Angeles. Fullerton is a full-service city renowned for its unique mix of residential, commercial and industrial, educational, and cultural environments which provide an outstanding quality of life for both residents and businesses alike. Fullerton, one of the largest cities in Orange County, is a community with a strong sense of tradition, one that treasures its historic past as it prepares to meet the challenges of its future.

Public Works Director ST. HELENA, CALIFORNIA St. Helena, in the heart of the Napa Valley, is a beautiful historical community located 65 miles north of San Francisco. With nearly 6,000 residents, St. Helena is a full service city that encompasses an area of four square miles. The City is seeking a highly motivated professional to join a team of similarly committed and very effective individuals as the Public Works Director. This is a unique opportunity to create and implement more effective work practices, and have a meaningful impact on a community. The City is embarking on several major projects over the next few years that will have a lasting impact and provide opportunities for professional growth, including: water/wastewater rate study implementation, wastewater treatment and reclamation plant upgrades, York Creek Ecosystem Restoration, local sales tax funded street rehabilitation, seismic evaluations of two dams, user fee study, and a development impact fee update.

William Avery & Associates Management Consultants 31/2 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Suite A Los Gatos, CA 95030 408.399.4424 Fax: 408.399.4423 email: jobs@averyassoc.net www.averyassoc.net

The ideal background for the new City Manager is a strong administrative and management experience base as a seasoned public sector executive. At least eight years of progressively responsible management experience as a City Manager, Assistant/Deputy City Manager or public sector executive in a complex organization is required for this position. A BA/BS in a related field is required and Master’s degree is desirable. For more details, please see the formal job announcement, which includes salary and benefits details and final filing date at www.averyassoc.net/current-searches/.

Deputy City Manager

City of Half Moon Bay, CA

H

ome to a population of 11,500, the City of Half Moon Bay is located 25 miles south of San Francisco and operates under a Council-Manager form of government. Considered a rural coastal community, Half Moon Bay is also a popular tourist destination with its breathtaking ocean views, world-class hotels and quaint cottages. Incredible recreational opportunities and rich agriculture appeal to many different lifestyles to those who value Half Moon Bay’s enduring beauty. Reporting to the City Manager, the Deputy City Manager will be a strong local government generalist with impressive policy experience and interests. A self-directed and resourceful professional, the ideal candidate will be a highly engaged and results oriented manager. He/ she will be an outstanding written and verbal communicator who is well-versed in community and stakeholder relations. Five years of experience in local government, including two years of supervisory experience, and a Bachelor’s degree are required. A Master’s degree is preferred. The salary range for this position goes up to $185,184 and is supplemented by an attractive benefits package. Closing date: Sunday, March 26, 2017. To download recruitment brochure and apply online, visit www.tbcrecruiting.com. Teri Black • 424.296.3111 Julie Yuan-Miu • 925.820.8436

For a detailed brochure and to apply online, visit www.cityofsthelena.org/ PublicWorksDirector.

Photo/art credits

Confidential inquiries are welcomed to Kathy Robinson, HR/IT Director, krobinson@cityofsthelena.org or phone 707.968.2741.

Page 7: Andy Dean Photography/Shutterstock. com

Page 24: Monkey Business Images/Shutterstock. com

Page 9: Rawpixel.com/Shutterstock.com

Page 29: Jude Hudson, Hudson + Associates

Deadline to apply is March 24, 2017.

18

The City Manager is appointed by, serves at the pleasure of and reports to the City Council and has broad responsibility for the safe, effective and efficient administration of all City departments, programs and activities. The City Manager is expected to provide CITY quality and responsive service to residents will focus on quality of life considerations MANAGER and that are vital to the community. Importantly, the Manager will understand and interact with the community and provide leadership and inspiration to the hardworking and committed City staff.

League of California Cities

Cover: Yvonne Hunter Page 3: photo, Patty Chan/Shutterstock.com; texture, Arigato/Shutterstock.com

Pages 15–16: photos courtesy of the City of Fairfield; texture, Fine Art Studio/Shutterstock.com Pages 20–23: Yvonne Hunter

Pages 10–12: Yvonne Hunter Page 13: sidebar, Yvonne Hunter; George Thomas photo courtesy of the City of Rancho Cordova and Mather Veterans Village

www.cacities.org


Fairfield Reverses Crime and Neglect in Parkway Gardens, continued from page 16

Turning the Community Around Over a period of two years, with the city’s support and a Community Development Block Grant investment of $104,000, Parkway Gardens made enormous improvements in the physical property and the quality of the residents’ lives. Residents and owners applauded the substantial, positive changes to their physical surroundings, the reductions in nonresident traffic and timely property repairs. The community pool, which had been a hub for spirited gatherings and fun before conditions at the complex declined, reopened in summer 2015, and Parkway Gardens collaborated with a community-based organization to launch an after-school program in the complex’s community room. “I honor the homeowners who had the courage and tenacity to work with the city on rebuilding the entire structure of their homeowners group to bring back law and order and recreate a vibrant community,” says Laura Snideman, assistant city manager of Fairfield. “This was not glamourous work!” A stable HOA board of directors and a responsive property manager now operate Parkway Gardens and hold owners accountable for managing their units responsibly. If standards remain unmet, owners are fined. The HOA has authority to evict renters if they repeatedly ignore the rules of the complex. Fairfield Chief of Police Joe Allio says, “What happened and continues to happen at Parkway Gardens is a noteworthy example of community-oriented policing.” Property values in Parkway Gardens nearly doubled in one year, compared with the community average increase of 10 percent. Calls for police services have declined by 35 percent, and serious crime has decreased by 80 percent, compared with citywide serious crime that is down by 10 percent. The positive changes at Parkway Gardens have drastically reduced the complex’s former drain on city resources.

www.westerncity.com

As one homeowner says, “Children are playing outside again at Parkway Gardens.”

“With our collective focus on the quality of life for all, these transformative actions helped us forge a route to ensuring a safe, livable community,” says Dawn La Bar, a member of Fairfield’s Quality of Life Task Force.

J

O

B

O

P

P

O

Contact: Gale D. Spears, communications manager, Fairfield City Manager’s Office; phone: (707) 428-7611; email: GSpears@ fairfield.ca.gov. ■

R

T

U

N

I

T

I

E S

Director of Cyber Security City of Los Angeles, Department of Water and Power The Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP), the largest municipal water and power utility in the nation, is now seeking a Director of Cyber Security. The Director of Cyber Security position is new to the Department of Water and Power. Under the direction of an executive manager, the Director of Cyber Security will be responsible for the design and implementation of a multi-year, enterprise-wide cyber security strategy. Minimum qualifications for this position include a Bachelor’s Degree from a recognized four-year college or university in Cyber Security, Computer Science, Information Systems, Electrical Engineering, or a related technological field; CISSP Certification; and 5 years of full-time paid experience working on cyber security development, implementation, or auditing within a regulated industry (preferably electric or water utility). A Master’s Degree in Business Administration is preferred, and CISA, CPP, ICS-CERT, GCIH-GIAC, GAWN, PCI QSA, PSP, or other related professional security certifications are desired. Salary range $187,000 – $233,000 annually, DOQ. If you are interested in this outstanding opportunity, please apply online at www.bobmurrayassoc.com. Please contact Mr. Gary Phillips at (916) 784-9080 should you have any questions. Brochure available. Closing date is March 17, 2017. phone 916•784•9080 fax 916•784•1985 www.bobmurrayassoc.com

Current Planning Manager City of Mountain View, CA

C

onveniently located in the center of Silicon Valley, the City of Mountain View (pop. 76,260) is nestled between the Santa Cruz Mountains and San Francisco Bay just 10 miles north of San Jose and 35 miles south of San Francisco. A strong tech presence and robust economy, superior public services and facilities, and a commitment to strong neighborhoods and citizen involvement all make Mountain View an ideal place to call home. The City is recruiting for a Current Planning Manager to oversee a division of approximately 10, tasked to review all development projects, implement the City Zoning Ordinance and General Plan, and conduct public hearings. Reporting to the Community Development Director, this manager will be an outstanding communicator, who is innovative, persuasive and collaborative. He/she will exhibit leadership and fortitude in maintaining the City’s high standards and quality of life. A Bachelor’s degree in urban/regional planning or closely related field and five years experience are required. Salary is up to $148,755, with an attractive benefits package that includes 2.7% @ 55 CalPERS for Classic Members. Closing date: Sunday, March 12, 2017. Brochure available at www.tbcrecruiting.com. Julie Yuan-Miu • 925.820.8436 Teri Black • 424.296.3111

Western City, March 2017

19


Mather Veterans Village: A Place to Call Home, continued from page 13

“I had been living in my car. One weekend I found myself praying to God, asking him to please help me. That Monday, I got the phone call that I could move into Mather Veterans Village,” says George.

didn’t know if he’d be alive the next day or where his next meal was coming from. But he had a family who loved him and 11 grandchildren he wanted to see grow up, so he decided to make a change.

Keeping a Promise to Veterans

George reached out to Veterans Resource Centers of America (VRC), the codeveloper and master service provider for Mather Veterans Village, to ask for help. VRC provides a spectrum of supportive services at the village, including counseling, job training, medical assistance, group and individual therapy and a healing environment. They placed George on the waiting list for Mather Veterans Village.

George served in the U.S. Army from 1979–86 as a field radio repairman and earned the rank of sergeant. Six years ago, his father — who was his best friend — passed away. Beset by grief, George turned to drugs to stop the pain. He became addicted and then homeless. Living on the streets was hard. George J

O

B

O

P

P

O

R

T

U

N

I

T

I

E

S

HUMAN RESOURCES/RISK MANAGER Salary: DOQ. Current salary under review: $8,215–$11,009/mo. Plus the City offers a competitive benefits package. Baldwin Park, the hub of the San Gabriel Valley, is located 20 miles east of Los Angeles and is seven square miles. The City is seeking a dedicated professional to plan, manage and direct the programs of the Human Resources Department. Candidate will possess at least five years of progressively responsible personnel and risk management experience, including three years of supervisory experience; Bachelor’s degree in business/public administration; Master’s degree is preferred. For detailed brochure and requirements, visit www.baldwinpark.com Filing deadline: Open Until Filled

Deputy Community Development Director

www.toaks.org •

805.449.2144

Fifty years of achievement have made Thousand Oaks one of the most sought after places to live, work and play in California. The community of 132,000 residents is home to excellent schools, outstanding parks, numerous corporate headquarters, diverse retail opportunities, cultural amenities and over 15,500 acres of open space.

The City is recruiting two Deputy Community Development Directors. One position will direct and manage all planning and development functions from concept to final inspection including the Permit Processing, Planning and Building functions, and will be the Planning Commission Liaison. The other position will direct and manage process improvement initiatives (including e-planning and e-permitting, etc.), the Code Compliance, Open Space, CDBG/Housing, Budget and Administrative Services functions. The position requires at least eight years of responsible community development and planning experience including five years management/supervisory responsibility and a Bachelor’s Degree (Master’s preferred). Salary range $115,862–$173,793. For more information please visit our website: www.toaks.org or contact Sandra Bill at 805-449-2144. Closing Date: March 24, 2017, 5:00 p.m.

20

League of California Cities

“We as Americans made a promise to these brave veterans,” says Marc Deal, executive director of VRC. “We said, ‘Fight our wars, keep the wolves at bay, stand the wall and when your watch is done, we will take care of you.’ Often, we have not kept our part of the bargain, but with Mather Veterans Village and this collaboration, we are. This is the finest

Working Toward a Dream Jerry Bradbury served in the U.S. Army from 1985–90. “After I left the service,” he says, “I went to college and raised a family. After the kids were grown, I moved home to Roseville and went to work as a truck driver.” On a day off work, he took a walk, and two strangers assaulted him. Bradbury fell from a bridge and suffered severe head injuries. “I woke up in the hospital,” says Bradbury, who subsequently received extensive rehabilitation for his injuries. His recovery was a prolonged process. In the years following his assault, he became depressed and started drinking. His daughter urged him to seek help, and he completed a drug and alcohol rehabilitation program in Redding. Bradbury ultimately made a fresh start. “I came back to Sacramento to be closer to my daughter,” he says. “I applied for a slot at Mather Veterans Village. After they approved my application, I moved in and got my dog, Twoface.” The dog has been a catalyst for Bradbury, who is earning a certification as a dog trainer. His face lights up when he describes the program. “My dream is to breed these dogs, train them to be service dogs, and then give them to members of the armed services,” he says. “It’s great that we can have our pets here.” He adds with a smile, “And it’s not just dogs — my neighbors have cats, too!”

www.cacities.org


example of not only keeping a promise but also giving a veteran the best gift you can: hope.”

Over 92,000 veterans live

in the Sacramento region, and

“I am living in my new home in Mather Veterans Village, enrolled in a drug recovery program and applying for a job,” says George. “I have hope for the future.”

the area has the 10th highest

number of homeless veterans of

continued

all California counties.

Finding a Community to Call Home Sheila Austin served in the U.S. Army from 1979–81. For the past several years, finding a place to live has presented a challenge. Sheila and her son stayed for a time in housing provided by members of her church and then at her sister’s house. The Veterans Resource Centers of America helped her secure temporary transitional housing two years ago and connected her with Mather Veterans Village, where she and her 16-year-old son now reside. The many amenities of her new home include a recent bicycle giveaway called “Freedom Wheels.” The Cameron Park Rotary Club and Folsom Moose Lodge gathered discarded bikes, which were repaired and refurbished by individuals in the prerelease program at Folsom Prison. Residents at Mather Veterans Village received 20 of these bikes in November 2016. “It was great!” says Austin. “We each got to pick one.” Austin describes life at Mather Veterans Village. “There is a shuttle to the light rail station and a bus stop right across the street, so my son can catch the bus to school,” she says. “We have cooking classes that are a lot of fun. There are computers for the vets to use and a nice TV to watch. The VA hospital is just across the street, and we have access to a gym.” Perhaps best of all, Austin says, she likes the sense of community here.

www.westerncity.com

J

O

B

O

P

P

O

R

T

U

N

I

T

I

E S

Deputy City Attorney I/II City of Tracy, CA

The City of Tracy is seeking a professional with previous experience working in a fast-paced law office, preferably in municipal government operations. The ideal candidate for this position must be a legal professional, a creative problem solver, and be adaptable to change. A salary range of $105,620–$141,220 Annually includes a generous benefit package. To apply, visit www.ci.tracy.ca.us and complete an application, supplemental questionnaire and submit writing sample representing your legal writing skills. For additional information call Human Resources at (209) 831-6150. EOE

Public Works Director City of Signal Hill, CA

L

ocated just 30 miles south of downtown Los Angeles and four miles from the Pacific Ocean, the City of Signal Hill is home to a residential population of 11,465 and a daytime population of 40,000. The Public Works Department is responsible for Engineering and Project Services, Environmental Programs, Maintenance Operations, Vehicle and Equipment Services, Water Operations, and the City’s Lighting and Landscape Maintenance District. Signal Hill is seeking a strong and engaged leader to serve as its next Public Works Director. The ideal candidate will be a team player who offers impressive engineering and capital improvement project depth. Six years of progressively responsible experience in municipal engineering and public works administration with at least four years of supervisory experience is desirable. A Bachelor’s degree is required. Registration in California as a professional civil engineer is preferred, but not required. Salary range $130,686 - $171,475. Placement within the range DOQE. Salary is supplemented by a generous benefits package. Closing date: Sunday, March 19, 2017. For detailed brochure and to apply online, visit www.tbcrecruiting.com. Teri Black • 424.296.3111 Julie Yuan-Miu • 925.820.8436

Western City, March 2017

21


Mather Veterans Village: A Place to Call Home, continued

Plans for Future Expansion

Over 92,000 veterans live in the Sacramento region, and the area has the 10th highest number of homeless veterans of all California counties. Nevertheless, housing to support the unique needs of veterans who are homeless and have disabilities was virtually non-existent — until now. J

O

B

O

P

P

O

The 50 permanent supportive homes are just the first of three phases planned for Mather Veterans Village. Phase II comprises the supportive services and transitional housing component of the overall project and will include a 46-bed transitional housing program, a comR

T

U

N

I

T

I

E

mercial kitchen and chef and administrative offices. Phase III will consist of an additional 50 permanent homes on the site, which is surrounded by supportive services including education and training, job opportunities and the Mather Veterans Administration Hospital, just a block away. The partners hope to break ground on Phases II and III in 2018.

S

CITY OF EL SEGUNDO El Segundo, a Los Angeles County beach city of almost 17,000, is located on the Santa Monica Bay. There are tree-lined neighborhoods with award winning schools, parks and athletic fields. A wealth of dining and retail experiences are thriving that range from historic Main Street to recently constructed lifestyle shopping centers. The City offers all the natural elements of fun and adventure that you’d expect from a beach city. The Information Systems Director (ISD) is a newly created role that represents an extraordinary opportunity to create and implement a new IT service model for the City. While INFORMATION reporting to the City Manager, the William Avery & Associates ISD will work closely with other city SYSTEMS Management Consultants executives and a Council appointed DIRECTOR Technology Committee in defining, 31/2 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Suite A prioritizing and addressing City information technology needs. The Los Gatos, CA 95030 ISD will also help establish an IT governance model that allows for 408.399.4424 prioritization of key city projects and initiatives. Fax: 408.399.4423 email: jobs@averyassoc.net

The new IS Director will have six or more years of progressively responsible www.averyassoc.net experienced in IT and IS management with at least three of those years as a senior level manager within a complex, full service IT operation. A Bachelor’s degree in Computer Science, Business Information Systems, Business Administration or a related field is required. The salary is up to $173,000 annually, DOQ. To be considered, please submit (email preferred) a letter of interest, resume, salary history and contact information including email addresses for five work-related references to Bill Avery by March 17, 2017. A formal job announcement is available at http://www.averyassoc.net.

Available in March . . .

Police Chief City of Palo Alto

Public Works Director City of Burbank

Police Chief City of Milpitas

Teri Black • 424.296.3111 Julie Yuan-Miu • 925.820.8436 Bradley Wardle • 650.450.3299

22

League of California Cities

www.cacities.org


The modern apartment homes surround a central courtyard, where benches are a popular destination for residents both day and night. It’s not uncommon to see veterans on these benches, either alone or with a service dog, quietly watching the American flag wave in the breeze. At other times, lively conversations, hearty

laughs and encouragement can be heard when residents gather in the courtyard. Whether they are in their homes or in the courtyard, these veterans and their families are now living in a peaceful and safe place, helping each other heal and giving each other hope. ■

J

O

B

O

P

P

O

More Information Online For links to related resources about homelessness in California, read the online version of this article at www.westerncity.com.

R

T

U

N

I

T

I

E S

Police Chief, City of Mesa, Arizona Located in the southeast part of the Phoenix metro area, Mesa is a city of more than 460,000 enjoying the community’s overall quality of life. The City provides the advantages of a thriving metropolis while maintaining a suburban feel. The awardwinning Mesa Police Department partners with community leaders, stakeholders, and citizens in developing solutions to multi-faceted community and quality of life issues. The City is seeking a Police Chief with demonstrated experience in leading and motivating staff and in fostering teamwork, innovation, and creativity in problem solving. A Bachelor’s degree in Criminal Justice, Public or Business Administration, or a related field is required, along with 10+ years of progressively responsible management experience in law enforcement at the rank of Police Lieutenant or higher. A Master’s degree is preferred. A background in investigation and polygraph is highly desired. Candidates must possess current Arizona Peace Officer Standards and Training certification or have the ability to obtain certification within one year of appointment. The salary for the Police Chief is highly competitive, dependent upon education, experience, and qualifications. The salary range for the position is $143,062-$192,546. If you are interested in this outstanding opportunity with the City of Mesa, please apply online at www.bobmurrayassoc.com. Contact Regan Williams at (916) 784-9080 with any questions. Closing date is March 17, 2017. phone 916•784•9080 fax 916•784•1985 www.bobmurrayassoc.com

City Manager, City of Dana Point, CA

Jerry Bradbury, Sheila Austin, Ernesto Hayles and Joe Qualls, all formerly homeless veterans, enjoy the friendly and supportive community provided at Mather Veterans Village.

left to right

www.westerncity.com

Located in southern Orange County, between Los Angeles and San Diego, the City of Dana Point (population 34,000) is characterized by nearly seven miles of prominent coastal bluffs and iconic beaches that have attracted gifted entrepreneurs, 5 star resorts, surfing industry pioneers, watermen, and a host of unique enterprises. The City of Dana Point is now seeking a City Manager. A strong, visionary leader, capable of effectively coordinating the activities of a municipal organization and steering the City towards its potential, and someone who understands and values the needs of the organization, with experience working in small communities will be ideal. At minimum, candidates must possess a Bachelor’s degree from an accredited four-year college or university with major course work in public and business administration, or a closely related field; a Master’s degree in a related field is highly desirable. Candidates must have five years of progressively responsible experience in municipal government with a minimum of 3 years as a city manager or assistant city manager in a larger city. Candidates’ experience must have involved developing and administering organization wide policies and procedures, supervising management level employees, developing and maintaining effective working relationships with outside organizations, and a wide variety of involvement in municipal programs. Candidates must also be comfortable working closely with and under the direction of the City Council. Experience working with the Coastal Commission will be a plus. Possession of, or ability to obtain, a valid California driver’s license is also required. The City offers a highly competitive compensation package which is dependent upon qualifications. If you are interested in this outstanding opportunity, please visit our website at www.bobmurrayassoc.com to apply online. Please contact Mr. Gary Phillips at (916) 784-9080, should you have any questions. Closing date is March 17, 2017.

phone 916•784•9080 fax 916•784•1985 www.bobmurrayassoc.com

Western City, March 2017

23


Funds Coming to Help Chronically Homeless Californians With Mental Illness, continued from page 9

The No Place Like Home program could ultimately fund an estimated 10,000 housing units.

J

O

B

O

P

P

O

R

T

U

N

I

T

I

E

S

City Clerk

City of Long Beach, CA

Funds will be divided into three categories:

T

he City of Long Beach (pop. 462,257) is a diverse urban coastal metropolis just south of Los Angeles. Long Beach is a full-service Charter City governed by nine City Council members elected by district; the Mayor is elected at-large. The Long Beach City Clerk is the local elections official for the city and related districts and is responsible for conducting municipal, college district, and school district elections. Supported by a team of 16.5 FTE, the City Clerk Department also provides legislative and administrative services to the City Council, Mayor, City Manager’s Office, and City departments. The ideal candidate will be a leader known for being on the forefront of the profession and a champion of open and transparent government. He/she will be an outstanding people manager and mentor who thrives in a fast-paced environment. A minimum of six years of relevant administrative and management experience in a comparable city or county along with a Bachelor’s degree are required. CMC certification or progress toward certification is preferred. Salary is open and DOQE; salary supplemented by a competitive benefits package. Closing date: Sunday, March 12, 2017. To download recruitment brochure and apply online, visit www.tbcrecruiting.com.

• Noncompetitive — $200 million; and • Technical assistance — $6.2 million. Although No Place Like Home funds will not be available until 2018, in February 2017 HCD released the NOFA for the $6.2 million in technical assistance. These funds will help counties — and the cities and developers they partner with — start developing their programming.

The current year will provide an opportunity for public agencies to prepare their plans for using the funds that will be distributed starting in 2018. Though counties will be administering the programs, many will be delivered in cities, and it is imperative that local agencies collaborate on these efforts.

Police Chief City of Santa Cruz, CA The City of Santa Cruz is a seaside community located 75 miles south of San Francisco and adjacent to the Monterey Bay, with a population of 64,632. The Police Chief will be an active member of the City Manager’s management team. The successful candidate must possess a Bachelor’s degree with major course work in criminal justice, police science, public administration, or a related field and have ten years of recent, progressively responsible municipal police service experience, including five years at the command level. Current or prior California law enforcement experience is highly desirable. A master’s degree is preferred. The salary for the Police Chief position is $158,900 to $202,860 annually, depending upon experience and qualifications. If you are interested in this outstanding opportunity with the City of Santa Cruz, please apply online at www.bobmurrayassoc.com. Contact Regan Williams at (916) 784-9080 with any questions. Closing date is April 14, 2017. phone 916•784•9080 fax 916•784•1985 www.bobmurrayassoc.com

League of California Cities

• Competitive — $1.8 billion;

What Cities Can Do Now

Teri Black • 424.296.3111 Julie Yuan-Miu • 925.820.8436

24

research and stakeholder outreach in fall 2016, established its advisory committees and released the draft framework in January 2017; feedback will be used to draft program guidelines this spring. HCD expects guidelines to be completed this summer along with the Notice of Funding Availability (NOFA), which will be released in early 2018. The guidelines and NOFA will include a comprehensive description of the program, its target populations and the mechanics of how a county — or a county in conjunction with a city or developer — can apply for funding.

HCD encourages city officials to connect with their county housing and behavioral health counterparts to develop a strategy on how they can work together effectively to access the No Place Like Home Funds in 2018. When HCD releases the draft guidelines in spring 2017, cities should review them and provide comments that will be used to shape the final program guidelines. In the meantime, the technical assistance grants are available. Cities should check with their county counterparts about applying for these funds and how they will use them. continued on page 26

www.cacities.org


PeckhamMcKenney &

Presents Outstanding Career Opportunities

City Manager City of Gustine, CA

Gustine is located 29 miles west of Merced in the fertile San Joaquin Valley and is home to 5,756 residents who take pride in its hometown atmosphere and strong sense of community. The City is a General Law city and operates under the Council/Manager form of government. The City has 25 employees and the budget for FY 2016-17 is $1.9 million. The new City Manager must possess outstanding listening and communication skills as well as excellent interpersonal skills. A Bachelor’s Degree strongly preferred, Master’s degree desired along with a minimum of ten years of progressively responsible experience in the planning, organization, coordination and administration of a variety of activities in a local government setting. Salary is dependent upon qualifications and experience with excellent benefits including CalPERS retirement (Classic members 2.5% @ 55); comprehensive health, dental, and vision for employee and dependents with little cost to the employee; 10 paid holidays; 336 hours of annual leave, life insurance, deferred compensation with employer match up to 3%; employee assistance program; and a wellness program. Filing Deadline is March 20, 2017. Contact Phil McKenney.

City Clerk

City of Redwood City, CA

Named among the Top 100 Places to Live, Redwood City has long been known for its diverse and active citizenry, strong neighborhoods and community associations, social involvement, and civic pride. Located in the heart of Silicon Valley, Redwood City is the third largest city in San Mateo County with approximately 83,000 residents, and it serves as the County Seat. Redwood City is recognized regionally as well managed and innovative, strategically driven, and financially stable. Appointed by a professional seven-member City Council, the City Clerk will oversee a total staff of 4 and annual budget of $821,747. The City Clerk will be forward-thinking, innovative and creative; technology savvy; and committed to continuous improvement. Equivalent to a Bachelor’s degree is required; MMC or CMC is strongly desired as well as increasingly responsible experience working with an elected or appointed body. Salary DOQE. Filing deadline is April 3, 2017. Contact Bobbi Peckham.

Upcoming Opportunities Budget Officer — City of Concord, CA Town Manager — Town of Truckee, CA Development Services Engineer — City of Millbrae, CA County Administrative Officer — Santa Cruz County, CA Assistant County Executive Officer — Placer County, CA Deputy Public Works Director, Operations — City of Millbrae, CA Please send your cover letter and resume electronically to:

“All about fit”

Peckham & McKenney

apply@peckhamandmckenney.com

Resumes acknowledged within two business days. Detailed brochures are available at

www.peckhamandmckenney.com (866) 912-1919


Funds Coming to Help Chronically Homeless Californians With Mental Illness, continued from page 24

of Counties (CSAC) formed a joint task force to identify, develop and provide needed education, resources and policy for cities and counties to use in preventing homelessness and assisting and reducing the number of homeless individuals and families in their communities. The joint task force held its initial meetings in September and November 2016, with more scheduled for 2017. This partnership between the League and CSAC underscores the need for cities and counties to work collaboratively to meet the needs of homeless Californians.

HCD’s No Place Like Home web page (www.hcd.ca.gov/grants-funding/activefunding/nplh.shtml) features additional information, announcements and related documents.

Addressing Homelessness Is a League Priority The League made responding to the homelessness crisis a top strategic priority for 2016 and 2017 (see www.cacities. org/priorities). The League convened an informal working group in late 2015 with city staff and elected officials from 19 diverse cities to help the organization craft positions on how state policies can best serve local communities in addressing this crisis.

The League also continues to support legislation that: • Provides increased funding for housing and supportive services; and

R

O

F

E

S

S

I

O

N

A

L

S

E

R V

I

C

William Avery & Associates, Inc. Labor Relations / Executive Search / Human Resources Consulting 31/2 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Suite A Los Gatos, CA 95030 408.399.4424 Fax: 408.399.4423 email: jobs@averyassoc.net www.averyassoc.net

26

League of California Cities

California cities are committed to working with their county, local developers, community groups and other stakeholders to move homeless individuals and families into housing where they can get the help they need to succeed. ■

• Gives local agencies flexibility to work with their county colleagues and other stakeholders to create programs that reflect local priorities.

This work expanded in 2016 when the League and the California State Association

P

Homelessness often results from a variety of factors that include difficult circumstances such as job loss and physical and mental health problems. The Great Recession left more people struggling to make ends meet as jobs disappeared and the housing market collapsed. Though the economic recovery has helped many Californians get back on track, it has been uneven throughout the state, and people are still falling through the cracks.

E

S

D

I

R

E

C

T O

R Y

Bobbi C. Peckham • Phil McKenney

Peckham&McKenney www.peckhamandmckenney.com

Roseville, CA

866.912.1919

www.cacities.org


P

R

O

F

E

S

S

I

O

N

A

L

S

E

R V

I

C

E

S

D

I

R

E

C

T O

R Y

Public Sector Human reSourceS conSulting

n

Koff & Associates

Solving the Human Resources Puzzle for 30 Years

Classification & Compensation Studies Staff and Executive Recruitment Organizational Assessments Performance Management HR Audits and Compliance

(510) 658-5633

www.KoffAssociates.com

Staffing Solutions:

HF&H CONSULTANTS, LLC

Building & Safety Code Enforcement ■ Public Works ■ Planning Dept ■ Executive Recruiting ■ ■

37+ Years of Stability and Service

HELPING LOCAL GOVERNMENT LEADERS

Managing Tomorrow’s Resources Today Providing Consulting Services to Recycling, Solid Waste, Water and Wastewater Management for more than 20 Years

Code Services:

• Planning • Procurement • Management

Plan Check Green Compliance ■ CASp Services ■ Fire-Life Safety ■ ■

• Financial/Rates • AB939 Compliance • Litigation Support

www.hfh-consultants.com Walnut Creek (925) 977-6950

www.vcacode.com | (714) 363-4700

Irvine (949) 251-8628

managementpartners.com Budget Strategies ∙ Service Sharing Organization Analysis ∙ Performance Management Process Improvement ∙ Strategic Planning Executive Recruitment ∙ Facilitation/Team Building

E XPERIENCE , T ALENT , COMMITMENT TO PUBLIC SERVICE San Jose ∙ Orange County ∙ Cincinnati ∙ 408-437-5400

WRITTEN TESTS

Elevate Your ExpectaƟons

Sales and Use Tax Property Tax SoŌware SoluƟons Cannabis Compliance Business Tax AdministraƟon TOT

888.861.0220 I www.hdlcompanies.com 888.861.0220  I   hdlcompanies.com 

www.westerncity.com

Over 70 stock tests available for jobs in public agencies. Toll Free (877) 22-EXAMS exams@donnoe.com www.donnoe.com

Western City, March 2017

27


P

R

O

F

E

S

S

I

O

Still comparing apples to oranges? U.S. Communities delivers cooperative purchasing solutions that can’t be matched.

N

A

L

S

E

R V

I

C

E

S

D

I

R

E

C

T O

R Y

Contact: Allan Crecelius or Sandra Comrie

12707 High Bluff Dr., Ste 200 San Diego, CA 92130 Tel 858.259.3800 fax 858.792.7465 acrecelius@rewardstrategy.com

Exceeding clients’ expectations since 1987.

www.uscommunities.org/lcc

Providing a Complete Range of Services to Cities, Counties and Special Districts

Classification | Compensation Special Surveys | Performance Management

• Management, Leadership & Organizational Assessments • Financial Management, Fee Studies & Fiscal Sustainability • Human Resource Management, Labor Relations & Investigations • Recreation, Parks & Community Services • Police, Fire & Communication System Studies • Public Works & Engineering • Library Operations • Planning, Community & Economic Development • Project Management

675 Hartz Avenue, Suite 300 • Danville, CA 94526 866-774-3222 • www.municipalresourcegroup.com

matrix consulting group 201 SAN ANTONIO Circle, Suite 148 MOUNTAIN VIEW, CA 94040 650.858.0507 • www.matrixcg.net Offices in California, Texas, Illinois, Massachusetts & Washington

Management and operations studies Feasibility studies User fees and cost allocation Police • Fire • Public Works • Utilities Parks & Recreation • Administration Planning & Building

SPECIALISTS IN CLASSIFICATION, JOB EVALUATION AND COMPENSATION

5663 Balboa Ave., #399, San Diego, CA 92111-2705 915 L Street, #C-102, Sacramento, CA 95814 Brentwood Village, 149 S. Barrington Ave., #726, Los Angeles, CA 90049-2950 1-888-522-7772 • www.compensationconsulting.com Offices in various major cities

28

League of California Cities

www.cacities.org


What has been the biggest change in your city in the past 10 years? Read more “On the Record” at www.westerncity.com.

Paul Akinjo Council Member Lathrop

Pat Gacoscos Vice Mayor Union City

Ginna Escobar Council Member Pomona

www.westerncity.com

We weathered the recession and focused on economic development, which is on an upward trend.

A lot of transit-oriented development around the BART station — mixed use with affordable housing so people can live close to work.

Economic development. The industrial zones and work opportunities are booming. And the city is conserving water and energy.

Jeff Gee Council Member Redwood City

Etta Waterfield Council Member Santa Maria

Cheryl Davila Council Member Berkeley

We transformed our downtown into a dynamic area. With the economic recovery, it took off — we have achieved many of our goals in just five years.

The economy. We used to be the No. 1 hub for manufacturing on the Central Coast. Now vineyard agriculture and high tech are driving economic development.

Increased development, homelessness and a lack of affordable housing.

Western City, March 2017

29


March 2017 Western City  

Land Use & Planning Issue

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you