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NEWS // ISSUES

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YOUR CITY You’re All Just Jealous of My Jetpack by Tom Gauld

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RANT//RAVE email: rantrave@westender.com ALL RANTS ARE THE OPINION OF THE INDIVIDUAL AND DO NOT REFLECT THE OPINIONS OF THE WESTENDER. THE EDITOR RESERVES THE RIGHT TO EDIT FOR CLARITY AND BREVITY, SO PLEASE KEEP IT SHORT AND (BITTER)SWEET. FREE SPEECH OR POPULAR RACISM?

Re: “Consider the context of Charlie Hebdo attack”, Rant/ Rave, Jan. 15, 2015. John H. Redekop’s predictable rant about Muslims reminds us how the masses in Hitler’s Germany followed like sheep. His “honouring” of free speech is really just popular racism. So many of the world leaders who are showing solidarity have trampled all over free speech rights. Many have imprisoned journalists for speaking against their government. There is a gross double standard here. Why are slanderous cartoons about orthodox Jews called antisemitic while slanderous cartoons about Muslims fall under free speech? –Anonymous

TRAFFIC LIGHTS ARE NICE, ESPECIALLY WHEN THEY WORK

Rave: Traffic lights were installed at the corner of Thurlow and Barclay! Rant: It has been months now since the lights were installed but they have yet to become operational. In the current state, drivers and pedestrians seem to be having a hard time determining just what to do at the intersection. In short, someone is going to get smoked by a car if the city doesn’t get around to turning the damn things on! –Brian

THE BEAUTY AND THE BEAST OF CRAFT BEER

Re: “Shock Top is a very good thing for the craft beer industry”, The Growler, Jan. 15, 2015.

Someone wants to spend millions promoting expanding one’s tastes in beer? Have at it! And I’m not so certain that small batch breweries have a quality advantage. Batch variations are part of the beauty and the beast in the craft beer industry. Furthermore not all craft brews are quality, but there is something there for most every taste. –Martin Williams If mediocre beer like Shock Top gets interest in real craft beer that’s OK with me. I expect most craft brewers will eventually sell out to the multi-nationals and cash in. –Stephen Bonner

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No charges against VPD dog handler in biting case MIKE HOWELL @howellings

The criminal justice branch of the provincial government announced last week that it will not approve charges against a Vancouver police dog handler after his dog bit a suspect badly enough to require surgery. The incident occurred Oct. 7, 2013 after the officer pulled over a suspect wanted for allegedly assaulting his girlfriend and threatening her and a friend with a meat cleaver and knife. The justice branch didn’t provide names in the report or indicate where in the city the assault and arrest occurred. The justice branch report said the suspect was set upon by the officer’s dog after he refused the officer’s command to get on the ground. “The [dog] bit the suspect on the left thigh,” the report said. “The suspect lifted the dog and punched its head. The officer struck the suspect on the back of his head, sending him to the ground. The officer got on top of the suspect, who was fighting and resisting arrest. The [dog] bit the suspect’s right arm while the officer grabbed his left arm.” Other officers arrived, causing the suspect to stop resisting arrest. He was handcuffed and transported to hospital, where he underwent surgery to repair

The BC government’s criminal justice branch announced Wednesday that it will not approve charges against a VPD dog handler after his dog bit a suspect badly enough to require surgery. Dan Toulgoet photo damage from the dog bites. He was discharged from hospital eight days after the arrest. The officer told investigators he was aware the suspect earlier told his girlfriend that he was not afraid to die. The officer also knew him as someone violent, an escape risk, prohibited from possessing weapons and recently charged with dangerous driving. The suspect, who is fivefoot-11 and 260 pounds, told investigators there

had been “a little argument” with his girlfriend but no violence. When he was pulled over in his vehicle, he said, the officer’s only command was “don’t move” before releasing the dog to attack him. The suspect said the officer encouraged the dog by saying, “Blood. Get him. Good boy, blood.” (The VPD does not have any dogs named “Blood.”) The Crown said the statements of witnesses and police officers, along with hospital records, were

consistent with the officer in question’s statement and inconsistent with the suspect’s version of events. “A court could reasonably rely on the version of events provided by the officer, and in those circumstances would not convict the officer of any offence,” said the justice branch’s report. “Based on the available evidence, the officer was acting in the lawful execution of his duties and the force he used in deploying [the dog] was justified in the circumstances.”

The suspect was subsequently convicted of two charges of assault with a weapon and one charge of driving while prohibited and sentenced to jail. The justice branch report doesn’t provide details of the sentence. The justice branch reviewed the file after the Independent Investigations Office believed the case could warrant a charge against the officer. Since the investigations office opened in September 2012, it has investigated 32 files where an officer was involved in an incident that resulted in death or serious harm. Twenty-two investigations are complete. Four cases were forwarded to Crown counsel to be reviewed for charges. So far, no charges have been laid. Pivot Legal Society released a report in June 2014 that indicated there were 14.75 police dog bites per 100,000 persons in Vancouver in 2011 compared to 12.73 in Abbotsford, 2.5 in Victoria and 2.34 in West Vancouver. In November 2014, the provincial government announced standards — said to be the first of their kind in Canada — designed to ensure police dog handlers and their dogs continue to further public safety while minimizing bites and injuries. -Story courtesy of Vancouver Courier

HTML500 aims to bring digital literacy to the people ROBERT MANGELSDORF editor@westender.com

It’s the language of the digital age, but for many modern workers, it remains a mystery. Called “code”, it’s the collective term that refers to the wide assortment of programming and markup languages used to design and create the websites, programs, and apps that we interact with every day. Despite its omnipresence in our lives, however, many are intimidated by this new digital language, and remain digitally illiterate. “People have a stigma about what it means to be a programmer and to code,” says Jeremy Shaki, co-founder of the webdevelopment training firm Lighthouse Labs. “We want to open people’s minds to coding and show them what they can create. It’s so easy now to take your thoughts and ideas and turn them into something you can share with the world.” To that end, Lighthouse Labs has partnered with 50

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Vancouver-based high-tech firms to create a free oneday training seminar to help make Canadians digitally literate. Called HTML500, the one-day bootcamp teaches participants the ins and outs of HTML (HyperText Markup Language), otherwise known as the language of the Internet. By the end of the day, participants will be able to design their own web landing page, and will have rubbed elbows with close to 100 industry professionals who will be volunteering their time as mentors. Shaki says the aim of HTML500 is to inspire the public by showing all the amazing opportunities created by code, as well as offering free access to introductory tech education. “In its most basic form, digital literacy is the ability to read and understand digital technology,” he explains. “Coding is one form of digital literacy, and HTML is one of the most basic forms of coding knowledge.”

Lighthouse Labs co-founder Jeremy Shaki want to make Canadians digital literate by teaching them basic HTML coding, for free. Contributed photo No prior coding experience or knowledge is necessary, and it’s never to late to learn how, Shaki insists. “We have people in their

60s participating,” he says. “It’s never too late.” • HTML500 starts its cross-Canada tour this Saturday in Vancouver at

the Rocky Mountaineer Station (1755 Cottrell) Register (for free!) at TheHTML500.com

City of Vancouver loses bid to halt CP clearing Arbutus Corridor NAIOBH O’CONNOR @naoibh

The Supreme Court of BC dismissed a bid by the City of Vancouver on Tuesday to halt Canadian Pacific from clearing gardens and other obstructions along Arbutus Corridor. The city filed a civil suit in an effort to halt further construction, demolition and clearing of gardens along the corridor after talks broke down between the two parties about the sale of the land. The city maintains the land is worth $20 million, while CP claims it’s worth $100 million. CP agreed to stop working on the corridor in November until the court reached a decision on the civil suit. Chief Justice Christopher Hinkson ruled in part that, “The city will suffer no irreparable harm if the trains do not run until the required statutory approval is forthcoming. In contrast, CPR will suffer irreparable harm if it is unable to even begin preparations for the resumption of rail use in the Corridor because it is enjoined from any ‘works of construction, reconstruction, deviation, change and alteration to the Marpole Spur’ before statutory approval is obtained for the use of the Corridor for rail purposes.” “We’re very happy to hear that the court dismissed the injunction and it has always been our contention that it is our right-of-way,” said CP spokesman Martin Cej. “So we are going to take a closer look at the decision from the court and over the next few weeks, we’re going to decide on the next course of action and at that time advise all the residents along the corridor of what our plans happen to be.” CP already ripped out about 150 metres of gardens at the south end of the corridor before work was halted. The court decision states that “the gardeners, pedestrians, cyclists, and motor vehicle operators who have been using the corridor have no right to such use.” “That’s definitive and it’s what we have said right from the beginning,” Cej said. Mayor Gregor Robertson told reporters in a postcouncil scrum Tuesday that he was disappointed by the court decision. “It’s disappointing to see that ruling but the city will continue to use all of our tools to ensure the federal government and the regulators address this issue,” Robertson said. -Courtesy of Vancouver Courier

January 22 – 28, 2015 W 5


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Musqueam representative Howard E. Grant stands at the Museum of Vancouver next to a display of words in hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓. The MOV and Musqueam band have partnered with the Museum of Anthropology for a groundbreaking three-part exploration of Musqueam history in Vancouver. Rob Newell photo

, c snaP m, the city before the city e

There is a city beneath Vancouver. An ancient city that supported generations of families with an abundance of resources. Despite this, many view Vancouver as “new” – the result of 150 years of immigration – and know little of this other history. The origins of this city, now lying unseen below the streets of Marpole, date back 4,000 years, and the people who built it have been here even longer. Before time was even measured as such, this seaside nation saw war canoes glide stealthily in and out of the clouds that habitually loom past Point Grey. In 1791, this civilization saw Spaniard and forgotten explorer José María Narváez sail into Burrard Inlet a full year before Captain Vancouver “discovered” it. And not even a century ago, this community saw their ancestors’ bones and belongings exhumed and displayed in museums as evidence of a “mysterious and long-dead” people. They are Musqueam, the First Nations band whose unceded land Vancouver is built upon, and who seek to prove with the upcoming exhibition c sna m , the city before the city, that their identity, language, and way of life are still very much alive. The exhibition, opening simultaneously at the Musqueam Cultural Centre, the Museum of Vancouver, and the Museum of Anthropology, represents a groundbreaking partnership – the first time the Musqueam band has worked with either cultural institution to curate an exhibition.

6 W January 22 – 28, 2015

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KELSEY KLASSEN kelsey@westender.com

But, like the obscured existence of c sna m itself, there is more to this exhibition than meets the eye.

BACK TO THE FUTURE

As curator Viviane Gosselin and marketing officer Myles Constable walk through the Museum of Vancouver into the room that will hold cesna?em, there is a sense of mea culpa in the air. The museum, whose vision statement is “to hold a mirror to the city and lead provocative conversations about its past, present and future” has admittedly omitted a crucial part of Vancouver’s history in its programming until now. Before the exhibition came to fruition, the existing gallery layout literally detoured around the empty space that had been earmarked for Aboriginal history. “There’s a metaphor in there,” says Constable. “Before [the exhibition] was built ... the history galleries bypassed the Aboriginal history, the prehistory of the city. We launched right into the 1900s, waiting for the right moment in time and funding to make this happen.” “It’s like StarWars,” curator Gosselin interjects. “We start the story… “ “Now here’s the prequel,” Constable finishes with a rueful chuckle. In addition to exploring the city’s development from the 1900s onward, the timeline will now connect with the Musqueam village, not just as an “ancient forerunner” to Vancouver, but as a place of continuing importance. With the museum itself indirectly representing the colonial gaze, the exhibition will

also reexamine the museum’s extensive existing collection of artifacts, and the small bone, stone, and shell objects should prompt larger conversations about the connections between indigenous and settler societies, colonialism and Musqueam culture. According to the museum, during the 1920s and 1930s, the Art, Historical and Scientific Association of Vancouver – the MOV’s predecessor – undertook crude excavations, led largely by self-taught archeologist Herman Leisk, at what was known as the Marpole Midden. More than 1,500 items (including personal possessions and human remains), were removed for the museum’s displays, while others were simply discarded. “[c sna m] is the beginning of a new chapter where we envision different terms of engagement, and interactions and understanding,” says Gosselin, “with the understanding that there’s this uncomfortable part of our institutional history, and we take responsibility and then we take action.” As you venture into the exhibition space, now painted a rich red ochre to represent Mother Earth, you see the story of the double-headed serpent, belongings from the village, the controversial cranial studies, and a portrait gallery, before coming to a map of Vancouver, filling an entire wall of the exhibition, that places the village in modern context. “Most people know this area as the Marpole Midden, or Marpole neighbourhood, but there was another name before; it’s not good enough to say Marpole Midden now,” explains Gosselin passionately.

“That was a revelation for me when I was in graduate school, how mapping and naming is part of a control, and taking control. And so for [Musqueam] to regain control by telling us how to name things, and doing their own mapping is a form of empowerment.” The semi-permanent exhibition, which will stay in place for the next five years, ends with a documentary on the 2012 Musqueam vigil, which lasted for 100 days and ultimately protected a large part of the village from being destroyed by a condo development, and addresses the questions of what next, and how to move forward in the larger conversation of reconciliation. “Museums in the 1850s were very much part of the efforts of nation-building – you have a flag, a national anthem, and you have a museum that talks about how great you are, all the colonies you have, and how strong and great your people are in comparison to the others,” says Gosselin. “And so I think that reconciliation has to take place in institutions like this. It’s easy for us to say to Vancouverites that we should all get along with Aboriginals, but we have things in our basement that are part of that uncomfortable history. “And of course, because we don’t want to repeat the pattern of doing without asking, we have to do this together.”

PEOPLE OF THE RIVER GRASS

The Musqueam people have lived in the area known as Vancouver for more than 9,000 years. The name Musqueam itself comes from the aboriginal word for the type of grass that

grew near the river, tying them intrinsically to the landscape in which their society flourished. Descended from the Coast Salish, Musqueam people moved through their traditional territory fishing, hunting, trapping and gathering. They also defended the region from northern invaders, standing guard as lookouts from Point Grey for friend and foe. “If you passed though that grey wall without singing, you were dead,” warns Howard E. Grant from the lounge of the Museum of Vancouver, speaking as a representative of the Musqueam band. Grant is one of the “fortunate children” who did not attend residential school. As result, he maintained a continuous connection with his ancestors and their cultural teachings. “When contact first occurred, there was a sophisticated, complex system of governance in place already, based on values and principles, conduct and etiquette. We never ever had to communicate what was ours,” recalls the 68-year-old. This lack of desire to claim things, combined with a “standoffishness” towards the Europeans, quickly bred discord between the two groups. “As the ships lay in harbour, our people would not come and work,” Grant explains. “Our people were not slaves, and that was slave labour loading the ships. Carrying those heavy logs and whatnot. But other people who came into our area did that. So they said, ‘Are Musqueam arrogant, or are they lazy?’” As result, very little was written about the Musqueam people. Shortly thereafter,

archeologists began discovering “mysterious” remains of villages like c sna m (considered to be one of the most significant sites of ancient culture in Canada, with some archeologists going so far as to compare it to ancient Egyptian civilizations) and failed to make the link to the Musqueam community right in front of them. “A lot of our artifacts were then put on display as if we were a dead society or a dead race or long-gone,” says Grant, “and we said, ‘No. We are still here, we are still alive, we’re vibrant and we’re thriving!’” A population of roughly 1,400 members lives on what is now known as the Musqueam Indian Reserve, located south of Marine Drive near the mouth of the Fraser River. Historically, the band has been involved in a number of precedent-setting Supreme Court legal battles over the past few decades to protect its claims. But this exhibition can possibly be regarded as the high water mark for a series of positive milestones for Musqueam relations in BC. In 2011, Musqueam discovered that a 108-unit condo development was planned for c sna m (declared a National Historic Site in 1933 as one of the largest pre-contact middens in Western Canada), without prior consolation with the band. By 2012, a breaking point in land negotiations was reached, and supporters staged a round-the-clock, 100-day vigil to demand “appropriate respect” for the burial sites. Much like the purchase of the nearby Fraser Arms Hotel in 1991, the Musqueam ultimately were able to buy a two-

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Museum of Vancouver curator Viviane Gosselin shows Larissa Grant behind the scenes of c̓əsnaPəm, the city before the city, launching Jan. 22. Rob Newell photo acre portion, located near the on-ramp to the Arthur Laing Bridge and Marine Drive, to protect the ground beneath it. On the heels of that victory came Idle No More – the largest Canadian social action since the civil rights movement of the ‘60s – and the City of Vancouver’s declaration that 2013 was the Year of Reconciliation. Around the same time, the Tsleil-Waututh, Squamish and Musqueam nations joined forces with environmentalists to protest American oil giant Kinder Morgan’s $5-billion plans to expand its Trans Mountain pipeline, and the province looked to First Nations leadership on tar sands issues. This groundswell engagement continues into 2015 with c sna m. “Because I travel across Canada, I have noticed that people west of the Coastal Mountain Range are moving much more towards how the Aboriginal people think,” explains Grant. “They’re caring for the environment; they’re caring for family; they’re caring for relationships. That’s the phenomenal change that’s happened [here]. Whereas east of the Coastal Mountain Range, they’re still much to do. Aboriginal people are envious across Canada of what’s happening here.” As result of this growing accord, the world is now welcome to visit. Located on the reserve inside the Musqueam Cultural Centre – formerly the Aboriginal Pavilion of the 2010 Vancouver Olympics – you’ll find part two of the exhibition, containing striking examples of pre-contact technology. “What we tried to do in our exhibit is not only educate the outside world,” says Larissa Grant, Howard’s daughter, “but educate our own people about how brilliant our people were and still are.” The exhibition includes structural engineering displays, with blueprints of the various canoes – ceremonial, deep-sea fishing, war – Musqueam designed, and the tools that were used to make them. Other displays will focus on medicine

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and plants, replicating what we think of as pharmacies or doctors or specialists while explaining the science behind healing traditions. “I don’t want to hide things away,” says the younger Grant with a smile. “So many people now – non-Musqueam and non-community members – want to know about us ... If you’re willing to come to me and learn about who I am as a Musqueam person, I want to share that.”

A GATHERING PLACE

Over at the Museum of Anthropology at UBC, participation in c sna m was prompted less by controversy, and more by conversation. MOA is credited as starting the discussion with Musqueam about working together more than 15 years ago. Funding was hard to come by, however, and the idea eventually shifted over to MOV’s camp. In 2010, Susan Roy, a former UBC instructor, published her PhD thesis on how archeology and the colonial way of thinking divorced Musqueam from their village. Roy’s research would go on to be instrumental in creating both museum exhibitions, and, with the timing finally right, MOA rejoined the effort, bringing its cultural anthropology expertise to the forefront. “For us at the museum, the impetus was after the vigil – exploring some of the issues that arose during that time period to do with heritage and conservation in today’s society,” explains Jordan Wilson, Musqueam member and co-curator. “It’s just a very special opportunity, having three exhibits – you can tell a much fuller story. At MOA, this exhibit focuses more on values and oral history.” The entrance to the exhibition is made to feel like a modern longhouse, and inside, you’re quickly surrounded by the teachings of Musqueam elders. A wall of quotes runs the length of the foyer while, opposite that, a gallery installation shows areas of significance

then and now, supplemented by stories about the origins of those places in the Musqueam language that have never been shared publicly before. As you continue through the exhibition, a sense of gathering sweeps you up and delivers you to a dinner table where Musqueam elders are having a conversation. Pre-recorded, you can join them to share in their perspectives, much like a young Howard Grant once did. “We’re still very much an oral culture – it’s storytelling, it’s history, it’s genealogy, couched together as what is commonly referred to in Musqueam culture as teachings. Particularly teachings that one has received since childhood,” explains the 27-year-old Wilson. “My own personal interpretation is that they tell you how to be in the world, and how to act in the world and how to carry yourself.” As Rowley looks around the soon-to-be-completed room, she pauses to reflect on the message the MOA hopes to send with the exhibition. “People who come to Vancouver need to understand that they’re now a part of Musqueam’s history, and they need to learn about that and understand where they are and the place that they have come to be.” “I think all too often there is a narrative with Vancouver that it’s a new city,” adds Wilson, “and for us as the Musqueam community, our very longstanding connection to, and use of, what is now Greater Vancouver has been overlooked. “So one of the things I hope visitors walk away with is an understanding that Vancouver is not a new city. It has been actively occupied and lived in for generations and generations.” W c̓ əsnaPəm, the city before the city opens Jan. 22 at MOV, Jan. 23 at Musqueam, and Jan. 25 at MOA. For further information, visit The CityBeforeTheCity.com.

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January 22 – 28, 2015 W 7


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Lacing up bridal trends

Patty Nayel, owner of Pure Magnolia Gowns, is the organizer of the pop-up Wedding Shoppe on Hastings Street, which runs until Feb. 28. Rob Newell photo NIKI HOPE @nikimhope

From the holidays through until Valentine’s Day is the time when most couples get engaged. Even my 60-something-year-old mother rang in the new year with a wedding proposal, proving that love can show up at any time of life. For the summer nuptials, she’ll most likely wear a modest champagne-coloured dress for her later-in-life second wedding. But for most brides to be, the wedding dress is a time to go all out on a lavish ensemble that will be documented – by high-priced photographers – and referred to for the rest of their lives. Many of those blushing brides will be wearing lace this year, which continues to be a popular pick, mainly

because it offers a sexy feel without being “trashy,” says Patty Nayel, owner of Pure Magnolia Gowns. “They are coming out with very interesting laces; they are a lot more artistic and more modern,” says Nayel. “Like, we aren’t seeing these silly curtain kind of laces that we were used to seeing back in the ‘80s.” Nayel is the organizer of the pop-up Wedding Shoppe on Hastings Street, which runs until Feb. 28. The spacious store has a multitude of gowns, at any given time, with new dresses shuffling in throughout the month. As well, there are bridal accessories, shoes, and displays from other wedding vendours. Nayel’s dresses, made at Pure Magnolia Gowns’ North Vancouver studio, which works with sustainable and organic fabrics, range

in price from $800 to $3,500 – hitting that market between mass-produced dresses made in China and designer dresses. Pure Magnolia also upcycles dresses, using the “good” parts (silk, lace, crinoline, etc.) of old dresses to create a modern gown. “Not a lot of brides use the dress as is,” Nayel explains. “A lot of brides bring in the dress because it’s their mom’s dress and they like the lace on it or they like something about it.” Meanwhile for 2015 bridal trends, Colleen Karavidas from Bisou Bridal – with the eye-catching storefront on West Second Avenue – says off-the-shoulder necklines are one of her favourite looks this season. “These styles are perfect for a classic bride who appreciates a refined and elegant beauty,” she says.

Karavidas also notes the classic beauty of lace never really goes out of style because it is synonymous with bridal. “When most people think of lace, they think of very traditional styles. The truth is that there are so many different styles of lace,” she says. “For example, Alencon lace is very classic, whereas Guipure lace reads quite modern. I think you’re seeing lace everywhere because designers no longer feel limited in the styles of lace that they can use in bridal.” Low-back dresses, with a little extra skin, are also stunners guaranteed to turn heads as she walks down the aisle, explains Karavidas. She also suggests the “Great Gatsby” effect – gowns with long silhouettes that offer romantic and chic glamour for sophisticated brides.

But the top trend at her shop is Boho chic, with relaxed gowns featuring accents of lace and delicate sparkle. “This style is perfect for a fuss-free bride who is a Patty Nayel, owner of Pure Magnolia Gowns and organizer of the pop-up Wedding Shoppe on Hastings, on three mistakes brides to-be make when on the prowl for the “right one.” 1. Don’t shop around to five or six places; it’s too much. Do your research, find the shops that have dresses that you like – in your price point – and go to three. If you are doing more than that, it starts to get confusing; you forget

romantic at heart,” Karavidas says. Email Vancouver fashion news and story ideas to nikihope@shaw.ca. Follow her on Twitter at @nikimhope. W which dresses you like and which you don’t. 2. Bringing too many people is a huge mistake. This isn’t Say Yes to the Dress. Don’t bring in eight people with you. It’s not like you bring a crew of people to buy a car or even your house. You have one other person whose opinion matters, and that’s it. 3. Try on lots of different things; don’t be stuck on one style.

My Digs: Alexis LaBonte Jennifer Scott A Good Chick to Know

@Jennifer_AGCTK

Designer Alexis LaBonte is constantly changing up the style of her Yaletown condo. Rob Newell photo

8 W January 22 – 28, 2015

Being a designer doesn’t kill the common curiosity to see how designers really live. In fact, it might even amp up the insatiable desire to peek into the homes of other industry people and see how they are living, loving and applying all the trends and options available within décor. This month we check in with local talent Alexis LaBonte of Design LaB. Alexis keeps things chic in

her Yaletown condo, a pad she’s called home for the last eight years. The space has seen many transformations (we designers can’t help but continuously redecorate) – but I’m all over what she currently has going on. This condo plays up West Coast warmth in a minimalistic setting, but has been styled with details to fashion a glamourous overall appeal. Clean lines in a monochromatic warm grey palette mixed with a strong art collection establish a creative yet polished space; Alexis has adorned her walls with her own art (both paintings and

photography), pieces that her (artist) mother created and an eclectic mix of Etsy prints. My favourite part of this pad? The dining chairs – a Craigslist find that found new glory with a soft emerald velvet reupholstery facelift. *swoon* What is it: A one-bed-plus-den Yaletown condo. Occupant: Alexis LaBonte, I am the owner of DesignLaB Interiors; design geek; lover of photography, tennis and a good glass of chardonnay.

Continued on next page Westender.com


STYLE // DESIGN

HOME Continued from page 8 Major selling feature: After hunting through every one-bedroom in Vancouver at the time, I walked into perfection. Office space with large windows, a west facing balcony that you could put a barbecue and two chairs on, floor plan that has entertainment on one side, privacy for bed/bath on the other, they do exist! Being steps from the seawall and a couple blocks from Yaletown’s core is very convenient. First thing I changed: I attacked the “builder’s beige” with more accent walls and added new lighting. The colours have changed a few times since I moved in, wallpapers gone up, come down… you get where I’m going. I love a good house project. Feature I brag about: My view and balcony are worthy of bragging rights. I can see the trusses under the Granville Bridge, False Creek and the sunset. Get your camera ready. That one conversation piece: My dining room chairs, my best craigslist find to date. They were Canadianmade, likely from the ‘40s/’50s, which I re-upholstered. They ended up being a bit of a splurge, but I love them. They are the punch of colour in the space. The décor: The revolving door that is an interior designer’s décor, of course! I have pretty contemporary neutral pieces that create a fresh yet comfortable vibe. I love a soft palette with accessory pieces that give it a bit of personality. The story behind the art/antiques/collectibles: I have surrounded myself with accessories pieces from my grandparents and artwork from my Mom, most things I have come with a story. Other art pieces I’ve painted myself as well as photographs I’ve taken in my travels. I’m constantly moving, adding and subtracting things; it’s become sort of a joke amongst my friends.

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Downsides: It’s rare to find a Car2Go in my area, otherwise I really have no complaints! Neighbourhood haunts: Tartine Bread & Pies is a neighborhood favorite, I go home just to get lunch there. I’m really looking forward to the Vancouver House development to bring in more food and beverage options. It’s still the quiet end of False Creek where I am. Compared to your last place: I was living in a rental building in Toronto… I’ll leave it at that. Favourite apartment/house/ condo activity: Hanging out having a glass of wine or cooking/baking, but doing both is preferred. W

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January 22 – 28, 2015 W 9


EAT // DRINK

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DINING OUT

Above: Bar manager Matt van Dinther, general manager Taylor Burnham, chef Scott Swanson and chef Ryan Reed pooled thier efforts to creat Nomad. Top left: Potato and cheddar pierogi with crispy fried onions and dill crème fraîche. Bottom left: The interior of Nomad on Main. Rob Newell photos.

Culinary wanderers call Nomad home Anya Levykh Nosh

@FoodGirlFriday NOMAD

3950 Main St. 604-708-8525 Nomad-Vancouver.com Open Monday-Friday, 5pmmidnight; Saturday-Sunday, 3pm-midnight There’s something romantic about being a nomad, wandering from place to place according to the seasons. At Nomad, the newest addition to the South Main dining scene, that concept is eminently practical, translating into a menu that uses what’s local and seasonal, focusing on partnerships with local growers

Anya Levykh Fresh Sheet

@FoodGirlFriday SCENE // HEARD Aaron Ash, owner of Gorilla Foods, has announced on his website that both locations of his popular raw-vegan café and retail operation have closed. While we’re sad to see him go, vegans should take heart, as Vegan Pudding & Co, a new dessert operation, is taking over the Powell Street location. Chef Mike Robbins, formerly of The Oakwood, will be taking over the former Kitsilano Daily Kitchen

10 W January 22 – 28, 2015

and producers, and offering an exclusively BC-based list of grapes and hops. The quartet of youngbloods behind the dream are a promising bunch. Taylor Burnham, who runs the front of house, obviously contributes business savvy, thanks to a degree from the Sauder School of Business at UBC. I’ve been served by him during his time as manager at Burgoo, and his people skills are equally solid. Matt van Dinther is the other FOH partner, covering the bar program. He’s got excellent cred from his time at The Diamond, Wildebeest and London’s Savoy Hotel. The drinks list felt a little summery for a January menu, but I couldn’t

argue with The Wandering Mule ($9) I had one night. Gin, aperol, kaffir lime and lemongrass syrup, all played nicely with the fresh lemon juice and ginger beer. (By the by, is ginger beer the new hot hooch? It’s been cropping up all over town.) The bourbon-based Witching Hour ($11) was more seasonally apropos and darkly attractive, combining roasted pumpkin and sage syrup, a house walnut tincture and PX sherry. The food is put out by the other two partners, Ryan Reed and Scott Swanson. Reed, who has been named Vancouver Island Chef of the Year, worked under Mark Filatow at Waterfront Wine Bar in Kelowna, and recently won an episode of Chopped

Canada. Swanson is also a Waterfront graduate who went on to work as a private chef before jumping into Nomad. Anyone who worked under Filatow is worth consideration, and there are some standouts on the menu here. Veggie pakoras ($8), with panang cream and cilantro, are soft, fresh and perfectly fried into small, chewy bits. Grilled squid ($12) with chickpeas and guanciale chimichurri is brilliant. Fork-tender chunks of “calamari” with lovely charring is well-matched with the bacon-studded relish. We had it as share plate to start, but I would recommend ordering your own. Sunchoke and wild mushroom soup ($10) with a terragon and beet “es-

sence” (think oil) is earthy, rich and almost too large. Paired with the pakoras, it could be a full meal. Warm apple fritters for dessert ($8) are excellent. A round slice of apple is at the centre of each doughnut, and the morello cherry caramel sauce is a rather nice dip. There are some misses here as well, however. There’s a strong preserving program in place, and a starter of marinated olives and pickled vegetables ($6) is generously sized. The olives are lovely, but the pickle brine is mouth-puckering, making beans, carrots and onions taste indistinguishable from each other. Pork belly ($23) in sweet plum wine is solid, but the garlic mashed potatoes are bland, with almost no garlic

in evidence. Braised lamb ($24) was unctuous and fell apart at the touch of the fork, but the fenugreek ricotta gnocchi were heavy and tasteless. It’s a new operation, so there are bound to be kinks to work out, but overall, Nomad has a promising future in its bright new room. And with such a solid team in place, one hopes that these wanderers have found a permanent home. Find Anya Levykh on Twitter @foodgirlfriday and Facebook.com/FoodGirlFriday. FoodGirlFriday.com W

space along with business partner Jeff Parr to open his first restaurant, AnnaLena. Look for a March opening.

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DRINK // DINE

chef Tyler Dallner will also collaborate with each chef to develop a three-course menu that will be offered for the rest of the month. The first dinner, featuring the Yukon, will be on Feb. 2. Tickets for this event only are $75, with the remaining dinners $125 per person. Tickets include dinner, beverage pairings and gratuities. EdibleCanada.com

Edible Canada is launching the first-ever coast-tocoast dinner series, featuring a different province or territory each month. At the start of each month, a different award-winning Canadian chef will launch the regional focus with a four-course kickoff dinner. Edible Canada

Odd Society Spirits is preparing to barrel their secondannual batch of single malt and is now offering the public private 30-litre casks for $1,500. Last year’s batch sold out and resulted in a waiting list for 2015, so interested buyers should order soon. Offer ends Feb. 9. All casks purchased are

Looking to get away? Parksville is hosting their annual Uncorked Wine and Food Festival Feb. 19-22. Showcasing craft beers and fine wines from around BC, as well as food from local chefs, events include tastings, dinners and galas. ParksvilleUncorked.com

Celebrate sustainability at the Vancouver Aquarium on Feb. 20 at an inaugural event featuring chef Rob Clark of The Fish Counter (and founding member of Ocean Wise), along with Aquarium executive chef Tim Bedford. The Sustainable Table dinner includes six courses featuring Ocean Wise sturgeon, BC spot prawns and Humboldt squid, among other local sustainable ingredients. Tickets $100, with proceeds going toward supporting Vancouver Aquarium’s conservation, research and education programs. VanAqua.org/SustainableTable W

Earnest Ice Cream is expanding, with a second location soon to open at 1829 Quebec, in the former Organic Lives location.

Looking to dine in during Dine Out? L’Epicerie Gourmande on Granville Island is offering a threecourse take away menu for $28 that includes options like veal feuillets, pan-seared wild sockeye salmon in saffron cream, roasted duck leg in shitake sauce and lemon sabayon verrine. LEpicerieGourmande.com The District Brasserie is holding their first-ever Single Awareness Week with $2 off Belgian beers, cocktails and martinis, $50 gift card prizes

The dining journey continues at Secret Location with two weeks of Italian-themed 10-course tasting menus featuring dishes such as charred caprese salad, lemon ash branzino and lobster and tiramisu modern. Dinner, including drink pairings, is

Food: ★★★★★ Service: ★★★★★ Ambiance: ★★★★★ Value: ★★★★★ Overall: ★★★★★

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EAT // DRINK

@WESTENDERVAN

DINING OUT

Warm up with Vancouver’s best soups In some cultures every meal starts with a salad, or bread and butter, but growing up my meals usually started with soup. It wasn’t just any soup, but a well-thought-out soup. It would change according to season and one’s health, and “delicious” wasn’t always a priority. Sometimes it had medicinal qualities – as well as flavours – so maybe that’s why I overlook it on a menu. I know I’m not alone, but soup deserves a second chance! It’s that time of the year when warming up to a meal starts with soup, and over the last couple months I’ve come across some real winners. I wasn’t even on a search for them, but they just came up and each one was more impressive than the next. Here are my five soups to try this season: Award-winning seafood chowder at Forage I got to give it to chef Chris

Sunset corn and chicken soup at Burgoo Okay, so I haven’t had it in a couple years, but it’s a signature at Burgoo and I doubt it will ever come off the menu. This crowd-pleaser is made with corn, free-run chicken, cream for richness, chipotle and cumin for spice and topped with crema fresca and cilantro. Try it with a Burgoo biscuit on the side. Soupe de canard at Chambar They hosted the Dine Out Vancouver media preview kick-off this month and served samples of this soup which is featured on their Dine Out menu. Although I didn’t try the real deal, I was surely teased. I even thought

about it the next morning. This cauliflower soup is made with barbecued duck, cilantro pistou and toasted almonds. More, please! Roasted parsnip vanilla bean soup at Diva at the Met Also featured on their Dine Out Vancouver menu is this sweet and savoury soup made with apple compote, raisin croutons and crispy pork belly. It was a beautiful medley of ingredients and my favourite on the Dine Out menu next to the incredible tiramisu. Lobster bisque en croute at Boulevard It’s new to the menu and not even advertised online yet. It’s such an old school French restaurant menu item, but it’s a classic and chef Alex Chen has really perfected it here. It’s only available on Fridays, so try it before the season ends and it will make you fall in love with lobster bisque all over again. Find out more about Mijune at FollowMeFoodie.com or follow her on Twitter and Instagram @followmefoodie. W

Burgoo’s sunset corn and chicken soup is a surefire way to brighten a cold, winter day. Mijune Pak photo

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January 22 – 28, 2015 W 11


EAT // DRINK

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SCOTCH

When a wine lover cheats Michaela Morris By the Bottle @MichaelaWine

Some would say I have a one-track mind. I think about wine from the time I wake up until I go to bed. I have been known to cheat though. My deviancy leads me to the harder stuff, particularly brown spirits. You’d think I’d gravitate to brandy as it’s distilled from wine, however, my tendency is towards whiskey (or whisky, depending on its country of origin), which is essentially distilled beer. And I don’t even drink beer. Yet once the alcohol and flavours have been concentrated then matured in wood barrels, I’m left weak at the knees. And I love it all; rye, bourbon, Irish and Tennessee whiskey, but most of all, scotch. My ultimate temptation is a single malt scotch. Made from malted barley, single malts are the expression of one single distillery.

Generalizations about single malts are often based on which region in Scotland the distillery is located in. The Lowland is associated with a lighter more delicate style (try Glenkinchie or Auchentoshan). The island of Islay is famous for its peated single malts, dominated by smoky, tarry flavours which come from peat fired kilns used to malt the barley. For some this is heaven, for others it’s akin to licking an ashtray. Lagavulin and Laphroaig are classic examples but I like the balance and complexity of Ardbeg. Yet not all Islay scotch is peated and truly the character of a single malt goes well beyond location. When you get into the regions of Highland and Speyside, there are dozens of distilleries and their single malts range from light and elegant to richer, fruitier and weightier. And some may even have a hint of peat. Single malts start around $50 and increase rapidly. When I can’t afford this, I pick up a blended scotch to satisfy

my craving. Blended scotches combine malts from a number of distilleries and add scotch made from grain other than malted barley. In no way should these be thought of as inferior. The better ones demonstrate that the sum is great than the parts. So in honour of Robbie Burns on Jan. 25, I say: Dear Rabbie, thank you for your beautiful poems and songs but most of all, thanks for giving me a legitimate occasion to indulge in a wee dram. Slàinte!

The Black Grouse • Blended Scotch whisky • $35.95, available at BC Liquor Stores For those who like a peaty character but can’t afford an Islay single malt. The peatiness is well balanced by honey and wood notes. Great value! Gaelic Whisky, Té Bheag Nan Eilean • Blended Scotch whisky • $46.99, available at BC Liquor Stores Rich yet firm with aromas of smoke, caramel, chocolate and orange peel leading to

a spicy finish. Packs tons of personality for the price. Bruichladdich, The Laddie Classic • Islay single malt Scotch whisky • $71.99, available at BC Liquor Stores Proof that not all Islay scotches are peated. Vanilla and dried pear with a smooth elegant mouthfeel and delightful tang of fresh sea air. Glenkinchie, 12 Year Old • Lowland single malt Scotch whisky • $91.99, available at BC Liquor Stores

Classic Lowland. Light and delicate with grass, lemon, hay and pretty meadow flowers. A sophisticated before dinner scotch and my go-to summer malt. Glenfarclas, 17 Year Old • Highland single malt Scotch whisky • $119.99, available at BC Liquor Stores Opulent and complex with raisins, plum pudding, clove and toffee then a smoldering smokiness underneath. Made for cozying up by the fire. W

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EAT // DRINK

SPECIALS FOR JAN. 22-29

CRAFT BEER

BC Craft Beer Guild on the rise of craft culture Stephen Smysnuik The Growler @StephenSmys

The BC Craft Beer Guild hasn’t always had it easy. Founded in 1989 as the Craft Brewers Association, it was marked by false starts, fledgling brands and in-fighting that resulted in the organization disbanded in 2011. But the following year, Don Gordon, director of sales at Northam Beverages, Phillips Brewing’s Matt Phillips and Tree Brewing’s Tod Melnyk saw the wave of craft beer craziness about to take BC over and started the Guild up again. They hired Ken Beattie as executive director, who doubled the membership in two years, and helped establish the BCCBG as a provincial stakeholder and a guiding force in the BC Liberal’s new liquor laws, which are taking effect April 1. I sat down last week with Gordon, Beattie and board member Jim Lister, general manager of Turning Point Brewery, to discuss the BCCBG’s philosophy and plans for 2015. The conversation was long and unwieldy – as tends to happen in a conversation with four people and several pints of beer apiece – so here’s a portion of that interview, edited for brevity. Westender: But what was the catalyst for you guys getting the guild back together? Were you aware of what was about to happen? Don Gordon: I would say 2012 was when everything was coming [together]. I don’t know the order of which breweries started appearing in Vancouver, but that would have been Parallel 49. WE: Is that why you got the Guild back together? You could see this thing coming? DG: Yup. We see trends too. We’re watching trends in the States, and also the beer market and the beer share, you could see the beer market dropping. Beer volume has gone down in the province for the past 10 years. It’s driven by the big guys, by the massive decline in national brands. At the same time that that’s happening, we see an influx in these municipal breweries opening up, and now our business is growing. WE: Do you think that decline [in national beer sales] is independent of the growth of the municipal breweries? Jim Lister: To some degree it is. I think it’s independent

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BC Craft Beer Guild executive director Ken Beattie. because the consumer base changed. The people following those brands, the heavy consumers driving that trend, were aging. WE: And they’re switching to wine? JL: Yup. That was the beginning of a downward trend. That was the start of it. It wasn’t all of it, but that was a big part of it. If you look at the alcohol categories, that was the time right when wine went the other way. WE: So they were drinking Kokanee and Canadian… JL: Right. They hit their 40s and 50s and say, “I’m not drinking a 15-pack of Blue anymore, I’m going to have a bottle of wine.” Ken Beattie: And then the liquor age, 19 and up, those people coming in are not necessarily beer drinkers anymore. They’re hard-liquor drinkers. It was coming from both ends and squeezing and squeezing and squeezing [beer out]. JL: That was right around when the Donnellys got hot. KB: Yes. It was about the romance of the cocktail again. DG: So [beer]’s being attacked from all different angles, and then you get the neighbourhood brewery opening up, and that’s hot. WE: And as this is happening, [the Guild] has not coalesced, or isn’t talking to each other in any way. DG: No. Don’t forget, this surge of new community breweries are opening up because of a culture and a love of beer, not necessarily what the old breweries – what we call the legends – have done, which is to sell six-packs at the liquor store and build a brewery, and sell beer everywhere in the province. These guys are saying, “I want to be part of the community.” It’s almost like an

art gallery or a deli that they put their heart and soul in to, to service their neighbourhood. Why would they want to join a guild to get better tax breaks for packaged beer and a liquor board display? It doesn’t make any sense. But in fact, when they come to meetings and they understand what Ken is all about, and the help that they can give everybody, it’s better for everyone. WE: When you started it up again in 2012, what was the mandate then? DG: [It’s about] the collective voice. If you ask what was the underpinning, the reason for getting this whole thing going again, it was to make sure the message was clear to everybody. Whatever that message was, we had a collective voice. It’s about awareness. And, quite frankly, knowing where we came from. Knowing the BC craft beer background, and where it’s going. JL: Alcohol in Canada is, other than tobacco and now prescription drugs, it’s the most the most regulated industry, probably in North America, but certainly in Canada. It’s good and bad, but because of that, there’s government involvement and huge profit margin pools for big companies and governments. They’ve had a mutual interest in revenue growth. Whether it was brewers or distillers, they all had big government lobbying groups where their guilds were just about government relations. That’s really all they do, because it’s about protecting profit. The guild for craft, while there is an element of that, it’s really about not getting left at the doorstep from the big guys. It’s about having a repository for knowledge and education so they don’t fail. Because if we get 100 breweries open and 60 of them fail, it’s damaging beyond repair for our total industry, and all of us will not succeed through it. We’ve taken a centre-of-knowledge approach, as well as a voice, as well as an advocacy role. KB: It’s kind of two things. We want to add value to the menu for the members, and ask as a resource for the members. It’s kind of the big buckets that everything gets weighed against. W Keep an eye out for The Growler Craft Beer Handbook, coming to a brewery/ bar/liquor store near you ver y soon.You can follow The Growler on Twitter at @TheGrowlerBC.

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ARTS // CULTURE

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WHAT’S ON

ACOUSTIC TOUR SHOWCASE Singer-songwriter Sarah Smith appears with local songwriter Robb Hill and special guest Jiffy from Anything But. 8:30pm at Railway Club. Tickets $10 at the door only.

THEATRE/DANCE THE BACCHAE 2.1 Dennis Gupa directs this adaptation by Charles Mee of the classic play by Euripedes. 7:30pm at Frederic Wood Theatre (UBC). Tickets at TheatreFilm.UBC.ca. Runs until Feb. 7. 27TH ANNUAL MASSACRE Vancouver’s world famous Improv tournament pits exceptional improve groups from around the world against each other in a battle for an inspired by your love. 7:30pm at The Improv Centre (1502 Duranleau, Granville Island). Tickets at Tickets.VTSL. com. Runs until Feb. 15.

ART MAINSTREETERS: TAKING ADVANTAGE, 1972-1982 A coming of age multi-faceted project that looks at a self-identified collective of socially and artistically motivated men and women who took advantage of a new medium (video) and of each other. Runs until March 14.

CHEAP & FUN VANCOUVER INTERNATIONAL BOAT SHOW Western Canada’s premiere boat show returns for the 53rd year with over 250 exhibitors showcasing the best and biggest selection of boats and boating products. 10am-8pm at BC Place and Granville Island. Tickets at MicroSpec.com. Runs until Jan. 25.

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OPERA OPULENZA GALA CONCERT New Vancouver based opera company presents a gala of operatic favourites, including arias and duets by Bizet, Verdi, Puccini, Mozart and more. 7-9pm Pyatt Hall, VSO School of Music. Tickets $25 at the door only.

MUD BAY BLUES BAND An evening of shakin’groovin’movin’ get down R&B the way it used to be made with special guests Bradley McGillivary Band. 9pm at Backstage Lounge. Tickets $10 at the door.

BANJO MASTERS One of a kind concert bringing together two of the most influential bluegrass banjo players, Alan Munde and Bill Evans performing original compositions, fiddle tunes on banjo and traditional bluegrass. 8pm at Anza Club. Tickets $20 at the door only.

THE WOOD BROTHERS Real life Colorado brothers bring their brand of Americana and blues with guests Mandolin Orange. 7pm at The Imperial. Tickets $20 at TicketWeb.ca BROOKE FRASER New Zealand singer-songwriter, electronic musician on tour in support of latest release Brutal Romantic with guests Dark Waves. 7pm at Venue. Tickets at Ticketmaster.ca TINK Chicago up-and-comer rapper/singer aka Trinity Home appears in support of her latest mix tape Winter’s Diary 2. 11pm at Fortune Sound Club. Tickets $18 at TicketWeb.ca

COMEDY GLEN WOOL Cleverly subversive comic whose homespun humour belies a sharp intelligence slowly and quietly hitting the mark on several of the important issues of the day. 7 & 9:30pm at Yuk Yuk’s. Tickets $20 at YukYuks.com IAN BAGG Canadian actor and stand-up comedian, of XM Radio’s The Ian Bagg Show and appearances on Conan, Leno and Ferguson. 8 & 10:30pm at Comedy Mix. Tickets $20 at TheComedyMix.com

THEATRE/DANCE RE-CALCULATING One man show featuring quadriplegic drummer Dave Symington’s personal journey as he navigates his way through identity and relationship struggles, a drum kit his constant companion. 8pm at CBC 700 Studio. Tickets at bpt.me. Runs until Jan. 24. PRIVATE LIVES Divorced couple Elyot and Amanda, each happily remarried, find themselves in adjacent hotel rooms on their respective honeymoons in France and when the two couples meet, the atmosphere begins to crackle. 8pm at Jericho Arts Centre. Tickets at JerichoArtsCentre.com

STEPH CAMERON BC singer-songwriter named one of Canada’s ‘up and coming’ by the Globe and Mail, on tour in support of Sad-Eyed Lonesome Lady with Alberta’s Joe Nolan. 10pm at Railway Club North Stage. Tickets $10 at the door. BEACON BROOKLYN R&B influenced duo appear with special guests Lord Raja and Jade Statues. 9pm at Electric Owl.Tickets $12 at TicketFly.com EL PAPACHANGO Argentinian DJ-producer appears with guests Sweet Anomaly, Amar Solunamar, Unmata, Dahlia Moon, and Calamity Sam. 9pm at Rickshaw Theatre. Tickets $20 at VTixOnline.com HOODED FANG Inexplicable and underrated weirdo garagepunkers play an early show with Reef Shark and MALK. 7:30pm at Biltmore Cabaret. Tickets $10 at the Biltmore, Red Cat, Zulu and TicketRiver.com

COMEDY GLEN WOOL Cleverly subversive comic whose homespun humour belies a sharp intelligence slowly and quietly hitting the mark on several of the important issues of the day. 7 & 9:30pm at Yuk Yuk’s. Tickets $20 at YukYuks.com IAN BAGG Canadian actor and stand-up comedian, of XM Radio’s The Ian Bagg Show and appearances on Conan, Leno and Ferguson. 8 & 10:30pm at Comedy Mix. Tickets $20 at TheComedyMix.com

THEATRE/DANCE ALL THAT FALL After a fifty year ban on stage productions of this Irish radio play, director Trevor Nunn adapts Samuel Beckett’s work in the first ever Canadian production. 8pm at Blackbird Theatre. Tickets at Tickets.TheCultch. com. Final performance.

DEEP PEACE TO YOU The High Spirits Choir performs music from Renaissance madrigals, jazz, gospel, and traditional melodies from around the world. 3:30pm at Unity Church. Tickets $10 at the door.

Les Ballets Trockadero de Monte Carlo, Jan. 24. LES BALLETS TROCKADERO DE MONTE CARLO Back in Vancouver for the first time since 1985, the infamous all male-troupe brings their saucily skewed, loving parodies of beloved classics featuring works by Bach, and interpretations of Paquita and Swan Lake. 8pm at Queen Elizabeth Theatre. Tickets at TicketsTonight.TicketForce.com

ART FAR AWAY SO CLOSE: PART II Three part exhibition series and publication set exploring the idea of bridging distance as a quixotic gesture, and the relationship of this to art making with a focus in Part II on political utterance. Artist talk at 2pm at Access Gallery. Runs until March 7.

CHEAP & FUN LE GRAND CONTINENTAL Community dancers from across Vancouver come together for a massive public line dancing performance, both infectious and joyful, a pleasure and a beauty to behold. 1 & 4pm at Queen Elizabeth Plaza. Free.

EVENTS

celine stubel, andrew mcnee, and martin happer. photo by emily cooper

MAD CADDIES & AGGROLITES Co-headlining for the first time ever are two of North America’s biggest ska/reggae acts with special guests The Bunny Gang. 8pm at The Imperial. Tickets $25 at Highlife, Red Cat, Beatstreet and TicketWeb.ca KITS CLASSICS AND WORLDS BEYOND Cellist Marina Hasselberg, clarinettist Johanna Hauser and pianist Monica Pfau perform chamber music by Beethoven and Gould. 4pm at St. James Hall. Free admission.

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SNAP M , THE CITY BEFORE THE CITY Musqueam First Nation, MOA and MOV partner on a transformative journey to explore ancient landscape and living culture right under Vancouver’s nose in a series of three unified exhibitions. Musqueam Cultural Education Centre and Gallery. Runs until Dec. 30. DOWNTOWN VANCOUVER BRUNCH CRAWL Visit 7+ restaurants throughout downtown as you taste all sorts of dishes using your ‘passport’ as a guide. Participants include some of Vancouver’s finest brunch spots. 10am-2pm at Kingston Taphouse & Grill. Tickets $40 at DineOutVancouver.com

MAYHEM AND WATAIN Pioneers of the Norwegian black-metal scene co-headline with veteran Swedish rockers. 7pm at Rickshaw Theatre. Tickets $32.50 at TicketWeb.ca

COMEDY THE LAUGH GALLERY WITH GRAHAM CLARK Legendary weekly stand up show of East Vancouver’s biggest and brightest comics. 9pm at Havana Theatre. Tickets $5 at Eventbrite.ca

ART PIGA PICHA! Originally conceived and presented in Nairobi in 2009, this North American premiere of the exhibition features a photographic portrayal of societal transformation in Kenya from the 1910’s to the present. 10am-5pm at the Museum of Anthropology. Runs until April 4

CHEAP & FUN VANCOUVER YOUTH POETRY SLAM Featuring 2014’s Youth Slam Grand Champion Sebastien Wen, the evening includes a poetry open mic, and the slam for youth 21 and under. 8pm at Café Deux Soleils. Admission is on a sliding scale from $4-$10.

LGBT2Q+ CAFÉ Women Transforming Cities hosts its 24th Café featuring discussion on municipal issues for LGBT2Q+ individuals. Participants are invited to learn about recent successes as well as identity and strategize solutions to ensure equality. 2-4pm at Trout Lake Community Centre.

Mad Caddies, Jan. 25.

“Officially the funniest show on the planet”

14 W January 22 – 28, 2015

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THE VASELINES Scottish altrockers appear in support of latest effort V for Vaselines with special guest Loch Lomond. 8pm at Rickshaw Theatre. Tickets $20 at TicketWeb.ca

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DARK TRANQUILITY Swedish pioneers of melodic death metal with special guests Insomnium and Dawning of the Inferno. 7pm at Venue. Tickets $25 at Scrape Records and TicketWeb.ca or $30 at the door.

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WHAT’S ON Tu/27

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L.A. WITCH LA rockers on tour to support their self-titled debut EP. 8pm at Electric Owl. Tickets $10 at Red Cat, Zulu, Luke’s General Store and TicketWeb.ca

STRING FLING III Vancouver based string quartet Four on the Floor collaborates with local indie acts for two evenings of classical, jazz, and folk music tied together by strings, featuring Jim Byrnes, Ryan Guldemond, Dustin Bentall, Parker Bossley, Hannah Epperson and more. 7pm at Biltmore Cabaret. Tickets $20/show or $30/ both nights at Red Cat, Zulu and HipCityMusic.ca/tickets. Night 2 on Jan. 29.

BASS DRUM OF DEATH Epic party rockers of Mississippi appear with special guests. 9pm at Fox Cabaret. Tickets $12 at BPLive.ElectroStub.com

COMEDY NOVELTY ACT Because women in comedy are often referred to as a ‘novelty act’, Sara Bynoe and Riel Hahn call bullshit and present a night of whatever they want! 8-10pm at The Emerald. Tickets $8 at EventBrite.com or $10 at the door.

THEATRE/DANCE THE FISH EYES TRILOGY Trio of dance-plays by celebrated actress Anita Majumdar, whose tour-de-force performances celebrate the joy and awkwardness of youth while slyly tackling issues of colonialism and cultural identity. 8pm at Vancouver East Cultural Centre. Tickets at Tickets.TheCultch. com. Runs until Jan. 31 with Parts I, II and III on alternating nights.

CHEAP & FUN OPEN MIC MOVIE NIGHTS 3: WITH A VENGEANCE Third instalment of this regular, curated event where aspiring filmmakers looking to screen their short film, music video or animated work submit it to the silver screen in an inclusive, non-competitive, safe, positive environment. 9pm at Rio Theatre. Tickets $7 advance at RioTheatreTickets.ca or $10 at the door. PUNK ROCK TRIVIA Russian Tim, CiTR 101.9FM’s ‘Rocket From Russia’ hosts this night of random punk trivia with punk rock spinning on vinyl all night long. 8pm at Biltmore Cabaret. Admission by donation.

THE TOASTERS Pioneer New York City ska group takes the stage with guests Devil in the Wood Shack and the Elixxxirs. 8pm at The Hindenburg. Tickets $15 at Red Cat, Highlife and Zulu Records.

THEATRE/DANCE APRES MOI AND THE LIST Captivating double bill of two French Canadian plays translated to English that will take the audience on a very human journey through love, loss, compassion and memory reminding us that by letting others in, if only briefly, our life’s trajectory can be profoundly altered. 8pm at Studio 16 (1555 West 7th). Tickets at BrownPaperTickets.com DARK MATTER A triumph of words, physical performance and imagination, Kate McIntosh takes the weightiest issues – time, space and existence – and turns them into wild, anarchic play. 8pm at SFU Goldcorp Centre for the Arts. Tickets at TicketsTonight.ca. Runs to Jan. 30. ONE MAN, TWO GUVNORS A side-splitting update of the Italian comedy The Servant of Two Masters, this unique blend of satire, songs, slapstick and sparkling wit set in 1963 Brighton sees our hapless hero Francis Henshall juggle two jobs and two bosses. 8pm at Stanley Industrial Alliance Stage. Tickets at ArtsClub.com

KODO ONE EARTH TOUR: MYSTERY Japanese taiko drumming troupe explores ‘mystery’ with its lavish theatrical elements representing a new direction for the ensemble. 8pm at Queen Elizabeth Theatre. Tickets at Banyen Books and NorthernTickets. com

COMEDY PETE JOHANSSON Former Vancouverite, now based in the UK with regular gigs in The Comedy Store, Glee Clubs, Komedia and Highlights. 8:30pm at The Comedy Mix. Tickets $15 at TheComedyMix.com

THEATRE/DANCE 7 IMPORTANT THINGS George Acheson was a rebel with a cause, living through the ‘60s and ‘70s counterculture and scraping through the years that followed. Now he tells his story, about the things worth fighting for. 8pm at SFU Goldcorp Centre for the Arts. Tickets at TicketsTonight.ca. Runs until Jan. 31. LE CARGO A thought provoking reflection on memory, heritage and history, Faustin Linyekula, a spellbinding dancer and storyteller takes us on a journey to his homeland of the Congo. 8pm at Scotiabank Dance Centre. Tickets at TicketsTonight.ca

ART OVERFLOW Carol Prusa’s current work speaks to multiple universes and possibility with the ancient technique of metalpoint drawing in a contemporary practice. 6-9pm at Kostuik Gallery (1070 Homer). Opening reception with artist talk at 7pm; runs until Feb. 22.

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A match made in punk heaven Vancouver’s Jordan Koop earns chance to work under legendary producer Steve Albini LOUISE BURNS @_louiseburns_

In just under a month, Vancouver’s Jordan Koop will be getting on a plane to France. To hang out with Steve Albini. You know, that guy who has recorded The Pixies, Nirvana, and PJ Harvey... Let me explain. Koop is a local stalwart of the Lower Mainland music scene who now runs the beloved Noise Floor Recording Studios. A few months ago, Terry Ondang, his wife and studio partner, suggested he apply for the Mix With The Masters series, a prestigious mentorship program allowing independent recording engineers and producers to work one-onone with some of the top guns in the game. Steve Albini will be hosting a session at La Fabrique studio in France, Feb. 9-15 that will accommodate just 14 people from around the world. Jordan Koop will be one of them. Steve Albini is a Chicagobased recording engineer renowned for his work on American alternative rock. So why France? “It would be much easier (and less expensive) for someone like to me travel [to Chicago],” says Koop of the location. “But the studio and the grounds are pretty incredible. There is a big mansion where we all will stay. It’s a real getaway retreat vibe, and seems really classy since Morrissey makes records there.” For a punk producer from Vancouver, the cost of this experience will be no small chunk of change. Enter Fundrazr, Koop’s crowd-funding campaign to cover his tuition

costs: 3,200 euros, to be exact. “Initially the crowd-funding thing bugged me. [The program] is really just education and I didn’t feel like people should help pay for my education.” says Koop. “But, a couple people started telling me they wanted to help out financially. So we launched [Fundrazr], but with a compilation album for download as a thank-you for anyone who donated.” Spoken like a true producer-for-the-people, a reputation Koop has been building since cutting his teeth at legendary Vancouver spots like Mushroom Studios and The Hive. “I really got started in about 2002/2003, interning at The Hive, which was still operating out of a basement. I bugged this guy Mark Lawson who worked there to try and get my foot in the door,” says Koop of his origin story. “He was also one my teachers at this crappy recording school I went to. He eventually told me to come over and assist Colin [Stewart of The Hive]… Mark moved to Montreal and ended up with a Grammy for the Arcade Fire record.” He is referring to Arcade Fire’s 2011 album The Suburbs, for which won a Grammy for Album of the Year. The allure of his former teacher’s success didn’t phase him. After all, he “started getting into recording when I found a cool scene in Vancouver. Weirdo art punks”. These “weirdo art punks” include Needles//Pins, The Courtneys, Peace, White Poppy, and of course his own band Twin Crystals, who will

REVIEWS // HOLY HUM

Appendix C (independent) The art of ambient music is a tricky one. Anyone with GarageBand and a keyboard can make some cool sounding shit in their bedroom – and good for them – but making something unique and worthwhile is no cakewalk. Appendix C is a single, hour long composition that explores an arc of musical tension and release, making it ideal accompaniment for “exercising, doing drugs, yoga or having sex” (as Holy Hum’s press release suggests). Inspired by the passing of Holy Hum’s Andrew Lee’s father, an opera

16 W January 22 – 28, 2015

singer and choir conductor, there is a nod to classical long-form composition as well as experimental synthetic textures akin to those of Laaraji or Brian Eno. In fact, this track would fit perfectly on to the excellent Light In The Attic new age anthology I Am The Center: Private Issue New Age Music In America 1950-1990. There are moments of sheer cotton candy bliss

Recording engineer Jordan Koop is all business in his Gabriola Island studio, The Noise Floor. Contributed photo be reuniting after a neartwo-year hiatus, in light of the fundraising efforts to get Jordan Koop to France. They are also re-releasing their entire discography at the bargain price of $2 per release. “Jesse [Taylor, of Twin Crystals] uploaded our entire discography. Some of this stuff I haven’t heard in six or seven years. He’s done a great job hyping the show up.” says Koop of their upcoming show. “We will be diving deep into the back catalogue, hopefully. I feel confident that I can finally play some of these old songs properly now that I’m a better drummer.” Does this mean a reunion for Twin Crystals? “Not sure if we will write new music, but I think it’s

in the form of long held synth pads and swirling percussion. A sombre cello waltzes in and out, eventually bringing us to a transcendentally darker place filled with muffled percussion and deeper synth tones. Holy Hum paints a picture for us of travel, transition and change. To capture such a dazzling array of emotions in a singular piece is no small feat. If you’re ready for divine awakening through the art of ambient drone music, consider Appendix C a journey through the centre of the universe. Or, at the very least, good music to chill out to. –Louise Burns Rating: ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

a good possibility. I think there’s maybe a bit better balance in all of our lives to make that possible, even though I’m way over here on this Gulf Island.” Gabriola Island, to be exact, where he runs Noise Floor Studios with his wife Terry Ondang in a 1,000-square foot converted boathouse, entirely designed by the pair. So really, it sounds like Koop’s got it made. But remember, we still need to get him to France, an opportunity that can be looked at as a mutual benefit for Koop and for BC’s thriving music scene. “[I want to] reiterate how awesome it is to be taking part in this program and how thankful I am for all my friends and the strangers who

have donated money to help me take part.” says Koop. Aside from the Twin Crystals reunion show, there has been an outpouring of support from the Gabriola Island community (where neighbours held a bake sale on his behalf), and an additional show in Victoria later this month at the Copper Owl, featuring local bands who all want to see their producer succeed. “To me, Albini is just a punk who made it. I love that he makes albums in a short amount of time, plays in cool bands and seems to have a pretty chill attitude,” says Koop of his soon-to-be-guru. “There aren’t many technical secrets that he is hiding under his hat. He answers questions all the time on the web, but

JESSICA PRATT

On Your Own Love Again (Drag City) Saudade is a Portuguese word that cannot be translated directly into English. In so many words, it is a melancholy feeling of nostalgia for something or someone that is no longer there. Jessica Pratt’s music is the embodiment of this sentiment. California songstress Jessica Pratt arrived in 2012 with her self-titled debut, making tiny ripples in the ocean yet remaining relatively unknown, despite garnering a small-yet-dedicated following. With the arrival of On Your Own Love Again, Pratt has been turning ripples into waves, riding on the cyber-

success of the album’s first single “Back, Baby”, a swinging acoustic ditty. Echoes of Linda Perhacs and tropicalia star Caetano Veloso resonate as she strums her acoustic guitar and sings the melancholy line, “Sometimes I pray for the rain”. Her voice may remind some of fellow freak folk-ette harpist Joanna Newsom, but Pratt’s specific style of intimate, colourful acoustic craftsmanship is far from the

I’m hoping to gain some wisdom on being a studio owner, getting through lean months (which I know he has), life balance, giving up versus not giving up, and of course how to be a better engineer.” Seems like a match made in punk heaven. W For more information visit Fundrazr.com/ campaigns/2uhu7 or TheNoiseFloor.ca The Jordan Koop/ Steve Albini mentorship fundraiser takes place Thursday, Jan. 22 at Pseudonym with Twin Crystals, Lié, Heavy Chains and Group Vision. Tickets $8 a the door.

elfin squeaks of Newsom. “Jacquelyn In The Background” is folk balladry at its best, creating a sombre ode to a friend that sounds both lovely and incredibly sad. “I’ve Got A Feeling” begins with a plucking pattern that opens up into a vocal line doused in dusty rose harmony. Pratt recorded and produced On Your Own Love Again at home, and there are wonderful nuances of white noise and recording buzz that can be heard throughout the record, upping the charm and timeless quality that makes her music so special. She’s who you’ve been missing all along... –Louise Burns Rating: ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

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Occupy the internet Non-traditional journeys for Occupy: The Movie and its Vancouver producer

@Sabrinarmf

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STILL ALICE

Starring Julianne Moore, Alec Baldwin Directed by Richard Glatzer, Wash Westmoreland

Sabrina Furminger Reel People

In September 2011, Andrew Halliwell started to pay close attention to what was going on in New York City. A social movement was taking shape in Zuccotti Park, a stone’s throw away from the impenetrable towers housing some of the most powerful banking entities in the world. That movement would soon be known around the world as Occupy Wall Street, and Halliwell, together with his friend Corey Ogilvie, began to track its emergence, progression, and representation in the mainstream media. “Corey and I both had an affinity with what was going on, and the traditional media wasn’t doing a good job of reporting on it,” says the Vancouver producer and musician over coffee more than three years after the birth of the Occupy Wall Street movement. Ogilvie began releasing five- to seven-minute web videos, intercutting animation segments and raw footage from boots on the ground with mainstream media coverage. One of the videos garnered more than one million views in less than a month. Soon Ogilvie and Halliwell realized they’d out-stepped the scope of web videos and were now in feature film territory – and that it was time to head south and experience the movement for themselves. Halliwell travelled down to New York that November, and was present for the teardown of Zuccotti Park, and the Brooklyn Bridge march; the following spring, Ogilvie and Halliwell returned to the States and began conducting interviews in earnest. The end result of their diligence is Occupy: The Movie. Directed by Ogilvie and produced by Halliwell, the film lays out the history of the corporatocracy: The tangled nest of government and corporate interests whose self-serving and destructive actions in the wake of the global economic slowdown so enraged the Occupiers. The documentary takes audiences deep into the Occupy Wall Street movement, via news bites, original footage, and interviews with notable thinkers like Kalle

REVIEWS //

Producer Andrew Halliwell is turning to the Internet to distribute his latest film, the documentary Occupy: The Movie. Contributed photo Larsen, Noam Chomsky, and Cornell West, and key players within the movement itself. Occupy: The Movie scooped up numerous accolades on the festival circuit, enjoying sold-out screenings at DOXA and Hot Docs and winning the award for Best Documentary World Cinema at the 2013 Phoenix Film Festival. Now, this little-documentary-that-could about a people-driven resistance movement is bypassing traditional distribution streams and offering itself up directly to the people. Self-distribution wasn’t the producers’ first choice. Occupy was on track to be distributed through more traditional avenues when the owner of their UK-based distributor died. “He had a meeting with Netflix on our behalf, and I don’t know what happened with it, because he went into hospital and he passed away,” says Halliwell. “That’s what life hands you sometimes. The universe owes you nothing, and you have to roll with it.” And so, the film is now available for rental and purchase via its website. “I like new media,” says Halliwell. “One thing that film producing taught me is that the traditional system is broken and I don’t want to work in it at all.” Like Occupy, Halliwell too seems to have eschewed a traditional path. Halliwell grew up in smalltown Ontario and moved to Vancouver Island when he was 15. An alumnus of the Canadian College of Performing Arts (where his roommate was Carly Rae Jepsen), Halliwell has tried his hand at numerous skill

sets over the years: musician; actor; composer; computer programmer; producer; web developer; one-time student of astronomy and astrophysics (“I did a year of physics and astronomy, and figured that if I was going to be poor and heady, I would rather be poor and heady as a musician than as a scientist”). Since Occupy: The Movie, Halliwell has composed music for multiple film projects, including Crystal Lowe’s Becoming Sophie, Agam Darshi’s Fade Out, Orsy Szabo and Krista Rand’s Lead and Follow, and Nash: The Movie, about homegrown basketball legend Steve Nash. He also found the time to produce Ben Ratner’s award-winning Down River, which began airing on Movie Central earlier this month. “I think I initially got into producing because I liked the challenge of it,” says Halliwell. “I like strategic thinking and I like planning, and that’s what producing offered to me.” Halliwell walked the red carpet at the 2014 Leo Awards as a double nominee for two very different skill sets: Best Musical Score for Fade Out, and as part of the Down River production team’s nomination for Best Picture (the latter of which took the top prize). For now, at least, Halliwell is focusing on musical composition and performance via his solo music project, Theves, and heralding the online release of Occupy: The Movie. W Occupy: The Movie is available to rent and purchase at OccupyTheMovie.com.

In the hands of a less capable lead actress, Still Alice would amount to a glossy Lifetime movie of the week. Thankfully, Julianne Moore is positively spellbinding in the Oscarworthy role of a linguistics professor struggling with a shocking diagnosis. After she forgets a word while giving a university lecture and gets temporarily lost during a routine campus jog, Dr. Alice Howland (Moore) receives devastating news that she is suffering from earlyonset Alzheimer’s. To make matters worse, the rare condition could potentially be passed on to her three children (Hunter Parrish, Kate Bosworth and Kristen Stewart). As Alice’s downward spiral begins, her family bonds are tested especially when it

BLACKHAT

Starring Chris Hemsworth, Wei Tang, Leehom Wang Directed by Michael Mann For his big-screen debut, Thief, Michael Mann enlisted a convicted safecracker to mentor James Caan and ensure that his star proved convincing as a burglar. Twenty-four years later (and with crime classics like Heat to his credit), Mann remains every bit as committed to verisimilitude when it comes to criminal enterprise, enrolling Chris Hemsworth in computer camp so that he could pass as a hacker in Blackhat. And while the honorary Asgardian now comes equipped with a pretty sweet keystroke, he’s still primarily deployed

TWO DAYS, ONE NIGHT

Starring Marion Cotillard, Fabrizio Rongione Directed by Jean-Pierre Dardenne, Luc Dardenne Marion Cotillard has worked exceptionally hard for her money of late. As an exploited newcomer to 1920s New York in James Gray’s gorgeous The Immigrant, she not only learned Polish but tapped a rich vein of anguish as she endured demeaning trials. Set in contemporary Belgium, Two Days, One Night is likewise a tale about “the things you do to survive.” However, as it’s directed by staunch social-realists Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne (L’Enfant), the film is stripped of any

Juliannne Moore stars in Still Alice.

comes to her husband John (Baldwin), who seems more interested in furthering his own career than with providing long-term care for his ailing wife. Moore is simply sensational in the role and she needs to be in order to elevate the sometimes hackneyed script and weepy, overbearing musical score. The slow decay and creeping intellectual demise of her character is so palpable it’s easy to forgive the film’s slight missteps. There is nothing particularly

unique or stylized about what directors Richard Glatzer and Wash Westmoreland bring to the movie but the acting speaks for itself with a surprisingly poignant performance from Stewart. Still Alice is a difficult journey, mired in loss and utter heartbreak, yet it manages to keep a tiny flame of optimism flickering and helps bring some dignity to the culture surrounding an often misunderstood and terrible disease. -Thor Diakow

as a perpetually brooding action figure posed against the urban backdrops of swirling fluorescent lights that Mann has masterfully composed with cinematographer Stuart Dryburgh. To be clear, screenwriter Morgan Davis Foehl has half-baked a convoluted plot for this cyber-thriller involving an alpha geek (Hemsworth) who’s been sprung from prison and sent globetrotting in order to stop the shadowy hacker who’s employing malware to wreck chaos on both nuclear reactors and stock prices. However, Mann doesn’t demonstrate nearly as much interest in advancing the storyline as he does pushing his aesthetic predilections to almost absurdly abstract extremes. Whereas

standard action fare offers up elaborate set-pieces, Blackhat delivers a succession of arresting images, be it a speedboat cruising through Hong Kong harbour or Hemsworth wading through a torch-lit parade. The result is an assuredly divisive film that will leave most viewers cold, if not outright confounded, while fueling heated post-screening discussion amongst Mann’s devotees concerning his hallmark thematic concerns and singular techniques. And should Blackhat’s abysmal box office spell the end the septuagenarian action auteur’s blockbuster days, at least he’s bowing out on his own idiosyncratic terms. –Curtis Woloschuk

sweeping score or showy cinematography that might easily elicit emotion from a viewer. Instead, the heavylifting is all left to Cotillard. Having just returned from medical leave, Sandra (Cotillard) discovers that her factory coworkers have voted to retain their bonuses rather than keep her on staff. When a friend (Catherine Salée) arranges for a revote, Sandra’s devoted husband (Fabrizio Rongione) encourages her to personally petition each of her colleagues to side with her. And so, she sets off into the suburbs of Liège, spending a weekend desperately trying to convince others of her value while staving off crippling depression. The involving story that

emerges serves as both a harrowing portrait of the ravages of mental illness and clear-eyed account of how financial hardship can spawn solidarity and selfinterest in equal measure. On the latter count, the Dardennes slyly ensure that Sandra’s coworkers’ domestic situations subtly mirror her own. In turn, they illustrate how this leaves them completely sympathetic to her cause, yet often without the sense of security required to go out on a limb for her. In turn, Cotillard delivers a bold performance, refusing to make Sandra easy to like but earning our respect as she painfully drags herself towards empowerment. –Curtis Woloschuk

January 22 – 28, 2015 W 17


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ARTS // CULTURE

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In world where you read most of your favourite magazines in two sentence summaries in your Facebook feed, it might be hard to picture a magazine that came contained in a cardboard box – filled with tangible unbound contents such as pamphlets, posters, records, reels of film and other objects. But that’s exactly what Aspen Magazine – which featured contributors such as Andy Warhol, Willem de Kooning, Ian Hamilton Finlay, David Hockney, Jasper Johns, Allan Kaprow,

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Ed Ruscha, J. G. Ballard, Bill Evans, Philip Glass, the Velvet Underground and Yoko Ono – was, and what the visiting exhibition Aspen Magazine: 1965-1971 at the Charles H. Scott Gallery at Emily Carr has been highlighting since November. As part of the exhibition, the gallery now welcomes Gwen Allen, author of Artists’ Magazines: An Alternative Space for Art (MIT, 2011) for a talk on the subject. On Jan. 22, 6pm at the Emily Carr Lecture Theatre, Allen will discuss Aspen, exploring its function and importance as an alternative exhibition space in the 1960s and ‘70s. She will also

STEPHEN BURKE

explore the history of artists’ magazines, designed in lofts by and for artists, and distributed “not according to the motives of profit, but according to the artistic, social, and political ideals they sought to convey.” We caught up with Allen for a preview of the talk: What was Aspen? Aspen was a groundbreaking multimedia artists’ magazine that functioned as a miniature traveling exhibition space. Why was it groundbreaking?  Aspen was significant because it functioned as a nexus for the 1960s avant-

garde. However it also brought together different generations of artists (featuring, for example, Hans Richter and Marcel Duchamp alongside John Cage and Sol LeWitt). Futhermore it was a site of transatlantic dialogue, featuring artists and writers from Europe and the United States side by side. Finally, it was significant in its intermedia nature – it brought together visual artists alongside writers, dancers, composers, filmmakers, and musicians, mirroring the expanded field of art itself in this time period.

Continued on page 23

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DRIVE

2015 Dodge Journey: Not your mother’s minivan BRENDAN MCALEER @brendan_mcaleer

They say that life is in the journey, not the destination. Well, Dodge might be asking you to take a fairly literal interpretation of that saying with their family-sized crossover, a three-row replacement for the venerable Caravan minivan. That’s right, the Caravan is no more.You’ll still be able to buy a Chrysler Town and Country, but as for the inexpensive van that got all kinds of Canadian families to hockey practice, soccer practice, dance recitals, and piano lessons, sliding doors are on their way out. Minivans as a segment are in a slow decline as more young parents try to avoid looking like their parents. This has inspired the rise of crossovers like these, which aren’t as thirsty as the old body-onframe SUVs which once dominated the road, but still have some of that rugged image. Problem is, they’re usually compromised in one way or another, trying to be both cargo-hauler and still retain a modicum of street cred. So, how does the Journey fare? Let’s wrestle in a couple of car seats and find out.

22 W January 22 – 28, 2015

DESIGN

Swathed in bright red paint and fitted with 19-inch black alloys, the Journey certainly looks tough enough to handle a Canadian winter. That big Dodge crosshair grille has presence, and the curved bar that’s meant to imitate a lightbar/skidplate combo looks ready to ram its way through the nearest snowbank. From other angles, the main impression is one of useful boxiness. That’s great – if the old Caravan didn’t have much to recommend it as a status symbol, it was at the very least extremely practical. The Journey has much better ground clearance, of course, but it’s still got the same squared-off lines, and doesn’t appear over styled at the rear, favouring function over form.

ENVIRONMENT

Inside the cabin, yes indeed, it’s quite roomy. There are three rows of seats here, but the rear is really only a jumpseat for temporary soccer team carpool duty. However, the first two rows have plenty of space for passengers, whether they ride in Gap khakis, or in a rear-facing child seat.

What’s more, there are cubbies aplenty hidden all over the place, more nooks and crannies than you’d find in the Millennium Falcon. The glove box isn’t especially huge, but there’s a bin under the passenger’s seat, and two more under the floorboards on each side in the back. Emergency snacks, backup Lego for long ferry waits, or maybe just a diaper emergency kit? That’s up to you, just be aware you can’t really access them when on the move. Rear seat passengers also have access to a conventional household plug and 12V power outlet, for charging electronic devices. My tester also came with the $1,200 rear video entertainment group, but given that most young kids these days have iPad minis and the like for much less than that, know that there are enough outlets to keep everybody charged and quiet. For the driver, the Journey’s dashboard is a very plain affair, almost completely without ornamentation except for the 8.4-inch Uconnect touchscreen. This controls everything in the car including the heated steering wheel – always a nice touch when

the thermometer starts falling – and is very easy to navigate through. Uconnect’s voice command is better than some other options out there, and its display is large enough not to distract too much from the task at hand.

PERFORMANCE

The Journey comes with two engine options: a 2.4L 4cyl making 173hp and Chrysler/Dodge’s ubiquitous 3.6L V6, which puts out a distinctly healthier 283hp. Allwheel-drive is only available with V6 models, and the base four-cylinder comes mated to a four-speed automatic

transmission – pretty outdated technology. On the other hand, the V6 and AWD tester had more than enough shove for passing and highway onramps, even when loaded up with the entire family and all the cargo needed to spend a few days travelling. The sixspeed automatic is a bit rough in engagement, especially when cold, but the ride and handling are quite good, even on a winding country road. You don’t really hustle a car with a small child strapped in the back, not if you don’t want to end up hosing vomit out of the back seats, so for slow and smooth driving with some kid-

friendly tunes on the stereo, the Journey proves agreeable. Grip from the all-wheel-drive system was perfectly acceptable on slippery roads, and at-speed on the highway, wind-noise wasn’t really an issue. “Nice” can be a bit of an epithet, but apart from a slight tendency to lurch when called upon to shift quickly, the Journey’s unremarkable ride, handling, and performance blended into the background, just what you want in a family vehicle. It didn’t thrill, but neither did anyone complain.

Continued on next page

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DRIVE Continued from page 22 FEATURES

Being a high-level trim in priced in the mid-thirties, my Crossroads tester came with every conceivable feature. Leather seats were heated up

front, there was the aforementioned heated steering wheel, and everyone had a chance to fiddle with the temperature with three-zone automatic climate control. I’d probably give the optional DVD system a miss, but the satellite navigation and backup camera package

PLEASE READ THE FINE PRINT: Offers valid until February 2, 2015. See toyota.ca for complete details on all cash back offers. In the event of any discrepancy or inconsistency between Toyota prices, rates and/or other information contained on toyotabc.ca and that contained on toyota.ca, the latter shall prevail. Errors and omissions excepted. ¥Don’t Pay for 90 Days on Toyota Financial Service Finance Contracts (OAC) on all new 2014 and 2015 Toyota models. Offer valid from January 3 - February 2, 2015. Interest deferment on all finance contracts at no cost for at least 60 days. Interest will commence on the 61st day after the contract date. The first payment will be due 90 days from the contract date. Available with monthly or bi weekly payment frequency. Not available on lease. ¥¥“The Freedom 40 Lease delivers a lower monthly payment by extending standard terms by four months”. As an example, standard term of 36 months can be stretched to 40 months. Freedom 40 Lease offer is valid until February 2, 2015. 2015 Corolla CE 6M Manual BURCEM-A MSRP is $17,540 and includes $1,545 freight and pre-delivery inspection and tire levy. *Lease example: 2015 Corolla CE 6M with a vehicle price of $17,540, includes $1,545 freight/PDI leased at 0.99% over 40 months with $1,599 down payment equals 80 semi-monthly payments of $88 with a total lease obligation of $8,677. Lease 40 mos. based on 60,000 km, excess km charge is $.07. **Finance example: 0.99% finance for 48 months, upon credit approval, available on 2015 Corolla CE 6M Manual BURCEM-A. Applicable taxes are extra. 2015 Camry Sedan LE Automatic BF1FLT-A MSRP is $25,595 and includes $1,745 freight and pre-delivery inspection, tire levy and air conditioning charge. †Lease example: 2015 Camry Sedan LE Automatic BF1FLT-A MSRP is $25,595, includes $1,745 freight/PDI leased at 1.99% over 40 months with $2,695 down payment equals 80 semi-monthly payments of $128 with a total lease obligation of $12,974. Lease 40 mos. based on 60,000 km, excess km charge is $.10. ††Finance example: 1.99% finance for 36 months, upon credit approval, available on 2015 Camry Sedan LE Automatic BF1FLT-A. Applicable taxes are extra. 2015 Tundra 4X4 Dbl Cab SR 4.6L UM5F1T-6A MSRP is $37,420 and includes $1,815 freight and pre-delivery inspection, tire levy, battery levy and air conditioning charge. ‡Lease example: 2015 Tundra 4X4 Dbl Cab SR 4.6L UM5F1T-6A with a vehicle price of $37,420 includes $1,815 freight/PDI leased at 0.99% over 40 months with $4,325 down payment equals 80 semi-monthly payments of $188 with a total lease obligation of $19,402. Lease 40 mos. based on 60,000 km, excess km charge is $.15. ‡‡Finance example: 0.99% finance for 48 months, upon credit approval, available on 2015 Tundra 4X4 Dbl Cab SR 4.6L UM5F1T-6A. Applicable taxes are extra. Applicable taxes are extra. Down payment, first semi-monthly payment and security deposit plus GST and PST on first payment and full down payment are due at lease inception. A security deposit is not required on approval of credit. Non-stackable Cash Back offers may not be combined with Toyota Financial Services (TFS) lease or finance rates. If you would like to lease or finance at standard TFS rates (not the above special rates), then you may be February 2, 2015. Cash incentives include taxes and are applied after taxes have been charged on the full amount of the negotiated price. See toyota.ca for complete details on all cash back offers. ‡‡‡Semi-monthly lease offer available through Toyota Financial Services on approved credit to qualified retail customers on most 24, 28, 36, 40, 48, 52, 60 and 64 month leases of new and demonstrator Toyota vehicles. First semi-monthly payment due at lease inception and next monthly payment due approximately 15 days later and semi-monthly thereafter throughout the term. Toyota Financial Services will waive the final payment. Semi-monthly lease offer can be combined with most other offers excluding the First Payment Free and Encore offers. First Payment Free offer is valid for eligible TFS Lease Renewal customers only. Toyota semi-monthly lease program based on 24 payments per year, on a 40-month lease, equals 80 payments, with the final 80th payment waived by Toyota Financial Services. Not open to employees of Toyota Canada, Toyota Financial Services or TMMC/TMMC Vehicle Purchase Plan. Some conditions apply. See your Toyota dealer for complete details. Visit your Toyota BC Dealer or www.toyotabc.ca for more details. Some conditions apply; offers are time limited and may change without notice. Dealer may lease/sell for less.

Artist magazines through history Continued from page 18 Can you place Aspen in context alongside other pivotal artist magazines in history? It was one of many fascinating and innovative artists’ magazines published in the postwar period. Other boxed and multimedia publications include SMS, Fluxus, and Decollage. These publications were artistically significant in that they reflect the changes in art during this time period – i.e. the trend for artists to work in new and different media. However they also reflect the ideological and political aspirations of these artists to make their work accessible and reach wider audiences. Is there a contemporary example of something similar? Today so many online publications, even mainstream ones such as the New York Times are multimedia, including videos, audio, etc. – in some ways these inherit the notion of a multimedia multimedia platform that Aspen tried to embody. There are also a handful of limited edition artists’ periodicals that utilize a boxed or multimedia format. Something like Visionnaire, while different than Aspen in its luxury format, is one example. There are also online publications, such as Triple Canopy that are thinking about the relationship between traditional print and online multimedia publications in self-reflexive ways. Describe the history of artist magazines – why are they important? Artists’ magazines have been essential for avant-garde movements going back to the early 20th century.They were important vehicles for defining artistic agendas and circulating ideas and manifestos. In the postwar period they became especially important within the context of conceptual art,

Aspen, Vol. 1, no. 3 (December 1965), 2012. Edited by Phillis Johnson, designed by Andy Warhol and David Dalton. which so often depended on textual and/or photographic documentation. They have also been extremely important to various kinds of alternative artistic practices and communities – from the feminist art movement, to performance art, Earth art and video – offering an alterative to mainstream media coverage. What is the state of the genre? Today, a moment of unquestionable crisis and transition for print media – artists are both revisiting and expanding upon these earlier practices, with a renewed interest in the potential of the magazine, even as they reflect upon its transformation by new digital technologies, online communication, and social media. At the same time, artists are returning to the printed page, as we see in the recent proliferation of artists’ periodicals and zines, as well as conferences, fairs, exhibitions, and academic programs devoted to such publishing activities. W • You can hear more from Gwen Allen Jan. 22 at 6pm in the Emily Carr University Theatre (Room SB301).The lecture is in conjunction with the ongoing exhibition Aspen Magazine: 1965–1971 at Emily Carr and is free to attend.

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LIFESTYLES //

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HEALTH

So what’s the deal with organic food? Patty Javier Gomez Whole Nourishment

@WholeNourishBC When someone first hears that I am a holistic nutritionist, a lot of comments follow. Things like, “Yeah, I eat healthy...ate three salads this

up your mind and blow off organics as some sort of “green-washing” trend, you need to understand that there is a big difference between organic and conventionallygrown foods. These are two completely different ways of growing and producing foods and there are a lot of factors to be considered. Now we live in a world full of companies trying to make a buck claiming to be healthier than they actually are, putting words on their product like “natural” or something else written in bold and green with a picture of a mountain of flower to signify it’s “purity”. But a closer look at what the product is actually made of shows otherwise (label reading is a whole different topic in itself; my point is, I get it). You are being misled and lied to every turn you take, so the skepticism of something labelled “organic” is totally valid. To give you a more clear picture of the differences between the two ways of producing food I am answering some of the FAQs that are usually drunkenly thrown my way, ‘cause everyone is an expert at everything after a few shots.

week!”, or “So, do you, like, eat nothing but organic and raw food?” Or my favorite; “Organic foods are bullshit, it’s a total scam.” To which I politely smile while sipping on my glass of organic Pinot Noir. Whether you want to eat organic foods is totally up to you, because free will and all. But before you make

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Is there actually a difference between organic and conventionally-grown foods? Conventional foods are sprayed with chemicals to enhance the growth process. Organic foods are helped along by the use of natural fertilizers, like compost. Another major difference is the use of pesticides on conventionally-grown foods to prevent various types of animals and insects that feed on plants and the potential bacteria that they can bring. Organic farming practices rely on the use of traps, companion planting and other methods to achieve the same results without the residue of pesticides being left on the plant or getting into the water.

Spring Break Cooking Camp March 9-13, 9:30am-1:30pm Kids Aged 8-14 | Cost: $325.00 + GST Choices Annex 604-736-0009 Kids in the Kitchen with Choices’ Nutrition Team & Project CHEF This spring break, keep your kids busy in the kitchen at our interactive cooking camp run by Project CHEF (Cook Healthy Edible Food). It’s the chance for your young ones to learn about healthy food: where it comes from, what it tastes like, how to prepare it and how to enjoy sharing around the table. Fee includes instruction, lunch and snacks, and a recipe book. To register and prepay visit choicesmarkets.com or call the number listed above.

Organic foods are free of chemical fertilizers and pesticides and sustainably farmed. However, higher costs of production and transportation mean a higher price at the grocery store. Thinkstock photo Vitamins and minerals have dramatically declined in our soil due to industrialized farming practices. Traditional farming systems were based on mixed farming that grew several plants in rotation, in order to replenish the soil and help biodiversity. For example, corn depletes the soil of nitrogen. Therefore, in the season following a corn harvest, it would be important to plant beans or peas to replenish the nitrogen deficiency in the soil. These specific plants concentrate nitrogen in their roots, thereby making it available in the soil once again. Now, contrast this with conventional industrial agriculture where the same corn is grown in the same fields year after year. Essentially, the soil is depleted of nitrogen and farmers are forced to replace the loss artificially with chemical fertilizers. The toxins then run into our lakes and rivers and cause all sorts of environmental havoc. Not to mention the pollution caused by machines used to cater to this type of farming.

Why is organic food more expensive? This is a question often asked by the person sporting a $200 haircut that has no problem spending $5 daily for their iced-chai-whatever, but when it comes a carton of eggs that are local, sustainable and organic for $6, they draw the line? Priorities folks, priorities! Organic products tend to be more expensive for a few reasons; no chemicals equals more labour (people need to get paid), higher cost of natural fertilizers, organic certification costs, post-harvest handling, mandatory segregation of organic and conventional produce (especially for processing and transportation), and the list goes on. Now having said that, you don’t need to buy all foods organic. The Environmental Working Group’s Shopper’s Guide to Pesticides has a “Clean 15” list of the 15 types of produce lowest in pesticides. Save your money for the other organic produce and buy the conventional versions of these. W

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24 W January 22 – 28, 2015

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Free Will Astrology The Vajankle may be By Rob Brezsny Is there a patron saint of advertising or a goddess of marketing or a power animal that rules publicity and promotion? If so, I’m going to find out, then pray to them in your behalf. It’s high time for your underappreciated talents and unsung accomplishments to receive more attention. And I am convinced that the astrological moment is ripe for just such a development. Help me out here, Aries. What can you do to get your message out better? What tricks do you have for attracting the interest of those who don’t know yet about your wonders? Polish up your self-presentation, please. During his 67 years of life, Taurus-born Leonardo da Vinci achieved excellence in 12 different fields, from painting to engineering to anatomy. Today he is regarded as among the most brilliant humans who ever lived. “His genius was so rare and universal that it can be said that nature worked a miracle on his behalf,” said one observer. “He towered above all other artists through the strength and the nobility of his talents,” said another. Yet on his death bed, Leonardo confessed, “I have offended God and mankind because my work did not reach the quality it should have.” Typical for a Taurus, he underestimated himself! It’s very important that you not do the same, especially in the coming weeks. The time has come for you to give yourself more of the credit and respect you deserve. Where you have been and what you have done will be of little importance in the coming weeks. Both your mistakes and your triumphs will be irrelevant. In my estimation, you have a sacred duty to spy on the future and reconnoiter the pleasures and challenges that lie ahead. So I suggest you head off toward the frontier with an innocent gleam in your eye and a cheerful hunger for interesting surprises. How’s your Wildness Quotient? If it’s in a slump, pump it up. Will you ever find that treasured memento you misplaced? Is there any chance of reviving a dream you abandoned? You are in a phase when these events are more likely than usual to happen. The same is true about an opportunity that you frittered away or a missing link that you almost tracked down but ultimately failed to secure. If you will ever have any hope of getting another shot at those lost joys, it would be in the coming weeks. For best results, purge the regret and remorse you still feel about the mistakes you think you made once upon a time. In the early 1300s, the people of the Mexica tribe had no homeland. They had wandered for centuries through the northern parts of what we now call Mesoamerica. According to legend, that changed in 1323, when their priests received a vision of an eagle eating a snake while perched at the top of a prickly pear cactus. They declared that this was the location of the tribe’s future power spot. Two years later, the prophecy was fulfilled. On an island in the middle of a lake, scouts spied the eagle, snake, and cactus. And that was where the tribe built the town of Tenochtitlan, which ultimately became the center of an empire. Today that place is called Mexico City. Have you had an equivalent vision, Leo? If you haven’t yet, I bet you will soon. Go in search of it. Be alert. By the end of the 16th century, nutmeg was in high demand throughout Europe. It was valued as a spice, medicine, and preservative. There was only one place in the world where it grew: on the Indonesian island of Run. The proto-capitalists of the Dutch East India Company gained dominion over Run, and enslaved the local population to work on plantations. They fully controlled the global sale of nutmeg, which allowed them to charge exorbitant prices. But ultimately their monopoly collapsed. Here’s one reason why: Pigeons ate nutmeg seeds on Run, then flew to other islands and pooped them out, enabling plants to grow outside of Dutch jurisdiction. I see this story as an apt metaphor for you in the coming months, Virgo. What’s your equivalent of the pigeons? Can you find unlikely allies to help you evade the controlling force that’s limiting your options?

Have you triggered any brilliant breakthroughs lately? Have you made any cathartic departures from the way things have always been done? Have you thought so far outside the box that you can’t even see the box any more? Probably not. The last few weeks have been a time of retrenchment and stabilization for you. But I bet you will start going creatively crazy very soon – and I mean that in the best sense. To ensure maximum health and wellbeing, you simply must authorize your imagination to leap and whirl and dazzle.

The cassava plant produces a starchy root that’s used as food by a half billion people all over the planet. No one can simply cook it up and eat it, though. In its raw state, it contains the poisonous chemical cyanide, which must be removed by careful preparation. An essential first step is to soak it in water for at least 18 hours. I see this process as a metaphor for the work you have ahead of you, Scorpio. A new source of psychological and spiritual sustenance will soon be available, but you will have to purge its toxins before you can use and enjoy it.

Italian composer Gioachino Rossini (1792-1868) didn’t like to work hard, and yet he was also prolific. In fact, his desire to avoid strenuous exertion was an important factor in his abundant output. He got things done fast. His most famous opera, The Barber of Seville, took him just 13 days to finish. Another trick he relied on to reduce his workload was plagiarizing himself. He sometimes recycled passages from his earlier works for use in new compositions. Feeling good was another key element in his approach to discipline. If given a choice, he would tap into his creative energy while lounging in bed or hanging out with his buddies. In the coming weeks, Sagittarius, I recommend you consider strategies like his.

Each hour of every day, the sun offers us more energy than oil, gas, and coal can provide in an entire year. Sadly, much of our star’s generous gift goes to waste. Our civilization isn’t set up to take advantage of the bounty. Is there a comparable dynamic in your personal life, Capricorn? Are you missing out on a flow of raw power and blessings simply because you are ignorant of it or haven’t made the necessary arrangements to gather it? If so, now would be an excellent time to change your ways.

strange, but I’m behind it Sex with Mish Way

@MyszkaWay Two years ago I went to the Adult Video News (AVN) Awards in Las Vegas to write a feature on the porn industry. During that week, I saw a lot of silicone. And not just bouncing off the breast bones of people; the AVN gallery rooms have endless displays of sex toys so unique and wild your brain kind of explodes for a minute. I remember when I walked by porn star James Deen’s booth: he was shoving chicken salad into his mouth as people walked by, then picked up the huge, synthetic penis modeled after his own, played with it then chucked it back on the table. He seemed unfazed. I mean, the salad looked really good. Most “stars” have silicone products modeled after their own genitalia. That’s par for the course in porn star land. I know I would be proud if someone had a mold of mine. It’s not like having great genitalia is an accomplishment (you are born with it, that penis was going to grow to its potential despite your eating habits and knowledge of biochemistry), but it’s still kind of coveted and special. At its core, the AVN silicone displays are pretty vanilla. The wildest thing you

really see involves anything anal and when you think about people like Mr. Hands or specialized scat movies, fucking a fake anus seems normal by comparison. I remember when I interviewed transgender porn star and diaper fetishist Riley Kilo, she explained to me that “a kink is a thrill, but a fetish is a must”. Can you imagine not being able to have an orgasm unless there was a pink elephant hanging from the ceiling or your partner wore a paper bag with only one eye hole cut out?

“A kink is a thrill, but a fetish is a must.”

–Riley Kilo

One of the most common and well-known fetishes is for the foot. How many times have I cruised through Craigslist and found 100 men willing to pay women big bucks to rub their feet? Well, now there’s this new synthetic foot called the Vajankle, made just for those who can’t get enough toes. Designed by a boutique company called Sinthetics (they also make insanely-detailed Real Dolls), the Vajankle is an extremely accurate syn-

thetic foot with a hole in the top. The inside of the hole is designed to mirror the texture and feel of the inside of a vagina. So, if feet make you crazy, then this is the ultimate jerk-off toy. You get to jerk off into a foot! When you order one of these feet (which are NOT cheap), you get to customize the foot to your exact taste even down the color of the nail polish on the toes. And, for those of you who do not desire to fuck the inside of an ankle, then there is the old fashioned synthetic foot model, to which you can do whatever you please. I am completely okay with these sex toys. They open up discussions about sex and create a healthy way for the fetishes to be explored. How many times have I been so hard up for cash I’ve contemplated answering Craigslist foot fetish ads? Too many times, and you’ve probably been there too. Sometimes a severed, silicone foot is better at satisfying a fetish than an ankle that is attached to a person who does not share the sexual need. W

EMAIL MISH Send Mish your own sex questions and queries at sex@westender.com

According to my analysis of the long-term astrological omens, 2015 is the year you can get totally serious about doing what you were born to do. You will be given the chance to slough off all that’s fake and irrelevant and delusory. You will be invited to fully embrace the central purpose of your destiny. If you’re interested in taking up that challenge, I suggest you adopt Oscar Wilde’s motto: “Nothing is serious except passion.” Your primary duty is to associate primarily with people and places and situations that feed your deepest longings.

“Give up all hope for a better past,” writes Emily Fragos in her poem “Art Brut.” That’s generally sound advice. But I think you may be able to find an exception to its truth in the coming weeks. As you work to forgive those who have trespassed against you, and as you revise your interpretations of bygone events, and as you untie knots that have weighed you down and slowed you up for a long time, you just may be able to create a better past. Dare to believe that you can transform the shape and feel of your memories.

Jan. 22: Linda Blair (56) Jan. 23: Django Reinhardt (105) Jan 24: Neil Diamond (74) Jan. 26: Alicia Keyes(34) Jan. 27: Wayne Gretzky (54) Jan. 28: Patton Oswalt (46) Jan. 28: Rick Ross (39)

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WEEKLY SPECIALS Prices Effective January 22 to January 28, 2015.

While quantities last. Not all items available at all stores. We reserve the right to correct printing errors.

100% BC Owned and Operated PRODUCE

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