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Wesleyan School

High School Course Offerings 2013 - 2014


he Wesleyan High School Course Offerings book is designed to provide students with a guide for academic planning. Wesleyan offers an exciting academic program that challenges high school students and demands significant preparation outside of class. As a Christian school of academic excellence, our faculty members provide a college-preparatory curriculum guided by Christian principles. With a diverse set of course offerings, one-to-one tablet laptop computers, and a wireless campus, students have significant resources and opportunities to explore their interests in a wide range of academic disciplines. Wesleyan challenges and nurtures students with the hope of developing responsible citizens prepared to lead and serve in an ever-changing world. Upon entering high school, each new and returning Wesleyan student begins the process of planning for the upcoming year, as well as developing a broader academic plan that will take him or her successfully through to graduation. Grade chairs assist students in making course selections and decisions about extracurricular activities. We encourage parents to contact their child's grade chair, who is your primary resource as you work through the planning process. Grade chairs best understand a student's performance and ability, and can provide the soundest guidance for making decisions. They work closely with each student in developing his or her academic plan while considering the intellectual challenge of each course and the student's overall academic and extracurricular program. Grade chairs and students will discuss student's college aspirations and an appropriate level of rigor for each student's schedule. While an Honors or AP course might seem to help in the college admission process, they place significantly higher demands on students' time, and it is more important that the course be a productive and successful experience for the student. In adapting to Wesleyan's academic rigor, new students often experience an adjustment period where they develop a better understanding of the expectations and learn to better manage their time. They need to be patient and communicate often with their teachers and grade chairs as they adjust to the workload. Please use this Course Offerings book as a resource for your planning. We hope each Wesleyan student enjoys a rewarding high school experience full of opportunities and challenges, and that this Course Offerings book will serve as a one of many resources for our students as they move through their high school career.

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Sean R. Casey High School Principal


Minimum Graduation Requirements (QJOLVK

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All students are required to successfully complete four units of Science in order to meet graduation requirements as set by the Georgia State Board of Regents. Wesleyan will post a high school credit for successful completion of Earth or Physical Science taken in the 8th grade, and the student will then have to successfully complete three additional science units in grades nine through twelve. If a student does not take, or successfully complete Earth or Physical Science in the 8th grade, he / she will have to earn four units of science in grades nine through twelve in order to graduate. â?– These requirements represent the minimum qualifications for graduation. Most Wesleyan students take more than the minimum and are encouraged to do so. The Wesleyan program fulfills the requirements of the College Preparatory Curriculum established by the Board of Regents as standards for admission to Georgia junior colleges, senior colleges and research universities.

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9th Grade Course of Study

Subject

Standard

English World Literature and Total Units Composition Required: 4 Mathematics Algebra I Total Units Algebra II Required: 4 Social Sciences Modern World Total Units History Required: 3 Science Biology Total Units Required: 3 Modern and French I or II Classical Languages Latin I or II Total Units Required: 3 of the Spanish I or II same language Themes of the Old Testament Other Courses (one semester) Required Health and Fitness (one semester)

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Honors

World Literature and Composition Honors Algebra II Honors Modern World History Honors Biology Honors French II Honors Latin II Honors Spanish II Honors


10th Grade Course of Study

Subject

Standard

English American Literature Total Units and Composition Required: 4 Mathematics Algebra II Total Units Geometry Required: 4 Social Sciences United States Total Units History Required: 3 Science Biology Environmental Science Total Units Chemistry Required: 3 Modern and French II or III Classical Languages Latin II or III Required: 3 of the Spanish II or III same language Other Courses The Life of Jesus Required and the Book of Acts (one semester)

Honors

American Literature and Composition Honors Geometry Honors AP United States History Chemistry Honors French III Honors Latin III Honors Spanish III Honors

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11 th Grade Course of Study

Subject

English Total Units Required: 4 Mathematics Total Units Required: 4

British Literature and Composition Geometry Pre-Calculus

Honors

British Literature and Composition Honors Pre-Calculus Honors AP Statistics

Social Sciences Total Units Required: 3

Social Science Electives

AP European History AP United States History

Science Total Units Required: 3

Chemistry Environmental Science Physics Anatomy & Physiology

AP Physics AP Chemistry AP Biology

French III or IV Latin III or IV Spanish III or IV Accelerated French Accelerated Spanish

French IV Honors Latin IV Honors Spanish IV Honors Accelerated French Accelerated Spanish

Modern and Classical Languages Required: 3 of the same language Other Courses Required

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Standard

Bible Electives


12th Grade Course of Study

Subject

Standard

Honors

English Total Units Required: 4

Senior English

AP English Literature

Mathematics Total Units Required: 4

Algebra III Statistics Pre-Calculus Calculus

AP Calculus AB AP Calculus BC AP Statistics

Social Sciences Total Units Required: 3 Science Total Units Required: 3 Modern and Classical Languages Total Units Required: 3 of the same language

Other Courses Required

American Government AP European (one semester) and History Economics AP United States (one semester) History Government Honors Social Science Economics Honors Electives Chemistry AP Physics Physics AP Chemistry Environmental Science AP Biology Anatomy & Physiology AP French Language French IV or V and Culture Latin IV or V Latin IV Honors Spanish IV or Latin V Honors Spanish Seminar Accelerated French AP Spanish Language Accelerated Spanish Accelerated French Accelerated Spanish Bible Electives

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Course Load Students take a minimum of six classes per semester. Ninth and tenth graders will be in study hall when they do not have a class. Eleventh and twelfth graders have a “free period” during this time. Free periods can be taken away from upperclassmen at the grade chairs’ discretion. Classes at Wesleyan will average eighteen per class and must have a minimum of ten students per class to make (excluding core curriculum and advanced placement courses). Drop/Adds Class schedules and teacher assignments are determined on the basis of information provided during registration the previous spring; therefore, students should carefully consider their selections in registering for the following year. There is a defined Drop and Add period in late May prior to the end of the school year during which schedule change requests can be submitted to grade chairs. Not all requests may be granted. All schedule requests are granted or denied at the choosing of the school with numerous factors taken into consideration, including teacher load, class size and balancing the master schedule. Although student choices of electives will be honored to the greatest extent possible, balance in class size and numbers of requests may preclude granting a first choice in all instances. Election and Offices Student Government offices and the post of class representative both require students to have passing grades and to maintain good standards of personal behavior. The decision regarding a student’s eligibility to serve as a class officer, Student Government member, or other student leader ultimately rests with the administration. Eligibility In accordance with the Georgia High School Association regulations, students who do not pass five subjects in a given semester and who fail to meet the following cumulative credit minimums are ineligible for interscholastic competition during the succeeding semester: • 4 credits by the end of ninth grade • 10 credits by the end of tenth grade • 16 credits by the end of eleventh grade Students who become ineligible at the end of the first semester may not participate in any tryouts or spring practices that occur before the end of the school year. Additionally, students who do not meet GHSA eligibility requirements are also precluded from participating in school-sponsored plays and theater productions as well as serving in Student Government. At interim grading periods, the student’s academic record comes under review, and the student may be advised to discontinue his or her extracurricular involvement. 8


A student who fails in the second semester may make up the credit in summer school and be eligible the following fall.  A student may not make up more than two credits in summer school and remain eligible the following semester. Exams The school year is divided into two semesters.  At the end of each semester, students in lower-level courses (as determined by each department) take oneand-one-half hour examinations that account for 20% of their final grade; and students in courses beyond level one take two-hour examinations that account for 25% of their final grade. Students who are ill and cannot take an exam should: ♦ supply a parental note ♦ call the grade chair who will schedule a make-up exam No students may take exams early. Exam Exemption Only seniors may exempt exams. The Wesleyan policy for exemption of senior exams is as follows: 1. Exemptions in year-long courses occur only during the second semester. 2. Exemptions for one-semester courses are at the discretion of the teacher. 3. Students may exempt ONLY with an average of 90 over the course of the two semesters (or a 90 average for a one-semester class). The second semester average must be a minimum of a 90. 4. Students may not have over 5 absences (excused or unexcused) in a course (college visits excepted). All exemptions are at the discretion of each teacher, who will evaluate the performance of the student in both course and behavior. Failures Any grade below 70 is a failure. To receive a passing grade and earn credit in a year-long course, students must: A. earn a two-semester average of 70 and B. have a passing average for the second semester. A student failing more than two courses for the year will be dismissed from Wesleyan.

High school students who have a failure in a one-semester course or in the spring semester for a year-long course as a result of an exam are eligible for a re-exam under the following conditions: 1) Student must have a passing pre-exam average (i.e., 70 or above). 2) Examination grade must be no lower than 50. 3) Student must take the re-exam at a specified time and date. 4) In a year-long course, student must have had a passing average for the first semester.

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 To receive a passing grade for the course, the student must pass the re-examination. The maximum semester grade, based on passing the re-examination, is 70. If the student passes the re-exam, both the exam grade and the semester grade will be recorded as 70. Students who do not receive a passing grade on the re-exam receive their original exam grade and final average. No re-exams will be given at the end of the fall semester. Senior English Students in Senior English must earn a passing grade on the Senior Thesis paper to pass the course. High school students who have a failing grade on the Senior Thesis are eligible for a rewrite of the Senior Thesis under the following conditions: 1) Student must have a passing pre-thesis average (i.e., 70 or above). 2) Senior Thesis grade must be no lower than 50. 3) Student must rewrite the paper by a specified time and date. To receive a passing grade for the course, the student must pass the rewrite of the paper. The maximum semester grade, based on passing the rewrite, is 70. If the student passes the rewrite, both the thesis grade and the semester grade will be recorded as 70. Students who do not receive a passing grade on the rewrite receive their original Senior Thesis grade and final average. Grade Reporting Each semester, grades will be reported as follows: 1st grading period – grades for all students and comments for students whose class average is 75 or below Mid-semester grading period – grades and comments for all students in all subjects 3rd grading period – grades for all students and comments for students whose class average is 75 or below Semester grading period – end-of-semester grades for all students Comments will be written for those classes that the student failed. Grading System

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Letter grading is the most universally used grading scale at both the secondary as well as collegiate level. The use of a weighted letter grading scale (pluses and minuses added to a letter grade) allows for a greater resolution of the grade than an unweighted scale allows. For example, both educators and students know that a significant gap exists between an 80 and an 89; yet an unweighted scale recognizes no such distinction. Both grades are a 3.0. On the other hand, a weighted scale regards the first as a 2.7 and the latter as a 3.3. With a weighted scale, students have a strong motivation to earn the 89 rather than the 80. In addition to the greater resolution, a weighted scale allows Wesleyan to add points to the transcript for successful work in honors and Advanced Placement courses. Homework Teachers assign homework on a regular basis. Students should prioritize and manage their own schedules to allow time for homework to be balanced with personal activities. In planning their schedule, students should allow for adequate time to complete assigned homework. Homework is assigned in various classes according to the following time ranges. Please note that these times reflect the amount of time that most students need to spend on homework in a particular course.

No-Homework Course: No homework on a regular basis – Homework may be assigned occasionally. Light-Homework Course: An average of 10-20 minutes per night Full-Homework Course: An average of 25-35 minutes per night Solid-Homework Course: An average of 45-60 minutes per night Advanced Placement Homework Course: An average of 45-60 minutes per night

Homework Guidelines: Parents may and should be interested in and encourage their child’s efforts; however, homework ultimately represents student effort. (Sharing homework, unless specifically permitted in certain cases of group work by teachers, breaks the Honor Code.) N  o assignments are given over Thanksgiving break, Christmas break, spring break, Easter break, or on other occasions specified by the principal. Honor Roll/ Merit List The following semester grade averages are required for Honor Roll and Merit List distinction: Honor Roll- an average of 90 or above with no failures Merit List- an average of 87 to 89 with no failures *Note: Averages are not rounded up in order to make merit list or honor roll.

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Honors/Advanced Placement Courses Honors courses receive a four-point addition to the final grade at the semester period; AP courses receive eight. These points will be reflected only in the overall semester and cumulative averages on the report cards and the transcript; they will not be reflected on the individual course grades on report cards or the transcript. At the end of the semester, points will be added to averages on honors and AP courses when the student earns a grade of 70 percent or better. Sophomores may take a maximum of one AP course/exam; juniors, a maximum of two AP courses/exams; seniors, a maximum of three AP courses/exams. All students enrolled in an AP course are required to sit for the exam. Office Hours Students are encouraged to attend office hours as needed. This period, Monday through Thursday from 3:00 PM to 3:30 PM, allows time to ask questions, to clarify ideas, to practice or reinforce skills, to make up work or tests missed due to absences, or to pursue a special topic of interest. It is a time of individualized help. Any student having difficulty scheduling extra help should see the grade chair. Schools and Colleges The College Advising Office will respond to any inquiry from colleges regarding disciplinary or honor infractions resulting in out-of-school suspension. After applications are submitted, Wesleyan reserves the right to report any change in academic or behavioral status to colleges. Should a senior be dismissed or withdraw from Wesleyan after applying to colleges, the College Advising Office will give the student one week to notify colleges of the change in status. After one week, the College Advising Office will notify colleges that the student has been dismissed or withdrawn. Course Change Policy Students can choose to drop or add a new course during the scheduled drop/ add period, which occurs at the end of the spring semester. Teacher-initiated drops can happen after the first week of classes with the approval of the department chair, grade chair and principal, but these changes cannot happen after the midterm except in rare instances, usually due to health reasons. Occasionally, teachers or department chairs recommend or consider additional changes later in the term, which usually involve the appropriate placement of students. After ten school days from the start of the course until the end of the first grading period, students who are withdrawn from a course will receive a “W� on grade reports / transcripts. Within one week after the end of their first grading period, students who are with-

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drawn from a course while not passing will receive a “WF” or, if passing, a “WP” on grade reports / transcripts. All withdrawals are at the discretion of the principal. Summer School Summer school courses are taken for make-up credit only. Grades earned in approved summer school programs do appear on the transcript for the purposes of earning credit. However, grades earned in approved summer school programs do not replace the “F” from the school year, nor are summer school grades averaged in with grades earned during the school year. Students may not take summer school for forward credit. A student who fails two credits in one year will be considered in academic jeopardy and will have to make up at least one credit in summer school. The student’s academic progress in the following year will be closely monitored, and if in the judgment of the school there is no sufficient improvement, the student may be asked to withdraw from Wesleyan. Please note that in order for a student to pass a year-long course and receive credit for it, a student must pass the course for the year (the average of both semesters’ numerical grades) and pass for the second semester.

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Wesleyan High School Course Offerings Bible *UDGH WK*UDGH WK*UDGH

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All students must complete both the 9th and 10th grade Bible courses before they may enroll in any of the Bible electives. With regard to electives, please be aware that some restrictions on enrollment are in place. Freshmen cannot take elective courses. Sophomores are eligible to take an elective during Spring semester, with the provision that they have completed The Life of Jesus and the Book of Acts and that their schedule will allow it. Seniors will always be given priority in course placement. Juniors should be aware of the possibility they may not be placed in their first choice of Bible electives. Themes of the Old Testament This semester course will provide students with an introduction to the Old Testament. The emphasis will be placed on God’s promise to send a Messiah to save His people from their sins, and how that promise is progressively unfolded in the history of the Jewish people. The major themes of the Old Testament will be explored, showing their relevance to teenagers today. (Light-Homework Course; Semester Course) The Life of Jesus and the Book of Acts This semester course will focus on Jesus as the fulfillment of God’s promise in the Old Testament to send a Messiah to save His people from their sins. An emphasis will be placed on the teachings of Jesus and their relevance

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to teenagers today. The course will also study the beginnings of the Christian church. (Light-Homework Course; Semester Course) World Religions and the Great Commission This semester course will first survey the foundational beliefs and practices of the world’s leading religions. Students will explore and analyze what other people believe and why they believe it. Additionally, students will view such beliefs and practices through the prism of the Great Commission, the command of Christ to proclaim His gospel to all nations. This course will equip students with the tools they need to engage people from different faith commitments and more effectively present the gospel message to them. (Light-Homework course: Semester Course) Contemporary Culture from a Biblical Perspective This semester course is designed to help students examine and apply the teaching of Jesus for Christians to be “in the world but not of the world.” Beginning with the presupposition that Christians are called to be transformers of culture, this course will teach students how to identify and discern both the subtle and overt messages they are confronted with from contemporary culture. Proceeding from a Biblical worldview, students will explore contemporary music, film, television, and politics as they study the Christians’ call to engage the culture in which they live. (Light-Homework Course: Semester Course) Practical Apologetics: Faith and Doubt Practical Apologetics is a one semester course designed to consider doubts and explore answers to many of the perennial questions asked by those in and outside of the Christian faith. Among such topics are the following: arguments for the existence of God, the problem of evil, the deity of Jesus Christ, the historicity of the resurrection, miracles, science and creationism, the authority and reliability of the Bible as well as a number of other issues. The goal of this class is to provide the student with a firm foundation for faith, one that will stand up to the storms of unbelief and critical attack. (Light-Homework Course; Semester Course) Biblical Leadership and Spiritual Identity Seminar This one-semester, discussion-based course is designed to provide the student with a framework and a foundation for leadership in the 21st century. Students will first consider their spiritual identity in Christ, including their purpose in God’s kingdom. Other topics will include character development, decision making, goal setting, servant leadership, spiritual disciplines, and stewardship of spiritual gifts. The class will also examine Biblical examples of leadership which, combined with other topics, are intended to motivate the student for a lifetime of influence wherever God leads. (Light-Homework Course; Semester Course) 15


180 Degree Theology With a primary emphasis on the book of Romans, this one semester course will investigate Paul, the world’s most influential writer. Beginning with an overview of his life, this class will study Paul’s conversion and how that transformation impacted the world on such topics as evil and the human dilemma, legalism, Jesus, redemption, the cross and the resurrection, God’s chosen people, the church, and Christian living. The objective of this course is for students to understand the counter-cultural message of the gospel, its diagnosis of and solution to the world’s problems, and its precepts for living a godly life in contemporary society. (Light-Homework Course; Semester Course) Global Justice and Biblical Ethics This semester course is designed to introduce students to issues of social justice and to examine God’s call for His people to act justly and to love mercy (Micah 6:8). Topics to be explored include world poverty and disease, genocide, the disparity of income among people and societies, justice for the weak and powerless of society, human trafficking, and others. The objectives for the course include students hearing and responding to God’s call by focusing on the message of the Old Testament prophets and to address such social justice issues by applying the foundational principles of Biblical ethics. (Light-Homework Course; Semester Course)

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*Students who are not taking AP Literature must take at least one English course per semester during their senior year. English 9: World Literature and Composition This course is broken into two distinct semesters. The first semester is a composition course. Students will write numerous analytical papers in various academic styles, focusing on crafting the type of thesis-driven essays that will be required of them in high school and college. In order to help students write with excellence, teachers will hone in on paragraph writing skills, grammatical correctness, and MLA formatting. The second semester is a literature course which includes the study of novels, plays, stories, and poems from cultures other than our own, both ancient and modern. In connection with the readings, strong emphasis will fall on literary analysis papers. Students will write a research paper in Modern Language Association format. Grammar, vocabulary, usage, and stylistic skills will be integrated with the course as a whole. (Standard and Honors Courses Available; Full-Homework Course; FullYear Course) English 10: American Literature and Composition In this course, students will study the literature of America from preColonial to contemporary times. Movements such as Transcendentalism, Romanticism, Realism, Modernism, and Postmodernism will come under scrutiny. In conjunction with the readings, students will write a research paper in Modern Language Association format along with other thesis-driven essays. Writing will focus on employing correct grammar usage and stylistic skills. Vocabulary studies will include strategies for understanding analogies and words in context. (Standard and Honors Courses Available; Full-Homework Course; FullYear Course)

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English 11: British Literature and Composition A chronological survey of British literature is the core of this course, covering readings from Beowulf, Chaucer, Shakespeare, Pope, and Milton, among others. Marked emphasis is placed on writing skills, critical thinking, grammar, vocabulary, usage, and style. A main requirement of the course is the production of a research paper on some facet of British literature in Modern Language Association format. (Standard and Honors Courses Available; Full-Homework Course; FullYear Course) English 12: Sports Literature and Society This course will include an exploration of sports writing–non-fiction and fiction–to examine and analyze how language is used to establish a story. When examining sport novels, short stories and poems, the focus will be on discovering how and why authors use sports to tell their stories. Attention will also be given to discovering themes and conflicts that may be universal to the sports genre. Works will be examined to discern how characters, conflicts, symbols, settings, points of view, and other literary devices advance the thesis for the sport writer. Vocabulary studies will include strategies for understanding analogies and words in context. The culminating assignment of this elective course will be a Senior Thesis paper of between five and seven well-researched pages. (Standard Course; Full-Homework Course; Semester Course) English 12: The American Dream This class will explore the concept of the American Dream through exploration of literature, poetry, and drama. During this exploration, students will develop an understanding of the concept through examining it from a historical and cultural perspective and the experiences that have influenced and shaped the development of the American Dream from the colonists to present-day. Vocabulary studies will include strategies for understanding analogies and words in context. The culminating assignment of this elective course will be a Senior Thesis paper of between five and seven wellresearched pages. (Standard Course; Full-Homework Course; Semester Course) English 12: Madness in Literature This course will prompt students to consider what affects one's sanity and will include such considerations as: Does war affect one's sanity? What effect do individual tragedies have on one's sanity? Does isolation contribute to insanity? Where is the boundary line between sanity and insanity? Shakespeare’s Hamlet is the centerpiece of the course, with other novels, short stories, and poems added to enhance the discussion of madness. Vocabulary studies will include strategies for understanding analogies and words in context. The culminating assignment of this elective course will be a Senior Thesis paper of between five and seven well-researched pages. (Standard Course; Full-Homework Course; Semester Course) 18


English 12: Shakespeare: From the Page to the Big Screen Students will read and analyze a number of Shakespeare’s plays and their themes in their historical contexts as informed by secondary source reading. Students will then watch modern film adaptations of each play and evaluate the effectiveness of these modern attempts to strike Shakespeare’s masterful balance of high and low art and communicate his timeless themes. As in any English course, there will also be a special focus on writing, especially comparative essay writing. Vocabulary studies will include strategies for understanding analogies and words in context. The culminating assignment of this elective course will be a Senior Thesis paper of between five and seven well-researched pages. (Standard Course; Full-Homework Course; Semester Course) English 12: The Southern Renaissance This course will delve into the themes that pervade much of Southern writing from the early to mid-20th century as explored through a variety of novels, plays, and movies. This time period in American history is packed with the conflicts of industrialization vs. agrarian life, international war, political tension, racial and gender strife, civil rights activism, and religious and spiritual paradigm shifts—and these tensions have birthed some amazing literature. The course will also contain a specific focus on the growing force of African-American writing. Vocabulary studies will include strategies for understanding analogies and words in context. The culminating assignment of this elective course will be a Senior Thesis paper of between five and seven well-researched pages. (Standard Course; Full-Homework Course; Semester Course) Advanced Placement English Literature This college-level course for seniors delves into a wide range of literary themes, genres, periods, and methods. Because of the given scope and sequence of the course, training in written literary analysis and practice in advanced reading comprehension form its foundation. Evaluation is based primarily on writing performance and reading comprehension, mirroring the format of the AP exam. Since the course is a demanding one, the standards stringent, and the grading strict, only high-achieving and highly motivated students may apply. (Advanced Placement Homework Course; Full-Year Course; Must have department chair approval)

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Symphonic Band - Woodwinds This is a one-year class with no exam and a light-homework requirement. This class is open to students who play a woodwind instrument at an intermediate to advanced ability level. This is a performance-based class and will include various performances throughout the year. Prerequisite: Intermediate level of playing, previous band experience, or permission of department. (Light-Homework Course; Full-Year Course) Symphonic Band - Brass (QJOLVK This is a one-year class with no exam and a no homework requirement. This class is open to students who play a brass instrument at an intermediate )LQH$UWV±%DQG0XVLF to advanced ability level. This is a performance-based class and will include various performances throughout the year. Prerequisite: Intermediate level of playing, previous band experience, or permission of department. (No-Homework Course; Full-Year Course) Symphonic Band - Percussion This is a one-year class with no exam and a no-homework requirement. This class is open to students who play a percussion instrument at an intermediate to advanced ability level (those who really would like to learn a percussion instrument). This is a performance-based class and will include various performances throughout the year. Prerequisite: Intermediate level of playing, previous band experience, or permission of department. (No-Homework Course; Full-Year Course)

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NOTE: Various tiers of ensembles will be added as student demand necessitates. Chamber Singers Chamber Singers is a select vocal ensemble for students in grades 9-12. Repertoire for the groups will vary and will consist of both a cappella and accompanied vocal arrangements. There will be frequent opportunities for small group performances (trios, quartets, etc.). This group will participate in several performances throughout the year, and will function as an outreach performing group for Wesleyan. Performances and occasional rehearsals outside of class are required. Prerequisite: None (Light-Homework Course; Full-Year Course)

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Music Appreciation/Theory This is an introductory course covering a broad spectrum of musical knowledge. Students will receive an overview of the history of music, discuss current trends in music, and explore various musicians and styles of music. Students will also learn fundamentals of reading and writing music, and ear training. Prerequisite: None (Light-Homework; One-Semester Course) Music Theory Honors足足足 This is a one-semester course with light-homework. Previous musical knowledge is required to take this course. This course is for students who have either taken Music Theory or have received permission from the department. Students will learn intermediate to advanced levels of reading and writing music, and ear training. Students will also apply theory to their given instrument, if they have one. Prerequisite: Music Theory or permission of department. (Light-Homework Course; One-Semester Course) Advanced Placement Music Theory Advanced Placement Music Theory is a college-level music theory course. This class will follow the given curricular requirements of the College Board. Students who have not completed the prerequisites but who have prior music experience, or students enrolled in a music course may also take this class with permission from the department. Students will learn to read, write, arrange, and compose. This course will also include an intensive listening component for advanced development of ear training and sight singing. Prerequisite: Music Theory, Honors Music Theory and/or participation in a performing ensemble. (Advanced Placement Homework Course; Full-Year Course)

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*Provided prerequisite is fulfilled in Fall Semester. Introduction to Studio Art (9-12) This course introduces students to the elements of art and principles of design through a variety of projects designed to give students a better understanding of the language and practice of visual arts. Concepts introduced–along with applied projects–will help prepare students for 2D Design I, 3D Design I, and Digital Photography. Prerequisite: None (Light-Homework Course; Semester Course) 2D Design I (9-12) This studio course offers students an opportunity to begin to explore a variety of two-dimensional media and techniques. Course content will focus on the development of images drawn from observation, imagination, and memory. Students will use a variety of media which may include, but are not limited to: graphite, pastel, charcoal, conte crayon, printmaking, India ink and watercolor. Prerequisite: Introduction to Studio Art or permission of department. (LightHomework Course; Semester Course) A sketchbook is required.

23


2D Design II (10-12) This studio course builds on two-dimensional media and techniques explored in 2D Design I. The elements and principles of art will be practiced at an intermediate level through acrylic, watercolor, mixed media and oil. The development of a painting style will be introduced with emphasis on constructing personal visual statements that communicate feelings and ideas. Prerequisite: 2D Design I or teacher recommendation and permission of department. (Full-Homework Course; Semester Course) A sketchbook is required. 2D Design III (11-12) This studio course is a continuation of 2D Design II with emphasis on advanced skill acquisition and manipulation of media. As students begin to explore different styles of drawing, painting, and collage, they are encouraged to further develop a sense of personal style and direction. This course is designed to expand the student’s skill set in two-dimensional design, as well as to help students who are interested in pursuing AP Art to develop the breadth portion of their portfolio. Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation and permission of department. (FullHomework Course; Full-Year course) A sketchbook is required. Advanced Placement Studio Art (12) The AP program in Studio Art is intended for highly-motivated students who are seriously interested in the study of art. Advanced Placement work involves significantly more commitment and accomplishment than the typical high school visual arts course. AP Studio Art is not based on a written examination. Instead, students submit portfolios of 25-35 works of art for evaluation. Students may choose to develop a portfolio of drawing/painting or two-dimensional design. Weekly homework/sketchbook assignments will be given, and there are expectations to finish one major project every 1-2 weeks. A first-semester exam period with the instructor is scheduled to provide time for reflection, critique, and assessment. Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation and permission of department. (Advanced Placement Homework Course; Full-Year Course) 3D Design I (9-12) This course begins an exploration of three-dimensional design. Using additive and subtractive sculpture methods, students will apply the elements of art and principles of design to their artwork using a variety of materials, techniques, and processes including, but not limited to: clay, plaster, wire, and wood. The structural integrity of the work and the student’s willingness to experiment and explore will be emphasized. Prerequisite: Introduction to Studio Art. (Light-Homework Course; Semester Course)

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3D Design II (10-12) This course is designed for students who want to further their development in three-dimensional processes. Students will examine advanced forms of three dimensional design that involve casting, carving, and constructing using plaster, clay, cardboard, metal, and found objects. Special emphasis will be placed on sculpting with clay, and its properties as a sculptural medium. Techniques in hand molding and use of the potter’s wheel will be taught. The structural integrity of the work and the students’ willingness to experiment and explore will be emphasized. Prerequisite: 3D Design I. (Light-Homework Course, Semester Course) Digital Photography I (10-12) This course will instruct students in fundamental concepts and techniques of photography including aesthetics and design concept, introduction to the digital SLR camera, and essential Photoshop skills. Interpretation and evaluation through critiques and a brief history of photography are explored. Owning a digital camera is recommended but not required. Students will have access to a digital SLR camera. Prerequisite: Introduction to Studio Art. (Full-Homework Course; Semester Course) Recommended Equipment: Digital SLR camera. Digital Photography II (11-12) Students continue to explore the aesthetic and technical aspects of digital photography with an emphasis on more personalized applications of concepts and creative techniques. Mastery of elements of art and design as they apply to photography will be emphasized. Students will learn about advanced studio equipment, advanced techniques in Photoshop, and how to apply their individual creativity and skills to photography. Owning a digital camera is recommended, but not required. Students will have access to a digital SLR camera. Prerequisite: Introduction to Studio Art and Digital Photography I (FullHomework Course; Semester Course) Recommended Equipment: Digital SLR camera.

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*Provided prerequisite is fulfilled in Fall Semester. Theater Appreciation and Performance This course introduces students to the history, practices and seminal performances of theater, beginning with the Greeks through the modern theater of today. Emphasis will be placed on drawing connections between the past and the present, and the brilliance and the beautiful accidents that created the framework of theater as we know it. In addition to reading complete plays, students will perform scenes from each of the plays read in class. Emphasis will be placed on the particular style of performance most relevant to the time period of the play being performed. Prerequisite: None (Light-Homework Course; Semester Course) Public Speaking This course provides students with various speaking and listening experiences, with the goal of helping them become more comfortable when speaking in front of a group. This class focuses on organization and wording, as well as the delivery aspects of voice, gesture, body movement, and facial

26


expression. Listening activities are designed to improve classroom skills as well as workplace readiness. This class covers aspects of the communication process and interpersonal: one-to-one, small group, and public speaking. Each student is required to present various types of speeches to his/her classmates. Student encounter a variety of writing and reading experiences while preparing original and interpretative presentations. Grades are based on written work, oral presentations, in-class participation, and use of class preparation time. Prerequisite: None (Full-Homework Course; Semester Course) The American Movie This course is structured around building a cinematic timeline, beginning with the Edison Manufacturing Company to the current domination of the Hollywood Seven. Students will watch movie clips for the purpose of analyzing subject matter, cultural norms, technical growth, and trends. Students should expect to bring an analytical eye to class, as this course will not be for entertainment purposes, but for developing a greater understanding of the cinematic art form and how the Christian faith played both a positive and negative role in the formation of “Hollywood� as we know it today. Prerequisite: None (Light-Homework Course; Semester course) American TV This course helps students better understand the complexities of the television medium. We will explore programming, marketing, and advertising on TV and how messages have changed over time and how they both influence and reflect modern culture. This course will explore the history of television and its advances, including: technology, programming, pay TV, cable, satellite, internet, and 3D TV. Students will develop a deeper understanding of the industry, how it works, and its cultural significance in different parts of the country. Prerequisite: American Movie (Light-Homework Course; Semester Course) Creative Thinking and Communication This course explores all forms of human communication and helps explain why good communication is vital in the process of innovation. Students will discover things like why a clicque forms, how it manipulates behavior, and how that squelches creativity and the formation of new ideas. We’ll explore how people communicate with each other, especially through technologies like Facebook, text messaging, and Twitter. Students will discuss areas of mass media and how messages are formulated, broadcast, and received in a given medium. In every situation, the creative mind is at work. Through individual as well as group work, students will learn to communicate more creatively. This course will consider the history and myths around innovation and how it is actually achieved. We will explore art, as well as technology, as a basis to better understand the process by which we con-

27


ceive, defend, communicate, and create or invent new ideas. Students will learn to develop their own creative power and effectively communicate their ideas. Prerequisite: Public Speaking (Light-Homework Course; Semester Course) 3D Stage Design (10-12) This course provides a "hands-on experience" designed to develop students' practical knowledge of various aspects of the visual side of theater. Students will divide their course time between constructing sets and props for the Wolf Players' and Junior Players' productions, and designing their own show. Students may also choose to “major” in other design areas of theater such as lighting, sound, or costume design and implementation. Prerequisite: Introduction to Studio Art (Light-Homework Course; Semester Course)

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Advanced Computer Applications This one-semester course is designed to help students expand their skills in communication, collaboration, critical thinking and creativity. Students will use the Microsoft Office suite, Adobe Master Collection and various web-based tools. Project-based learning will be used with some projects having a defined outcome while others will be based on student choices. Prerequisite: None (Open to Grade Levels 9-12; No Homework Course; No Exam; Semester Course) Web Design This one-semester course allows students to evaluate and explore the key elements of web design. Students will learn basic photo-enhancing skills with Photoshop; create interesting, graphic-rich movies using Flash animation; and use web-authoring tools to create various web pages. In addition, 28


students will review copyright laws and online etiquette; evaluate the effectiveness of websites; explore color theory and the impact on web development; and identify criteria for viewing web pages on various devices. Prerequisite: None (Open to Grade Levels 9-12; No Homework Course; No Exam; Semester Course) Animated Graphic Design This one-semester course will focus on creative problem solving through the development of cartoons and games. This course will be taught primarily in Adobe Flash. We will explore character development, backgrounds and scenery, sounds, and character animation all in the context of creating a cartoon. Students will also create some basic trivia and adventure games including a final game project. No artistic ability is needed. Prerequisite: None (Open to Grade Levels 9-12; No Homework Course; No Exam; Semester Course) Digital Filmmaking This one-semester course offers students a chance to create their own short films, complete with their own unique soundtracks. All students get “hands on� experience with digital film, cameras, and tripods. We also watch a number of short films in class to learn about techniques (including some special effects). Students are required to storyboard ideas and then work alone or in groups to create several short film projects. Tips for working efficiently in the Adobe Premiere CS5 software are examined, along with advanced editing skills like nesting sequences and clip management strategies. Other course features include color keying to remove backgrounds, editing multi-track audio and audio effects, color correction, and troubleshooting problems. Prerequisite: None (Open to Grade Levels 9-12; No Homework Course; No Exam; Semester Course) Advanced Filmmaking This one-semester course allows students to learn and experiment with the advanced features of Adobe Premiere CS5, including color correction, compositing, nested sequencing and keyframing effects. The additional tools of the Adobe Creative Suite such as Encore, Photoshop, and After Effects will be used to enhance film projects. Part of the course will be dedicated to mixing audio with Adobe Audition. Students will work individually and in groups to produce film projects with advanced effects and original soundtracks. This course will explore the way 3-D effects can enhance film projects and at least one project will be completed using an ultra-high definition 3-D camera. Prerequisite: Digital Filmmaking (Open to Grade Levels 10-12; No Homework Course; No Exam; Semester Course)

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Fundamentals of Programming This one-semester course introduces students to the field of computer science in a fun and engaging way. Students will learn three different approaches in creating a program. First, students will use Alice to create cartoon characters and make them interact. Students will create both an animated video and a simple game using Alice. Next, students will employ a hands-on approach to programming using Lego robots. Students will build and program robots that can move, throw a ball, and respond to stimuli. Students will work in pairs to build the robots and complete a set of challenges. The third programming language introduced is Python, which is used by Georgia Tech in its introductory programming class. Students will see how a professional programming language is used to create an application. Prerequisite: None (Open to Grade Levels 9-12; No Homework Course; No Exam; Semester Course) Media Computation with Java (formerly Advanced Computer Science) This one-semester course is designed to introduce students to the Java programming language. Students learn about computer science by writing programs that will manipulate media. Students will create and modify images, such as correcting “red-eye” and generating negative images. Students will modify sounds by splicing words into sentences or reversing sounds to make interesting effects. The course allows students to see how Java is used by major animation studios such as Pixar to program animations and effects in movies. Experimenting with programming can and should be fun! This course is designed to prepare a student for AP Computer Science and for college level programming courses. Prerequisite: None (Open to all Grade Levels 9-12; Light Homework Course; No Exam; Semester Course) Advanced Placement Computer Science–Java The goal of this course is to prepare students for the Advanced Placement Exam in Computer Science. Advanced Placement Computer Science is a course taught at the introductory college level, and is designed for the accelerated student who is interested in pursuing advanced topics in computer science. The course is taught using the Java program­ming language, with emphasis on object-oriented programming and analysis of algorithms. We will emphasize general problem-solving techniques and the writing of programs that are well designed and well-documented. Topics will include sorting and searching algorithms, recur­sion, classes, and object-oriented design. Every student will take an exam at the end of first semester and will be required to take the Advanced Placement exam in May. Prerequisite: Must have department chair approval. Must have completed Algebra II. (Full Homework Course; Full Year Course; Open to Grade Levels 10-12)

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Mathematics Standard 1

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Algebra I This course is an introduction to topics in Algebra. These topics include, but are not limited to: linear functions, exponential functions, rational functions, quadratic functions, radical functions, polynomials, equations, inequalities, and systems of equations and inequalities. This course demonstrates math’s usefulness and encourages independent thinking. Problem solving, logical reasoning, and critical thinking skills will be emphasized through the use of cooperative learning and technology. Prerequisite: Pre-Algebra; students who are new to Wesleyan must take a placement test. A graphing calculator is required for this course. (FullHomework Course; Full-Year Course) Algebra II This course is designed to reinforce and extend the concepts presented in Algebra I. Topics include, but are not limited to: equations and inequalities, linear relations and functions, systems of equations and inequalities, matrices, polynomials, irrational numbers and complex numbers, quadratic equations, quadratic relations and functions, conics, polynomial functions, rational polynomial expressions, and exponential and logarithmic functions. This course demonstrates math’s usefulness and encourages independent thinking. Problem solving, logical reasoning and critical thinking skills will be emphasized through the use of cooperative learning, manipulatives, and technology. Prerequisite: Achievement in Algebra I and the approval of the department chair; students who are new to Wesleyan must take a placement test. A graphing calculator is required for this course. (Full-Homework Course; FullYear Course; Standard and Honors courses offered)

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Geometry This course is designed to integrate algebra with geometry. Topics include, but are not limited to: angles, parallel lines, polygons and polyhedrons, area, volume, circles and spheres, similarity, and transformations. Independent thinking and discovery are encouraged throughout the course. This course demonstrates math’s usefulness and encourages independent thinking. Problem solving, logical reasoning, and critical thinking skills will be emphasized through the use of cooperative learning, manipulatives, and technology. Prerequisite: Algebra II. A graphing calculator is required for this course. (Full-Homework Course; Full-Year Course; Standard and Honors courses offered) The Prerequisite for Geometry Honors is significant achievement in Algebra II or Algebra II Honors and the approval of the department chair. Algebra III This course is designed to reinforce and expand the concepts presented in earlier Algebra courses. Topics revisited in this course are: algebraic expressions, equations and inequalities, relations and functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, and systems of equations and inequalities. Trigonometry will be introduced. This course demonstrates math’s usefulness and encourages independent thinking. Problem solving, logical reasoning, and critical thinking skills will be emphasized through the use of cooperative learning, manipulatives, and technology. Prerequisite: Algebra II, Geometry, and teacher recommendation. A graphing calculator is required for this course. (Full-Homework Course; Full-Year Course) Pre-Calculus The principal feature of the course is to guide students in developing proficiency in algebraic, numerical, graphical, and verbal methods of representing problems. To support this emphasis, the class utilizes graphing calculators extensively. Students are urged to solve problems by one method and confirm by another, and to interpret their results within the constraints of the model. Topics include, but are not limited to: functions, graphs, solving equations and inequalities, polynomial functions, and exponential and logarithmic functions. Trigonometric topics include: triangle analysis, polar graphing, trigonometric functions and their inverses, fundamental identities, graphing of trigonometric functions, complex numbers, and DeMoivre’s Theorem. This course demonstrates math’s usefulness and encourages independent thinking. Problem solving, logical reasoning, and critical thinking skills will be emphasized through the use of cooperative learning, manipulatives, and technology. Prerequisite: Algebra II and Geometry. A graphing calculator is required for this course. (Full-Homework Course; Full-Year Course; Standard and Honors courses offered) The Prerequisite for Pre-Calculus Honors is Geometry and significant achievement in Algebra II or Algebra II Honors and the approval of the department chair. 33


Statistics The focus of this course is to develop the skills required to collect, collate, and analyze data. Emphasis is placed on a variety of applications, designs of experiments, techniques of data analysis, and conceptual understanding. Course topics include, but are not limited to: the nature of data, probability, estimates, hypothesis testing, inferences, correlation, regression, and variance. Prerequisite: This course is only open to seniors and fulfills the senior mathematics requirement, or can be taken as an elective concurrently with Pre-Calculus or Calculus. A graphing calculator is required for this course. (Full-Homework Course; Full-Year Course; must have approval of the department chair) Advanced Placement Statistics This course is designed to prepare students for the AP Statistics exam administered annually by the College Board for the purpose of obtaining college credit while still in secondary school. The focus of this course is to introduce students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. Students are exposed to four broad conceptual themes: 1. Exploring Data: Describing patterns and departures from patterns 2. Sampling and Experimentation: Planning and conducting a study 3. Anticipating Patterns: Exploring random phenomena using probability and simulation 4. Statistical Inference: Estimating population parameter and testing Prerequisite: This course is opened to juniors and seniors who are enrolled in or have completed Pre-Calculus. A graphing calculator is required. (Advanced Placement Homework Course; Full-Year Course) Calculus This course is a study of calculus in one variable. The topics covered include: limits and continuity; differentiation of polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric and inverse functions; graph and data analysis based on first and second derivative tests; study of mean and the extreme value theorem; related rates; applications such as velocity and acceleration; integral calculus with applications; area under the curve; net distance; and volumes of solids of revolutions. This course demonstrates math’s usefulness and encourages independent thinking. Problem solving, logical reasoning, and critical thinking skills will be emphasized through the use of cooperative learning, manipulatives, and technology. Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus: A graphing calculator is required for this course. (Full-Homework Course; Full-Year Course; must have approval of the department chair)

34


Advanced Placement Calculus (AB level) This course is designed to prepare students for the AP Calculus AB exam administered annually by the College Board for the purpose of obtaining college credit while still in secondary school. Topics include those covered in Calculus, as well as others including volumes of known cross sections and slope fields. This course demonstrates math’s usefulness and encourages independent thinking. Problem solving, logical reasoning, and critical thinking skills will be emphasized through the use of cooperative learning, manipulatives, and technology. Prerequisite: Significant achievement in Pre-Calculus Honors; must have approval of the department chair. A graphing calculator is required for this course. (Full-Year Course; Advanced Placement Homework Course) Advanced Placement Calculus (BC level) The AP Calculus Exam covers the same differential and integral calculus topics that are included in the Calculus AB exam, plus additional topics in differential and integral calculus, and polynominal approximations and series. This is material that would be included in a two-semester calculus sequence at the college level. Students cannot take both the Calculus AB and the Calculus BC exams during the same year. Prerequisite: Significant achievement in Pre-Calculus Honors; must have approval of the department chair; A graphing calculator is required for this course. (Full-Year Course; Advanced Placement Homework Course)

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*Accelerated French and Accelerated Spanish are courses offered as electives to students who will have completed level III of their required language sequence. Wesleyan School offers Latin and two modern languages, French and Spanish. Our study of French and Spanish provides an opportunity for students to broaden their horizons globally, learning through language the culture, history, and peoples of the francophone and hispanophone world. These classes are conducted in the target language. The emphasis in Latin is on the Classics, allowing students an opportunity to explore the history, life, and times of the Roman Empire through study and active use of the Latin language and literary excerpts. French I First-year French introduces students to the sounds and structures of the French language, and to cultures of the francophone world. This course fosters the foundation of a strong grammatical base and confidence in oral communication with an emphasis on vocabulary used in daily situations. Students approach language learning through a variety of methods, and begin to demonstrate proficiency at an appropriate level by way of interpersonal, presentational, and interpretive modes of communication. Prerequisite: None (Full-Homework Course; Full-Year Course; Standard Course) French II Second-year French expands upon the basic skills acquired in French I with the acquisition of the future, perfect, and imperfect tenses, and an introduction to the subjunctive mood. Students approach language learning through a variety of methods, and continue to demonstrate proficiency at an 36


appropriate level by way of interpersonal, presentational, and interpretive modes of communication. Prerequisite: French I (Full-Homework Course; Full-Year Course; Standard and Honors Courses available) French III Third-year French continues with daily-life vocabulary through various authentic written and audio passages. Grammar structures from the first two years are reinforced while presenting further present and compound tenses in the indicative, subjunctive, and conditional moods. Students approach language learning through a variety of methods, and demonstrate proficiency at an appropriate level by way of interpersonal, presentational, and interpretive modes of communication. Prerequisite: French II (Full-Homework Course; Full-Year Course; Standard and Honors Courses available) French IV and French V Students who have completed French III have the option of studying various topics in francophone cultures and civilization. Students learn to approach and respond to authentic and topical materials through a variety of methods. They will demonstrate proficiency at an appropriate level by way of interpersonal, presentational, and interpretive modes of communication. This is a performance-based course requiring the active and engaged participation of students on a daily basis. This course can be taken more than once for credit, as the topics are presented on a rotating basis to ensure that students study different subjects each year. Prerequisite: French III (Full-Homework Course; Full-Year Course; Standard Course) French IV Honors Students continue to approach French language learning through a variety of methods, and demonstrate proficiency at an appropriate level by way of interpersonal, presentational, and interpretive modes of communication. This course takes students to the next level of grammar and syntax by using language in context from a variety of authentic sources, preparing them for a greater understanding of the French language and francophone cultures and for the Advanced Placement French Language and Culture course. Solid speaking, reading and writing skills are required, along with a desire to perfect current skills. Prerequisite: French III Honors (Full-Homework Course; Full-Year Course) Advanced Placement French Language and Culture This course engages students in an exploration of culture in both contemporary and historical contexts. Students will demonstrate proficiency in French language through the three modes of communication: Interpersonal, Interpretive and Presentational. This course develops students’ awareness and 37


appreciation of authentic cultural products, both tangible and intangible; practices (patterns of social interactions within a culture); and, perspectives (values, attitudes and assumptions that underlie both practices and products). Prerequisite: French IV Honors; must have approval of the department chair. (Advanced Placement Homework Course; Full-Year Course) Latin I First-year Latin explores the profound impact of Roman culture on our modern world. A wide range of topics is surveyed within the context of Roman history, from the rise of the Republic to the fall of the Empire. Students are introduced to basic Latin grammar through readings and translations. Vocabulary studies target Latin words as well as English derivatives. Level-appropriate proficiency is demonstrated through translations and some oratory work. Prerequisite: None (Full-Homework Course; Full-Year Course; Standard Course) Latin II Second-year Latin focuses on Roman history up to the end of the Roman Republic. The major events of this time period are revisited, with attention given to the accomplishments of individual Romans. Level-appropriate proficiency is demonstrated through translations and some oratory work, readings contain more complex grammar and use a wider base of vocabulary. Students continue to learn English derivatives. Prerequisite: Latin I (Full-Homework Course; Full-Year Course; Standard and Honors Courses available) Latin III Third-year Latin focuses on the transition to the Roman Empire and its eventual fall. The major events of this time period are revisited, with attention given to the accomplishments of individual Romans. Level-appropriate proficiency is demonstrated through translations and some oratory work, as students continue to learn grammar, Latin vocabulary, and English derivatives. Readings now include original sources. Prerequisite: Latin II (Full-Homework Course; Full-Year Course; Standard and Honors Courses available) Latin IV In fourth-year of Latin, students will complete their training in Latin grammar as readings focus almost exclusively on original sources. Students will study authentic sources, translating passages from a variety of writers such as those of the Golden and Silver Ages, and texts such as the Latin Vulgate, alongside an evaluation of English versions of the Bible. Prerequisite: Latin III; Full-Homework Course; Full-Year Course; Standard and Honors Courses available

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Latin V Fifth-year of Latin takes a thematic approach to the study of classical authors and a variety of texts to focus on a cross-section of culture. Prerequisite: Latin IV (Full-Homework Course; Full-Year Course; Standard and Honors Courses available) Spanish I First-year Spanish introduces students to the sounds and structures of the Spanish language, and cultures of the Spanish-speaking world. This course fosters the foundation of a strong grammatical base and confidence in oral communication with an emphasis on vocabulary used in daily situations. Students approach language learning through a variety of methods, and begin to demonstrate proficiency at an appropriate level by way of interpersonal, presentational, and interpretive modes of communication. Prerequisite: None (Full Homework Course; Full-Year Course; Standard Course) Spanish II Second-year Spanish expands upon the basic skills acquired in Spanish I with the acquisition of the future, perfect, and imperfect tenses, and an introduction to the subjunctive mood. Students approach language learning through a variety of methods, and continue to demonstrate proficiency at an appropriate level by way of interpersonal, presentational, and interpretive modes of communication. Prerequisite: Spanish I (Full-Homework Course; Full-Year Course; Standard and Honors Courses available) Spanish III Third-year Spanish continues with daily-life vocabulary through various authentic written and audio passages. Grammar structures from the first two years are reinforced while presenting further present and compound tenses in the indicative, subjunctive, and conditional moods. Students approach language learning through a variety of methods, and demonstrate proficiency at an appropriate level by way of interpersonal, presentational, and interpretive modes of communication. Prerequisite: Spanish II (Full-Homework Course; Full-Year Course; Standard and Honors Courses available) Spanish IV In this interactive course, students study various topics related to the cultures and civilization of Spanish-speaking peoples. Students learn to approach and respond to authentic and topical materials through a variety of methods. They will demonstrate proficiency at an appropriate level by way of interpersonal, presentational, and interpretive modes of communication. This is a performance-based course requiring the active and engaged participation of students on a daily basis. Prerequisite: Spanish III (Full-Homework Course; Full-Year Course; Standard Course) 39


Spanish IV Honors Students continue to approach Spanish language learning through a variety of methods, and demonstrate proficiency at an appropriate level by way of interpersonal, presentational, and interpretive modes of communication. This course takes students to the next level of grammar and syntax by using language in context from a variety of authentic sources, preparing them for a greater understanding of the Spanish language and hispanophone cultures and for the Advanced Placement Spanish Language and Culture course. Solid speaking, reading and writing skills are required along with a desire to perfect current skills. Prerequisite: Spanish III Honors (Full-Homework Course; Full-Year Course) Advanced Placement Spanish Language and Culture This course engages students in an exploration of culture in both contemporary and historical contexts. Students will demonstrate proficiency in Spanish through the three modes of communication: Interpersonal, Interpretive and Presentational. This course develops students’ awareness and appreciation of authentic cultural products, both tangible and intangible; practices (patterns of social interactions within a culture); and perspectives (values, attitudes and assumptions that underlie both practices and products). Prerequisite: Spanish IV Honors; must have approval of the department chair. (Advanced Placement Homework Course; Full-Year Course) Spanish Seminar Seniors who have completed Spanish III or IV have the option of studying various topics in Spanish-speaking cultures and civilization through literature and film. Students learn to approach and respond to authentic and topical materials through a variety of methods. They will demonstrate proficiency at an appropriate level by way of interpersonal, presentational, and interpretive modes of communication. This is a performance-based course requiring the active and engaged participation of students on a daily basis. Prerequisite: Spanish III (Full-Homework Course; Full-Year Course; Standard Course) Foreign Language Elective: Accelerated French or Accelerated Spanish Students in this course move at an accelerated pace through Levels I and II over the course of one year. It is designed for the student who already has a strong foundation in his/her primary foreign language (having completed Level III or higher) and is interested in pursuing a third language. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Level III of primary second language, teacher recommendation, and approval of the department chair. (FullHomework Course; Full-Year Course)

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Lifetime Activities Lifetime Activities is a Pass/Fail semester-long course in which students participate in a number of different fitness-related sports and activities. The prerequisite for this course is the successful completion of 9th grade Health. This course6WDQGDUG will emphasize sports and activities that students can participate +RQRUV 6WDQGDUG 3K\VLFDO6FLHQFH in throughout their lifetime such as aerobic activities, yoga, survival swim%LRORJ\ %LRORJ\+RQRUV %LRORJ\ orienteering, golf, fishing, bowling, archery, and small ming, self-defense, %LRORJ\ arms orientation. (QYLURQPHQWDO &KHPLVWU\ &KHPLVWU\+RQRUV (No-Homework Course; Junior/Senior Semester Course) 6FLHQFH

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that for graduation. It is primarily taught 3K\VLFV to the ninth grade. This class includes an $33K\VLFV introduction&KHPLVWU\ to Basic Life(QYLURQPHQWDO6FLHQFH Support/CPR, suicide awareness, and ADAP $3%LRORJ\ $QDWRP\ 3K\VLRORJ\ (Alcohol and Drug Awareness Program) certification–a$3&KHPLVWU\ requirement for stu$QDWRP\ 3K\VLRORJ\ dents under the age of 18 to get their Georgia driver’s license. A variety of health/fitness related topics will be studied and discussed: elements of health, components of health fitness, mental health, body image, eating disorders, nutrition, body composition, and stress. This course includes weekly classroom lectures and discussions, written examinations, and fitness labs and physical assessment procedures. (Light-Homework; Semester Course)

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Dance Students will examine various forms of dance as a creative art form and develop a strong technique base to improve strength, flexibility, grace, and endurance. Students will explore roles as dance performers with the opportunity to present small group works. Prerequisite: Available to grades 10-12 only. Limited to a Maximum of 12 Students (No Homework Course; Semester Course)

Guidance Peer Leadership Peer Leadership is a student-centered program offered at Wesleyan in which twenty-two outstanding seniors, eleven boys and eleven girls, are carefully selected and trained by a team of faculty sponsors to serve as mentors for all ninth graders. Peer Leadership group sessions occur three times per month, with senior planning meetings held in between. These sessions range from friendly games to group discussions and role-playing dealing with ninth grade and general adolescent issues. The Peer Leadership Retreat is a requirement for participation in this program. The Peer Leadership class meets every day as a course as well as during the Tuesday program time. Prerequisite: Application process (Full-Year Course; Open to Seniors upon acceptance)

Publications Journalism Students expand their knowledge of journalistic techniques, and they draw upon these as they produce the high school newspaper, the Green & Gold. Students enrolled in this hands-on course develop skills in areas including time management, intensive research, interviewing techniques, journalistic writing, editing, and computer pagination and layout. Prerequisite: Submission of a writing sample; written permission from the instructor. (Light-Homework Course; Junior/Senior Full-Year Course\) Yearbook Students participate in the production of the school yearbook, Wolftracks. During daily class sessions, students write about the clubs, classes, and activities of the school. They learn to use computer pagination and layout software and compile pages for the yearbook. This course is a full-year commitment since each student assumes responsibility for producing a section of the yearbook. Prerequisite: Written permission from the instructor. (Light-Homework Course; Junior/Senior Full-Year Course)

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Physical Science This course provides students with a basic knowledge of chemistry and physics. Through a variety of activities, students will explore the various characteristics of elements, atoms, and chemical bonds, as well as investigate motion, physics equations, and machines. Physical Science is intended to be taken by students who did not take Physical or Earth Science in eighth grade. (Full-Homework Course; Lab Science; Full-Year Course) General Biology This course traces the organization of living things from the simple to the complex. Students first explore the chemistry of life and how matter and energy are related in the biosphere. This course then covers cell structure, genetics, and organ systems, and concludes with the interaction of living organisms with their environment. The diversity of life and theories of the origin of life are also discussed. Other topics include an in-depth investigation of plants, and the biology of bacteria and viruses. The lab portion of this class involves microscope skills, hands-on genetic investigations, dissection, and several calculator-based laboratories (CBL). A graphing calculator is required for this course. (Full-Homework Course; Lab Science; Full-Year Course)

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Biology Honors Biology is the science of living organisms and life processes, including the study of structure, function, growth, origin, evolution, and distribution of living organisms. This course is demanding, as more material is covered in depth. There are many hands-on activities, including computer-based labs, microscope work, and gel-electrophoresis investigations. During this course, students are exposed to the following basic principles: â—† Chemical Foundations for Cells â—† Cell Structure and Function

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◆ Metabolism-Photosynthesis/Cell Respiration ◆ Principles of Inheritance ◆ Evolution and Diversity ◆ Plant Structure and Function ◆ Animal Structure and Function ◆ Ecology and Behavior Prerequisite: Must have approval of the department chair. A graphing calculator is required for this course. (Full-Homework Course; Lab Science; Full-Year Course) Advanced Placement Biology This course is equivalent of a college-level introductory biology course, usually taken by biology majors during their first year. This course is designed to help students develop a conceptual framework for modern biology and gain an appreciation of science as a process. The AP Biology exam is administered in the spring and is mandatory. It is three hours in length and is designed to measure students' knowledge and understanding of modern biology. Twelve specific labs are conducted during the year, along with other hands-on activities. The major topics covered during the year are: ◆ Molecules and Cells: Chemistry of Life, Cells, and Cellular Energetics ◆ Heredity and Evolution: Heredity, Molecular Genetics, and Evolutionary Biology ◆ Organisms and Populations: Diversity of Organisms, Structure and Function of Plants and Animals, and Ecology Prerequisite: Biology Honors, Chemistry Honors, or AP Chemistry and approval of the department chair. A graphing calculator is required for this course. (Advanced Placement Homework Course; Lab Science; Full-Year Course) Chemistry Chemistry is the study of materials, their composition and structure, and the changes they undergo. Through extensive research and experimentation, students will gain experience in formulating ideas, discovering evidence to support those ideas, and practical applications of real-world concepts. Topics covered include: classification of matter, atomic structure, periodic properties, molecular structure, chemical bonding, and acids and bases. Chemistry involves working in the laboratory, experimentation and observation serve to foster a more complete understanding of a scientific concept. Students will develop a manner of thinking and a means to approach a problem. By the end of the course, students will be expected to record lab data and transform their data into thorough lab reports. Prerequisite: Biology and Algebra I; must have approval of the department chair. A graphing calculator is required for this course. (Full-Homework Course; Lab Science; Full-Year Course)

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Chemistry Honors Chemistry Honors is the study of materials, their composition and structure, and the changes they undergo. Through extensive research and experimentation, students will gain experience in formulating ideas, discovering evidence to support those ideas, and practical applications of real-world concepts. Honors Chemistry focuses on concepts and mastery of the material, and pushes students to think independently beyond the obvious. Some of the topics covered include: ◆ Classification of Matter and Energy ◆ Atomic and Molecular Structure ◆ Chemical Reactions and Bonding ◆ Kinetic Theory ◆ Acids, Bases, and Salts ◆ Oxidation and Reduction In addition, chemistry involves working in the laboratory, where experimentation and observation serve to foster a more complete understanding of a scientific concept. Students will develop a manner of thinking and a means to approach a problem. By the end of the course, students will be expected to record lab data and transform their data into thorough lab reports. Prerequisite: Biology and Algebra II; must have approval of the department chair. A graphing calculator is required for this course. (Full-Homework Course; Lab Science; Full-Year Course) Advanced Placement Chemistry Advanced Placement Chemistry is offered to students who demonstrate proficiency in math and science. Emphasis is placed on the theoretical aspects of chemistry, and how these principles apply to the real world. Quantum theory of atomic structure is introduced, as are modern theories of chemical bonding. In addition, the elements of physical chemistry, including thermodynamics, chemical equilibrium and solubility, kinetics, and electrochemistry are studied. Various lab activities are conducted throughout the year, as are other hands-on activities. This course is equivalent to a rigorous college freshman course in general chemistry, and is designed to prepare students to take the AP Chemistry examination in May. Prerequisite: Honors Algebra II, Chemistry or Honors Chemistry, teacher recommendation, and evaluations by both math and science department chairs; must have approval of the department chair. A graphing calculator is required for this course. (Advanced Placement Homework Course; Lab Science; Full-Year Course) Environmental Science Environmental Science is the interdisciplinary study of how humans affect and interact with the living and non-living environment. Topics covered during the first semester include: natural resource use and sustainability, population dynamics, energy flow, nutrient cycles, and major ecosystems. In

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the second semester, the course shifts to focus on major environmental issues such as: water resources and management, water and air pollution, fossil fuel use and global warming, environmental toxins and public health, and biodiversity and habitat destruction. Students will develop a better understanding of the ecological principles that govern our planet, and will be able to make informed decisions concerning its resources. Students will conduct shortand long-term lab investigations that are relevant to the course material, especially water quality studies. Prerequisite: Biology. A graphing calculator is required for this course. (Full-Homework Course; Lab Science; Full-Year Course) Physics General Physics is a year-long laboratory course designed both as an introduction to the basic principles of physics and as preparation for continued study in this area. Topics to be covered include: ◆ Mechanics (kinematics, force, work, energy, momentum, rotational motion) ◆ Thermal physics (temperature, heat, thermodynamics) ◆ Wave motion (wave properties, sound) ◆ Light and optics (reflection, refraction, lenses) ◆ Electricity and magnetism (forces, fields, potential, circuits) Students will complete semester projects, an individual research project, and a presentation on a student-selected topic in physics. Prerequisites: Pre-Calculus concurrently, Chemistry; must have approval of the department chair. A graphing calculator is required for this course. (Full-Homework Course; Lab Science; Full-Year Course) Advanced Placement Physics B This intense, year-long laboratory course is designed to equip students with introductory college-level knowledge of the main branches of physics. Topics covered in this course include: ◆ Newtonian mechanics ◆ Fluid mechanics ◆ Thermal physics ◆ Electricity and magnetism ◆ Waves and optics ◆ Atomic and nuclear physics Students who wish to enroll in this course should be proficient in math (algebra and trigonometry) and have an interest in science. In this rigorous course, students will conduct hands-on, college-level laboratory experiments, during which they will learn to work with sensing devices, and gather and manipulate data and present it in quantitative and graphical form. Students are required to account for their experimental findings, and point out the differences between idealized theory (i.e. absence of or constant fric47


tion, perfect heat insulators, etc.) and their actual experimentation data. Students will record laboratory findings in a lab portfolio/notebook which they are encouraged to keep, as they may be asked to present it as proof of sufficient laboratory experience in order to obtain college credit for the course. Prerequisites: Honors Pre-足Calculus enrolled concurrently (juniors) or completed (seniors); Honors chemistry; Must have approval of the department chair. A graphing calculator is required for this course. (AP Homework Course; AP Lab Science; Full-Year Course) Anatomy and Physiology Anatomy and Physiology addresses how the body maintains life. Anatomy examines the structures or morphology of body parts: their forms and organization. Physiology considers the functions of body parts: what they do and how they do it. Prerequisite: Biology and Chemistry (Full-Homework Course; Lab Science; Full-Year Course)

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Modern World History This course is a comprehensive survey of modern world history from the time of the Scientific Revolution and Enlightenment through the fall of communism and modern world affairs. Through the use of discussion, lecture, text, primary sources, hands-on projects, and additional outside reading, this course will attempt to identify, clarify, and explore history’s lessons and problems in order to gain a deeper understanding of how our shared past continues to influence our present and future. Special emphasis will be placed on the relationship between economics, social and intellectual evolution, political revolutions (English, American, French, Russian), the rise of nationalism, international conflict, and geo-political relationships. Prerequisite: Honors requires teacher referral. (Full-Homework Course; Full-Year Course; Standard and Honors Courses Available) United States History This course is a survey study of American history from 1607 to the present. In addition to learning the primary historical facts and understanding the major movements in the development of the United States, students will be expected to comprehend the concepts which have distinguished this nation from its founding to the present. The goal of this course is for students to gain a thorough understanding of the events, issues, ideas, and people that have shaped our nation, while learning critical reading and writing skills. (Full-Homework Course; Full-Year Course; Standard Course) Economics This course is a survey of basic micro- and macro-economic concepts and their application in our everyday life. Through the use of discussion, lecture, text, primary sources, and additional outside reading, this class will help students understand basic micro- and macro-economic concepts, the development of the science of economics, and the utilization of economics in everyday life. As part of the regular curriculum, simulations and in-class 49


group activities will be completed to offer students an opportunity to apply the principles discussed. Upon course completion, students will be familiar with supply, demand, and price, and their application in economic systems. Basic skills required for success in this course include critical thinking and high-level reasoning. Source readings on financial stewardship will be incorporated, and the class may participate in a state-wide stock market competition. Prerequisite: Honors requires students to complete an application and be approved by a committee of teachers and the department chair. (FullHomework Course; Semester Course; Standard and Honors courses available) American Government This course is a comprehensive survey of the American political system. Through lecture, discussion, suppplemental texts, and primary sources, this course seeks to help students understand current world affairs through the application of concepts studied in class. Students will explore the basic principles of government and democracy, and the origin of the United States Constitution. This course also examines the duties and functions of the United States government, using the Constitution as a framework. Students will learn how government policies are made, implemented, and interpreted. Analysis of these processes will include discussion of party politics and political ideologies, the role of interest groups, and the influence of the media. Prerequisite: Honors requires students to complete an application and be approved by a committee of teachers and the department chair. (FullHomework Course; Semester Course; Standard and Honors courses available) Advanced Placement United States History This college-level course requires students to develop the analytical skills and factual knowledge necessary to critically deal with United States history. This course will enable students to deal with the demands of college-level work, and learn the self-pacing and independent study habits necessary to successfully compete at the collegiate level. Students will learn to assess historical materials and interpret the importance of these materials as they pertain to historical reasoning. Students will be required to analyze and interpret primary sources, including documentary materials, maps, and graphic evidence of historical events. Students will be tested on their grasp of historical knowledge through multiple-choice tests similar to the Advanced Placement exam. This course will emphasize written essays and analytical research papers to teach the students to express themselves clearly and precisely and to cite sources and credit the writing and ideas of others. Prerequisite: Students must complete an application and be approved by a committee of teachers and the department chair. (Advanced Placement Homework Course; Full-Year Course) 50


Advanced Placement European History This college-level course requires students to develop the analytical skills and factual knowledge necessary to critically deal with Modern European History. This course will cover the time period from 1450 to the present, with an emphasis on the political, cultural, and philosophical trends of each era throughout this time frame. Students will learn to assess historical materials as they pertain to historic reasoning. Students will relate events within a specific time period, and learn how those events affect consequent historical situations. This course reveals the continuing evolution of history and thought as it pertains not only to Europe but to Europe’s effect on the rest of the world. Students will be tested on their grasp of historical knowledge through multiple-choice tests similar to the Advanced Placement exam and will be assigned essays and original source document papers to test their ability to interpret historical data. Prerequisite: Students must complete an application and be approved by a committee of teachers and the department chair. (Advanced Placement Homework Course; Full-Year Course) Social Science Elective: History of World War II This course provides students with an intense and in-depth study of the Second World War, including, but not limited to: its causes; the social, political, economic and cultural effects of the war; the effect of the war on Europe, Asia, and the United States; the major campaigns of both the European and Pacific theaters of war; limited military strategy; the importance and emergence of air power; the introduction of atomic weapons, and a perspective of the war from soldiers themselves. This course is designed for upperclassmen (juniors/seniors) who can understand, appreciate and discuss the serious and intricate elements of war, as well as handle some graphic and sensitive readings and videos that depict both the reality and nature of war itself. In addition to articles supplied to students by the teacher, students will be asked to read two books: Ghost Soldiers by Hampton Sides and Band of Brothers by Stephen Ambrose. (Light-Homework Course; One-Semester Course; Open to Juniors and Seniors)

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Accreditations/Affiliations Wesleyan is fully-accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools as a unit school, grades kindergarten to twelve. Wesleyan affiliations: Georgia High School Association Educational Records Bureau The College Board Educational Testing Service Southern Association of Independent Schools National Association of College Admissions Counselors Atlanta Area Association of Independent Schools

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Wesleyan School 5405 Spalding Drive Peachtree Corners, Georgia 30092 www.wesleyanschool.org

High School Course Guide 2013-14  

HS courses and policies