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Winter 2019 | Edition 29


‘ To act su sta i nably is to uphold ba sic hu ma n r ights, seek econom ic ju stice, str ive for globa l peace a nd demonst rate a genu i ne re spect for natu re. It is about hu ma n it y su sta i n i ng not on ly the pla net, but a lso hu ma n it y itsel f a s a n eth ica l i n f luence on the world. ’ N AT H A N J E S S U P | D E P U T Y H E A D


Inside this edition

Winter 2019 | Edition 29

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WELCOME FROM OUR HEADMASTER

COLLEGE COLLAGE

ENGAGIN’ IN WAGIN

First impressions are everything

Pictorial highlights from a busy start to the year

Wesley's adventures on the road

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THE COMMISSIONING SPEECH

PROUDLY GREEN

SPOTLIGHT ON: ANNETTE DAVOREN

How Wesley is adopting a sustainable outlook

Get to know Wesley's Health Services Manager

COVER: Daniel Chen (PP2) in the Sustainability Garden by Callum Hey (06–14).

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A MESSAGE FROM THE COLLEGE CHAPLAIN

PEER MENTORING

SPOTLIGHT ON: MARK THOMAS

The Wesleyan is printed on Pacesetter—it is FSC® Mix Certified, manufactured from ECF pulp, with ISO 14001 environmental certification.

Rev Nalin Perera's thoughts on faith and hope

Instilling confidence in our young men

We speak to the Head of Arts (Performance) at Wesley

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FROM THE DEPUTY HEAD

FROM THE JUNIOR SCHOOL

BOARDING

Nathan Jessup on why education sits at the heart of sustainability

Maria Hodges explains the importance of the Sustainability Garden

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HELLO FROM THE P&F

FROM THE MIDDLE SCHOOL

MOORDITJ MOB

We hear from the new Chair of the P&F Association

Brad Hilliard learns about the power of the outdoors

Dan Barnes talks to us about his passion for the Moorditj Mob

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WESLEY FRIENDS

NATHAN INKIRIWANG

WHY GIVE?

Helping in times of need

The keys to his success

Read Ross Barron's speech in full

The boarders get to know Rodney Steer

We speak to recent scholarship recipients

The Wesleyan and Old School Ties Editor: Rachel Dalton For queries or story ideas please contact: communityrelations@ wesley.wa.edu.au Thanks to the following contributors for the Sustainability Edition of The Wesleyan: Ross Barron, Greg Brown (82–86), Thomas Goodheart (09–15), Patrick Henning (02–07), Brad Hilliard, Maria Hodges, Nathan Jessup, Rev Nalin Perera, Emma Power, Alexandra Robertson and Richard Ryan.


Welcome from our Headmaster First impressions are everything

We all know how important it is to make a good first impression. At the same time, we’re told we shouldn’t judge a book by its cover, because looks can be deceiving. Fortunately, I can say that Wesley College has made an amazing first impression on my family and I, and we feel genuinely welcomed into the College community. The unique village-like feel at Wesley is evident from the moment you set foot on campus. It is a testament to the College and you, our community, just how welcoming you have all been. Since starting this year I have had a large number of students come up to me, say hello and introduce themselves. I was expecting a handful of students to do this, but the sheer number who have gone out of their way to speak to me has been remarkable. Parents, you should be extremely proud of your children. I believe that what makes a school like Wesley great are the opportunities and the authentic connections that develop while achieving amazing things. Witnessing students, parents, staff and alumni all working together to bring out the best in each student has been impressive. The strong connections that our students are forging now, extend beyond the College gates. Perhaps the most

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important thing they will ever do is build and maintain longterm, happy, healthy, fulfilling relationships with other people. I have also observed an overwhelming engagement from the majority of students. They truly want to achieve their personal best and encourage their peers to do the same. I saw this in action when attending a Senior School assembly where a Year 11 student sang accompanied by a guitar. Impressively, every single student in the auditorium gave the performer their full attention and when he had finished they genuinely acknowledged his talent. This is an example of the growing sense of confidence and belief in the College. It is not arrogance, but a quiet assurance that everyone believes they belong and are supported in achieving their personal best. Finally, I hope you enjoy this edition of The Wesleyan. Sustainability is a theme that resonates with me in my role here at Wesley. As Headmaster, I have to make sure that I am affecting change within a balanced environment and that, collectively as a community, we do not let short-term thinking undermine long-term benefits. I believe that having a futurefocused and solution-orientated approach will ensure the ongoing success of the College. ROSS BARRON | HEADMASTER

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‘The strong connections that our students are forging now, extend beyond the College gates.’ ROSS BARRON

PICTURED Ross Barron welcoming Wesley students to the College.

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The Commissioning Speech ‘If I must boast, I will boast of the things that show my weakness.’

As I stand here, enjoying the impressive ceremony that goes with becoming your Headmaster, I’m reminded of a line in the

I would lash out without thinking of the consequences.

things that show my weakness.’

That’s when a very special teacher took an interest in my life. She saw that I needed some guidance. She saw that I needed to have my confidence built up again.

Because, as it goes, there was a period of my life where I

That teacher made a connection with me.

Bible. It’s in Corinthians. ‘If I must boast, I will boast of the

was weak; where I wasn’t on the right path to end up here at Wesley College. In fact, I wasn’t on any kind of path to be my personal best. My world revolved around reacting on instinct with a flight or fight mindset. It’s not that I was a bad child, I just lost direction. I grew up in Kalgoorlie. It was a small town of about 20,000 people when I was young—about 600km inland from here. It’s hot and dusty—and famous for its gold mines. My father worked in one of those mines, as an underground miner. It was a hard, tough job to have. It was a job that everyone knew to be dangerous—and, when I was seven months old, my father was killed in a mining accident. I never got to know him. My mother (who I’m delighted to say is just over there) had to begin raising me alone—working hard by day, caring for me by night. She was selfless. I doubt I’ll ever fully know how exhausting it must have been for her. She eventually remarried, to a wonderful man (who is also here today) whom I now think of as my father. But inside, something was missing, although I was too young to be able to understand or articulate it. By the time I was 10 years old, I wasn’t acting like ‘a man for others’. I knew how to be kind, but I was also impulsive—

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I look back now and realise that what she was doing was highly skilled. She understood that in order to teach me, she had to find a point of connection and engage with me as a young student, as a person. I didn’t know that was happening at the time, but I look back now and think about the care she took and how I wanted to do whatever I could to please her. She gave me the direction I needed. I tried more. My classwork went from disengaged to excellent. I was working so much harder than I had ever realised was possible. What took me by surprise is that she gave me an interest in things I’d never thought about trying before. In my mind, I wanted to be a fighter pilot while my day-to-day life revolved around playing sport. But this teacher, this remarkable, special teacher, found a way into my mind and into my heart. She encouraged me to push myself towards fresh opportunities. Opportunities that made me believe that, if I could do this, I could do anything—singing in the school choir, appearing in plays, dancing in musicals. Piece by piece everything came into focus. My world view grew. As much as I fantasised about being a fighter pilot, I had always quietly assumed that my destiny was to work in a mine like all the people around me. That’s just what we did.

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PICTURED Rev Steve Francis, Abbey Barron, Narelle Barron, Ross Barron, Jim Walker and Rev Nalin Perera.

But suddenly the world took on fresh colour. I understood that by applying myself I could change my future. I could serve others. I could leave Kalgoorlie and make connections. I wanted to try and help just as I had been helped. After all, in a school as diverse as Wesley—with students and staff from all around Australia and the world, we’re all looking for connections. We’re all looking for someone to support us and push us towards our personal best. Over the years, as I grew older and looked back at my youth, I tried to get in touch with my teacher again. There were things I wanted to say, things I wanted her to know. Sadly, I’m not as good with social media as most of you, especially the students in front of me. So I was never able to find her. 40 years of words left unsaid. And that’s where I thought this story would end. But then a funny thing happened. I told someone at Wesley about my teacher. I told them that she had changed my life. Their ears pricked up. Before I knew it, they were on a mission to find her. One person knew a person, who knew a person who thought they might know her. See, again, the importance of connections. And that’s why I’m able to turn around today and say: ‘Aurora Stefani—my teacher—I’m so pleased you’re here’ I couldn’t find you. I wasn’t able to publicly thank you. I can’t believe you’re here today to bear witness to my Commissioning at this great College. 40 years ago, you used your skills as a teacher to give me the confidence I needed to make a mark in the world. Because

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of the spark you nurtured in me, I now stand here in front of 1,300 students able to play my part in trying to ignite the same spark in them. You changed a life so that I could change lives. I will be forever grateful for what you did. Thank you for making a difference. Thank you for believing in me. Students of Wesley, this is what I want you to remember… As you meet people, as you make your connections in life, never underestimate your power to influence others. We’re all looking for a point of connection—and it’s that point of connection that transforms lives. As Wesleyans we serve others, and the power to change someone’s future lives within each of us. It’s a wonderful thing. In closing, I want to say how proud I feel today. Proud of where I am, proud of my family, proud of my parents, proud of all of you. I think about the Nyoongar people, the traditional owners of the land on which we are gathered today. I also think of our Old Collegians and the sacrifices they have made for our College. In particular, I give deep thanks to the boys and men from Wesley who lost their lives while serving this country. Finally, I think about the deep sense of community here; a spirit of inclusion that has made me, my wife and our family feel so very welcome. I thank you all. It’s my honour to be your Headmaster, I hope we will dare to do amazing things together. Audendo Atque Agendo— By daring & by doing. ROSS BARRON | 8 FEBRUARY, 2019

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‘My family were told that my condition could indeed prove fatal. This illness had struck me down out of nowhere and I was truly frightened.’ RE V NALIN PERER A

PICTURED Rev Nalin Perera at the 2019 OWCA ANZAC Day Service.

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A message from the College Chaplain In his own words

Throughout my adult life journey I have discovered with each passing year that life, first and foremost, is a journey of hope, with its twin companion, faith.

of a young and vulnerable student, being taken under the wing of a caring teacher who believed in the person she was entrusted to teach.

Ultimately, by necessity, life has to also be a journey of love, otherwise it will lack depth and any real sense of purpose.

As we all now know, the highlight was that after 40 years of trying to find the teacher who gave him so much, our Headmaster was able to welcome Aurora Stefani into our Wesley family at his Commissioning and publicly thank her for the diligence of her endeavour. As the familiar Paul Kelly lyrics go, in a song so pivotal to the early Indigenous land rights struggle, ‘From little things big things grow…’

In the early weeks of January, I was struck down by a mystery illness, so serious that I was rushed to hospital and admitted to intensive care. My family were prepared that my condition could indeed prove fatal. I had been struck down out of nowhere and I was truly frightened. In my dark moments I was forced to look back upon my life, wondering if I had been faithful to my calling as a minister; whether I had been a good husband and father; whether I had caused any one irreparable harm. The list kept on growing. At the same time I was so fearful of what might eventuate, I was surrounded by the unique skills of medical staff, who probed and pondered until they knew precisely what they were dealing with. I received unbelievable medical assistance, while total strangers, whom I will never meet, supplied the blood I needed for several transfusions. In the midst of all this, I knew I was being sustained in prayer, along with practical support for my family, by friends and by this wonderful community at Wesley. Literally from death’s door I began to rapidly recover, almost as quickly as the manner in which I fell ill. It was truly remarkable, indeed a miracle. So strongly did my health return, I was able to resume my duties as your Chaplain, albeit with lots of caveats from concerned colleagues and friends about not overdoing it, with my first public act of 2019 leading the Commissioning Service for our new Headmaster, Ross Barron. What an inspiring occasion it was! Our Headmaster’s speech at his Commissioning still has everyone talking. Staff, students and families alike had tears in their eyes as we heard

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As we undertake this new year of endeavour and in the familiarity of our daily timetable, we all need to be encouraged and be encouraging of each other in ‘thinking out of the square’, seeking to emulate our College motto, as did our Headmaster in his concluding remarks at the Commissioning: Audendo Atque Agendo - By daring & by doing. Until this year, I was comfortable with my life and felt a true sense of belonging within this community. Then suddenly, as if from nowhere, it could have all been snatched away from me by illness, if not death. I now feel like a new person given a second lease on life and I am excited for what we can do together in this place. My prayer for the whole College community: students, staff and our families alike, is that in this 96th year of Wesley’s life we value more than ever the gift we have been given. It should not have to come within a hair’s breadth of losing one’s life, as I have discovered, to be able to fully appreciate the twin companions of hope and faith that sustain us, undergirded always by love. We have all been given a wonderful opportunity to pursue lives of service and commitment. Let none us be found wanting. It is my great privilege to serve you as Chaplain, blessings. REV NALIN PERERA | COLLEGE CHAPLAIN

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From the Deputy Head A few years ago, a prominent advertising magazine included the word ‘sustainability’ on its list of the ‘jargoniest jargon’. The rationale was that the term is a good concept gone bad because of misuse and overuse. In the current age most people associate sustainability with the environment. This is not surprising given our rising awareness of the perilous state of the planet. To understand ‘sustainability’ in these terms is to limit its scope and original intent. Despite being an environmental scientist, the late Donella Meadows was one of the first to promote a broader perspective. She believed that the aim of sustainability is to fully realise human potential. Recently, our understanding of sustainability has expanded even further. To act sustainably is to uphold basic human rights, seek economic justice, strive for global peace and demonstrate a genuine respect for nature. It is about humanity sustaining not only the planet, but also humanity itself as an ethical influence on the world. It is these aspirational views that I want to reflect upon within the context of this publication, as they not only capture the essence of sustainability, but also align strongly with what we should seek in our approach to educating children. Sustainability and education are both balancing acts. This is because a host of different variables, influences and opinions are at play. Associated with this is the intersection of sometimes conflicting and competing demands; conservatism versus disruption; consumerism versus contribution; progression versus preservation. The list could go on. The key is finding a dynamic equilibrium. One that seeks to improve our way of life—without detrimentally affecting others—both now and into the future.

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Achieving this is a challenge, as it requires us to resist the urge to be reactive. In a world where innovation moves so quickly, it is hard to avoid being swept up by the latest craze or fad. If you are not trending, you can be quickly dismissed as irrelevant. This applies as readily to sustainability as it does to education. A recent Huffington Post article considered this paradox. Charting the brief history of sustainability, it suggests that the concept is not a trend but an ethic. It therefore takes discipline, conviction and a degree of courage to stay true to your ethos rather than jumping at shadows. At Wesley College, we are acutely aware of this. For some 96 years, we have stood by the motto Audendo Atque Agendo (By daring & by doing). For our existence to remain consistent with our essence, we know that we have to live by this creed rather than just pay lip service to it. I hope that you gain a sense of this as you flick through the pages of this magazine. To this point, I have drawn parallels between the challenges and opportunities facing both sustainability and education. I will conclude by suggesting that education also sits at the very heart of sustainability. For humanity to continue to exist and flourish, it requires our children to learn what it means and takes to live well, and to contribute to a truly sustainable future. Senegalese environmentalist, Baba Dioum, beautifully captured this sentiment in a powerful speech he made in 1968. He stated, ‘in the end, we will conserve only what we love, we will love only what we understand, and we will understand only what we are taught.’ Timeless words that go some way to proving that, when language is used well, it can transcend the most ‘jargoniest jargon’. NATHAN JESSUP | DEPUTY HEAD

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PICTURED Nathan Jessup with Caitlyn Roshkov (14–18–24).

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from the P&F I would like to thank Fiona Marais who was our dedicated and enthusiastic P&F Chair for the last 18 months. Prior to taking on the Chair position, Fiona took on many other voluntary positions within the College community. We will miss her energy, drive and the great pragmatism she provided. I will endeavour to continue her initiatives.

We can achieve these things only with active participation and input from our community.

This edition of The Wesleyan focuses on sustainability. What does that mean for a group like the P&F? We need to consider our role and place in the College community holistically, as part of an interconnected system.

To all those who already contribute to our College community through the P&F, I appreciate and respect the time and effort you put in. What better way to model a sustainable, connected community to our children than being an active citizen of that community?

Sustainability is a process of continuous improvement to allow our community to constantly evolve and make changes to accomplish our mutual goals. Ideally, any sustainable community’s objectives should include: ŰŰ t he creation of a collective vision for the future including the development of principles of sustainability; ŰŰ c lear and measurable goals with mutually agreed indicators to evaluate progress; ŰŰ broad and diverse involvement of members; ŰŰ a n inventory of existing assets and resources and additional assets that would benefit the community; ŰŰ open and transparent communication; and

I therefore encourage each of you to think about the vision and goals you might have for the P&F. Do we fund-raise or friend-raise? Who should we support? How can we serve the community more effectively? How can we make our College community and relationships better and more sustainable? How can we enrich our community experience and foster fellowship? How can we act to achieve all we want? What can we do to make these goals a reality?

Remember that even small contributions and differences can be important contributions and differences. I think John Wesley said it best, ‘he who governed the world before I was born shall take care of it likewise when I am dead. My part is to improve the present moment.’ In order to have a sustainable community we must constantly strive to review our goals to reflect our community ethos and vision. I look forward to continually working with our new Headmaster, Ross Barron, our Committee, and the parents and staff of the College to achieve our own sustainable Parents’ & Friends’ community. EMMA POWER | CHAIR OF THE P&F ASSOCIATION

ŰŰ the celebration of success.

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‘Without a sense of caring, there can be no sense of community.’ A N T H O N Y J . D 'A N G E L O

Wesley Friends Help in times of need

Wesley Friends is a confidential voluntary service which provides practical support to anyone in our community during times of need. Privacy and discretion are of paramount importance. Service is central to our beliefs and values at Wesley College. This extends beyond the classroom and into the wider community, with parents and staff modelling service through actions in the many voluntary roles available, including Wesley Friends. The Wesley community is often described as a family. Many of us live far from family and at times of need rely on our friends and the College community for support. It is comforting to know that the Wesley Friends service

is available during these difficult times. For many years, members of our community have cared for one another during times of illness, grief or family crisis. A card, a bouquet of flowers, a home-cooked meal says so much about how we care. A conversation over a cup of tea and offers of practical help at home are the services we can provide. We have a team of volunteers ready to help. If you would like to join the Wesley Friends team or know someone in need of practical support, please let us know via wesleyfriends@wesley.wa.edu.au


RECEIVE IN YOUR INBOX

We’re going digital! We have exciting news! You can now receive The Wesleyan as a digital publication. This means the content you love will now be available in a convenient digital format. The decision was made to align with our sustainable approach and how readers prefer to experience our magazine.

What this means for you. The Wesleyan will continue as a printed issue, but if you would like to go paperless and receive only the digital version, then please follow these three easy steps: 1. 2. 3.

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Send an email to communityrelations@wesley.wa.edu.au Subject line to be ‘I want to go digital’ Add in your full name

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College Collage It’s been a busy start to the year!


‘ Su sta i nabi l it y at We sley, for me, is a l l about reduci ng ou r i mpact on the env i ron ment so that the pr isti ne locat ion that we a re i n is wel lma i nta i ned for f utu re We sleya ns a nd members of the com mu n it y. ’ PAT R I C K A R T H U R (10 J )

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Proudly GREEN A whole College approach to sustainability

Visually speaking, Wesley is the ‘greenest’ school in the Public Schools’ Association. Walking through the campus, you are instantly overwhelmed by a sea of green: shirts, jumpers, gardens, ovals, crests and buildings. But when you think about it, is Wesley truly a green school? It is time to put the College’s sustainability under the microscope.

The Junior School students are, in many ways, leading the charge when it comes to thinking sustainably. At the very heart of the sub-school is the Sustainability Garden, designed and managed by Sarah de Laeter. The garden acts as a learning tool, teaching students that we can meet our present needs without compromising the needs of future generations.

Educational institutions like Wesley take pride in the fact that they are shaping the minds of the future. These minds will solve problems and change the way society operates. What is concerning, however, is the fact that these bright minds will be living on an incredibly polluted planet.

‘The garden at Wesley allows the children to engage with their environment and to learn while they’re doing that,’ said Head of Junior School, Maria Hodges. ‘The way in which we use the garden is what makes it unique. We have our own Sustainability teacher, we have incursions for older students, we use it as part of everyday classes and as a play space during break times. There’s a real sense of caring: caring for the garden, for plants, for trees, for others, for themselves and for the future. It is part of a much bigger picture.’

This concern is now at the forefront of the community’s collective mind and the time for raising awareness about Wesley’s environmental footprint is upon us. Accordingly, it is no surprise that 2018 saw the creation of a Sustainability Committee, led by the Headmaster’s Executive Assistant, Anna Sellings. The biggest challenge for Wesley and more specifically, this committee, is creating a shared mindset. We must fight this issue together, rather than saying, ‘I am just one person; what difference can I make to the wellbeing of the planet?’ ‘At first, it does appear too hard to make large-scale changes,’ explained committee member and Director of Service Learning and Leadership, Lynette McGivern. ‘It can be hard to know where to start. That’s why we are developing a whole College approach that will see positive incremental change in how we deal with waste.’ From the Junior School to the Senior School and from staff to the OWCA, this ‘whole College’ approach has been evident. In fact, within three months of adopting a greener outlook, the College had already made some small but positive changes. In 2018, Wesley College became a member of the Waste Wise Schools program. All staff members were provided with Keepcups to encourage more sustainable choices. Differentiated bins were introduced to staff kitchen areas to encourage recycling and composting. The use of single-use plastics, like disposable coffee cups and food wrappers in the canteen, has been reduced. Since the mentality shift, staff even limited their amount of printing by considerable amounts. Clearly, the staff are on board, but what of the students?

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Sarah agrees with this point. ‘The students learn so much in that space. They learn where our food comes from, how to recycle, how to be a better gardener and how to care for plants properly. I find it special that they can have the knowledge that they can grow vegetables at home and feel comfortable with living sustainably,’ she said. Market Day at the end of every term provides a fantastic indication of what the Junior School students are learning in relation to sustainability. Parents are invited into the space and are able to buy produce that comes straight from the garden, including herbs, succulents, worm tea and flowers. The students collect all the money that is raised, and this is used to buy new plants for the garden. As a result, there is a real sense of ownership of the garden, of nature and of the future. On the other side of Swan Street, the Middle School is also joining the march towards a greener Wesley. Year 6 students have been joining forces with GreenBatch, a company that is working towards building Western Australia’s first plastic recycling facility. As a component of this partnership, students in Business Ventures classes have been tasked with creating stickers for bins, with hope that they will indicate more clearly what waste should be in each bin.

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LEFT TO RIGHT Volunteer boarders picking up rubbish at a local beach. Patrick Arthur (10J) with Darren Lomman, the CEO of GreenBatch.

The Middle School’s involvement with GreenBatch was completely driven by a Year 10 student, Patrick Arthur (10J). After attending a United Nations run program that featured a guest speaker from GreenBatch, Patrick returned to the College with a dream. ‘After hearing that talk, I knew it was something we could implement at Wesley,’ said Patrick. ‘We already have five or so 3D printers and the plastics that are recycled through GreenBatch could be used as filaments.’ As a result of his newfound interest in caring for the environment, Patrick was invited to be one of the two students involved with the Sustainability Committee. ‘Sustainability at Wesley, for me, is all about reducing our impact on the environment so that the pristine location that we are in is well-maintained for future Wesleyans and members of the community. Many students, including myself at times, see sustainability as a bit of a chore. It is often easier to put your waste in the nearest bin. I see Wesley joining up with GreenBatch as a bit of a legacy that I can leave behind. It is not as if I have come to Wesley for an education and will graduate and that is it. I will have been able to help the College for the better—and that’s pretty exciting,’ he explained. Patrick’s passion for sustainability is beginning to spread amongst older students. Up in the Senior School, students are venturing outside the campus to help care for the environment. Over the past four years, Wesley College has been a proud supporter of the Tangaroa Blue Foundation Beach Clean-up. In pairs, students roam beaches for large

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parts of a day and each piece of rubbish that is collected is documented and logged in fine detail, allowing the Tangaroa Blue Foundation to find waste trends. The Wesley Bike Rescue Initiative that began in 2018 is another example of Senior School students getting involved in meaningful activities. In support of Bicycles for Humanity WA, 35 Year 10 students gave up an hour of their time per week to salvage and fix bikes to be sent to families in Africa. After the success of the Wesley Bike Rescue Initiative in the Senior School, the Middle School Bike Rescue Club commenced in Term 1 of this year. The club currently features three Year 6 students and is expected to grow as the year goes on. The bikes salvaged by the club will be sent to local children. ‘The focus of the project is to collect unwanted bikes—many of which would be bound for landfill—to reduce waste and donate to children locally who are either recently arrived refugees or children who are in dire situations related to domestic violence. Hopefully the students will have a different attitude towards throwing their own stuff out and will realise what they can do for others,’ said Humanities and Social Sciences teacher, Declan Hanley. Senior School students are also offered the opportunity to venture out to Rottnest Island for snorkelling trips. These trips, organised by Carijoa, highlight what is happening to the seagrass as a result of pollution. Paul Day from the Wesley Maintenance Team, who leads the trips, is also a Marine Biologist, so the knowledge that he passes on is incredibly valuable.

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP Jordan Sprigg (08-09) with his sculpture made completely out of scrap material. | Ian Simpson, Penny Reiss and John McGuckin with their Wesley College Keepcups. | Harrison Sutherland (11T), Ike Sutherland (11C), Harrison Beeck (11C) and Marcus Varone (11C) fixing bikes for the Wesley Bike Rescue.

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP Patrick Arthur (10J) explaining what GreenBatch is to Brody Coles (601), Remy Hamilton-Ducroz (601), Jake Rintoul (601) and Aidan Brennan (601) | Year 7 students observing the aquaponics set-up in the Mildred Manning Science Centre | Oliver Welland (10M), Christopher Jongue (10M) and Travis Godfrey (10H) with wallets made from recycled plastic.

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ABOVE The Sustainability Committee consisting of Wendy White, Ivy Goncalves, Veronica Bowman, Joshua Troy (12G), Lynette McGivern, Patrick Arthur (10J), Paul Sutton, Kathy Krajcar, Anna Sellings and Claire Leong.

Lynette believes the students have learnt a lot from the experience. ‘I like the idea of those sorts of recreational activities,’ she said. ‘It teaches students that looking after and enjoying the environment, aren’t mutually exclusive. We need to understand that to have those incredible recreational activities in the future, we need to start caring for the environment now.’

over the three years,’ Roger said. ‘They learnt how to shape the hole for each plant to catch rainfall run-off and how to remove weeds to support plant growth. Through active involvement in a conservation activity, we hope they have gained an appreciation of the importance of preserving the natural environment for native animals—even in the middle of Perth’s suburbs!’

Looking around, Wesley is filled with consistent reminders that we are indeed going green. The recently refurbished Mildred Manning Science Centre features a comprehensive aquaponics set-up that recycles fish waste and uses it as a nutrient source for plants within the centre. On top of this, the Maintenance Team has installed sensors on lights, flow restrictors on taps and showers, dual flush toilet pans and more environmentally friendly air conditioner controls, just to name a few inclusions.

As a PK to Year 12 College, it is imperative that sustainability messages are consistently circulating throughout the entire community. Furthermore, even The Wesleyan itself is taking a more sustainable approach, with future editions set to be available online, if preferred.

Impressively, many past students are also thinking green. Jordan Sprigg (08–09) makes incredible sculptures of all sorts of animals. These sculptures are made completely from scrap metal and old machinery. Roger Reynolds (62–66) and his local community group, JMH Action, has been revegetating an area of land near Como Secondary College. The purpose of this revegetation is to provide a food source for the Carnaby’s black cockatoo, an endangered species with a major roosting site in the area. With the support from the community and local schools, Roger and his team have been able to plant over 9,000 trees within three years.

Although it is incredibly difficult to gauge how much of a difference our actions are making when it comes to the environment, the statistics do not lie. The College’s involvement in the Waste Wise Schools program has seen the introduction of compost bins on the campus. Proudly, between May and December of 2018, Wesley College diverted 6.5 tonnes of food waste from landfill. Whether we realise it or not, the small efforts do indeed add up to make a difference. That being said, Wesley is acknowledging that there is a lot left to do in relation to reducing its environmental footprint. We have made a start, but it is just that—a start. It is time to show our true colours. Let us proudly be green!

‘Students from Wesley College have helped with the planting

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Peer mentoring Instilling confidence in our young men

As a young man, engaging a class of fellow students is no simple feat. This challenge is what the ‘peer leaders’ of the recently introduced Peer Mentoring program were faced with. At the start of the year, students from Years 10–12 nominated themselves to become ‘peer leaders’ and in a few short weeks they were running hour-long activities for groups of Year 7 students. Before entering the classroom, the leaders were required to partake in a series of training sessions in the first week of Term 1. Spanning across two afternoons, the sessions lasted six hours and revolved around topics such as communication techniques, interaction styles and empathy. Lynette McGivern, the Director of Service Learning and Leadership, has championed the program with the aid of frameworks and guidance from Peer Support Australia. ‘In the training sessions, there were lots of role plays. The leaders were challenged to think differently and ask themselves: how would the Year 7s think in this situation?’ Lynette said. This notion of thinking differently is exactly what the program revolves around. By learning to rethink every problem that presents itself, resilience can be developed. ‘It has taught us a lot about resilience. We’ve needed to adjust our thinking and consider how we deliver content to different groups. Even the notion of preparing for and managing a class has been eye opening. It’s made us think about what our teachers do,’ Bryn Hamersley (11T) said. Following the training sessions, the Peer Mentoring process began. With interactive styles in mind, each Year 10 leader was paired up with a Year 11 or Year 12. The pairs were then assigned a group of nine Year 7 students to meet with every Tuesday during the day, running sessions with themes such as growth mindsets and teamwork.

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‘The program has been really interesting. We have been forced to get out of our comfort zones with a group of younger students who we didn’t even know the names of to begin with,’ Ben Fowler (10D) said. ‘It’s great that the older students have sacrificed their time to run through the activities and games with us. The mentors have been really nice—they are just normal teenage boys now in our eyes; they aren’t intimidating at all,’ Lachlan Caddy (704) added. The positive vertical interactions between year groups that have been fostered as a result of the program have highlighted its success. This was clearly demonstrated when the Peer Leaders ventured out to the Year 7 camp, joining in for a day. The full list of benefits, however, are yet to be discovered. When the now Year 7s move into Year 9, becoming members of the Senior School, they will be welcomed by the familiar faces of their mentors. ‘Feedback from the Year 7 teaching staff has been incredibly positive,’ Head of Middle School, Brad Hilliard, said. ‘Having the older students working with students in the Middle School is a great concept, with the connections between younger and older students being an obvious outcome. Having a large group of the older students volunteer to attend the Year 7 camp is testament to these young men and the impact that they are having on the younger students.’ ‘It’s not just about building those bridges, it’s the upkeep that counts. Being able to see the Year 7s each week has helped to develop some really strong relationships. When we walk past them on the campus we can stop and say hello, and that’s pretty special,’ D’Arcy McDonald (11T) said. Instilling confidence in the young leaders of the College and the community, as well as fostering relationship building, bodes well for the future. The Peer Mentoring program looks destined to stay.

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PICTURED Lachlan Caddy (704) and Bryn Hamersley (11T).

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PICTURED Campbell Bignell (PP2), Micah Cunningham (PP1) and Jacqueline Fang (PP2) in the Junior School's Stick Land.

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From the Junior School Head of Junior School, Maria Hodges, explains the importance of the Sustainability Garden in the Junior School

The three ‘Rs’—reading, ’riting and ’rithmetic have always been at the heart of education, but recently they have been joined by three more—reduce, reuse and recycle. Admittedly, the six ‘Rs’ might be a little unwieldy, but the truth is, in modern education the need to be aware of sustainability is an important addition to the essentials of Mathematics and English. After all, while the three ‘Rs’ will always be the building blocks for the curriculum, we can’t ignore the need for humans to change our habits to protect the planet for future generations of children. Teaching our children how to do this is vital—from learning how to eliminate waste, to vermicomposting, to growing their own vegetables. In fact, the Melbourne Declaration on Education Goals for Young Australians, identified sustainability as an area of prime importance for young people to learn about. As teachers, parents and a community, it is our charge to take this on to ensure we equip our children for their futures. This is a large responsibility resting upon us. The good news is it is fun and children love this subject area. If many of us think back to our own childhoods, it was not uncommon for us to have many sustainable practices as part of our regular lives growing up. I don’t remember it being called sustainability or it being something I ever thought about. It was just what we did. In our house, dad had a large compost bin and we would save our scraps and turn the big barrel handle around and round until it was ready to put on the garden. A trip to the tip with dad was the best and we would search for recycled goodies to take home and furnish the cubby—much to mum’s disgust! Our back yard had lemon and fruit trees and even some chickens roaming around. Digging, planting and harvesting

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were part of our everyday lives and when we were hot and thirsty a long drink from the garden hose did the trick! We made cubbies out of sticks and bits of rubble we found, we dug in the dirt and splashed in muddy puddles after it had rained. We collected eggs and picked mulberries from any neighbour who happened to have this delicious fruit growing, coming home stained from the juice running down our chins! Our swings were recycled tyres hung from trees and our skipping ropes were literally ropes dad gave us once he was finished with them. It was real and it was fun. This also happens to be the kind of environment we provide for our children in the Junior School. The chickens, mud, and materials to build a cubby can all be found in our Sustainability Garden, along with plants for children to grow and tend to. They can even nibble on the result of their efforts when the harvest comes around. We are fortunate that we have the expert guidance of our Sustainability teacher, Sarah De Laeter, who ensures the children are taught about the safe handling of equipment and materials as well as overseeing the garden program and classes with the children. At the end of each term, a Market Day is held where the children sell their produce to families. The money raised funds the garden and the program. So, of course, every child at Wesley learns the very best in reading, ’riting and ’rithmetic—but they also learn the very best in sustainability. Skills that help them see themselves as part of the wider world—a global community trying to do our bit to protect our planet. As we push further into the 21st Century, that is vital. Plus, the carrots are delicious. MARIA HODGES | HEAD OF JUNIOR SCHOOL

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From the Middle School The power of the outdoors

Head of Middle School, Brad Hilliard, sat down with the new Head of Outdoor Learning, Matthew Wells, at the Year 7 Camp. Here’s what Brad took away from their conversation. When I look back at my own childhood and schooling, I have many fond memories regarding outdoor education and I see similarities with the Outdoor Learning program at Wesley, which has been developed to build students’ resilience, life skills and a passion for the great outdoors. Recently, I joined our new Head of Outdoor Learning, Matthew Wells, on the Year 7 Camp at Nanga, where he gave me some interesting perspectives on not only the importance of the program but the benefits that can be taken back into the school setting as well as drawn on in the future. I asked Matt how Outdoor Learning at Wesley compared to what he has seen in other schools. ‘I think this question can be answered in two parts,’ he said. ‘Firstly, I see Outdoor Learning at Wesley as being part of the fabric that makes this College so unique. Outdoor Learning is an important co-curricular program, and we are able to offer unique experiential based activities that span from Margaret River to Karijini.

for their next personal or group goal. In doing so, they have the chance to create their own unique experiences in the outdoors,’ Matt explained. Parents can sometimes be unsure of the benefits of Outdoor Learning as they have not necessarily had the same experiences in their own schooling. Convincing parents of the benefits can be a challenge, but one that Matt believes is easily overcome when they see the opportunities their children are encouraged to experience. ‘Education as a whole is an ever changing environment and Outdoor Learning is just one facet of this,’ he said. ‘I would have to say that one of the greatest benefits to Outdoor Learning is giving students the opportunity to learn through their achievements and mistakes but also offer them a chance to learn outside the classroom. Outdoor Learning offers a wonderful opportunity for students to learn about the natural world, themselves and others around them in a remote environment. Students are trusted to experience the College motto of By daring & by doing and are provided with a unique, safe and supportive space to learn and grow.’

‘Both teachers and students understand the ‘why’ of Outdoor Learning. This is largely due to the College committing time for students to grow and learn and also due to the exceptional Katitjin program which is built upon similar principles.

It is important that the community is aware of the obvious benefits that students gain as well as less well-known ones. ‘The obvious outcomes for students are resilience, selfmanagement, self-awareness, positive relationships (with themselves, others and the natural environment) as well as the notion of leadership and followership,’ said Matt. ‘Some of the lesser known benefits are the concepts of experiential education or learning through one’s experiences, which develop lifelong skills and a passion for outdoor activities such as mountain biking, climbing and hiking. However, by far the best, and sometimes the most overlooked, are the connections and friendships that are formed whilst on the program and the benefit to one’s mental health by simply ‘disconnecting’ from the digital world.’

‘Secondly, the program is progressive. At no point do the students take a step backwards, instead they are encouraged to challenge and move out of their comfort zone or strive

After my conversation with Matt and experiencing the Year 7 Camp, I think Outdoor Education at Wesley is in very good hands!

‘This experiential style of program is different as it promotes lifelong activities and positive relationships. Within the Outdoor Learning program at Wesley, the students do not simply travel through a place, they are given time to understand it. I suppose that differs from other Outdoor Learning approaches that I have seen. Also, at Wesley the community is very positive about the program.

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MATT’S TOP FIVE THINGS TO PACK:

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1. WATER 2. WIDE BRIMMED HAT 3. SHELTER AND SLEEPING GEAR 4. GOOD FOOD 5. BACKPACK!

ABOVE Photos from the Year 7 Camp.

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Nathan Inkiriwang Keys to success

Skilful pianist, Jonathan (Nathan) Inkiriwang (11D), is impressing anyone fortunate enough to hear him play.

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On the stage sits a grand piano, in darkness aside from a single spotlight. A musician walks towards it, sits and begins to play. The sound is that of a virtuoso—emotion evident in every fluid keypress. He expresses light and shade, joy and regret—a love story brought to life through the power of the music. But our pianist isn’t wearing a tuxedo or performing in a sold out auditorium. Not quite yet, anyway. Instead, Nathan Inkiriwang is in the Goatcher Auditorium wearing the same shorts and green jumper as any other student in Year 11. Despite being only 16, Nathan possesses an ability to imbue incredibly complex pieces of music with sentiments that go beyond his years. ‘I don’t like talking to people all that much, but when I sit at a piano I see that as my chance to express how I feel,’ he explains. ‘With every song there’s something that I want to express or a story I want to tell so I try to convey that as well as I can.’ Of course, such prodigious talent doesn’t come without years of work. Nathan began learning piano when he was three and a half and living in Indonesia. ‘My mum thought it would be a great way to link the left and right sides of my brain, and I enjoyed it,’ Nathan remembers. The tinkling of that toddler has turned into a much more concerted effort—with Nathan practising two to three hours a day as well as having additional lessons at the Western Australia Academy of Performing Arts a couple of times a week. Moving to Australia has been a big step forwards for Nathan, who joined Wesley at the start of the year. ‘It’s been a big change, but Wesley is a great school. I needed time to adapt— the curriculum is quite different from the one in Indonesia— but Wesley is so supportive, I feel as if I’ve really settled in.’ So if you’re walking through the College and you hear the sound of Chopin or Rachmaninoff in the air, take a moment to stop and enjoy Nathan’s immense talent. After all, in a decade, you'll probably have to pay to see him play in a concert hall.

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FeNaClNG Festival Karratha 3 & 4 August

Engagin’ in Wagin Wesley took to the road to visit the Wagin Woolorama in March

One of the highlights of the year is getting to load up the College bus and drive from the city to regional events. This is especially true at the moment, with so many people keen to meet our new Headmaster, Ross Barron, and our new Head of Boarding, Rodney Steer. The first trip of the year was to Wagin for the Woolorama. Attracting around 20,000 visitors, the Woolorama is always a great place to catch up with Wesley families and people interested in joining our community.

Mingenew Midwest Expo 14 & 15 August

This year was no different, with our stand absolutely buzzing in the Education Pavilion. Ross and Rod were thrilled to have the chance to introduce themselves to as many people as possible. On Friday, we rounded off a great day by hosting drinks at the brilliantly named Wine Baa. The perfect end to a great visit.

LOOK OUT FOR OUR UPCOMING COMMUNITY VISITS. WE HOPE TO SEE YOU THERE! Dowerin Field Day 28 & 29 August

Newdegate Field Day 4 & 5 September

Esperance Agricultural Show 18 & 19 October

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PICTURED Students, parents, staff and Old Collegians at the Wagin Woolorama.

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PICTURED Angus Lothian (9C) and Annette Davoren.

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Spotlight On:

Annette Davoren Annette Davoren is the Health Services Manager at Wesley. She joined the College in 2008 and in that time has helped to care for thousands of students, staff, parents and community members.

What made you choose to join Wesley College? Wesley College had a great reputation for being a community which regarded both staff and students as individuals, and encouraged them to become part of something much bigger than themselves. I also wanted to give back to the farming community of Western Australia as my family were one of the first landholders in the Esperance region in the 1950s.

Tell us what makes the Wesley College Health Centre a special place to work. Every day, I look forward to coming to work with the Registered Nurse team to make a difference in our community.

During your years at Wesley, what changes have you seen in the College and in the students? The students and the campus have all grown. I have seen 11 Year 12 cohorts graduate and buildings revamped and also built anew. The College renews itself on a continual basis but continues to offer a safe place to learn and live.

Outside of the College, what are your favourite things to do? I love to garden and cook for my friends.

What makes Wesley a great place to work? Wesley College does not feel like a place of work. It is a lifestyle, an extension of my own family and the work is effortless. Every day brings something new for me to learn from and I feel proud of what I offer to the community.

What has been the most satisfying moment of your time at Wesley? Watching each student grow and move off into the world as a fine young person with something to offer somewhere.

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PICTURED Mark Thomas, Taj Rollings (601) and Milo Kern (603).

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Spotlight On:

Mark Thomas Mark Thomas is the Head of Arts (Performance) at Wesley. He joined the College, in this newly created position, at the beginning of 2017 and has quickly settled in.

As a family, we love to go camping and following a recent purchase of a 4x4 we are hoping to explore more of this beautiful country.

What made you choose to join Wesley College?

What makes Wesley a great place to work?

I have always had a passion for working in the performing arts and felt that the position at Wesley would give me the opportunity to lead programs of inclusion and excellence. I believe, particularly in working with boys through their adolescent years and that opportunities in the performing arts allow students to explore and develop their creativity, social and emotional responses, communication, collaboration and risk taking whether it be acting on stage, singing in a choir or playing in a band or orchestra.

I believe Wesley is a very special community and I have certainly enjoyed the help and support of everyone in settling into my new role. I also think that Wesley does an outstanding job in preparing students for their future pathways, exposing and developing their interests and talents and personalising the educational experience for the needs of every child.

Tell us what makes the Wesley Arts Department a special place to work. In previous roles I have worked primarily in Music Departments so I have enjoyed the opportunity at Wesley to work in an Arts team that is incredibly collaborative and passionate about engaging students holistically and providing a stimulating arts community at the College.

During your time at Wesley, what has impressed you most about the students? Having only been at Wesley for just over a year, I continue to be impressed by the willingness of the students to engage in the whole life of the College and to support each other in their interests and talents. I also believe there is strong sense of excitement and enthusiasm where Wesley can further grow and succeed as we approach our centenary, and beyond.

Outside of the College, what are your favourite things to do?

What are some of your highlights from your time at Wesley? There have been many highlights for me over my short time at Wesley including the creation of a symphony orchestra, Beauty and the Beast, the choral showcase concert at Winthrop Hall, and the inaugural Battle of the Bands and Jazz at The Ellington. However, Wesley Takes the Stage at the Perth Concert Hall was probably my most satisfying moment. I valued the opportunity to bring together the whole College community to celebrate the arts at Perth’s premier performance venue. I witnessed the look of excitment as our youngest students first walked onto the stage and and then watched with pride as the combined choirs, senior strings and Moorditj Mob shared the stage with Gina Williams and members of the West Australian Symphony Orchestra. Finally, the collaboration of students, Old Collegians, staff and parents joining in a special finale performance was incredible. These are some of the moments that I have most enjoyed.

In a previous life, I competed in and taught ballroom and Latin dancing and continue to enjoy this as a social hobby.

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PICTURED Sage Clarke (802), Harrison Sutherland (11T), Leon Francis (802), Rodney Steer, Liam Wicks-Manado (10C) and Bohan Teakle (12T).

Boarding The boarders get to know Rodney Steer Taking on the position of Head of Boarding at Wesley College at the beginning of the year has been a life-changing event for Rodney Steer. Taking the plunge and moving to Perth from Geelong with his young family was a major decision for Rod and his wife, but they are extremely happy that they have made the move. For Rod, the two most important things in boarding are community and relationships, and he has been busy building strong relationships with our Boarding community by spending as much time as he can with the boarders, their families and boarding staff. Rod recently sat down with a few of the boarders for a chat. Here are some of the burning questions the boarders wanted to know about him.

Leon Francis (802) Which AFL team do you support? We are a tragic Collingwood family as my dad played for them in the 1960s. He played in the 1964 Grand Final and lost by four points and then again in the 1966 Grand Final and lost by one point! If you watch the final moments of the 1966 Grand Final, you will see Barry Breen kick the winning point with only minutes to go. That occurred just after two old blokes contest a ball up, and the Collingwood player involved is my dad, Trevor. My whole extended family goes for Collingwood based on this, even all my uncles on my mum’s side changed to support Collingwood. I’m not going to give up on them, even though

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they have caused me a lot of heartache over the years, especially in these current times. We managed to live in Geelong without converting. I enjoy the heritage of the club and the sense of pride our boys have knowing that their Pa played for the team. Realistically, they didn’t have much of a choice!

Sage Clarke (802) Are you a dog or cat person? We have two dogs, so I am definitely a dog person. Sabi and Coco are our fearsome Spoodles; a cocker spaniel crossed with a poodle. If you walk past our house they will present a tough front, but would probably just lick you to death.

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What are you up to this weekend? Liam Wicks-Manado (10C) How have you found the transition from Geelong to Perth? That’s an interesting question as there are two aspects to it for me; settling in as Head of Boarding and settling into life in Perth as a family. Our sons, Thomas (401) and Jackson (601), are settling in really well. It turns out we actually knew some Wesley families through a friend and they have a son who is not only in Year 6 with Jackson, but actually in his class. This made the first few days much easier for both of them. My wife, Sarah, subconsciously still feels like she is on holiday in Queensland with the weather we have had. She has been enjoying the local area, including the foreshore and Perth city. Wesley is perfectly positioned so we have all been out bike riding and exploring the various beaches on weekends. For me, settling in as Head of Boarding has been a very enjoyable transition owing to the people that I work with. This extends from the students and staff in the Boarding House through to the College. The Wesley Boarding community has been very welcoming with the Residents on Duty and Year Level Co-ordinators having all been fantastic in many different ways. Overall, our decision to come to Wesley has been very positive and we are all very happy that we made the move.

Harrison Sutherland (11T) Had you been to Western Australia much before you moved over here? Five years ago we came across and spent some time down in Dunsborough and then had three nights in Fremantle, which included a day trip to Rottnest Island. This experience was enough for us to know how beautiful the area is and there is so much more to explore. Already this year, we have been back down to Dunsborough and a few other places locally. As a family we plan to explore the State at every opportunity. We have a camper trailer and over the Easter holidays we travelled to Esperance and explored the natural beauty there. We also managed to stop in Hyden, to visit the Nield family, before making our way to Esperance. There is a long list of other places to visit that just keeps growing as people proudly extol the virtues of their area. Exmouth, Shark Bay and Broome are on our list. Luckily, we now know lots of people in these areas to drop in and visit and get inside information from!

I am actually planning on going surfing with one of the Science staff members, Glenn Solomon. We are heading up the coast to Wedge Island, I believe. It all depends on the swell and wind, and his knowledge will come in handy. Being in the ocean is where I unwind and finding a wave is an added bonus. When we lived in Victoria, we used to spend a lot of time with family and friends camping by the beach. This included treks to Fraser Island during the holidays so we could camp on the beach and explore.

Bohan Teakle (12T) What has been the most difficult part of your move interstate? I’d have to say leaving our family behind. Whilst we were all spread out over Victoria and New South Wales, it’s a bit more difficult from here to just jump in a car and visit them. But, we have them organised for visits and they are looking forward to coming over.

What do you consider your greatest achievement? Personally, I consider my family to to be my greatest achievement. Providing for, supporting and working with my wife to give our boys an environment that will help them thrive, is something that we have worked hard to do and of which I am very proud. Sporting wise, reaching the quarter finals of the Surf Boats at the National Surf Life Saving Championships at Kurrawa in 2003 was a personal highlight. As a coach, winning the National Schools' Basketball tournament in 2004 was a great team effort. Both are achievements of which I am extremely proud for different reasons. Professionally, one that springs to mind quite often when asked is when I worked with a group of students at a previous school to swim the English Channel as relay teams. It was a 12 month journey and for the two teams to successfully complete the swim, landing on the beach of Sangatte in France, was a very powerful moment as an educator. The personal growth in each of the students, in various ways, was amazing and a strong reminder as to why I teach.

As part of the Head of Boarding role, I plan on attending all the community events this year to make sure I meet as many of our Boarding families as possible. It is really important to me to get to know the boarders, their families and where they come from. My first experience was the Wagin Woolarama which was a great couple of days. Farming in Western Australia is on a different scale to back home; our farm back east would be the ‘house paddock’ here.

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Moorditj Mob Dan Barnes has a passion for the Moorditj Mob

We caught a minute with Wesley’s new Indigenous Program Coordinator, to find out what drew him to the College.

extremely successful—which is highlighted by the amount of interest we get externally.

The Moorditj Mob is a unique aspect of life at Wesley College. Few other Public Schools’ Association schools have a dedicated Indigenous Pathways program, let alone anything on the scale of what Wesley is attempting to achieve.

‘We’re regularly contacted by other schools, businesses and government agencies asking if they can have the Moorditj Mob perform a dance, an Acknowledgement of Country or a workshop. I really want to continue that momentum, while getting the balance right with the students’ education.’

With around 40 students being offered a needs-based Indigenous Scholarship, the College is leading the way in trying to narrow the gap between the educational opportunities available to non-Indigenous and Indigenous students. The man currently at the helm of the program is Dan Barnes, who joined Wesley at the start of the year. Although he’s new to the College, Dan has previously worked with Aboriginal people in Western Australia. ‘Prior to joining Wesley, I was working up in the Pilbara with Indigenous communities,’ he said. ‘The aim was to deliver a sport and recreation program to remote communities. Doing that up there ignited my passion and interest in Aboriginal culture.

Naturally, great care is taken to ensure that each student who volunteers to dance does so with minimal impact on his lessons. However, the educational impact that comes from the experience cannot be underestimated. ‘We’re going out and doing dance performances, becoming well-known in the community,’ said Dan. ‘So the students are developing as leaders—as well as educating non-Indigenous (and even some Indigenous) people about their culture.’ Having a bit of time together travelling in the College bus has also helped Dan slot into his Moorditj Mob role, as it’s a great way to get to know the students better.

‘Helping students engage in their own culture, and develop their own knowledge about their own culture, as well as having all the opportunities that come with a great education seemed like a really good balance for Indigenous students.’

‘The students have been really good. As soon as I got to know them it was obvious that they were great young men to talk to and to deal with. I’m enjoying building a relationship with each of them.

Of course, Dan has had the good fortune to inherit a thriving program. ‘I have to acknowledge that my predecessor, Ben Lewis, did a wonderful job and the work he put in really lifted the profile of the Moorditj Mob. The program has become

‘I’ve also been really lucky to have fantastic support from Derek Nannup and Michael Spratt (10–14) who have made my transition into the role much smoother.’

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PICTURED Leon Francis (802), Dan Barnes, Brayden Kickett (9T) and Anthony O’Dene (11C).

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Why Give? Scholarships, a life-changing gift

Each year the generosity of our community allows us to award more than 25 scholarships to students from all over the State; Indigenous, academic, rural, music and general excellence—students whose contribution to the world will exceed our wildest imagination. We sat down with a small group of our most recent scholarship recipients and spoke to them about their scholarship experience. These students come from different cultures and backgrounds, but their responses were all so similar. Here’s what they had to say.

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Lachlan Ison (702)

Nathan Duke-Yonge (803)

Arthur Marshall Scholarship

George Ferguson Scholarship

What makes going to school at Wesley special?

What makes going to school at Wesley special?

The opportunities which are offered to all students at Wesley make it special, whether it is academic or leadership. Everyone has an opportunity to learn and experience new things.

I think Wesley is really special because it has an all-round approach. I really enjoy the well-roundedness of the College and getting to give lots of things a go, especially Katitjin.

The community feel is also special here. Everyone feels as if they belong. Also, the teachers. From my experience they’ve all been invested in me and want to help me. They don’t just want to teach me the curriculum and that is it. It’s about me and how I’m going.

What three words come to your mind when you think about Wesley? Opportunity, community and I know it’s not a word, but the College motto, By daring & by doing.

How did you feel when you heard that you had won a scholarship? I was really excited that I’d actually done it, but I was also appreciative and grateful that I’d received a scholarship and also honoured that I’d received the Arthur Marshall Scholarship and that I get to uphold his name.

What three words come to your mind when you think about Wesley? Amazing, opportunities and fun.

How did you feel when you heard that you had won a scholarship? It felt amazing. I really wanted it to help my mum financially.

What does it mean to you to be a scholarship recipient? It means that I’m a role model and a representative for the College. It’s a really good way to get involved in all the activities I do, such as debating, World Scholars Cup and da Vinci Decathlon.

What does it mean to you to be a scholarship recipient? To me, it means that I have to set a good example for my peers and become a role model.

What was it like meeting the Marshall family? It was amazing; an experience that I will never forget. They told me a lot about Arthur Marshall (47–51) OAM and it made me feel connected to the Scholarship and them as a family. I really want to make them proud and do well.

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James Timcke (804)

Matthew Tang (702)

General Excellence Scholarship

Council Music Scholarship

What makes going to school at Wesley special?

What makes going to school at Wesley special?

The community—because you’re with the same group of people for an extended period of time you are always so close to everyone and get to know people really well. I also love all of the opportunities that we’re given. The new Mildred Manning Science Centre and Languages Centre are great spaces to learn in; the Trenaman Library is also cool.

The community feeling is really great, I have lots of friends and everyone knows each other.

What three words come to your mind when you think about Wesley? Integrity: being yourself and knowing who you are as a person. Community: everyone knows everyone and there is always a familiar face to turn to. Mateship: knowing that there is always someone to listen to you and you can listen to them.

How did you feel when you heard that you had won a scholarship? It put a skip in my step knowing that I’d achieved something quite special. It was a nice feeling.

What does it mean to you to be a scholarship recipient? It is special and not something that I take lightly as a person. It also means respecting others, holding myself accountable for my actions, taking control and being independent.

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What three words come to your mind when you think about Wesley? Community, special and striving.

How did you feel when you heard that you had won a scholarship? I felt really accomplished, and I felt that I could achieve at Wesley.

What does it mean to you to be a scholarship recipient? It means a lot to me as without this scholarship I wouldn’t be able to go to Wesley and now being here, I really enjoy it. There are heaps of opportunities; the people are nice and it’s a great feeling here at the College.

What does music mean to you? Music is a way of expressing yourself. When you’re happy you can show it through music. Music is a great thing to enjoy!

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Pratyush Goel (803)

Cyril Jones (701)

Arthur Moore Scholarship

Indigenous Scholarship

What makes going to school at Wesley special?

What makes going to school at Wesley special?

The sense of community and the friendships I have made here are really good. Also, the opportunities that Wesley provides are really good too.

The teachers push you to the best of your ability and you can really trust them. They really have your back.

What three words come to your mind when you think about Wesley?

What three words come to your mind when you think about Wesley? Brotherhood, challenging and fun.

Opportunity, facilities and community.

How did you feel when you heard that you had won a scholarship? I was shocked as there were so many people going for scholarships with limited places. I was sort of wondering ‘am I going to get it?’ I was very nervous. I was also happy and proud of myself.

What does it mean to you to be a scholarship recipient? I feel as if I need to be performing to a high standard and engage in all the co-curricular opportunities that are on offer here.

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How did you feel when you heard that you had won a scholarship? I was really proud and my whole family was so proud of me. To be the first in our family to get to a school like Wesley, I was really stoked.

What does it mean to you to be a scholarship recipient? I feel really proud to be a role model to other Indigenous boys, showing them that they can go to a school like Wesley and get a really good education. It’s really good sharing my culture with the community and being able to dance.

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Corner of Coode and Angelo Streets South Perth WA 6151 PO Box 149 South Perth WA 6951 +61 8 9368 80 0 0 wesley.wa.edu.au


‘It’s the richness in the life that is important, not the richness in the bank.’

FEATURE STORY

KYLE BOWEN IS SHOOTING FOR THE SKY Story on page 6

NEW THIS EDITION WYVERN CORNER OFFICE How the Carter brothers are caring for the community See page 10

Photo courtesy of the Perth Wildcats.

AL AN CARTER (69–72) | FOUNDING CO-CHAIR OF RECONCILIATION WA


Inside this edition Winter 2019 | Edition 29

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FROM THE PRESIDENT

SHOOTING FOR THE SKY

WESLEY CORNER OFFICE

It's been a busy start to the year for the OWCA

We look at rising star, Kyle Bowen

We sit down with Ian and Alan Carter


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ALLEN THOMAS

REWARDING EXCELLENCE

ANZAC DAY

IN MEMORIAM

CONDOLENCES

A passion for science, a passion for life

We speak to the 2019 President's Award recipient

Wesley honours those who made the ultimate sacrifice


From the President As we approach the halfway mark of an action-packed 2019, it is important to take a breath and reflect on what has already been an eventful start to the year for the Association. We started 2019 with the Commissioning of Headmaster and OWCA Patron, Ross Barron. In his short time as Headmaster, Ross has impressed many with his personable approach and his desire to continue to strengthen ties between the OWCA and the College. In early April we hosted the Annual Combined PSA Beverley Districts’ Dinner, and thank Dean Nalder (79-83) MLA for his keynote speech on the evening. Dean was trying to shake an early bout of the flu, so we really appreciate him soldiering on and providing a compelling insight into WA politics and some of the infrastructure challenges the State faces as our population continues to grow. As is tradition, our fallen Old Collegians were honoured on ANZAC Day in our Memorial Chapel, followed by the laying of the wreath in the Old Collegians’ Memorial Rose Garden. We have some wonderful photos from the day on page 19. The Pioneers’ Club is going from strength to strength and Pioneers’ Day continues to be a highlight of the OWCA calendar, our 1969 leavers being the newest members to be invited to join the club. At lunch, the 2019 OWCA

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Presidents’ Award winner, Jonathan Parker (11H), delivered an insightful speech about what it meant to be a Wesleyan. You can find out more about Jonathan in the Awarding Excellence article on page 16. We are also delighted that the 2018 award recipient, Benjamin Roshkov (12M), is the College Captain for 2019. The committee has again been very active, engaging in a number of discussions and updating policies relating to investments, strategic planning and scholarship criteria. We have also been working hard organising upcoming events for the Association together with the Community Relations Team. This year we have welcomed the 2018 College Captain, Lachlan Fitzgerald (13-18), to the committee, as well as Jesse Wilson (95-00) and Casey York (05-09) and look forward to them providing a valuable insight into the younger generations. We continue to strive to provide a more relevant service to Old Collegians and always appreciate feedback on areas where you think we could do better. Please do not hesitate to contact Alumni Manager, Patrick Henning (02–07), or collar me at the next event you attend. As always, I hope you enjoy this edition of Old School Ties. GREG BROWN (82–86) | OWCA PRESIDENT

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PICTURED Nicholas Brown (9D) with his father, Greg Brown (82–86).

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PICTURED Kyle Bowen (13–17–18) playing for the Perth Wildcats in February 2019. Photo courtesy of the Perth Wildcats.

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Shooting for the sky It’s been a whirlwind few years for Kyle Bowen (13–17–18), but he is used to that. In his last year at Wesley, Kyle played for six different sporting teams as well as juggling academic commitments. To manage these demands, Kyle became the pilot Tier 1 athlete for Wesley’s Long-term Athletic Development (LTAD) program. As part of the program, arrangements were made for Kyle to train over the 2016 summer holidays with the Perth Wildcats and in 2017 he was offered a two-year scholarship to the Basketball Australia’s Centre of Excellence at the Australian Institute of Sport in Canberra. Fast-forward to March of this year, and 18 year old Kyle received a development contract and subsequent gametime with the NBL Championship winning Perth Wildcats. In August, he departs for Saint Mary’s College in California on a basketball scholarship, suiting up on the same home court fellow Australians, Patrick Mills and Matthew Dellavedova used to springboard into the NBA. A South Perth native, Kyle was back on campus recently and reflected on the defining moments of his sporting career and his excitement for what the future has in store for him.

the program and being able to work with professionals to develop young talent, was the perfect opportunity for me. It stopped the pressure of feeling as though I was being pulled in too many directions. I had so many coaches asking where I was training, what sessions I was doing and the LTAD program got everyone on the same page. It also prepared me for what was to come when I joined Basketball Australia’s Centre of Excellence. The strength and conditioning side of the LTAD program in particular was huge for me.

On winning the 2017 Blackwood Trophy The culture surrounding that season of basketball was immense. We had so many of the Year 12 cohort coming along to our games, with the final match deciding if we were going to win or lose the trophy. We dedicated ourselves and it was an incredible experience to win the trophy with my close mates.

On the LTAD program

I started playing basketball when I was in Year 8 and the older guys really looked out for me. We always had a strong team, but could never quite win the competition, then to finally win it in Year 11 when I was playing with team mates I was really close to, was very special.

The LTAD experience for me was awesome. I am very thankful to Head of Sport, Lyndon Brieffies, who was the driving force behind bringing the elite program to Wesley. Wesley has a lot of talented athletes, and having access to

I was based in Canberra for my Year 12 season but wished I could have flown back every weekend and played for Wesley. I remember constantly trying to find out everything that was happening from my friends.

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PICTURED Kyle Bowen (13–17–18), bottom row third from left, and the 2017 1st V Basketball Team.

On handling nerves

On his long-term goals

Whether it’s your first game for Wesley or your first game for Australia, your nerves are still the same.

A lot of people have the goal of NBA, I’ve sort of retracted from that a bit. I think I’d love to play in Europe long-term, I grew up watching European basketball and the style is more team-based, which I find enjoyable to watch, so going over there would be perfect.

When I played my first game for the Wesley 1st V, I felt very intimidated. I remember looking up at all the Year 12s as a Year 8 and my nerves were through the roof, I felt as if I was in the deep end. I think it’s just having the mindset that it doesn’t matter if you’re playing for your country or playing for your school, you just need to be fully dedicated. I have always played sport and my parents encouraged me a lot. I started off with football and basketball, but around Year 8 I made the decision to dedicate myself to basketball. Since joining the Basketball Australia’s Centre of Excellence in Canberra halfway through Year 11, training and playing against older guys and living the life of a professional athlete has been my lifestyle. The six day a week schedule is tough and you have to condition yourself for it. My body ached every morning and in the first two weeks I remember calling my mum and saying, ‘I'm not sure I can do this!’ But the good thing is you’re living with other boys in the same situation, so you’ve always got someone to talk to and they’d tell me it gets easier.

On the St Mary’s scholarship It’s ridiculous, isn’t it? It’s surreal. They offered me a visit, which is a 48-hour look at the College. I went over at the end of last year and it was a completely different world. It’s 40 minutes outside of San Francisco, and is a very peaceful campus with a strong history and culture, like Wesley. I got to watch their basketball team practice and it was next level, I’m so excited to get over there. As part of the recruitment process ‘Delly’ gave me a call and I couldn’t even concentrate on what he was saying, I was too busy thinking ‘I’m on the phone to Matthew Dellavedova, this is insane’. They’ve got a real focus on alumni, there’s a real brotherhood too, which I’m excited to be part of. I’m planning on studying either Business Administration or Psychology when I’m there, academics is still going to be a strong focus for me.

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Also, being a Perth boy, the Wildcats is always a team you want to play for. However, if the opportunity to play in the NBA comes up, you’re never going to turn that down.

On his development contract with the Wildcats I feel as if I’m one of the luckiest basketballers in Australia right now! I’ve had the opportunity to be a development player with the Wildcats and I am training and playing with guys who have been and done the college experience. I’ve been picking their brains on what it’s like and how I can best prepare. I’m feeling very good about the opportunity. I’ve had great people and mentors surrounding me, which I think is very important in sport. I’m trying to get as many different perspectives as I can and stay curious about everything.

On his Wesley experience I have nothing but good words about Wesley. It’s just so special, when you’re at school it’s so hard to recognise how significant it is, but being back here brings back amazing memories, like the Blackwood win. I think you need to go off and do other things before you can realise how special the times you had at Wesley were. It's a great school and gives you amazing opportunities to grow as an individual. It’s not just about the sport, it’s about becoming a better man.

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PICTURED (ABOVE, CLOCKWISE) Kyle Bowen (13–17–18) goes from playing for the Wesley 1st V, to the Australian U18 team, to the Perth Wildcats. Kyle Bowen (13-17-18) shoots some hoops on the Wesley courts.

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PICTURED Ian (69–72) and Alan (69–72) Carter.

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The Carter brothers Caring for the community

Through a maintained belief that the mark of a community is how it looks after its more vulnerable members, identical twins Ian (69-72) and Alan (69-72) Carter have built legacies around the pursuit of social justice. For over two decades, Ian has been the Chief Executive Officer of Anglicare WA. He has harnessed his passion for community and social justice to great effect through creating and governing community organisations at local, national and international levels. Alan is the founding Co-Chair of Reconciliation WA, an organisation that works closely with the government, corporate and community sectors to promote reconciliation activities that support programs to overcome disadvantage in our Indigenous community. Alan also works as a business consultant, providing organisations with expertise in relation to the development and implementation of reconciliation strategies at corporate, government and community organisations.

What was it like growing up as an identical twin? Alan Carter (AC): There’s obviously been different phases of our lives. When we were younger we just did things together.

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When we moved into adolescence there was a real attempt to make sure we were seen as two different people. You didn’t want to be seen as ‘the twinnies’. You see family photos of us and we were often the bookends, it was always the way. Ian Carter (IC): There was very much an effort to differentiate, if Alan had shorts and a white t-shirt on, I’d probably go put jeans and a coloured shirt on. I’m the eldest by 12 minutes, older and taller. AC: He got the head start and I’ve never caught up!

People must’ve mistaken you for one another all the time? AC: I recall one day when we were both playing 1st XI Hockey together for Wesley, and at the end of the game they had to award the best player. The opposition coach was talking to our coach, and he pointed over at Ian and said, ‘that kid was everywhere today, it's as if there were two of him!’ And Bob had to admit that there were in fact two of us out there. Ian was on top of the list so he got the votes. IC: There was a similar incident during the 4x100m relay at the Inter-House Athletics Carnival. Our father, Don Carter (42–46), the carnival referee, was standing at the finish line with Frank Wood, senior. Alan ran the first leg and then handed the baton over to me at the first change. Immediately

OLD SCHOOL TIES WINTER 2019


George ‘Gus’ Ferguson (27–36) lifted the red flag. Dad went over there to see what had happened and Gus Ferguson said to our dad ‘the same boy ran the first two legs for Hardey House; they need to be disqualified’. Dad said, ‘they’re my twin sons!’ And walked away. AC: We’ve also been hugged and kissed by a whole swag of people we’ve never met before but they are friends with our twin!

What do you remember from your time at Wesley? IC: I remember my time at Wesley with great fondness and joy. I’ve kept up with many of my classmates and many are still good friends. Sport was very important to both of us as we played hockey together for the 1st XI and competed in athletics, Alan was always faster than me. AC: The other good thing about Wesley, was the very strong community which included parents and Old Collegians. The Old Collegians have always had a reputation for being close knit and very much a part of the College. We benefitted from that. We’d often play hockey for Wesley in the morning then the Old Wesley Hockey Club in the afternoon. We were being mentored by guys five to ten years older than us who were close friends. That sense of community was really strong.

As people in leadership positions, what traits do you think a good leader needs? IC: The capacity to bring everyone who is part of your team together on the same journey and keep them on that journey so that you know where you’re going. Your job is to tell the story both externally and with your own staff. A sense of compassion has to be at the absolute heart of what you’re doing, I think at the end of the day the concept of servant leadership is important too. AC: Lao Tzu said, ‘a leader is best when people barely know he exists. When his work is done, his aim fulfilled, they will say: we did it ourselves’. It’s about empowering people to take on leadership themselves, to give them ownership and a sense of value.

Social justice is obviously a passion for both of you, what or who has influenced this? AC: Our mother came from a working-class family and was into Labor-type issues and socially progressive causes. She did her post-graduate study on women’s issues, so there was a lot of discussion around the family table and that had a big influence on us. We still regularly have lengthy political conversations with mum, she turns 90 this year and is still very across what is happening! IC: Some of those frameworks were definitely pre-set by mum but the Wesley For Others’ Fund has certainly played a role. Clive Hamer’s progressive views influenced us quite strongly.

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What qualities do you think a person needs to succeed? AC: Tenacity is obviously one, and I suppose for me the question is, what does success mean? What do you measure success by? I’ve never measured success by money or material gain. To me success is about achieving social change and doing things that improve the lives of lots of people, I think everybody has a responsibility to do that. In that sense, success is measured by your ability to engage with people. It comes with an element of humility and a preparedness not to be the one who is up there in lights all the time, but making sure that others get that spotlight. IC: Passion and tenacity, and a focus on being clear about what you are trying to achieve. Then you need to develop partnerships and relationships to make it all happen both within your team and with other partners. Build a strong network of trusted people around you and the journey becomes a lot easier. You can’t do things alone.

What advice do you have for current students on following their passion? AC: After leaving university I worked in the corporate world and became a manager at an international insurance broking firm, but ultimately I knew in my heart that my passion lay with causes around the environment and social justice. I was working with major corporates and things were not as socially responsible as they are now, so there were some things going on that I was aware of and felt really uncomfortable with. In my university days I’d been regularly campaigning for environmental causes. That was my passion, and I was suddenly sitting there thinking ‘these two don’t line up’. So, I was compelled to do something. I’m not sure if I ever thought about it in these terms, but the values instilled in me from my time at Wesley taught me to say, ‘I need to do something better for the community and my place is elsewhere’. It put me in many cases as an outsider, which was a challenge, but it’s never deterred me from pursuing those causes because I’m committed to them. Follow your passion and do what you’re passionate about and what you feel will contribute to making the world a better place. That’s what I would be saying to people, it’s the richness in the life that is important, not the richness in the bank. IC: I’ve always felt that you follow your passion—what excites you, and that can be in a career or in voluntary and sporting roles. I loved playing hockey and I loved working with others to make social change and the latter developed in me over the years. You also need to continually read, converse and reflect and never feel that you have all the answers!

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What this means for you. The Wesleyan will continue as a printed issue, but if you would like to go paperless and receive only the digital version, then please follow these three easy steps: 1. 2. 3.

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Send an email to communityrelations@wesley.wa.edu.au Subject line to be ‘I want to go digital’ Add in your full name

OLD SCHOOL TIES WINTER 2019


Allen Thomas A passion for science, a passion for life

From a young age, science captured Allen Thomas’ (40– 43–45) curiosity and imagination. He remembers one of his father’s friends showing him a telescope and explaining how it worked. The man then gave him two pieces of glass to take home. He went straight home and using materials he found around the house made a mount and created his very own telescope. This resourcefulness and creativity has been a common thread throughout Allen’s life. Allen was a mid-week boarder at Wesley College when Dr James Rossiter was Headmaster. At school he enjoyed Mathematics and Science, and would sit under the arches of the Kefford Building revising and soaking up everything he was taught. He remembers the kindness and nurturing approach of science teacher, Victor Cooper, who played an essential role in imparting a passion for science and machinery in Allen. Allen left Wesley after his junior year to take up a fitter and turner apprenticeship with the Australian Electrical Company. He then worked at the ABC in Adelaide Terrace until he retired in September 2005. His passion for science has never waned and he first learnt about the Foucault pendulum when reading a science magazine and he decided that he would like to make one. So just as he was taught all those years ago at Wesley, Allen got to work in his shed, By daring & by doing. Allen’s Foucault pendulum now sits in the Mildred Manning Science Centre for the Wesley community to enjoy. A huge thank you to Allen for his generosity and support of science at Wesley.

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HOW DOES A SWINGING PENDULUM PROVE THAT THE EARTH ROTATES? The Foucault pendulum (pronounced fooKOH) is named after the French physicist Léon Foucault, and is a simple device that demonstrates the rotation of the Earth. The apparatus consists of a single pendulum (a heavy bob on a lengthy piece of wire) that is mounted in such a way that allows the plane of its swing to turn freely. The change in the swing plane demonstrates the earth's rotation. Pop into the Mildred Manning Science Centre to see the pendulum and learn more.

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PICTURED Theodore Kang (10H), Allen Thomas (40–43–45) and Adam Healy (10H) with the Foucault pendulum in the Mildred Manning Science Centre.

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Rewarding excellence Adjudicated and funded by the Old Wesley Collegians’ Association (OWCA), the Presidents’ Award is given every year to either a prospective or current Year 10 student who is the son or grandson of an Old Collegian. The award is given to a student who demonstrates the College’s values and on a criteria of general excellence.

A generally relaxed character, Jonathan said the two-way nature

The 2019 Presidents’ Award recipient was Jonathan Parker (11H), a third generation Wesleyan with strong family ties to the College.

my family and go through my grades, but it was not like that.

Jonathan has immersed himself in the arts at Wesley and is a member of six different ensembles involving percussion, guitar and voice. He says his involvement with the arts program over the past 12 months has been the highlight of his Wesley journey so far. ‘The Arts Tour was an incredible experience because New York has such a strong culture and was really inspiring. Performing in Wesley Takes the Stage at the Perth Concert Hall last year was really cool. We had a massive audience which was incredible. It really illustrated to me the many segments of the Wesley community and how we all come together under the one flag.’ As part of his application, Jonathan had to meet with a selection panel that included former Headmaster, David Gee and the President of the OWCA, Greg Brown (82–86).

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of the interview made him feel comfortable immediately. ‘It was quite calming, it felt as if it was more of a general discussion which was nice,’ Jonathan said. ‘I walked in thinking I would be having to recount things about The Wesley community is great, I know I was in the room with people who are in high positions such as the Headmaster and President of the OWCA, but it was very relaxed.’ Jonathan’s advice for Wesley’s younger students is to take up the opportunity to explore the co-curricular subjects on offer, and experiment with different subjects until you find the right fit for you. ‘By the time you get to Year 11 and Year 12, you really need to know what you’re good at and what you like doing. In the younger years at Wesley you should be trying everything at least once, because the only way you discover what’s for you and what isn’t, is by getting involved. ‘That way you’ll find subjects and co-curricular activities that you’re passionate about and come a bit more naturally to you. You can take the things you like and the things you’re good at and put it in to a potential career path,’ he said.

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PREVIOUS OWCA PRESIDENTS’ AWARD WINNERS 2002 Robert Wheatley (99-03) 2003 Joshua Dunjey (00-04) 2004 Benjamin King (01-05) 2005 Samuel Watson (02-06) 2006 Drew Maddock (03-07) 2007 Campbell Ince (04-08) 2008 Casey York (05-09) 2009 James Cohen (06-10) 2010 Cambell Nalder (07-11) 2011 Angus Paterson (08-12) 2012 Harrison Main (09-13) 2013 Alexander Gunnell (05-14) 2014 Thomas Marshall (10-15) 2015 Hamish Blair (07-16) 2016 Darcy Roden (12-17) 2017 Charlie Willock (13-18) 2018 Benjamin Roshkov (12M) 2019 Jonathan Parker (11H)

PICTURED 2019 President's Award recipient, Johnathan Parker (11H).

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OWCA ANZAC Day Service As always, it was a beautiful service where the College community reflected on the ultimate sacrifice made by Australian and New Zealand armed forces, paying special tribute to the 56 fallen Old Wesleyans. This year saw Captain Angela Bond, from the Royal Australian Navy, give an inspirational address to a full Old Wesley Collegians’ Memorial Chapel. Thank you to everyone who joined us to honour our ANZACs. We remember them, all those who served after, are serving now and will serve in the future. Lest we forget.

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ABOVE Photos from ANZAC Day 2019.

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In memoriam GRAHAM LOCKHART (48–50–52)

RONALD YELDON (RON) (36–39)

STUART GAIRNS (61–70–69)

KENNETH BLADEN (45–49–51)

8 March 2018

6 November 2018

27 December 2018

22 February 2019

JOHN CARRIE (41–44–47)

JAYDEN WHYTE (02–06)

PERCY JAMES LANDERS (87–98)

JUSTIN KEALS (80–85)

2 May 2018

12 November 2018

5 January 2019

24 February 2019

FRANK CURTIS MITCHELL (52–55–57)

MALCOLM TAYLOR (44–48–49)

ROGER BURROWS (56–60)

BERNARD BOWEN (41–48)

25 May 2018

17 November 2018

7 January 2019

19 March 2019

RODNEY O’SHANNASSY (42–44–46)

TREVOR SUTCLIFFE (52–54–55)

LAURENCE SCOTT (LAURIE) (40–43–44)

JOHN PATTON (52–58)

21 July 2018

16 December 2018

11 January 2019

10 May 2019

WILLIAM GEORGE HENDERSON (BILL) (37–44–46)

KEVIN WOODTHORPE (74–78)

HARRY EPSTEIN (41–42–44)

20 December 2018

8 February 2019

21 September 2018

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Condolences NIGEL BARWOOD (81–85) and SIMON BARWOOD (79–83) on the loss of your mother, WENDY BARWOOD

JOSEPH WALTER GREEN (WALLY) (38–43) on the loss of your wife, CARINA (VAN) GREEN

STUART BOWDEN (68– 73–75) on the loss of your father, WALLACE BOWDEN

ALEXANDER HEATHER (97–04) on the loss of your father, NOEL HEATHER

TIM BURROWS (80–86) in the loss of your father, ROGER BURROWS (56–60)

BRUCE HYDE (77–79–81) on the loss of your father in law, HARRY EPSTEIN (41–42–44)

JOHN EDWARDS (62–66) on the loss of your mother and MICHAEL LOSS (96–00) on the loss of your grandmother RAE EDWARDS

NICK KLETNIEKS (69–73) on the loss of your mother, FREDA KLETNIEKS

CAMERON PLATELL (73–77) on the loss of your parents, FRANK PLATELL and NORMA PLATELL

MARCUS LIP (78–82) on the loss of your mother, ANNIE LIP

JAMES REID (05–08) on the loss of your grandmother, JUDITH STOVE

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SHAUN LITTERICK (71–73–76) and KIRSTEN LITTERICK (84–87–94) on the loss of your father, ROSS LITTERICK ALEXANDER (99–11) and SAMANTHA (00–05–13) MILLINGTON on the passing of your mother, JAYNE MILLINGTON

PAUL RICH (81–86) and DAVID RICH (78–83) on the loss of your father, PETER RICH MICHAEL SMITH (96–04) on the loss of your uncle, STUART GAIRNS (61–70–69) GRAHAM TAYLOR (74– 77–79) on the loss of your father MALCOLM TAYLOR (44–48–49) RICKY WOODTHORPE (59–61–66) and WILLIAM WOODTHORPE (73–76) on the loss of your brother, KEVIN WOODTHORPE (74–78)

OLD SCHOOL TIES WINTER 2019

Profile for Wesley College

The Wesleyan, Winter 2019  

In the Sustainability Edition we look at the what makes Wesley proudly green.

The Wesleyan, Winter 2019  

In the Sustainability Edition we look at the what makes Wesley proudly green.

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