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WINTER / SPRING 2012

H I G H

D E S E R T

PULSE Healthy Living in Central Oregon

THE AMAZIN G STORY OF A TRUE MERICA’S BLOOD SUP PLY

ALSO INSIDE!

GOGGLES: WHAT COLOR IS BEST TODAY?

MAKING THE CALL ON CELLPHONE SAFETY

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H I G H

D E S E R T

PULSE Healthy Living in Central Oregon

WINTER / SPRING 2012 VOLUME 4, NO. 1

How to reach us Julie Johnson | Editor 541-383-0308 or jjohnson@bendbulletin.com Sheila Timony | Associate editor 541-383-0355 or stimony@bendbulletin.com

OUR COMMITMENT IS TO YOU Providing cutting-edge surgical care to Central Oregon community through general & specialized surgeries including: laparoscopic, complex vascular, breast, endocrine, thoracic and gastrointestinal surgery. JACK W. HARTLEY, M.D. | JOHN C. LAND, M.D. | GEORGE T. TSAI, M.D. 541.548.7761 1245 NW 4th Street, #101, Redmond, OR 97756 www.cosurgery.com

• Reporting Anne Aurand 541-383-0304 or aaurand@bendbulletin.com Betsy Q. Cliff 541-383-0375 or bcliff@bendbulletin.com Markian Hawryluk 541-617-7814 or mhawryluk@bendbulletin.com David Jasper 541-383-0349 or djasper@bendbulletin.com • Design / Production Greg Cross Lara Milton

Mugs Scherer Andy Zeigert

• Photography Ryan Brennecke Pete Erickson

Rob Kerr Andy Tullis

• Corrections High Desert Pulse’s primary concern is that all stories are accurate. If you know of an error in a story, call us at 541-383-0308 or email pulse@bendbulletin.com. • Advertising Jay Brandt, Advertising director 541-383-0370 or jbrandt@bendbulletin.com Sean Tate, Advertising manager 541-383-0386 or state@bendbulletin.com On the Web: www.bendbulletin.com/pulse

The Bulletin All Bulletin payments are accepted at the drop box at City Hall. Check payments may be converted to an electronic funds transfer. The Bulletin, USPS #552-520, is published daily by Western Communications Inc., 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave., Bend, OR 97702. Periodicals postage paid at Bend, OR. Postmaster: Send address changes to The Bulletin circulation department, P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708. The Bulletin retains ownership and copyright protection of all staff-prepared news copy, advertising copy and news or ad illustrations. They may not be reproduced without explicit prior approval. Published: 2/20/2012

Write to us Send your letters of 250 words or less to pulse@bendbulletin.com. Please include a phone number for verification.

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Contents |

HIGH DESERT PULSE

COVER STORY

8

WILL THERE BE BLOOD? They may not leap tall buildings, yet donors save lives daily. Can the system keep up with demand?

20

FEATURES

20

ARE CELLPHONES SAFE? Researchers are at odds over making that call.

DEPARTMENTS

7 16 26 28 30 33 35 38 53 54

UPDATES What’s new since we last reported.

16

GET READY: SWIMMING Jump right in. The water’s fine. HEALTHY EATING Nutrition advice that may surprise you. GET GEAR: SNOW GOGGLES What color is right for a bluebird day? HOW DOES SHE DO IT? Clara Graves doesn’t act her age. Not even close. GET ACTIVE: BACKCOUNTRY SKIING Picture-perfect wilderness. ON THE JOB: CYTOTECHNOLOGISTS Our health is under their microscopes. SORTING IT OUT: NUTRITION APPS Let your phone count your calories.

28

BODY OF KNOWLEDGE: POP QUIZ Finding humor in medical terminology. ONE VOICE: A PERSONAL ESSAY Breastfeeding: Why one mother opted out. COVER DESIGN: ANDY ZEIGERT CONTENTS PHOTOS, FROM TOP: ROB KERR (2), ANDY TULLIS, SUBMITTED PHOTO

To subscribe or learn more about our publications, call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com. HIGH DESERT PULSE • WINTER / SPRING 2012

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30


Updates | ER 2010 SPRING / SUMM

H I G H

R T D E S E

2011 SUMMER / FALL

H I G H

NEW SINCE WE LAST REPORTED

R T D E S E

ing The fine line

ER 2009 Overtrain SPRING / SUMM

I Gen H H betwe

Pregnancy bed rest T Rused, Often in S E D E Aspir but never or Advil proven or what? The right you for one

2010 WINTER / SPRING

You’ve had your baby.

2011 WINTER / SPRING

PULSE PULSE PULSE g Healthy Livin

Fresh fuel Kick-start a balanced Healthy Day

The Dash You can do it Drew Bledsoe Fit after football

fitness and fanaticism

in Central

Oregon

g Healthy Livin

Stage zero breast cancer

in Central

Is the treatmenset wor than the disease?

Oregon

g in Central Healthy Livin

Cancer survival rates have nePvearrents been high asersume

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d you then But what cure r can kill you late

The factn’t.is, most are

Take it outside:a view Workouts with

PULSrE leftove embryos? What’s to become of the

Oregon

Marathon mortality Who runs the risk? Body scans The value of looking below the surface TV medicine ‘Scrubs’ may influence your health

Scratch that itch Why it feels prevent Clean hands so good

wash illness: Do docs

up?

Did his birth mother drink?

syndrome of fetal alcohol The hidden risk s pean adoption in Eastern Euro

ic sleeplessness Cures for chron

— MARKIAN HAWRYLUK

Physician hand washing In our Spring/Summer 2009 issue, we reported about the importance of physician hand washing in “Our health is in their hands.” Now, some potentially discouraging news: In a study published in December, only 20 percent of medical students could correctly identify when to wash their hands in a short questionnaire. The study came out of Germany, so it’s unclear if it would apply to American medical students. Nevertheless, the study suggests that medical schools may need to concentrate on this aspect of training more than they currently do.

snowshoes • Newfangled in medical crisis • Legal relief

Registry could reduce repeat surgeries Since we reported on the lack of a national hip implant registry in the U.S. in our Spring/Summer 2010 issue, more research is backing the notion that too many Americans must get follow-up hip replacement surgery because doctors don’t have real-time feedback on implants and techniques. A study published by the journal Health Affairs in January calculated that if the U.S. had a national joint replacement registry comparable to the one implemented by Sweden in 1979 and could lower the percentage of surgeries that needed to be redone to Sweden’s 10 percent, it could save $2 billion by 2015. Meanwhile, a November study sponsored by the Food and Drug Administration found no clear evidence that one hip implant was better than any other. But the authors left open the possibility that metal-on-metal hip implants might pose a higher risk for patients. The investigators said the lack of a single standardized registry made comparison of results difficult and that looking at several smaller registries could only suggest a problem with that type of implant. — MARKIAN HAWRYLUK

Marathons and heart attacks In our Winter/Spring 2010 issue, we discussed the cardiac risks of running in “Marathon mortality.” That year, a number of seemingly healthy runners collapsed and died during races or training runs. But a study out in January finds that 2010 may have been an anomaly and that death during long-distance running is rare. The study, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, looked at the number of heart attacks and deaths from heart attacks for all marathons and half-marathons held in the United States between 2000 and 2010. It found that out of the nearly 11 million participants, there were 59 heart attacks, 42 of them fatal. Most of those deaths occurred among men with underlying cardiac disease. — BETSY Q. CLIFF

Managing risks of cancer treatment The ongoing health issues facing cancer survivors as a result of their treatment, as reported on in “Living with the cure” in our Summer/Fall 2011 issue, have continued to garner significant attention. In October, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued new

HIGH DESERT PULSE • WINTER / SPRING 2012

resources for patients and caregivers on how to prevent infections during chemotherapy treatment. “Some chemotherapy treatments cause low white blood cell counts and place patients at risk for serious infections,” said Dr. Lisa Richardson, associate director for science in the CDC’s division of cancer prevention and control. The materials, available for free at www.preventcancerinfections.org, help patients identify their risk for low white blood cell counts and provide tips on how to recognize infections when they occur.

— BETSY Q. CLIFF

Alcohol consumption and FAS Earlier this year, researchers from the University of California, San Diego reported new research that better identifies the risks of alcohol consumption during pregnancy, as reported on in “The hidden risk of fetal alcohol syndrome” in our Winter/Spring 2011 issue. The study used reports from women who contacted a confidential state program that counsels expectant mothers on the risks associated with drug and alcohol consumption. It found that alcohol consumption in the second half of the first trimester had the highest risk of physical manifestations associated with fetal alcohol syndrome. For every one-drink increase in the average number of drinks consumed by the women daily, the risk for a smooth philtrum (the notch below the nose) rose 25 percent, and the risk for a thin upper lip rose 22 percent. Each additional drink increased the risk of low birth weight by 16 percent and the risk of smaller-than-normal head size by 12 percent. The researchers said they could not factor in the number of miscarriages or stillbirths that may have been caused by alcohol consumption in the first half of the first trimester, and reiterated the prevailing medical view that no amount of alcohol during pregnancy could be considered safe. — MARKIAN HAWRYLUK

Corrections In the Fall/Winter 2011 issue of High Desert Pulse, in a story titled “Single-sport kids,” Bend High School athlete Aldy Larson’s name was misspelled. In the same issue, the caption in the photo essay “Get Active: Cyclocross” incorrectly stated the years the Cyclocross National Championships were held in Bend. The events occurred in 2009 and 2010. In the same issue, in a story titled “East meets West,” Dr. Larry Paulson’s credentials were stated incorrectly. He is a licensed physician who is trained in acupuncture. High Desert Pulse regrets the errors.

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Mabel Adams at the St. Charles Bend blood bank. PHOTOS BY PETE ERICKSON

Medical technologist Emma Zumwalt types blood at the St. Charles Bend blood bank.

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Cover story |

BLOOD RELATIONS

BLOOD RELATIONS Getting blood from donor to recipient is a nearly superhuman act that occurs every day. The concern is whether it will continue to meet demand.

of platelets, two units of clotting factors known as cryoprecipitates, and 28 of the hospital’s last 40 units of O blood. s manager of the hospital blood bank at St. Charles Bend, As doctors worked to stabilize the patient, a second trauma victim it’s Mabel Adams’ job to make sure there’s enough blood was brought in, followed quickly by a third. The staff scrambled to on hand to handle most emergencies in the region. But on borrow 10 more units from other Central Oregon hospitals a summer day in 2010, a series of events and called the Oregon State Police to rush had left her more than a little nervous. more blood from Portland. But it would The hospital blood bank was be hours before the blood already on red alert for Type would arrive. O-negative blood, a common Fortunately, the third patient occurrence during the summer required no blood. The second months when blood donations patient had initially received two typically go down. Over the units of O-negative blood, which course of the day, a number can be given to any patient reof patients combined to use gardless of blood type. As the pa— Mabel Adams, blood bank manager up more O blood than usual, and tient was stabilized, the staff could the stockpile dropped from a norfinally determine he was Type A. If he mal supply of 79 units to just 40. The needed any more blood, it wouldn’t hospital ordered more blood from the have to be Type O. Red Cross distribution center in Portland, taking the added But Adams knew how thin the margin had been. She step of asking for it to be delivered by plane. It would arrive that implemented new protocols to ensure the hospital would never get that night in Redmond on the 8:30 flight. low on blood again and used the incident as a training tool for disaster But in the early evening, a trauma victim was rushed to the hospi- planning. The second patient could have potentially cleaned them out. tal, and the emergency room doctors initiated a massive transfusion “If he had been (Type) O, it would have been a huge drain on the protocol. He would end up requiring 21 units of plasma, four units blood supply,” Adams said. “We came close enough that we don’t

BY MARKIAN HAWRYLUK

A

“If you have a terrible disaster or tragedy, it’s the blood that’s already on the shelves that’s saving lives. It’s not, ‘Let’s all go donate now.’”

HIGH DESERT PULSE • WINTER / SPRING 2012

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Cover story | BLOOD RELATIONS want to be there again.” Managing the supply to ensure the right blood is available when and where a patient needs it means finding a delicate balance, a stockpile large enough to cover most shortterm contingencies yet not so large that the perishable product gets wasted. Because of the extensive testing that each pint of blood must undergo, blood donations take at least a day and a half to get from donor to patient. And in more remote areas such as Central or Eastern Oregon, it might take even longer. “One of the things about this whole business is it is a pipeline. If you have a terrible disaster or tragedy, it’s the blood that’s already on the shelves that’s saving lives. It’s not, ‘Let’s all go donate now’ unless it’s a real ongoing, protracted thing,” Adams said. “That’s why the people who save lives are the regular blood donors who keep it there all the time.” Yet, many people who manage the nation’s blood supply are concerned about our ability to secure enough blood donations going forward. A constantly shrinking pool of donors coupled with an expected rise in demand over the next 20 to 30 years has many worried whether enough people will step forward to give the gift of life. “When you hear the people who are down on the world and (think) everybody’s awful, I like to say, ‘Look, you could not treat leukemia — you could not do it — without the altruism and time of a bunch of people who say, ‘I just need to do it,’” Adams said. “It gives you a really good feeling about human nature when you think about all the people who have been supported for years.”

Supply chain The blood bank at St. Charles Bend manages the supply not only for the hospital’s patients, but it serves as a blood depot for hospitals in Redmond, Prineville, Madras and Burns. Although blood donations are collected just minutes away at the American Red Cross’ Bend Blood Donation Center, the blood must first be shipped to Portland for testing and then brought back to Central Oregon. “Whenever we get a disaster, we have to be thinking three to four hours out, because that’s how long it takes to get blood here from Portland,” Adams said. “We train our

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DISTRIBUTION OF BLOOD TYPES IN THE U.S.

B+ 9%

A+ 34%

B2% O+ 38%

AB+ 3% AB1%

A6% 07%

BLOOD TYPES

Most people could probably name the four major blood types (A, B, O and AB). But the ABO classification system is only one of 30 recognized systems for typing blood. Classification systems are based on the presence of antigens on the surface of the red blood cells. Antigens are molecules that are used by the body’s immune system to distinguish between the body’s natural components and foreign substances. Antigens trigger the development of antibodies, which then neutralize the foreign matter so it can be destroyed by the immune system. If a person is given blood with antigens to which he or she has antibodies, the immune system will destroy those red bloods, creating life-threatening issues for the patient.

people as soon as you start putting out a lot of blood, you start putting your orders in, so you get it in the pipeline, and it will be here by the time we need it.” While hospitals in Portland could get more blood delivered in less than an hour, it could take four hours to get fresh supplies to Bend, or longer during the winter months. But with a limited shelf life, there’s little ability to stockpile blood. Plasma, the watery component of whole blood, can be frozen and stored for up to a year. But red blood cells have a shelf life of only 42 days. Platelets, a critical component needed for clotting, can survive only five days after donation. With one and a half days for testing and another half day for transportation, platelets stay at St. Charles for a mere two days, stored at room temperature in a machine that keeps them in constant motion.

Platelets are so precious that if by their last day St. Charles has not used them, they will be shipped to Oregon Health & Science University in Portland. As much as 50 percent of the platelets that make it to St. Charles get shipped back. But demand is so unpredictable that it’s a challenge to get the supply right. Adams said the usage of platelets averages three units per day, but ranges from zero to eight units depending on patient need. “Sometimes you overorder,” Adams said. “But you can deal with that. You can’t deal with running out.” The blood bank must also manage supplies to ensure it has the right blood type, although in most cases it can use the universal donor blood type, O-negative, for any patient. That makes it more valuable to blood banks than even the rarest blood types. “People who are AB, they know they are

WINTER / SPRING 2012 • HIGH DESERT PULSE


rare and so they’re motivated to donate. But the patients who need it are rare, too,” Adams said. “The Type O people are 45 percent of the population, plus we use it as the universal donor. So I’m always looking for O donors.” For all the talk about the billions of dollars spent on health care and the profits made by insurance companies and pharmaceutical manufacturers, the fact remains that millions of patients would never survive if not for a simple act of voluntarism. Without thousands of Americans each day rolling up their sleeves to donate blood, many of the medical advances we have come to take for granted would be for naught.

OTHER BLOOD TYPE IDENTIFIERS

Voluntary network Blood, bone marrow and organ donations are, for the most part, the only part of the American health system that still relies on such altruism. Plasma centers may pay donors for blood that is used to make biological drugs and other products, but donors cannot be paid for blood that will be used for human transfusion. Part of the reason for that is to protect the safety of the blood. “We rely on the veracity of the donor to provide a safe product,” said Jim McPherson, president of America’s Blood Centers, a network of community blood centers that accounts for half of the country’s blood collections. “We know that the paid system has far higher disease rates, but you can pasteurize those products so you can eliminate that. You can’t pasteurize red blood cells.” It’s why collection centers may hand out a T-shirt or pin commemorating a donation milestone, but most donors will leave with just a cup of orange juice and a pair of cookies to compensate them for their time and discomfort. Centers can’t take the risk that a more lucrative reward would bring out the small percentage of people willing to hide their risk factors in the pre-donation screening. “We have to find incentives that won’t motivate people to lie,” Adams said. “Unfortunately, we all have to worry about the small groups, because in this business, 100 percent (accuracy) is what you need.” But relying on volunteers also means being subject to the same winds that buffet people’s lives. Collection centers know that when weather is bad, donations will go down. During the summer months when families go on vacation and schools are out, collec-

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ABO The ABO system is the most important and well-known blood typing system. People with Type A blood have A antigens and B antibodies, while people with Type B blood have B antigens and A antibodies. If a Type A person is given Type B blood, the B antibodies in his or her blood will recognize the B antigens on the donated red blood cells, triggering the immune system to destroy the new blood cells. Type O blood has both A and B antibodies but no A or B antigens. (The O designation actually represents a zero, as in zero antigens.) That’s why it can be given to a person with any blood type. Type AB blood has both A and B antigens, but no antibodies, so a person with that type can be given blood from any donor. Rh The positive and negative designation added to ABO blood types refers to the presence of the D antigen on red blood cells. It’s part of the Rh system, named after Rhesus monkeys used to develop blood typing. Although the Rh system includes more than 50 antigens, the presence of the D antigen is the most likely to cause an immune system reaction. Someone who is Rh negative, for example, has no D antibodies. Anyone can receive blood that is Rh negative, but giving Rh positive blood to someone who is Rh negative can result in an immune response. Hemolytic disease of the newborn The Rh incompatibility issue is particularly important during pregnancy. If the mother is Rh negative, but the baby is Rh positive, maternal antibodies can cross the placenta and destroy fetal red blood cells. It’s usually not a problem with the first pregnancy, as Rh negative individuals won’t develop D antibodies

unless they are exposed to Rh positive blood. That can happen during birth, when placenta ruptures are common. With each subsequent pregnancy, the risk to an Rh positive fetus increases. The baby can be born with severe anemia, requiring a large transfusion of Rh negative blood immediately after birth. Rare blood types Duffy blood group Other blood type systems are less widely used, because they’re based on antigens that almost all people have on their blood cells. However, in those rare cases where people may lack one of those antigens, the kind of blood they can receive can be limited . A large percentage of individuals of African descent lack the Duffy antigen, named after the hemophiliac in whom the blood type was first discovered. That also makes them resistant to malaria infections. Kell blood group Some researchers have posited that Henry VIII may have had a rare blood type known as Kell positive, found in only 9 percent of Caucasians. It could explain why his wives had so much trouble producing an heir. He would have passed on the Kell positive trait to his offspring, which could have created an immune reaction in his wife’s tissue, resulting in a miscarriage. Bombay blood group The rarest of all blood types is known as Bombay, named after the city in which it was first discovered. Individuals with this blood type lack the H antigen, and can only receive blood from other Bombay donors. It is found in about 1 of 10,000 individuals in India and 1 in 8,000 in Taiwan. Fewer than 1 in a million individuals born in the U.S. have the Bombay blood type.


Cover story | BLOOD RELATIONS

of the anonymously in one ks donors to patients lin e elin Cenpip m ly fro pp ted su The blood Blood collec n caring and altruism. ma hu of ted, ys tes pla is it dis ve ere rtland, wh more impressi Red Cross facility in Po a to n ve spidri ho is al rs ion no reg uted to tral Oregon do ed to Bend to be distrib urn ret d an ts . en ls on ita sp mp ho broken into co than they use in local s donate more blood tals. Central Oregonian

PEOHPELBELOOD PIPELINE ON T

RENEGADE DONOR

Mike Lum might turn a few heads when he walks through the door at the Red Cross Bend Blood Donation Center every two months. Known as Renegade, he often pulls up on his Harley, sporting multiple tattoos, a dead ringer for Charles Bronson. A former Navy Seal, Vietnam vet and firefighter, he’s donated blood regularly since he joined the military more than 40 years ago. He’s given 146 pints of blood in Central Oregon — the equivalent of nearly 15 times the total amount of blood in his body — and many more units of platelets when he lived in California. Last November, his first day of eligibility after his last donation fell on Nov. 10, the Marine Corps birthday and his 72nd birthday. He celebrated both with a pint — a donated pint, that is. “I care,” he said. “I think everybody should donate.”

ELLA JEANS DONOR

Ella Jeans, 86, has donated blood in Bend since she moved to Central Oregon in 1975. By last September, she’d contributed 14 gallons. “As a former nurse, I know how important it is,” she said. “I know how badly people need blood, and it’s a cheap way to find out how your blood pressure is without going to the doctor.” Jeans loves to tell jokes. “You know the difference between a doctor and a duck?” she quips. “A doctor has a larger bill.” If she really likes you, she’ll share one of her more risqué jokes. “It can help people so much if you put a smile on their face,” she explains. Which is why she gives back rubs to the volunteers and bakes a potent Harvey Wallbanger cake every time she comes to donate. Red Cross officials believe she’s donated more blood than any other woman in Central Oregon, and she plans to continue to donate as long as she can. “I think it’s important,” she said.

SANDY THRASHER COLLECTOR

At least once a day, donors tell Sandy Thrasher they don’t like needles. So the medical assistant at the Red Cross blood collection center in Bend has a standard response. “You know what? If you liked needles, we probably wouldn’t be taking your blood,” she tells them. Thrasher, 63, has collected blood donations for nearly eight years now, a refugee from the health care system where she grew tired of jabbing sick people with needles. “They feel terrible anyway, and then you have to start poking them,” she said. “Here, it’s a much more positive atmosphere. You are working with people who want to be here.” Thrasher, of Prineville, initially came to the Red Cross as a donor. She has needed blood as a patient twice, and she wanted to replace the blood she had used. “I saw the work of the people who are doing it and decided, yeah, I really might enjoying doing that,” Thrasher said.

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WINTER / SPRING 2012 • HIGH DESERT PULSE


BRIAN ALVAREZ DRIVER

Brian Alvarez and his drivers at Stat Courier Service are as reliable as the mailman. Driving blood from the donation center in Bend to the testing facility in Portland and back to supply the hospitals in Central Oregon, he knows he can’t let bad weather or traffic delay his rounds. “We’ve been going to the Red Cross for probably 12 years now, and we’ve never missed a day,” he said. “It does get interesting in the wintertime, that’s for sure.” His drivers carry chain saws in their vehicles to be able to clear trees blocking the road. They’ve rendezvoused with the Oregon State Police to rush blood to hospitals at critical times. When one of his drivers found himself stuck behind an accident, he recruited a handful of truck drivers who were waiting for the road to reopen. “Everybody grabbed a box of blood and they hiked about a mile through the snow and had a truck at the other end of the road closure meet them so we could still get the blood product where it needed to go,” Alvarez said. “It’s an important thing and we’re bound and determined.”

CATHY DOWNING RECIPIENT

Two years ago, the residents of Central Oregon gave Cathy Downing the equivalent of a brand-new Lexus. Downing, 62, had been in a horrific car accident. Her small Honda Civic was rear-ended and pushed in front of an oncoming semi. She was airlifted to St. Charles Bend, where doctors worked to stem the bleeding from where the seat belt had cut open her pancreas and badly damaged her intestines. They had to place her in an induced coma to fix her aorta, which was dangerously close to rupturing. Over her 49 days in the hospital, Downing received 26 units of packed red blood cells, including 16 in the first hours after she arrived; eight units of frozen plasma; four units of platelets; and four units of cryoprecipitate. The total bill for the blood she used: $33,000, or about the cost of a 2012 Lexus IS 250. “That would be a lot of people donating a lot of blood,” she said.

HUNTLEY HICKS RECIPIENT

Kelsey Roberson had a nearly perfect pregnancy. Her baby was three days overdue when, during a routine appointment, doctors couldn’t find his heartbeat. They rushed Roberson into an emergency cesarean delivery, only to find that her baby had nearly bled out due to a problem with Roberson’s placenta. Within 20 minutes, doctors gave the baby a full blood transfusion. They gave little Huntley packed red blood cells, frozen plasma and platelets. They told the parents his chances were slim. “We had nothing,” Roberson said. “We had no hope.” But somehow the 8-pound, 8-ounce baby boy hung on. And by the end of the week, he had turned the corner. Now 20 months old, Huntley shows no signs of his rough entry into the world, and Roberson has become a die-hard advocate for blood donation. “I’ve decided blood donors are definitely heroes,” she said. “People don’t know how many lives they’ve touched.”

HIGH DESERT PULSE • WINTER / SPRING 2012

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Cover story | BLOOD RELATIONS Continued from Page 11 tions plummet. Blood drives at colleges and high schools account for 20 percent of blood donations. “In the summer, we know that the blood won’t be available. It scares us every year,” said Jen Collins, donor development representative for the Red Cross in Bend. “(Last) year it was incredibly low, the lowest (national) supply in 12 years.” Tornadoes and hurricanes and flooding all kept people away from collection sites, and the Red Cross allowed its centers to use the term “critical” for the first time in years. Such designations, however, could be more prevalent in the future. Blood centers have put significant efforts into recruiting a new generation of donors to replace the large and generous baby boomer generation that could soon stop offering up its arms. “As the population ages, you’re getting more and more people who need blood and fewer and fewer people able to donate,” said Dr. Jeff McCullough, a medical school professor at the University of Minnesota and one of the nation’s leading experts on the blood supply. “I wouldn’t say the United States is close to a crisis right now, but we need to begin to project some trends so that people can be thinking about it over the next 10 years or so.”

If you started donating blood at age 17 and gave every 56 days (the most often you can donate) until age 79, you’d have given 46.5 gallons.

Fewer eligible The potential loss of donors comes after years of new restrictions shrinking the donor pool. In 2007, McCullough published the first analysis of what all the blood-donation bans were doing to the numbers of potential donors. He found that only 38 percent of Americans are eligible to donate at any given time. National figures from the American Red Cross suggest that only about 8 percent of eligible donors actually donate. In Central Oregon, it’s about 8.3 percent. As recently as 1990, some 60 percent of Americans were eligible to donate. “Over the last 20 years, really since the onset of the HIV epidemic, there’s just been one factor after another layered on

Page 14

top of everything as reasons for deferral,” McCullough said. Reasons for deferral can be aimed at protecting the donor, such as deferrals for anemia or abnormal blood pressure. But most of the recent changes have been about protecting the recipient from bloodborne diseases. It’s a different approach to blood safety, stemming from what the nation learned from the sudden appearance of HIV in the early 1980s. “There’s not a lot we can do to stop (a new virus from emerging). The epidemiologists and the CDC have to recognize that it’s happening, so there really isn’t much we can do, other than be prepared for it,” McCullough said. “But on the other hand, the way the blood bank system responds to new threats is quite different than it was pre-HIV.” America’s Blood Centers’ McPherson agreed that HIV was a game-changer. Before blood banks realized what was happening, hundreds of blood transmissions passed on the virus that causes AIDS. “We did respond to AIDS, but we responded slowly and we were sort of in denial for a while,” he said. “Now if anything, we’re overly cautious.” For example, most blood centers stopped taking blood from patients diagnosed with chronic fatigue syndrome after a 2009 study suggested a virus known as XMRV could be linked to the syndrome. The researchers later retracted their findings after discovering that some of their samples had been contaminated. In September, the National Institutes of Health reported that follow-up research could find no sign that XMRV was transmitted through the blood of chronic fatigue patients, and now blood banks expect that

WINTER / SPRING 2012 • HIGH DESERT PULSE


Page 15

YOUR GUIDE TO

Health IN

NorthWest Crossing

7

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deferral to be overturned. Officials took similar actions in the late 1990s with the mad cow scare to prevent people from contracting a form of Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease from people who had consumed contaminated beef. McCullough, who was on the Food and Drug Administration’s blood donation advisory committee at the time, said regulators weren’t sure what the infectious agent might be, whether it could be passed on from donor to recipient through blood, or how long the virus might live. They opted to defer donors who had spent any significant in time in Europe during the outbreak. “It’s a much more assertive approach to blood safety than would have occurred before HIV. And so that does mean that you make some decisions that are precautionary, that go beyond what you actually have data to justify doing,” McCullough said. “The trust of the public is absolutely key. Nobody is going to lay down and get stuck with a big needle if they don’t have the confidence that we’re going to do the right thing with their blood.” The ramification for blood centers, however, was staggering, eliminating about 9 percent of their donors in one fell swoop. “We had massive shortages,” McPherson said. “There were even some reports of organ wastages. A lot of elective surgeries (for heart problems or cancer) were canceled.” Now many question whether the ban was worth it. “We’d love to bring back all of those wonderful donors we had that were deferred and still are for mad cow,” McPherson said. “That epidemic seems to have gone away. It’s probably one of the smallest in history, only 300 cases.” But with three recent transmissions in the U.K., he said it was unlikely we’d see a change anytime soon. “And once you’ve lost donors,” he said, “they don’t usually come back.” That’s been the case with other deferrals that were later overturned. Cancer survivors were once excluded, even if Continued on Page 47

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Get ready | SWIMMING

BY ANNE AURAND PHOTO BY ROB KERR

Lapping it up For a low-impact, all-over workout, it’s never too late to start swimming

A Central Oregon Masters Aquatics swimmer swims laps in the Madras Aquatic Center pool.

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M

any kids start swimming at a young age as a form of play. Adults may view the sport differently: as a hard workout. But there are many reasons for grown-ups to include swimming in their exercise regimen for both fun and fitness. Swimming burns a lot of calories, strengthens the whole body and doesn’t come with the jolting impacts and road-rash crashes that can accompany some other cardiovascular workouts. Just about anyone can do it at any age, and it’s never too late to start. Help is available for every level of swimmer — even those who didn’t learn the basics as a youngster. And winter is a great time to get into one of the region’s indoor pools. “It’s a low-impact cardiovascular workout that’s safer than trying to jog on an icy river trail,” said Rob Higley, the aquatics director at the Athletic Club of Bend. And “it helps the aging community keep in shape without jarring and injuries that land sports offer.” Besides the cardiovascular benefits, swimming builds all-over body strength, from the legs to the core to the upper body. Swimmers can also isolate upper or lower body parts, if there’s something they want to focus on.

WINTER / SPRING 2012 • HIGH DESERT PULSE


If swimming is not your primary sport of choice, it’s still a great one to add to the mix to diversify what muscles get worked, and to challenge the body and brain. Swimming can raise one’s overall fitness to a higher level, Higley said. Bend retirees Georgia Roth, 67, and Bob Roth, 70, lap swim regularly to feel better, sleep better and keep their bodies healthy. Both learned how to swim as children, but it wasn’t until adulthood that swimming became a regular and integral part of their well-being, Georgia said. When Georgia was raising kids, she started getting more serious about swimming because she needed something else in her life. Bob has always enjoyed sports, she said, but got tennis elbow and a basketball injury in his 30s, so he turned to swimming. Neither of them competes. “I just did it because I enjoyed it and it made me feel good,” she said. “We’ve just continued it all our lives.” They both have had problems with various joints, but swimming doesn’t exacerbate that or create any pain, they both said. “I still swim because it’s the one thing I can do that gives me a total-body workout,” Georgia said. They would never live anywhere that didn’t have a good lap-swimming pool. The hardest part, she said, is that it can get boring, pacing back and forth across the pool. When that happens, she tries to count laps, men-

HIGH DESERT PULSE • WINTER / SPRING 2012

tally organize her day or meditate. To get to that peaceful, meditative state, she said, the trick is to be good at breathing and to feel comfortable in the water: in other words, to really know how to swim.

A technical activity There are many components of successful swimming. “Anybody can do it,” said Bob Bruce, the aquatics specialist for the Bend Park & Recreation District and head coach of Central Oregon Masters Aquatics. “But it’s skill intensive.” Unlike running, he said, which is an extension of an activity people do every day (walking), swimming involves the coordinated synchronization of kicking the legs, moving the arms independently, breathing and blowing bubbles. “You have to have a bigger skill set to pick up swimming,” Bruce said. “When you stop running, you stand. When you stop swimming ... ” he trails off to make a point. Bruce believes there are significant numbers of adults in the region who don’t know how to swim. Many have psychological blocks to swimming. Those deterrents might have come from a terrifying early experience in the water, a perception of danger or even selfconsciousness about wearing a swimsuit in public. Many adults who don’t know how to swim are just too embarrassed to be a beginner

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Pools in Central Oregon Public pools: Juniper Swim & Fitness Center, www.bend parksandrec.org, 800 N.E. Sixth St., Bend, 541389-7665; adult single visit: $5.50 for in-district residents and $6.50 for out-of-district residents Cascade Swim Center, www.raprd.org, 465 S.W. Rimrock Drive, Redmond, 541-548-7275; adult single visit: $3 Madras Aquatic Center, www.macaquatic. com, 1195 S.E. Kemper Way, Madras, 541-475-4253; adult single visit: $4 for in-district and $5.50 for out-of-district residents Private pools: Bend Golf and Country Club, www.bendgolf club.com, 61045 Country Club Drive, Bend. 541382-3261. Call for information about membership rates. No public drop-in rate. Athletic Club of Bend, www.athleticclubofbend .com, 61615 Athletic Club Drive, Bend, 541-3853062. Call 541-322-5803 for information about membership options. No public drop-in rate. Sisters Athletic Club, www.sistersathleticclub. com, 1001 Desperado Trail, Sisters, 541-549-6878. Call for information about membership. Nonmember adults drop-in fee for lap swimming: $15.

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Get ready | SWIMMING at something that children seem so comfortable with. Juniper Swim & Fitness Center in Bend offers a class just for people who need to overcome their fears before learning the motor skills. Called “Swim Without Fear,” it’s a gentle introduction for hesitant adults. For those not overcoming those sorts of obstacles, a new swimmer can get from zero to swimming in just a couple of lessons, Bruce said. Most pools around the region offer lessons for all levels of swimmers. (See “Pools in Central Oregon” for regional facilities.) Some private pools allow nonmembers to take lessons in their facilities. Private lessons can cost $25-$30 an hour. Short-term group coaching typically costs less, perhaps $35-$40 for a series. Lessons can retool an experienced swimmer’s skills, form and efficiency, Bruce said. “Everyone looks at swimming as an individual activity, but it’s learned best in a group setting,” said Bruce. “Not only do you

have an instructor teaching you, but the people that you are active with are your support group. … It can be pursued alone, but it works better when you have other people keeping you accountable. No one swims as well or as hard (by themselves) as they would if swimming with a group of their peers.” Mike Carew is a retired, local competitive swimmer who has relied more on swimming to fulfill his fitness and competitive needs after running trashed his hips. He swims with the Central Oregon Masters Aquatics group, which provides camaraderie and coaching. And, he said, using online fitness challenge programs offered through the U.S. Masters Swimming site www.usms.org (click on “Health & Fitness” and then “Fitness Events”) has motivated him to do more. He’s done a program called “Go The Distance” for five years now, which he said has made him swim farther and contributed to his health and weight loss.

WINTER/SPRING 2012 • HIGH DESERT PULSE


Swimming gear Tips for success To make progress, Bruce suggests hitting the pool for practice about three times a week. Higley said a respectable swim workout for a recreational lap swimmer might require a 45-minute time commitment. Start with some slow warm-up laps and stretching before pushing into a 20- to 30-minute hard workout, he said. Don’t forget the cool-down laps and stretching at the end, too, he said. It’s not uncommon for a lone lap swimmer to get bored swimming back and forth for 45 minutes. Higley suggests either focusing on techniques and form to keep the mind busy, or buying a waterproof iPod or case to listen to music. If a person doesn’t want to join a group but needs some structure to his or her lap swimming, structured workout ideas are available online. Google “swim workout” to find many customized workouts to meet your personal goals. If you’re considering your first triathlon next summer, it’s crucial to start coached swim lessons right now, said both Higley and Bruce. A swimmer needs time to master the skills before starting the intense training that’s typical of competitors. Hard and frequent training with improper form can lead to repetitive-use injuries. For more information about swimming, including goal setting, pool etiquette and how to use pace clocks, visit www.usms.org/fitness. •

HIGH DESERT PULSE • WINTER / SPRING 2012

Besides the swimsuit, there are a few personal items that a swimmer might choose to own. Here are some gear tips from Rob Higley, Athletic Club of Bend aquatic director: Goggles ($10-$30) — a basic necessity to see clearly in the water. Caps ($5-$30) — help prevent chlorine damage and keep long hair out of the eyes for visibility. Ear plugs ($3-$15) and nose plugs ($2-$6) — nice for swimmers who get bothered by water in the ears, or who haven’t mastered breathing out through the nose when swimming. To mix up a swim workout: Kick boards ($9-$27) — typically used for isolating the legs. Fins ($15-$50 ) — give the foot more surface area while kicking to help strengthen the legs and make ankles more flexible. They make it easier to swim farther. Not recommended after knee surgery. Pull buoys ($5-$14) — flotation de-

vices to wedge between the thighs to keep the lower body afloat and in position without kicking. They help isolate the arm stroke. Hand paddles ($7-$28) — increase the surface area of hands, adding resistance to build upper body strength. Higley advises mastering one’s technique with a coach before using them because paddles increase pressure on the shoulders, which could lead to rotator cuff injuries with improper form. Where to buy: Besides kick boards, which are generally available to borrow at pools, you might need to bring your own accessories. Most public pools sell some basic supplies, such as goggles. The shop at the Athletic Club of Bend carries suits and all kinds of accessories and is open to the public. Seasonally, stores such as Big 5 Sporting Goods or Dick’s Sporting Goods carry supplies. Everything is available online, said Higley, who recommends www.swimoutlet.com. But first, see if your local pool has items available to borrow.

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Union representative Yaju Dharmarajah travels for his job and has union members calling him before and after work hours. The result? He’s on his cellphone a lot. Page 20


Cellphone safety | ARE OUR PHONES HARMING US?

Who will make the call? With a lifestyle and lots of money at stake, researchers are at odds over risk to the brain from cellphones BY BETSY Q. CLIFF PHOTOS BY ROB KERR

“M

y cellphone is attached to my hip,” says Yaju Dharmarajah, a representative for the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees Council 75, a union that in Central Oregon includes county and state employees. Dharmarajah, who lives in Bend, travels as far as Morrow County for his job, and allows union members to call him before and after work, meaning he needs to be on his cellphone a lot, he said. “In my industry, legal or union representative positions, everyone uses their cellphones,” he says. “You cannot go without having a cellphone in this job.” Dharmarajah is not alone. Cellphones are ubiquitous. In a Pew Research Center survey from May, 83 percent of American adults said they own at least one. Industry statistics show the number of active phones in this country now exceeds our population. And whether we use them for work, to catch up with friends and family or to check email, most of us rely on cellphones more than ever before. We often do it without even thinking about it. But Dharmarajah said over the past few months, thanks to news headlines, he has begun to think about his use. “I’m sincerely concerned about the potential links between

cellphone usage and radiation,” he said. “I use speakerphone a lot more, and I use my hands-free device a lot more.” With a cellphone by the side of most Americans, the question of whether cellphone radiation could harm human health has become a major public health question. Though the technology has been around for decades, the recent explosion of both the number of users and amount of time each person spends with his or her cellphone has experts scrambling to lay out what, if any, risk exists. “There has never been this kind of exposure that has risen so quickly and had such a dramatic impact on peoples’ lives,” said Dr. Martha Linet, chief of the radiation epidemiology branch of the National Cancer Institute. “There’s the worry, are we doing this big natural experiment on people without knowing what’s going on?” There have been loads of studies, but so far little consensus. The studies to date have not provided direct evidence linking cellphone use and cancer. But neither have they given absolute assurance, with some studies finding hints of risk or potentially worrisome effects. With few conclusions and such high stakes, the debate over whether cellphone users should take precautions has become fierce. The cellphone industry regularly weighs in

How we use our phones Percent of cellphone owners who have done the following: Smartphone users Other cellphone users Used phone to get information needed right away

79% 31% Used phone for entertainment when bored

72% 21% Been in an emergency situation where having your cellphone really helped

43% 37% Had trouble doing something because you didn’t have your phone with you

34% 22% Pretended to use your phone to avoid interaction with another person

20% 8% Source: Pew Research Center survey April/May 2011

GREG CROSS

“There’s the worry, are we doing this big natural experiment on people without knowing what’s going on?” Dr. Martha Linet, epidemiologist, National Cancer Institute HIGH DESERT PULSE • WINTER / SPRING 2012

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Cellphone safety | ARE OUR PHONES HARMING US?

and prominent epidemiologists — the primary scientists who study potential cellphone dangers — line up on both sides. Even regulatory agencies can’t agree, with some emphasizing the potential for links to cancer while others, particularly U.S. agencies, stating no links have been found. “There’s so much money involved here,” said Louis Slesin, the New York-based editor of a newsletter, Microwave News, who has been reporting on the cellphone industry since its inception. “The politics are hot and heavy.” While experts debate, millions of Americans and billions of people worldwide are left without clear guidance about whether they should be changing their cellphone habits, or putting down the phones altogether.

How cellphones work To connect to other devices and receive information, cellphones emit a type of radiation known as non-ionizing radiation, as distinct from ionizing radiation, which strips electrons from atoms and molecules. Ionizing radiation, like that found in X-rays and radon, is known to damage DNA, potentially causing diseases such as cancer. Cellphone radiation is part of a category of lower-frequency radiation that includes visible light, energy from microwave ovens, cordless phones, Wi-Fi transmitters and digital baby monitors. It has not been proven to cause negative effects. Still, it does have some effect on the brain. The radiation can heat up tissue. (Think microwave oven, though cellphones do not emit at the same intensity as microwaves do.) Being on the phone for half an hour, for example, can heat up the skin by about one degree Fahrenheit, and the temperature inside your head by less, said

Page 22

Henry Lai, a professor of bioengineering at the University of Washington who researches the effect of non-ionizing radiation. Those kind of low temperatures, he said, may be noticeable but are unlikely to have health effects. Another effect, perhaps more potent, was demonstrated in a study published last year by researchers at the National Institutes of Health and Brookhaven National Laboratory. Researchers paid 47 volunteers to sit with cellphones next to their heads for about 50 minutes, as if they were talking on them. The cellphones were muted though, and unbeknownst to the subjects, were sometimes turned on and sometimes turned off. The volunteers sat quietly in a room with their eyes open. When cellphones were on, researchers noticed areas of the brain closest to the phones showed an increased amount of activity. Specifically, those areas increased their metabolism of glucose, meaning the cells were taking in and burning more fuel. Brain cells increase glucose metabolism for any number of reasons, most of them entirely normal. Speaking will increase the glucose metabolism of brain cells involved in speech, for example, and some areas of your brain are increasing their rate of glucose metabolism just by reading and processing this article. What researchers found remarkable in this experiment was that glucose metabolism increased simply with proximity to an active phone. There were no other stimuli, such as sounds or conversation, to otherwise spark the brain’s activity. In a news conference after the results were published, lead author Dr. Nora Volkow said the results show that the human brain


PULSE STAFF PHOTOS

While experts debate, billions worldwide are left without clear guidance about whether they should be changing their cellphone habits, or even putting phones down altogether. On the job, in coffee shops, on the slopes and on trails, Central Oregonians are on their phones. While it’s hard to imagine life without the convenience and connectivity they offer, the jury is still out on whether cellphones pose health risks.

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Cellphone safety | ARE OUR PHONES HARMING US? is sensitive to radiation from cellphones. But whether that has any negative effects on the brain, she continued, is “something that needs to be properly evaluated.” She made the point even more explicit: “Our finding does not enlighten in any way this controversy of whether cellphone exposure produces or does not produce cancer.” There is a potential way that cellphones could increase the risk of cancer, said Lai, who was not affiliated with the Volkow study. He said that more than 200 papers have “consistently” shown that cellphones increase the activity of free radicals, molecules that can damage DNA. Indeed, an increase in free radicals is one of the ways in which ionizing radiation is known to damage DNA and predispose the body to cancer. But Lai’s contention is not a settled issue; other scientists debate whether cellphone radiation can, in fact, increase free radical production, at least in humans. Most studies done have been laboratory work, often on animals, and some say even those don’t show links with cancer. “Animal studies do not show a relationship,” said Linet at the National Cancer Institute. “Lab studies do not show a relationship.”

Research on people Most studies that have looked explicitly at whether cellphone use causes cancer in humans are epidemiological studies, which compare habits of large groups of people with health outcomes. There have been a number of these studies, most of them in Europe, focusing on whether those who use their cellphones more often are more likely to develop cancer. In total, the studies have not found huge

cause for concern. “The findings for the most part in epidemiological studies are null,” said Linet. But, she noted, “there’s a little whiff here, a little whiff there (of some effect).” One large study, published in the fall, correlated a national cancer registry in Denmark to another registry of cellphone subscribers. The researchers wanted to see if people with brain cancer were more likely to be subscribers. They found no relationship between the two lists, though the study was criticized for methodological problems. For example, critics said, people may use a cellphone frequently for business but not be classified as a subscriber because the person’s employer pays for the cellphone. On the other hand, studies from Sweden have found a relationship between cellphone use and cancer, particularly for people who used a phone for more than 10 years and began using it before age 20. One analysis from this group found almost a threefold increase in brain cancer among long-term users. Perhaps the most talked-about study is known as Interphone. This study involved thousands of subjects and more than 20 scientists spread out over 13 countries. Data was collected between 2000 and 2004, and the study was published in 2010. Scientists collected information on cellphone habits of people with several different types of brain tumors and the habits of demographically similar types of people without brain tumors. They looked for evidence that people with brain tumors had been using cellphones for longer or more intensely. They didn’t find it. Overall, it seemed there was no correlation between cellphone use and brain Continued on Page 52

Reduce risk while using a cellphone • Hold the phone away from your head, especially when a call is connecting. Even an inch will reduce the amount of radiation you absorb. • Use a hands-free device or speakerphone as much as possible. • If you are in an office or at home, use a land line. • Keep cellphone conversations short. • Use text messaging. • Don’t leave your phone on at night and close to you. Turn it off or move it to the other side of the room. • Limit the use of cellphones by children, who may absorb more radiation than adults do with the same amount of use. Page 25


Healthy eating | DID YOU KNOW?

Advice you can eat Don’t sweeten with agave. The syrupy sweetener from the agave plant has been touted as a natural and therefore preferable way to sweeten foods. But dietician Julie Hood Gonsalves said agave can contain up to 93 percent fructose; the remainder is glucose, a different form of sugar. Research has associated fructose with higher triglyceride levels, more belly fat and insulin resistance — a condition in which the body doesn’t use insulin properly. Consider that both high fructose corn syrup and table sugar are generally about half fructose and half glucose. So, tablespoon for tablespoon, agave would be higher in fructose than high fructose corn syrup. However, agave tends to be sweeter, and less might be necessary to sweeten a recipe. Gonsalves recommends using fruit juices or smaller amounts of regular table sugar if sweetening foods is necessary.

Use canola instead of olive oil.

Increase potassium to reduce salt impact.

Olive oil has been well-marketed in recent years, but canola oil actually has a higher proportion of heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids per serving. Omega-3s are best known for their role in the reduction of inflammation. They balance out omega-6 fatty acids, which tend to promote inflammation. Consider that the typical American diet includes considerably more omega-6s than omega-3s. The two varieties of oils are comparable in calories and monounsaturated fat levels. Olive oil is typically preferred for its flavor, so use it on pasta or roasted vegetables. But in baking, when the oil’s taste is going to dissipate anyway, choose canola for its omega-3s, Gonsalves said.

Here’s the bright side of the sodium/ blood pressure debate: A growing body of research is showing that potassium will reduce the effect of sodium on blood pressure. So for all the salt lovers out there, focus on increasing potassium in your diet. Eight servings of fruits and vegetables a day will probably do the trick, Gonsalves said. Foods that are particularly high in potassium include bananas, potatoes, sweet potatoes, tomatoes and all types of legumes. Yogurt is good too, Gonsalves said.

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541-504-9577 • www.bestcaretreatment.org Page 26

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BY ANNE AURAND

A

n ever-growing body of nutritional knowledge can confuse even the most conscientious eater. We are here to help. Julie Hood Gonsalves, a registered dietitian

Nutritionist’s advice may not be what you would expect.

and associate professor of science and health at Central Oregon Community College, follows nutrition research. Here, Gonsalves offers five tips for healthier shopping and cooking. Some of them might surprise you. While a few of these tips might appear to

be a free pass to indulge, Gonsalves says it’s still important to think about where foods fit into your overall diet and health. Does coffee keep you up at night? Might want to cut back. Can’t seem to drop that last five pounds? Go easy on the potatoes. •

Frozen can beat fresh.

Go ahead, drink coffee.

Many of the vegetables we consume come from overseas. Nutrients are lost over time and during the shipping process. Even vegetables grown on the East Coast lose quite a bit of nutritional value as they are transported across the country, Gonsalves said. Exposure to light, oxygen or heat in the truck, in the store or at home will destroy surface vitamins. Vitamins remain inside, but the loss can be significant. When vegetables are frozen, most companies harvest, process and freeze them immediately. Freezing slows the destruction processes, so nutrients are retained, she said. The exception would be when fresh vegetables are eaten within a few days of harvest.

Prevailing wisdom has said coffee was a diuretic, something that increases one’s loss of urine and therefore causes dehydration. But more recent studies have debunked that assumption, Gonsalves said. Not only has research shown that coffee isn’t dehydrating, she said, it can actually be counted as fluid intake. Plus, it’s high in antioxidants, natural compounds that help neutralize free radicals, substances which can cause some diseases and accelerate the aging process. And research has shown a correlation between coffee consumption and reduced risk of Type 2 diabetes, Parkinson’s disease and endometrial cancer. Having a low-fat latte is also a good source of calcium, Gonsalves said. But, she warned, it’s the extras that can become unhealthy for coffee drinkers, so skip the high-fat cream, sugar and flavored syrups.

PHOTOS BY ROB KERR

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541.548.7483 732 SW 23rd Street, Redmond, OR 97756 hospice@bendcable.com www.redmondhospice.org HIGH DESERT PULSE • WINTER / SPRING 2012

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Get gear |

GOGGLES

Looking good Syncing lens with conditions can help you see better, too. BY MARKIAN HAWRYLUK

P

eople ask a lot of their goggles. Most sport the same pair regardless of whether the sun is blindingly bright or dark clouds cast the entire mountain into shadows. Talk about looking at life through rose-colored glasses! Many of today’s goggles, however, allow skiers and boarders to swap out lenses depending on the light conditions. It’s akin to having fat skis for powder days and shaped skis for carving out turns. Some colors filter out more light, making them ideal for bright days, while others increase contrast, helping to highlight the bumps and dips in the terrain ahead. Typically, entry level models (less than $50) have a single fixed lens. But you can find plenty of models under $100 with interchangeable lenses. Basic goggles curve across your face, but are straight vertically. More advanced models curve vertically as well, improving peripheral vision, lowering distortion and reducing glare. Virtually all goggles these days are helmet-compatible, but it’s always a good idea to try them on with your helmet to make sure they fit well together. • Airborne ski jumping at Mt. Bachelor is reflected in the lens of a skier nearby. ANDY TULLIS

Color your world

36%

light transmission

The color of the lens in your goggles is much more than a fashion statement. Different colors filter out different colors of light, changing the way your eyes see the features on the slope. Page 28

68%

light transmission

10-18%

23-59%

light transmission

light transmission

Rose/copper

Yellow

Dark brown

Rose

Increases contrast and depth perception Best conditions: Fog, overcast, stormy weather

Highlights shadows, brings out bumps, better depth Best conditions: Fog, overcast, stormy weather

Increases contrast Best conditions: Bright and sunny

Boosts depth perception Best conditions: Flat lighting WINTER / SPRING 2012 • H


20-55%

light transmission

30-40%

light transmission

68-90%

15%

light transmission

84-99%

light transmission

light transmission

Gold

Green

Yellow-orange, amber

Gray

Clear

Increases contrast Best conditions: Bright and sunny

Increases contrast Best conditions: Fog, overcast, stormy weather

Highlights shadows, brings out bumps, good all-around Best conditions: Fog, overcast, stormy weather

Maintains true color Best conditions: Bright

Allows the most light Best conditions: Snowy, sunset, night time

012 • HIGH DESERT PULSE

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How does she do it? |

CLARA GRAVES

90? Who, me? Clara Graves is having too much fun to worry about a little thing like age BY MARKIAN HAWRYLUK

I

Since retiring to Bend 30 years ago, Clara Graves has led an active life of sports and travel, from skiing at Crater Lake to a glider ride last year to celebrate her 90th birthday. SUBMITTED PHOTOS

f there’s any doubt the Central Oregon lifestyle leads to a long and healthy life, one need only look at Clara Graves. A war bride who retired to Bend 30 years ago for the sunny weather and recreational opportunities, she has taken advantage of all the region has to offer to keep healthy and active late in life. Last year, the staff at Juniper Swim & Fitness Center, along with her classmates from the water aerobics class, threw her a party to celebrate her 90th birthday. That’s 90 … A party at the gym … The same gym where she mock pole danced the previous year. That’s pole dancing … at 89 … at the gym … “I don’t feel old,” Graves said. “I just don’t feel it.” Living to 100 or even 90 may be part luck, but there’s definitely a science behind it. Researchers have identified several common traits among those who live to be 100. They stay active all their lives. They don’t smoke and drink only moderately. They inherit good genes from their parents and eat a diet low in red meat and heavy on plants. And they have strong social connections. That describes Graves to a T. Her father lived to 67, but her mother to 90. She grew up with three brothers, and spent her childhood playing the same sports they did. She played football and tin-can hockey, climbed trees and telephone poles. She married Perry Graves in 1942 in an Army wedding ceremony that involved putting the bride and groom on chairs perched atop artillery pack mules. They raised four children in southern Illinois, including a daughter who later worked as a BLM geologist in Prineville. The Graveses had visited Central Oregon in the early ’80s to house-sit for her while she took an extended trip. Upon returning to southern Illinois, Perry Graves asked his wife if she’d like to move out to Bend. “I’ll pack my bags tomorrow,” she replied. Their friends couldn’t believe they were moving to Oregon.

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ROB KERR

Every Friday, Clara Graves, 90, gets together with a group of young friends — in their 70s and 80s — for lunch and a game of cards. Research suggests that having strong social connections is a key component to a long life.

“I didn’t want to say it, but it sure beats southern Illinois,” she more either. quipped. Southern Illinois summers were hot and humid, and while Each Friday, she still gets together with her circle of friends to play Graves bowled and golfed there, it didn’t have the outdoor oppor- cards — dummy rummy, she calls it. tunities that Bend did. Once in Central Oregon, Graves learned to “We go to each other’s houses and it’s fun,” she said. “But they’re ski with nordic skiing guru Virginia Meissner. all young.” “We would go to three different places to ski (each Those friends are 85, 79 and 71. You know, young week) and the groups were really big,” she recalls. “So women … I really met a lot of people.” “Most of my friends my age are dead or in assisted When Graves had been skiing for only a year, Meissner — Clara Graves living,” Graves said, matter-of-factly. suggested they ski down to Elk Lake. “It’s all downhill,” Graves was a social smoker back in Illinois but soon Meissner told her, when Graves expressed some doubts. discovered few smoked in Bend, so she quit too. On her “That first hill going down to Todd Lake, I thought I was going to doctor’s advice, she changed her diet to mostly chicken or fish protein, die,” Graves said. “I was going so fast, I was afraid to fall because I with lots of vegetables and salads, and few desserts. though I would kill myself. I was athletic, but putting those two long “It’s not that difficult (staying in shape),” she said. “But some peoboards on my feet changed things!” ple like to eat and not exercise.” The Graveses skied in the winter and hiked and played golf in the At 68, Lynn Hanlon, a friend from water aerobics class, is young summer, becoming fast friends with a group of active people. Sev- enough to be Graves’ daughter. In fact, her mother just died last year eral years ago, Clara Graves gave up skiing and golf after a knee at age 90. She admits to being inspired by Graves’ seemingly endreplacement, and transitioned to exercising at Juniper. less supply of life energy. “I missed it a lot the first year, but I changed my lifestyle,” she said. “I attribute her longevity to her basically sunny personality,” she “I miss the people and all the friends that I was doing that with.” said. “She’s really Suzy Sunshine.” Of course, most of the people she skied with aren’t skiing any Hanlon thinks part of Graves’ longevity is due to the fact that while

“I don’t feel old. I just don’t feel it.”

HIGH DESERT PULSE • WINTER / SPRING 2012

Page 31


How does she do it? | CLARA GRAVES

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she was always active, sports were more a social than a competitive outlet for her. “She never really put herself to the task of being the best, so she didn’t have the stress of competition,” Hanlon said. “She only had the enjoyment of the sport.” At her water aerobics class, Graves has a reputation for entertaining the group. “She’s really a social butterfly at the pool. She may not always follow instructions, but she’s definitely leading the parade,” Hanlon said. “Sometimes she may not be moving exactly the way the teacher is telling us or she may be moving her jaw simultaneously.” Betty Bromley, another pool regular, confirmed that Graves keeps up the chatter, but with good reason. “You know, when you’ve lived that long,” she explained, “then you have a lot to say.” Alli Jorgensen, who leads the aerobics class, said Graves stands in contrast to many of the older patrons of the club, who often dwell on the negative, focusing on their health problems or other challenges. “She comes in and she is just a light for that class,” Jorgensen said. “She’s always smiling. She always wants to make the class fun. She’s willing to try anything and to make anybody laugh.” Instructors can often get frustrated when class participants are chatting rather than following instructions, but with Graves, she said it’s worth it because she helps make the class fun for everyone. “She’s the one that’s facing you, she’s looking at you, she’s smiling at you, she’s engaging you. There are some that are barely moving, they’re just there to chat,” Jorgensen said. “Her energy is worth the trade-off.” Graves’ speech hasn’t slowed down either. She still regales her cohorts with tales in a rapid-fire staccato, suggesting her mind has stayed as active as her body. “I’m at that place — my husband is too — where we’re starting to slow down,” she said. “There comes a time when your body does wear out. Your mind doesn’t really wear out. It’s kind of frustrating. You want to do things.” The difference, of course, is that so many others have experienced that slowdown in their 70s and 80s. Graves is quick to point out there are other nonagenarians in Central Oregon who remain active. One friend is 90 and still plays tennis. A man in her daughter’s hiking group still hits the trail at 92. Two friends that Graves hiked with lived till 98 and 100. And she knows two sisters who still walk to the grocery store at ages 94 and 98. (It’s safer than driving, they tell her.) How much of that is attributable to Central Oregon? It’s debatable, although a study last year found that Deschutes County residents had a significantly higher than average life expectancy. Graves has certainly made the most of the local resources. She’s taken balance classes at the Bend Senior Center and healthy living classes at St. Charles Bend. And she’s spent a good part of her time outdoors, basking in the Central Oregon sun, getting her dose of vitamin D. “She’s definitely solar powered,” Hanlon said. “When she finally goes off to heaven, she’ll find a beach chair and face south and get some sun in.” •

Page 32

WINTER / SPRING 2012 • HIGH DESERT PULSE


Get active |

BACKCOUNTRY SKIING

PHOTO BY ROB KERR

B

ackcountry ski guide Jonas Tarlen scales a slope along Tam McArthur Rim in the Three Sisters Wilderness. A popular location for backcountry snow enthusiasts, the northfacing feature just east of Broken Top holds wonderful pockets of untouched powder. Page 33


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On the job |

CYTOTECHNOLOGISTS

Cell scrutiny Cytotechnologists help physicians diagnose disease by examining microscopic cell samples

BY BETSY CLIFF PHOTOS BY ROB KERR

E

Sherri Tyrrell analyzes cells for signs of disease at a lab in Bend. She found out about cytotechnology while researching career paths for biologists.

ach day hundreds of specimens are sent to Central Oregon Pathology Consultants, a pathology laboratory and practice on Bend’s east side. Many of those specimens make their way into a small, well-lit room in one corner of the building. There, three cytotechnologists sit in front of microscopes, peering at slide after slide to look for abnormalities. Cytotechnology is the study of cells, and cytotechnologists look specifically at cells that are not organized into tissues. That means they don’t typically see biopsies, but they do see Pap tests or fluid samples. They’re looking at individual cells for any sign of disease. Each day, they spend hours with their faces pressed against the microscope, typically going through a new set of specimens every few minutes. “It’s not boring,” said Gay Halverson, who has been a cytotechnologist for nearly four decades. “Each slide is different.” Sherri Tyrrell, another cytotechnologist who has only been on the job a few years, said she, too, likes the job. “I’m still just fascinated with all the things that can happen within the body and that you can see under the microscope.” The field of cytotechnology was born in the 1950s, with the widespread adoption of the Pap test for cervical cancer. Then, a cytotechnologist’s primary and often only duty was to interpret whether each smear was normal or abnormal. Pap tests continue to be a huge part of the work of a cytotechnologists. Central Oregon Pathology gets more than 20,000 Pap smears every year, and the three cytotechnologists there go through all of them. Tests that look normal go no further than the cytotechnologist, while anything abnormal is sent to a pathologist, who has a medical degree, for further review. “They probably sign out 85 percent of the Paps we get on their own,” said Dr. Cheryl Younger, a pathologist who specializes in cy-

HIGH DESERT PULSE • WINTER / SPRING 2012

Page 35


On the job | CYTOTECHNOLOGISTS

“It’s not boring,” says Gay Halverson, who has been a cytotechnologist for nearly four decades. “Each slide is different.”

topathology at the practice. Still, the field has branched out considerably in the past decade. “It’s evolved,” said Halverson. “We don’t just sit at a microscope, which makes it more interesting.” The cytotechnologists in Central Oregon assist with fine needle aspirations, procedures done in a physician’s office that use a small needle to draw cells from a cyst or mass, often to look for signs of disease. They also run a genetic test for the human papilloma virus, commonly called HPV. The test determines what strain of HPV a person has, as some strains are more likely to cause cervical or other types of cancer. A person interested in cytotechnology needs a bachelor’s degree

Page 36

at minimum, with a healthy load of biology courses along with some chemistry. “You have to be a little bit of a science geek,” said Tim Wilson, a cytotechnologist at Central Oregon Pathology. All three of the cytotechnologists who work in Central Oregon said they enjoyed biology and found out about cytotechnology through that field. Wilson graduated from college with a major in biology and, when looking for a practical use for his degree, stumbled on cytotechnology. Tyrrell had a similar story, finding out about the profession by doing research on careers while still in college. Halverson was trained in the early 1970s, when she said the federal government paid for people to go through cytotechnology programs to build up the workforce of cytotechnologists. A college instructor noticed that Halverson was good with a microscope, and handed her a brochure about cytotechnology. “I saw (that) they pay you,” she said, and said she thought to herself, “Wow, they pay you.” She left college, which at that time was not required for cytotechnology, and went into a training program. (She later finished her degree in biology.) There are a few dozen accredited cytotechnology programs in the United States. The closest programs to Central Oregon are in California and Utah, according to the American Society of Cytopathology, a

WINTER / SPRING 2012 • HIGH DESERT PULSE


At left, normal cervical cells from a Pap smear; below, cells that have a darker and larger than normal nucleus, signalling an abnormality.

professional association. Cytotechnology can be incorporated into a bachelor’s degree, which is what Tyrrell did at Indiana University. Or, someone with a bachelor’s degree and the right science prerequisites can obtain a postbaccalaureate certificate, often in a one-year program. After school, students sit for a national certification exam. The median salary range is between $58,000 and $69,000 annually, according to the American Society of Cytopathology. The cytotechnologists in Central Oregon work regular hours, with staggered shifts beginning at 7 a.m. and ending at 6 p.m. Larger centers, they said, sometimes require more irregular hours or weekend work, depending on when lab work needs to get done. Besides an interest in science, people who can work independently are well-suited for the job. “You have to make a lot of decisions,” said Wilson. “You have to be able to have a fair amount of responsibility.” Halverson said people who don’t need a lot of human interaction would also do well. “I mean, when you want your down time, or your quiet time, you got it.” She and Wilson also said they liked the aspect of the job related to helping people. Most of the time, they are looking for diseased cells, as-

“You have to be a little bit of a science geek,” says cytotechnoligist Tim Wilson, speaking of his profession. Wilson majored in biology in college.

sisting a pathologist in a diagnosis of disease, often cancer. “There are certain times where you get kind of excited,” because of something abnormal, said Halverson, though she quickly added it’s easier for her to get excited about it because she is dealing with the pure biology and doesn’t have to see patients. That kind of attention to detail adds intellectual challenge to the job that all three cytotechnologists said they enjoyed. “Your mind is constantly having to think of different criteria of different diseases,” said Tyrrell. Wilson echoed her thoughts. “It’s a mystery figuring out each case.” •

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Sorting it out | NUTRITION APPS

Smart food

Our top applications for watching what you eat

BY BETSY Q. CLIFF

M

ore than one-third of Americans now own a smartphone, according to the Pew Research Center. These phones help us email, send photos, surf the Web and listen to music. But can they make us healthier? Perhaps. Here are some of our favorite apps, for both iPhone and Android platforms, that might help you make better nutritional choices. How’s that for smart?

MyNetDiary

Whole Foods Market Recipes

Cost: Free on iPhones; $3.99 on Androids and for the Pro version on iPhones For: iPhone iOS 3.0+, Android 1.5+ What it does: Lets you keep a food diary, compiles the information and analyzes your choices. The app will tell you if you’re eating too much fat, sodium or calories to meet your weight loss goals. Selling point: The database contains more than 100,000 foods, according to its developers, a sizeable number compared with other apps. My quibble: It can be really, reallllly tedious to enter everything you ate manually. There are some shortcuts, especially for things you eat regularly, but it still takes diligence.

Cost: Free For: iPhone iOS 3.1.2+ What it does: Suggests recipes based on certain criteria. You can pick the meal course, attributes (budget conscious or quick-andeasy, for example) and dietary needs (low fat, sugar conscious, vegan and more). Selling point: Easy to use. It also gives basic nutrition information and lets you load ingredients into a shopping list. My quibble: There’s a cool section called “On Hand” that allows you to put in items you already have and find recipes that incorporate those foods. But it needs some fine tuning. When I put in “cheese” and “peppers,” it suggested I make a chocolate yule log.

MealSnap Cost: 99 cents For: iPhone iOS 4.0+ What it does: Take a food photo, and the app tells you what it is and approximately how many calories it contains. Selling point: An easy way to keep a food log. My quibble: You’ll sacrifice some accuracy by using this method over an entered food diary. When I took pictures of full meals, even ones that seemed they would be easy to identify (macaroni and cheese with a side of blueberries) the app told me it was not a food. Adding captions helps, but the calorie ranges may be off for some foods. I wouldn’t use this app if you are tracking calories closely.

Restaurant Nutrition Cost: Free For: iPhone iOS 4.0+, Android 1.6+ What it does: Contains calorie counts and basic nutrition information for more than 250 restaurant chains, according to the developer, including some surprising ones, like Great Harvest Bread Co. and Black Bear Diner. Selling point: Easy and quick to search. And, as an added bonus, it allows you to search for nearby restaurant locations. My quibble: Some of the nutrition information seems inaccurate. For example, I just don’t believe a Black Bear Diner meatloaf has no protein. • IPHONE PHOTO COURTESY APPLE

Page 38

WINTER / SPRING 2012 • HIGH DESERT PULSE


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ALZHEIMERS & DEMENTIA CARE

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ASSISTED LIVING

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BEHAVIORAL HEALTH

St. Charles Behavioral Health

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CARDIOLOGY

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CARDIOTHORACIC SURGERY

St. Charles Cardiothoracic Surgery

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COUNSELING & WELLNESS

Juniper Mountain Counseling & Wellness

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COSMETIC SERVICES

Bend Memorial Clinic

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DENTURISTS

Sisters Denture Specialties

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DERMATOLOGY

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DERMATOLOGY (MOHS)

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ENDOCRINOLOGY

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FAMILY MEDICINE

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FAMILY MEDICINE

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GASTROENTEROLOGY

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

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GENERAL DENTISTRY

Coombe and Jones Dentistry

774 SW Rimrock Way • Redmond

541-923-7633

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HOME HEALTH SERVICES

St. Charles Home Health Services

2500 NE Neff Road • Bend

541-5382-4321

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HOSPICE/HOME HEALTH

Partners In Care

2075 NE Wyatt Ct. • Bend

541-382-5882

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HOSPITAL

Mountain View Hospital

470 NE “A” Street • Madras

541-475-3882

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HOSPITAL

Pioneer Memorial Hospital

1201 NE Elm St • Prineville

541-447-6254

www.scmc.org

HOSPITAL

St. Charles Bend

2500 NE Neff Road • Bend

541-382-4321

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

HOSPITAL

St. Charles Redmond

1253 NE Canal Blvd • Redmond

541-548-8131

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

HOSPITALIST

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

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HYBERBARIC OXYGEN THERAPY

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

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IMAGING SERVICES

Bend Memorial Clinic

Locations in Bend, Redmond & Sisters

541-382-4900

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IMAGING SERVICES

Central Oregon Radiology Associates, P.C.

1460 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-9383

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IMMEDIATE CARE

St. Charles Immediate Care

2600 NE Neff Road • Bend

541-706-3700

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

INTEGRATED MEDICINE

Center for Integrated Medicine

916 SW 17th St, Ste 202 • Redmond

541-504-0250

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INTERNAL MEDICINE

Bend Memorial Clinic

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LASIK

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

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ADULT FOSTER CARE

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AESTHETIC SERVICES


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NEONATOLOGY

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NUTRITION

Bend Memorial Clinic

OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY

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OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY

St. Charles OB/GYN - Redmond

OCCUPATIONAL MEDICINE

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The Center: Orthopedic & Neurosurgical Care & Research

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ONCOLOGY ~ MEDICAL & RADIATION

St. Charles Cancer Center

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OPHTHALMOLOGY

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ORTHOPEDICS

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PALLIATIVE CARE

St. Charles Advanced Illness Management

PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY

Deschutes Pediatric Dentistry

PEDIATRICS

Bend Memorial Clinic

PHARMACY

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PHYSICAL MEDICINE

Desert Orthopedics

PHYSICAL MEDICINE

The Center: Orthopedic & Neurosurgical Care & Research

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Bend Memorial Clinic

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PHYSICAL THERAPY

Alpine Physical Therapy & Spine Care

2275 NE Doctors Dr, #3 & 336 SW Cyber Dr, Ste 107

541-382-5500

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PHYSICAL THERAPY

Healing Bridge Physical Therapy

404 NE Penn Avenue • Bend

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PODIATRY

Cascade Foot Clinic

Offices in Bend, Redmond & Prineville

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PULMONOLOGY

Bend Memorial Clinic

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PULMONOLOGY

St. Charles Pulmonary Clinic

Locations in Bend & Redmond

541-706-7715

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

REHABILITATION

St. Charles Rehabilitation Center

Locations in Bend & Redmond

541-706-7725

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RHEUMATOLOGY

Bend Memorial Clinic

SENIOR CARE HOME

Central Oregon Adult Foster Care

SLEEP MEDICINE

Locations in Bend & Redmond

541-382-4900

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n/a

Bend Memorial Clinic

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SLEEP MEDICINE

St. Charles Sleep Center

Locations in Bend & Redmond

541-706-6905

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

SURGICAL SPECIALIST

Bend Memorial Clinic

Locations in Bend & Redmond

541-382-4900

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SURGICAL SPECIALIST

Surgical Associates of the Cascades

1245 NW 4th Street, #101 • Redmond

541-548-7761

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SURGICAL SPECIALIST & OBESITY CARE

Cascade Obesity and General Surgery

1245 NW 4th Street, #101 • Redmond

541-548-7761

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URGENT CARE

Bend Memorial Clinic

VEIN SPECIALISTS

Inovia Vein Specialty Center

VEIN SURGERY

Bend Memorial Clinic

Locations in Bend & Redmond

541-382-4900

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541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

PA I D A D V E R T I S I N G S U P P L E M E N T To be included in the next issue of the PULSE/Connections Medical Directory, contact:

The Bulletin • 541.382.1811


ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT

2012 CENTRAL OREGON MEDICAL DIRECTORY M E D I C A L P R O F E S S I O N A L S B Y S P E C I A LT Y ALLERGY & ASTHMA

ADAM WILLIAMS, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

Bend Eastside & Redmond

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

2275 NE Doctors Drive, Ste 9 • Bend

541-330-6463

www.northstarneurology.com

2542 NE Courtney Dr • Bend

541-706-7730

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

ALZHEIMERS/DEMENTIA & GERIATRIC NEUROLOGY

FRANCENA ABENDROTH, MD

NorthStar Neurology

BEHAVIORAL HEALTH

PHILIP B. ANDERSON, MD

St. Charles Behavioral Health

KAREN CAMPBELL, PhD

St. Charles Behavioral Health

RYAN C. DIX, PsyD

St. Charles Family Care - Prineville

BRIAN T. EVANS, PsyD

2542 NE Courtney Dr • Bend

541-706-7730

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

1103 NE Elm Street, Ste C • Prineville

541-447-6263

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

St. Charles Behavioral Health

2542 NE Courtney Dr • Bend

541-706-7730

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

EUGENE KRANZ, PhD

St. Charles Behavioral Health

2542 NE Courtney Dr • Bend

541-706-7730

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

SONDRA MARSHALL, PhD

St. Charles Behavioral Health

2542 NE Courtney Dr • Bend

541-706-7730

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

NATHAN OSBORN, MD

St. Charles Behavioral Health

2542 NE Courtney Dr • Bend

541-706-7730

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

MIKALA SACCOMAN, PhD

St. Charles Behavioral Health

2542 NE Courtney Dr • Bend

541-706-7730

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

LEAH SCHOCK, PhD

St. Charles Behavioral Health

2542 NE Courtney Dr • Bend

541-706-7730

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

REBECCA SCRAFFORD, PsyD

St. Charles Behavioral Health

2542 NE Courtney Dr • Bend

541-706-7730

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

KIMBERLY SWANSON, PhD

St. Charles Behavioral Health

2542 NE Courtney Dr • Bend

541-706-7730

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

CARDIOLOGY

JEAN BROWN, PA-C

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

KAREN DICKERSON, PA-C

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

RICK KOCH, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

Bend Eastside & Redmond

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

GAVIN L. NOBLE, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

Bend Eastside & Redmond

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

STEPHANIE SCOTT, PA-C

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

JASON WEST, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

CARDIOTHORACIC SURGERY

JOHN D BLIZZARD, MD

St. Charles Cardiothoracic Surgery

2500 NE Neff Road • Bend

541-388-1636

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

DARIN CLEMENT, PA-C

St. Charles Cardiothoracic Surgery

2500 NE Neff Road • Bend

541-388-1636

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

CARL E. MILLER, PA-C

St. Charles Cardiothoracic Surgery

2500 NE Neff Road • Bend

541-388-1636

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

ANGELO A. VLESSIS, MD

St. Charles Cardiothoracic Surgery

2500 NE Neff Road • Bend

541-388-1636

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

TIMOTHY J. ZERGER, PA-C

St. Charles Cardiothoracic Surgery

2500 NE Neff Road • Bend

541-388-1636

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

1345 NW Wall St, Ste 202 • Bend

541-318-1000

www.bendwellnessdoctor.com

CHIROPRACTIC

JASON M. KREMER, DC, CCSP, CSCS

Wellness Doctor

DENTISTRY

MICHAEL R. HALL, DDS

Central Oregon Dental Center

1563 NW Newport Ave • Bend

541-389-0300

www.centraloregondentalcenter.net

BRADLEY E. JOHNSON, DMD

Contemporary Family Dentistry

1016 NW Newport Ave • Bend

541-389-1107

www.contemporaryfamilydentistry.com

DERMATOLOGY

ALYSSA ABBEY, PA-C

Bend Memorial Clinic

2600 NE Neff Road • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

JAMES M. HOESLY, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

2600 NE Neff Road • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

GERALD E. PETERS, MD, DS (Mohs)

Bend Memorial Clinic

2600 NE Neff Road • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

ANN M. REITAN, PA-C (Mohs)

Bend Memorial Clinic

2600 NE Neff Road • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

MARY F. CARROLL, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

RICK N. GOLDSTEIN, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

TONYA KOOPMAN, FNP

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

1103 NE Elm Street • Prineville

541-447-6263

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

ENDOCRINOLOGY

FAMILY MEDICINE

CAREY ALLEN, MD

St. Charles Family Care - Prineville


2012 CENTRAL OREGON MEDICAL DIRECTORY

ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT

FAMILY MEDICINE CONT.

HEIDI ALLEN, MD

St. Charles Family Care - Prineville

1103 NE Elm Street • Prineville

541-447-6263

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

THOMAS L. ALLUMBAUGH, MD

St. Charles Family Care - Redmond

211 NW Larch Avenue • Redmond

541-548-2164

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

KATHLEEN C. ANTOLAK, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

SADIE ARRINGTON, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

865 SW Veterans Way • Redmond

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

JOSEPH BACHTOLD, DO

St. Charles Family Care - Sisters

615 Arrowleaf Trail • Sisters

541-549-1318

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

JEFFREY P. BOGGESS, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

1080 SW Mt. Bachelor Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

BRANDON W. BRASHER, PA-C

St. Charles Family Care - Prineville

1103 NE Elm Street • Prineville

541-447-6263

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

SHANNON K. BRASHER, PA-C

St. Charles Family Care - Prineville

1103 NE Elm Street • Prineville

541-447-6263

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

MEGHAN BRECKE, DO

St. Charles Family Care - Bend

2965 NE Conners Ave, Suite 127 • Bend

541-706-4800

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

NANCY BRENNAN, DO

St. Charles Family Care - Bend

2965 NE Conners Ave, Suite 127 • Bend

541-706-4800

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

WILLIAM C. CLARIDGE, MD

St. Charles Family Care - Redmond

211 NW Larch Avenue • Redmond

541-548-2164

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

LINDA C. CRASKA, MD

St. Charles Family Care - Prineville

AMY DELOUGHREY, PA-C

Bend Memorial Clinic

JAMES K. DETWILER, MD

1103 NE Elm Street • Prineville

541-447-6263

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

St. Charles Family Care - Redmond

211 NW Larch Avenue • Redmond

541-548-2164

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

MAY S. FAN, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

231 East Cascades Avenue • Sisters

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

MARK GONSKY, DO

St. Charles Family Care - Bend

2965 NE Conners Ave, Suite 127 • Bend

541-706-4800

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

STEVEN GREER, MD

St. Charles Family Care - Sisters

617 Arrow Leaf Trail • Sisters

541-549-1318

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

ALAN C. HILLES, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

Redmond & Sisters

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

PAMELA J. IRBY, MD

St. Charles Family Care - Redmond

211 NW Larch Avenue • Redmond

541-548-2164

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

MAGGIE J. KING, MD

St. Charles Family Care - Prineville

1103 NE Elm Street • Prineville

541-447-6263

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

PETER LEAVITT, MD

St. Charles Family Care - Bend

2965 NE Conners Ave, Suite 127 • Bend

541-706-4800

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

CHARLOTTE LIN, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

JOE T. MC COOK, MD

St. Charles Family Care - Redmond

211 NW Larch Avenue • Redmond

541-548-2164

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

DANIEL J. MURPHY, MD

St. Charles Family Care - Redmond

211 NW Larch Avenue • Redmond

541-548-2164

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

SHERYL L. NORRIS, MD

St. Charles Family Care - Redmond

211 NW Larch Avenue • Redmond

541-548-2164

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

JANEY PURVIS, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

DANA M. RHODE, DO

Bend Memorial Clinic

1080 SW Mt. Bachelor Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

HANS G. RUSSELL, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

Bend Eastside & Westside

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

ERIC J. SCHNEIDER, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

CINDY SHUMAN, PA-C

Bend Memorial Clinic

1080 SW Mt. Bachelor Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

EDWARD M. TARBET, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

JOHN D. TELLER, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

NATHAN R. THOMPSON, MD

St. Charles Family Care - Redmond

211 NW Larch Avenue • Redmond

541-548-2164

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

MARK A. VALENTI, MD

St. Charles Family Care - Redmond

211 NW Larch Avenue • Redmond

541-548-2164

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

THOMAS A. WARLICK, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

BRUCE N. WILLIAMS, MD

St. Charles Family Care - Prineville

1103 NE Elm Street • Prineville

541-447-6263

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

GASTROENTEROLOGY

RICHARD H. BOCHNER, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

ELLEN BORLAND, FNP

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

ARTHUR S. CANTOR, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

HEIDI CRUISE, PA-C

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

SIDNEY E. HENDERSON III, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

SANDRA K. HOLLOWAY, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

HOSPITALIST JOHN R. ALLEN, MD


2012 CENTRAL OREGON MEDICAL DIRECTORY

ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT

HOSPITALIST CONT. GINGER L. DATTILO, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

BEN ENGLAND, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

MICHAEL GOLOB, PA-C

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

ADRIAN KRUEGER, PA-C

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

SUZANN KRUSE, PA-C

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

PHONG NGO, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

DEONA J. WILLIS, FNP

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

Bend Memorial Clinic

Bend Eastside & Redmond

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

MICHAEL N. HARRIS, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

ANITA D. KOLISCH, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

Bend Eastside & Redmond

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

MATTHEW R. LASALA, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

KAREN L. OPPENHEIMER, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

1080 SW Mt. Bachelor Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

A. WADE PARKER, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

MATTHEW REED, PA-C

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

M. SEAN ROGERS, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

DAN SULLIVAN, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

INFECTIOUS DISEASE JON LUTZ, MD INTERNAL MEDICINE

NEONATOLOGY CAROL A. CRAIG, NNP

St. Charles Medical Group - Neonatology

2500 NE Neff Road • Bend

541-382-4321

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

JOHN O. EVERED, MD

St. Charles Medical Group - Neonatology

2500 NE Neff Road • Bend

541-382-4321

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

SARAH E. JAMES, NNP

St. Charles Medical Group - Neonatology

2500 NE Neff Road • Bend

541-382-4321

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

JAMES MCGUIRE, MD

St. Charles Medical Group - Neonatology

2500 NE Neff Road • Bend

541-382-4321

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

FREDERICK J. RUBNER, MD

St. Charles Medical Group - Neonatology

2500 NE Neff Road • Bend

541-382-4321

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

MICHAEL E. FELDMAN, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

Bend Eastside & Redmond

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

RICHARD S. KEBLER, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

Bend Eastside & Redmond

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

RUSSELL E. MASSINE, MD, FACP

Bend Memorial Clinic

Bend Eastside & Redmond

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

ROBERT V. PINNICK, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

Bend Eastside & Redmond

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

2275 NE Doctors Drive • Bend 2863 NW Crossing Dr, Ste 100 • Bend

541-330-6463

www.northstarneurology.com

NEPHROLOGY

NEUROMUSCULAR, NEUROPHYSIOLOGY CRAIGAN GRIFFIN, MD

NorthStar Neurology NorthStar Neck & Back Clinic

NEUROSURGERY RAY TIEN, MD

The Center: Orthopedic & Neurosurgical Care & Research

Locations in Bend & Redmond

541-382-3344

www.thecenteroregon.com

BRAD WARD, MD

The Center: Orthopedic & Neurosurgical Care & Research

Locations in Bend & Redmond

541-382-3344

www.thecenteroregon.com

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

NUTRITION ANNIE WILLIAMSON, RD, LD

Bend Memorial Clinic

OBSTETRICS/GYNECOLOGY WILLIAM H. BARSTOW, MD

St. Charles OB/GYN - Redmond

213 NW Larch Ave, Ste A • Redmond

541-526-6635

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

CRAIG P. EBERLE, MD

St. Charles OB/GYN - Redmond

213 NW Larch Ave, Ste A • Redmond

541-526-6635

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

AMY B. MCELROY, FNP

St. Charles OB/GYN - Redmond

213 NW Larch Ave, Ste A • Redmond

541-526-6635

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

TODD W. MONROE, MD

St. Charles OB/GYN - Redmond

213 NW Larch Ave, Ste A • Redmond

541-526-6635

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

LINDY VRANIAK, MD

St. Charles OB/GYN - Redmond

213 NW Larch Ave, Ste A • Redmond

541-526-6635

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

Locations in Bend & Redmond

541-382-3344

www.thecenteroregon.com

OCCUPATIONAL MEDICINE JOHN BATTLE, ANP-BC THEODORE KRUSE, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

The Center: Orthopedic & Neurosurgical Care & Research


2012 CENTRAL OREGON MEDICAL DIRECTORY

ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT

ONCOLOGY – MEDICAL Locations in Bend & Redmond

541-706-5800

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

Bend Eastside & Redmond

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

St. Charles Cancer Center

Locations in Bend & Redmond

541-706-5800

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

SUSIE DOEDYNS, FNP

St. Charles Cancer Center

Locations in Bend & Redmond

541-706-5800

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

STEVE KORNFELD, MD

St. Charles Cancer Center

Locations in Bend & Redmond

541-706-5800

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

BILL MARTIN, MD

St. Charles Cancer Center

Locations in Bend & Redmond

541-706-5800

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

LAURIE RICE, ANP

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

WILLIAM SCHMIDT, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

Bend Eastside & Redmond

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

HEATHER WEST, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

ROB BOONE, MD

St. Charles Cancer Center

THEODORE A. BRAICH, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

CORA CALOMENI, MD

ONCOLOGY – RADIATION LINYEE CHANG, MD

St. Charles Cancer Center

2500 NE Neff Road • Bend

541-706-7733

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

TOM COMERFORD, MD

St. Charles Cancer Center

2500 NE Neff Road • Bend

541-706-7733

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

RUSS OMIZO, MD

St. Charles Cancer Center

2500 NE Neff Road • Bend

541-706-7733

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

OPHTHAMOLOGY BRIAN P. DESMOND, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

Bend Eastside, Westside & Redmond

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

THOMAS D. FITZSIMMONS, MD, MPH

Bend Memorial Clinic

Bend Eastside, Westside & Redmond

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

ROBERT C. MATHEWS, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

Bend Eastside, Westside & Redmond

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

SCOTT T. O’CONNER, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

Bend Eastside, Westside & Redmond

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

DARCY C. BALCER, OD

Bend Memorial Clinic

Bend Eastside & Westside

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

LORISSA M. HEMMER, OD

Bend Memorial Clinic

Bend Eastside & Westside

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

1475 SW Chandler, Ste 101 • Bend

541-617-3993

www.drkeithkrueger.com

Locations in Bend & Redmond

541-388-2333

www.desertorthopedics.com

OPTOMETRY

ORAL & MAXILLOFACIAL SURGERY KEITH E. KRUEGER, DMD, PC

Keith E. Krueger, DMD, PC

ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY, FOOT & ANKLE

AARON ASKEW, MD

Desert Orthopedics

ANTHONY HINZ, MD

The Center: Orthopedic & Neurosurgical Care & Research

Locations in Bend & Redmond

541-382-3344

www.thecenteroregon.com

JEFFREY P. HOLMBOE, MD

The Center: Orthopedic & Neurosurgical Care & Research

Locations in Bend & Redmond

541-382-3344

www.thecenteroregon.com

JOEL MOORE, MD

The Center: Orthopedic & Neurosurgical Care & Research

Locations in Bend & Redmond

541-382-3344

www.thecenteroregon.com

ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY, JOINT REPLACEMENT KNUTE BUEHLER, MD

The Center: Orthopedic & Neurosurgical Care & Research

Locations in Bend & Redmond

541-382-3344

www.thecenteroregon.com

MICHAEL CARAVELLI, MD

The Center: Orthopedic & Neurosurgical Care & Research

Locations in Bend & Redmond

541-382-3344

www.thecenteroregon.com

Locations in Bend & Redmond

541-388-2333

www.desertorthopedics.com

Locations in Bend & Redmond

541-382-3344

www.thecenteroregon.com

Locations in Bend & Redmond

541-388-2333

www.desertorthopedics.com

ERIN FINTER, MD JAMES HALL, MD

ROBERT SHANNON, MD

Desert Orthopedics The Center: Orthopedic & Neurosurgical Care & Research

Desert Orthopedics

ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY, SPINE

GREG HA, MD

Desert Orthopedics

1303 NE Cushing Dr, Ste 100 • Bend

541-388-2333

www.desertorthopedics.com

KATHLEEN MOORE, MD

Desert Orthopedics

1303 NE Cushing Dr, Ste 100 • Bend

541-388-2333

www.desertorthopedics.com

Locations in Bend & Redmond

541-382-3344

www.thecenteroregon.com

ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY, SPORTS MEDICINE TIMOTHY BOLLOM, MD

The Center: Orthopedic & Neurosurgical Care & Research

1315 NW 4th Street • Redmond

541-388-2333

www.desertorthopedics.com

SCOTT T. JACOBSON, MD

The Center: Orthopedic & Neurosurgical Care & Research

Locations in Bend & Redmond

541-382-3344

www.thecenteroregon.com

BLAKE NONWEILER, MD

The Center: Orthopedic & Neurosurgical Care & Research

Locations in Bend & Redmond

541-382-3344

www.thecenteroregon.com

541-388-2333

www.desertorthopedics.com

BRETT GINGOLD, MD

Desert Orthopedics

ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY, SPORTS MEDICINE, FEMALE SPORTS MEDICINE

CARA WALTHER, MD

Desert Orthopedics

1303 NE Cushing Dr, Ste 100 • Bend


2012 CENTRAL OREGON MEDICAL DIRECTORY

ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT

ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY, UPPER EXTREMITY MICHAEL COE, MD

KENNETH HANNINGTON, MD SOMA LILLY, MD

MICHAEL MARA, MD JAMES VERHEYDEN, MD

The Center: Orthopedic & Neurosurgical Care & Research

Desert Orthopedics The Center: Orthopedic & Neurosurgical Care & Research

Desert Orthopedics The Center: Orthopedic & Neurosurgical Care & Research

Locations in Bend & Redmond

541-382-3344

www.thecenteroregon.com

Locations in Bend & Redmond

541-388-2333

www.desertorthopedics.com

Locations in Bend & Redmond

541-382-3344

www.thecenteroregon.com

Locations in Bend & Redmond

541-388-2333

www.desertorthopedics.com

Locations in Bend & Redmond

541-382-3344

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2500 NE Neff Road • Bend

541-706-5885

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St. Charles Advanced Illness Management

2500 NE Neff Road • Bend

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541-388-2333

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Bend Memorial Clinic

1080 SW Mt. Bachelor Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

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KATE L. BROADMAN, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

1080 SW Mt. Bachelor Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

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Bend Memorial Clinic

1080 SW Mt. Bachelor Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

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211 NW Larch Ave • Redmond

541-548-2164

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Bend Memorial Clinic

1080 SW Mt. Bachelor Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

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Bend Memorial Clinic

1080 SW Mt. Bachelor Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

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211 NW Larch Ave • Redmond

541-548-2164

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1080 SW Mt. Bachelor Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

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The Center: Orthopedic & Neurosurgical Care & Research

Locations in Bend & Redmond

541-382-3344

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The Center: Orthopedic & Neurosurgical Care & Research

Locations in Bend & Redmond

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The Center: Orthopedic & Neurosurgical Care & Research

Locations in Bend & Redmond

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The Center: Orthopedic & Neurosurgical Care & Research

Locations in Bend & Redmond

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The Center: Orthopedic & Neurosurgical Care & Research

Locations in Bend & Redmond

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St. Charles Preoperative Medicine

2500 NE Neff Road • Bend

541-706-2949

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JONATHON BREWER, DO

Bend Memorial Clinic

Bend Eastside & Redmond

541-382-4900

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Locations in Bend & Redmond

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Locations in Bend & Redmond

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Locations in Bend & Redmond

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Locations in Bend & Redmond

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Locations in Bend & Redmond

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Bend Eastside & Redmond

541-382-4900

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541-382-4900

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541-382-4900

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Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

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1245 NW 4th Street, #101 • Redmond

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Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

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1245 NW 4th Street, #101 • Redmond

541-548-7761

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Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

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JEANNE WADSWORTH, MS, PA-C

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

ERIN WALLING, MD, FACS

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

Cascade Obesity and General Surgery

1245 NW 4th Street, #101 • Redmond

541-548-7761

n/a

JEFF CABA, PA-C

Bend Memorial Clinic

Bend Eastside, Westside & Redmond

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

ANN CLEMENS, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

Bend Eastside, Westside & Redmond

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

TERESA COUSINEAU, PA-C

Bend Memorial Clinic

Bend Eastside, Westside & Redmond

541-382-4900

www.bendmemorialclinic.com

DANETTE ELLIOT-MULLENS, DO

St. Charles Immediate Care

2600 NE Neff Road • Bend

541-706-3700

www.stcharleshealthcare.org

J. RANDALL JACOBS, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

Bend Eastside, Westside & Redmond

541-382-4900

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AMEE KOCH, PA-C

Bend Memorial Clinic

Bend Eastside, Westside & Redmond

541-382-4900

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JIM MCCAULEY, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

Bend Eastside, Westside & Redmond

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JAY O’BRIEN, PA-C

Bend Memorial Clinic

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CASEY OSBORNE-RODHOUSE, PA-C

Bend Memorial Clinic

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541-382-4900

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Bend Memorial Clinic

Bend Eastside, Westside & Redmond

541-382-4900

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Bend Memorial Clinic

Bend Eastside, Westside & Redmond

541-382-4900

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SEAN SUTTLE, PA-C

Bend Memorial Clinic

Bend Eastside, Westside & Redmond

541-382-4900

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THOMAS H. WENDEL, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

Bend Eastside, Westside & Redmond

541-382-4900

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BRENT C. WESENBERG, MD

Bend Memorial Clinic

Bend Eastside, Westside & Redmond

541-382-4900

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EDWARD M. BOYLE, JR., MD, FACS

Inovia Vein Specialty Center

2200 NE Neff Road, Ste 204 • Bend

541-382-8346

www.bendvein.com

ANDREW JONES, MD, FACS

Inovia Vein Specialty Center

2200 NE Neff Road, Ste 204 • Bend

541-382-8346

www.bendvein.com

Bend Memorial Clinic

1501 NE Medical Center Drive • Bend

541-382-4900

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SPINAL DECOMPRESSION, AUTO ACCIDENTS DAVID HERRIN, DC STROKE, NECK & BACK RICHARD L. KOLLER, MD SURGICAL SPECIALIST

SURGICAL SPECIALIST (BARIATRICS) NGOCTHUY HUGHES, DO, PC URGENT CARE

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Cover story | BLOOD RELATIONS

BLOOD COMPONENTS Continued from Page 15 they were in remission or cancer-free. That broad restriction was narrowed to a five-year deferral several years ago, but many survivors are still unaware they can donate. Similarly, all diabetics were once kept from giving blood, but now can donate as long as their blood sugar is well-controlled and they didn’t use the bovine insulin available in the 1980s. The rules are constantly changing, and donors frequently aren’t up to speed. “As science brings us new answers, we find new things,” Collins said.

New concerns The restrictions as well as better testing of donated blood have almost eliminated the risk of HIV, hepatitis or syphilis from blood transfusions. But that has shifted the focus toward less common conditions. In September, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warned that the U.S. blood supply was vulnerable to babesia, a parasite infection spread by ticks. Between 1979 and 2009, there have been 159 transfusion-related babesia cases in the U.S., with threequarters occurring after 2000. The condition is treatable, but is more likely to have severe consequences, including death, in the elderly or people with weak immune systems. Regulators will face a difficult decision if one of the manufacturers working on tests for the parasite is able to secure FDA approval. The tick that carries the parasite is prevalent only in the Northeast and upper Midwest. Most patients infected by tick bite have been in seven states in those regions during the summer months. But cases contracted through a blood transfusion have been found in 19 states and have occurred year-round. “There may be only five to 10 cases a year in the United States, but if you’re going to do the test on 10 to 12 million pints of blood a year, you’re spending an enormous amount of money,” McCullough said. “On the other hand, if you can spend that money and prevent that disease, politically you can’t decide not to do it.” The FDA requires blood to be tested for 13 diseases. According to

HIGH DESERT PULSE • WINTER/SPRING 2012

A pint of donated blood is usually divided into three or four components. That’s why blood centers say a single donation can save three lives. Red blood cells Function: Cells that carry oxygen from the lungs to tissues and take carbon dioxide back to the lungs to be exhaled. Uses: Given to patients who have lost a lot of blood due to trauma or surgery, or those with chronic anemia resulting from kidney disease, cancer or gastrointestinal bleeding. Shelf life: 42 days (refrigerated). Plasma Function: The liquid portion of blood; transports water and nutrients, contains proteins that help blood to clot and fight infection. Uses: Given to help maintain blood pressure in patients with significant blood loss and to supply critical clotting factors for certain bleeding disorders. Shelf life: Up to one year (frozen). Platelets Function: Small colorless cell fragments that help blood clot. Uses: Prevent massive blood loss from trauma; used for patients with a shortage of platelets or with abnormal platelet function. Shelf life: Five days (room temperature, in constant motion). Cryoprecipitate Function: Portion of the plasma rich in clotting factors; removed from plasma by freezing, then thawing it. Uses: Used to prevent bleeding in hemophiliacs and those with von Willebrand’s disease; to help stem massive bleeding; and to reverse the effects of blood thinners. Shelf life: 1 year (frozen).

Page 47


Cover story | BLOOD RELATIONS

Red Cross fined for rule violations In January, the Food and Drug Administration fined the American Red Cross $10 million for a series of violations from December 2009 through September 2010. Sixteen facilities were cited, including two in the western U.S. , but none in the Pacific Northwest. The violations reflected mainly procedural shortcomings, including a lack of timely follow-up after problems were identified as well as shortfalls in maintaining the national list of deferred donors. According to a timeline put together by ProPublica, an independent, non-profit newsroom, the Red Cross has racked up $46 million in fines since 2003 for ineffective screening of donors, understaffing, and failure to recall infected blood. None of the latest violations involved direct patient harm, but FDA officials expressed concern that systematic lapses opened the door for more serious issues. “We are not aware of any adverse donor reactions or patient issues due to the problems in the FDA report,” Red Cross officials said in a statement reacting to the FDA action. “We are disappointed that the FDA believed it necessary to issue a fine for an inspection conducted so long ago and it is important to know we have already taken corrective steps to address those matters and that improvement in operations have been made.”

America’s Blood Centers, it costs about $300 to $350 to process, test and deliver the components from a single pint of blood to a hospital. Centers then charge the hospital for the blood to cover their costs, and most centers break even. “The problem is the safety measures cost a lot,” McPherson said. “We would need a 2 to 3 percent markup each year just to cover inflation, but then a new test comes along and that alone raises the cost 3 to 5 percent.” Hospitals, many of which have faced significant financial challenges themselves in recent years, balk at a 7 percent annual increase. A new blood test for babesia could add $7 to $10 per pint of blood. “If you’re testing all the donors in the Northeast, you’re talking $4 to $5 million,” McPherson said. “Now there have been deaths; that’s why we’re considering testing.” The FDA recently added a new test for Chagas disease, a parasitic disease transmitted by a blood-sucking insect endemic to Latin America. But with the ease of international travel and immigration, cases have been contracted via blood transfusion in the U.S. Officials are also keeping a close eye on the spread of Dengue fever in the U.S. Because of climate change, the mosquito that carries the disease, once limited to tropical regions, is now found in Puerto Rico. Cases have also cropped up in Key West, Fla., and Oahu, Hawaii.

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WINTER / SPRING 2012 • HIGH DESERT PULSE


Distribution of blood types by nation Lifting bans While new tests for babesia or Dengue fever would add costs, the diseases aren’t prevalent enough to defer large numbers of donors. According to the American Red Cross, most donors who are deferred are tripped up by anemia (having too few red blood cells) or travel within the past year to an area where malaria is found. Those are generally short-term deferrals, but deferred donors often feel rejected, and many won’t come back. Blood centers try to prescreen donors when they recruit them at fairs or over the phone to limit the chance that someone will come to the donation center and then get turned away. But in the end, they must err on the side of donor and patient safety. “Malaria deferral is another thing that we would really like removed. It’s just so overly broad,” McPherson said. “There hasn’t been a transmission of malaria by blood in decades in this country. Yet anybody who goes down to Cancun for a vacation is deferred.” Both America’s Blood Centers and the American Red Cross have also pushed federal health officials to remove the lifetime donation ban for men who have had sex with other men. The ban was put in place to prevent the spread of sexually transmitted diseases, including HIV. “The policy would make more sense if it treated like risks alike,” said Jeff Bennett, an assistant professor of communications at the University of Iowa. “A straight man could have unprotected sex with 10 women in two

The B blood type is more commonly found in India and Central Asia. The farther west you go, the less likely you are to find Type B blood. Type A blood is more commonly found in Europe and among Native Americans. Country

O+

A+

B+

AB+

O-

A-

B-

AB-

Australia

40%

31%

5%

2%

9%

7%

2%

1%

Brazil

36%

34%

9%

4%

7%

6%

2%

<1%

Canada

39%

36%

8%

3%

7%

6%

1%

<1%

France

36%

37%

9%

3%

6%

7%

1%

1%

Germany

35%

37%

9%

4%

6%

6%

2%

1%

India

37%

22%

31%

6%

2%

1%

1%

<1%

Ireland

47%

26%

9%

2%

8%

5%

2%

1%

Israel

32%

34%

17%

7%

3%

4%

2%

1%

Saudi Arabia

48%

24%

17%

4%

4%

2%

1%

<1%

South Africa

39%

32%

12%

3%

7%

5%

2%

1%

Spain

36%

34%

8%

3%

9%

8%

2%

<1%

Taiwan

44%

26%

24%

6%

<1%

<1%

<1%

<1%

U.K.

37%

35%

8%

3%

7%

7%

2%

1%

U.S.

38%

34%

9%

3%

7%

6%

2%

<1%

Populationweighted mean

36%

28%

21%

5%

4%

4%

1%

<1%

Source: Compiled by Wikipedia from government reports, blood collection agencies and academic centers; America’s Blood Centers

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Page 49


Cover story | BLOOD RELATIONS

After donating blood, you restore the fluid lost in a matter of hours. It takes four weeks to replace the red blood cells and eight weeks to replace the iron.

months, and they’d say, ‘OK, wait a year and come back.’ They don’t do that for gay people. There’s this idea that if you’re of one population and you wait a year, you’re magically reborn; if you’re of another population, you’re perpetually contaminated.” Bennett recently authored the book “Banning Queer Blood,” which examined the impact of the policy. He interviewed several gay men who said they ignore the policy, pretend to be straight and answer “no” on the question about having sex with other men. “All of the men I talked to lied because they wanted to give blood for altruistic reasons,” Bennett said. “They viewed blood donation as a civic responsibility.” A 2010 report from the UCLA School of Law found that lifting the ban would add 219,000 pints of blood to annual collections in the U.S., an increase of 1.4 percent. Donated blood has been tested for HIV since 1985, but a small window remains in which a person can be infected with HIV but not have detectable antibody levels. New state-of-the-art nucleic-acid amplification testing implemented in 2002 reduced that window from 22 days to about 11 days by looking for viral genes instead of antibodies. That has reduced the risk of being infected with HIV to one in 2 million blood

Page 50

transfusions. But federal authorities have resisted moving to the one-year deferral for males who have had sex with males because of this small risk. Despite all the precautions, from donor screening to rigorous testing, the fact remains that blood will never be 100 percent safe. Still, the system works so well that only a handful of patients ever face preventable infections. Although several researchers have tried to develop viable synthetic blood products, none are close to being marketable. And that leaves thousands of patients dependent on the real thing for survival, with no other choice than to accept the minute risks that come with donated blood. “Sickle cell patients get transfused all the time; that’s the only therapy they have,” McPherson said. “So they know it saves their lives. But the patient just has to live with the fear that maybe something will break through.”

A steady supply Such patients would be at greater risk if the blood pipeline were ever disrupted. A recent study in Germany, for example, examined what impact a flu pandemic would have on supply. A breakout could keep people from coming out to donate and could impact the availability of workers to collect and test the blood. Meanwhile, health authorities

WINTER / SPRING 2012 • HIGH DESERT PULSE


might take steps to minimize the spread of disease by limiting large public gatherings in small spaces, an apt description of a blood drive. The researchers concluded a pandemic would cut blood collections in half, leaving supplies about 20 percent below what would be needed for urgent cases. Blood collection centers and hospitals have contingency plans in place for such events, but there is little ability to stockpile blood. They have also focused efforts on being more efficient with blood use to prepare for the impending demographic changes. Some of that comes from medical advances. Kidney disease patients, for example, now take drugs to boost production of red blood cells where they once relied on transfusions. And an increasing number of surgeries now collect, filter and return the patient’s own blood, limiting the need for donated blood. America’s Blood Centers now works with hospitals on best practices to use less blood, identifying which patients can benefit from blood transfusions and what cases represent more waste than benefit. But the emphasis remains on getting more regular donors to keep the pipeline flowing. America’s Blood Centers estimated that if all current donors gave three times a year, instead of the current average of two, blood shortages would be rare events. And if only one additional percent of all Americans would give blood,

Want to be a blood donor superhero? Call the Red Cross blood donation hotline (888-895-1099). Central Oregon’s blood donation center will be moving on March 26. The new location is at 816 S.W. Bond Street, Suite 110, across from the movie theater in Bend’s Old Mill District.

shortages would disappear altogether. It’s not a far-fetched idea that Americans could take that step. In the days after the 9/11 attacks, Americans donated more than 500,000 pints of blood, nearly 12 times the average daily collections in the U.S. and Canada. (The surge in donations was more than the system needed or could handle, and some of the blood was ultimately discarded.) Every day, one in seven people entering a hospital requires blood, and each pint donated is broken into components that can save three lives. “It is a feel-good story. There’s tens of thousands of people every day who will lay down and get stuck with a big needle to help somebody that they don’t know,” McCullough said. “And that is really pretty darn impressive.” •

A newborn baby has about a cup of blood.

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Cellphone safety | ARE OUR PHONES HARMING US? Continued from Page 25 cancer. Indeed, it actually seemed cellphone users were less likely to have some types of brain cancer, though researchers attributed that finding to anomalies in the data collection. The one exception was for those people who used their cellphones the most. The top 10 percent of users had a 40 percent increase in glioma, a type of brain cancer. Those users, classified as heavy in 2004, may be somewhere different in the spectrum of use now. On average, they each used a cellphone for about half an hour a day. “To me, there’s certainly smoke there,” said Elisabeth Cardis, a Spanish scientist and lead author of the paper, to editor Slesin of Microwave News shortly after the publication of the study. “Overall, my opinion is that the results show a real effect.” Other scientists who were part of the project disagreed, instead emphasizing the overall finding. Maria Feychting, a Swedish scientist and another author, issued a news release stating “The use of mobile phones for over ten years shows no increased risk of brain tu-

mors,” according to Microwave News. The rift between the two camps stalled the publication of the research for years while the scientists argued over how to present their data, said Slesin. “This is the underbelly of the whole thing,” he said, “how mean and vicious it can be.” It also illustrates how difficult it can be to glean useful data from these studies. While overall there appears to be minimal risk, there is a suggestion of something more. So what’s a prudent person to do?

Conflicting guidance There is some guidance about cellphone safety through regulatory authorities and expert bodies, which look at the totality of evidence and make recommendations. In the United States, major authorities proclaim no apparent risk of cellphone use. The Food and Drug Administration declares in a statement on its website, “The weight of evidence has not linked cellphones with any health problems.” The Federal Communications Commission is somewhat more equivocal, calling

the evidence “inconclusive” and pointing to the FDA’s website. The National Cancer Institute, which houses some of the leading cancer epidemiologists, makes a similar statement saying “there is no evidence from studies of cells, animals, or humans that (cellphone) energy can cause cancer.” But these statements contrast with warnings coming from other areas of the world. In particular, a major international committee associated with the World Health Organization declared cellphone radiation “possibly carcinogenic” in a decision last spring. Industry groups downplayed the decision. “You look at that list, coffee is on that list, talcum powder,” said John Walls, a vice president at CTIA-The Wireless Association, an industry lobby group. But there are other, less innocuous items in there too, including the chemical DDT and gasoline engine exhaust. “The industry tries to make light of this ruling, but this is a very conservative body,” said Joel Moskowitz, director of the Center for Family and Community Health at the University of California Berkeley. ”It’s actually a fairly landmark decision.” What it means is that the WHO committee found limited evidence of a link to cancer but nothing definitive. It called for more research. And more research seems to be the only thing that everyone can agree on. Linet said the NIH is getting ready to launch a few animal studies, which she called “very exciting,” that will look at the effects of non-ionizing radiation. In addition, a study that aims to follow up to 300,000 mobile phone users for at least a couple of decades was launched in Europe in 2010. And another multinational study is currently looking at the effects of cellphone radiation in young people. All are trying to determine whether the suggestion of risk seen by some experts is actually significant. “This exposure is kind of unique,” said Linet, “because anywhere in the world you go, people have cellphones.” She continued, “people want to know that what they’re doing … is 100 percent safe. Nobody is going to give them that absolute guarantee.” •

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Body of knowledge |

POP QUIZ

So, doc, what’s the good word? BY DAVID JASPER

W 1

3

5

Turner’s syndrome: A. Serialized marriage-divorce pattern common among cable

6

Alopecia totalis: A. What medical experts call whatever’s going on with Donald

7

Kuru: A. Progressive, fatal spongiform encephalopathy, or prion dis-

8

Minimal brain dysfunction: A. Precursor to much worse maximal brain dysfunction B. Neurological disorder caused by mercury poisoning from

Kawasaki disease: A. Harmful bacteria found in sake made from spoiled rice B. Groin numbness due to nerve damage, common among motorcycle and ATV riders C. Rare disease giving children red rashes on their hands and feet D. Irritation of the ear canal lining resulting from loud engines

2

GREG CROSS

Couvade syndrome: A. Leakage of blood into the uterine musculature from premature placenta detachment B. Sympathetic pregnancy in which a man may vomit, gain weight and suffer symptoms experienced by his pregnant partner C. Victorian-era code for feminine hygiene products: “Apothecary, do you have anything for a case of couvade syndrome?” D. Type of black lung common among bicyclists, associated with exhaust fumes and cinder dust in bike lanes

Cat scratch disease: A. That difficult-to-reach itch near one’s uvula B. Sympathetic laziness in which a cat owner sleeps excessively and exhibits other behaviors of a house cat C. Disease whose symptoms include reddening of the neck D. Infectious disease from the scratch or bite of a cat, causing low-grade fever

4

Hydrocephalus: A. Water-borne spore known to infect fishermen B. Water-filled marital aid C. Abnormal buildup of fluid that can cause enlargement of the skull and brain compression D. A rash common to water slide users, exacerbated by chlorine

Source: The American Heritage Stedman’s Medical Dictionary, second edition

HIGH DESERT PULSE • WINTER / SPRING 2012

news and other TV magnates B. Congenital condition of females associated with a defect or absence of an X chromosome C. Superstitious avoidance of left turns, believed by some to be bad luck D. Repetitive stress injury from overuse of gadgetry such as smartphones

Trump’s hair B. Hair loss causing one to comb over remaining hair involuntarily C. Total hair loss on all parts of the body D. Complete loss of scalp hair occurring either at one time or in a short period of time

ease, possibly caused by a virus transmitted through cannibalism and endemic to New Guinea B. Medical slang for excretions. Sample usage: “Gross, doctor, you just stepped in a puddle of kuru!” C. Orthotic shoe that claims to be “The World’s Most Anatomical Footwear” D. A and C

contaminated seafood C. Erstwhile scientific term for attention deficit disorder D. Cognitive problem afflicting people who don’t know what “erstwhile” means Answers: 1-C, 2-B, 3-D, 4-C, 5-B, 6-D, 7-D, 8-C

hether you enjoy colorful language, are a hypochondriac looking to self-diagnose an imaginary ailment or just enjoy being grossed out, medical terminology is for you. In fact, it may be the most important language going. Medical terms save lives by being very precise in meaning. They may also leave patients with quizzical expressions as they vow to look up that word the doctor used, if only they can figure out how to spell it. Al O. Whatta? Alopecia? Aloe peesha? Think you can speak their language already? Take this quiz and see.

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One voice |

A PERSONAL ESSAY

What’s right is sometimes wrong I’ve written about health for newspapers and magazines for close to a decade and talked to myriad experts. I know there is ive weeks after the birth of my first strong evidence that breastfeeding, specifichild, I sat on the couch, utterly, horcally nursing, helps both mothers and babies. ribly miserable. The baby was crying You’re supposed to do it. to be fed. Again. And I’ve always been a supposed-to kind of We had just finished our last feeding about gal. I was supposed to get good grades in col20 minutes earlier, a contentious, painful tuslege and I did. I was supposed to work, and I sle that itself lasted nearly 45 minutes. have. I do what I’m supposed to do. Charlie was what was known as a bad Now, in one of the biggest endeavors of my latcher. That meant he did not take enough of life, and perhaps the one that I had been least the breast in his mouth when he fed, resultprepared to take on, I was shirking guidelines. ing in breast pain that vacillated between the At that time, the meaning of the decision sear of a sharp needle and the crush of getnot to nurse was too intense to think about. ting a finger slammed in a car door. Later, as Charlie got older, I began to reflect I had seen lactation consultants about the more on it. I realized the decision, the one issue. These calm, wise women urged me to filled with so much angst, actually made me keep at it, that it would all work out and soon proud. Not because of its substance — I still we would be on our way to breastfeeding, think nursing would have been my first choice bonding bliss. (The hormones! Haven’t you Bulletin health reporter Betsy Cliff with her son — but because I had the courage to do what heard about the love hormones released dur- Charlie. Betsy’s second child is due in April. was right for my family rather than what I was ing nursing?!) supposed to do. But here I was — mid-morning on a clear fall day, with sun streamThere are guidelines and suggestions for every aspect of parenting, ing through the windows and fallen leaves blanketing the ground — in from how much television kids are supposed to watch to what babies seemingly the perfect setting to sit and bond with my baby. Instead, I are supposed to eat to what they should play with. These guidelines, sat with my head in my hands, crying. for the most part, have good evidence that they help most kids. But I don’t know if Charlie and I would have ever reached breastfeeding my kid wasn’t most kids; he was my kid. And the guidelines can’t capbliss. I do know that in that moment and in the weeks leading up to it, ture every family’s experiences. we weren’t anywhere close. I looked at the baby and I began to resent Still, struggling through the uncertainty and gravity of raising a him. He was hungry and I just didn’t want to feed him; at least, not child, it can be hard to remember that. I — and perhaps many parents using my body. So I didn’t. — grasp for anything to tell me I’m doing it right. Stopping nursing I got up and heated up a bag of breast milk I had frozen. I gave him was not doing it right. a bottle and he settled down, content. As time passed, I realized that though it may not be right for everyone, He napped soon after and I used the breast pump to fill another bot- or even for most people, it was right for us. That gave me the confidence tle. After that day, Charlie did continue to nurse some, but he usually to listen to my own family’s needs and tune out the suggestions that didn’t drank breast milk from a bottle. It worked well for us, and gazing into fit. We follow many recommendations, and I still take guidance from those his soft eyes during bottle feedings brought more bonding and bliss who are wiser in the ways of parenting than I. But I don’t feel beholden to it. than gritting my teeth through a nursing session ever had. Charlie, for his part, loves bottles of milk. He drinks one every I saw my physician about a week after this decision for a postna- morning when he wakes, and sometimes after his nap. tal checkup. When I told her about the arrangement, she looked sad. He’s 2 now. We were supposed to give up bottles around age 1, or “There are plenty of resources to help you,” she said. “You didn’t have so the pediatricians and guidelines told us. We tried for a week. We’re to do that.” Clearly, she was disappointed. not ready yet. • BY BETSY Q. CLIFF

PHOTO BY ROB KERR

F

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WINTER / SPRING 2012 • HIGH DESERT PULSE


High Desert Pulse - Winter/Spring 2012  

Healthy Living in Central Oregon

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