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Earmark ban creates tension in each party

‘WELL-CAPITALIZED BANK’

Bank of the Cascades secures needed funds By Tim Doran The Bulletin

By David M. Herszenhorn

New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — In leading his colleagues in a vote Tuesday to ban the lawmaker-directed spending items known as earmarks, Mitch McConnell, the Senate publ i A N A L Y S I S Re can leader and consummate congressional appropriator, averted a divisive clash within his caucus over the question of joining the new House Republican majority in enacting an earmark “moratorium” for the next Congress. Given how zealously McConnell has defended the constitutional prerogative of Congress to control the federal purse, his turnabout was also the surest sign yet that the rightward pressure of tea party groups, and an anti-spending sentiment among voters, have begun to influence the way Washington does business. At the same time, the renewed push against earmarks highlighted a potential conflict between the calls to eliminate the spending items and demands by many tea party supporters for greater fidelity to the Constitution. It is the Constitution, after all, that put Congress in charge of deciding how to spend taxpayer money. In pledging not to let individual lawmakers designate federal money for local purposes, the anti-earmark contingent is in effect ceding more power to the executive branch over how taxpayer dollars are spent, presumably not the outcome desired by the new crop of grassroots conservatives. “If Congress does not direct any spending,” said Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison, R-Texas, who supported the earmark ban, “the president will have 100 percent of the discretion in all federal programs. The failed stimulus is replete with examples of the president’s earmarks that are wasteful.” See Earmarks / A5

Bend-based Cascade Bancorp, which has been operating under a federal order to raise capital for 15 months, announced Tuesday that it has agreements with private investors to raise more than enough to meet federal banking requirements.

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A surge of panic At first, Paul Cook assumed it was some kind of joke. It was shortly after 7 p.m. on Monday, and the 71-year-old Bend man said he had just finished taking out the trash at the northeast Bend dental office where he works as a janitor. He had his keys in his hand and was about to unlock the door of his car when he heard a voice behind him. “Give me your wallet,” the man said. Cook turned around and

Bend man recounts robbery at gunpoint

scanned the dark parking lot, thought he looked young, maybut he couldn’t be in his 20s. see anyone. For He wasn’t very a few seconds, “It’s like you’re ready big — maybe he thought an about 5 feet, 8 old buddy of his to get shot. At that inches tall and was trying to be instant, I’m on the thin. The voice funny by giving was steady and ground, and I’m him a scare. calm. “Give me Then he thinking: ‘This is it.’” your wallet,” he heard the voice repeated. again, and for — Paul Cook, carjacking Cook pulled the first time, victim his wallet out of he said, he saw his pocket and a man, wearing handed it over. a hooded sweatshirt. It was hard When the man asked for his to make out his face, but Cook keys, Cook didn’t argue.

At some point, Cook realized that the man was holding a handgun. It wasn’t pointed in his direction, but it wasn’t exactly hidden, either. The man ordered Cook to lie down on the ground, and he quickly dropped to the pavement. As he lay on the cold pavement, he said, he listened to the man try to open the car door. For a moment, the man seemed confused, thinking another key on Cook’s key ring was meant for the Toyota Camry he was trying to steal. See Carjacking / A4

By Keith Chu The Bulletin

WASHINGTON — Senators, bank executives and experts at the U.S. Senate Banking Committee hearing Tuesday expressed grave concern about the ongoing foreclosure crisis and problems with the mortgage modification process. So far, though, the government solutions have done little to help Central Oregon homeowners, according to the largest homeowner advocate in the region, while the number of foreclosures in the area continues to lead the state. Following the hearing, U.S. Sen. Jeff Merkley, D-Ore., said a few simple changes by mortgage servicers would be big improvements — the most important would be an end to the “dual track” process, where companies process a homeowner’s mortgage modification at the same time it is starting the foreclosure process. See Mortgages / A4

Re-enactments sometimes find controversy in pursuit of WWII accuracy By Yeganeh June Torbati The Baltimore Sun

BALTIMORE — It was billed as light entertainment, a ride back to the 1940s on the Western Maryland Scenic Railroad complete with Abbott and Costello impersonators entertaining passengers during the annual “Cumberland Goes to War” festivities. But the inclusion of volunteers playing German soldiers and wearing uniforms bearing swastikas gave the excursion a far more somber feel, and sparked strong reaction from at least one passenger as Veterans Day approached. “There is no way to have a swastika, there is no way to have the Nazis, there is no way to have this presented that is not inherently offensive,” said Marcia Lurensky, a Washington lawyer who found the depiction of Axis soldiers deeply disturbing and insensitive. See Re-enact / A5

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group, Moss said in a news release. Fellow banking executive Larry Snyder, president and CEO of High Desert Bank in Bend, said Cascade Bancorp’s stock sale is good news for the community, as well as Bank of the Cascades, which has about one-third of the market, he said. See BOTC / A4

Paul Cook, 71, of Bend, sits in his 2000 Toyota Camry, which he said was stolen Monday evening in an armed robbery outside his workplace, a dentist’s office in northeast Bend. Police recovered the car early Tuesday morning, a few blocks from where it was stolen.

The Bulletin

A ROYAL WEDDING: Prince William announces engagement, Page A3

and the Federal Reserve Bank, the amount will exceed the federal capital requirements that led to the federal consent order, Moss said. Along with exceeding the federal “well-capitalized bank” threshold, the stock sale will make the company one of the “best-capitalized community banks in the nation” in its peer

CARJACKING: ‘I’m not going to shoot you’

By Erin Golden

TOP NEWS INSIDE

“We’re very pleased,” said Patricia Moss, CEO of Cascade Bancorp, the parent company of Bank of the Cascades. “It’s a great thing for the bank and the community.” The company has reached agreements with investors to buy $177 million of its common stock, she said. If approved by shareholders

Merkley working to relieve mortgage crisis woes

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California town struggles with water purification By Scott Kraft

Los Angeles Times

SEVILLE, Calif. — The beige notice appeared on Becky Quintana’s doorstep one recent morning here in Seville, a century-old settlement nestled amid fruit and almond groves in the Central Valley. “Boil your water,” it warned in bold, capital letters. Alarming as that was, the blue “unsafe water alert” that came the next day was more worrisome: Don’t drink, cook or even wash dishes with the water — and don’t boil

it, because that just concentrates the nitrates. But, a day later, more pastelcolored circulars arrived. One canceled the do-not-boil alert. Another repeated the boil-it-first alert. A third said water pressure was so low that residents should use it only for the essentials. “People are really confused,” she told Britt Fussel, a Resource Management Agency engineer. “And not everybody got these notes.” “There must have been a miscommunication,” Fussel said,

promising to investigate. “But the water is safe to drink, as far as we know, today.” More than 1 million people in California live in places where tap water isn’t reliably safe to drink, and about a third of them are in small, mostly Latino towns such as Seville, in the San Joaquin Valley. Many residents of those communities ignore the often contradictory water-quality notices and spend extra money for bottled water for cooking and drinking. See Water / A5

Becky Jacquez empties her home water filter to show the algae, sand and debris that comes from the community water supply in Seville, Calif, in August. Don Bartletti Los Angeles Times


A2 Wednesday, November 17, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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WASHINGTON — Eighty thousand cubic yards of dirt. Thirty steel girders. An eightfoot-high concrete wall. All to hold back floodwaters that may, or may not, surge across the Mall in the next century or so. But in the apocalyptic, postHurricane Katrina world, no chances can be taken. So government officials announced this week that work is about to start on a $9 million flood-control project that will alter the landscape of the Mall west of the Washington Monument to protect it, and part of Washington, from potential catastrophe.

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“It became necessary for us to finally protect this Mall with something other than sandbags The notion of breaking this landscape is really heartbreaking to me and should be to all who value what the Mall stands for. But … there was nothing else to do.”

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The flood zone project will add berms and about a 450-foot-long post-and-panel system that would protect a swath of the Mall from extreme floods. Construction will begin in a few weeks and should be completed next summer.

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Heading off disaster When FEMA reviewed Washington’s flood zones, it concluded that existing plans to use sandbags and jersey barriers to block floodwaters flowing north on

Eight-foot-tall aluminum panels will be placed manually in the event of a flood threat.

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The project will create a levee that would be erected across 17th Street below Constitution Avenue in the event of a huge flood. It calls for the construction of large earthen berms, using tons of dirt, and the eight-foot walls on both sides of 17th Street. It also will require engineers to sink a series of caissons 30 feet deep into the surface of 17th Street, where girders could be placed to support temporary panels to block floodwater. Work is to begin next month and conclude next summer. The project aims to protect large sections of downtown Washington from extensive river flooding, and to keep those sections from being declared a flood zone, which could require property owners to buy flood insurance. Such insurance runs about $1,500 a year, officials said. The project is the result of the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s nationwide review of flood zone maps after Hurricane Katrina devastated New Orleans and parts of the Gulf Coast in 2005.

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17th Street from the Potomac River and the Tidal Basin were inadequate. FEMA foresaw a scenario in which a flood could inundate a huge crescent of downtown Washington from 17th Street and Constitution Avenue east to the Capitol and south toward Fort McNair. And it proposed placing the area — including Federal Trian-

gle, the east end of the Mall, and several Smithsonian museums — in the 100-year flood zone unless a better flood-prevention system was devised. “It became necessary for us to finally protect this Mall with something other than sandbags,” Washington, D.C., Congressional Delegate Eleanor Holmes Norton said at this week’s announcement.

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Working together, the city, the Army Corps of Engineers, the National Park Service and other agencies came up with the idea for a robust flood barrier at a “choke point” on 17th Street. It is called a post-and-panel system, officials said. In the event of a flood, girders would be erected temporarily and eight-foottall aluminum panels assembled between the girders to block the

surging water. Although the project is deemed necessary, Norton expressed some dismay. “I regret that, however minor, any structure is on this land,” she said. “The notion of breaking this landscape is really heartbreaking to me and should be to all who value what the Mall stands for. But … there was nothing else to do.”

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Oregon Lottery Results As listed by The Associated Press

MEGA MILLIONS The numbers drawn are:

1 26 27 39 46 21 x3

PORTLAND — The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife has found that poachers are killing as many mule deer as legal hunters. The poaching is considering a contributing factor to a decline in the state mule deer population, which has fallen to 216,000 animals from historic peaks of more than 300,000. Research supervisor DeWayne Jackson in Roseburg said poachers typically kill female deer, which are more important to reproduction. Licensed hunters kill more bucks than does. “If we look at the illegal take, it’s basically equal to the legal take — it’s bad,” said Michelle Dennehy, a Fish and Wildlife spokeswoman in Salem. “Poaching is not ethical, it’s not hunting.”

Mule deer study

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Species under pressure Oregon mule deer are native to the state and typically found east of the Cascade Range crest. Wildlife managers say the deer are under intense pressure from predators, including an estimated 5,700 cougars roaming Oregon’s forests and high deserts, up from 2,600 two decades ago. Oregon also has 25,000 black bears, and Canadian gray wolves have staked claim to the state’s northeastern corner. All three species prey on mule deer. Automobiles, too, account for plenty of mule deer deaths. A Fish and Wildlife study documented 1,626 mule deer killed by motor vehicles along 150 miles of U.S. 97 and Oregon 31, south of Bend, between October 2005 and January. Dennehy said habitat issues are also a concern in Central Oregon, where resort development, new homes and other human activities have sharply reduced winter range for mule deer.

ers about the law. Mark Gold, president of the Santa Monica environmental group Heal the Bay, said previous county efforts to promote recycling of plastic bags at grocery stores was a failure. “You cannot recycle your way out of the plastic bag problem,” Gold said. The measure is a significant win for environmental groups, which suffered a major defeat in Sacramento at the end of August with the failure of the state Senate to pass a sweeping plastic bag ban that won the support of the state Assembly and Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger amid heavy and costly lobbying by plastic bag manufacturers.

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Because the study wasn’t designed to detect poachers, biologists don’t know if other areas have comparable numbers of deer taken illegally, said Don Whittaker, Fish and Wildlife ungulate coordinator. But wildlife managers suspect poaching is happening across Oregon. Poaching “is out of hand in Oregon,” said Ken Hand of Klamath Falls, regional director of the 11,000-member nonprofit Mule Deer Foundation based in Salt Lake City. “It’s going on all over the state, 365 days a year. From all the contacts I have around the state, I just hear about it

constantly.” The chance of Oregon’s mule deer population ever rebuilding seem pretty slim “with the predators out there, including the humans,” he said.

LOS ANGELES — Enacting one of the nation’s most aggressive environmental measures, the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors voted Tuesday to ban plastic grocery bags in unincorporated areas of the county. The ban, which will cover nearly 1.1 million residents countywide, is to the point: “No store shall provide to any customer a plastic carryout bag.” An exception would be made for plastic bags that are used to hold fruit, vegetables or raw meat in order to prevent contamination with other grocery items. If grocers choose to offer paper bags, they must sell them for 10 cents each, according to the ordinance. The revenue will be retained by the stores to purchase the paper bags and educate custom-

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State biologists discovered the level of poaching during a five-year research study of deer between Bend and the California border, The Oregonian reported. The state study of 500 mule deer fitted with radio collars was conducted between July 2005 and last January. Researchers said 128 deer

died during the study. Of those, poachers killed 19 and hunters legally shot 21. Cougars killed 15 and eight were hit and killed by cars. Of the rest, five succumbed to coyotes, disease claimed five and four others died while tangled in fences or from some other accident, Jackson said. Biologists listed 51 as “cause of death unknown,” but poachers could have taken some of those, he said. “Sometimes we just find the radio collar laying out in the sagebrush,” he said.

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Nobody won the jackpot Tuesday night in the Mega Millions game, pushing the estimated jackpot to $16 million for Friday’s drawing.

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THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, November 17, 2010 A3

T S ARMY SERGEANT GIVEN MEDAL OF HONOR

Rangel found guilty of 11 ethics violations

By Gregory Katz The Associated Press

By Richard S. Dunham Hearst News Service

WASHINGTON — In a stunning rebuke of a longtime congressional power broker, a House ethics panel Tuesday found New York Rep. Charlie Rangel guilty of 11 ethics violations, despite the veteran congressman’s last-minute boycott of the proceedings after he failed to win a delay. The House ethics panel concluded his public trial in his absence and reached a verdict on misconduct allegations against the former House Ways and Means Committee chair in closed-door deliberations. The 80-yearold Manhattan Democrat, who recently won re-election in his Harlem district by a wide margin, Rep. Charles was charged Rangel, with 13 counts D-N.Y., may of misconduct. face expulHis actions that sion from the led to the ethics House. trial included failure to pay taxes on rental income from a villa in the Dominican Republic, accepting rent-stabilized apartments from a developer and soliciting charitable contributions from corporations and individuals with business pending before the committee. The special panel of four Democrats and four Republicans deadlocked on one of the 13 charges against Rangel and merged two of the others into one count. Rangel, who walked out of his trial on Monday after declaring that he no longer had a lawyer and needed more time to prepare a defense against the charges of financial misconduct and ethical lapses, issued a statement challenging the outcome. “How can anyone have confidence in the decision of the Ethics Subcommittee when I was deprived of due process rights, right to counsel and was not even in the room?” Rangel said in his statement. The full ethics committee will review the panel’s conclusions. The ethics committee’s findings will be taken to the House floor, where Rangel could face a wide range of actions from vindication to expulsion.

Scott Applewhite / The Associated Press

Staff Sgt. Salvatore Giunta receives the Medal of Honor from President Barack Obama in a ceremony at the White House on Tuesday. Giunta, 25, of Hiawatha, Iowa, was given the nation’s top military award for rescuing two members of his squad in Afghanistan in October 2007. Obama said Giunta “charged headlong into the wall of bullets,” pulling one soldier to safety before chasing down two Taliban fighters who were carrying away another soldier, who had been mortally wounded. Giunta is the first living recipient of the Medal of Honor in nearly 40 years.

Bishops choose new, conservative leader The Associated Press BALTIMORE — New York Archbishop Timothy Dolan was elected president Tuesday of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops in a surprise win that underscored the bishops’ shift toward a more aggressive defense of orthodoxy. Dolan defeated Tucson Bishop Gerald Kicanas, who was

known for his conciliatory style and served for three years as vice president. It is the first time since the 1960s that a sitting vice president was on the ballot for conference president and lost. For the next vice president, the bishops chose the prelate who led their campaign for traditional marriage, Archbishop Joseph Kurtz of Louisville, Ky.

“This is an indication that bishops are going to continue to be leaders in the culture wars,” said the Rev. Thomas Reese, author of a book on the American bishops and senior fellow at the Woodstock Theological Center at Georgetown University. Chicago Cardinal Francis George finishes his three-year term as president this week.

Republican throws wrench into plans for arms treaty New York Times News Service President Barack Obama’s hopes of ratifying a new arms control treaty with Russia by the end of the year appeared to come undone Tuesday as the chief Senate Republican negotiator moved to block a vote on the agreement, one of the White House’s top foreign policy goals, in the lameduck session of Congress. The announcement by the senator, Jon Kyl of Arizona, the Republican point man on the issue, blindsided and angered the White House, which vowed to keep pressing for approval of the so-called New START treaty. But the White House strategy had hinged entirely on winning over Kyl, and Democrats, who began scrambling for a backup plan, said they considered the chances of success slim. The treaty, which would force both countries to pare back nuclear arsenals and resume mutual inspections that lapsed last year, is the centerpiece of two of Obama’s signature goals: restoring friendly relations with Russia and putting the world on a path toward eventually eliminating nuclear arms.

U.K. looking forward to a royal wedding as Prince William proposes

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LONDON — Thirty years after the fairy-tale nuptials with the unhappy ending, Britain will finally have another big royal wedding: its dashing helicopter-pilot prince — second in line to the throne — will marry the lovely commoner who may someday become queen. Prince William and Kate Middleton bubbled with joy Tuesday evening in their first public appearance since the palace announced their engagement after more than eight years of dating. Their wedding will be next spring or summer. In a poignant symbol for William, his betrothed wore the sapphire and diamond engagement ring that belonged to his late mother, Diana. “I thought it was quite nice because obviously she’s not going to be around to share any of the fun and excitement of it all. This was my way of keeping her close to it all,” William said. While the romance of the two 28-year-olds is the stuff that dreams are made of, it is no exaggeration to say that the future of the Windsor dynasty depends to no small degree on the success of their union. “We’re massively excited,” William said in the televised interview that marked the first time they have spoken publicly about the trials and tribulations of their love affair, which dates back to their days as university freshmen. “We’re hugely ex-

Kirsty Wigglesworth / The Associated Press

Prince William and Kate Middleton, seen at St. James’s Palace in London on Tuesday, plan to wed in the spring or summer of 2011. cited. We’re looking forward to spending the rest of our lives together.” News of the engagement was greeted with enthusiasm in Britain. Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip said they were “absolutely delighted for them both,” Buckingham Palace said. Prince Charles said he was “thrilled.” Middleton’s parents, Carole and Michael, also gushed. “We all think he’s wonderful. We’re extremely fond of him,” Michael Middleton said. Royal officials said that while Middleton is commonly known as Kate, her official name is Catherine Elizabeth. She will be named Queen Catherine if William, as expected, eventually takes the throne.


A4 Wednesday, November 17, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

C OV ER S T OR I ES

Shanghai fire stirs safety concerns amid building boom The Associated Press SHANGHAI — China ordered tighter fire prevention measures early today following a blaze that gutted a high-rise apartment building in China’s business capital, killing at least 53 people, with

BOTC Continued from A1 The growth of Central Oregon, Snyder said, and the historical success of Bank of the Cascades, which was founded in 1977, go hand in hand. “I’m happy for them,” he said, referring to the bank management, “and I’m happy for all of Central Oregon. “You couldn’t find a better friend of the community than Bank of the Cascades.” Mike Hollern, CEO of property development company Brooks Resources, agreed the announcement brings good news. “I think it’s great,” he said.

Caught in the crash Caught in the real estate bubble and resulting economic crash, Cascade Bancorp went from record annual profits of $35.7 million in 2006 to $30 million in 2007. Then, in a sign of things to come, Cascade Bancorp in February 2008 restated its fourth-quarter 2007 earnings, to $259,000 from $5.4 million, due to an increase in loan-loss provisions. For 2008, Cascade Bancorp reported a net loss of $134.6 million, followed by a net loss of $114.8 million in 2009. For the first nine months of this year, it lost $15.1 million. In August 2009, less than a month after state and federal regulators closed Prineville-

Carjacking Continued from A1 “I’m not going to shoot you,” he told Cook. For the first time, Cook felt a surge of panic. “It’s like you’re ready to get shot,” he said. “At that instant, I’m on the ground, and I’m thinking: ‘This is it.’” But then Cook heard the car door slam and the roar of the engine. Seconds later, the man was gone. Cook grabbed his cell phone from his pocket and dialed 911. Within a few minutes, Bend police officers had flooded the area, near the intersection of Northeast Fourth Street and Northeast Franklin Avenue. Just after 5 a.m. on Tuesday, officers spotted Cook’s lavender 2000 Toyota Camry about five blocks from the scene of the alleged robbery, near the intersection of Southeast Fifth Street and Southeast Drive. The car was empty, except for Cook’s jacket. His wallet and keys were not inside.

Mortgages Continued from A1 Selef Spragg, home ownership specialist at Central Oregon nonprofit NeighborImpact, said problems dealing with mortgage service companies haven’t improved, even after the foreclosure moratorium and succession of federal housing aid programs. “It seems every time they say they’re going to make changes, the problems just perpetuate,” Spragg said. Bank executives testified on Tuesday that the foreclosure process is needed to help clear out a big backlog of delinquent loans and added that they don’t take the final step in the process — seizing the house — until the modification process has run its course. But Merkley said homeowners are often baffled when they receive foreclosure notices when they’re close to receiving a modification. “If we can just get servicers to suspend foreclosure proceedings until they’re done with the modification process, that would be one huge step,” Merkley said. “We need to figure out how to put all the incentives in place so we have that alignment of interests so the success of the family is at the top of the list.” The other change Merkley mentioned was a pledge by companies not to sell loans that are in the process of modification.

dozens believed still missing. Relatives were still searching for their loved ones, while authorities have not given any figures for the number of missing from the fire in a downtown neighborhood Monday after-

noon. Shanghai’s fire chief, Chen Fei, said firefighters searched the 28-story building thoroughly after the fire was put out and could not have missed anyone. In a notice posted on its website, the Cabinet ordered au-

thorities to improve fire safety and prevention, especially in the winter when widespread use of space heaters is an added risk. It named construction sites and high-rise buildings as areas needing extra attention.

based Community First Bank, Cascade Bancorp entered into the consent order with regulators, agreeing to, among other things, improve its capital levels within 150 days, reduce nonperforming assets and increase its reserves for loan losses. Regulators require banks to maintain a certain level of capital, essentially as a cushion against potential losses. Since Jan. 22, regulators have shut down three additional Oregon-based banks including The Dalles-based Columbia River Bank and Eugene-based LibertyBank.

Lightyear Fund II L.P., private equity funds affiliated with Leonard Green & Partners L.P., and private equity funds affiliated with WL Ross & Company LLC, according to a news release from Cascade Bancorp. Bolger became Cascade Bancorp’s largest shareholder in April 2006 when he merged his Farmers & Merchants State Bank in Boise, Idaho, into Cascade Bancorp, according to the news release.

investor will be 40 cents. Leonard Green, Lightyear and WL Ross also will each get one representative on Cascade Bancorp’s board of directors. Bolger already has a designee, Thomas Wells, on the board. Along with the stock sale, Cascade Bancorp’s board will implement a 1-for-10 reverse stock split effective Monday. Under the split, each 10 shares of outstanding common stock will be automatically reclassified as one share. For example, 10 shares worth $4, at 40 cents per share, would become one share worth $4, Moss said. The reverse stock split will reduce the number of shares outstanding and bring the stock price up to meet the $1 per share minimum price required by the Nasdaq. Cascade Bancorp would not be the first Northwest bank to emerge from under a federal regulatory order after successfully raising capital. After Lake Oswego-based West Coast Bancorp raised $172.9 million of capital, its regulatory order was lifted in July. Banking regulators lifted an order on Spokane, Wash.,-based Sterling Financial Corp., holding company of Sterling Savings Bank, in September after it raised $730 million, more than enough capital required by the order, according to newspaper archives.

Bank can grow Along with infusing Cascade Bancorp with capital, Moss said, the stock sale means the bank can grow, something it could not do under the consent order. “It allows the bank to grow and prosper and provide more credit to our community,” she said. And while some of the nation’s largest banks survived by taking government loans through the Troubled Asset Relief Program, Moss said, “We did it without government assistance.” For Cascade Bancorp, the next move will be to file a proxy statement and then convene a shareholder’s meeting. Shareholders must approve the stock sale, and the Federal Reserve Bank must approve the investors. The four lead investors are: David Bolger, an affiliate of

Lt. Ken Stenkamp of the Bend Police Department said officials are still looking for the suspect, who could face charges of firstdegree robbery, unauthorized use of a motor vehicle and unauthorized use of a weapon. He said police were searching the car for any evidence that could help them track down the suspect, including fingerprints and DNA. Meanwhile, officials are asking for tips from anyone who saw the man or the car, which has Oregon license plate numbers SRZ387, around the time of the incident. Stenkamp said the alleged robbery appears to be a random crime, which made it unusual.

Rare occurrence Carjackings are a fairly rare occurrence in the area, but there have been at least three in the last several months. In August, police arrested two Bend men who allegedly pulled up behind a Jeep Grand Cherokee in the parking lot of Albertsons on Northeast Third Street and dragged the driver

Bend resident Cesar Corona, 54, was the victim of a change in mortgage service companies earlier this year. Corona came to Central Oregon four years ago to give his two children a nicer place to grow up. “This town is beautiful,” Corona said. “I love it.”

Work wasted Corona said he began having trouble paying his mortgage two years ago, after heart trouble forced him to leave his job as a machine operator. More than a year ago, he began seeking a modification to his mortgage. He slowly advanced along the process until a few months ago, when the mortgage company sold his loan to another firm, wiping out the work. “I did everything and then they sold it to someone else,” Corona said. Spragg said he is currently helping about 100 homeowners through the modification process. “In reality, that doesn’t even really show the true demand,” Spragg said. “A lot of people are so disillusioned with the situation, they’re just defaulting because they feel there’s no way out.” Deschutes County continued to have the highest foreclosure rate in the state, at one in every 165 homes, according to RealtyTrac, a company that tracks foreclosures. Crook County was

‘They were stalwarts’ In October 2009, he and Lightyear pledged to pump $65 million into the bank if the bank raised $85 million on its own, according to The Bulletin’s archives. Over the next 13 months, the two investors stuck with the bank, agreeing to extend their deals with Cascade Bancorp about 10 times. “They were stalwarts,” Moss said. Leonard Green and WL Ross were new lead investors announced on Tuesday, Moss said. Both are well-respected in the banking industry, she said, and their participation provides a mark of confidence in the “bank and the communities that we operate in,” she said. Upon the sale’s completion, Leonard Green, Lightyear and WL Ross will each own 24.35 percent of the common stock, and Bolger will own slightly more than 14 percent, according to the news release. The purchase price per share for each

and two passengers out of the vehicle. One of the suspects drove off in the Jeep while the other left on a motorcycle. The Jeep was found a short time later. One suspect, Jeffery Dale Stanphill pleaded guilty to one count of second-degree robbery last month. The other suspect, David Andrew Strunk, is scheduled to enter pleas on charges of robbery, assault and unauthorized use of a vehicle next month. Meanwhile, the case of an Idaho man who allegedly threatened a camper at Cultus Lake before duct-taping the camper to a tree and stealing his car in September is also pending in Deschutes County Circuit Court. James Patrick Powers is charged with several crimes, including robbery and kidnapping. Powers led police on a chase in the stolen Honda Civic before fleeing on foot near Oakridge. After hiding from officials from a few days, Powers was shot by an Oregon State Police trooper and taken into custody. His plea hearing was recently pushed back to Nov. 29.

second, at one in 263 homes, while Jefferson was worse than the state average, at one foreclosure for every 338 homes. The region’s housing market, meanwhile, has continued its uneven progress. In the third quarter of 2010, the number of sales was up by 32 percent over the same time in 2009, but the median sale amount was down by 14 percent to $148,000, according to statistics provided by the Central Oregon Association of Realtors. At the hearing Tuesday, Georgetown University Law Professor Adam Levitin said federal efforts to help troubled homeowners have done almost nothing to alleviate the pain of widespread foreclosures.

‘Hyped initiatives’ “A series of much-hyped initiatives … have all met what can charitably be described as limited success,” Levitin said, in testimony before the committee. Merkley said he’s working on his own plan to ease the backlog of foreclosures, but wasn’t ready to discuss it publicly. The most recent program, the Home Affordable Modification Program, has resulted in fewer than 500,000 mortgages modifications as of Sept. 30, compared to about 2.5 million mortgages in foreclosure, based on estimates by the Mortgage Bankers Association. Bank of America Home Loans

Tim Doran can be reached at 541-383-0360 or at tdoran@bendbulletin.com.

Be safe but not ‘overly concerned,’ police say Stenkamp said Monday’s incident shouldn’t cause people to worry. “As always, people should be aware of their surroundings and lock their doors and be safe,” he said. “But this isn’t a reason to become overly concerned and be totally afraid.” Cook said he had about $50 cash in his wallet and his credit cards, which he has now cancelled for good. He said the robbery made him realize that he doesn’t really need all those cards — and that he should change up his nightly routine of taking out the garbage at work. He said he’s worked at the dentist’s office for about 15 years and never thought twice about heading out into the dark parking lot on his own. “That’s going to change,” he said. Erin Golden can be reached at 541-617-7837 or at egolden@bendbulletin.com.

President Barbara Desoer testified at the hearing that her bank hasn’t wrongly foreclosed on any homeowners, but could do a better job of communicating with customers. “We have confirmed the basis for our foreclosure decisions has been correct and accurate,” Desoer said. “At the same time, however, we have not found a perfect process.” Bank of America halted foreclosures several times over the past few years, Desoer said, and is improving its process, including creating a single contact person for each homeowner. Corona recently began the modification process with the new company, meaning he’s started all over in the process of long waits for letters from the company, followed by frantically working to complete paperwork on tight deadlines set by the mortgage servicer. Corona, a naturalized U.S. citizen originally from Mexico, doesn’t understand all of the documents, so he’s relied on help from NeighborImpact and his 11- and 14-year-old children, he said. In the meantime, Corona said he and his wife are doing what they can to stay in their house. “We have to do something. Make tamales or something,” Corona said. “We just try to help ourselves.” Keith Chu can be reached at 202-662-7456 or at kchu@bendbulletin.com.

JORDAN

Forbidden tales are bookstore’s hottest sellers By Borzou Daragahi

manuals. But his shop is known as the AMMAN, Jordan — At place in Amman to get forbidden Sami Abu Hossein’s cramped fruits of knowledge. bookstore, the hundred or Censoring books in the age so book titles listed on a wall of the Internet may seem like a aren’t bestsellers. They’re quaint idea. Even the government banned. official in charge of restricting And the cheery Abu Hosse- them recently announced in a in can you get you any of them, newspaper article that “stopping sometimes in the few minutes books from reaching the people it takes to sit down and drink is a page we’ve turned.” a cup of thick-brewed Turkish The censor, Abdullah Abu Rocoffee. man, occasionally stops by the “There are three no-nos,” bookstore to hobnob with Abu the owner of Al Taliya Books Hossein. So do plainclothes seexplains with a big smile. curity officials. Abu Hossein “Sex, politics and religion. Un- serves them his Turkish coffee. fortunately, that’s all anyone They very politely ask him for ever wants to read about.” the copies of the forbidden books. He laughs uproariously. He hands them over. It’s all very “These are all the banned civilized. ones,” he says, gesturing to the “Allah maakon,” he bids them list taped to the wall above the farewell. God be with you. store entrance, books on sexu“They are very sensitive to poliality to ones that critically ex- tics and criticism of politicians,” amine the life and times of the says Abu Hossein, who has been prophet Muhammad, the most working at his family shop for detaboo topic in the Arab world. cades. “But there are some books “We have them,” he says, that are banned arbitrarily. Somegrinning broadly, “but don’t times a censor will ban a book for tell anyone.” a sentence he The tubby doesn’t like.” father of five “They are very A bearded seems to get a sensitive to politics man wearing a tremendous kick headdress and out of bucking and criticism of flowing white the rules. (Not politicians. But dishdasha walks that they’re in. He’s one of the strictly enforced; there are some regulars, a Saudi he’s never been books that are religious scholar arrested or even named Thaer summoned by banned arbitrarily. Balawi who the authorities.) perhaps enjoys Sometimes a His partner in the challenge thought crime is censor will ban of subjecting Hossein Yassin, a book for a his puritanical a self-described sentence he Salafist beliefs Marxist in a to the scrutiny worn beige linen doesn’t like.” of critical intelsuit. Abu Hosselects. “You can’t in summons his — Sami Abu Hossein, stop an idea by wiry 48-year-old bookstore owner censoring it,” he comrade in for says. the really tough “ Ma m noueh jobs. maqroubieh,” goes the Arabic Yassin jokes that he’s the proverb. All that is forbidden is Special Forces for getting desired. banned or hard-to-find books. Abu Hossein recalls a memHe makes allusions to a murky oir by a former interior minister past as an underground that the censors forbade for its revolutionary. sensitive revelations. It became a “I can get any book,” he bestseller. But later, the political boasts. “But don’t ask how I sands shifted, and the book was get them.” removed from the blacklist. Now The most widely requested it hardly sells. banned book remains “The Abu Hossein and his customSatanic Verses,” the 1988 nov- ers believe there’s something speel that suggested some parts cial about holding a book in your of the Quran weren’t God’s hand, feeling its pages, gabbing words and thereby earned its with the bookseller and fellow author, Salman Rushdie, a seekers of knowledge, like Carol fatwa issued by Iran’s Ayatol- Kaplanian, a 29-year-old doctoral lah Ruhollah Khomeini and student writing a thesis on honor the hatred of pious Muslims killings of women in the Middle worldwide. East, picking through a pile of Other top requests include books on gender relations. “23 Years,” by the Iranian The afternoon wears on. Abu scholar Ali Dashti, which Hossein keeps serving cups of questions miracles ascribed to coffee for his guests, the SalafMuhammad in the Quran; and ist, the communist, the feminist “The Joke in the Arab World,” and the Web dude with a passion by the Egyptian writer Khaled for philosophy. They sift through Qashtin, a sarcastic view of titles and chat quietly, their murthe Middle East, its rulers and murs softened by the stacks of customs. books surrounding them. Abu Hossein’s shop, in the capital’s rambling but lively downtown, also sells nonblacklisted books. His shelves are filled with titles from seLaser Resurfacing | Fraxel | Restylane Precision Liposuction | Botox rious political studies about the Middle East to romance Call 541.330.6160 novels and pirated software www.aesthetics-md.com Los Angeles Times

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Water Continued from A1 The crisis has spawned a new group of activists, women like Quintana, who are leading efforts to pressure politicians to clean up the water. A generation ago, Quintana’s father fought alongside César Chávez for farmworkers’ rights. These days, she takes those lessons of political activism into battle with county and state officials. “People — even some in Seville — ask me, ‘Why don’t you move?’” said Quintana, 54. “But you know what? My parents raised me here, and my father and his generation sweated for our little house. This isn’t about me. It’s about our kids and grandkids.” A drive through the San Joaquin Valley, the southern stretch of the Central Valley from Bakersfield to Fresno, reveals the food-producing might of California. Dust devils dance across fields of citrus, nuts and vegetables — some of the more than 200 different crops grown here. Agriculture in these parts is a $28-billiona-year business. The small towns where many of the fieldworkers live, often below the poverty line, are far from the highways and major cities. Much of the water contamination in those towns comes from the harmful levels of nitrates, which enter the groundwater from crop fertilizers, feedlot runoff and leaky septic tanks. The colorless and odorless nitrates pose a particular health threat to infants because they can cause “blue baby syndrome,” a blood oxygen disorder that can be fatal. The long-term risk for adults is unclear. Farmers started using nitrogen fertilizer to boost crop production four decades ago, and since then nitrate contamination in the valley has increased fivefold. The State Water Resources Control Board is writing new guidelines for fertilizer use, but it will take years,

THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, November 17, 2010 A5

Re-enact

Don Bartletti / Los Angeles Times

Students line up to drink from a water cooler in Seville, Calif., in August. The water supply is often contaminated with agricultural chemicals, so school administrators will not let students drink from the taps and water fountains. perhaps even decades, before groundwater pollution begins to ease, water experts say. “I hear people in Hollywood talk about helping people in the Third World get clean water. Well, we need help in our own backyard first,” Quintana said. “Farming is important. But in the end we can live without the fruit — not without water.” Susana De Anda, co-director of the Community Water Center, a Visalia organization that helps these small towns make their case to the authorities, says California “has clear and consistent policies: Clean water flows toward money and power. But we’re making progress, because these women are moving their communities forward.” Seville, population 350, covers five square blocks in northeastern Tulare County, a half-hour’s drive from the rolling mountains of Sequoia National Park. Pipes that deliver water from the lone well are riddled with leaks, and tall stands of tules sprout from the pooling water. A few leaks have

Earmarks Continued from A1 Both supporters and skeptics of an earmark ban say that it would empower the executive branch, at least initially. While earmarks amount to a tiny trickle in the government’s flood of red ink — slightly more than three-tenths of one percent of federal spending — most of that money would still be expended by federal agencies in the absence of earmarks but without specific directions from Congress. Sen. Thad Cochran of Mississippi, the senior Republican on the Appropriations Committee, said, “I remain unconvinced that fiscal prudence is effectively advanced by ceding to the Obama administration our constitutional authority.” But he said he would abide by his colleagues’ wishes. Some critics of earmarks say that the tension between the constitutional and anti-spending prerogatives is overblown. Rep. Jeff Flake, R-Ariz., said that Congress could easily maintain — and even expand — its purview over spending and still not engage in the earmarking process that has led to embarrassing corruption scandals and is often viewed as a way to generate campaign contributions. “This notion that earmarks are an expression of our Article 1 authority, that’s a pretty sad tale,” Flake said in an interview, referring to the part of the Constitution that gives Congress power of the purse. He said that defenders of earmarks often note that they account for a tiny percentage of federal spending, and Flake said that was the reason that Congress should stop paying so much attention to them. Supporters of earmarks, like the Senate majority leader, Harry Reid, D-Nev., were quick to invoke the constitutional defense Tuesday. “I believe personally we have a constitutional obligation, responsibility to do congressionally directed spending,” Reid said. “I think I have an obligation to the people of Nevada to do what is important to Nevada, not what is important to some bureaucrat down here with green eyeshades.” Steve Ellis, vice president of Taxpayers for Common Sense, said the recent election results made a continued defense of earmarks politically untenable. “To say, ‘Hey, thanks for your votes, we’re going back to business as usual,’ that was really going to be damaging to their credibility.”

been repaired with old inner tubes held in place with wire. For years, low water pressure has left toilets and shower heads clogged with pebbles and rocks. Two years ago, though, the town learned it had a more serious problem: water contaminated by nitrates. Quintana led a contingent to the Tulare County Board of Supervisors last year. “We’re not asking for a handout,” she told Supervisor Steve Worthley, whose region includes Seville. “But you’ve got to either help us or move out of the way.” The county eventually agreed to run Seville’s water system temporarily, while the community applied for state grants to fix it. But a year has passed with no action from the state, local water bills have increased from $20 to $60 a month — and nothing has been done to improve water quality. Drinking fountains at Stone Corral Elementary are shut down, and the 137 students use bottled water dispensers set up in the classrooms — at a monthly cost

to the school of $220. “I could have bought a whole new language arts series for the cost of that water,” said Christopher Kemper, the school’s superintendent and principal. “I used to read about places like this, but I always assumed some government agency would sweep in and clean everything up,” Kemper said. Not in Seville, though. “It’s a good thing Becky’s become involved. Without her, people here might have just said: ‘The water’s bad, but let’s just live with it.’” A few weeks ago, Quintana helped launch a grass-roots effort in Seville and nearby communities to replace Supervisor Worthley, who has told Seville residents he believes their water is probably safe to drink and that any nitrates in the water are probably “naturally occurring.” After all precincts had reported on Nov. 2, Worthley trailed his challenger by 21 votes. “They’ve tried to sweep us under the table,” Quintana said. “But we will not disappear.”

lied forces had to overcome. The soldiers on the train were not depicting an actual event, but were Continued from A1 instead providing a wartime Lurensky’s response and sim- tableau. ilar controversies surrounding “The goal of my re-enactment war re-enactments elsewhere group is strictly to demonstrate in the country illustrate the fine what the American soldier, the line between conveying his- Allied soldier, was facing as they torical events and glorifying a went into D-Day, and what they dismal past, or even reopening had to do in order to win our wounds. freedom,” said Gilbert White, While playing out depictions who displayed war artifacts at a of older wars from American campground in Cumberland but history is generally not contro- was not on the train. versial, conflicts that are fresher Arthur Abramson, executive present challenges and evoke director of the Baltimore Jewstrong emotions, according ish Council, said the acceptable to those who have studied the display and use of the German topic. or Nazi uniform depends on “The re-enactment of battles context. from more recent “If they were wars like World trying to depict War II and Viet- “If they were the horrors of nam, with some trying to depict Nazi Germany, participants playI would applaud ing Nazis or Viet- the horrors of Nazi them,” Abramson cong, has a differ- Germany, I would said of the reent flavor,” Jenny enactors. “You Thompson, the au- applaud them. You just can’t make thor of a book on just can’t make a a general state20th-century war ment, that ‘Oh, re-enactors, wrote general statement, it’s bad because in The New York that ‘Oh, it’s they’re wearing a Times. “For real uniform.’” bad because survivors, some One risk that whose memories they’re wearing a World War II reare still raw, the uniform.’” enactors recogsafe historical disnize and guard tance collapses.” against is the in— Arthur Abramson, C o n t r o v e r s y executive director, filtration of their over depictions of Baltimore Jewish Council group by Nazi German soldiers sympathizers or was in the news members of hate last month, when photographs groups. Vendors hoping to ply surfaced of a congressional their wares in Western Marycandidate from Ohio wearing a land were warned on a registraNazi SS uniform. Rich Iott ar- tion form that while they could gued that he participated in war bring both Allied and Axis milire-enactments with his son out tary merchandise, no “Neo-Nazi of historical interest, but he lost or extremist activity of any kind the support of some Republican will be tolerated.” leaders. White said a small minority of Those who took part in the other German-soldier re-enacCumberland festivities — which tors he has encountered in his 14 ran Nov. 4-7 and included a pe- years have displayed radical ideriod fashion show and stories ology, but that those people are from veterans — said they were quickly flushed out of legitimate providing an accurate depiction groups. “Everyone in my group of World War II-era scenes. The is an American; we don’t hold presence of German soldiers, any beliefs other than American re-enactors said, educates spec- ideology,” White said. “We’re not tators about both sides of the Fascists, we’re not Communists, war, while also making clear we’re not Nazis. We’re just ordithe challenge American and Al- nary people.”


A6 Wednesday, November 17, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Britain to pay Guantanamo abuse victims

N AT ION / WOR L D

INDIA

Liberals present their plan for deficit reduction

By Janet Stobart Los Angeles Times

LONDON — Several former Guantanamo Bay detainees who sued Britain for alleged complicity in their torture will receive unspecified settlement payments from the government, officials said Tuesday. The former prisoners accused Britain’s spy agency, MI5, and the country’s overseas intelligence service, MI6, of violating international law by doing nothing to stop the torture the detainees suffered at the hands of others at the U.S. detention facility at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Agents were not accused of torturing the detainees. Although British officials did not specify how many former detainees would receive settlements, 16 former prisoners at Guantanamo Bay and other overseas detention centers were expected to receive payments based on the accusations of at least 12 of them, according to BBC and other reports. Justice Secretary Ken Clarke said in a statement to parliament that mediated settlements had been reached. The confidentiality of such agreements is legally binding, therefore details would not be made public, Clarke said. The settlements are expected to total millions of dollars, according to media reports quoting confidential sources. British intelligence officials said in a statement that the settlements would allow MI5 and MI6 to concentrate on “protecting national security.” Clarke said the settlements avoided lengthy and expensive court proceedings. The government reportedly did not admit liability and the detainees did not withdraw their allegations. “We have saved public money instead of continuing to contest the claims,” he said. “It was better to settle it than just let it go on. No one should read into this any liability.” The decision also came as government officials expressed concerns about any disclosure of evidence they considered a risk to international security.

By David Lightman McClatchy -Tribune News Service

Mustafa Quraishi / The Associated Press

Indian rescue workers search through the rubble of a collapsed building in New Delhi, India, on Tuesday. The four-story building collapsed in a congested neighborhood in New Delhi Monday, killing at least 64 and injuring scores of others, a top police official said.

Death toll rises in building collapse By Lydia Polgreen and Saimah Khwaja New York Times News Service

NEW DELHI — Rescue workers searched frantically Tuesday through the rubble of a five-story tenement a day after it collapsed, killing at least 64 people, many of them migrant workers from eastern India’s countryside. The ramshackle building crumbled into a heap Monday just after 8 p.m., trapping an untold number of people beneath a jumble of stone and steel. Dogs helped locate some survivors, while others were able to use their cell phones to call rescuers, who bored through the wreckage with jackhammers. Through the night, distraught onlookers shouted “Dead or alive?” as each body was pulled out. Local residents said that as many as 400 people lived in the building at any given time; many were unaccounted for Tuesday. The cause of the collapse

“It happened so quickly that it took me a while to understand what actually happened. There was lot of noise and cries. I was myself crying, looking for my mother and brothers.” — Urmila Biswas, survivor was not immediately clear, but suspicions centered on this year’s heavy monsoon rains, the building’s location near a swollen river and shoddy, illicit construction. “There is already a question mark on the legality of the construction of buildings in this area,” said Tejendra Khanna, the city’s lieutenant governor, and the owner of the building, Amrit Singh, was being sought for arrest.

First lady’s aide stepping down By Nia-Malika Henderson The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — Susan Sher, Michelle Obama’s chief of staff, will leave her post in January, adding to staff shake-ups in the East Wing over the past 18 months. Sher, a longtime Obama mentor, took the helm in June 2009, overseeing the rollout of the first lady’s childhood obesity initiative and coordinating with the West Wing on Michelle Obama’s role in the elections. “Susan has been both a colleague and a dear friend for decades, and I have been grateful every day for her leadership and wise counsel in Washington,” the first lady said Tuesday. “I also very much appreciate her generosity in staying longer than she initially planned

— spending so many months away from her family in Chicago — to help me build my office in the East Wing. I wish her all Susan Sher the best.” No successor has been named, but Tina Tchen, White House director for public engagement and a big Obama fundraiser, is considered a possible replacement. Sher will stay on to manage the transition. The East Wing has had turnover at the top ranks over the past year and a half. Sher replaced Jackie Norris, Michelle Obama’s first chief of staff, last summer. Social Secretary Ju-

lianna Smoot replaced Desiree Rogers in February, and Camille Johnston, former communications director, left in August. An East Wing aide said Johnston’s replacement will be announced in the coming weeks. Sher, a former executive at the University of Chicago Medical Center, is close friends with Valerie Jarrett, a senior adviser to President Obama. Sher made clear from her first days in the White House that she intended to return to Chicago, where her husband lives. “Susan has brought tremendous skill and dedication to the first lady’s office, as well as my administration’s outreach to the Jewish community and our efforts to pass health care reform, and I thank her for her service,” the president said Tuesday.

Religion offers no break on airport screening By Sharon Theimer The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The Transportation Security Administration says airline passengers won’t get out of body imaging screening or pat-downs based on their religious beliefs. TSA chief John Pistole told the Senate Homeland Security Committee on Tuesday that passengers who refuse to go through a full-body scanner machine and reject a pat-down won’t be allowed to board, even if they turned down the in-depth screening for religious reasons. “That person is not going to get on an airplane,” Pistole said in response to a question from Sen. John Ensign, R-Nev., on whether the TSA would provide exemptions for passengers whose religious beliefs do not allow them to go through a physically revealing body scan or be touched by screeners. Civil rights groups contend the more intensive screening violates civil liberties including freedom of religion, the right to privacy and the constitutional protection against unreasonable searches. Pistole said the tougher screen-

Manuel Balce Ceneta / The Associated Press

Transportation Security Administration Administrator John Pistole, right, accompanied by Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano, left, speaks to the media during a news conference to kick off the holiday travel season at Washington’s Ronald Reagan National Airport on Monday. ing is necessary, and that the FDA has found the imaging machines to be safe. Going through the whole-body scanning machine is similar to getting about three minutes of the radiation

that passengers receive at 30,000 feet on a typical flight, he said. Pistole said his agency was working to address pilot and flight attendant concerns about the screening.

The building was in a tangled warren of back alleys in a part of the city called Laxmi Nagar, where thousands of hastily constructed apartment blocks have risen on the soggy soil at the edge of the Yamuna River. With migrant laborers streaming into New Delhi from the countryside, seeking jobs, the claustrophobic rooms rent for $50 to $80 a month and often house an extended family. Bathrooms and kitchens are usually shared with dozens of others. Witnesses described a horrific crash, followed by a mad scramble to escape the debris. Urmila Biswas, a 15-year-old maid from West Bengal, lived in the building with her family. Her mother was missing, and her two younger brothers were in the hospital. “It happened so quickly that it took me a while to understand what actually happened,” Biswas said. “There was lot of noise and cries. I was myself crying, looking for my mother and brothers.”

WASHINGTON — Liberals made clear Tuesday what they want from the bipartisan deficit commission — more help for the poor and middle class, and bigger corporate tax increases. Rep. Jan Schakowsky, DIll., one of 18 members of the National Commission on Fiscal Responsibility and Reform that is to report its recommendations on Dec. 1, offered a detailed plan aimed at cutting $427.7 billion from the federal budget deficit by 2015. Schakowsky’s blueprint amounts to a liberal’s manifesto. It frames one path that President Barack Obama must weigh as he decides how to tackle deficits. Will he team with the panel’s centrists and perhaps some Republicans on steps outlined last week by the panel’s two co-chairmen — a strategy that would alienate his party’s liberal base — or will he side instead with liberals such as Schakowsky, and forfeit any chance at a bipartisan deal with the new Congress?

Protect middle class Schakowsky, who’s close to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., was clear in her mission: “Lower- and middle-class Americans did not cause the deficit,” she said. “The middle class did not benefit from the Republican economic policies that led to the current deficit. They were the victims — and should not be called upon to pick up the tab.” Moderate and conservative commission members, who comprise the bulk of the panel, have been more circumspect. After co-chairmen Erskine Bowles and Alan Simpson offered their proposals last week — focused 2-to1 on spending cuts over tax

increases — the commission’s three Republican members from the House of Representatives issued a joint statement tentatively welcoming their approach. “This is a provocative proposal, and while we have concerns with some of their specifics, we commend the co-chairs for advancing the debate,” they said. Under the Bowles-Simpson proposals, discretionary spending — generally popular programs involving education, law enforcement, human services, some defense and other items — would be rolled back to last year’s levels for fiscal 2012. Liberals were appalled.

Public wants a ‘fight’ “Democrats should fight loudly and clearly — because the public overwhelmingly wants Democrats to fight that fight,” said Adam Green, co-founder of the Progressive Change Campaign Committee. Schakowsky on Tuesday laid out alternatives favored by the left, including: • $200 billion of new spending on economic stimulus to help create jobs over the next two years. • $110.7 billion in defense cuts. She’d cut certain weapons systems and scale back the Army and Marine Corps to pre-Iraq/ Afghanistan war sizes. • $17.2 billion in health care savings. She’d create a “robust public option,” or governmentrun health care plan, to get an estimated savings of $10 billion. • $144.6 billion in tax increases. She’d tax capital gains and qualified dividends as ordinary income. She’d also enact capand-trade legislation, which allocates emission allowances through auctions.

Why pay retail? 541-385-5950

New Bend Location:

2nd & Greenwood

www.extrafurniture.com


B

The challenge of being a working woman and saving for retirement, see Page B3. www.bendbulletin.com/business

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2010

MARKET REPORT

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STOC K S R E P O R T For a complete listing of stocks, including mutual funds, see Pages B4-5

B U S I N E SS IN BRIEF Economist: Region facing slow growth Oregon’s economy is growing, a regional economist said Tuesday, but at a slow pace that will likely continue into next year. Bill Watkins, director of the Center for Economic Research and Forecasting at California Lutheran University, predicts Oregon’s economic gains will not be as robust as those of the national economy, but will outpace California and the construction industry, both of which are in terrible shape. Watkins, who studies the state and regional economies, gave an economic update Tuesday to a small group in Bend. He does not expect significant job growth in the state during the next six months or so, he said. Economic growth in Western Oregon, Watkins said, will likely outpace Central Oregon, which has seen some of the state’s highest unemployment.

COVA, Allegiant Air plan trip packages The Central Oregon Visitors Association and Allegiant Air are working together to introduce vacation packages to the region from Phoenix/Mesa, Ariz., and Las Vegas, the two destinations Allegiant serves with nonstop flights to and from Redmond Airport. “This is a significant step forward and we couldn’t be more excited about it,” Alana Audette, COVA president and CEO, said of Allegiant recognizing Central Oregon as a destination for consumers in the two markets. When Allegiant began serving Central Oregon, it focused on locals flying to Phoenix/Mesa and Las Vegas for leisure, she said in a news release. Because Central Oregon has been so successful for Allegiant, it has been open to promoting inbound travel packages to the region, too, she said. Packages must be booked directly through Allegiant. Flights and lodging will be packaged in a single rate structure and add-ons such as ski lift tickets, rafting trips and guided tours also will be available. Packages are expected to be appear on Allegiant’s system within about a week, the news release said.

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GRAPES of Central Oregon The

Maragas Winery’s first batch of 100% local wine is ready to be poured

If you go

By Jordan Novet

When: Saturday, Nov. 27 Where: The M Bar, 643 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend, and Maragas Winery, 15523 S.W. U.S. Highway 97, Culver Details: Tastings of locally produced wine at the winery from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and wine and food at the M Bar from 5 p.m. to close.

Events celebrating the first purely Central Oregon wine from Maragas Winery

GRAND OPENING OF M BAR

The Bulletin

CULVER — It seemed like a long shot, producing wine exclusively from Central Oregon grapes, but now it has been done. Maragas Winery has stuck pre-release labels on bottles of Central Oregon Red dessert wine, which contain not a sliver of grape skin from any other region — not from the Willamette Valley, not from Washington state, not from California. For the first time, the stuff is all local. The wine, which was made last year out of five grape types and aged for months in flavor-neutral oak barrels, will be available for purchase at the Culver winery and at the newly renovated M Bar on Colorado Avenue in Bend. “It’s a historical event for us and, I think, our community,” said Doug Maragas, who founded the winery in Bend in 1999. The news comes as Maragas Winery seeks to grow more grapes all around Central Oregon — in order to produce more locally sourced wine, in more varietals — over the next two years. Maragas, 46, also is aiming to try his hand at growing and selling food products such as vinegar, kale and kombucha — a fermented tea — in the next few years. See Maragas / B5

CELEBRATION OF CENTRAL OREGON RED

Photos by Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

Doug Maragas, owner of Maragas Winery, holds a bottle of Central Oregon Red dessert wine, which is made entirely from grapes grown in Central Oregon.

When: Saturday, Dec. 11 Where: Maragas Winery, 15523 S.W. U.S. Highway 97, Culver Details: Barrel tasting of 2007 merlot and local food samplings, and an appearance by Santa Claus; from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Retail sales The estimated monthly sales for retail and food services.

340 2009

2010

Note: All figures are seasonally adjusted Source: Department of Commerce

AP

EUROPEAN CRISIS

New push for Ireland to consent to bailout By Steven Erlanger and James Kanter

New York Times News Service

As Ireland tried to fend off pressure to accept a bailout Tuesday and other European nations raised objections to participating in a rescue plan, Europe again found itself confronting a crisis of confidence in the euro and, ultimately, in its ability to manage its economic problems. A very public struggle over how to grapple with the latest market unease over the fiscal stability of several European countries illustrated the touchy questions of sovereignty and difficulty of reaching consensus that have kept Europe from reacting quickly. The latest episode also raises questions about tapping an existing bailout fund that Europe created earlier this year to prevent a debt crisis in Greece. The differences rattled financial markets, with stocks falling about 2 percent or more in many European countries and more than 1.5 percent in the United States. Investor fears of an Irish crisis were exacerbated by reports that growth might be slowing in China. As European finance ministers met in Brussels to pressure a reluctant Ireland to accept an $80 billion financial rescue plan, the president of the European Union, Herman Van Rompuy, said that the union was “in a survival crisis.” Van Rompuy appealed for European solidarity, saying, “If we don’t survive with the euro zone, we will not survive with the European Union.” See Europe / B5

New York Times News Service

Maragas, right, and assistant winemaker Nathan Johnson collect every last drop of fermented merlot grapes to be put into aging barrels while making wine at Maragas Winery in Culver on Tuesday. These grapes were grown at a certified live vineyard near Hermiston and shipped to Culver to be made into wine.

Boeing, Airbus waver on reworking smaller jets Airlines pushing for more fuel-efficient engine upgrades New York Times News Service

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GM IPO set to be largest in U.S. history

Factory output is up WASHINGTON — After leading the economy out of recession last year and then flagging over the summer, manufacturers might be getting a second wind. Factories boosted their output in October by the most since July, the Federal Reserve said Tuesday. Its report follows several other positive readings on the economy, including data released Monday that showed retail sales rose in October by the most in seven months. — From staff and wire reports

B

At Work

The latest high-stakes maneuvering by Boeing and Airbus does not involve their top-ofthe-line models, the 787 Dreamliner and the A380 jumbo jet, but instead their aging smaller workhorses. The two companies have long been defined by their willingness to take risks. But perhaps because of all the problems and costs involved with the bigger planes, the companies have turned more cautious in responding to pressure from the

The Associated Press file photo

Boeing says it’s unlikely to retrofit its 737 planes with engines that utilize breakthroughs in fuel-efficiency technologies, preferring instead to create a brand-new version of the plane by 2020. airlines to develop more fuel-efficient substitutes for their smaller planes, the 737 and A320. Aviation experts say breakthroughs in engine technology offer a rare chance to re-engineer the two companies’ narrow

737s and A320s, which make up three-fourths of the fleets at the largest airlines. But while the new engines could save the airlines hundreds of millions of dollars a year, Airbus would have to invest $1.5 billion to $2

billion — and Boeing possibly twice that — to test and install them on the jets. And that, both companies say, would force them to push back plans to design brand-new versions of the planes, which would eventually offer even greater cost savings. James Albaugh, the chief executive of Boeing Commercial Airplanes, a unit of Boeing, said in an interview that his company was likely to hold off on the engine change and instead create a new plane by 2020. Airbus officials said their top executives were divided about what to do and planned to decide soon. Most analysts say they think Airbus will install the new engines and streamline the A320 by 2015 to take sales from Boeing while it is working out its new design. See Planes / B2

As General Motors’ keenly anticipated initial public offering draws near, it is on the cusp of a new distinction: the largest stock debut in U.S. history. The company is expected to raise the number of common shares it will sell in the offering by about 31 percent, with the majority of the newly added shares coming from the Treasury Department’s holdings, people briefed on the matter said Tuesday. They were not authorized to speak publicly. GM will now offer 478 million shares in the offering, which is expected to price between $32 to $33 a share, these people said. The company’s underwriters also have the option — likely to be used — to expand the size of the offering to about 550 million shares. GM also expects to sell up to $4.4 billion worth of preferred shares. At the midpoint of the expected price range, GM’s stock sale could raise $21.3 billion, surpassing the credit card company Visa’s $19.7 billion debut in 2008. Should the offering price be closer to $33 a share, it could even top this summer’s $22.1 billion debut on Hong Kong and Shanghai markets by the Agricultural Bank of China, the largest IPO in history. See GM / B5


B USI N ESS

B2 Wednesday, November 17, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

M  BUSINESS CALENDAR TODAY ZOOM TAX SMALL-BUSINESS SEMINAR, CASH FLOW TECHNIQUES AND PLANNING: Learn survival skills for a tight economy. Presented by Giancarlo Pozzi, CPA, owner of Zoom Tax. Registration requested. Free for existing clients; $25 at the door; 4-5 p.m.; Redmond Chamber of Commerce, 446 S.W. Seventh St.; 541385-9666 or www.myzoomtax.com. BEND CHAMBER BUSINESS AFTER HOURS: RSVP by Nov. 16; free; 5-7 p.m.; Helly Hansen, 450 S.W. Powerhouse Dr. NETWORK OF ENTREPRENEURIAL WOMEN: Wells Ashby, prosecutor for the Deschutes County District Attorney’s Office, will speak on cyberfraud and real threats from a virtual world. Register at www.network women.org; 5-8 p.m.; St. Charles Bend conference center, 2500 N.E. Neff Road. UNDERSTANDING AND MANAGING CREDIT: Part of NeighborImpact’s financial fitness series, providing a general overview of credit including the pros and cons of using it, the kinds of credit available and the importance of maintaining a good credit record. Registration required; free; 5:30-7:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 2303 S.W. First St., Redmond; 541-318-7506, ext. 109 or somerh@ neighborimpact.org.

THURSDAY OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $20 “Discount Day”; 9 a.m.1 p.m.; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www .happyhourtraining.com. ETFS EXPLAINED: Learn why exchange traded funds (ETFs) are a rapidly growing investment option, including information on cost and tax advantages, flexibility, liquidity, and diversification. Presented by Luiz Soutomaior, CFP, CFS. Registration required by Nov. 16; free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794. EDWARD JONES OPEN HOUSE: Donations for the Humane Society of Central Oregon will be accepted as part of the celebration and may be dropped off before or during the event. RSVP to Lynn Hobson; 36 p.m.; Anna Robbins’ office at Edward Jones, 1444 N.W. College Way, Suite 2, Bend; 541-330-4329. GREEN DRINKS: Learn about businesses and their sustainability efforts at the last Green Drinks of 2010. Hosted by Sara Bella, maker of useful products from trash. Venue is located upstairs, across from Banana Republic; free; 5-7 p.m.; Sara Bella Upcycled, 520 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Ste. 621, Bend; 541-420-4961. CROOKED RIVER RANCHTERREBONNE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE NETWORKING SOCIAL: Hosted by Nancy Popp and her staff. Admission is free and you do not have to be a chamber member to attend; 5:30 p.m.; Crooked River Realty, 5135 Clubhouse Road; 541-923-2679. LIVE CONTRACTOR EDUCATION: Central Oregon Community College Small Business Development Center course, taught by Central Oregon Contractor Training, satisfies the educational requirement to become a licensed contractor in Oregon. Registration and prepayment are required. $275; fee includes the Oregon Contractor’s Reference Manual. 6-9 p.m.; class continues Nov. 19 and 20, 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Redmond campus, 2030 S.E. College Loop, Redmond; 541-383-7290 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. BEND TOASTMASTERS MEETING: Come and learn how Toastmasters may benefit you; free; 6:30 p.m.; IHOP, 30 N.E. Bend River Mall Drive; 541-480-1871. SOCIAL MEDIA, MANAGING YOUR SITES: Third in the Online Marketing Series offered by Central Oregon Community College. Registration required; $59; 6:30-8:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

FRIDAY REDMOND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE COFFEE CLATTER: 8:309:30 a.m.; Juniper Golf Course, 1938 S.W. Elkhorn Ave.; 541-548-8198. EDWARD JONES COFFEE CLUB: Current market and economic update including current rates; free; 9 a.m.; Sisters Coffee Co., 61292 S. U.S. Highway 97, Suite 105, Bend; 541617-8861.

SATURDAY INTERMEDIATE EXCEL 2007: Registration required; $59; 9 a.m.4 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Redmond campus, 2030 S.E. College Loop, Redmond; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

MONDAY OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum

requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $35; 9 a.m-1 p.m.; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-4476384 or www.happyhourtraining.com.

WEDNESDAY Nov. 24 ROTH CONVERSIONS, WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW: Learn the costs and benefits of converting and potential next steps. Presented by Luiz Soutomaior, CFP, CFS. Registration required by Nov. 22; free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794.

FRIDAY

If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact Collene Funk at 541-617-7815, e-mail business@bendbulletin.com, or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at www.bendbulletin.com. Please allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication.

Google sees WTO violations in limits on Internet access By Keith Bradsher and Claire Cain Miller

New York Times News Service

With China evidently in its sights, Google has released a policy paper contending that countries that limit Internet users’ access to information providers outside their borders violate their World Trade Organization commitments. The company did not single out China in the position paper. But Google has had a running battle with Beijing over censor-

ship, and many of the examples cited in the paper came from the company’s experiences with China. The paper was published online Monday but went largely unnoticed until bloggers started writing about it Tuesday. Bob Boorstin, Google’s public policy director, made the freetrade link forcefully in a posting on Google’s public policy blog. “The premise is simple,” he wrote in a statement posted on the blog with a link to the paper.

“In addition to infringing human rights, governments that block the free flow of information on the Internet are also blocking trade and economic growth.” Boorstin went on to call for Western officials to challenge trade barriers to information. “In the paper we’re releasing today, we urge policy makers in the United States, European Union and elsewhere to take steps to break down barriers to free trade and Internet commerce,” Boorstin wrote.

Nov. 26 EDWARD JONES COFFEE CLUB: Current market and economic update including current rates; free; 9 a.m.; Sisters Coffee Co., 61292 S. U.S. Highway 97, Suite 105, Bend; 541617-8861.

SATURDAY Nov. 27 OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $35; 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-4476384 or www.happyhourtraining.com.

MONDAY Nov. 29 OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $35; 4-8 p.m.; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-4476384 or www.happyhourtraining.com.

TUESDAY Nov. 30 TECHNICAL ANALYSIS FOR TRADERS: This workshop gives traders an introduction to technical analysis including trends, supports and resistance, chart patterns and technical indicators. Presented by Keith Wells, Charles Schwab & Co.’s active trader market manager. Registration required by Nov. 26. Five one-hour sessions. Call for details; free; 10 a.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794. FIRST TIME HOMEBUYER CLASS: Find out about the latest government programs and grants for first-time homebuyers and those who have not owned for the past three years. Enjoy a free dinner while learning about buying a home. Call for reservations; 6-8 p.m.; Evergreen Home Loans, 963 SW Simpson Ave. #200, Bend; 541-318-5500.

THURSDAY Dec. 2 LEADERSHIP SKILLS SERIES: Central Oregon Community College’s Small Business Development Center offers a nine-month series designed to give managers and team leaders the skills they need to succeed in their organizations; entire series costs $645, individual seminars are $85; 8 a.m.-noon; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7700 or http://www.cocc.edu/. MANAGING DAY-TO-DAY PERFORMANCE: Managers and team leaders can learn skills to identify performance gaps and increase productivity; $85; 8 a.m.-noon; Central Oregon Community College, Boyle Education Center, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7290 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. CREATING A NOT-SO-BIG INSPIRED HOME: Learn to achieve beauty, efficiency and conservation of energy and resources in a smaller space. Registration requested by Dec. 2; $12.50; 9 a.m.-noon; Bend Park & Recreation District Office, Community Room, 799 S.W. Columbia St.; 541-480-7303 or bsullivan@ earthadvantage.org. REPRESENTATION-PRACTICE AND PROCEDURES: Study for the Enrolled Agent IRS exams in a course offered by Central Oregon Community College’s Continuing Education Department. Registration required; call 541-383-7270. $480 plus $145 for required text available at first class; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; class continues Dec. 3; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7700. GREEN BUILDING TOUR AND ANNUAL MEETING: Join the High Desert Branch of Cascadia for its annual meeting, an evening of networking and a tour of The Oxford Hotel; 5-7:30 p.m.; The Oxford Hotel, 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541410-9845. BEND TOASTMASTERS MEETING: Come and learn how Toastmasters may benefit you; free; 6:30 p.m.; IHOP, 30 N.E. Bend River Mall Drive; 541-480-1871.

An unlikely alliance quickly results in all-electric RAV4 By Hiroko Tabuchi

New York Times News Service

It was over glasses of red wine on a May evening in Palo Alto, Calif., that Akio Toyoda, president of Toyota, and Elon Musk, founder of the electric vehicle start-up company Tesla Motors, first talked through the particulars of a partnership they had just announced. By the end of their chat, according to Toyoda, they had settled on at least one project: an electric version of Toyota’s RAV4 sport utility vehicle. Today, a mere six months later, the two automakers are set to show a prototype of an all-electric RAV4 at the Los Angeles Auto Show. The car represents the real debut of this unlikely alliance, in which Toyota invested $50 million for a 3 percent stake in Tesla and signed a $60 million deal to jointly develop an electric vehicle. Toyota is known more for rigid and methodical decision-making than for flair, while Tesla is the bold Silicon Valley upstart that sells $100,000 cars to George Clooney and Leonardo DiCaprio. The prototype, developed at remarkable speed and based on the idea of a relatively affordable mass-market electric, indicates that each company is learning from the other. A commercial version is expected to reach the market in 2012. “Speedy decision-making is part of a startup’s DNA,” Toyoda said in a joint press conference with Musk in Tokoyo last week to discuss the partnership. “That’s what we want to absorb.” He added: “Remember, Toyota was once a startup, too.” But more than a difference in cultures, the two companies share divergent views of the future trajectory of electric auto-

Koji Sasahara / The Associated Press

Toyota President Akio Toyoda sits behind the wheel of a Tesla Roadster as he receives its key from Tesla Motors Chief Executive Elon Musk during a ceremony Friday at the Tesla showroom in Tokyo. A prototype of an all-electric Toyota RAV4 is set to be unveiled just six months after the executives decided to collaborate. mobiles. Musk is a firm believer in a decisive swing toward electric cars, and would like to enter a wider market in 2012 with a cheaper electric car. “In the long term, all vehicles will become electric,” he said last week in Tokyo. “It’s a question of when, not if, and we hope the transition will come sooner, not later.” Toyoda and his colleagues are more cautious, with Toyota executives often talking down the all-electric car in favor of the company’s gas-electric hybrid technology. The company has invested millions of dollars in its Prius gas-electric hybrid and is not eager for a quick switch to electricity, analysts say. Toyota has said it will introduce hybrid versions of all of its models by 2020. And yet, as momentum builds around all-electric power trains, Toyota has been

increasingly criticized for lagging behind in next-generation automotive technology. Nissan Motor plans next month to start selling the Leaf, which it calls the world’s first mass-produced all-electric car. General Motors will soon introduce its Chevrolet Volt plug-in hybrid. Toyota is also set to introduce its own all-electric vehicle in 2012, a car based on its iQ ultra-mini compact that the automaker is developing independently. But Toyota has signaled that it considers the iQ a niche car, one mainly tailored for short-distance commuters in Japan. Toyoda said the market had simply not yet chosen the best low-emissions technology, which was why Toyota was preparing for all options. “When customers do give us their answer,” he said, “I want the company to be ready.”

NEWS OF RECORD BANKRUPTCIES Chapter 7 Filed Nov. 6

David M. and Tamela J. Estopare, 65365 Concorde Lane, Bend Kristi R. Hanson, 933 N.W. Canal Blvd. Apt. 105, Redmond Filed Nov. 7

Delynn K. Travis, 1095 N.W. 12th St., Prineville Heriberto A. Guevara, 2525 N.W. Elm Ave., Redmond Jesse M. and Angela J. Sweetman, 3028 S.W. Peridot St., Redmond Howard E. and Carol L. Morgan, P.O. Box 2069, La Pine Filed Nov. 8

Clifton J. Alton and Sherry A. BakerAlton, 14683 S.E. Leeway, Prineville Christopher T. and Renee T. McGahan, 1959 N.W. Balitch Court, Bend Mark A. and Cynthia J. McCready, 20867 Daniel Duke Way, Bend Richard P. Cooper, 70 S.W. Century Drive Suite 100-310, Bend Brandee M. DeFoe, 4631 S.W. Lava Ave., Redmond Filed Nov. 9

Lance S. Cournoyer, P.O. Box 2769, La Pine Filed Nov. 10

Kevin R. and Marni I. Hanna, 61483 Elder Ridge St., Bend Roger L. and Shannon M. Lockwood,

1126 S.W. 33rd, Redmond Jeremiah D. and Rebecca H. Fender, 1017 N.W. Cumberland Ave., Bend Gregory A. and Tara D. Rogers, 1515 N.E. 10th St., Bend Filed Nov. 11

Donald C. and Leslie C. Seaton, 61280 Victory Loop, Bend Amy R. Crofcheck, 1511 N.E. Frank McClean #2, Bend Kelly R. and Ashley E. Bookwalter, 15912 Twin Drive, La Pine Karen A. Durfee, P.O. Box 88, Warm Springs Armando and Francisca E. Pacheco, P.O. Box 995, Madras Filed Nov. 12

Robert J. Adams, 6778 N.E. Clark Drive, Madras Rachelle M. Scozno, 76 S.E. Hoff Lane Apt. B, Madras Marlys A. and Bradcus K. Schrandt, 61050 Targee Drive, Bend Terrill V. and Suzanne M. Pearson, 16978 Jacinto Road, Bend George H. Fallowfield, 1430 NW Wall St. #108, Bend Evan and Debrah F. Erickson, 20492 Mazama Place, Bend and 19699 Mountaineer Way #E126, Bend, respectively Marjorie A. Clark, 64100 N. U.S. Highway 97 #7, Bend John S. and Paula J. Hickey, P.O. Box 5381, Bend Filed Nov. 13

Lesley M. Jones, 61181 Cone Flower St., Bend Filed Nov. 15

Diane J. Schaffer, 2002 S.W. Canyon Drive #20, Redmond Costa A. Martin, 346 S.W. Dover Lane #27, Metolius Barbara A. Slater, 1104 N.W. Foxwood Place, Bend Chapter 13 Filed Nov. 7

Craig D. and Shawn L. Houghton, 11385 N.W. Dove Road, Terrebonne Spencer S. and Kandace D. McNeill, 3139 S.W. Reindeer Ave., Redmond Michael R. Bremont, 612 N.E. Apache Circle, Redmond Filed Nov. 8

Michael L. and Kimberly D. Riley, P.O. Box 4484, Bend David H. and René M. Lassila, 19761 Chicory Ave., Bend Filed Nov. 10

David R. and Barbara H. Owen, P.O. Box 1197, Terrebonne Bradley D. and Kelly A. Duren, 61330 Obernolte Road, Bend Filed Nov. 12

Jeremey J. and Vanessa L. Slaven, P.O. Box 755, Redmond Filed Nov. 15

Heather D. Miller, P.O. Box 626, Bend Filed Nov. 16

James O. and Susan E. Anderson, P.O. Box 1513, Sisters

Planes Continued from B1 But with oil prices back above $80 a barrel, airline executives say that they had hoped to hear cheerier news about faster solutions. The 737s and A320s, which each typically seat 150 to 180 people, have formed the backbone of the air travel system for decades. More than 10,000 of them shuttle passengers between major airports within the United States and other continents. But in terms of fuel economy, “we haven’t seen substantial improvements since the 1990s,” said Michael G. Van de Ven, chief operating officer of Southwest Airlines, one of Boeing’s biggest customers. And with ticket prices rising, he said, “if there is one single thing that you can do to improve the economics in this industry, that is to introduce a new airplane.” Boeing and Airbus say they are under too much financial strain from delays on the larger planes to jump right into designing a new jet, which could cost $7 billion to $10 billion. Albaugh, the Boeing executive, said that given the choice of new engines in five years or a whole new plane in 10, most airlines would prefer to wait. While the engines could help cut the operating costs for a new plane by 15 percent, he said, modifications and other costs in adding them to the 737s could reduce the total savings to less than 5 percent. “A lot of people will say, ‘Yeah, go re-engine the plane,’” Albaugh said. “But the second question is, ‘Would you buy it?’ ” Airbus could save even more in a plane’s total operating costs — analysts estimate 7 percent to 10 percent — by using the new engines and taking other steps to streamline the A320. But top Airbus officials said last month that they were concerned about whether they had enough engineers to handle all the work in front of them.

A changing game The companies’ ambivalence about installing new engines on the existing planes — which is essentially a stopgap measure — also illustrates how “the great Airbus-Boeing game is changing,” said Richard Aboulafia, vice president for analysis at the Teal Group, an aviation consulting firm in Fairfax, Va. While dominating the market for large commercial planes over the past two decades, the two companies have loved nothing more than to leapfrog each other with bold technological advances. But even as the demand for new planes bounces back from the recession, both are finding themselves hamstrung by the need to solve their production problems, Aboulafia said. Boeing is nearly three years late in delivering its most important plane, the 787 Dreamliner, the first jetliner made substantially of lightweight carbon composites that are also supposed to slash fuel costs. A fire on a test flight last week reinforced expectations among analysts for further delays in its first deliveries next year. Airbus said last week that it was pushing the delivery date for the A350 XWB, its answer to the Dreamliner, to late 2013 from mid-2013. Airbus might have to make more changes in its A380 jumbo jet after debris spewed from an engine during a Qantas Airways flight on Nov. 4. Boeing and Airbus also have to worry about new competitors from Canada, China and Russia. They are taking advantage of the new engine technologies to design planes that could cut into the sales of 737s and A320s over the next few years. “I don’t think that all the people who have aspirations will be successful,” Albaugh, the Boeing executive, said. “But I think that one or two of them possibly could.” Boeing and Airbus recently stepped up production of the 737s and the A320s, both to generate cash and to meet as much of the demand as they can.


B USI N ESS

THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, November 17, 2010 B3

A W Women’s financial futures As weak economy drags on, workers rest on weak savings rate Less than half of working women in U.S. participate in retirement plans

Joanna Harris, with children Joshau and Sophie, is the owner of Crunch Care, a nanny and caregiver referral service. She is the rare working mother who regularly keeps track of a 401(k) plan and makes adjustments.

By Cindy Krischer Goodman

McClatchy-Tribune News Service

MIAMI — Joanna Harris, who started her own business in January, remembers the day she walked out of her grandfather’s luxury senior home and thought, “I want to be able to afford to live in a place like this.” It’s the only reason Harris kept her part-time position with a real estate firm, a job that offers a retirement savings plan. Harris is the rare mother of two, juggling work and family, who is even thinking of retirement planning in this economy. Today, most women are focused on holding jobs, caring for their families and paying bills. Less than half of working women in the United States participate in a retirement plan, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. Women are more likely than men to care for elderly family members, start a business, work part-time jobs and step off the career track to raise children. In the struggle for work-life balance, we are losing control of our financial futures. “Women think retirement savings is one of those things than can always wait,” said Jan Knight, a financial services with MML Investors Services in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., a MassMutual subsidiary. “All it takes is to just get started, baby steps.”

Emily Michot Miami Herald

“Women think retirement savings is one of those things than can always wait. All it takes is to just get started, baby steps.” — Jan Knight, a financial services with MML Investors Services

A critical matter Sandy Hernandez, a 46-yearold Miami health care professional raising two children on her own, sees herself working well into her 70s and maybe her 80s. “I don’t see how I can ever possibly retire,” she said. Yet, the recession has taught us that working into old age may be unrealistic. In this time of high unemployment, 2.1 million older Americans are looking for work. Two important variables make it even more critical for women like Hernandez to make time for financial planning conversations: They earn less than men and live longer. Studies show women also invest more conservatively than men, are less likely to have employer-sponsored retirement plans and are more prone to tapping retirement funds for general consumption, according to the Employment Benefit Research Institute. They often make the mistake of focusing on day-to-day time demands and trusting their

Saving sooner

Savings gap Average IRA balance for women:

$51,000

Average IRA balance for men:

$91,000

spouses to save enough for their golden years. To turn things around, women need to know exactly how much money they are spending, Knight said. “You can’t invest if you don’t have a surplus,” she said. “You need to figure out how to save a little, then you can talk about what’s the right thing to do with that money.” The process also is easier if you have a retirement mission and a savings goal. Jane Hardwick, a certified retirement coach, said that knowing what you want to do when you retire, where you want to live and who you will spend time with paves the way for figuring out how to get there.

Hardwick urges women to make saving for retirement a priority, even if it means stashing away less for a child’s college education. “One of the best ways to help your kids is to put yourself in a position where you are financially OK in your own retirement,” Hardwick said. Women need to start saving sooner than men, as early as their 20s, because by the time they retire they will most likely have been in the work force 13 fewer years than men, experts say. If you’re working, save as much as you can in your company’s retirement plan, or in an IRA in which you can make tax-deductible contributions. Experts urge women to seek out free classes at community banks or ask for a consultation with a financial planner with the goal of trying to demystify the savings process. Eventually, most women have to invest more aggressively than men. The average individual balance for men (including all IRA

types) was $91,000, while for women it was $51,000. Men also contribute more to Social Security because they are less likely to take time off from their careers. Fortunately, it’s a good time to get started or add to an employee-sponsored retirement savings plan: Of the 293 U.S. employers that suspended matching contributions last year, 44 percent have already restored the match or intend to restore it by next year, according to a survey by Fidelity. Harris, the mother of two, owns CrunchCare, a South Florida nanny and caregiver referral business. She regularly watches her 401(k) savings and makes adjustments. Still, she understands why many working mothers forego retirement contributions: “They want to take home as much out of their paycheck as they can. They think retirement is far away and that they will have time to save later.” Harris said her experience placing caregivers has shown her otherwise. “ ‘Later’ sneaks up on people. Dealing with it later is not the right attitude.”

Language matters in job recommendations By Diane Stafford

McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Who doesn’t appreciate a nice letter of recommendation? Turns out some women might not want one. In a study of the words used in reference letters, researchers at Rice University found marked differences in word choice, depending on whether the job candidates were men or women. Male candidates were more often described with active or assertive words such as confident, ambitious, forceful, independent and intellectual. Letters about female candidates were more likely to use social or emotive words such as helpful, kind, nurturing, tactful

and agreeable. Whereas men were more likely to be championed for influencing others, women were more likely to be appreciated for taking direction well. And it didn’t matter one bit whether the letter writer was male or female. The study was focused on applicants for junior faculty positions, but it may translate into the larger work world. If so, it could spell trouble for candidates — male or female — whose recommendations are laden with “communal” rather

than “agentic” words. When the Rice researchers stripped out names and pronouns and submitted recommendation letters for hiring evaluation (also controlling for all other qualification variables), “The more communal characteristics mentioned, the lower the evaluation of the candidate,” said Randi Martin, one of the professors who conducted the study. The researchers believe this is the first study to show that these perceived gender differences in letters affect judgments

of hirability. They acknowledge that broader research is needed. Even with its limited sample, though, it builds on a body of research that suggests communal skills — generally perceived as female — aren’t necessarily valued for leadership positions. Also telling was a disparity noted in many of the recommendation letters. About women, writers were more likely to say she might make an excellent leader, while men were more likely praised as already a leader.

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stuck in temp jobs

Mid-level managers, executives earning far less than before, without benefits By Alejandra Cancino Chicago Tribune

CHICAGO — After years searching for permanent jobs, many skilled workers are getting used to the new normal: temporary employment. These are workers with established careers, who were making up to $100,000 a year as mid-level managers or executives before the recession. Now, they are temporary workers, hired without benefits and at a fraction of what they used to make. They are workers like Bob Szabo, 48, who moved to Chicago in early 2007 to become the chief operating officer of a wireless services company. He was laid off a few months later, then rehired and laid off again in 2008. “I figured the downturn would last five or six more months, and figured that, if nothing else, I would find a job as a loan officer at a bank,” Szabo said. Szabo has visited the unemployment office on West Lawrence Avenue in Chicago more times than he can remember. He’s worked as a salesman for a car dealership and as a U.S. Census worker. He’s become a master at using coupons and an expert at finding free events, but he’s twice racked up about $15,000 in credit card debt. The first time, he sold his shares in Apple Inc. for $30,000 to pay his debt. His goal was to stop using his credit cards, he said, but without a job, he resorted to using them. “My plans to retire are destroyed,” said Szabo. “I have less than half than what I had when I was 38. I am going backwards.” Since Szabo lost his job, his partner of 18 years has become his sole support. Without him, Szabo would be in California, he said, living at his parents’ home. He continues to look for a job, one he hopes will last until he can retire. “I just want to manage something, I don’t care (what it is),” he said.

A new reality Another temporary worker, Tim Halas, works full time as a mid-level manager with a competitive salary, but for short periods of time and without benefits. “Every time the contract is near its end, he gets nervous but doesn’t say anything,” said Halas’ wife, Sharon. About every six months, Halas applies for another short-term job. He has looked for permanent positions but hasn’t found one. It’s unsettling, he said, but he is adjusting. “Like any person, when you are the primary bread winner, you get that feeling in the pit of your gut and wonder how will you support your family,” said Halas, 53. In addition to saving Sharon Halas’ paycheck, the couple plan dinner dates at home, and Tim Halas bikes to the store to save on gasoline. In the mornings, instead of driving separately, Sharon Halas takes him to the train station. “If this is what I do the rest of my life, I will make do,” he

The advantage of a temp job While permanent jobs are scarce, this is a good time to apply for temporary jobs and “make pretty good money,” said Lisa Bordinat, senior vice president with Aon Hewitt. It’s also a good time to try something new, she said. “If the type of job they had isn’t available, that’s when they have to start getting creative,” Bordinat said. “That means they have to branch off into a new career, reinvent themselves. It can be a real opportunity.” And during the interview, make sure to sell yourself. “They really need to be able to articulate the value they can bring and the value they got out of that time they might have had off,” Bordinat said. — Chicago Tribune said. “But if the right (permanent) position came along, I will (take it).”

Employers’ market Then, there are people like Mark Lyons, who doesn’t think he’ll land a permanent job again. The way he sees it, companies will continue to hire full-time workers on a temporary basis. After all, he said, it’s an employer’s market. “Employers are more demanding,” he said. “If the position has 10 requirements, you have to have 11 of them.” That’s why companies have been able to hire him at a fraction of what he’s worth, he said. Before he was laid off in April 2008, Lyons was a mid-level manager, doing market research for food companies. When he lost his job, he signed up with 17 temp agencies to earn money as he looked for a permanent job. After working a few clerical jobs, he got a two-week assignment at a health care nutrition company. The company kept him on as a temp for almost two years, paying him $17.25 an hour, or about $35,000 a year, $53,000 less than his previous job. When the job with the health care nutrition company ended in August, Lyons landed a temporary consulting job that has continued to keep him afloat. To supplement his income, he is teaching a vegetable gardening seminar at a local library and night classes at a few colleges. He also lines up singing gigs on his days off. Lyons said he still sends out resumes and continues to network, but the past two years have made him think about what he wants out of life. So he’s starting a business teaching people how to grow food in their gardens. “I’m going after the things I like to do,” Lyons said.


B USI N ESS

B4 Wednesday, November 17, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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AXIS Cap BB&T Cp BBVABFrn BCE g BE Aero BGC Ptrs BHP BillLt BHPBil plc BJs Whls BMB Munai BMC Sft BMP Sunst BP PLC BPZ Res BRE BRFBrasil s BSD Med BabckW n Baidu s BakrHu Baldor BallCp BallyTech BanColum BcBilVArg BcoBrades BcoSantand BcoSBrasil BcpSouth BkofAm BkAm pfH BkAm wtA BkAm wtB BkAML pfQ BkHawaii BkIrelnd BkMont g BkNYMel BkNova g Banks.com BannerCp Banro g BarcUBS36 BarcGSOil BiPCop BrcIndiaTR Barclay Bar iPVix rs BarVixMdT Bard BarnesNob Barnes BarrickG BasicEnSv Baxter BaytexE g BeaconPw BeacnRfg BeazerHm BebeStrs BeckCoult BectDck BedBath Belden Belo Bemis Berkley BerkH B s BerryPet BestBuy BigLots BigBand h BBarrett Biocryst Biodel BiogenIdc BioMarin BioMedR BioScrip BioTime BlkHillsCp BlkRKelso Blkboard BlackRock BlkBldA n BlkCAIT BlkCorpHY BlkCpHYIII BlkCpHY V BlkCpHY VI BlkCrAll2 BlkCrAll4 BlkDebtStr BlkIT BlkIntlG&I BlkLtdD BlkMuIntD BlkMunihCA BlkMunHIQ BlkMunHQ2 BlMunyQlty BlkMuniyQ3 BlkMuIQT BlkMuIT BlkMunvst BlkMuniyld BlkSenHgh Blackstone BlockHR BlueCoat BdwlkPpl Boeing Boise Inc Boise wt Borders BorgWarn BostPrv BostProp BostonSci BoydGm Brandyw BrasilTele BreitBurn BrigStrat BrigExp Brightpnt Brigus grs Brinker Brinks BrMySq Broadcom BroadrdgF BroadSft n Broadwind BrcdeCm Brookdale BrkfldAs g BrkfldPrp BrooksAuto BrwnBrn BrownShoe BrukerCp Brunswick Bsquare BuckTch Buckle Bucyrus Buenavent BungeLt CA Inc CB REllis CBIZ Inc CBL Asc CBOE n CBS B CEVA Inc CF Inds CGI g CH Robins CIGNA CIT Grp n CLECO CME Grp CMS Eng CNH Gbl CNO Fincl CNOOC CNinsure CRH CSX CVB Fncl CVR Engy CVS Care Cabelas CablvsnNY Cabot CabotO&G CACI CadencePh Cadence CalDive CalaCvHi CalaCvOp CalaGDyIn CalaStrTR Calgon CaliperLSc CallGolf CallonP h Calpine CAMAC En CamdnP Cameco g Cameron CampSp CampCC n CIBC g CdnNRy g CdnNRs gs CP Rwy g CdnSolar CanoPet Canon CapGold n CapOne CaptlTr CapitlSrce CapsteadM CpstnTrb h CardnlHlth Cardiom g CardioNet CardiumTh CareFusion CareerEd Carlisle CarMax Carnival CarpTech Carrizo Carters Caseys Caterpillar CathayGen CaviumNet CelSci Celanese CeleraGrp Celestic g Celgene CellTher rsh

D 0.84 0.60 0.68 1.83

34.95 -.69 24.45 -.60 11.54 -1.01 32.57 -.22 34.24 -.46 0.48 7.26 -.43 1.74 85.04 -2.65 1.74 73.86 -2.60 46.17 -.47 .81 -.05 43.82 -.81 9.80 +.01 41.78 -1.26 3.69 -.14 1.50 42.19 -1.54 0.10 14.61 -.18 6.14 +.13 23.42 -.42 103.60 -5.20 0.60 47.39 -.52 0.68 43.93 -.57 0.40 64.49 -.80 38.07 -.21 1.34 61.39 -2.88 0.57 11.37 -.33 0.51 20.42 -.54 0.80 11.33 -.37 0.33 13.64 -.62 0.88 13.52 -.09 0.04 11.94 -.16 2.05 25.23 -.12 6.60 -.09 2.31 +.05 2.16 25.54 -.01 1.80 45.01 -.41 1.04 2.31 +.11 2.80 56.88 -1.26 0.36 27.69 -.04 1.96 51.32 -1.15 .18 -.11 0.04 1.78 2.69 -.24 43.22 -1.59 23.24 -.67 49.43 -2.47 73.94 -2.77 0.28 17.47 -.55 49.34 +2.10 73.86 +1.86 0.72 84.40 -.67 1.00 14.41 -.31 0.32 19.33 -.22 0.48 48.85 -1.30 12.94 +.04 1.24 50.32 -1.12 2.16 39.66 -.79 .23 -.01 15.47 -.10 4.15 -.10 0.10 6.05 -.08 0.76 54.72 -.83 1.48 76.61 -.78 43.34 -.53 0.20 31.87 +1.27 5.68 -.18 0.92 30.21 -.51 0.28 27.09 -.46 79.91 -.28 0.30 36.80 -.29 0.60 42.76 -.43 29.88 +.01 2.86 -.16 36.78 -.10 4.74 -.29 1.70 -.11 64.33 -1.13 25.07 -.48 0.68 16.87 -.53 4.27 -.12 7.29 +.38 1.44 29.50 -.29 1.28 10.95 -.61 39.44 -.59 4.00 167.28 -5.80 0.12 17.76 -.13 0.91 12.82 +.28 0.61 6.73 -.15 0.60 6.73 -.20 0.99 11.04 -.23 0.99 10.82 -.25 0.76 10.05 +.01 0.95 12.48 -.12 0.32 3.81 -.05 0.29 6.79 -.03 1.36 10.40 -.39 1.05 15.96 -.46 0.86 14.06 +.42 0.88 13.00 +.40 0.90 13.01 +.40 0.88 12.34 0.92 13.51 +.25 0.85 12.61 +.39 0.92 13.08 +.03 0.94 12.80 +.45 0.68 9.15 +.07 0.99 13.43 +.22 0.30 3.83 -.10 0.40 13.17 -.49 0.60 12.46 -.36 26.57 -.45 2.06 31.65 -.37 1.68 62.78 -.83 0.40 7.26 -.07 .57 1.10 -.02 56.49 -1.27 0.04 5.34 -.24 2.00 81.56 -2.21 6.52 -.17 8.62 -.55 0.60 10.89 -.33 21.44 -.53 1.56 19.55 -.45 0.44 17.53 -.28 23.37 -1.02 8.44 -.36 1.63 -.07 0.56 18.24 -.41 0.40 25.37 -.18 1.28 26.04 -.28 0.32 40.49 -.63 0.60 21.61 +.18 18.58 +.13 1.67 -.10 5.74 +.13 18.71 -.28 0.52 29.30 -.72 0.56 16.92 -.43 7.38 -.10 0.32 22.39 -.47 0.28 11.32 -.30 14.98 -.16 0.05 15.85 -.75 5.19 +.36 0.16 17.75 -.28 0.80 34.52 +.02 0.10 89.24 -.56 0.46 52.06 -.84 0.92 59.54 -.41 0.16 22.78 -.53 19.04 -.88 6.40 -.07 0.80 15.86 -.90 0.40 24.60 +.26 0.20 16.21 -.51 22.07 +.47 0.40 114.52 -2.66 16.25 -.48 1.00 70.82 -.58 0.04 35.81 -.65 41.17 -1.64 1.00 30.38 -.52 4.60 286.65 -2.90 0.84 17.72 -.26 42.57 -2.37 5.56 -.22 5.28 215.18 -5.74 0.26 21.83 -.38 0.83 18.05 -.41 1.04 60.27 -1.12 0.34 8.41 +.06 11.03 -.20 0.35 29.65 -.40 21.19 -1.09 0.50 28.85 -.06 0.72 34.20 -.45 0.12 33.48 -.78 48.75 -1.31 7.95 -.10 8.12 -.12 5.09 -.22 1.02 12.68 -.49 1.14 12.56 -.51 0.60 7.98 -.23 0.63 8.88 -.18 14.16 -.26 5.56 +.01 0.04 7.11 -.17 5.40 -.30 12.41 -.10 2.21 -.07 1.80 48.98 -1.76 0.28 33.59 -2.03 43.96 -.06 1.10 34.47 -.20 11.96 -.20 3.48 73.52 -1.57 1.08 63.06 -1.10 0.30 37.82 -1.39 1.08 63.02 -1.48 13.78 -.62 .32 -.02 47.01 -.70 4.22 -.22 0.20 38.82 -.87 1.39 +.04 0.04 6.09 -.11 1.66 11.41 -.16 .79 -.00 0.78 34.41 -.48 5.11 +.26 4.46 -.21 .50 -.02 23.17 -.32 18.41 +.17 0.68 35.45 -.77 32.05 -.81 0.40 41.32 -.80 0.72 35.16 -.99 26.22 +.15 28.92 -.37 0.54 39.66 -.28 1.76 80.37 -1.45 0.04 14.04 -.37 33.14 -.78 .66 -.01 0.20 35.07 -1.19 5.89 -.03 8.73 -.19 59.78 -.79 .38 -.01

Nm Cemex Cemig pf CenovusE n Centene CenterPnt CnElBrasil CentEuro CEurMed CFCda g CentAl CntryLink Cenveo Cephln Cepheid Cerner CerusCp ChRvLab ChrmSh ChkPoint Cheesecake ChelseaTh Chemtura n CheniereEn ChesEng Chevron ChicB&I Chicos ChildPlace Chimera ChinAgri s ChiArmM ChinaBAK ChinaBiot ChinaDigtl ChinaDir ChinaFd ChinaGreen ChinaIntEn ChinaLife ChinaMda ChinaMed ChiMYWd n ChinaMble ChinaNGas ChinaNepst ChNBorun n ChinNEPet ChinaPet ChinaPStl ChinaRE ChinaSecur ChinaShen ChinaSun ChinaTInfo ChinaUni ChiValve ChinaYuch ChiCache n ChipMOS Chipotle Chiquita Chubb ChungTel ChurchDwt CIBER CienaCorp Cimarex CinciBell CinnFin Cinemark Cintas Cirrus Cisco Citigp pfJ Citigp pfN Citigrp CitzRepB h CitrixSys CityTlcm Clarcor Clarient h ClaudeR g CleanEngy ClearEFd n Clearwire CliffsNRs Clorox CloudPeak Coach CobaltIEn n CocaCE CocaCl Coeur Cognex CognizTech CohStInfra CohStQIR CohStRE Coinstar ColdwtrCrk ColgPal CollctvBrd ColonPT Comcast Comc spcl Comerica CmcBMO CmclMtls CmwReit rs ComScop CmtyHlt CommVlt CBD-Pao s CompDivHd Compellent CompPrdS CompSci Compuwre ComstkRs Comtech Comverge Con-Way ConAgra Concepts ConchoRes ConcurTch Conexant Conns Conns rt ConocPhil ConsolEngy ConEd ConstellA ConstellEn Contango ContlRes Cnvrgys ConvOrg h CooperCo Cooper Ind CooperTire CopanoEn Copel CoreLab s CoreLogic CoreSite n CorinthC CornPdts Corning CorpOffP CorrectnCp Cosan Ltd Costamre n Costco Cott Cp CousPrp Covance CovantaH CoventryH Covidien Crane Cray Inc Credicp CrSuisInco CredSuiss CrSuiHiY Cree Inc Crocs Crossh glf CrosstexE CrwnCstle CrownHold Crystallx g Ctrip.com s CubistPh CullenFr Cummins CurEuro CushTRet Cyclacel CypSemi CypSharp CytRx h Cytec Cytomed Cytori DCT Indl DG FastCh DJSP Ent DNP Selct DPL DR Horton DRI Corp DST Sys DSW Inc DTE DWS Muni DanaHldg Danaher s DaqoNEn n Darden Darling DaVita DeVry DeanFds DeckOut s DeerConsu Deere DejourE g DelMnte Delcath Dell Inc DeltaAir DeltaPtr h Deluxe DenburyR Dndreon DenisnM g Dennys Dentsply Depomed DeutschBk DB Cap pf DB AgriDL DBGoldDL DBGoldDS DevelDiv DevonE DexCom Diageo DiaOffs

D 0.43 8.89 -.26 0.86 16.59 -.50 0.80 28.41 -.77 21.94 -.10 0.78 15.88 -.34 1.56 13.14 -.27 24.10 -1.02 20.97 -.12 0.01 17.81 -.34 13.35 -.84 2.90 41.69 -.64 5.28 -.41 65.23 -.52 20.37 -.13 85.21 -.95 2.53 -.03 32.77 +.20 3.53 -.09 42.59 -.65 28.99 -.43 5.21 -.07 13.58 -1.17 4.74 -.11 0.30 21.96 -.35 2.88 82.48 -1.66 26.79 -1.29 0.16 10.07 -.08 46.31 -.01 0.69 3.99 -.03 11.71 -.59 2.93 -.27 2.01 -.07 11.06 -.41 6.81 -.15 1.22 +.01 0.26 31.62 -1.83 7.68 -.34 8.51 -.87 1.54 64.59 -2.27 15.93 -1.07 11.77 -.05 10.03 -.58 1.85 50.38 -.92 4.97 -.62 0.28 4.80 -.38 12.82 -1.60 6.85 -.23 2.79 94.02 -2.82 1.55 -.13 9.80 -.61 5.51 -.06 2.76 -.10 4.52 -.17 5.62 +.66 0.23 13.63 -.24 10.49 -.45 0.25 23.41 -1.99 25.98 -2.12 1.37 +.07 225.09 -5.28 11.71 -.52 1.48 57.08 -1.25 1.27 24.32 -.07 0.68 64.31 -.94 3.31 -.13 14.04 -.28 0.32 79.81 -1.80 2.47 -.12 1.60 29.53 -.65 0.84 17.85 -.34 0.49 26.91 -.67 12.87 -.10 19.43 -.52 2.13 26.46 -.04 1.97 26.39 -.16 4.22 -.10 .62 -.01 62.26 -1.66 0.52 15.28 +.04 0.42 38.94 -.72 4.97 1.57 -.12 13.83 -.34 1.40 20.81 -.54 6.40 +.05 0.56 66.03 -1.49 2.20 62.99 -.65 19.41 -1.13 0.60 50.84 -1.48 9.63 -.42 0.48 24.51 -.58 1.76 62.08 -.88 21.58 -1.24 0.32 28.03 -.07 61.75 -1.67 0.96 16.45 -.43 0.72 8.28 -.35 1.20 14.17 -.29 58.99 -.29 3.27 -.08 2.12 76.81 -1.56 15.76 +.23 0.60 16.95 -.79 0.38 20.26 -.33 0.38 19.11 -.26 0.40 36.74 -.92 0.94 37.67 -.31 0.48 14.16 -.02 2.00 24.49 -.92 32.03 +.12 32.00 -.87 29.33 -.54 0.36 38.61 -.73 1.36 16.55 -.32 24.32 -.26 27.10 -.66 0.60 45.84 -.72 9.95 -.14 24.59 -.46 1.00 29.46 -.56 6.09 -.08 0.40 32.81 -.74 0.92 21.14 -.47 14.02 -.49 75.64 +.48 49.70 +.02 1.38 -.04 3.96 +.06 .50 -.01 2.20 60.94 -1.13 0.40 39.87 -2.05 2.38 48.66 -.55 19.65 -.66 0.96 28.63 -.29 57.86 +1.18 48.82 -.21 12.37 -.23 .39 -.02 0.06 49.13 -.66 1.08 51.73 -.91 0.42 20.04 -.36 2.30 29.15 -.65 1.09 23.65 -.09 0.24 81.88 -.98 18.13 -.32 13.08 -.06 4.40 -.04 0.56 43.67 -.84 0.20 17.45 -.70 1.65 34.27 -.75 24.20 -.70 12.52 -.57 10.95 -.15 0.82 65.74 +.26 7.58 -.23 0.12 7.56 -.18 46.49 -1.04 1.50 15.76 -.32 24.86 -.65 0.80 42.60 -1.09 0.92 38.05 -1.08 5.97 -.42 1.70 117.01 -3.25 0.32 3.56 -.05 1.85 41.16 -1.02 0.32 2.86 -.05 55.12 +1.27 15.41 -.32 .25 +.01 0.28 9.17 -.20 41.63 -.48 30.82 -.48 .32 -.02 45.38 -.93 23.49 -.19 1.80 54.28 -.71 1.05 91.32 -2.66 0.01 134.35 -.83 0.90 9.60 -.13 1.58 -.07 15.21 -.07 2.40 13.15 -.14 .92 -.01 0.05 46.03 -.96 .51 +.02 4.47 -.24 0.28 4.63 -.11 24.78 -1.08 .43 -.05 0.78 10.07 -.07 1.21 25.73 -.41 0.15 11.02 +.05 1.22 -.37 0.60 41.79 -.84 35.63 -1.30 2.24 45.11 -.61 0.84 11.49 +.05 13.98 -.54 0.08 42.80 -.98 13.39 -.74 1.28 47.57 -1.47 12.01 -.01 71.25 -.78 0.24 45.79 7.44 -.30 59.97 -.95 11.11 +.05 1.20 75.70 -.78 .32 -.00 0.36 14.35 +.16 9.75 -.34 13.40 -.12 13.15 -.05 .77 -.03 1.00 21.76 -.05 18.17 -.35 35.87 +.41 2.39 -.18 3.50 -.04 0.20 30.87 -.43 5.30 -.05 0.93 54.36 -.84 1.90 26.12 -.12 10.19 -1.08 38.36 -.86 8.97 +.19 0.08 12.21 -.44 0.64 70.44 -.99 11.85 -.03 2.38 73.48 -1.18 0.50 67.95 -.80

Nm

D

DiamRk DianaShip DicksSptg DigitalRlt DigRiver Dillards Diodes DirecTV A DrxTcBll s DrxEMBll s DrTcBear rs DrSCBear rs DREBear rs DrxEBear rs DirEMBr rs DirFnBear DrxFBull s Dir30TrBear DrxREBll s DirxDMBear DirxSCBull DirxLCBear DirxLCBull DirxEnBull Discover DiscCm A DiscCm C DiscvLab h DishNetwk Disney DrReddy DolbyLab DollarGen DollarTh DllrTree s DomRescs Dominos Domtar grs DonlleyRR DoralFncl DEmmett Dover DowChm DrPepSnap DragonW g DrmWksA DressBarn DresserR DryHYSt DryStrt DrySM Dril-Quip drugstre DryShips DuPont DuPFabros DukeEngy DukeRlty Duoyuan DyaxCp Dynavax Dynegy rs

0.03 2.12 0.16 6.26 5.68 0.20

7.35 3.41 4.77 8.06 5.06 0.08

2.00 0.35 0.24

1.83 1.00 1.04 0.40 1.10 0.60 1.00

0.52 0.59 0.54

1.64 0.48 0.98 0.68

Nm 9.72 -.34 13.15 -.40 33.51 +3.59 52.94 -.92 35.46 -.99 29.71 -.76 22.77 -.34 41.41 -.74 37.68 -2.17 34.93 -2.99 29.45 +1.43 21.92 +1.17 22.94 +2.10 31.66 +1.70 25.24 +1.84 12.10 +.59 22.50 -1.18 42.65 -3.27 46.16 -5.29 9.77 +.65 53.08 -3.30 10.98 +.51 58.25 -2.87 43.03 -2.67 18.10 -.77 40.27 +.04 34.97 -.12 .22 +.01 19.08 -.42 36.92 -.33 38.75 -.35 63.85 -.83 29.16 +.28 45.83 -.49 53.37 -.18 42.79 -.33 13.98 -.58 76.98 -1.89 15.97 -.59 1.50 -.05 16.27 -.53 53.52 -1.37 30.56 -.60 36.43 -.14 7.05 -.13 32.01 -.30 23.78 -.01 36.83 -.25 4.31 7.79 +.04 7.45 +.03 71.86 -1.20 1.64 -.08 5.25 -.24 45.68 -.63 22.33 -.49 17.61 -.13 11.15 -.39 2.83 -.05 2.19 -.11 1.98 -.08 5.02 +.39

E-F-G-H E-House ETrade rs eBay EDAP TMS EMC Cp EMCOR ENI EOG Res EQT Corp ETF Pall n EagleBulk EagleMat EaglRkEn ErthLink EstWstBcp EastChm EKodak Eaton EatnVan EV LtdDur EVMuniBd EVRiskMgd EV TxAG EV TxDiver EVTxMGlo EVTxGBW Ebix Inc s Ecolab Ecopetrol EdisonInt EducMgmt EducRlty EdwLfSci s 8x8 Inc ElPasoCp ElPasoPpl Elan EldorGld g ElectArts ElsterGp n eMagin EBrasAero Emcore EmersonEl EmmisCm EmpDist Emulex EnbrEPtrs EnCana g s EncoreEn EndvrInt EndvSilv g EndoPhrm EndurSpec Ener1 EnerNOC Energen Energizer EngyConv EngyTEq EngyTsfr EgyXXI rs EnergySol Enerpls g Enersis EnerSys ENSCO Entegris Entergy EntPrPt EnterPT EntropCom EnzonPhar EpicorSft Equifax Equinix EqLfPrp EqtyOne EqtyRsd EricsnTel EssexPT EsteeLdr EtfSilver EthanAl EverestRe EvergE rs EvrgrSlr h ExactSci h ExcelM ExcoRes Exelixis Exelon ExeterR gs ExideTc Expedia ExpdIntl ExpScrip s Express-1 ExterranH ExtraSpce ExtrmNet ExxonMbl Ezcorp F5 Netwks FBR Cap FEI Co FLIR Sys FMC Corp FMC Tech FNBCp PA FSI Intl FTI Cnslt FairchldS FalconStor FamilyDlr Fastenal FedExCp FedRlty FedSignl FedInvst FelCor Ferro FibriaCelu FidlNFin FidNatInfo FifthStFin FifthThird FinEngin n Finisar FinLine FstAFin n FstBcpPR FstCwlth FstHorizon FstInRT FMidBc FstNiagara FstPotom FstSolar FTDJInet FT Fincl FT HiLgSh FT RNG FT REIT FirstEngy FstMerit Fiserv FlagstB rs FlrtyPfdSc Flextrn Flotek h FlowrsFds Flowserve Fluor FocusMda FEMSA FootLockr ForcePro FordM FordM wt FordC pfS ForestCA ForestLab ForestOil FormFac Fortinet n Fortress

0.25 14.60 14.76 29.77 4.10 21.03 25.02 2.51 43.45 0.62 91.05 0.88 39.72 63.78 5.25 0.40 25.44 0.10 7.41 0.64 8.96 0.04 17.37 1.76 76.40 4.70 2.32 93.24 0.72 29.40 1.39 15.59 0.92 12.20 1.80 13.10 1.23 13.80 1.62 11.64 1.53 11.16 1.56 12.41 20.80 0.62 47.61 1.34 43.68 1.26 37.34 14.10 0.20 7.22 64.34 2.90 0.04 13.56 1.64 32.75 5.55 0.05 16.56 15.39 16.00 4.86 0.38 28.50 1.25 1.38 54.63 .56 1.28 21.87 11.38 4.11 60.27 0.80 27.93 2.00 19.71 1.22 5.54 35.11 1.00 43.19 4.03 25.05 0.52 44.78 69.23 4.68 2.16 38.83 3.58 50.40 22.68 4.85 2.16 26.65 0.68 23.55 29.36 1.40 47.96 6.01 3.32 71.99 2.33 42.55 2.60 45.40 8.37 10.65 9.03 0.64 33.98 81.17 1.20 54.68 0.88 16.91 1.35 47.36 0.28 10.13 4.13 106.82 0.75 70.98 25.38 0.20 14.84 1.92 85.60 .86 .87 6.05 5.98 0.16 18.35 4.39 2.10 39.82 5.42 7.20 0.28 25.50 0.40 50.52 50.72 2.59 23.10 0.33 15.53 2.90 1.76 68.94 25.02 115.95 3.70 22.19 27.30 0.50 74.55 76.44 0.48 9.08 2.80 34.99 12.03 2.85 0.62 47.99 0.84 51.22 0.48 85.87 2.68 77.24 0.24 6.08 0.96 23.59 5.59 13.99 16.26 0.72 13.52 0.20 27.06 1.26 11.27 0.04 12.68 15.74 18.67 0.16 16.57 0.24 13.62 .31 0.04 6.21 0.72 10.03 6.92 0.04 10.26 0.60 12.30 0.80 15.54 130.69 32.08 0.11 13.73 18.82 0.08 17.86 0.21 13.84 2.20 35.17 0.64 17.72 54.39 1.25 1.50 16.38 6.84 2.94 0.80 25.81 1.16 105.24 0.50 54.11 23.66 0.64 53.89 0.60 16.06 5.00 16.51 7.85 3.25 51.83 14.94 31.91 33.04 9.52 31.38 4.73

-1.00 -.28 -.29 +.51 -.42 -.72 -.86 -1.38 -.86 -2.91 -.28 -1.02 +.02 -.13 -.58 -1.04 -.09 -.96 -.58 -.11 +.39 -.13 -.37 -.19 -.17 -.15 -.75 -.63 -2.34 -.43 -.45 -.51 -1.50 -.09 -.18 -1.73 -.16 -.50 -.29 +.05 -.46 -.96 -.10 -.45 -.26 -.23 -.79 -.42 -.03 -.27 -.62 -.87 -.19 -.55 -1.37 -1.02 -.48 -.93 -1.08 -.50 -.15 -1.10 -.41 -.37 +.28 -.36 -.56 -.72 -1.78 -.02 -.09 -.24 -.39 -2.02 -2.65 -.60 -1.84 -.10 -4.09 -1.74 -.04 -.33 -.71 -.03 -.03 -.22 -.33 -.11 -.13 -.35 -.34 -.24 -.25 -1.00 -.95 -.13 -.03 -.62 -.06 -1.54 -.17 -3.60 +.02 -.45 -.82 -1.19 -1.16 -.10 -.08 -.08 -.27 -.04 -.23 -1.42 -.52 -1.82 -.12 -.75 -.39 -.36 -.56 -.22 -.26 -.42 -.34 -.24 -.10 +.59 -.28 +.03 -.13 -.09 -.27 -.15 -.15 -.15 -8.97 -.63 -.27 -.15 -.41 -.48 -.32 -.70 -1.10 -.03 -.32 -.03 -.01 -.12 -.76 -1.27 -.98 -1.11 -.11 +.01 -.49 -.46 -.33 -.26 -.50 -1.12 -.39 +.38 -.27

How to Read the Market in Review He e a e he 2 578 mos ac ve s ocks on he New Yo k S ock Exchange Nasdaq Na ona Ma ke s and Ame can S ock Exchange Mu ua unds a e 415 a ges S ocks n bo d changed 5 pe cen o mo e n p ce Name S ocks a e s ed a phabe ca y by he company s u name no s abb ev a on Company names made up o n a s appea a he beg nn ng o each e e s s D v Cu en annua d v dend a e pa d on s ock based on a es qua e y o sem annua dec a a on un ess o he w se oo no ed Las P ce s ock was ad ng a when exchange c osed o he day Chg Loss o ga n o he day No change nd ca ed by ma k Fund Name Name o mu ua und and am y Se Ne asse va ue o p ce a wh ch und cou d be so d Chg Da y ne change n he NAV YTD % Re Pe cen change n NAV o he yea o da e w h d v dends e nves ed S ock Foo no es – PE g ea e han 99 d – ue ha been a ed o edemp on b ompan d – New 52 wee ow dd – Lo n a 12 mo e – Compan o me ed on he Ame an E hange Eme g ng Compan Ma e p a e g – D dend and ea n ng n Canad an do a h – empo a e mp om Na daq ap a and u p u ng qua a on n – S o wa a new ue n he a ea The 52 wee h gh and ow gu e da e on om he beg nn ng o ad ng p – P e e ed o ue p – P e e en e pp – Ho de owe n a men o pu ha e p e q – C o ed end mu ua und no PE a u a ed – R gh o bu e u a a pe ed p e – S o ha p b a ea 20 pe en w h n he a ea w – T ade w be e ed when he o ued wd – When d bu ed w – Wa an a ow ng a pu ha e o a o u– New 52 wee h gh un – Un n ud ng mo e han one e u – Compan n ban up o e e e hp o be ng eo gan ed unde he ban up aw Appea n on o he name D v dend Foo no es a – E a d dend we e pa d bu a e no n uded b – Annua a e p u o – L qu da ng d dend e – Amoun de a ed o pa d n a 12 mon h – Cu en annua a e wh h wa n ea ed b mo e en d dend announ emen – Sum o d dend pa d a e o p no egu a a e – Sum o d dend pa d h ea Mo e en d dend wa om ed o de e ed – De a ed o pa d h ea a umu a e ue w h d dend n a ea m – Cu en annua a e wh h wa de ea ed b mo e en d dend announ emen p – n a d dend annua a e no nown e d no hown – De a ed o pa d n p e ed ng 12 mon h p u o d dend – Pa d n o app o ma e a h a ue on e d bu on da e Mo a e o abo e mu be wo h $1 and ga ne o e $2 Mu ua Fund Foo no es e – E ap a ga n d bu on – P e ou da quo e n – No oad und p – Fund a e u ed o pa d bu on o – Redemp on ee o on ngen de e ed a e oad ma app – S o d dend o p – Bo h p and – E a h d dend

Sou ce The Assoc a ed P ess and L ppe Nm FortuneBr Fossil Inc FosterWhl FranceTel FrankRes FrkStPrp FMCG FresKabi rt Fronteer g FrontierCm FrontierOil Frontline FuelSysSol FuelCell FullerHB FultonFncl Fuqi Intl lf FurnBrds FushiCopp GATX GFI Grp GMX Rs GSI Cmmrc GT Solar G-III GabelliET GabGldNR Gafisa s Gallaghr GameTc hlf GameStop GamGld g Gannett Gap Garmin Gartner GascoEngy GaylrdEnt GencoShip GenCorp GnCable GenDynam GenElec GenGrPr n GenMarit GenMills s GenMoly GenSteel GenesisEn Genpact Gentex GenuPrt GenVec h Genworth Genzyme GaGulf Gerdau GeronCp GiantIntac GigaMed Gildan GileadSci GlacierBc GlaxoSKln Gleacher GlimchRt GlobalCash GloblInd GlobPay GlblXColom GblXChCon GblX Uran GlbXSilvM Globalstr h GlbSpcMet GluMobile GolLinhas GoldFLtd GoldResrc Goldcrp g GoldStr g GoldS60 n GoldmanS Goodrich GoodrPet Goodyear Google GovPrpIT vjGrace Graco GrafTech Graingr Gramrcy GranTrra g GrCanyEd GraniteC GraphPkg GrayTelev GrtAtlPac GrtBasG g GrLkDrge GtPlainEn GreenMtC s GreenPlns GreenbCos Greenhill Group1 GrpoFin GpTelevisa Guess GugChinSC GugSolar GulfRes Gymbree HCC Ins HCP Inc HSBC HSBC Cap2 HSN Inc HainCel Hallibrtn Halozyme HampRBk HanJI Hanesbrds HanmiFncl HansenNat HarbinElec HarleyD Harman Harmonic HarmonyG HarrisCorp Harsco HartfdFn HartFn pfA HarvNRes Hasbro HatterasF HawaiiEl HawHold Headwatrs HltCrREIT HlthCSvc s HltMgmt HlthcrRlty HealthNet HlthSouth HlthSprg HrtlndEx HeartWare Heckmann HeclaM Heinz HelixEn HelmPayne Hemisphrx HSchein Herbalife HercOffsh HercTGC Hersha Hershey Hertz Hess HewlettP Hexcel hhgregg Hibbett HighOne n HghldsCrdt HighwdPrp Hill-Rom Hittite HollyCp Hollysys Hologic HomeDp Home Inns HomeProp Honda HonwllIntl HorizLns Hormel Hornbeck HorsehdH

D 0.76 57.40 +.07 65.86 -2.13 27.26 -.52 1.77 22.42 -.47 0.88 114.30 -4.23 0.76 12.35 -.30 2.00 97.61 -4.39 .03 -.00 8.43 -.42 0.75 8.92 -.18 14.15 -.60 1.90 27.72 -.79 34.42 -.31 1.29 -.08 0.28 20.70 -.45 0.12 8.94 -.05 6.51 -.28 4.46 -.14 10.31 +.10 1.12 31.93 -.46 0.20 4.67 -.02 4.53 -.31 23.31 -1.78 8.39 -.22 24.66 -1.14 0.48 5.20 -.11 1.68 17.62 -.52 0.14 15.23 -.43 1.28 27.79 -.42 .43 -.18 20.85 +.13 6.23 -.14 0.16 12.44 -.23 0.40 20.28 -.04 1.50 29.14 -.42 31.37 -.35 .34 -.00 31.55 -.48 15.54 -.79 4.71 -.19 30.34 -.39 1.68 65.54 -1.01 0.48 15.86 -.34 14.31 -1.09 0.04 4.07 -.04 1.12 35.57 -.29 5.22 -.24 2.50 -.11 1.55 23.24 -1.02 0.18 14.43 -.12 0.44 20.79 -.46 1.64 46.89 -.58 .50 +.01 11.42 -.11 69.94 -.09 17.53 -1.07 0.32 12.61 -.43 5.69 -.10 0.18 6.87 -.06 1.53 -.09 26.64 -.07 37.83 -.17 0.52 13.45 -.11 2.00 38.54 -.69 2.32 -.07 0.40 7.61 -.30 2.77 -.05 5.99 -.11 0.08 40.30 -.80 1.06 40.95 -1.96 19.56 -.66 16.53 -1.32 21.58 -.98 1.53 -.06 0.15 15.93 -.48 2.10 -.16 0.40 16.33 -.16 0.16 16.61 -.55 0.12 23.15 -.04 0.36 44.95 -.98 4.17 -.22 1.53 24.00 -.23 1.40 165.10 -2.12 1.16 82.39 -.47 13.90 -.48 9.85 -.24 583.72-11.75 1.64 25.63 -.63 31.76 -1.20 0.80 35.83 -.23 17.92 -.57 2.16 124.53 -.84 2.04 -.10 7.64 -.21 18.95 +.47 0.52 25.87 -.62 3.51 -.10 1.69 +.03 3.94 -.42 2.72 -.23 0.07 6.98 -.17 0.83 18.58 -.32 30.87 -.51 10.80 -.49 17.81 -.21 1.80 78.45 -.65 0.40 37.96 -.04 14.76 -.74 0.52 22.22 -.65 0.64 41.05 -.26 0.03 30.87 -.91 7.59 -.31 10.17 +.61 65.28 -.01 0.58 27.79 -.32 1.86 32.10 -1.08 1.70 52.91 -1.63 27.89 +.02 27.27 -.22 25.90 +.01 0.36 35.03 -.81 7.12 -.25 .70 +.08 2.06 19.68 -1.32 24.85 -.22 1.08 -.03 49.63 -.02 20.03 -.39 0.40 30.76 -.71 40.26 -.10 6.61 0.07 11.69 -.32 1.00 45.56 -.42 0.82 23.20 -.56 0.20 23.62 -.52 1.81 23.80 -.55 12.44 -.44 1.00 45.97 -.69 4.60 29.79 -.09 1.24 22.18 -.53 6.70 -.30 3.81 -.06 2.76 45.36 -1.42 0.62 15.82 -.24 8.44 -.12 1.20 20.60 -.61 27.79 -.87 18.93 -.26 27.28 +.07 0.08 14.87 -.14 85.17 -1.01 3.86 -.05 7.84 -.47 1.80 47.72 -.45 13.20 -.40 0.24 44.97 -.46 .50 56.64 -.92 1.00 66.17 -1.19 2.70 -.25 0.80 9.87 -.30 0.20 6.09 -.11 1.28 46.40 -.60 11.74 -.09 0.40 67.78 -1.75 0.32 41.80 -.74 16.74 +.58 22.30 -.43 27.36 +.79 19.87 +1.10 0.63 7.50 -.13 1.70 30.84 -1.08 0.41 38.69 -1.14 53.04 -1.70 0.60 33.52 -.38 13.71 -.04 16.41 -.30 0.95 31.71 +.32 48.26 -1.22 2.32 51.97 -1.83 35.90 -.65 1.21 48.44 +.85 0.20 3.91 -.10 0.84 45.60 -.50 20.97 -.78 12.07 -.64

Nm Hospira HospPT HostHotls HotTopic HovnanE HHughes n HuanPwr HudsCity Humana HuntJB HuntBnk Huntsmn Hypercom Hyperdyn

D 57.32 -.71 1.80 21.43 -.89 0.04 15.31 -.39 0.28 5.44 -.08 3.80 -.07 40.30 -.45 1.23 22.93 -.45 0.60 11.57 -.17 57.56 -.99 0.48 35.99 -.58 0.04 5.78 -.16 0.40 12.80 -.36 6.13 -.19 2.88 -.16

I-J-K-L IAC Inter 27.31 -.53 IAMGld g 0.06 16.26 -.83 ICICI Bk 0.53 51.53 -2.99 IdexxLabs 63.21 -.39 IDT Corp 0.22 20.22 +1.77 IESI-BFC g 0.50 22.40 +.16 iGateCorp 0.26 22.10 -.55 ING GRE 0.54 7.41 -.21 ING GlbDv 1.20 11.28 -.25 ING 10.47 -.22 ING 8.5cap 2.13 25.65 -.13 INGPrRTr 0.31 5.64 ION Geoph 5.97 -.35 iShGold s 13.12 -.13 iShGSCI 30.71 -.94 iSAstla 0.81 24.32 -.49 iShBraz 2.58 74.80 -2.11 iSCan 0.42 28.65 -.72 iShEMU 0.96 35.05 -.87 iSFrnce 0.60 24.18 -.72 iShGer 0.30 23.27 -.53 iSh HK 0.48 19.24 -.39 iShJapn 0.16 10.07 -.18 iSh Kor 0.39 54.19 -1.28 iSMalas 0.25 13.65 -.21 iShMex 0.75 57.29 -.97 iShSing 0.38 13.58 -.33 iSPacxJpn 1.37 45.74 -.92 iShSoAfr 1.36 68.64 -1.96 iSSpain 2.26 39.04 -.97 iSTaiwn 0.21 13.87 -.11 iSh UK 0.44 16.88 -.53 iShThai 1.20 62.52 -2.72 iShChile 0.68 75.41 -1.14 iShBRIC 0.64 47.73 -1.76 iShTurkey 1.22 71.79 -3.08 iShSilver 24.93 iShS&P100 1.08 53.34 -.77 iShDJDv 1.69 47.65 -.67 iShBTips 2.56 108.83 +.20 iShAsiaexJ 0.87 61.58 -1.58 iShChina25 0.68 44.11 -1.31 iShDJTr 1.01 85.85 -1.31 iSSP500 2.34 118.51 -1.93 iShBAgB 3.70 107.18 +.26 iShEMkts 0.59 45.17 -1.22 iShACWX 0.80 42.28 -.98 iShiBxB 5.30 109.82 +.58 iSh ACWI 0.64 44.38 -.96 iShEMBd 5.63 109.07 -.75 iSSPGth 1.13 61.96 -1.01 iSSPGlbEn 0.82 35.97 -.98 iShSPLatA 1.22 50.81 -1.36 iSSPVal 1.24 55.73 -.80 iShNMuBd 3.74 100.40 -.60 iShB20 T 3.83 96.14 +2.33 iShB7-10T 3.23 97.49 +.72 iShB1-3T 0.98 84.15 +.04 iS Eafe 1.38 56.05 -1.35 iSRusMCV 0.83 41.69 -.81 iSRusMCG 0.52 51.98 -.83 iShRsMd 1.42 93.76 -1.68 iSSPMid 0.99 83.09 -1.52 iShiBxHYB 7.88 88.66 -.99 iShNsdqBio 86.81 -.87 iShC&SRl 1.85 61.36 -2.07 iSR1KV 1.28 60.66 -1.03 iSR1KG 0.72 53.71 -.89 iSRus1K 1.11 65.46 -1.07 iSR2KV 1.06 64.68 -1.36 iShBarc1-3 3.16 104.61 iSR2KG 0.47 78.38 -1.46 iShR2K 0.79 70.64 -1.40 iShUSPfd 2.89 39.31 -.26 iShDJTel 0.67 21.81 -.37 iShDJTch 0.26 60.38 -1.11 iShREst 1.88 52.65 -1.71 iShFnSc 0.59 53.33 -1.01 iShSPSm 0.58 62.18 -1.18 iShBasM 0.91 68.50 -1.73 iShPeru 0.82 46.41 -1.85 iShDJOG 0.20 56.60 -1.16 iShEur350 1.02 38.40 -1.00 iStar 5.17 -.32 ITT Corp 1.00 45.88 -1.10 ITT Ed 62.09 +.52 IconixBr 17.24 -.50 IDEX 0.60 36.86 -.63 Ikanos 1.02 +.01 ITW 1.36 47.01 -.99 Illumina 56.96 -.72 Imax Corp 22.19 -.41 Immucor 18.10 -.67 ImunoGn 7.82 +.15 Imunmd 3.41 +.01 ImpaxLabs 18.67 -.30 Incyte 15.76 -.36 IndiaFd 0.09 36.30 -2.08 IndoTel 1.25 37.00 +.23 Inergy 2.82 38.51 -1.15 Infinera 8.21 -.10 InfoSpace 7.70 -.08 Informat 39.23 -.34 InfosysT 0.90 64.61 -1.86 IngerRd 0.28 41.42 -.77 IngrmM 17.52 -.33 InlandRE 0.57 8.36 -.41 InovioPhm 1.31 +.05 InsightEnt 13.53 -.09 InsitTc 22.24 -.34 Insulet 12.82 -.78 IntgDv 6.15 -.18 ISSI 7.10 -.12 IntegrysE 2.72 50.53 -.95 Intel 0.72 21.07 -.23 InteractBrk 18.41 -.43 IntcntlEx 110.76 -2.59 InterDig 33.25 -.63 Intrface 0.08 14.45 -.31 InterMune 13.10 -.49 InterNAP 4.73 -.21 IBM 2.60 142.24 -1.40 Intl Coal 5.98 -.15 IntFlav 1.08 50.74 -1.08 IntlGame 0.24 15.88 -.42 IntPap 0.50 24.61 -.67 IntlRectif 26.34 -.98 IntTower g 7.71 -.33 InterntCap 11.09 -.98 InterOil g 74.99 -4.19 Interpublic 10.52 -.01 Intersil 0.48 12.89 -.19 IntPotash 29.82 -1.64 Intuit 46.89 -1.34 IntSurg 262.56 -5.64 Invesco 0.44 21.69 -.49 InvMtgCap 3.57 22.21 -.26 InvVKAdv2 0.88 11.39 +.18 InvVKDyCr 1.03 11.87 -.12 InvVKMOT 1.03 13.05 +.20 InvVKMuT 0.96 13.14 +.44 InvVKTIG 1.06 13.65 +.28 InVKSrInc 0.29 4.67 +.01 InvRlEst 0.69 8.74 -.10 IridiumCm 9.13 +.03 IronMtn 0.25 22.00 -.80 IsilonSys 33.73 -.04 Isis 9.81 -.14 ItauUnibH 0.59 23.82 -.90 Itron 58.40 -.35 IvanhoeEn 2.24 -.13 IvanhM g 23.52 -1.22 JCrew 35.35 +1.42 JA Solar 7.85 -.56 JDS Uniph 11.40 -.26 JPMorgCh 0.20 39.61 -.47 JPMAlerian 1.80 35.88 -.79 Jabil 0.28 14.09 -.46 JackHenry 0.38 27.39 -.51 JackInBox 22.70 -.55 JacobsEng 39.95 -2.12 Jaguar g 6.24 -.13 Jamba 2.17 -.06 JamesRiv 18.23 -.49 JanusCap 0.04 11.00 -.38 Jarden 0.33 31.22 -.75 JazzPhrm 15.12 -.03 Jefferies 0.30 24.38 -.70 JetBlue 6.57 -.19 JinkoSol n 29.19 -2.25

nc Sa es gu es a e uno c a

Nm JoAnnStrs JoesJeans JohnJn JohnsnCtl JonesGrp JonesSoda JosABnk s JoyGlbl JnprNtwk KB Home KBR Inc KKR n KKR Fn KLA Tnc KT Corp KV PhmA Kaman KandiTech KC Southn KA MLP Kellogg Kemet rs Kennamtl KeryxBio KeyEngy Keycorp KilroyR KimbClk Kimco KindME KindMM KindredHlt KineticC KingPhrm Kinross g KnghtCap KnightTr KnightT KodiakO g Kohls KopinCp KoreaElc Kraft KratonPP n KrispKrm Kroger Kulicke L&L Egy n L-1 Ident L-3 Com LAN Air LDK Solar LG Display LJ Intl LKQ Corp LSI Corp LTXCrd rs LaZBoy LabCp LaBrnch LamResrch LamarAdv Landstar LVSands LaSalleH Lattice LawsnSft Lazard LeapWirlss LeapFrog LearCorp n LeeEnt LeggMason LeggPlat LenderPS LennarA Lennox LeucNatl Level3 h LexiPhrm LexRltyTr Lexmark LibertyAcq LbtyASE LibGlobA LibGlobC LibtyMIntA LibMCapA LibtProp LifeTech LifeTFit LifePtH Lihua Intl LillyEli LimelghtN Limited Lincare s LincNat LincN pfF Lindsay LinearTch LinnEngy Lionbrdg LiveNatn LivePrsn LizClaib LloydBkg Local.com LockhdM Loews Logitech LogMeIn LongtopFn LongweiPI Lorillard LaPac Lowes Lubrizol lululemn g LumberLiq LyonBas A LyonBas B

D 42.91 1.74 2.16 63.14 0.52 35.50 0.20 13.27 1.08 40.83 0.70 74.52 33.66 0.25 11.50 0.20 25.96 0.23 12.74 0.56 8.60 1.00 35.92 21.43 2.11 0.56 26.63 6.01 44.00 1.92 27.43 1.62 48.94 14.37 0.48 32.70 5.00 9.77 0.04 7.98 1.40 32.64 2.64 61.53 0.72 15.68 4.44 69.42 4.44 63.00 15.54 38.85 14.17 0.10 17.42 13.74 0.24 18.45 1.70 23.02 4.25 50.65 3.68 12.67 1.16 30.34 26.39 5.24 0.42 22.44 5.75 9.37 11.80 1.60 69.89 0.46 29.78 11.57 16.37 5.13 21.95 5.42 5.96 7.70 80.85 3.10 44.24 34.27 0.20 37.55 46.24 0.44 21.56 4.37 8.32 0.50 36.35 11.57 5.55 86.21 1.89 0.24 32.53 1.08 19.83 0.40 31.56 0.16 15.76 0.60 39.51 26.15 1.11 1.42 0.46 7.61 36.16 10.50 0.29 4.56 37.38 35.44 15.09 56.45 1.90 31.45 49.72 38.66 35.44 11.44 1.96 34.43 6.46 0.60 31.09 0.80 26.14 0.20 23.67 1.69 25.31 0.34 59.07 0.92 31.12 2.64 35.08 3.32 10.01 9.61 6.48 1.45 4.21 3.74 3.00 68.68 0.25 38.40 20.02 39.28 39.44 2.80 4.50 86.84 7.88 0.44 21.57 1.44 104.01 47.08 21.19 26.70 26.57

-.59 +.02 -1.00 -.98 -.34 -.22 -3.25 -.68 -.42 -1.08 -.30 -.28 -.74 -.49 +.01 +.51 -.29 -1.19 -.58 +.14 +.44 -1.22 -.17 -.29 -.13 -.91 -.65 -.83 -.79 -1.22 -.28 -1.09 +.02 -.57 -.26 +.13 -.56 -.04 -.30 -.10 -.29 -.45 +.17 -.16 -.41 -.13 -1.05 -.01 -.76 -.64 -.74 -.58 -.31 -.37 -.03 -.43 -.37 -1.90 -.04 -.63 -.09 -.12 -2.86 -1.28 -.04 -.17 -.91 -.20 -.34 -.50 -.07 -1.00 -.32 +.44 -.13 -.80 -.57 -.03 -.04 -.48 -1.23 -.13 -.08 +.04 -.14 -.23 -1.65 -1.08 -.74 -.15 -.15 -.61 -.20 -.32 -.35 -.62 -.53 +.05 -.02 -.16 -.84 -.05 -.17 +.08 +.03 -.19 -.26 -.69 -.86 -.28 -1.57 -.05 -.40 -1.33 -.20 +.11 -2.24 +.38 -.43 -.96 -1.03

M-N-O-P M&T Bk MB Fncl MBIA MCG Cap MDC MDU Res MELA Sci MEMC MF Global MFA Fncl MFS HInM MFS HYMu MIN h MMT MFM MGIC MGM Rsts MIPS Tech MPG OffTr MSCI Inc Macerich MackCali Macys MadCatz g MagelMPtr MagelPt MagicSft Magma MagnaI g MagHRes MaidenBrd MMTrip n MgHiYP Manitowoc MannKd ManpwI Manulife g MarathonO MktVGold MktV Steel MkVStrMet MktVRus MkVPoland MktVJrGld MktV Agri MkVBrzSC MktVCoal MarkWest MarIntA MarshM MarshIls MartMM MarvellT Masco Masimo MasseyEn Mastec MasterCrd Mattel Mattson MaximIntg McClatchy

2.80 79.76 -1.53 0.04 15.18 -.37 9.92 -.90 0.37 6.85 -.29 1.00 26.05 -.54 0.65 20.48 -.22 2.92 -3.45 12.34 -.42 7.83 -.05 0.90 8.13 +.06 0.40 4.67 +.08 0.36 4.34 +.07 0.58 6.60 +.04 0.54 6.69 0.50 6.45 -.05 8.24 -.15 12.37 -.56 13.70 +.23 2.20 -.31 35.06 -.82 2.00 43.12 -2.25 1.80 31.16 -1.36 0.20 24.15 -.55 .57 -.05 2.98 55.31 -1.88 1.86 -.20 0.50 3.93 -.36 3.99 -.20 1.44 94.87 -.62 5.02 -.10 24.12 27.94 -.08 0.24 2.20 -.12 0.08 10.67 -.60 5.99 -.07 0.74 53.87 -1.92 0.52 14.87 -.21 1.00 33.31 -.36 0.11 57.66 -1.81 0.98 64.39 -1.78 19.43 -.95 0.08 33.63 -1.09 27.21 -.90 36.88 -1.62 0.42 48.84 -1.35 0.45 57.61 -2.09 0.31 41.59 -1.30 2.56 41.82 -1.23 0.35 37.59 -.62 0.84 24.97 -.49 0.04 5.09 -.23 1.60 84.02 -1.63 18.94 -.49 0.30 11.11 -.14 2.00 30.02 +.01 0.24 46.18 -1.37 14.22 -.47 0.60 233.06 -9.87 0.75 24.33 +.78 2.67 -.05 0.84 22.24 -.49 3.06 -.07

Nm McCorm McDrmInt s McDnlds McGrwH McKesson McMoRn McAfee MeadJohn MdbkIns MeadWvco Mechel MedAssets MedcoHlth Mediacom MedProp MediCo Medicis Medifast Medtrnic MelcoCrwn MensW MentorGr MercadoL Merck Meredith MergeHlth Mesab Metalico Methanx MetLife MetroPCS Micrel Microchp Micromet MicronT MicrosSys MicroSemi Microsoft Microtune Micrvisn MdwGold g MillerHer MillerPet Millicom MincoG g MindrayM Mindspeed Minefnd g MinesMgt Mirant MitsuUFJ MizuhoFn MobileTel s Modine Mohawk Molex MolsCoorB Molycorp n Momenta MoneyGrm MonPwSys Monsanto MonstrWw Montpelr Moodys MorgStan MSEMDDbt Mosaic Motorola Motricity n Move Inc MuellerWat MurphO Mylan MyriadG NCR Corp NETgear NGAS Rs h NII Hldg NIVS IntT NMT Md h NPS Phm NRG Egy NV Energy NYSE Eur Nabors NalcoHld Nanomtr NasdOMX NBkGreece NatCineM NatFnPrt NatFuGas NatGrid NOilVarco NatPenn NatRetPrp NatSemi NatwHP NatResPtrs Nautilus NaviosAcq Navios NaviosMar Navistar NektarTh NeoStem Net1UEPS NetLogic s NetApp Netease Netflix Netlist NetSolTch NetwkEng NBRESec Neurcrine NeutTand Nevsun g NDragon NewEnSys NGenBiof h NwGold g NY CmtyB NY Times NewAlliBc Newcastle NewellRub NewfldExp NewmtM NewpkRes NewsCpA NewsCpB Nexen g NextEraEn NiSource Nicor NightwkR NikeB 99 Cents NipponTT NoahHld n NobleCorp NobleEn NokiaCp Nomura NordicAm Nordstrm NorflkSo NA Pall g NoWestCp NoestUt NDynMn g NthnO&G NorTrst NthgtM g NorthropG NStarRlt NwstBcsh NovaGld g Novartis NovtlWrls Novavax Novell Novlus NSTAR NuSkin NuHoriz lf NuVasive NuanceCm Nucor NutriSyst NuBldAm n NuvDivA NuvDiv2 NuvDiv3 NvIMO NIPIM2 NvInQl NvIQl NMuHiOp NuvMuHi2 NvMO NuvMuVal NuvPP NvMulSI&G

D 1.04 43.36 16.68 2.44 77.42 0.94 35.61 0.72 64.12 16.29 47.31 0.90 59.39 0.16 9.11 0.92 25.21 23.75 17.29 58.92 8.36 0.80 10.53 12.72 0.24 26.86 23.34 0.90 34.17 6.09 0.36 26.79 11.15 60.56 1.52 34.10 0.92 33.13 3.78 2.39 40.10 4.17 0.62 27.56 0.74 38.87 11.29 0.14 11.99 1.38 32.85 6.48 7.22 43.41 21.63 0.64 25.81 2.89 1.46 .57 0.09 20.01 4.28 7.24 90.24 1.44 0.20 26.43 6.23 9.30 3.12 10.95 4.64 3.01 21.05 13.54 52.18 0.70 20.42 1.12 47.99 31.86 15.43 2.32 15.59 1.12 59.33 19.13 0.40 19.14 0.42 27.15 0.20 25.63 1.20 16.55 0.20 66.32 7.81 28.04 2.22 0.07 3.39 1.10 65.46 18.96 20.34 14.11 29.83 .40 39.09 2.44 .25 6.11 19.44 0.48 13.58 1.20 28.46 21.28 0.14 29.45 11.37 21.28 0.29 1.90 0.80 18.87 12.54 1.38 60.60 7.17 46.48 0.40 57.63 0.04 7.25 1.52 25.83 0.40 13.20 1.88 36.74 2.16 29.67 1.75 0.20 5.24 0.24 5.59 1.68 18.42 51.65 13.70 1.39 11.00 28.99 52.69 39.60 165.40 2.37 1.38 1.43 0.24 3.75 6.80 15.27 5.45 .04 7.63 .07 8.48 1.00 16.72 7.72 0.28 13.26 4.99 0.20 17.27 63.90 0.60 59.39 5.48 0.15 14.25 0.15 15.69 0.20 21.05 2.00 52.56 0.92 17.09 1.86 44.68 6.42 1.08 80.51 15.78 22.68 15.50 0.90 36.46 0.72 80.90 0.56 10.08 5.45 1.70 26.97 0.80 40.55 1.44 60.55 4.99 1.36 28.73 1.03 31.20 8.50 18.67 1.12 50.59 3.01 1.88 61.90 0.40 3.99 0.40 10.74 13.47 1.99 55.74 9.13 2.13 5.68 29.92 1.60 41.50 0.50 29.69 6.96 24.32 16.22 1.44 37.97 0.70 20.50 1.40 18.63 0.91 13.23 0.96 13.41 0.98 13.45 0.86 13.39 0.74 12.28 0.85 13.04 0.94 13.49 1.00 11.73 0.96 11.47 0.98 13.22 0.47 9.30 0.94 14.05 0.75 8.23

-.45 -.37 -1.65 -.88 -.47 -.35 -1.22 -.46 -.55 -.86 -.26 -.58 -.01 -.37 -.16 -.61 -.25 -.49 -.27 +.32 -.02 +.71 -.44 -.41 -.18 -2.57 -.26 -.83 -.86 -.44 -.05 -.41 -.31 -.20 -1.15 -1.21 -.23 -.01 -.03 -.04 -.46 -.33 -2.28 -.04 -1.32 -.13 -.17 -.11 +.19 -.08 -.11 -.36 -.54 -.95 -.86 -1.06 -1.34 -.53 -.15 -.61 -1.46 -.14 -.06 -.75 -.37 -.32 -.09 -.13 -.64 -.05 -.09 -1.73 -.28 -.56 -.16 -.58 +.01 -1.66 -.08 -.02 -.06 -.35 -.28 -.42 -.36 -.35 -.45 -.30 -.06 +.13 -.48 -2.03 -1.15 +.14 -.25 -.61 -.16 -1.61 -1.37 -.08 -.56 -.45 -.41 -.21 -.07 -.28 -.32 -.40 -1.24 -.93 -2.90 -.50 -.05 -.08 -.09 -.40 -.39 -.40 -.00 +.41 -.15 -.13 -.20 -.11 +.04 -.08 -1.48 -1.27 -.21 -.13 -.19 -1.15 -1.01 -.22 -1.03 -.01 -1.29 -.04 -.44 -1.00 -.35 -.75 -.23 -.05 -.08 -1.28 -.78 -.22 -.24 -.52 -.39 -.55 -.71 -.03 -1.11 -.25 -.16 -.71 -.61 -.41 -.14 -.13 -.09 -.67 -.74 -.02 -.48 -.22 -1.39 -.28 -.30 +.11 +.19 -.07 +.24 +.38 +.31 +.19 -.07 +.04 +.26 +.08 +.38 -.18

D

NvMSI&G2 0.75 8.66 -.16 NuvPI 0.92 13.22 +.22 NuvPI2 0.89 13.48 +.24 NuvPI4 0.85 12.36 +.32 NuvQInc 0.95 13.29 +.27 NuvQualPf 0.60 7.30 -.26 NuvQPf2 0.66 7.83 -.20 NuvQPf3 0.62 7.63 -.21 Nvidia 12.71 -.39 OGE Engy 1.45 44.04 -1.26 OReillyA h 58.38 -.94 OasisPet n 23.15 -.53 OcciPet 1.52 85.17 -2.58 Oceaneer 68.03 -.58 OceanFr rs .98 -.08 Oclaro rs 9.15 -.23 OcwenFn 8.73 -.14 OfficeDpt 4.39 -.14 OfficeMax 16.61 -.21 OilSvHT 2.66 124.94 -1.37 OilStates 55.33 -1.66 Oilsands g .46 -.01 OldNBcp 0.28 10.02 OldRepub 0.69 12.52 -.14 Olin 0.80 18.34 -.51 OmegaHlt 1.48 20.94 -.67 Omncre 0.13 24.28 -.41 Omnicom 0.80 44.97 -.66 OmniVisn 25.92 -.79 Omnova 8.37 +.02 OnSmcnd 7.86 -.09 ONEOK 1.92 50.46 -1.48 OnyxPh 29.51 -.28 OpenTable 63.64 -1.08 OpnwvSy 2.04 -.02 OpntTch 0.40 21.19 +.62 optXprs 17.46 -.04 Oracle 0.20 27.58 -.82 OrbitalSci 16.36 -.55 Orbitz 4.91 -.20 Orexigen 5.31 -.14 OrientEH 10.89 -.14 OrienPap n 5.54 +.94 OrientFn 0.16 11.64 -.08 OriginAg 8.40 -.40 Orthovta 2.01 -.13 OshkoshCp 28.53 -.72 OvShip 1.75 35.80 -.71 OwensCorn 26.89 -.82 OwensIll 27.21 -.42 Oxigene h .28 +.00 PDL Bio 1.00 5.59 +.18 PF Chng 0.63 46.59 -1.03 PG&E Cp 1.82 47.27 -.57 PHH Corp 20.26 -.07 PMC Sra 7.34 -.18 PMI Grp 3.08 -.13 PNC 0.40 55.61 -1.35 PNM Res 0.50 12.38 -.44 POSCO 1.43 100.38 -2.40 PPG 2.20 75.58 -1.28 PPL Corp 1.40 25.75 -.31 PSS Wrld 22.62 -.52 PacWstBc 0.04 18.50 -.07 Paccar 0.48 51.56 -1.25 PacerIntl 5.16 -.27 PacCapB h .41 -.01 PacEth h .81 -.02 PacSunwr 5.69 +.19 PackAmer 0.60 24.98 -.09 Pactiv 33.23 +.02 PaetecHld 3.76 -.05 PallCorp 0.64 43.15 -.87 PalmHHm .20 -.31 PanASlv 0.10 34.96 -.93 PaneraBrd 93.35 -1.33 ParagShip 0.20 3.72 -.13 ParamTch 21.33 -.46 ParaG&S 1.55 -.07 Parexel 20.18 -.86 ParkDrl 4.09 -.11 ParkerHan 1.16 78.46 -1.94 PartnerRe 2.20 77.74 -1.64 PatriotCoal 13.83 -.72 Patterson 0.40 28.11 -.38 PattUTI 0.20 20.05 -.32 Paychex 1.24 27.60 -.42 PeabdyE 0.34 55.82 -2.00 Pegasys lf 0.12 29.25 -.33 Pengrth g 0.84 12.27 -.35 PnnNGm 34.62 -.66 PennVa 0.23 16.09 -.55 PennVaGP 1.56 24.50 -1.46 PennVaRs 1.88 26.96 -1.11 PennWst g 1.80 21.59 -.56 PennantPk 1.04 11.01 -.37 Penney 0.80 30.80 -.39 PenRE 0.60 13.27 -.51 Penske 14.85 -.20 Pentair 0.76 32.47 -.38 PeopUtdF 0.62 12.49 -.17 PepBoy 0.12 11.85 -.42 PepcoHold 1.08 18.54 -.31 PepsiCo 1.92 64.04 -.38 PeregrineP 1.49 -.09 PerfectWld 26.03 -5.44 PerkElm 0.28 23.21 -.54 Prmian 1.38 21.70 -.77 Perrigo 0.28 59.49 -.59 PetChina 3.97 124.22 -5.03 Petrohawk 17.72 -.20 PetrbrsA 1.12 29.56 -1.19 Petrobras 1.12 32.50 -1.19 PtroqstE 6.68 -.52 PetsMart 0.50 37.67 -.07 Pfizer 0.72 16.60 -.15 PhrmAth 3.23 +.20 PhmHTr 3.81 63.47 -.82 PharmPdt 0.60 25.26 -.40 Pharmacyc 6.20 Pharmerica 11.00 +.09 PhilipMor 2.56 58.54 -.91 PhilipsEl 0.95 29.83 -.59 PhlVH 0.15 59.50 -.54 PhnxCos 2.36 -.12 PhnxTc 4.18 -.01 PhotrIn 5.94 -.20 PiedNG 1.12 28.58 -.77 PiedmOfc n 1.26 18.85 -.66 Pier 1 8.86 -.24 PilgrmsP n 6.49 -.05 PimcoCA2 0.75 8.58 +.33 PimcCA3 0.72 9.01 +.02 PimcoCpI 1.28 15.29 -.59 PimCpOp 1.38 16.58 -.81 PimcIncStr 0.90 11.33 -.60 PimIncStr2 0.78 9.76 -.29 PimcoHiI 1.46 12.22 -.68 PimIncOpp 2.12 25.44 -.70 PimcoMuni 0.98 12.53 +.28 PimcoMu2 0.78 10.41 +.35 PimcMu3 0.84 10.28 +.32 PimcoStrat 0.90 10.49 -.39 PinnclEnt 12.95 -.54 PinWst 2.10 40.79 -.48 PionDrill 6.90 -.08 PionHiIn 1.65 15.46 -.66 PioMuAdv 1.08 12.70 -.14 PioMunHi 1.08 13.49 -.11 PioNtrl 0.08 76.34 -.77 PitnyBw 1.46 23.06 -.27 PlainsAA 3.80 61.25 -2.62 PlainsEx 28.75 -.32 Plantron 0.20 34.40 -.99 PlatGpMet 2.11 -.11 Plexus 27.29 -1.66 PlugPwr h .46 -.03 PlumCrk 1.68 36.10 -1.20 Polaris 1.60 70.51 -1.19 Polo RL 0.40 102.45 -1.90 Polycom 35.01 -.22 PolyMet g 1.95 -.12 PolyOne 11.94 -.43 Polypore 32.22 -.98 Popular 2.82 -.06 PortGE 1.04 21.05 -.31 PostPrp 0.80 30.72 -1.27 Potash 0.40 134.63 -2.64 Potlatch 2.04 32.08 -1.23 PwrInteg 0.20 38.52 +.19 Power-One 8.94 -.12 PSCrudeDS 66.00 +3.82 PwshDB 24.55 -.75 PS Agri 28.28 -.94 PS Oil 25.53 -.60 PS BasMet 21.44 -1.33 PS USDBull 22.92 +.13 PS USDBear 26.90 -.17 PwSClnEn 9.68 -.41 PwSWtr 0.11 17.48 -.33 PSFinPf 1.31 17.80 -.18 PSETecLd 0.11 17.72 -.40 PSBldABd 1.36 25.18 +.26 PShNatMu 1.11 22.98 -.29 PSHYCpBd 1.49 18.17 -.17 PwShPfd 1.01 14.21 -.07 PShEMSov 1.60 27.25 -.36 PSIndia 0.12 23.99 -.88 PwShs QQQ 0.33 51.45 -.87 Powrwav 2.09 -.03 Praxair 1.80 90.40 -1.11 PrecCastpt 0.12 131.93 -1.54 PrecDrill 7.96 -.04 PrmWBc h .41 +.00 Prestige 11.16 -.10 PriceTR 1.08 56.86 -1.31 priceline 399.00 -8.43 PrideIntl 31.73 -.43 PrinctnR 1.11 -.01 PrinFncl 0.55 27.86 -.70 PrivateB 0.04 12.56 -.09 ProShtDow 46.88 +.73 ProShtQQQ 36.92 +.59 ProShtS&P 47.06 +.71 PrUShS&P 27.39 +.82 ProUltDow 0.40 49.19 -1.59 PrUlShDow 23.14 +.66 PrUShMC 14.37 +.50 ProUltQQQ 72.57 -2.52 PrUShQQQ 13.21 +.43 ProUltSP 0.43 42.04 -1.36 ProUShL20 36.59 -1.69 ProUSL7-10T 40.00 -.49 ProShtEM 32.83 +.81 PrUSCh25 rs 29.53 +1.56 ProUSEM rs 36.48 +1.80 ProUSRE rs 21.14 +1.22 ProUSOG rs 46.34 +1.60 ProUSBM rs 25.08 +1.13 ProUltRE rs 0.41 43.93 -3.02 ProUShtFn 18.62 +.66 ProUFin rs 0.09 56.84 -2.12 PrUPShQQQ 37.79 +1.83 PrUPShR2K 32.27 +1.69 ProUltO&G 0.23 37.52 -1.49 ProUBasM 0.10 39.48 -2.03 ProUShEur 15.76 +.79 ProShtR2K 35.94 +.65 ProUltPQQQ 124.68 -6.51 ProUSR2K 15.71 +.55 ProUltR2K 0.01 34.61 -1.42

Nm

D

ProSht20Tr 43.66 -1.07 ProUSSP500 24.07 +1.06 ProUltSP500 0.48 168.22 -8.30 ProUltCrude 10.36 -.60 ProSUltGold 63.45 -1.60 ProUSGld rs 31.60 +.64 ProUSSlv rs 15.23 +.04 ProUShCrude 12.57 +.64 ProSUltSilv 110.81 -.21 ProUltShYen 16.55 +.07 ProUShEuro 20.06 +.22 ProctGam 1.93 63.45 -.84 ProgrssEn 2.48 43.80 -.58 ProgsvCp 1.16 20.85 -.35 ProLogis 0.45 12.88 -.32 ProspctCap 1.21 9.85 -.39 ProspBcsh 0.70 33.49 -.43 Protalix 8.58 -.21 ProtLife 0.56 23.76 -.34 ProvET g 0.72 7.21 -.15 ProvidFS 0.44 13.83 +.19 Prudentl 1.15 53.26 -1.27 PSEG 1.37 31.44 -.52 PubStrg 3.20 95.10 -4.49 PudaCoal 11.35 -1.56 PulseElec 0.10 4.05 -.34 PulteGrp 6.89 -.19 PMMI 0.53 7.08 +.07 PMIIT 0.52 5.80 -.05 PMOT 0.80 11.25 -.05 PPrIT 0.71 6.29 -.02

Q-R-S-T QEP Res n QIAGEN QKL Strs QLT QiaoXing QlikTech n Qlogic Qualcom QuantaSvc QntmDSS QuantFu h QstDiag QuestSft Questar s Questcor QksilvRes Quiksilvr QuinStrt n QwestCm RAIT Fin RF MicD RPC RPM RRI Engy RSC Hldgs RTI IntlM Rackspace RadianGrp RadntSys RadientPh RadOneD h RadioShk Radware RailAmer Ralcorp RAM Engy Rambus Randgold RangeRs RareEle g RJamesFn Rayonier Raytheon RealD n RealNwk RltyInco RedHat Rdiff.cm RedwdTr RegalBel RegalEnt RgcyCtrs RegncyEn Regenrn RegBkHT RegionsFn Regis Cp RehabCG ReinsGrp RelStlAl ReneSola RentACt Rentech Repsol RepubAir RepubSvc RschMotn ResMed s ResrceCap RetailHT RexEnergy ReynAm s RigelPh RightNow RINO Intl RioTinto s RitchieBr RiteAid Riverbed s RobbMyer RobtHalf RockTen RockwlAut RockColl RockwdH RogCm gs Roper RosettaR RossStrs Rovi Corp Rowan RoyalBk g RBScotlnd RBSct prQ RBSct prT RylCarb RoyDShllB RoyDShllA RoyGld Rubicon g RubiconTc RubyTues RuthsHosp Ryanair Ryder RdxSPEW Ryland SAIC SAP AG SBA Com SCANA SEI Inv SFN Grp SK Tlcm SLGreen SLGrn pfC SLM Cp SM Energy SMTC g SpdrDJIA SpdrGold SP Mid S&P500ETF Spdr Div SpdrHome SpdrKbwBk SpdrKbwIns SpdrWilRE SpdrLehHY SpdrNuBST SpdrNuBMu SpdrKbw RB SpdrRetl SpdrOGEx SpdrOGEq SpdrMetM SPS Cmc n SPX Cp SRA Intl STEC STMicro STR Hldgs SVB FnGp SabraHlt n Safeway StJoe StJude Saks Salesforce SalixPhm SallyBty n SamsO&G SanDisk SandRdge Sanmina Sanofi Santarus Sapient SaraLee Satcon h SauerDanf SavientPh Schlmbrg Schnitzer Scholastc SchwUSMkt SchwUSLgC SchwEMkt Schwab SciGames ScorpioT n Scotts ScrippsNet ScrippsEW SeabGld g SeacoastBk SeadrillLtd SeagateT SealAir SearsHldgs Seaspan SeattGen SelCmfrt SelMedHld SemiHTr SemiMfg SempraEn Semtech SenHous Sensata n Sensient Sequenom ServiceCp 7DaysGp n ShandaGm Shanda ShawGrp Sherwin

0.08 32.88 -.38 18.11 -.23 4.20 -1.25 5.94 -.01 1.75 -.06 21.87 -.79 17.40 -.43 0.76 46.38 -.49 17.05 -.33 3.13 -.13 .50 +.00 0.40 50.12 -.89 25.22 -.68 0.56 17.14 -.24 13.49 +.47 14.73 -.02 3.90 -.21 18.71 -.31 0.32 6.70 -.15 1.59 -.05 6.76 -.34 0.28 26.02 -.56 0.84 20.68 -.56 3.89 +.10 7.74 -.21 27.25 -.65 26.65 -.40 0.01 7.54 -.14 17.36 -.39 .40 -.01 1.20 -.01 0.25 19.39 -.64 30.53 -1.28 11.89 +.05 61.74 +.32 1.60 -.06 19.81 -.33 0.17 95.31 -2.27 0.16 40.80 -.79 9.95 -.56 0.44 29.19 -.76 2.16 49.96 -2.40 1.50 45.90 -.64 26.78 -.19 3.26 -.21 1.73 33.13 -.69 40.91 -.40 3.00 -.19 1.00 13.98 -.06 0.68 55.35 -.43 0.72 13.24 -.20 1.85 40.19 -1.38 1.78 25.23 -.77 24.68 +.19 0.58 77.62 -1.01 0.04 5.92 -.28 0.16 18.02 -2.62 19.28 -.27 0.48 49.92 -1.18 0.40 44.33 -1.48 9.82 -.91 0.24 26.11 -.18 1.17 -.08 1.15 26.14 -.87 7.88 -.19 0.80 27.88 -.45 56.29 -1.49 32.78 -.66 1.00 6.48 -.13 1.68 99.82 -.42 11.47 -.33 1.96 32.04 -.39 7.72 24.53 -2.23 7.15 -.40 0.90 66.30 -2.93 0.42 19.72 -.29 .91 -.01 27.82 -1.03 0.17 28.42 -1.13 0.52 27.00 -.58 0.80 50.75 -.74 1.40 63.72 -.96 0.96 55.16 -.53 35.24 -.90 1.28 36.04 -.46 0.38 69.79 -1.63 30.62 -.79 0.64 63.57 -.06 52.02 -.49 29.72 -.98 2.00 51.87 -.78 12.97 -.53 16.11 -.12 17.11 -.09 40.25 -.76 3.36 63.14 -1.58 3.36 64.04 -1.41 0.36 50.12 -.72 3.84 -.02 20.23 -.77 11.68 -.68 4.75 -.09 2.29 29.20 -.39 1.08 42.65 -.92 0.62 43.72 -.76 0.12 15.22 -.16 15.23 -.29 0.67 49.07 -.58 36.86 -.15 1.90 40.57 -.62 0.20 22.56 -.39 8.04 -.25 18.31 -.43 0.40 61.50 -2.04 1.91 25.05 -.16 11.53 -.20 0.10 48.44 -.50 3.51 -.29 2.55 110.50 -1.75 130.97 -1.45 1.54 151.03 -2.60 2.31 118.16 -1.87 1.68 50.50 -.87 0.12 15.61 -.28 0.11 23.11 -.39 0.43 39.47 -.83 1.75 57.10 -1.96 4.21 39.81 -.42 0.44 23.92 +.06 0.89 22.15 -.09 0.30 23.19 -.32 0.57 44.27 -.23 0.20 46.91 -.84 0.12 32.81 -.54 0.35 57.57 -2.01 12.25 -.24 1.00 64.40 -.75 19.93 -.28 14.97 -1.33 0.28 8.62 -.10 18.96 -.32 45.74 -1.33 19.10 +2.18 0.48 22.79 -.40 17.92 -1.12 38.56 -.26 11.16 -.16 111.02 -2.61 41.38 -.40 12.29 -.24 1.18 -.02 38.22 -.95 5.15 +.01 10.90 -.33 1.63 32.96 -.64 2.85 -.05 0.35 11.79 -.51 0.46 14.90 -.12 3.77 -.05 30.49 +1.45 11.41 -.29 0.84 73.18 -1.12 0.07 52.70 -1.86 0.30 27.65 -1.23 0.38 28.38 -.46 0.38 28.10 -.44 27.45 -.66 0.24 15.05 -.10 7.39 -.28 9.80 -1.23 1.00 50.30 +.38 0.30 50.99 -.55 8.51 -.25 28.65 -.54 1.12 -.04 2.31 30.75 -.94 13.85 -.20 0.52 22.25 -.24 64.89 -2.83 0.50 12.74 -.36 13.77 -.24 7.83 -.37 6.17 -.06 0.60 30.00 -.32 3.69 -.13 1.56 49.96 -.75 22.60 -.30 1.48 22.90 -.73 25.54 -.17 0.80 33.00 -.62 7.02 -.12 0.16 7.86 -.10 22.63 +.01 6.30 +.04 40.32 -1.13 30.86 -.78 1.44 73.56 +.05

Nm ShipFin ShufflMstr SiderNac s Siemens SigaTech h SigmaDsg SigmaAld SignetJwlrs SilganH s SilicGrIn SilicnImg SilcnLab Slcnware SilvStd g SilvWhtn g SilvrcpM g SimonProp Sina Sinclair SinoCkg n SinoTech n Sinovac SiriusXM Skechers SkyPFrtJ SkystarB s SkywksSol SmartBal SmartM SmartT gn SmartHeat SmithWes SmithAO s SmithMicro SmithfF Smucker SmurfStn n SnapOn SocQ&M SodaStrm n Sohu.cm Solarfun SolarWinds Solutia Somaxon SonicAut SonicCorp SonicSolu SonocoP Sonus SonyCp Sothebys Sourcefire SouthnCo SthnCopper SoUnCo SwstAirl SwstnEngy SovranSS SpectraEn SpiritAero Spreadtrm SprintNex SprottSilv SprottGld n SP Matls SP HlthC SP CnSt SP Consum SP Engy SPDR Fncl SP Inds SP Tech SP Util StdPac StanBlkDk Staples StarGas StarScient Starbucks StarwdHtl StarwdPT StateStr Statoil ASA StlDynam Steelcse StemCell h Stericycle Steris SterlBcsh StrlF WA h Sterlite StillwtrM StoneEngy StratHotels Stryker SuccessF SunLfFn g Suncor gs SunesisP h Sunoco SunOpta SunPowerA SunPwr B SunriseSen SunstnHtl Suntech SunTrst SuperiorBc SupEnrgy Supvalu SurModic SusqBnc SwRCmATR SwERCmTR SwftEng Symantec Symetra n Synaptics Syngenta Syniverse Synopsys Synovus Sysco TAM SA TC PpLn TCF Fncl TD Ameritr TECO TFS Fncl THQ TICC Cap TIM Partic TJX TRWAuto TTM Tch tw telecom TaiwSemi TakeTwo Talbots TalecrisBio TalismE g Tanger TanzRy g TargaRes Target Taseko TASER TataMotors Taubmn TechData TeckRes g Teekay TeekOffsh TeekayTnk Tekelec TlCmSys TelNorL TelcmNZ TelefEsp TelMexL TelData Telestone TeleTech Telik h Tellabs Telvent TempleInld TmpEMI TmpGlb TempurP Tenaris TenetHlth Tengsco Tenneco Teradata Teradyn Terex Ternium Terremk TeslaMot n Tesoro TetraTc TetraTech TevaPhrm Texas Inds TexInst TexRdhse Textron Thai Theravnce ThermoFis ThmBet ThomCrk g ThomsonR Thor Inds Thoratec 3M Co TibcoSft Tidwtr Tiffany Tii NtwkT Timberlnd TimberlnR TW Cable TimeWarn Timken Titan Intl TitanMet TiVo Inc TollBros TomoThera Trchmrk Toreador TorDBk g TortMLP n Total SA TotalSys TowerSemi Toyota TractSup s TradeStatn TrCda g TransAtlH TrnsatlPt n TransDigm TransGlb Transocn Travelers Travelzoo TridentM h

D 1.40 21.24 -.39 9.94 -.12 0.58 16.56 -.44 2.41 112.59 -2.93 11.71 -.29 11.55 -.02 0.64 62.37 -1.19 35.27 -.71 0.42 32.96 -.06 6.93 -.21 6.17 +.05 40.77 -.61 0.41 5.10 -.02 24.05 -1.07 31.69 -1.30 0.08 10.69 -.41 2.40 96.14 -3.59 56.99 -1.54 0.43 7.27 -.41 8.56 -.32 5.30 -.20 4.33 -.09 1.37 -.01 20.37 +.06 5.24 -.38 8.99 +.66 22.36 -.58 3.78 -.01 5.90 -.10 8.06 -.02 5.70 -.45 3.84 -.13 0.56 37.65 -.70 13.43 -.42 16.43 -.11 1.60 63.10 +.24 21.77 -.79 1.28 51.72 -.79 0.62 49.30 -.54 30.01 -.73 72.28 -2.58 8.69 -.44 17.58 -.64 20.35 -.42 3.27 -.02 0.10 12.04 -.38 8.83 -.08 8.96 -.15 1.12 32.14 -.52 2.66 -.08 0.28 33.67 +.03 0.20 41.09 -.76 24.73 +1.22 1.82 38.13 -.20 1.68 42.43 -1.27 0.60 24.41 -.90 0.02 13.30 -.21 37.18 -.83 1.80 36.38 -2.12 1.00 23.70 -.55 18.23 -.26 14.88 -.48 3.74 -.09 10.57 -.11 11.87 -.16 1.05 34.47 -.76 0.58 30.49 -.45 0.77 28.40 -.32 0.43 35.45 -.49 1.00 61.45 -1.17 0.16 14.76 -.25 0.60 31.99 -.53 0.31 23.83 -.44 1.27 31.08 -.37 3.83 -.13 1.36 59.50 -1.20 0.36 20.07 -.10 0.29 5.09 -.56 1.66 -.06 0.52 29.84 -.82 0.20 54.49 -1.22 1.32 20.43 -.84 0.04 43.13 -.74 1.02 20.59 -.66 0.30 15.56 -.25 0.16 9.14 +.03 1.06 +.01 70.55 -.79 0.60 34.23 -.48 0.06 6.16 -.04 .25 +.01 0.08 15.25 -.94 17.75 -1.35 18.30 -.60 4.53 -.25 0.60 50.70 -.72 27.19 -.94 1.44 28.20 -.29 0.40 32.90 -1.16 .32 -.01 0.60 38.00 -.29 6.89 13.50 -.63 13.05 -.51 3.66 -.19 9.44 -.38 8.34 -.21 0.04 24.84 -.43 .59 -.28 28.71 -1.06 0.35 9.90 -.28 8.33 -.25 0.04 8.10 -.10 9.29 -.40 8.16 -.32 33.98 -1.30 16.71 -.37 0.20 11.84 -.20 28.03 -.33 1.13 55.19 -1.94 30.34 -.02 24.74 -.28 0.04 2.01 -.09 1.04 28.78 -.14 0.92 24.10 -.42 3.00 47.91 -1.11 0.20 13.56 -.29 0.20 17.23 -.06 0.82 16.68 -.38 8.07 -.16 4.20 -.10 0.88 10.46 -.43 0.71 32.64 -.46 0.60 45.03 -.67 46.71 -2.82 12.36 -.22 16.23 -.30 0.47 10.86 -.20 10.73 -.35 9.87 -.21 22.13 -.45 0.25 18.96 -.27 1.55 46.77 -1.56 6.64 -.17 2.15 30.17 -.64 1.00 53.79 -.37 4.24 -.14 4.03 -.03 0.32 30.07 -.88 1.66 44.71 -1.68 42.84 -.80 0.40 47.07 -1.91 1.27 32.43 -.36 1.90 28.13 -.87 1.28 12.00 -.07 12.44 -.44 4.79 -.24 1.65 14.04 -.20 0.77 8.14 -.28 5.25 72.40 -1.37 1.35 15.05 -.28 0.45 35.12 -.32 14.78 -.02 16.93 -.54 .66 -.05 0.08 6.61 -.15 23.44 -.41 0.44 19.59 -.53 1.00 16.11 -.51 0.54 10.24 -.13 33.99 -.52 0.68 42.40 -1.93 4.50 -.13 .45 -.04 34.39 -.72 38.92 -1.16 11.30 -.48 24.61 -.52 0.50 33.67 -.51 11.14 -.34 29.67 -1.13 14.19 -.42 22.77 -.59 9.62 -.37 0.75 50.34 -.61 0.30 36.43 -1.45 0.52 30.57 -.28 15.54 -.30 0.08 20.84 -.31 0.19 12.82 -.79 21.12 -.33 50.27 -1.08 43.11 -.59 11.99 -.57 1.16 36.79 -.62 0.40 32.70 -.71 25.47 +.73 2.10 84.24 -1.96 18.38 -.59 1.00 47.17 -.82 1.00 54.54 -1.67 1.93 +.17 23.25 -.60 1.10 -.05 1.60 62.07 -.50 0.85 30.54 +.03 0.72 42.72 -.64 0.02 15.87 -.14 17.16 -.50 8.73 -.19 18.07 -.34 3.45 -.12 0.64 57.62 -.87 14.15 -.33 2.44 71.06 -1.52 0.57 23.99 -.45 3.13 51.87 -1.81 0.28 15.10 -.26 1.45 -.05 1.05 74.93 -.73 0.28 40.46 -.07 6.27 -.04 1.60 35.19 -1.41 0.84 50.82 -.92 3.40 -.03 67.28 +1.48 13.77 -1.55 66.16 -1.06 1.44 54.73 -2.05 35.65 -1.23 1.72 -.06

Nm

D

TrimbleN TrinaSol s Trinity TriQuint Tri-Tech TrueBlue TrueRelig Trustmk Tsakos TuesMrn Tuppwre Turkcell TwoHrbInv TycoElec TycoIntl Tyson

35.97 23.69 0.32 23.39 10.31 10.58 16.13 19.34 0.92 22.29 0.60 9.81 4.80 1.20 46.50 0.66 18.27 1.34 9.62 0.64 31.01 0.85 37.28 0.16 15.24

-.41 -1.71 -.75 +.05 +.60 -.60 +.05 -.34 -.19 -.31 -1.00 -.51 -.01 -.65 -.37 +.23

U-V-W-X-Y-Z U-Store-It UBS AG UDR UGI Corp UIL Hold URS US Airwy US Geoth US Gold USA Tech h USEC USG UTiWrldwd UTStrcm UltaSalon UltraPt g Uluru Umpqua UndrArmr UniSrcEn UnilevNV Unilever UnionPac Unisys Unit UtdCBksGa UtdContl UtdMicro UtdNtrlF UtdOnln UPS B UtdRentals US Bancrp US NGsFd US OilFd USSteel UtdTech UtdTherap UtdhlthGp U D U H U U mG U U U m U mR U O

N

G m M R D W m N R D M m G

m m m M m G

Mw

M W& O WG H WM W W O W R W M W W W W W M W R W WR W W M W W W W W W W M W W R W W W W W W M W W W W W W W G W H W H O W M H W M M WD W G W R W U W W W W W W H W W W Wm Wm Wm W G Wm W m W D W W R W W D W W W WW W Ww G W W W M W W m W G

R M R Ww m G m

mm

w w

0.10 8.22 -.32 16.70 -.40 0.74 21.46 -.70 1.00 29.36 -.44 1.73 29.44 -.66 40.35 -1.43 10.69 -.02 1.12 -.15 5.35 -.24 1.00 -.06 5.31 -.37 12.72 -.34 0.06 19.02 -.01 2.12 -.02 31.57 -.23 46.54 -.43 .09 -.01 0.20 10.98 -.28 50.00 +.29 1.56 35.24 -.76 1.11 29.85 -.32 1.11 29.28 -.50 1.32 89.76 -1.53 21.51 -1.08 40.05 -.50 1.35 +.10 27.18 -.29 0.08 2.95 -.04 35.72 -.70 0.40 6.45 -.21 1.88 67.51 -.56 19.06 -.72 0.20 24.72 -.22 5.51 -.04 35.45 -1.05 0.20 45.43 -1.12 1.70 74.16 -1.15 60.68 +.45 0.50 3


C OV ER S T OR I ES

Maragas

“To me, what’s gonna be interesting is in time what variety will emerge as being the great (one) for the Bend area. Will it be a cabernet, will it be a syrah, will it be a white grape like a riesling? The jury’s still out. So that, I think, is exciting.”

Continued from B1 He will receive direction from Gary Bishop of Bishop Farms in Bend and David Touvell, the owner of and chef at Chow restaurant in Bend. “We should be able to have one heck of an operation,” Maragas said. For now, though, Maragas can take pleasure in his winery’s achievement, which a few years ago people thought impossible, because Central Oregon weather can be unpredictable, and because wine had never been produced from local grapes. The winery will hold celebrations in coming weeks at the M Bar and its Culver location. Until then, there is work to do. Late October or early November is high time for making this year’s wine, after first frost last month concluded the growing season for the 2010 grapes. There are riesling, muscat, pinot noir grapes and others, which have been shipped from vineyards in different parts of the state. They all must be processed if they have not been already. At the winery, Maragas and assistant winemaker Nathan Johnson were busy sending merlot grapes through the stainless steel screen inside an air-diaphragm press to squeeze out their liquid, but not too much. Bits of grape

— Steve Roberts, author of “Wine Trails of Oregon” seeds and skin set the stage for a presence in the mouth — or mouth feel, to use a wine connoisseurs’ term — somewhere between the weight of water and oil. The next stages for this year’s batches include secondary fermenting, clarifying, aging and bottling. Maragas said the winery is approaching profitability. The winery has already seen more than 80 percent growth in revenue this year, he said. Despite the winery’s latest success and ideas for expansion, there are no plans to offer future wines in retail stores, Maragas said. Bottles of the Central Oregon Red wine and others will only be available at the winery, the M Bar and online; the few bottles left

GM

investors’ appetites with a lowenough price. By selling additional shares now, the government is seeking to lock in proceeds while demand is high, though it will need to sell the rest of its stake over the next few years. The government must sell its shares at an average of roughly $44 each to break even on the bailout, though it has already recovered more than $7.4 billion from the company, including interest and dividends. The United Automobile Workers is also selling additional shares. The governments of Canada and Ontario are not increasing the number of shares they are selling. A GM representative was not immediately available for comment. A Treasury spokesman declined to comment. Orders for the offering closed

Continued from B1 The GM offering is now also expected to cut Treasury’s stake in the company to about 26 percent from 61 percent, well below the level the company had initially sought as it tried to shed the “Government Motors” label. Strong investor demand for the offering could mean a speedier repayment of the company’s $50 billion taxpayer-financed rescue. GM and its underwriters had initially expected to raise about $10.6 billion from the offering, excluding the sale of preferred shares. Analysts had said that the initial price range of $26 to $29 a share was low, and people involved in the planning of the IPO have said the company and its shareholders wanted to whet

THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, November 17, 2010 B5

Europe

at grocers will soon disappear, as the winery has chosen to phase out retail sales outside its own operations. Roger Lee, executive director of Economic Development of Central Oregon, once brought grape seeds back to Bend from France. But all he managed to yield was foliage, he said. “He’s obviously got a greener thumb than I do,” Lee said of Maragas. “I would’ve not thought it possible when he started out,” Lee said, “but, you know, I guess he’s proved otherwise.” Lee said he is eager to see if Central Oregon Red will set off a trend of wines produced solely in the area. The news did not catch Steve Roberts, author of “Wine Trails of Oregon,” by surprise. He recalled learning that someone connected to the viticulture and enology department at Oregon State University had once told the winery that European grapes could grow in Central Oregon. “To me, what’s gonna be interesting is in time what variety will emerge as being the great (one) for the Bend area,” he said. “Will it be a cabernet, will it be a syrah, will it be a white grape like a riesling? The jury’s still out. So that, I think, is exciting.”

Continued from B1 The meeting ended Tuesday night with an agreement to “intensify” talks on salvaging the Irish banking sector if requested, buying Dublin a bit more time but pushing Ireland toward a bailout. Asked in Brussels if assistance for Ireland was now inevitable, Brian Lenihan, the Irish finance minister, said: “It is not inevitable. I would not agree with that analysis.” Still he added, referring to the intensified discussions, “I am not going to put a timeline on this, but this is urgent.” In Dublin, the Irish prime minister, Brian Cowen, hinted at a possible deal, telling parliament that his government had not asked for help but was “working with others to see in what way we can ameliorate market risks.” The European Union’s commissioner for economic and monetary affairs, Ollie Rehn, was more explicit, however, saying that the commission was discussing aid to Ireland with both the European Central Bank and the International Monetary Fund “and of course the Irish.”

Jordan Novet can be reached at 541-633-2117 or at jnovet@bendbulletin.com.

Crisis politics

Bailout resistance The pressure on Ireland grew as officials feared that market jitters could spread rapidly if nothing was done, putting the squeeze on other fiscally weakened countries, like Portugal and Spain, the fourth-largest economy in the euro zone. But officials in the more fiscally sound nations, like Germany and Finland, raised concerns about simply turning over money to nations without a coherent plan. The European Union cannot “throw money from helicopters,” Germany’s economy minister, Rainer Bruederle, said during a visit to Rome. “You have to create confidence in institutions, in the state, in public authorities.”

Tuesday afternoon, and the final price of the IPO shares will be determined today. The shares will begin trading on the New York Stock Exchange and the Toronto Stock Exchange on Thursday. The expanding offering is the latest sign of recovery at GM, which filed for a quick bankruptcy at the government’s behest that helped the company shed billions of dollars in debt. Since then, GM has seen its business recover, reporting a $2 billion profit in the third quarter this year atop a big gain in revenue. The decision to sell additional shares in the offering was made as GM and its underwriters met with investors during a breakneck two-week road show, in which executives found big demand from institutional investors and sovereign wealth funds in the Middle East and Asia.

Cowen, the Irish prime minister, tried to put the emphasis on problems with Ireland’s banks, not its government. But Rehn, the European Union’s economic commissioner, noted that “these are connected,” since the government, two years ago, guaranteed the liabilities of the banks. Brian Lucey, a professor of finance at Trinity College Dublin and former economist for the Irish central bank, concurred, saying that the distinction between the government and the banks was politically useful for Cowen, who can say that Europe is helping the banks, not the state, but it was meaningless. “It’s right to say that it’s not a state bailout but a bank bailout,

but they’re the same,” he said in an interview. “We’re not in a position to dictate. The banks are in deep, deep trouble, and we can’t pull them out ourselves.” Lucey said that Cowen was correct “in playing coy and cautious until absolutely certain what the situation is and what’s on the table, to get the strongest deal he can.” But “pride cometh before a fall,” Lucey said. “We’re in serious danger of falling off a cliff.” In his speech, Cowen blamed the markets as abnormal and overreacting, saying that Ireland should not be “enslaved” to them. But as Greece discovered, the markets will press on vulnerabilities, and having moved too slowly to bail out Greece, the European Union is eager to move more quickly this time. The first concern of European officials is to prevent a larger bailout that has to cover Portugal, which is manageable, or Spain, which would be much harder.

National pride Irish pride is an important factor, given how long the country and its currency were tied to Britain and the pound. While both countries joined the European Union only in 1973, Ireland embraced the euro, which Britain has not, as an important sign of its independence and economic sovereignty. As a result, the deal will be politically sensitive for Cowen, who has a very fragile majority and has been hoping to put off any bailout until next year. Any rescue plan will come with conditions negotiated by the European Union and the International Monetary Fund, as was the case in Greece. Germany in particular is pushing Ireland to raise its corporate tax rate of 12.5 percent, one of the lowest in the euro zone, to reduce its deficits. A tax rate that Germany and other European nations see as unfair competition is viewed in Dublin as a critical element in its economic success, past and future.

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Buttressing the Finnish view that governments were not eager to hand over their cash, Austrian Finance Minister Josef Proell said Tuesday that his country had not yet submitted its contribution for December of funds to Greece for the bailout negotiated in the spring. “If Greece doesn’t fulfill certain things, we have the need for discussion,” Proell said. Greece was “not 100 percent on track,” he said. Dublin has for weeks resisted market and now political pressure to sign up for a bailout that would save its banks. Some European nations, like Portugal and Spain, want a deal to take bond market pressure off themselves. But other European leaders, like the Germans, are mindful of needing support from constituents who do not want to spend their earnings to bail out one country after another. Most analysts expect that the European Union will muddle through, adjusting its institutions as necessary. But the cost may mean new financial commitments by already strapped governments that need to cut their own budgets, and a further loss of credibility in global financial markets.

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Market update Northwest stocks Name

Div

PE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

AlskAir Avista BkofAm BarrettB Boeing CascadeB h CascdeCp ColSprtw Costco CraftBrew FLIR Sys HewlettP HmFedDE Intel Keycorp Kroger Lattice LaPac MDU Res MentorGr Microsoft

... 1.00 .04 .36f 1.68 ... .40f .80a .82 ... ... .32 .22 .72f .04 .42f ... ... .65f ... .64f

9 13 18 24 14 ... ... 24 23 46 18 11 ... 11 ... ... 10 ... 16 ... 7

54.17 +.12 +56.7 21.55 -.30 -.2 11.94 -.16 -20.7 15.00 -.69 +22.1 62.78 -.83 +16.0 .45 +.01 -33.8 35.62 -2.31 +29.6 52.52 -.27 +34.5 65.74 +.26 +11.1 6.48 +.03 +170.0 27.30 -.82 -16.6 41.80 -.74 -18.9 10.97 -.20 -17.6 21.07 -.23 +3.3 7.98 -.13 +43.8 22.44 -.41 +9.3 4.37 -.04 +61.9 7.88 -.20 +12.9 20.48 -.22 -13.2 11.15 -.02 +26.3 25.81 -.23 -15.3

Name NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstB Weyerh

Precious metals Metal NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

Price (troy oz.) $1338.00 $1338.30 $25.229

Pvs Day $1362.50 $1368.40 $26.088

Div

PE

1.08 .80 1.74f ... .48f ... 1.68 .12 .48 .07 1.44 .86f .52 ... .20 .20 .20 .20 ... .20a

20 16 17 23 56 ... 34 20 ... 22 17 9 24 10 ... 16 72 11 ... ...

Market recap YTD Last Chg %Chg 80.51 40.55 47.93 16.61 51.56 2.14 36.10 131.93 22.79 52.70 73.56 42.24 29.84 10.31 10.98 24.72 15.10 27.19 2.65 16.91

-1.29 -1.28 -.93 -.21 -1.25 +.04 -1.20 -1.54 -.40 -1.86 +.05 -.79 -.82 +.05 -.28 -.22 -.14 -.46 -.01 -.67

+21.9 +7.9 +6.4 +30.9 +42.2 -23.8 -4.4 +19.6 +7.0 +10.5 +19.3 +5.5 +29.4 +71.8 -18.1 +9.8 -21.9 +.7 +26.2 +6.7

Prime rate Time period

Percent

Last Previous day A week ago

3.25 3.25 3.25

NYSE

Amex

Most Active ($1 or more)

Name

Vol (00)

Citigrp S&P500ETF FordM BkofAm iShEMkts

4833332 2679621 2288175 2124955 1333360

Last Chg

4.22 118.16 16.51 11.94 45.17

-.10 -1.87 -.49 -.16 -1.22

Gainers ($2 or more)

Name

C-TrCVOL DicksSptg PSBMetDS DREBear rs DirChiBear

Last

Chg %Chg

110.03 +13.03 33.51 +3.59 14.45 +1.50 22.94 +2.10 18.45 +1.66

+13.4 +12.0 +11.6 +10.1 +9.9

Losers ($2 or more)

Name

Fabrinet n Noranda n Regis Cp MPG OffTr PSBMetDL

Last

17.01 11.29 18.02 2.20 15.00

Indexes

Chg %Chg

-2.69 -1.70 -2.62 -.31 -2.04

Most Active ($1 or more)

Name

NovaGld g GrtBasG g GoldStr g Taseko NthgtM g

Last Chg

123078 13.47 -.71 80030 2.72 -.23 74495 4.17 -.22 63337 4.24 -.14 59838 3.01 -.03

Gainers ($2 or more)

Name

OrienPap n EngySvcs CagleA SDgo pfA NewConcEn

Last

Chg %Chg

5.54 +.94 +20.4 4.45 +.45 +11.3 7.17 +.67 +10.3 21.86 +1.78 +8.9 4.09 +.33 +8.8

Losers ($2 or more)

Name

-13.7 -13.1 -12.7 -12.4 -12.0

LongweiPI PudaCoal LGL Grp WhiteRiv HeraldNB

422 2,665 58 3,145 20 140

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Diary Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Vol (00)

Last

52-Week High Low Name

Nasdaq

Chg %Chg

2.80 -.40 -12.5 11.35 -1.56 -12.1 18.26 -2.29 -11.1 17.13 -2.01 -10.5 2.29 -.25 -9.8

Most Active ($1 or more)

Name

Vol (00)

Last Chg

Cisco PwShs QQQ Microsoft Intel SiriusXM

2089178 900244 635801 608054 541844

19.43 51.45 25.81 21.07 1.37

-.52 -.87 -.23 -.23 -.01

Gainers ($2 or more)

Name

Last

InfoSvcs un EDAP TMS ChinaTInfo MediciNova SabraHlt n

Chg %Chg

5.19 +.76 4.10 +.51 5.62 +.66 5.95 +.70 19.10 +2.18

+17.2 +14.2 +13.3 +13.3 +12.9

Losers ($2 or more)

Name

Last

IBC Cap pf Netlist PerfectWld Shiloh CarverBcp

Diary

Chg %Chg

12.51 -2.73 -17.9 2.37 -.50 -17.4 26.03 -5.44 -17.3 10.36 -1.88 -15.4 2.83 -.50 -15.0

Diary 133 363 28 524 2 48

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

555 2,105 111 2,771 34 68

11,451.53 9,614.32 Dow Jones Industrials 4,957.21 3,742.01 Dow Jones Transportation 413.75 346.95 Dow Jones Utilities 7,817.25 6,355.83 NYSE Composite 2,177.58 1,689.19 Amex Index 2,592.94 2,061.14 Nasdaq Composite 1,227.08 1,010.91 S&P 500 12,970.39 10,596.20 Wilshire 5000 745.95 567.98 Russell 2000

World markets

Last

Net Chg

11,023.50 4,749.99 397.29 7,472.63 2,051.51 2,469.84 1,178.34 12,450.59 705.30

-178.47 -70.47 -4.57 -144.88 -41.85 -43.98 -19.41 -211.53 -14.64

YTD %Chg %Chg -1.59 -1.46 -1.14 -1.90 -2.00 -1.75 -1.62 -1.67 -2.03

52-wk %Chg

+5.71 +15.86 -.18 +4.00 +12.41 +8.84 +5.67 +7.81 +12.78

+5.62 +17.30 +5.36 +3.30 +11.78 +12.07 +6.13 +8.94 +17.09

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed Tuesday.

Key currency exchange rates Tuesday compared with late Monday in New York.

Market

Dollar vs:

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Close

Change

339.21 2,608.06 3,762.47 5,681.90 6,663.24 23,693.02 35,648.21 20,563.07 3,315.06 9,797.10 1,899.13 3,212.10 4,782.80 5,764.90

-1.83 t -1.75 t -2.63 t -2.38 t -1.87 t -1.39 t -1.13 t -2.05 t -.40 t -.31 t -.77 t -.76 t +.20 s -1.22 t

Exchange Rate

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

Pvs Day

.9764 1.5879 .9789 .002058 .1505 1.3490 .1289 .012008 .080192 .0320 .000880 .1437 1.0041 .0330

.9881 1.6065 .9927 .002070 .1505 1.3599 .1290 .012043 .081393 .0323 .000881 .1455 1.0154 .0330

Selected mutual funds YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret Amer Beacon Insti: LgCapInst 18.50 -0.30 +7.2 Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 17.55 -0.29 +6.9 Amer Century Inv: EqInc 6.90 -0.09 +7.4 GrowthI 24.05 -0.39 +9.1 Ultra 21.13 -0.39 +8.5 American Funds A: AmcpA p 17.60 -0.25 +6.5 AMutlA p 24.14 -0.30 +6.3 BalA p 17.24 -0.16 +8.1 BondA p 12.36 +0.01 +8.3 CapWA p 20.83 -0.08 +6.6 CapIBA p 49.36 -0.55 +6.0 CapWGA p 34.69 -0.65 +4.0 EupacA p 40.31 -0.81 +5.1 FdInvA p 34.50 -0.60 +6.6 GovtA p 14.58 +0.04 +6.6 GwthA p 28.83 -0.50 +5.5 HI TrA p 11.27 -0.07 +13.4 IncoA p 16.23 -0.18 +8.1 IntBdA p 13.59 +0.01 +5.7 ICAA p 26.73 -0.41 +4.6 NEcoA p 24.28 -0.40 +8.0 N PerA p 27.34 -0.49 +6.6 NwWrldA 53.77 -0.96 +13.9 SmCpA p 36.84 -0.69 +16.8 TxExA p 12.05 -0.12 +3.5 WshA p 25.83 -0.38 +6.7 Artio Global Funds: IntlEqI r 29.42 -0.67 +4.2 IntlEqA 28.66 -0.65 +4.0 IntEqII I r 12.17 -0.30 +3.3 Artisan Funds: Intl 21.35 -0.50 +3.3 MidCap 30.56 -0.56 +19.6 MidCapVal 19.44 -0.32 +8.1 Baron Funds: Growth 46.42 -0.49 +12.4 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 14.04 +0.02 +9.7 DivMu 14.49 -0.09 +3.4

TxMgdIntl 15.37 BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 16.57 GlAlA r 18.81 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 17.54 BlackRock Instl: EquityDv 16.61 GlbAlloc r 18.91 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 48.95 Columbia Class A: DivEqInc 9.38 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 28.02 AcornIntZ 38.31 ValRestr 46.31 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 10.60 USCorEq2 10.10 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 32.46 Davis Funds C & Y: NYVenY 32.86 NYVen C 31.21 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.66 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq 21.04 EmMktV 35.66 IntSmVa 15.90 LargeCo 9.32 USLgVa 18.50 US Small 19.24 US SmVa 22.84 IntlSmCo 15.85 Fixd 10.36 IntVa 17.54 Glb5FxInc 11.57 2YGlFxd 10.23 Dodge&Cox: Balanced 66.85 Income 13.37 IntlStk 34.43 Stock 100.66

-0.35 +0.6 -0.27 +6.3 -0.26 +5.5 -0.24 +4.8 -0.26 +6.6 -0.26 +5.8 -0.89 +10.1 -0.16 +7.6 -0.47 +13.7 -0.72 +13.9 -1.00 +9.4 -0.25 +6.5 -0.17 +11.5 -0.52 +4.8 -0.53 +5.0 -0.50 +4.1 -0.01 +8.1 -0.42 +16.8 -0.79 +14.5 -0.38 +6.5 -0.15 +7.6 -0.31 +9.9 -0.38 +17.2 -0.49 +16.5 -0.34 +12.9 +1.1 -0.43 +4.9 +6.7 +1.7 -0.76 +6.3 +7.0 -0.81 +8.1 -1.54 +5.8

Eaton Vance A: LgCpVal 17.02 NatlMunInc 9.27 Eaton Vance I: GblMacAbR 10.30 LgCapVal 17.07 FMI Funds: LgCap p 14.72 FPA Funds: NwInc 10.98 FPACres 26.38 Fairholme 34.18 Federated Instl: KaufmnK 5.14 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 18.90 StrInA 12.79 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 19.11 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 13.33 FF2015 11.11 FF2020 13.41 FF2020K 12.81 FF2025 11.12 FF2030 13.25 FF2035 10.96 FF2040 7.65 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 12.32 AMgr50 14.89 Balanc 17.49 BlueChGr 42.03 Canada 53.64 CapAp 23.84 CpInc r 9.31 Contra 64.31 ContraK 64.36 DisEq 21.51 DivIntl 29.19 DivrsIntK r 29.21 DivGth 25.92 EmrMk 25.49 Eq Inc 41.20 EQII 16.96

-0.30 +2.5 -0.20 +2.0 -0.01 +4.4 -0.30 +2.8 -0.17 +4.9 +0.01 +3.2 -0.22 +7.9 -0.68 +13.6 -0.09 +10.3 -0.32 +9.8 -0.06 +9.3 -0.32 +10.1 -0.15 -0.13 -0.19 -0.17 -0.18 -0.22 -0.20 -0.15

+7.2 +7.3 +7.6 +7.7 +7.7 +7.6 +7.5 +7.5

-0.22 +7.7 -0.15 +9.0 -0.17 +8.6 -0.82 +10.8 -1.16 +10.6 -0.37 +11.2 -0.10 +13.6 -1.10 +10.5 -1.10 +10.7 -0.40 +2.4 -0.65 +4.2 -0.66 +4.4 -0.50 +10.1 -0.49 +12.7 -0.74 +6.6 -0.29 +5.0

Fidel 29.72 FltRateHi r 9.78 GNMA 11.68 GovtInc 10.67 GroCo 76.66 GroInc 16.98 GrowthCoK 76.73 HighInc r 8.97 Indepn 22.46 IntBd 10.71 IntmMu 10.20 IntlDisc 31.90 InvGrBd 11.61 InvGB 7.45 LgCapVal 11.63 LatAm 56.14 LevCoStk 25.42 LowP r 35.85 LowPriK r 35.85 Magelln 66.74 MidCap 25.89 MuniInc 12.52 NwMkt r 16.03 OTC 50.13 100Index 8.35 Ovrsea 30.95 Puritn 17.14 SCmdtyStrt 11.15 SrsIntGrw 10.77 SrsIntVal 9.74 StIntMu 10.68 STBF 8.49 SmllCpS r 17.69 StratInc 11.41 StrReRt r 9.22 TotalBd 10.92 USBI 11.50 Value 64.00 Fidelity Selects: Gold r 53.97 Fidelity Spartan: ExtMkIn 35.09 500IdxInv 41.82 IntlInxInv 34.47

-0.55 +5.4 -0.02 +6.8 +0.02 +7.8 +0.03 +6.2 -1.35 +11.1 -0.29 +6.2 -1.34 +11.3 -0.06 +12.4 -0.46 +12.8 +0.03 +8.8 -0.07 +3.5 -0.79 +5.1 +0.03 +8.1 +0.02 +8.9 -0.20 +3.4 -1.41 +9.9 -0.43 +11.1 -0.56 +12.5 -0.56 +12.6 -1.23 +3.9 -0.47 +10.8 -0.13 +4.1 -0.13 +11.8 -0.98 +9.6 -0.13 +5.3 -0.81 +0.1 -0.18 +8.6 -0.42 +2.3 -0.26 +10.5 -0.25 +0.3 -0.05 +2.4 +0.01 +3.9 -0.35 +11.0 -0.05 +9.7 -0.13 +8.9 +0.02 +8.9 +0.04 +7.3 -1.20 +12.4 -1.52 +27.1 -0.67 +16.6 -0.68 +7.5 -0.86 +3.1

TotMktInv 34.32 -0.58 +9.1 Fidelity Spart Adv: 500IdxAdv 41.82 -0.68 +7.5 TotMktAd r 34.33 -0.57 +9.1 First Eagle: GlblA 44.67 -0.66 +11.7 OverseasA 22.01 -0.28 +13.1 Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA p 11.63 -0.13 +2.8 FoundAl p 10.23 -0.16 +5.9 HYTFA p 9.93 -0.14 +5.2 IncomA p 2.13 -0.02 +9.7 USGovA p 6.82 +0.01 +6.5 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv p +11.0 IncmeAd 2.11 -0.03 +9.4 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.15 -0.02 +9.1 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 20.28 NA Frank/Temp Temp A: ForgnA p 6.83 -0.14 +4.3 GlBd A p 13.54 -0.05 +10.8 GrwthA p 17.25 -0.32 +2.6 WorldA p 14.32 -0.26 +2.5 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 13.57 -0.05 +10.4 GE Elfun S&S: S&S PM 38.23 -0.62 +3.7 GMO Trust III: Quality 19.37 -0.30 +1.2 GMO Trust IV: IntlIntrVl 21.15 -0.47 +3.1 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 14.01 -0.27 +14.3 IntlCorEq 28.10 -0.63 +5.1 Quality 19.38 -0.30 +1.3 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 7.27 -0.04 +12.1 HYMuni 8.44 -0.12 +7.9 Harbor Funds: Bond 13.01 +8.8 CapApInst 34.50 -0.59 +4.6 IntlInv t 57.47 -1.62 +5.7 Intl r 58.16 -1.64 +6.0

Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 32.54 -0.58 +6.1 Hartford Fds Y: CapAppI 32.53 -0.58 +6.3 Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 39.62 -0.72 +8.4 Div&Gr 18.54 -0.28 +5.8 Advisers 18.71 -0.19 +7.2 TotRetBd 11.36 +0.01 +7.8 Hussman Funds: StrGrowth 12.99 +0.12 +1.6 Invesco Funds A: Chart p 15.28 -0.21 +1.7 CmstkA 14.78 -0.22 +8.2 EqIncA 8.21 -0.09 +6.9 GrIncA p 18.00 -0.27 +5.2 HYMuA 9.26 -0.11 +6.8 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 23.36 NA AssetStA p 24.06 NA AssetStrI r 24.27 NA JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 11.64 +0.02 +8.0 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 11.63 +0.02 +8.1 HighYld 8.19 -0.05 +13.3 IntmTFBd 10.89 -0.08 +2.6 ShtDurBd 11.03 +3.2 USLCCrPls 19.26 -0.32 +5.9 Janus T Shrs: OvrseasT r 48.37 -1.14 +13.8 PrkMCVal T 21.31 -0.34 +7.6 Twenty T 63.04 -1.24 +2.4 John Hancock Cl 1: LSBalanc 12.65 -0.15 +9.0 LSGrwth 12.47 -0.19 +8.9 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 20.99 -0.34 +17.0 Lazard Open: EmgMkO p 21.31 -0.35 +16.6 Legg Mason A: WAMgMu p 15.47 -0.22 +1.9 Longleaf Partners: Partners 26.89 -0.41 +11.6 Loomis Sayles:

LSBondI 14.31 -0.09 +12.6 StrInc C 14.90 -0.09 +11.8 LSBondR 14.26 -0.08 +12.4 StrIncA 14.82 -0.10 +12.5 Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdY 12.49 -0.02 +11.4 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 10.68 -0.17 +5.2 BdDebA p 7.76 -0.05 +11.4 ShDurIncA p 4.65 +6.4 MFS Funds A: TotRA 13.67 -0.13 +6.2 ValueA 21.59 -0.32 +5.0 MFS Funds I: ValueI 21.69 -0.32 +5.2 MainStay Funds A: HiYldBA 5.92 -0.02 +11.4 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 8.37 -0.18 +3.7 Matthews Asian: AsianGIInv 18.07 -0.23 +15.9 PacTgrInv 22.97 -0.40 +19.4 MergerFd 15.94 -0.04 +2.6 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.67 +0.02 +12.2 TotRtBdI 10.66 +0.01 +12.3 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 28.80 -0.40 +7.8 GlbDiscZ 29.61 NA QuestZ 18.49 NA SharesZ 20.48 NA Neuberger&Berm Inv: GenesInst 41.82 -0.63 +10.8 Neuberger&Berm Tr: Genesis 43.36 -0.65 +10.5 Northern Funds: HiYFxInc 7.33 -0.05 +13.0 Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 26.46 -0.28 +3.6 Intl I r 18.61 -0.35 +10.5 Oakmark r 39.58 -0.57 +6.9 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 7.96 -0.06 +12.6 GlbSMdCap 14.71 -0.25 +15.2 Oppenheimer A:

CapApA p 40.87 -0.74 +2.4 DvMktA p 34.23 -0.67 +19.0 GlobA p 57.86 -1.22 +9.1 GblStrIncA 4.30 -0.02 +15.3 IntBdA p 6.66 -0.06 +7.9 MnStFdA 30.77 -0.54 +9.4 RisingDivA 14.67 -0.24 +6.5 S&MdCpVl 29.36 -0.46 +10.5 Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 13.30 -0.23 +5.7 S&MdCpVl 25.21 -0.40 +9.7 Oppenheimer C&M: RisingDvC p 13.26 -0.22 +5.8 Oppenheimer Roch: RcNtMuA 6.95 -0.13 +5.1 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 33.94 -0.66 +19.4 IntlBdY 6.66 -0.06 +8.2 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 11.52 +0.01 +9.3 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AlAsetAut r 11.08 +0.01 +11.1 AllAsset 12.50 -0.04 +12.5 ComodRR 8.40 -0.35 +9.9 HiYld 9.32 -0.05 +13.4 InvGrCp 11.74 +0.02 +12.7 LowDu 10.64 -0.01 +5.2 RealRtnI 11.53 +0.02 +9.0 ShortT 9.93 +2.0 TotRt 11.52 +0.01 +9.6 TR II 11.13 +0.02 +8.7 PIMCO Funds A: LwDurA 10.64 -0.01 +4.8 RealRtA p 11.53 +0.02 +8.6 TotRtA 11.52 +0.01 +9.2 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 11.52 +0.01 +8.4 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 11.52 +0.01 +9.3 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 11.52 +0.01 +9.5 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 43.80 -0.58 +13.3 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 38.04 -0.69 +7.2

Price Funds: BlChip 35.82 CapApp 19.62 EmMktS 34.19 EqInc 22.03 EqIndex 31.82 Growth 30.20 HlthSci 28.09 HiYield 6.79 IntlBond 10.14 IntlStk 13.80 MidCap 55.73 MCapVal 22.28 N Asia 19.05 New Era 47.28 N Horiz 30.76 N Inc 9.67 R2010 15.13 R2015 11.61 R2020 15.92 R2025 11.58 R2030 16.52 R2040 16.55 ShtBd 4.88 SmCpStk 32.08 SmCapVal 33.44 SpecIn 12.35 Value 21.90 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 12.60 VoyA p 22.12 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 10.65 PremierI r 18.70 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 35.72 S&P Sel 18.64 Scout Funds: Intl 30.87 Selected Funds: AmShD 39.26 AmShS p 39.18 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 19.85 Third Avenue Fds:

-0.66 +9.3 -0.19 +8.0 -0.74 +13.6 -0.31 +6.6 -0.51 +7.3 -0.57 +9.8 -0.44 +7.3 -0.05 +13.0 -0.06 +5.0 -0.32 +9.5 -0.84 +17.4 -0.35 +7.5 -0.25 +18.0 -1.11 +8.4 -0.37 +20.3 +0.02 +7.8 -0.16 +8.5 -0.14 +8.8 -0.22 +9.0 -0.17 +9.1 -0.27 +9.3 -0.28 +9.2 +0.01 +3.4 -0.52 +19.1 -0.61 +13.4 -0.04 +8.6 -0.37 +6.9 -0.22 +5.8 -0.42 +12.1 -0.19 +12.7 -0.33 +14.7 -0.57 +8.3 -0.30 +7.5 -0.69 +6.9 -0.64 +5.4 -0.64 +5.1 -0.38 +3.1

ValueInst 51.32 Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 26.93 IntValue I 27.53 Tweedy Browne: GblValue 23.20 Vanguard Admiral: CAITAdm 10.87 CpOpAdl 71.42 EMAdmr r 38.39 Energy 115.00 500Adml 108.76 GNMA Ad 11.05 HlthCr 51.28 HiYldCp 5.74 InfProAd 26.12 ITsryAdml 11.84 IntGrAdm 59.25 ITAdml 13.46 ITGrAdm 10.31 LtdTrAd 11.06 LTGrAdml 9.37 LT Adml 10.90 MuHYAdm 10.32 PrmCap r 64.94 STsyAdml 10.88 ShtTrAd 15.90 STIGrAd 10.84 TtlBAdml 10.78 TStkAdm 29.49 WellslAdm 52.27 WelltnAdm 51.93 Windsor 42.24 WdsrIIAd 43.18 Vanguard Fds: AssetA 23.48 CapOpp 30.90 DivdGro 13.70 Energy 61.22 EqInc 19.27 Explr 66.20 GNMA 11.05 GlobEq 17.28 HYCorp 5.74

-1.04 +10.8 -0.46 +9.2 -0.47 +9.6 -0.33 +9.4 -0.13 +3.7 -1.03 +2.9 -0.79 +12.7 -2.75 +2.6 -1.76 +7.5 +0.01 +7.4 -0.61 +2.1 -0.03 +12.3 +0.06 +7.3 +0.05 +9.9 -1.50 +9.6 -0.14 +3.2 +0.03 +12.2 -0.05 +2.3 +0.15 +10.4 -0.12 +3.1 -0.12 +4.3 -0.96 +5.3 +0.01 +3.1 -0.03 +1.1 +0.01 +5.5 +0.03 +7.4 -0.50 +8.9 -0.11 +9.0 -0.47 +6.6 -0.66 +5.8 -0.69 +3.9 -0.24 +10.0 -0.45 +2.9 -0.18 +5.1 -1.46 +2.6 -0.29 +7.8 -1.15 +15.5 +0.01 +7.3 -0.32 +10.3 -0.03 +12.2

HlthCre 121.47 InflaPro 13.30 IntlGr 18.61 IntlVal 31.40 ITIGrade 10.31 LifeCon 16.09 LifeGro 21.15 LifeMod 19.09 LTIGrade 9.37 Morg 16.79 MuInt 13.46 MuLtd 11.06 PrecMtls r 25.22 PrmcpCor 12.94 Prmcp r 62.56 SelValu r 17.75 STAR 18.61 STIGrade 10.84 StratEq 17.03 TgtRetInc 11.23 TgRe2010 22.20 TgtRe2015 12.25 TgRe2020 21.62 TgtRe2025 12.26 TgRe2030 20.91 TgtRe2035 12.59 TgtRe2040 20.63 TgtRe2045 13.02 USGro 17.13 Wellsly 21.57 Welltn 30.07 Wndsr 12.52 WndsII 24.33 Vanguard Idx Fds: 500 108.74 Balanced 20.63 EMkt 29.16 Europe 26.34 Extend 37.73 Growth 29.61 ITBnd 11.61 MidCap 18.78 Pacific 10.45 REIT r 17.27

-1.45 +2.1 +0.03 +7.2 -0.47 +9.5 -0.75 +2.6 +0.03 +12.1 -0.10 +8.2 -0.30 +8.8 -0.18 +8.8 +0.15 +10.3 -0.29 +10.0 -0.14 +3.1 -0.05 +2.2 -1.01 +23.5 -0.19 +6.9 -0.93 +5.2 -0.29 +11.3 -0.17 +7.2 +0.01 +5.4 -0.33 +11.5 -0.03 +7.7 -0.16 +8.2 -0.12 +8.3 -0.23 +8.3 -0.16 +8.3 -0.30 +8.3 -0.20 +8.3 -0.33 +8.3 -0.21 +8.3 -0.30 +4.1 -0.05 +8.9 -0.27 +6.5 -0.19 +5.8 -0.39 +3.9

SmCap

31.69 -0.61 +15.3

SmlCpGth

19.72 -0.35 +17.2

SmlCpVl

14.81 -0.31 +13.4

-1.76 +7.4 -0.19 +8.5 -0.60 +12.6 -0.75 +1.5 -0.70 +15.5 -0.48 +9.3 +0.06 +12.2 -0.32 +14.8 -0.17 +8.0 -0.61 +19.3

500Sgl

89.84 -1.46 +7.5

STBdIdx

10.67 +0.01 +4.5

STBnd

10.67 +0.01 +4.4

TotBnd

10.78 +0.03 +7.3

TotlIntl

15.23 -0.36 +5.7

TotStk

29.48 -0.50 +8.8

Vanguard Instl Fds: DevMkInst EmMkInst

9.81 -0.24

NS

29.23 -0.60 +12.8

ExtIn

37.79 -0.71 +15.7

FTAllWldI r

91.05 -2.11 +6.2

GrwthIst

29.62 -0.48 +9.5

InfProInst

10.64 +0.03 +7.3

InstIdx

108.05 -1.75 +7.5

InsPl

108.05 -1.75 +7.6

InsTStPlus

26.66 -0.44 +9.0

MidCpIst

18.85 -0.33 +15.0

SCInst

31.75 -0.61 +15.5

TBIst

10.78 +0.03 +7.5

TSInst

29.50 -0.49 +8.9

Vanguard Signal:

TotBdSgl

10.78 +0.03 +7.4

TotStkSgl

28.47 -0.47 +8.9

Western Asset: CorePlus I

10.92 +0.02 +12.5


B6 Wednesday, November 17, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2010

McKay Park

The Bulletin

Chuck Arnold and Scott Ramsay will have to wait a little while longer before finding who was the top vote-getter in their race for Bend City Council. And after that, they might have to wait some more. As of Nov. 3, Ramsay held an eight vote lead over Arnold in the tightest race for local government but there were still some outstanding ballots that needed to be tallied. On Tuesday, the Deschutes County Clerk Nancy Blankenship reported there are 505 ballots that will be added to Central Oregon’s total numbers. She estimated that about half of those could be city ballots, and therefore play a role in the outcome of the race for Position 7 on the Bend City Council. Those ballots should be counted this week, Blankenship said, and a final tally should be available on Friday. But even then it’s still probable a recount will take place because Ramsay and Arnold’s vote totals are so close. See Votes / C5

Correction In a story headlined “Bend taking another look at DMV site’s traffic impact,” which appeared Sunday, Nov. 14, on Page B1, the impacts the city of Bend will re-evaluate before issuing a building permit for the DMV office were reported incorrectly because of incorrect information supplied to The Bulletin. The city will only review the parking impacts in Brookswood Meadow Plaza. The Bulletin regrets the error.

Wall St. Bond St.

Agency agrees to pay land trust $1.1 million for Miller’s Landing

Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

The Bulletin

The Bend Park & Recreation District committed to buying a new riverfront park Tuesday night, agreeing to purchase the Miller’s Landing property

near the Colorado Avenue Dam for $1.1 million early next year. The roughly 4.7-acre parcel sits directly across the Deschutes River from McKay Park. It is currently owned by Millbrook LLC — a partnership between Brooks Resources and the Miller family, owners of Bend-based Miller Lumber. As recently as 2007, Millbrook LLC was aiming to develop 37 townhouses on the property, a plan the company dropped when the real estate market went soft. Central to the transaction is the Trust for Public Land, a national nonprofit conservation organization that obtained an option to purchase the prop-

erty from Millbrook LLC last spring. Park district Executive Director Don Horton said the plan is for the trust to close a deal to buy the property for $1.8 million before the end of the year, then sell it to the park district for $1.1 million by the end of March 2011. Horton said the trust has obtained a short-term loan from the Portlandbased Collins Foundation that will allow the group to finalize the deal for the property before the end of 2010 — as required under the option from Millbrook — while it works to raise the final $155,000 it needs to reach the $1.8 million figure. See Park / C5

AFTER-SCHOOL ARTS

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Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

abino Perez, 13, completes an art poster in Pat Roberts’ classroom Monday afternoon after school at Pilot Butte

Middle School in Bend. Perez and a handful of other students create art in the classroom and around the school as part of an after-school art club. For the full story and more photos, turn to Page C3.

Division Street skatepark proposal gets a new push Grass-roots group begins talks with city of Bend, ODOT to move project forward By Nick Grube The Bulletin

Jesse Pennavaria’s wait for a new skateboard park in Bend might be a little more meaningful now. The 19-year-old has been skating at Bend’s lone public skateboarding facility, at Ponderosa Park off S.E. 15th Avenue Park, for years. After countless hours of riding through the concrete bowls and over limited street features, like a four-step staircase and single handrail, he said he’s in need of something more. “It’s just too old. It’s been here for too long,” Pennavaria said while standing in a parking lot next to the circa-1997 skatepark. “I still want it here, but I just want a new park.” His wish might be granted

Proposed skatepark Division St.

8th St.

By Nick Grube

Bend park district to buy 4.7-acre riverfront tract By Scott Hammers

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Race for Bend council seat may head to recount

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Simpso n Ave.

The Bulletin

REDMOND — Several changes could be on the way for Redmond’s Centennial Park, including a new manager for its farmers market and possibly a skating rink this winter. The park opened last year as a centerpiece of the city’s centennial celebrations. Concerts were scheduled for much of the summer, and people could buy coffee and baked goods at One Street Down Cafe’s park location. A play fountain has proved popular, as did the farmers market. City staff, though, keep trying to find new ways to fill the park. The city, for instance, recently began “The idea is to searching for a new management comhave a place pany to run the park’s really focused farmers market. Last market operator on high-quality, year’s moved out of Central OregonOregon, so Redmond this week posted a reproduced quest for proposals for food. That’s market management. Responses are due by a service we 5. want to provide Jan. The RFP outlines in downtown.” how the city believes the market should be — Jon Williams, run, in particular deRedmond economic fining what kind of booths should line the development paths. At least 30 perproject manager cent of the vendors should be selling local produce — defined as being from Oregon — with the remaining booths selling locally-produced crafts or food prepared by non-chain restaurants, according to the RFP. The document also bans people from selling services such as “cell phone or cable subscriptions.” “The idea is to have a place really focused on high-quality, Oregon-produced food,” said Jon Williams, an economic development project manager with the city. “That’s a service we want to provide in downtown. We do not intend for people to be able to sign up for cable.” See Redmond / C5

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By Patrick Cliff

The Trust for Public Land is preparing to purchase Miller’s Landing, a 4.7-acre property across the river from McKay Park between downtown Bend and the Old Mill District. The Trust intends to sell the property to the Bend Park & Recreation District, which provided a portion of the $1.8 million purchase price.

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New market manager, skating rink among ideas for city park

Parks board approves property acquisition

Columbia St.

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Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

sooner than he thinks. A grass-roots effort to build a skatepark on Division Street under the Bend Parkway is currently under way. Organizers are in negotiations with the Oregon Department of Transportation on a lease for the property, and they have contacted the city of

Bend to inquire about the various steps they need to take and fees they have to pay to move forward with the project. “We’re trying to make this a legitimate, real-deal push,” said Christopher Laws, the treasurer for the nonprofit Division Street Skatepark Project. “We want to provide a community-built skatepark that’s good, that’s safe and that gives a good name to the skateboarding community.” The idea for a Division Street skatepark was hatched several years ago by a group of 30-something skateboarders who wanted to add a little flavor to Bend’s urban landscape and give skaters a new place to ride. The park was inspired by Portland’s Burnside Skatepark, which was built underneath the Burnside Bridge by skaters, and would be constructed in much the same manner — with the skaters in control of the design. See Skatepark / C5

Bend driver charged with assault and reckless driving in incident with cyclist By Erin Golden The Bulletin

The driver who hit and seriously injured a cyclist riding on Century Drive this summer is now facing charges of assault and reckless driving. On June 30, 75-year-old Kirk Bashore, of Bend, was driving north on Century Drive near the intersection of Mammoth Drive when he came upon three cyclists riding single file in the bike lane. According to police, Bashore swerved into the bike lane and then back onto the road, striking the second cyclist, 40-year-old Shelli Zulauf, of Bend, with the driver’s side of his Dodge Durango. Bashore’s SUV continued across both lanes of traffic before hitting an embankment and rolling onto its top. He was taken by ambulance to St. Charles Bend, where he was treated and released on the day of the crash. Zulauf, who was critically injured, was also taken to the hospital. See Cyclist / C5


C2 Wednesday, November 17, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

L B   Compiled from Bulletin staff reports

Suspicious devices prompt bank closure A La Pine bank was closed Tuesday afternoon after someone spotted devices in the bank that were described as “potentially suspicious.� At about 1:40 p.m., Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office deputies were called to the U.S. Bank branch on Huntington Road to investigate, according to a news release from Lt. Kevin Dizney. No threatening messages about the devices had been sent to the bank or the Sheriff’s Office, but officials notified the Oregon State Police Bomb Squad. The bomb squad was called off after deputies determined that the devices, smokeless cigarette containers used to help people quit smoking, were not a threat. The items were recovered by their owner, the release said.

Candlelight vigil set for missing woman Friends and family members of Lori “Woody� Blaylock, the 48-year-old Bend woman who has been missing since late Oc-

tober, are planning a candlelight vigil, to be held at Drake Park on Thursday evening. The event will be held at 6:30 p.m., said Richelle Hartman, Blaylock’s friend and co-worker. She said Blaylock’s sister and niece are encouraging anyone who knew Blaylock and members of the public to attend the vigil. Blaylock was reported missing on Nov. 2 by her co-workers at St. Charles Bend. Her body has not been found, but police suspect that her husband, who was arrested last week, killed her and left her body in the North Santiam River. Investigators have recovered a sweater that Blaylock was believed to be wearing at the time of her disappearance.

Election winners to speak at event tonight Election winners will discuss plans for the future at a Talk of the Town event tonight, according to a news release. The event, which will take place at the Cascade Theatrical Company, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave. in Bend, at 6:30 p.m., will fea-

ture election winners discussing their plans and goals for the year ahead. The elected officials will also answer audience questions. The event is free, though attendees must RSVP ahead of time. Those interested in attending should e-mail an RSVP to talk@bendbroadband.com.

Bend-La Pine school board seeks applicants The Bend-La Pine Schools Board of Directors is seeking applicants for its vacant volunteer board member position, according to a news release. The deadline to apply for the Zone 1 volunteer director position is Dec. 3 at 4 p.m. The position, which was previously held by Wells Ashby, is now vacant as Ashby takes on the role of Deschutes County Circuit Court judge. Those interested in applying for the position can attend an informational session Nov. 30 at 5:30 p.m. at Bend La Pine Schools, 520 N.W. Wall St., Room 314, to learn more. More information about the application process can be viewed at http://bit.ly/BLSZone1.

N  R POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Bend Police Department

Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 7:17 a.m. Nov. 15, in the 100 block of Northwest Gilchrist Avenue. Burglary — A burglary was reported and vehicle and tools stolen at 8:17 a.m. Nov. 15, in the 100 block of Northeast Franklin Avenue. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and wallet stolen at 8:54 a.m. Nov. 15, in the 20600 block of Morningstar Drive. Unlawful entry — An RV was reported entered and television, DVD player and fire extinguisher stolen at 9:16 a.m. Nov. 15, in the 20400 block of Robal Road. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and purse stolen at 9:35 a.m. Nov. 15, in the 20600 block of Liberty Lane. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 10:36 a.m. Nov. 15, in the 20700 block of Amber Way. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 10:40 a.m. Nov. 15, in the 20700 block of Amber Court. Theft — A theft was reported at 11:03 a.m. Nov. 15, in the 1300

block of Southeast Armour Road. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and clothing stolen at 3:40 p.m. Nov. 15, in the 800 block of Northwest 12th Street. Theft — A cell phone was reported stolen at 4:46 p.m. Nov. 15, in the 2500 block of Northeast Twin Knolls Drive. Robbery — A robbery was reported at 7:15 p.m. Nov. 15, in the 500 block of Northeast Fourth Street. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 12:19 a.m. Nov. 16, in the 100 block of Southeast Third Street. Redmond Police Department

Theft — A theft was reported at 4:55 p.m. Nov. 15, in the 2200 block of Northwest Cedar Avenue. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 3:29 p.m. Nov. 15, in the 2900 block of Southwest 23rd Street. Criminal mischief — Graffiti was reported at 11:49 a.m. Nov. 15, in the 1700 block of Southwest Parkway Drive. Criminal mischief — Graffiti was reported at 11:32 a.m. Nov. 15, in the 2000 block of Southwest Highland Avenue. Theft — Items were reported stolen from vehicles at 7:53 a.m. Nov. 15, in the 200 block of Southwest Pumice Avenue. Prineville Police Department

Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 8:28 a.m.

Nov. 15, in the area of Fifth Street. Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 9:43 p.m. Nov. 15, in the area of Choctaw Road and River Woods Drive in Bend. Theft — A theft was reported at 2:27 p.m. Nov. 15, in the 65100 block of Smokey Butte Drive in Bend. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 9:44 a.m. Nov. 15, in the area of Powell Butte Highway near milepost 14 in Bend. Oregon State Police

DUII — Richard Lee Rizzuti, 41, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 12:25 a.m. Nov. 16, in the area of Southeast Cleveland Avenue and Southeast Third Street.

BEND FIRE RUNS Friday 10:29 a.m. — Passenger vehicle fire, 2978 N.E. Red Oak Drive. 11:44 a.m. — Unauthorized burning, 20858 King Hezekiah Way. 5:14 p.m. — Smoke odor reported, 344 N.W. Delaware Ave. 23 — Medical aid calls. Saturday 4:46 p.m. — Unauthorized burning, 63155 Don Jr Lane. 23 — Medical aid calls. Sunday 14 — Medical aid calls.

Iranian ayatollah orders release of 13 American hostages in 1979 The Associated Press

Today is Wednesday, Nov. 17, the 321st day of 2010. There are 44 days left in the year. TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On Nov. 17, 1800, Congress held its first session in Washington in the partially completed Capitol building. ON THIS DATE In 1558, Elizabeth I acceded to the English throne upon the death of Queen Mary. In 1869, the Suez Canal opened in Egypt. In 1917, French sculptor Auguste Rodin died in Meudon at age 77. In 1934, Lyndon Baines Johnson married Claudia Alta Taylor, better known as Lady Bird, in San Antonio, Texas. In 1962, Washington’s Dulles International Airport was dedicated by President John F. Kennedy. In 1969, the first round of Strategic Arms Limitation Talks between the United States and the Soviet Union opened in Helsinki, Finland. In 1970, the Soviet Union landed an unmanned, remote-controlled vehicle on the moon, the Lunokhod 1. In 1973, President Richard Nixon told Associated Press managing editors in Orlando, Fla.: “People have got to know whether or not their president is a crook. Well, I’m not a crook.�

T O D AY IN HISTORY In 1979, Iran’s Ayatollah Khomeini ordered the release of 13 black and/or female American hostages being held at the U.S. Embassy in Tehran. In 1987, a federal jury in Denver convicted two neo-Nazis and acquitted two others of civil rights violations in the 1984 slaying of radio talk show host Alan Berg. TEN YEARS AGO The Florida Supreme Court froze the state’s presidential tally, forbidding Secretary of State Katherine Harris from certifying results of the marathon vote count just as Republican George W. Bush was advancing his minuscule lead over Democrat Al Gore. Also, a federal appeals court refused to block recounts under way in two heavily Democratic counties. FIVE YEARS AGO U.S. Rep. John Murtha of Pennsylvania, considered one of Congress’ most hawkish Democrats, called for an immediate U.S. withdrawal from Iraq. A jury in Sarasota, Fla. convicted mechanic Joseph Smith of kidnapping, raping and strangling 11-year-old Carlie Brucia, whose abduction had been captured by a car-wash security camera. (Smith was later sentenced to death.)

TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Sen. James Inhofe, R-Okla., is 76. Rock musician Gerry McGee (The Ventures) is 73. Singer Gordon Lightfoot is 72. Singer-songwriter Bob Gaudio is 69. Movie director Martin Scorsese is 68. Actress Lauren Hutton is 67. Actor-director Danny DeVito is 66. “Saturday Night Live� producer Lorne Michaels is 66. Baseball Hall-of-Famer Tom Seaver is 66. Movie director Roland Joffe is 65. Former Democratic National Chairman Howard Dean is 62. Actor Stephen Root is 59. Rock musician Jim Babjak (The Smithereens) is 53. Actress Mary Elizabeth Mastrantonio is 52. Actor William Moses is 51. Entertainer RuPaul is 50. Actor Dylan Walsh is 47. U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Susan Rice is 46. Actress Sophie Marceau is 44. Actress-model Daisy Fuentes is 44. Rhythmand-blues singer Ronnie DeVoe (New Edition; Bell Biv DeVoe) is 43. Rock musician Ben Wilson (Blues Traveler) is 43. Actor Leonard Roberts is 38. Actress Leslie Bibb is 37. Actor Brandon Call is 34. Country singer Aaron Lines is 33. Actress Rachel McAdams is 32. Rock musician Isaac Hanson (Hanson) is 30. Actor Justin Cooper is 22. Actress Raquel Castro is 16. THOUGHT FOR TODAY “The upper classes are merely a nation’s past; the middle class is its future.� — Ayn Rand, RussianAmerican author (1905-1982)

After 55 years, engineering veteran still reports to work By Mike Mcinally

the Army. When his hitch ended in 1957, he enrolled in graduCORVALLIS — It doesn’t ate school at the University of tell you everything you need to Minnesota, earning a master’s know about Roger Lindquist, degree in civil engineering. but his employee number at In 1958, with graduate school CH2M Hill isn’t a bad place to completed, “I loaded up my car start the story: and drove to Corvallis. Jim Remember that CH2M Hill, (Howland, one of the company’s the international engineering founders) was expecting me to company that started in Corval- come back. What dumb luck ‌ lis, has some 24,000 employees I think they were probably still around the globe. Lindquist’s desperate.â€? employee number? 24. In those days, CH2M was In fact, Lindquist’s career at based in a building on Western CH2M Hill dates back to 1955. Boulevard in Corvallis. The Today, 55 years later, the 77- partners had offices, while enyear-old Lindquist still reports gineers sat three abreast in one to work, logging big open room. eight or so hours The break room a week, careful “CH2M has really was in the furnot to take work nace room. away from any been a special Even then, of the younger place to work. Lindquist reengineers. called, it was Not that they They gave me a clear that Howmind. One of lot of respect.â€? land and his those younger co-founders had engineers, Vince — Rodger Lindquist, launched someRybel, wrote this longtime CH2M Hill thing special. of Lindquist back employee “They respected in 2005: “I cannot their fellow emthink of anyone ployees. They within the company who has communicated really well ‌ He provided such outstanding ser- created an atmosphere, a workvice in training young engineers ing atmosphere that I’ve never for such a long period of time as seen anywhere else.â€? Roger has done. Without Roger, Later in 1959, Roger met his CH2M Hill would have had future wife, Whitney, on a blind fewer successful projects, more date. projects with major problems “It was a successful first and a less stellar reputation.â€? date,â€? said Whitney Lindquist. Lindquist shrugs off the “We got married in July 1960. praise. “CH2M has really been I had no clue what an engineer a special place to work,â€? he said. was when I got married.â€? “They gave me a lot of respect.â€? One thing about an engineer’s When employee No. 24 start- life became clear as the years ed work at CH2M, the com- went on: “They travel a lot.â€? pany had just landed one of its In fact, Roger Lindquist has first big jobs a Georgia-Pacific tackled projects near and far for mill in Toledo and it needed, as CH2M Hill. Lindquist said, “a flunky.â€? Some The list is a lengthy, but it inof Lindquist’s professors at Or- cludes projects at the wastewaegon State University recom- ter treatment plants in Corvalmended the young engineer to lis, Eugene and Milwaukie. He’s the company. also worked on projects at the That was 1955. Later that Portland and Seattle airports year, however, the draft beck- and dam projects throughout oned, and Lindquist went into the United States and elseGazette-Times

where. Abroad, he’s worked on a water-distribution project on the island of Trinidad, and on a wastewater project in Alexandria, Egypt, among many other ports of call. Whitney got to travel with her husband for some of those projects. But she also had to stay behind in Corvallis to raise their two daughters while Roger’s work took him away from home for extended periods. “The girls and I would get into our little routine,� she said, “and then suddenly some guy from Egypt would show up.� Whitney Lindquist also managed some rental units in Corvallis for years, and she learned to handle matters on her own important when you consider that communications around the world were not as timely or convenient as they are now. “When he was gone, he was gone,� she said. “And I had to figure out how to fix the problems, because there was no one else to help.� But she’s clearly proud of Roger’s work around the world and equally proud of the way he still works as a mentor to younger engineers. The job also has given the Lindquists the freedom to sightsee around the world in particular, they rave about hiking trips in Switzerland. In fact, one of the reasons why Roger Lindquist hasn’t retired yet is that they’ve already been able to cross many of those “to-dos� off their list. “Roger has not needed to retire in order to do some of the things that people sometimes need to retire to do,� she said. Some projects do await Roger Lindquist when he does retire, in particular writing a family history. But it doesn’t sound as if he’s got plans to take down his shingle anytime soon. “I don’t have any idea� when he might officially retire, he said. “I’m sure they’ll tell me.�


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, November 17, 2010 C3

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A special section featuring news from schools in Deschutes, Jefferson and Crook counties

Creativity in the classroom After-school program gives middle-school students an artistic outlet By Megan Kehoe The Bulletin

Deep puddles of neon paint sat waiting on the pallet. After 20 minutes of carefully lining the floor with newspaper and laying out black sheets of construction paper, it was finally time. Joceline Heredia, 12, picked up a paintbrush, dipped it in one of the puddles and started slicing through the air. Bright pink paint went flying in all directions. “It can get pretty messy,” said Joceline, smiling. “Last time we had to scrub the floors because paint got everywhere.” Cleaning up is only a small aspect of Pilot Butte Middle School’s art club, where students funnel their pent-up creativity into painting and drawing two afternoons a month. During Monday’s session, about ten students met after school in the art room for an hour, working on projects of their own choosing. “The club allows them to get some art into their life when it doesn’t fit into their class schedule,” said Pat Roberts, who has taught at the middle school for 18 years. “It lets them get that creative energy out.” The creativity was flowing Monday, with most students seated at tables, buried in piles of pencils and oil pastels. Sometimes, the students will use their artistic talent to work together on club projects to benefit the school. According to Kaylie Simon, 13, last year, students in the club painted trash cans around the school and the set for a school play. “It’s a lot more fun than doing art at home,” said Kaylie of the club, adding that the art room is bursting with fun art materials. “It’s nice to not to have your brother torturing you while you try and make something,” she said smiling.

Pilot Butte Middle School students use a splatter technique — accompanied by giggles — on a black sheet of construction paper at the art club after school Monday afternoon. Photos by Rob Kerr The Bulletin

September James, 11, concentrates as she works on an architectural drawing during an art club meeting at Pilot Butte Middle School on Monday afternoon. The program, in Pat Roberts’ classroom, offers snacks and the opportunity to continue art education beyond school hours.

Pollock-esque painting During the hourlong session, Kaylie worked with Joceline to create Jackson Pollock-inspired artwork. The two loaded paintbrushes with thick gobs of bright neon paint, and then splattered it in violent motions across sheets of black construction paper. The finished product was a smattering of neon yellow, green and pink streaks that the girls dried with the help of an old hair dryer. “Art’s really my thing,” said Kaylie as she waved the dryer over the finished work. “It’s nice to have something like this at school.” Though students have worked together in the past, most were deeply involved in their own projects. Jorrianne Tucker, 14, spent the club meeting drawing images as part of a larger story. Her manga-style sketches featured two silhouettes walking into a bleak landscape, and another one featuring the portrait of sad girl. According to Jorrianne, the drawings are part of a storyline she’s been working on about a murder.

After snack time, Kaylie Simon, 13, uses a hair dryer on some splattered paint to speed up the drying process Monday afternoon.

“The club allows them to get some art into their life when it doesn’t fit into their class schedule. It lets them get that creative energy out.” — Pat Roberts, Pilot Butte Middle School teacher “It’s cool to come here and be able to draw anything you want to draw,” said Jorriane of the club. Though, she admits that the art doesn’t always get left behind at the door. “This one I did during math class,” she said pulling out one of her sketches from a folder stuffed with them. Art club member Gabino Perez, 13, spent the session singing along to the music blaring from

his headphones while he worked on drawing a pumpkin. He eyed the small green gourd intently, noting every slope and line. Then, he transferred the image in broad strokes of green and orange to his sheet of paper. “I started doing art in third grade,” said Gabino. “When I figured out they had an art club here, I was so happy.” According to Roberts, though

the club offers students a chance to express their creative side, it also gives them a place where they can belong. “At the very least, it’s something to do,” said Roberts of the club. “Rather then going home to an empty house, they can be here in a social environment.”

the first to go. However, Roberts is determined that the students in her art club not be affected by the economic woes. “When you teach, it’s not a job. It’s a career,” said Roberts, who pays for all the art club snacks out of her pocket. “And to me,

paying for a bag of pretzels and a bottle of juice really isn’t a big deal. Especially when it makes them happy.” Megan Kehoe can be reached at 541-383-0354 or at mkehoe@bendbulletin.com.

Snack bar While students worked on their individual artwork, Roberts setup a snack bar on one end of the room. With budget cuts having affected many of the programs at the middle school in the last few years, funding for the club’s art materials and snacks was among

C O N TAC T U S SCHOOL BRIEFS: Items and announcements of general interest. Please include details and contact information. Phone: 541-617-7831 E-mail: smiller@bendbulletin.com TEEN FEATS: The Bulletin wants to recognize high school students’ achievements off the playing fields. Do you know of teens who have been recognized recently for their academic achievements or who have won an award or certificate for their participation in clubs, choirs or volunteer groups? If so, please submit the information and a photo. Phone: 541-383-0358 Mail: P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 E-mail: youth@bendbulletin.com

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Pilot Butte Middle School teacher Pat Roberts spends time discussing different paper types with art club participant Delaney Postyeni, 13.


C4 Wednesday, November 17, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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‘A’ for parks; ‘F’ for transparency

W

hat with its enviable tax base and its stiff system development charges, the Bend Park and Recreation District has absolutely no problem taking money

from the public. But when it comes to providing public information to those very same taxpayers, the district is more miserly than Ebenezer Scrooge after a stock market crash.

We wish we could say the park district was unique in this regard, but it isn’t. As the Oregon Attorney General’s Office noted in its Oct. 7 report on government transparency, “requests for records are often met with high fee requirements and long delays.” Government entities drag their feet and gouge the public in order to discourage the sort of scrutiny Oregon’s public records laws are supposed to allow. Late last week, we asked the district to provide copies of communications with the Oregon Department of Transportation between July 1 and mid-November. That’s not a particularly expansive request, as the district probably doesn’t have much reason to correspond at length with ODOT. And, in fact, the district said our request would generate a mere 48 copies. For which we were expected to pay $226.76, which is the district’s way of saying, “stuff it.” While the glass at the park district’s lavish new headquarters certainly cost the public a pretty penny, it’s done nothing to improve the transparency with which district officials operate. What prompted our request, in case you wondered, is an agenda item for the district’s Nov. 16 meeting. Back in April, the Oregon Transportation Commission decided to give the district roughly $79,000 in federal funds for work on a section of the Deschutes River Trail. But on July 2, ODOT suddenly yanked the funding pending further review. Four months later, ODOT agreed to reinstate the award under certain conditions. We would like to find out what happened, and documents — rather than people — tend to tell the most accurate stories. The story may or may not reflect badly on anybody, but the district’s response is telling. It includes $24 for copies (a rate of 50 cents per copy), $149 for 3.5 hours of the planning manager’s time and $53.76 for one hour of the director of planning’s time. Those hourly rates, by the way, reflect the costs of salary and benefits, according to Planning Director Bruce Ronning. The district is nothing if not thorough in gouging, er, charging, for public records. It was impossible to assign the task to lower-paid staffers for a number of reasons, says Ronning, including the fact that the planning manager changed computers a few months ago and had to muck around in the old one to find the documents we had requested. In other words, the district doesn’t store public records as efficiently as it might, and the cost of this inefficiency is — naturally — passed along to any member of the public bold enough to request documents. In any case, the task of fulfilling a public records request was done

While the glass at the park district’s lavish new headquarters certainly cost the public a pretty penny, it’s done nothing to improve the transparency with which district officials operate. by two employees who make about $88,500 and $112,000 per year, including benefits, which cost about 30 percent of base salary. State law, by the way, allows government agencies to waive such fees. In at least 11 states, meanwhile, government agencies may not charge for the staff time needed to comply with public records requests, according to the attorney general’s transparency report. Staff time accounts for nearly 90 percent of the park district’s estimate. Even worse was the Bend-La Pine School District’s response to an earlier request for information. More than a month and a half ago, we asked the district for communications with the Chalkboard Project, a nonprofit with which the district is cooperating on an initiative involving, among other things, teacher pay and evaluations. Initially, the district told us the bill would be about $1,000, most of which would be used to pay a lawyer to read over the district’s e-mails. Shortly thereafter, the district’s lawyers told us that initial estimate “is probably low.” We then asked for an accurate estimate of the cost, which is always good to have before moving forward. We’re still waiting for it, 50 days after making the initial request. In their defense, neither the Bend Park and Recreation District nor the Bend-La Pine School District has quite the gall exhibited by the city of Sisters, which requires a $100 deposit with each request. Thus does the city require payment for at least some request-related staff time in advance, in the process creating a significant upfront barrier to access. After it fulfills the request, the city will refund any portion of the $100 left over. But if Sisters pays its employees as handsomely as the Bend Park and Recreation District, that $100 doesn’t buy much. The abuses we’ve mentioned above are in no way unusual. Central Oregon’s governments consistently drag their feet, charge exorbitant fees and employ other methods of hiding public information from taxpayers who deserve to know how their money is spent. It’s no coincidence that, as the attorney general’s report points out, a “2007 study of government transparency in the 50 states gave Oregon an ‘F.’ ” Raising that grade substantially should be a priority for the 2011 Legislature.

My Nickel’s Worth Program needed A recent trip across America via Amtrak was not only a fine way to see our country but served to point out a glaring need in dozens of small communities. Railroad tracks generally do not go through the elite portions of cities or villages, but in many tiny communities, the entire area may not be more than blocks long in any direction. Observation even at flank speed disclosed an urgent need for some type of government assistance. Countless numbers of abandoned small buildings, warehouses, factories with windows smashed, unusable rusted equipment, debris scattered about. It was obvious the communities did not even have the dollars to clean up those areas much less raze the structures. Considering the need for employment and, simultaneously the uselessness of so-called stimulus packages already in place, a federal government funded program similar to the CCC or WPA programs of the Depression years is the answer to the need for jobs. It would create jobs, put money to work in areas with no other recourse, clean up America and also create a pool of land available for development near transportation and be a source of taxable property for those communities. Russell Williams Sisters

Unfortunate statement I want to apologize to Rocky Mountain Products, its management, staff, employees and customers for certain

Letters policy We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or OpEd piece every 30 days.

comments I made during a public meeting Sept. 8, 2010, which, regrettably, appeared in this newspaper Sept. 9. During that meeting, I stated that Rocky Mountain Products offered to give Deschutes County “barbecue sauce for interest payments” on a loan it obtained from the county in 1995. That statement was hyperbole. Rocky Mountain Products fully repaid the loan principal, plus significant interest and fees to Deschutes County’s satisfaction and approval. Working with Economic Development of Central Oregon, the board of commissioners set aside some monies to help new and existing business to locate or expand their operations in Central Oregon. At the recommendation of EDCO, the board of commissioners recently approved a loan in the amount of $56,000 for Rocky Mountain Products. This loan is intended to enable expansion of production. With the successful completion of their planned expansion, much needed new jobs will be added to the Central Oregon economy. I and the other commissioners wish them much success with their expansion. Again, I want to express my sincere personal apology for any misimpression or misunderstanding my comments might have created. I wish Rocky Mountain Products the best and look forward to its continued growth and success. Dennis Luke Deschutes County Commissioner

What GOP wants What can the American people expect from the Republican leadership

over the next two years? Work to improve the economy? Reduce unemployment? I guess not. According to Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell “… the single most important thing we (the Republicans) want to achieve is for President Obama to be a one term president.” So those Americans who are unemployed and are losing their homes, the Republican leadership has a higher priority than dealing with your problems. Richard Carroll Bend

Kill the trees I would like to propose that the ponderosa pine trees in the care of the Bend Park and Recreation District be felled. The pinecones dropped from these trees are a nuisance to park goers and picking up these cones is an expense that is unjustified in this time of economic trouble. The BMPRD has massive machines to pick up the pinecones. The cost of the machines themselves, maintenance, and manpower to operate these machines places a burden of scores of thousands of dollars onto our deficitstricken community. Whoever has decided that cleaning up after the geese is too costly and troublesome is on the right track. By eliminating the geese and the trees we could save thousands and save someone the trouble of having to get up in the morning to go to work. While we’re at it, what about the grass? The price of water is rising. Barbara Campbell Bend

In My View policy

Submissions

In My View submissions should be between 600 and 800 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Why voters turned against Democrats in election By David Blahnik

Bulletin guest columnist

T

he 2010 midterms were really a debacle for the Democrats on many different levels. It is worse than they admit. Liberal pundits have been biting around the results trying to ease the pain and downplay the debacle as to why this happened, what the national numbers mean, and what the president thinks has gone wrong. First, just two short years ago, these same pundits were extolling the death of conservatism and the Republican Party for decades to come. Nothing could revive this corpse that the Democrats had buried. What happened in that short span of time to have the Democrats suffer such an ignominious defeat? Conservative pundits, for months, had been warning that the Obama administration was on the wrong side of several key national debates. “Obamacare” is disliked by a majority and is despised for its overall content and the heavy-handed tactics used to get

the law passed. Many Democrats were asked to walk the plank and vote for a bad bill; most are midterm losers. A majority of the electorate did not like the handling of the Arizona immigration issue. A majority disagreed with terrorists being tried in civil court. The Tea Party movement was underestimated. The Democrats should not have ridiculed the movement particularly when it became an obvious source of political power. The fact that some of Sarah Palin’s picks lost doesn’t denigrate the entire movement. She may have supported certain candidates, but voters in those states still had to make a choice. The Obama administration simply overplayed its power hand and chose the wrong issues to tackle first. No credible attempt was made to lower the unemployment rate or to improve the climate for investors. The stimulus bill was passed exclusively by Democrats and then pushed out unto the public to survive and prosper. It did not. This bill in

IN MY VIEW one day cost more than the whole Iraq war. Trillions of corporate and investor dollars remain on the sidelines; investor capital just waiting until the business climate brightens. Second, the national numbers indicate that it may be the Democrats who are thrown into despair. The 2010 midterms show the biggest House seat turnover at least since 1948. Almost 700 legislative seats nationwide changed to Republican. Nineteen state legislatures flipped from Democrat to Republican control. Twenty-nine governors are Republican. These facts do not bode well for 2012 because of the redistricting that comes next year. In addition, 23 Democratic senators will be up for re-election in 2012, and they must be careful how they support the Obama administration if they want to return. They saw what happened to those who supported him in 2010.

Third, while watching President Obama’s postmortem press conference, I saw nothing that indicated he was going to change his style — lots of words about reconciliation, nonpartisan lawmaking and the need to retain the gains he has made in the last 24 months. Now, only when the Republicans have some clout in the House, is he interested in talking about reaching across the aisle. Since he knows he probably has a veto-proof hand, he is not compelled to change much. Gridlock is possible, and in 2012, Obama will try to pin that on the Republicans’ intransigence. He has not demonstrated the political skills to shift gears that Bill Clinton did in 1994 because he never had a meaningful government job that required him to compromise. When Obama came into office with hardly a critical word about his credentials from the press, we were to believe he was the smartest person, a great communicator and a post-partisan, post-

racial politician. We now know that the emperor has no clothes. He has created only more discontent among the electorate and has no clue how to get America back to work. Make no mistake: The Republicans have some serious challenges to tackle in the next 24 months. They must try to avoid gridlock, show the public there are less expensive and less intrusive ways to improve health care, and they must start to look at potential 2012 presidential candidates. Fortunately, starting to emerge is a very strong group of candidates who will give President Obama a good run for the presidency. A final thought. As long as the Democrats are content to breathe new life into politicians like Jerry Brown and John Kitzhaber and continue with the likes of Barbara Boxer and Barney Frank, they cannot be taken as seriously in wishing to change the national discourse on any pressing issue. David Blahnik lives in Bend.


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, November 17, 2010 C5

O D N   Connie Rose Carver, of Bend Feb. 19, 1942 - Nov. 11, 2010 Arrangements: Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home, 541-382-2471 www.niswonger-reynolds.com

Services: Graveside services will be held on Thurs., Nov. 18, 2010, at Pilot Butte Cemetery in Bend.

Hashim Nicholas Nouri, of Bend

Peggy Ann Collinsworth, of Bend Jan. 3, 1941 - Nov. 8, 2010 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals, Bend 541-318-0842 www.autumnfunerals.com Services: No services are scheduled at this time.

Virginia Lee Comstock, of Bend Mar. 22, 1925 - Nov. 10, 2010 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals, Bend 541-318-0842 www.autumnfunerals.com Services: No services are planned at this time.

Sept. 5, 1990 - Nov. 12, 2010 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals, Bend 541-318-0842 www.autumnfunerals.com Services: Will be held on Saturday, November 20, 2010 in California.

Walter "Kelly" K. Pinson, of Bend

Orval Alfred Shaver Jr., of Bend

Dec. 4, 1919 - Nov. 12, 2010 Arrangements: Deschutes Memorial Chapel 541-382-5592

Aug. 14, 1930 - Nov. 13, 2010 Arrangements: Autumn Funeral, Bend 541-318-0842 www.autumnfunerals.com Services: No services are scheduled at this time.

Patrick Gail Daugherty, of Bend Dec. 29, 1968 - Nov. 10, 2010 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals, Bend 541-318-0842 www.autumnfunerals.com Services: No services are planned at this time.

Thomas Legore Coles, of Bend Mar. 1, 1925 - Nov. 13, 2010 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals, Bend 541-318-0842 www.autumnfunerals.com Services: Private Family services will be held.

www.deschutesmemorialchapel.com

Services: Graveside services will be held in Lonoke, AR, on Monday, Nov. 22, 2010.

Wanda Sue Ladwig, of Bend Sept. 30, 1938 - Nov. 7, 2010 Arrangements: Baird Funeral Home www.bairdmortuaries.com 541-382-0903 Services: Per Wanda's request, there will be a private family gathering at a later date. Contributions may be made to:

Partners In Care Hospice www.partnersbend.org 541-382-5882

Wesley Duane Whitaker, of Bend Dec. 4, 1933 - Nov. 9, 2010 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals, Bend 541-318-0842 www.autumnfunerals.com Services: No services are planned at this time.

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 FAX: 541-322-7254 MAIL: Obituaries E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708

Daniel A. Rohrback, CMDR USN (Ret) Sept. 22, 1942 - Nov. 14, 2010 Daniel A. Rohrback, 68, passed away Sunday. Born in Portland, OR, he retired from the United States Navy as a Commander in 1987. He moved to Arizona in 2001, and in 2006, married Lynda Lee Merrill. In 2007, they moved to Salem where he was active at St. Paul's Episcopal Church and Navy VP 6 Squadron Reunions. He is survived by wife, Lynda; children, Bryan of Littleton, CO, Kristen (Scott) Konecny, Littleton, CO. extended family, Bruce Merrill of NY, Abigail (Tim) King, Salem, OR, Roger Merrill, Prineville, OR, Molly (Burt) Andrew, Bend, OR, Ian and Jessica Woodford, Bend, OR; grandchildren, Odin and Tages Konecny, Littleton, CO, Elliot King, Hawaii, Isaac and Madeline King, Salem, OR, Malia, Makayla and Carson Woodford of Bend, OR, and Kenzie Andrew, of Bend, OR; mother, Rose Rohrback, Mesa, AZ; siblings, twin, David (Cathy) Forest Grove, OR, Michael (Cathy) Laveen, AZ, and Sally (Louis of Scottsdale, AZ; also by a

number of nieces and nephews and cousins. His father, Leonard is deceased. Contributions may be sent to Fr. Jim Young's discretionary fund at St. Paul's Episcopal Church, 1444 Liberty St. SE, Salem, OR; Willamette Valley Hospice, 1015 3rd St. NW, Salem, OR 97304; or to a charity of your choice. Services will be at 11:00 a.m. Monday, Nov. 22, 2010, at St. Paul's Episcopal Church. Interment will be in Fort Logan National Cemetery, Denver, CO. Arrangements are by Virgil T. Golden Funeral Service.

Park Continued from C1 Local representatives of the Trust for Public Land could not be reached for comment Tuesday. Under the terms of the contract approved Tuesday, the park district will spend up to $850,000 for the property from its general fund as well as a $250,000 Oregon Lottery grant awarded to the district in July. Although the park district has

Skatepark Continued from C1 Laws said the Division Street Skatepark Project has raised about $25,000. While the goal is to build a $500,000 to $1 million skatepark, he said the initial $25,000 should be enough to construct something that skaters could ride on by next summer if all goes according to plan. “Our goal is to be groundbreaking within the next six to eight months,” Laws said. “It may only be a couple features, but … we’re going to do our best to try to get it there.” He said some of the people who are helping with the designs

not developed any formal plans for the property, early discussions of the future park have included proposals for parking, restrooms and changing rooms for river users.

Whitewater play area In related news, the park district board approved a second contract Tuesday, awarding just shy of $236,000 to OTAK to design a whitewater play area that would be built just yards from the Miller Landing property.

have actually built skateparks in the past and have connections to companies like Grindline Skateparks, Inc. in Seattle and Dreamland Skateparks out of Lincoln City, which created Redmond’s skatepark.

‘Empower’ skaters “We want to empower the skateboarders of Central Oregon with this park,” Laws said. “It’s going to be a community effort.” ODOT officials fully support using its vacant land for the skatepark project, and are currently reviewing some proposed changes the skatepark group made to the terms of a lease agreement.

Cyclist

Redmond

Continued from C1 Zulauf’s page on the “Caring Bridge” website, which allowed family members and friends to track her progress during her nearly three-week stay at St. Charles Bend, indicated that Zulauf suffered cracked ribs, several broken bones and shortterm memory loss, among other complications. Zulauf could not be reached for comment. The other two cyclists were not injured. Officials said after the crash that they did not believe there were any obstacles or traffic problems in the road that may have contributed to the crash and did not believe Bashore suffered from a medical condition that caused him to lose control of his vehicle. When interviewed by police, Bashore said he believed Zulauf was about to drift across the fog line and into traffic and swerved to avoid her. Bashore referred questions to his attorney, Thomas Hill, who could not be reached for comment on Tuesday. Officers, including some who specialize in crash reconstruction, investigated the incident and referred the case to the District Attorney’s Office later in the summer.

Continued from C1 The Bend Farmers Market — which runs near Mirror Pond and at St. Charles Bend — does not have such explicit guidelines, though it also restricts anyone from soliciting sales for services, according to Katrina Wiest, the Bend market’s manager. Redmond’s guidelines, though, speak to the purpose of farmers markets promoting local food, Wiest said. “I applaud them because I think they’re really trying to look at what a farmers market should be,” Wiest said. Redmond does not define everything about the market in the RFP. For example, the RFP does not define whether the market will be for-profit or nonprofit, according to Williams. Revenues — such as vendor fees — will be divided, with 70 percent going to the operator and 20 percent dedicated to pro-

Grand jury A grand jury was convened to consider charges in the case, but a decision was delayed because the jury was interested in an official speed calculation for Bashore’s vehicle at the time of the crash, said Deputy District Attorney Jody Vaughan. Last week, the grand jury handed down an indictment charging Bashore, now 76, with one count of third-degree assault, a Class C felony, and one count of reckless driving, a Class A misdemeanor. He is scheduled to be arraigned on Nov. 23 in Deschutes County Circuit Court. Erin Golden can be reached at 541-617-7837 or at egolden@bendbulletin.com.

Where Buyers And Sellers Meet 1000’s Of Ads Every Day

Votes Continued from C1 Under state law, a jurisdiction must perform a recount if the vote difference between candidates is one-fifth of one percent of the total number of ballots cast for the candidates. In Arnold and Ramsay’s case, that’s a difference of about 42 votes, not

The proposed play area calls for replacing the current Colorado Avenue Dam with a spillway allowing safe passage for river floaters, kayakers and fish. Park Design Manager Robin Laughlin told board members Tuesday that the project would route floaters toward the left side of the river near the current takeout point, while fish passages would be built on the right side. The center would include a series of waves and pools for more

On the Web

Anyone wishing to get involved with the Division Street Skatepark Project can reach organizers through the contact page at www .divisionstreetskatepark.org.

“It just seems like the right thing to do. It’s space that really isn’t doing anything,” ODOT Region Four Spokesman Peter Murphy said about the gravel lot that has boulders on it to prevent people from using as a parking spot. “We feel that the proposal merits further analysis and pursuit and is a good use for that

moting the market. The remaining 10 percent of revenue will be saved for possible operator bonuses at the end of the market’s season. Redmond also plans to contribute $2,000 toward the market’s initial marketing budget. Williams said the city wants to help create another draw during the summer to Redmond’s downtown. “The idea is to have something unique there that you can’t get anywhere else,” Williams said. The market is held primarily during spring and summer, so the city’s staff has also been working to find a way to make Centennial Park a year-round draw. Installing a temporary ice rink could do that, according to Mayor George Endicott. The proposed rink, which would be about 4,000 square feet, has a few remaining issues before the city commits to the idea. Redmond must figure out how many hours of staff time maintaining an ice-cooling sys-

including the 250 or so ballots Blankenship estimates are left to be counted for the city election. A recount, assuming it’s needed, is scheduled for Nov. 30. Arnold and Ramsay are competing to take over for Councilor Oran Teater, who decided not to run for re-election. Teater was appointed to the council after then-Councilor Chris Telfer resigned to take a position in the

skilled boaters. A taller pedestrian bridge would be constructed, providing headroom for boaters passing beneath and a place for spectators to watch the activity in the river. The park district has not identified funding for the whitewater play area, which was estimated earlier this year to require $1.7 million to construct. Scott Hammers can be reached at 541-383-0387 or shammers@bendbulletin.com.

piece of property.” For Pennavaria, he just hopes some of his ideas get included in the Division Street Skatepark. When he heard the plan to build it hadn’t stalled out, he started musing out loud about some of the features wanted to see, like some vertical ramps, a good street course and a nice bowl. Most importantly, he said, is that when it’s designed, it can’t be done by construction workers or people from a parks department. “It’s gotta be built by skateboarders, ’cause they know what’s up,” he said. Nick Grube can be reached at 541-633-2160 or at ngrube@bendbulletin.com.

tem would require. Funding for the system — from ice maintenance to rental skates — will likely cost about $45,000, and Redmond has yet to decide whether that money would come from the Downtown Urban Renewal District or the city’s general fund, according to Endicott. The urban renewal district has already funded the park, and Endicott said that is the most likely funding source. Still, Endicott is hopeful that the city could have an ice rink ready by mid-December. That could, he said, require the council to hold a special session between now and mid-December. Endicott said the rink would be a worthy addition to the park. “The whole notion is that it’s an urban park, a family-friendly park,” Endicott said. “This is just one more use that fits right in.” Patrick Cliff can be reached at 541-633-2161 or at pcliff@bendbulletin.com.

state senate. Arnold is the executive director of the Downtown Bend Business Association, and Ramsay is a local businessman, who owns the Sun Mountain Fun Center, and Casarama, a furniture store on Division Street. Nick Grube can be reached at 541-633-2160 or at ngrube@bendbulletin.com.

Find It All Online bendbulletin.com

Barbara Ann Langeliers January 10, 1942 - November 11, 2010 Barbara Ann Langeliers, of Redmond, passed away November 11, 2010. She was 68. Barb was a loving wife, mother, grandmother, great-grandmother, and friend. Barb was born in Terrebonne in her grandparent’s farmhouse on January 10, 1942. She met her husband, Ralph Langeliers when they were in the third grade. They married at the age of seventeen on July 31, 1959 and lived their life together in Terrebonne and Redmond. Barb is survived by her husband of 51 years; her daughter and son-in-law, Sherry and Gary Thrasher of Redmond, OR; her son and daughter-in-law, Mark and Sharon Langeliers of Redmond, OR; her five grandchildren; K.C. & T.J. Thrasher, Kaitlin Ferrando, and Jordyn and Chase Langeliers; and her three great-grandchildren, Anna, Caden, and Jack. Barb never met a person that she couldn’t carry a conversation with and had a strong and tenacious outlook on life. She will be remembered for her sense of humor, contagious laugh and giving spirit. Barb will be greatly missed by her family and friends. A Celebration of Life Open House will be held at Ralph Langeliers home at 702 SW 55th Place, Redmond, Oregon from 2-4 pm, Saturday, November 20, 2010. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to any Hospice or the Humane Society of Redmond


W E AT H ER

C6 Wednesday, November 17, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LLC ©2010.

TODAY, NOVEMBER 17

HIGH Ben Burkel

52

Bob Shaw

FORECASTS: LOCAL

Western Ruggs

Condon

50/35

45/32

52/34

37/28



56/39

48/29



Willowdale

Warm Springs

Marion Forks

Mitchell

Madras

50/34

53/37

Camp Sherman 49/29 Redmond Prineville 52/32 Cascadia 49/33 51/33 Sisters 51/31 Bend Post Oakridge Elk Lake 49/31

40/20

 Crescent Lake

Rain wil snow above 4,000 feet today. Rain and snow likely tonight. Central

54/38

52/32

47/30

Hampton 47/29

51/30

Chemult 46/26

Seattle

City





Bend Eugene 52/32 Grants Pass

53/41

Boise 52/38





Idaho Falls

53/40

Redding

Elko

67/43

Christmas Valley 48/31

Silver Lake

Missoula 43/32 Helena

50/40

Burns

47/28

43/22

25/16

43/38

42/27

53/28

Reno

51/30

Partly to mostly cloudy today. Rain and snow north tonight.

Crater Lake 40/28

62/32

San Francisco 69/51



Salt Lake City 48/33



Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

LOW

HIGH

Moon phases Full

Last

New

Nov. 21 Nov. 28 Dec. 5

First

Dec. 13

Wednesday Hi/Lo/W

LOW

HIGH

Astoria . . . . . . . . 52/49/0.27 . . . . . . 52/41/r. . . . . . 49/39/sh Baker City . . . . . . 52/36/0.03 . . . . . 45/33/pc. . . . . . 42/27/rs Brookings . . . . . . 58/50/0.01 . . . . . 55/47/sh. . . . . . 53/42/sh Burns. . . . . . . . . . 48/38/0.00 . . . . . . 50/33/c. . . . . . 40/27/rs Eugene . . . . . . . . 55/45/0.03 . . . . . . 53/41/r. . . . . . 47/36/sh Klamath Falls . . . 48/36/0.00 . . . . . 52/32/pc. . . . . . 44/31/sh Lakeview. . . . . . . 52/32/0.00 . . . . . 52/31/pc. . . . . . 46/35/sh La Pine . . . . . . . . 44/37/0.00 . . . . . 47/28/pc. . . . . . 41/23/rs Medford . . . . . . . 55/45/0.00 . . . . . 54/39/pc. . . . . . 48/40/sh Newport . . . . . . . 55/50/0.01 . . . . . . 53/46/r. . . . . . 50/40/sh North Bend . . . . . 55/46/0.12 . . . . . . 54/44/r. . . . . . 51/41/sh Ontario . . . . . . . . 57/46/0.00 . . . . . . 52/38/c. . . . . . 49/34/sh Pendleton . . . . . . 57/44/0.00 . . . . . . 55/38/c. . . . . . 51/35/sh Portland . . . . . . . 57/48/0.03 . . . . . . 50/40/r. . . . . . . 47/37/r Prineville . . . . . . . 49/40/0.00 . . . . . . 49/33/c. . . . . . 48/30/rs Redmond. . . . . . . 51/42/0.00 . . . . . . 53/30/c. . . . . . 43/26/rs Roseburg. . . . . . . 53/45/0.01 . . . . . 53/41/sh. . . . . . 47/44/sh Salem . . . . . . . . . 56/48/0.16 . . . . . . 52/41/r. . . . . . 47/37/sh Sisters . . . . . . . . . 51/41/0.00 . . . . . 51/31/sn. . . . . . 43/27/rs The Dalles . . . . . . 64/49/0.14 . . . . . . 52/36/r. . . . . . 48/35/sh

TEMPERATURE

SKI REPORT

The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

LOW 0

MEDIUM 2

4

HIGH 6

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48/36 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.00” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .70 in 1929 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.49” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . -2 in 1955 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 0.70” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.95” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 9.19” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 30.14 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 1.52 in 1930 *Melted liquid equivalent

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .8:47 a.m. . . . . . .5:23 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .4:39 a.m. . . . . . .3:12 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . . .8:47 a.m. . . . . . .5:36 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . . . .2:04 p.m. . . . . . .1:42 a.m. Saturn. . . . . . . .3:18 a.m. . . . . . .2:57 p.m. Uranus . . . . . . .2:08 p.m. . . . . . .2:01 a.m.

1

LOW

35 20

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX Thursday Hi/Lo/W

Mostly cloudy, snow showers, cooler.

37 20 PLANET WATCH

OREGON CITIES

Calgary

Vancouver

Sunrise today . . . . . . 7:03 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 4:37 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 7:04 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 4:36 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 2:17 p.m. Moonset today . . . . 3:01 a.m.

SUNDAY Mostly cloudy, snow showers, cooler.

41 21

BEND ALMANAC

Portland

Partly to mostly cloudy today. Rain and snow north tonight. Eastern

HIGH

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Yesterday’s regional extremes • 64° The Dalles • 32° Lakeview

SATURDAY Mostly cloudy, mixed showers, cool.

42 22

34/23

49/28

Fort Rock

HIGH

32

Cloudy, mixed showers, breezy, much LOW cooler.

NORTHWEST

44/29

La Pine

Crescent

LOW

48/39

Brothers

46/29

Tonight: Mainly cloudy, mixed showers, breezy.

FRIDAY

A storm system will be responsible for rain and mountain snow west and north today.

Paulina

48/30

Sunriver

45/27

Today: Mostly cloudy skies, breezy, showers developing late evening.

STATE

Maupin

Government Camp

THURSDAY

V.HIGH 8

10

ROAD CONDITIONS Snow level and road conditions representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday. Key: T.T. = Traction Tires.

Ski report from around the state, representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday: Snow accumulation in inches Ski area Last 24 hours Base Depth Anthony Lakes . . . . . . . no report . . . no report Hoodoo . . . . . . . . . . . . . no report . . . no report Mt. Ashland. . . . . . . . . . no report . . . no report Mt. Bachelor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 . . . . . . 18-25 Mt. Hood Meadows . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Mt. Hood Ski Bowl . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Timberline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . . . 12 Warner Canyon . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Willamette Pass . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report

Pass Conditions I-5 at Siskiyou Summit . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires I-84 at Cabbage Hill . . . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 20 at Santiam Pass . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Government Camp. . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Ochoco Divide . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 58 at Willamette Pass . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 138 at Diamond Lake . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 242 at McKenzie Pass . . . . . . . . .Closed for season

Aspen, Colorado . . . . . . no report Mammoth Mtn., California . . . 0.0 Park City, Utah . . . . . . . no report Squaw Valley, California . . . . . 0.0 Sun Valley, Idaho. . . . . . no report Taos, New Mexico. . . . . no report Vail, Colorado . . . . . . . . no report

For up-to-minute conditions turn to: www.tripcheck.com or call 511

For links to the latest ski conditions visit: www.skicentral.com/oregon.html

. . . no report . . . . . . 13-30 . . . no report . . . no report . . . no report . . . no report . . . no report

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes

S

S

S

S

S

Calgary 25/16

Vancouver 43/38 Seattle 48/39

S

Saskatoon 21/10

S Winnipeg 27/14

S

S

S

S

S

S S

Quebec 50/41

Thunder Bay 37/21

Halifax 56/48 Portland Billings Portland (in the 48 To ronto 56/41 39/28 50/40 contiguous states): 46/37 St. Paul Green Bay Boston 37/24 44/29 Boise 62/42 Buffalo Rapid City Detroit 52/38 49/37 • 87° New York 32/20 52/36 64/44 Des Moines Vero Beach, Fla. Cheyenne Philadelphia Columbus 40/25 Chicago 36/25 54/36 62/41 • 2° 51/36 Omaha San Francisco Salt Lake W ashington, D. C. 37/24 Alamosa, Colo. 67/51 City 64/41 Las St. Louis Denver Louisville 48/33 • 2.88” Kansas City 56/37 Vegas 46/25 57/43 45/28 68/47 Tallahassee, Fla. Charlotte 64/36 Los Angeles Albuquerque Oklahoma City Nashville 70/53 55/29 57/32 60/45 Little Rock Phoenix 64/41 Atlanta 77/54 Honolulu 61/41 Birmingham 83/69 Dallas Tijuana 61/44 67/40 71/51 New Orleans 66/53 Orlando Houston 80/59 Chihuahua 75/49 72/37 Miami 83/69 Monterrey La Paz 83/53 86/59 Mazatlan Anchorage 87/62 20/2 Juneau 33/16 Bismarck 34/17

FRONTS

PORTLAND

Police captain suspended for German tribute in park By Jonathan J. Cooper The Associated Press

PORTLAND — A senior Portland police official was suspended Tuesday for posting a plaque 11 years ago in a city park to honor German soldiers in World War II. Portland Police Capt. Mark Kruger said in a public apology that he attached the plaque to a tree as part of his decades-old study of European history. He denied having sympathy for the followers of Adolf Hitler and called Nazi conduct “abhorrent” and “repulsive.” “I ask that community members focus on my life’s work and not on a poor decision made years ago,” he wrote. Kruger has waived his right to appeal his discipline. He was ordered to take two weeks of unpaid leave, undergo tolerance training and participate in an unspecified mentor relationship for up to two years.

Old friend accuses The officer has spent years dodging allegations by an old friend that he’s a Nazi sympa-

thizer, but police officials say there is no record of a formal or detailed investigation until now. The probe was prompted when the friend, Robert Seaver, filed a complaint about the plaque in October 2009. His plaque honored five German soldiers, including Michael Wittman, who was a member of the Waffen-SS, an elite Nazi party military unit that served as a special security force that was involved in war crimes. Kruger was off-duty in 1999 when he and Seaver posted the plaque in a forested city park — a violation of a city ordinance. The hillside tree was chosen in part because Kruger could be see it while driving below on an Interstate highway. He called it “ehrenbaum,” or “honor tree.” The officer returned at least once to clean the plaque and ensure it was attached securely, police documents show. Kruger removed the plaque in 2003 or 2004 when its existence came up in a federal lawsuit alleging the officer violated civil rights by detaining a demonstrator at a Portland protest.

Police Chief Michael Reese said in a letter of reprimand that the incident and the negative publicity it has generated have raised legitimate questions about Kruger’s ability to be effective in his job.

Firing considered He said administrators considered firing or demoting Kruger, but decided against such severe punishment, in part because the incident occurred so long ago. The 16-year veteran cop had never been disciplined. He was promoted to captain, a fourthfrom-the-top command post, in 2008. In his apology, Kruger wrote that he saw brief combat in the U.S. military and has long studied how soldiers respond to the ordeal of battle. “I believe military history has much to teach us about bravery, leadership, self-initiative, ingenuity, endurance and the virtue of sacrifice,” he wrote. He also apologized to his fellow officers for embarrassing the Portland police force.

O  B Lawsuit alleges officer handcuffed 8-year-old PORTLAND — A federal civil rights lawsuit has been filed in the case of an Oregon third grader whose mother says he was handcuffed by a police officer after the child’s teacher locked him out of class with no supervision. The lawsuit says the teacher sent the boy out of class for being disruptive on Oct. 14, 2009, and he began throwing chairs in a hallway. Police apparently were called after an incorrect report that the then 8-year-old boy had left the school. The suit alleges excessive force, false imprisonment and discrimination, saying the boy was diagnosed with attentiondeficit hyperactivity disorder.

Friday’s court filing names a Gresham police officer, three Highland Elementary School faculty members and the Gresham-Barlow School District. The Oregonian reported the Gresham Police Department declined comment and the officer could not be reached. The school district declined comment Monday but said locking a student out of class without supervision “is not a common practice.”

Wyden says he’ll defy secret monument plan GRANTS PASS — U.S. Sen. Ron Wyden says he will oppose any secret effort to establish a national monument that would set aside land across the Siskiyou Mountains in southern Oregon.

The Daily Courier reported the Oregon Democrat told a town hall meeting in Grants Pass on Saturday that he had heard about a proposal by the environmental group Klamath Siskiyou Wildland Center a couple of years ago. At least 10 people asked Wyden about the proposal that would set aside much of the high Siskiyous, stretching from the Oregon Caves to Mount Ashland and well into Northern California, as a monument. They raised concerns about the effects on mining and private property. Wyden, who won re-election in November, reassured them he would oppose any effort behind the scenes to establish a monument. — From wire reports

Yesterday WednesdayThursday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .66/34/0.00 . . .64/31/s . . . 60/37/s Akron . . . . . . . . .50/34/0.80 . . .51/36/c . . . .45/31/r Albany. . . . . . . . .50/43/0.11 . .57/37/sh . . 50/33/pc Albuquerque. . . .61/28/0.00 . . .55/29/s . . . 58/32/s Anchorage . . . . .24/18/0.00 . . . .20/2/s . . . . 26/4/s Atlanta . . . . . . . .71/57/0.13 . . .61/41/s . . . 63/41/s Atlantic City . . . .61/50/0.10 . 61/44/pc . . 56/43/pc Austin . . . . . . . . .69/46/0.00 . . .77/37/s . . . 66/29/s Baltimore . . . . . .59/47/0.35 . 63/39/pc . . 56/38/pc Billings. . . . . . . . .42/27/0.11 . . .39/28/c . . 47/24/pc Birmingham . . . .66/52/0.77 . . .61/44/s . . . 60/39/s Bismarck . . . . . . .40/26/0.00 . . .34/17/c . . . 38/21/c Boise . . . . . . . . . .54/46/0.01 . 52/38/pc . . 49/34/sh Boston. . . . . . . . .53/48/0.01 . .62/42/sh . . 54/36/pc Bridgeport, CT. . .54/47/0.09 . .61/41/sh . . 54/38/pc Buffalo . . . . . . . .54/35/0.43 . .49/37/sh . . 46/33/sh Burlington, VT. . .53/35/0.00 . .54/36/sh . . 43/26/sh Caribou, ME . . . .48/38/0.00 . . .46/41/r . . 41/22/pc Charleston, SC . .78/63/0.00 . . .70/47/s . . . 69/49/s Charlotte. . . . . . .64/53/0.05 . . .64/36/s . . 63/38/pc Chattanooga. . . .69/52/1.45 . 60/41/pc . . 60/40/pc Cheyenne . . . . . .44/22/0.02 . . .36/25/c . . . 57/32/s Chicago. . . . . . . .50/32/0.00 . 51/36/pc . . . 45/31/s Cincinnati . . . . . .50/37/0.76 . 54/37/pc . . 48/31/sh Cleveland . . . . . .50/34/0.61 . . .50/38/c . . .46/32/rs Colorado Springs 58/20/0.00 . 44/24/pc . . . 62/35/s Columbia, MO . .59/35/0.00 . .52/33/sh . . 47/32/pc Columbia, SC . . .71/58/0.14 . . .68/39/s . . . 67/38/s Columbus, GA. . .75/62/0.30 . . .65/41/s . . . 65/42/s Columbus, OH. . .52/40/0.59 . 54/36/pc . . 48/30/sh Concord, NH . . . .52/44/0.02 . .61/36/sh . . 48/29/pc Corpus Christi. . .73/49/0.00 . . .79/47/s . . . 68/43/s Dallas Ft Worth. .64/46/0.03 . . .67/40/s . . . 59/38/s Dayton . . . . . . . .47/32/0.77 . 52/36/pc . . 45/29/pc Denver. . . . . . . . .60/30/0.03 . 46/25/pc . . . 60/33/s Des Moines. . . . .45/37/0.00 . .40/25/sn . . . 41/30/s Detroit. . . . . . . . .50/31/0.10 . . .52/36/c . . 44/31/pc Duluth . . . . . . . . .32/18/0.00 . . .35/19/c . . 28/22/pc El Paso. . . . . . . . .67/35/0.00 . . .67/35/s . . . 67/37/s Fairbanks. . . . . . . 4/-11/0.00 . . -2/-5/pc . . . 21/5/sn Fargo. . . . . . . . . .37/30/0.00 . . .32/14/c . . 33/24/pc Flagstaff . . . . . . .53/22/0.00 . . .53/19/s . . . 56/21/s

Yesterday WednesdayThursday Yesterday WednesdayThursday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .49/32/0.00 . 51/32/pc . . .41/28/rs Rapid City . . . . . .41/21/0.00 . . .32/20/c . . 53/30/pc Green Bay. . . . . .50/30/0.00 . 44/29/pc . . 41/28/pc Reno . . . . . . . . . .64/30/0.00 . . .62/32/s . . 62/38/pc Greensboro. . . . .63/48/0.02 . . .65/37/s . . 60/36/pc Richmond . . . . . .68/50/0.11 . . .68/40/s . . 60/40/pc Harrisburg. . . . . .54/46/0.55 . 58/38/pc . . . 55/36/c Rochester, NY . . .53/32/0.34 . .49/38/sh . . 49/33/sh Hartford, CT . . . .54/44/0.04 . .61/38/sh . . 53/33/pc Sacramento. . . . .73/44/0.00 . . .69/44/s . . . 66/43/s Helena. . . . . . . . .41/21/0.35 . .34/23/sn . . .41/14/rs St. Louis. . . . . . . .54/38/0.00 . .56/37/sh . . . 48/30/s Honolulu . . . . . . .85/67/0.00 . 83/69/pc . . . 83/68/c Salt Lake City . . .53/42/0.01 . 48/33/pc . . 56/42/pc Houston . . . . . . .68/51/0.00 . . .75/49/s . . . 66/43/s San Antonio . . . .72/49/0.00 . . .77/42/s . . . 69/37/s Huntsville . . . . . .64/48/0.57 . 60/40/pc . . . 57/36/s San Diego . . . . . .65/53/0.00 . . .69/53/s . . . 69/54/s Indianapolis . . . .45/32/0.40 . 53/40/pc . . . 48/33/s San Francisco . . .69/53/0.00 . . .69/51/s . . . 67/53/s Jackson, MS . . . .62/47/0.20 . . .68/46/s . . . 60/36/s San Jose . . . . . . .75/49/0.00 . . .73/48/s . . . 69/49/s Madison, WI . . . .50/32/0.03 . 46/26/pc . . 40/27/pc Santa Fe . . . . . . .55/18/0.01 . . .49/24/s . . . 56/24/s Jacksonville. . . . .76/52/0.34 . . .73/45/s . . . 73/44/s Juneau. . . . . . . . .38/25/0.00 . . .33/16/s . . 28/17/pc Kansas City. . . . .53/37/0.00 . .45/28/sh . . . 45/37/s Amsterdam. . . . .52/34/0.00 . 45/35/pc . . . 47/38/c Lansing . . . . . . . .49/28/0.00 . 50/33/pc . . .42/28/rs Athens. . . . . . . . .71/56/0.00 . .66/55/sh . . 64/54/sh Las Vegas . . . . . .76/51/0.00 . . .68/47/s . . . 72/48/s Auckland. . . . . . .72/57/0.00 . . .71/55/s . . 70/55/pc Lexington . . . . . .58/44/0.65 . 55/41/pc . . 47/36/sh Baghdad . . . . . . .82/50/0.00 . . .83/49/s . . 83/50/pc Lincoln. . . . . . . . .52/28/0.00 . . 37/24/rs . . . 45/33/s Bangkok . . . . . . .88/77/0.01 . 90/76/pc . . 89/77/sh Little Rock. . . . . .54/44/0.53 . 64/41/pc . . . 56/35/s Beijing. . . . . . . . .55/25/0.00 . . .54/31/s . . 57/33/pc Los Angeles. . . . .66/51/0.00 . . .70/53/s . . . 71/55/s Beirut. . . . . . . . . .86/72/0.00 . 81/66/pc . . . 82/67/s Louisville . . . . . . .49/43/0.96 . 57/43/pc . . . 49/35/s Berlin. . . . . . . . . .46/39/0.00 . .46/39/sh . . 49/41/sh Memphis. . . . . . .50/42/0.75 . 64/44/pc . . . 54/33/s Bogota . . . . . . . .66/52/0.23 . .64/51/sh . . 63/51/sh Miami . . . . . . . . .83/68/0.00 . 83/69/pc . . 84/64/pc Budapest. . . . . . .59/41/0.00 . . .64/50/c . . 56/44/sh Milwaukee . . . . .54/39/0.02 . 49/35/pc . . 43/30/pc Buenos Aires. . . .73/54/0.00 . . .77/55/s . . 82/59/pc Minneapolis . . . .36/30/0.01 . . .37/24/c . . 33/30/pc Cabo San Lucas .81/57/0.00 . . .86/64/s . . . 88/64/s Nashville . . . . . . .57/43/0.92 . 60/45/pc . . . 56/36/s Cairo . . . . . . . . . .79/64/0.00 . . .82/63/s . . . 82/62/s New Orleans. . . .72/60/0.00 . . .66/53/s . . . 64/46/s Calgary . . . . . . . .27/14/0.24 . .25/16/sn . . . 21/1/sn New York . . . . . .57/52/0.16 . .64/44/sh . . 56/40/pc Cancun . . . . . . . .82/66/0.00 . .84/66/sh . . . .82/64/t Newark, NJ . . . . .58/52/0.06 . .64/42/sh . . 57/39/pc Dublin . . . . . . . . .50/39/0.00 . .50/41/sh . . 49/39/sh Norfolk, VA . . . . .73/53/0.01 . . .70/43/s . . 60/41/pc Edinburgh . . . . . .46/28/0.00 . .45/39/sh . . 48/39/sh Oklahoma City . .59/33/0.00 . 57/32/pc . . . 54/33/s Geneva . . . . . . . .45/41/0.88 . 52/38/pc . . 45/38/sh Omaha . . . . . . . .49/35/0.00 . .37/24/sn . . . 41/32/s Harare . . . . . . . . .84/61/0.00 . .84/62/sh . . . .83/61/t Orlando. . . . . . . .84/57/0.00 . . .80/59/s . . . 76/51/s Hong Kong . . . . .75/68/0.02 . 80/69/pc . . 79/68/pc Palm Springs. . . .79/54/0.00 . . .82/51/s . . . 82/52/s Istanbul. . . . . . . .66/55/0.03 . 68/52/pc . . 65/54/sh Peoria . . . . . . . . .56/32/0.00 . . .52/33/c . . 45/29/pc Jerusalem . . . . . .81/67/0.00 . . .82/57/s . . . 83/56/s Philadelphia . . . .58/50/0.09 . 62/41/pc . . 56/39/pc Johannesburg . . .73/55/0.00 . . .75/59/t . . . .64/54/t Phoenix. . . . . . . .77/51/0.00 . . .77/54/s . . . 79/55/s Lima . . . . . . . . . .70/61/0.00 . .67/60/sh . . 69/61/sh Pittsburgh . . . . . .51/42/0.30 . .51/36/sh . . 46/34/sh Lisbon . . . . . . . . .59/46/0.00 . .58/48/sh . . 58/47/pc Portland, ME. . . .55/46/0.00 . . .56/41/r . . 48/29/pc London . . . . . . . .45/30/0.00 . . .46/42/r . . 50/42/sh Providence . . . . .56/48/0.01 . .63/41/sh . . 54/35/pc Madrid . . . . . . . .55/36/0.00 . .54/39/sh . . 55/35/pc Raleigh . . . . . . . .67/54/0.11 . . .66/38/s . . 63/37/pc Manila. . . . . . . . .88/75/0.00 . . .89/78/t . . . .87/77/t

Yesterday WednesdayThursday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Savannah . . . . . .78/60/0.00 . . .71/43/s . . . 71/45/s Seattle. . . . . . . . .52/47/0.07 . . .48/39/r . . . .45/39/r Sioux Falls. . . . . .39/35/0.00 . 35/19/pc . . 39/28/pc Spokane . . . . . . .48/37/0.06 . . .42/36/c . . . .39/28/r Springfield, MO. .55/41/0.03 . .55/34/sh . . 46/32/pc Tampa . . . . . . . . .80/66/0.00 . . .80/61/s . . . 76/54/s Tucson. . . . . . . . .74/45/0.00 . . .75/42/s . . . 77/43/s Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .60/41/0.00 . 60/34/pc . . . 51/37/s Washington, DC .61/50/0.31 . 64/41/pc . . 57/39/pc Wichita . . . . . . . .55/34/0.00 . .47/27/sh . . . 50/35/s Yakima . . . . . . . 60/44/trace . . .52/31/c . . . .45/28/r Yuma. . . . . . . . . .82/51/0.00 . . .81/55/s . . . 81/57/s

INTERNATIONAL Mecca . . . . . . . .104/77/0.00 . . .99/76/s . . 97/77/pc Mexico City. . . . .73/43/0.00 . 76/47/pc . . 73/45/sh Montreal. . . . . . .54/34/0.00 . . .49/41/r . . .41/27/rs Moscow . . . . . . .50/41/0.00 . . .44/33/c . . .41/33/rs Nairobi . . . . . . . .73/59/0.00 . .77/59/sh . . . .76/60/t Nassau . . . . . . . .84/64/0.00 . . .85/73/t . . . .83/72/t New Delhi. . . . . .68/66/0.00 . 83/65/pc . . . 83/62/s Osaka . . . . . . . . .55/43/0.00 . . .60/46/s . . 62/48/pc Oslo. . . . . . . . . . .25/14/0.00 . . .30/17/s . . .28/19/sf Ottawa . . . . . . . .52/37/0.00 . . .49/39/r . . .41/26/rs Paris. . . . . . . . . . .52/37/0.00 . .49/39/sh . . . 50/40/c Rio de Janeiro. . .75/72/0.00 . . .79/70/t . . . .82/72/t Rome. . . . . . . . . .64/52/0.24 . .61/49/sh . . 60/50/sh Santiago . . . . . . .81/52/0.00 . .79/53/sh . . 76/51/pc Sao Paulo . . . . . .66/63/0.00 . . .78/63/t . . 80/63/sh Sapporo. . . . . . . .39/37/0.00 . .41/32/sh . . . 47/37/s Seoul . . . . . . . . . .46/25/0.00 . . .47/30/s . . . 53/35/s Shanghai. . . . . . .54/50/0.00 . . .62/51/s . . . 64/52/s Singapore . . . . . .90/77/0.00 . . .88/76/t . . . .87/77/t Stockholm. . . . . .34/23/0.00 . . .35/24/s . . .35/26/rs Sydney. . . . . . . . .70/64/0.00 . .69/61/sh . . 73/62/sh Taipei. . . . . . . . . .68/64/0.00 . .74/65/sh . . 77/67/sh Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .79/63/0.00 . . .82/65/s . . . 81/63/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .54/46/0.00 . .60/48/sh . . 58/49/sh Toronto . . . . . . . .50/36/0.00 . .46/37/sh . . . 43/27/c Vancouver. . . . . .50/48/0.16 . .43/38/sh . . 41/36/sh Vienna. . . . . . . . .52/45/0.00 . .52/42/sh . . 50/41/sh Warsaw. . . . . . . .46/45/0.00 . .55/46/sh . . . 57/44/c


S

D

NBA Inside Wesley Matthews sets a career high in scoring as Portland beats Memphis, see Page D3.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2010

AUTO RACING Bend driver to appear on TV series Thursday SONOMA, Calif. — Warren Regnier, of Bend, reached the final of PINKS All Out drag-racing competition in September. The event will air on SPEED TV this Thursday at 5 p.m. Regnier, 25, made it to the final race out of 380 drivers. He lost the final to finish second. Regnier, who was invited to the competition six weeks before the event, raced a 1963 Chevy Nova. He also finished second at the Madras Dragstrip series this year. During the PINKS All Out competition, Regnier was wired with a microphone and a camera was mounted on his roll cage. Regnier built the motor in the 63 Nova with his father, Dave Regnier, who is also an accomplished drag racer from Bend. —Bulletin staff report

Golf, charity still strong partners Tournaments for nonprofits going strong The golf season in this region is loaded with fundraising tournaments for charities, schools, and just about every other kind of nonprofit. With the recession, one might assume that the proliferation of such tournaments would at least be slowed. Central Oregon is experiencing tough times, after all, and local golf facilities and charities have been far from immune. But it appears that, even more than two years deep into one of the worst

ZACK HALL

A

Central Oregon golfer could choose to play in nothing more than charity tournaments during the golf season and still have a welltuned game.

economic slumps since the Great Depression, this region’s golf facilities and nonprofits maintain a partnership that has worked well for both. It’s a partnership that brings much-needed revenue to golf courses, while raising funds for charities that are more in need than they have been in years. And such tournaments do not appear to be going anywhere anytime soon. “The number of tournaments that are out there … it seems like they’ve all been hanging in there,” says Zak

Boone, executive director of Ronald McDonald House Charities of Central Oregon. “You know, golf is a culture over here.” The Ronald McDonald House’s Central Oregon Open at Eagle Crest Resort, which was held on Father’s Day weekend this past June, did more than just hang in there this year. The charity’s two-day event raised more than $117,000 in 2010, the most the Central Oregon Open has raised since 2005. See Charity / D6

TEE TO GREEN

PREP GIRLS SOCCER

NFL

Dynamic Vick having MVP year for Eagles

COLLEGE FOOTBALL Ex-Mississippi State player in Newton case interviewed by FBI An attorney for the former Mississippi State player who helped spark the NCAA’s investigation of Auburn quarterback Cam Newton said Tuesday his client has been interviewed by the FBI. Phil Abernethy wrote in an e-mail to The Associated Press that John Bond met with federal law enforcement and state investigators Tuesday and that he “cooperated fully with both agencies and has provided them all facts known by him.” Abernethy says Bond would have no further comment because of the “ongoing nature” of the investigation. The FBI also declined comment on Tuesday. Newton’s father, Cecil, has been accused of seeking cash during his son’s recruitment. Cecil Newton has denied any wrongdoing and Mississippi State officials have said all of its employees acted appropriately. Bond, a former Mississippi State quarterback, told MSU officials in January he had been asked for $180,000 by a former teammate in exchange for Newton’s commitment to the Bulldogs. The man was later identified as Kenny Rogers in an ESPN. com report. Rogers is expected to be interviewed by the NCAA, according to his attorney Doug Zeit. — The Associated Press

INSIDE

By Rob Maaddi

The Associated Press

Matthew Aimonetti / For The Bulletin

Mountain View forward Edna Ibarra chases down a loose ball during the Cougars’ semifinal match with Marist High.

Cougars move on Mountain View, Summit set to battle for Class 5A state championship Bulletin staff report

EUGENE — For the third consecutive year a Central Oregon school will win the Class 5A state girls soccer championship. After Summit defeated Crescent Valley in one semifinal on Tuesday, Mountain View rallied for a 2-1 overtime victory over Marist at Willamette High School to set up an all-Bend 5A state final on Saturday. Trailing 1-0 at halftime, the Cougars scored the game’s final two goals to advance to the state championship match for the second time in three years. Mountain

View lost to Bend High 1-0 in the 5A final in 2008. “A few girls took charge at halftime,” said Cougars coach Grant Mattox, whose team is scheduled to play Summit at 10:30 a.m. on Saturday in the 5A girls state final at Hillsboro Stadium. “We didn’t have to say a whole lot to ‘em. The seniors stood up and spoke their mind.” Ten minutes into the second half Cougar forward Edna Ibarra received a pass from the flank and sent a shot from outside the box into the upper corner of the goal to even the score 1-1.

COLLEGE BASKETBALL

Outlaws advance to Class 4A final

Connecticut hangs on, beats Baylor

Sisters scores twice on penalty kicks

Maya Moore scores 30 points to lead the No. 1 Huskies to a 65-64 win over No. 2 Baylor and increase the team’s win streak to 80 games, see Page D4

Bulletin staff report

INDEX Scoreboard ................................D2 NHL ...........................................D2 NBA ...........................................D3 College basketball .................... D4 MLB .......................................... D4 Cycling ..................................... D4 Prep sports ................................D5 NFL ............................................D5 Tee to Green.............................. D6

The match remained tied after 80 minutes of regulation and through the first 10minute overtime period. The game changed in the second minute of the second 10-minute overtime period, though, when Mountain View took a free kick from midfield, sending the ball to the top of the penalty box, which led to another Marist foul. From there Torie Morris, who also scored in the Cougars’ quarterfinal victory over Corvallis last week, smashed the ball against the crossbar and past the Marist goalkeeper for what would be the game-winning score. See Cougars / D5

Jerry Baldock / For The Bulletin

Sisters’ McKenzie Cooper makes a header while playing Scappoose during the girls Class 4A state semifinals at Scappoose on Tuesday. Sisters won the game 2-1.

SCAPPOOSE — Penalty kicks favor the shooter in the sport of soccer and the taker only has the goalkeeper to beat. But they are not as easy to convert as it may look. Especially when a school’s perfect record and first-ever appearance in a state championship match is on the line. Sisters High junior Michelle Young showed nerves of steel Tuesday in scoring not once but twice on penalty kicks to lead the Outlaws to a 2-1 victory over host Scappoose in a Class 4A state semifinal match. Young put her team in the state final for the first time in school history. Sisters is scheduled to play Mazama of Klamath Falls on Saturday at Liberty

High School in Hillsboro for the 4A girls soccer state championship. “We hung in there today,” Sisters coach Nik Goertzen said about his team’s semifinal win. “I’m very, very proud of our accomplishments.” The Outlaws (17-0 overall) struggled in the first half Tuesday, playing on a wet and heavy pitch with a significant crown. “We were lethargic,” Goertzen said. Just past the midway point of the first half the Indians, a team which entered Tuesday’s contest on a 15-game winning streak, scored to take a 1-0 advantage at the break. Scappoose protected its lead with a physical style of defense, but it came at a cost. See Outlaws / D5

PHILADELPHIA — Michael Vick had just scored after another dazzling run against the Redskins when Eagles fans at a local sports bar began chanting: “M-V-P! M-V-P! M-V-P!” It was a far cry from what Vick was being called a few years ago. Once one of the NFL’s biggest and highest paid stars, his career was in ruins and his life in shambles. He was broke, reviled and relegated to being a situational No. 3 quarterback after serving 18 months in federal prison for running a dogfighting ring. Now he’s on top again, playing maybe better than ever, and just in time to become perhaps the biggest free agent on the market next year. Vick may have had the best allaround game by a quarterback in NFL history Monday night against Washington. He threw for 333 yards and four touchdowns, and ran for 80 yards and two scores in Philadelphia’s 5928 victory. So much for everyone who protested his arrival in Philadelphia and threatened to boycott games. “I thought what he did was disgusting, but the guy paid his dues and deserves a second chance,” said Shaun Young, an 18-year season ticket holder who was inducted into the Pro Football Ultimate Fan Association’s Hall of Fame last year in Canton, Ohio. “He’s playing incredible. I respect people’s opinions that don’t like him, but isn’t this world based on second chances?” Since signing with the Eagles in August 2009, he’s been a model citizen off the field, working with the Humane Society of the United States and speaking to school and community groups about the cruelty of dogfighting. On the field, Vick has been downright spectacular, even more so than when he was a superstar with the Atlanta Falcons. “I feel like I’m playing the best football only because of the coaches that I have, the guys I’m playing with. The offensive line is playing great,” Vick said. “I have a great group of guys around me. Just as I’m doing a great job, those guys are doing a great job as well.” See Vick / D5

Philadephia quarterback Michael Vick

Miles Kennedy / The Associated Press


D2 Wednesday, November 17, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

O  A TELEVISION

SCOREBOARD

TODAY

ON DECK

SOCCER

Friday Football: Class 5A state quarterfinals: Corvallis at Mountain View, 7 p.m.

8:55 a.m. — Men, Brazil vs. Argentina, ESPN2. 11 a.m. — Men, United States vs. South Africa, ESPN2.

BASKETBALL 4 p.m. — NBA, Phoenix Suns at Miami Heat, ESPN. 6:30 p.m. — NBA, Chicago Bulls at San Antonio Spurs, ESPN. 7 p.m. — Men’s college, Oregon State at Seattle, FSNW.

HOCKEY 4 p.m. — NHL, Boston Bruins at New York Rangers, VS. network.

FOOTBALL 5 p.m. — College, Bowling Green at Toledo, ESPN2.

GOLF 9 p.m. — PGA European Tour, Hong Kong Open, first round, Golf Channel.

THURSDAY BASKETBALL 2 p.m. — College, Puerto Rico Tip-Off, Hofstra vs. North Carolina, ESPN2. 4 p.m. — College, Coaches vs. Cancer, Maryland vs. Pittsburgh, ESPN2. 5 p.m. — NBA, Phoenix Suns at Orlando Magic, TNT. 6 p.m. — College, Coaches vs. Cancer, Illinois vs. Texas, ESPN2. 7:30 p.m. — College, Virginia at Stanford, FSNW. 7:30 p.m. — NBA, Denver Nuggets at Portland Trail Blazers, TNT.

FOOTBALL 5 p.m. — College, UCLA at Washington, ESPN. 5 p.m. — NFL, Chicago Bears at Miami Dolphins, NFL Network.

GOLF 9 p.m. — PGA European Tour, Hong Kong Open, second round, Golf Channel.

RADIO TODAY BASKETBALL 7 p.m. — Men’s college, Oregon State at Seattle, KICE-AM 940, KRCOAM 690.

THURSDAY FOOTBALL 5 p.m. — College, UCLA at Washington, KICE-AM 940.

BASKETBALL 7:30 p.m. — NBA, Denver Nuggets at Portland Trail Blazers, KBND-AM 1110, KRCO-AM 690. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

FOOTBALL NFL NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE ——— AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF N.Y. Jets 7 2 0 .778 208 New England 7 2 0 .778 258 Miami 5 4 0 .556 172 Buffalo 1 8 0 .111 164 South W L T Pct PF Indianapolis 6 3 0 .667 240 Tennessee 5 4 0 .556 241 Jacksonville 5 4 0 .556 196 Houston 4 5 0 .444 217 North W L T Pct PF Baltimore 6 3 0 .667 196 Pittsburgh 6 3 0 .667 200 Cleveland 3 6 0 .333 172 Cincinnati 2 7 0 .222 184 West W L T Pct PF Oakland 5 4 0 .556 235 Kansas City 5 4 0 .556 212 San Diego 4 5 0 .444 239 Denver 3 6 0 .333 203 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF Philadelphia 6 3 0 .667 257 N.Y. Giants 6 3 0 .667 236 Washington 4 5 0 .444 183 Dallas 2 7 0 .222 194 South W L T Pct PF Atlanta 7 2 0 .778 222 New Orleans 6 3 0 .667 201 Tampa Bay 6 3 0 .667 188 Carolina 1 8 0 .111 104 North W L T Pct PF Chicago 6 3 0 .667 175 Green Bay 6 3 0 .667 221 Minnesota 3 6 0 .333 169 Detroit 2 7 0 .222 215 West W L T Pct PF Seattle 5 4 0 .556 166 St. Louis 4 5 0 .444 160 San Francisco 3 6 0 .333 160 Arizona 3 6 0 .333 175 ——— Thursday’s Game Chicago at Miami, 5:20 p.m. Sunday’s Games Detroit at Dallas, 10 a.m. Oakland at Pittsburgh, 10 a.m. Washington at Tennessee, 10 a.m. Houston at N.Y. Jets, 10 a.m. Buffalo at Cincinnati, 10 a.m. Arizona at Kansas City, 10 a.m. Cleveland at Jacksonville, 10 a.m. Baltimore at Carolina, 10 a.m. Green Bay at Minnesota, 10 a.m. Atlanta at St. Louis, 1:05 p.m. Seattle at New Orleans, 1:05 p.m. Tampa Bay at San Francisco, 1:05 p.m. Indianapolis at New England, 1:15 p.m. N.Y. Giants at Philadelphia, 5:20 p.m. Monday’s Game Denver at San Diego, 5:30 p.m.

PA 150 214 192 245

Baseball • Phils’ Halladay unanimously wins NL Cy Young Award: Roy Halladay of the Philadelphia Phillies has unanimously won the NL Cy Young Award, making him the fifth pitcher to earn the honor in both leagues. Halladay pitched a perfect game in May and then threw a no-hitter in the playoffs. In his first season with the Phillies, he led the NL with 21 wins and topped the majors in innings, shutouts and complete games. Halladay received all 32 first-place votes in results released Tuesday by the Baseball Writers’ Association of America. Adam Wainwright of St. Louis was second and Ubaldo Jimenez of Colorado was third. • Tommy John gets another chance at Hall of Fame: To some, Tommy John is best known for the surgery that carries his name. Next month, he hopes to add another distinction — Hall of Fame pitcher. John, who went 288231 in a 26-season career that ended in 1989, is on the 12-man Veterans Committee ballot. Voting results will be announced Dec. 6 at baseball’s winter meetings in Lake Buena Vista, Fla. • Braves acquire 2B Uggla from Marlins for two players: Power-hitting second baseman Dan Uggla was dealt from the Florida Marlins to the Atlanta Braves on Tuesday for infielder Omar Infante and left-hander Mike Dunn in the first trade of the general managers’ meetings. A two-time All-Star, Uggla hit .287 with 33 homers and 105 RBIs last season with Florida. • Cubs chairman pushes plan for state aid: Chicago Cubs chairman Tom Ricketts on Tuesday trotted out everyone from iron workers to restaurant owners, saying they will benefit from his proposal to use $200 million in state bonds to help renovate Wrigley Field. Flanked by representatives of unions and civic groups, Ricketts tried to dispel any suggestion that his proposal would cost the public — unless they come through the turnstiles — any money at all. Gov. Pat Quinn and Chicago Mayor Richard Daley say they can’t back a plan that calls for the state to issue the bonds, not when Illinois is mired in billions of dollars worth of debt.

Track and field • Felix, Oliver win 2010 Jesse Owens Awards: Allyson Felix has won her third Jesse Owens Award, and David Oliver was honored by USA Track and Field for the first time. Felix won the U.S. national title at 100 meters this year, and won IAAF Diamond League titles in the 200 and 400. She also won the Jesse Owens Award for top American track athlete in 2005 and 2007.

BASKETBALL Men’s college

PA 185 179 250 257 PA 165 162 182 213 PA 188 194 197 252 PA 209 193 229 252 PA 175 151 206 215 PA 146 143 195 202 PA 199 164 198 261

College

S   B

Schedule All Times PST (Subject to change) ——— Tuesday’s Game Ohio 31, Temple 23 Today’s Games MIDWEST Miami (Ohio) (6-4) at Akron (0-10), 3 p.m. Bowling Green (2-8) at Toledo (6-4), 5 p.m. Thursday’s Games SOUTH Georgia St. (6-4) at Alabama (8-2), 4:30 p.m. SE Louisiana (2-8) at Nicholls St. (3-7), 5 p.m. FAR WEST UCLA (4-5) at Washington (3-6), 5 p.m. Air Force (7-4) at UNLV (2-8), 7 p.m. Friday’s Games FAR WEST Fresno St. (6-3) at Boise St. (9-0), 6:30 p.m. Saturday’s Games EAST Virginia (4-6) at Boston College (5-5), 9 a.m. Duquesne (6-4) at Bryant (7-3), 9 a.m. St. Francis, Pa. (1-9) at Cent. Connecticut St. (7-3), 9 a.m. Villanova (6-4) at Delaware (9-1), 9 a.m. Yale (7-2) at Harvard (6-3), 9 a.m. Penn St. (6-4) vs. Indiana (4-6) at Landover, Md., 9 a.m. Lehigh (8-2) at Lafayette (2-8), 9 a.m. James Madison (5-5) at Maine (4-6), 9 a.m. Towson (1-9) at New Hampshire (6-4), 9 a.m. Columbia (4-5) at Brown (5-4), 9:30 a.m. Penn (8-1) at Cornell (2-7), 9:30 a.m. Bucknell (1-9) at Holy Cross (5-5), 9:30 a.m. Massachusetts (6-4) at Rhode Island (4-6), 9:30 a.m. Monmouth, N.J. (3-7) at Albany, N.Y. (5-5), 10 a.m. Colgate (6-4) at Fordham (5-5), 10 a.m. Marist (3-7) at Georgetown, D.C. (3-7), 10 a.m. Dartmouth (5-4) at Princeton (1-8), 10 a.m. Wagner (5-5) at Sacred Heart (3-7), 10 a.m. E. Michigan (1-9) at Buffalo (2-8), 11 a.m. Arkansas St. (4-6) at Navy (7-3), 12:30 p.m. Army (6-4) vs. Notre Dame (5-5) at Bronx, N.Y., 4 p.m. Connecticut (5-4) at Syracuse (7-3), 4 p.m. SOUTH VMI (3-7) at Gardner-Webb (2-7), 8:30 a.m. West Virginia (6-3) at Louisville (5-5), 9 a.m. N.C. State (7-3) at North Carolina (6-4) 9 a.m. Troy (5-4) at South Carolina (7-3), 9 a.m. Pittsburgh (5-4) at South Florida (6-3), 9 a.m. Appalachian St. (9-1) at Florida (6-4), 9:30 a.m. Charleston Southern (3-7) at Coastal Carolina (5-5), 10 a.m.

Austin Peay (2-8) at E. Kentucky (5-5), 10 a.m. Delaware St. (2-8) at Howard (1-9), 10 a.m. Campbell (3-7) at Morehead St. (4-6), 10 a.m. Davidson (3-7) at Presbyterian (1-9), 10 a.m. Duke (3-7) at Georgia Tech (5-5), 10:30 a.m. S. Carolina St. (8-2) at N. Carolina A&T (1-9), 10:30 a.m. Prairie View (6-4) at Alabama A&M (3-7), 11 a.m. Alcorn St. (5-5) at Jackson St. (7-3), 11 a.m. Georgia Southern (6-4) at Furman (5-5), 11 a.m. Tennessee St. (3-7) at Murray St. (5-5), 11 a.m. Old Dominion (7-3) at N.C. Central (3-7), 11 a.m. The Citadel (2-8) at Samford (4-6), 11 a.m. Norfolk St. (5-5) at Savannah St. (1-9), 11 a.m. Clemson (5-5) at Wake Forest (2-8), 11 a.m. Florida A&M (7-3) vs. Bethune-Cookman (10-0) at Orlando, Fla., 11:30 a.m. W. Carolina (2-8) at Elon (5-5), noon Chattanooga (6-4) at Wofford (8-2), noon. Mississippi (4-6) at LSU (9-1), 12:30 p.m. Stony Brook (6-4) at Liberty (7-3), 12:30 p.m. North Texas (3-7) at Louisiana-Monroe (4-6), 12:30 p.m. Virginia Tech (8-2) at Miami (7-3), 12:30 p.m. UCF (7-3) at Tulane (4-6), 12:30 p.m. Richmond (6-4) at William & Mary (7-3), 12:30 p.m. Hampton (5-5) at Morgan St. (4-6), 1 p.m. Memphis (1-9) at UAB (3-7), 1 p.m. Middle Tennessee (3-6) at W. Kentucky (2-8), 1:15 p.m. Jacksonville St. (9-1) at Tennessee Tech (4-6), 2 p.m. Fla. International (4-5) at Louisiana-Lafayette (2-8), 4 p.m. Arkansas (8-2) at Mississippi St. (7-3), 4 p.m. Tennessee (4-6) at Vanderbilt (2-8), 4:30 p.m. Florida St. (7-3) at Maryland (7-3), 5 p.m. Houston (5-5) at Southern Miss. (7-3), 5 p.m. MIDWEST Oklahoma St. (9-1) at Kansas (3-7), 9 a.m. Wisconsin (9-1) at Michigan (7-3), 9 a.m. Purdue (4-6) at Michigan St. (9-1), 9 a.m. N. Illinois (8-2) at Ball St. (4-7), 10 a.m. N. Dakota St. (7-3) at Missouri St. (4-6), 11 a.m. North Dakota (3-7) at S. Dakota St. (4-6), 11 a.m. Indiana St. (6-4) at S. Illinois (4-6), 11 a.m. N. Iowa (7-3) at W. Illinois (6-4), 11 a.m. Kent St. (4-6) at W. Michigan (4-6), 11 a.m. Ohio St. (9-1) at Iowa (7-3), 12:30 p.m. Illinois (5-5) at Northwestern (7-3), 12:30 p.m. Missouri (8-2) at Iowa St. (5-6), 4 p.m. Rutgers (4-5) at Cincinnati (3-6), 4:30 p.m. SOUTHWEST East Carolina (6-4) at Rice (2-8), 10 a.m. UTEP (6-5) at Tulsa (7-3), 11 a.m. Marshall (4-6) at SMU (5-5), noon Texas St. (4-6) at Sam Houston St. (5-5), noon Northwestern St. (5-5) at Stephen F.Austin (8-2), noon Weber St. (6-4) at Texas Tech (5-5), noon Florida Atlantic (4-5) at Texas (4-6), 12:30 p.m. McNeese St. (6-4) at Cent. Arkansas (6-4), 1 p.m. Panhandle St. (6-4) at Lamar (4-6), 4 p.m. Oklahoma (8-2) at Baylor (7-4), 5 p.m. Nebraska (9-1) at Texas A&M (7-3), 5 p.m. Ark.-Pine Bluff (5-5) at Texas Southern (7-3), 5 p.m. FAR WEST Kansas St. (6-4) at Colorado (4-6), 11 a.m. Montana St. (8-2) at Montana (7-3), 11 a.m. Colorado St. (3-8) at Wyoming (2-9), 11 a.m. Idaho (4-6) at Utah St. (4-6), noon Stanford (9-1) at California (5-5), 12:30 p.m. Idaho St. (1-9) at E. Washington (8-2), 1:05 p.m. New Mexico St. (2-8) at Nevada (9-1), 1:05 p.m. Portland St. (2-8) at N. Arizona (5-5), 2:05 p.m. New Mexico (1-9) at BYU (5-5), 3 p.m. Sacramento St. (6-4) at UC Davis (5-5), 4 p.m. Southern Cal (7-3) at Oregon St. (4-5), 5 p.m. Utah (8-2) at San Diego St. (7-3), 7 p.m. San Jose St. (1-9) at Hawaii (7-3), 7:30 p.m. THE AP TOP 25 The Top 25 teams in The Associated Press college football poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Nov. 13, total points based on 25 points for a firstplace vote through one point for a 25th-place vote, and previous ranking: Record Pts Pvs 1. Oregon (38) 10-0 1,469 1 2. Auburn (12) 11-0 1,427 2 3. Boise St. (9) 9-0 1,377 4 4. TCU (1) 11-0 1,361 3 5. LSU 9-1 1,220 5 6. Wisconsin 9-1 1,176 6 7. Stanford 9-1 1,129 7 8. Ohio St. 9-1 1,073 8 9. Nebraska 9-1 1,051 9 10. Alabama 8-2 916 11

11. Michigan St. 9-1 910 10 12. Oklahoma St. 9-1 879 12 13. Arkansas 8-2 816 14 14. Virginia Tech 8-2 671 16 15. Missouri 8-2 624 20 16. Oklahoma 8-2 611 19 17. South Carolina 7-3 520 22 18. Texas A&M 7-3 413 23 19. Nevada 9-1 412 21 20. Southern Cal 7-3 310 — 21. Iowa 7-3 251 13 22. Mississippi St. 7-3 222 17 23. Arizona 7-3 156 18 24. Miami 7-3 107 — 25. Utah 8-2 105 15 Others receiving votes: Northwestern 99, Florida St. 69, N.C. State 38, N. Illinois 37, San Diego St. 32, Temple 9, Michigan 4, Syracuse 2, Tulsa 2, Delaware 1, Maryland 1.

Betting Line NFL (Home teams in Caps) Favorite Opening Current Underdog Thursday DOLPHINS 1.5 1.5 Bears Sunday STEELERS 8 7.5 Raiders JETS 7 7 Texans Ravens 9 10 PANTHERS TITANS 7 7 Redskins COWBOYS 7.5 6.5 Lions Packers 2.5 3 VIKINGS BENGALS 5 5.5 Bills JAGUARS 2 1.5 Browns CHIEFS 7 8 Cards SAINTS 11.5 11.5 Seahawks Falcons 3 3 RAMS 49ERS 3 3 Bucs PATRIOTS 3 3 Colts* EAGLES 3.5 3.5 Giants* Monday CHARGERS 9.5 10 Broncos* Bye week: Packers, Saints, Raiders, Chargers. College (Home teams in Caps) Opening Current Underdog Today Miami-Ohio 13 10.5 AKRON TOLEDO 10.5 10 Bowling Green* Thursday WASHINGTON 3 2.5 Ucla Air Force 19.5 19 NLV* Friday BOISE ST 30.5 30.5 Fresno St* Saturday l-Penn St 11 10 Indiana Tennessee 10.5 9 VANDERBILT SYRACUSE 4 4 Connecticut Florida St 5.5 4.5 MARYLAND Clemson 13.5 13.5 WAKE FOREST GEORGIA TECH 12.5 12.5 Duke BOSTON COLL 7 6.5 Virginia CINCINNATI 10.5 12.5 Rutgers MICHIGAN ST 21 20 Purdue Wisconsin 6 5 MICHIGAN Ohio St 3 3 IOWA Missouri 12 11 IOWA ST Oklahoma St 22.5 24 KANSAS Arkansas 4 3 MISSISSIPPI ST No Illinois 14.5 15 BALL ST E Carolina 11 9.5 RICE W MICHIGAN 4 3 Kent St TULSA 18 17.5 Utep BUFFALO 6.5 7 E Michigan WYOMING 1.5 2.5 Colorado St UTAH ST 2.5 2.5 Idaho SMU 13 13.5 Marshall w-Illinois 7.5 7.5 Northwestern N CAROLINA 2.5 2.5 NC State Stanford 8 7 CALIFORNIA C Florida 15.5 17 TULANE Virginia Tech 2 2.5 MIAMI-FLORIDA Kansas St 3 2 COLORADO NEVADA 37.5 37.5 New Mexico St UAB 20 20 Memphis BYU 27.5 28.5 New Mexico y-Notre Dame 8 8 Army Pittsburgh 3 2.5 S FLORIDA SOUTHERN MISS 5 4 Houston Favorite

Tuesday’s Games ——— FAR WEST California 80, CS Northridge 63 N. Arizona 74, Alabama St. 46 N. Colorado 67, Wyoming 53 New Mexico 76, Arizona St. 62 Sacramento St. 84, Bethany, Calif. 55 Washington 98, E. Washington 72 Washington St. 88, Idaho 71 Weber St. 97, Colorado Christian 73 MIDWEST Bradley 66, N. Illinois 63 Dayton 76, Akron 68 IUPUI 83, Indiana-Northwest 62 Indiana 71, MVSU 54 Iowa 68, Louisiana-Monroe 40 Kansas St. 73, Virginia Tech 57 Kent St. 62, Robert Morris 59 Michigan St. 82, South Carolina 73 N. Iowa 84, Coe 45 Northeastern 63, S. Illinois 62, OT W. Carolina 69, DePaul 64 Wichita St. 79, Texas Southern 67 Wisconsin 85, North Dakota 53 Xavier 76, IPFW 66, OT Youngstown St. 64, Buffalo 53 TOURNAMENT NIT Season Tip-off-East First Round Hampton 45, Winthrop 44 Va. Commonwealth 90, Wake Forest 69 NIT Season Tip-off-North First Round Boston U. 76, George Washington 67 Villanova 84, Marist 47 NIT Season Tip-off-South First Round Missouri St. 80, Arkansas St. 71 Tennessee 85, Belmont 76 NIT Season Tip-off-West Third Place Pepperdine 76, Nevada 75 EAST Cabrini 84, Haverford 75 Eastern 73, PSU-Brandywine 61 Malone 96, Wilberforce 72 Marywood 63, Hilbert 62 Navy 74, Neumann 62 New Hampshire 55, Dartmouth 53 Penn St. 66, Saint Joseph’s 57 Philadelphia 66, St. Thomas Aquinas 60 Quinnipiac 66, Hartford 64 Rhode Island 92, Brown 67 Stony Brook 51, Monmouth, N.J. 49 Syracuse 66, Detroit 55 Towson 89, Coppin St. 74 West Liberty 157, Point Park 89

Pittsburgh New Jersey N.Y. Islanders

19 9 8 2 20 58 52 18 5 11 2 12 33 59 17 4 10 3 11 37 58 Northeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Montreal 18 12 5 1 25 49 36 Boston 15 9 5 1 19 44 29 Ottawa 18 9 8 1 19 46 53 Buffalo 19 7 9 3 17 51 60 Toronto 17 6 8 3 15 40 51 Southeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Washington 18 13 4 1 27 66 47 Tampa Bay 17 8 7 2 18 48 54 Atlanta 18 7 8 3 17 57 67 Carolina 17 8 9 0 16 51 60 Florida 15 7 8 0 14 44 39 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Detroit 15 11 3 1 23 51 37 St. Louis 16 9 4 3 21 41 40 Chicago 20 9 9 2 20 57 59 Columbus 15 9 6 0 18 41 38 Nashville 16 7 6 3 17 42 48 Northwest Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Vancouver 17 10 4 3 23 54 43 Colorado 17 9 7 1 19 59 53 Minnesota 16 8 6 2 18 38 38 Calgary 16 7 9 0 14 46 49 Edmonton 16 4 9 3 11 42 66 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Los Angeles 16 12 4 0 24 50 34 Anaheim 20 10 8 2 22 51 59 San Jose 16 9 5 2 20 48 40 Phoenix 17 7 5 5 19 47 53 Dallas 16 9 7 0 18 48 45 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Tuesday’s Games Toronto 5, Nashville 4 Montreal 3, Philadelphia 0 Dallas 2, Anaheim 1 Today’s Games Tampa Bay at N.Y. Islanders, 4 p.m. Boston at N.Y. Rangers, 4 p.m. Vancouver at Pittsburgh, 4 p.m. Buffalo at Washington, 4 p.m. Ottawa at Carolina, 4 p.m. Florida at Atlanta, 4 p.m. St. Louis at Detroit, 4:30 p.m. Anaheim at Minnesota, 5 p.m. San Jose at Colorado, 6 p.m. Phoenix at Calgary, 6:30 p.m. Chicago at Edmonton, 6:30 p.m. Columbus at Los Angeles, 7:30 p.m. Thursday’s Games Florida at Boston, 4 p.m. New Jersey at Toronto, 4 p.m. Tampa Bay at Philadelphia, 4 p.m. Nashville at Montreal, 4:30 p.m. San Jose at Dallas, 5:30 p.m.

SOCCER MLS MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PST —— MLS CUP Sunday, Nov. 21: Colorado vs. FC Dallas at Toronto, 5:30 p.m.

Women’s college Tuesday’s Games ——— SOUTHWEST Texas 112, Northwestern St. 53 Texas A&M 87, Ark.-Little Rock 41 Texas-Pan American 70, Texas Southern 62 Tulsa 86, Oral Roberts 85 MIDWEST Detroit 78, Ball St. 60 Iowa 91, Bradley 53 Loyola of Chicago 67, W. Michigan 62, OT N. Illinois 73, W. Illinois 65 Tennessee St. 57, S. Illinois 43 UMKC 80, Rockhurst 40 Wichita St. 79, SIU-Edwardsville 53 Wis.-Milwaukee 82, Chicago St. 69 SOUTH Alabama St. 55, Mobile 37 Charleston Southern 96, Voorhees 63 Coastal Carolina 44, Coll. of Charleston 43 Georgia Southern 71, Mercer 52 Liberty 71, Virginia Union 19 Louisiana Tech 71, W. Kentucky 55 McNeese St. 86, New Orleans 33 Middle Tennessee 74, Austin Peay 60 Nicholls St. 53, Louisiana-Monroe 52 Presbyterian 70, Erskine 42 SE Louisiana 65, William Carey 48 South Alabama 95, Southern Miss. 61 Tulane 62, Mississippi St. 42 UAB 74, Jackson St. 38 EAST Albany, N.Y. 49, St. Francis, NY 43 Binghamton 66, Canisius 50 Connecticut 65, Baylor 64 Delaware 69, Villanova 62 Drexel 86, La Salle 55 Fairleigh Dickinson 61, Columbia 50 Georgetown 53, Maryland 45 Kent St. 71, Northeastern 53 New Hampshire 65, Dartmouth 52 Saint Joseph’s 67, Sacred Heart 49 Seton Hall 72, Temple 59 St. John’s 77, Manhattan 51 Towson 65, St. Francis, Pa. 55 UMBC 58, Coppin St. 51

HOCKEY NHL NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE All Times PST ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Philadelphia 19 12 5 2 26 63 41 N.Y. Rangers 18 10 7 1 21 55 49

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL—Announced the retirement of vice president of rules and on-field operations Bob Watson, effective at the end of the year. American League DETROIT TIGERS—Named Kevin Bradshaw minor league field coordinator, Joe DePastino minor league catching coordinator and Dave Owen minor league infield coordinator. National League ATLANTA BRAVES—Traded INF Omar Infante and LHP Mike Dunn to Florida for 2B Dan Uggla. ST. LOUIS CARDINALS—Agreed to terms with RHP Jake Westbrook on a two-year contract. SAN DIEGO PADRES—Named Brad Ausmus as special assistant to baseball operations. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association PHOENIX SUNS—Signed C Earl Barron. Released G Matt Janning. Assigned F Gani Lawal to Iowa (NBADL). FOOTBALL National Football League ARIZONA CARDINALS—Placed OT Brandon Keith on injured reserve. Signed OT D’Anthony Batiste. Signed RB Alfonso Smith to the practice squad. Released WR Ed Gant from the practice squad. CAROLINA PANTHERS—Signed QB Brian St. Pierre from the practice squad. Waived RB Andre Brown. Signed LB Sean Ware to the practice squad. CINCINNATI BENGALS—Signed PK Aaron Pettrey and OT Kirk Chambers. CLEVELAND BROWNS—Waived QB Brett Ratliff and P Dave Zastudil. Placed G Billy Yates on injured reserve. Signed DB Eric King and KR Clifton Smith. NEW YORK GIANTS—Signed WR Derek Hagan. Placed WR Ramses Barden on injured reserve. Signed DT Dwayne Hendricks to the practice squad. PITTSBURGH STEELERS—Released PK Jeff Reed. Signed PK Shaun Suisham. TENNESSEE TITANS—Signed TE Riar Geer to the practice squad. Waived TE Joel Gamble. HOCKEY National Hockey League BOSTON BRUINS—Reassigned F Yannick Riendeau from Providence (AHL) to Reading (ECHL). ST. LOUIS BLUES—Assigned F Nick Drazenovic to Peoria (AHL). Recalled F T.J. Hensick from Peoria. WASHINGTON CAPITALS—Re-assigned D Joe Finley from Hershey (AHL) to South Carolina (ECHL). COLLEGE ILLINOIS—Dismissed LB Evan Frierson from the football team after he was arrested and charged with aggravated battery. MONTANA—Announced it will not renew the contract of women’s soccer coach Neil Sedgwick. MONTANA TECH—Announced the retirement of football coach Bob Green. MONTANA WESTERN—Football coach Rich Ferris announced his contract was not renewed. Announced the resignation of volleyball coach Katie Howells.

NHL ROUNDUP

Video review helps Stars slip past Ducks The Associated Press

Football • Redskins have out clause in McNabb’s new contract: Nothing is straightforward about Donovan McNabb these days. It turns out the $40 million he is supposed to be guaranteed in his new contract could turn out to be a mere $3.5 million. McNabb’s agent, Fletcher Smith, clarified some of the details of McNabb’s deal Tuesday. He says while the contract is worded so that it has “$40 million in guarantees,” the Redskins do have an option to cut McNabb at the end of the season with no further money due. McNabb receives a $3.5 million bonus this year as part of the new agreement, but the rest of the five-year, $78 million package would come to naught if the team decides to cut ties.

Basketball • Barkley, TNT NBA analysts to join NCAA coverage: Look out, March Madness. Charles Barkley is coming. CBS and Turner executives confirmed Tuesday that the brash Hall of Famer and other big names from TNT’s NBA broadcasts would be part of their joint coverage of the NCAA tournament starting this season. — From wire reports

Oklahoma 7 7.5 BAYLOR Nebraska 3 2.5 TEXAS A&M W Virginia 5.5 4.5 LOUISVILLE Usc 3 3 OREGON ST LSU 16.5 16.5 Mississippi Uta 3.5 3 SAN DIEGO ST HAWAII 30 30 San Jose St S CAROLINA 23.5 22.5 Troy TEXAS 21 21 Fla Atlantic NAVY 15 14 Arkansas St Mid Tenn St 3.5 5 W KENTUCKY Florida Int’l 8 10 UL-LAFAYETTE UL-MONROE 2 1 North Texas* l- Landover, Md..; w- Wrigley Field; y- Yankee Stadium.

IN THE BLEACHERS

Tony Gutierrez / The Associated Press

Dallas Stars center Brad Richards (91) reacts after scoring in the third period of an NHL hockey game against the Anaheim Ducks Tuesday in Dallas.

DALLAS — Brad Richards wasn’t sure his third-period shot crossed the goal line. Then James Neal assured his Dallas Stars linemate that he didn’t need to worry. Richards scored his 200th career goal to break a tie after a video review midway through the third period and the Stars edged the Anaheim Ducks 2-1 on Tuesday night. With the game tied at 1, Richards’ shot from the left circle glanced off the post, and the referees initially ruled no goal at 8:24 of the final period. Jonas Hiller controlled the puck to stop play, and replays showed that the puck fluttered over the goal line in the air. “I wasn’t sure,” Richards said. “I thought maybe it was in. But James was right there and he thought for sure it was in.” The game marked the debut of Swedish referee Marcus Vinnerborg, who became the first European to work an NHL game. Vinnerborg made the announcement

that the goal counted, much to the delight of the Stars. “It was good to see,” said Dallas’ Steve Ott, who added a power-play goal. “I screamed like a 10-year-old girl with all the fans when I saw it on the (replay board).” Richards greeted the news with a wide grin, and a Stars equipment man saved the puck for the Stars center. “It’s special,” Richards said. “I never thought I’d get a chance to play this long. To get that many goals, I’m fortunate. Hopefully there’s many more and there’s another milestone someday.” Kari Lehtonen stopped 26 shots as the Stars returned from an 0-3 road trip to win their fourth straight at home. Dallas managed three goals during the three road losses, but has 17 in the past four home games. “We’ve had a lot of bad breaks, hit a lot of posts,” Ott said of the road trip. “The last couple games, we had 1-1 games going into the third period and we lost ‘em. This is the direction we need to go in.”

Corey Perry scored on the power play and Hiller made 24 saves for the Ducks. Anaheim was 1 for 6 with the man advantage, missing out on several prime scoring opportunities. Also on Tuesday: Canadiens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Flyers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 MONTREAL — Carey Price made 41 saves for his third shutout, Brian Gionta had a goal and two assists, and Montreal extended its winning streak to four with a victory over Philadelphia. Price stopped 13 shots in the first and 20 more in the second on his way to his seventh career shutout, his second in four games. Maple Leafs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Predators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 TORONTO — Kris Versteeg scored second-period power-play goals 59 seconds apart and Toronto overcome an early three-goal deficit in a win over Nashville. Nikolai Kulemin’s goal late in the second period completed a big comeback as Toronto scored four power-play goals in the second period.


N BA B A SK ET BA L L

THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, November 17, 2010 D3

Hot Matthews leads Blazers past Grizzlies The Associated Press

MEMPHIS, Tenn. — Wesley Matthews let his Portland teammates know early they needn’t worry about leading scorer Brandon Roy sitting out. Matthews, subbing for the injured Roy, scored a career-high 30 points, 22 in the first half, and the Trail Blazers beat the Memphis Grizzlies 100-99 on Tuesday night. “He did exactly what we needed,” Portland coach Nate McMillan said. “He scrapped defensively. I thought he let the offense come to him. It was good to see him knock down some shots and get to the basket.” Matthews shot 11 of 19 from the field, including five of 10 from three-point range, in his first start of the season as the Trail Blazers salvaged a win after losing their first two games on a three-game road trip. Portland beat Memphis for the eighth straight time on the road. “We all had to step up,” Matthews said. “I’m part of a team, so I’m just fulfilling my duty as a teammate to step up like everyone else did.”

LaMarcus Aldridge The teams exchanged had 23 points for the the lead throughout Trail Blazers, while much of the fourth peAndre Miller finished riod, neither holding with 19, 13 in the fourth more than a two-point quarter. He also had advantage until 6 minnine assists. utes remained, when Next up “I was trying to get a Matthews made con• Denver little bit more assertive,” secutive baskets for an Nuggets at Miller said of his fourth83-79 advantage. There Portland were 14 lead changes quarter play. “I had a Trail Blazers and a trio of ties in the lot of shots early, but I fourth quarter alone. didn’t take them. It was • When: A tip-in by Nicolas an idea of keeping guys Thursday, Batum (11 points), then a involved, and it fell our 7:30 p.m. steal by Miller that led to way.” his 10-footer with 21 secRudy Gay led Mem- • TV: TNT onds left gave Portland phis with 20 points, a 97-93 lead, and there while Zach Randolph had 19 points and 14 rebounds. would be no more lead changes. “Everyone is taking away the O.J. Mayo scored 17 and Mike Conley added 16, including a inside with either zone or douthree-pointer at the buzzer that bling up,” Memphis coach Liowasn’t enough to send the game nel Hollins said of the Grizzlies offensive woes. “We just have into overtime. Roy, the Trail Blazers’ leading to figure out how to attack betscorer with 18.1 points per game, ter without forcing it inside, and missed his first game of the sea- we’ve got to make shots. When we are on the perimeter, we have son with a sore left knee. “You got to give them credit. to make shots.” Portland relied on threeThey’ve got a star player out, and they played good,” Randolph pointers to take an early lead while Memphis struggled from said.

Portland Trail Blazers guard Wesley Matthews (2) dunks over Memphis Grizzlies forward Rudy Gay (22) in the second half of an NBA basketball game Tuesday in Memphis, Tenn. The Trail Blazers beat the Grizzlies 100-99.

the field. The shooting eventually would even out, although the Trail Blazers would end the half 6 of 11 from outside the arc. Matthews already was more than sufficiently making up for the lost offensive production with Roy out, scoring 22 in the first half, on 7 of 10 from the field. “We knew he was ready to play,” Miller said. “He brings a lot of energy to the game. He made some good plays offensively and defensively. He has the experience. That’s what we expect of him. It’s a collective effort, but tonight was his night all around.” Portland led 51-45 at halftime as Aldridge added 14 points. Memphis chipped away and Greivis Vasquez converted a three-point play with 8.9 seconds left in the third period to cut the Portland lead to 71-70 entering the fourth. But Memphis couldn’t make plays down the stretch. “We needed to play well and to give ourselves something good going home,” McMillan said. “Now, we need to go home and take care of business there.”

Jim Weber / The Associated Press

NBA ROUNDUP

NBA SCOREBOARD

Nuggets survive test from Knicks

SUMMARIES Tuesday’s summaries

Nuggets 120, Knicks 118 The Associated Press

DENVER — Maybe he will be trying to help them win games in the future. On this night, Carmelo Anthony was more than happy to hand the New York Knicks another loss. “I’m just glad we got the win,” Anthony said after the Denver Nuggets’ 120-118 escape Tuesday night when he scored 26 points. Said Amare Stoudemire, who led the Knicks with 24 points: “We did a solid job on Carmelo. Pretty much me and him played chess and canceled each other out.” Stoudemire would love to be Anthony’s sidekick soon and not his opponent, and he’s been lobbying for a union with the New York native who grew up idolizing former Knicks small forward Bernard King. Anthony swore it never crossed his mind on this night that he could be playing alongside Stoudemire soon. “I never thought about that tonight. Never. Not once. Never,” Anthony insisted. “That wasn’t even on my mind throughout the game.” And he said none of the Knicks lobbied him in their postgame hugs and handshakes for him to join them either via trade this season or next summer, when he’d be the headliner of the 2011 free agent class. “No, not at all. They’re trying to win, we’re trying to win,” Anthony said. “They competed hard tonight. They fought back. But nobody, no, there wasn’t none of that going on out there. Of course not.” Anthony referred questions about any trade talk to general manager Masai Ujiri, who hasn’t been speaking publicly since failing to persuade him to sign his three-year, $65 million contract months ago. Anthony didn’t have a great game, committing five turnovers and missing 13-of-21 shots. But he came through often enough for the Nuggets to hand the Knicks their sixth straight loss. Denver led by 16 early but

Jack Dempsey / The Associated Press

Denver Nuggets forward Carmelo Anthony (15) goes up for a shot against New York Knicks forward Amare Stoudemire (1) during the second half of Tuesday’s game in Denver. The Nuggets won 120-118. the Knicks made a game of it by trimming a 12-point deficit to start the fourth quarter to 109107 with 3:07 left on Raymond Felton’s free throw when Anthony was whistled for a technical after tossing his headband when he was tied up by Wilson Chandler while going for a slam dunk. Anthony was then whistled for a loose-ball foul on the jump, and Chandler sank both foul shots to cap an 11-0 run and tie it at 109. Chauncey Billups and Ty Lawson hit back-to-back jumpers and the Nuggets settled down. After Stoudemire’s threepointer pulled the Knicks to 117115, Anthony sank one of two free throws with 12 seconds left to put Denver ahead 118-115. Felton dribbled out of bounds, and Anthony again sank one of two foul shots with 9.7 seconds remaining. Felton’s three-pointer with a second left made it a one-point

game and Billups was fouled. He swished his first shot and missed his second high off the rim, the buzzer sounding as the Knicks corralled the rebound. Al Harrington chipped in 22 points against his former team and rookie Gary Forbes scored 19 as Denver bounced back from a fourth-quarter meltdown in Phoenix one night earlier. Rookie guard Landry Fields had a big game for New York with 21 points and 17 boards. Nuggets coach George Karl was asked before the game how his team has handled the trade talk swirling around its superstar that many expect will end up in the Big Apple, where he and TV personality LaLa Vazquez were married over the summer. Also on Tuesday: Lakers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .118 Bucks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 MILWAUKEE — Kobe Bryant scored 31 points, Shannon Brown added 16 of his 21 in the fourth quarter, and the Los Angeles Lakers beat Milwaukee to snap a two-game losing streak. Bulls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 Rockets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 HOUSTON — Derrick Rose scored 17 of his 33 points in the fourth quarter and Chicago opened its seven-game road trip by beating Houston. Wizards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 Raptors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 WASHINGTON — Gilbert Arenas, replacing injured rookie John Wall and scored 20 points in his first start of the season to help Washington beat Toronto. Cavaliers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .101 76ers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 CLEVELAND — Daniel Gibson scored 18 points, Jamario Moon added 13 and Cleveland finally shook its third-quarter blues to beat Philadelphia, which lost its fourth in a row and played without swingman Andre Iguodala. Hawks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102 Pacers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 INDIANAPOLIS — Josh Smith had 25 points, eight rebounds and seven blocks to help Atlanta beat Indiana.

EASTERN CONFERENCE

NEW YORK (118) Gallinari 6-19 7-8 21, Stoudemire 10-19 38 24, Mozgov 0-2 0-0 0, Fields 10-15 1-1 21, Felton 5-13 7-10 19, Turiaf 0-1 0-0 0, Chandler 8-16 5-6 23, Douglas 0-4 0-0 0, Randolph 2-4 0-0 4, Mason 0-1 0-0 0, Walker 2-4 0-0 6. Totals 43-98 23-33 118. DENVER (120) Anthony 8-21 10-14 26, She.Williams 4-4 2-4 10, Nene 7-9 3-4 17, Billups 4-12 5-7 13, Afflalo 1-4 5-6 7, Harrington 7-15 6-7 22, Forbes 8-13 0-1 19, Lawson 3-8 0-4 6, Smith 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 42-86 31-47 120. New York 26 28 28 36 — 118 Denver 26 35 33 26 — 120 3-Point Goals—New York 9-31 (Walker 2-3, Felton 2-4, Chandler 2-5, Gallinari 2-10, Stoudemire 1-2, Mason 0-1, Fields 0-3, Douglas 0-3), Denver 5-14 (Forbes 3-3, Harrington 2-6, Lawson 0-1, Anthony 0-1, Afflalo 0-1, Billups 02). Fouled Out—Turiaf, Harrington. Rebounds— New York 61 (Fields 17), Denver 64 (Anthony, Forbes 9). Assists—New York 24 (Felton 11), Denver 23 (Billups 8). Total Fouls—New York 33, Denver 26. Technicals—New York defensive three second, Anthony, Denver defensive three second. A—15,190 (19,155).

Bulls 95, Rockets 92 CHICAGO (95) Deng 6-21 3-6 16, Gibson 1-9 0-0 2, Noah 4-7 4-5 12, Rose 13-20 3-6 33, Bogans 1-1 0-0 3, Brewer 5-7 1-5 11, Korver 3-4 2-2 10, Watson 1-3 0-0 2, Asik 2-2 2-4 6. Totals 36-74 1528 95. HOUSTON (92) Battier 4-10 0-2 11, Scola 11-17 5-6 27, Miller 8-15 4-4 21, Lowry 3-5 1-3 7, Martin 5-15 7-8 18, Hill 1-1 0-0 2, Hayes 2-6 0-0 4, Smith 0-1 0-0 0, Lee 0-1 2-2 2. Totals 34-71 19-25 92. Chicago 19 30 14 32 — 95 Houston 26 15 30 21 — 92 3-Point Goals—Chicago 8-12 (Rose 4-5, Korver 2-2, Bogans 1-1, Deng 1-4), Houston 515 (Battier 3-7, Miller 1-3, Martin 1-5). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Chicago 51 (Deng 10), Houston 43 (Hill, Hayes, Miller, Scola 5). Assists—Chicago 18 (Rose 7), Houston 21 (Lowry 7). Total Fouls—Chicago 24, Houston 24. Technicals—Chicago defensive three second, Houston defensive three second. A—18,158 (18,043).

Blazers 100, Grizzlies 99 PORTLAND (100) Batum 5-10 0-0 11, Aldridge 9-17 5-5 23, Camby 3-7 0-0 6, Miller 7-17 5-6 19, Matthews 11-19 3-4 30, Cunningham 3-5 0-0 6, Fernandez 1-7 0-0 3, Johnson 0-4 0-0 0, Marks 1-1 0-0 2. Totals 40-87 13-15 100. MEMPHIS (99) Gay 8-12 3-3 20, Randolph 7-12 5-8 19, Gasol 4-6 1-3 9, Conley 5-14 4-4 16, Mayo 7-13 0-0 17, Thabeet 0-0 0-0 0, Vasquez 1-8 3-5 5, Young 1-2 0-0 3, Arthur 2-4 4-4 8, Henry 0-1 0-0 0, Allen 1-3 0-0 2. Totals 36-75 20-27 99. Portland 22 29 20 29 — 100 Memphis 17 28 25 29 — 99 3-Point Goals—Portland 7-19 (Matthews 5-10, Batum 1-3, Fernandez 1-6), Memphis 7-19 (Mayo 3-6, Conley 2-5, Gay 1-2, Young 1-2, Vasquez 0-4). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Portland 47 (Camby 17), Memphis 48 (Randolph 14). Assists—Portland 25 (Miller 9), Memphis 20 (Conley 6). Total Fouls—Portland 20, Memphis 19. A—10,827 (18,119).

Lakers 118, Bucks 107 L.A. LAKERS (118) Artest 3-5 1-1 7, Odom 6-11 1-2 13, Gasol 7-13 4-7 18, Fisher 3-7 2-2 10, Bryant 10-23 1111 31, Barnes 3-4 1-2 9, Blake 2-4 0-0 6, Brown 7-9 3-3 21, Ebanks 1-2 1-1 3, Walton 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 42-78 24-29 118.

Atlantic Division Boston New Jersey New York Philadelphia Toronto

W 8 4 3 2 2

L 2 6 8 9 9

Orlando Atlanta Miami Charlotte Washington

W 7 8 6 4 3

L 3 4 4 7 6

Chicago Cleveland Milwaukee Indiana Detroit

W 6 5 5 4 4

L 3 5 6 5 7

Pct .800 .400 .273 .182 .182

GB — 4 5½ 6½ 6½

L10 8-2 4-6 2-8 2-8 2-8

Str W-2 W-1 L-6 L-4 L-2

Home 4-0 2-4 1-4 1-3 1-3

Away 4-2 2-2 2-4 1-6 1-6

Conf 6-1 2-6 3-3 2-6 2-4

Away 2-1 5-1 2-2 3-3 0-4

Conf 5-2 5-2 5-2 3-4 2-6

Away 1-2 3-1 2-3 2-2 2-5

Conf 2-2 5-4 4-1 3-3 1-4

Southeast Division Pct .700 .667 .600 .364 .333

GB — — 1 3½ 3½

L10 7-3 6-4 6-4 4-6 3-6

Str W-2 W-2 W-1 W-1 W-1

Home 5-2 3-3 4-2 1-4 3-2

Central Division Pct .667 .500 .455 .444 .364

GB — 1½ 2 2 3

L10 6-3 5-5 5-5 4-5 4-6

Str W-4 W-1 L-1 L-1 L-1

Home 5-1 2-4 3-3 2-3 2-2

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division New Orleans San Antonio Dallas Memphis Houston

W 8 8 7 4 3

L 1 1 2 8 7

Utah Oklahoma City Portland Denver Minnesota

W 7 6 7 6 3

L 4 4 5 5 9

L.A. Lakers Golden State Phoenix Sacramento L.A. Clippers

W 9 7 6 3 1

L 2 4 4 6 10

Pct .889 .889 .778 .333 .300

GB — — 1 5½ 5½

L10 8-1 8-1 7-2 3-7 3-7

Str L-1 W-7 W-4 L-4 L-1

Home 5-0 4-1 4-2 2-4 1-3

Away 3-1 4-0 3-0 2-4 2-4

Conf 5-1 5-1 4-2 4-5 1-5

Away 5-2 3-1 4-4 2-4 1-7

Conf 2-4 3-3 3-4 5-3 1-4

Away 3-1 2-4 3-2 2-2 0-5

Conf 7-2 4-1 5-4 1-4 1-8

Northwest Division Pct .636 .600 .583 .545 .250

GB — ½ ½ 1 4½

L10 7-3 6-4 5-5 5-5 2-8

Str L-1 W-1 W-1 W-1 L-2

Home 2-2 3-3 3-1 4-1 2-2

Pacific Division Pct .818 .636 .600 .333 .091

GB — 2 2½ 5 8

L10 Str 8-2 W-1 6-4 W-1 6-4 W-3 3-6 L-5 1-9 L-6 ——— Tuesday’s Games

Cleveland 101, Philadelphia 93 Washington 109, Toronto 94 L.A. Lakers 118, Milwaukee 107 Denver 120, New York 118

Home 6-1 5-0 3-2 1-4 1-5

Atlanta 102, Indiana 92 Portland 100, Memphis 99 Chicago 95, Houston 92 Today’s Games

Phoenix at Miami, 4 p.m. Washington at Boston, 4:30 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Minnesota, 5 p.m. Houston at Oklahoma City, 5 p.m. Chicago at San Antonio, 6:30 p.m.

Toronto at Philadelphia, 4 p.m. L.A. Lakers at Detroit, 4:30 p.m. Dallas at New Orleans, 5 p.m. New Jersey at Utah, 6 p.m. New York at Sacramento, 7 p.m. Thursday’s Games

L.A. Clippers at Indiana, 4 p.m. Denver at Portland, 7:30 p.m.

Phoenix at Orlando, 5 p.m. ——— All Times PST

MILWAUKEE (107) Mbah a Moute 0-4 0-0 0, Gooden 8-11 4-4 22, Bogut 5-13 2-10 12, Jennings 12-26 3-3 31, Salmons 4-13 0-0 10, Boykins 4-5 0-0 8, Ilyasova 3-5 2-2 9, Dooling 0-2 0-0 0, Maggette 5-10 5-8 15, Sanders 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 41-89 16-27 107. L.A. Lakers 32 25 33 28 — 118 Milwaukee 29 30 22 26 — 107 3-Point Goals—L.A. Lakers 10-16 (Brown 4-5, Barnes 2-2, Fisher 2-2, Blake 2-3, Bryant 0-4), Milwaukee 9-24 (Jennings 4-11, Gooden 2-2, Salmons 2-6, Ilyasova 1-2, Maggette 0-1, Dooling 0-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—L.A. Lakers 45 (Gasol 10), Milwaukee 55 (Bogut 18). Assists—L.A. Lakers 24 (Odom 6), Milwaukee 22 (Salmons, Jennings 6). Total Fouls—L.A. Lakers 20, Milwaukee 23. Tech-

70 26-30 92. Atlanta 21 29 27 25 — 102 Indiana 24 25 16 27 — 92 3-Point Goals—Atlanta 8-15 (Bibby 3-5, Ja.Crawford 2-2, Teague 2-3, Smith 1-1, Williams 0-1, Johnson 0-3), Indiana 4-18 (Posey 2-6, Granger 1-4, Dunleavy 1-4, Rush 0-1, Price 0-1, Ford 0-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds— Atlanta 36 (Smith 8), Indiana 47 (Hibbert 15). Assists—Atlanta 26 (Bibby 7), Indiana 18 (Ford 5). Total Fouls—Atlanta 24, Indiana 24. Technicals—Johnson, Granger, Indiana defensive three second. A—11,133 (18,165).

Wizards 109, Raptors 94 TORONTO (94) Weems 7-13 0-0 16, Evans 1-4 3-4 5, Bargnani 3-13 5-6 12, Jack 5-14 3-4 13, DeRozan 5-9 2-2 12, Johnson 2-5 2-2 6, Andersen 2-5 0-0 4, Kleiza 7-11 1-2 15, Calderon 1-8 0-0 3, Wright 1-1 0-0 2, Banks 0-2 2-4 2, Dorsey 1-1 2-2 4. Totals 35-86 20-26 94. WASHINGTON (109) Thornton 3-6 0-0 6, Blatche 9-13 3-4 22, McGee 3-7 2-2 8, Arenas 7-14 3-4 20, Hinrich 5-8 2-2 13, Booker 4-6 0-1 8, Young 8-15 3-4 20, Armstrong 5-6 0-0 10, Martin 0-0 0-2 0, Hudson 0-2 0-0 0, Seraphin 1-3 0-0 2, N’diaye 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 45-80 13-19 109. Toronto 23 24 21 26 — 94 Washington 27 27 36 19 — 109 3-Point Goals—Toronto 4-11 (Weems 2-2, Bargnani 1-2, Calderon 1-3, Andersen 0-1, Jack 0-1, Kleiza 0-2), Washington 6-15 (Arenas 3-6, Blatche 1-1, Hinrich 1-2, Young 1-4, Hudson 0-1, Thornton 0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds— Toronto 44 (Evans 9), Washington 54 (McGee 9). Assists—Toronto 19 (Jack 5), Washington 28 (Hinrich 12). Total Fouls—Toronto 18, Washington 26. Technicals—Washington defensive three second. A—11,513 (20,173).

Cavaliers 101, 76ers 93 PHILADELPHIA (93) Brand 5-13 3-4 13, Nocioni 5-10 0-0 12, Hawes 0-2 0-0 0, Holiday 3-9 5-5 11, Turner 4-13 7-8 16, Young 8-12 1-1 17, L.Williams 3-10 2-2 10, Songaila 3-3 0-0 6, Meeks 1-3 0-0 3, Battie 2-4 1-2 5. Totals 34-79 19-22 93. CLEVELAND (101) Moon 5-8 2-2 13, Hickson 4-9 0-0 8, Varejao 4-5 1-1 9, Sessions 1-8 5-6 7, Parker 3-8 3-4 10, Jamison 4-11 0-0 10, Gibson 6-12 3-4 18, Graham 6-11 0-0 13, Hollins 3-5 3-4 9, Harris 1-3 2-4 4. Totals 37-80 19-25 101. Philadelphia 23 31 16 23 — 93 Cleveland 19 35 26 21 — 101 3-Point Goals—Philadelphia 6-13 (L.Williams 2-2, Nocioni 2-3, Meeks 1-3, Turner 1-3, Holiday 0-2), Cleveland 8-20 (Gibson 3-5, Jamison 2-5, Parker 1-3, Graham 1-3, Moon 1-3, Harris 0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Philadelphia 50 (Brand 11), Cleveland 47 (Moon 8). Assists— Philadelphia 23 (Holiday 10), Cleveland 28 (Gibson, Sessions 8). Total Fouls—Philadelphia 21, Cleveland 18. Technicals—Cleveland defensive three second. A—20,562 (20,562).

LEADERS

nicals—Bryant, Milwaukee defensive three second. Flagrant Fouls—Odom. A—18,059 (18,717).

Hawks 102, Pacers 92 ATLANTA (102) Williams 4-8 3-3 11, Smith 9-16 6-7 25, Horford 7-12 1-1 15, Bibby 5-9 3-4 16, Johnson 4-12 3-3 11, Ja.Crawford 3-7 3-3 11, Evans 0-3 0-0 0, Teague 2-3 0-0 6, Pachulia 2-3 1-2 5, Powell 0-0 0-0 0, Collins 1-1 0-0 2. Totals 37-74 20-23 102. INDIANA (92) Granger 7-14 7-8 22, McRoberts 1-3 0-0 2, Hibbert 6-16 6-8 18, Ford 3-10 0-0 6, Dunleavy 4-8 5-5 14, Posey 3-7 0-0 8, Rush 1-5 3-4 5, S.Jones 4-4 2-2 10, Price 2-3 3-3 7. Totals 31-

Through NOV. 15 SCORING G FG FT Durant, OKC 10 90 87 Ellis, GOL 11 110 59 Bryant, LAL 10 84 69 Wade, MIA 10 81 74 Anthony, DEN 10 93 49 Martin, HOU 9 63 73 Gay, MEM 11 105 32 Rose, CHI 8 73 36 Westbrook, OKC 10 75 83 Gasol, LAL 10 94 44 Nowitzki, DAL 9 78 49 Gordon, LAC 9 68 62 James, MIA 10 70 75 Williams, UTA 11 83 61 Granger, IND 8 66 24 Scola, HOU 9 79 41 Millsap, UTA 11 98 39 Ginobili, SAN 9 60 46 Richardson, PHX 10 84 13 Howard, ORL 10 74 64

PTS 284 292 252 247 245 217 261 189 235 232 207 206 223 244 177 199 239 192 212 212

AVG 28.4 26.5 25.2 24.7 24.5 24.1 23.7 23.6 23.5 23.2 23.0 22.9 22.3 22.2 22.1 22.1 21.7 21.3 21.2 21.2

Beasley piles up points after trade from Miami to Minnesota By Jon Krawczynski The Associated Press

MINNEAPOLIS — It’s taken a few weeks for Michael Beasley to find his way in the Minnesota Timberwolves offense. Coach Kurt Rambis has flooded the 21-year-old with responsibilities, asking him to play two positions, be aggressive but not TOO aggressive and take over when the time is right. The message appears to be getting through. For a player who was labeled irresponsible in his first two seasons in Miami, Beasley is embracing his role as the go-to guy in his first season in Minnesota. He scored a career-high 42 points in a win over the Kings last week, followed that up with 35 in a win over the Knicks and is averaging 32.5 points over the last four games. Beasley’s scoring binge has helped the Wolves go 2-2, showing a feistiness that wasn’t there early in the season — or for the last five years, really. Beasley welcomed a baby boy into his family on the same day he hung 42 on

the Kings and is quickly settling into his new surroundings after two so-so seasons to start his career. “I feel at home,” Beasley said. “I definitely feel at home, on the court and off.” The precocious personality and freewheeling spirit never really felt comfortable on South Beach after the Heat made him the No. 2 overall pick in 2008. He never got into the flow of the offense playing with Dwyane Wade and ran into problems off the court as well. The Heat sent him to Minnesota in a salary dump to create room for LeBron James and Chris Bosh this summer. Rather than feel sorry for himself in basketball’s version of Siberia, Beasley has shown signs of blossoming into the kind of player everyone thought he could be when he was drafted. It’s still very early in his first season with the Timberwolves, but teammates, coaches and fans are liking what they see so far. “He’s very outgoing,” Rambis said. “He has a lot of fun playing. He loves the game of basketball. We certainly enjoy

Chuck Burton / The Associated Press

Minnesota Timberwolves’ Michael Beasley is averaging 32.5 points a game in his last four outings. his enthusiasm.” And his game isn’t too shabby, either. It’s been a long time since the long-suffering Timberwolves have had a player

with the kind of offensive versatility that the 6-foot-9 Beasley has at his disposal. He can get to the rim, knock down the 3 and create his own shot, a revelation for a team that has had to work so hard for offense in recent seasons. “His talent is through the roof,” shooting guard Wayne Ellington said. “He’s just a baller man. Flat out.” Starting at small forward rather than his normal power forward, Beasley is shooting 55 percent from the field and 58 percent (7 for 12) from 3-point range during his surge, and is gradually picking up all the things that Rambis wants him to do — on both ends of the court. “It’s the hardest (basketball) thing I’ve ever done in my life,” Beasley said. “I’m playing the three and the four on offense and defense. I’m banging with the big guys. I’m chasing the little guys. It’s just focus. ... It’s all mental. Coach tells me before every possession. Every time he gives me a new job he tells me and I lock in and do it.” Rambis knows it’s going to take time for Beasley to pick up all the nuances

on offense and defense, but the coach is willing to let him learn on the job, especially when he’s scoring like this. “He’s kind of learning a new way to play and a new position,” Rambis said earlier this season. “He’s got a lot to learn. We’re just going to be extremely patient with him. He’s a very talented, knowledgeable basketball player. I think you see him going through this trying to figure things out.” Beasley and 22-year-old rebounding machine Kevin Love are emerging as a formidable duo that the Wolves hope to build around for years to come. The youngest team in the league still hasn’t established a pecking order for the fourth quarter, but Beasley is moving toward asserting himself as that guy. “I would love for it to be me,” he said. “I want to take that shot. I work every day for that shot. I shoot that shot a million times. I dream about that shot every night. I would love for it to be me. If it’s not, I’m not mad. I just want to get the win. I would love to be that go-to guy. I would love to be the guy that carries that team.”


D4 Wednesday, November 17, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL

COLLEGE BASKETBALL ROUNDUP Washington’s Venoy Overton starts to fall as he drives against Eastern Washington’s Rocky Brown, left, and Rashano Mcrae (12) in the second half of an NCAA college basketball game Tuesday, Nov. 16, 2010, in Seattle. Washington won 98-72.

UConn holds off Baylor to take win streak to 80 By Doug Feinberg The Associated Press

HARTFORD, Conn. — Maya Moore scored 30 points and No. 1 Connecticut won its 80th straight game, 65-64, holding on when No. 2 Baylor missed a last chance to score. A record winning streak exactly two years in the making came down to the final seconds. The Huskies are now eight wins short of matching the 88-game string put together by UCLA’s men’s team in the 1970s. Moore missed from the corner in the closing seconds and the Bears rushed down court trying to get off a last shot. Odyssey Sims launched a three from well beyond the arc at the buzzer — it fell short but it didn’t matter, it came too late. Coach Geno Auriemma covered his head with his hands as he met Baylor coach Kim Mulkey at midcourt. Ahead 44-29 early in the second half, the Huskies suddenly found themselves in trouble when 6-foot-8 star Brittney Griner took over for Baylor. The Bears rallied, taking an eightpoint lead with 6:42. Then, freshman Bria Hartley emerged for the Huskies. “I thought we played great for long stretches. Obviously Baylor is a great team and they made their run,” Auriemma said. “Then the improbable happened, people other than Maya began scoring. “They don’t know what’s its like to come back from a run,” Auriemma said. It’s true. The Huskies have spent the last two seasons rolling over the rest of women’s college basketball, waiting for a real test. They got one Tuesday night. Tiffany Hayes added 16 points for Connecticut (2-0). Griner scored 19 points and had nine blocks for the Lady Bears (3-1). Sims added 17 points and Kimetria Hayden had 15. Melissa Jones had a putback for Baylor that made it 65-64 with 36.5 seconds left. UConn ran the clock down and Moore missed with 6 seconds left as the shotclock went off. Having just used its last timeout, Baylor had no choice once Jones grabbed the rebound. The Bears had to get to the basket. Sims brought the ball up the court but her 30-foot attempt fell way short. Trailing 56-48, Moore, Hartley and the Huskies wouldn’t let the streak end, closing a physical game with a 17-8 run. It was the 46th time that the top two teams in The Associated Press Top 25 poll have played. The No. 1-ranked team holds a 27-19 lead. This is the earliest that the top teams have played in either men’s or women’s basketball. UConn improved to 10-1 in those contests as the top team. During its current run, UConn has faced the No. 2 team four other times and won by nearly 17 points a game. Griner and the Bears nearly changed that. After going scoreless for nearly 21 minutes, the sophomore phenom keyed a 27-4 run over the next 9 minutes, scoring 11 points on an array of post moves.

Fred Beckham / The Associated Press

Connecticut’s Maya Moore shoots around Baylor’s Brittney Griner in the second half of Connecticut’s 65-64 victory in Tuesday’s game in Hartford, Conn. Moore scored a gamehigh 30 points.

MLB

Elaine Thompson / The Associated Press

No. 17 Washington cruises over EWU The Associated Press SEATTLE — Washington can now think about Maui without getting in trouble for looking ahead. For one half Tuesday night, it looked like the 17th-ranked Huskies were already island bound. Justin Holiday scored eight of his career-high 18 points during Washington’s 20-5 run to open the second half, center Matthew Bryan-Amaning posted his second double-double in as many games, and the Huskies overcame a sluggish first half to rout Eastern Washington 98-72. “I don’t think so,” Holiday said. “I haven’t been thinking about Hawaii yet. I go game by game. Of course we’re going to have slow starts, I don’t know the reasons for it.” Ask coach Lorenzo Romar and he thinks his squad simply got “out-scrapped” in the first half by an Eastern Washington team that proved to be more of a headache than the Huskies envisioned in their last warmup before the Maui Invitational. Any worries, though, quickly vanished in the opening moments of the second half. The Huskies’ (2-0) passive first-half defense suddenly became aggressive and suffocating. Holiday scored on quick run outs and added a three-pointer. Abdul Gaddy, who made just three three-pointers during his difficult freshman season, knocked down three on Tuesday night, two during the spurt to start the second half that made it 62-39. The lead only grew, reaching 29 late in the second half. “They came out and showed us they were confident,” Washington guard Venoy Overton said. “They showed us they were better than the last team we played.” Washington might be excused for the sluggish first half with what awaits on the horizon. The Huskies leave Saturday for Maui and the Eagles were meant to be an easy warmup before the challenge that awaits on the islands, beginning with Virginia. For at least one half, EWU was more of a thorn than an easy walkthrough. The Eagles, who lost to Division II Seattle Pacific and Montana State-Billings in their exhibition games, didn’t blink against the preseason favorites in the Pac-10. If not for 14 first-half turnovers, the Eagles might have found themselves in the lead, thanks largely to a passive Washington defense that gave open shots and second chances. “Of our 14 turnovers, six of them were what I consider inexcusable, one’s that we can’t make,” Eastern Washington coach Kirk Earlywine said. “But I was happy with our competitiveness to rebound the ball.” That changed quickly in the second half. Washington scored the first nine points of the half and 13 of 16. Coming off a career-high 28 points in the opener against McNeese State, Bryan-Amaning followed up with 14 points and 10 rebounds against the smaller Eagles. Gaddy finished with 13 points and six assists, while Overton, Isaiah Thomas, Scott Suggs and freshman Terrence Ross all finished with nine. “It was a great game for us to use as a springboard going to Maui,” Romar said. “They were more deliberate ... they were more organized offensively, they knew who they wanted to take shots and it was the kind of team that if we didn’t guard them would have scored a lot more points, but I thought overall we did a pretty good job defending them.” Kevin Winford led the Eagles (0-2) with 14 points. Tremayne Johnson added 13 points for the Eagles, who simply couldn’t keep up with the Huskies in the second half. EWU played without point guard Glen Dean, the Big Sky defensive player of the year last season. Cliff Colimon was a question mark to even see the court with a sprained ankle, but scored seven points. In other games on Tuesday: No. 1 Duke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .79 Miami (Ohio). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45 DURHAM, N.C. — Seth Curry scored 17 points and Duke routed Miami of Ohio in the second round of the CBE Classic. Kyrie Irving added 13 points and Mason Plumlee had 10 points and a career-high 14 rebounds for the Blue Devils (2-0). No. 2 Michigan State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74 Dayton. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .62 EAST LANSING, Mich. — Durrell Summers had 22 points, Draymond Green scored 18 and Delvon Roe added 15 for Michigan State. The Spartans (2-0) led 42-25 at halftime, but had the

lead cut to single digits early in the second half and couldn’t pull away because they made too many turnovers and gave up a lot of three-pointers. No. 3 Kansas State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73 No. 22 Virginia Tech . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57 MANHATTAN, Kan. — Martavious Irving hit three three-pointers in a decisive second-half run that turned a tight game between two cold-shooting teams into a laugher and sparked Kansas State to a victory over Virginia Tech. Two technical fouls were called on Virginia Tech as Kansas State (2-0) was taking charge in the second half. No. 4 Ohio State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .93 No. 9 Florida. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75 GAINESVILLE, Fla. — Freshman Jared Sullinger and senior David Lighty both scored 26 points to lead Ohio State. The Buckeyes used a nearly flawless second half to turn a small deficit into a double-digit lead. No. 6 Villanova. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .84 Marist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47 VILLANOVA, Pa. — Maalik Wayns scored 17 points and Dominic Cheek had 15 to lead Villanova in the NIT Season Tip-Off. Jay Bowie had 14 points for Marist (0-1), which extended Division I’s longest losing streak to 19 games. No. 10 Syracuse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66 Detroit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55 SYRACUSE, N.Y. — Scoop Jardine scored a career-high 27 points and Rick Jackson had 10 points and a career-best 22 rebounds for Syracuse in the Legends Classic. Syracuse (3-0) trailed for much of the first half and finally broke open the game with two big runs in the second to foil the upset bid by Detroit (0-2). No. 25 San Diego State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .79 No. 11 Gonzaga . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76 SPOKANE, Wash. — Billy White scored a career-high 30 points and San Diego State dealt Gonzaga its fifth home loss at the McCarthey Athletic Center since it opened in 2004. Kawhi Leonard added 18 points for San Diego State (20), which is ranked in the AP Top 25 for the first time in school history. Louisville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .88 No. 16 Butler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73 LOUISVILLE, Ky. — Rakeem Buckles scored 17 points and Louisville christened its new downtown arena with the upset win. Terrence Jennings added 13 points and eight rebounds while Elijah Justice and Preston Knowles added 12 points each as the Cardinals withstood a late surge by the Bulldogs to open the KFC Yum! Center with a win. No. 17 Baylor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74 La Salle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64 WACO, Texas — Quincy Acy had 25 points and 11 rebounds and Anthony Jones scored three consecutive baskets to ignite a go-ahead spurt early in the second half for Baylor. Playing the second of three games to start the season without suspended guard LaceDarius Dunn, the Bears (2-0) went ahead to stay with the 13-2 run soon after halftime. No. 24 Tennessee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .85 Belmont . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76 KNOXVILLE, Tenn. — Scotty Hopson scored 18 points and Tennessee hung on in the first round of the NIT Season Tip-Off. Tennessee (2-0) held a 71-54 lead with 7:01 to play, but Belmont’s Drew Hanlen had three three-pointers as part of a 22-6 run to cut that lead to a point. UCLA. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57 Pacific . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44 LOS ANGELES — Reeves Nelson tied his career-high with 21 points and 14 rebounds, and UCLA overcame a poor shooting second half to defeat Pacific in the NIT Season Tip-Off. New Mexico . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76 Arizona State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .62 ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. — The New Mexico backcourt of Dairese Gary and Kendall Williams combined for 33 points Tuesday night to lead the Lobos to a 76-62 victory over Arizona State. Washington State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .88 Idaho . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71 PULLMAN, Wash. — Faisal Aden finished with 26 points and Klay Thompson added 23 as Washington State defeated Idaho. California . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .80 CS Northridge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63 BERKELEY, Calif. — Jorge Gutierrez had a career-high 18 points and eight assists, Markhuri Sanders-Frison added 15 points and 10 rebounds and California won its season opener over Cal State Northridge.

Expanded MLB playoffs more likely for 2012 By Ronald Blum The Associated Press

ORLANDO, Fla. — Baseball management is more likely to consider expanded playoffs for 2012 than for next year. After discussing upcoming collective bargaining Tuesday with major league general managers, MLB executive vice president Rob Manfred said adding wild-card teams for 2011 would be “a difficult trick to pull off” because it would have to be a modification of the current labor contract, which runs through next season. Manfred said the proposal would have to be made by the owners’ labor policy committee, then endorsed by owners and agreed to by the players’ association. “In the middle of a contract, we can’t act unilaterally,” said Manfred, baseball’s chief labor negotiator. Chicago Cubs general manager Jim Hendry favors additional wild cards. He credited commissioner Bud Selig with pushing through the initial wild-card playoffs, which began in 1995. “It turns out the commissioner was right on,” he said. Hendry thinks a majority of GMs would back more playoffs. “It’s all about postseason baseball. That’s what fans like,” Arizona Diamondbacks general manager Kevin Towers said. Detroit Tigers GM Dave Dombrowski said the sentiment of the group isn’t that clear cut. “There was definitely a split on the topic when it came up. It’s not per se that everybody’s for it,” he said. GMs were to discuss bargaining some more Wednesday, and owners gather Thursday for the final day of meetings. In the first trade of the session, two-time All-Star second baseman Dan Uggla was dealt from the Florida Marlins to the Atlanta Braves for infielder Omar Infante and left-hander Mike Dunn. Uggla is eligible for free agency after next season, and the Marlins couldn’t reach an agreement on a longterm contract. Florida is close to replacing some of the lost power with free-agent catcher John Buck, who is nearing agreement on an $18 million, three-year contract. Among free agents, righthander Jake Westbrook decided to stay with the St. Louis Cardinals, agreeing to a $16.5 million, two-year contract. Also, Texas Rangers GM Jon Daniels said he met with Cliff Lee and his agent on Monday in Arkansas, where the left-

hander lives. The top starting pitcher on the market, Lee also is being pursued by the New York Yankees. Last month, union head Michael Weiner said players were open to considering additional playoffs as part of collective bargaining, and Selig said the concept intrigued him. Baseball would have to gauge the interest of its television partners before deciding whether to add more postseason games. Baseball doubled its playoff teams to four in 1969 and again to eight for 1995, a year later than intended because of a players’ strike. If there were additional wild-card teams, baseball would have to decide the length of the new round. “I think best-of-one would be a little short, but I don’t see how you go more than best-ofthree given the need for travel and all the other playoffs that have to take place,” New York Mets general manager Sandy Alderson said. “But somebody may be able to figure it out on a best-of-five basis.” Management also seems intent on proposing a slotting system for amateur draft picks to eliminate individual negotiations. “There are reasons why major league players should want a slotting system, because what’s not spent in the draft arguably could be or would be spent on major league players,” Alderson said. Having worked for MLB in the Dominican Republic before joining the Mets last month, Alderson said a worldwide draft remains another possible proposal. Currently, the draft is limited to the U.S., Canada, Puerto Rico and U.S. territories, but baseball may propose expanding it. That would eliminate large free-agent deals for Latin American players and problems caused by buscones who have taken cuts of signing bonuses. MLB also has struggled with age and identity fraud. “Based on what I’ve heard from the commissioner, that’s an option still on the table,” Alderson said. “If we can clean up some of these problems, there’s a less likelihood of a draft being instituted.” While the NFL, NBA and NHL are facing potentially acrimonious labor negotiations, MLB remains confident it can reach another deal without strife. Since the 7½-month strike that wiped out the World Series, players and owners have learned to deal with each other with more harmony. “Of all the sports, I’d say we are the least likely to experience a work stoppage,” Alderson said.

CYCLING

U.S. investigation comes to France The Associated Press LYON, France — U.S. investigators interviewed French anti-doping officials at Interpol headquarters Tuesday as part of a probe into allegations of drug use by cyclists, including Lance Armstrong, a French official told The Associated Press. The investigation shifted its focus to France, with an American delegation seeking information from police officials and the national anti-doping agency (AFLD) that has stored some of Armstrong’s samples from the Tour de France. Armstrong won cycling’s storied race seven straight times, from 1999 to 2005. Francoise Lasne, director of the AFLD lab, and testing director Jean-Pierre Verdy were heard as witnesses Tuesday at Interpol, an official with knowledge of the meeting told the AP. The official spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to speak publicly on the case. Interpol, the international police agency, is acting an intermediary between the U.S.

and French officials. Before the meeting, a French official said the AFLD would make its information available to the Americans. The official also spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to publicly discuss the meeting. He said the agency would share “everything we know, everything we have, in the fridges, in the freezers, everything, everywhere” and is prepared to answer “everything that they ask.” The U.S. probe is being conducted by U.S. Food and Drug Administration Agent Jeff Novitzky and others. Approached in the lobby of his hotel, Novitzky declined comment. The French official said he believed the American delegation also included U.S. federal prosecutor Doug Miller and U.S. AntiDoping Agency CEO Travis Tygart. Miller had been booked at the same hotel as Novitzky, but canceled the reservation. He couldn’t immediately be reached for comment.


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, November 17, 2010 D5

PREP BOYS SOCCER

NFL

NFL offensive linemen prove mighty tough playing in the trenches

Madras’ Jesus Zamora is knocked down by Hidden Valley’s Thomas Fate during a semifinal game in Grants Pass on Tuesday. KEVIN LAUNIUS/ Daily Courier

By Barry Wilner

The Associated Press

Madras falls in semis Bulletin staff report

GRANTS PASS — Madras enjoyed a good run. Hidden Valley broke Madras’ five game-win streak and ended its state title hopes by besting the visiting White Buffaloes 4-1 in a Class 4A state semifinal boys soccer match Tuesday. In 2009 as a Class 5A team, Madras finished the season 8-33 overall. This year in Class 4A play the White Buffs went 14-3 overall and were two wins away from a state title. At 8-2 in TriValley Conference play, Madras was far and away the best team in the league, as runner-up Estacada finished the year 5-4-1. The White Buffaloes scored first Tuesday in just the fourth minute of the game. Derrick Pacheco sent a cross to the middle of the 18-yard box, and after the ball bounced around in the penalty box, Jose Medina recovered it and scored from point-blank range. “He’s like the quarterback of our team,” second-year White Buffaloes coach Clark Jones said of Medina, one of Madras’ team captains. “If he’s not scoring, he’s passing.” The Mustangs (17-1), the No.

Outlaws Continued from D1 A minute into the second half Sisters’ leading scorer Jodie Reoch was fouled inside the 18-yard box, setting up Young’s first score off a penalty kick. “Sometimes when your opponent is overaggressive, you get rewarded,” Goertzen said. Another penalty was called in the 62nd minute when the Indians dragged down senior Marin Allen, again in the box. Young converted again, giving the Outlaws their first lead of the match. Sisters held on for the victory in what Goertzen called a “very, very physical” semifinal match. “We’re pretty banged up,” he added. “But we’re also flying. We’re in the clouds right now.” The Outlaws will need to come back down to earth by Saturday, when they play Mazama, a squad that has gone 152-1 this season. The Vikings finished second in the Skyline Conference this year with a 9-2 league mark.

Cougars Continued from D1 Mountain View will now try to beat a Summit squad the Cougars have lost to twice this season by a combined score of 7-1. “We’re hoping the third time’s a charm,” Mattox said. The two Central Oregon squads know each other well. Many of the girls on both teams play on club sides together. “It’s kind of like sibling rivalry,” Mattox explained. “You love them dearly but you want to beat ‘em.”

1 team from the Skyline Conference, tied the match in the 32nd minute on a goal by Robin Klimczak, who was stifled on a point-blank shot 20 minutes earlier by Madras keeper Jonny Villanueva, who finished with four saves. As Klimczak approached the bench after his near-goal, a Hidden Valley coach told him he would get another chance. One minute after he stepped back onto the field, he received that opportunity. More importantly for the Mustangs, though, Klimczak calmly settled the ball and capitalized. “I was set up so beautifully by my teammates,” said Klimczak, who also scored the tying goal during a quarterfinal victory against North Marion. “It’s a great feeling to know I made a difference.” While Klimczak’s goal might have raised the level of confidence among his teammates, Mitch Matheny put the momentum into overdrive early in the second half with the go-ahead goal. Matheny, who worked around a defender and the goalkeeper, lost the ball, but when a White

Buffalo attempted to clear, the ball deflected off Matheny’s leg and into the net. “That was a tough goal to score,” said Matheny, who added the team had an epiphany before the second half started. “We realized that we fall together or we win together. We came together as one, and as a whole, we’re unstoppable.” Hidden Valley, which relied primarily on its size to control play in the middle of the field, added a goal in the 66th minute to go ahead 3-1, putting the game all but out of reach. “We didn’t really play to our strengths,” Jones noted. “We tried to score, but in pushing forward we left some backside goals open.” The Mustangs sealed Madras’ fate in the 78th minute, capitalizing on the White Buffaloes’ aggressive offensive play with another goal to make it 4-1. “It’s been a really good year,” said Jones. “And the good news is most of them (his players) are back next year.” Larry Cathey of The (Grants Pass) Dailey Courier contributed to this report.

Storm beat CV, set date with Cougars PREP GIRLS SOCCER

Bulletin staff report

CORVALLIS — Summit High’s record-setting girls soccer season will continue into the Class 5A state championship match. Eve Hess scored the game’s only goal Tuesday as the Storm defeated Crescent Valley of Corvallis 1-0 in a 5A state semifinal match at Oregon State University’s Lorenz Field. The victory sends Summit (142-2 overall), which earlier in the season won its first league title, to the state final for the first time in school history. “We want three marks in history for Summit girls soccer,” Storm coach Jamie Brock said. “This will be our first state final and we won our first (Intermountain Conference) championship this year. We want to go three for three (with a state title).” Summit will play crosstown rival Mountain View at 10:30 a.m. on Saturday at Hillsboro Stadium for the 5A state title. The Cougars defeated Marist 2-1 in overtime in Tuesday’s other 5A semifinal match. Despite playing in ideal conditions for the Willamette Valley in November, the two teams Tuesday entered halftime tied 0-0. In the 65th minute, though, Hess fielded a cross from freshman Hadlie Plummer at the top of the 18-yard box. “I touched it ahead and saw I had an open shot,” Hess said. “I just hit it as hard as I could.” The ball sailed above the finger-

tips of the Raiders’ keeper, giving the Storm a 1-0 lead with 15 minutes left in the game. Crescent Valley (10-2-5) did not go down without a fight, though, knocking a ball off the post late in the game. Summit’s freshman goalkeeper Rachel Estopare posted the Storm’s 10th shutout of the season to help preserve the win. “She made some great decisions on whether to clear or pick up the ball,” Brock said about Estopare. “She was very calm and composed and led our team from the back.” Crescent Valley attacked for most of the game, according to Brock, playing an aggressive overthe-top offense that created a frantic pace of play for her midfielders and defenders. “It’s hard to build (an offensive) out of that because it seems like you’re running back and fourth the whole time,” Brock said. Summit settle down in the second half, though, which led to Plummer’s pass to Hess. “We held the ball a little more which kept our defense organized,” Brock said. “Under the lights, at OSU, there was all this build up. … That first half we were a little shaken up. But in the second we brought it down and played with confidence.”

PREP SCOREBOARD GIRLS SOCCER

6A Playoffs Grant 2, Westview 1 Jesuit 2, Clackamas 0

5A Playoffs Summit 1, Crescent Valley 0 Mountain View 2, Marist 1, (OT)

4A Playoffs Mazama 2, Gladstone 1, (OT)

Sisters 2, Scappoose 1

3A/2A/1A St. Mary’s (Medford) 4, Oregon Episcopal 1 Catlin Gabel 4, Rogue River 0

BOYS SOCCER

6A Playoffs Jesuit 1, South Salem 0 Beaverton 2, Westview 0

5A Playoffs Woodburn 3, Liberty 1 Corvallis 3, Crescent Valley 0

4A Playoffs Hidden Valley 4, Madras 1 Stayton 1, McLoughlin 0

3A/2A/1A St. Mary’s 1, Dayton 0 Catlin Gabel 4, Riverside 2

It’s hard to look right past a large group of 300-pound men, yet that’s what most football fans do. You won’t catch the quarterbacks or running backs ignoring their offensive linemen, though, and several performances in the trenches this past week emphasize the importance of a solid blocking unit. The Patriots, Cowboys and Bears, in particular, won on Sunday because of improved play by the OL. The Falcons showed how important a block party is during their comeback victory against Baltimore last Thursday. Dallas carved up the Giants’ usually efficient, sack-happy defense for a 33-20 victory in Jason Garrett’s debut as Cowboys coach. That was a sharp contrast from the sieve that tried to protect Tony Romo in the team’s previous meeting, when the Giants had three sacks and tons of pressures, and broke Romo’s collarbone last month. “I think it starts with the offensive line. I think our offensive line played very well,” Garrett said. “They were challenged and we challenged them. Justin Tuck is a heck of a good football player. Osi Umenyiora is a heck of a good football player, and they have other guys. ... Then, they bring guys in to substitute and rotate through. So they were going to be challenged physically to block those guys, man-to-man blocking in the run game and in the pass game, and they stepped up and did a nice job.” A few hours after Dallas’ win, the Patriots stymied Pittsburgh’s vaunted defense. Tom Brady had so much time in the pocket he could have cooked dinner and had dessert before he felt pressure. Maybe even washed the dishes. Brady went 30 of 43 for 350 yards, was not sacked — the only time he was touched was when he ran the ball — and gave a nod to the boys upfront after the 39-26 win. “The offensive line played great,” he said. “Those guys know how important they are to winning.” And to losing. Both of the Patriots’ losses this year came when the blocking was weak. Dallas and New England have been known for strong offensive lines through the years. But both units underwent key changes this season — the Patriots were without key guard Logan Mankins for the first half of the schedule; the Cowboys cut tackle Flozell Adams

Gene J. Puskar / The Associated Press

New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady, center, takes a snap behind center Dan Koppen (67) and guard Logan Mankins (70) during the first quarter of an NFL football game against the Pittsburgh Steelers in Pittsburgh on Sunday.

NFLPA details counter proposal

NEW YORK — A person familiar with the negotiations tells The Associated Press that the NFL Players Association has given specifics on its counter proposal to an 18game regular season. In order to have an 18-game season, the players want two bye weeks, increased rosters of up to five spots and the practice squad could also be expanded. They are also seeking a two-thirds reduction of offseason workouts. The owners want to play 18 regular-season and two preseason games, instead of the current breakdown of 16 and four. That’s one issue to be hashed out during the collective bargaining negotiations between the league and the union. The current agreement expires in March, raising fears of a potential lockout. — The Associated Press

and have experienced assorted injuries on the line. On Sunday, everything came together for both teams. Chicago had been winning despite shaky play by its blockers. Indeed, Jay Cutler was sacked nine times by the Giants on Oct. 3 and left the loss with a concussion. The Bears won five of their first eight while struggling to protect him and open holes in the running game. They hardly were perfect Sunday in the 27-13 victory over Minnesota, but Cutler was sacked only once. The Bears are moving around the pocket

Vick Continued from D1 Fickle fans who were outraged when the Eagles signed him to a two-year deal are now demanding the team give him a new contract. Vick, who filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in July 2008, could be a top free agent on the market next year if Philadelphia lets him get that far. Teams who weren’t willing to trade a high draft pick for him when the Eagles made him available last offseason just may be lining up to throw money at him. “The other 31 teams out there need to save their money and vote for Michael Vick or try to get a bid for him because the way he was looking out there, he was looking awesome,” Redskins defensive tackle Albert Haynesworth said. Some would argue that if Redskins quarterback Donovan McNabb can get a $78 million, five-year deal from the Redskins, the 30-year-old Vick certainly should be worth more right now. He’s younger and arguably playing better than McNabb did when he led the Eagles to the Super Bowl in 2004. McNabb was traded by the Eagles to Washington in April and the rest, well, is history. “I could have never envisioned this,” Vick said. “Signing here, I didn’t even think I’d be starting as the quarterback this year. So, all of this is paramount for me, but at the same time it’s somewhat surprising.” Hard to believe that Vick’s

Nick Wass / The Associated Press

Philadelphia Eagles quarterback Michael Vick (7) rushes during the first half of an NFL football game against the Washington Redskins, Monday in Landover, Md. The Eagles won 59-28. No. 7 jersey, which was being sold at clearance prices last December, is a hot item nowadays. “He’s my favorite player,” said Ashley Walton, one of many fans wearing a Vick jersey at a sports bar in South Philadelphia. “I know what he did was wrong and it’s something some people will never forgive him for, but he went to jail and he did his time. People can’t judge him for one mistake forever. Everyone makes mistakes.” Indeed, Vick has made the Eagles (6-3) an instant contender in a season in what was to be a rebuilding season. They’re 4-0 in games that he’s started and

more, letting Cutler get away from pass rushers, but this weekend the line was not a detriment, allowing Chicago to tie Green Bay for the NFC North lead. “The offensive line did an outstanding job pass blocking and of course with the run,” coach Lovie Smith said, noting the unit finally is getting some continuity. “We should — we played the same group two weeks in a row; that may have a little bit to do with it. This is the crew we want to go with. They should get better.” Atlanta is a somewhat overlooked 7-2, tied for the league’s best record. It has offensive balance, which never has been displayed better than in last week’s 26-21 victory over Baltimore. On a final 80-yard touchdown drive to win it, the Falcons’ OL dominated what is supposed to be an elite Ravens D. “There was an air of confidence about what needed to be done and what we were going to get done,” coach Mike Smith said. “It was a heck of a drive in the last 65 seconds for us to win the game.” Contrasting those performances was the ineffectiveness of Pittsburgh’s blockers against New England. The Steelers have concerns up front with left tackle Max Starks lost for the season and left guard Chris Kemoeatu bothered by knee problems. Right tackle Willie Colon already was out for the season. Other teams have concerns on the offensive line, including three first-place clubs — the Giants, Seahawks and Eagles. They should be buoyed by the turnarounds they saw this weekend in the trenches.

finished, and are tied with the New York Giants for first place in the NFC East. Check out his numbers, despite missing three games with a rib injury: He has passed for 1,350 yards and 11 TDs and rushed for 341 yards and four TDs. He hasn’t thrown an interception or lost a fumble and his passer rating of 115.1 leads the NFL. Vick’s sensational game against the Skins made his college coach, Frank Beamer at Virginia Tech, think about the 2000 Sugar Bowl. Back then, Vick put on quite a show against Florida State even though the Hokies lost 46-29. “I remember the day after the national championship game, everybody was talking about the performance Michael Vick had last night ... ,” Beamer said Tuesday. “Today seems like that same day. Everybody in the country seems to be talking about what a performance he had last night, and he did.” In general, he said, Vick doesn’t take anything for granted. “The time away, I think he realized a lot of things and in talking with him, he’s very humble and just glad to be back in the NFL. And then I think he’s worked hard to get his body in condition. I think he’s worked hard to get mentally right out there and know where the ball needs to go and be good in that regard. I always thought he was good. I always thought he had unbelievable talent, different talent. I think he’s determined to get it back right. “I’m pulling for him all the way. I’m pulling for him hard.”


T EE

D6 Wednesday, November 17, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

TO

G R EEN

CENTRAL OREGON COURSE UPDATE

Looking back on 2010 at Crooked River Ranch By Zack Hall The Bulletin

The Bulletin continues a weekly Tee To Green feature in which we check in via e-mail with golf professionals at Central Oregon courses for an offseason update. This week we contacted Pat Huffer, head professional at Crooked River Ranch.

Q: A:

How was business in 2010?

As with most everyone one else in the golf industry, we experienced lower-than-average rounds and revenue. We have done better in the last couple of months and we have 5½ more months of our fiscal year remaining. If the winter and early spring are kind to us, we hope to be down just 5 percent to 7 percent from last year.

Q: A:

Were any changes of note made to the facility this past year? We opened the newly renovated seventh tee, expanded irrigation on the back nine, and began using a new greens roller. Conditions have been improving every year, and the course was in the best condition ever this season.

Charity Continued from D1 Jeff McDonald, manager of the Ray’s Food Place store in Sisters, has organized charity golf tournaments for the Kiwanis Club of Sisters for the last 10 years. This past June, he says, that tournament drew a full field of 240 golfers to Aspen Lakes Golf Course in Sisters for the fifth consecutive year. The net proceeds for Sisters Kiwanis was about $20,000 for the day, or about average for the tournament’s last five years, according to McDonald. ”It’s really stayed about the same,” he says. “Last year, when I first started getting going to put together sponsors and put together the golfers (for the 2010 tournament) — and donations for prizes, food and all the above — I was envisioning a worst-case scenario of this could be our toughest year ever. “And really, it wasn’t. It really ended up being an average year as far as putting it together. And it was our second-biggest year ever as far as (gross) revenues.”

Golf facilities Charity tournaments are not having much trouble finding homes, either. Golf facilities, which generally offer discounts of between 30 and 50 percent per round for charity tournaments, often consider the tournaments a true win-win for both the golf course and the charity. Mark Amberson, general manager of private Awbrey Glen Golf Club in Bend, offers three reasons why Awbrey Glen has stepped up its efforts to host nonprofit tournaments: They generate revenue, expose new golfers to the facility, and help the course become a good “community partner.” The private Bend Golf and Country Club has also gotten more involved with charity tournaments, hosting three such events in 2010. In previous years, the country club would typically host just one charity tournament, according to Erik Nielsen, head pro at Bend G&CC. Nielsen says hosting a charity event at a member-only Bend G&CC also helps attract more golfers. “If you are able to play at a private course … it helps to generate a little money for them (charities), but then also generate a little money for us,” he says. But private courses — which

Crooked River Ranch

Q: A:

Are any changes and/or improvements to the facility scheduled for 2011? We renovated the fairway bunker on No. 1, just leveled and enlarged the fourth and sixth tees and plan to do the same with Nos. 3 and 5. We have also done some filling in and smoothing of some of the holes and irrigation

rely less on daily fees than public courses do — are not alone. The majority of the daily-fee courses in the area are also willing partners for charity tournaments, even if it means a full day of discounted greens fees rather than a day of regular-priced rounds. “Obviously when we do the discount, we are not making nearly as much as we would on a normal day,” says Pam Mitchell, a member of the family that owns Aspen Lakes. “But we look at it as good (public relations) and just a good opportunity to be a part of the community.” But days when tee times are booked solid are not as common as they once were, so even for daily-fee courses, charity tournaments make some financial sense. “One of the things that we look at tournaments as is, you can get bad weather any day of the year (in Central Oregon),” Mitchell says. “If you have a tournament booked, you know it’s going to be a good day, even if it’s at a discount. Those people are going to show up and you know what to count on.” Golf facilities have also been willing to give charities breaks, beyond the usual discounts. And the charities do appreciate the extra help. “They’ve always worked with us, because it is a charity event,” says McDonald, referring to Aspen Lakes. “They let Kiwanis do the food (at the golf course during the charity tournament). So they kind of take a hit there, too, because they don’t serve any food or beverage that day themselves.”

Ample support Of course, none of these partnerships would matter if not for golfers willing to play in the tournaments. Despite the recession, most charities have found that golfers are at least willing to spend some money on a charity event. And in some local cases, golfers travel from around the Pacific Northwest to attend, Boone says. Marie Gibson, secretary/treasurer for the Hunger Prevention Coalition of Central Oregon, which is benefited by the longrunning Rude Rudy golf tournament, was surprised that the 2010 Rude Rudy was able to raise $32,000. This after the Rude Rudy — named after Rudy Dory, owner of Newport Avenue Market in Bend and founder of the golf tourna-

LOCAL

No. 3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141 yards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-iron

The Bulletin welcomes contributions to its weekly local golf results listings and events calendar. Clearly legible items should be faxed to the sports department, 541-385-0831, e-mailed to sports@bendbulletin.com, or mailed to P.O. Box 6020; Bend, OR 97708.

Nov. 15 WIDGI CREEK Brian Case, Bend No. 5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120 yards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-iron

DESERT PEAKS Thursday Men’s Club, Nov. 11 Two-Man Net Best Ball 1, Don Lupinacci/Ken Southwick, 68. 2, Dean Hunt/Wes Graves, 69. 3, Dean Ditmore/Val Paterson, 71. KP — Val Paterson. Long Drive — Sam Brown. Sunday Group Play, Nov. 14 Stroke Play Gross: 1, Ed McDaniel, 72. 2, Fred Blackman, 74. 3, Mike Gardner, 80. Net: 1, Denny Story, 66. 2, Jim Wyzard, 68. 3, Bobby Brunoe, 69. Long Drive — Ed McDaniel. JUNIPER Men’s Club, Nov. 11 One Low Gross, One Low Net 1 (tie), Elton Gregory/George Owens/Dick Kane, 144; Bob Kennedy/Dave King/Don Mitchell, 144. 3, Gene Peles/Ken Carl/Lynn Kurth, 147. KPs — George Owens, No. 3; Ken Carl, No. 13; Kip Gerke, No. 16.

Hole-In-One Report Nov. 11 CROOKED RIVER RANCH Pat Huffer, Redmond No. 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122 yards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-iron Nov. 11 BEND GOLF AND COUNTRY CLUB Eiel Eielson, Bend

Q: A:

Number of holes: 18 Status: Open year-round, weather permitting Location: 5195 Club House Road, Crooked River Ranch Tee times: 541-923-6343 Course stats: Par 71, 5,818 yards Head golf professional: Pat Huffer Course designers: Original nine, William McPherson (1978); second nine, Jim Ramey (1994) Extras: Driving range, pro shop, chipping and bunker practice area, two practice putting greens Website: www.crookedriverranch.com.

ment — had been canceled in 2009 because of the recession. “Isn’t it amazing?” Gibson says of the June tournament’s success. “I think people are just realizing things are so tough for so many other people that they are contributing, in spite of their own relative impact that they’ve had with the economy. “People did have a wonderful time AND they feel good. It’s a great way to have a good time and then realize that you are really making an impact on other people.” Monte Dammarell, incoming president of La Pine’s Habitat for Humanity, says the tournaments have a downside. His organization’s annual tournament, which had been played at Quail Run Golf Course in La Pine, was canceled this year not because it was not a good fundraiser, but because the organization could not find enough volunteers to work the tournament, Dammarell says. But he says attracting golfers has also become difficult for some tournaments. “There are a lot of charities in our area, and there are a lot of golf tournaments,” Dammarell says. “People only have so much discretionary income, so it makes it a little difficult to put on tournaments when you are going after the same people all the time.” But Dammarell is hoping to rekindle the tournament in 2011. “We’ve done very well,” Dammarell says. “It’s one of our biggest fundraisers, and that’s why we are thinking of doing it again.” Likely, Dammarell will have no trouble finding a host course. After all, charity work is something most golf courses take great pride in — not only in hosting the tournaments, but also in the hundreds of rounds nearly every golf course donates to charities for fundraisers, says Grant Cyrus, general manager of Aspen Lakes. “Courses are so generous with the amount of rounds they give for silent-auction items, raffle prizes, oral-auction items,” Cyrus says. “The tournaments we have, we’ve given rounds to, and I see all the other courses that have given rounds. Everybody is just really, really generous with their golf in trying to help the community out.” Zack Hall can be reached at 541-617-7868 or at zhall@ bendbulletin.com.

GOLF SCOREBOARD

Club Results

lines in a few fairways.

Nov. 16 THE GREENS AT REDMOND Paul Braly, Bend No. 16. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .99 yards . . . . . . . . . . . . . sand wedge

Calendar The Bulletin welcomes contributions to its weekly local golf events calendar. Items should be mailed to P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708; faxed to the sports department at 541-385-0831; or e-mailed to sports@bendbulletin.com. ——— TOURNAMENTS Nov. 19 — Central Oregon Winter Series tournament at Eagle Crest Resort in Redmond. Tournament is a two-person better ball. No more than one professional allowed per team. Cost is $25 for professionals, $45 for amateurs. Cart and optional gross skins competition cost extra. All players must sign up by noon on the Thursday before the event. To register or for more information, call Pat Huffer, head pro at Crooked River Ranch, at 541-923-6343 or e-mail him at crrpat@crookedriverranch.com. Dec. 5 — Christmas Goose Golf Tournament at Meadow Lakes Golf Course in Prineville. Two-person scotch ball tournament tees off with an 10 a.m. shotgun start. To register or for more information, call the Meadow Lakes golf shop at 541-447-7113. Jan. 14 — Central Oregon Winter Series tournament at KahNee-Ta High Desert Resort & Casino near Warm Springs. Tournament is a two-person triple six. No more than one professional allowed per team. Cost is $25 for professionals, $45 for amateurs. Cart and optional gross skins competition cost extra. All players must sign up by noon on the Thursday before the event. To register or for more information, call Pat Huffer, head pro at Crooked River Ranch, at 541-923-6343 or e-mail him at crrpat@crookedriverranch.com. Feb. 4 — Central Oregon Winter Series tournament at Meadow Lakes Golf Course in Prineville. Tournament is a two-person scramble. No more than one professional allowed per team. Cost is $25 for

professionals, $45 for amateurs. Cart and optional gross skins competition cost extra. All players must sign up by noon on the Thursday before the event. To register or for more information, call Pat Huffer, head pro at Crooked River Ranch, at 541-923-6343 or e-mail him at crrpat@crookedriverranch.com. Feb. 18 — Central Oregon Winter Series tournament at Crooked River Ranch. Tournament is a two-person better ball. No more than one professional allowed per team. Cost is $25 for professionals, $45 for amateurs. Cart and optional gross skins competition cost extra. All players must sign up by noon on the Thursday before the event. To register or for more information, call Pat Huffer, head pro at Crooked River Ranch, at 541-923-6343 or e-mail him at crrpat@crookedriverranch.com. March 11 — Central Oregon Winter Series tournament at Juniper Golf Course in Redmond. Tournament is a two-person scramble. No more than one professional allowed per team. Cost is $25 for professionals, $45 for amateurs. Cart and optional gross skins competition cost extra. All players must sign up by noon on the Thursday before the event. To register or for more information, call Pat Huffer, head pro at Crooked River Ranch, at 541-923-6343 or e-mail him at crrpat@crookedriverranch.com. March 25 — Central Oregon Winter Series tournament at the Club at Brasada Ranch on Powell Butte. Tournament is a two-person shamble. No more than one professional allowed per team. Cost is $25 for professionals, $45 for amateurs. Cart and optional gross skins competition cost extra. All players must sign up by noon on the Thursday before the event. To register or for more information, call Pat Huffer, head pro at Crooked River Ranch, at 541-923-6343 or e-mail him at crrpat@crookedriverranch.com. April 1 — Central Oregon Winter Series tournament at Lost Tracks Golf Club in Bend. Tournament is a two-person triple six. No more than one professional allowed per team. Cost is $25 for professionals, $45 for amateurs. Cart and optional gross skins competition cost extra. All players must sign up by noon on the Thursday before the event. To register or for more information, call Pat Huffer, head pro at Crooked River Ranch, at 541-923-6343 or e-mail him at crrpat@crookedriverranch.com. April 8 — Central Oregon Winter Series tournament at Pronghorn Club’s Nicklaus Course in Bend. Tournament is a two-person shamble. No more than one professional allowed per team. Cost is $25 for professionals, $45 for amateurs. Cart and optional gross skins competition cost extra. All players must sign up by noon on the Thursday before the event. To register or for more information, call Pat Huffer, head pro at Crooked River Ranch, at 541-923-6343 or e-mail him at crrpat@crookedriverranch.com.

G W

Do you expect to see any fresh ideas that will help Central Oregon golf facilities continue to weather the economic storm? I don’t believe that continued discounting is the way to go, mainly because maintenance and other operating costs go on and generally increase at a faster rate than income. Perception of a good value, on the other hand, can certainly help and can be effective. We will be doing some bundling or “add-ons,” but with rates remaining relatively level. For example, “Join by X date and get X free months,” “receive X with X number of fees paid,” or “kids play free with adult paid.” These kinds of promotions are being done, but the ante will likely be bumped up somewhat. I also feel strongly that all Central Oregon facilities need to work together to draw new customers/golfers to our “golf mecca.” The Central Oregon Golf Trail (www. centraloregongolftrail.com) is working to that end, and I am hopeful it will be able to expand its reach.

Site: Hong Kong.

Zack Hall can be reached at 541-617-7868 or at zhall@ bendbulletin.com.

Last year: France’s Gregory Bourdy won his third European tour title, beating Northern Ireland’s Rory McIlroy by two strokes. Bourdy had a 19-under total.

Australian Masters eyes spot before Presidents Cup The Associated Press

MELBOURNE, Australia — Tiger Woods returning to Australia for the third straight year is a fairly safe bet considering the Presidents Cup will be held in 2011 at Royal Melbourne. The question is how many times he plays Down Under, and that depends largely on the schedule. IMG runs the Australian Masters, which it has invigorated by strengthening the field and the sandbelt courses on which it is played. Organizers want the same date for next year, only they suddenly have competition. With the Presidents Cup set for Nov. 17-20, whatever event is the week before might get several players from the U.S. and International teams. The Australasia Tour is contemplating putting the Australian Open (played in Sydney) or the Australian PGA Championship (Coolum) a week before the Presidents

Cup. If that’s the case, Woods almost certainly won’t be playing. Woods would like to see the Masters the week before the Presidents Cup, especially since it will be played at Kingston Heath, voted the top course in Australia. It would be back-to-back weeks on the famed sandbelt.

PGA EUROPEAN HONG KONG OPEN Schedule: Thursday-Sunday. Course: Hong Kong Golf Club (6,700 yards, par 70). Purse: $2.5 million. Winner’s share: $410,465. Television: Golf Channel (Wednesday-Thursday, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., 6:30-9:30 a.m.; Friday-Saturday, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., 6 a.m.-10 a.m.).

Last week: Australia’s Adam Scott won the Singapore Open for the third time, completing a 3-under 68 in a Monday finish for a three-stroke victory over Denmark’s Anders Hansen. Scott, also the 2005 and 2006 winner, finished at 17 under. Notes: The European tour’s seasonending Dubai World Championship is next week. The top 60 on the Race to Dubai money list will qualify. ... The Asian Tour will be in Thailand next week for the King’s Cup. Online: www.europeantour.com Asian Tour site: www.asiantour.com. ——— All Times PST

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S

HELPING YOU MAKE GOOD BUYING DECISIONS

SAVVY SHOPPER

Inside

‘Walking Dead’ alive and well AMC’s zombie series a smash hit, Page E2

SHOPPING IN BRIEF

On Black Friday, you can go green

Revamp your look Kathy Martens, style specialist and owner of Dres-ol-o-gy, a fashion styling service, will be available from noon to 4 p.m. Saturday at Acadia Footwear to demonstrate how to use layering, accessories and shoes to re-energize outfits that are already in your closet. Martens says it’s changing the elements of an outfit, either by adding something sparkly or changing the buttons, that can give new life to a piece of clothing or an outfit. Attendees are encouraged to bring something they don’t know how to style to get ideas. Martens says thinking outside the box is key. Putting a shirt with a sweater in a contrasting color or putting two different patterns in the same color together can transform an outfit. “The line I hear a lot, that I never get tired of is, ‘Wow, I never thought of that,’ ” she said. “(A new look) really builds confidence.” The event will be held at Acadia Footwear in the Old Mill District, 330 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend. Contact: 541-389-8900 or www.acadiacomfortfootwear.com.

By Sharon Harvey-Rosenberg

Solving the

present puzzle Psychologists offer guidance on how to give the perfect gift

Courtesy photo

Book fair fundraiser Cascade Middle School is hosting a community book fair to raise funds to purchase new books for its library. Shop at Camalli Book Company, Between the Covers or Barnes & Noble book stores in Bend Dec. 1-7 and mention Cascade Middle School at check-out to have a percentage of your purchase donated to the school’s library fund. The school is also hosting Afternoon of Art Dec. 4, where band, orchestra and choir students will perform at the book stores. A schedule will be posted closer to the event on the Cascade Middle School website at www.bend.k12.or.us. Book store locations: Camalli Book Company, 1288 S.W. Simpson Ave. Suite C. Between the Covers, 645 N.W. Delaware Ave. Barnes & Noble, 2690 N.E. U.S. Highway 20.

New boutique opens A shopping boutique called … & Then Some has opened a temporary retail location in the Cascade Village Shopping Center, between El Rancho Grande and Famous Footwear. The boutique features only locally made items, including feather earrings, aprons made from vintage material, children’s clothing, stuffed animals, stockings and ornaments. The boutique has four permanent designers, A.W.A.R.E., BayBeeGee, Monster Love and Sunshine Luci, with guest vendors changing every Sunday. The store has a play area for children. The Cascade Village Shopping Center is located at 63455 North U.S. Highway 97, Bend. Contact: 541-388-1495 or visit the boutique’s Facebook page at www.facebook.com/ shopandthensome. — Marielle Gallagher, The Bulletin

• Television • Comics • Calendar • LAT crossword • Sudoku • Horoscope

www.bendbulletin.com/savvyshopper

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2010

An example of an outfit styled by Kathy Martens, style specialist and owner of Dres-ol-o-gy.

E

By Katie Aberbach

A

The Washington Post

s we approach Hanuk kah, Christmas, Kw a n z a a ,

Christmakwanzakah, Festivus and various other end-ofthe-year occasions, two types of gift-givers emerge. There are those who seem to give the perfect gift every year, and those who seem to give the perfect amount of effort — but always miss the mark. Common sense tells us that gift-giving is an art and those who excel at it are simply gifted (pun intended), but picking presents can be a science, too. We talked to a few psychology experts to learn how cognitive theory can help everyone earn a gold star in gift-giving.

Ignore the crowds ’Tis the season for items to become inexplicably hard to get our hands on. Remember the hype over Tickle Me Elmos in 1996, or the frenzy to

nab a Cabbage Patch Kid in the ’80s? In both instances, harried parents fought each other in the aisles of Toys R Us stores across the country. Cuteness or creepiness aside, the dolls had one major factor going for them: They were in short supply. Blame heuristics — ingrained inclinations to behave without thinking. In this case, the scarcity heuristic makes us value things that are hard to obtain, says Wray Herbert, the author of “On Second Thought” ($25, Crown).

“Simply perceiving that something is rare skews your thinking and behavior,” Herbert says. “That’s what merchandisers are doing when they say ‘available for a limited time’ and ‘while they last.’ They’re trying to create this false sense of scarcity or rarity so it will boost our desire for something.” You think you should: Get a hot new piece of video game equipment, such as the widely anticipated Kinect sensor for the Xbox 360 ($150). During the last week of October, retailers including Amazon, Best Buy and Toys R Us sold out of pre-orders for the gadget, which detects players’ sound and motion without using controllers. It’s looking like some unlucky gift-givers might end up camping out in front of the neighborhood Target so their households will be the only ones on their blocks with a Kinect. Try this instead: Get an old-fashioned board game. Stevanne Auerbach, author of “Smart Play Smart Toys,” analyzes a wide range of playthings each year. She believes the best presents for kids — and many adults — are often not trendy, hard-to-find items, but ones that can be enjoyed with others. “Playing board games with the family is something kids remember for a long time,” says Auerbach, who has a Ph.D. in child development and psychology. Check out some updated crowd-pleasers such as Clue: Secrets and Spies ($25) or Monopoly: Revolution ($35). See Gifts / E6

McClatchy Newspapers

Black Friday — the shopping binge that follows the Thanksgiving eating binge — is often busiest day of the holiday shopping season. In 2009, for example, Black Friday was the No. 1 shopping day of the year, according to ShopperTrak. The term “Black Friday” has a colorful history. Traditionally, on the day after Thanksgiving, stores shifted from being in debt (“in the red”) to a profit (“in the black”), according to the National Retail Federation. But while stores are moving from red to black, consumers can go green with an eco-friendly to-do list designed to save money and resources: • Audit your energy bill: Give Black Friday a green charge by scheduling an energy audit to measure the energy-efficiency of your home. Many regional electric utility companies offer onsite residential audits. Carrying a laptop, printer and several circuits of knowledge, a team of energy management specialists tested the energy efficiency of several appliances in my home, including the central air cooling and heating system, the refrigerator, oven and stove. Extensive testing identified energy-draining appliances and the team created a list of energy- and money-saving solutions. • Target giveaways: Use Black Friday to organize and purge closets and bookshelves. Recycle by donating your castoffs to a thrift shop. Unwanted books and video games can be bartered for store credits at used-book and video game stores. • Create a wallet buddy: Download a free “wallet buddy” from the Center for a New American Dream, a nonprofit organization that promotes eco-friendly policies, conscious spending and quality-of-life improvements. The wallet buddy is a do-it-yourself card holder that serves as a spending barrier every time you reach for a card. The wallet buddy is easy to assemble after being downloaded from New Dream (www.newdream.org). Use recycled or discarded paper to print the anti-spending pledges, which include: “Every dollar I spend is a statement about the kind of world I want and the quality of life I value.” The other side of the wallet buddy offers questions designed to make you think twice about each purchase. See Black Friday / E6

As season changes, so should your skin-care regimen By Catherine Saint Louis

New York Times News Service

If Lisbeth Salander, the dark-lipped, pierced dynamo of Stieg Larsson’s “Millennium” trilogy, wanted to soften her look a bit, November would be a good time to get rid of one of her tattoos. That also goes for LeBron James, whose “Loyalty” tattoo, scrawled across his rib cage, has attracted derision since he left Cleveland for Miami. Why now? Tattoo removal, like many other laser treatments, shouldn’t be performed on tanned skin. “The danger is that your natural sun pigment — melanin — absorbs the laser light, and you end up with scabbing and

crusting, then a temporary period of skin lightening,” said Dr. Arielle Kauvar, a dermatologist in Manhattan. With winter on the horizon, patients are likely to keep their inked shoulder blades under chunky knits, safely out of the sun, for the duration of treatment. Most tattoo removals take 6 to 12 sessions, with multicolored intricate designs taking the longest, said Kauvar, a clinical professor of dermatology at the New York University School of Medicine, so she has some patients schedule visits fall to spring two years in a row. Much ado has been made of carefully timing cosmetic interventions so they remain a secret and get you to the ball,

or a crucial meeting, looking fabulous. Seasonal changes can also affect results and cause unpleasant side effects. Laser treatments that single out brown spots, sun spots or unwanted hair are best done as days shorten. “Everybody is tan in July,” said Dr. Jeffrey Dover, a dermatologist in Chestnut Hill, Mass. He advises patients to come back after Halloween for light or laser treatments. “Inexperienced treaters treat people all the time who are tan who don’t realize they are,” Dover said, adding botched hair-removal cases (resulting in blisters or light splotches) routinely result in lawsuits in Massachusetts. See Skin care / E6

Tony Cenicola / New York Times News Service

From left, Burt’s Bees Almond Milk hand creme, Aveeno Skin Relief moisturizing lotion, Aquaphor Healing Ointment and MAC Gulabi lipstick.


T EL EV ISION

E2 Wednesday, November 17, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Thank-you notes a forgotten formality

On AMC, 2 dramas, just 1 hit By Brian Stelter

New York Times News Service

Dear Abby: At Christmas, “Santa” always fills my children’s stockings with a mix of fun, edible and practical items. A few years ago, when my oldest child was beginning to write, my husband and I started the tradition of tucking packets of thankyou cards into their stockings. We explained that Santa must have given them the cards so they would have stationery to write thank-you notes to family and friends for the gifts they had received. The cards are a wonderful reminder to my children that they need to express their gratitude to those who have spent time and money to buy and send them a gift. Usually there are cards left over to cover thank-you notes at birthday time as well. Unfortunately, these days, not enough people — even adults — take the time to write a note of appreciation for presents they are given. I believe parents should encourage children to do this as soon as they are able to understand the concept. I hope my husband and I are instilling a lifelong habit in our children. Abby, can you help get the point across? — Thankful Mom in Brunswick, Maine Dear Thankful Mom: Gladly. You are teaching your children an important lesson. It’s a formality that started being ignored decades ago. Then, as years passed, it was a custom that was not just ignored, but many people forgot it existed. The result was that parents who hadn’t been taught the social niceties did not teach them to THEIR children. When I publish letters about thank-you notes, I invariably receive an avalanche of letters and e-mails from readers complaining that they are hurt and offended because they don’t receive thank-you notes. Some individuals use texts and e-mails

DEAR ABBY to acknowledge gifts. However, for most people a handwritten note is much more memorable. Thanking someone for a gift, an invitation to a party or a kind deed in writing is important. While composing a letter may always be a chore to some people, there are occasions when the written message is the only proper means of communication. It shows effort, and can become a keepsake. For those people who have difficulty expressing their thoughts, my booklet “How to Write Letters for All Occasions” covers a few basic rules for acknowledging gifts, expressing sympathy and accepting or declining an invitation. It can be ordered by sending your name and mailing address, plus check or money order for $6 (U.S. funds), to Dear Abby — Letters Booklet, P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL 610540447. Shipping and handling are included in the price. Not everyone can write letters that are literary masterpieces, but for anyone who wonders how to put in writing a brief, charming thank-you note, a letter expressing congratulations, a love letter — or one that announces a broken engagement — my booklet will serve as a guide to those who have put off writing because they didn’t know what to say, how to say it, or even how to begin. Because the season for exchanging gifts is nearly here, “Thankful Mom,” your letter is an important and timely one. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

At this time of year, network television executives survey the dead shows of autumn and ask, what went wrong? AMC, the movie channel turned hourlong drama powerhouse, is instead surveying its new hit about a zombie attack, “The Walking Dead,” and asking, what went right? On its face, “The Walking Dead” would seem a hard sell to viewers, with its gory flesheating scenes and its comicbook roots. But when the first episode was shown on Halloween, it instantly ranked as the most watched scripted series in the history of cable television among 18- to 49-year-olds, a demographic courted by advertisers and by AMC. Last week, AMC executives ordered a second season of “The Walking Dead” and, at an off-site retreat, celebrated the victory. They also promptly canceled another show, “Rubicon,” a conspiracy theory thriller that put up disappointing ratings after it had its premiere over the summer. Both shows were charactercentric dramas, but the differences were stark. “Rubicon” was criticized for plodding along, while “The Walking Dead” was praised for its cliffhanger endings. And “Rubicon” started in August, which, in the new math of the television season, was a more competitive time of year. Around Halloween, “The Walking Dead,” said Gary Lico, the chief executive of CableU, “had an open field” since most new network shows had started four to six weeks before. Perhaps most important, “The Walking Dead” had some of the markings — and the marketing — of a feature-length film. Frank Darabont, who directed “The Shawshank Redemption” and “The Green Mile,” developed the series and directed the first episode, which was close to 90 min-

Courtesy AMC

“The Walking Dead” has been a hit since its Halloween debut. utes long. Robert Kirkman, who helped write the comic books of the same name, was on the set much of the time. The series had its premiere in dozens of countries at the same time, backed by a marketing budget that its international distributor, Fox International, called unprecedented. “Every now and then in this business,” Lico said, “things just come together.” Similarly, the president of AMC, Charlie Collier, said there was a “pretty wonderful confluence of events.” In an interview last week, he foremost credited Kirkman, Darabont and the other creative forces behind the series. He said the comic books brought a “passionate genre fan base,” and suggested that others were attracted to the show “for the same reason we were, which is that it’s a character drama and it’s about survival.” Kirkman concurred in an interview, saying, “It’s something that succeeds in movies all the time, but I don’t think anybody has seen survival horror on TV before.” The first episode drew 5.3 million viewers, a record for AMC, a unit of Cablevision’s Rainbow Media, and the second, on Nov. 7, drew 4.8 million.

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The show was spun off from the seven-year-old comic book series. Gale Anne Hurd, one of the executive producers, said that in the pitch meeting late last year, the channel executives were already genuinely familiar with Kirkman’s work. “You often pitch people who say they’ve read something, but haven’t,” she remarked. Within two days of the meeting, AMC asked for a pilot script, which Darabont then wrote. Rather than producing just a pilot episode, however, the channel decided to order six episodes outright, an unusual step in the TV business. “We looked at the source material, looked at the people, and said, ‘We gotta get this on the air for Halloween,’” Collier said. AMC caters to horror fans each October with a two-week movie marathon, “Fearfest,” giving “The Walking Dead” a relevant lead-in. Producing just six episodes limited the damage in case the series flopped, though Collier said it was never intended as a miniseries. The advantage in producing six episodes in a row was continuity, Hurd said, keeping the cast members in character and keeping the same crew members employed. “It was also, to

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be honest, far more cost-effective,” she said. The episodes were filmed almost entirely on location in and around Atlanta, where a roughly 30-percent tax credit cut down costs. AMC declined to comment on the show’s budget, but two people with knowledge of the production said each episode cost $2 million to $2.5 million, a price that puts it in line with other high-end dramas on cable, though still below the equivalent prices on broadcast television. Limiting the financial exposure, AMC sold all international rights to “The Walking Dead” in advance to Fox International, an arm of the News Corporation. Fox International then introduced the show in those markets simultaneously, making it more like a theatrical release, said Sharon Tal Yguado, a senior vice president at Fox International. Marketers organized zombie-walking stunts in about two dozen cities. Tal Yguado said she thought it helped that the whole project was positioned “as an event.” Already, Fox International has been boasting of the show’s strong ratings in countries like Korea and Venezuela. In the United States, an October debut allowed “The Walking Dead” to catch the tailwind of “Mad Men,” AMC’s best known show, which had its fourth season finale on Oct. 17. “They had the ‘Mad Men’ momentum,” Lico said. “Rubicon,” on the other hand, was introduced shortly after “Mad Men” returned in the summer. Lico thought “Rubicon” also suffered because it was “too complicated” to explain to viewers. In contrast, “with zombies, you get it,” he said. “It’s a one-sentence thing.”

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Å How I Met How I Met 138 39 20 31 The Fairy Jobmother ‘PG’ Å The Rachel Maddow Show (N) The Last Word Countdown With Keith Olbermann The Rachel Maddow Show The Last Word Countdown With Keith Olbermann 56 59 128 51 Countdown With Keith Olbermann That ’70s Show That ’70s Show That ’70s Show World of Jenks World of Jenks True Life ’ 16 and Pregnant ’ ‘14’ Å The Challenge: Cutthroat (N) ’ ‘14’ (11:01) The Challenge: Cutthroat ‘14’ 192 22 38 57 The Seven ’ iCarly ‘G’ Å iCarly ‘G’ Å iCarly ‘G’ Å iCarly iQuit iCarly ’ ‘G’ Å My Wife and Kids My Wife and Kids Hates Chris Hates Chris George Lopez ’ George Lopez ’ The Nanny ‘PG’ The Nanny ‘PG’ 82 46 24 40 iCarly iDo ’ ‘G’ CSI: Crime Scene Investigation ‘14’ UFC 123 Countdown: Rampage vs. UFC Unleashed ’ ‘14’ Å UFC Unleashed (N) ’ ‘14’ Å The Ultimate Fighter (N) ’ ‘14’ Blue Mountain Blue Mountain 132 31 34 46 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation ‘14’ Fact or Faked: Paranormal Files Ghost Hunters ’ ‘PG’ Å Ghost Hunters ’ ‘PG’ Å Ghost Hunters Sloss Furnace ‘PG’ Hollywd-Trsr Hollywd-Trsr Ghost Hunters Sloss Furnace ‘PG’ 133 35 133 45 Stargate Atlantis ’ ‘PG’ Å Behind Scenes Grant Jeffrey Secrets of Bible Van Impe Pres Praise the Lord Å Easter Exper. Jesse Duplantis Thru History Changing-World Praise the Lord Å 205 60 130 Love-Raymond King of Queens King of Queens Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ House of Payne House of Payne Meet the Browns Meet the Browns Meet the Browns Meet the Browns Conan (N) 16 27 11 28 Love-Raymond ›››› “The Kid” (1921) Charlie Chaplin, ›› “The Pilgrim” (1923, Comedy) Charles Moguls and Movie Stars: A History of (8:15) One Week (8:45) ››› “Steamboat Bill, Jr.” (1928, Comedy) Buster Keaton, ››› “Safety Last” (1923, Comedy) Harold Lloyd. Silent. A store ››› “It” (1927) 101 44 101 29 Jackie Coogan. Chaplin, Edna Purviance. Hollywood The Dream Merchants Ernest Torrence, Marion Byron. clerk tries to climb a 12-story building. Clara Bow. Wedding Day Cake Boss ‘PG’ Cake Boss ‘PG’ Sarah Palin’s Alaska ’ ‘PG’ Å The Man With Half a Body (N) ‘PG’ Untold Stories of the E.R. (N) ’ ‘14’ Ton of Love (N) ’ ‘14’ Å Untold Stories of the E.R. ‘14’ Å 178 34 32 34 Say Yes, Dress Law & Order Burn Baby Burn ‘14’ Bones The Graft in the Girl ’ ‘14’ ››› “Forrest Gump” (1994) Tom Hanks. A slow-witted Southerner experiences 30 years of history. Å CSI: NY Green Piece ’ ‘14’ Å 17 26 15 27 Law & Order The Ring ’ ‘14’ Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Hole in the Wall Garfield Show Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Hole in the Wall Would Happen Destroy Build Regular Show MAD ‘PG’ King of the Hill King of the Hill Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ 84 Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Carnivore Man v. Food ‘G’ Food Wars ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Carnivore Carnivore 179 51 45 42 Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations All in the Family All in the Family Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Roseanne ‘PG’ (11:31) Roseanne 65 47 29 35 Good Times ‘PG’ The Jeffersons NCIS Murdered model. ‘PG’ Å NCIS Ravenous ’ ‘PG’ Å NCIS Deliverance ’ ‘PG’ Å NCIS Double Identity ’ ‘PG’ Å Psych In Plain Fright (N) ‘PG’ Å Burn Notice Eyes Open ‘PG’ Å 15 30 23 30 NCIS Deception ’ ‘PG’ Å Don’t Forget Don’t Forget Dance Cam Slam Mario Lopez Mario Lopez Mario Lopez I Love Money (N) ’ ‘14’ Å I Love Money ’ ‘14’ Å 191 48 37 54 Basketball Wives Basketball Wives Basketball Wives Reunion ’ ‘14’ PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(3:50) ›› “The Vanishing” 1993 (5:50) ››› “Good Will Hunting” 1997, Drama Matt Damon. ’ ‘R’ Å ›› “2 Fast 2 Furious” 2003, Action Paul Walker, Tyrese. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å (9:50) ›› “American Pie 2” 2001 Jason Biggs. ’ ‘R’ (11:40) The Quest ›› “Terror Train” 1980, Horror Ben Johnson, Jamie Lee Curtis. ‘R’ Å ›› “The Entity” 1982, Horror Barbara Hershey, Ron Silver, George Coe. ‘R’ Å ›› “Terror Train” 1980, Horror Ben Johnson, Jamie Lee Curtis. ‘R’ Å › Freaked 1993 Moto: In Out BC One (N) The Daily Habit Thrillbillies ‘14’ Built to Shred Red Bull Exp. The Daily Habit Insane Cinema The Daily Habit Thrillbillies ‘14’ Built to Shred Red Bull Exp. The Daily Habit Top 10 Top 10 Masters Highlights Phil Mickelson. Big Break Dominican Republic Golf Central Playing Lessons European PGA Tour Golf UBS Hong Kong Open, First Round (Live) “Angel of Pennsylvania Ave.” “Mr. St. Nick” (2002, Fantasy) Kelsey Grammer, Charles Durning. ‘PG’ Å “Naughty or Nice” (2004, Drama) George Lopez, Lisa Vidal. ‘G’ Å “All I Want for Christmas” (2007, Romance) Gail O’Grady. ‘PG’ Å ››› “Spider-Man” 2002, Action Tobey Maguire, Willem Dafoe. A bite from a mutant (7:15) ››› “Avatar” 2009, Science Fiction Sam Worthington, Voice of Zoe Saldana, Sigourney Weaver. A former Marine falls in Boardwalk Empire Belle Femme Nucky Real Time With Bill Maher Author Nora HBO 425 501 425 10 spider gives a teen unusual powers. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å love with a native of a lush alien world. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å prepares for war. ‘MA’ Å Ephron. ’ ‘MA’ Å ›› “City of Ghosts” 2002, Crime Drama Matt Dillon, James Caan. ‘R’ Arrested Dev. Dead Set ‘MA’ Indie Sex II: Teens ‘MA’ (9:15) ›› “Shattered” 1991, Suspense Tom Berenger, Bob Hoskins. ‘R’ ›› “City of Ghosts” 2002 ‘R’ IFC 105 105 ›› “Valentine’s Day” 2010, Romance-Comedy Jessica Alba. Los Angeles residents (4:50) ›› “License to Drive” 1988, Comedy Corey Haim, Corey (6:20) ›› “A Perfect Getaway” 2009 Steve Zahn. Honeymoon- ››› “Nobody’s Fool” 1994, Drama Paul Newman, Jessica Tandy. A 60-year-old MAX 400 508 7 Feldman, Carol Kane. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å ing hikers find terror in paradise. ’ ‘R’ Å handyman revels in his irresponsibility. ’ ‘R’ Å wend their way into and out of romance. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Detroit Gang Squad ‘14’ Border Wars Murder on the Lake (N) Border Wars 3,000-Pound Coke Bust Detroit Gang Squad ‘14’ Border Wars Murder on the Lake Border Wars 3,000-Pound Coke Bust Egypt Unwrapped ‘PG’ NGC 157 157 Dragon Ball Z Kai Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air The Troop ’ ‘G’ Invader Zim ‘Y7’ Dragon Ball Z Kai Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air The Troop ’ ‘G’ Invader Zim ‘Y7’ Invader ZIM ‘Y7’ Action League NTOON 89 115 189 S.W.A.T. Maga Shooting USA Sighting Gun Nuts Amer. Rifleman Impossible Shots Shooting Gallery Cowboys Shooting USA Sighting Best Defense Cowboys Pheasants For. Amer. Rifleman OUTD 37 307 43 (4:15) ››› “You Kill Me” 2007, Comedy Jamie Kennedy: Uncomfortable (iTV) (7:15) ››› “Cocaine Cowboys II: Hustlin’ With the Godmother” 2008 Drug lords Inside the NFL (iTV) (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å Inside NASCAR (iTV) (N) ‘PG’ Inside the NFL (iTV) ’ ‘PG’ Å SHO 500 500 Ben Kingsley. iTV. ‘R’ ’ ‘MA’ Å Charles Cosby and Griselda Blanco become friends. ‘NR’ Å Intersections ‘14’ Intersections ‘G’ Pinks - All Out ‘14’ Stealth Rider ‘14’ Stealth Rider ‘14’ Intersections ‘14’ Intersections ‘G’ Pinks - All Out ‘14’ Stealth Rider ‘14’ Stealth Rider ‘14’ NASCAR Race Hub SPEED 35 303 125 (5:15) ›› “John Q” 2002, Drama Denzel Washington. ‘PG-13’ Starz Studios ››› “Undercover Brother” 2002 Eddie Griffin. ››› “Zombieland” 2009 Woody Harrelson. ‘R’ (10:35) ›› “The Crazies” 2010 Timothy Olyphant. ‘R’ STARZ 300 408 300 (4:45) ››› “Lymelife” 2008 Alec Baldwin. A 1970s New Jersey (6:20) “Wake” 2010 Bijou Phillips. An emotionally isolated ›› “Bottle Shock” 2008, Drama Alan Rickman, Chris Pine, Bill Pullman. Vintners vie ›› “Extract” 2009 Jason Bateman. A freak workplace accident (11:35) ›› “The TMC 525 525 teenager grows up in a dysfunctional family. woman goes to strangers’ funerals. ’ ‘R’ Å to win a French-American wine contest. ’ ‘PG-13’ throws a factory owner’s life into chaos. ’ ‘R’ Brothers Bloom” (4:00) NHL Hockey Boston Bruins at New York Rangers Hockey Central The T.Ocho Show Whacked Out NHL Overtime (Live) Quest for Cup NASCAR: Next The T.Ocho Show Whacked Out NHL Overtime VS. 27 58 30 ›››› “Terms of Endearment” 1983, Comedy-Drama Shirley MacLaine, Debra Winger, Jack Nicholson. ‘PG’ The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ Å I Want to Save I Want to Save WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 18 33


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, November 17, 2010 E3

CALENDAR TODAY WHAT’S BREWING? : Crook County Foundation presents this series of programs to discuss matters important to the community; Featuring State Rep. Mike McLane; free; 7-8 a.m.; Meadow Lakes Restaurant, 300 Meadow Lakes Drive, Prineville; 541-447-6909. THANKSGIVING POTLUCK: Bring a vegan dish to share, along with its recipe; free; 6 p.m.; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; 541-480-3017 or http://vegnetbend.org. LIVE READ: Sit in comfy chairs and listen to short fiction read aloud by library staff; free; 6:30 p.m.; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1080 or www. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. TALK OF THE TOWN: COTV hosts a forum to meet the election winners and discuss the year ahead; reservations required; free; 6:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541388-5814, talk@ bendbroadband. com or www. talkofthetownco. com. DEAD WINTER CARPENTERS: The California-based roots-rock band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. POWDER HOUND SLIDE SHOW: The 11th annual Pine Mountain Sports fundraiser party will feature local photographers and filmmakers, along with an outdoor gear raffle; proceeds to benefit Central Oregon Trail Alliance and Deschutes County Search & Rescue; $12 in advance, $14 at the door; doors open at 6 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-385-8080 or www.pinemountainsports.com.

THURSDAY GREAT AMERICAN SMOKEOUT: Event providing information on how to quit smoking and live a tobacco-free life; in conjunction with national event to encourage smokers to quit smoking; free; 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7700. HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE: Festive open house featuring seasonal beer and wine tastings, tasty food, and music by a local band; free; 5:30 p.m.; Great Earth Natural Foods, 46 S.W. D St., Madras; 541-475-1813. BLUEGRASS CHILI COOKOFF BENEFIT: Event featuring a chili cookoff and live bluegrass music; proceeds to benefit Abegail Carpenter and family to help with medical expenses; $10, $5 ages 12 and under, $25 for whole family; 6-9 p.m.; Trinity Lutheran Church & School, 2550 N.E. Butler Market Road, Bend; 541-382-1850. COMMUNITY THANKSGIVING DINNER: Dinner hosted by the Crook County Kids Club; donations accepted; 6-8 p.m.; Crook County Fairgrounds, Carey Foster Hall, 1280 S. Main St., Prineville; 541-447-7661. STEELHEAD FILM NIGHT: A screening of fishing films and photos from around the world; proceeds benefit the Deschutes River Conservancy; $10; 6 and 8:30 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174. “DARWIN’S LEGACY — 200 YEARS OF INSIGHTS AND CHALLENGES”: Featuring “What Does It All Mean?” with Kathleen Dean Moore; $10, $3 students, $8 members of the Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory; 6:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Wille Hall, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7257. INTERFAITH THANKSGIVING SERVICE: A Thanksgiving celebration open to members of various faiths and religions; with music by the Gospel Choir of the Cascades; donations accepted; 7 p.m.; First United Methodist Church, 680 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-1672.

“IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE”: The La Pine High School drama department presents the holiday classic about a man who sees what the world would be like without him when an angel visits on Christmas Eve; $5, $4 with a donation of canned food; 7 p.m.; La Pine High School, 51633 Coach Road; 541-322-5360. “RENT”: BEAT performs the hit musical; $15, $10 students 18 and younger; 7:30 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541419-5558 or www.beatonline.org.

FRIDAY A CASCADES CLASSICAL EVENING: Concert pianist Dr. William Chapman Nyaho performs pieces by Chopin, Bach-Rachmaninoff, Beethoven and Gershwin; proceeds benefit the Cascades Classical Music Foundation; $75; 6 p.m.; Broken Top Club, 61999 Broken Top Drive, Bend; 541-383-0868. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Melany Tupper will discuss her book “The Sandy Knoll Murder”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 422 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-5261491. “IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE”: The La Pine High School drama department presents the holiday classic about a man who sees what the world would be like without him when an angel visits on Christmas Eve; $5, $4 with a donation of canned food; 7 p.m.; La Pine High School, 51633 Coach Road; 541-322-5360. FREAK MOUNTAIN RAMBLERS: The Portland-based Americana group performs; part of the Great Northwest Music Tour; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-3825174 or www.mcmenamins.com. JAZZBROS AND CENTRAL SINGERS: The choirs perform a jazz fusion concert; $5; 7 p.m., doors open 6:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Wille Hall, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7512. “TWELVE ANGRY MEN”: A screening of the 1957 unrated film; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541-475-3351 or www.jcld.org. IMPROV SHOW: Improv comedy with Triage; scenes and characters made up on the spot based on audience suggestion; $5; doors open at 7 p.m., show at 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803. “RENT”: BEAT performs the hit musical; $15, $10 students 18 and younger; 7:30 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541419-5558 or www.beatonline.org. THE CENTRAL OREGON MASTERSINGERS: The premier 45-voice choir presents “Cathedral Classics” under the direction of Clyde Thompson; $15; 7:30 p.m.; Bend Church of the Nazarene, 1270 N.E. 27th St.; 541-385-7229 or www. co-mastersingers.com. CENTRAL OREGON’S LAST COMIC STANDING: Final round; comedians present comic acts and attempt to advance to the next round of competition; $10; 8-10 p.m.; Old Stone Church, 157 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; 541-585-3557. TIM LEE: The scientist-turnedcomedian performs; $20, $10 children and students; 8 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-3170700 or www.towertheatre.org. THE ASCETIC JUNKIES: The Portland-based indie folk band performs; $7; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www.silvermoonbrewing.com.

SATURDAY INDOOR SATURDAY SWAP: Sale of toys, tools, clothes, jewelry and more; free admission; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Indoor Swap Meet, 401 N.E. Second St., Bend; 541-317-4847.

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

COMAG TRUNK SALE: A sale of arts produced by the Central Oregon Metal Arts Guild; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Arts Central, 875 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-771-2370. HARMONY 4 WOMEN CONCERT: Tickets available at The Ticket Mill in Bend, The High Desert Gallery in Bend and Sisters, Paulina Springs Bookstore in Redmond and Sisters, Great American Home Furnishings in Redmond, Home Federal Bank and Riches & Rags in Prineville and online at www.wrcco.org. Attendees can have their photos taken by a professional photographer, refreshments for sale; advance tickets are $12.00 for either show or $15 at the door; Nov. 20, 2:30 and 7 p.m.; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541410-4162. FREAK MOUNTAIN RAMBLERS: The Portland-based Americana group performs; part of the Great Northwest Music Tour; free; 5 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-3825174 or www.mcmenamins.com. TOY RUN AND CASINO NIGHT: Featuring dinner, casino games with funny money, raffles, live music and more; proceeds benefit the South Central Oregon Outreach & Toy Run; $30, $25 before Nov. 15; 6-10 p.m.; La Pine Event Center, 16405 First St.; 541-536-8398. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Melany Tupper will discuss her book “The Sandy Knoll Murder”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 252 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-0866. “IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE”: The La Pine High School drama department presents the holiday classic about a man who sees what the world would be like without him when an angel visits on Christmas Eve; $5, $4 with a donation of canned food; 7 p.m.; La Pine High School, 51633 Coach Road; 541-322-5360. HARMONY 4 WOMEN CONCERT: Tickets available at The Ticket Mill in Bend, The High Desert Gallery in Bend and Sisters, Paulina Springs Bookstore in Redmond and Sisters, Great American Home Furnishings in Redmond, Home Federal Bank and Riches & Rags in Prineville and online at www.wrcco.org. Attendees can have their photos taken by a professional photographer, refreshments for sale; advance tickets are $12.00 for either show or $15 at the door; Nov. 20, 2:30 and 7 p.m.; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541-410-4162. POWELL BUTTE HOLIDAY CONCERT: Featuring Bronn & Kathryn Journey along with The Bells of Sunriver Handbell Choir; $8 in advance, $12 at the door; 7 p.m.; Powell Butte Christian Church, 13720 S.W. State Highway 126; 541-5483066 or powellbuttechurch.com. “RENT”: BEAT performs the hit musical; $15, $10 students 18 and younger; 7:30 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-419-5558 or www. beatonline.org. THE CENTRAL OREGON MASTERSINGERS: The premier 45-voice choir presents “Cathedral Classics” under the direction of Clyde Thompson; $15; 7:30 p.m.; Bend Church of the Nazarene, 1270 N.E. 27th St.; 541-3857229 or www.co-mastersingers.com. PAUL TAYLOR DANCE COMPANY — TAYLOR 2: The innovative modern dance company performs; $35 or $45; 8 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-3170700 or www.towertheatre.org. TALIB KWELI: The underground hip-hop star performs, with Mosley Wotta, DJ R-2 and emerging local MCs; $22 plus fees in advance, $25 at the door, $20 students; 8 p.m.; Century Center, 70 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; art@riseupinternational. com or www.bendticket.com. DIEGO’S UMBRELLA: The San Francisco-based pirate polka band performs; $6; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www.silvermoonbrewing.com.

SUNDAY DORIAN MICHAEL AND KENNY BLACKWELL: The mandolin and guitar duo performs; free; 2 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1032 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar.

MONDAY MARY YOUNGBLOOD: A native flute concert; free; 4 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Wille Hall, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-3833782. THE CELTIC TENORS: Matthew Gilsenan, Daryl Simpson and James Nelson perform “A Celtic Christmas”; $27 or $32; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-3170700 or www.towertheatre.org.

WEDNESDAY Nov. 24 THANKSGIVING DINNER: A meal of turkey, mashed potatoes, gravy, yams, vegetables, a dessert and more; free; noon-3 p.m.; La Pine Community Kitchen, 16480 Finley Butte Road; 541-536-1312 or lapinecommunitykitchen@ crestviewcable.com. TEXAS HIPPIE COALITION WITH TEMPESTA AND EXFIXIA: Texasbased rock outlaws perform; $8 in advance, $10 at the door; doors open at 7 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-788-2989.

THURSDAY Nov. 25 GINGERBREAD JUNCTION: A display of gingerbread houses opens; through Dec. 26; free; 8 a.m.-9 p.m.; Sunriver Resort, 17600 Center Drive; 541-593-4609 or www. sunriver-resort.com/ landing/gingerbread.php. THANKSGIVING DAY COMMUNITY MEAL: A hot breakfast and traditional Thanksgiving dinner featuring holiday fare; free; 8:30-11:30 a.m.; Bend’s Community Center, 1036 N.E. Fifth St.; 541-312-2069. BEND TURKEY TROT: 5K and 10K races through the Old Mill District and along the Deschutes River; Registration required by Nov. 23; Proceeds to benefit Girls on the Run; $20, $10 ages 12 and younger; 9 a.m.; Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive; 541-322-9383 or www.bendturkeytrot.com/. I LIKE PIE FUN RUN AND PIE CONTEST: Run or walk 2K, 5K, 10K or 10 miles and eat pie; bring a pie to enter judged baking contest; registration required; donations benefit NeighborImpact; $5 and five cans of food suggested donation; 9 a.m.; FootZone, 845 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-3568 or www.footzonebend.com. COMMUNITY OF REDMOND THANKSGIVING DINNER: Community dinner featuring holiday fare; open to everyone; free, donations accepted; noon-3 p.m.; Redmond Senior Center, 325 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; 541-5485483.

FRIDAY Nov. 26 WONDERLAND EXPRESS AUCTION: A silent auction of unique creations; proceeds benefit Wonderland Express’ annual event; free admission; noon-6 p.m.; Sunriver Resort Great Hall, 17728 Abbot Drive; 541-593-4405 or www. wonderlandexpress.com. GRAND ILLUMINATION : Kick off the season with one of Central Oregon’s largest holiday light displays; featuring sleigh rides, live music and Santa; free; 4 p.m.; Sunriver Resort, 17600 Center Drive; 541-593-1000 or http://www.sunriver-resort.com. HOLIDAY ART WALK: Featuring a showcase of local art and music at various downtown stores; free; 5-8 p.m.; downtown Redmond; 541-923-5191.

REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend 541-382-6347

CONVICTION (R) 4, 7 FOR COLORED GIRLS (R) 4:05, 6:50 INSIDE JOB (PG-13) 4:15, 7:05 NOWHERE BOY (R) 4:30, 6:55 STONE (R) 4:25, 6:40 THE TOWN (R) 4:10, 6:45

REGAL OLD MILL STADIUM 16 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend 541-382-6347

DUE DATE (R) 12:10, 1:50, 2:30, 4:10, 5:20, 8, 10:25 HEREAFTER (PG-13) 12:30, 4:25, 7:25, 10:20 JACKASS 3-D (R) 1:20, 3:45, 6:25, 9:10 LES MISÉRABLES IN CONCERT

— THE 25TH ANNIVERSARY (no MPAA rating) 7:30 LIFE AS WE KNOW IT (PG-13) 3:55, 9:45 MEGAMIND 3-D (PG) Noon, 1:30, 2:25, 4, 5, 6:30, 7:30, 9, 9:55 MEGAMIND (PG) 11:30 a.m., 1:55, 4:30, 7, 9:25 MORNING GLORY (PG-13) 11:35 a.m., 2:05, 4:40, 7:20, 10:05 PARANORMAL ACTIVITY 2 (R) 11:50 a.m., 2:20, 5:15, 7:55, 10:10 RED (PG-13) 12:35, 4:05, 6:55, 9:40 SAW 3-D (R) 1:25, 3:40, 6:20, 9:05 SECRETARIAT (PG) 12:25, 3:50, 6:40, 9:30 SKYLINE (PG-13) 11:55 a.m., 2:15, 4:50, 7:40, 10 THE SOCIAL NETWORK (PG13) 11:45 a.m., 6:35 UNSTOPPABLE (PG-13) 12:15, 1:40, 2:40, 4:20, 5:10, 7:10, 7:50, 9:35, 10:15 EDITOR’S NOTE: Movie Times in bold are open-captioned showtimes.

EDITOR’S NOTE: There is an additional $3.50 fee for 3-D movies.

MCMENAMINS OLD ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend 541-330-8562

(After 7 p.m. shows 21 and over only. Under 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.) INCEPTION (PG-13) 6 THE OTHER GUYS (PG-13) 9:30 EDITOR’S NOTE: The University of Oregon football game will screen at 4:30 p.m. Saturday (doors open at 4 p.m.). Due to Monday Night Football, no movies will be shown on Monday. “Catch Magazine Film Night” will screen at 6 and 8:30 p.m. Thursday.

REDMOND CINEMAS

DUE DATE (R) 5, 7:15, 9:30 MEGAMIND (PG) 4:30, 6:30, 8:30 SKYLINE (PG-13) 4:15, 6:45, 9:15 UNSTOPPABLE (PG-13) 4:45, 7, 9:30

SISTERS MOVIE HOUSE 720 Desperado Court, Sisters 541-549-8800

DUE DATE (R) 4:30, 6:45 HEREAFTER (PG-13) 6:30 MEGAMIND (PG) 4:15 RED (PG-13) 6:30 SECRETARIAT (PG) 4 UNSTOPPABLE (PG-13) 4:45, 7

PINE THEATER 214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

RED (PG-13) 4, 7 1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond, 541-548-8777

What is it about Bristol? Sarah Palin’s daughter still a hit on ‘Dancing With the Stars’ despite lackluster judge scores By Lisa de Moraes

The Washington Post

It’s the most important vote since the midterm elections. It’s a bellwether for 2012. Expect instant analysis from political pundits when the results come in Tuesday night. We’re talking, of course, about ABC’s “Dancing With the Stars.” ABC’s ballroom dance competition series has pasodobled its way to the top of the TV ratings based on its quaint escapist appeal, but this season, with Sarah Palin’s daughter Bristol among the “celebrity” dancers, it has become the most politicized nonpolitical race of the year. Bristol Palin is no hoofer. Week after week, the McCain campaign do-as-we-say-not-as-we-do poster child turned celebrity-in-training has wound up with the fewest points from the professional judges — and, week after week, the tally of votes from viewers pulls Bristol back to safety. Other, far better celeb dancers with higher judge scores are sent packing. Who survives and who gets the hook each week on the show is determined by some closely held formula that factors in both the judges’ points and viewer votes. Ever since the show debuted in 2005, the network and producer BBC have steadfastly refused to disclose how America has voted. No tallies, no state-bystate breakdowns, no nothing. While Fox’s ratings behemoth “American Idol” has slipped badly in the ratings the past couple of seasons, “Dancing” continues to find new fans. In its 10th edition, last spring, the ABC contest clocked its biggest audience ever — nearly 22 million viewers each week. This season it’s averaging around 21 million — but that number will likely climb if Bristol makes it to next week’s finals.

Voting for other Palin?

M T For Wednesday, Nov. 17

Seeking friendly duplicate bridge? Go to www.bendbridge.org Five games weekly

But already, the survival of America’s top “teen advocate” to this week’s semifinals round has some accusing that social-networking conservatives have been voting for her mother, not her. “By all means, let the Republicans conspire to fix this meaningless election. ... If Bristol Palin wins, while the judges gag at her weak performances, then finally, we’ll be able to explain politics to the apolitical using concepts that they can understand!” the liberal blog Daily Kos posted last week. Since the latest edition of the show debuted in September, political Web sites promoting Sarah Palin’s career have been getting out the vote for Bristol, including instructions on how to cast multiple votes via telephone, text message or online for hours after each Monday’s performance show. “She’s in the final four. Congratulations Bristol,” read the home page of Conservatives4 Palin.com, which has every week instructed followers how and when to cast multiple votes for their gal’s daughter.

ABC via Associated Press

Bristol Palin and her partner, Mark Ballas, perform on “Dancing With the Stars” Nov. 8 in Los Angeles.

‘Enormously relatable’ The most popular nonpolitical explanation for Bristol’s improbable success: She’s a plucky underdog. She’s The Cinderella Girl of 2010 — just like Susan Boyle, only younger, prettier and without the jaw-dropping talent. “Dancing” executive producer Conrad Green says he has no way of knowing why people cast their votes for certain celebrities in the competition. But, he is obviously tickled that they do, gushing, “Bristol has been fascinating to watch dancing. We’ve gradually seen her blossoming as a person to become less and less shy. ... She’s an enormously relatable person.” Additionally, Bristol’s lack of sophistication — in marked contrast to this season’s other C-list dancers — her occasional homesickness, and her voice like clotted cream — have caused the show’s many older female viewers to break out in a bad case of “gone maternal,” Green asserted. “She reminds them of their children and their grandchildren.”

No special treatment “Dancing” exec producer Green disputes the idea the Palins have gotten special treatment on the show. He notes that the season in which Kelly Osbourne — another young woman famous for her parents — danced on the reality show, Ozzy and Sharon Osbourne were often seen in the audience, Sharon was interviewed by Bergeron, and the Osbourne parents also were shown at home. Green says that so far as he is concerned, a celebrity is a celebrity, and his only concern is drawing viewers to the show. Anyway, he added, he would love to have a Democratic political figure compete on the show, “but Bill Clinton turned us down very politely. ... I think (the casting director) got as far as ‘Dancing With...’ He would be my ultimate booking on the show.” Green said he’s been astonished when he’s encountered people angry about seeing so much of the Palins on this edition of the show, “and I ask who they voted for and they say, ‘No one.’ ” Typical. Even stargazing suffers from turnout problems. Says Green: “It’s like an election.”


E4 Wednesday, November 17, 2010 • THE BULLETIN TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, November 17, 2010 E5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY JACQUELINE BIGAR

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Wednesday, Nov. 17, 2010: This year, you will discover the strength of living your word and carrying projects to completion. In order to do this, you might need to hop through your share of hoops, as the unexpected runs riot in your daily life — but you can do it. Many opportunities will appear because of your newfound precision and dedication. If you are single, be wary of romance until spring, when it is more likely to be long-term. Still, really get to know someone before deciding if this is it. If you are attached, you might be more romantically inclined than in many years. As a result, your special attention tends to heat up the love temperature. ARIES reads you cold. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH Pressure builds. You are on top of your game. Be sensitive to a cantankerous boss or higherup. Don’t look at the situation as power and control games, but rather as insecurity. Avoid playing into this person’s “stuff.” Tonight: Everything works out fine. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HH Take your time moving a project forward. In fact, backtracking might be wise in order to determine if everything is in order. Confusion surrounds a partnership for now, but that could change. Learn the power of the waiting game. Tonight: Vanish for some much-needed private time. GEMINI (May 21-June 20)

HHHHH You are direct and know what you want to do. Stay in touch with your feelings, understanding what needs to happen. Your creativity could be lessened by a feeling that doesn’t support what you ultimately want. Tonight: Where the action is. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHH Focus on each job and accomplishing what you must. Realize that you need to move a project forward. Remain optimistic and direct, despite a lingering feeling that something could go wrong. Evaluate what is happening clearly. Tonight: On top of your game. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHHH Work as a team to accomplish much more of what you want. Though you could be tired of the same issue rearing its ugly head, you must proceed. A fun exchange could help you relax and allow more of your innate creativity to bubble forth. Tonight: Let your hair down. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHHH Defer to others and relate on a one-on-one level. If you understand what is happening within a key relationship or friendship, open up talks. Let go of financial tension. Allow greater give-andtake, and don’t judge others so much. They are processing. Tonight: Visit with a favorite person. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHH Others seem to have a clear sense of direction and what they expect. You could be dragging your heels, not exactly sure about what feels right. Communication sizzles with a touch of sarcasm. Tonight: Sort through offers, deciding not to be alone.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHH News that is forthcoming could leave you flat. Give yourself time to process and get to the bottom of a problem. Opt not to commit to an expenditure or overdo it in any way financially. Discussions are animated. Tonight: Keep a conversation perking. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHHH Unusual physical and mental energy allows greater flexibility. You have drive and a strong sense of direction. If you hit an obstacle, you find a way to hurdle right over it. Trust yourself more. Tonight: Be ever playful. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHH Listen to your instincts. You know what it takes to make yourself feel grounded and secure. Look to your personal life for that type of anchoring. Your instincts help you know which way to go when you’re upset. Tonight: Mosey on home. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHH Talk through a problem. Don’t allow this issue to bog down your thinking and willingness to look at expansion and yet another approach. Pressure builds in an unprecedented manner. You will want to take action. Tonight: Where the action is. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHH Your instincts guide you in a money matter. Your ability to clear out problems and draw out others will need to come into play. You know much more of what is going on than you thought. A boss sympathizes but pushes you. Tonight: A must appearance. © 2010 by King Features Syndicate


E6 Wednesday, November 17, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Celebs turn to experts for philanthropy advice By Harriet Ryan

Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — John Legend, the Grammy Award-winning musician, was in search of a charitable cause last year. An African village he supported was thriving, but the Ohio-born singer, fresh from volunteering in the Obama campaign, wanted to do something domestically — something, he recalled, “for people who don’t have a voice.” Legend hired a consulting firm, and a month and a half later, he had a cause: education reform. “My time is very hard to come by and you have to delegate sometimes,” Legend said in a phone interview from his European tour. “I felt like hiring them would help me make a bigger impact.” Legend is among an increasing number of celebrities, including Rachael Ray, Yao Ming, Ben Stiller, Demi Moore and Ashton Kutcher who have paid experts to strategize their goodwill. Such philanthropic advising has existed in Hollywood for decades — Barbra Streisand has had an adviser for 24 years — but the number of consultants working with celebrities is rising as younger and less established figures, such as television personality Nicole Richie and pop singer Avril Lavigne, call upon their services. “There are certainly more people in this space,” said Streisand’s adviser, Margery Tabankin, who opened her firm in 1994 and has been credited with launching the profession in Hollywood. “I think there’s a sense that you should look at your philanthropic investment the same way you look at a financial investment.” Hiring advisers is a national trend among wealthy donors of all stripes, but in Hollywood, it may also reflect a desire to be associated with the sort of serious activism that transformed Angelina Jolie and Bono from mere entertainers to global power players. “There’s no question they’ve inspired the next generation of high-profile philanthropists. Frankly, it’s not limited to

Black Friday Continued from E1 • Create menus: Use Black Friday to plan menus with holiday leftovers. Menu-planning creates a money-saving strategy for grocery shopping and meal preparation.

celebrities. They’re inspirational to philanthropists, period,” said Adam Waldman, president of the Endeavor Group, a Washington-based consulting company that advises Jolie and Brad Pitt. The attempt by celebrities to display a deep commitment to issues was apparent at last month’s meeting of the Clinton Global Initiative, the annual summit of world leaders to address “some of the world’s most pressing challenges.” Celebrities including NASCAR’s Jeff Gordon, actress Geena Davis and Stiller attended alongside prime ministers and corporate CEOs. “You have to earn your stripes in philanthropy if you are a celebrity, and it takes homework. People can tell if you are serious or not,” said Trevor Neilson, whose Global Philanthropy Group opened a Santa Monica, Calif., office last year and advises a dozen celebrities, including Legend and Lavigne. Those who hire consultants fall into various categories — those like Legend, who know they want to do something, but aren’t sure what; others who know what they want to do but don’t know how; and those who are already doing something but doing it poorly. “We do a lot of redos,” said Marc Pollick, president of the Giving Back Fund, which has advised Justin Timberlake and Britney Spears and now works mainly with professional athletes, including Yao. “People put their mothers, fathers, brothers, French poodles in charge of their organizations simply because it is a job for someone in their entourage ... and the foundation is floundering.” The Giving Back Fund instituted a policy that clients must make “a meaningful personal gift” to their cause after several frustrating experiences. “We’ve had people who have hundred-million-dollar contracts. It’s in the paper. And they’ll come to us with a $5,000 check and say, ‘I want to start a foundation and can we blow up this check so I can stand behind it for a picture,’” Pollick said.

• Sleep: Hit the snooze alarm and skip over pre-dawn Black Friday sales, which often feature large crowds and dubious sales. Save money and preserve your health by getting more sleep. Sleep deprivation costs money and diminishes safety, according to the National Sleep Foundation. Rest your mind, body and wallet on Black Friday.

C OV ER S T OR I ES

Gifts Continued from E1

Familiarity is misleading From annual visits to the community Christmas tree to decking the halls with boughs of holly, seasonal customs make us feel like the holidays are here. Advertisers love traditions, too — especially the time-honored practice of preying upon our deep-seated desire for what we know (that is, taking advantage of the familiarity heuristic). “Madison Avenue tries to keep drilling brand names into your brain so that they become so familiar that you associate them with comfort, safety and feeling good,” Herbert says. “Buying Dad a tie for Christmas: It’s a joke we laugh about, but we don’t want to break away from it because our brain resists change. We stick with what we know is going to work.” You think you should: Get the latest gadgets from famous brands Apple and Amazon. Those would be Apple’s iPad (starts at $499), the fastest-adopted new non-phone technology ever, with 4.5 million units sold per quarter, according to Bernstein Research; and Amazon’s newest generation of Kindle e-readers

Skin care Continued from E1 Autumn, when one can wear tights and tall boots, is also a good time to treat unsightly leg veins with the procedure called sclerotherapy since, as Kauvar pointed out, “your veins actually do look worse before they look better.” Though they’re not exactly fashionable, she recommends wearing compression stockings for three days after each treatment. “Most people don’t want to wear heavy compression hose in 95 percent humidity,” she said. Facial resurfacing, the kind that involves the removal of microscopic columns of tissue to create new collagen, requires roughly a week of at-home healing and weeks of avoiding ultraviolet rays — arguably an easier task when the sun sets early. Dover said that his patients who are schoolteachers, however, have their faces resurfaced in late June and July to avoid scrutiny from their harshest critics. “Their kids are the worst audience of all,” Dover said, letting his voice sound childlike for a moment: “Ohhhh, Ms. Jones changed something.” Just as seersucker suits and linen dresses are stowed as an autumnal chill arrives, so should we adapt our beauty routines. As the temperature

(from $139), which became the best-selling products on Amazon.com by the end of October. Everybody else has one, so they have to be good, right? Try this instead: Consider other brands’ versions of the same idea, some of which are also shaping up to be hot holiday gifts, according to Consumer Reports electronics editor Paul Reynolds. They’re at least worth researching before you buy, because one device doesn’t truly fit all. Among the standout alternatives: Barnes & Noble’s Nook Color (starts at $249) is seeing brisk sales, and Samsung’s Android-based Galaxy 7-inch tablet ($600) is also already looking popular, Reynolds says.

We don’t envy Santa. With a frigid home base and a vast, multispecies workforce to manage, the Jolly One has a pretty unglamorous life for 364 days of the year. But for Christmas, he has a major advantage: wish lists. Picking from a vast spectrum of potential presents “paralyzes us” as shoppers, says Barry Schwartz, a professor of social theory and social action at Swarthmore College, and the author of “The Paradox of Choice” ($15, Harper Perennial) and the forthcoming “Practical Wisdom” ($26, Riverhead).

“It’s hard enough when we’re choosing for ourselves, but when we’re choosing for somebody else, it’s even worse.” You think you should: Get a gift card, which would allow the recipient to buy whatever he or she wants — and would take the pressure of choosing off of you. Try this instead: A gift card puts the pressure to make a choice on the recipient. (Plus, it might not even get used! A recent Consumer Reports survey showed that 27 percent of Americans who received a gift card last December still hadn’t used it by mid-October.) Try surprising the recipient with something that “makes a connection between you and them, that tells them you’ve noticed something about them or appreciate something about them,” recommends Sheena Iyengar, a professor at Columbia Business School and the author of “The Art of Choosing” ($26, Twelve). “Gifts that stay in the memory bank have more value.” Schwartz recommends experiential presents. “I think the greatest gift is the gift of time, so if you can give gifts that free up time for the recipient, that’s a lot better than a sweater,” Schwartz says. “There’s a lot of evidence that doing is more satisfying than having. Cook them dinner.” Or take them skydiving — now that will be memorable.

falls, the air tends to become drier, often leaving skin and lips parched. If your lips have hanging chads, it’s gauche to wear a bold statement color. Instead use Aquaphor healing ointment regularly — easier to spread than balms in stick form, Dover said. Dr. Amy Derick, a dermatologist in Barrington, Ill., also cautioned patients to avoid licking their lips, since that aggravates dryness, sometimes resulting in an unattractively raw pout. “It looks like the mouth of a clown, a red rashy border around the lips,” she said. Many women exfoliate their faces year-round to help speed their cell turnover and encourage a healthy glow. In the winter, exfoliating their bodies may help ward off itch as well. Research has shown that in cold the cells of the upper epidermis (or corneocytes) accumulate, said Dr. Gil Yosipovitch, a professor of dermatology at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center in Winston-Salem, N.C. A lot of people think that exfoliating itchy, dry skin will only dry it out, but counterintuitively, Yosipovitch said, “I think it does have an effect on activating the cycle.” So consider using an exfoliating body wash in the shower to forestall scaly limbs (with moisturizer after). Dover also recommended a warmmist humidifier in the bedroom at night to help rehydrate the skin. He considers

cold-air machines whose water isn’t often changed a poor choice for people prone to sinus infections, because “it’s like having a little pond in your room,” he said. During the stretch from Thanksgiving to the New Year, one ritual is hard to resist: overeating. But it’s a myth that winter cold makes our bodies more prone to packing on pounds, said Dr. Michael Jensen, a professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic, who has studied fat for decades. The same old rule — calories in, calories out — applies. But recently Jensen added a new wrinkle to an existing finding that people who gain weight in their legs and hips (known as “pears”) are better off when it comes to diabetes, high cholesterol and high blood pressure than those who gain it in the belly (“apples”). During his study, the results of which were published last month in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 28 participants were overfed for eight weeks, gaining on average 5.5 pounds on top and 3.3 pounds on the bottom. Those who gained leg fat did it by creating more fat cells, the study found. So the good news this season for prolific fat-cell makers is “your fat is doing what you want it to do: It’s storing fat in your legs,” Jensen said. “The bad news is you’ve got more fat cells.”

Less is more


SISTERS ARTS | CULTURE | EVENTS

Town of

INSIDE:

tiny Lights

A MAGAZINE DEDICATED TO SPECIAL EVENTS IN THE TOWN OF SISTERS

WINTER 2010

Sisters celebrates a Cowboy Christmas!

Endorsed by

SISTERS CHRISTMAS EVENTS HOLIDAY GIFT GUIDE EVENTS CALENDAR BUSINESS PROFILE

Advertising Supplement to The Bulletin


2 | Sisters Magazine | Town of Tiny Lights 2010


It’s a Cowboy Christmas!

Photos by Gary Miller, Sisters Country Photography

The Town of Tiny Lights has a full schedule of events to get you in the spirit. by Laurel Brauns, for The Bulletin Special Projects Decades ago, business in Sisters began adorning their storefronts with tiny white lights. The tradition spread, and eventually the city began participating by decorating the trees in Barclay Park with the same small decorations. Sisters was tagged the “Town of Tiny Lights,” and every year since, the downtown streets transform into an illuminated holiday wonderland. Sisters has thus developed a reputation as a great place to spend the holidays for those looking for an enchanting Christmas experience. “Sisters is a great place to be and spend the holidays,” said Erin Borla, executive director of the Sisters Chamber of Commerce. “It is a western town with a small-town, rural feel. It is a real traditional community.” There are a number of activities planned by the Chamber of Commerce and the City of Sisters to make the “Cowboy Christmas” theme (adopted by the Chamber five years ago) that much more memorable for locals and visitors alike. The weekend after Thanksgiving, the activities kick into action.

Tree Lighting On Friday, Nov. 26 at 5:30 p.m., the annual tree lighting ceremony will be held in Barclay Park. This is the sixth year that the Christmas tree has been donated to Sisters by the Deschutes Land Trust (DLT.) The tree is cut from property owned by the DLT near Camp Sherman. Every year, employees of the city and the Chamber of Commerce pick out the tree, and it is cut and delivered to Barclay Park by Sisters Tree Service.

Adding to the traditional feel of the evening, carolers, lead by Si Simonsen, will be dressed in Victorian clothing as they perform three holiday songs. The incredibly coordinated Bell Ringers, lead by Lola Knox, will also perform. Hot drinks and popcorn will be for sale by the Lions Club as a fundraiser for the organization.

Holiday Parade On Saturday, Nov. 27 at 2 p.m., the annual holiday parade will proceed through downtown on Hood Avenue from Pine Street to Spruce Street. The parade traditionally features around 50 participants who take an hour to march through town. This year, the parade will include floats, wagons, horses and Christmas characters like Frosty, Cinnamon Bear and the Ginger Bread Man. Santa and Mrs. Claus will arrive at the end of the parade in a horse-drawn carriage driven by Jackie Herring. “This is a real community oriented parade,” said Jeri Buckmann, events director for the Sisters Chamber of Commerce. “It is special because the community really participates, everyone knows everyone. The parade announcer, Bob Buckmann, knows everyone in the parade, too, so he always adds a little something special about each participant.” Directly following the parade, from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m., Santa and Mrs. Claus will go over to the Sisters Chamber of Commerce, located on the corner of Main Street and Spruce Street, to talk with children about their Christmas wishes. Hot drinks and cookies will be served, and a professional photographer will be on hand to take pictures with Santa, Frosty and other holiday characters.

Magical Voices

CHRISTMAS TREE LIGHTING — Friday, Another event to get Nov. 26, 5:30 p.m., Barclay Park you in the holiday spirit is the Magical Voices of HOLIDAY PARADE — Saturday, Nov. 27, Christmas, an annual 2 p.m., along Hood Avenue fundraiser for music MAGICAL VOICES OF CHRISTMAS — programs in Sisters Sunday, Dec. 5, 6 p.m., Sisters High School Public Schools, hosted by the Sisters Rotary at All three events are FREE! the Sisters High School. The two-hour show starts at 6 p.m. on and seniors will perform solo on the Sunday, Dec. 5 and is free and open to piano. the public. Special guests include the Gospel The theme this year is “A World Choir of the Cascades from Bend, who of Christmas.” The event will feature will perform a gospel version of “Silent a variety show of music, singing and Night” as well as “Shout!” by the Isley dancing by various choral groups and Brothers. The Central Oregon Irish bands of all ages from Sisters, as well as Dancers will also add a Celtic flourish a few special guests. to the evening. The audience can expect high energy “This is the 14th year we are doing it, performances by the Rhythm Wranglers, and we’ve gotten such a great response the Sisters High School Choral Group, that we continue the tradition every and various choirs, jazz ensembles and year,” said Steve Auerbach of the Sisters concert bands throughout the evening. Rotary. “It is a great evening to bring Sisters homecoming queen, Janelle your kids and get them in the spirit of Johnson, will sing “Chestnuts Roasting the holidays.” on an Open Fire,” and several juniors

Town of Tiny Lights 2010 | Sisters Magazine | 3


Christmas at

Black Butte Ranch by Sondra Holtzman, for The Bulletin Special Projects

Having become a time-honored tradition, Black Butte Ranch will celebrate the holidays with exciting and festive events, many of which are open to the public. Each year, the Ranch (located eight miles west of Sisters) adopts a holiday theme, usually centered around what is on display in The Lodge Gallery. This year’s theme, titled Americana Christmas at Black Butte Ranch, features a collection of tapestries by Sisters artist Paul Alan Bennett. Bennett, a nationally recognized, award-winning painter known for his warm sense of humor, draws inspiration from familiar landscapes and personal experiences. “Art is a lot about other art,” said Bennett. “You can’t help but fall in love with certain styles and artists when you study art history. Eventually, those influences will make their way into your own work.” Don’t miss the Ranch Open House on Saturday, Dec. 11, a holiday sale in all retail outlets of the Ranch, including the Big Meadow Golf Shop and the Glaze Meadow Sports Shop and Spa. Receive up to 40 percent off Black Butte Ranch logo wear in the Sports Shop and partake in what the Ranch calls the “15 for 15,” $15 for a 15-

minute foot or chair massage or a 15minute manicure/pedicure in the spa. Other holiday Ranch activities include horse-drawn carriage rides on Saturday and Sunday, Dec. 18 and 19 from 8 to 11 a.m. and again from Friday, Dec. 24 through Saturday, Jan. 1 from 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. A warm mug of hot chocolate, fresh-brewed coffee or spiced cider from the Lodge Espresso Shop is included. “Carriages are beautifully decked out with holiday trimming and rides go rain, snow or shine,” said Charles Kingsbaker, director of sales and marketing for Black Butte Ranch. “We encourage people to purchase tickets in advance and dress warmly for weather conditions. And remember to bring your own blankets.” The Christmas Day Celebration Buffet features peel-and-eat shrimp, oysters on the half shell and the classic Ranch salad bar, which includes vegetable salads, cured meats and a cheese display. The feast continues with maple-glazed chicken with a pear and cider sauce, sweet potato casserole with pecans and roasted turkey and pork with all the trimmings, including herb crusted prime rib. And for dessert, select from pumpkin cheesecake, carrot cake, eggnog and croissant bread pudding or chocolate pecan pie. Kids have a separate buffet all their own, with grilled chicken, tater tots, green beans, macaroni and

SUNDANCE SHOES • Dansko • Clark • Ecco • Keen • Naot • Merrell • Teva • Chaco • New Balance • Reef • Ugg • Brighton Jewelry • Brighton Handbags and much more!

town square

541• 549•4240 Sisters, Oregon 97759 4 | Sisters Magazine | Town of Tiny Lights 2010

cheese, chocolate pudding and candy canes. No holiday celebration would be complete without a breakfast and photo with Santa. Santa Claus will be available at Black Butte Ranch on two consecutive Saturdays — Dec. 11 and 18 from 8 to 11 a.m. Black Butte’s “Santa” is a bona fide member of the American Santa Association. He sports a real beard, and in fact, you really might think he is Santa. Reservations are required and include a special children’s buffet.

Photos courtesy of Black Butte Ranch

“The holidays are a great time to spend with family and friends, and the Ranch is all about making memories,” said Kingsbaker. “We love to host Central Oregon communities here at the Ranch, whether it’s making a snow man in the meadow, taking a carriage ride or telling Santa what they want for Christmas. We hope to create memories families and kids take with them for a lifetime.” For more information, call 866-9012961. For reservations for Breakfast with Santa on Saturday, Dec. 11 and 18, call 541-595-1260. To reserve a carriage ride, call 541595-1510.

HUCKLEBEARY’S ESPRESSO


HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE & CRAFT FAIR: Saturday, Dec. 4, 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. • Sisters Art Works

For browsing, for shopping, for pets Fifth annual Holiday Open House & Craft Fair to offer one-of-a-kind gifts, and pet photos too. by Sondra Holtzman, for The Bulletin Special Projects As anticipation and excitement builds for the holidays, Sisters Art Works is planning its fifth annual Holiday Open House & Craft Fair on Saturday, Dec. 4 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. in Sisters. The juried event will feature a diverse mix of craftspeople, from jewelers to potters, glass artists, quilters and painters. Founded in 2005 by artist Kathy Deggendorfer, Sisters Art Works is a community clubhouse for creative thinkers and artists, as well as a performance and classroom space. “Sisters Art Works was designed to stimulate the economy of Sisters with a creative-based business,” said Deggendorfer. “Each year, friends of Sisters Art Works gather for the Holiday Open House, an endof year celebration and sale of handmade gift items.” Deggendorfer is collaborating with

Sisters Bakery and artist Tonye Phillips to create a limited collection of intriguing pie boxes. Inside you’ll find a gift certificate from the bakery, a custom pie server made by Deggendorfer and a beautiful, handmade pot holder by Phillips, all encased in fanciful wrapping paper done in Deggendorfer’s distinctive painting style. Glass artist Nancy Becker will be offering festive, hand-blown glass holiday ornaments, joining forces with artist John Christman, whose bird feeders and houses are collector’s items. Don’t miss Laurence Dyer’s handcrafted wooden jewelry boxes and quilter Jackie Erickson’s handmade pin cushions and coin purses. Fine artist Mary Marquiss is well known for her beautiful watercolors, which are also reflected in her own line of cookbooks. Fishing enthusiasts will love Mike Melchiori’s handcrafted wooden fly-fishing nets made with laminated woods. “This year, I wanted to offer some gift

items targeted especially for men,” said Deggendorfer. For those who love specialty foods, check out Pam Wavrin’s line of homemade chutneys and balsamic vinaigrettes, along with a selection of Mexican baked goods from Sisters Bakery. Other vendors include popular Sisters artist Paul Alan Bennett, jeweler Suzy Ramsey, Moonbeam Glassworks from Portland, ceramic artist and potter Deb Sether, recycle queen Sarah Bella, and Tracy Curtis, who creates handbags out of coffee bags and jewelry from guitar strings. Speaking of music, the Holiday Open House & Craft Fair will feature local harpist Becky Smith. She also directs a men’s acapella group who will sing the afternoon of the open house, along with an array of acoustic guitar players making music throughout the day. Pet lovers are invited to bring their beloved animals to the fourth annual Pet Photos with Santa, a fundraiser for Furry Friends, a Sisters organization affiliated with the Kiwanis Food

Bank and founded by Sisters resident Kiki Dolson. The event, which takes place from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Sisters Art Works, helps raise money for people who need assistance with regard to the care and feeding of their pets, along with spay and neuter services. All proceeds go directly to Furry Friends. Photo options include either a single printed image or a CD with multiple photos of your pet, available for pick-up at Sisters Feed company approximately 10 days after the close of the event. “It’s not just for dogs and cats,” said Deggendorfer. “We’ve had people bring a goose, llama, goats, chickens, even a pot bellied pig.” Bring your wish list and furry friend and head over to Sisters this holiday season. This is an event you won’t want to miss. Sisters Art Works is located at 204 W Adams St. in Sisters. For a complete list of participating artists, visit www. sistersartworks.com.

Town of Tiny Lights 2010 | Sisters Magazine | 5


Sisters Gift Guide: A few helpful suggestions for Christmas shopping in Sisters! Heritage U.S.A.

The Stitchin’ Post / Twigs Home & Garden

Hanging around for 20 years and with more than 50 great vendors, Heritage U.S.A. has something for everyone —the marketplace for antiques, collectibles, gifts, home and garden. You will find wilderness, western, large pictures, metal, cast iron, jewelry, furniture, coins, misc. tiles, linens, rustic items, local llama fiber throws and rugs, Beaches carved birds, Bear Paw Juniper items, and lots of Fenton. Come and check out the old, new and the in between items for you or that gift for the holidays.

Inspiration, education, color, texture, pattern ... nestled in the pines of Sisters, Oregon, the Stitchin’ Post offers a contemporary approach to a traditional art form, while still providing the classic appeal of quilting and sewing. Visit our fabulous selection of yarns, a knitter’s fantasy. Twigs brings you lifestyle accessories for everyday living. A unique blend of styles and products for the avid gardener, the ecoconscious, your home, and the people you love big and small. Come experience Twigs ... respect the planet, indulge your senses.

253 East Hood Avenue, 541-549-4660

311 West Cascade Ave., 541-549-6061, www.stitchinpost.com

Paulina Springs Books Shopping online appears convenient and “what everyone is doing.” But if we shop online, our dollars don’t support local events, taxes, fundraising activities, etc. We desire a community with cultural stimulation, public resources, excellent education, fiscal stability, and a vibrant quality of life. Local economies are what create the lifestyle we enjoy. Support your neighbors by shopping locally and together, we’ll create the living standards we desire.

252 West Hood Ave., 541-549-0866

Sundance Shoes Sundance Shoes specializes in comfort footwear for your family needs. Our experienced team will help you “find” and “fit” the right shoe or boot for your winter needs. We invite you to come check out our new styles from such companies as Dansko, Clark, Ecco, Keen, Naot, Merrell, Teva, Chaco, New Balance, Reef, Born, Spring Step, Bogs, Ugg, Sorel, and Brighton handbags, jewelry and more.

141 East Cascade Ave., 541-549-4240

Beacham’s Clock Co. Holiday Open House & Craft Fair

204 W. Adams, Sisters

Bring your furry friend for the 4th annual Pet Photos with Santa from 11am to 2pm!

Beacham’s Clock Co. has wonderful clocks for your gift giving needs. It offers a large selection of approximately 800 clocks with a wide variety of prices. From miniature to 10-foot grandfather clocks, let us decorate your hall, mantle and walls with beautiful time pieces.

300 West Hood Ave., 541-549-9971

For more info. visit www.sistersartworks.com

Beacham’s Clock Co. Sales & Service of the World’s Finest Clocks

Exclusive manufacturer of award-winning clocks

300 West Hood • NW corner of Hood & Oak • Sisters, OR 541-549-9971 • www.beachamsclockco.com Open 9:30am - 5:00pm • Closed Sunday & Wednesday 6 | Sisters Magazine | Town of Tiny Lights 2010

All Proceeds benefit The Little Cloverdale Preschool The Little Cloverdale Preschool does not discriminate against race, religion or gender.


BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT: Slick’s Que Co. Roy Slicker, owner of Slick’s Que Co. in Sisters / Photo by Lyle Cox

by Andrew Moore, for The Bulletin Special Projects

Slick’s Que Co. of Sisters honored among the best barbecue restaurants in the country. People from all over the country annually flock to Sisters for its rodeo, its quilt show and its festivals. Add to that list barbecue. Sisters resident Roy Slicker and his wife, Kim, have turned what was once a gas station convenience store into an authentic Southern-style barbecue shack that is rapidly becoming a destination for the fraternity of folks whose mouths water when talk turns to brisket, burnt ends and pulled pork. Earlier this year, their restaurant, Slick’s Que Co., at 240 E. Cascades Ave. in downtown Sisters, was named among the best barbecue restaurants in the country by National Barbecue News, an honor bestowed after a series of covert visits by judges. For Slicker, it was an unexpected award, and validation he and his wife are on the right track, especially considering that five years ago, he was busy running a software company in the Bay Area. “No other food has the type of following barbecue does,” said Slicker. “I learned from the best of the best, and I’m putting that into the menu.” Indeed, if you like barbecue, Slicker’s menu is something to marvel. Besides the brisket and pulled pork (slowly smoked for 16 to 18 hours using split wood from apple trees and another fruit tree Slicker keeps secret) are baby back pork ribs, whole chickens, smoked turkey breast and Meyers sausage. All of it is cooked over a slow fire, and when the food is gone, the restaurant closes. The side menu is a treat as well, with pineapple-roasted baked beans, coleslaw, garlic mashed potatoes and Slicker’s own 65-year-old family recipe for potato salad. To top it off is Slicker’s barbecue sauce, his own creation which he insists must be served warm to bring out the flavor of the food. It’s also a key component of one of his favorite recommendations: A plate of pulled pork, doused with his sauce and covered

with coleslaw. “In the South they do this,” Slicker said. “It’s the sweet, sour and savory, all mixed together.” And Slicker should know, having driven thousands of miles in the last few years to learn the secrets of the art of barbecue, stopping in famous barbecue joints in outof-the-way towns in Texas, Missouri, Illinois and others. In many of those places, Slicker said he volunteered to wash dishes or help out in the kitchen, hoping to pick up a few tricks. He’s also attended barbecue conventions and competitions, and eventually befriended some of the industry’s leaders, like Dave Raymond, the creator of the popular Sweet Baby Ray’s barbecue sauce, and Mike Mills, a multiple winner of Memphis in May, an annual barbecue contest in Memphis that is considered the Super Bowl of the competition barbecue circuit. Indeed, Slicker immersed himself in the barbecue culture, and his restaurant is a shrine to that unique American culinary tradition. The walls are covered in photographs of the people and places he saw on his travels, and other memorabilia fill the room, including a 1953 NWA Golden Jubilee tractor -— inherited from his fatherin-law -— which Slicker recently restored. “It’s simple,” said Slicker of his restaurant. “You want to appeal to people’s (sight, sounds and smells) and if you do that, they feel good.” He seems to have hit the mark. Slicker, who opened the restaurant in May 2009, said the restaurant nearly broke even in its first year of operation. This year, he said he’s up 60 percent. Despite his success, Slicker said he never imagined he would open a restaurant. When Slicker and his wife moved to Sisters five years ago, they opened a catering business, the Left Handed Chef. They catered parties and weddings and were content. Slicker said he feared that opening a restaurant would take over his life.

But fate intervened. For his catering business, Slicker decided to purchase an industrial-size smoker and installed it in a custom trailer. Then he decided that to really learn how to barbecue, he had to hit the road and learn from the masters. Along the way, Slicker said he learned not to smother barbecue meat in sauce, as that can mean the chef is hiding something. He learned that smoked chicken should fall off the bone but that rib meat shouldn’t. “We in the industry all cringe when we hear that (about rib meat),” Slicker said. “When you bite into a rib, there should still be fibers sticking to the bone.” He also met the owners of barbecue shacks who told him he shouldn’t be afraid to open a restaurant. “I was at the National Barbecue Association meeting in Austin (Texas), and I had an epiphany,” said Slicker. “I decided it was my destiny.” So Slicker said he hit the road again, trying to learn every secret he could. He signed a lease for the convenience store location in mid-April 2009 and opened by that Memorial Day. In all, Slicker estimates he’s traveled more than 50,000 miles in the past few

years, crossing the country learning how to barbecue. Slicker has made such an impression on the close-knit barbecue industry that he’s now a regional vice president for the NBBQ, overseeing association matters in 10 Western states. And earlier this year, Slicker gave the keynote address at the association’s annual convention in Memphis. In his address, Slicker said he told his fellow members “that when you have a passion for something, you can do anything.” Sisters might seem an odd location for a Southern-style barbecue shack, but Slicker said the community has been immensely supportive. “For us, that has been key,” said Slicker. “The community has been very helpful, and I think it’s a very good fit.” Slick’s Que Co., at 240 E. Cascades Ave. in downtown Sisters, is open from 11 a.m. to close (until the food runs out) Wednesdays through Sundays. The restaurant is closed in January and February. Take-out and catering are also available. You can reach the restaurant by calling 541-719-0580 or visiting the website, www. slicksque.com.

www.sistersathleticclub.com • 541-549-6878 Town of Tiny Lights 2010 | Sisters Magazine | 7


COWBOY CHRISTMAS “Find your holiday spirit in Sisters Country.”

Holiday Event Highlights It’s Cowboy Christmas time in Sisters Country! – Celebrate the season with family and friends – special events and activities run November through January. GINGERBREAD TRAIL: Wednesday, Nov. 24 - Monday, Jan.3, throughout downtown Sisters.

ARTIST RECEPTION: Saturday, Nov. 27, Sisters Art Works, by Tom Browning.

MAGICAL VOICES OF CHRISTMAS: Sunday, Dec. 5, 6 p.m. at Sisters High School. Free.

TRADITIONAL CHRISTMAS TREE LIGHTING: Friday, Nov. 26, 5:30 p.m., Barclay Park, downtown Sisters. Can Food drive for local food bank.

OPEN HOUSE: Monday, Nov. 29, Stitchin’ Post & Twigs.

BREAKFAST WITH SANTA: Saturday, Dec. 11, 9 a.m. at FivePine Conference Center, Sisters.

“HOME ON THE RANGE” GINGERBREAD DISPLAY: Dec. 1-31, The Lodge at Black Butte Ranch.

NIGHT SKIING: Friday & Saturday nights at Hoodoo.

CAMP SHERMAN CHRISTMAS BAZAAR: Friday-Saturday, Nov. 26-27, Camp Sherman Community Hall. ANNUAL CHRISTMAS PARADE: Saturday, Nov. 27, 2 p.m., Hood Avenue, downtown Sisters. ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION: Saturday, Nov. 27, Don Terra Artworks.

IT’S A WONDERFUL FRIDAY: Friday, Dec, 3, 10 and 17; select stores are open until 7 p.m. for your holiday shopping needs. HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE & CRAFT SHOW: Saturday, Dec. 4, 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.; arts & crafts, pet photos with Santa and more; Sisters Art Works.

BREAKFAST WITH SANTA: Saturday, Dec. 11 & 18, 8 a.m. at Black Butte Ranch. CARRIAGE RIDES: Dec. 18, 19 and Dec. 24-Jan. 1, 2011, at Black Butte Ranch. NEW YEAR’S EVE CELEBRATION: Friday, Dec. 31 at Hoodoo.

866-549-0252 • www.sisterscountry.com • 541-549-0251

The Bulletin  

The Bulletin for Wednesday, Nov. 17, 2010.

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