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October 1, 2012

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bendbulletin.com Broad-tailed hummingbird Selasphorus platycercus

WASHINGTON, D.C.

10 years later, sniper rampage still haunts those it touched

DESCHUTES COUNTY

Courtesy U.S. Fish and Wildlife

Courtesy High Desert Museum

An exhibit for the birds

By Michael E. Ruane The Washington Post

Dean Meyers’ old Timex wristwatch stopped at 8:23 and 54 seconds — the precise moment his body hit the pavement on that night in 2002. A conscientious man, he always set his watch a little fast. So that’s what time it said when police found him at the gas station near Manassas, Va., slumped beside his Mazda, his skull shattered by the snipers’ rifle bullet. Meyers’ brother Bob still keeps that watch, with its gold trim and old-fashioned, rectangular face, in a case inside his Pennsylvania home. It’s a symbol of a stopped life and of a fearful time. Ten years Malvo, after snipers top, in John Allen Mu2003, hammad and and MuLee Boyd Malvo hammad, terrorized the in 2004 region by shooting indiscriminately at people doing the mundane things of their daily lives, the memories of white vans, tarot cards and zigzagging though parking lots have somewhat faded. But for Bob Meyers and others directly affected by the sniper shootings, getting on with their lives has meant holding on to a piece of that past. Meyers has the Timex. Around the country, there are other mementos: a wooden box wrapped in black hair bands that contains a slain mother’s jewelry; a retired policeman’s thin logbook with a notation that still brings him to tears. Ten years ago, Dean Meyers, then a 53-year-old civil engineer living in Gaithersburg, Md., became one of the 15 people slain in a cross-country spree that climaxed in the Washington, D.C., region during three terrifying weeks in October. See Snipers / A5

Anna’s hummingbird Calypte anna

• But local and state officials say the numbers are skewed By Erik Hidle The Bulletin

(and the butterflies) • High Desert Museum lets visitors interact with live wildlife By Hillary Borrud The Bulletin

atience was all it took for Lily Grier to convince a monarch butterfly to alight onto her extended hand. “If it’s on a stick or a leaf, just move your hand toward it and it will crawl right onto it,” said Lily, 8, of Bend. The monarch was beautiful, but Lily and her friend Siena

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Baker, 13 and also from Bend, said their favorite among all the insects at the High Desert Museum Butterflies & Hummingbirds exhibit was a butterfly with bright blue wings. The exhibit is humid and warm, approximately 80 degrees, and filled with native and tropical plants. Manzanita branches hang from the ceiling of the exhibit, where hummingbirds zip to and

fro. Butterflies are drawn to large hanging lamps, as were flocks of children who watched as the colorful insects fluttered their wings on Sunday afternoon. Visitors can look through windows into the pupae emergence room, where butterflies emerge daily from chrysalises in a variety of shapes and colors. See Exhibit / A6

Hummingbirds of Central Oregon The rufous hummingbird featured in the High Desert Museum exhibit is one of several hummingbirds that live part of the year in Central Oregon. The birds migrate south during the winter and typically return in the spring. “Most of the species that migrate are moving right now,” said Simon Wray, High Desert Region conservation biologist with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. Hummingbird feeders can prompt the Anna’s hummingbird to stick

around during the winter, but Wray said this is bad for the bird because “if it’s really rough conditions, they’re not necessarily going to make it through the winter time.” People can attract hummingbirds during the spring and summer by planting nectar flowers, including penstemon, butterfly bush, fuschia, petunias, phlox, honeysuckle, sweet william and some types of salvia.

Black-chinned hummingbird Archilochus alexandri

Calliope hummingbird Selasphorus calliope

Rufous hummingbird Selasphorus rufus

Courtesy High Desert Museum

Census shows a decline in poverty

Courtesy U.S. Fish and Wildlife

A count of impoverished Deschutes County residents appears to have bucked the state and national trend by decreasing between 2010 and 2011, but officials dealing with the reality of poverty aren’t convinced by the numbers. A 2011 U.S. Census Bureau estimate found 13.3 percent of the county population is considered living below the poverty level. For one person, that means living on less than $11,484 per year. The number appears to have decreased from the 2010 count, when 15.4 percent were estimated to live below the poverty level, but the Oregon Employment Department says the numbers simply aren’t an accurate count. “The numbers have a bigger margin of error for smaller population areas (such as Deschutes County),” said Gail Krumenauer, an economist with the state employment department. “It’s not that bad of an estimate, but it’s important to remember it is an estimate.” The county poverty line count has a margin of error of plus or minus 3.2 percent in 2011. In 2010, it was plus or minus 2.8 percent. A count of the entire state of Oregon found the poverty number jumped from 15.8 percent in 2010 to 17.5 percent. Because of the larger population, the results have a higher level of confidence, with margin of error of plus or minus 0.5 percent. Krumenauer said it’s important to consider the numbers imperfect, as the census data shows exciting trends of an improving local economy. Unemployment numbers in the county dropped slightly, the number of uninsured individuals decreased and median household income is apparently on the rise. See Poverty / A5

“The numbers have a bigger margin of error for smaller population areas (such as Deschutes County). It’s not that bad of an estimate, but it’s important to remember it is an estimate.” — Gail Krumenauer, economist, Oregon Employment Department

Courtesy High Desert Museum

Germany becomes ‘a wonderland for raccoons’

Microsoft sees classrooms as tech-worker incubators

By Henry Chu Los Angeles Times

By Nick Wingfield New York Times News Service

SEATTLE — Leandre Nsabi, a senior at Rainier Beach High School here, received some bluntly practical advice from an instructor recently. “My teacher said there’s a lot of money to be made in computer science,” Leandre said. “It could be really helpful in the future.” That teacher, Steven Edouard, knows a few things about the subject. When he is not volunteering as a computer

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science instructor four days a week, Edouard works at Microsoft. He is one of 110 engineers from high-tech companies who are part of a Microsoft program aimed at getting high school students hooked on computer science, so they go on to pursue careers in the field. In doing so, Microsoft is taking an unusual approach to tackling a shortage of computer science graduates — one of the most serious issues facing the technology industry. See Tech / A6

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Henry Chu / Los Angeles Times

Marga Trautmann-Winter, of Nieste, Germany, occasionally catches one of the raccoons that pilfer fruit from her backyard orchard.

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NIESTE, Germany — The masked intruders who come regularly after dark don’t fill Marga Trautmann-Winter with dread so much as irritation — lots of it. She finds evidence of their larceny at daybreak in her backyard, where plums have been pilfered, cherries picked and apples appropriated from her small orchard. But if she’s lucky, she manages to turn the tables and ensnare one of the thieves, as has happened about 20 times in the last two years, including one recent morning. The bandit lay curled up in a metal cage, its drowsy expression turn-

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ing to wariness, then narrow-eyed aggression as Trautmann-Winter approached. “They look very smart, but I think they are very dangerous,” she said, as the captive hissed and bared its teeth. “And they are a problem for us.” A big one, it turns out. A species first imported from the U.S. in the 1930s, Germany’s raccoon population is exploding and encroaching on the human environment more than ever before. That has many residents here up in arms — literally, in the case of hunters strapping on their rifles and heading into the woods to help stem the tide of hungry ring-tailed pests. See Raccoons / A4

TOP NEWS BANNED: California prohibits ‘gay repair’ therapy for minors, A3


THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2012

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President Barack Obama and Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney campaign in the battleground state of Ohio last week. Obama and Romney each have a specific mission for the series of debates that starts Wednesday. Obama must convince Americans that he can do in a second term what he couldn’t in his first: restore the U.S. economy to full health. Romney needs to instill confidence that he is a credible and trusted alternative to the president, with a better plan for strengthening the fragile economy.

IN HISTORY

They’re a challenge, but debates can turn the tide for candidates By John Harwood

If you watch

New York Times News Service

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WASHINGTON — History shows that candidates have different ways to score in presidential debates: the forceful put-down, the surprising show of skill, the opponent’s fumble, superior post-debate tactics. But it also shows that to fundamentally alter the direction of a campaign, a candidate usually has to accomplish all those things. That underscores the challenge Mitt Romney faces approaching the first presidential debate of 2012 — the 27th of the television era — against President Barack Obama in Denver on Wednesday. In 2004, with Americans increasingly anxious about the Iraq War, Sen. John Kerry knocked President George W. Bush onto the defensive by pointing out: “Saddam Hussein didn’t attack us. Osama bin Laden attacked us.” Kerry dented Bush’s lead, but ultimately could not overcome it. In 1980, Ronald Reagan’s avuncular, “There you go again” performance reassured Americans that he was not the extremist that President Jimmy Carter had warned about. Reagan’s standing improved after that debate, though the race had already tilted his way and a Gallup study concluded the debate was “not likely to have been a determining factor” in his landslide victory. Four years before, President Gerald Ford blundered by asserting, “There is no Soviet domination of Eastern Europe.” Trailing Carter, the Democratic nominee, by double-digit mar-

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gins before their three debates, Ford made up ground after the debates but went on to lose the popular vote by two percentage points.

Changing the outcome Only twice have debates appeared to shift the election’s outcome. The first time was in 1960, when Americans first saw presidential candidates debate on television. Sen. John F. Kennedy, whose crisp, cool demeanor contrasted with Vice President Richard Nixon’s haggard appearance, moved from being even in the Gallup Poll to four percentage points ahead by the last debate Oct. 21. Gallup later concluded that the four encounters “could very well have accounted” for the Democrat’s narrow victory, though the closeness of the contest and dearth of other polling then makes a definitive conclusion difficult. The clearest shift from debates came in the 2000 election, pitting Gov. George W. Bush of Texas against Vice President Al Gore. It resulted from a rare combination of factors, with devastating cumulative effects on Gore’s campaign. Gore entered the first encounter, on Oct. 3, with a reputation as a strong debater and with a lead of 5 percentage points among likely voters in a New York Times/CBS News poll.

Mitt Romney When: 6 p.m. Wednesday Watch live: ABC, NBC, CBS, FOX, PBS, CNBC, CNN, CSPAN

“We weren’t all that far from where Romney is now,” Jan van Lohuizen, a pollster for Bush, recalled last week. But Gore’s skill at jousting became overshadowed by minor factual misstatements and what appeared as a condescending, impatient demeanor — especially after Bush’s aides called attention to them in postdebate interviews. “They beat us after the debate in the spin room,” a strategist for Gore, Tad Devine, said. “Their spin was, ‘He lied and he sighed,’ and that took hold.” It got worse when Bush’s running mate, Dick Cheney, bested Gore’s No. 2, Sen. Joseph Lieberman of Connecticut, in the vice-presidential debate. In the second presidential faceoff, Gore responded with what was widely judged to be an ineffectual performance. Then, in their final debate, on Oct. 17, Gore overcompensated again — seeking to discomfit Bush by approaching him onstage. With a nod of greeting and an easy grin, Bush made Gore appear foolish. Other errors by the Gore campaign during those two weeks, which included poor makeup for one debate that gave Gore an orange tint, helped Bush gain a strong edge in polls for “likability.” Daron Shaw, a political scientist at the University of Texas who studies the impact of different cam-

paign events, called the result a “wave effect” that lifted the Republican ticket.

Uneven terrain Even the most gifted political communicators have found debates an uneven terrain. Reagan cemented his telegenic reputation by closing his lone 1980 confrontation with Carter with a question for voters: “Are you better off than you were four years ago?” “We were headed for victory” anyway, said Ken Khachigian, who was Reagan’s speechwriter. But the strong performance “accelerated” Reagan’s momentum, he said, “maybe turning a very strong victory into a landslide.” Four years later, Reagan’s Democratic challenger, Walter Mondale, gained the upper hand in their first debate. Steady and incisive, Mondale saw his poll ratings surge while Reagan, then 73, came across as fumbling and outmatched. Reagan’s performance quickly triggered commentary — too much, in the Mondale campaign’s view — about whether he was too old to be president. “That hurt us a lot,” Mondale’s press secretary, Maxine Isaacs, said by creating conditions for a backlash in the president’s favor. Reagan made use of it in the second debate by declaring, “I am not going to exploit, for political purposes, my opponent’s youth and inexperience.” Mondale, then 56, laughed along with viewers — and concluded his chance of erasing Reagan’s formidable lead had vanished.

On immigration issues

No consistent bias in polls for last 10 presidential races

Where the presidential candidates stand:

By Nate Silver

Romn ney Romney The Dream Act (would

New York Times News Service

Obama Ob Obama

Opposes bipartisan create a path act; would GOP to citizenship veto it if for some Congress passes it; youths brought supports allowing illegal to U.S. illegally immigrants who serve as children) honorably in military to get citizenship

Supports the act; ordered a Dems two-year halt to the deportation of young illegal immigrants who came to U.S. as children and have no criminal record

Illegal immigrants living in U.S.

Supports “self deportation” and sanctions against employers who hire illegal workers; says undocumented residents should be deported

Wants to focus deportation on illegal immigrants with criminal records; supports a citizenship path for law-abiding undocumented immigrants

Arizona immigration enforcement law

Supports it; says each state has the duty, and right, to secure its borders, preserve rule of law when federal government has failed to meet its responsibilities

Opposes; says law, parts of which were struck down by Supreme Court, undermines the notion of fairness

Comprehensive immigration reform

Says the 2007 immigration reform act that failed was “amnesty plan”

Supported 2007 bill that would have created path to citizenship

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What: Presidential debate between Barack Obama and

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• Congress goes on break until Nov. 12. • The U.S. Supreme Court begins its 2012-13 term, with major decisions expected on affirmative action and other possible cases involving gay marriage and voting rights. • An appeal hearing is scheduled in a Russian court for three punk-rock musicians who were sentenced to two years in prison for performing a song critical of President Vladimir Putin.

Border fence Wants to build an “impermeable border fence”

Says the fence “is now basically complete” though GOP critics dispute this claim

Source: NPR, About.com, Politifact, CNN Judy Treible, Robert Dorrell / © 2012 McClatchy-Tribune News Service

With polls drawing increased attention in the closing weeks of the presidential race, perhaps it is no surprise that when supporters of one candidate do not like the numbers they are seeing, they tend to blame the messenger. In 2004, Democratic websites were convinced that the polls were biased for President George W. Bush, saying they showed an implausible gain in the number of voters identifying as Republicans. But in fact, the polls were very near the actual result. Bush defeated John Kerry by 2.5 percentage points, slightly better than the 1- or 2-point lead that he had on average in the final polls. Surveys of voters leaving polling places that year found an equal number of voters describing themselves as Democrats and Republicans, also close to what the polls had predicted. Since President Barack Obama gained ground in the polls after the Democratic National Convention, it has been the Republicans’ turn to make the same accusations of bias. Some have said the polls

are “oversampling” Democrats and producing results that are biased in Obama’s favor. The criticisms are largely unsound, especially when couched in terms like “oversampling,” which implies pollsters are deliberately rigging their samples. But pollsters, at least if they are following the industry’s standard guidelines, do not choose how many Democrats, Republicans or independent voters to put into their samples — any more than they choose the number of voters for Obama or Mitt Romney. Instead, this is determined by the responses of the voters that they reach after calling random numbers from telephone directories or registered voter lists. Data suggest that polling in presidential elections has no history of partisan bias, at least not on a consistent basis. There have been years, like 1980 and 1994, when the polls did underestimate the standing of Republicans. But there have been others, like 2000 and 2006, when they underestimated the standing of Democrats.

Highlights: In 1908, Henry Ford introduced his Model T automobile to the market. In 1910, the offices of the Los Angeles Times were destroyed by a bomb explosion and fire; 21 Times employees were killed. In 1932, Babe Ruth of the New York Yankees made his supposed called shot, hitting a home run against Chicago’s Charlie Root in the fifth inning of Game 3 of the World Series, won by the New York Yankees 7-5 at Wrigley Field. In 1940, the first section of the Pennsylvania Turnpike, 160 miles in length, was opened to the public. In 1949, Mao Zedong proclaimed the People’s Republic of China during a ceremony in Beijing. A 42-day strike by the United Steelworkers of America began over the issue of retirement benefits. In 1961, Roger Maris of the New York Yankees hit his 61st home run during a 162-game season, compared to Babe Ruth’s 60 home runs during a 154-game season. (Tracy Stallard of the Boston Red Sox gave up the round-tripper; the Yankees won 1-0.) In 1962, Johnny Carson debuted as host of NBC’s “Tonight Show,” beginning a nearly 30-year run; after being introduced to the audience by Groucho Marx, Carson received his first guests, actor-singer Rudy Vallee, actress Joan Crawford, singer Tony Bennett and comedian Mel Brooks. In 1972, the book “The Joy of Sex” by Alex Comfort was first published by Mitchell Beazley of London. In 1982, Sony began selling the first commercial compact disc player, the CDP-101, in Japan In 1987, eight people were killed when an earthquake measuring magnitude 5.9 struck the Los Angeles area. Ten years ago: Iraq agreed to a plan for the return of U.N. weapons inspectors for the first time in nearly four years, but ignored U.S. demands for access to Saddam Hussein’s palaces and other contested sites. Five years ago: Russian President Vladimir Putin, in a surprise announcement, opened the door to becoming the country’s prime minister. One year ago: More than 700 Occupy Wall Street protesters were arrested after they swarmed the Brooklyn Bridge and shut down a lane of traffic for several hours in a tense confrontation with police. Campaigning began in Tunisia for the first elections born of the revolts that swept the Middle East.

BIRTHDAYS Former President Jimmy Carter is 88. Actress-singer Julie Andrews is 77. Actress Stella Stevens is 74. Rock musician Jerry Martini (Sly and the Family Stone) is 69. Baseball Hall-of-Famer Rod Carew is 67. Jazz musician Dave Holland is 66. Actor Stephen Collins is 65. Actress Yvette Freeman is 62. Actor Randy Quaid is 62. Singer Youssou N’Dour is 53. Actor Esai Morales is 50. Retired MLB All-Star Mark McGwire is 49. Actor Christopher Titus is 48. Actress-model Cindy Margolis is 47. Actor Zach Galifianakis is 43. Singer Keith Duffy is 38. Actress Jurnee Smollett is 26. Actress Brie Larson is 23. — From wire reports


MONDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

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T S Obama, Romney prepare for 1st debate By Mark Landler New York Times News Service

LAS VEGAS — President Barack Obama arrived here Sunday to prepare for his first debate with Mitt Romney, leading in the polls nationally and in most of the critical states, but still fending off Republican criticism over the White House’s shifting accounts of the deadly September attack on the U.S. diplomatic post in Benghazi, Libya. Obama plans to go into virtual seclusion at a lakeside resort hotel outside Las Vegas today and Tuesday, when his staff and outside consultants will drill him for the encounter with Romney in Denver on Wednesday evening. Romney was also preparing for the debate but planning to do some campaigning in Denver today.

CALIFORNIA

‘Gay repair’ therapy for minors banned • LGBT organizations are praising the first-in-the-nation law By Wyatt Buchanan San Francisco Chronicle

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — California has become the first state in the country to ban controversial therapy practices that attempt to change the sexual orientation of minors after Gov. Jerry Brown signed a bill to outlaw them. The bill, SB1172 by Sen. Ted Lieu, D-Torrance, bars mental health practitioners from performing so-called reparative therapy, which professional

psychological organizations have said may cause harm. Gay rights groups have labeled them dangerous and abusive. “This bill bans non-scientific ‘therapies’ that have driven young people to depression and suicide. These practices have no basis in science or medicine and they will now be relegated to the dustbin of quackery,” Brown said in a statement to the San Francisco Chronicle.

National gay rights organizations had been lobbying the governor intensely to sign the therapy ban. The Human Rights Campaign, the nation’s largest lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender rights organization, sent Brown a petition with nearly 50,000 signatures urging him to approve the measure. “LGBT youth will now be protected from a practice that has not only been debunked as junk science, but has been

proven to have drastically negative effects on their well-being. We commend Gov. Brown for putting children first, and call on all states to take California’s lead on this issue,” said Chad Griffin, president of the Human Rights Campaign. Under the new law, which will take effect Jan. 1, no mental health provider will be able to provide therapy that seeks “to change behaviors or gender expressions, or to eliminate or reduce sexual or romantic attractions or feelings toward individuals of the same sex.”

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Grenade kills boy at church in Kenya

The Libya issue As Obama hunkered down, his aides continued to battle criticism from Republicans about the White House’s handling of the Benghazi attack, which the administration initially characterized as a spontaneous demonstration gone awry, and later described as an organized terrorist act by extremists with possible links to al-Qaida. Sen. Robert Corker, RTenn., labeled the administration’s changing accounts “bizarre.” In a letter to the director of national intelligence, James Clapper, Corker questioned whether the compound was adequately secured before the attack, in which the ambassador to Libya, J. Christopher Stevens, and three other Americans were killed. The administration welcomed scrutiny of the security of U.S. embassies, insisting that the safety of diplomats was a top priority for Obama, and was reviewing the security at diplomatic facilities around the world, Joshua Earnest, the White House deputy press secretary, said to reporters Sunday. “I recognize, particularly in this political season — and here we are nearing October in an election year — that there are going to be people who are going to be asking politically motivated questions,” Earnest said. “I can tell you that the president is not focused on the politics of the situation, he’s focused on the safety and security of our diplomats.” But, pivoting immediately to politics, the Obama campaign’s press secretary, Jen Psaki, asserted that Romney’s proposed budget would cut money for security at American embassies. “This raises into question what their priorities are too,” she said.

Romney turns up heat The Romney campaign kept up the pressure as well, accusing the administration of mixed messages. Romney’s running mate, Rep. Paul Ryan, said on “Fox News Sunday” that the administration’s response to the attack was “slow, it was confused, it was inconsistent.” Later in the interview, Ryan complained that the Romney campaign was fighting an uphill battle because the news media was tilted toward Obama. “I think it goes without saying that there’s definitely a media bias,” he said to the host, Chris Wallace. “I think most people in the mainstream media are left of center, and therefore they want a very left-of-center president than they want a conservative president like Mitt Romney,” Ryan said. He did, however, acknowledge that the Republican campaign has had its flaws, including what he described as Romney’s “inarticulate” comments about people who pay no taxes and receive government help.

Mental health professionals who violate the law, which applies to therapy for patients younger than 18, will be subject to discipline by whatever group licenses them. The therapy often starts from the premise that a person’s childhood and parental upbringing has somehow left that person deficient and thus has led him or her to samesex attractions. Practitioners often are religious, and gay rights groups have derisively characterized the therapy as an attempt to “pray away the gay.”

Fernando Llano / The Associated Press

Supporters of presidential candidate Henrique Capriles, Hugo Chavez’s rival, cheer Sunday during a campaign rally in Caracas, Venezuela. Presidential elections are scheduled for Oct. 7.

Opposition candidate’s backers turn out for huge rally in Caracas By Fabiola Sanchez The Associated Press

CARACAS, Venezuela — A huge crowd filled the streets of Venezuela’s capital Sunday, cheering for opposition candidate Henrique Capriles, waving flags in a show of support one week before the country’s hotly contested presidential election. Capriles waved from a truck that rolled through the vast expanse of supporters. The crowd overflowed from Bolivar Avenue, the widest downtown thoroughfare, which according to some estimates has a capacity to hold about 260,000 people. The authorities didn’t provide a crowd estimate.

“Bolivar Avenue is too small for us,” Capriles shouted to the crowd, which was the largest of any opposition gathering in recent years. While President Hugo Chavez led a rally with tens of thousands of supporters in western Zulia state Sunday, authorities were investigating the killings of two men in a shooting that erupted elsewhere during an opposition campaign caravan Saturday. Capriles condemned the killings in western Barinas state. “On Oct. 7 we’re going to defeat violence in Venezuela,” Capriles said. “Our country is tired of the violence, of the division, of the confrontation. ... The time of hatred is going to

be buried in Venezuela.” Chavez also lamented the violence, calling for his supporters not to “fall for provocations” at election time. “I ask all Venezuelans, it’s not with violence that we’re going to face each other. It’s vote against vote,” Chavez said. Justice Minister Tareck El Aissami said in Twitter message that a suspect was arrested in the killings, but he didn’t immediately identify him. Opposition lawmaker Julio Cesar Reyes said on Saturday that a group of Chavez’s supporters blocked the caravan and people on both sides were arguing when a gunman appeared and started shooting.

Land donation helps advance plans for memorial to victims New York Times News Service

WEST WARWICK, R.I. — There is a striking, if scrappy, shrine here, where dozens of homemade crosses rise behind a corroded parking lot, set back from a thin state highway ridged with strip malls and myriad power lines. This is where the Station nightclub used to stand — the site of a fire in 2003 that killed 100 people. For nearly 10 years, this stretch of grass has been a reliquary for these mementos. But the landowners retained ownership, preventing a formally constructed memorial from taking shape here, and leaving it up to families to mark and maintain this space on their own. “My family’s been pretty

much mowing and raking and keeping it up, trying to make it look good,” said Shawn Corbett, whose brother Edward died in the fire. That is about to change. On Friday, the Station Fire Memorial Foundation announced that the owner, Raymond Villanova, had donated the land to the group — which is run mostly by survivors of the blaze. “It means the world,” Corbett said quietly. “This is the last place where they had fun,” said Paula McLaughlin, whose younger brother, Michael Hoogasian, and his wife, Sandy, died on that February night. “People who have lost children need a place to go.” The Hoogasians and more than 400 others had come to

Son defends former Chinese official BEIJING — The youngest son of Bo Xilai, the former Communist Party leader who is expected to be tried on a wide range of criminal charges, has released a statement defending his father as “upright in his beliefs and devoted to duty.” It was the most explicit public defense that Bo Guagua, 24, who graduated this year from the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard, has made since a sordid political scandal broke in the spring involving the entire Bo family. Bo is believed to be living in the U.S. while his father and mother have been under detention in Beijing. — From wire reports

Find It All Online

2003 STATION NIGHTCLUB FIRE

By Jess Bidgood

Both men killed were participants in the motorcade of Capriles supporters. Violence has erupted previously during the campaign for the Oct. 7 vote, but these were the first deaths. Chavez rallied thousands of supporters during weekend street events in Guarenas, a town east of Caracas, and in western Zulia state. “It’s impossible for us to lose,” Chavez said at Saturday’s rally in Guarenas. The crowd chanted: “Ooh, Ahh, Chavez won’t go!” People grabbed at red Tshirts that were thrown into the crowd. Some stood on rooftops cheering, and women screamed as Chavez passed.

MOMBASA, Kenya — A 9-year-old boy was killed and several other children were wounded Sunday when a grenade was hurled into a church in Kenya’s capital, Nairobi, two days after Kenyan forces invaded the last major stronghold of the al-Shabab militant group in Somalia. No suspects have been apprehended, but suspicion immediately focused on sympathizers of al-Shabab who have attacked several churches and public gathering spots in Kenya in the last year. Kenyan officials have said that they do not believe that the relatively small attacks are the work of al-Shabab, whose fighters have killed hundreds of people in Somalia with huge suicide bombs. AlShabab’s supporters in Kenya do not have the skills or supplies to stage large-scale operations and turn to less complicated attacks like the one Sunday.

the 4,400-square-foot club to see the band Great White perform on the night of Feb. 20, 2003. Shortly after 11 o’clock, the band’s tour manager lit a pyrotechnic display, which ignited foam insulation near the back of the stage. The fire engulfed the building in just six minutes, sending a crush of people to the front entrance. Many of the 100 died from smoke inhalation, while more than 200 others were injured — trampled and burned. In the next few weeks, foundation members expect to meet with designers and begin raising money for the project. Their goal is $5 million, so they can establish a trust fund for the memorial’s maintenance.

bendbulletin.com

Award-winning neighborhood on Bend’s westside. www.northwestcrossing.com

Congratulations Dr. Tom Comerford Dr. Tom Comerford, Bend’s first Radiation Oncologist and founder of St Charles Cancer Center, is retiring after 30 years of dedicated service to our community! We would love to have you share your warm wishes and fond memories as he embarks on the next phase of his life. Please send your messages to: Linyee Chang, St. Charles Cancer Center 2500 NE Neff Road, Bend, OR 97701 lchang@stcharleshealthcare.org, fax: 541-706-6341


A4

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2012

5 dead after clash between U.S. and Afghan troops By Rod Nordland New York Times News Service

KABUL, Afghanistan — Only two days after joint operations between U.S. and Afghan forces were said to be returning to normal, five people — two Americans and three Afghans — were killed when a pitched battle broke out between soldiers of the two sides, U.S. and Afghan officials said Sunday. Afghan officials said that the clash Saturday was a misunderstanding and that the Americans apparently attacked an Afghan National Army unit in error. A top coalition officer said the Americans were attacked first in what might possibly have been an insurgent attack. Nonetheless, he expressed regret for what ensued. An initial statement from the NATO-led International Security Assistance Force, commonly referred to as ISAF, on Sunday described the episode as “a suspected insider attack,” which killed a foreign soldier

and a civilian contractor. If so, that would bring to 53 the number of coalition forces killed in the so-called insider attacks this year. The episode was another in a series of setbacks this year, and particularly in the last month, in relations between the U.S. and Afghan militaries. It comes at a delicate moment, when all of the U.S. surge reinforcements have only recently left the country, and NATO has been trying to transfer ever greater responsibility to a growing Afghan military. Shahidullah Shahid, the spokesman for the governor in Wardak province where the fighting occurred, said the deaths came “after a clash ensued between two sides following a misunderstanding.” An Afghan official, speaking anonymously because he was not authorized to release details, said that a mortar shell had landed amid the U.S. unit, killing a soldier and a civil-

ian contractor and wounding several others. The Americans thought it came from a nearby Afghan National Army checkpoint on a hill overhead and attacked it with small arms and rockets, killing three and wounding three of the seven soldiers there, the official said. The Wardak provincial police chief, Abdul Qayoum Baqizoi, said the fight broke out when an Afghan soldier among seven soldiers at the checkpoint opened fire on the Americans; in the ensuing gun battle, three Afghan soldiers were killed, including the one who fired first. “We still don’t have a clear picture of what happened,” Baqizoi said. He quoted the lone Afghan soldier who was unhurt as saying, “‘I heard some noise and verbal argument and suddenly heard the shooting and then one of the coalition soldiers threw a hand grenade, so I fled from the check post and hid myself behind our Humvee.’”

Ayman Oghanna / New York Times News Service

Visitors are reflected across from a sarcophagus believed to contain the remains of Alexander the Great, on display in Istanbul’s Archaeology Museum. An aggressive campaign by Turkey to reclaim antiquities it says were looted has led in recent months to the return of an ancient sphinx and many golden treasures from the region’s rich past.

Museums react with alarm as Turkey demands its art By Dan Bilefsky New York Times News Service

Raccoons Continued from A1 But they’re fighting a losing battle. Their furry, fertile and firmly established enemy fills an unoccupied niche in the local ecology, unmolested by natural predators, and has successfully colonized this country in less than a century since arriving from its faraway native habitat. “It’s a present of the American people,” Derk Ehlert, chief wildlife officer for the city of Berlin, said dryly. In the German capital, raccoons once confined to the forested margins now make regular appearances in the city proper, including one that popped up in busy Alexanderplatz, a square full of tourists and shoppers. Overturned trash cans on leafy residential streets attest to nocturnal forages. Last month, to the bewilderment of other passengers, two raccoons boarded a subway train, said Ehlert, who did not know the pair’s final destination. Excited, anxious or nonplused Berliners constantly ring up his office to report sightings. “We’re getting 50 calls a day. I know of at least 500 raccoon families in the city,” Ehlert said. “They are the most intelligent mammals in Europe. They’re very quick.” They’re also highly mobile, at least the males, which can travel long distances (without benefit of public transport) in search of mates as well as food to sate their ravenous appetites. Scientists were surprised to discover that one raccoon had migrated more than 100 miles, far more ground than they had thought the animals could cover. That has heightened fear of an expansion across manmade borders. The vast majority of Europe’s raccoons live in Germany, said zoologist Ulf Hohmann, but many neighboring nations have already recorded their presence. Leave it to Britain’s jingoistic Sun tabloid, never one to mince words or miss a chance to stick it to the Germans, to warn hysterically of “Nazi raccoons on (the) warpath,” marching across the Continent toward the English Channel “just like the Nazis did.” An illustration of a masked raccoon, foreleg raised with a swastika-stamped red armband, punctuated the point. The Nazi reference springs in part from an account of the raccoon’s origins in Germany that zoologists and wildlife biologists like Ehlert say is a myth. The story has it that one of Hitler’s closest advisers, military leader Hermann Goering, personally ordered the release of imported raccoons into Germany’s forests, either to foster biodiversity — in utter contrast to the Nazis’ evil ideology of human racial purity — or to increase the number of game animals for Germany’s avid hunters. Ehlert said a forestry official did release two pairs of raccoons from the United States into the wild in 1934 to promote diversity of fauna, though Goering had noth-

A pair of raccoons at an animal shelter in Berlin, Germany. In less than a century, the animals — imported from the United States in the 1930s — have colonized the country.

Henry Chu Los Angeles Times

“I think our grandchildren will regard them as a part of the natural habitat. It’s our generation that still remembers they came to Europe artificially. Just accept it. We don’t have a chance.” — Zoologist Ulf Hohmann

ing to do with it. Then, during World War II, a bomb destroyed a farm near Berlin where raccoons were being raised for their pelts, allowing about 20 of the critters to escape. These two dozen ancestors essentially gave rise to today’s raccoon population in Germany, which is impossible to tally exactly but which Hohmann estimates is edging toward the 1 million mark. In one indicator of their proliferation, nearly 68,000 raccoons were shot during the hunting season that ended in early 2011, the last period for which figures are available. Ten years earlier, the number was about 9,000. “It’s really incredible what the species is doing at the moment,” Hohmann said. Germany’s temperate climate and extensive forest cover “fits perfectly what the raccoon needs. It’s mild. They love water. We have a lot of rain. It’s a wonderland for raccoons.” Humans are a godsend as well. As litterers, food wasters and suckers for cute-looking animals, humans unwittingly or deliberately help satisfy raccoons’ ravenous appetites. (The German word for raccoon, waschbaer, or “wash bear,” derives from the creature’s habit of washing its food with its highly sensitive paws). The most heavily besieged urban area is the central German city of Kassel, where raccoons have become the stuff of daily headlines. Here in Nieste, a small town nine miles east of Kassel, the animals are a scourge for residents such as TrautmannWinter, whose backyard, where her grandchildren like to play, is covered with raccoon droppings after the animals feast on her fruit trees at night. She often looks out her kitchen window in the eve-

nings to see a family of raccoons scampering across her neighbor’s rooftop. Curious and adaptable, the four-legged interlopers have pried up roof tiles and chewed through insulation to nest in the warm eaves of houses. They raid horses’ feed troughs for snacks. Edgar Paul, an enthusiastic hunter, says he shot and killed a raccoon about once every two weeks, on average, in the surrounding woods last year. Hunting is not allowed in areas of human habitation. Trying to figure out what to do about the raccoon invasion is now one of his biggest headaches as Nieste’s mayor. “The problem isn’t the forest. If they lived in the forest, they’d be easy to get rid of,” Paul said. “They live in the town now, in roofs, and there you can’t get rid of them.” Fed-up Germans have suggested mass hunts to try to solve the problem, but evolution has doomed such efforts to almost certain failure, because raccoons can adjust their breeding patterns to help compensate for lost numbers when their population is under stress. In any case, animal rights activists deplore the idea of widespread killing or trapping, noting that raccoons pose no physical threat to humans, who would do better just to secure their garbage cans and plug gaps in their walls to discourage forays into town. “I’ve never heard of a raccoon attacking someone. No raccoon has ever stolen a baby,” said Beate Kaminski, a spokeswoman for the Tierschutzverein (Animal Protection Society) in Berlin, which operates Europe’s largest animal shelter. “They can be annoying — I can understand that — but again, it’s no reason to go out and shoot anything that moves in your garden,” Kaminski said. Probably the only thing capable of wiping out large numbers of raccoons is illness, but that’s up to nature. Humans, said Hohmann, should best resign themselves to an uneasy coexistence. “I think our grandchildren will regard them as a part of the natural habitat. It’s our generation that still remembers they came to Europe artificially,” he said. “Just accept it. We don’t have a chance.”

ISTANBUL — An aggressive campaign by Turkey to reclaim antiquities it says were looted has led in recent months to the return of an ancient sphinx and many golden treasures from the region’s past. But it has also drawn condemnation from some of the world’s largest museums, which call the campaign cultural blackmail. In their latest salvo, Turkish officials this summer filed a criminal complaint in the Turkish court system seeking an investigation into what they say was the illegal excavation of 18 objects that are now in the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Norbert Schimmel collection. Turkey’s efforts have spurred an international debate about who owns antiquities after centuries of shifting borders. Museums like the Met, the Getty, the Louvre and the Pergamon in Berlin say their mission to display

global art treasures is under siege from Turkey’s tactics. Museum directors say the repatriation drive seeks to alter accepted practices, like a widely embraced UNESCO convention that lets museums acquire objects that were outside their countries of origin before 1970. Although Turkey ratified the convention in 1981, it is now citing a 1906 Ottoman-era law — one that banned the export of artifacts — to claim any object removed after that date as its own. “The Turks are engaging in polemics and nasty politics,” said Hermann Parzinger, president of the Prussian Cultural Heritage Foundation, which oversees the Pergamon. Turkey’s campaign has enjoyed notable success, however. Last year the Pergamon agreed to return a 3,000-year-old sphinx from the Hittite Empire that Turkey said had been taken to Germany for restoration in 1917. German officials said

Turkey had threatened to block major archaeological projects if the sphinx did not come home. The director of the Met, Thomas P. Campbell, said in an interview that the museum believed the objects sought by Turkey had been legally acquired by Norbert Schimmel in the European antiquities market in the 1960s before being donated to the museum in 1989, and thus were in compliance with the UNESCO accord. Campbell said the argument that objects should always be returned to their countries of origin was dubious, given that artifacts travel throughout the centuries. “We are in the business of celebrating Turkish culture,” he said, “and it is the great displays in London, Paris and New York, more than anything else, that will encourage people to go to Turkey and explore their cultural heritage, and not just the sun and beach.”

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MONDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

Malvo describes his younger self as ‘a monster’

Snipers Continued from A1 Seven others were wounded. In the Washington metro area, 10 people were killed and three wounded between Oct. 2 and the day the snipers were arrested, Oct. 24. The victims were selected at random by an itinerant former soldier, stickup man and con artist, John Allen Muhammad, 41, and his sidekick, a Jamaican teenager named Lee Boyd Malvo, who roved the area in a broken-down car, armed with a stolen rifle. They chose unsuspecting targets, caught at vulnerable moments — a man mowing a lawn, a cabdriver buying gasoline, a nanny vacuuming a car. And they spread terror across the region, from Baltimore to Richmond, Va., as they picked off innocents, left ghastly murder scenes and made potential targets of millions of local residents. People were afraid to buy gas or go to the grocery store. The killing seemed unstoppable. Local and state police, as well as federal law enforcement agencies, appeared helpless. At one point, then-Montgomery County Police Chief Charles Moose wept with anger and frustration during a news conference after the snipers shot and wounded a 13-yearold on his way to school. A hero in the end, Moose feared the snipers might never be caught and he would have failed the community. Finally, a description of the killers’ car and its license number were leaked to the public. And early on the morning of Oct. 24, acting on a tip, a SWAT team seized the suspects as they slept in their car at a highway rest stop near Frederick, Md. The sniper rifle was found stashed behind the back seat. A year later, Muhammad and Malvo were tried and convicted in the case. Muhammad, charged with Meyers’ murder, was executed by lethal injection in 2009. Malvo, now 27, is in a maximum-security prison in Virginia, where he is serving a life term for murder. In the decade since, people touched by the tragedy have pondered its meaning, and some have saved mementos to remind them. Bob Meyers saved Dean’s watch, along with his old green canoe, and the folded American flag that was on his coffin. Nelson Rivera, whose wife, Lori, 25, was shot in the back while vacuuming a car at a gas station in Kensington, Md., saved her wooden jewelry box. It contains her wedding ring, necklaces, her driver’s license, a contact lens case and a snapshot of the couple with their daughter, Jocelin. And retired Montgomery County police captain Bernard “Barney” Forsythe, one of the lead investigators in the case, still has the simple logbook where he jotted notes during the last weeks of the case. He cries when he reviews the entry he made after the killers were arrested. It was the same sense of emotional relief he felt years earlier when his eldest child was born healthy after serious medical complications. He says he kept the log because the case is “a part of me, a part of history.”

A brother’s memory In the living area of his home in the Pennsylvania countryside northwest of Philadelphia, Bob Meyers shows the keepsakes of Dean he has retrieved from the display case beside the piano in the next room. This is the country where Dean grew up, where he went off to the Vietnam War, where he came back with a mangled

Poverty Continued from A1 But blasting holes in the census data is a state count of unemployed in Deschutes County. While the census estimates the unemployment rate in the county dropped from 9.8 percent in 2010 to 9.5 percent in 2011, the state believes those numbers were closer to 14.1 percent in 2010 and 12.4 percent in 2011. And while there is no margin of error on the count of median household income, the census estimate of $44,680 in 2010 isn’t adjusted for inflation. Krumenauer said if you adjust for inflation, the median comes out to $47,571. That means the 2010 median income is actually higher than the 2011 median household income estimate of $46,984.

A5

By Josh White The Washington Post

Carl Costas / For The Washington Post

Nelson Rivera and his daughter Jocelin, 13, reflect on the death of his wife and her mother, Lori Lewis Rivera, one of 15 people killed in a shooting spree carried out 10 years ago by John Allen Muhammad and Lee Boyd Malvo. Now remarried, Rivera still has his first wife’s jewelry box and its contents, including bracelets, a barrette, necklace, bobby pin, earrings and her wedding ring.

arm, and where he left years ago for a good job outside Washington. He never married, lived in a simple townhouse and went home to visit his family regularly. He would have been 63 now. In the past 10 years, both of his parents have died. A nephew committed suicide. Dean is buried beneath a black and gold metal marker in a nearby churchyard, beside the graves of his parents, “Hap” and Rose. There’s no mention of the sniper on his marker. With his name and dates, it reads: “Sgt US Army Vietnam … Purple Heart” As for the wristwatch, Bob Meyers doesn’t know where Dean got it. But he said it is emblematic of his brother. “When he hit the ground it stopped,” Bob Meyers said. “But it was a few minutes fast. Because that’s the way he always was. He was always on time.” “He wasn’t much for show,” Bob Meyers said. “He wouldn’t have a Rolex. He would have a Timex. That was my brother. If he could afford a Rolex, he’d still have a Timex.” In the distribution among the family of Dean’s possessions after his death, Bob Meyers said he requested the watch. “I asked for the watch because it was on him when he was shot,” he said. “And I don’t have anything else that was that close to him. … It’s the only thing I have that was with him at that moment.”

3, with his second wife, moved to California about seven years ago. A native of Honduras, he works in ground maintenance for a local school district. But he said he remains haunted by his wife’s death. “I still can’t believe that happened to her,” he said. “She was just so young. So young.” He said he thinks about it every day, in part because Jocelin resembles her mother so much. In “everything,” he said, the way “she moves her hands.” If time heals wounds, Rivera said, he must be different. “When I talk about this, it’s like it happened yesterday,” he said. “I’m conscious that it’s been already 10 years, but I still remember her.” He said he especially recalls leaving for work early on the day she was killed. It was 5:30 a.m. She was still asleep. And he paused to gaze at her, something he said he had never done before. He said it was like he sensed something was going to happen. He never saw her alive again. Now, he said, October always comes as a sad reminder. “To tell you the truth, I don’t think I’m ever going to forget this for the rest of my life.”

Logging the hours

Almost 3,000 miles away, in a tan house with brown shutters in Antelope, Calif., Nelson Rivera, 41, keeps a small wooden box wrapped in two black hair bands in a safe in his bedroom. The box has a glass window in the lid, faded pink lining inside, and slots for rings. Inside are bracelets, a barrette, a necklace, a bobby pin, earrings and a wedding ring — reminders of the gentle woman who had been his wife. He has even kept some strands of her blond hair. Lori Lewis Rivera was a native of Mountain Home, Idaho, where she is buried beneath a tombstone etched with a scene of a fairy-tale castle. She had left home to become a nanny and had come to the Washington area to work. She was among the five people the snipers killed Oct. 3. “I tried to keep everything,” Nelson Rivera said. “Because everything, even if it’s a little thing, is of value to me. … Eventually, when Jocelin turns 18 we’re going to give it to her.” Rivera, now remarried and with two children, ages 6 and

“Barney” Forsythe sets his old blue logbook on the checkerboard tablecloth in the kitchen of his house in suburban Maryland. The log is just a simple spiral notebook he got at a law enforcement conference years ago. But on its lined pages, Forsythe began making entries that covered the last 10 days of the case. Forsythe, 65 and retired, was then a captain and the director of the Montgomery County major-crimes division. As such, under Moose, he ran the investigation for the county, which suffered the highest number of sniper murders. Forsythe, nearing the end of his career, was a methodical, old-fashioned, trench-coat cop. After scrambling to get his footing in the case, he settled down in a special command center with scores of other state and federal officers and began jotting personal notes in his log. The entries begin Oct. 14 — 12 days into the case, 10 days before it ended. The notes are spare, often about what turned out to be the background noise of the investigation: non-credible witnesses, dogs, hypnosis, profilers, negotiators. But he records the wounding of victim Jeffrey Hopper in Ashland, Va., on Oct. 19, the attempt to establish communi-

Krumenauer said when you look at the data holistically, it’s likely things simply stayed the same between 2010 and 2011. Still, that’s a better trend than what the country and state are seeing. Both the state and the nation’s poverty levels rose between 2010 and 2011. “I think that, even though it’s not significant, the numbers are moving in the different direction from Oregon, for example,” Krumenauer said. “I think the thing that makes it difficult to tell the story right now is that it’s just not an extraordinary story. There really isn’t, in terms of job growth, there isn’t that dramatic story compared to a few years back when things were falling.” Jason Carr, executive director of Partnership to End Poverty, said he agrees the economy has stayed the same

over the past few years. “I would say that despite the numbers, the effects of the recession are so significant that there is still a large need out there and there are still a large number of families living in poverty,” Carr said. A qualitative example is the demand Carr saw at this year’s Project Connect tent erected at the county fair. The tent helped connect low-income individuals with county services. “If you just walked in and looked you saw a huge line for the free dental (services),” Carr said. “What we see on the nonprofit side is the need to help low-income families and folks isn’t going away right now … and we are hearing (from our partners) that demand is high and the need is still there.”

‘I still remember her’

cations with the killers, and the shooting of bus driver Conrad Johnson in Aspen Hill. “Tues — 10/22/02-0600,” that entry begins. “New shooting … Ride-on bus driver … Dies Approx 09:26.” Then, on Oct. 23, there is the simple note, “Malvo et al,” indicating that investigators were at last on the right trail. Early the next morning, Oct. 24, the log states, Forsythe is notified by one of his men, Sgt. Roger Thomson, that the killers’ car has been located. Forsythe and a top aide, Lt. Philip Raum, head to the scene. At “03:30,” the log records, “arrest made.” The killers were taken back to Montgomery County for processing, and a few hours later Forsythe was notified that the rifle had been found. That was the news he had been waiting for. He made the announcement in the command center. “Much applause,” his logbook states. Now he was done in. The 10:00 entry reads, “I need a break.” Forsythe had been going hard for three weeks, trying to stay cool in a relentless pressure cooker. At 13:00, he notes, he went to the school where his wife, Marcia, taught, and told her the news. The notation continues, “The feeling of relief is very similar to the feelings following birth of Jason 1st son — Joy, Relief, Tears, Exhaustion.” In October 1976, Forsythe explained tearfully, his wife’s labor had become complicated, and the baby was in serious trouble. After anguished waiting, he was told that the child had been born safely and his wife was fine. The emotional release was overwhelming. “That’s what it was like” with the capture of the snipers, Forsythe said, his voice trembling. “That’s what it was like.” The log of those awful days now resides atop a desk in Forsythe’s living room, plain and unadorned. The handwriting looks slightly faded, but the words bring back the sentiments. On Oct. 26, 2002, two days after the arrests, he was finally able to relax. He was home. The house was quiet, and he was alone with his dog, Lily. He noted in the log that he couldn’t concentrate and was too distracted to read: “Continue to savor silence.”

WASHINGTON — Lee Boyd Malvo said he remembers each of the sniper shootings in detail. But one moment — one image — stands out among the carnage of that terrifying time 10 years ago: “Mr. Franklin’s eyes.” Malvo remembers being in the blue Chevrolet Caprice, in which police found binoculars and walkie-talkies. He scanned the area to make sure John Allen Muhammad had a clean shot. He gave the “go” order and looked across Route 50 at the target. Muhammad, hidden on a hill above, pulled the trigger. A bullet screamed across the highway, instantly killing Linda Franklin, who just happened to be going about her business at the Home Depot at precisely the wrong time. But mostly he remembers Ted Franklin’s eyes — the devastation, the shock, the sadness. “They are penetrating,” Malvo said in a rare media interview from prison. “It is the worst sort of pain I have ever seen in my life. His eyes. … Words do not possess the depth in which to fully convey that emotion and what I felt when I saw it. “… You feel like the worst piece of scum on the planet.” Malvo’s attitude provides a sharp contrast to his posture 10 years ago. Shortly after his arrest, a boastful Malvo told investigators he fired the bullet that killed Franklin. He laughed and pointed to his head to show where the bullet struck. It has been 10 years since Malvo and Muhammad went on one of the most notorious killing sprees in the nation’s history. For 23 days in October 2002, the pair ambushed 13 unsuspecting strangers, killing 10 of them, in the Washington, D.C., area. Muhammad is gone — executed in 2009 for his crimes. Malvo, the scrawny teenager, the cold-blooded accomplice, is now 27. His killer stare seems to have softened. He speaks with an adult perspective on what he did. He claims to understand the enormity of his actions and believes that but for Muhammad, he might have accomplished something in life. “I was a monster,” Malvo said. “If you look up the definition, that’s what a monster is. I was a ghoul. I was a thief. I stole people’s lives. I did someone else’s bidding just because they said so. … There is no rhyme or reason

or sense.” Retired FBI agent Brad Garrett, who helped question Malvo in 2002, said he’s not surprised by what Malvo is saying in 2012. “When we interviewed him, our belief was that he was under the spell of Muhammad and that would wear off as time went on,” Garrett said last week. In three hours of interviews in September, Malvo reflected on the sniper shootings and what led to the deadly spree of crimes. He said he is different now, extricated from Muhammad’s grip, and wiser. He said he has deep regret for everything he did. Malvo spoke through plexiglass Sept. 19 in the stark cinder-block visitation room at Red Onion State Prison, a remote supermax facility about eight hours from Washington. Malvo then spoke the next day by telephone in four separate, recorded calls. He said there is no explanation for why he and Muhammad killed so many people, only that he learned of Muhammad’s plans piecemeal. He knows Muhammad snapped when he lost custody of his children and wanted to get back at his ex-wife so he could get the children back. Malvo also said that in October 2002, he would have done anything Muhammad asked of him. Though at peace with a life behind bars — “I see opportunity everywhere” — Malvo said he has had to work hard to recover from what he calls a total brainwashing at the hands of a “sinister” and “evil” man who manipulated him into an effective “killing machine.” Malvo grew up in Jamaica and Antigua, and he looks back at the 14-year-old who met Muhammad as if he’s a million miles away. That boy was a vagabond, bouncing from his father to his mother and enduring physical abuse. He was fighting an illness, Malvo said, and Muhammad nursed him back to health. “The groundwork was laid in Antigua because I leaned on him, I trusted him,” Malvo said. Muhammad was a savior in Malvo’s eyes, someone who could make his dreams come true. An ideal. And Malvo sees that boy now as the perfect rube. “He picked me because he knew he could mold me,” Malvo said at Red Onion. “He knew I could be what he needed me to be. … He could not have chosen a better child.”

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Bend Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) Public Transit Plan Public Events • Wed. 10/3, 5:00 PM - 7:00 PM Downtown Public Library 601 NW Wall Street, Brooks Room • Thurs. 10/4, 1:00 PM - 3:30 PM Hawthorne Station SE Hawthorne Ave between 3rd & 4th Streets

Did you know? 31% of Bend residents live within a quarter-mile walk* of a bus stop; 60% live within a half-mile walk* of a bus stop. *actual street network distance

Website: www.bendoregon.gov/transitplan What to expect: • Review the Bend MPO Draft Public Transit Plan • Learn about plans for future transit in Bend • Staff will be available for discussion Accommodation Information for People with Disabilities To obtain this information in an alternate format such as Braille, large print, electronic formats and audio cassette tape please contact Tyler Deke at, tdeke@ci.bend.or.us, and/or 541-693-2113.


A6

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2012

Photos by Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Young visitors to the High Desert Museum — including Chase Schroeder, 10, of Walla Walla Wa., below — enjoy having butterflies land on them as they check out the Butterflies & Hummingbirds exhibit Sunday afternoon.

Exhibit Continued from A1 “You’re surrounded by life,” said Dana Whitelaw, vice president of programs for the High Desert Museum. “Throughout the winter, it can be a really wonderful experience to walk into this space.” More than 100 species of butterflies will be featured over the life of the exhibit, which continues through April 7, according to a museum brochure. New butterfly species will emerge from their chrysalises each week. The exhibit includes one species of bird, the rufous hummingbird. The museum had great success with a similar butterfly exhibit in 2010, Whitelaw said. “From my perspective, it’s a remarkably engaging way to get people up close to a species and learn about what they do in nature, what their role is, what we can do to help them,” Whitelaw said.

While butterflies and hummingbirds are not closely related, there are some similarities: both gather nectar while in flight and in addition to consuming the sweet liquid, they pollinate the plants. Visitors to the exhibit can observe the unique flight of hummingbirds. Their very mobile shoulder joints allow the birds to move their wings in a figureeight pattern, rather than the up-and-down motion of most birds’ wings, according to a museum brochure. “It’s almost like treading water,” Whitelaw said. “It’s a blur for us because we can’t track it as humans, but that’s their special adaptation to remaining in

place and feeding off nectar.” The rufous hummingbirds people see in the exhibit were captured in Central Oregon. Museum staff obtained a permit from the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and worked with the agency to decide which species to take and where to net them, Whitelaw said. “The rufous hummingbirds are known to be the most successful in captivity,” Whitelaw said. Museum staff will watch carefully in the spring for hummingbirds migrating back to Central Oregon. When those birds appear in the area, Whitelaw will know the climate is warm enough to release the rufous hummingbirds. At 9:30 a.m. on Wednesday and Thursday this week, parents and children ages 3 and 4 can learn how colors help butterflies survive at the museum’s “backpack explorers” program. — Reporter: 541-617-7829, hborrud@bendbulletin.com

Tech Continued from A1 It’s also a broader challenge for the nation’s economy. There are likely to be 150,000 computing jobs opening up each year through 2020, according to an analysis of federal forecasts by the Association for Computing Machinery, a professional society for computing researchers. But despite the hoopla around startup celebrities like Mark Zuckerberg of Facebook, fewer than 14,000 U.S. students received undergraduate degrees in computer science last year, the Computing Research Association estimates. And the wider job market remains weak. “People can’t get jobs, and we have jobs that can’t be filled,” Brad Smith, Microsoft’s general counsel who oversees its philanthropic efforts, said in a recent interview. Big technology companies have complained for years about a dearth of technical talent, a problem they have tried to solve by lobbying for looser immigration rules to accommodate more foreign engineers and sponsoring tech competitions to encourage student interest in the industry. Google, for one, holds a programming summer camp for incoming ninth-graders and underwrites an effort called CS4HS, in which high school teachers sharpen their computer science skills in workshops at local universities. But Microsoft is sending its employees to the front lines, encouraging them to commit to teaching a high school computer science class for a full school year. Its engineers, who earn a small stipend for their classroom time, are in at least two hourlong classes a week and sometimes as many as five. Schools arrange the classes for first thing in the day to avoid interfering with the schedules of the engineers, who often do not arrive at Microsoft until the late morning. The program started as a grass-roots effort by Kevin Wang, a Microsoft engineer with a master’s degree in education from Harvard. In 2009, he began volunteering as a computer science teacher at a Seattle public high school on his way to work. After executives at Microsoft caught wind of what he was doing, they put financial support behind the effort — which is known as Technology Education and Literacy in Schools, or TEALS — and let Wang run it full time.

Michael Braun, a computer science teacher at Rainier Beach High School in Seattle, works with a student on making software for mobile phones. Stuart Isett / New York Times News Service

The program is now in 22 schools in the Seattle area and has expanded to more than a dozen other schools in Washington, Utah, North Dakota, California and other states this academic year. Microsoft wants other big technology companies to back the effort so it can broaden the number of outside engineers involved. This year, only 19 of the 110 teachers in the program are not Microsoft employees. In some cases, the program has thrown together volunteers from companies that spend a lot of their time beating each other up in the marketplace. “I think education and bringing more people into the field is something all technology companies agree on,” said Alyssa Caulley, a Google software engineer, who, along with a Microsoft volunteer, is teaching a computer science class at Woodside High School in Woodside, Calif. While computer science can be an intimidating subject, Microsoft has sought to connect it to the technologies most students use in their everyday lives. At Rainier Beach High School recently, Peli de Halleux, a Microsoft software engineer, taught a class on making software for mobile phones. The students buried their faces in the phones, supplied by Microsoft. They were asked to create programs that performed simple functions, like playing a random song when the phones were shaken. Leandre, who took de Halleux’s mobile programming class last year and is in Edouard’s Advanced Placement computer science class this year, proudly showed off a simple game he had created, Sun Collector, in which players tilt the phone to dodge black balls and hit big yellow ones. “I never really understood what was behind these games,” he said. “Once you start getting it, it’s pretty easy to understand.”

Finding capable computer science teachers is also hard. Few other industries are as good as the technology business in its ability to divert would-be educators into far more lucrative corporate jobs. Edouard graduated from the University of Florida in 2011 and considered enlisting in Teach for America, but he also had multiple offers from technology employers. “In today’s day and age, with so many college loans, it’s tough to go into teaching,” he said. One of the biggest concerns about Microsoft’s effort is that most of its volunteers have little teaching experience. To comply with district licensing requirements and to help engineers with classroom challenges like managing unruly teenagers, a professional teacher is also in the room during lessons. One of the program’s tenets is that Microsoft engineers need to teach the teachers, alongside students, so that those instructors can eventually run an engaging computer science class on their own. “We are taking the kids further than I could do,” said Michael Braun, a teacher at Rainier Beach High who is working with Microsoft volunteers. There are still hiccups, including tensions between some of the professional teachers and the Microsoft engineers assigned to work with them, according to several people involved in the program, who did not want to be named for fear of seeming critical of Microsoft. Wang, the program’s founder, said a professional from the tech industry who stands at the head of a class for a full year can be a powerful role model. “Kids can see themselves in their shoes,” Wang said. After all, he added, “their chances of going to college and majoring in computer science are exponentially better than getting into the NFL.”

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LOCALNEWS

News of Record, B2 Editorials, B4

B

Obituaries, B5 Weather, B6

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2012

Cold front could bring strong wind

Bulletin staff reports The federal sentencing has been delayed until January for the president of the now-defunct Bend company accused of conducting a multimilliondollar loan fraud. Tyler Fitzsimons, the former president of Desert Sun Development Inc., pleaded guilty in February to two counts each of conspiracy to commit bank fraud and bank fraud, and one

count of money laundering. In November 2009, 13 people involved with Desert Sun were charged with more than three dozen crimes, including taking about $19 million from banks for uncompleted commercial construction and maintaining an employee real estate investment program that falsely inflated employees’ assets and income. According to court documents,

A dry cold front moving south across Washington and Oregon this week could bring winds up to 15 mph Tuesday night, with gusts as high as 25 mph in Bend. Because of low rainfall since July, vegetation is dry and windy conditions could easily spark fast-moving fires, according to a special weather statement for the area. “Expect some winds but probably not enough to kick up some dust in your area there,” said Ann Adams, assistant forecaster for the National Weather Service in Pendleton. “But temperatures are expected to cool down quite a bit by mid-week.” In Bend this week, high temperatures are expected to be in the 60s and 70s, with overnight lows at or below freezing starting Tuesday. The National Weather Service predicted a low of 25 degrees Wednesday night Madras should be similar, with high temperatures in the 60s and 70s this week and lows around freezing. Prineville is also expected to have high temperatures in the 60s and 70s and lows in the 30s, including an expected low of 27 degrees Wednesday night.

Fitzsimons and others in the company submitted fraudulent documents to various banks to obtain financing. Of the 13 implicated in the real estate scheme, nine have pleaded guilty to various charges. Del Barber Jr., a former mortgage broker, was sentenced in 2011 to 15 months in prison and ordered to pay $200,000 in restitution. See Desert Sun / B5

Something in the air?

— Bulletin staff report

More briefing and News of Record, B2

FIRE UPDATE Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

An Oregon Department of Environmental Quality air monitoring device sits near the U.S. Forest Service Sisters Ranger District offices in Sisters on Friday. The air quality device was added in addition to another one installed there — the white pipe on the building in the background — to better monitor air conditions after the Pole Creek Fire.

Reported for Central and Eastern Oregon. For the latest information, visit www.nwccweb .us/information/ firemap.aspx.

• Budget constraints and community opposition hinders air control monitoring By Dylan J. Darling The Bulletin

Despite a smoky month around Central Oregon brought by wildfire, the state isn’t planning to add more permanent air monitors here. “I would like to have more monitoring, yes I would,” said Mark Bailey, eastern region air quality manager for the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality. But he said there isn’t room in the agency’s budget. That doesn’t leave Central Oregon’s air unchecked though. The DEQ runs permanent air monitors for the fine particles of air pollution put off by wildfires in downtown Bend, along the Deschutes River, and in Prineville. Jefferson County pays to have air

monitored during the summer agriculture Inside • Charting burning season. the smoke The U.S. Forest Serfrom vice also has an air monthe Pole itor in Sisters, which was Creek installed just last year, Fire, B2 said Jinny Reed, assistant fire management officer for the Sisters Ranger District on the Deschutes National Forest. She said she is studying the amount of smoke put off by prescribed fires versus wildfires. “I want to determine the difference between nuisance smoke and unhealthy smoke,” she said. Wildfire definitely left a smoky mark on Sisters this year. The 26,285-acre Pole Creek Fire southwest of Sisters has regularly

swamped the town with smoke during the past three weeks, as inversions pushed the smoke downhill from the fire overnight and into the mornings. Air quality readings in Sisters regularly spiked into levels considered hazardous by the state since the fire started Sept. 9. Smoke also spread to Redmond, prompting the Forest Service to install a temporary air monitor Sept. 18 at the Redmond Air Center. The air monitor showed air quality reaching very unhealthy levels earlier this month and will be in place through the duration of the fire. As of Sunday, the fire was 85 percent contained and fire officials expected it to be fully contained Oct. 15. See Air quality / B2

La Grande

2

3

Madras Bend

1

MILES 0

Bend

50

1. Pole Creek Fire • Acres: 26,285 • Containment: 85% • Cause: Under investigation 2. Rooper Fire • Acres: 600 • Containment: 10% • Cause: Human 3. Bald Mountain Fire • Acres: 1,009 • Containment: 0% • Cause: Lightning

“Air monitoring is kind of expensive.” — Mark Hansen, natural resource specialist, Oregon Department of Environmental Quality

EMPIRE AVENUE AND 18TH STREET

SIMPSON AVENUE AND MT. WASHINGTON DRIVE

8th St.

Par kR d.

Revere Ave.

Neff Rd.

Newport Ave. Greenwood Ave.

Bear Creek Rd.

15th St.

CENTURY DRIVE

Reed Mkt. Rd.

t. BUS 97

Powers Rd.

Dr. tur y

4

Bl od Brookswo

27th St.

3

Cen

20

MILES 0

Murphy Rd.

1/2

1

15th St.

2

Franklin Ave. 9th St.

Sk yliners Rd.

Petigrew Rd.

Galveston Ave.

The Oregon Department of Transportation is doing major paving work on Century Drive. Contractor Knife River plans to pave from 3 p.m. to 7 a.m., Sunday through Friday, until the project is finished, according to ODOT. Drivers can expect delays of up to 20 minutes. Paving will begin at the Bend city limit and progress toward Mount Bachelor. Paving will stop during special events scheduled on the road.

Sources: City of Bend, Oregon Department of Transportation

.

t. Mk Butler

3rd S

4

She vlin

BROOKSWOOD BOULEVARD AND POWERS ROAD

The intersection of Brookswood Boulevard and Powers Road is closed through October for the construction of a new roundabout. Traffic will be detoured around the intersection.

Brinson Blvd.

M

The intersection of Simpson Avenue and Mt. Washington Drive is closed through October for the construction of a new roundabout. Traffic will be detoured around the intersection. 3

1

Bend Parkway

2

n to

Empire Ave.

Rd

The intersection of 18th Street and Empire Avenue is closed through October for the construction of a new roundabout. Traffic will be detoured around the intersection.

. Dr

27th St.

Detour

14th St.

Local traffic only

Morningstar Dr.

Purcell Blvd.

Road closed 1

97

18th St.

20

Bend road closures

. Rd ey Ril OB

— Lily Raff McCaulou is a columnist for The Bulletin. 541-617-7836, lraff@bendbulletin.com

Sentencing delayed in fraud trial

vd .

A

s Tanya Young’s quest to buy a house in Bend drags on — four months and counting — she feels as if she accidentally stepped into a time machine and traveled back to the real estate boom of 2005. The 51-year-old works at an appliance store and is taking classes to become a medical assistant. When she has some free time, she says, she typically identifies four or five houses in her price range, under $175,000. She visits one. It’s nice. Maybe she could even see herself living in it. But, she figures, she ought to take a peek at the others. “By the time I look at them, there are already (multiple) offers on the first house,” she says. “And I’ve gotten to the point where if there’s more than two offers on a house, I walk … because I feel like I’m wasting time.” Young left Bend in 2000, when the real estate market was taking off. When she decided to move back from Portland, she wasn’t expecting this. Isn’t the economy in the tank, after all? “It’s really frustrating,” she says. Seven or so years ago, when the real estate bubble was most inflated, it was common to find renters in a panic. Prices were rising so quickly, they thought: If I don’t buy now, how will I ever be able to afford a home? It sounds crazy — the economy is still sputtering, both locally and nationally — but that sense of urgency seems to be creeping back. “I’m definitely seeing that at the lower end of the market,” says Jaynee Beck, president of the Central Oregon Association of REALTORS. To Beck, this is a good sign for the economy overall. “That’s how markets repair themselves … As those low-end sellers sell their houses, then they’re able to go out and buy higher-end ones. So it kind of works its way up,” she says. In the month of June — the same month that Young began looking for a house — 87 houses in Bend were listed at prices between $125,000 and $225,000. Of those, 82 were categorized as “pending” by the end of the month. Meanwhile, 80 new homes in that price range went on the market. “So what’s coming on (the market) is getting absorbed right away,” Beck says. Within that price range, there is currently less than 1½ months of inventory. In other words, if home sales continue at their current rate, all of the homes listed in that price range will be sold in less than 11⁄2 months. Among homes $625,000 and higher, however, there is 13.2 months of inventory. A healthy inventory, Beck says, is four to six months. Overall, home prices are inching higher. According to a monthly report by the local real estate association, the median price of homes sold in Deschutes County this August was $210,000 — up from $185,000 one year earlier. Average price per square foot also rose during that time, from $120 in 2011 to $132 this year. Homes are getting snatched up more quickly, too. Homes sold in Deschutes County this August spent an average of 139 days on the market — that’s almost one month less than the August 2011 average of 164 days. To find a home, Young is working with Laurie Combs, a local real estate agent with RE/MAX. Combs says she tells her clients, including Young, to be ready to make a decision on a home very quickly. “It puts a lot of pressure on the buyer, because they don’t have a night to sleep on it,” Combs says. Beck says investors are jumping back into the market, buying homes with cash. Rent has been rising and prices are still relatively low, so rental properties can turn a profit. “That’s part of what’s making the lower end of the market more competitive,” Beck says. And it made life even more hectic for Young. “It was really hard to find a rental,” she adds.

LOCAL BRIEFING

ashin g

The struggle of aspiring homeowners

DESERT SUN DEVELOPMENT INC.

t. W

LILY RAFF MCCAULOU

www.bendbulletin.com/local

Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin


THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2012

B2

Air quality Continued from B1 The DEQ tried to install a permanent air monitor at a school in Redmond in 2007 but ran into resistance from

residents near the proposed site, said Mark Hansen, a natural resource specialist at the agency’s laboratory and environmental division in Hillsboro. A 30-foot tower, to hold equipment used to check wind

speed and direction, and temperature, was part of the plan and the root of the objections, he said. Before going ahead with the air monitor plans, the DEQ would have had to hold a public hearing at a cost of

about $4,000. “We decided to count our losses and go to Prineville instead,� he said. Public hearings are just part of the cost of installing a permanent air monitor. Depending on

where they are, at-use permits and other fees can run from $1,000 to $12,000. “Each site is so completely different,� Hansen said. Running an air monitor costs about $20,000 per year,

Hansen said. The costs include communication connections, equipment and rent if needed. “Air monitoring is kind of expensive,� he said. — Reporter: 541-617-7812, ddarling@bendbulletin.com

The story of the smoke The Pole Creek Fire started Sept. 9 about eight miles southwest of Sisters. It quickly grew to become one of the largest fires of the Central Oregon season and spewed smoke into Sisters and other area towns at unhealthy and sometimes hazardous levels. The Department of Environmental Quality and the Western Regional Climate Center collected air quality data in each town throughout the incident. Below is a look at how unhealthy the air became as the fire grew. Sunday, Sept. 9 Started around 10:30 a.m., grows to 1,690 acres 0% contained Nearby roads closed and pre-evacuation notice in effect

SUNDAY 9/9

Thursday, Sept. 13 5,794 acres 200 firefighters 10% contained Cool air causing smoke to drop into Sisters; public health advisory in effect

Tuesday, Sept. 11 4,318 acres 200 firefighters, 5 helicopters 5% contained Closure in effect for large part of wilderness

MONDAY 9/10

Saturday, Sept. 15 16,025 acres 945 firefighters 10% contained “Level 2� pre-evacuation notice put into effect for Sisters neighborhoods; officials worry fire moving toward Bridge Creek watershed

TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY 9/11 9/12 9/13

FRIDAY 9/14

MICRONS PER CUBIC METER OF POLLUTANT PM2.5 1,000

800

600

SUNDAY 9/16

Tuesday, Sept. 18 22,000 acres 1,200 firefighters, 20% contained

MONDAY 9/17

Thursday, Sept. 20 25,553 acres 1,200 firefighters, 5 helicopters 45% contained Sisters prep sports relocated due to smoke

Saturday, Sept. 22 25,553 acres 55% contained

Friday, Sept. 21 25,553 acres Firefighters transition to mop-up and patrol 50% contained

TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY 9/18 9/19 9/20

1,113.8 Maximum PM2.5 level detected in Sisters since start of Pole Creek Fire

What is PM2.5? PM2.5 is fine particulate matter of 2.5 microns in diameter or less. A concentration of PM2.5 of 250 micrograms or greater per cubic meter for an hour is considered hazardous by the DEQ. Particulates smaller than 2.5 microns are among the most harmful pollutants in the air as they can be inhaled deep into the lungs, according to the DEQ. Its website claims inhaling the particles can cause lung damage and induce respiratory and cardiovascular problems.

400

SATURDAY 9/15

Sunday, Sept. 16 16,500 acres 1,103 firefighters, 5 helicopters 10% contained Red Cross opens smoke aid station in Sisters

FRIDAY 9/21

SATURDAY 9/22

Monday, Sept. 24 26,285 acres 70% contained

SUNDAY 9/23

Tuesday, Sept. 25 26,285 acres 832 firefighters, 70% contained

MONDAY 9/24

Wednesday, Sept. 26 26,285 acres 75% contained “Level 2� preevacuation notice lifted

Thursday, Sept. 27 26,285 acres 685 firefighters 80% contained

TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY 9/25 9/26 9/27

Air quality monitor installed in Redmond

Sisters Bend Redmond

Department of Environmental Quality recalibrated Sisters air quality sensor after PM2.5 readings reached maximum levels two days in a row.

Sisters

Hazardous 200 Unhealthy Moderate

SUNDAY 9/9

Hazardous

Redmond

Very unhealthy

Bend

Unhealthy for SG

MONDAY 9/10

TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY 9/11 9/12 9/13

FRIDAY 9/14

SATURDAY 9/15

SUNDAY 9/16

MONDAY 9/17

TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY 9/18 9/19 9/20

FRIDAY 9/21

SATURDAY 9/22

SUNDAY 9/23

MONDAY 9/24

TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY 9/25 9/26 9/27 Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

Source: Oregon Department of Environmental Quality, Western Regional Climate Center (Data not available for all dates and times)

N  R Continued from B1

Men hurt in crash leave hospital Two men injured in a car crash near La Pine on Saturday have been released from the hospital. Guy Tavares, 48, of La Pine, was treated at St. Charles Bend and released Saturday, according to the hospital. Justice Scoons, 20, of La Pine, was discharged from St. Charles Bend on Sunday. Candis Connolly, 28, of La Pine, died Saturday at the scene of the two-vehicle crash on State Rec Road about a half-mile west of the intersection with Huntington Road, according to the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office. The crash was reported shortly before 4 p.m. The crash is still under investigation, Sgt. Ronny Dozier said. — Bulletin staff report

Have a story idea or submission? Contact us!

The Bulletin Call a reporter: Bend ................ 541-617-7829 Redmond ........ 541-977-7185 Sisters............. 541-977-7185 La Pine ........... 541-383-0348 Sunriver ......... 541-383-0348 Deschutes ...... 541-617-7837 Crook ..............541-633-2184 Jefferson ........541-633-2184 Salem ..............541-554-1162 D.C. .................202-662-7456 Business ........ 541-383-0360 Education ....... 541-977-7185 Public lands .....541-617-7812 Public safety.....541-383-0387 Projects .......... 541-617-7831

Submissions: • Civic Calendar notices: Email event information to news@bendbulletin.com, with “Civic Calendarâ€? in the subject, and include a contact name and phone number. Contact: 541-383-0354

• Births, engagements, marriages, partnerships, anniversaries: Details: The Milestones page publishes Sunday in Community Life. Contact: 541-383-0358

CIVIL SUITS Filed Sept. 17

12CV0906: Jane Fate v. Michael Fate, complaint, $49,950 12CV0907: American Express Bank FSB v. Landrie Peterman, complaint, $28,666.70 12CV0908: Discover Bank v. Bruce O. Joseph, complaint, 12,123.46 12CV0909: Midland Funding LLC v. Kelly McCray, complaint, $18,781.10 12CV0910: Citimortgage Inc. v. James H. Turnbull aka Jim Harold Turnbull and Deborah L. Turnbull aka Debbie Louise Turnbull, complaint, $122,677.93 plus interest, costs and fees 12CV0911: U.S. Bank N.A. v. Wallace R. Buckman, Norma J. Buckman and Selco Community Credit Union, complaint, $171,783.98 plus interest, costs and fees Filed Sept. 18

12CV0912: U.S. Bank N.A. v. James R. Pylkki, Joyce P. Pylkki and The Ridge at Eagle Crest Owners Association, complaint, $292,633.82 12CV0913: Virginia Hollowell v. Julie Johnson, complaint, $49,999.62 12CV0914: Julie Houston v. Walter Garrison, complaint, $104,330.21 12CV0915: JP Morgan Chase Bank N.A. v. Samuel Ramirez, complaint, $84,802.88 12CV0916: JP Morgan Chase Bank N.A. v. Rosa Vargas and Fairhaven Village Homeowners’ Association Inc., complaint, $115,778.15 12CV0917: Nationstar Mortgage LLC v. Richard Vecqueray, Kimberly Vecqueray and Unifund CCR Partners, complaint, $183,442.10 plus interest, costs and fees 12CV0918: Federal National

Mortgage Association v. National City Bank and Linda A. Collier trustee of The Linda A. Collier Living Trust, complaint, 311,101.69 plus interest, costs and fees

Arts & Entertainment Every Friday

12CV0919: Bruce Rava v. Central Oregon Community College Foundation and COCC Foundation Property LLC Filed Sept. 19

12CV0920: Green Tree Servicing LLC v. Alicia M. Butts, complaint, $159,999.39 plus interest, costs and fees 12CV0921: Federal National Mortgage Association v. Leonard T. Haaby, David Hoole, Loretta Hoole and Columbia River Bank, complaint, $151,693.59, plus interest, costs and fees 12CV0922: First Horizon Home Loans, a division of First Tennessee Bank N.A. through its loan servicing agent Nationstar Mortgage LLC v. Carolyn Albertazzi, Anthony V. Albertazzi, First Horizon Home Loan Corporation and River Canyon Estates Homeowners Association, complaint, $289,072.23 plus interest, costs and fees

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12CV0923: Nationstar Mortage LLC v. Marsha J. Morrison, trustee for the Marsha Morrison Trust, complaint, $254,306.30 plus interest, costs and fees 12CV0925: Jan Peckfelder v. Marcella L. Spelhaug, complaint, $100,000 12CV0926: City of Redmond v. Jack Robinson & Sons Inc., complaint, $1,506,976 12CV0927: Nationstar Mortgage LLC v. Angelica McIntosh, Jake Johnson, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. and GB Home Equity LLC, complaint, $171,854.44 plus interest, costs and fees

TOUR 9 OF CENTRAL OREGON’S GREENEST HOMES!

P  O    For The Bulletin’s full list, including federal, state, county and city levels, visit www.bendbulletin.com/officials.

CONGRESS U.S. Senate

Sen. Jeff Merkley, D-Ore.: 107 Russell Senate Office Building Washington, D.C. 20510 Phone: 202-224-3753 Web: http://merkley.senate.gov Bend office: 131 N.W. Hawthorne Ave., Suite 208 Bend, OR 97701 Phone: 541-318-1298 Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore. 223 Dirksen Senate Office Building Washington, D.C. 20510 Phone: 202-224-5244 Web: http://wyden.senate.gov Bend office: 131 N.W. Hawthorne Ave., Suite 107 Bend, OR 97701 Phone: 541-330-9142

U.S. House of Representatives

Rep. Greg Walden, R-Hood River 2182 Rayburn House Office Building Washington, D.C. 20515 Phone: 202-225-6730 Web: http://walden.house.gov/ Bend office: 1051 N.W. Bond St., Suite 400 Bend, OR 97701 Phone: 541-389-4408 Fax: 541-389-4452

STATE OF OREGON Gov. John Kitzhaber, Democrat 160 State Capitol, 900 Court St. Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-378-4582 Fax: 503-378-6872 Web: http://governor.oregon.gov

PHOTO: ROSS CHANDLER

LOCAL BRIEFING

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MONDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

B3

O N SALEM

Albany police ‘Wheelie Guy’ sets world record interview child, rile his parents By Justin Much

Statesman Journal (Salem)

SALEM — “Wheelie Guy” did it. A spent Chris Barnett, a.k.a. “Wheelie Guy,” had few words when he pulled around to the dozens of onlookers who had just witnessed him set a new a world record. “Need some water,” he said. As he replenished his fluids, a lap tracker advised him of his performance: “13.65 miles.” “That’ll do it,” Barnett answered. Shortly after 9 a.m. Saturday Barnett, 23, of West Salem surpassed the previous world record for the longest distance ridden on a bicycle in one hour, all while doing a wheelie. The cheering dozens who watched the fete at South Salem High School’s track couldn’t help but to notice the fast pace. Barnett began his quest at 8:30 a.m. and broke the previous record of 10.5 miles well inside of the allotted hour. Ensuing shouts encouraged him to keep going, which he did. At 9:22 a.m. Barnett’s momentum finally began to stall and the front tire set down at the northwest corner of the track, ending the effort. “I definitely felt the adrenalin,” Barnett said. “When they showed me the sign showing I had 10 laps to go for the record, that’s when it really

Kobbi Blair / The Statesman Journal (Salem)

Chris Barnett, “Wheelie Guy” of Salem, crushes the world record for longest distance traveling on a bicycle doing a wheelie within an hour Saturday at South Salem High School. He rode 13.65 miles in 51 minutes 27 seconds.

kicked in. To see everyone out here cheering for me, even in the first few laps, that’s when I knew I would do it.” The cheerful gathering lined the south edge of the track, some were friends and family, some just curious — all were supportive, erupting with applause each time Barnett cruised by with a smile. “This is awesome,” said Bill Beavert, 56, a neighbor of the Barnett family in West Salem. “I’ve known Chris for a long time. I’ve been snowboarding with him. He’s friends with my kids from the neighborhood. He’s quite an athlete.” Crews marked each lap and kept the times, and a handful of two-wheeled riders took turns keeping pace — each needing respites during the ride. Among the pace riders were Thomas Richards, Jon

Barnett (Chris’ brother) Derek Wilson and Keith Brandtjen. “His pace was … ridiculous,” said one bystander. “He set a blistering pace,” agreed pace-rider Richards. Barnett’s ride was more than a record breaker; he’s raising money to help a needy African village obtain a freshwater well. “Got to get a well dug now — that will be nice,” said Steve Barnett, Chris’s father. Chris Barnett said he had raised $2,000 for the cause coming into the day; about half of what is needed. “I can’t help to be proud,” said Paula Barnett, Chris’s mother. “He’s been working toward this for more than a year; obsessed really. Maybe a little too obsessed, but it’s a good obsession and a good cause.”

MOVE TO THE MUSIC

The Associated Press ALBANY — Parents at an Albany middle school are unhappy their 12-yearold son was interviewed by police without their permission, but both the school and the Albany Police Department say permission isn’t required in many instances. Administrators at Calapooia Middle School say, however, that school policy wasn’t followed when a detective recently interviewed the boy without the parents first being notified by the school. The boy’s mother, Kerri Evans, told the Albany Democrat-Herald her son was labeled as a suspect in a May incident involving a neighborhood child who doesn’t attend Calapooia. She said she worked the situation out with the other child’s mother, and knew nothing of a police investigation until a detective showed up at her door Sept. 18. The detective told Evans he had talked with her son alone at school earlier that day, the mother said, adding she complained to police while her husband phoned the school. “It bothers me the way this was approached. They just went and pulled him from class. All the teachers, the vice principal, know what’s going on; whether they know the exact reason or not, they know it’s something serious,” Evans said. “All his friends are like, ‘Dude, are you going to juvie?’”

Evans said she’s angry she and her husband weren’t given an opportunity attend the interview with their son. She said the detective recited the Miranda rights to the boy, letting him know he could contact an attorney, but she isn’t convinced a 12-year-old who didn’t have anyone else in the room to talk to would really understand. Principal Pat Weidmann said school district policy and Calapooia’s student handbook state the district will first attempt to notify the student’s parent or guardian, as a courtesy, in such cases. If no one can be reached, a reasonable attempt should be made to notify the family as soon as possible after an interview. In either case, a building administrator is supposed to be present at such interviews, and maintain a written record of what is said, unless the parents ask the official not to attend. Weidmann said he was not in the building and the vice principal was on recess duty. A new staff secretary let the detective in that day. Capt. Eric Carter of the Albany Police Department said he didn’t know the circumstances of the case surrounding Evans’ son nor say why officers waited four months to talk to him, or why they chose to do it at school.

Girl, 11, dies after falling out of moving party bus The Associated Press PORTLAND — Portland Police say an 11-year-old girl has died after falling out of a party bus window in downtown Portland. The Oregonian reports the bus was carrying about 20 kids to a quinceañera party where they were going to meet their families. The girl fell out of an emergency window on the bus around 6:30 p.m. when it turned from Southwest First Avenue onto Southwest Harrison Street. Police spokesman Robert King says the force of the girl’s body against the window during the turn caused her to fall out. She died at the scene of her injuries. The waiting families were immediately notified and came to the scene of the accident. The driver of the bus cooperated with police, and there was no indication that alcohol was involved.

856 NW Bond • Downtown Bend • 541-330-5999 www.havenhomestyle.com

PRESENTING THE BULLETIN’S

CENTRAL OREGON NATIVE WILDLIFE WORD SEARCH GAME We’ve taken the names of some of Central Oregon’s native wildlife and created a fun and challenging local game.

HERE’S HOW TO PLAY: Randy L. Rasmussen / The Associated Press

People dance during the West Coast premiere of “Le Grand Continental,” a flash mob performance Sunday, which brought together more than 150 participants at Portland’s Pioneer Courthouse Square to perform a contemporary re-imaging of a traditional festive line dance.

First, find all the hidden wildlife. Second, deliver your answers to our office (in person or by mail by October 15th) and you’ll be entered to win a

$30 GIFT CARD to Fred Meyer!

Tensions mounting between charter school, Philomath district The Associated Press CORVALLIS — A dispute between an Oregon charter school and the local school district offers some insights into the complex and sometimes tense relationship between charter schools and their sponsoring districts. After the Philomath School Board voted to close Kings Valley School in early 2001 because of budgetary reasons, community members rallied to save the small, rural school. In September 2001, Kings Valley Charter School opened its doors. With the support of the Philomath School District, it has thrived. The district provided more funding than required by state law and added high school grades. A decade later, that relationship has grown strained. This past summer, Kings Valley sued the district, arguing it had withheld some of the money it was owed because of its status as a rural school. The district accused the school of violating its charter and issued a notice to terminate the charter. For three months, they have met to try to resolve their issues, but they are far from an agreement. Scio School District Super-

“It’s a parentchild relationship. Sometimes I don’t think they always like that, especially when they are trying to grow.” — Gary Tempel, superintendent, Scio School District

intendent Gary Tempel tells The Corvallis Gazette-Times that no matter the relationship between districts and charter schools, there’s always some inherent tension. “It’s a parent-child relationship,” Tempel said. “Sometimes I don’t think they always like that, especially when they are trying to grow.” Oregon’s charter school law was passed in May 1999. Oregon was the 38th state to enact such a law. Enrollment and funding are common points of contention. The conflict between Kings Valley and the Philomath School District, for example, hinges on an interpretation of a bill passed by the Legislature in 2011 that gives extra money to the district to support

rural schools. Kings Valley officials say they should receive all the money. Philomath School District officials say they have the discretion to choose how to distribute the money. The district has accused the school of violating its charter agreement by getting permission to contract with a nonprofit group to hire teachers outside the state system to avoid paying into the Public Employees Retirement System. Mark Hazelton, director of Kings Valley Charter School, says some of the tension might be rooted in resentment. “It’s a lot of work for a district to sponsor a charter school, especially in the beginning. There’s processes and timelines they have to follow. Nobody likes having to do more work when they are already working hard,” he said. A common theme emerges when talking to charter school and district officials: The importance of talking with and listening to each other. “That openness to share information with each other is crucial,” Bogatin said. “We count on them and they count on us. Working together is the only way to make sure students’ needs are met.”

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WINNER WILL BE DRAWN ON OCTOBER 19TH • FIND THESE CENTRAL OREGON NATIVE WILDLIFE: ANTELOPE, BAT, BEAR, BEAVER, BIGHORN SHEEP, COUGAR, DEER, COYOTE, ELK, FOX, MOUSE, PORCUPINE, RABBIT, RACCOON, SKUNK, BASS, SALMON, STEELHEAD, STURGEON, TROUT, BLUEJAY, CHUKAR, DUCK, EAGLE, GOOSE, GROUSE, HAWK, HERON, KINGFISHER, MEADOWLARK, OSPREY, OWL, PHEASANT, QUAIL, RAVEN, ROBIN, TURKEY, WOODPECKER, LIZARD, RATTLESNAKE

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THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2012

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Mulenex for mayor of La Pine

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a Pine voters will select a mayor directly for the first time in November. Previously, the council has selected the mayor from among those elected as

councilors. Candididates Ken Mulenex and Stu Martinez both served as mayor under those old rules. They both now serve on the council, with Mulenex as mayor. Both are knowledgeable about the city’s history and issues, and both have devoted time and talent to advancing its interests. We urge voters to choose Mulenex to provide continuity for the young city and because he has the time and leadership skills the city needs. The city also has one counselor, Kathy Agan, running unopposed. Martinez moved to La Pine in 1992 and runs Wilderness Garbage & Recycling. He was elected to the council six years ago and served as mayor for just under a year before resigning to fight throat cancer, which he said is now in remission. He’s an active member of the American Red Cross, traveling recently to Tennessee and Alabama. He’s thoughtful and committed to the city’s well-being, and we hope

he’ll continue to engage in the many issues it faces. Mulenex moved to La Pine in 1996 and is retired. He was in the Air Force for 20 years in computer maintenance, earned a degree in marine biology and chemistry and then worked again in computers before buying a liquor store in California. He is concerned about bringing family-wage jobs to La Pine, ensuring respect for seniors and preserving the town’s smalltown feel. Mulenex said he works well with people and focuses on what he calls P&R: presence and relationships. The city has recently taken over the local sewer and water districts, and received approval from the state for its comprehensive plan. Mulenex said he’s also focused on polishing the town’s tourism image, finding ways to extend the tourism season and thus create enough business to bring in hotels and other amenities.

Spraying is necessary for knapweed in forest

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n a perfect world, perhaps pulling invasive weeds by hand would make sense. But when you’re dealing with such things as knapweed, as the U.S. Forest Service is in its current spray program in Central Oregon forests, hand pulling is no solution at all. Thus, despite challenges from the Blue Mountains Biodiversity Project, the agency is right to go ahead and spray. Knapweed, one of the targeted weeds, is difficult to pull correctly, and failure to do the job right only serves to spread the pest. This time of year, seed heads must be bagged and the plants destroyed. Earlier, before knapweed flowers, improper pulling can break the taproot and fail to kill the plant. Most animals, meanwhile, won’t eat knapweed and the plant itself chokes out native plants they will eat. It fuels fires, prevents native plants from germinating and lessens biodiversity in part by forcing native animals to look elsewhere for their food. Cheatgrass, commonly a range plant that is beginning to move into relatively low-elevation forests, also wreaks havoc on the land it invades and on the animals that live on that land. On rangeland, meanwhile, cheat is in part responsible for loss of sage grouse habitat which, if it continues, will force the listing of that bird under the Endangered Species Act.

Knapweed, one of the targeted weeds, is difficult to pull correctly, and failure to do the job right only serves to spread the pest. This time of year, seed heads must be bagged and the plants destroyed.

It also provides excellent fuel for range fires. As for pulling such weeds, experts say knapweed can be controlled in small areas — one-quarter acre or less — by hand pulling, but the process must be repeated over a period of years to be successful. Neither does cheat lend itself to control by pulling. That leaves the Forest Service with two options. One, let the plants invade, forcing out animals and native plants. Be prepared, however, for the nearly certain damage by fire, loss of native plants and animals, loss of recreation opportunities and all the rest. Or, the Forest Service can, as it is doing in the Deschutes forest, spray and hope to control invasive weeds that way. If healthy forests, populated by the plants and animals that make up the natural ecosystem is the goal, however, spraying is surely the best option.

My Nickel’s Worth Vote carefully As an immigrant from socialist Czechoslovakia in early 1980, my wife and I went through hard times, but eventually we established ourselves, had a family and now we are happily retired in the beautiful city of Bend. When at first I heard an infamous line of President Obama, “You didn’t build that,� it sent shivers down my spine for inevitably sooner or later the sentence, “You don’t even own that, it belongs to all of us,� will follow. We have experienced that in the postwar Czechoslovakia. The government nationalized the big businesses first (automobile industry, financial institution, etc. ), but at the end no small business was spared. The process of socialism and collectivism threw the country into a deep economic and moral decline. Now 50 years later, the lands of Czech Republic and Slovakia are slowly recovering since they adopted at least some principles of a free market economy, although I believe it will take generations before all the damage is undone. So, please, my fellow citizens, when you go to vote, choose wisely, because history, unfortunately, repeats itself. Ales Matzenauer Bend

Put up birdhouses Those of you who have read the book “A Promise Given,� by Rick Steber understand why I am dedicating so much effort to bringing the mountain bluebirds back to Central Oregon. If you haven’t read the book, I would suggest you make an effort to beg, borrow or steal a copy and read

it. You will find the book is not just about me and my life, but it is really about what we can all do to save one small part of our environment. Since the coming of the first Europeans to North America, we have lost 90 percent of our songbirds because of the introduction of non-native, invasive species of birds, the widespread use of DDT, urban sprawl and other things. But we can reverse this sad trend and bring back our songbirds if all of us will pitch in and simply put up birdhouses. If you read the book you will understand why I build birdhouses and give them away to anyone who will agree to put them up. I have built and given away more than 1,400 birdhouses and gladly accept donations of boards from anyone who has a few extra. The best boards are 1x6 inches, any length. I have three dozen birdhouses available to give to anyone interested in putting them up. If you feel a desire to get involved, and to make a positive impact on our environment, give me a call at 541-223-8152. I will arrange for you to have a birdhouse. I thank you and the bluebirds thank you. Trevor Russell Prineville

resident for 15 years, Hovekamp has served our community in various capacities, including the Bend-La Pine School Board, Planning Commission, community college faculty member, and various other committees and projects working to maintain Bend as a place where we all, despite political, economic, or other social differences, are part of a supportive community. By supporting Hovekamp as your state representative, you will get a principled individual who will work to ensure Bend and Central Oregon have a bright future. In advocating positions and policy, Hovekamp is led by evidence, reason and democratic values. He understands how to work together despite our differences. He is a champion of civil discourse. He believes that through meaningful and respectful dialogue we gain better understanding, participation, and, ultimately better policy. In voting for Hovekamp this November, you will be electing a person who represents our collective interest in keeping Bend a quality place where we all can live, learn and raise healthy families. Tom Barry Bend

Support Hovekamp

Mirror Pond ownership

On Jan. 20, 1961, President Kennedy gave his inaugural address. In that speech he highlighted the value and importance of service to our country. While we may have differing opinions about Kennedy, I think all of us share the virtue of civic engagement. Through its embodiment, we form strong and healthy communities, states and a nation. Nathan Hovekamp is running for state representative in District 54. A Bend

Before any money is spent on planning studies or remediation of Mirror Pond, which may cost millions, perhaps it would be wise for the city to really determine who owns Mirror Pond. Then have the assessor check to see who has been paying taxes on it and send them a bill. If no one has been paying taxes, then maybe nobody owns it. John Bihary Jr. Bend

Letters policy

In My View policy

How to submit

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 550 and 650 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or email them to The Bulletin. Write: My Nickel’s Worth / In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 Fax: 541-385-5804 Email: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

City’s vision for Juniper Ridge has failed to appear A

By Scott Siewert decade ago, a group of city “visioneers� headed by Councilor John Hummel and his cronies launched an ill-fated plan to develop 1,500 acres of city-owned property north of Cooley Road, which was subsequently named Juniper Ridge. While they had no written strategic plan or fiscal forecast to provide standards for account- IN MY ability, the basic idea at that time was to attract dozens of scientific research and hi-tech manufacturers to a park anchored by a prestigious new university. Bend avoided a public vote on the issue by creating an unprecedented Urban Renewal District for 1,500 acres of pristine High Desert that seemingly provides unlimited capacity for debt without accountability to anyone through TIF (Tax Increment Financing) bonds. Ten years later, the public fully de-

serves a comprehensive analysis of the failure that Bend has realized at Juniper Ridge through a comparison of stated objectives to justify the project versus what has actually materialized over ensuing years. Objective 1: A prestigious new research university to attract desirable employers. Result: Oregon State UniVIEW versity-Cascades Campus is thriving on Bend’s west side. Objective 2: Thousands of new jobs to create economic vitality in Central Oregon. Result: Zero new jobs in 10 years in addition to millions wasted on relocations for Les Schwab Tire Center Inc. and Suterra. Objective 3: Dozens of scientific research and hi-tech manufacturing firms. Result: Zero new employers of this caliber; Facebook and Apple built facilities in Prineville.

Objective 4: Tens of millions in profits from land sales for the city. Result: A massive pile of debt with interest meters going “ka-ching� every day. Objective 5: A comprehensive northside traffic fix including Cooley Road/ U.S. Highway 97 and an interchange for Juniper Ridge. Result: Traffic on the north side is snarled worse than ever. Objective 6: A massive flow of property tax revenues from a multitude of new tenants. Result: The city recently layered an enterprise zone over parts of the project to defer taxes for years. Objective 7: Mixed use facilities including large tracts of residential development by 2012. Result: No mixed use facilities and no residential development whatsoever. Objective 8: A labyrinth of fabulous parks.

Result: No new parks of any kind. Objective 9: A Performing Arts Center with a big lake! Result: No center and no lake. Objective 10: A sophisticated new technical center. Result: The new technical center was awarded to Redmond. In 2007, the city hired yet another costly consultant named ECON NW to perform a financial analysis of Juniper Ridge, including preparation of a fiscal forecast five years after the fact. They projected revenues from the project of $115 million by the first quarter of 2012. Subsequent sales to Suterra and Pacific Power generated approximately $8 million, which means that the city has missed their latest sales target by an unbelievable 93 percent. To make matters worse, a prominent city official recently announced the city has not given up on a new university at Juniper Ridge.

When is this madness ever going to end? How is the debt going to be repaid at Juniper Ridge with no sales in the past four years? Everything that could possibly go wrong at Juniper Ridge during the past 10 years has gone wrong, primarily as the result of poor strategic planning and flawed execution by the city. Myriad costly consultants have only made a bad situation worse. The city of Bend should never have been in the development business in the first place. That’s not a proper function of government. We need to replace the current council with successful business people in November. It’s far past time for a 50-year moratorium on this unmitigated disaster followed by a sale of property to private developers who possess the expertise to manage a project of this magnitude. — Scott Siewert lives in Bend.


MONDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

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NORTHWEST NEWS

O Tribal casino brought in $165M for Coos County, analysis shows Andres argued that weight gain increased longevity By Damian Mann

The Mail Tribune (Medford)

view with The New York New York Times News Service Times. “But there’s just overDr. Reubin Andres, a ger- whelming evidence now that ontologist who advanced the as you go through life, it’s in study of diabetes but gained your best interests to lay down his widest attention for argu- some fat.” ing that weight gain in older Andres was not advocating people increases longevity, obesity. “It is not my contendied Sept. 23 at his home in tion that the fatter the better,” Baltimore. He was 89. he said. “It is my contention The cause was heart dis- that the desirable range rises ease, said his daughter, Julie with age.” Schwait. When Andres published Andres had been clinical his research in a medical director of the National Insti- textbook and began to speak tute on Aging since about it at conferences 1977 — the first to be FEATURED in the mid-1980s, it named to that federal an outcry OBITUARY provoked post — when he began from those in the medexamining weight ical profession who gain a few years later. He had saw fat as the enemy of good been asked to address a 1980 health. Even a panel at the conference on obesity and National Institutes of Health, mortality in New York, and the Institute on Aging’s parnot knowing much about the ent agency, declined to accept topic, he began investigating his conclusions, saying that a the literature. body weight 20 percent above Of particular use were the Metropolitan Life Tables weight and height data culled was an established health from insurance policyholders hazard. and compiled by the Society Today, Andres’ findings of Actuaries and Association remain controversial. While of Life Insurance Directors several studies have seconded of America. He compared the his findings that some extra society’s weight data on those weight as you age is not a risk who had lived the longest factor in mortality, the NIH with the ideal weights that the still does not recommend ageMetropolitan Life Insurance specific weight gain. This is in Co. recommended to ensure part because disagreements a long life. At the time, the persist about why a little more company’s recommendations weight might be beneficial. were widely disseminated by Some doctors believe that fat doctors. allows older adults to better In analyzing that and other withstand the stresses caused longitudinal studies, Andres by disease and injury, while determined that Metropolitan others think that those with a Life’s weight recommenda- little more weight are showing tions were too high for the ear- signs that they were healthier ly years and too low for later to begin with. years. Among other things, he In his research on diabetes, observed that the group with Andres developed a method the smallest percentages of that allowed doctors to indeaths, or “minimum mortal- crease insulin or glucose in ity,” was 10 to 20 percent over the body without permitting the recommended weights the counter-regulatory mechand increased with age. anisms to kick in. The invenTo live longer, he concluded, tion, known as the glucose people should start thin and insulin clamp, gave doctors then gain about 6 pounds a de- the ability, for the first time, cade beginning in their early to quantify insulin sensitiv40s. That advice went against ity and insulin secretion in the prevailing wisdom, which human beings, which is imheld that the most healthful portant because it allows reway to age was to maintain searchers to study new drugs the same weight throughout and other interventions for adulthood. people with Type 2 diabetes. “For some reason the idea Andres won numerous has grabbed us that the best awards for this, including, weight throughout the life in 2000, the Albert Renold span is that of a 20-year-old,” Award from the American Andres said in a 1985 inter- Diabetes Association. By Leslie Kaufman

“It is not my contention that the fatter the better. It is my contention that the desirable range rises with age.” — Dr. Reubin Andres, gerontologist, 1923-2012

Obituary policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, email or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. Deadlines: Death Notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. Phone: 541-617-7825 Email: obits@bendbulletin.com Fax: 541-322-7254 Mail: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708

D E 

 Deaths of note from around the world: Barbara Ann Scott, 84: Won Canadian’s only Olympic title in women’s figure skating at the 1948 Games in St. Moritz. Died Sunday. Peter Praeger, 65: Heart surgeon who saved a man’s life and as a result wound up owning a gefilte fish company — and who as a result of that wound up starting a successful natural-foods company. Died Sept. 22 in Hackensack, N.J. Robert Newton, 85: Who with his wife, Joyce, founded Hoosier Racing Tire, the Indiana company whose tires have become fixtures at car-racing tracks across the country. Died Wednesday in Lakeville, Ind., of complications of a stroke. Carlton Funn, 80: Washington, D.C., area schoolteacher who championed the preservation of black history for more than a half-century. Died Sept. 11 in Alexandria, Va., of congestive heart failure. John Anderson, 59: Psychologist who specialized in AIDS-related matters for the American Psychological Association. Died Sept. 17 in Washington, D.C., of colon cancer. — From wire reports

An economic analysis shows how much of a financial powerhouse the Coquille Indian Tribe and The Mill Casino in North Bend are for the Coos County economy. The ECONorthwest study, which was released July 9, analyzes the economic impact of the tribe and the casino during 2010. The ripple effect of the casino and tribal operations throughout the state amounted to $165 million in direct and indirect impacts, generating 1,555 jobs, the study concluded. Now the tribe wants to expand into Medford to help serve its 100 tribal

members residing in Jackson County, but also to increase its revenues. For Coos County, the economic impact of both the tribal government and the casino totaled $125 million, including direct revenues of the casino and tribes and their effect on other businesses in the county. By itself, gaming and other services related to The Mill Casino generated $47 million in 2010, employing 512. Employment income amounted to $26 million. Tribal government during the same year generated $22 million, employing 110. Employment income added up to almost $8 million. In 2010, the tribe contributed more than $600,000 to charities.

The tribe purchased a closed lumber mill in North Bend on U.S. Highway 101 in 1995, converting it into The Mill Casino. Since then a hotel and recreational vehicle park for 102 vehicles have been added. In 2008, an upscale, highrise hotel was built, doubling the number of rooms to 203. The Coquille tribe has 6,469 acres of reservation land, which includes a 5,400-acre forest and 1,069 acres at the casino and near Charleston for a community center, cranberry farm and other tribal business. “We obviously took a hit when the economy took a hit in 2008,” said Ray Doerning, spokesman for the casino and tribe.

IN REMEMBRANCE OF THE FALLEN

Paul T. Erickson / The Tri-City Herald (Kennewick, Wash.)

Several generations of veterans and their families attend a Time of Remembrance ceremony Sunday at Flat Top Park in West Richland, Wash., to honor service men and women who have died fighting the war on terrorism in Iraq and Afghanistan. More than 70 families from Washington, Oregon and Idaho attended the sixth-annual Time of Remembrance event. The keynote speaker was Richland High School graduate, Gen. James Mattis, commander of the U.S. Central Command in Tampa, Fla. Names of more than 600 names of the fallen were read at the end of the ceremony.

Vancouver, Wash., wins national award for 2011-12 budget plan The Associated Press VANCOUVER, Wash. — The city of Vancouver has won a national award for its 2011-12 budget. But the announcement of the award coincides with news that the city’s budget manager is leaving. The Columbian in Vancouver reports the Distin-

guished Budget Presentation Award from the Government Finance Officers Association honors state and local governments that prepare budgets according to best practices established by the National Advisory Council on State and Local Budgeting. Those practices include a demonstration of long-term goals and bud-

getary trends and an explanation of priorities, revenues and expenditures. The city’s budget planning manager, Natasha Ramras, submitted her resignation this week to City Manager Eric Holmes. Ramras will work as the finance director of the Knight Cancer Institute at Oregon Health & Science University.

Washington Catholic school coach on leave amid background probe The Associated Press EVERETT, Wash. — A Catholic school in Everett has put its interim head football coach on leave while officials explore issues raised about his previous job in Oregon. Archbishop Murphy High

School officials said Michael Allison agreed to be placed on paid administrative leave while they review the issues that have been raised in the newspaper. Allison ended his teaching career at a school in Oregon after he stipulated to an inappropriate relationship with a

female student. No criminal allegations were made. Public records show Allison surrendered his teaching license in Oregon after an investigation in 2009 concluded he engaged in inappropriate conduct with a high school student.

Timber group calls off protest By Paul Fattig The Mail Tribune (Medford)

A Portland-based timber industry group Friday withdrew its administrative protest of a restoration forest management project that includes a 6.75-million-board-foot timber sale on public lands near Butte Falls. The American Forest Resource Council also asked environmental groups to follow suit with other timber sales on U.S. Bureau of Land Management and U.S. Forest Service lands, noting the appeals and litigation are costing Oregonians jobs. “We made our point,” council President Tom Partin said in a prepared statement. “We are confident that the BLM is now aware of AFRC’s concerns. “We have acted in good faith by withdrawing our protest,” he added. “We challenge those holding up the BLM sale program with appeals and litigation — Cascadia Wildlands, Center for Biological Diversity, Klamath-Siskiyou Wildlands Center, Oregon Wild and the others — to withdraw their appeals and litigation now. Our forests and our communities depend on our cooperation.” He estimated the groups have used appeals and litigation to stop at least 25 BLM timber sales containing more than 90 million board feet of timber in southern Oregon. “Every million feet of timber supports 38 jobs,” he said. “That’s almost 3,500 Southern Oregonians who are suffering from underemployment at a very bad time in our state’s economy.” Joseph Vaile, program director for the Ashlandbased Klamath-Siskiyou Wildlands Center, countered that his group and others aren’t opposed to logging, providing it is done in a manner that is sustainable and doesn’t degrade the environment. “We look at each project individually, based on the criteria of protecting old growth, clean water and wildland habitat,” he said. “We have far more agreement with federal agencies projects than disagreement. I think there is a lot of common ground moving forward.” Partin noted that no timber harvesting would have been stopped by the council’s protest. The withdrawal ensures the BLM would expend no resource on a formal response, he said.

Desert Sun Continued from B1 The company’s former construction manager Michael Wilson as well as local escrow agent Teresa Ausbrooks and mortgage broker Shaun Little are all due to be sentenced Dec. 18. Former Desert Sun Vice President Shannon Egeland, as well as the company’s office manager Jeremy Kendall, former Umpqua Bank building inspector Robert Morley Brink, construction business owner John Partin and Fitzsimons are all due to be sentenced Jan. 8. Meanwhile, former Desert Sun employee Garret Towne, loan officer Jeffrey Sprague, loan processor Barbaranne Hotchkiss and building materials supplier Kevin Palotay are all expected to go to trial Nov. 13. They are charged with conspiracy to commit bank fraud, making false statements on loan applications, wire fraud and bank fraud.


THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2012

B6

W E AT H ER FOR EC A ST Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LP ©2012.

TODAY, OCTOBER 1

TUESDAY

Today: Sunny.

Tonight: Clear.

HIGH

LOW

80

43

70/51

62/52

Cannon Beach 60/52

Hillsboro Portland 80/55 78/49

Tillamook 69/50

Salem

64/48

82/48

81/51

Maupin

83/48

Corvallis 82/49

Yachats

75/40

Prineville 77/44 Sisters Redmond Paulina 73/40 78/42 80/43 Sunriver Bend

66/51

Eugene

Florence

83/49

65/47

77/42

83/48

Coos Bay

76/40

Oakridge

Cottage Grove

Crescent

Roseburg

61/50

Silver Lake

75/37

Port Orford 62/53

92/45

59/52

75/40

Unity 81/43

82/48

81/50

Vale 83/51 80/49

Juntura

Burns Riley

87/44

78/41

82/42

Jordan Valley

79/42

78/42

Frenchglen 86/48

Yesterday’s state extremes

Rome

• 89°

83/44

Medford

82/46

Chiloquin

Medford

84/41

Klamath Falls 83/40

Ashland

64/51

John Day

Paisley 93/54

Brookings

79/41

82/36

Grants Pass

Gold Beach

EAST Abundant sunshine and Ontario pleasant.

Baker City

Christmas Valley

Chemult

85/52

77/44

CENTRAL Expect mostly sunny and warm conditions.

Nyssa

Hampton

Fort Rock 78/41

75/38

70/33

Bandon

79/43

Brothers 77/39

La Pine 77/39

Crescent Lake

63/51

80/43

76/44

Union

Mitchell 79/45

81/46

Camp Sherman

76/41

Joseph

Granite Spray 85/41

Enterprise

Meacham 79/47

78/50

Madras

73/40

La Grande

Condon

Warm Springs

Wallowa

74/37

78/50

84/48

82/47

82/49

81/48

Ruggs

Willowdale

Albany

Newport

Pendleton

81/50

79/48

81/50

64/47

Hermiston 81/46

Arlington

Wasco

Sandy

Government Camp 70/51

79/51

81/50

The Biggs Dalles 80/55

79/53

McMinnville

Lincoln City

Umatilla

Hood River

89/47

• 28°

Fields

Lakeview

McDermitt

85/51

81/44

Meacham

86/38

-30s

-20s

Yesterday’s extremes (in the 48 contiguous states):

• 109° Thermal, Calif.

• 27° Stanley, Idaho

• 4.17” Monroe, La.

Honolulu 86/70

-10s

0s

Vancouver 64/49

10s Calgary 80/33

20s

Sunny.

HIGH LOW

HIGH LOW

62 22

Sunny.

HIGH LOW

66 25

69 28

BEND ALMANAC

PLANET WATCH

TEMPERATURE

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . .8:31 a.m. . . . . . 7:14 p.m. Venus . . . . . .3:33 a.m. . . . . . 5:15 p.m. Mars. . . . . .11:16 a.m. . . . . . 8:35 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . .9:42 p.m. . . . . 12:54 p.m. Saturn. . . . . .8:45 a.m. . . . . . 7:37 p.m. Uranus . . . . .6:31 p.m. . . . . . 6:54 a.m.

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend 24 hours ending 4 p.m.*. . 0.00” High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75/45 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . 0.13” Record high . . . . . . . . 89 in 1993 Average month to date. . . 0.41” Record low. . . . . . . . . 20 in 1954 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.74” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Average year to date. . . . . 7.17” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.30.28 Record 24 hours . . .0.21 in 1971 *Melted liquid equivalent

Sunrise today . . . . . . 7:04 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 6:45 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 7:05 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 6:43 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 7:19 p.m. Moonset today . . . . 8:44 a.m.

Moon phases Last

Oct. 8

New

First

Full

Oct. 15 Oct. 21 Oct. 29

OREGON CITIES

FIRE INDEX

Yesterday Monday Tuesday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Precipitation values are 24-hour totals through 4 p.m.

Bend, west of Hwy. 97......Ext. Bend, east of Hwy. 97.....High Redmond/Madras .......High

Astoria . . . . . . . .67/41/0.00 Baker City . . . . . .75/34/0.00 Brookings . . . . . .80/49/0.00 Burns. . . . . . . . . .82/36/0.00 Eugene . . . . . . . .77/44/0.00 Klamath Falls . . .82/35/0.00 Lakeview. . . . . . .82/34/0.00 La Pine . . . . . . . .44/37/0.00 Medford . . . . . . .89/51/0.00 Newport . . . . . . .61/43/0.00 North Bend . . . . .66/43/0.00 Ontario . . . . . . . .85/53/0.00 Pendleton . . . . . .77/45/0.00 Portland . . . . . . .75/49/0.00 Prineville . . . . . . .76/38/0.00 Redmond. . . . . . .80/41/0.00 Roseburg. . . . . . .80/50/0.00 Salem . . . . . . . . .76/42/0.00 Sisters . . . . . . . . .77/33/0.00 The Dalles . . . . . .80/51/0.00

Mod. = Moderate; Ext. = Extreme

. . . .70/51/pc . . . . .63/49/pc . . . . .79/41/s . . . . . .72/30/s . . . . .64/51/s . . . . .67/50/pc . . . . .82/41/s . . . . . .77/30/s . . . . .83/49/s . . . . . .79/47/s . . . . .83/40/s . . . . . .78/38/s . . . . .81/44/s . . . . . .77/41/s . . . . .77/39/s . . . . . .77/22/s . . . . .93/54/s . . . . . .83/46/s . . . .64/47/pc . . . . .60/47/pc . . . . .62/50/s . . . . .62/46/pc . . . . .81/50/s . . . . . .79/44/s . . . . .81/48/s . . . . . .71/36/s . . . . .80/55/s . . . . .70/53/pc . . . . .77/44/s . . . . . .75/32/s . . . . .79/42/s . . . . . .72/31/s . . . . .85/52/s . . . . .75/43/pc . . . . .81/50/s . . . . . .76/48/s . . . . .78/42/s . . . . . .75/26/s . . . . .81/51/s . . . . . .77/42/s

PRECIPITATION

WATER REPORT Sisters ..............................High La Pine................................Ext. Prineville...........................Ext.

The following was compiled by the Central Oregon watermaster and irrigation districts as a service to irrigators and sportsmen.

Reservoir Acre feet Capacity Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . . 33,860 . . . . . . 55,000 Wickiup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107,033 . . . . . 200,000 Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . 70,763 . . . . . . 91,700 Ochoco Reservoir . . . . . . . . 18,484 . . . . . . 47,000 Prineville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88,880 . . . . . 153,777 The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is River flow Station Cubic ft./sec Deschutes RiverBelow Crane Prairie . . . . . . . 359 for solar at noon. Deschutes RiverBelow Wickiup . . . . . . . . . . . 989 Crescent CreekBelow Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . 27 LOW MEDIUM HIGH V.HIGH Little DeschutesNear La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127 0 2 4 6 8 10 Deschutes RiverBelow Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112 Deschutes RiverAt Benham Falls . . . . . . . . . 1,495 Crooked RiverAbove Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . 1 Crooked RiverBelow Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . 196 Updated daily. Source: pollen.com Ochoco CreekBelow Ochoco Res. . . . . . . . . . 15.1 Crooked RiverNear Terrebonne . . . . . . . . . . . 127 Contact: Watermaster, 388-6669 LOW MEDIUM HIGH or go to www.wrd.state.or.us

To report a wildfire, call 911

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX 5

POLLEN COUNT

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL 30s

Saskatoon 78/44

Seattle 73/51

FRIDAY

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS -40s

THURSDAY

Sunny.

73 29

WEST Sunny to partly cloudy with mild temperatures.

Astoria

Sunny.

HIGH LOW

FORECAST: STATE Seaside

WEDNESDAY

40s

Winnipeg 66/50

50s

60s

70s

80s

Thunder Bay 64/41

90s

100s 110s

Quebec 55/46

Halifax 64/51 Portland Billings To ronto Portland 66/50 77/54 65/49 80/55 Green Bay St. Paul Boston 70/50 69/48 Boise 70/54 Buffalo Rapid City Detroit 78/48 67/51 New York 70/52 66/55 74/60 Philadelphia Columbus Chicago 69/56 75/60 Omaha Cheyenne 71/56 Kansas City San Francisco 76/46 Salt Lake 67/45 Washington, D. C. 77/51 83/57 City 75/61 Las Denver Louisville 80/55 Vegas Des Moines 75/50 67/59 St. Louis 77/48 98/73 Charlotte Nashville 66/55 70/66 70/58 Albuquerque Los Angeles Oklahoma City Little Rock 79/54 91/67 Atlanta 82/54 74/55 Phoenix 75/64 103/78 Birmingham Dallas Tijuana 75/60 82/60 89/65 New Orleans 76/66 Orlando Houston 91/74 Chihuahua 82/61 80/57 Miami 87/77 Monterrey La Paz 91/69 89/75 Mazatlan Anchorage 89/77 45/31 Juneau 48/35 Bismarck 70/50

FRONTS

Yesterday Monday Tuesday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . . .78/63/0.00 . .80/56/pc . . 81/60/s Akron . . . . . . . . . .65/49/0.00 . .68/53/pc . 69/56/sh Albany. . . . . . . . . .62/53/0.10 . .67/49/pc . 72/60/sh Albuquerque. . . . .82/51/0.00 . .79/54/pc . . 82/55/s Anchorage . . . . . .46/30/0.00 . . . 45/31/s . . .46/37/r Atlanta . . . . . . . . .72/65/0.30 . . . 75/64/t . 73/57/sh Atlantic City . . . . .71/51/0.00 . . . 76/62/s . . .75/68/t Austin . . . . . . . . . .79/67/0.00 . .83/59/pc . 85/63/pc Baltimore . . . . . . .73/51/0.00 . .75/60/pc . . .76/66/t Billings . . . . . . . . .78/55/0.00 . . . 77/54/s . 78/38/sh Birmingham . . . . .70/65/1.12 . . . 75/60/t . 71/55/pc Bismarck. . . . . . . .80/45/0.00 . . . 70/50/s . 78/45/pc Boise . . . . . . . . . . .82/54/0.00 . . . 78/48/s . . 77/39/s Boston. . . . . . . . . .59/55/0.21 . . . 70/54/s . 75/62/sh Bridgeport, CT. . . .69/57/0.13 . . . 71/56/s . 71/63/sh Buffalo . . . . . . . . .61/51/0.09 . . . 67/51/s . 70/59/sh Burlington, VT. . . .55/52/0.16 . .62/46/pc . 66/56/sh Caribou, ME . . . . .61/51/0.45 . .59/44/sh . 64/42/pc Charleston, SC . . .77/69/0.01 . . . 84/73/t . . .87/69/t Charlotte. . . . . . . .74/57/0.00 . .70/66/sh . . .80/63/t Chattanooga. . . . .72/56/0.00 . . . 75/64/t . 73/59/pc Cheyenne . . . . . . .70/48/0.00 . .67/45/pc . . 79/48/s Chicago. . . . . . . . .66/50/0.00 . .71/56/pc . 70/55/pc Cincinnati . . . . . . .74/48/0.00 . .68/58/pc . 71/55/sh Cleveland . . . . . . .63/48/0.01 . . . 67/56/s . 68/59/sh Colorado Springs .73/49/0.00 . .71/45/pc . . 77/48/s Columbia, MO . . .76/53/0.00 . .71/51/pc . 71/53/pc Columbia, SC . . . .71/66/0.01 . . . 83/70/t . . .87/62/t Columbus, GA. . . .76/70/0.50 . . . 80/65/t . . .77/58/t Columbus, OH. . . .70/47/0.00 . .69/56/pc . 73/56/sh Concord, NH. . . . .59/52/0.16 . .64/44/pc . 71/56/sh Corpus Christi. . . .86/74/0.00 . .84/65/pc . 87/68/pc Dallas Ft Worth. . .75/64/0.10 . .82/60/pc . 84/61/pc Dayton . . . . . . . . .68/46/0.00 . .68/56/pc . 70/55/sh Denver. . . . . . . . . .75/50/0.00 . .75/50/pc . . 82/50/s Des Moines. . . . . .85/52/0.00 . .77/48/pc . . 77/54/s Detroit. . . . . . . . . .65/48/0.00 . . . 66/55/s . 65/55/pc Duluth. . . . . . . . . .65/43/0.00 . .65/38/pc . . 67/47/s El Paso. . . . . . . . . .85/58/0.00 . .84/59/pc . . 87/61/s Fairbanks. . . . . . . .36/30/0.00 . .43/26/pc . 46/31/pc Fargo. . . . . . . . . . .86/50/0.00 . .70/43/pc . 77/49/pc Flagstaff . . . . . . . .75/35/0.00 . . . 75/39/s . . 76/40/s

Yesterday Monday Tuesday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . . .68/47/0.00 . . . 68/47/s . 71/48/sh Green Bay. . . . . . .66/42/0.00 . .69/48/pc . 69/47/pc Greensboro. . . . . .70/55/0.00 . .70/64/sh . . .76/59/t Harrisburg. . . . . . .66/49/0.01 . .71/55/pc . . .70/61/t Hartford, CT . . . . .66/55/0.00 . . . 70/49/s . 77/60/sh Helena. . . . . . . . . .76/50/0.00 . . . 81/46/s . 67/37/sh Honolulu. . . . . . . .83/73/0.00 . . . 86/70/s . . 85/71/s Houston . . . . . . . .77/66/0.00 . .82/61/pc . 83/62/pc Huntsville . . . . . . .71/56/0.01 . . . 75/64/t . 72/57/pc Indianapolis . . . . .70/48/0.00 . . . 65/55/r . 68/52/pc Jackson, MS . . . . .76/66/1.28 . .72/57/sh . 76/54/pc Jacksonville. . . . . .88/70/0.64 . . . 90/74/t . . .88/66/t Juneau. . . . . . . . . .49/41/0.07 . .48/35/sh . 50/38/pc Kansas City. . . . . .79/49/0.00 . .77/51/pc . . 77/56/s Lansing . . . . . . . . .65/45/0.00 . . . 68/49/s . 70/50/sh Las Vegas . . . . . . .97/71/0.00 . . . 98/73/s . 100/73/s Lexington . . . . . . .73/49/0.00 . . . 67/59/t . 68/55/sh Lincoln. . . . . . . . . .81/42/0.00 . .78/44/pc . . 77/54/s Little Rock. . . . . . .67/62/0.06 . . . 74/55/r . 77/54/pc Los Angeles. . . . . .83/65/0.00 . . . 91/67/s . . 85/65/s Louisville. . . . . . . .75/53/0.00 . . . 67/59/t . 71/54/sh Madison, WI . . . . .70/39/0.00 . .70/48/pc . 70/48/pc Memphis. . . . . . . .68/62/0.11 . . . 69/56/t . 71/55/pc Miami . . . . . . . . . .88/76/0.00 . . . 87/77/t . . .88/76/t Milwaukee . . . . . .63/49/0.00 . .66/55/pc . 64/53/pc Minneapolis . . . . .77/48/0.00 . .70/50/pc . . 74/52/s Nashville. . . . . . . .73/54/0.00 . . . 70/58/t . 71/54/pc New Orleans. . . . .84/75/0.62 . .76/66/pc . 79/66/pc New York . . . . . . .68/55/0.00 . . . 74/60/s . 76/66/sh Newark, NJ . . . . . .70/56/0.01 . . . 75/58/s . 74/64/sh Norfolk, VA . . . . . .75/58/0.01 . . .76/67/c . . .81/71/t Oklahoma City . . .75/63/0.10 . .82/54/pc . . 80/57/s Omaha . . . . . . . . .81/46/0.00 . .76/46/pc . . 76/53/s Orlando. . . . . . . . .90/73/0.00 . . . 91/74/t . . .89/72/t Palm Springs. . . .107/76/0.00 . .107/75/s . 108/76/s Peoria . . . . . . . . . .74/48/0.00 . .71/50/pc . 71/51/pc Philadelphia . . . . .70/55/0.00 . . . 75/60/s . . .77/66/t Phoenix. . . . . . . .103/75/0.00 . .103/78/s . 102/78/s Pittsburgh . . . . . . .62/47/0.11 . .66/55/pc . . .71/57/t Portland, ME. . . . .59/54/0.62 . .66/50/pc . . 70/54/c Providence . . . . . .61/54/0.18 . . . 71/53/s . 75/61/sh Raleigh . . . . . . . . .73/57/0.00 . . . 75/67/t . . .80/62/t

Yesterday Monday Tuesday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . . .81/59/0.00 . . . 70/52/s . . 82/49/s Reno . . . . . . . . . . .89/52/0.00 . . . 90/54/s . . 90/51/s Richmond . . . . . . .75/53/0.00 . .76/63/pc . . .79/70/t Rochester, NY . . . .59/50/0.24 . . . 67/50/s . 71/59/sh Sacramento. . . . . .96/56/0.00 . .100/63/s . . 99/60/s St. Louis. . . . . . . . .74/55/0.00 . . . 66/55/r . 67/53/pc Salt Lake City . . . .81/55/0.00 . . . 80/55/s . . 83/56/s San Antonio . . . . .82/67/0.00 . .82/61/pc . 86/64/pc San Diego . . . . . . .83/68/0.00 . . . 91/68/s . . 88/68/s San Francisco . . . .82/52/0.00 . . . 86/59/s . . 78/54/s San Jose . . . . . . . .90/54/0.00 . . . 95/62/s . . 90/59/s Santa Fe . . . . . . . 78/46/trace . . . 73/44/s . . 75/46/s

Yesterday Monday Tuesday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Savannah . . . . . . .81/71/1.46 . . . 85/73/t . . .84/67/t Seattle. . . . . . . . . .70/46/0.00 . .73/51/pc . 61/47/pc Sioux Falls. . . . . . .81/40/0.00 . .73/40/pc . . 80/52/s Spokane . . . . . . . .75/47/0.00 . . . 77/47/s . . 64/37/s Springfield, MO . .72/53/0.00 . . . 72/52/r . . 72/51/s Tampa. . . . . . . . . .89/76/0.00 . . . 89/76/t . . .87/73/t Tucson. . . . . . . . . .98/65/0.00 . . . 98/66/s . . 98/66/s Tulsa . . . . . . . . . . .77/61/0.00 . .82/57/pc . 80/58/pc Washington, DC . .74/54/0.00 . .75/61/pc . . .77/65/t Wichita . . . . . . . . .76/58/0.00 . .79/51/pc . . 78/58/s Yakima . . . . . . . . .80/39/0.00 . . . 80/47/s . . 70/39/s Yuma. . . . . . . . . .109/74/0.00 . .105/74/s . 106/74/s

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . . .61/45/0.00 . .61/54/sh . 61/52/sh Athens. . . . . . . . . .86/66/0.00 . . . 87/67/s . . 87/69/s Auckland. . . . . . . .64/55/0.00 . .63/49/pc . 60/49/pc Baghdad . . . . . . .104/70/0.00 . .106/71/s 107/69/pc Bangkok . . . . . . . .95/77/0.00 . . . 84/74/t . 78/77/sh Beijing. . . . . . . . . .79/45/0.00 . .76/55/pc . 76/55/pc Beirut . . . . . . . . . .93/81/0.00 . . .91/86/c . 95/78/sh Berlin. . . . . . . . . . .63/43/0.00 . . . 63/43/s . 66/50/pc Bogota . . . . . . . . .64/52/0.00 . .68/51/sh . 66/49/sh Budapest. . . . . . . .75/59/0.00 . .76/59/sh . . 75/55/c Buenos Aires. . . . .77/57/0.00 . .75/55/sh . 66/51/sh Cabo San Lucas . .90/72/0.00 . . . 88/71/s . . 88/72/s Cairo . . . . . . . . . . .90/73/0.00 . . . 92/71/s . . 91/66/s Calgary . . . . . . . . .61/41/0.00 . .80/33/pc . .45/22/sf Cancun . . . . . . . . .88/72/0.00 . . . 87/76/t . . .87/78/t Dublin . . . . . . . . . .61/50/0.00 . .58/46/sh . 55/40/sh Edinburgh. . . . . . .59/50/0.00 . . .57/44/c . 54/42/sh Geneva . . . . . . . . .57/52/0.00 . . .59/47/c . 63/47/pc Harare. . . . . . . . . .86/61/0.00 . .81/56/pc . . 83/54/s Hong Kong . . . . . .86/77/0.00 . .84/75/pc . 84/76/pc Istanbul. . . . . . . . .81/70/0.00 . .81/66/pc . 76/63/pc Jerusalem . . . . . . .96/78/0.00 . . .89/70/c . 91/70/pc Johannesburg. . . .73/43/0.00 . . . 75/49/s . . 82/51/s Lima . . . . . . . . . . .68/61/0.00 . . . 70/61/s . 68/61/pc Lisbon . . . . . . . . . .77/61/0.00 . . . 74/59/s . . 76/61/c London . . . . . . . . .63/43/0.00 . .65/53/pc . 61/47/sh Madrid . . . . . . . . .68/48/0.00 . . . 70/52/s . 74/60/pc Manila. . . . . . . . . .86/79/0.00 . . . 86/77/t . . .79/78/t

Mecca . . . . . . . . .102/84/0.00 . .104/82/s . 105/82/s Mexico City. . . . . .73/59/0.00 . . . 69/54/t . . .65/49/t Montreal. . . . . . . .54/50/0.00 . .58/48/sh . 64/52/pc Moscow . . . . . . . .55/45/0.00 . . .51/43/c . . 57/48/c Nairobi . . . . . . . . .82/61/0.00 . .80/56/pc . . 81/57/s Nassau . . . . . . . . .86/75/0.00 . . . 88/80/t . . .90/79/t New Delhi. . . . . . .91/72/0.00 . . . 97/74/s . 97/73/pc Osaka . . . . . . . . . .73/66/0.00 . .75/63/pc . 76/66/pc Oslo. . . . . . . . . . . .55/41/0.00 . .59/45/pc . 53/39/sh Ottawa . . . . . . . . .54/50/0.00 . . .59/46/c . 64/49/pc Paris. . . . . . . . . . . .64/39/0.00 . .66/58/pc . 63/53/sh Rio de Janeiro. . . .79/64/0.00 . . . 82/65/s . . 87/67/s Rome. . . . . . . . . . .77/63/0.00 . .75/59/pc . . 76/62/s Santiago . . . . . . . .57/50/0.00 . . .58/41/c . 63/43/pc Sao Paulo . . . . . . .79/54/0.00 . . .82/66/c . 83/66/sh Sapporo . . . . . . . .63/61/0.00 . .63/54/sh . 68/53/sh Seoul. . . . . . . . . . .68/50/0.00 . .71/56/pc . 74/50/pc Shanghai. . . . . . . .77/61/0.00 . . . 74/62/s . . 73/61/s Singapore . . . . . . .90/77/0.00 . . . 90/80/t . 89/78/pc Stockholm. . . . . . .55/43/0.00 . .57/52/sh . 57/54/sh Sydney. . . . . . . . . .68/50/0.00 . . . 66/58/s . . 70/61/s Taipei. . . . . . . . . . .79/64/0.00 . .78/68/pc . 78/70/pc Tel Aviv . . . . . . . . .91/79/0.00 . . .90/82/c . 90/75/pc Tokyo. . . . . . . . . . .84/72/0.00 . .81/67/sh . 75/65/sh Toronto . . . . . . . . .63/48/0.00 . . .65/49/c . 64/56/pc Vancouver. . . . . . .61/46/0.00 . .64/49/sh . . 55/42/s Vienna. . . . . . . . . .66/50/0.00 . .71/59/pc . 67/57/pc Warsaw. . . . . . . . .63/41/0.00 . .57/48/sh . 65/49/pc

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1 4 6 5 S W K N O L L AV E . , B E N D 5 4 1 . 3 8 8 . 4 41 8 C L A S S I C - C O V E R I N G S . C O M


GREEN, ETC.

TV/Movies, C2 Calendar, C3 Dear Abby, C3 Horoscope, C3

C

Comics, C4-5 Sudoku, C5 Daily Bridge, C5 Crossword, C5

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2012

www.bendbulletin.com/greenetc

Use of broadband in Oregon exceeds national rate • Central Oregon leads state in home access to high-speed Internet, recent survey finds By Rachael Rees The Bulletin

Oregon’s adoption of highspeed Internet service exceeds national levels, and Central Oregon is leading the way with the highest level of access and use of broadband at home in the state, according to a report released last month by the Oregon Public Utility Commission. For businesses in Central

Oregon, broadband is not a luxury but a necessity. That might help explain the region’s usage level, said Roger Lee, executive director of Economic Development for Central Oregon. “Here, we realize we are a smaller market, and we need that outside connection,” Lee said. “In order to operate some of our businesses that aren’t place bound — required to

Control room Not many workers are needed to run a data center. In this room, operators monitor computer, cooling and security systems.

Electrical system Electricity comes in from the grid and is sent to various components via power distribution units.

be in large metro areas — we commissioned a survey in need the ability to transport 2010 using funds from the large amounts of data fast to American Recovery and Reinour customers.” vestment Act. On Sept. Despite the high rates 10, the PUC released the of broadband adoption results in the Oregon in Central Oregon, the Broadband Adoption Portland area and other report. regions, more work is The survey examined OTECH how many Oregonians needed to bridge the digital divide throughout have computers and use the state. broadband Internet serTo identify the challenges vices, the cost of the service that might prevent state and its availability. residents from accessing and “Oregonians have adopted using high-speed Internet it here so much quicker than services in Oregon, the PUC the rest of the nation has,” said

Cooling Industrial cooling systems are required to remove the tremendous amount of heat generated by the servers.

Servers Servers are the computational brains. Most of the infrastructure exists to provide reliable power and data connections to the servers.

Continuous power If electricity from the grid is lost, even for an instant, this system provides power to the servers for seconds to minutes at most. These systems often have banks of hundreds or thousands of batteries.

Inside • Oregon map of home Internet usage by county, C6

Shelley Jones, senior policy analyst for the PUC. Oregon has an 82 percent adoption rate, compared to 68 percent nationwide, the report said. Jones said the difference could be attributed to higher rates of Internet use by low-income and older residents in Oregon, com-

Diesel generators Diesel generators are ready in case of a longer failure or blackout. Generators have been cited for multiple environmental violations across the country.

Fiber optic connections The data center is connected to the Internet via high-speed links, typically fiber optic cables.

pared to the nation. For those Oregonians not using broadband, the survey found that cost, followed by being comfortable with the Internet were the primary factors, not availability. That finding surprised the commission, Jones said. “There are more people not adopting broadband because it cost too much, or because they have little perceived value for it, than there are people not adopting it because it’s not available,” she said. See Broadband / C6

SOLAR PROJECT

Treatment of tortoises a concern for activists By Ken Wells Bloomberg News

Data center anatomy

Data centers are the hidden machinery that powers nearly all activity that occurs on the Internet. Above, a schematic diagram showing the main components of a typical data center.

Frank O’Connell / New York Times News Service

The high costs of Internet convenience By James Glanz New York Times News Service QUINCY, Wash. — et in the dry hills and irrigated farmland of central Washington, Grant County is known for its robust harvest of apples, potatoes, cherries and beans. But for Microsoft, a prime lure was the region’s other valuable resource: cheap electrical power. The technology giant created a stir here in 2006 when it bought about 75 acres of bean fields to build a giant data center, a digital warehouse to support various Internet services. Its voracious GREEN appetite for electricity would be fed by hydroelectric generators that work off the flow of the nearby Columbia River, and Microsoft officials pledged to operate their new enterprise with a focus on energy efficiency and environmental sensitivity. “You’re talking about one of the largest corporations,” said Tim Culbertson, who was the general manager of the local utility at the time. “You’re talking Microsoft and Bill Gates. Wow!”

S

Steve Dykes / The New York Times file photo

A row of backup generators, inside the white housings, line the back exterior of the Facebook data center in Prineville. The generators are to ensure service even in the event of a power failure.

But for some in Quincy, the gee-whiz factor of such a prominent high-tech neighbor wore off quickly. First, a citizens group initiated a legal challenge over pollution from some of nearly 40 giant diesel generators that Microsoft’s facility — near an elementary school — is

allowed to use for backup power. Then came a showdown late last year between the utility and Microsoft, whose hardball tactics shocked some local officials. In an attempt to erase a $210,000 penalty the utility said the company owed for underestimating its power

use, Microsoft proceeded to simply waste millions of watts of electricity, records show. Then it threatened to continue burning power in what it acknowledged was an “unnecessarily wasteful” way until the fine was substantially cut, according to documents obtained by The New York Times. “For a company of that size and that nature, and with all the ‘green’ things they advertised to me, that was an insult,” said Randall Allred, a utility commissioner and local farmer. A Microsoft spokeswoman said the episode was “a one-time event that was quickly resolved.” Internet-based industries have honed a reputation for sleek, clean convenience based on the magic they deliver to screens everywhere. At the heart of every Internet enterprise are data centers, which have become more sprawling and ubiquitous as the amount of stored information explodes, sprouting in community after community. But the Microsoft experience in Quincy shows that when these Internet factories come to town, they can feel a bit more like oldtime manufacturing than modern magic. See Data / C6

Stuart Isett / The New York Times

Dell’s data center in Quincy, Wash. At the heart of every Internet enterprise are data centers, which have grown in size as the amount of stored information explodes.

It’s a 106-degree Fahrenheit day in the Mojave Desert. Heat devils dance off chocolate-hued Clark Mountain on the horizon. Air-conditioned cars zip along Interstate 15 toward Las Vegas. And inside a chain-link pen covered to keep out predators are scores of rare, threatened, SCIENCE sand-colored desert tortoises. Their captivity helps show how complicated it is to combat climate change without collateral damage. The foot-long creatures are being removed from their burrows for a project to harvest solar energy in the California desert. Trucks groan down sunbaked roads, cranes pivot with 750-pound mirrors and mechanical post-pounders drive steel pylons into the packed desert floor, destroying their habitat. Construction of such largescale green-energy projects has splintered environmental groups. When concern over global warming was at a peak, national organizations such as the Sierra Club and the Natural Resources Defense Council threw their support behind industrialscale wind and solar installations on public land. Now some smaller conservationist groups object to what they consider an environmentally destructive gold rush. “Of course we need to do solar, but it should go on rooftops or in appropriate places, not the pristine desert,” says April Sall, director of the Wildlands Conservancy in Oak Glen, Calif., operator of the state’s largest nonprofit preservation system. “We need to tackle warming — but not forget that there are other things at stake.” The Mojave solar project embodies the clash of environmental priorities. The $2.2 billion installation being built by closely held BrightSource Energy Inc. of Oakland, Calif., is designed to power 140,000 homes without emitting greenhouse gases. But it threatens the tortoises. That’s why the Western Watersheds Project conservationist group of Hailey, Idaho, sued to stop it in a Los Angeles U.S. court. The 120-year-old Sierra Club, which calls itself “America’s largest and most influential” environmental group, also lobbied for changes to the project’s design to protect the tortoises. Yet the 1.4 million-member organization chose not to try to block the plant, says Barbara Boyle, a Sierra green energy specialist. See Solar / C6


C2

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2012

TV & M CBS, Lifetime bet on Whitney Houston

L M T  FOR MONDAY, OCT. 1

SISTERS

EDITOR’S NOTES:

BEND

tuned in to watch the music industry lay its heart at the It’s raining Whitney Hous- feet of its fallen heroine — ton memorials! the Grammy’s biggest audiTwo days after Lifetime ence in nearly three decades. announced that it bought a CBS’ newly announced one-hour Houston special Houston special will include “Remembering Whitney� highlights from her career — and about seven months and never-before-seen footafter Houston’s age and interdeath — CBS as well as TV SPOTLIGHT views, announced that artists sharing it will air a onetheir memories hour Houston speof her. cial, “We Will Always CBS’ special may Love You: A Grammy look like a throwback Salute to Whitney to the days when Houston,� during the musical specials November sweeps. during sweeps were Lifetime’s special Houston standard — who can boasts never-beforeforget CBS’ Jackson seen family photos and “can- Five reunion special that did insights� from Houston aired during the November family members; those same ’01 sweeps period and that relatives are starring in Life- copped nearly 30 million time’s new family reality se- viewers? But it’s actually ries “The Houstons: On Our part of a trend in which netOwn,� debuting days later. works — as they try to hang Meanwhile, CBS’ Houston on to hot trophy shows — special will feature perfor- wind up agreeing also to buy mances by Celine Dion, a couple of Shoulder Shows Jennifer Hudson and Usher, from the academy that owns with more names to come. the trophy show. Put your money on those ABC, for instance, is on names belonging to music the hook to air “CMA Music stars who have albums to sell Festival: Country’s Night to during the holiday season. Rock� — and did so again CBS’ special is being done earlier this month — as a sort with the Recording Acad- of early reminder to viewers emy, which owns not only that the CMA Awards will the Grammy Awards, but take place during the Noalso, arguably, the Houston vember sweeps period. And “death story� — what with that you can catch it on ABC. her having died on the eve of That network is also on the the Grammy Awards, while hook for a CMA Christmas getting ready to attend the special. It’s all part of ABC’s Grammys’ biggest pre-cer- 10-year deal to air the Counemony bash, put on every try Music Association’s CMA year by record-industry mo- Awards, signed last year. gul Clive Davis. CBS, for its part, has Houston’s death, hours aired a Grammy nominabefore the live Grammycast, tion announcement special turned that trophy show into since 2008 as part of its ara weep-fest for the pop star. rangement to hang on to the Nearly 40 million people Grammy Awards.

Regal Pilot Butte 6

By Lisa de Moraes

2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend, 541-382-6347

The Washington Post.

BEASTS OF THE SOUTHERN WILD (PG-13) 1:15, 4:15, 7:15 THE BEST EXOTIC MARIGOLD HOTEL (PG-13) 12:30, 3:30, 6:30 THE BOURNE LEGACY (PG-13) 12:15, 3:15, 6:15 CELESTE AND JESSE FOREVER (R) 1, 4, 7 FOR A GOOD TIME, CALL ... (R) 12:45, 3:45, 6:45 THE MASTER (R) Noon, 3, 6

Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend, 541-382-6347

2016: OBAMA’S AMERICA (PG) Fri-Tue, Thu: 1:40, 4:20, 7:20, 9:40 Wed: 1:40, 4:20 THE BOURNE LEGACY (PG-13) 12:05, 3:20, 6:40, 9:50 THE CAMPAIGN (R) 7:55, 10:10 THE DARK KNIGHT RISES IMAX (PG-13) 11:30 a.m., 6 DREDD 3-D (R) 3:40, 10:15 DREDD (R) 12:55, 7:45 END OF WATCH (R) 12:40, 4:05, 7:25, 10:05 FINDING NEMO 3-D (G) 11:45 a.m., 2:30, 6:10, 9:05 HOPE SPRINGS (PG-13) 1:20, 7:30 HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA (PG) 12:45, 1:55, 4:30, 6:05, 6:50, 9:10 HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA 3-D (PG) 11:35 a.m., 3:15, 9 HOUSE AT THE END OF THE STREET (PG-13) 1:10, 4:15, 7:40, 10:20

The Weinstein Company via AP

Philip Seymour Hoffman stars in the drama “The Master.� LAWLESS (R) 11:55 a.m., 2:40, 6:20, 9:30 LOOPER (R) 12:30, 3:30, 7:10, 10 THE ODD LIFE OF TIMOTHY GREEN (PG) 12:15, 2:50, 6:25, 9:15 PARANORMAN (PG) 1:30, 4:40 RESIDENT EVIL: RETRIBUTION (R) 3:50, 10:25 RESIDENT EVIL: RETRIBUTION IMAX (R) 3:05, 9:35 TROUBLE WITH THE CURVE (PG13) 12:20, 3, 6:35, 9:20 WON’T BACK DOWN (PG) 1, 3:55, 7, 9:45

McMenamins Old St. Francis School 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend, 541-330-8562

Due to Monday Night Football, no movies will be shown today.

• Accessibility devices are available for some movies at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX. • There may be an additional fee for 3-D movies. • IMAX films are $15.50 for adults and $13 for children (ages 3 to 11) and seniors (ages 60 and older). • Movie times are subject to change after press time.

Sisters Movie House 720 Desperado Court, Sisters, 541-549-8800

END OF WATCH (R) 6:30 HOPE SPRINGS (PG-13) 6:30 HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA (PG) 6 TROUBLE WITH THE CURVE (PG13) 6:15

MADRAS Madras Cinema 5 1101 S.W. U.S. Highway 97, Madras, 541-475-3505

After 7 p.m., shows are 21 and older only. Younger than 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.

DREDD (R) 5:20, 7:30 END OF WATCH (R) 4:50, 7:10 FINDING NEMO 3-D (G) 4:30, 6:50 HOUSE AT THE END OF THE STREET (PG-13) 5:10, 7:20 TROUBLE WITH THE CURVE (PG13) 4:40, 7

Tin Pan Theater 869 N.W. Tin Pan Alley, Bend, 541-241-2271

AI WEIWEI: NEVER SORRY (R) 6

PRINEVILLE

REDMOND

Pine Theater

Redmond Cinemas

214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond, 541-548-8777

HOPE SPRINGS (PG-13) 4, 6:15 HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA (PG) 5:15, 7:15 HOUSE AT THE END OF THE STREET (PG-13) 4:30, 6:45 TROUBLE WITH THE CURVE (PG13) 4:15, 6:45

HOPE SPRINGS (PG-13) 4, 7 HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA (UPSTAIRS — PG) 4:15 Pine Theater’s upstairs screening room has limited accessibility.

Weekly Arts & Entertainment Every Friday In

Providing unparalled service across a variety of industries since 1983.

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7:30 AM - 5:30 PM MON-FRI 8 AM - 3 PM SAT. Local Service. Local Knowledge. 541-848-4444 1000 SW Disk Dr. • Bend www.highdesertbank.com

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*In HD, these channels run three hours ahead. / Sports programming may vary. BD-Bend/Redmond/Sisters/Black Butte (Digital); PM-Prineville/Madras; SR-Sunriver; L-La Pine

ALSO IN HD; ADD 600 TO CHANNEL No.

BROADCAST/CABLE CHANNELS

BD PM SR L ^ KATU KTVZ % % % % KBNZ & KOHD ) ) ) ) KFXO * ` ` ` KOAB _ # _ # ( KGW KTVZDT2 , _ # / OPBPL 175 173

5:00

5:30

KATU News World News News Nightly News News Evening News KEZI 9 News World News America’s Funniest Home Videos Wild Kratts ‘Y’ Electric Comp. NewsChannel 8 Nightly News We There Yet? We There Yet? Lidia’s Italy Chefs A’Field

6:00

6:30

KATU News at 6 (N) ’ Å NewsChannel 21 at 6 (N) Å Access H. Old Christine KEZI 9 News KEZI 9 News Two/Half Men Two/Half Men This Old House Business Rpt. NewsChannel 8 News King of Queens King of Queens My Family Time Goes By

7:00

7:30

Jeopardy! ‘G’ Wheel Fortune Jeopardy! ‘G’ Wheel Fortune How I Met 30 Rock ’ ‘14’ Entertainment The Insider ‘PG’ Big Bang Big Bang PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Ă… Live at 7 (N) Inside Edition Engagement Engagement Live From Lincoln Center ’ ‘G’ Ă…

8:00

8:30

9:00

9:30

10:00

10:30

Dancing With the Stars: All-Stars (N) ’ ‘PG’ Ă… (10:01) Castle (N) ’ ‘PG’ Ă… The Voice Vocalists compete in blind auditions. (N) ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Revolution No Quarter (N) ’ ‘14’ How I Met Partners (N) ‘14’ 2 Broke Girls Mike & Molly ’ Hawaii Five-0 Kanalua (N) ’ ‘14’ Dancing With the Stars: All-Stars (N) ’ ‘PG’ Ă… (10:01) Castle (N) ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Bones (N) ‘14’ Ă… (DVS) The Mob Doctor (N) ’ ‘14’ Ă… News TMZ (N) ’ ‘PG’ Antiques Roadshow ‘G’ Ă… Half the Sky: Turning Oppression Into Opportunity for Women The Voice Vocalists compete in blind auditions. (N) ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Revolution No Quarter (N) ’ ‘14’ iHeartRadio Music Festival (N) ’ Ă… Seinfeld ‘PG’ Seinfeld ‘PG’ Placido Dom World News Tavis Smiley (N) Charlie Rose (N) ’ Ă…

11:00

11:30

KATU News (11:35) Nightline News Jay Leno News Letterman KEZI 9 News (11:35) Nightline The Simpsons Family Guy ‘14’ History Detectives ’ ‘G’ Ă… NewsChannel 8 Jay Leno ’Til Death ‘PG’ ’Til Death ‘PG’ PBS NewsHour ’ Ă…

BASIC CABLE CHANNELS

The First 48 ‘14’ Ă… Hoarders Kathleen; Scott ‘PG’ Hoarders Debra & Patty ‘PG’ Hoarders Charles & Alvin (N) ‘PG’ Intervention Amanda (N) ‘14’ (11:01) Intervention ‘14’ Ă… *A&E 130 28 18 32 The First 48 ‘14’ Ă… (3:00) ›› “King ›› “Pitch Blackâ€? (2000, Science Fiction) Radha Mitchell, Vin Diesel, Cole Hauser. Vicious crea- ››› “Terminator 2: Judgment Dayâ€? (1991, Science Fiction) Arnold Schwarzenegger, Linda Hamilton, Edward Fur››› “Terminator 2: Judgment Dayâ€? *AMC 102 40 39 Arthurâ€? tures stalk the survivors of a spaceship crash. Ă… long. Cyborgs battle over a youth who holds the key to the future. Ă… (1991), Linda Hamilton Ă… Fatal Attractions ’ ‘14’ Ă… North Woods Law: On the Hunt Frozen Planet ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Frozen Planet Spring ‘PG’ Ă… Frozen Planet Summer ‘PG’ Ă… Frozen Planet ’ ‘PG’ Ă… *ANPL 68 50 26 38 Monsters Inside Me ‘PG’ Ă… Housewives/NYC Housewives/NYC Housewives/NYC Housewives/NYC Housewives/NYC Gallery Girls (N) What Happens Housewives BRAVO 137 44 Reba ‘PG’ Ă… Reba ‘PG’ Ă… Reba ‘PG’ Ă… Reba ‘PG’ Ă… Reba ‘PG’ Ă… ›› “Elizabethtownâ€? (2005) Orlando Bloom. A flight attendant helps a man get back on track. Ă… CMT 190 32 42 53 Roseanne ‘PG’ Roseanne ‘PG’ Reba ‘PG’ Ă… Diamond Rush Secret Lives of American Greed Mad Money Diamond Rush Secret Lives of American Greed Teeter Hang Paid Program CNBC 54 36 40 52 Ultimate Factories ‘PG’ Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 Ă… Erin Burnett OutFront Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 Ă… Erin Burnett OutFront CNN 55 38 35 48 Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Ă… Always Sunny Tosh.0 ‘14’ Colbert Report Daily Show Futurama ‘PG’ Futurama ‘PG’ South Park ‘MA’ South Park ‘MA’ Brickleberry South Park ‘MA’ Daily Show Colbert Report COM 135 53 135 47 (4:58) Futurama Always Sunny Dept./Trans. City Edition Paid Program Morning Oregon Desert Cooking Oregon Joy of Fishing Journal Get Outdoors Visions of NW The Yoga Show The Yoga Show Morning Oregon City Edition COTV 11 Politics & Public Policy Today CSPAN 61 20 12 11 Politics & Public Policy Today Phineas, Ferb Phineas, Ferb Good-Charlie Gravity Falls ’ Good-Charlie Austin & Ally ’ ›› “Mostly Ghostlyâ€? (2008) Sterling Beaumon, Ali Lohan. ’ Ă… Phineas, Ferb A.N.T. Farm ‘G’ My Babysitter *DIS 87 43 14 39 Phineas, Ferb American Chopper ’ ‘PG’ Ă… American Chopper ’ ‘PG’ Ă… American Chopper ’ ‘PG’ Ă… American Chopper (N) ‘PG’ Ă… Fast N’ Loud (N) ’ ‘14’ Ă… American Chopper ’ ‘PG’ Ă… *DISC 156 21 16 37 Fast N’ Loud ’ ‘14’ Ă… Keeping Up With the Kardashians Fashion Police ‘14’ E! News (N) Keeping Up With the Kardashians Keeping Up With the Kardashians Jonas Jonas Chelsea Lately E! News *E! 136 25 NFL Football Chicago Bears at Dallas Cowboys (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… NFL PrimeTime (N) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… ESPN 21 23 22 23 Monday Night 2012 World Series of Poker Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter Football Live Baseball Ton. NFL Presents SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… College Football ESPN2 22 24 21 24 World/Poker 30 for 30 Ă… 30 for 30 Ă… ESPNC 23 25 123 25 2012 Ryder Cup Final Day From the Medinah Country Club in Medinah, Ill. (N) SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. ESPNN 24 63 124 203 SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… Switched at Birth ’ ‘14’ Ă… Switched at Birth (N) ‘14’ Ă… ››› “My Best Friend’s Weddingâ€? (1997) Julia Roberts. The 700 Club ’ ‘PG’ Ă… FAM 67 29 19 41 (4:00) ››› “A League of Their Ownâ€? (1992) Tom Hanks. Hannity (N) On Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Ă… Hannity On Record, Greta Van Susteren The Five FNC 57 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Ă… Paula’s Cooking Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive $24 in 24 (N) Diners, Drive Diners, Drive *FOOD 177 62 98 44 Best Dishes (4:00) ››› “Saltâ€? (2010) How I Met How I Met Two/Half Men Two/Half Men › “What Happens in Vegasâ€? (2008) Cameron Diaz, Ashton Kutcher, Rob Corddry. › “What Happens in Vegasâ€? (2008), Rob Corddry FX 131 Love It or List It ‘G’ Ă… Love It or List It ‘G’ Ă… Love It or List It (N) ‘G’ Ă… House Hunters Hunters Int’l Love It or List It Olmstead ‘G’ HGTV 176 49 33 43 Property Brothers Kate & Cole ‘G’ Property Brothers ‘G’ Ă… *HIST 155 42 41 36 Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Counting Cars Counting Cars Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ (11:02) American Pickers ‘PG’ My Ghost Story ‘PG’ Ă… My Ghost Story ‘PG’ Ă… ›› “Tyler Perry’s the Family That Preysâ€? (2008) Kathy Bates, Alfre Woodard. Ă… Project Runway It’s Fashion Baby ‘PG’ Ă… LIFE 138 39 20 31 Celebrity Ghost Stories ‘PG’ The Rachel Maddow Show (N) The Last Word The Ed Show The Rachel Maddow Show The Last Word Hardball With Chris Matthews MSNBC 59 59 128 51 The Ed Show (N) Jersey Shore One Shot ‘14’ Ă… Jersey Shore ’ ‘14’ Ă… Ridiculousness Ridiculousness Ridiculousness Ridiculousness Ridiculousness Inbetweeners Guy Code To the Night Out ‘14’ MTV 192 22 38 57 Jersey Shore ’ ‘14’ Ă… SpongeBob Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles ’ Drake & Josh Drake & Josh Full House ‘G’ Full House ‘G’ Full House ‘G’ Full House ‘G’ The Nanny ‘PG’ The Nanny ‘PG’ Friends ’ ‘PG’ (11:33) Friends NICK 82 46 24 40 SpongeBob Main Street Undercover Boss ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Undercover Boss Belfor ’ ‘PG’ Lovetown, USA (N) ’ ‘PG’ Lovetown, USA (N) ’ ‘14’ Lovetown, USA (N) ’ ‘PG’ Lovetown, USA ’ ‘PG’ OWN 161 103 31 103 Main Street Mariners Mariners Pre. MLB Baseball Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim at Seattle Mariners From Safeco Field in Seattle. (N) (Live) Mariners Post. The Dan Patrick Show MLB Baseball ROOT 20 45 28* 26 College Football ›››› “Star Wars IV: A New Hopeâ€? (1977, Science Fiction) Mark Hamill, Harrison Ford. ’ Repo Games ’ Repo Games ’ SPIKE 132 31 34 46 (4:30) ›› “Robin Hoodâ€? (2010) Russell Crowe. Robin and his men battle the Sheriff of Nottingham. ’ Warehouse 13 Second Chances Warehouse 13 ’ Ă… Alphas Life After Death (N) ‘14’ Warehouse 13 (N) ’ ‘14’ Ă… (10:01) Alphas ‘14’ (11:01) Warehouse 13 ‘14’ Ă… SYFY 133 35 133 45 Warehouse 13 Endless Wonder Behind Scenes Living Edge Kingdom Conn. Jesse Duplantis Praise the Lord Ă… Joel Osteen Manna-Fest Live-Holy Land Creflo Dollar Praise the Lord Ă… TBN 205 60 130 Friends ’ ‘14’ King of Queens King of Queens Seinfeld ’ ‘G’ Seinfeld ‘PG’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Conan (N) ‘14’ Ă… *TBS 16 27 11 28 Friends ’ ‘14’ ›› “Me and My Galâ€? (1932, Comedy) Spencer Tracy, ››› “A Man’s Castleâ€? (1933) Spencer Tracy. A shanty- ››› “The Power and the Gloryâ€? (1933, Drama) Spencer ›› “Dante’s Infernoâ€? (1935, Drama) Spencer Tracy, Claire ››› “20,000 Years in Sing Singâ€? TCM 101 44 101 29 Joan Bennett, Marion Burns. Premiere. town drifter grows to love a naive woman. Tracy, Colleen Moore, Ralph Morgan. Ă… Trevor, Henry B. Walthall. Premiere. (1933) Spencer Tracy. Ă… Breaking Amish: Extended Epi (9:06) Breaking Amish: Extended Episodes (N) ‘14’ Breaking Amish: Extended Epi Breaking Amish: *TLC 178 34 32 34 Say Yes, Dress Say Yes, Dress Island Medium Island Medium Breaking Amish: Extended Epi The Mentalist Bloodhounds ‘14’ The Mentalist Red Alert ’ ‘14’ Major Crimes ‘14’ Ă… Major Crimes (N) ‘14’ Ă… The Mentalist Blood Money ‘14’ Major Crimes ‘14’ Ă… *TNT 17 26 15 27 The Mentalist ’ ‘14’ Ă… Johnny Test ’ Regular Show Regular Show Wrld, Gumball Adventure Time Adventure Time Regular Show Annoying King of the Hill King of the Hill American Dad American Dad Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ *TOON 84 Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Bourdain: No Reservations Bourdain: No Reservations Bourdain: No Reservations Bizarre Foods/Zimmern *TRAV 179 51 45 42 Bourdain: No Reservations M*A*S*H ‘PG’ M*A*S*H ‘PG’ M*A*S*H ‘PG’ Cosby Show Cosby Show Cosby Show Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond King of Queens King of Queens TVLND 65 47 29 35 Bonanza Jack Knife ‘G’ Ă… NCIS Minimum Security ’ ‘PG’ NCIS: Los Angeles ’ ‘14’ Ă… WWE Monday Night RAW (N) ’ Ă… CSI: Crime Scene Investigation USA 15 30 23 30 NCIS Sub Rosa ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Basketball Wives LA ’ ‘14’ Basketball Wives LA ’ ‘14’ Basketball Wives LA (N) ’ ‘14’ T.I. and Tiny Chrissy & Jones Basketball Wives LA ’ ‘14’ T.I. and Tiny Chrissy & Jones VH1 191 48 37 54 (4:00) ›› “Fat Albertâ€? (2004) PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(5:35) ››› “Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearlâ€? 2003 ‘PG-13’ Jason and the Argonauts ‘PG’ Ă… ›› “Bad Teacherâ€? 2011 Cameron Diaz. ‘R’ Ă… (11:05) › “The Avengersâ€? 1998 ENCR 106 401 306 401 (3:45) Gattaca ›› “Blowâ€? 2001, Drama Johnny Depp, PenĂŠlope Cruz, Franka Potente. ‘R’ Ă… ›› “We Own the Nightâ€? 2007 Joaquin Phoenix. ‘R’ Ă… FMC 104 204 104 120 ›› “Blowâ€? 2001, Drama Johnny Depp, PenĂŠlope Cruz, Franka Potente. ‘R’ Ă… UFC Fight Night UFC: Struve vs. Miocic Strangers UFC Tonight UFC Reloaded UFC 143: Diaz vs. Condit Nick Diaz takes on Carlos Condit. FUEL 34 Top 10 PGA Tour Fall Series Highlights Greenbrier Greenbrier Golf Central PGA Tour Fall Series Highlights Greenbrier Greenbrier The Golf Fix GOLF 28 301 27 301 Top 10 (N) Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ NUMB3RS Vector ’ ‘PG’ Ă… NUMB3RS ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Frasier ‘PG’ Frasier ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘G’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ HALL 66 33 175 33 The Waltons The Heritage ‘G’ (3:55) “Shattered ››› “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1â€? 2010, Fantasy Daniel Radcliffe. Harry sets Real Time With Bill Maher Journalist ››› “Extremely Loud & Incredibly Closeâ€? 2011 Tom Hanks. A boy searches Boxing Jason Escalera vs. Edwin HBO 425 501 425 501 Glassâ€? ’ out to destroy the secrets to Voldemort’s power. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… John Feehery. ‘MA’ Ă… New York for clues related to a mysterious key. ‘PG-13’ Rodriguez, Super Middleweights ››› “Night of the Living Deadâ€? 1968, Horror Duane Jones. ‘NR’ ›› “The Ringerâ€? 2005, Comedy Johnny Knoxville, Brian Cox. ‘NR’ ››› “Night of the Living Deadâ€? 1968, Horror Duane Jones. ‘NR’ “Tooth & Nailâ€? 2007, Horror ‘R’ IFC 105 105 (4:05) ›› “Hart’s Warâ€? 2002 Bruce (6:10) ›› “What’s Your Number?â€? 2011 Anna Faris. Premiere. A woman ›› “The Change-Upâ€? 2011, Comedy Ryan Reynolds. An overworked lawyer ›› “The Matrix Revolutionsâ€? 2003, Science Fiction Keanu Reeves. Neo, MorMAX 400 508 508 Willis. Premiere. ’ ‘R’ Ă… wonders if one of 20 exes could be her true love. ’ ‘R’ Ă… and his carefree buddy switch bodies. ’ ‘NR’ Ă… pheus and Trinity battle vicious machines. ’ ‘R’ Ă… Alaska State Troopers ‘14’ To Catch a Smuggler ‘PG’ Drugs, Inc. Ecstasy ‘14’ To Catch a Smuggler ‘PG’ Drugs, Inc. Ecstasy ‘14’ Alaska State Troopers ‘14’ Wild Justice Fish & Meth ‘14’ NGC 157 157 Odd Parents Planet Sheen Planet Sheen Avatar: Air. Avatar: Air. Odd Parents Odd Parents SpongeBob SpongeBob Avatar: Air. Avatar: Air. Dragon Ball Z Iron Man: Armor NTOON 89 115 189 115 Odd Parents Profess. Fisher’s ATV Dirt Trax TV Destination Pol. PBR Outdoors Best of West Headhunters TV The Crush Fisher’s ATV Dirt Trax TV Destination Pol. Overhaul OUTD 37 307 43 307 Legends of Fall Hunt Masters (3:45) ››› “Stardustâ€? 2007, Fantasy ››› “Fright Nightâ€? 2011, Horror Anton Yelchin, Colin Farrell. A teenager Dexter Are You ...? Deb tries to cover Homeland The Smile A former asset Dexter Are You ...? Deb tries to cover Homeland The Smile A former asset SHO 500 500 Claire Danes. ‘PG-13’ discovers that his new neighbor is a vampire. ’ ‘R’ Ă… up involvement. ‘MA’ Ă… threatens Carrie’s peace. ‘MA’ up involvement. ‘MA’ Ă… threatens Carrie’s peace. ‘MA’ Gearz ‘G’ Hot Rod TV ‘G’ Hot Rod TV ‘14’ Truck U ‘G’ Truck U ‘G’ Gearz ‘G’ Gearz ‘G’ Hot Rod TV ‘G’ Hot Rod TV ‘14’ Truck U ‘G’ Truck U ‘G’ Unique Whips ‘14’ SPEED 35 303 125 303 Gearz ‘G’ Boss Backflash ’ ‘MA’ Ă… Boss The Conversation ’ ‘MA’ ››› “Shanghai Knightsâ€? 2003 Jackie Chan. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… Boss The Conversation ’ ‘MA’ ››› “The Rockâ€? 1996 ‘R’ Ă… STARZ 300 408 300 408 (4:00) ›› “The Green Hornetâ€? (4:30) ››› “Trekkiesâ€? 1997 Denise ›› “How to Lose a Guy in 10 Daysâ€? 2003 Kate Hudson. A writer bets she can ›› “Spoken Wordâ€? 2009, Drama Kuno Becker, Ruben Blades. A poet returns › “Hotel Californiaâ€? 2008 Erik Palladino. A hoodlum re- (11:40) “Good TMC 525 525 Crosby. ‘PG’ Ă… seduce a man and then drive him away. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… home and reverts to the ways of his youth. ’ ‘NR’ Ă… turns 18 months after a deal gone bad. ‘NR’ Neighboursâ€? ‘R’ ››› “The Naturalâ€? (1984) Robert Redford, Robert Duvall. A flawed baseball hero gets a new chance. Boxing Tomasz Adamek vs. Eddie Chambers NBCSN 27 58 30 209 (4:00) ››› “The Naturalâ€? (1984) Robert Redford, Robert Duvall. Joan & Melissa: Joan *WE 143 41 174 118 Roseanne ‘PG’ Roseanne ‘PG’ Roseanne ‘PG’ Roseanne ‘PG’ Roseanne ‘PG’ Roseanne ‘PG’ Roseanne ‘PG’ Roseanne ‘PG’ Roseanne ‘PG’ Roseanne ‘PG’ Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ Ă…


MONDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

A  & A  

Cemetery wreath thief does disservice to family Dear Abby: I need to let off some steam because the more I think about an incident that happened last summer, the madder I get. My sister and I take turns (a few days at a time) caring for our 91-year-old mother, who has Alzheimer’s and can’t be left alone. My family lives 60 miles from my mother, so before returning to my home for the Fourth of July, I took flowers to the family cemetery, which is close to Mom’s house. It’s something I do every year, and the tradition holds great meaning for me. It was late afternoon on Saturday when I took wreaths I had made for each of my grandparents, an uncle, my precious son (who was 5 years old when he died), and my dear late sister who was recently laid to rest. Each wreath was unique — I had carefully chosen favorite flowers and colors. Even though the wreaths were artificial, they were pretty, and I felt proud to display them on the graves of my loved ones. The following evening, my sister called me after she had delivered her flowers to the cemetery. I was shocked to hear the news that my offerings were no longer on the graves — someone had taken them! (I am positive that the wind hadn’t blown them away because I was careful to secure them in the ground.) I have heard stories about people stealing floral displays from graves to put on other graves — even selling them at yard sales. However, I have come up with a solution: The next time I take a wreath to the cemetery, I’ll put on my rubber gloves and add poison ivy to the greenery. — Itching To Get Even in Cincinnati Dear Itching: I don’t blame

DEAR A B B Y you for being angry, and your solution is both clever and diabolical. However, as much as you would like to get even with the wreath thief, please don’t do anything rash. An innocent person — like a groundskeeper — might pick up the wreath and suffer the consequences. Dear Abby: I recently attended a beautiful, fairy-tale wedding. When it came time for the bride and groom to cut the cake, the groom fed his bride a bite and then smashed the rest all over her face. It went all over her dress and destroyed her makeup. I’m sure she was angry and humiliated. I have been to lots of weddings over the years and have seen this happen over and over. I’m not old, Abby, I’m only 35 — so no one can say I’m a crotchety old woman. My point is, this man had just promised to love, cherish, honor and endow his bride with all his worldly goods. Then he negated his vow with a blatant disregard for her self-respect in front of family and friends. I’m all for food and fun, in its place. However, I don’t feel a day that has been planned and prepared for months — and sometimes years, wads of money spent for a dress, veil, makeup, etc. — deserves to be defiled. I have also seen grooms treated this way by brides. It is just wrong! — Offended in Grand Prairie, Texas Dear Offended: I agree. Not only is it wrong, but it is also an indication of the perpetrator’s level of immaturity. — Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

Horoscope: Happy Birthday for Monday, Oct. 1, 2012 By Jacqueline Bigar This year you often will consider your relationships and continually evaluate how much to give. In disagreements, consider that both of you might be right. Sometimes you are very hard on yourself. Release that quality. If you are single, dating will be your favorite game. Do not feel pressure to commit. If you are attached, you will find that you can bring both of you closer together or create more distance between you — the call is yours. TAURUS is a peaceful soul, like you. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHH You alternate between optimism and a trancelike state. Some of you might feel beaten down or confused. This ambivalence will even out, given time. Honor your feelings, and understand that they are real when they occur. Tonight: Consider a budget revision. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHH You could have many ideas, yet isolating the correct path might be more important than you realize. Know that you need to listen to your instincts. You will find the answer quickly and will act accordingly. Unless a project is practical, nix it. Tonight: Your beaming smile draws in many people. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHH Where you are is where you want to be, for now. Surround yourself with friends and/or associates who offer different perspectives. A meeting could be more important than you realize. You might be worrying a little too much about the outcome of a situation. Tonight: Take some muchneeded personal time. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHH Accept your role as nurturer and leader. You might feel undermined in a creative venture or by a loved one. Mixed messages could be at the core of the problem. Wait until later today or even tomorrow before exploring the issue at hand. Tonight: Find your friends. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHHH Your broad perspective is needed. First, make sure you are not reacting to a personal attack. You could be concerned that miscommunication could throw plans up in the air. Do what you need in order to detach from the situation. Your actions will change the game. Tonight: Burn the candle at both ends. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH You tend to interact rather intensely with others. Discussions revolve around a partnership as well

as a separate issue involving travel and possibly education. This period favors brainstorming over taking action. Trust your judgment. Tonight: Go for some lightness and good music. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH You might decide to start counting how many complicated people are in your life. Dealing with these individuals is a handful, and you will encounter some of them today. These interactions might have you feeling off-kilter. Honor your feelings, and use your intellect in order to respond effectively. Tonight: A close conversation. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHH Recognize your own bias when dealing with someone you generally look up to. You might have mixed feelings, presently. Separate your energy from the immediate issue at hand. Fundamentally, you are not speaking the same language, and this creates a misunderstanding. Tonight: Try dinner and a talk. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHHH Tap into your creativity rather than absorb someone’s negativity and/or fear. You know what the possibilities are, and you’ll start to see even more. Dare to make a dream a reality, especially if it involves a domestic issue. Your imagination flows through nearly everything you touch. Tonight: Add in a little friendly warmth. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHH You might want to understand what a family member expects from you. Real estate and domestic matters could weave together. You might be under more pressure than you realize to maintain a strong presence and deal with a situation at home. Tap into your vision of what you want to happen. Tonight: Let your hair down. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHH You express yourself with clarity when addressing a misunderstanding or a difference in viewpoints with an important person in your daily life. Good feelings will prevail between you and a loved one. You consider this person to be part of your family, even if he or she is not. Tonight: Hunker down at your pad. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH You might be concerned about whether you are pitching in enough or perhaps too much. Look within yourself. If you have resentment, you are doing too much. If you experience guilt, you need to do more. Refuse to take on someone else’s opinions. You know who you are. Tonight: A leisurely chat over a meal. Š 2012 by King Features Syndicate

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C C  Please email event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� at www.bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

TODAY NO EVENTS LISTED.

TUESDAY “ETHOS�: A screening of the film about system flaws that work against democracy and the environment; free; 6:30 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend; 541-815-6504. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Kaya Mclaren talks about her book “How I Came to Sparkle Again�; free; 6:30 p.m.; Between the Covers, 645 N.W. Delaware Ave., Bend; 541-385-4766 or www. btcbooks.com. PUB QUIZ: Answer questions in rounds on different topics; donations benefit the Kurera Foundation; $40 per team of five; 6:30-9 p.m.; The Summit Saloon & Stage, 125 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-749-2440.

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin file photo

Members of the Central Oregon Mastersingers practice at Central Oregon Community College in 2006. The choir will perform Saturday at the First Presbyterian Church in Bend.

WEDNESDAY PUMPKIN PATCH: Free admission; noon-6 p.m.; Central Oregon Pumpkin Company, 1250 N.E. Wilcox Ave., Terrebonne; 541-504-1414 or www. pumpkinco.com. BEND FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 3-7 p.m.; Brooks Alley, between Northwest Franklin Avenue and Northwest Brooks Street; 541-408-4998, bendfarmersmarket@gmail.com or www.bendfarmersmarket. com. BUDDY WAKEFIELD: Two-time Individual World Poetry Slam champion performs; registration requested; $15, free for students; 7 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Hitchcock Auditorium, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-647-2233 or www.thenatureofwords.org. ROB LARKIN AND THE WAYWARD ONES: The Los Angeles-based roots-rock band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www. mcmenamins.com. “WRONG WINDOW�: Cascades Theatrical Company presents the comedy about a couple who think they have witnessed a murder through a window; $24, $18 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www. cascadestheatrical.org. MUSIC OF INDIA: Featuring a performance by the Mysore violin brothers; $15 in advance, $20 at the door; 7:30 p.m., doors open at 7 p.m.; The Old Stone, 157 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; 541-322-7273 or www. bendticket.com.

THURSDAY PUMPKIN PATCH: Free admission; noon-6 p.m.; Central Oregon Pumpkin Company, 1250 N.E. Wilcox Ave., Terrebonne; 541-504-1414 or www. pumpkinco.com. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Julia Kennedy Cochran presents her father’s memoir, “Ed Kennedy’s War: V-E Day, Censorship and the Associated Press�; free; 6:30 p.m.; East Bend Public Library, 62080 Dean Swift Road; 541-330-3760 or tinad@ deschuteslibrary.org. “LAWRENCE OF ARABIA�: A screening of the 1962, PG film about a British military figure and his conflicted loyalties; $12.50; 7 p.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347 or www.fathomevents.com. “SPIRIT STORIES�: A performance of “Spirit Stories,� readings from the poetic drama of William Butler Yeats; featuring “Purgatory� and “At the Hawk’s Well�; $5 suggested donation; 7 p.m.; Innovation Theatre Works, 1155 S.W. Division St., Bend; 541-504-6721. JEFF CROSBY & THE REFUGEES: The Idaho-based Americana band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www. mcmenamins.com. SPEAKNOW: High-school students compete in a spoken word competition; $10, free to participate; 7 p.m., registration at 6:30 p.m.; The Old Stone, 157 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; www. thenatureofwords.org. “WRONG WINDOW�: Cascades Theatrical Company presents the comedy about a couple who think they have witnessed a murder through a window; $24,

$18 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3890803 or www.cascadestheatrical. org. BILLY DON BURNS: The country artist performs; $5; 8 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; 541-7280879 or www.reverbnation. com/venue/thehornedhand. BOOM VARIETAL, THE RISE OF MALBEC: A screening of the wine documentary filmed in Argentina; $3; 8:30 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www. mcmenamins.com.

FRIDAY PUMPKIN PATCH: Free admission; noon-6 p.m.; Central Oregon Pumpkin Company, 1250 N.E. Wilcox Ave., Terrebonne; 541-5041414 or www.pumpkinco.com. CORN MAIZE: $7.50, $5.50 ages 116, free ages 5 and younger; 3-7 p.m.; Central Oregon Pumpkin Company, 1250 N.E. Wilcox Ave., Terrebonne; 541-504-1414 or www.pumpkinco. org. BEND FALL FESTIVAL: The annual event kicks off with a concert by Mosley Wotta, Sophistafunk and Radiation City; free; 5 p.m.; downtown Bend; 541-389-0995 or www.c3events.com. FIRST FRIDAY GALLERY WALK: Event includes art exhibit openings, artist talks, live music, wine and food in downtown Bend and the Old Mill District; free; 5-9 p.m.; throughout Bend. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: April Streeter talks about her book “Women on Wheels�; free; 6 p.m.; Bend Electric Bikes, 223 N.W. Hill St.; 541-410-7408 or info@ bendelectricbikes.com. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Keith Scribner talks about his book “The Oregon Experiment�; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 252 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-0866. “SPIRIT STORIES�: Readings from the poetic drama of William Butler Yeats; featuring “Purgatory� and “At the Hawk’s Well�; $5 suggested donation; 7 p.m.; Innovation Theatre Works, 1155 S.W. Division St., Bend; 541-504-6721. “THE BEST EXOTIC MARIGOLD HOTEL�: A screening of the PG13-rated 2011 film; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541475-3351 or www.jcld.org. “WE, A COLLECTION OF INDIVIDUALS� AND “ACT NATURAL�: A screening of the Red Bull Media ski film, followed by a screening of the ski/snowboard film “Act Natural�; $13.50 plus fees; 7:30 p.m., doors open at 6:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre. org. “WRONG WINDOW�: Cascades Theatrical Company presents the comedy about a couple who think they have witnessed a murder through a window; $24, $18 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www. cascadestheatrical.org. JEFF CROSBY & THE REFUGEES: The Americana band performs; $5; 8 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; 541728-0879 or www.reverbnation. com/venue/thehornedhand. HANK SHREVE BAND: The blues band performs, with Jaccuzi; $5; 8:30 p.m.; Liquid Lounge, 70 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend; 541-389-6999. FLOATER: The Oregon rock band performs an acoustic set, with Jones Road; $15 plus fees in advance, $18 at the door; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W.

Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-7882989 or www.randompresents.com. THE HENHOUSE PROWLERS: The Chicago-based bluegrass act performs; $7; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3888331 or www.silvermoonbrewing. com.

SATURDAY PRINEVILLE FARMERS MARKET: Free; 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Prineville City Plaza, 387 N.E. Third St.; 503-739-0643 or prinevillefarmersmarket@gmail. com. VFW BREAKFAST: Community breakfast with pancakes and sausage or ham and eggs; $8, $7 senors and children ages 6 and younger; 8:30-10:30 a.m.; VFW Hall, 1503 N.E. Fourth St., Bend; 541-389-0775. CRAFT AND BAKE SALE: �Cold Hands, Warm Hearts� sale, with a silent auction; proceeds benefit local nonprofits; free admission; 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; First United Methodist Church, 680 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-1672 or cver59@ bendbroadband.com. PUMPKIN PATCH: Free admission; 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; DD Ranch, 3836 N.E. Smith Rock Way, Terrebonne; 541548-1432 or www.ddranch.net. CORN MAIZE: Fridays; $7.50, $5.50 ages 11-6, free ages 5 and younger; 10 a.m.-7 p.m.; Central Oregon Pumpkin Company, 1250 N.E. Wilcox Ave., Terrebonne; 541-5041414 or www.pumpkinco.org. FARM FESTIVAL: Featuring a pumpkin patch, hay rides, petting zoo, a BBQ and more; $25 per vehicle; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; DD Ranch, 3836 N.E. Smith Rock Way, Terrebonne; 541-548-1432 or info@ ofco.org. BEND FALL FESTIVAL: A celebration of all things fall featuring activities, a fashion show, contests, art and food; Sara Jackson Holman, The Horde and the Harem, Leaves Russel, Tango Alpha Tango, Sophistafunk, Larry and His Flask and the Steve Kimock Band perform; free; Family Harvest Area closes at 5 p.m; downtown Bend; 541-389-0995 or www.c3events. com/events/Bend-Fall-Festival/. GENEALOGY 101: Learn the basics of genealogy and what resources the library offers; free; 1 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1050. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Keith Scribner talks about his book “The Oregon Experiment�; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 422 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-526-1491. “OCCUPIED CASCADIA�: A screening of the documentary film about bioregionalism in the Pacific Northwest; $10 plus fees; 8:30 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-3170700 or www.towertheatre.org. “WRONG WINDOW�: Cascades Theatrical Company presents the comedy about a couple who think they have witnessed a murder through a window; $24, $18 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3890803 or www.cascadestheatrical. org. BEND COMMUNITY CONTRADANCE: Featuring caller Ron Bell-Roemer and music by Fiddlplay; $7; 7 p.m. beginner’s workshop, 7:30 p.m. dance; Boys & Girls Club of Bend, 500 N.W. Wall St.; 541-330-8943. CENTRAL OREGON MASTERSINGERS: The premier choir presents “For the Love of Singing� under the direction of Clyde Thompson; reception to follow; free; 7:30 p.m.; First

Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend; 541-385-7229 or www.co-mastersingers.com. THE FRED EAGLESMITH BAND: The storytelling folk singer performs; $25 suggested donation; 8 p.m., doors open at 7 p.m.; HarmonyHouse, 17505 Kent Road, Sisters; 541-548-2209. THE HORDE AND THE HAREM: The indie-rock band performs, with Third Seven’s CD release; $5; 8 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; 541728-0879 or www.reverbnation. com/venue/thehornedhand.

SUNDAY PUMPKIN PATCH: Free admission; 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; DD Ranch, 3836 N.E. Smith Rock Way, Terrebonne; 541548-1432 or www.ddranch.net. CORN MAIZE: $7.50, $5.50 ages 116, free ages 5 and younger; 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Central Oregon Pumpkin Company, 1250 N.E. Wilcox Ave., Terrebonne; 541-504-1414 or www. pumpkinco.org. PUMPKIN PATCH: Free admission; 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Central Oregon Pumpkin Company, 1250 N.E. Wilcox Ave., Terrebonne; 541-5041414 or www.pumpkinco.com. BEND FALL FESTIVAL: A celebration of all things fall featuring activities, a fashion show, contests, art and food; Five Pint Mary and Tony Smiley perform; free; Family Harvest Area closes at 4 p.m.; music at 1 p.m.; downtown Bend; 541-389-0995 or www.c3events. com/events/Bend-Fall-Festival/. FALL BOOK SALE: The Friends of the Bend Public Library hosts a bag sale of books; free admission, $4 per bag; 1-4 p.m.; Deschutes Library Administration Building, 507 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-312-1021. KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS OKTOBERFEST: The eighth annual event features live music, food and more; $15, $5 ages 6-12, free ages 5 and younger; 1-6 p.m.; St. Edward the Martyr Church, 123 Trinity Way, Sisters; 541-549-9391 or www. stedwardsisters.org. “WRONG WINDOW�: Cascades Theatrical Company presents the comedy about a couple who think they have witnessed a murder through a window; $24, $18 seniors, $12 students; 2 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www. cascadestheatrical.org. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Julia Kennedy Cochran presents her father’s memoir, “Ed Kennedy’s War: V-E Day, Censorship and the Associated Press�; free; 2 p.m.; Barnes & Noble Booksellers, 2690 E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-3187242 or tinad@deschuteslibrary.org. NOTABLES SWING BAND: The big band plays swing, blues, Latin, rock ’n’ roll and waltzes; $5; 2-4 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-639-7734 or www.notablesswingband.com. SECOND SUNDAY: Marjorie Sandor reads from a selection of her works; followed by an open mic; free; 2 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1032 or www. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. MUSICA MAESTRALE: The Portland-based early music ensemble featuring Hideki Yamaya, Adaiha Macadam-Somer and Noah Strick performs; donations accepted; 7:30 p.m.; private residence, 67155 Sunburst St. , Bend; 503-213-3144 or www.hyamaya.com. SEAN HAYES: The San Franciscobased indie-folk artist returns, with Birds of Chicago; $18; 7:30 p.m.; Mandala Yoga Community, tbd loft, 55 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-678-5183 or www. mandalayogabend.com.


C4

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2012

TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

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DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


MONDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

BIZARRO

C5

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C6

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2012

Broadband

Ethan Pines / The New York Times file photo

A security officer stands watch at a data center in Las Vegas in 2010. Data centers, the backbone of the Web, consume an enormous amount of power to carry out the demands of Internet users.

Data Continued from C1 In Santa Clara, Calif., a hub of technology facilities in Silicon Valley, diesel emissions from generators at a Microsoft data center landed the company on a list of polluters for potentially threatening the health of workers at nearby businesses. Microsoft, which was notified by state regulators last year, says it has reduced its emissions. Over the last few years, Quincy has become an unlikely technology outpost, with five data centers and a sixth under construction. Far from the software meccas of Northern California or Seattle, Quincy has barely 6,900 residents, two hardware stores, two supermarkets, no movie theater and a main drag, State Route 28, whose largest buildings are mostly food packers and processors. Its tallest building is a grain elevator. “A farming community in the middle of a desert,” said Warren Morgan, the president of Double Diamond Fruit. The remarkable scale of the Quincy data centers, and their power demands, have made this town something of a test tube for studying the planet’s exploding need to house and process digital information. The data centers, which also include Yahoo and Dell facilities, wound up in Quincy by way of the Columbia. The river flows 1,200 miles from the mountains of British Columbia to the spectacular gorge between Oregon and Washington, where the water crashes into the Pacific Ocean. Along the way, about a dozen large hydroelectric dams tame the river, provid-

ing irrigation for farms and the cheap, plentiful power that has become a magnet for large agricultural operations and heavy industries like aluminum, steel, paper and chemical plants. When Microsoft was searching the country for a location for its new installation, the Grant County Public Utility District, which owns two of the dams, says it offered the company rates that would range from 2.5 cents to 3.8 cents per kilowatt-hour in its first five years — far below the national industrial average of 6 cents to 7 cents, according to the Electric Power Research Institute. The power from dams is also highly reliable, a critical factor for data centers, which can crash with the slightest interruption. Microsoft’s operation has now spread to four buildings and is the largest of Quincy’s data centers. Taken together, Microsoft and Yahoo’s operations overwhelm all nonindustrial electric usage, utility figures show. All residential and small commercial accounts in Quincy consumed an average of 9.5 million watts last year, while Microsoft and Yahoo used 41.8 million watts, the utility said. Morgan, the president of Double Diamond Fruit, said the positive impact overall had been far less than many people imagined. As for all the digital services that data centers power around the country, Morgan said, “I understand that it’s a necessary situation for us as a society and the way we want to live.” “But I don’t think it’s benefiting Quincy,” he said. “I think we’re taking one for the team, to tell you the truth.”

Continued from C1 Those living in Central Oregon and Portland, the regions with the highest adoption rates, were the most likely to feel that it is important to have highspeed Internet access at home, according to the report. Based on separate data from the Federal Communications Commission, about 99.5 percent of Deschutes County had access to broadband in 2011. In Crook County, about 91 percent had access and about 89 percent in Jefferson County. Lee, of EDCO, said those in the High Desert have multiple options for service, and he agreed that cost, not availability, is more of an issue for Central Oregonians who are not using broadband. “In other parts of the world, it is really cheap,” he said, “as low as $10 a month.” On average, broadband costs users about $43 a month in Central Oregon, according to the survey. The figure is nearly $6 a month less than the Portland Metro region, which had the highest rate. In addition to quantifying the number of broadband adopters, Jones said the survey also aimed to identify what they used it for, in hopes of aiding the Oregon Broadband Advisory Council. However, a lot has changed in the two years since the survey was conducted, with much of it fueled by federal stimulus funding. In Crook County, a public computer lab opened in August 2011 as part of the Central Oregon Community College Crook County Open Campus. Funded, in part, by nearly $4 million through the Broadband Technology Opportunity Program and by COCC, the project contains multiple classrooms with the latest technology, teaching resources and the computer lab, according to the website of Oregon Open Campus, which is run by Oregon Statue University. BendBroadband, the Bend-based cable TV, Internet and telephone pro-

Home internet Clatsop ColumbiaMultnomah 88% 76% 80% Hood usage in River Washington Oregon Tillamook 89% 78% 82% Yamhill by county Clackamas 88%

Umatilla Wallowa Sherman Morrow 78% 83% 61% Gilliam 58% Union 77% 54% Wasco 83% Polk Marion 80% Wheeler Baker 77% Lincoln 93% Jefferson Grant 80% 50% 78% Benton 84% Linn 81% 98% 90% Crook 91% Lane Deschutes 87% 89% Malheur 72% Harney Coos Douglas 71% Lake 85% 81% 68%

67% and below 68% to 75% 76% to 80% 81% to 86% 87% and above

Curry Josephine 71% 73% Jackson 84%

Klamath 79%

Type of internet service by region Portland

North Central

Central Oregon

Northwest Coast

Central Coast

Southwest Oregon

South Central

Eastern Oregon

Cable modem

48%

25%

41%

28%

46%

32%

27%

14%

DSL

28%

49%

37%

54%

30%

44%

43%

58%

Other broadband

22%

23%

21%

13%

23%

19%

24%

21%

Dial-up

2%

4%

2%

5%

5%

5%

7%

10%

Internet use at home by region Statewide

Northwest Coast

Central Oregon

Portland

Central Coast

Southwest Oregon

South Central

North Central

Eastern Oregon

85%

78%

89%

88%

86%

81%

77%

75%

74%

Internet monthly cost by region Portland Metro

Willamette/ Central Coast

South Central

All of Oregon

North Central

Northwest Coast

Central Oregon

Southwest Oregon

Eastern Oregon

$49.37

$48.88

$48.18

$47.75

$45.90

$45.41

$43.42

$43.42

$42.24

Source: Oregon Broadband Adoption survey, Oregon Public Utility Commission

vider, expects to have about 90 percent of its fiber-optic highway completed in the third quarter, according to its most recent report filed with the National Telecommunications and Information Administration. The project, funded by $4.4 million from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act and by BendBroadband, will extend high-speed Internet service to underserved areas of La Pine, Madras, Prineville and Sunriver. In the spring, Warm Springs Telecommunications

Find It All Online bendbulletin.com

Co. began providing the community expanded and improved Internet service, paid for with $5.4 million from the Recovery Act. Despite the new developments since the survey, Bob Valdez, public affairs specialist for the PUC, said the report will still be helpful. “I think it will still have a lot of value for cities and counties that look at what the existing availabilities are, even though there is a lag in the actual data,” he said. He said the information has been shared with legisla-

Greg Cross / The Bulletin

tors to give them a snapshot of Oregon’s broadband availability and how it compares nationally. It will also provide lawmakers information if they are considering related legislation, he said. “The availability of broadband is becoming more of a crucial part of life for information, for people who have businesses … and for people to be able to access services they are entitled to from the state, counties and or cities,” he said. — Reporter: 541-617-7818, rrees@bendbulletin.com

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Some environmentalists are critical of solar energy projects that disrupt habitats of endangered species, such as this desert tortoise.

Solar Continued from C1 “Ultimately, we need to jump-start renewables to combat climate change, and large-scale solar has to play a big part in that,” Boyle says. However, as it became clear the project was rooting out many more tortoises than projected and as some California chapters urged action, the organization joined a coalition that sued the Department of the Interior in March to block another long-planned Mojave solar project that it says threatens wildlife. Similar disputes are playing out elsewhere and show a growing concern among green groups and willingness to block large-scale solar and wind projects when the cost to wildlife and habitat seem to outweigh the benefits of fighting climate change. A surge in supplies of cheap, clean-burning natural gas has also begun to undercut demand for more costly green energy. Including the Mojave project that is relocating desert tortoises, the Interior Department has accelerated construction approval for 26 large-scale solar plants on public lands since 2009, including nine that it cleared in August. The Obama administration has steered $9 billion in stimulus funds from

the 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to 23,000 solar and large-scale wind installations, according to the Department of Energy. Conservationist and Native American groups sued to halt five other Mojave solar projects. The organizations argue that federal and state authorities conducted inadequate environmental reviews and failed to consult with tribes on sacred sites. The Bureau of Land Management, the solar companies and the state deny the allegations. Conservationists say it is wrongheaded to rip up the public desert and destroy wildlife habitat when millions of already-degraded acres are available. The Environmental Protection Agency last year identified 80,000 to 250,000 abandoned mine sites that could be used for solar and other renewable energy projects, according to Janine Blaeloch, director of the Seattle- based Western Lands Project, a watchdog group. “This is the ritual privatization of public lands, turning our deserts into permanent industrial zones that will utterly transform the sites upon which these solar plants are placed,” Blaeloch says. “Even if they are dismantled in 50 years, the desert will be unable to restore itself.”

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SPORTS

Scoreboard, D2 MLB, D3 NFL, D4, D5

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2012

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

NFL

CYCLING CENTRAL

Eagles Giants

19 17

Falcons Panthers

30 28

Patriots Bills

52 28

Vikings Lions

20 13

Chargers Chiefs

37 20

Rams Seahawks

19 13

49ers Jets

34 0

Texans Titans

38 14

Broncos Raiders

37 6

Cardinals Dolphins

24 21

Bengals Jaguars

27 10

Packers Saints

28 27

Redskins Bucs

24 22

PREP SPORTS COMMENTARY

Grinding gears, by the numbers • Are you mystified by the digits associated with cycling parts? Here’s a quick primer. AMANDA MILES

I

finally know what the numbers mean. Don’t worry: I have not been obsessing over a set of numbers like the incomparable and endearing but somewhat psychologically addled Hurley on “Lost,” but I have finally satisfied my curiosity as to what numbers such as 50/34, 12-25 and 11-

27 mean. Those who are knowledgeable about bike gearing already know what I am talking about, but I would guess a fair number of riders — perhaps even regular cyclists — do not. To begin, let me back up a bit. I started competing in triathlons four years ago. I came from a running and swimming background and knew almost nothing about cycling except for how to ride a bike. See Numbers / D6

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

Numbers are associated with nearly every part of a bike, including the chainring and the cassette; not everyone who rides a bike is familiar with what those numbers mean.

COLLEGE FOOTBALL COMMENTARY

Packers survive against Saints Green Bay prevails despite another controversial call by officials, D5

Ted S. Warren / The Associated Press

Oregon’s Kenjon Barner (24) celebrates his touchdown with Oregon’s Will Murphy (89) in the first half of Saturday’s game in Seattle. Barner had 195 rushing yards and four touchdowns in the game, and Oregon beat Washington State, 51-26.

Los Angeles Angels’ Mike Trout

Angels’ Trout reaches rare feat ARLINGTON, Texas — Los Angeles Angels center fielder Mike Trout became the first major league rookie ever with 30 home runs and 40 stolen bases. Trout hit his 30th homer Sunday, a twoout solo shot in the seventh inning at Texas off Yu Darvish in the first game of a doubleheader. The 21-year-old Trout had a leadoff walk to start the game, then quickly got his 48th stolen base. Only two players in the majors have ever had 30 homers and 50 stolen bases — Eric Davis in 1987 and Barry Bonds in 1990. — The Associated Press

AL

NL

Angels 5-7 Rangers 4-8

Braves Mets

6 2

Yankees 9 Blue Jays 6

Reds Pirates

4 3

Orioles Red Sox

Cardinals 10 Nationals 4

6 3

Rays 6 White Sox 2

Giants Padres

7 5

Tigers Twins

2 1

Dodgers Rockies

7 1

A’s 5 Mariners 2

Astros Brewers

7 0

Indians Royals

Phillies Marlins

4 1

Cubs D’backs

7 2

15 3

O’s, Yankees, Rangers clinch Three playoff spots are decided in the American League, D3

How the Ducks do it • Oregon’s electrifying offense has a way of flipping a switch and turning a close ballgame into a blowout in a hurry By Bud Withers The Seattle Times

SEATTLE — f Mike Leach had an idle moment Saturday morning, he might have spent it watching two old underlings, West Virginia’s Dana Holgorsen and Baylor’s Art Briles, stage one of college football’s zanier games of the season. Holgorsen ultimately won it over his exLeach staffmate, 10-9. Touchdowns, that is — a 70-63 game proving that not only in Xbox do offensive histrionics happen. Leach’s imprint was all over that game, and if he hadn’t had work to do later in the evening, he might have had a warm feeling about the day. Alas, Leach and Co. had to keep an appointment with the Oregon Ducks, who are not much into coaching genealogy, only getting to the end zone in as little time as possible.

I

BEAU EASTES

Bend coach learns sport can be an international language

Green Bay wide receiver James Jones catches a touchdown pass on Sunday.

MLB

D

Motor sports, D5 Cycling Central, D6

The Cougars, after taking the Ducks through a first half that ended with Oregon ahead 23-19, got washed away in a wave of Oregon touchdowns in the third quarter and did what just about all opponents of the second-ranked Ducks do — lost, to the tune of 51-26. Oregon is this irrepressible. It makes you feel good about the first half you played and still finds time to suffocate you in an avalanche of offense in the second half. Let’s start at the top: Washington State athletic director Bill Moos has been getting some heat for scheduling a Pac-12 game in Seattle. Detractors said the crowd would prove their point, as the Duck fans would make it a half-house of lemon and green. See Ducks / D5

Pac-12 dominating Top 25 poll The Pac-12 has six teams in the Top 25, including No. 2 Oregon and No. 14 Oregon State, which has been the most surprising team in the nation so far. The last time the Pac-12 was so well represented in the AP poll was Sept. 15, 2002. Oregon State has been quite the story. Since having their first game postponed, the Beavers have beaten Wisconsin, UCLA and Arizona. After those past two wins on the road, the Beavers celebrated with trips to In-N-Out Burger, coach Mike Riley proudly tweeted. • For the full Associated Press and USA Today polls, see Scoreboard, D2. Oregon State quarterback Sean Mannion threw for three touchdowns against Arizona Saturday. OSU is ranked No. 14 in the AP poll.

S

ports have always been a huge part of Lisa Nye’s life. Currently the head crosscountry coach at Bend High School, Nye, 41, was a multisport star (as Lisa Karnopp) at Mountain View High and an elite-level distance runner at the University of Oregon before becoming one of the nation’s top steeplechase Nye and trail runners in her 20s and 30s. Still a runner, she is also the mother of two active school-age children and a proud supporter of the Lava Bears in just about any athletic activity. Maybe it should come as no surprise, then, that when Nye and her family spent six months in Hungary last year as part of an international teaching exchange program, sports played an integral role in her family’s stay. “What’s important in your life, wherever you are, it follows you,” says Nye, whose Lava Bears host the Oxford Classic on Friday. “You seek it out and have that commonality with people.” Last summer, Nye, her husband Brad, and their kids Merle, 14, and Olive, 7, took off for the adventure of a lifetime. The family spent six months in the Hungarian town of Kaposvar — a city of some 70,000 residents located about a four-hour drive south of Vienna, Austria — after Lisa was selected to participate in a Fulbright teaching exchange for the first half of the 2011-12 school year. “I’d done a little bit of traveling with my family before, but for the most part all my travels were as an athlete,” Nye says. “My experiences were almost all about going to a high-pressure event and worrying about being ready to compete.” A history teacher in Bend High’s International Baccalaureate program, Nye was excited about the chance to not just travel abroad but to live and teach in another country. She wanted to, “expand my internationalism,” as she put it. She had no idea, though, how big a role sports would play in that process. See Coach / D4 See more photos from the past week in prep sports: bendbulletin.com/preppics

GOLF: RYDER CUP

Comeback complete: Europe stuns U.S. • The Americans can’t hold on to their big lead in individual matches as the Europeans rally at Medinah By Doug Ferguson The Associated Press

David J. Phillip / The Associated Press

Europe’s Martin Kaymer leaps into the arms of teammate Sergio Garcia after winning the Ryder Cup Sunday in Medinah, Ill.

MEDINAH, Ill. — Erasing some of their worst Ryder Cup memories, the Europeans wore the image of Seve Ballesteros on their sleeves and played their hearts out Sunday at Medinah to match the greatest comeback in history and head home with that precious gold trophy. Europe got its payback for Brookline, when the

Americans roared back from the same 10-6 deficit. This rally was even more remarkable, carried out before a raucous American crowd that began their chants of “USA!” some three hours before the first match got under way. Jose Maria Olazabal squeezed his eyes and fought back tears when Kaymer holed a 6-foot par putt to beat Steve Stricker and give Europe the point it needed to keep the cup. This was the first Ryder Cup since Ballesteros, the soul of European golf in this event, died last May of a brain tumor. Olazabal wanted his team to wear navy blue, Seve’s favorite color, and added a clever touch — his iconic silhouette on the sleeves of their shirts. See Ryder / D6


D2

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2012

O  A TELEV ISIO N

SCOREBOARD

Today SOCCER 11:55 a.m.: English Premier League, Queens Park Rangers vs. West Ham United, ESPN2. 1 p.m.: English Premier League, Manchester United vs. Tottenham Hotspur (taped), Root Sports. 4 p.m.: Women’s college, Washington State at Colorado (taped), Pac-12 Network. 7 p.m.: Women’s college, UCLA at Arizona State, Pac-12 Network. FOOTBALL 5:30 p.m.: NFL, Chicago Bears at Dallas Cowboys, ESPN. BASEBALL 4 p.m.: MLB, Boston Red Sox at New York Yankees or Baltimore Orioles at Tampa Bay Rays, MLB Network. 7 p.m.: MLB, Los Angeles Angels at Seattle Mariners, Root Sports.

Tuesday SOCCER 11:30 a.m.: UEFA Champions League, SL Benfica vs. Barcelona, Root Sports. BASKETBALL 6 p.m.: WNBA playoffs, Seattle Storm at Minnesota Lynx, ESPN2. BASEBALL 7 p.m.: MLB, Los Angeles Angels at Seattle Mariners, Root Sports. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

ON DECK Today Volleyball: Culver vs. Waldport in Lebanon, 5:30 p.m.; Culver at East Linn Christian, 7 p.m. Tuesday Boys soccer: Crook County at Ridgeview, 3 p.m.; Umatilla at Culver, 4 p.m.; Mountain View at Summit, 6 p.m.; Bend at Redmond, 3 p.m.; Madras at La Salle, 6 p.m. Girls soccer: Crook County at Ridgeview, 4:30 p.m.; Sisters at La Pine, 4:30 p.m.; Mountain View at Summit, 7:30 p.m.; Bend at Redmond, 4:30 p.m.; La Salle at Madras, 4:30 p.m. Volleyball: Summit at Mountain View, 6:30 p.m.; Redmond at Bend, 6:30 p.m.; Ridgeview at Crook County, 6:30 p.m.; Sisters at Cottage Grove, 6:45 p.m.; Junction City at La Pine, 6:45 p.m.; Madras at La Salle, 6 p.m.; Gilchrist at Paisley, 4:30 p.m.; Sherman County at Central Christian, 5:30 p.m. Boys water polo: Summit at Redmond, TBA; Bend at Mountain View, TBA

Friday Football: Summit at Bend, 7 p.m.; Mountain View at Pendleton, 7 p.m.; Redmond at Crook County, 7 p.m.; The Dalles Wahtonka at Ridgeview, 7 p.m.; Madras at Molalla, 7 p.m.; Junction City at Sisters, 7 p.m.; Cottage Grove at La Pine, 7 p.m.; Regis at Culver, 7 p.m.; Triad at Gilchrist, 4 p.m. Cross-country: Bend, Mountain View, Summit, Redmond, Ridgeview, Crook County, La Pine at the Oxford Classic in Bend’s Drake Park, TBA Volleyball: Triad at Gilchrist, 5:30 p.m.; Paisley at Trinity Lutheran, 2 p.m. Boys water polo: Bend at Mountain View, TBA Saturday Cross-country: Summit, Sisters at Mizuno Harrier Classic in Albany, 12:40 p.m. Volleyball: La Pine, Madras at Junction City tournament, 9 a.m. Boys soccer: Sweet Home at Crook County, 1 p.m.; Irrigon at Central Christian, 1 p.m. Girls soccer: Sweet Home at Crook County, 11 a.m. Volleyball: Bend at Glencoe tournament, TBA; Central Christian at Gilchrist Tournament, 9 a.m.; Trinity Lutheran at Prospect, 1:15 p.m.

College

Motor sports • IndyCar brings back Pocono and a Triple Crown: The IndyCar Series will return to Pocono Raceway in 2013 and host doubleheaders at Detroit, Toronto and a new venue in Houston for a 19race schedule. The July 7 race at Pocono will be a 400-miler and be included in a Triple Crown challenge by IndyCar. A $1 million bonus will go to the driver who can win the Indianapolis 500, Pocono and the Oct. 19 finale at Fontana. The season opens March 24 at St. Petersburg, and returns to 14 of the 15 venues it visited in 2012. Off the schedule is Edmonton, and Pocono and Houston are the new additions.

Hockey • NHL, locked-out players meet for third straight day: The NHL and the Players’ Association are meeting for the third straight day to try to resolve the lockout. The sides met for about four hours Saturday, and they agreed to meet again Sunday. The agenda likely included discussions on health and safety issues. Core economic issues still weren’t on the agenda Saturday when the opposing groups got together again at the NHL office. Sunday’s talks came three days after the league canceled the remaining preseason games. The regular season is scheduled to start Oct. 11. If a deal isn’t reached soon, regular-season games will be in danger of being lost.

Tennis • Monaco beats Benneteau to win Malaysian Open: Juan Monaco of Argentina beat Julien Benneteau of France 7-5, 4-6, 6-3 on Sunday to win the Malaysian Open in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, his fourth title this season. The 11th-ranked Monaco needed just over three hours to edge out Benneteau in the tournament’s longest match this year for his first hard-court title. • Gasquet beats Simon to win Thailand Open: Secondseeded Richard Gasquet won his first tournament of the year when he beat Gilles Simon 6-2, 6-1 in an all-French final of the Thailand Open in Bangkok on Sunday. The 14th-ranked Gasquet routed the 2009 champion in 68 minutes for his seventh career victory. — From wire reports

Schedule All Times PDT (Subject to change) Thursday’s Games SOUTH Arkansas St. at FIU, 4:30 p.m. East Carolina at UCF, 5 p.m. FAR WEST Southern Cal at Utah, 6 p.m. ——— Friday’s Games EAST Pittsburgh at Syracuse, 4 p.m. FAR WEST Cal Poly at Weber St., 5 p.m. Utah St. at BYU, 7:15 p.m. ——— Saturday’s Games EAST Boston College at Army, 9 a.m. Northwestern at Penn St., 9 a.m. UConn at Rutgers, 9 a.m. Robert Morris at St. Francis (Pa.), 9 a.m. South Florida at Temple, 9 a.m. Dartmouth at Yale, 9 a.m. Columbia at Lehigh, 9:30 a.m. Albany (NY) at Bryant, 10 a.m. Georgetown at Fordham, 10 a.m. Cornell at Harvard, 10 a.m. Bucknell at Holy Cross, 10 a.m. Brown at Rhode Island, 10 a.m. Wagner at Sacred Heart, 10 a.m. Maine at Delaware, 12:30 p.m. William & Mary at Penn, 12:30 p.m. Princeton at Lafayette, 3 p.m. Charleston Southern at Stony Brook, 3 p.m. Richmond at Villanova, 3 p.m. SOUTH Arkansas at Auburn, 9 a.m. Boise St. at Southern Miss., 9 a.m. Mississippi St. at Kentucky, 9:21 a.m. Virginia Tech at North Carolina, 9:30 a.m. Dayton at Davidson, 10 a.m. Florida A&M at Howard, 10 a.m. Towson at James Madison, 10 a.m. Jacksonville at Morehead St., 10 a.m. Presbyterian at VMI, 10:30 a.m. Furman at Wofford, 10:30 a.m. Texas Southern at Alabama St., 11 a.m. E. Kentucky at Tennessee St., 11 a.m. Southern U. at Alcorn St., noon Virginia at Duke, noon Alabama A&M at MVSU, noon The Citadel at Samford, noon SE Louisiana at UAB, noon E. Illinois at UT-Martin, noon Elon at Appalachian St., 12:30 p.m. Georgia Tech at Clemson, 12:30 p.m. LSU at Florida, 12:30 p.m. New Hampshire at Georgia St., 12:30 p.m. Gardner-Webb at Liberty, 12:30 p.m. Tulsa at Marshall, 12:30 p.m. Wake Forest at Maryland, 12:30 p.m. Louisiana-Monroe at Middle Tennessee, 12:30 p.m. Georgia Southern at W. Carolina, 12:30 p.m. NC A&T at Bethune-Cookman, 1 p.m. Delaware St. at Norfolk St., 1 p.m. Tulane at Louisiana-Lafayette, 2 p.m. Murray St. at Austin Peay, 4 p.m. UNLV at Louisiana Tech, 4 p.m. Rice at Memphis, 4 p.m. Texas A&M at Mississippi, 4 p.m. Lamar at Northwestern St., 4 p.m. Morgan St. at Savannah St., 4 p.m. Georgia at South Carolina, 4 p.m. Florida St. at NC State, 5 p.m. Jacksonville St. at Tennessee Tech, 5 p.m. MIDWEST Michigan St. at Indiana, 9 a.m. Kansas at Kansas St., 9 a.m. Buffalo at Ohio, 9 a.m. Kent St. at E. Michigan, 10 a.m. San Diego at Drake, 10:30 a.m. Bowling Green at Akron, 11 a.m. S. Illinois at Illinois St., 11 a.m. Youngstown St. at N. Dakota St., 11 a.m. Butler at Valparaiso, 11 a.m. UMass at W. Michigan, 11 a.m. SC State vs. NC Central at Indianapolis, 11:30 a.m. N. Illinois at Ball St., noon W. Illinois at South Dakota, noon Cent. Michigan at Toledo, noon Missouri St. at Indiana St., 12:05 p.m. Illinois at Wisconsin, 12:30 p.m. Michigan at Purdue, 1 p.m. Miami (Ohio) at Cincinnati, 4 p.m. Vanderbilt at Missouri, 4 p.m. Miami vs. Notre Dame at Chicago, 4:30 p.m. Nebraska at Ohio St., 5 p.m. SOUTHWEST Iowa St. at TCU, 12:30 p.m. Oklahoma at Texas Tech, 12:30 p.m. Stephen F. Austin vs. Sam Houston St. at Houston, 1 p.m. Jackson St. at Ark.-Pine Bluff, 4 p.m. Nicholls St. at Cent. Arkansas, 4 p.m. North Texas at Houston, 4 p.m. Grambling St. vs. Prairie View at Dallas, 4 p.m. West Virginia at Texas, 4 p.m. SMU at UTEP, 5 p.m. FAR WEST Navy at Air Force, 9:30 a.m. Sacramento St. at S. Utah, noon Arizona at Stanford, noon Montana at N. Colorado, 12:35 p.m. New Mexico St. at Idaho, 2 p.m. Texas St. at New Mexico, 3 p.m. Washington St. at Oregon St., 3 p.m. Fresno St. at Colorado St., 4 p.m. Montana St. at UC Davis, 4 p.m.

GA 39 34 43 31 40 41 46 52 49

BASKETBALL WNBA WOMEN’S NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION All Times PDT ——— CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS (Best-of-3) Eastern Conference Connecticut 2, New York 0 Thursday, Sept. 27: Connecticut 65, New York 60 Saturday, Sept. 29: Connecticut 75, New York 62 Atlanta 1, Indiana 1 Friday Sept. 28: Atlanta 75, Indiana 66 Sunday, Sept. 30: Indiana 103, Atlanta 88 Tuesday, Oct. 2: Atlanta at Indiana, 4 p.m.

Thursday Volleyball: Crook County at Summit, 6:30 p.m.; Bend at Mountain View, 6:30 p.m.; Ridgeview at Redmond, 6:30 p.m.; Junction City at Sisters, 7 p.m.; Sweet Home at La Pine, 6:45 p.m.; Molalla at Madras, 6 p.m.; Western Mennonite at Culver, 6 p.m.; Dufur vs. Central Christian at Crook County Middle School (two matches), 5:30 p.m. Boys soccer: Redmond at Ridgeview, 3 p.m.; Sweet Home at Sisters, 4:30 p.m.; Summit at Crook County, 3 p.m.; Mountain View at Bend, 3 p.m.; Molalla at Madras, 4:30 p.m. Girls soccer: Redmond at Ridgeview, 4:30 p.m.; Sisters at Sweet Home, 4:30 p.m.; Summit at Crook County, 4:30 p.m.; Mountain View at Bend, 4:30 p.m.; La Pine at Cottage Grove, 7 p.m.; Madras at Molalla, 4:30 p.m. Boys water polo: Redmond at Madras, TBA; Summit at Mountain View, TBA

FOOTBALL

S   B

W L T Pts GF x-San Jose 18 6 7 61 65 x-Real Salt Lake 16 11 4 52 44 x-Los Angeles 15 11 5 50 55 x-Seattle 13 7 10 49 45 Vancouver 10 12 9 39 31 FC Dallas 9 12 10 37 38 Colorado 9 18 4 31 39 Portland 7 15 9 30 32 Chivas USA 7 16 7 28 21 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. x- clinched playoff berth ——— Sunday’s Games Colorado 1, Los Angeles 1, tie Wednesday’s Games Philadelphia at Chicago, 5:30 p.m. Chivas USA at Vancouver, 7 p.m.

IN THE BLEACHERS

Western Conference Minnesota 1, Seattle 1 Friday, Sept. 28: Minnesota 78, Seattle 70 Sunday, Sept. 30: Seattle 86, Minnesota 79 Tuesday, Oct. 2: Seattle at Minnesota, 6 p.m. Los Angeles 2, San Antonio 0 Thursday, Sept. 27: Los Angeles 93, San Antonio 86 Saturday, Sept. 29: Los Angeles 101, San Antonio 94

Wyoming at Nevada, 4:05 p.m. Hawaii at San Diego St., 5 p.m. North Dakota at E. Washington, 5:05 p.m. Idaho St. at Portland St., 5:05 p.m. UCLA at California, 7 p.m. Washington at Oregon, 7:30 p.m. Polls AP Top 25 The Top 25 teams in The Associated Press college football poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Sept. 29, total points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote, and previous ranking: Record Pts Pv 1. Alabama (60) 5-0 1,500 1 2. Oregon 5-0 1,430 2 3. Florida St. 5-0 1,349 4 4. LSU 5-0 1,310 3 5. Georgia 5-0 1,252 5 6. South Carolina 5-0 1,152 6 7. Kansas St. 4-0 1,123 7 8. West Virginia 4-0 1,066 9 9. Notre Dame 4-0 1,043 10 10. Florida 4-0 937 11 11. Texas 4-0 932 12 12. Ohio St. 5-0 793 14 13. Southern Cal 3-1 703 13 14. Oregon St. 3-0 647 18 15. Clemson 4-1 608 17 15. TCU 4-0 608 15 17. Oklahoma 2-1 581 16 18. Stanford 3-1 509 8 19. Louisville 5-0 404 19 20. Mississippi St. 4-0 306 21 21. Nebraska 4-1 240 22 22. Rutgers 4-0 160 23 23. Washington 3-1 159 NR 24. Northwestern 5-0 143 NR 25. UCLA 4-1 122 NR Others receiving votes: Cincinnati 72, Boise St. 53, Texas A&M 51, Michigan St. 43, Texas Tech 39, Michigan 38, Louisiana Tech 37, Baylor 31, Ohio 30, Arizona St. 15, Arizona 4, Miami 4, Iowa St. 3, Tennessee 3. USA Today Top 25 Poll The USA Today Top 25 football coaches poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Sept. 29, total points based on 25 points for first place through one point for 25th, and previous ranking: Record Pts Pvs 1. Alabama (57) 5-0 1,472 1 2. Oregon 5-0 1,403 2 3. LSU (1) 5-0 1,327 3 4. Florida St. (1) 5-0 1,301 4 5. Georgia 5-0 1,227 5 6. South Carolina 5-0 1,161 6 7. West Virginia 4-0 1,137 7 8. Kansas St. 4-0 1,050 8 9. Texas 4-0 981 10 10. Notre Dame 4-0 915 11 11. Florida 4-0 883 12 12. USC 3-1 784 13 13. TCU 4-0 749 14 14. Oklahoma 2-1 684 15 15. Clemson 4-1 626 16 16. Louisville 5-0 524 17 17. Oregon St. 3-0 453 21 18. Stanford 3-1 452 9 19. Mississippi St. 4-0 422 19 20. Nebraska 4-1 415 20 21. Rutgers 4-0 206 25 22. Northwestern 5-0 202 NR 23. Cincinnati 3-0 175 NR 24. Texas Tech 4-0 108 NR 25. Boise St. 3-1 83 NR Others Receiving Votes: Washington 65; Texas A&M 61; UCLA 58; Louisiana Tech 56; Michigan State 45; Baylor 41; Arizona State 40; Miami (Fla.) 17; Michigan 11; Ohio 11; Louisiana-Monroe 8; Purdue 6; Wisconsin 6; San Jose State 4; Oklahoma State 3; Toledo 1; Tulsa 1; Virginia Tech 1.

Betting line NFL (Home teams in Caps) Opening Current Underdog Today COWBOYS 3.5 3.5 Bears Favorite

GOLF Ryder Cup At Medinah Country Club Medinah, Ill. Sunday EUROPE 14½, UNITED STATES 13½ ——— Singles Europe 8½, United States 3½ Luke Donald, Europe, def. Bubba Watson, United States, 2 and 1. Ian Poulter, Europe, def. Webb Simpson, United States, 2 up. Rory McIlroy, Europe, def. Keegan Bradley, United States, 2 and 1. Justin Rose, Europe, def. Phil Mickelson, United States, 1 up. Paul Lawrie, Europe, def. Brandt Snedeker, United States, 5 and 3. Dustin Johnson, United States, def. Nicolas Colsaerts, Europe, 3 and 2. Zach Johnson, United States, def. Graeme McDowell, Europe, 2 and 1. Sergio Garcia, Europe, def. Jim Furyk, United States, Europe 1 up. Jason Dufner, United States, def. Peter Hanson, Europe, 2 up. Lee Westwood, Europe, def. Matt Kuchar, United States, 3 and 2. Martin Kaymer, Europe, def. Steve Stricker, United States, 1 up. Francesco Molinari, Europe, halved with Tiger Woods, United States. Ryder Cup Champions 2012 — Europe 14½, United States 13½; Medinah Country Club, Medinah, Ill. 2010 — Europe 14½, United States 13½; Celtic Manor Resort, Newport, Wales 2008 — United States 16½, Europe 11½; Valhalla Golf Club, Louisville, Ky. 2006 — Europe 18½, United States 9½; The K Club (Palmer Course), Straffan, Ireland 2004 — Europe 18½, United States 9½; Oakland Hills CC (South Course), Bloomfield Township, Mich. 2002 — Europe 15½, United States 12½; The Belfry, Sutton Coldfield, England 1999 — United States 14½, Europe 13½; The Country Club, Brookline, Mass. 1997 — Europe 14½, United States 13½; Valderrama Golf Club, Sotogrande, Spain

1995 — Europe 14½, United States 13½; Oak Hill CC, Rochester, N.Y. 1993 — United States 15, Europe 13; The Belfry, Sutton Coldfield, England 1991 — United States 14½, Europe 13½; The Ocean Course, Kiawah Island, S.C. 1989 — Europe 14, United States 14; The Belfry, Sutton Coldfield, England 1987 — Europe 15, United States 13; Muirfield Village GC, Dublin, Ohio 1985 — Europe 16,½ United States 11½; The Belfry, Sutton Coldfield, England 1983 — United States 14½, Europe 13½; PGA National GC, Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. 1981 — United States 18½, Europe 9½; Walton Health GC, Surrey, England 1979 — United States 17, Europe 11; The Greenbrier, White Sulphur Springs, W.Va. 1977 — United States 12½, Great Britain & Ireland 7½; Royal Lytham & St. Annes, England 1975 — United States 21, Great Britain & Ireland 11; Laurel Valley GC, Ligonier, Pa. 1973 — United States 19, Great Britain & Ireland 13; Muirfield, Scotland 1971 — United States 18½, Britain 13½; Old Warson CC, St. Louis 1969 — United States 16, Britain 16; Royal Birkdale GC, Southport, England 1967 — United States 23½, Britain 8½; Champions GC, Houston 1965 — United States 19½, Britain 12½; Royal Birkdale GC, Southport, England 1963 — United States 23, Britain 9; East Lake CC, Atlanta 1961 — United States 14½, Britain 9½; Royal Lytham & St. Annes, England 1959 — United States 8½, Britain 3½; Eldorado CC, Palm Desert, Calif. 1957 — Britain 7½, United States 4½; Lindrick GC, Yorkshire, England 1955 — United States 8, Britain 4; Thunderbird CC, Palm Springs, Calif. 1953 — United States 6½, Britain 5½; Wentworth GC, England 1951 — United States 9½, Britain 2½; Pinehurst CC, Pinehurst, N.C. 1949 — United States 7, Britain 5; Ganton GC, Scarborough, England 1947 — United States 11, Britain 1; Portland GC, Portland, Ore. 1939-45 — No matches, World War II 1937 — United States 8, Britain 4; Southport & Ainsdale GC, England 1935 — United States 9, Britain 3; Ridgewood CC, Ridgewood, N.J. 1933 — Britain 6½, United States 5½; Southport & Ainsdale GC, England 1931 — United States 9, Britain 3; Scioto CC, Columbus, Ohio 1929 — Britain 7, United States 5; Moortown GC, England 1927 — United States 9½, Britain 2½; Worcester CC, Worcester, Mass.

TENNIS Professional Malaysian Open Sunday At Putra Stadium Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Purse: $947,750 (WT250) Surface: Hard-Indoor Singles Championship Juan Monaco (2), Argentina, def. Julien Benneteau (7), France, 7-5, 4-6, 6-3. Thailand Open Sunday At Impact Arena Bangkok, Thailand Purse: $608,500 (WT250) Surface: Hard-Indoor Singles Championship Richard Gasquet (2), France, def. Gilles Simon (4), France, 6-2, 6-1. China Open Sunday At The Beijing Tennis Centre Beijing Purse: Men, $2.205 million (WT500); Women, $4.8 million (Premier) Surface: Hard-Outdoor Singles Women First Round Ekaterina Makarova, Russia, def. Maria Kirilenko (13), Russia vs. 6-3, 6-3. Monica Niculescu, Romania, def. Lucie Safarova (16), Czech Republic, 6-2, 6-0. Elena Vesnina, Russia, def. Mona Barthel, Germany, 6-1, 6-1. Ayumi Morita, Japan, def. Maria-Teresa Torro-Flor, Spain, 6-3, 6-0. Laura Robson, Britain, def. Kimiko Date-Krumm, Japan, 6-4, 6-4. Lourdes Dominguez Lino, Spain, def. Roberta Vinci (15), Italy, 6-7 (4), 7-6 (4), 6-2. Camila Giorgi, Italy, def. Sara Errani (6), Italy, 5-4, retired. Peng Shuai, China, def. Yanina Wickmayer, Belgium, 7-5, 7-5. Jelena Jankovic, Serbia def. Andrea Petkovic, Germany, 6-2, 6-4. Marion Bartoli (9), France, def. Bojana Jovanovski, Serbia, 6-3, 6-3. Li Na (7), China, def. Francesca Schiavone, Italy, 6-2, 6-3. Julia Goerges, Germany, def. Vania King, United States, 6-7 (9), 7-5, 6-2.

SOCCER MLS MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT ——— Eastern Conference W L T Pts x-Sporting Kansas City 17 7 7 58 New York 15 8 8 53 Chicago 16 9 5 53 D.C. 15 10 6 51 Houston 13 8 10 49 Columbus 14 11 6 48 Montreal 12 15 4 40 Philadelphia 8 15 6 30 New England 7 16 8 29 Toronto FC 5 19 7 22 Western Conference

GF 39 54 42 48 44 39 44 31 37 35

GA 25 44 36 40 37 39 49 36 43 59

BASEBALL MLB MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL ——— Sunday’s Boxscores

Angels 5, Rangers 4 (First Game) Los Angeles Trout cf-lf Tor.Hunter rf Pujols 1b K.Morales dh Callaspo 3b Aybar ss Trumbo lf Bo.Wilson c M.Izturis 2b Iannetta c 2-Bourjos pr-cf Totals

AB 4 5 4 4 4 4 4 0 4 3 0 36

R 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 5

H 2 4 2 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 11

BI 1 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

BB 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 3

SO 2 0 0 2 0 1 1 0 0 2 0 8

Avg. .322 .309 .289 .274 .255 .289 .262 .214 .254 .248 .226

Texas AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Kinsler 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .262 Andrus ss 2 1 1 0 1 0 .289 Hamilton cf-lf 4 1 1 1 0 3 .285 Beltre 3b 3 1 2 1 1 0 .321 N.Cruz rf 4 1 1 2 0 0 .262 Mi.Young dh 4 0 0 0 0 0 .273 Dav.Murphy lf 2 0 0 0 1 0 .304 1-Gentry pr-cf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .307 Soto c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .197 a-Napoli ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .224 Moreland 1b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .273 Totals 31 4 6 4 3 4 Los Angeles 001 001 102 — 5 11 0 Texas 022 000 000 — 4 6 0 a-grounded out for Soto in the 9th. 1-ran for Dav.Murphy in the 7th. 2-ran for Iannetta in the 9th. LOB—Los Angeles 8, Texas 4. 2B—Tor.Hunter 2 (24), Callaspo (18), Beltre (32). HR—Trout (30), off Darvish; N.Cruz (24), off Greinke. SB—Trout (48). DP—Texas 1. Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Greinke 7 1-3 6 4 4 2 3 110 3.53 S.Downs 1-3 0 0 0 1 1 7 3.20 Richards W, 4-3 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 3 4.71 Frieri S, 23-26 1 0 0 0 0 0 13 2.36 Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Darvish 6 2-3 9 3 3 1 7 117 3.90 Ogando H, 12 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 14 3.06 Nathan L, 3-5 1 2 2 2 2 1 28 2.84 T—3:12. A—46,713 (48,194).

Rangers 8, Angels 7 (Second Game) Los Angeles Trout cf Aybar ss M.Izturis ss Pujols dh Tor.Hunter rf Trumbo 1b Callaspo 3b b-K.Morales ph H.Kendrick 2b V.Wells lf Bo.Wilson c a-Iannetta ph-c Totals

AB 3 2 3 5 4 5 4 1 4 4 2 2 39

R 0 1 0 1 2 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 7

H 0 1 0 1 3 3 2 0 2 0 0 0 12

BI 0 0 0 1 1 2 0 0 3 0 0 0 7

BB 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

SO 2 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 2 8

Avg. .321 .290 .252 .288 .313 .266 .257 .273 .281 .230 .212 .245

Texas AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Kinsler dh 5 0 0 0 0 0 .260 Andrus ss 4 1 1 0 1 0 .289 Hamilton cf 5 0 3 1 0 2 .288 Beltre 3b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .319 Olt 3b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .152 N.Cruz rf 3 1 1 0 1 0 .262 Mi.Young 2b 3 1 1 0 1 0 .274 Profar 2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .176 Dav.Murphy lf 4 3 2 1 0 0 .306 Napoli c 3 2 3 6 1 0 .231 Moreland 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .272 Totals 35 8 12 8 4 3 Los Angeles 400 000 300 — 7 12 0 Texas 123 020 00x — 8 12 0 a-struck out for Bo.Wilson in the 6th. b-fouled out for Callaspo in the 9th. LOB—Los Angeles 8, Texas 8. 2B—Pujols (49), Callaspo 2 (20), Hamilton (30), Napoli (9). HR—Trumbo (32), off D.Holland; H.Kendrick (8), off D.Holland; Dav.Murphy (15), off E.Santana; Napoli 2 (23), off E.Santana 2. DP—Los Angeles 1. Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA E.Santana L, 9-13 2 2-3 7 6 6 1 1 56 5.16 Williams 2 2-3 3 2 2 1 2 44 4.58 Maronde 1-3 1 0 0 1 0 10 1.69 Hawkins 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 7 3.64 S.Downs 2-3 0 0 0 1 0 10 3.15 Jepsen 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 10 3.09 Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA D.Holland W, 12-6 6 2-3 12 7 7 2 5 113 4.69 R.Ross H, 9 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 8 2.24 Uehara H, 7 1 0 0 0 0 3 23 1.87 Nathan S, 37-40 1 0 0 0 1 0 14 2.80 T—3:17. A—48,089 (48,194).

Phillies 4, Marlins 1 Philadelphia AB R Rollins ss 3 1 Pierre lf 4 1 Bastardo p 0 0 c-L.Nix ph 1 0 Papelbon p 0 0 Utley 2b 3 1 Ruiz c 4 1 D.Brown rf-lf 3 0 Schierholtz cf-rf 4 0 Ruf 1b 4 0 Orr 3b 2 0 a-Frandsen ph-3b 2 0 Hamels p 3 0 Mayberry cf 1 0 Totals 34 4

H 0 1 0 0 0 1 3 0 2 1 1 0 0 0 9

BI 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 4

BB 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

SO 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 2 1 9

Avg. .250 .310 --.250 --.266 .330 .234 .248 .320 .321 .330 .217 .249

Miami G.Hernandez cf Petersen lf Reyes ss Stanton rf Ca.Lee 1b D.Solano 2b J.Buck c Velazquez 3b Eovaldi p

H 0 1 2 1 2 1 0 0 0

BI 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0

SO 3 2 1 0 1 2 1 0 2

Avg. .172 .194 .285 .290 .264 .299 .195 .239 .094

AB 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 2 2

R 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0

Da.Jennings p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 M.Dunn p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Webb p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 b-Kearns ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .245 H.Bell p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 33 1 7 1 1 12 Philadelphia 300 000 010 — 4 9 2 Miami 000 100 000 — 1 7 0 a-grounded out for Orr in the 7th. b-popped out for Webb in the 8th. c-grounded out for Bastardo in the 9th. E—Hamels 2 (4). LOB—Philadelphia 7, Miami 6. 2B—Ruiz (31), Reyes (37), D.Solano (11). SB— Reyes (38). Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hamels W, 17-6 7 5 1 1 1 8 99 3.05 Bastardo H, 26 1 0 0 0 0 2 14 4.24 Papelbon S, 38-42 1 2 0 0 0 2 20 2.20 Miami IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Eovaldi L, 4-13 6 6 3 3 1 7 108 4.30 Da.Jennings 1 0 0 0 1 1 15 1.96 M.Dunn 1-3 3 1 1 0 0 15 4.70 Webb 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 7 4.17 H.Bell 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 5.03 T—2:53. A—28,317 (37,442).

MOTOR SPORTS NASCAR SPRINT CUP AAA 400 Sunday At Dover International Speedway Dover, Del. Lap length: 1 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (10) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 400 laps, 118.2 rating, 47 points, $221,070. 2. (7) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 400, 114.1, 43, $207,796. 3. (26) Mark Martin, Toyota, 400, 98.7, 41, $140,760. 4. (11) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 400, 119.6, 41, $164,321. 5. (15) Carl Edwards, Ford, 400, 100.3, 39, $158,126. 6. (3) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 400, 100.2, 38, $132,674. 7. (5) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 399, 139.8, 39, $148,068. 8. (1) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 399, 119, 37, $136,901. 9. (2) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 399, 108.8, 36, $115,474. 10. (14) Joey Logano, Toyota, 399, 83.6, 34, $95,535. 11. (25) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 398, 85.4, 33, $92,510. 12. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 397, 74.9, 0, $78,935. 13. (13) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 397, 79.6, 31, $126,596. 14. (16) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 397, 77.7, 30, $106,468. 15. (9) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 397, 98, 29, $87,260. 16. (6) Greg Biffle, Ford, 397, 89.1, 28, $87,485. 17. (18) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 397, 69.3, 27, $102,118. 18. (27) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 397, 64.6, 26, $105,543. 19. (21) Aric Almirola, Ford, 397, 73.1, 25, $114,296. 20. (24) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 397, 70.3, 24, $127,835. 21. (8) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 397, 81, 23, $117,593. 22. (19) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 396, 65.3, 22, $84,735. 23. (28) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 395, 63.9, 21, $98,643. 24. (20) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 394, 66, 20, $107,268. 25. (4) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge, 393, 84.1, 0, $117,335. 26. (35) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 393, 52.5, 18, $106,326. 27. (39) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 393, 56.3, 17, $114,535. 28. (38) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 393, 42, 0, $75,135. 29. (33) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 392, 49.9, 15, $94,818. 30. (31) David Ragan, Ford, 392, 45.5, 14, $85,782. 31. (30) Casey Mears, Ford, 391, 42.5, 13, $74,060. 32. (42) David Gilliland, Ford, 391, 52.1, 12, $71,360. 33. (41) T.J. Bell, Ford, 390, 36, 0, $79,485. 34. (40) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, 388, 38.3, 10, $71,035. 35. (12) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 371, 66.6, 9, $119,621. 36. (22) Landon Cassill, Toyota, 354, 43.1, 8, $97,280. 37. (23) Josh Wise, Ford, vibration, 92, 32.4, 7, $72,030. 38. (32) Michael McDowell, Ford, suspension, 51, 36.1, 6, $70,353. 39. (37) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, electrical, 48, 31.4, 0, $67,500. 40. (34) Scott Speed, Ford, suspension, 32, 34, 4, $67,325. 41. (43) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, overheating, 29, 32.2, 3, $67,125. 42. (36) Scott Riggs, Chevrolet, brakes, 26, 29.3, 2, $66,995. 43. (29) Reed Sorenson, Toyota, brakes, 18, 28.6, 0, $67,329. Race Statistics Top 12 in Points: 1. B.Keselowski, 2,142; 2. J.Johnson, 2,137; 3. D.Hamlin, 2,126; 4. C.Bowyer, 2,117; 5. T.Stewart, 2,110; 6. K.Kahne, 2,110; 7. D.Earnhardt Jr., 2,103; 8. M.Truex Jr., 2,100; 9. K.Harvick, 2,096; 10. J.Gordon, 2,094; 11. G.Biffle, 2,091; 12. M.Kenseth, 2,070.

NHRA NATIONAL HOT ROD ASSOCIATION Midwest Nationals Sunday At Gateway Motorsports Park Madison, Ill. Final Finish Order Top Fuel 1, Antron Brown. 2, Spencer Massey. 3, Brandon Bernstein. 4, David Grubnic. 5, Tony Schumacher. 6, Khalid alBalooshi. 7, Steve Torrence. 8, Shawn Langdon. 9, Doug Kalitta. 10, Bob Vandergriff. 11, Larry Dixon. 12, Clay Millican. 13, Morgan Lucas. 14, T.J. Zizzo. 15, Terry McMillen. 16, Bruce Litton. Funny Car 1, Jack Beckman. 2, Matt Hagan. 3, Tim Wilkerson. 4, Tony Pedregon. 5, Ron Capps. 6, Dale Creasy Jr.. 7, Mike Neff. 8, Jeff Arend. 9, Johnny Gray. 10, Jim Head. 11, Alexis DeJoria. 12, Robert Hight. 13, Cruz Pedregon. 14, John Force. 15, Bob Tasca III. 16, Courtney Force. Pro Stock 1, Erica Enders. 2, Allen Johnson. 3, Vincent Nobile. 4, Jason Line. 5, Greg Anderson. 6, Buddy Perkinson. 7, Dave Connolly. 8, Mike Edwards. 9, V. Gaines. 10, Larry Morgan. 11, Chris McGaha. 12, Jeg Coughlin. 13, Shane Gray. 14, Greg Stanfield. 15, Ron Krisher. 16, Warren Johnson. Pro Stock Motorcycle 1, Eddie Krawiec. 2, Andrew Hines. 3, Hector Arana. 4, Hector Arana Jr. 5, Karen Stoffer. 6, Chip Ellis. 7, Scotty Pollacheck. 8, Shawn Gann. 9, Matt Smith. 10, Michael Ray. 11, John Hall. 12, Jim Underdahl. 13, Jerry Savoie. 14, Mike Berry. 15, LE Tonglet. 16, Steve Johnson.

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL National League COLORADO ROCKIES—Selected the contract of OF Rafael Ortega from Modesto (Cal). Transferred LHP Jonathan Sanchez to the 60-day DL. PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES—Selected the contract of RHP Tyson Brummett from Lehigh Valley (IL). Transferred C Brian Schneider to the 60-day DL. FOOTBALL National Football League CINCINNATI BENGALS—Released TE Richard Quinn. Signed CB Chris Lewis-Harris from the practice squad. COLLEGE AUBURN—Suspended WR Quan Bray indefinitely from the football team for violation of team rules.

FISH COUNT Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Saturday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 1,957 1,444 914 240 The Dalles 2,903 2,819 1,837 522 John Day 2,433 2,235 1,307 375 McNary 1,840 915 1,465 400 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Saturday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 569,696 129,474 222,337 81,459 The Dalles 389,065 106,665 178,373 63,339 John Day 317,489 93,407 132,170 50,057 McNary 314,255 49,255 119,316 40,777


MONDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

D3

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL STANDINGS, SCORES AND SCHEDULES

AL Boxscores Athletics 5, Mariners 2 Seattle Gutierrez cf T.Robinson lf C.Wells rf Seager 3b J.Montero c Smoak 1b M.Saunders lf-cf Olivo dh Triunfel 2b b-Ackley ph Ryan ss c-Jaso ph Totals

AB 2 3 4 4 3 4 4 4 3 1 3 1 36

R 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

H 2 1 2 1 0 2 0 1 1 0 1 0 11

BI 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

BB 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

American League SO 0 1 1 3 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 8

Avg. .260 .216 .223 .258 .257 .214 .249 .219 .235 .227 .195 .275

Oakland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Crisp cf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .260 Drew ss 3 1 0 0 1 2 .257 Cespedes lf 4 2 3 2 0 1 .291 Moss 1b 3 1 1 1 0 1 .284 Reddick rf 4 1 1 2 0 1 .244 Donaldson 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .240 S.Smith dh 3 0 1 0 0 0 .240 1-J.Weeks pr-dh 1 0 0 0 0 0 .221 Kottaras c 1 0 0 0 1 0 .214 a-D.Norris ph-c 1 0 0 0 0 1 .190 Pennington 2b 1 0 0 0 2 0 .217 Totals 28 5 6 5 5 7 Seattle 002 000 000 — 2 11 0 Oakland 200 000 03x — 5 6 0 a-struck out for Kottaras in the 7th. b-lined out for Triunfel in the 9th. c-flied out for Ryan in the 9th. 1-ran for S.Smith in the 7th. LOB—Seattle 8, Oakland 5. 2B—Gutierrez 2 (10), Ryan (19). 3B—C.Wells (3), Cespedes (5). HR—Cespedes (23), off Kelley; Reddick (32), off Luetge. SB—Crisp (38), Moss (1). DP—Seattle 1; Oakland 1. Seattle IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Er.Ramirez 6 1-3 3 2 2 4 6 100 3.36 Furbush 1 0 0 0 1 1 18 2.72 Kelley L, 2-4 0 1 1 1 0 0 5 3.25 Luetge 0 2 2 2 0 0 13 3.98 Kinney 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 4 4.02 Oakland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Milone 4 2-3 9 2 2 0 3 85 3.74 Neshek 0 0 0 0 1 0 4 1.37 Blevins 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 14 2.49 R.Cook 1 2 0 0 0 3 27 2.18 Doolittle W, 2-1 1 0 0 0 0 1 9 3.25 Balfour S, 22-24 1 0 0 0 0 1 16 2.64 Neshek pitched to 1 batter in the 5th. Kelley pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Luetge pitched to 2 batters in the 8th. T—3:17. A—21,057 (35,067).

Indians 15, Royals 3 Kansas City J.Dyson dh Falu ss A.Gordon lf Butler 1b B.Pena 1b S.Perez c a-Pina ph-c Moustakas 3b Giavotella 2b Francoeur rf Lough cf T.Abreu 2b-3b Totals

AB 3 4 4 2 1 2 2 2 2 4 4 4 34

R 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 3

H 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 7

BI 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 3

BB 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

SO 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 3

Avg. .265 .355 .292 .312 .246 .301 .000 .242 .232 .235 .236 .265

Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Choo rf 4 2 2 2 0 0 .283 Neal lf 1 0 1 0 0 0 .217 Kipnis 2b 3 3 2 1 2 1 .257 C.Phelps 2b 1 0 1 1 0 0 .214 As.Cabrera ss 5 3 3 4 0 0 .274 Rottino rf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .125 Chisenhall dh 3 0 0 0 1 2 .277 b-LaPorta ph-dh 2 0 1 2 0 1 .255 Hannahan 3b 5 2 3 1 0 1 .247 Lillibridge cf-ss 4 0 0 0 1 2 .198 Kotchman 1b 5 1 2 1 0 0 .231 Marson c 4 2 3 1 1 1 .230 Donald lf-cf 4 2 1 1 0 2 .193 Totals 42 15 19 14 5 11 Kansas City 000 002 100 — 3 7 1 Cleveland 010 0(10)0 22x — 15 19 0 a-grounded into a fielder’s choice for S.Perez in the 6th. E—Francoeur (4). LOB—Kansas City 6, Cleveland 10. 2B—Choo (43), Kipnis (21), LaPorta (2), Hannahan (16). HR—A.Gordon (13), off McAllister; As.Cabrera (16), off Teaford. SB—J.Dyson (30), Choo (21). DP—Kansas City 1. Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hochevar L, 8-16 4 2-3 9 9 9 3 7 102 5.73 Teaford 1 1-3 4 2 2 1 1 26 4.99 Jeffress 1 1-3 6 4 3 1 1 44 6.75 L.Coleman 2-3 0 0 0 0 2 6 3.94 Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA McAllister W, 6-8 6 2-3 5 3 3 2 2 106 4.24 Sipp 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 21 4.53 F.Herrmann 1 1 0 0 0 1 16 2.41 T—3:02. A—18,099 (43,429).

Orioles 6, Red Sox 3 Boston Ellsbury cf Pedroia 2b C.Ross rf M.Gomez 1b a-Podsednik ph Valencia 3b b-Loney ph Lavarnway c Nava lf Ciriaco dh Iglesias ss Totals

AB 4 4 4 3 1 3 1 4 3 3 3 33

R 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 3

H 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 2 1 2 1 9

BI 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 3

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 1 6

Avg. .273 .288 .269 .273 .303 .193 .231 .170 .247 .290 .123

Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg. McLouth lf 4 1 2 1 0 1 .278 Hardy ss 3 2 2 1 0 0 .238 C.Davis rf 3 2 2 1 1 0 .272 1-En.Chavez pr-rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .204 Ad.Jones cf 3 1 1 0 0 0 .288 Wieters c 3 0 0 0 1 1 .249 Thome dh 4 0 2 2 0 2 .286 Mar.Reynolds 1b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .226 Flaherty 2b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .228 Andino 2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .211 Machado 3b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .272 Totals 29 6 9 5 3 6 Boston 000 100 200 — 3 9 0 Baltimore 302 010 00x — 6 9 0 a-flied out for M.Gomez in the 9th. b-grounded out for Valencia in the 9th. 1-ran for C.Davis in the 7th. LOB—Boston 3, Baltimore 4. 2B—Lavarnway (8), Ciriaco (14), Iglesias (2). HR—C.Ross (22), off J.Saunders; Nava (5), off J.Saunders; McLouth (7), off Z.Stewart; Hardy (22), off Z.Stewart; C.Davis (31), off Mortensen. SB—McLouth (11), Ad.Jones (16). DP—Boston 3; Baltimore 1. Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP Z.Stewart L, 1-4 2 2-3 7 5 5 0 1 48 Mortensen 3 1-3 1 1 1 1 4 40 C.Carpenter 1 1 0 0 1 0 10 Padilla 1 0 0 0 1 1 13 Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP J.Saunders W, 3-3 7 1-3 8 3 3 0 5 90 O’Day H, 14 2-3 1 0 0 0 1 10 Johnson S, 50-53 1 0 0 0 0 0 7 T—2:19. A—41,257 (45,971).

ERA 8.58 2.93 1.59 4.59 ERA 3.63 2.32 2.53

Yankees 9, Blue Jays 6 New York AB R H Jeter ss 5 1 3 I.Suzuki rf 4 0 1 Al.Rodriguez 3b 4 2 2 Cano 2b 5 2 3 Swisher 1b 4 0 1 Granderson cf 4 1 1 Ibanez lf 4 0 2 1-Gardner pr-lf 0 1 0 c-Dickerson ph-lf 1 0 0 R.Martin c 4 0 0 Er.Chavez dh 2 1 1 a-E.Nunez ph-dh 2 1 1 Totals 39 9 15

BI 1 1 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 1 7

BB 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

SO 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 5

Avg. .318 .285 .270 .306 .264 .226 .235 .321 .308 .209 .284 .271

Toronto Lawrie 3b R.Davis lf Encarnacion dh b-Rasmus ph-dh Y.Escobar ss Lind 1b Sierra rf Arencibia c

BI 2 0 0 0 1 1 1 0

BB 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 1

SO 0 1 0 1 0 0 2 0

Avg. .273 .258 .280 .225 .254 .247 .229 .236

AB 5 5 2 1 4 4 4 3

R 2 1 1 0 1 0 0 0

H 3 2 0 0 2 1 1 0

z-Baltimore z-New York Tampa Bay Toronto Boston

W 92 92 88 70 69

L 67 67 71 89 90

Detroit Chicago Kansas City Cleveland Minnesota

W 86 83 71 67 66

L 73 76 88 92 93

W L z-Texas 93 66 Oakland 91 68 Los Angeles 88 71 Seattle 73 86 z-clinched playoff berth x-clinched division

East Division Pct GB WCGB .579 — — .579 — — .553 4 3 .440 22 21 .434 23 22 Central Division Pct GB WCGB .541 — — .522 3 8 .447 15 20 .421 19 24 .415 20 25 West Division Pct GB WCGB .585 — — .572 2 — .553 5 3 .459 20 18

Sunday’s Games Cleveland 15, Kansas City 3 L.A. Angels 5, Texas 4, 1st game N.Y. Yankees 9, Toronto 6 Baltimore 6, Boston 3 Detroit 2, Minnesota 1 Tampa Bay 6, Chicago White Sox 2 Oakland 5, Seattle 2 Texas 8, L.A. Angels 7, 2nd game

National League

L10 7-3 6-4 9-1 4-6 1-9

Str Home Away W-4 47-34 45-33 W-1 48-30 44-37 W-2 44-34 44-37 L-1 38-40 32-49 L-5 34-47 35-43

L10 7-3 2-8 3-7 6-4 4-6

Str Home Away W-2 50-31 36-42 L-2 45-36 38-40 L-1 36-42 35-46 W-1 36-42 31-50 L-2 31-50 35-43

L10 4-6 6-4 7-3 3-7

Str Home Away W-1 50-31 43-35 W-3 47-31 44-37 L-1 46-35 42-36 L-3 38-40 35-46

East Division Pct GB WCGB .604 — — .585 3 — .503 16 6 .459 23 13 .421 29 19 Central Division W L Pct GB WCGB x-Cincinnati 96 63 .604 — — St. Louis 86 73 .541 10 — Milwaukee 81 78 .509 15 5 Pittsburgh 77 82 .484 19 9 Chicago 60 99 .377 36 26 Houston 53 106 .333 43 33 West Division W L Pct GB WCGB x-San Francisco 93 66 .585 — — Los Angeles 84 75 .528 9 2 Arizona 80 79 .503 13 6 San Diego 75 84 .472 18 11 Colorado 62 97 .390 31 24

z-Washington z-Atlanta Philadelphia New York Miami

Today’s Games Boston (Buchholz 11-7) at N.Y. Yankees (Sabathia 14-6), 4:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox (H.Santiago 3-1) at Cleveland (Kluber 2-4), 4:05 p.m. Minnesota (Vasquez 0-2) at Toronto (Laffey 4-6), 4:07 p.m. Baltimore (W.Chen 12-10) at Tampa Bay (Cobb 10-9), 4:10 p.m. Detroit (Porcello 9-12) at Kansas City (B.Chen 11-13), 5:10 p.m. Texas (M.Perez 1-3) at Oakland (J.Parker 12-8), 7:05 p.m. L.A. Angels (C.Wilson 12-10) at Seattle (F.Hernandez 13-8), 7:10 p.m.

W 96 93 80 73 67

L 63 66 79 86 92

Sunday’s Games Philadelphia 4, Miami 1 Cincinnati 4, Pittsburgh 3 Atlanta 6, N.Y. Mets 2 Houston 7, Milwaukee 0 St. Louis 10, Washington 4 San Francisco 7, San Diego 5 Chicago Cubs 7, Arizona 2 L.A. Dodgers 7, Colorado 1

L10 5-5 8-2 5-5 7-3 1-9

Str Home Away L-1 48-30 48-33 W-2 48-33 45-33 W-2 40-41 40-38 L-2 36-45 37-41 L-2 36-42 31-50

L10 6-4 7-3 4-6 3-7 2-8 5-5

Str Home Away W-1 50-31 46-32 W-1 48-30 38-43 L-1 47-31 34-47 L-1 43-35 34-47 W-1 37-41 23-58 W-1 35-46 18-60

L10 7-3 7-3 6-4 4-6 4-6

Str Home Away W-1 48-33 45-33 W-5 43-35 41-40 L-1 40-38 40-41 L-1 42-39 33-45 L-3 35-46 27-51

Today’s Games Atlanta (Maholm 13-10) at Pittsburgh (Locke 0-3), 4:05 p.m. Philadelphia (K.Kendrick 10-12) at Washington (Lannan 4-0), 4:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Familia 0-0) at Miami (Jo. Johnson 8-14), 4:10 p.m. Houston (Harrell 10-11) at Chicago Cubs (Berken 0-2), 5:05 p.m. San Diego (Richard 14-13) at Milwaukee (Marcum 6-4), 5:10 p.m. Cincinnati (Arroyo 12-9) at St. Louis (J.Garcia 6-7), 5:15 p.m. Colorado (D.Pomeranz 2-9) at Arizona (Miley 16-11), 6:40 p.m. San Francisco (M.Cain 16-5) at L.A. Dodgers (Harang 10-10), 7:10 p.m.

American League roundup

National League roundup

• Orioles 6, Red Sox 3: BALTIMORE — The Baltimore Orioles clinched their first playoff berth since 1997, extending their winning streak to four by beating Boston as Nate McLouth, J.J. Hardy and Chris Davis hit solo homers. With three games left, the Orioles are tied with the New York Yankees for the AL East lead. • Yankees 9, Blue Jays 6: TORONTO — Eduardo Nunez drove in the go-ahead run with an eighthinning sacrifice fly, and the Yankees overcame a 5-1 deficit and clinched their 17th playoff berth in 18 years. • Angels 5-7, Rangers 4-8: ARLINGTON, Texas — Mike Napoli homered twice and drove in six runs as Texas assured itself a spot in the playoffs, earning a doubleheader split against the Los Angeles Angels. • Athletics 5, Mariners 2: OAKLAND, Calif. — Yoenis Cespedes broke a 2-2 tie in the eighth with a home run off Shawn Kelley (2-4) as Oakland closed in on its first playoff berth in six years. Josh Reddick connected with a two-run shot for his team-leading 32nd homer two batters later as the A’s completed a three-game sweep. • Tigers 2, Twins 1: MINNEAPOLIS — Prince Fielder hit a two-run, opposite-field homer to left off Jared Burton (3-2), his 30th of the season, and Detroit opened a season-high, three-game lead over the second-place Chicago White Sox in the AL Central with three games to play. • Rays 6, White Sox 2: CHICAGO — David Price (20-5) allowed two runs and five hits in seven innings to become Tampa Bay’s first 20-game winner, B.J. Upton hit his 27th and 28th homers and Tampa Bay (88-71) remained three games behind Oakland for the AL’s second wild-card berth with three games left. • Indians 15, Royals 3: CLEVELAND — Asdrubal Cabrera capped a 10-run fifth inning with a grand slam as Cleveland topped Kansas City.

• Cardinals 10, Nationals 4: ST. LOUIS — Carlos Beltran homered from both sides of the plate for the ninth time in his career and drove in five runs, and St. Louis closed in on the NL’s second wild-card berth by beating Washington. St. Louis (86-73) took a 7-0 lead by the third inning and reduced its magic number for clinching to two. They lead the Dodgers by two games for the second NL wild card. • Braves 6, Mets 2: ATLANTA — Atlanta won for a major league record 23rd straight time in games started by Kris Medlen, beating the New York Mets in the regular-season home finale for Chipper Jones. • Reds 4, Pirates 3: PITTSBURGH — Pittsburgh ensured they would finish with a record 20th straight losing season when they blew a ninth-inning lead in a defeat to Cincinnati. • Dodgers 7, Rockies 1: LOS ANGELES — Josh Beckett earned his first victory in his past five starts and the Los Angeles Dodgers backed him with three homers, beating Colorado for their fifth straight win to stay in contention for an NL wild-card spot. • Phillies 4, Marlins 1: MIAMI — Cole Hamels struck out eight and allowed one run over seven innings to finish his season with a flourish, and Philadelphia beat Miami. • Astros 7, Brewers 0: MILWAUKEE — Jordan Lyles pitched his first major league shutout and hit his first home run as Houston eliminated Milwaukee from wild-card playoff contention. • Giants 7, Padres 5: SAN DIEGO — Pinch-hitter Xavier Nady homered off Huston Street to tie the game with one out in the ninth and Hunter Pence hit a go-ahead, two-run shot as San Francisco rallied to beat San Diego. • Cubs 7, Diamondbacks 2: PHOENIX — Anthony Rizzo had three hits, David DeJesus homered and the Chicago Cubs ended a seven-game losing streak, beating Arizona.

Hechavarria 2b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .252 Gose cf 3 1 1 0 1 1 .222 Totals 35 6 10 5 5 7 New York 001 001 322 — 9 15 0 Toronto 200 030 001 — 6 10 1 c-popped out for Gardner in the 9th. 1-ran for Ibanez in the 8th. E—Lawrie (17). LOB—New York 9, Toronto 8. 2B—Jeter (31), Cano 2 (46), Y.Escobar (22). HR—Er.Chavez (16), off H.Alvarez; Lawrie (11), off P.Hughes. DP—New York 1; Toronto 1. New York IP H R ER BB SO NP P.Hughes 4 2-3 8 5 5 2 4 93 D.Lowe 1 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 13 Logan W, 7-2 2-3 0 0 0 1 1 20 D.Robertson H, 30 1 0 0 0 1 2 14 R.Soriano 1 2 1 1 1 0 17 Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP H.Alvarez 6 7 2 2 0 4 87 Cecil 0 1 1 1 0 0 4 Delabar H, 11 1-3 2 2 2 1 0 19 Loup BS, 1-1 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 6 Oliver L, 3-4 0 1 2 2 1 0 7 Lyon 1 1 0 0 0 0 9 Frasor 2-3 3 2 2 1 1 20 Beck 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 4 Cecil pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Oliver pitched to 2 batters in the 8th. T—3:25. A—31,418 (49,260).

ERA 4.23 5.18 3.79 2.72 2.19 ERA 4.85 5.64 3.74 2.73 2.10 3.13 4.12 6.75

Tigers 2, Twins 1 Detroit A.Jackson cf Berry lf Mi.Cabrera 3b Fielder 1b D.Young dh Dirks rf a-A.Garcia ph-rf Jh.Peralta ss Avila c Infante 2b Totals

AB 4 3 3 4 4 3 1 3 4 3 32

R 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

H 2 0 0 1 1 2 0 1 0 0 7

BI 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

BB 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2

SO 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 3 0 6

Avg. .301 .261 .325 .309 .272 .320 .333 .240 .242 .259

Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Span cf 5 0 1 0 0 0 .283 Revere rf 4 0 0 0 1 0 .285 Mauer c 4 0 3 0 1 0 .323 Morneau dh 4 0 0 0 0 0 .267 Doumit lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .275 Parmelee 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .233 Plouffe 3b 3 0 2 0 0 0 .232 1-J.Carroll pr-3b 1 1 1 0 0 0 .265 A.Casilla 2b 3 0 2 0 0 0 .237 Florimon ss 4 0 1 1 0 1 .233 Totals 36 1 10 1 2 4 Detroit 000 000 020 — 2 7 0 Minnesota 000 000 100 — 1 10 0 a-struck out for Dirks in the 9th. 1-ran for Plouffe in the 7th. LOB—Detroit 6, Minnesota 11. 2B—D.Young (27), Dirks (18). HR—Fielder (30), off Burton. SB— A.Casilla 2 (20). DP—Minnesota 1. Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA A.Sanchez 6 1-3 7 1 1 1 4 102 3.74 Coke W, 2-3 2-3 1 0 0 1 0 13 4.00 Dotel H, 11 1 2 0 0 0 0 15 3.63 Valverde S, 34-39 1 0 0 0 0 0 8 3.84 Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hendriks 7 5 0 0 2 3 99 5.59 Burton L, 3-2 1 2 2 2 0 1 13 2.21 Perkins 1 0 0 0 0 2 8 2.47 T—2:43. A—32,554 (39,500).

Rays 6, White Sox 2 Tampa Bay De.Jennings lf B.Upton cf Zobrist ss Longoria 3b

AB 4 5 3 5

R 1 3 1 0

H 2 3 0 2

BI 0 3 0 1

BB 1 0 2 0

SO 1 0 0 1

Avg. .249 .247 .271 .285

Keppinger 1b C.Pena 1b Scott dh B.Francisco rf a-Joyce ph-rf R.Roberts 2b C.Gimenez c J.Molina c Totals

3 1 2 2 1 4 3 0 33

0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 6 9 6 7 8

.328 .199 .231 .240 .244 .219 .239 .223

Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Wise cf 2 0 1 0 2 0 .260 Youkilis 3b 4 1 1 0 0 3 .236 A.Dunn dh 4 0 0 0 0 3 .204 Konerko 1b 4 1 2 0 0 0 .297 Rios rf 3 0 1 1 1 0 .303 Pierzynski c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .276 Viciedo lf 2 0 0 1 0 0 .250 b-O.Hudson ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .184 Al.Ramirez ss 3 0 0 0 0 0 .266 Beckham 2b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .235 Totals 29 2 5 2 3 8 Tampa Bay 200 120 001 — 6 9 0 Chicago 000 200 000 — 2 5 0 a-struck out for B.Francisco in the 7th. b-struck out for Viciedo in the 9th. LOB—Tampa Bay 8, Chicago 5. 2B—B.Upton (28), Longoria (14). 3B—De.Jennings (7). HR— B.Upton (27), off Quintana; R.Roberts (5), off Quintana; B.Upton (28), off A.Reed. DP—Tampa Bay 1; Chicago 2. Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Price W, 20-5 7 5 2 2 2 4 109 2.56 Jo.Peralta H, 37 1 0 0 0 1 2 26 3.53 Rodney 1 0 0 0 0 2 12 0.61 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Quintana L, 6-6 4 6 4 4 3 3 85 3.76 N.Jones 2 1 1 1 3 1 45 2.40 Myers 2 1 0 0 1 3 22 3.27 A.Reed 1 1 1 1 0 1 15 4.75 Quintana pitched to 1 batter in the 5th. T—3:06. A—26,831 (40,615).

NL Boxscores Dodgers 7, Rockies 1 Colorado Rutledge ss R.Ortega cf Pacheco c A.Brown rf Nelson 3b Blackmon lf McBride 1b White p b-J.Herrera ph C.Torres p LeMahieu 2b J.De La Rosa p Scahill p Colvin 1b Totals

AB 5 3 5 4 4 3 3 0 1 0 3 2 0 2 35

R 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

H 1 2 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 9

Los Angeles M.Ellis 2b Victorino lf Kemp cf Ad.Gonzalez 1b H.Ramirez ss L.Cruz 3b Ethier rf A.Ellis c Beckett p a-E.Herrera ph P.Rodriguez p Sh.Tolleson p Belisario p J.Wright p Choate p c-J.Rivera ph Wall p Totals Colorado Los Angeles

AB R H 5 0 1 5 2 3 3 1 2 3 1 2 4 0 2 4 1 1 3 1 0 4 1 1 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 35 7 12 000 100 000 412

BI 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

BB 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 4

SO 1 1 2 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 8

Avg. .285 .667 .305 .240 .298 .273 .222 .179 .248 .222 .291 .400 .000 .291

BI BB SO 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 2 0 2 0 1 1 2 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 7 3 8 000 — 1 00x — 7

Avg. .260 .253 .310 .291 .256 .301 .282 .270 .000 .245 ------.000 --.239 --9 0 12 1

a-flied out for Beckett in the 6th. b-popped out for White in the 8th. c-struck out for Choate in the 8th. E—L.Cruz (4). LOB—Colorado 12, Los Angeles 7. 2B—Rutledge (19), Pacheco (31), Blackmon (7), McBride (2). HR—A.Brown (5), off Beckett; Kemp (23), off J.De La Rosa; L.Cruz (6), off J.De La Rosa; A.Ellis (12), off White. SB—R.Ortega (1), Victorino (39). DP—Los Angeles 1. Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP De La Rosa L, 0-2 4 5 4 4 0 3 67 Scahill 1 3 1 1 1 1 28 White 2 3 2 2 2 2 53 C.Torres 1 1 0 0 0 2 17 Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP Beckett W, 2-3 6 6 1 1 3 5 91 P.Rodriguez 2-3 1 0 0 0 1 10 Sh.Tolleson 0 1 0 0 1 0 11 Belisario 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 4 J.Wright 2-3 1 0 0 0 0 9 Choate 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 2 Wall 1 0 0 0 0 2 15 Sh.Tolleson pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. T—3:31. A—35,607 (56,000).

ERA 9.28 1.04 5.51 5.26 ERA 2.93 1.35 4.50 2.58 3.55 3.03 4.76

Cubs 7, Diamondbacks 2 Chicago AB R H DeJesus rf-cf-rf 5 2 2 Barney 2b 5 0 0 Rizzo 1b 5 2 3 A.Soriano lf 4 1 1 Campana cf 0 0 0 S.Castro ss 4 1 2 Valbuena 3b 4 0 0 B.Jackson cf 2 0 0 b-Sappelt ph-rf-lf 1 1 1 Recker c 3 0 1 Rusin p 2 0 0 c-LaHair ph 1 0 1 Bowden p 0 0 0 Russell p 0 0 0 Camp p 0 0 0 e-Cardenas ph 1 0 0 Marmol p 0 0 0 Totals 37 7 11

BI 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 6

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

Avg. .265 .257 .289 .263 .260 .285 .224 .175 .300 .188 .167 .257 .000 .000 --.193 ---

Arizona AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Pollock cf 4 0 2 0 0 0 .260 Elmore ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .191 A.Hill 2b 3 1 1 0 1 0 .304 J.Upton rf 4 1 1 0 0 0 .279 Kubel lf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .253 Ransom 3b 3 0 1 1 0 1 .220 f-R.Wheeler ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .234 Jacobs 1b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .235 Nieves c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .301 Collmenter p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .063 a-Graham ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Shaw p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Zagurski p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Albers p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Bergesen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 d-C.Young ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .229 Lindstrom p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Saito p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --g-G.Parra ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .274 Totals 33 2 6 1 3 9 Chicago 100 004 101 — 7 11 2 Arizona 200 000 000 — 2 6 3 a-struck out for Collmenter in the 5th. b-singled for B.Jackson in the 6th. c-singled for Rusin in the 6th. d-struck out for Bergesen in the 7th. e-fouled out for Camp in the 9th. f-walked for Ransom in the 9th. ggrounded out for Saito in the 9th. E—Recker (1), S.Castro (26), Ransom (8), Jacobs (1), Bergesen (1). LOB—Chicago 5, Arizona 7. 2B—DeJesus (28), Rizzo 2 (14). HR—DeJesus (9), off Saito. DP—Chicago 1; Arizona 2. Chicago Rusin W, 2-3 Bowden H, 2 Russell Camp

IP 5 1 1 1

H 3 1 1 1

R 2 0 0 0

ER BB SO NP 1 2 4 68 0 0 1 22 0 0 2 14 0 0 0 17

ERA 6.37 3.03 3.34 3.33

Marmol 1 0 0 0 1 2 21 Arizona IP H R ER BB SO NP Collmenter 5 6 1 1 0 2 76 Shaw L, 1-6 H, 10 1-3 2 3 0 0 0 12 Zagurski H, 4 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 3 Albers BS, 2-2 1-3 2 1 1 0 0 7 Bergesen 1 0 1 0 0 0 10 Lindstrom 1 0 0 0 1 0 8 Saito 1 1 1 1 0 1 20 T—3:05. A—35,535 (48,633).

3.54 ERA 3.69 3.61 5.65 2.57 2.45 2.53 6.75

Giants 7, Padres 5 San Francisco AB R H G.Blanco cf 4 1 1 Theriot 2b 4 0 1 Runzler p 0 0 0 Loux p 0 0 0 d-Nady ph 1 1 1 Romo p 0 0 0 A.Huff 1b 3 0 0 1-F.Peguero pr-lf 1 2 1 Pence rf 5 2 2 Belt lf-1b 5 0 2 H.Sanchez c 3 1 2 2-Christian pr 0 0 0 Whiteside c 1 0 0 B.Crawford ss 3 0 1 Arias 3b-2b 3 0 1 Lincecum p 0 0 0 a-Burriss ph-2b 1 0 0 c-Sandoval ph-3b 1 0 0 Totals 35 7 12

BI 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 2 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 7

BB 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 5

SO 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 10

Avg. .243 .271 --.000 .196 --.182 .214 .257 .276 .278 .125 .091 .248 .272 .089 .213 .286

San Diego AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Ev.Cabrera ss 2 2 0 0 2 1 .242 Forsythe 2b 4 1 1 2 0 0 .282 Headley 3b 4 1 2 1 0 0 .285 Grandal c 3 1 1 1 1 0 .293 Alonso 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .275 Kotsay lf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .266 Maybin cf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .244 Venable cf-rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .259 Denorfia rf-lf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .295 Volquez p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .071 Boxberger p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Brach p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Solis ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Gregerson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Thatcher p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Thayer p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Street p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --e-Quentin ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .261 Totals 33 5 6 4 3 7 San Francisco 100 100 023 — 7 12 1 San Diego 002 111 000 — 5 6 0 a-struck out for Lincecum in the 7th. b-struck out for Brach in the 7th. c-struck out for Burriss in the 8th. d-homered for Loux in the 9th. e-struck out for Street in the 9th. 1-ran for A.Huff in the 8th. 2-ran for H.Sanchez in the 8th. E—H.Sanchez (7). LOB—San Francisco 8, San Diego 4. 2B—Headley (30). HR—Nady (4), off Street; Pence (24), off Street; Forsythe (6), off Lincecum; Grandal (8), off Lincecum; Headley (31), off Lincecum. SB—G.Blanco (26), Ev.Cabrera 4 (41). DP—San Diego 1. San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO NP Lincecum 6 4 5 4 2 4 92 Runzler 1 0 0 0 0 2 12 Loux W, 1-0 1 1 0 0 1 0 15 Romo S, 13-14 1 1 0 0 0 1 14 San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP Volquez 4 6 2 2 3 4 71 Boxberger 2 0 0 0 1 1 29 Brach H, 15 1 0 0 0 0 2 10 Gregerson 0 1 2 2 1 0 6 Thatcher H, 14 1-3 2 0 0 0 0 9 Thayer H, 21 2-3 0 0 0 0 2 8 Street L, 2-1 1 3 3 3 0 1 19 Gregerson pitched to 2 batters in the 8th. T—3:00. A—33,407 (42,691).

ERA 5.18 0.00 4.97 1.82 ERA 4.14 2.67 3.84 2.43 3.48 3.51 1.85

Braves 6, Mets 2 New York AB R Tejada ss 4 1 Dan.Murphy 2b 4 0 Ju.Turner 3b 4 0 I.Davis 1b 3 1 Hairston cf-rf 4 0 Duda lf 3 0 Baxter rf 2 0 b-An.Torres ph-cf 2 0 Shoppach c 3 0 e-F.Lewis ph 1 0 Mejia p 2 0 McHugh p 0 0 Hampson p 0 0 c-R.Cedeno ph 1 0 Acosta p 0 0 Totals 33 2

H 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

BI 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

BB 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

SO 1 1 1 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 7

Avg. .292 .293 .266 .225 .258 .239 .260 .229 .208 .150 .000 .000 .000 .261 ---

Atlanta AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Bourn cf 3 1 2 1 1 0 .276 Prado lf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .303 Heyward rf 4 0 1 1 0 0 .267 C.Jones 3b 2 1 1 0 2 0 .287 F.Freeman 1b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .263 Uggla 2b 3 1 0 0 0 2 .219 D.Ross c 4 1 1 3 0 1 .254 Simmons ss 3 1 2 1 1 1 .301 Medlen p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .121 a-J.Francisco ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .239 Avilan p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .333 d-Hinske ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .192 Gearrin p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Kimbrel p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 31 6 8 6 4 7 New York 001 000 001 — 2 5 1 Atlanta 030 012 00x — 6 8 1 a-struck out for Medlen in the 6th. b-grounded out for Baxter in the 7th. c-flied out for Hampson in the 8th. d-struck out for Avilan in the 8th. e-grounded out for Shoppach in the 9th. E—Mejia (1), F.Freeman (12). LOB—New York 6, Atlanta 6. 2B—Dan.Murphy (40), I.Davis (24), Bourn (26), Heyward (30), F.Freeman (33). 3B—Simmons (2). HR—D.Ross (9), off Mejia. SB—Bourn (40). DP—New York 2. New York IP H R ER BB SO NP Mejia L, 1-2 5 6 4 4 2 3 91 McHugh 1 2 2 2 0 2 21 Hampson 1 0 0 0 1 0 12 Acosta 1 0 0 0 1 2 21 Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP Medlen W, 10-1 6 3 1 0 1 4 79 Avilan 2 0 0 0 0 3 25 Gearrin 2-3 2 1 1 1 0 21 Kimbrel S, 42-45 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 3 T—2:50. A—50,635 (49,586).

ERA 5.63 7.29 1.86 6.60 ERA 1.57 2.06 1.89 1.02

Astros 7, Brewers 0 Houston AB R Greene 2b 4 0 S.Moore rf 4 0 B.Barnes cf 1 0 Lowrie ss 4 1 Ma.Gonzalez ss 0 0 Dominguez 3b 5 2 Wallace 1b 4 1 F.Martinez lf 4 1 1-Bogusevic pr-rf 0 0 Maxwell cf-rf-lf 4 0 Corporan c 3 1 Lyles p 3 1 Totals 36 7

H 1 0 0 1 0 2 0 2 0 1 1 1 9

BI 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 2 1 7

BB 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 4

SO 2 3 1 1 0 2 2 1 0 1 0 0 13

Avg. .226 .260 .213 .250 .234 .296 .257 .232 .203 .225 .257 .158

Milwaukee AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Aoki rf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .285 R.Weeks 2b 3 0 1 0 1 0 .229 Braun lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .320 Ar.Ramirez 3b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .299 Hart 1b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .272 Lucroy c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .321 C.Gomez cf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .260 Segura ss 3 0 0 0 0 0 .277 Fiers p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .094 a-L.Schafer ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .350 Kintzler p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --M.Parra p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Stinson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Morgan ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .240 Totals 29 0 4 0 1 3 Houston 001 112 020 — 7 9 1 Milwaukee 000 000 000 — 0 4 1 a-flied out for Fiers in the 6th. b-fouled out for Stinson in the 9th. 1-ran for F.Martinez in the 8th. E—Wallace (9), Hart (6). LOB—Houston 7, Milwaukee 3. 2B—Greene (15). HR—F.Martinez (5), off Fiers; Lyles (1), off Fiers; Lowrie (16), off Fiers; Dominguez (5), off Fiers. DP—Houston 3. Houston Lyles W, 5-12 Milwaukee Fiers L, 9-10

IP 9 IP 6

H 4 H 6

R 0 R 5

ER BB SO NP ERA 0 1 3 103 5.09 ER BB SO NP ERA 5 1 10 105 3.74

Kintzler 1 2-3 3 2 2 1 2 37 3.14 M.Parra 2-3 0 0 0 2 1 21 4.76 Stinson 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 8 0.00 T—2:42. A—38,443 (41,900).

Cardinals 10, Nationals 4 Washington Werth rf Harper cf Zimmerman 3b LaRoche 1b Morse lf Desmond ss Espinosa 2b K.Suzuki c Detwiler p Wang p Stammen p C.Garcia p a-Bernadina ph Duke p c-Tracy ph Totals

AB 4 3 4 4 4 3 4 3 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 33

R 0 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

H 1 1 0 2 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7

BI 0 1 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

BB 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 1 0 2 1 2 2 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 11

Avg. .298 .269 .284 .271 .286 .292 .250 .266 .044 .167 .000 --.290 .000 .270

St. Louis AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Jay cf 4 3 2 1 1 0 .306 Beltran rf 4 2 3 5 1 0 .269 Holliday lf 4 0 1 0 1 2 .292 Craig 1b 5 0 1 0 0 1 .310 Y.Molina c 4 1 0 0 1 1 .317 Freese 3b 3 2 0 0 2 1 .294 Descalso 2b 4 1 2 0 0 0 .228 Kozma ss 3 1 3 3 0 0 .338 Lynn p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .060 Rosenthal p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Mujica p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-S.Robinson ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .248 Boggs p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --J.Kelly p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .152 Totals 34 10 12 9 6 6 Washington 000 400 000 — 4 7 1 St. Louis 052 200 01x — 10 12 0 a-grounded out for C.Garcia in the 7th. b-grounded into a fielder’s choice for Mujica in the 7th. c-grounded out for Duke in the 9th. E—Espinosa (13). LOB—Washington 5, St. Louis 8. 2B—Werth (21), LaRoche (34), Desmond (33), Jay (21), Kozma (5). HR—Harper (22), off Lynn; Espinosa (17), off Lynn; Beltran (31), off Detwiler; Beltran (32), off Wang. DP—St. Louis 1. Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP Detwiler L, 10-8 2 1-3 4 7 3 5 3 81 Wang 2 1-3 3 2 2 1 0 44 Stammen 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 3 C.Garcia 1 0 0 0 0 2 7 Duke 2 5 1 1 0 1 42 St. Louis IP H R ER BB SO NP Lynn W, 18-7 5 1-3 6 4 4 1 9 99 Rosenthal 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 7 Mujica 1 0 0 0 0 0 8 Boggs 1 1 0 0 0 2 16 J.Kelly 1 0 0 0 0 0 13 T—3:09. A—40,084 (43,975).

ERA 3.40 6.68 2.40 2.45 1.42 ERA 3.78 2.91 3.05 2.24 3.60

Reds 4, Pirates 3 Cincinnati B.Phillips 2b Cozart ss W.Valdez ss-2b Votto 1b Frazier rf-lf-3b Heisey lf b-Bruce ph-rf Cairo 3b d-Paul ph-lf Stubbs cf Hanigan c Cueto p LeCure p Marshall p e-Ludwick ph 1-Phipps pr A.Chapman p Totals

AB 3 2 5 4 4 3 1 3 1 4 3 3 0 0 1 0 0 37

R 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 4

H 1 1 2 2 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 10

BI 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 12

Avg. .283 .249 .203 .342 .274 .267 .251 .189 .313 .213 .277 .090 .000 --.279 .300 ---

Pittsburgh AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Presley lf 4 1 1 0 0 0 .237 S.Marte lf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .247 J.Harrison 2b 3 1 0 0 0 1 .236 A.McCutchen cf 3 0 1 1 1 1 .329 G.Jones 1b 3 1 1 2 0 2 .276 c-G.Sanchez ph-1b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .220 P.Alvarez 3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .245 Snider rf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .238 f-Tabata ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .243 Barmes ss 3 0 1 0 1 0 .226 Barajas c 4 0 2 0 0 1 .208 2-d’Arnaud pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 W.Rodriguez p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .066 Watson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-Holt ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .297 Grilli p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Hanrahan p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --g-McKenry ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .239 Totals 33 3 7 3 3 9 Cincinnati 002 000 002 — 4 10 3 Pittsburgh 002 010 000 — 3 7 0 a-lined out for Watson in the 7th. b-struck out for Heisey in the 8th. c-flied out for G.Jones in the 8th. d-homered for Cairo in the 9th. e-doubled for Marshall in the 9th. f-walked for Snider in the 9th. g-struck out for Hanrahan in the 9th. 1-ran for Ludwick in the 9th. 2-ran for Barajas in the 9th. E—Votto (6), Cueto (5), A.Chapman (1). LOB— Cincinnati 7, Pittsburgh 7. 2B—Cozart (33), Votto (43), Cairo (7), Ludwick (27), Presley (13). HR—Paul (2), off Hanrahan; G.Jones (26), off Cueto. Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cueto 7 6 3 1 1 6 98 2.78 LeCure 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 5 3.21 Marshall W, 5-5 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 10 2.55 Chapman S, 37-42 1 1 0 0 2 2 22 1.53 Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA W.Rodriguez 6 6 2 2 1 7 104 3.76 Watson H, 15 1 0 0 0 0 2 14 3.44 Grilli H, 32 1 1 0 0 0 3 13 2.91 Hanrahan L, 5-2 1 3 2 2 0 0 18 2.72 T—2:58 (Rain delay: 0:04). A—32,814 (38,362). More Sunday boxscores in Scoreboard, D2.

Leaders Through Sunday’s Games AMERICAN LEAGUE BATTING—MiCabrera, Detroit, .325; Mauer, Minnesota, .323; Trout, Los Angeles, .321; Beltre, Texas, .319; Jeter, New York, .318; TorHunter, Los Angeles, .313; Butler, Kansas City, .312. RBI—MiCabrera, Detroit, 136; Hamilton, Texas, 127; Encarnacion, Toronto, 110; Willingham, Minnesota, 110; Fielder, Detroit, 108; Butler, Kansas City, 107; Pujols, Los Angeles, 104. HITS—Jeter, New York, 213; MiCabrera, Detroit, 199; Beltre, Texas, 189; Butler, Kansas City, 189; Cano, New York, 187; AGordon, Kansas City, 185; AdJones, Baltimore, 184. HOME RUNS—MiCabrera, Detroit, 43; Hamilton, Texas, 43; Encarnacion, Toronto, 42; ADunn, Chicago, 41; Granderson, New York, 40; Beltre, Texas, 36; Willingham, Minnesota, 35. PITCHING—Weaver, Los Angeles, 20-4; Price, Tampa Bay, 20-5; MHarrison, Texas, 18-10; Sale, Chicago, 17-8; Verlander, Detroit, 17-8; Scherzer, Detroit, 16-7; Darvish, Texas, 16-9; PHughes, New York, 16-13. STRIKEOUTS—Verlander, Detroit, 239; Scherzer, Detroit, 228; Darvish, Texas, 221; FHernandez, Seattle, 216; Shields, Tampa Bay, 208; Price, Tampa Bay, 205; Sale, Chicago, 192. NATIONAL LEAGUE BATTING—MeCabrera, San Francisco, .346; Posey, San Francisco, .337; AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, .329; Braun, Milwaukee, .320; YMolina, St. Louis, .317; Craig, St. Louis, .310; DWright, New York, .306; Jay, St. Louis, .306. RBI—Headley, San Diego, 113; Braun, Milwaukee, 112; ASoriano, Chicago, 108; Pence, San Francisco, 104; ArRamirez, Milwaukee, 103; Holliday, St. Louis, 101; Posey, San Francisco, 100. HITS—AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, 192; Braun, Milwaukee, 188; Prado, Atlanta, 186; Scutaro, San Francisco, 186; SCastro, Chicago, 181; AHill, Arizona, 180; Reyes, Miami, 180. HOME RUNS—Braun, Milwaukee, 41; Stanton, Miami, 36; Bruce, Cincinnati, 34; Beltran, St. Louis, 32; LaRoche, Washington, 32; ASoriano, Chicago, 32; IDavis, New York, 31; Headley, San Diego, 31; AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, 31. PITCHING—GGonzalez, Washington, 21-8; Dickey, New York, 20-6; Cueto, Cincinnati, 19-9; Lynn, St. Louis, 18-7; Hamels, Philadelphia, 17-6; 7 tied at 16. STRIKEOUTS—Dickey, New York, 222; Kershaw, Los Angeles, 221; Hamels, Philadelphia, 216; GGonzalez, Washington, 207; Gallardo, Milwaukee, 204; ClLee, Philadelphia, 200; Strasburg, Washington, 197.


D4

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2012

NFL SCOREBOARD Summaries

AMERICAN CONFERENCE

Sunday’s Games

East Rams 19, Seahawks 13 Seattle St. Louis

7 0 3 3 — 13 3 10 3 3 — 19 First Quarter Sea—Lynch 18 run (Hauschka kick), 10:45. StL—FG Zuerlein 58, 4:59. Second Quarter StL—Amendola 2 pass from Hekker (Zuerlein kick), 1:11. StL—FG Zuerlein 48, :00. Third Quarter StL—FG Zuerlein 60, 13:46. Sea—FG Hauschka 31, 4:10. Fourth Quarter Sea—FG Hauschka 30, 13:03. StL—FG Zuerlein 24, 6:07. A—53,193. ——— Sea StL First downs 19 15 Total Net Yards 319 286 Rushes-yards 34-179 27-75 Passing 140 211 Punt Returns 2-1 1-18 Kickoff Returns 1-69 1-10 Interceptions Ret. 1-29 3-40 Comp-Att-Int 17-25-3 17-31-1 Sacked-Yards Lost 2-20 2-12 Punts 4-49.0 4-39.0 Fumbles-Lost 0-0 0-0 Penalties-Yards 5-55 6-37 Time of Possession 29:52 30:08 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Seattle: Lynch 20-118, Turbin 6-45, Wilson 7-14, Washington 1-2. St. Louis: Jackson 18-55, D.Richardson 6-16, Amendola 1-6, Bradford 2-(minus 2). PASSING—Seattle: Wilson 17-25-3-160. St. Louis: Bradford 16-30-1-221, Hekker 1-1-0-2. RECEIVING—Seattle: Rice 4-41, Lynch 4-37, Miller 3-32, McCoy 2-20, Turbin 2-13, Baldwin 1-10, Tate 1-7. St. Louis: Amendola 6-55, Gibson 2-28, Kendricks 2-22, Pettis 2-22, D.Richardson 2-13, Givens 1-52, Quick 1-19, Jackson 1-12. MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.

Redskins 24, Buccaneers 22 Washington Tampa Bay

7 14 0 3 — 24 3 3 7 9 — 22 First Quarter TB—FG Barth 50, 4:42. Was—Garcon fumble recovery in end zone (Cundiff kick), :00. Second Quarter Was—Griffin III 5 run (Cundiff kick), 7:26. Was—Morris 39 run (Cundiff kick), 5:15. TB—FG Barth 57, 1:55. Third Quarter TB—Jackson 7 pass from Freeman (Barth kick), 1:56. Fourth Quarter TB—Blount 2 run (pass failed), 9:41. TB—FG Barth 47, 1:42. Was—FG Cundiff 41, :03. A—58,191. ——— Was TB First downs 27 16 Total Net Yards 474 373 Rushes-yards 30-160 18-80 Passing 314 293 Punt Returns 3-17 4-36 Kickoff Returns 2-42 1-2 Interceptions Ret. 1-13 0-0 Comp-Att-Int 26-35-0 24-39-1 Sacked-Yards Lost 2-9 1-6 Punts 6-46.7 6-46.2 Fumbles-Lost 1-0 0-0 Penalties-Yards 8-73 10-107 Time of Possession 32:19 27:41 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Washington: Morris 21-113, Griffin III 7-43, Royster 2-4. Tampa Bay: Martin 8-33, Blount 6-17, Ware 1-17, Freeman 2-8, Benn 1-5. PASSING—Washington: Griffin III 26-35-0323. Tampa Bay: Freeman 24-39-1-299. RECEIVING—Washington: Hankerson 7-57, F.Davis 4-70, Morgan 4-62, Moss 3-33, Royster 3-15, Young 2-40, Paul 1-30, Garcon 1-20, Morris 1-(minus 4). Tampa Bay: Jackson 6-100, Williams 4-115, Underwood 3-39, Benn 3-18, Clark 3-15, Martin 2-9, Ware 2-(minus 2), Stocker 1-5. MISSED FIELD GOALS—Washington: Cundiff 41 (WR), 57 (SH), 31 (WL).

Packers 28, Saints 27 New Orleans Green Bay

7 7 10 3 — 27 7 14 0 7 — 28 First Quarter GB—Ja.Jones 12 pass from Rodgers (Crosby kick), 9:02. NO—Colston 20 pass from Brees (Hartley kick), 3:33. Second Quarter GB—G.Jennings 9 pass from Rodgers (Crosby kick), 14:15. GB—Ja.Jones 14 pass from Rodgers (Crosby kick), 4:50. NO—Sproles 6 pass from Brees (Hartley kick), :27. Third Quarter NO—FG Hartley 20, 9:41. NO—Morgan 80 pass from Brees (Hartley kick), 3:49. Fourth Quarter NO—FG Hartley 27, 13:04. GB—Nelson 11 pass from Rodgers (Crosby kick), 7:00. A—70,571. ——— NO GB First downs 25 30 Total Net Yards 474 421 Rushes-yards 19-45 25-102 Passing 429 319 Punt Returns 1-4 0-0 Kickoff Returns 3-91 3-88 Interceptions Ret. 1-0 0-0 Comp-Att-Int 35-54-0 31-41-1 Sacked-Yards Lost 2-17 0-0 Punts 3-36.0 2-41.0 Fumbles-Lost 0-0 1-1 Penalties-Yards 10-72 7-43 Time of Possession 30:28 29:32

N.Y. Jets New England Buffalo Miami

W 2 2 2 1

L 2 2 2 3

T 0 0 0 0

Pct .500 .500 .500 .250

PF 81 134 115 86

Houston Indianapolis Jacksonville Tennessee

W 4 1 1 1

L 0 2 3 3

T 0 0 0 0

Pct 1.000 .333 .250 .250

PF 126 61 62 81

Baltimore Cincinnati Pittsburgh Cleveland

W 3 3 1 0

L 1 1 2 4

T 0 0 0 0

Pct .750 .750 .333 .000

PF 121 112 77 73

San Diego Denver Kansas City Oakland

W 3 2 1 1

L 1 2 3 3

T 0 0 0 0

Pct .750 .500 .250 .250

PF 100 114 88 67

PA 109 92 131 90

Home 1-1-0 0-1-0 1-1-0 1-1-0

Away 1-1-0 2-1-0 1-1-0 0-2-0

AFC 2-1-0 2-1-0 2-2-0 1-2-0

NFC 0-1-0 0-1-0 0-0-0 0-1-0

Div 2-0-0 1-0-0 0-2-0 0-1-0

Away 2-0-0 0-1-0 1-1-0 0-2-0

AFC 4-0-0 0-1-0 1-2-0 0-3-0

NFC 0-0-0 1-1-0 0-1-0 1-0-0

Div 2-0-0 0-1-0 1-1-0 0-1-0

Home 3-0-0 1-0-0 1-0-0 0-2-0

Away 0-1-0 2-1-0 0-2-0 0-2-0

AFC 3-0-0 2-1-0 1-2-0 0-3-0

NFC 0-1-0 1-0-0 0-0-0 0-1-0

Div 2-0-0 1-1-0 0-0-0 0-2-0

Home 1-1-0 2-1-0 0-2-0 1-1-0

Away 2-0-0 0-1-0 1-1-0 0-2-0

AFC 3-0-0 2-1-0 0-2-0 1-3-0

NFC 0-1-0 0-1-0 1-1-0 0-0-0

Div 2-0-0 1-0-0 0-1-0 0-2-0

South PA 56 83 97 151

Home 2-0-0 1-1-0 0-2-0 1-1-0

North PA 83 112 75 98

West PA 71 83 136 125

NATIONAL CONFERENCE East Philadelphia Dallas N.Y. Giants Washington

W 3 2 2 2

L 1 1 2 2

T 0 0 0 0

Pct .750 .667 .500 .500

PF 66 47 111 123

Atlanta Tampa Bay Carolina New Orleans

W 4 1 1 0

L 0 3 3 4

T 0 0 0 0

Pct 1.000 .250 .250 .000

PF 124 82 80 110

Minnesota Chicago Green Bay Detroit

W 3 2 2 1

L 1 1 2 3

T 0 0 0 0

Pct .750 .667 .500 .250

PF 90 74 85 100

Arizona San Francisco St. Louis Seattle

W 4 3 2 2

L 0 1 2 2

T 0 0 0 0

Pct 1.000 .750 .500 .500

PF 91 104 79 70

PA 83 54 84 123

Home 2-0-0 1-0-0 1-1-0 0-1-0

Away 1-1-0 1-1-0 1-1-0 2-1-0

NFC 1-1-0 2-1-0 2-2-0 2-1-0

AFC 2-0-0 0-0-0 0-0-0 0-1-0

Div 1-0-0 1-0-0 0-2-0 0-0-0

Away 2-0-0 0-2-0 0-2-0 0-2-0

NFC 1-0-0 1-3-0 1-3-0 0-3-0

AFC 3-0-0 0-0-0 0-0-0 0-1-0

Div 1-0-0 1-0-0 1-2-0 0-1-0

Home 2-0-0 2-0-0 2-1-0 1-1-0

Away 1-1-0 0-1-0 0-1-0 0-2-0

NFC 2-0-0 1-1-0 2-2-0 1-2-0

AFC 1-1-0 1-0-0 0-0-0 0-1-0

Div 1-0-0 0-1-0 1-0-0 0-1-0

Home 3-0-0 1-0-0 2-0-0 2-0-0

Away 1-0-0 2-1-0 0-2-0 0-2-0

NFC 2-0-0 2-1-0 2-2-0 2-2-0

AFC 2-0-0 1-0-0 0-0-0 0-0-0

Div 1-0-0 0-0-0 1-0-0 0-2-0

South PA 76 91 109 130

Home 2-0-0 1-1-0 1-1-0 0-2-0

North PA 72 50 81 114

West PA 61 65 91 58

Thursday’s Game Baltimore 23, Cleveland 16 Sunday’s Games Houston 38, Tennessee 14 San Diego 37, Kansas City 20 St. Louis 19, Seattle 13 New England 52, Buffalo 28 Minnesota 20, Detroit 13 Atlanta 30, Carolina 28 San Francisco 34, N.Y. Jets 0 Arizona 24, Miami 21, OT Denver 37, Oakland 6 Cincinnati 27, Jacksonville 10 Green Bay 28, New Orleans 27 Washington 24, Tampa Bay 22 Philadelphia 19, N.Y. Giants 17 Open: Indianapolis, Pittsburgh Today’s Game Chicago at Dallas, 5:30 p.m.

Thursday, Oct. 4 Arizona at St. Louis, 5:20 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 7 Baltimore at Kansas City, 10 a.m. Atlanta at Washington, 10 a.m. Philadelphia at Pittsburgh, 10 a.m. Green Bay at Indianapolis, 10 a.m. Cleveland at N.Y. Giants, 10 a.m. Miami at Cincinnati, 10 a.m. Seattle at Carolina, 1:05 p.m. Chicago at Jacksonville, 1:05 p.m. Buffalo at San Francisco, 1:25 p.m. Tennessee at Minnesota, 1:25 p.m. Denver at New England, 1:25 p.m. San Diego at New Orleans, 5:20 p.m. Open: Dallas, Detroit, Oakland, Tampa Bay Monday, Oct. 8 Houston at N.Y. Jets, 5:30 p.m.

Cardinals 24, Dolphins 21 (OT) Miami Arizona

0 13 0 8 0 — 21 0 0 7 14 3 — 24 Second Quarter Mia—FG Carpenter 32, 13:15. Mia—Lane 1 run (Carpenter kick), 1:56. Mia—FG Carpenter 27, :03. Third Quarter Ari—Fitzgerald 3 pass from Kolb (Feely kick), 9:46. Fourth Quarter Ari—Roberts 46 pass from Kolb (Feely kick), 9:45. Mia—Hartline 80 pass from Tannehill (Lane pass from Tannehill), 7:05. Ari—Roberts 15 pass from Kolb (Feely kick), :22. Overtime Ari—FG Feely 46, 8:29. A—60,183. ——— Mia Ari First downs 21 19 Total Net Yards 480 297 Rushes-yards 29-86 15-28 Passing 394 269 Punt Returns 2-9 4-18 Kickoff Returns 1-23 3-90 Interceptions Ret. 2-31 2-5 Comp-Att-Int 26-41-2 29-48-2 Sacked-Yards Lost 4-37 8-55 Punts 5-44.2 9-48.3 Fumbles-Lost 2-2 4-0 Penalties-Yards 4-40 6-62 Time of Possession 35:00 31:31 ———

Coach Continued from D1 For starters, the Nyes were shocked at how little English was spoken in their adopted hometown. They traveled frequently throughout their stay in Hungary, and when they were in Germany, Romania and Austria, finding locals with some basic English skills was fairly easy. In Kaposvar, not so much. “Our biggest immersion experience was with Merle’s basketball team,” Nye recalls. “We showed up for the first day of practice in August, and none of the kids spoke English. We don’t speak Magyar, the Hungarian language. The coach spoke some English, so we were really lucky.” Merle, who ended up learning more Hungarian than anyone else in his family in large part because of his basketball experience, got by with hand signals and head shakes for most of the season. “It made me think about my life in Bend,” Nye says. “I’ve never had an experience like that, but I’ve had students that do. … I gained a new appreciation for kids that aren’t nativeEnglish speakers.” The entire Eastern European club sport experience took Nye and her family by surprise. When they went to cheer on Merle at his first basket-

Broncos 37, Raiders 6 3 3 0 0 — 6 10 0 21 6 — 37 First Quarter Den—Dreessen 22 pass from Manning (Prater kick), 10:32. Oak—FG Janikowski 38, 6:47. Den—FG Prater 21, :00. Second Quarter Oak—FG Janikowski 24, :22. Third Quarter Den—Decker 17 pass from Manning (Prater kick), 10:08. Den—McGahee 2 run (Prater kick), 7:30. Den—Ball 14 pass from Manning (Prater kick), 3:46. Fourth Quarter Den—FG Prater 43, 12:56. Den—FG Prater 53, 3:43. A—76,787. ——— Oak Den First downs 12 26 Total Net Yards 237 503 Rushes-yards 16-56 38-165 Passing 181 338 Punt Returns 0-0 5-42 Kickoff Returns 0-0 1-16 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 0-0 Comp-Att-Int 19-34-0 30-39-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 3-21 0-0 Punts 7-49.4 0-0.0 Fumbles-Lost 1-0 1-1 Penalties-Yards 5-41 4-30 Time of Possession 22:35 37:25 ———

ball game, they were the only family in the gym. “The coach thought it was really interesting we wanted to go watch all the games,” Nye says with a laugh. “We’re used to playing COBO (Central Oregon Basketball Organization) here, where it’s real social and all the parents go to all the games. It’s a different approach over there. The kids get on a bus Saturday morning, go to the game, and come back with the coach. “The coach was pretty cute about it,” Nye adds. “He got to the point where he’d tell us where the game was and how to get there because he realized we were going to go to every game and we were the only parents that needed directions. For us, immersionwise, it was one of our greatest experiences.” While Merle played basketball and the rest of the family found a local track that provided a sense of community each evening at about 5 o’clock, the Nyes were surprised by how much they missed being involved with fall sports back home. “My husband would stay up late following Duck games on the computer and the rest of us would be following how Bend High was doing,” Nye says. “We missed football more than we anticipated. … That’s fall for us.” Maybe the most important relation-

Cincinnati Jacksonville

Chargers 37, Chiefs 20

3 14 0 10 — 27 0 7 3 0 — 10 First Quarter Cin—FG Nugent 35, 6:10. Second Quarter Jac—Lewis 2 pass from Gabbert (Scobee kick), 13:33. Cin—Pressley 1 pass from Dalton (Nugent kick), 6:16. Cin—Dalton 1 run (Nugent kick), 1:11. Third Quarter Jac—FG Scobee 21, 3:04. Fourth Quarter Cin—Green 18 pass from Dalton (Nugent kick), 13:51. Cin—FG Nugent 35, 12:38. A—63,030. ——— Cin Jac First downs 20 17 Total Net Yards 382 212 Rushes-yards 34-138 18-69 Passing 244 143 Punt Returns 3-33 0-0 Kickoff Returns 0-0 3-70 Interceptions Ret. 1-23 1-10 Comp-Att-Int 20-31-1 23-34-1 Sacked-Yards Lost 0-0 6-43 Punts 3-47.7 6-49.2 Fumbles-Lost 2-1 1-1 Penalties-Yards 6-50 3-37 Time of Possession 31:19 28:41 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Cincinnati: Green-Ellis 26-82, Peerman 1-48, Dalton 6-5, Leonard 1-3. Jacksonville: Jones-Drew 13-38, Gabbert 3-19, Jennings 2-12. PASSING—Cincinnati: Dalton 20-31-1-244. Jacksonville: Gabbert 23-34-1-186. RECEIVING—Cincinnati: Green 6-117, Gresham 5-47, Hawkins 3-39, Green-Ellis 2-12, Leonard 1-13, Charles 1-10, M.Jones 1-5, Pressley 1-1. Jacksonville: Blackmon 6-48, Jones-Drew 5-42, Jones 4-25, Lewis 3-32, Robinson 1-19, Thomas 1-9, Shorts 1-8, Elliott 1-5, Jennings 1-(minus 2). MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.

Minnesota Detroit

INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Miami: Bush 17-67, Miller 4-13, Thomas 4-4, Lane 3-2, Tannehill 1-0. Arizona: R.Williams 13-26, Powell 2-2. PASSING—Miami: Tannehill 26-41-2-431. Arizona: Kolb 29-48-2-324. RECEIVING—Miami: Hartline 12-253, Bess 7-123, Fasano 5-30, Naanee 1-19, Thomas 1-6. Arizona: Fitzgerald 8-64, Roberts 6-118, Floyd 4-35, Doucet 4-31, Housler 2-48, King 2-22, Powell 2-6, R.Williams 1-0. MISSED FIELD GOALS—Miami: Carpenter 51 (WR).

Oakland Denver

Bengals 27, Jaguars 10

36:56 23:04 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—San Francisco: Gore 21-62, Hunter 8-56, Kaepernick 5-50, Manningham 1-28, Dixon 4-16, Ale.Smith 2-12, K.Williams 1-9, Ginn Jr. 1-7, Miller 1-5. N.Y. Jets: Greene 11-34, Powell 411, Tebow 2-0. PASSING—San Francisco: Ale.Smith 12-21-0143, Kaepernick 0-1-0-0. N.Y. Jets: Sanchez 13-291-103, Tebow 1-1-0-9. RECEIVING—San Francisco: Manningham 347, Walker 2-31, V.Davis 2-28, Crabtree 2-15, Gore 213, Miller 1-9. N.Y. Jets: Holmes 4-29, Cumberland 4-17, Schilens 3-45, Kerley 2-12, Epps 1-9. MISSED FIELD GOALS—San Francisco: Akers 55 (WR), 40 (WR).

Vikings 20, Lions 13

——— All Times PDT

——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—New Orleans: Sproles 5-20, P.Thomas 9-14, Ingram 5-11. Green Bay: Benson 18-84, Rodgers 5-13, Kuhn 1-5, Harrell 1-0. PASSING—New Orleans: Brees 35-54-0-446. Green Bay: Rodgers 31-41-1-319. RECEIVING—New Orleans: Colston 9-153, J.Graham 7-76, Moore 7-67, Sproles 5-44, P.Thomas 2-(minus 1), Morgan 1-80, Collins 1-12, Henderson 1-10, D.Thomas 1-6, Ingram 1-(minus 1). Green Bay: Nelson 8-93, Cobb 7-66, Ja.Jones 5-56, Finley 4-54, Benson 4-22, Crabtree 1-16, G.Jennings 1-9, Driver 1-3. MISSED FIELD GOALS—New Orleans: Hartley 48 (WL).

INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Oakland: McFadden 13-34, Goodson 3-22. Denver: McGahee 19-112, Hillman 10-31, Caldwell 1-14, Ball 6-10, Manning 1-(minus 1), Osweiler 1-(minus 1). PASSING—Oakland: Palmer 19-34-0-202. Denver: Manning 30-38-0-338, Prater 0-1-0-0. RECEIVING—Oakland: Reece 5-54, Moore 471, Goodson 3-(minus 5), Criner 2-29, Hagan 2-18, Myers 1-22, Ausberry 1-9, McFadden 1-4. Denver: Decker 7-79, McGahee 6-23, D.Thomas 5-103, Tamme 5-38, Hillman 2-32, Stokley 2-32, Dreessen 2-17, Ball 1-14. MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.

10 3 7 0 — 20 3 3 0 7 — 13 First Quarter Min—Harvin 105 kickoff return (Walsh kick), 14:48. Det—FG Hanson 40, 13:06. Min—FG Walsh 49, 1:16. Second Quarter Min—FG Walsh 27, 8:14. Det—FG Hanson 31, 1:46. Third Quarter Min—Sherels 77 punt return (Walsh kick), 13:09. Fourth Quarter Det—Stafford 1 run (Hanson kick), 2:56. A—63,616. ——— Min Det First downs 15 23 Total Net Yards 227 341 Rushes-yards 28-127 20-55 Passing 100 286 Punt Returns 1-77 3-35 Kickoff Returns 2-109 0-0 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 0-0 Comp-Att-Int 16-26-0 30-51-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 2-11 5-33 Punts 6-43.2 5-39.6 Fumbles-Lost 0-0 1-1 Penalties-Yards 5-87 5-72 Time of Possession 29:18 30:42 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Minnesota: Peterson 21-102, Harvin 3-12, Gerhart 3-8, Ponder 1-5. Detroit: LeShoure 13-26, Stafford 4-14, Burleson 1-8, T.Young 1-5, Bell 1-2. PASSING—Minnesota: Ponder 16-26-0-111. Detroit: Stafford 30-51-0-319. RECEIVING—Minnesota: Simpson 4-50, Peterson 4-20, Harvin 3-22, Rudolph 2-8, Gerhart 1-8, Jenkins 1-4, Carlson 1-(minus 1). Detroit: Pettigrew 7-67, Bell 6-72, Johnson 5-54, Burleson 5-51, LeShoure 4-37, T.Young 1-17, Scheffler 1-16, K.Williams 1-5. MISSED FIELD GOALS—Minnesota: Walsh 46 (WL).

49ers 34, Jets 0 San Francisco N.Y. Jets

0 10 7 17 — 34 0 0 0 0 — 0 Second Quarter SF—Kaepernick 7 run (Akers kick), 13:37. SF—FG Akers 36, :00. Third Quarter SF—Gore 2 run (Akers kick), 2:49. Fourth Quarter SF—Rogers 51 fumble return (Akers kick), 14:46. SF—FG Akers 40, 8:23. SF—Hunter 1 run (Akers kick), 6:03. A—79,088. ——— SF NYJ First downs 26 9 Total Net Yards 379 145 Rushes-yards 44-245 17-45 Passing 134 100 Punt Returns 4-40 0-0 Kickoff Returns 1-25 2-73 Interceptions Ret. 1-0 0-0 Comp-Att-Int 12-22-0 14-30-1 Sacked-Yards Lost 2-9 3-12 Punts 4-46.0 8-37.9 Fumbles-Lost 2-0 3-3 Penalties-Yards 8-67 4-30

ship the Nyes developed while overseas was with a neighboring family. Away from all family and friends in a place where you don’t speak the language can be overwhelming. Thankfully for the Nyes, they bonded with an extended family over basketball and tennis. One son-in-law in the family, Nye recalls, was a Croatian Olympic basketball player, and another was a high-level Hungarian tennis player. “What those people did for us was amazing,” Nye says. “They welcomed us, they took care of us. … We bonded over that appreciation for basketball and tennis.” Since coming back to the U.S. in January, Nye says the biggest thing she has taken away from her Hungarian teaching adventure is how fortunate she is to be in a country, a region, a state and a town she loves. “I grew up in Bend, lived in Eugene, lived in Portland for five years and moved back to Bend,” Nye says. “My idea of roughing it was living in Eugene. “To go somewhere that was really humid and flat and that had a lot of air pollution, I didn’t appreciate how important it was to live somewhere amazing,” she adds. “I just have such a great appreciation for where I’m at now.” — Reporter: 541-383-0305, beastes@bendbulletin.com.

Time of Possession

San Diego Kansas City

17 10 0 10 — 37 0 6 7 7 — 20 First Quarter SD—Royal 4 pass from Rivers (Novak kick), 10:04. SD—FG Novak 24, 6:26. SD—Battle 1 run (Novak kick), 5:28. Second Quarter SD—FG Novak 47, 8:09. KC—Charles 37 run (pass failed), 5:09. SD—Butler 21 interception return (Novak kick), 2:51. Third Quarter KC—Charles 13 pass from Cassel (Succop kick), 8:40. Fourth Quarter SD—Battle 4 pass from Rivers (Novak kick), 7:54. KC—Bowe 29 pass from Cassel (Succop kick), 5:29. SD—FG Novak 45, 1:56. A—69,979. ——— SD KC First downs 19 25 Total Net Yards 293 353 Rushes-yards 34-104 22-119 Passing 189 234 Punt Returns 1-0 3-39 Kickoff Returns 2-53 4-109 Interceptions Ret. 3-73 1-1 Comp-Att-Int 18-23-1 24-42-3 Sacked-Yards Lost 3-20 2-17 Punts 5-53.8 4-51.3 Fumbles-Lost 2-0 4-3 Penalties-Yards 7-75 9-80 Time of Possession 33:52 26:08 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—San Diego: Mathews 14-61, Battle 15-39, McClain 2-4, Rivers 3-0. Kansas City: Charles 17-92, Gray 1-15, Draughn 4-12. PASSING—San Diego: Rivers 18-23-1-209. Kansas City: Cassel 24-42-3-251. RECEIVING—San Diego: Battle 4-42, Gates 359, Brown 3-50, Royal 3-16, Floyd 2-23, Mathews 221, McClain 1-(minus 2). Kansas City: Bowe 7-108, Baldwin 4-50, Draughn 4-34, Charles 3-23, Moeaki 3-18, McCluster 2-6, Breaston 1-12. MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.

Texans 38, Titans 14 Tennessee Houston

0 7 0 7 — 14 14 0 14 10 — 38 First Quarter Hou—Casey 11 pass from Schaub (S.Graham kick), 11:41. Hou—Foster 4 run (S.Graham kick), :17. Second Quarter Ten—Stevens 19 pass from Hasselbeck (Bironas kick), 7:52. Third Quarter Hou—Manning 55 interception return (S.Graham kick), 9:21. Hou—Daniels 28 pass from Schaub (S.Graham kick), 2:47. Fourth Quarter Hou—FG S.Graham 33, 5:38. Hou—Jackson 63 interception return (S.Graham kick), 3:57. Ten—Wright 11 pass from Hasselbeck (Bironas kick), :57. A—71,581. ——— Ten Hou First downs 17 16 Total Net Yards 325 297 Rushes-yards 29-158 31-95 Passing 167 202 Punt Returns 3-9 4-34 Kickoff Returns 5-107 2-56 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 2-118 Comp-Att-Int 17-27-2 20-28-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 4-26 0-0 Punts 7-46.6 6-43.2 Fumbles-Lost 2-1 0-0 Penalties-Yards 7-73 1-3 Time of Possession 27:34 32:26 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Tennessee: C.Johnson 25-141, Ringer 2-14, Hasselbeck 2-3. Houston: Foster 24-86, Tate 5-11, Schaub 2-(minus 2). PASSING—Tennessee: Hasselbeck 17-25-2193, Locker 0-2-0-0. Houston: Schaub 20-28-0202. RECEIVING—Tennessee: Wright 4-46, Washington 3-43, Cook 3-36, Stevens 2-24, C.Johnson 2-16, Q.Johnson 1-17, Williams 1-6, Hawkins 1-5. Houston: Daniels 6-72, Casey 5-36, Johnson 3-56, Martin 2-19, Tate 2-3, Foster 1-8, Walter 1-8. MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.

Falcons 30, Panthers 28 Carolina Atlanta

7 7 7 7 — 28 7 10 7 6 — 30 First Quarter Car—Olsen 17 pass from Newton (Medlock kick), 11:45. Atl—White 49 pass from Ryan (Bryant kick), :26. Second Quarter Atl—FG Bryant 41, 13:11. Car—D.Williams 13 run (Medlock kick), 8:44. Atl—White 14 pass from Ryan (Bryant kick), 1:49. Third Quarter Atl—Turner 60 pass from Ryan (Bryant kick), 10:17. Car—Newton 4 run (Medlock kick), 3:16. Fourth Quarter Car—Pilares 36 pass from Newton (Medlock kick),

7:55. Atl—FG Bryant 33, 4:57. Atl—FG Bryant 40, :05. A—69,594. ——— First downs Total Net Yards Rushes-yards Passing Punt Returns Kickoff Returns Interceptions Ret. Comp-Att-Int Sacked-Yards Lost Punts Fumbles-Lost Penalties-Yards Time of Possession

Car 21 404 35-199 205 3-23 2-55 1-21 15-25-0 3-10 6-45.2 3-1 9-64 30:06

Atl 24 426 19-121 305 2-17 1-27 0-0 25-40-1 7-64 5-47.0 0-0 2-15 29:54

——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Carolina: Newton 9-86, D.Williams 11-49, Stewart 10-40, Tolbert 4-14, Smith 1-10. Atlanta: Turner 13-103, Rodgers 6-18. PASSING—Carolina: Newton 15-24-0-215, A.Edwards 0-1-0-0. Atlanta: Ryan 25-40-1-369. RECEIVING—Carolina: Olsen 6-89, Smith 3-52, Pilares 1-36, A.Edwards 1-12, Murphy 1-8, Stewart 18, Tolbert 1-8, D.Williams 1-2. Atlanta: White 8-169, Gonzalez 5-51, Rodgers 4-40, Turner 3-68, Snelling 3-5, Jones 1-30, Douglas 1-6. MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.

Patriots 52, Bills 28 New England Buffalo

7 0 14 31 — 52 0 14 7 7 — 28 First Quarter NE—Ridley 6 run (Gostkowski kick), 6:49. Second Quarter Buf—Chandler 24 pass from Fitzpatrick (Lindell kick), 9:43. Buf—Chandler 20 pass from Fitzpatrick (Lindell kick), 3:30. Third Quarter Buf—Jones 68 pass from Fitzpatrick (Lindell kick), 11:08. NE—Woodhead 17 pass from Brady (Gostkowski kick), 8:10. NE—Brady 4 run (Gostkowski kick), 3:53. Fourth Quarter NE—Gronkowski 28 pass from Brady (Gostkowski kick), 14:55. NE—Ridley 2 run (Gostkowski kick), 11:42. NE—Bolden 7 run (Gostkowski kick), 10:29. Buf—B.Smith 35 pass from Fitzpatrick (Lindell kick), 6:32. NE—Lloyd 25 pass from Brady (Gostkowski kick), 4:02. NE—FG Gostkowski 30, 1:56. A—70,684. ——— NE Buf First downs 33 19 Total Net Yards 580 438 Rushes-yards 40-247 27-98 Passing 333 340 Punt Returns 1-14 0-0 Kickoff Returns 1-20 1-26 Interceptions Ret. 4-56 0-0 Comp-Att-Int 22-36-0 22-39-4 Sacked-Yards Lost 1-7 3-10 Punts 3-39.7 5-41.8 Fumbles-Lost 3-2 3-2 Penalties-Yards 1-10 3-17 Time of Possession 30:47 29:13 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—New England: Bolden 16-137, Ridley 22-106, Brady 1-4, Vereen 1-0. Buffalo: Spiller 8-33, F.Jackson 13-29, Fitzpatrick 3-14, Choice 2-14, J.White 1-8. PASSING—New England: Brady 22-36-0-340. Buffalo: Fitzpatrick 22-39-4-350. RECEIVING—New England: Welker 9-129, Gronkowski 5-104, Lloyd 3-50, Woodhead 2-23, Fells 1-18, Bolden 1-11, Vereen 1-5. Buffalo: Chandler 4-62, Graham 4-34, F.Jackson 3-50, Jones 2-90, B.Smith 2-49, Dickerson 2-36, St.Johnson 2-23, Spiller 2-5, Choice 1-1. MISSED FIELD GOALS—New England: Gostkowski 49 (WR), 42 (WL).

Eagles 19, Giants 17 N.Y. Giants Philadelphia

0 3 7 7 — 17 0 7 6 6 — 19 Second Quarter Phi—Jackson 19 pass from Vick (Henery kick), 1:47. NYG—FG Tynes 25, :05. Third Quarter Phi—FG Henery 20, 9:55. NYG—Cruz 14 pass from Manning (Tynes kick), 5:28. Phi—FG Henery 48, 2:07. Fourth Quarter Phi—FG Henery 35, 9:25. NYG—Pascoe 6 pass from Manning (Tynes kick), 6:45. Phi—FG Henery 26, 1:49. A—69,144. ——— NYG Phi First downs 20 22 Total Net Yards 366 422 Rushes-yards 19-57 36-191 Passing 309 231 Punt Returns 3-29 1-3 Kickoff Returns 6-217 3-50 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 1-14 Comp-Att-Int 24-42-1 19-30-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 0-0 2-10 Punts 5-44.4 4-45.5 Fumbles-Lost 1-0 1-0 Penalties-Yards 7-55 5-49 Time of Possession 26:39 33:21 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—N.Y. Giants: Bradshaw 13-39, A.Brown 5-14, Hynoski 1-4. Philadelphia: McCoy 23-123, Vick 6-49, Havili 2-15, Brown 4-5, D.Johnson 1-(minus 1). PASSING—N.Y. Giants: Manning 24-42-1-309. Philadelphia: Vick 19-30-0-241. RECEIVING—N.Y. Giants: Cruz 9-109, Hixon 6-114, Bradshaw 3-38, Barden 2-36, Pascoe 1-6, A.Brown 1-4, Bennett 1-2, Hynoski 1-0. Philadelphia: Jackson 6-99, Celek 4-57, McCoy 3-17, Avant 2-30, D.Johnson 1-17, Harbor 1-7, Havili 1-7, Maclin 1-7. MISSED FIELD GOALS—N.Y. Giants: Tynes 54 (SH).

LOOKING BACK Athlete of the week: Summit forward Hadlie Plummer recorded two assists in the Storm’s 3-1 girls soccer victory over Bend High on Thursday. Summit is 5-02 and sits atop the most recent OSAA Class 5A state rankings. Game of the week: Ridgeview notched the third win of its inaugural football season on Friday, blitzing Burns in the first half en route to a 49-22 nonconference home victory. Quarterback David Lacock and receiver Jack Bowman connected for three touchdown passes to lead the Ravens.

LOOKING AHEAD Tuesday Mountain View at Summit boys soccer, 6 p.m.: Both the Storm (5-1-1 overall) and the Cougars (3-3-1) enter this Class 5A Intermountain Conference match on three-game winning streaks. The winner will be in control of the 5A IMC race. Thursday Crook County at Summit volleyball, 6:30 p.m.: The reigning Class 4A state champions play at the defending 5A state champs’ gym in what has become one of the best volleyball rivalries in the state. University of Portland-bound Makayla Lindburg leads the Cowgirls against the Storm’s Laney Hayes, who has committed to play at Boise State. Friday Oxford Classic cross-country meet at Bend’s Drake Park, 1 p.m.: The premier cross-country race in Central Oregon will showcase teams from around Oregon as well as from California, Idaho and Nevada. The elite boys and girls races are scheduled to begin at 3 p.m. Summit at Bend football, 7 p.m.: Both teams are hoping to make a run at the state playoffs with a strong second half of the season. Bend (1-4) is coming off a 36-6 loss at Hermiston, and the Storm (2-3) look to rebound after last week’s 50-0 defeat at Redmond.


MONDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

D5

NFL ROUNDUP

MOTOR SPORTS ROUNDUP

Rodgers throws late TD, Packers send Saints to 0-4

Keselowski wins at Dover, takes lead in NASCAR’s Sprint Cup

• Green Bay wins despite another controversial call The Associated Press GREEN BAY, Wis. — As if bearing the brunt of the call that ultimately led to the end of the NFL’s replacement officials wasn’t enough, Aaron Rodgers and the Green Bay Packers nearly had a big comeback win undone by a blunder from the regular refs. Rodgers threw a go-ahead touchdown to Jordy Nelson in the fourth quarter, and the Packers shook off a week’s worth of controversy with a rally to beat the New Orleans Saints 28-27 on Sunday. With Lambeau Field fans howling about what appeared to be yet another bad call — this time by the regular officials, not the replacements — Garrett Hartley missed a 48-yard field goal attempt with just under three minutes remaining that cost the Saints a shot at the lead. “We’ve probably had to deal with more adversity than most of the teams I’ve played with, especially early on we’ve had some interesting games already,” Rodgers said. “We’re four games in. So, I think the character of this team is very strong. Winning games like this says a lot about the kind of men that we have.” Rodgers threw for 319 yards with four touchdowns and an interception for the Packers (2-2). “I’m very proud of our football team, especially the week we’ve endured,” Packers coach Mike McCarthy said. “We talk a lot about integrity and character, and I thought today’s game had plenty of those types of situations where it showed up big.” Drew Brees threw for 446 yards with three touchdowns for the winless Saints (0-4). “It’s going to hurt when you lose a game like this,” Saints interim coach Aaron Kromer said. “But I will not let them get down. We are too close.” Brees now has thrown at least one touchdown in 47 straight regular-season games, tying the NFL’s alltime mark set by Johnny Unitas. “Yeah, it’s disappointing,” Brees said of the loss. “It stinks. But despite where we’re at, right now I think this team’s going to do something.” With the win, the Packers were able to put Monday night’s controversial replacement official-driven loss at Seattle behind them. But even with the regular refs back this week, the Packers and their fans still nearly were dealt a crushing blow on a blown call. After Rodgers’ touchdown to Nelson, Darren Sproles appeared to fumble the ensuing kickoff but officials ruled that he was down by contact. Replays showed that the ball clearly came out, but the Packers were out of replay challenges, leaving Packers fans screaming at the officials for the second week in a row. “You guys were all happy that the officials were back, and we tried to tell you that they’d still get booed,” Nelson said with a laugh. Brees then led the Saints into field goal range, and Hartley hit a 43-yard attempt — but the Saints were called for holding, forcing Hartley to line up a 53-yarder. The

Jeffrey Phelps / The Associated Press

Green Bay Packers’ Jordy Nelson is congratulated by fans after his touchdown catch against the New Orleans Saints during the fourth quarter of Sunday’s game in Green Bay, Wis.

Packers then were called for encroachment, leaving Hartley to try a 48-yarder and he missed it wide left. In other games on Sunday: Falcons. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30 Panthers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28 ATLANTA — Matt Bryant kicked a 40-yard field goal with five seconds remaining and Atlanta remained unbeaten, rallying past Carolina. The Falcons (4-0) are off to their best start since 2004, when they reached the NFC championship game. Despite taking a career-high seven sacks, Matt Ryan threw three touchdown passes for Atlanta. Bryant added three field goals. The Panthers (13) nearly clinched it on Cam Newton’s run with just over a minute remaining, but he fumbled the ball while trying to dive for the necessary yardage. Carolina recovered and wound up punting, downing the ball at the Atlanta 1. But Ryan immediately got the Falcons out of the hole, throwing a 59-yard pass to Roddy White. Four plays later, Bryant won it. Eagles. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19 Giants. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 PHILADELPHIA — Lawrence Tynes missed two fieldgoal tries from 54 yards with 15 seconds left and Philadelphia held on for a victory over New York. Tynes missed wide left, but the Eagles had called timeout to ice him. He was short on his second attempt. With LeSean McCoy leading the way on the ground with 123 yards rushing, Michael Vick guided the Eagles (3-1) to another comeback. Alex Henery kicked a 26-yard field goal with 1:49 left and the Eagles overcame two pass interference penalties on New York’s final drive. The defending Super Bowl champion Giants (2-2) have struggled against Philadelphia, losing eight of the past nine meetings. Texans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38 Titans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14 HOUSTON — Danieal Manning and Kareem Jackson returned interceptions for touchdowns and Matt Schaub threw two TD passes. Arian Foster had a touchdown run for the Texans (4-0), who are off to the best start in club history. Quarterback Jake Locker left in the first quarter for the Titans (1-3) and did not return after hurting his left, non-throwing shoulder on a hit by Glover Quin.

Ducks Continued from D1 That didn’t happen. The crowd was 60,929, second-largest of WSU’s 10 games in this stadium, and it looked like maybe 6- or 7-to-1, in favor of Cougar crimson. And they had reason to get amped in the first half. The Cougars fell behind 20-3, but then with some cunning and some chutzpah, they edged back into it. Leach, showing what he thinks of those questioning his brassiness on fourth-down calls the past two weeks, went for it (and made it) on

Cardinals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Dolphins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21 GLENDALE, Ariz. — Jay Feely kicked a 46-yard field goal 6:31 into overtime to keep Arizona unbeaten. The Cardinals (4-0) forced overtime when Kevin Kolb threw a 15-yard touchdown pass on fourth down to Andre Roberts with 22 seconds to play in regulation. Miami rookie quarterback Ryan Tannehill threw for 431 yards. Brian Hartline set a Dolphins record with 253 yards receiving on 12 catches. 49ers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34 Jets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0 EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. — Carlos Rogers returned a fumble 51 yards for a touchdown, and San Francisco ran for more than 200 yards. Frank Gore, Kendall Hunter and backup quarterback Colin Kaepernick — on a wildcat-style option — all ran for scores as the 49ers (31) bounced back from a loss at Minnesota. The Jets (2-2) lost top wide receiver Santonio Holmes to what appeared to be a serious foot injury. Broncos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37 Raiders. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 DENVER — Peyton Manning finished with 338 yards and three touchdown passes. Manning opened the game by leading the Broncos on an 80-yard touchdown drive — their first opening-quarter touchdown of the season — and Denver never trailed. The Broncos (2-2) beat the Raiders (1-3) at home for the first time since 2007. Willis McGahee ran for 112 yards for his 32ndcareer 100-yard game. Vikings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20 Lions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 DETROIT — Percy Harvin returned the opening kickoff 105 yards for a touchdown and Marcus Sherels scored on a punt return early in the third for Minnesota. Minnesota (3-1), in first place in the NFC North, matched the number of wins it had last season. The Vikings also snapped an 11game losing streak in the division. The Lions (1-3) have lost three straight. Rams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19 Seahawks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 ST. LOUIS — Rookie Greg Zuerlein kicked four field goals, including a 58-yarder and a club record 60-yarder, and the Rams also used a fake field goal to score their only TD of the game. The Rams (2-2) went ahead 10-7 late in the first half when a

a fourth-and-four play early. A little later, he tried an onside kick that failed. Interspersed, Teondray Caldwell ran a kickoff back 92 yards. Nose tackle Ioane Gauta dropped Duck burner De’Anthony Thomas for a 3-yard loss. Xavier Cooper stoned Kenjon Barner 6 yards behind the line. At halftime, then, WSU ran off heartened. Oregon scoffs at such silliness. The Ducks jammed three touchdowns in 10 minutes, 33 seconds to start the third quarter and made sure the pollsters knew they were

fake field goal attempt turned into a 2-yard touchdown pass from punter Johnny Hekker to Danny Amendola. Marshawn Lynch led Seattle (2-2) with 118 yards on 20 carries, including an 18-yard score on the game’s first possession. The Rams intercepted Russell Wilson three times. Patriots. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52 Bills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28 ORCHARD PARK, N.Y. — Tom Brady led New England on six consecutive second-half touchdown drives. Brady finished 22 of 36 for 340 yards and three scores, and also scored on a 4-yard run in helping the Patriots (22) avoid their first three-game losing streak in 10 years. Stevan Ridley scored two touchdowns rushing. New England scored 35 straight points and finished with 580 total yards in overcoming a 21-7 thirdquarter deficit. The Bills (2-2) dropped to 1-17 in their past 18 games against New England. Chargers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37 Chiefs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20 KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Philip Rivers threw for 209 yards and two touchdowns, and San Diego capitalized on six turnovers. Five of the Chiefs’ turnovers came in the first half, when San Diego (31) raced to a 27-6 lead. Matt Cassel threw for 251 yards and two touchdowns for Kansas City (1-3), but he also had three first-half interceptions. Redskins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Buccaneers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22 TAMPA, Fla. — Billy Cundiff redeemed himself for a poor day kicking, booting a 41-yard field goal with three seconds remaining. Cundiff missed three earlier attempts, including a 31-yarder that would have put the Redskins (2-2) up by two scores early in the fourth quarter. Tampa Bay (1-3) wiped out an 18point deficit to go ahead 22-21 on Connor Barth’s third field goal, a 47-yarder with 1:42 remaining. Bengals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27 Jaguars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — Andy Dalton threw two touchdown passes and ran for a score. Dalton and A.J. Green burned Jacksonville several times, including once to set up a second-quarter touchdown and again for a fourth-quarter score. The Bengals (3-1) finished with six sacks, putting constant pressure on Blaine Gabbert of the Jaguars (1-3).

not in any jeopardy. One of those scores was Avery Patterson’s 34-yard return of an interception thrown by Connor Halliday, which, if you listen to Halliday, is not only characteristic of Oregon’s explosiveness — on both sides of the ball — but WSU’s fragile mental state. “It’s tough, when their offense comes out on the field and scores, and I throw a pick for a touchdown — that’s 14 points,” said Halliday. “We’ve got to battle through it. We’ve got some guys that hang their heads, and we aren’t going to be successful if that keeps happening

The Associated Press DOVER, Del. — Brad Keselowski had fuel to spare for a couple of victory burnouts. Those few splashes of gas left down the stretch were just enough for a checkered flag — and a sign Keselowski is a championship favorite. With other contenders battling fuel woes and limping toward pit road, Keselowski had enough gas in the No. 2 Dodge to win Sunday at Dover International Speedway for his second victory in three weeks. Keselowksi’s stout start to the Chase for the Sprint Cup championship allowed him to swipe the points lead from Jimmie Johnson. Keselowski holds a fivepoint lead over Johnson as the Chase shifts to Talladega Superspeedway. Keselowski, who won the Chase opener at Chicagoland, has deftly avoided the famed Big Ones that strike the Alabama track to win twice there in seven career starts. He held off a late push from runner-up Jeff Gordon to match Denny Hamlin for the season victory lead with five. “I can’t state loudly enough how much longer this battle is,” Keselowski said. Keselowski, Johnson and Hamlin have staked their claim through the first three of 10 Chase races as the drivers to beat. Johnson and Hamlin each led a chunk of laps on the mile concrete oval, but failed to stretch their fuel to the end. Johnson, who has seven career wins at Dover, was ordered to back off the gas and salvaged a fourth-place finish. Hamlin pitted with 10 laps left, opening the door for Keselowski, and denying him his first win at the Monster Mile. Hamlin faded to eighth after starting from the pole. “They’re not going to beat us on the track, that’s just plain and simple,” Hamlin said. “We’re just too fast right now and I feel like everything is going well. These strategy games, and the way these cautions are falling, it’s ill-timed.” There was a caution at the end of a cycle of green-flag pit stops only 69 laps into the race that quickly dropped drivers a lap back. Amazingly, most of the field couldn’t ever get that lap back, and only six drivers finished on the lead lap. Non-Chase drivers Mark Martin finished third and Carl Edwards was fifth. Kyle Busch led a race-high 302 laps until his own battles with the pump cost him what would have been a nice victory in a season where he failed to make the Chase. He finished seventh. There were some rough finishes for the rest of the Chase field. Martin Truex Jr. was sixth, Clint Bowyer was ninth,

Dale Earnhardt Jr. 11th, Kevin Harvick 13th, Kasey Kahne 15th, Greg Biffle 16th, Tony Stewart 20th, and Matt Kenseth was knocked out of the race and was 35th. There are seven races left in the Chase. “By no means, do I feel like we’re the favorite,” Keselowski said. “Certainly, we’re not the underdog.” Nope, not with a complete team effort turning the No. 2 Dodge into a regular contender to win. Keselowski joked he had about another “100 miles” of racing left in his tank. While crew chief Paul Wolfe didn’t want to reveal too much of his fuel-saving strategy, he conceded the car was “within a lap or two” or running on fumes. Keselowski raced the last 89 laps without a stop. “There’s always some risk in calls like that,” Wolfe said. “We know where we stand. We know what we need to do. We know the guys are racing right now for the championship. I felt like we were as good as anybody on mileage.” Johnson had his record eighth win at Dover in sight until he was forced to start saving fuel with about 15 laps left. Crew chief Chad Knaus told Johnson to yield the lead so the No. 48 could at least salvage a top-five. “I wish we could have raced for it,” said Johnson, a fivetime Cup champion. “We finally got control of the race late. But it just didn’t unfold like a normal race here.” Keselowski had four career wins coming into the season. He had his career breakthrough at Talladega in 2009 when he raced to his first career victory. He won there again this season in May and knows a season sweep will give him a nice cushion in the standings. “He didn’t make a mistake. We didn’t lose any time on the track,” team owner Roger Penske said. “He’s doing a terrific job and I love the position we’re in.” Also on Sunday: Brown tops field at NHRA Midwest Nationals MADISON, Ill. — Antron Brown raced to his sixth Top Fuel victory of the season, winning the NHRA Midwest Nationals to increase his championship points lead. Brown beat championship rival Spencer Massey in the final round and moved 21 points ahead with three races left in the Full Throttle Countdown to the Championship playoffs. Brown had a run of 3.766 seconds at 325.22 mph, while Massey trailed with a 3.812 at 324.05. Jack Beckman won in Funny Car, Erica Enders in Pro Stock, and Eddie Krawiec in Pro Stock Motorcycle.

Nick Wass / The Associated Press

Brad Keselowski performs a burnout after winning the NASCAR Sprint Cup race Sunday in Dover, Del.

around here.” Still, Leach was encouraged by what he saw. He noted the early freeze by the Cougars, when he said they “started out frantic. I’ve had teams in situations like that where they never really came out of it.” He added: “I did feel we came out of it, midway through the first quarter, which is pretty quick for a young team. We battled away.” But not always efficiently. The Cougars dropped a bunch of balls, and Halliday’s statistics were similar to last week — 33 completions in 60 attempts. And there were the inevitable Or-

egon explosive plays, the last one an 80-yard touchdown run by Barner. Leach addressed the bigger picture when he noted his team’s excitement at being right there at halftime. “If the excitement’s surprise that we made plays, we shouldn’t be surprised that some good things happen,” he said. “I thought we played better than the score.” But there it was, the score, so incriminating. That’s what Oregon does to you, especially if you don’t have West Virginia’s or Baylor’s offense with which to reply.


D6

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2012

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David J. Phillip / The Associated Press

The United States’ Jim Furyk reacts after missing a putt on the 16th hole during a singles match at the Ryder Cup on Sunday at the Medinah Country Club in Medinah, Ill.

Ryder Continued from D1 “This one is for all of Europe,” Olazabal said. “Seve will always be present with this team. He was a big factor for this event for the European side, and last night when we were having that meeting, I think the boys understood that believing was the most important thing. And I think they did.” Tiger Woods missed a 3½foot par putt on the 18th hole, and then conceded a par to Francesco Molinari of about that length to halve their match. That extra half-point made it a clear-cut win for Europe, 14½-13½. Woods and Stricker, the anchors in the lineup, didn’t win a single match at Medinah. Ian Poulter was the first to embrace Olazabal, which was only fitting. It was Poulter who gave Europe hope Saturday evening when he made five straight birdies to turn a loss into a win and swing momentum in Europe’s favor. Poulter was up to his fist-pumping, eye-bulging tricks again on the final day, winning the last two holes in his match against U.S. Open champion Webb Simpson. And he had plenty of help. Europe’s top five players in the lineup all won, including Rory McIlroy, who was lucky to be playing. McIlroy thought his match was at 12:25 p.m. — it was listed in Eastern time, not Central — and needed a police escort to get to the course with 10 minutes to spare. Then, he came up with key birdies to hand Keegan Bradley his first loss of the week. The biggest match might have belonged to Justin Rose. He was on the verge of losing to Phil Mickelson when Rose holed a 12-foot par putt to halve the 16th, made a 35-foot birdie putt from the back of the 17th green to win the hole, and then closed out Mickelson with a 12-foot birdie on the last hole. Six of the 12 matches went to the 18th hole on Sunday. The Americans won only one of them. The Americans also rallied from a four-point deficit to win in 1999 at Brookline. This was different, though. The Americans won big in those early matches. At Medinah, so many of them could have gone either way. It was so close, so tense, that either side could have won the Ryder Cup down to the very end. Stricker made an 8-foot par putt on the 18th, and Kaymer faced a par putt from 6 feet to win the match. If he missed, the Americans would get a half-point, and Woods was leading 1-up over Molinari and in the middle of the 18th fairway. Kaymer, a former No. 1 and major champion who has struggled all year, poured it in the middle and the celebration was on. He could barely speak at this point, not so much from pure emotion but having to scream over the crowd behind him. Players were hugging and crying, and the small European contingent that had been drowned out all week was serenading themselves with what has become the theme song of the Ryder Cup. “Ole, ole, ole, ole,” they

sang merrily, even as the teams prepared for the closing ceremony. Europe now has won seven of the past nine Ryder Cups, and even more remarkable about this comeback is that they did it on the road. Davis Love III became the first U.S. captain to sit every player at least once before Sunday, wanting them to be fresh for the decisive day. Instead, the Americans faltered at the end — especially Jim Furyk and Stricker, two of his captain’s picks. “The plan worked the first two days,” he said. “It just didn’t work today.” The only U.S. points came from Dustin Johnson, who went 3-0 in this Ryder Cup, Zach Johnson and unheralded Jason Dufner. “We’re all kind of stunned,” Love said. “We know what it feels like now from the ’99 Ryder Cup. It’s a little bit shocking. We were playing so well, we figured it didn’t matter how we sent them out there. We got a couple of matches flipped there in the middle that cost us.” Love thought all along the Ryder Cup would be decided in the ninth match by Dufner. It was most appropriate that Europe won the cup thanks to Kaymer. Kaymer gave German golf some redemption from Kiawah Island in 1991, when countryman Bernhard Langer missed a par putt from about the same length that allowed the Americans to win. “It’s a feeling I never had before,” Kaymer said. “On Friday, I sat down with Bernhard and talked a little bit about the Ryder Cup because my attitude was not the right one. But now I know how important the Ryder Cup is.” It means everything to Europe, and it showed. They didn’t have a home crowd to rally them, relying instead on the silence. “Last time it was done, it was the American team in America,” Lee Westwood said after closing out Matt Kuchar in 16 holes. “This would be against all odds. This would be the greatest comeback in the Ryder Cup — ever.” And it was a collapse the Americans won’t soon forget. Just 24 hours earlier, they had a 10-4 lead with two team matches still on the course — they were ahead in one of them, while Woods and Stricker were closing in on the other. It’s hard to believe they would only win 3½ points the rest of the way. Europe came out fast, and for McIlroy, that started at his hotel. He was leisurely heading out of the hotel — thinking that his tee time was an hour later than it was — when he got a frantic call to tell him his match was in 25 minutes. McIlroy was lucky to run into the police, who helped him get to Medinah with enough time to change his shoes, take a few putts and head to the tee box. He never trailed in his match, making two straight birdies late to knock off Bradley. “It’s my own fault,” McIlroy said. “If I let down these 11 other boys and vice captains and captains this week, I would never forgive myself. I’m just obviously happy to get the point and help the cause out a little bit today.”

DIRT DIVAS MOUNTAIN BIKING PROGRAM IN-STORE CLINIC: Wednesday; 7 p.m.; Pine Mountain Sports, Bend; learn about riding in cold weather, with accessories, layering and night riding tips from Lindsey Voreis; free; snacks and socializing at 6:30 p.m.; contact Leanna with questions and register at 541-385-8080. INDOOR CYCLING CLASSES: At Powered by Bowen, 143 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; limited to eight riders per class; sessions from 6:30 a.m. to 7:30 a.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays; $12-$18 per class; www.poweredbybowen.com, 541-585-1500. FIX-A-FLAT CLINIC: Learn how to repair a punctured mountain- or road-bike tire; 10 a.m. Sundays; Sunnyside Sports, 930 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend; free; 541-382-8018. RESTORE PROPER MOVEMENT YOGA: Restorative yoga for busy athletes such as cyclists, runners and triathletes already training; no strength poses, just restorative yoga for active recovery; Mondays; 5 p.m.; Powered by Bowen, 143 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 30 minutes; 5 points on Power Pass or $5 per class; 541-585-1500.

YOUTH DEVELOPMENT BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY CYCLOCROSS TEAM: Ages 10-18; Tuesdays through Thursdays through Nov. 25, option to extend to Jan. 6; 4 p.m.-6 p.m.; for beginners to advanced riders; teaches bike handling skills, fitness workouts and race strategy in a fun and safe environment; beginner participants may use mountain bikes; team offers weekly training sessions and fully supported travel to Oregon Junior Series races; bill@ bendenduranceacademy.org or enroll online at BendEnduranceAcademy.org. BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY CYCLING AFTER-SCHOOL MOUNTAIN BIKING: Grades three through eight, all abilities welcome;

Wednesdays through Oct. 10; 2:45 p.m.4:15 p.m. for grades three through five, 1 p.m.-4:15 p.m. for grades six through eight; program encourages elementary and middle school kids to explore the trails, spend time with friends and improve cycling fitness and skills; transportation provided from area schools for grades six through eight; bill@ bendenduranceacademy.org or enroll online at BendEnduranceAcademy.org.

RACES WEBCYCLERY THRILLA CYCLOCROSS SERIES: Thursdays through Oct. 4; 5:25 p.m.; NorthWest crossing course next to Summit High School, Bend; one race for juniors and beginners (men C, women C, men C 40+ and men C 50+), and another race for experienced riders (men A and B, women A and B, men A and B 40+, and women B 40+); adults $15 per race or $45 for series, juniors $8 per race or $25 for series; OBRA license required; http:// webcyclery.com/thrilla_2012. HALLOWEEN CROSS CRUSADE: Saturday and Sunday, Oct. 27-28 (Sunday is official costume day, option on Saturday); 8:40 a.m.; Old Mill District, Bend; races Nos. 4 and 5 of the Cross Crusade Series; divisions for men, women, masters, Clydesdales, single speed, juniors, unicycles and kids (age 12 and younger); $5-$30 per race, $40-$210 for series; OBRA membership required; crosscrusade.com.

RIDES BEND’S BIG FAT TOUR: Friday, Oct. 12Sunday, Oct. 14; guided, supported rides, $89-$159, depending on number of rides and date of registration; 541-385-7002; info@ bendsbigfattour.org; bendsbigfattour.com. BEND BELLA CYCLISTS: Weekly womenonly group road and mountain bike rides; see website for dates and meeting times; meet at Pine Mountain Sports, 255 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; bendbellacyclists.org.

TRINITY BIKES RIDE: Group road bike ride starting in Redmond at Trinity Bikes, 865 S.W. 17th St.; Mondays; 6 p.m.; somewhat casual pace; 541-923-5650. PINE MOUNTAIN SPORTS BIKE RIDE: Twicemonthly guided mountain bike rides hosted by Pine Mountain Sports and open to all riders; 5:30 p.m. on the first and third Wednesday of each month; free; rental and demo bikes available at no charge (be at the shop at 5 p.m.); meet at 255 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-3858080; www.pinemountainsports.com. EUROSPORTS RIDE: Group road bike ride starting in Sisters from Eurosports, 182 E. Hood St.; Saturdays; check with the shop for start time; all riders welcome; 541-549-2471; www. eurosports.us. HUTCH’S NOON RIDE: Group road bike ride starting in Bend from Hutch’s Bicycles eastside location, 820 N.E. Third St., at noon on Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays; and from Hutch’s west-side location, 725 N.W. Columbia St., at noon on Tuesdays, Thursdays; pace varies; 541-382-6248; www.hutchsbicycles. com. HUTCH’S SATURDAY RIDE: Group road bike ride begins at 10 a.m. Saturdays in Bend from Hutch’s Bicycles east-side location, 820 N.E. Third St.; approximately 40 miles; vigorous pace; 541-382-6248; www.hutchsbicycles.com.

OUT OF TOWN CROSS CRUSADE: Eight-race cyclocross series; each day, first race starts at 8:40 a.m. and last race starts at 3:15 p.m.; race No. 1 is Sunday at Alpenrose Dairy in Portland; race No. 2 is Sunday, Oct. 14, at Rainier High School, Ranier; divisions for men, women, masters, Clydesdales, single speed, juniors, unicycles and kids (age 12 and younger); $5-$30 per race, $40-$210 for series; OBRA membership required; crosscrusade.com. SOUTHERN BAJA, MEXICO SINGLETRACK TOURS: December 8-12 and Feb. 16-20; Baja, Mexico; includes four days of riding and five nights of accommodations, all meals and a Specialized full suspension bike rental; tours limited to 12 riders; $925 (airfare not included); 541-385-7002; cogwild. com/multi-day-vacations/baja-singletrack.

CYCLING SCOREBOARD Cyclocross Redmond Golf Cross Saturday, Redmond ——— Men Category A — 1, Chris Sheppard, Bend. 2, Bart Bowen, Bend. 3, Brett Luelling, Salem. 4, Sean Passage, Bend. 5, Russell Cree, Portland. 6, Tim Jones, Bend. 7, Owen Murphy, Bend. 8, Matt Williams, Bend. 9, Ryan Ness, Bend. 10, Peter Vraniak, Bend. 11, Jason Oman, Bend. 12, Matt Russell, Bend. Category B — 1, Shane Johnson, Redmond. 2, Cory Tanler, Bend. 3, Matt Hickey, Bend. 4, Beny Ambauen, Bend. 5, Steve Langenderfer, Bend. 6, Sean Lewis, Bend. 7, Kyle Mills, Bend. 8, Greg Freyberg, Bend.

Numbers Continued from D1 Like many participants who are new to their sport, I was interested in expanding my knowledge base. For me, that extended to cycling in particular, given my lack of expertise in that sport. Perusing bike-related forums, I would read terms such as “compact crank” and some of the numbers listed above. The posters would use them in reference to bike gearing but would not explain what they meant in ways that made sense to a beginner — at least not this beginner. As I invariably seem to forget to ask the questions I would really like to have answered in places suitable to that end — such as my local bike shop — I was invariably kept in the dark until I decided to finally investigate in the past couple weeks. As far as gearing goes, I have had the basics down for quite a while. I understand that riding with my chain in my small chainring (the rings with all the teeth at the front of the drivetrain are your chainrings) is easier than riding with my chain in the big chainring. I also understand that within each chainring, riding with the chain on a bigger cog in the back is easier than riding on a smaller cog (the rings with the teeth in the back, at the hub of the rear wheel, are called cogs; collectively, the cogs make up a cassette). But that was as much as I knew. Until a few days ago, I did not know what kind of crankset or cassette was on my bike, if it was the right one for me, or if I would be better off with something else. So I went looking for answers. As both Susan Bonacker at Sunnyside Sports and James Gritters at Sagebrush Cycles explained to me, the numbers such as 50/34 refer to the number of teeth on each of the chainrings. And numbers such as 11-27 and 12-25 refer to the number of teeth on the smallest and largest cogs in a cassette, respectively. But the teeth on those

Category C — 1, Shay Mavis, Bend. 2, Zach Violett, Bend. 3, Thomas Pastor, Bend. 4, Don Petersen, Bend. 5, Steve McCorkle, Bend. 6, Chris Sterry, Bend. 7, Frank Fleetham, Bend. Master 35+ A — 1, Andrew Sargent, Bend. 2, Lauren McCarthy, Bend. 3, Robert Uetrecht, Bend. 4, Erik Bergstrom, Bend. 5, Adam Carroll, Bend. 6, Wade Miller, Bend. 7, Michael Dennis, Bend. 8, Karsten Hagen, Bend. 9, David Baker, Bend. 10, Henry Abel, Bend. Master 35+ B — 1, Erik Hammer, Bend. 2, Brook Gardner, Bend. 3, David Sjogren, Bend. 4, Todd Schock, Bend. 5, David Anderson, Bend. 6, Eric Birky, Bend. 7, Jurgen Fennerl, Bend. 8, Whit Bazemore, Bend. 9, Charles Thomas, Bend. 10, Mike Albright, Bend. 11, Rob Kerr, Bend.

Master 35+ C — 1, Kenny Wolford, Bend. 2, Ken Johnson, Bend. 3, Kent Chapple, Bend. 4, Alan Thomason, Bend. 5, Lucas Freeman, Bend. Master 50+ — 1, Steve Yenne, Salem. 2, Doug Perrin, Bend. 3, Mark Reinecke, Bend. 4, Dan Davis, Bend. 5, Rick Gregory, Eugene. 6, Michael McLandress, Bend. 7, Stan Kiefer, Bend. 8, David Dorocke, Bend. 9, Brian Smith, Bend. 10, Paul Mautner, Portland. 11, Amory Cheney, Bend. 12, Craig Mavis, Bend. 13, Tad Hodgert, Bend. Clydesdale — 1, Terry Chubb, Bend. Beginner — 1, Shawn Gerdes, Bend. 2, Ted Hodgert, Bend. 3, Greg Reed, Redmond. 4, Jeff Palmer, Redmond. Junior — 1, Donovan Birky, Bend. 2, Jonathan Wimberly, Bend. 3, Nathaniel Cannon, Bend.

chainrings can vary. Something called a compact double crankset has become common in the past five years, Bonacker said, noting that a “compact” has a 50/34 chainring combo on. The most common pairing for a standard crankset, Gritters said, is a 53/39. Just how common is a compact crankset these days? Bonacker said that all of the bikes on the Sunnyside floor have compact cranks, and Gritters estimated that 90 percent of bikes in general sport the compact. “So now everything in the back end is lower,” Bonacker explained, referring to the gears. “However, you have this 11-tooth cog back there that compensates for that because it’s a higher gear for your back. So what you end up with is gears that you use more of — and that’s the take home. A compact crank will give you a big chainring that you can use not just on that one time when you’re riding down Mount Bachelor. It’s a chainring that you use all the time on the flats.” A compact double, Bonacker added, offers a wide range of gears, spanning from a low climbing gear to nearly as high of a big gear as a standard crankset. Those lower gears can be helpful, such as when climbing big hills. “Everybody wants to use the easiest possible gear to get up the hills,” Gritters said. While many cyclists are riding with the compact cranks these days, some riders may still prefer a standard crankset. Gritters said that riders who are long accustomed to a standard crank and most racers still opt for it. As for the cassettes, going back to those numbers, a 1225 cassette’s smallest cog has 12 teeth, its largest has 25, and the other cogs have numbers of teeth falling somewhere in between. And the larger the cog, the easier the gear. Some cassettes offer wider gearing options, Gritters said, with 1128, 12-30 (new this year) and 11-32 cassettes being popular. Thoroughly curious as to what type of crankset I had on

my bike after these conversations, I brought it to Sunnyside Sports for some analysis. As it turns out, I have a standard crankset (that is a 53/39 chainring combo) and what looked to Sunnyside employee Muffy Roy like a 12-25 cassette. If I were to purchase my bike today, she noted, it would probably come with compact crank (that 50/34 combo) and an 11-27 or 11-28 cassette. But that does not mean what is on my bike is bad or does not work. “If you ride it and you enjoy it, and you find that you can sit in the saddle climbing as much as you like, then it’s fine,” Roy noted. Overall, I feel like I am fine with what is on my bike. I have ridden only with a standard crankset, so I do not know any different, though I would be somewhat interested in how a compact crank would feel. But if I were to change my gearing, a different cassette might be helpful. I do not find that I need a bigger gear at the top end, but sometimes I find myself thinking that another gear or two at the lowest end might be a nice option for steep pitches. Changing out a cassette is

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Single speed — 1, Brett Luelling, Salem. 2, Ian Eglitis, West Linn. 3, Todd Griffith, Bend. Women Category A — 1, Serena Bishop Gordon, Bend. 2, Stephanie Uetrecht, Bend. 3, Solana Kline, Bend. 4, Meagan Masten, Salem. 5, Jennifer Cree, Portland. Category B — 1, Erica Wescott, Bend. 2, Aimee Furber, Bend. 3, Michelle Mills, Bend. Category C — 1, Amanda Atwill, Bend. Master 35+ — 1, Sarah Max. 2, Laura Hagen. 3, Shellie Heggenberger, Bend. Master 45+ — 1, Michelle Bazemore, Bend. 2, Gina Davis. 3, Mary Dallas, Bend. Beginner — 1, Patti Wolfe, Brownsville. 2, Molly Cogswell-Kelley, Bend. 3, Amy Mitchell, Bend. Junior — 1, Jennelle Holmes, Bend.

a “cost-effective, simple fix,” Bonacker said, with viable options running between $30 and $200. And decent cranksets are available for $150 to $200, Gritters said. But you do have to swap out the entire crankset, as compact double and standard cranksets use different-size bolts. In the end, I do not know if I will wind up changing anything. But if nothing else, I do feel like a more educated cyclist. After all, now I know what the numbers mean. — Reporter: 541-383-0393; amiles@bendbulletin.com.

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Golden Retriever pups, Furniture & Appliances AKC, written guarantee, shots, parents on site, A1 Washers&Dryers 20+ yr. breeder, nice $150 ea. Full warrange of color from red ranty. Free Del. Also to light golden. Beauty & wanted, used W/D’s brains, calm tempera541-280-7355 ment, good hunters. Tumalo area. Ready now. Bookcase, 2 shelf, $10, $500. 541-420-5253 please call Golden Retriever pups, 541-504-1624. ready Oct. 13, Male & Female left. Call China Hutch, exc. cond., dark wood, $500 541-848-2277. OBO, 541-504-7994. Husky Malamute Pups, 8 weeks old, beautiful Computer Desk & chair, $25, call markings, 1st shots, $350. 541-306-9218 541-504-1624.

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OASIS Large capacity Bicycles & Kenmore (Elite) HE Accessories Washer & Electric Dryer - $600. Trex (2) multi-track 700s, 2.0 GE Profile Micro- 26”, with 15” & 19” wave - counter top - frames, like new, $240 $150. each. 541-322-6280 Call (541) 639-4047 Washer & dryer, stackable, like new, $400 set. 541-593-1101 The Bulletin r ecommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to FRAUD. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Chihuahua, teacups (2), Kittens/cats avail. thru rescue group. Tame, shots & dewormed, shots, altered, ID chip, $250 ea 541-977-0035 more. Sat/Sun 1-5, call Dachshund AKC mini pup re: other days. 65480 $375/$425.541-508-4558 78th St., Bend, www.bendweenies.com 541-389-8420, 5985488; photos, etc. at 202 Dog Crate, 26” long x www.craftcats.org 20” wide, 20” tall, $45, Want to Buy or Rent 541-382-0421. Labradoodles - Mini & WANTED: RAZORS, med size, several colors Dog Kennel, 10x10x6 Double or single541-504-2662 Behlen complete club edged, straight www.alpen-ridge.com kennel, like new, razors, shaving Labrador AKC puppies, $450. 541-647-1236 brushes, mugs & 212 black & choc, dewclaws, scuttles, strops, Antiques & athletic parents, ready shaving accessories DO YOU HAVE 9/25. 541-410-9000 Collectibles & memorabilia. SOMETHING TO Fair prices paid. SELL Labrador AKC pups, Call 541-390-7029 FOR $500 OR choc / blk / yellow, males Antiques wanted: tools, furniture, fishing, between 10 am-3 pm. LESS? & females, exlnt hunters/ marbles, old signs, Non-commercial family dogs. $600 each. 205 toys, costume jewelry. 1st shots & dewormed. advertisers may Call 541-389-1578 Items for Free In Hillsboro, OR, place an ad with 1-707-775-5809 or our Old Trunks, 1 larger, FREE Llama Manure www.facebook.com/ "QUICK CASH dated “1900”, $75. 1 Shovel ready, you haul! amandito.casteen SPECIAL" medium, $65, call Call 541-389-7329 1 week 3 lines, $12 541-382-0421. Labradors AKC exc. or 2 weeks, $20! 208 bloodlines, choc & Ad must include Pets & Supplies black, $500. La Pine price of single item 1-541-231-8957 of $500 or less, or multiple items The Bulletin recomPOODLE (TOY) Pups, whose total does AKC. Pomapoos also! mends extra caution So cute! 541-475-3889 not exceed $500. when purchasing products or serQueensland Heelers Call Classifieds at vices from out of the standard & mini,$150 & 541-385-5809 area. Sending cash, up. 541-280-1537 http:// www.bendbulletin.com checks, or credit inrightwayranch.wordpress.com formation may be subjected to fraud. English Bulldog SIBERIAN HUSKY For more informaPuppies PUP - $150 to great tion about an adverAKC registered, 1st home only. tiser, you may call shots & microchipped. Gorgeous 8 mos old the Oregon State Ready to go! male red & white. Attorney General’s $2000. 541 416-0375 Super healthy, Office Consumer smart, loving. Very Protection hotline at English Bulldogs, DOB special boy! 8/6/12, 4 females, 3 1-877-877-9392. 805-832-3434. males, 1st shots, $2200. 541-280-6268 Yorkie male puppies (2), 8 weeks, vet checked & Aussie Shepherd reg. shots, can deliver, pups, standard, blue & $600. 541-792-0375 red merles anrd tris, 541-420-1580 210

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Wanted- paying cash Piano, Steinway Model for Hi-fi audio & stuO Baby Grand 1911, dio equip. McIntosh, gorgeous, artist qualJBL, Marantz, Dyity instrument w/great naco, Heathkit, Sanaction & Steinway’s sui, Carver, NAD, etc. warm, rich sound. Will Call 541-261-1808 adorn any living room, church or music stu263 dio perfectly. New reTools tail $69,000. Sacrifice at $34,000 OBO, SW Portable Boss air- Quadifire 3100 wood stove, good condition. call 541-383-3150. less paint sprayer, $700. 541-382-4144. $500. 541-949-4413 260

Misc. Items

Buying Diamonds 2 pair of 175mm Para/Gold for Cash bolic skis: 1 pair Saxon’s Fine Jewelers Atomic 2 yrs old with 541-389-6655 binding & poles $120; 1 pair Dynastar with BUYING bindings & poles 4 742 30-06, Lionel/American Flyer yrs old, $100. Used Rem. trains, accessories. semi-auto w/ 2x7 Redby elderly couple 541-408-2191. field. Deluxe, $375. 541-383-4142. 541-815-4901 BUYING & SELLING 246 Wanted: Collector All gold jewelry, silver seeks high quality Guns, Hunting and gold coins, bars, fishing items. rounds, wedding sets, & Fishing Call 541-678-5753, or class rings, sterling sil503-351-2746 ver, coin collect, vinBend local pays CASH!! tage watches, dental Winchester Model 94 for Guns, Knives & gold. Bill Fleming, 30-30,orig. box,“Golden Ammo. 541-526-0617 541-382-9419. Spike”Commemorative, #105 of limited US run, Browning Bar II .338 COWGIRL CASH $850 firm,541-350-5373 $1150. Ruger .357 SS We buy Jewelry, Boots, SOLD .Mossberg 308 255 Vintage Dresses & SOLD. 541-408-4844 More. 924 Brooks St. Computers CASH!! 541-678-5162 For Guns, Ammo & THE BULLETIN re- www.getcowgirlcash.com Reloading Supplies. quires computer ad541-408-6900. vertisers with multiple ad schedules or those Need to get an selling multiple systems/ software, to disad in ASAP? close the name of the You can place it business or the term online at: "dealer" in their ads. Private party advertiswww.bendbulletin.com ers are defined as those who sell one 541-385-5809 computer.

267

265

Building Materials La Pine Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 52684 Hwy 97 541-536-3234 Open to the public . Where can you ind a helping hand? From contractors to yard care, it’s all here in The Bulletin’s “Call A Service Professional” Directory Prineville Habitat ReStore Building Supply Resale 1427 NW Murphy Ct. 541-447-6934 Open to the public.

Fuel & Wood

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD... To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery and inspection. • A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’ • Receipts should include name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased. • Firewood ads MUST include species and cost per cord to better serve our customers.

www.bendbulletin.com

541-385-5809


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

E2 MONDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD Edited by Will Shortz

PLACE AN AD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . .11:00 am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Starting at 3 lines

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

*UNDER $500 in total merchandise

OVER $500 in total merchandise

7 days .................................................. $10.00 14 days ................................................ $16.00

Garage Sale Special

4 days .................................................. $18.50 7 days .................................................. $24.00 14 days .................................................$33.50 28 days .................................................$61.50

4 lines for 4 days.................................. $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

PRIVATE PARTY RATES

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702

PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday. 269

270

286

476

476

Gardening Supplies & Equipment

Lost & Found

Sales Northeast Bend

Employment

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

400

CAUTION READERS:

For newspaper delivery, call the Circulation Dept. at 541-385-5800 To place an ad, call 541-385-5809 or email

classified@bendbulletin.com

SUPER TOP SOIL

www.hersheysoilandbark.com

Ladies black leather cross-stitch foldover hand wallet with silver heart, lost on 9/22 at Albertson’s Redmond. Reward for return with contents. Leave msg. 541-504-1908 Lost cat, gray/tiger stripe F, white neck/chest, SW Bend Lodgepole/Honkers area, 9/6. $100 Reward offered. 541-330-8732 Lost in area of NE Vogt/Cool and Boyd Acres: Llasa-Apso male, B&W, underbite, no collar. $150 reward. 541-419-5120

HH F R E E G ara g e

HH

S ale

K it

Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE! KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $2.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!”

TRUCK SCHOOL

300

SOLD IN 30 DAYS!!

Want Results from qualified local buyers? Call us at 541-385-5809 and ask about our Wheel Deal special!

www .bendbulletin

421

Schools & Training

Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High huPICK UP YOUR mus level, exc. for GARAGE SALE KIT at flower beds, lawns, 1777 SW Chandler gardens, straight Ave., Bend, OR 97702 screened top soil. Lost totally gray cat (Russian Blue) name Bark. Clean fill. DeLucy last seen Mon. liver/you haul. 9/24 Wilson & Upper 541-548-3949. Terrace, Bend. Call 292 People Look for Information Jon, 602-290-9009 or Bill 541-548-0844 About Products and Sales Other Areas Services Every Day through REMEMBER: If you Estate Sale in Sisters: The Bulletin Classifieds have lost an animal, Thurs. Oct. 4- Sun. don't forget to check Yard Bug riding lawnOct. 7th 9-5, 16036 The Humane Society mower from Home DeCattle Drive Rd. in Bend 541-382-3537 pot, just tuned up, $250. 541-389-9503 after 5pm Redmond, 541-923-0882 270 Farm Prineville, Lost & Found 541-447-7178; Market OR Craft Cats, Found 9/25, Weedeater 541-389-8420. & bucket of tools, on South bound parkway Call a Pro near Powers Rd. Call to identify Whether you need a 541-420-7232. fence ixed, hedges 308 Found CD Holder w/ trimmed or a house Farm Equipment CD’s, White Peaks Dr, built, you’ll ind & Machinery 9/24, 541-419-5677. professional help in Found keys on Dobbin IH1566, 180 hp, duals, The Bulletin’s “Call a Rd. Call to describe. 3 pt., 540/1000 pto, 541 389 7904 Service Professional” cab, heat, a/c, tilt, stereo, low hours Directory Found Sunglasses, in $16,800. 541-419-2713 Redmond, 9/24, call 541-385-5809 to ID, 541-388-1533. Good classiied ads tell the essential facts in an interesting Manner. Write from the readers view - not “Please discontinue this the seller’s. Convert the ad as the vehicle has facts into beneits. Show been sold. I am pleased the reader how the item will to tell you that I had help them in some way. posted it on Craig’s List on 6 different locations Murano but it was the Bulletin ad Nissan SL-AWD 2004, 75k, that sold it!” all-weather tires, tow Lee, G. pkg, gold metallic, beige leather int., moonroof, .........

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly.

www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-387-9252

Find exactly what Use extra caution when you are looking for in the applying for jobs online and never proCLASSIFIEDS vide personal information to any source 454 you may not have reLooking for Employment searched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when College graduate responding to ANY reliable,motivated online employment looking for ad from out-of-state. entry-level full time job in any field. We suggest you call 717-380-0477 the State of Oregon (Jared) Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320

Garage Sales Garage Sales Garage Sales Find them in The Bulletin Classiieds

541-385-5809

Beauty/Barber

Supercuts now hiring stylists for Bend, Redmond & Prineville. Apply at all 5 locations or fax resume to 541-923-7640.

Caregivers - Experienced Part time & 24 hrs caregivers. Home Instead Senior Care is currently seeking Caregivers to provide in-home care to our seniors. Candidates must be able to lift, transfer, provide personal care & assist in various home duties. Alzheimer / Dementia/ ALS experience a needed. Must have ability to pass background checks & have valid DL & insurance. Training provided. Call 541-330-6400, or fax resume to: 541-330-7362.

EMPLOYMENT 410 - Private Instruction 421 - Schools and Training 454 - Looking for Employment 470 - Domestic & In-Home Positions 476 - Employment Opportunities 486 - Independent Positions

FINANCE AND BUSINESS 507 - Real Estate Contracts 514 - Insurance 528 - Loans and Mortgages 543 - Stocks and Bonds 558 - Business Investments 573 - Business Opportunities

476

476

476

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW?

Call The Bulletin before 11 a.m. and get an ad in to publish the next day!

541-385-5809. VIEW the Classifieds at:

www.bendbulletin.com

LoggingImmediate Remember.... openings for Log Add your web adLoader, Chipper, and dress to your ad and Cat Skidder operareaders on The tors, Log Truck drivBulletin' s web site ers, and Fire Patrol. will be able to click 11 month work year, through automatically not shut down due to to your site. fire danger, work in N CA. 530-258-3025. Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 971-673-0764 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Classified Department The Bulletin 541-385-5809

470

Domestic & In-Home Positions Weekend help needed: CNA/caregiver for female with MS. Sat-Sun, 9am-1pm in private home close to COCC. 2 references required. Call 541-318-1335 Medical

Admin Asst BBR PD Part-time, Yr. Round Job descript & app at www.blackbutteranch police.com

Clinical Informatics Coordinator - FT Whitefish, MT

North Valley Hospital (NVH) in beautiful NW Montana is transitioning to a new electronic health record (EHR) system. We seek an indi325 vidual with a clinical, healthcare background and experience using MCKESSON PARAGON Hay, Grain & Feed CLINICAL MODULES & HORIZON PATIENT FOLDER or similar EHR system. Coordinator Wheat Straw: Certified & will design, build & train advanced clinical comBedding Straw & Garden ponents of NVH’s new EHR system; coordinate Straw;Compost.546-6171 design, build & training for Physician Workflows within the products; be first line of technical Just too many support for nursing staff; and provide training to collectibles? nursing and other areas on clinical components. Visit www.nvhosp.org and click on Careers & VolSell them in unteers, and then click Employment Opportunities to view full job description & learn more The Bulletin Classiieds about NVH. Excellent benefits: group health/dental, earned leave/retirement plans. 541-385-5809 EOE Independent Contractor

H Supplement Your Income H

Operate Your Own Business

FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF

Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor

&

Call Today &

We are looking for independent contractors to service home delivery routes in:

H Prineville H Must have reliable, insured vehicle.

To place your ad, visit www.bendbulletin.com or 541-385-5809

Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 during business hours apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com

Telephone Hours: Monday - Friday 7:30am - 5pm • Saturday 10am - 12:30pm

Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours.

541-385-5809

Hours: Monday - Friday 7:30am to 5:00pm 24 Hour Message Line: 541-383-2371: Place, cancel, or extend an ad after hours. 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - Roommate Wanted 616 - Want To Rent 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 630 - Rooms for Rent 631 - Condos & Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for Rent General 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2012 E3

682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 730 - New Listings 732 - Commercial Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740 - Condos & Townhomes for Sale 744 - Open Houses 745 - Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest Bend Homes 747 - Southwest Bend Homes 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 749 - Southeast Bend Homes 750 - Redmond Homes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson County Homes 757 - Crook County Homes 762 - Homes with Acreage 763 - Recreational Homes and Property 764 - Farms and Ranches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land

476

Employment Opportunities

Finance & Business

500 600

Sales Telephone prospecting position for important professional services. Income potential $50,000. (average in528 come 30k-35k) opportunity for ad- Loans & Mortgages vancement. Base & Commission, Health BANK TURNED YOU and Dental Benefits. DOWN? Private party Will train the right perwill loan on real esson. Fax resume to: tate equity. Credit, no 541-848-6408. problem, good equity is all you need. Call The Bulletin now. Oregon Land Recommends extra Mortgage 388-4200. caution when purchasing products or Get your services from out of the area. Sending business cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to GROW FRAUD. For more informawith an ad in tion about an adverThe Bulletin’s tiser, you may call “Call A Service the Oregon State Attorney General’s Professional” Office Consumer Directory Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392. LOCAL MONEY:We buy secured trust deeds & note,some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 ext.13. Take care of

ING

your investments with the help from The Bulletin’s “Call A Service Professional” Directory

personals To the bicyclist who I invertantly cut off at the Mill Mall roundabout last Saturday, my apologies.

Rentals

Reverse Mortgages by local expert Mike LeRoux NMLS57716 Call to learn more.

541-350-7839 Security1 Lending NMLS98161

630

Rooms for Rent Furnished rm, $425 +sec dep; refs. TV, Wifi, micro, frig. 541-389-9268 Studios & Kitchenettes Furnished room, TV w/ cable, micro & fridge. Utils & linens. New owners.$145-$165/wk 541-382-1885 634

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend $299 1st mo. rent!! * GET THEM BEFORE THEY ARE GONE! 2 bdrm, 1 bath $530 & $540 Carports & A/C included! Fox Hollow Apts. (541) 383-3152 Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co *Upstairs only with lease

636

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend Fully furnished loft Apt

on Wall Street in Bend, with parking. All utilities paid. Call 541-389-2389 for appt 642

Apt./Multiplex Redmond

Duplex 3 bdrm, 2 bath, Say “goodbuy” 1260 sq.ft., 1 story, gato that unused rage w/opener, fenced yard, RV/Boat parking, item by placing it in fridge, dishwasher, miThe Bulletin Classiieds cro, walk-in laundry, W/S/G paid, front gardner paid, $775+dep., 541-385-5809 541-604-0338

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 (This special package is not available on our website)

Building/Contracting

Landscaping/Yard Care

Landscaping/Yard Care

NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). More Than Service An active license Peace Of Mind means the contractor is bonded and inFall Clean Up sured. Verify the contractor’s CCB li- Don’t track it in all Winter •Leaves cense through the •Cones CCB Consumer •Needles Website •Pruning

Nelson Landscape Maintenance

www.hirealicensedcontractor. com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications. USE THE CLASSIFIEDS! Door-to-door selling with fast results! It’s the easiest way in the world to sell. The Bulletin Classiied

541-385-5809 Debris Removal

JUNK BE GONE

I Haul Away FREE

For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel, 541-389-8107 Handyman ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES. Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. On-time promise. Senior Discount. Work guaranteed. 541-389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded & Insured CCB#181595 I DO THAT! Home/Rental repairs Small jobs to remodels Honest, guaranteed work. CCB#151573 Dennis 541-317-9768 Home Improvement Kelly Kerfoot Const.

28 yrs exp in Central OR!

Quality & honesty, from carpentry & handyman jobs, to expert wall covering install / removal. Sr. discounts CCB#47120 Licensed/bonded/insured 541-389-1413 / 410-2422

•Debris Hauling

Gutter Cleaning Compost Applications Use Less Water

$$$ SAVE $$$ Improve Soil

2012 Maintenance Package Available weekly, monthly and one time service

648

875

880

882

882

Houses for Rent General

Watercraft

Motorhomes

Fifth Wheels

Fifth Wheels

Ranch Cottage,LonePine Valley,Terrebonne,1bdrm 1 bath, 800 sq.ft., $600, 1st, last, dep., no pets/ smoking,541-548-0731

Boats & RV’s

800

652

850

Houses for Rent NW Bend

Snowmobiles

Classic 2 bdrm, lrg. yard, quiet near river, econ. heat. $800+ last+ dep. lease. no pets. Local refs. 1977 NW 2nd Want to impress the relatives? Remodel your home with the help of a professional from The Bulletin’s “Call A Service Professional” Directory 656

Houses for Rent SW Bend Clean 3 (could be 4) bedroom, on nearly 1 acre, $1200 mo., 1 year lease required, 541-390-4213 658

Houses for Rent Redmond

PACKAGE DEAL! 2003 800 Skidoo Summit; 1997 Yamaha Phaser. Ultra-lite 2-place trailer. Only $4500. 541-815-4811. 860

Motorcycles & Accessories 1978 XL 125 Honda Trail bike, runs strong, $275. 541-388-3188 Harley Davidson SoftTail Deluxe 2007, white/cobalt, w/passenger kit, Vance & Hines muffler system & kit, 1045 mi., exc. cond, $19,999, 541-389-9188.

2007 SeaDoo 2004 Waverunner, excellent condition, LOW hours. Double trailer, lots of extras. Monaco Dynasty 2004, Carri-Lite Luxury 2009 by Carriage, 4 slideloaded, 3 slides, dieouts, inverter, satelsel, Reduced - now $119,000, 541-923lite sys, fireplace, 2 Ads published in "Wa8572 or 541-749-0037 flat screen TVs. tercraft" include: Kay$60,000. aks, rafts and motor541-480-3923 ized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809 Southwind 35.5’ Triton, 2008,V10, 2 slides, Dupont UV coat, 7500 mi. Fleetwood Wilderness Bought new at 36’, 2005, 4 slides, $132,913; rear bdrm, fireplace, asking $94,900. AC, W/D hkup beauCall 541-923-2774 tiful unit! $30,500. 541-815-2380 Sea Kayaks - His & Hers, Eddyline Wind Dancers,17’, fiberglass boats, all equip incl., paddles, personal flotation devices,dry bags, Winnebago Class C 27’ Komfort 25’ 2006, 1 1992, Ford 460 V8,64K slide, AC, TV, awning. spray skirts,roof rack w/ mi., good cond., $7000 NEW: tires, converter, towers & cradles -- Just OBO 541-678-5575 batteries. Hardly used. add water, $1250/boat $15,500. 541-923-2595 Firm. 541-504-8557. Motorhomes

Harley Heritage Softail, 2003 $5,000+ in extras, $2000 paint job, 30K mi. 1 owner, For more information please call 541-385-8090 or 209-605-5537

700

All real estate advertised here in is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or intention to make any such preferences, limitations or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of this law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. The Bulletin Classified

17’ Seaswirl 1988 open bow, rebuilt Chevy V6 engine, new upholstery, $4500 or best offer. 707-688-4523

BULLETIN CLASSIFIEDS Search the area’s most comprehensive listing of classiied advertising... real estate to automotive, merchandise to sporting Free Estimates goods. Bulletin Classiieds Senior Discounts appear every day in the 541-390-1466 print or on line. Same Day Response Call 541-385-5809 NOTICE: OREGON www.bendbulletin.com Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise Aeration/Fall Clean-up to perform LandBOOK NOW! scape Construction Weekly / one-time service which includes: avail. Bonded, insured, planting, decks, free estimates! fences, arbors, COLLINS Lawn Maint. water-features, and Call 541-480-9714 installation, repair of Maverick Landscaping irrigation systems to Mowing, weedeating, be licensed with the yard detailing, chain Landscape Contracsaw work & more! tors Board. This LCB#8671 541-923-4324 4-digit number is to be included in all adverPet Services tisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protec- Central Oregon Best in-home animal care tion call 503-378-5909 service. Going on or use our website: vacation? We provide www.lcb.state.or.us to compassionate and check license status loving in-home anibefore contracting mal care. Make it a with the business. vacation for your pet Persons doing landtoo! Call today! scape maintenance Tamron Stone do not require a LCB 541-215-5372 license.

EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential

Gentle Giant Animal Care

Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 11:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday and Monday. 541-385-5809 Thank you! The Bulletin Classified *** 775

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes

FACTORY SPECIAL

New Home, 3 bdrm, $47,500 finished on your site,541.548.5511 www.JandMHomes.com

tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500. 541-389-1413

900 908

Aircraft, Parts & Service

Komfort 20’ Trailblazer, 2004, with all the extras, from new tires & chrome wheels to A/C! $8495. 541-447-3342, Prineville

Springdale 2005 27’, 4’ slide in dining/living area, sleeps 6, low mi,$15,000 obo. 541-408-3811

Springdale 29’ 2007, slide,Bunkhouse style, sleeps 7-8, excellent condition, $16,900, 541-390-2504

Montana 3400RL 2008, 4 slides, no smokers or pets, limited usage, 5500 watt Onan gen, solar panel, fireplace, dual A/C, central vac, elect. awning w/sunscreen arctic pkg, rear Executive Hangar at Bend Airport receiver, alum wheels, 2 (KBDN) TVs, many extras. $35,500. 541-416-8087 60’ wide x 50’ deep, w/55’ wide x 17’ high bi-fold door. Natural gas heat, office, bathroom. Parking for 6 cars. Adjacent to Frontage Rd; great visibility for aviation MONTANA 3585 2008, bus. 1jetjock@q.com exc. cond., 3 slides, 541-948-2126 king bed, lrg LR, Arctic insulation, all options $37,500. 541-420-3250 NuWa 297LK HitchHiker 2007, *Snowbird Special* 32’, touring coach, left kitchen, rear lounge, many extras, beautiful cond. inside & out, $35,900 OBO, Prineville. 541-447-5502 days & 541-447-1641 eves.

Sprinter 272RLS, 2009 29’, weatherized, like new, furnished & ready to go, incl Wine- Open Road 2004 37' w/ 3 slides W/D hook-up, gard Satellite dish, lrg LR w/rear window $26,995. 541-420-9964 & desk area. $19,750 obo. 541-280-7879 Viking Tent trailer 2008, clean, self contained, sleeps 5, easy to tow, great cond. $5200, obo. 541-383-7150. Call The Bulletin At

ONLY 1 OWNERSHIP SHARE LEFT! Economical flying in your own Cessna 172/180 HP for only $10,000! Based at BDN. Call Gabe at Professional Air! 541-388-0019 916

Trucks & Heavy Equipment

Diamond Reo Dump Truck 1974, 12-14 yard box, runs good, $6900, 541-548-6812 Pilgrim 27’, 2007 5th wheel, 1 slide, AC, TV,full awning, excellent shape, $23,900. 541-350-8629

inverter (2007). Onan 6300 watt gen, 111K mi, parked covered $35,000 obo. 541-419-9859 or 541-280-2014

882

Fifth Wheels Bighorn 2008 3400RL 37' fireplace, 3 slides, king bed, upgrades $30,000 541-815-7220

SPRINTER 36’ 2005, $10,500 obo. Two slides, sleeps 5, queen air mattress, small sgl. bed, couch folds out. 1.5 baths, 541-382-0865, leave message!

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530 21’7” Sun Tracker Pontoon Fishin’ Barge, 2008, with low hours Mercury 90, top & cover. $16,000. 503-701-2256 Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

OMC rebuilt marine motors: 151 $1595; 3.0 $1895; 4.3 (1993), $1995. 541-389-0435

Autos & Transportation

1/3 interest in Columbia 400, located at Sunriver. $138,500. Call 541-647-3718 1/3 interest in wellequipped IFR Beech Bonanza A36, located KBDN. $55,000. 541-419-9510

Fleetwood 1997, 14x60, 2 bdrm, 1 bath., well GENERATE SOME exmaint., $17,000 OBO, citement in your neigmust be moved from borhood. Plan a gaTumalo location, rage sale and don't 503-523-7908. forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809. Move in Ready $19,900 2 bdrm, 2 bath $23,900 2 bdrm, 1 bath $38,900 3 bdrm, 2 bath $39,999 3 bdrm, 2 bath Used out-drive 541-548-5511 parts - Mercury www.JandMHomes.com Movers! $7,999 2 bdrm, 1 bath, $19,999 Office/ Studio, $32,900 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 541-548-5511 www.JandMHomes.com

Raider canopy, fits 6-ft bed, fiberglass, perfect shape, $600. Call 541-388-4662; 604-0116

Econoline trailer 16-Ton 29’ Bed, shape; 1988 Bronco II w/fold up ramps, elec. 4x4 to tow, 130K brakes, Pintlehitch, mostly towed miles, $4700, 541-548-6812 nice rig! $15,000 both. 541-382-3964, leave Pilgrim International msg. 2005, 36’ 5th Wheel, Weekend Warrior Toy Model#M-349 RLDS-5 Hauler 28’ 2007,Gen, Fall price $21,865. fuel station, exc cond. Itasca Spirit Class C Hyster H25E, runs 541-312-4466 sleeps 8, black/gray 2007, 20K miles, front well, 2982 Hours, interior, used 3X, entertainment center, $3500, call $24,999. all bells & whistles, 541-749-0724 541-389-9188 extremely good condition, 2 slides, 2 HDTV’s, $48,500 Looking for your OBO. 541-447-5484 next employee? Regal Prowler AX6 ExPlace a Bulletin help treme Edition 38’ ‘05, wanted ad today and 4 slides,2 fireplaces, all reach over 60,000 maple cabs, king bed/ Peterbilt 359 potable readers each week. water truck, 1990, bdrm separated w/slide Your classified ad 3200 gal. tank, 5hp glass dr,loaded,always will also appear on pump, 4-3" hoses, garaged,lived in only 3 bendbulletin.com camlocks, $25,000. Jayco Seneca 2007, mo,brand new $54,000, which currently re541-820-3724 17K mi., 35ft., Chevy still like new, $28,500, ceives over 1.5 milwill deliver,see rvt.com, 5500 diesel, toy 925 lion page views evad#4957646 for pics. hauler $130,000. ery month at no Utility Trailers Cory, 541-580-7334 541-389-2636. extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get ReRoadranger 27’ 1993, 2007 17’ Express cargo sults! Call 385-5809 A/C, awning, sleeps 6, trailer w/ramp, gd shape, or place your ad exc. cond., used little, $3750. 541-536-4299 on-line at $4,495 OBO. bendbulletin.com 541-389-8963

Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial •Sprinkler Repair •Sprinkler Installation 750 •Back Flow Testing •Fire Prevention, 18.5’ ‘05 Reinell 185, V-6 Redmond Homes Volvo Penta, 270HP, Lot Clearing low hrs., must see, •Fall Clean up Redmond Worry Free $15,000, 541-330-3939 Certified Home $149,000 •Weekly Mowing Huge Landscaped Lot •Bark, Rock, Etc. Move in Ready! •Senior Discounts 800-451-5808 ext 819 Reserving spots for sprinkler 20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 773 winterization & snow 205 Run About, 220 Acreages Immaculate! removal HP, V8, open bow, Beaver Coach Marquis exc. cond., very fast Bonded & Insured 40’ 1987. New cover, *** w/very low hours, 541-815-4458 new paint (2004), new CHECK YOUR AD lots of extras incl. LCB#8759 Call The Yard Doctor for yard maintenance, thatching, sod, sprinkler blowouts, water features, more! Allen 541-536-1294 LCB 5012

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Canopies & Campers

Travel Trailers

motor, fish finder, 2 Hunter’s Delight! Pack541-385-5809 extra seats, trailer, age deal! 1988 Winextra equip. $3500 nebago Super Chief, Place Your Ad Or E-Mail 38K miles, great At: www.bendbulletin.com obo. 541-388-9270 17’ 1984 Chris Craft - Scorpion, 140 HP inboard/outboard, 2 depth finders, trolling motor, full cover, EZ - Load trailer, $3500 OBO. 541-382-3728.

Everything works, $1750/partial trade for car. 541-460-9127

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880

1600 sq ft 3 bdrm + den, 1.75 bath, gas fireplace, 2-car garage, fenced backyard, great neighCountry Coach Intrigue borhood, close to shop2002, 40' Tag axle. ping & schools. $895/mo 400hp Cummins Die+ dep. Pets nego, avail sel. two slide-outs. 10/1/12. 541-504-4624, Harley Street Glide 2006, 41,000 miles, new or 541-419-0137 21K miles, $11,500. tires & batteries. Most 541-728-0445 687 options. $95,000 OBO 541-678-5712 Commercial for HD FAT BOY Rent/Lease 1996 Completely rebuilt/ Spectrum professional customized, low building, 250’-500’, miles. Accepting of$1.00 per ft. total. No fers. 541-548-4807 NNN. Call Andy, Econoline RV 1989, 541-385-6732. fully loaded, exc. cond, HD Screaming Eagle 35K orig. mi., $19,750. Electra Glide 2005, Call 541-546-6133. 103” motor, two tone Real Estate candy teal, new tires, 23K miles, CD player, CAN’T BEAT THIS! For Sale hydraulic clutch, exLook before you buy, below market cellent condition. value! Size & mileHighest offer takes it. age DOES matter! 541-480-8080. Class A 32’ HurriHonda Elite 80 2001, cane by Four Winds, 1400 mi., absolutely 2007. 12,500 mi, all 745 like new., comes w/ amenities, Ford V10, carrying rack for 2” Homes for Sale lthr, cherry, slides, receiver, ideal for use like new! New low w/motorhome, $995, 4270Sq.ft., 6/6, 4-car, price, $54,900. corner, .83 acre mtn 541-548-5216 541-546-6920 view, by owner. $590,000 541-390-0886 Scenic Softail Deluxe Gulfstream See: bloomkey.com/8779 Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, 2010, 805 miles, Cummins 330 hp dieBANK OWNED HOMES! Black Chameleon. sel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 FREE List w/Pics! $17,000 in. kitchen slide out, www.BendRepos.com Call Don @ new tires,under cover, bend and beyond real estate 20967 yeoman, bend or hwy. miles only,4 door 541-410-3823 fridge/freezer iceFixer Upper 75 SW maker, W/D combo, Roosevelt Bend 3/2 + 870 Interbath tub & Bonus, Detached shower, 50 amp pro3-car Garage-Work- Boats & Accessories pane gen & more! shop, Lot over 9000 Smokercraft $55,000. sq.ft., Bend Park-Old 13’ Mill District, Zoned 1985, good cond., 541-948-2310 RM for Multi Units, 15HP gas Evinrude Owner (541)390-5721 + Minakota 44 elec.

NOTICE:

Taurus 27.5’ 1988

$10,000 541-719-8444

541-385-5809

Big Tex Landscaping/ ATV Trailer, dual axle flatbed, 7’x16’, 7000 lb. GVW, all steel, $1400. 541-382-4115, or 541-280-7024.


E4 MONDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

AUTOS & TRANSPORTATION 908 - Aircraft, Parts and Service 916 - Trucks and Heavy Equipment 925 - Utility Trailers 927 - Automotive Trades 929 - Automotive Wanted 931 - Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 932 - Antique and Classic Autos 933 - Pickups 935 - Sport Utility Vehicles 940 - Vans 975 - Automobiles

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Automotive Parts, Service & Accessories

Antique & Classic Autos

Sport Utility Vehicles

GMC Denali 2003

Snow tires,16” studded, on 2007 Volvo wheels, $650, 541-382-4029 or 541-408-2331,

loaded with options. Exc. cond., snow tires and rims included. 130k hwy miles. $12,000. 541-419-4890.

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $ 500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for:

Plymouth Barracuda 1966, original car! 300 hp, 360 V8, centerlines, (Original 273 eng & wheels incl.) 541-593-2597 PROJECT CARS: Chevy 2-dr FB 1949 & Chevy Jeep Willys 1947,custom, $ Coupe 1950 - rolling 10 - 3 lines, 7 days small block Chevy, PS, chassis’s $1750 ea., $ OD,mags+ trailer.Swap 16 - 3 lines, 14 days Chevy 4-dr 1949, comfor backhoe.No am calls plete car, $1949; Ca(Private Party ads only) please. 541-389-6990 dillac Series 61 1950, 2 dr. hard top, complete Mini Cooper S Coun932 w/spare front clip., tryman AWD 2011, Antique & $3950, 541-382-7391 only 8500 mi., black/ Classic Autos black leather bucket VW Bugs 1968 & 970, seats, all options & VW Baja Bug 1968, packages except naviall good cond., Make gation, same as new, offers. 541-389-2636 paid $37,500, sell $32,500, 541-848-2115

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Automobiles

Automobiles

Cadillac CTS Sedan 2007, 29K, auto, exc. cond, loaded, $17,900 OBO, 541-549-8828 Need to get an ad in ASAP? Fax it to 541-322-7253 The Bulletin Classiieds

541-385-5809

Cadillac Seville STS 2003 - just finished $4900 engine work by Certified GM mechanic. Has everything but navigation. Too many bells and whistles to list. I bought a new one. $6900 firm. 541-420-1283

Chrysler Sebring 2006 exc. cond, very low miles (38k), always garaged, transferable warranty incl. $8600 541-330-4087

Chevy

C-20

VW Karman Ghia 1970, good cond., new upholstery and convertible top. $10,000. 541-389-2636

Pickup

1969, all orig. Turbo 44; VW Thing 1974, good auto 4-spd, 396, model CST /all options, orig. owner, $24,000, 541-923-6049

cond. Extremely Rare! Only built in 1973 & 1974. $8,000. 541-389-2636 933

Pickups

Chevy Wagon 1957, 3/4 ton 4x4, 4-dr., complete, Chevy 1995, extended cab, $15,000 OBO, trades, long box, grill guard, please call running boards, bed 541-420-5453. rails & canopy, 178K miles, $4800 obo. Chrysler 300 Coupe 208-301-3321 (Bend) 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, Chevy Silverado frame on rebuild, re1500 2000, 4WD, painted original blue, auto, X-cab, heated original blue interior, leather seats, tow original hub caps, exc. pkg, chrome brush chrome, asking $9000 guard, exc. cond., or make offer. runs great, 130K mi., 541-385-9350. $9500, 541-389-5579.

Tick, Tock Tick, Tock... ...don’t let time get away. Hire a professional out of The Bulletin’s “Call A Service Professional” Directory today!

Chrysler SD 4-Door 1930, CDS Royal Standard, 8-cylinder, body is good, needs some restoration, runs, taking bids, 541-383-3888, 541-815-3318

FIAT 1800 1978, 5-spd, door panels w/flowers & hummingbirds, white soft top & hard top. Just reduced to $3,750. 541-317-9319 or 541-647-8483

Ford Galaxie 500 1963, 2 dr. hardtop,fastback, 390 v8,auto, pwr. steer & radio (orig),541-419-4989 Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199

Ford F250 XLT 4x4 Lariat, 1990, red, 80K original miles, 4” lift with 39’s, well maintained, $4000 obo. 541-419-5495

Ford Ranger 1999, 4x4, 71K, X-cab, XLT, auto, 4.0L, $7900 OBO. 541-388-0232

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $1950. 541-419-5480.

Ford Ranchero 1979

with 351 Cleveland modified engine. Body is in excellent condition, $2500 obo. 541-420-4677

RAM 2500 2003, 5.7L hemi V8, hd, auto, cruise, am / fm / cd. $8400 obro. 541-420-3634 / 390-1285 935

Ford T-Bird 1966 390 engine, power everything, new paint, 54K original miles, runs great, excellent cond. in & out. Asking $8,500. 541-480-3179

Sport Utility Vehicles

Buick Enclave 2008 CXL AWD, V-6, black, clean, mechanically sound, 82k miles. $23,900. Call 541-815-1216

Chevy Tahoe LS 2001 4x4. 120K mi, Power seats, Tow Pkg, 3rd GMC ½ ton 1971, Only row seating, extra $19,700! Original low tires, CD, privacy tintmile, exceptional, 3rd ing, upgraded rims. owner. 951-699-7171 Fantastic cond. $7995 Contact Timm at 541-408-2393 for info or to view vehicle. Mercury Monterrey 1965, Exc. All original, 4-dr. sedan, in storage last 15 yrs., 390 Ford Excursion High Compression 2005, 4WD, diesel, engine, new tires & liexc. cond., $18,900, cense, reduced to call 541-923-0231. $2850, 541-410-3425.

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads The Bulletin Toyota Camry XLE 1994 V6, 4 dr, leather interior, AM/FM radio CD/Tape player, sunroof, auto., ps/pb, cruise, A/C, very clean, great condition, $3150. 541-593-2134 Advertise your car! Add A Picture!

Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

You’ll ind it in The Bulletin Classiieds

Toyota 4Runner 4WD 1986, auto, 2 dr., needs work $995, 541-923-7384

541-385-5809 Kia Rio 2009! Black #556497 $11,995

541-598-3750

aaaoregonautosource.com

Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited 2005, fully loaded, sunroof, heated leather seats, new tires, GPS, always garaged, 127K 1 owner miles, maint. Toyota 4-Runner 4x4 Ltd, records, $9900, 2006, Salsa Red pearl, 541-593-9908. 49,990 miles, exlnt cond, professionally detailed, Mitsubishi 3000 GT $22,900. 541-390-7649 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. 940 $9500. 541-788-8218. Vans

Chevy Astro Cargo Van 2001,

Toyota Prius 2008 Touring w/leather, 6 CD/ MP3, GPS, bluetooth, snow tires on rims, new headlamps & windshield 47,700 miles, clean, $18,200 541-408-5618 Need help ixing stuff? Call A Service Professional ind the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com Toyotas: 1999 Avalon 254k; 1996 Camry, 98k, 4 cyl. Lots of miles left in these cars. Price? You tell me! I’d guess $2000-$4000. Your servant, Bob at 541-318-9999, no charge for looking. Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

Looking for your next employee?

pw, pdl, great cond., business car, well maint, regular oil changes, $4500, please call 541-633-5149

Nissan Altima 3.5SR 2012, 13,200 mi., exc. cond., 6-cyl., 270HP, 8-way power driver seat, 60/40 rear seat, leather steering wheel with audio controls, Dodge Caravan AM/FM/CD/AUX with 1999, regular Bose speakers, A/C, oil/trans. service, Bluetooth, USB, back new battery/tires, up camera, heated alloy wheels. 222K front seats, power $2,000. Cash only moonroof & more. In 541-410-1246. Bend, below Blue Book at $21,955, Ford Arrowstar 1989 (317) 966-2189 $400 or best offer. 541-977-4391

Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

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The Bulletin

Automobiles

To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

Ford Super Duty F-250 Audi Q5 2011, 3.2L, SLine Blk, 270 hp V6, 2001, 4X4, very good auto/man 6spd trans; shape, V10 eng, $7900 AWD NAV, 20" whls, OBO. 541-815-9939 21k mi, exceptional $43,500. Call/text 541-480-9931 International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $1950. 541-419-5480.

Toyota Camry’s 1984, $1200 OBO, 1985 $1400 OBO, 1986 parts car, $500; call for details, 541-548-6592

looking for?

Porsche Cayenne 2004, 86k, immac, dealer maint’d, loaded, now $17000. 503-459-1580

Audi S4 Cabriolet 2005 49K mi, red w/charcoal interior, 2 sets tires, exc. cond., $19,950 firm. 541-350-5373. Buicks! 1996 Regal, 87k; 1997 LeSabre, 112k; and others! You’ll not find nicer Buicks $3500 & up. One look’s worth a thousand words. Call Bob, 541-318-9999. for an appt. and take a drive in a 30 mpg. car

Porsche 911 1974, low mi., complete motor/ trans. rebuild, tuned suspension, int. & ext. refurb., oil cooling, shows new in & out, perf. mech. cond. Much more! $28,000 541-420-2715 PORSCHE 914 1974, Roller (no engine), lowered, full roll cage, 5-pt harnesses, racing seats, 911 dash & instruments, decent shape, very cool! $1699. 541-678-3249 The Bulletin’s “Call A Service Professional” Directory is all about meeting your needs. Call on one of the professionals today!

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Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the ARNOLD IRRIGATION classiieds! Ask about our DISTRICT Super Seller rates! ZONES 2, 3 AND 5

Cadillac El Dorado 1994, Total cream Subaru Outback 2002, 1 owner, garaged, all oppuff, body, paint, trunk tions except leather, as showroom, blue $7500, 541-318-8668. leather, $1700 wheels w/snow tires although FIND IT! car has not been wet BUY IT! in 8 years. On trip to SELL IT! Boise avg. 28.5 mpg., $5400, 541-593-4016. The Bulletin Classiieds

What are you Chev Corvair Monza convertible,1964, new top & tranny, runs great, exlnt cruising car! $5500 obo. 541-420-5205

Subaru Forester 2004 Turbo, 5-spd manual, studded tires & wheels, chains, Thule ski box, 67K miles, perfect! $13,950. 541-504-8316

The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subject to FRAUD. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Arnold Irrigation District is accepting nominations for candidates for Board of Directors for Zones 2, 3 and 5. Zone 2 is a one year term, commencing at the first board meeting in January 2013 until the first board meeting in January 2014. Zone 3 and 5 are three year terms, commencing at the first board meeting in January 2013 until the first board meeting in January 2016. Qualifications are as follows: Must be 18 years of age or older; must be the owner of a water right within the Zone; must live within the Zone; must live within the State of Oregon, must submit a petition, signed by 10 qualified voters with Arnold Irrigation District water rights within the Zone, to the District office by October 9, 2012. Petitions can be obtained from the Arnold Irrigation District office. If only one petition is received for the Zone, that petitioner will be certified as having been nominated and elected for that Zone. The receipt of two or more petitions for the Zone will require an official election to be held on the November 13, 2012 date. Contact Arnold Irrigation District, 541-382-7664. LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES PROBATE DEPARTMENT. Estate of EDWARD CHANCE, JR., Deceased. Case No. 12PB0074. NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative. All persons having claims against the Estate are required to present them, with vouchers attached, to the undersigned Personal Representative at Karnopp Petersen LLP, 1201 NW Wall Street, Suite 300, Bend, Oregon 97701-1957, within four months after the date of first publication of this notice, or the claims may be barred. All persons whose rights may be affected by the proceedings may obtain additional information from the records of the court, the Personal Representative or the attorneys for the Personal Representative, who are Karnopp Petersen LLP, 1201 NW Wall Street, Suite 300, Bend, Oregon 97701-1957. DATED and first published October 1, 2012. Irma E. Brosig, Personal Representative, FAX: (541) 388-5410. PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE: Irma E. Brosig, 33329 N. Santiam Hwy., Gates, Oregon 97346. ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE: KARNOPP PETERSEN LLP, Thomas J. Sayeg, OSB# 873805, tjs@karnopp.com, 1201 NW Wall Street, Suite 300, Bend, OR 97701-1957, TEL: (541) 382-3011, FAX: (541) 388-5410. Of Attorneys for Personal Representative LEGAL NOTICE The Tillicum Village Homeowners Association is required by agreement with the City of Bend to convert its non-potable irrigation system to the potable City water system by April 2015. The Tillicum Village Board of Directors is seeking bids from qualified irrigation design and construction contractors to develop plans for this conversion complete with specifications and cost estimates. The successful bider will also be required to provide installation of the approved plan. A pre-bid meeting will be held for all interested bidders at the Deschutes Downtown Bend Library on Wednesday, October 10, 2012. from 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. Site visits are encouraged both prior and after the pre-bid meeting. Questions may be directed to the Chairman of the Tillicum Village Water Conversion Committee, Deak Preble at (541) 388-3366.

S41026 kk

BOATS & RVs 805 - Misc. Items 850 - Snowmobiles 860 - Motorcycles And Accessories 865 - ATVs 870 - Boats & Accessories 875 - Watercraft 880 - Motorhomes 881 - Travel Trailers 882 - Fifth Wheels 885 - Canopies and Campers 890 - RV’s for Rent

TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809 975

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE The Trustee under the terms of the Trust Deed described herein, at the direction of the Beneficiary, hereby elects to sell the property described in the Trust Deed to satisfy the obligations secured thereby. Pursuant to ORS 86.745, the following information is provided: 1.PARTIES: Grantor: JOSEPH FILBEN AND AMIE FILBEN. Trustee:FIRST AMERICAN INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON. Successor Trustee:NANCY K. CARY. Beneficiary:WORLD SAVINGS BANK, FSB. 2.DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: The real property is described as follows: Lot 32, DESCHUTES RIVER CROSSING PHASE 2, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. 3.RECORDING. The Trust Deed was recorded as follows: Date Recorded: June 20, 2006. Recording No.: 2006-42371 Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 4.DEFAULT. The Grantor or any other person obligated on the Trust Deed and Promissory Note secured thereby is in default and the Beneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed for failure to pay: Monthly payments in the amount of $1,040.30 each, due the first of each month, for the months of August 2011 through June 2012; plus late charges and advances; plus any unpaid real property taxes or liens, plus interest. 5.AMOUNT DUE. The amount due on the Note which is secured by the Trust Deed referred to herein is: Principal balance in the amount of $206,982.48; plus interest at an adjustable rate pursuant to the terms of the Promissory Note from July 1, 2011; plus late charges of $511.81; plus advances and foreclosure attorney fees and costs. 6.SALE OF PROPERTY. The Trustee hereby states that the property will be sold to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed. A Trustee's Notice of Default and Election to Sell Under Terms of Trust Deed has been recorded in the Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 7.TIME OF SALE. Date:November 15, 2012. Time:11:00 a.m. Place:Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon. 8.RIGHT TO REINSTATE. Any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the Trustee conducts the sale, to have this foreclosure dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, by curing any other default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed and by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with the trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amount provided in ORS 86.753. You may reach the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at 503-684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be available if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.org. Any questions regarding this matter should be directed to Lisa Summers, Paralegal, (541) 686-0344 (TS #17368.30988). DATED: July 9, 2012. /s/ Nancy K. Cary. Nancy K. Cary, Successor Trustee, Hershner Hunter, LLP, P.O. Box 1475, Eugene, OR 97440.

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LEGAL NOTICE AMENDED TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE (after release from stay) The trust deed to be foreclosed pursuant to Oregon law is referred to as follows (the "Trust Deed"): Grantor: Michael E. Kasper and Michele E. Kasper. Trustee: Deschutes County Title Company. Beneficiary: Rivermark Community Credit Union. Date: June 30, 2008. Recording Date: July 8, 2008. Recording Reference: 2008-29079. County of Recording: Deschutes County. The Successor Trustee is Miles D. Monson and the mailing address of the Successor Trustee is: Miles D. Monson, "TRUSTEE", Anderson & Monson, P.C., Cascade Square, Suite 450, 8625 SW Cascade Avenue, Beaverton, OR 97008. The Trust Deed covers the following described real property in the County of Deschutes and State of Oregon, ("the Property"): See Exhibit "A" attached hereto and incorporated herein which describes the Property The default for which foreclosure is made is: Exhibit A - PARCEL I: Beginning at the Northeast corner of the Southwest quarter of the Northeast quarter of the Southeast quarter of Section 16, Township 22 South, Range 10 East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon; thence South 0°21’ West, 331.84 feet to the Southeast corner of the North half of said Southwest quarter of the Northeast quarter of the Southeast quarter of said Section 16; thence South 89°10' West along the South line of said North half, 131.31 feet; thence North 0°21’ East parallel with the East line of said Southwest quarter, 331.76 feet to the North line of said Southwest quarter; thence North 89°08' East, 131.31 feet to the point of beginning. EXCEPTING THEREFROM the North 30 feet for roadway easement purposes. PARCEL II: Beginning at a point on the North line of the Southwest quarter of the Northeast quarter of the Southeast quarter of Section 16, Township 22 South, Range 10 East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, said point being 131.31 feet South 89°08 West from the Northeast corner of said Southwest quarter of the Northeast quarter of the Southeast quarter of said Section; thence South 0°21' West parallel with the East line of said Southwest quarter, 331.76 feet to the South line of the North half of said Southwest quarter; thence South 89°10' West along the South line of said North half, 131.39 feet; thence North 0°21' East, 331.67 feet to the North line of said Southwest quarter; thence North 89°08 East, 131.39 feet to the point of beginning. EXCEPTING THEREFROM the North 30 feet for roadway easement purposes. The Grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly installments of $466.99 beginning April 1, 2011 through the installment due November 1, 2011, plus late charges. The sum owing on the obligation that the Trust Deed secures (the "Obligation") is: $69,906.99, plus interest of $2,752.61 through October 1, 2011, plus interest on the principal sum of $69,906.99 at a variable rate of interest which is at the rate of 6.75 percent per annum from October 2, 2011 until paid, together with Trustee's fees, attorney's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the Trust Deed. The Notice of Default and original Notice of Sale given pursuant thereto stated that the Property would be sold on September 11, 2012 at the hour of 1:00 P.M. at the Deschutes County Courthouse, Front West Entrance, 1164 NW Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes and State of Oregon. Subsequent to the recording of the Notice of Default the original sale proceedings were stayed by the Grantors filing a chapter 7 bankruptcy case on June 7, 2012. The Beneficiary did not participate in obtaining such stay. The stay terminated on September 11, 2012, when an Order Re: Relief From Debtor Stay was signed by the court. The Property will be sold to satisfy the Obligation. The date, time and place of the sale is: Date: DECEMBER 12, 2012. Time: 1:00 P.M. Place: DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, FRONT WEST ENTRANCE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, CITY OF BEND, COUNTY OF DESCHUTES AND STATE OF OREGON. RIGHT TO CURE - The right exists under ORS 86.753 to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by doing all of the following at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale: (1) Paying to the Beneficiary the entire amount then due (other than such portion as would not then be due, had no default occurred); (2) Curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the Trust Deed; and (3) Paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with Trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "Grantor" includes any successor in interest to the Grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by the Trust Deed, and the words "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. We are a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information we obtain will be used to collect the debt. Cashier's checks for the foreclosure sale must be made payable to Miles D. Monson, Successor Trustee. Bankruptcy Information: The personal liability of the grantors to pay the debt owed to Beneficiary was discharged in the grantors' chapter 7 bankruptcy case, however, the Trust Deed lien against the real property described above remains in existence and is in full force and effect. Beneficiary will not seek to enforce any debt obligation as a personal liability of the grantors as a discharge order was entered in their bankruptcy case. Beneficiary is merely foreclosing its lien which was not be effected by any bankruptcy discharge. DATED: September 27, 2012. /s/ Miles D. Monson. Miles D. Monson, Successor Trustee, Cascade Square - Suite 450, 8625 SW Cascade Avenue, Beaverton, Oregon 97008, Telephone: (503) 646-9230.


simple fast delicious

WARM UP TO FALL WITH THESE HEARTY SOUPS

OCTOBER 2012

dashrecipes.com

QUICK STIR-FRY! SESAME-HONEY CHICKEN

FUN TREATS LET KIDS DO THE DECORATING!

VISIT DASH FOR A SPERECIPES.COM CIAL TREA T FROM

Featuring Tips and Recipes From ©฀PARADE฀Publications฀2012.฀All฀rights฀reserved.


Challenged by chicken? Baffled by beef? Exhausted with eggs? Add a bold seasoning statement with all-natural Mrs. Dash! A tasty blend of 14 herbs and spices, Mrs. Dash brings surprisingly delicious, salt-free flavor to any dish. For quick and easy recipes, visit mrsdash.com.

Chicken Primavera Ingredients 𰀛𰀃𰀃𰀃𰁛𰁉𰁚𰁗𰀃𰀴𰁙𰁚𰀕𰀃𰀫𰁈𰁚𰁏𰂎𰀃𰀳𰁌𰁔𰁖𰁕𰀃𰀷𰁌𰁗𰁗𰁌𰁙𰀃 𰀺𰁌𰁈𰁚𰁖𰁕𰁐𰁕𰁎𰀃𰀩𰁓𰁌𰁕𰁋 𰀛𰀃𰁉𰁖𰁕𰁌𰁓𰁌𰁚𰁚𰀓𰀃𰁚𰁒𰁐𰁕𰁓𰁌𰁚𰁚𰀃𰁊𰁏𰁐𰁊𰁒𰁌𰁕𰀃𰁉𰁙𰁌𰁈𰁚𰁛𰁚 𰀟𰀃 𰀃𰁖𰁡𰀃𰁍𰁙𰁖𰁡𰁌𰁕𰀃𰁔𰁐𰁟𰁌𰁋𰀃𰁝𰁌𰁎𰁌𰁛𰁈𰁉𰁓𰁌𰀃𰁔𰁌𰁋𰁓𰁌𰁠 𰀙𰀃𰀃𰁛𰁉𰁚𰁗𰀃𰁖𰁓𰁐𰁝𰁌𰀃𰁖𰁐𰁓

Directions 𰀘𰀕𰀃 𰀃𰀷𰁓𰁈𰁊𰁌𰀃𰁊𰁏𰁐𰁊𰁒𰁌𰁕𰀃𰁉𰁙𰁌𰁈𰁚𰁛𰁚𰀃𰁈𰁕𰁋𰀃𰁝𰁌𰁎𰁌𰁛𰁈𰁉𰁓𰁌𰀃𰁔𰁌𰁋𰁓𰁌𰁠𰀃 𰁐𰁕𰀃𰀙𰀃𰁚𰁌𰁗𰁈𰁙𰁈𰁛𰁌𰀃𰁉𰁖𰁞𰁓𰁚𰀕𰀃𰀻𰁖𰁚𰁚𰀃𰁌𰁈𰁊𰁏𰀃𰁞𰁐𰁛𰁏𰀃𰀘𰀃𰁛𰁉𰁚𰁗𰀃 𰁖𰁓𰁐𰁝𰁌𰀃𰁖𰁐𰁓𰀃𰁈𰁕𰁋𰀃𰀙𰀃𰁛𰁉𰁚𰁗𰀃𰀴𰁙𰁚𰀕𰀃𰀫𰁈𰁚𰁏𰂎𰀃𰀳𰁌𰁔𰁖𰁕𰀃𰀷𰁌𰁗𰁗𰁌𰁙𰀃 𰀺𰁌𰁈𰁚𰁖𰁕𰁐𰁕𰁎𰀃𰀩𰁓𰁌𰁕𰁋𰀕 𰀙𰀕𰀃 𰀃𰀳𰁈𰁠𰀃𰁊𰁏𰁐𰁊𰁒𰁌𰁕𰀃𰁖𰁕𰀃𰁈𰀃𰀠𰀃𰁟𰀃𰀠𰀃𰁐𰁕𰁊𰁏𰀃𰁙𰁖𰁈𰁚𰁛𰁐𰁕𰁎𰀃𰁗𰁈𰁕𰀕𰀃𰀷𰁓𰁈𰁊𰁌𰀃 𰁝𰁌𰁎𰁌𰁛𰁈𰁉𰁓𰁌𰁚𰀃𰁐𰁕𰀃𰁈𰁕𰀃𰁖𰁝𰁌𰁕𰁗𰁙𰁖𰁖𰁍𰀃𰁊𰁈𰁚𰁚𰁌𰁙𰁖𰁓𰁌𰀃𰁋𰁐𰁚𰁏𰀕

©2012 B&G Foods, Inc. Mrs. Dash is a Registered Trademark of B&G Foods North America, Inc.

𰀚𰀕𰀃 𰀃𰀷𰁓𰁈𰁊𰁌𰀃𰁉𰁖𰁛𰁏𰀃𰁐𰁕𰀃𰀚𰀞𰀜𰂇𰀭𰀃𰁗𰁙𰁌𰁏𰁌𰁈𰁛𰁌𰁋𰀃𰁖𰁝𰁌𰁕𰀃 𰁈𰁕𰁋𰀃𰁊𰁖𰁖𰁒𰀃𰀚𰀜𰀔𰀛𰀜𰀃𰁔𰁐𰁕𰁜𰁛𰁌𰁚𰀓𰀃𰁛𰁜𰁙𰁕𰁐𰁕𰁎𰀃𰁌𰁈𰁊𰁏𰀃𰁈𰁍𰁛𰁌𰁙𰀃 𰀙𰀗𰀃𰁔𰁐𰁕𰁜𰁛𰁌𰁚𰀕 𰀛𰀕𰀃 𰀃𰀷𰁓𰁈𰁛𰁌𰀃𰀛𰀃𰁚𰁌𰁙𰁝𰁐𰁕𰁎𰁚𰀓𰀃𰁚𰁗𰁖𰁖𰁕𰁐𰁕𰁎𰀃𰁝𰁌𰁎𰁌𰁛𰁈𰁉𰁓𰁌𰁚𰀃𰁖𰁝𰁌𰁙𰀃 𰁊𰁏𰁐𰁊𰁒𰁌𰁕𰀃𰁉𰁙𰁌𰁈𰁚𰁛𰁚𰀕𰀃𰀫𰁌𰁓𰁐𰁊𰁐𰁖𰁜𰁚𰀃𰁞𰁐𰁛𰁏𰀃𰁙𰁐𰁊𰁌𰀕

The salt-free flavor statement.™

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board Tips, Tricks & Tools of the Kitchen

Q: I went apple-picking with my kids last weekend and now have more apples than I know what to do with. Any ideas? Tina Aiello, via email

Four easy steps to a smooth surface worthy of a bake shop 1

A: One or two! Try this recipe for a savory snack that can also be served as an appetizer.

Before you start spreading, measure out the frosting for each layer to ensure that you have enough to finish the job.

Easy-Cheesy Apple Tart Hands-on: 10 min Total: 40 min Serves: 6 ALL PHOTOS, UNLESS OTHERWISE CREDITED: ANDREW MCCAUL; FOOD STYLING, PAUL GRIMES; PROP STYLING, TIZIANA AGNELLO. THIS PAGE, BON APPÉTIT PHOTOS: ZACH DESART; FOOD STYLING, KAY CHUN. NUTRITION CONSULTING/ANALYSIS: JEANINE SHERRY, M.S., R.D.

THE BEST WAY TO ICE A CAKE?

from 2

3 3 2 1

onions, sliced thin apples, sliced thin, divided Tbsp olive oil (13.8-oz) can refrigerated pizza dough 1 ⁄2 cup crumbled goat cheese 3 Tbsp chopped fresh parsley 1. Preheat oven to 425°F. 2. In a large skillet, cook onions and half the apples in oil until soft and beginning to brown. 3. On a parchment-lined baking sheet, press dough into a large rectangle. Prick with a fork in several places. Bake for 10 minutes or until golden. Spread cooked mixture over crust.

Q: I’m getting a little bored with the coleslaw I always make. Do you have a recipe for a cabbage salad that’s a bit out of the ordinary? T. Brandon, via email A: This delightful salad uses Napa cabbage (also called Chinese cabbage), which is widely available year-round. Look for firm heads with crisp, green-tinged leaves.

Crunchy Coleslaw with Buttermilk Dressing Hands-on: 20 min Total: 20 min Serves: 4

BON ´ APPETIT

Work your way from the bottom of the cake to the top, using the tip of your spatula to spread. Leave a lip of icing on the top layer to create a seamless edge.

3

Sprinkle with cheese. Broil for 1 minute. Top with remaining apple slices and parsley. Cut into squares.

⁄2 cup well-shaken buttermilk 2 Tbsp mayonnaise 2 Tbsp cider vinegar 2 tsp minced shallot 1 Tbsp sugar 1 ⁄2 tsp salt 1 ⁄4 tsp black pepper 3 Tbsp finely chopped chives 1 lb Napa cabbage, cored and thinly sliced crosswise (about 4 cups) 6 radishes, diced 2 celery ribs, thinly sliced diagonally 1

PER SERVING: 100 cal, 8g carbs, 2g protein, 6g fat, 5mg chol, 410mg sodium, 2g fiber

PER SERVING: 290 cal, 45g carbs, 8g protein, 9g fat, 5mg chol, 520mg sodium, 3g fiber

1. In a large bowl, whisk buttermilk, mayonnaise, vinegar, shallot, sugar, salt, and pepper until sugar dissolves. Add chives. 2. Toss cabbage, radishes, and celery with dressing.

from

GOURMET

Spread the top layer with frosting until it meets the edge. To create the final look, smooth the top entirely or give it waves for texture.

4

Use leftover icing to smooth over any imperfections on the sides and top. You want your cake to look great from all angles. To keep it out of harm’s way, always store a frosted cake under a dome. dashrecipes.com OCTOBER 2012

3

©฀PARADE฀Publications฀2012.฀All฀rights฀reserved.


EASY ENTERTAINING

5

MONSTER BASH Start with a batch of cupcakes and a can of frosting—then let the decorating fun begin!

GOBBLIN’ GOBLIN

Ice cupcake with white frosting tinted with green food coloring. Make eyes from mini Oreos (tops removed), green Sprees, and a dot of black icing. Use a Circus Peanut for a nose, candy corn for hair, and wax gummy teeth for a mouth.

1

MR. BONES Spread canned chocolate frosting on cupcake. Insert a white 6-inch lollipop stick into center. Thread 3 yogurtcovered pretzels onto stick, holding each in place with a dab of white frosting. Press 2 small jawbreakers into a marshmallow to make eyes. Draw a mouth with black decorating gel. Place marshmallow on stick. Decorate cupcake with small candy bones.

2

WEB MASTER Spread cupcake with vanilla frosting. Squeeze concentric circles of black icing on top. Use a toothpick to pull icing from center to outside edge to create a web pattern. Position a green Ghost Dots gumdrop to form the spider body; make legs out of green decorating icing.

4

6 3 TO DIE FOR Top cupcake with ith chocolate icing. Cut a marshmallow Circus Peanut in half lengthwise, then trim so halves look like arms and hands (including fingers). Decorate with gel icing and arrange on cupcake. Take a Grasshopper cookie, write “RIP” on it, and place on cupcake as tombstone. bstone.

4

FRESH OFF THE VINE Tint white icing deep orange; frost cupcake. Sprinkle with orange decorating sugar. Use a toothpick to etch lines into

frosting, as on a pumpkin. Arrange a small piece of a pretzel twist on top to create stem. Cut up a Green Apple Frootie and shape to look like leaves. Press into cupcake near stem.

Let Dash editor Shannon McCook show you how to make these Franken–Kit Kats, and see what other tricks she has up her sleeve for Halloween. Watch the video at dashrecipes.com

HATS OFF! Tint white icing orange and frost cupcake. Place a Fudge Stripes Dark Chocolate cookie on top. Attach a (trimmed) chocolate sugar cone to cookie using a squiggle of green decorating icing.

7

GO BATTY Frost cupcake with chocolate icing. Make bat head out of a mini Oreo. Frost it black. Make eyes from tiny yellow candies and a mouth from a red sprinkle. For ears, cut a black jellybean in half; affix to head with black decorating icing. Cut a chocolate wafer cookie in half. Attach halves on either side of head for wings.

OCTOBER 2012 dashrecipes.com

©฀PARADE฀Publications฀2012.฀All฀rights฀reserved.


The #1 kitchen is German-engineered. Fill your kitchen with the appliances most frequently recommended by a leading consumer publication. Receive a rebate of up to

15

%

when you purchase three or more Bosch kitchen appliances via a Bosch VISA® prepaid card.* To find out more, scan this MS tag. Get the free mobile app at http://gettag.mobi

Bosch delivers top performance through top technology in every appliance, and right now, when you buy three or more Bosch kitchen appliances, you’ll get a rebate of up to 15%. There has never been a better time to upgrade your home with a Bosch kitchen. Visit your local Lowe’s to find out how German engineering and European styling are the perfect upgrade to your home. www.lowes.com/bosch Offer valid from September 1, 2012 through January 5, 2013.

© 2012 BSH Home Appliances Corporation. ©2012 Lowe’s Companies, Inc. All rights reserved. Lowe’s, the gable design, and Never Stop Improving are trademarks of LF, LLC. All are used with permission. *Purchase at least three Ascenta, 300 series, 500 series or 800 series Bosch Appliances and receive a 10% reward of the purchase price or purchase at least three 800 Series Bosch Appliances and receive a 15% reward of the purchase price. Purchase price is actual net price paid on receipt after any discounts and excludes sales tax, installation, disposal or any other fees. All eligible appliances must be refl ected on the same sales receipt. Card can be used anywhere Visa debit cards are accepted. BFK891-14-102204-2

©฀PARADE฀Publications฀2012.฀All฀rights฀reserved.


SHOP SMART

Put Some Spice in Your Life We’ve taken the work out of making an Indian classic (but kept the fun) Chicken Tikka Masala Hands-on: 20 min Total: 1 hr Serves: 4 For chicken: 1 cup plain yogurt 2 Tbsp lemon juice 1 tsp cinnamon 1 tsp paprika 1 ⁄2 tsp cayenne pepper 1 ⁄4 tsp black pepper 1 tsp salt 11⁄2 lb boneless, skinless chicken breast, cut into 2-inch pieces For sauce: 2 tsp minced garlic 2 Tbsp butter 1 tsp cumin 1 tsp paprika 1 tsp salt 1 (8-oz) can tomato sauce 1 cup heavy cream For garnishes: 3 Tbsp chopped cilantro + White rice + Naan (Indian flatbread) 1. Whisk yogurt, lemon juice, cinnamon, paprika, cayenne, pepper, and salt. Add chicken, stir, and set aside for 30 minutes. 2. In a skillet, cook garlic in butter for 2 minutes. Add cumin, paprika, and salt. Cook 1 minute. Stir in tomato sauce and cream. Simmer, stirring, until the sauce is thick. 3. Discard marinade. Broil chicken until done. Stir into sauce. Top with cilantro. Serve with rice and naan.

PER SERVING: 490 cal, 7g carbs, 41g protein, 32g fat, 200mg chol, 1,190mg sodium, 1g fiber

Got tomato sauce? You’re in business! EGGPLANT PARMESAN Simmer Classico Tomato & Basil Sauce with canned diced tomatoes. Spoon over breaded, fried eggplant slices. Top with grated mozzarella. Bake 25 to 30 minutes at 350ºF.

6

BEEF ’N’ BEAN CHILI Sauté chopped onion and ground beef; drain. Add Hunt’s Tomato Sauce, drained kidney beans, canned diced tomatoes, and chili powder, salt, and pepper to taste. Cook 10 minutes or until hot.

SPEEDY ZITI & SAUSAGE Simmer sliced sweet Italian sausage, Del Monte Garlic & Onion Pasta Sauce, and chopped onion and bell pepper until sausage is done. Stir in cooked ziti. Top with Parmesan.

OCTOBER 2012 dashrecipes.com

©฀PARADE฀Publications฀2012.฀All฀rights฀reserved.


60,000

More than young children end up in emergency departments every year because they got into medicines while their parent or caregiver was not looking. Always put every medicine and vitamin up and away every time you use it. Also, program the Poison Help number into your phone: 1.800.222.1222.

To learn more, visit UpandAway.org ©฀PARADE฀Publications฀2012.฀All฀rights฀reserved.


A New Way TO CONQUER THE ENERGY GAP.

New!

REV ™ wraps from Hormel.® Made with real meat and real cheese for satisfying real energy.

In eight tasty flavors like Pepperoni Pizza and Ham & Cheese. Each with at least 15 grams of protein to make the most of the day. New REV™ wraps. Now available in your grocer’s lunchmeat case.

Fuel The Journey. ©2012 Hormel Foods, LLC

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SUPERFAST

STEWS & SOUPS

Hearty and filling— ideal for fall nights

from

EPICURIOUS .COM

Spicy Beef Stew Hands-on: 30 min Total: 40 min Serves: 4 4 Tbsp olive oil, divided 24 oz beef tenderloin, cut into 1-inch cubes 1 ⁄4 tsp salt 1 ⁄4 tsp black pepper

6 1 4 2 ⁄4 2 5

1

⁄3

1

large shallots, sliced lb baby carrots tsp ground cumin tsp pumpkin pie spice tsp cayenne Tbsp flour cups low-sodium beef broth cup chopped mint

1. Heat 2 Tbsp oil in a large nonstick skillet over high. Sprinkle beef with salt and pepper, add to skillet, and sauté until cooked to desired doneness, about 2 minutes for medium-rare.

PER SERVING: 530 cal, 30g carbs, 45g protein, 26g fat, 110mg chol, 910mg sodium, 8g fiber

2. Transfer beef to a bowl. Add remaining oil to skillet. Add shallots and carrots and sauté until starting to soften, about 3 minutes. Add all spices; stir for 30 seconds.

3. Add flour; stir for 30 seconds. Stir in broth and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium; simmer until carrots are just tender. 4. Return beef to skillet; cook until sauce thickens slightly, about 1 minute. Sprinkle with mint.

dashrecipes.com OCTOBER 2012

9

©฀PARADE฀Publications฀2012.฀All฀rights฀reserved.


STEWS & SOUPS Curried Pork Stew Hands-on: 25 min Total: 1 hr Serves: 6

Mediterranean Chicken Stew Hands-on: 30 min Total: 55 min Serves: 6 ⁄2 1 1 ⁄2 1 2 1 2 1 2 1 + 1

⁄2 tsp cayenne 2 (14-oz) cans reduced sodium chicken broth 1 ⁄2 tsp salt 1 ⁄4 tsp black pepper 11⁄2 cups baby carrots 1 ⁄2 (20-oz) package frozen butternut squash cubes, thawed + Sour cream for garnish (optional)

1 (3-lb) boneless pork shoulder, cut into 1-inch cubes 3 Tbsp canola oil 3 Granny Smith apples (2 chopped, 1 sliced very thin) 1 large onion, chopped 1 tsp curry powder 1 tsp coriander 1 tsp cumin

1

1. In a large pot, sauté pork in oil in several batches until browned. 2. Return all cooked meat to pot. Add chopped apple, onion, curry powder, coriander, cumin, and cayenne. Cook on medium, stirring, for 2 minutes. Add broth, salt, and pepper. Bring to a boil, reduce heat, and simmer, covered, for 1⁄2 hour.

3. Add carrots, reduce heat to low, and simmer for 20 minutes more. Add sliced apple and squash and cook for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally. When pork and vegetables are tender, remove pot from heat. Garnish each portion with sour cream, if desired. PER SERVING: 460 cal, 22g carbs, 37g protein, 25g fat, 130mg chol, 590mg sodium, 3g fiber

cup flour tsp salt, divided tsp black pepper, divided (3-lb) chicken, cut into pieces Tbsp olive oil chopped onion tsp chopped garlic (14-oz) can diced tomatoes small cans mushrooms, drained tsp dried oregano Hot cooked linguine

1. Combine flour, 1⁄2 tsp salt, and 1⁄4 tsp pepper. Coat chicken with flour mixture. 2. In a large skillet, heat oil for 30 seconds. Add chicken and brown on all sides. Remove chicken to a large bowl. 3. In same skillet, sauté onion and garlic for 3 minutes. Add tomatoes, mushrooms, 1 ⁄2 tsp salt, 1⁄4 tsp pepper, and oregano. Bring to a boil. Add chicken. Cover; simmer for 25 minutes or until done. Serve with linguine.

Find Tortellini Soup and 20 more warming recipes at dashrecipes .com/fall

PER SERVING: 670 cal, 12g carbs, 46g protein, 47g fat, 225mg chol, 820mg sodium, 2g fiber (excluding linguine)

1. In a large skillet, heat oil for 30 seconds on medium. Add onion, 1 cups reduced ⁄4 tsp salt, and pepper. sodium chicken Sauté for 5 minutes. broth Add carrots; sauté for Tbsp chopped dill 5 minutes. cup frozen peas 2. In a large slow and carrots, cooker, arrange thawed chicken. Sprinkle with 1 cups cooked ⁄4 tsp salt. Top with vermicelli, carrots, onions, and broken into bay leaf. 3-inch pieces

Slow Cooker Chicken Noodle Soup Hands-on: 30 min Total: 6½ hr Serves: 4 to 6 2 1 1 ⁄2 1 ⁄4 1 1

10

OCTOBER 2012 dashrecipes.com

Tbsp canola oil onion, chopped tsp salt, divided tsp black pepper cup baby carrots lb bone-in, skinless chicken thighs 11⁄2 lb bone-in, skinless chicken breasts 1 bay leaf

5

2 1

11⁄2

Add broth. Cover and cook on low for 6 hours. 3. Remove chicken from cooker. Cool. Dice chicken. Strain soup, discarding vegetables. In slow cooker, combine broth, chicken, dill, peas and carrots, and vermicelli. Cook on high for 10 minutes.

PER SERVING: 320 cal, 18g carbs, 36g protein, 11g fat, 95mg chol, 670mg sodium, 2g fiber

©฀PARADE฀Publications฀2012.฀All฀rights฀reserved.


All the sound without all the wires.

Bose Wave ®

Shown in Platinum White.

Just plug it in and hear what you’ve been missing. With the Bose ® Wave ® music system III, there are no stacks of components. No tangle of wires. No dials to adjust. Advanced Bose technologies work together to fill the room with the acclaimed performance that has made Bose the most respected name in sound. You enjoy clear, realistic sound that you may have only thought possible from a much larger, more complicated stereo. And the Wave® music system III also has a new FM/AM tuner for improved radio reception. New radio text for song and station information. Convenient new touch-top controls for on, off and snooze.

Shown in Titanium Silver with optional Multi-CD Changer.

®

music system III

And new dual alarms so you can set two different wake-up times. You enjoy an audio system like no other, an improvement on what was already the most highly acclaimed system in its class. A roomful of premium sound…not wires. With the Wave® music system III, you’ll experience the pleasures of Bose quality sound moments after you open the box. Everything you need is built in, including the radio tuner and a CD/MP3 CD player. You control them all with a convenient, credit card-style remote. You can also add the optional Multi-CD Changer to enjoy your music uninterrupted for hours on end. Try it for 30 days, risk-free. Experience the Wave® music system III in your own home risk-free for 30 days. Choose your favorite color: Platinum White, Graphite Gray or Titanium Silver. And when you call, ask about making 12 easy payments, with no interest charges from Bose.* So call now and order the Wave® music system III. You’ll soon discover how delightfully simple it is to enjoy Bose sound.

FREE SHIPPING with your order.

To order or learn more:

1-800-276-2073, ext. TZ176

www.Bose.com/WMS

*Bose payment plan available on orders of $299-$1500 paid by major credit card. Separate financing offers may be available for select products. See website for details. Down payment is 1/12 the product price plus applicable tax and shipping charges, charged when your order is shipped. Then, your credit card will be billed for 11 equal monthly installments beginning approximately one month from the date your order is shipped, with 0% APR and no interest charges from Bose. Credit card rules and interest may apply. U.S. residents only. Limit one active financing program per customer. ©2012 Bose Corporation. The distinctive design of the Wave® music system is a registered trademark of Bose Corporation. Financing and free shipping offers not to be combined with other offers or applied to previous purchases, and subject to change without notice. Offers valid 10/1/12-10/31/12. Risk-free refers to 30-day trial only, requires product purchase and does not include return shipping. Delivery is subject to product availability.

©฀PARADE฀Publications฀2012.฀All฀rights฀reserved.


LABEL TO TABLE

Wok Star Stumped on what to make for a school-night dinner? Kids will eat this one up!

Find meals ready in 30 minutes or less on our new Simple Kitchen blog at dashrecipes .com/simple

Sesame-Honey Chicken Stir-Fry start with

FROZEN VEGETABLES

Hands-on: 20 min Total: 20 min Serves: 4 ⁄4 2 2 3 11⁄4

cup honey Tbsp rice vinegar Tbsp soy sauce Tbsp sesame oil, divided lb boneless, skinless chicken breasts, sliced into ¼-by-1-inch strips 1 Tbsp chopped ginger (from a jar)

1

12

OCTOBER 2012 dashrecipes.com

2 tsp minced garlic (from a jar) 1 (16-oz) package frozen stir-fry vegetables such as Birds Eye asparagus stir-fry 3 cups hot cooked rice 2 Tbsp black sesame seeds 1. In a small bowl, whisk honey, vinegar, and soy sauce. 2. In a wok, heat 2 Tbsp oil over medium-high for 1 minute. Add chicken and stir-fry for 3 minutes. Remove to a plate.

3. Add remaining oil, ginger, and garlic to wok. Stir-fry for 30 seconds. Add vegetables and cook for 5 minutes, then add soy mixture; cook until mixture boils. Add chicken and stir-fry for about 3 minutes or until chicken is thoroughly cooked. 4. Serve over rice, sprinkled with black sesame seeds.

PER SERVING: 540 cal, 59g carbs, 38g protein, 16g fat, 85mg chol, 550mg sodium, 2g fiber

©฀PARADE฀Publications฀2012.฀All฀rights฀reserved.


Look Who’s Coming To Town! Join Chef Jon Ashton, from PARADE and dash, at a brand new live cooking event. Enjoy a fun-filled day of cooking tips, great food, and a chance to win fabulous prizes!

Download a personal message from Chef Jon

Check out dashrecipes.com/tour today for the tour schedule and to purchase tickets.

NATIONAL SPONSORS: ©฀PARADE฀Publications฀2012.฀All฀rights฀reserved.


SWEET ENDINGS

Dessert to Curl Up To Have a spoonful of old-fashioned comfort

For a Dark Chocolate Chunk variation and more of our faves, go to dashrecipes .com/breadpudding

Bread Pudding with Dried Fruit Hands-on: 15 min Total: 1 hr 5 min Serves: 8 41⁄2 cups stale French bread, torn into large pieces, crusts on 1 ⁄2 cup raisins 1 ⁄2 cup chopped dried apricots 4 eggs 21⁄2 cups whole milk 1 ⁄2 cup half-andhalf 3 ⁄4 cup sugar 11⁄2 tsp vanilla 14

OCTOBER 2012 dashrecipes.com

extract 1 tsp cinnamon 1 ⁄4 tsp salt For topping: 3 Tbsp sugar 1 ⁄2 tsp cinnamon 1. Preheat oven to 350°F and butter a shallow 2-quart baking dish. 2. Arrange bread in dish. Sprinkle raisins and apricots on top. 3. In a large bowl, beat eggs until frothy. Add milk, half-and-half, sugar, vanilla, cinnamon, and salt. Pour over

bread, pressing gently to submerge slices. 4. Combine topping ingredients; sprinkle on pudding. 5. Place a baking sheet with a 2-inch rim in oven; set baking dish on sheet. Add water to a depth of 1 inch. 6. Bake for 50 minutes or until a toothpick inserted into center comes out clean. Cool. Serve with whipped cream, if desired.

PER SERVING: 310 cal, 55g carbs, 11g protein, 6g fat, 105mg chol, 340mg sodium, 1g fiber

©฀PARADE฀Publications฀2012.฀All฀rights฀reserved.


®

®

Warm up your fall with this simple, sweet dessert using Eggo® Seasons Pumpkin Spice Waffles, available for a limited time only. For a fun twist during the holidays, replace the heavy cream with eggnog. 12 cooked Eggo® Seasons Pumpkin Spice Waffles 2 cups whole milk 2 cups heavy cream 8 egg yolks 3 /4 cup sugar 1 tbsp. vanilla essence 3 tsp. orange zest

Directions Preheat the oven to 325° and butter a 9 x 13-inch oval baking dish. In a large bowl, whisk together the milk, cream, yolks, sugar, vanilla, and zest. Arrange the waffles in a baking dish (large enough to hold waffles) and pour the custard mixture over the top of them. Press the waffles down into the custard and allow the waffles to soak up mixture for at least 30 minutes. Cover with foil and bake. Check after 30 minutes to see if custard is setting. Remove foil and bake for an additional 10–15 minutes. To check doneness, poke the center with a knife to be sure there is no liquid present. Once custard is set, remove dish from oven. Please note the pudding will continue to cook after it has been removed from oven. Let cool and serve. Serves 4. Recipe created by Chef Jon Ashton

TM

48-ct. Eggo® Seasons Pumpkin Spice Waffles Available for a limited time—only at Sam’s Club®. Visit SamsClub.com/meals for more delicious ways to use this fall favorite. ®, ™, © 2012 Kellogg NA Co.

© 2012 Sam’s Club

©฀PARADE฀Publications฀2012.฀All฀rights฀reserved.


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Bulletin Daily Paper 10/01/12  

The Bulletin Daily print edition for Monday October 1, 2012

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