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THURSDAY

September 27, 2012

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Deschutes commissioners set time line to move inmates By Mac McLean The Bulletin

Deschutes County commissioners set July 1, 2013, as the date they’d like to reduce overcrowding at the 228-bed adult jail off Jamison Street in Bend by moving inmates to a juvenile detention facility a few hundred feet away on Northwest Britta Street. Now that they’ve set a time line for the transition, which will give Sheriff Larry Blanton and his officers 10 months to start preparing for the move, the commissioners’ next task is to figure out where the juvenile detainees at the Britta Street facility will go. Earlier this month, commissioners rejected a plan to add 144 beds to the county jail by selling $10 million worth of bonds. They talked about moving inmates into the juvenile facility, which has space for 88 adults, but took no formal action until Wednesday afternoon. “This is a public safety issue that we keep mulling around with and I’m getting sick and tired of it,” Blanton said Wednesday. One option for the juvenile detainees is to rent space for at Northern Oregon Regional Correctional Facilities in The Dalles. But no one on the three-member board of commissioners favored that because of its cost and the logistics involved with transporting the youths. See Jail / A5

OSU-CASCADES

$1M closer to a 4-year school • Eugene-based trust’s donation is a big boost for $4M fundraising effort Charitable Trust, a Eugene-based organization that supports higher education, health care and the arts. The money will go toward purchasing, renovating or building facilities that will make the expansion a reality. With the Tykeson donation, OSU-Cascades has raised $2.8 million toward its goal of at least $4 million in private funds. That

By Ben Botkin The Bulletin

Oregon State UniversityCascades Campus officials on Wednesday announced the campus received a $1 million donation toward its expansion into a fouryear school in Bend. The donation — the largest for the school’s fundraising effort — comes from the Tykeson Family

leaves at least $1.2 million left for the school to raise by December 2013 to reach the minimum needed in private donations. “At some point down the road, we’ll invite you all to, I’m sure, a very special space on the new campus that will be named in honor of the Tykesons,” OSU President Ed Ray said at a news conference in Bend’s Old Mill District.

Donald Tykeson, of Eugene, acquired BendBroadband in 1983; his daughter Amy Tykeson, of Bend, is president and chief executive officer of the company and a trustee of the family foundation. “We could not be more pleased to be able to make a lead gift to help transform OSU Cascades into a four-year institution to further elevate the quality of choice and study available in Central Oregon,” Donald Tykeson said. See OSU-Cascades / A4

REMEMBERING JOHN HARTFORD

‘A life that was well-lived’

“This is a public safety issue that we keep mulling around with and I’m getting sick and tired of it.” — Deschutes County Sheriff Larry Blanton

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

During a memorial service for John Hartford on Wednesday, his daughter Haley, 19, left, gets a hug from her mom, Maryann, as a friend reads one of the letters written to John by family members. The service for the Elton Gregory Middle School principal, who died Friday, was held at Ridgeview High School in Redmond. Jason DeCrow / The Associated Press

• Redmond middle school principal made a lasting impact on the lives of others

Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad addresses the U.N. General Assembly on Wednesday.

At the U.N., focus on the Middle East eclipses other issues

By Ben Botkin The Bulletin

REDMOND — undreds packed the auditorium at Ridgeview High School on Wednesday to pay their respects to John Hartford. Hartford, the principal of Elton Gregory Middle School in Redmond, died in a motorcycle crash Friday. The memorial Wednesday highlighted Hartford’s role as a husband,

H

By Hannah Allam McClatchy Newspapers

NEW YORK — Casual observers of this week’s U.N. General Assembly could be forgiven for thinking that the Middle East was the only region of concern for world leaders. The civil war in Syria, Israeli-led anxiety over Iran’s nuclear program and anti-American riots in Inside Arab countries are dominat• At the U.N., ing this 67th gathering of Mideast leaders rebut heads of state, overshadowing other pressing issues of Obama, A3 global importance, say analysts and visiting delegates. Even when raised by leaders as prominent as President Barack Obama, problems such as climate change or the global financial crisis have barely registered. While the General Assembly’s agenda listed more than 160 topics, delegates struggled for an audience if they broached issues not rooted in the Mideast. See U.N. / A4

MON-SAT

We use recycled newsprint

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Vol. 109, No. 271, 38 pages, 7 sections

of life, his family, the outdoors and motorcycle trips. For Hartford, family was his wife, Maryann, daughter Haley and son Kevin. Friends read letters aloud that the three family members wrote to Hartford. In her letter, Maryann wrote about her first time meeting Hartford at a dance hall and thinking he looked like a nice guy. See Hartford / A4

Obama has history of lavishing time, attention on Ohio By Jerry Markon The Washington Post

After President Barack Obama pledged in March to create up to 15 manufacturing centers nationwide, the first federal grant went to a place at the heart of his affections: Ohio. When the Obama administration awarded tax credits to promote clean energy, the $125 million taken home

The Bulletin An Independent Newspaper

father and cancer survivor who didn’t give up after doctors told him four years ago that he had a fatal cancer. Heads bowed as Hartford’s friend and pastor, Chris Blair of Powell Butte Christian Church, prayed. “We thank you for a life that was well-lived,” Blair said. “He is at peace and all is well.” In letters and stories, friends and family members shared stories about Hartford’s love

by Ohio companies was nearly four times the average that went to other states. And when a Cleveland dairy owner wanted to make more ricotta cheese, he won what was then the largest loan in the history of the U.S. Small Business Administration. “One of the tastiest investments the government has ever made,” the

INDEX Business Calendar Classified

E1-4 B3 G1-4

Comics B4-5 Crosswords B5, G2 Dear Abby

B3

Health F1-6 Local News C1-6 Outing B1-6

president joked as he mentioned the dairy and other businesses his administration has helped in the state. It goes without saying that, every four years, presidential candidates shower battleground states with attention. This time around, it’s Obama in Ohio, doling out the perks of office — all the time. See Ohio / A4

TODAY’S WEATHER Sports D1-6 Stocks E2-3 TV & Movies B2

Mostly sunny High 80, Low 45 Page C6

ELECTION Related • Corporations disclose details of their donations, A2 • Romney reaches out in ad, A4

TOP NEWS LIBYA: Attack tied to al-Qaida, A3 GREECE: Protests turn violent, A3


THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2012

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FOCUS: CAMPAIGN FINANCE

It’s Thursday, the 271st day of 2012. There are 95 days left in the year.

Corporations are disclosing contributions By Jonathan D. Salant Bloomberg News

WASHINGTON — Aflac and Chubb are among a growing number of companies revealing their corporate contributions, some of which may go to nonprofits and trade associations spending millions of dollars on U.S. elections without disclosing their donors. A study released Tuesday found 45 of 88 companies providing information about corporate donations, up from 36 a year earlier. The trend toward corporate disclosure runs counter to a growth in campaign spending by nonprofits that don’t have to identify their donors. Even as Republicans on the Federal Election Commission and in Congress block efforts to force nonprofits to identify their donors, some corporate contributors are voluntarily disclosing their support.

‘Forward movement’

Chairwoman Elizabeth C. McCool ...........541-383-0374 Publisher Gordon Black .....................541-383-0339 Editor-in-Chief John Costa .........................541-383-0337

Discoveries, breakthroughs, trends, names in the news — things you need to know to start your day. Until Election Day, this page will focus on politics.

“It shows forward movement,” said Bruce Freed, president of the Center for Political Accountability, which conducted the study with the University of Pennsylvania Wharton School’s Zicklin Center for Business Ethics Research. “Companies are showing that they consider this to be important. They’re acting on their own.” Freed’s Washington-based group is among those advocating for greater disclosure of corporate contributions. By

“Disclosure leads a company to think three or four times. You do have some investors who will raise questions.” — Bruce Freed, president, Center for Political Accountability

forcing companies to identify where their money is going, executives have to answer to shareholders and directors about their corporate contributions to outside groups that might not have the best interests of the company at heart. For example, four of the seven biggest sellers of birth control drugs and devices, including Merck and Pfizer, gave to a trade association that financed efforts to elect Republican lawmakers seeking to limit access to those products. And Target faced a boycott by gay rights groups in 2010 after the company donated $150,000 to a business group supporting Minnesota Republican gubernatorial candidate Tom Emmer, who opposed same-sex marriage. “Disclosure leads a company to think three or four times,” Freed said. “You do have some investors who will raise questions.”

Mandatory disclosure A coalition of organizations has asked the Securities and Exchange Commission to require publicly traded companies to disclose their donations to nonprofits. “A lot of the research shows

that the money tends to be squandered following the political biases of the CEO,” said Craig Holman of Public Citizen, a Washington-based advocacy group that favors stronger disclosure rules. “The objective is not to prevent political expenditures; it’s to make sure those expenditures are reasonable and for the benefit of the company itself.”

‘Feeling pressure’ Former Federal Election Commission Chairman Bradley Smith called it “a bad thing” for groups to pressure companies into disclosing their donations, especially when shareholders “regularly defeat” such proposals. “Many corporations are feeling pressure from faux ‘shareholder rights’ groups to adopt such policies, or to exit the political arena entirely,” said Smith, chairman and co-founder of the Center for Competitive Politics, an Alexandria, Va.-based group that opposes campaign finance regulations. The growth in spending by nonprofit groups that hide their donors is a byproduct of the Supreme Court’s 2010 Citizens United decision, which

HAPPENINGS

removed restrictions on corporate and union spending on behalf of candidates. Some companies have disclosed their support of nonprofits, including Chevron and Prudential Financial, both of which helped fund the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. The oil companies’ trade group, the American Petroleum Institute, helped fund Americans for Prosperity, a nonprofit backed by energy executives Charles and David Koch that this year has spent $31 million to help elect Republican candidates. Columbus, Ga.-based Aflac will start revealing corporate donations to outside groups, said Jon Sullivan, a spokesman. The company’s website said Aflac will report contributions of more than $50,000 to trade groups and other nonprofits. Warren, N.J.-based Chubb for the first time disclosed contributions of more than $1 million to trade groups, including $425,000 to the Chamber of Commerce and its legal reform institute. Campaign finance lawyer Jim Bopp Jr., who has sued to overturn disclosure requirements, said he has no problem with companies acting on their own, without a government mandate. “It should be up to the companies,” he said. “If they think they get a competitive advantage by disclosing their contributions, we are fine with that. That’s the marketplace.”

• An appeal hearing is set to resume in Peshawar, Pakistan, for Shakil Afridi, the doctor who was jailed after helping the U.S. track down Osama bin Laden. Afridi ran a fake vaccination program designed to get DNA from the al-Qaida leader.

IN HISTORY Highlights: In 1540, Pope Paul III issued a papal bull establishing the Society of Jesus, or Jesuits, as a religious order. In 1939, Warsaw, Poland, surrendered after weeks of resistance to invading forces from Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union during World War II. In 1962, “Silent Spring,” Rachel Carson’s groundbreaking as well as controversial study on the effects of pesticides on the environment, was published in book form by Houghton Mifflin. In 1964, the government publicly released the report of the Warren Commission, which found that Lee Harvey Oswald had acted alone in assassinating President John F. Kennedy. In 1979, Congress gave its final approval to forming the U.S. Department of Education. Ten years ago: President George W. Bush said the United Nations should have a chance to force Saddam Hussein to give up his weapons of mass destruction before the United States acted on its own against Iraq, but told a Republican fundraising event in Denver that action had to come quickly. Five years ago: Soldiers fired into crowds of anti-government demonstrators in Yangon, Myanmar; Kenji Nagai, 50, a video journalist for Japan’s APF News, was shot and killed. One year ago: Opening statements in the Los Angeles trial of Michael Jackson’s personal physician, Dr. Conrad Murray, took place as prosecutors accused Murray of killing the superstar through irresponsible use of the anesthetic propofol, and the defense maintaining Jackson had caused his own death. Israel gave the go-ahead for construction of 1,100 new Jewish housing units in east Jerusalem; the announcement met with swift criticism from the United States and the European Union.

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NEED TO KNOW Views on education issues Where the presidential candidates stand: Pell grants

ROMNEY ROM MNEY

O OB OBAMA B MA BAM

Restrict only to GOP poorest students; no details on how much he would cut

Increased spending Dems from $16 billion to $36 billion, grants are bigger, more students receive them; says expansion paid for with savings from moving student loans from private banks to Dept. of Education

CORRECTIONS The Bulletin’s primary concern is that all stories are accurate. If you know of an error in a story, call us at 541-383-0358.

TO SUBSCRIBE Home delivery and E-Edition: One month: $11 (Print only: $10.50) By mail in Deschutes County: One month: $14.50 By mail outside Deschutes County: One month: $18 E-Edition only: One month: $8

Federal role Would want Congress to

revise the education law to eliminate the federally required steps that failing schools must take to improve; instead, he’d require that states grade the schools so parents could easily tell how they are doing

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School choice

Would allow parents of low-income and special-needs children to decide how tax dollars for their children’s educations should be spent

Supports school choice within the public school system; has encouraged investments in public charter schools but opposes vouchers

Cost of college

Wants to return student lending to private banks

Wants student borrowers to be able to cap loan payments at 10 percent of income; started tax credit for low-, middle-income families paying for college; wants incentive plan to get colleges to hold down costs

OTHER SERVICES Photo reprints....................541-383-0358 Obituaries ..........................541-617-7825 Back issues .......................541-385-5800 All Bulletin payments are accepted at the drop box at City Hall. Check payments may be converted to an electronic funds transfer. The Bulletin, USPS #552-520, is published daily by Western Communications Inc., 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave., Bend, OR 97702. Periodicals postage paid at Bend, OR. Postmaster: Send address changes to The Bulletin circulation department, P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708. The Bulletin retains ownership and copyright protection of all staff-prepared news copy, advertising copy and news or ad illustrations. They may not be reproduced without explicit prior approval.

Oregon Lottery results As listed at www.oregonlottery.org

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The numbers drawn Wednesday night are:

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Has used money and waivers from 2002 No Child Left Behind law to provide incentives to states to do such things as raise standards, reward good teachers and remove poor ones; says costs are less than 1 percent of total U.S. education spending

Source: McClatchy Washington Bureau

© 2012 McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Are political spam texts legal? By Kim Geiger Tribune Washington Bureau

WASHINGTON — Voters in Virginia are the latest to get a taste of an increasingly popular type of political attack: the anonymous text message. “Tim Kaine calls for radical new tax on all Americans,” reads a text message attacking the Democratic candidate in the Virginia Senate race. The message came from an email address that used portions of Kaine’s name. But his campaign said it had nothing to do with the message, and called on Virginia Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli to investigate. “This isn’t just a sleazy campaign tactic,” Kaine’s campaign wrote in an email to supporters. “It’s a crime.” As it turns out, there is some

disagreement about that. Although the Federal Communications Commission has clearly stated that unsolicited automated text messages are against the law, some political advertising firms have found a way around the ban. Instead of sending text messages the traditional way — from one phone number to another — these firms send emails to people’s cellphones. The CAN-SPAM Act of 2003 exempts political messages from bans on email spam. But although the messages may originate as emails, the phone companies consider them incoming text messages. Federal regulators are now being urged to close the loophole that allows unsolicited email-to-text messages.

Romney at risk of losing his financial advantage By Ezra Klein The Washington Post

To understand the Romney campaign’s nightmare scenario, you need to understand its much-vaunted finances. It has become conventional wisdom that Mitt Romney’s operation has more money than President Barack Obama’s. But that’s not quite right. If you compare just the campaigns, Obama’s has a cash advantage. Until August, the most recent month for which fundraising numbers are available, Obama had raised $337 million to Romney’s $194 million. Romney’s financial advantage becomes clear when you add in the Republican-affiliated super PACs. The major pro-Romney super PACs — American Crossroads and Restore Our Future — have brought in more than $150 million, and raise more at will. The major proObama super PAC — Priorities USA — has netted $34 million. Here’s the catch: Romney controls only the money raised by his campaign. The money brought in by the RNC is controlled by the RNC. The money raised by Karl Rove’s American Crossroads super PAC is controlled by Rove and his partners. These groups are not solely devoted to the task of electing Romney. If they are devoted to anything, it’s to blocking Obama. Which leads to Romney’s nightmare scenario: If things don’t turn around for him soon, those groups might give up on trying to elect him and turn to encircling Obama’s second term with a Republican House and a Republican Senate. Consider the numbers: A week ago, Obama was leading by 3.1 percentage points in RealClearPolitics’ average of polls, and he had a 74.8 percent chance of winning in election wonk Nate Silver’s model. One week later, Obama is up by 3.7 percentage points in the polls, and up to 77.6 percent in the model.

Ad spending Outside groups backing Mitt Romney funded half the ad spending on his behalf in August, in millions: In support of Mitt Romney $32.7

Romney campaign*

Republican National Committee**

10.9

Restore Our Future

20.0

Americans for Prosperity

18.3

American Crossroads

5.9

BIRTHDAYS

$87.8 Today’s Birthdays: Actor Wilford Brimley is 78. World Golf Hall of Famer Kathy Whitworth is 73. Singermusician Randy Bachman is 69. Rock singer Meat Loaf is 65. Singer Shaun Cassidy is 54. Rock singer Stephan Jenkins is 48. Actress Gwyneth Paltrow is 40. Rock singer Brad Arnold is 34. Rapper Lil’ Wayne is 30. Singer Avril Lavigne is 28.

In support of Barack Obama $66.6 Obama campaign* Priorities USA

8.7 $75.3

*Includes coordinated expenditures by the parties’ national committees **Independent expenditures Source: U.S. Federal Election Commission filings © 2012 McClatchy-Tribune News Service

— From wire reports

Romney probably has at least until the Oct. 3 presidential debate to show that he can make up some ground. But if he’s not able to make big gains soon, his last remaining advantage could collapse.

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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

T S Arab leaders rebut Obama speech • The presidents of Egypt and Yemen argue at the U.N. that cultural limits on traditional Western freedoms must be respected By Neil MacFarquhar New York Times News Service

UNITED NATIONS — The new presidents of Egypt and Yemen — both of whom were swept to power by uprisings demanding democratic rights — issued clear rebuttals on Wednesday to President Barack Obama’s ardent defense of Western values at the United Nations, arguing that cultural limits on rights like freedom of speech had to be respected. President Mohammed Morsi of Egypt, who billed his 40minute speech to world leaders as the first by a democratically elected leader of his country, condemned the violence stem-

ming from a short online video that insulted the Prophet Muhammad and led to numerous deaths, including that of the U.S. ambassador to Libya. But Morsi flatly rejected Obama’s broad defense of free speech at the U.N. a day earlier, saying that “Egypt respects freedom of expression, freedom of expression that is not used to incite hatred against anyone.” “We expect from others, as they expect from us, that they respect our cultural specifics and religious references, and not to seek to impose concepts or cultures that are unacceptable to us,” said Morsi, a former leader of the Muslim Brotherhood.

On Tuesday, Obama laid out a lengthy defense of the right of free speech as a universal value. But Morsi and other leaders signaled that such a right could only go so far. President Abed Rabbu Mansour Hadi of Yemen opened his speech on Wednesday by demanding curbs on freedom of speech that insults religion. “These behaviors find people who defend them under the justification of the freedom of expression,” he said. “These people overlook the fact that there should be limits for the freedom of expression, especially if such freedom blasphemes the beliefs of nations and defames their figures.”

Ahmadinejad softens rhetoric President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad of Iran gave a subdued speech at the United Nations on Wednesday, sticking largely to spiritual and moral themes, rather than his usual annual broadside. Ahmadinejad injected a few veiled accusations that the international media does not write the truth about Zionism. He also aligned himself indirectly with Occupy Wall Street, saying the voices of the “99 percent” were not heard in policymaking decisions. — New York Times News Service

A riot policeman reacts after he was hit by a petrol bomb thrown by protesters during a nationwide general strike Wednesday in Athens. Police clashed with protesters after an antigovernment rally called as part of the strike turned violent. Petros Giannakouris The Associated Press

Protests jolt European markets By Liz Alderman and Niki Kitsantonis New York Times News Service

ATHENS, Greece — After a period of relative calm, European markets shuddered once again Wednesday as protests erupted across Greece and demonstrators surrounded the Spanish Parliament for a second day to protest the austerity program of Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy. Earlier this month, the European Central Bank announced its intention to buy unlimited quantities of debt from European nations, including the troubled economies of southern Europe. That kept the peace in the financial markets until Wednesday, when political instability startled investors, with the Spanish stock market dropping 3.9 percent and even the German DAX falling by 2 percent. The

interest rate on the 10-year Spanish bond, which had been declining, inched closer to the ominous 6 percent level. On Tuesday in Spain, tens of thousands of demonstrators besieged Parliament to protest austerity measures planned by Rajoy. Last week, more than half a million people marched in cities across Portugal to protest an increase in social security contributions, and a million marched in Barcelona calling for Catalan independence. In Athens, trade unions called a nationwide strike Wednesday to contest billions of dollars in new salary and pension cuts being discussed by the government and its international creditors. It was the first such walkout since a conservative coalition led by Prime Minister Antonis Samaras came to power in June.

Scouts will review files on suspected predators By Jason Felch Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — The Boy Scouts of America says it will conduct a comprehensive review of files on suspected sexual predators, marking the first time it will thoroughly study its own confidential blacklist meant to keep predators out of scouting. The review will examine allegations of abuse in the last 47 years to ensure all have been reported to law enforcement, the organization said. The announcement comes nine days after the Los Angeles Times published an investigation that found officials did not report hundreds of cases of alleged sexual abuse between 1970 and 1991 to law enforcement. The findings were based on a review of 1,600 files entered into evidence in a 1992 court case. For decades, the Boy

Scouts have argued the confidential files contain no information of value to the public or for protecting youth in general against pedophiles. Asked to explain why the Scouts were now analyzing their files, a Scout spokesman said in an email: “While we believe the files are an inconclusive record, the BSA will undertake a new review and analysis . to ensure that all good-faith suspicion of abuse (from 1965-present) have been reported to law enforcement.” In announcing the review Tuesday, the Boy Scouts also released a summary of a more limited study it commissioned that suggested the confidential files had helped protect Scouts from abuse. The analysis covered 1,200 files dating from 1960 to 1995 and was conducted for the Scouts by Janet Warren, a University of Virginia psychiatrist.

Samaras is negotiating a $15 billion austerity package that is needed to persuade Greece’s so-called troika of lenders — the International Monetary Fund, the European Central Bank and the European Commission — to release nearly $40.7 billion in financial aid that the country needs to stay solvent. Rajoy has been trying for months to convince investors that Spain can handle its own problems and that it will not need a bailout that would force Madrid to cede some authority over its fiscal affairs to its lenders, and is set to introduce new cutbacks to meet budgetary goals. The proposed cuts in Greece have ignited new anger here, with many talking openly of increased impoverishment as the nation grapples with a third round of austerity measures in

three years. The protests in Athens in the morning were peaceful, as civil servants, teachers, medical personnel, bank employees and lawyers made their way to the city center. A police spokeswoman put the turnout at 35,000 to 40,000 people — modest by Greek standards. But violence broke out shortly after 1 p.m., as a group of protesters wearing black face masks hurled gasoline bombs at police officers on Vasilissis Sofias, a wide avenue abutting Parliament, sending bursts of flame and black smoke into the air. Firebombs were also thrown at the Finance Ministry and into the lush National Gardens next to Parliament. Officers wielding batons responded with bursts of tear gas, scattering demonstrators and tourists as police helicopters circled overhead.

W  B

Firebrand faces corruption charges JOHANNESBURG — Julius Malema, the firebrand former leader of the African National Congress youth wing, appeared in a court in his home province of Limpopo on Wednesday to face a charge of money launder- Malema ing in connection with state contracts with an engineering company linked to him. After being released on bail of around $1,200 following a brief court appearance, he denounced the charge. “I have nothing to hide,” Malema told a throng of supporters cheering him outside the courthouse. “I have never been part of any criminal activity. I am not corrupt, and I do not engage in fraudulent activities. What you see is what you get.” In recent weeks, Malema

has emerged to champion miners engaged in wildcat strikes at gold and platinum mines.

Suicide bombers hit Syrian military HQ BEIRUT — Suicide bombers targeted the main Syrian military headquarters in the heart of Damascus on Wednesday in the most significant attack in the capital in more than two months, triggering scenes of panic and widespread gunfire in which a reporter for an Iranian television channel was killed. State television said the attack was carried out by suicide bombers and broadcast security-camera footage showing a white van exploding on the main highway just outside the headquarters’ perimeter fence. Moments later, there was a second explosion within the grounds that the anchor said was also caused by a suicide bomb. — From wire reports

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Clinton links al-Qaida affiliate to Libya attack vision of that country this year. Al-Qaida in the Islamic Secretary of State Hill- Maghreb has long operated ary Clinton on Wednesday in the region, she said, and suggested there was a link was now exploiting a haven between the al-Qaida fran- in Mali to export extremchise in North Africa and the ism and terrorist violence to attack at the U.S. diplomatic neighbors like Libya. mission in Benghazi, Libya, “Now with a larger safe that killed the U.S. ambas- haven and increased freesador and three others. She dom to maneuver, terrorists was the highest-ranking are seeking to extend their Obama administration offi- reach and their networks in cial to publicly make multiple directions,” the connection, and Clinton told leadher comments inteners assembled at the sified what is becommeeting, including ing a fiercely partisan President Francois fight over whether Hollande of France the attack could have Clinton and the U.N. secrebeen prevented. tary-general, Ban Clinton did not offer any Ki-moon. “And they are new evidence of an al-Qa- working with other violent ida link, and officials later extremists to undermine said the question would be the democratic transitions officially settled only after under way in North Afrithe FBI completed a crimi- ca, as we tragically saw in nal inquiry, which could Benghazi.” take months. But they said Ban called the meeting they had not ruled out the to lay the groundwork for a involvement of al-Qaida in possible international milithe Islamic Maghreb — an tary intervention — to be led affiliate of the international by African troops — to help terrorist group with origins the new military government in Algeria — in an attack in Mali re-establish control the administration initially over a part of the country described as a spontaneous that Hollande noted was the protest turned violent. size of France and is now Her remarks added to the under the grip of Islamist administration’s evolving extremists imposing their viand at times muddled expla- sion of law and order. nation of what happened on Top militia leaders in the evening of Sept. 11 and Benghazi have dismissed the into the next morning. Re- possibility that al-Qaida in publicans in Congress have the Islamic Maghreb played accused President Barack a role in the attacks or had Obama of playing down pos- a foothold in eastern Libya. sible terrorist involvement Benghazi residents have said in the midst of a re-election they believe the brigade that campaign in which killing conducted the attack could Osama bin Laden and crip- not have managed the aspling al-Qaida are cited as sault on its own, because major achievements. it included more than 100 Clinton made her remarks heavily armed fighters. at a special U.N. meeting on Clinton’s connection of the political and security cri- the turmoil in the Sahel with sis in the parts of North Af- the violence in Benghazi, rica known as the Maghreb which killed Ambassador J. and the Sahel, particularly Christopher Stevens, echoed in northern Mali, which has remarks made last week by been overrun by Islamic Matthew Olsen, the director extremists since a military of the National Countertercoup helped lead to the di- rorism Center. By Steven Lee Myers

New York Times News Service

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THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2012

U.N. Continued from A1 “Are there some?” James Paul, the director of the Global Policy Forum, asked with mock incredulity. Paul, whose organization monitors policymaking at the United Nations, said he’d heard scant mention of the U.S. government’s trillion-dollar deficit, the euro crisis or the sense that the world economy was “on the edge.” At most, he said, nonMiddle East issues arise in sideline meetings, and even then are couched in jargon about “multi-stakeholders’ dialogue” and “pro-poor policies.” “The most important things are not coming up here, and that’s what’s disappointing,” Paul said. Seemingly every bland comment about Syria has become news, but there was little buzz when the United Kingdom pledged more than $1.5 million to combat sexual violence in conflict zones. Or when the Pakistanis announced that the heroin trade had increased by 3,000 percent and was fueling deadly terrorist groups. Or when the Senegalese sounded alarms over the fact that heavily armed Islamist militant groups now occupy two-thirds of Mali, “sowing despair among the population and destroying symbols of World Cultural Heritage.” The continent of Africa, whose problems take up an estimated 70 percent of the U.N. Security Council’s agenda, appears downright neglected when compared with the attention lavished on the Middle East this week. The crisis in Mali, for example, shares some common features with Syria — jihadist haven, refugee exodus — but the United Nations so far hasn’t named a special envoy, which would propel that conflict to more prominence. Syria, meanwhile, is on its second high-profile envoy in 18 months. “Syria is so visible. It’s a real civil war and you have Syrian opposition documenting it and sending it out,” said Tiffany Lynch, senior Africa policy analyst at the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom, a bipartisan watchdog commission that makes policy recommendations to the U.S. government. “There’s really a lack of press coverage on Mali.” “What happens in Africa doesn’t get much attention,” she added. African delegates were diplomatic about the U.N.’s focus on their northern neighbors but concerned that there wasn’t enough action to help African countries get on track to meet their Millennium Development Goals, eight benchmarks that U.N. member countries are striving to reach by 2015. They include establishing universal primary education, eradicating hunger and empowering women. “The concentration on the hot spots of the world — mainly the Middle East — is not without reason, and it shows that the U.N. is concerned about world peace,” said Liberian delegate Abu Kamara. “But African countries are lagging far behind the development goals, and these are critical issues.” Reports circulating at the conference seem determined to outdo one another in doom and gloom, as if to shock attendants into looking beyond Middle Eastern borders. More than 100 million people will die by 2030 if there’s no action on climate change, one report warns. The tiny South Pacific island of Nauru tried to marshal attention to what it called “a staggering and irrevocable loss of biodiversity and our shared natural heritage.” “This summer, we were treated to a new round of truly terrifying news: Arctic sea ice dropped to its lowest extent in recorded history, shattering the previous record by a jaw-dropping 18 percent,” Nauru President Sprent Dabwido told the assembly. “Some scientists are predicting that the Arctic Ocean could be ice-free in as little as five years.” It’s unclear how many leaders heard Nauru’s distressing message; many had filed out after Obama’s address to the assembly Tuesday morning.

Romney ad reaches out to working class

Madalyn Ruggiero / The Associated Press

President Obama greets supporters at Toledo Express Airport in Swanton, Ohio, on Wednesday.

Ohio Continued from A1 He returned to the state Wednesday to barnstorm in Bowling Green and Kent, making his 29th visit since taking office. Excluding his neighboring states of Virginia and Maryland, that’s more than any state except New York, where he often flies to raise money, and far more than other swing states, including Florida (22 visits), Colorado (14) and Wisconsin (9), according to White House records. Either Obama or Vice President Joe Biden has popped up in the Buckeye State every three weeks on average since they took office.

High stakes The president has eaten Cincinnati chili, led the cheers for Ohio State basketball and planted himself in the back yard of a Columbus family to highlight, next to their tomato garden, what his policies did for them. His trips, along with repeated outings by Biden (18 visits) and other Cabinet members, often have come with good news about funding and other government largess. Obama even jokes about his courtship of the state, saying in a 2010 visit that he had been there so many times that the governor “might start charging me for it.” And he is clear about the stakes. “If we win Toledo, we will win Ohio,” Obama said in a Toledo speech this month. “And if we win Ohio, we’ll win this election.” The line is a refrain he is known to have used in various battleground states. His efforts appear to be paying off in what is perhaps the ultimate battleground, a po-

OSU-Cascades Continued from A1 Amy Tykeson said, “I know that a four-year university has been at the top of the list for Central Oregon for many years. Not only will OSU-Cascades make a difference for students, it will support our employers and provide even more appeal to our beautiful region.” OSU-Cascades already offers upper-division courses. Students attend Central Oregon Community College for the first two years of school. The university, which has almost 1,000 students, aims to have its first freshman class in 2015. By 2025, an enrollment of 3,000-5,000 students in Bend is anticipated. The total funding needed for the expansion is about $24 million. To reach that goal, OSU-Cascades needs at least $4 million in donations and for the Legislature to approve $16 million in state bonds. OSU funding should cover the remaining $4 million. The first part of fundraising is finished and it garnered $1.8 million to show initial community support. Ray said the second phase started Wednesday with the $1 million donation. Going beyond the $4 million goal would aid the effort and help with efforts in Salem, university officials said. “It’s momentum,” Ray said. “We’re going to make a case that we need the state to step up, that the community is on board with providing its resources and energy and talent to make this

litically divided state with 18 electoral votes that has gone with the winning candidate in nearly every presidential election for 70 years.

Efforts pay off A Washington Post poll released Tuesday shows Obama with an eight-point lead over Mitt Romney in Ohio among likely voters. The gap also could be tied to the state’s improving economy and the relative popularity in Ohio of the auto-industry bailout that the administration oversaw. Obama and other officials have repeatedly touted the bailout on visits to Ohio, emphasizing Romney’s opposition to it and the fact that the domestic car industry employs about 150,000 workers in the state. Administration officials said that they have not favored Ohio and that federal money flows to every state, including those with little political benefit, according to merit-based reviews. “These decisions are made on the merits by professionals with the relevant policy expertise,” said Eric Schultz, a White House spokesman. “These projects often have bipartisan support and are part of programs that have created jobs all across the country.” Schultz added that “a state’s political significance doesn’t secure it federal resources — but it shouldn’t be a disqualifying factor either.” Another administration official involved in funding decisions agreed that they are policy-based but acknowledged an awareness of the political benefit. “When good policies are good politics, that’s great,” said the official, who spoke on the condition of anonymity be-

happen, and the more powerful statement we can make along those lines, the more likely we are to persuade legislators who have to make tough choices all the time that this is a good investment.” The school has not designated a campus location where the expansion would unfold, said Becky Johnson, OSU-Cascades vice president. Because all the necessary funding isn’t secured yet, the university isn’t in a position to negotiate for real estate, she said. In the meantime, a committee of real estate experts is advising the university and developing an analysis of the square footage needed for a comparison to available locations, Johnson said. The university already has a presence at the Millpoint subdivision, where its graduate research center is located. But officials haven’t reached a deal with property owners there. The ideal goal would be to find existing buildings near that location within walking distance, she said, adding that the school needs to be flexible. The university also announced a newly formed campaign cabinet of community leaders to assist with fundraising. Its members are former Bend mayors Allan Bruckner and Oran Teater, Ann Bruckner, Janie Teater, Gary Fish, Mike and Sue Hollern, Mark and Kathy Kralj, Patti and Greg Moss, Bob and Clella Thomas, Amy Tykeson and John Teller. — Reporter: 541-977-7185, bbotkin@bendbulletin.com

cause he is not an authorized spokesman. In paying “disproportionate attention to Ohio,” Obama “is following in the footsteps of his recent predecessors,” said Brendan Doherty, an expert on presidential travel at the U.S. Naval Academy. Since the Ronald Reagan administration, presidents have been increasingly targeting battleground states. The trend escalated under George W. Bush, who visited Ohio 35 times in his first term, Doherty said.

Key moments Obama has framed many key moments in his term in Ohio. As the administration was distributing stimulus money, the president noted in a 2010 town hall meeting near Cleveland that Ohio “received more funds than just about anybody in order to build on that cleanenergy economy.” In fact, the state’s portion of the $2.3 billion in clean-energy manufacturing tax credits was tens of millions of dollars more than the slice that went to other swing states. In high-speed rail, another administration priority, Ohio also fared well. The White House in 2010 awarded the state $400 million to resume passenger train service between Cincinnati, Cleveland and other cities, a service that had ended four decades earlier. The announcement highlighted nine “major corridor” projects, serving up to 11 states. The only two that benefited a single state were in Ohio and Florida. Both states rejected the money after electing Republican governors. Administration officials said

the tax credit and rail funding were awarded on merit. In one case, the administration’s fondness for Ohio appeared to lead to a sudden about-face to save jobs. When Obama visited Mansfield in August, media outlets and Republicans in the state pointed out that he would be flying into an Air National Guard base where his budget had proposed cutting a fleet of aircraft and about 800 positions. By day’s end — after base officials vowed to position the threatened planes so Obama could see them from Air Force One — the White House said it would “find a mission” for the guard unit. A White House spokesman said this week that Obama remains “absolutely” committed to finding that mission.

‘Very appreciative’ Brian Reis, who runs a company making potato chips and other snack food about 100 miles from Cleveland, says he is grateful for the attention. Reis, a Republican, has received three Small Business Administration loans for totaling $3.9 million since Obama took office, along with a $2 million loan during the Bush administration. In August, the agency’s head, Karen Mills, toured his facility for the launch of a kit that allows people to flavor their own gourmet potato chips. Last year, Biden had singled him out in a speech near Cleveland. “Does it benefit them politically? Sure it does,” Reis said in an interview. “But this is the vice president of the United States saying good things about our company. How can anybody in their right mind not be very appreciative?”

WESTERVILLE, Ohio — Mitt Romney stepped up his efforts to repair the damage from his “47 percent” comments, releasing a new television ad on Wednesday in which he speaks directly to the camera about his compassion and tries to reassure voters that he cares about the poor and middle class. The 60-second ad, “Too Many Americans,” was Romney’s most aggressive effort so far to clean up the fallout from his secretly videotaped remarks at a fundraiser in May, where he described voters who do not pay income tax as “victims” who are dependent on the government and feel “entitled to health care, to food, to housing, to you name it.” But the ad came nine days after the video first surfaced, a period in which Democrats have bashed Romney over the remarks, leaving him on the defensive in swing states like Ohio. The ad reflected a belief among his aides that in addition to trying to move past his “47 percent” comments, Romney can appeal to voters in an intimate, personal way, bonding over their economic worries. The spot, in which Romney seems to address the viewer, is an attempt, aides said, to reveal the compassion behind the policy. “The goal is to connect with voters over their anxieties over the state of the economy, and reflect the fact that Governor Romney has a plan to fix it,” said Kevin Madden, a senior campaign adviser. The ad comes on the heels of a concerted effort by the Romney campaign to offer up more of Romney’s personal story, after Republican complaints that he has not done enough to sell himself or humanize himself to many voters. “President Obama and I both care about poor and middle-class families,” Romney says in the ad. “The difference is my policies will make things better for them.” The Obama campaign continued to demand specifics in an effort to link Romney’s “47 percent” remarks to the policies he would pursue as president. “Mitt Romney’s new ad is just more of the evasiveness that his campaign has become known for,” said Lis Smith, an Obama campaign spokeswoman. — Ashley Parker, New York Times News Service

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

Powell Butte Christian Church Pastor Chris Blair, left, speaks before a full house during the memorial service for John Hartford at Ridgeview High School in Redmond on Wednesday.

Hartford Continued from A1 They stuck together. “I will always love you, my dear sweet John,” she wrote. Haley highlighted the many lives Hartford impacted as educator, coach and father. “You were so loved, Dad, and you will never, ever be forgotten,” she wrote. In Kevin’s tribute, the son wrote: “I look up to you and hope to be the man you

principal of Hugh Hartman Middle School, then nearly four years as principal of Lynch Elementary School. Hartford’s first teaching job was in St. Paul, south of — Kevin Hartford, Newberg. While teaching in a tribute to his father at St. Paul High School, he coached the girls basketball team, leading it to three state were.” titles. He also taught science Hartford, 54, was in his at Westview High School in fourth year as principal of Portland before coming to the Elton Gregory. He worked Redmond School District. — Reporter: 541-977-7185, eight years for Redmond bbotkin@bendbulletin.com School District, first as vice

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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

In Los Angeles, firefighters may roll up on two wheels By Frank Shyong Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — Los Angeles firefighter Greg Pascola spotted a column of smoke from the corner of his eye — a fire burning on a distant hillside. He looked east from his vantage point on a mountaintop road near Mulholland Drive and felt wind at his back. It was 3 p.m. on a September Friday that would see record-breaking heat, and cars choked every lane of the 405 Freeway for miles. He and his partner gunned their motorcycles. They are part of the Los Angeles Fire Department’s pilot motorcycle response team, a five-man unit that can speed to the side of an injured victim, provide information to dispatchers and skirt traffic to scout fires and other problems. The unit first rode during last year’s “Carmageddon” closure of the 405, and its next deployment will take place during the follow-up closure this weekend, when workers will demolish the other half of the Mulholland Drive bridge overhead. Fire departments serving traffic-snarled cities around the nation have adopted similar motorcycle teams to improve response times, staff special events and, in some cases, save lives and resources. As the L.A. department faces budget cuts and intense scrutiny over response times that lag behind national standards, some believe that a roving motorcycle unit could help the department. The pilot unit features five off-road-capable motorcycles on loan from the Kawasaki Motor Corp. Each bike retails for about $6,300 and is outfitted with a defibrillator, a small fire extinguisher, various medical supplies and a handlebarmounted GPS system. A dozen firefighters have undergone the necessary training, and a permanent unit could have up to 10 motorcycles and 28 riders, said Capt. Craig White, who first proposed the unit to the department. White said he’d thought about creating a motorcycle unit for years, and last year’s 405 closure — shutting down 10 miles of one of the nation’s busiest freeways — presented

Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times

Los Angeles Fire Departement motorcycle medic unit members Wes Schroeder, front, and Greg Pascola consult with other firefighters during the Sepulveda Pass Fire. The motorcycle unit rides enduro bikes along dirt roads, keeping en eye out for fires and people who might need help.

the ideal test. The department already had a bicycle medic unit for events such as the L.A. Marathon. Though the nightmare Carmageddon traffic jams that officials feared never materialized, the motorcycle unit had an opportunity to show what it could do earlier this month. As a 70-acre brush fire stopped traffic on the 405 and caused the evacuation of the Getty Center, Pascola and his partner reached the command post within three minutes even before helicopters could reach the site. They were handed radios and began to map the blaze, weaving between cars, hopping sidewalks and navigating narrow, curving mountain roads. “At the time, we were the only ones out there to scout,” Pascola said. In addition to scouting fires, advocates say the motorcycle response team could also help save lives. When a heart attack occurs, the American Heart and Lung Assn. says, irreversible brain damage can begin after four minutes. Motorcycleborne medics equipped with defibrillators in Miami cut re-

sponse times from an average of seven minutes to less than three in some places, said Capt. Roman Bas of Miami-Dade Fire Rescue. “Absolutely it saved lives,” Bas said. “And it saved money too.” Bas said deploying motorcycles instead of ambulances and trucks reduced fuel consumption and extended the working life of more valuable emergency response vehicles, which were used less. He had planned to expand the program to 12 battalions, with a roving motorcycle response unit to cover multiple areas of the city. But Miami’s motorcycle medic unit was dismantled in 2008 after departmentwide budget cuts. Though the program was relatively cheap — the fleet of 10 donated motorcycles cost $36,000 a year to maintain — Bas said it wasn’t a priority. “Putting firefighters on motorcycles is just not tradition,” Bas said. “You still have departments where all they do is handle fire. They need to look into new ways of using these units.” The Seattle Fire Department has also explored motorcycle response units, but a program

never got off the ground. Austin, Texas, has a program with four motorcycles, but it is run separately from the Austin Fire Department. The units are more common overseas in Japan and Europe, where some motorcycle units tow cars and fight fires with specialized attachments. White said LAFD officials want to see if state and federal grants could help make their motorcycle unit permanent, although a large expansion like the one Miami’s Bas had wanted is unlikely. LAFD Chief Brian Cummings said motorcycles could be “one of the solutions” the department considers for improving response times. “Do I see the motorcycles supplanting larger vehicles? No. There’s always going to be a need to bring heavy equipment and large numbers of individuals,” Cummings said. “They each have a role. They’re each tools in the toolbox.” White, a motorcycle enthusiast since high school, said the unit’s biggest selling point is its flexibility. “Right now,” he said, “we just want to see what we can do with them.”

Search for survivors resumes after ferry sinking off Indonesia The Associated Press JAKARTA, Indonesia — Rescuers continued to search waters off Indonesian islands today for people reporting missing after a ferry collided with a chemical-carrying ship and sank, killing at least eight people. More than 210 passengers and crew were rescued and eight bodies were pulled from

the water, including a 10year-old girl, after the sinking Wednesday morning, said Heru Purwanto, an official at Bakauheni port on southern Sumatra. They are believed to have jumped into the sea without life jackets and could not swim, he said. The manifest listed 213 passengers and crew and 78 ve-

hicles on the ferry, but manifests are often unreliable in Indonesia. The search for survivors

was continuing after many family members came forward to report the names of missing loved ones.

A5

UC agrees to pay $1M in pepper-spray lawsuit By Terence Chea The Associated Press

SAN FRANCISCO — The University of California has agreed to pay $1 million to settle a lawsuit filed by demonstrators who were peppersprayed during an Occupy protest at UC Davis last fall, according to a preliminary settlement filed Wednesday. The Nov. 18, 2011, incident prompted national outrage, campus protests and calls for the resignation of Chancellor Linda Katehi after online videos shot by witnesses went viral. Images of a police officer casually spraying pepperspray in the faces of nonviolent protesters became a rallying symbol for the Occupy Wall Street movement. The demonstrators had been protesting steep tuition hikes and police brutality. Under the proposed settlement, UC would pay $30,000 to each of 21 plaintiffs named in the complaint and an additional $250,000 for their attorneys to split.

Jail Continued from A1 They instead focused on two proposals in which space in existing buildings could be transformed to securely hold the juvenile detainees. One plan involves part of the Britta Street facility and the other involves the old downtown juvenile detention facility on Northwest Harriman Street. Upgrading the downtown facility could be completed in two stages over 12 months and cost $1.7 million. The first phase, which could cost $383,600 and involve four months of work, would make the downtown facility capable of holding eight detainees in seven rooms. The second phase would take another eight months and cost $1.3 million. It would add space to the downtown facility so it could house 14 detainees in 13 rooms. The county juvenile facility currently holds 16 detainees, including four from another county. The second option, converting some of the Britta Street facility treatment rooms into a detention cells, would cost the county only $806,000 and take eight months to complete. But while this was the cheaper of the two options, it would house only 12 detainees in six rooms. “Our exposure is just so

Katehi, who has publicly apologized for the incident, would be required to issue a formal written apology to each of the plaintiffs, who are current students or recent alumni. If the $1 million settlement is approved, total costs associated with the incident could exceed $2 million, according to the Sacramento Bee newspaper. Those expenses come as UC faces the prospect of deep budget cuts if Gov. Jerry Brown’s tax initiative fails in November. UC and plaintiffs represented by the American Civil Liberties Union filed the preliminary settlement in U.S. District Court in Sacramento. The agreement, which was approved by the UC Board of Regents in mid-September, is subject to the approval of a federal judge, and parties have the right to appeal. The settlement also calls for UC to set aside $100,000 to pay other individuals who can prove they were arrested or pepper-sprayed.

extreme if we do that,” said Community Justice Director Ken Hales. He said he worried that detainees might abuse each other or cause other problems if they were double bunked. “But there is one benefit: It does cost less.” The commissioners were also split on the cost-versuspracticality issue — while they wanted to house their detainees in a suitable facility, they also didn’t want to spend almost $2 million on something that was at best a shortor mid-term solution — until Commissioner Tammy Baney moved to set the time line and instruct county staff members recommend what they thought was the best option. Hales and Susan Ross, director of the county property and facilities department, said they would take a couple of weeks to compose a recommendation. They promised to deliver it so whatever option they choose would be at least half ready — either the first phase of the downtown facility’s upgrades or the entire Britta Street facility updgrades — by July 1. That way Blanton could move his adult inmates across the way as planned. — Reporter: 541-617-7816, mmclean@bendbulletin.com

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THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2012

www.bendbulletin.com/outing

TRAIL UPDATE Fires are closing many area trails Area trails are looking good, if dusty, but hikers and bikers may find their excursions stymied by fire. The Pole Creek Fire has closed dozens of miles of trails in the Three Sisters Wilderness, including the Pacific Crest Trail between Trail No. 3531 and the trailhead at state Highway 242. The Peterson Ridge, Three Creek Lake and Tam Rim areas are also closed. Deschutes National Forest Trails Supervisor Chris Sabo also warned of a new fire that started over the weekend in the Jack Lake area, which is causing extensive closures. Sabo advises hikers to check either the Deschutes National Forest website or www .inciweb.org before setting out, as both will list current fire closure information. Because of the extreme fire danger, campfires are prohibited in the Deschutes National Forest in nonwilderness areas, even in designated campgrounds. Fires are allowed in wilderness areas, but Sabo said the U.S. Forest Service is asking campers to not have fires if possible. If they must use a campfire, campers should attend it closely, completely extinguish it when leaving camp, and keep it small and in a legally designated area. “Conditions are so tinder-dry out there,” Sabo said. “We certainly have enough fire traffic going on that we don’t need another popping up.” Additional closures are now in effect at Tumalo Falls, though these are not related to fires. The city of Bend is installing pipeline around the Bridge Creek Watershed, which has closed the Tumalo Falls trailhead, Farewell trail, the lower section of the Bridge Creek Trail, a section of Tumalo Creek Trail and Forest Road 4603. Skyliner trailhead will also have intermittent closures, though hikers can park to the west of the trailhead.

See Trails / B6

Anne Aurand / The Bulletin

Fort Rock State Park as seen from the road as you approach.

Photos by Anne Aurand / The Bulletin

On the northwestern side of Fort Rock State Park, a trail climbs up to this crack in the wall, which provides a view outside of the walls of other rock formations that bulge upward from an endless sea of rabbitbrush, bitterbrush, sagebrush and grasses.

Inside the fortress • Find your inner child at Fort Rock State Park By Anne Aurand The Bulletin

W

SPOTLIGHT Tools needed for fundraiser The Heart of Oregon Corps, a nonprofit that helps young people through employment and education, is asking for donations of unwanted tools for an upcoming fundraiser. The organization will put on a Gear & Tool-apalooza Sale on Oct. 13. It will start at 9 a.m. at the baseball field at Marshall High School in Bend. Heart of Oregon Corps is accepting tool and gear donations from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Mondays through Fridays at 1291 N.E. Fifth St., Building B, Bend. Its office is located next to the school. Contact: 541-6337834. — From staff reports

hen considering where to venture for an outing last week, my primary goal was to escape the smoke from the Pole Creek Fire. I figured I should head the opposite direction and drive as far as feasible for a day trip. I decided to check out Fort Rock State Park, a geologic gem and dramatic dose of scenery about 90 minutes southeast of Bend. My next quandary was whether to wait until the weekend so I could take my 6-year-old daughter. The

hiking out there is easy and I knew she would love scrambling around on the rocky cliffs and exploring the kidsized caves. Ultimately, I realized I should use the weekend for the unpleasant chore of moving into a new home. My household was boxed up and waiting for a U-Haul and a day off to move. So, on Friday, I hit the road by myself shortly after 9 a.m. and by 10:30 a.m., I was hiking up the dusty little trail that starts on the southeastern edge of the Fort Rock monolith, near a picnic area, outhouses and the information kiosks. See Outing / B6

Fort Rock State Park can be seen from the road as you approach.

You can see what 2.9 million years ago looks like By Bill Logan For The Bulletin

SKY WATCH

The autumn constellations — Capricorn, Aquarius, Aries, Perseus and Pisces — are now becoming prominent along the zodiac in the south and east. The giant square of Pegasus appears due east shortly after dark and at the zenith (directly overhead, also called the transit) by midnight this time of year. Jupiter will grace the eastern night sky

at 10:01 tonight and will be at the zenith at 5:35 a.m. Friday. Jupiter will be easy to spot as it will be very bright in the east within 16 degrees below the open star cluster the Pleiades. Incidentally, the Pleiades is also known as the Seven Sisters, and is the logo of the Subaru automobile. To find Andromeda Galaxy, look about 11 degrees north of the Pleiades open star cluster (or one fist width at arm’s length). In

dark and clear skies, it can be seen with the naked eye. If you have a smartphone using the Google Sky app, just point north of the Pleiades and Andromeda will appear. The Andromeda Galaxy is a beautiful sight in a good pair of binoculars. It’s way too big for any telescope. The light you see in your binoculars left Andromeda 2.9 million years ago. Likewise, if astronomers in Andromeda had a powerful

telescope, they would see us as we were 2.9 million years ago. The moon will be waxing gibbous (more than 50 percent illuminated) tonight, rising at 5:29 p.m. and setting at 4:30 a.m. Friday. The full moon will be at 7:41 a.m. Saturday morning. The full moon is the second-brightest object in the sky and deep space objects will be “washed out” during the full moon. See Sky Watch / B6


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THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2012

TV & M

Holmes, out of rehab, with a Lady Watson solid performance by Aidan Quinn as Capt. Gregson, Holmes’ New York police By Mike Hale confidant. New York Times News Service Part of the show’s premise When CBS added “Elemen- is that Holmes and Watson are tary� to its fall schedule, a lot equally damaged, and that Watof people asked whether tele- son begins to come out of her vision really needed another shell because she’s excited by the Sherlock Holmes show when intellectual challenge of solving the one we already have, cour- crimes. It’s not a bad idea, and tesy of BBC and Liu makes it work PBS, is so good. TV SPOTLIGHT in the pilot, delinThat strikes me eating Watson’s as unfair, though, awakening with a and not only because the mak- touching restraint. ers of BBC’s “Sherlock� cough However, beyond its stars, up only three episodes a year. “Elementary� is a mixed bag. The crazy-genius police con- Doherty, whose primary sultant character has so thor- credit is a long stint on the oughly colonized American voluptuously melodramatic television over the last decade, “Medium,� is good on atmofrom “Monk� to “Psych� to sphere and character but not “The Mentalist,� that CBS and so strong on plot mechanics, the creator of “Elementary,� and that’s a problem with a Rob Doherty, should get credit Holmes story. for at least being honest about Some of Holmes’ deductheir source. tions in the first murder case In keeping with that hon- seem arbitrary even by TV esty, this new Holmes is not procedural standards, and only played by a British actor, regular viewers of crime draJonny Lee Miller (of ABC’s mas will have the kind of nag“Eli Stone� and “After Miss ging questions that drive them Julie� on Broadway), but is crazy. (Shouldn’t the coroner also actually British. Having have been able to tell whether fled London for drug rehab in the deliveryman died yesterNew York, he’s now living in day or three days ago?) what appears to be a BrookAnd as well as Miller and Liu lyn Heights brownstone with a finesse their characters, at times marvelous rooftop view of the you can’t avoid noticing a tiring Brooklyn Bridge. familiarity and superficiality in His Dr. Watson, however, is their psychological issues, and a novelty double — or perhaps how the Holmes character, estriple — play: Asian-American pecially, shows signs of Franand female. Lucy Liu plays kensteinlike origins: a piece of Joan Watson, a former surgeon Adrian Monk here, a piece of who suffered a crackup of her Gregory House there. own and now makes a living as Those are both things that a combination baby-sitter and can be fixed, or could subside, warden for former addicts. as the series progresses, howMiller and Liu are good in ever, and it would be nice if the pilot, and their rapport is that happened, because it’s fun reason enough to check out to watch Miller, Liu and Quinn “Elementary,� along with a work together. “Elementary� 10 tonight, CBS

L M T 

FOR THURSDAY, SEPT. 27

RESIDENT EVIL: RETRIBUTION IMAX (R) 1:05, 4:15, 7:05, 9:35

BEND

TROUBLE WITH THE CURVE (PG-13) 12:10, 1:10, 3:30, 6:10, 7:10, 9:20

Sisters Movie House

EDITOR’S NOTES:

720 Desperado Court, Sisters, 541-549-8800

• Accessibility devices are available for some movies at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX. • There may be an additional fee for 3-D movies. • IMAX films are $15.50 for adults and $13 for children (ages 3 to 11) and seniors (ages 60 and older). • Movie times are subject to change after press time.

END OF WATCH (R) 6:30

Regal Pilot Butte 6

McMenamins Old St. Francis School

2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend, 541-382-6347

BEASTS OF THE SOUTHERN WILD (PG-13) 1:15, 4:15, 7:15 THE BEST EXOTIC MARIGOLD HOTEL (PG-13) 12:30, 3:30, 6:30 THE BOURNE LEGACY (PG-13) 12:15, 3:15, 6:15 CELESTE AND JESSE FOREVER (R) 1, 4, 7 COSMOPOLIS (R) 12:45, 3:45, 6:45 THE MASTER (R) Noon, 3, 6

Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend, 541-382-6347

2016: OBAMA’S AMERICA (PG) 1:55, 4:55, 7:20, 9:35 THE BOURNE LEGACY (PG-13) Noon, 3:10, 6:20, 9:30 THE CAMPAIGN (R) 7:35, 9:50 DREDD 3-D (R) 7, 9:40 DREDD (R) 1:20, 3:50 END OF WATCH (R) 12:05, 3, 6:05, 9 FINDING NEMO (G) 12:45 FINDING NEMO 3-D (G) 12:35, 3:35, 4:35, 6:25, 7:30, 9:05 HOPE SPRINGS (PG-13) 1:35, 4:05, 6:40, 9:10 HOUSE AT THE END OF THE STREET (PG-13) 12:25, 3:20, 6:45, 9:25

700 N.W. Bond St., Bend, 541-330-8562

MARVEL’S THE AVENGERS (PG-13) 5:30 “Line of Sight� screens at 9 tonight. After 7 p.m., shows are 21 and older only. Younger than 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.

Tin Pan Theater

HOPE SPRINGS (PG-13) 6:15 TROUBLE WITH THE CURVE (PG13) 6:15 WILD HORSE, WILD RIDE (PG) 6:30

MADRAS Madras Cinema 5 1101 S.W. U.S. Highway 97, Madras, 541-475-3505

DREDD (R) 5:20, 7:30

869 N.W. Tin Pan Alley, Bend, 541-241-2271

END OF WATCH (R) 4:50, 7:10 FINDING NEMO 3-D (G) 4:30, 6:50

MUST COME DOWN (no MPAA rating) 6, 8:30

Weekly Arts & Entertainment In

HOUSE AT THE END OF THE STREET (PG-13) 5:10, 7:20 TROUBLE WITH THE CURVE (PG13) 4:40, 7

REDMOND

Every Friday

Redmond Cinemas

PRINEVILLE

1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond, 541-548-8777

IMAGINE Buying a Car From Someone You TRUST...

Pine Theater

HOPE SPRINGS (PG-13) 4, 6:15 HOUSE AT THE END OF THE STREET (PG-13) 4:30, 6:45 THE POSSESSION (PG-13) 5:15, 7:15 TROUBLE WITH THE CURVE (PG13) 4:15, 6:45

214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

NOW YOU CAN!

THE EXPENDABLES 2 (UPSTAIRS — R) 6

From AAA Oregon Autosource

PARANORMAN (PG) 4, 7

SALES CONSULTANT Dealer#0225

Pine Theater’s upstairs screening room has limited accessibility.

SISTERS

Bob Hoffman New or Used Trade-ins are Welcomed! Financing Available

LAST OUNCE OF COURAGE (PG) 1:45, 4:45, 7:45

Go to the source you can trust...

LAWLESS (R) 12:20, 3:05, 6:30, 9:15 THE ODD LIFE OF TIMOTHY GREEN (PG) 1:25, 4:25, 7:40

Oregon Autosource

PARANORMAN (PG) 2, 5 THE POSSESSION (PG-13) 3:55, 9:50 RESIDENT EVIL: RETRIBUTION (R) 12:55, 3:45, 6:55, 9:25

541-598-3750 20350 Empire Blvd., Suite 5 Bend, OR 97701

aaaoregonautosource.com

L TV L

 

THURSDAY PRIME TIME 9/27/12

*In HD, these channels run three hours ahead. / Sports programming may vary. BD-Bend/Redmond/Sisters/Black Butte (Digital); PM-Prineville/Madras; SR-Sunriver; L-La Pine

ALSO IN HD; ADD 600 TO CHANNEL No.

BROADCAST/CABLE CHANNELS

BD PM SR L ^ KATU KTVZ % % % % KBNZ & KOHD ) ) ) ) KFXO * ` ` ` KOAB _ # _ # ( KGW KTVZDT2 , _ # / OPBPL 175 173

5:00

5:30

KATU News World News News Nightly News News Evening News KEZI 9 News World News America’s Funniest Home Videos Wild Kratts ‘Y’ Electric Comp. NewsChannel 8 Nightly News We There Yet? We There Yet? Chef John Besh Sara’s

6:00

6:30

KATU News at 6 (N) ’ Å NewsChannel 21 at 6 (N) Å Access H. Old Christine KEZI 9 News KEZI 9 News Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Travelscope Business Rpt. NewsChannel 8 News King of Queens King of Queens The Return of Sherlock Holmes

7:00

7:30

Jeopardy! ‘G’ Wheel Fortune Jeopardy! ‘G’ Wheel Fortune How I Met 30 Rock ’ ‘14’ Entertainment The Insider (N) Big Bang Big Bang PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Ă… Live at 7 (N) Inside Edition Engagement Engagement Finding Your Roots

8:00

8:30

Last Resort Captain (N) ‘14’ Ă… Sat. Night Live Up All Night (N) Big Bang Two/Half Men Last Resort Captain (N) ‘14’ Ă… The X Factor Auditions No. 6 ‘14’ Oregon Art Beat Outdoor Idaho Sat. Night Live Up All Night (N) The Vampire Diaries ‘14’ Ă… POV Brief documentaries. ’ ‘PG’

9:00

9:30

Grey’s Anatomy (N) ’ ‘14’ Ă… The Office ‘PG’ Parks/Recreat (9:01) Person of Interest (N) ‘14’ Grey’s Anatomy (N) ’ ‘14’ Ă… Glee Makeover (N) ’ ‘14’ Doc Martin Blood Is Thicker ‘PG’ The Office ‘PG’ Parks/Recreat The Next (N) ’ (Live) ‘PG’ Ă… World News Tavis Smiley (N)

10:00

10:30

(10:02) Scandal (N) ’ ‘14’ Ă… Rock Center With Brian Williams (10:01) Elementary Pilot (N) ‘14’ (10:02) Scandal (N) ’ ‘14’ Ă… News TMZ (N) ’ ‘PG’ The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes Rock Center With Brian Williams Seinfeld ‘PG’ Seinfeld ‘PG’ Charlie Rose (N) ’ ‘PG’ Ă…

11:00

11:30

KATU News (11:35) Nightline News Jay Leno News Letterman KEZI 9 News (11:35) Nightline The Simpsons Family Guy ‘14’ Arts & the Mind ’ ‘PG’ Ă… NewsChannel 8 Jay Leno ’Til Death ‘PG’ ’Til Death ‘PG’ PBS NewsHour ’ Ă…

BASIC CABLE CHANNELS

The First 48 ‘14’ Ă… The First 48 Ă… The First 48 ‘14’ Ă… The First 48 Brutal Business After the First 48 (N) Ă… (11:01) The First 48 ‘14’ Ă… *A&E 130 28 18 32 The First 48 ‘14’ Ă… CSI: Miami About Face A criminal CSI: Miami Caged Horatio protects a CSI: Miami Paint It Black Investigation ››› “The Princess Brideâ€? (1987, Adventure) Cary Elwes, Robin Wright. A ›››› “Close Encounters of the Third Kindâ€? (1977) Richard Dreyfuss. UFO *AMC 102 40 39 takes Natalia hostage. ‘14’ Ă… martial artist. ’ ‘14’ Ă… into a student’s death. ‘14’ stableboy in disguise sets out to rescue his beloved. Ă… sighters finally meet the aliens that obsessed them. Ă… Call-Wildman Call of Wildman Swamp Wars ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Swamp Wars ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Swamp Wars ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Man-Eating Super Snake ’ ‘14’ Swamp Wars ’ ‘PG’ Ă… *ANPL 68 50 26 38 Rattlesnake Republic ‘PG’ Ă… Housewives/NYC Housewives/NJ Housewives/NJ The Real Housewives of Miami The Real Housewives of Miami The Real Housewives of Miami What Happens Housewives BRAVO 137 44 Roseanne ‘G’ Reba ‘PG’ Ă… Reba ‘PG’ Ă… Reba ‘PG’ Ă… Reba ‘PG’ Ă… Reba ‘PG’ Ă… Reba ‘PG’ Ă… Crossroads (N) ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Dallas Cowboys Cheerleaders: Making the Team ’ ‘PG’ Ă… CMT 190 32 42 53 Roseanne ‘G’ Crime Inc. American Greed Mad Money Crime Inc. American Greed Jillian Michaels Breakthrough CNBC 54 36 40 52 The Facebook Obsession Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 Ă… Erin Burnett OutFront Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 Ă… Erin Burnett OutFront CNN 55 38 35 48 Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Ă… (6:02) Tosh.0 Colbert Report Daily Show (7:44) Futurama ’ ‘14’ Ă… (8:17) Futurama (8:50) Futurama (9:23) Futurama South Park Brickleberry Daily Show Colbert Report COM 135 53 135 47 (4:58) Futurama Always Sunny Dept./Trans. City Edition Paid Program Morning Oregon Desert Cooking: Central Oregon Style Journal Get Outdoors Visions of NW The Yoga Show The Yoga Show Morning Oregon City Edition COTV 11 Capitol Hill Hearings CSPAN 61 20 12 11 Capitol Hill Hearings Wizards-Place Phineas, Ferb Good-Charlie Austin & Ally ’ My Babysitter Shake It Up! ‘G’ ›› “Hannah Montana: The Movieâ€? (2009) Miley Cyrus. ’ Ă… Phineas, Ferb Good-Charlie Shake It Up! ‘G’ *DIS 87 43 14 39 Wizards-Place Fast N’ Loud Amazing Impala ‘14’ Fast N’ Loud ’ ‘14’ Ă… Fast N’ Loud ’ ‘14’ Ă… Fast N’ Loud ’ ‘14’ Ă… Texas Car Wars (N) ’ ‘14’ Ă… Fast N’ Loud ’ ‘14’ Ă… *DISC 156 21 16 37 Fast N’ Loud ’ ‘14’ Ă… Fashion Police ‘14’ Kevin & Dani Jonas ‘14’ E! News (N) The Soup ‘14’ Jonas Keeping Up With the Kardashians Kardashian Kardashian Chelsea Lately E! News *E! 136 25 College Football Stanford at Washington (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… ESPN 21 23 22 23 College Football Live (N) Ă… WNBA Basketball San Antonio Silver Stars at Los Angeles Sparks (N) NFL Live (N) (Live) Ă… Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) Ă… MMA Live (N) NASCAR Now ESPN2 22 24 21 24 WNBA Basketball New York Liberty at Connecticut Sun (N) Ă… Friday Night Lights ’ ‘14’ Ă… Friday Night Lights ’ ‘14’ Ă… Car Auctions Car Auctions Boxing Ă… Boxing Ă… Boxing Ă… Boxing Ă… College Football ESPNC 23 25 123 25 White Shadow Bonus Baby Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. ESPNN 24 63 124 203 SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… Reba ‘PG’ Ă… ›› “The Last Songâ€? (2010, Drama) Miley Cyrus, Greg Kinnear, Liam Hemsworth. ›› “Sweet Home Alabamaâ€? (2002) Reese Witherspoon, Josh Lucas. The 700 Club ’ ‘PG’ Ă… FAM 67 29 19 41 Reba ‘PG’ Ă… Hannity (N) On Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Ă… Hannity On Record, Greta Van Susteren The Five FNC 57 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Ă… Best Dishes Chopped ‘G’ Chopped Squashed Chopped Sunny Side Apps ‘G’ Chopped Ready, Set, Escargot! Chopped A seafood surprise. ‘G’ The Great Food Truck Race ‘G’ *FOOD 177 62 98 44 Best Dishes (4:00) ››› “Black Hawk Downâ€? (2001, War) Josh Hartnett. How I Met How I Met How I Met How I Met Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Louie (N) ‘MA’ (10:35) Louie (11:09) Louie (11:40) Wilfred FX 131 Income Prop. Selling NY Selling NY Hunters Int’l House Hunters Buying and Selling ‘G’ Ă… Extreme Homes ‘G’ Ă… House Hunters Hunters Int’l Living Abroad Hunters Int’l HGTV 176 49 33 43 Income Prop. Clash of the Gods Thor ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Counting Cars Counting Cars Capture Cowb. Restoration *HIST 155 42 41 36 Clash of the Gods Minotaur ‘PG’ Project Runway ‘PG’ Ă… Project Runway ‘PG’ Ă… Project Runway ‘PG’ Ă… Project Runway It’s Fashion Baby (N) ‘PG’ Ă… Prank My Mom Dance Moms ‘PG’ Ă… LIFE 138 39 20 31 Project Runway ‘PG’ Ă… The Rachel Maddow Show (N) The Last Word The Ed Show The Rachel Maddow Show The Last Word Hardball With Chris Matthews MSNBC 59 59 128 51 The Ed Show (N) True Life Regret tattoos. ’ Ă… True Life Excessive texting. ’ True Life Digital habits. ’ The Challenge: Battle of Seasons Jersey Shore: Gym, Tan Jersey Shore A New Family ‘14’ MTV 192 22 38 57 (3:40) › “The Final Destinationâ€? SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob Drake & Josh Drake & Josh Full House ‘G’ Full House ‘G’ Full House ‘G’ Full House ‘G’ The Nanny ‘PG’ The Nanny ‘PG’ Friends ’ ‘14’ (11:33) Friends NICK 82 46 24 40 SpongeBob Breaking Down the Bars ’ ‘14’ Breaking Down the Bars ’ ‘14’ 48 Hours: Hard Evidence ’ ‘14’ 48 Hours: Hard Evidence ’ ‘14’ 48 Hours: Hard Evidence ’ ‘14’ 48 Hours: Hard Evidence ’ ‘14’ OWN 161 103 31 103 Breaking Down the Bars ’ ‘14’ UFA High School Football Kentlake at Auburn (N) (Live) Seahawks Seahawks The Dan Patrick Show ROOT 20 45 28* 26 UFA Jail ‘14’ Ă… Jail ‘14’ Ă… Jail ‘14’ Ă… Jail ‘14’ Ă… Jail ‘14’ Ă… iMPACT Wrestling (N) ’ (Live) ‘14’ Ă… MMA Uncensrd ››› “Hunt to Killâ€? (2010) Steve Austin. ’ SPIKE 132 31 34 46 Jail ‘14’ Ă… › “Saw IVâ€? (2007, Horror) Tobin Bell, Scott Patterson. Ă… › “Saw Vâ€? (2008, Horror) Tobin Bell, Costas Mandylor. Premiere. Warehouse 13 No Pain, No Gain SYFY 133 35 133 45 (4:30) ›› “Saw IIIâ€? (2006, Horror) Tobin Bell, Shawnee Smith. Behind Scenes Joel Osteen Joseph Prince Hillsong TV Praise the Lord Ă… Live-Holy Land The Cross Grant Jeffrey Creflo Dollar Praise the Lord Ă… TBN 205 60 130 Friends ’ ‘14’ King of Queens King of Queens Seinfeld ‘PG’ Seinfeld ‘PG’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘PG’ Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Conan (N) Ă… *TBS 16 27 11 28 Friends ’ ‘14’ Saturday After- (5:22) A Sea (6:06) A Harem Catalina, Here I (6:52) Broke in (7:36) The Golf Smith’s Pony (8:22) Fiddle(9:06) The Best His Unlucky (9:52) Taxi for (10:36) Match The Great Pie (11:24) The Loud TCM 101 44 101 29 noon Dog’s Tale Knight Come China Nut sticks Man Silent. Night Two Play Mystery Mouth Toddlers & Tiaras ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Here Comes Honey Boo Boo ‘PG’ Say Yes: ATL Say Yes: ATL Four Weddings (N) ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Bling It On (N) ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Four Weddings ’ ‘PG’ Ă… *TLC 178 34 32 34 Bling It On ’ ‘PG’ Ă… The Mentalist Ball of Fire ’ ‘14’ The Mentalist Red Moon ’ ‘14’ The Mentalist ’ ‘14’ Ă… The Mentalist Pilot ’ ‘14’ Ă… The Mentalist ’ ‘14’ Ă… CSI: NY Super Men ’ ‘14’ Ă… *TNT 17 26 15 27 The Mentalist Red Scare ’ ‘14’ Lego Star Wars Regular Show Regular Show Wrld, Gumball Adventure Time Annoying MAD ‘PG’ Regular Show King of the Hill King of the Hill American Dad American Dad Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ *TOON 84 Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Bourdain: No Reservations Mysteries at the Museum ‘PG’ Mysteries at the Museum ‘PG’ *TRAV 179 51 45 42 Bourdain: No Reservations M*A*S*H ‘PG’ M*A*S*H ‘PG’ Home Improve. Home Improve. Cosby Show Cosby Show (9:12) Everybody Loves Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond King of Queens TVLND 65 47 29 35 (4:30) Bonanza M*A*S*H ‘PG’ NCIS Sea Dog ’ ‘PG’ Ă… NCIS Officer’s sword. ‘PG’ Ă… NCIS Cover Story ’ ‘PG’ Ă… NCIS A blind photographer. ‘PG’ NCIS Trojan Horse ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Burn Notice Scorched Earth ‘PG’ USA 15 30 23 30 NCIS Hung Out to Dry ‘PG’ Ă… Basketball Wives LA ’ ‘14’ Love & Hip Hop ’ ‘14’ Chrissy & Jones T.I. and Tiny ›› “Romeo Must Dieâ€? (2000, Action) Jet Li, Aaliyah, Isaiah Washington. ’ Chrissy & Jones VH1 191 48 37 54 Rehab With Dr. Drew Detox ‘14’ PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS › “Billy Madisonâ€? 1995 Adam Sandler. ’ ‘PG-13’ The Pillars of the Earth ’ ‘MA’ The Pillars of the Earth ’ ‘MA’ › “The Roommateâ€? 2011 Leighton Meester. Ă… (11:35) The Fog ENCR 106 401 306 401 (4:50) ›› “The Fogâ€? 2005 Tom Welling. ‘PG-13’ FXM Presents ››› “The Curious Case of Benjamin Buttonâ€? 2008, Fantasy Brad Pitt, Cate Blanchett. ‘PG-13’ Ă… FXM Presents FMC 104 204 104 120 ››› “The Curious Case of Benjamin Buttonâ€? 2008, Fantasy Brad Pitt, Cate Blanchett. ‘PG-13’ Ă… UFC Fight Night ’ ‘PG’ UFC Unleashed UFC Unleashed The Ultimate Fighter ’ ‘PG’ UFC Tonight UFC All Angles Hooters’ Snow Angels ‘14’ FUEL 34 Live From the Ryder Cup Live From the Ryder Cup European Tour Weekly (N) ‘G’ GOLF 28 301 27 301 Live From the Ryder Cup Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ HALL 66 33 175 33 The Waltons The Substitute ‘G’ (3:45) ››› “Extremely Loud & Incred- The Latino List: Volume Two ’ ›› “Klitschkoâ€? 2011, Documentary The lives and careers of Vitali and Wladi- ››› “Rise of the Planet of the Apesâ€? 2011 James Franco. A medical experi- Real Sex Naked witches perform MacHBO 425 501 425 501 ibly Closeâ€? 2011 ‘PG-13’ ‘14’ Ă… mir Klitschko. ’ ‘NR’ ment results in a superintelligent chimp. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… beth. ’ ‘MA’ Ă… ›› “Ramboâ€? 2008 Sylvester Stallone. ‘NR’ (6:45) ››› “Valhalla Risingâ€? 2009, Action Mads Mikkelsen. ‘NR’ (8:45) ››› “Open Waterâ€? 2003, Suspense Blanchard Ryan. ‘R’ ››› “Valhalla Risingâ€? 2009 Mads Mikkelsen. IFC 105 105 (3:40) ›› “Sucker ››› “Collateralâ€? 2004, Suspense Tom Cruise, Jamie Foxx. A contract killer ››› “Forrest Gumpâ€? 1994, Comedy-Drama Tom Hanks, Robin Wright, Gary Sinise. An innocent › “Your Highnessâ€? 2011, Comedy Danny McBride, James (11:45) “Erotic MAX 400 508 508 Punchâ€? uses a cabdriver for his jobs. ’ ‘R’ Ă… man enters history from the ’50s to the ’90s. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… Franco, Natalie Portman. ’ ‘R’ Ă… Karmaâ€? 2012 ’ Amish: Out of Order ‘PG’ Amish: Out of Order ‘PG’ Taboo Extreme Bodies ‘14’ Taboo Extreme Bodies ‘14’ Amish: Out of Order ‘PG’ Amish: Out of Order ‘PG’ Wild Justice Bear Scare ‘14’ NGC 157 157 Odd Parents Planet Sheen Planet Sheen Avatar: Air. Avatar: Air. Odd Parents Odd Parents SpongeBob SpongeBob Avatar: Air. Avatar: Air. Dragon Ball Z Iron Man: Armor NTOON 89 115 189 115 Odd Parents In Pursuit With Realtree RealTree’s Bow Madness Ult. Adventures The Season Wild Outdoors Bushman Show Hunt Masters Wild Outdoors Steve’s Outdoor Sasquatch Fear No Evil OUTD 37 307 43 307 Hunt (4:00) “Smoke ›› “Deceptionâ€? 1993, Mystery Andie MacDowell, Liam ››› “Fair Gameâ€? 2010, Drama Naomi Watts, Sean Penn. Valerie Plame is (8:55) › “I Melt With Youâ€? 2011, Suspense Thomas Jane, Jeremy Piven. Col- Gigolos (N) ’ Polyamory: MarSHO 500 500 Signalsâ€? 1998 Neeson, Viggo Mortensen. ’ ‘PG-13’ revealed as a CIA agent. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… lege friends meet up for their annual reunion. ’ ‘R’ Ă… ‘MA’ Ă… ried & Dating Wrecked ‘14’ Wrecked ‘14’ Hard Parts Hard Parts Car Warriors Mustang ‘14’ Wrecked ‘14’ Wrecked ‘14’ Hard Parts Hard Parts Unique Whips ‘14’ SPEED 35 303 125 303 Car Warriors Mustang ‘14’ (6:45) ›› “Cars 2â€? 2011 Voices of Owen Wilson. ’ ‘G’ Ă… (8:35) ››› “The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the Kingâ€? 2003, Fantasy Elijah Wood, Ian McKellen. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… STARZ 300 408 300 408 (4:30) ›› “Country Strongâ€? 2010 ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… (4:05) ›› “Islanderâ€? 2006 Thomas “All Good Thingsâ€? 2010, Mystery Ryan Gosling. The wife of a New York real ›› “Piranhaâ€? 2010, Horror Elisabeth Shue, Adam Scott, ›› “Scream 4â€? 2011, Horror Neve Campbell, Courteney Cox. The Ghostface ››› “The Rockâ€? TMC 525 525 Hildreth. ’ ‘R’ Ă… estate scion suddenly goes missing. ’ ‘R’ Ă… Jerry O’Connell. ’ ‘R’ Ă… Killer returns to claim new victims. ’ ‘R’ Ă… 1996 ‘R’ Caught Looking (N) ‘PG’ Caught Looking ‘PG’ War by the Shore ‘G’ Caught Looking ‘PG’ NFL Turning Point ‘PG’ War by the Shore ‘G’ NBCSN 27 58 30 209 War by the Shore (N) ‘G’ Tamar & Vince (N) Tamar & Vince Tamar & Vince Meet the Herberts Tamar & Vince Ghost Whisperer Dead Eye ‘PG’ Braxton Family Values *WE 143 41 174 118 Tamar & Vince Meet the Herberts


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

A  & A  

Breakup of long marriage may be only short-term Dear Abby: My husband and I just got some shocking news. His father — age 81 — is leaving his wife of 60 years! Mom is not entirely self-sufficient and seems dependent on him. Dad found himself a younger woman — a “chick� of 70. He has announced that he still has sexual needs and wants to enjoy the rest of his life. My husband thinks it will be a shortterm fling and he’ll return to Mom, but she says she won’t be taking him back. (Who knows how she’ll feel later?) My problem is, no matter what happens between them, I’m having a hard time even considering forgiving him for his selfishness. I know it’s not my place as his daughter-inlaw, but I don’t know how I can bring myself to face him feeling as I do. Any words of wisdom? — Judgmental Judy in Arizona Dear Judgmental Judy: I do have a few. If your mother-inlaw hasn’t already done so, make sure she gets the best legal advice possible. After 60 years of marriage, there should be plenty of assets to split. They will make her financially independent, and from that, emotional independence will follow. Do not count her out as a weak sister just yet because she appears to be stronger than you think. While it’s possible your father-in-law may want to reunite after the fling, it is equally possible that when the “chick� sees his nest egg is cracked in half, he will be less appealing to her. Only time will tell. In the meantime, keep the peace, bide your time, and as tempting as it may be to voice everything that’s on your mind, keep your lip zipped. This isn’t your marriage, so don’t stir the pot. Dear Abby: I have been married to “Tom,� the love of my life, for four years. We have been together more than 10 years and have a 2-year-old daughter. Tom was diagnosed with a terminal illness early last

DEAR ABBY year and is close to the end now. He’s very angry, which I understand, but he takes it out on me since I am his caregiver. I’m also a full-time student about to graduate with my degree in registered nursing, so I’m busy all the time. Between school, my daughter and giving full care to my husband, I’m stressed out. He yells a lot about everything, from money woes to the wrong bread on his sandwich. To top it off, we haven’t been intimate since our daughter was born. I’m not considering straying from our marriage, but at times I feel I’ll be ready to date as soon as he’s gone. It makes me feel guilty. Is it wrong to feel this way? Do you have any advice to help me through this tragic time in our lives? — Depressed and Lonely in Michigan Dear Depressed: Yes. Stop beating yourself up for experiencing human emotions at a time when you’re hauling a load that would crush an ox. Of course your husband is angry. He has good reason to be — but he’s misdirecting it on you. Guilt is the last thing you need to add to what you’re dealing with. It’s normal to crave the closeness you haven’t experienced in two years. If there are counseling services offered at your nursing school, please avail yourself of them. Venting your feelings in a supportive environment will lighten your load and help you cope with your husband. There are also online support groups for caregivers. If you reach out in either direction, you’ll feel better. It could also be helpful to ask your husband’s doctor for a referral to someone who does end-of-life counseling for him. — Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

Horoscope: Happy Birthday for Thursday, Sept. 27, 2012 By Jacqueline Bigar This year you experience many different feelings that help guide you. You sometimes wonder which voice to listen to, but only you can decide that. You often have issues with the opposite sex. Maintain your sense of humor, and everything will work out fine. Transform your attitude, and you’ll transform your life. If you are single, you come from a place of compassion when you meet someone. Be vulnerable yet open to the fact that this person might not be Mr. or Ms. Right. If you are attached, share a new hobby with a sweetie in order to become closer. PISCES can drag you down. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHH Your intuition directs you as to which way to go, though you could feel stuck between a rock and a hard place. You see the potential for change, but you need a boss or supervisor to go along with you. You might opt not to share everything you are thinking. Tonight: Not to be found. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHHH A friend seems to zero in on an issue, which helps you to verbalize and express your thoughts. A partner cares, but he or she initially might show it as hostility. Get past this person’s behavior. Detach, and you will see more. Tonight: Where your friends are. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHH You are on top of your game, and you understand what makes an associate function in the way that he or she does. Open up to a talk, and share more of what you think is needed. Be aware of what others suggest as well. Tonight: A must appearance. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHHH Detach before making a final decision. You intuitively want to know more of what could make a situation work. By stepping back, you will gain greater insight for how to proceed. Evaluate what is needed at the moment. Tonight: Your feelings need to lead the way. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH Recheck any agreements that could impact your finances. You have very high ideals, and you want to satisfy them. Sometimes doublechecking is important in ensuring that everything is proceeding as you’d like. Be willing to flow with a change in plans or a call that takes too long. Tonight: Deal with a family member directly.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH Defer to someone who really wants to call the shots and make the decisions. You might not agree with this person, but you need to witness the end results of his or her actions. A child or loved one interjects a delightful element into your day. Tonight: Make calls and figure out weekend plans. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH You deal with others directly and with self-confidence. You know what your expectations are, and, for the most part, you share them with those involved. You could get into a heated conversation at first, but let it go — don’t let it mar your interaction. Tonight: Off to the gym. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHHH Your sense of direction calls for some quick decisions. Your ability to see beyond an issue and understand the consequences of certain actions allows you to make the right move. Deal with a passionate individual directly; remember that this person cares. Tonight: Choose something fun. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHH Think through a problem with key players. What you see happening is OK, even if on some level you don’t buy someone else’s version of the story. Nevertheless, you plan on making an important change because you see the wisdom of making it. Tonight: Happy to be home. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHHH Keep conversations moving. You have an intuitive sense of what you want to hear. Do not let frustration build, and realize that you have no control over others. Stay upbeat. A conversation opens up a situation. Tonight: Visit with a friend over a drink and munchies. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHHH You might not understand the financial implications of what you are seeing. Someone might be more deceptive than you think. If you are unsure, say little and avoid making any commitments. A boss or higherup tests your patience. Tonight: Think “budget.� PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHHH You might want to understand what is going on with someone at a distance. You could be unusually aggravated with a loved one, but let these feelings pass. A friend encourages you to go along with his or her idea. Say “yes.� Tonight: Beam in what you want. Š 2012 by King Features Syndicate

B3

C C  Please email event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� at www.bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

TODAY TUMALO FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 3-6 p.m.; Tumalo Garden Market, off of U.S. Highway 20 and Cook Avenue; 541-728-0088, earthsart@gmail.com or http:// tumalogardenmarket.com. “HOW DID WE GET HERE?� LECTURE SERIES: Featuring a presentation on “What Makes us Human?�; $10, $8 Sunriver Nature Center members, $3 students, $50 for series; 6:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Hitchcock Auditorium, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-593-4394. “WRONG WINDOW�: Cascades Theatrical Company presents the comedy about a couple who think they have witnessed a murder through a window; $24, $18 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www .cascadestheatrical.org. PIANO QUARTET: Free; Win Seley, Maureen Fagan, Jean Edwards and Sally Burger perform light classical and popular piano music; St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, 807 E. First St., Prineville; 541-447-7085. COMMUNIST DAUGHTER: The indie-folk band performs, with Terrible Buttons; $5; 8 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; 541-7280879 or www.reverbnation.com/ venue/thehornedhand. “LINE OF SIGHT�: A screening of the cycling film; proceeds benefit the Bicycle Messenger Emergency Relief Fund, Commute Options, Safe Routes to Schools and Central Oregon Trail Alliance; $5; 9 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www .mcmenamins.com.

FRIDAY YARD SALE FUNDRAISER: Proceeds benefit the center’s programs; free admission; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Center for Compassionate Living, 828 N.W. Hill St., Bend; 541-350-2392 or www.compassionatecenter.org. TEEN CHALLENGE GOLF TOURNAMENT: Four-man scramble golf tournament; proceeds benefit Central Oregon Teen Challenge; $125; 10:30 a.m., 9:30 a.m. registration; Meadows Golf Course, 1 Center Drive, Sunriver; 541-678-5272, kim .vanantwerp@teenchallenge pnw.com or http://teen challengepnw.com. BEND FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 2-6 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-408-4998, bendfarmersmarket@gmail.com or www.bendfarmersmarket.com. COMMUNITY FALL FESTIVAL: A celebration of fall featuring hay rides, a pumpkin patch, face painting, a treasure hunt and more; hosted by Mission Church; free; 5-9 p.m.; Taylor Ranch, 22465 McArdle Rd., Bend; 541-306-6209 or www .mymissionchurch.org. YARN TASTING: Knit or crochet while listening to live music, with a yarn trunk show; hors d’oeuvres and drinks provided; free; 5-8 p.m.; The Stitchin’ Post, 311 W. Cascade Ave., Sisters; 541-549-6061. A CELEBRATION OF FRIENDSHIP AND COMEDY: Perform and listen to standup comedy, food and drinks provided; proceeds benefit Innovation Theatre Works; registration requested; $20 suggested donation; 6-10 p.m.; Innovation Theatre Works, 1155 S.W. Division St., Bend; 541312-3098, pdelruth@gmail.com or www.innovationtw.org. CRAZY EIGHTS AUTHOR TOUR: Eight Oregon authors will speak, for five minutes each, about their life and works; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 422 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-526-1491. GIRLS NIGHT OUT: Night of pampering includes massage, beauty consultations, food, a silent auction and more; registration recommended; proceeds benefit Healthy Beginnings; $40 in advance, $50 at the door; 7-10 p.m.; Carrera Motors, 1045 S.E. Third St., Bend; 541-383-6357 or www .myhb.org. TODD AGNEW: The Christian rock artist performs, with Jason Gray; $32 plus fees in advance; 7 p.m., doors open at 6:30 p.m.; The Sound Garden, 1279 N.E. Second St., Bend; 541-6336804 or www.thesound gardenstudio.com.

Scott Hammers / The Bulletin file photo

The Sisters Fresh Hop Festival returns for its second year at Village Green Park from noon to 9 p.m. Saturday. Admission is free. Celia Getchell, of Salem, reaches for a sample from Cascade Lakes Brewery at the festival last year. “WRONG WINDOW�: Cascades Theatrical Company presents the comedy about a couple who think they have witnessed a murder through a window; $24, $18 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org. THE GLAZZIES: The alternative rock band performs; $5; 8 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; 541-728-0879 or www.reverbnation.com/venue/ thehornedhand. KLOVER JANE: The rock band performs, with Demigod; $5; 8:30 p.m.; Liquid Lounge, 70 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend; 541-389-6999. ELEVEN EYES: The Eugene-based funk and jazz band performs; $5; 9:30 p.m.; Astro Lounge, 939 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-388-0116 or www.astroloungebend.com. NATHANIEL TALBOT: The Washington-based indie guitarist and vocalist performs, with Anna Tivel; $5; Doors open at 6 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-215-0516, derek@ volcanictheatrepub.com or www .actorsrealm.com.

SATURDAY PRINEVILLE FARMERS MARKET: Free; 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Prineville City Plaza, 387 N.E. Third St.; 503-739-0643 or prineville farmersmarket@gmail.com. “BUTTERFLIES AND HUMMINGBIRDS� EXHIBIT OPENS: New exhibit explores the world of butterflies and hummingbirds; exhibit runs through April 7; included in the price of admission; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www .highdesertmuseum.org. FRIENDS OF THE FOREST: Half-day volunteer conservation projects along Whychus Creek; projects include planting, scattering seeds, mulching and more; free; 9 a.m.2 p.m.; Creekside Park, U.S. Highway 20 and Jefferson Avenue, Sisters; 541-549-0253 or www.national forests.org/volunteer. YARD SALE FUNDRAISER: Proceeds benefit the center’s programs; free admission; 9 a.m.2 p.m.; Center for Compassionate Living, 828 N.W. Hill St., Bend; 541350-2392 or www.compassionate center.org. RUN, WALK & ROLL RACE: A race for all abilities that includes a 5K run and 5K wheelchair race and a onemile fun run/walk; $30 in advance, $35 day of race for 5K; 9:30 a.m., 9 a.m. registration; Riverbend Park, Southwest Columbia Street and Southwest Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-280-4878 or www .codsn.org. PASSPORT TO THE ARTS: Take a “passport� and tour downtown art sculptures; with live music and vendors; passports benefit public art purchases; $25 for passport; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Centennial Park, Seventh Street and Evergreen Avenue, Redmond; 541-923-7763 or jaclyn.abslag@ci.redmond.or.us. HARVEST FESTIVAL: Featuring an apple cider press, Dutch oven cooking, wagon rides and vegetable harvesting; $2, $10 families; 11 a.m.-3 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www .highdesertmuseum.org. PACIFIC NORTHWEST SCHOLA CANTORUM: the Seattle-based chorale performs; free; 11:30 a.m.; Bend Seventh-day Adventist Church, 21610 N.E. Butler Market Road; 541-382-5991 or www.pnw scholacantorum.com. SISTERS FRESH HOP FESTIVAL: The second annual festival featuring the best fresh hop brews in the west; live music and beer tasting; free admission, $5 pint glass, $1 per

4 oz. taste; noon-9 p.m.; Village Green Park, 335 S. Elm St.; 541-549-0251 or www.SistersCountry.com. DEAR DIEGO: Robin Martinez explores letters from Diego Rivera’s Russian mistress, Angelina Beloff; free; 2 p.m.; East Bend Public Library, 62080 Dean Swift Road; 541-312-1032 or www.deschutes library.org/calendar. BARBECUE FUNDRAISER: Hosted by the Central Oregon Nordic Club, featuring live music by the Prairie Rockets; proceeds go toward rebuilding the Swampy Shelter; free admission; 3:30-6:30 p.m.; Pine Mountain Sports, 255 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-385-8080, conordicclub@gmail.com or www .saveourswampy.com. “THE CLEAN BIN PROJECT, A COMPETITION WHERE LESS IS MORE�: A screening of the documentary film, with a reception; free; 4:30 p.m.; Sunlight Solar, 50 S.E. Scott St., Building 13, Bend; 541-322-1910. SWINGING WITH THE STARS: Local celebrities dance with professional dancers in a competition modeled on “Dancing with the Stars�; registration requested; proceeds benefit Central Oregon Sparrow Clubs; $15-$60; 6 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-647-4907 or www .swingingwiththestars.org. THE HOPEFUL HEROINES: The Colorado Springs-based folkclassical band performs; free; 6 p.m.; The Workhouse at Old Ironworks, 50 S.E. Scott St., Bend; aworkhouse@yahoo.com. “WRONG WINDOW�: Cascades Theatrical Company presents the comedy about a couple who think they have witnessed a murder through a window; $24, $18 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www .cascadestheatrical.org. “THE DREAM FACTORY�: A screening of the Teton Gravity Research ski film; $12 in advance, $15 at the door, $5 children 12 and younger; 8 p.m., doors open at 7 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.tgrtix.com. REEL ROCK FILM TOUR: A screening of climbing films to benefit Bend Endurance Academy, presented by Mountain Supply; $10 in advance, $15 at the door; 8 p.m.; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541-4195071 or www.reelrocktour.com. THE BEAUTIFUL TRAIN WRECKS: The Portland-based roots rock band performs, with the Jake Oken-burg Band and Brian Copeland; $5; 8 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; 541-728-0879 or www.reverbnation.com/venue/ thehornedhand. THE HOPEFUL HEROINES: The Colorado Springs-based folkclassical band performs; free; 8 p.m.; The Workhouse at Old Ironworks, 50 S.E. Scott St., Bend; aworkhouse@yahoo.com.

SUNDAY MUSIC IN PUBLIC PLACES: Featuring a performance by symphony musicians performing with vocalists Katy Hays and Trish Sewell; free; 1 and 4 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Wille Hall, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-317-3941, info@cosymphony .com or www.cosymphony.com. “WRONG WINDOW�: Cascades Theatrical Company presents the comedy about a couple who think they have witnessed a murder through a window; $24, $18 seniors, $12 students; 2 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www .cascadestheatrical.org. INTRODUCING BELLUNO: Explore Belluno, Italy, Bend’s sister city; free; 2:30 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1032 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/ calendar.

MONDAY No events listed.

TUESDAY “ETHOS�: A screening of the film about system flaws that work against democracy and the environment; free; 6:30 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend; 541-815-6504. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Kaya Mclaren talks about her book “How I Came to Sparkle Again�; free; 6:30 p.m.; Between the Covers, 645 N.W. Delaware Ave., Bend; 541-385-4766 or www.btcbooks.com. PUB QUIZ: Answer questions in rounds on different topics; donations benefit the Kurera Foundation; $40 per team of five; 6:30-9 p.m.; The Summit Saloon & Stage, 125 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-749-2440.

WEDNESDAY BEND FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 3-7 p.m.; Brooks Alley, between Northwest Franklin Avenue and Northwest Brooks Street; 541-408-4998, bendfarmersmarket@gmail.com or www.bendfarmersmarket.com. BUDDY WAKEFIELD: Two-time Individual World Poetry Slam champion Buddy Wakefield performs; registration requested; $15, free for students; 7 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Wille Hall, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-647-2233 or www.the natureofwords.org. ROB LARKIN AND THE WAYWARD ONES: The Los Angeles-based roots-rock band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www .mcmenamins.com. “WRONG WINDOW�: Cascades Theatrical Company presents the comedy about a couple who think they have witnessed a murder through a window; $24, $18 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www .cascadestheatrical.org. MUSIC OF INDIA: Featuring a performance by the Mysore violin brothers; $15 in advance, $20 at the door; 7:30 p.m., doors open at 7 p.m.; The Old Stone, 157 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; 541-322-7273 or www.bendticket.com.

THURSDAY Oct. 4 AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Julia Kennedy Cochran presents her father’s memoir, “Ed Kennedy’s War: V-E Day, Censorship and the Associated Press�; free; 6:30 p.m.; East Bend Public Library, 62080 Dean Swift Road; 541-330-3760 or tinad@deschuteslibrary.org. JEFF CROSBY & THE REFUGEES: The Idaho-based Americana band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. SPEAKNOW: High-school students compete in a spoken word competition; $10, free to participate; 7 p.m., registration at 6:30 p.m.; The Old Stone, 157 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; programs@ thenatureofwords.org. SPIRIT STORIES: A performance of “Spirit Stories: Readings from the poetic drama of William Butler Yeats�; featuring “Purgatory� and “At the Hawk’s Well�; $5 suggested donation; 7 p.m.; Innovation Theatre Works, 1155 S.W. Division St., Bend; 541-504-6721. BILLY DON BURNS: The country artist performs; $5; 8 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; 541-728-0879 or www.reverbnation.com/ venue/thehornedhand.


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THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2012

TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

BIZARRO

B5

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively.

SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

DAILY BRIDGE CLUB

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

Seeking a friendly duplicate bridge? Find five games weekly at www.bendbridge.org.

CANDORVILLE

SAFE HAVENS

LOS ANGELES TIMES DAILY CROSSWORD

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN


B6

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2012

C    D   

Datebook is a weekly calendar of regularly scheduled nonprofit events and meetings. Listings are free but must be updated monthly to continue to publish. Please email event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” at www.bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Contact: 541-383-0351.

ORGANIZATIONS

Bend; 541-728-0050. BINGO: 6 p.m.; American Legion Post #44, Redmond; 541-548-5688.

TODAY BINGO: 6 p.m.; Elks Lodge, Bend; 541-382-1371. COMMUNICATORS PLUS TOASTMASTERS: 6:30-7:45 p.m.; IHOP, Bend; 541-593-1656 or 541-480-0222. THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45-4 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752.

THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45-4 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752.

SATURDAY INTERCAMBIO SPANISH/ENGLISH CONVERSATION GROUP: 9:30-11:30 a.m.; Green Plow Coffee Roasters, Redmond; 541-279-7298.

FRIDAY

SUNDAY

BEND KNIT-UP: $2; 10 a.m.-noon; Rosie Bareis Community Campus,

BINGO: 12:30 p.m.; American Legion Post #44, Redmond;

541-548-5688. THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45-5 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752.

MONDAY CASCADE CAMERA CLUB: 7 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; www.cascade cameraclub.org or 541-312-4364. CRIBBAGE CLUB: 6 p.m.; Bend Elks Lodge; 541-317-9022. THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45-5 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE: 7-9 p.m.; Sons of Norway Hall, Bend; 541-549-7311 or 541-848-7523. ORDER OF THE EASTERN STAR:

7:30 p.m.; Masonic Lodge, Redmond; 541-504-0444.

and cribbage; 9:45 a.m.-2 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752.

Barnes & Noble Booksellers, Bend; 541-728-0050.

TUESDAY

HIGH DESERT RUG HOOKERS: 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-382-5337.

BEND SUNRISE LIONS CLUB: 7 a.m.; Jake’s Diner, Bend; 541-286-5466.

BELLA ACAPPELLA HARMONY: 6 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-388-5038.

HIGHNOONERS TOASTMASTER CLUB: Noon-1 p.m.; New Hope Church, Classroom D, Bend; 541390-5373 or 541-317-5052.

BEND GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY MENTORING PROGRAM: 10 a.m.noon; Williamson Hall, 2200 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-3179553 or www.orgenweb.org/ deschutes/bend-gs. BINGO: 6 p.m.; Eagles Lodge & Club, Prineville; 541-447-7659.

LA PINE CHAMBER TOASTMASTERS: 8-9 a.m.; Gordy’s Truck Stop, La Pine; 541-536-9771.

WEDNESDAY

GAME DAY: 11:45 a.m.; Bend’s Community Center; 541-323-3344.

BEND CHAMBER TOASTMASTERS: Noon-1 p.m.; The Environmental Center, Bend; 541-610-2308.

THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Canasta

BEND KNITUP: 5:30-8 p.m.;

BINGO: 6 p.m.; American Legion Post #44, Redmond; 541-548-5688. THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45-4 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752. KIWANIS CLUB OF REDMOND: Noon-1 p.m.; Juniper Golf and Country Club, Redmond; 541-5485935 or www.redmondkiwanis.org. PRIME TIME TOASTMASTERS: 12:05-1 p.m.; Home Federal Bank, Prineville; 541-416-6549. REDMOND AREA TOASTMASTERS: Noon-1 p.m.; Ray’s Food Place, Redmond; 541-410-1758.

Outing

Sky Watch

Continued from B1 I hadn’t entirely escaped the smoke; a haze clouded the horizon. But once inside the formation, its rust-brown color sharply contrasted the bright blue sky. It was as though a magic force field dissipated the smoke inside the ring of walls. That very idea of magic got me missing my kid. Like the castles of Scotland, this fortress inspires fantastical reverie. I knew my daughter would crawl and climb all over the rocks and into the small caves, pretending to be a dragon or a lizard, the latter of which were (in real-life) scampering all over the place. Fort Rock’s sheer walls tower some 300 feet high, and the entire crescent-shaped formation measures more than a half mile across, according to Alan D. St. John’s book “Oregon’s Dry Side, Exploring East of the Cascade Crest.” This formation was created between 50,000 and 100,000 years ago, a result of underwater eruptions. The entire area was a lake, nearly 600 square miles, under which were numerous faults. When magma arose, it met groundwater and exploded, St. John wrote. “A lathery mixture of wet ash, rocks, lake mud and vaporized water was spewed in great arcs and built a layered mud ring around an exploding crater. This hot glop cooled and hardened into a type of volcanic rock known as tuff,” according to the book. Geologists say it took several eruptions to create the ring. Then, when the volcanic activity calmed down, waves from the Fort Rock lake sculpted the walls that exist today. By about 13,000 years ago, the climate was more arid and the lake was gone, St. John wrote. The steep walls offer protection and habitat for golden eagles, red-tailed hawks and prairie falcons, according to David L. Anderson’s book, “50 Hikes in Oregon.” As I wandered under the walls, raptors soared overhead. I’m not sure what they were because my 40-yearold vision is fuzzy, and my old, cheap sunglasses are scratched, further obscuring eyesight, but I think they were red-tailed hawks. At the heart of the circle, someone has built cairns near a stand-alone pillar that illustrates the forces of erosion. The pillar also offered a little bit of shade for my hairy mutt, who was already seeking out cool, dusty spots to lay her belly. The day was growing hot, and the place is pretty exposed. I realized I had no sunscreen. It was probably packed in a box with other toiletries, ready to move. The Fort Rock trail system is short. Anderson’s book says the loop is about 1.75 miles. But there’s plenty to explore. On the western side, a trail climbs up to a crack in the wall that offers northwestern views of a couple of other rock formations bulging upward from an endless sea of rabbitbrush, bitterbrush, sagebrush and grasses. Climbing over the walls or on the outside of the walls would be dangerous and is not recommended. This vantage point would have been a great place to contemplate and meditate, if it weren’t for the overpowering sound of my dog panting. I shared my water bottle with her, which I’m sure would dis-

Continued from B1 It is the worst time to observe the surface of moon with a telescope or binoculars because there is no contrast and no shadows. Craters and mountain ranges are next to impossible to see. Many amateur and professional astronomers study only the moon. It is interesting to note that the moon “rocks” back and forth several times a month, revealing craters and landscapes on the limbs, or east-west edges of the moon. This rocking motion is call libration, a slight tipping and tilting of the moon from week to week that brings various features into better view. The best time to view the moon’s limbs is during the full moon. For a detailed explanation of these librations, go to www .spof.gsfc.nasa.gov/star gaze/Smoon4.htm. For a libration schedule, you can consult most astronomy magazines.

Photos by Anne Aurand / The Bulletin

A column rises out of the heart of the bowl at Fort Rock.

While you’re in the neighborhood If you have more time to explore, here’s a couple of other nearby sites to consider visiting after you’ve seen Fort Rock:

• HOLE-IN-THE-GROUND About six miles northwest of Fort Rocks, is best reached by returning to U.S. Highway 31 and then driving north. In about seven miles, look for signs to Hole-in-the-Ground and take a right on a gravel road. In about five more miles, you’ll be at the milewide, 350- to 520-foot deep depression.

•CRACK IN THE GROUND A 70-foot-deep, two-milelong narrow fissure in the basaltic landscape caused by a fault line, is east of Fort Rock and about seven miles north of the small town of Christmas Valley.

There’s an easy, short trail that starts near the parking area and loops around Fort Rock. It travels along the inside of the crescent-shaped formation.

Bend Sunriver 97

Source: “Oregon’s Dry Side; Exploring East of the Cascade Crest,” by Alan D. St. John

Fort Rock State Park 20

Deschutes Deschutes National County Forest

Lake County

Fort Rock State Park

Trail

18

La Pine

Parking

Fort Rock

Bill Logan is an expert solar observer and a volunteer amateur astronomer with University of Oregon’s Pine Mountain Observatory. He lives in Bend. Contact: blogan0821@gmail.com

Trails Continued from B1 All of these closures will be in effect for approximately eight months, through May or June, according to Sabo. And access will be barred to all traffic on Tumalo Falls Road, including walkers and bikers, and skiers in the winter. North Fork Trail, above Tumalo, will remain open, but will offer access only to hikers. Because of the myriad closures for bikers in this area, Sabo recommends that cyclists who are planning long trips check maps posted on the Deschutes National Forest website before setting out to ensure that routes are open. As a final note, Sabo recommends that trail users keep in mind that certain hunting seasons are still in effect. In addition to extreme fire wariness, hikers should consider wearing bright clothes to avoid being mistaken for animals. — Breanna Hostbjor, The Bulletin

County Rd. 5-11A To Fort Rock 31 Greg Cross / The Bulletin

This small side trail scrambles up to an overlook that provides westward views outside of the walls of Fort Rock. Kenai the dog takes an opportunity to rest in the shade.

gust some people but made me feel like a responsible caregiver. Because for the most part, I was pretty unprepared for both of us. I carried one water bottle and an apple in a canvas grocery bag slung over my shoulder (my backpack was stuffed into a moving box

somewhere). You can get away with that in this small hiking area in which its impossible to get lost, when you’re not traveling with a kid. I sat at the vantage spot, pulled off my running shoes and dumped out rocks. I’d recommend hiking boots only be-

cause the gravely dust is deep and can creep into your shoes. Alas, my boots were long packed away. Colorful splashes of chartreuse and orange lichen brightened up the rock wall where I sat. The rock was pocked with fairy-sized indentations, that is, if you think like a 6-year-old and you see fairy dwellings everywhere. I know exactly which spots will delight my daughter when the weather cools off and I bring her here to explore. But spending time alone with my own, inner 6-year-old is good sometimes, too. — Reporter: 541-383-0304, aaurand@bendbulletin.com

If you go Getting there: From Bend, drive south through La Pine on U.S. Highway 97, then head southeast (left) on state Route 31, toward Reno. It’s about 30 more miles until you turn left at Fort Rock Road. In six miles, take another left on Cabin Lake Road and follow signs to Fort Rock parking lot. Difficulty: Easy Cost: Free Information: 800-5516949 or www.oregonstate parks.org/park_40.php

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Find It All Online bendbulletin.com


LOCALNEWS

News of Record, C2 Editorials, C4

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2012

www.bendbulletin.com/local

LOCAL BRIEFING

“The kinds of contamination they are concerned about won’t happen because we are not doing that.”

Sisters evacuation alert called off

— Susan Petty, president, AltaRock Energy, addressing concerns about fracking and groundwater pollution at a Wednesday meeting in Sunriver

ELECTION: MEASURE 84 For our complete coverage, visit www.bendbulletin.com

The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office is removing the level 2 precautionary evacuation notice for all Sisters area residents as a result of the improvement in the Pole Creek Fire. Residents from the affected areas should be aware that fire conditions still exist and will probably continue until seasonal weather conditions change. A large area south and west of Sisters remains closed because of the fire.

Opponent calls estate tax bad for economy By Lauren Dake The Bulletin

Bend-La Pine asks budget panel help Bend-La Pine Schools is seeking applicants for its budget committee. Two volunteer positions are available: one for a three-year term and one for a two-year term. The budget committee works with the school board to review the budget for the school year. Committee members are asked to attend several meetings each school year. Deadline for applications is 4 p.m. Oct. 30. Send a letter of interest and a résumé to BendLa Pine Schools Board of Directors, Attention: Marsha Baro, 520 N.W. Wall Street, Bend 97701. To learn more, call 541-355-1004.

NeighborImpact offers free program As part of National Energy Awareness Month in October, NeighborImpact will offer free home weatherization services to those who meet income requirements. The nonprofit will offer services such as insulation, air sealing and replacement of inefficient appliances. To qualify, applicants must meet income requirements and get homeowner approval. The organization will also offer free energy education workshops that provide tips on saving energy and money. The workshops are free. To learn more, go to www.neighborimpact. org/homesource or call 541-316-2034. More briefing and election calendar, C2

FIRE UPDATE Reported for Central and Eastern Oregon. For the latest information, visit www.nwccweb .us/information/ firemap.aspx.

La Grande

3 2

Newberry test ready to rock • Despite resistance, AltaRock announces it soon will launch geothermal experiment By Dylan Darling The Bulletin

SUNRIVER — Cracking of hot rock deep within Newberry Volcano will start early next month, the company leading a geothermal experiment announced Wednesday night at a public meeting. AltaRock Energy of Seattle plans to pump cold water down a 10,000-foot well beginning the week of Oct. 8, Susan Petty, company president said. About 20 people attended the meeting in Sunriver, with a vocal contingent of four repeatedly breaking into her presentation with questions about whether the experiment was fracking and if it would taint groundwater. “The kinds of contamination they are concerned about won’t happen because we are not doing that,” Petty said after the meeting. Fracking, short for hydraulic fracturing, is the controversial process of breaking underground rock with high pressure water mixed with chemicals to release pockets of oil and natural gas. Petty says AltaRock will be using hydroshearing rather than fracking in the experiment.

Enhanced geothermal systems project

Hydroshearing will lead to a network of small cracks, she said, while fracking creates large fractures. The critics of the experiment argue there isn’t a difference and the company is avoiding using the term “fracking” to avoid controversy. “Fracking is what it is,” said Sheilajean Whitehead, 59, a former nurse from Bend. She was among the group who repeatedly questioned Petty about how the project might affect groundwater and the volcano. The other key concern of critics is the possibility the experiment will cause earthquakes, or worse, an eruption. “How are you going to turn off the volcano once you turn it on?” Whitehead said. Petty said the experiment will be creating earthquakes, but the “micro” temblors will be so small that people in La Pine and other nearby places won’t feel them. The company will use sensitive equipment to monitor the earthquakes and track the spread of underground cracks. It has plans to stop the experiment if the quakes are strong enough to be felt. See Geothermal / C2

AltaRock Energy plans to pump millions of gallons of water into the earth starting early next month to open fractures deep below Newberry Volcano. It will then test how well passing water through the cracked rock heats the water as a potential source of geothermal power production. NE WBERRY N ATION AL VOLCANIC MONUMENT

Proposed demonstration Newberry Crater site Paulina

97 21

Paulina Lake Resort Paulina Peak

To La Pine MILES 0

1

2

East Lake East Resort Lake

Big Obsidian Flow

21

HOW ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS WORK The process involves pumping water deep into the earth to open fractures, then circulating water through hot rocks to heat it. Tracer chemicals are mixed with the water to determine how much rock it is reaching. 1 Pump water down existing injection well 2 Create reservoir of small fractures using water pressure 3 Drill wells to return hot water to surface and create more fractures 4

Test water circulation

Source: Department of Energy Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

Geothermal experiment at Newberry AltaRock Energy of Seattle is posting updates online about its geothermal experiment at Newberry Volcano. Go to http://www.facebook .com/NewberryEGS and Blog.NewberryGeothermal.com. You can also get information by calling 855-872-4347 toll free.

Madras

MILES 0

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Michael Moore, right, director of project management, and Dave Stowe discuss plans to use steel shims to level the pumps for a geothermal project in the Deschutes National Forest near Newberry National Volcanic Monument.

4

Bend

1

REDMOND Bend

50

1. Pole Creek Fire • Acres: 26,285 • Containment: 75% • Cause: Under investigation 2. Trail 2 Fire • Acres: 139 • Containment: 90% • Cause: Lightning 3. Bear Slide Fire • Acres: 1,680 • Containment: 98% • Cause: Lightning 4. Bald Mountain Fire • Acres: 1,009 • Containment: 0% • Cause: Lightning

C

Obituaries, C5 Weather, C6

Five running for three seats on council By Erik Hidle The Bulletin

Redmond Mayor George Endicott, who is running unopposed for re-election in November, says he hopes the Redmond City Council can stay on topic as it prepares to George welcome at least Endicott one new face after the election. “The two big pitches for the city continue to be that we are open for business and we are continuing to work on being a family-friendly community,” Endicott said. “Right now

Redmond City Council THREE POSITIONS OPEN

Joe Centanni

Anne Graham

Camden King

things in the economy look like they are ticking up. We have new commercial buildings being constructed so we may have turned the corner here.” Endicott said the City Council has a job to continue creating a business-friendly environment in the coming

Ginny McPherson

Ed Petersen

years. Efforts will be directed to northwest Redmond and in the region to the south, near the new high school. Endicott said discussions will also be held on improving amenities for families, such as making the downtown

seasonal skating rink a more permanent fixture. The mayoral term runs for two years. Five candidates are vying for three open council seats. Each councilor serves four years. Joe Centanni was appointed to the council earlier this year after Ed Boero moved to Bend. It isn’t his first time on the council; he was first elected in 2006 but choose not to run again in 2010. Now Centanni is looking to keep his seat, saying his knowledge of city economic issues has stayed sharp. See Redmond / C2

SALEM — Oregon voters will decide this November whether to eliminate the state’s estate tax. Measure 84 is being pushed by former lawmaker and attorney Kevin Mannix, who was the driving force behind several successful Oregon ballot initiatives, including the mandatory-minimum sentencing Measure 11. Measure 84, if passed, would phase out the socalled inheritance tax, eliminating it by Jan. 1, 2016. It would reduce state revenues by $60 million in the 2013-15 biennium, according to Paul Warner, with the Oregon Legislative Revenue Office. For the 2015-17 biennium, that figure would further reduce state revenues by $190 million and when fully phased in, it would decrease state revenues by $256 million in the 2017-19 biennium. See Measure 84 / C2

Bend man braces for plunge into ‘Shark Tank’ Entrepreneur and Bend native Matt Franklin is scheduled to pitch his posture-correction brace to the investors on ABC’s “Shark Tank” on Friday’s episode. But the 1987 Bend High School graduate won’t be alone. He and business partner “Krazy” Mike Lane will be joined by Jonathan Roberts and Anna Trebunskaya, the professional dancers from the show “Dancing with the Stars.” On “Shark Tank,” entrepreneurs try to persuade the sharks, a panel of investors, to help fund their businesses. In turn, the sharks grill the participants about their business plans. Franklin, 43, said he cannot reveal what happens in the episode, which airs locally on KOHD at 8 p.m. “It was terrifying,” he said. Franklin, who now lives in Portland, and Lane appeared before Barbara Corcoran, real estate mogul; Mark Cuban, owner of the Dallas Mavericks and AXS TV; Robert Herjavec, technology entrepreneur; Kevin O’Leary, venture capitalist; and Daymond John, fashion and branding expert — who is also the scheduled keynote speaker for next month’s Bend Venture Conference. As for the endorsement from the husband-andwife celebrity dance team, Franklin said it’s not a gimmick. The couple uses PostureNow, the posturecorrection product Franklin and Lane developed that reminds users not to slouch. But having celebrities help pitch the product never hurts, he said. “Neither of us know how to dance,” Franklin said, “or know anything about it.” — Tim Doran


C2

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2012

Redmond LOCAL BRIEFING Continued from C1

La Pine land plan gets state approval The Oregon Department of Land Conservation and Development recently acknowledged the La Pine Comprehensive Plan and Urban Growth Boundary. A milestone in civic governance, it enables La Pine to exercise local control of local land-use issues, including zoning, land use, code enforcement capabilities and more, and to self-govern, according to a city news release issued Sept. 20. “Achieving self-governance is why La Pine residents wanted to incorporate to begin with. It is a very exciting day for us that took six years in the making,� said La Pine City Manager Steve Hasson. “Deschutes County extends our congratulations to the City of La Pine, La Pine residents, Planning Commission and elected officials. We look forward to working together on land use projects now and in the future,� said Deschutes County Commissioner Tony DeBone.

Fees will be waived for Public Lands Day Day-use fees at most U.S. Forest Service recreation sites will be waived Saturday as part of National Public Lands

Day. Fees will not be waived at campgrounds or for recreation rentals. In addition to the fee waiver, there will be numerous volunteer opportunities Saturday on state and local lands. Depending on the site, volunteers can plant trees and vegetation, build trails, remove trash and repair bridges. To learn more about volunteering, go to www.publiclandsday.org.

Rookie police dog finds missing man An Alzheimer’s patient who wandered off Wednesday was located by a tracking dog working his first day with the Bend Police Department. Police were called to the area of Northeast 27th Street and Mary Rose Place at around 12:37 p.m., on reports of a 66-year-old man who had been missing for more than two hours. Police dog Ranger, a bloodhound new to the force, was brought to the scene by his handler, Officer Kyle Voll. Ranger and Voll tracked the man and found him huddled under a tree near Rose Pharmacy, a few hundred feet from where he was reported missing. The man was checked by Bend Fire Department medics due to possible dehydration.

Ryan Brenneke / The Bulletin

The site of the geothermal project in the Deschutes National Forest near Newberry National Volcanic Monument.

Geothermal Continued from C1 Petty said the experiment won’t trigger volcanic activity. “This is too small a thing to affect the volcano,� Petty said. The U.S. Department of Energy is covering about half the cost of the $44 million project, which Petty said could lead to major breakthroughs in geo-

CIVIC CALENDAR Occupy Bend: One-year anniversary celebration; noon Oct. 15; Drake Park stage, 777 N.W. Riverside Blvd., Bend. To

learn more, email 2012gig@ gmail.com or call 541-6392696.

N  R POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Prineville Police Department

Theft — A theft was reported at 12:30 p.m. Sept. 25, in the area of Northeast Combs Flat Road.

Measure 84 Continued from C1 But Mannix maintained it would lead to the creation of more jobs. Within five years, he said, eliminating the tax would create more revenue for the state than the tax brings in. “Essentially, we need to phase out the estate tax in Oregon because of the damage it’s causing to family-owned businesses and family-owned farms,� Mannix said. “And, also, simply because it’s an unfair double tax.� Dennis Thompson, spokesman with the state’s Department of Revenue, said on aver-

Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 1:50 p.m. Sept. 26, in the Northeast Elm Street. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 11:14 a.m. Sept. 26, in the area of Southeast 27th Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 6:36 p.m. Sept. 26, in the area of Northeast Yellowpine Road.

BEND FIRE RUNS 18 — Medical aid calls.

age 1,200 estates each year are subject to the estate tax. Mannix believes the tax prevents people from investing in the state and encourages them to leave once they retire. The very wealthy, he said, can find ways to avoid the tax. “It’s the relatively smaller estates hit by this tax and they are the ones that produce jobs,� Mannix said, using local farms and grocery store owners as examples. But Jody Wiser, with Tax Fairness Oregon, said eliminating the estate tax constitutes a tax break for millionaires. It would only affect those whose estates are worth

— Reporter: 541-617-7812, ddarling@bendbulletin.com

For The Bulletin’s full list, including federal, state, county and city levels, visit www.bendbulletin.com/officials.

LEGISLATURE City Council Position 2 candidates Douglas Knight, Edward McCoy, Edward Barbeau and Charles Baer; and Bend City Council Position 4 candidates Jim Clinton and Mike Roberts; Bend City Hall, 701 N.W. Wall St.; 541-382-2724. Oct. 9, 5:15 p.m. Candidate forum featuring Oregon secretary of state candidates Kate Brown, Knute Buehler, Bruce Alexander Knight, Robert Wolfe and Seth Woolley. Sponsored by the League of Women Voters of Deschutes County; Deschutes Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-312-1034. Oct. 11, 5:15 p.m. Candidate forum featuring a presentation on ballot measures. Sponsored by the League of Women Voters of Deschutes County. Deschutes Public Library, East Bend branch, 62080 Dean Swift Rd., Bend; 541-312-1034.

Petty said, building a larger and more productive network of cracks in the rock. She said the technology could lead to geothermal power production wherever there is hot rock underground. “That is what we are trying to figure out how to do, how to do this anywhere,� Petty said.

P  O   

— From staff reports

ELECTION CALENDAR Today, 5:15-7 p.m. Candidate forum featuring Bend City Council Position 1 candidates Victor Chudowsky, Wade Fagen and Barb Campbell; and Position 3 candidates Kathie Eckman, Ron (Rondo) Boozell and Sally Russell. Sponsored by the League of Women Voters of Deschutes County; Bend City Hall, 701 N.W. Wall St.; 541-382-2724. Tuesday, 5:15 p.m. Candidate forum featuring Oregon State Senate District 27 candidates Geri Hauser and Tim Knopp and Oregon House of Representatives District 54 candidates Jason Conger and Nathan Hovekamp. Sponsored by the League of Women Voters of Deschutes County; Deschutes Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-312-1034. Oct. 4, 5:15-7 p.m. Candidate forum featuring Bend

thermal power. While there is hot rock in the Newberry Volcano, there is not a traditional geothermal source of steam venting from the rock. In the experiment, the company is attempting to create geothermal activity by pushing water through cracks in the rock. The experiment will expand on lessons learned at projects around the world,

Senate

Sen. Ted Ferrioli, R-District 30 (includes Jefferson, portion of Deschutes) 900 Court St. N.E., S-323 Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-986-1950 Email: sen.tedferrioli@state.or.us Web: www.leg.state.or.us/ferrioli Sen. Chris Telfer, R-District 27 (includes portion of Deschutes) 900 Court St. N.E., S-423 Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-986-1727 Email: sen.christelfer@state.or.us Web: www.leg.state.or.us/telfer

City Council County Commission

Tammy Baney, R-Bend Phone: 541-388-6567 Email: Tammy_Baney@ co.deschutes.or.us Alan Unger, D-Redmond Phone: 541-388-6569 Email: Alan_Unger@co.deschutes. or.us Tony DeBone, R-La Pine Phone: 541-388-6568 Email: Tony_DeBone@ co.deschutes.or.us

CROOK COUNTY

Tom Greene Phone: 541-388-5505 Email: tgreene@ci.bend.or.us Jeff Eager Phone: 541-388-5505 Email: jeager@ci.bend.or.us Kathie Eckman Phone: 541-388-5505 Email: keckman@ci.bend.or.us Jim Clinton Phone: 541-388-5505 Email: jclinton@ci.bend.or.us Mark Capell Phone: 541-388-5505 Email: mcapell@ci.bend.or.us Jodie Barram Phone: 541-388-5505 Email: jbarram@ci.bend.or.us Scott Ramsay Phone: 541-388-5505 Email: sramsay@ci.bend.or.us

Sen. Doug Whitsett, R-District 28 (includes Crook, portion of Deschutes) 900 Court St. N.E., S-303 Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-986-1728 Email: sen.dougwhitsett@state.or.us Web: www.leg.state.or.us/whitsett

300 N.E. Third St. Prineville, OR 97754 Phone: 541-447-6555 Fax: 541-416-3891 Email: administration@co.crook.or.us Web: co.crook.or.us

House

Crook County Judge Mike McCabe Phone: 541-447-6555 Email: mike.mccabe@co.crook.or.us

716 S.W. Evergreen Ave. Redmond, OR 97756 Phone: 541-923-7710 Fax: 541-548-0706

County Court

City Council

Ken Fahlgren Phone: 541-447-6555 Email: ken.fahlgren@co.crook.or.us

Mayor George Endicott Phone: 541-948-3219 Email: George.Endicott@ ci.redmond.or.us Jay Patrick Phone: 541-508-8408 Email: Jay.Patrick@ci.redmond. or.us Ed Boero Phone: 541-604-5399 Email: Ed.Boero@ci.redmond.or.us Margie Dawson Phone: 541-604-5400 Email: Margie.Dawson@ ci.redmond.or.us Shirlee Evans Phone: 541-604-5401 Email: Shirlee.Evans@ci.redmond. or.us Camden King Phone: 541-604-5402 Email: Camden.King@ci.redmond. or.us Ed Onimus Phone: 541-604-5403 Email: Ed.Onimus@ci.redmond.or.us

Rep. Jason Conger, R-District 54 (portion of Deschutes) 900 Court St. N.E., H-477 Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-986-1454 Email: rep.jasonconger@state.or.us Web: www.leg.state.or.us/conger Rep. John Huffman, R-District 59 (portion of Jefferson) 900 Court St. N.E., H-476 Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-986-1459 Email: rep.johnhuffman@state.or.us Web: www.leg.state.or.us/huffman Rep. Mike McLane, R-District 55 (Crook, portion of Deschutes) 900 Court St. N.E., H-385 Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-986-1455 Email: rep.mikemclane@state.or.us Web: www.leg.state.or.us/mclane Rep. Gene Whisnant, R-District 53 (portion of Deschutes County) 900 Court St. N.E., H-471 Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-986-1453 Email: rep.genewhisnant@state.or.us Web: www.leg.state.or.us/whisnant

DESCHUTES COUNTY 1300 N.W. Wall St. Bend, OR 97701 Web: www.deschutes.org Phone: 541-388-6571 Fax: 541-382-1692

more than $1 million. Wiser pointed out that the money from the tax goes into the state general fund, which is put toward funding schools and public safety. “Why would we damage our schools in order to benefit the very wealthiest families?� Wiser said. She also pointed out that families with natural resource properties — forests and farms — are eligible for a tax credit if their estates are worth up to $7.5 million. “This tax is a fair tax.... There is no reason we should change it,� Wiser said. — Reporter: 541-554-1162, ldake@bendbulletin.com

Find Your Dream Home In Real Estate Every Saturday In

Seth Crawford Phone: 541-447-6555 Email: seth.crawford@co.crook.or.us

JEFFERSON COUNTY 66 S.E. D St. Madras, OR 97741 Phone: 541-475-2449 Fax: 541-475-4454 Web: www.co.jefferson.or.us County Commission

Mike Ahern, John Hatfield, Wayne Fording Phone: 541-475-2449 Email: commissioner@co. jefferson.or.us

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Continued from C1 Centanni has served on both the Redmond Economic Development Board of Directors and the board of Economic Development for Central Oregon. He chaired the last city budget committee. Incumbent Councilor Camden King is a small business owner who says a second term for him will focus on keeping Redmond’s economic development plans moving forward. King believes the city is on the right path. Specifically, he’s happy with progress on the urban renewal district and development near the hospital and airport. King was the one who lobbied successfully during last year’s budget cycle for additional city funds for Redmond Economic Development Inc., an organization that recruits companies to the city. King said bringing higher education to the city and improving the downtown are also priorities. Anne Graham is a retired Intel manager whose career involved factory planning and design across the United States and China. She also spent two years as a consultant for companies looking for new factory locations. Graham was appointed to the Redmond Urban Area Planning Commission in 2011 and said she enjoyed working with the city. She says her industrial development background should help Redmond in its quest to create more jobs. Ginny McPherson, a Redmond minister who has served on the city budget committee and the Downtown Urban Renewal District Citizens Advisory Committee, says she wants to focus on keeping the city budget tight and balanced. McPherson says she also wants to focus on maintaining the efforts to improve the development of the downtown area, and to improve family activities across the city. Ed Petersen is owner of a local advertising company. He is focusing on job creation. He said he believes his background in marketing and advertising translates to helping the city market itself. Petersen said he believes there is more that can be done to promote job growth in Redmond, and wants to see efforts extended toward making the city both business-friendly and attractive to potential employers.

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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

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O N BATTLE OF HUNGRY HILL

Terror suspect wants Searchers uncover site of 1855 fight surveillance records

The Associated Press MEDFORD — Archaeologists and volunteers have found musket balls and other artifacts confirming the site of the biggest battle of the Rogue River Indian Wars nearly 150 years ago. Southern Oregon University announced that the site of the 1855 Battle of Hungry Hill is on federal land west of Interstate 5 in Southern Oregon between Glendale and Sunny Valley, The Mail Tribune reported Wednesday. After fleeTveskov ing an attack by Jacksonville miners on their Table Rock Reservation outside Gold Hill, a band of about 200 American Indians fought off about 300 soldiers and militia members over several days in October 1855. A few months later, the wars ended when the Indians were forced to move hundreds of miles from their home to the Grand Ronde and Siletz reservations. Southern Oregon University archaeologist Mark Tveskov said the battle’s location has long been a mystery, which was solved over the course of three years. Clues came from an old New York Herald newspaper account found by a member of the Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians, which provided new details of the battle, and a battle map in the National Archives located by a military historian. In recent weeks, a team of searchers tramped the Grave Creek Hills west of the old Ap-

Navy aims to expand training at range near Boardman The Associated Press PENDLETON — The Navy wants to expand military training activities at the Boardman Bombing Range in northeastern Oregon, a facility that has gained value recently for drone use. An environmental analysis weighs possible effects of adding mortar pads, live firing ranges or a demolition training area, the East Oregonian reported Wednesday. The proposal includes extending low-flying airspace over the Umatilla Chemical Depot, where destruction of toxic weapons has been completed. The bombing range southwest of Boardman along the Columbia River is used by planes from the Whidbey Island Naval Air Station for low-altitude training — as low as 200 feet. “This is a joint training range ... and it’s at a premium right now,” said Capt. Jay Johnston, commander at Whidbey Island. “We don’t really have the ability to build new airspace.” Johnston said the Boardman range has restricted airspace that’s scarce in the Pacific Northwest and is important for low-altitude electronic attack training. The Navy has held public meetings and is taking comments until Nov. 6 on the environmental analysis. The plan contemplates two levels of expansion beyond current activities. It includes an increase in training activities, as well as new aircraft, ranges for machine gun and convoy fire, a maintenance building for drone systems and a landing strip. Beyond that, the plans call for three mortar pads, a second convoy firing range and a control center.

call many aspects of the investigation leading to the arrest, PORTLAND — In the including details about a day year before his arrest, terror in June 2010 when Mohamud suspect Mohamed Moham- was turned away from an ud sent more than 11,000 Alaska Airlines flight at Porttext messages. He was land International Airport. The FBI was watching the watched by FBI agents, his calls were monitored, and whole time, Henderson testified, and agents took that his emails were tracked. Now, his defense team opportunity to interview Mohamud and his wants records of parents. that surveillance — Federal public derecords the governfender Steve Wax asked ment has said it posHenderson whether he sesses but claims it remembered assemdoesn’t have to probling a report in anMohamud vide to Mohamud. ticipation of the airport The back-andforth played out in federal encounter — something the decourt this week with testi- fense would request if it could mony and tough cross-ex- confirm its existence. Henderamination of two FBI agents son said he didn’t remember who headed the investiga- doing so. “This is precisely the type tion of Mohamud that culminated in his dramatic of concern that we have,” Wax November 2010 arrest dur- then told U.S. District Court ing a Portland Christmas- Judge Garr King. Wax said in court that the tree lighting ceremony. Prosecutors say Moham- government has only provided ud was attempting to deto- about 1,000 of the 11,000 text nate a bomb, though his co- messages sent by Mohamud. King should review those conspirators were in fact undercover FBI agents and documents and thousands of the bomb they placed at the others that the defense believes scene and told Mohamud to exist concerning the investigadetonate with a cellphone tion of Mohamud and determine whether any would be was a fake. The fight over the records helpful to the defense, the lawis part of a larger battle yer said. King appeared noncommittal. the defense is waging as it seeks to keep certain statements made by Mohamud from a jury during a trial scheduled for January. On Wednesday, former FBI agent Chris Henderson testified that he didn’t reBy Nigel Duara

The Associated Press

Jamie Lusch / Medford Mail Tribune via The Associated Press

Southern Oregon University Archaeologist Mark Tveskov holds a musket ball found in the Grave Creek Hill area west of Interstate 5 between Sunny Valley and Glendale. The artifact helped Tveskov’s archaeological team prove it had found the site of the Battle of Hungry Hill.

plegate Trail, now Interstate 5. They looked at two other likely sites and found no artifacts. At the third site, they found two unfired .69 caliber musket balls, which would fit the 1842 Springfield musketoon issued to Army dragoons at the time, and a lead stopper from a gunpowder flask. The artifacts matched similar items found at Fort Lane outside Gold Hill. “Sometimes when you are out there, walking through the woods and finding nothing, you feel like you are crazy for doing it,” Tveskov said. “And we had been doing that for three years.”

Tveskov said they hope to return to the battlefield for more surveys, and to preserve the site for history. Until then, they are keeping its exact location secret. Stephen Dow Beckham, professor emeritus of history at Lewis & Clark College, wrote an account of the battle in his history of the Rogue River Wars, “Requiem for a People.” He told The Associated Press that about 200 Indians, including women and children, were camped in timber on a ridge west of the Applegate Trail between Wolf Creek and Cow Creek, where they

O  B 

Exxon Valdez fund still has $1 million KODIAK, Alaska — A settlement fund set up to pay plaintiffs from lawsuits stemming from the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill still has about $1 million left to disperse. KMXT reports about 900 people haven’t claimed money from the Exxon Qualified Settlement Fund. Plaintiffs’ attorney Dave Oesting of Anchorage says there will be one last push to find these people. If these people can’t be found, the money will have to be turned over to the states from their last known address. The claimants are from many places in the Lower 48, including California, Oregon and Washington state. Oesting also says if a claimant has died, his or her heirs are entitled to the settlement funds.

Gorge fire slows traffic, closes trail PORTLAND — A wildfire in the Columbia Gorge has closed a trail for bicyclists and hikers and slowed traffic on Interstate 84. The Oregon Department of Forestry says the fire is two miles east of Hood River and burning on about 50 acres in steep terrain. It was reported Tuesday evening. The trail on abandoned highway between Hood River and Mosier has been closed. Transportation officials say an eastbound lane of the interstate has been closed, and motorists should be prepared for slowdowns.

Teen rescues boy from burning home PORTLAND — A 14-yearold Troutdale boy is being hailed as a hero after he rescued an 8-year-old neighbor from a burning home. Marcos Ugarte and his father, Eduardo, rushed to the house Monday night when they heard screams outside. The Oregonian says the pair ran to the home and found four family members outside. One child, an 8-year-old boy, had locked himself in a second-story bedroom when he spotted flames and his father couldn’t reach him. Eduardo Ugarte ran inside

the house but was pushed back by flames. Meanwhile, his teenage son grabbed a ladder, climbed it and pulled the boy to safety. Gresham Fire Battalion Chief Mark Maunder says the 8-year-old was taken to a hospital and released. Others were treated at the scene for possible smoke inhalation. Marcos Ugarte is a freshman at Gresham High School.

Board denies parole to Seaside killer ASTORIA — A man convicted of killing a Chicago couple in 1991 in Seaside will remain in prison. The state Board of Parole and Post-Prison Supervision ruled Tuesday that Andrew Metz is not likely to be rehabilitated. The Daily Astorian reports the ruling prevents Metz from seeking early parole from his 60-year sentence. Clatsop County District Attorney Josh Marquis says the ruling is a victory for the family of Duncan and Ellen McKinnon, who were stabbed to death in their hotel room.

Ex-inmate sues jail over strip searches PORTLAND — A former inmate of Multnomah County’s Inverness Jail has filed a federal lawsuit accusing the sheriff’s office of improper strip searches. The civil rights lawsuit filed in Portland by Joseph Cunningham says while he was in jail in the fall of 2010 kitchen workers, including women, were forced to strip at the end of each shift with numerous deputies watching. County Attorney Jenny Morf told The Oregonian on Tuesday that she hadn’t seen the lawsuit and couldn’t comment on the jail’s strip search policy.

Wilsonville issues warning about bombs WILSONVILLE — Officials in Wilsonville are warning the public to watch out for homemade bottle bombs, after four were found Monday in parks. They were safely disarmed. The bombs use household chemicals that expand when mixed and can cause a soda or water bottle to explode. — From wire reports

were attacked by about 250 local militia members. In the fall, when rivers had fallen too low for placer mining, the miners would then regularly attack the local Indians and bill the government. A platoon of Army dragoons blazing a trail from Port Orford on the coast to the Applegate Trail stumbled into the fight and threw in with the militias. Beckham said seven volunteers were killed and 20 wounded, and four Army soldiers were killed and seven wounded. About 20 Indians were killed.

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THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2012

E Bend-La Pine makes strong case for school bond

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espite the economic downturn, more and more students are showing up at Bend-La Pine Schools, prompting the district to propose asking voters for $98

million to build two new schools and repair and upgrade others. If voters approve the bond in May, however, their tax rate will not go up. That’s because payments on older bonds are decreasing as they age. Superintendent Ron Wilkinson said this is the fourth time the district has sought a bond without increasing the tax rate, which is now approximately $1.60 per $1,000 assessed value. The district has made a convincing case for the need to build new schools, and the extent of the repairs and upgrades seems reasonable, considering that more than half the existing schools are at least 30 years old. The school board is expected to decide in October whether to place the bond on the spring ballot. As of early this week, the district had 16,582 students enrolled, an increase of 282 over last year. The vast majority of the increase — 213 — is in elementary grades. The district has grown in 26 of the last 27 years, with 2009 the only exception. Enrollment has increased from 7,641 students in 1986 to 13,551 students in 2001. As of 2011, that amounted to a 10-year average growth of 302 students per year. Projections show a student population of 19,710 by 2021. The district reports that 11 of its 17 elementary school are near or over capacity, as are three middle schools. Those figures make it easy to see why new schools are needed. About half of the new bond would

pay for an elementary and a middle school. The rest would pay for repairs and upgrades at every school in the district. The district’s facilities committee started with a wish list of more than 400 projects before whittling it down to 138, and members say all are needs, not wishes. It’s tough to judge that assertion, but the vast majority of projects look important — heating systems, parking lot paving, ADA-required restroom renovations and replacing windows that have broken seals — among many others. Paring the list wouldn’t save much for any individual taxpayer. In fact, if the bond is defeated, taxpayers would see their rate go down in the first year by about 33 cents per $1,000 assessed value, according to the district’s estimates. On a home assessed at $200,000, that 33 cents amounts to about $66 per year or a little more than $5 a month. Crowding wouldn’t be the only result of a defeat for this bond. If the district has to add portable classrooms, as it has done in the past, each double unit would cost about $80,000 in the first year. That money would come out of the general fund and likely mean losing a teaching position. Also, some of the repairs would have to be paid for from the general fund. It’s a tough time to ask voters for money, but the district has made a convincing case for voter support.

Tumalo Falls Road closure lacked clear advance notice

T

here’s nothing wrong with closing a road to work on it or under it. It’s safer. It also makes it easier to bring in the equipment. So it should not be hard to understand why the city of Bend and the U.S. Forest Service announced Tuesday that Tumalo Falls Road will be closed until spring. The city is going to be installing a pipeline to bring water in from Bridge Creek as part of its $20.1 million surface water project. Construction is scheduled to start on Oct. 10, and equipment needs to be staged before construction can start. There is still an appeal pending before the Land Use Board of Appeals, and Central Oregon LandWatch says it is going to file a federal complaint. Should that mean the city does nothing until every possible complaint or appeal is resolved? That approach would yield con-

trol over projects to anybody with a lawyer. The road closure will make accessing Tumalo Falls more difficult. It’s going to affect access to all sorts of activities — hiking and later cross-country skiing and snowshoeing. Those things are still possible. It will require a tromp through the woods. The announcement was likely a surprise to many. There was no clear advance notice. The mentions of the road closure are buried in planning documents. If there was a mistake, it was that the city and the Forest Service did not make it clear to the community that construction would likely mean a road closure. Bend and Central Oregon residents are keenly interested in access to the outdoors. This project has already been tumultuous. No clear advance notice added unnecessarily to the tumult.

My Nickel’s Worth Support Bagley for judge This November we have an opportunity to elect officials that will represent us for years to come. One of those positions is Circuit Court judge. Two candidates are seeking this position. Only one, however, has the experience, knowledge and integrity to fully serve our community: Beth Bagley. Bagley is the only candidate that has both prosecuted and defended criminal cases in Oregon. Bagley dutifully fulfilled her roles as a prosecutor by her comprehensive knowledge of the law, her professionalism and her emphasis on fair and equal justice for all. Bagley has served Central Oregon for over 10 years as a prosecutor. Her courtroom skills, preparedness and judgment have earned her not only the respect of her colleagues, but the endorsement of all three law enforcement officer associations in Central Oregon — the only candidate for office so endorsed. I have been a police officer for 23 years. I have had a unique opportunity to see the criminal justice system as a citizen and as a member of law enforcement. I have also had the opportunity to work several major cases with Bagley. Not only have I witnessed firsthand Bagley’s ability as an attorney, but I have also seen her compassion and respect for witnesses and crime victims. I am voting for Bagley because she is the only candidate that has the experience, knowledge and

moral compass needed to serve our community. Scott Vincent Bend

Understand power of words While reading reports of the anti-Muslim film that has sparked demonstrations in the Middle East, the words of a playground chant came to mind: Sticks and stones may break my bones but words will never hurt me. When we were children, we thought that was true. As adults we need to recognize the power of words. They can inflame passions or provide a calming influence, create anger or spread understanding, build bridges between nations or sever important alliances that have taken the hard work of diplomacy to establish. Politicians know that, but sometimes they comment about emerging situations before getting all the facts. Talk show hosts know that too, but unfortunately some intentionally frame their comments to create a hateful response. As citizens, we owe it to our country and the world to carefully analyze all that we hear and thoughtfully measure our own comments. Our nation was founded by men and women seeking religious freedom to worship as they please. We owe it to their memory, to our nation, to ourselves and to our brothers and sisters of all faiths to remember that and speak accordingly. We would do well to remember the prayer of St. Francis, “Lord, make

me an instrument of your peace. Where there is hatred, let me sow love; where there is injury, pardon.� Judy Osgood Bend

Environmentalists harm forests, economy, schools As summer turns to fall, I’d like to remember our blessings and thank an environmentalist. 1. When you can’t see or breathe in Sisters because a fire is burning the overgrown forest due to lack of harvesting, thank an environmentalist. 2. When the firefighters can’t reach the fire because “roadless� policy has left the roads in ruins, thank an environmentalist. 3. When 50 percent of the Sisters National Forest is charred timber because we can’t harvest dead wood or even replant, thank an environmentalist. 4. When you pay $4 for gas because we can’t drill for more oil or build new refineries, thank an environmentalist. 5. When the cost of food goes up because so much of our corn harvest is forced into ethanol, thank an environmentalist. 6. When unemployment is over 10 percent in Central Oregon because all the timber harvesting and mill jobs are gone, thank an environmentalist. 7. When schools lay off teachers and classrooms are crowded because the timber tax revenue has dried up, thank an environmentalist. John Shepherd Sisters

Letters policy

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We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 550 and 650 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or email them to The Bulletin. Write: My Nickel’s Worth / In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 Fax: 541-385-5804 Email: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

County corrections projects should be cost-conscious B

By Valerie Kifer ecause the safety of our community is important to me, I attended the county commissioners’ recent work session on the options for additional jail beds. First I would like to compliment the commissioners for avoiding making a rash and irreversible decision. Secondly, I need to express my concerns regarding some unanswered questions. Most important, if the county uses the space in the juvenile detention center to add 88 adult jail beds, how is that going to meet the need for 144 additional beds as expressed by Sheriff Larry Blanton? How long will 88 additional beds meet the needs of Deschutes County? Is there an actual cost savings for the

long term? It does not make sense to reformed juvenile criminals become spend a little now only to have the adult criminals and a poor economy same needs four, five or even 10 years creates more adult and juvenile from now. Also, if it ultimately results criminals. Our juvenile facility can in the need for bonds, now make money accommodatis the time to do it, not five ing the needs of neighboring years from now when inter- IN MY VIEW counties. est rates will most likely be Our local courts do not higher. believe that the old juvenile building It also makes no sense to possi- will meet the needs of our communibly spend $5 million to end up with ty. Current juvenile management has a size-appropriate juvenile deten- created a policy of not holding youth tion center, instead of spending in order to give the impression that $10 million to accommodate the needs they are doing a good job (look at a of the adult jail. I realize budgets na- 10-year history as well as the major tionwide are hurting and the band- increase in crimes of which juveniles aid fix is tempting, but all involved are predominantly involved in). need to look at the whole picture. Is spending $35,000 for a consulThe juvenile detention center is tant from the Midwest to evaluate the the only one in Central Oregon; un- needs of Central Oregon cost-effec-

tive? Is spending $179,000 to $200,000 for a temporary fix, in addition to the costs to convert the current juvenile facility to house adult inmates, cost-effective? Finally, regarding the $10 million price tag for 144-jail beds, exactly what does that include? I realize government construction jobs require the higher prevailing wages, but seriously? Building supply costs are lower than five years ago, so is this buying the usual government building architecture that is just fancy but not functional (look at our newest city and county buildings)? Could the jail addition be done at a lower price by eliminating unnecessary fluff? How many bids did Sheriff Blanton get? I believe I read

in The Bulletin that it was only two. I certainly never saw an RFP in our local paper, and with the excessive numbers of starving construction companies, maybe additional bids should be requested. I appreciate that the commissioners are requesting more information from some of the involved agencies, but as a taxpayer I would also like to see the commissioners use the historical data that is available to them to aid in their decision making. One walk through the juvenile facility in more than five years does not constitute due diligence. Nor does it make sense to fully trust input from individual department heads when their departments are the issue. — Valerie Kifer lives in Bend.


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

WEST NEWS

O D N  Vernon (Vern) L.

FEATURED OBITUARY

Harley Jack DeForest Dillon, of Redmond Jan. 14, 1937 - Sept. 20, 2012 Arrangements: Autumn FuneralsRedmond (541-504-9485) www.autumnfunerals.net Services: Memorial Service: 2:00pm, Sat., Sept. 29, 2012, Seventh Day Adventist Church, 945 SW Glacier Ave.

Paris Ruth Steen, of Bend Nov. 12, 1943 - Sept. 21, 2012 Arrangements: Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home, 541-382-2471, www.niswonger-reynolds.com

Services: Celebration of Life, 11:00 AM Thursday, October 4, 2012 at Nativity Lutheran Church, 60850 Brosterhous Rd., Bend, OR. Contributions may be made to:

Partners In Care Hospice, 2075 NE Wyatt Ct. Bend, OR 97701 or Equine Outreach, 63220 Silvis Rd., Bend, OR 97701.

Robert Arthur Nelson, of Redmond Nov. 25, 1933 - Sept. 25, 2012 Arrangements: Autumn FuneralsRedmond, 541-504-9485, www.autumnfunerals.net Services: Services are pending.

Thomas Joseph Griffin, of Redmond Mar. 30, 1951 - Sept. 23, 2012 Arrangements: Deschutes Memorial Chapel, (541)382-5592; www.deschutesmemorialchapel.com

Services: Memorial Services are being arranged by the family for a later time.

Willa "Marty" Glenn Whitney, of Sisters Oct. 24, 1933 - Sept. 24, 2012 Arrangements: Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home, 541-382-2471, www.niswonger-reynolds.com

Services: A Memorial Service will be held at a later date. Contributions may be made to:

Central Oregon Equine Outreach, 63220 Silvis Road, Bend, Oregon 97701, www.equineoutreach.com

Joyce A. Evans April 29, 1926 - Sept. 22, 2012 Joyce A. Evans was born on April 29, 1926 in Black Creek, WI and peacefully slipped into heaven on Sept. 22, 2012 from Redmond, OR. Joyce met and married the love of her life, Harold Evans, in 1943. The couple lived in a variety of places while he served in Joyce A. Evans the Navy, and afterward settled down in Santa Clara County, CA to raise their family. After retiring, Joyce volunteered in her church’s Food Pantry, for the Goodwill Thrift Store, and was very active in Eastern Star. In 2005 they moved to Oregon, where she spent the final years of her life. She was a lovely, classy lady who liked to dance, sing, cook, camp, fish and entertain. She believed ‘family was everything’, but had many friends and acquaintances. She is survived by her husband of 69 years, Harold Evans, and two of her 3 sons: Hal and Mike (Jeff predeceased her). She has six grandchildren: Alicia Hague, Jacob, Matt, Melissa, Taylor, and Lauren; and four great-grandchildren: Ben, Hannah and Tyler Hague, and Asher Evans. She will be sorely missed by all. Services will be held on Friday; contact the family for details. In lieu of flowers, the family asks donations be made to Partners In Care Hospice (2075 NE Wyatt Court, Bend, OR) in her honor.

July 26, 1924 - Sept. 16, 2012 Vern went to his eternal home with the Lord on September 16, 2012. He was born in Spokane, WA, to Eugene and Cleo Harley on July 26, 1924. He attended schools in Spokane and graduated from the University of Vern Harley California Berkeley majoring in economics in 1947. He became a distributor/jobber for Chevron for 37 years until he retired. He participated in the local SMART reading program helping children to read for several years. He had a great sense of humor to the delight of everyone he met. He enjoyed travelling. He was an avid fisherman and enjoyed local fly fishing and deep sea fishing at the Oregon coast. His greatest joy was fishing for salmon in Alaska for 16 summers until 1999. He is survived by his wife, Carol of 37 years; five children, Carol L. Harley of Vancouver, WA, Jay Harley of Bellflower, CA, Lorie Henderson of Gilbert, AZ, Ted Harley of Goodyear, AZ, KayLee Carroll of Apache Junction, AZ; four step-daughters, Christine Thomas, Jeneane Warner, Stephanie McGolrick all of Bend, Connie Hottinger of Eugene, OR; 15 grandchildren and 12 great-grandchildren. He was preceded in death by parents, Eugene and Cleo Harley; and an infant daughter. He was greatly loved and will be sorely missed. A Celebration of Life service will be held Monday, October 1, 2012, at 10:30 a.m., with a brunch to follow at Nativity Lutheran Church, 60850 Brosterhous Road, Bend. Donations may be made to your favorite charity in his name. Please sign our guest book at www.niswonger-reynolds.com

Obituary policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, email or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. Deadlines: Death Notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. Phone: 541-617-7825 Email: obits@bendbulletin.com Fax: 541-322-7254 Mail: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708

D E 

 Deaths of note from around the world: Billy Barnes, 85. Composer and lyricist whose music and devilishly funny lyrics were displayed on “Rowan & Martin’s Laugh-In� in the 1960s and ’70s and in his earlier series of satirical music revues in Hollywood that launched the careers of performers such as Ken Berry, Bert Convy and Jo Anne Worley. Died Tuesday in Los Angeles of complications from Alzheimer’s disease. — From wire reports

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‘Carmageddon II’ gets softer alarm from officials By Matt Stevens Los Angeles Times

The Associated Press file photo

Andy Williams performs on his Emmy-winning television show in 1961. Best known for his version of “Moon River,� Williams died Tuesday night at his home in Branson, Mo., following a yearlong battle with bladder cancer. He was 84.

Andy Williams was a signature ’60s voice By Jim Salter and Bob Thomas The Associated Press

ST. LOUIS — With a string of gold albums, a hit television series and the signature song “Moon River,� Andy Williams was a voice of the 1960s, although not the ’60s we usually hear about. The singer known for his easy-listening style and his wholesome, middle-America appeal was the antithesis of the counterculture that gave rise to rock ’n’ roll. “The old cliche says that if you can remember the 1960s, you weren’t there,� he once recalled. “Well, I was there all right, but my memory of them is blurred — not by any drugs I took but by the relentless pace of the schedule I set myself.� Williams’ plaintive tenor, boyish features and cleancut demeanor helped him outlast many of the decade’s rock stars and fellow crooners such as Frank Sinatra and Perry Como. He remained on the charts into the 1970s, hosting hugely popular Christmas television specials and becoming closely associated with the holiday standard “The Most Wonderful Time of the Year.� Williams, who continued to perform into his 80s at the Moon River Theatre he built in Branson, Mo., announced in November 2011 that he had been diagnosed with bladder cancer and vowed to return to performing the following year, his 75th in show business. The 84-year-old entertainer died Tuesday night at his Branson home following a yearlong battle with the disease, his Los Angeles-based publicist, Paul Shefrin, said Wednesday. Williams became a major star in 1956, the same year as Elvis Presley, with the Sinatralike swing number “Canadian Sunset.� For a time, he was pushed into such Presley imitations as “Lips of Wine� and the No. 1 smash “Butterfly.� But he mostly stuck to what he called his “natural style� and kept it up throughout his career. In 1970, when even Sinatra had temporarily retired, Williams was in the top 10 with the theme from “Love Story,� the Oscar-winning tearjerker. He had 18 gold records, three platinum and five Grammy award nominations. Williams was also the first host of the live Grammy awards telecast and hosted the show for seven consecutive years, beginning in 1971. Movie songs became a specialty, including his signature “Moon River.� The longing ballad by Johnny Mercer and Henry Mancini was his most famous song, even though he never released it as a single because his record company feared such lines as “my huckleberry friend� were too confusing and old-fashioned for teens. The song was first performed by Audrey Hepburn in the beloved 1961 film “Breakfast at Tiffany’s,� but Mancini thought “Moon River� ideal for Williams, who recorded it in “pretty much one take� and also sang it at the 1962

Academy Awards. Although “Moon River� was covered by countless artists and became a hit single for Jerry Butler, Williams made the song his personal brand. In fact, he insisted on it. “When I hear anybody else sing it, it’s all I can to do stop myself from shouting at the television screen, ‘No! That’s my song!’ � Williams wrote in his 2009 memoir titled, fittingly, “Moon River and Me.� “The Andy Williams Show,� which lasted in various formats through the 1960s and into 1971, won three Emmys and featured Williams alternately performing his stable of hits and bantering with guest stars. It was on that show that Williams — who launched his own career as part of an allbrother quartet — introduced the world to another clean-cut act — the original four singing Osmond Brothers of Utah. Their younger sibling Donny also made his debut on Williams’ show in 1963, when he was 6 years old. Four decades later, the Osmonds and Williams would find themselves in close proximity again, sharing Williams’ theater in Branson. His wholesome image endured one jarring interlude. In 1976, his ex-wife, former Las Vegas showgirl Claudine Longet, shot and killed her lover, skiing champion Spider Sabich. The Rolling Stones mocked the tragedy in “Claudine,� a song so pitiless that it wasn’t released until decades later. Longet, who said it was an accident, spent only a week in jail. Williams stood by her. He escorted her to the courthouse, testified on her behalf and provided support for her and their children, Noelle, Christian and Robert. Also in the 1970s, Williams was seen frequently in the company of Ethel Kennedy, Robert Kennedy’s widow. The singer denied any romantic involvement. He was born Howard Andrew Williams in Wall Lake, Iowa, on Dec. 3, 1927. In his memoir, Williams remembered himself as a shy boy who concealed his insecurity “behind a veneer of cheek and self-confidence.� Williams began performing with his older brothers Dick, Bob and Don in the local Presbyterian church choir. Their father, postal worker and insurance man Jay Emerson Williams, was the choirmaster and the force behind his children’s career. When Andy was 8, Williams’ father arranged for the kids to have an audition on Des Moines radio station WHO’s Iowa Barn Dance. They were initially turned down, but Jay Emerson Williams and the young quartet kept returning, and they were finally accepted. The show attracted attention from Chicago, Cincinnati and Hollywood. Another star at WHO was a young sportscaster named Ronald Reagan, who would later praise Williams as a “national treasure.�

LOS ANGELES — Last year in the run-up to Carmageddon, officials were downright apocalyptic about what the full closure of the 405 Freeway through the Sepulveda Pass would mean. “It will be an absolute nightmare,� Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa warned. “Avoid the area like the plague,� Councilman Paul Koretz advised. But after all the dire warnings, the traffic mayhem never materialized. With another closure of a 10-mile section of the 405 planned for this weekend, officials are subtly retooling their message and hoping they can get similar results a second time around. The fears promoted by public officials, with media help, in the run-up to last July’s freeway shutdown clearly worked. But that very success carries the risk that this time motorists may ignore appeals to stay away. The closure, starting early Saturday morning, will allow the remainder of the Mulholland Bridge to be demolished as part of a $1 billion project that includes adding a carpool lane to the busy freeway.

A bigger challenge “The challenge for officials is actually greater this time because of people saying, ‘We’ve heard this disaster message before,’ � said Brian Taylor, co-author of a University of California, Los Angeles, study titled “Why it wasn’t Carmageddon,� prepared for the mayor’s office. The researchers’ conclusion? “Dramatic messages of fear� will not work in the Carmageddon sequel. And public officials should embrace warmer rhetoric that appeals to civic pride, instead of cajoling motorists to stay away. Crafting a more nuanced admonition entails “an interesting and complex social phenomenon,� says Martin Wachs, co-author of the study. The trick, researchers say, is to sound a loud enough alarm in the coming days to get people’s attention and blend it “with extensive, hopeful messaging� that can reprise the cooperation achieved during Carmageddon I. “We can’t do what we did last time,� Villaraigosa recently acknowledged. “This time around, we’re not going to say, ‘Folks, look, we’re going to have the worst traffic ever.’ “What we’re going to say is: ‘What about another day without a car in L.A.? What about Angelenos accepting the challenge to stay out of their car?’ � No one is expecting calamity this time around. Transportation experts predict traffic volumes similar to or slightly greater than last year. Still, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority is trying to spread word about the closure even more widely than last year, according to spokesman Marc Littman. The agency has spent about $150,000 on newspaper, online and radio advertising related to the shutdown, compared with about $100,000 last year, he said. Officials also have held about a dozen press conferences, issued public service announce-

ments and have enlisted various elected officials and government agencies to post Carmageddon information on their websites.

Billboards back up More than 50 Clear Channel billboards are back in action. So are the electronic signs on freeways across the region — albeit with a toneddown warning. A year ago, the signs flashed “EXPECT BIG DELAY.� Now they simply say “EXPECT DELAY.� A spokeswoman for the California Department of Transportation said the wording change “was based on experience last year. We did expect big delays last year, and they didn’t materialize.� This year, the agency is “hoping to keep the message accurate. We DO expect delays,� she said in an email. The news media, too, have dialed back coverage after predictions last summer — including that cars could be backed up to the Mexican border — proved overblown. One difference this time is that the second closure hasn’t attracted international media attention, Littman said. Overall, as a news story and in terms of public awareness, a 405 closure is no longer “uncharted territory,� he said. Some officials worry that if the public tunes out or discounts their pleas, Carmageddon could yet live up to its name. “There’s still a lot of anxiety associated with a closure of this magnitude for all of the agencies involved,� said Littman’s colleague Dave Sotero. “We just don’t want (the public) to become complacent.� One new tactic is promoting financial incentives intended to keep residents away from the closure area and encourage community engagement. Businesses complained about sizable dips in income last July when people stayed home that weekend. This year, Metro is touting an interactive map on its website that includes about 300 businesses where patrons can receive 10 percent to 50 percent discounts during the closure. Also starting Wednesday, the Los Angeles Tourism & Convention Board began tweeting out 405 things to do Saturday and Sunday. Metro’s Carmageddon slogan has been tweaked, as well. “Plan ahead. Avoid the area, or stay home� is now “Plan ahead. Avoid the area, or eat, shop and play locally.� Jay Handal, owner of San Gennaro Cafe in Brentwood — a quarter-mile west of the closure — says the revised pitch is smarter. On Carmageddon Saturday last year, only about eight customers showed up at his restaurant — less than a tenth the crowd he normally gets on a summer Saturday, he said. “We ended up using our elected officials as rabbis,� he said. “Someone to cry to and feel better.� Handal said his customers are aware of the potential for congestion this weekend. He predicts many will stay out of their cars without heavyhanded warnings. Some experts like the softer sell. “I don’t think that fear plays a good role in any public message,� said Dennis Mileti, a professor emeritus of the University of Colorado at Boulder and an expert on risk communication.

Lawrence K. Ho / Los Angeles Times

Billboards on Santa Monica Boulevard in west Los Angeles advise people about the next Carmageddon.


THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2012

C6

W E AT H ER FOR EC A ST Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LP ©2012.

TODAY, SEPTEMBER 27

FRIDAY

Today: Mostly sunny skies, staying warm and very pleasant.

HIGH

80

Tonight: Clear skies through the night, still a touch hazy and smoky.

LOW

45

Astoria 70/52

57/52

Cannon Beach 57/52

Hillsboro Portland 82/52 81/43

Tillamook 71/49

Salem

64/49

84/44

86/50

Maupin

84/47

Corvallis Yachats

76/39

Prineville 80/44 Sisters Redmond Paulina 74/39 81/35 81/42 Sunriver Bend

65/53

Eugene

Florence

83/44

63/49

78/41

84/44

Coos Bay

80/42

Oakridge

Cottage Grove

Crescent

Roseburg

60/49

Gold Beach 59/49

80/43

84/43

Vale 83/51

Juntura

Burns Riley

86/45

79/40

Jordan Valley 79/42

Frenchglen

88/56

WEST Areas of coastal fog early; otherwise sunny to partly cloudy today. CENTRAL Mostly sunny with mild to warm temperatures expected today.

OREGON CITIES

Yesterday’s state extremes • 87° • 26°

McDermitt

La Pine

83/37

-30s

-20s

Yesterday’s extremes

-10s

0s

Vancouver 66/52

10s Calgary 67/49

20s

30s

40s Winnipeg 68/44

50s

60s

Thunder Bay 63/45

70s

80s

90s

100s 110s

Quebec 56/35

Halifax 66/41 Portland Portland Boston 67/43 82/52 To ronto St. Paul Green Bay 67/51 61/42 • 102° Buffalo New York 69/48 63/38 Boise Rapid City 64/44 73/59 Palm Springs, Calif. Detroit 78/48 77/49 66/48 Philadelphia Des Moines • 21° 74/59 Cheyenne Columbus 74/47 Chicago 68/45 Fosston, Minn. 69/54 65/50 Washington, D. C. Omaha San Francisco Salt Lake 76/48 Louisville • 1.70” 79/62 66/54 City 78/61 Las Denver Emporia, Kan. 76/57 Kansas City St. Louis Vegas 72/49 79/59 76/58 93/70 Charlotte 86/60 Albuquerque Los Angeles Nashville Little Rock 81/57 73/65 85/64 89/66 Oklahoma City Phoenix Atlanta 86/66 97/74 Honolulu 85/63 Birmingham 87/72 Dallas Tijuana 87/62 91/73 82/64 New Orleans 88/73 Orlando Houston 89/72 Chihuahua 89/74 79/60 Miami 89/76 Monterrey La Paz 94/72 88/77 Mazatlan Anchorage 89/79 52/42 Juneau 50/45

(in the 48 contiguous states):

Billings 79/48

Moon phases Full

Last

Sept. 29 Oct. 8

New

First

Oct. 15 Oct. 21

FIRE INDEX

Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Precipitation values are 24-hour totals through 4 p.m.

Bend, west of Hwy. 97......Ext. Bend, east of Hwy. 97.......Ext. Redmond/Madras ......Mod.

Astoria . . . . . . . .67/42/0.00 Baker City . . . . . .75/30/0.00 Brookings . . . . . .62/47/0.00 Burns. . . . . . . . . .79/32/0.00 Eugene . . . . . . . .74/41/0.00 Klamath Falls . . .80/39/0.00 Lakeview. . . . . . .79/43/0.00 La Pine . . . . . . . .80/26/0.00 Medford . . . . . . .87/48/0.00 Newport . . . . . . .57/39/0.00 North Bend . . . . .63/45/0.00 Ontario . . . . . . . .82/46/0.00 Pendleton . . . . . .77/41/0.00 Portland . . . . . . .74/50/0.00 Prineville . . . . . . .76/31/0.00 Redmond. . . . . . .76/33/0.00 Roseburg. . . . . . .79/47/0.00 Salem . . . . . . . . .72/43/0.00 Sisters . . . . . . . . .75/29/0.00 The Dalles . . . . . .82/46/0.00

Mod. = Moderate; Ext. = Extreme

. . . .70/52/pc . . . . .68/51/pc . . . . .80/41/s . . . . .82/43/pc . . . .60/48/pc . . . . .60/49/pc . . . . .83/44/s . . . . . .85/43/s . . . . .83/44/s . . . . . .81/47/s . . . . .81/42/s . . . . . .83/42/s . . . . .81/42/s . . . . . .80/44/s . . . . .79/30/s . . . . . .81/29/s . . . . .94/54/s . . . . . .93/53/s . . . .64/51/pc . . . . .64/50/pc . . . .61/49/pc . . . . .61/49/pc . . . . .81/48/s . . . . .83/52/pc . . . . .82/47/s . . . . . .83/50/s . . . . .82/52/s . . . . .80/56/pc . . . . .80/44/s . . . . . .82/44/s . . . . .82/42/s . . . . . .83/45/s . . . . .88/50/s . . . . .84/51/pc . . . . .82/46/s . . . . . .81/49/s . . . . .81/35/s . . . . .79/40/pc . . . . .86/50/s . . . . . .83/53/s

WATER REPORT Sisters ................................Ext. La Pine................................Ext. Prineville...........................Ext.

The following was compiled by the Central Oregon watermaster and irrigation districts as a service to irrigators and sportsmen.

Reservoir Acre feet Capacity Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . . 34,030 . . . . . . 55,000 Wickiup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107,094 . . . . . 200,000 Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . 70,684 . . . . . . 91,700 Ochoco Reservoir . . . . . . . . 18,976 . . . . . . 47,000 Prineville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90,391 . . . . . 153,777 The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is River flow Station Cubic ft./sec Deschutes RiverBelow Crane Prairie . . . . . . . 362 for solar at noon. Deschutes RiverBelow Wickiup . . . . . . . . . . . 989 Crescent CreekBelow Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . 27 LOW MEDIUM HIGH V.HIGH Little DeschutesNear La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166 0 2 4 6 8 10 Deschutes RiverBelow Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126 Deschutes RiverAt Benham Falls . . . . . . . . . 1,536 Crooked RiverAbove Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . NA Crooked RiverBelow Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . 196 Updated daily. Source: pollen.com Ochoco CreekBelow Ochoco Res. . . . . . . . . . 15.1 Crooked RiverNear Terrebonne . . . . . . . . . . . 166 Contact: Watermaster, 388-6669 LOW MEDIUM HIGH or go to www.wrd.state.or.us

To report a wildfire, call 911

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX 5

POLLEN COUNT

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

Saskatoon 73/50

Seattle 75/53

Sunrise today . . . . . . 6:59 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 6:52 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 7:00 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 6:50 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 5:29 p.m. Moonset today . . . . 4:30 a.m.

PRECIPITATION

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS -40s

81 45

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend 24 hours ending 4 p.m.*. . 0.00” High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73/39 Record high . . . . . . . . 90 in 1952 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . 0.13” Average month to date. . . 0.36” Record low. . . . . . . . . 19 in 1970 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.74” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 Average year to date. . . . . 7.12” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.30.02 Record 24 hours . . .0.79 in 1948 *Melted liquid equivalent

83/45 85/54

HIGH LOW

80 42

TEMPERATURE

Rome

Fields

HIGH LOW

78 44

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . .8:13 a.m. . . . . . 7:19 p.m. Venus . . . . . .3:25 a.m. . . . . . 5:18 p.m. Mars. . . . . .11:17 a.m. . . . . . 8:42 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . .9:57 p.m. . . . . . 1:10 p.m. Saturn. . . . . .8:58 a.m. . . . . . 7:52 p.m. Uranus . . . . .6:47 p.m. . . . . . 7:10 a.m.

Medford

81/42

HIGH LOW

PLANET WATCH

84/44

Lakeview

HIGH LOW

More sunshine and high pressure stays in hold.

More warm weather with dry and sunny conditions.

BEND ALMANAC

83/51

Klamath Falls 81/42

MONDAY

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Ontario EAST 81/48 Mostly sunny with mild to warm temNyssa peratures expected 80/48 today.

83/45

86/52

Chiloquin

Medford Ashland

60/48

80/41

Unity

Paisley 94/54

Brookings

Baker City John Day

82/39

Grants Pass 94/51

76/39

80/41

Silver Lake

76/36

Port Orford 59/49

76/47

Christmas Valley

Chemult

88/50

Hampton

Fort Rock 79/40

76/37

71/32

Bandon

81/42

Brothers 78/38

La Pine 79/30

Crescent Lake

62/49

80/45

78/38

Union

Mitchell 80/44

82/47

Camp Sherman

83/46

79/36

Joseph

Granite Spray 86/40

Enterprise

Meacham 82/42

80/45

Madras

75/34

La Grande

Condon

Warm Springs

Wallowa

77/34

80/48

84/46

83/46

83/46

82/47

Ruggs

Willowdale

Albany

Newport

Pendleton

84/52

82/48

82/46

64/51

Hermiston 82/44

Arlington

Wasco

Sandy

Government Camp 74/47

80/46

83/53

The Biggs Dalles 83/56

82/49

McMinnville

Lincoln City

Umatilla

Hood River

SUNDAY Staying above average, but cooling from Friday.

More sunshine and warm temperatures.

82 47

FORECAST: STATE Seaside

SATURDAY

Bismarck 78/49

FRONTS

Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . . .91/70/0.00 . .87/67/pc . . .80/62/t Akron . . . . . . . . . .65/59/0.58 . .66/49/pc . 67/47/pc Albany. . . . . . . . . .68/57/0.09 . . . 67/42/s . 65/52/pc Albuquerque. . . . .77/55/0.00 . .81/57/pc . 78/56/pc Anchorage . . . . . .50/43/0.00 . . . 52/42/r . . .47/36/r Atlanta . . . . . . . . .86/60/0.00 . . . 85/63/s . 84/62/pc Atlantic City . . . . .81/64/0.00 . . .74/60/c . 73/64/sh Austin . . . . . . . . . .92/65/0.00 . .89/70/pc . . 88/70/c Baltimore . . . . . . .82/61/0.08 . . .76/61/c . . .71/62/t Billings . . . . . . . . .72/56/0.00 . .79/48/pc . 80/50/pc Birmingham . . . . .85/58/0.00 . . . 87/62/s . 87/65/pc Bismarck. . . . . . . .78/35/0.00 . .78/49/pc . . 79/50/s Boise . . . . . . . . . . .82/57/0.00 . . . 78/48/s . 79/51/pc Boston. . . . . . . . . .74/59/0.00 . .67/51/pc . 64/53/pc Bridgeport, CT. . . .74/67/0.07 . .73/52/pc . 64/55/sh Buffalo . . . . . . . . .66/57/0.05 . . . 64/44/s . . 67/48/s Burlington, VT. . . .67/55/0.06 . . . 61/40/s . 65/48/pc Caribou, ME . . . . .61/46/0.00 . . . 57/33/s . 59/38/pc Charleston, SC . . .85/60/0.00 . . . 85/67/s . 85/66/pc Charlotte. . . . . . . .81/56/0.00 . .86/61/pc . 85/63/pc Chattanooga. . . . .83/57/0.00 . .87/60/pc . . .86/62/t Cheyenne . . . . . . .58/45/0.10 . . . 68/45/t . 70/46/pc Chicago. . . . . . . . .68/56/0.00 . . . 65/50/s . . 69/51/s Cincinnati . . . . . . .76/60/0.11 . . . 74/56/t . . .72/53/t Cleveland . . . . . . .65/60/0.94 . .64/51/pc . . 65/50/s Colorado Springs .66/45/0.00 . . . 63/44/t . 68/46/pc Columbia, MO . . .76/62/0.06 . . . 75/57/t . . .73/53/t Columbia, SC . . . .86/55/0.00 . . . 86/61/s . 87/62/pc Columbus, GA. . . .87/58/0.00 . . . 88/63/s . 89/64/pc Columbus, OH. . . .75/60/0.37 . . . 69/54/t . 70/51/pc Concord, NH. . . . .72/55/0.03 . . . 67/36/s . 65/45/pc Corpus Christi. . . .94/73/0.00 . .90/74/pc . . .89/75/t Dallas Ft Worth. . .94/74/0.00 . .91/73/pc . 89/69/pc Dayton . . . . . . . . .72/61/0.03 . . . 70/52/t . 70/49/pc Denver. . . . . . . . . .67/52/0.55 . . . 72/49/t . 75/49/pc Des Moines. . . . . .77/53/0.00 . . . 74/47/s . . 76/50/s Detroit. . . . . . . . . .72/61/0.01 . . . 66/48/s . . 70/49/s Duluth. . . . . . . . . .59/34/0.00 . . . 66/46/s . . 68/44/s El Paso. . . . . . . . . .91/69/0.00 . . . 84/65/t . 82/64/pc Fairbanks. . . . . . . .60/41/0.00 . .51/31/sh . 50/28/sh Fargo. . . . . . . . . . .65/28/0.00 . . . 76/48/s . 77/48/pc Flagstaff . . . . . . . .71/35/0.00 . . . 72/42/s . . 72/43/s

Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . . .72/52/0.00 . . . 65/40/s . . 67/46/s Green Bay. . . . . . .61/41/0.00 . . . 63/38/s . . 70/46/s Greensboro. . . . . .81/57/0.00 . .85/62/pc . 83/62/pc Harrisburg. . . . . . .76/61/0.00 . . .73/56/c . 68/58/sh Hartford, CT . . . . .72/61/0.00 . .71/49/pc . 67/54/sh Helena. . . . . . . . . .72/49/0.00 . . . 75/44/s . . 78/46/s Honolulu. . . . . . . .86/74/0.00 . . . 87/72/s . . 87/73/s Houston . . . . . . . .91/71/0.00 . .89/74/pc . . .89/73/t Huntsville . . . . . . .84/57/0.00 . . . 87/61/s . 86/59/pc Indianapolis . . . . .72/63/0.10 . .71/54/pc . 72/51/pc Jackson, MS . . . . .86/59/0.00 . . . 89/67/s . . .89/66/t Jacksonville. . . . . .86/65/0.41 . . . 82/74/t . . .84/71/t Juneau. . . . . . . . . .50/47/0.14 . . . 50/45/r . . .50/44/r Kansas City. . . . . .74/61/0.08 . . . 79/59/t . 76/56/pc Lansing . . . . . . . . .70/55/0.00 . . . 65/39/s . . 67/45/s Las Vegas . . . . . . .91/71/0.00 . . . 93/70/s . . 94/70/s Lexington . . . . . . .79/62/0.19 . . . 77/60/t . . .75/57/t Lincoln. . . . . . . . . .78/50/0.00 . .77/50/pc . 77/48/pc Little Rock. . . . . . .86/68/0.00 . .89/66/pc . . .85/65/t Los Angeles. . . . . .72/64/0.00 . . . 73/65/s . 75/67/pc Louisville. . . . . . . .81/64/0.23 . . . 78/61/t . . .76/56/t Madison, WI . . . . .67/42/0.00 . . . 66/38/s . . 70/45/s Memphis. . . . . . . .87/69/0.00 . .90/70/pc . . .87/67/t Miami . . . . . . . . . .88/79/0.00 . . . 89/76/t . . .88/78/t Milwaukee . . . . . .62/49/0.00 . . . 62/46/s . . 66/50/s Minneapolis . . . . .65/40/0.00 . . . 69/48/s . 74/46/pc Nashville. . . . . . . .84/63/0.00 . .85/64/pc . . .83/62/t New Orleans. . . . .88/69/0.00 . .88/73/pc . . .88/72/t New York . . . . . . .77/63/0.00 . .73/59/pc . 67/59/sh Newark, NJ . . . . . .78/64/0.00 . .74/56/pc . 67/58/sh Norfolk, VA . . . . . .83/60/0.00 . .85/65/pc . . .81/66/t Oklahoma City . . .90/65/0.00 . . . 86/66/t . . .81/63/t Omaha . . . . . . . . .80/48/0.00 . . . 76/48/s . . 76/46/s Orlando. . . . . . . . .91/69/0.00 . . . 89/72/t . . .89/72/t Palm Springs. . . .102/69/0.00 . .102/76/s . . 99/77/s Peoria . . . . . . . . . .75/61/0.00 . .72/48/pc . 72/47/pc Philadelphia . . . . .81/65/0.00 . . .74/59/c . 70/60/sh Phoenix. . . . . . . . .97/74/0.00 . . . 97/74/s . . 96/73/s Pittsburgh . . . . . . .66/58/0.20 . . . 68/50/t . . 68/49/c Portland, ME. . . . .68/58/0.00 . . . 67/43/s . 63/49/pc Providence . . . . . .72/57/0.00 . .71/50/pc . 66/53/sh Raleigh . . . . . . . . .83/54/0.00 . . . 87/61/s . 84/63/pc

Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . . .82/42/0.00 . . . 77/49/t . 78/50/pc Reno . . . . . . . . . . .82/49/0.00 . . . 84/52/s . . 84/54/s Richmond . . . . . . .84/57/0.00 . .86/63/pc . . .81/64/t Rochester, NY . . . .69/59/0.00 . . . 63/43/s . 65/46/pc Sacramento. . . . . .89/56/0.00 . . . 96/59/s . . 96/61/s St. Louis. . . . . . . . .79/66/0.19 . . . 76/58/t . . .73/54/t Salt Lake City . . . .74/53/0.00 . . . 76/57/s . . 78/56/s San Antonio . . . . .90/70/0.00 . .87/72/pc . . 87/70/c San Diego . . . . . . .75/67/0.00 . . . 79/69/s . 84/69/pc San Francisco . . . .65/54/0.00 . .70/55/pc . . 71/59/s San Jose . . . . . . . .75/52/0.00 . . . 81/58/s . . 82/62/s Santa Fe . . . . . . . 75/48/trace . .70/48/pc . 70/45/pc

Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Savannah . . . . . . .86/61/0.00 . . . 85/68/s . . .85/68/t Seattle. . . . . . . . . .67/48/0.00 . . . 75/53/s . . .74/54/f Sioux Falls. . . . . . .73/33/0.00 . . . 77/45/s . . 79/46/s Spokane . . . . . . . .74/48/0.00 . . . 80/44/s . . 81/47/s Springfield, MO . .73/60/0.57 . . . 79/63/t . . .72/58/t Tampa. . . . . . . . . .89/72/0.00 . . . 89/73/t . . .89/74/t Tucson. . . . . . . . . .93/66/0.00 . . . 91/68/s . . 93/69/s Tulsa . . . . . . . . . . .83/64/0.46 . . . 83/67/t . . .81/62/t Washington, DC . .84/65/0.00 . . .79/62/c . . .75/64/t Wichita . . . . . . . . .78/64/0.12 . . . 78/61/t . . .77/60/t Yakima . . . . . . . . .79/42/0.00 . . . 80/44/s . 81/51/pc Yuma. . . . . . . . . . .99/72/0.00 . . . 95/73/s . . 96/75/s

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . . .61/52/0.00 . .62/48/sh . 58/50/sh Athens. . . . . . . . . .91/62/0.00 . . . 90/69/s . 86/69/pc Auckland. . . . . . . .64/54/0.00 . . .62/51/c . 61/48/pc Baghdad . . . . . . .100/68/0.00 . .107/73/s . 104/71/s Bangkok . . . . . . . .95/81/0.00 . . . 91/75/t . . .88/77/t Beijing. . . . . . . . . .81/54/0.00 . . . 78/49/s . . 70/58/s Beirut . . . . . . . . . .86/75/0.00 . . . 88/82/s . . 94/80/s Berlin. . . . . . . . . . .77/54/0.00 . .62/52/sh . 63/49/pc Bogota . . . . . . . . .66/46/0.00 . .61/47/sh . 64/48/sh Budapest. . . . . . . .82/52/0.00 . .83/61/pc . 83/63/pc Buenos Aires. . . . .57/34/0.00 . . . 67/57/s . . 71/59/c Cabo San Lucas . .90/77/0.00 . . . 84/75/t . . .88/75/t Cairo . . . . . . . . . . .90/70/0.00 . . . 92/71/s . . 93/72/s Calgary . . . . . . . . .63/48/0.00 . . . 67/49/s . . 78/47/s Cancun . . . . . . . . .84/73/0.00 . . . 88/78/t . . .88/77/t Dublin . . . . . . . . . .59/46/0.00 . . .54/47/c . 55/42/pc Edinburgh. . . . . . .57/48/0.00 . . .54/47/c . 55/42/sh Geneva . . . . . . . . .61/48/0.00 . .65/52/sh . . 63/51/c Harare. . . . . . . . . .81/55/0.00 . . . 83/60/s . . 84/62/s Hong Kong . . . . . .86/81/0.00 . . . 86/72/s . 86/74/pc Istanbul. . . . . . . . .82/64/0.00 . . . 82/65/s . 77/66/pc Jerusalem . . . . . . .85/63/0.00 . . . 92/74/s . . 95/76/s Johannesburg. . . .73/50/0.00 . . . 80/64/s . 76/37/sh Lima . . . . . . . . . . .66/61/0.00 . . . 70/61/s . 70/62/pc Lisbon . . . . . . . . . .72/57/0.00 . . . 75/58/s . 74/60/pc London . . . . . . . . .59/50/0.00 . .60/45/sh . 60/45/sh Madrid . . . . . . . . .68/54/0.00 . .70/59/pc . 69/53/sh Manila. . . . . . . . . .88/82/0.00 . . . 80/76/t . . .81/77/t

Mecca . . . . . . . . .111/86/0.00 . .106/82/s . 104/83/s Mexico City. . . . . .72/57/0.00 . . . 70/56/t . . .73/55/t Montreal. . . . . . . .66/57/0.00 . . . 58/38/s . . 61/48/s Moscow . . . . . . . .54/45/0.00 . . .59/54/c . . 72/53/c Nairobi . . . . . . . . .81/59/0.00 . . . 80/57/s . . 80/58/s Nassau . . . . . . . . .90/77/0.00 . .86/78/pc . . .87/78/t New Delhi. . . . . . .93/73/0.00 . . . 94/71/s . . 96/72/s Osaka . . . . . . . . . .84/64/0.00 . . . 79/70/s . 78/67/pc Oslo. . . . . . . . . . . .48/43/0.00 . . .55/44/c . 45/39/pc Ottawa . . . . . . . . .68/55/0.00 . . . 59/34/s . 61/47/pc Paris. . . . . . . . . . . .63/54/0.00 . .66/47/sh . 60/48/pc Rio de Janeiro. . . .66/63/0.50 . .69/56/sh . 73/55/sh Rome. . . . . . . . . . .79/70/0.00 . . . 83/70/t . 81/69/pc Santiago . . . . . . . .73/46/0.00 . .59/43/pc . 65/48/pc Sao Paulo . . . . . . .59/48/0.00 . .60/51/pc . 64/54/sh Sapporo . . . . . . . .66/66/0.00 . .71/58/pc . 70/60/pc Seoul. . . . . . . . . . .77/61/0.00 . .74/48/pc . 72/53/sh Shanghai. . . . . . . .82/73/0.00 . .77/62/pc . 77/58/pc Singapore . . . . . . .84/73/0.00 . . . 87/80/t . . .87/80/t Stockholm. . . . . . .57/48/0.00 . .55/50/sh . 55/48/sh Sydney. . . . . . . . . .72/61/0.00 . .77/55/pc . 78/55/sh Taipei. . . . . . . . . . .86/73/0.00 . . . 81/71/t . . .77/66/r Tel Aviv . . . . . . . . .86/72/0.00 . . . 92/77/s . . 98/80/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . . .75/66/0.00 . .74/69/sh . 79/69/sh Toronto . . . . . . . . .64/57/0.00 . .61/42/pc . 60/47/pc Vancouver. . . . . . .63/48/0.00 . . . 66/52/s . 64/52/sh Vienna. . . . . . . . . .79/54/0.00 . .73/59/sh . . 64/52/c Warsaw. . . . . . . . .75/45/0.00 . .72/53/sh . 66/46/sh

WEST NEWS

California’s community colleges struggle in hard times By Carla Rivera Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — Marianet Tirado returned to Los Angeles Trade Tech community college this fall, optimistic that she would get into the classes she needs to transfer to a four-year university. Of the courses she wanted, only two had space left when she registered in May. She enrolled in those and “crashed” others. In one of those cases, she lucked out when the professor teaching a political science class admitted additional students. But she couldn’t get into a biology class because she was too far down on the waiting list. If the math and English courses she needs aren’t offered next spring, she may have to push back her plans to apply to San Francisco State, UCLA or USC. Her mother is puzzled that Tirado may spend three or four years at what is supposed to be a two-year college. “Because that’s what we think community college is,” said Tirado, 24, a journalism major who lives in Watts. “It’s hard to explain to my mom that I’m trying to go to school but the courses are not there.” This is the new reality for Tirado and about 2.4 million other students in the nation’s largest community college system. The system is the workhorse of California’s 1960 Master Plan for Higher Education, which promised affordability, quality and access to all. In reality, the state’s twoyear colleges are buckling under the stress of funding cuts, increased demand and a weak record of student success. The situation can be seen on all 112 campuses — students on long waiting lists, those who take years to graduate or transfer and others so frustrated that they drop out altogether. Most of them enter ill-prepared for college-level work. Some 85 percent need remedial English, 73 percent remedial math. Only about of third of those transfer to a four-year school or graduate with a community college

Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times

Marianet Tirado, far right, waits in a crowded hallway at Los Angeles Trade Tech College before the start of her speech class. Because of overcrowding and cutbacks, Tirado has had trouble getting the required classes she needs to transfer to a four-year university and may have to push back her plans.

Don Bartletti / Los Angeles Times

Every desk is taken in Jeanne Neil’s Accounting 101 classroom at Orange Coast Community College in Costa Mesa, Calif. Neil said dozens more students were left on a waiting list after the beginning business course reached capacity enrollment.

associate’s degree. “We’re at the breaking point,” said Jack Scott, who served as chancellor of the California Community College system for three years until retiring this month. “It’s like a nice-looking car you’ve been driving for several years: It looks shiny, but the engine is falling apart,” said Eloy Ortiz Oakley, president of Long Beach City College. “The wheels fell off the Master Plan 20 or 30 years ago. We’re finally feeling the results because we have enormous needs for our educational system to produce qualified workers, and we’re playing catch-up now.” The consequences of not meeting those demands are huge: About 80 percent of firefighters and law enforcement officers and 70 percent of nurses embarked on their careers in community college. By some estimates, California will need 2.3 million community college degree and certificate holders by 2025 to meet the demands of employers. President Obama has described community colleges as a major engine of job growth

and set a goal of graduating an additional 5 million students by 2020. But in California, home to a quarter of the nation’s community college students, those efforts are hampered by the state’s budget crisis. The colleges also play a vital role in the state’s higher education system, preparing students to transfer to University of California and California State University campuses. About half of all Cal State graduates began at community colleges. California’s community colleges started early in the 20th century as offshoots of high schools. Gradually they became separate junior colleges with a state-appointed Board of Governors. The idea was to offer free classes to high school graduates, people looking for job training and those who just wanted to take a music, art or language class on a neighborhood campus. Classes were free until 1984. At $46 per unit today, they remain among the least expensive in the nation. About

44 percent of all current community college students qualify for fee waivers based on income. The system has experienced explosive growth, peaking at about 2.9 million students in 2008-09, while funding grew to about $5.8 billion last year from $200 million in 1965. Community colleges have three main sources of revenue: state funds, property taxes and student fees. State aid accounts for 61 percent of the system’s budget. State funding has not kept pace with enrollment growth. Funding per full-time student has declined from a peak of $6,400 in 2000 to about $5,000 today. Course offerings have been slashed by almost a quarter since 2008, and enrollment has dropped by 485,000 students since then. The community college system is divided among 72 districts run by locally elected boards of trustees, which control their own budgets and the hiring and firing of staff. Four affluent districts — Marin, Mira Costa, South Orange County and San Mateo

County — collect so much revenue from local property taxes and student fees that they don’t qualify for most state aid. Still, with declining property taxes in recent years, they’re not immune to cutbacks. Many other college districts that depend on state aid are in more serious financial trouble. They have been forced to dig deeper into their reserves or borrow money. The 90,000student City College of San Francisco appears to be in the worst situation and faces potential insolvency. Campuses are cutting counseling and tutoring and dropping winter and summer sessions, trends that officials say could accelerate if voters reject a November ballot measure that would temporarily raise the state sales tax and the state income tax for high earners. With a 3.6 GPA out of high school, Eduardo Vargas could have gone to a four-year university but chose East Los Angeles College because it was more affordable. During his first year, he was unable to register for any of the highdemand classes he needed for his business administration major. This fall, he enrolled in honors classes — political science and statistics — because fewer students meet the re-

quirements, so they’re easier to get into. Even with an added speech class, he doesn’t have the required 12 units to be considered full time. “I look at the time frame it’s going to take me to transfer to San Jose State and it’s probably two more years,” said Vargas, 19, of Monterey Park. “It’s not that important anymore if I get a high-paying job. I just want to get my master’s and be stable. Society needs an educated workforce, but it’s going to have to invest more in education.” A study by the U.S. Census Bureau showed that high school graduates earned an average of $25,900 per year compared with $33,000 for those with a community college degree and $45,400 for those with a bachelor’s degree. Tirado, meanwhile, took classes at both Trade Tech and East Los Angeles College last spring to fill out her schedule. This time around, she may need to find a biology class at another community college during the winter session — if she can find a campus still offering winter classes. “Sometimes it’s very discouraging to have to go through all of these obstacles to get an education,” Tirado said. “But if we see it that way, we’re not going to succeed.”


SPORTS

Scoreboard, D2 MLB, D3 NFL, D4 Motor sports, D4

D

Prep sports, D4 Golf, D5 Hunting & Fishing, D6

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2012

COLLEGE FOOTBALL Pac-12 to face best of rest in playoffs? NEW YORK — A tentative plan for the new college football postseason calls for a Pac-12 or Big 12 team to face the best team from a group of five conferences, including the Big East. A person with direct knowledge of the plan for the four-team playoff in 2014 told The Associated Press that either a Pac-12 or a Big 12 team likely will be the opponent for the top-rated champion from the Big East, Mountain West, Conference USA, Sun Belt and Mid-American Conference. The person spoke on condition of anonymity Wednesday because the conferences did not want to make the plan public. The proposal has the Pac-12 sending either its champion or a replacement team to the game in years when the Rose Bowl hosts a national semifinal. In years the Rose Bowl is a traditional Big Ten-Pac12 matchup, the Big 12 would send one of its top teams to the game. The deal with the Big 12 and Pac-12 would be similar to the one the Orange Bowl is working on with the Big Ten and the Southeastern Conference. That deal, which has not been completed, would match a team from either of those conferences or Notre Dame against the Atlantic Coast Conference champ or a another ACC team. The original playoff plan had the national semifinals rotating among six bowl sites, giving the new system two playoff games and four other high-revenue bowl games each season. The top four teams determined by a selection committee, regardless of conference affiliation, will play in the semifinals. The winners meet in a championship game about a week later. — The Associated Press

LOCAL GOLF Bend’s Kearney shines at Fall Tour BLACK BUTTE RANCH — Bend pro Brandon Kearney blistered Black Butte Ranch’s Glaze Meadow course Wednesday to tie for the low score in the third round of the Fall Tour Invitational. Kearney, an assistant pro at Bend Golf and Country Club, shot a 4-under-par 68. Only Portland-area pro Brian Nosler could equal Kearney’s day. Kearney and Nosler each won $450. Jeff Fought, the director of golf at Black Butte Ranch, shot a 71 to finish in fourth place, and Crooked River Ranch pro Pat Huffer tied for fifth place at even par. The Fall Tour is hosted by four different Central Oregon golf courses. The tournament is split into four one-round events and includes club professionals and amateurs. Jesse Ehrlich, of Trysting Tree Golf Club in Corvallis, shot the low amateur gross round with a 1-under 71, one shot ahead of Awbrey Glen Golf Club’s Ron Seals. The tournament continues with today’s final round at Black Butte Ranch’s Big Meadow course. — Bulletin staff report

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

PREP FOOTBALL: FRIDAY PREVIEW

NFL

Unbeaten Redmond tries to stay on roll League, • The high-scoring Panthers are set to take on Summit refs reach tentative agreement By Grant Lucas The Bulletin

Inside

Sometimes simplicity is all it takes. You don’t “outthink the room,” as a football guru once told Redmond High coach Nathan Stanley. With a powerful ground game, the Panthers have jumped out to a 4-0 record, their best start since opening the 2005 campaign 6-1. That rushing

• A look at all of Friday’s football games involving Central Oregon teams, D4

attack, led by senior Trevor Hindman, has propelled Redmond to 40.75 points per game. “We try to have balance in what we do,” said Stanley, whose squad

will host Summit (2-2) on Friday. “With our offense, it’s a little bit harder to defend. Kind of the basis of what we do is to keep people honest and to play without cheating. Not cheating in the rules, but cheating with their assignments. That’s kind of how we predicate what we do.” Hindman has averaged 185 yards per game during the Panthers’ past three contests and scored nine touchdowns, but he isn’t alone. See Redmond / D4

By Barry Wilner The Associated Press

NEW YORK — So long, replacement refs. The NFL’s regular crews will be back on the field starting tonight. After two days of marathon negotiations — and mounting frustration among coaches, players and fans — the NFL and the referees’ union announced at midnight Eastern time today that a tentative agreement had been reached to end a lockout that began in June. Commissioner Roger Goodell, who was at the bargaining table Tuesday and Wednesday, said the regular officials would work the Browns-Ravens game at Baltimore. The tentative eight-year deal must be ratified by 51 percent of the union’s 121 members. They plan to vote Friday and Saturday in Dallas. See NFL / D4

GOLF: RYDER CUP

Aye, aye, captain: Snedeker making Love look good Photo courtesy ODFW

Deer season begins this weekend in Oregon, with controlled deer hunting in Central Oregon running through Oct. 10.

Deer in season • The rifle buck season begins this Saturday in Oregon, but dry conditions and restrictions are prevalent, especially in the High Desert By Mark Morical The Bulletin

Rifle deer hunters will be met with seasonably dry conditions and a mess of fire restrictions as the season starts this Saturday in Oregon. Campfires are not allowed in any dispersed camping statewide, according to the U.S. Forest Service. Sections of the Deschutes National Forest and the Three Sisters Wilderness near Pole Creek Road and Three Creeks Road southwest of Sisters are closed to the public due to fire danger. Mike Dykzeul of the Oregon Forest Industries Council estimated that 50 percent more private lands are closed this year than at the same time last year.

HUNTING & FISHING Controlled deer hunting in Central Oregon units will run through Oct. 10. Hunters who have drawn tags for those units have until this Friday to purchase their tags. In the Ochoco District — which includes the Ochoco, Grizzly and Maury units — deer populations are down somewhat, but buck-to-doe ratios are encouraging, according to Steve Niemela, a Prineville-based wildlife biologist for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. “The mule deer across the West

have been in a decades-long decline now,” Niemela said this week. “All of our units are below where we would like to see them as far as our overall deer population goes.” But Niemela added that the Ochoco and Grizzly units are above the ODFW management objectives for buck-to-doe ratios. The Ochoco Unit is at 19 bucks per 100 does, and the Grizzly Unit is at 18 bucks per 100 does. “That basically means there’s more bucks out there for hunters to choose from,” Niemela said. “Even though the overall population has declined a little bit, the population is where we want it to be as far as having harvestable bucks.” See Deer / D5

By Nancy Armour The Associated Press

MEDINAH, Ill. — Brandt Snedeker is earnestly polite, and he could pass for Opie Taylor’s big brother with his reddish-blond hair and sunny smile. Do not be fooled. Put Snedeker on a golf course, and he’s got an edge the X-Games set would respect. He dishes it right back when Phil Mickelson and Tiger Woods give him grief — “I want to make sure they don’t get a hall pass” — and he’s as competitive as they come. After three top-10 finishes in the past six weeks, including his monster win at the Tour Championship last weekend, he sees no reason why he can’t make a run at No. 1 in the world. See Ryder Cup / D5

Charlie Riedel / The Associated Press

U.S. captain Davis Love III, left, and Brandt Snedeker hold the Ryder Cup on Tuesday in Medinah, Ill.

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

Are the Beavers good? Just ask their opponents so far

Oregon State running back Storm Woods celebrates a touchdown against UCLA. Mark J. Terrill / The Associated Press

Oregon’s Lyerla gets some time in Ducks’ backfield By Anne M. Peterson

Next up No. 18 Oregon State at Arizona • When: Saturday, 7 p.m. • TV: Pac-12 Network • Radio: KICE-AM 940; KRCO-AM 690

By Anne M. Peterson

The Associated Press

The Associated Press

EUGENE — Tight end Colt Lyerla can be excused for momentary lapses, because he’s still getting used to playing a role in the Oregon Ducks’ backfield. The sophomore laughed that he was not supposed to hold on to the football when quarterback Bryan Bennett handed off to him in the third quarter Saturday night against Arizona. Neither Lyerla nor Bennett would let go, so both scored together from a yard out. There was confusion about who to give the touchdown to, but in the end it was determined that Lyerla crossed the plane of first.

Those wondering if Oregon State is the real thing need look no further than to the football coaches who have lost to the No. 18 Beavers this season — Wisconsin’s Bret Bielema and UCLA’s Jim Mora. Oh, and Arizona’s Rich Rodriguez — whose Wildcats will face the Beavers this Saturday night — has a few things to say as well. “They’re just a fundamentally sound, well-coached, hard-playing football team that I think will win a lot of games this year,” said Mora, whose favored Bruins lost 2720 to OSU last Saturday at the Rose Bowl. Yep, he’s talking about Oregon State, which won only three games all of last year but has surprisingly opened this season with two attention-grabbing wins over the then-No. 13 Badgers and the then-No. 19 Bruins. See Beavers / D5

Next up No. 2 Oregon at Washington State • When: Saturday, 7:30 p.m. • TV: ESPN2 • Radio: KBND-AM 1110

the goal line See Ducks / D5


D2

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2012

O  A

SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION Today

Friday

GOLF Noon: Web.com Tour, Chiquita Classic, first round, Golf Channel. BASEBALL 12:30 p.m.: MLB, Seattle Mariners at Los Angeles Angels, Root Sports. FOOTBALL 5 p.m.: College, Wingate at Carson Newman, CBS Sports Network. 5:20 p.m.: NFL, Cleveland Browns at Baltimore Ravens, NFL Network. 7 p.m.: High school, Kentlake at Auburn, Root Sports. BASKETBALL 5 p.m.: WNBA playoffs, New York Liberty at Connecticut Sun, ESPN2. 7 p.m.: WNBA playoffs, San Antonio Silver Stars at Los Angeles Sparks, ESPN2. SOCCER 6 p.m.: Women’s college, Oregon State at Stanford, Pac12 Network.

GOLF 5 a.m.: Ryder Cup, Day 1, ESPN. Noon: Web.com Tour, Chiquita Classic, second round, Golf Channel. SOCCER Noon: Women’s college, Washington State at Utah, Pac12 Network. 2 p.m.: Women’s college, Oregon at Cal, Pac-12 Network. 4 p.m.: Men’s college, UCLA at Stanford, Pac-12 Network. 5:30 p.m.: Major League Soccer, Chicago Fire at Sporting Kansas City, NBC Sports Network. BASEBALL 4 p.m.: MLB, New York Yankees at Toronto Blue Jays or Boston Red Sox at Baltimore Orioles, MLB Network. 7 p.m.: MLB, Seattle Mariners at Oakland A’s, Root Sports. FOOTBALL 5 p.m.: College, Hawaii at BYU, ESPN. 6:50 p.m.: High school, Summit at Redmond, COTV 11. BASKETBALL 4 p.m.: WNBA playoffs, Atlanta Dream at Indiana Fever, ESPN2. 6 p.m.: WNBA playoffs, Seattle Storm at Minnesota Lynx, ESPN2. VOLLEYBALL 6 p.m.: College, Colorado at Oregon State, Pac-12 Network. 8 p.m.: College, Utah at Oregon, Pac-12 Network. 10 p.m.: College, USC at Washington (same-day tape), Pac-12 Network.

RADIO Today FOOTBALL 6 p.m.: College, Stanford at Washington, KICE-AM 940.

Friday FOOTBALL 7 p.m.: High school, Summit at Redmond, KBND-AM 1110. 7 p.m.: High school, Mountain View at Wilsonville, KICE-AM 940. 7 p.m.: High school, Madras at North Marion, KWSO-FM 91.9

Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

S   B Football • Nebraska AD Osborne retiring: Tom Osborne, who put together one of the most successful coaching runs in college football history before serving in Congress and taking the reins as Nebraska’s athletic director five years ago, is retiring. The 75year-old Osborne announced at a news conference Wednesday that he would step down Jan. 1, though he will stay for an additional six months to assist in the transition to a new athletic director. Osborne is most widely known for his coaching. Every one of his 25 teams won at least nine games, and three of his last four teams won national championships. He retired with a career record of 255-49-3, an .836 winning percentage that ranked fifth all-time among Division I coaches, and 13 conference titles. • Belichick fined $50K: The NFL fined New England Patriots coach Bill Belichick $50,000 and Washington Redskins assistant Kyle Shanahan $25,000 on Wednesday for their conduct toward replacement officials. Belichick grabbed an official’s arm at the end of Sunday night’s game after the Ravens kicked a winning field goal. Shanahan was cited by the league for “abuse of officials” in Washington’s loss to Cincinnati. “It was inappropriate for me to contact the official. I take responsibility for what happened,” Belichick said in statement released by the team. “ I accept the discipline and I apologize for the incident Sunday night in Baltimore.” Shanahan, the son of Redskins coach Mike Shanahan, was called for unsportsmanlike conduct for berating officials in the final seconds of the Redskins’ 38-31 loss. He also confronted an official in a stadium tunnel after the game. • Another QB leaves Penn State: Penn State is down another quarterback after coach Bill O’Brien said Wednesday that backup Paul Jones had left the team for personal reasons. The rocket-armed sophomore, once a highly touted recruit, had slipped behind true freshman Steven Bench to third string. Senior Matt McGloin is the

entrenched starter. Jones is the second quarterback to leave Penn State this year. Rob Bolden left over the summer, about two months after O’Brien tabbed McGloin the starter. Bolden is now at LSU. • Arkansas AD committed to coach: Arkansas athletic director Jeff Long isn’t giving up on coach John L. Smith or the season just yet. Long said Wednesday that he is committed to Smith for this season, despite the program’s difficult start. Speaking to a group of reporters following an appearance at the Northwest Arkansas Touchdown Club, Long said he is also committed to the rest of the coaching staff, which remained intact after former coach Bobby Petrino’s firing in April. The Razorbacks (1-3) lost their third straight game last week, a 35-26 setback to No. 23 Rutgers.

Basketball • Phoenix gets No. 1 pick in WNBA: The Phoenix Mercury won the WNBA draft lottery Wednesday night and earned the right to choose Brittney Griner with the top pick next year. Chicago will pick second and Tulsa third. Washington, which had the worst record in the league will pick fourth. The 6-foot-8 center Griner, The Associated Press women’s college basketball player of the year, guided Baylor to a national championship and a 40-0 record.

Cycling • Contador wins road race: Alberto Contador won the revived Milano-Torino road race on Wednesday in Milan, his second title since returning from a doping ban. Contador moved ahead of the peloton on the final climb to the Basilica di Superga and held on for his first victory in the one-day, 123-mile race. Diego Ulissi of Italy was second, while Fredrik Kessiakoff of Sweden was third. Contador returned from a doping ban in August, and won the Spanish Vuelta earlier this month. The prestigious race is Italy’s oldest cycling classic and was first staged in 1876. However, it had not been held since 2007. — From wire reports

ON DECK Today Cross-country: Redmond, Sisters, La Pine at the Harrier’s Challenge in Cottage Grove, TBA Volleyball: Bend at Summit, 6:30 p.m.; Redmond at Crook County, 6:30 p.m.; Mountain View at Ridgeview, 6:30 p.m.; La Pine at Sisters, 6:45 p.m.; North Marion at Madras, 6 p.m.; Culver at Regis, 6 p.m.; Central Christian at Mitchell, 4 p.m. Boys soccer: Ridgeview at Mountain View, 3 p.m.; Sisters at Cottage Grove, 7 p.m.; Crook County at Redmond, 3 p.m.; Summit at Bend, 3 p.m.; North Marion at Madras, 4:30 p.m. Girls soccer: Ridgeview at Mountain View, 4:30 p.m.; Cottage Grove at Sisters, 4:30 p.m.; Crook County at Redmond, 4:30 p.m.; Summit at Bend, 4:30 p.m.; Junction City at La Pine, 4 p.m.; Madras at North Marion, 4 p.m. Boys water polo: Summit at Madras, TBA; Redmond at Bend, TBA

First round Nikolay Davydenko, Russia, def. Sanam Singh, India, 7-5, 6-4. Feliciano Lopez (5), Spain, def. Lukas Lacko, Slovakia, 6-3, 7-6 (7-3). Alex Bogomolov Jr., United States, def. Dominic Inglot, Great Britain, 7-5, 6-3. Denis Istomin, Uzbekistan, def. Pablo Andujar (6), Spain, 6-3, 6-2. Second round Alejandro Falla, Colombia, def. Rajeev Ram, United States, 7-6 (7-4), 4-2, ret. Julien Benneteau (7), France, def. Matthew Ebden, Great Britain, 7-5, 6-2. Vasek Pospisil, Canada, def. Michael Yani, United States, 6-3, 7-5.

IN THE BLEACHERS

Thailand Open Wednesday At Impact Arena Bangkok, Thailand Purse: $608,500 (WT250) Surface: Hard-Indoor Singles First Round Ivo Karlovic, Croatia, def. Marinko Matosevic, Australia, 6-3, 6-4. Go Soeda, Japan, def. Danai Udomchoke, Thailand, 6-4, 7-5. Gael Monfils, France, def. Kevin Anderson, South Africa, 6-4, 2-6, 7-5. Second Round Janko Tipsarevic (1), Serbia, def. Hiroki Moriya, Japan, 6-4, 6-4. Jarkko Nieminen (7), Finland, def. Philipp Petzschner, Germany, 7-6 (1), 6-2.

Friday Football: Bend at Hermiston, 7 p.m.; Mountain View at Wilsonville, 7 p.m.; Summit at Redmond, 7 p.m.; Burns at Ridgeview, 7 p.m.; Madras at North Marion, 7 p.m.; Crook County at Madison, 7 p.m.; Sweet Home at Sisters, 7 p.m.; La Pine at Junction City, 7 p.m.; Vernonia at Culver, 7 p.m.; Gilchrist at Camas Valley, 4 p.m. Cross-country: Ridgeview at the Bridgitte Nelson Invitational in The Dalles, 4 p.m. Boys soccer: Irrigon at Culver, 4 p.m. Volleyball: Hosanna Christian at Gilchrist, 4 p.m.; Trinity Lutheran at Triad, 4:30 p.m. Boys water polo: Madras at Bend, TBA; Mountain View at Redmond, TBA Saturday Cross-country: Madras hosts the Madras Invitational, 10:45 a.m.; Sisters at the Woahink Lake XC Invitational in Florence, TBA Boys soccer: Central Christian at Culver, 1 p.m. Volleyball: Summit, Mountain View at South Albany tourney, 8 a.m.; Crook County at Oregon City tourney, 8 a.m.; Redmond at Cottage Grove tournament, TBA; Butte Falls at Trinity Lutheran, 2:15 p.m.; Central Christian at Gilchrist JV tourney, 9 a.m.

FOOTBALL NFL NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE All Times PDT ——— AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF N.Y. Jets 2 1 0 .667 81 Buffalo 2 1 0 .667 87 New England 1 2 0 .333 82 Miami 1 2 0 .333 65 South W L T Pct PF Houston 3 0 0 1.000 88 Jacksonville 1 2 0 .333 52 Tennessee 1 2 0 .333 67 Indianapolis 1 2 0 .333 61 North W L T Pct PF Baltimore 2 1 0 .667 98 Cincinnati 2 1 0 .667 85 Pittsburgh 1 2 0 .333 77 Cleveland 0 3 0 .000 57 West W L T Pct PF San Diego 2 1 0 .667 63 Denver 1 2 0 .333 77 Kansas City 1 2 0 .333 68 Oakland 1 2 0 .333 61 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF Dallas 2 1 0 .667 47 Philadelphia 2 1 0 .667 47 N.Y. Giants 2 1 0 .667 94 Washington 1 2 0 .333 99 South W L T Pct PF Atlanta 3 0 0 1.000 94 Tampa Bay 1 2 0 .333 60 Carolina 1 2 0 .333 52 New Orleans 0 3 0 .000 83 North W L T Pct PF Minnesota 2 1 0 .667 70 Chicago 2 1 0 .667 74 Green Bay 1 2 0 .333 57 Detroit 1 2 0 .333 87 West W L T Pct PF Arizona 3 0 0 1.000 67 San Francisco 2 1 0 .667 70 Seattle 2 1 0 .667 57 St. Louis 1 2 0 .333 60 ——— Today’s Game Cleveland at Baltimore, 5:20 p.m. Sunday’s Games Tennessee at Houston, 10 a.m. San Diego at Kansas City, 10 a.m. Seattle at St. Louis, 10 a.m. New England at Buffalo, 10 a.m. Minnesota at Detroit, 10 a.m. Carolina at Atlanta, 10 a.m. San Francisco at N.Y. Jets, 10 a.m. Miami at Arizona, 1:05 p.m. Oakland at Denver, 1:05 p.m. Cincinnati at Jacksonville, 1:05 p.m. New Orleans at Green Bay, 1:25 p.m. Washington at Tampa Bay, 1:25 p.m. N.Y. Giants at Philadelphia, 5:20 p.m. Open: Indianapolis, Pittsburgh Monday, Oct. 1 Chicago at Dallas, 5:30 p.m. NFC Individual Leaders Week 3 Quarterbacks Att Com Yds M. Ryan, ATL 107 77 793 Kolb, ARI 59 38 428 Ponder, MIN 97 68 713 Griffin III, WAS 89 60 747 Ale. Smith, SNF 92 64 641 E. Manning, NYG 118 79 1011 Romo, DAL 108 70 841 A. Rodgers, GBY 115 78 745 R. Wilson, SEA 75 43 434 Bradford, STL 95 61 660 Rushers Att Yds Avg M. Lynch, SEA 72 305 4.24 Gore, SNF 45 264 5.87 Morris, WAS 61 263 4.31 L. McCoy, PHL 58 261 4.50 A. Peterson, MIN 58 230 3.97 D. Martin, TAM 63 214 3.40 Murray, DAL 50 213 4.26 Griffin III, WAS 32 209 6.53 And. Brown, NYG 33 184 5.58 M. Turner, ATL 42 154 3.67 Receivers No Yds Avg Harvin, MIN 27 277 10.3 Amendola, STL 25 296 11.8 Ca. Johnson, DET 24 369 15.4 Cruz, NYG 23 279 12.1 Gonzalez, ATL 21 214 10.2 R. White, ATL 19 244 12.8 M. Crabtree, SNF 19 183 9.6 Sproles, NOR 18 163 9.1 J. Graham, NOR 17 172 10.1 Burleson, DET 17 149 8.8 Touchdowns TD Rush Rec Ve. Davis, SNF 4 0 4 And. Brown, NYG 3 3 0 Ma. Bennett, NYG 3 0 3 M. Bush, CHI 3 3 0 Gonzalez, ATL 3 0 3 J. Graham, NOR 3 0 3 Griffin III, WAS 3 3 0 Ju. Jones, ATL 3 0 3 Morris, WAS 3 3 0 Rudolph, MIN 3 0 3

PA 75 79 64 66 PA 42 70 113 83 PA 67 102 75 75 PA 51 77 99 88 PA 54 66 65 101 PA 48 67 79 102 PA 59 50 54 94 PA 40 65 39 78

TD Int 8 1 4 0 4 0 4 1 5 1 5 3 4 3 3 2 4 1 4 3 LG TD 36 1 23t 2 29 3 22 1 20 2 17 1 48 1 19 3 31 3 25 2 LG TD 24 0 56 1 51 1 80t 1 25 3 26 1 20 0 25 1 23 3 21 1 Ret Pts 0 24 0 20 0 18 0 18 0 18 0 18 0 18 0 18 0 18 0 18

AFC Individual Leaders Week 3 Quarterbacks Att Com Yds TD Int Roethlisberger, PIT 120 82 904 8 1 Dalton, CIN 95 65 867 6 3 Schaub, HOU 96 63 751 5 1 Flacco, BAL 110 71 913 6 2 Brady, NWE 118 79 887 4 1 Fitzpatrick, BUF 86 50 581 8 3 Locker, TEN 104 67 781 4 2 C. Palmer, OAK 128 80 879 5 2 P. Rivers, SND 103 69 688 4 3 Gabbert, JAC 79 40 468 4 0

SOCCER MLS

Rushers Att Yds J. Charles, KAN 55 323 Jones-Drew, JAC 59 314 Spiller, BUF 33 308 Re. Bush, MIA 50 302 A. Foster, HOU 79 294 R. Rice, BAL 46 268 Ridley, NWE 52 233 McGahee, DEN 50 213 Green-Ellis, CIN 56 204 T. Richardson, CLE 50 175 Receivers No Yds Wayne, IND 23 294 Lloyd, NWE 22 237 A.. Green, CIN 21 311 Ant. Brown, PIT 18 240 Bowe, KAN 18 234 Pitta, BAL 18 188 Decker, DEN 17 243 M. Wallace, PIT 17 234 McFadden, OAK 17 107 Welker, NWE 16 251 Touchdowns TD Rush A. Foster, HOU 4 3 H. Miller, PIT 4 0 Spiller, BUF 4 3 Stevi. Johnson, BUF 3 0 Kerley, NYJ 3 0 R. Rice, BAL 3 3 T. Richardson, CLE 3 2 Rosario, SND 3 0 M. Wallace, PIT 3 0 McGahee, DEN 2 2

Avg 5.87 5.32 9.33 6.04 3.72 5.83 4.48 4.26 3.64 3.50

LG TD 91t 1 59t 1 56t 3 65t 2 22 3 43 3 20 1 31 2 19 2 32t 2

Avg 12.8 10.8 14.8 13.3 13.0 10.4 14.3 13.8 6.3 15.7

LG TD 30t 1 27 0 73t 2 27 1 33t 2 25 2 35 0 37t 3 17 0 59 0

Rec Ret Pts 1 0 24 4 0 24 1 0 24 3 0 18 2 1 18 0 0 18 1 0 18 3 0 18 3 0 18 0 0 14

College Schedule All Times PDT (Subject to change) Today’s Games SOUTHWEST Sam Houston St. at Texas Southern, 5 p.m. FAR WEST Stanford at Washington, 6 p.m. ——— Friday’s Games EAST Holy Cross at Harvard, 4 p.m. FAR WEST Hawaii at BYU, 5 p.m. ——— Saturday’s Games EAST Stony Brook at Army, 9 a.m. Penn at Dartmouth, 9 a.m. Delaware at New Hampshire, 9 a.m. CCSU at Sacred Heart, 9 a.m. Buffalo at UConn, 9 a.m. Baylor at West Virginia, 9 a.m. Colgate at Yale, 9 a.m. Princeton at Columbia, 9:30 a.m. Fordham at Lehigh, 9:30 a.m. Monmouth (NJ) at Albany (NY), 10 a.m. Bryant at Wagner, 10 a.m. St. Francis (Pa.) at Duquesne, 10:10 a.m. Brown at Georgetown, 11 a.m. Villanova at Maine, 12:30 p.m. San Jose St. at Navy, 12:30 p.m. Virginia Tech vs. Cincinnati at Landover, Md., 12:30 p.m. Ohio at UMass, 12:30 p.m. Clemson at Boston College, 12:30 p.m. Cornell at Bucknell, 3 p.m. Lafayette at Robert Morris, 3 p.m. SOUTH NC State at Miami, 9 a.m. Missouri at UCF, 9 a.m. Middle Tennessee at Georgia Tech, 9 a.m. E. Kentucky at UT-Martin, 9 a.m. Duke at Wake Forest, 9:30 a.m. Savannah St. at Howard, 10 a.m. Marist at Jacksonville, 10 a.m. Wofford at Elon, 10:30 a.m. W. Carolina at Furman, 10:30 a.m. Norfolk St. at SC State, 11 a.m. Alabama St. at Alcorn St., noon Tulsa at UAB, noon Coastal Carolina at Appalachian St., 12:30 p.m. Tennessee at Georgia, 12:30 p.m. Idaho at North Carolina, 12:30 p.m. Old Dominion at Richmond, 12:30 p.m. Troy at South Alabama, 12:30 p.m. Florida A&M vs. Southern U. at Atlanta, 12:30 p.m. Louisiana-Monroe at Tulane, 12:30 p.m. Louisiana Tech at Virginia, 12:30 p.m. SE Missouri at Jacksonville St., 1 p.m. North Texas at FAU, 2 p.m. Prairie View at Jackson St., 2 p.m. Drake at Campbell, 3 p.m. Presbyterian at Davidson, 3 p.m. Samford at Georgia Southern, 3 p.m. Bethune-Cookman at Hampton, 3 p.m. Florida St. at South Florida, 3 p.m. Ark.-Pine Bluff at Tennessee St., 3 p.m. Chattanooga at The Citadel, 3 p.m. Grambling St. at Alabama A&M, 4 p.m. UTEP at East Carolina, 4 p.m. South Carolina at Kentucky, 4 p.m. Towson at LSU, 4 p.m. FIU at Louisiana-Lafayette, 4 p.m. Tennessee Tech at Murray St., 4 p.m. Georgia St. at William & Mary, 4 p.m. Northwestern St. at McNeese St., 5 p.m. Louisville at Southern Miss., 5 p.m. Mississippi at Alabama, 6:15 p.m. MIDWEST Penn St. at Illinois, 9 a.m. Minnesota at Iowa, 9 a.m. Ball St. at Kent St., 9 a.m. Indiana at Northwestern, 9 a.m. Dayton at Butler, 10 a.m. Miami (Ohio) at Akron, 11 a.m. Austin Peay at E. Illinois, 11:30 a.m. Illinois St. at South Dakota, noon Rhode Island at Bowling Green, 12:30 p.m. Ohio St. at Michigan St., 12:30 p.m. Cent. Michigan at N. Illinois, 12:30 p.m. Marshall at Purdue, 12:30 p.m. N. Dakota St. at N. Iowa, 4 p.m. Missouri St. at S. Dakota St., 4 p.m. Indiana St. at S. Illinois, 4 p.m. Toledo at W. Michigan, 4 p.m. Cal Poly at North Dakota, 4:05 p.m. Texas Tech at Iowa St., 5 p.m. Wisconsin at Nebraska, 5 p.m. SOUTHWEST Arkansas at Texas A&M, 9:21 a.m. Nevada at Texas St., 11 a.m. Houston at Rice, 12:30 p.m. SE Louisiana at Lamar, 1 p.m. W. Kentucky at Arkansas St., 4 p.m. TCU at SMU, 4 p.m.

Cent. Arkansas at Stephen F. Austin, 4 p.m. Texas at Oklahoma St., 4:50 p.m. FAR WEST Colorado St. at Air Force, 11 a.m. Montana St. at S. Utah, 12:30 p.m. Sacramento St. at Idaho St., 12:35 p.m. Arizona St. at California, 1 p.m. Portland St. at N. Arizona, 2:05 p.m. UCLA at Colorado, 3 p.m. Boise St. at New Mexico, 3 p.m. Montana at E. Washington, 4:15 p.m. UTSA at New Mexico St., 5 p.m. UNLV at Utah St., 5 p.m. Weber St. at UC Davis, 6 p.m. Oregon St. at Arizona, 7 p.m. San Diego St. at Fresno St., 7 p.m. Oregon at Washington St., 7:30 p.m.

Betting line NFL (Home teams in Caps) Opening Current Underdog Today RAVENS 13 12.5 Browns Sunday Patriots 3.5 4 BILLS LIONS NL NL Vikings FALCONS 8 7 Panthers 49ers 3.5 4 JETS CHIEFS 1.5 (C) 1 Chargers TEXANS 12 12 Titans Seahawks 2.5 2.5 RAMS CARDS 6.5 6.5 Dolphins BRONCOS 6 6.5 Raiders Bengals 1.5 2 JAGUARS PACKERS 7.5 7.5 Saints BUCS 3 3 Redskins EAGLES 2.5 2.5 Giants Monday COWBOYS 3.5 4 Bears (C)—Chargers started as favorite Favorite

COLLEGE Today Stanford 7 7 WASHINGTON Friday BYU 28 27.5 Hawaii Saturday l-Va Tech 6.5 7.5 Cincinnati CONNECTICUT 18 16.5 Buffalo ILLINOIS 1.5 1.5 Penn St IOWA 7 7 Minnesota Texas Tech 1.5 2.5 IOWA ST Clemson 10 9.5 BOSTON COLL La Tech 3.5 2.5 VIRGINIA Ohio U [25] [24] MASSACHUSETTS Ball St 1.5 1 KENT ST N CAROLINA 24 25.5 Idaho NORTHWESTERN13.5 11.5 Indiana PURDUE 15 16.5 Marshall WAKE FOREST 3.5 3 Duke S Carolina [21] [21] KENTUCKY AIR FORCE 14.5 15 Colorado St Tcu 17 16.5 SMU NO ILLINOIS 10 11 C Michigan Ucla 21 19.5 COLORADO San Jose St 2.5 2.5 NAVY s-Oregon 29 29 WASHINGTON ST Texas 2 2.5 OKLAHOMA ST TEXAS A&M 13.5 13.5 Arkansas W VIRGINIA 12 13.5 Baylor MICHIGAN ST 2 3 Ohio St GEORGIA 13.5 13 Tennessee CALIFORNIA 2 2.5 Arizona St ARIZONA 3 2.5 Oregon St ALABAMA 31.5 31.5 Mississippi Miami-Ohio 6 3.5 AKRON C FLORIDA 2.5 3 Missouri E CAROLINA 4.5 4.5 Utep MIAMI-FLA 3.5 2.5 Nc State Florida St 16 17 S FLORIDA W MICHIGAN 3 PK Toledo Nevada 22 20 TEXAS ST Louisville 10.5 10.5 SO MISS N MEXICO ST 4.5 1 Tx-S Antonio NEBRASKA 12.5 12 Wisconsin Tulsa 13.5 13.5 UAB UTAH ST 17 19 Unlv r-Houston [4] [6] Rice Boise St 27.5 26.5 NEW MEXICO FRESNO ST 7.5 7.5 San Diego St W Kentucky 1(A) 2.5 ARKANSAS ST Troy 9.5 9.5 S ALABAMA UL-LAFAYETTE 6 6 Fla Int’l N Texas 4 6.5 FLA ATLANTIC GA TECH 27.5 27.5 Mid Tenn St Ul-Monroe 17.5 18 TULANE l- Landover, MD. s- Seattle, WA. r- Reliant Stadium. (A)- Arkansas State opened as a favorite. []-denotes a circle game. A game is circled for a variety of reasons, with the prime factor being an injury. When a game is inside a circle, there is limited wagering. The line could move a few points in either.

TENNIS Professional Toray Pan Pacific Open Wednesday At Ariake Colosseum Tokyo Purse: $2.17 million (Premier) Surface: Hard-Outdoor Singles Third Round Sara Errani (6), Italy, def. Marion Bartoli (9), France, 3-6, 6-2, 6-2. Nadia Petrova (17), Russia, def. Petra Martic, Croatia, 7-6 (2), 6-7 (1), 6-4. Sam Stosur (8), Australia, def. Dominika Cibulkova (12), Slovakia, 6-4, 7-5. Angelique Kerber (5), Germany, def. Urszula Radwanska, Poland, 6-1, 6-1. Maria Sharapova (2), Russia, def. Lucie Safarova, Czech Republic, 6-2, 7-6 (5). Agnieszka Radwanska (3), Poland, def. Jamie Hampton, United States, 6-4, 6-3. Caroline Wozniacki (10), Denmark, def. Li Na (7), China, 4-6, 6-3, 6-4. Victoria Azarenka (1), Belarus, def. Roberta Vinci (14), Italy, 6-4, 6-2. Malaysian Open Wednesday At Putra Stadium Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Purse: $947,750 (WT250) Surface: Hard-Indoor Singles

MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT ——— Eastern Conference W L T Pts GF GA Sporting Kansas City 16 7 7 55 37 25 Chicago 16 8 5 53 42 34 D.C. 15 10 5 50 47 39 New York 14 8 8 50 50 43 Houston 12 8 10 46 42 37 Columbus 13 11 6 45 36 37 Montreal 12 15 4 40 44 49 Philadelphia 8 14 6 30 29 33 New England 7 15 8 29 37 41 Toronto FC 5 18 7 22 34 55 Western Conference W L T Pts GF GA x-San Jose 18 6 6 60 62 36 x-Los Angeles 15 11 4 49 54 42 x-Real Salt Lake 15 11 4 49 40 34 Seattle 13 7 9 48 45 31 Vancouver 10 12 8 38 31 40 FC Dallas 9 12 9 36 35 38 Colorado 9 18 3 30 38 45 Portland 7 15 8 29 31 51 Chivas USA 7 15 7 28 21 45 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. x- clinched playoff berth ——— Friday’s Game Chicago at Sporting Kansas City, 5:30 p.m. Saturday’s Games Toronto FC at New York, 4 p.m. Philadelphia at Columbus, 4:30 p.m. New England at Houston, 5:30 p.m. Seattle FC at Vancouver, 6 p.m. FC Dallas at San Jose, 7:30 p.m. Real Salt Lake at Chivas USA, 7:30 p.m. D.C. United at Portland, 7:30 p.m. Sunday’s Game Los Angeles at Colorado, 4 p.m.

BASKETBALL WNBA WOMEN’S NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION All Times PDT ——— CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS (x-if necessary) (Best-of-3) Eastern Conference Connecticut vs. New York Today, Sept. 27: New York at Connecticut, 5 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 29: Connecticut at New York, 4 p.m. x-Monday, Oct. 1: New York at Connecticut, 4 p.m. Indiana vs. Atlanta Friday Sept. 28: Atlanta at Indiana, 4 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 30: Indiana at Atlanta, 1 p.m. x-Tuesday, Oct. 2: Atlanta at Indiana, TBD Western Conference Minnesota vs. Seattle Friday, Sept. 28: Seattle at Minnesota, 6 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 30: Minnesota at Seattle, 6 p.m. x-Tuesday, Oct. 2: Seattle at Minnesota, TBD Los Angeles vs. San Antonio Today, Sept. 27: San Antonio at Los Angeles, 7 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 29: Los Angeles at San Antonio, noon x-Monday, Oct. 1: San Antonio at Los Angeles, 7:30 p.m.

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES — Placed LHP Randy Wolf on the 60-day DL. Selected the contract of INF Bill Hall from Norfolk (IL). BASKETBALL National Basketball Association GOLDEN STATE WARRIORS—Signed G Carlon Brown, G/F Lance Goulbourne, F Rick Jackson and G/F Tarence Kinsey. FOOTBALL National Football League NFL — Fined New England coach Bill Belichick $50,000 and Washington offensive coordinator Kyle Shanahan $25,000 for their actions during Sunday’s games. ARIZONA CARDINALS — Signed RB Alfonso Smith. Released LB Ricky Elmore from the practice squad. Signed LB Zack Nash to the practice squad. ATLANTA FALCONS — Released S Mark LeGree from the practice squad. Signed RB Josh Vaughan to the practice squad. KANSAS CITY CHIEFS — Placed C Rodney Hudson on injured reserve. Signed G Russ Hochstein and C Bryan Mattison. NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS — Released DL Marcus Forston. Signed DL Terrell McClain. OAKLAND RAIDERS — Signed DL Andre Carter. Signed WR Tori Gurley to the practice squad. PHILADELPHIA EAGLES — Released WR Jeremy Ebert from the practice squad. Signed TE Kyle Nelson to the practice squad. SAN DIEGO CHARGERS—Signed WR Malcom Floyd to a three-year contract extension through 2015. TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS — Released WR Jordan Shipley. Signed WR Roscoe Parrish and DE Jeff Charleston. TENNESSEE TITANS — Signed DE Pannel Egboh. Placed DE Keyunta Dawson on injured reserve. WASHINGTON REDSKINS — Placed RB Roy Helu Jr. on injured reserve. Signed RB Ryan Grant. SOCCER Professional Arena Soccer League PASL — Announced the addition of the Texas Strikers for the 2012-13 season. COLLEGE SUN BELT CONFERENCE — Suspended Arkansas State LB Qushaun Lee one game. HARVARD—Named Bill Decker baseball coach. NEBRASKA — Announced the retirement of athletic director Tom Osborne, effective Jan. 1. PENN STATE—Announced QB Paul Jones had left the team for personal reasons.

FISH COUNT Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Tuesday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 2,901 2,450 879 253 The Dalles 3,490 2,509 2,018 590 John Day 3,116 2,463 3,512 1075 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Tuesday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 556,865 119,899 217,478 80,124 The Dalles 380,923 99,320 174,228 62,383 John Day 308,583 85,984 126,209 48,272 McNary 298,370 42,826 105,595 37,005


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

D3

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL STANDINGS, SCORES AND SCHEDULES

AL Boxscores Angels 4, Mariners 3 Seattle Ackley 2b Gutierrez cf Seager 3b J.Montero dh Smoak 1b Olivo c C.Wells rf Figgins lf Ryan ss Totals

AB 4 3 3 4 4 4 2 2 3 29

R 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 3

H 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 2 5

BI 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 3

BB 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 1 0 4

American League SO 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 2 0 6

Avg. .229 .257 .258 .261 .212 .218 .220 .181 .195

Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Trout cf-lf 3 0 0 0 2 0 .323 Tor.Hunter rf 5 0 2 2 0 2 .307 Pujols dh 4 0 1 0 0 3 .288 K.Morales 1b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .275 Callaspo 3b 4 1 2 0 0 0 .255 H.Kendrick 2b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .277 Aybar ss 4 0 2 2 0 0 .293 Trumbo lf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .261 Bo.Wilson c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .214 a-M.Izturis ph 1 1 1 0 0 0 .252 Iannetta c 2 0 1 0 1 1 .249 1-Bourjos pr-cf 0 1 0 0 0 0 .226 Totals 33 4 10 4 3 9 Seattle 002 100 000 — 3 5 1 Los Angeles 020 000 101 — 4 10 0 One out when winning run scored. a-singled for Bo.Wilson in the 9th. 1-ran for Iannetta in the 7th. E—Olivo (5). LOB—Seattle 4, Los Angeles 9. 2B—Ryan (18), Aybar (31). HR—Smoak (19), off C.Wilson. SB—Aybar (19). CS—Olivo (6). DP—Los Angeles 1. Seattle IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA F.Hernandez 6 5 2 2 2 9 103 2.86 Kinney BS, 1-2 2-3 3 1 1 0 0 20 4.15 O.Perez 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 6 1.88 Pryor L, 3-1 1 1-3 2 1 1 1 0 27 2.91 Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA C.Wilson 5 1-3 5 3 3 3 5 87 3.86 Williams 1 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 12 4.53 Jepsen 1 0 0 0 1 0 14 2.83 Frieri W, 4-2 1 0 0 0 0 0 5 2.45 T—3:03. A—37,916 (45,957).

Indians 6, White Sox 4 Cleveland Choo rf Kipnis 2b As.Cabrera ss Lillibridge ss C.Santana 1b Kotchman 1b Canzler lf Rottino lf Hafner dh Chisenhall 3b Hannahan 3b Marson c Carrera cf Totals

AB 5 3 1 3 2 0 4 1 5 4 0 2 5 35

R 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 1 6

H 1 1 0 0 1 0 2 1 0 1 0 0 2 9

BI 1 2 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 6

BB 1 3 0 1 3 0 0 0 0 1 0 3 0 12

SO 1 0 0 2 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 1 0 7

Avg. .280 .257 .271 .186 .260 .234 .307 .130 .226 .261 .241 .219 .254

Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. De Aza lf 1 1 1 0 3 0 .281 Youkilis 3b 5 1 1 0 0 0 .232 A.Dunn dh 5 1 1 0 0 1 .209 1-O.Hudson pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .179 Konerko 1b 4 0 0 1 1 1 .299 Rios rf 3 0 2 1 0 0 .299 Pierzynski c 3 1 2 1 1 1 .280 Al.Ramirez ss 4 0 1 1 0 0 .267 Wise cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .264 Beckham 2b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .236 Totals 32 4 8 4 6 5 Cleveland 100 201 110 — 6 9 1 Chicago 300 010 000 — 4 8 0 1-ran for A.Dunn in the 9th. E—Lillibridge (8). LOB—Cleveland 14, Chicago 9. 2B—Choo (40), Carrera (5), Pierzynski (18), Al.Ramirez (24). HR—Rottino (1), off Myers. SB—Kipnis 2 (30), Carrera (8), De Aza (26). DP—Cleveland 1; Chicago 1. Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Masterson 4 2-3 7 4 4 4 2 109 5.03 F.Herrmann 1 0 0 0 1 1 18 2.70 Sipp W, 1-2 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 3 4.73 J.Smith H, 20 1 1 0 0 0 1 11 3.09 E.Rogers H, 6 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 2.49 C.Perez S, 38-42 1 0 0 0 1 0 19 3.40 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA H.Santiago 3 1-3 5 3 3 4 2 78 3.69 Omogrosso 1 1-3 1 0 0 2 2 37 2.89 Veal 1-3 1 1 1 1 0 8 1.46 N.Jones BS, 3-3 1-3 0 0 0 2 1 25 2.35 Thornton L, 4-9 1 1-3 1 1 1 2 0 29 3.39 Myers 1 1-3 1 1 1 1 1 27 3.38 Crain 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 2.64 Veal pitched to 2 batters in the 6th. T—3:44. A—20,166 (40,615).

Athletics 9, Rangers 3 Oakland Drew ss J.Gomes lf a-S.Smith ph-lf Barton 1b Cespedes cf Carter dh Moss 1b-lf Donaldson 3b Reddick rf D.Norris c Pennington 2b Totals

AB 5 3 2 0 5 5 5 4 4 4 4 41

R 1 0 0 0 1 1 3 2 1 0 0 9

H 4 1 0 0 1 1 3 2 2 2 0 16

BI 2 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 3 0 8

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 3

SO 0 0 1 0 2 2 2 2 1 1 0 11

Avg. .270 .255 .242 .204 .288 .244 .281 .243 .243 .193 .217

Texas AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Kinsler 2b 2 1 0 0 3 0 .262 Andrus ss 4 0 1 2 0 2 .288 Hamilton cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .286 Beltre 3b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .315 N.Cruz rf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .256 Mi.Young dh 4 1 2 0 0 1 .277 Dav.Murphy lf 4 1 1 0 0 2 .308 Napoli c 3 0 0 0 1 1 .224 Moreland 1b 3 0 0 1 1 2 .275 Totals 31 3 5 3 6 12 Oakland 502 100 001 — 9 16 1 Texas 120 000 000 — 3 5 1 a-struck out for J.Gomes in the 5th. E—Moss (8), Hamilton (6). LOB—Oakland 9, Texas 8. 2B—Drew (5), Moss 2 (15), Andrus (30), Mi.Young (26). 3B—Cespedes (4), D.Norris (1). DP—Oakland 1. Oakland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA J.Parker W, 12-8 6 5 3 3 3 8 109 3.44 Blevins 1 2-3 0 0 0 1 1 28 2.59 Scribner 1 1-3 0 0 0 2 3 34 2.90 Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA M.Perez L, 1-3 2-3 6 5 5 0 1 24 5.03 Oswalt 1 1-3 2 0 0 0 3 24 5.93 Font 0 0 2 2 2 0 13 18.00 Scheppers 1 2-3 4 1 1 1 1 35 4.50 Tateyama 2 1-3 0 0 0 0 4 32 9.00 Grimm 3 4 1 1 0 2 43 9.00 Font pitched to 2 batters in the 3rd. T—3:35. A—46,689 (48,194).

Rays 4, Red Sox 2 Tampa Bay De.Jennings rf-lf B.Upton cf Zobrist ss Longoria 3b Keppinger dh C.Pena 1b B.Francisco lf Joyce rf R.Roberts 2b Lobaton c Totals

AB 4 4 4 3 4 4 3 1 3 4 34

R 0 0 0 0 2 1 1 0 0 0 4

H 0 0 2 0 2 2 1 0 0 1 8

BI 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 1 4

BB 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 2

SO 2 2 0 2 2 1 1 1 1 2 14

Avg. .251 .248 .271 .287 .332 .202 .242 .244 .219 .227

Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Ciriaco 3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .289 Podsednik cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .307 Pedroia 2b 2 1 0 0 2 0 .289 C.Ross rf 3 0 1 0 1 1 .270 Loney 1b 2 0 0 1 1 0 .241 1-Kalish pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .229 Saltalamacchia c 3 1 0 0 1 2 .226 Lavarnway dh 4 0 1 0 0 2 .168 Nava lf 4 0 1 1 0 2 .249 Iglesias ss 3 0 0 0 0 2 .118 Totals 29 2 4 2 5 12 Tampa Bay 000 030 100 — 4 8 0 Boston 010 001 000 — 2 4 0 1-ran for Loney in the 9th. LOB—Tampa Bay 5, Boston 6. 2B—Zobrist (37), Lobaton (10). HR—C.Pena (19), off Lester; B.Francisco (2), off Lester. SB—Pedroia 2 (18).

New York Baltimore Tampa Bay Boston Toronto

W 90 89 85 69 68

L 65 67 70 87 87

Detroit Chicago Kansas City Cleveland Minnesota

W 83 82 70 65 65

L 72 73 85 91 91

W L Texas 91 64 Oakland 88 67 Los Angeles 86 69 Seattle 72 83 z-clinched playoff berth x-clinched division

East Division Pct GB WCGB .581 — — .571 1½ — .548 5 3 .442 21½ 19½ .439 22 20 Central Division Pct GB WCGB .535 — — .529 1 6 .452 13 18 .417 18½ 23½ .417 18½ 23½ West Division Pct GB WCGB .587 — — .568 3 — .555 5 2 .465 19 16

Wednesday’s Games N.Y. Yankees 8, Minnesota 2 Detroit 5, Kansas City 4 Baltimore 12, Toronto 2 Tampa Bay 4, Boston 2 Oakland 9, Texas 3 Cleveland 6, Chicago White Sox 4 L.A. Angels 4, Seattle 3

National League

L10 8-2 7-3 7-3 3-7 2-8

Str Home Away W-1 48-30 42-35 W-1 44-34 45-33 W-7 44-34 41-36 L-2 34-47 35-40 L-1 36-38 32-49

L10 6-4 3-7 4-6 5-5 5-5

Str Home Away W-3 49-31 34-41 L-2 44-33 38-40 L-4 36-42 34-43 W-2 34-41 31-50 L-1 30-48 35-43

L10 5-5 4-6 7-3 3-7

Str Home Away L-2 48-29 43-35 W-2 44-31 44-36 W-5 46-34 40-35 L-3 38-40 34-43

East Division Pct GB WCGB .606 — — .581 4 — .503 16 5½ .458 23 12½ .426 28 17½ Central Division W L Pct GB WCGB x-Cincinnati 93 62 .600 — — St. Louis 84 72 .538 9½ — Milwaukee 80 75 .516 13 3½ Pittsburgh 76 79 .490 17 7½ Chicago 59 96 .381 34 24½ Houston 51 105 .327 42½ 33 West Division W L Pct GB WCGB x-San Francisco 90 65 .581 — — Los Angeles 80 75 .516 10 3½ Arizona 78 77 .503 12 5½ San Diego 74 81 .477 16 9½ Colorado 61 94 .394 29 22½

z-Washington z-Atlanta Philadelphia New York Miami

Today’s Games Kansas City (Mendoza 8-9) at Detroit (Fister 10-9), 10:05 a.m. Oakland (Blackley 5-3) at Texas (M.Harrison 17-10), 11:05 a.m. Seattle (Iwakuma 7-5) at L.A. Angels (Haren 12-11), 12:35 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Nova 12-7) at Toronto (Morrow 8-7), 4:07 p.m. Tampa Bay (Shields 15-9) at Chicago White Sox (Peavy 11-12), 5:10 p.m.

W 94 90 78 71 66

L 61 65 77 84 89

Wednesday’s Games L.A. Dodgers 8, San Diego 2 Washington 8, Philadelphia 4 Atlanta 3, Miami 0 Milwaukee 8, Cincinnati 1 N.Y. Mets 6, Pittsburgh 0 Houston 2, St. Louis 0 Colorado 6, Chicago Cubs 0 San Francisco 6, Arizona 0

L10 5-5 8-2 5-5 5-5 2-8

Str Home Away W-1 48-30 46-31 W-4 45-32 45-33 L-1 40-40 38-37 W-1 35-45 36-39 L-6 35-40 31-49

L10 6-4 8-2 7-3 3-7 2-8 4-6

Str Home Away L-1 49-31 44-31 L-1 46-29 38-43 W-1 46-29 34-46 L-1 42-33 34-46 L-4 37-41 22-55 W-1 35-46 16-59

L10 7-3 5-5 7-3 5-5 3-7

Str Home Away W-1 47-33 43-32 W-1 40-35 40-40 L-1 38-37 40-40 L-1 41-36 33-45 W-3 34-46 27-48

Today’s Games Milwaukee (W.Peralta 2-1) at Cincinnati (Latos 13-4), 9:35 a.m. Pittsburgh (Correia 11-10) at N.Y. Mets (Dickey 19-6), 10:10 a.m. Chicago Cubs (Volstad 3-10) at Colorado (Chacin 2-5), 12:10 p.m. Arizona (Corbin 6-7) at San Francisco (Zito 13-8), 12:45 p.m. Washington (G.Gonzalez 20-8) at Philadelphia (Cloyd 2-1), 4:05 p.m. Miami (Ja.Turner 1-3) at Atlanta (Hanson 12-9), 4:10 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Capuano 11-11) at San Diego (C.Kelly 2-2), 7:05 p.m.

American League roundup

National League roundup

• Tigers 5, Royals 4: DETROIT — Jhonny Peralta brought home the go-ahead run when Andy Dirks’ hard slide broke up a potential inning-ending double play in the eighth inning as Detroit beat Kansas City. Triple Crown candidate Miguel Cabrera was robbed of a tiebreaking homer in the fifth inning by Alex Gordon’s catch above the left-field wall. Detroit now holds a one game lead over the Chicago White Sox in the AL Central. • Indians 6, White Sox 4: CHICAGO — The slumping Chicago White Sox fell out of the AL Central lead for the first time in two months, walking 12 batters in a loss to Cleveland. • Athletics 9, Rangers 3: ARLINGTON, Texas — Yoenis Cespedes had one of Oakland’s two triples in the first inning and the Athletics jumped out to a quick lead in a victory at Texas to pull within three games of the AL West-leading Rangers. Oakland has a two-game lead over the Angels for the AL’s second wild card. • Orioles 12, Blue Jays 2: BALTIMORE — Chris Davis and Manny Machado each connected twice and Baltimore tied a team record with seven home runs and stayed within 1½ games of the AL East lead. Yankees 8, Twins 2: MINNEAPOLIS — CC Sabathia struck out 10 batters over eight innings and New York beat Minnesota to keep its AL East lead over Baltimore. • Rays 4, Red Sox 2: BOSTON — Carlos Pena and Ben Francisco hit back-to-back, tape-measure homers in the fifth inning to lead Tampa Bay to its seventh consecutive victory. • Angels 4, Mariners 3: ANAHEIM, Calif. — Torii Hunter’s RBI singles tied it in the seventh inning and ended it in the ninth, and Los Angeles rallied to keep pace in the AL wild-card race with its fifth consecutive victory.

• Brewers 8, Reds 1: CINCINNATI — Ryan Braun hit his NL-leading 41st home run, and Milwaukee kept its wild-card chances flickering with a victory over Cincinnati. Milwaukee moved within 3 1⁄2 games of St. Louis for the final NL wild-card spot, a long shot that left them with no margin for error. • Astros 2, Cardinals 0: HOUSTON — Bud Norris pitched into the eighth inning for his first win since May 21, and Jose Altuve homered as Houston avoided a sweep. • Braves 3, Marlins 0: ATLANTA — Martin Prado homered and Paul Maholm combined with three relievers on a six-hitter as Atlanta showed no hangover from their champagne celebration after clinching an NL wild-card spot the night before. • Nationals 8, Phillies 4: PHILADELPHIA — Bryce Harper hit his 20th homer, Ian Desmond and Kurt Suzuki also connected and Washington moved closer to winning its first division title since moving to Washington. • Dodgers 8, Padres 2: SAN DIEGO — Matt Kemp had four hits, falling a triple shy of the cycle, and four RBIs as Los Angeles used a rare offensive outburst to keep its slim playoff hopes alive. • Mets 6, Pirates 0: NEW YORK — David Wright broke the Mets’ record for hits with 1,419 in his career, and Jeremy Hefner bounced back from a horrendous start in a victory that eliminated Pittsburgh from playoff contention. • Giants 6, Diamondbacks 0: SAN FRANCISCO — Matt Cain pitched seven innings and had two hits and an RBI to lead San Francisco over Arizona. • Rockies 6, Cubs 0: DENVER — Drew Pomeranz tossed five scoreless innings for his first win in more than two months as Colorado beat Chicago.

DP—Tampa Bay 1; Boston 1. Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP Cobb W, 10-9 5 3 1 1 3 5 91 Farnsworth 0 1 1 1 1 0 8 McGee H, 18 1 0 0 0 0 2 19 W.Davis H, 7 1 0 0 0 0 2 13 Jo.Peralta H, 36 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 Rodney S, 45-47 1 0 0 0 1 2 18 Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP Lester L, 9-14 6 4 3 3 1 5 97 Mortensen 0 1 1 1 0 0 3 R.Hill 2-3 2 0 0 0 2 10 Melancon 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 4 23 Breslow 1 0 0 0 1 3 21 Mortensen pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Farnsworth pitched to 2 batters in the 6th. T—3:18. A—37,247 (37,495).

ERA 4.18 3.42 2.05 2.53 3.64 0.63 ERA 4.94 2.95 1.93 6.44 2.95

Tigers 5, Royals 4 Kansas City Lough cf A.Escobar ss A.Gordon lf Butler dh S.Perez c Moustakas 3b Francoeur rf Hosmer 1b Falu 2b Totals

AB 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 36

R 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 4

H 1 0 2 1 1 1 1 0 3 10

BI 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 4

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 1 2 0 2 3 0 0 1 0 9

Avg. .244 .291 .293 .314 .295 .243 .237 .232 .379

Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg. A.Jackson cf 4 1 2 1 0 1 .304 Berry lf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .264 Mi.Cabrera 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .327 Fielder 1b 3 0 1 0 1 0 .309 D.Young dh 4 1 2 0 0 0 .273 1-D.Kelly pr-dh 0 1 0 0 0 0 .187 Dirks rf 4 0 2 1 0 1 .318 Jh.Peralta ss 3 1 1 1 1 0 .242 Avila c 4 1 1 2 0 1 .248 Infante 2b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .261 Totals 33 5 9 5 2 3 Kansas City 003 100 000 — 4 10 0 Detroit 010 300 01x — 5 9 1 1-ran for D.Young in the 8th. E—Fielder (10). LOB—Kansas City 5, Detroit 6. 2B—Lough (2), A.Gordon 2 (51), Falu (5), A.Jackson (28), D.Young (26). HR—Francoeur (14), off Porcello; Avila (9), off Guthrie; A.Jackson (16), off Guthrie. SB—D.Kelly (2). Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Guthrie 7 7 4 4 2 3 103 3.18 K.Herrera L, 4-3 1 2 1 1 0 0 19 2.41 Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Porcello 4 7 4 4 0 3 61 4.68 L.Marte 2-3 1 0 0 0 2 16 3.32 Alburquerque 2 1-3 1 0 0 0 3 30 0.00 Benoit W, 4-3 1 1 0 0 0 1 17 3.15 Valverde S, 32-37 1 0 0 0 0 0 12 3.95 T—2:39. A—32,360 (41,255).

Orioles 12, Blue Jays 2 Toronto AB R Lawrie 3b 4 0 Rasmus cf 3 0 a-McCoy ph-lf 1 0 Encarnacion dh 4 1 Y.Escobar ss 3 0 d-Hechavarria ph 1 0 Lind 1b 4 0 R.Davis rf 3 0 e-Sierra ph 1 0 Vizquel 2b 3 0 Arencibia c 2 1 Gose lf-cf 3 0 Totals 32 2 Baltimore McLouth lf b-Hoes ph-lf

H 0 0 0 1 0 1 3 0 0 0 1 1 7

BI 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1

SO 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 3

Avg. .269 .223 .173 .282 .254 .259 .247 .245 .240 .235 .235 .221

AB R H BI BB SO Avg. 4 2 2 1 0 0 .274 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000

Hardy ss c-Quintanilla ph-ss C.Davis rf En.Chavez rf Ad.Jones cf Avery cf Wieters c Thome dh Mar.Reynolds 1b Flaherty 2b Andino 2b Machado 3b Totals Toronto Baltimore

3 2 2 1 0 0 4 2 2 0 0 0 4 0 1 0 0 0 3 1 0 4 1 1 4 2 1 3 0 1 1 0 0 4 2 2 36 12 12 100 010 100 052

0 0 5 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 3 12 000 22x

1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 3 0 0 1 2 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 2 12 — 2 — 12

.238 .232 .267 .204 .292 .223 .252 .253 .227 .225 .213 .264 7 2 12 0

a-grounded out for Rasmus in the 8th. b-grounded out for McLouth in the 8th. c-struck out for Hardy in the 8th. d-singled for Y.Escobar in the 9th. e-grounded into a double play for R.Davis in the 9th. E—Lawrie 2 (16). LOB—Toronto 4, Baltimore 2. 2B—Arencibia (16), Ad.Jones (39). HR—Encarnacion (42), off Mig.Gonzalez; McLouth (6), off Villanueva; Thome (3), off Villanueva; Machado (5), off Villanueva; C.Davis (27), off Villanueva; Mar.Reynolds (23), off Carreno; C.Davis (28), off Beck; Machado (6), off D.Carpenter. DP—Toronto 2; Baltimore 1. Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Villanueva L, 7-7 4 2-3 7 6 6 1 7 86 4.16 Lyon 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 5 3.27 Carreno 1 2 2 2 1 1 28 6.00 Beck 1 2 2 2 0 1 19 6.75 D.Carpenter 1 1 2 1 0 2 19 30.38 Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gonzalez W, 8-4 7 5 2 2 1 1 96 3.45 Matusz 1 0 0 0 0 2 13 4.93 Tom.Hunter 1 2 0 0 0 0 8 5.54 T—2:47. A—26,513 (45,971).

Yankees 8, Twins 2 New York I.Suzuki rf Gardner lf Jeter ss Cano 2b Swisher 1b Granderson cf Er.Chavez 3b Ibanez dh C.Stewart c Dickerson lf-rf Totals

AB 5 0 4 5 4 5 2 4 3 4 36

R 1 0 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 2 8

H 2 0 0 2 1 1 0 2 1 2 11

BI 0 0 0 2 1 2 0 0 0 2 7

BB 0 0 1 0 1 0 2 0 1 0 5

SO 1 0 1 2 1 1 1 1 0 1 9

Avg. .283 .321 .320 .297 .262 .229 .283 .236 .245 .333

Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Span cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .286 Revere rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .288 Mauer dh 4 0 0 0 0 3 .323 Doumit c 4 1 1 0 0 1 .275 Parmelee 1b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .238 M.Carson lf 4 0 1 1 0 2 .245 J.Carroll 3b 2 1 1 0 1 0 .265 a-C.Herrmann ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .091 A.Casilla 2b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .233 Florimon ss 3 0 1 1 0 1 .244 Totals 34 2 7 2 1 11 New York 006 002 000 — 8 11 0 Minnesota 010 000 100 — 2 7 0 a-singled for J.Carroll in the 9th. LOB—New York 6, Minnesota 6. 2B—Cano 2 (43), Ibanez (19). 3B—Granderson (4). HR—Dickerson (2), off Swarzak. DP—Minnesota 1. New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Sabathia W, 14-6 8 6 2 2 1 10 118 3.42 Eppley 1 1 0 0 0 1 17 3.45 Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Deduno 1 2-3 0 0 0 2 2 30 4.44 Duensing L, 4-11 1 5 6 6 2 1 31 5.15 Swarzak 3 1-3 3 2 2 1 3 37 4.91 Waldrop 2 2 0 0 0 2 30 2.79 Perdomo 1 1 0 0 0 1 18 3.77 T—2:54. A—33,251 (39,500).

NL Boxscores Astros 2, Cardinals 0 St. Louis Jay cf M.Carpenter 3b Holliday lf Craig 1b Y.Molina c Chambers rf Descalso 2b Kozma ss C.Carpenter p Rzepczynski p b-Beltran ph S.Miller p Totals

AB 4 4 4 4 3 2 3 3 2 0 1 0 30

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 3

BI 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 3 1 0 0 0 7

Avg. .301 .299 .294 .306 .320 .224 .225 .278 .250 --.266 .000

Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Altuve 2b 4 1 1 1 0 0 .292 S.Moore rf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .265 Bogusevic rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .202 Lowrie ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .251 Maxwell cf-lf 3 1 0 0 0 0 .228 Wallace 1b 3 0 1 1 0 0 .257 J.Castro c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .256 F.Martinez lf 1 0 1 0 0 0 .218 a-B.Barnes ph-cf 1 0 1 0 0 0 .217 B.Laird 3b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .310 B.Norris p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .102 W.Lopez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 28 2 5 2 0 4 St. Louis 000 000 000 — 0 3 1 Houston 000 200 00x — 2 5 1 a-singled for F.Martinez in the 7th. b-grounded into a fielder’s choice for Rzepczynski in the 8th. E—Kozma (3), Wallace (8). LOB—St. Louis 4, Houston 4. 2B—Jay (19), S.Moore (11). HR—Altuve (6), off C.Carpenter. SB—Maxwell (9). DP—St. Louis 1; Houston 1. St. Louis IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA C.Carpenter L, 0-1 6 4 2 2 0 3 92 3.27 Rzepczynski 1 1 0 0 0 0 11 4.27 S.Miller 1 0 0 0 0 1 9 2.35 Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA B.Norris W, 6-13 7 1-3 2 0 0 0 7 104 4.82 W.Lopez S, 8-11 1 2-3 1 0 0 0 0 18 2.11 T—2:27. A—18,712 (40,981).

Nationals 8, Phillies 4 Washington Werth rf Harper cf Zimmerman 3b LaRoche 1b Morse lf Bernadina lf Desmond ss Lombardozzi 2b Mattheus p Clippard p b-Tracy ph Storen p K.Suzuki c Lannan p Espinosa 2b Totals

AB 4 5 5 3 4 0 3 3 0 0 1 0 4 1 2 35

R 2 1 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 8

H 2 2 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 9

BI 2 3 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 8

BB 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 4

SO 1 2 1 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 9

Avg. .304 .262 .285 .268 .287 .290 .297 .274 .000 --.282 --.271 .125 .253

Philadelphia Rollins ss Mayberry cf Utley 2b Howard 1b Ruiz c D.Brown rf Ruf lf 1-Pierre pr-lf Frandsen 3b K.Kendrick p Rosenberg p Lindblom p a-Schierholtz ph Horst p

AB 5 5 4 3 2 3 4 0 4 0 1 0 1 0

R 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0

H 1 1 2 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 1 0 0 0

BI 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0

BB 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 0 1 0 2 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0

Avg. .248 .253 .265 .223 .325 .236 .333 .313 .331 .152 1.000 --.239 ---

De Fratus p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Bastardo p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-L.Nix ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .255 Totals 33 4 8 3 2 7 Washington 230 000 003 — 8 9 1 Philadelphia 001 100 110 — 4 8 1 a-grounded out for Lindblom in the 7th. b-grounded out for Clippard in the 9th. c-struck out for Bastardo in the 9th. 1-ran for Ruf in the 8th. E—K.Suzuki (3), Utley (7). LOB—Washington 4, Philadelphia 7. 2B—Utley (15), Frandsen (6). 3B—Harper (9), Frandsen (3). HR—Harper (20), off K.Kendrick; Desmond (25), off K.Kendrick; K.Suzuki (5), off K.Kendrick; Rollins (23), off Mattheus. SB— Harper (17), Desmond (21), K.Suzuki (1). DP—Washington 1; Philadelphia 2. Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP Lannan W, 4-0 5 1-3 5 2 2 1 3 82 Mattheus H, 16 1 2-3 1 1 1 0 1 22 Clippard H, 11 1 2 1 1 1 2 26 Storen 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP Kendrick L, 10-12 2 5 5 4 2 1 47 Rosenberg 3 0 0 0 1 3 42 Lindblom 2 0 0 0 0 2 29 Horst 1 1 0 0 0 1 12 De Fratus 2-3 2 3 3 1 1 27 Bastardo 1-3 1 0 0 0 1 6 K.Kendrick pitched to 2 batters in the 3rd. T—3:20. A—41,440 (43,651).

ERA 4.23 2.95 3.75 2.39 ERA 4.08 6.86 3.23 1.00 4.32 4.41

Brewers 8, Reds 1 Milwaukee Aoki rf R.Weeks 2b Braun lf Ar.Ramirez 3b Hart 1b Ishikawa 1b Lucroy c L.Schafer cf Bianchi ss Marcum p Fr.Rodriguez p b-T.Green ph Kintzler p Veras p Totals

AB 4 5 5 5 4 0 4 5 3 3 0 1 0 0 39

R 2 1 2 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 8

H 3 1 2 1 1 0 3 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 13

BI 2 0 2 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 8

BB 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 3

SO 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 3

Avg. .289 .231 .318 .298 .275 .250 .328 .333 .190 .083 --.192 -----

Cincinnati AB R H BI BB SO Avg. B.Phillips 2b 5 0 0 0 0 2 .283 Cozart ss 3 1 2 0 1 1 .246 Votto 1b 2 0 2 1 2 0 .342 Rolen 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .238 Bruce rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .256 Heisey cf 3 0 0 0 1 2 .273 Paul lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .304 Hanigan c 4 0 1 0 0 0 .282 Arroyo p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .145 Ondrusek p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-H.Rodriguez ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .231 LeCure p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Simon p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 c-Gregorius ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .300 Totals 32 1 6 1 4 9 Milwaukee 003 001 211 — 8 13 0 Cincinnati 100 000 000 — 1 6 0 a-grounded out for Ondrusek in the 7th. b-struck out for Fr.Rodriguez in the 8th. c-grounded out for Simon in the 9th. LOB—Milwaukee 9, Cincinnati 9. 2B—Aoki 2 (36), Braun (34), Lucroy (16), Bianchi (2), Votto (42). 3B—L.Schafer (2). HR—Aoki (10), off Arroyo; Braun (41), off Ondrusek; Lucroy (11), off Simon. Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP Marcum W, 6-4 6 4 1 1 3 7 98 Fr.Rodriguez 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 Kintzler 1 1 0 0 0 1 18 Veras 1 1 0 0 1 0 22 Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP Arroyo L, 12-9 6 8 4 4 1 1 89 Ondrusek 1 2 2 2 1 0 18 LeCure 1 1 1 1 1 1 21 Simon 1 2 1 1 0 1 19 HBP—by Ondrusek (Hart). T—3:04. A—20,570 (42,319).

ERA 3.74 4.57 2.25 3.65 ERA 3.70 3.59 3.23 2.59

Braves 3, Marlins 0 Miami Petersen lf G.Hernandez cf Reyes ss Ca.Lee 1b Dobbs rf D.Solano 2b J.Buck c Velazquez 3b Jo.Johnson p a-Kearns ph Koehler p Da.Jennings p Totals

AB 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 1 0 0 34

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 6

BI 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 1 0 1 0 2 2 4 1 0 1 0 0 12

Avg. .192 .179 .287 .264 .289 .295 .198 .242 .094 .243 --.000

Atlanta AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Constanza cf 3 1 0 0 1 1 .246 Kimbrel p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Prado lf 4 1 2 2 0 1 .306 Heyward rf 3 0 1 0 1 1 .271 C.Jones 3b 2 0 0 0 2 0 .295 F.Freeman 1b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .265 Uggla 2b 4 1 0 0 0 1 .215 McCann c 4 0 1 0 0 3 .227 Simmons ss 3 0 0 0 0 0 .280 Maholm p 3 0 0 0 0 1 .066 Durbin p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --O’Flaherty p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Re.Johnson cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .293 Totals 29 3 4 2 5 9 Miami 000 000 000 — 0 6 1 Atlanta 101 001 00x — 3 4 0 a-struck out for Jo.Johnson in the 7th. E—Velazquez (1). LOB—Miami 8, Atlanta 7. HR—Prado (10), off Jo.Johnson. SB—Constanza (5), Heyward (20), Uggla (4), McCann (3). Miami IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Johnson L, 8-14 6 4 3 2 5 7 112 3.81 Koehler 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 5.14 Da.Jennings 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 2.20 Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Maholm W, 13-10 6 2-3 5 0 0 0 6 104 3.71 Durbin H, 14 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 3 3.17 O’Flaherty H, 28 1 1 0 0 0 1 12 1.76 Kimbrel S, 40-43 1 0 0 0 0 4 17 1.04 T—2:37. A—23,420 (49,586).

Dodgers 8, Padres 2 Los Angeles E.Herrera lf Punto 2b Kemp cf Castellanos rf Ad.Gonzalez 1b J.Wright p H.Ramirez ss L.Cruz 3b J.Rivera rf-1b Treanor c Harang p Sh.Tolleson p Choate p c-Federowicz ph Guerrier p Victorino cf Totals

AB 5 5 5 0 5 0 5 4 4 4 3 0 0 0 0 0 40

R 0 4 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 8

H 0 3 4 0 2 0 2 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 14

BI 0 0 4 0 2 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1

SO 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 5

Avg. .242 .333 .304 .136 .269 .000 .254 .302 .240 .175 .073 --------.250

San Diego AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Ev.Cabrera ss 3 0 1 0 1 1 .248 Boxberger p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Burns p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 d-Jo.Baker ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .239 Forsythe 2b-ss 5 1 0 0 0 0 .282 Headley 3b 3 1 1 1 1 0 .283 Grandal c 4 0 2 1 0 0 .279 Alonso 1b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .275 Venable rf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .258 Guzman lf 3 0 0 0 1 2 .246 Maybin cf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .250 Richard p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .076 Vincent p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-Amarista ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .240 Bass p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .138 b-Parrino ph-2b 1 0 0 0 1 0 .211 Totals 33 2 6 2 5 6 Los Angeles 201 302 000 — 8 14 0 San Diego 000 000 200 — 2 6 2 a-grounded out for Vincent in the 5th. b-walked for Bass in the 7th. c-walked for Choate in the 8th. dgrounded out for Burns in the 9th. E—Guzman (2), Ev.Cabrera (16). LOB—Los Angeles 6, San Diego 9. 2B—Kemp (20), Harang (1), Headley (29). HR—J.Rivera (8), off Richard; Kemp (20), off Bass. DP—San Diego 2. Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Harang W, 10-10 5 1-3 4 0 0 4 3 100 3.68 Sh.Tolleson 1 1-3 2 2 2 1 2 31 4.50

Choate 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 4 Guerrier 1 0 0 0 0 0 13 J.Wright 1 0 0 0 0 0 12 San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP Richard L, 14-13 3 2-3 10 6 4 0 2 70 Vincent 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 16 Bass 2 2 2 2 0 1 24 Boxberger 1 0 0 0 1 1 15 Burns 1 1 0 0 0 1 15 T—2:59. A—24,818 (42,691).

3.05 3.95 3.60 ERA 3.91 1.93 4.56 2.88 5.74

Giants 6, Diamondbacks 0 Arizona Eaton cf A.Hill 2b J.Upton rf M.Montero c Goldschmidt 1b G.Parra lf Ransom 3b Jo.McDonald ss Miley p a-Jacobs ph Bergesen p b-Kubel ph Ziegler p Zagurski p Saito p d-R.Wheeler ph Totals

AB 4 4 4 4 4 3 4 4 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 35

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H 1 0 1 2 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7

BI 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

BB 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 0 0 1 2 1 0 2 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 8

Avg. .224 .301 .278 .293 .288 .273 .215 .242 .169 .143 .000 .255 .250 ----.225

San Francisco AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Pagan cf 4 1 0 0 1 1 .290 F.Peguero lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .167 Scutaro 2b 4 1 2 1 0 0 .305 Burriss 2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .215 Sandoval 3b 4 0 2 2 1 0 .288 Otero p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Posey c 5 0 1 1 0 0 .331 Whiteside c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .111 Pence rf 4 1 1 0 1 1 .255 Nady lf 3 0 0 0 1 2 .193 G.Blanco lf-cf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .241 Belt 1b 4 1 3 0 0 1 .275 B.Crawford ss 3 1 1 0 1 0 .248 M.Cain p 2 1 2 1 0 0 .181 c-A.Huff ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .194 Mota p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Affeldt p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Arias 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .276 Totals 35 6 12 5 5 6 Arizona 000 000 000 — 0 7 2 San Francisco 002 210 01x — 6 12 3 a-struck out for Miley in the 5th. b-grounded out for Bergesen in the 7th. c-flied out for M.Cain in the 7th. d-flied out for Saito in the 9th. E—Ransom (7), A.Hill (6), Belt (7), B.Crawford 2 (17). LOB—Arizona 9, San Francisco 12. 2B—Goldschmidt (43), G.Parra (21), Scutaro (31). 3B—Belt (6). DP—Arizona 1; San Francisco 2. Arizona IP H R ER BB SO NP Miley L, 16-11 4 6 4 3 3 3 75 Bergesen 2 3 1 0 0 1 33 Ziegler 1 2 0 0 0 1 16 Zagurski 1-3 1 1 1 1 0 14 Saito 2-3 0 0 0 1 1 15 San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO NP M.Cain W, 16-5 7 4 0 0 1 6 91 Mota 2-3 1 0 0 0 1 16 Affeldt 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 8 Otero 1 1 0 0 0 1 13 T—2:58. A—41,516 (41,915).

ERA 3.32 2.54 2.49 5.70 6.55 ERA 2.77 5.03 2.82 5.84

Rockies 6, Cubs 0 Chicago Sappelt rf Barney 2b Rizzo 1b A.Soriano lf S.Castro ss W.Castillo c Vitters 3b Mather cf Berken p a-Recker ph L.Castillo p b-LaHair ph Bowden p Totals

AB 4 4 3 3 3 3 4 3 1 1 0 1 0 30

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H 2 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 5

BI 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

BB 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 5

SO 0 2 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 6

Avg. .283 .261 .283 .261 .283 .290 .117 .211 .000 .182 --.254 .000

Colorado AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Rutledge ss 5 0 0 0 0 1 .288 Blackmon lf 3 2 1 1 1 0 .276 Pacheco 1b 4 2 2 1 0 0 .307 W.Rosario c 3 1 0 0 1 0 .274 Colvin cf 3 1 2 1 0 0 .290 Nelson 3b 4 0 2 2 0 1 .299 A.Brown rf 3 0 0 0 1 2 .239 LeMahieu 2b 3 0 2 0 1 0 .293 D.Pomeranz p 2 0 1 0 0 1 .240 White p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .179 Scahill p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 30 6 10 5 4 5 Chicago 000 000 000 — 0 5 1 Colorado 204 000 00x — 6 10 1 a-flied out for Berken in the 5th. b-struck out for L.Castillo in the 7th. E—W.Castillo (7), A.Brown (2). LOB—Chicago 8, Colorado 7. 2B—Sappelt (6), Mather (11), Pacheco (30), D.Pomeranz (2). HR—Blackmon (2), off Berken. SB—A.Brown (2). DP—Chicago 1; Colorado 3. Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Berken L, 0-2 4 9 6 6 2 2 73 5.14 L.Castillo 2 0 0 0 2 0 29 8.79 Bowden 2 1 0 0 0 3 29 3.12 Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Pomeranz W, 2-9 5 3 0 0 3 3 84 5.01 White 2 2 0 0 0 2 17 5.44 Scahill 2 0 0 0 2 1 24 0.00 T—2:50 (Rain delay: 1:24). A—27,057 (50,398).

Mets 6, Pirates 0 Pittsburgh S.Marte lf Presley rf A.McCutchen cf G.Jones 1b P.Alvarez 3b McKenry c J.Harrison 2b Barmes ss Locke p Leroux p a-Clement ph Karstens p Morris p b-Snider ph Qualls p Totals

AB 3 4 4 3 3 3 3 2 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 28

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

BI 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

BB 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

SO 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 8

Avg. .255 .238 .334 .275 .246 .243 .243 .225 .111 .000 .150 .107 --.244 ---

New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Tejada ss 5 1 4 2 0 0 .296 Dan.Murphy 2b 4 1 2 1 0 2 .292 D.Wright 3b 4 1 2 0 0 0 .307 Hairston rf-lf 4 1 2 1 0 1 .263 I.Davis 1b 3 0 0 0 1 2 .224 Shoppach c 4 0 1 1 0 1 .206 Familia p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Duda lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .240 Baxter rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .262 An.Torres cf 4 2 3 0 0 0 .228 Hefner p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .059 Nickeas c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .178 Totals 34 6 14 5 1 9 Pittsburgh 000 000 000 — 0 3 1 New York 004 101 00x — 6 14 0 a-struck out for Leroux in the 5th. b-struck out for Morris in the 8th. E—P.Alvarez (26). LOB—Pittsburgh 3, New York 7. 2B—Hairston (25), An.Torres (17). SB—Tejada (4), An.Torres (12). DP—New York 1. Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Locke L, 0-3 3 2-3 9 5 5 1 5 70 6.35 Leroux 1-3 2 0 0 0 0 5 6.10 Karstens 2 2 1 1 0 2 29 4.01 Morris 1 0 0 0 0 2 10 2.25 Qualls 1 1 0 0 0 0 9 5.24 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hefner W, 3-7 7 3 0 0 1 7 103 5.32 Familia 2 0 0 0 1 1 22 8.64 T—2:35. A—22,890 (41,922). Leaders Through Wednesday’s Games AMERICAN LEAGUE BATTING—MiCabrera, Detroit, .327; Mauer, Minnesota, .323; Trout, Los Angeles, .323; Jeter, New York, .320; Beltre, Texas, .315. RBI—MiCabrera, Detroit, 133; Hamilton, Texas, 124; Willingham, Minnesota, 110; Encarnacion, Toronto, 107; Fielder, Detroit, 104/ HOME RUNS—Hamilton, Texas, 43; MiCabrera, Detroit, 42; Encarnacion, Toronto, 42; ADunn, Chicago, 41; Granderson, New York, 40; Beltre, Texas, 35; Willingham, Minnesota, 35.


D4

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2012

MOTOR SPORTS: NASCAR

Redmond

NFL

Hamlin crew chief proves he’s right man for job • Darian Grubb has his team rolling in the Sprint Cup championship chase By Jenna Fryer The Associated Press

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — The hottest crew chief in NASCAR was available, and yet Denny Hamlin wasn’t sure he wanted him to lead his race team. Darian Grubb was out of work just days after guiding Tony Stewart to last year’s championship. Stewart won the title with five victories in the final 10 Chase for the Sprint Cup races — and Stewart let him go before they even collected the trophy. Grubb had job offers from all over the garage, but Hamlin wasn’t convinced he was the best fit for the No. 11 team. Hamlin had been with Mike Ford for his entire Sprint Cup Series career, and he didn’t necessarily need to make a change. True, he was coming off a flat 2011 season after nearly winning the title the year before, but there wasn’t a pressing need to replace Ford. But Joe Gibbs Racing was enticed by Grubb, even if Hamlin had to be convinced the crew chief was still motivated to chase another championship. “I was a little more apprehensive that he did just win the championship. I knew that he was mulling offers of not being a crew chief anymore,” Hamlin said. “So that scared me a little bit that, ‘Hey, what’s his drive to go out here and win a championship with me?’ He’s just won the championship. He’s got nothing to prove.” Hamlin was wrong. Although Grubb has insisted from the start he’s not seeking any sort of revenge against Stewart or validation from the industry, he has done a tremendous job this season. He led Hamlin to a dominating win last Sunday at New Hampshire, a victory that goes down as Grubb’s sixth in 12 Chase races dating to last season. Hamlin won a series-best four races during the “regular season” to earn the top seed in the Chase, and the New Hampshire win was a huge lift after a mistake cost the team critical points in the opener. Hamlin and Grubb now go to Dover — the third race in the Chase — ranked third in the standings and seven points behind leader Jimmie Johnson. Stewart, meanwhile, has three wins on the season and is fourth in the Chase standings, 10 points out of the lead. Neither Grubb or Stewart discuss in any real detail what led to their split. Hamlin said he doesn’t ask. “As many times as I’ve been in a hauler with him and they’ve talked about crew chief changes on the TV right here in front of him, I always think it is an awkward situation for him,” Hamlin said. “But he’s never brought up that, ‘I just want to beat him,’ or anything like that. It’s always focused on our team and what he needs to be better.” Stewart’s decision to release Grubb came weeks before they won the championship, and he didn’t change his mind even after winning three of the final four races of the season. Stewart isn’t one to wonder if he let a great crew chief slip away, and he’s content with Steve Addington. “I know Darian and I know Denny enough to know that they were going to have good chemistry together,” Stewart said before the Chase opener. “But you have to do what you think as an owner to try to give yourself the best opportunity to have success. You don’t look back. You don’t sit there and say, ‘What if?’ You sit there and work on your program and try to figure out what you have to do now.” And he understands that letting Grubb go can come back to bite him during this Chase. “You obviously know that if you make a change like that, that that guy can go out and beat you,” Stewart said. After a lunch meeting with Grubb, Hamlin was convinced that the crew chief had enough fire to lead his team for several years. And of all the jobs being offered — including a management position at Hendrick Motorsports, where Grubb had been before joining Stewart — he thought Hamlin was the best fit. “He assured me that he felt like I would give him his best chance at winning a championship, and he had something to prove,” Hamlin said. “He wanted to win another championship. He just didn’t want to go out the way things ended.”

Joe Amon / The Denver Post via The Associated Press

Denver Broncos linebacker Joe Mays, left, knocks Houston Texans quarterback Matt Schaub’s helmet off on a hit during the third quarter of Sunday’s game in Denver. Mays received a one-game suspension and a $50,000 fine from the NFL for the hit that dislodged Schaub’s helmet and took off a piece of his ear.

‘Tough-guy’ quarterback Schaub emerges for Texans • The Houston QB led his team to victory after losing part of his ear By Chris Duncan The Associated Press

HOUSTON — Matt Schaub found the rest of his left ear. “It’s been recovered,” Schaub said Wednesday. The Houston Texans quarterback took one for the team in Denver over the weekend, losing a chunk of his ear on a big hit by linebacker Joe Mays. He also tied his career high with four touchdown passes, outplaying Peyton Manning in a 3125 victory. Schaub’s coaches and teammates have known all along that he’s tough. Now, Schaub has a validating moment, skipping only one snap after Mays’ violent, helmet-first hit, and then leading his team to a hard-fought road victory. “I haven’t given much attention or thought to it, where other people might,” Schaub said. “Me, I’m just excited that we won the other day, and looking to move on to our fourth game.” Houston (3-0) plays the Titans (1-2) on Sunday at Reliant Stadium. Titans cornerback Alterraun Verner says Schaub proved his mettle by returning to the game so quickly after the hit. “It shows that he’s the leader of that team,” Verner said. “He knew if he showed weakness, then people might give in and that game ended up being close toward the end, too. He showed the toughness that probably pushed his team through to get that win.” The Texans are unbeaten in Schaub’s past seven starts, going back to a 41-7 win at Tennessee last October. Schaub did his usual Monday work and practiced on Wednesday, wearing only a simple bandage over the grisly injury. He says it won’t bother him at all this weekend. “He’s a strong guy, he’s our leader,” said receiver Kevin Walter, who caught a 52-yard TD pass from Schaub before the hard hit. “He’s a tough guy, and

NFL Continued from D1 “Welcome back REFS,” Buffalo Bills running back C.J. Spiller tweeted shortly after the news broke. The replacements worked the first three weeks of games, triggering a wave of outrage that threatened to disrupt the rest of the season. After a missed call cost the Green Bay Packers a win on a chaotic final play at Seattle on Monday night, the two sides really got serious. “We are glad to be getting back on the field for this week’s games,” referees’ union president Scott Green said. The agreement hinged on working out pension and retirement benefits for the officials, who are part-time employees of the league. The tentative pact calls for their salaries to increase from an average of $149,000 a year in 2011 to $173,000 in 2013, rising to $205,000 by 2019. Under the proposed deal, the current defined benefit pension plan will remain in place for current officials through the 2016 season or until the official earns 20 years’ service. The defined benefit plan will then be frozen. Retirement benefits will be provided for new hires, and for all officials beginning in 2017, through a defined contribution arrangement. The annual league contribution made on behalf of each game official will begin with an average of more than $18,000 per official and increase to more than $23,000 per official in 2019. Beginning with the 2013 season, the NFL will have the option to hire a number of officials on a full-time basis to work year round, including on the field. The NFL also will be able to retain additional officials for training and development, and can assign those officials to work games. The number of additional officials will be determined by the league. “As you know, this has to be ratified and we know very little about it, but we’re excited to be back. And ready,” referee Ed Hochuli told The Associated Press in a telephone interview. “ And I think that’s the most important message — that we’re ready.” Replacement refs aren’t new to the NFL. They worked the first week of games in 2001 before a deal was reached. But those officials came from the highest level of college football; the current replacements do not. Their ability to call fast-moving NFL games drew mounting criticism through

that’s what he’s all about. I always knew Matt was a tough guy, I’ve seen him get hit plenty of times and come back and play.” Only last season, though, the old questions emerged about Schaub’s durability when he fractured his right Lisfranc joint in Week 10 and missed the rest of the season. The Texans were 7-3 at the time, finished 106 and won their division for their first playoff appearance. Schaub’s foot was fully healed by the time training camp started and he looked as sharp as ever in Houston’s third preseason game, completing 15 of 18 passes against New Orleans. He hasn’t needed to put up staggering numbers in Houston’s first three games because it hasn’t been necessary — the Texans were fueled by four turnovers in a 30-10 rout of Miami and they rushed for 216 yards in an easy 27-7 win over Jacksonville. The Broncos dared Schaub to throw deep and he did, finding Andre Johnson and Walter for touchdown passes covering more than 50 yards. Schaub completed 17 of 30 passes for a modest season-high 290 yards against Denver. He also threw his first interception of the season and only the second in those past seven starts. “Last week was as good as he’s played this year,” coach Gary Kubiak said. “The thing about our team offensively, we’re built a little bit differently than some teams. There are times where we’ll go out there and may not ask Matt to throw it 22 or 23 times in the course of a game. Or we may need him to throw it 45 times for us to win. I don’t know when those days are going to be, but he’s handled himself very well. “He’s thrown for a percentage when somebody played him a certain way, and then he made big plays when somebody played him a different way last week,” Kubiak said. “Matt’s on his way, practicing very well.”

Week 3, climaxing last weekend, when ESPN analyst Jon Gruden called their work “tragic and comical.” Those comments came during “Monday Night Football,” with Seattle beating Green Bay 14-12 on a desperation pass into the end zone on the final play. Packers safety M.D. Jennings had both hands on the ball in the end zone, and when he fell to the ground in a scrum, both Jennings and Seahawks receiver Golden Tate had their arms on the ball. The closest official to the play, at the back of the end zone, signaled for the clock to stop, while another official at the sideline ran in and then signaled touchdown. The NFL said in a statement Tuesday that the touchdown pass should not have been overturned — but acknowledged Tate should have been called for offensive pass interference before the catch. The league also said there was no indisputable evidence to reverse the call made on the field. That drew even louder howls of disbelief. Some coaches, including Miami’s Joe Philbin and Cincinnati’s Marvin Lewis, tried to restore some calm by instructing players not to speak publicly on the issue. Fines against two coaches for incidents involving the replacements were handed out Wednesday. Patriots coach Bill Belichick was docked $50,000 for trying to grab an official’s arm Sunday to ask for an explanation of a call after his team lost at Baltimore. And Washington offensive coordinator Kyle Shanahan was tagged for $25,000 for what the league called “abuse of officials” in the Redskins’ loss to Cincinnati on Sunday. Two other coaches, Denver’s John Fox and assistant Jack Del Rio, were fined Monday for incidents involving the replacements the previous week. “I accept the discipline and I apologize for the incident,” Belichick said. Players were in no mood for apologies from anyone. “I’ll probably get in trouble for this, but you have to have competent people,” Carolina receiver Steve Smith said. “And if you’re incompetent, get them out of there.” Added Rams quarterback Sam Bradford: “I just don’t think it’s fair to the fans, I don’t think it’s fair to us as players to go out there and have to deal with that week in and week out. I really hope that they’re as close as they say they are.” They were.

Continued from D1 Redmond High seniors Cam Peters and Trevor Genz have eclipsed the century mark in rushing yards at some point this season, giving the Panthers three more than capable weapons in their backfield. “I guess that’s kind of what we want to try to do is to try to get two and three guys going at the same time and force the defense to try to defend all three of them,” Stanley said. “I think that you look at spread teams that want to run the football, they spread the field so that they can run, and they pass to set up the run. We’re more of a run to set up the pass.” Summit has had problems with the run at times this season, but has shown recent improvement. The Storm gave up 379 rushing yards to Eagle Point in a 34-7 loss on Sept. 7, but they rebounded in a win against The Dalles Wahtonka last week, allowing 186 yards rushing on 52 carries. Still, in order to slow down Redmond’s backfield and the Panthers’ physical offensive line, Summit coach Joe Padilla said the Storm will have to put its best defense on display. “We have to play aggressive,” Padilla said. “We’ve shown signs of and improved a lot in how aggressive we play, but this has to be our most aggressive game we’ve played so far. It’s got to be a swarming, 11-man type of defense, where everyone’s to the ball. That’s been our approach all week, and we just hope we can execute that on Friday.” — Reporter: 541-383-0305, glucas@bendbulletin.com

Prep football this weekend, at a glance Here’s a quick look at the rest of the games involving area teams on Friday with records in parentheses: • Bend (1-3) at Hermiston (1-2), 7 p.m.: The Lava Bears stuck with the run game last week, leading to a 33-6 win against Portland’s Franklin thanks to Duke DeGaetano’s 161 yards on the ground. DeGaetano’s 108 rushing yards-per-game average, combined with quarterback Jonah Koski, who has passed for 568 yards and seven touchdowns this season, could be lethal against a Hermiston squad that is allowing 36 points per contest this season and 47 points the past two games. • Mountain View (2-2) at Wilsonville (31), 7 p.m.: Riding the legs of Kyler Ayers and arm of Toby Webb, the Cougars look to build off of a 23-20 win over Class 6A McNary last week, during which Mountain View posted 443 yards of total offense. That well-balanced attack — Webb has accounted for 909 passing yards in 2012 and Ayers has recorded 441 rushing yards — will face a test against Wilsonville’s 19.75-points-per-game defense. • Burns (3-1) at Ridgeview (2-2), 7 p.m.: The Class 3A Hilanders have picked apart 4A programs so far this season, notching wins against Sisters and La Pine. Ridgeview, however, has pounded opponents on the ground this year, averaging 347 yards rushing per game in addition to scoring 16 touchdowns. The Ravens’ Boomer Fleming is averaging 128.8 rushing yards per game this season and has scored five touchdowns. • Madras (1-2) at North Marion (3-0), 7 p.m.: The White Buffaloes hope to snap a three-game losing streak when they head to Aurora to take on the undefeated Huskies in a Class 4A Tri-Valley Conference matchup. Madras has been outscored 140-72 during that stretch, but Devin Cecilliani has been a force for the Buffs, accounting for 10 touchdowns this season — including five against Crook County last week. • Crook County (3-1) at Madison (3-1), 7 p.m.: The Class 4A Cowboys are off to a similar start to last season, but this time, Marcus Greaves and company look to change the pattern with a win against the 5A Senators of Portland. Greaves is coming off a six-touchdown performance against Madras last week that helped Crook County escape with a 60-52 win. With a victory, the Cowboys would be off to their best start in more than nine years. • Sweet Home (2-2) at Sisters (2-2), 7 p.m.: The Outlaws look to bounce back from an 18-point loss last week and eclipse last year’s season-total win mark in their Class 4A Sky-Em League opener against the Huskies. Ethan Luloff has been Sisters’ main offensive weapon, averaging more than 120 yards rushing in the Outlaws’ past three games. • La Pine (2-2) at Junction City (2-2), 7 p.m.: After being shut out in a 55-0 loss at Burns last week, the Hawks aim to bounce back in their Class 4A Sky-Em League opener against the Tigers. La Pine has gone 0-2 against programs within their classification, but the Hawks took the last meeting against Junction City, a 32-22 decision in La Pine’s season finale a year ago. • Vernonia (2-1) at Culver (0-2), 7 p.m.: The Bulldogs have defeated Vernonia each of the past two years, but the Loggers come in with a 21-point win over Santiam under their belts. Culver’s offense, which has tallied just 14 points in two games this season, looks to turn things around against a Vernonia defense that allows more than 20 points per contest. • Gilchrist (1-2 Class 1A Special District 2, 1-2 overall) at Camas Valley (3-0 SD2, 4-0), 4 p.m.: The Grizzlies come off their first win of the season after a two-point squeaker against Powers a week ago. Gilchrist, however, faces Camas Valley, a team that blew by the Grizzlies 72-28 last year and reigns as the defending 1A state champion. The Hornets have racked up 234 points so far this season, which is secondmost in 1A.


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

Deer

Don Ryan / The Associated Press

Oregon tight end Colt Lyerla, right, and quarterback Bryan Bennett both carry the football over the goal line for a touchdown during the second half of Saturday’s game against Arizona in Eugene.

Ducks Continued from D1 “He was supposed to keep it. I messed it up,” Lyerla said with a smile. “I held on to it a little bit too long.” The Ducks defeated the then-No. 22 Wildcats 49-0, and in the process jumped a spot in the AP rankings to No. 2. Oregon takes on Washington State this Saturday night in a game at Seattle’s CenturyLink Field. In the week before Oregon’s game against Arizona, the 6-foot-5, 255pound Lyerla found himself working out more with the Ducks’ running backs. Several times against the Wildcats, Oregon used a formation with Lyerla and Bennett, the backup quarterback behind Marcus Mariota, together in the backfield. Lyerla, who has earned the nickname “Bane” after Photoshopped pictures of him wearing the mask of the supervillain from “Batman” circulated on the Internet, finished the game with 63 yards rushing on seven carries with the touchdown. He also had two catches for 53 yards. “It meant the world, especially to go in there and be successful with it,” said Lyerla, whose affable nature belies his

imposing appearance. “I just went out there and played as hard as I could.” Coach Chip Kelly said that using Lyerla at tailback really was nothing new. The versatile football talent from Hillsboro High School has been lined up in a two-back set earlier this season, but he was mostly blocking. It was time to take it to the next level. “It’s an opportunity to get Bryan Bennett in the game and Colt in a new position,” Kelly said. “It’s nice, as a coach, to have those weapons to bring in. It’s nice to have that kind of depth.” Lyerla played in 12 games as a true freshman last season behind starter David Paulson, who graduated and now plays in the NFL for the Pittsburgh Steelers. Lyerla finished the season with seven catches for 147 yards and five touchdowns. Lyerla missed the first several days of preseason camp after attending to personal issues and it almost seemed like he was in the doghouse. He did not speak to the media, and Kelly would not name him the starter at tight end, instead listing four players at the position on the depth chart: Lyerla, true freshmen Pharaoh Brown, T.J. Daniel and redshirt freshman Koa Ka’ai. Lyerla said he had been hoping for a

chance at tailback. “I was probably lobbying in the back of my head, but I don’t have the guts to make any suggestions like that,” he said. “I just lucked out.” At Hillsboro High, Lyerla was considered a four-star recruit when he decided on Oregon after interest from a long list of other schools, including Oklahoma, USC and Stanford. He said he chose the Ducks because they were one of the only teams that told him he would get a chance to play on offense. As a high school senior, he rushed for 1,519 yards, had 352 yards receiving and scored 25 touchdowns. He grabbed national attention in his junior year when he caught a 61-yard desperation pass against Glencoe High that showed up on ESPN and later became a hit on YouTube. The Ducks could use some help at running back. Oregon’s only two scholarship running backs with experience heading into preseason camp were senior Kenjon Barner and versatile sophomore De’Anthony Thomas, who also plays at receiver. “Chip’s a smart guy. Whatever he wants to do, I’ve got to trust him,” Lyerla said. “Whatever he puts on my shoulders I’ll do.”

boasts the most deer of the three Deschutes District units, and he predicted that hunters will enjoy some fairly high success rates there. But the Paulina Unit, he noted, will be challenging, as the number of deer in that unit is at only about 60 percent of the ODFW’s management objective. “There are still quite a few deer around,” George said of the Paulina Unit. “Bucks will be more in the younger age class than the older age class — little forked horns and three points.” The Upper Deschutes Unit has a fair number of deer, according to George, but stalking conditions will be particularly tough in that unit. “The brush and the cover is pretty thick in the Upper Deschutes Unit, so it’s going to make hunting conditions difficult,” George said, The Upper Deschutes Unit is right at the management objective of 15 bucks per 100 does, George said, while the Paulina is just below that, at 14 bucks per 100 does. Last rifle deer season, 2,131 hunters made a bid for a buck in the Upper Deschutes Unit, and just 15 percent were successful, according to the ODFW. In the Paulina Unit, 1,812 hunters took part in the season, and 25 percent bagged a buck. The Metolius Unit saw 423 hunters, who posted a 41 percent success rate.

Continued from D1 During last fall’s postseason surveys, Niemela calculated that 20 percent of the bucks he saw in each of the Ochoco and Grizzly units were four points or bigger. In the Maury Unit, 30 percent were the older age-class bucks. According to ODFW statistics, during the 2011 rifle deer season in the Ochoco Unit, 2,536 hunters stalked game, and 39 percent were successful. The Grizzly Unit saw 1,189 hunters, 31 percent of whom took a buck. In the Maury Unit, 348 hunters took part in the season, posting a 39 percent success rate. Niemela said deer hunters should expect dry and noisy conditions at the start of the season, making it difficult to stalk bucks without spooking them. “I went elk archery hunting this last weekend, and it was crackly and noisy out there,” Niemela said. “As much as people can, if there’s a place they know bucks pass through, just sitting down and watching a hillside can be a pretty good place, as opposed to moving around — especially for early morning and evening, when animals are up and moving around.” In the Deschutes District — which includes the Metolius, Upper Deschutes and Paulina units — deer are fairly spread out, according to Bend-based ODFW wildlife biologist Steve George. George said the Metolius Unit

— Reporter: 541-383-0318, mmorical@bendbulletin.com

Central Oregon Wildlife Management units National Forest

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Maupin

26

197

Warm Springs Indian Reservation

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Clarno

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Warm Springs Madras Camp Sherman Sisters Tumalo

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Terrebonne Prineville

Redmond Powell Butte

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Continued from D1 The victories propelled the Beavers into the AP rankings this week at No. 18. After their opener against Nicholls State was postponed because of travel issues in the wake of Hurricane Isaac, the Beavers hosted Wisconsin, which had beaten them 35-0 last season in Madison, Wis. Oregon State held the Badgers to 207 yards in total offense for a 10-7 victory. “The team we saw last year is now a much-improved one with a quarterback that can be very accurate,” Bielema said. “I give a lot of credit again to Oregon State. Mike Riley is a very good football coach. They do a good job at beating ranked opponents.” Next up was UCLA, which had pulled off a 36-30 home upset of thenNo. 17 Nebraska in the nonconference season. The Beavers went down to Pasadena and won 27-20. “They’re obviously a well-coached team with Mike Riley, they play very, very hard, they’re a big, physical group,” Mora said. “I was very impressed — not only with their defense, which I knew would be good going into the game — but their offense. Their quarterback played very well, and they have two very explosive wide receivers.”

The Beavers (2-0, 1-0 Pac-12) are certainly spreading the workload around. Sophomore quarterback Sean Mannion is averaging 327.5 passing yards per game, best in the conference. He has thrown for three touchdowns and an interception. Receivers Brandin Cooks and senior Markus Wheaton are pulling down a little more than half of all Mannion’s passes. Cooks ranks third in the nation with an average of 127.7 yards in receptions each game, while Wheaton is ranked fifth with 118.5. But what has set Oregon State apart has been its run defense, which is ranked second nationally (behind Stanford) and has allowed opponents an average of just 53.2 yards on the ground per game. Last season, the Beavers were ranked 118th — third from last — in the category. The Beavers are also distinguished by the manner of their amiable coach. Riley stresses hard work, while making sure that his players are not overwhelmed. Practice is open to all, injuries are not kept secret, formal news conferences are eschewed for informal chats on the side of the practice field. Last week, after the victory over UCLA, Riley took his entire team to In-N-Out Burger, a popular fast-food chain that does not extend to Oregon.

McIlroy ‘marked man’ of Ryder Cup By Doug Ferguson The Associated Press

MEDINAH, Ill. — Rory McIlroy has gone from being a rookie in the Ryder Cup to a marked man at Medinah. McIlroy is the first European in nearly 20 years to go into the Ryder Cup as the No. 1 player in the world, although the star power of this 23-year-old from Northern Ireland is defined by much more than a computer ranking. He already has won two majors, with a record score in the U.S. Open last year at Congressional and a record margin at the PGA Championship last month at Kiawah Island. His four wins this year are the most of anyone in the world, all against the strongest fields. So it was no surprise when Jim Furyk referred to Boy Wonder as the “present day Tiger Woods” and a “marked man” at this Ryder Cup. That’s the role Woods played for so many years in these matches when he dominated golf. There was a feeling among Europeans that beating Woods was worth more than one point because of the emotional lift it gave the rest of the team. McIlroy doesn’t see it that way. “This week I’m not the No. 1 player

in the world,” he said Wednesday. “I’m one person in a 12-man team, and that’s it. It’s a team effort. There’s 12 guys all striving toward the same goal. I’m just part of that.” But even in this team competition, it’s easy to get wrapped in a single star, as it was for Woods. There’s only one way to keep score in the Ryder Cup, though it’s tempting to make individuals accountable. Even when Woods was at his best, he still could only deliver a maximum of five points if he played every match. He never came close, and didn’t even produce a winning record until his fifth Ryder Cup. “I don’t have a number. I don’t have a total,” McIlroy said. “I think with the U.S. playing here at home, I think they are the favorites. It’s a very strong team. So we know we have got to go out there and play very, very well to have a chance. So if I play on Friday morning, I just want to get my point and then take it from there.” Wednesday brought the Ryder Cup one day closer to the start of matches that are growing in anticipation. Both teams look strong on paper, with all 24 players among the top 35 in the world.

Oregon State is 2-0 for the first time since 2009. The Beavers have not opened a season 3-0 since 2003. “It’s a sign of good things, actually,” Riley said. “It’s just a matter of how you handle it. We’ve just got to keep the theme of this team going, which is just working hard and getting ready to play.” Rodriguez, who has brought his hurry-up, no-huddle offense to Arizona, is wary. The Wildcats (3-1) are coming off a 49-0 shutout loss to now No. 2 Oregon, during which they failed to punch it in from inside the red zone six times. “Wisconsin hasn’t run the ball as well as they have in the past, but they’re still pretty big up front,” Rodriguez said. “UCLA has been putting points and yards on everybody they’ve faced, and Oregon State did a great job stopping them.” The Beavers have won in their past five trips to Tucson. Last year in Corvallis, Oregon State defeated the Wildcats 37-27. “They have a great coach up there and a great system and scheme,” Arizona center Kyle Quinn said. “We just have to be ready for a very physical game. They’re going to come in here and try to take it from us in our house, and we just have to go out there and get the W.”

Ryder Cup Continued from D1 “People might think that’s crazy talk, but I don’t,” Snedeker said Wednesday. “After the way I played the last six weeks, I think I proved that I can do that.” First, however, there is a Ryder Cup to win. U.S. captain Davis Love III raised a few eyebrows when he made Snedeker, a Ryder Cup rookie at 31, his final captain’s pick. Not that he wasn’t worthy. Snedeker is one of the purest putters around, and Ryder Cups often turn on which team is more dependable on the green. But Snedeker had missed a big chunk of the summer because of a rib injury, returning at the British Open. Hunter Mahan had won twice on the PGA Tour, including the Match Play Championship when he beat Rory McIlroy. He also had Ryder Cup experience, making one of the key putts when the United States last won the Ryder Cup in 2008 at Valhalla. “I look forward to getting to Medinah and trying to make Davis look like a genius,” Snedeker said after he was selected.

Dayville

Ochoco

La Pine

Beavers

D5

20

MILES

Crescent

Chemult 97

Fort Rock

0

Christmas Valley

Riley

10 395

Silver Lake Greg Cross / The Bulletin

Dry weather could mean more land closures Deer hunters will likely find more private forestlands closed this year due to high fire danger, according to the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and the Oregon Department of Forestry. “This year, it’s more important than ever that hunters check for closures before heading afield, and follow fire restrictions,” said Tom Thornton, ODFW game program manager. Forestland managers say forest vegetation is extremely dry. Moisture content in vegetation in Western Oregon currently ranges from 10 to 20 percent, while east of the Cascades the moisture content is in single digits. “Under these parched conditions, any fire started could spread rapidly,” said Dan Postrel, of the

He didn’t need that long. Snedeker was the runner-up at The Barclays, then shot 65-67 on the weekend to finish sixth at the Deutsche Bank Championship. After tying for 37th at the BMW Championship, he knew his only shot at the FedEx Cup title — and it’s $10 million payday — was to win the Tour Championship. No small task, considering Rory McIlroy and Woods were eying the same prize. But Snedeker was the only player in the last five groups who broke par Sunday. With three birdies on the back nine, he’d built such a big lead it didn’t even matter that he put his tee shot on 18 into the stands. He still finished with a 2under 68, beating Justin Rose by three strokes. “If you told me at the beginning of the year that I was going to be FedEx Cup champion, I probably would have told you I did not see that coming. I don’t see how I can be there,” Snedeker said. “As the year went on, I realized I was playing a lot better and better, practicing more concisely and doing the right stuff a lot more often than I had in the past. And the results started coming more and more.”

Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF). ODF keeps a list of landowner closures on its website (oregon. gov/ODF/Pages/fire/corporate_ closure.aspx). It changes frequently, and lands could be opened if Oregon receives significant wet weather. Hunters should check back before the season opener or on the day they plan to hunt for the latest information. Hunters who do not see their local landowner listed on the website should call the landowner directly. Through Friday around Central Oregon, ODF will also host several hunter information booths that will have the latest information on restrictions and closures for hunters. —From staff and wire reports

He has been asked repeatedly this week what he’s going to do with all the money he just won — add in the $1.44 million he got for winning The Tour Championship, and it was the richest payoff in golf — and Snedeker just smiles. Those good manners and boy-next-door personality friendliness are no act. He drives the same SUV he bought when he first joined the PGA Tour back in 2006, and he still lives in Nashville, Tenn., where Snedeker grew up and went to college. He may have played all around the world and held his own against Woods and McIlroy, but Snedeker still sounds like that kid who used to wake up early and park himself in front of the TV for the entire day to watch Love and Fred Couples, Seve Ballesteros and Jose Maria Olazabal. “Just going crazy,” Snedeker said with a grin. “So it’s kind of crazy to think that I’m on that TV this time. I’m out there with the other kids watching me do what I’m supposed to be doing. “It’s going to be a lot of pressure on myself, because I want to perform,” he added. “I want to show everybody that I am playing some great golf right now.”


D6

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2012

H U N T I NG & F ISH I NG

H & F  C  

COMMENTARY

FISHING REPORT

Cooler weather should help angling in region

Please email Hunting & Fishing event information to sports@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� on our website at bendbulletin.com. Items are published on a space-availability basis, and should be submitted at least 10 days before the event.

FISHING THE FLY FISHING FESTIVAL AT SUNRIVER: Saturday, Sept. 29, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. in Sunriver Village; festival will include vendors, equipment, guides, outfitters, fly tiers, rodcasting area, boats; kids area with a bug pond, fly-tying and fishing pond; admission is free; visit hookfish.com/festival or call 541-593-2358. FREE FLY-FISHING LESSONS: Through the end of September, the Orvis Company retail store in Bend will offer free lessons every Tuesday, Thursday and most Saturdays from 10 a.m. to noon; RSVP’s are necessary; contact the Bend Orvis store at 541-312-8200 to register; www. orvis.com/bend. CENTRAL OREGON BASS CLUB: Meets on the first Tuesday of each month at Abby’s Pizza in Redmond; 7 to 9 p.m.; new members welcome; www.cobc.us. DESCHUTES CHAPTER OF TROUT UNLIMITED: Meets on the first Monday of each month at the ONDA offices in Bend; meeting starts at 6:45 p.m. for members to meet and greet, and discuss what the chapter is up to; 541-306-4509; communications@deschutestu.org; www. deschutestu.org. BEND CASTING CLUB: The Bend Casting Club is a group of local fly anglers from around Central Oregon who are trying to improve their casting technique; club meets on the fourth Wednesday of each month, from 6 to 8 p.m., at the Orvis Casting Course in Bend’s Old Mill District; 541306-4509 or bendcastingclub@gmail.com. THE SUNRIVER ANGLERS CLUB: Meets on the third Thursday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Sunriver Homeowners Aquatic & Recreation Center (SHARC); contact www.sunriveranglers. org. THE CENTRAL OREGON FLYFISHERS CLUB: Meets on the third Wednesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Bend Senior Center, 1600 SE Reed Market Road; contact: www.coflyfishers.org.

HUNTING WOMEN’S ONLY BIG BUCK CONTEST HOSTED BY COWGIRL CASH: Two-week-long contest launched by the western vintage shop in Bend to promote female sportsmanship; Sept. 29 through Oct. 14; open to all women who hunt; Cowgirl Cash located at 924 N.W. Brooks Street in Bend, open Monday through Saturday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m., and Sunday from noon to 4 p.m.; stop by the store with the head of the buck and it will be measured; contact Rebecca Charlton, the owner of Cowgirl Cash, at 541-678-5162 or visit cowgirlcashbend.com. LEARN THE ART OF TRACKING ANIMALS: Guided walks and workshops with a certified professional tracker; learn to identify and interpret tracks, sign and scat of the animals in Central Oregon; two or more walks per month all year; $35; ongoing, 8 a.m. to noon; 541633-7045; dave@wildernesstracking.com; wildernesstracking.com. THE BEND CHAPTER OF THE OREGON HUNTERS ASSOCIATION: Meets the second Wednesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the King Buffet at the north end of the Wagner Mall, across from Robberson Ford in Bend; contact: ohabend.webs. com. THE OCHOCO CHAPTER OF THE OREGON HUNTERS ASSOCIATION: Meets the first Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Prineville Fire Hall, 405 N. Belknap St.; contact: 447-5029. THE REDMOND CHAPTER OF THE OREGON HUNTERS ASSOCIATION: Meets the third Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Redmond VFW Hall.

SHOOTING COSSA KIDS: The Central Oregon Shooting Sports Association’s NRA Youth Marksmanship Program is every third Saturday of the month from 10 a.m. to noon at the COSSA Range; the range is east of Bend off U.S. Highway 20 at milepost 24; contact Don Thomas, 541-389-8284. BEND TRAP CLUB: Trap shooting, five-stand and skeet shooting are all open Thursdays and Sundays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m; located east of Bend off U.S. Highway 20 at milepost 30; contact Bill Grafton at 541-383-1428 or visit www. bendtrapclub.com. CENTRAL OREGON SPORTING CLAYS AND HUNTING PRESERVE: 13-station, 100-target course and 5-stand open Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to dusk, and Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday from 11 a.m. to dusk (closed Wednesday); located at 9020 South Highway 97, Redmond; www.birdandclay.com or 541-383-0001. REDMOND ROD & GUN CLUB: Archery, pistol, and rifle are Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Saturdays and Sundays from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; skeet is Tuesdays and Sundays from 10 a.m. to about 2 p.m.; sporting clays is the first and third Saturdays of each month from 10 a.m. to about 2 p.m.; trap is Wednesdays from 10 a.m. to about 2 p.m. and 5 p.m. to closing, and Sundays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.; non-members are welcome; check www.rrandgc.com for events and closures. HUNTER SIGHT-IN DAYS AT REDMOND ROD & GUN CLUB: Every weekend during September from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.; www.rrandgc.com or 541-504-1513. PINE MOUNTAIN POSSE: Cowboy action shooting club that shoots at the Central Oregon Shooting Sports Association range on U.S. Highway 20 at milepost 24; second Sunday of each month; 541-318-8199 or www. pinemountainposse.com. HORSE RIDGE PISTOLEROS: Cowboy action shooting with pistols, rifles and shotguns at the Central Oregon Shooting Sports Association range on U.S. Highway 20 at milepost 24; first and third Sunday of each month at 10 a.m.; 541408-7027 or www.hrp-sass.com.

Here is the weekly fishing report for selected areas in and around Central Oregon, provided by fisheries biologists for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife:

CENTRAL ZONE

Photos by Gary Lewis / For The Bulletin

Silver salmon and chinook stack at the mouths of Columbia River tributaries in September and early October. Fishing off the mouth of the White Salmon River last week, Dennis Udlinek, left, Terry Sheely and Doug Allen try their luck with salmon eggs.

Chaos, coho and kings on the mid-Columbia GARY LEWIS

F

orest fire smoke hung in the air, diffused the light and cast a haze over the river. An east wind blew down the gorge and riffled the water in wavelets that lapped against the boat. There were 24 boats at the mouth of the White Salmon when we motored across the Columbia from Hood River. Dave Eng, of SalmonTroutSteelheader magazine, was our captain. He handed out Lamiglas rods with big line counter casting reels. Cindy Thompson and I took up stations at the back of the boat, while Doug Eckelkamp and Zack Scheidegger of Alps Mountaineering grabbed the forward seats. It was day three of Fish Camp at Peach Beach on the Columbia, fishing for salmon, steelhead, walleye, bass and sturgeon while trying out new gear from Cabela’s, Coast, Camp Chef, WorkSharp, Lamiglas and Izorline. A quick glance showed a third of the boats were trolling, while most fished salmon roe. Hover-fishing, they call it. Drop bait to the bottom, then bring it up two cranks. Bounce it on the bottom and you will hook a sturgeon. One couple was fishing with jigs, Buzz Bombs, I guessed, by the way they dropped the blades down then ripped them up. Eng decreed we would troll K15 and K16 Kwikfish, wrapped with sardine fillets. Some days the trolling works better, sometimes the hover fishing works best, some days jigs are what they want. We trolled from downriver up past the mouth of the White Salmon then reeled in and drove downstream to start again. Around us, the egg fishermen battled salmon and netted them. We watched the jig fishermen land a couple. Just when we thought we should rig up with eggs, Cindy’s rod bent over hard. When she turned to set the hook, the fish was gone. That kept us going for another hour. Around us, fishermen battled bright kings and coho. We began to rig for bait. Eng

ANTELOPE FLAT RESERVOIR: Fishing has been slow, but anglers are still reporting 18- to 20-inch trout. Fishing should begin to pick up with the cooling weather. BEND PINE NURSERY POND: Trout fishing should pick up with cooler temperatures. CRANE PRAIRIE RESERVOIR: Trout fishing should pick up with cooling temperatures. CRESCENT LAKE: Kokanee fishing has been good. CROOKED RIVER BELOW BOWMAN DAM: Fishing for trout has been good. DESCHUTES RIVER (Mouth to the Pelton Regulating Dam): Summer steelhead fishing on the Lower Deschutes is at its best in September. Good numbers of fish are being found by anglers from the mouth upstream to Sherars Falls. EAST LAKE: Chub removal has resulted in larger trout and fewer incidental catches of chubs. Anglers have reported good fishing. FALL RIVER: Fishing is good. LAKE BILLY CHINOOK: Fishing for smallmouth bass has been good. Fishing for kokanee has picked up as the fish are staging in the Metolius arm prior to entering the Metolius River to spawn. METOLIUS RIVER: Trout fishing has been good. Insect hatches should offer lots of opportunities for good dry-fly fishing. ODELL LAKE: Kokanee fishing good on the lake’s west end. PAULINA LAKE: Fishing is good. PRINEVILLE RESERVOIR: Fishing for bass, crappie and bullhead catfish should be good. Anglers are reporting more bass and larger smallmouth bass than in recent years. SUTTLE LAKE: Recent fish sampling showed excellent trophy brown trout opportunity. WALTON LAKE: Fishing has been good, with the best fishing occurring during the cooler times of the day and near the springs. WICKIUP RESERVOIR: High water will spread out kokanee this fall, but there is opportunity for large kokanee.

HUNTING REPORT

Fishing with Dave Eng, left, Gary Lewis boated this bright king salmon at the mouth of the White Salmon River.

and I set up rods and tied leaders. I had just knotted a leader to a swivel when my rod buried. I dropped the leader on the deck and grabbed the rod from the holder. The fish shook his head with violent shakes and made several short runs. On the reel, the line counter read 68 and then I gained a little. Closer to the surface, the fish peeled line like a freight train going away, and I couldn’t stop it until the counter read 145. A sturgeon? When he turned, I battled him back to the boat. When the line counter read 13, I saw him flash. A king, fresh from the salt. Now, almost at my feet, the fish dove for cover beneath the boat. The rod tip followed it down toward the kicker motor, the line was inches from the spinning prop. Over the years, I have seen a few guys lose rods. One guy lost one to a sturgeon that yanked it off the dock. Five guys lost their rods to a jet ski on the Cowlitz. When he was a little kid, I watched Troy Sprague drop a rod overboard while we were kokanee fishing. On East Lake, a few years ago, Jerry Garrity lost a rod to a rainbow and caught them both again the next week. Yanked out of my grip, the rod reversed and the tip plunged beneath the water. In that moment, I knew two things with certainty. I should have put Rod Wrap on this handle, and I’d better not drop a rod in front of Dave Eng, who knows more people than I do. Time stood still. Eng turned his head. He didn’t want to see it happen. When the rod swiveled, the

pistol grip rotated on my right pinky finger and my left hand clamped around the fore grip. I shoved the rod down while the fish dove. Moments later the fish was back to the boat and Eng scooped it up — 15 angry pounds of Columbia River salmon. In the big river, an angler in a boat has a definite advantage. Downstream, where anglers anchor in 12 to 20 feet of water, spinners are a favored bait, but upstream, where salmon stack at mouths of rivers like the White Salmon, the Klickitat, the Wind and the Deschutes, hover-fishing, trolling and jigging are the tactics in play. Trollers start downriver and motor up to pull the wiggling lures behind the boat. Hover-fishermen like to drift downstream while they watch the graph and keep their leads and eggs two cranks off the bottom. Jig fishermen prefer to start at the top of the hole and drift down, tempting salmon with bright painted lead and steel. Salmon roll between the boats. Jet sleds and ski boats that do double duty as fishing craft drift this way and that. Fishermen wave and nod as they pass or curse when someone gets too close. They try to stay out of each other’s way, but bright gashes in some of the boats speak to the accidents that happen out there in the chaos that is salmon season on the Columbia. — Gary Lewis is the host of “Adventure Journal� and author of “John Nosler — Going Ballistic,� “Black Bear Hunting,� “Hunting Oregon� and other titles. Contact Lewis at www. GaryLewisOutdoors.com.

Dry conditions heightening fire concerns Here is the weekly hunting report for selected areas in and around Central Oregon, provided by wildlife biologists for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife:

CENTRAL ZONE OPEN: Cougar, bear, rifle deer (controlled hunt, opens Sept. 29), forest grouse, dove (closes Sept. 30) PRINEVILLE/OCHOCO WILDLIFE DISTRICT Fire danger remains a concern, and recreational users should check with Ochoco and Prineville BLM offices for the latest access and camping information. CONTROLLED RIFLE BUCK DEER: Season opens this Saturday. Buck ratios are near or above management objective in all Prineville District units (Maury, Ochoco and Grizzly), and deer hunters should find good prospects for a buck this fall. The continued dry conditions have heightened fire concerns, and hunters should consult with the Prineville BLM and/or Ochoco National Forest for the latest fire restrictions. BEAR: Successful hunters, remember you must check in unfrozen bear skulls at an ODFW office within 10 days of harvest. Please call ahead and make an appointment to ensure a biologist is present for the check in. It’s also a good idea to prop the bear’s mouth open with a stick for easier tissue sampling, teeth collection and tagging. Remember that cubs and sows with cubs are illegal to take, so if in doubt use caution. See regulations for details. ANTLERLESS ELK: hunts are ongoing in portions of the Maury, Ochoco and Grizzly units. These hunts are primarily on private agricultural and range lands where hunters need permission from the landowner. Typically elk move into these hunt areas in greater numbers during the late summer to take advantage of the irrigated pastures and hay fields. COUGAR: Present throughout the Maury, Ochoco and Grizzly units but are more likely near deer and elk herds. The Maury and Ochoco units are recommended because of their greater amounts of accessible public land. Remember cougars must be checked in at an ODFW office within 10 days of harvest. Please consult the synopsis for all required parts, and be sure to call first to make an appointment.

FLY-TYING CORNER

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Fall Run, courtesy Fly and Field Outfitters.

In the magic weeks of early October, when water temperatures begin to fall, steelhead are more likely to chase a fly. Use a floating line or a sink tip to present a fly that blends the greens and sparkle of autumn with a profile that commands attention. The Fall Run is a good pattern to put to work in low light, and it will continue to draw fish from the bottom after the light hits the water. When casting and swinging a wet fly, use a high rod mend to reposition the line and leader upstream of the slower-moving wet

fly. Throughout the arc of the fly, try to slow it down to give steelhead more time to see it. To tie this pattern, start with black thread on a No. 5 Alec Jackson or similar hook. For the tag, start with a base of wire overlaid with flat gold tinsel. Tie the tail with trimmed black hackle fibers and fine gold tinsel, then build the body with chartreuse sparkle dubbing at the rear and black dubbing at the front. Rib with flat gold tinsel. For the wing, use hanked Lite Brite and gold tinsel. Finish with a black soft hackle collar. — Gary Lewis


BUSINESS

Calendar, E4 News of Record, E4

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2012

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NASDAQ

CLOSE 3,093.70 CHANGE -24.03 -.77%

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DOW JONES

www.bendbulletin.com/business

CLOSE 13,413.51 CHANGE -44.04 -.33%

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S&P 500

CLOSE 1,433.32 CHANGE -8.27 -.57%

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BONDS

10-year Treasury

CLOSE 1.62 CHANGE -2.99%

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$1750.60 GOLD CLOSE CHANGE -$13.20

SILVER

CLOSE $33.883 CHANGE -$0.003

U.S. market becoming cautionary tale Startup

Ex-Art Central building leased A Bend resident and longtime ski guide has leased the Goodwille-Allen-Rademacher House, located next to Riverfront Plaza in downtown Bend. David Marchi plans to open a ski and bicycle equipment shop, called Crow’s Feet Commons, at the historic Bend building on Northwest Brooks Street. He signed a lease for the building with the city that took effect Sept. 1. Marchi also plans to include a cafe and serve beer and wine on location, while also serving as a tourism booking agency, according to his lease with the city. The building had been leased by the nonprofit Arts Central for more than a decade. But they terminated their lease with the city in February. Marchi said he hopes to have Crow’s Feet Commons up and running around Oct. 20.

By Nathaniel Popper

New York Times News Service

After years of emulating the flashy U.S. stock markets, countries around the globe are now using America as a model for what they don’t want to look like. Industry leaders and regulators in several countries including Canada, Australia and Germany have adopted or proposed a wide range of limits on high-speed trading

and other technological developments that have come to define U.S. markets. The flurry of international activity is particularly striking because regulators have been slow to act in the United States, where trading firms and investors have been hardest hit by a series of market disruptions, including the flash crash of 2010 and the runaway trading in August by Knight Capital that cost

it $440 million in just hours. While the Securities and Exchange Commission is hosting a round table on the topic on Tuesday, the agency has not proposed any major new rules this year. In contrast, the German government on Wednesday advanced legislation that would, among other things, force high-speed trading firms to register with the government and limit their ability to

rapidly place and cancel orders, one of the central strategies used by the firms to take advantage of small changes in the price of stocks. A few hours later, a European Union committee agreed on similar but broader rules that would apply to the entire Continent if they win approval from the union’s governing bodies. See Trading / E3

LAKE OSWEGO — Columbia Banking System Inc. said Wednesday it will buy West Coast Bancorp in a $506 million deal that will create a dominant Pacific Northwest bank. Columbia Banking, based in Tacoma, Wash., is the parent company of Columbia State Bank. It operates 101 branches in Oregon and Washington. West Coast, based in Lake Oswego is the parent company for West Coast Bank and West Coast Trust Co. It operates 58 branches in Oregon and Washington.

RadioShack CEO stepping down LOS ANGELES — RadioShack Corp. on Wednesday said its chief executive, James Gooch, was stepping down. Gooch’s departure is effective immediately, and the company’s board is already bringing in an executive search firm to find his replacement. The strip mall staple’s stock has tanked more than 80 percent since. The company suffered a net loss of $21 million after earning $24.9 million in the year-earlier quarter. Dorvin Lively, the company’s executive vice president and chief financial officer, will serve as acting CEO.

The Bulletin

Channeling fast food

Damian Dovarganes / The Associated Press

McDonald’s patrons watch the new McDonald’s television channel at a McDonald’s restaurant in Norwalk, Calif. McDonald’s is testing its own TV channel in 700 California restaurants in a pilot project that could expand to all the company’s restaurants.

• McDonald’s launches in-restaurant television network to connect with patrons By Lynn Elber The Associated Press

LOS ANGELES — The question of the moment at 700 pioneering McDonald’s restaurants: You want TV with those fries? Not just any television, but the custom-made M Channel, formulated and tested with the same attention to detail that made Big Macs and Chicken McNuggets cultural icons. The channel’s aim is to offer exclusive content to entertain customers.

More ambitiously, it also intends to create promotional and sales opportunities for record companies and others who want to dive into McDonald’s vast customer pool. Lee Edmondson, who has spent more than eight years developing the concept for McDonald’s and years beforehand pondering it, said the fastfood chain is thinking way outside the TV box. “It is a vision that is more than television,” more than the “passive rela-

tionship” that viewers have with gas station or supermarket TV feeds, said Edmondson, who comes from a venture-capital background. The M channel is akin to a broadcast network with its own news, entertainment and sportscasts localized for cities and even neighborhoods, he said. But there’s more: It will supersize the experience by directing viewers online for shopping or other opportunities. See McDonald’s TV / E3

Lenders profiting more than homeowners in Fed’s plan

— Staff and wire reports

By Jody Shenn Bloomberg News

Local government Illinois had the highest number of local governments, according to preliminary estimates. Oregon ranked 22nd and Hawaii 50th. Local government includes counties, cities, towns, special districts and independent school districts. 2012

NEW YORK — The Federal Reserve’s latest mortgage bond purchases so far are helping profit margins at lenders including Wells Fargo and JPMorgan Chase more than homebuyers and property owners looking to refinance.

Since the Fed’s Sept. 13 announcement that it would buy $40 billion more securities per month, the rates offered for new 30-year loans have fallen by just 0.11 percentage point, compared with a drop of more than 0.6 percentage point for yields on the bonds into which the loans get packaged, ac-

cording to data compiled by Bloomberg and Bankrate .com. The gap between the two, which typically signals increasing lender revenue when it widens, has reached a record of more than 1.6 percentage point. Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke’s stated goal of helping boost the housing market

Ill.

6,969

2

Penn.

4,906

‘Clean space for dirty content’

3

Texas

4,857

By Jeff Ostrowski

4

Calif.

4,351

5

Kan.

3,807

6

Mo.

3,753

7

Ohio

3,703

8

Minn.

3,634

9

N.Y.

3,455 3,124

22 Ore.

1,510 22

Source: U.S. Census Bureau

is being undercut by lenders’ inability to keep up with consumer demand, even as investors drive up bond prices. Banks have been slow to lower rates after being overwhelmed this year by applications to refinance mortgages. See Mortgages / E3

Budding entrepreneurs will have a chance in November to pitch an idea and launch a startup company in 54 hours during Bend Startup Weekend. The event will be among about 125 startup weekends taking place worldwide in November, and the local winner will participate in a Global Startup Battle, said Alec Campbell, the primary organizer of Bend Startup Weekend. Bend’s Startup Weekend will also contribute to the region’s other efforts to support entrepreneurial talent. “How does a town like Bend become a Boulder (Colo.) or an Austin (Texas)?” Campbell said. “You can try to attract that talent here, or you try to cultivate it from the existing community.” More than 670 Startup Weekend events have been held worldwide, creating more than 5,000 startups, according to the organization’s website. The program is now an affiliate of the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation, a Kansas City, Mo., nonprofit dedicated to entrepreneurship. But the concept has Central Oregon ties. Sister’s native Andrew Hyde developed Startup Weekend in 2007, Campbell said, and sold it to the foundation. “You can’t teach entrepreneurship,” Campbell said. “You’re either a risk taker or you’re not. But, you can feed the mentality of entrepreneurship to help people recognize the opportunity, form an idea that is a solution to the problem that they’ve recognized, and then have the help around to take that initial kernel of an idea and develop a business from it.” Bend’s Startup Weekend begins Nov. 16 and will take place at the offices of onlinemarketing company G5. Portland has one scheduled for the same weekend, according to the Startup Weekend website, and Eugene will host one starting Oct. 12. At the Bend event, up to 100 people can participate and share their ideas for businesses. Those ideas will be voted on, and about 20 will be selected, Campell said. Each idea will get a team of four people, and team members will spend the weekend developing the idea. On Sunday, teams will present their business concepts and get feedback from a panel of judges made up of business leaders and investors. The judges will pick a local winner, who will be entered into the Global Startup Battle. See Startup / E3

A CHANGING INTERNET

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10 Wisc.

event seeks to cultivate talent By Rachael Rees

West Coast Bank to be bought

50 Hawaii

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IN BRIEF

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Personal Finance, E4 Stock listings, E2-3

Cox Newspapers

PALM BEACH GARDENS, Fla. — Stuart Lawley has made millions in his short stint as an Internet porn impresario, but the mild-mannered Brit seems more buttoned-down businessman than Hugh Hefner-style high-roller. Lawley runs ICM Registry, the Palm Beach Gardensbased owner of the newly launched dot-xxx domain. The content on dot-xxx is risque,

but company headquarters is just plain boring. It’s a 3,000square-foot cubicle farm in a PGA Boulevard office building. “Boogie Nights” it’s not. The space is decorated in bland colors, with nary a stripper pole in sight. “No naked women running around,” said Lawley, 49. “I’ve never been arrested for anything, never been in trouble in my life. We’re very sober people.” For Lawley, Internet porn

is all business. And business is pretty good. Lawley said he brought in $25 million in revenue during the final three months of 2011, when dot-xxx went live. ICM Registry has sold some 230,000 domain names. Lawley acknowledges that fully 80,000 were so-called defensive registrations bought by organizations such as retailer Target and Northwestern University. See Dot-xxx / E3

Thomas Cordy / Palm Beach (Fla.) Post

Stuart Lawley, owner of ICM registry, at the company’s offices in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla., on Sept. 12. ICM Registry is the top-level domain registrant for the “.xxx” World Wide Web extension.


E2

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2012

Consolidated stock listings N m

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4.74 4.63 8.70 47.55 23.96 26.75 45.06 110.60 19.49 56.95 173.08 43.30 9.65 7.11 21.12 55.33 46.28 28.61 16.90 17.01 10.47 16.98 9.50 8.78 11.09 64.30 58.00 45.49 10.99 102.88 6.45 37.17 10.70 14.69 12.60 16.50 26.22 18.76 26.17 .80 20.95 47.90 7.22 28.84 39.42 21.85 9.22 9.77 31.59 9.99 13.74 12.76 51.17 75.27 45.00 42.32 34.52 2.69 16.13 16.34 35.19 53.75 8.19 69.38 53.10 44.51 5.90 45.70 199.54 68.58 20.81 57.38 9.13 148.52 60.65 56.64 33.61 22.15 17.86 13.49 27.04 10.97 23.43 .70 7.61 10.27 4.59 35.60 3.12 57.65 36.02 15.03 63.25 19.65 33.23 3.38 91.23 32.45 22.39 105.08 53.05 20.09 55.57 47.00 11.40 6.18 26.37 7.35 20.62 97.40 13.17 64.21 42.58 84.39 105.06 21.13 4.82 3.55 8.96 21.12 31.81 12.87 10.79 15.36 14.84 22.34 22.01 4.39 7.10 9.55 12.79 22.38 12.59 8.09 13.11 34.35 20.90 19.27 21.17 17.04 19.20 44.42 14.81 73.07 38.80 5.23 1.02 43.98 25.44 6.07 11.99 20.41 126.89 56.00 23.11 90.32 35.78 10.01 1.16 15.16 35.91 8.10 5.65 25.02 4.30 5.37 27.04 .23 24.23 30.72 84.13 23.05 12.52 29.69 57.00 123.28 11.50 39.28 9.19 57.40 4.94 3.88 .86 33.38 9.78 9.05 29.20

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43.20 25.29 .76 36.98 5.35 16.83 5.69 4.58 1.72 35.94 14.27 21.12 17.91 35.27 59.32 40.85 46.30 .14 38.09 3.55 9.49 29.00 66.61 22.10 19.26 39.95 3.24 23.39 38.36 67.29 3.54 2.56 16.79 17.13 11.54 61.47 5.23 27.55 26.49 .10 .46 36.08 9.77 1.72 1.84 4.98 66.06 15.60 46.55 10.42 7.85 43.26 7.52 24.11 .40 15.11 10.93 4.63 5.78 37.95 12.79 3.15 21.14 45.02 5.13 1.96 2.03 113.08 12.80 11.99 753.46 23.54 58.53 49.56 9.16 207.24 3.09 4.98 22.84 28.20 5.79 2.18 7.70 2.27 22.35 12.61 23.52 5.98 16.44 50.36 22.25 4.70 12.91 23.16 25.39 51.88 29.59 32.75 29.32 12.08 31.97 33.75 44.33 36.65 31.74 25.53 46.46 28.21 62.83 7.18 33.92 7.78 31.67 31.96 36.85 41.93 45.97 4.62 8.49 50.80 39.17 11.72 20.61 18.68 9.06 37.31 28.21 26.72 5.63 6.44 57.68 22.44 8.20 23.02 22.04 24.07 13.46 31.53 4.10 6.45 38.29 55.85 18.40 46.43 .90 79.32 45.05 4.86 13.48 5.08 70.67 13.73 52.40 17.11 23.35 7.12 21.93 13.31 32.75 28.90 18.26 26.39 12.61 40.14 20.33 59.17 24.14 16.04 61.80 23.42 22.50 13.38 31.47 59.44 3.48 29.07 36.51 9.61 33.43 23.60 16.04 8.85 1.00 3.43 30.28 79.17 7.82

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51.60 15.38 39.34 98.99 96.21 18.74 9.17 8.05 6.20 6.69 56.60 22.86 17.04 33.19 23.62 54.63 28.31 30.47 21.38 22.73 17.87 12.31 9.24 58.36 14.38 64.48 13.29 44.13 28.11 28.53 24.74 13.25 17.48 56.54 56.34 32.87 66.22 57.71 121.86 33.88 87.42 143.93 112.36 40.93 39.60 121.56 46.69 120.66 77.48 42.71 65.45 125.04 108.69 31.77 84.45 53.43 48.41 61.62 98.03 91.74 51.14 15.00 140.30 77.54 109.37 71.84 66.41 79.12 73.97 105.53 94.93 83.14 61.05 39.85 22.34 25.56 64.18 19.27 76.75 67.40 36.90 56.98 7.86 74.95 20.31 33.22 18.24 43.88 4.39 41.25 58.66 46.85 19.21 2.78 15.79 26.15 45.94 6.28 17.76 19.00 5.51 22.96 34.18 47.32 44.68 15.28 54.06 8.36 12.67 .59 10.36 21.60 5.89 52.87 22.65 22.29 134.67 35.34 13.26 6.24 9.07 204.00 59.57 12.85 36.03 16.82 2.75 74.58 11.07 8.85 6.53 21.18 57.97 495.62 11.98 24.60 20.15 12.69 5.04 18.28 8.41 33.61 13.25 14.04 .77 15.74 42.46 .53 15.87 9.52 31.97 .87 12.14 24.88 40.24 40.00 18.90 37.39 28.34 40.71 1.15 14.16 2.24 2.91 9.07 52.08 54.79 13.83 4.90 14.71 1.07 69.00 27.42 12.97 76.95 56.37 17.38

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2.80 94.03 11.83 0.04 20.03 10.19 0.56 4.68 1.00 37.93 0.67 22.21 2.73 0.99 8.43 0.64 10.16 0.53 6.46 0.48 7.32 1.44 10.54 19.36 7.15 0.64 25.16 3.32 1.00 67.22 35.39 2.20 57.30 1.80 26.65 0.80 37.75 39.81 1.10 43.72 4.32 0.32 9.02 1.80 28.92 1.25 17.53 0.18 2.21 0.08 13.01 2.83 0.86 37.37 0.52 11.88 0.68 29.57 1.40 53.00 0.14 3.86 0.15 52.40 40.10 31.21 0.58 28.48 1.59 23.72 0.48 22.97 1.77 32.88 0.44 30.50 3.20 53.53 0.52 39.01 0.92 33.87 1.60 83.22 0.24 9.21 0.30 14.98 24.42 20.01 1.20 445.84 0.60 20.73 1.24 35.31 .93 0.96 26.09 8.12 2.23 1.24 62.89

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12.00 93.20 54.18 87.79 11.63 4.49 73.37 30.54 7.06 16.99 10.44 25.97 43.33 39.32 53.41 13.75 73.95 43.07 2.86 13.02 100.46 34.17 15.50 80.27 45.01 3.70 37.99 4.24 9.17 27.55 33.99 11.25 9.15 52.80 10.33 32.72 5.94 48.14 19.89 30.17 2.10 65.02 8.08 1.59 14.37 5.04 18.86 34.05 3.24 3.81 4.69 3.28 17.35 78.33 26.09 24.03 45.11 11.57 14.67 26.30 19.37 34.99 89.49 53.31 7.22 22.07 44.07 16.43 16.72 57.04 3.76 50.17 .50 .01 4.75 53.04 24.05 26.50 22.88 38.72 16.70 32.17 8.06 8.98 21.40 18.11 23.76 24.64 13.96 10.17 13.71 3.34 22.91 2.38 16.18 16.75 52.62 55.86 25.57 78.38 9.32 30.55 33.55 20.74 2.86 10.93 3.65 21.53 10.53 .69 43.00 4.12 32.98 52.87 55.13 9.52 60.94 1.20 39.09 4.42 12.23 14.73 14.56 13.91 7.12 9.60 7.68 19.14 31.28 55.26 7.33 24.34 24.56 25.24 6.80 69.95 .87 25.47 29.43 95.49 24.18 35.17 91.18 2.59 6.86 10.18 7.01 58.38 54.90 64.57 1.80 37.41 38.10 4.64 16.61 46.41 66.19 6.30 12.31 5.59 60.89 1.93 2.02 37.01 22.99 24.00 38.09 3.23 50.46 9.68 10.39 9.87 9.55 7.46 13.18 13.20 3.33 55.71 84.24 39.87 28.12 11.89 85.01 54.85 9.55 2.70 27.44

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D

OdysMar OfficeDpt OfficeMax 0.08 Oi SA s 2.01 OilStates OldDomF s OldNBcp 0.36 OldRepub 0.71 Olin 0.80 OmegaHlt 1.68 Omncre 0.56 Omnicom 1.20 OmniVisn Omnova OnAssign OnSmcnd Oncothyr ONEOK s 1.32 OnyxPh OpenTxt OpenTble h OpkoHlth OptimerPh Oracle 0.24 OraSure OrbitalSci Orexigen OrientEH OshkoshCp OvShip OwensMin 0.88 OwensCorn OwensIll PAA NGsS 1.43 PDC Engy PDL Bio 0.60 PECO pfA 3.80 PECO pfC 4.40 PG&E Cp 1.82 PHH Corp PimcoTR 1.09 PimShMat 1.54 PMC Sra PNC pfQ 1.34 PNC 1.60 PNM Res 0.58 POSCO 2.09 PPG 2.36 PPL Corp 1.44 PSS Wrld PVH Corp 0.15 Paccar 0.80 PacDrill n PacEthan h PacSunwr PaciraPhm PackAmer 1.00 PallCorp 0.84 PaloANet n PanASlv 0.20 Panasonic 0.06 Pandora PaneraBrd ParPharm ParamTch ParaG&S Parexel ParkCity ParkDrl ParkerHan 1.64 ParkerVsn Parkwy 0.45 PartnerRe 2.48 Patterson 0.56 PattUTI 0.20 Paychex 1.28 PeabdyE 0.34 Pebblebrk 0.48 PeetsCfeT Pengrth g 0.48 PnnNGm PennVa 0.23 PennWst g 1.08 PennantPk 1.12 Penney PennaRE 0.64 PennyMac 2.20 Penske 0.48 Pentair 0.88 PentairL wi PeopUtdF 0.64 PepBoy PepcoHold 1.08 PepsiCo 2.15 PeregrinP PerfectWld 2.00 PerkElm 0.28 Prmian 1.27 Perrigo 0.32 PetSmart 0.66 PetrbrsA 1.03 Petrobras 1.03 PtroqstE Pfizer 0.88 Pharmacyc PhilipMor 3.40 PhilipsEl 1.00 Phillips66 n 0.80 PhotrIn PiedNG 1.20 PiedmOfc 0.80 Pier 1 0.16 PilgrimsP PimDyInco 2.12 PimcoHiI 1.46 PinnclEnt PinWst 2.10 PionEnSvc PioNtrl 0.08 PitnyBw 1.50 PizzaInn PlainsAA 4.26 PlainsEx PlatGpMet Plexus PlumCrk 1.68 PluristemT Polaris 1.48 Polycom PolyOne 0.20 Polypore Pool Corp 0.64 Popular rs PortGE 1.08 PortglTel 0.85 PostPrp 1.00 Potash 0.84 PwrInteg 0.20 Power-One PSCrudeDS PwshDB PS PrcMet PS Agri PS Oil PS Gold PS USDBull PwShHiYD 0.33 PwSIntlDv 0.53 PwShMda 0.09 PSPrivEq 0.10 PSFinPf 1.23 PSBldABd 1.50 PS KBWBk 0.90 PS SrLoan 1.30 PS SP LwV 0.81 PSKbwHiDv 2.29 PS SP HiB 0.14 PShNatMu 1.08 PSHYCpBd 1.08 PwShPfd 0.93 PShEMSov 1.49 PSIndia 0.13 PwShs QQQ 0.61 PSS&PBW 2.26 Pwrwv rsh PranaBio Praxair 2.20 PrecCastpt 0.12 PrecDrill Pretium g PriceTR 1.36 priceline Primero g Primoris 0.12 PrinFncl 0.84 PrivateB 0.04 ProLogis 1.12 ProShtDow ProShtQQQ ProShtS&P PrUShS&P ProUltDow 0.22 ProUltMC PrUltQQQ s PrUShQQQ ProUltSP 0.32 PrUShtFin ProUShL20 ProUShEafe PrUltSCh25 ProUltSOG ProUltSBM ProUltFin 0.34 ProUPShD30 ProUltO&G 0.07 ProUBasM 0.08 PrUPR2K 0.01 ProShtR2K PrUPQQQ s ProUltR2K 0.01 ProSht20Tr PrUltSP500 0.03 PrUSSilv rs PrSUltNG rs PrUVxST rs ProSUltGold PrShtVixST PrUltCrude PrUShCrde ProVixSTF ProUltSGld ProUltSlv s ProUShEuro ProctGam 2.25 PrognicsPh ProgrsSoft ProgsvCp 0.41 PUShDow rs ProUSR2K PrUShEur PUSSP500 rs PUPSR2K rs PUShQQQ rs PrUltSRE rs ProspctCap 1.22 ProspBcsh 0.78 ProtLife 0.72 Prudentl 1.45 PSEG 1.42 PubStrg 4.40 PulseElec 0.10

3.30 2.57 7.86 4.04 78.77 30.17 13.60 9.26 21.68 22.88 33.20 51.72 14.18 7.67 19.98 6.13 5.07 47.80 82.52 54.05 40.92 4.14 13.87 30.73 10.79 14.58 5.66 8.74 27.56 6.71 30.04 33.40 18.88 20.24 30.22 7.68 89.60 98.40 43.00 20.19 109.05 101.58 5.67 24.85 63.51 21.15 80.68 114.60 28.87 23.27 92.59 39.91 9.71 .41 2.55 17.54 35.42 63.08 63.25 21.05 6.57 10.41 169.03 49.93 21.45 2.61 30.48 3.41 4.23 82.26 2.33 13.48 74.15 34.42 15.84 33.17 22.30 23.58 73.35 6.69 42.66 6.11 14.24 10.73 24.55 15.71 23.27 30.01 41.89 41.92 12.06 10.14 19.00 70.42 1.66 10.33 29.36 14.90 116.25 68.05 22.36 23.11 6.35 24.83 61.15 90.41 23.99 45.53 5.44 32.93 17.56 18.50 5.11 27.86 13.97 12.16 53.48 8.08 101.58 13.94 2.85 88.52 37.37 1.04 29.94 44.07 3.97 79.17 10.24 16.55 34.25 40.96 17.38 27.35 4.96 47.85 43.29 31.03 5.62 45.45 28.16 60.82 29.01 25.50 60.34 21.88 9.70 15.23 16.36 9.41 18.39 30.21 25.19 24.95 28.19 24.43 20.51 25.68 19.03 14.74 30.53 18.36 68.20 20.74 .63 2.06 103.85 161.06 7.95 12.88 62.57 622.09 5.12 13.12 26.79 16.15 33.95 34.08 24.76 34.26 13.76 73.51 68.63 60.16 27.94 60.67 38.21 15.37 19.43 26.17 20.70 14.85 61.47 16.73 48.06 34.76 67.90 25.10 59.60 43.99 28.89 89.19 41.60 47.24 35.37 94.56 127.26 29.86 42.66 20.47 14.48 56.38 20.07 69.30 3.03 19.16 20.72 46.96 27.09 31.27 39.01 37.63 37.45 25.66 11.49 42.75 26.17 53.74 31.85 139.35 .76

C

N m

-.01 -.01 -.01 +.03 -1.60 +.77 -.16 -.09 -.04 -.02

PulteGrp 15.30 PureBio rs 1.02 PPrIT 0.36 5.75

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D

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Q-R-S-T QEP Res 0.08 QIAGEN QR Energy 1.95 Qihoo360 QlikTech Qlogic QuadGrph 1.00 Qualcom 1.00 QualityS s 0.70 QuantaSvc QntmDSS QuantFu h QstDiag 0.68 QuestSft Questar 0.65 Questcor QksilvRes Quiksilvr RAIT Fin 0.36 RF MicD RLJ LodgT 0.66 RPC s 0.32 RPM 0.86 RTI IntlM Rackspace RadianGrp 0.01 RadioShk Ralcorp RLauren 1.60 Rambus RamcoG 0.65 Ramtrn Randgold 0.40 RangeRs 0.16 RaptorPhm RareEle g RJamesFn 0.52 Rayonier 1.76 Raytheon 2.00 RealD RealPage RltyInco 1.82 RedHat RedwdTr 1.00 RegalEnt 0.84 RgcyCtrs 1.85 RegncyEn 1.84 Regenrn RegionsFn 0.04 Regis Cp 0.24 ReinsGrp 0.96 RelStlAl 1.00 RenaisRe 1.08 ReneSola Renren RentACt 0.64 Rentech 1.06 RentechN n 4.68 RepubSvc 0.94 RschMotn ResMed 0.68 ResoluteEn ResoluteF ResrceCap 0.80 Responsys RetailOpp 0.56 RetailPrp n 0.66 RexEnergy RexahnPh ReynAmer 2.36 Richmnt g RioTinto 1.64 RitchieBr 0.49 RiteAid RiverbedT RobbMyer 0.20 RobtHalf 0.60 RockTen 0.80 RockwlAut 1.88 RockColl 1.20 RockwdH 1.40 RofinSinar Roper 0.55 RosttaG rs RosettaR RossStrs s 0.56 Roundys n 0.92 RousePr n 0.28 Rovi Corp Rowan RoyalBk g 2.40 RBScotlnd RBSct prS 1.65 RBSct prT 1.81 RylCarb 0.48 RoyDShllB 3.44 RoyDShllA 3.44 RoyGld 0.60 Royce 0.72 Rubicon g RubiconTc Rudolph rue21 RushEntA Ryder 1.24 Ryland 0.12 SAIC 0.48 SAP AG 1.48 SBA Com SCANA 1.98 SEI Inv 0.30 SK Tlcm SLGreen 1.00 SLM Cp 0.50 SM Energy 0.10 SpdrDJIA 3.67 SpdrGold SpdrEuro50 1.28 SpdrIntRE 1.55 SP Mid 1.83 S&P500ETF 2.85 Spdr Div 1.83 SpdrHome 0.22 SpdrS&PBk 0.42 SpdrSemi 0.21 SpdrBarcCv 1.89 SpdrShTHiY 0.80 SpdrLehHY 3.60 SpdrNuBST 0.28 SpdrNuBMu 0.83 SpdrLe1-3bll SpdrS&P RB0.48 SpdrRetl 0.68 SpdrOGEx 0.49 SpdrMetM 0.60 SPX Cp 1.00 SS&C Tech STEC STMicro 0.40 SVB FnGp SABESP 2.96 SabraHltc 1.32 SafeBulk 0.60 Safeway 0.70 StJoe StJude 0.92 Saks Salesforce SalixPhm SallyBty SamsO&G SanchezE n SanDisk SandRdge Sandst g rs Sanmina Sanofi 1.76 Sanofi rt Santarus Sapient Sarepta rs Sasol 2.11 SavientPh Schlmbrg 1.10 Schnitzer 0.75 SchwUSMkt 0.63 SchwUSLgC 0.65 Schwab 0.24 SciClone SciGames Scotts 1.30 ScrippsNet 0.48 SeaBrght 0.20 SeabGld g SeacoastBk SeadrillLtd 3.36 SeagateT 1.28 SealAir 0.52 Sealy SearsHldgs 0.33 SearsHm rt SeattGen SelCmfrt SelMedHld SemGroup SempraEn 2.40 Semtech Senesco SenHous 1.52 SensataT Sequenom ServiceCp 0.24 ServNow n SvcSource 7DaysGrp ShandaG s 1.02 ShawGrp Sherwin 1.56 ShipFin 1.56 Shire 0.46 ShufflMstr Shutterfly SiderurNac 0.43 Siemens 4.04 SigmaAld 0.80 SignatBk SignetJwlrs 0.48 SilganHld 0.48 SilicGrIn SilicnImg SilicnMotn Slcnware 0.24 SilverBull SilvStd g SilvWhtn g 0.37 SilvrcpM g 0.10 SimonProp 4.20 Sina Sinclair 0.60 Sinovac h SiriusXM SironaDent SixFlags 2.40 Skechers Skullcandy SkyWest 0.16

30.77 18.54 19.17 22.22 22.77 11.57 17.11 62.32 18.01 24.73 1.62 .76 62.52 27.99 20.10 18.24 4.04 3.38 5.23 4.05 18.98 11.99 28.72 23.28 64.24 4.36 2.60 72.18 150.91 5.29 12.88 3.08 119.32 67.75 5.44 4.81 36.61 48.77 57.59 9.14 23.02 40.62 54.66 14.47 13.72 48.33 23.23 142.97 7.15 18.32 57.20 52.02 76.80 1.48 3.85 35.75 2.45 37.08 27.37 7.00 40.01 8.85 13.35 5.99 9.99 12.71 11.35 12.80 .52 43.66 4.93 46.61 20.08 1.21 22.75 59.61 26.31 71.94 68.77 52.69 46.24 19.93 109.47 7.26 46.03 64.77 6.57 14.46 14.62 33.81 56.97 8.25 20.50 22.59 30.11 72.51 70.45 94.05 12.99 3.59 9.52 10.43 30.42 19.37 38.70 30.01 12.20 70.72 61.51 48.68 21.34 14.45 79.29 15.74 49.83 133.90 169.81 31.59 39.37 178.57 143.30 57.81 24.60 23.39 43.23 39.22 30.40 40.03 24.49 24.54 45.82 28.59 62.47 54.56 43.24 63.68 24.85 6.73 5.56 60.57 78.54 20.33 5.83 15.99 19.78 42.01 10.39 148.94 42.52 25.08 1.04 19.39 42.66 6.84 12.33 8.32 43.55 1.66 8.76 10.41 14.31 43.88 2.42 72.05 28.04 34.37 34.00 12.90 5.51 8.00 43.11 60.19 11.13 18.93 1.58 38.85 30.98 15.57 2.14 54.84 2.94 26.50 30.43 11.08 36.83 64.14 25.28 .21 21.71 29.49 3.49 13.42 38.08 9.98 11.95 3.74 43.49 146.31 15.69 87.27 15.60 29.76 5.79 100.18 72.23 66.50 48.39 42.47 8.30 4.59 14.40 5.42 .50 15.62 37.65 6.07 151.14 63.64 11.48 2.62 2.50 55.94 58.35 20.07 12.92 10.53

-.27 -.09 -.24 -.59 -.15 +.06 -.69 -.41 -.41 +.01 +.04 -.55 +.01 -1.05 -.08 +.07 +.03 -.01 +.14 -.20 -.12 -.12 -1.22 +.06 +.04 -.82 -.18 +.04 -.10 +1.14 +.67 -.01 +.07 -.29 -.83 -.46 +.34 +.15 -.22 -.42 -.19 -.09 -.29 +.23 -3.03 -.06 -.13 -.47 +.46 +.36 -.06 -.07 +.26 -.14 -2.21 -.33 +.40 -.30 -.14 -.17 -.02 -.06 -.57 +.03 +.06 +.08 -.31 -.25 -.02 -.10 -.03 -.08 -.43 -1.14 +.34 +.22 -.45 -.67 +.32 -1.18 +.04 -.39 +.01 -.28 -.78 -.30 -.31 -.28 -.16 -.48 -.59 -.58 +.37 -.13 -.15 -.35 -.08 -.86 +.33 -.36 -1.81 -1.40 +.29 +.06 -.36 -.05 -.80 -.31 -.92 -.44 -.96 -.55 +.13 -1.37 -.81 -.28 -.58 -.14 -.45 -.36 -.05 -.17 +.01 +.04 +.01 -.20 -.19 -1.02 +.26 -.82 -.11 -.10 -.10 +.01 +.81 -.04 -.09 -.37 -.42 +.04 -.14 -3.19 -.56 -.63 -.03 -1.23 -.18 +.14 -.80 -.65 -.02 -.12 -.05 -.03 -.28 -.64 +.28 -.20 -.20 +.01 +.10 -.54 -1.04 +.32 -.03 -.95 -.57 -.10 -.41 +.13 +.03 -1.08 -.01 -.30 -.28 -.53 +.01 -.18 -.14 +.08 -1.91 -.25 +1.38 +.04 -1.52 +.02 -1.02 +.10 -.72 +.13 -.92 -.86 -.48 -.11 -.02 +.07 -.40 -.03 +.30 -.36 +.01 -1.25 -1.93 -.39 -.06 +.03 -.57 -.86 +.35 +.10 +.23

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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

McDonald’s TV Continued from E1 Get details on a featured electronic toy or be among the first to download a music video discovered via M Channel. Want to get close to artists you heard on your coffee break? Enter to win backstage concert passes or maybe lunch with them. M Channel’s goal is to target different audiences at different times of day and be so area-specific that a restaurant could show high school football game highlights to hometown fans, Edmondson said. News reports are taped by local station anchors for the channel. Among those who have enlisted as content providers are producer Mark Burnett (“Survivor,” “The Voice”), ReelzChannel and broadcast stations. A range of advertisers, minus other restaurants and perhaps alcoholic beverages, will be welcome, Edmondson said. For now, the programming is in its infancy. At a McDonald’s in Costa Mesa, south of Los Angeles, a flat-screen TV tucked in a corner showed an hourlong loop that included weather; a trivia quiz that promoted “Jeopardy!”; features on windsurfing in Maui and auto racing; and a Hollywood movie report packaged by ReelzChannel. “If you see a piece of content that connects with you immediately, we’ve provided you a value,” he said. “If we can do it consistently, we become a trusted source of information ... and a great way for con-

tent providers to engage with consumers.” Major music companies are intrigued. “Interscope values a new way of communicating to customers where our content is positioned front and center to a massive audience,” said Jennifer Frommer, the company’s head of brand partnerships. “The channel provides a platform to market music in ways that have never been done before.” The pilot project, which began testing in scattered Western outlets two years ago, recently completed expansion to all McDonald’s California outlets from San Diego north to Bakersfield. All told, the eateries get nearly 15 million monthly visits from adult customers alone. The end game Edmonson foresees: versions of the channel in McDonald’s worldwide, and perhaps the birth of a template for other industries. So far, the investor-funded Channel M has consumed tens of millions of dollars and it “will be that again to pull it off,” he said, declining to give an exact figure. The M channel is “a smart thing to do,” said Valerie Folkes, a marketing professor at the University of Southern California’s Marshall School of Business. “Advertisers face difficulties not only in reaching the right people but also in capturing their attention,” Folkes said. “Here they have people who they know are customers and who are more inclined to listen to their message.”

Mortgages Continued from E1 “Think about it this way: If you had a restaurant with 100 people out the door waiting in line, would lowering prices be the first thing on your mind?” said Scott Simon, the mortgage head at Newport Beach, Calif.-based Pacific Investment Management Co., manager of the world’s largest bond fund. Margins on sales of mortgages have widened by about 50 percent since the Fed’s announcement

Trading Continued from E1 In Australia, the top securities regulator recently stated its intention of bringing computer-driven trading firms under stricter supervision and forcing them to conduct stress testing, to protect the country’s markets “against the type of disruption we have seen recently in other markets.” The broadest and fastest reforms have come out of Canada, where this spring regulators began increasing the fees charged to firms that flood the market with orders. The research and trading firm ITG found that the change had already made trading more efficient by reducing the crush

Dot-xxx Startup Continued from E1 “The purpose of the course of the weekend is to gain market validation for your idea and have a sort of working demo,” Campbell said. Jim Boeddeker, one of the event organizers and part of the Tech Alliance of Central Oregon, said the event will help create a venue for entrepreneurs that have ideas in their heads, but don’t know how to get started. An entrepreneurial ecosystem exists in Central Oregon, he said, through Central Oregon Community College and Oregon State University-Cascades Campus, the business incubator FoundersPad, and Economic Development for Central Oregon and its events,

On the Web For more information Bend Startup Weekend, visit http://bend. startupweekend.org/

PubTalk and the Bend Venture Conference. The startup weekend is another element in building an effective ecosystem that helps new businesses get established. “It kind of creates a steppingstone that will help us establish many more companies and increase the quality of those companies,” he said. “(It will) also increase the possibility of success for a brand-new startup.” — Reporter: 541-617-7818, rrees@bendbulletin.com

Continued from E1 Even after accounting for the brands that paid to protect their names from being sullied, that leaves a whole lot of porn providers. “I was amazed by the number of fetishes or predilections people have,” he said. Lawley launched .xxx after a long battle with the federal government, and he faces opposition from antiporn activists and from pornographers. Lawley in 2003 began working to create the .xxx domain. He spent seven years and ran up a hefty legal bill fighting the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers, or ICANN, which the U.S. government established in

Northwest stocks Name

Div PE

AlaskAir s Avista BkofAm BarrettB Boeing CascdeBcp CascdeCp ColSprtw Costco CraftBrew FLIR Sys HewlettP HmFedID Intel Keycorp Kroger Lattice LaPac MDU Res MentorGr Microsoft

... 1.16 .04 .44 1.76 ... 1.40 .88 1.10 ... .28 .53 .24f .90 .20 .60f ... ... .67 ... .92f

YTD Last Chg %Chg

12 35.74 +2.07 -4.8 17 26.10 +.14 +1.4 9 8.81 -.11 +58.5 38 27.28 -.98 +36.7 12 70.25 +.87 -4.2 ... 5.30 +.15 +21.0 11 53.81 +.56 +14.1 18 53.62 +.80 +15.2 28 101.00 -.44 +21.2 53 8.02 +.13 +33.2 14 20.09 -.30 -19.9 6 17.11 +.40 -33.6 ... 11.43 +.11 +9.9 10 22.65 +.11 -6.6 9 8.70 -.07 +13.1 22 23.52 +.05 -2.9 9 3.82 -.02 -35.7 ... 12.62 -.64 +56.4 19 22.21 -.13 +3.5 13 15.50 -.23 +14.3 15 30.17 -.23 +16.2

Div PE

NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstBcp Weyerhsr

1.44 1.08 1.78 .08 .80 ... 1.68 .12 .70 .75 1.56 .89f .68 ... .36 .78 .32 .88 .20 .60

Precious metals Metal NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

Price (troy oz.) $1752.00 $1750.60 $33.883

from the average level this year, which already was elevated, said Kevin Barker, an analyst at Washington-based Compass Point Research & Trading. “It’s very good to be a mortgage originator right now,” he said in a telephone interview. The Fed is targeting the $5.2 trillion market for mortgage bonds guaranteed by government-backed Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac and Ginnie Mae, which helps determine the rates that lenders can offer. Lenders bundle about 90 percent of new loans into the securities to sell to investors, giving

them funds to make more. The added time it’s taking to close on loans is signaling the industry’s limited capacity for handling more. Mortgage refinancings completed in August took an average of 51 days, up from 42 days in March and 37 days a year earlier, according to Ellie Mae, a Pleasanton, Calif.based mortgage-technology firm. Loans for home purchases, which lenders often prioritize, took 47 days, up from 43 days in August 2011. To be sure, mortgage rates have continued to set new lows following the Fed’s an-

nouncement, reaching 3.46 percent on Sept. 24, according to Bankrate.com. The trend, which the Fed has also helped engineer with stimulus efforts including pledges to keep short-term interest rates near zero, has contributed to a recovery in housing this year after a 35 percent slump in prices since mid-2006. U.S. home values climbed more than forecast in July, with the S&P/Case Shiller index for 20 metropolitan areas released yesterday showing a rise of 1.2 percent from a year earlier, the biggest 12-month jump since August 2010.

of data burdening the market’s computer systems. Now Canadian trading desks are preparing for rules that will come into effect on Oct. 15 and curtail the growth of the sophisticated trading venues known as dark pools that have proliferated in the United States. While the regulation has been hotly debated, many Canadian bankers and investors have said they don’t want to go any further down the road that has taken the United States from having one major exchange a decade ago to having 13 official exchanges and dozens of dark pools today. “We don’t want to look like the U.S., but we have to do it better than we are now,” said Greg Mills, the head of stock trading at the nation’s largest bank, Royal Bank of Canada.

Canadian executives traveled to Washington last week to speak about what the United States may soon be able to learn from Canada about how to rein in the new high-speed markets. “Because the U.S. had moved ahead so fast, we had the opportunity to watch and decide in some cases that there were extremes we didn’t want to go to,” Kevan Cowan, the president of the Toronto Stock Exchange, said at last week’s conference. U.S. regulators have faced a growing demand at home for some sort of market reform from traders and exchange executives. At a Senate hearing on computerized trading last Thursday, one market analyst called for a moratorium on the new trading venues that have

popped up in recent years, while traders on the panel recommended mandatory kill switches that could be flipped in case of technology malfunctions. The senator who called the hearing, Jack Reed, D-R.I., said “our marketplace has been evolving very quickly and it is not clear that our rules have kept up.” Susan Wolburgh Jenah, the chief executive of the Investment Industry Regulatory Organization of Canada, said that her agency was increasingly going its own way rather than just following the American approach to regulating new forms of trading. “With all this new technology comes responsibility for ensuring that market integrity is not adversely impacted,” she said.

1998 to run the Internet’s address system. “It took years and millions of dollars, and we won,” he said. Now that .xxx is open for business, Lawley faces detractors from two sides. Porn critics take issue with the very existence of the .xxx domain. Pat Trueman, a former federal prosecutor and president of the organization Morality in Media, said Lawley’s business is illegal. “Under federal law, distribution of hard-core pornography on the Internet is a criminal act,” Trueman said. “You’ve got a business built on the premise that they can violate federal law. How long is that business model good for?” Lawley countered that porn is protected by the First Amendment. While federal prosecutors aggressively pursue child pornography viola-

tions, they’re not concerned about explicit material involving adults, he said. Trueman said an anti-porn president might change that position. In addition to the obvious opposition from anti-porn activists, Lawley has taken heat from some leading pornographers. Last year, the California-based owner of YouPorn .com sued ICM Registry, claiming “monopolistic conduct, price gouging, and anti-competitive and unfair practices.” Lawley calls .xxx “a clean space for dirty content.” He promises stricter policing of domain-name registration than for dot-com sites. For instance, ICM verifies the identity of those who buy sites. Once the site is up and running, ICM runs regular security checks to make sure the sites aren’t spewing out viruses and malware

And ICM promises that .xxx sites show no images of children being abused. “Anybody can get a dot-com for $10 a year,” he said. “There’s no certainty, no protection, no nothing. The consumer can go there knowing the dot-triple-x sites are the safest anywhere on the Internet.” Now that Lawley has the .xxx domain up and running, he has bigger plans. He launches a dot-xxx search engine this week. Instead of creating its own algorithms, ICM partnered with Google. Lawley said Google-like sponsored ads are a possibility. The next step, he said, is an iTunes-like payment plan that will let porn viewers pay for content. “I wouldn’t like to throw out numbers, but we’re talking about eight- or nine-digit sums,” he said.

Market recap

Name

YTD Last Chg %Chg

20 95.49 +.41 -.9 17 54.90 ... +10.4 21 48.93 +.04 +2.1 17 7.86 -.01 +73.1 12 39.91 -.65 +6.5 ... 1.34 ... -29.8 40 44.07 -.27 +20.5 18 161.06 +.15 -2.3 9 15.99 -.37 -24.0 12 28.04 +.28 -33.7 29 146.31 -1.52 +63.9 10 31.03 -.34 -15.6 28 50.10 -.43 +8.9 ... 5.13 -.03 +5.3 16 12.95 -.10 +4.5 12 33.95 +.03 +25.5 14 16.75 -.19 +19.7 11 34.42 -.30 +24.9 13 22.22 +2.04 +42.4 40 26.13 -.35 +40.0

Prime rate

Pvs Day

Time period

Percent

$1760.00 $1763.80 $33.886

Last Previous day A week ago

3.25 3.25 3.25

NYSE

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

BkofAm GpFSnMx n S&P500ETF Bar iPVix SPDR Fncl

1543240 8.81 -.11 1409255 12.91 ... 1304077 143.30 -.81 680944 9.57 +.33 512948 15.50 -.10

Last Chg

Gainers ($2 or more) Name

Last

Chg %Chg

BarcShtC AGreet 7DaysGrp KnghtCap Vipshop n

15.99 +4.06 +34.0 16.82 +2.48 +17.3 11.95 +1.38 +13.1 2.61 +.21 +8.8 7.50 +.60 +8.7

Losers ($2 or more)

Amex

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

CheniereEn NovaGld g NwGold g GoldStr g Vringo

Last Chg

46313 15.38 -.38 36950 5.59 +.01 32332 12.23 +.09 27306 1.96 +.12 23503 3.19 -.04

Gainers ($2 or more)

Indexes Nasdaq

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

SiriusXM Microsoft Intel RschMotn Facebook n

Last Chg

724441 2.50 +.03 539740 30.17 -.23 493044 22.65 +.11 432184 7.00 +.40 369247 20.62 +.34

Gainers ($2 or more)

Name

Last

Chg %Chg

Name

Last

GoldRsv g PernixTh AvalnRare MAG Slv g CoastD

3.15 7.47 2.00 11.83 2.11

+.27 +.42 +.11 +.65 +.11

LifePtrs StarScient CalAmp DialGlobal WstCstBcp

3.66 +2.20 +150.7 3.83 +.49 +14.7 8.11 +.99 +13.8 2.91 +.31 +11.9 22.22 +2.04 +10.1

+9.4 +6.0 +5.8 +5.8 +5.5

Losers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

Losers ($2 or more)

Name

Last

Chg %Chg

Name

Last

Chg %Chg

Name

Last

Blyth s Omnova ETr2xSSD Jabil AmrRlty

25.68 7.67 26.67 18.90 3.51

-6.89 -21.2 -1.08 -12.3 -3.08 -10.4 -2.07 -9.9 -.33 -8.6

IncOpR TriangPet ImpacMtg NavideaBio Servotr

3.63 7.03 6.72 2.86 8.45

-.34 -.52 -.44 -.18 -.53

-8.6 -6.9 -6.1 -5.9 -5.9

NuPathe Telestone FFinSvc PrimaBio n Cytori wt

3.23 -1.11 -25.6 2.04 -.36 -15.0 3.00 -.50 -14.3 5.25 -.85 -13.9 2.10 -.29 -12.1

1,220 1,809 109 3,138 104 23

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

185 234 34 453 15 5

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Diary Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

E3

Diary

Chg %Chg

Diary 903 1,522 139 2,564 37 27

52-Week High Low

Name

13,653.24 10,404.49 5,390.11 3,950.66 499.82 411.54 8,515.60 6,414.89 2,502.21 1,941.99 3,196.93 2,298.89 1,474.51 1,074.77 15,432.54 11,208.42 868.50 601.71

Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

Last

Net Chg

%Chg

YTD %Chg

52-wk %Chg

13,413.51 4,913.52 474.96 8,221.32 2,444.50 3,093.70 1,433.32 14,962.82 833.93

-44.04 -3.10 +.62 -53.46 -6.84 -24.03 -8.27 -85.98 -5.19

-.33 -.06 +.13 -.65 -.28 -.77 -.57 -.57 -.62

+9.79 -2.12 +2.21 +9.95 +7.29 +18.75 +13.97 +13.44 +12.55

+21.82 +15.50 +9.99 +19.55 +17.90 +24.17 +24.52 +24.18 +27.91

World markets

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed yesterday. Market Close % Change

Key currency exchange rates Friday compared with late Thursday in New York. Dollar vs: Exchange Rate Pvs Day

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

328.05 2,405.51 3,414.84 5,768.09 7,276.51 20,527.73 40,332.98 15,408.03 3,809.32 8,906.70 1,980.44 3,046.68 4,382.46 6,044.42

-1.93 -1.83 -2.82 -1.56 -2.00 -.83 +.29 -3.29 -.42 -2.03 -.55 -.67 -.30 -1.12

t t t t t t s t t t t t t t

1.0357 1.6154 1.0157 .002115 .1587 1.2859 .1290 .012867 .077726 .0319 .000892 .1516 1.0639 .0340

1.0407 1.6211 1.0206 .002116 .1586 1.2926 .1290 .012858 .077732 .0322 .000893 .1525 1.0682 .0341

Selected mutual funds YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret Amer Century Inv: EqInc 7.96 -0.03 +11.5 GrowthI 28.35 -0.19 +15.4 Ultra 26.58 -0.17 +16.0 American Funds A: AmcpA p 21.23 -0.13 +13.2 AMutlA p 28.26 -0.12 +11.1 BalA p 20.17 -0.07 +12.4 BondA p 12.98 +0.01 +5.5 CapIBA p 52.92 -0.16 +10.5 CapWGA p 35.99 -0.25 +14.4 CapWA p 21.62 +6.9 EupacA p 39.56 -0.32 +12.5 FdInvA p 39.89 -0.28 +13.8 GovtA p 14.65 +0.01 +2.5 GwthA p 33.58 -0.26 +16.9 HI TrA p 11.17 -0.05 +10.5 IncoA p 17.94 -0.06 +10.1 IntBdA p 13.81 +0.01 +2.7 ICAA p 30.62 -0.18 +14.5 NEcoA p 28.16 -0.19 +18.4 N PerA p 30.26 -0.21 +15.7 NwWrldA 51.86 -0.32 +12.4 SmCpA p 38.85 -0.27 +17.1 TxExA p 13.11 +0.02 +7.5 WshA p 31.23 -0.14 +11.8 Artisan Funds: Intl 23.55 -0.13 +18.8 IntlVal r 28.86 -0.25 +15.0 MidCap 38.25 -0.29 +16.2 MidCapVal 20.99 -0.14 +6.5 Baron Funds: Growth 57.76 -0.19 +13.2 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 14.25 +0.02 +4.9 DivMu 14.89 +0.01 +2.7 BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 20.05 -0.08 +11.5 GlAlA r 19.51 -0.07 +8.1 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 18.14 -0.07 +7.5 BlackRock Instl:

EquityDv 20.10 -0.09 GlbAlloc r 19.60 -0.08 Cohen & Steers: RltyShrs 67.85 -0.05 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 30.93 -0.15 AcornIntZ 39.56 -0.23 Credit Suisse Comm: ComRet t 8.38 -0.08 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 10.01 -0.11 USCorEq1 12.20 -0.08 USCorEq2 12.02 -0.08 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 36.08 -0.12 Davis Funds Y: NYVenY 36.51 -0.13 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.47 +0.01 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq 18.90 -0.12 EmMktV 28.30 -0.19 IntSmVa 15.01 -0.15 LargeCo 11.30 -0.07 USLgVa 22.12 -0.18 US Small 23.29 -0.14 US SmVa 26.73 -0.18 IntlSmCo 15.15 -0.13 Fixd 10.35 IntVa 15.61 -0.20 Glb5FxInc 11.26 +0.01 2YGlFxd 10.13 Dodge&Cox: Balanced 76.28 -0.40 Income 13.83 +0.01 IntlStk 32.57 -0.45 Stock 118.28 -0.89 DoubleLine Funds: TRBd I 11.46 +0.01 TRBd N p 11.45 +0.01 Dreyfus: Aprec 45.32 -0.23 Eaton Vance I: FltgRt 9.09

+11.7 +8.3 +12.8 +13.6 +15.9 +2.4 +10.6 +14.6 +14.7 +11.0 +11.2 +6.2 +11.1 +10.3 +12.4 +15.7 +17.0 +14.2 +15.9 +11.4 +0.8 +8.7 +4.3 +0.9 +14.6 +6.9 +11.4 +18.0 NA NA +12.7 +6.7

FMI Funds: LgCap p 17.26 -0.08 FPA Funds: NewInco 10.70 +0.01 FPACres 28.71 -0.12 Fairholme 30.00 -0.23 Federated Instl: TotRetBd 11.64 +0.01 StrValDvIS 5.18 -0.02 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 23.03 -0.14 StrInA 12.71 -0.02 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 23.36 -0.13 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 14.30 -0.05 FF2010K 13.10 -0.04 FF2015 11.95 -0.05 FF2015K 13.17 -0.04 FF2020 14.47 -0.06 FF2020K 13.59 -0.06 FF2025 12.06 -0.06 FF2025K 13.75 -0.06 FF2030 14.36 -0.08 FF2030K 13.90 -0.07 FF2035 11.90 -0.07 FF2035K 13.98 -0.09 FF2040 8.30 -0.05 FF2040K 14.02 -0.09 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 13.00 -0.09 AMgr50 16.38 -0.04 AMgr20 r 13.37 -0.01 Balanc 20.24 -0.09 BalancedK 20.24 -0.09 BlueChGr 50.09 -0.35 CapAp 29.61 -0.15 CpInc r 9.34 -0.04 Contra 79.07 -0.45 ContraK 79.09 -0.44 DisEq 24.70 -0.17 DivIntl 29.02 -0.20 DivrsIntK r 29.01 -0.20 DivGth 29.90 -0.20

+13.2 +2.0 +8.1 +29.6 +5.9 +9.5 +16.8 +8.2 +17.0 +9.5 +9.6 +9.6 +9.8 +10.6 +10.7 +11.8 +11.9 +12.1 +12.3 +13.0 +13.1 +13.0 +13.1 +15.8 +10.0 +6.1 +12.2 +12.3 +18.1 +20.3 +12.3 +17.2 +17.3 +14.8 +13.7 +13.9 +16.4

Eq Inc 47.15 -0.30 EQII 19.67 -0.09 Fidel 35.99 -0.28 FltRateHi r 9.94 -0.01 GNMA 11.89 -0.01 GovtInc 10.96 +0.02 GroCo 97.24 -0.88 GroInc 21.24 -0.14 GrowCoF 97.26 -0.88 GrowthCoK97.25 -0.88 HighInc r 9.26 -0.04 IntBd 11.15 +0.01 IntmMu 10.66 +0.02 IntlDisc 31.76 -0.21 InvGrBd 12.07 +0.01 InvGB 8.01 +0.01 LgCapVal 11.36 -0.06 LowP r 39.07 -0.19 LowPriK r 39.04 -0.20 Magelln 74.20 -0.55 MidCap 29.90 -0.22 MuniInc 13.53 +0.02 NwMkt r 17.52 -0.02 OTC 61.11 -0.48 100Index 10.37 -0.06 Puritn 19.82 -0.08 PuritanK 19.82 -0.08 SAllSecEqF13.02 -0.09 SCmdtyStrt 9.23 -0.08 SCmdtyStrF 9.26 -0.08 SrsIntGrw 11.57 -0.07 SrsIntVal 9.11 -0.09 SrInvGrdF 12.08 +0.02 STBF 8.59 StratInc 11.38 -0.02 TotalBd 11.32 +0.01 USBI 12.04 +0.01 Value 73.54 -0.46 Fidelity Spartan: 500IdxInv 51.03 -0.29 500Idx I 51.04 -0.29 Fidelity Spart Adv: ExMktAd r 39.96 -0.24 500IdxAdv 51.04 -0.28

+15.7 +14.3 +16.2 +5.6 +3.4 +2.9 +20.2 +17.6 +20.4 +20.3 +11.8 +4.4 +4.2 +15.0 +5.2 +5.8 +12.8 +14.5 +14.5 +18.1 +14.5 +6.6 +14.9 +11.7 +17.6 +13.0 +13.2 +15.9 +3.0 +3.2 +14.4 +12.7 +5.3 +2.0 +8.5 +6.0 +4.1 +15.9 +15.8 +15.8 +14.0 +15.8

TotMktAd r 41.59 -0.23 +15.5 USBond I 12.04 +0.01 +4.1 First Eagle: GlblA 49.36 -0.29 +9.4 OverseasA 22.35 -0.14 +9.8 Forum Funds: AbsStrI r 11.26 +0.02 +1.9 Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA p 12.73 +0.03 +7.6 GrwthA p 49.93 -0.20 +11.9 HYTFA p 10.89 +0.02 +9.4 IncomA p 2.23 -0.01 +11.4 RisDvA p 37.68 -0.16 +8.3 StratInc p 10.67 -0.02 +9.4 USGovA p 6.92 +2.4 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv 13.26 -0.05 +11.1 IncmeAd 2.21 -0.01 +11.6 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.25 -0.01 +10.9 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 22.22 -0.11 +12.9 Frank/Temp Temp A: GlBd A p 13.30 -0.05 +10.9 GrwthA p 18.67 -0.25 +14.6 WorldA p 15.59 -0.19 +13.5 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 13.33 -0.04 +10.6 GE Elfun S&S: US Eqty 45.00 -0.25 +16.1 GMO Trust III: Quality 23.91 -0.08 +14.6 GMO Trust IV: IntlIntrVl 20.21 -0.27 +8.1 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 11.21 -0.09 +8.7 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 7.31 -0.04 +11.8 MidCapV 38.07 -0.22 +13.4 Harbor Funds: Bond 13.05 +8.4 CapApInst 42.84 -0.32 +16.1 IntlInv t 58.37 -0.49 +12.3 Intl r 59.04 -0.50 +12.6

Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 32.34 -0.26 Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 41.94 -0.32 Hussman Funds: StrGrowth 10.96 +0.05 IVA Funds: Wldwide I r16.17 -0.06 Invesco Funds A: Chart p 17.86 -0.09 CmstkA 17.35 -0.13 EqIncA 9.17 -0.04 GrIncA p 20.89 -0.13 HYMuA 10.07 +0.01 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 24.33 -0.11 AssetStA p 25.17 -0.12 AssetStrI r 25.42 -0.13 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 12.16 +0.03 JP Morgan Instl: MdCpVal 27.61 -0.13 JPMorgan R Cl: CoreBond 12.16 +0.03 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 12.15 +0.03 HighYld 8.11 -0.04 ShtDurBd 11.03 +0.01 USLCCrPls 23.06 -0.17 Janus T Shrs: PrkMCVal T21.90 -0.11 John Hancock Cl 1: LSBalanc 13.51 -0.06 LSGrwth 13.39 -0.08 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 19.40 -0.13 Longleaf Partners: Partners 29.89 -0.23 Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 14.96 -0.04 StrInc C 15.37 -0.06 LSBondR 14.90 -0.04 StrIncA 15.28 -0.06 Loomis Sayles Inv:

+12.2 +12.8 -11.8 +5.3 +11.3 +15.4 +11.7 +13.6 +11.7 +12.5 +13.1 +13.2 +4.6 +16.3 +4.9 +4.8 +11.1 +1.6 +16.8 +8.5 +11.5 +12.4 +15.5 +12.2 +11.5 +9.6 +11.2 +10.1

InvGrBdY 12.75 +10.1 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 11.90 -0.07 +13.7 BdDebA p 8.05 -0.04 +10.3 ShDurIncA p4.64 +5.3 Lord Abbett C: ShDurIncC t 4.67 +4.8 Lord Abbett F: ShtDurInco 4.63 -0.01 +5.2 MFS Funds A: TotRA 15.19 -0.03 +10.1 ValueA 25.38 -0.12 +14.8 MFS Funds I: ValueI 25.49 -0.12 +15.0 MainStay Funds A: HiYldBA 6.09 -0.02 +10.1 Managers Funds: Yacktman p19.17 -0.04 +10.9 YacktFoc 20.62 -0.04 +10.4 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 7.46 -0.07 +12.6 MergerFd 15.92 -0.02 +2.1 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 11.06 +0.01 +9.8 TotRtBdI 11.06 +0.01 +10.0 MorganStanley Inst: MCapGrI 34.95 -0.15 +6.2 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 29.60 -0.19 +10.7 GlbDiscZ 30.03 -0.20 +11.0 SharesZ 22.44 -0.11 +13.2 Neuberger&Berm Fds: GenesInst 49.62 -0.33 +6.9 Northern Funds: HiYFxInc 7.44 -0.04 +11.4 Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 28.95 -0.12 +7.0 Intl I r 18.96 -0.27 +14.6 Oakmark 48.67 -0.32 +16.7 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 7.48 -0.02 +11.3 GlbSMdCap14.66 -0.11 +10.8 LgCapStrat 9.73 -0.08 +10.9 Oppenheimer A:

DvMktA p 33.47 -0.19 GlobA p 60.87 -0.56 GblStrIncA 4.30 -0.01 IntBdA p 6.52 -0.01 MnStFdA 37.46 -0.17 RisingDivA 17.29 -0.10 S&MdCpVl30.71 -0.17 Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 15.64 -0.09 S&MdCpVl25.96 -0.15 Oppenheimer C&M: RisingDvC p15.57 -0.09 Oppenheimer Roch: RcNtMuA 7.52 +0.02 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 33.16 -0.19 IntlBdY 6.52 -0.01 IntGrowY 29.23 -0.26 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 11.59 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AlAsetAut r 11.14 -0.05 AllAsset 12.62 -0.06 ComodRR 6.99 -0.06 DivInc 12.15 -0.02 EmgMkCur10.46 -0.03 EmMkBd 12.23 -0.02 HiYld 9.50 -0.05 InvGrCp 11.28 +0.02 LowDu 10.67 +0.01 RealRtnI 12.59 +0.03 ShortT 9.90 +0.01 TotRt 11.59 PIMCO Funds A: RealRtA p 12.59 +0.03 TotRtA 11.59 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 11.59 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 11.59 PIMCO Funds P: AstAllAuthP11.13 -0.05 TotRtnP 11.59 Perm Port Funds:

+14.2 +12.6 +10.3 +8.0 +16.5 +11.3 +3.6 +10.5 +3.0 +10.7 +15.3 +14.5 +8.4 +14.5 +9.0 NA NA NA NA +6.6 +12.3 NA NA NA NA NA +9.1 NA +8.8 +8.3 +8.9 NA +9.1

Permannt 49.24 -0.18 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 41.84 -0.27 Price Funds: BlChip 45.79 -0.30 CapApp 23.18 -0.05 EmMktS 31.78 -0.19 EqInc x 26.01 -0.27 EqIndex x 38.61 -0.40 Growth 37.94 -0.26 HlthSci 43.52 -0.37 HiYield 6.88 -0.02 InstlCpG 18.91 -0.15 IntlBond 10.17 Intl G&I 12.56 -0.13 IntlStk 13.80 -0.10 MidCap 58.51 -0.26 MCapVal 24.87 -0.12 N Asia 15.95 -0.09 New Era 43.39 -0.36 N Horiz 35.88 -0.31 N Inc 9.96 +0.01 OverS SF 8.21 -0.08 R2010 16.61 -0.06 R2015 12.92 -0.06 R2020 17.91 -0.08 R2025 13.12 -0.06 R2030 18.84 -0.11 R2035 13.32 -0.08 R2040 18.96 -0.11 ShtBd 4.86 SmCpStk 36.02 -0.25 SmCapVal 38.76 -0.22 SpecIn 12.98 -0.02 Value 26.08 -0.14 Principal Inv: LgCGI In 10.35 -0.08 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 14.38 -0.09 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 11.72 -0.09 PremierI r 19.49 -0.10 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 40.73 -0.23

+6.8 +9.2 +18.5 +12.4 +11.5 +14.6 +15.6 +19.2 +33.5 +11.6 +17.3 +6.2 +9.0 +12.3 +11.0 +16.3 +14.7 +3.2 +15.6 +5.3 +12.2 +10.6 +11.6 +12.6 +13.3 +13.9 +14.2 +14.4 +2.6 +15.3 +12.4 +8.5 +15.7 +16.6 NA +8.9 +5.2 +15.2

S&P Sel 22.66 -0.12 Scout Funds: Intl 31.47 -0.24 Sequoia 162.49 -0.80 TCW Funds: TotRetBdI 10.30 +0.01 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 18.82 -0.29 Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 26.11 -0.31 IntValue I 26.69 -0.31 Tweedy Browne: GblValue 24.76 -0.33 Vanguard Admiral: BalAdml 23.92 -0.07 CAITAdm 11.72 +0.02 CpOpAdl 76.46 -0.53 EMAdmr r 34.36 -0.21 Energy 114.31 -1.17 EqInAdm n 51.16 -0.18 ExtdAdm 44.85 -0.27 500Adml 132.14 -0.74 GNMA Ad 11.14 +0.01 GrwAdm 37.00 -0.25 HlthCr 62.35 -0.32 HiYldCp 6.02 -0.02 InfProAd 29.37 +0.08 ITBdAdml 12.20 +0.03 ITsryAdml 11.84 +0.03 IntGrAdm 58.37 -0.48 ITAdml 14.38 +0.02 ITGrAdm 10.46 +0.02 LtdTrAd 11.19 +0.01 LTGrAdml 11.05 +0.06 LT Adml 11.78 +0.02 MCpAdml 99.70 -0.64 MuHYAdm 11.24 +0.02 PrmCap r 71.84 -0.36 ReitAdm r 91.76 -0.04 STsyAdml 10.79 STBdAdml 10.67 ShtTrAd 15.94 +0.01 STIGrAd 10.86 SmCAdm 38.16 -0.22

+15.8 +13.4 +11.7 +11.4 +10.6 +9.7 +10.1 +13.3 +10.9 +5.6 +12.2 +9.9 +3.3 +13.1 +14.0 +15.8 +3.1 +17.5 +14.9 +11.0 +6.5 +6.5 +2.9 +12.3 +4.9 +8.2 +1.7 +11.6 +6.9 +11.8 +7.9 +12.2 +14.4 +0.6 +1.8 +1.0 +3.9 +14.3

TtlBAdml 11.21 TStkAdm 35.64 WellslAdm 59.73 WelltnAdm 59.36 Windsor 49.20 WdsrIIAd 51.97 Vanguard Fds: CapOpp 33.09 DivdGro 16.84 Energy 60.87 EqInc 24.40 Explr 79.06 GNMA 11.14 HYCorp 6.02 HlthCre 147.74 InflaPro 14.95 IntlGr 18.34 IntlVal 29.59 ITIGrade 10.46 LifeCon 17.37 LifeGro 23.48 LifeMod 20.92 LTIGrade 11.05 Morg 20.14 MuInt 14.38 PrmcpCor 14.94 Prmcp r 69.21 SelValu r 20.72 STAR 20.63 STIGrade 10.86 StratEq 20.81 TgtRetInc 12.29 TgRe2010 24.42 TgtRe2015 13.51 TgRe2020 23.98 TgtRe2025 13.66 TgRe2030 23.44 TgtRe2035 14.11 TgtRe2040 23.17 TgtRe2045 14.55 USGro 21.13 Wellsly 24.65 Welltn 34.36 Wndsr 14.58

+0.01 -0.20 +0.01 -0.17 -0.32 -0.35

+4.1 +15.5 +9.3 +11.3 +15.4 +14.9

-0.23 -0.06 -0.62 -0.09 -0.68 +0.01 -0.02 -0.75 +0.04 -0.15 -0.35 +0.02 -0.02 -0.11 -0.07 +0.06 -0.15 +0.02 -0.07 -0.34 -0.11 -0.08

+12.1 +10.4 +3.2 +13.1 +10.7 +3.0 +10.9 +14.9 +6.4 +12.2 +11.1 +8.1 +8.1 +12.1 +10.1 +11.5 +15.3 +4.9 +10.7 +12.1 +11.5 +11.1 +3.8 +13.5 +7.4 +8.9 +9.8 +10.6 +11.3 +12.0 +12.8 +13.0 +13.1 +17.1 +9.3 +11.2 +15.2

-0.14 -0.01 -0.05 -0.04 -0.09 -0.06 -0.11 -0.07 -0.14 -0.09 -0.15 -0.10 -0.10

WndsII 29.28 -0.20 Vanguard Idx Fds: ExtMkt I 110.70 -0.66 MidCpIstPl108.64 -0.70 TotIntAdm r23.79 -0.21 TotIntlInst r95.14 -0.85 TotIntlIP r 95.16 -0.84 500 132.14 -0.74 MidCap 21.95 -0.14 TotBnd 11.21 +0.01 TotlIntl 14.22 -0.13 TotStk 35.64 -0.20 Vanguard Instl Fds: BalInst 23.93 -0.06 DevMkInst 9.37 -0.09 ExtIn 44.85 -0.27 GrwthIst 37.00 -0.25 InfProInst 11.96 +0.03 InstIdx 131.97 -0.73 InsPl 131.98 -0.73 InsTStPlus 32.42 -0.18 MidCpIst 22.03 -0.14 STIGrInst 10.86 SCInst 38.16 -0.22 TBIst 11.21 +0.01 TSInst 35.65 -0.20 ValueIst 22.82 -0.11 Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl 109.15 -0.61 MidCpIdx 31.46 -0.20 STBdIdx 10.67 TotBdSgl 11.21 +0.01 TotStkSgl 34.40 -0.19 Virtus Funds I: EmMktI 9.73 -0.01 Western Asset: CorePlus I 11.68 +0.02

+14.9 +14.0 +11.9 +10.8 +10.8 +10.8 +15.7 +11.7 +4.0 +10.7 +15.4 +11.0 +11.3 +14.0 +17.5 +6.5 +15.8 +15.8 +15.6 +11.9 +3.9 +14.3 +4.1 +15.5 +13.7 +15.8 +11.9 +1.8 +4.1 +15.5 +12.6 +7.6


E4

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2012

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PERSONAL FINANCE

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TODAY BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL DESCHUTES BUSINESS NETWORKERS CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Starts at 7 a.m.; visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541-610-9125. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit; registration required; $35; 9 a.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www .happyhourtraining.com. GETTING THE MOST OUT OF SCHWAB.COM: Free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794. OPEN COMPUTER LAB: Free; 1-2:30 p.m.; La Pine Public Library, 16425 First St.; 541-536-0515. OPEN COMPUTER LAB: Free; 2-3:30 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7080. BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WILDFIRE CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 3:30 p.m.; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541-480-1765. SOROPTIMIST INTERNATIONAL OF BEND: Deschutes Co. Commissioner Tammy Baney will speak at Soroptimist’s Autumn kick off dinner program. RSVP is necessary by Sept. 26; $15 dinner includes beverage and gratuity; 5:30-7 p.m.; Boston’s, 61276 S. U.S. Highway 97, Suite 140; 541-728-0820 or president@sibend.org. LIVE CONTRACTOR EDUCATION COURSE: The live course, taught by ML Vidas with Central Oregon Contractor Training, is approved by the Oregon Construction Contractors Board and satisfies the educational requirement to take the test to become a licensed contractor in Oregon. Course continues Sept. 28-29; $299 includes the Oregon Contractor’s Reference Manual; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7290.

FRIDAY EDWARD JONES COFFEE CLUB: Current market and economic update including current rates; free; 9 a.m.; Ponderosa Coffee House, 61292 S. U.S. Highway 97, Suite 105, Bend; 541-617-8861. SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS GROUP: Jennifer Letz, the Sustainable Operations Specialist for the Deschutes and Ochoco National Forests in Central Oregon, will be speaking about managing waste at a fire camp; 9-10:30 a.m.; American Licorice Company, 2796 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend. CENTRAL OREGON REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT CLUB: Free; 11 a.m.; ServiceMaster Clean, 20806 Sockeye Place, Bend; 541-610-4006 or bobbleile@windermere.com. FREE TAX FRIDAY: Free tax return reviews; schedule an appointment at 541-385-9666 or www.myzoomtax .com; free; 2-4 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666. KNOW INTERNET FOR BEGINNERS: Free; 3-4:30 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1050.

TUESDAY BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL HIGH DESERT CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Starts at 7:15 a.m.; visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541-420-7377. WORKPLACE INVESTIGATIONS AND TERMINATIONS: Presentation by Katherine Tank, an attorney with Schwabe, Williamson, and Wyatt. Pre-registration required before Sept. 28; $50 includes breakfast; 7:15 a.m.-12:15 p.m.; The Riverhouse Hotel & Convention Center, 3075 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-388-6296 or brenda.r.pierce@state.or.us. IS THERE A CUSTOMER BASE TO SUPPORT YOUR BUSINESS?: Registration required; $15; 6-8 p.m.; COCC - Crook County Open Campus, 510 S.E. Lynn Blvd., Prineville; 541-383-7290. FIVE KEY STRATEGIES TO GUARANTEE YOUR SUCCESS IN THE REAL ESTATE BUSINESS: Live internet show; free; 7 p.m.; Exit Realty Bend, 354 N.E. Greenwood Ave., No. 100; 541-480-8835 or http://goo.gl/RtnJe.

WEDNESDAY Oct. 3 GO SOLAR! CENTRAL OREGON

FREE WORKSHOP: Registration requested; free; 5:30 a.m.-6:30 p.m.; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; 541-323-9722 or www.gosolarcentraloregon.org. BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL BEND CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7 a.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-749-0789. GRANT WORKSHOP: Oregon Humanities Director of Programs Jennifer Allen and Program Officer Annie Kaffen will review guidelines for 2013 Public Program Grants and share best practices in preparing successful letters of interest. RSVP to a.kaffen@oregonhumanities .org; free; 11 a.m.-noon; Jefferson County Library, 241 S.E. Seventh St., Madras; 541-475-3351. LAUNCH YOUR BUSINESS: Designed to help business owners get off to a good beginning and develop a working plan. Preregistration is required. The course combines four 1-hour daytime coaching sessions that start Sept. 26, with three Wednesday evening classes on Oct. 3, Oct. 17 and Nov. 7; $79; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Madras Campus, 1170 E. Ashwood Road, Madras; 541-383-7290. MTA SECURITY FUNDAMENTALS: Discover whether a future in computers is for you with this Microsoft Technology Associate class on security. This class prepares one to pass the MTA exam in Security. Class meets Wednesdays, Oct. 3-24. Registration required; $99-$249; 6-9 p.m.; COCC - Crook County Open Campus, 510 S.E. Lynn Blvd., Prineville; 541-383-7273 or www. cocc.edu/continuinged/systech/. WHAT ARE YOUR OPTIONS FOR FUNDING YOUR BUSINESS?: Registration required; $15; 6-8 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7290.

THURSDAY Oct. 4 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL DESCHUTES BUSINESS NETWORKERS CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Starts at 7 a.m.; visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541-610-9125. LEADERSHIP SERIES: Nine seminars designed to give managers and team leaders the skills they need to succeed in their organizations. Registration required. Course continues every first thursday of the month; $725 for entire series, $95 per seminar; 8 a.m.-noon; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7290. GRANT WORKSHOP: Oregon Humanities Director of Programs Jennifer Allen and Program Officer Annie Kaffen will review guidelines for 2013 Public Program Grants and share best practices in preparing successful letters of interest. RSVP to a.kaffen@oregonhumanities.org; free; 11 a.m.-noon; Crook County Library, 175 N.W. Meadow Lakes Drive, Prineville; 541-447-7978. BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WILDFIRE CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 3:30 p.m.; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541-480-1765.

FRIDAY Oct. 5 CENTRAL OREGON REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT CLUB: Free; 11 a.m.; ServiceMaster Clean, 20806 Sockeye Place, Bend; 541-610-4006 or bobbleile@windermere.com. GRANT WORKSHOP: Oregon Humanities Director of Programs Jennifer Allen and Program Officer Annie Kaffen will review guidelines for 2013 Public Program Grants and share best practices in preparing successful letters of interest. RSVP to a.kaffen@oregonhumanities.org; free; 11 a.m.-noon; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1050. FREE TAX FRIDAY: Free tax return reviews; schedule an appointment at 541-385-9666 or www.myzoomtax .com; free; 2-4 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666.

.happyhourtraining.com.

MONDAY Oct. 8 MEDICAL CODING PROCEDURES COURSE: A six-week blended delivery course (classroom + online) for those wishing to enter the health care field in an administrative role or expand their knowledge of medical coding. Classes continue Thursdays through Nov. 15. Registration required; $495; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or www.cocc. edu/ContinuingEd/Medoffice/.

TUESDAY Oct. 9 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL HIGH DESERT CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Starts at 7:15 a.m.; visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541-420-7377. HOME BUYING CLASS: Registration required; free; 5:30-9:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 2303 S.W. First St., Redmond; 541-318-7506, ext. 309.

WEDNESDAY Oct. 10 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL BEND CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7 a.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-749-0789. IMPACTING YOUR PROFIT: This class is designed to help established business owners or principals identify what drives profit and how to increase profitability. The course combines three one-on-one advising sessions with three 2-hour classes on Oct. 10, Oct. 24 and Nov. 7. Registration required; $199; 8-10 a.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7290. HOME BUYING CLASS: Registration required; free; 5:30-9:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 2303 S.W. First St., Redmond; 541-318-7506, ext. 309.

THURSDAY Oct. 11 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL DESCHUTES BUSINESS NETWORKERS CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Starts at 7 a.m.; visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541-610-9125. N.W. GREEN BUILDING INDUSTRY SUMMIT: Topics will include Home Performance and Cost Prioritizing, Living Building Challenge update, Ground Source Heating, Cash Incentives for upgrades, Solar Systems, Heating with Common Cents and more. Register before Oct. 10; $50 pre-register, $65 at the door; 7:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.; Westside Church, 2051 Shevlin Park Road, Bend; 541-382-7504. BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WILDFIRE CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 3:30 p.m.; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541-480-1765.

Oct. 16 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL HIGH DESERT CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Starts at 7:15 a.m.; visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541-420-7377. VISIT BEND BOARD MEETING: Open to the public but please email Valerie@visitbend.com to reserve a seat; 8 a.m.; Bend Visitor Center, 750 N.W. Lava Road; 541-382-8048.

WEDNESDAY Oct. 17 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL BEND CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7 a.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-749-0789. RISK MANAGEMENT - VISION, STRATEGY, & EXECUTION: A panel of regional bank CEO’s share their perspective and outlook; $30 for individuals and $350 for a corporate table of 8; 7:30 a.m.; Seventh Mountain Resort, 18575 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-382-8711. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain an alcohol server permit; registration required; $35; 9 a.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541447-6384 or www .happyhourtraining.com. FINANCIAL PLANNING AND MONEY MANAGEMENT: Call 541-318-7506 extension 309 to reserve a seat; 5:30-7:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 2303 S.W. First St., Redmond; 541-548-2380. LAUNCH YOUR BUSINESS: Designed to help business owners get off to a good beginning and develop a working plan. Pre-registration is required. The course combines four 1-hour daytime coaching sessions starting Oct. 8, with three Wednesday evening classes on Oct. 17, Oct. 31 and Nov. 14; $79; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7290.

THURSDAY Oct. 18 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL DESCHUTES BUSINESS NETWORKERS CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Starts at 7 a.m.; visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541-610-9125. BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WILDFIRE CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 3:30 p.m.; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541-480-1765.

FRIDAY Oct. 19 CENTRAL OREGON REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT CLUB: Free; 11 a.m.; ServiceMaster Clean, 20806 Sockeye Place, Bend; 541-610-4006 or bobbleile@windermere.com. FREE TAX FRIDAY: Free tax return reviews; schedule an appointment at 541-385-9666 or www.myzoomtax .com; free; 2-4 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666.

FRIDAY TUESDAY Oct. 12 DO’S AND DON’TS OF POWER PRESENTING: Inter-active early morning session with producer, director, speaker, and sportscaster, Alistair Paterson and his thoughts and ideas on the art of power presenting. Reservations encouraged; free; 7:30 a.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541389-0803 or www.bendchamber.org. CENTRAL OREGON REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT CLUB: Free; 11 a.m.; ServiceMaster Clean, 20806 Sockeye Place, Bend; 541-610-4006 or bobbleile@windermere.com. FREE TAX FRIDAY: Free tax return reviews; schedule an appointment at 541-385-9666 or www.myzoomtax .com; free; 2-4 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666.

MONDAY

SATURDAY

Oct. 15

Oct. 6

FORECLOSURE PREVENTION CLASS: Learn about NeighborImpact’s Housing Center tools and services which can assist individuals struggling to pay their mortgages; free; 5:30-7:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 2303 S.W. First St., Redmond; 541-318-7506, ext. 309, karenb@neighborimpact.org or www.homeownershipcenter.org.

OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain an alcohol server permit; registration required; $35; 9 a.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www

TUESDAY

Oct. 23 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL HIGH DESERT CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Starts at 7:15 a.m.; visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541-420-7377. SAVING AND INVESTING: Call 541318-7506 extension 309 to reserve a seat; 5:30-7:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 2303 S.W. First St., Redmond; 541-548-2380. HOW TO DEVELOP A BUSINESS PLAN: First-time business owners will learn how to evaluate their finances, target their market and present their ideas in a written business plan. Registration required, course continues Oct. 30; $59; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7290. HOW TO START A BUSINESS: Registration required; $15; 6-8 p.m.; La Pine Public Library, 16425 First St.; 541-383-7290. INTEGRATION, REVITALIZATION AND TRANSPORTATION, OPPORTUNITIES FOR A SMALL CITY CAMPUS: David C. Bagnoli, AIA, LEED AP, BD+C, McGraw Bagnoli Architects, will present; free; 7 p.m.; Bend Park & Recreation District Office, Community Room, 799 S.W. Columbia St.; 541-389-7275.

Is refinancing right for you? By Claudia Buck The Sacramento Bee

They’re knocking on the lender’s door. As mortgage rates have tumbled to all-time lows, demand for refinancing has fired up homeowners nationwide. And it’s not just those drowning in underwater mortgages. With rates for 30-year mortgages hovering below 4 percent since last October, all kinds of homeowners are trying to get their monthly mortgages reduced, say lenders and mortgage experts. “It’s huge. It’s buried our staff and every other lender in town,� said O.J. Vallejo, mortgage consultant with First Priority Financial in Sacramento, Calif., who said his three-person staff has been working six days a week for the past four months. Nationally, refinance volume “has been running at a three-year high in recent weeks, as mortgage rates remained extremely low,� Mike Fratantoni, vice president of research for the Washington, D.C.based National Mortgage Bankers Association, said in an email. “With refinances, the No. 1 driver is interest rates.� Along with months of record-breaking low interest rates, other factors are driving the refinancing boom: a competitive lending market and changes in some federal refinancing programs for struggling homeowners. It’s prompted many established homeowners with old-school, high-interest mortgages to decide it’s time to refi.

Why refi? Generally the primary reasons for refinancing a mortgage are to: • Lower monthly mortgage payments. • Eliminate the unpredictability of an adjustablerate mortgage by switching to a fixed rate. • Free up home equity cash for home improvements, college costs or other expenses. • Shorten the loan term, say from a 30- to a 15year mortgage, which can save thousands in interest payments. Saving money is usually the biggest incentive.

Should you refi? It’s a personal calculation that varies. Generally, homeowners should look at how long they plan to be in their current home and whether the upfront costs outweigh the monthly savings. “If you’re not going to be in your home another one or two years, you’re not going to recoup the closing costs,� said Greg McBride, senior financial analyst with Bankrate.com. “Everybody’s situation is different,� said mortgage consultant Vallejo. “There’s no right or wrong answer. The only answer is what works for your family.� Some couples who refinance are looking ahead to retirement. “Paying off the mortgage is now back in vogue,� Vallejo said, especially for those in their late 40s or 50s who want to be mortgage-free at retirement age. That doesn’t necessarily mean they’ll lower their monthly payment by refinancing. For example,

a couple with a $250,000, 30-year loan at 5.25 percent three years ago would have been paying about $1,380 a month. If they refinanced their current balance to a 20year, 3.5 percent loan today, their payments would increase slightly, to $1,405. “Their payment goes up $25, but they just took seven years off their mortgage,� said Vallejo. “That’s almost $116,000 in interest. That’s huge.� On the other hand, younger homeowners with kids might choose a 30-year mortgage when they refinance because they need the lower monthly cash flow to save for college or pay off debt. Or those with adjustable mortgages due to reset to higher rates may want to lock in single-digit rates.

What you’ll pay The mortgage rate you’ll be offered depends on numerous factors, including: your credit score, loan amount, loan-tovalue ratio, length of your loan term and type of home. Lots of mortgage ads promise “no-cost� loans. According to some lenders, that’s a misnomer. Typically, in a no-cost loan, all closing costs and pre-paid items (such as appraisal fees and credit checks) are paid by the lender and built into the interest rate.

Shop around It pays to compare quotes from several lenders because they offer different rates and fees. Start with your current lender or sit down with a local loan originator. You can also do refinance comparisons online, using mortgage calculators at sites like Bankrate. com or those of individual banks and lenders. Struggling homeowners can ask lenders about changes in the federal Home Affordable Refinance Program and FHA refinance programs that have made refinancing options more plentiful.

Good standing Be sure the lender is in good standing. Tom Pool, spokesman for the California Department of Real Estate, said state and federal licensing standards for mortgage originators are much stricter than they used to be, which “has weeded out most of the bad actors.� Pool recommends online searches at sites like the Better Business Bureau, at www.bbb.org, to see if the lender has been linked to bad practices or scams.

Is it too late? Even though interest rates have inched upward in the last month, it’s probably not too late. “It’s not worth losing any sleep over,� said Bankrate’s McBride. “Given the European debt crisis, (interest rates) can’t rise appreciably.� On the other hand, the national mortgage bankers group predicts mortgage interest rates will “drift slowly higher� next year, leading to significant declines in refinance activity. But that doesn’t mean refinancing is right for everyone. “It’s a significant financial transaction,� said Edward Achtner, an Oakland, Calif.based regional sales executive for Bank of America. “If buying a home is the largest transaction a consumer embarks upon, a refinance is a close second. Do the research, evaluate the different options. Take your time and do not be pressured into making any decisions.�

N  R

PERMITS Deschutes County

State of Oregon, 15800 La Pine

State Recreation Road, La Pine, $140,000 John W. Anderson, 21560 McGilvray Road, Bend, $267,507.04


HEALTH

Health Events, F2 People, F2 Money, F2

F

Fitness, F3 Medicine, F4-5 Nutrition, F6

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2012

www.bendbulletin.com/health

DETOX DOWNLOAD

St. Charles can look inside your arteries

Do juice cleanses do a body good? By Wendy Donahue Chicago Tribune

CHICAGO — Jennifer Lopez, Olivia Wilde and other celebs have testified about a banner crop of detox regimens that replace meals for a period of three or more days. These juice-based concoctions boast vitamins and other nutriNUTRITION ents. We figured even the least disciplined among us could handle a gateway cleanse. So we tested three, consisting of either perishable pre-mixed juices, which are v by FedEx on the day you are to begin, or dried fruit powders that you reconstitute with water or juice and therefore have a longer shelf life. Here’s a look at three experiences.

Relieve your

PAIN IN

Kaeng Raeng All Natural Detox Drink Level: Beginner Price: $69.99 excluding tax; kaengraeng.com and in select Whole Foods stores. Tester: Wendy Donahue The promise: “Jump-start weight loss, remove toxins, bolster immunity, improve digestion, enhance skin and hair quality, relieve bloating, reduce cravings and overeating.” The drill: Mix individual powder packet with 24 to 32 ounces of liquid as a meal replacement for three days. Mixing with yogurt, juice or nondairy milk is permitted. Beginners are allowed to snack on raw fruit and vegetables. Green tea is condoned, but not alcohol or caffeine. Taste: My first was a packet of strawberry-raspberry-pineapple at about 10 a.m. with 24 ounces of water. Hard to dissolve, but I like the chewy-powdery lumps. Not too sweet, not too earthy. It quells hunger and, being a serial snacker/sipper at work, I find it reassuring to reach for it over the course of a couple of hours. The mango-peach-pineapple mixed with water in the afternoon is less appetizing, with a split-pea soup color and wan flavor. Day 1: Higher frequency of bathroom breaks, but not embarrassingly intense. A few hours after starting the first drink, I’m feeling sleepy, and hunger is setting in, so I mix my second around 3 p.m. No headache has developed (I drank one cup of coffee that morning but usually have two). At 7:30 p.m. I arrive home famished to see a bowl of Quaker rice crisps on the counter. I cave, substituting these crisps for my third drink. Day 2: Customer support confirms that my choice of alternatives last night wasn’t advisable (particularly because of cheesy coating), but that the cleanse is not ruined. (Try raw cashews next time, I’m told.) See Juice / F6

THE NECK

By Breanna Hostbjor The Bulletin

What do the insides of your arteries look like? Your physician may now be able to find out. St. Charles Bend has purchased an ILUMIEN PCI OptimizaMEDICINE tion System, which allows physicians to use cutting-edge technology to diagnose patients with coronary artery disease. The system has two main components: A wireless tool that measures blood flow and the severity of artery blockages, and an imaging probe that provides high-resolution views of the inside of the artery. Together, these two pieces of information can guide physicians in deciding when and if to stent an artery. It can also determine if a stent — a narrow tube inserted into a blocked artery to hold it open — has been misplaced, potentially preventing a second cardiac event. See Arteries / F4

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Physical therapy aide Valerie Marshall demonstrates a traction device at Therapeutic Associates, Bend Physical Therapy. The device pulls the head upward from the neck to relieve pressure from the joints and the nerves.

An image of the inside of a “normal” coronary artery.

• Some sufferers can find relief simply by undoing bad posture habits By Anne Aurand • The Bulletin

I

t could have been work stress. It could have been the way she held her neck while sitting at the computer. It might have been exacerbated by carrying a heavy bag on the same side of her body all the time. One or all of these factors

added up to serious neck pain for Leah Schock in November. The 42-year-old psychologist in Bend said the tightness and ache on the right side of her neck, above her shoulder, radiated into the base of her head and triggered headaches. To address the pain, she had some massage therapy, which felt good, but she couldn’t afford one every week. Someone recommended a chiropractor whose treatFITNESS ments seem to have helped. She’s done some weight training to strengthen the muscles in her scapular area. She’s learned more about posture and has worked to pull her chin back and hold her shoulders back when she’s sitting or standing. She switches her heavy bag from her right shoulder to her left to balance things out. She started using a wireless headset so she wouldn’t have to hold her phone between her ear and her shoulder. It’s all added up to relief. “If my neck and my head feel good, I can focus better, my energy is better and I generally feel less stressed,” Schock said. Nearly three-quarters of all people experience neck pain at some point in their lives, according to a study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Most common problem areas in the neck The large upper trapezius muscle is where people tend to carry their stress. Levator scapula and the front scalenes are other common sources of pain, said Brian Timm, physical therapist and certified strength and conditioning specialist with Therapeutic Associates, Bend Physical Therapy.

Upper trapezius muscle Levator scapulae muscle

Courtesy St. Jude Medical

An image showing the inside of a coronary artery. Calcified plaque can be seen in the upper and lower left-hand side of the wall.

Companies set sights on MRSA vaccine By Ryan Flinn Bloomberg News

Front scalene muscles Sternal head muscle

Source: Therapeutic Associates, Bend Physical Therapy

It’s most frequent in office and computer workers. It’s also more prevalent in women than in men, in high-income countries more than low- or middleincome countries, and in urban areas more than rural. Dr. Brian Ragel, an assistant professor and neurosurgeon at

Greg Cross / The Bulletin

Oregon Health & Science University, said neck pain can be tough to pinpoint and solve. On rare occasions, neck pain can be symptomatic of dangerous infections around the spinal cord, or cancers or cervical discs pinching a nerve. See Neck / F3

SAN FRANCISCO — A new wave of experimental vaccines is the medical community’s latest hope against MONEY a powerful staph infection that kills more people in the United States than skin cancer and costs as much as $8 billion a year to treat. Pfizer and GlaxoSmithKline, two of the world’s biggest drugmakers, and NovaDigm Therapeutics Inc., a closely held biotechnology company, are each testing novel vaccines to halt methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, or MRSA, long a dangerous infection in hospitals and nursing homes and which is now increasingly finding its way into day care centers, schools and prisons. See Vaccines / F2

HEALTH HIGHLIGHTS MONEY: Chronic pain is a costly condition in the U.S., F2

FITNESS: Poll shows Americans’ top health concerns for kids, F3

MEDICINE: Can common drugs prevent strokes and heart attacks? F4

NUTRITION: Menu labeling may result in healthier offerings, F6


F2

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2012

H E  Editor’s note: Ongoing support groups now appear online only. See www.bendbulletin. com/supportgroups. To submit an entry for either list, see instructions below.

FLU SHOTS FLU SHOT CLINIC: Administered by HealthWise to benefit Healthy Beginnings, for ages 9 and older; $25, with health insurance billing options; noon-6 p.m. Friday; Ray’s Food Place, 635 N. Arrowleaf Trail, Sisters; www.myhb.org.

CLASSES COMMUNITY HEALTH EXPO: Health fair featuring local agencies and organizations, screenings and flu shots; free admission; 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Wednesday; Sunriver Homeowners Aquatic & Recreation Center (SHARC), 57250 Overlook Road; www.sunriver chamber.com or 541-593-8149. LUNCH AND LEARN: Learn about the “Top 10 Nutritional Mistakesâ€? from therapeutic nutritionist Hector Perez; free, registration requested; noon-1 p.m. Wednesday; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; www .bendparksandrec.org/senior_center/ or 541-388-1133. MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS PRESENTATION: Neurologist Gareth Parry speaks on “If I Knew ‌ Is It Me or My MS?â€?; dinner provided; free; 3-6 p.m. Wednesday; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; www.event.ms lifelines.com or 1-877-969-1722.

How to submit Health Events: Email event information to healthevents@ bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� at www .bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing class listings must be updated monthly and will appear at www.bendbulletin .com/healthclasses. Contact: 541-383-0358. People: Email info about local people involved in health issues to healthevents@ bendbulletin.com. Contact: 541-383-0358.

P  Dr. Audrey Davey has joined the staff of Bend Memorial Clinic’s east-side clinic family medicine department. Davey is a former employee of Highland Care Center Nursing Home. Davey She is a graduate of Wayne State University School of Medicine in Detroit, Mich. Davey completed her residency at Utah Healthcare Institute, St. Mark’s Hospital. Andy Emerson has been appointed the clinic manager of Rebound Physical Therapy’s La Pine clinic. Emerson is a graduate of the University of Emerson Washington and the University of Rhode Island, and attended the North American Institute of Manual Therapy. He is a certified clinical instructor through the American Physical Therapy Association and is a board certified Orthopedic Clinical Specialist. Surgeons at Redmond-based Surgical Associates of the Cascades will become employed by St. Charles Medical Group on Jan. 1. The physicians include Drs. Jack Hartley, John Land, George Tsai and Ngocthuy Hughes. SAC surgeons operate at St. Charles Bend and Redmond as well as Mountain View Hospital in Madras.

D   Central Oregon Community College’s Massage Therapy program will be offering student massages to the public during the 2012 fall term in the Health Career Center. The center charges $15 for one-hour sessions, and massages will be offered today through Nov. 30. Call 541-318-3756 to book an appointment and for more information. Struble Orthodontics recently moved to a location at High Lakes Medical Center, 929 S.W. Simpson Ave., Bend.

M Chronic pain costs up to $635B a year Economists at Johns Hopkins University have published a study in The Journal of Pain that calculates the annual costs of chronic pain. Researchers estimated that chronic pain costs up to $635 billion each year in the United States, which would make it more expensive than cancer, heart disease and diabetes. The study’s authors defined pain sufferers as those whose pain or a disability limited their ability to work, or had arthritis or joint pain. The data only considered those ages 18 and older who were not institutionalized, were civilians, and were not caregivers who might miss work to care for a loved one. The total was derived by assessing the incremental costs to health care that pain cause and the indirect costs caused by lowered worker productivity. The health care costs of people who reported chronic pain were then weighed against the costs of those who did not report it. The study revealed that average

Vaccines Continued from F1 The vaccines are in early studies and years away from possible approval. Two other drug companies have already tried and failed to make an effective vaccine, most recently Merck & Co. in 2011. Still, as infections spread, doctors are eager for a vaccine that works. “It’s very clear we need a vaccine, and we need it soon,� said Robert Daum, a pediatrics professor at the University of Chicago and principal investigator at the school’s MRSA Research Center, in a telephone interview. “The challenge is, we don’t really know what makes people immune to staph infections.�

Ineffective treatments Mostly benign Staphylococcus aureus bacteria live widely on people’s skin and in their nasal passages. About 1 percent of those with the bacteria carry MRSA, a toxic form of the illness that enters the bloodstream and is resistant to most treatments. MRSA, which kills more than 11,400 Americans a year, can enter the body through a cut, a sore, a catheter or a breathing tube. Once infected, patients are typically treated with powerful antibiotics. The more these therapies are used, though, the more likely it is that the bacteria will develop resistance to them as well. “Are they optimal? No,� said Frank Lowy, a pathology professor at Columbia University in New York, in a telephone interview. Thus the need for an effective vaccine. Each of the experimental vaccines being developed take a different tack toward their goal of snuffing out the bacteria. Pfizer’s and Glaxo’s products attack on several biological fronts at once, following the model of HIV drug cocktails, while NovaDigm’s sparks an immune system response to kill the bug before it enters the body. In hospitals, a vaccine would be used for patients going into surgery or those with compromised immune systems, Daum said. Beyond hospitals, people could get routine vaccinations to help protect them against proliferating staph bacteria in places like day care centers for children and gym locker rooms.

A ‘secret and silent killer’ For Jeanine Thomas, a vaccine could have prevented years of suffering. The Chicago-based former marketing executive and avid tennis player slipped on ice and broke her ankle in December 2000. During surgery to repair the joint Thomas was infected with MRSA, leading to months of complications, organ failure and near death, she said in an interview. “People don’t see this as an immediate threat to them,� Thomas, who founded the advocacy group MRSA Survivors Network in 2003, said in an interview. “But it’s a secret and silent killer.� Daum, a pediatrician who was one of the first doctors to identify MRSA’s growth in hospitals and the community

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health care costs are $4,475 each year. People who reported moderate pain had costs that were double that of the painfree group, paying an additional $4,516 each year. Those reporting severe pain added an additional $3,210 to the costs of those who suffered moderate pain. The authors of the study concluded that pain caused totals of $261 billion to $300 billion to health care, and an additional $299 billion to $334 billion in lost productivity. — Breanna Hostbjor, The Bulletin

in a 1998 report in the Journal of the American Medical Association, has said that if such a vaccine could be made to work, it should become part of the regular pediatric vaccine schedule. Even without a vaccine, better awareness and prevention efforts have helped reduce the amount of invasive MRSA in hospitals and other acute-care facilities in the U.S. by 20 percent, to 67,000 cases in 2010 from 82,000 in 2007-2008, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

A growing problem The greater problem now is in public places beyond hospital doors. Incidences of staph in the community, which first appear as skin infections, “increased rapidly during the past decade� to about 13,800 cases in 2010 and are likely to keep rising, according to the Atlantabased agency. MRSA kills more than 11,400 Americans a year, according to the CDC’s 2010 report, compared with about 9,200 who die annually from melanoma, the most serious form of skin cancer. The spread of staph infections is a global concern, and thus a potential global market for any successful vaccine. In Europe, for example, infections are spreading, said Carmen Pessoa da Silva, a London-based medical officer with the World Health Organization. “We are really facing a very rapid increase in these figures, and this is a reason for concern for all of us,� she said in an interview.

Research under way The new vaccines from New York-based Pfizer, London-based Glaxo and NovaDigm Therapeutics, in Grand Forks, N.D., are in the first phases of a three-step system of research required for U.S. marketing approval. While the earliest testing is primarily designed to check safety, it often provides clues about a treatment’s effectiveness. Typically, it takes years to complete all three test stages, and many fail. Pfizer has two vaccines in early trials, one an updated version of the original, said Emilio Emini, the drugmaker’s chief scientific officer for vaccine research. The hope is that these treatments will spur action by either three or four separate antigens in the body, substances that activate immune system cells that are part of the body’s natural defenses against outside invaders. Results from the Phase 1 study of the three-antigen compound will be presented next month at the Infectious Diseases Society of America meeting in San Diego, while a Phase 2 study of the fourantigen vaccine may be reported next year. The “feeling in the field right now is that a vaccine that’s driven to one specific immunological target is probably going to be insufficient,� Emini, based in Collegeville, Pa., said in a telephone interview. While he declined to estimate the potential market size for an approved vaccine, he said the company’s focus

Health insurance spending grows at faster pace as cost of care rises U.S. spending on health insurance grew at an accelerated rate in 2011, breaking a two-year trend of smaller cost increases. The culprit, a new study suggests, is not Americans seeking more treatment but rather rapid growth in the price of medical care. Spending for private health insurance surged by 4.6 percent in 2011, according to a report from the Health Care Cost Institute. That growth rate is faster than the rest of the economy and higher than the previous year, which had 3.8 percent growth. Average spending on a private insurance patient rose to $4,547 in 2011, compared with $4,349 in 2010. That statistic suggests that a recent downturn in health-care spending may have been a temporary product of the recession rather than a more permanent change, as some health-care economists have hoped. “We don’t know yet whether this is a

now is to target hospitalbased infections. GlaxoSmithKline is also evaluating a four-component vaccine, Melinda Stubbee, a spokeswoman for the company, said in an email. The drugmaker has completed its first-stage trial and is evaluating the results, Stubbee said. She declined to give a time line for further development steps. The experimental product from NovaDigm Therapeutics, aims to spur patients’ immune systems to recognize MRSA infection on the skin, before it spreads within the body, and send out T cells, Chief Executive Officer Tim Cooke said during an interview. Two Phase 1 trials showed the therapy, dubbed NDV-3, was safe in humans, he said, and earlier studies in mice found it created a protective layer of white blood cells around a skin wound infected with MRSA. Mice without the vaccine had infections spread deeper into the skin level, he said. “We have had really excellent immune responses.� Other scientists are working on alternative solutions that wouldn’t require a vaccine. Menachem Shoham, an associate professor of biochemistry at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio, is attempting to outwit the bacteria rather than kill it by ending its ability to create the poisonous toxins it produces. The research doesn’t seek to “wipe out the bugs, just disarm them of their deadly weapons,� he said. Resistance occurs when drugs fall short in their drive to eliminate diseases, giving weakened or leftover cells the chance to adapt biologically in ways that allow them to continue their growth. “Since the survival of the bugs isn’t threatened by our approach the likelihood of resistance development is small,� Shoham said.

one-off year aberration or a resumption of patterns of higher growth,� said Health Care Cost Institute Director David Newman. “We just don’t know. When you have one data point, you’re cautious.� The Health Care Cost Institute used data from 40 million Americans with private insurance provided by health plans such as Aetna and Kaiser Permanente. The research does not include data on public insurance programs, such as Medicare and Medicaid, which the federal government will make available in early 2013. Employers typically have tried to control costs by reducing the volume of care delivered, whether that means higher copays for doctor visits or using prevention to catch costly diseases earlier. Those efforts, this report suggests, have succeeded: Inpatient admissions to hospitals actually declined by 0.5 percent between 2010 and 2011. — Sarah Kliff, The Washington Post

Tax penalty will hit nearly 6 million people By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Nearly 6 million Americans — significantly more than first estimated— will face a tax penalty under President Barack Obama’s health overhaul for not getting insurance, congressional analysts said last week. Most would be in the middle class. The new estimate amounts to an inconvenient fact for the administration, a reminder of what critics see as broken promises. The numbers from the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office are 50 percent higher than a previous projection by the same office in 2010, shortly after the law passed. The earlier estimate found 4 million people would be affected in 2016, when the penalty is fully in effect. That’s still only a sliver of the population, given that more than 150 million people currently are covered by employer plans. Nonetheless, in his first campaign for the White House, Obama pledged not to raise taxes on individuals making less than $200,000 a year and couples making less than $250,000. And the budget office analysis found that nearly 80 percent of those who’ll face the penalty would be making up to or less than five times the federal poverty level. Currently that would work out to $55,850 or less for an individual and $115,250 or less for a family of four. Average penalty: about $1,200 in 2016. “The bad news and broken promises from Obamacare just keep piling up,� said Rep. Dave Camp, R-Mich., chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee, who wants to repeal the law. Starting in 2014, virtually every legal resident of the

U.S. will be required to carry health insurance or face a tax penalty, with exemptions for financial hardship, religious objections and certain other circumstances. Most people will not have to worry about the requirement since they already have coverage through employers, government programs like Medicare or by buying their own policies. A spokeswoman for the Obama administration said 98 percent of Americans will not be affected by the tax penalty — and suggested that those who will be should face up to their civic responsibilities. “This (analysis) doesn’t change the basic fact that the individual responsibility policy will only affect people who can afford health care but choose not to buy it,� said Erin Shields Britt of the Health and Human Services Department. “We’re no longer going to subsidize the care of those who can afford to buy insurance but make a choice not to buy it.� The budget office said most of the increase in its estimate is due to changes in underlying projections about the economy, incorporating the effects of new federal legislation, as well as higher unemployment and lower wages. The Supreme Court upheld Obama’s law as constitutional in a 5-4 decision this summer, finding that the insurance mandate and the tax penalty enforcing it fall within the power of Congress to impose taxes. The penalty will be collected by the IRS, just like taxes. The budget office said the penalty will raise $6.9 billion in 2016. The new law will also provide government aid to help middle-class and low-income households afford coverage, the financial carrot that balances out the penalty.

“Aussie Aussie Aussie, Oi Oi Oi� Rebound is happy to announce the return of

Chris Vergona, PT! Call or stop by Rebound Westside to schedule your visit.

541-322-9045 West Bend Clinic: 1160 SW Simpson Ave.


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

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F POLL Concerns for kids: obesity, exercise A nationwide poll of adults ranked lack of exercise and obesity as top health concerns for children in 2012. In the sixth annual University of Michigan C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital National Poll on Children’s Health, not enough exercise was rated at the top of the list (39 percent), followed closely by childhood obesity (38 percent). Subsequent results were: • Smoking and tobacco use (34 percent) • Drug abuse (33 percent) • Bullying (29 percent) • Stress (27 percent) • Alcohol abuse (23 percent) • Teen pregnancy (23 percent) • Internet safety (22 percent) • Child abuse and neglect (20 percent) — Anne Aurand, The Bulletin

A soft alternative to iron dumbbells An iron dumbbell certainly works the muscles, but it might also break the toes. One alternative is the Sandbell, which can be lifted, tossed or slammed. Sandbells are Neoprene-filled disks made to weigh 2 to 50 pounds. They are used in many school districts, including Miami, Los Angeles and Dallas, said Jordan Pratt, marketing manager for the Sandbell maker, Hyperwear Inc. She was showing them off at a recent expo for fitness instructors. “They inspire creativity, which sounds cliched, but you can do anything with them. You can drop them, and I’m not going to hurt myself. They’re not as intimidating as regular iron dumbbells,” Pratt says. And, she says, since they’re pliable, they provide good exercise for the hands. Eight fluid ounces of sand weighs a pound, and Sandbells can be purchased empty, from $7.99 to $85.99. www.hyperwear.com/ discover/sandbell.html/ — Mary MacVean, Los Angeles Times

Exercise may have long-term effects on stress

Neck Continued from F1 But most of the time, neck pain is from lifestyle habits. In those cases, chiropractic manipulation, massage, physical therapy and injections of local anesthetic and steroids are often useful. “You don’t know what’s hurting so you try these treatments and hopefully it helps,” Ragel said.

Causes Where exactly the pain manifests in the neck region and why can vary, and in many cases, may never fully be known. Common neck pains frequently start in the upper trapezius muscles, which are on the top of the shoulders and into the neck, but aches appear in other muscles, too, said Brian Timm, a physical therapist and certified strength and conditioning specialist with Therapeutic Associates, Bend Physical Therapy. Sometimes the problem might be in one of the joints, such as the facet joints between vertebrae, and not in the muscles. Poor posture and personal stress are common causes of neck area muscle tension and pain, Timm said. Working at a computer too much rises to the top of the blame list. Slouching — on couches or in La-Z-Boy chairs, while playing video games or watching TV — is close behind. In some people, it’s stress-induced teeth clenching or grinding that creates muscle tension in the jaw and neck region. Chronic craning or bending of the neck can create pain, too. That could come from how a person sleeps, so pillow size and selection is important. Or, a ceiling painter, for example, would be likely to flex his or her neck too much, too. Of course, those who have had some sort of trauma, such as a car crash injury, are prone to it. The trauma, or whiplash, could tear muscles or ligaments or even fracture a joint. And finally, there’s a variety of spinal disc problems that could create neck pain. For example, a person could herniate a disc by lifting something too heavy, he said, or could just have some disc degeneration.

Prevention Some of these problems can be avoided. “A lot of (prevention) is strengthening and postural education and stretching,” Timm said. Resistance exercises can be done at home to strengthen the neck, shoulder, jaw and upper back. (See photos above for demonstrations.) A conscious effort at improving posture can help, too. “We tend to round forward, our heads forward,” he said. For office workers, the way the computer is set up is crucial. The computer screen should be straight ahead at a height that doesn’t require the head to tip up or down. People who put their computer monitors to the side are especially prone to neck problems. “I tell people not to sit at a

By Meredith Cohn The Baltimore Sun

Photos by Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Brian Timm, a physical therapist, and Valerie Marshall, a physical therapy aide, demonstrate an exercise that people should do at home to strengthen their neck muscles and prevent common pain at Therapeutic Associates, Bend Physical Therapy.

computer for more than one hour,” he said. Change positions and stretch frequently. Stretch the arms forward and overhead. Gently rotate the head and press each ear toward the shoulder periodically. Consider your choice of pillow, he said. Timm doesn’t advise bouncy foam rubber pillows but does recommend memory foam or feather pillows. Whether someone uses a contoured pillow — one that has an additional roll under the neck and an indentation under the head — is each person’s personal preference, but Timm often recommends patients try one. They can support the neck so the head is not cranked at an awkward angle. Stomach sleepers might not be able to tolerate that shape of a contoured pillow and might need to try a feather pillow, he suggested. A Harvard Medical School HEALTHbeat newsletter article about neck pain recommended people try sleeping on their sides or their backs to prevent neck pain. “Sleeping on your stomach is tough on your spine, because the back is arched and your neck is turned to the side,” the article said.

Treatments Usual treatments for acute and less-intense neck pain include medication such as painkillers or anti-inflammatory drugs, spinal manipulation from a chiropractor, physical therapist or osteopath, or exercises. Medication does not appear to be the best treatment, according to the study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine in January.

We would like to announce that Dr. Eric Shreve has joined our team.

WELCOME Dr. Eric Shreve

Dr Shreve grew up in Cincinnati. After completing his undergraduate degree at Wabash College in Indiana, he completed his Medical Degree at University of Cincinnati. He performed a general surgery internship at University of Louisville and then finished his Urology Residency at University of Cincinnati. While at the University of Iowa, he trained in a fellowship program for reconstructive urologic surgery. He has specialized training in DaVinci robotic surgery as well as prosthetics and incontinence.

For appointments call 541-382-6447

Dr Shreve is currently seeing patients in Bend and Redmond.

The researchers wanted to know which method was the most effective: medication, spinal manipulation or exercise. They randomly divided 272 adults with neck pain that lasted between two weeks and three months into three groups. The first group received spinal manipulation from experienced chiropractors, the second received pain medications from a medical doctor and the third saw therapists to learn about home exercises. Each treatment lasted 12 weeks and researchers measured participants’ pain before, during and after the treatments. Researchers found that the spinal manipulation — chiropractic treatments — were better at relieving neck pain than medication after 12 weeks of treatment and at a one-year follow-up. Participants who did home exercises experienced improvements similar to those who had manipulation treatments. “Participants who received

medication seemed to fare worse, with a consistently higher use of pain medication for neck pain throughout the trial’s observation period. The performance of the (home exercise) group, which has the potential for cost savings over both (spinal manipulation therapy) and medication interventions, is noteworthy,” authors wrote in the discussion of the study. The study was funded by the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, which is part of the National Institutes of Health. Timm said physical therapists typically try soft tissue and joint mobilization, which feels like a pleasant massage. Therapists also perform “traction” for relieving pain from herniated discs, degenerative disc disease or joint degeneration. Either manually or with a small traction device, the process involves pulling the head upward from the neck to relieve pressure from the joints and the nerves. Treatments last 15 to 30 minutes but have long-lasting effects, Timm said. Other ways to treat neck pain include electrical nerve stimulation or injections of anesthetics or steroid into a joint, Timm said, but those are not usually first-line treatments. — Reporter: 541-383-0304, aaurand@bendbulletin.com

Those who exercise may already recognize that it immediately reduces their stress. But it may also help keep anxiety at bay well after the exertion, new research from the University of Maryland School of Public Health suggests. A period of moderate exercise and a period of rest both lowered stress shortly afterward, according to the study lead by J. Carson Smith, assistant professor in the Department of Kinesiology. But only those who exercised experience prolonged stress relief. The study was published in the journal Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. “While it is well-known that exercise improves mood, among other benefits, not as much is known about the potency of exercise’s impact on emotional state and whether these positive effects endure when we’re faced with everyday stressors once we leave the gym,” Smith said in a statement. “We found that exercise helps to buffer the effects of emotional exposure. If you exercise, you’ll not only reduce your anxiety, but you’ll be better able to maintain that reduced anxiety when confronted with emotional events.” Smith tested healthy college students by having them exercise or rest and testing their anxiety state before, shortly afterward and after exposing them to pleasant and unpleasant photographs. The students answered questions about their state of mind. Anxiety levels returned for those who had only rested after about 20 minutes.


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THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2012

M RESEARCH Study will look at common drugs The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute is funding a trial to determine whether taking a common antiinflammatory drug can help prevent heart attacks, strokes and other deaths due to cardiovascular disease, according to the National Institutes of Health. Patients in the study, which will begin in March, will have had a heart attack in the past five years in addition to having Type 2 diabetes or metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome is often present in those with Type 2 diabetes, and comprises a cluster of traits including high blood pressure, a large waistline, high blood triglyceride levels, high blood sugar and low levels of HDL (good) cholesterol. People with diabetes and metabolic syndrome usually display markers of inflammation and elevated blood levels, and they are much more likely to die from heart disease. The study will test whether the anti-inflammatory medication methotrexate will reduce patients’ rates of cardiovascular events. Methotrexate is a generic anti-inflammatory drug commonly used to treat rheumatoid arthritis and, in higher doses, certain forms of cancer. — Breanna Hostbjor, The Bulletin

Pain-free injection method found For the needle adverse, there is good news. Researchers may have found a way to inject medications and vaccines without the ouch. A new laser-based system can blast microscopic jets of drugs into the skin. It’s the same type of laser used by dermatologists on facial treatments, called an erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet, or Er:YAG, laser. The device was developed by Jack Yoh, professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at Seoul National University in South Korea, and his graduate students. The injector is described in the Optical Society’s journal Optics Letters. The laser is attached to an adaptor containing the liquid drug. A membrane separates it from another chamber filled with water. Laser pulses lasting 250 millionths of a second generate a vapor bubble in the water, and the pressure of the bubble forces the drug to be ejected through a nozzle the size of a human hair. “The impacting jet pressure is higher than the skin tensile strength and thus causes the jet to smoothly penetrate into the targeted depth underneath the skin, without any splashback of the drug,” Yoh said in a statement. Tests on guinea pigs showed the jet can penetrate several millimeters under the skin without harming the tissue and with little or no pain. The researchers said this method is superior to past attempts by others to create injectors because it’s got better jet strength and drug dosage control. There’s no word on when it may be available for humans. — By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun

Airport security can be tricky Sleepwalking affects for those with medical issues millions every year By Key Kaye Sun Sentinel

The bustling holiday season is around the corner and for many airline passengers, it brings tidings of discomfort along with the joy. Their dilemma: How to get through airport security without setting off alarms or having needed medications confiscated. To help, the Transportation Security Administration last year created a consumer hotline specifically for medical issues. It averages about 700 inquiries a week. Here are some of the most common questions the agency’s hotline receives. If I have an internal Q: medical device, be it a pacemaker or a knee replacement, do I have to go through a body scanner or a metal detector? No. Any passenger may request a pat-down instead, but it will be thorough. Those who go through a scanner must be able to stand still with arms raised for 5 to 7 seconds without the support of a person or device. If you are instructed to go through

A:

a metal detector, you can request a body scanner instead.

Before coming to the airA: port, fill out a notification card and hand it to officers at

Q:

the checkpoint. The card can be found at: www.tsa.gov/ assets/pdf/disability_notifica tion_cards.pdf

What if I have a pacemaker and want to avoid going through an X-ray machine? Some travelers have been instructed by their doctors to avoid X-ray machines, as they could affect the pacemaker’s magnetic calibration. The TSA recommends you show your Pacemaker Identification Card to an officer and ask for a pat-down.

A:

What if I have an imQ: plant and want to avoid alarms? Before entering a body A: scanner or metal detector, tell security officers where the implant is located. The officers will offer — or you can request — a private screening. If your implant does set off alarms, you most likely will be given a pat-down but you won’t be required to remove or lift your clothing. What if I would prefer Q: not to tell security officers about my condition in front of other passengers?

What if I want to take Q: prescription medicines or medical supplies through security? All medications and supplies must be screened, normally by an X-ray machine. However, you can request a visual inspection; place medications and supplies in a separate pouch and hand it to a security officer as you approach a metal detector. You then will be asked to display and repack the medications, which do not need to be labeled.

A:

What if I have a hidden Q: disability and either need assistance or move slower than others? Advise a security officer. You can request a private screening, and you can be accompanied by a companion. You also can request to sit down during the screening process.

A:

Arteries Continued from F1

How it works In order to measure vessels, physicians insert a catheter into the arm or groin and a probe is threaded up through the artery. The wireless probe feeds information back to a main console, which provides nearly instant measurements. “The artery is imaged by the OCT (optical coherence tomography) catheter in less than five seconds; the robust software processes the data immediately,” St. Jude Medical, the company which manufactures the ILUMIEN, said in a news release. The imaging catheter uses near-infrared light to capture images of the inside of veins, and the result is a detailed image that the physician can see on the machine’s console. “They make beautiful highresolution pictures,” said Dr. Saurabh Gupta, a physician at Oregon Health & Science University. And because the technology is wireless, he said, it creates a less cluttered environment for the physician while the procedure is in progress.

How it’s used While St. Charles sometimes uses the ILUMIEN to find lesions and blockages in arteries, the system is mainly employed to view stents that have already been placed, according to Anna Mouser, the cardiovascular and IR labs clinical supervisor at St. Charles Bend. “If the stent … isn’t apposed to the artery wall, it increases the risk later on that stent might reclot and cause a heart attack,” said Mouser. Using the ILUMIEN to view how a stent is placed, and to check that it is snug against the artery wall, can ensure that stents are effectively propping arteries open. “If we can do a better job with this technology and keep a patient from having to come back and have this procedure redone, we’re providing better care at a lower cost,” said Karen Doolan, the manager of cardiovascular services at St. Charles, in a press release. Because the machine takes such high resolution images, Mouser also noted, it can show physicians where ruptures have taken place and where clots have formed in addition to plaque morphology, or appearance, and the type of tissues present in the vessel wall. All of these details not only aid a cardiologist in determining where or if to place a stent, they provide information that can guide treatment going forward.

Different technology This level of imaging is not just new to St. Charles. Ac-

By Leslie Barker The Dallas Morning News

Sleepwalking tends to conjure up thoughts of Lady Macbeth or of zombie-gaited kids with outstretched arms trying to fool friends at slumber parties. But sleepwalking is very real, and not just among fictional characters and children. “One-third of the U.S. adult population has experienced it,” says Maurice Ohayon, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine, whose study on sleepwalking appeared in the journal Neurology this spring. The percentage of adults who have sleepwalked in the last year — 3.6 — may not sound like that much. But that’s 8.5 million people. About 1 percent of Americans — 2.5 million — have two or more sleepwalking episodes in a month. “Sleepwalking is a phenomenon that is very, very interesting,” says Ohayon, who conducted a sleepwalking study in Europe 10 years ago. “We know it’s a constant in all the general population, about 3.4 percent.” The recent sleepwalking study, the first such extensive study done in the United States, involved more than 19,000 people from 15 states. About one-third reported family members who also sleepwalked. Typically, says Ryan Hays of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, sleepwalking occurs in the first few hours of sleep, the first half of the night. “The bed partner or the parent describes the person sitting up in bed, eyes open, with a goal-oriented task,” says Hays, assistant professor of neurology. “They’re not conscious, but the part of the body that controls movements is awake.” The part of the brain that

forms new memories is still asleep, he says, so sleepwalkers generally have no recollection of their nocturnal wanderings. They know they sleepwalk though, because someone tells them, or they find proof the next day. One of Ohayon’s patients, for instance, woke up to find his apartment “devastated.” He thought someone had broken in, but nothing was missing. So who are these sleepwalkers? They’re equally men and women of all ages, though episodes decrease as people get older. People who suffer from depression are 3.5 times more likely to sleepwalk than those who don’t. “Generally speaking, it’s linked with sleep-deprivation, insomnia, some problem of depression or anxiety,” Ohayon says. “People must be aware that some medications, like over-thecounter to go against the flu, for instance, have agents that can trigger an episode of sleepwalking.” There’s also an association with alcohol, he says, and for people taking antidepressants. “These are only triggers,” he says. “It doesn’t mean this medication is the cause.” One of his patients, a woman in her early 30s, reported going to sleep in her bed and waking up in her garden. “We learned she was sleep-deprived,” Ohayon says. “She had a sleepwalking episode three times per month, which was pretty frequent. It was linked with a bad situation at work.” He wants to stress that sleepwalking “is not a disease, it’s not a disorder. “It’s a problem of safety, it’s only that. You are not to feel ashamed if you have it. What’s disturbing and could be dangerous is when it’s happening often, because you’re exposing yourself to more and more risk. The risk is a problem of safety.”

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Hugh Adair stands by the new ILUMIEN device at St. Charles Bend. Adair is one of four doctors from the Heart Center Cardiology group that uses the device.

cording to the hospital, it is the first in Oregon to use the device. “It’s new technology that’s exciting,” said Gupta. And as hospitals gain more experience with the technology, he expects that it will become more widespread. “I feel excited about it,” he said. “We’ll likely look forward to getting it at OHSU.” Prior to using ILUMIEN, St. Charles used intravascular ultrasound, or IVUS technology, to examine veins. This imaging uses sound waves to capture images at approximately 10 times lower resolution than ILUMIEN. The ILUMIEN also provides

measurements of blood flow in the vein, which IVUS technology typically does not. And since these measurements can be important in determining whether stents are necessary or not, according to Gupta, this is an important tool in the physician’s arsenal. The high-resolution imaging is also a step forward, since it potentially allows physicians to gather more information. “We pretty typically can see (ruptures) on our (IVUS) imaging, but every now and then there’s one that you might not see,” said Mouser. “This helps us with that.” — Reporter: 541-383-0375, bhostbjor@bendbulletin.com

Congratulations Dr. Tom Comerford Dr. Tom Comerford, Bend’s first Radiation Oncologist and founder of St Charles Cancer Center, is retiring after 30 years of dedicated service to our community! We would love to have you share your warm wishes and fond memories as he embarks on the next phase of his life. Please send your messages to: Linyee Chang, St. Charles Cancer Center 2500 NE Neff Road, Bend, OR 97701 lchang@stcharleshealthcare.org, fax: 541-706-6341

These Dentists are offering 1/2 price teeth whitening (normally $400) during the month of October: Dr. Marci Aplin-Scott Dr. Carlo Arredondo Dr. David Cauble Dr. Jade Cherrington Dr. Edward Clark Dr. Karen Coe Dr. Yoli DiGiulio Dr. Blake Drew Dr. Andy Engel Dr. Matt Engel Dr. Greg Everson Dr. Matt Falkenstein Dr. David Fuller Dr. Greg Ginsburg Dr. Janell Ginsburg Dr. Ben Grieb Dr. Bill Guy Dr. James Hammett Dr. Brad Hester Dr. Max Higbee

Dr. Dennis Holly Dr. Bradley Johnson Dr. Jeff Johnson Dr. Mark Keener Dr. Christopher Keldsen Dr. Tran Miller Dr. Robert Moss Dr. Maureen Porter Dr. Zack Porter Dr. Tom Rheuben Dr. Mehdi Salari Dr. Stephen Schwam Dr. Ken Shirtcliff Dr. Marika Stone Dr. Andy Timm Dr. Jeff Timm Dr. Ryan Timm Dr. Steve Timm Dr. John Wiley

Call today to schedule your October appointment! These dentists and their offices are donating their time to the Kemple Smile Campaign.

Don’t see your dentist? Contact their office or Vickie @ 541/617-1653 to see if they are participating


M EDICI N E

MEDICAL MYSTERY

Unexplained pain in woman’s mouth takes a toll on her life By Sandra G. Boodman Special to The Washington Post

The 80th birthday party for Josephine van Es marked two milestones, only one of which was apparent at the time. Held in November 2004 at her daughter’s house in Rehoboth Beach, Del., the event was a celebration of her longevity, good health and loving family. It also marked one of the last times van Es can remember feeling well and not beset by the pain that developed soon afterward and has left the inside of her mouth feeling perpetually scalded and with a constant metallic taste. “It’s awful,” said van Es, 87, who says the burning is worse than the taste, which she likens to “sucking on a penny.” Her daughter Karen van Es says that her mother’s problem has taken a toll on both their lives. For nearly eight years, she has taken time from her job at a Northern Virginia veterinary clinic to ferry her mother, who lives independently in a condominium in Lewes, Del., to doctors in Delaware, Philadelphia and Washington. She also has contacted specialists in Florida and Canada hoping one would propose an effective remedy for an ailment that took more than a year to diagnose and has so far eluded treatment. “She tells me, ‘I just feel rotten all the time,’ “ said Karen van Es, 63, an only child who speaks to her mother every day and sees her often. “My mother has lost confidence as a result of this,” Karen van Es said, adding that she often feels helpless and frustrated about not being able to do more. “She’s got a strong heart, good blood pressure and she’s mentally sharp as a tack. But it’s just slowly eating her away.”

Searching for answers In January 2005, when Josephine van Es — the name is pronounced “van-ess” — mentioned the metallic taste and burning sensation to her internist, “he looked at me like I had three heads,” she recalled. Because the problem seemed to start with a burning in the back of her throat, the doctor suspected gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), and referred her to a gastroenterologist. He concurred and prescribed medicine. But the anti-reflux drug did nothing to ease the pain or diminish the metallic taste, which were sometimes accompanied by severe nausea. An endoscopy performed by the gastroenterologist a few months later ruled out GERD. Perhaps, Karen van Es thought, the problem wasn’t medical but dental. In addition to the burning and bad taste, Josephine van Es noticed that her mouth seemed unusually dry. After a thorough dental exam found nothing, her dentist suggested she use a rinse to alleviate dry mouth and sip water frequently. Neither helped. “To put it bluntly, it’s a b----,” she said, adding that she grew increasingly desperate about her situation. She had survived cancer — her thyroid was removed when she was in her 30s — and had lost most of her sense of smell after a severe case of flu about 40 years ago. But nothing had prepared her for this. In 2006, an ear, nose and throat specialist noted that except for a slightly swollen tongue, he couldn’t find anything wrong. He recommended further testing for Sjogren’s syndrome, an immune-system disorder that causes dry mouth, as well as for Lyme disease and rheumatoid arthritis, which can accompany Sjogren’s. Tests for all were negative. Because van Es had lost more than 20 pounds, her internist ordered abdominal and pelvic CT scans to check for a tumor, as well as an MRI scan of her brain. All were clear. The MRI found only “relatively subtle evidence” of sinus disease “of doubtful significance,” according to the radiologist’s report. Van Es was determined to keep looking for something that might help her mother. “I was taking time off and driving her to different doctors in Delaware, Philadelphia,

(Washington) D.C. — anyone we thought might help,” she recalled. It was clear that Josephine van Es had become depressed, although doctors did not consider her mental state to be the underlying cause of her problem. Various doctors prescribed antidepressants, but most of the drugs just made her groggy or loopy and did nothing to alleviate the scalded feeling or metallic taste.

A diagnosis By January 2008, mother and daughter were in Philadelphia, seeing a dental specialist at the University of Pennsylvania. After reviewing the stack of lab tests and scans, the specialist concluded that Josephine van Es’s symptoms were consistent with a poorly understood condition called glossodynia, or burning mouth syndrome, which most often affects postmenopausal women. The cause of the syndrome, which can appear suddenly, is unknown, according to the National Institute of Dental Care and Research. Linda Bartoshuk, a taste researcher at the University of Florida and an expert on the syndrome, said that it is a diagnosis of exclusion: Other conditions that can cause similar symptoms, such as Sjogren’s and Type 2 diabetes, must be ruled out first. Most scientists believe that the problem may stem from damage to the nerves that control taste. The ability to taste diminishes after menopause, when it becomes more difficult to distinguish substances that are bitter. Luckily, burning mouth is “quite rare,” said Bartoshuk, who has evaluated more than 75 people with the problem, which affects “supertasters” — those born with a heightened sense of taste because they have more tastebuds than most people. One treatment that has proved successful is a very low dose of clonazepam, an antianxiety medicine that diminishes nerve fiber activity. A small study in 1998 by Toronto dentist Miriam Grushka and others found the drug worked for 70 percent of patients; earlier this year, another small but more rigorous study confirmed its effectiveness. For others, paradoxically, diluted capsaicin, the ingredient responsible for heat in hot chili peppers, can desensitize a pain signal chemical in nerve cells. Other patients find relief by chewing sugarless gum, sucking on ice chips and avoiding highly spiced or acidic foods. Although chewing sugarless gum has made Josephine van Es’ mouth less dry, nothing else has helped. Her daughter contacted both Bartoshuk and Grushka but found that her mother had already tried the treatments they recommended, including clonazepam and capsaicin. “Unfortunately we don’t know what to do” for patients if clonazepam doesn’t work, Bartoshuk said. “We desperately need more research on this.” For the past few years, Josephine van Es has been seeing a psychiatrist, who has helped her devise a routine to manage eating, an activity she dreads. “I sit in the front of the TV and just poke it in,” said van Es, who has lost about 30 pounds in the past eight years. Her diet is unvarying: Breakfast is thin oatmeal and fruit (“I call it gruel”), lunch is yogurt and Ensure, and dinner is broccoli florets and a small chicken breast submerged in applesauce. She also eats ice cream twice a day and has found that drinking is less painful than eating. Meanwhile, mother and daughter are trying to manage as best they can. Karen van Es is on the lookout for anything that might help her mother. “We’ve done everything imaginable,” she said. Josephine van Es says she is most grateful for her daughter’s unwavering devotion. “I could never have anyone better than Karen,” she said. “I pray every day and plead with God to take this away. Nothing’s happened yet.”

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

F5

A cure worse than the illness By Jane E. Brody New York Times News Service

Antibiotics are important drugs, often restoring health and even saving lives. But like all drugs, they can have unwanted and serious side effects, some of which may not become apparent until many thousands of patients have been treated. Such is the case with an important class of antibiotics known as fluoroquinolones. The best known are Cipro (ciprofloxacin), Levaquin (levofloxacin) and Avelox (moxifloxacin). In 2010, Levaquin was the best-selling antibiotic in the United States. But by last year it was also the subject of more than 2,000 lawsuits from patients who had suffered severe reactions after taking it. Part of the problem is that fluoroquinolones are often inappropriately prescribed. Instead of being reserved for use against serious, perhaps life-threatening bacterial infections like hospital-acquired pneumonia, these antibiotics are frequently prescribed for sinusitis, bronchitis, earaches and other ailments that may resolve on their own or can be treated with less potent drugs or nondrug remedies — or are caused by viruses, which are not susceptible to antibiotics. In an interview, Mahyar Etminan, a pharmacological epidemiologist at the University of British Columbia, said the drugs were overused “by lazy doctors who are trying to kill a fly with an automatic weapon.” Etminan directed a study published in April in The Journal of the American Medical Association showing that the risk of suffering a potentially blinding retinal detachment was nearly fivefold higher among current users of fluoroquinolones, compared with nonusers. In another study submitted for publication, he documented a significantly increased risk of acute kidney failure among users of these drugs. The conditions Etminan has studied are relatively easy to research because they result in hospitalizations with diagnoses that are computerized and tracked in databases. Far more challenging to study are the array of diffuse, confusing symptoms suffered by fluoroquinolone users like Lloyd Balch, a 33-year-old Manhattan resident and website manager for City College of New York.

Yvetta Fedorova / New York Times News Service

Fluoroquinolones are an important class of antibiotics, but their often inappropriate prescription raises the risk of very serious side effects, including retinal detachment and kidney failure.

In an interview, Balch said he was healthy until April 20, when a fever and cough prompted him to see a doctor. Nothing was heard through a stethoscope, but a chest Xray indicated a mild case of pneumonia, and he was given Levaquin. Although he had heard of problems with Levaquin and asked the doctor if he might take a different antibiotic, he was told Levaquin was the drug he needed. After just one dose, he developed widespread pain and weakness. He called to report this reaction but was told to take the next dose. But the next pill, he said, “eviscerated” him, causing pain in all his joints and vision problems.

Debilitating side effects In addition to being unable to walk uphill, climb stairs or see clearly, his symptoms included dry eyes, mouth and skin; ringing in his ears; uncontrollable shaking; burning pain in his eyes and feet; heart palpitations; and muscle spasms in his back and around his eyes. Although Balch’s reaction is unusual, doctors who have studied the side effects of fluoroquinolones say others have suffered similar symptoms. Three and a half months after he took that second pill, these symptoms persist, and none of the many doctors of different specialties he has consulted has been able to help. In a phone consultation with Dr. David Flockhart, an expert in fluoroquinolone side effects at the Indiana University School of Medicine, he was told it could take a year for his symptoms to resolve, if they ever do disap-

pear completely. Guidelines by the American Thoracic Society state that fluoroquinolones should not be used as a first-line treatment for community-acquired pneumonia; it recommends that doxycycline or a macrolide be tried first. Balch didn’t know this, or he might have fought harder to get a different antibiotic. Adverse reactions to fluoroquinolones may occur almost anywhere in the body. In addition to occasional unwanted effects on the musculoskeletal, visual and renal systems, the drugs in rare cases can seriously injure the central nervous system (causing “brain fog,” depression, hallucinations and psychotic reactions), the heart, liver, skin (painful, disfiguring rashes and phototoxicity), the gastrointestinal system, hearing and blood sugar metabolism. The rising use of these potent drugs has also been blamed for increases in two very serious, hard-to-treat infections: antibiotic-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (known as MRSA) and severe diarrhea caused by Clostridium difficile. Fluoroquinolones carry a “black box” warning mandated by the Food and Drug Administration that tells doctors of the link to tendinitis and tendon rupture and, more recently, about the drugs’ ability to block neuromuscular activity. But patients are rarely informed of the risks by prescribing doctors.

Lack of long-term studies No one knows how often serious adverse reactions occur. The FDA’s reporting sys-

tem for adverse effects is believed to capture only about 10 percent of them. Complicating the problem is that, unlike retinal detachments that were linked only to current or very recent use of a fluoroquinolone, the drugs’ adverse effects can show up weeks or months after the treatment ends. No long-term studies have been done among former users of these antibiotics. A half-dozen fluoroquinolones have been taken off the market because of unjustifiable risks of adverse effects. Those that remain are undeniably important drugs, when used appropriately. Experts caution against giving these drugs to certain patients who face higher than average risks of bad reactions — children younger than 18, adults older than 60, and pregnant and nursing women — unless there is no effective alternative. The risk of adverse effects is also higher among people with liver disease and those taking corticosteroids or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. When an antibiotic is prescribed, it is wise to ask what the drug is and whether it is necessary, what side effects to be alert for, whether there are effective alternatives, when to expect the diagnosed condition to resolve, and when to call if something unexpected happens or recovery seems delayed. At the same time, when an antibiotic is appropriately prescribed, it is extremely important to take the full prescription as directed and not to stop treatment when the patient simply begins to feel better.


F6

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2012

N More fruits, veggies is the key for weight loss in older women By Carolyn O’Neil The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

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GOOD FOR YOU Menu labeling may improve diets Menu labeling has been proposed as a way to potentially improve restaurant diners’ nutritional choices. McDonald’s recently started posting calories on its restaurant and drive-through menus, ahead of regulations that will require major chain restaurants to do so next year. Researchers who wanted to know if such actions would actually make meaningful changes studied chain restaurants in the Seattle area and found that labeling menus with calories, fat and sodium content resulted in healthier menu adaptations by the restaurants after labeling regulations went into effect. King County implemented menu labeling regulations in January 2009. Researchers audited menus at 11 sitdown restaurants and 26 quick-serve chain restaurants. They evaluated the nutrition in entrees that were on the menu six months after the regulations went into effect and remained on the menu 12 months later. They found reduced calories, saturated fat, and sodium content in menu items that were on the menu at both time periods, according to the study which was recently published in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. However, 18 months after the labeling began, a majority of items still exceeded the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s dietary guidelines for those nutrients. Entrees not designated for children exceeded by 56 percent, 77 percent and 89 percent of the calories, saturated fat, and sodium guidelines, respectively, according to the study. — Anne Aurand, The Bulletin

Looks like eating more fruits and vegetables is the notso-surprising secret to weight control for older women. It’s a common complaint as waistlines widen with advancing birthdays, especially for post-menopausal women, who typically say, “I’m eating the same, but the numbers on the scale just keep creeping higher.” What’s not the same, unfortunately, is the body’s metabolic rate, which naturally slows down with age. Add to that a lifestyle that’s often less active and you’ve got the math to verify that calories-in

Juice Continued from F1 At 10 a.m. I mix the strawberry-raspberry-pineapple again. My energy level and mood remain steady and better than usual throughout the day, and I abstain from the fried calamari being passed around during lunch at a pub. Instead, I order a house salad, no dressing, and savor the flavor and texture of cherry tomatoes and radishes like never before. For dinner, I eat raw cashews at home. Three drinks in a day is just too much for me. Day 3: I combine the blueberry-blackberry-banana with rice milk and frozen berries in a blender for breakfast, a welcome enhancement from water. Energy, spirits and alertness still high. I haven’t lost true weight; liberal nut intake is probably to blame. Days 4 and 5: Cleanse over, I treat myself to a Cobb-type salad for dinner; not beyond reproach but superior to many menu options at a restaurant. Two days after cleanse, I bring a whole avocado and nuts and watermelon to work for lunch, which is not like me. I continue to feel more attracted to wholesome foods. Verdict: Thumbs up, particularly for those soft on selfdiscipline. The single-serve powder packages are less expensive and more shelf-stable than many other cleanse regimens. I could do a two-a-day like this again to correct a course of excess. Organic Avenue LOVEdeep Level: Intermediate Price: $210; organicavenue .com Tester: Ross Werland The promise: “Bright eyes, mental clarity, physical glow, feeling grounded and balanced, clear skin, heightened consciousness, perfect weight, positive thoughts, synergy with people, animals and the environment, a sense of calm, feeling and being more loving, incredible stamina, overall improved physical health.” The drill: Organic Avenue suggests a cleanse of at least five days; I did three. That meant seven bottles a day of its cold-pressed organic vegetable and fruit juices on a timetable and in prescribed

vs. calories-out can move the scales in the wrong direction. Sure, you can step up the exercise regime and vow never to order dessert again. But according to a new study of nearly 500 overweight women in their 50s and 60s, it’s what they were adding to their meals that ultimately helped them lose weight and keep it off. Dr. Bethany Barone Gibbs and colleagues at the University of Pittsburgh studied eating habits of women who lost weight over short term (six months) and long term (four years). The highly motivated dieters in the six-month group ate fewer desserts and fried

What dietitians say We asked registered dietitians Rachel Berman, director of nutrition for CalorieCount.com, and Cari Coulter, program director at Wellspring weight loss camp in Wisconsin, to share their perspectives on juicebased cleanses. Are three-day juice Is there a chance of a cleanses good for the cleanse doing more harm body? than good to the metabolism? Berman: There’s evidence that Berman: Three days isn’t long. people experience increased But even for a short amount energy when they do some of of time, you are slowing these juice cleanses, which your metabolism. Just think could be a motivation to of it on a basic level. Your increase nutrient intake or body doesn’t have to work to improve what they’re eating. digest the protein in a piece of The benefit is more mental chicken; your digestion doesn’t than physical. Any increase have to grind. Everyone is in energy likely comes from unique, of course, and has cutting out things like sodium a different metabolism and and saturated fat that can digestive tract. be hindering energy. So is Coulter: Rather than it a matter of how great the enhancing someone’s ability cleanse is, or making tweaks to choose healthy foods, it to the diet to get that effect? is probably going to lead to Having a juice every once in uncontrolled consumption of a while as a meal substitute all the foods the person has is great, as long as it’s made avoided during the fast as from fruits and vegetables soon as it ends. Adopting a where you’re getting the dietary plan with measurable nutrients. But masticating goals (such as eating less than those fruits and vegetables 20 grams of fat a day) and increases the satisfaction you engaging in behaviors such derive and gives you the fiber as regularly weighing oneself that might be lost in the juice. and self-monitoring physical Coulter: Your body has a activity and food intake are the number of organ systems in best ways to maintain a strong place that work to detoxify the awareness of one’s actions. body, including the liver, lymph system, GI tract, lungs, urinary tract, etc. Therefore, cleanses are unnecessary and may even be harmful if they have a diuretic or laxative effect. Juice fasts often do not have enough calories or protein to preserve muscle mass or support physical activity.

Q:

Q:

order (one shot-glass size, followed by six 14-ounce bottles). No solid food, coffee, beer or wine; nothing but water between the juices, plus a little hot, caffeine-free tea at night. Taste: I am disciplined with my mostly Paleo diet, but I found some of the hard-core green juices unpalatable on day one. By the third day it was easier, but I never became a fan. The fruit juices (watermelon, ginger lemonade and pear) were a treat. Day 1: Not long after taking the first dose, a shot of chlorophyll at about 10 a.m., I made my first bathroom visit.

Community Education Series SPECIAL NEEDS SEMINAR

Member of WE HONOR VETERANS Program

FAMILIES OF CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES Friday, October 5, 2012 | TIME: Noon to 1:00 pm

SESSION OBJECTIVES AND TOPICS: • Find strategies for defining your intentions for your child now and when you are gone. • Preserve your child’s current quality of life through supplemental income while maintaining government benefits • Balance all your financial goals while providing for a loved one with a disability.

PRESENTERS: Mark L. Mintz, CFM Certified Special Needs Advisor-Merrill Lynch Brent Kinkade, Attorney at Law, Karnopp Petersen

Seating is limited. RSVP required. Call 541-382-5882 or email Lisa lisamh@partnersbend.org Location: Partners In Care; large conference room 2075 NE Wyatt Court, Bend

foods, drank fewer sugarsweetened beverages and ate more fish. After four years, the women were still saying “no” to pie and soda fairly often, but the habit that emerged as the most powerful predictor for longterm weight loss was eating more fruits and vegetables, followed by eating less meat and cheese. Good news for Southerners: They weren’t necessarily skipping fried foods. “People are so motivated when they start a weightloss program,” said Barone Gibbs. “You can say, ‘I’m never going to eat another piece of pie,’ and

www.partnersbend.org

Hospice | Home Health | Hospice House | Transitions

I lost track of bathroom visits on the first day. I do know it was in the teens. Developed a dull headache. I was craving a taste of anything other than

you see the pounds coming off. Eating fruits and vegetables may not make as big a difference in your caloric intake. But that small change can build up and give you a better long-term result, because it’s not as hard to do as giving up french fries forever.”

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the juices, so I cheated with a cup of low-sodium chicken broth at night. I also had a cup of decaffeinated tea. Day 2: A little easier to take as my palate adjusted slightly to the grassy green drinks in the seven-drink regimen. These green drinks, however, seemed to have the most potent cleansing effect. I cheated with the broth again at night. I also had another tea. Bathroom visits were frequent but reduced from Day 1. Day 3: I felt like a sports car, with a burst of new energy and a sense of well-being. I also was looking forward to the next day’s cup of coffee. Bathroom visits were almost back to normal. All three days, I never felt hungry. One unexpected change was a dramatically enhanced sense of smell. Day 4: Cleanse over, I felt supercharged, running for most of what usually is a 1½-mile morning walk. I felt so good, I skipped the morning coffee and waited until noon to have a small cup. One of the reasons I wanted to try this cleanse was because of what I think are undiagnosed symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome. Those were gone, though I don’t know whether to credit caffeine/alcohol cessation or the juice. And my weight was down more than 4 pounds. Verdict: Thumbs absolutely up! No question that this was good for my body. I find merit in the cleanse itself, which you probably could achieve by fasting with water alone, but the juices you’re consuming are loaded with nutrients, so not only are you purging, but you’re also loading tremendous goodness into your system. Also, you’re not polluting yourself with coffee and alcohol. I’d be interested in post-cleanse maintenance, perhaps one cleanse day a

month. I think a juicer might allow a person to replicate the best parts of this regimen. BluePrint Renovation Cleanse Level: Beginner Price: $75; blueprintcleanse .com Tester: Ellen McGuire The promise: Detoxify without hunger or overly “grassy” concoctions. Targeted to real people who like a martini and steak but want to lose a few pounds or rebound from an indulgent weekend. The drill: Six juices per day, in numbered order, for three days. Phasing out sugary and meaty indulgences a few days beforehand is encouraged. Other raw fruits and vegetables (dressed with lemon juice and olive oil) are allowed during the cleanse. The taste: Surprisingly pleasant. Of the six juices, my favorites were P.A.M. (pineapple, apple, mint), the Spicy Lemonade and the Cashew Milk. The Green Juice and the C.A.B. (carrot, apple, beet) will remind you that, yes, this is a health food cleanse. Final juice of the day, combining cashews, vanilla and cinnamon, was the biggest treat. Day 1: I enjoyed all of the flavors and felt energized, healthy and full. Day 2: I felt so invigorated I tried out a new morning yoga class. But by mid-afternoon I was a bit lightheaded and low on energy, though my body felt less bloated and my skin looked smoother. Day 3: The biggest mental challenge. I was tired of the juice flavors and really missing the fun of eating. However, my energy level rebounded from the day before, and my snug clothes fit more comfortably. Verdict: Thumbs up! This cleanse has inspired me to continue making healthier food choices.


THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2012 G1

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Pets & Supplies

Chocolate Lab AKC 10 Golden Retriever pups, ready Oct. 13, Male & yrs, very nice, great Female left. Call with kids, moving and 541-848-2277. can’t take with us. Free. 541-385-6232 Kittens/cats avail. thru Dachshund AKC mini pup rescue group. Tame, $375/$425.541-508-4558 shots, altered, ID chip, www.bendweenies.com more. Sat/Sun 1-5, call re: other days. 65480 St., Bend, Dog Kennel, 10x10x6 78th Behlen complete club 541-389-8420; photos, etc. at www.craftcats.org kennel, like new, $450. 541-647-1236 Labradoodles - Mini & med size, several colors 541-504-2662 DO YOU HAVE www.alpen-ridge.com SOMETHING TO SELL Labrador AKC puppies, FOR $500 OR black & choc, dewclaws, LESS? athletic parents, ready Non-commercial 9/25. 541-410-9000 advertisers may place an ad with Just bought a new boat? our Sell your old one in the "QUICK CASH classiieds! Ask about our SPECIAL" Super Seller rates! 1 week 3 lines, $12 541-385-5809 or 2 weeks, $20! Ad must include Labradors AKC exc. price of single item bloodlines, choc & of $500 or less, or black, $500. La Pine multiple items 1-541-231-8957 whose total does Local animal rescue not exceed $500. group seeks volunteers! Fosters to care for kitCall Classifieds at tens, help at the sanctu541-385-5809 ary, off-site adoption www.bendbulletin.com events, more. It's hard work but very fulfilling, & the animals need all the English Bulldog help they can get. Puppies www.craftcats.org AKC registered, 1st shots & microchipped. 541/389-8420; 598-5488 Ready to go! $2000. 541 416-0375 Local animal rescue group seeks donation of English Bulldogs, DOB bldg w/basic utilities to 8/6/12, 4 females, 3 sort deposit cans/bottles males, 1st shots, $2200. as a fundraiser to cover vet bills. Value of the 541-280-6268 space is tax deductible German Shepherd pure- to you, & a great help to bred, 8wks, blk w/ gold/ the animals. For into: www.craftcats.org tan mrkgs. 1st shots & wormed. 4 females $325 541-389-8420, or email betsandbill@bendcable.com ea. Parents on site. Redmond. 541-788-7859 POODLE (TOY) Pups, AKC. Pomapoos also! So cute! 541-475-3889

G old e n

R e t ri e v e r

Purebred Yorkie, 3 mos old. $350. 541-380-1655 or 541-280-4200. NO TEXTS!

pups, AKC, written Queensland Heelers gaurantee, shots, standard & mini,$150 & parents on site, 20+ up. 541-280-1537 http:// yr. breeder, nice rightwayranch.wordpress.com range of color from red to light golden. Rescued kittens lookBeauty & brains, calm ing for forever homes. temperment good Social, playful, perhunters. Tumalo area. fect companions for Ready 9/28 resv. now an inside home. $500. 541-420-5253 541-617-6182

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Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

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Pets & Supplies

Antiques & Collectibles

Guns, Hunting & Fishing

Misc. Items

Gardening Supplies & Equipment

Lost & Found

Siberian Husky pups. $850 - $1000. M/F. stones-siberians@live .com

Antiques wanted: tools, Parker-Hale 25-06, and furniture, fishing, 3x9x50 Tasco scope, marbles, old signs, $495; InterArms 243 toys, costume jewelry. caliber, 3x9 Leupold Call 541-389-1578 scope with do, $495. 541-419-4221 or Extensive Collection of 541-447-8629 Collector plates, w/certificates, some solid Remington Model 870 ivory, 541-312-2951. Express Super Mag + accessories, $349. The Bulletin reserves 541-948-4413 the right to publish all ads from The Bulletin newspaper onto The Remington Woodmaster Bulletin Internet web- 6mm 742 semi-auto with 2x7 scope, sling, recoil site. pad, checkering with engraving, 2 boxes ammo, $375. 541-318-2219

Sponsors needed for Gordon, a sweet, young abandoned cat who suffered mouth trauma & infection & WANTED VENDORS! Wanted: Collector must have most of his New vendors market seeks high quality teeth removed. This is opening in Bend, Orfishing items. a big $ hit for a small egon. Northwest Pick- Call 541-678-5753, or nonprofit. He then ers & Consignment, 503-351-2746 needs a loving, forLLC. Great opportuever home. Cat Res255 nity! Collectors, articue, Adoption & Fossans and craftsman Computers ter Team - CRAFT, who want to have a www.craftcats.org, winter outlet for their THE BULLETIN rePOB 6441, Bend quality merchandise quires computer ad97708, 541 389 8420. indoors Saturdays Oct. vertisers with multiple through March. $25 ad schedules or those Weimaraners, AKC per day for 8’x10’ selling multiple sys4 males, 3 females. space. Sell your wares tems/ software, to dis$575. 503-394-3486 / in a warm comfortable close the name of the 503-871-0175 space with high buyer business or the term traffic. For details call People Look for Information "dealer" in their ads. Don at 541-977-1737 Private party advertisAbout Products and or e-mail ers are defined as Services Every Day through nwpickers@hotmail.com those who sell one The Bulletin Classifieds computer. 215 210 Coins & Stamps 257 Furniture & Appliances Private collector buying Musical Instruments postage stamp alA1 Washers&Dryers bums & collections, Gibson electric guitar w/case, ES-335 reis$150 ea. Full warworld-wide and U.S. sue series, $1500 obo. ranty. Free Del. Also 573-286-4343 (local, 541-322-3999 wanted, used W/D’s cell #) 541-280-7355 241 Piano/Organ /Guitar Bicycles & Lessons - all ages and pro-piano tuning Accessories special! 541-647-1366 Trex (2) multi-track 700s, 26”, with 15” & 19” Visit our HUGE frames, like new, $240 home decor each. 541-322-6280 consignment store. New items 242 arrive daily! Exercise Equipment 930 SE Textron, Bend 541-318-1501 Piano, Steinway Model www.redeuxbend.com Elliptical Dual Trainer, O Baby Grand 1911, Sports Air Fitness gorgeous, artist qualE-80, Dual workout, ity instrument w/great GENERATE SOME exelectronic programing action & Steinway’s citement in your for workout levels, like warm, rich sound. Will neighborhood! Plan a new, orig. cost $1200, adorn any living room, garage sale and don't asking $350, church or music stuforget to advertise in 541-322-9833. dio perfectly. New reclassified! tail $69,000. Sacri541-385-5809. 246 fice at $34,000 OBO, Guns, Hunting call 541-383-3150. Kitchen table light colored wood with 4 & Fishing 260 chairs. Good condition $100. call Browning Bar II .338 Misc. Items 541-388-0153 $1150. Ruger .357 SS Buying Diamonds SOLD .Mossberg 308 OASIS Large capacity SOLD. 541-408-4844 /Gold for Cash Kenmore (Elite) HE Saxon’s Fine Jewelers Washer & Electric Browning White Gold 541-389-6655 Medallion II in .270. Dryer - $600. New with Leupold 2.0 GE Profile MicroBUYING VarX II scope and Lionel/American Flyer wave - counter top original box. $999. $150. trains, accessories. 541-280-3035 Call (541) 639-4047 541-408-2191. CASH!! BUYING & SELLING Refrigerator, GE 18 cu For Guns, Ammo & gold jewelry, silver ft, black, brand new, Reloading Supplies. Alland gold coins, bars, must sell! $400 obo. 541-408-6900. rounds, wedding sets, 541-330-4344 class rings, sterling silDO YOU HAVE Washer & dryer, stackver, coin collect, vinSOMETHING TO able, like new, $400 tage watches, dental SELL gold. Bill Fleming, set. 541-593-1101 FOR $500 OR 541-382-9419. LESS? The Bulletin COWGIRL CASH Non-commercial r ecommends extra We buy Jewelry, Boots, advertisers may caution when purVintage Dresses & place an ad chasing products or More. 924 Brooks St. with our services from out of 541-678-5162 "QUICK CASH the area. Sending www.getcowgirlcash.com SPECIAL" cash, checks, or 1 week 3 lines $12 Guild Wars 2 PC game, credit information or Brand NEW! Changed may be subjected to 2 weeks $20! mind. $50/offer. FRAUD. For more Ad must 541-382-6806 information about an include price of advertiser, you may single item of $500 Large mirror, $99. 4 auto call the Oregon or less, or multiple rims, $15 each. OHSA State Attorney items whose total safety harness, $99. General’s Office does not exceed Hampton Bay stand up Consumer Protec$500. 3-spd fan, $99. Router, tion hotline at $125. 541-948-4413 1-877-877-9392. Call Classifieds at Ponderosa scrap wood 541-385-5809 for camping, 8 @ $3www.bendbulletin.com $4/box. 541-504-0707

Security camera monitor, recorder, cameras & wall stand; you come uninstall from my home, now $250. 541-948-4413 Wanted- paying cash for Hi-fi audio & studio equip. McIntosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808

For newspaper delivery, call the Circulation Dept. at 541-385-5800 To place an ad, call 541-385-5809 or email

classified@bendbulletin.com

WHEN YOU SEE THIS

SUPER TOP SOIL

On a classified ad go to www.bendbulletin.com to view additional photos of the item.

Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949.

www.hersheysoilandbark.com

263

Tools

Yard Bug riding lawnSW Portable Boss air- mower from Home Deless paint sprayer, pot, just tuned up, $250. 541-389-9503 after 5pm $500. 541-949-4413 Workbench heavy duty, wood, on whls, 64”x22” x 36”H $50. 541-383-4231

270

Lost & Found

Found 9/25, Weedeater & bucket of tools, on Find exactly what South bound parkway you are looking for in the near Powers Rd. Call CLASSIFIEDS to identify 541-420-7232. 265

Building Materials

Found garage door remote at garage sale in August; call to identify, 541-382-4661

REDMOND Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Found keys on Dobbin Rd. Call to describe. Quality at 541 389 7904 LOW PRICES 1242 S. Hwy 97 Found Sunglasses, in 541-548-1406 Redmond, 9/24, call Open to the public. to ID, 541-388-1533.

Ladies black leather cross-stitch foldover hand wallet with silver heart, lost on 9/22 at Albertson’s Redmond. Reward for return with contents. Leave msg. 541-504-1908 Need to get an ad in ASAP? You can place it online at: www.bendbulletin.com

541-385-5809 Lost cat, gray/tiger stripe F, white neck/chest, SW Bend Lodgepole/Honkers area, 9/6. $100 Reward offered. 541-330-8732 Lost in area of NE Vogt/Cool and Boyd Acres: Llasa-Apso male, B&W, underbite, no collar. $150 reward. 541-419-5120 Lost small white with brown & tan Jack Russell female last seen on Jordan Ln. in Redmond/Terrebonne area. Reward for info. 541-419-2495 REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal, don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend 541-382-3537 Redmond, 541-923-0882 Prineville, 541-447-7178; OR Craft Cats, 541-389-8420.

Advertise with a full-color photo in The Bulletin Classifieds and online.

Easy, flexible, and affordable ad packages are also available on our Web site. To place your Bulletin ad with a photo, visit www.bendbulletin.com, click on “Place an ad” and follow these easy steps: a category, choose a classification, 1. Choose and then select your ad package. Write your ad and upload your digital

2. photo.

your account with any major 3. Create credit card. All ads appear in both print and online Please allow 24 hours for photo processing before your ad appears in print and online. To place your photo ad, visit us online at www.bendbulletin.com or call with questions 541-385-5809

www.bendbulletin.com


G2 THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

Edited by Will Shortz

PLACE AN AD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . .11:00 am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Starting at 3 lines

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

*UNDER $500 in total merchandise

OVER $500 in total merchandise

7 days .................................................. $10.00 14 days ................................................ $16.00

Garage Sale Special

4 days .................................................. $18.50 7 days .................................................. $24.00 14 days .................................................$33.50 28 days .................................................$61.50

4 lines for 4 days.................................. $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

PRIVATE PARTY RATES

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702

PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday.

Farm Market

300 308

Farm Equipment & Machinery 280

286

Estate Sales

Sales Northeast Bend

ESTATE SALE: Fri. 9/28Sat. 9/29, 9-4, located at 1500 NW Wild Rye Cir. North Rim Hall, on Awbrey Butte. This sale consists of entire contents from 2nd home in Kona, HI. Furniture, antiques, collectibles, beautiful decor, linens, Persian rugs, outdoor furniture, kitchen items, new leather theater relcliner set, too much to list! Pics on estatesales.org & Craig’s List. Don’t miss this one! This sale given by Farmhouse Estate Sales. 282

Sales Northwest Bend

HH FREE HH Garage Sale Kit Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE! KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $2.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!”

IRON HORSE ANTIQUES Customer Appreciation Parking Lot Sale & free lunch! Sat. 9/29, 9-4, 210 NW Congress St. Large Moving Sale 9/27 -9/30 10am-5pm daily, 20043 Elizabeth Lane, 541-480-8230 BULLETIN CLASSIFIEDS Search the area’s most comprehensive listing of classiied advertising... real estate to automotive, merchandise to sporting goods. Bulletin Classiieds appear every day in the print or on line. Call 541-385-5809 www.bendbulletin.com

Moved and it won’t fit. New sofa, 4 swivel bar stools, bedding, hardware, nice stuff. 1131 NW Fairwell Dr. Awbrey Butte. Sat. & Sun. 9-4, 210-857-9371

IH1566, 180 hp, duals, 3 pt., 540/1000 pto, cab, heat, a/c, tilt, Big Yard Sale: Power & stereo, low hours hand tools, furniture, $16,800. 541-419-2713 trunks, antiques, windows w/screens - all sizes, baby & adult Garage Sales clothes, clocks, kitchenware, DVD’s/ videos. Garage Sales Lots more! Priced to sell! Sat.-Sun. 9-5, near Garage Sales Smith Rock State Park, Find them 2735 NE Wilcox, Terin rebonne, follow signs The Bulletin 292 Classiieds Sales Other Areas

541-385-5809 PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT at

1777 SW Chandler Ave., Bend, OR 97702

BIG RUMMAGE SALE, 828 NW Hill St, 9-2, Sept 28&29, decor, Moving sale! Fri. & Sat., household goods, 8-1. Garage shelving, books, electronics, antique china, snowquality clothing & blower, misc. more 541-728-0878 20737 Beaumont Dr. Garage Sale: Sat. 8-4, Small lamp & other collectibles, furniture, misc., uniform scrubs, 311 NW Riverside Blvd

290

Sales Redmond Area

Huge Yard Sale NO JUNK, Fri. & Sat. Sept. 28th & 29th, 8-4, RV things, 5th wheel hitch, 2 ton winch,stablelizer, yard, chain saws, Christmas decorations inside & out, camping gear,books, something for everyone! 12679 SW Cornett Lp, Powell Butte 541-815-8839.

Multi-Family Estate Sale! Sat 9/29 only, 8-3, 21776 Moving Sale:Sat. Only, 9 Eastmont Dr. Household am., 18045 Plainview items, sports equip, reRd.,Hwy 20 from Bend, frigerator, large variety! to Fryrear Rd., follow signs. Heavy duty picSat. 8-2, 21448 Bradetnic table, outdoor ich Lp, off Eagle Rd, lounge chairs, fishing books, craft supplies, poles, adult bikes, sporting goods, etc. youth skis, kitchen & glasswares & crystal. YARD SALE: Sat 9/29 8am-2pm. 63415 Vogt Park-wide Yard Sale Rd. Household, fishing, at Terrace Mobile hunting. Collectibles. Plaza, 400 NW Terrace Lane, Prineville, 288 Fri,. Sat., Sun., 9-3. Sales Southeast Bend USE THE CLASSIFIEDS! Bargains Galore! Fri.-Sat. 8-3, 21280 Dove Ln, off Door-to-door selling with 27th between Bear fast results! It’s the easiest Creek & Reed Mkt, lots way in the world to sell. of great items & prices! The Bulletin Classiied

MOVING

SALE

Fri/Sat, Sept 28 & 29 8am-4pm. Downsizing and moving out of state, so lots and lots for sale!! 20729 Alan A Dale Ct. Bend. Take SE 15th to Sherwood Forest Dr., west to Alan A Dale Ct.

SALE: FURNITURE, GUY STUFF,1-DAY, 1018 Shadowood Dr. Sat. 9/29 8-2:00

541-385-5809

NOTICE Remember to remove your Garage Sale signs (nails, staples, etc.) after your Sale event is over! THANKS! From The Bulletin and your local utility companies.

Moving Sale 9-2 Fri-Sat, www.bendbulletin.com 9/28-29. 20522 Loco Rd. (follow signs at Cooley Herman & Shirley Ebster Rd, to Hunnell to Loco). 284

Sales Southwest Bend

MOVING SALE

1260 Killdeer Ct., EAGLE CREST

383

476

Produce & Food

Employment Opportunities

THOMAS ORCHARDS Kimberly, OR: New Fall Hrs, Starting Mon.10/1. Closed Tue & Wed, open Thur.-Mon. 10-4 pm only U-Pick:Freestone canning peaches- O’Henry, nectarines, Brooks prunes, Gala & Golden Delicious Apples, Asian pears. Also Ready Picked Jonagold Apples BRING CONTAINERS Open 7 days/week, 8am6 pm only 541-934-2870 Visit us on Facebook for updates Also we are at Bend Farmer’s Mkt at Drake Park & St. Charles

Employment

400

325

Premium 1st cutting Orchard Grass hay, shed stored, 70-lb bales, $225/ton. Call Ten Barr Ranch, 541-389-1165

TRUCK SCHOOL

www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-387-9252

Check out the classiieds online Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedding Straw & Garden www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily Straw;Compost.546-6171 Good classiied ads tell the essential facts in an interesting Manner. Write from the readers view - not the seller’s. Convert the facts into beneits. Show the reader how the item will help them in some way.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 541-385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com Get your business

Crestview Cable Communications seeks a personable Cable TV/ Internet/Phone Installer in Madras. Electronics, computer or cable TV experience preferred. Pole/ladder climbing/lift 65 lbs. $10-$13/hr. DOE, plus benefits. License/good driving record, drug and background check. Bilingual a plus. Must live or be willing to relocate to our Madras system. Resume to agautney@crestviewcable.com, or to 374 SW 5th Street, Madras, OR. EOE

421

Schools & Training Hay, Grain & Feed

Cable TV/ Internet/ Phone Installer

DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW?

Call The Bulletin before 11 a.m. and get an ad in to publish the next day!

541-385-5809. VIEW the Classifieds at:

www.bendbulletin.com

454

Immediate Looking for Employment Loggingopenings for Log Loader, Chipper, and Experienced couple Cat Skidder operaavail. for housesitting tors, Log Truck drivOct. 1. 541-410-4794 ers, and Fire Patrol. 11 month work year, 470 not shut down due to Domestic & fire danger, work in N In-Home Positions CA. 530-258-3025. Weekend help needed: CNA/caregiver for female with MS. Sat-Sun, 9am-1pm in private home close to COCC. 2 references required. Call 541-318-1335 476

Employment Opportunities CAUTION READERS: Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state.

Medical Records Partners In Care Home Health and Hospice is seeking experienced applicants to fill a newly created part-time role of Medical Records Clerk. Qualified candidates should have working knowledge of electronic medical records, HIPAA compliance, scanning and electronic file maintenance. The ability to multi-task in a team environment is essential. The position is for 24 hours per week and is a benefits eligible position following successful completion of the 90-day introductory period. Qualified candidates are asked to submit a resume to 2075 NE Wyatt Court, Bend OR 97701 Attn: HR, or via email to HR@partnersbend. org.

Fri. & Sat. • Sept. 28 & 29 • 9 to 5 ONLY! Crowd control admittance numbers RED HOT SALE! at 8:00 a.m. Friday Two 3-wheel elect. GROW trikes, banjo, mando- ( Take Hwy 126 to Eagle Crest, turn west on lin, antique pump orCoopers Hawk Drive and follow to a Stop sign with an ad in gan, antique welder; - MerlinDr.Turn left one block to Killdeer Ct.The Bulletin’s John Deere colParking only one one side of the street- do not We suggest you call lectibles, trikes and “Call A Service block cul-de-sac!! Signs are not allowed. the State of Oregon trailers. Antique printPlease look up a map or follow info) Consumer Hotline at Professional” ing press with metal 1-503-378-4320 Directory letters and orig. wood This lovely Sale includes the following: 50" Flat screen TV; Antique piano stool; Broyhill trays. Lawn & garden For Equal Opportunity Remember.... Sofa, Loveseat,Chair, Ottoman all in lovely tools, metal & wood Laws: Oregon Bu333 brown suede cloth; Upright Freezer; Fisher and Add your web adshelving. Costume reau of Labor & InPaykel Washer and Dryer; Lovely area rugs; dress to your ad and Poultry, Rabbits, jewelry. Fri. & Sat. 9-5. King bed; Queen Bed; Dressers; Nice sofa by dustry, Civil Rights readers on The 19365 Indian Summer & Supplies La-Z Bo -rust color; Keurig coffee makers; ElecDivision, Rd. follow the Red Bulletin' s web site trical appliances; food products; Hand and 971-673-0764 Hot signs! will be able to click electrical tools; Coffee and end tables; Lamps; Serama’s the smallest through automatically breed in world, 6 pair If you have any quesLinens Books; DVDs and CDs; Vacuums; Pe286 to your site. for sale, $50/pair w/2 can-finish dining room set, six chairs and three tions, concerns or Sales Northeast Bend free chicks, great for leaves Matching china cabinet; Walnut dining comments, contact: 4-H, FFA or showing, table with three black chairs and one long beautiful & show qual- Classified Department 2-family sale ~ DownsizTick, Tock bench; Uni-Flame Barbecue; Patio table and The Bulletin ity, laying & hatching ing! Bike, quality items, four chairs; Other patio wrought iron pieces; 541-385-5809 chicks, 541-433-2112. clothing, shoes, house Tick, Tock... Room size and area rugs; Clothing: ladies decor, furniture. Cash med., shoes 8; Lots of Christmas items; Com...don’t let time get only! 9/28-29, 9-4, 2418 341 puter desk; file cabinets; 1987 Nintendo game NE Jenni Jo Court. away. Hire a never used--new in box; Conn 1st Alto SaxoHorses & Equipment phone; Live plants and faux plants; Lawn mower Beauty/Barber professional out Estate Sale, 9/28-29, 9-4. 4HP -Yard Machine; lawn and garden tools; 2 Reg. Shetland Mares. Supercuts now hiring Fishing equipment, tools, of The Bulletin’s Lots of other items!!! stylists for Bend, Palominos. $100 for antlers, sewing machine, Handled by... “Call A Service broodmare; $250 for Redmond & Prineville. hsehold goods, clothes, gentle mare, NOT Apply at all 5 locaDeedy's Estate Sales Co. shoes, misc. Lots of new Professional” broke to ride. tions or fax resume to items. 2519 NE Lynda 541-419-4742 days • 541-382-5950 eves Directory today! 541-788-1649 Lane. Cash only! 541-923-7640. www.deedysestatesales.com

ING

EMPLOYMENT 410 - Private Instruction 421 - Schools and Training 454 - Looking for Employment 470 - Domestic & In-Home Positions 476 - Employment Opportunities 486 - Independent Positions

FINANCE AND BUSINESS 507 - Real Estate Contracts 514 - Insurance 528 - Loans and Mortgages 543 - Stocks and Bonds 558 - Business Investments 573 - Business Opportunities

476

573

Employment Opportunities The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to FRAUD. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $ 500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for:

Finance & Business

Business Opportunities

500

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

528

Loans & Mortgages WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no $ problem, good equity 10 - 3 lines, 7 days is all you need. Call $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days now. Oregon Land (Private Party ads only) Mortgage 388-4200. LOCAL MONEY:We buy secured trust deeds & note,some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 ext.13.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Reverse Mortgages by local expert Mike LeRoux NMLS57716 Call to learn more.

541-350-7839 Security1 Lending NMLS98161

Where buyers meet sellers.

Your Future Is Here. Whether you’re looking for a home or need a service, your future is in these pages.

Thousands of ads daily in print and online. To place your ad, visit www.bendbulletin.com or call 541-385-5809

Program Support Secretary-Bilingual Spanish/English

Where can you ind a helping hand? From contractors to yard care, it’s all here in The Bulletin’s “Call A Service Professional” Directory

Join one of the largest child education networks in Oregon preparing children for school. Year round full time position w/ excellent benefits. Please visit our website www.ocdc.net for full description, requirements and to apply online. Or mail resume, apply in person to: Oregon Child Development Coalition, ATTN: Human Resources 659 NE “A” St. Madras, OR 97741 Equal Opportunity Employer

Independent Contractor

H Supplement Your Income H

Operate Your Own Business

FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF

Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor

& Call Today & We are looking for independent contractors to service home delivery routes in:

H Prineville H Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours.

Must have reliable, insured vehicle. Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 during business hours apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - Roommate Wanted 616 - Want To Rent 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 630 - Rooms for Rent 631 - Condos & Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for Rent General 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space The Bulletin’s “Call A Service Professional” Directory is all about meeting your needs. Call on one of the professionals today!

personals

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2012 G3

682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 730 - New Listings 732 - Commercial Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740 - Condos & Townhomes for Sale 744 - Open Houses 745 - Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest Bend Homes 747 - Southwest Bend Homes 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 749 - Southeast Bend Homes 750 - Redmond Homes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson County Homes 757 - Crook County Homes 762 - Homes with Acreage 763 - Recreational Homes and Property 764 - Farms and Ranches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land 630

Rentals

600

Rooms for Rent Studios & Kitchenettes Furnished room, TV w/ cable, micro & fridge. Utils & linens. New owners.$145-$165/wk 541-382-1885

775

870

880

881

881

RV Parking

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes

Boats & Accessories

Motorhomes

Travel Trailers

Travel Trailers

Mobile Home or Recreation RV Space for Movers! $7,999 2 bdrm, rent, in Smith Rock 1 bath, $19,999 Office/ area, on private prop- Studio, $32,900 3 bdrm, erty, nice lawn/trees, 2 bath, 541-548-5511 good credit req., www.JandMHomes.com 541-548-8052 687

Commercial for Rent/Lease Spectrum professional building, 250’-500’, $1.00 per ft. total. No NNN. Call Andy, 541-385-6732.

Boats & RV’s

800 850

Snowmobiles

745

Homes for Sale

PACKAGE DEAL! 2003 800 Skidoo Summit; 1997 Yamaha Phaser. Ultra-lite 2-place trailer. Only $4500. 541-815-4811.

4270Sq.ft., 6/6, 4-car, corner, .83 acre mtn view, by owner. 860 $590,000 541-390-0886 See: bloomkey.com/8779 Motorcycles & Accessories

BANK OWNED HOMES! 1978 XL 125 Honda FREE List w/Pics! Trail bike, runs strong, $275. 541-388-3188 www.BendRepos.com bend and beyond real estate Harley Davidson Soft20967 yeoman, bend or Tail Deluxe 2007, Fixer Upper 75 SW white/cobalt, w/pasRoosevelt Bend 3/2 + senger kit, Vance & Bonus, Detached Hines muffler system 3-car Garage-Work& kit, 1045 mi., exc. shop, Lot over 9000 cond, $19,999, sq.ft., Bend Park-Old 541-389-9188. Mill District, Zoned RM for Multi Units, TURN THE PAGE Owner (541)390-5721

Rooms for Rent

Immaculate!

www.hirealicensedcontractor. com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications. Debris Removal

JUNK BE GONE

I Haul Away FREE

For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel, 541-389-8107 Handyman ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES. Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. On-time promise. Senior Discount. Work guaranteed. 541-389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded & Insured CCB#181595 I DO THAT! Home/Rental repairs Small jobs to remodels Honest, guaranteed work. CCB#151573 Dennis 541-317-9768 Home Improvement Kelly Kerfoot Const.

28 yrs exp in Central OR!

Quality & honesty, from carpentry & handyman jobs, to expert wall covering install / removal. Sr. discounts CCB#47120 Licensed/bonded/insured 541-389-1413 / 410-2422

Landscaping/Yard Care

More Than Service Peace Of Mind

Fall Clean Up

Don’t track it in all Winter •Leaves •Cones •Needles •Pruning •Debris Hauling

Gutter Cleaning Compost Applications Use Less Water

$$$ SAVE $$$ Improve Soil

2012 Maintenance Package Available weekly, monthly and one time service EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential Free Estimates Senior Discounts

541-390-1466

Same Day Response

652

775

Maverick Landscaping Manufactured/ Houses for Rent Mowing, weedeating, Mobile Homes NW Bend yard detailing, chain saw work & more! LCB#8671 541-923-4324 Clean, quiet 2 bdrm, nice FACTORY SPECIAL New Home, 3 bdrm, yard, “R-60” insulation! $47,500 finished $800+ last+ dep. Pet Services on your site,541.548.5511 lease. No pets. Local www.JandMHomes.com refs. 1977 NW 2nd.

Gentle Giant Animal Care

Central Oregon Best in-home animal care service. Going on vacation? We provide compassionate and loving in-home animal care. Make it a vacation for your pet too! Call today!

Tamron Stone 541-215-5372

Fleetwood 1997, 14x60, 2 bdrm, 1 bath., well Houses for Rent maint., $17,000 OBO, Redmond must be moved from Tumalo location, 503-523-7908. 1600 sq ft 3 bdrm + den, 1.75 bath, gas fireplace, Move in Ready 2-car garage, fenced backyard, great neigh- $19,900 2 bdrm, 2 bath borhood, close to shop- $23,900 2 bdrm, 1 bath ping & schools. $895/mo $38,900 3 bdrm, 2 bath + dep. Pets nego, avail $39,999 3 bdrm, 2 bath 541-548-5511 10/1/12. 541-504-4624, www.JandMHomes.com or 541-419-0137 658

Check out OCANs online at classifieds.oregon.com!

to promote your service

Building/Contracting

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Springdale 29’ 2007, slide,Bunkhouse style, Hunter’s Delight! Packsleeps 7-8, excellent age deal! 1988 Wincondition, $16,900, nebago Super Chief, 541-390-2504 38K miles, great 882 shape; 1988 Bronco II 4x4 to tow, 130K Fifth Wheels mostly towed miles, nice rig! $15,000 both. 21’7” Sun Tracker 541-382-3964, leave Pontoon Fishin’ msg. Barge, 2008, with low hours Mercury 90, top Sprinter 272RLS, 2009 & cover. $16,000. Itasca Spirit Class C 29’, weatherized, like 503-701-2256 2007, 20K miles, front new, furnished & entertainment center, ready to go, incl Wine- Carri-Lite Luxury 2009 Ads published in the by Carriage, 4 slideall bells & whistles, gard Satellite dish, "Boats" classification outs, inverter, satel$26,995. 541-420-9964 extremely good coninclude: Speed, fishlite sys, fireplace, 2 dition, 2 slides, 2 ing, drift, canoe, flat screen TVs. HDTV’s, $48,500 house and sail boats. $60,000. OBO. 541-447-5484 For all other types of 541-480-3923 Viking Tent trailer watercraft, please see 2008, clean, self Class 875. contained, sleeps 5, 541-385-5809 easy to tow, great cond. $5200, obo. 541-383-7150. GENERATE SOME excitement in your neig- Jayco Seneca 2007, Fleetwood Wilderness 17K mi., 35ft., Chevy borhood. Plan a ga36’, 2005, 4 slides, 5500 diesel, toy rage sale and don't rear bdrm, fireplace, hauler $130,000. forget to advertise in AC, W/D hkup beau541-389-2636. classified! 385-5809. tiful unit! $30,500. Weekend Warrior Toy 541-815-2380 Hauler 28’ 2007,Gen, fuel station, exc cond. Need help ixing stuff? sleeps 8, black/gray Call A Service Professional Used out-drive interior, used 3X, ind the help you need. parts - Mercury $24,999. www.bendbulletin.com 541-389-9188 OMC rebuilt ma-

CALL A SERVICE PROFESSIONAL Call 541-385-5809 NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website

Springdale 2005 27’, 4’ slide in dining/living area, sleeps 6, low mi,$15,000 obo. 541-408-3811

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530

Real Estate For Sale

700

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500. 541-389-1413

Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 in. kitchen slide out, new tires,under cover, hwy. miles only,4 door fridge/freezer icemaker, W/D combo, Interbath tub & shower, 50 amp propane gen & more! $55,000. 541-948-2310

Call The Bulletin At For More Ads 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Place Your Ad Or E-Mail NEW ON MARKET! Enjoy peace & tranFurnished rm, $425 +sec At: www.bendbulletin.com quility in this 3 Harley Heritage dep; refs. TV, Wifi, mibdrm/2.5 bath, 2080 Softail, 2003 634 cro, frig. 541-389-9268 rine motors: 151 sq. ft. on just under .5 $5,000+ in extras, Beaver Coach Marquis Apt./Multiplex NE Bend $1595; 3.0 $1895; acre on corner lot in $2000 paint job, 40’ 1987. New cover, 4.3 (1993), $1995. cul-de-sac. Move-in 30K mi. 1 owner, new paint (2004), new $299 1st mo. rent!! * 541-389-0435 ready, so don’t wait! For more information inverter (2007). Onan GET THEM BEFORE Close to recreation please call 6300 watt gen, 111K mi, THEY ARE GONE! 541-385-8090 and just minutes from 875 parked covered $35,000 2 bdrm, 1 bath or 209-605-5537 Bend! MLS# obo. 541-419-9859 or Watercraft $530 & $540 201206813. Kathy Harley Street Glide 2006, 541-280-2014 Carports & A/C included! Denning, Broker 21K miles, $11,500. Fox Hollow Apts. 541-480-4429 2007 SeaDoo 541-728-0445 (541) 383-3152 2004 Waverunner, Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co John L. Scott Real Estate, Bend excellent condition, *Upstairs only with lease HD FAT BOY www.johnlscott.com/57 LOW hours. Double 1996 361 trailer, lots of extras. 636 Completely rebuilt/ $10,000 Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 750 Monaco Dynasty 2004, customized, low 541-719-8444 loaded, 3 slides, diemiles. Accepting ofRedmond Homes Fully furnished loft Apt sel, Reduced - now fers. 541-548-4807 on Wall Street in Ads published in "WaLandscaping/Yard Care $119,000, 541-923Bend, with parking. All Redmond Worry Free tercraft" include: Kay8572 or 541-749-0037 HD Screaming Eagle utilities paid. Call Certified Home $149,000 aks, rafts and motorNOTICE: OREGON Huge Landscaped Lot Electra Glide 2005, 541-389-2389 for appt ized personal RV CONSIGNMENTS Landscape ContracMove in Ready! 103” motor, two tone WANTED watercrafts. For tors Law (ORS 671) 800-451-5808 ext 819 candy teal, new tires, 642 "boats" please see We Do The Work, You requires all busi23K miles, CD player, Keep The Cash, Class 870. nesses that advertise Apt./Multiplex Redmond hydraulic clutch, exLooking for your next On-Site Credit 541-385-5809 to perform Landcellent condition. employee? Approval Team, scape Construction Duplex 3 bdrm, 2 bath, Highest offer takes it. Web Site Presence, 1260 sq.ft., 1 story, ga- Place a Bulletin help which includes: 541-480-8080. rage w/opener, fenced wanted ad today and We Take Trade-Ins. planting, decks, yard, RV/Boat parking, reach over 60,000 Free Advertising. Honda Elite 80 2001, fences, arbors, fridge, dishwasher, mireaders each week. BIG COUNTRY RV 1400 mi., absolutely water-features, and cro, walk-in laundry, Your classified ad Bend 541-330-2495 like new., comes w/ installation, repair of W/S/G paid, front gardRedmond: 541-548-5254 will also appear on carrying rack for 2” irrigation systems to ner paid, $775+dep., bendbulletin.com receiver, ideal for use be licensed with the 541-604-0338 which currently rew/motorhome, $995, Landscape Contracceives over Sea Kayaks - His & 541-546-6920 tors Board. This 648 1.5 million page Hers, Eddyline Wind 4-digit number is to be Houses for Dancers,17’, fiberglass views every month included in all adverSoftail Deluxe boats, all equip incl., at no extra cost. Rent General tisements which indipaddles, personal flo- Southwind 35.5’ Triton, 2010, 805 miles, Bulletin Classifieds cate the business has tation devices,dry bags, 2008,V10, 2 slides, DuGet Results! Black Chameleon. PUBLISHER'S a bond, insurance and spray skirts,roof rack w/ pont UV coat, 7500 mi. Call 385-5809 or NOTICE $17,000 workers compensatowers & cradles -- Just place your ad on-line All real estate adverBought new at Call Don @ tion for their employadd water, $1250/boat at tising in this newspa$132,913; ees. For your protec541-410-3823 Firm. 541-504-8557. bendbulletin.com asking $94,900. per is subject to the tion call 503-378-5909 Call 541-923-2774 Fair Housing Act 880 or use our website: 870 which makes it illegal www.lcb.state.or.us to 762 Motorhomes to advertise "any check license status Boats & Accessories preference, limitation Homes with Acreage before contracting or discrimination with the business. 13’ Smokercraft based on race, color, Deschutes River frontPersons doing land1985, good cond., age. Custom single religion, sex, handiscape maintenance level 3 bdrm, 3 bath, 15HP gas Evinrude cap, familial status, do not require a LCB Winnebago Class C 27’ 3962 sq.ft., 12.72 acre + Minakota 44 elec. marital status or nalicense. 1992, Ford 460 V8,64K gated community, primotor, fish finder, 2 Country Coach Intrigue mi., good cond., $7000 tional origin, or an invate setting with 1/4 tention to make any extra seats, trailer, 2002, 40' Tag axle. OBO 541-678-5575 mile river frontage. Call a Pro such preference, extra equip. $3500 400hp Cummins Die$997,000. MLS limitation or discrimi881 Whether you need a sel. two slide-outs. obo. 541-388-9270 #201205961. Pam nation." Familial sta41,000 miles, new Travel Trailers Lester, Principal Brofence ixed, hedges tus includes children tires & batteries. Most ker, Century 21 Gold 17’ 1984 Chris Craft trimmed or a house under the age of 18 options. $95,000 OBO - Scorpion, 140 HP Country Realty, Inc. living with parents or built, you’ll ind 541-678-5712 inboard/outboard, 2 541-504-1338 legal custodians, depth finders, trollprofessional help in pregnant women, and 773 ing motor, full cover, The Bulletin’s “Call a people securing cusEZ - Load trailer, Acreages tody of children under Service Professional” $3500 OBO. 18. This newspaper Komfort 20’ Trailblazer, 541-382-3728. Directory will not knowingly ac- 139716 Dorothy Lane, 2004, with all the extras, 541-385-5809 cept any advertising Crescent Lake, Ore. from new tires & chrome Econoline RV 1989, Charming cottage with for real estate which is wheels to A/C! $8495. fully loaded, exc. cond, 17’ Seaswirl 1988 150 feet of Crescent in violation of the law. 541-447-3342, Prineville 35K orig. mi., $19,750. Nelson Landscape Our readers are Creek frontage. Per- open bow, rebuilt Call 541-546-6133. Chevy V6 engine, fect vacation home Look at: Maintenance hereby informed that new upholstery, with covered deck for Bendhomes.com all dwellings adverServing $4500 or best offer. entertaining, wood CAN’T BEAT THIS! tised in this newspaCentral Oregon for Complete Listings of Look before you 707-688-4523 stove, 2 bed/ 1 bath. per are available on Residential Area Real Estate for Sale buy, below market An RV garage and an equal opportunity & Commercial value! Size & milelots of upgrades on basis. To complain of ROUA Digorgio 1971 •Sprinkler Repair age DOES matter! fridge, this one acre. Close discrimination call heater, propane •Sprinkler Class A 32’ Hurrito the Ski Pass, trails HUD toll-free at & elec. lights, awning, Installation cane by Four Winds, and lakes. $275,000 2 spares, extra insu1-800-877-0246. The 2007. 12,500 mi, all •Back Flow Testing MLS# 201207074. lation for late season toll free telephone amenities, Ford V10, •Fire Prevention, Call Kerry at hunting/cold weather number for the hearlthr, cherry, slides, Lot Clearing 541-815-6363 camping, well maint, 18.5’ ‘05 Reinell 185, V-6 ing impaired is like new! New low •Fall Clean up Cascade Realty very roomy, sleeps 5, Volvo Penta, 270HP, 1-800-927-9275. price, $54,900. •Weekly Mowing great for hunting, low hrs., must see, 541-548-5216 *** $3200, 541-410-6561 650 •Bark, Rock, Etc. $15,000, 541-330-3939 CHECK YOUR AD •Senior Discounts Houses for Rent Please check your ad Reserving spots NE Bend on the first day it runs for sprinkler regon to make sure it is corYOUR AD WILL RECEIVE CLOSE TO 2,000,000 winterization & snow rect. Sometimes inlassified EXPOSURES FOR ONLY $250! Looking for your next removal structions over the employee? Bonded & Insured rtising Oregon Classified Advertising Network is a service of the Oregon Newspaper Publishers Association. dve phone are misunderPlace a Bulletin help 541-815-4458 stood and an error etwork Week of September 24, 2012 wanted ad today and LCB#8759 can occur in your ad. reach over 60,000 If this happens to your readers each week. Call The Yard Doctor ad, please contact us Your classified ad for yard maintenance, the first day your ad will also appear on thatching, sod, sprinappears and we will bendbulletin.com, kler blowouts, water 541-385-5809 be happy to fix it as currently receiving features, more! soon as we can. over 1.5 million page Allen 541-536-1294 Deadlines are: Weekviews, every month LCB 5012 days 11:00 noon for at no extra cost. next day, Sat. 11:00 Bulletin Classifieds Aeration/Fall Clean-up a.m. for Sunday and DIVORCE $135. Complete preparation. Includes children, Get Results! BOOK NOW! Monday. Call 541-385-5809 or custody, support, property and bills division. No court Weekly / one-time service 541-385-5809 place your ad on-line avail. Bonded, insured, Thank you! appearances. Divorced in 1-5 weeks possible. 503-772-5295. at free estimates! The Bulletin Classified bendbulletin.com COLLINS Lawn Maint. www.paralegalalternatives.com, divorce@usa.com. *** Call 541-480-9714 630

To the bicyclist who I invertantly cut off at the Mill Mall roundabout last Saturday, my apologies.

675

O C A N

Services

Help Wanted: Drivers DRIVERS: Looking for job security? Haney Truck Line, seeks CDL-A, hazmat/doubles required. Offer Paid Dock bumps, Benefits, Bonus Program, Paid Vacation! Call NOW 1-888-414-4667. www.GOHANEY.com. DRIVERS: $0.01 increase per mile after 6 months. Quarterly Bonuses. Annual Salary $45K to $60K. CDL-A, 3 months current OTR exp. 800-414-9569 www.driveknight.com.

Business Opportunity LOOMIX(R) FEED supplements is seeking dealers. Motivated individuals with cattle knowledge and community ties. Contact Bethany @ 800-870-0356 / becomeadealer@adm.com to find out if there is a dealership opportunity in your area.

1000

Legal Notices LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF SEIZURE FOR CIVIL FORFEITURE TO ALL POTENTIAL CLAIMANTS AND TO ALL UNKNOWN PERSONS READ THIS CAREFULLY If you have any interest in the seized property described below, you must claim that interest or you will automatically lose that interest. If you do not file a claim for the property, the property may be forfeited even if you are not convicted of any crime. To claim an interest, you must file a written claim with the forfeiture counsel named below, The written claim must be signed by you, sworn to under penalty of perjury before a notary public, and state: (a) Your true name; (b) The address at which you will accept future mailings from the court and forfeiture counsel; and (3) A statement that you have an interest in the seized property. Your deadline for filing the claim document with forfeiture counsel named below is 21 days from the last day of publication of this notice. Where to file a claim and for more information: Daina Vitolins, Crook County District Attorney Office, 300 NE Third Street, Prineville, OR 97754. Notice of reasons for Forfeiture: The property described below was seized for forfeiture because it: (1) Constitutes the proceeds of the violation of, solicitation to violate, attempt to violate, or conspiracy to violates, the criminal laws of the State of Oregon regarding the manufacture, distribution, or possession of controlled substances (ORS Chapter 475); and/or (2) Was used or intended for use in committing or facilitating the violation of, solicitation to violate, attempt to violate, or conspiracy to violate the criminal laws of the State of Oregon regarding the manufacture, distribution or possession of controlled substances (ORS Chapter 475). IN THE MATTER OF: U.S. Currency in the amount of $1,011.00, Case No. 12-85340 seized 5/2/12 from Jeremy Taylor. LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF SEIZURE FOR CIVIL FORFEITURE TO ALL POTENTIAL CLAIMANTS AND TO ALL UNKNOWN PERSONS READ THIS CAREFULLY If you have any interest in the seized property described below, you must claim that interest or you will automatically lose that interest. If you do not file a claim for the property, the property may be forfeited even if you are not convicted of any crime. To claim an interest, you must file a written claim with the forfeiture counsel named below, The written claim must be signed

1000

Legal Notices g by you, sworn to under penalty of perjury before a notary public, and state: (a) Your true name; (b) The address at which you will accept future mailings from the court and forfeiture counsel; and (3) A statement that you have an interest in the seized property. Your deadline for filing the claim document with forfeiture counsel named below is 21 days from the last day of publication of this notice. Where to file a claim and for more information: Daina Vitolins, Crook County District Attorney Office, 300 NE Third Street, Prineville, OR 97754. Notice of reasons for Forfeiture: The property described below was seized for forfeiture because it: (1) Constitutes the proceeds of the violation of, solicitation to violate, attempt to violate, or conspiracy to violates, the criminal laws of the State of Oregon regarding the manufacture, distribution, or possession of controlled substances (ORS Chapter 475); and/or (2) Was used or intended for use in committing or facilitating the violation of, solicitation to violate, attempt to violate, or conspiracy to violate the criminal laws of the State of Oregon regarding the manufacture, distribution or possession of controlled substances (ORS Chapter 475). IN THE MATTER OF: U.S. Currency in the amount of $14,522.00, and a 2003 Chrysler PT Cruiser, Blue, CA plates 6TNK468, VIN 3C4FY48B13T593732,

Case No. 2012-145376 seized 7/19/12 from Juan Pablo Jacobo Lopez and Daniel Silva-Ortiz. 1000

Legal Notices PUBLIC NOTICE Request for Proposals The City of Paisley is soliciting Proposals from qualified engineering firms to provide engineering services to construct Integrated Water Treatment Plant for Arsenic Treatment. Work under this contract will be funded with funds from the Oregon Water Wastewater Financing Program and the City of Paisley. Requests for the RFP packet may be submitted in writing to: Emma Villagrana, City Recorder, City of Paisley, 715 Chewaucan - P.O. Box 100, Paisley OR 97636 or via phone at 541-943-3173. The City of Paisley reserves the right to reject any and all proposals. Proposals must be received by 5:00 pm October 11, 2012 at the Paisley City Hall at the above address. Mis-deliveries, late or faxed submittals will be considered nonresponsive.


G4 THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

BOATS & RVs 805 - Misc. Items 850 - Snowmobiles 860 - Motorcycles And Accessories 865 - ATVs 870 - Boats & Accessories 875 - Watercraft 880 - Motorhomes 881 - Travel Trailers 882 - Fifth Wheels 885 - Canopies and Campers 890 - RV’s for Rent

AUTOS & TRANSPORTATION 908 - Aircraft, Parts and Service 916 - Trucks and Heavy Equipment 925 - Utility Trailers 927 - Automotive Trades 929 - Automotive Wanted 931 - Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 932 - Antique and Classic Autos 933 - Pickups 935 - Sport Utility Vehicles 940 - Vans 975 - Automobiles

882

908

932

Fifth Wheels

Aircraft, Parts & Service

Antique & Classic Autos

Executive Hangar

at Bend Airport (KBDN) Komfort 25’ 2006, 1 60’ wide x 50’ deep, w/55’ wide x 17’ high slide, AC, TV, awning. bi-fold door. Natural NEW: tires, converter, gas heat, office, bath- FIAT 1800 1978, 5-spd, batteries. Hardly used. door panels w/flowers room. Parking for 6 $16,500. 541-923-2595 & hummingbirds, cars. Adjacent to white soft top & hard Frontage Rd; great top. Just reduced to visibility for aviation $3,750. 541-317-9319 bus. 1jetjock@q.com or 541-647-8483 541-948-2126 Montana 3400RL 2008, 4 slides, no smokers or pets, limited usage, 5500 watt Onan gen, solar panel, fireplace, dual A/C, central vac, elect. awning w/sunscreen arctic pkg, rear receiver, alum wheels, 2 TVs, many extras. $35,500. 541-416-8087

Ford Galaxie 500 1963, ONLY 1 OWNERSHIP 2 dr. hardtop,fastback, SHARE LEFT! 390 v8,auto, pwr. steer & Economical flying in radio (orig),541-419-4989 your own Cessna 172/180 HP for only Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, $10,000! Based at V8, automatic, great BDN. Call Gabe at shape, $9000 OBO. Professional Air! 530-515-8199 541-388-0019 916

Trucks & MONTANA 3585 2008, Heavy Equipment exc. cond., 3 slides, king bed, lrg LR, Arctic insulation, all options $37,500. 541-420-3250 NuWa 297LK HitchHiker 2007, *Snowbird Special* 32’, Diamond Reo Dump touring coach, left Truck 1974, 12-14 kitchen, rear lounge, yard box, runs good, many extras, beautiful $6900, 541-548-6812 cond. inside & out, $35,900 OBO, Prineville. 541-447-5502 days & 541-447-1641 eves.

Ford Ranchero 1979

with 351 Cleveland modified engine. Body is in excellent condition, $2500 obo. 541-420-4677 Ford T-Bird 1966 390 engine, power everything, new paint, 54K original miles, runs great, excellent cond. in & out. Asking $8,500. 541-480-3179

Econoline trailer 16-Ton 29’ Bed, w/fold up ramps, elec. Open Road 2004 37' w/ brakes, Pintlehitch, 3 slides W/D hook-up, $4700, 541-548-6812 lrg LR w/rear window GMC ½ ton 1971, Only & desk area. $19,750 $19,700! Original low obo. 541-280-7879 mile, exceptional, 3rd owner. 951-699-7171 Hyster H25E, runs well, 2982 Hours, $3500, call Mercury Monterrey 541-749-0724 1965, Exc. All original, Pilgrim 27’, 2007 5th 4-dr. sedan, in storwheel, 1 slide, AC, age last 15 yrs., 390 TV,full awning, excelHigh Compression lent shape, $23,900. engine, new tires & li541-350-8629 cense, reduced to $2850, 541-410-3425. Peterbilt 359 potable water truck, 1990, 3200 gal. tank, 5hp pump, 4-3" hoses, camlocks, $25,000. 541-820-3724 Pilgrim International 2005, 36’ 5th Wheel, 925 Plymouth Barracuda Model#M-349 RLDS-5 Utility Trailers 1966, original car! 300 Fall price $21,865. hp, 360 V8, center541-312-4466 2007 17’ Express cargo lines, (Original 273 trailer w/ramp, gd shape, eng & wheels incl.) $3750. 541-536-4299 541-593-2597 PROJECT CARS: Chevy 2-dr FB 1949 & Chevy Coupe 1950 - rolling chassis’s $1750 ea., Chevy 4-dr 1949, complete car, $1949; Cadillac Series 61 1950, 2 dr. hard top, complete w/spare front clip., $3950, 541-382-7391

Big Tex LandscapRegal Prowler AX6 Exing/ ATV Trailer, treme Edition 38’ ‘05, dual axle flatbed, 4 slides,2 fireplaces, all 7’x16’, 7000 lb. maple cabs, king bed/ GVW, all steel, bdrm separated w/slide glass dr,loaded,always $1400. garaged,lived in only 3 541-382-4115, or mo,brand new $54,000, 541-280-7024. still like new, $28,500, VW Bugs 1968 & 970, will deliver,see rvt.com, VW Baja Bug 1968, 931 ad#4957646 for pics. all good cond., Make Automotive Parts, Cory, 541-580-7334 offers. 541-389-2636 Roadranger 27’ 1993, Service & Accessories A/C, awning, sleeps 6, exc. cond., used little, 4 studded snow tires on rims for 1994 Toyota VW Karmanghia $4,495 OBO. Camry used 1 winter 1970, good cond., 541-389-8963 $300. 541-593-2134. new upholstery and convertible top. SPRINTER 36’ 2005, 932 $10,000. $10,500 obo. Two Antique & 541-389-2636 slides, sleeps 5, queen air mattress, Classic Autos small sgl. bed, couch folds out. 1.5 baths, 541-382-0865, leave message!

Chev Corvair Monza convertible,1964, new top & tranny, runs great, exlnt cruising car! $5500 obo. 541-420-5205

VW Thing 1974, good cond. Extremely Rare! Only built in 1973 & 1974. $8,000. 541-389-2636 933

Pickups

Taurus 27.5’ 1988

Everything works, $1750/partial trade for car. 541-460-9127

900 908

Aircraft, Parts & Service

1/3 interest in Columbia 400, located at Sunriver. $138,500. Call 541-647-3718 1/3 interest in wellequipped IFR Beech Bonanza A36, located KBDN. $55,000. 541-419-9510

940

975

975

975

Pickups

Sport Utility Vehicles

Vans

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

GMC Denali 2003

Dodge Caravan 1999, regular

Chrysler PT Cruiser 2009, Auto, 51K miles. Vin# 558355. $11,999

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $1950. 541-419-5480.

loaded with options. Exc. cond., snow tires and rims included. 130k hwy miles. $12,000. 541-419-4890.

oil/trans. service, new battery/tires, alloy wheels. 222K $2,000. Cash only 541-410-1246.

541-647-2822 HertzBend.com DLR4821

Nissan Altima 3.5SR 2012, 13,200 mi., exc. cond., 6-cyl., 270HP, 8-way power driver seat, 60/40 rear seat, leather steering wheel with audio controls, AM/FM/CD/AUX with Bose speakers, A/C, Bluetooth, USB, back up camera, heated front seats, power moonroof & more. In Bend, below Blue Book at $22,955, (317) 966-2189

Toyota Camry Solara LE Sports Coupe 2004, auto, 4-cyl, sunroof, chrome wheels,32mpg, lots of standard equip., clear coat black, 30K mi., like new $10,000. Firm 541-388-8887 Toyota Camry XLE 1994 V6, 4 dr, leather interior, AM/FM radio CD/Tape player, sunroof, auto., ps/pb, cruise, A/C, very clean, great condition, $3150. 541-593-2134

Hummer H2 2003, auto, Ford Arrowstar 1989 $400 or best offer. 4X4, premium wheels, 541-977-4391 Take care of 3rd seat, leather, grill Nissan Titan Crewcab guard, lots of extras. 975 your investments LE 2007, auto, Vin #113566. Automobiles with the help from leather, nav., loaded. $17,988. Vin #210963. The Bulletin’s $18,999. “Call A Service 2060 NE Hwy 20 • Bend 877-266-3821 Professional” Directory Dlr #0354 2060 NE Hwy 20 • Bend 877-266-3821 Dlr #0354 Audi Q5 2011, 3.2L, Toyota Prius 2008 TourSLine Blk, 270 hp V6, FIND IT! ing w/leather, 6 CD/ auto/man 6spd trans; BUY IT! MP3, GPS, bluetooth, AWD NAV, 20" whls, snow tires on rims, new SELL IT! 21k mi, exceptional headlamps & windshield Chrysler Sebring The Bulletin Classiieds Jeep Willys 1947,custom, $43,500. Call/text 47,700 miles, clean, 2006 exc. cond, 541-480-9931 small block Chevy, PS, Porsche 911 1974, low $18,200 541-408-5618 very low miles (38k), OD,mags+ trailer.Swap mi., complete motor/ Buicks! 1996 Regal, always garaged, for backhoe.No am calls trans. rebuild, tuned 87k; 1997 LeSabre, Want to impress the transferable warplease. 541-389-6990 suspension, int. & ext. 112k; and others! ranty incl. $9,100 relatives? Remodel refurb., oil cooling, You’ll not find nicer 541-330-4087 Lexus RX 350, 2010, your home with the shows new in & out, Buicks $3500 & up. Honda Accord EX 1997, perf. mech. cond. help of a professional RAM 2500 2003, 5.7L auto, AWD, silver, 35K, One look’s worth a auto, moonroof, alloy Much more! hemi V8, hd, auto, cruise, loaded, no OR winters. thousand words. Call from The Bulletin’s am / fm / cd. $8400 obro. $35,250. 541-593-3619 wheels, Vin #063075. $28,000 541-420-2715 Bob, 541-318-9999. “Call A Service 541-420-3634 / 390-1285 $3,999. for an appt. and take a Mercury PORSCHE 914 1974, Professional” Directory drive in a 30 mpg. car Subaru Baja Turbo Mountaineer 2000, Roller (no engine), auto, tow, 4X4, alloys, Cadillac CTS Sedan Pickup 2006, manual, lowered, full roll cage, Toyotas: 1999 Avalon 2007, 29K, auto, exc. 2060 NE Hwy 20 • Bend leather. Vin #J42745 AWD, leather, pre5-pt harnesses, rac254k; 1996 Camry, cond, loaded, $17,900 mium wheels, mooning seats, 911 dash & 877-266-3821 $7,995 98k, 4 cyl. Lots of OBO, 541-549-8828 roof, tonneau cover. instruments, decent Dlr #0354 miles left in these Vin #103218. shape, very cool! cars. Price? You tell Cadillac DeVille Just too many $14,788. me! I’d guess $1699. 541-678-3249 1996, Auto, loaded, 541-647-2822 $2000-$4000. collectibles? Cream Puff! Only HertzBend.com Your servant, Bob at Subaru Forester 118K mi., DLR4821 541-318-9999, no 2060 NE Hwy 20 • Bend 2004 Turbo, 5-spd Vin #104880 Sell them in charge for looking. 877-266-3821 manual, studded Nissan Armada SE $4,295 The Bulletin Classiieds Dlr #0354 tires & wheels, Toyota Sienna 2000, 2007, 4WD, auto, auto, loaded, chains, Thule ski leather, DVD, CD. Vin #176708 box, 67K miles, Vin#700432. $14,788. 541-385-5809

541-647-2822 HertzBend.com

perfect! $13,950.

$7,995

541-504-8316 Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited 2005, fully loaded, sunroof, Subaru Forester 2007, heated leather seats, XT turbo, auto, all new tires, GPS, alweather pkg., moonways garaged, 127K 1 roof, alloy wheels, owner miles, maint. multi disc. Vin records, $9900, #730108. $17,999. 541-593-9908.

DLR4821 2060 NE Hwy 20 • Bend 877-266-3821 Cadillac El Dorado 541-647-2822 Dlr #0354 1994, Total cream HertzBend.com puff, body, paint, trunk DLR4821 as showroom, blue Volvo V70XC 2000, leather, $1700 wheels 3rd row seat, mounted w/snow tires although studs, tow pkg, extras, car has not been wet $5000, 541.693.4764 in 8 years. On trip to Lexus LS400 Sedan 2060 NE Hwy 20 • Bend 1999, loaded leather, Boise avg. 28.5 mpg., Volvo V70 XL 2000 , Porsche Cayenne 2004, 877-266-3821 moonroof, premium $5400, 541-593-4016. 935 AWD wgn, 68k, 86k, immac, dealer Dlr #0354 wheels, low miles, #682041 $10,995 maint’d, loaded, now Sport Utility Vehicles very clean. Vin Cadillac Seville STS Subaru Legacy 2009, $17000. 503-459-1580 #145798. $12,999. 2003 - just finished 3.0 L, limited, auto, $4900 engine work loaded, leather, by Certified GM memoonroof, nav., rear chanic. Has every- 2060 NE Hwy 20 • Bend spoiler, Vin #217519 541-598-3750 877-266-3821 thing but navigation. $25,999. aaaoregonautosource.com Dlr #0354 Too many bells and Toyota 4Runner whistles to list. I Buick Enclave 2008 CXL 4WD 1986, auto, AWD, V-6, black, clean, Say “goodbuy” bought a new one. Mitsubishi 3000 GT 2060 NE Hwy 20 • Bend 2 dr., $995, 1999, auto., pearl mechanically sound, 82k $6900 firm. 877-266-3821 to that unused white, very low mi. 541-923-7384 miles. $23,900. 541-420-1283 Dlr #0354 $9500. 541-788-8218. Call 541-815-1216 item by placing it in Subaru Outback 2002, 1 The Bulletin Classiieds Chevy Tahoe 1500 LS owner, garaged, all op2004, auto, 4X4, tions except leather, Vin #216330. $9,999. $7500, 541-318-8668. 541-385-5809 “Please discontinue this ad as the vehicle has Subaru Outback been sold. I am pleased Wagon 2007, 2.5 WHEN YOU SEE THIS 2060 NE Hwy 20 • Bend Toyota 4-Runner 4x4 Ltd, to tell you that I had manual, alloy wheels, 877-266-3821 2006, Salsa Red pearl, posted it on Craig’s List AWD. Vin #335770. Dlr #0354 49,990 miles, exlnt cond, on 6 different locations $16,999. professionally detailed, Nissan Murano Chevy Tahoe LS 2001 $22,900. 541-390-7649 but it was the Bulletin ad SL-AWD 2004, 75k, On a classified ad 4x4. 120K mi, Power that sold it!” all-weather tires, tow go to seats, Tow Pkg, 3rd Lee, G. 940 pkg, gold metallic, 2060 NE Hwy 20 • Bend www.bendbulletin.com row seating, extra beige leather int., 877-266-3821 to view additional Vans tires, CD, privacy tintmoonroof, ......... Dlr #0354 photos of the item. ing, upgraded rims. Fantastic cond. $7995 Want Results from qualified Astro What are you Contact Timm at Chevy Toyota Camry’s local buyers? Cargo Van 2001, 541-408-2393 for info 1984, $1200 Call us at 541-385-5809 and ask looking for? pw, pdl, great cond., or to view vehicle. about our Wheel Deal special! OBO, 1985 $1400 business car, well You’ll ind it in OBO, 1986 parts maint, regular oil car, $500; call for The Bulletin Classiieds changes, $4500, please call details, Ford Excursion 541-633-5149 www .bendbulletin 541-548-6592 2005, 4WD, diesel, 541-385-5809 exc. cond., $18,900, call 541-923-0231. Toyota Tacoma 2008 SR5 pkg, dbl. cab 4x4 V6, L/B, exc. cond., Tonneau cover, orig. owner. 46,700 miles. Incl. set of mounted snow tires. $24,200 obo. 541-536-5587

SOLD IN 30 DAYS!!

SMO L I CH M O T O RS

THE BETTER WAY TO BUY A CAR! ’96 Cadillac DeVille AT, Loaded/Cream Puff, only 118K #104880 ................ $4,295

’00 Mercury Mountaineer AT, 4X4, Tow, Alloys, Leather #J42745 ................ $7,995

’00 Toyota Sienna AT, Loaded #558355 ................ $7,995

’09 Chrysler P/T Cruiser Touring / Low Miles 57K only #558355 ............. $11,999

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0%

72 MO*

72 MO*

’11 Kia Rio AT, Great Fuel Economy #960522 ............. $13,359

’10 Chevy Aveo AT, Touring #118671 ............. $13,995

’10 Nissan Sentra 4 DR Sedan, Great Fuel Saver #651104 ............. $14,695

’11 Suzuki SX-4

’11 Ford Fiesta

NEW 2012 SUZUKI $ EQUATOR 4x4

2012 SUZUKI $ 255/mo. 41422/mo. NEW SX4 AWD

VIN: CC461804. Stock#: Z12013. MSRP $29,824. Down Payment $0. 0% for 72 months. On approved credit.

VIN: C6304106. Stock#: Z12001. MSRP $19,995. Down Payment $2,000. 0% for 72 months. On approved credit.

AT, Nicely Equipped #210319.............. $14,995

’10 Dodge Avenger R/T Sedan 37K Miles, Loaded! #177898 ............. $15,495

’10 Mazda 6 Automatic, Loaded #M05673A ......... $15,495

’12 Nissan Versa

3/4 ton 4x4, C-20 Pickup Chevy 1995, extended cab, 1969, all orig. Turbo 44; long box, grill guard, 885 auto 4-spd, 396, model running boards, bed Canopies & Campers CST /all options, orig. rails & canopy, 178K owner, $24,000, miles, $4800 obo. 541-923-6049 208-301-3321 (Bend) Raider canopy, fits 6-ft bed, fiberglass, perfect Chevy Pickup 1965,good shape, $600. Call farm truck, asking 541-388-4662; 604-0116 $800, 541-678-8164.

Autos & Transportation

935

33 MPG! #302264 ............. $14,995

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809 933

Chevy

Chevy Silverado 1500 2000, 4WD, Chevy Wagon 1957, 4-dr., complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453.

auto, X-cab, heated leather seats, tow pkg, chrome brush guard, exc. cond., runs great, 130K mi., $9500, 541-389-5579.

Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $9000 or make offer. Ford Ranger 1999, 4x4, 71K, X-cab, XLT, 541-385-9350. auto, 4.0L, $7900 OBO. 541-388-0232 Chrysler SD 4-Door 1930, CDS Royal Standard, 8-cylinder, body is good, needs some restoration, runs, taking bids, 541-383-3888, 541-815-3318

Automatic, 5-Door HB, Fuel Saver #358909A .......... $16,556

’11 Chrysler 200 Sedan Touring #553592 ............. $17,995

’11 Subaru Impreza AWD #511600A .......... $17,995

NEW 2011 SUZUKI KIZASHI SE AWD

21,888

VIN: B6111075. Stock#: Z11011. MSRP $24,698. Smolich Discount $2,810.

NEW 2011 SUZUKI GRAND VITARA 4x4

$

21,888

VIN: B4103044. Stock#: Z11006. MSRP $23,983. Smolich Discount $2,095.

’11 KIA Sedona 4 Dr, Blue #371299 ............. $18,650

’12 Hyundai Sonata 4 Dr Sedan, AT, Loaded #320628 ............. $19,461

’09 Subaru Legacy Sedan

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0%

72 MO*

72 MO*

H4 Special Edition #235780 ............. $19,995

’11 Mazda CX-7 AWD, Leather, AT #369463 ............. $20,995

’07 Toyota F-J Cruiser Auto, Loaded, Only 44K Miles! #085836 ............. $23,995

’12 Kia Sorento AWD, AT, V6, Well equipped #241684 ............. $23,995

’11 Toyota Avalon AT, Leather, Beautiful Car #406252 ............. $26,995 Through 10/3/12

NEW 2012 SUZUKI $ KIZASHI SE AWD

541-647-2822 535 NE Savannah Dr, Bend HertzBend.com

319/mo.

VIN: C6101355. Stock#: Z12004. MSRP $25,124. Smolich Discount $525. Down Payment $2,000. 0% for 72 months. On approved credit.

All vehicles subject to prior sale, does not include tax, license or title and registration processing fee of $100. Vin#’s posted at dealership. See Hertz Car Sales of Bend for details. Dealer #4821

Ford Super Duty F-250 2001, 4X4, very good shape, V10 eng, $7900 OBO. 541-815-9939

$

O M S

LI

CH

NEW 2012 SUZUKI $ GRAND VITARA 4x4

299/mo.

VIN: C4100574. Stock#: Z12005. MSRP $24,719. Smolich Discount $831. Down Payment $2,700. 0% for 72 months. On approved credit.

541- 548 -1448 2987 HWY 97 • REDMOND

VISIT SMOLICHSUZUKI.COM All vehicles subject to prior sale, tax, title, license & registration fees. All financing, subject to credit approval. *On approved credit, $13.89 per $1000 financed. 0% in lieu of factory rebate. Pictures for illustration purposes only. Offers expires 9/30/12

Bulletin Daily Paper 09/27/12  

The Bulletin Daily print edition for Thursday September 27, 2012

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