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WEDNESDAY September 5, 2012

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Oregon delegates solidly behind Obama

Seniors want their money back • United Senior Citizens of Bend is seeking $890,000 it raised for construction of the Bend Senior Center By Mac McLean The Bulletin

About a dozen senior citizens waited in a lobby outside the Bend Park & Recreation District’s meeting room

BACK TO SCHOOL

Tuesday night for their chance to add to the latest chapter in an yearlong debate about the Bend Senior Center and what it’s supposed to be. “I guess they’re not going to let us

speak tonight,� said the group’s attorney, Bill Buchanan, as he walked out of the conference room and delivered the bad news to the group, all members of the United Senior Citizens of Bend. About 10 years ago, USCB teamed up with the parks district and the city of Bend to raise the money needed to

build the senior center, which sits in southeast Bend at the corner of 15th Street and Reed Market Road. The group gave the city the title to its building as part of the fundraising effort and helped raise $890,000 to build the center and to expand it a few years later, Buchanan said. See Seniors / A6

A KISS FROM MOM

By Andrew Clevenger The Bulletin

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Oregon’s delegation threw its support Tuesday behind President Barack Obama as the Democratic National Convention opened. Some who attended the 2008 convention in Denver said they were more enthusiastic about Obama’s Inside candidacy • First lady’s this time speech wows around. They crowd, A4 are wary of seeing his • Bill Clinton accomplishsteps back into spotlight, ments rolled back should A4 the Republican candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, win in November. With a bounce in the polls following last week’s Republican National Convention, Romney is running neck and neck with Obama. “This time I see the challenge as much greater,â€? said Loyd Henion of Albany, who was a Hillary Clinton delegate in 2008. “When you’ve got a close contest, that’s when you need your energy the highest.â€? See Convention / A4

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

Book details rift between Komen, Planned Parenthood

Yvette Gaynor, of Sisters, kisses her daughter Molly, 6, goodbye Tuesday in Joni Stengel’s first-grade classroom at Sisters Elementary. Tuesday was the first day of school in the Sisters district. “She’s excited,� Yvette Gaynor said of her daughter.

By David Crary

The cuter, the better

First day of school BEND-LA PINE SCHOOLS

CULVER SCHOOL DISTRICT

Submit photos of your favorite back-to-school kid to our gallery at bendbulletin.com/back2school/ submitphotos.

Today, grades 1-9 Thursday, grades 10-12

Today, grades 1-9 Thursday, grades 10-12

The Associated Press

NEW YORK — Criticizing major players on both sides, former Susan G. Komen for the Cure Vice President Karen Handel has written a blistering insider’s account of the prominent cancer charity’s decision to halt grants to Planned Parenthood and its swift retreat in the face of an intense, widespread backlash. Titled “Planned Bullyhood� and due for publication next Tuesday, the book depicts Planned Parenthood as an aggressive, partisan organization that was willing to weaken Komen to further a liberal political agenda. However, Handel — who resigned from Komen after its reversal — also assails Komen’s leadership as indecisive, timid and politically naive. See Komen / A5

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Tuesday was the first day of school in the Sisters District and some Crook County schools. Here are starting dates for other Central Oregon districts. Note: If you have a kindergartner starting school this year, contact your elementary school about start dates.

CROOK COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT Today, grades 7-8 and 10-12

JEFFERSON COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT Monday, grades 1-6 and 9 Tuesday, grades 7, 8, and 10-12

REDMOND SCHOOL DISTRICT Monday, grades 2-6 and 9 at Redmond High, all grades at Ridgeview High. Tuesday, grades 7, 8 and 10-12 at Redmond High Wednesday, Sept. 12, grade 1

U.S. flower growers fight to survive flood of imports By Rob Hotakainen McClatchy Newspapers

Nick Gonzales / Bellingham Herald

Diane Szukovathy, co-owner of Jello Mold Farm in Mt. Vernon, Wash., collects Audrey Grace dahlias (red) and Snoho Jojo dahlias (pink) at her farm.

The Bulletin An Independent Newspaper

Vol. 109, No. 249, 32 pages, 6 sections

WASHINGTON — As she took a break on Monday from picking dahlias, zinnias and amaranths on her Jello Mold Farm in Mount Vernon, Wash., Diane Szukovathy wondered why, in her opinion, the federal government is working so hard to put other flower growers and her out of business by helping competitors thousands of miles away

INDEX Business Calendar Classified

E1-4 B3 F1-4

Comics B4-5 Crosswords B5, F2 Editorials

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Local News C1-6 Obituaries C5 Shopping B1-6

in the temperate regions of Colombia. First came the international war on drugs, with the U.S. government spending millions since 1999 to help poor Colombian farmers destroy their coca plants and replace them with flowers. Then Congress passed a free-trade agreement with Colombia last year, making those blooms cheaper for Americans to buy. With Colombian imports

TODAY’S WEATHER Sports D1-6 Stocks E2-3 TV & Movies B2

Sunny, High 88, Low 43 Page C6

now accounting for three of every four cut flowers sold in the United States, domestic growers say they can’t compete with the planeloads of Colombian flowers that are flown in through Miami each day. “It’s job robbing. I mean, it’s so bad. It’s so wrong,� said Szukovathy, 49, who’s run her farm in the Skagit River Valley, about an hour north of Seattle, for nearly 10 years. See Flowers / A5

TOP NEWS CHINA: Mixed signals for Clinton, A3 WILDFIRE: S. California burns, A3


THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2012

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Voyager is about to go where no spacecraft has gone before

It’s Wednesday, Sept. 5, the 249th day of 2012. There are 117 days left in the year.

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Oregon Lottery results As listed at www.oregonlottery.org

MEGA MILLIONS

The numbers drawn Tuesday night are:

16 32 39 41 53 16 x3 The estimated jackpot is now $105 million.

PASADENA — Thirty-five years after leaving Earth, Voyager 1 is reaching for the stars. The workhorse spacecraft is poised to bid adieu to the solar system and enter a new realm of space — the first time a manmade object will have escaped to the other side. Perhaps no one on Earth will relish the moment more than 76-year-old Ed Stone, who has toiled on the project from the start. “We’re anxious to get outside and find what’s out there,” he said. When NASA’s Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 first rocketed out of Earth’s grip in 1977, no one knew how long they would live. Now, they are the longestoperating spacecraft in history and the most distant, billions of miles away from Earth but in different directions. Today marks the 35th anniversary of Voyager 1’s launch to Jupiter and Saturn. It is now flitting around the fringes of the solar system, which is enveloped in a giant plasma bubble. This hot and turbulent area is created by a stream of charged particles from the sun. Outside the bubble is a new frontier in the Milky Way — the space between stars. Once it plows through, scientists expect a calmer environment by comparison. Exactly when that will happen is anyone’s guess. Voyager 1 is in uncharted celestial territory. One thing is clear: The boundary that separates the solar system and interstellar space is near, but it could take days, months or longer to reach that milestone. Voyager 1 is currently more than 11 billion miles from the sun. Its twin, Voyager 2, which celebrated its launch anniversary two weeks ago, trails behind at 9 billion miles from the sun. They’re still ticking despite being relics of the early Space Age. Each only has 68 kilobytes of computer memory. To put that in perspective, the smallest iPod — an 8-gigabyte iPod Nano — is 100,000 times more powerful. Each also has an eight-track tape recorder. Today’s spacecraft use digital memory. The Voyagers’ original goal was to tour Jupiter and Saturn, and they sent back postcards

NASA file photo via The Associated Press

An image taken by the Voyager 1 spacecraft shows a volcanic plume on Io, one of Jupiter’s moons. Launched in 1977, the spacecraft and its twin, Voyager 2, are exploring the edge of the solar system. Voyager 1 is poised to cross into interstellar space.

Still searching Thirty-five years after leaving Earth, NASA’s Voyager 1 continues to explore space and may soon leave the solar system.

Moving through space Termination shock Shifting boundary where solar winds are reduced

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Voyager 1 Farthest human-built object from Earth

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Heliopause Sun’s influence gives way to that of interstellar space; end of the solar system

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Pluto*

Earth Saturn

Neptune

Sun

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Bow shock Theoretical area where interstellar gases create a shock wave around heliopause

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• Thirty-five years after being launched, the craft is set to become the first man-made object to leave the solar system

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Voyager 2

Interstellar space Space between two or more stars

Voyager 1 probe

*Pluto declassified as a planet in 2008

Note: Drawing not to scale; approximate locations

1,592 pounds • Travels 38,000 mph • Carries disk with sounds and images portraying the diversity of life and culture on Earth as a greeting to any life form • Radio signals from the craft take 16 hours and 38 minutes to reach Earth Size • Has enough fuel and power to send compared to 6 foot messages until at least 2020, 12.4 billion person miles from Earth Source: NASA

Melina Yingling / © 2012 McClatchy-Tribune News Service

of Jupiter’s big red spot and Saturn’s glittery rings. They also beamed home a torrent of discoveries: erupting volcanoes on Jupiter’s moon Io; hints of an ocean below the icy surface of Europa, another moon of Jupiter; signs of methane rain on the Saturn’s moon Titan. Voyager 2 then journeyed to Uranus and Neptune. It remains the only spacecraft to fly by these two outer planets. Voyager 1 used Saturn as a

gravitational slingshot to catapult itself toward the edge of the solar system. “Time after time, Voyager revealed unexpected — kind of counterintuitive — results, which means we have a lot to learn,” said Stone, Voyager’s chief scientist and a professor of physics at the California Institute of Technology. These days, a handful of engineers diligently listen for the Voyagers from a satellite campus not far from the NASA Jet

Propulsion Laboratory, which built the spacecraft. The control room, with its cubicles and carpeting, could be mistaken for an insurance office if not for a blue sign overhead that reads “Mission Controller” and a warning on a computer: “Voyager mission critical hardware. Please do not touch!” There are no full-time scientists left on the mission, but 20 part-timers analyze the data streamed back. Since the spacecraft are so far out, it takes 17 hours for a radio signal from Voyager 1 to travel to Earth. For Voyager 2, it takes about 13 hours. Cameras aboard the Voyagers were turned off long ago. The nuclear-powered spacecraft, about the size of a subcompact car, still have five instruments to study magnetic fields, cosmic rays and charged particles from the sun known as solar wind. They also carry gold-plated discs containing multilingual greetings, music and pictures — on the off chance that intelligent species come across them. Since 2004, Voyager 1 has been exploring a region in the bubble at the solar system’s edge where the solar wind dramatically slows and heats up. Over the last several months, scientists have seen changes that suggest Voyager 1 is on the verge of crossing over. When it does, it will be the first spacecraft to explore between the stars. Space observatories such as the Hubble and Spitzer space telescopes have long peered past the solar system, but they tend to focus on far-away galaxies. As ambitious as the Voyager mission is, it was scaled down from a plan to send a quartet of spacecraft to Jupiter, Uranus, Neptune and Pluto in what was billed as the “grand tour” of the solar system. But the plan was nixed, and scientists settled for the Voyager mission. American University space policy expert Howard McCurdy said it turned out to be a boon. They “took the funds and built spacecraft robust enough to visit all four gas giants and keep communicating” beyond the solar system, McCurdy said. The double missions so far have cost $983 million in 1977 dollars, which translates to $3.7 billion now. The spacecraft have enough fuel to last until around 2020. By that time, scientists hope they will already be floating between the stars.

HAPPENINGS • Former President Bill Clinton will place Barack Obama’s name into nomination for a second term as president at the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, N.C. • A memorial service commemorating the 40th anniversary of the Munich Olympics massacre — during which 11 Israelis, a German policeman and five Palestinian attackers were killed — will be held in Munich.

IN HISTORY Highlights: In 1774, the first Continental Congress assembled in Philadelphia. In 1793, the Reign of Terror began during the French Revolution as the National Convention instituted harsh measures to repress counterrevolutionary activities. In 1957, the novel “On the Road,” by Jack Kerouac, was first published by Viking Press. In 1972, terrorism struck the Munich Olympics as members of the Palestinian group Black September attacked the Israeli delegation; 11 Israelis, five guerrillas and a police officer were killed in the resulting siege. In 1975, President Gerald Ford escaped an attempt on his life by Lynette “Squeaky” Fromme, a disciple of Charles Manson, in Sacramento, Calif. In 1997, Mother Teresa died in Calcutta, India, at age 87. Ten years ago: Afghan President Hamid Karzai survived an assassination attempt in Kandahar, hours after an explosives-packed car tore through a Kabul market. Five years ago: German officials announced that three militants from an Islamic group linked to al-Qaida were planning “imminent” bomb attacks against Americans in Germany when an elite antiterrorist unit raided their smalltown hideout. One year ago: The prosecution’s first witness in the trial of ousted Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, Gen. Hussein Moussa, startled the court by testifying that police had not been ordered to fire on protesters in Cairo’s Tahrir Square, contradicting prosecutors’ central claim.

BIRTHDAYS Former Federal Reserve Board Chairman Paul Volcker is 85. Comedian-actor Bob Newhart is 83. Actress-singer Carol Lawrence is 80. Actor William Devane is 73. Actor George Lazenby is 73. Actress Raquel Welch is 72. Movie director Werner Herzog is 70. Singer Al Stewart is 67. Actor-director Dennis Dugan is 66. “Cathy” cartoonist Cathy Guisewite is 62. Actor Michael Keaton is 61. TV personality Dweezil Zappa is 43. Actress Rose McGowan is 39. — From wire reports

FOCUS: SCIENCE

Citizen scientists helping chart tsunami debris By Lindsey Hoshaw New York Times News Service

ABOARD THE SEA DRAGON, 1,000 miles east of Japan — After narrowly avoiding a typhoon, battling seasickness and being pelted by rain for days on end, crew members aboard the Sea Dragon were galvanized by the sight of a stranded boat. The 150-pound piece of a skiff, torn in half and adorned with Japanese characters, was most likely a remnant of the tsunami that struck eastern Japan last year. This scientific expedition was unusual in many ways, including the fact that it didn’t contain any scientists. Members of the volunteer crew hailed from six countries and

lived on a yacht for a month in hopes of finding an array of debris they could photograph and blog about. They are part of a citizens’ brigade that has been fanning out along the West Coast and in the Pacific, collecting and categorizing thousands of items that were swept out to sea after an 8.9-magnitude earthquake sent a tsunami crashing into coastal Japanese communities in March 2011. In some cases, they are tracking down and returning items to their owners. Their efforts have quickly become the backbone of a national effort to better understand what is washing up along thousands of miles of coastline.

Lindsey Hoshaw / New York Times News Service

Volunteers found the wreckage of this boat, likely debris from last year’s tsunami, in waters east of Japan on June 21.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has received more than 1,000 reports of marine debris on U.S. beaches since the orga-

nization started its marine debris hot line last December. Citizen scientists have taken an archaeological interest in the flotsam. “The tsunami debris is something of a time capsule,” said Ken Campbell, a professional kayaker who, with two fellow guides, has toured Washington islands looking for lost items. Many see the debris field as a watery Pompeii, eloquent but impermanent, soon to be wiped clean by the force of waves and gravity. “Beachcombers are like archaeologists, and if you don’t talk to them when the debris arrives, the info is lost,” said Curtis Ebbesmeyer, an oceanographer who started the

world’s largest beachcombing organization. Along with the Algalita Marine Research Institute, Marcus Eriksen, whose marine conservation nonprofit organization, 5 Gyres Institute, chartered the Sea Dragon expedition in June, said the natural disaster hit home. “When you see this swath of debris washing ashore, it’s hard not to feel connected to their tragedy because in some ways you experienced it with them.” Japanese officials estimate that up to 1.5 million tons of debris is still afloat, and large items like a concrete dock and a Harley-Davidson motorcycle have already washed up along the coasts of Oregon and British Columbia.


WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

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Firefighters battle blaze in S. Calif. By Ian Lovett New York Times News Service

LOS ANGELES — A wildfire in the Angeles National Forest has consumed 3,600 acres, driving local residents and thousands of holiday weekend visitors from the popular wilderness area, about 25 miles east of here. With hot, dry conditions continuing across Southern California, officials said they did not expect to fully contain the blaze for at least another week. Almost 800 firefighters from across the region were on the ground Tuesday, battling the blaze that began Sunday afternoon. Aided by four air tankers and 10 helicopters, they had managed to contain only 15 percent of the blaze. Nathan Judy, a spokesman for the U.S. Forest Service, said efforts to contain the fire had been slowed by the steep,

remote terrain where it is burning. “They are working in a remote area of the forest, with nasty, nasty steep cliffs on either side,” Judy said. “When we put the firefighters into that area, we want to make sure they are up there safely, and don’t slide off the side of those hills while they’re putting in the containment line.” Thus far, as the blaze has burned through chaparral and brush that has not seen a fire in over two decades, there have been no major injuries, and no structures threatened, officials said. Five firefighters have suffered minor injuries — most from heat exhaustion — but all of them were treated and back on the fire line Tuesday. Still, the nearby campgrounds, which on a busy holiday weekend could attract as many as 12,000 people, have all been evacuated.

China greets Clinton with warmth, criticism By Steven Lee Myers and Jane Perlez New York Times News Service

Nick Ut / The Associated Press

A Los Angeles County firefighter helicopter drops water on a wildfire burning through 3,600 acres of the Angeles National Forest on Tuesday near Glendora, Calif. It could be a week before firefighters can contain the blaze because of high temperatures and rugged terrain in thick brush.

Record food-stamp use in June revives political debate Bloomberg News WASHINGTON — Foodstamp use reached a record 46.7 million people in June, the government said Tuesday, as Democrats prepare to nominate President Barack Obama for a second term with the economy as a chief issue in the campaign. Participation was up 0.4 per-

cent from May and 3.3 percent higher than a year earlier. It has remained greater than 46 million all year as the unemployment rate stayed higher than 8 percent. New jobless numbers will be released Sept. 7. “Too many middle-class families who have fallen on hard times are still struggling,” Agriculture Secretary Tom

Vilsack said in an emailed statement Tuesday. “Our goal is to get these families the temporary assistance they need so they are able to get through these tough times and back on their feet as soon as possible.” Food-stamp spending, which more than doubled in four years to a record $75.7 billion in the fiscal year ended

Louisiana estimates Isaac damaged 13,000 homes By Michael Muskal Los Angeles Times

It could take weeks to bring Louisiana back to normal after Hurricane Isaac, an unusually wet storm that caused serious flooding in 10 parishes and damaged more than 13,000 homes, authorities said Tuesday. State officials made their first estimates of the toll imposed by Isaac, which came ashore Aug. 28 with 80-mph winds. The slow-moving storm caused flooding but no levee breaks — unlike catastrophic Hurricane Katrina in 2005. Katrina, blamed for more than 1,800 deaths, was followed weeks later by Hurricane Rita. Together, they destroyed hundreds of thousands of homes. Isaac’s damage will be less, said Christina Stephens, a spokeswoman for the Governor’s Office of Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness. The 13,000 tally is an early estimate that is expected to increase once state and federal teams complete

Gerald Herbert / The Associated Press

Ashley Evans, right, helps search for possessions in the ruined home of her friend, Ashley Herleikson, left, after floodwaters from Hurricane Isaac receded in Braithwaite, La., Tuesday.

their assessments. “This is a very preliminary number based on an initial assessment of communities that had flooding and wind damage,” said Stephens, speaking by telephone after a meeting of the Unified Command Group, led by Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal.

“We still have floodwaters in some areas. We expect that this number could rise after FEMA completes house-by-house inspections,” Stephens added. Those inspections will determine whether a damaged building can be repaired or needs to be torn down, which would increase the loss, she said.

Iran airlifting arms to Syria, U.S. says By Michael R. Gordon New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — Iran has resumed shipping military equipment to Syria over Iraqi airspace in a new effort to bolster the embattled government of President Bashar Assad of Syria, according to senior U.S. officials. The Obama administration pressed Iraq to shut down the air corridor that Iran had been using earlier this year, raising the issue with Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki of Iraq. But as Syrian rebels have gained ground and Assad’s government was rocked by a bombing that killed several high officials, Iran doubled down in supporting the Syrian leader. The flights started up again in July, and to the frustration of

U.S. officials have continued ever since. Military experts say the flights have enabled Iran to provide supplies to the Syrian government despite the efforts Syrian rebels have made to seize several border crossings where Iranian aid has been trucked in. “The Iranians have no problems in the air and the Syrian regime still controls the airport,” said a retired Lebanese Army general, Hisham Jaber, who heads the Middle East Center for Studies and Research in Beirut. Vice President Joe Biden, who has played the lead role on Iraq policy for the Obama administration, discussed the Syrian crisis in a phone call with al-Maliki on Aug. 17. The

White House has declined to disclose details, but a U.S. official who would not speak on the record said that Biden had registered his concerns over the flights. Al-Maliki has sought to maintain relations with Iran, while the U.S. has led the international effort to impose sanctions on the Tehran government. At the same time, the Iraqi prime minister appears to look at the potential fall of Assad as a development that might strengthen his Sunni Arab and Kurdish rivals in the region. Iran has an enormous stake in Syria. It is Iran’s staunchest Arab ally, a nation that borders the Mediterranean and Lebanon, and has provided a channel for Iran’s support to Hezbollah.

Sept. 30, 2011, is the Department of Agriculture’s biggest annual expense. Republicans in Congress have criticized the cost of the program, and the House budget plan approved in April sponsored by Rep. Paul Ryan of Wisconsin, the party’s vice-presidential nominee, would cut expenses by $33 billion over 10 years.

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton arrived here Tuesday night to a barrage of unusually harsh coverage in China’s official news media over what they called U.S. meddling in territorial disputes in the region — and then a strikingly warm welcome from the country’s foreign minister. The contrasting receptions — both official, though in different ways — underscored a complicated and often fraught relationship that both countries nevertheless appear intent to maintain despite serious differences over foreign policy, trade and human rights. “In recent years, the ChinaU.S. relationship has maintained stability and achieved development,” the foreign minister, Yang Jiechi, told Clinton in brief but positive remarks before talks and a dinner here, “and we have made important progress in some areas.” A certain amount of pleasantries and parrying is not unusual during high-level visits like Clinton’s, but articles and editorials in China’s official media, as well as comments by Chinese analysts, contained unusual bite Tuesday, including personal criticism of Clinton. The sharpness stemmed from tensions over China’s increasingly assertive claims in maritimedisputeswithothernations in the region, and it echoed a feeling shared by many in both countries that the United States and China are locked in a competition for dominance in the region and beyond. “The United States should stop its role as a sneaky trou-

blemaker sitting behind some nations in the region and pulling strings,” a writer specializing in foreign policy said in an article for Xinhua, the state-run news agency. It was a clear reference to recent statements by the State Department criticizing China’s establishment of a military garrison on disputed islands in the South China Sea. Clinton’s visit is certain to have far less drama than her last one, in May, when a blind Chinese dissident, Chen Guangcheng, escaped house arrest and sought refuge in the U.S. Embassy here, infuriating the Chinese and enmeshing the United States in arduous negotiations that eventually won permission for Chen to leave China for New York. Despite the lingering tensions from that case and new ones over China’s territorial ambitions, Clinton is scheduled over two days to meet with all of the country’s senior leaders, including President Hu Jintao and his presumed successor, Xi Jinping, on Wednesday. “We are committed to building a cooperative partnership with China,” Clinton said here Tuesday evening. “It is a key aspect of our rebalancing in the Asia-Pacific.” The Obama administration’s renewed focus on Asia has been unfavorably interpreted in some quarters here as an effort to contain China. China is as wary of U.S. moves in the region — including an increase in military personnel and materiel in Australia and the Philippines — as the United States and its allies in the region are of China’s territorial ambitions.


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THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2012

THE FIRST LADY SPEAKS

‘We must work like never before’ By Anita Kumar and Lesley Clark McClatchy Newspapers

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — First lady Michelle Obama headlined the opening Tuesday of the Democratic National Convention, an emotion-charged finale to an opening act designed to build enthusiasm among women and minorities whose votes are critical to reelecting her husband. “We must work like never before,” she told the convention, urging them to help President Barack Obama defeat Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney. She asked supporters to rally to her husband’s side as they did in first helping him win the White House four years ago. “And we must once again come together and stand together for the man we can trust to keep moving this great county forward, my husband, our president, Barack Obama,” she told the cheering delegates. In a largely personal tale, the first lady tried to connect her husband to working Americans, talking about his humble beginnings, his decision to forgo a high-paying career in favor of community work and public service, and about his life as a loving husband and father. She recounted her husband’s modest upbringing by a single mother and his grandparents and later their life as a young married couple who had student loan bills higher than their mortgage. “Today, after so many struggles and triumphs and moments that have tested my husband in ways I never could have

Lynne Sladky / The Associated Press

First Lady Michelle Obama speaks to delegates Tuesday at the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, N.C.

imagined, I have seen firsthand that being president doesn’t change who you are — no, no it reveals who you are,” she said to a thunderous ovation. The first lady — lauded earlier by her brother, Craig Robinson, and her sister-inlaw, Maya Soetoro-Ng — told the thousands at Time Warner Cable Arena that Obama had worked tirelessly to make the economy more stable, ease college students loans and im-

prove health care. “He believes that when you’ve worked hard, and done well, and walked through that doorway of opportunity . . . you do not slam it shut behind you . . . No, you reach back, and you give other folks the same chances that helped you succeed,” she said. The audience erupted into their longest, loudest cheers of the night when Michelle Obama came to the stage

to the tune Stevie Wonder’s “Signed, Sealed, Delivered, I’m Yours.” They waved thousands of blue signs: “We Love Michelle” and interrupted her from time to time with chants of “Four more years!” Her appeal capped a day that included the adoption of a party platform that for the first time embraces gay marriage but dropped the party’s earlier support for Jerusalem’s status as Israel’s capital. Republicans quickly pounced on the omission, with House Majority Leader Eric Cantor of Virginia saying the administration was distancing itself from Israel. The platform also stirred controversy with another omission — no reference to God. It also included strong support for abortion rights. The evening saw a diverse parade of speakers that included San Antonio Mayor Julian Castro, the first Latino keynote speaker in convention history, as well as the chairman of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, the first woman to reach the rank of Army three-star general, Black members of Congress, and the convention chairman, Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa. Together, they served as a notso-subtle nod to the changing demographics of the nation. “My family’s story isn’t special. What’s special is the America that makes our story possible,” Castro said. “Ours is a nation like no other — a place where great journeys can be made in a single generation. . . . No matter who you are or where you come from, the path is always forward.”

For one night, Bill Clinton will be back on top By Paul West Tribune Washington Bureau

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — When Bill Clinton takes his star turn Wednesday night at the Democratic convention, it will be another step on a remarkable climb back to the pinnacle of American politics. He will be opening a new chapter in a fraught relationship with President Barack Obama — one that was strained four years ago, has since been mended and could well influence the outcome of the November election. And if everything goes the former president’s way, it could conceivably lead to another Clinton winning the White House in 2016. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton is not on the premises, in keeping with the diplomatic tradition of steering clear of partisan politics, but her husband’s ubiquitousness here would certainly come in handy during any future presidential try by her. All this is possible because, nearly 12 years after leaving office still marred by impeachment, the former president is arguably the most popular figure on the political scene. His personal approval ratings have never been higher, easily exceeding Obama’s. His easy drawl is bombarding the airwaves in battleground state television ads broadcast by the Obama team. Obama has asked Clinton to place his name in nomination, which makes him the first expresident to have that honor and provides further proof, if any were needed, of his importance to the re-election effort.

Big fundraiser Clinton is already raising money for Obama from wealthy donors and volunteering strategic advice. “He calls me frequently,” said a senior Obama campaign official in Chicago. “He is all the way in.”

J. Scott Applewhite / The Associated Press file photo

President Barack Obama listens as former President Bill Clinton speaks in the briefing room of the White House in Washington in October 2010. Clinton will take the convention stage tonight to endorse Obama’s bid for re-election.

He is also keeping the family business alive while his wife finishes her term as secretary of state. He has been making endorsements in down-ballot races and raising money for Democrats who backed her presidential campaign and could be in a position to help her again. Secretary Clinton, one of the only figures on the national scene today whose aura rivals her husband’s, has seen her personal ratings rebound to near-record highs during her tenure as the nation’s senior diplomat. She has announced plans to return to private life after the 2012 election, prompting intense speculation about another bid for the Democratic nomination. “Why wouldn’t she run?” House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi has said, echoing the assessment of many others inside and outside Clinton circles. She would turn 69 in 2016, but even those who say she hasn’t made up her mind don’t think age would be an impediment. Because she will be on the opposite side of the planet tonight — meeting with China’s leaders as part of a 10-day, six-

nation trip — her husband will not only be promoting Obama and burnishing his own legacy in Charlotte. He’ll be her stand-in too, said Ann Lewis, a top Clinton White House aide and senior adviser in Secretary Clinton’s 2008 campaign. “He’s been practicing the role of spouse for several years,” she said. “He’s pretty good at it.”

Seventh convention speech The former president once lamented that he never confronted a crisis serious enough to establish his greatness as president. But the worst economy since the Great Depression has cast a rosier view on his eight years in office. Borrowing his popularity, Obama has picked up speech lines from Clinton, who retains his gift for explaining complex concepts in simple terms. “Nobody has a better grasp and understanding of the issues than this man,” Obama said at a New York fundraiser in June, with Clinton at his side. Clinton’s address tonight will be his seventh in a row to a Democratic convention. The first, also a nominating speech, was in 1988. That

night, he bombed. His biggest applause line: “In closing.” By then, two of the three major TV networks had already cut him off. Today, at 66, he’s a slim slice of his once-beefy self — the product of exercise and a vegan diet after heart surgery. He’s busy with travel, philanthropic works, lucrative speaking gigs (more than $13 million in fees last year, a personal best) and undiminished lust for the political game. His prominence in Obama’s campaign is partly a role reversal for the titans of the Democratic Party. In 2008, lingering tensions between the Clinton and Obama camps led many Democrats to wonder whether the former president would deliver a full-throated endorsement at the convention in Denver. (He did.) Back then, Obama was riding high, and Clinton’s most prominent campaign efforts didn’t come until the final days before the election.

On board early This year, he was brought on board early, reflecting the hard reality of a re-election fight that will be more difficult than the one that brought Obama to power. Obama aides describe Clinton as a validator: someone who can reel in wavering Democrats (including conservative-leaning Clinton Democrats) and reach out to undecided voters. Obama often drops Clinton’s name into his speeches, arguing that his economic plan is just like the one that gave the country prosperity during the Clinton years. Clinton has the potential to help with “important voting groups that Obama is struggling with,” including “whites, men, seniors and political independents,” according to a recent analysis of poll data by Lydia Saad of the Gallup organization.

Police let anti-war protest proceed after one arrest By Viv Bernstein New York Times News Service

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — An antiwar march near the Democratic National Convention on Tuesday afternoon led to a standoff with the police, one arrest and ultimately a peaceful protest through the streets of Charlotte. The march began with about 200 protesters, and tensions quickly rose when the

police formed a barricade in the middle of an intersection a few blocks from the convention site. Hundreds of police officers surrounded the protesters, and John Rhodes Penley, 60, of Asheville, N.C., was arrested when he tried to climb over a police bicycle that was being used to block the protesters. He was charged with breaching a police line

and barricade. Penley, who said he was a Navy veteran, had been carrying an American flag at the front of the protest. “We want Bradley Manning freed,” Penley said as he was handcuffed, a reference to the Army intelligence analyst who has been charged during a federal inquiry into WikiLeaks with disclosing more than

260,000 diplomatic cables, many of them classified. More than two hours later, after a rain shower doused both sides and the number of protesters had dwindled significantly, Police Chief Rodney Monroe met briefly with one of the marchers, and they were allowed to continue walking through Charlotte while surrounded by police officers.

Oregon delegates get good seating CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Oregon’s 84-member delegation enjoyed some pretty good seats in the Time Warner Cable Arena, which normally hosts the home games of the NBA’s Charlotte Bobcats. The best seats on the floor, right in front of the stage, were reserved for the delegations from Illinois and Delaware — the home states of the president and vice president — and North Carolina, the convention’s home state. Other floor seats went to swing states, including Colorado, Nevada, Iowa and Virginia. Oregon occupied the first section of seats that rose up from the floor, one section away from the stage, opposite the delegations from Michigan and Florida. • Former Democratic National Committee chair and 2004 presidential candidate Howard Dean visited the Oregon delegation’s morning breakfast meeting on Tuesday. After joking that he would have preferred to be finishing his second term as president, the former six-term governor of Vermont delivered one of his trademark thundering addresses, inducing shouts and standing ovations. He reminded the delegates that President Bush had inherited a budget surplus, only to leave with a large deficit. “The truth is, you can’t trust Republicans with your money,” he said. “Borrow and spend, borrow and spend, borrow and spend.” • Oregon Sen. Ron Wyden also visited with the delegation and praised Obama for, among other things, passing the Affordable Care Act. “Four years ago, the health care system was for the healthy and the wealthy, and thanks to Barack Obama, that’s no longer true,” he said. Rep. Suzanne Bonamici, D-Beaverton, urged the delegates to spread enthusiasm for not just the president, but for candidates for the House of Representatives. Contrary to what Republicans have suggested, she said, control of the House is “in play.” • Stacy Smith, Intel’s chief financial officer, also attended the delegation’s morning breakfast. (Intel CEO Paul Otellini spoke to Oregon’s Republican Delegation in Tampa.) Smith said Intel was proud of its commitment in Oregon, where its 17,000 employees make it the state’s largest private employer. Three members of the Oregon delegation — Karen Schouten of Beaverton, Elizabeth Rice of Portland and Lawrence Taylor of Astoria — work for Intel. — Andrew Clevenger

Convention Continued from A1 Obama was naive if he believed when he took office that he could forge alliances with congressional Republicans, Henion said. “I’m really disappointed that the Republicans didn’t meet him halfway,” he said. “I wish we weren’t so divided.” Henion said he hopes to hear, rather than platitudes, more about the president’s jobs plan, how he will improve the Affordable Care Act and how Medicare can be saved. “What I really hope to hear is precisely, specifically what needs to be done,” he said. Shirley Woods, a delegate from Wilsonville, said her parents were in the generation that marched for civil rights in the 1960s. It is important to re-elect Obama so that her grandchildren don’t have to fight the same battles over again, she said. Woods said she remains satisfied with Obama’s job performance. “We don’t have any time for anger and cynicism because we understand what he inherited (from the previous administration),” she said. “You can’t unravel that in four years.” Lew Frederick, a state representative and delegate from Portland, said his support for Obama has never wavered. Frederick credited Obama with getting the U.S. out of Iraq,

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and supports Obama’s efforts to end the country’s involvement in Afghanistan. “The time line that he’s put together is appropriate,” he said. “Having effective military action is very different than acting like a cowboy.” Frederick said he hopes to hear more about the president’s plans for education, because an educated workforce will pave the way for economic prosperity throughout the 21st century. Multnomah County Commissioner Loretta Smith, a delegate from Portland, said she was inspired and energized by the evening’s speakers, especially Newark, N.J., Mayor Cory Booker, who said that the most critical investment the country can make in a 21st-century, knowledgebased economy is education. “I think he’s had his hands full,” she said of the president. “I see a sense of urgency to protect the chance the president put in place.” — Reporter: 202-662-7456, aclevenger@bendbulletin.com

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Flowers Continued from A1 “Those politics are such a mess. I don’t really feel like that’s my government, almost,” she said. For small growers caught in the crossfire of global trade, it means the possible loss of an industry they love. For Americans, it means the possible loss of the simple notion of heading to the neighborhood florist to buy locally grown flowers for special friends or spouses or to decorate the graves of loved ones. In Washington and California, two of the top-producing states for flowers used mainly in bouquets, growers are trying to fight back, but they fear they don’t have much time before their industry collapses. For starters, they’re banding together by forming cooperatives that they hope will reduce their transportation costs and make it easier to deal with the expanding foreign competition. And they’re trying to push new buy-American, buy-local campaigns, hoping that consumers will think twice when they realize that their Valentine’s Day bouquets and nearly all the roses on the California’s Rose Parade floats are South American imports. “My sense is that people don’t understand what we’re really up against, the Costco effect of flowers being shipped in by 747s each day, between seven and 10 a day and up to 35 on the holidays,” said Kasey Cronquist, the chief executive officer of the California Cut Flower Commission. “It really puts us at a sizable disadvantage.”

Changes in the business Growers say it’s a far cry from 20 or 30 years ago, when Americans could be reasonably confident that florists were selling local products. Cronquist said that foreign nations, led by Colombia, now sell 82 percent of the cut flowers in the United States. And he said the U.S. flower industry was on its “last stand” and needed U.S. consumers to demand more locally grown

Komen Continued from A1 She also writes that its decision to backtrack was “a terrible mistake.” Handel was hired by Komen as vice president for public policy in April 2011 after losing a Republican gubernatorial primary in Georgia, and was given the task of figuring out how to disengage Komen from Planned Parenthood. The grants from Komen were for breast-cancer education and screening, but the charity was under increasing pressure from antiabortion groups and religious conservatives to cut all ties with Planned Parenthood because, in addition to its other services, it is the nation’s leading provider of abortions. Late in 2011, Komen made a final decision to halt the grants, which totaled $680,000 that year, and its president, Liz Thompson, informed Planned Parenthood’s president, Cecile Richards, of the decision in midDecember. However, the rift did not become public knowledge until Jan. 31, when The Associated Press broke the news. Reaction was immediate and passionate. Twitter and Facebook were flooded with denunciations of Komen’s action. Democratic members of Congress urged Komen to reconsider, as did some of Komen’s own affiliates. Planned Parenthood accused Komen of bowing to right-wing bullying and eagerly mobilized its supporters, raising $3 million in donations within days of the news report. Handel says she urged Thompson and Komen’s CEO and founder, Nancy Brinker, to hold firm and ride out the firestorm, but instead Komen announced on Feb. 3 — just three days after the initial disclosure — that it was shifting gears and restoring Planned Parenthood’s eligibility for grants. Handel, who resigned the next week, was distraught — and she perceived herself being made the scapegoat for a public-relations fiasco. “I was upset with myself for not better anticipating how Planned Parenthood would attack. I was angry at what I believed was betrayal by my Komen teammates and our own consultants. And I was deeply disappointed that Nancy had not had the courage to stand up for Komen and what she

flowers. He said flower growers wanted to piggyback on the growing demand for locally grown food. “We’re really trying to educate a group of people who are receptive to this message now, before it’s too late,” Cronquist said. The booming flower imports from Colombia reflect growing demand from Americans, who’ll want even more as the economy recovers and consumers start piling up more nonessential purchases, said Jerry Haar, the associate dean and director of the Pino Global Entrepreneurship Center at Florida International University.

trade pact with Colombia will boost U.S. exports by $1.1 billion, Haar had a message for the flower producers in Washington state and California: Consumers are calling the shots.

Global trade

While flower growers are lamenting the situation, they’ve found little support in Washington, D.C. Touting global trade has long been a winning argument in Congress, which last year approved free-trade agreements sought by the Obama administration with Colombia, Panama and South Korea. Many U.S. industries are eager to cash in by exporting more of their products: In Washington state, for example, exports of apples, cherries, pears, potatoes and wine are expected to increase. Colombian flowers already have created nearly 225,000 jobs in the United States, most of them near the port of entry in Miami, according to August Solano, the president of the Association of Colombian Flower Exporters. When the Colombian trade pact took effect May 15, he noted, 4,200 boxes of Colombian flowers marked the first import of any product to hit the Miami International Airport under the deal. “Florida is always a winner when trade barriers — tariffs and non-tariff barriers — are lowered within the importing countries,” he said. Last year, trade between Colombia and Florida totaled more than $9 billion, and Florida Gov. Rick Scott is planning to lead a trade mission to Colombia on Dec. 2-5 to line up more business deals. Predicting that the new

“They need to understand that global trade is not about protecting select groups of producers but about affording consumers choice, quality and price,” Haar said. “They need to find ways of improving their operations. Bottom line: There are many more consumers of flowers in the U.S. than there are producers. Consumers rule, as they should.” In Washington state, 19 growers from Washington, Oregon and Alaska are part of the Seattle Wholesale Growers Market, a cooperative of smaller growers that sells directly to florists and retailers. Szukovathy, the president of the market, which was created last year, said the co-op was an attempt to lower distribution costs for producers and to make it more attractive for prospective buyers to have a greater selection of flowers to choose from. “I don’t personally have a problem with some imported flowers; it’s just the ratio is wrong,” she said. “And it’s crazy that the majority of flowers are coming from 3,000 miles away, when there’s really good ones that can be had locally.” While it ended up passing easily, the Colombian pact drew criticism from some liberals on Capitol Hill, including Rep. Jim McDermott of Seattle, the top Democrat on the House of Representatives Ways and Means Subcommittee on Trade, who said workers and labor leaders in Colombia “are killed every year by the dozen.” At a hearing last year, he said that nearly all the workers in the Colombian flower sector were women, who were subjected to violence if they tried to assert any rights in the workplace. Labor and human rights groups have long made similar complaints.

knew was the best decision for the organization,” Handel writes. In Handel’s view, Brinker was a strong-willed leader, but also “very vulnerable to criticism, especially in the press.” Liz Thompson, according to Handel, was knowledgeable about breast cancer, but “sometimes seemed a bit out of her depth” as Komen president. “At times Liz seemed unsure, unwilling to make the tough calls, and easily backed off a position,” Handel writes. Komen announced Aug. 9 that Thompson was leaving the organization and that Brinker would relinquish her role as CEO. Komen spokeswoman Andrea Rader said she could not comment on Handel’s book before its release, but defended the two women who led the charity during the controversy. “The record is well-known: Nancy Brinker and Susan G. Komen for the Cure have done more for women facing breast cancer than any other individual or organization,” Rader wrote in an email. “Liz Thompson is one of the most highly respected leaders in women’s health in the nation, if not the world.” A Planned Parenthood spokesman, Eric Ferrero, also said he couldn’t yet respond to specifics in the book, but added in an email, “It is incredible that there are people who still want to inject politics into breast cancer detection and treatment.” “Thanks to the outpouring of supportwereceivedduringtheKomen funding situation we’ve been able to expand our breast health work nationwide,” he wrote. Komen was founded by Brinker in 1982 in memory of her sister, who died of breast cancer, and it grew to be the nation’s largest breast cancer charity. Yet despite its mainstream popularity, Komen was a target of anti-abortion groups because of partnerships with Planned Parenthood. The pressure escalated last year, with Roman Catholic bishops criticizing Komen for maintaining those ties and the publishing division of the Southern Baptist Convention recalling pink Bibles it had sold because some of the money generated for Komen was being routed to Planned Parenthood. Handel says a break with Planned Parenthood had been pondered by Komen’s lead-

ers long before she was hired, but the move became more definite during the latter half of 2011 and was approved by Komen’s board of directors in November. There was no objection from board members, but some Komen affiliates expressed dismay during a conference call in December, according to Handel. Handel says Komen’s leaders — during December and January — were hopeful that Planned Parenthood would agree to an amicable split, and not go public with any angry reaction. However, Handel writes that she became worried about possible leaks to Planned Parenthood from Komen employees or consultants, and says she began to sense that things would end badly for Komen. “Planned Parenthood would play the victim, accusing Komen of being bullies and succumbing to political pressure,” she writes. “I felt in my heart of hearts that Komen would not have the fortitude to see this through ... and somehow knew that I would be the scapegoat.” A major complication, according to Handel’s book, was that Komen’s leaders struggled to pinpoint how they would publicly justify halting the grants to Planned Parenthood. During the three days after the grant cutoff was reported, Komen was inconsistent in efforts to explain its move — citing the investigation angle initially, the granting criteria at later points, and, in Handel’s view, damaging itself with changing messages. Another key point in that tumultuous week came on Feb. 2, when Brinker granted an interview to Andrea Mitchell of NBC News. Handel says a session held that morning to prepare Brinker was “complete pandemonium,” and the Komen CEO headed to the interview “dazed and unsure.” The result, writes Handel, was a “fiasco” — highlighted by aggressive questioning from Mitchell, who asked why Komen would have hired Handel given her disapproval of Planned Parenthood. Brinker replied, “Karen did not have anything to do with this decision” — and Handel writes that she immediately thought, “Oh no. That was not true. I was part of the decisionmaking process.”

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DROUGHT ON THE MISSISSIPPI

River traffic all backed up

Mexican egg shortage leads to price spikes

By Julie Cart

By William Booth

Los Angeles Times

The Washington Post

LAKE PROVIDENCE, La. — Eight grim-faced men sit in a cramped, impromptu war room in the shadow of a levee on the Mississippi River. With laptops opened to Web pages of the National Weather Service and the Army Corps of Engineers, the group of farmers, grain brokers and barge operators is engaged in what humans have grappled with for more than 200 years in the Mississippi Delta: puzzling out the latest blow from a stubborn river that refuses every effort to control it. Drought has reduced the Mississippi to a relative trickle, and even the dozens of inches of rainfall from Hurricane Isaac will change little on the river. The best crops of corn and soybeans in a generation are awaiting shipment by Mississippi barges and won’t wait forever before spoiling. The window is about 10 days, and once it closes, consumers across the country will feel the bite of higher prices. All along the lower Mississippi — from Memphis, Tenn., to New Orleans — water levels are at record lows. Sandbars have appeared in midstream, and broad beaches now spread at the edge of what were green riverbanks. Traffic has slowed to a crawl and, on some stretches of the river, has been at a standstill since June as water levels have dropped so low that even barges requiring just 9 feet of water are running aground.

MEXICO CITY — It is the Great Mexican Egg Crisis, and it will not be over easy, though there will be puns, especially in the Mexican press, which is cracking a lot of jokes. But seriously: The public here is faced with an extreme shortage of eggs in a country that has the highestper-capita egg consumption on the planet. Highest being 22.4 kilograms (about 50 pounds) per person in 2011, or more than 400 eggs a year, depending on the size of the egg, according to Mexico’s National Poultry Industry. There has been hoarding, price spikes and two-hour lines to buy eggs. Some retail outlets have been forced to limit how many cartons a day a customer can buy. American hens have been called to the rescue. An outbreak of AH7N3 avian flu virus is partly responsible. The deadly bird flu was detected in June on poultry farms in the Pacific coast state of Jalisco, and Mexican farmers and the government acted with lethal authority and slaughtered 11 million chickens to prevent its spread. Within weeks of the outbreak, 90 additional million hens were vaccinated against the virus, with a second round of inoculation now underway. Because of the mass culling, and stoked by price gouging and the soaring cost of chicken feed, the price of eggs has doubled this summer in Mexico, on average from less than 20 pesos to more than 40 pesos a kilo, or from $1.50 to $3. There are about 16 or so eggs in a kilo. This might not sound like much (unless you’re a family of five eating 2,000 eggs a year), but the rapid rise for a basic commodity and the attempts by the government at

Isaac adds to trouble With river traffic jammed up, much of the Deep South’s agricultural economy is on hold and most of its ability to ferry oil, coal, fertilizer and other products is diminished. To compound the region’s misery, Isaac’s drenching of the Gulf Coast threatens to spoil the rest of the soybean crop still in the Delta’s fertile fields, while doing little to restore water levels. That depends on rainfall in the Midwest and upper reaches of the river. Larry Tubbs, who operates a local grain elevator, is among those assembled in the war room at the offices of Terral River Service. He is a veteran at rolling with the river’s punches. But not this time. “We’re fixin’ to get panicstricken,” Tubbs said. Discussion turns to national priorities and funding. The federal government no longer dredges the river routinely, which means silt builds up, rendering the river less navigable and more vulnerable to drought. Johnny Martin, chief operating officer of Terral River Service, is quick to praise the Corps of Engineers for its work, but he bemoans the agency’s inability to maintain dredging outside times of crisis. “We are a very small fish trying to stay afloat,” Martin told the men, cautioning them to not expect much more federal assistance because of budget cuts. “Every system, every waterway, every lock and dam in the country is fighting for that slice of the pie,” he said. The federal government is trying to carve a waterway

Photos by Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

A dredge works to deepen the port near Lake Providence, La., where Terral River Services has its operations. Barges are unable to use the port due to low water levels that are slowing down the transport of perishable crops, such as soybeans.

Drought has caused low flows in the Mississippi River, slowing vital barge traffic to a crawl.

down the river using dredging ships operating around the clock and under duress — the vessels must first remove millions of tons of silt and sand deposited in shipping channels from last year’s catastrophic flooding. The Mississippi River is a commercial artery every bit as vital as the nation’s highways and railroads. It carries 60 percent of the country’s grain and nearly half the $200 billion of freight that moves on the country’s inland waterways. The river transports goods with an efficiency that cannot be duplicated: It would require 58 semitrailer trucks to carry the cargo held by just one barge. A barge can carry a bushel of corn from St. Louis to New Orleans for about 30 cents. The same bushel would cost 90 cents to move by train and $1.15 by truck.

Light loads = more costs But in recent weeks, barge traffic has come to a standstill while dredges costing $80,000 a day carve a 100-foot-wide channel. Other times, boats crawl along, funneled into one lane. The once-teeming waterway — the third-largest river drainage in the world — is mostly empty, of water and traffic. Companies like Terral ship on the river by lashing 30 to 40 barges together, loading them to a 10- to 11-foot draft — the distance from the surface of the water to the bottom of the barge. With the shallow channel, boats are now “light loading” to 81⁄2 feet, losing 324 tons of cargo per foot, which means

more inefficiency, higher costs and a greater backlog waiting to be move down the river. At best, shipments are sporadic. The usually broad river now affords enough room for only one vessel in many places. Faster-moving barges don’t have space to get around slower barge tows. And, should a group of barges run aground, everyone waits until the boats are freed. Until substantially more water flows in the river, the painfully slow dredging plan is the only answer. An Army Corps commander predicted the crisis could extend until October. “The worst is ahead of us,” Major Gen. John W. Peabody told reporters in Memphis.

tain of corn is growing by the hour. It’s not uncommon to have 2 million bushels on the ground and covered with tarps for short periods of time, Mark Raley said. The facility now has 9 million bushels under tarps and waiting for barge space. In business since 1952, the company is running 24 hours, trying to keep up with the procession of trucks bringing grain from farmers. Until the river rises, not much of it is going to move. Jeremy Raley ran a hand over his face and pondered the power of the river and its ability to bend to its will those who depend on it. “It’s a mysterious, uncontrollable being,” he said. “We work hard to try to control her. We worry about a lot of things in regard to producing the crop, getting it to market. The one thing we seldom worry about is the Mississippi River running dry, and now, here we are, trying to figure it out.”

the highest level to calm the storm expose Mexico’s greatest vulnerability, a stubborn, punishing poverty. While the nation is steadily becoming more prosperous, competitive and middle class, about half of all Mexicans still live in poverty — and the slightest change, just a few pennies in the cost of tortillas, beans, cooking oil, gasoline and eggs — can send shudders through the population. “This is no joke, because Mexicans like their eggs, and the price of eggs is the price of breakfast, and it is breakfast that gets children to school, people to work,” said Carmen Moreno, who tends a food stall at the municipal market in the Roma neighborhood in Mexico City. And few cultures have done more marvelous things with breakfast eggs than Mexican cuisine, which serves them scrambled, poached and fried, with beans, chiles, tomatoes, onions, salsas and tortillas. “The egg is essential,” said a major egg broker in Los Mochis, in the Pacific state of Sinaloa, who asked not to be named because he also blamed the government for mismanagement of the crisis. “For 8 pesos, a person can eat two eggs, a sausage and three tortillas. It’s a very good breakfast, for the price of two cigarettes.” Last week, Mexico’s President Felipe Calderón went on television to promise to bring egg prices down — and to punish speculators. “We will not allow Mexican families, especially those who have less, to see their pocketbooks affected by unjustified increases in the price of this basic commodity,” Calderon said. The federal government’s Office of the Consumer began a public health campaign last week called “You Can Choose to Eat Healthy” that offered menus for eggfree breakfasts.

Capricious waterway Those who make a living off the “lower Miss” are accustomed to the river’s caprice. A year ago a weeks-long deluge in the Midwest engorged the Mississippi and caused it to flow over its levees. Greenville, Miss., just up the road, was inundated. River operators aren’t the only ones racing against the clock. Farmers are frantically attempting to bring in their soybean crop, which the hurricane and its projected rain would quickly reduce to mush. The corn crop, which is mostly harvested and being stored, is less perishable. Still, Louisiana agricultural officials estimate $350 million worth of grain must be moved in the next few weeks. At the Raley Bros. grain elevator in Monticello, a moun-

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Seniors Continued from A1 And now USCB wants its money back, he said, because what it got out of the deal was not what it wanted when it cut the first check. The city contributed $923,000 toward the senior center, Buchanan said, and the parks district gave the property on which it was built. Buchanan claims USCB contributed its share with the expectation that the facility would continue its mission of helping low-income seniors. That vision, outlined in an application seeking a $600,000 community development block grant the city used to build the center, included an office where USCB and the Central Oregon Council on Aging could provide information and referral services to seniors in need of help, a space for St. Charles Bend to run a senior health program, and a satellite library facility that

provided seniors with audio books and large-print books. It also included an expanded space in which COCOA could run its on-site meal program and its Meals on Wheels program, both of which operated out of USCB’s previous location and had grown too big for its space. “We expected to get a larger version of what we already had, and that was pretty much it,” USCB President Virginia Reddick said as she waited outside the board’s meeting room for her chance to speak. But Reddick said that USCB instead got a place that was focused on providing recreational activities to seniors rather than the social services the agency had envisioned. USCB closed its office in the Bend Senior Center last summer, shortly after COCOA moved out from the senior center to its current location on Greenwood Avenue. In addition, it moved the

on-site meal program to its current base at the Bend Community Center. Park district officials claim that with the exception of those services, the center offers most of the activities the USCB had in mind at the outset. But the group now wants its money back, a goal Buchanan said he hopes to achieve by applying pressure directly to the park district board. The seniors, however, did not get a chance to speak Tuesday. The meeting was a work session, at which board members discussed staff presentations, and did not include a public comment period. Six of the seniors in the audience came with prepared public comment cards in the event they got three minutes at the microphone. “We’ll just have to come back some other time to get our three minutes,” Buchanan said. — Reporter: 541-617-7816, mmclean@bendbulletin.com

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SAVVYSHOPPER

B

TV & Movies, B2 Dear Abby, B3 Comics, B4 Puzzles, B5

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2012

www.bendbulletin.com/savvyshopper

IN BRIEF Parking garage gets new meters Patrons of the downtown Bend parking garage are now able to pay with credit and debit cards thanks to two new digital parking meters. The new meters are “pay and display,” meaning a customer inserts cash or a card and the meter spits out a ticket. The customer then puts the ticket on the dashboard. The first three hours of parking remain free in the garage. After that, parking costs $5 per day. One meter is located in the parking garage lobby, and the other is in Tin Pan Alley adjacent to the Oxford Hotel. The meters also accept Downtown Bend Parking Smart Cards, which are part of a new effort being launched by the Downtown Bend Business Association. The plan is for downtown businesses to buy the cards at $5 apiece and, when desired, reward customers with them. Vehicle access to the garage is off Lava Road. Contact: www.downtownbend.org.

Bead shop moving to Boomtown site Azillion Beads, a Bend shop that carries beads in every material from glass to freshwater pearls to wood, will soon move to the old Boomtown space downtown. The store will move in October to 910 N.W. Harriman St., Suite 100, which has its retail entrance on Northwest Greenwood Avenue. In the meantime, goods are on sale in anticipation of the move at Azillion’s current location, 240 N.E. Emerson Ave. #110. The move gives the bead shop roughly 3,400 square feet of retail space more than its current location. It will provide more room for display of merchandise and an area for artists to display their wares. Also located in the old Boomtown location is Rescue Moderne Consignment. Azillion Beads will start out with the same hours as at its current location: 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sundays and 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Mondays. Contact: 541-6178854.

Erik M. Lunsford / St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The home of David Deatherage in downtown St. Louis is filled with midcentury items. Deatherage, of Century Design Ltd., sells online to high-end customers who are avid collectors of midcentury modern furnishings.

Midcentury

REVIVAL By Debra D. Bass St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS — fter the bloated siege of the overstuffed couch, the “chair and a half,” and mountainous mattresses, the sleek and sexy era of midcentury modern is back with a vengeance. A slew of vintage stores cater almost exclusively to the era, and big box stores from Kmart to Crate & Barrel have knock-off versions of lowprofile sofas and slick nesting tables. Midcentury modern is as persistent as ’80s music in the realm of things that refuse to go out of style. But unlike the music genre, an Eames tulip chair is less likely to cause waves of nausea. “One thing that makes it enduring is that it was scaled for postwar houses. It was made to be uncluttered,” said David Deatherage of Century Design Ltd. in St. Louis. He sells online to a troupe of high-end customers who are avid collectors of midcentury modern

A

Boutique closing sale starts today Bella Moda in Bend plans to shut its doors for good Sept. 22. In the meantime, the downtown boutique’s clothing, shoes and other merchandise are 50 percent off or more starting today. Also, Bella Moda is running a contest giving away 10 prizes, such as a gift certificate to Jen’s Garden and an iPad 2. Registration is taking place at the store, and no purchase is necessary. The winners will be drawn on the shop’s closing day. In its final weeks, Bella Moda is hosting a community food drive, as well. Bring nonperishable items in to be donated to the Family Kitchen, which serves hot meals in Bend to those in need. Bella Moda stores in Redmond and Sisters already closed this year. The owner of the three retail outlets is retiring. Until the end, Bella Moda is open 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Mondays through Saturdays and noon to 4 p.m. Sundays. It’s located at 1001 N.W. Wall St., Suite 102. Contact: 541-550-7001. — Heidi Hagemeier, The Bulletin

furnishings. Deatherage said he personally prefers what he calls “Hollywood Modern” (also referred to as “Hollywood Regency”) pieces of the era but mostly from the 1930s and ’40s. The pieces are low-profile and slim, but they have an innate opulence — glowing acrylic accents, curved edges, glossy finishes, crystal embellishments and sculptural details sitting atop luxuriously plush rugs. He said strict clean Danish Modern designs with straight lines and sharp angles have

convinced some people that midcentury modern has to be cold. Of the iconic Eames chair and George Nelson’s famed pretzel chair, Deatherage said: “I have no personal affinity for fiberglass and bent plywood. Inventive, yes. Glamorous, no. My personal preference is furniture from that same period but pieces more likely designed by interior designers — James Mont, Tommi Parzinger, Billy Haines and Dorothy Draper.” See Midcentury / B6

The Milo Baughman vintage desk is an example of midcentury modern. McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Dorm design: leaving home, but none of its comforts By Steven Kurutz New York Times News Service

I don’t remember everything I took with me when I went to college, but do I know it all fit easily into the back seat of our family car. The twin-size sheets were new; nearly everything else (pillow, stereo, ugly green rug) had been scavenged from home or a thrift store. As for electronics, that summer my

well-meaning parents went to a garage sale and were talked into buying an Apple Macintosh with a drive that accepted only large floppy disks. My suspicion that it was embarrassingly out of date, even by 1994 standards, was confirmed by my roommate’s look of disbelief when I tried to boot up. Altogether, furnishing my dorm room cost maybe $50. These memories came back as I

stood inside a Target store in South Philadelphia one night last week at midnight, watching 1,200 students from Temple University swarming the aisles like amped-up contestants on a shopping-spree game show. Target had bused the students from campus and rearranged the store for the after-hours event. A DJ played dance music in what was normally the baby department; mini-fridges

and cases of Red Bull were stacked along a central corridor. Students’ carts were filling with hanging mirrors, garbage cans in bright colors, shower caddies and bed-in-a-bag sheet sets. Gina D’Annunzio, director of student activities at Temple, said she had resisted Target’s previous overtures to host an after-hours event. See Dorms / B6


B2

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2012

TV & M

Anthony Bourdain’s Travel Channel exit shows strengths, holes use a word he might wince at, New York Times News Service sincere they are. In the world of lifestyle teleIntelligence and honesty vision, few people get as much are a rare and therefore potent attention as Anthony Bour- combination in nonfiction TV. dain, and it’s fair to ask why When they appear together a middle-aged for(or seem to), you mer chef whose At its best TV SPOTLIGHT notice. TV show draws “No Reservations� fewer than 500,000 is in a very small viewers deserves so much ink. group of personality-driven (Figuratively speaking.) shows — “Moyers and ComThere are the obvious pany� and “Our America With biographical and cosmetic Lisa Ling� also come to mind reasons: The striking looks — that make you feel smarter with an Old World cast and for having watched them. the juicy back story involvBut that’s not always the ing walk-in freezers and lots case with “No Reservations.� of drugs. His artful profanity Whether it’s the logistical and public put-downs of other and physical grind of producculinary celebrities don’t hurt. ing close to 140 episodes of All of those things contrib- thoughtful TV in locations all ute to his persona, but they over the globe, or it’s just that don’t fully explain the appeal some destinations turn out to of his globe-trotting travel and be less fruitful than others, food show, “Anthony Bour- there are episodes that sag. dain: No Reservations,� which Scattershot segments visit began its final run of episodes cheesy attractions that signal on the Travel Channel on Mon- desperation on the part of field day night. producers, and Bourdain’s The channel is billing these narration turns both jokey as the ninth season of “No and sentimental as he strains Reservations,� but they’re ac- to compensate. tually the last seven episodes These lackluster episodes of Season 8, which was sus- tend to be the ones that rely pended shortly after Bour- the most on exoticism or dain’s announcement in May spectacle. Where he’s at his that he would be leaving to best are places that have a do a new show for CNN. Split long-established and sophistioff and repackaged as “The cated food culture, whether it Final Tour� to capitalize on involves Western fine dining, the publicity surrounding his like his Season 7 pilgrimage to departure, they coincidentally the Spanish gastro-mecca El include some destinations — Bulli, or Asian hawker stalls, Emilia-Romagna, Burgundy, like the Season 8 finale in PenBrooklyn — that should play to ang, Malaysia. The difference his strengths. For the truth is is palpable on screen: Bourthat despite the fans he might dain is both more relaxed and win by eating a live cobra or more engaged, his narration is calling Sandra Lee “pure evil,� more cohesive (and even movBourdain and his show are ing), his barbed observations better the more serious and, to have more force. By Mike Hale

L M T 

FOR WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 5

LAWLESS (R) 2, 4:30, 7, 9:30 THE ODD LIFE OF TIMOTHY GREEN (PG) 1:45, 4:15, 6:45, 9:15

EDITOR’S NOTES: • Open-captioned showtimes are bold. • There may be an additional fee for 3-D movies. • IMAX films are $15.50 for adults and $13 for children (ages 3 to 11) and seniors (ages 60 and older). • Movie times are subject to change after press time.

BEND Regal Pilot Butte 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend, 541-382-6347

BEASTS OF THE SOUTHERN WILD (PG-13) 12:45, 3:45, 6:30 THE BEST EXOTIC MARIGOLD HOTEL (PG-13) 12:15, 3:15, 6:15 THE BOURNE LEGACY (PG-13) Noon, 2:50, 5:45 CELESTE AND JESSE FOREVER (R) 1, 3:30, 6 FAREWELL, MY QUEEN (R) 4 MOONRISE KINGDOM (PG-13) 1:15, 7 ROBOT AND FRANK (PG-13) 12:30, 3, 6:45

Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend, 541-382-6347

2016: OBAMA’S AMERICA (PG) 12:05, 3, 6, 9 THE BOURNE LEGACY (PG-13) 12:15, 3:25, 6:30, 9:30 BRAVE (PG) 1:45, 4:45, 7:25 THE CAMPAIGN (R) 2, 5, 8, 10:20 THE DARK KNIGHT RISES IMAX (PG-13) 12:30, 4:15, 7:55 THE DARK KNIGHT RISES (PG13) 12:20, 4:05, 7:45 THE EXPENDABLES 2 (R) 1:30, 4:25, 7:15, 9:50 HIT AND RUN (R) 1:35, 4:35, 7:35, 10:15 HOPE SPRINGS (PG-13) 1:10, 3:45, 6:35, 9:05 LAWLESS (R) 12:10, 3:30, 6:25, 9:15

SISTERS Sisters Movie House 720 Desperado Court, Sisters, 541-549-8800

Focus Features via The Associated Press

Jared Gilman appears in a scene from “Moonrise Kingdom.� MARVEL’S THE AVENGERS (PG-13) 12:35, 4, 7:50 THE ODD LIFE OF TIMOTHY GREEN (PG) 12:45, 3:40, 6:15, 9:10 THE OOGIELOVES IN THE BIG BALLOON ADVENTURE (G) 12:25, 3:05, 6:05 PARANORMAN 3-D (PG) 1:20, 7:05 PARANORMAN (PG) 3:50, 9:25 THE POSSESSION (PG-13) 1:55, 4:55, 7:40, 10:10 PREMIUM RUSH (PG-13) 12:55, 3:15, 6:50, 9:45 TED (R) 10 TOTAL RECALL (PG-13) 9:35

McMenamins Old St. Francis School 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend, 541-330-8562

THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN (PG13) 6

MADAGASCAR 3: EUROPE’S MOST WANTED (PG) 3 MAGIC MIKE (R) 9:10 After 7 p.m., shows are 21 and older only. Younger than 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.

BEASTS OF THE SOUTHERN WILD (PG-13) 6:45 THE BOURNE LEGACY (PG-13) 6:15 LAWLESS (R) 6:30 PREMIUM RUSH (PG-13) 7

MADRAS Madras Cinema 5 1101 S.W. U.S. Highway 97, Madras, 541-475-3505

FIRST POSITION (no MPAA rating) 6, 8 GERHARD RICHTER PAINTING (no MPAA rating) 3:30

THE BOURNE LEGACY (PG-13) 6:30 THE CAMPAIGN (R) 7 THE EXPENDABLES 2 (R) 4:55, 7:20 HIT AND RUN (R) 4:40, 6:50 THE OOGIELOVES IN THE BIG BALLOON ADVENTURE (G) 5:05 PARANORMAN 3-D (PG) 5, 7:10

REDMOND

PRINEVILLE

Tin Pan Theater 869 N.W. Tin Pan Alley, Bend, 541-241-2271

Redmond Cinemas

Pine Theater

1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond, 541-548-8777

214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

THE CAMPAIGN (R) 3:15, 5:15, 7:15, 9:15 THE EXPENDABLES 2 (R) 2:15, 4:30, 6:45, 9

THE CAMPAIGN (UPSTAIRS — R) 6 LAWLESS (R) 4, 7 Pine Theater’s upstairs screening room has limited accessibility.

Providing unparalled service across a variety of industries since 1983.

541-389-1505 400 SW Bluff Dr Ste 200 Bend , OR 97702

Saturdays, June 30 - Sept. 22 | 10am-2pm NorthWest Crossing Neighborhood Center

www.expresspros.com

www.nwxfarmersmarket.com

L TV L

 

WEDNESDAY PRIME TIME 9/5/12

*In HD, these channels run three hours ahead. / Sports programming may vary. BD-Bend/Redmond/Sisters/Black Butte (Digital); PM-Prineville/Madras; SR-Sunriver; L-La Pine

ALSO IN HD; ADD 600 TO CHANNEL No.

BROADCAST/CABLE CHANNELS

BD PM SR L ^ KATU KTVZ % % % % KBNZ & KOHD ) ) ) ) KFXO * ` ` ` KOAB _ # _ # ( KGW KTVZDT2 , _ # / OPBPL 175 173

5:00

5:30

6:00

6:30

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7:30

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KATU News World News KATU News at 6 (N) ’ Ă… Democratic National Convention Football Night NFL Football Dallas Cowboys at New York Giants (N) ’ (Live) Ă… News Evening News Access H. Old Christine Democratic National Convention KEZI 9 News World News KEZI 9 News KEZI 9 News Democratic National Convention The Simpsons The Simpsons Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Big Bang Big Bang Democratic National Convention The 2012 Democratic National Convention. (N) ’ (Live) Ă… Football Night NFL Football Dallas Cowboys at New York Giants (N) ’ (Live) Ă… Meet, Browns Meet, Browns King of Queens King of Queens Seinfeld ‘PG’ Seinfeld ‘PG’ Baking Made Kimchi Chron Outnumbered Last of Wine Midsomer Murders ’ ‘PG’ Ă…

Jeopardy! ‘G’

8:30 Wheel Fortune NBC Primetime

9:00

9:30

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10:30

The Middle ‘PG’ Suburgatory ’ Modern Family Suburgatory ’ (9:10) Jeopardy! Wheel Fortune Dateline NBC ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Big Brother (N) ’ Ă… Criminal Minds Hit ’ ‘14’ How I Met 30 Rock ’ ‘14’ Entertainment The Insider (N) The Middle ‘PG’ Suburgatory ’ Modern Family Suburgatory ’ So You Think You Can Dance Six dancers perform; elimination. ‘PG’ News TMZ (N) ’ ‘PG’ Orangutan Diary ’ ‘G’ Ă… Orangutan Diary (9:38) NOVA ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Bold Visions News ›››› “Rockyâ€? (1976, Drama) Sylvester Stallone, Talia Shire. Oh Sit! (N) ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Supernatural ’ ‘14’ Ă… CW Fall First ’Til Death ‘PG’ Democratic National Convention The 2012 Democratic National Convention. (N) ’ Ă…

11:00

11:30

KATU News (11:35) Nightline News Jay Leno News Letterman KEZI 9 News (11:35) Nightline Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ In the Life ‘PG’ In the Life ‘PG’ NewsChannel 8 Jay Leno ’Til Death ‘PG’ That ’70s Show PBS NewsHour ’ Ă…

BASIC CABLE CHANNELS

Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage-Texas Storage-Texas Hoggers Hoggers Hoggers Hoggers *A&E 130 28 18 32 The First 48 ‘14’ Ă… CSI: Miami In the Wind Eric Delko CSI: Miami A man is murdered in CSI: Miami L.A. Evidence-tampering ›› “Behind Enemy Linesâ€? (2001, Action) Owen Wilson, Gene Hackman, Gabriel Macht. An ›› “Basicâ€? (2003) John Travolta. A DEA agent probes the *AMC 102 40 39 returns. ’ ‘14’ Ă… outer space. ’ ‘14’ Ă… accusations. ‘14’ Ă… American flight navigator is stranded in war-torn Bosnia. Ă… fate of a much-hated Army officer. Ă… Swamp Wars ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Gator Boys ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Tanked ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Tanked ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Call of the Wildman ‘PG’ Ă… Tanked ’ ‘PG’ Ă… *ANPL 68 50 26 38 Rattlesnake Republic ‘PG’ Ă… Top Chef Masters ‘14’ Ă… Top Chef Masters ‘14’ Ă… Housewives/NYC Housewives/NYC Flipping Out A House Divided Top Chef Masters (N) ‘14’ Ă… Top Chef Masters ‘14’ Ă… BRAVO 137 44 Yes, Dear ‘PG’ Yes, Dear ‘PG’ Yes, Dear ‘PG’ Reba ‘PG’ Ă… Reba ‘PG’ Ă… Reba ‘PG’ Ă… Reba ‘PG’ Ă… ››› “Any Given Sundayâ€? (1999) Al Pacino. A football coach copes with crises on and off the field. CMT 190 32 42 53 Yes, Dear ‘PG’ American Greed: The Fugitives American Greed Mad Money American Greed: The Fugitives American Greed Quit Your Job! You Breathe! CNBC 54 36 40 52 American Greed: The Fugitives Piers Morgan Tonight (N) (Live) Democratic National Convention ’ Ă… CNN 55 38 35 48 (4:00) Democratic National Convention The 2012 Democratic National Convention. (N) ’ (Live) Ă… (6:02) Tosh.0 Colbert Report Daily Show (7:44) South Park ‘14’ Ă… South Park ‘14’ South Park ‘MA’ South Park ‘MA’ (9:56) Kevin Hart: Seriously Funny Daily Show Colbert Report COM 135 53 135 47 (4:58) Futurama Always Sunny Dept./Trans. City Edition Bend City Council Work Session Bend City Council Get Outdoors Visions of NW The Yoga Show The Yoga Show Talk of the Town Local issues. COTV 11 Capitol Hill Hearings CSPAN 61 20 12 11 Capitol Hill Hearings Jessie ‘G’ Ă… Phineas, Ferb Good-Charlie Jessie ‘G’ Ă… Gravity Falls ’ Shake It Up! ‘G’ ›› “Spy Kids 3: Game Overâ€? (2003) ’ Ă… Austin & Ally ’ Phineas, Ferb Jessie ‘G’ Ă… A.N.T. Farm ‘G’ *DIS 87 43 14 39 Jessie ‘G’ Ă… American Guns ’ ‘14’ Ă… American Guns ’ ‘14’ Ă… American Guns ’ ‘14’ Ă… American Guns (N) ’ ‘14’ Ă… Dirty Jobs: Down Under (N) ‘PG’ American Guns ’ ‘14’ Ă… *DISC 156 21 16 37 American Guns ’ ‘14’ Ă… Keeping Up With the Kardashians Keeping Up With the Kardashians E! News (N) Jonas Jonas Keeping Up With the Kardashians The Soup ‘14’ The Soup ‘14’ Chelsea Lately E! News *E! 136 25 2012 World Series of Poker Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… ESPN 21 23 22 23 2012 World Series of Poker SportsNation (N) Outside Lines NFL Live (N) (Live) Ă… Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) Ă… NASCAR Now World/Poker ESPN2 22 24 21 24 (4:00) 2012 U.S. Open Tennis Men’s and Women’s Quarterfinals (N) (Live) Ă… Summer Olympics Tragedy of the Munich Games Summer Olympics Tragedy of the Munich Games Summer Olympics Tragedy of the Munich Games ESPNC 23 25 123 25 Tragedy of the Munich Games SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. Outside Lines ESPNN 24 63 124 203 SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… Reba ‘PG’ Ă… Melissa & Joey ››› “Pretty Womanâ€? (1990, Romance-Comedy) Richard Gere, Julia Roberts. ››› “My Best Friend’s Weddingâ€? (1997) Julia Roberts. The 700 Club ’ ‘G’ Ă… FAM 67 29 19 41 Reba ‘PG’ Ă… Hannity (N) America’s Election Headquarters (N) On the Record With Greta Van Susteren (N) Ă… America’s Election Headquarters Record FNC 57 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Ă… Paula’s Cooking Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Restaurant: Impossible ‘G’ Restaurant: Impossible Del’s Restaurant: Impossible Frankie’s Restaurant Stakeout (N) Restaurant: Impossible *FOOD 177 62 98 44 Best Dishes › “Big Daddyâ€? (1999, Comedy) Adam Sandler, Joey Lauren Adams. Two/Half Men Two/Half Men › “The Waterboyâ€? (1998, Comedy) Adam Sandler, Kathy Bates. › “The Waterboyâ€? (1998, Comedy) Adam Sandler, Kathy Bates. FX 131 House Hunters Property Brothers ‘G’ Ă… Buying and Selling (N) ‘G’ Ă… House Hunters Hunters Int’l Property Brothers ‘G’ Ă… HGTV 176 49 33 43 Property Virgins Property Virgins Property Virgins Property Virgins Hunters Int’l Nostradamus Effect ‘PG’ Ă… Nostradamus Effect ‘PG’ Ă… Cajun Pawn Cajun Pawn Cajun Pawn Cajun Pawn Restoration Restoration Restoration Restoration *HIST 155 42 41 36 Nostradamus Effect ‘PG’ Ă… Trading Spouses: Mommy Trading Spouses: Mommy Trading Spouses: Mommy Trading Spouses: Mommy Trading Spouses: Mommy Trading Spouses: Mommy LIFE 138 39 20 31 Wife Swap Martin/Vallone ’ ‘PG’ Democratic National Convention ’ Ă… MSNBC 59 59 128 51 (4:00) Democratic National Convention The 2012 Democratic National Convention. (N) ’ (Live) Ă… (5:46) True Life The recession. ’ (6:53) True Life ’ True Life I Work With My Ex ’ True Life (N) ’ The Real World (N) ’ ‘14’ Ă… (11:01) Jersey Shore ‘14’ Ă… MTV 192 22 38 57 (4:39) True Life ’ SpongeBob iCarly ‘G’ Ă… iCarly ‘G’ Ă… Victorious ‘G’ Victorious ‘G’ Friends ’ ‘PG’ Friends ’ ‘PG’ Friends ’ ‘PG’ Friends ’ ‘PG’ Friends ‘PG’ Friends ‘PG’ Friends ’ ‘PG’ (11:33) Friends NICK 82 46 24 40 SpongeBob Main Street Main Street Main Street Main Street Main Street 48 Hours: Hard Evidence ’ ‘14’ Dateline on OWN ’ ‘14’ Ă… Dateline on OWN (N) ’ ‘14’ 48 Hours: Hard Evidence ’ ‘14’ OWN 161 103 31 103 Main Street Seahawks Mariners Pre. MLB Baseball Boston Red Sox at Seattle Mariners From Safeco Field in Seattle. (N) (Live) Mariners Post. The Dan Patrick Show MLB Baseball ROOT 20 45 28* 26 MLB Baseball SPIKE 132 31 34 46 Auction Hunters Auction Hunters Auction Hunters Auction Hunters Auction Hunters Auction Hunters Auction Hunters Auction Hunters Auction Hunters Auction Hunters Auction Hunters Auction Hunters Auction Hunters Auction Hunters Ghost Hunters ’ Ă… Paranormal Witness Ghost Hunters ’ Ă… Ghost Hunters (N) ’ Ă… Paranormal Witness (N) Ghost Hunters ’ Ă… SYFY 133 35 133 45 Ghost Hunters Haunted Heroes Behind Scenes Turning Point Joseph Prince End of the Age Praise the Lord Ă… Always Good Jesse Duplantis Easter Exper. Creflo Dollar Praise the Lord Ă… TBN 205 60 130 Seinfeld ‘PG’ Family Guy ’ ‘14’ Ă… Family Guy ‘14’ Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Conan (N) Ă… *TBS 16 27 11 28 Friends ’ ‘PG’ Friends ’ ‘PG’ King of Queens King of Queens Seinfeld ‘PG’ ››› “To Have and Have Notâ€? (1944) Humphrey Bogart. A skipper fools Nazis ››› “The Big Sleepâ€? (1946) Humphrey Bogart, Lauren Bacall. Philip Marlowe ››› “Dark Passageâ€? (1947) Humphrey Bogart, Lauren Bacall. Art student ››› “Key Largoâ€? (1948) Humphrey TCM 101 44 101 29 and flirts with a singer on Martinique. Ă… (DVS) investigates blackmail and murder. Ă… (DVS) hides escaped convict after his plastic surgery. Ă… (DVS) Bogart. Ă… (DVS) Toddlers & Tiaras ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Here Comes Here Comes Here Comes Here Comes Here Comes Here Comes Here Comes Here Comes Here Comes Here Comes *TLC 178 34 32 34 Four Weddings ’ ‘PG’ Ă… The Mentalist Blood Brothers ‘14’ The Mentalist ’ ‘14’ Ă… The Mentalist ‘14’ Ă… The Mentalist ‘14’ Ă… The Mentalist ’ ‘14’ Ă… CSI: NY ’ ‘14’ Ă… *TNT 17 26 15 27 The Mentalist ’ ‘14’ Ă… Dragons: Riders Regular Show Regular Show Wrld, Gumball Adventure Time Johnny Test ’ NinjaGo: Mstrs NinjaGo: Mstrs King of the Hill King of the Hill American Dad American Dad Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ *TOON 84 Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Toy Hunter ‘PG’ Toy Hunter ‘PG’ Sandwich Paradise ‘G’ Ă… Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ *TRAV 179 51 45 42 Bourdain: No Reservations M*A*S*H ‘PG’ M*A*S*H ‘PG’ M*A*S*H ‘PG’ M*A*S*H ‘PG’ M*A*S*H ‘PG’ M*A*S*H ‘PG’ Love-Raymond Love-Raymond The Soul Man The Exes ‘PG’ King of Queens King of Queens TVLND 65 47 29 35 Bonanza ‘PG’ Ă… NCIS Hide and Seek ‘14’ Ă… NCIS Enemies Foreign ‘14’ Ă… NCIS Enemies Domestic ‘14’ Royal Pains (N) ‘PG’ (10:01) NCIS Masquerade ’ ‘PG’ (11:01) NCIS Jack Knife ’ ‘PG’ USA 15 30 23 30 NCIS Knockout ’ ‘PG’ Ă… 40 Greatest R&B Songs 40 Greatest R&B Songs Love & Hip Hop: Atlanta ‘14’ Love & Hip Hop: Atlanta ‘14’ Mama Drama Time Apart (N) ‘14’ VH1 191 48 37 54 (4:30) ››› “Drumlineâ€? (2002) Nick Cannon, Zoe Saldana. ’ PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(6:20) ›› “Short Circuitâ€? 1986 Ally Sheedy. ‘PG’ ›› “Tron: Legacyâ€? 2010, Science Fiction Jeff Bridges. ’ ‘PG’ Ă… (10:10) ››› “The Abyssâ€? 1989 Ed Harris. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… ENCR 106 401 306 401 (4:40) ›› “Look Who’s Talking Nowâ€? 1993 Ă… ››› “Frequencyâ€? 2000, Fantasy Dennis Quaid, Jim Caviezel. ‘PG-13’ Ă… ›› “Undisputedâ€? 2002, Drama Wesley Snipes, Peter Falk. ‘R’ Ă… FMC 104 204 104 120 ››› “Frequencyâ€? 2000, Fantasy Dennis Quaid, Jim Caviezel. ‘PG-13’ Ă… UFC Reloaded UFC 135: Jones vs Rampage Jones vs Jackson; Hughes vs Koscheck. Forrest Griffin: The Ultimate Fighter UFC 101 UFC Unleashed English Premier League Soccer FUEL 34 Jack’s First Major On the Range Inside PGA Golf Central Jack’s First Major On the Range School of Golf Golf Academy GOLF 28 301 27 301 On the Range (N) Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Frasier ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ‘PG’ HALL 66 33 175 33 The Waltons The Whirlwind ‘G’ (4:00) ›› “Fast Fiveâ€? 2011, Action Vin (6:15) ›› “Dinner for Schmucksâ€? 2010 Steve Carell. Comic misadventures Face Off With 24/7 Chavez, ›› “Horrible Bossesâ€? 2011, Comedy Jason Bateman, Boardwalk Em- Real Time With Bill Maher Actor HBO 425 501 425 501 Diesel. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… follow a man’s encounter with a buffoon. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… Max Kellerman Jr./Martinez Charlie Day, Jason Sudeikis. ’ ‘R’ Ă… pire: Distilling Jason Alexander. ’ ‘MA’ Ă… ››› “Monster’s Ballâ€? 2001, Drama Billy Bob Thornton, Heath Ledger. ‘NR’ ›› “King of New Yorkâ€? 1990 Christopher Walken. ‘R’ (9:45) ››› “Monster’s Ballâ€? 2001, Drama Billy Bob Thornton, Heath Ledger. ‘NR’ IFC 105 105 (4:00) ››› “Greaseâ€? 1978 John Tra- (5:50) ›› “Sucker Punchâ€? 2011, Action Emily Browning, (7:45) ››› “The Terminalâ€? 2004, Comedy-Drama Tom Hanks, Catherine Zeta-Jones, Stanley ››› “Crazy, Stupid, Love.â€? 2011 Steve Carell. A suddenly single 40-someMAX 400 508 508 volta. ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Abbie Cornish. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… Tucci. A European living in an airport befriends a stewardess. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… thing needs help finding his groove again. ‘PG-13’ Ă… Abandoned ‘PG’ Abandoned ‘PG’ Abandoned ‘PG’ Abandoned ‘PG’ America’s Lost Treasures (N) ‘G’ Abandoned ‘PG’ Abandoned ‘PG’ America’s Lost Treasures ‘G’ Abandoned ‘PG’ Abandoned ‘PG’ Alaska State Troopers ‘14’ NGC 157 157 Odd Parents Planet Sheen Planet Sheen Avatar: Air. Avatar: Air. Odd Parents Odd Parents SpongeBob SpongeBob Avatar: Air. Avatar: Air. Dragon Ball Z Iron Man: Armor NTOON 89 115 189 115 Odd Parents Shooting USA Best Defense Amer. Rifleman Impossible Gun Stories Gun Nuts Shooting USA Ă… Best Defense Gun Stories Impossible Amer. Rifleman OUTD 37 307 43 307 Midway USA’s Gun Stories (4:00) › “Cold(5:45) ›› “Xanaduâ€? 1980, Fantasy Olivia Newton-John. Premiere. A rollerWeeds Threshold ›› “The Mechanicâ€? 2011, Action ››› “Trafficâ€? 2000, Crime Drama Michael Douglas, Don Cheadle, Benicio Del Toro. The war on All Access (N) SHO 500 500 bloodedâ€? 1995 skating muse boosts a young artist’s career. ’ ‘PG’ Ă… drugs brings many casualties and few victories. ’ ‘R’ Jason Statham. ’ ‘R’ Ă… ‘14’ ‘MA’ Ă… 101 Cars 101 Cars Barrett-Jackson Special Edition Pinks - All Out ‘PG’ 101 Cars 101 Cars Barrett-Jackson Special Edition Unique Whips ‘14’ SPEED 35 303 125 303 Pinks - All Out ‘PG’ (5:35) ››› “Freaky Fridayâ€? 2003 ’ ‘PG’ Ă… (7:15) ››› “13 Going on 30â€? 2004 Jennifer Garner. ‘PG-13’ Ă… ››› “The Ides of Marchâ€? 2011, Drama Ryan Gosling. ’ ‘R’ Ă… (10:50) › “Jack and Jillâ€? 2011 STARZ 300 408 300 408 › Jack and Jill (4:15) ›› “The Fighting Temptationsâ€? 2003, Comedy (6:20) ››› “Mad Dog and Gloryâ€? 1993, Comedy Robert ›› “The Jonesesâ€? 2009 David Duchovny. Stealth market- (9:40) ›› “The Switchâ€? 2010 Jennifer Aniston. A woman uses a friend’s “Hollywood Sex TMC 525 525 Warsâ€? 2011 Cuba Gooding Jr. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… De Niro, Bill Murray. Premiere. ’ ‘R’ Ă… ers move into a wealthy neighborhood. ‘R’ sperm, unknowingly, to get pregnant. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… MLS Soccer Portland Timbers at Colorado Rapids (N) (Live) Dream On: Journey Motorcycle Racing Dream On: Journey IndyCar 36 ‘PG’ NBCSN 27 58 30 209 Paralympics (N) MLS 36 ‘PG’ ›› “Notting Hillâ€? 1999 Julia Roberts. A bookseller and a movie star have an unlikely romance. ‘PG-13’ Amazing Wedding Cakes ‘PG’ *WE 143 41 174 118 ›› “Notting Hillâ€? 1999 Julia Roberts. A bookseller and a movie star have an unlikely romance. ‘PG-13’


WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

A  & A  

Father’s idea of cuddling is too close for comfort Dear Abby: My mom’s boyfriend wants to spend time with my 16-year-old sister and take her places all the time. He wants to cuddle with both of us whenever we sit on the couch and gets really upset when we don’t want to. He’s my biological father, but I have known him only for a year because he left my mom when she was pregnant with me. Now he wants to play “dad� when I already have had a dad all my life. (Mom was married for 11 years to another man.) I’m 14. He yells and swears all the time and takes things away from us if we don’t do what he wants. He isn’t physically abusive yet, but the cuddling freaks me out and I don’t think it’s right. I told my school counselor. She said to get over it, that it wasn’t a big deal. Abby, what can I do? I think he is grooming my sister for sex since he told us he likes young girls and was used to them before Mom. Mom has problems with depression and reality and won’t listen to us. Help us, please. Where can I go? — Helpless in the Midwest Dear Helpless: Because your father’s overtures make you uncomfortable, and he “punishes� you if you don’t accept them — it is a “big deal.� Before this goes any further, you should call Childhelp and describe what’s happening. The toll-free number is 800-4224453. The person who answers the phone can refer you to help in your state. Please don’t wait. Your safety and that of your sister could depend on it. Dear Abby: I am romantically attracted to a girl, “Jade.� We have known each other ever since we were in diapers. She’s bubbly, vivacious and beautiful. We flirted with puppy love about 10 years ago, but it never went beyond writing love letters and ended quickly. It was so disappointingly brief that I have never regarded it as a true relationship. I consider her my first love.

DEAR ABBY Jade goes through boyfriends like a chain-smoker goes through cigarettes. It seems as if every time I ask her, “So, how is your current boyfriend?� that she has a new one. Her mother is the same way, truth be told, and never found a good father figure for Jade. The men her mother dated were abusive. Consequently, Jade isn’t the best judge of men, either. My parents have suggested that she may view me as a friend because I’m the only decent guy in her life, and she’s afraid we wouldn’t be friends if our romantic relationship ended. I want to tell her that I’d like to date her the next time her current relationship ends. At the same time, I want her to know I’d rather have her as a friend than nothing at all. Thanks to the wonder of social media, I will know when her next relationship ends. Should I wait till then? If not, how long? — First Love in the South Dear First Love: You seem to have a lot of insight about Jade. Because she was raised by a mother who was involved in one abusive relationship after another, she may feel that unless there is pain and drama, that what she’s experiencing is boring and not really “love.� Until she realizes that the criteria she’s using in choosing men are flawed, and is willing to get help to straighten out her thinking, her pattern will continue to repeat itself. As you hover over your keyboard waiting for news of her next romantic failure, I suggest that rather than “pounce,� you keep her as a friend until she’s ready for a mature relationship. If you don’t, you will only suffer more disappointment. — Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

Horoscope: Happy Birthday for Wednesday, Sept. 5, 2012 By Jacqueline Bigar This year you express your mellow and reasonable personality to many. Others clearly are drawn to you, no matter what segment of your life you are dealing with; however, your temper becomes explosive and can be triggered easily. To some people, you actually might seem scary. Express your intense feelings in a way that doesn’t portray you like a madman or woman. If you are single, you hook up with someone significant to your life history this year. If you are attached, the two of you gain by leaving town together. You will recharge and enjoy each other’s personalities and insights. Plan a longer getaway together. TAURUS demands quality and could cost you a pretty penny. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHH You tend to tell it like it is, but you could go overboard as to how you verbalize your feelings. Note if someone seems to be staggering backward after hearing your words. Perhaps your self-expression might be too dramatic for this person. Tonight: Out on the town. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHHH Your high energy might challenge someone. This person generally exhibits a lot of vitality, too. The two of you might be extremely explosive together. A little diplomacy or even steering clear of each other could work wonders. Tonight: All smiles. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHH Zero in on what makes different situations work so well. You know what is needed to make the impression you want. Use selfdiscipline and think carefully before you say anything, despite someone’s steamy words or hostility. Tonight: Get some extra Z’s CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHHH You need to head in a new direction and change the tune you have been singing. Note what is not working. Tap into your creativity with the knowledge that things will get better if you make the correct choices. Tonight: Celebrate your free will. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH You like to be acknowledged. The flip side of wanting this approval is that some people might feel free to tell you what you do wrong. It’s possible that you’ll encounter some negativity. Some people would like

more quality time with you and less limelight. Tonight: Be diplomatic. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH You could be overwhelmed by all the options that surround you. Listen to news with more of an open mind. You, like many people, sometimes automatically close down at the mention of new, adventurous ideas. Decide not to. Tonight: Take a stand. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH Work with a key person in your life, and you’ll gain results quickly and efficiently. You could revise your thinking as a result. Listen and make sure you are on the same page with plans as well as with the vibes of the moment. Tonight: Just do not be alone. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHH You are full of get-up-andgo. You see life from a fixed point of view. This trait could be positive in many ways, yet it could cause a collision with someone you deal with daily. Is this disagreement necessary? Tonight: Go with a suggestion. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHH Focus on individual tasks instead of getting caught up in someone’s story or even your own tales. By detaching, you will see new paths to the same end, given some peace and quiet. A friend or associate does everything he or she can to get your attention. Tonight: Play it low-key. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHH Your creativity saves the day, be it for yourself or others. A friend might push you beyond your patience and endurance. Though you could react harshly, this person might need to have your limits clarified in a meaningful way. Tonight: Finally having fun. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHH Pressure builds within your immediate circle. You could be taken aback by someone’s temper, which could impact you emotionally. Communication soars to a new level. Realize what you are asking — not just the words, but the emotional commitment as well. Tonight: Happy at home. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH You could be affected by a lot of disruption. You know when enough is enough, but sitting on chaos could be hard. Your ability to work with others emerges once more. You might want to rethink a decision. Tonight: Accept an invitation that will help you relax. Š 2012 by King Features Syndicate

B3

C C  Please email event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� at www.bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351. based funk-rock band performs; $5; 9:30 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www. silvermoonbrewing.com.

TODAY BEND FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 3-7 p.m.; Brooks Alley, between Northwest Franklin Avenue and Northwest Brooks Street; 541-408-4998, bendfarmersmarket@gmail.com or http://bendfarmersmarket. com. MUSIC ON THE GREEN: Featuring traditional Hawaiian dancing by the Hokulea Dancers; vendors available; free; 6-7:30 p.m.; Sam Johnson Park, Southwest 15th Street, Redmond; 541-923-5191 or http:// visitredmondoregon.com.

WEDNESDAY Sept. 12

THURSDAY TONY SMILEY: The Portlandbased looping rocker performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www. mcmenamins.com.

FRIDAY GARDEN WORK PARTY: Help complete the reclaimed fence around the Kansas Avenue Learning Garden; free; 9 a.m.noon; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; 541385-6908. RUN TO THE CASCADES MOTORCYCLE RALLY: The rally includes live music, jousting, charity poker, classic cars, a tattoo expo and more; a portion of proceeds benefit local charities; $15 day pass, $25 for weekend; 11 a.m.-11 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-548-2711 or www. runtothecascades.com. BEND FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 2-6 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541408-4998, bendfarmersmarket@ gmail.com or http:// bendfarmersmarket.com. SISTERS FARMERS MARKET: 3-6 p.m.; Barclay Park, West Cascade Avenue and Ash Street; www.sistersfarmersmarket.com. FIRST FRIDAY GALLERY WALK: Event includes art exhibit openings, artist talks, live music, wine and food in downtown Bend and the Old Mill District; free; 5-9 p.m.; throughout Bend. SISTERS FOLK FESTIVAL: Three-day folk music festival including performances by James McMurtry, Mary Gauthier, Gregory Alan Isakov and more; SOLD OUT; 5:30 p.m.-1 a.m.; downtown Sisters; 541-5494979, info@sistersfolkfestival.org or www.sistersfolkfestival.org. YOGIS UNITE!: With yoga classes, social activities and dance performances; $25 for two days; 5:30-8:30 p.m.; Juniper Swim & Fitness Center, 800 N.E. Sixth St., Bend; information@ yogisunitebend.com or www. yogisunitebend.com. MUNCH & MOVIES: An outdoor screening of “Hugo�; with food vendors and live music; free; 6 p.m., movie begins at dusk; Compass Park, 2500 N.W. Crossing Drive, Bend; 541-3890995 or www.northwestcrossing. com. SYNRGY: The Ashland-based reggae band performs; free; 6-9 p.m.; Deschutes Brewery & Public House, 1044 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-9242. “GREGORIAN, GOSPEL AND GERSHWIN�: Mark Oglesby presents an organ concert; donations accepted; 7 p.m.; St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church & School, 2450 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-382-3631. RED ROCK SQUARE DANCE: Spectators and dancers welcome; $5, free for spectators; 7-10 p.m.; Redmond Grange, 707 S.W. Kalama Ave.; 541-923-8804. “RICHARD III�: Thoroughly Modern Productions and Stage Right Productions present Shakespeare’s play about the controversial English king; with a champagne reception; $18, $15 students and seniors; 7:30 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-3129626, 2ndstreettheater@gmail. com or www.2ndstreettheater. com. SCREEN ON THE GREEN: Juggling performance followed by a screening of the PG-rated film “How to Train Your Dragon�; free; 7:30 p.m., 8 p.m. movie; Sahalee Park, B and Seventh streets, Madras; 541-475-3351 or www.jcld.org. BLACK BEAST REVIVAL: The rock band performs, with Strive Roots; $5; 8:30 p.m.; Liquid Lounge, 70 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend.

SATURDAY HIGH DESERT SWAP MEET & CAR SHOW: A sale of antiques and a car show; proceeds benefit local and regional charities; free admission; 7 a.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-548-4467 or bramsey@ bendbroadband.com.

Submitted photo

Portland-based one-man band Tony Smiley performs Thursday at McMenamins Old St. Francis School in Bend. RUN TO THE CASCADES MOTORCYCLE RALLY: The rally includes live music, jousting, charity poker, classic cars, a tattoo expo and more; a portion of proceeds benefit local charities; $15 day pass, $25 for weekend; 8 a.m.-7 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-5482711 or www.runtothecascades.com. PRINEVILLE FARMERS MARKET: Free; 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Prineville City Plaza, 387 N.E. Third St.; 503-739-0643 or prinevillefarmersmarket@gmail.com. GARDEN WORK PARTY: Help complete the reclaimed fence around the Kansas Avenue Learning Garden; free; 9 a.m.-noon; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; 541-385-6908. SPORTSMAN JAMBOREE COLLECTIBLE SHOW: A show of guns, knives, coins and collectibles; food available; $5, $4 with a trade gun, free ages 12 and younger with an adult; 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; La Pine Event Center, 16405 First St.; 541-5366237. YOGIS UNITE!: An outdoor yoga event with classes, exhibitors, a raffle and more; registration requested; $25 for two days; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Drake Park, 777 N.W. Riverside Blvd., Bend; information@yogisunitebend.com or www.yogisunitebend.com. NORTHWEST CROSSING FARMERS MARKET: Free; 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; NorthWest Crossing, Mt. Washington and Northwest Crossing drives, Bend; 541-382-1662, valerie@ brooksresources.com or www. nwxfarmersmarket.com. A DAY TO REMEMBER: Featuring a fire truck parade, booths, ax-throwing contests, demonstrations, races and more; proceeds benefit a scholarship fund for the children of fallen firefighters; free admission; 11 a.m.-6 p.m.; Big Al’s Firehouse Grill, state Highway 126 and Williams Road, Powell Butte; 541-548-1488. SISTERS FOLK FESTIVAL: Threeday folk music festival including performances by James McMurtry, Mary Gauthier, Gregory Alan Isakov and more; SOLD OUT; 11-12:30 a.m.; downtown Sisters; 541-549-4979, info@sistersfolkfestival.org or www. sistersfolkfestival.org. VFW DINNER: A 9/11 barbecue, with a poker run; free; 1-7 p.m.; VFW Hall, 1503 N.E. Fourth St., Bend; 541-3890775. LA GUITARRA IN MEXICO: A lecture tracing the history of the guitar and its different transformations in Mexico; free; 3 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-3121032, lizg@deschuteslibrary.org or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. BEND GAME NIGHT: Play available board games or bring your own; free; 6 p.m.-midnight; East Bend Public Library, 62080 Dean Swift Road; 541318-8459. “RICHARD III�: Thoroughly Modern Productions and Stage Right Productions present Shakespeare’s play about the controversial English king; $18, $15 students and seniors; 7:30 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-3129626, 2ndstreettheater@gmail.com or www.2ndstreettheater.com. JASON & THE PUNKNECKS: The Nashville, Tenn.-based country punk band performs; $5; 8 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; 541-728-0879 or www.reverbnation.com/venue/ thehornedhand. THE HOONS: The indie rock band performs, with Dead Remedy; $5; 9:30 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www. silvermoonbrewing.com.

SUNDAY SPORTSMAN JAMBOREE COLLECTIBLE SHOW: A show of guns, knives, coins and collectibles; food available; $5, $4 with a trade

BEND FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 3-7 p.m.; Brooks Alley, between Northwest Franklin Avenue and Northwest Brooks Street; 541-408-4998, bendfarmersmarket@gmail.com or http://bendfarmersmarket.com. MUSIC IN THE CANYON: The concert series finale; free; 5:30-8 p.m.; American Legion Community Park, 850 S.W. Rimrock Way, Redmond; www.musicinthecanyon. com. CASEY NEILL & THE NORWAY RATS: The Portland-based Americana group performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www. mcmenamins.com. BUCKETHEAD: The Californiabased experimental rocker performs, with DJ Samples; $20 plus fees in advance, $25 at the door; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-788-2989 or www. randompresents.com.

gun, free ages 12 and younger with an adult; 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; La Pine Event Center, 16405 First St.; 541536-6237. SISTERS FOLK FESTIVAL: Threeday folk music festival including performances by James McMurtry, Mary Gauthier, Gregory Alan Isakov and more; SOLD OUT; 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; downtown Sisters; 541-5494979, info@sistersfolkfestival.org or www.sistersfolkfestival.org. ANNUAL GREAT DRAKE PARK DUCK RACE: Event includes live music, food, activity booths and duck races; proceeds from duck sales benefit local charities; free admission; 11 a.m.-4 p.m.; Drake Park, 777 N.W. Riverside Blvd., Bend; www.theduckrace.com. FIDDLERS JAM: Listen or dance at the Oregon Old Time Fiddlers Jam; donations accepted; 1-3:30 p.m.; VFW Hall, 1836 S.W. Veterans Way, Redmond; 541-647-4789. LA GUITARRA IN MEXICO: A lecture tracing the history of the guitar and its different transformations in Mexico; free; 2 p.m.; Sisters Public Library, 110 N. Cedar St.; 541-3121032, lizg@deschuteslibrary.org or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. SECOND SUNDAY: Carl Adamshick reads from a selection of his works; followed by an open mic; free; 2 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1032 or www. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. “RICHARD III�: Thoroughly Modern Productions and Stage Right Productions present Shakespeare’s play about the controversial English king; $18, $15 students and seniors; 3 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626, 2ndstreettheater@gmail.com or www.2ndstreettheater.com.

THURSDAY

MONDAY

FRIDAY

“CAMP AMACHE — AN AMERICAN STORY�: Gordon Nagai talks about his family’s experiences in a Japanese internment camp in Colorado and Japanese volunteers who served in the army; free; 2 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-4663. CITY FAIRE: The Seattle-based rock band performs; free; 7:3010:30 p.m.; Astro Lounge, 939 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-388-0116, theastrolounge@theastrolounge. com or www.theastrolounge.com.

Sept. 14

TUESDAY REDMOND FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 2-6:30 p.m.; Centennial Park, Seventh Street and Evergreen Avenue; 541-550-0066 or redmondfarmersmarket1@hotmail. com. BROOKSWOOD PLAZA FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 3-7 p.m.; Brookswood Meadow Plaza, 19530 Amber Meadow Drive, Bend; 541-323-3370 or farmersmarket@ brookswoodmeadowplaza.com. HUEY LEWIS AND THE NEWS: The ‘80s rockers perform; $39 or $78 reserved, plus fees; 6:30 p.m., gates open 5 p.m.; Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-318-5457 or www.bendconcerts.com. “LIFE WITH AN INDIAN PRINCE�: A screening of the documentary about traditional falconry practices of the Indian Rajput Princes; free; 7 p.m., doors open 6 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. “WILD VERSUS WALL�: A screening of the film about how the Mexican border wall affects desert animals and life; followed by a discussion; free; 7 p.m., 6:30 p.m. reception; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; 541-389-0785. BROTHERS GOW: The San Diego-

Sept. 13 FALL RV SHOW AND SALE: See new floor plans and technology advances for 2013 models; free; 9 a.m.-6 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-548-2711. THE LIBRARY BOOK CLUB: Read and discuss “Tuesdays with Morrie� by Mitch Albom; free; noon; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1055 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. THE LIBRARY BOOK CLUB: Read and discuss “Have a Little Faith� by Mitch Albom; free; noon; Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7080 or www. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. TUMALO FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 3-6 p.m.; Tumalo Garden Market, off of U.S. Highway 20 and Cook Avenue; 541-728-0088, earthsart@gmail.com or http:// tumalogardenmarket.com. MAPS OF EARLY MEXICO: A slide show presentation and discussion of maps of early Mexico; free; 6:30 p.m.; East Bend Public Library, 62080 Dean Swift Road; 541-3121032. “RICHARD III�: Thoroughly Modern Productions and Stage Right Productions present Shakespeare’s play about the controversial English king; $18, $15 students and seniors; 7:30 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-3129626, 2ndstreettheater@gmail.com or www.2ndstreettheater.com. ANIMAL EYES: The Portlandbased indie rockers perform; free; 9 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; 541-728-0879 or www.reverbnation.com/venue/ thehornedhand.

FALL RV SHOW AND SALE: See new floor plans and technology advances for 2013 models; free; 9 a.m.-6 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-548-2711. MYTHS AND REALITIES OF THE SPANISH CONQUEST OF MEXICO: Robert Haskett explores myths and realities of what happened after Cortes arrived in Mexico; free; noon; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 451-3121032 or www.deschuteslibrary. org/calendar. BEND FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 2-6 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541408-4998, bendfarmersmarket@ gmail.com or http:// bendfarmersmarket.com. SISTERS FARMERS MARKET: 3-6 p.m.; Barclay Park, West Cascade Avenue and Ash Street; www. sistersfarmersmarket.com. “HUGO�: A screening of the PG-13-rated 2011 film; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541-475-3351 or www. jcld.org. “RICHARD III�: Thoroughly Modern Productions and Stage Right Productions present Shakespeare’s play about the controversial English king; $18, $15 students and seniors; 7:30 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-3129626, 2ndstreettheater@gmail.com or www.2ndstreettheater.com. “THE PRODUCERS�: Cat Call Productions presents the musical satire about two people who set out to produce the worst show in Broadway history; $30 or $35; 8 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www. towertheatre.org. SHADOWS ON STARS: The musical duo performs, with Cadence; $5; 8:30 p.m.; Liquid Lounge, 70 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend.


B4

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2012

TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

BIZARRO

B5

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively.

SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

DAILY BRIDGE CLUB

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

Seeking a friendly duplicate bridge? Find five games weekly at www.bendbridge.org.

CANDORVILLE

SAFE HAVENS

LOS ANGELES TIMES DAILY CROSSWORD

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN


B6

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2012

Dan Gill / New York Times News Service Stephanie Diani / The New York Times

Last year, Sarah Calle, a 21-year-old junior at Laguna College of Art and Design in Laguna Beach, Calif., started Dormdesign.tumblr.com, a blog that showcases tricked-out dorm rooms.

Dorms C o n tin u e d f r o m B 1 But this year the timing had worked out, and D’Annunzio remembered that as a little girl she had dreamed of getting “locked in a mall” — a common fantasy, judging by the scene at Target. Jordyn Richman, an 18year-old freshman, had come for a mattress pad, a body pillow, a night light and push pins. Before arriving at Temple, Richman had already spent $300 on dorm decor at Target and Ikea stores near her home in Boca Raton, Fla. The additional items she was buying would “round out” her room, she said. In recent years, the Target run — or a shopping trip to a similar big-box store — has become a new college tradition, right up there with spring break and sleeping through class. This time of year it is common to see students and parents roaming the aisles, checking off items from an ever-growing list of essentials. The goal, it seems, is to turn the dorm room into a plush home away from home. Derek Jackson, director of housing and dining services at Kansas State, is among those who have observed a growing influx of comforts like coffee makers and the rise of colorcoordinated rooms. “We get requests saying, ‘Can you give us dimensions for the windows, because we want to hang curtains?’ ” he said. “Back in the old days, students were just trying to make their rooms purposeful.” And of the 72-inch televisions he has lately been seeing students lug into residence halls, Jackson said, “If they can fit it into their room: That’s the mind-set.” Norb Dunkel, associate vice president for student affairs at the University of Florida, who is busy overseeing the current crop of arrivals, has also noticed the maximalist shift. He cited the overloaded family car

Amanda Zuckerman, a graphic design student at Washington University in St. Louis, and her mother started Dormify.com, an e-commerce site that sells stylish (and generally more expensive) bedding sets, wall decals and sorority-themed items like posters.

hangers and laundry hampers to things of more questionable necessity (particularly during a recession), like a tool kit, blackout panels and iPod speakers. “The business just continues to grow,” Grannis said. “There’s so many different ways to get in on this.”

Family ties

Ryan Collerd / New York Times News Service

Temple University students Chris Vinan, left, and Mike Barbacano line up to check out in a Target in Philadelphia last month. In recent years, a shopping trip to a big-box store, like Target, has become a new college tradition.

as a ubiquitous image during move-in week. “When they back their vehicle up, if it goes beep-beepbeep, they’re bringing too much stuff,” Dunkel said. “And you can hear the beep-beepbeeps now.” Both men say big-box retailers have played a big role in fueling students’ desire to make their dorm rooms more than just drab boxes along a doubleloaded corridor. Retailers are now marketing so heavily to students during the back-tocollege season, Dunkel said, that they would probably like to “put a flier in every student’s room.”

Big college business Kathy Grannis, a spokeswoman for the National Retail Federation, an industry group, said hard goods for back-tocollege, which includes school supplies, laptop computers and dorm decor, are a $50 billion annual business. Which is why retailers as diverse as Apple, Kate Spade, Krups, Roux Maison detergents and Sure Fit slipcovers are all promoting deals. Despite the recession, Grannis expects to see growth in this sector, because in an annual survey conducted by her organization, she said, this

year more people responded that their children will live in dorms on campus, rather than commuting from home to save money as they have in previous years. Surely there are students whose families can’t afford to spend hundreds of dollars outfitting a dorm room. But “the kid with two suitcases flies under the radar,” said Patrick Love, associate vice president for student affairs at Rutgers, which also holds an after-hours sale with Target. “What draws your eye are the students bringing the flat-screen TVs.” Not surprisingly, Target is a leader in the market. Its after-hours sales for Temple and Rutgers students are just two of 69 similar events the retailer is holding in partnership with colleges across the country, an effort that began 11 years ago with the University of Minnesota. Bed Bath & Beyond also markets heavily to college students, offering programs like a college registry and Shop Here, Pick Up There, which allows students to buy items locally or online and retrieve them at a store near their college. The retailer’s Campus & Beyond Checklist, a sacred text among students and parents, numbers over 90 items: from basics like

Chris Seman, president of Caring Transitions, a Cincinnati-based company that handles logistics when people make a big life change, said the closer ties between children and parents have redefined the move to college. Students are “so connected to their family and home they don’t see moving to college as a new stage,” he said. “They want to bring home with them.” At the same time, he added, helicopter parenting doesn’t stop when the child goes off to school: “Now parents think their kids have to have everything they had at home or it’s going to be too traumatic for them.” Jess Smith, an 18-year-old freshman at Temple who came to the Target event to buy a mirror, said her parents “took over decorating” the loungestyle room she is sharing with two roommates. “They were a huge help,” Smith said. “My dad came today and installed a shower caddy.” Seman, who attended Eastern Michigan University in the mid-1980s, said he recalls taking little more than clothes and a Led Zeppelin poster. But when he sent his oldest son off to college two years ago, he admitted to overdoing it at Target, where he spent $350. “I probably ended up returning $100 worth of stuff,” Seman said. “He had roommates. It was duplicates of everything. How many spatulas do you need?” If the volume of moving boxes has increased, however, so has students’ desire to live in a well-designed space. Reality shows focused on design and websites like Pinterest have

Midcentury C o n tin u e d f r o m B 1 Modern furniture is rarely anonymous. Every object is attributed to specific designers, even if in later years it’s ruled a collaboration or occasionally stolen credit. For the most part, midcentury styles were designed with the intention of making rooms feel dramatically airy and inviting. There’s often a nod to nature or organic shapes through design or materials. But as styles changed, the pendulum shifted toward furniture that people could sink into — some would say that the furniture looked foreboding enough to swallow humans whole. Deatherage understands the desire for luxury and comfort but said that furniture should be scaled to fit the environment, not some vague quest for cozy grandiosity. A 10-by10-foot room should not have a gigantic king-sized mattress tower, in his opinion. Anna Weiss of MoModerne in St. Louis, said part of the appeal of midcentury design is that it tends to be brighter, trimmer and lighter. “It’s minimal and clean but it’s also fun, because of the colors — turquoise and pinks and yellows and the fantastic oranges,” Weiss said. She noted that it’s an easy sell to younger clients because they are craving something unique and funky that’s no longer cookie cutter. And older clients are buying nostalgia from their

made students savvier about decorating. Roommates connect on Facebook months before college begins, Jackson said, to plan their decor: “They pick out carpet and start accessorizing. The bedspreads match. It’s a more coordinated effort.” At the University of Florida, there is even an annual competition for the best decorated room. The winner two years ago, Kent Stephan, used shells and weathered furniture to create a nautical effect. “I’ve stayed at a lot of hotels, and my inspiration came from having that chic, luxury feel,” said Stephan, who graduated last year and is considering starting a design business geared to students. “I wanted to break from that dorm-room look.”

Different looks Indeed, for a number of students, the bed-in-a-bag just doesn’t cut it. Last year, Sarah Calle, a 21-year-old junior at Laguna College of Art and Design in Laguna Beach, Calif., started Dormdesign.tumblr.com, a blog that showcases trickedout dorm rooms. “I wanted to see people who took it beyond the basics,” Calle said. “Some inspirational design.” Amanda Zuckerman went one step further. Before she went off to Washington University in St. Louis as a freshman three years ago, she went shopping for dorm furnishings and found the offerings at big-box stores “very childish,” she said. “No one had Twin XL bedding

that was very stylish,” she said, referring to the irregular bed size native to residence halls. So Zuckerman and her mother, Karen, an advertising executive in Washington, started Dormify.com, an ecommerce site that sells stylish (and generally more expensive) bedding sets, wall decals and sorority-themed items like posters and Greek prints. “If you care about what you’re wearing, you’ll care about what your room is like,” Zuckerman said. “It’s a form of self-expression.” Her freshman dorm room had a cream-and-green color scheme with “pops of orange,” she said, and a chandelier wall decal. It was known among her friends as the “hotel suite.” As I was leaving the Target event, I ran into a 19-year-old Temple student with frosted hair named Alec Santiago Hooper. His cart was loaded with a Mr. Coffee machine, a 10-speed blender, pillows and burgundy curtains, among other items. Like many students I spoke to, he had already done most of his shopping, buying bedding at Ikea and a used dresser on Craigslist, and was picking up extras for his off-campus apartment. “I didn’t know my room was so plain,” he said. “So I got the curtains.”

for appointments call 541-382-4900 856 NW Bond • Downtown Bend • 541-330-5999 www.havenhomestyle.com

The COCC Community Learning Fall Schedule is here. You’ll find inspiration on every page.

Photos by McClatchy-Tribune News Service

FROM LEFT: A midcentury modern chair at MoModerne, the Winsor glass top accent table at World Market Cost Plus and Crate and Barrel’s Milo Classic Leather Lounge Chair.

childhood. “I think ‘Mad Men’ has helped a lot,” said Jennie Bates, owner of the newly opened consignment store Modern Vintage Décor in St. Louis. She said her clientele trends younger because people might have fond memories of their grandparents’ furniture when they were a kid, but they didn’t actually have to live with it. “Older people tend not to buy,” they browse and reminisce, she said. “But ultimately been there, done that.” Bates started her store five months ago because she was working at another resale shop nearby and people kept coming in with midcentury items that the other store couldn’t accept. After turning dozens of people away, she knew there was an opportunity. “The great thing is that you can’t go to Pottery Barn and buy these things. Your friends don’t come over and say, ‘Oh yeah.’ They say, ‘Wow, where’d you get that?’ ” Bates said. And though Bates is new

to the business of midcentury modern, the trend has been growing for years. Deatherage and Weiss have both been selling for more than a decade. Weiss started selling online when she bought a Pulley Light Fixture by Italian designer Paavo Tynell for $10 at an estate sale. She sold it online for $600. “At the time, I didn’t even know what I had until I went to sell it, but that’s what got me through college,” she said. She’s been selling vintage modern pieces online for 10 years but decided to open a brick-and-mortar shop that debuted in January. She wasn’t sure demand would justify a storefront but said that she’s been pleasantly surprised. Most people already own something that divines from a midcentury modern design, whether it’s cookware, glassware, furniture or table lamps, but many may not recognize it as such. Modern style lines dominate lower-priced stores (Ikea,

anyone?) and even high-end designers like Jonathan Adler and retailers like Design Within Reach have coordinated with manufacturers and estates to reissue licensed merchandise by modern designers. “Price has a lot to do with whether people buy vintage or not,” Bates said. However, that depends on the item and where it’s sold. A desk with a thick white top sells for $199 at Cost Plus World Market, and the vintage Milo Baughman desk with similar lines sells for $2,000. But many items, such as mass-produced chairs and lamps from the era, would be more comparably priced. And often vintage couches and huge wood cabinet pieces are much, much cheaper, but often require some cosmetic work. “Quality is an issue no matter when the item was made, but you’re probably looking at a sturdier piece,” if it has survived since the end of World War II, Deatherage said.

Find yours. Register today. Watch for your insert in The Bulletin, Wed., Sept. 5

A dynamic mix of classes to inspire you year-round.

COMMUNITY LEARNING Register online or by phone. www.cocc.edu\continuinged 541.383.7270


LOCALNEWS

C

Editorials, C4 Obituaries, C5 Weather, C6

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2012

LOCAL BRIEFING Remains await identification Officials say they might never be able to identify the skeletal remains found west of Detroit Lake on Saturday morning. According to Marion County Sheriff’s Office public information officer Don Thomson, the remains were found about a mile from the water in a remote hunting area. Thomson said there are no missing people in his county, and pointed to high-profile missing persons cases like Kyron Horman, the 9-year-old Portland boy who disappeared in June 2010, and Lori “Woody” Blaylock, the Bend woman whose husband murdered her in November 2010 and dumped her body in the North Santiam River near Marion Forks. According to a press release, hunters found the skeletal remains off state Highway 22, near Niagara Park. That’s more than 25 miles from Marion Forks. The bones have been sent to the medical examiner’s office. Thomson cautioned the remains might never be identified. “It all depends on what we’re able to determine, on how many bones we collect,” he said. The investigation is ongoing.

www.bendbulletin.com/local

Candidate’s email ruled legal By Joel Aschbrenner

ELECTION: CROOK COUNTY JUDGE

The Bulletin

A candidate for Crook County judge was within his rights when he used a county Listserv last week to publicize his campaign Facebook page, a state election official said. But a county official said the email put county employees who received it at risk of violating election rules. Walt Wagner, an Independent Party candidate challenging incumbent Mike McCabe, said he accidently included the county Listserv in an email blast promoting his new Facebook page. Distributing campaign material, Wagner said,

is his constitutional right. Assistant County Counsel Eric Blaine asked Wagner in an email to “cease and desist” sending campaign emails to Wagner the county Listserv. The county uses the Listserv to send public meeting notices and news releases to employees and members of the public who request them. Distributing campaign material

through the Listserv puts county employees at risk of violating a campaign law that prohibits government employees from engaging in political activities, like visiting campaign websites, on the clock, Blaine said. But nothing prohibits Wagner from distributing campaign material to county employees or using the county Listserv to do so, said Andrea CantuSchomus, director of communications with the Oregon Secretary of State’s Office. In fact, McCabe could use the county Listserv to publicize a website of his own if he wanted, she said. See Email / C2

TAKING THEIR MEMORY ON TOUR

The Bulletin

More briefing and News of Record, C2

CIVIC CALENDAR

— Contact: 541-383-0354, news@bendbulletin.com. In emails, please write “Civic Calendar” in the subject line. Include a contact name and number.

FIRE UPDATE Reported for Central and Eastern Oregon. For the latest information, visit www.nwccweb .us/information/ firemap.aspx.

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

Larry De Filippis, on vacation from University Place, Wash., looks at the photos and reads the names of some of the service people who died in the Vietnam War in a visit to The Wall That Heals traveling memorial in the parking lot of Ray’s Food Place in Sisters on Tuesday. The traveling memorial, sponsored by the Vietnam Veter-

ans Memorial Fund, is free to view from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. in Sisters until early Friday. Visitors can see the pictures and read the names of many of the war dead on one side of the trailer and learn more about the war from a static display on the other side. More information can be found at www.vvmf.org/twth.

Happy with a full plate The Bulletin

H

is parents warned him it might be a bad idea, given his already-packed schedule and difficult course load. But when C.J. Fraley, 17, found out Bend High School’s Creative Writing Club was defunct because of a lack of student interest last year, he did what he always does when he

OUR SCHOOLS, OUR STUDENTS Educational news and activities, and local kids and their achievements. • School Notes and submission info, C2

Negligence trial begins today for Bend clinic

notices something in need of help. He took initiative, and restarted the club. “I wanted to reboot the club because writing, while being one of the most inclusive arts on the planet, is also by its nature pretty solitary,” C.J. said. “The club sounded like a great way to become a better writer and meet interesting people.” See Fraley / C2

By Megan Kehoe

Baker City Burns

Madras Bend

2

MILES 0

50

Joe Kline / The Bulletin

Bend High School senior C.J. Fraley, 17, has returned from Washington, D.C., where he was on a community serviceoriented trip this summer.

Lakeview 1. Waterfalls 2 Fire • Acres: 12,265 • Containment: 85% • Cause: Lightning 2. Parish Cabin Fire • Acres: 6,481 • Containment: 65% • Cause: Human

August 2012 weather for Bend DAILY HIGHS AND LOWS Average temperature: 67.7° (4.8° above normal) DAY

1

HI 84

2

3

4

5

6

84

82

88

92

92

7

In a story headlined, “Hal David was hit songwriter,” which ran Sunday, Sept. 2, on Page B5, The Associated Press misidentified the songwriters of “That’s What Friends Are For.” The song was co-written by Burt Bacharach and Carole Bayer Sager. The Bulletin regrets the error.

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

87

84

89

92

93

94 93 H

86

87

94 H

90 94 H

89

82

81 77

77

84

84

80

79

71

81

L 39

45

L 39

48

40

40

40

80

60

40 FREEZING

20 LO 48

50

48

48

52

48

56 57

PRECIPITATION TOTAL: .11”

Correction

8

91 92

INCH

49

49

50

50

50

57 56

54

53

57

59 52

54

47

46 40

Historical average precipitation for the month: .49”

T = Trace

.11

ALMANAC Highest temperature Highest recorded temperature Highest for therecorded month:

maximum for the month 102° on Aug. 8, 1972

94°

Lowest temperature

39°

Average high

86.2°

Average low

Lowest recorded temperature for the month:

Monthly average high temperature through the years:

Monthly average low temperature through the years:

27°

81.1°

44.6°

on Aug. 27, 1960

* Monthly averages calculated from 1928 through 2005, Western Regional Climate Center Sources: NOAA, Western Regional Climate Center, Bend Public Works Department

The owner of a former Bend mortgage-lending company and one of his clients have been arraigned in federal court in Eugene on charges of wire fraud and conspiracy to commit wire fraud. Peter Wilkinson, who ran Deschutes Mortgage Group Inc. on Northwest Milwaukee Avenue in Bend, and client Amy Ridley, a former Bend resident, were charged in August 2011 in a federal grand jury indictment, which was ordered sealed. The indictment was unsealed in May, and during the arraignment at the Wayne L. Morse U.S. Courthouse in June, Wilkinson and Ridley pleaded not guilty. Attorneys representing Wilkinson and Ridley did not respond to requests for comment. According to the indictment, the two knowingly gave inaccurate information in 2006 about Ridley’s income and employment to the now-defunct GreenPoint Mortgage Funding Inc. to secure two refinancing loans for a rental home on Northeast Ninth Street in Bend. The two told GreenPoint that Ridley had worked for two years at a company named Rent-A-Husband, was earning $13,000 per month and had more than $15,000 in her bank accounts, the indictment states. However, the indictment states, Ridley was not working consistently at the time. See Ex-broker / C2

BMC

Bend

1

Ex-broker and client arraigned on fraud charges By Jordan Novet

— Bulletin staff report

• Candidate forum featuring Deschutes County Commissioner Position 2 candidates Tom Greene and Alan Unger; sponsored by The League of Women Voters; 12:15 p.m. to 1:15 p.m.; Sept. 25; Deschutes County Building, 1300 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-382-2724.

DESCHUTES MORTGAGE GROUP

49.1°

Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

By Sheila G. Miller The Bulletin

Opening arguments are set to begin today in a $5.5 million civil trial that pits a doctor and the Bend Memorial Clinic against a patient who alleges her colon cancer was not discovered because of negligent care. Mia Bongers, 84, of Bend, sued Dr. Thomas Warlick and BMC in November 2011, alleging personal injury and medical malpractice. Warlick has worked at BMC since 1977. According to an amended complaint, Bongers alleges that Warlick and BMC were negligent in failing to order or perform, offer or recommend a colonoscopy or colon cancer screenings between Nov. 22, 2006, and May 8, 2009. As a result, the complaint alleges, Bongers’ metastatic colon cancer was not diagnosed or treated in a timely manner. Bongers is asking for not more than $5 million in noneconomic damages and $500,000 in economic damages related to medical, hospital and rehabilitation expenses. Warlick and BMC deny the claims, alleging Bongers failed to follow Warlick’s recommendation to have preventive screenings, as well as three other doctors’ recommendations to have a colonoscopy. The original complaint also included St. Charles Health System, Central Oregon Radiology Association and Dr. Ronald Hanson, but they were dismissed from the case. See BMC / C2


C2

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2012

BMC LOCAL BRIEFING Continued from C1

OSP investigate strange death Oregon State Police are investigating a Tuesday morning incident in Chemult that ended with the death of a 52-yearold man. According to an OSP news release, medical personnel were called around 9:45 a.m. with reports of a man who had fallen down near a Chevron station along U.S. Highway 97. Witnesses said the man was acting erratically, crossing the highway multiple times and rolling around in the dirt behind the gas station. While awaiting the arrival of the ambulance, witnesses attempted to calm the man, talking to him and giving him water. When the ambulance arrived, the man jumped in front of it, then headed for an apartment police believe was occupied by a pregnant woman. Bystanders, including the pregnant woman’s father, intervened and restrained the man on the ground to prevent him from going to the apartment. While on the ground, he lost consciousness and stopped breathing. Emergency medical personnel performed CPR in an effort to revive the man, but he died at the scene. Police are still trying to contact members of the dead man’s family, and are not yet prepared to release his name. The Klamath County District Attorney’s Office is assisting OSP detectives in the investigation. An autopsy has not yet been scheduled.

Bend park secures grant The Bend Park & Recreation District will receive a $262,750 grant to help build Miller’s Landing Park, the district announced Tuesday. Construction of the park, across the Deschutes River from McKay Park and just downstream from the Colorado Avenue bridge, is scheduled to begin in November, and is expected to be completed next summer. Miller’s Landing is one of 14 park projects around the state splitting $2.4 million in funds from the Oregon Lottery.

Flags to lower for fallen soldier Gov. John Kitzhaber has ordered flags at public institutions to be flown at half-staff today in honor of an Oregon soldier killed last week in Afghanistan. Spc. Mabry Anders, of Baker City, died of injuries inflicted by enemy fire Aug. 27.

IPads donated to Bend schools The Bank of the Cascades has donated 10 iPads to the Education Foundation for Bend-La Pine Schools to increase access to technology in classrooms. The iPads will expand the district’s Instructional Technology department’s iPad loaner library for teachers.

Sale to benefit the homeless Redmond Walmart employees will raise funds for nonprofit Jericho Road on Saturday by selling hot dogs and soda at the store location. The event will take place from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. All proceeds from the event will go to support Jericho Road, a nonprofit that provides transitional housing for homeless families and children. — Bulletin staff reports

‘Sporadic’ patient

Continued from C1 Bongers and Warlick were in court Tuesday as attorneys selected jurors for the trial, which is slated to last two weeks. According to the plaintiff’s trial memorandum, Bongers began going to Warlick in 1986. In 1992, he performed a general exam and screened her for colon cancer. “Over the next 15 years, Dr. Warlick saw Mrs. Bongers numerous times but did not offer or perform any general exams or colon cancer screening tests,” the memo states. The memo alleges Warlick was Bongers’ primary care physician for 21 years and he should have offered patients over 50 an “initial screening colonoscopy,” but failed to do so at her appointments.

Hospitalized in 2009 Bongers was hospitalized for diverticulitis in May 2009, and afterward had a follow-up appointment with Warlick. “On that date, despite knowing that Mrs. Bongers was 80 years old, had an abnormality in her colon and had never undergone a colonoscopy, Dr. Warlick negligently failed to order a colonoscopy,” the memo states. “Had Mrs. Bongers undergone a colonoscopy at that time, her colon cancer would have been discovered and could have been treated and cured with a colon resection and chemotherapy.” Subsequently in November 2009, according to the memo, Bongers was hospitalized twice more for diverticulitis, and eventually had a colon resection surgery that turned up colon cancer. The cancer had spread to her lungs. It has been in remission since June 2010. Bongers alleges Warlick never recommended she get any screenings after 1992.

But the defendants’ trial brief tells a different story. Warlick first saw Bongers in 1986 for shingles and went to BMC “sporadically” and for “acute care issues” until she got a physical in March 1992. Warlick, according to the brief, suggested she come in for a routine annual exam each time she came for acute issues, but she never did. For the following years, the brief states, Bongers went to BMC from time to time for illnesses like bronchitis, sinusitis and skin conditions, but not for preventive care. “Dr. Warlick will testify that he told her each time that he saw her that she needed to come in for a screening exam. He always tells his patients to get in for screening exams as he can’t do screening exams during acute medical visits,” the brief states. But, the brief states, Bongers did not have mammograms or other preventive screenings performed. “That was her own choice,” the brief states. The brief further alleges that after Bongers was hospitalized for diverticulitis in May 2009, she was told by three physicians to schedule a colonoscopy with Warlick. When she saw Warlick in June 2009, she “failed to tell Dr. Warlick about the recommendation for a colonoscopy and failed to tell him this was her second hospitalization for diverticulitis.” Warlick prescribed an antibiotic for another illness and asked Bongers to return once she finished the medication. He planned, the brief states, to talk over the diverticulitis at that following appointment, but Bongers never returned.

— Walt Wagner, candidate, Crook County judge

Continued from C1 Wagner said he viewed Blaine’s request as an attempt to intimidate him from continuing to distribute campaign material. “When you start intimidating someone and it could affect their First Amendment rights ... that’s wrong,” Wagner said. Wagner is a candidate for county judge, an administrative position and chair of the county court — a three-member governing body — with no judicial responsibilities. Blaine said he was only trying preclude county employees from receiving campaign material at work. “The county’s only interest is to protect employees from violating campaign rules,” Blaine said.

Wagner said that is not his problem. “It’s up to the county to make sure county employees are informed that when something comes in like that, they ... should either delete it or send it to their home email,” he said. In all, 126 people received Wagner’s email. Several complained to the county about it, Blaine said. The county is now looking to secure its Listserv from similar uses in the future, Blaine said. The county had used a simple list of email addresses that any recipient could access by clicking “reply all,” rather than using a blind carbon copy feature, which prevents recipients from seeing who else received the message. — Reporter: 541-633-2184, jaschbrenner@bendbulletin.com

N  R POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Bend Police Department

Burglary — A burglary was reported at 6:41 p.m. Aug. 14, in the 700 block of Southeast Fifth Street. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 4:33 p.m. Aug. 20, in the 21000 block of Bear Creek Road. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 9:27 a.m. Aug. 21, in the 61400 block of Elder Ridge Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 11:05 a.m. Aug. 21, in the 2500 block of Northeast U.S. Highway 20. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 2:03 p.m. Aug. 22, in the 20400 block of Klahani Drive. Theft — A theft was reported at 10:27 a.m. Aug. 26, in the 600 block of Northwest Congress Street. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 11:42 p.m. Aug. 26, in the 61500 block of South U.S. Highway 97. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was

Continued from C1 C.J. is a Bend High senior who is hard to define. On one side, he is a highly creative individual with a passion for writing and reading. On the other side, he is a math whiz who takes classes at Central Oregon Community College. And somewhere in between, he is a charitable individual who helps fight hunger and poverty both locally and at the national level. “He never really stops moving, thinking, writing, studying and serving,” Bend High counselor Gary Whitley said. C.J. says his love for writing might be hereditary: Both his mom and grandmother are writers. By kindergarten, C.J. was already attempting to write a book. Since then, he’s written multiple screenplays and completed the first draft of a novel. “I just love knowing that I can do anything in writ-

C.J. Fraley, 17 Bend High School senior GPA: 3.95 Favorite Movie: “Attack the Block” Favorite Book: “Dead Beat: The Dresden Files” by Jim Butcher; Dante’s “Divine Comedy” TV Show: “Sherlock” Music: We are Scientists

ing,” C.J. said. “You get to create whole new worlds that never existed before.” With his creative writing club now 25 students strong, C.J. plans to dedicate more time to it and to start a literary magazine at the high school this year. Despite his love for the written word, C.J.’s future plans have more to do with the left side of his brain. Since he was young, C.J.’s been interested in space exploration and ways it could solve problems such as overpopulation and famine. He wants to study aerophysics

in college. “In the larger scope of things, Earth is a small place and we could have the technology to move past it,” C.J. said. “It just seems like it would be a goal big enough to focus on for my whole life.” C.J isn’t waiting to help others until he solves global-scale problems, as reflected by his dedication to community service. C.J. is a member of the Bend Youth Collective, a church youth organization that takes on local community service projects throughout the year. Over the past few summers, he’s visited San Francisco, Chicago and Washington, D.C., to volunteer with soup kitchens and building projects. He also volunteers with the Backpacks in Bend program every year, a nonprofit service started by C.J.’s mom that provides backpacks full of food to children and families in need. “Helping people kind of makes me feel like everything is possible,” C.J. said. — Reporter: 541-383-0354, mkehoe@bendbulletin.com

S  N  REUNIONS USS Columbus CA-74/CG-12/ SSN-762 reunion; Sept. 12-16; Holiday Inn Portland Airport; for registration information, contact Allen Hope, president, 3828 Hobson Road, Fort Wayne, Ind., 46815-4505, 260-486-2221 (8 a.m.-5 p.m. EST) or hope4391@ frontier.com. Madras High School class of 1972 will hold a reunion Sept. 15; free; 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Juniper Hills Park, East Ashwood Road and Northeast Bean Drive, Madras; contact 541-410-4602,

williams_lore@yahoo.com or mlhagman@madras.net.

TEEN FEATS Aspen Hassell has been named September’s High Desert Hero from The Center Foundation of Bend. Hassell attends Mountain View High School and maintains a 3.97 GPA. She is captain of the cross-country team and a member of the Nordic ski and track and field teams. She is also a member of student council, the FFA and the

National Honor Society. She plays the violin and piano in the Mountain View orchestra and volunteers with several organizations.

MILITARY NOTES Stefanie Meyer has been commissioned as a second lieutenant in the U.S. Army after successfully completing the Army ROTC program and graduating with a bachelor’s degree from Oregon State University. Meyer is a 2008 graduate of Redmond High School and is the daughter of Pat and Patty Huffer, of Redmond.

— Reporter: 541-617-7831, smiller@bendbulletin.com

“It’s up to the county to make sure county employees are informed that when something comes in like that, they ... should either delete it or send it to their home email.”

Email

Fraley

reported entered and an arrest made at 6:22 a.m. Aug. 27, in the 300 block of Southeast Miller Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at 9:18 a.m. Aug. 29, in the 63100 block of Desert Sage Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 3:34 p.m. Aug. 29, in the 900 block of Northeast Lena Place. DUII — Joe Samuel Joseph Jr., 51, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 9:14 p.m. Aug. 29, in the area of Southeast Fourth Street and Southeast Cleveland Avenue. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 8 a.m. Aug. 30, in the 100 block of Northwest Oregon Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at noon Aug. 5, in the 20200 block of Reed Lane.

BEND FIRE RUNS Thursday 9:26 a.m. — Smoke odor reported, 61470 South U.S. Highway 97. 6:24 p.m. — Grass fire, 2288 N.E. Second St. 6:53 p.m. — Brush or brush-andgrass mixture fire, 19075 Shoshone Road. 7:25 p.m. — Natural vegetation fire, 337 N.E. Revere St. 22 — Medical aid calls.

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Teen feats: Kids recognized recently for academic achievements or for participation in clubs, choirs or volunteer groups. (Please submit a photo.) Phone: 541-383-0358 Email: youth@bendbulletin.com Mail: P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708

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Other school notes: College announcements, military graduations or training completions, reunion announcements. Phone: 541-383-0358 Email: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Ex-broker Continued from C1 Wilkinson obtained two cashier’s checks totaling $15,000 and gave them to Ridley, who deposited them in order to “artificially inflate her bank account balances for the loan approval process,” according to the indictment. After the bank verified the deposits, Ridley repaid Wilson $10,000 with a check from her account, ac-

Student profiles: Know of a kid with a compelling story? Phone: 541-383-0354 Email: mkehoe@bendbulletin.com

cording to the indictment. Within weeks, Wilkinson prepared and Ridley signed a home loan application and submitted it to GreenPoint, and Melville, N.Y.-based North Fork Bank transferred more than $247,000 to an Oregon bank in two transactions intended to be the first and second mortgages on the Ninth Street home, the indictment states. But Ridley could not pay her mortgages. The Northeast Bend house went into foreclosure proceedings, and it sold

CASCADE Warehouse Prices

MATTRESS

in 2008 for $197,100, according to Deschutes County property records. A jury trial is scheduled for 9 a.m. on Oct. 31 in Eugene before U.S. District Judge Michael Hogan. — Reporter: 541-633-2117, jnovet@bendbulletin.com


WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

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O N 2nd death in beach trip shooting near Bandon

DAMASCUS

By Steven DuBois The Associated Press

Emily Fuggetta / The Oregonian

Lowell Patton, the owner of the largest piece of property in Damascus, stands for a photo in Damascus on Aug. 1. Patton is suing the city for $66 million in revenue lost because he can’t develop his property until Damascus completes a comprehensive plan and development code.

State’s newest city divided over development zoning The Associated Press DAMASCUS — A few years ago, residents of the rural Damascus area in Clackamas County got together to incorporate as a city, Oregon’s newest. But a split between those who want to develop land and those who want to keep a rural life has been hard to bridge. City commissioners have asked voters to vote in November on whether they favor pulling about half the city of about 10,000 people out of the regional planning process, a move that could lead to returning that part of the city to rural status. Some in the city are talking about doing away with Damascus’ incorporated status entirely. Kitty O’Meara, who helped develop the draft comprehensive plan rejected by voters in 2010, said the deadlock over development has proved too difficult to overcome. “We’ve just been circling the drain for a long, long time,” she said.

State law requires cities to have comprehensive plans so that they can zone property. The vote against the plan was 65-35. In another development, the state Department of Transportation has pulled a federal grant Damascus was using for work on its state-required transportation system, citing passage of a local measure that requires voter approval of major plans and ordinances.

$66M lawsuit A major landowner, 89year-old Lowell Patton, has filed a lawsuit that claims the city’s development deadlock has cost him $66 million. Patton operates a rock products business and has held land, some of it with sweeping views of Mount Hood, for nearly four decades, waiting for the right time to build. He hoped to start four or five years ago, during better times for real estate. Among his ideas is a winery with mountain views. “I figured when I bought all

this it was a retirement program,” Patton said. But because Damascus lacks a development process, Patton’s land has remained mostly empty. Now he hopes he can de-annex his property and proceed with what he’s planned since long before Damascus was a city. If the measure proposed by the City Council passes in November, the council would ask the regional government Metro to remove the land from the urban grown boundary it administers. City Council members say that same area will probably be de-annexed, which would lower taxes for those property owners. “I think that could alleviate some of the angst,” said council President Diana Helm. But, she said, that’s only part of the solution. “Could it be the whole solution if the city disincorporated? I don’t know,” she said. “There are people all throughout the city who are just ready to throw in the towel.”

Court blocks canola crop expansion in the Valley By Eric Mortenson The Oregonian

The Willamette Valley won’t see expanded plantings of canola this fall. On Friday, the Oregon Court of Appeals — siding with specialty seed growers and food activists who believe canola will contaminate other crops — blocked an attempt to expand the areas where it can be grown. Earlier this summer, the Oregon Department of Agriculture adopted a temporary rule allowing canola to be planted at the edges of a protected zone in the Willamette Valley. The rule would have opened an estimated 480,000 acres for canola, which is grown for food oil and biofuel. Supporters said only a fraction of the acreage would be planted in any given year, however, because most farmers would grow it in annual rotation with grass seed or grains. The agriculture department adopted the rule in order to give interested farmers time to plant canola this fall. The Court of Appeals issued a stay, meaning the temporary rule can’t take effect and canola production in the Willamette Valley is not allowed until further notice, said Bruce Pokarney, agriculture spokesman. The court said canola opponents demonstrated a “very substantial likelihood of prevailing” in their rule challenge. Opponents also “demonstrated a sufficient likelihood of severe and ir-

“We’ve managed to overcome this first roadblock, but the fight does not end here.” — Leah Rodgers, field director, Friends of Family Farmers

remediable harm,” the court said. The department is pursuing a permanent rule that would allow canola cultivation in the future, however. A public hearing will be held Sept. 28 at the Oregon State Fairgrounds in Salem. Farmers involved in Oregon’s $32 million specialty seed fiercely oppose canola, saying it spreads rapidly and will cross-pollinate and contaminate their valuable seed. Farmers here grow cabbage, radish, turnip and pumpkin seed, among many others, that are used by farmers all over the world. Fresh-market vegetable growers also don’t like canola. Groups such as Friends of Family Farmers particularly oppose the introduction of genetically modified canola into the valley. “We’ve managed to overcome this first roadblock, but the fight does not end here,” said Leah Rodgers, field director for Friends of Family Farmers. “Still on the table is the fight over the identical permanent rule that

would change the face of the Willamette Valley, the lives and livelihoods of growers and the economic security of this state,” she said in a prepared statement. George Kimbrell, senior attorney at Center for Food Safety, called the ruling a “fitting tribute to the hardworking growers who have created a thriving economic engine for the state.” On the other side, some farmers and processors believe canola is a viable option that has been unfairly restricted. Canola produces tiny, dark seeds that are crushed to produce biodiesel or foodgrade oil. It’s a profitable crop that can be planted in rotation every few years to break disease cycles that occur when the same crops are planted in fields year after year. It doesn’t require irrigation and can be planted and harvested with the same equipment used for grass seed or wheat. The two sides have been arguing for more than 10 years. Before this year, the state managed the problem by establishing a 48- by 120-mile rectangle in the Willamette Valley — nearly 3.7 million acres — in which canola could not be grown without a permit. Some test plots were allowed in 2007-09, but no other permits were issued. An advisory group representing both sides met with the Department of Agriculture several times this year but was unable to reach consensus.

PORTLAND — An Oregon man has been charged with killing his mother-inlaw’s 19-year-old husband and 70-year-old ex-husband during a family trip to the coast, authorities said. Timothy Henson then kidnapped his wife and mother-and-law before officers discovered them off a spur road a few miles from the scene of the double homicide, said R. Paul Frasier, the Coos County district attorney. Henson, 43, was arraigned Tuesday afternoon on charges of aggravated murder, assault and kidnapping. A judge set bail at $6 million and provided him with a court-appointed attorney. The violence erupted Sunday evening in a Chevy Blazer. After the relatives spent a day visiting beaches, a dispute arose as the vehicle traveled on U.S. High-

way 101 south of Bandon. Henson allegedly fired one to three shots inside the vehicle, with a bullet hitting his wife, 30-year-old Vallena Tuell, in the forearm. The car came to a stop and Henson shot George Micheaux III, 19, and Milton Chester Leach, 70, outside the vehicle, Frasier said. George Micheaux died at the scene. Leach was removed from life support Monday at a Portland hospital.

Family dispute The district attorney said he would present the case to a grand jury later this week. In the meantime, he declined to say what type of gun was used or what the dispute was about. The family lived together in Myrtle Creek, about 90 miles east of the crime scene. Henson and his wife lived in the house, the Micheauxs have a trailer on the property, and Leach, the ex-husband of Ruth Sherrie Micheaux, stayed in the garage. Frasier said Leach had terminal lung cancer, and the week-

end getaway was a chance for him to enjoy the coast for perhaps a final time. The quintet stayed at a motel Saturday night before heading to the beaches Sunday. Tuell has three or four children, according to Kim McCollum, who is an aunt to one of them and lives near the family. “It’s a very sad thing,” McCollum said. “But to be totally and completely honest, I’m just happy the kids weren’t there.” Tuell was treated at a local hospital for her forearm injury and released. McCollum, who learned of the deaths from a reporter, said she did not know Henson or George Micheaux well, but said Leach was “awesome.” “Milton was an old-school guy,” she said. “He always did the best that he could. He was a very caring individual.” It’s unclear when Leach and 47-year-old Ruth Micheaux got divorced. Micheaux and her teenage husband were married in New Mexico in November 2009.

O  B 

State ranked No. 4 in illegal drug use PORTLAND — A new report says Oregon ranks fourth in the nation for illegal drug use by people 12 and older. The findings are based on a national survey that asked about drug use in the past 30 days. They were included in a report released Tuesday by the state Department of Justice. The report says state and federal restrictions on the sale of cold medications that are a key ingredient in methamphetamine have contributed to a sharp decline in the number of meth labs discovered. Analysts also say marijuana use and cultivation

Care for loved ones. Comfort for all. 541-389-0006 www.evergreeninhome.com

are on the rise in Oregon.

Pendleton area man struck, killed by train PENDLETON — The Umatilla County sheriff’s office says an 81-year-old who was struck and killed by a train near Pendleton lived near the tracks. Sheriff John Trumbo told the East Oregonian the death Monday appears to be an accident. Union Pacific Railroad told emergency dispatchers the train struck a pedestrian at a crossing. He died at the scene.

Police responded to Annies Uppertown Tavern Saturday night on a report of at least 20 people fighting in the street. The Daily Astorian reports the dispute began with a bachelor party in the bar for a group of loggers. They argued with fishermen about which occupation was better and which job paid more money. The bartender told them to take it outside. The fight broke up when officers arrived. No one was arrested because of what police called “mutual combat.”

Fishermen, loggers brawl in Astoria

— From wire reports

ASTORIA — An argument between fishermen and loggers at an Astoria tavern turned into a street brawl.

Local Service. Local Knowledge. 541-848-4444 1000 SW Disk Dr. • Bend www.highdesertbank.com

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THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2012

E

The Bulletin AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER

B  M C G B  J C  R  C

Chairwoman Publisher Editor-in-Chief Editor of Editorials

Merkley’s bill doesn’t protect water levels

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ishermen, water skiers and anyone else who uses the Prineville Reservoir are right to be concerned about Sen. Jeff Merkley’s bill to divide the water from the

Crooked River. Merkley, an Oregon Democrat, says his bill is not expected to significantly drop the reservoir’s water level, but there is no such guarantee in the bill. Instead, the bill explicitly allocates some of the water, and it says unallocated water shall be stored in and released from Prineville Reservoir “for the benefit of downstream fish and wildlife.� That puts fish and wildlife first. People, recreation and commerce don’t matter. If it would benefit fish and wildlife for the water level in the reservoir to be cut in half or drained, that’s what would happen under this bill. Lower lake levels could dry it up as a fishing spot. Lower lake levels could ruin the reservoir for water skiing. Lower lake levels could hurt businesses that rely on the lake. Based on this bill, Merkley will surely win votes from fish and wildlife. The only protection for reservoir levels is a bet. The Ochoco Irrigation District says models show levels should remain high in the summer. If there is such confidence in the lev-

els, why aren’t they enshrined in the bill? Merkley’s bill does do a number of positive things for the region. It allows Prineville to drill for more water. It provides for irrigation needs and for McKay Creek. It makes it at least possible for hydro electricity to be generated beyond the dam. U.S. Rep. Greg Walden, R-Hood River, proposed a bill that essentially did those things. What it did not have was a commitment of the unallocated water to fish and wildlife. Prineville City Manager Steve Forester said Merkley’s bill is a compromise. The bill protects its water guarantees from environmental lawsuits by including promises for fish and wildlife. That might be. But the bill also opens a door for environmental lawsuits, claiming that not enough water is being released from the reservoir for fish and wildlife. It’s not pejorative to say that Merkley’s bill has a ready bias. Fishermen, water skiers and others who use the reservoir might be its victims.

Dedicated lottery funds tie lawmakers’ hands

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regon’s lottery is the product of hard times, a move by the citizens of Oregon to boost economic development during the depths of the recession of the early 1980s. It offered then, and does today, a lesson in just what’s wrong with segregating tax dollars for specific uses and no others. In the beginning, lottery proceeds were to be used for economic development and nothing more. Since then, voters have added education, fish and wildlife habitat restoration and state parks to the list of lottery fund recipients. Counties receive some of the money set aside for economic development, and there are real questions about how those dollars are being spent. In Deschutes County, for example, lottery economic development dollars have helped finance programs that provide emergency food and shelter or serve the mentally ill and the abused or neglected, according to a report by the Association of Oregon Counties. Multnomah County, too, has siphoned economic development funds into social service programs. Deschutes County Commissioner Tammy Baney, meanwhile, points out that lottery dollars are simply helping support programs for services the county is required by law to provide. She argues that helping those in financial trouble get back on their feet is, in fact, economic development.

That logic and those expenditures do raise eyebrows, however, and state Rep. Patrick Sheehan, R-Clackamas, doesn’t believe the laws governing the lottery allow for that kind of spending — though that might well be a matter of who is doing the reading. Sheehan attempted to clarify the situation in the 2011 Legislature, but the resulting law has done little to change the situation. Meanwhile, however, the county’s problem remains. It must provide services that its leaders say they do not have enough money to provide. County officials clearly believe they have an obligation to the community’s neediest citizens, a sentiment we cannot dispute. Were lottery dollars handed out and not dedicated to specific kinds of spending, no one would question their decisions. The problem lies in the fact that lottery dollars cannot be spent where officials believe they will do the most good, not in the fact that those officials have identified a real need and have channeled the lottery funds toward it. Sheehan might well attempt further clarification during the 2013 Legislature, he says. That’s a worthy goal, but the lesson remains: Dedicating funds to specific causes ties the hands of lawmakers at all levels and prevents those we elect from serving Oregonians in ways that will do the most good.

Politics’ ‘crippled epistemology’ By Cass R. Sunstein Bloomberg News

I

n 2002, New York University political scientist Russell Hardin wrote a brilliant essay called “The Crippled Epistemology of Extremism.� Hardin contended that many extremists, including terrorists, are not stupid, insane or badly educated. The real problem is that their information comes from a sharply limited set of sources, all of which are supportive of their extremist beliefs. Many extremists listen only to one another. They live in self-reinforcing information cocoons. Their “crippled epistemology� can lead to utterly baseless, but firmly held, convictions — and sometimes even violence. Most Democrats and most Republicans are not extremists. But Hardin’s argument offers lessons about 21st-century political campaigns in the United States — and about some of the most serious difficulties in contemporary governance. How do you know what you know? You undoubtedly have firsthand knowledge about many things, including your job, your family and your possessions. But how do you know whether George Washington or James Madison really lived, or whether matter consists of atoms? With respect to innumerable issues, including political ones, most of what we know is what we learn from other people. By itself, that is inevitable and nothing to lament. Here is the problem: When we listen mostly to people who already agree with us, our pre-existing convictions get fortified, and we start to think that those who disagree with us are evil, dumb or duped. Is it any wonder that our politics are highly polarized? A few years ago, I participated in some experiments designed to shed light on how people’s political

beliefs are formed. My co-authors and I assembled a number of people in Colorado into all-liberal groups and all-conservative groups. We asked the groups to discuss three issues: climate change, affirmative action and civil unions for same-sex couples. We requested group members to state their opinions at three stages. The first occurred before they started to talk, when we recorded their views privately and anonymously. In the second stage, we asked them to discuss the issues with one another and then to reach a kind of group “verdict.� In the final stage, we asked people to record their views, after discussion, privately and anonymously. Our findings were simple. On all three issues, both liberal and conservative groups became more unified and more extreme after talking to one another. Not only in their public verdicts but also in their private, anonymous statements of views. Discussions with one another made conservatives more skeptical of climate change and more hostile to affirmative action and same-sex unions — while liberals showed exactly the opposite pattern. What is more striking, and more revealing about our current problems, is that after liberals spoke only with liberals, and conservatives only with conservatives, the divisions between the two groups grew dramatically. Why do groups polarize in this way? One reason involves people’s concern for their reputations. The more interesting reason involves the exchange of information. In conservative groups, for example, people tend to offer a number of arguments against affirmative action, and very few in favor of it. Group members learn from what they hear. Having heard the set of arguments in their group, people become more confident, more unified and more

extreme. Can anything be done to address this problem? The most obvious answer is to break out of information cocoons. That is a central goal of the American constitutional system, which was devised to ensure that diverse people would speak with one another. Political conventions are occasions for group polarization. This is inevitable and by design. But in the best cases, political campaigns get people to escape from their information cocoons — not merely because competing perspectives are available, but because citizens are really listening. When escape proves difficult, it helps to insist on the importance of respecting technical expertise. In dealing with patients with diabetes, doctors don’t polarize; they consult the latest medical evidence. In dealing with clients complaining of breach of contract, lawyers don’t polarize; they consult the law. True, we can identify issues on the technical frontiers, where doctors and lawyers might end up in information cocoons of their own. But we shouldn’t underestimate the number of cases in which specialists really do come to consensus. In politics and government, a healthy respect for the technical expertise of scientists, lawyers and economists usually helps to anchor discussion — and to avoid a crippled epistemology. Many of our political convictions are intensely held, especially in an election season. Some of us are undoubtedly right. But an appreciation of how we know what we know should help to engender a healthy dose of humility, making political campaigns far more productive and sensible governance far more likely. — Cass R. Sunstein is a columnist for Bloomberg and the Felix Frankfurter professor of law at Harvard University.

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We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 550 and 650 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or email them to The Bulletin. Write: My Nickel’s Worth / In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 Fax: 541-385-5804 Email: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Immediate changes necessary at Pilot Butte park By Denny Sullivan ncluded with the many tourist attractions in Central Oregon, Mount Bachelor, the High Desert Museum, bike trails and the beautiful Deschutes River, is the underdeveloped Pilot Butte State Park. With its fitness trails, scenic views and memorial recognition, it is one of the best places to visit in Oregon. I write underdeveloped Pilot Butte because of the fact that the opportunities there are unlimited. The state, the city of Bend and the Bend Park & Recreation District seem to overlook what an asset the butte is to the area. Pilot Butte is now facing a problem. The road, paved to meet handicap re-

I

quirements, is the culprit. Hundreds of cars and people are using this trail/road every day. The cars don’t like sharing with the people, and the people — many with baby carriages — don’t like the cars. It’s an accident waiting to happen. A solution must be found before someone is hurt, or worse yet, killed. As an 86-year-old man with 1,000 hours in trail work in the last 20 years of volunteering, I believe — before I go — that it is my responsibility to make all the hard work I have done with many volunteers not go away in vain. Recently, I met with several top community leaders to make them aware of the butte’s problem and a

IN MY VIEW need from all state and city entities to solve this dilemma. Seemingly, they all agreed with me. That was a month or so ago and I haven’t heard from anyone. For reasons unknown to me, nothing has been done and no one shows enough consideration to return my calls. I could be wrong, but the seriousness of the butte’s problem seems to be no one’s concern. I’ll let you, the athletes, the taxpayers, the voters, be the judge. As it is now, parking is limited at the summit. Many times, cars can’t find a space to park and must go

back to the base. Just visualize, with no cars allowed to use the road, what it could do to tourism. With this also in mind, a solution must be found to halt the use of cars driving up the butte. I’m sure there are several ways to solve this problem. I believe a tram, which would eventually pay for itself, would be one possible solution. A tram would cost a lot of money, but being positive, one can start saving now and — through different funds and fundraisers — hopefully raise the bulk of the cost to begin the much-needed project without an added tax burden. The biggest worry would be getting the previously mentioned state,

city and Bend Park & Recreation District agencies to work together on this project. Of the road and trail people I interviewed, everyone agreed that closing the road to cars is a necessity. Other thoughts on the success of this kind of project would be for the land around the butte to not be sold off for the purpose of another apartment complex. Pilot Butte should be developed to perfection with the true beauty of nature in mind. Save the butte’s environment. Let’s make Pilot Butte Park the very best and the trail/road safe in the future for all. — Denny Sullivan lives in Bend.


WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

O D N  John A. McGinnis, of Bend Dec. 23, 1939 - Aug. 29, 2012 Arrangements: Baird Funeral Home (541) 382-0903 www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: A Memorial Service will be held on Saturday, September 15, 2012, at 10:00 AM at Holy Family Catholic Church, located at 7525 Cesar Chavez Blvd. in Portland, Oregon. (503) 774-1428. Contributions may be made to:

Partners In Care 2075 NE Wyatt Court Bend, Oregon 97701 www.partnersbend.org

Kent Robert Smith, of Prineville Feb. 3, 1944 - Aug. 24, 2012 Arrangements: Whispering Pines Funeral Home, 541-416-9733 Services: In accordance with his wishes no service will be held.

LeRoy Orgain, of Redmond Nov. 24, 1918 - Aug. 29, 2012 Arrangements: Autumn FuneralsRedmond, 541-504-9485 www.autumnfunerals.net Services: Graveside, Friday, Sept., 7, 2012, at 1:00 p.m., at Redmond Memorial Cemetery. Gathering to follow at Redmond Senior Center from 1:30 - 3:30 p.m.

Patricia Ethel Robertson, of Prineville April 17, 1938 - Aug. 29, 2012 Arrangements: Whispering Pines Funeral Home, 541-416-9733 Services: A Celebration of Life will be held at 2PM Saturday, September 15, 2012 at the Seventh Day Adventist Church in Prineville, OR. Contributions may be made to:

Pioneer Memorial Hospice, 1201 NE Elm St., Prineville, OR 97754.

Obituary policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, email or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825.

Deadlines: Death Notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details.

Phone: 541-617-7825 Email: obits@bendbulletin.com Fax: 541-322-7254

Mail: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708

Maetzig’s films helped postwar Germans come to terms with Nazi past by working during university holidays at his father’s facKurt Maetzig, a pioneer- tory, which, in the way that a ing figure in East Germany’s book publisher turns an edited socialist film industry after manuscript into books for disWorld War II who became one tribution to bookstores, copied of the country’s most respected original edited movies to mass directors, not least for compel- produce them for distribution ling Germans to acknowledge to theaters. their Nazi past, died Aug. 8 at His early film activities were his home in Germany. cut short when the NaHe was 101. FEATURED zis revoked his work German news orbecause his OBITUARY permit ganizations, quoting mother was Jewish, a family member, said and in 1944 he joined he died in the village of Wild- the German Communist Party, kuhl, where he had lived for which was then working unmany years. derground against the Nazis. Maetzig was a founder of At the end of World War II, East Germany’s main film with most of Germany in ruins, studio at the close of World Maetzig co-founded a collecWar II, and in a three-decade tive that aimed to get film procareer he directed about 30 duction back up and running, feature films and documenta- a goal shared by the Soviet ries. In most of them he care- generals in control of Berlin’s fully observed the ideological eastern sector. After the estabboundaries set by the ruling lishment of the state corporaCommunist Party. tion known as DEFA, which But his 1965 film, “The Rab- would oversee East German bit Is Me,� pushed the lim- film production for the next its of cinematic criticism by four decades, Maetzig became portraying hypocrisy in the one of its core filmmakers. criminal justice system. Party His first feature film, “Marleaders attacked the film as riage in the Shadows,� released counterrevolutionary, banned in 1947, was a partly fictionalit and urged him to issue a hu- ized retelling of the true story miliating public self-criticism, of an actor and his Jewish wife which he did. He later said that who committed suicide rather he had feared imprisonment, than accept deportation to the but that he had come to regret death camps. his capitulation as an act of In the early 1960s, Maetzig “self-pollution.� believed the party was enMaetzig’s earliest films scru- couraging artists to take a tinized anti-Semitism, corpo- more critical view of socialist rate complicity with fascism life. The Soviet leader Nikita and other fault lines in Ger- Khrushchev, during a visit man society that had opened to East Germany, even told the way to Nazi rule. Stephen Maetzig at a reception that Brockmann, a professor at he should “provoke a little� Carnegie Mellon University to shake up the party, the and author of “A Critical Histo- filmmaker recalled in a 1999 ry of German Film� (2010), said interview. Maetzig’s films had helped It was in that context that East German cinema make its Maetzig filmed “The Rabbit Is most important contribution to Me,� an exploration of official postwar Germany: coming to corruption in which a young terms with the Nazi past. waitress falls in love with a Maetzig was born on Jan. married judge who had jailed 25, 1911, in Berlin and stud- her brother as a subversive ied chemistry, engineering and was recognizable as one and business administration of the many opportunistic in Munich, earning a Ph.D. in East German officials whose 1935. He got early experience positions shifted with the ideoin the motion picture industry logical winds. By Sam Dillon

New York Times News Service

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NORTHWEST NEWS

A monument to thrifty innovation • Olympic games should learn from Seattle Center’s success in 1962 By James S. Russell Bloomberg News

The exuberant London Olympics made me want to revisit the 1962 World’s Fair in Seattle, the city where I grew up. The Space Needle, Monorail and Bubblelator of “Century 21� not only pointed to an exciting technology-driven future. The fair did what great urban spectacles like the Olympics are supposed to do: It put the city on the map, jump-starting a halfcentury of transformation. The history of Olympic bids and World’s Fairs is littered with costly failures. Beijing’s Olympics site is dominated by the spectacular empty husk of the Birds Nest stadium. Athens’ stunning venues by Santiago Calatrava attract aficionados of ruin porn. Hoping to avoid such fates, London focused its Olympics planning on revitalizing an ignored swath of its East End. The costs rose, however, to as much as $14 billion. Cities are reassessing Olympics bids. Recessionwracked Madrid, looking longingly on Barcelona’s 1992 success, promises a shoestring games if it’s selected for 2020. I thought about what Seattle did right — for about $500 million in today’s dollars — as I walked the 74-acre fair site. The iconic Space Needle still dominates the city, with an athletic design that sums up the era’s faith in the futuristic with purposefully elegant engineering. The fair’s centerpiece was the science pavilion, boxlike exhibition structures arranged around a sparkling pool from which elegant fretwork arches rise. It showed visitors the degree to which the city was evolving from hick timber town to engineering hub. Boeing, which dominated Seattle’s economy in the 1960s the way cars dominated Detroit, had inaugurated its 707 — the

Two-level walkways pass under the arches of the Pacific Science Center at Seattle Center, site of the World’s Fair of 1962. Seattle’s site is one of few World’s Fair or Olympics sites that have left a lasting legacy.

Photos by James S. Russell / Bloomberg News

The International Fountain, at the Seattle Center, is still a popular attraction after a 1995 renovation.

plane that ushered in today’s era of mass air transportation — in 1958. The much-modernized Pacific Science Center remains one of the best designs of architect Minoru Yamasaki in his signature Modernist Gothic style. He would find global fame designing New York’s

World Trade Center. I walked past the Seattle Repertory Theater and the Seattle Opera, both founded the year after the fair’s success allowed Seattle to chase big-city cultural dreams. A distinctive arena with angular columns holding up a handsome cable-suspended

roof has served well for hockey and basketball, though San Francisco hedge-fund manager Christopher Hansen now seeks to replace it. The fair was charmingly modest, and lucky to get far better architecture from talented locals (Victor Steinbrueck, Paul Thiry) than New York City’s overblown extravaganza of 1964. It was said to have made money. The site still hosts numerous festivals and celebrations. Frank Gehry designed the Experience Music Project for Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen. It showcases a strange amalgam of rock-music history and science-fiction memorabilia. Last spring, a collection of Dale Chihuly glass art opened in a greenhouse-style pavilion erected at the base of the Space Needle. Ten million people visited the fair in what was then an unpretentious, middle-class city. A lot of them liked the mountains, picturesque bays and slow pace. There was a civic-builder class preparing the city for the future with regionalized planning and sewers that cleared up the crown jewel of Lake Washington. Seattle also had a powerful engine of innovative growth in the form of Boeing, and a growing customer-focused retail chain called Nordstrom. So people came. Seattle looked like a writeoff around 1970, though, when Boeing was forced to lay off two-thirds of a work force of about 80,000. Yet those who stayed and worked had the skills to take on new challenges a decade later when fledgling companies like Microsoft, Starbucks and Amazon.com were ready to grow fast. Almost everyone who was around then recognizes the fair as a turning point. It was an expression of civic energy and an emerging urban identity. The fair didn’t invent that identity; it proclaimed it to a world that didn’t know. Barcelona hosted the most successful recent Olympics, but it spent big on transformative infrastructure, as London did. The lesson of Seattle’s budget World’s Fair is a subtle one. If a city doesn’t have an economy and amenities to draw people, neither the glitziest fair pavilions nor the most glamorous stadiums will make a difference.

Retired bus driver finds art in Washington By Amy Nile The Chronicle (Centralia, Wash.)

At 77, Jan Remillard, Chehalis, a painter and retired school bus driver, has done just about everything. While most women of her generation stayed busy at home taking care of their families, Remillard spent her career working everywhere from a dynamite factory to a hospital to a reportedly haunted castle. Making her way from the East Coast to the West Coast, Remillard never married, preferring to call the shots herself. The self-taught painter today has a large body of artwork and a new challenge: sanding and repainting her 1990 Chevy S10 pickup. Remillard said she decided to repaint the old Chevy because it was rusting but had less than 100,000 miles.

“And it runs like a champion,� she said. “I wouldn’t trade it if I had $40,000.� Remillard doesn’t know if she will finish the project this year because some tasks are harder with wind and weather. “Masking is a scream,� she said with a laugh. “It’s like watching me eat corn on the cob with my false teeth.�

Always tough Remillard was always tough, even earning herself a medal for bravery at age 4 after saving her 5-year-old friend’s life when she fell through the ice into a frozen pond. At 13, she started painting in her Massachusetts hometown on stretched-out window shades because she couldn’t afford canvas. She then learned to mix oils from a friend who had an artist mother while living in New York. “She’s really good consider-

D E 

 Deaths of note from around the world: Mark Abrahamian, 46: Lead guitarist for the rock group Starship. Died after a concert Sunday in Norfolk, Neb. Mahmoud el-Gouhari, 74: Egypt’s former national football team coach. Died Monday in Jordan of a brain hemorrhage. Max Bygraves, 89: British entertainer known for his oldfashioned charm, “I wanna tell you a story� catchphrase, and as the writer of a string of comic songs. Death was

announced Saturday. Died in Queensland, Australia, from Alzheimer’s disease. Viredo Espinosa, 83: Member of a revolutionary group of artists in 1950s Cuba whose Abstract Expressionism expanded the scope of the country’s modern art. Died Aug. 26 in Costa Mesa, Calif., of natural causes. Oreste Valsangiacomo, 92: Served as a Democratic member of the House of Representatives in Vermont from 1967-74 and 1977-2000. Died Friday. — From wire reports

ing she never had any lessons,� said 71-year-old Jo Coleman, Centralia, Remillard’s self-described adopted sister. “She just blew my socks off.� By her 20s, Remillard had sold her first painting for $100 after winning a ribbon at a fair. “That was like a million bucks back then,� she recalled smiling. She then started bartering with her pieces that she would paint while working graveyard shifts at a gas station. Remillard supported herself and her art in a variety of ways over the years including doing electrical work, working in a shoe shop and in a cotton mill. Eventually she ended up in Washington working for 17 years as a Thurston County school bus driver. “She amazes me. I hope I’m as lively as she is at her age,� said Remillard’s little sister, 64-year-old Darlene

Bussard, of Chehalis. After retiring, Remillard has kept herself busy by painting a variety of things — like a boot on the Bible, or military men in an embrace or a whitehaired woman.

‘Been around the block’ “You either like that one or you don’t. I don’t,� said Bussard. “But she got an award for that.� Another painting of Remillard’s depicts two miners in a dark mine shaft. “It’s one of the best of any local artists I’ve seen,� said Paulie Rollins, an area art teacher. With her art, like her life, demonstrating a full range of experiences, Remillard says she wouldn’t change a thing. “Yeah, I’ve been around the block a few times,� Remillard said laughing. “All kinds of things happen that make you glad you’re a Christian and you can give.�

In Loving Memory Dan Vogt Sept. 5, 1947 – April 23, 2007

One of Bend’s Brightest Lights went out on April 23, 2007. Dan was born on this day, Sept. 5, 65 years ago. Dan was a loving husband, father, brother, uncle and friend. Dan is truly missed by his wife Shirley Vogt, son Lee Vogt, sister Lynn Barclay, brother Rick Vogt, stepson Ron Suliman, many nieces and nephews and a long list of great friends. Dan’s memory will be cherished and never forgotten. Dan, We Love You!


THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2012

C6

W E AT H ER FOR EC A ST Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LP ©2012.

TODAY, SEPTEMBER 5

THURSDAY

Today: Sunny.

Tonight: Clear.

HIGH

LOW

88

43

Astoria 69/54

61/54

Cannon Beach 62/54

Hillsboro Portland 84/58 87/51

Tillamook 73/52

Salem

65/52

89/54

89/52

Maupin

91/50

Corvallis Yachats

85/49

66/45

85/52

87/50

Coos Bay

85/40

Oakridge

Cottage Grove

Crescent

Gold Beach

Vale 90/56

83/40

Juntura

Burns Riley

93/49

86/41

87/47

Jordan Valley 90/54

Brookings

Klamath Falls 85/43

Ashland

60/49

WEST Patchy fog along the coast early today. Coastal fog developing tonight.

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend 24 hours ending 4 p.m.*. . 0.00” High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81/46 Record high . . . . . . . . 97 in 2003 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . 0.00” Average month to date. . . 0.06” Record low. . . . . . . . . 29 in 1956 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.61” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 Average year to date. . . . . 6.82” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.30.11 Record 24 hours . . .0.33 in 1952 *Melted liquid equivalent

CENTRAL Mostly sunny and warm to hot today. Mostly clear tonight.

OREGON CITIES

Yesterday’s state extremes • 93°

88/52

• 31°

Fields

McDermitt

91/60

83/48

Meacham

91/44

-30s

-20s

Yesterday’s extremes (in the 48 contiguous states):

• 106° Chickasha, Okla.

• 26°

-10s

0s

Vancouver 72/57

10s

20s

Calgary 69/43

Billings 79/50

Portland 84/58 Boise 84/51

30s

40s

Winnipeg 61/52

50s

60s

70s

90s

St. Paul 75/54

To ronto 82/65

Green Bay 78/58

Des Moines 85/58

100s 110s

Quebec 79/66

Thunder Bay 73/44

Bismarck 74/49 Rapid City 79/56

80s

Detroit 86/70

Buffalo

87/68

Halifax 60/55 Portland 72/60 Boston 78/66 New York 85/72

ColumbusPhiladelphia Chicago 88/67 86/72 89/65 Omaha San Francisco • 5.19” Salt Lake Washington, D. C. 82/52 64/54 City Philadelphia, Penn. Las 87/72 Denver St. Louis Louisville 88/67 Kansas City Vegas 98/70 84/54 89/72 91/62 99/76 Nashville 93/71 Los Angeles Oklahoma City Charlotte Little Rock 100/74 73/67 86/72 Atlanta 98/75 Phoenix Albuquerque 85/72 101/84 Honolulu 91/68 Birmingham 87/73 Dallas Tijuana 93/74 101/76 83/65 New Orleans 91/78 Orlando Houston 92/75 Chihuahua 95/78 87/68 Miami 88/77 Monterrey La Paz 101/77 89/76 Mazatlan Anchorage 87/73 56/46 Juneau 54/48

Stanley, Idaho

Cheyenne 79/49

FRONTS

Moon phases Last

New

First

Full

Sept. 8 Sept. 15 Sept. 22 Sept. 29

FIRE INDEX

Yesterday Wednesday Thursday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Precipitation values are 24-hour totals through 4 p.m.

Bend, west of Hwy. 97......Ext. Bend, east of Hwy. 97.......Ext. Redmond/Madras .......High

Astoria . . . . . . . .71/55/0.00 Baker City . . . . . .81/42/0.00 Brookings . . . . . .69/50/0.00 Burns. . . . . . . . . .84/45/0.00 Eugene . . . . . . . .86/49/0.00 Klamath Falls . . .84/41/0.00 Lakeview. . . . . . .86/37/0.00 La Pine . . . . . . . .84/31/0.00 Medford . . . . . . .93/54/0.00 Newport . . . . . . .61/45/0.00 North Bend . . . . . .61/48/NA Ontario . . . . . . . .88/57/0.00 Pendleton . . . . . .85/47/0.00 Portland . . . . . . .84/57/0.00 Prineville . . . . . . .81/39/0.00 Redmond. . . . . . .83/38/0.00 Roseburg. . . . . . .86/51/0.00 Salem . . . . . . . . .86/50/0.00 Sisters . . . . . . . . .83/41/0.00 The Dalles . . . . . .90/55/0.00

Mod. = Moderate; Ext. = Extreme

. . . .69/54/pc . . . . .67/53/pc . . . . .84/44/s . . . . . .84/44/s . . . . .60/49/c . . . . .59/53/pc . . . . .88/47/s . . . . . .85/43/s . . . . .85/49/s . . . . . .85/51/s . . . . .85/43/s . . . . . .82/41/s . . . . .83/48/s . . . . . .83/45/s . . . . .86/39/s . . . . . .81/31/s . . . . .95/55/s . . . . . .95/56/s . . . .63/53/pc . . . . .63/51/pc . . . .61/49/pc . . . . .58/51/pc . . . . .88/55/s . . . . . .89/55/s . . . . .88/49/s . . . . . .89/52/s . . . . .84/58/s . . . . . .85/59/s . . . . .90/44/s . . . . . .83/46/s . . . . .88/44/s . . . . . .86/47/s . . . . .89/52/s . . . . . .87/52/s . . . . .86/52/s . . . . . .87/53/s . . . . .86/42/s . . . . . .81/37/s . . . . .89/52/s . . . . . .92/59/s

WATER REPORT Sisters ................................Ext. La Pine................................Ext. Prineville...........................Ext.

The following was compiled by the Central Oregon watermaster and irrigation districts as a service to irrigators and sportsmen.

Reservoir Acre feet Capacity Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . . 35,005 . . . . . . 55,000 Wickiup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114,934 . . . . . 200,000 Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . 70,567 . . . . . . 91,700 Ochoco Reservoir . . . . . . . . 22,140 . . . . . . 47,000 Prineville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100,846 . . . . . 153,777 The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is River flow Station Cubic ft./sec Deschutes RiverBelow Crane Prairie . . . . . . . 428 for solar at noon. Deschutes RiverBelow Wickiup . . . . . . . . . . 1,410 Crescent CreekBelow Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . 70 LOW MEDIUM HIGH V.HIGH Little DeschutesNear La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85.2 0 2 4 6 8 10 Deschutes RiverBelow Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173 Deschutes RiverAt Benham Falls . . . . . . . . . 1,867 Crooked RiverAbove Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . 2 Crooked RiverBelow Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . 224 Updated daily. Source: pollen.com Ochoco CreekBelow Ochoco Res. . . . . . . . . . 14.4 Crooked RiverNear Terrebonne . . . . . . . . . . . 85.2 Contact: Watermaster, 388-6669 LOW MEDIUM HIGH or go to www.wrd.state.or.us

To report a wildfire, call 911

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX 6

POLLEN COUNT

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

Saskatoon 69/44

Seattle 79/54

Sunrise today . . . . . . 6:34 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 7:33 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 6:35 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 7:31 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 9:52 p.m. Moonset today . . . 11:56 a.m.

PRECIPITATION

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS -40s

81 42

TEMPERATURE

Medford

Lakeview

HIGH LOW

86 46

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . .6:13 a.m. . . . . . 7:32 p.m. Venus . . . . . .2:48 a.m. . . . . . 5:28 p.m. Mars. . . . . .11:24 a.m. . . . . . 9:28 p.m. Jupiter. . . . .11:19 p.m. . . . . . 2:31 p.m. Saturn. . . . .10:12 a.m. . . . . . 9:13 p.m. Uranus . . . . .8:15 p.m. . . . . . 8:41 a.m.

84/45

95/55

HIGH LOW

87 44

Partly cloudy.

PLANET WATCH

86/50

Chiloquin

Medford

58/49

Mostly clear.

BEND ALMANAC

90/50

Paisley

93/50

HIGH LOW

SUNDAY

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Rome

86/41

Grants Pass

83/48

Frenchglen

Mostly clear.

86 48

Ontario EAST 88/55 Mostly sunny and warm to hot Nyssa today. Mostly clear 87/53 tonight.

84/48

84/50

87/42

Silver Lake

84/37

Port Orford 63/50

84/44

Unity

Christmas Valley

Chemult

89/52

Hampton

Fort Rock 87/41

84/38

79/33

Roseburg

62/49

Baker City John Day

Brothers 85/39

La Pine 86/39

Crescent Lake

65/49

Bandon

Spray 89/48

88/43

83/40

74/45

Prineville 90/44 Sisters Redmond Paulina 86/40 86/42 88/43 Sunriver Bend

Eugene

Florence

80/45

Union

Granite

83/40

66/53

80/42

Joseph

Mitchell 91/45

89/48

Camp Sherman

88/52

Enterprise

Meacham 83/43

79/54

Madras

76/39

La Grande

Condon

Warm Springs

Wallowa

74/37

82/53

89/52

90/49

88/52

88/49

Ruggs

Willowdale

Albany

Newport

Pendleton

88/57

84/53

86/52

63/53

Hermiston 88/52

Arlington

Wasco

Sandy

Government Camp 76/51

87/52

86/55

The Biggs Dalles 87/55

89/55

McMinnville

Lincoln City

Umatilla

Hood River

SATURDAY

Mostly clear.

HIGH LOW

FORECAST: STATE Seaside

FRIDAY

Yesterday WednesdayThursday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .102/79/0.00 . . 103/75/t 102/75/pc Akron . . . . . . . . . .77/71/0.45 . .84/65/pc . . .82/58/t Albany. . . . . . . . . .79/68/0.00 . . . 81/62/t . 84/63/pc Albuquerque. . . . .94/69/0.00 . .91/68/pc . 90/68/pc Anchorage . . . . . .56/49/0.00 . . . 56/46/r . 56/44/sh Atlanta . . . . . . . . .77/72/0.10 . . . 85/72/t . . .91/71/t Atlantic City . . . . .83/72/0.97 . . . 82/71/t . 86/72/pc Austin . . . . . . . . .101/74/0.00 . .101/75/s 100/74/pc Baltimore . . . . . . .89/75/0.00 . . . 87/70/t . 90/71/pc Billings . . . . . . . . .80/51/0.00 . .79/50/pc . 71/46/sh Birmingham . . . . .83/72/0.00 . . . 93/74/t . . .94/73/t Bismarck. . . . . . . .85/42/0.00 . . . 74/49/s . . 73/48/c Boise . . . . . . . . . . .86/53/0.00 . . . 84/51/s . . 84/50/s Boston. . . . . . . . . .72/63/0.44 . . . 78/66/t . 78/67/pc Bridgeport, CT. . . .79/70/0.26 . . . 82/69/t . 85/69/pc Buffalo . . . . . . . . .83/66/1.30 . .87/68/pc . . .83/59/t Burlington, VT. . . .76/63/0.06 . . . 80/63/t . 83/59/pc Caribou, ME . . . . .77/55/0.00 . .69/57/sh . 68/56/pc Charleston, SC . . .89/73/0.00 . . . 88/75/t . . .88/74/t Charlotte. . . . . . . .84/73/0.67 . . . 86/72/t . . .87/68/t Chattanooga. . . . .81/73/0.51 . . . 89/72/t . . .92/70/t Cheyenne . . . . . . .86/57/0.00 . . . 79/49/s . 81/48/pc Chicago. . . . . . . . .90/70/0.40 . . . 89/65/t . . 78/65/s Cincinnati . . . . . . .88/73/0.00 . .89/67/pc . 87/64/pc Cleveland . . . . . . .78/70/1.09 . .82/69/pc . . .79/62/t Colorado Springs .90/55/0.00 . . . 78/53/s . 81/56/pc Columbia, MO . . .94/72/0.17 . . . 98/63/t . . .86/64/t Columbia, SC . . . .91/74/0.00 . . . 89/71/t . . .88/70/t Columbus, GA. . . .81/72/0.50 . . . 89/72/t . . .92/73/t Columbus, OH. . . .83/73/0.54 . . . 88/67/s . . .86/63/t Concord, NH. . . . .65/59/0.28 . . . 75/58/t . 82/60/pc Corpus Christi. . .101/77/0.00 . . . 94/79/s . 91/78/pc Dallas Ft Worth. .103/78/0.00 101/76/pc . 99/75/pc Dayton . . . . . . . . .87/73/0.04 . . . 87/67/s . 85/62/pc Denver. . . . . . . . . .92/63/0.00 . . . 84/54/s . 88/58/pc Des Moines. . . . . .97/71/0.00 . .85/58/pc . 82/59/pc Detroit. . . . . . . . . .81/71/0.95 . .86/70/pc . . 86/62/s Duluth. . . . . . . . . .84/57/0.00 . .73/50/pc . 69/51/pc El Paso. . . . . . . . . .97/76/0.00 . .96/75/pc . 96/75/pc Fairbanks. . . . . . . .65/50/0.01 . . .63/42/c . 55/37/sh Fargo. . . . . . . . . . .87/55/0.00 . . . 72/52/s . 74/50/pc Flagstaff . . . . . . . .78/52/0.00 . .78/49/pc . . .77/52/t

Yesterday WednesdayThursday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . . .83/69/1.06 . . . 84/63/t . 78/56/pc Green Bay. . . . . . .84/64/0.00 . . . 78/58/t . . 76/56/s Greensboro. . . . . .84/72/0.43 . . . 85/70/t . . .87/68/t Harrisburg. . . . . . .84/72/0.27 . . . 85/67/t . . .88/64/t Hartford, CT . . . . .79/66/0.03 . . . 83/66/t . 84/66/pc Helena. . . . . . . . . .73/48/0.00 . . . 78/45/s . 69/41/pc Honolulu. . . . . . . .87/75/0.00 . . . 87/73/s . . 87/72/s Houston . . . . . . . .97/77/0.00 . .95/78/pc . 95/78/pc Huntsville . . . . . . .88/73/0.00 . . . 90/69/t . . .92/71/t Indianapolis . . . . .88/72/0.00 . . . 88/69/t . . 83/61/s Jackson, MS . . . . .95/77/0.00 . . . 96/75/t . . .96/73/t Jacksonville. . . . . .92/72/0.00 . .90/76/pc . . .89/74/t Juneau. . . . . . . . . .61/53/0.19 . .54/48/sh . 55/46/sh Kansas City. . . . . .95/70/1.60 . . . 91/62/s . 85/65/pc Lansing . . . . . . . . .81/68/1.31 . . . 86/64/t . 78/55/pc Las Vegas . . . . . .102/83/0.00 . . . 99/76/t 100/77/pc Lexington . . . . . . .86/70/0.00 . .87/70/pc . 88/66/pc Lincoln. . . . . . . . .102/63/0.01 . . . 82/54/s . 81/62/pc Little Rock. . . . . . .99/76/0.00 . . . 98/75/t . . .95/72/t Los Angeles. . . . . .81/65/0.00 . .73/67/pc . 73/66/pc Louisville. . . . . . . .90/73/0.00 . .89/72/pc . 91/66/pc Madison, WI . . . . .93/64/0.00 . . . 81/55/t . 76/57/pc Memphis. . . . . . . .94/76/0.00 . . . 98/76/t . 94/74/pc Miami . . . . . . . . . .88/75/0.41 . . . 88/77/t . . .90/77/t Milwaukee . . . . . .85/69/0.16 . . . 80/64/t . . 75/62/s Minneapolis . . . . .92/68/0.00 . .75/54/pc . 76/54/pc Nashville. . . . . . . .91/75/0.01 . .93/71/pc . 93/71/pc New Orleans. . . . .92/78/0.00 . . . 91/78/t . . .93/78/t New York . . . . . . .80/70/0.10 . . . 85/72/t . 86/72/pc Newark, NJ . . . . . .81/70/0.91 . . . 85/70/t . 88/68/pc Norfolk, VA . . . . . .89/75/0.00 . . . 88/74/t . . .89/73/t Oklahoma City . .104/78/0.00 . . 100/74/t . 100/73/t Omaha . . . . . . . . .97/66/0.00 . . . 82/52/s . 80/61/pc Orlando. . . . . . . . .92/72/0.00 . . . 92/75/t . . .91/73/t Palm Springs. . . .102/85/0.00 . . 105/80/t 105/79/pc Peoria . . . . . . . . . .91/73/0.00 . . . 90/60/t . . .81/61/t Philadelphia . . . . .83/73/0.98 . . . 86/72/t . 89/72/pc Phoenix. . . . . . . .101/80/0.00 . . 101/84/t . . .99/84/t Pittsburgh . . . . . . .84/69/0.36 . .83/65/pc . . .84/61/t Portland, ME. . . . .67/55/0.34 . . . 72/60/t . 75/61/pc Providence . . . . . .75/66/0.74 . . . 82/67/t . 81/67/pc Raleigh . . . . . . . . .89/73/0.03 . . . 88/72/t . . .87/70/t

Yesterday WednesdayThursday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . . .93/47/0.00 . . . 79/56/s . 77/56/pc Reno . . . . . . . . . . .93/55/0.00 . .91/58/pc . . 87/54/s Richmond . . . . . . .88/75/0.00 . . . 87/71/t . . .91/71/t Rochester, NY . . . .84/68/2.47 . .83/66/pc . . .87/60/t Sacramento. . . . . .95/57/0.00 . .91/61/pc . . 92/59/s St. Louis. . . . . . . . .92/74/0.01 . . . 98/70/t . 85/69/pc Salt Lake City . . . .91/62/0.00 . . . 88/67/s . 88/65/pc San Antonio . . . . .99/77/0.00 . .100/75/s . 99/75/pc San Diego . . . . . . .84/69/0.00 . .78/68/pc . 77/69/pc San Francisco . . . .64/51/0.00 . .69/55/pc . . 69/55/s San Jose . . . . . . . .78/57/0.00 . .81/58/pc . . 78/58/s Santa Fe . . . . . . . .88/59/0.00 . .87/60/pc . 85/59/pc

Yesterday WednesdayThursday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Savannah . . . . . . .89/75/0.12 . . . 89/74/t . . .88/73/t Seattle. . . . . . . . . .76/52/0.00 . . . 79/54/s . . 81/55/s Sioux Falls. . . . . . .91/61/0.00 . . . 77/52/s . 80/55/pc Spokane . . . . . . . .79/50/0.00 . . . 82/49/s . 83/50/pc Springfield, MO . .96/73/0.00 . . . 94/68/t . . .88/68/t Tampa. . . . . . . . . .90/76/0.00 . . . 91/75/t . . .90/75/t Tucson. . . . . . . . . .90/71/0.00 . . . 95/75/t . . .95/74/t Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .104/81/0.00 . . . 99/74/t . . .93/72/t Washington, DC . .89/75/0.00 . . . 87/72/t . 91/73/pc Wichita . . . . . . . . .98/74/0.00 . . . 91/69/t . 89/69/pc Yakima . . . . . . . . .85/47/0.00 . . . 88/53/s . . 89/55/s Yuma. . . . . . . . . .102/85/0.00 . . 103/81/t 102/80/pc

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . . .73/54/0.00 . .64/56/pc . 67/52/pc Athens. . . . . . . . . .80/71/0.00 . . . 90/71/s . . 89/74/s Auckland. . . . . . . .59/52/0.00 . . . 60/50/s . . 61/46/s Baghdad . . . . . . .106/75/0.00 . .105/74/s . 108/77/s Bangkok . . . . . . . .84/77/0.00 . . . 91/76/t . . .88/77/t Beijing. . . . . . . . . .81/54/0.00 . .83/64/pc . . .81/68/t Beirut . . . . . . . . . .90/79/0.00 . . . 92/81/s . . 91/81/s Berlin. . . . . . . . . . .73/52/0.00 . .66/50/pc . . 65/49/s Bogota . . . . . . . . .63/50/0.00 . .63/50/sh . 61/47/sh Budapest. . . . . . . .86/64/0.00 . .86/59/pc . 79/48/sh Buenos Aires. . . . .61/54/0.00 . .66/47/sh . 63/56/sh Cabo San Lucas . .88/75/0.00 . .88/76/pc . 91/77/pc Cairo . . . . . . . . . . .93/75/0.00 . . . 95/74/s . . 95/72/s Calgary . . . . . . . . .66/45/0.00 . .69/43/sh . . 64/48/s Cancun . . . . . . . . .88/72/0.00 . . . 88/77/t . . .88/77/t Dublin . . . . . . . . . .64/46/0.00 . .63/49/pc . 67/55/pc Edinburgh. . . . . . .64/52/0.00 . . .63/45/c . . 64/55/c Geneva . . . . . . . . .75/61/0.00 . .73/55/pc . 72/53/pc Harare. . . . . . . . . .90/54/0.00 . . . 78/52/s . . 73/51/s Hong Kong . . . . . .90/81/0.00 . . . 86/79/t . . .90/80/t Istanbul. . . . . . . . .82/70/0.00 . .83/71/pc . 82/71/pc Jerusalem . . . . . . .91/68/0.00 . . . 93/68/s . . 90/67/s Johannesburg. . . .73/46/0.00 . .64/47/sh . 59/43/sh Lima . . . . . . . . . . .66/61/0.00 . .65/60/pc . 65/60/pc Lisbon . . . . . . . . . .91/72/0.00 . .87/68/pc . . 88/70/s London . . . . . . . . .77/57/0.00 . .71/48/pc . . 68/51/s Madrid . . . . . . . . .84/59/0.00 . . . 88/55/s . . 90/59/s Manila. . . . . . . . . .88/77/0.00 . . . 89/78/t . . .91/78/t

Mecca . . . . . . . . .109/82/0.00 107/82/pc . 106/83/s Mexico City. . . . . .79/52/0.00 . . . 74/51/t . . .75/52/t Montreal. . . . . . . .79/70/0.00 . . . 83/64/t . . .82/64/t Moscow . . . . . . . .66/50/0.00 . .64/57/pc . . 62/48/c Nairobi . . . . . . . . .79/54/0.00 . .75/56/sh . 69/56/sh Nassau . . . . . . . . .88/75/0.00 . .89/76/pc . 88/74/pc New Delhi. . . . . . .88/79/0.00 . . . 94/80/t . . .90/79/t Osaka . . . . . . . . . .90/75/0.00 . . . 87/76/t . . .88/75/t Oslo. . . . . . . . . . . .68/52/0.00 . .62/39/pc . 57/42/pc Ottawa . . . . . . . . .75/64/0.00 . .85/56/pc . . .80/57/t Paris. . . . . . . . . . . .77/57/0.00 . .76/48/pc . . 72/51/s Rio de Janeiro. . . .73/66/0.00 . . . 76/60/s . 81/62/pc Rome. . . . . . . . . . .70/63/0.00 . . . 80/66/t . . .82/66/t Santiago . . . . . . . .63/52/0.00 . . . 66/35/s . 59/39/sh Sao Paulo . . . . . . .63/57/0.00 . . . 79/58/s . 78/61/pc Sapporo . . . . . . not available . .81/67/pc . . .78/68/t Seoul. . . . . . . . . . .73/68/0.00 . .79/66/pc . . 83/61/s Shanghai. . . . . . . .75/72/0.00 . . . 87/76/t . . .88/77/t Singapore . . . . . . .90/75/0.00 . . . 87/79/t . . .86/80/t Stockholm. . . . . . .63/48/0.00 . .64/46/pc . 57/49/pc Sydney. . . . . . . . . .73/50/0.00 . . . 75/53/s . . 75/55/s Taipei. . . . . . . . . . .91/77/0.00 . .89/78/pc . 89/79/pc Tel Aviv . . . . . . . . .91/77/0.00 . . . 92/77/s . . 90/75/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . . .88/75/0.00 . . . 89/77/t . . .88/75/t Toronto . . . . . . . . .75/66/0.00 . .82/65/pc . . .82/59/t Vancouver. . . . . . .68/54/0.00 . . . 72/57/s . . 75/52/s Vienna. . . . . . . . . .77/63/0.00 . .77/59/pc . 69/49/pc Warsaw. . . . . . . . .73/52/0.00 . .75/52/pc . 65/48/pc


SPORTS

Scoreboard, D2 MLB, D3 Tennis, D4 Prep sports, D4

College football, D5 Motor sports, D5 Tee to Green, D5-D6

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2012

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

TEE TO GREEN

COLLEGE FOOTBALL Alabama takes top spot in poll NEW YORK — Alabama is the new No. 1 in The Associated Press college football poll, moving past Southern California after its resounding victory against Michigan. The Crimson Tide swayed more than enough voters with its 41-14 win Saturday night in Texas to overtake the preseason No. 1 Trojans, who beat Hawaii 49-10. USC entered that game a 40-point favorite at home. The Tide received 45 first-place votes, up 28 from last week. USC drew 11 first-place votes and No. 3 LSU four. Oregon, with its 57-34 victory over Arkansas State on Saturday night, moved past Oklahoma from No. 5 to No. 4 with 1,295 votes, including one first-place vote. Oklahoma struggled to a 24-7 home victory over UTEP on Saturday night and received 1,170 votes. It’s the 47th time Alabama has been No. 1, the 16th under coach Nick Saban. This is the 86th time in the 76-year history of the AP media poll that the top-ranked team won and dropped in the rankings. It’s happened at least once every year since 2007. For a list of both the AP and the USA Today top 25 polls, see Scoreboard, D2. — The Associated Press

CYCLING

Masters Road Nationals return A special section previewing this week’s national cycling event can be found in today’s Bulletin, See Business, section E.

TENNIS

D

Fall is near, but golf season continues • Summer is all but over, but some of the best golf can be found after Labor Day By Zack Hall The Bulletin

Inside

If Labor Day is the unofficial end of summer, then next week might mark the beginning of a local’s REAL golf season. Juniper Golf Course in Redmond, and Bend’s River’s Edge and Widgi Creek courses, plan to lower their green fees on Monday for the fall shoulder season, and other Central Oregon public golf courses will soon follow suit.

• Davis Love III makes his picks that fill out the U.S. Ryder Cup squad, D5

That certainly signals the waning of the peak summer golf season. But those who know Central Oregon golf best know that a boatload of quality golf can be had before it’s time to wax up the snow-sports equipment.

“You’ve got great weather, long enough days, and for the price-conscious folks, it fits their budget a little better, too,” Troy Eckberg, head professional at River’s Edge Golf Club, says of September and October. Central Oregon’s weather generally stays golfer-friendly well into October. Along with the pleasant weather, fall golf provides better value if the right steps are taken. Consider that golf courses are less

expensive, often less busy (especially in October) and in nearly as good a shape as during the peak golf season, says Dan Ostrin, head pro at Widgi Creek Golf Club. So just how much golf can be played? “You can probably golf until 7:30 (p.m.) pretty comfortably through midSeptember,” says Ostrin. “You get out at 12:30 (p.m.) and you can conceivably get 36 holes in.” Obviously that window will shrink as the calendar moves deeper into fall. See Fall / D6

PREP GIRLS SOCCER

PREP VOLLEYBALL

Storm push with Bowmen • Two of the top teams in the state battle to a 2-2 tie in a nonconference game in Bend

• A team effort leads the Bulldogs to a conference win over Regis

By Beau Eastes The Bulletin

Bill Brown, Sherwood’s girls soccer coach, loves playing Summit High early in the season. “They’re definitely one of the top two or three teams in 5A and so are we,” Brown said Tuesday after his Bowmen, the reigning Class 5A state champions, settled for a 2-2 nonconference tie with the Storm on the artificial turf at Summit High. “About 75 percent of the teams we play, we can do pretty much whatever we want with. These guys (the Storm), they’ve got speed on the wings, they’re tough in the middle and quick up front. I’d be real surprised if we don’t see them again late in the season.” Junior forward Hadlie Plummer scored twice for the Storm (1-0-1 overall) and junior goalkeeper Rachel Estopare picked off two potentially dangerous crosses late in the second half as Summit rallied for the home draw. The Bowmen (0-0-1) led 2-1 at halftime, but Plummer tied the game 2-2 three minutes into the second half. “We lost seven seniors, so we’re still figuring out some roles,” Storm coach Jamie Brock said. “It’s good to play a team like this, the defending state champs. It shows your strengths and weaknesses.” See Storm / D4

Culver scores a victory in Tri-River opener

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Summit player Marina Johannesen, left, kicks the ball to a teammate past Sherwood player Tear’sa Krieger during a Wednesday afternoon game at Summit High School in Bend.

Bulletin staff report CULVER — Shealene Little recorded 15 kills and eight aces as Culver rallied to knock off Regis 24-26, 23-25, 25-18, 25-19, 15-8 in both schools’ Class 2A Tri-River Conference volleyball opener. Gabrielle Alley added 14 kills, 10 digs and five aces and Jahnie Cleveland contributed 30 assists for the Bulldogs, who over the weekend won the Warrenton tournament. “My girls got tired of losing,” Culver coach Randi Viggiano said about her team’s third-game turnaround. “Those first two games were ours to lose; we didn’t close them out.” The Bulldogs received contributions all over the floor as Cassandra Fulton recorded 10 kills and Jazmin Ruiz ended the night with nine digs. “This showed a lot of tenacity and perseverance on the girls’ part,” Viggiano said. “You’ve got to struggle before you triumph. … It was awesome.” The Bulldogs (1-0 TRC) are back at home Thursday with another league match against East Linn Christian.

PREP WATER POLO: SEASON PREVIEW

Azarenka

New leagues, new teams, new look for 2012 season

No. 1 seed moves on at U.S. Open

By Emily Oller

Victoria Azarenka is one of the few to advance after rain pushes matches to today, D4.

CORRECTION A story headlined “Sisters tired of being state runner-up” that appeared in Monday’s Bulletin on Page D1 contained incorrect information about Mountain View’s girls soccer team. Maddy Booster is the Cougars’ lone returning all-league player. The Bulletin regrets the error.

Joe Kline / The Bulletin

Teddy Tsai is among the key returning players for Redmond, which has merged with new Ridgeview High to form a combined boys team in the Oregon High School Water Polo Committee’s new 5A/4A Northern Oregon League.

The Bulletin

Inside

Central Oregon high schools boast some of the top water polo teams in the state in their classification, with two teams finishing in the top four last year and the inclusion of Redmond High to the 5A/4A league. Area coaches predict another strong showing in 2012. Five programs representing seven Central Oregon high schools — Bend’s Summit, Mountain View and Bend High, along with Redmond/Ridgeview and Madras/Culver combined squads — compete in the Oregon High School Water Polo Committee’s 5A/4A Northern Oregon League, which also includes teams representing Sandy, Parkrose and Hood River Valley high schools. Teams are expected to play about 15 regular-season games this fall, and the league’s top four teams will advance to the 5A/4A state qualifying tournament. Last year, Central Oregon teams placed respectably at the state level.

• A roundup of all Central Oregon water polo teams competing in the 2012 season, D4

Summit’s boys placed first in their league (formerly the Central Oregon League) and fourth in the state tournament. The Madras girls were first in the Central Oregon League and also placed fourth in the state tournament. “When we first began (water polo at Madras High), we didn’t have a girls program for the first two years,” recalls Bobby DeRoest, coach of the Madras/ Culver teams. “So the girls program is growing, considering we didn’t have one, but now they’re established.” The Oregon High School Water Polo Committee (OHSWPC), the governing body for prep water polo in the state, has reorganized its leagues and postseason play this season. See Water polo / D4


D2

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2012

O  A TELEVISION

SCOREBOARD

Today TENNIS 9 a.m.: U.S. Open, men’s and women’s quarterfinals, ESPN2. 4 p.m.: U.S. Open, men’s and women’s quarterfinals, ESPN2. FOOTBALL 5:30 p.m.: NFL, Dallas Cowboys at New York Giants, NBC. SOCCER 6 p.m.: MLS, Portland Timbers at Colorado Rapids, NBC Sports Network. VOLLEYBALL 7 p.m.: College, Jiangsu Chinese vs. Stanford, Pac-12 Network. BASEBALL 7 p.m.: MLB, Boston Red Sox at Seattle Mariners, Root Sports.

Thursday GOLF 5:30 a.m.: European Tour, KLM Open, first round, Golf Channel. 9:30 a.m.: LPGA Tour, Kingsmill Championship, first round, Golf Channel. Noon: PGA Tour, BMW Championship, first round, Golf Channel. TENNIS 9 a.m.: U.S. Open, men’s quarterfinals and mixed doubles finals, ESPN2. 4 p.m.: U.S. Open, men’s quarterfinals and pro-celebrity exo, ESPN2. BASEBALL 4 or 5 p.m.: MLB, New York Yankees at Baltimore Orioles or Texas Rangers at Kansas City Royals, MLB Network. FOOTBALL 5 p.m.: College, Bowie State at Benedict, CBS Sports Network. 5 p.m.: College, Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, ESPN. 7 p.m.: High school, teams TBA, Root Sports. VOLLEYBALL 7 p.m.: Women’s college, Jiangsu Chinese Team at California, Pac-12 Network. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

S   B Football • NFLPA asks for restraining order in bounty case: The NFL Players Association has asked a federal judge for a temporary restraining order that would allow players suspended in connection with the NFL’s bounty investigation to rejoin their teams in time to play regular season openers. The union, which filed the motion Tuesday on behalf of New Orleans defensive end Will Smith, Cleveland linebacker Scott Fujita, and free agent defensive lineman Anthony Hargrove, argues the players will suffer irreparable harm if they are forced to miss games while their case against the league proceeds. • Dolphins release veteran quarterback Garrard: Quarterback David Garrard has been released by the Miami Dolphins, leaving Matt Moore as the veteran backup to rookie starter Ryan Tannehill. Garrard signed in March and climbed atop the depth chart in training camp before he was sidelined by a left knee injury that required arthroscopic surgery Aug. 11. In his absence, Tannehill claimed the starting job for Sunday’s opener at Houston.

Baseball • Reds activate Votto off DL, not in lineup: Cincinnati has activated first baseman Joey Votto off the disabled list, but he’s still not ready to play every day. Votto hadn’t played since July 15 because of damaged cartilage in his left knee that required two operations. He had a rehab stint in Class A Dayton and Triple-A Louisville last week. Votto wasn’t in the lineup for a game against the Philadelphia Phillies on Tuesday. — From wire reports

ON DECK Today Girls soccer: Madras at La Pine, 4:30 p.m. Volleyball: Churchill at Summit, 4:30 p.m.; West Albany at Summit, 6:30 p.m.; Mountain View vs. West Albany at Summit, 4:30 p.m.; Mountain View vs. Churchill at Summit, 6:30 p.m. Thursday Cross-country: Madras at the Darrel Deedon Cascade Invite in Turner, TBA Boys soccer: Mazama at Ridgeview, 3 p.m.; Madras at Redmond, 4:30 p.m.; East Linn Christian at Culver, 4 p.m.; Molalla at Sisters, 5:30 p.m. Girls soccer: Mazama at Ridgeview, 4:30 p.m.; Molalla at Sisters, 4 p.m.; Redmond at Madras, 4 p.m. (Red schedule says at 4:30 p.m.) Volleyball: Redmond at Ridgeview, 6 p.m.; Stayton at Sisters, 7 p.m.; Cascade at Madras, 6:30 p.m.; East Linn Christian at Culver, 6 p.m. Boys water polo: Summit at Madras, TBA Friday Football: Bend at Silverton, 7 p.m.; Century at Mountain View, 7 p.m.; Summit at Eagle Point, 7 p.m.; Redmond at Madras, 7 p.m.; Klamath Union at Ridgeview, 7 p.m.; Crook County at Cascade, 7 p.m.; Burns at Sisters, 7 p.m.; La Pine at Oakridge, 7 p.m.; Culver at Grant Union, 7 p.m.; Gilchrist at Elkton, 4 p.m. Boys soccer: Mountain View at North Medford, 4 p.m.; Bend at South Medford, 4 p.m.; McLoughlin at Redmond, 4:30 p.m. Girls soccer: North Medford at Mountain View, 4 p.m.; Willamette at Summit, 4 p.m.; South Medford at Bend, 4 p.m.; McLoughlin at Redmond, 3 p.m. Volleyball: Gilchrist at Prospect, 5 p.m.; Trinity Lutheran at Butte Falls, 1 p.m. Saturday Cross-country: Bend, Mountain View, Redmond, Summit, Sisters, La Pine, Ridgeview and Crook County at the Breese Ranch Stampede in Prineville, 8 a.m.; Madras at the Trask Mountain Assault in McMinnville, noon Volleyball: Summit at Central Catholic Invitational, 9 a.m.; Bend, Redmond, Ridgeview, Crook County at Mountain View tournament, TBA; Sisters, Madras at Cascade tourney, 8 a.m.; Culver at Heppner tournament, TBA; Trinity Lutheran at Prairie City tournament, TBA; Central Christian at Paisley, 2 p.m.. Boys soccer: Summit at Madras, 10 a.m.; Mountain View at South Medford, 11 a.m.; Bend at North Medford, 11 a.m.; Central Christian at Irrigon, 1 p.m. Girls soccer: North Medford at Bend, 11 a.m.

TENNIS Professional U.S. Open Tuesday At The USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center New York Purse: $25.5 million (Grand Slam) Surface: Hard-Outdoor Singles Men Fourth Round David Ferrer (4), Spain, def. Richard Gasquet (13), France, 7-5, 7-6 (2), 6-4. Andy Roddick (20), United States, leads Juan Martin del Potro (7), Argentina, 6-6 (1-0), susp., rain. Janko Tipsarevic (8), Serbia, leads Philipp Kohlschreiber (19), Germany, 5-2 (40-40), susp., rain. Novak Djokovic (2), Serbia, leads Stanislas Wawrinka (18), Switzerland, 2-0, susp., rain. Women Quarterfinals Victoria Azarenka (1), Belarus, def. Sam Stosur (7), Australia, 6-1, 4-6, 7-6 (5). Marion Bartoli (11), France, leads Maria Sharapova (3), Russia, 4-0 (15-30), susp., rain. Doubles Men Quarterfinals Marcel Granollers and Marc Lopez (6), Spain, def. Alexander Peya, Austria, and Bruno Soares (15), Brazil, 6-3, 6-4. Leander Paes, India, and Radek Stepanek (5), Czech Republic, lead Julian Knowle, Austria, and Filip Polasek, Slovakia, 6-2, 1-0, susp., rain. Aisam-ul-Haq Qureshi, Pakistan, and Jean-Julien Rojer (9), Netherlands, vs. Christian and Ryan Harrison, United States, 6-2, 2-2, susp., rain, Women Quarterfinals Sara Errani and Roberta Vinci (2), Italy, def. Julia Goerges, Germany, and Kveta Peschke (11), Czech Republic, 6-2, 7-6 (2). Show Court Schedules Today All Times PDT At The USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center New York Play begins at 8 a.m. Arthur Ashe Stadium Maria Sharapova (3), Russia, vs. Marion Bartoli (11), France, comp. of susp. match Not before 9:30 a.m.: Juan Martin del Potro (7), Argentina, vs. Andy Roddick (20), United States, comp. of susp. match Andy Murray (3), Britain, vs. Marin Cilic (12), Croatia Night Session (Play begins at 4 p.m.) Ana Ivanovic (12), Serbia, vs. Serena Williams (4), United States Roger Federer (1), Switzerland, vs. Tomas Berdych (6), Czech Republic Louis Armstrong Stadium Sara Errani (10), Italy, vs. Roberta Vinci (20), Italy Not before 9:30 a.m.: Stanislas Wawrinka (18), Switzerland, vs. Novak Djokovic (2), Serbia, comp. of susp. match Julien Benneteau and Nicolas Mahut, France, vs. Bob and Mike Bryan (2), United States Grandstand Aisam-ul-Haq Qureshi, Pakistan, and Jean-Julien Rojer (9), Netherlands, vs. Christian and Ryan Harrison, United States, comp. of susp. match Not before 9:30 a.m.: Janko Tipsarevic (8), Serbia, vs. Philipp Kohlschreiber (19), Germany, comp. of susp. match

FOOTBALL NFL NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE All Times PDT ——— Today’s Game Dallas at New York Giants, 5:30 p.m. Sunday’s Games Indianapolis at Chicago, 10 a.m. Atlanta at Kansas City, 10 a.m. Philadelphia at Cleveland, 10 a.m. Washington at New Orleans, 10 a.m. St. Louis at Detroit, 10 a.m. New England at Tennessee, 10 a.m. Jacksonville at Minnesota, 10 a.m. Buffalo at New York Jets, 10 a.m. Miami at Houston, 10 a.m. Seattle at Arizona, 1:25 p.m. San Francisco at Green Bay, 1:25 p.m. Carolina at Tampa Bay, 1:25 p.m. Pittsburgh at Denver, 5:20 p.m. Monday, Sept. 10 Cincinnati at Baltimore, 4 p.m. San Diego at Oakland, 7:15 p.m.

College USA Today Top 25 Poll The USA Today Top 25 football coaches poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Sept. 3, total points based on 25 points for first place through one point for 25th, and 2011 final ranking: Record Pts Pvs 1. Alabama (37) 1-0 1,447 2 2. Southern Cal (14) 1-0 1,398 3 3. LSU (7) 1-0 1,375 1 4. Oregon (1) 1-0 1,286 5 5. Oklahoma 1-0 1,171 4 6. Florida State 1-0 1,144 7 7. Georgia 1-0 1,092 6 8. West Virginia 1-0 1,032 11 9. South Carolina 1-0 943 9 10. Arkansas 1-0 929 10 11. Michigan State 1-0 868 13 12. Clemson 1-0 826 14 13. Wisconsin 1-0 719 12 14. Nebraska 1-0 652 16 15. Texas 1-0 600 15 16. Oklahoma State 1-0 595 19 17. TCU 0-0 479 17 18. Virginia Tech 1-0 476 20 19. Michigan 0-1 427 8 20. Kansas State 1-0 414 21 21. Stanford 1-0 324 18 22. Notre Dame 1-0 252 24

Patriots VIKINGS TEXANS LIONS Falcons PACKERS Panthers Seahawks BRONCOS

IN THE BLEACHERS

RAVENS Chargers

23. Florida 1-0 204 23 24. Louisville 1-0 109 NR 25. Boise State 0-1 82 22 Others receiving votes Washington 55; Brigham Young 41; Baylor 39; Tennessee 29; Utah 20; Auburn 18; Georgia Tech 16; Missouri 16; Texas A&M 13; South Florida 12; Central Florida 11; Ohio 11; Cincinnati 10; Mississippi State 10; Virginia 7; Arizona 6; Louisiana Tech 6; Nevada 5; Vanderbilt 3; Northwestern 1; Rutgers 1; Texas Tech 1. The AP Top 25 The Top 25 teams in The Associated Press college football poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Sept. 3, total points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote, and previous ranking: Record Pts Pv 1. Alabama (45) 1-0 1,481 2 2. Southern Cal (11) 1-0 1,435 1 3. LSU (4) 1-0 1,382 3 4. Oregon 1-0 1,295 5 5. Oklahoma 1-0 1,170 4 6. Florida St. 1-0 1,135 7 7. Georgia 1-0 1,083 6 8. Arkansas 1-0 992 10 9. South Carolina 1-0 980 9 9. West Virginia 1-0 980 11 11. Michigan St. 1-0 915 13 12. Clemson 1-0 788 14 13. Wisconsin 1-0 664 12 14. Ohio St. 1-0 634 18 15. Virginia Tech 1-0 604 16 16. Nebraska 1-0 603 17 17. Texas 1-0 584 15 18. Oklahoma St. 1-0 558 19 19. Michigan 0-1 446 8 20. TCU 0-0 355 20 21. Kansas St. 1-0 339 22 22. Notre Dame 1-0 198 NR 23. Louisville 1-0 190 25 24. Florida 1-0 145 23 25. Stanford 1-0 131 21 Others receiving votes: Boise St. 79, Tennessee 73, BYU 63, North Carolina 48, Baylor 38, Utah 34, Washington 15, Georgia Tech 14, Ohio 10, Texas St. 10, Missouri 7, South Florida 5, Texas A&M 5, UCF 4, Auburn 3, Mississippi St. 3, Cincinnati 2. Schedule All Times PDT (Subject to change) Thursday’s Games SOUTH North Greenville at Tennessee Tech, 5 p.m. MIDWEST Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, 5 p.m. ——— Friday’s Game FAR WEST Utah at Utah St., 5 p.m. ——— Saturday’s Games EAST Lehigh at CCSU, 9 a.m. Dayton at Duquesne, 9 a.m. Albany (NY) at Robert Morris, 9 a.m. Bryant at St. Francis (Pa.), 9 a.m. Maryland at Temple, 9 a.m. NC State at UConn, 9 a.m. Maine at Boston College, 10 a.m. Wagner at Georgetown, 10 a.m. Rhode Island at Monmouth (NJ), 10 a.m. Delaware St. at Delaware, 12:30 p.m. Howard at Rutgers, 12:30 p.m. Southern Cal vs. Syracuse at East Rutherford, N.J., 12:30 p.m. Indiana at UMass, 12:30 p.m. Morgan St. at Buffalo, 3 p.m. Bucknell at Marist, 3 p.m. Pace at Stony Brook, 3 p.m. Fordham at Villanova, 3 p.m. SOUTH Auburn at Mississippi St., 9 a.m. Penn St. at Virginia, 9 a.m. East Carolina at South Carolina, 9:21 a.m. Ball St. at Clemson, 9:30 a.m. Jacksonville at Charleston Southern, 10:30 a.m. Chowan at VMI, 10:30 a.m. Austin Peay at Virginia Tech, 10:30 a.m. North Carolina at Wake Forest, noon Missouri St. at Louisville, 12:30 p.m. W. Kentucky at Alabama, 12:39 p.m. Georgia St. at Tennessee, 1 p.m. Coastal Carolina at Furman, 2 p.m. Nicholls St. at South Alabama, 2 p.m. Virginia-Wise at Campbell, 3 p.m. Morehead St. at E. Kentucky, 3 p.m. Akron at FIU, 3 p.m. Savannah St. at Florida St., 3 p.m. Old Dominion at Hampton, 3 p.m. Alcorn St. at James Madison, 3 p.m. W. Virginia St. at NC A&T, 3 p.m. Gardner-Webb at Richmond, 3 p.m. Bethune-Cookman at SC State, 3 p.m. Georgia Southern at The Citadel, 3 p.m. Montana at Appalachian St., 3:30 p.m. MVSU at Alabama St., 4 p.m. NC Central at Elon, 4 p.m. Presbyterian at Georgia Tech, 4 p.m. Chattanooga at Jacksonville St., 4 p.m. Washington at LSU, 4 p.m. Davidson at Lenoir-Rhyne, 4 p.m. Norfolk St. at Liberty, 4 p.m. W. Carolina at Marshall, 4 p.m. FAU at Middle Tennessee, 4 p.m. UTEP at Mississippi, 4 p.m. Cent. Arkansas at Murray St., 4 p.m. Ark.-Monticello at Northwestern St., 4 p.m. West Alabama at Samford, 4 p.m. Jackson St. vs. Tennessee St. at Memphis, Tenn., 4 p.m. Louisiana-Lafayette at Troy, 4 p.m. Lafayette at William & Mary, 4 p.m. Lincoln (Mo.) at Wofford, 4 p.m. Kent St. at Kentucky, 4:30 p.m. McMurry at McNeese St., 5 p.m. S. Dakota St. at SE Louisiana, 5 p.m. MIDWEST Miami at Kansas St., 9 a.m. New Hampshire at Minnesota, 9 a.m. UCF at Ohio St., 9 a.m. Illinois St. at E. Michigan, 10 a.m. S. Illinois at Miami (Ohio), 10 a.m. Quincy at Indiana St., 11:05 a.m. Colgate at South Dakota, noon Michigan St. at Cent. Michigan, 12:30 p.m. Iowa St. at Iowa, 12:30 p.m. Rice at Kansas, 12:30 p.m. Air Force at Michigan, 12:30 p.m. Purdue at Notre Dame, 12:30 p.m. Indianapolis at W. Illinois, 1 p.m. Valparaiso at Youngstown St., 1 p.m. Franklin at Butler, 3 p.m. Idaho at Bowling Green, 4 p.m.

Montana St. at Drake, 4 p.m. UT-Martin at N. Illinois, 4 p.m. Central St., Ohio at N. Iowa, 4 p.m. Portland St. at North Dakota, 4 p.m. New Mexico St. at Ohio, 4 p.m. Mars Hill at SE Missouri, 4 p.m. E. Illinois at W. Michigan, 4 p.m. Georgia at Missouri, 4:45 p.m. Vanderbilt at Northwestern, 5 p.m. SOUTHWEST Tulane at Tulsa, 9 a.m. Texas A&M Commerce at UTSA, 11 a.m. Florida at Texas A&M, 12:30 p.m. Alabama A&M at Ark.-Pine Bluff, 3 p.m. Louisiana-Monroe vs. Arkansas at Little Rock, Ark., 4 p.m. Memphis at Arkansas St., 4 p.m. Texas Southern at North Texas, 4 p.m. Florida A&M at Oklahoma, 4 p.m. Incarnate Word at Sam Houston St., 4 p.m. Grambling St. at TCU, 4 p.m. Texas Tech at Texas St., 4 p.m. Louisiana Tech at Houston, 5 p.m. Prairie View at Lamar, 5 p.m. Stephen F. Austin at SMU, 5 p.m. New Mexico at Texas, 5 p.m. FAR WEST Weber St. at BYU, noon S. Utah at California, noon Sacramento St. at Colorado, noon E. Washington at Washington St., noon Mesa St. at N. Colorado, 12:35 p.m. South Florida at Nevada, 12:35 p.m. Wisconsin at Oregon St., 1 p.m. Toledo at Wyoming, 1 p.m. Black Hills St. at Idaho St., 3 p.m. Fresno St. at Oregon, 3:30 p.m. N. Dakota St. at Colorado St., 4 p.m. Army at San Diego St., 4:30 p.m. Nebraska at UCLA, 4:30 p.m. UC Davis at San Jose St., 5 p.m. W. New Mexico at San Diego, 6 p.m. N. Arizona at UNLV, 7 p.m. Oklahoma St. at Arizona, 7:30 p.m. Illinois at Arizona St., 7:30 p.m. Duke at Stanford, 7:30 p.m. The AP Top 25 Fared First Week No. 1 Southern Cal (1-0) beat Hawaii 49-10. Next: vs. Syracuse at East Rutherford, N.J., Saturday. No. 2 Alabama (1-0) beat No. 8 Michigan 41-14. Next: vs. Western Kentucky, Saturday. No. 3 LSU (1-0) beat North Texas 41-14. Next: vs. Washington, Saturday. No. 4 Oklahoma (1-0) beat UTEP 24-7. Next: vs. Florida A&M, Saturday. No. 5 Oregon (1-0) beat Arkansas State 57-34. Next: vs. Fresno State, Saturday. No. 6 Georgia (1-0) beat Buffalo 45-23. Next: at Missouri, Saturday. No. 7 Florida State (1-0) beat Murray State 69-3. Next: vs. Savannah State, Saturday. No. 8 Michigan (0-1) lost to No. 2 Alabama 41-14. Next: vs. Air Force, Saturday. No. 9 South Carolina (1-0) beat Vanderbilt 17-13, Thursday. Next: East Carolina, Saturday. No. 10 Arkansas (1-0) beat Jacksonville State 49-24. Next: vs. Louisiana-Monroe, Saturday. No. 11 West Virginia (1-0) beat Marshall 69-34. Next: vs. James Madison at Landover, Md., Sept. 15. No. 12 Wisconsin (1-0) beat Northern Iowa 26-21. Next: at Oregon State, Saturday. No. 13 Michigan State (1-0) beat No. 24 Boise State 17-13, Friday. Next: at Central Michigan, Saturday. No. 14 Clemson (1-0) beat Auburn 26-19. Next: vs. Ball State, Saturday. No. 15 Texas (1-0) beat Wyoming 37-17. Next: vs. New Mexico, Saturday. No. 16 Virginia Tech (1-0) beat Georgia Tech 20-17, OT, Monday. Next: vs. Austin Peay, Saturday. No. 17 Nebraska (1-0) beat Southern Miss 49-20. Next: at UCLA, Saturday. No. 18 Ohio State (1-0) beat Miami (Ohio) 56-10. Next: vs. UCF, Saturday. No. 19 Oklahoma State (1-0) beat Savannah State 840. Next: at Arizona, Saturday. No. 20 TCU (0-0) did not play. Next: vs. Grambling, Saturday. No. 21 Stanford (1-0) beat San Jose State 20-17, Friday. Next: vs. Duke, Saturday. No. 22 Kansas State (1-0) beat Missouri State 51-9. Next: vs. Miami, Saturday. No. 23 Florida (1-0) beat Bowling Green 27-14. Next: at Texas A&M, Saturday. No. 24 Boise State (0-1) lost to No. 13 Michigan State 17-13, Friday. Next: vs. Miami (Ohio), Sept. 15. No. 25 Louisville (1-0) beat Kentucky 32-14, Sunday. Next: vs. Missouri State, Saturday. Pac-12 Standings All Times PDT ——— North Conf. Overall Stanford 0-0 1-0 Oregon 0-0 1-0 Washington 0-0 1-0 Oregon State 0-0 0-0 California 0-0 0-1 Washington State 0-0 0-1 South Conf. Overall Arizona 0-0 1-0 Arizona State 0-0 1-0 UCLA 0-0 1-0 USC 0-0 1-0 Utah 0-0 1-0 Colorado 0-0 0-1 Friday’s Game Utah at Utah State, 5 p.m. Saturday’s Games Southern Utah at California, noon Sacramento State at Colorado, noon Eastern Washington at Washington State, noon USC at Syracuse, 12:30 p.m. Wisconsin at Oregon State, 1 p.m. Fresno State at Oregon, 3:30 p.m. Washington at LSU, 4 p.m. Nebraska at UCLA, 4:30 p.m. Illinois at Arizona State, 7:30 p.m. Oklahoma State at Arizona, 7:30 p.m.

Betting line GIANTS BEARS Eagles JETS SAINTS

NFL (Home teams in Caps) Wednesday 4 3.5 Sunday 9.5 9.5 8 8 3 3 9.5 7.5

Cowboys Colts BROWNS Bills Redskins

6.5 5.5 TITANS 4.5 4 Jaguars 10.5 11.5 Dolphins 8.5 7.5 Rams 2 3 CHIEFS 5.5 5 49ers 2.5 2.5 BUCCANEERS 2 2.5 CARDINALS 1 1.5 Steelers Monday, Sept. 10 6 6 Bengals 1.5 1 RAIDERS

COLLEGE (Home teams in Caps) Thursday CINCINNATI 3.5 4 Pittsburgh Friday Utah 7 7.5 UTAH STATE Saturday VIRGINIA 9.5 10 Penn St Indiana 13.5 13.5 UMASS MICHIGAN 21.5 21 Air Force OHIO U 21 21 New Mexico St KENTUCKY 7 7 Kent St OHIO ST 17 17.5 C. Florida BOWLING GREEN 13.5 16 Idaho CLEMSON 26.5 27 Ball St KANSAS 10 9.5 Rice WYOMING 2.5 3 Toledo N. Carolina 7 8 WAKE FOREST Georgia 3 3.5 MISSOURI KANSAS ST 7 6.5 Miami (Fla.) Michigan St 23.5 23.5 C. MICHIGAN e-Usc 26 27.5 Syracuse NOTRE DAME 14.5 14.5 Purdue NEVADA PK 1 S. Florida Wisconsin 8 8 OREGON ST OREGON 33.5 34.5 Fresno St S. CAROLINA 23.5 22 E. Carolina IOWA 4 3.5 Iowa St LSU 24 23.5 Washington MISSISSIPPI 7.5 7.5 Utep MISSISSIPPI ST 3 3 Auburn Texas Tech 16 17.5 TEXAS ST TEMPLE 10.5 10 Maryland TEXAS 37.5 38 New Mexico TEXAS A&M 2 1.5 Florida Louisiana Tech 3.5 3.5 HOUSTON Nebraska 4.5 5 UCLA SAN DIEGO ST 4.5 4.5 Army NC State 4 6 CONNECTICUT TULSA 24.5 25 Tulane Vanderbilt 3 3.5 NORTHWESTERN STANFORD 14.5 15 Duke Oklahoma St 13.5 13 ARIZONA ARIZONA ST PK 3 Illinois FLORIDA INT’L 23.5 23.5 Akron TROY 2.5 3 UL-Lafayette MID TENN ST 7 8 Florida Atlantic AKRANSAS ST 21 22.5 Memphis l-ARKANSAS 30 30.5 UL-Monroe ALABAMA 40 40 W. Kentucky e-East Rutherford, N.J. l-Little Rock, Ark.

SOCCER MLS MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT ——— Eastern Conference W L T Pts GF Sporting Kansas City 15 7 5 50 34 New York 13 7 7 46 46 Chicago 13 8 5 44 35 Houston 11 7 9 42 39 Columbus 12 8 6 42 33 D.C. 12 10 5 41 43 Montreal 12 14 3 39 43 Philadelphia 7 13 5 26 25 New England 6 14 7 25 33 Toronto FC 5 16 6 21 30 Western Conference W L T Pts GF San Jose 16 6 5 53 56 Real Salt Lake 14 10 4 46 38 Seattle 12 6 8 44 41 Los Angeles 13 11 4 43 48 Vancouver 10 11 7 37 29 FC Dallas 8 12 9 33 34 Chivas USA 7 11 7 28 20 Portland 7 13 6 27 27 Colorado 8 17 2 26 33 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. ——— Today’s Games Columbus at New England, 5 p.m. Portland at Colorado, 6 p.m. Thursday’s Game Real Salt Lake at Houston, 5:30 p.m. Saturday’s Game Chivas USA at Seattle FC, 1 p.m.

GA 24 39 31 33 30 38 46 30 38 48 GA 33 32 27 40 37 38 39 43 41

BASKETBALL WNBA WOMEN’S NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION All Times PDT ——— Eastern Conference W L Pct GB x-Connecticut 20 7 .741 — Indiana 17 8 .680 2 Atlanta 14 13 .519 6 Chicago 10 16 .385 9½ New York 10 16 .385 9½ Washington 5 22 .185 15 Western Conference W L Pct GB x-Minnesota 22 4 .846 — x-Los Angeles 19 9 .679 4 x-San Antonio 17 9 .654 5 Seattle 11 14 .440 10½ Phoenix 6 19 .240 15½ Tulsa 6 20 .231 16 x-clinched playoff spot ——— Tuesday’s Games Connecticut 77, Washington 70 Minnesota 88, Los Angeles 77 Today’s Games Indiana at Atlanta, 4 p.m. Phoenix at New York, 4 p.m. Thursday’s Games Tulsa at Seattle, 7 p.m.

AUS USA ESP SAF USA USA USA WAL USA USA USA IRL GER AUS USA DEN SWE USA SWE USA USA SAF ENG SAF FIJ AUS ESP JPN

2.56 2.46 2.45 2.41 2.40 2.39 2.37 2.36 2.36 2.35 2.34 2.32 2.30 2.29 2.26 2.25 2.17 2.16 2.15 2.08 2.08 2.04 2.00 1.97 1.97 1.97 1.95 1.95

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL MLB—Suspended Baltimore Orioles LHP Kevin Grendellue 50 games for a positive test and Los Angeles Angels LHP Yancarlos Santiago and free-agent RHP Ysmael Carmona 25 games each for violations under the Minor League Drug Prevention and Treatment Program. American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES—Recalled LHP Zach Britton from Norfolk (IL). BOSTON RED SOX—Acquired C Guillermo Quiroz from the Seattle Mariners for cash considerations. Recalled RHP Clayton Mortensen from Portland (EL). KANSAS CITY ROYALS—Recalled RHP Jeremy Jeffress from Northwest Arkansas (Texas). MINNESOTA TWINS—Recalled INF Eduardo Escobar and RHP Luis Perdomo from Rochester (IL). NEW YORK YANKEES—Recalled INF Casey McGehee from Charleston (SAL). OAKLAND ATHLETICS—Recalled RHP Jim Miller from Stockton (CAL). National League CINCINNATI REDS—Activated 1B Joey Votto from the 15-day DL. Recalled RHP Todd Redmond and RHP Pedro Villarreal from Louisville (IL). Selected the contract of LHP Tony Cingrani from Pensacolo (SL). Assigned INF Chris Valaika and RHP Jordan Smith outright to Louisville. NEW YORK METS—Recalled OF Jordany Valdespin, RHP Elvin Ramirez, RHP Jenrry Mejia and RHP Jeurys Familia from Buffalo (IL). Selected the contracts of LHP Justin Hampson and OF Fred Lewis from Buffalo. Transferred C Rob Johnson and LHP Tim Byrdak to 60-day DL. PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES—Selected the contract of INF/OF Pete Orr from Lehigh Valley (IL). ST. LOUIS CARDINALS—Selected the contract of RHP Shelby Miller from Memphis (PCL). Recalled INF Ryan Jackson and OF Adron Chambers from Memphis. SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS—Recalled INF Emmanuel Burriss, RHP Dan Otero and LHP Dan Runzler. Designated RHP Eric Hacker for assignment. WASHINGTON NATIONALS—Recalled OF Corey Brown from Syracuse (IL). Activated RHP Chien-Ming Wang from the 15-day DL. FOOTBALL National Football League BUFFALO BILLS—Signed WR Ruvell Martin. Placed CB Ron Brooks on injured reserve/designated for return list. Signed DT Jay Ross to the practice squad. CINCINNATI BENGALS—Placed C Kyle Cook on injured reserve/designated for return list. Signed TE Richard Quinn. Released TE Bryce Davis from the practice squad. JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS—Signed TE Colin Cloherty. Placed TE Brett Brackett on injured reserve. NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS—Signed RB Lex Hilliard. Released OL Matt Tennant. NEW YORK GIANTS—Signed WR Brandon Collins to the practice squad. Released OL Stephen Goodin from the practice squad. NEW YORK JETS—Released P T.J. Conley and NT Isaako Aatui. GOLF Ladies Professional Golf Association LPGA—Named Ricki Lasky vice president, tournament business affairs. HOCKEY National Hockey League PHOENIX COYOTES—Signed F Lucas Lessio. LACROSSE National Lacrosse League COLORADO MAMMOTH—Re-signed D Jarett Park. Signed D Richard Morgan and T John McClure. THOROUGHBRED RACING DELTA DOWNS RACETRACK CASINO & HOTEL— Named Bryan Schultz track superintendent. COLLEGE HOLY CROSS—Named James Thorpe assistant soccer coach. LEES-MCRAE—Named Ryan Riedel women’s assistant basketball coach. MISSOURI—Named Rick Carter men’s assistant basketball coach. NEW MEXICO—Announced the men’s soccer program will join Conference USA in 2013. NORTH CAROLINA—Named Bryant Gaines assistant baseball coach. WAGNER—Named Dwayne Lee graduate manager for men’s basketball.

RODEO

GOLF

PRCA

World Ranking Through Monday 1. Rory McIlroy NIR 2. Luke Donald ENG 3. Tiger Woods USA 4. Lee Westwood ENG 5. Webb Simpson USA 6. Bubba Watson USA 7. Jason Dufner USA 8. Justin Rose ENG 9. Adam Scott AUS 10. Steve Stricker USA 11. Matt Kuchar USA 12. Keegan Bradley USA 13. Graeme McDowell NIR 14. Sergio Garcia ESP 15. Zach Johnson USA 16. Dustin Johnson USA 17. Louis Oosthuizen SAF 18. Hunter Mahan USA 19. Nick Watney USA 20. Brandt Snedeker USA 21. Ernie Els SAF 22. Phil Mickelson USA 23. Rickie Fowler USA 24. Charl Schwartzel SAF 25. Francesco Molinari ITA 26. Ian Poulter ENG 27. Martin Kaymer GER 28. Bo Van Pelt USA 29. Jason Day AUS 30. Paul Lawrie SCO 31. Jim Furyk USA 32. Carl Pettersson SWE 33. Bill Haas USA 34. Peter Hanson SWE 35. Nicolas Colsaerts BEL 36. John Senden AUS 37. David Toms USA 38. K.J. Choi KOR 39. David Lynn ENG 40. Martin Laird SCO 41. Thomas Bjorn DEN 42. Geoff Ogilvy AUS 43. G. Fernandez-Castano ESP 44. Fredrik Jacobson SWE 45. Rafael Cabrera-Bello ESP 46. Simon Dyson ENG 47. Sang-Moon Bae KOR

48. Aaron Baddeley 49. Mark Wilson 50. Alvaro Quiros 51. Branden Grace 52. Jonathan Byrd 53. Scott Piercy 54. Kevin Na 55. Jamie Donaldson 56. Robert Garrigus 57. Kyle Stanley 58. Bud Cauley 59. Padraig Harrington 60. Marcel Siem 61. Greg Chalmers 62. Ben Crane 63. Anders Hansen 64. Alexander Noren 65. John Huh 66. Robert Karlsson 67. Michael Thompson 68. Ben Curtis 69. Retief Goosen 70. Robert Rock 71. Tim Clark 72. Vijay Singh 73. Marc Leishman 74. Miguel Angel Jimenez 75. Ryo Ishikawa

10.14 9.40 8.61 7.26 6.12 6.09 6.05 6.01 5.95 5.64 5.52 5.49 5.15 5.08 5.04 4.96 4.94 4.89 4.72 4.71 4.65 4.21 4.16 4.09 4.06 4.02 4.01 3.95 3.93 3.86 3.81 3.72 3.70 3.69 3.43 3.29 3.18 3.11 2.93 2.87 2.83 2.70 2.66 2.66 2.66 2.57 2.56

PROFESSIONAL RODEO COWBOYS ASSOCIATION Pro Rodeo Leaders Through Monday All-Around 1. Trevor Brazile, Decatur, Texas $195,706 2. Steven Dent, Mullen, Neb. $121,529 3. Bobby Mote, Culver, Ore. $103,137 4. Josh Peek, Pueblo, Colo. $93,298 5. Clint Robinson, Spanish Fork, Utah $85,681 6. Russell Cardoza, Terrebonne, Ore. $82,838 7. Colby Lovell, Madisonville, Texas $79,386 8. Rhen Richard, Roosevelt, Utah $73,987 9. Landon McClaugherty, Tilden, Texas $67,339 10. Ryan Jarrett, Comanche, Okla. $67,283 11. Jess Tierney, Hermosa, S.D. $58,886 12. Seth Glause, Cheyenne, Wyo. $53,899 13. Curtis Cassidy, Donalda, Alberta $52,563 14. B.J. Campbell, Aguila, Ariz. $49,559 15. Paul David Tierney, Oral, S.D. $48,891 16. Jake Cooper, Monument, N.M. $45,047 17. Clayton Moore, Pouce Coupe, B.C. $44,670 18. Ryle Smith, Oakdale, Calif. $43,003 19. Dakota Eldridge, Elko, Nev. $35,683 20. Kyle Thomson, Lundbreck, Alberta $34,773

FISH COUNT Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Monday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 11,946 3,078 2,450 739 The Dalles 6,398 2,221 2,998 834 John Day 5,610 1,999 1,938 615 McNary 4,376 510 1,008 344 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Monday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 349,280 43,995 180,618 69,582 The Dalles 240,175 31,720 116,694 48,173 John Day 201,713 27,136 72,331 31,979 McNary 191,387 13,765 61,698 24,697


WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

D3

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL STANDINGS, SCORES AND SCHEDULES

AL Boxscores Rays 5, Yankees 2 New York Jeter ss Granderson cf Swisher 1b Cano dh Al.Rodriguez 3b Ibanez lf J.Nix 2b b-Er.Chavez ph Dickerson rf C.Stewart c a-I.Suzuki ph Cervelli c Totals

AB 4 3 3 4 4 4 3 1 3 2 1 0 32

R 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

H 2 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 6

BI 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

BB 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

American League SO 0 1 3 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 9

Avg. .316 .233 .267 .303 .275 .230 .260 .288 .286 .248 .264 ---

Tampa Bay AB R H BI BB SO Avg. De.Jennings lf 3 2 1 1 1 0 .254 B.Upton cf 4 1 2 2 0 0 .252 Zobrist ss 3 1 0 0 1 0 .266 Longoria dh 3 1 1 2 1 1 .287 Joyce rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .253 Keppinger 3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .329 C.Pena 1b 1 0 0 0 2 1 .191 R.Roberts 2b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .224 J.Molina c 3 0 0 0 0 2 .203 Totals 28 5 5 5 5 9 New York 200 000 000 — 2 6 0 Tampa Bay 102 020 00x — 5 5 0 a-struck out for C.Stewart in the 8th. b-grounded out for J.Nix in the 9th. LOB—New York 5, Tampa Bay 4. 2B—B.Upton (24). HR—Cano (29), off Cobb; Longoria (10), off F.Garcia; De.Jennings (12), off F.Garcia; B.Upton (18), off F.Garcia. SB—Dickerson (1), De.Jennings (25). DP—New York 1; Tampa Bay 1. New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA F.Garcia L, 7-6 5 1-3 5 5 5 4 5 101 5.09 Rapada 0 0 0 0 1 0 7 2.88 Eppley 1 2-3 0 0 0 0 2 23 3.20 Chamberlain 1 0 0 0 0 2 11 9.35 Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cobb W, 9-8 7 4 2 2 1 5 97 4.28 Jo.Peralta H, 33 1 1 0 0 0 3 17 3.70 Rodney S, 42-44 1 1 0 0 0 1 16 0.71 Rapada pitched to 1 batter in the 6th. T—3:00. A—17,652 (34,078).

Red Sox 4, Mariners 3 Boston Podsednik lf c-M.Gomez ph Kalish lf Pedroia 2b Ellsbury cf C.Ross rf Loney 1b Saltalamacchia c Lavarnway dh Ciriaco 3b Iglesias ss Totals

AB 4 1 0 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 36

R 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 4

H 1 0 0 2 1 1 2 0 1 1 1 10

BI 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 1 0 0 4

BB 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

SO 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 4

Avg. .336 .283 .216 .292 .262 .274 .313 .228 .178 .316 .053

Seattle AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Ackley 2b 5 1 2 0 0 0 .232 Gutierrez cf 2 1 1 1 0 1 .278 Thames rf 2 0 1 0 1 1 .237 Seager 3b 5 1 2 1 0 0 .251 J.Montero dh 4 0 3 1 0 0 .264 Smoak 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .193 Olivo c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .215 a-Jaso ph-c 0 0 0 0 1 0 .273 T.Robinson lf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .250 C.Wells rf-cf 2 0 0 0 1 0 .224 b-Carp ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .204 Figgins cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .185 Ryan ss 3 0 1 0 0 1 .197 d-L.Jimenez ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 36 3 12 3 3 5 Boston 000 004 000 — 4 10 1 Seattle 102 000 000 — 3 12 0 a-walked for Olivo in the 8th. b-grounded into a double play for C.Wells in the 8th. c-flied out for Podsednik in the 9th. d-flied out for Ryan in the 9th. E—Saltalamacchia (7). LOB—Boston 8, Seattle 9. 2B—Loney (1), Iglesias (1). 3B—Thames (3). HR—C.Ross (20), off Beavan; Lavarnway (1), off Beavan; Gutierrez (3), off Lester; Seager (16), off Lester. SB—Podsednik (8), Pedroia (15), Ackley (13), C.Wells (3), Ryan (10). DP—Boston 2. Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lester W, 9-11 6 9 3 3 2 4 111 4.99 Breslow H, 3 1-3 2 0 0 0 1 13 4.38 Tazawa H, 1 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 5 1.64 Padilla H, 23 1 0 0 0 1 0 15 4.37 A.Bailey S, 2-3 1 1 0 0 0 0 19 1.35 Seattle IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Beavan L, 9-9 5 2-3 8 4 4 0 1 85 5.01 C.Capps 1 1-3 1 0 0 1 2 26 4.91 Luetge 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 10 3.16 Kelley 2-3 1 0 0 0 0 9 3.34 O.Perez 2-3 0 0 0 1 1 11 1.66 T—3:27. A—12,754 (47,860).

Angels 6, Athletics 1 Los Angeles Trout cf Tor.Hunter rf Pujols dh K.Morales 1b H.Kendrick 2b Aybar ss Callaspo 3b V.Wells lf Iannetta c Totals

AB 5 4 5 5 5 3 3 4 3 37

R 0 1 0 1 1 1 1 0 1 6

H 2 0 2 3 1 1 2 0 1 12

BI 1 0 0 1 0 1 2 0 0 5

BB 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2

SO 1 3 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 6

Avg. .333 .304 .288 .275 .291 .279 .249 .227 .268

Oakland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Crisp cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .253 S.Smith dh 3 0 1 0 0 0 .248 a-J.Gomes ph-dh 1 0 0 0 0 1 .257 Reddick rf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .258 Cespedes lf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .294 Moss 1b 4 1 1 1 0 2 .255 Donaldson 3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .231 Drew ss 2 0 0 0 1 0 .250 Kottaras c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .211 Pennington 2b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .207 Totals 31 1 4 1 2 5 Los Angeles 000 011 022 — 6 12 0 Oakland 000 000 100 — 1 4 1 E—Drew (2). LOB—Los Angeles 8, Oakland 5. 2B—Pujols (39), K.Morales (19), Aybar (25), S.Smith (19). HR—Moss (16), off Greinke. SB—H.Kendrick (12), Iannetta (1). Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Greinke W, 4-2 7 4 1 1 2 4 105 4.36 S.Downs H, 20 1 0 0 0 0 1 7 2.93 Isringhausen 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 3.92 Oakland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA J.Parker L, 9-8 7 8 2 2 0 5 104 3.67 Doolittle 2-3 3 2 2 0 1 20 3.62 Scribner 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 8 2.66 J.Miller 2-3 0 2 1 2 0 18 2.23 Blevins 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 10 2.65 T—2:52. A—11,688 (35,067).

Twins 18, White Sox 9 Minnesota AB Revere cf 6 J.Carroll 2b 4 h-A.Casilla ph-2b 1 Mauer c 3 Butera c 1 Willingham dh 3 f-M.Carson ph-dh 1 Morneau 1b 2 g-Mastroianni ph-rf 2 Doumit lf 6 Parmelee rf-1b 4 Plouffe 3b 4 E.Escobar ss 4 Totals 41

R 2 1 0 1 0 2 0 3 0 3 2 2 2 18

H 2 1 0 1 1 2 0 2 0 3 1 2 2 17

BI 1 2 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 3 4 2 3 18

BB 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 2 0 0 1 1 1 8

SO 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 7

Avg. .301 .258 .218 .317 .215 .261 .276 .278 .262 .284 .235 .237 .220

Chicago AB De Aza cf 5 Youkilis 3b 2 a-O.Hudson ph-2b 3 A.Dunn dh 2 b-H.Gimenez ph-dh-lf .500 Konerko 1b 2 c-Jo.Lopez ph-3b 2 Rios rf 2 d-D.Johnson ph-1b 2 Viciedo lf 2 e-Wise ph-lf-p 3 Al.Ramirez ss 2 Olmedo ss 3 Flowers c 4 Beckham 2b 1 Jor.Danks rf 2 Totals 40

R 0 1 0 1 3

H 1 1 0 1 0

BI 1 0 0 0 1

BB 0 0 0 0 0

SO 1 0 1 1 0

Avg. .279 .240 .186 .207 1

0 0 0 0 1 1 2 1 1 2 1 2 0 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 9 13

1 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 9 3 8

.307 .251 .295 .500 .256 .280 .271 .286 .230 .232 .232

Baltimore New York Tampa Bay Boston Toronto

W 76 76 75 63 60

L 59 59 61 74 75

Chicago Detroit Kansas City Cleveland Minnesota

W 73 72 61 58 56

L 62 63 74 78 80

Texas Oakland Los Angeles Seattle

W 80 76 73 66

L 55 59 63 71

East Division Pct GB WCGB .563 — — .563 — — .551 1½ 1½ .460 14 14 .444 16 16 Central Division Pct GB WCGB .541 — — .533 1 4 .452 12 15 .426 15½ 18½ .412 17½ 20½ West Division Pct GB WCGB .593 — — .563 4 — .537 7½ 3½ .482 15 11

Tuesday’s Games Cleveland 3, Detroit 2 Baltimore 12, Toronto 0 Tampa Bay 5, N.Y. Yankees 2 Minnesota 18, Chicago White Sox 9 Kansas City 6, Texas 3 L.A. Angels 6, Oakland 1 Boston 4, Seattle 3

National League

L10 8-2 3-7 5-5 3-7 4-6

Str Home Away W-3 37-30 39-29 L-3 41-28 35-31 W-4 37-30 38-31 W-1 32-38 31-36 L-4 33-34 27-41

L10 3-7 5-5 5-5 3-7 5-5

Str Home Away L-1 39-27 34-35 L-2 42-28 30-35 W-1 31-36 30-38 W-2 32-37 26-41 W-1 25-40 31-40

L10 6-4 8-2 7-3 5-5

Str Home Away L-1 43-25 37-30 L-2 42-29 34-30 W-2 36-29 37-34 L-1 35-33 31-38

Today’s Games Minnesota (Walters 2-2) at Chicago White Sox (Peavy 9-10), 11:10 a.m. L.A. Angels (Haren 9-10) at Oakland (McCarthy 8-5), 12:35 p.m. Cleveland (Jimenez 9-14) at Detroit (Fister 7-8), 4:05 p.m. Baltimore (Mig.Gonzalez 6-3) at Toronto (Morrow 8-5), 4:07 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Kuroda 12-10) at Tampa Bay (M.Moore 10-8), 47:10 p.m. Texas (Dempster 4-1) at Kansas City (Teaford 1-3), 5:10 p.m. Boston (A.Cook 3-8) at Seattle (Millwood 4-12), 7:10 p.m.

Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP Diamond W, 11-6 5 7 4 4 2 4 90 Swarzak 2 1-3 4 4 4 0 3 35 Perdomo 1 2-3 2 1 1 1 1 32 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP Quintana L, 5-4 1 1-3 5 7 7 2 2 54 Axelrod 2 2-3 3 2 2 2 1 50 Septimo 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 3 Humber 1-3 7 8 8 2 0 41 Omogrosso 3 1-3 1 1 1 1 4 43 Wise 1 1 0 0 1 0 12 Axelrod pitched to 2 batters in the 5th. T—3:24. A—15,698 (40,615).

ERA 3.35 4.99 2.35 ERA 3.68 5.03 5.40 6.50 3.60 0.00

Indians 3, Tigers 2 Cleveland Choo rf Kipnis 2b As.Cabrera ss C.Santana dh Brantley cf Canzler lf Carrera lf Kotchman 1b Hannahan 3b Marson c Totals

AB 5 5 4 4 2 4 0 4 4 3 35

R 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 3

H 1 1 2 2 1 1 0 0 1 0 9

BI 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 3

BB 0 0 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 1 5

SO 3 1 1 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 8

Avg. .281 .256 .274 .250 .285 .313 .277 .228 .226 .234

Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg. A.Jackson cf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .304 Dirks lf 4 1 0 0 0 1 .322 Mi.Cabrera 3b-1b 4 1 1 2 0 1 .330 Fielder dh 4 0 1 0 0 2 .312 Boesch rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .245 D.Kelly 1b 2 0 1 0 0 0 .179 a-A.Garcia ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .429 b-Berry ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .266 Worth 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .206 c-D.Young ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .277 Jh.Peralta ss 3 0 0 0 0 2 .252 Avila c 2 0 1 0 0 0 .243 Infante 2b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .254 Totals 31 2 4 2 1 8 Cleveland 021 000 000 — 3 9 1 Detroit 000 002 000 — 2 4 0 a-was announced for D.Kelly in the 7th. b-grounded out for A.Garcia in the 7th. c-grounded out for Worth in the 9th. E—Hannahan (11). LOB—Cleveland 10, Detroit 4. 2B—Choo (37), As.Cabrera (31), Brantley (36), Avila (18). HR—Mi.Cabrera (34), off Masterson. DP—Cleveland 1. Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP Masterson W, 11-126 4 2 2 1 4 93 S.Barnes H, 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 4 J.Smith H, 17 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 13 Pestano H, 34 1 0 0 0 0 2 13 C.Perez S, 34-38 1 0 0 0 0 2 10 Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP Porcello L, 9-11 5 2-3 8 3 3 2 2 93 Smyly 1 0 0 0 2 3 30 Alburquerque 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 13 Benoit 1 1 0 0 1 2 18 T—2:57. A—27,729 (41,255).

ERA 4.84 6.57 3.09 1.96 3.51 ERA 4.58 4.26 0.00 3.05

Royals 6, Rangers 3 Texas Kinsler 2b Andrus ss Hamilton cf Beltre 3b N.Cruz rf Mi.Young dh

AB 3 3 4 4 4 3

R 0 1 1 0 0 0

H 1 1 2 1 0 1

BI 0 1 0 0 0 1

BB 1 0 0 0 0 0

SO 1 0 2 1 2 0

Avg. .266 .298 .291 .317 .262 .268

L 52 60 71 72 76

Cincinnati St. Louis Pittsburgh Milwaukee Chicago Houston

W 83 74 71 66 51 42

L 54 62 64 69 84 94

San Francisco Los Angeles Arizona San Diego Colorado

W 77 73 66 63 56

L 58 64 70 74 78

L10 6-4 5-5 6-4 7-3 3-7

Str Home Away W-3 41-25 42-27 L-1 38-32 38-28 L-1 32-37 33-34 L-2 30-35 34-37 L-1 31-36 29-40

L10 7-3 5-5 4-6 8-2 3-7 2-8

Str Home Away W-1 43-25 40-29 W-2 42-26 32-36 W-1 41-27 30-37 W-1 41-28 25-41 L-4 34-34 17-50 L-1 28-40 14-54

L10 7-3 4-6 2-8 6-4 6-4

Str Home Away W-3 38-28 39-30 L-1 38-32 35-32 L-3 33-34 33-36 W-1 33-33 30-41 W-1 30-41 26-37

Today’s Games Philadelphia (Halladay 8-7) at Cincinnati (Leake 7-8), 9:35 a.m. N.Y. Mets (Dickey 17-4) at St. Louis (Wainwright 13-11), 10:45 a.m. Chicago Cubs (Volstad 2-9) at Washington (G.Gonzalez 17-7), 4:05 p.m. Houston (Abad 0-2) at Pittsburgh (Correia 9-8), 4:05 p.m. Colorado (White 2-7) at Atlanta (Minor 7-10), 4:10 p.m. Milwaukee (W.Peralta 0-0) at Miami (Eovaldi 4-10), 4:10 p.m. San Diego (Richard 12-12) at L.A. Dodgers (Harang 9-8), 7:10 p.m. Arizona (Cahill 9-11) at San Francisco (Bumgarner 14-9), 7:15 p.m.

4 2 3 30

• Nationals 11, Cubs 5: WASHINGTON — Adam LaRoche hit two of Washington’s six homers, Ian Desmond had four RBIs and the Nationals beat Chicago. • Rockies 6, Braves 0: ATLANTA — Carlos Gonzalez hit his second home run since July 23 to give Colorado the lead, and Jordan Pacheco also went deep for the Rockies. • Pirates 6, Astros 2: PITTSBURGH — Andrew McCutchen had his major league-leading sixth fourhit game of the season and drove in three runs to help Pittsburgh snap a four-game losing streak. • Cardinals 5, Mets 1: ST. LOUIS — Jaime Garcia carried a shutout into the eighth inning and Yadier Molina got his 1,000th career hit with an infield single that started a three-run second for St. Louis against rookie Matt Harvey. • Reds 2, Phillies 1: CINCINNATI — Jay Bruce homered for the third straight game, hitting a two-run shot that sent Cincinnati to the win with first baseman Joey Votto watching from the bench. Votto was activated off the disabled list before the game, but didn’t play. Cincinnati went 32-16 without him, taking control of the NL Central. • Brewers 8, Marlins 4: MIAMI — Norichika Aoki and Jeff Bianchi homered and drove in three runs apiece to power the Brewers to the victory. Ryan Braun drove in Milwaukee’s other two runs to give him 98 RBIs, which leads the National League. The reigning NL MVP is looking for his fifth straight season with 100 RBIs. • Padres 6, Dodgers 3: LOS ANGELES — Logan Forsythe hit a two-run single with the bases loaded in the 11th inning after Yasmani Grandal tied the score with a two-run homer in the eighth, and San Diego beat Los Angeles. 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 3 7 3 2 7

.321 .227 .286

Kansas City AB R H BI BB SO Avg. L.Cain cf 4 1 1 0 0 2 .243 A.Escobar ss 4 2 1 1 0 0 .292 A.Gordon lf 4 1 2 2 0 1 .298 Butler 1b 3 1 1 1 0 0 .309 Hosmer 1b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .240 S.Perez c 4 0 1 1 0 0 .308 Francoeur rf 4 0 2 0 0 1 .234 Moustakas 3b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .254 T.Abreu dh 4 0 1 0 0 1 .350 Giavotella 2b 4 1 1 1 0 1 .229 Totals 35 6 11 6 0 7 Texas 110 000 001 — 3 7 1 Kansas City 002 031 00x — 6 11 1 E—Kinsler (15), Butler (2). LOB—Texas 4, Kansas City 6. 2B—Kinsler (37), Moreland (14), A.Escobar (26), S.Perez (14), Moustakas (30). HR—Andrus (3), off Guthrie; A.Gordon (11), off M.Harrison; Giavotella (1), off Oswalt. DP—Kansas City 1. Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Harrison L, 15-9 4 2-3 8 5 3 0 3 102 3.37 Oswalt 2 1-3 1 1 1 0 4 30 5.85 M.Lowe 1 2 0 0 0 0 14 2.13 Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Guthrie W, 4-3 7 5 2 2 2 5 102 3.70 K.Herrera 1 2 1 1 0 1 17 2.51 Holland S, 11-13 1 0 0 0 0 1 6 2.73 K.Herrera pitched to 2 batters in the 9th. T—2:32. A—12,462 (37,903).

Orioles 12, Blue Jays 0 Baltimore AB R H Markakis rf 5 2 3 1-Ford pr-rf 0 0 0 Hardy ss 5 0 2 St.Tolleson ss 0 0 0 McLouth lf-cf 4 0 1 Ad.Jones cf 5 2 2 Avery lf 0 0 0 Wieters c 4 1 1 b-Teagarden ph-c 1 0 0 C.Davis dh 4 3 3 Mar.Reynolds 1b 4 2 3 c-Betemit ph-1b 1 0 0 Machado 3b 5 2 3 Andino 2b 4 0 0 Flaherty 2b 0 0 0 Totals 42 12 18

BI 1 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 4 0 1 1 0 11

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 6

Avg. .304 .174 .232 .185 .255 .285 .233 .240 .128 .261 .232 .263 .273 .219 .211

Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg. R.Davis lf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .242 a-Gose ph-lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .181 Rasmus cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .227 Encarnacion dh 3 0 0 0 1 1 .284 Lind 1b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .232 d-Torrealba ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .243 Y.Escobar ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .251 K.Johnson 2b 3 0 0 0 1 2 .224 Sierra rf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .253 Mathis c 3 0 0 0 0 2 .203 Hechavarria 3b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .224 Totals 31 0 4 0 2 10 Baltimore 000 031 350 — 12 18 0 Toronto 000 000 000 — 0 4 1 a-popped out for R.Davis in the 8th. b-grounded out for Wieters in the 9th. c-flied out for Mar.Reynolds in the 9th. d-struck out for Lind in the 9th. 1-ran for Markakis in the 8th. E—Beck (1). LOB—Baltimore 6, Toronto 6. 2B— Markakis 2 (28), Hardy (26), Ad.Jones (31), C.Davis (16), Machado (4), Sierra (3). HR—Mar.Reynolds (17), off Villanueva. DP—Toronto 2. Baltimore Britton W, 5-1 Gregg Z.Phillips Toronto Villanueva L, 7-5 Loup

East Division Pct GB WCGB .615 — — .559 7½ — .478 18½ 7½ .471 19½ 8½ .441 23½ 12½ Central Division Pct GB WCGB .606 — — .544 8½ — .526 11 1 .489 16 6 .378 31 21 .309 40½ 30½ West Division Pct GB WCGB .570 — — .533 5 — .485 11½ 6½ .460 15 10 .418 20½ 15½

Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP Marcum 5 2-3 7 4 4 1 3 86 Loe W, 6-4 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 2 Fr.Rodriguez H, 25 1 0 0 0 0 2 13 Henderson 1 1 0 0 0 2 18 Veras 2-3 1 0 0 1 2 23 Axford S, 24-32 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 7 Miami IP H R ER BB SO NP LeBlanc 6 5 3 3 1 1 92 Webb H, 8 2-3 1 1 1 0 1 8 Dunn L, 0-2, 3-4 0 1 1 1 0 0 2 Zambrano 1-3 2 0 0 0 1 11 Gaudin 1 2 3 3 0 1 21 A.Ramos 1 0 0 0 0 3 13 M.Dunn pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. T—3:07. A—23,403 (37,442).

ERA 3.53 3.62 5.03 3.24 4.26 4.95 ERA 2.72 4.38 4.06 4.28 4.55 0.00

IP 7 1 1 IP 6 2-3 1-3

H 4 0 0 H 7 5

R 0 0 0 R 6 4

ER BB SO NP ERA 0 2 8 108 4.15 0 0 1 7 4.22 0 0 1 16 10.80 ER BB SO NP ERA 6 1 6 90 3.42 4 0 0 21 3.52

Beck 1 4 2 2 0 0 22 7.27 Lyon 1 2 0 0 0 0 16 2.08 Loup pitched to 3 batters in the 8th. T—2:48. A—13,556 (49,260).

NL Boxscores Reds 2, Phillies 1 Philadelphia Rollins ss Frandsen 3b Utley 2b Howard 1b Mayberry cf D.Brown lf c-Wigginton ph Schierholtz rf d-Polanco ph Kratz c K.Kendrick p a-L.Nix ph Lindblom p Rosenberg p Diekman p De Fratus p Totals

AB 4 4 4 3 2 2 1 3 1 3 2 1 0 0 0 0 30

R 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

H 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

BI 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

BB 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

Avg. .248 .336 .242 .239 .253 .238 .234 .241 .257 .288 .138 .250 ---------

Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA K.Kendrick L, 8-10 6 6 2 2 1 3 91 3.96 Lindblom 1 1 0 0 0 2 17 3.48 Rosenberg 2-3 0 0 0 1 1 17 12.34 Diekman 0 0 0 0 1 0 5 4.64 De Fratus 1-3 0 0 0 1 0 13 0.00 Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Latos W, 12-4 7 4 1 1 2 6 100 3.69 Broxton H, 7 1 0 0 0 0 0 12 4.09 Chapman S, 35-39 1 0 0 0 1 2 20 1.23 Diekman pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. T—3:08. A—17,806 (42,319).

Brewers 8, Marlins 4 AB 5 5 5 5 3 4 3 4 2 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 38

R 2 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 8

H 2 2 2 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 11

BI 3 0 2 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8

BB 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

BI 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

BB 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 3

SO 2 3 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 11

Avg. .308 .331 .312 .140 .252 .293 .313 .271 .283 .200 .333 .000 .000

Atlanta AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Bourn cf 3 0 1 0 1 2 .284 Re.Johnson lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .306 C.Jones 3b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .304 F.Freeman 1b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .269 Prado 2b-ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .298 Heyward rf 4 0 2 0 0 1 .273 D.Ross c 3 0 2 0 1 1 .271 Janish ss 2 0 0 0 0 0 .191 a-Constanza ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .231 b-Je.Baker ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .265 Durbin p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Batista p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 e-Overbay ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .286 Hanson p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .024 Moylan p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Avilan p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .333 c-Uggla ph-2b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .208 Totals 33 0 9 0 2 10 Colorado 000 110 220 — 6 10 0 Atlanta 000 000 000 — 0 9 3 a-was announced for Janish in the 7th. b-struck out for Constanza in the 7th. c-grounded out for Avilan in the 7th. d-lined out for C.Gonzalez in the 9th. egrounded into a double play for Batista in the 9th. E—Durbin (1), Heyward (5), F.Freeman (7). LOB—Colorado 7, Atlanta 8. 2B—Fowler (15), C.Gonzalez (28), Colvin (21), LeMahieu (9), D.Ross (7). HR—C.Gonzalez (22), off Hanson; Pacheco (4), off Hanson. DP—Colorado 2. Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP D.Pomeranz 3 5 0 0 1 2 72 C.Torres W, 4-1 3 3 0 0 0 3 46 Brothers 2 0 0 0 1 4 30 Belisle 1 1 0 0 0 1 13 Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP Hanson L, 12-8 5 2-3 5 2 2 2 8 96 Moylan 2-3 0 2 0 1 0 14 Avilan 2-3 1 0 0 0 2 18 Durbin 1 3 2 1 0 1 23 Batista 1 1 0 0 0 0 14 T—3:18. A—16,686 (49,586).

ERA 4.93 3.86 4.20 3.07 ERA 4.40 0.00 2.16 3.29 4.53

Pirates 6, Astros 2 SO 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 8

Cincinnati AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Stubbs cf 3 0 1 0 1 2 .220 W.Valdez ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .196 B.Phillips 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .296 Ludwick lf 3 1 1 0 1 0 .279 1-Phipps pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 --A.Chapman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Bruce rf 3 1 2 2 1 0 .261 Frazier 1b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .289 Rolen 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .244 Hanigan c 3 0 2 0 0 0 .286 Latos p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .218 b-Paul ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .333 Broxton p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Heisey lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .286 Totals 29 2 7 2 4 6 Philadelphia 000 100 000 — 1 4 0 Cincinnati 000 002 00x — 2 7 0 a-flied out for K.Kendrick in the 7th. b-doubled for Latos in the 7th. c-flied out for D.Brown in the 9th. d-struck out for Schierholtz in the 9th. 1-ran for Ludwick in the 8th. LOB—Philadelphia 6, Cincinnati 8. 2B—Rollins (32), Utley (11), Paul (3). HR—Bruce (31), off K.Kendrick. SB—W.Valdez (3). DP—Cincinnati 1.

Milwaukee Aoki rf R.Weeks 2b Braun lf Ar.Ramirez 3b Hart 1b Lucroy c C.Gomez cf Bianchi ss Marcum p Loe p a-Morgan ph Fr.Rodriguez p c-Ishikawa ph Henderson p Veras p Axford p Totals

Rockies 6, Braves 0 Colorado AB R H Fowler cf 5 0 2 Rutledge ss 5 0 0 C.Gonzalez lf 4 1 2 d-Blackmon ph-lf 1 0 0 W.Rosario c 5 0 1 Colvin rf 2 1 1 Pacheco 1b 4 1 2 Nelson 3b 4 1 0 LeMahieu 2b 4 1 2 D.Pomeranz p 1 0 0 C.Torres p 1 1 0 Brothers p 1 0 0 Belisle p 0 0 0 Totals 37 6 10

SO 0 1 1 3 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7

Avg. .288 .229 .312 .293 .272 .323 .255 .222 .103 --.244 --.257 ----.000

Houston Altuve 2b Greene ss Wallace 1b Maxwell cf a-F.Martinez ph b-C.Snyder ph B.Barnes cf J.Castro c M.Downs rf d-J.Schafer ph Paredes lf B.Laird 3b R.Cruz p J.Valdez p e-S.Moore ph Lyles p Fe.Rodriguez p Fick p Dominguez 3b Totals

AB 4 4 4 2 0 1 0 4 3 1 4 3 0 0 0 2 0 0 2 34

R 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2

H 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 7

BI 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

BB 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2

SO 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 8

Avg. .291 .229 .286 .228 .200 .196 .167 .261 .204 .215 .174 .333 ----.226 .156 ----.310

Pittsburgh AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Holt 2b 5 2 4 0 0 0 .462 Snider rf 1 1 0 0 0 0 .271 Tabata rf 2 1 0 0 1 1 .233 A.McCutchen cf 4 1 4 3 0 0 .347 G.Jones 1b 3 1 1 1 1 0 .292 G.Sanchez 1b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .216 P.Alvarez 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .248 McKenry c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .256 Presley lf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .234 Barmes ss 4 0 1 0 0 2 .221 W.Rodriguez p 3 0 0 0 0 2 .020 Resop p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Watson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 c-Clement ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Hanrahan p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 34 6 10 4 3 9 Houston 000 000 020 — 2 7 2 Pittsburgh 102 030 00x — 6 10 0 a-was announced for Maxwell in the 8th. b-singled for F.Martinez in the 8th. c-fouled out for Watson in the 8th. d-struck out for M.Downs in the 9th. e-walked for J.Valdez in the 9th. E—Greene (9), R.Cruz (1). LOB—Houston 7, Pittsburgh 7. 2B—Wallace (9), Holt (1), A.McCutchen (26). SB—Altuve (28). DP—Houston 2. Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP Lyles L, 3-11 4 2-3 7 5 4 1 5 92 Fe.Rodriguez 1-3 0 1 0 1 1 19 Fick 1 1 0 0 1 2 18 R.Cruz 1 1 0 0 0 1 16 J.Valdez 1 1 0 0 0 0 16 Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP Rodriguez W, 10-137 4 0 0 1 7 90 Resop 2-3 2 2 2 0 0 14 Watson 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 7 Hanrahan 1 0 0 0 1 1 19 T—3:07. A—12,785 (38,362).

ERA 5.55 5.72 4.60 6.80 0.00 ERA 3.71 3.74 3.71 2.44

Cardinals 5, Mets 1 New York Tejada ss R.Cedeno 2b D.Wright 3b Hairston rf b-Baxter ph-rf Dan.Murphy 1b Shoppach c d-F.Lewis ph Bay lf e-Duda ph An.Torres cf f-Valdespin ph Harvey p

AB 4 4 4 3 0 4 3 1 3 1 3 1 2

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H 2 0 2 2 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0

BI 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1

Hampson p R.Ramirez p a-Ju.Turner ph Familia p g-I.Davis ph Totals

0 0 1 0 1 35

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 9 1 0 5

----.284 --.224

St. Louis AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Jay cf 4 0 2 1 0 0 .315 M.Carpenter 1b 3 0 0 1 1 1 .300 Holliday lf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .305 1-Chambers pr-lf 0 1 0 0 0 0 .250 Craig rf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .310 Y.Molina c 3 1 2 0 1 0 .324 Freese 3b 4 1 2 1 0 1 .300 Schumaker 2b 4 1 1 1 0 1 .300 Descalso ss 3 1 2 1 1 0 .221 J.Garcia p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .267 Lynn p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .071 c-Berkman ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .263 Rosenthal p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 29 5 10 5 4 5 New York 000 000 010 — 1 9 0 St. Louis 030 001 10x — 5 10 2 a-singled for R.Ramirez in the 8th. b-hit a sacrifice fly for Hairston in the 8th. c-struck out for Lynn in the 8th. d-grounded out for Shoppach in the 9th. e-grounded out for Bay in the 9th. f-reached on error for An.Torres in the 9th. g-popped out for Familia in the 9th. 1-ran for Holliday in the 7th. E—Descalso (12), M.Carpenter (7). LOB—New York 8, St. Louis 9. SB—Descalso (5). DP—New York 1; St. Louis 2. New York IP H R ER BB SO NP Harvey L, 3-4 5 6 3 3 3 4 92 Hampson 1 1 1 1 0 0 13 R.Ramirez 1 2 1 1 1 0 23 Familia 1 1 0 0 0 1 10 St. Louis IP H R ER BB SO NP J.Garcia W, 4-6 7 1-3 9 1 0 0 5 94 Lynn 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 8 Rosenthal 1 0 0 0 0 0 15 T—2:51. A—34,108 (43,975).

ERA 3.04 3.86 4.39 0.00 ERA 4.16 4.07 3.38

Nationals 11, Cubs 5

National League roundup

• Rays 5, Yankees 2: ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Evan Longoria hit a go-ahead homer and Tampa Bay beat New York to drop the struggling Yankees into a tie for first place in the AL East. • Orioles 12, Blue Jays 0: TORONTO — Mark Reynolds hit a three-run homer, Zach Britton pitched seven innings to win his fourth straight start and Baltimore moved into a first-place tie in the AL East with a victory over Toronto. Baltimore’s third consecutive victory coupled with the Yankees’ loss at Tampa Bay gave the Orioles a share of first place in September for the first time since 1997. • Twins 18, White Sox 9: CHICAGO — Chris Parmelee hit a three-run homer to cap a 10-run fifth inning and Minnesota routed Chicago. The Twins also batted around in a seven-run second against rookie Jose Quintana (5-4), but first-place Chicago remained one game ahead of Detroit in the AL Central. • Indians 3, Tigers 2: DETROIT — Justin Masterson pitched six solid innings, and Cleveland beat Detroit for its second straight victory over the playoffchasing Tigers. • Royals 6, Rangers 3: KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Jeremy Guthrie pitched seven strong innings and Kansas City got home runs from Alex Gordon and Johnny Giavotella in a victory over Texas. • Angels 6, Athletics 1: OAKLAND, Calif. — Zack Greinke pitched seven sharp innings to win his third consecutive start and Los Angeles beat Oakland. • Red Sox 4, Mariners 3: SEATTLE — Cody Ross hit a tying three-run homer in the sixth inning, Ryan Lavarnway connected two batters later and Boston snapped its seven-game losing streak with a win over Seattle. The Red Sox were off to another lackluster effort on this miserable road trip before pulling even with a rally that took just six pitches. Dav.Murphy lf Soto c Moreland 1b Totals

W 83 76 65 64 60

Tuesday’s Games Washington 11, Chicago Cubs 5 Pittsburgh 6, Houston 2 Colorado 6, Atlanta 0 Milwaukee 8, Miami 4 Cincinnati 2, Philadelphia 1 St. Louis 5, N.Y. Mets 1 San Diego 6, L.A. Dodgers 3, 11 innings Arizona at San Francisco, late

American League roundup

Minnesota 070 0(10)0 100 — 18 17 1 Chicago 300 100 041 — 9 13 1 a-struck out for Youkilis in the 5th. c-grounded out for Konerko in the 5th. d-walked for Rios in the 5th. e-grounded out for Viciedo in the 5th. g-struck out for Morneau in the 7th. h-flied out for J.Carroll in the 8th. E—Butera (1), Rios (7). LOB—Minnesota 6, Chicago 7. 2B—De Aza (25), A.Dunn (17), D.Johnson (1), Viciedo 2 (15), Wise 2 (7), Al.Ramirez (21), Olmedo (1), Flowers (6). 3B—Plouffe (1). HR—Parmelee (5), off Humber; Doumit (15), off Omogrosso. DP—Chicago 1.

Washington Atlanta Philadelphia New York Miami

Miami AB R H BI BB SO Avg. G.Hernandez cf 4 1 1 2 0 2 .165 e-Kearns ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .244 D.Solano 2b 5 0 0 0 0 0 .280 Reyes ss 4 0 1 0 0 0 .281 Stanton rf 4 1 2 1 0 1 .286 Ca.Lee 1b 3 1 0 0 1 1 .275 Ruggiano lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .325 Brantly c 3 0 1 0 1 0 .268 Do.Murphy 3b 4 1 2 1 0 1 .200 LeBlanc p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .100 Webb p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 M.Dunn p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Zambrano p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .176 b-Petersen ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .200 Gaudin p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 A.Ramos p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-Dobbs ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .295 Totals 35 4 9 4 2 9 Milwaukee 120 000 230 — 8 11 0 Miami 010 120 000 — 4 9 0 a-singled for Loe in the 7th. b-struck out for Zambrano in the 7th. c-flied out for Fr.Rodriguez in the 8th. d-struck out for A.Ramos in the 9th. e-singled for G.Hernandez in the 9th. LOB—Milwaukee 5, Miami 7. 2B—Aoki (26), Braun (28). HR—Aoki (7), off LeBlanc; Bianchi (3), off Gaudin; Stanton (30), off Marcum; G.Hernandez (1), off Marcum. SB—Reyes (34).

Avg. .297 .276 .313 .272 .281 .286 .278 .000 .169 .237 .225 .241 .400

Chicago DeJesus rf Valbuena 3b-2b Rizzo 1b A.Soriano lf S.Castro ss W.Castillo c B.Jackson cf b-Mather ph-cf Barney 2b Socolovich p c-Sappelt ph Al.Cabrera p Beliveau p f-Recker ph Rusin p J.Chapman p a-Campana ph B.Parker p Dolis p Cardenas 2b d-Vitters ph-3b Totals

AB 5 3 3 4 4 4 2 2 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 33

R 0 2 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

H 0 2 2 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8

BI 0 0 0 3 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

BB 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 4

SO 1 0 1 1 1 2 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 10

Avg. .267 .231 .291 .261 .276 .272 .184 .205 .254 --.000 ----.000 .500 --.256 ----.229 .079

Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Werth cf-rf 5 2 4 1 0 1 .324 Desmond ss 5 1 2 4 0 2 .289 Zimmerman 3b 5 1 1 1 0 2 .282 Lombardozzi 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .280 Morse rf-lf 5 0 1 0 0 0 .287 LaRoche 1b 4 2 4 2 1 0 .266 Espinosa 2b 4 1 2 0 1 1 .257 T.Moore lf 4 1 1 2 0 0 .279 Gorzelanny p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .400 Mattheus p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 e-DeRosa ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .147 Mic.Gonzalez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Flores c 5 1 1 1 0 1 .223 E.Jackson p 3 1 2 0 0 0 .220 C.Garcia p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Harper cf 1 1 1 0 0 0 .256 Totals 42 11 19 11 2 8 Chicago 000 103 010 — 5 8 0 Washington 230 301 11x — 11 19 0 a-struck out for J.Chapman in the 3rd. b-flied out for B.Jackson in the 7th. c-walked for Socolovich in the 7th. d-walked for Cardenas in the 7th. e-struck out for Mattheus in the 8th. f-flied out for Beliveau in the 9th. LOB—Chicago 5, Washington 9. 2B—Werth (16), Desmond (26), Espinosa 2 (31), Harper (20). 3B—A.Soriano (2). HR—A.Soriano (26), off Mattheus; Desmond (20), off Rusin; Flores (5), off Rusin; LaRoche (26), off Dolis; T.Moore (8), off Dolis; Zimmerman (18), off Socolovich; LaRoche (27), off Beliveau. SB—Espinosa (18). DP—Washington 1. Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP Rusin L, 0-2 1 8 5 5 1 1 43 J.Chapman 1 0 0 0 1 1 15 B.Parker 1 2 0 0 0 1 17 Dolis 1 3 3 3 0 1 22 Socolovich 2 2 1 1 0 1 29 Al.Cabrera 1 2 1 1 0 2 14 Beliveau 1 2 1 1 0 1 28 Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP E.Jackson W, 9-9 5 2-3 7 4 4 1 8 93 C.Garcia 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 3 Gorzelanny 1 0 0 0 3 1 30 Mattheus 1 1 1 1 0 1 9 Mic.Gonzalez 1 0 0 0 0 0 13 Rusin pitched to 4 batters in the 2nd. T—3:30. A—17,648 (41,487).

ERA 9.00 0.00 1.59 7.12 4.50 8.44 4.05 ERA 3.63 0.00 3.19 2.62 2.54

Padres 6, Dodgers 3 (11 innings) San Diego Denorfia rf d-Venable ph-rf Forsythe 2b Headley 3b Quentin lf Gregerson p Grandal c Alonso 1b Maybin cf Ev.Cabrera ss Stults p a-Guzman ph Thayer p Thatcher p Boxberger p c-Kotsay ph Brach p Layne p f-Amarista ph-lf Totals

AB 3 1 5 6 6 0 5 4 5 4 2 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 44

R 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

H 1 0 2 2 1 0 2 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 11

BI 1 0 2 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

BB 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

SO 1 0 1 0 2 0 1 0 2 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 11

Avg. .290 .261 .280 .284 .262 .000 .276 .271 .240 .232 .350 .252 ------.262 ----.261

Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. M.Ellis 2b 5 1 3 0 0 0 .269 Victorino lf 4 0 1 1 0 0 .255 Ad.Gonzalez 1b 4 0 2 1 0 1 .239 Kemp cf 5 0 1 0 0 2 .324 H.Ramirez ss 5 0 0 0 0 2 .254 Ethier rf 5 1 1 1 0 0 .292 L.Cruz 3b 5 0 1 0 0 0 .305 A.Ellis c 3 1 1 0 2 0 .280 Kershaw p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .220 b-A.Kennedy ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .262 Guerrier p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Choate p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Belisario p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --e-B.Abreu ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .249 Ely p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --g-Punto ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .167 Totals 38 3 10 3 3 6 San Diego 100 000 020 03 — 6 11 0 Los Angeles 010 000 200 00 — 3 10 1 a-struck out for Stults in the 7th. b-sacrificed for Kershaw in the 7th. c-grounded out for Boxberger in the 8th. d-grounded out for Denorfia in the 9th. e-walked for Belisario in the 9th. f-grounded out for Layne in the 11th. g-grounded out for Ely in the 11th. E—L.Cruz (3). LOB—San Diego 11, Los Angeles 9. 2B—Quentin (20), Alonso (33), M.Ellis 2 (17), Ad.Gonzalez (3). HR—Denorfia (6), off Kershaw; Grandal (7), off Guerrier; Ethier (17), off Stults. SB—H.Ramirez (17).San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Stults 6 7 1 1 1 1 90 2.35 Thayer 1-3 3 2 2 0 0 16 3.99 Thatcher 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 7 3.29 Boxberger 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 6 3.45 Brach 2 0 0 0 1 1 26 4.18 Layne W, 1-0 1 0 0 0 0 3 13 1.80 Gregerson S, 4-8 1 0 0 0 1 0 21 2.44 Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Kershaw 7 5 1 1 3 9 116 2.79 Guerrier BS, 1-1 2-3 2 2 2 1 0 16 4.82 Choate 1-3 0 0 0 1 0 11 2.70 Belisario 1 0 0 0 0 0 12 2.54 Ely L, 0-1 2 4 3 3 1 2 42 13.50 T—4:06. A—40,619 (56,000).


D4

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2012

Late matches suspended by rain TENNIS: U.S. OPEN

By Howard Fendrich The Associated Press

Mike Groll / The Associated Press

Victoria Azarenka reacts after winning her match against Samantha Stosur in the quarterfinals of the U.S. Open Tuesday in New York. Azarenka won 6-1, 4-6, 7-6 (5).

PREP SPORTS ROUNDUP

Sisters boys soccer scores big victory over Crook County Bulletin staff report PRINEVILLE — In its boys soccer season opener, Sisters made a statement: Good teams win by big margins. With nine players tallying goals, including a hat trick by reigning Sky-Em League player of the year Jake McAllister, the Outlaws cruised by Crook County 13-0 in nonleague action. “They did everything we wanted them to do,” Sisters coach Rob Jensen said. “That’s exactly the outcome we were looking for, and our players were working really hard to get there.” Gabe Rietmann and Colton Manhalter racked up two goals apiece, while Evan Rickards contributed with a score and two assists. Sisters (1-0) will host Class 4A defending state champion Molalla on Thursday. Crook County (0-2) entertains La Pine at home on Sept. 18. In other prep action Tuesday: BOYS SOCCER Summit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Sherwood . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 SHERWOOD — A late goal by senior Glenn Sherman broke a 2-2 tie and earned the Storm a season-opening win. Sherman finished with two goals as well as an assist on senior Dan Maunder’s score in the first half. Summit (1-0) will pick things up again on Saturday, when it travels to Madras to face the White Buffaloes. Ridgeview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Culver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 REDMOND — The Ravens jumped out to a 6-0 lead within the first 20 minutes of their program debut en route to the win, as freshmen Nakoda Sanders and Malachi Stalberg punched in three and two goals, respectively. Ridgeview (1-0) welcomes Mazama on Thursday, while Culver (0-1) will host East Linn Christian Academy the same day. VOLLEYBALL Ridgeview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25—25—25 La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6—21—7 LA PINE — The Ravens won their first match in program history, sweeping the Hawks in nonleague play. Ridgeview received strong serving from Katie Nurge, who ended the night 21 of 22 from the back line with four aces, and Delaney Hampton, who was 10 for 11 with six aces. Katrina Johnson led the Ravens with 10 kills and Rhian Sage contributed 16 assists. Cassandra Roes paced the Hawks with 15 digs and two aces, while Holly Jackson added four kills and four blocks. Ridgeview celebrates its home opener on Thursday with an Intermountain Hybrid match against crosstown rival Redmond High. La Pine is off until Tuesday when the Hawks play at Ridgeview. Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25-25-25 Burns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-14-13 The Lava Bears set a goal to come out strong, and they did just that and more in their sweep of Burns, the Class 3A defending state champion. Senior Molly Maloney led Bend with 12 kills, sophomore Cassidy Wheeler added six, and senior Ellis Clair delivered 18 assists in the win. Bend (1-0) returns to action on Saturday in the Mountain View tournament.

Storm Continued from D1 Summit scored first in the 16th minute when Plummer collected a rebound off the post from Megan Buzzas, calmly set up the ball, and drilled her shot past Sherwood keeper Kyeli Hendryx to give the Storm a 1-0 advantage. Emily Harris and Megan Schoen responded with goals in the 19th and 32nd minutes for the Bowmen and Sherwood rolled into the break with a 2-1 lead. Plummer tied the game 22 on Summit’s first shot on goal of the second half at the 43-minute mark and nearly recorded the goahead score in the 63rd minute, bouncing the ball off the far post. “She’s kind of been in Kristen Parr’s shadow the last couple of years, but her time is right now,” Brock said, referring to the Storm’s former all-state forward who is now starting at the University of Oregon as a freshman. “Hadlie’s the same type of player.” Summit, which blew out Sandy 9-0 in its season opener on Saturday, returns to the field Friday with a home match against Willamette of Eugene. “We’ve got the talent,” Brock said about her squad. “It’s all about putting it all together on the right day.” — Reporter: 541-383-0305, beastes@bendbulletin.com.

NEW YORK — His match, and his retirement, put off for at least another day, Andy Roddick stepped out of Arthur Ashe Stadium and into the drizzly night, a black jacket’s hood pulled overhead, a bag of ice soothing his right shoulder. He’ll try to prolong his U.S. Open — and his professional tennis career — today. Roddick’s fourth-round showdown against another past champion at Flushing Meadows, Juan Martin del Potro of Argentina, was suspended because of rain Tuesday night, with the American leading 1-0 in a first-set tiebreaker. A little more than a half-hour later, the players were told they could head to their hotels. They were scheduled to resume today as the second match in Ashe, after four-time major champion Maria Sharapova’s quarterfinal against 2007 Wimbledon runnerup Marion Bartoli. That was halted Tuesday with Bartoli ahead 4-0. Other matches stopped in progress, also in the first set, included defending champion Novak Djokovic against No. 18 Stanislas Wawrinka, and No. 8 Janko Tipsarevic against No. 19 Philipp Kohlschreiber.

Water polo Continued from D1 The new format includes 15 teams and two leagues — Northern Oregon and Southern Oregon — and the top four teams from each will play in state qualifying tournaments. From the qualifying tourneys, the top four teams will advance to the state championships. The Northern Oregon League, which includes all of the Central Oregon teams, will hold a league championship tournament the weekend before the state qualifier to determine the four teams that will move on. Water polo is a growing sport in Central Oregon. Redmond High first competed in water polo 13 years ago, according to Redmond coach Tom Nichols, and gradually other area high schools followed suit. In 2005, Bend High, Mountain View and Summit all sponsored boys teams, but female interest in the sport at those schools was slow to develop. For a time, girls from the three Bend high schools combined to form a single team, as OHSWPC rules permit. As water polo caught on among girls in the area, the turnout climbed. And after two years playing as a combined team, the squad split to form teams at each of the Bend schools. Madras and Culver formed a combined water polo club in 2008, starting with only a boys team. But by 2010, Madras/ Culver also sponsored a girls squad. The Madras/Culver girls have been quick to excel. Last year, they were undefeated in league play and went on to finish fourth at state. According to DeRoest, the girls team this season will be headed by returning players Brianna Hunt, who was all-state second team in the 2011 state championship tournament, and Sophie Gemelas and Elizabeth Armitage, both all-state honorable mention recipients from the championship tournament last year. The Madras/Culver boys were fourth in their league last season, behind Summit, Redmond and Bend. “Most of our kids are in the water year-round with the swim team,” DeRoest says, explaining the Madras/Culver team’s success, “and they play a little in the spring league we run every year.” Once the three Bend schools had water polo programs of

On a day of off-and-on action because of intermittent showers, only two singles matches were completed: Top-seeded Victoria Azarenka reached her first U.S. Open semifinal by cobbling together a 6-1, 4-6, 76 (5) victory over defending champion Sam Stosur, and No. 4 David Ferrer reached the quarterfinals by beating No. 13 Richard Gasquet 7-5, 7-6 (2), 6-4. So, Victoria, what went through your mind as your high-tension, high-quality match stretched into that third-set tiebreaker? “You don’t want to know what I kept telling myself,” Azarenka deadpanned. “I would have to bleep that, I think.” She went on to offer a cleaned-up version of what her thoughts had been — “Don’t be a chicken” — while assuring herself of retaining the No. 1 ranking no matter what happens the rest of this week. “Definitely I don’t want to stop. I really want it bad,” Azarenka said about the prospect of adding a second Grand Slam trophy to the one she earned in January at the Australian Open. “I’m going to do absolutely everything I have, you know, to give

it all here.” Her match, like most at Flushing Meadows so far, took second billing to one involving the 20th-seeded Roddick, who surprisingly announced last week that this tournament would be the last of his career. Since then, he picked up victories over players ranked 43rd and 59th, but the No. 7-seeded del Potro figured to provide more of a challenge. Del Potro is the only man other than Roger Federer, Rafael Nadal or Djokovic to win any of the past 30 Grand Slam titles. There were thousands of empty blue seats when Roddick and del Potro took to the court, probably owing to the showers that led to about an hour’s delay at the start of the marquee match. It was hardly the full house of rowdy, partisan fans that Roddick might have hoped for. More spectators filed in as things progressed, and those who were there certainly grabbed each and every opportunity to cheer for their man. They even gave del Potro a bit of a hard time when he had a couple of ball boys go wipe a wet spot near the baseline with white towels. It was misty at the outset, and the humidity topped 80 percent, leaving both men’s shirts sopped with sweat.

Water polo at a glance A look at the area high school water polo teams for 2012:

BOYS

GIRLS

BEND Coach: Alex Bick (first season) Key players: Michael Bird, sr.; Gage Kaufman, jr. MADRAS/CULVER Coach: Bobby DeRoest (fifth season) Key players: Dustin Henderson, sr.; Ian Goodwin, jr.; Brady Tucker, soph. MOUNTAIN VIEW Coach: Ryan Duffy (fourth season) Key players: John Murphy, sr.; Noah Cox, jr.; Nate Cox, jr. REDMOND/RIDGEVIEW Coach: Tom Nichols (13th season) Key players: Matt Gibbons, sr.; Mitch Naze, sr.; Teddy Tsai, jr. SUMMIT Coach: Jay Soles (eighth season) Key players: Conner Brenda, sr.; Michael Hartmeier, sr.; Aidan Soles, sr.; Brent Soles, sr.; Christopher Spreadborough, sr.; Stuart Wettstein, sr.

BEND Coach: Ryan Dixon (second season) Key players: Maddie Torres, sr.; Kameran Joel, sr. MADRAS/CULVER Coach: Bobby DeRoest (fifth season) Key players: Brianna Hunt, sr.; Elizabeth Armitage, sr.; Sophie Gemelas, soph. REDMOND/RIDGEVIEW Coach: Tom Nichols (13th season) Key players: Jenny White, sr.; Teagan Perkins, sr.; Rachael Heney, jr. SUMMIT Coach: Heather Brenda (second season) Key players: Josie Alberts, sr.; Ky Heffner, jr.; Annie Jarvis, jr.

STATE PLAYOFFS

STATE CHAMPIONSHIPS

Class 5A/4A Boys and Girls Nov. 3 Juniper Swim & Fitness Center, Bend

All Classifications, Boys and Girls Nov. 9-10 Tualatin Hills Aquatic Center, Beaverton

their own, Mountain View developed one of the larger girls teams in the region, according to Cougars coach Ryan Duffy. But then Mountain View faced a shortage of boys and could not form a boys team. The numbers have flip-flopped in the past couple of years, and currently the lone female in the program is sophomore Abbe Andreson, who by OHSWPC rule can play on the boys team and will this season, as she did last fall. Last year the Mountain View boys finished fourth in the Central Oregon League, one game behind Madras. According to Duffy, the Cougar boys will have a good shot at making it to the state tournament this season. “We will be improved from last year,” says Duffy, “and we plan to beat Summit this season.” The OHSWPC permits high

schools with insufficient turnout to merge with another area school to form a team for up to two consecutive years. With Ridgeview High opening this year in Redmond, its water polo players will join ranks with Redmond High to form a single program, with Nichols, the coach from Redmond High, heading the combined-schools squad. “This year we will be combined with the new high school,” Nichols says. “We wouldn’t be able to form a team if we didn’t.” Last year as a 6A program, Redmond enjoyed a successful season: the boys placed third in the Southern Valley League. The Panther girls finished second in the league and went on to the state qualifying tournament, where they placed 12th, according to Nichols. Forming a girls team at Redmond

has always been a struggle, Nichols notes, but for now the roster remains steady at 10 to 12 players. The Redmond boys teams, Nichols observes, have consistently included about 15 players. The Bend High boys had a solid season last year, placing second in the Central Oregon League behind Summit. This year the Lava Bears have a number of new players but will be headed by a senior, Michael Bird, who is one of the returning veterans and a key player, according to head boys coach Alex Bick. “We’re looking to the different sports to try and get different kids, who haven’t done it (played water polo) before, to get experience,” Bick says. The Lava Bear girls are coming off a winless season, but their coach, Ryan Dixon, has stepped up the training for the team both in and out of the pool. Dixon is confident entering the new season. “I have a lot of kids that are coming back who know the game, and some newcomers,” he says, “so if we put it all together we can definitely make a splash and maybe make it to state this year.” Both Summit High teams qualified for state last season. The boys placed first in the Central Valley League and fourth at state. Returning to the team as seniors are twins Aidan and Brent Soles, who were second-team all-state selections in the 2011 tournament. The Storm girls were second in their league behind undefeated Madras, but they lost to league-rival Sandy in their first game at the state qualifying tournament. Water polo is gaining momentum at high schools around Central Oregon, as evidenced by the growing number of players and by the development of several club programs, which allow players to play in the prep offseason. “It’s not like we have a lot of teams in Central Oregon, but there are a lot of individuals playing so the teams have really improved,” says DeRoest, the Madras coach. “There’s programs in the state that have been around for 20 or 30 years and they don’t have nearly as many individuals as the Bend schools, which has made us really competitive.” —Reporter: eoller@bendbulletin.com.

Summit player Presley Quon, right, connects on a kick to another Summit player while a Sherwood defender gives chase during a nonconference game at Summit High School in Bend Wednesday afternoon. The two teams played to a 2-2 tie. Andy Tullis / The Bulletin


WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

D5

PROFESSIONAL GOLF

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

Captain’s pick shows strength of American Ryder Cup team By Doug Ferguson The Associated Press

Morry Gash / The Associated Press

Wisconsin’s Montee Ball (28) breaks away from Northern Iowa’s Wilmot Wellington (20) for a 16-yard pass reception during the second half last Saturday, in Madison, Wis. Bell and the No. 13 Badgers take on Oregon State Saturday in Corvallis.

Pac-12 teams face tough opponents this week By John Marshall The Associated Press

PHOENIX — The Pac-12 had a long opening week, stretching from four games Thursday night to Arizona’s frenetic game with Toledo that went into the wee hours of Sunday morning. There were a couple of surprising losses, some tougher-than-expected wins, but mostly the week was filled with lopsided victories against overmatched opponents. This week figures to get a lot tougher for the conference with ranked teams like Wisconsin, Nebraska and Oklahoma State on the schedule. The most daunting game would go to Washington. Coming off a win against San Diego State, the Huskies get a huge test in the bayou when they face No. 3 LSU on Saturday. “They are a very good football team,” Washington coach Steve Sarkisian said. Oregon State is facing a pretty good one, too. The Beavers had their game against Nicholls State postponed due to Hurricane Isaac, giving them extra time to prepare for No. 13 Wisconsin. They may need it. Oregon State was overrun 35-0 in Madison last year and this season the Badgers are the favorites to win a third straight Big Ten title behind Heisman hopeful Montee Ball and quarterback Danny O’Brien, a transfer from Maryland. The Beavers do get to face Wisconsin at home this time and are hoping the fans in Corvallis will give them a boost. “It’s as big a nonconference game as Oregon State has hosted,” Oregon State coach Mike Riley said. “I think it’s awesome. It’s going to be a

great atmosphere here.” UCLA faces a big jump in competition from one week to the next. The Bruins started their inaugural season under coach Jim Mora impressively, rolling over Rice 49-24 after Johnathan Franklin ran for 214 yards and three touchdowns. Week 2 gets a whole lot tougher for UCLA: No. 16 Nebraska. The Cornhuskers appear to be back among the nation’s elite and are coming off a 4920 rout over Southern Mississippi. Nebraska had 632 yards of total offense, most since coach Bo Pelini took over in 2008, and Taylor Martinez threw for a 354 yards with five touchdowns against the Golden Eagles, giving UCLA plenty to think about before its second game. “They’re a nationally ranked team that comes off an impressive win, they’ve got a lot of depth, they’re very talented and very wellcoached,” Mora said. “We’re going to have to play our best to beat them.” Arizona also is facing a big step up in competition after barely getting past a smallerconference program in coach Rich Rodriguez’s debut. In a game that appeared to be stuck on fast-forward, the Wildcats and Rockets combined for an astounding 182 plays while playing well into Sunday morning. Arizona won it 24-17 in overtime when quarterback Matt Scott threw a 10-yard touchdown pass to Terrence Miller and its defense held. The Wildcats had plenty of mistakes and breakdowns in that game and will need to get better quick; up next is No. 18 Oklahoma State. The Cowboys have beaten Arizona each of the past two

seasons and didn’t give the Wildcats much game film to look at from their opener, pulling most of their starters after the first period of an 84-0 win over Savannah State. Oklahoma State showed some mercy with the overmatched Tigers and still had their most lopsided victory since 1916. Yeah, that will get your attention. “Their last game, they could have scored 184 by halftime if they had left their starters in, and their backups are pretty good, too,” Rodriguez said. “It’s a big challenge and we’re going to have to play well to have a chance in this game, but it’s also an opportunity to see where we’re at.” Washington was already going to have a tough time playing the Tigers on the road. It will be even more difficult after running back Jesse Callier tore the ACL in his right knee against San Diego State and right tackle Ben Riva broke his forearm. The good news for the Huskies is that they’ve played LSU close before. In 2009, Sarkisian took over a team that had lost its previous 14 games and was facing the nation’s 11th-ranked team. Despite some pre-game jitters, the Huskies held their ground at home against the Tigers and came away with a respectable 31-23 loss. “Hopefully, we look a little better in pregame warm-ups,” Sarkisian said. “I was a little kind of looking at their side and looking at our side and it didn’t feel like this was a great matchup in pregame warmups. I thought our kids played hard that first time around.” They’ll need to do it again to have a chance this time — just like many of the other Pac-12 teams.

Kenseth’s move to JGR official By Jenna Fryer

MOTOR SPORTS

The Associated Press

HUNTERSVILLE, N.C. — Matt Kenseth opened this season with a second victory in the Daytona 500, and it didn’t take him long to establish himself as a legitimate championship contender. But before the midpoint of the season, Kenseth had decided he no longer wanted to drive for Roush Fenway Racing. On Tuesday, nearly two months after RFR said Kenseth was leaving, the driver finally confirmed he’s moving to Joe Gibbs Racing at the end of the season. “Surprise,” he said as he entered a JGR news conference, a dry quip at one of the worst kept secrets in NASCAR. Kenseth was deliberately vague, though, as to why he’s leaving RFR after 13 full Cup seasons. He’s never driven for anyone else at NASCAR’s highest level, and paired with Jack Roush won 22 races, a

pair of Daytona 500s and the 2003 championship. “I knew it would not only be a good fit, but it’s about winning races and winning championships and you want to put yourself in a position to be competitive going forward,” Kenseth said. “I felt like this was it.” But he was winning races and he was competitive at Roush, where the 40-yearold Kenseth is considered one of NASCAR’s elite drivers. Pressed as to what JGR offered, Kenseth knew he wasn’t going to give a clear answer. “There’s just a lot of different things that go into that. It’s about 2013 and beyond,” Kenseth said. “I felt like and I feel like (Gibbs) was the right place for me. I know without a doubt at all it’s the right place for me to be.” Kenseth was in the final year of his contract with

RFR, and every one of his previous deals with Roush had been extended before he’d gotten to the final season. But he indicated Tuesday things “got cloudy” after his Daytona 500 victory. Enter JGR, who has room for a fourth car but was also eager to add an upgrade to its lineup. Kenseth said it was RFR’s decision to announce in June that Kenseth was leaving at the end of the year and would be replaced in the Sprint Cup Series by defending Nationwide champion Ricky Stenhouse Jr. Then it was Joe Gibbs Racing’s decision on when it was ready to announce Kenseth had signed to drive the No. 20 Toyota next year. Behind the scenes, Gibbs officials were trying to figure out how to also keep Joey Logano but Penske Racing made it formal Tuesday and hired him to drive the No. 22 Ford in the Sprint Cup Series.

NEW YORK — Davis Love III faced a tough decision when he filled out his Ryder Cup team with four picks, no different from the previous 11 U.S. captains. What helped is that he couldn’t go wrong. Steve Stricker and Jim Furyk were locks all along, and Dustin Johnson became impossible to ignore when his game rounded into shape over the past two weeks. Brandt Snedeker was the final choice over Hunter Mahan, but really, it could have gone much deeper. “He was in a no-lose situation,” said Paul Azinger, the 2008 captain who was behind the changes of picking four players instead of two. “He could have picked Hunter, Bo Van Pelt or Nick Watney and not gotten slaughtered. He maybe could have picked Rickie Fowler and not gotten slaughtered. Really, has it ever been the case when you could look at 18 names and all 18 names would have been OK?” The focus Tuesday from Times Square was on the four guys added to the American team. Not to be forgotten are the eight guys who previously earned a spot on the team. This might be the most talented U.S. team since 1999 at Brookline, where the Americans staged the greatest comeback in Ryder Cup history. “I think we are extremely deep this time, I think deeper than we have ever been,” Love said. The eight players who qualified have combined for 12 wins on the PGA Tour, including two majors (Bubba Watson and Webb Simpson), a World Golf Championship (Keegan Bradley) and The Players Championship (Matt Kuchar). Even so, the strength is best measured by who won’t be at Medinah. The Americans are finally starting to look like the European team, which has won six of the past eight times in the Ryder Cup. What made the Europeans look so strong in Wales two years ago was not so much the guys who made the team, but those who got left out — Sergio Garcia, Paul Casey, Justin Rose. Check out that U.S. team from 2010. It had four players who hadn’t won a tournament all year, and three of them were captain’s picks because Corey Pavin didn’t have many options from which to choose (except for Tiger Woods because, well, he’s Tiger Woods). Now consider the players Love left behind. Mahan has won twice this year, including the Match Play

Ryder Cup Rosters At Medinah Country Club Medinah, Ill. Sept. 28-30, 2012

UNITED STATES Captain: Davis Love III Keegan Bradley Jason Dufner c-Jim Furyk c-Dustin Johnson Zach Johnson Matt Kuchar Phil Mickelson Webb Simpson c-Brandt Snedeker c-Steve Stricker Bubba Watson Tiger Woods

EUROPE Captain: Jose Maria Olazabal c-Nicolas Colsaerts, Belgium Luke Donald, England Sergio Garcia, Spain Peter Hanson, Sweden Martin Kaymer, Germany Paul Lawrie, Scotland Graeme McDowell, Northern Ireland Rory McIlroy, Northern Ireland Francesco Molinari, Italy c-Ian Poulter, England Justin Rose, England Lee Westwood, England ——— c-captain’s pick

Championship when he built a 4-up lead through 10 holes and beat Rory McIlroy, Europe’s best player. Mahan was leading the Ryder Cup standings after the Masters and still couldn’t make the team. Part of that speaks to Mahan’s form, another part to the quality of the U.S. team. Fowler finally got his first PGA Tour win — in a playoff over McIlroy (and D.A. Points) at Quail Hollow — and didn’t come close to making the team. Nick Watney won The Barclays, one of the strongest fields of the year. “Davis had an enviable and difficult time,” said Curtis Strange, another former captain. “He had a lot of good players. Can’t go wrong there.” Then again, Love’s picks were never going to determine the outcome in the Sept. 28-30 matches. That’s never the case. Strange gets maligned for going 0-3 at Oak Hill in 1995, losing the last three holes against Nick Faldo in a 14½13½ win for Europe. Then again, Peter Jacobsen, Jay Haas and Brad Faxon all came to the 18th with a chance to

earn points and missed crucial putts. There have been rumblings that Snedeker was helped by having a winter home at Sea Island, the longtime home base of Love, along with being in the same management group as Love and having the same equipment sponsor. “That’s probably made it harder on me,” Snedeker said over the weekend. Strange has lived through that kind of gossip. He had won the U.S. Open at Oak Hill and was playing well when Lanny Wadkins picked him in 1995, even though he was down the list. “There was this argument about a good ol’ boy network, a couple of guys from Virginia,” Strange said. “The truth is, I never had dinner with Lanny once in my life except at the Ryder Cup, and even then I didn’t want to have dinner with him.” Even so, Strange said he felt more pressure than usual on the final day because he knew people questioned the pick, and because he had lost both his foursomes matches. What intrigued Strange about the picks Tuesday was how Love said he was looking for good putters and to “plug holes.” Strange made what some considered a curious selection in 2001 when he took Scott Verplank, the first captain’s pick to have never played in the Ryder Cup. Strange wanted someone for foursomes, and few players combined accuracy off the tee and great putting better than Verplank. He went 2-1. His only loss was when he and Scott Hoch lost on the 18th hole to Colin Montgomerie and Bernhard Langer, one of Europe’s strongest teams which lost only one out of the seven matches they played. Azinger was No. 22 in the standings when he was picked in 2001, and it didn’t help that the matches were postponed one year by the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. By the time the Ryder Cup rolled around one year later, he was out of form. He and Woods lost the opening match, and Azinger didn’t play again until singles. He was in the eighth spot, where the Ryder Cup is often decided, and dreading it. Azinger managed — barely — by holing a bunker shot on the 18th to earn a halve against Niclas Fasth and at least delay Europe’s celebration. “I made a 10-footer on the 17th with Europe around the green ready to pop the cork,” he said. “I miss it and they win. I still think it’s the greatest putt I ever made.” Where Buyers And Sellers Meet

G  B Local • Bend golfer shines in Southern Oregon: Bend’s Tiffany Schoning came from behind in the 36-hole championship match Monday to win the women’s division of the Southern Oregon Championship at Rogue Valley Country Club in Medford. Schoning came back from five holes down with 18 to play and two holes down with five holes left to beat two-time tournament champion Amanda Nealy, who is from Grants Pass but now lives in Baton Rouge, La. Schoning — who beat Bend’s Amy Anderson in her semifinal match on Sunday — birdied the 15th hole and eagled the par-5 16th to square the match, and won when Nealy narrowly missed a halving putt on the 36th hole. Earlier in the week, Schoning earned medalist honors and the top seed in match play after 36 holes of stroke play. With 400 golfers playing in 33 flights, the 83-year-old Southern Oregon Championship is the largest amateur match-play tournament held on a single course in the U.S., according to tournament organizers. • Tetherow hosting free links golf clinic: Tetherow Golf Club in Bend is hosting a clinic on how to play better links-style golf. Chris van der Velde, Tetherow’s managing partner and a former European Tour player, will instruct

golfers on strategy and the rewards and challenges of playing links golf. Clinic participants will play Tetherow’s first and ninth holes with van der Velde. The clinic is scheduled to begin at 4 p.m. on Wednesday, Sept. 12. Links golf, the traditional style of golf found in Scotland and duplicated at Tetherow and Bandon Dunes Golf Resort on the southern Oregon Coast, is characterized by massive greens, ragged bunkers and tight lies created by hard-andfast fescue grasses. For more information or to register, call Tetherow’s golf shop at 541-388-2582. — Bulletin staff reports

G OLF C OURSE LATE SUMMER SPECIAL: $25 for 18 Holes Monday though Friday ALL SEPTEMBER

LATE DAY RATE: $25 for 18 Holes with cart after 3:00 pm

541-447-7113


D6

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2012

G W PGA Tour BMW CHAMPIONSHIP Site: Indianapolis. Schedule: Thursday-Sunday. Course: Crooked Stick Golf Club (7,497 yards, par 72). Purse: $8 million. Winner’s share: $1.44 million. Television: Golf Channel (Thursday, noon-3 p.m.; Friday, noon-3 p.m.; Saturday, 12:30-3 p.m.; Sunday, 9 a.m.-11 a.m.) and NBC (Saturday, 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Sunday, 11 a.m.-3 p.m.). Last year: Justin Rose won at Cog Hill in Lemont, Ill., chipping in for birdie on No. 17 en route to a twoshot victory over John Senden. Last week: Rory McIlroy won the Deutsche Bank Championship on Monday in Norton, Mass., for his third PGA Tour victory of the year. The PGA Championship winner rallied to beat Louis Oosthuizen by a stroke. Notes: The top 70 in the FedEx Cup standings qualified for the third of the four playoff events. The field will be cut to 30 for the Tour Championship on Sept. 20-23 at East Lake in Atlanta. ... McIlroy leads the points race for the $10 million prize with 4,799, followed by Barclays winner Nick Watney (3,468) and regular-season leader Tiger Woods (3,417). ... Davis Love III completed the U.S. Ryder Cup team Monday, selecting Jim Furyk, Steve Stricker, Dustin Johnson and Brandt Snedeker as captain’s picks. ... The 2013 tournament will be played at Conway Farms in Lake Forest, Ill., and the 2014 event is set for Cherry Hills in Colorado.

LPGA Tour KINGSMILL CHAMPIONSHIP Site: Williamsburg, Va. Schedule: Thursday-Sunday. Course: Kingsmill Resort, River Course (6,315 yards, par 71). Purse: $1.3 million. Winner’s share: $195,000. Television: Golf Channel (Thursday-Friday, 9:30-11:30 a.m.; Saturday, 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Sunday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m.). Last year: Inaugural event. Last event: Lydia Ko won the Canadian Women’s Open on Aug. 26 in British Columbia to become the LPGA Tour’s youngest winner and fifth amateur champion. The 15-year-old South Korean-born New Zealander broke the age record of 16 set by Lexi Thompson last year in the Navistar LPGA Classic. Notes: The Michelob Ultra Championship was played at Kingsmill from 2003-09. Cristie Kerr won the event in 2005 and 2009. ... Top-ranked Yani Tseng is skipping the tournament to prepare for her title defense next week in the Women’s British Open. ... Second-ranked Stacy Lewis, No. 5 Ai Miyazato and No. 10 Kerr are the only players in the top 10 in the field. Michelle Wie also is playing. She missed the cut in the Canadian Open and has only one top-10 finish this season.

European Tour KLM OPEN Site: Hilversum, Netherlands. Schedule: Thursday-Sunday. Course: Hilversumsche Golf Club (6,906 yards, par 70). Purse: $2.27 million. Winner’s share: $378,390. Television: Golf Channel (Thursday-Friday, 5:30 a.m.-9:30 a.m.; Saturday, 4-8 a.m., Sunday, 3:30-7:45 a.m.). Last year: Simon Dyson won the tournament for the third time in six years, beating English countryman David Lynn by a stroke. Dyson won in 2006 and 2009 at Kennemer. Last week: Scotland’s Richie Ramsay won the European Masters in Switzerland for his second tour title, closing with a 5under 66 for a four-stroke victory. Notes: Germany’s Martin Kaymer, the 2010 winner, is in the field along with Dyson, Ramsay, Darren Clarke, Paul Casey, Miguel Angel Jimenez and Dutch stars RobertJan Derksen, Maarten Lafeber and Joost Luiten. ... The Italian Open is next week. ——— All Times PDT

T EE T O GR EEN

Fall Continued from D1 “The only issue there is that mornings are a little colder (which can create frost delays) and we lose daylight on the other end,” Wattenburger says. “So the play window moves to like 9 (a.m.) to 1 (p.m.).” To make the most of it: • Know that a golf course’s fall rates often include unlimited golf. Check in with the pro shop to find out if the green fee includes all the holes a golfer can play, Eckberg says. “Maximize the time and warmth and get a better value that way,” Eckberg says. Ostrin adds that for golfers who don’t mind paying more, the most golf can be had just before the afternoon rates kick in. “If you are looking to play quick, it is sometimes worth kicking in that extra 10 or 12 dollars,” says Ostrin, adding that players who want the earliest times at the afternoon rate should call a few days in advance. • Seek out days when the course is less busy — and not just Mondays through Thursdays. Bruce Wattenburger, head pro at Juniper, says that Sundays can also allow ample room for a golfer to work. “Sunday afternoons are getting

softer,” Wattenburger says. • Ask the course about their fall aeration schedule before making a tee time. “Most of us in Central Oregon are going to be aerating probably sometime right after Labor Day,” says Wattenburger, adding that Juniper is planning to aerate Sept. 10-11. Some golfers may prefer to avoid those days immediately after aeration, when punched greens are bumpier and less predictable. But some courses, including Juniper, offer an additional discount for the inconvenience during post-aeration days that might appeal to bargain hunters, Wattenburger adds. The face of golfers also changes after Labor Day. At River’s Edge, school-aged golfers become a rarer sight, and locals begin to dominate the golf course as September rolls forward, says Eckberg. As long as cold weather holds off, the fall can be a boon for Central Oregon’s facilities. And that has the local golf industry hoping for two more months of dry, warm weather. “Hopefully it’s going to be a nice, long Indian summer,” says Eckberg. “That would be wonderful.” — Reporter: 541-617-7868, zhall@ bendbulletin.com.

Fall rates Central Oregon courses offering fall rates: (Fall rate start dates and summer peak rates in parentheses) Aspen Lakes Golf Course (Oct. 8): $45, $35 before 7:30 a.m. ($75); $17 per-person cart fee. Black Butte Ranch Big Meadow and Glaze Meadow (Oct. 1): $55, $50 after 1 p.m., $30 after 2 p.m. ($75); $32 cart fee, which can be shared by two golfers. Crooked River Ranch (Oct. 1): $36 weekdays, $40 weekends ($48); $15 per-person cart fee. Eagle Crest Resort (Oct. 15): Challenge Course, $35 ($44); Ridge Course, $50 ($74); Resort Course, $50 ($74); $16 per-person cart fee. The Greens at Redmond (TBD): $24, $20 after 2 p.m. ($32); $20 cart fee, which can be shared by two golfers. Juniper Golf Course (Sept. 10): $49, $39 after noon ($65); $15 per-person cart fee. Kah-Nee-Ta Resort (Oct. 15): $25 ($40) and includes cart. Lost Tracks Golf Club (Oct. 1): $40 weekdays, $35 after 3 p.m; $50 weekends, $40 after 3 p.m. ($72); $13 per-person cart fee. Meadow Lakes Golf Course (Oct. 1): $25 weekdays, $30 weekends, $25 after 3 p.m. ($38); $14 per-person cart fee. Missing Link (Oct. 15): $10 ($15). Pronghorn Club’s Jack Nicklaus Course (Oct. 1): $144 ($199), including cart and forecaddie fee. Quail Run Golf Course (Oct. 5): $42, $25 after 1 p.m. ($55); $13 per-person cart fee. River’s Edge Golf Course (Sept. 10): $47, $30 after 3 p.m. ($59); $16 per-person cart fee. Sunriver Resort Woodlands and Meadows courses (Oct. 1): $49 for Deschutes County residents, $55 for others ($79); includes cart and range balls. Tetherow Golf Club (Oct. 1 for Central Oregon residents): $80 for Central Oregon residents, $99 for others ($175), includes cart and forecaddie. Widgi Creek Golf Club (Sept. 10): $59 before noon, $45 after noon, $25 after 4 p.m.; $45 after Oct. 1 ($75); $16 per-person cart fee.

GOLF SCOREBOARD The Bulletin welcomes contributions to its weekly local golf results listings and events calendar. Clearly legible items should be faxed to the sports department, 541-3850831, emailed to sports@bendbulletin. com, or mailed to P.O. Box 6020; Bend, OR 97708.

Club Results AWBREY GLEN Saturday Men’s Game, Sept. 1 Partner’s Net Best Ball 1, David Morton/Larry Hinkle, 62. 2, Bob Johanson/Michael Mount, 67. Skins — John Maniscalco, 4. David Morton, 4. David Morton, 4. David Morton, 3. David Morton, 3. Bob Browning, 3. Labor Day Couples, Sept. 3 Jack and Jill First Flight — 1, Robert Browning/Diane Browning/Dennis Magill/Maryanne Freeman, 127. 2, Brian Fleck/Cathy Fleck/Todd Smith/Julie Smith, 127. 3, Michael Mount/Molly Mount/Larry Hinkle/Cay Williams, 129. Second Flight — 1, Bill Long/Rosie Long/Ken Waskom/Donna Waskom, 118. 2, Chuck Woodbeck/ Sandy Woodbeck/Gary Chandler/Barbra Chandler, 123. 3 (tie), Ron Anderson/Dee Anderson/Norm Schupbach/Roberta Dyer, 128; Gary Hill/Debbie Hill/Dennis Baird/Donna Baird, 128. KPs — Men: Don Fellows; John Seaton. Women: Julie Smith; Louann Thomas. BEND GOLF AND COUNTRY CLUB Ladies Golf Association, Aug. 29 T and F Championship Flight — Gross: 1, Connie Newport, 42. Net: 1, Judie Bell-Putas, 36.5. A Flight — Gross: 1, Madeline Henderson, 47. 2, Shirleen Chambers, 48. Net: 1, Dana Hagenbaugh, 38. 2, Cheryl Davis, 39.5. B Flight — Gross: 1, Kay Miller, 49. 2, Linda Corson, 51. Net: 1, Sally Schafroth, 37.5. 2, Ginger Williamson, 41.5. C Flight — Gross: 1, Linda Kammerich, 51. Net: 1, Mary Ellen Marlatt, 38.5. D Flight — Gross: 1, Laurel Sorlie, 56. Net: 1, Ann Moore, 38. Nine-Hole Flight — Gross: 1, Berta Cleveland, 50. 2, Maddie Nasharr, 62. Net: 1 (tie), Judy McKee, 40.5; Jean Hardman, 40.5. Men’s Day Game, Aug. 30 Beat the Pro Gross Pro Score — 77. Winners — Net: Frank Putnam, 73. Bob Roach, 75. Gene Powell, 69. Jerry Mattioda, 71. Rich Gagne, 70. Mac Ryder, 72. Chip Cleveland, 68. Sid Smith, 70. Jim Brommer, 66. Steve Pistole, 75. Jim Jensen, 75. Ron Tokuyama, 72. Carl Ryan, 69. Paul Beem, 70. John Harrigan, 70. Bill Degree, 76. Bill Boos, 75. Kevin Rueter, 75. Don Thornburg, 70. Mike Binns, 68. Mike Groat, 71. Brian Mikkelborg, 75. Jack Sealock, 75. Geoff Higlin, 72. Bob Thye, 71. Ron Estes, 76. Jay Bennett, 69. Neil Bryant, 73. Stephen Parel, 70. Mark Hagenbaugh, 74. Kevin Freihoefer, 76. Chuck Wehrle, 72. Mike Smolich, 73. Labor Day Couple’s Mixer, Sept. 3 Net Best Ball Stableford Low Net Stableford Team — Tom Oller/Mia Oller, 37. Teamsters Flight — 1, Eiel Eielson/Cindy Eielson, 36. 2, Scott Hakala/Nancy Hakala, 34. 3, Craig Smith/Debbi Smith, 31. 4 (tie), Mac Ryder/Susie Dougan, 30; Charlie Rice/Madeline Rice, 30. 6 (tie), Dan Newport/Connie Newport, 29; Chuck Wehrle/Barbara Wehrle, 29. 8, Mike Kelso/Suzanne Kelso, 28. 9, Jim Schell/Mary Schell, 23. 10, Mark Hagenbaugh/Dana Hagenbaugh, 19. UAW Flight — 1, Don Christensen/Joanne Christensen, 37. 2, Jay Bennett/Julie Bennett, 31. 3, Steve Pistole/Terry Pistole, 30. 4, Ron Weaver/Nancy Weaver, 27. 5, Geoff Higlin/Erica Higlin, 25. 6 (tie), Frank Putnam/Pat Putnam, 22; Ron Tokuyama/Robin Schueler, 22. 8, Joe Miller/Kay Miller, 21. 9, Jim Lynch/Nancy Lynch, 20. 10, Bob Thye/Joan Thye, 19. AFL-CIO Flight — 1, Randy Grout/Janis Grout, 36. 2, Bill Mills/Sandy Mills, 33. 3, Mal Murphy/Jane Boubel, 30. 4, Joe Rodgers/Charlotte Rodgers, 28. 5, Jon Drake/Christine Difilippo, 24. 6, Mike Toolan/Debbie Toolan, 23. 7 (tie), Bruce Salvog/Kathi Salvog, 22; Jeff Criswell/Paige Criswell, 22. 9, Gil Ward/Linda Beccio, 21. 10 (tie), Maury Hardman/Jean Hardman, 20; Tom Richardson/Donna Richardson, 20; Sid Smith/ Marilyn Wurster, 20. KPs — Men: Ron Eldredge, No. Women: Joanne Christensen, No. 11. Long Putt — Men: Ed Amarillas, No. 9. Women: Debbi Smith, No. 18. CROOKED RIVER RANCH Men’s Club Championship, Aug. 28-29 Stroke Play Club Champion — Sean Remer, 148. A Flight — 1, Darrell Wells, 151. 2, Robert Wright, 155. 3 (tie), Gary Olds, 156; Paul F. Nemitz, 156. 5, Fred Johnson, 158. B Flight — 1, Franklin Earls, 150. 2 (tie), Gary D. Johnson, 156; Jay Snavely, 156. 4, Ronald Aker, 158. 5, Wylie Harrell, 160. C Flight — 1, Ronald E Fitzpatrick, 167. 2 (tie), Bill Daw, 168; Joe K. Griffin, 168. 4, Roger Ferguson, 169. 5, Art Crossley, 174. D Flight — 1 (tie), Douglas Wyant, 179; Wes Price, 179. 3, John Cress, 187. 4, David Wildt, 191. 5, Eddie Maroney, 194. DESERT PEAKS Monday Ladies Scramble, Aug. 27 Scramble 1, Margaret Sturza/Sara Gephart, 37. 2, Teresa Lindgren/Juanice Schram/Jeanette Houck, 41. Thursday Men’s Club, Aug. 30 Stableford

1 (tie), Gerry Ellis, 42; Mike Funk, 42. 3, Kurt Ocker, 40. 4 (tie), Bob Victorin, 39; Val Paterson, 39. KP — Val Paterson. LD — Ed McDaniel. Friday Night Couples, Aug. 30 Chapman 1, Dean Ditmore/Juanita Hawkins, 32.7. 2, Jim Wyzard/ Phyllis Rice, 33.2. 3 (tie), Kurt Olson/Margaret Sturza, 33.8; Spud Gephart/Sara Gephart, 33.8. Sunday Group Play, Sept. 2 Stroke Play Gross: 1 (tie), Carl Lindgren, 76; Spud Miller, 76. 3, Francisco Morales, 77. 4, Ken Black, 79. Net: 1, Teresa Lindgren, 63. 2, Bobby Brunoe, 66. 3, Dean Hunt, 67. 4, Josh Ridinger, 70. KP — Gary Gruner. LD — Spud Miller. Labor Day Flag Tournament, Sept. 3 Flag 1, Josh Ridinger, 200 yds from pin. 2, Dean Hunt, 5 ft from pin. 3, Spud Miller, 10 ft from pin. 4, Chuck Schmidt, 30 ft from pin. 5, Al Dupont, 15 ft from pin. 6, Joe Stanfield, 30 ft from pin. 7, Carl Lindgren, 60 yds from pin. EAGLE CREST Men’s Club, Aug. 22 at Challenge Course Shamble, Two Net Best Ball 1, Jim Kelly/Jerry Coday/Pat Kenny/Don Greenman, 88. 2. Hank McCauley/Peter O’Reilly/Hank Cavender, 91. 3 (tie), Bob Mowlds/Tom Johnson/David Rygh/Peter Brown, 93; Mike Narzisi/Chuck Smith/Ken Walters/Ray Benetti, 93; Jim Whitehurst/Tom Joyce/Bill Carey/blind draw, 93. 6, Ron Wolfe/David Drake/Ted Moore/Don Sheets, 94. Men’s Club, Aug. 29 at Resort Course Two Net Best Ball 1, Bob Mowlds/Roger Duby/Lee Roehlke/Ernie Brooks, 116. 2, Steve Austin/Dennis Flinn/Terry Black/Bill Houck, 120. 3, Ray Schadt/Hank Cavender/George Steelhammer/Jim Madison, 121. 4 (tie), John Boynton/Donald Nash/Larry Clark/Bill McCullough, 122. Mike Narzisi/David Drake/Jerry Volf/Bill Carey, 122. 6, Roger Palmer/Peter O’Reilly/Frank Nickel/Billy Balding, 123. THE GREENS AT REDMOND Men’s Club, Aug. 30 Net Stroke Play A Flight — 1, Dan Morris, 53. 2, Bob Grabar, 57. 3, Manual Diaz, 60. 4 (tie), Bob Gordon, 61; Darwin Thies, 61. B Flight — 1, Scott McMillin, 55. 2, Kent Leary, 57; Arlie Holm, 57. 4, Ron Jonhoal, 61. 5, Dennis Gillet, 63. KPs — Dan Morris, No. 5. Bob Gordon, No. 7. Steve Warwick, No. 14. Ken Ennor, No. 16. Golfer of the Week — A Flight: Bob Grabar. B Flight: Kent Leary. MEADOW LAKES Couples Golf and Grub, Sept. 2 Scramble Gross: 1, The Southgate’s, 35. Net: 1 (tie), The Koon’s, 31; The Benkowsky’s, 31. KPs — Men: Sale Southgate, No. 17. Women: Kathy Koon, No 17. Senior Men’s League, Sept. 4 Nine-Hole Stroke Play Gross: 1, Nelson Haas, 39. Net: 1, Trevor Russell, 30. 2, Allen Burnett, 31. 3 (tie), Phil Horton, 33; Charlie McDermott, 33. KPs — Boyd Joyce, No. 4; Allen Burnett, No. 8. SUNRIVER Men’s Club, Aug. 29 at Glaze Meadow Two Net Best Ball 1, Don Martin/Tim Swezey/Tom Ellis/blind draw, 127. 2, Dan Frantz/Charlie Wellnitz/Mike Pinto/blind draw, 128. 3, Robert Hill/Randy Schneider/John Poe/blind draw, 129. Individual — Gross: Dan Frantz, 75. Net: Charlie Wellnitz, 67. Skins (0-18 handicaps) — Gross: Don Olson, 2. Mike Calhoun, 2. Dan Frantz, 2. Dan Weybright, 1. Don Martin, 1. Gene Carpenter, 1. Net: Tim Swezey, 1. Virgil Martin, 1. Charlie Wellnitz, 1. Don Olson, 1. Dan Frantz, 1. Robert Hill, 1. KPs — Virgil Martin, No. 5. Charlie Wellnitz, No. 8. Dan Frantz, No. 11. Dan Weybright, No. 14. Dan Frantz, No. 17. WIDGI CREEK Open Championship, Aug. 22 & 29 Stroke Play Open Champion and Senior Club Champion — Ed Carson, 149. Super Senior Club Champion — Don Kramer, 165. Net Champion — Bob Brydges, 138. Net Senior Champion — Rick Hanson, 143. Net Super Senior Champion — Dave Madrigal, 130. Open Division A Flight — Gross: 1, Chris Hall, 158. Net: 1, Greg Watt, 152. B Flight — Gross: 1, John Deetz, 163. Net: 1, Bill Burley, 149. 2, Fran Ostlund, 150. Senior Division A Flight — Gross: 1, John Deetz, 163. Net: 1, Fran Ostlund, 150. Jerry Olsen, 154. B Flight — Gross: 1, Daryl Hjeresen, 184. Net: 1, Rich Friscia, 149. 2, Ray Horgen, 154. Super Senior Division A Flight — Gross: 1, Gary Hoagland, 171. Net: 1, Ron Stassens, 145. 2, Pat Kallal, 148. B Flight — Gross: 1 (tie), Larry Strunk, 184; Lloyd Vordenberg, 184. Net: 1, Peter Gulick, 131. 2, Russell Struve, 156. Women’s Club, Aug. 29

Shamble 1, Melinda Bailey/Linda Barnett/Pam Meals/Carole Colby, 131. 2 (tie), Janet Knowlton/Virginia Knowles/Cheryl Shay/Bev Ramsey, 135; Jan Sandburg/Cherie Powell/Mindy Cicinelli/Phyllis Bear, 135. KPs — A Flight: Jan Sandburg, No. 5. B Flight: Cherie Powell, No. 5. C Flight: Brenda Pace, No. 5. Central Oregon Golf Tour, Aug. 30 Stroke Play Gross: 1 (tie), Tony Battistella, 77; Verl Steppe, 77. 3, Blake Stamos, 80. Net: 1 (tie), Bob Stirling, 72; Jim Orr, 72. 3, Bill Burley, 74.

Hole-In-One Report Aug. 28 JUNIPER Daniel Lane, Camas, Wash. No. 16. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157 yards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-iron Aug. 31 BEND GOLF AND COUNTRY CLUB Nancy Breitenstein, Bend No. 16. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145 yards . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-wood Aug. 31 BRASADA RANCH Roy Stafford No. 4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174 yards . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-wood Aug. 31 SUNRIVER MEADOWS Joe Howe, unknown No. 13. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165 yards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-iron Sept. 3 THE GREENS AT REDMOND Ken Ennor No. 13. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139 yards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-iron

Springs Indian Reservation is presented by the Oregon Chapter of the PGA. Admission is free to spectators. For more information, call 541-553-4971 or visit www. orpga.com. Sept. 14 — Ninth annual Gopher Broke Scramble at Awbrey Glen Golf Club. This four-person scramble tournament begins with a 12:30 p.m. shotgun. Cost is $600 per team and includes golf, cart, polo shirt, appetizers, and food at every hole. Proceeds from the golf tournament go to Bend Park & Recreation District Foundation scholarships. For more information or to register, email Sue Boettner at sueb@bendparksandrec.org or call her at 541-388-1133. Sept. 14 — 10th Annual Mountain View Hospital Foundation Classic at Eagle Crest Resort’s Challenge Course. The tournament will begin with an 8 a.m. shotgun start. Cost is $150 per person or $500 per team. Entry fee includes green fees, driving range balls, cart, lunch and awards. Proceeds benefit the Mountain View Hospital Foundation. For more information or to register, call Jill Sansom at 541-475-3882. Sept. 15-16 — The Men’s and Women’s Oregon Mid-Amateur Championship at Black Butte Ranch’s Glaze Meadow is an Oregon Golf Association 36-hole strokeplay tournament for amateurs. The field is limited to men with a handicap index of 10 or better, and women must have a handicap index of 22.4 or better. All players must turn 25 by July 10 to be eligible. Entry forms at www.oga. org or call the OGA at 866-981-4653. Sept. 17 — 15th annual Bend Chamber Fall Invitational at Awbrey Glen Golf Club in Bend. Tournament separated into two flights: a serious gross & net competition and a scramble with mulligans and strings. Shotgun start at 11 a.m. followed by dinner and awards starting about 4:30 p.m. Amateur men and women golfers compete in a four-person scramble tournament. Cost is $145 per person and includes cart, dinner, and contests. To register or for more information, call Gayle Najera at

Calendar The Bulletin welcomes contributions to its weekly local golf events calendar. Items should be mailed to P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708; faxed to the sports department at 541-385-0831; or emailed to sports@bendbulletin.com. ——— CLINICS OR CLASSES Wednesdays — Golf clinic for senior golfers at Missing Link Family Golf Center in Redmond. Golf instructor Kenneth Johnson will introduce golfers to fundaments of golf swings. Classes held from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. Cost is $15. For more information or to register, call 541-923-3426. Thursdays — Ladies golf clinic at Juniper Golf Course in Redmond. Students will be introduced to the fundamentals of golf by Stuart Allison, Juniper’s director of instruction. Clinic begins at 8:30 a.m. on Sept. 6 and Sept. 20. Cost is $20 per class and each is open to the public. For more information or to register: call 480-5403015 or email pro@stuartallisongolf.com. Sept. 12 — Links golf clinic at Tetherow Golf Club in Bend begins at 4 p.m.. Chris van der Velde, Tetherow’s managing partner and a former European Tour player, will instruct golfers on strategy and the rewards and challenges of playing links golf. Clinic participants will play Tetherow’s first and ninth holes with van der Velde. For more information or to register, call Tetherow’s golf shop at 541-388-2582. ——— TOURNAMENTS Sept. 6 — Central Oregon Golf Tour tournament at Sunriver Resort’s Woodlands course. The Central Oregon Golf Tour is a competitive golf series held at golf courses throughout Central Oregon. Gross and net competitions open to all amateur golfers of all abilities. Prize pool awarded weekly, and membership not required. For more information or to register: 541-633-7652, 541318-5155, or www.centraloregongolftour.com. Sept. 8 — Crook County Chamber of Commerce and Prineville Economic Development for Central Oregon golf tournament at Meadow Lakes Golf Course. Four person scramble begins with an 11 a.m. shotgun. Cost is $250 per team. For more information or to register call the Prineville Chamber of Commerce at 541-447-6304. Sept. 8 — American Legion of La Pine’s annual golf tournament at Quail Run Golf Course in La Pine. For more information or to register, call Larry Matthews at 541-419-0861. Sept. 8-9 — Juniper Best Ball is a 36-hole tournament for two-person men’s teams at Juniper Golf Course in Redmond. For more information or to register, call 541-548-3121, or download an entry form at www. playjuniper.com. Sept. 10 — Central Oregon Seniors Golf Organization event at The Greens at Redmond. The format is individual gross and net best ball, as well as team best ball. Cash prizes awarded at each event. Tournament series is open to men’s club members at host sites, and participants must have an Oregon Golf Association handicap. Cost is $150 for the season plus a $5 perevent fee. For more information, call Ron Meisner at 541-548-3307. Sept. 10 — Prineville Kiwanis Club Benefit Golf Tournament at Brasada Canyons Golf Club in Powell Butte. Eleventh annual event is a four-person shamble, which begins with a shotgun start at 9 a.m. and includes net and gross divisions. Cost is $125 per player and includes cart, range balls and barbecue lunch. For more information call Wayne Looney at 541-416-9380, or to register, call the Brasada clubhouse at 541-526-6380. Sept. 13-14 — The Kah-Nee-Ta Fall Invitational at Kah-Nee-Ta High Desert Resort & Casino on the Warm

Self Referrals Welcome

541-706-6900

541-382-3221. Sept. 17-19 — PNGA women’s Senior Team at Sunriver Resort’s Meadows and Woodlands courses. Tournament is 54 holes of two-person team competition (four ball, chapman, and four ball) for golfers age 50 and older. All golfers must carry a 40.4 handicap index or better. Cost is $425 per team and field is limited to 60 teams. Deadline to enter is Aug. 27. For more information or to register, visit www.thepnga.org or call the PNGA at 800-643-6410. Sept. 19-21 — PNGA men’s Senior Team at Sunriver Resort’s Meadows and Woodlands courses. Tournament is 54 holes of two-person team competition (four ball, chapman, and four ball) for golfers age 50 and older. All golfers must carry a 26.4 handicap index or better. Cost is $425 per team and field is limited to 60 teams. Deadline to enter is Aug. 29. For more information or to register, visit www.thepnga.org or call the PNGA at 800-643-6410. Sept. 20 — Central Oregon Golf Tour two-man best ball tournament at Meadow Lakes Golf Course in Prineville. The Central Oregon Golf Tour is a competitive golf series held at golf courses throughout Central Oregon. Gross and net competitions open to all amateur golfers of all abilities. Prize pool awarded weekly, and membership not required. For more information or to register: 541-633-7652, 541-318-5155, or www.centraloregongolftour.com.


B U SINESS

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IN BRIEF Home prices soar to 6-year high Home prices shot up 3.8 percent in July, making their largest yearover-year leap since 2006, according to real estate data provider CoreLogic. The gain marks the fifth straight rise in the gauge, part of a positive swing following a year and a half of slumps. The last time prices rose so much was in August 2006, when they jumped 4.1 percent. Without distressed sales — including foreclosures and short sales — national prices were up 4.3 percent compared with last July.

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Pickups drive double-digit auto sales • Model-year closeouts and low-interest financing helped fuel August surge By Tom Krisher The Associated Press

DETROIT — Strong pickup demand fueled a big jump in U.S. auto sales last month. GM’s August U.S. sales rose 10 percent compared with a year earlier, while Ford’s rose 13 percent and Chrysler’s 14 percent. Most automakers reported strong gains as Americans flowed into dealer showrooms, drawn by model-year closeouts, low-interest

financing and appealing new models. Analysts expected overall sales to rise around 20 percent when companies finished reporting later Tuesday. Pickups, traditionally the top sellers in the U.S., drove much of the business, thanks to a recovering housing market. Sales of Ford’s FSeries trucks rose 19 percent, while Chrysler’s Ram jumped by the same. GM’s pickups, the Chevrolet Silverado and GMC Sierra, among

the oldest trucks in the market, saw a 6 percent sales increase. Asian companies and Germany’s Volkswagen did well in car sales. The overall increase was due mainly to pent-up demand as consumers and businesses were forced to replace aging cars and pickup trucks, said Yingzi Su, GM’s senior economist. The average age of a vehicle on U.S. road is approaching 11 years. See Autos sales / E3

Seth Perlman / The Associated Press

A Dodge RAM 1500 pickup truck is for sale at an auto dealership in Springfield, Ill. August sales of Chrysler’s Ram trucks rose 19 percent.

CRISIS IN EUROPE

Bond plan’s details emerge amid a flurry of diplomacy

Awards show producer sold Dick Clark Productions, which produces TV including New Year’s Rockin’ Eve and the Golden Globe Awards, is being sold to a group including investment firm Guggenheim Partners. Financial terms were not disclosed. Selling Dick Clark Productions is RedZone Capital Management, owned by Washington Redskins owner Dan Snyder. RedZone bought the company in 2007 for $175 million. Along with Guggenheim, other buyers include Mandalay Entertainment and Mosaic Media Investment Partners.

By Andrew Frye Bloomberg News

ROME — European leaders stepped up shuttle diplomacy this week as details of a bond-buying plan emerged from the central bank, fueling a surge in some Spanish and Italian debt. European Union President Herman Van Rompuy met with German Chancellor Angela Merkel on Tuesday in Berlin, while Italian Prime Minister Mario Monti hosted Francois Hollande in Rome, with the French President saying that issues tied to bailouts in Greece and Spain must be settled before euro countries take steps to forge a closer banking and economic union. While Monti and Hollande reiterated that it was up to the European Central Bank to decide how to intervene in markets, ECB President Mario Draghi said the bank’s primary mandate compels it to intervene in bond markets to wrest back control of interest rates and ensure the euro’s survival. “I think there is broad agreement among these people,” said Luca Jellinek, head of European interest-rate strategy at Credit Agricole Corporate & Investment Bank in London. “Many people are realizing that monetary policy is broken in Europe, badly broken.” See Europe / E3

Cosmopolitan gets new editor Women’s magazine Cosmopolitan on Tuesday named Joanna Coles as editor-in-chief of its U.S. edition, as Kate White steps down from the post after 14 years with the company. Coles, 50, served as editor-in-chief of Marie Claire since April 2006. She previously worked as executive editor of More magazine and articles editor of New York Magazine. She begins her new role on Monday. — From wire reports Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Corrections A story headlined “Sensing an opportunity,” which appeared Monday, Sept. 3, on Page C1, contained several errors. The company that signed a licensing agreement with Bend-based PulsedLight LLC is Pacer International, an England-based retailer of optical equipment. The year PulsedLight co-founder Bob Lewis moved to Bend was 2006, and the year Lewis met co-founder Dennis Corey was 2007. The Bulletin regrets the errors.

Pension burden Some states have taken on significant amounts of debt relative to their incomes to meet their pension obligations. Pension obligation bonds issued by states and localities from 1992 through 2009, as a share of 2009 state and local revenue

Oregon 21.2% Illinois 17.4 Connecticut 11.3 Wisconsin 7.5 New Jersey 5.7 California 5.5 Colorado 4.4 Michigan 4.2 Pennsylvania 3.6 Kansas 3.2 Source: Center for Retirement Research New York Times News Service

Jo Jorgensen, 58, is one of the top consultants for Tomboy Tools, a Denver-based company that sells tools made for women. She also is the company’s only Central Oregon-based consultant.

Selling pink, seeing green • Tomboy Tools finds success with implements made for women By Rachael Rees The Bulletin

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hen Jo Jorgensen spotted an ad for Tomboy Tools about a decade ago, she became the first consultant to get involved with the company that sells tools made for women and educates them on how to use them. Now, the Redmond resident is one of Tomboy Tools’ top consultants, with the highest sales and largest team in the nation, according to company officials. Tomboy Tools, headquartered in Denver, uses

direct sales to sell 85 products, ranging from drills to jumper cables. They are generally lighter weight and contoured for women’s hands. Most also come in the company’s signature color: pink. When Tomboy Tools began in 2000, Jorgensen said, manufacturers didn’t take seriously the idea of making tools for women. “Some of the manufacturers said something like, ‘Let’s make them pretty and smell good when you hit things with them,’” she said. “It was a real put-down to the idea of girl tools.” See Tools / E3

A startup by any other name ... might be a flop By Hanah Cho The Dallas Morning News

DALLAS — Dealz? Too limiting. Shareit? Boring. Blinqq? Nixed by lawyers on potential trademark issues. Dallas entrepreneur Jack Wrigley and his partner, John Phan, tossed out a dozen names before they found the ideal one for their startup. It’s called Qwiqq: A mobile commerce app that allows merchants and

AT WORK consumers to easily share a product across various social platforms. The name is intended to convey the quick nature of the app. Plus, the two entrepreneurs liked the look of the double q’s. “We wanted it to be playful,” Wrigley said. “You want it to be sort of memorable and something that’s

preferably a single syllable that’s easy to say.” From mashing up two words (Groupon) to misspelling one (Flickr) to making up monikers (Plaxo), entrepreneurs seek inspirations of all kinds to find the perfect name for their startups. One thing is clear: Picking a name is an important task for entrepreneurs in a brand-focused, social world. See Names / E4

Gregorio Borgia / The Associated Press

Banners posted in Rome by the Italian Communist party depict German Chancellor Angela Merkel and read: “You pay taxes for your house, banks do not, thanks to the EU. Against the EU for Socialism.”

Hackers claim to have stolen 12M Apple IDs By Salvador Rodriguez Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — A hacker group known as AntiSec claims it stole the identification numbers for 12 million Apple devices and has posted information on a million of them on a website. AntiSec, which is short for anti-security, alleges it gained access to a file containing the list of the Apple IDs after hacking into the computer of an FBI agent. It did not identify the agent or who the ID numbers belonged to. AntiSec said it chose to release a portion of the Apple IDs list to get people’s attention to its claims that the FBI is gathering people’s Apple device details. “Well, we have learnt (sic) it seems quite clear nobody pays attention if you just come and say, ‘Hey, FBI is using your device detail,’ ” the group said in a note posted online. The group claims that some of the devices on the list also contain names, telephone numbers, addresses and ZIP codes. See Hackers / E3


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N m D JetBlue JiveSoft n JohnJn 2.44 JohnsnCtl 0.72 JonesGrp 0.20 JonesLL 0.40 JosABank JoyGlbl 0.70 JnprNtwk KB Home 0.10 KBR Inc 0.20 KBW Inc 0.20 KCAP Fin 0.96 KIT Digitl KKR 0.70 KKR Fn 0.84 KLA Tnc 1.60 KT Corp KC Southn 0.78 Kaydon s 0.80 KA MLP 2.11 KeeganR g Kellogg 1.76 Kemet Kenexa Kennamtl 0.64 KeryxBio KeyEngy Keycorp 0.20 KilroyR 1.40 KimballInt 0.20 KimbClk 2.96 Kimco 0.76 KindME 4.92 KindMorg 1.40 KindrM wt KindMM 4.92 KindredHlt Kinross g 0.16 KirbyCp KnghtCap KnightTr 0.24 KnightT 1.53 Knoll Inc 0.48 KodiakO g Kohls 1.28 KoreaElc KornFer Kraft 1.16 KratonPP KratosDef KrispKrm Kroger 0.46 KronosWw 0.60 Kulicke L-3 Com 2.00 LAN Air 0.47 LDK Solar LG Display LKQ Corp LPL Fincl 0.48 LSI Corp LaZBoy LabCp LamResrch LamarAdv Landstar 0.24 LVSands 1.00 LaSalleH 0.80 Lattice Layne Lazard 0.80 LeapWirlss LeapFrog LearCorp 0.56 LeggMason 0.44 LeggPlat 1.16 LenderPS 0.40 LennarA 0.16 Lennox 0.72 Lentuo LeucNatl 0.25 Level3 rs LexiPhrm LexRltyTr 0.50 Lexmark 1.20 Libbey LbtyASE 0.32 LibGlobA LibGlobC LibCapA LibtyIntA LibVentA n LibtProp 1.90 LifePtrs 0.40 LifeTech LifeTFit LillyEli 1.96 LimelghtN Limited 1.00 LincElec 0.68 LincNat 0.32 LinearTch 1.00 LinkedIn LinnEngy 2.90 Lionbrdg LionsGt g Liquidity LithiaMot 0.40 LiveNatn LivePrsn LloydBkg LockhdM 4.00 Loews 0.25 Logitech LogMeIn LonePine g Lorillard 6.20 LaPac Lowes 0.64 Lufkin 0.50 lululemn gs LumberLiq Luminex LyonBas A 1.60

4.89 15.30 67.26 26.85 12.81 72.69 48.48 51.65 17.69 11.35 27.31 15.48 8.76 3.20 14.25 9.27 52.12 15.03 77.77 22.13 30.68 3.90 50.65 4.50 45.95 36.98 2.05 7.69 8.40 47.37 11.31 83.73 20.49 83.22 35.68 3.20 74.02 11.68 8.87 53.88 2.76 14.52 6.41 14.78 8.95 51.99 10.45 15.08 41.84 22.01 4.74 7.55 22.34 16.86 11.36 69.06 23.09 1.25 11.80 38.40 28.78 7.77 13.99 88.26 33.63 33.19 47.35 41.66 27.35 3.91 19.12 28.65 5.46 10.71 38.14 24.75 23.99 28.20 32.86 47.99 2.02 21.11 21.70 2.26 9.49 21.14 15.91 4.70 56.01 52.86 104.28 18.56 48.21 37.06 1.44 48.21 48.25 45.29 2.38 48.46 41.30 23.31 32.70 107.37 39.59 3.77 15.22 52.19 29.28 8.74 16.98 2.07 90.53 40.79 9.44 22.46 1.28 126.58 13.93 28.43 52.27 66.88 48.73 19.96 47.01

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D

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Q-R-S-T QEP Res 0.08 QIAGEN QR Energy 1.95 Qihoo360 QlikTech Qlogic QuadGrph 1.00 Qualcom 1.00 QualityS s 0.70 QuanexBld 0.16 QuantaSvc QntmDSS Quaterra g QstDiag 0.68 QuestSft Questar 0.65 Questcor QuickLog QksilvRes Quiksilvr RAIT Fin 0.32 RBS pfG RF MicD RLJ LodgT 0.66 RPC s 0.32 RPM 0.86 RTI IntlM Rackspace RadianGrp 0.01 RadioShk RailAmer Ralcorp RLauren 1.60 Rambus Randgold 0.40 RangeRs 0.16 RaptorPhm RJamesFn 0.52 Rayonier 1.76 Raytheon 2.00 RealD RltyInco 1.81 RedHat RedwdTr 1.00 Reeds RegalBel 0.76 RegalEnt 0.84 RgcyCtrs 1.85 RegncyEn 1.84 Regenrn RegionsFn 0.04 Regis Cp 0.24 ReinsGrp 0.96 RelStlAl 1.00 RenaisRe 1.08 ReneSola Renren RentACt 0.64 Rentech 1.06 RentechN n 4.68 ReprosTh RepubAir RepubSvc 0.94 RschMotn ResMed 0.68 ResoluteEn ResoluteF ResrceCap 0.80 Responsys RetailOpp 0.56 RetailPrp n 0.66 RexEnergy Rexnord n ReynAmer 2.36 Richmnt g RigelPh RioTinto 1.64 RitchieBr 0.49 RiteAid RiverbedT RoadrnTrn RobbMyer 0.20 RobtHalf 0.60 RockTen 0.80 RockwlAut 1.88 RockColl 1.20 RockwdH 1.40 RofinSinar Rollins 0.32 Roper 0.55 RosttaG rs RosettaR RossStrs s 0.56 Roundys n 0.92 RousePr n 0.28 Rovi Corp Rowan RoyalBk g 2.40 RBScotlnd RBSct prT RylCarb 0.40 RoyDShllB 3.44 RoyDShllA 3.44 RoyGld 0.60 Rubicon g RubiconTc RubyTues Ryder 1.24 Ryland 0.12 SAIC 0.48 SAP AG 1.48 SBA Com SCANA 1.98 SEI Inv 0.30 SK Tlcm SLGreen 1.00 SLM Cp 0.50 SM Energy 0.10 SpdrDJIA 3.60 SpdrGold SpdrEuro50 1.31 SpdrDJ RE 1.20 SpdrIntDiv 3.56 SpdrIntRE 1.51 SpdrWldxUS0.59 SP Mid 1.69 S&P500ETF 2.70 Spdr Div 1.79 SpdrHome 0.23 SpdrS&PBk 0.41 SpdrBarcCv 1.89 SpdrLehHY 3.60 SpdrNuBST 0.28 SpdrBarcTip 1.11 SpdrLe1-3bll SpdrS&P RB0.48 SpdrRetl 0.58 SpdrOGEx 0.45 SpdrMetM 0.56 SPX Cp 1.00 SS&C Tech STEC STMicro 0.40 SVB FnGp SabaSftw lf SABESP 2.96 Safeway 0.70 StJoe StJude 0.92 Saks Salesforce SalixPhm SallyBty SamsO&G SJuanB 1.24 SanderFm 0.68 SanDisk SandRdge SandRdgP 2.43 Sandst g rs SangBio Sanmina Sanofi 1.76 Sanofi rt Santarus Sapient 0.35 Sarepta rs Sasol 2.11 SavientP h Schlmbrg 1.10 Schnitzer 0.75 Schwab 0.24 SciClone SciGames Scotts 1.30 ScrippsNet 0.48 ScrippsEW SeaBrght 0.20 SeabGld g SeadrillLtd 3.36 SeagateT 1.28 SealAir 0.52 SearsHldgs 0.33 SeattGen SelCmfrt SelMedHld SemGroup SempraEn 2.40 Semtech SenHous 1.52 SensataT Sensient 0.88 Sequenom ServiceCp 0.24 ServNow n SvcSource SevArts rs ShandaG s 1.02 ShawGrp Sherwin 1.56 ShipFin 1.56 ShufflMstr Shutterfly SiderurNac 0.43 Siemens 4.04 SigmaAld 0.80 SignatBk SignetJwlrs 0.48 SilganHld 0.48 SilicGrIn SilicnImg SilicnMotn Slcnware 0.24 SilvStd g SilvWhtn g 0.37 SilvrcpM g 0.10 SimonProp 4.20 Sina Sinclair 0.60 SiriusXM SironaDent SixFlags 2.40 Skechers Skullcandy SkyWest 0.16

28.68 18.15 18.35 23.25 21.30 12.33 18.40 60.81 17.58 17.47 24.07 1.54 .36 60.80 27.98 19.98 47.80 2.69 3.32 3.07 4.77 17.21 3.83 18.01 12.22 27.64 21.53 62.16 3.34 2.53 27.41 71.72 157.02 4.34 101.66 65.41 4.91 35.84 49.45 56.45 10.19 42.72 57.03 14.49 6.47 68.84 13.92 49.54 23.14 150.16 7.01 18.21 59.49 51.68 77.85 1.39 3.56 35.73 2.29 34.57 13.04 4.44 27.49 6.65 39.19 9.08 12.49 6.02 9.50 12.61 11.20 12.08 15.70 46.46 4.25 9.80 43.16 18.47 1.21 20.63 17.56 59.70 25.97 66.28 71.55 48.66 46.78 21.61 23.54 102.49 5.55 42.82 69.47 7.42 14.13 15.20 35.11 55.67 7.07 22.77 26.93 71.83 69.54 88.02 3.53 8.50 6.72 40.01 27.44 12.10 66.13 59.97 47.90 21.95 14.48 81.92 15.82 47.69 130.23 164.48 30.19 40.93 44.90 38.35 23.09 179.00 141.03 57.27 23.86 22.74 38.80 39.86 24.44 60.51 45.81 28.09 61.71 52.68 40.46 64.15 22.10 7.41 5.85 59.51 9.13 85.13 15.82 19.18 38.42 11.82 144.84 43.95 27.58 1.04 13.65 44.64 40.89 6.52 19.67 9.77 5.52 8.58 40.78 1.68 7.05 10.16 14.92 43.31 1.27 71.42 27.68 13.33 4.67 7.26 42.07 60.34 10.87 10.96 16.88 40.42 32.40 14.12 53.14 27.82 29.23 10.32 35.40 66.13 24.92 22.30 30.23 36.66 3.84 13.48 33.67 9.38 .93 3.73 42.20 143.14 16.90 14.92 29.55 4.69 94.00 70.49 65.39 46.18 42.18 9.00 4.77 14.90 5.56 15.50 35.14 6.18 158.75 59.93 11.67 2.54 54.25 57.54 22.11 15.72 8.93

-.01 +.41 +.48 +.86 +.15 +.16 +.08 -.65 -.09 -.03 +.07 -.06 +.33 +.03 +.23 +4.36 +.01 -.08 -.06 +.07 +.07 +.08 +.17 -.03 +.23 -.16 +2.18 -.02 +.10 +.01 +.76 -1.63 +.06 -1.31 +.22 -.06 +.64 +.46 -.07 +.28 +.59 +.99 +.16 +.49 +.78 +.02 +.54 +2.11 +.05 +.20 +.75 +.25 +.60 -.04 -.27 +.45 +.09 +.60 +.37 -.01 -.16 -.05 +1.62 +.04 -.08 +.04 -.09 +.04 -.02 -.31 +.65 +.36 +.09 +.48 -.67 -.19 +.02 +.64 +.08 -.12 -.33 -.49 -.51 -.21 -.56 -.12 +.26 -.30 +.17 -.12 +.28 -.07 +.23 -.15 -.07 -.34 -.12 -.02 -.09 -.36 -.43 +.03 +.08 -.04 +.63 -.11 +.47 +.19 +.54 +.20 +.14 +1.32 +.07 +.46 -.65 +.26 +.11 -.03 -.03 -.23 -.12 +1.67 -.13 +.11 +.27 +.15 +.27 -.06 -.03 +.05 -.01 +.30 +.49 -.06 -.48 +.25 -.08 -.09 +1.52 -.27 +.02 +.17 +.01 +.66 +.07 -.34 -.01 +.08 +.01 +.03 +.62 -.33 -.05 -.31 +.02 +.15 -.06 -.17 +.28 +.88 +.05 -.90 -.01 -.05 -.96 +.06 -.16 -.23 -.07 +.42 +1.24 +.50 -.02 +.09 +.04 +.39 -.15 +.39 +1.28 +.66 -.03 -.14 -.07 +.40 +.18 +.20 +.81 +.17 +.44 +2.57 +.12 -.40 -.16 +.12 +.06 +.76 -.25 -.20 -.13 -.28 -.54 +.76 +.32 +.25 +.46 +.04 -.44 -.01 +.67 +.54 +.30 +.05 +3.83 +.11 +.01 +1.11 +2.31 +.44 +.38 +.16

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WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

Tools Continued from E1 Originally, Jorgensen said, Tomboy Tools came in blue. The company was against the idea of pink tools. In fact, she said, she still has a hat with a pink wrench on it that has a slash through it. Tomboy feared people would think of pink tools as cheap, cute and not really usable, she said. But when the company created a pink hammer for its Hammer Out Breast Cancer campaign, Jorgensen said, women started clamoring for more pink tools. “It was interesting that we went to the pink tools. Women said they would take the blue tools home and their husbands would run off with them,” she said. “They loved the pink tools because their husbands wouldn’t steal them.” The company’s most popular product is the Tomboy Traveler toolkit, said Janet Rickstrew, the CEO and cofounder of the company. For every 200 pink Traveler toolkits sold, Rickstrew said, the company would only sell one blue one. The sales of blue tools basically ended when the pink tools were introduced,

Auto sales Continued from E1 “People have been holding off new purchases for such a long time, since 2008 to now,” she said, adding that auto sales are seeing overall improvements even though the economy is growing slowly. August sales could hit more than 1.2 million vehicles, up around 20 percent from a year earlier, analysts predict. The annual pace could reach 14.6 million units, among the best months of the year. Toyota now has a full inventory of new cars at dealers and continued its recovery from bad sales last year. Sales grew almost 46 percent. Honda, which like Toyota saw its factories hobbled by the earthquake in Japan last year, reported a 60 percent increase led by the Civic compact, CRV small SUV and the Accord midsize sedan. Kia sales rose 21.5 percent from a year earlier, while Hyundai’s rose only 4 percent over strong numbers from August of 2011. Volkswagen continued its staggering growth. Sales jumped 63 percent on strong

she said. Over the past six years, Rickstrew said, Tomboy tools has raised more than $280,000 for breast cancer research. If a customer doesn’t like pink, consultants respond by saying Tomboy Tools are pink for a purpose. Currently, Tomboy Tools has 3,300 consultants nationwide, with additional consultants in England and Canada. The company started as an online store for tools, with educational information, Rickstrew said, but moved to a direct sales model in 2002. “The great part about our business is we put education first and foremost,” she said. “We believe tools hanging on the shelf aren’t going to educate. We want to inspire (women), showing them that they are capable of doing projects.” According to the Direct Selling Association, 78 percent of all direct sales in the U.S. were made by women in 2011. It’s a popular option for women because it gives them the opportunity to start their own businesses at a realistic price, as well as the flexibility to dictate their own schedules, Rickstrew said. A lot of women also join because it’s social and fun. They

get to meet a lot of people through their work with the company. Jorgensen makes a living from her work with Tomboy Tools. It’s her only job, but she said income can vary depending on whether a consultant works full-time, part-time or as a hobby. The consultants sell tools at events and tool parties, similar to Tupperware parties. The average tool party, nationwide, brings in $500, Jorgensen said, and consultants make 30 percent of the total retail sales. “I’d always wanted to get into direct sales. I just hadn’t found a product I wanted to promote,” Jorgensen said. “I’m not into makeup, and I don’t wear a lot of jewelry, so when I saw tools, it was something in my interest.” Before getting involved with Tomboy Tools, she worked in a woodworking plant making custom furniture. However, Jorgensen said, not all women feel as comfortable around tools or have the experience she does. “Women don’t have the same upper-body or hand strength as men,” Jorgensen said. “We need tools that we don’t have to put a lot of effort into using so we can put more

strength into our projects and not the tools.” At a tool party, Jorgensen said she shows the different tools Tomboy offers and their special features. Women can either try out the tools and work on a group project, or, Jorgensen said, she’ll demonstrate the correct techniques and products to use when hanging pictures, repairing drywall, installing mosaic tile or working on other projects. Women can purchase individual tools or kits. “Its about using the tools and getting them into the women’s hands,” she said. “Once they hold them and feel them, they will be amazed at the difference between those and the guys’ tools.” Part of Tomboy Tools’ mission is educating and enabling women to do simple home repairs. “I carry a little sign that says ‘Ladies, if a man says he’ll fix it, he will. There’s no need to remind him every six months,’ ” she said. “The whole idea behind learning to do it yourself is because its on your time line and there’s no waiting on him to do it.”

demand for the Jetta and Passat sedans. For pickups, a better housing market appeared to be the driver: Builders are getting more permits to start home construction and they have been breaking more ground on projects. Chrysler sold more than 25,000 Rams, aided by discounts. Ford said its F-Series sales rose to 58,201, while the Chevy Silverado trailed at 38,295. Chrysler also reported a big spike in minivans, with sales of the Dodge Caravan and Chrysler Town & Country each rising more than 30 percent. Chrysler’s 300 luxury sedan posted a 65 percent increase. At Ford, sales rebounded from a poor July, driven by the new Escape and Explorer crossover SUVs. The redesigned Escape bounced back from a safety recall last month to increase 37 percent. Explorer large SUV sales were up 33 percent. Ford also said it would raise production in the fourth quarter by 7 percent to meet increased demand. GM also recovered from a bad July, with all four of its brands reporting increases.

Chevy sales were up 11 percent, led by the Cruze compact. The Sonic subcompact, which had barely reached showrooms in August of last year, saw sales jump to more than 8,700. It likely will be the top-selling subcompact in the nation again in August. GM also said it was helped by heavy advertising on the Olympics and a full month of a money-back guarantee program for Chevrolets. Industry analysts say U.S. auto sales are likely to keep the economy going even as it struggles to grow. The economy expanded at a tepid 1.7 percent annual rate from April through June. On Friday, Chairman Ben Bernanke made clear that the Federal Reserve will do more to boost the economy because of high unemployment and a recovery that remains “far from satisfactory.” Customers likely found good deals on 2012 models last month, especially for leases and pickup trucks. Chrysler is offering $4,289 in discounts on the Ram 1500, Edmunds said. Also, Honda raised its incentives 27 percent in August from July to an average of $1,666 per vehicle.

Buyers also were drawn out by exciting new models such as the midsize Nissan Altima and the Dodge Dart compact, Schuster said. Chrysler sold more than 3,000 Darts in its first full month on the market. The Dart is the company’s first competitive compact car in more than a decade. Low interest rates also were pulling people in. A 48-month new-car loan averaged 2.98 percent last week, according to Bankrate.com. And automakers were offering no-interest loans on some models. Honda and Toyota once again are expected to lead the way in sales increases. Last year at this time their dealers had few models to sell because a March earthquake in Japan hobbled their factories. This year they’re back to full supplies. Sales started the year strong, backed off a little in May, but came back during the summer. Schuster expects to end the year at 14.3 million, more than 1.5 million above last year. Sales hit a recent high of 17 million in 2005. The bottomed at a 30-year low of 10.4 million during the recession in 2009.

Northwest stocks Name

Div PE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

AlaskAir s Avista BkofAm BarrettB Boeing CascdeBcp CascdeCp ColSprtw Costco CraftBrew FLIR Sys HewlettP HmFedID Intel Keycorp Kroger Lattice LaPac MDU Res MentorGr Microsoft

... 1.16 .04 .44 1.76 ... 1.40 .88 1.10 ... .28 .53 .24f .90f .20 .46 ... ... .67 ... .80

33.49 25.58 8.00 25.49 70.87 5.20 50.92 52.71 98.15 8.00 19.80 16.99 10.75 24.42 8.40 22.34 3.91 13.93 21.82 16.99 30.39

12 16 9 35 12 ... 10 18 27 53 14 6 ... 10 8 22 10 ... 19 15 15

-.06 +.18 +.01 +.15 -.53 -.02 +1.85 +.42 +.28 +.05 ... +.11 +.13 -.42 -.03 +.06 +.02 +.51 +.27 +.46 -.44

-10.8 -.7 +43.9 +27.7 -3.4 +18.7 +7.9 +13.2 +17.8 +32.9 -21.0 -34.0 +3.4 +.7 +9.2 -7.8 -34.2 +72.6 +1.7 +25.3 +17.0

Metal NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

Price (troy oz.) $1697.00 $1692.90 $32.348

Continued from E1 The stewards of the single currency, who have sparred as borrowing costs diverged in the 17 nation-euro area, seem to be falling in line behind Draghi’s plans. Merkel, whose country shoulders the largest cost of bailing out weaker governments, has indicated she would back a more active crisis-fighting role at the ECB and Monday told a crowd of beer drinkers at a political rally in Bavaria that Germany must show solidarity with Europe. With the next summit of European heads of state and government planned for Oct. 19, leaders are unable to move forward until after elections in the Netherlands on Sept. 12 and a German court ruling on the constitutionality of the European Stability Mechanism, the region’s permanent bailout fund, expected the same day. The euro fell 0.3 percent to $1.2562, erasing earlier gains when it traded near a twomonth high. Italian and Spanish two-year yields dropped the most in about a month. Leaders are back from summer vacation and facing what Merkel called a “very ambitious agenda” this month to quell what has been a three-year sovereign debt crisis. Talks haven’t always gone smoothly, as Merkel and Monti clashed last week in Berlin over details while agreeing on the broad principles of collective action. Monti has pushed for flexibility on market intervention, while Merkel has focused on budget rigor. “We have to press for reforms in other countries even if they sometimes say we’re hard-line,” Merkel said to a packed beer tent in the town of Abensberg. “It’s not enough just to keep muddling through. But I also say that in such a difficult phase these countries deserve our solidarity and that we root for them

Hackers Continued from E1 But AntiSec said it chose to reveal only user IDs, device types and device names in the portion of the list it released. It wasn’t immediately clear what damage could be done with a device’s ID or how us-

Market recap

Name

Div PE

NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstBcp Weyerhsr

1.44 1.08 1.78 .08 .80 ... 1.68 .12 .70 .75 1.56 .89f .68 ... .36f .78 .32 .88 ... .60

Precious metals

— Reporter: 541-617-7818, rrees@bendbulletin.com

Europe

YTD Last Chg %Chg

21 97.26 -.10 +.9 18 57.67 -.16 +16.0 21 49.84 +.67 +4.0 13 5.93 +.12 +30.6 11 39.15 -.76 +4.5 ... 1.30 ... -31.9 38 41.10 +.17 +12.4 18 160.45 -.63 -2.6 9 15.82 +.17 -24.8 12 27.68 +.06 -34.5 29 143.14 +.06 +60.3 10 31.65 +.43 -13.9 28 49.51 -.10 +7.6 ... 5.63 +.07 +15.5 16 12.75 +.11 +2.9 12 33.12 -.29 +22.4 13 16.35 +.25 +16.9 11 33.80 -.23 +22.6 12 19.93 +.01 +27.8 39 25.05 +.14 +34.2

Prime rate

Pvs Day

Time period

Percent

$1688.00 $1684.60 $31.370

Last Previous day A week ago

3.25 3.25 3.25

NYSE

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

S&P500ETF BkofAm NokiaCp iShR2K GenElec

1037800 141.03 -.13 793694 8.00 +.01 683030 2.83 +.01 629348 82.11 +.99 377332 20.51 -.20

Last Chg

Gainers ($2 or more) Name

Last

Chg %Chg

Medicis Heckmann Lentuo ValeantPh NBGre pfA

43.65 +12.09 3.71 +1.02 2.02 +.40 58.78 +7.51 4.12 +.42

+38.3 +37.9 +24.7 +14.6 +11.4

Losers ($2 or more)

Amex

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

GoldStr g CheniereEn NavideaBio Vringo NwGold g

Last Chg

36959 1.52 +.11 26502 14.73 -.03 25782 3.80 +.16 22941 3.24 +.09 22583 11.28 +.22

Gainers ($2 or more) Name

Last

Chg %Chg

NTS Rlty NDynMn g WalterInv UraniumEn GoldenMin

4.70 +1.63 +53.2 3.52 +.69 +24.4 31.94 +3.95 +14.1 2.90 +.35 +13.7 5.85 +.50 +9.3

Losers ($2 or more)

Nasdaq

Most Active ($1 or more) Name Microsoft Facebook n SiriusXM Intel PwShs QQQ

Vol (00)

Last Chg

453390 436466 392556 391409 294202

30.39 -.44 17.73 -.33 2.54 +.01 24.42 -.42 68.09 -.07

Gainers ($2 or more) Name

Last

Chg %Chg

IntrntGold SyntaPhm FtSecG rsh Santarus K Swiss

2.59 7.56 2.80 7.05 3.22

+.54 +.99 +.35 +.88 +.39

+26.3 +15.1 +14.2 +14.2 +13.8

Losers ($2 or more)

Last

Chg %Chg

Name

Last

Chg %Chg

Name

Last

CitiS&P5-14 CSVLgBrnt Navistar MediaGen iP SER2K

11.31 45.65 19.99 4.37 22.35

-1.69 -13.0 -5.64 -11.0 -1.99 -9.1 -.43 -9.0 -1.89 -7.8

Medgen wt NovaCpp n SwGA Fn HallwdGp Medgenics

5.90 2.27 7.33 8.78 11.46

-.85 -12.6 -.20 -8.1 -.63 -7.9 -.62 -6.6 -.79 -6.4

EmmisC pf CharmCom Misonix ZionO&G ArmHld

14.50 -4.40 -23.3 4.01 -.87 -17.8 2.92 -.45 -13.4 2.55 -.31 -10.8 24.91 -2.33 -8.6

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Diary 1,785 1,209 121 3,115 192 24

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Chg %Chg

Diary 242 188 29 459 9 4

to overcome their difficulties.” Draghi told lawmakers in a closed-door meeting that purchasing short-dated bonds doesn’t constitute state financing. “If we are to buy long-term bonds we are in a very delicate situation,” he told the lawmakers. “But if we go on the shortterm part of the market where bonds have a length of time, a maturity of up to one year, two years or even three years, these bonds will easily expire, so there is very little monetary financing if anything at all that we are doing.” Italian two-year yields fell 26 basis points to 2.37 percent, the lowest since March, while the yield on similar maturity Spanish debt declined 44 basis points to 3.07 percent. Italian 10-year bond yields declined 10 basis points to 5.67 percent. Spanish 10-year bond yields fell 28 basis points to 6.57 percent. Draghi may give more details on the bank’s bond buying plans when he holds his first news conference after the summer break on Thursday. That day, Monti will meet with European Commission President Jose Barroso, and Merkel will travel to Madrid to talk with Spanish Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy. Hollande suggested Tuesday that Spain had to decide how it wants its European partners to help with a budget shortfall exacerbated by its need to re-capitalize banks hurt by a collapsing real estate bubble. “We have to settle the question of Spain, whether they take part, if they wish, in this or that plan,” Hollande said at a joint news conference with Monti. Greece will also be on the agenda as policy makers await a bailout progress report due next month from the country’s creditors — the European Commission, the European Central bank and the International Monetary Fund. Greece is trying to show that it’s making enough progress on the loans to keep the aid spigot open.

ers can protect themselves if their information was stolen or released. The FBI told the Los Angeles Times it was aware of the alleged hack but a spokeswoman said the agency could not comment further. Apple could not be immediately reached for comment.

Indexes

Name

Diary

E3

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

1,499 949 116 2,564 111 38

52-Week High Low

Name

13,338.66 10,404.49 5,390.11 3,950.66 499.82 411.54 8,327.67 6,414.89 2,498.89 1,941.99 3,134.17 2,298.89 1,426.68 1,074.77 14,951.57 11,208.42 847.92 601.71

Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

Last

Net Chg

%Chg

YTD %Chg

52-wk %Chg

13,035.94 5,008.36 468.78 8,002.31 2,416.05 3,075.06 1,404.94 14,693.03 822.14

-54.90 +.87 +.57 -12.61 -.47 +8.10 -1.64 +12.13 +10.05

-.42 +.02 +.12 -.16 -.02 +.26 -.12 +.08 +1.24

+6.70 -.23 +.88 +7.03 +6.04 +18.04 +11.72 +11.40 +10.96

+17.03 +14.27 +10.50 +11.95 +7.76 +24.30 +20.57 +19.82 +20.75

World markets

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed Tuesday. Market Close % Change

Key currency exchange rates Tuesday compared with late Friday in New York. Dollar vs: Exchange Rate Pvs Day

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

328.66 2,347.90 3,399.04 5,672.01 6,932.58 ... 39,549.58 15,222.63 3,676.02 ... 1,907.13 3,011.55 4,325.55 5,883.63

-.97 -.78 -1.58 -1.50 -1.17 ... -.64 -.29 +.19 ... -.29 -.19 -.60 -1.09

t t t t t t t s t t t t

1.0228 1.5879 1.0146 .002078 .1575 1.2571 .1289 .012747 .075990 .0310 .000882 .1489 1.0466 .0335

1.0254 1.5892 1.0144 .002076 .1577 1.2597 .1289 .012777 .075850 .0310 .000884 .1494 1.0489 .0335

Selected mutual funds YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret Amer Century Inv: EqInc 7.87 +9.5 GrowthI 28.01 +0.01 NA Ultra 26.06 NA American Funds A: AmcpA p 20.87 -0.01 +11.3 AMutlA p 28.04 -0.07 +9.7 BalA p 19.92 -0.04 +10.5 BondA p 12.94 +5.0 CapIBA p 52.63 -0.02 +8.9 CapWGA p 35.08 -0.12 +11.0 CapWA p 21.36 -0.01 +5.7 EupacA p 38.09 -0.21 +8.3 FdInvA p 39.18 -0.11 +11.4 GovtA p 14.62 -0.01 +2.2 GwthA p 32.76 -0.04 +14.0 HI TrA p 11.10 +9.3 IncoA p 17.81 -0.02 +8.3 IntBdA p 13.79 +2.4 ICAA p 30.14 -0.10 +12.3 NEcoA p 27.51 +0.03 +15.7 N PerA p 29.49 -0.14 +12.7 NwWrldA 50.31 -0.10 +9.1 SmCpA p 37.95 +0.21 +14.4 TxExA p 13.08 +7.0 WshA p 30.88 -0.07 +9.9 Artisan Funds: Intl 22.76 -0.03 +14.8 IntlVal r 27.98 -0.01 +11.5 MidCap 38.41 +0.03 +16.6 MidCapVal 20.88 +0.02 +6.0 Baron Funds: Growth 57.32 +0.59 +12.4 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 14.21 -0.01 +4.4 DivMu 14.89 +0.01 +2.5 BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 19.55 -0.06 +8.7 GlAlA r 19.13 -0.05 +6.0 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 17.80 -0.04 +5.5 BlackRock Instl:

EquityDv 19.60 -0.06 GlbAlloc r 19.22 -0.05 Cohen & Steers: RltyShrs 69.75 +0.43 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 30.69 +0.21 AcornIntZ 38.18 -0.18 Credit Suisse Comm: ComRet t 8.44 +0.03 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 9.64 -0.05 USCorEq1 12.01 +0.02 USCorEq2 11.82 +0.03 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 35.39 -0.09 Davis Funds Y: NYVenY 35.81 -0.09 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.45 -0.01 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq 18.20 -0.02 EmMktV 27.00 -0.04 IntSmVa 14.35 -0.04 LargeCo 11.12 -0.01 USLgVa 21.56 -0.03 US Small 22.97 +0.26 US SmVa 26.24 +0.27 IntlSmCo 14.55 -0.06 Fixd 10.35 IntVa 14.97 -0.09 Glb5FxInc 11.31 -0.01 2YGlFxd 10.14 Dodge&Cox: Balanced 74.97 -0.18 Income 13.87 +0.01 IntlStk 31.20 -0.17 Stock 115.48 -0.37 DoubleLine Funds: TRBd I 11.34 TRBd N p 11.33 Dreyfus: Aprec 44.36 -0.09 Eaton Vance I: FltgRt 9.04

+8.9 +6.2 +15.9 +12.7 +11.9 +3.2 +6.1 +12.4 +12.3 +8.9 +9.1 +5.8 +6.3 +4.6 +7.1 +13.3 +13.6 +12.4 +13.6 NA +0.8 +3.7 +4.1 +0.9 +12.6 +6.3 +6.7 +14.8 NA NA +10.3 +5.7

GblMacAbR 9.85 FMI Funds: LgCap p 17.05 -0.05 FPA Funds: NewInco 10.67 +0.01 FPACres 28.34 -0.05 Fairholme 30.28 +0.17 Federated Instl: TotRetBd 11.59 StrValDvIS 5.10 +0.01 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 22.55 +0.03 StrInA 12.64 +0.01 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 22.86 +0.03 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 14.13 FF2010K 12.94 FF2015 11.81 FF2015K 13.01 FF2020 14.28 FF2020K 13.41 FF2025 11.88 FF2025K 13.54 FF2030 14.14 FF2030K 13.68 FF2035 11.69 FF2035K 13.74 FF2040 8.16 FF2040K 13.78 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 12.76 -0.01 AMgr50 16.18 +0.01 AMgr20 r 13.32 +0.01 Balanc 19.95 -0.01 BalancedK 19.96 BlueChGr 49.38 +0.02 CapAp 29.18 +0.01 CpInc r 9.28 Contra 77.40 +0.12 ContraK 77.41 +0.12 DisEq 24.25 -0.03 DivIntl 27.89 -0.17 DivrsIntK r 27.88 -0.16

+3.0 +11.8 +1.7 +6.7 +30.8 +5.2 +7.8 +14.4 +7.4 +14.5 +8.2 +8.2 +8.4 +8.5 +9.1 +9.2 +10.2 +10.2 +10.4 +10.6 +11.0 +11.1 +11.1 +11.2 +13.6 +8.6 +5.6 +10.6 +10.8 +16.4 +18.5 +11.3 +14.7 +14.8 +12.7 +9.3 +9.4

DivGth 29.57 +0.04 Eq Inc 45.92 -0.06 EQII 19.29 -0.04 Fidel 35.32 -0.02 FltRateHi r 9.90 +0.01 GNMA 12.00 +0.01 GovtInc 10.95 GroCo 96.62 +0.45 GroInc 20.65 -0.04 GrowthCoK96.62 +0.46 HighInc r 9.20 IntBd 11.13 IntmMu 10.65 IntlDisc 30.47 -0.22 InvGrBd 12.05 InvGB 7.99 +0.01 LgCapVal 11.06 -0.01 LowP r 40.31 +0.08 LowPriK r 40.31 +0.08 Magelln 72.57 +0.08 MidCap 29.66 +0.24 MuniInc 13.52 +0.01 NwMkt r 17.45 +0.04 OTC 61.46 +0.27 100Index 10.12 -0.01 Puritn 19.54 +0.01 PuritanK 19.53 SAllSecEqF12.78 -0.01 SCmdtyStrt 9.30 +0.04 SCmdtyStrF 9.32 +0.03 SrsIntGrw 11.24 -0.05 SrsIntVal 8.74 -0.06 SrInvGrdF 12.06 +0.01 STBF 8.59 StratInc 11.31 TotalBd 11.29 USBI 12.04 Value 72.32 +0.15 Fidelity Spartan: 500IdxInv 49.95 -0.06 500Idx I 49.96 -0.06 Fidelity Spart Adv: ExMktAd r 39.62 +0.34 500IdxAdv 49.96 -0.05

+14.3 +12.7 +12.1 +14.1 +5.0 +3.1 +2.7 +19.4 +14.3 +19.6 +10.7 +4.1 +3.9 +10.4 +4.9 +5.4 +9.8 +12.8 +12.9 +15.5 +13.5 +6.3 +14.1 +12.4 +14.7 +11.5 +11.5 +13.8 +3.8 +3.9 +11.2 +8.2 +5.0 +1.9 +7.6 +5.5 +3.9 +13.9 +13.3 +13.4 +13.0 +13.4

TotMktAd r 40.80 +0.03 +13.3 USBond I 12.04 +0.01 +4.0 First Eagle: GlblA 48.27 -0.11 +7.0 OverseasA 21.63 -0.05 +6.2 Forum Funds: AbsStrI r 11.26 +1.9 Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA px 12.70 -0.03 +7.3 HYTFA p 10.90 +9.2 IncomA px 2.18 -0.02 +8.9 RisDvA p 36.93 -0.02 +6.1 StratInc p 10.55 +8.1 USGovA px 6.90 -0.01 +2.1 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv 13.07 -0.01 +9.2 IncmeAd x 2.17 -0.01 +9.6 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC tx 2.20 -0.02 +8.4 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 22.03 -0.01 +11.2 Frank/Temp Temp A: GlBd A p 13.11 -0.01 +9.0 GrwthA p 17.96 -0.08 +10.3 WorldA p 14.99 -0.07 +9.1 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 13.13 -0.01 +8.7 GE Elfun S&S: US Eqty 44.11 -0.03 +13.8 GMO Trust III: Quality 23.47 -0.04 +12.5 GMO Trust IV: IntlIntrVl 19.35 -0.07 +3.5 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 10.76 +4.4 Quality 23.48 -0.04 +12.6 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 7.27 +0.01 +10.7 MidCapV 37.93 +0.16 +13.0 Harbor Funds: Bond 12.92 +0.01 +7.3 CapApInst 42.10 +0.03 +14.1 IntlInv t 56.24 -0.30 +8.2 Intl r 56.87 -0.31 +8.4

Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 31.61 -0.03 Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 41.07 -0.03 Hussman Funds: StrGrowth 11.09 -0.01 IVA Funds: Wldwide I r15.85 -0.02 Invesco Funds A: Chart p 17.55 -0.05 CmstkA 16.86 -0.05 EqIncA 9.03 -0.02 GrIncA p 20.43 -0.05 HYMuA 10.05 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 23.68 -0.13 AssetStA p 24.49 -0.13 AssetStrI r 24.74 -0.13 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 12.12 JP Morgan Instl: MdCpVal 27.31 +0.07 JPMorgan R Cl: CoreBond 12.12 ShtDurBd 11.02 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 12.11 HighYld 8.03 +0.01 ShtDurBd 11.02 USLCCrPls 22.57 -0.05 Janus T Shrs: PrkMCVal T21.64 +0.02 John Hancock Cl 1: LSBalanc 13.29 +0.01 LSGrwth 13.14 +0.01 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 18.60 +0.01 Longleaf Partners: Partners 29.29 -0.11 Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 14.78 +0.01 StrInc C 15.13 +0.01 LSBondR 14.72 +0.01 StrIncA 15.05 +0.01

+9.7 +10.5 -10.8 +3.2 +9.3 +11.7 +9.5 +10.7 +11.1 +9.5 +10.0 +10.2 +4.2 +15.0 +4.5 +1.7 +4.4 +10.0 +1.5 +14.3 +7.2 +9.7 +10.3 +10.7 +9.9 +9.7 +7.6 +9.5 +8.1

Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdY x12.54 -0.06 +8.3 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 11.56 -0.02 +10.5 BdDebA p 7.99 +0.01 +9.0 ShDurIncA p4.63 +0.01 +4.8 Lord Abbett C: ShDurIncC t 4.65 +4.1 Lord Abbett F: ShtDurInco 4.62 +4.7 MFS Funds A: TotRA 14.93 -0.03 +8.2 ValueA 24.83 -0.07 +11.9 MFS Funds I: ValueI 24.95 -0.07 +12.1 MainStay Funds A: HiYldBA 6.03 +9.0 Managers Funds: Yacktman p18.82 -0.01 +8.9 YacktFoc 20.27 -0.01 +8.5 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 7.26 -0.03 +9.5 MergerFd 15.96 -0.02 +2.4 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.93 +8.3 TotRtBdI 10.93 +0.01 +8.5 MorganStanley Inst: MCapGrI 34.39 +0.15 +4.5 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 29.53 -0.04 +8.8 GlbDiscZ 29.95 -0.03 +9.0 SharesZ 22.24 +11.5 Neuberger&Berm Fds: GenesInst 49.17 +0.46 +5.9 Northern Funds: HiYFxInc 7.38 +0.01 +10.0 Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 28.60 -0.01 NA Intl I r 18.15 -0.09 +9.7 Oakmark 47.94 -0.04 +15.0 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 7.34 +9.2 GlbSMdCap14.40 +0.01 +8.8 Oppenheimer A:

DvMktA p 32.25 GlobA p 58.78 -0.22 GblStrIncA 4.27 IntBdA p 6.47 +0.01 MnStFdA 36.68 -0.01 RisingDivA 17.11 -0.07 S&MdCpVl30.20 +0.04 Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 15.46 -0.06 S&MdCpVl25.54 +0.03 Oppenheimer C&M: RisingDvC p15.40 -0.06 Oppenheimer Roch: RcNtMuA 7.51 +0.01 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 31.94 IntlBdY 6.47 +0.01 IntGrowY 28.23 -0.13 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 11.50 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AlAsetAut r 11.03 +0.01 AllAsset 12.47 ComodRR 7.05 +0.03 DivInc 12.11 +0.01 EmgMkCur10.28 EmMkBd 12.19 +0.01 HiYld 9.45 InvGrCp 11.17 LowDu 10.60 RealRtnI 12.48 ShortT 9.87 TotRt 11.50 PIMCO Funds A: RealRtA p 12.48 TotRtA 11.50 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 11.50 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 11.50 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 11.50 Parnassus Funds: EqtyInco 29.38 +0.18

+10.0 +8.8 +9.1 +7.0 +14.1 +9.8 +1.9 +9.1 +1.3 +9.3 +14.6 +10.3 +7.3 +10.6 +8.0 +11.6 +9.7 +9.5 +10.8 +4.7 +11.6 +9.8 +11.1 +4.8 +7.4 +2.7 +8.1 +7.1 +7.9 +7.3 +7.9 +8.1 +12.2

Perm Port Funds: Permannt 48.41 +0.08 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 41.37 -0.11 Price Funds: BlChip 45.00 CapApp 22.84 -0.03 EmMktS 30.40 -0.05 EqInc 25.51 -0.07 EqIndex 37.97 -0.05 Growth 37.36 +0.08 HlthSci 42.76 +0.73 HiYield 6.81 InstlCpG 18.58 +0.05 IntlBond 9.99 Intl G&I 12.09 -0.07 IntlStk 13.30 -0.05 MidCap 58.22 +0.22 MCapVal 24.38 +0.03 N Asia 15.42 +0.01 New Era 42.00 -0.18 N Horiz 35.93 +0.34 N Inc 9.93 OverS SF 7.88 -0.06 R2010 16.34 R2015 12.68 -0.01 R2020 17.54 -0.01 R2025 12.83 -0.01 R2030 18.41 -0.01 R2035 13.00 -0.02 R2040 18.50 -0.01 ShtBd 4.86 SmCpStk 35.76 +0.33 SmCapVal 38.15 +0.29 SpecIn 12.88 Value 25.32 -0.07 Principal Inv: LgCGI In 10.19 +0.01 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 14.00 -0.04 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 11.60 +0.10 PremierI r 19.45 +0.16 Schwab Funds:

+5.0 +7.7 +16.4 +10.8 +6.6 +11.8 +13.1 +17.4 +31.2 +10.0 +15.3 +4.2 +4.9 +8.2 +10.4 +14.0 +10.9 -0.1 +15.8 +4.8 +7.7 +8.8 +9.5 +10.2 +10.8 +11.3 +11.5 +11.6 +2.4 +14.4 +10.6 +7.5 +12.3 +14.8 +11.0 +7.8 +5.0

1000Inv r 39.97 -0.01 S&P Sel 22.18 -0.03 Scout Funds: Intl 30.35 -0.16 Sequoia 161.33 +2.46 TCW Funds: TotRetBdI 10.11 +0.01 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 18.06 -0.10 Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 25.21 -0.19 IncBuildC p18.59 -0.04 IntValue I 25.78 -0.20 Tweedy Browne: GblValue 24.36 -0.04 Vanguard Admiral: BalAdml 23.63 +0.01 CAITAdm 11.69 CpOpAdl 75.90 +0.04 EMAdmr r 33.30 -0.13 Energy 110.87 -0.80 EqInAdm n 50.06 -0.10 ExtdAdm 44.49 +0.39 500Adml 130.00 -0.15 GNMA Ad 11.10 GrwAdm 36.63 -0.02 HlthCr 60.41 +0.11 HiYldCp 5.98 InfProAd 29.14 -0.01 ITBdAdml 12.16 -0.02 ITsryAdml 11.84 -0.01 IntGrAdm 55.93 -0.37 ITAdml 14.36 ITGrAdm 10.39 -0.01 LtdTrAd 11.18 LTGrAdml 11.03 -0.01 LT Adml 11.76 MCpAdml 98.78 +0.27 MuHYAdm 11.22 PrmCap r 70.78 -0.17 ReitAdm r 95.29 +0.74 STsyAdml 10.80 STBdAdml 10.67 ShtTrAd 15.93

+13.0 +13.3 +9.3 +10.9 +9.4 +6.0 +5.6 +7.1 +5.9 +11.5 +9.6 +5.2 +11.4 +5.2 +0.2 +10.7 +13.1 +13.4 +2.5 +15.9 +11.4 +9.8 +5.7 +5.9 +2.8 +7.6 +4.6 +7.3 +1.5 +11.1 +6.5 +10.8 +7.5 +10.5 +17.9 +0.7 +1.7 +0.8

STIGrAd 10.84 SmCAdm 37.80 TtlBAdml 11.21 TStkAdm 35.14 WellslAdm 59.11 WelltnAdm 58.26 Windsor 48.13 WdsrIIAd 50.88 Vanguard Fds: CapOpp 32.85 DivdGro 16.58 Energy 59.04 EqInc 23.88 Explr 78.92 GNMA 11.10 HYCorp 5.98 HlthCre 143.14 InflaPro 14.84 IntlGr 17.57 IntlVal 28.38 ITIGrade 10.39 LifeCon 17.16 LifeGro 22.99 LifeMod 20.58 LTIGrade 11.03 Morg 19.95 MuInt 14.36 PrmcpCor 14.78 Prmcp r 68.19 SelValu r 20.42 STAR 20.28 STIGrade 10.84 StratEq 20.85 TgtRetInc 12.16 TgRe2010 24.10 TgtRe2015 13.30 TgRe2020 23.57 TgtRe2025 13.40 TgRe2030 22.96 TgtRe2035 13.79 TgtRe2040 22.64 TgtRe2045 14.22 USGro 20.83 Wellsly 24.40

+3.6 +0.43 +13.2 +3.9 +0.02 +13.3 -0.10 +8.2 -0.12 +9.2 -0.16 +12.9 -0.09 +12.5 +0.01 -0.04 -0.43 -0.05 +0.81

+0.27 -0.12 -0.15 -0.01 -0.02 -0.03 -0.02 -0.01 +0.03 -0.05 -0.16 +0.04 -0.03 +0.14 -0.01 -0.02 -0.01 -0.03 -0.01 -0.02 -0.02 -0.03 -0.01 +0.04 -0.04

+11.3 +8.7 +0.1 +10.7 +10.5 +2.5 +9.8 +11.3 +5.6 +7.5 +6.6 +7.2 +6.8 +9.8 +8.3 +11.0 +14.2 +4.5 +9.6 +10.4 +9.8 +9.2 +3.5 +13.7 +6.3 +7.4 +8.1 +8.7 +9.2 +9.8 +10.2 +10.4 +10.5 +15.4 +8.2

Welltn 33.73 -0.07 Wndsr 14.27 -0.04 WndsII 28.67 -0.05 Vanguard Idx Fds: ExtMkt I 109.82 +0.98 MidCpIstPl107.63 +0.29 TotIntAdm r23.23 -0.12 TotIntlInst r92.91 -0.50 TotIntlIP r 92.93 -0.50 500 129.97 -0.15 MidCap 21.75 +0.06 TotBnd 11.21 TotlIntl 13.88 -0.08 TotStk 35.12 +0.02 Vanguard Instl Fds: BalInst 23.63 +0.01 DevMkInst 9.00 -0.06 ExtIn 44.49 +0.39 GrwthIst 36.63 -0.01 InfProInst 11.87 InstIdx 129.17 -0.14 InsPl 129.18 -0.14 InsTStPlus 31.81 +0.02 MidCpIst 21.82 +0.06 SCInst 37.80 +0.43 TBIst 11.21 TSInst 35.14 +0.02 ValueIst 22.37 -0.02 Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl 107.38 -0.12 MidCpIdx 31.17 +0.08 STBdIdx 10.67 TotBdSgl 11.21 TotStkSgl 33.91 +0.02 Virtus Funds I: EmMktI 9.54 -0.01 Western Asset: CorePlus I 11.62

+9.2 +12.8 +12.5 +13.1 +10.8 +6.4 +6.4 +6.4 +13.3 +10.7 +3.9 +6.3 +13.2 +9.6 +6.9 +13.1 +15.9 +5.7 +13.4 +13.4 +13.4 +10.8 +13.2 +3.9 +13.3 +10.7 +13.4 +10.8 +1.7 +3.9 +13.3 +10.4 +6.9


E4

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2012

M 

If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact Ashley Brothers at 541-383-0323, email business@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� at www.bendbulletin.com. Please allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication.

B C 

TODAY BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL BEND CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7 a.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541749-0789.

THURSDAY BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL DESCHUTES BUSINESS NETWORKERS CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Starts at 7 a.m.; visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541-610-9125. GETTING THE MOST OUT OF SCHWAB.COM: Free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-3181794. OPEN COMPUTER LAB: Free; 23:30 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-3837290. BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WILDFIRE CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 3:30 p.m.; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541-480-1765. BE A TAX PREPARER: Registration required. Sept. 6 through Nov. 15; $389; 6-10 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. SYSTEMS TECHNICIAN CERTIFICATION PREP INFORMATIONAL WORKSHOP: The Systems Technician Certification Prep program helps equip students for careers in the information technology industry; learn the needed skills and obtain the required certification for a position in the high tech and server industry; classes are open to anyone 16 and older; free; 6 p.m.; COCC-Crook County Open Campus, 510 S.E. Lynn Blvd., Prineville; 541-447-6228.

FRIDAY COFFEE CLATTER: Redmond Chamber of Commerce meeting; free; 8:30-9:30 a.m.; Centennial Park, Seventh Street and Evergreen Avenue, Redmond. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit; registration required; $35; 9 a.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www .happyhourtraining.com. KNOW DIGITAL BOOKS: Free; 10:30 a.m.-noon; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541383-7290. CENTRAL OREGON REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT CLUB: Free; 11 a.m.; ServiceMaster Clean, 20806 Sockeye Place, Bend; 541-610-4006 or bobbleile@windermere.com. FREE TAX FRIDAY: Free tax return reviews; schedule an appointment at 541-385-9666 or www.myzoomtax .com; free; 2-4 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666. KNOW COMPUTERS FOR BEGINNERS: Free; 3-4:30 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-383-7290.

SATURDAY HOMEBUYING CLASS: Registration required; free; 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 20310 Empire Ave., Suite A110, Bend; 541-3187506, ext. 309.

MONDAY KNOW DIGITAL BOOKS: Free; 10:30 a.m.-noon; La Pine Public Library, 16425 First St.; 541-383-7290.

welcome and first two visits are free; 7 a.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541749-0789. OVERCOME THE FEAR OF PUBLIC SPEAKING: Reservations encouraged; free; 7:30 a.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3890803 or www.bendchamber.org. FOR WHAT AM I PAYING?: Learn about the costs of various investment-related products; free; 8:30-10 a.m.; Starbucks, 61470 U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-639-8055. UPGRADE YOUR SALES TEAM IN 2012: Dennis Hungerford, president of Sandler Training Oregon, presents; registration required; free; 8:30-11 a.m.; Phoenix Inn Suites Bend, 300 N.W. Franklin Ave.; 541382-4316 or www.hcc.sandler.com. KNOW DIGITAL BOOKS: Free; 9:3011 a.m.; Sisters Public Library, 110 N. Cedar St.; 541-383-7290. BUSINESS AFTER HOURS REDMOND’S BAZAAR: 4:30-5:30 p.m.; Redmond’s Bazaar, 2145 S. U.S. Highway 97; 541-604-1367. ARE YOU READY TO BE IN BUSINESS?: Registration required; $15; 6-8 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Madras Campus, 1170 E. Ashwood Road, Madras; 541-383-7290.

Starts at 7:15 a.m.; visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541-420-7377. DO YOU HAVE WHAT IT TAKES TO RUN YOUR OWN BUSINESS: Registration required; $15; 11 a.m.-1 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Redmond campus, 2030 S.E. College Loop, Redmond; 541383-7290. KNOW COMPUTERS FOR BEGINNERS: Free; 2-3:30 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-383-7290. OPEN COMPUTER LAB: Free; 3-4:30 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-383-7290. CROOKED RIVER RANCHTERREBONNE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE NETWORKING SOCIAL: You do not have to be a Chamber member to attend; free; 5:30 p.m.; Juniper Realty, 14290 S.W. Chinook Road; call Hope Johnson at 541-923-2679 or go to www.crrchamber.com for more information. SMALL-BUSINESS COUNSELING: No appointment necessary; free; 5:30-7:30 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-383-7290.

THURSDAY

Sept. 19

Sept. 13 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL DESCHUTES BUSINESS NETWORKERS CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Starts at 7 a.m.; visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541-610-9125. OPPORTUNITY KNOCKS ANNUAL CELEBRATION: An evening of networking with associates from the Bend business community. Member of the Year and Facilitator of the Year for 2012 will be recognized. Free required annual meeting prior to the main event; $15 includes one drink; 5:30 a.m.-7:30 p.m.; The Point at Shevlin Corporate Park, 929 S.W. Simpson Ave., Bend. EXPLORE THE BENEFITS OF WORKING WITH SCHWAB: Free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794. OPEN COMPUTER LAB: Free; 2-3:30 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-383-7290. BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WILDFIRE CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 3:30 p.m.; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541-480-1765.

FRIDAY Sept. 14 CENTRAL OREGON REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT CLUB: Free; 11 a.m.; ServiceMaster Clean, 20806 Sockeye Place, Bend; 541-610-4006 or bobbleile@windermere.com. CENTRAL OREGON BUSINESS EDUCATION & NETWORKING MEETUP GROUP: Launch meeting, COCC learning center, lunch provided, registration requested; $5; 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-848-3600, kmuinch@hotmail.com or http:// www.meetup.com/COBEN12/. KNOW DIGITAL BOOKS: Free; 1-2:30 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-383-7290. FREE TAX FRIDAY: Free tax return reviews; schedule an appointment at 541-385-9666 or www.myzoomtax .com; free; 2-4 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666. KNOW WORD FOR BEGINNERS: Free; 3-4:30 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-383-7290.

MONDAY TUESDAY

Sept. 17

BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL HIGH DESERT CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Starts at 7:15 a.m.; visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541-420-7377. KNOW DIGITAL DOWNLOADS: Free; 2-3:30 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-383-7290. OPEN COMPUTER LAB: Free; 23:30 p.m.; East Bend Public Library, 62080 Dean Swift Road; 541-3837290. OPEN COMPUTER LAB: Free; 34:30 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-3837290. SMALL-BUSINESS COUNSELING: No appointment necessary; free; 5:30-7:30 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-383-7290.

OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit; registration required; $35; 9 a.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www .happyhourtraining.com. FORECLOSURE CLASS: 5:30-7:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 20310 Empire Ave., Suite A110, Bend; call 541-3187506, ext. 309 to reserve a seat. FORECLOSURE PREVENTION CLASS: Learn about NeighborImpact’s Housing Center tools and services that can assist individuals struggling to pay their mortgages; free; 5:30-7:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 20310 Empire Ave., Suite A110, Bend; 541-318-7506, ext. 309, karenb@ neighborimpact.org or www .homeownershipcenter.org.

WEDNESDAY

TUESDAY

Sept. 12

Sept. 18

BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL BEND CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are

BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL HIGH DESERT CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING:

WEDNESDAY CENTRAL OREGON OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH CONFERENCE: Oregon’s Occupational Safety and Health Division encourages workers and employers to attend, to help improve safety and health performance; keynote speaker Jake French; registration required; $125, with optional pre-conference workshops for $40; ; Eagle Crest Resort, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; 503-378-3272 or www.orosha.org/ conferences. BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL BEND CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7 a.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-749-0789. HR AND THE GREAT LEGAL ROUNDUP: $30 for HRACO members, $40 for non-members; registration required at www. hrcentraloregon.org/calendarevents. aspx#rsvpform; 7:30-11 a.m.; Shilo Inn Suites Hotel, 3105 O.B. Riley Road, Bend; 541-389-9600. KNOW EXCEL FOR BEGINNERS: Free; 1:30-3 p.m.; La Pine Public Library, 16425 First St.; 541-3837290.

THURSDAY Sept. 20 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL DESCHUTES BUSINESS NETWORKERS CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Starts at 7 a.m.; visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541-610-9125. CENTRAL OREGON OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH CONFERENCE: Oregon’s Occupational Safety and Health Division encourages workers and employers to attend, to help improve safety and health performance; keynote speaker Jake French; registration required; $125, with optional pre-conference workshops for $40; ; Eagle Crest Resort, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; 503-378-3272 or www.orosha.org/ conferences. DESERT CONFERENCE: A forum for land managers, conservationists, academics and advocates to educate and collaborate on critical desert issues; includes Wild and Scenic Film fest, live music and guest speakers; $50; 8 a.m.-8 p.m.; Oregon Natural Desert Association, 50 S.W. Bond St., Suite 4, , Bend; 541-330-2638. ADVICE AT SCHWAB: Free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541318-1794. KNOW WORD FOR BEGINNERS: Free; 2-3:30 p.m.; East Bend Public Library, 62080 Dean Swift Road; 541-383-7290. OPEN COMPUTER LAB: Free; 2-3:30 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-383-7290. BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WILDFIRE CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 3:30 p.m.; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541-480-1765.

FRIDAY Sept. 21 TOWN HALL FORUM: Four year university: What does that mean for education in Bend; free; 7:30 a.m.; Bend Golf and Country Club, 61045 Country Club Drive; 541-382-7437 or www.bendchamber.org. DESERT CONFERENCE: A forum for land managers, conservationists, academics and advocates to educate and collaborate on critical desert issues; includes Wild and Scenic Film fest, live music and guest speakers; $50; 8 a.m.-8 p.m.; Oregon Natural Desert Association, 50 S.W. Bond St., Suite 4, , Bend; 541-330-2638.

Names Continued from E1 “Your brand building starts on Day 1,� said Tina Young, president of MarketWave, a branding and marketing firm in Dallas. “I started my business 14 years ago, and I was thinking about my service mix and how I was going to gain my first customer, (but) you can’t forget the name in the midst of all of that.� Marketing and entrepreneurship experts say a name won’t break a new business venture or necessarily deter investors from putting up capital as long as the underlying business model is sound. Still, it doesn’t make marketing or fundraising any easier for a young company if the name becomes a distraction. “Picking a wrong name for the company won’t kill your chance of being successful, but it won’t help it,� said Trey Bowles, a serial entrepreneur and co-chairman of Startup DFW, the local chapter of a nationwide initiative to drive entrepreneurship. Bowles knows it firsthand. He named his first company Daedalus Consultants after the Greek mythological innovator known for fabricating wings out of feather and wax. The concept was that the consulting company would help companies integrate online and offline channels, or “we’d fashion your own pair of wings,� so to speak, Bowles said. The name backfired when some people pronounced it “data-less.� “We tried to make something extremely fancy and tried to tell his amazing story, which you can’t do in a onesentence elevator pitch,� he said. “We ended up constantly defending our name.� Bowles advises startups to keep names simple and avoid creating a new word in hopes of creating a brand around it. Ideally, a name should convey what a company does. Whether a domain name is available can also act as a guide. One of his later ventures was called GodTube, a video sharing site, a nod to YouTube but with a Christian bent. On the other hand, having a memorable or clever name for a company doesn’t guarantee success, either. As David Lei, associate professor of management and organizations at Southern Methodist University’s Cox School of Business, put it: “Even if you have a great name, is it a market that’s durable?� Carrie Layne saw an opening for a mobile and social app that scans QR codes to reward consumers with deals

The Associated Press file photo

Back when it was a startup looking for a name, this daily deal site opted for the strategy of mashing two words together — “group� and “coupon� — and Groupon was born.

Getting to Qwiqq

name. Take the startup Socialyzer, a social media optimization engine that began as Queued.at. Founder Bradley Joyce said the first name reflected the startup’s early platform, which allowed people to “queue up� social media content throughout the day. As the platform evolved from a scheduling system to one that involved analysis to predict the perfect time to post social media content, so did its name, Joyce said. Socialyzer marries social content with analysis. The new name “clicked with people a lot faster,� Joyce said. When Koupon Media Inc., which provides mobile coupons and analytics services, was founded in 2011, it was known as mComm360, short for mobile commerce with the 360 intended to reflect the full scope of its digital coupon offerings. Co-founder T.J. Person quickly realized the startup’s original name did not convey its brand or what it did, at least without some explanation. “We spent a fair amount of time, maybe too much time, on explaining what the name was,� said Person, whose 32person company raised $6.5 million in the past 10 months. “When we changed to Koupon Media, it was very clear what we did right off the bat.� In brainstorming for a new name, Person had a few criteria. He wanted to use some variation of coupon and to find a good URL. Spelling coupon with a “k� made sense to him because he traveled frequently to Japan when he worked at electronics maker Samsung. There, the English derivative of coupon is spelled with a “k.� “There are a lot of made-up names that people have created,� he said. “But I think if you could relate (a name) to the value you’re offering, I think it’s just that much easier to break through some of the noise.�

Jack Wrigley and John Phan considered lots of names for their company before settling on Qwiqq. Here are some, and the reasons they didn’t make the cut: • Blinqq: Potential trademark infringement. In the logo, the last two q’s had googly eyes, and lawyers said it was too close to something else out there. • Bazaar: Has a negative connotation, as in bizarre. • Dealz: They liked this one a lot but worried that it was too specific. Dealz is about deals, and so it would be limiting in the event that the company had to adjust its approach. Ditto for two other candidates, Deelz and Yurdeelz. • Qwiqqr: Pronounced quicker, but the owners wanted a single-syllable name. • Shareit: Considered too broad and almost commonplace. Name made sense for the platform but didn’t have any lasting value. They felt the same way about Loveit.

and offers while creating buzz around a local merchant. Thus, BestBuzz was born. “It’s important that your brand, your name reflect the action or the message about the product that you want people to take away,� Layne said. The startup is trying to use its name to build a brand around QR codes. Instead of scanning a QR code, for instance, Layne and her small staff tell clients and consumers to buzz in. When a client uses the app, the phone buzzes as well as says buzz. In many cases, fine tuning is involved, resulting in a new

N  R

BANKRUPTCIES Chapter 7 Filed Aug. 28

Dwayne R. Sohn, 208 S.E. Fourth St., Bend Todd W. Confer, 15964 Livewood Court, La Pine James E. O’Meara, 12555 S.W. Corral Place, Crooked River Ranch Stanley K. McGuyer, 2825 S.W. 27th Court, Redmond Malcom K. Nunley, 2053 N.W. Poplar Ave., Redmond Justin D. Lowery, 6855 N.W. 14th St., Terrebonne Galdino Aguirre-Torres, 45 S.E. East St., Madras Geffrey H. Kinnaman, P.O. Box 1629, Sisters Filed Aug. 29

Christopher R. Hillard, 20583 Chivas Place, Bend Daniel J. Watkins, 2819 N.E. Lotno Drive, Bend Cody W. Standiford, 518 N.E. Majesty Lane, Bend Filed Aug. 30

David A. Masters, 20636 Kandi Court, Bend David L. Thomas, 114 S.E. Ninth St., Madras Gretchen M. Thoma 20908 Bilyeu Court, Bend Raymond P. Soliz, 2240 N.W. Oak Court, Redmond Joshua R. Rogers, 20969 Hicrest Place, Bend Treana R. Henley, 406 S.W. Center Ridge Drive, Culver Matthew C. Matwich, 60948 Aspen Lane, Bend

Charlotte M. Good, 21137 Guinevere Court, Bend Filed Aug. 31

Filed Sept. 2

Jose L. Arreola, P.O. Box 2427, La Pine Chapter 13

Richard A. Pauls, 3343 Knob Hill Way, Prineville Jessica M. Knox, 3017 S.W. Pumice Ave., Redmond Karo D. Long, 12149 Peninsula Drive, Crooked River Ranch

Filed Aug. 31

Dolores Blackburn, 830 N.E. Elm St., Apt 213, Prineville Michael H. Price, 653 N.E. 12th St., Bend

Jonathan B. Prom, 1113 S.W. 31st, Redmond Franky W. Ross, 52841 Day Road, La Pine Darlene L. Parr, 62866 Bilyeu Way, Bend

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DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS? Non-commercial advertisers may place an ad with our "QUICK CASH SPECIAL" 1 week 3 lines, $12 or 2 weeks, $20! Ad must include price of single item of $500 or less, or multiple items whose total does not exceed $500.

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CASH!! For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Supplies. 541-408-6900.

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Wanted: $Cash paid for vintage costume jewelry. Top dollar paid for Gold/Silver.I buy by the GENERATE SOME exEstate, Honest Artist citement in your Elizabeth,541-633-7006 neighborhood! Plan a garage sale and don't Wanted! forget to advertise in Pellet stove classified! 541-382-4144 541-385-5809. WANTED: RAZORS, Call Classifieds at Table, solid oak pedDouble or single541-385-5809 edged, straight estal, w/ 4 upholwww.bendbulletin.com razors, shaving stered chairs on rollbrushes, mugs & ers. $350 OBO. scuttles, strops, 541-647-1333 German Shepherd shaving accessories purebred, spayed fe& memorabilia. male, 4 yrs, current The Bulletin Fair prices paid. shots, very sweet, r ecommends extra Call 541-390-7029 caution when purgreat w/ people. $500 between 10 am-3 pm. chasing products or firm. 541-647-7064. 208 services from out of Kittens/cats avail. thru the area. Sending Pets & Supplies rescue group. Tame, cash, checks, or shots, altered, ID chip, credit information more. Sat/Sun 1-5, The Bulletin recommay be subjected to other days by appt. mends extra caution FRAUD. For more 65480 78th Bend, when purchasinformation about an 541-389-8420; visit ing products or seradvertiser, you may www.craftcats.org for vices from out of the call the Oregon photos & more. area. Sending cash, State Attorney checks, or credit in- Lab Pups AKC, black General’s Office formation may be Consumer Protec& yellow, Master subjected to fraud. tion hotline at Hunter sired, perforFor more informa1-877-877-9392. mance pedigree, OFA tion about an advercert hips & elbows, tiser, you may call Call 541-771-2330 the Oregon State www.kinnamanretrievers.com Attorney General’s Labradoodles - Mini & 212 Office Consumer Protection hotline at med size, several colors Antiques & 541-504-2662 1-877-877-9392. www.alpen-ridge.com Collectibles People Look for Information Antiques wanted: tools, About Products and furniture, fishing, marbles, old signs, Aussies,Mini/Toy's AKC Services Every Day through toys, costume jewelry. all colors parents on The Bulletin Classifieds Call 541-389-1578 site 1st shots,wormed 541-598-5314/788-7799 Lionhead mix baby bun- Dog Houses, Large Ignies, 4 @ $15 each. Full loo, $60, Smaller one, Australian Shepherd adult female Lionhead, $25, 541-593-4456. Mix Pups, 1 week old, $15. 541-548-0747 reserve now, 4 left, The Bulletin reserves Yorkie-Maltese pups, 1 $100, 541-815-9257 the right to publish all white female, $300, 1 ads from The Bulletin white male, $250, 1 black Just too many newspaper onto The & gold male, $250, Cash, collectibles? Bulletin Internet web541-546-7909 site. Maltese Toy AKC, champ Sell them in lines, extra small, The Bulletin Classiieds 541-420-1577 215

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LEARN TO SHOOT LIKE THE COPS plus UTAH Permit class. $99. Sisters, 1 p.m. Sun. Sept. 9. Call 817-789-5395 www.reacttrainingsystems.com Male black hunting Lab looking for AKC female to breed. My lab is pointing, hi-power, hand signals, AKC pending, good hunter. Let’s talk! 541-408-4528 OREGON’S LARGEST GUN & KNIFE SHOW Sept. 8 & 9 Sat. 9-6 • Sun. 9-4 ADM: $9 Portland Expo Center I-5 Exit 306B Call Classifieds at For Info: 503-363-9564 541-385-5809 www.wesknodelgunwww.bendbulletin.com shows.com Remington 243 788 carEAA Elite Witness Match bine, scope, sling, nice! pistol, .45 ACP, two$500. 541-788-8137 tone, adj. sights,10-rnd mag, case, & ammo. Find exactly what $400. 541-977-3173 you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS FNAR, semi-auto .308, $1200, please call Taurus Model 66, 541-571-9833. stainless 3”,.357, NIB, wood grips, $400, Howa 30-06, $300; ItalNorm, 541-318-1619 ian coach gun 20 ga., $300 + 7 boxes ammo; Wanted: Collector five game winches, seeks high quality never lift an animal in fishing items. your pickup again! At Call 541-678-5753, or my cost $220 each; 503-351-2746 8’ Leer canopy, missing rear door, $250 Weatherby 7mm Mags 541-480-1536 (2), 1 left hand, 1 right hand,scope,slink, case, exc. new cond., $1095 HUNTERS in Silvies each 541-593-8294. Hunt Unit. Cabin in the pines with run- Weatherby Orion 12 ga. ning water and O/U $875. Ithaca 20 amenities, green yard. ga. O/U $575. ContiOr, looking for a private nental Arms .410 place to set up your $150 541-306-0346. camp trailers? MulWin Model 70 Lighttiple night discounts. weight, RMEF SponCall (541) 589-1130 sor Rifle, 30.06 cal., View at Nikon 3-9 Variable www.elkridgecabin.com scope, bore sighted, but never fired, $700, Kimber 1911 Ultra incl. 1 box premium Carry 9mm. $650. shells, 541-410-6242 Call 503-320-3008 255

La Pine Sportsman Jamboree Gun-Knife Archery-Coin Collectible Show!

Computers

Pit bull terrier puppy, Coins & Stamps Beautiful Purebred, 7 THE BULLETIN remo, neutered, all Barn/shop cats FREE, quires computer adPrivate collector buying shots. Great with (Sponsored by La Pine some tame, some not. vertisers with multiple postage stamp alsmall kids & cats! Senior Activity Ctr & We deliver! Fixed, ad schedules or those bums & collections, La Pine Park & Rec Dist) $250, 541 306 8640 shots, etc. 389-8420 selling multiple sysworld-wide and U.S. Exhibits, Antique & tems/ software, to dis573-286-4343 (local, Modern Firearms - Trade, POODLE (TOY) PUPS close the name of the cell #) Well-socialized & lovSwap, Sell or Buy! business or the term able. 541-475-3889 Sat 9/8, 9-5; Sun 9/9, 9-3 241 "dealer" in their ads. LaPine Parks&Rec Bldg Queensland Heelers Private party advertis(corner 1st & Morson) Bicycles & standard & mini,$150 & ers are defined as Adults $5 ($4 w/trade gun) Accessories up. 541-280-1537 http:// those who sell one Children 12 & under free! Boston Terrier pups, rightwayranch.wordpress.com computer. very social, 2 females Bike trailer, Bob Yack, Call Andi, 541-536-6237 left, hand raised, dew Schnauzer Miniature never used, $280 firm, 257 claws removed, 1st male puppy. Family 541-617-9260. FIND YOUR FUTURE Musical Instruments shots, $600 ea.. raised, vaccinations & HOME IN THE BULLETIN 541-815-2216 or groomed. $350. Mtn. Bike, Jamiz Full Crate Electra Guitar, w/ 541-815-5651 Suspension new 541-771-1830. Your future is just a page amplifier, $75, tires, & just tuned up, away. Whether you’re looking 541-593-4398. exc. cond., $500 for a hat or a place to hang it, THANKS to Mike & the OBO, 541-410-6242. team at M.C. Smith The Bulletin Classiied is 260 Sign Co. for their onyour best source. 245 Misc. Items going suport of Cat Every day thousands of Rescue, Adoption & Golf Equipment buyers and sellers of goods 22’ alum. semi-truck trlr, Foster Team, with Boxer puppies, AKC reg, best used for storage, and services do business in great signs/banners & Taylor Made Rocket 1st shots, very social $500. 541-447-4405 these pages. They know for accepting cans/ $700. 541-325-3376 Balls Irons, 4-Pitching bottles on site for onwedge, $435, leave you can’t beat The Bulletin Buying Diamonds Chihuahua, teacups (2), Classiied Section for going fundraising. You msg at 541-480-1014 /Gold for Cash shots & dewormed, selection and convenience rock! Purrs to you! Saxon’s Fine Jewelers $250 ea,541-977-0035 246 - every item is just a phone www.craftcats.org 541-389-6655 call away. Guns, Hunting Chi-pom mix pups, BUYING males & females, 6 Whippet Puppies, 1st & Fishing The Classii ed Section is shots. Amazing pets. Lionel/American Flyer weeks old. Females easy to use. Every item $350. 541-280-1975. trains, accessories. $200 males $175. Beretta 686 white onyx, is categorized and every 541-408-2191. Cash only. 30” 12 ga,O/U shotgun cartegory is indexed on the 210 541-480-2824 w/chokes, $1550. Call BUYING & SELLING section’s front page. Furniture & Appliances Ralph, 541-255-3242. All gold jewelry, silver Chocolate lab pups, 5 Whether you are looking for and gold coins, bars, weeks, shots & a home or need a service, Browning Midas Comrounds, wedding sets, A1 Washers&Dryers wormed, 541-389-2283 pound Bow, many ex- your future is in the pages of class rings, sterling sil$150 ea. Full warThe Bulletin Classii ed. tras, soft case, new Doxie AKC mini pups, all ver, coin collect, vinranty. Free Del. Also arrows, hunt ready, colors inc wheaton &dapl, tage watches, dental wanted, used W/D’s exc. cond., $250, $375-425. 541-508-4558 gold. Bill Fleming, 541-280-7355 www.bendweenies.com 541-382-9419. 541-410-6242.

541-385-5809

COWGIRL CASH

BULLETIN CLASSIFIEDS Search the area’s most comprehensive listing of classiied advertising... real estate to automotive, merchandise to sporting goods. Bulletin Classiieds appear every day in the print or on line. Call 541-385-5809 www.bendbulletin.com

Moving Boxes, 4 sizes, 200 total, cost $300, Asking $100 OBO. 541-306-4181 Stained Glass, 4.5’x 4.5’, beautiful ocean scenery with tropical fish. $800. 541-233-6520. 261

Medical Equipment

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD... To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery and inspection. • A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’ • Receipts should include name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased. • Firewood ads MUST include species and cost per cord to better serve our customers.

O r e g o n Farm Market

Employment

300 400 325

421

Hay, Grain & Feed

Schools & Training

Premium 1st cutting Orchard Grass hay, shed stored, 70-lb bales, $225/ton. Call Ten Barr Ranch, 541-389-1165

TRUCK SCHOOL

Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedding Straw & Garden Straw;Compost.546-6171

www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-387-9252 454

Looking for Employment

Wheat straw, small 50-lb couple bales, in stack, $1.00 Experienced avail. for housesitting ea. 541-546-9821 Oct. 1. 541-410-4794 341

Horses & Equipment Dry Juniper Firewood $225 per cord, split. 1/2 cords available. Immediate delivery! 541-408-6193

Mini ponies, mares and studs, $250 and up. 541-923-3530.

269

Livestock & Equipment

Gardening Supplies & Equipment

9 7 7 0 2

345

476

Employment Opportunities CAUTION READERS: Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly.

Golden Power Wheelchair, like new, bright red, exc. cond., used For newspaper only 3 mo, orig. delivery, call the $3500, sacrifice at Circulation Dept. at $2000, 541-848-7755 1977 14' Blake Trailer, 541-385-5800 or 541-948-7518. or refurbished by To place an ad, call dorene@quailbend.com Frenchglen Black541-385-5809 smiths, a Classy ClasLift Recliner Chair, w/ or email sic. Great design for attached remote conclassified@bendbulletin.com multiple uses. Overtrol, taupe color, exc. head tack box (bunk- Use extra caution when cond., used 1 yr., house) with side and applying for jobs on$1000 new, now easy pickup bed ac$400,541-848-7755 or line and never process; manger with left 541-948-7518. or McPheeters Turf Fall vide personal inforside access, windows dorene@quailbend.com Nursery Sale: Trees mation to any source and head divider. Toyo & Shrubs Only, Sept. you may not have reCheck out the radial tires & spare; 7th-15th, closed Sun. searched and deemed new floor with mats; classiieds online Cash & Check Only. to be reputable. Use center partition panel; www.bendbulletin.com All Sales Final. extreme caution when bed liner coated in key Updated daily 541-546-9081 responding to ANY areas, 6.5 K torsion online employment axles with electric 263 Prompt Delivery ad from out-of-state. brakes, and new paint, Rock, Sand & Gravel Tools $7500 OBO! Call Multiple Colors, Sizes We suggest you call John at 541-589-0777. Delta 10” tablesaw, $350. Instant Landscaping Co. the State of Oregon 541-389-9663 Grizzly ½” drill press, 358 Consumer Hotline at $100. Lathe tools, $45. 1-503-378-4320 Farmers Column SUPER TOP SOIL 541-815-0665 www.hersheysoilandbark.com Honda 3000 Generator, Screened, soil & com- 80 lineal ft. of welded For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bu2010, low hrs., $2200 post mixed, no pipe horse corral, 4reau of Labor & In541-749-8060. rocks/clods. High hu- rail, 2” pipe with 3” dustry, Civil Rights mus level, exc. for posts & 2 feeders. Router, Craftsman, 1.5 Division, flower beds, lawns, $300 541-410-3218 hp, $30, 971-673-0764 gardens, straight 541-593-4398 383 screened top soil. If you have any ques265 Bark. Clean fill. DeProduce & Food tions, concerns or liver/you haul. Building Materials comments, contact: 541-548-3949. THOMAS ORCHARDS Classified Department Kimberly, OR La Pine Habitat The Bulletin 270 U-Pick & Ready Picked: RESTORE 541-385-5809 Freestone Canning Lost & Found Building Supply Resale peaches: Suncrest, LorQuality at ing, Elberta, Angelus, Found Set of Keys, atLOW PRICES tached to pink slipper, Necarines, Plums, Bar52684 Hwy 97 8/29, on Baker Rd, tlett Pears, Gala Apples 541-536-3234 BRING CONTAINERS 541-317-9326 Call a Pro Open to the public . Open 7 days a week 8am-6 pm only Whether you need a Window, Milgard 4’x6’, Found Siamese cat new, $85, call fence ixed, hedges friendly female, cor- Visit541-934-2870. us on Facebook 541-593-4398. ner of 21st. and Timtrimmed or a house for updates ber, Redmond. if unAlso we are at Bend 266 built, you’ll ind claimed free to good Farmer’s Mkt at Drake Heating & Stoves professional help in home. 541-604-0063. Park & St. Charles The Bulletin’s “Call a NOTICE TO Injured bicycle found Call The Bulletin At Service Professional” ADVERTISER tied to a tree. Old 541-385-5809 Since September 29, Bend-Redmond Hwy Directory 1991, advertising for and 93rd St., Call to Place Your Ad Or E-Mail 541-385-5809 At: www.bendbulletin.com used woodstoves has ID 541-312-8955 been limited to models which have been Lost: 8/29, Blue Surf-Tec stand up paddle board, certified by the OrData Center Network corner of Columbia & egon Department of Technicians Shevlin Hixon Dr., Environmental Qual541-610-4086 ity (DEQ) and the fedFacebook is hiring! We’re seeking a highly eral Environmental motivated Data Center Network Technician Protection Agency Lost Siamese cat near COCC. She’s a Seal (EPA) as having met to help us build a world-class facility at our Point with blue eyes smoke emission stanPrineville, Oregon location. and white feet. $100 dards. A certified reward if found call. woodstove may be The ideal candidate will have 3+ years’ 541-306-3078. identified by its certifiexperience in data center network deploycation label, which is ment, strong troubleshooting skills, a solid REMEMBER: If you permanently attached understanding of Layer 2 and Layer 3 have lost an animal, to the stove. The Bulnetwork switching/routing, and experience don't forget to check letin will not knowin configuring and supporting Cisco, The Humane Society ingly accept advertisJuniper, and F5 devices. in Bend 541-382-3537 ing for the sale of Redmond, uncertified 541-923-0882 For more information woodstoves. Prineville, please visit our careers page 541-447-7178; Wanted! https://www.facebook.com/career Pellet stove OR Craft Cats, or email ristine@fb.com. 541-382-4144 541-389-8420.


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

F2 WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD Edited by Will Shortz

PLACE AN AD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . .11:00 am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Starting at 3 lines

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

*UNDER $500 in total merchandise

OVER $500 in total merchandise

7 days .................................................. $10.00 14 days ................................................ $16.00

Garage Sale Special

4 days .................................................. $18.50 7 days .................................................. $24.00 14 days .................................................$33.50 28 days .................................................$61.50

4 lines for 4 days.................................. $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

PRIVATE PARTY RATES

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702

PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday. 476

476

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Banking

We are excited to announce an available position in Bend, Oregon. Branch Supervisor Salary Range: $ 29,000 - $40,000 EOE. For more details, please apply online: www.sofcu.com Caregiver – All Shifts avail. Apply in person. Interviews this week. 1099 NE Watt Way, Bend.

DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW?

Call The Bulletin before 11 a.m. and get an ad in to publish the next day!

541-385-5809. VIEW the Classifieds at:

www.bendbulletin.com

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin' s web site will be able to click through automatically to your site. Resort Housekeeping The Pines at Sunriver, call 541-593-2160.

282

Sales Northwest Bend Estate Sale, Fri-Sat 9/7-8, 8am-3pm. Furn, W/D, desk, much more! 931 NW Milwaukie. Large Multi-Family & Neighborhood Yard Sale! Everything Must Go! Furniture, household items, artwork, area rugs, antiques, etc. 1142 NW Knoxville, Fri 8-4, Sat. 8-3. 284

Sales Southwest Bend Multi-Family Sale! 61451 Rock Bluff Lane, Fri-Sat, 9-3. Dressers, tables & chairs, furniture, household misc., lots of stuff! 286

The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to FRAUD. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Saturday, Sept. 8th 8:00 am - 3:00 pm Antique gas generator, Electric dryer, Propane Camp Oven/Range, Computer desk/Entertainment Center, Chain saw, tent, Riot Slice Whitewater kayak. 292

HH FREE HH

Sales Other Areas

Garage Sale Kit

232 SW Meadowlakes Dr., Prineville. Tools, power equipment, hardwood lumber, fishing gear, women’s stuff. Thurs-Fri-Sat, 8-5. 541-815-0665 Huge Craft Supplies Sale. Get ready for holiday bazaars. Floral, fabric & more. Fri. & Sat., 9:30-4, 18238 Fadjur Ln., Sisters. Indoor-Outdoor MultiFamily Sale! Fri-Sat, Sept. 7-8, 8am-5pm, 2565 SW Bear Dr., Madras. Desk, file cabinet, tires, area rugs, furniture, household items, linens, bedding, vanity cabinet, portable 12-volt 3000-lb winch, mechanics creeper, fishing gear, horse tack, Schwinn bike, collectibles, Savage 308, Remington 700, 30-06, ammo & much more!

KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $2.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!”

PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT at

1777 SW Chandler Ave., Bend, OR 97702

HUGE Downsizing Sale Sept. 7th & 8th, 7 am. Years of collecting, Great stuff for everyone! FREE Cookies, 20660 Bouderfield.

Houses for Rent General

Rentals

500 600 528

605

Loans & Mortgages

Roommate Wanted

Crooked River Ranch, 1350 sq.ft. ranch home, 2 bdrm., 2 bath, dbl. garage, cement patio, mtn. views, no smoking, 1 small pet neg., $795, 541-548-4225. 650

Roommate wanted, male Houses for Rent WARNING or female, call Jennifer, The Bulletin recomNE Bend 541-876-5106 La Pine mends you use caution when you pro4 Bdrm 2.5 bath, 1700 sq Need help ixing stuff? vide personal ft, appls, fenced yd, on Call A Service Professional information to compaculdesac. No smoking. ind the help you need. nies offering loans or Pets? 2400 NE Jeni Jo www.bendbulletin.com Ct., near hospital. credit, especially $1050. 503-680-9590 those asking for ad630 vance loan fees or Quiet 2-1/2 bath, 2 bedRooms for Rent companies from out of room Duplex.Firestate. If you have place, single car gaMt. Bachelor Motel has concerns or quesrage, water & rooms, starting $150/ tions, we suggest you landscaping paid. week or $35/nt. Incl consult your attorney Looking for your next $725/mo. with $1000 guest laundry, cable & or call CONSUMER employee? security. No smoking/ WiFi. 541-382-6365 HOTLINE, Place a Bulletin help pets. 541 460-3010 1-877-877-9392. wanted ad today and Studios & Kitchenettes reach over 60,000 Furnished room, TV w/ BANK TURNED YOU readers each week. cable, micro & fridge. Looking for your next DOWN? Private party employee? Your classified ad Utils & linens. New will loan on real esPlace a Bulletin help will also appear on owners.$145-$165/wk tate equity. Credit, no wanted ad today and bendbulletin.com 541-382-1885 problem, good equity reach over 60,000 which currently is all you need. Call 634 readers each week. receives over 1.5 now. Oregon Land Your classified ad million page views Apt./Multiplex NE Bend Mortgage 388-4200. will also appear on every month at bendbulletin.com, no extra cost. CHECK OUT THIS LOCAL MONEY:We buy currently receiving Bulletin Classifieds HOT DEAL! secured trust deeds & over 1.5 million page Get Results! note,some hard money $299 1st month’s rent! * views, every month Call 385-5809 loans. Call Pat Kelley 2 bdrm, 1 bath at no extra cost. or place 541-382-3099 ext.13. $530 & 540 Bulletin Classifieds your ad on-line at Carports & A/C incl! Reverse Mortgages Get Results! bendbulletin.com Fox Hollow Apts. by local expert Mike Call 541-385-5809 or (541) 383-3152 LeRoux NMLS57716 Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co place your ad on-line Call to learn more. *Upstairs only with lease* at Where can you ind a 541-350-7839 bendbulletin.com Call for Specials! helping hand? Security1 Lending Limited numbers avail. NMLS98161 From contractors to 1, 2 and 3 bdrms. The Bulletin yard care, it’s all here W/D hookups, patios 573 To Subscribe call or decks. in The Bulletin’s Business Opportunities 541-385-5800 or go to MOUNTAIN GLEN, “Call A Service www.bendbulletin.com 541-383-9313 Professional” Directory Professionally Looking for your 663 managed by Norris & next employee? Houses for Rent Stevens, Inc. Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and Madras 636 reach over 60,000 Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 3 bedroom, 1 bath, wood readers each week. Your classified ad stove, possible garage, Fully furnished loft Apt will also appear on greenhouse, lots of on Wall Street in ground, $500 mo. Call bendbulletin.com Bend, with parking. All which currently re541-475-3519 utilities paid. Call ceives over 1.5 mil541-389-2389 for appt lion page views The Bulletin is your every month at 288 Small studio downtown no extra cost. Employment area, all util. pd. $550, Sales Southeast Bend Bulletin Classifieds $525 dep. No pets/ Get Results! Call Marketplace smoking. 541-3302 FAMILY SALE!! 385-5809 or place 9769 or 541-480-7870 911 SE Polaris Ct. your ad on-line at Call Sat. & Sun, 8-5. bendbulletin.com 642 A lot of quality items! Apt./Multiplex Redmond 541-385-5809 First Ever Fri. Only, 9-4, Need to get an 2256 SE Velocette Ln, Duplex 3 bdrm, 2 bath, to advertise. tools, furniture, colad in ASAP? 1260 sq.ft., 1 story, galectables, books, rage w/opener, fenced You can place it household items, woyard, RV/Boat parking, www.bendbulletin.com online at: mens clothes; sizes fridge, dishwasher, mi2-4, toys & more. cro, walk-in laundry, www.bendbulletin.com W/S/G paid, front gardner paid, $775+dep., GARAGE SALE 541-385-5809 541-604-0338 61258 Mt Vista Drive -

Sales Northeast Bend

Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE!

648

Finance & Business

Independent Contractor

H Supplement Your Income H

Operate Your Own Business

FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF

Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor

& Call Today & We are looking for independent contractors to service home delivery routes in:

Real Estate For Sale

Boats & RV’s

800

700

SW Bend Deschutes Landing Riverfront Townhomes Starting in the low $400,000s Pahlisch Homes The Hasson Company Realtors. Edie Delay, Broker 541-420-2950, Julie Burgoni, Broker 541-306-8927

H Prineville, Sunriver/La Pine H Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours.

Southeast Bend Homes

749

Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 during business hours apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com

870

Boats & Accessories

1/4 Mi. Deschutes River frontage. Custom single level 3 bdrm, 3 bath, 3962 sq.ft., 12.72 acre gated community, private setting. $997,000. 745 860 MLS #201205961. Pam Lester, Principal Motorcycles & Accessories Homes for Sale Broker, Century 21 Gold Country Realty, Harley Davidson Soft4 Bedroom, 2.5 bath, 1963 sq. ft. home lo- Inc. 541-504-1338 Tail Deluxe 2007, cated in the heart of white/cobalt, w/pasPrineville. This lovely Looking for your next senger kit, Vance & traditional style home Hines muffler system employee? has a low mainte- Place a Bulletin help & kit, 1045 mi., exc. nance yard, solid wanted ad today and cond, $19,999, wood cabinetry 541-389-9188. reach over 60,000 throughout, as well as readers each week. Harley Heritage a tile entry, and lamiYour classified ad Softail, 2003 nate wood floors. will also appear on $5,000+ in extras, Master on the main bendbulletin.com $2000 paint job, floor and a bonus which currently re30K mi. 1 owner, room over the garage. ceives over For more information Wiring for AC unit is 1.5 million page please call already there, short views every month 541-385-8090 distance to movies, at no extra cost. or 209-605-5537 restaurants, and Bulletin Classifieds shopping. MLS Get Results! HD FAT BOY #201108663 Call 385-5809 or $159,950. 1996 place your ad on-line Team Clark Completely rebuilt/ at Century 21, customized, low bendbulletin.com Gold Country Realty miles. Accepting of541-548-2131 fers. 541-548-4807 755 4270 sq ft, 6 bdrm, 6 ba, 4-car, corner, .83 acre Sunriver/La Pine Homes Find It in mtn view, by owner. $590,000 541-390-0886 Ranch-style 3 bdrm, 2 The Bulletin Classifieds! bath, open floorplan, See: bloomkey.com/8779 541-385-5809 DRRH area, ½ ac., BANK OWNED HOMES! adjoining ½ ac. view FREE List w/Pics! lot can be purchased HD Screaming Eagle Electra Glide 2005, www.BendRepos.com separately. bend and beyond real estate 103” motor, two tone 509-585-9050. 20967 yeoman, bend or candy teal, new tires, 23K miles, CD player, BUNGALOW ON THE Advertise your car! hydraulic clutch, exAdd A Picture! WESTSIDE! cellent condition. Cute with endless pos- Reach thousands of readers! Call 541-385-5809 Highest offer takes it. sibilities to re-design 541-480-8080. or plenty of room to The Bulletin Classifieds add additional square Honda C70 Motorbike 773 footage on this large 1980, Classic, excepAcreages double lot. Sturdy tional cond., 2000 mi., construction of a bynew tires & tune-up, gone era with all the *** $900 firm, quirky charm you just CHECK YOUR AD 541-617-9260. don’t find in modern Please check your ad homes today. on the first day it runs Honda Elite 80 2001, 1400 mi., absolutely $219,900 to make sure it is corlike new., comes w/ MLS#201204713 rect. Sometimes incarrying rack for 2” Rhonda Garrison & structions over the receiver, ideal for use Chris Sperry Principhone are misunderw/motorhome, $995, pal Broker & Broker stood and an error 541-546-6920 541-279-1768 & can occur in your ad. 541-550-4922 If this happens to your Honda Trail 110, great John L. Scott Real ad, please contact us cond, 3000 mi., $1300 Estate, Bend the first day your ad OBO, 541-447-5807 www.JohnLScott.com/Bend appears and we will be happy to fix it as Honda Valkyrie 2001, NOTICE: $7000; Kawasaki soon as we can. All real estate adverKLR650 2008, $4500; Deadlines are: Weektised here in is subKawasaki Ninja 250 days 11:00 noon for ject to the Federal 2007, $2500, all in exc. next day, Sat. 11:00 Fair Housing Act, cond., 541-388-1699. a.m. for Sunday and which makes it illegal Monday. to advertise any prefMoped Trike 2011 only 541-385-5809 erence, limitation or used 3 months, street Thank you! discrimination based legal. Please call The Bulletin Classified on race, color, reli541-433-2384 for * * * gion, sex, handicap, more information and familial status or na- Powell Butte 6 acres, details. tional origin, or inten- 360 views, great horse tion to make any such property, 10223 HousSoftail Deluxe preferences, limita- ton Lake Rd. $99,900. 2010, 805 miles, tions or discrimination. 541-350-4684 Black Chameleon. We will not knowingly accept any advertis775 $17,000 ing for real estate Call Don @ Manufactured/ which is in violation of 541-410-3823 Mobile Homes this law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings ad- FACTORY SPECIAL 865 vertised are available New Home, 3 bdrm,1026 ATVs sq.ft., $46,900 finished on an equal opportunity basis. The Bulle- on your site,541.548.5511 www.JandMHomes.com tin Classified

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classiieds

Must have reliable, insured vehicle.

750

Redmond Homes

NE Bend McCall Landing Our Newest Community Starting in the Mid $100,000’s. Pahlisch Homes The Hasson Company Realtors. Rhianna Kunkler, Broker, 541-306-0939

FIND YOUR FUTURE HOME IN THE BULLETIN Your future is just a page away. Whether you’re looking for a hat or a place to hang it, The Bulletin Classiied is your best source.

Honda TRX300 EX 2005 sport quad w/Rev, runs & rides great, new pipe & paddles incl. $1700 obo. 541-647-8931

Every day thousands of buyers and sellers of goods and services do business in these pages. They know you can’t beat The Bulletin Classiied Section for selection and convenience - every item is just a phone call away.

Yamaha Grizzly 700 FI 2009, 543 mi, 2WD/ 4WD, black w/EPS, fuel injection, independent rear suspension winch w/handle controls & remote, ps, auto, large racks, exc. cond., $7850, 541-322-0215

The Classiied Section is easy to use. Every item is categorized and every cartegory is indexed on the section’s front page. Whether you are looking for a home or need a service, your future is in the pages of The Bulletin Classiied.

Yamaha Kodiak 400, 2005 4x4, 2500 lb winch, gun rack & alum loading ramp, only 542 miles, show room cond, $4800. 541-280-9401

17’ 1984 Chris Craft - Scorpion, 140 HP inboard/outboard, 2 depth finders, trolling motor, full cover, EZ - Load trailer, $3500 OBO. 541-382-3728. 17’ Seaswirl 1988 open bow, rebuilt Chevy V6 engine, new upholstery, $4500 or best offer. 707-688-4523 Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classiieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates!

541-385-5809

18.5’ ‘05 Reinell 185, V-6 Volvo Penta, 270HP, low hrs., must see, $15,000, 541-330-3939 18.5’ Bayliner 185 2008. 3.0L, open bow, slim deck, custom cover & trailer, exc. cond., 30-35 total hrs., incl. 4 life vests, ropes, anchor, stereo, depth finder, $12,000, 541-729-9860.

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500. 541-389-1413

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530 Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

Used out-drive parts - Mercury OMC rebuilt marine motors: 151 $1595; 3.0 $1895; 4.3 (1993), $1995. 541-389-0435

Where buyers meet sellers. Every day thousands of buyers and sellers of goods and services do business in these pages. They know you can’t beat The Bulletin Classiied Section for selection and convenience - every item is just a phone call away.

Thousands of ads daily in print and online. To place your ad, visit www.bendbulletin.com or call 541-385-5809


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2012 F3

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Watercraft

Motorhomes

Motorhomes

Fifth Wheels

2007 SeaDoo 2004 Waverunner, excellent condition, LOW hours. Double trailer, lots of extras.

$10,000 541-719-8444 Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

Eddyline carbonlite Sky 10 Kayak and roller roof rack, like new. $895 OBO. 541-420-3277.

Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 in. kitchen slide out, new tires,under cover, hwy. miles only,4 door Southwind 35.5’ Triton, fridge/freezer ice- 2008,V10, 2 slides, Dumaker, W/D combo, pont UV coat, 7500 mi. Bought new at Interbath tub & $132,913; shower, 50 amp proasking $94,900. pane gen & more! Call 541-923-2774 $55,000. 541-948-2310

Carri-Lite Luxury 2009 by Carriage, 4 slideouts, inverter, satellite sys, fireplace, 2 flat screen TVs. $60,000. 541-480-3923

975

Sport Utility Vehicles

Automobiles

908

Aircraft, Parts & Service

Chevy Wagon 1957, 4-dr., complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453. Need to get an ad

Garage Sales

Monaco Dynasty 2004, loaded, 3 slides, diesel, Reduced - now $119,000, 541-9238572 or 541-749-0037

Komfort 25’ 2006, 1 slide, AC, TV, awning. NEW: tires, converter, batteries. Hardly used. $16,500. 541-923-2595

Montana 3400RL 2008, 4 slides, no smokers or pets, limited usage, 5500 watt Onan gen, solar panel, fireplace, dual A/C, central vac, elect. awning w/sunscreen arctic pkg, rear receiver, alum wheels, 2 TVs, many extras. $35,500. 541-416-8087

MONTANA 3585 2008, exc. cond., 3 slides, king bed, lrg LR, Arctic insulation, all options $37,500. 541-420-3250

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $ 500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for: $ $

10 - 3 lines, 7 days 16 - 3 lines, 14 days

(Private Party ads only) Sprinter 272RLS, 2009 29’, weatherized, like new, furnished & ready to go, incl Winegard Satellite dish,

Country Coach Intrigue 2002, 40' Tag axle. 400hp Cummins Diesel. two slide-outs. 41,000 miles, new tires & batteries. Most options. $95,000 OBO 541-678-5712

$26,995. 541-420-9964

National Sea Breeze 2004 M-1341 35’, gas, 2 power slides, upgraded queen mattress, hyd. leveling system, rear camera Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 28’ 2007,Gen, & monitor, only 6k mi. fuel station, exc cond. Reduced to $41,300! sleeps 8, black/gray 541-480-0617 interior, used 3X, $24,999. RV CONSIGNMENTS 541-389-9188 WANTED We Do The Work, You Looking for your Keep The Cash, Econoline RV 1989, next employee? On-Site Credit fully loaded, exc. cond, Place a Bulletin help Approval Team, 35K orig. mi., $22,750. wanted ad today and Web Site Presence, Call 541-546-6133. reach over 60,000 We Take Trade-Ins. readers each week. Free Advertising. TURN THE PAGE Your classified ad BIG COUNTRY RV For More Ads will also appear on Bend 541-330-2495 bendbulletin.com Redmond: 541-548-5254 The Bulletin which currently receives over 1.5 million page views evTick, Tock CAN’T BEAT THIS! ery month at no Look before you Tick, Tock... extra cost. Bulletin buy, below market Classifieds Get Revalue! Size & mile...don’t let time get sults! Call 385-5809 age DOES matter! or place your ad away. Hire a Class A 32’ Hurrion-line at cane by Four Winds, professional out 2007. 12,500 mi, all bendbulletin.com of The Bulletin’s amenities, Ford V10, lthr, cherry, slides, “Call A Service People Look for Information like new! New low About Products and Professional” price, $54,900. Services Every Day through 541-548-5216 Directory today! The Bulletin Classifieds

Pilgrim 27’, 2007 5th wheel, 1 slide, AC, TV,full awning, excellent shape, $23,900. 541-350-8629

Pilgrim Open Road 2005, 36’, 3 slides, w/d hookup, upgrades, $24,440. 541-312-4466

Regal Prowler AX6 Extreme Edition 38’ ‘05, 4 slides,2 fireplaces, all maple cabs, king bed/ bdrm separated w/slide glass dr,loaded,always garaged,lived in only 3 mo,brand new $54,000, still like new, $28,500, will deliver,see rvt.com, ad#4957646 for pics. Cory, 541-580-7334 Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS Roadranger 27’ 1993, A/C, awning, sleeps 6, exc. cond., used little, $4,495 OBO. 541-389-8963

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 (This special package is not available on our website)

www.hirealicensedcontractor. com

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Pickups

900

Hunter’s Delight! Package deal! 1988 Win- Winnebago Class C 27’ Fleetwood Wilderness 1992, Ford 460 V8,64K nebago Super Chief, 36’, 2005, 4 slides, mi., good cond., $7000 38K miles, great rear bdrm, fireplace, OBO 541-678-5575 shape; 1988 Bronco II AC, W/D hkup beau4x4 to tow, 130K tiful unit! $30,500. mostly towed miles, Garage Sales 541-815-2380 nice rig! $15,000 both. 541-382-3964, leave Garage Sales msg.

Immaculate!

NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website

933

Antique & Classic Autos

in ASAP?

Itasca Sun Cruiser Find them 1997, 460 Ford, Class A, 26K mi., 37’, living in room slide, new awThe Bulletin nings, new fridge, 8 new tires, 2 A/C, 6.5 Classiieds Onan Gen., new batteries, tow pkg., rear 541-385-5809 towing TV, 2 tv’s, new Sea Kayaks - His & hydraulic jack springs, 881 Hers, Eddyline Wind tandem axel, $15,000, Dancers,17’, fiberglass Travel Trailers 541-385-1782 boats, all equip incl., paddles, personal flotation devices,dry bags, spray skirts,roof rack w/ towers & cradles -- Just Jayco Greyhawk Fleetwood 28’ Pioneer 2003, 13’ slide, sleeps add water, $1250/boat 2004, 31’ Class C, 6, walk-around bed with Firm. 541-504-8557. 6800 mi., hyd. jacks, new mattress; power new tires, slide out, hitch, very clean 880 exc. cond, $49,900, $11,500. Please call 541-480-8648 Motorhomes 541-548-4284. ROUA Digorgio 1971 fridge, heater, propane & elec. lights, awning, 2 spares, extra insulation for late season hunting/cold weather Allegro 2002, 2 slides, camping, well maint, 22K mi, workhorse very roomy, sleeps 5, chassis, 8.1 Chev en- Beaver Coach Marquis great for hunting, gine, like new, $41,900 40’ 1987. New cover, $3200, 541-410-6561 obo. 541-420-9346 new paint (2004), new inverter (2007). Onan Good classiied ads tell 6300 watt gen, 111K mi, the essential facts in an parked covered $35,000 obo. 541-419-9859 or interesting Manner. Write from the readers view - not 541-280-2014 the seller’s. Convert the Springdale 29’ 2007, facts into beneits. Show slide,Bunkhouse style, the reader how the item will sleeps 7-8, excellent help them in some way. condition, $16,900, 541-390-2504

Building/Contracting

Autos & Transportation

932

Home Improvement

Landscaping/Yard Care

Kelly Kerfoot Const.

Nelson Landscape Maintenance

28 yrs exp in Central OR!

Quality & honesty, from carpentry & handyman jobs, to expert wall covering install / removal. Sr. discounts CCB#47120 Licensed/bonded/insured 541-389-1413 / 410-2422

USE THE CLASSIFIEDS! Door-to-door selling with fast results! It’s the easiest way in the world to sell. The Bulletin Classiied

or call 503-378-4621. 541-385-5809 The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to con- Landscaping/Yard Care tracting with anyone. Some other trades NOTICE: OREGON also require addiLandscape Contractional licenses and tors Law (ORS 671) certifications. requires all businesses that advertise Debris Removal to perform Landscape Construction which includes: JUNK BE GONE planting, decks, I Haul Away FREE fences, arbors, For Salvage. Also water-features, and Cleanups & Cleanouts installation, repair of Mel, 541-389-8107 irrigation systems to be licensed with the Handyman Landscape Contractors Board. This ERIC REEVE HANDY 4-digit number is to be SERVICES. Home & included in all adverCommercial Repairs, tisements which indiCarpentry-Painting, cate the business has Pressure-washing, a bond, insurance and Honey Do's. On-time workers compensapromise. Senior tion for their employDiscount. Work guarees. For your protecanteed. 541-389-3361 tion call 503-378-5909 or 541-771-4463 or use our website: Bonded & Insured www.lcb.state.or.us to CCB#181595 check license status I DO THAT! before contracting Home/Rental repairs with the business. Small jobs to remodels Persons doing landHonest, guaranteed scape maintenance work. CCB#151573 do not require a LCB license. Dennis 541-317-9768

Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial •Sprinkler Repair •Sprinkler Installation •Back Flow Testing •Fire Prevention, Lot Clearing • Summer Clean up •Weekly Mowing •Bi-Monthly & Monthly Maintenance •Flower Bed Clean Up •Bark, Rock, Etc. •Senior Discounts

Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458 LCB#8759

Call The Yard Doctor for yard maintenance, thatching, sod, sprinkler blowouts, water features, more! Allen 541-536-1294 LCB 5012 Aeration/Fall Clean-up BOOK NOW! Weekly / one-time service avail. Bonded, insured, free estimates!

COLLINS Lawn Maint. Call 541-480-9714 Maverick Landscaping Mowing, weedeating, yard detailing, chain saw work & more! LCB#8671 541-923-4324 Holmes Landscape Maint

• Clean-up • Aerate • De-thatch • Free Est. • Weekly / Bi-wkly Svc. call Josh 541-610-6011 Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classiieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates!

541-385-5809

SPRINTER 36’ 2005, $10,500 obo. Two slides, sleeps 5, queen air mattress, small sgl. bed, couch folds out. 1.5 baths, 541-382-0865, leave message!

Big Tex Landscaping/ ATV Trailer, dual axle flatbed, 7’x16’, 7000 lb. GVW, all steel, $1400. 541-382-4115, or 541-280-7024. Take care of your investments with the help from The Bulletin’s “Call A Service Professional” Directory

885

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads The Bulletin

GMC ½ ton 1971, Only $19,700! Original low mile, exceptional, 3rd owner. 951-699-7171 Say “goodbuy” to that unused item by placing it in The Bulletin Classiieds

541-385-5809

931

Automotive Parts, Service & Accessories

Mercury Monterrey 1965, Exc. All original, 4-dr. sedan, in storHonda Accord 1981 age last 15 yrs., 390 parts car, $250. High Compression 541-447-4405 engine, new tires & license, reduced to Set of 4 Enkei alloy $2850, 541-410-3425. wheels, silver & black, w/studded snow tires. fits Audi bolt pattern. $250. 541-408-5350

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Everything works, $1750/partial trade for car. 541-460-9127

Antique & Classic Autos

29th Annual Oregon High Desert Swap Meet & Car Show

Plymouth Barracuda 1966, original car! 300 hp, 360 V8, centerlines, (Original 273 eng & wheels incl.) 541-593-2597 933

Pickups

Saturday, September 8th. Starts 7 a.m. – Vendors 6:30 a.m. The Deschutes County Fairgrounds Chevy 3/4 ton 4x4, 1995, extended cab, and Expo Center, long box, grill guard, Redmond Oregon. running boards, bed Free admission to rails & canopy, 178K Lance 945 1995, 11’3”, the public. Special miles, $4800 obo. all appl., solar panel, antique section in208-301-3321 (Bend) new battery, exc. cond., doors with many $5995, 541-977-3181 dealers from the Pa- Ford F250 XLT ‘95, 4WD auto, long bed, 3/4 ton, cific Northwest. No 8600 GVW, white,178K Dogs Please. Contact mi, AC, pw, pdl, Sirius, Butch Ramsey for info tow pkg., bedliner, bed & reservations rail caps, rear slide phone: (541)548-4467 window, new tires, raonline: diator, water pump, bramsey@bendbroadband.com hoses, brakes, more, $5200, 541-322-0215 Canopies & Campers

Where buyers meet sellers Thousands of ads daily in print and online. To place your ad, visit www.bendbulletin.com or call 541-385-5809

2.5L 4-cyl engine, 5-spd standard trans, long bed, newer motor & paint, new clutch Porsche Cayenne 2004, & tires, excellent con86k, immac, dealer dition, clean, $4500. 541-598-3750 maint’d, loaded, now aaaoregonautosource.com Call 541-447-6552 $17000. 503-459-1580 Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809 Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com Toyota 4Runner Mercedes E320 2004, 4WD 1986, auto, 72K miles, silver/silver, V6, front wheel drive. 2 dr., $1200, Exc. cond. $12,900 Call 541-923-7384 541-788-4229

1/3 interest in Columbia 400, located at Fax it to 541-322-7253 Sunriver. $138,500. The Bulletin Classiieds Mitsubishi 3000 GT Call 541-647-3718 Ford Super Duty F-250 1999, auto., pearl 2001, 4X4, very good 1/3 interest in wellwhite, very low mi. equipped IFR Beech Chrysler 300 Coupe shape, V10 eng, $8500 $9500. 541-788-8218. OBO. 541-815-9939 1967, 440 engine, Bonanza A36, loauto. trans, ps, air, cated KBDN. $55,000. frame on rebuild, re541-419-9510 Toyota 4-Runner 4x4 Ltd, painted original blue, 2006, Salsa Red pearl, Executive Hangar original blue interior, GMC ½-ton Pickup, 49,990 miles, exlnt cond, at Bend Airport original hub caps, exc. professionally detailed, 1972, LWB, 350hi (KBDN) chrome, asking $9000 $24,599. 541-390-7649 motor, mechanically 60’ wide x 50’ deep, or make offer. Nissan Altima 3.5SR A-1, interior great; 940 w/55’ wide x 17’ high 2012, 13,200 mi., exc. 541-385-9350. body needs some bi-fold door. Natural Vans cond., 6-cyl., 270HP, TLC. $3131 OBO. gas heat, office, bath8-way power driver Call 541-382-9441 seat, 60/40 rear seat, room. Parking for 6 Chevy Astro leather steering wheel cars. Adjacent to Chrysler SD 4-Door Cargo Van 2001, with audio controls, Frontage Rd; great 1930, CDS Royal pw, pdl, great cond., AM/FM/CD/AUX with visibility for aviation Standard, 8-cylinder, business car, well Bose speakers, A/C, bus. 1jetjock@q.com body is good, needs International Flat Bluetooth, USB, back maint, regular oil 541-948-2126 some restoration, Bed Pickup 1963, 1 up camera, heated changes, $4500, runs, taking bids, ton dually, 4 spd. front seats, power please call 541-383-3888, trans., great MPG, moonroof & more. In 541-633-5149 541-815-3318 could be exc. wood Bend, below Blue hauler, runs great, Book at $24,000, new brakes, $1950. NISSAN QUEST (317) 966-2189 541-419-5480. 1996, 3-seat mini PORSCHE 914 1974, ONLY 1 OWNERSHIP van, extra nice in and Roller (no engine), out $3,400. Sold my SHARE LEFT! 935 lowered, full roll cage, Windstar, need anEconomical flying in Sport Utility Vehicles 5-pt harnesses, racother van! your own Cessna ing seats, 911 dash & 541-318-9999, ask 172/180 HP for only FIAT 1800 1978, 5-spd, door panels w/flowers Chevy Tahoe LS 2001 instruments, decent for Bob. Ask about $10,000! Based at 4x4. 120K mi, Power free trip to D.C. for & hummingbirds, shape, very cool! BDN. Call Gabe at seats, Tow Pkg, 3rd WWII vets. white soft top & hard $1699. 541-678-3249 Professional Air! row seating, extra top. Just reduced to 541-388-0019 tires, CD, privacy tint$3,750. 541-317-9319 975 ing, upgraded rims. Check out the or 541-647-8483 Automobiles Fantastic cond. $7995 classiieds online Contact Timm at www.bendbulletin.com 541-408-2393 for info Buicks! 1996 Regal, Updated daily or to view vehicle. 87k; 1997 LeSabre, 112k; and others! Porsche Carrera 1999 916 black metallic, 46k You’ll not find nicer Ford Escape 2006, Trucks & careful mi, beautiful, Buicks $4000 & up. Limited edition, 57K Ford Galaxie 500 1963, upgrades, Tiptronic. One look’s worth a mi, $10,950 OBO, call Heavy Equipment 2 dr. hardtop,fastback, thousand words. Call $20,000. 541-593-2394 Rod at 541-647-1650. 390 v8,auto, pwr. steer & Bob, 541-318-9999. radio (orig),541-419-4989 for an appt. and take a drive in a 30 mpg. car What are you Cadillac CTS Sedan Ford Excursion 2007, 29K, auto, exc. looking for? Toyota Camry’s 2005, 4WD, diesel, cond, loaded, $19,000. You’ll ind it in 1984, $1200 Diamond Reo Dump exc. cond., $19,900, 541-549-8828 Truck 1974, 12-14 call 541-923-0231. OBO, 1985 $1400 The Bulletin Classii eds Cadillac El Dorado yard box, runs good, OBO, 1986 parts 1994, Total cream $7900, 541-548-6812 car, $500; call for puff, body, paint, trunk GMC Denali 2003 541-385-5809 details, as showroom, blue loaded with options. 541-548-6592 leather, $1700 wheels Exc. cond., snow Ford Mustang Coupe w/snow tires although tires and rims in1966, original owner, car has not been wet Toyotas: 1999 Avalon cluded. 130k hwy V8, automatic, great in 8 years. On trip to miles. $12,000. 254k; 1996 Camry, shape, $9000 OBO. Boise avg. 28.5 mpg., 541-419-4890. 98k, 4 cyl. Lots of 530-515-8199 Econoline trailer $5400, 541-593-4016. miles left in these 16-Ton 29’ Bed, cars. Price? You tell w/fold up ramps, elec. Jeep Grand Cherokee, Ford Ranchero Cadillac Seville STS me! I’d guess brakes, Pintlehitch, 2006, GREAT COND, 1979 2003 - just finished $2000-$4000. black exterior, auto, $4900, 541-548-6812 with 351 Cleveland Your servant, Bob at $4900 engine work V6, Quadra-Trac, modified engine. 541-318-9999, no by Certified GM mepremium audio, 88K Body is in charge for looking. chanic. Has everymi, $11,000 OBO. excellent condition, thing but navigation. 541-389-8093 $2500 obo. Too many bells and 541-420-4677 whistles to list. I bought a new one. Peterbilt 359 potable VOLVO S40 2006 $6900 firm. water truck, 1990, Ford T-Bird 1966 541-420-1283 AWD, 66k miles, 3200 gal. tank, 5hp 390 engine, power pump, 4-3" hoses, $11,500 everything, new camlocks, $25,000. Jeep Willys 1947,custom, Chrysler 300 C SRT8 or best offer! paint, 54K original 541-820-3724 2006, exc. cond., small block Chevy, PS, miles, runs great, 541-678-3913 43,800 mi.,, loaded, OD,mags+ trailer.Swap 925 excellent cond. in & no DVD, $25,000, for backhoe.No am calls out. Asking $8,500. Utility Trailers 541-977-4921. Looking for your please. 541-389-6990 541-480-3179

Wheels (4), new, 20x7.5, GM,chrome, aluminum, 6x132 $125, 390-8386

Taurus 27.5’ 1988

Honda CR-Z Hybrid 2011, 7,000 miles, $19,995 #010017

Ford Ranger XLT 1998 X-cab

Chev Corvair Monza convertible,1964, new top & tranny, runs great, exlnt Ford Ranger 1999, 4x4, cruising car! $5500 obo. 71K, X-cab, XLT, 541-420-5205 auto, 4.0L, $7900 OBO. 541-388-0232

‘69 Chevy C-20 Pickup, all orig.Tubro 44; auto 4-spd,396, model CST w/all options, orig. owner, $24,000, 541-923-6049

Want to impress the relatives? Remodel your home with the help of a professional from The Bulletin’s “Call A Service Professional” Directory

Jeep Wrangler 1999, TJ Sahara Ed., 4.0L, exc. tires, body & paint. 69,700+ mi, hardtop + new full buckskin soft & bikini tops, Warn winch, motorhome tow pkg, stinger, alum wheels, $12,300. 541-617-9176

Ford Thunderbird 1988, 3.8 V-6, 35K actual mi., new hoses, belts, tires, battery, pb, ps, cruise, A/C, CD, exc. cond. in & out, 2nd owner, maint. records, must see & drive! New Price! - Now $2500, obo. 541-330-0733

SOLD IN 30 DAYS!! “Please discontinue this ad as the vehicle has been sold. I am pleased to tell you that I had posted it on Craig’s List on 6 different locations but it was the Bulletin ad that sold it!” Lee, G.

Nissan Murano SL-AWD 2004, 75k, all-weather tires, tow pkg, gold metallic, beige leather int., moonroof, .........

Want Results from qualified local buyers? Call us at 541-385-5809 and ask about our Wheel Deal special!

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Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subject to FRAUD. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

F4 WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2012 • THE BULLETIN %

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LEGAL NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF IN THE CIRCUIT SUPPLEMENTAL COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON BUDGET ADOPTION FOR THE COUNTY A supplemental OF DESCHUTES. In budget will be disthe Matter of the Escussed and adopted tate of SUSAN ANN for the fiscal year SOLBERG, DeJuly 1, 2012 to June ceased, Case No. 30, 2013 for the City 12PB0080. NOTICE of Redmond, State TO INTERESTED of Oregon. The PERSONS. NOTICE meeting will take IS HEREBY GIVEN place on the 11th that Thomas Cendday of September at rowski has been ap6:45 am at Redpointed personal mond Council representative for the Chambers. The Estate of Susan Ann purpose of the Solberg. All persons meeting is to dishaving claims against cuss and adopt the the trust estate are resolution for the required to present supplemental budthem, with vouchers get. A copy of the attached, to the unsupplemental buddersigned personal get may be inrepresentative at 747 spected or obtained SW Mill View Way, on or after SeptemBend, Oregon 97702, ber 5th. within four months after the date of first Get your publication of this notice, or the claims may business be barred. All persons whose rights may be affected by the proceedings may obtain additional information from the records of the court, With an ad in the personal repreThe Bulletin's sentative, or the lawyers for the personal representative, Ryan "Call A Service P. Correa. Dated and first published on AuProfessional" gust 29, 2012. THOMAS CENDROWSKI, Directory Personal Representative. LEGAL NOTICE USDA - Forest Service Deschutes National FIND YOUR FUTURE Forest HOME IN THE BULLETIN Sisters Ranger District Bend Broadband Your future is just a page Permit Re-issuance away. Whether you’re looking for a hat or a place to hang it, Additional Actions to the Reconstruction of a The Bulletin Classiied is Recreation Residence, your best source. Tract C Lot 43 Final Decision Memos Every day thousands of

sociated with the reconstruction of the cabin which were not included in a previous FDM. The projects are located on lands managed by the Deschutes National Forest. The projects are consistent with the Deschutes National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, as amended. The preliminary decision memos were subject to notice, comment, and appeal pursuant to 36 CFR 215. A legal notice announcing the

Pursuant to 36 CFR

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215.12 these FDM are not subject to appeal. For further information about the FDM please contact Sommer Moore, Sisters Ranger District, Post Office Box 249, Sisters, Oregon 97759 (541) 549-7706.

Tick, Tock Tick, Tock... ...don’t let time get away. Hire a professional out of The Bulletin’s “Call A Service Professional” Directory today!

IN G

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buyers and sellers of goods and services do business in these pages. They know you can’t beat The Bulletin Classiied Section for selection and convenience - every item is just a phone call away. The Classiied Section is easy to use. Every item is categorized and every cartegory is indexed on the section’s front page. Whether you are looking for a home or need a service, your future is in the pages of The Bulletin Classiied.

On August 29, 2012 District Ranger Kristie L. Miller signed two Final Decision Memos (FDM). The first FDM authorizes Bend Broadband to continue the operation and maintenance of existing facilities located on National Forest System land under a new 20-year term permit. The second FDM authorizes the owners of a Recreation Residence located on Lot C-43 of the Metolius River Tract to perform additional construction activities as-

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LEGAL NOTICE OREGON TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No: F537189 OR Unit Code: F Loan No: 0999887326/BEAVER Investor No: 168907981 Min No: 100356720050502997 AP #1: 112526 Title #: 120186417 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by JERRY A. BEAVER, MELISSA A. BEAVER as Grantor, to WESTERN TITLE AND ESCROW COMPANY as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR EDGEWATER LENDING GROUP INC. as Beneficiary. Dated August 16, 2006, Recorded August 21, 2006 as Instr. No. 2006-57211 in Book --- Page --- of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of DESCHUTES County; OREGON covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: A PARCEL OF LAND LOCATED IN THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER (NE 1/4 SE 1/4) OF SECTION 17, TOWNSHIP 18 SOUTH, RANGE 13, EAST OF WILLAMETTE MERIDIAN, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: PARCEL 3 OF MAJOR PARTITION 94-25 AND FILED IN THE COUNTY RECORDER'S OFFICE AS PARTITION PLAT 1995-49. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: 7 PYMTS FROM 11/01/11 TO 05/01/12 @ 679.23 $4,754.61 Sub-Total of Amounts in Arrears:$4,754.61 Together with any default in the payment of recurring obligations as they become due. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Trust Deed, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. The street or other common designation if any, of the real property described above is purported to be : 60980 KRAMER LANE, BEND, OR 97702 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street or other common designation. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: Principal $249,916.77, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from 10/01/11, and such other costs and fees are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. WHEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on October 1, 2012, at the hour of 10:00 A.M. in accord with the Standard Time, as established by ORS 187.110, INSIDE THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND, BEND , County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, (which is the new date, time and place set for said sale) sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor had or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S.86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation of the Trust Deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. It will be necessary for you to contact the undersigned prior to the time you tender reinstatement or payoff so that you may be advised of the exact amount, including trustee's costs and fees, that you will be required to pay. Payment must be in the full amount in the form of cashier's or certified check. The effect of the sale will be to deprive you and all those who hold by, through and under you of all interest in the property described above. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. The Beneficiary may be attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained may be used for that purpose. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If available, the expected opening bid and/or postponement information may be obtained by calling the following telephone number(s) on the day before the sale: (714) 480-5690 or you may access sales information at www.tacforeclosures.com/sales DATED: 05/23/12 CHRISTOPHER C. DORR, OSBA # 992526 By CHRISTOPHER C. DORR, ATTORNEY AT LAW DIRECT INQUIRIES TO: T.D. SERVICE COMPANY FORECLOSURE DEPARTMENT 4000 W. Metropolitan Drive Suite 400 Orange, CA 92868 (800) 843-0260 TAC# 958740 PUB: 08/15/12, 08/22/12, 08/29/12, 09/05/12

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LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES. In the Matter of the Estate of, ARRENE F. POWELL, Deceased. Case No.: 12PB0076. NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Linda M. Heath and Letha L. Powell have been appointed co-personal representatives of the Estate of Arrene F. Powell. All persons having claims against the estate are required to present them, with vouchers attached, to the co-personal representatives c/o Elliott, Anderson, Riquelme & Wilson, LLP, 1558 SW Nancy Way, Ste. 101, Bend, OR 97702, within four months after the date of first publication of this notice, or the claims may be barred. All persons whose rights may be affected by the proceedings may obtain additional information from the records of the court, the personal representatives, or the attorney for the personal representatives, Timothy G. Elliott, Anderson, Riquelme & Wilson, LLP, 1558 SW Nancy Way, Ste. 101, Bend OR 97702, (541) 383-3755, Fax: (541) 330-1480. Dated and first published on August 22, 2012. ELLIOTT, ANDERSON, RIQUELME & WILSON, LLP, Timothy G. Elliott, OSB No. 952553, tim@eaattorneys.com, Attorneys for Personal Representatives.

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Legal Notices g 30-day comment period was published in The Bulletin, the newspaper of record, on July 13, 2012; the 30-day public comment period ended on August 11, 2012. No comments expressing concern with the projects were received. One comment was received in regards to actions approved in the previous FDM for the project on Lot C-43. Discussion on that comment was addressed in the previous FDM signed on May 17, 2012.

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the foregoing instrument shall constitute notice, pursuant to ORS 86.740, that the Grantor of the Trust Deed described below has defaulted on its obligations to beneficiary, and that the Beneficiary and Successor Trustee under the Trust Deed have elected to sell the property secured by the Trust Deed: TRUST DEED AND PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: This instrument makes reference to that certain line of credit instrument/line of credit deed of trust dated November 28, 2006, and recorded on December 1, 2006, in the official real property records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as instrument number 2006-78901; as modified by that certain modification of deed of trust dated May 12, 2008, and recorded on May 16, 2008, in the official real property records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as instrument number 2008-21440; as further modified by that certain modification of deed of trust dated October 29, 2009, and recorded on October 30, 2009, in the official real property records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as instrument number 2009 46273; as assigned to NW Bend, LLC by that certain assignment of deed of trust dated November 29, 2011 to be effective September 29, 2011, and recorded on December 2, 2011, in the official real property records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as instrument number 2011-042614 wherein Lee D. Dorsey III, is the Grantor, AmeriTitle is the Trustee, and NW Bend, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company, assignee of Bank of the Cascades, is the Beneficiary (the "Trust Deed"). The aforementioned Trust Deed covers property (the "Property") described as: Lots Sixty-Five (65) and Sixty-Six (66), BOULDER BROOK PHASE 5, recorded January 13, 2006, in Cabinet G, Page 1003, Deschutes County, Oregon. Also commonly described as: 438 NW 19th Street, #65 and #66, Redmond, OR 97756. The tax parcel numbers are: 250912 and 250913. The undersigned hereby certifies that she/he has no knowledge of any assignments of the Trust Deed by the Trustee or by the Beneficiary or any appointments of a Successor Trustee other than the appointment of JEFFREY C. GARDNER, ESQ., as Successor Trustee as recorded in the property records of the county in which the Property described above is situated. Further, the undersigned certifies that no action has been instituted to recover the debt, or any part thereof, now remaining secured by the Trust Deed. Or, if such action has been instituted, it has been dismissed except as permitted by ORS 86.735(4). The name and address of Successor Trustee are as follows: Jeffrey C. Gardner, Successor Trustee, Ball Janik LLP, 101 SW Main Street, Suite 1100, Portland, Oregon 97204-3219. The Trust Deed is not a "Residential Trust Deed", as defined in ORS 86.705(3), thus the requirements of Chapter 19, Section 20, Oregon Laws 2008, and Chapter 864 [S.B. 628], Oregon Laws 2009, do not apply. DEFAULT BY BORROWER: There are continuing and uncured defaults by Lee D. Dorsey III (the "Borrower") that, based on the provisions of the Trust Deed and the written documents for Loan No. 102344-001 (Bank of the Cascades Loan No. 300000825), including the promissory note dated and effective as of November 28, 2006, as amended and renewed by promissory note dated and effective as of May 12, 2008, as amended by two change in terms agreements dated May 26, 2009, and August 6, 2009, as amended and renewed by promissory note dated and effective as of October 29, 2009 which promissory note reduced the stated principal amount to $450,000.00 (collectively, the "Note"), authorize the foreclosure of the Trust Deed and the sale of the Property described above, which uncured and continuing defaults include but are not necessarily limited to the following: 1. The Loan secured by the Trust Deed matured on October 15, 2010, at which time the entire principal balance owed together with all accrued interest plus Beneficiary's unpaid fees, costs, and expenses was immediately due and payable by Borrower to Lender. Borrower has failed to pay to Lender a total of not less than $502,211.17 (the "Indebtedness") which total amount is comprised of an unpaid principal balance of $447,000.00 together with accrued and unpaid interest through and including March 9, 2012 of $50,953.08 plus Beneficiary's unpaid fees, costs, and collection expenses of not less than $4,258.09. Interest on account of the unpaid principal portion of the Indebtedness continues to accrue from and after March 9, 2012, at a rate that is currently 6.0% percent per annum or $71.67 per diem. ALL AMOUNTS are now due and payable along with all costs and fees associated with this foreclosure. 2. As to the defaults which do not involve payment of money to the Beneficiary of the Trust Deed, the Borrower must cure each such default. Listed below are the defaults which do not involve payment of money to the Beneficiary of the Trust Deed. Opposite each such listed default is a brief description of the action necessary to cure the default and a description of the documentation necessary to show that the default has been cured. The list does not exhaust all possible other defaults; any and all defaults identified by Beneficiary or the Successor Trustee that are not listed below must also be cured. OTHER DEFAULT/ Description of Action Required to Cure and Documentation Necessary to Show Cure. Payment of City of Redmond liens or HOA assessments, if any. Deliver to Successor Trustee written proof that liens or assessments against the Property are paid current. TOTAL UNCURED MONETARY (PAYMENT) DEFAULT: By reason of said uncured and continuing defaults, the Beneficiary has accelerated and declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the Trust Deed and the Property immediately due and payable. The sums due and payable being the following: Unpaid principal amount owing pursuant to the Obligations, as of March 9, 2012: $447,000.00. Unpaid interest owing pursuant to the Obligations as of March 9, 2012: $50,953.08. Accrued and unpaid fees, costs and collection expenses, including attorneys fees and costs to March 9, 2012: $4,258.09. TOTAL DUE: $502,211.17. Accordingly, the sum owing on the obligation secured by the Trust Deed is $502,211.17 as of March 9, 2012, together with interest accruing on the principal portion of that amount, plus additional costs and expenses incurred by Beneficiary and/or the Successor Trustee (including their respective attorney's fees, costs, and expenses). ELECTION TO SELL: Notice is hereby given that the Beneficiary, by reason of the uncured and continuing defaults described above, has elected and does hereby elect to foreclose said Trust Deed by advertisement and sale pursuant to ORS 86.735 et seq., and to cause to be sold at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the Grantor's interest in the subject Property, which the Grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time the Grantor executed the Trust Deed in favor of the Beneficiary, along with any interest the Grantor or the Grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed as well as the expenses of the sale, including compensation of the Trustee as provided by law, and the reasonable fees of Trustee's attorneys. PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the sale will be held at the hour of 10:00 a.m., in accordance with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, on Friday, September 7, 2012, on the front interior steps just inside the main entrance to the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon 97701. RIGHT OF REINSTATEMENT: Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five (5) days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed satisfied by (A) payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, together with the costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the terms of the obligation, as well as Successor Trustee and attorney fees as prescribed by ORS 86.753); and (B) by curing all such other continuing and uncured defaults as noted in this Notice. DATED: April 16, 2012. By: Jeffrey C. Gardner, OSB 980549, Successor Trustee, Ball Janik LLP, 101 SW Main Street, Suite 1100, Portland, Oregon 97204-3219. Telephone: (503) 228-2525. Facsimile: (503) 295-1058. Email: jgardner@balljank.com.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE: AS THE RESULT OF AN ORDER ENTERED IN A BANKRUPTCY PROCEEDING, TIMOTHY PATRICK KELLY AND SERENA LEA KELLY MAY NOT BE PERSONALLY LIABLE FOR THE UNPAID BALANCE OF THE BELOW REFERENCED LOAN. HOWEVER, THE BENEFICIARY RETAINS A DEED OF TRUST DESCRIBED BELOW WHICH IS SUBJECT TO FORECLOSURE IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE LAWS OF THE STATE OF OREGON. AS OF THE DATE OF THIS NOTICE/LETTER, THE BALANCE TO PAY OFF THE DEED OF TRUST IS $334,230.02. INTEREST FEES AND COSTS WILL CONTINUE TO ACCRUE AFTER THE DATE OF THIS NOTICE/LETTER. UNLESS YOU DISPUTE THE VALIDITY OF THE DEBT OR ANY PORTION THEREOF WITHIN 30 DAYS AFTER RECEIVING NOTICE OF THIS DOCUMENT, THIS OFFICE WILL ASSUME THE DEBT TO BE VALID. IF YOU NOTIFY THIS OFFICE IN WRITING WITHIN THE 30-DAY PERIOD THAT THE DEBT OR ANY PORTION THEREOF IS DISPUTED, VERIFICATION OF THE DEBT WILL BE OBTAINED AND WILL BE MAILED TO YOU. UPON WRITTEN REQUEST WITHIN 30 DAYS, THE NAME AND ADDRESS OF THE ORIGINAL CREDITOR, IF DIFFERENT FROM THE CURRENT CREDITOR, WILL BE PROVIDED. NOTICE: IF YOU ARE NOT PERSONALLY LIABLE TO PAY THIS OBLIGATION BY REASON OF A BANKRUPTCY PROCEEDING, THEN THIS NOTICE IS NOT AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT BUT IS INTENDED ONLY TO RELAY INFORMATION REGARDING YOUR DEED OF TRUST. NOTICE: IF YOU ARE PERSONALLY LIABLE TO PAY THIS OBLIGATION, WE WISH TO INFORM YOU THAT WE ARE A DEBT COLLECTOR, ANY INFORMATION YOU PROVIDE TO US WILL BE USED FOR THE PURPOSES OF FORECLOSING THE DEED OF TRUST MENTIONED BELOW. Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Serena L. Kelly and Timothy P. Kelly, as grantor, to First American Title, as trustee, in favor of U.S. Bank National Association ND, as beneficiary, dated November 23, 2005, recorded November 28, 2005, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as Recording Number 2005-81259, covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: Lot 342 Riverrim P.U.D., Phase 7, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. Both the beneficiary and the trustee, David A. Weibel, will sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statues 86.753(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor’s failure to pay the following sums: 1. Monthly Payments: Delinquent Monthly Payments Due from 5/1/2011 through 6/1/2012: Total Payments: $24,612.92. Accrued Late Charges: $1,097.07. Lender’s Other Fees: $201.00. THE SUM OWING ON THE OBLIGATION SECURED BY THE TRUST DEED: $26,010.99. 2. Delinquent Real Property Taxes, if any. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: Unpaid balance is $331,730.02 as of June 26, 2012. In addition there are attorney's fees and foreclosure costs which as of the date of this notice are estimated to be $2,500.00. Interest, late charges and advances for the protection and preservation of the property may accrue after the date of this notice. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, David A. Weibel, on November 7, 2012 at the hour of 11:00 am, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the front entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in the City of Bend, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the said trust deed together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), paying all advances authorized under the trust deed, including all costs and expenses incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, and by curing any other default complained of therein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word “grantor” includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words “trustee” and “beneficiary” include their respective successors in interest, if any. DATED: July 3, 2012. David A. Weibel, Trustee. For Information Call: Bishop, White, Marshall & Weibel, P.S., 720 Olive Way, Suite 1301, Seattle, WA 98101, (206) 622-7527. 1000

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE: YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED THAT THE AMOUNT OF YOUR INDEBTEDNESS TO THE BENEFICIARY, THEIR SUCCESSORS IN INTEREST AND/OR ASSIGNEES AS RECITED BELOW, AS OF THE DATE OF THIS NOTICE/LETTER, IS $531,674.64. INTEREST FEES AND COSTS WILL CONTINUE TO-ACCRUE AFTER THE DATE OF THIS NOTICE/LETTER. UNLESS YOU DISPUTE THE VALIDITY OF THE DEBT OR ANY PORTION THEREOF WITHIN 30 DAYS AFTER RECEIVING NOTICE OF THIS DOCUMENT, THIS OFFICE WILL ASSUME THE DEBT TO BE VALID. IF YOU NOTIFY THIS OFFICE IN WRITING WITHIN THE 30-DAY PERIOD THAT THE DEBT OR ANY PORTION THEREOF IS DISPUTED, VERIFICATION OF THE DEBT WILL BE OBTAINED AND WILL BE MAILED TO YOU. UPON WRITTEN REQUEST WITHIN 30 DAYS, THE NAME AND ADDRESS OF THE ORIGINAL CREDITOR, IF DIFFERENT FROM THE CURRENT CREDITOR, WILL BE PROVIDED. NOTICE: WE ARE A DEBT COLLECTOR. THIS COMMUNICATION IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR PURPOSES OF DEBT COLLECTION. Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Jeffrey Freund and Jill L. Freund, as grantor, to Amerititle, as trustee, in favor of first Mutual Bank, as beneficiary, dated February 29, 2008, recorded March 7, 2008, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as Recording Number 2008-10451, said Deed of Trust was modified on April 13, 2009 by an instrument recorded under Auditor’s File No. 2009-17933 on April 29, 2009, said Deed of Trust was modified on December 4, 2009 by an instrument recorded under Auditor’s File No. 2010-00540 on January 5, 2010, covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT TWO (2) IN BLOCK FIVE (5) OF HOWELL’S RIVER RIM, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON; TOGETHER WITH A PARCEL OF LAND SITUATED IN A PORTION OF LOT ONE (1) IN BLOCK FIVE (5) OF HOWELL’S RIVER RIM, DESCHUTES COUNTY OREGON, A SUBDIVISION LOCATED IN THE SOUTH ONE HALF OF THE SOUTHEAST ONE QUARTER (S1/2SE1/4) OF SECTION ONE (1) OF TOWNSHIP FIFTEEN (15) SOUTH, RANGE TWELVE (12), EAST OF THE WILLAMETTE MERIDIAN, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON, MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCING AT A HALF INCH IRON ROD MONUMENTING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 1 IN BLOCK 5 OF HOWELL’S RIVER RIM, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON, THE INITIAL POINT AS WELL AS THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE NORTH 89° 41’ 42” WEST ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID LOT 1 TO A HALF INCH IRON ROD MONUMENTING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SAID LOT 1 ON THE SOUTHEAST RIGHT OF WAY OF 57TH WAY; THENCE NORTHEAST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY APPROXIMATELY 55 FEET TO AN EXISTING FENCE; THENCE EASTERLY ALONG SAID FENCE TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Both the beneficiary and the trustee, David A. Weibel, will sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statues 86.753(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor’s failure to pay the following sums: 1. Monthly Payments: Delinquent Monthly Payments Due from 3/1/2012 through 7/1/2012: Total Payments: $15,140.00. Accrued Late Charges: $605.60. THE SUM OWING ON THE OBLIGATION SECURED BY THE TRUST DEED: $15,745.60. 2. Delinquent Real Property Taxes, if any. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: Unpaid balance is $529,174.64 as of July 5, 2012. In addition there are attorney's fees and foreclosure costs which as of the date of this notice are estimated to be $2,500.00. Interest, late charges and advances for the protection and preservation of the property may accrue after the date of this notice. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, David A. Weibel, on November 14, 2012 at the hour of 11:00 am, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the front entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in the City of Bend, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the said trust deed together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), paying all advances authorized under the trust deed, including all costs and expenses incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, and by curing any other default complained of therein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word “grantor” includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words “trustee” and “beneficiary” include their respective successors in interest, if any. DATED: July 9, 2012. David A. Weibel, Trustee. For Information Call: Bishop, White, Marshall & Weibel, P.S., 720 Olive Way, Suite 1301, Seattle, WA 98101, (206) 622-7527.


Wednesday, Sept. 5, 2012 • The Bulletin special section

Nationals: Day by day The USA Cycling Masters Road National Championships start today and conclude on Sunday. Here’s a look at the schedule of events (see the back of this page for maps of the courses):

Today • Time trial: Men and women 35 to 70+, 8 a.m. (departures at 30-second intervals) • Time trial: Tandems (men, women and mixed) follow the individual riders (departures at 1-minute intervals)

BREAKING DOWN THE DAY The time trial course has moved this year from the west Bend course that kept riders predominantly on Skyliners Road to a route in Prineville. The start/finish area for all races is at Crooked River Park in Prineville. Men 65 and older and women 55 and older will cover 20 kilometers on the out-and-back course along the Crooked River Highway. Men ages 35 to 64 and women 35 to 54 will ride 30K, and all tandems will race 40K.

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin file

Riders compete in last year’s time trial in Bend.

Thursday

Friday

• Road race: Men 35 to 59 and women 35 to 49, 8 a.m. (final race of day starts at 3:15 p.m.)

• Road race: Men 60+, women 50+ and tandems, 8 a.m. (final race of day starts at 3:10 p.m.)

BREAKING DOWN THE DAY

BREAKING DOWN THE DAY

This course will be familiar to fans of the Cascade Cycling Classic, as it covers most of the same terrain as the third stage of the pro men’s and women’s races in this year’s CCC. All of Thursday’s races will start and finish at Mt. Bachelor ski area, and all races are 84K in length except for the men’s 35-39 and 40-44 events — those riders will cover 110K. All riders will turn south on Forest Service Road 45 after leaving Mt. Bachelor and then east on FS 40. Those racing 84K will proceed directly from FS 40 onto the Cascade Lakes Highway, while the 110K riders will do one lap around Crane Prairie Reservoir before embarking on the long climb up the highway back to the finish.

Women 50 to 59, men 60 to 64 and all tandems will cover the same 84K-course used in Thursday’s road races. Women 60 and older and men 65 and older will ride a 62K route that starts at the northeast corner of Crane Prairie Reservoir. Those riders will ride clockwise around the reservoir before turning north onto the Cascade Lakes Highway and racing back to the finish at Mt. Bachelor ski area.

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin file

Racers in the men’s 40-44 division build up speed on Bend’s Shevlin Park Drive during a road race in 2011.

Riders compete in one of the women’s road race events in 2011.

Saturday

Sunday

• Criterium: Men 35 to 59 and women 35 to 49, 8 a.m. (final race of day starts at 5:30 p.m.)

• Criterium: Men 60 and older, and women 50 and older, 9 a.m. (final race of day starts at 3:30 p.m.)

BREAKING DOWN THE DAY

BREAKING DOWN THE DAY

This year’s downtown Bend criterium course is somewhat different from the popular rectangular circuit employed in the 2011 masters nationals and the CCC. The start and finish are still located on Northwest Wall Street between Oregon and Minnesota avenues. After 90-degree right-hand turns onto Oregon Avenue and Bond Street, riders will turn left on Minnesota, right on Lava Road and right on Franklin Avenue before a final turn back onto Wall to complete the 1K circuit. Most age groups will ride 40K. Women 45 to 49 will cover 30K, women 50 to 54 will ride 35K, and men 35 to 44 will race 50K.

The championships conclude with a day of racing in Bend’s NorthWest Crossing neighborhood. The 1K circuit is the only 2012 route that is exactly the same as in the 2011 masters nationals. Women in all age groups will race 30K, while all men will cover 35K. The start/finish area is located on Northwest Crossing Drive near the intersection of Fort Clatsop Street.

Women ride past Bend’s Tower Theatre during a criterium in 2011.

USA Cycling Masters Road National Championships In Central Oregon • Today through Sunday

Return of the masters

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin file

Dina Boswell, Tracy Smith, Cascade Event Photography / USA Cycling

Dina Boswell & Tracy Smith, Cascade Event Photography / USA Cycling

Riders battle for position in the Masters Road National Championships road race for men 40-44 last year in Bend.

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin file

Riders compete in last year’s criterum held in Bend’s NorthWest Crossing.

• Central Oregon hosts the cycling national championships for riders age 35 and older for the second time, but this year’s edition features a lot of changes By Amanda Miles The Bulletin

The USA Cycling Masters Road National Championships make their second consecutive run through Central Oregon starting today and continuing through Sunday, and competitors from at least 42 states and Washington, D.C., have registered to compete. On the line are dozens of national titles in time trial, road race and criterium events for individual riders, and in road race and time trial events for tandems. These championships will not look exactly the same as they did in 2011. For one thing, the 2012 nationals will be taking on an older look, if only slightly. Last fall, USA Cycling decided to take out the 30-34 age division from masters nationals, says Micah Rice, the organization’s vice president of national events. That decision makes 35-39 the masters nationals’ youngest age division this year, while the oldest riders will likely be in their 80s. Distances in each event vary based on age division. “A lot of other sports also don’t really start their masters age categories until 35, first of all,” Rice

explains. “We were getting low participation in that age category, and it was taking a lot of extra time in the day and made the days really packed. “What we really want to do is make sure that we are really concentrating on our core group of people who are showing up for this event. The core people seem to really be the late 30s and 40s riders; even people up into the 50s are filling up their categories.”

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On the flip side • Turn the page over for maps of the courses, a spectators’ guide and riders to watch


Wednesday, Sept. 5, 2012 • The Bulletin special section • USA Cycling Masters Road National Championships

Riders compete in the men’s 60-64 division during the USA Cycling Masters Road National Championship road race in Bend in 2011.

Riders to watch

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Fort Clatsop Dr. The elimination of that youngest age group is not expected to have a significant impact on overall participation numbers. About 950 riders competed in last year’s event, Rice says, and he is anticipating about the same number this year. “I think word really got out that Bend was a great destination, and I think that people really want to check it out,” he notes. As of early last week, 98 riders from Oregon had signed up for the competition — including 45 from

Central Oregon, who predominantly hail from Bend. The single race with the greatest number of riders registered is the men’s 45-49 road race, with 106 entries. Perhaps the most notable departure from the 2011 masters nationals involves the course routes. This time around, the NorthWest Crossing criterium is back, but it is the only route completely unchanged from a year ago. The criterium will also return to downtown Bend, but on a somewhat altered course compared with the one familiarly employed in the Cascade Cycling

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The first race of the day on Sunday begins at 9 a.m., and the last event of the day should conclude by 4:30 p.m.

Bend’s Eric Martin rides on his way to a third-place finish in the men’s 45-49 criterium race at last year’s USA Cycling Masters Road National Championships in Bend.

Start/Finish Mt. Bachelor ski area

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—Amanda Miles

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin file

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Riders will be out on the course starting at 8 a.m. and continuing well into the afternoon.

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• Brenna Lopez-Otero, of Bend: Lopez-Otero was one of just four Central Oregonians to earn a title at the masters nationals in 2011, when she took the women’s 4044 criterium. (The other three were Bend’s Tim Jones and T.J. Paskewich, who won the men’s tandem 70+ time trial and road race, and Dagmar Eriksson, who prevailed in the women’s 65-69 time trial.) Lopez-Otero is scheduled to attempt a title defense in the women’s 40-44 criterium and also contest the road race this year. • Eric Martin, of Bend: Perhaps this will be the year for Martin, who just missed earning his first masters national title in cycling when he took third in a deep men’s 45-49 criterium race in 2011. A winner of multiple masters national championships in cross-country skiing, Martin is expected to ride in the time trial today and the road race on Thursday in addition to Saturday’s criterium. • Kevin Metcalfe, of Pleasant Hill, Calif.: No single rider swept all three races in his or her division last year, but Metcalfe came almost as close as possible. The Californian won the time trial and the road race in the men’s 50-54 division and finished second — just a second behind — to criterium victor Bubba Melcher, of Reno, Nev., who also returns in 2012. Metcalfe, who was third in the 1996 Olympic trials in the team pursuit and won three masters

national championships on the track in 2008, will again contest all three races in 2012. • David Zimbelman, of The Dalles: Zimbelman is back to defend the men’s 55-59 road race and time trial titles he won a year ago. A rider with a long list of credentials on his resume, Zimbelman won the road race in his age division at the 2011 UCI World Cycling Tour in Belgium just a few weeks after his masters championships in Bend last summer. • John and Linda Elgart, of Sacramento, Calif.: This husband-and-wife duo enjoyed a successful stint in Bend in 2011. John Elgart took first place in the men’s 65-69 criterium and road race, and he teamed with Jan Elsbach, of Davis, Calif., to win the men’s 110+ tandem road race and time trial. Not to be outdone, Linda Elgart added a title of her own in the women’s 55-59 criterium, and she was also second in the road race and fourth in the time trial. Both riders also boast masters national titles in cyclocross and track cycling, and John Elgart was second in his age group in the 2012 UCI Masters Cyclocross World Championships. He is scheduled to compete in the road race and criterium, as well as the men’s 110+ tandem time trial and road race. Linda Elgart will be racing in the time trial and the criterium, and in the mixed 110+ tandem road race as well. • Rebecca Rusch, of Ketchum, Idaho: Rusch brings standout mountain biking credentials to this year’s masters road nationals. Among her results are several world titles, including a win in the UCI Mountain Bike Masters World Championships women’s 35-44 division in 2010. She also won USAC single speed and 24-hour team (four riders) titles in 2011. Rusch has registered for the women’s 4044 time trial and road race.

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The USA Cycling Masters Road National Championships will gather cyclists from all around the country this week. Participants from at least 42 states and Washington, D.C., were registered as of last week. It’s hard to keep tabs on 1,000 or so competitors, a number of whom have stellar cycling credentials. But here are a few worth watching out for, including a couple of locals:

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin file

N.W. Crossing Dr. Compass START/FINISH Park High Lakes Loop NorthWest Crossing BEND development

Classic and in last year’s masters nationals. The time trial and road race courses, based out of Prineville and Mt. Bachelor ski area, are at completely different sites altogether. One of the changes Rice is particularly enthused about is the time trial course, an out-and-back route on the Crooked River Highway, based out of Crooked River Park in Prineville. “I think that being kind of a long, reasonably flat, not as many ups and downs as the (time trial) that we had last year, I think that’s a real positive change,” Rice observes,

With races going on in multiple locations throughout Central Oregon, spectators will have plenty of options for watching some of the action in the USA Cycling Masters Road National Championships. Race director Chad Sperry offers a few suggestions:

Today, time trial Spectators will not have much access to the gently rolling time trial course that winds along the Crooked River and through the Crooked River canyon. “The only place you can spectate is just basically the start/finish at Crooked River Park,” Sperry notes. “The road is closed that the course will be on.” During the time trial, local residents who live along the highway will be able to receive police escorts to access their residences.

Thursday and Friday, road race Savvy spectators should have plenty of opportunities to catch the action on these days. The start/finish area is located at Mt. Bachelor ski area and is the obvious option. One prime viewing spot that Sperry suggests is the pullout area where cyclists will take a right turn from Forest Service Road 45 onto FS 40. He adds that the Cascade Lakes Highway offers a number of vantage points for cycling enthusiasts who “get there early and pull out” and mentions the incline along Sparks Lake in particular. “That’s going to be kind of the decisive location where any groups or packs of the riders coming into that will definitely start to split apart and splinter,” Sperry points out. Sperry also notes that the roads will be open to traffic but closed around the pelotons, meaning that any vehicles not involved in the race will need to pull to the side of the road when cyclists are passing. It also means that spectators may be able to catch their favorite riders at a couple of points along the route. “Always travel in reverse direction of the course, because … if you’re going with the course, it’s going to be very hard for you to pass or overtake the field,” Sperry says. “Whereas if you’re going head-on, and there’s maybe three different, distinct races out on the road, if you come across one, generally the delay’s only a couple minutes for the race to pass, and then you can resume on.”

calling it a more traditional time trial course. “I think a lot of people are really going to like that.” In the road race, competitors will hit a Central Oregon staple ride in the loop from Mount Bachelor down toward Sunriver, east to (and for some divisions, around) Crane Prairie Reservoir, and then back up to the ski area finish via the Cascade Lakes Highway. “While some people might not like that as much because it’s got a little bit more climbing, I think that some people will be very happy with the climbing and enjoy it a lot,”

Saturday, criterium As in 2011, a number of the criterium races will take place in downtown Bend, but the course has a somewhat different look from the familiar rectangular circuit used a year ago for the masters nationals and each summer for the Cascade Cycling Classic. The start/finish line remains on Wall Street between Minnesota and Oregon avenues. But after the turn from Oregon Avenue onto Bond Street, instead of proceeding straight down Bond onto Idaho Avenue, riders will make a left turn onto Minnesota Avenue, a right onto Lava Road, and then a right onto Franklin Avenue before finishing the circuit with another right back onto Wall. “This is the national criterium championships for the masters, so we need to have something that was a bit more technical, demanding,” says Sperry, explaining the adjusted course. With their closed circuits, criteriums are by nature spectator-friendly races. But Sperry does point out one spot along the route: the curving stretch on Lava Road between Minnesota and Franklin avenues. “I think that is a tight, technical section through there that’s pretty entertaining to watch,” he offers.

Sunday, criterium The only course that remains exactly the same as in 2011 is the NorthWest Crossing criterium circuit in northwest Bend. “The racers loved it, got a great number of spectators out,” Sperry says, referring to last year’s NorthWest Crossing crit. “Just a really pretty setting, so we’re looking forward to being out there again for the final day.” Sperry says good viewing spots are located throughout the 1-kilometer route, but he points specifically to the short section that curves along the Compass Park roundabout, especially for those spectators with children. “You want to have them (kids) kind of entertained but also watch the race,” Sperry notes, adding that the start/finish area is another good viewing possibility. The start/finish line is located on Northwest Crossing Drive between Fort Clatsop Drive and John Fremont Street.

Rice notes. And instead of what Rice describes as a “drag race” on the old downtown Bend criterium course, this year’s circuit offers what Rice expects to be a more technical route, including more turns and a curvy section on Lava Road. “These guys know how to handle their bikes, so I think it will be good,” Rice says. And they are also looking to enjoy themselves while they are here. “The group of people that are coming in for this event are used to coming for a vacation, for a destina-

—Amanda Miles

tion, and they spend money,” Rice observes. “So it’s a really good group to bring to Bend because there’s a lot of great things to do and really good food and some great places to stay.” For those who want to jump in on the racing action in person, registration is available for any race through the day before it is scheduled. For more information, including registration times and locations, go to usacycling.org/2012/masters-road-nationals. — Reporter: 541-383-0393, amiles@bendbulletin.com.


Bulletin Daily Paper 09/05/12