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LONDON OLYMPICS

EATON The stage is set; now it comes down to 10 events, Page C1

THREE RIVERS

Fast-moving fire forces evacuations

By Hillary Borrud The Bulletin

South Sudan runner’s marathon: just getting there By Shashank Bengali McClatchy Newspapers

LONDON — In Guor Marial’s first marathon, he posted a time good enough to qualify for the Olympics. Perhaps that’s because when he was growing up, he has said, he got used to running from people who were trying to kill him. When Marial, 28, lines up for the marathon on Sunday, the final day of the London Olympic Games, it will mark the culmination of a remarkable journey from his wartorn homeland in Africa to the United States and on to the biggest athletic competition in the world. It will be just his third time running the 26.2-mile race. The road he’s traveled to get here must make that distance seem minuscule. “I’m just going there and I will run the race and see what happens,” he said by phone last week from Flagstaff, Ariz., where he was training. See Marathon / A6

County plans jail expansion without more taxes

Photo courtesy Lake Chinook Fire & Rescue

An air tanker drops retardant at about 5:30 p.m. Monday in the Three Rivers subdivision south of Lake Billy Chinook. Caused by lightning Sunday evening, the Geneva 12 Fire erupted Monday afternoon, causing the evacuation of 100 homes in the subdivision. By Dylan J. Darling The Bulletin

Inside

A wildfire Monday south of Lake Billy Chinook forced the evacuation of 100 homes in the Three Rivers subdivision. The Geneva 12 Fire, started by lightning Sunday night, was first spotted just after noon Monday, said Lisa Clark, spokeswoman at the Central Oregon Interagency Dispatch Center. At 8:30 p.m. it was estimated

• Geneva 12 Fire map, A6 • Map of other Oregon fires, D1

to be 1,341 acres. “It can move very quickly, and that is definitely what people would be concerned about out there,” she said. The fire burned about a quarter mile from homes at Three Rivers,

Clark said. While it didn’t burn any homes, the fire destroyed a truck and a utility trailer. Most of the houses in the subdivision are vacation homes, so only 15 people were evacuated, Clark said. The evacuation order went out at 4 p.m. and was still in effect as of 9 p.m. Another lightning-caused fire 10 years ago destroyed 18 homes in the same subdivision, she said. See Wildfire / A6

Deschutes County officials say they have found a way to expand the crowded county jail without asking taxpayers for more money. County commissioners and Sheriff Larry Blanton revealed at a Monday meeting their plan to sell bonds and repay the debt with money from the sheriff’s budget and the county general fund, which receives a large portion of its revenue from property taxes. The money will pay for construction of a new jail wing with 144 beds. “We know we’ve got some additional work to do with finalizing the nuts and bolts of the plan,” Blanton said Monday afternoon. “But for the most part, the majority of the plan seems to be finished.” Nonetheless, some basic information about the proposal was unavailable Monday. No one would reveal the cost of the project or the potential annual debt cost to the county general fund and Sheriff’s Office. Blanton said the plan will accomplish what taxpayers wanted the county to do when in 2010 they rejected a $44 million bond measure to expand the jail: tackle the problem without any new taxes. Overcrowding at the 228bed jail has been the top issue facing Deschutes County government for the last seven to 10 years, said Interim County Administrator Erik Kropp. The jail is where all adult inmates in the county are held, regardless of whether they were arrested in Bend, Sunriver or Terrebonne. See Jail / A6

Slain Sikh leader, wounded officer emerge as heroes

MARS ROVER

After perfect landing, photos of what lies ahead

murderous path ultimately left six people dead. Murphy OAK CREEK, Wis. — They was armed with a police couldn’t have come from firearm, Kaleka with a butter two more different worlds: knife. Both paid dearly: KaleOne of them, Lt. Brian ka with his life, MurMurphy, a classic New phy nearly so — he lays Inside York-style cop with critically wounded in a more than two decades • Picture of nearby hospital, but is shooter on the streets. The expected to survive. emerges, other, Satwant Singh The pain of tragedy A3 Kaleka, a deeply reliseems always to be gious native of India accompanied by a who came to the U.S. search for a story of as an impoverished immicourage. In Oak Creek, there grant and made his way up are two such accounts. The buying gas stations. public has seized on Murphy Yet here they were, both cut and Kaleka as the heroes, to the ground and shedding their desperate bids to halt blood at different parts of the the gunman’s rampage being Sikh Temple of Wisconsin on told and retold in community Sunday. Both had come up halls and in the media. See Shooting / A6 against the gunman whose By Kim Murphy

Los Angeles Times

By Kenneth Chang New York Times News Service

PASADENA, Calif. — NASA followed up its picture-perfect landing of a plutonium-powered rover Sunday night with a picture of the balletic Mars landing — as well as some wellearned self-congratulation about what the accomplishment says about NASA’s ingenuity. “There are many out in the community who say NASA has lost its way, that we don’t know how to explore — we’ve lost our moxie,” John M. Grunsfeld, associate administrator for NASA’s science mission directorate,

said at a post-landing news conference, where beaming members of the landing team, all clad in blue polo shirts, crammed in next to the reporters. “I want you to look around tonight, at those folks with the blue shirts and think about what we’ve achieved.” That achievement, in the early hours of Monday, was indeed dramatic: With the eyes of the world watching, the car-size craft called Curiosity was lowered at the end of 25-foot cables from a hovering rocket stage, successfully touching down on a gravelly Martian plain. See Mars / A6

NASA via The Associated Press

An image taken by NASA’s Curiosity shows the rover’s main science target, informally called Mount Sharp, Monday on Mars. The rover’s shadow can be seen in the foreground, and the dark bands beyond are dunes. Rising up in the distance is the highest peak of Mount Sharp at a height of about 3.4 miles.

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Mostly sunny High 90, Low 54 Page D6

Correction In a story headlined “Staff questions safety at St. Charles,” which appeared Sunday, Aug. 5, on Page A1, Dr. Sara Singer, assistant professor of health care management and policy at the Harvard School of Public Health, was incompletely identified. The Bulletin regrets the error.

TOP NEWS PRESIDENTIAL RACE: Romney leads fundraising for 3rd month, A3 SYRIA: Prime minister’s reported defection jolts Syria, A3


THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, AUGUST 7, 2012

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Oregon Lottery results As listed at www.oregonlottery.org

MEGABUCKS

The numbers drawn Monday night are:

3 12 23 27 33 43 The estimated jackpot is now $3.2 million.

Tim Johnson / McClatchy-Tribune News Service

A cargo ship passes through the Miraflores Locks of the Panama Canal on July 11.

Wider Panama Canal a ‘game changer’ • Project is expected to cause a big shift in global trade patterns

Panama is adding a third lane to its famous canal that will permit a new class of mega-ships to traverse the narrow isthmus from the Caribbean Sea to the Pacific Ocean. The change is expected to strongly affect global trade.

By Tim Johnson

Comparing old and new canal locks

McClatchy Newspapers

PANAMA CITY, Panama — The nature of global trade is about to change. The Panama Canal will soon have a third lane that can accommodate mega-ships nearly three times larger than any vessel that has ever transited the isthmus over the past century. It might not seem like earthshaking news. But the impact will ripple around the world — from shipyards in South Korea to highways in Texas to coalfields in Colombia and soy plantations in Brazil’s northeast. Entire nations will see trade patterns shift. Ports up and down the U.S. Atlantic Seaboard are in a frenzied race to get ready for the larger, slower, more efficient ships that one day will ply the oceans. They are dredging harbors, expanding rail lines, taking a look at port facilities and distribution centers and, in the case of the New York City area, preparing to elevate the roadway on the Bayonne Bridge so that bigger vessels can slip underneath to Newark Harbor. “It’s been said that it’s a game changer. Yes, it is,” said Alberto Aleman, a Texas A&M-educated engineer who has been administrator of the canal for 16 years during a period in which the United States handed off control to Panamanian hands.

Easing constraints Since the SS Ancon became the first ship to slide through the locks of the Panama Canal on Aug. 15, 1914, the roughly 50-mile-long waterway has saved cargo lines the journey around Cape Horn and through the stormy Drake Passage at the southern tip of South America. More than a million ships have transited the canal, and roughly 5 percent of all world trade moves across the isthmus each year. But the Panama Canal was always constrained by the size of its locks, permitting no vessel longer than 965 feet, wider than 106 feet and with a draft greater than 39 feet to pass through. Ships suitable for the canal became known as Panamax vessels and could carry nearly 5,000 20-foot shipping containers. When the third lane opens in late 2014, the canal’s capacity will more than double. Ships as long as 1,200 feet and up to 160 feet wide, with drafts as deep as 50 feet, will be able to transit. The largest vessels will carry as many as 13,200 containers, or at least double the dry weight of bulk cargo that can pass through today. Panamax vessels are long, slim and require a lot of water ballast to maintain balance. New mega-ships will be wider, more stable and will consume up to 16 percent less fuel — meaning a smaller environmental foot-

A wider, deeper canal

Existing locks

Depth 42 ft. Width 110 ft. Vessel capacity about 5,000 containers

New locks Depth 60 ft. Width 180 ft. Vessel capacity: 13,200 containers • More than a million ships have transited the canal since 1914

Detailed

Colon

Main navigational channel at Gatun Lake will be expanded • Roughly 5 percent of all world trade moves through it each year • The largest new vessels will carry as many as 13,200 containers, more than double the dry weight of cargo a ship can carry through now

PANAMA

New lock complex

Pacific Ocean

Escobal

Panama Canal

5 km

New lock complex

5 miles

Comparing container ships The size ship that can pass through the Panama Canal now compared to the new size in 2014 Current length 965 ft.

Alajuela Lake

PANAMA

Gatun Lake

Panama City Balboa

Current width 106 ft.

Current draft 39 ft. deep

New length 1,200 ft.

New width 160 ft.

New draft 50 ft. deep © 2012 McClatchy-Tribune News Service

print and lower costs for their operators. Shipyards are seeing a surge in orders for what are called post-Panamax vessels. “The economies of scale mean it is only one ship moving twice the amount of cargo,” Aleman said. The Panama Canal widening will affect inland railway hubs such as Kansas City and ports along the Gulf Coast, according to a study released in June by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. As shipping becomes cheaper, rail lines that handle cargo coming from Asia that is offloaded at Pacific ports and rolled across the country may notice a slowdown, it said. Yet it will be a boon for the Midwest Farm Belt as grain exports moving through the Gulf Coast become more competitive in Asia, it said. “This could have a significant impact on both the total quantity of U.S. agricultural exports and commodities moving down the Mississippi River for export at New Orleans,” the study predicted. More goods will move through Texas ports, too, and motorists are certain to groan at clogged highways. Texas officials in May created the Panama Canal Stakeholder Working Group to figure out how such highways as I-35 between Dallas and San Antonio, which already handles some 200,000 vehicles a day, will cope.

Bustling traffic Traffic already is bustling at the canal, too. The number of shipping containers aboard freighters transiting the canal has risen from 200,000 in 1995 to 6.6 million last year. Once the third lane opens, mammoth ships will take advantage of economies of scale to carry containers for the WalMarts and Targets of the world. One problem is some of the ports along the Atlantic Seaboard don’t have channels deep enough to handle such seagoing behemoths. That’s why the White House announced July 19 that it had issued orders to expedite dredging projects to deepen harbors and approaches in Miami, Jacksonville, Fla., Savannah, Ga., Charleston, S.C., and the Port of New York and New Jersey. “It’s not only about the ports,” Aleman said. “It’s the roads, the trains, the distribution centers and actually it’s about jobs.” With bigger ships, bottlenecks can happen. “The bigger a vessel is and the more cargo it carries, the slower it is to load and unload. So the ports become more important,” said Francisco Bustamante, a former economist for the Inter-American Development Bank in Washington and an expert on trade. The widening of the canal will affect trade across Latin America. Very large ships carrying

coal from northeastern Colombia and iron ore from Brazil will soon be able to take the raw material to China through Panama more cheaply, giving a boost to those industries and creating jobs. Chilean copper producers will find it easier to export to European markets. “There’s LNG (liquefied natural gas) coming out of Trinidad & Tobago today that goes to Chile, and that has to go around the Cape,” Aleman said. Once the canal expansion is completed, it can go through the canal, shaving hundreds of sea miles from the trip to Chile. Panama, a diminutive country of 3.5 million people, took a huge risk financing the canal widening. But the payoff will be bountiful. The United States ran the canal as a break-even operation. Once Panama took over in 1999, it increased tolls to make a profit. This year, the canal will contribute $1 billion to government coffers. By 2025, projections are for Panama to earn $4 billion a year from the tolls. With the widening, Panama also hopes to transform itself from just a transit point for cargo into a logistical hub where ships can be overhauled in dry dock, containers sorted for onward passage and industrial parks set up for final assembly of goods. Already, major multinationals, including Caterpillar, Procter & Gamble, Dell and Mexico’s Cemex have turned to Panama as a headquarters for regional operations. “All of America is coming here to Panama,” said Adolfo Quintero, an economist at the University of Panama. Change your mind. Change your life.

Highlights: In 1882, the famous feud between the Hatfields of West Virginia and the McCoys of Kentucky erupted into full-scale violence. In 1942, U.S. and other allied forces landed at Guadalcanal, marking the start of the first major allied offensive in the Pacific during World War II. (Japanese forces abandoned the island the following February.) In 1959, the United States launched the Explorer 6 satellite, which sent back images of Earth. In 1989, a plane carrying U.S. Rep. Mickey Leland, D-Texas, and 14 others disappeared over Ethiopia. (The wreckage of the plane was found six days later; there were no survivors.) Ten years ago: Former ImClone Systems chief executive Samuel Waksal was indicted in New York on charges of obstruction of justice and bank fraud in addition to previous securities fraud and perjury charges. (Waksal later pleaded guilty and was sentenced to more than seven years in prison; he was released in February 2009.) Five years ago: San Francisco’s Barry Bonds hit home run No. 756 to break Hank Aaron’s storied record with one out in the fifth inning of a game against the Washington Nationals, who ended up winning, 8-6. One year ago: The Treasury Department announced that Secretary Timothy Geithner had told President Barack Obama that he would remain on the job, ending speculation he would leave the administration.

BIRTHDAYS Humorist Garrison Keillor is 70. FBI Director Robert Mueller is 68. Former diplomat, talk show host and activist Alan Keyes is 62. Actor David Duchovny is 52. Actress Charlize Theron is 37. — From wire reports

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TUESDAY, AUGUST 7, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

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T S Romney cashes in as Obama lags for 3rd month

Prime minister’s defection in the dark jolts Syria

By Ken Thomas and Julie Pace The Associated Press

By Damien Cave and Dalal Mawad New York Times News Service

BEIRUT — The defection of Syria’s prime minister, Riad Farid Hijab, began like many others: with coded conversations and furtive planning. He began discussing the idea of fleeing, an aide said, as soon as President Bashar Assad strongarmed him into taking the job in June. In recent days, he worked to get his extended family out. Then, early Monday, the prime minister slipped out of Damascus under cover of darkness with his wife and four children, scrambling through the desert as a fugitive. At sunrise, he crossed into Ramtha, Jordan, shocking the Syrian regime — which immediately claimed he had been fired — and spurring jubilation within a weary opposition. “This is a proof that the political basis of the regime is collapsing,” said Samir Nachar, a leader of the Syrian National Council, the main exile opposition group. “This is the momentum we needed to tell the political and military elite that it is time for them to jump off the sinking ship.” Hijab’s journey began when he climbed into a simple car with a driver who did not know his identity, according to an account provided by a Free Syrian Army commander, an activist at the Syria-Jordan border and Hijab’s spokesman. He traveled down roads lined with rebel lookouts until he reached a contested stretch of border. Finally, he made his dramatic departure from Syria. Syria’s powerful military pounded rebels again Monday in Aleppo, Damascus and other cities. But the scale of the Hijab defection — involving 10 prominent Sunni families who escaped over the past week — suggests Assad is losing the loyalty of Sunni officials crucial to his minority regime’s ability to hold power. His feared internal security apparatus also seems to be cracking. Hijab, the highest-level official to defect, was closely watched by the Assad regime, which nonetheless failed to keep him from communicating with the opposition for months and arranging for dozens of relatives to leave Damascus.

M. Spencer Green / The Associated Press

Amardeep Kaleka, son of the president of the Sikh Temple of Wisconsin, center, comforts members of the temple Monday in Oak Creek, Wis., where a gunman killed six people a day earlier. Satwant Kaleka, 65, founder and president of the temple, died in the shooting. He was among four priests who died.

Picture starts to emerge of Sikh temple shooter tively tell you what that motive is — if we can determine The Associated Press that,” Edwards said. OAK CREEK, Wis. — BePage, who was shot to death fore he strode into a Sikh by police, joined the Army in temple with a 9mm handgun 1992 and was discharged in and multiple magazines of 1998. He was described Monammunition, Wade Michael day by the Southern Poverty Page played in white su- Law Center as a “frustrated premacist heavy metneo-Nazi” who had al bands with names long been active in the such as Definite Hate obscure underworld and End Apathy. of white supremacist The bald, heavily music. tattooed bassist was Page wrote frea 40-year-old Army Page quently on white suveteran who trained premacist websites, in psychological warfare be- describing himself as a fore he was demoted and dis- member of the “Hammercharged more than a decade skins Nation,” a skinhead ago. group rooted in Texas that A day after he killed six has offshoots in Australia worshippers at the suburban and Canada, according to the Milwaukee temple, frag- SITE Monitoring Service, a ments of Page’s life emerged Maryland-based private inin public records and inter- telligence firm that searches views. But his motive was the Internet for terrorist and still largely a mystery. So far, other extremist activity. no hate-filled manifesto has In online forums, Page proemerged, nor any angry blog moted his music while interor ranting Facebook entries acting with other skinheads. to explain the attack. He posted 250 messages on Oak Creek Police Chief one site between March 2010 John Edwards suggested and the middle of this year, Monday that investigators and appeared eager to remight never know for certain cruit others. In March 2011, why the lone attacker target- he advertised for a “family ed a temple full of strangers. friendly” barbecue in North “We have a lot of informa- Carolina, exhorting those ontion to decipher, to put it all line to attend. together before we can posi“If you are wanting to meet By Scott Bauer and Todd Richmond

Law OKs care for Lejeune Egypt pledges water swift response victims to Sinai attack By Ernesto Londoño The Washington Post

CAIRO — The Egyptian government on Monday vowed to act swiftly to restore security in north Sinai as a brazen attack near the Israeli border that killed 16 Egyptian security personnel dealt the country’s new president a vexing first crisis. The ambush and the gunmen’s attempt to storm across the border Sunday night brought into sharp focus challenges that could define or undo the presidency of the nation’s first Islamist statesman. The assailants are believed to be Islamist extremists who have secured a foothold near the Israeli border as the area has descended into lawlessness in recent years. No assertion of responsibility has emerged. The incident is likely to become the first real test of the power struggle between Egypt’s military chiefs and President Mohamed Morsi, a Muslim Brotherhood leader who was among the thousands of Islamists persecuted by the state under the reign of ousted leader Hosni Mubarak.

McClatchy Newspapers WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama on Monday signed into law legislation to provide health care to thousands of sick Marine veterans and their families who were exposed to contaminated water at Camp Lejeune in North Carolina. Retired Marine Jerry Ensminger and cancer survivor Mike Partain stood looking over the president’s shoulder as he, with the swipe of his pen, vindicated all their late nights poring over undisclosed documents, cross-country trips to seek out other victims, and countless battles with Marine Corps officials who, they say, continue to ignore their pleas. “Sadly, this act alone will not bring back those we’ve lost, including Janey Ensminger,” Obama said before signing the bill, named partly after Ensminger’s daughter, “but it will honor their memory by making a real difference for those who are still suffering.” Janey Ensminger was just 9 years old when she died in 1985 of a rare form of leukemia.

people, get involved and become active, then you really need to attend,” he wrote, according to SITE. “Stop hiding behind the computer or making excuses.” In November, Page challenged a poster who indicated he would leave the United States if Herman Cain were elected president. “Stand and fight, don’t run,” he replied. In an April message, Page said: “Passive submission is indirect support to the oppressors. Stand up for yourself and live the 14 words,” a reference to a common white supremacists mantra. Mark Potok, a senior fellow at the law center, a nonprofit civil rights organization in Montgomery, Ala., said Page played in groups whose often sinister-sounding names seemed to “reflect what he went out and actually did.” The music talked about genocide against Jews and other minorities. In a 2010 interview, Page told a white supremacist website that he became active in white-power music in 2000, when he left his native Colorado and started the band End Apathy in 2005. The band’s MySpace page listed the group as based in Nashville, N.C.

Contraceptive access bill moves ahead in Philippines New York Times News Service MANILA — Despite opposition from the powerful Roman Catholic Church, a bill that would mandate sex education in schools and subsidize contraceptives moved ahead Monday after being stalled in the Philippine Congress for 14 years. “May God have mercy on our Congress,” said Angel N. Lagdameo, an archbishop in the central Philippines, one of a number of church leaders who condemned the measure. The Philippine House of Representatives voted Monday to close debate and allow amendments on the bill — not final approval but an important procedural step. The Reproductive Health Bill, as the measure is known, must also be approved by the Senate and signed by President Benigno S. Aquino III before it can become law, but Aquino backs the bill and his allies control the Senate. The bill would direct the Department of Health to distribute “medically safe, legal, accessible, affordable and effective reproductive health care services nationwide,” and requires “ageappropriate reproductive health and sexuality education” from the fifth grade through high school. Contraceptives are le-

gal and can be bought readily here, but unlike some other Asian nations with fast-growing populations, the Philippines has no distribution program to help the poor obtain them.

STAMFORD, Conn. — Can President Barack Obama raise the money he needs to hold onto the White House? Money wasn’t supposed to be a worry for the president’s campaign, which smashed fundraising records in 2008. But Mitt Romney’s team has hauled in more than Obama and Also his allies for a • Tea party third straight turns to month, raisMissouri ing the onceprimary, unthinkable A7 question. While the race for voter support is tight, according to polls, Romney’s robust fundraising and a crush of money from Republicanleaning political action committees have forced the president’s campaign to spend heavily through the summer. Highlighting the challenge for Obama, Romney on Monday reported a July fundraising haul of more than $101 million along with the Republican National Committee, compared to the $75 million that Obama’s campaign said it had brought in along with the Democratic National Committee. During a fundraiser in Stamford, Conn., Obama said Romney’s tax proposal would benefit the wealthy at the expense of many middle-class families. “It’s like Robin Hood in reverse,” he said. “It’s Romney Hood.” Romney campaign spokesman Ryan Williams countered that Obama was the only “candidate in this race who’s going to raise taxes on the American people.” The president also warned that his campaign faced a deluge of Republican money. “Over the course of the next three months, the other side is going to spend more money than we have ever seen on ads that basically say the same thing you’ve been hearing for the past three months,” Obama said, then summarized their argument as “the economy is not where it needs to be and it’s Obama’s fault.” Before Romney’s summer surge, Obama had not been outraised by an opponent since 2007. In an email to supporters after the July num-

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Romney’s VP list gets shorter Mitt Romney appears to have narrowed his short list of potential running mates, as national Republicans announced Monday that at least four people once thought to be under consideration for the No. 2 spot will speak at this month’s Republican National Convention — all but ruling them out of contention for the vice presidential slot. The Republican National Committee announced that former secretary of state Condoleezza Rice, former Arkansas Governor Mike Huckabee, South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley and New Mexico Gov. Susana Martinez are among those expected to address the Aug. 27-30 convention in Tampa. That still leaves a number of presumed contenders — including former Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty, Ohio Sen. Rob Portman, House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan of Wisconsin, Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal and New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie — in the mix. With less than three weeks until the convention, speculation about Romney’s selection is escalating rapidly. And his campaign is doing its best to maximize the attention, taunting reporters with the prospect of news, joking about the timing and scheduling a bus tour through four swing states this weekend that could be the backdrop for a vice presidential rollout — or not. — The Washington Post

bers were announced, the Obama campaign said, “If we don’t step it up, we’re in trouble.” A huge spending advantage in the final months of a close election can help a campaign as it seeks to sway undecided voters. Obama officials say they expected Romney to outraise the president through the summer and have made contingency plans if the disparity continues. Part of that planning has involved heavy spending on ads through the spring and summer in an attempt to define Romney for voters before he has access to most of his general election funds.


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THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, AUGUST 7, 2012

Police, fire officials testing drones

Questions surround ‘lost’ Medal of Honor nomination

By Brian Bennett Tribune Washington Bureau

By Jonathan S. Landay McClatchy Newspapers

WASHINGTON — Like other U.S. trainers with the Afghan force that day, former Army Capt. William Swenson had expected light resistance. Instead, the contingent walked into a furious six-hour firefight with Taliban ambushers in which Swenson repeatedly charged through intense fire to retrieve wounded and dead. The 2009 battle of Ganjgal is perhaps the most remarkable of the Afghan war for its extraordinary heroism and deadly incompetence. It produced dozens of casualties, career-killing reprimands and a slew of commendations for valor. They included two Medal of Honor nominations, one for Swenson. Yet months after the first living Army officer in some 40 years was put in for the nation’s highest military award for gallantry, his nomination vanished into a bureaucratic black hole. The U.S. military in Afghanistan said an investigation had found that it was “lost” in the approval process, something that several experts dismissed as improbable, saying that hasn’t happened since the awards system was computerized in the mid-1970s. In fact, the investigation uncovered evidence that suggests a far more troubling explanation. It showed that as former Marine Cpl. Dakota Meyer’s Medal of Honor nomination from the same battle sailed toward approval despite questions about the accuracy of the account of his deeds, there may have been an effort to kill Swenson’s nomination.

‘Totally jacked up’ Swenson’s original nomination was downgraded to a lesser award, in violation of Army and Defense Department regulations, evidence uncovered by the investigation showed. Moreover, Swenson’s Medal of Honor nomination “packet,” a digitized file that contains dozens of documents attesting to his “heroism … above and beyond the call of duty,” disappeared from the computer system dedicated to processing awards, a circumstance for which the military said it has “no explanation.” The unpublished findings, which McClatchy Newspapers has reviewed, threaten to taint a military awards process that’s designed to leave no margin of doubt or possibility of error about the heroism and sacrifices of U.S. service personnel. “The whole awards system is just totally jacked up,” said Doug Sterner, a military historian who’s made a career of verifying the authenticity of commendations. The Pentagon and the military services deny that the system is flawed, and the U.S. command in Afghanistan denied that there was any attempt to downgrade Swenson’s Medal of Honor nomination. Yet despite the possibility of malfeasance or worse, no further effort was made to determine what happened. It couldn’t be determined whether there was an effort to kill Swenson’s Medal of Honor nomination, but there are several possible motives for doing so. Interviewed by military investigators five days after the battle, Swenson implicitly criticized top U.S. commanders in Afghanistan by blasting their rules of engagement. Angered that his repeated calls for artillery and air support were denied during the ambush, he charged that in trying to prevent civilian casualties for political reasons, the rules were costing U.S. soldiers’ lives. “We are not looking at the ground fighter and why he is using these air assets,” Swenson said, according to a transcript obtained by McClatchy. “We just reduced an asset that’s politically unpopular. I’m sure there are a lot of people out there saying, ‘I would really like that asset.’ There are probably a lot of people who got killed as a result of not having that asset.”

New York Times News Service file photo

Heavy smog from burning peat fires shrouds Moscow’s Red Square in August 2010. A study says it is nearly certain that events like the Russian heat wave of that year would not have happened without the human release of greenhouse gases.

Extreme-heat study stokes debate on climate change By Justin Gillis New York Times News Service

The percentage of Earth’s land surface covered by extreme heat in the summer has soared in recent decades, from less than 1 percent in the years before 1980 to as much as 13 percent in recent years, according to a new scientific paper. The change is so drastic, the paper says, that scientists can claim with near certainty that events like the Texas heat wave last year, the Russian heat wave of 2010 and the European heat wave of 2003 would not have happened without the planetary warming caused by the human release of greenhouse gases. Those claims, which go beyond the established scientific consensus about the role of climate change in causing weather extremes, were advanced by James Hansen, a prominent NASA climate scientist, and two co-authors in a scientific paper published online Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. “The main thing is just to

look at the statistics and see that the change is too large to be natural,” Hansen said in an interview. The findings provoked an immediate split among his scientific colleagues, however. Some experts said he had come up with a smart new way of understanding the magnitude of the heat extremes that people around the world are noticing. Others suggested that he had presented a weak statistical case for his boldest claims and that the rest of the paper contained little that had not been observed in the scientific literature for years. The divide is characteristic of the strong reactions that Hansen has elicited playing dual roles in the debate over climate change and how to combat it. As the head of the Goddard Institute for Space Studies in Manhattan, he is one of NASA’s principal climate scientists and the primary custodian of its records of the earth’s temperature. Yet he has also become an activist who marches in protests to demand new government poli-

cies on energy and climate. The latter role — he has been arrested four times at demonstrations, always while on leave from his government job — has made him a hero to the political left and particularly to college students involved in climate activism. But it has discomfited some of his fellow researchers, who fear that his political activities may be sowing unnecessary doubts about his scientific findings and climate science in general.

Skeptics doubt numbers Climate-change skeptics routinely accuse Hansen of manipulating the temperature record to make global warming seem more serious, although there is no proof that he has done so and the warming trend has repeatedly been confirmed by other researchers. Scientists have long believed that the warming — roughly 2.5 degrees Fahrenheit over land in the past century, with most of that occurring since 1980 — was caused largely by the human release of greenhouse gases from burning fos-

sil fuels. But researchers have struggled with the question of whether any particular heat wave or storm can be definitively linked to human-induced climate change. In the new paper, titled “Perception of Climate Change,” Hansen and his co-authors compared the global climate of 1951 to 1980, before the bulk of global warming had occurred, with the climate of the years 1981 to 2011. They computed how much of the earth’s land surface in each period was subjected in June, July and August to heat that would have been considered particularly extreme in the period from 1951 to 1980. In that era, they found, only 0.2 percent of the land surface was subjected to extreme summer heat. But from 2006 to 2011, extreme heat covered from 4-13 percent of the world, they found. “It confirms people’s suspicions that things are happening” to the climate, Hansen said in the interview. “It’s just going to get worse.”

WASHINGTON — On a chaparral-covered hillside 40 miles north of Los Angeles in June 2010, researchers from the Department of Homeland Security hid a device the size of a pack of cigarettes that emitted a safe pulse of low-grade radiation. It was a stand-in for a dirty bomb, or fallout from a nuclear meltdown. Nearby, a pilot toggled a joystick and a gray drone with the wingspan of a California condor banked through the sky. As the plane’s sensor sniffed for radioactive isotopes, law enforcement officers and firefighters watched a portable controller that looked like an oversized Game Boy. In minutes, a warning signal glowed on the screen. The drone had detected the radiation. “Think of Fukushima or some awful event like that,” said Cmdr. Bob Osborne, who hosted the tests as part of his job finding and buying new gadgets for the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department. “We wanted to know: Will it even be able to detect radiation? And it did,” he said. The experiment in Los Angeles County was the first in a rapidly expanding $3.2 million effort by the Department of Homeland Security to accelerate the use of drones by police and fire departments. In October, the department is planning to invite drone manufacturers to Fort Sill, Okla., where their aircraft will be scored on how they perform in a series of scenarios, such as a hostage standoff, an earthquake or a hazardous material spill. A rating system will rank the capabilities of the various models. It’s like a Good Housekeeping Seal of Approval for drones.

Legal concerns

Alaskan Arctic villages hit hard by changes By Juliet Eilperin The Washington Post

POINT HOPE, Alaska — Fermented whale’s tail doesn’t taste the same when the ice cellars flood. Whaling crews in this Arctic coast village store six feet of tail — skin, blubber and bone — underground from spring until fall. The tail freezes slowly while fermenting and taking on the flavor of the earth. Paying homage to their connection to the frozen sea, villagers eat the delicacy to celebrate the moment when the Arctic’s ice touches shore. But climate change, with its more intense storms, melting permafrost and soil erosion, is causing the ice cellars to disintegrate. Many have washed out to sea in recent decades. The remaining ones regularly flood in the spring, which can spoil the meat and blubber, and release scents that attract polar bears. “They’re thawing and filling up with water,” Point Hope Mayor Steve Oomittuk said as he lifted a small wooden door to a cellar, surrounded by plastic sheets shielding the remaining snow cover from the sun. This spring, residents had to take some meat and blubber out and make room for it in their freezers at home. “When you store it in a freezer, it tastes different,” Oomittuk said. More quickly than any other place in the United States, the Alaskan Arctic is being transformed by global warming. The impacts of climate change are threatening a way of life. The dilemma for the federal government — and state and local officials — is whether to try to preserve, if it is even possible, the heritage of the Inuit villages, their ice cellars, sod ancestral homes and cemeter-

Juliet Eilperin / The Washington Post

Residents of Point Hope, a village with 850 residents, lived in sod houses like this until the mid-1970s.

ies ringed with spires of whalebones. Or spend the hundreds of millions of dollars it would cost to move even one village. Point Hope, with a 4,500year history, has much to lose. It’s not just a matter of culture and history but of survival. Households in Alaskan Arctic villages rely on hunting and fishing for most of their food consumption, and those activities depend on sea ice. The importance of catching their own food is evident in the aisles of the Alaska Commercial Co., a supermarket on Bison Street in Kotzebue. Milk costs $9.99 a gallon, and a jumbo pack of drumsticks is $21.77. “You get a sense of our dependence on subsistence hunting,” John Chase said, pointing out the prices. He handles land use permitting for the state’s northernmost borough and oversees climate change issues. The Arctic sea ice, which shrinks over the summer and grows in the winter, decreased by a total of 21.1 million square miles in June, the largest loss on record for the month since satellite records began, according to the National Oceanic

and Atmospheric Administration. Overall, summer sea ice has declined 40 percent since 1979, according to satellite imagery. The hunters in Kotzebue, 180 miles south of Point Hope, struggled during this year’s bearded seal hunt. The slushy ice made it hard to find a firm place to stand, and many of the seals were submerged in water and harder to shoot and retrieve. “This year’s ice was really bad. It makes it harder to see them. Some of the ice was brown and dark,” explained Karmen Monigold, 36, who has been hunting since she was 20. “Our food security is being threatened, not just by climate change, but by offshore development. When I think of my boys, they may not be able to hunt like I do.” In the town of Barrow, the northernmost community in the United States and 330 miles north of Point Hope, the men and women who build trails on the ice so they can harpoon whales and pull them onto a solid surface now complain of mugaliq, a combination of slush, ice and snow that

is harder to work on. Point Hope, population 850, ends in a slender stretch of land jutting into the Chukchi Sea. The community’s heritage is clustered in this part of the sparse landscape for a reason: The sea’s bounty once sustained a local population of more than 5,000. But that proximity to the ocean is also why it is losing ground. The North Slope Borough that encompasses Point Hope and Barrow has spent roughly $2 million building a 275-foot rock revetment near Point Hope’s runway to guard against erosion, and the Army Corps of Engineers spent $433,000 to restore an evacuation road that was damaged by storms and is the main alternative to the airstrip. The community also makes a line of defense out of gravel each summer. “We pile up this gravel and try to stop the erosion,” Oomittuk said, looking out at the steep piles of brown gravel as the waves lapped against them. “We see the things that are changing with the climate change, the offshore development, the ice moving out there, the destructive fall storms,” he said. This summer, the town of Kotzebue put the finishing touches on a $34 million sea wall — primarily funded by the federal government — to protect its beach from powerful fall storms and erosion. Northwest Arctic Borough Mayor Siikauraq Whiting, who is headquartered in Kotzebue, said she and other residents are committed to defending their community and way of life. “The last thing I’m going to say is we’re a people of the past,” she said. “We still exist.”

But some legal experts are worried about the effect of surveillance drones in U.S. skies. “This is putting the cart before the horse where DHS and other federal agencies are looking to put money toward drone use without looking at what it means for privacy and civil liberties,” said Jennifer Lynch, a lawyer with the Electronic Frontier Foundation in San Francisco. DHS has awarded hundreds of thousands of dollars in grants to at least 13 police departments to buy small surveillance drones. But safety restrictions imposed by the Federal Aviation Administration — and the fact that some models have proved difficult to use — have kept most on the ground. That could change soon. Earlier this year, Congress passed a law requiring the FAA to ease restrictions on commercial drone use in U.S. airspace by 2015. Next year, the administration is expected to issue a rule allowing law enforcement and first responders to fly small unmanned aerial vehicles. The Fort Sill center will test drones in “real-world situations where individual lives are in imminent danger,” according to a recent presentation given by John Appleby, the DHS program manager for the tests, who also indicated that Homeland Security officials are drafting recommendations on how to protect people’s privacy. But some in Congress are concerned. Rep. Edward Markey, D-Mass., co-chairman of the Bipartisan Congressional Privacy Caucus, proposed a bill last week that would require police to tell the FAA how they would “minimize the collection and retention of data unrelated to the investigation of a crime,” among other restrictions.


TUESDAY, AUGUST 7, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

Young Chinese make voices heard online, not in the square By Kaz Komolafe

Leaders may be gathering to talk power transition

McClatchy Newspapers

BEIJING — Zhong Shi, a 22year-old student who’s studying English at China Foreign Affairs University in Beijing, has a different idea of political activism from his parents. Zhong hadn’t been born when Chinese authorities brutally put down student-led demonstrations in Tiananmen Square in 1989. He also hasn’t lived through famine, drought or poverty. But while he and his classmates may be less likely to take on the government directly than their parents’ generation did, they have one tool of resistance their elders lacked: the Internet, which has rapidly become an outlet for frustrations with the national government, social issues and even their parents. “The Internet has given them a place to make their voice heard and their voice mean something,” said Mary Bergstrom, who lives in Shanghai. She’s the author of the book “All Eyes East” and the founder of the China marketing firm The Bergstrom Group. Paul Clark, a professor of Chinese at the University of Auckland in New Zealand, said this resistance to the government was unlikely to end in outand-out revolution, however. Chinese youth, “like others, simply exercise opportunities as quiet resistance to the absurdities of the system, parents’ ideas, etc.,” Clark said. “There is enough virtual space out there to be able to express and share critical views of the system, school, authority figures without getting into trouble.” Michael Stanat, the author of a book on Chinese youth culture called “China’s Generation Y,” noted that as China grew in power in the international arena, this Generation Y would take the reins of the na-

Kaz Komolafe / MCT

“We were born in the new era of China,” says Zhong Shi, 22, a student at Chinese Foreign Affairs University in Beijing.

tion’s economy and its foreign relations. “As China becomes a global player, young people will be leading new innovations, changes in China’s economy, as well as investments in the U.S. and Europe,” said Stanat, an American expatriate who’s been living in Shanghai for a little less than a year. More than half of China’s Internet users are younger than 30. Recent studies conducted by SIS International Research, the global marketing research firm where Stanat works, show that Chinese youth use the Internet more on average than their North American and European counterparts do, Stanat said. For Zhong, it’s a generational shift: When his parents want to send an email they ask their secretaries; when he wants to, he does it himself. For young adults such as Zhong, the micro-blogging website Sina Weibo has become their outlet, Stanat said. The site, which was launched in 2007, has more than 250 million subscribers. Stanat recalled an incident in 2010 in which two college stu-

BEIJING — China’s staterun news agency and central state television network have begun publishing reports from the beachside town of Beidaihe on the activities of top Communist Party visitors from Beijing, suggesting to some political observers that China’s leaders have begun congregating there to discuss the power transition expected to take place this fall. For months, party elders and current senior officials have been negotiating quietly in Beijing to fill the seats of the party’s top governing bodies, the 25-member Politburo and its elite nine-member Standing Committee. The new members are expected to be announced in the fall during the Communist Party’s 18th National Congress. Since the time of Mao Zedong, leaders have met in Beidaihe at the height of summer to talk politics. After Hu Jintao

dents were run over, killing one of them. The man accused in her death was politically connected, and there was an outpouring of condemnation on Sina Weibo, as bloggers speculated that the government was trying to quiet news reports about the story in hopes that it would go away, Stanat said. “The Internet is a medium through which young people can express themselves in a society that values indirect communication,” he said. The Communist Party has started to sit up and take notice of some of these Internet protests. Earlier this year, when the party dismissed Bo Xilai, the former party head in Chongqing, Sina Weibo users posted so many comments critical of the

became party chief in 2002, he called for a halt to the formal meetings and central government summertime operations in Beidaihe, even though his predecessor, Jiang Zemin, favored holding negotiations at Beidaihe. One party media insider said some of the central figures involved in the succession talks this year had begun arriving in Beidaihe, about 180 miles east of Beijing, by Aug. 1. The latest round of speculation over the meetings there was ignited by the main report on the 7 p.m. Sunday news program of China Central Television. It showed Xi Jinping, the vice president and expected successor to Hu, talking with people in Beidaihe. A report by Xinhua, the state-run news agency, said Xi was meeting with “renowned experts and grass-roots talents” who had been invited to Beidaihe as a reward for their work. The report said 62 such people had been invited this year, in a program that began in 2001. — New York Times News Service

party that the government shut down the site for three days. The next month, Sina Weibo introduced a new user-credit system that experts suspect is a government censorship ploy. Now users receive 80 credits when they sign up, and they lose points for “untrue information, invasions of privacy, personal attacks, plagiarized content, the assuming of others’ identities and harassment of others.” Bergstrom reeled off a list of other government attempts to censor the site: deleted users, deleted posts and censored comments. But Sina Weibo now “has too much momentum and too many users,” she said. “It would be dangerous to do anything to it.”

A5

W  B Embassy worker charged in killing Venezuela’s first secretary at its embassy in Kenya was charged Monday with murdering the newly arrived ambassador as allegations surfaced that officials at the scandalplagued post in Nairobi may have been trafficking drugs under cover of diplomatic immunity, Kenyan media reported. Dwight Sagaray entered a plea of not guilty when he appeared before a Nairobi judge to answer to murder charges in the July 27 slaying of veteran diplomat Olga Fonseca, the reports said. The 57year-old envoy, who had arrived to the Kenya post just 12 days before her death, was found strangled in the bedroom of her official residence.

Ernesto continues toward Mexico An up-and-down Tropical Storm Ernesto is forecast to strengthen into a hurricane by today and take aim at Belize or Mexico’s Yucatan with sustained winds of 85 mph. As of Monday afternoon, the system was in the Caribbean about 135 miles northeast of Cabo Gracias A Dios, on the Nicaragua-Honduras border, moving northwest at 12 mph with sustained winds of 65 mph. Earlier on Monday, forecasters said they didn’t expect Ernesto to strengthen beyond tropical storm status because it was being attacked by wind shear and dry air. However, a hurricane hunter aircraft found the system’s core reformed and became better organized in

the process. After crossing the Yucatan, Ernesto is forecast to emerge in the southern Gulf of Mexico on Thursday and hit mainland Mexico on Friday, possibly as a hurricane.

Hillary Clinton visits ailing Mandela JOHANNESBURG, South Africa — Nelson Mandela, retired from public life and largely confined to his house, smiled when he saw Secretary of State Hillary Clinton on Monday, but the 94-year-old Nobel laureate appeared very frail. “That’s a beautiful smile!” Clinton exclaimed after she and a small group of aides flew from Johannesburg to pay respects to Mandela in his home village, Qunu. Clinton is on an eight-nation African visit. Photographers and a reporter were allowed to see a few moments of the hour-long meeting in Mandela’s comfortable house. Mandela rarely appears in public now, and even meetings at home with anyone outside his family are becoming rare. The Clinton visit had the air of a fond farewell. Mandela’s single term as president, from 1994 to 1999, coincided with the Clinton presidency in the United States. Former President Bill Clinton and then-first lady Hillary Clinton saw Mandela often. As first lady, Clinton attended Mandela’s inauguration as South Africa’s first democratically elected president, calling it a “milestone of the 20th century.” — From wire reports

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THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, AUGUST 7, 2012

Wildfire Continued from A1 The Eyerly Fire started on July 15, 2002, and also leveled 19 other structures as it burned 23,000 acres. The fire burned for 17 days before it was contained. As of 9 p.m. Monday, the Geneva 12 Fire was 20 percent contained, she said. Full containment is expected by Aug. 13. Two bulldozers, four 20-person handcrews, seven engine crews and three structure protection crews fought the fire on the ground Monday, Clark said, while two helicopters and three air tankers fought it from the air. The fire was among 30 new blazes found Monday by firefighters after a Sunday thunderstorm that hit Central Oregon with an estimated 4,200 lightning strikes. Most of the lightning was in Deschutes County, but the

Shooting Continued from A1 FBI agents hugged Kaleka’s son before telling him how his 65-year-old father had confronted the much younger gunman with the knife, keeping him away from his wife and other temple followers. The Sikh community, for its part, started a Facebook page for “Sikhs expressing EXTREME gratitude to Lt. Brian Murphy” in appreciation for urging fellow officers to help the wounded inside the temple despite having been shot nine times himself at close range. “You are a selfless hero,” wrote Simi Burn Bassett. Amardeep Kaleka, 34, of Los Angeles, said his father had always believed strongly that America was going to be a place of new opportunities for him, his wife and his two boys when he arrived from India’s Punjab region and settled in northern Milwaukee in the early 1980s. He got a job working at a family member’s gas station, Kaleka said. “He started working a third shift for an uncle and worked his butt off, 16, 18 hours a day. Then he went on to rent one, and then to own one, and at the end, he owned something like eight gas stations. … All with hard work. No tricks. Hard work.”

Madras

Lake Billy Chinook

Metolius

Deschutes National Forest

26

Graham Rd. Jordan Rd.

Culver Start of Geneva 12 Fire

Crooked River National Grassland JEFFERSON COUNTY

Crooked River Deschutes River 97 Greg Cross / The Bulletin

storm also rumbled over parts of Crook, Lake and Klamath counties. Most of the other fires were kept to a single tree, Clark said. While the thunderstorm

dropped rain in many of the places hit by lightning, there could be smoldering trees that could bloom into a fire. “We can expect more for the next couple of days and even weeks,” she said.

The elder Kaleka chastised his sons when they complained about discrimination Murphy or ill treatment, Amardeep Kaleka said. “He put the largest American flag right on the front lawn, and if you go there, you’ll see the flag there. It looks like it was stolen from an elementary school standing there, it’s so big,” he said. “We came home and we said, ‘It’s an eyesore, this thing is going to make us look foolish here.’ And he said, ‘You’re an American now. You push the American dream. Study and knowledge and education, that’s what’s going to lead us forward.’ ” Kaleka said his father used much of his earnings from the gas stations to help build the new Sikh temple, which opened in July 2007, not only with the help of his savings, but the pledges of 24 other community members who put up their houses as collateral for the loan on the property. The elder Kaleka became the president of the temple. On the day of the attacks, Kaleka said, his father went to the temple much earlier than usual. From what he has been told by law enforcement agents, a trail of blood

led from where the elderly Sikh confronted the gunman toward the kitchen, suggesting Kaleka’s knife may have wounded the attacker, though this has not been confirmed. Kaleka’s wife was hiding in terror in a pantry. “During the battle he took two wounds, but he was able to hold him off,” the son said. “He was doing his best to keep that guy away and get them to security.” The gunman’s next roadblock was Lt. Brian Murphy, a 51-year-old New York native who still talked with the accent and confidence of a New Yorker. He has served 21 years with the Oak Creek force and was one of three finalists for police chief the last time the job came open. He had received a commendation in 2004 for an investigation into suspected sabotage of electrical lines, according to the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel. Oak Creek Police Chief John Edwards told reporters Murphy was “ambushed” as he approached the shooting scene. “He was in very close proximity to the shooter. When he arrived, he came upon someone who was injured, and he was going to assist that individual when the shooter came around him, close to his squad car, and hit him at a close dis-

Marathon Continued from A1 Marial will be competing under special rules as an “independent Olympic athlete,” representing no nation and running under the Olympic flag. His birthplace of South Sudan is a brand-new country, fresh from decades of conflict, without its own Olympic team. His adopted home, the United States, where he discovered his athletic gift, hasn’t made him a citizen. If Marial wins the gold — that isn’t expected, but then again, little about his story is — the Olympic anthem would play on the medal stand. Perhaps that’s only fitting for a man whose story seems to epitomize the Olympic ideal. “Guor Marial is not a man without a team,” said his friend Brad Poore, a Sacramento, Calif.-area lawyer who led the fight to get him invited to London. “The world is his team.” Marial was born in 1984 in a small village in Unity state in what is now South Sudan. At the time, though, his village was still part of Sudan, the vast, unruly East African nation that has been at war with itself for decades. In the conflict pitting the northern government against southern rebels, hardly any family was spared — certainly not Marial’s own. He lost eight of his 10 brothers and sisters, and many other relatives, either because of fighting or the privation and disease it unleashed. His family tried to send him to the north, to live with an uncle, but he was captured along the way and forced to work as a laborer. He was barely 10 years old. He managed to return to the south only to be captured again, this time by a Sudanese soldier, whose family used him as an unpaid servant. When he finally made it to the north, Sudanese authorities accused his uncle, a humanitarian worker, of helping the southern rebels. Security forces raided their home and attacked Marial and his aunt,

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Warm Springs Indian Reservation

Metolius River

Geneva Rd.

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The Geneva 12 Fire — named after a town once located near where the fire started — was likely caused by lightning-struck juniper, Clark said. Once the sun dried out the grasses around the tree on Monday, flames flared up and the fire spread. Smoke hung in the air around Bend Monday but it likely wasn’t from the Geneva 12 Fire. Experts disagreed on where the smoke came from. Possible sources were large wildfires in California and Nevada and the 23,000-acre Lava Fire burning southeast of Bend. The Lava Fire, caused by lighting on July 23, was burning through juniper, grass and sagebrush on rugged land overseen by the Bureau of Land Management about 15 miles from Fort Rock. As of Monday the fire was 50 percent contained. — Reporter: 541-617-7812, ddarling@bendbulletin.com

tance,” Edwards said at a news conference on Monday. Other officers opened fire and killed the gunman, but when they attempted to help Murphy, he told them to go help the other victims first. “He had been shot nine times — one of them very serious in the neck area — and he waved them off and told them to go into the temple to assist those in there,” Edwards said. Police administrators have declined further interviews about the confrontation pending the investigation, as have the officers themselves. James Palmer II, executive director of the Wisconsin Professional Police Officers Association, which represents Oak Creek officers, said they have made it clear they don’t want to be the subject of folk tales. “The officers at this point are really not interested in being viewed as heroes. They feel as though they were simply doing their job, and they are confident that any one of their colleagues would have acted in the same manner. For that reason, they don’t view themselves as extraordinary,” Palmer said. “While I run the police association, I’m not a police officer, and I have to say I find that kind of extraordinary myself,” he said. “Incredible, actually.”

“He’s an incredible kid. As a coach, he’s a once-in-a-lifetime kid.” — Rusty Cofrin, Guor Marial’s high school cross-country coach

Photo courtesy of Brad Poore / MCT

Guor Marial, left, with friend Brad Poore after the Rock ’n’ Roll Marathon in San Diego in June. Marial, born in South Sudan, finished sixth with a time of 2:12:55 in just his second competitive marathon. Poore led the fight to get Marial invited to the Olympics.

breaking his jaw with the butts of their rifles. He and his aunt fled to Egypt, where they lived under the auspices of the United Nations before the United States took them in as refugees in 2001. Marial enrolled in high school in Concord, N.H., at age 17 and got a 40-hour-a-week job stocking produce at a grocery store to send money back to his family in Sudan. He’d never really run before, but his P.E. teacher noticed something unusual. “He said, ‘You can run and run and never get tired,’ “ Marial recalled. The cross-country coach, Rusty Cofrin, called him in for a tryout. Marial showed up in basketball shoes, and Cofrin looked skeptical. But once he started running, “the kid just floated,” Cofrin said. After a long circuit around a park and 1.5 miles on the track, Cofrin, an accomplished runner, saw that Marial seemed barely to have broken a sweat. “If you feel good, take off,” Cofrin said. The teenager left his coach in the dust. “At that point I knew, this is a keeper,” said Cofrin, now 54. Cofrin later discovered that Marial had a chronic back injury from when he was beaten by Sudanese security forces. But he was a fierce competi-

tor, leading the Concord High cross-country and track teams to their best results in years. “He’s an incredible kid,” Cofrin said. “As a coach, he’s a once-in-a-lifetime kid.” He went on to Iowa State University, where he was a cross-country All-America and earned a chemistry degree. But he put his plans for graduate school on hold to pursue running. He moved to Flagstaff, where the high altitude and dry heat make an ideal environment for distance runners. His days are spent training, his nights working at a facility for mentally challenged adults. He doesn’t have a coach, and mostly he runs alone. When he showed up at the Twin Cities Marathon in October, he had never run a race longer than 10 kilometers. At the pasta dinner on the eve of the race, he met Poore, an elite distance runner who’d spent time working in Africa. “I was honestly a little concerned for him,” Poore said. But Marial, 5-foot-11 and about 130 pounds, took off with the lead group of runners and finished the race in 2:14:32, fast enough to qualify for the Olympics. In June, at a marathon in San Diego, he shaved more than a minute and a half off his time. Yet still it seemed unlikely that he’d make it to London. South Sudan finally achieved independence from Sudan last year but was still more a concept than a functioning state, lacking all but the most basic infrastructure, and it wasn’t fielding an Olympic team. While Marial was a permanent resident of the United States, he wasn’t a citizen and therefore couldn’t join the American squad. Oddly, Sudan, the very country whose security forces kidnapped and beat Marial, chasing him and his relatives from

their homeland, offered Marial a spot on its Olympic team. As politely as possible, he refused. The offer was particularly strange because the Sudanese government is in the process of trying to expel hundreds of thousands of southern refugees from its land on the grounds that the war is over. Many of them left the south decades ago and are uncertain about returning. If the Khartoum government follows through on its threat, these refugees could become stateless. “Yet they were prepared to have Guor, who is South Sudanese, come and fly the colors of Sudan at the Olympics because he is a brilliant athlete. There is some cynicism in that,” said Michel Gabaudan, president of Refugees International, an advocacy group. “Guor was very dignified in his refusal.” Guor arrived in London last Friday and was reunited with his friend and fellow runner Lopez Lomong, another refugee from southern Sudan, who carried the U.S. flag at the 2008 opening ceremonies in Beijing. Together they represent the dreams of their homeland even if few there will be able to watch them — perhaps not even Marial’s parents, who remain in their village in Unity state. Marial hasn’t seen his parents in more than a decade, and he hasn’t spoken to them since he got the Olympic invitation. Their village is too remote for cellphone service, so he’s passed messages through friends and relatives and he thinks “they are aware of the situation.” Sometime this week, he was told, they’ll set off on foot to the town of Panrieng, the nearest town that has a TV and satellite dish — a 30-mile walk that could take two days. “Hopefully, they’ll find a TV,” he said, “and hopefully the network is providing Olympic coverage.”

Mars Continued from A1 For the world of science, it was the second slam-dunk this summer — the first one being the announcement last month that the Higgs boson, a long-sought particle theorized by physicists, had likely been found. But while the focus of the high-energy physics world has shifted overseas to CERN, the European laboratory, the United States remains the center of the universe for space, ahead of Russia, Europe and China, and for NASA, it was a chance to parry accusations of being slow, bloated and rudderless. “If anybody has been harboring doubts about the status of U.S. leadership in space,” John Holdren, the president’s science adviser, said at the news conference, “well, there’s a 1-ton automobile-size piece of American ingenuity. And it’s sitting on the surface of Mars right now.” Now that it has reached Mars, Curiosity ushers in a new era of exploration that could turn up evidence that the Red Planet once had the necessary ingredients for life — or might even still harbor life today. Far larger than earlier rovers, Curiosity is packed with the most sophisticated movable laboratory that has ever been sent to another planet. It is to spend at least two years examining rocks within the 96-mile crater it landed in, looking for carbon-based molecules and other evidence that early Mars had conditions friendly for life. Only one other country, the Soviet Union, has successfully landed anything on Mars, and that spacecraft, Mars 3 in 1971, fell silent shortly after landing. So far, this rover appears to be healthy. “What’s amazing about it is the miracle of this engineer-

Jail Continued from A1 The county has been renting beds in the Jefferson County jail since April, and in July county officials signed an agreement to rent 10 inmate beds from the Jefferson County jail for one year. Other local law enforcement officials said Monday that there is a real need to expand the jail. Deschutes County Circuit Court Judge Alta Brady said that every morning, judges receive a report on how many jail beds are available. “We have to be very careful, because of course we don’t want to be making decisions on sentences based on whether we have room at the inn,” Brady said. However, the reality is that on some days, judges learn the jail has “no female beds and two male beds,” Brady said. “We work cooperatively with the jail, but they’re simply out of jail beds.” Brady said the plan Blanton described to her seems to be “the best way to run at it without going back to the voters.” Bend Chief of Police Jeff Sale said the county Sheriff’s Office does a good job operating the jail. “Without more capacity, we’re just going to keep releasing people that we’ll be chasing down the next night or in a couple of weeks and figuring out what to do with them,” Sale said. Former county administrator Mike Maier, who was part of a group that met privately on the issue for four months, said construction of the jail’s new wing could be completed in two years. “The nice thing about it is it can be done quick,” Maier said. The proposal to build a 144-bed wing on the jail is significantly scaled back from what the 2010 bond measure had planned. The $44 million bond would have paid for the addition of 250 beds, a new courtroom and other remodeling work, according to a sheriff’s presentation. Whereas the bond measure would have added 73,000 square feet of space, the latest proposal would add 15,000 square feet. The county obtained an engineer’s opinion on how much the project will cost, but the sheriff and commissioners declined to reveal the figures, citing a variety of reasons. “We’re not going to make that public until we have to, so we can get competitive bids,”

ing,” said John Grotzinger, the project scientist. As the drama of the landing unfolded, each step proceeded without flaw. The capsule entered the atmosphere at the appointed time, with thrusters guiding it toward the crater. The parachute deployed. Then the rover and rocket stage dropped away from the parachute and began a powered descent toward the surface, and the sky crane maneuver worked as designed. “Touchdown confirmed,” Allen Chen, an engineer in the control room here, said at 10:32 p.m. Sunday. “We’re safe on Mars.” Two minutes later, the first image popped onto video screens — a grainy, 64-pixelby-64-pixel black-and-white image that showed one of the rover’s wheels and the Martian horizon. A few minutes later, a clearer version appeared, then an image from the other side of the rover. “That’s the shadow of the Curiosity rover on the surface of Mars,” Robert Manning, the chief engineer for the project, gushed. More photos followed. One image showed the rover’s destination, a 3-mile-high mound at the center of the crater informally known as Mount Sharp. NASA also released a series of photographs that the rover snapped as it descended, showing the heat shield falling away and later a plume of dust kicked up by the rocket engines. Over the first week, Curiosity is to deploy its main antenna, raise a mast containing cameras, a rock-vaporizing laser and other instruments, and take its first panoramic shot of its surroundings. NASA will spend the first weeks checking out Curiosity before embarking on the first drive.

Blanton said. Commissioner Alan Unger said he did not know the cost, and Commissioner Tammy Baney said she did not want to say because it was only a ballpark figure and might not be correct. Commissioner Tony DeBone did not comment on whether he was aware of the project cost. County officials have been meeting privately since April to discuss how to expand the jail without asking taxpayers for more money. The meetings have included Blanton, Baney, Kropp, Maier, Finance Director and Treasurer Marty Wynne, Community Justice Director Ken Hales, and Susan Ross, director of the county’s Property and Facilities Department, Kropp said. During the meeting Monday afternoon, Ross showed commissioners an animated video tour of the proposed new wing on the jail. The group discussed a variety of ideas that included converting the county’s juvenile detention center into additional jail space, Kropp said. “Then the challenge is, what do you do with the juveniles?” Kropp said. Baney said the reason for holding the discussions privately was the sensitive nature of topics such as converting juvenile detention into jail space. Unger said he supported the plan. “I think this plan is costeffective,” Unger said. Baney agreed. “We’re living within our means, and that’s what we were asked to do,” Baney said. “I know there’s a lot more work to do, but it’s not going to involve going back out to the taxpayers.” DeBone said commissioners need to talk more about what the project will actually cost, but called the plan “exciting.” Commissioners voted unanimously at the Monday meeting to support the concept of expanding the jail. They also voted unanimously to have county employees draft resolutions to issue bonds and allow the county to begin incurring expenses that will be repaid with money from the sale of bonds. Both resolutions will require approval by the county commission at a future meeting to take effect. “That means ‘go forward,’ ” DeBone told Blanton. — Reporter: 541-617-7829, hborrud@bendbulletin.com


TUESDAY, AUGUST 7, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

A7

Tea party takes Texas momentum to Missouri By David A. Lieb The Associated Press

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. — Sarah Palin is mounting an aggressive campaign in Missouri — in television and radio ads, in automated telephone calls, even serving barbecued pork sandwiches at a rural political picnic. She’s urging residents to vote for Sarah — Sarah Steelman, one of three Republicans in a prickly U.S. Senate primary. Fresh off a resounding Republican runoff victory by Ted Cruz in Texas, Palin and the tea party movement now are trying to capitalize in primaries this month in Missouri, Wisconsin and Arizona. But they may pose a more difficult test

than in Texas, where the charismatic Cruz waged an outsider’s campaign against the Re- Palin publican establishment’s pick of Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst. In today’s primary in Missouri, conservative loyalties are fractured among a trio of candidates all preaching a smallergovernment message while splitting the endorsements of conservative celebrities. In Wisconsin, the would-be tea party beneficiaries are up against a political icon — former fourterm Gov. Tommy Thompson. In all three states, millionaire businessmen are self-financ-

ing campaigns focused more on a Main Street message of jobcreation than a direct tea party Steelman appeal. The uncertain outlook shows that winning as a tea party candidate still takes a combination of factors, even in states where Republicans are conservative and getting more so. Holding sole claim to the tea party label is a big help, along with strong campaign skills and vulnerable opponents. Few hopefuls manage to have all three. “The voters in Missouri are conservative like Texas, so I certainly hope it’s going to

help,” Steelman said a day after Cruz’s victory on July 31, as she passed out newly printed fliers featuring Palin’s face and Steelman’s 12-point platform to a lunchtime crowd at a Jefferson City diner. She and other Republican candidates have taken notice of Cruz’s powerful coalition — featuring Palin and other tea party stars such as South Carolina Sen. Jim DeMint and Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul; talkshow personalities Glenn Beck and Sean Hannity; and financially stacked political groups such as the Club for Growth and FreedomWorks for America. But she, and the multiple conservative contenders in the other states, are splitting the

key endorsements with their opponents, creating a murkier picture for voters. Steelman, 54, is a former state senator and treasurer who lost a Republican primary for governor four years ago. Her father is a former Missouri Republican Party chairman and her husband a former attorney general candidate. She’s hardly a political outsider as she seeks to challenge Democratic Sen. Claire McCaskill. Yet she’s running on a slogan of “the status quo has got to go,” she has the endorsement of the Tea Party Express and she’s airing a TV ad in which Palin describes her as an economist “who defends our tax dollars like a momma grizzly defends her cubs.”

Some grassroots tea party activists aren’t impressed. “She tried to attach herself to the tea party without actually getting our approval. None of us in the tea party really appreciated that,” said Jeannine Huskey, 56, of Eureka, who is supporting businessman John Brunner. Brunner, 60, is the former CEO and chairman of health care products manufacturer Vi-Jon Inc. He has poured more than $7.5 million into a campaign centered on his privatesector experience, and he’s benefiting from millions more in advertising by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. Brunner also has the support of FreedomWorks, which aided Cruz.

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Joe A. Lochner Insurance Agency Johnson Benefit Plan Journey Peak Travel Juniper Paper & Supply Kellj J. Witt construction Knife River LaPine Dairy Queen LaPine Pet Bed & Bath Lara House Lodge Laserlive Manufacturing Leading Edge Aviation Inc. Lean on Me Virtual Services Living Fitness Longboard Louie’s Lumberman’s Insurance Madras Sanitary Services Madras Vision Source Dr. Curtis L. Dix, OD MediSIMPLE Megalitsch Pole Fencing & Log Furniture Merrill Lynch - Eric White Metolius Market and Gas MICROSEMI Mid Oregon Credit Union Midstate Electric Cooperation Mill Point Dental Center Miller Lumber MST Corporation Mt. View Hospital Murphy’s Saw Shop NAPA Auto Parts LaPine Neil Kelly Company New House Manufacturing Co. Inc. Northwest Crossing Northwest Mechanical Group NW Brain & Spine Ochoco Lumber Company On Point Community Credit Union Overleaf Lodge and Spa Papa Murphy’s Pizza Parrilla Grill PGC Building & Design PhD Computers Pizza Mondo Potter’s Piano Service Powell’s Sweet Shoppe Precious Paws LLC Premier Auto Body & Paint Premier Printing Solutions Prep Profile System Professional Heating & Cooling Pro-Vend Services PTI Transportation Quality Builders Electric Inc. Quality Business Service Ray Johnson Post 44 - American Legion Ray’s Food Place Redmond Area Parks & Recreation Redmond Gymnastics Academy Rimrock Trails Adolescent Treatment Services Robert Goold CPA Robertson Taco Shop Robinson and Owen Heavy Construction Rocky Mountain Chocolate Factory Round Butte Seed Growers Inc. RV Outfitters Ryder Graphics Schnitzer Steel Industries Scwabe, Williamson & Wyatt Second Street Theater Severson Plumbing & Mechanical Inc. & Severson Fire Protection Shevlin Sand & Gravel Sounds Fast Sounds on Wheels South Side Pub Inc. Stark’s Vacuums Steve the Appliance Doctor Stoneridge Townhomes at Sun River Subaru Guru Subaru of Bend Sunray Vacation Rentals Sunrise Pool & Patio Sunriver Books & Music Sunriver Resort Sunwest Builders Superior Service / Walter Inc. Swan’s Automotive Terrebonne Hardware Tetherow Golf Club The Corner Store The DeLeone Corporation The Dime Store The Identity Zone The Law Office of Bryan W. Gruetter PC The Loft of Bend The Pony Express The Summit Restaurant The Yard Doctor, Inc. Thin Book Publishing TK Jacobson Investments Inc. Tom Collier Classic Motor Car Company Inc. Top Notch Electric Trailer World Trimble, Everton, Ferrens & Mode Tumalo Therapeutics - Marian B. McCall UBS Financial Services, Inc. US Bank Madras VanHandel Automotive, Inc. Vic Russell Constructino Inc. Wanderlust Tours Warm Springs Market West Side Bakery & Cafe Westside Chiropractic Wilderness Garbage & Recyclilng WT Equipment Inc.

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541-548-6023 541-382-3571 800-848-5775 541-312-4070 541-408-5683 541-388-0445 541-536-3344 541-536-5355 541-388-4064 541-548-0882 541-383-8825 541-504-2619 541-382-2332 541-383-5889 541-382-2421 541-475-2071 541-475-2020 541-330-1393 541-382-1579 541-382-4373 541-546-4171 541-382-8028 541-382-1795 541-536-2126 541-388-0078 541-382-4301 541-416-9000 541-460-4039 541-548-2515 541-536-2192 541-382-7580 541-548-1055 541-382-1662 541-728-0024 541-585-2400 541-447-6296 800-527-3932 800-338-0507 541-617-6164 541-617-9600 541-312-4201 541-526-2100 541-330-9093 541-382-5411 541-617-9866 541-382-0209 541-548-2299 541-617-9899 541-382-1401 541-923-3366 541-389-9999 541-318-7468 541-318-1940 541-475-2259 541-548-5688 541-447-6423 541-548-7275 541-923-3513 541-447-2631 541-382-7009 541-388-6783 541-549-1848 541-383-1718 541-546-5222 541-312-9758 541-382-5934 541-382-8471 541-749-4044 541-312-9626 541-382-3720 541-312-4730 541-312-4332 541-388-0300 541-383-7672 541-323-3011 541-382-7205 541-593-1502 541-382-6067 541-389-3031 541-593-3225 541-447-2005 541-593-2525 541-593-4915 541-548-7341 541-388-8839 541-385-8498 541-548-8707 541-388-2582 541-536-0700 541-504-8311 541-549-8479 541-475-8700 541-585-1140 541-915-5669 541-549-1538 541-749-2440 541-536-1294 541-382-7579 541-383-8502 541-317-3403 541-317-1998 541-541-3491 541-385-0534 541-420-8577 541-322-6122 541-475-3811 541-549-0416 541-593-8310 541-389-8359 541-553-1597 541-382-3426 541-318-1632 546-586-1194 541-318-1716


A8

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, AUGUST 7, 2012

The Guide to Central Oregon schools publishes Wednesday, August 15


COMMUNITYLIFE

TV & Movies, B2 Calendar, B3 Horoscope, B3 Comics, B4-5 Puzzles, B5

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, AUGUST 7, 2012

B

www.bendbulletin.com/community

PETS SPOTLIGHT Sustainability awards Oct. 18 The Environmental Center is accepting applications for the 2012 Sustainability Awards through Aug. 31. The awards are given to a citizen, small business, large business and agency or nonprofit that are committed to “a healthy environment, a vibrant economy and an equitable society,” according to a press release from the center. The awards ceremony will be Oct. 18 at the Jungers Culinary Center at Central Oregon Community College in Bend. Applications can be found at bit.ly/TEC awards. Contact: www.enviro center.org.

Jade, a love bird

An African gray parrot

Luna, a Quaker parrot

PARROT APPEAL

Angel, a Solomon Island eclectus parrot Photos by Ryan Brennecke The Bulletin

— From staff reports

• Local sanctuary operators says those weighing bird ownership should understand these brightly feathered friends are long-lived, intelligent, vocal

YOUR PET

By Tom Olsen For The Bulletin

I

magine a pet so intelligent, affectionate and articulate that at bedtime, it flies to your shoulder, cocks its head to one side, looks into your eyes and says, “I love you.” This is Einstein, an African grey parrot. Now imagine another pet so sensitive that after you die or become disillusioned with him, he pulls out all of his feathers in an unsuccessful attempt to relieve his separation anxiety. This is Tristan, another African grey. The behavioral extremes of these two birds bring the pleasures and pitfalls of parrot ownership into sharp focus, according to Jaimi Jenkins and Jim Warren, operators of the Once Upon a Wing parrot sanctuary in Alfalfa, where the birds live.

Submitted photo

2 blind kitties, see them play Say hello to two completely blind cats. Pia, 2, left, was born without retinas. Sophie, 2, was born without eyes. They live in Bend with Donna Raymond, Peter Casey, another cat named ZeeDee, who has only one eye, an ancient dog, a cool hamster and three kids — and somehow everyone works really well together. To submit a photo for publication, email a high-resolution image along with your animal’s name, age and species or breed, your name, age, city of residence and contact information, and a few words about what makes your pet special. Send photos to pets@bendbulletin .com, drop them off at 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. in Bend, or mail them to The Bulletin Pets section, P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708. Contact: 541-3830358.

“Parrots have the intelligence and mentality of a 3-year-old child and go through all the same emotions that a human does,” said Jenkins. Their emotions including love and affection, curiosity, jealousy, anger, anxiety and depression, she said. “And some parrots can live to be 75 years old.” While parrots can be charming, too many new owners buy them without fully understanding their emotional needs or considering their longevity, Jenkins said. And too often, the result is a beautiful but mentally bruised bird needing rescue. Thirteen parrots of nine different species now reside in the sanctuary; nine of them rescues. Jenkins has placed another nine surrendered birds in new homes over the past six years the sanctuary has been open. See Parrot / B6

Jaimi Jenkins talks to Coco, an umbrella cockatoo. Jenkins operates Once Upon a Wing parrot sanctuary in Alfalfa.

ADOPT ME

Submitted photo

Coco, rear, an umbrella cockatoo

Pioneer orchards rooted in history

Meet sweet Joli Meet Joli, a domestic shorthair calico/Manx with lots of color. Joli is a sweet girl who likes other cats. She would enjoy a home where she can do a little bird-watching from the back of the couch, or climbing up a cat tree, or just have a lap to call her own. If you would like to visit Joli, or any other pet available for adoption at the Humane Society of the Ochocos, contact the shelter at 541-447-7178 or visit www.humane societyochocos.com.

By Mac McLean The Bulletin

Courtesy photo

Julius and Sarah McCoin, pictured in this 1875 wedding portrait, moved their family to a 160-acre tract of land on Gray Butte in 1886.

Jerry Ramsey climbed over a barbedwire fence on the northeast slope of Gray Butte and walked over to a tree his great-grandparents, Julius and Sarah McCoin, planted when they settled in the area almost 120 years ago. Its branches, full of quarter-sized fruit, dangled toward the ground. “We don’t have any idea what some of these trees are,” said Ramsey, president of the Jefferson County Historical Society and an expert when it comes to local lore. He said most of the trees produce either red or yellow apples, “but that doesn’t tell us anything.” On Aug. 18, Ramsey will guide members of the historical society and the Home Orchard Society, a Portland-based group of amateur arborists, on a tour of the McCoin

Alex McDougall / The Bulletin

Jefferson County Historical Society President Jerry Ramsey inspects fruit in the McCoin Orchard that his great-grandparents, Julius and Sarah McCoin, planted in the 1880s.

Orchard and another homestead orchard planted near what is now the Crooked River Grassland’s Cyrus Horse Camp. He hopes the tour will shed some light on what type of trees are in the orchards and how they’ve stayed in production for so many years (see “About the tour,” Page B6). “Obviously those are some pretty har-

dy trees,” said Joanie Cooper, president of the Home Orchard Society, which also aims to preserve the pioneer orchards of the Pacific Northwest. “I just hope there’s no expectation (that) we can go into the orchard, look up at their branches and tell you what kind of trees they are.” See Orchard / B6


B2

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, AUGUST 7, 2012

TV & M

Shark Week has new teeth in its 25th year shows frame sea predators realistically, with great cauLOS ANGELES — After a tion. Experts lace safety tips quarter-century of dorsal fins throughout each episode. and drinking games, “Shark “Sharks are rational actors,� Week� remains a strange and Runnette said. “They’re precelebrated event. The annual dictable. We aim to teach viewDiscovery Channel lineup, ers about their habits and patwhich kicks off Sunday, terns. Sharks never just go out snared more than and intentionally 26 million viewers humans.� TV SPOTLIGHT hunt last summer. Sal Jorgensen, The tradition a marine biologist began in 1988, when Discov- at the Monterey Bay Aquariery aired a week’s worth of um, teamed up with Discovshark-oriented programming ery producers to shoot “Great in hopes of drawing audiences White Highway� — a program on a slow summer week. It that explores movement patworked: According to Brooke terns of the marine beasts, Runnette, the network’s exec- based on his research. utive producer for special projAlongside titles like “Air ects, the series’ 1988 premiere Jaws Apocalypse� and “Shark doubled Discovery’s prime- Fight� (to name two of nine), time average, launching a 24- Discovery Channel’s 25th year streak of increasingly edition of Shark Week feahigh yearly ratings. tures a bus-sized shark skel“We don’t do Grizzly Week, eton unearthed in Bakersfield. we don’t do Lion Week — it’s “Sharkzilla,� as it’s dubbed, that sharks are profoundly rested near the bones of a demysterious and profoundly capitated whale, and “Mythpowerful creatures. They put us Busters� co-host Kari Byron in our place on the food chain. aims to answer, “What actuThat makes them endlessly fas- ally happened there?� cinating,� said Runnette, who “It really hit home for me planned the 25th Shark Week when I got to hold a tooth specials. that was bigger than my Maybe it’s because society hand,� said Byron, who is no is in awe of the monstrous stranger to shark jaws. While — from Dracula to Jaws, shooting Discovery Channel powerful, scary things have programs, she fears real-life long dominated family movie encounters. nights and casual conversa“We went diving at night to tion. Shark Week trends on see if sharks are attracted to Twitter for days; Runnette said flashlights,� she said. “I was loyal fans upload images of just terrified, my heart was cupcakes with candy teeth, liv- pounding — and a sea turtle or ing rooms decorated in “Jaws� something suddenly brushed theme, babies in shark garb. behind me. I screamed so But Shark Week doesn’t loudly into my mask.� And strive to glorify shark attacks, though her wet suit was which periodically make shark-resistant — “The teeth headlines along the coasts in just slide off!� — a shark bite hotter months. Against con- would leave a mean bruise, ventional reality television Byron said. “I have both fear wisdom, Runnette said, the and respect for them.� By Danielle Paquette Los Angeles Times

L M T 

FOR TUESDAY, AUG. 7

BEND Regal Pilot Butte 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend, 541-382-6347

THE DARK KNIGHT RISES (PG13) 12:30, 6 BEASTS OF THE SOUTHERN WILD (PG-13) 12:45, 3:45, 7

PROMETHEUS (R) 12:30, 4:30, 7:25, 10:20 STEP UP REVOLUTION (PG-13) 12:40, 6:25 STEP UP REVOLUTION 3-D (PG-13) 3:50, 9:35 TED (R) 1:35, 5, 7:45, 10:25 TOTAL RECALL (PG-13) 11:45 a.m., 1:15, 2:50, 4:15, 6:30, 7:30, 9:40, 10:30 THE WATCH (R) 1:05, 4:50, 7:40, 10:05

2:30, 6:05, 9:30

EDITOR’S NOTES:

DIARY OF A WIMPY KID: DOG DAYS (PG) 1:45, 4, 6:15, 8:30

• Open-captioned showtimes are bold. • There may be an additional fee for 3-D movies. • IMAX films are $15.50 for adults and $13 for children (ages 3 to 11) and seniors (ages 60 and older). • Movie times are subject to change after press time. • As of press time, complete movie times for Wednesday and Thursday at the Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX were unavailable. Check The Bulletin’s Community Life section those days for the complete movie listings.

ICE AGE: CONTINENTAL DRIFT (PG) 1:45, 4:15 TED (R) 6:45, 9:15 TOTAL RECALL (PG-13) 2, 4:30, 7, 9:30

SISTERS Sisters Movie House

SAVAGES (R) 3:30 TO ROME WITH LOVE (R) 1, 6:45 THE INTOUCHABLES (R) 12:15, 3:15, 6:30 MOONRISE KINGDOM (PG-13) 1:15, 4:15, 7:15 THE BEST EXOTIC MARIGOLD HOTEL (PG-13) Noon, 3, 6:15

Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX

McMenamins Old St. Francis School

720 Desperado Court, Sisters, 541-549-8800

700 N.W. Bond St., Bend, 541-330-8562

THE DARK KNIGHT RISES (PG-13) 7

MEN IN BLACK 3 (PG-13) 6 PROMETHEUS (R) 9 After 7 p.m., shows are 21 and older only. Younger than 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.

680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend, 541-382-6347

BRAVE (PG) 12:25, 3, 6:35, 9:10 THE DARK KNIGHT RISES (PG13) 11:30 a.m., 1:30, 3:05, 6:10, 6:40, 9:25, 9:50, 10:15

REDMOND

DIARY OF A WIMPY KID: DOG DAYS (PG) Noon, 1, 2:45, 4, 6:20, 7, 9

TOTAL RECALL (PG-13) 5, 7:30 THE WATCH (R) 7:45

PRINEVILLE

Madras Cinema 5

TAKE THIS WALTZ (R) 2:30, 5 SHUT UP AND PLAY THE HITS (no MPAA rating) 7:30

THE DARK KNIGHT RISES IMAX (PG-13) 11:35 a.m., 3:10, 6:45, 10:20

TO ROME WITH LOVE (R) 5

MADRAS

869 N.W. Tin Pan Alley, Bend, 541-241-2271

THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN 3D (PG-13) 12:15, 6:55

MOONRISE KINGDOM (PG-13) 7:30

THE WATCH (R) 2:45, 5, 7:15, 9:30

Tin Pan Theater

THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN (PG-13) 3:30, 10:10

ICE AGE: CONTINENTAL DRIFT (PG) 5:30

Redmond Cinemas 1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond, 541-548-8777

THE DARK KNIGHT RISES (PG-13)

1101 S.W. U.S. Highway 97, Madras, 541-475-3505

Pine Theater 214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

THE DARK KNIGHT RISES (PG-13) 4, 7 DIARY OF A WIMPY KID: DOG DAYS (PG) 2:25, 4:30, 6:40, 9

THE DARK KNIGHT RISES (UPSTAIRS — PG-13) 5

ICE AGE: CONTINENTAL DRIFT (PG) 3, 5:10, 7:20, 9:15

DIARY OF A WIMPY KID: DOG DAYS (PG) 3:20, 6

TOTAL RECALL (PG-13) 2:20, 4:35, 6:50, 9:20

Pine Theater’s upstairs screening room has limited accessibility.

ICE AGE: CONTINENTAL DRIFT (PG) 1:20, 4:40, 7:05, 9:30 MAGIC MIKE (R) 12:10, 3:20, 7:10, 10 MARVEL’S THE AVENGERS (PG13) 11:50 a.m., 3:45, 7:20, 10:30

7:30 AM - 5:30 PM MON-FRI 8 AM - 3 PM SAT.

for appointments call 541-382-4900

541-382-4171 541-548-7707 2121 NE Division Bend

641 NW Fir Redmond

www.denfeldpaints.com

L TV L

 

TUESDAY PRIME TIME 8/7/12

*In HD, these channels run three hours ahead. / Sports programming may vary. BD-Bend/Redmond/Sisters/Black Butte (Digital); PM-Prineville/Madras; SR-Sunriver; L-La Pine

ALSO IN HD; ADD 600 TO CHANNEL No.

BROADCAST/CABLE CHANNELS

BD PM SR L ^ KATU KTVZ % % % % KBNZ & KOHD ) ) ) ) KFXO * ` ` ` KOAB _ # _ # ( KGW KTVZDT2 , _ # / OPBPL 175 173

5:00 KATU News News News KEZI 9 News The Simpsons Electric Comp. NewsChannel 8 Meet, Browns Mexico/Bayless

5:30 World News Nightly News Evening News World News The Simpsons Fetch! With Ruff Nightly News Meet, Browns Hey Kids-Cook

6:00

6:30

KATU News at 6 (N) ’ Ă… NewsChannel 21 at 6 (N) Ă… Access H. Old Christine KEZI 9 News KEZI 9 News Two/Half Men Two/Half Men This Old House Business Rpt. NewsChannel 8 News King of Queens King of Queens New Tricks Gloves Off ‘G’ Ă…

7:00

7:30

Jeopardy! ‘G’ Wheel Fortune Jeopardy! ‘G’ Wheel Fortune How I Met 30 Rock ‘PG’ Entertainment The Insider ‘PG’ Big Bang Big Bang PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Ă… Live at 7 (N) Olympic Zone Seinfeld ‘PG’ Seinfeld ‘PG’ Making Waves ‘G’ Ă… (DVS)

8:00

8:30

9:00

9:30

10:00

10:30

The Middle ‘PG’ Last-Standing Wipeout ’ ‘PG’ Ă… NY Med (N) ’ Ă… XXX Summer Olympics Gymnastics, Track and Field, Beach Volleyball (N) ’ Ă… NCIS Secrets ‘14’ Ă… (DVS) NCIS: Los Angeles ’ ‘14’ Person of Interest Legacy ’ ‘14’ The Middle ‘PG’ Last-Standing Wipeout ’ ‘PG’ Ă… NY Med (N) ’ Ă… MasterChef Previously eliminated cooks compete. ‘14’ Ă… (DVS) News TMZ (N) ’ ‘PG’ Billy the Kid: American History Detectives (N) ‘PG’ Ă… Golf’s Grand Design (N) ‘G’ Ă… XXX Summer Olympics Gymnastics, Track and Field, Beach Volleyball (N) ’ Ă… Hart of Dixie ’ ‘PG’ Ă… The L.A. Complex Be a Man ‘14’ Cops ‘PG’ Ă… ’Til Death ‘PG’ Herbert Hoover: Landslide ‘PG’ World News Tavis Smiley Charlie Rose (N) ’ Ă…

11:00 KATU News

11:30 (11:35) Nightline

News Letterman KEZI 9 News (11:35) Nightline Family Guy ‘PG’ Family Guy ‘PG’ Moyers & Company ’ ‘G’ Ă… ’Til Death ‘14’ That ’70s Show PBS NewsHour ’ Ă…

BASIC CABLE CHANNELS

Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Shipping Wars Shipping Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars *A&E 130 28 18 32 Shipping Wars Shipping Wars Storage Wars (2:45) “The Sum ›› “Behind Enemy Linesâ€? (2001, Action) Owen Wilson, Gene Hackman, Gabriel Macht. An ›› “Hidalgoâ€? (2004, Adventure) Viggo Mortensen, Omar Sharif, Louise Lombard. A Westerner races a horse across ›› “Saharaâ€? (2005) Matthew McCo*AMC 102 40 39 of All Fearsâ€? American flight navigator is stranded in war-torn Bosnia. Ă… the Arabian desert. Ă… naughey, Steve Zahn. Ă… Dirty Jobs Worm Grunter ’ ‘PG’ Alaska Wildlife Troopers ’ ‘PG’ Man-Eating Super Snake ’ ‘14’ Man-Eating Super Croc ‘14’ Ă… Drug Kingpin Hippos ‘PG’ Ă… Man-Eating Super Snake ’ ‘14’ *ANPL 68 50 26 38 Infested! ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Housewives/NJ Housewives/NJ Housewives/NJ Million Dollar LA Million Dollar LA Love Broker (N) What Happens Love Broker BRAVO 137 44 Yes, Dear ‘PG’ Yes, Dear ‘PG’ Yes, Dear ‘PG’ Reba ‘PG’ Ă… Reba ‘PG’ Ă… Reba ‘PG’ Ă… Reba ‘PG’ Ă… ›› “National Lampoon’s Vacationâ€? (1983) Chevy Chase. ’ Ă… (11:15) “Smokey and the Banditâ€? CMT 190 32 42 53 Yes, Dear ‘PG’ 60 Minutes on CNBC American Greed Mad Money 60 Minutes on CNBC American Greed Paid Program Paid Program CNBC 51 36 40 52 American Greed Mob Money Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 Ă… Erin Burnett OutFront Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 Ă… Erin Burnett OutFront CNN 52 38 35 48 Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Ă… South Park ‘14’ (6:24) Tosh.0 Colbert Report Daily Show Workaholics (8:27) Tosh.0 (8:57) Tosh.0 (9:28) Tosh.0 (9:59) Tosh.0 Workaholics Daily Show Colbert Report COM 135 53 135 47 (4:50) Futurama Always Sunny Dept./Trans. City Edition Desert Cooking Oregon Redmond City Council Get Outdoors Visions of NW The Yoga Show The Yoga Show Talk of the Town Local issues. COTV 11 Capitol Hill Hearings CSPAN 58 20 12 11 Capitol Hill Hearings Wizards-Place Phineas, Ferb Good-Charlie A.N.T. Farm ‘G’ My Babysitter Good-Charlie Shake It Up! ‘G’ Code 9 Ă… Austin & Ally ’ Gravity Falls ’ A.N.T. Farm ‘G’ Shake it Up! ‘G’ Jessie ‘G’ Ă… *DIS 87 43 14 39 Jessie ’ ‘G’ Deadliest Catch Revelations ’ ‘14’ Ă… Deadliest Catch (N) ’ ‘14’ Ă… Alaskan Monster Hunt Deadliest Catch ’ ‘14’ Ă… *DISC 156 21 16 37 Deadliest Catch Deadliest Catch The opilio season comes to a close. ’ ‘14’ Ă… Keeping Up With the Kardashians Keeping Up With the Kardashians E! News (N) ››› “Sex and the Cityâ€? (2008, Romance-Comedy) Sarah Jessica Parker, Kim Cattrall, Chris Noth. Chelsea Lately E! News *E! 136 25 2012 World Series of Poker Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… ESPN 21 23 22 23 2012 World Series of Poker 2012 Home Run Derby From Kauffman Stadium in Kansas City, Mo. Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) Ă… NFL Live (N) Ă… 2012 World Series of Poker ESPN2 22 24 21 24 Little League Baseball NBA Eastern Conference first round game 4, from May 6, 2012. (N) Bay City Blues Ă… AWA Wrestling Ă… MLB Baseball From Aug. 8, 1997. Ă… ESPNC 23 25 123 25 Boxing: Bonavena vs. Frazier SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. ESPNN 24 63 124 203 SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… Reba ‘PG’ Ă… Beverly Hills Nannies ‘14’ Ă… Pretty Little Liars Stolen Kisses Pretty Little Liars (N) ‘14’ Ă… Beverly Hills Nannies (N) ’ ‘14’ Pretty Little Liars ’ ‘14’ Ă… The 700 Club ‘G’ Ă… FAM 67 29 19 41 Reba ‘PG’ Ă… Hannity (N) On Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Ă… Hannity On Record, Greta Van Susteren The Five FNC 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Ă… Chopped Champions Chopped Champions Chopped Champions Chopped Champions Chopped Cake Walk (N) Chopped *FOOD 177 62 98 44 Chopped Champions How I Met How I Met How I Met How I Met Two/Half Men Two/Half Men ››› “Zombielandâ€? (2009) Woody Harrelson, Jesse Eisenberg. ››› “Zombielandâ€? (2009) Woody Harrelson, Jesse Eisenberg. FX 131 Design Star All Stars ‘G’ Ă… Hunters Int’l House Hunters Property Brothers ‘G’ Ă… Design Star All Stars (N) ‘G’ House Hunters Hunters Int’l Million Dollar Born Sellers HGTV 176 49 33 43 Property Brothers ‘G’ Ă… The Universe Alien Sounds ‘PG’ The Universe Ă… Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Top Gear Death Valley ‘PG’ Ă… Top Gear First Cars ‘PG’ Ă… (11:01) Top Gear ‘PG’ Ă… *HIST 155 42 41 36 The Universe Asteroid threat. ‘PG’ Dance Moms ‘PG’ Ă… Dance Moms ‘PG’ Ă… Dance Moms ‘PG’ Ă… Dance Moms Break a Leg ‘PG’ Dance Moms Break a Leg ‘PG’ Dance Moms ‘PG’ Ă… LIFE 138 39 20 31 Dance Moms ‘PG’ Ă… The Rachel Maddow Show (N) The Last Word The Ed Show The Rachel Maddow Show The Last Word Hardball With Chris Matthews MSNBC 56 59 128 51 The Ed Show (N) (Live) (7:49) Awkward. (8:24) Awkward. Teen Mom The Next Step ’ ‘PG’ Teen Mom By the Rules (N) ‘PG’ Teen Mom By the Rules ’ ‘PG’ MTV 192 22 38 57 (4:54) Awkward. (5:29) Awkward. (6:04) Awkward. (6:39) Awkward. (7:14) Awkward. ’ ‘14’ SpongeBob Victorious ‘G’ Victorious ‘G’ Figure It Out ‘G’ Splatalot (N) ‘G’ Victorious ‘G’ Victorious ‘G’ Hollywood Heights (N) ‘PG’ Ă… George Lopez George Lopez Friends ’ ‘PG’ Friends ’ ‘PG’ NICK 82 46 24 40 SpongeBob Hardcover Mysteries ‘14’ Ă… Hardcover Mysteries ‘14’ Ă… Dateline on OWN (N) ’ ‘14’ Our America With Lisa Ling ‘PG’ Our America With Lisa Ling ‘PG’ Dateline on OWN ’ ‘14’ OWN 161 103 31 103 Hardcover Mysteries ‘14’ Ă… Mariners Post. MLB Baseball Seattle Mariners at Baltimore Orioles From Oriole Park at Camden Yards in Baltimore. Mariners The Dan Patrick Show ROOT 20 45 28* 26 (4:00) MLB Baseball Seattle Mariners at Baltimore Orioles (N) (Live) Repo Games ’ Repo Games ’ Repo Games ’ Repo Games ’ Repo Games ’ Repo Games ’ Worst Tenants Worst Tenants Worst Tenants Rat Bastards ’ Repo Games ’ Repo Games ’ SPIKE 132 31 34 46 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation Haunted Highway Destination Truth ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Destination Truth ’ Ă… Destination Truth (N) ’ Ă… Haunted Highway (N) Destination Truth ’ Ă… SYFY 133 35 133 45 Haunted Highway Behind Scenes Joyce Meyer Joseph Prince Rod Parsley Praise the Lord From the Cove Praise the Lord From the Cove ACLJ Life Head-On Full Flame Creflo Dollar Praise the Lord TBN Classics TBN 205 60 130 Friends ’ ‘14’ King of Queens King of Queens Seinfeld ‘PG’ Seinfeld ‘PG’ Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Conan Grouplove performs. (N) *TBS 16 27 11 28 Friends ’ ‘14’ ››› “A Raisin in the Sunâ€? (1961) Sidney Poitier, Claudia McNeil. A black fam- (7:15) ››› “To Sir, With Loveâ€? (1967) Sidney Poitier, Judy Geeson. An ideal- (9:15) ››› “Edge of the Cityâ€? (1957) John Cassavetes. A labor boss ha››› “Buck and the Preacherâ€? (1972) TCM 101 44 101 29 ily plans to move to an all-white Chicago suburb. Ă… istic teacher takes on some tough London youths. Ă… rasses a longshoreman and his fugitive white friend. Ă… Sidney Poitier. Ă… My 600-Lb. Life: Melissa Craft Wars ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Craft Wars Heavy Metal (N) ‘PG’ What Not to Wear Vanessa ‘PG’ What Not to Wear Deborah ‘PG’ Craft Wars Heavy Metal ’ ‘PG’ *TLC 178 34 32 34 My 600-Lb. Life: Melissa’s Story Franklin & Bash ‘14’ Ă… Franklin & Bash ‘14’ Ă… Rizzoli & Isles ‘14’ Ă… Rizzoli & Isles ‘14’ Ă… Rizzoli & Isles ‘14’ Ă… Rizzoli & Isles ‘14’ Ă… *TNT 17 26 15 27 Franklin & Bash Viper ‘14’ Ă… ›› “Percy Jackson & the Olympians: The Lightning Thiefâ€? (2010) Logan Lerman. To Be Announced Wrld, Gumball King of the Hill King of the Hill American Dad American Dad Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ *TOON 84 Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Mysteries at the Museum ‘PG’ Mysteries at the Museum ‘PG’ Mysteries at the Museum ‘PG’ Bizarre Foods/Zimmern *TRAV 179 51 45 42 Bourdain: No Reservations M*A*S*H ‘PG’ (6:32) M*A*S*H (7:05) M*A*S*H (7:43) Home Improvement ’ ‘G’ Home Improve. Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond King of Queens King of Queens TVLND 65 47 29 35 Bonanza ‘PG’ Ă… Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Political Animals Lost Boys ‘PG’ USA 15 30 23 30 Law & Order: SVU Behind the Music The Game ‘14’ Love & Hip Hop: Atlanta ’ ‘14’ Single Ladies ’ ‘14’ Big Ang ’ ‘14’ Big Ang ’ ‘14’ Mob Wives Chicago ’ ‘14’ Love & Hip Hop: Atlanta ’ ‘14’ VH1 191 48 37 54 (4:30) Behind the Music ’ ‘14’ PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(6:20) ›› “Airheadsâ€? 1994 Brendan Fraser. Ă… ›› “The Jackalâ€? 1997, Suspense Bruce Willis. ’ ‘R’ Ă… (10:10) ›› “Assassinsâ€? 1995, Action Sylvester Stallone. ’ ‘R’ Ă… ENCR 106 401 306 401 (3:50) ›› “Godzillaâ€? 1998 Matthew Broderick. ’ ›› “Along Came a Spiderâ€? 2001 Morgan Freeman. ‘R’ Ă… ››› “Summer of Samâ€? 1999, Drama John Leguizamo. ‘R’ Ă… ›› “Along Came a Spiderâ€? ‘R’ FMC 104 204 104 120 ››› “Summer of Samâ€? 1999, Drama John Leguizamo. ‘R’ Ă… The Ultimate Fighter Brazil Countdown to UFC 150 UFC Tonight (N) UFC Insider UFC: Shogun vs. Vera UFC Unleashed UFC Tonight UFC Insider FUEL 34 Live From the PGA Championship Live From the PGA Championship Live From the PGA Championship GOLF 28 301 27 301 Live From the PGA Champ. Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ HALL 66 33 175 33 The Waltons The Ordeal ‘PG’ (5:15) ›››› “Titanicâ€? 1997, Historical Drama Leonardo DiCaprio, Kate Winslet, Billy Zane. A woman falls for an artist aboard the ill-fated ››› “Puss in Bootsâ€? 2011, Adventure Voices of Antonio Hard Knocks: Training Camp With The Newsroom 5/1 An anonymous HBO 425 501 425 501 ship. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… Banderas, Salma Hayek. ’ ‘PG’ Ă… the Miami Dolphins (N) ‘PG’ source. ’ ‘MA’ Ă… ››› “The Bank Jobâ€? 2008, Crime Drama Jason Statham, Saffron Burrows. ‘R’ ›› “Lord of Warâ€? 2005, Drama Nicolas Cage, Jared Leto, Bridget Moynahan. ‘R’ ››› “The Good, the Bad, the Weirdâ€? 2008 Song Kang-ho. ‘R’ IFC 105 105 (4:45) ›› “Deliver Us From Evaâ€? 2003, Romance-Comedy (6:35) ›› “The Dilemmaâ€? 2011, Comedy Vince Vaughn. A man sees his best ›› “Never Die Aloneâ€? 2004 DMX. An aspiring writer (11:40) Femme ››› “Unstoppableâ€? 2010, Action Denzel Washington, MAX 400 508 508 LL Cool J, Gabrielle Union. ’ ‘R’ Ă… friend’s wife out with another guy. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… learns about a drug dealer. ’ ‘R’ Ă… Chris Pine. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… Fatales ’ ‘MA’ Drugs, Inc. Designer Drugs ‘14’ American Gypsies (N) American Gypsies ‘14’ American Gypsies American Gypsies ‘14’ Drugs, Inc. Designer Drugs ‘14’ Drugs, Inc. Cocaine ‘14’ NGC 157 157 Odd Parents Odd Parents Planet Sheen Planet Sheen Huntik: Secrets Odd Parents SpongeBob SpongeBob Fanboy-Chum Fanboy-Chum Planet Sheen T.U.F.F. Puppy NTOON 89 115 189 115 Huntik: Secrets Odd Parents Ted Nugent Hunt., Country Outdoors TV Wildlife Dream Season Hunting TV Michaels MRA Truth Hunting Wildlife The Hit List Bow Madness Legends of Fall SOLO Hunters OUTD 37 307 43 307 The Hit List (5:15) ›› “Charlie Bartlettâ€? 2007 Anton Yelchin, Hope Davis. An awkward Weeds ’ ‘MA’ Ă… Web Therapy Doug Stanhope: Before Turning the › “Filth and Wisdomâ€? 2008 Eugene Hutz. In London three Episodes ’ Kevin Nealon: Whelmed but Not SHO 500 500 teen appoints himself his new school’s psychiatrist. ’ ‘R’ Adaptation ‘14’ Gun on Himself ‘MA’ Ă… roommates manage to scrape by. ‘NR’ ‘MA’ Ă… Overly ’ ‘14’ Ă… Dumbest Stuff Hard Parts Hard Parts My Ride Rules My Ride Rules Dumbest Stuff Dumbest Stuff Hard Parts Hard Parts My Ride Rules My Ride Rules Unique Whips ‘14’ SPEED 35 303 125 303 Dumbest Stuff (6:50) ›› “How Do You Knowâ€? 2010 Reese Witherspoon. ‘PG-13’ ›› “Soul Surferâ€? 2011, Drama AnnaSophia Robb. ’ ‘PG’ Ă… (10:50) ›› “Honeyâ€? 2003 Ă… STARZ 300 408 300 408 (5:05) ›› “Addicted to Loveâ€? 1997 Meg Ryan. ’ ‘R’ Ă… “Pros & Ex-Consâ€? 2005 Sam Worthington. Ex-cons kill the (6:35) ›› “My Life’s in Turnaroundâ€? 1993, Comedy Eric ››› “Another Happy Dayâ€? 2011 Ellen Barkin. A woman attends her son’s ›› “The Tempestâ€? 2010 Helen Mirren. A vengeful sorceress unleashes her TMC 525 525 wrong man and have to correct their error. Schaeffer, Donal Lardner Ward. ‘R’ Ă… wedding at the estate of her ex-husband. ‘R’ Ă… powers against shipwrecked enemies. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… ››› “Rudyâ€? (1993, Drama) Sean Astin, Ned Beatty, Charles S. Dutton. Heads-Up Poker Poker After Dark Darts Poker After Dark NBCSN 27 58 30 209 MLS 36 ‘PG’ Kendra on Top Kendra on Top Kendra on Top Kendra on Top Bridezillas Brittany & Michelle ‘14’ Bridezillas Michelle & Tasha ‘14’ Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Bridezillas Liza & Brittany ‘14’ *WE 143 41 174 118 Kendra on Top Kendra on Top


TUESDAY, AUGUST 7, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

A  & A  

Store owners drag entire staff into an office affair Dear Abby: I am one of nine employees who work in a jewelry store owned by “Tom� and “Carol,� a husband and wife. Tom is having an affair with “Angie,� our bookkeeper. I know, because I have heard him talk about it to my coworkers. Carol is suspicious and has approached each of us to ask if anything is going on between them. So far we have covered for them. Abby, we are getting tired of covering for our boss. It creates tension to lie to Carol, and personally, I feel a lot of guilt over this. Some of us have suggested to Angie that she quit, but she has no intention of doing so. Should we tell Carol what we know, tell Angie’s husband, or just keep our mouths shut and continue working in these uncomfortable circumstances? — Uneasy in New York Dear Uneasy: I don’t blame you for feeling uneasy. You have been placed squarely in the middle. It is unfair for your boss to expect you to lie for him, and equally unfair that his wife is asking you to be her stool pigeon. Carol probably knows what’s what. She shouldn’t be putting her employees on the spot to obtain proof that Tom is fooling around. If she questions you again, simply say, “Sorry, I have nothing to say.� I assure you, she’ll get the message. Dear Abby: What do you do with someone who has no manners? A relative of my husband’s has been dating a woman for more than a year. They are both in their 30s, and there’s a strong possibility they will marry. Whenever a group of us get together to go out for dinner, on vacation or anywhere, she puts a damper on the entire event. She won’t converse (and it’s not because she’s shy), she never smiles, she just sits with her arms crossed and is absolutely miserable.

DEAR A B B Y She has been to our home for dinner on a couple of occasions. Afterward she gets up from the table and never, ever, says please or thank you. She’s the most immature, self-centered, unpleasant human being I have ever met. Even our children comment on her rudeness — in addition to the group of people we go out with. She is even rude to my mother-inlaw, but her boyfriend just doesn’t see it. They say that love is blind — but THAT blind? It has reached the point that we don’t want to associate with this couple. Would I be out of line to say something to her (particularly when she is in my home) about her lack of manners, and if so — what do you suggest I say? (I know what I’d LIKE to say!) — Fuming in Delaware Dear Fuming: From your description of this unhappy young woman’s body language, it is obvious that she’s desperately uncomfortable in social situations with you and “the group.� It is possible that she suffers from a social phobia of some sort. Rather than confront her about her “bad manners,� make a date to see her alone. Then, in the kindest way possible, try to get her to open up about what’s bothering her. If that doesn’t work, then talk to your husband’s relative about your concerns. His girlfriend may suffer from emotional problems that could be helped with counseling or medication. As a last resort, curtail your invitations to them. — Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

Horoscope: Happy Birthday for Tuesday, Aug. 7, 2012 By Jacqueline Bigar This year you are full of energy and easily could become frustrated. Be verbal, and ask for more feedback. You are likely to lose your temper more than usual. Others could be taken aback as a result. Choose your words with care; otherwise, you could cause yourself more problems. If you are single, you find yourself drawn to a suitor who might be emotionally unavailable. A friendship could develop into more. If you are attached, the two of you would enjoy scheduling a long-desired trip. Do so, and you will become closer. Be respectful of each other’s differences. ARIES makes a fun friend. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH Once more, you are nearly unstoppable with your high energy. In fact, if someone stands in your way, you might feel like a freight train about to run him or her over. As a result you could become irritable and difficult. Tonight: Whatever is your pleasure. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHH You can express your feelings in a manner that lets you be heard. However, only someone who really cares about you might listen intently. You would be wise to say very little at this moment — just wait for the right time. Tonight: Not to be found. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHHH You might want to look at a friendship in a new light. Somehow, others are not coming from the same place as you. You actually might feel pressured by a very assertive friend. Keep your chin up. Tonight: Where the action is. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHH Venus moves into your sign today, adding extra allure and desirability. You find that others keep asking you to assume more responsibility in their lives. For some people, this request is authentic. For others, it is an excuse to have you closer. Tonight: Till the wee hours. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHH Your fiery ways make a big difference with many people. Some people are intimidated by your energy, yet others find it to be contagious. Take comments with a grain of salt. Be careful of a new person you meet today. Tonight: Try something totally new.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH You could be encouraged to deal with one individual directly. A sense of insecurity marks your interactions. You might feel pushed to the max. You’ll gain a sense of well-being by handling this important matter. Tonight: Keep togetherness in mind. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHHH You know what is going on, but you can’t isolate yourself from dealing with the matter at hand. A situation could become increasingly difficult to handle. Perhaps you need to let go rather than try to take control. Someone lets you know how much he or she appreciates your efforts. Tonight: Sort through ideas. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHH Realize that you are limited when it comes to how much you can accomplish. Understand what is happening with an associate or acquaintance you deal with on a daily basis. Open up to new thoughts and different approaches. Tonight: Easy works. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHH You could be torn between two options. One allows you to feel much freer. The other demands a certain amount of self-discipline. A child or new friend pulls you into a fun situation. Go along for the ride. Tonight: Let off some steam. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHH You could be directly impacted by another’s energy. He or she could be very pushy. For whatever reason, you think you need to step up to the plate and establish your boundaries. Just don’t allow a situation to become too demanding. Tonight: Happy to head home. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHH Your words have punch to them — much more than you think. Turn around and observe the reactions around you, then you will realize your power. Do not withdraw, but try to take a more nurturing approach. Listen to what is being shared. Tonight: Share dinner with a pal. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH Someone you care about might be unusually affectionate. Nevertheless, dealing with an associate or partner tests your limits and helps you stay grounded. Negativity is contagious, or so you’ll discover. Tonight: Treat yourself well. Š 2012 by King Features Syndicate

B3

C C  Please email event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� at www.bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

TODAY REDMOND FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 2-6:30 p.m.; Centennial Park, Seventh Street and Evergreen Avenue; 541-550-0066 or redmondfarmersmarket1@ hotmail.com. TUESDAY FARMERS MARKET AT EAGLE CREST: Free admission; 2-6 p.m.; Eagle Crest Resort, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; 541-633-9637 or info@sustainableflame.com. BROOKSWOOD PLAZA FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 3-7 p.m.; Brookswood Meadow Plaza, 19530 Amber Meadow Drive, Bend; 541-323-3370 or farmersmarket@brooks woodmeadowplaza.com. COUNTING CROWS: The rock band comes to Bend as part of The Outlaw Roadshow, with Tender Mercies, Kasey Anderson and The Honkies and Field Report; $39 or $75 reserved, plus fees; 6 p.m., gates open 5 p.m.; Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-318-5457 or www.bendconcerts.com. GREEN TEAM MOVIE NIGHT: Featuring a screening of “Garbage Warrior,� a portrait of Michael Reynolds; free; 6:308:30 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend; 541-815-6504.

WEDNESDAY THE GOOD, THE BAT AND THE UGLY: Learn about bats, their biology, why they hibernate, their ecological importance and more; free; noon; Sisters Public Library, 110 N. Cedar St.; 541-312-1032 or www.deschutes library.org/calendar. BEND FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 3-7 p.m.; Brooks Alley, between Northwest Franklin Avenue and Northwest Brooks Street; 541-408-4998, bendfarmersmarket@gmail.com or http://bendfarmersmarket.com. ALIVE AFTER FIVE: Featuring a performance by jazz act Dirty Dozen Brass Band, with the Moon Mountain Ramblers; located off of northern Powerhouse Drive; free; 5-8 p.m.; Old Mill District, 661 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-

389-0995 or www.aliveafter fivebend.com. CROOK COUNTY FAIR: Featuring a carnival, animals, bull riding, concerts, magic shows, a kids zone and more; free admission; 5-10 p.m.; Crook County Fairgrounds, 1280 S. Main St., Prineville; 541-447-6575 or www.crookcountyfairgrounds.com. MUSIC ON THE GREEN: Featuring delta blues by Deco Moon; vendors available; free; 6-7:30 p.m.; Sam Johnson Park, Southwest 15th Street, Redmond; 541-923-5191 or http://visitredmondoregon.com. PICNIC IN THE PARK: Featuring a country performance by Carrie Cunningham and the Six Shooters; free; 6-8 p.m.; Crook County Fairgrounds, 1280 S. Main St., Prineville; 541-447-6909. MOVIE NIGHT AND POTLUCK: A screening of “Mid-August Lunch,� with an Italian potluck; free; 6:30 p.m.; Cascade Culinary Institute, 2555 N.W. Campus Village Way, Bend; 541-390-5362. THE GOOD, THE BAT AND THE UGLY: Learn about bats, their biology, why they hibernate, their ecological importance and more; free; 6:30 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1032 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. DEAD WINTER CARPENTERS: The California-based roots-rock band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. GREG EARL PROJECT: The Portland-based blues act performs; free; 7 p.m.; Niblick and Greene’s, 7535 Falcon Crest Drive #100, Redmond; 541-548-4220.

THURSDAY CROOK COUNTY FAIR: Featuring a carnival, animals, bull riding, concerts, magic shows, a kids zone and more; with a breakfast for veterans; free admission, donations accepted for breakfast; 10 a.m.10 p.m., 8 a.m. breakfast; Crook County Fairgrounds, 1280 S. Main St., Prineville; 541-447-6575 or www.crookcountyfairgrounds.com. DECATHLON SCREENING: Watch the final two events of the Olympic decathlon; with live music; free; 10:30 a.m., doors open 9:30 a.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www .towertheatre.org.

TREEHOUSE PUPPETS IN THE PARK: With a performance of “Beans Again?!�; followed by a coordinated activity; free; 11 a.m.noon; Orchard Park, 2001 N.E. Sixth St., Bend; 541-389-7275 or www .bendparksandrec.org. LIBRARY BOOK CLUB: Read and discuss “Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet� by Jamie Ford; free; noon; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-3121050 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/ calendar. THE GOOD, THE BAT AND THE UGLY: Learn about bats, their biology, why they hibernate, their ecological importance and more; free; noon; La Pine Public Library, 16425 First St.; 541-312-1032 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. MUNCH & MUSIC: Event includes a performance by pop-rock act The Fixx, with Voodoo Highway; with food and arts and crafts booths, children’s area and more; dogs prohibited; free; 5:30-9 p.m.; Drake Park, 777 N.W. Riverside Blvd., Bend; www.munchandmusic.com. GREG EARL PROJECT: The Portland-based blues act performs; free; 7 p.m.; Niblick and Greene’s, 7535 Falcon Crest Drive #100, Redmond; 541-548-4220. NATURAL HISTORY PUB: Bruce Haak talks about his raptor research; free; 7 p.m., doors open 6 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www .mcmenamins.com. THE PHENOMENAUTS AND PRIMA DONNA: The California-based rock bands perform; $10; 8 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; 541-728-0879 or www .reverbnation.com/venue/thehorned hand. HONEY ISLAND SWAMP BAND: The New Orleans-based Americana band performs; $5; 9:30 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www.silvermoonbrewing.com.

FRIDAY CROOK COUNTY FAIR: Featuring a carnival, animals, bull riding, concerts, magic shows, a kids zone and more; free admission; 10 a.m.-11 p.m.; Crook County Fairgrounds, 1280 S. Main St., Prineville; 541-447-6575 or www .crookcountyfairgrounds.com. SUNRIVER ART FAIRE: A juried art

show showcasing 60 artists, with demonstrations, a kids center, live music and more; proceeds benefit nonprofits in southern Deschutes County; free admission; 10 a.m.7 p.m.; Village at Sunriver, 57100 Beaver Drive; 877-269-2580, sunriverartfaire@yahoo.com or www.sunriverartfaire.com. BEND FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 2-6 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541408-4998, bendfarmersmarket@ gmail.com or http://bendfarmers market.com. SISTERS FARMERS MARKET: 3-6 p.m.; Barclay Park, West Cascade Avenue and Ash Street; www.sistersfarmersmarket.com. SUNRIVER FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 4-7 p.m.; Village at Sunriver, 57100 Beaver Drive; www.sunriverchamber.com. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Rick Steber talks about his book “A Promise Given�; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 422 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-526-1491. GREG EARL PROJECT: The Portland-based blues act performs; free; 7 p.m.; Niblick and Greene’s, 7535 Falcon Crest Drive #100, Redmond; 541-548-4220. “THE TEMPEST�: Innovation Theatre Works presents Shakespeare’s play about a sorcerer trapped on an island, with a Woodstock theme; free; 7:30 p.m.; GoodLife Brewing Co., 70 S.W. Century Drive, 100-464, Bend; 541-504-6721 or www.innovation tw.org. SUNRIVER MUSIC FESTIVAL POPS CONCERT: The Sunriver Music Festival Orchestra performs a Pops concert, “Classical Mystery Tour: A Tribute to the Beatles�; $30-$50, $10 youth; 7:30 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-5939310, tickets@sunrivermusic.org or www.sunrivermusic.org. THE HOOTEN HALLERS: The Columbia, Mo.-based rock band performs; $5; 8 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; 541-728-0879 or www .reverbnation.com/venue/ thehornedhand. “H2INDO�: A screening of the film about stand up paddling in Indonesia; $9; 9 p.m., doors open 8:30 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-3825174 or www.mcmenamins.com. VOLIFONIX: The funk band performs, with Jaccuzi; $5; 9 p.m.; Liquid Lounge, 70 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend.

P  C  GENERAL PET LOSS GROUP: Drop-in support group for anyone experiencing or anticipating the death of a pet; free; 6-7:30 p.m. Tuesdays; Partners in Care, 2075 N.E. Wyatt Court, Bend; Sharon Myers at 541-382-5882.

DOGS BEHAVIORAL TRAINING: Cost by quotation; times by appointment; Wednesdays; Lin’s School for Dogs, 63378 Nels Anderson Road, Suite 7, Bend; Lin Neumann at 541-536-1418 or www.linsschoolfordogs.com. AKC RING-READY COACHING: Cost by quotation; times by appointment; Wednesdays; Lin’s School for Dogs, 63378 Nels Anderson Road, Suite 7, Bend; Lin Neumann at 541-536-1418 or www.linsschoolfordogs.com. PUPPY 101: Puppies ages 8 weeks to 13 weeks old may join any week; $85; 6-7 p.m. Thursdays; Dancin’ Woofs, 63027 N.E. Lower Meadow Drive, Suite D, Bend; Mare Shey at 541-312-3766 or www.dancinwoofs.com. PUPPY KINDERGARTEN CLASSES: Ongoing training, behavior and socialization classes for puppies 10 weeks to 16 weeks old; $80 for four weeks; 6:157:30 p.m. Thursdays; Pawsitive Experience, 65111 High Ridge Drive, Tumalo; Meredith Gage at 541-318-8459, trainingdogs123@ bendbroadband.com or www .pawsitiveexperience.com. OBEDIENCE CLASSES: Sixweek, drop-in classes; $99.95; 5 and 6 p.m. Mondays, 6 p.m. Fridays, and 10 a.m. and 5 p.m. Saturdays; Petco, 3197 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; Loel Jensen at 541-382-0510. OBEDIENCE FOR AGILITY: Six weeks; $120; 4 p.m. Saturdays; Desert Sage Agility, 24035 Dodds Road, Bend; Stephanie Morris at 541-633-6774 or www.desertsageagility.com. PUPPY MANNERS CLASS: Social skills for puppies up to 6 months; $110 for seven-week class, cost includes materials; 6-7 p.m. Mondays; preregister; Friends for Life Dog Training, 2121 S.W.

Deerhound Ave., Redmond; Dennis Fehling at 541-350-2869 or www. friendsforlifedogtraining.com. PRIVATE TRAINING: For aggression and other serious behavior problems and one-on-one training; cost by quotation; times by appointment; Friends for Life Dog Training, 2121 S.W. Deerhound Ave., Redmond; Dennis Fehling at 541-350-2869 or www .friendsforlifedogtraining.com. PRIVATE BEHAVIORAL COUNSELING: Cost by quotation; times by appointment; Dancin’ Woofs, 63027 Lower Meadow Drive, Suite D, Bend; Mare Shey at 541-312-3766 or www.dancinwoofs.com. PRIVATE TRAINING: Cost by quotation; times by appointment; Chris Waggoner at 541-633-0446 or www.DeschutesRiverDogs.com. MUTTS ABOUT YOU: Positive methods for basic training, all age groups; $115 for five weeks; class size limited; call for class hours; The Dog Patch Boutique, info@thedogpatchboutiqueinc.com or 541-678-5640. SOLVE CHALLENGING BEHAVIOR: S.A.N.E. Solutions for challenging dog behavior, private lessons; cost by quotation; times by appointment; Kathy Cascade at 541-516-8978 or kathy@sanedogtraining.com. TELLINGTON TTOUCH: Learn tools to reduce stress and reactivity, help your dog become more confident and improve social skills; cost by quotation; times by appointment; Kathy Cascade at 541-516-8978 or kathy@sanedogtraining.com. FIX LEASH AGGRESSION: Cost by quotation; times by appointment; Dogs Ltd & Training, 59860 Cheyenne Road, Bend; Linda West at 541-318-6396 or www.dogsltd training.com. A BETTER-BEHAVED DOG: Individual marker training with positive reinforcement; cost by quotation; times by appointment; Anne Geser at 541-923-5665. BOARD AND TRAIN: Minimum of one week boarding; cost by quotation; times by appointment; La Pine Training Center, Diann Hecht at 541536-2458 or diannshappytails@msn .com or www.diannshappytails.com. PRIVATE TRAINING: For owners and their dogs with special behavior or scheduling needs; cost by quotation, times by appointment; La Pine Training Center, Diann Hecht at

541-536-2458, diannshappytails @msn.com or www.diannshappy tails.com. DAY SCHOOL FOR DOGS: Training basics for companion dogs, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. four days a week for three weeks; cost by quotation; times by appointment; Dogs Ltd & Training; 59860 Cheyenne Road, Bend; Linda West at 541-318-6396 or www.dogsltdtraining.com. K9 NOSE WORK: Drop-in class for advanced students; $15 per session; 6 p.m. Fridays; preregister; Friends for Life Dog Training, 2121 S.W. Deerhound Ave., Redmond; Dennis Fehling at 541-350-2869, Pam Bigoni at 541-306-9882 or www .friendsforlifedogtraining.com. PET CPR AND FIRST AID: Two year certification course; $90 includes workbook and materials; 9 a.m.5 p.m. Sunday; preregister; Friends for Life Dog Training, 2121 S.W. Deerhound Ave., Redmond; Dennis Fehling at 541-350-2869 or www .friendsforlifedogtraining.com. PET ADOPTION EVENT AND VACCINE CLINIC: Meet dogs and cats available for adoption from the Humane Society of the Ochocos, vaccines for parvo, distemper and rabies available; $10 per vaccination; 10:30 a.m.-3 p.m. Aug. 18; The Carriage House, 150 S. Williamson Drive, Prineville. LIVING WITH AGGRESSION IN DOGS: Support group for people with reactive dogs; free; 6 p.m. Aug. 16; preregister; Friends for Life Dog Training, 2121 S.W. Deerhound Ave., Redmond; Dennis Fehling at 541-350-2869 or www .friendsforlifedogtraining.com. BASIC LEVEL CLASS: Covers basic manners and commands, for any age or breed; $75; 7-8 p.m. Thursdays, starts Aug. 20; register by Aug. 18; La Pine Training Center, Diann Hecht at 541-536-2458 or diannshappytails@msn.com or www.diannshappytails.com. DAY CARE DAYS FOR YOUR DOG: Small, supervised dog day care groups; $25 per day, discounts available; by appointment; La Pine Training Center, Diann Hecht at 541-536-2458 or diannshappytails@ msn.com or www.diannshappytails .com. DAY CAMP TRAINING: One-on-one training combined with dog day care; $65 per day; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; by

appointment; La Pine Training Center, Diann Hecht, 541-536-2458 or diannshappytails@msn.com or www.diannshappytails.com. BOARD AND TRAIN: Board your dog with a certified trainer; cost by quotation, times by appointment; La Pine Training Center, Diann Hecht, 541-536-2458 or diannshappytails@msn.com or www.diannshappytails.com.

HORSES ROLLING RANCH IN SISTERS: Open for trail-course practice and shows; $10 per horse; 69516 Hinkle Butte Drive, Sisters; Shari at 541-549-6962. OFQHC ALL BREED AND NFQHA WESTERN REGIONAL SHOW: Competition in conformation and performance, sorting, cattle and pattern work; free for spectators; Aug. 10-12; Rim Rock Riders Event Center, 17037 Alfalfa Road, Powell Butte; Darcy Wright at 541-480-9844, horseridgeQH@aol. com or www.OFQHC.com. BOLENDER’S MOUNTAIN TRAIL CHALLENGE: Trail course competition; $35 per class, $120 for the day; Aug. 12; Sky Hawk Ranch, 6287 N.E. 33rd St., Redmond; Madison at 541-639-7030, madison@skyhawkranch.biz or www.bolenderhorsepark.com. REINING CLINIC WITH TIM RAWLINS: $100 or $20 audit; Aug. 18; Sky Hawk Ranch, 6287 N.E. 33rd St., Redmond; Madison at 541-639-7030, madison@skyhawkranch.biz or www.bolenderhorsepark.com. TRAIL PLAY DAY: $15; 10 a.m.4 p.m. Aug. 25; Sky Hawk Ranch, 6287 N.E. 33rd St., Redmond; Madison at 541-639-7030 or madison@skyhawkranch.biz. TRAIL CLINIC WITH MARK BOLENDER: Learn how to negotiate obstacles and grain confidence through “unique horsemanship� techniques; $425 for all three days, $20/day to audit; Sept. 7-9; Sky Hawk Ranch, 6287 N.E. 33rd St., Redmond; Madison at 541-6397030, madison@skyhawkranch.biz or www.bolenderhorsepark.com. GAITED HORSES WITH NYA BATES: 90 minute one-on-one sessions; $150; Sept. 21-23; Sky Hawk Ranch, 6287 N.E. 33rd St., Redmond; Madison at 541-639-7030 or madison@skyhawkranch.biz.


B4

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, AUGUST 7, 2012

TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


TUESDAY, AUGUST 7, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

BIZARRO

B5

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively.

SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

DAILY BRIDGE CLUB

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

Seeking a friendly duplicate bridge? Find five games weekly at www.bendbridge.org.

CANDORVILLE

SAFE HAVENS

LOS ANGELES TIMES DAILY CROSSWORD

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN


B6

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, AUGUST 7, 2012

Orchard C o n tin u e d f r o m B 1 Settlers from the late 1800s and early 1900s depended on fruit orchards to feed their families, according to the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. They planted many varieties to ensure a long harvest season. Many of these orchards still exist today.

RIGHT: Many trees in the McCoin Orchard continue to bear fruit even though they were planted more than a century ago.

About the tour What:Members of the Jefferson County Historical Society and the Home Orchard Society will lead a “Homestead Orchard Tour,” featuring visits to Cyrus Horse Camp, the McCoin Orchard and the West Cyrus Orchard. When:The tour will leave from the Jefferson County Courthouse at 9:30 a.m. Aug. 18 Cost: $60, includes lunch Contact: Jerry Ramsey at 541-475-5390 or email ramseyjarold@yahoo.com by Saturday to reserve a spot.

BELOW: Jefferson County Historical Society President Jerry Ramsey points out fruit high on a tree in the McCoin Orchard, which his great-grandparents planted when they settled the area in the 1880s. Ramsey estimates the orchard’s three to five acres contain more than than 100 fruit trees. Photos by Alex McDougall The Bulletin

The homesteaders In 1877, Julius and Sarah McCoin and their 2-yearold son, Numa, left Kansas, where his family had lived for a couple years after fleeing the Union Army’s advance through Georgia in 1864. Ramsey said the family spent five years traveling through San Francisco, Portland and McMinnville before they settled briefly with family members who lived on the west side of Goose Lake in Southern Oregon. The couple had two daughters — Minnie and Ramsey’s grandmother Ella — before they moved north in September 1882 to Crook County’s Haystack community, where they stayed on a homestead owned by Sarah’s older brother. They also lived in a log cabin north of Prineville that is still standing, Ramsey said. In spring 1886, the family moved to a 160-acre tract with a well-functioning spring on Gray Butte’s northeast slope. They claimed the land under the federal Homestead Act. Walter, their fourth and youngest child, was born that summer. “This whole area was claimed,” Ramsey said as he drove south on U.S. Highway 26 from Madras into what is now the Crooked River National Grassland, an area that is almost devoid of structures except for a few old silos, water troughs and recreational facilities used by hikers, horseback riders and mountain bikers across its open terrain. Ramsey said the people who settled in the area surrounding Gray Butte built homes, planted crops, set up businesses, and built an elementary school that was about 9 miles from the McCoins’ home. But the homesteading boom came to an abrupt end in the 1930s when a 10-year drought made it all but impossible for people to sustain themselves on their land.

Because the homesteaders, many of whom were also struggling from the effects of the Great Depression, couldn’t support themselves, they stopped paying their taxes and in some cases simply walked away from their land. It was at this point that the federal government stepped in. Using a series of laws it passed during the New Deal era, the Roosevelt administration effectively ended homesteading and created a mechanism where the federal government could either buy or seize marginal lands that were no longer productive. Ramsey said the Civilian Conservation Corps then moved in and demolished whatever structures the homesteaders built near Gray Butte so the land could

be used for cattle grazing. Julius McCoin died in 1928 after watching his children grow up and start families of their own. His youngest son, Walter, managed the property for four more years before he sold it to the federal government for $1,200 in 1934 and started his own ranch near Terrebonne. All that’s left of the family’s homestead is a stand of poplar trees that were used as a windbreak for their second house, and the orchard.

The orchard During the late 1880s, Julius McCoin started a freighthauling business that used horses to carry wagon loads of wool, timber and other goods from Prineville to The Dalles and return with what-

ever merchandise and supplies the people who lived in the area could not make for themselves. Ramsey said McCoin continued making these trips after his wife, Sarah, died in 1888, even though it meant his youngest children — who were 9, 6, and 3 years old at the time — had to fend for themselves during the two-week stretches he was out on the road. During this time, McCoin started picking up fruit tree starts from The Dalles and planting them near a stream that ran by where he built the family’s second house. Ramsey said the McCoin children would pick the fruit, a mixture of summer apples, fall apples and pears, can and eat them while McCoin was

Parrot C o n tin u e d f r o m B 1 Her mission, she said, is to save as many parrots as possible, to find homes for all she can, and to educate the public about these fascinating animals. Parrots are found in the tropics all over the world and have adapted to temperate and alpine climates in Australia and New Zealand, according to Jenkins. Flocks first introduced by man now thrive in the cities of Honolulu, San Francisco and, as unlikely as it may seem, even Seattle. Lola Crayola and Rico, two conures at Jenkins’ haven, are small parrots native to Central and South America and, as their names imply, are brilliantly feathered in yellow, red and orange. Angel, an eclectus — a larger parrot found in the Solomon Islands — is clad in rich plumage of burgundy, deep blue and purple. Coco, an umbrella cockatoo native to the Southwestern Pacific in and around Australia, is as white as an unsoiled snow drift, and Einstein sports the ashen gray of a spent briquette. The vast and vivid array of hues of their plumage is one reason parrots have been exploited as pets for longer and in greater numbers than any other wild animal, Jenkins said. This exploitation also is the reason the international trade in feral birds has been banned for 30 years. But their beauty is only feather deep, she continued, and their emotional appeal to people lies in their affectionate nature, intelligence, and, in several species, their ability to speak. Coco, the cockatoo, was rescued from a meth lab seven years ago, said Jenkins, and suffers from a variety of respiratory problems. Coco is very affectionate and loves to dance

Jenkins feeds a variety of food to the parrots, from fresh fruit and seed to cooked eggs.

Photos by Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

A pair of parrots navigate a cage full of toys in Jaimi Jenkins’ parrot sanctuary in Alfalfa.

to AC/DC, but she wants to be the center of attention all the time, Jenkins said. “She pouts if she doesn’t get her way, and in a really bad mood, (she) will chase the dog around,” she said. Like most cockatoos, Coco isn’t especially verbal and shows her smarts in her ability to manipulate objects with her feet and beak, said Jenkins. Einstein, a female African gray and also a rescue bird, is the talkative one in the sanctuary, Jenkins continued. “Einstein calls people she doesn’t know ‘weirdo’ (until she learns their names), and she knows her favorite foods — pasta and macaroni and cheese — by name,” said Jenkins. “She also knows all of the songs to the (animated) Disney movies like ‘Mulan.’ ” Rico, the brilliant yellowand-red male conure, is 30 years old and was inherited by a college student in Seattle, After living with the parrot for three years, the young man got engaged, but Rico never bonded with the fiance, who finally

said, “It’s me or the bird.” The result was another surrender to the haven, Jenkins said. Rico was visibly depressed for weeks after losing his owner and finally snapped out of his funk after Lola Crayola, the female conure, allowed him to share her bird cage, said Jenkins. Parrots need a lot of stimulation to satisfy their curious and intelligent natures, Jenkins said, and she provides them with plenty of toys and free movement in her house. While cleaning up parrot poop is an occasional requirement, the birds keep themselves naturally clean by frequent preening and birdbaths. Jenkins even has perches suction-supped to the walls of her shower, and some of the birds join her there in obvious relish

of the spraying water. Parrots are social animals who often entertain each other. When she’s in another room, Jenkins said she has heard them talking to each other in simple but meaningful conversations, and has heard the African grays sing “The Addams Family” song to one another with each taking the proper phrasing in sequence. An African gray named Alex was rigorously tested over 30 years by animal psychologist Irene Pepperberg, Jenkins said. “Alex was able to identify shapes, textures, could count and do simple arithmetic,” she said. Pepperberg concluded Alex’s innate intelligence was equal to that of dolphins and great apes. If parrots’ intellectual capacities and needs are high, their dietary requirements are not, according to Jenkins. More than 50 percent of their food should be fruit, though they can eat cooked cereals, such as pasta, and enjoy cooked meat, including chicken and beef.

hauling freight loads. Surrounded by a barbedwire fence, the McCoin Orchard contains more than 100 fruit trees spread out over three to five acres in the Crooked River National Grassland near the Gray Butte trailhead. The orchard’s fruit trees more than likely would have gone dormant, Ramsey said, had it not been for an unknown person or group of people who pruned them in the 1960s. “Whoever it was, they knew what they were doing,” said Ramsey, who hopes to also identify the pruners. But first, identifying the trees may prove to be difficult, said Cooper, who estimates there are 100 species of apple trees that are “commonly

“Parrots are very susceptible (to intestinal bacterial infections, such as) E. coli and you should cook just as clean for your parrot as you do for yourself,” she said. Salty snacks should be avoided as they can result in sodium poisoning, she said. As tropical birds, they also need plenty of sunlight to produce vitamin D and metabolize calcium, she said. In the winter, that can be a challenge on the High Desert, and Jenkins seasonally provides her birds a full spectrum sun lamp. Parrots’ need for preventive health care is much like humans’, said Jenkins, and she recommends regular visits to a veterinarian for general checkups and to screen for preventable parasites. New owners should know of the existence of species-specific ailments such as “beak and feather disease” that veterinarians can identify and treat. Only parrots bred in captivity are legal for purchase in the United States, said Jenkins, and the cost can range from as little as $75 for the common lovebird to $2,500 for

found” in Oregon and a couple hundred more that have been found only in remote areas. She said Oregon has this type of diversity in its fruit because the people who settled here during the 1800s came from all over the U.S. and brought along the types of fruit trees they knew best. Cooper said she’s been interested in the McCoin Orchard ever since Ramsey sent her a couple of shrivelled up apples he picked from its trees this past fall. She hopes to identify what types of trees they are — a process she’s certain will take a while — and wants to take samples of them so they can be propagated and planted in other parts of the state. But what Cooper finds most interesting about the McCoin Orchard — along with a pair of orchards Enoch and Mary Cyrus likely planted when they settled on a Homestead Act claim about 2½ miles north of the McCoin homestead — is its size and the fact it has been left alone for so long. While it’s likely the state’s early settlers planted hundreds of orchards like those of the McCoin and Cyrus families, it’s rare to find one still intact, let alone one as big as those two properties. Typically, when the Home Orchard Society comes across a homestead orchard all that’s left is a single tree, Cooper said. “This will be fun,” she said. “We’re really interested in historic orchards and when we find one we get very excited about it.” — Reporter: 541-617-7816, mmclean@bendbulletin.com

Resources Jaimi Jenkins invites prospective parrot owners seeking advice, or those interested in forming a parrot club, to email majesticmountainranch@ gmail.com or call 541-280-8744.

a Macaw. Some of the rarest parrots may fetch as much as $15,000, she said. Above all, responsible prospective parrot owners need to recognize that their commitment to a new bird is decades, and sometimes generations, into the future. “We can’t stress enough the time commitment it takes to have these birds,” Warren said. “Because they live so long.” Reporter: tom.olsen71@gmail.com

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S P ORTS

Scoreboard, C2 Olympics, C3-C5 MLB, C6

C

Golf, C7 Community Sports, C8

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, AUGUST 7, 2012

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

WCL BASEBALL

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

GOLF: PGA CHAMPIONSHIP

Elks keep playoff hopes alive

Ducks start practice

South Carolina to host latest war by the shore

The Bend Elks blew a five-run lead against the Kitsap Blue Jackets before rallying in the bottom of the ninth inning for a 10-9 victory that kept Bend’s slim West Coast League playoff hopes alive. Bend had an 8-3 lead through seven innings before surrendering three runs to Kitsap (1437 WCL) in both the top of the eighth and ninth to give the BlueJackets a 9-8 lead. But the Elks (23-28 WCL) scored twice in the ninth to earn the walk-off win. Jake Azevedo got a pinch-hit single with one out in the bottom of the ninth inning to start the rally, and Tommy Pluschkell drew a walk. The Elks were down to their final out when Zane Yanzick flied out, but Cullen Hendrickson walked to load the bases. Darian Ramage and Steven Halcomb followed with back-to-back RBI singles for the tying and go-ahead runs. Starting pitcher Brent Jones went 7 2⁄3 innings for the Elks and got a no-decision, giving up five earned runs while striking out five. Bend reliever Josh McAlister struck out the only batter he faced in the ninth inning to get the win. Bend had 15 hits in the game, led by three from Halcomb, who singled twice and doubled. Ramage, Bo Walter, Will Sparks and Shawn O’Brien all had a pair of hits for the Elks. Halcomb and Sparks both had three runs batted in. The Elks play their final regular-season WCL series at Cowlitz (Wash.) starting tonight, likely needing to win all three games to reach the league playoffs. The Elks trail Klamath Falls by two games for second place in the WCL’s West Division and are one game behind Cowlitz. The Elks’ split-squad will host a game against NW Star Academy today at 6:35 p.m.

• Oregon’s biggest question for the upcoming season is who will be the starter at quarterback By Mark Morical The Bulletin

EUGENE — After running with the bulls last month in Spain, Chip Kelly figured the opening day of preseason camp was the appropriate time to relate the experience to football. “It was just total anarchy,” the University of Oregon head coach said Monday at Autzen Stadium, recalling his chaotic charge through the streets of Pamplona with Ducks wide receivers coach Scott Frost. “Every plan we had that we were go-

ing to execute was out the window and we were just running for our lives … much the same thing that happens when the football is kicked off. You better have a contingency plan because if your plan doesn’t exactly work, you’re going to get hit with a horn.” The plan at quarterback for the Ducks this season is unknown, but it figures to take shape starting this week as Oregon began practices Monday before its opener against Arkansas State on Sept. 1 at Autzen. See Ducks / C2

By Bill Pennington New York Times News Service

Inside • The Oregon schedule for the 2012 season, C2

Coming up • A report on Oregon State’s fall camp in Wednesday’s Bulletin

In the spring of 1990, there was a news conference for the Ryder Cup, which was coming one year later to the inconspicuous, windswept South Carolina barrier island known as Kiawah. The man charged with turning an oceanside tract of swamp and shrub into a dauntingly beautiful championship golf course was asked where he planned to put the huge galleries expected for the event. “Galleries?” the golf architect Pete Dye answered. “How

Inside • A look at the course, C7

do I know? We don’t even have holes yet. We don’t even have a paved road to get there.” Less than 14 months later, Dye’s Ocean Course made its debut as the compelling and unparalleled stage for a riveting competition that transformed the Ryder Cup from a midlevel golf attraction to a major international sports happening. See PGA / C7

Olympic Medals Table

LONDON OLYMPICS

Ready for the world

Through Monday’s events: Nation G S B Tot China 31 19 14 64 United States 29 15 19 63 Russia 7 17 18 42 Britain 18 11 11 40 Japan 2 12 14 28 France 8 9 9 26 South Korea 11 5 6 22 Germany 5 10 7 22 Australia 2 12 8 22 Italy 7 6 4 17 Netherlands 3 3 4 10 Canada 1 3 6 10 Ukraine 3 0 6 9 Hungary 4 1 3 8 Belarus 3 2 3 8 New Zealand 3 1 4 8 Denmark 2 4 2 8 Romania 2 4 2 8 Brazil 2 1 5 8 Kazakhstan 6 0 1 7 Cuba 3 3 1 7 Poland 2 1 3 6 Sweden 1 3 2 6 North Korea 4 0 1 5 Czech Republic1 3 1 5 Kenya 1 2 2 5 Mexico 0 3 2 5

• Bend’s Ashton Eaton begins his quest for an Olympic gold medal in the decathlon on Wednesday By Mark Morical The Bulletin

Lessons learned a year ago in Daegu, South Korea, could help Bend’s Ashton Eaton as he vies for Olympic gold this week in London. Eaton finished second in the decathlon to U.S. teammate Trey Hardee at the 2011 world championships. But now Eaton, the prohibitive Olympic gold-medal favorite, is ready to win an international decathlon. In Daegu, Eaton ran a subpar 100 meters to start the decathlon, and from then on he was “chasing points,” instead of focusing on each of the competition’s remaining nine events, according to his former coach at Bend’s Mountain View High School, Tate Metcalf. See Eaton / C5

U.S. reaches soccer final The American women defeat Canada in the semifinals in dramatic fashion, C3.

— Bulletin staff report

BASEBALL Local team falls in regional play ONTARIO, Calif. — The Redmond Senior League baseball team’s run came to an end on Monday night in the semifinals of the Western Regional Tournament. After going 2-1 in pool play, the team made up of players from Bend and Redmond reached the semifinals of the tournament. The Central Oregon squad fell to a team from Hilo, Hawaii, 17-3 Monday to end its bid to reach the Senior League World Series. Cody Anthony and Collin Runge both had doubles for Redmond in the loss. Redmond opened the tournament last Wednesday with a loss to Northern California’s Sunnyvale before beating Washington’s Stilly Valley (Arlington) 7-5 on Saturday and host Chino, Calif., 13-9 on Sunday. In the win over Chino, Braedon Price hit a grand slam. Redmond coach Sid Robinson said pitchers Anthony, Dakota Schaumburg, Chris Hawkins and Sinjin Robinson all threw well in the tournament. — Bulletin staff report

Olympic decathlon schedule (All times Pacific) WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

100 meters, 2:10 a.m. Long jump, 3:10 a.m. Shot put, 4:50 a.m. High jump, 10 a.m. 400 meters, 1:30 p.m.

110-meter hurdles, 1 a.m. Discus throw, 1:55 a.m. Pole vault, 4:55 a.m. Javelin throw, 10:30 a.m. 1,500 meters, 1:20 p.m.

INTERNET COVERAGE

Ben Curtis / The Associated Press

Watch the decathlon live at www.nbcolympics.com.

Tweeting from London

On the web

Bend’s Tate Metcalf, Ashton Eaton’s high school coach and longtime mentor, will be sending tweets from the London Olympics under the Twitter handle @BBulletinSports.

Go to the Bulletin’s web site at www.bendbulletin.com/ ashtoneaton for more coverage

Marcio Jose Sanchez / The Associated Press file

United States’ Abby Wambach, right, celebrates her team’s final goal on Monday.

More coverage See C3-C5 for TV listings, coverage of Monday’s events, and more.

COMMUNITY SPORTS

Court is in session in Bend • Youth tennis lessons are seeing big numbers

W Alex McDougall / The Bulletin

Ben Wenndorf, 12, squares up to return a serve during a Bend Park & Recreation District summer tennis lesson last week. The program has seen a sharp rise in attendance this summer.

hen it comes to youth sports, the hottest game in Bend this summer might be tennis. The Bend Park & Recreation District’s summer youth tennis program is proving wildly popular this year. Organizers estimate that participation numbers for the program, staged on the tennis courts in Juniper Park every Monday through Thursday, will be a record high of about 450 kids

AMANDA MILES this year. The previous highwater mark was 373 kids in 2011, said Kevin Collier, the park district sports coordinator in charge of tennis, out at the Juniper courts last week. “We’ve seen ... w growth, and what’s exciting is it’s definitely at the grass-roots

level, so it’s introducing kids to a lifelong sport that they can play forever,” Collier noted. The tennis lessons have been so popular this year that many of the classes — limited to 24 students per hour — have been full with waiting lists. Sessions last for two weeks at a time, and the final session of the season started Monday. (As of last week, a few spots were still available, said Collier, whose general advice on registering for lessons is to sign up early.) See Tennis / C8


C2

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, AUGUST 7, 2012

O  A

SCOREBOARD

T E L E VI S ION Today

Wednesday

BASEBALL 2 p.m.: Little League World Series, Southwest Regional, first semifinal, ESPN2. 4 p.m.: MLB, New York Yankees at Detroit Tigers or Texas Rangers at Boston Red Sox, MLB Network. 4 p.m.: MLB, Seattle Mariners at Baltimore Orioles, Root Sports. 5 p.m.: Little League World Series, Southwest Regional, second semifinal, ESPN2. CYCLING 1 p.m.: Tour of Utah, Root Sports.

BASEBALL 8 a.m.: Little League World Series, Great Lake Regional, first semifinal, ESPN2. 10 a.m.: Little League World Series, Southeast Regional, first semifinal, ESPN. 11 a.m.: Little League World Series, Great Lakes Regional, second semifinal, ESPN2. 3 p.m.: Little League World Series, Southeast Regional, second semifinal, ESPN2. 4 p.m.: MLB, Seattle Mariners at Baltimore Orioles, Root Sports. 5 p.m.: MLB, San Francisco Giants at St. Louis Cardinals, ESPN. SOFTBALL 1 p.m.: Big League, final, teams TBD, ESPN2. CYCLING 1 p.m.: Tour of Utah, Root Sports. SOCCER 5 p.m.: World Challenge, Real Madrid vs. AC Milan, ESPN2.

Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

S   B Football

Baseball

• Father of OSU coach dies: Bud Riley, the father of Oregon State University head football coach Mike Riley, died Saturday near his home in British Columbia at the age of 86. Bud Riley was an assistant coach at OSU under Dee Andros from 1965 to 1972 and with Craig Fertig in 1979, serving as the secondary coach and defensive coordinator. He was an integral part of one of the most recognized teams in school history — the 1967 Giant Killers. He left OSU in 1972 to coach in the Canadian Football League, where he served as the head coach at Toronto, Winnipeg, Hamilton and Calgary. He also held assistant coaching and front office positions in the CFL. • Owens agrees to terms with Seahawks after tryout: Terrell Owens is coming back to the NFL after one year on the sidelines. The 38-year-old Owens had a tryout with the Seattle Seahawks on Monday, and hours later the team announced it had agreed to terms with the former star receiver. He hasn’t played in the NFL since the 2010 season with Cincinnati, when he caught 72 passes for 983 yards and nine touchdowns. He then had surgery on his left knee and didn’t receive any offers to play last season. • NFL disputes report of Vilma settlement offer: The NFL calls a report it has offered a settlement and reduced suspension to Saints linebacker Jonathan Vilma “completely inaccurate.” Vilma has been suspended for the 2012 season for his role in the Saints bounty program, which he adamantly has claimed did not exist. Citing anonymous sources, ESPN. com reported the league offered Vilma an eight-game suspension if he would drop his defamation lawsuit against NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell.

• Angels’ protest of 8-6 loss at White Sox denied: Major League Baseball has denied the Los Angeles Angels’ protest of their extra-inning loss at the Chicago White Sox last week, although it still hasn’t convinced manager Mike Scioscia the call was correct. On the play Friday night, Chicago’s Paul Konerko grounded to third with the bases loaded and no outs in the first inning. After getting an out at home, catcher Chris Iannetta fired wide to first, pulling Albert Pujols off the bag. Scioscia argued that Konerko was not within the baseline for the last 45 feet, as is required. The umpires upheld the safe call and Scioscia played the game under protest. • Red Sox owner voices support for manager Valentine: Red Sox owner John Henry is backing Bobby Valentine in his first season as manager while Boston hovers around the .500 mark. Henry said on Monday that management is not making a managerial change, and he cited numerous injuries as one reason for the team’s struggles. In an email to reporters, Henry said that it is “simply wrong” to blame Valentine for the team’s troubles, and “we all” share responsibility. He also said there has been no lack of effort by players.

Basketball • Kings extend Keith Smart’s deal through 2013-14: Keith Smart is getting the closest thing he’s ever had to a long-term deal as an NBA coach. The Sacramento Kings extended Smart’s contract Monday through the 2013-14 season. Smart’s deal had been set to expire after the upcoming season. The 47-yearold Smart took over for the fired Paul Westphal in January after a 2-5 start. The Kings went 20-39 the rest of the way.

Ducks Continued from C1 The Ducks boast three straight conference championships, have made three straight BCS bowl appearances, and are coming off a 12-2 season in which they won the Rose Bowl and finished ranked fourth in the polls. Oregon is ranked fifth in the preseason USA Today coaches poll, though the Ducks return just five starters and 31 percent of their total offense (in terms of yardage) from last season and have some glaring inexperience at the tight end and wide receiver positions. On defense, Oregon returns just four starters but has considerable experience thanks to the frequent rotations implemented by defensive coordinator Nick Aliotti. Kelly called his squad a “young football team,” pointing to a roster that includes 35 freshmen and only 16 seniors. “We’ll have 22 practices before we determine their positions,” Kelly said. “Everything is open. Everybody’s just trying to see where they fit in the rotation. We’ve really developed some depth over the last few years. It’s not about being the No. 1 guy, it’s about being in the rotation. Because

— From wire reports

PREPS

Singles First Round Jeremy Chardy, France, def. Donald Young, United States, 3-6 7-6 (4), 6-0. Viktor Troicki, Serbia, def. Alex Bogomolov Jr., Russia, 6-4, 7-6 (5). Bernard Tomic, Australia, def. Michael Berrer, Germany, 6-3, 3-6, 6-3. Pablo Andujar, Spain, def. Lukas Lacko, Slovakia, 6-2, 4-6, 6-2. Matthew Ebden, Australia, def. Peter Polansky, Canada, 0-6, 6-4, 6-3. Flavio Cipolla, Italy, def. Jurgen Zopp, Estonia, 6-1, 6-2. Vasek Pospisil, Canada, def. Andreas Seppi, Italy, 4-6, 6-4, 7-6 (6). Marcos Baghdatis, Cyprus, def. Carlos Berlocq, Argentina, 6-4, 6-3.

IN THE BLEACHERS

Prep Calendar ——— To submit information to the Prep Calendar, email The Bulletin at sports@bendbulletin.com ——— Free physicals — Free physicals for incoming ninth-graders and 11th-graders at The Center in Bend (2200 N.E. Neff Road), Aug. 7, 5:30 p.m. ——— Bend High football Conditioning: Aug. 6-9 at Bend High football field, 5 to 6 p.m. each day, free. Air Bear Camp: Aug. 13-16 at Bend High practice field, 5 to 8 p.m. each day. Cost is $100 for early registration and $110 for late registration. Contact Bend High head coach Matt Craven at matt.craven@bend. k12.or.us or go to www.bendfootball.com for more information. Daily doubles: Aug. 20-30 at Bend High; Varsity/ JV from 9 to 11:30 a.m. and 5 to 7:30 p.m. Freshmen from 8 to 10:30 a.m. and 4 to 6:30 p.m. Equipment checkout: Aug. 14 for all players, freshmen, junior varsity and varsity, 8 a.m. to noon, Bend High. Note: Paperwork is available at the Bend High’s athletics office starting Aug. 6. Paperwork and fees are not necessary to check out equipment but must be completed before practice starts Aug. 20. Mountain View football Weightlifting/conditioning: Grades 9-12, Aug. 6-9 and Aug. 13-16, 9 to 10:30 a.m. Cougar Camp: Grades 9-12, Aug. 13-17 from 3 to 5:30 p.m.; cost is $65 at registration on Aug. 13 at 2 p.m. Daily doubles: Aug. 20-24; varsity/JV 9 to 11:30 a.m. and 3 to 5:30 p.m.; freshmen 8 to 10:30 a.m. and 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Paperwork: Will be available for final clearance starting Aug. 6 in the Mountain View High athletics office. All paperwork and physicals must be on file before Aug. 20. Summit football Summit Storm Camp: Aug. 6-9 at Summit High football field, 8 to 10:30 a.m. for grades 9-12. Cost $30, summer participation form required. Contact head coach Joe Padilla at joe.padilla@bend.k12.or.us to sign up or for more information. Conditioning camp: Aug. 13-14, 8 to 10 a.m., and Aug. 15, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., at Summit High; Aug. 16 at Juniper Swim & Fitness Center, 2:15 to 4:30 p.m. Cost $60. Daily doubles: Aug. 20-24, varsity/JV 8 to 11 a.m. and 4 to 6 p.m.; freshmen 9 to 11 a.m. and 4 to 5:30 p.m. Paperwork: Available at the Summit High athletics office starting Aug. 6. Mountain View girls soccer Preseason training: Aug. 6-17 at Mountain View soccer fields; 6 to 7:30 p.m. each day with additional 9 a.m. workouts on Aug. 7, 9, 14 and 16; $70; for girls entering grades six through 12; for more information go to www.cougargirlssoccer.webs.com. Mountain View boys soccer Technical camp: Aug. 6-9 at Mountain View High, 5:30 to 7 p.m. each day. Conditioning camp: Aug. 13-16 at Mountain View High, 8 to 9:15 a.m. and 5:30 to 7 p.m. each day. For more information call coach Chris Rogers at 541-280-9393. Ridgeview boys soccer All incoming Ridgeview and Redmond Proficiency Academy students living within the Ridgeview boundary are welcome to attend all of the following events. For more information go to ridgeviewsoccer.com. Preseason technical camp: Aug. 6-8 and Aug. 10, at Obsidian Middle School; Aug. 6-8 sessions 10 to 11:45 a.m.; Aug. 10 session 1 to 2:45 p.m.; free. Participants should wear shinguards and a white shirt and bring a size 5 ball. Ridgeview physical and clearance night: Aug. 13, 5 to 8 p.m. (see specific time by last name at ridgeviewsoccer.com) at Obsidian Middle School. Parents need to accompany players to complete clearance process and submit pay-to-play fees. Physical exams are required for incoming freshmen and juniors; $30. Ravens daily-double tryouts: Aug. 20-24 at Ridgeview High; check-in Aug. 20, 9-10 a.m., in TV production lab inside school. Sessions run 10 to 11:45 a.m. each day. Players should bring shinguards and running shoes. ——— Cascade Middle School football Contact camp: At Summit Stadium for incoming seventh-graders and eighth-graders; Aug. 6-9, 10:45 a.m.-12:45 p.m.; Aug. 20-23, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Cost $80 for two-week camp. Contact Summit High head coach Joe Padilla at joe.padilla@bend.k12.0r.us or call 541-610-9866 to sign up or for more information. Equipment checkout: Aug. 6, 8 to 10 a.m. at Cascade Middle School.

BASEBALL

L 17 20 26 29 L 21 26 27 28 37

Elks 10, BlueJackets 9

2012 Oregon Schedule (All times Pacific) Sept. 1 Arkansas State 7:30 p.m. Sept. 8 Fresno State 3:30 p.m. Sept. 15 Tennessee Tech noon Sept. 22 Arizona TBA Sept. 29 at Wash. State* TBA Oct. 6 Washington TBA Oct. 18 at Arizona State 6 p.m. Oct. 27 Colorado TBA Nov. 3 at USC TBA Nov. 10 at California TBA Nov. 17 Stanford TBA Nov. 24 at Oregon State TBA * At CenturyLink Field, Seattle

if you’re in the rotation, you’re going to play.” The fight for playing time began Monday in practice, including at the quarterback position. Once two-year starter Darron Thomas declared early for the NFL Draft, sophomore Bryan Bennett (Encino, Calif.) seemed poised to take the helm of Oregon’s fast-paced spread offense this season after filling in admirably for an injured Thomas in two wins last season. But

Bend 100 043 002 — 10 15 4 McKay, Thomson (6), Reppert (8), Poole (9) and Zarate. Jones, Hamann (8), Spencer (9), McAlister (9) and Gallegos. W — McAlister. L — Reppert. 2B — Kitsap: Burcham, Gallaway, Alvarez; Bend: Halcomb, Sparks.

FOOTBALL NFL National Football League Preseason Glance All Times PDT ——— Sunday’s Game New Orleans 17, Arizona 10 Thursday’s Games Washington at Buffalo, 4 p.m. Pittsburgh at Philadelphia, 4:30 p.m. Baltimore at Atlanta, 4:30 p.m. New Orleans at New England, 4:30 p.m. Green Bay at San Diego, 5 p.m. Denver at Chicago, 5:30 p.m. Friday’s Games Tampa Bay at Miami, 4:30 p.m. N.Y. Jets at Cincinnati, 4:30 p.m. N.Y. Giants at Jacksonville, 4:30 p.m. Cleveland at Detroit, 4:30 p.m. Arizona at Kansas City, 5 p.m. Minnesota at San Francisco, 6 p.m. Saturday’s Games Houston at Carolina, 4 p.m. Tennessee at Seattle, 7 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 12 St. Louis at Indianapolis, 10:30 a.m. Monday, Aug. 13 Dallas at Oakland, 5 p.m.

SOCCER MLS MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT ——— Friday’s Game Houston at New York, 5 p.m. Saturday’s Games Real Salt Lake at Vancouver, 4 p.m. Toronto FC at Columbus, 4:30 p.m. D.C. United at Sporting Kansas City, 5:30 p.m. Colorado at FC Dallas, 6 p.m. Seattle FC at San Jose, 7:30 p.m. Sunday’s Games Chicago at Philadelphia, 4 p.m. Montreal at New England, 4 p.m. Los Angeles at Chivas USA, 8 p.m.

PGA Tour

Monday’s Summary

Kitsap

Transactions

GOLF

WCL West Coast League ——— League Standings East Division W Wenatchee AppleSox 34 Bellingham Bells 31 Kelowna Falcons 28 Walla Walla Sweets 22 West Division W Corvallis Knights 30 Klamath Falls Gems 25 Cowlitz Black Bears 24 Bend Elks 23 Kitsap BlueJackets 14 Monday’s Games Cowlitz 4, Kelowna 3 Bend 10, Kitsap 9 Bellingham 15, Walla Walla 4 Corvallis 9, Klamath Falls 3 Today’s Games Bend at Cowlitz, 6:35 p.m. Kitsap at Wenatchee, 7:05 p.m. Corvallis at Klamath Falls, 7:05 p.m. Walla Walla at Bellingham, 7:05 p.m.

DEALS

020 010 033 — 9 13 1

PGA Championship Tee Times At Kiawah Island Golf Resort (Ocean Course) Kiawah Island, S.C. All Times PDT Yardage: 7,776; Par: 72 First and Second Rounds Thursday-Friday Hole 1-Hole 10 4:20 a.m.-9:30 a.m. — Kelly Mitchum, D.A. Points, Marcel Siem 4:30 a.m.-9:40 a.m. — John Senden, Ken Duke, Michael Frye 4:40 a.m.-9:50 a.m. — Greg Chalmers, Spencer Levin, Michael Thompson 4:50 a.m.-10 a.m. — Thomas Bjorn, Robert Garrigus, Charley Hoffman 5 a.m.-10:10 a.m. — Lucas Glover, Ben Curtis, Trevor Immelman 5:10 a.m.-10:20 a.m. — Scott Stallings, Jeev Milkha Singh, Johnson Wagner 5:20 a.m.-10:30 a.m. — Shaun Micheel, David Toms, John Daly 5:30 a.m.-10:40 a.m. — Bernd Wiesberger, Ryan Palmer, Robert Karlsson 5:40 a.m.-10:50 a.m. — Alvaro Quiros, Cameron Tringale, Ryan Moore 5:50 a.m.-11 a.m. — Tommy Gainey, Jason Day, Carl Pettersson 6 a.m.-11:10 a.m. — Mike Small, Brian Davis, John Huh

Marcus Mariota, a redshirt freshman from Honolulu, broke out with a highlight-filled spring game in April. The battle for the starting job is expected to last well into preseason camp. “I’m not opposed to playing two quarterbacks,” Kelly said. “But everywhere I’ve been, it’s always shaken out that one has emerged. If it ends up being dead-smack even, I’ve never been in that situation, so I don’t know. It’s always what guy moves the offense better. Do they make the players around them better?” Kelly said he has faith in the abilities of both Bennett (6 feet 3, 204 pounds) and Mariota (6-4, 211), but until they get into a game, he will not know how one or the other handles the starting role. “As much as we can try to simulate that in practice, until that first time they get out on the field and take a snap in Autzen Stadium, with it packed … their first snap will be our first look at how they handle it,” Kelly said. “I anticipate them being very successful, but we’ll see. That’s obviously a big question for all of us.” Bennett and Mariota offer similar skill sets, each with a combined running and throwing ability that is key

6:10 a.m.-11:20 a.m. — Sean O’Hair, Brian Cairns, Seung-yul Noh 6:20 a.m.-11:30 a.m. — Ben Crane, Marty Jertson, Thongchai Jaidee 9:30 a.m.-4:20 a.m. — Gonzalo Fernandez-Castano, George McNeill, Frank Bensel 9:40 a.m.-4:30 a.m. — Brendon de Jonge, Danny Balin, Hiroyuki Fujita 9:50 a.m.-4:40 a.m. — John Rollins, Kyle Stanley, Francesco Molinari 10 a.m.-4:50 a.m. — Charl Schwartzel, Rickie Fowler, Nicolas Colsaerts 10:10 a.m.-5 a.m. — Hunter Mahan, Adam Scott, Sergio Garcia 10:20 a.m.-5:10 a.m. — Bubba Watson, Webb Simpson, Ernie Els 10:30 a.m.-5:20 a.m. — Luke Donald, Brandt Snedeker, Zach Johnson 10:40 a.m.-5:30 a.m. — Padraig Harrington, Phil Mickelson, Davis Love III 10:50 a.m.-5:40 a.m. — Scott Piercy, Graeme McDowell, Matt Kuchar 11 a.m.-5:50 a.m. — Justin Rose, Paul Lawrie, Nick Watney 11:10 a.m.-6 a.m. — K.J. Choi, Simon Dyson, Scott Verplank 11:20 a.m.-6:10 a.m. — Mitch Lowe, Jeff Overton, Blake Adams 11:30 a.m.-6:20 a.m. — TBD, Paul Scaletta, Robert Allenby Hole 10-Hole 1 4:20 a.m.-9:30 a.m. — Matteo Manassero, Charles Howell III, Mark Brown 4:30 a.m.-9:40 a.m. — Pat Perez, Corey Prugh, Martin Laird 4:40 a.m.-9:50 a.m. — Toru Taniguchi, Rory Sabbatini, Rafa Cabrera-Bello 4:50 a.m.-10 a.m. — Jose Maria Olazabal, Branden Grace, Matt Dobyns 5 a.m.-10:10 a.m. — Darren Clarke, Ryo Ishikawa, Gary Woodland 5:10 a.m.-10:20 a.m. — Dustin Johnson, Rory McIlroy, Jim Furyk 5:20 a.m.-10:30 a.m. — Jason Dufner, Paul Casey, Geoff Ogilvy 5:30 a.m.-10:40 a.m. — Keegan Bradley, Martin Kaymer, Tiger Woods 5:40 a.m.-10:50 a.m. — Louis Oosthuizen, Ian Poulter, Steve Stricker 5:50 a.m.-11 a.m. — Lee Westwood, Bill Haas, Angel Cabrera 6 a.m.-11:10 a.m. — Stewart Cink, Peter Hanson, Tim Clark 6:10 a.m.-11:20 a.m. — Jeff Coston, Bud Cauley, Robert Rock 6:20 a.m.-11:30 a.m. — Joost Luiten, Alan Morin, Thomas Aiken 9:30 a.m.-4:20 a.m. — Bryce Molder, Matt Every, Bob Sowards 9:40 p.m.-4:30 a.m. — Sang Moon Bae, Darrell Kestner, David Lynn 9:50 a.m.-4:40 a.m. — Marcus Fraser, Jamie Donaldson, Doug Wade 10 a.m.-4:50 a.m. — Jonathan Byrd, Anders Hansen, Aaron Baddeley 10:10 a.m.-5 a.m. — Thorbjorn Olesen, Fredrik Jacobson, Jimmy Walker 10:20 a.m.-5:10 a.m. — Miguel Angel Jimenez, K.T. Kim, Bo Van Pelt 10:30 a.m.-5:20 a.m. — Y.E. Yang, Rich Beem, Vijay Singh 10:40 a.m.-5:30 a.m. — Charlie Wi, Pablo Larrazabal, Chez Reavie 10:50 a.m.-5:40 a.m. — Retief Goosen, Mark Brooks, Roger Chapman 11 a.m.-5:50 a.m. — Alex Noren, Mark Wilson, George Coetzee 11:10 a.m.-6 a.m. — Marc Leishman, Ted Potter Jr., Brian Gaffney 11:20 a.m.-6:10 a.m. — Michael Hoey, Kevin Na, Rod Perry 11:30 a.m.-6:20 a.m. — Brendan Jones, Bill Murchison, TBD

TENNIS Professional Rogers Cup Monday At Rexall Centre Toronto Purse: $3.2 million (Masters 1000) Surface: Hard-Outdoor

to Oregon’s spread attack. Last season, Bennett led the Ducks on four scoring drives in the second half to defeat Arizona State 41-27. The following week, he started at Colorado and led the Ducks in a 45-2 blowout. Bennett said Monday that he understands he is in competition with Mariota, but he added that his primary focus is on helping his team get better. “I’m really worried about just today at practice, and what I’m going to do to get better today,” Bennett said. “All I can worry about is the now and hopefully everything else falls into place. We have a good surrounding cast — so many people who can contribute. I think just getting those guys the ball is what’s important.” Bennett deflected a question on whether he thought his game-time experience from last season gave him an advantage over Mariota. And he was nothing but complimentary when talking about his freshman challenger. “He’s a good player,” Bennett said. “He’s knows what he’s doing on the field. He can run and throw. It’s a good deal, having two quarterbacks going head to head and competing to make each other better. I’m not

BASEBALL COMMISSIONER’S OFFICE—Suspended Cleveland minor league RHP Juan Nivar 50 games after testing positive for metabolites of a performance-enhancing substance in violation of the Minor League Drug Prevention and Treatment Program. American League CHICAGO WHITE SOX—Reassigned OF Brandon Short from Charlotte (IL) to Winston-Salem (SAL). CLEVELAND INDIANS—Claimed RHP Fabio Martinez off waivers from the L.A. Angels and optioned him to Carolina (Carolina). DETROIT TIGERS—Optioned INF Danny Worth to Toledo (IL). KANSAS CITY ROYALS—Designated 2B Yuniesky Betancourt for assignment. Selected the contract of 2B Tony Abreu from Omaha (PCL). Recalled LHP Francisley Bueno from Omaha. MINNESOTA TWINS—Recalled 2B Tsuyoshi Nishioka from Rochester (IL). SEATTLE MARINERS—Optioned RHP Erasmo Ramirez to Tacoma (PCL). TAMPA BAY RAYS—Optioned INF Will Rhymes to Durham (IL). National League ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS—Placed C Henry Blanco on the 15-day DL. Claimed C Wil Nieves off waivers from Colorado. CHICAGO CUBS—Placed RHP Matt Garza to the 15-day DL. COLORADO ROCKIES—Reinstated 3B Chris Nelson from the 15-day DL. Placed 1B Todd Helton on the 15-day DL. HOUSTON ASTROS—Agreed to terms with RHP Brian Sanches on a minor league contract. LOS ANGELES DODGERS—Designated OF Tony Gwynn Jr. for assignment. Recalled OF/1B Jerry Sands from Albuquerque (PCL). Named Janet Marie Smith senior vice president of planning and development. MILWAUKEE BREWERS—Recalled SS Jean Segura from Huntsville (TL). PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES—Agreed to terms with 1B Jake Opitz on a minor league contract. Reinstated LHP Raul Valdes from the 15-day DL. Optioned 1B Hector Luna to Lehigh Valley (IL). PITTSBURGH PIRATES—Sent RHP Juan Cruz to Altoona (EL) for a rehab assignment. ST. LOUIS CARDINALS—Agreed to terms with OF Raymond Kruml on a minor league contract. SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS—Agreed to terms with OF Xavier Nady on a minor league contract. Claimed LHP Jose Mijares off waivers from Kansas City. WASHINGTON NATIONALS—Assigned C Carlos Maldonado outright to Syracuse (IL). Agreed to terms with RHP Ramses Rosario, OF Aldrem Corredor, OF Darryl Florentino and OF Luis Guzman on minor league contracts. Claimed SS Cesar Izturis off waivers from Milwaukee. Placed INF/OF Mark DeRosa on the 15-day DL, retroactive to Aug. 5. Designated LHP Atahualpa Severino for assignment. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association SACRAMENTO KINGS—Signed coach Keith Smart to a contract extension through the 2013-14 season. FOOTBALL National Football League ATLANTA FALCONS—Signed RB Richard Medlin. BALTIMORE RAVENS—Named Sandy Weil director of football analytics. CHICAGO BEARS—Signed WR Rashied Davis to a one-year contract. Placed WR Devin Thomas on the reserve/left team list. DALLAS COWBOYS—Waived S Brodney Pool and CB Isaac Madison. Signed WR David Little and RB Javarris Williams. DENVER BRONCOS—Signed S Jim Leonhard and LB Keith Brooking. JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS—Agreed to terms with WR Justin Blackmon to a four-year contract. MINNESOTA VIKINGS—Signed WR A.J. Love. Placed WR Greg Childs on the waived-injured list. OAKLAND RAIDERS—Waived DT Travis Ivey. Removed CB Ron Bartell from the non-football injury list. PHILADELPHIA EAGLES—Signed LB Adrian Moten. Waived WR Andrew Brewer SEATTLE SEAHAWKS—Agreed to terms with WR Terrell Owens. TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS—Waived TE Chase Coffman. Signed LS Andrew DePaola. COLLEGE SOUTHLAND CONFERENCE—Named Chris Parker communications assistant. UAB—Named Bailey Coleman assistant indoor and sand volleyball coach. UCLA—Dismissed junior C Anthony Stover from the men’s basketball team for failure to meet NCAA eligibility requirements.

FISH COUNT Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Sunday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 448 112 3,141 1,220 The Dalles 420 155 2,544 1,042 John Day 341 87 1,920 817 McNary 303 37 1,187 447 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Sunday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 242,380 20,625 106,112 45,190 The Dalles 187,219 17,866 67,524 30,892 John Day 168,469 17,170 40,579 19,365 McNary 165,973 9,672 31,639 13,149

thinking about having an edge right now, I’m just thinking about trying to get better each day.” A fresh-faced Mariota said all the right things Monday as well. Whichever of the two is behind center, he will have a few experienced playmakers on his side, including De’Anthony Thomas, Kenjon Barner, and Josh Huff. “I just have to get the ball out to those guys that can make plays,” Mariota said. “They’ll make the offense run. My goal is to get better every day and continue to jell with these guys. You have to go through different situations in practice where you’ll be put under adversity.” Mariota said he and Bennett are helpful to and supportive of one another, even as they are competing for one of the most high-profile positions in all of college football. “Bryan and I, we’re both competitors and we both want to play,” Mariota said. “But whatever happens, if it’s him or if it’s me, we’re going to support each other. It’s a team sport and we like to think of our unit as a family.” That family will become much closer over the next four weeks. — Reporter: 541-383-0318, mmorical@bendbulletin.com.


TUESDAY, AUGUST 7, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

London2012

TV SCHEDULE • For an interactive guide to NBC’s coverage, visit www.nbcolympics.com/tv-listings. Note that most of the coverage on NBC itself is tape-delayed for Pacific time. The schedule is subject to change. • If you have a cable subscription that includes CNBC and MSNBC, you can also watch live streams online at www.nbcolympics.com/liveextra. For a complete schedule of the day’s events, see Olympic Scoreboard, C5. TODAY Midnight: Boxing, CNBC. 1 a.m.: Men’s field hockey, South Korea vs. Netherlands, NBCSN. 2 a.m.: Canoe/Kayak, NBCSN. 3:30 a.m.: Triathlon, NBCSN. 5:30 a.m.: Canoe/Kayak, NBCSN. 6 a.m.: Women’s basketball, quarterfinals, United States vs. Canada, NBCSN. 6 a.m.: Women’s volleyball, quarterfinals, Japan vs. China, MSNBC. 7 a.m.: Women’s volleyball, quarterfinals, Russia vs. Brazil, MSNBC. 7:45 a.m.: Equestrian, NBCSN. 8:30 a.m.: Women’s handball, NBCSN. 9 a.m.: Track & field, NBC. 9 a.m.: Men’s soccer, semifinal, Mexico vs. Japan, NBCSN. 9 a.m.: Beach volleyball, MSNBC. 9:30 a.m.: Women’s water polo, semifinal, United States vs. Australia, NBC. 10:30 a.m.: Cycling, NBC. 10:45 a.m.: Track & field, NBC. 10:45 a.m.: Women’s handball, quarterfinal, Russia vs. South Korea, NBCSN. 11 a.m.: Cycling, NBC. 11 a.m.: Table tennis, MSNBC. 11:30 a.m.: Track & field, NBC. 11:40 a.m.: Women’s water polo, semifinal, Hungary vs. Spain, MSNBC. 11:45 a.m.: Men’s soccer, semifinal, South Korea vs. Brazil, NBCSN. Noon: Cycling, NBC. 12:15 p.m.: Diving, NBC. 1 p.m.: Women’s volleyball, quarterfinal, United States vs. Dominican Republic, NBC. 1 p.m.: Synchronized swimming, MSNBC. 1:30 p.m.: Women’s basketball, quarterfinal, Turkey vs. Russia, NBCSN. 1:45 p.m.: Wrestling, MSNBC. 2 p.m.: Boxing, CNBC. 2:15 p.m.: Women’s basketball, quarterfinal, France vs. Czech Republic, NBCSN. 2:30 p.m.: Women’s volleyball, MSNBC. 3 p.m.: Men’s beach volleyball, NBC. 4 p.m.: Weightlifting, NBCSN. 8 p.m.: Primetime, gymnastics, track & field, beach volleyball, men’s diving, cycling, NBC.

WEDNESDAY Midnight: Boxing, CNBC. 3 a.m.: Men’s handball, quarterfinal, NBCSN. 4:45 a.m.: Table tennis, men’s bronze medal game, NBCSN. 6 a.m.: Men’s basketball, quarterfinal games 1 and 2, NBCSN. 6 a.m.: Men’s volleyball, quarterfinal, MSNBC. 7:45 a.m.: Men’s water polo, quarterfinal, MSNBC. 8 a.m.: Men’s volleyball, quarterfinal, NBC. 9 a.m.: Men’s water polo, quarterfinal, MSNBC. 9 a.m.: Equestrian, NBC. 9:45 a.m.: Track & field, NBC. 10 a.m.: Boxing, women’s semifinals, NBCSN. 10 a.m.: Table tennis, MSNBC. 10:30 a.m.: Men’s water polo, quarterfinal, MSNBC. 11:15 a.m.: Field hockey, women’s semifinal, NBCSN. 11:40 a.m.: Men’s volleyball, quarterfinal, MSNBC. 11:45 p.m.: Canoe/ Kayak, NBC. Noon: Men’s basketball, quarterfinals games 3 and 4, NBCSN. 12:15 p.m.: Track & field, NBC. 1 p.m.: Beach volleyball, bronze medal match, NBC. 1 p.m.: Wrestling, MSNBC. 1:30 p.m.: Track & field, NBC. 1:30 p.m.: Men’s volleyball, quarterfinal, MSNBC. 2 p.m.: Men’s water polo, quarterfinal, NBC. 2 p.m.: Boxing, men’s quarterfinals, CNBC. 3 p.m.: Cycling, men’s BMX, NBC. 4:15 p.m.: Events TBA, NBCSN. 8 p.m.: Primetime, women’s beach volleyball final, track & field, women’s diving (sameday tape), NBC.

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Games of the XXX Olympiad • July 27-August 12, 2012 • Coverage on C4-C6

WOMEN’S SOCCER

LOOK AHEAD

Douglas chases more gold in individual beam By Janie McCauley The Associated Press

Jon Super / The Associated Press

United States’ Abby Wambach, center left, celebrates with teammates including Kelley O’Hara, center right, and scorer of the winning goal Alex Morgan, left, after their semifinal win over Canada in their women’s soccer match at the 2012 Summer Olympics, Monday in Manchester, England.

U.S. tops Canada, set to face Japan for gold By Joseph White The Associated Press

MANCHESTER, England — On the verge of missing the gold-medal game for the first time, the U.S. women’s soccer team caught a break when the referee made a call rarely seen in the sport. Then the Americans put together a final winning surge, inspired by the familiar — a pep talk from co-captain Abby Wambach. “I know I’ve said this before,” she said she told her teammates during extra time. “But it really does just take one moment and one chance, one moment of brilliance for somebody to do something individually spectacular.” The moment came beyond the 90 minutes of regular time, beyond the scheduled 30 minutes of extra time. In the third and final minute of injury time, with goalkeeper Hope Solo already preparing for a penalty kick shootout, Alex Morgan looped in a 6-yard header on a long cross from Heather O’Reilly, giving the U.S. a 4-3 win over Canada in the Olympic semifinals at Old Trafford. “I don’t have much to say because I need to wrap my head around what just happened,” Solo said. “And that’s the truth of the matter. We tend to keep things interesting.” Next comes the game the U.S. players have been eyeing for more than a year, a rematch with Japan on Thursday at Wembley Stadium with gold on the line. The top-ranked Americans lost to Japan on penalty kicks in the World Cup final last summer, a stunning blow that became a source of motivation as the players prepared for the London Olympics. “This is redemption for us,” midfielder Carli Lloyd said. “We know how hard it was for us after that game. It hurt us for a really long time.” The Americans overcame three onegoal deficits, all due to Christine Sinclair goals in the 22nd, 67th and 73rd minutes. Megan Rapinoe scored in the 54th and 70th minutes, and Wambach in the 80th for the U.S., leaving Sinclair and Wambach tied at No. 2 with 143 international goals apiece, both chasing Mia Hamm’s world record of 158. It was the sequence that led to Wambach’s tying goal that left the Canadians fuming. It started when goalkeeper Erin McLeod was whistled for holding the ball

more than six seconds, a call even U.S. coach Pia Sundhage said she had never seen before. That gave the Americans an indirect free kick inside the area. Rapinoe took the kick and rammed it into the Canadian wall, the ball glancing off the arm of Marie-Eve Nault. Referee Christiana Pedersen of Norway then awarded the U.S. a penalty kick, which Wambach converted off the left post. McLeod said she did not receive the usual warning from the referee about holding the ball too long, although she said the linesman had told her at the start of the second half not to slow down play. “I think the referee was very one-sided,” McLeod said. “It was an interesting sequence of events. I think we outplayed the Americans the entire game. I think it’s unfortunate the calls went the way that they did. Of course, the Americans are a great soccer team, and today we were better, and the luck went their way.” Canada coach John Herdman said he felt the referee also missed a hand ball in front of the U.S. goal. “The ref, she will have to sleep in bed tonight after watching the replays,” Herdman said. “She’s gonna have to live with that. We will move on from this. I wonder if she will be able to.” Canada, seeking the country’s first Summer Games medal in a traditional team sport since 1936, will play France for the bronze on Thursday at Coventry. The U.S. team has played in the title match in every Summer Games since women’s soccer was introduced in Atlanta in 1996, winning the gold in 1996, 2004 and 2008, and the silver in 2000. But in many ways this win was reminiscent of the landmark comeback victory against Brazil in last year’s World Cup, when Wambach willed the team to a shootout win in the quarterfinals. With that kind of history, she knew her teammates could rally against the Canadians. “Even when they scored their third goal, there was something in me that knew that we had more, that we could give more,” Wambach said. The result maintains the Americans’ dominance of their neighbor to the north, extending their unbeaten streak against Canada to 27 games (23-0-4).

LONDON — Gabby Douglas is back for her grand finale. Already a two-time gold medalist, the American teen nicknamed the Flying Squirrel has a chance for one more title before she leaves the London Games, competing today on the balance beam. Even Douglas wouldn’t have expected to make the final in the event a month ago, considering she had been so shaky in training. A fall off the beam on the second day of the U.S. championships in June cost her the national title. But lately Douglas has the highest scores of anybody on the talented U.S. women’s roster. She is determined to keep that run going and finish strong after placing eighth — and last — in the uneven bars final Monday with a score of 14.9. “Beam has been excellent. If I can just do what I did in the all-around finals or team finals, then I’ll be good,” said Douglas, who won gold in the all-around and team competitions last week. “I’m going to get a lot of rest, just rest up, and do a lot of therapies and relax my body and hopefully prepare for that.” American Danell Leyva, bronze medalist in the men’s all-around, competes on high bar today along with teammate Jonathan Horton. Also today, the two U.S. women’s beach volleyball pairs play semifinal matches at Horse Guards Parade and could set up an all-American final. Two-time defending gold medalists Kerri Walsh Jennings and Misty May-Treanor take on Beijing bronze medalists Xue Chen and Zhang Xi of China, while No. 2 American tandem April Ross and Jennifer Kessy face reigning world champions Juliana and Larissa of Brazil. The 16-year-old Douglas would much prefer gold than a second-place silver to match that sparkly silver leotard she wore for the bars Monday. She is admittedly tired at this stage of the Summer Games. She has endured a whirlwind of public appearances and media obligations after her all-around victory — and she hoped to escape the spotlight for a night and take advantage of some much-needed downtime in the athletes village. “It hasn’t really been hard because we’re in the village, so we’re kind of caged in,” she said. “We can’t, like, leave and the media can’t come in, so we’re definitely on lockdown. I think toward the end of the Olympics you get mentally and physically tired and you’re just, like, drained.” Douglas and her U.S. teammates heard from President Obama after winning the team gold last Tuesday, the first for the American women in team competition since the Magnificent Seven of the 1996 Atlanta Games. Then, she followed that up by beating Russia’s Viktoria Komova on Thursday night to become the first African-American gymnast to win the Olympic all-around event.

NBC Tuesday prime time schedule 8 p.m.-midnight (PDT) Gymnastics: individual event gold medal finals in men’s parallel bars, men’s high bar, women’s balance beam, women’s floor exercise. Track and field: gold medal finals in men’s 1500m, men’s high jump, women’s 100m hurdles. Beach volleyball: semifinal.


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THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, AUGUST 7, 2012

2012 Summer Olympics

ROUNDUP

Vaulter gives U.S. gold; gymnast falls short By Jay Cohen

U.S. men’s basketball rolls into quarterfinals

The Associated Press

LONDON — Jenn Suhr has been America’s best female pole vaulter for a while. Now she’s the best in the world. Suhr rounded out her resume with Olympic gold, vaulting 15 feet, 7 inches to defeat Cuba’s Yarisley Silva, who cleared the same height but lost on a tiebreaker because she had one more miss in the competition. Suhr also beat two-time defending Olympic champion Yelena Isinbayeva of Russia, who failed to become the first woman to win the same individual track and field event at three consecutive Olympics. Isinbayeva settled for bronze with a vault of 15-5. Grenada’s Kirani James won the men’s 400 meters and 35-year-old Felix Sanchez of the Dominican Republic took the men’s 400-meter hurdles on a rainy night at Olympic Stadium. Other track and field winners included Belarus’ Nadzeya Ostapchuk (women’s shot put) and Russia’s Yuliya Zaripova (women’s 3,000-meter steeplechase). Michael Tinsley was second in the 400 hurdles, but it was a disappointing session for the U.S. overall. The U.S. was without a representative in the 400 final, and it was the first time since the 1980 Moscow Games that someone other than an American won the race. “It’s probably crazy at home right now,” James said. “There’s probably a road party right now in the streets. I don’t think there are any words to describe the celebration right now.” In gymnastics, Gabby Douglas was nowhere near the podium this time. The all-around champion, who also helped the United States to team gold, finished last on uneven bars. Russia’s Aliya Mustafina rallied to the victory. “Toward the end of the Olympics, you get mentally and physically tired and you’re just like drained,” Douglas said. “I tried to fight through it as much as I could.” Mustafina, who injured her left knee in April 2011, gave Russia its first gold in women’s gymnastics in London. This completed her medal set following a silver in team competition and bronze in all-around. Arthur Zanetti finished first on still rings for Brazil’s first gymnastics medal, and Yang Hak-seon of South Korea added the gold on vault to his world title. Also Monday, American judo fighter Nick Delpopolo apologized after he was expelled from the Olympics for doping, blaming the disqualification on his unintentional consumption of something baked with marijuana. Delpopolo is the first of the 10,500 London Games athletes to fail an incompetition doping test. The International Olympic Committee said it disqualified him from the 73-kilogram class, where he placed seventh. He beat opponents from Hong Kong and Belgium, then lost to fighters from South Korea and Mongolia. The IOC added that he tested positive for metabolites of cannabis after competing on July 30, the day of his event. The judoka from Westfield, N.J., said his positive test was “caused by my inadvertent consumption of food that I did not realize had been baked with marijuana” before he left for the Olympics. “I apologize to U.S. Olympic Committee, to my teammates, and to my fans, and I am embarrassed by this mistake,” he said in a statement released by the USOC. “I look forward to representing my country in the future, and will rededicate myself to

LONDON — Kevin Durant shot the U.S. men’s Olympic basketball team out of trouble, and right into the top seed in their group. Durant scored 17 of his 28 points during the Americans’ explosive 42-point third quarter, turning a one-point game into a blowout that sent the U.S. soaring into the quarterfinals with a 126-97 victory over Argentina on Monday night. The NBA scoring champion matched the Argentines’ point total in the period, going five of six from three-point range, the last one from well beyond 25 feet. The Americans didn’t stop shooting and scoring until Carmelo Anthony made a three-pointer in the final second of the quarter while taking what he and the U.S. bench right behind him felt was a cheap shot from Argentina’s Facundo Campazzo, setting off an exchange of words and technical fouls. “You kind of want to send a message a little bit,” Kobe Bryant said. “This was the second game in a row that a team has played us close. We didn’t want to give them confidence.” The Americans (5-0) will play Australia (3-2) in a quarterfinal game Wednesday. LeBron James added 18 points, getting the Americans’ first seven of the third quarter before Durant took over. Chris Paul finished with 17. “We’re a great shooting team, but in close games sometimes you’ve got to go down and get some easy ones, and I wanted the ball, whether it was layups or in the post,” James said. “Once you get a couple easy ones at the rim then the three-pointers open up and you saw what KD was able to do.” — The Associated Press

David J. Phillip / The Associated Press

United States’ Jennifer Suhr competes in the women’s pole vault final during the 2012 Summer Olympics, in London, Monday.

being the best judo athlete that I can be.” Defending Olympic 50K race walk champion Alex Schwazer also tested positive for doping, and the Italian Olympic Committee said he had been removed from the team. Schwazer was scheduled to compete on Saturday. The rest of the Olympic action Monday: E Q UE S T RI AN Britain beat the Netherlands in a jumpoff for the Olympic gold medal in team show jumping. Saudi Arabia finished with the bronze, while the United States tied for sixth after all four of its team riders knocked down fences. Part-time Sunriver resident and Oregon High Desert Classics regular Rich Fellers competed for the U.S. Three members of Britain’s fourman team — Nick Skelton, Ben Maher and Peter Charles — rode clear rounds in the jumpoff. Scores from the final round in the team competition are combined with scores from Sunday’s first round. Saudi Arabia held the lead with only one penalty point after the first round. BE ACH VOLLEYBALL Americans Jake Gibb and Sean Rosenthal were knocked out of the men’s tournament by Latvia. The Americans won the first set 21-19, then dropped two straight to Martins Plavins and Janis Smedins, 21-18, 1511. The other American men’s team, Beijing gold medalists Todd Rogers and Phil Dalhausser, had already been eliminated. Latvia will meet the

reigning world champion Brazilian team of Emanuel and Alison, which escaped a set point in the third to beat Poland 21-17, 16-21, 17-15. The No. 2 Brazilian team of Ricardo and Pedro Cunha lost to Germany, and Reinder Nummerdor and Rich Schuil of the Netherlands beat Italy in the remaining quarterfinal. BOXING Flyweight Marlen Esparza and middleweight Claressa Shields clinched the U.S. team’s first two boxing medals. Esparza patiently outboxed Venezuela’s Karlha Magliocco, and the 17-year-old Shields closed furiously in an 18-14 win over Swedish veteran Anna Laurell. Ireland lightweight Katie Taylor and top-seeded flyweight Ren Cancan of China also won in the first women’s tournament. On the men’s side, lightweight Vasyl Lomachenko of Ukraine clinched his second Olympic boxing medal with a 14-9 victory over Puerto Rico’s Felix Verdejo, and middleweight Vijender Singh was eliminated in the biggest blow yet to the beleaguered Indian team. Middleweight Anthony Ogogo and super heavyweight Anthony Joshua each won for the powerful British team. VOLLEYBALL David McKienzie scored 17 points and the defending champion U.S. men’s team clinched a top tournament seed with a victory over winless Tunisia. Sean Rooney added 12 points in the 25-15, 25-19, 25-19 win, which set up a quarterfinal against Italy on Wednesday. Bulgaria plays

Germany, Poland faces Russia and Argentina plays Brazil in the other quarters. SHOOTING Matt Emmons finally made his way to the podium in the 50-meter three-position rifle event at the Olympics. The U.S. marksman held on to win the bronze medal at the London Games. Italy’s Niccolo Campriani set Olympic marks of 1,180 in qualifying and 1,278.5 for his overall score, easily topping silver medalist Kim Jong-hyun of South Korea. In men’s trap, Giovanni Cernogoraz of Croatia beat world champion Massimo Fabbrizi in a shoot-off for the gold. Kuwait’s Fehaid Aldeehani won another shoot-off for the bronze. WATER POLO Norbert Hosnyanszky scored three times and defending champion Hungary beat the U.S. 11-6 to close out the preliminary stage of the men’s tournament. The Americans have dropped two straight and will face undefeated Croatia in the quarterfinals on Wednesday. Hungary plays Italy, Spain takes on Montenegro and Australia faces Serbia in the other quarters. CYCLING Jason Kenny won the sprint for Britain’s fifth gold medal out of a possible seven in track cycling. Kenny earned his first win against three-time world champion Gregory Bauge of France. The 24-year-old from Bolton made good on the British team’s decision to enter him in the event instead of defending champion Chris Hoy. Bauge failed in his bid to become the first Frenchman to win the Olympic sprint title in 40 years. Shane Perkins of Australia claimed the bronze medal. SAILING Tom Slingsby of Australia won the men’s Laser class by match-racing closest competitor Pavlos Kontides to the back of the fleet. Kontides took the silver, the first-ever Olympic medal for Cyprus, the small island nation that started taking part in the games in Moscow in 1980. A few hours later, as Slingsby was about to receive his gold medal in a harborside ceremony, the Aussie crew of Nathan Outteridge and Iain Jensen came ashore with an unassailable lead in the 49er skiff class. To collect their medals, Outteridge and Jensen need to make a “genuine effort” to start, sail the course and finish in the medals race Wednesday. In the women’s Laser Radial, Xu Lijia of China won the gold despite having to do a penalty turn on the first down-

wind leg for rocking the boat. Marit Bouwmeester of the Netherlands took silver, and Belgium’s Evi Van Acker was third. DIVING Ilya Zakharov of Russia led the men’s 3-meter springboard preliminaries, with He Chong of China close behind in second during a competition marked by pratfalls. Zakharov totaled 507.65 points during the six rounds. He, who was ninth after his first dive, totaled 500.90 while opening defense of his Olympic title. Troy Dumais of the U.S. was third at 486.60 after rallying from sixth in the fourth round. Two divers scored all zeros, while two others got low scores for badly botching their dives. SYNCHRONIZED SWIMMING Natalia Ishchenko and Svetlana Romashina head into the duet final as top qualifiers after the preliminary free routine. The Russians added to their leading marks in the preliminary technical to easily claim the top spot in 196.800. China’s Huang Xuechen and Liu Ou were next at 192.810, while Spain’s Ona Carbonell and Andrea Fuentes were third at 192.590. The top 12 teams advanced to today’s final. FIELD HOCKEY Three-time Olympic champion Australia was knocked out of the women’s tournament when it played a scoreless draw against world champion Argentina. Argentina advanced to the semifinals with the draw in the finale of pool play. Australia had to win, and it never looked likely. Germany, the other former Olympic champion in Pool B, also was eliminated with a 0-0 draw with New Zealand. New Zealand’s reward for making it to the semifinals for the first time was a clash with unbeaten defending champ the Netherlands on Wednesday. Britain meets Argentina in the other semi. HANDBALL Daniel Narcisse scored six goals and defending champion France beat Sweden 29-26 to reach the men’s quarterfinals. France was boosted by a supportive crowd and next faces Spain, which lost 30-25 to two-time Olympic champion Croatia. Croatia finished on top of Group B with 10 points and is unbeaten heading into its Wednesday quarterfinal against Tunisia. Iceland crushed Britain 41-24 to remain unbeaten and top Group A with 10 points. It will face Hungary in the next round. Sweden and Denmark meet in the other quarterfinal.


TUESDAY, AUGUST 7, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

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2012 Summer Olympics OLYMPIC SCOREBOARD Medalists Monday, Aug. 6 ATHLETICS Men 400 GOLD—Kirani James, Grenada. SILVER—Luguelin Santos, Dominican Republic. BRONZE—Lalonde Gordon, Trinidad & Tobago. 400 Hurdles GOLD—Felix Sanchez, Dominican Republic. SILVER—Michael Tinsley, Little Rock, Ark. BRONZE—Javier Culson, Puerto Rico. Women 3000 Steeplechase GOLD—Yuliya Zaripova, Russia. SILVER—Habiba Ghribi, Tunisia. BRONZE—Sofia Assefa, Ethiopia. Shot Put GOLD—Nadzeya Ostapchuk, Belarus. SILVER—Valerie Adams, New Zealand. BRONZE—Evgeniia Kolodko, Russia. Pole Vault GOLD—Jennifer Suhr, Fredonia, N.Y. SILVER—Yarisley Silva, Cuba. BRONZE—Elena Isinbaeva, Russia. CYCLING TRACK Men Sprint GOLD—Jason Kenny, Britain. SILVER—Gregory Bauge, France. BRONZE—Shane Perkins, Australia. EQUESTRIAN Men Team Jumping GOLD—Britain (Scott Brash, Peter Charles, Ben Maher, Nick Skelton). SILVER—Netherlands (Marc Houtzager, Gerco Schroder, Maikel van der Vleuten, Jur Vrieling). BRONZE—Saudi Arabia (Ramzy Al Duhami, HRH Prince Abdullah Al Saud, Kamal Bahamdan, Abdullah Waleed Sharbatly). GYMNASTICS ARTISTIC Men Vault GOLD—Yang Hak Seon, South Korea. SILVER—Denis Ablyazin, Russia. BRONZE—Igor Radivilov, Ukraine. Rings GOLD—Arthur Nabarrete Zanetti, Brazil. SILVER—Chen Yibing, China. BRONZE—Matteo Morandi, Italy. Women Uneven Bars GOLD—Aliya Mustafina, Russia. SILVER—He Kexin, China. BRONZE—Elizabeth Tweddle, Britain. SAILING Men Laser GOLD—Tom Slingsby, Australia. SILVER—Pavlos Kontides, Cyprus. BRONZE—Rasmus Myrgren, Sweden. Women Laser Radial GOLD—Xu Lijia, China. SILVER—Marit Bouwmeester, Netherlands. BRONZE—Evi Van Acker, Belgium. SHOOTING Men 50m Rifle 3 Positions GOLD—Niccolo Campriani, Italy. SILVER—Kim Jonghyun, South Korea. BRONZE—Matthew Emmons, Brown Mills, N.J. Trap GOLD—Giovanni Cernogoraz, Croatia. SILVER—Massimo Fabbrizi, Italy.

Eaton Continued from C1 “As painful as that was to watch … I saw it right away in the 100,” said Metcalf, who is currently in London to watch Eaton in his first Olympic decathlon on Wednesday and Thursday. “What happens, especially in the decathlon, as soon as you start chasing points, that’s when you’re pushing too hard and you’re not relaxed. Because he didn’t have a great 100, in his mind he was 50 points behind of where he needed to be. Now it’s time to go to the long jump and, ‘I have to make up those 50 points.’ Instead of just competing, he was chasing points.” Eaton’s toughest competition this week will likely come from Hardee and a trio of Europeans. Pascal Behrenbruch of Germany won the European championship in Helsinki, Finland, in June with a careerbest 8,558 points. Hans van Alphen of Belgium took first place in late May at the annual Gotzis, Austria, decathlon with a personal record of 8,519. And Eelco Sintnicolaas of the Netherlands was second at Gotzis with a PR of 8,506. None of those scores even comes close to Eaton’s world record of 9,039 points, which he set at the U.S. Olympic trials in Eugene in late June.

BRONZE—Fehaid Aldeehani, Kuwait. WEIGHTLIFTING Men 105Kg GOLD—Oleksiy Torokhtiy, Ukraine. SILVER—Navab Nasirshelal, Iran. BRONZE—Bartlomiej Wojciech Bonk, Poland. WRESTLING Men 60Kg GOLD—Omid Haji Noroozi, Iran. SILVER—Revaz Lashkhi, Georgia. BRONZE—Ryutaro Matsumoto, Japan. BRONZE—Zaur Kuramagomedov, Russia. 84Kg GOLD—Alan Khugaev, Russia. SILVER—Karam Mohamed Gaber Ebrahim, Egypt. BRONZE—Damian Janikowski, Poland. BRONZE—Danyal Gajiyev, Kazakhstan. 120Kg GOLD—Mijain Lopez Nunez, Cuba. SILVER—Heiki Nabi, Estonia. BRONZE—Johan Euren, Sweden. BRONZE—Riza Kayaalp, Turkey.

Semifinal, 1 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 11 Bronze medal, 9 a.m. Gold medal, 1 p.m.

Soccer Women’s Olympic Soccer All Times PDT SEMIFINALS Monday, Aug. 6 Wembley, England Japan 2, France 1 Manchester, England United States 4, Canada 3, extra time ——— BRONZE MEDAL MATCH Thursday, Aug. 9 Coventry, England France vs. Canada, 5 a.m. GOLD MEDAL MATCH Thursday, Aug. 9 Wembley, England Japan vs. United States, 11:45 a.m.

Basketball Olympic Men’s Basketball Glance All Times PDT Group A Country W L Pts United States 5 0 10 France 4 1 9 Argentina 3 2 8 Lithuania 2 3 7 Nigeria 1 4 6 Tunisia 0 5 5 Group B Country W L Pts Russia 4 1 9 Brazil 4 1 9 Spain 3 2 8 Australia 3 2 8 Britain 1 4 6 China 0 5 5 At Basketball Arena Monday, Aug. 6 Australia 82, Russia 80 Lithuania 76, Tunisia 63 France 79, Nigeria 73 Britain 90, China 58 Brazil 88, Spain 82 United States 126, Argentina 97 Wednesday, Aug. 8 Quarterfinals Russia vs. Lithuania, 6 a.m. France vs. Spain, 8:15 a.m. Brazil vs. Argentina, noon United States vs. Australia, 2:15 p.m. Friday, Aug. 10 Semifinal, 9 a.m. Semifinal, 1 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 12 Bronze Medal, 3 a.m. Gold Medal, 7 a.m. Women’s Olympic basketball All Times PDT At Basketball Arena Quarterfinals United States vs. Canada, 6 a.m. Australia vs. China, 8:15 a.m. Turkey vs. Russia, noon France vs. Czech Republic, 2:15 p.m. At North Greenwich Arena Thursday, Aug. 9 Semifinal, 9 a.m.

Pool A Japan 1, China 0 South Korea 3, Belgium 1 Netherlands 2, Britain 1 Pool B New Zealand 0, Germany 0 South Africa 7, United States 0 Argentina 0, Australia 0 WATER POLO Men Group A Croatia 12, Kazakhstan 4 Italy 10, Spain 7 Australia 13, Greece 8 Group B Serbia 12, Romania 4 Montenegro 13, Britain 4 Hungary 11, United States 6

Schedule

Volleyball Olympic Men’s Volleyball All Times PDT Group A Country W L Pts Bulgaria 4 1 12 Poland 3 2 9 Argentina 3 2 9 Italy 3 2 8 Australia 2 3 7 Britain 0 5 0 Group B Country W L Pts United States 4 1 13 Brazil 4 1 11 Russia 4 1 11 Germany 2 3 5 Serbia 1 4 5 Tunisia 0 5 0 Monday, Aug. 6 Australia 3, Poland 1 (25-21, 25-22, 18-25, 25-22) Russia 3, Serbia 0 (25-15, 25-20, 25-17) Bulgaria 3, Italy 0 (32-30, 25-20, 25-19) Argentina 3, Britain 0 (25-18, 25-18, 25-15) United States 3, Tunisia 0 (25-15, 25-19, 25-19) Brazil 3, Germany 0 (25-21, 25-22, 25-19) Olympic Women’s Volleyball All Times PDT Today, Aug. 7 Quarterfinals Japan vs. China, 5 a.m. Russia vs. Brazil, 7 a.m. United States vs. Dominican Republic, 11 a.m. Italy vs. South Korea, 1 p.m.

Monday’s Scores HANDBALL Men Group A Tunisia 25, Argentina 23 Iceland 41, Britain 24 France 29, Sweden 26 Group B Hungary 26, Serbia 23 Denmark 26, South Korea 24 Croatia 30, Spain 25 HOCKEY Women

Decathlon explainer The decathlon consists of 10 events conducted over two days to measure strength, spring, coordination, speed and endurance, and to determine track and field’s greatest all-around athlete. Decathlon scoring is based on a points system for each event, not by position achieved. A mathematical formula that includes the performance (time or distance) and three event-specific parameters is used to calculate the points earned for each event. The total number of points from the 10 events is a decathlete’s final score.

Top 10 decathlon performances in 2012 1, Ashton Eaton, USA, 9,039 points 2, Pascal Behrenbruch, Germany, 8,558 3, Hans van Alphen, Belgium, 8,519 4, Eelco Sintnicolaas, Netherlands, 8,506 5, Kevin Mayer, France, 8,415 6, Trey Hardee, USA, 8,383 7, Sergey Sviridov, Russia, 8,365 8, Larbi Bourrada, Algeria, 8,332 9, Rico Freimuth, Germany, 8,322 10, Oleksiy Kasyanov, Ukraine, 8,321

But questions remain about Eaton’s ability to focus in an international decathlon, in which the two days of competition are considerably longer and the events are much more spread out — each day lasts about 12 hours, rather than eight hours like at the trials. Eaton will also not have the home-crowd advantage of Eugene’s Hayward Field, where he starred for the University of Oregon track program from 2007 to 2010. “I think he’s learned, because of Daegu, that he can’t

chase points,” Metcalf said. “But also, he’s so much more confident now in his throws (shot put, discus, javelin) … I would also say that Ashton can capture a crowd. So, even though there may not be the diehards like in other places, there’ll still be people that are going to jump on the Ashton Eaton train. He’ll feel that crowd.” Eaton’s current coach, Harry Marra, said that Eaton’s ability in the 1,500 meters — the decathlon’s final event — is an enormous psychologi-

Today, Aug. 7 Athletics At Olympic Stadium Men’s 110 Hurdles round 1, 200 round 1, Triple Jump qualifying; Women’s 5000 round 1, Javelin qualifying, 2 a.m. Men’s 800 semifinals, 1500 final, High Jump final, Discus final; Women’s 100 Hurdles semifinals and final, 200 semifinals, Long Jump qualifying, 11:50 a.m. Basketball Olympic Park-Basketball Arena Women United States vs. Canada, 6 a.m. Australia vs. China, 8:15 a.m. Turkey vs. Russia, noon France vs. Czech Republic, 2:15 p.m. Beach Volleyball At Horse Guards Parade Men’s semifinal 9 a.m. Women’s semifinal 9 a.m. Men’s semifinal, 1 p.m. Women’s semifinal, 1 p.m. Boxing At ExCeL Men’s Flyweight (52kg) and Men’s Welterweight (69kg) quarterfinals, 1:30 p.m. Canoe (Sprint) At Eton Dorney, Buckinghamshire Men’s Canoe Double 1000 heats, semifinal; Men’s Kayak Four 1000 heats, semifinal; Women’s Kayak Single 500 heats, semifinals; Women’s Kayak Double 500 heats, semifinal, 1:30 a.m. Cycling (Track) At Olympic Park-Velodrome Men’s Keirin: round 1 & repechages; Women’s Omnium: 3km individual pursuit, 3:30 a.m. Men’s Keirin: round 2, finals; Women’s Omnium: 10km scratch race, 500m time trial-(medal); Women’s Sprint semifinals, finals, 8 a.m. Diving At Olympic Park-Aquatics Centre Men’s 3-Meter Springboard semifinal, 2 a.m. Men’s 3-Meter Springboard final, 11 a.m. Equestrian (Dressage) At Greenwich Park Team Dressage finals, 2 a.m. Field Hockey Men At Olympic Park-Hockey Centre South Korea vs. Netherlands, 12:30 a.m. Australia vs. Pakistan, 2:45 a.m. Argentina vs. South Africa, 5:45 a.m. India vs. Belgium, 8 a.m. Spain vs. Britain, 11 a.m. Germany vs. New Zealand, 1:15 p.m.

Watch at Bend’s Tower Theatre The Tower Theatre will stream the final two events of the 2012 Olympic decathlon — the javelin throw and the 1,500 meters — on Thursday starting at 10:30 a.m. on the theater’s big screen. Doors open at 9:30 a.m. Admission is free. Spectators are encouraged to wear red, white and blue to represent the U.S., red and black to represent Mountain View High School, or green and yellow to represent the University of Oregon. Concessions will be available.

cal advantage over the other decathletes. In Daegu, his 1,500 time vaulted him from the bronze medal to the silver. “He didn’t have the greatest meet in Daegu, and he was fighting himself,” Marra said. “When it came down to the 1,500, I told him, ‘You’re in this thing.’ The 1,500 is an extra bullet in his gun. He’s not afraid to run fast in the 1,500. Some people just go into the tank — not Ashton.” Marra said that successful decathletes are able to bounce back after a poor showing in

Gymnastics At Artistic North Greenwich Arena Men’s Horizontal Bar final; Men’s Parallel Bars final; Women’s Balance Beam final; Women’s Floor Exercise final, 6 a.m. Sailing At Weymouth and Portland, Dorset Men’s 470, RS:X (medal race); Women’s 470, Elliott 6m, RS:X (medal race), 4 a.m. Soccer Men At Wembley Stadium Semifinal, 9 a.m. At Old Trafford, Manchester Semifinal, 11:45 a.m. Synchronized Swimming At Olympic Park-Aquatics Centre Women’s Duets final, 7 a.m. Table Tennis At ExCeL Women’s Team bronze medal match, 3 a.m. Women’s Team gold medal match, 7:30 a.m. Team Handball Women At Copper Box Quarterfinal, Brazil vs. Norway, 2 a.m. Quarterfinal, Spain vs. Croatia, 5:30 a.m. Quarterfinal, Russia vs. South Korea, 9 a.m. Quarterfinal, France vs. Montenegro, 12:30 p.m. Triathlon At Hyde Park Men’s race, 3:30 a.m. Volleyball Women At Earls Court Quarterfinal, Japan vs. China, 5 a.m. Quarterfinal, Russia vs. Brazil, 7 a.m. Quarterfinal, United States vs. Dominican Republic, 11 a.m. Quarterfinal, Italy vs. South Korea, 1 p.m. Water Polo Women At Olympic Park-Water Polo Arena Classification match 5th-8th places Italy vs. China, 6:10 a.m. Russia vs. Britain, 10:20 a.m. Semifinals United States vs. Australia, 7:30 a.m. Hungary vs. Spain, 11:40 a.m. Weightlifting At ExCeL Men’s +105kg group B, 7:30 a.m. Men’s +105kg group A (medal), 11 a.m. Wrestling (Greco-Roman) At ExCeL Men’s 66kg and 96kg qualifications, 1/8 finals, quarterfinals, semifinals, 5 a.m. Men’s 66kg and 96kg repechage rounds, bronze and gold medal contests, 9:45 a.m. Wednesday, Aug. 8 Athletics At Olympic Stadium Men’s 5000 round 1, Pole Vault qualifying, Decathlon: 100, long jump, shot put; Women’s 800 round 1, Hammer qualifying, 2 a.m. Men’s 110 Hurdles semifinals and final, 200 semifinals, Javelin qualifying, Decathlon: high jump, 400; Women’s 200 final, 400 Hurdles final, 1500 semifinals, Long Jump final, 10 a.m. Basketball At North Greenwich Arena Men Quarterfinal. Russia vs. Lithuania, 6 a.m. Quarterfinal, France vs. Spain, 8:15 a.m. Quarterfinal, Brazil vs. Argentina, noon Quarterfinal, United States vs. Australia, 2:15 p.m.

any one of the competition’s 10 disciplines. “It’s not going to go perfect,” Marra said. “Multi-event kids want to be great at everything. But you can’t be great all the time. If you fail and you get down in the dumps, you won’t be successful at multi-events. You’ve got to fight.” Eaton said that interaction with the other athletes is what sets the decathlon apart from other track and field events. He said he is always trying to “use” another decathlete’s performance to better his own. “In the decathlon, you can beat someone in the long jump but you know they will beat you in the shot put,” Eaton said before the Games. “You think, ‘I must beat them by this much more on the long jump to offset how much they might beat me in the shot put.’ “It’s just so weird, you’re always ‘using’ someone. Using them so you can beat yourself. Because when you win against yourself, you win against everyone else.” With his world record nearly 500 points better than any other decathlete’s best mark this year, chances are that Eaton will be competing against himself more than against any other decathlete in London. But Metcalf is not expecting another world record from Eaton. “Typically, world records don’t happen at the Olympics,” said Metcalf, who remains a

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Beach Volleyball At Horse Guards Parade Women’s bronze and gold medal matches, 11 a.m. Boxing At ExCeL Women’s Flyweight (51kg); Women’s Lightweight (60kg) and Women’s Middleweight (75kg) semifinals, 5:30 a.m. Men’s Light Flyweight (49kg); Men’s Light Welterweight (64kg) and Men’s Light Heavyweight (81kg) quarterfinals, 12:30 p.m. Canoe (Sprint) At Eton Dorney, Buckinghamshire Men’s Canoe Single 1000 final; Men’s Kayak Single 1000 final; Men’s Kayak Double 1000 final; Women’s Kayak Four 500 final, 1:30 a.m. Cycling (BMX) At BMX Olympic Park Men’s and Women’s seeding phase runs, 7 a.m. Diving At Olympic Park-Aquatics Centre Women’s 10-Meter Platform Prelims, noon Equestrian (Jumping) At Greenwich Park Individual Jumping: final rounds, (medal), 4 a.m. Field Hockey Women At Olympic Park-Hockey Centre Classification (9th-10th places), Japan vs. South Africa, 12:30 a.m. Classification (7th-8th places), South Korea vs. Germany, 3:30 a.m. Semifinal, Netherlands vs. New Zealand, 7:30 a.m. Semifinal, Argentina vs. Britain, noon Sailing At Weymouth and Portland, Dorset Men’s 49er (medal race); Women’s Elliott 6m, 4 a.m. Table Tennis At ExCeL Men’s Team bronze medal match, 3 a.m. Men’s Team gold medal match, 7:30 a.m. Taekwondo At ExCeL Men’s -58kg and Women’s -49kg preliminary round of 16, 1 a.m. Men’s -58kg and Women’s -49kg quarterfinals, semifinals, 7 a.m. Men’s -58kg and Women’s -49kg repechages, bronze medal contests, gold medal, noon Team Handball Men At Copper Box Quarterfinal, 3 a.m. Quarterfinal, 6:30 a.m. Quarterfinal, 10 a.m. Quarterfinal, 1:30 p.m. Volleyball Men At Earls Court Quarterfinal, 6 a.m. Quarterfinal, 8 a.m. Quarterfinal, 11:30 a.m. Quarterfinal, 1:30 p.m. Water Polo Men At Olympic Park-Water Polo Arena Quarterfinal, 6:30 a.m. Quarterfinal, 7:50 a.m. Quarterfinal, 10:40 a.m. Quarterfinal, noon Wrestling (Freestyle) At ExCeL Women’s 48kg and 63kg qualifications, 1/8 finals, quarterfinals, semifinals, 5 a.m. Women’s 48kg and 63kg repechage rounds, bronze and gold medal contests, 9:45 a.m.

mentor and friend to Eaton. “He knows that historically that’s not the way it works — but he is absolutely set on winning the gold.” At the Thorpe Cup in Germany in late July, a final tuneup for the Olympics, Eaton set a personal best in the javelin, throwing it more than 200 feet. He also notched a season best in the shot put with a heave of more than 48 feet. Eaton’s fiancee, Brianne Theisen — who finished 11th in the Olympic heptathlon for her native Canada on Saturday — said she fully expects her longtime boyfriend to get the gold after his learning experience at the 2011 world championships. “Last year in Daegu was Ashton’s first big meet with a massive target on his back,” Theisen said before the Olympics. “He had the best score going in and I think a lot of people expected him to win that gold medal. He struggled with a few events, and learned a good lesson last summer. I KNOW that Ashton will never let that happen to him again. If he keeps his head up and uses the pressure he’s going to feel to his advantage, no one is going to be able to touch him. “I think he’ll be coming home to the United States with that Olympic gold medal, because Ashton doesn’t make the same mistake twice.” — Reporter: 541-383-0318, mmorical@bendbulletin.com

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C6

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, AUGUST 7, 2012

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL Seattle Ackley 2b M.Saunders cf J.Montero dh Jaso c Seager 3b Carp 1b C.Wells lf Thames rf Kawasaki ss Totals

AB 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 33

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1

H 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 2 7

BI 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1

BB 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

Howard 1b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .198 Mayberry cf 4 1 1 1 0 0 .238 Schierholtz rf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .253 Frandsen 3b 3 0 2 0 1 0 .310 Schneider c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .219 Worley p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .094 Valdes p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Pierre ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .313 Rosenberg p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Horst p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Wigginton ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .231 Schwimer p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 32 1 7 1 1 0 Atlanta 003 100 101 — 6 11 0 Philadelphia 000 100 000 — 1 7 1 a-lined out for Valdes in the 5th. b-grounded out for Horst in the 7th. E—Howard (4). LOB—Atlanta 8, Philadelphia 6. 2B—F.Freeman (26), Uggla (20), J.Francisco (8), Janish (4), Utley (4), Schierholtz (5). HR—Heyward (18), off Schwimer; Mayberry (9), off Sheets. DP—Atlanta 2.

TWINS ROUT INDIANS

AL Boxscores Orioles 3, Mariners 1 SO 1 1 1 1 2 1 0 0 0 7

Avg. .224 .255 .259 .282 .246 .218 .236 .241 .200

Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Markakis rf 4 1 2 2 0 0 .287 Andino 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .229 Hardy ss 4 0 1 0 0 0 .227 Ad.Jones cf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .291 Wieters c 4 0 0 0 0 0 .240 C.Davis dh 3 0 0 0 0 1 .262 Ford lf 3 1 1 0 0 0 .143 McLouth lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .400 Mar.Reynolds 1b 3 1 3 1 0 0 .212 Quintanilla 2b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .286 Totals 32 3 8 3 0 2 Seattle 000 000 010 — 1 7 0 Baltimore 030 000 00x — 3 8 1 E—Quintanilla (3). LOB—Seattle 7, Baltimore 5. 2B—Thames (9), Hardy (19), Ad.Jones (26), Mar. Reynolds 2 (20). HR—Markakis (11), off Vargas. Seattle IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Vargas L, 12-8 8 8 3 3 0 2 105 3.69 Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Tillman W, 5-1 7 1-3 5 1 1 1 5 99 2.38 Strop H, 18 2-3 0 0 0 1 1 13 1.29 Johnson S, 33-36 1 2 0 0 0 1 13 3.40 T—2:24. A—21,184 (45,971).

White Sox 4, Royals 2 Kansas City A.Gordon lf A.Escobar ss L.Cain cf Butler dh S.Perez c Francoeur rf Hosmer 1b T.Abreu 3b Getz 2b Totals

AB 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 3 34

R 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 2

H 1 1 0 1 1 2 0 1 2 9

BI 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 2

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 1 1 2 1 0 0 1 0 1 7

Avg. .291 .300 .284 .300 .319 .241 .231 .333 .288

Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Jor.Danks cf 3 1 1 0 1 0 .308 Youkilis 3b 4 0 1 1 0 0 .245 A.Dunn dh 4 0 0 0 0 3 .205 Konerko 1b 4 1 1 1 0 0 .319 Rios rf 3 1 1 0 0 0 .316 Pierzynski c 3 0 2 1 0 0 .293 Al.Ramirez ss 2 0 0 0 0 0 .267 Viciedo lf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .248 Beckham 2b 3 1 1 1 0 1 .228 Totals 29 4 7 4 1 6 Kansas City 000 010 100 — 2 9 0 Chicago 010 000 12x — 4 7 1 E—Al.Ramirez (10). LOB—Kansas City 5, Chicago 3. 2B—T.Abreu (1), Youkilis (12), Pierzynski (12). 3B—Rios (6). HR—Francoeur (11), off Sale; Butler (21), off Sale; Konerko (18), off Mendoza; Beckham (10), off Mendoza. DP—Kansas City 2; Chicago 3. Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Mendoza L, 5-8 7 1-3 7 4 4 1 5 103 4.36 Collins 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 12 3.09 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Sale W, 13-3 8 8 2 2 0 7 100 2.59 A.Reed S, 20-23 1 1 0 0 0 0 8 3.83 Inherited runners-scored—Collins 1-0. HBP—by Mendoza (Al.Ramirez). WP—Collins. T—2:17. A—30,097 (40,615).

Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP Sheets W, 4-1 7 1-3 7 1 1 1 0 92 O’Flaherty 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 6 C.Martinez 1 0 0 0 0 0 12 Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP Worley L, 6-7 3 2-3 6 4 4 3 2 74 Valdes 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 3 20 Rosenberg 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 1 22 Horst 2-3 3 1 1 0 0 14 Schwimer 2 1 1 1 0 2 20 T—2:37. A—41,665 (43,651).

Pirates 4, Diamondbacks 0 Tony Dejak / The Associated Press

Minnesota Twins’ Ben Revere (11) congratulates Justin Morneau (33) after Morneau hit a tworun home run off Cleveland Indians pitcher Josh Tomlin in the fourth inning of Monday’s game in Cleveland. The Twins scored 10 runs in the second inning en route to a 14-3 victory.

STANDINGS, SCORES AND SCHEDULES American League New York Baltimore Tampa Bay Boston Toronto

W 63 58 56 55 53

L 45 51 52 55 55

Chicago Detroit Cleveland Minnesota Kansas City

W 60 59 50 48 45

L 48 50 59 61 63

Texas Los Angeles Oakland Seattle

W 63 59 58 51

L 45 51 51 60

East Division Pct GB WCGB .583 — — .532 5½ ½ .519 7 2 .500 9 4 .491 10 5 Central Division Pct GB WCGB .556 — — .541 1½ — .459 10½ 8½ .440 12½ 10½ .417 15 13 West Division Pct GB WCGB .583 — — .536 5 — .532 5½ ½ .459 13½ 8½

Monday’s Games Minnesota 14, Cleveland 3 Detroit 7, N.Y. Yankees 2 Baltimore 3, Seattle 1 Boston 9, Texas 2 Chicago White Sox 4, Kansas City 2 L.A. Angels 4, Oakland 0

Twins 14, Indians 3 Minnesota Span cf Revere rf Mauer dh Willingham lf Mastroianni lf Morneau 1b Doumit c a-Butera ph-c Nishioka 2b Dozier ss J.Carroll 3b Totals

AB 6 5 5 4 0 5 4 1 5 3 3 41

R 2 3 1 2 0 3 2 0 0 0 1 14

H 1 4 3 1 0 3 2 0 0 0 0 14

BI 0 1 3 2 0 4 3 0 0 0 0 13

BB 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 5

SO 0 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 6

Avg. .286 .331 .321 .263 .271 .275 .290 .215 .000 .234 .245

Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Kipnis 2b 4 2 1 0 0 1 .262 As.Cabrera ss 3 0 1 0 0 1 .278 Lillibridge lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .175 Choo rf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .288 C.Santana 1b 3 1 1 2 1 0 .237 Brantley cf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .293 Hannahan ss 1 0 0 0 0 0 .233 Duncan dh 4 0 1 0 0 0 .222 Jo.Lopez 3b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .249 Marson c 3 0 0 0 1 1 .250 Carrera lf-cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .438 Totals 34 3 8 2 2 4 Minnesota 0(10)0 201 010 — 14 14 3 Cleveland 100 002 000 — 3 8 1 a-grounded out for Doumit in the 9th. E—J.Carroll (7), Nishioka 2 (2), Kipnis (4). LOB—Minnesota 5, Cleveland 6. 2B—Mauer 2 (23), Doumit (22), Brantley (33). HR—Willingham (29), off McAllister; Morneau (14), off McAllister; Doumit (12), off Tomlin; Morneau (15), off Tomlin; C.Santana (12), off Diamond. DP—Minnesota 4; Cleveland 1. Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Diamond W, 10-5 7 7 3 2 1 3 100 2.91 Gray 1 0 0 0 1 1 16 5.32 Perdomo 1 1 0 0 0 0 14 3.38 Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA McAllister L, 4-4 1 2-3 6 9 2 2 3 62 3.60 Tomlin 3 1-3 3 3 3 0 1 51 5.82 Sipp 1 2 1 1 0 1 21 4.97 C.Allen 1 0 0 0 1 1 23 0.00 E.Rogers 1 3 1 1 0 0 13 2.86 J.Smith 1 0 0 0 2 0 28 3.11 T—3:01. A—18,775 (43,429).

Red Sox 9, Rangers 2 Texas Kinsler 2b Mi.Young ss Hamilton cf Beltre 3b N.Cruz rf Dav.Murphy lf Napoli c Soto dh Moreland 1b Totals

AB 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 2 3 32

R 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 2

H 0 1 1 1 3 1 0 0 1 8

BI 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 2

BB 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 3

SO 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 1 0 4

Avg. .279 .271 .281 .310 .261 .300 .226 .200 .282

Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Ellsbury cf 5 3 3 1 0 1 .274 C.Crawford lf 4 2 2 3 0 1 .292 Pedroia 2b 4 1 3 1 1 0 .267 1-Ciriaco pr-2b 0 1 0 0 0 0 .338 Ad.Gonzalez 1b 5 0 3 3 0 1 .307 Punto 1b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .204 C.Ross dh 4 0 1 1 0 2 .268 Saltalamacchia c 4 0 0 0 1 3 .227 Middlebrooks 3b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .289 Kalish rf 3 1 1 0 1 1 .213 Aviles ss 3 1 1 0 1 0 .258 Totals 35 9 14 9 5 10 Texas 010 000 001 — 2 8 0 Boston 002 300 13x — 9 14 0 1-ran for Pedroia in the 8th. LOB—Texas 6, Boston 9. 2B—Mi.Young (18), N.Cruz 2 (29), Ellsbury 2 (10), C.Crawford 2 (4), Pedroia 3 (22), Ad.Gonzalez (30). HR—Beltre (19), off Tazawa. SB—Pedroia (8), Kalish (3). DP—Boston 2. Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Darvish L, 11-8 6 2-3 11 6 6 4 9 123 4.57 Kirkman 2-3 3 3 3 1 1 27 5.59 Scheppers 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 8 5.12 Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA A.Cook W, 3-5 7 6 1 1 3 2 98 4.70 Tazawa 2 2 1 1 0 2 23 1.42 T—2:47. A—37,316 (37,495).

Tigers 7, Yankees 2 New York Granderson cf Jeter ss Cano 2b Teixeira 1b Ibanez lf Swisher rf

AB 5 5 4 4 3 4

R 1 0 0 0 0 0

H 0 2 2 0 0 0

BI 0 1 1 0 0 0

BB 0 0 0 0 1 0

SO 3 0 0 3 1 2

Avg. .243 .315 .316 .253 .243 .255

ERA 1.41 2.50 3.70 ERA 3.83 3.57 9.53 1.50 3.64

L10 4-6 6-4 5-5 6-4 4-6

National League Str Home Away L-1 34-22 29-23 W-3 26-26 32-25 L-2 29-27 27-25 W-2 29-32 26-23 W-2 28-23 25-32

L10 Str Home Away 7-3 W-2 30-23 30-25 6-4 W-5 32-21 27-29 0-10 L-10 27-26 23-33 7-3 W-1 23-32 25-29 4-6 L-1 21-32 24-31 L10 5-5 4-6 4-6 7-3

Str Home Away L-2 34-21 29-24 W-1 30-22 29-29 L-3 32-26 26-25 L-2 25-29 26-31

Today’s Games Minnesota (Deduno 3-0) at Cleveland (Kluber 0-0), 4:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (P.Hughes 11-8) at Detroit (Porcello 8-6), 4:05 p.m. Seattle (Beavan 7-6) at Baltimore (Britton 1-1), 4:05 p.m. Texas (Dempster 0-0) at Boston (Lester 5-9), 4:10 p.m. Toronto (Happ 0-0) at Tampa Bay (Shields 9-7), 4:10 p.m. Kansas City (B.Chen 7-9) at Chicago White Sox (Peavy 9-7), 5:10 p.m. L.A. Angels (C.Wilson 9-7) at Oakland (B.Colon 8-8), 7:05 p.m.

Washington Atlanta New York Miami Philadelphia

W 66 63 53 49 49

L 43 46 56 60 60

Cincinnati Pittsburgh St. Louis Milwaukee Chicago Houston

W 66 62 60 49 43 36

L 43 46 49 59 64 74

San Francisco Los Angeles Arizona San Diego Colorado

W 59 59 55 47 39

L 50 51 54 64 68

East Division Pct GB WCGB .606 — — .578 3 — .486 13 9½ .450 17 13½ .450 17 13½ Central Division Pct GB WCGB .606 — — .574 3½ — .550 6 2½ .454 16½ 13 .402 22 18½ .327 30½ 27 West Division Pct GB WCGB .541 — — .536 ½ 4 .505 4 7½ .423 13 16½ .364 19 22½

Monday’s Games Pittsburgh 4, Arizona 0 Atlanta 6, Philadelphia 1 Washington 5, Houston 4, 11 innings Milwaukee 6, Cincinnati 3 St. Louis 8, San Francisco 2 San Diego 2, Chicago Cubs 0 Colorado 2, L.A. Dodgers 0

L10 7-3 8-2 5-5 4-6 4-6

Str Home Away W-3 32-22 34-21 W-2 32-26 31-20 L-1 26-26 27-30 L-2 27-27 22-33 L-1 23-31 26-29

L10 7-3 6-4 7-3 5-5 3-7 2-8

Str Home Away L-2 36-20 30-23 W-2 34-16 28-30 W-4 33-21 27-28 W-1 31-26 18-33 L-6 27-24 16-40 L-2 25-28 11-46

L10 4-6 6-4 6-4 4-6 2-8

Str Home Away L-1 32-23 27-27 L-1 32-24 27-27 L-3 30-24 25-30 W-2 25-30 22-34 W-1 21-37 18-31

Today’s Games Arizona (Corbin 3-4) at Pittsburgh (Karstens 4-2), 4:05 p.m. Atlanta (Minor 6-7) at Philadelphia (Hamels 11-6), 4:05 p.m. Miami (LeBlanc 1-1) at N.Y. Mets (Niese 8-5), 4:10 p.m. Washington (Detwiler 6-4) at Houston (Lyles 2-8), 5:05 p.m. Cincinnati (Cueto 14-5) at Milwaukee (Fiers 5-4), 5:10 p.m. San Francisco (Zito 8-8) at St. Louis (Lynn 13-4), 5:15 p.m. Chicago Cubs (Raley 0-0) at San Diego (Ohlendorf 3-2), 7:05 p.m. Colorado (White 2-6) at L.A. Dodgers (Harang 7-6), 7:10 p.m.

American League roundup

National League roundup

• Tigers 7, Yankees 2: DETROIT — Justin Verlander matched a career high with 14 strikeouts and got home-run support from Prince Fielder and Miguel Cabrera, leading Detroit over the New York Yankees. Verlander (12-7) threw 132 pitches, his most in a regular-season game, and sent the Tigers to their fifth straight win. • Twins 14, Indians 3: CLEVELAND — Justin Morneau homered twice and drove in four runs, Joe Mauer had three RBIs and Ryan Doumit hit a threerun homer and Minnesota handed Cleveland its 10th straight loss. Ben Revere had four of the Twins’ 14 hits and extended his hitting streak to 20 games while Josh Willingham hit his 29th homer, matching his career-high. • Orioles 3, Mariners 1: BALTIMORE — Chris Tillman took a three-hit shutout into the eighth inning to extend a run of successful starts by Baltimore pitchers, and the Orioles beat Jason Vargas and the Mariners. Nick Markakis homered and Mark Reynolds had three hits and an RBI for the Orioles, who have won six of eight to improve to 58-51. • White Sox 4, Royals 2: CHICAGO — Paul Konerko and Gordon Beckham homered late, Chris Sale pitched eight solid innings and the Chicago White Sox beat Kansas City. Konerko tied it leading off the seventh and Beckham gave the White Sox a 3-2 lead with a solo shot in the eighth off Luis Mendoza (5-8). • Red Sox 9, Rangers 2: BOSTON — Dustin Pedroia had three of Boston’s eight doubles, Aaron Cook pitched seven solid innings and the Red Sox beat Texas. Jacoby Ellsbury and Carl Crawford each doubled twice and Adrian Gonzalez once as the Red Sox increased their major league high to 248 doubles. • Angels 4, Athletics 0: OAKLAND, Calif. — Jered Weaver pitched a four-hitter for his major-league leading 15th victory, and the Los Angeles Angels beat Oakland to overtake the final spot in the crowded AL wild card standings.

• Pirates 4, Diamondbacks 0: PITTSBURGH — Erik Bedard allowed two hits over seven innings and Pittsburgh opened a season-long 11-game homestand with a win over Arizona. Bedard did not walk a batter and faced just one over the minimum, striking out five. • Brewers 6, Reds 3: MILWAUKEE — Yovani Gallardo pitched seven innings, and Martin Maldonado homered and drove in three runs to help Milwaukee beat Cincinnati. • Cardinals 8, Giants 2: ST. LOUIS — Jake Westbrook threw six solid innings and Carlos Beltran hit his 26th home run as St. Louis beat Matt Cain and San Francisco. • Braves 6, Phillies 1: PHILADELPHIA — Ben Sheets pitched into the eighth inning and Jason Heyward homered to lead streaking Atlanta over Philadelphia. • Padres 2, Cubs 0: SAN DIEGO — Eric Stults and four relievers combined on a five-hitter, leading San Diego to a win over the slumping Chicago Cubs. Stults (2-2) allowed five hits as he pitched 5 1⁄3 innings in his first start since June 3. He struck out five, walked two and had a wild pitch. • Nationals 5, Astros 4: HOUSTON — Roger Bernadina scored when Houston made two errors on the same play in the 11th inning and Washington picked up its third straight win. Ryan Zimmerman had two hits and two RBIs, and Michael Morse added two hits for Washington. • Rockies 2, Dodgers 0: LOS ANGELES — Adam Ottavino gave up one hit in three innings of relief, a single that was the result of a reversed call, and Colorado beat the Los Angeles Dodgers. Carlos Gonzalez had a sacrifice fly in the first inning and rookie Jordan Pacheco added an RBI single in the third for the Rockies, who prevented the Dodgers from overtaking NL West-leading San Francisco following the Giants’ loss at St. Louis.

Er.Chavez 3b I.Suzuki dh R.Martin c Totals

4 4 4 37

1 3 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 3 0 1 0 0 1 2 8 2 1 14

.275 .259 .193

Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg. A.Jackson cf 4 0 1 1 0 0 .322 Dirks lf-rf 3 0 1 1 0 1 .333 Mi.Cabrera 3b 4 1 1 1 0 1 .324 R.Santiago 2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .216 Fielder 1b 3 1 2 1 0 0 .313 Boesch rf 3 1 1 0 0 1 .249 Berry lf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .283 D.Young dh 3 1 2 0 1 1 .265 Avila c 4 1 2 1 0 2 .250 Jh.Peralta ss 4 1 2 1 0 0 .264 Infante 2b-3b 3 1 1 1 0 0 .293 Totals 32 7 13 7 1 7 New York 000 020 000 — 2 8 0 Detroit 010 132 00x — 7 13 2 E—Mi.Cabrera (10), Verlander (3). LOB—New York 9, Detroit 4. 2B—Er.Chavez 2 (10). HR—Fielder (19), off Nova; Mi.Cabrera (28), off Nova. SB—Cano (2). DP—New York 3. New York Nova L, 10-6 Chamberlain Phelps Detroit Verlander W, 12-7 Valverde

IP 5 1-3 1 2-3 1 IP 8 1

H 11 2 0 H 8 0

R 7 0 0 R 2 0

ER BB SO NP ERA 7 0 5 68 4.81 0 0 1 26 5.40 0 1 1 11 2.45 ER BB SO NP ERA 0 1 14 132 2.51 0 0 0 18 3.63

T—2:42. A—41,381 (41,255).

DP—Los Angeles 1; Oakland 1.

Angels 4, Athletics 0 Los Angeles Trout cf-lf Tor.Hunter rf Pujols 1b Trumbo lf Bourjos cf K.Morales dh Callaspo 3b H.Kendrick 2b Aybar ss Iannetta c Totals

AB 3 5 3 4 1 4 3 4 4 4 35

R 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 1 4

H 2 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 3 2 10

BI 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 4

BB 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 3

SO 0 3 0 3 1 1 0 1 0 0 9

Avg. .348 .292 .287 .290 .228 .278 .250 .280 .263 .209

Oakland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Crisp cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .247 J.Weeks 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .217 Reddick rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .258 Carter 1b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .241 Moss lf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .233 J.Gomes dh 3 0 0 0 0 2 .253 Inge 3b 3 0 2 0 0 1 .216 D.Norris c 3 0 1 0 0 2 .204 Sogard ss 3 0 0 0 0 0 .167 Totals 30 0 4 0 0 9 Los Angeles 020 000 200 — 4 10 0 Oakland 000 000 000 — 0 4 0 LOB—Los Angeles 9, Oakland 3. 2B—K.Morales (13), Inge (13).SB—Trout 3 (36), Callaspo (1).

Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Weaver W, 15-1 9 4 0 0 0 9 117 2.13 Oakland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA J.Parker L, 7-6 6 2-3 9 4 4 1 6 98 3.55 Neshek 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 7 0.00 Figueroa 2 1 0 0 2 2 30 1.20 T—2:33. A—13,341 (35,067).

NL Boxscores Braves 6, Phillies 1 Atlanta Bourn cf Prado lf Heyward rf F.Freeman 1b McCann c Uggla 2b J.Francisco 3b Janish ss Sheets p O’Flaherty p C.Martinez p Totals

AB 4 5 5 5 4 4 3 4 2 0 0 36

R 1 1 2 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 6

H 1 1 2 1 2 2 1 1 0 0 0 11

BI 1 0 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

BB 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 3

SO 0 0 2 0 1 1 0 2 2 0 0 8

Avg. .286 .299 .272 .281 .240 .212 .259 .203 .000 --.000

Philadelphia Rollins ss D.Brown lf Utley 2b

AB 4 3 4

R 0 0 0

H 1 1 1

BI 0 0 0

BB 0 0 0

SO 0 0 0

Avg. .245 .286 .264

Arizona Bloomquist ss A.Hill 2b Kubel lf Goldschmidt 1b J.Upton rf M.Montero c C.Johnson 3b C.Young cf Miley p Albers p Ziegler p Zagurski p b-G.Parra ph Totals

AB 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 0 0 0 1 28

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

BI 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 1 0 1 0 0 2 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 7

Avg. .296 .297 .281 .304 .275 .280 .282 .213 .250 --.333 --.279

Pittsburgh AB R H BI BB SO Avg. S.Marte lf 3 0 1 0 1 1 .244 J.Harrison 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .245 A.McCutchen cf 4 2 2 0 0 0 .369 G.Sanchez 1b 4 1 2 1 0 0 .209 Walker 2b 4 1 1 1 0 1 .292 G.Jones rf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .271 Snider rf 1 0 1 1 0 0 .250 Barajas c 3 0 1 1 0 0 .204 Barmes ss 3 0 1 0 0 0 .211 Bedard p 2 0 1 0 0 0 .097 a-Presley ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .235 Grilli p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Qualls p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 31 4 10 4 2 3 Arizona 000 000 000 — 0 2 3 Pittsburgh 000 100 03x — 4 10 0 a-walked for Bedard in the 7th. b-grounded out for Zagurski in the 9th. E—Bloomquist (6), C.Young (1), C.Johnson (15). LOB—Arizona 1, Pittsburgh 7. 2B—Goldschmidt (31), Barmes (12). DP—Arizona 2. Arizona IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Miley L, 12-7 6 6 1 0 1 2 112 2.85 Albers 1 0 0 0 1 0 9 0.00 Ziegler 1-3 2 2 2 0 1 7 2.74 Zagurski 2-3 2 1 1 0 0 16 5.13 Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Bedard W, 6-12 7 2 0 0 0 5 84 4.53 Grilli H, 26 1 0 0 0 0 1 8 1.77 Qualls 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 4.32 T—2:33. A—24,213 (38,362).

Brewers 6, Reds 3 Cincinnati Cozart ss Stubbs cf B.Phillips 2b Bruce rf Ludwick lf Rolen 3b Frazier 1b Hanigan c LeCure p a-Paul ph Arredondo p Arroyo p D.Navarro c Totals

AB 5 5 5 5 4 2 3 2 0 1 0 2 1 35

R 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

H 2 1 0 1 1 2 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 9

BI 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 3

BB 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 4

SO 0 2 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 5

Avg. .247 .238 .292 .250 .261 .244 .268 .270 .000 .381 --.150 .000

Milwaukee AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Aoki rf 4 0 2 0 0 0 .284 C.Gomez cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .253 Braun lf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .307 Ar.Ramirez 3b 4 1 2 1 0 0 .293 Hart 1b 4 1 2 1 0 0 .272 R.Weeks 2b 4 2 2 0 0 2 .213 M.Maldonado c 4 2 3 3 0 1 .286 Segura ss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .000 Gallardo p 3 0 1 1 0 2 .125 Fr.Rodriguez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Axford p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 35 6 12 6 0 7 Cincinnati 000 000 120 — 3 9 0 Milwaukee 000 014 01x — 6 12 0 a-singled for LeCure in the 8th. LOB—Cincinnati 10, Milwaukee 5. 2B—Ludwick (20), Rolen (10), Ar.Ramirez (37), M.Maldonado 2 (6). HR—Cozart (12), off Gallardo; Ar.Ramirez (14), off Arroyo; Hart (21), off Arroyo; M.Maldonado (6), off Arroyo. SB—Stubbs (25). DP—Cincinnati 1. Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Arroyo L, 7-7 5 1-3 10 5 5 0 5 76 4.05 LeCure 1 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 14 3.12 Arredondo 1 2 1 0 0 1 21 2.60 Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gallardo W, 10-8 7 6 1 1 3 4 108 3.79 Fr.Rodriguez 1-3 2 2 2 1 0 24 5.48 Axford S, 18-25 1 2-3 1 0 0 0 1 29 5.21 T—2:54. A—31,319 (41,900).

Cardinals 8, Giants 2 San Francisco Pagan cf Theriot 2b Me.Cabrera lf Posey c Pence rf Scutaro 3b Belt 1b B.Crawford ss M.Cain p Kontos p b-G.Blanco ph Loux p Totals

AB 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 3 2 0 1 0 33

R 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

H 2 0 2 2 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 8

BI 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 0 1 1 1 2 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 8

Avg. .283 .264 .354 .329 .264 .275 .244 .229 .160 --.237 .000

St. Louis AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Descalso 2b 5 0 0 0 0 1 .245 Craig 1b 5 1 1 0 0 0 .293 Holliday lf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .323 Beltran rf 3 2 1 1 1 1 .286 Freese 3b 2 2 1 2 1 1 .312 Y.Molina c 3 1 1 0 1 1 .317 Jay cf 4 1 4 2 0 0 .296 Furcal ss 3 0 1 1 1 1 .267 Westbrook p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .154 a-M.Carpenter ph 1 0 1 2 0 0 .295 Mujica p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Salas p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 c-Schumaker ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .321 Fuentes p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 33 8 12 8 4 7 San Francisco 100 001 000 — 2 8 0 St. Louis 020 003 30x — 8 12 0 a-singled for Westbrook in the 6th. b-grounded into a fielder’s choice for Kontos in the 7th. c-singled for Salas in the 8th. LOB—San Francisco 4, St. Louis 6. 2B—Craig (21), Holliday (28). HR—Pagan (7), off Westbrook; Posey (17), off Westbrook; Beltran (26), off M.Cain. DP—San Francisco 1; St. Louis 1. San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA M.Cain L, 10-5 5 2-3 8 5 5 2 7 114 3.01 Kontos 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 1 2.38 Loux 2 4 3 3 2 0 37 5.66 St. Louis IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Westbrook W, 11-8 6 7 2 2 0 4 79 3.76 Mujica H, 16 1 1 0 0 0 1 9 3.98 Salas 1 0 0 0 0 1 8 4.76 Fuentes 1 0 0 0 0 2 13 2.25 T—2:36. A—38,652 (43,975).

Padres 2, Cubs 0 Chicago B.Jackson cf Barney 2b Rizzo 1b A.Soriano lf S.Castro ss W.Castillo c Vitters 3b Mather rf T.Wood p a-DeJesus ph Corpas p Marmol p Totals

AB 4 4 4 3 3 4 4 3 2 1 0 0 32

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H 0 1 0 1 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 5

BI 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

BB 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

SO 4 0 1 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 8

Avg. .250 .268 .301 .270 .275 .260 .000 .217 .222 .261 .000 ---

San Diego AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Denorfia rf-lf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .280 Forsythe 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .252 Gregerson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Venable rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .243 Headley 3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .271 Quentin lf 3 1 1 0 1 1 .267 Street p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Alonso 1b 4 1 1 1 0 0 .270 Maybin cf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .213 Ev.Cabrera ss 3 0 1 1 0 1 .238 E.Rodriguez c 2 0 0 0 1 2 .200 Stults p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .222 Brach p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Thayer p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Amarista ph-2b 1 0 1 0 0 0 .276 Totals 28 2 6 2 3 5 Chicago 000 000 000 — 0 5 0 San Diego 000 200 00x — 2 6 0 a-popped out for T.Wood in the 7th. b-doubled for Thayer in the 7th. LOB—Chicago 7, San Diego 6. 2B—Barney (22), Quentin (13), Maybin (13), Amarista (11). SB— A.Soriano (3), S.Castro (17). S—Stults. DP—Chicago 1. Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP T.Wood L, 4-8 6 5 2 2 3 3 96 Corpas 1 1 0 0 0 1 9 Marmol 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP Stults W, 2-2 5 1-3 5 0 0 2 5 79 Brach H, 5 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 9 Thayer H, 7 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 Gregerson H, 16 1 0 0 0 0 1 14 Street S, 19-19 1 0 0 0 0 1 8 T—2:25. A—27,187 (42,691).

ERA 4.77 3.76 4.72 ERA 2.72 3.80 3.69 2.66 0.79

Nationals 5, Astros 4 (11 innings) Washington Espinosa ss Harper cf-rf Zimmerman 3b Morse lf LaRoche 1b Stammen p Werth rf Bernadina cf K.Suzuki c Lombardozzi 2b E.Jackson p Gorzelanny p Mattheus p S.Burnett p Storen p d-T.Moore ph Clippard p Tracy 1b Totals

AB 6 4 4 5 5 0 4 1 5 5 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 43

R 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

H 2 0 2 2 1 0 2 1 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 14

BI 0 0 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

BB 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

SO 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

Avg. .241 .257 .280 .303 .277 .000 .298 .279 .250 .263 .211 .500 .000 ----.295 --.255

Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Altuve 2b 5 1 2 1 1 2 .299 Ma.Gonzalez ss 4 1 1 1 1 1 .262 Wallace 1b-3b 4 0 1 1 0 2 .306 W.Lopez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Maxwell rf-cf 4 1 1 0 1 2 .253 S.Moore 3b 2 0 0 0 0 1 .223 a-Pearce ph-1b 2 0 1 1 1 0 .333 J.D.Martinez lf 5 0 0 0 0 0 .237 Schafer cf 2 0 0 0 0 0 .216 b-B.Francisco ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .263 Fe.Rodriguez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --W.Wright p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 e-M.Downs ph-3b 2 0 0 0 0 1 .207 Corporan c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .293 1-Harrell pr 0 1 0 0 0 0 .190 C.Snyder c 1 0 0 0 0 1 .177 Keuchel p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .000 X.Cedeno p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Storey p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Bogusevic ph-rf 1 0 0 0 2 0 .211 Totals 38 4 6 4 6 12 Washington 000 130 000 01 — 5 14 0 Houston 100 002 001 00 — 4 6 3 a-singled for S.Moore in the 6th. b-grounded out for Schafer in the 7th. c-flied out for Storey in the 7th. d-was hit by a pitch for Storen in the 9th. e-struck out for W.Wright in the 9th. 1-ran for Corporan in the 9th. E—Pearce (1), Bogusevic (4), Wallace (1). LOB— Washington 8, Houston 9. 2B—Altuve (26). 3B— Maxwell (2). HR—Ma.Gonzalez (2), off E.Jackson. SB—Altuve (21), Ma.Gonzalez (3), Maxwell (4), Bogusevic (12). DP—Houston 2. Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA E.Jackson 5 1-3 2 2 2 2 8 106 3.56 Gorzelanny H, 8 2-3 2 1 1 0 0 8 3.48 Mattheus H, 9 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 2.85 S.Burnett H, 26 2-3 1 0 0 0 0 8 1.90 Storen H, 4 1-3 0 0 0 2 0 16 2.84 Clippard BS, 4-26 1 1 1 1 1 3 24 3.16 Stammen W, 5-1 2 0 0 0 1 1 33 2.32 Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Keuchel 6 12 4 3 1 2 105 5.60 X.Cedeno 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 9 4.20 Storey 1-3 0 0 0 1 1 11 0.00 Fe.Rodriguez 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 5.77 W.Wright 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 2.83 W.Lopez L, 3-1 2 2 1 0 0 2 25 2.36 T—4:15. A—13,843 (40,981).

Rockies 2, Dodgers 0 Colorado E.Young rf Fowler cf Pacheco 3b C.Gonzalez lf Ra.Hernandez c McBride 1b R.Betancourt p Nelson 2b J.Herrera ss D.Pomeranz p Ottavino p Belisle p c-Colvin ph-1b Totals

AB 5 4 4 2 4 4 0 4 4 2 1 0 1 35

R 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

H 3 1 2 0 1 0 0 1 2 1 0 0 0 11

BI 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

BB 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 0 1 9

Avg. .280 .290 .309 .326 .220 .300 --.256 .263 .267 .333 .000 .279

Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Victorino lf 4 0 2 0 1 0 .257 M.Ellis 2b 3 0 1 0 1 1 .257 Kemp cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .349 H.Ramirez ss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .243 J.Rivera 1b-rf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .252 League p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Choate p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --J.Wright p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Sands rf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .174 Sh.Tolleson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Ethier ph-rf 0 0 0 0 1 0 .287 L.Cruz 3b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .248 A.Ellis c 2 0 0 0 1 0 .285 Capuano p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .081 a-Loney ph-1b 2 0 0 0 0 0 .255 Totals 31 0 5 0 4 10 Colorado 101 000 000 — 2 11 1 Los Angeles 000 000 000 — 0 5 0 a-flied out for Capuano in the 7th. b-walked for Sh.Tolleson in the 8th. c-struck out for Belisle in the 9th. E—McBride (1). LOB—Colorado 8, Los Angeles 10. RBIs—Pacheco (26), C.Gonzalez (74). SF—C.Gonzalez. DP—Colorado 1; Los Angeles 2. Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP D.Pomeranz 4 3 0 0 3 7 84 Ottavino W, 3-1 3 1 0 0 0 2 46 Belisle H, 15 1 1 0 0 1 1 25 Betancrt S, 18-22 1 0 0 0 0 0 16 Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP Capuano L, 10-8 7 9 2 2 1 6 92 Sh.Tolleson 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 League 1-3 2 0 0 0 1 14 Choate 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 4 J.Wright 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 3 T—3:22. A—32,659 (56,000).

ERA 4.76 4.53 2.86 2.77 ERA 3.29 3.63 9.00 3.03 4.01


TUESDAY, AUGUST 7, 2012 • THE BULLETIN 94th

Par 4 Yards 396

PGA

CHAMPIONSHIP

AUG.

C7

9-12

1 2

A gentle start to the final major, though it features one of the most narrow fairways on the golf course, with a waste area to the right and thick dune grass on the left. A good drive will leave a short iron to a green tucked in a natural dune area. This should yield plenty of birdies.

4

3

The Ocean Course

9

Kiawah Island, S.C. 8 7

Total length: 7,676 yards Total par: 72

6 5

FRONT NINE N 10

BACK NINE

Clubhouse 11 12

Par 5 Yards 557

16 15

14 This will be another good scoring opportunity, depending on the wind. Players look out toward the rolling surf in the Atlantic from the tee box, even though it is the farthest point from the ocean on the course. Players will have to decide how much marsh to take on with their drive, but they should be able to get home in two. The elevated green is set between two sand ridges. Into the wind, however, this becomes a three-shot hole.

Par 4 Yards 390

18

17

13

Blowin’ in the wind Golf’s best will be looking to end the major tournament season with a strong finish at the PGA Championship on Kiawah Island in South Carolina. Wind will play a factor as Atlantic breezes and offshore gusts could make designer Pete Dye’s Ocean Course even more challenging.

Par 4 Yards 480 The fairway is framed by three wind-pruned live oak trees. Players should take aim at the center oak with a slight draw to eliminate problems from a waste area and a small pond to the left. The green is open at the front, but protected on both sides by more sand. The safe shot is center of his narrow, deep green.

Par 4 Yards 497 Par 4 Yards 447

The shortest par 4 can be deceptive. The tee essentially is a small island, and players drive over a marsh to what looks to be a wide fairway. To get the best angle, though, the tee shot should favor a plateau on the left side of the fairway. That allows the best view of the green, which is elevated similarly to the fairway plateau and framed by an old live oak that guards the approach. The green slopes off on all sides, with the marsh in play both long and left.

Par 5 Yards 579 Depending on the wind, players will have to decide whether to carry a natural dune area that creeps into the fairway from the right, or simply play left of it. The green should be reachable in two by most players, with a slightly elevated green that is open in the front.

Par 4 Yards 458 This is considered the toughest hole on the outward nine. The landing area for the tee shot is generous. Depending on the wind, the second shot to a large green can be played with nearly every club in the bag, from a hybrid to an 8-iron. Against the wind, players might choose to bail out left of the green and try to save par from an extended collar area.

Par 3 Yards 198 This par 3 gets more difficult the farther back the hole location is on the green. The elevated green is framed by tall live oaks just off the front left corner, and the green gets more narrow as it extends away from the players. Any shot missing long or right will likely find the sand. Expect to see players attack the flag in the front and play safe when it's in the back.

Par 3 Yards 188 The course turns back to the west at this point. With the Stono River Inlet and Folly Beach to their backs, players will hit to a green in the shape of an hourglass, running away from them diagonally to the right. A large waste area from tee-to-green ends with a steep face that cuts into the middle of the hourglass. The key is to find the right section of the green or face a long and difficult two-putt.

Par 4 Yards 494 This is more about length than direction with a long par 4 and a wide fairway that slopes down from the right. The green is open in the front, but a variety of collection areas and swales and waste areas to the left and right will make for a difficult up-and-down.

A tee shot down the left-center to the crest of the fairway sets up an approach to a green that is set below them in the dunes. Players will face a large waste area to the left front of the green, and a deeper, steep-faced waste area to the back.

The canal down the right side comes into play on the tee shots and continues all the way to the hole. Players must decide how far down the canal they can carry their tee shots. The approach to the green is open, though it is protected by two deep waste areas on the left.

Continued from C1 The 1991 Ryder Cup, known as the War by the Shore, went down to a last missed putt, drew top television ratings even on an NFL Sunday and earned for the Ocean Course a reputation as one of America’s most distinctive — and perhaps most difficult — courses. On Thursday, at the start of the 2012 PGA Championship, the world’s best golfers return to Dye’s devilish layout for the first time in 21 years. Although the course hosted the 2007 Senior PGA Championship and some World Cup play, this week’s PGA will be the first of golf’s majors to be contested on the renowned spit of land south of Charleston. Dye, now 86, has been refining the course for the past two years, softening some features near the vast and penal bunkers, while adding teeth — and length — in other spots. But much has not changed; the course is as isolated and fickle as ever, and the

First and second rounds Thursday-Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., TNT Third round Saturday, 8 to 11 a.m., TNT; 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. CBS Final round Sunday, 8 to 11 a.m., TNT; 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. CBS

Par 5 Yards 581 Players will have to carry the tee shot over a pond to reach a fairway with the higher shelf on the right side. A long, shallow waste bunker guards the second shot on the right, with a deeper waste bunker down the left side of a green that is perched high on a dune ridge. This should be an easy birdie opportunity when the wind is at the players' back.

Par 3 Yards 238

Par 5 Yards 593

Par 3 Yards 223

The course turns back to the east and plays directly along the beach, the start of five dramatic finishing holes. The green is elevated and very exposed to the wind, and any miss will leave a severe uphill chip to try to save par. A deep and dangerous waste area borders the left of the green. The back portion of the green is hidden from the tee, and the green slopes from front to back, making this hole play more difficult with the wind.

This likely will play as a three-shot hole except for when the wind is at the back. Off the tee, players should avoid deep waste areas down the right side of the fairway. Unless the big hitters can get home in two, it’s better to lay back from the green to avoid the large waste area left of the green. The elevated green is relatively flat, sitting atop a dune ridge and guarded by more waste area in the front. The risk might be too great if players can get there in two.

The target appears narrow, fiercely guarded by water short and to the right, with two deep waste areas to the left. The object is simply to find the green, which so many players couldn’t do on the final day of the 1991 Ryder Cup. If it’s a tight leaderboard on Sunday, this hole could create some separation.

Par 4 Yards 501

Par 4 Yards 412 Players go from the widest fairway to the most narrow approach. Long irons might be used off the tee to avoid a downhill lie for the second shot. The green is closely guarded on the right by a canal, with dunes and thick native grasses framing the left and rear. The green is open at the front, with a rolling collar area providing some room if the approach misses to the left. A new tee has been built at 300 yards as an option to play it as a drivable par 4.

Par 4 Yards 444 A straightforward hole, though the tee shot must find the fairway for an approach to a green that runs diagonally away to the right. Waste areas are left and back of this small green, which is set in a natural dune area.

SOURCE: PGA Championship

PGA

Television coverage (all times PDT)

With the Atlantic on the right, the best tee shot will hug the right side of the fairway. Longer hitters might get an advantage if they challenge the crest of the hill and reach the lower level of the fairway, giving them a shorter approach. The elevated green is open from the right and runs away to the back left. Into the wind, most players won’t be able to reach the lower level of the fairway and will face an approach over 200 yards to the narrow, protected green.

AP

ocean has not moved. It still closely borders most of the holes, bringing with it precarious seaside wind patterns. “It can never be like any other course,” Dye said last year while touring the course on foot. “It is the only course we built that walks and swims. It is of the land and of the water.” It was also one of the least popular golf courses to host a big event. Before the Ryder Cup, David Feherty, then a player and not a broadcaster, was asked if the course and its coastal location reminded him of something from Ireland or Scotland. “It’s like something from Mars,” he insisted instead. U.S. players who visited the course for practice rounds enjoyed it on fair days but hated it when the wind blew. Raymond Floyd went from hitting carefree 8-irons into some greens to 3-irons. On the par-3 17th hole, Hale Irwin hit 6-iron one day and 3-wood the next day. Visiting players were in a foul mood, especially when their

sponsor-paid courtesy cars got stuck in the makeshift parking lot, the tires of each car sinking until the fenders rested on the sand and mud. Even the U.S. victory in the 1991 Ryder Cup — assured when Germany’s Bernhard Langer failed to convert the final, curving 6-foot putt — did not change many opinions. In fact, more than 20 years has not changed the prevailing sentiment. The author Curt Sampson did extensive interviewing for his new book, “The War by the Shore,” which examines the drama and historical significance of the 1991 Ryder Cup. “Fans loved the Ocean Course, but I never heard a positive word about it from the pros,” Sampson said. “I think they all felt beat up by it.” But recreational golfers continue to flock to the Ocean Course, which is open to the public. Though it can cost as much as $343 to play, the course routinely hosts more than 40,000 rounds annually. The Ryder Cup put Kiawah Island on the map as a resort, and it has

become a premier destination. Even nongolfers come to gawk at the scenic, alluring and mysterious Ocean Course. Tourists, especially European ones, routinely want to see where Langer missed his putt. Unfortunately, it cannot be replicated. The 18th green has since been moved closer to the ocean. Movie buffs come to the Ocean Course, too. It was the setting for “The Legend of Bagger Vance,” starring Will Smith and Matt Damon. That the Ocean Course would find such renown was not plainly evident in 1989 when the project was started. “It was nothing but myrtles and ugly bushes,” Dye said. “The first time the PGA folks saw the land they almost threw up. But I saw the future the moment I got there.” Dye, who has hundreds of golf courses to his name, is fond of saying that he never designed a golf course. But he will talk about the ones he built, and so he does with the Ocean Course. In 1989, the Dyes moved to

Kiawah with their two young sons, both now golf architects. “I was told every single day that we would never get it ready in time for the Ryder Cup,” Dye said. But when it was over, people remembered the 1991 Ryder Cup for where it was held almost as much as for what happened there. The Ocean Course was immediately on Golf Digest’s list of top 100 courses, where it has remained. It still ranks in the top five public resorts in America. Tom Fazio, the celebrated U.S. golf architect, recalled watching the 1991 Ryder Cup on television and knowing what it would become. “It had a Pebble Beach quality,” Fazio said, “and yet it was new.” Dye thinks his masterpiece will again be the golf theater that serves as a backdrop for competitive thrills and high drama. “Sure, it’s grown up now,” he said, snickering. “New clubhouse, big practice range, roads and all the trimmings. It’s polished. But it’s still got its bite.”


C8

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, AUGUST 7, 2012

COM M U N I T Y SP ORTS

C S   C 

C OMMUNITY SPORTS SCOREBOARD

Please email Community Sports event information to sports@ bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� on our website at bendbulletin.com. Items are published on a spaceavailability basis, and should be submitted at least 10 days before the event.

BASEBALL PEE WEE T-BALL: Ages 3-5; Wednesdays, Aug. 8-22; 11 a.m.11:30 a.m.; RAPRD Activity Center, Redmond; work on throwing, catching, hitting ball off of tee and baserunning; no glove needed; $17; raprd.org; 541-548-7275.

BASKETBALL

Alex McDougall / The Bulletin

Diane Baumgartner, of Redmond, returns a shot during the first-ever Bend Pickleball Tournament on Sunday morning at Bend’s Juniper Park. At right is McMinnville’s Wes Gabrielsen, who teamed with Baumgartner to win the mixed doubles 5.0 division.

Pickleball Bend Pickleball Tournament Aug. 3-5, In Bend Men’s doubles 3.0 — Gold: Jerry Erickson, Salem, and Brian Joynt, Salem Men’s doubles 3.5 — Gold: Craig McCarraugh, Redmond, and Bruce Shafer, Bend. Silver: Brian Platz, Salem, and Bob VanderLinden, Albany. Bronze: Don Benson, Redmond, and Mel Hatton, Redmond. Men’s doubles 4.0 — Gold: Steve Franssen, Portland, and Tom Cruise, Salem. Silver: Craig Palermo, Reedsport, and Don Bangs, Reedsport. Bronze: Bob Anderson, Corvallis, and Wai Leung, Albany. Men’s doubles 4.5 — Gold: Brad Johnsen,

Washington, Utah. Bronze: Lance Thiede, Vancouver, Wash., and Paul Hoggatt, Surprise, Ariz. Bronze: Ed Obermeyer, South Beach, and Lee Moore, Bend. Men’s doubles 5.0 — Gold: Steve Paranto, Hillsboro, and Wes Gabrielsen, McMinnville. Silver, Brad Johnson, Washington, Utah, and Chandler Oliveira, Bend. Women’s doubles 2.5 — Gold: Anceli Gangan, Redmond, and Vicky Diegel, Redmond. Women’s doubles 3.0 — Gold: Janice Patchett, Bend, and Emily Wierenga, Bend. Bronze: Sherie Browning, Bend, and Carolyn Fournier, Bend. Women’s doubles 3.5 — Gold: Susie Dougan, Bend, and Karen Fellows, Sunriver. Silver: Jamie Filepeli, Bend, and Viki Perkett, Bend. Bronze: Edly Day, Bend, and Connie Emerson, Sheridan. Women’s doubles 4.0 — Gold: Lori Scott,

Bend, and Rhoda Zaph, Casa Grande, Ariz. Silver: Diane Baumgartner, Redmond, and Cathy Holly, Redmond. Bronze: Anne Reynolds, Bend, and Boomer Lambert, Powell Butte. Women’s doubles 4.5 — Gold: Caryn McComas, Eugene, and Libby Macklin, Blanchard, Idaho. Silver: Connie Anderson, Corvallis, and Lala Climenco, Beaverton. Women’s doubles 5.0 — Gold: Barb Schnecker, Bend, and Bryn Oliveira, Bend. Silver: Lisa Palcic, Sunriver, and Sabrina Fefferman, Bend. Bronze: Irene Fraties, Bend, and Linda Hoggatt, Surprise, Ariz. Mixed doubles 3.0 — Gold: Lynne Newbauer, Bend, and Al Burdi, Bend. Mixed doubles 3.5 — Gold: Morgan Lefeber, Pasco, Wash., and Arthur Galbreath, Pasco, Wash. Silver: Anne Reynolds, Bend, and Werner Zehnder,

Bend. Bronze: Karen Fellows, Sunriver, and Paul Hoggatt, Surprise, Ariz. Mixed doubles 4.0 — Gold: Terry Lavinge, Reedsport, and Don Bangs, Reedsport. Silver: Rhoda Zaph, Casa Grande, Ariz., and Peter McGannon, Casa Grande, Ariz. Bronze: Jamie Filepeli, Bend, and Wai Leung, Albany. Mixed doubles 4.5 — Gold: Caryn McComas, Eugene, and Ed Obermeyer, South Beach. Silver: Sasha Vervolet, Bend, and Brad Johnsen, Washington, Utah. Bronze: Constance Anderson, Corvallis, and Bob Anderson, Corvallis. Mixed doubles 5.0 — Gold: Diane Baumgartner, Redmond, and Wes Gabrielsen, McMinnville. Silver: Carol Tripp, Surprise, Ariz., and Mike Rains, Eloy, Ariz. Bronze: Barb Schnecker, Bend, and Marc Lechband, Bend.

Tennis Continued from C1 “I think a big part of it is just getting the maximum amount of kids with rackets in their hands, which is what we’re doing,� says Josh Cordell, the program director. Cordell knows a thing or two about the park district program. The 33-year-old Bend resident has directed the program for about six years. But way before that, he was one of those kids out learning the sport. When Cordell was in elementary school, he took lessons in the program from Collier. After that, he went on to play for Mountain View High School, and he has been the Summit High School boys team coach since the school opened in 2001. The Storm have won three Class 5A state championships and two individual and three doubles state titles under Cordell. But in the summer, Cordell — along with two assistant instructors and a corps of volunteers — gets to work with a much larger age range of players. Lessons are open to kids as young as 4 and are divided by age and ability level. For more-experienced players ages 10 to 17, a tournament training class is staged on Monday and Wednesday afternoons. When asked about the increase in enrollment, Cordell offered a couple of possible reasons: a consistent group of instructors from whom kids want to learn and an awareness of the success of local players at the high school level. Now, kids are participating in several classes per summer, Cordell said, instead of just one. “It’s a fun activity. It’s a safe place,� Cordell said of the program. “And we’re just going to have the best time we can, and if you like it, then we’re going to work hard and you’re going to get better at it. And it’s working out.� Not only is the tennis enjoyable, but it is designed to be affordable. The registration fee for morning classes is $40 per session for park district residents, $54 otherwise, while the cost for the tournament class — which spans four weeks instead of two — is $70 for park district residents, $95 otherwise. And to get started, the only equipment students need is a pair of shoes. “The only thing we really recommend is that they have court shoes so that they’re not rolling their ankles,� Collier advised. “But if the kids don’t have a racket, we have extra rackets that they can loan. We like to have the kids at some

• Locals shine at soap box derby: Two Central Oregon girls were among hundreds of contestants who competed recently in the 2012 All American Soap Box Derby in Akron, Ohio. Emma Lawson, 16, and Mikayla Sadler, 11, both of Sisters, qualified for the national event at the Salem Soap Box Derby Championships in June. As part of the reward for winning in Salem, the Salem Soap Box Derby Association covered the girls’ travel costs and paid for shipment of their race cars to Ohio for the July 21 event. Competing in the super stock division, Lawson lost in her first heat against two other girls and was eliminated. The super stock division included 117 racers, and 78 were eliminated in the first heat.

HIKING SILVER STRIDERS SCHEDULED HIKES: Geared toward those age 55 and older; Tuesday, Aug. 14, intermediate/advanced hike, Echo Basin, Willamette National Forest, meet in Sisters; Thursday, Aug. 18, easy hike, Three Creek Lake and Little Three Creek Lake trails, Sisters Ranger District, Deschutes National Forest, meet in Sisters: Saturday, Aug. 18, intermediate hike, Scar Mountain, Willamette National Forest, meet in Sisters: $20 for first hike, $25 otherwise; strideon@ silverstriders.com; 541-383-8077; silverstriders.com.

MISCELLANEOUS

Alex McDougall / The Bulletin

Tennis director Josh Cordell, left, leads a group of students in a cheer during a Bend Park & Recreation District summer tennis lesson last week.

Get on the court While the opportunity for summer tennis lessons through the Bend Park & Recreation District is dwindling this year, the park district will be staging a middle school tennis camp Aug. 20-23 for kids entering grades six through eight. The two-week program is designed to prepare students for the upcoming middle school tennis season, which is based out of the Bend middle schools but facilitated by the park district. The middle school season runs Tuesdays and Thursdays, Sept. 11 through Oct. 25. The park district also offers lessons for adults. Plenty of other Central Oregon organizations offer tennis programs, including the Redmond Area Park and Recreation District. Athletic Club of Bend, Black Butte Ranch, Crook County Parks and Recreation District, and Sunriver Resort.

point get their own racket if they want to keep playing, but we have plenty of rackets and balls and teaching supplies to run the program.� Cian Marderos is a park district tennis program veteran. After a fast-paced hour of running around on the tennis

courts and working on his game this past Wednesday, the 12-year-old Bend resident said that he started playing after moving to Central Oregon from California about eight years ago. He said he really liked it the first time he tried it, and that he has gotten better at hitting the ball. “I think it’s really fun, and I might do it in high school,� Cian said of tennis. Faith Schniepp, 13 and one of Cian’s classmates, is much newer to the sport. She had starting playing with her dad about a year ago, but last week was just her second week of organized tennis. She said she enjoyed playing “champion of the court,� a rapid-fire game in which players square off for a point, and the loser has to exit the court while the winner stays on to face a new challenger. “You actually feel like you’re playing a real game and running around,� Faith observed. Which, if she keeps it up, is something she could be doing for a long time. “Tennis is one of those unique sports where the whole family can get out and play,� Cordell said. “You can play for your whole life. You can play in a wheelchair. You can play against the wall. It just has a lot of options. It’s got a lot of things going for it.� — Reporter: 541-383-0393, amiles@bendbulletin.com

C S    B  Youth sports

COBO ADVANCED MIDDLE SCHOOL BASKETBALL CAMP: Grades four through nine; Monday, Aug. 13Thursday, Aug. 16; Mountain View High School, Bend; 9 a.m.-noon for grades four through six, and 1 p.m.-4 p.m. for grades seven through nine; focus on advanced skill development in a competitive environment; campers should bring a snack; $95 for Bend Park & Recreation District members, $128 otherwise; bendparksandrec.org. PRO DEVELOPMENT CLINIC: For boys and girls ages 9-17; Saturday, Aug. 18; noon-4 p.m.; Athletic Club of Bend; led by Jeff Christensen, an assistant coach in the NBA Development League; register by Wednesday; $50; 503-453-7741; jeff@showcasebasketball.com; showcasebasketball.com.

Sadler raced in the stock division and managed to beat out two other drivers in her first heat. She was eliminated in the second round but placed in the top third in a field of 117 drivers.

Running • Central Oregon resident fares well in Maine: Bend’s Renee Metivier Baillie finished fifth and was the top American in the star-studded women’s race this past Saturday at the Beach to Beacon 10K Road Race in Cape Elizabeth, Maine. Metivier Baillie, 30, completed the course in 32 minutes, 30.4 seconds, finishing behind four Kenyan runners. Emily WangariMuriuki won in 31:51.4, defeating runner-up Emily Chebet — the 2010 cross-country world champion, by six-tenths of a second. Lineth Chepkurui (31:53.9) and

2006 Boston Marathon champion Rita Jeptoo (31:57.9) were third and fourth, respectively. Metivier Baillie finished 9.4 seconds ahead of Eugene resident Julia Lucas, who had placed fourth in the 5,000 meters at the U.S. Olympic Team Trials in June, for the top American finish.

Dawson qualified for the final by winning the Oregon state meet in early July and posting the best time of all winners in his region. In 2011, Dawson won the boys ages 11-12 100 meters at the North American Final. Complete results are available at hersheystrackandfield.com.

Track and field

Weightlifting

• Central Oregon sprinter seventh at Hershey’s: Bend’s Dawson Cockman placed seventh in the boys ages 13-14 200-meter dash at the Hershey’s Track & Field Games North American Final this past Saturday in Hershey, Pa. Dawson, who finished the race in 25.58 seconds, was one of seven participants from Oregon at the meet. Obiora Emenike, of Columbia, S.C., won in 23.43.

• Bend resident wins silver: Josh Brandt finished second in his division at the AAU Junior Olympic Games on July 30 in Houston. Brandt, a recent Summit High School graduate, lifted 200 kilograms (440 pounds) between his snatch and cleanand-jerk lifts to take silver in the age 18-19 77-kilogram division. Brandt’s mark was a personalbest total by 20 kilograms. —Bulletin staff reports

ACROVISION TAEKWONDO: Age 6 and older; Tuesdays and Thursdays, Aug. 7-30; 7-8 p.m.; RAPRD Activity Center, Redmond; students will train in a complete martial arts system; uniforms are required and will be available for purchase; $69; 541-548-7275 or raprd.org. TEEN ADVENTURE CAMP: Ages 11-16; Monday, Aug. 20-Thursday, Aug. 23; 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; different field trips each day to explore area while hiking, fishing, swimming and more; meet at RAPRD Activity Center, transportation provided; $170; 541-548-7272; raprd.org.

MULTISPORT RAT (REDMOND AREA TRIATHLON) RACE: Saturday; first swim wave starts at 7:30 a.m.; Redmond; 500-meter swim at Cascade Swim Center, 12-mile bike ride and 5K run; duathlon, 5K run and kids race also available; $10-$60; racetherat.com. XTERRA CENTRAL OREGON: Saturday, Sept. 8; Sisters; offroad triathlon with 1K swim in Suttle Lake, 30K bike on Cache Mountain and 12K run around the lake; $75-$100; 541-385-7413; xterracentraloregon.com.

PADDLING TUMALO CREEK SUP RACE SERIES: Wednesdays through Aug. 29; Deschutes River, Bend; 6 p.m.; free; rentals available; 541-317-9407; tumalocreek.com. YAK-A-TAK KIDS SUMMER STANDUP PADDLEBOARD CAMPS: For kids ages 8-16; Mondays through Thursdays, Aug. 13-16; improve stroke technique and board balance; 9 a.m.-4 p.m. daily; $295; transportation and gear provided; Tumalo Creek Kayak & Canoe; 541397-9407; tumalocreek.com. HOBIE DEMO DAY: Saturday, Aug. 18; demo 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Little Fawn Campground, Elk Lake; try Hobie’s fleet of fishing and sailing sit-on-top kayaks; with Tumalo Creek Kayak & Canoe; tumalocreek.com. HOBIE SAILING CLINIC: Sunday, Aug. 19; 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; Little Fawn Campground, Elk Lake; on-land and -water training, learn to adjust, attach and experiment with sails on Hobie kayaks; $25; tumalocreek. com.

YAK-A-TAK KIDS SUMMER PADDLING CAMPS: Kids ages 8-16; whitewater camps Monday through Thursday, Aug. 20-23; practice in pool and then work on technique and reading currents on the Deschutes River and at Elk Lake; flatwater camp Aug. 27-30; explore river trails and alpine lakes while learning how to paddle own boat; 9 a.m.-4 p.m. daily; $295; transportation and gear provided; Tumalo Creek Kayak & Canoe; 541397-9407; tumalocreek.com. WOMEN’S AND LOCALS SUP SERIES: Stand-up paddleboard nights, Mondays through Thursdays, through Aug. 30; 6 p.m.-8 p.m.; participants are asked to arrive 15 minutes early to sign release forms; participants will get a board, a paddle, a personal flotation device and basic instruction from Tumalo Creek Kayak & Canoe staff; participants are asked to wear quick-drying clothes, a hat, sunscreen and sunglasses; Tumalo Creek Kayak & Canoe; 541-3979407; tumalocreek.com.

RUNNING RORK CROSS-COUNTRY CAMP: All ages; Monday, Aug. 13-Friday, Aug. 17; 6 p.m.-7:30 p.m.; Redmond High School track; free, $10 donation requested toward starting a scholarship program for RHS distance runners; scott.brown@ redmond.k12.or.us. TWILIGHT 5K RUN/WALK: Thursday, Aug. 16; 7 p.m.; Bend; $20-$25; superfitproductions. com/?page_id=93. COPS AND ROBBERS: Wednesday, Aug. 22; 5 p.m.; FootZone, downtown Bend; gather items on your list while evading the FootZone patrol; free, family-friendly, costumes encouraged; register at footzonebend.com/events.

SOCCER REDMOND 4 VS 4 SOCCER TOURNAMENT: Saturday; 9 a.m.noon; West Jaqua soccer field; youth (grades three through five); middle school, high school and adult brackets for male, female and coed teams; $5 individuals, $20 teams; Ansel Evans; 541-905-0065; anselevans@yahoo.com. HIGH SCHOOL SOCCER OFFICIALS MEETING: Wednesday, Aug. 15; 7 p.m.-8:30 p.m.; St. Charles Bend medical classroom; open to adults interested in officiating high school soccer matches; training will be offered to interested individuals; free; Mehdi Salari, bendsalari@ yahoo.com; Pat Evoy, soccer@ cascadefoot.com. PORTLAND TIMBERS YOUTH CAMP: For kids ages 5-13; 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; Monday, Aug. 20Wednesday, Aug. 22; Big Sky Park, Bend; learn technical skills, meet a Timbers player and learn from Timbers TREES life skills and life values program; registration deadline Aug. 16; Erik Lyslo; elyslo@ portlandtimbers.com; 503-5535575; portlandtimbers.com/youth/ portland-timbers-camp-program.

VOLLEYBALL ADULT SAND VOLLEYBALL LEAGUE: Age 18 and older; Saturdays through Aug. 11; 9:30 a.m.; one best-of-three match per team per week; recreational league, players call own fouls and manage games; $80 per team; 541-5487275; raprd.org. RIDGEVIEW RAVEN VOLLEYBALL SKILLS CAMP: Monday, Aug. 13-Wednesday, Aug. 15; 8 a.m.11 a.m. for grades five through eight; 1 p.m.-4 p.m. for grades nine through 12; Ridgeview High School, Redmond; $65; registration form available at redmond.k12. or.us/ridgeview/site/default.asp and clicking on “Athletics� tab; Debi Dewey; 541-389-5917; debi. dewey@redmond.k12.or.us.

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LOCALNEWS

News of Record, D2 Editorials, D4

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, AUGUST 7, 2012

www.bendbulletin.com/local

LOCAL BRIEFING

DESCHUTES RIVER

Man jailed after Madras drug bust

Drowned woman wore life jacket

A Madras man was arrested Monday after police allegedly found methamphetamine, firearms and marijuana plants in his apartment, the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office said. Juan Miguel Lopez, 28, was arrested on suspicion of the possession, manufacture and delivery of meth after police executed a search warrant at an apartment in the Trailside apartment complex. Police found 7.6 ounces of meth and 16 marijuana plants in the apartment. The search warrant was part of a severalmonth investigation by the Sheriff’s Office and the Warm Springs Police Department.

By Dylan J. Darling The Bulletin

A day after an Oregon woman drowned while rafting the Deschutes River southwest of Bend, authorities had yet to release her name, saying they were having trouble contacting her family. “Until that is done, they don’t want to release any names,” said Deschutes County Sheriff’s Deputy Liam Klatt. The woman drowned short-

WHATEVER HAPPENED TO ...

ly after 6 p.m. Sunday at Lava Island Falls, about six miles south of Bend. The falls are a stretch of the river usually challenged only by experienced boaters. Klatt said one guidebook lists a section of it as a Class V and Class VI rapids. Such rapids are considered dangerous even for experts. “It’s pretty narrow, so you have a confined space with a lot of water flowing through

it,” Klatt said. “It generates a lot of fast-moving water through some pretty gnarly rapids.” The woman who drowned was in a three-person inflatable raft with another woman, said Sgt. Vance Lawrence of the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office. The other woman survived the rapids, swimming to the east shore. Both were wearing life jackets. It is unclear whether the

women jumped from their raft or whether they were thrown out, Lawrence said. The raft hadn’t been found as of Monday evening. While he would say the women were from Oregon, Lawrence declined to say what city, not wanting to reveal too much about their identities. He said they weren’t familiar with the stretch of river. See Drowning / D2

Following up on Central Oregon’s most interesting stories, even if they’ve been out of the headlines for a while. Email ideas to news@bendbulletin.com. To follow the series, visit www.bendbulletin.com/updates.

WESTERN TOADS IN SUNRIVER

Metolius man faces charges

Toad Patrol still on the job

A Metolius man was arrested after police allegedly found him to be in possession of one ounce of methamphetamine, the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office said. Juan Miranda-Medina, 32, was arrested in the parking lot of Erickson’s Thriftway in Madras on July 27 on suspicion of possession and delivery of meth. Miranda-Medina was taken to the Jefferson County jail, where he is also being held by Immigration and Customs Enforcement for illegal re-entry into the United States.

Lightning sparks Bend church fire A lightning strike caused a fire Sunday evening at Bend’s First Presbyterian Church, the Bend Fire Department said. The fire department responded to a report of the fire after Sunday’s thunderstorm. Witnesses reported seeing lightning hit the church, across from Bend High School, and hearing fire alarms. Fire crews were able to access the church roof and extinguish the flames. The fire caused about $75,000 in damage.

FIRE UPDATE Photos by Joe Kline / The Bulletin

Reported for Central and Eastern Oregon. For the latest information, visit www.nwccweb .us/information/ firemap.aspx.

Zach Mercer, 4, of Cincinnati, dumps out a bucket of Western toads he collected near the Sunriver Nature Center last Thursday. Mercer was helping the Toad Patrol transport the amphibians from Lake Aspen to a nearby meadow.

• Researchers are no longer worried about the tiny amphibian’s extinction By Scott Hammers

Enterprise

The Bulletin

W

John Day Bend Burns

MILES 0

50

1.Lava Fire • Acres: 21,546 • Containment: 85% • Cause: Lightning 2. Cougar Fire • Acres: 500 • Containment: 0% • Cause: Lightning

2

ith the shores of Sunriver’s Lake Aspen practically pulsating with life, it’s hard to imagine that this is — historically speaking at least — a bit of an off year for the Western toad. In July or August of every year, nickel- and dime-sized toadlets emerge from the lake next to the Sunriver Nature Center. Over the course of about a week, they

The Bulletin

In a story headlined “Fundraising slows for nonprofits,” which appeared Monday, Aug. 6, on Page D1, NeighborImpact Development Director Bill Kemp was misidentified. The Bulletin regrets the error.

spread out across the landscape, leaving the pond behind in favor of the meadows and forests where they’ll spend most of their lives.

Numbers are down Jay Bowerman, the Nature Center’s principal researcher, estimates this year’s hatch at around 50,000. At times in the 1960s and 1970s, 1 million to 2 million toadlets were born each year at Aspen Lake. See Toads / D5

Sunriver Nature Center lead naturalist Jennifer Curtis holds a Western toad in Sunriver on Thursday.

Suspect in infant’s assault pleads not guilty By Ben Botkin

Correction

By Dylan J. Darling The Bulletin

The Mirror Pond Steering Committee has $200,000 it must use to determine how to handle silt build-up in Bend’s signature body of water. The City of Bend and the Bend Park & Recreation District each put up $100,000 in the last month to fund the search for a silt solution, said Mel Oberst, director of community development for the City of Bend. “What are we going to do with it?” Oberst asked the committee at a Monday meeting. The committee is composed of representatives from the city and the park district, as well as William Smith Properties, Inc., which owns the dam upstream from the pond; Pacific Power, which owns the dam creating the pond; and Bend 2030, a civic group. In the one-hour session, the committee decided it will start by pricing how much it would cost to have drawings made of each of the options for the pond and investigating the cost of permits needed from state and federal agencies to dredge the pond. The options being weighed by the steering committee include not removing the silt, removing the dam that creates the pond, or dredging the pond. See Mirror Pond / D2

Retired trooper runs again for judge By Joel Aschbrenner The Bulletin

Madras

1

Mirror Pond panel weighs options

CROOK COUNTY

— Bulletin staff reports

Bend

D

Obituaries, D5 Weather, D6

A Bend man accused of assaulting a child under the age of 6 pleaded not guilty to the charges on Monday in Deschutes County Circuit Court. Larry Dean Wright Jr., 26, also had a six-day trial scheduled, which will start Sept. 18. Wright faces two charges of first-degree assault involving the child and two charges of

fourth-degree assault involving the child’s mother. Additionally, Wright Wright faces three counts of first-degree criminal mistreatment and charges of harassment and second-degree sexual abuse for allegedly subjecting the child’s mother to unwanted physical contact.

According to an email from Chief Deputy District Attorney Mary Anderson, public records show the child is less than a year old and the injuries included fractures of the arm, ribs and leg. Wright was subdued and said little in his video appearance before Senior Judge Dale Koch. The prosecution expects to call some 23 witnesses during

the trial. Angela Lee, Wright’s attorney, said she’ll have an additional four to five witnesses for the defense. Wright was arrested July 26 and remains in jail. Jail records show Wright’s bond is set at $500,000, with 10 percent needed to post bail. — Reporter: 541-977-7185, bbotkin@bendbulletin.com

A retired Oregon State Police trooper who lost the 2008 Republican primary for Crook County Judge is running again, this time as a member of the Independent Party. Walt Wagner, of Powell Butte, filed Friday to face incumbent Judge Mike McCabe in the Wagner November election. There are no Democrats in the race. Wagner said job growth would be his top priority. He said he would travel outside the area, talking to different employers about what Crook County could offer them. “You have to be extremely proactive and extremely aggressive outside the county to bring in businesses of different types,” he said. Wagner said he needs to do more research about what types of businesses would fit well in Crook County. A sporting goods manufacturer for example, he said, could take advantage of Crook County’s enterprise zones and its proximity to the Bend market. Current county leaders, for their part, did help recruit Facebook and Apple data centers to Prineville. See Wagner / D2


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THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, AUGUST 7, 2012

Drowning Continued from D1 The women started their float just downstream of Big Eddy and upstream of Lava Island Falls. There are signs upstream of the falls warning of the hazard. Lawrence said it is unclear if the women intended to run the rapids. “I believe they either didn’t know (the danger) or couldn’t get over to the edge to get out,” he said. Rapids on the Deschutes have proved deadly over the years. In 2006 alone, six people drowned in its waters near Bend. The falls and rapids off the Cascades Lakes Highway, from Benham Falls on down, make for a particularly treacherous section of the river. “It’s a dangerous place to raft if you haven’t done some research and don’t know the area,” Lawrence said. — Reporter: 541-617-7812, ddarling@bendbulletin.com

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

The danger sign at the Lava Island boat ramp warns boaters before the start of the rapids of Lava Island Falls on Monday. The sign marks the take-out ramp and warns of dangerous rapids downstream. The start of the Lave Island Falls is approximately 200 yards downstream from this point.

Well shot! READER PHOTOS Can you work a camera, and capture a great picture? And can you tell us a bit about it? Email your color or black and white photos to readerphotos@bendbulletin.com and we’ll pick the best for publication. Submission requirements: Include as much detail as possible — when and where you took it, and any special technique used — as well as your name, hometown and phone number. Photos must be high resolution (at least 6 inches wide and 300 dpi) and cannot be altered.

Lava Island Falls on the Deschutes River is rated as a Class V whitewater rapid. The top of this photo shows the take-out Monday (also seen in the Pete Erickson photo at left). The calm water near the take-out changes abruptly as the river narrows and plummets through lava rock. A rafter wearing a life jacket died there Sunday evening.

Mirror Pond Continued from D1 Silt collects in Mirror Pond, forming mudflats that clog the pond on the Deschutes River. While dredging is the apparent solution, there are many challenges. They include finding a funding source for the project, which will likely cost between $2 million and $5 million. The park district considered allotting $425,000 for a study on dredging the pond as part of its November bond measure, but cut it in June. The city and the district then put up the $200,000 to be used on Mirror Pond. To move forward, the committee also must earn the approval of the owners of the land under the pond. The McKay family, one of the

Wagner

JUMPIN’ GERMAN Kristin Wolter, of Bend, snapped this photo of her friend Kena Johnson’s dog, Lobo, jumping into a pool at the Deschutes County Fair in Redmond. Wolter used a Canon 7D with a 24-105 mm L lens. “I used aperture priority until I reached a shutter speed fast enough to freeze the midair motion,” Wolter wrote.

N  R POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Bend Police Department

Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 10:16 a.m. July 11, in the 20300 block of Shetland Loop. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 4:24 p.m. July 28, in the 61400 block of Southwest Elkhorn Street. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 9:48 a.m. July 24, in the 2400 block of Northeast Moonlight Drive. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 6:17 a.m. July 26, in the 800 block of Northeast Locksley Drive. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 1:13 p.m. July 26, in the area of Northeast Acorn Way and Northeast Yellow Ribbon Drive. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 8:28 a.m. July 27, in the 700 block of Northeast Greenwood Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at 1:50 p.m. July 28, in the 21100 block of Copperfield Avenue. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 12:38 p.m. July 30, in the 100 block of Southwest Shevlin Hixon Drive. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 3:13 p.m. July 30, in the 100 block of Northwest Gilchrist Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at 11:50 a.m. Aug. 1, in the 100 block of Northwest Greenwood Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at 3:43 p.m. Aug. 1, in the 1700 block of Southeast Tempest Drive. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 11:01 p.m. Aug. 1, in the 600 block of Southwest Powerhouse Drive. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 6 a.m. Aug. 2, in the 19600 block of Mountaineer Way.

Theft — A theft was reported at 8:27 a.m. Aug. 2, in the 60800 block of Yellow Leaf Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 8:42 a.m. Aug. 2, in the 600 block of Northeast Bellevue Drive. Theft — A theft was reported at 8:53 a.m. Aug. 2, in the 100 block of Northeast Greenwood Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at 11:11 a.m. Aug. 2, in the 700 block of Northwest Bond Street. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 11:23 a.m. Aug. 2, in the 100 block of Southeast Third Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 1:52 p.m. Aug. 2, in the 900 block of Southwest Simpson Avenue. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 2:27 p.m. Aug. 2, in the 500 block of Delaware Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at 3:22 p.m. Aug. 2, in the 19900 block of Alderwood Circle. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported and an arrest made at 8:19 p.m. Aug. 2, in the 100 block of Southwest Century Drive. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 2:08 p.m. July 28, in the 2600 block of Northeast Division Street. Unauthorized use — A vehicle was reported stolen at 4:02 p.m. July 28, in the 1900 block of Northeast 12th Street. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 1:25 p.m. July 29, in the 2600 block of Northeast U.S. Highway 20. Theft — A theft was reported at 3:41 p.m. July 29, in the 600 block of Northeast Third Street. DUII — Jason Blu Patereau, 43, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 2:55 a.m. Aug. 2, in the area of Northwest Mt. Washington Drive and Northeast Third Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 5 p.m. Aug. 3, in the 1000 block of Northwest Bond Street. DUII — Jill Ann Eckenrode, 45, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 12:18 a.m. Aug. 4, in the area of Archie Briggs Road and Star Ridge Court. Theft — A theft was reported at

12:32 a.m. Aug. 4, in the area of North U.S. Highway 97. DUII — Kristopher Ryenne McLaughlin, 19, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 4 p.m. July 30, in the area of Northeast Third Street and Northeast Lafayette Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 2:13 p.m. July 31, in the 1100 block of Northwest Newport Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at 3:15 p.m. Aug. 1, in the 300 block of Southwest Century Drive. Theft — A theft was reported at 3:51 p.m. Aug. 1, in the 100 block of Northwest Greenwood Avenue. DUII — Scott Baker Munsey, 44, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 7:27 p.m. Aug. 1, in the 1100 block of Northwest Newport Avenue. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 3:28 p.m. Aug. 2, in the area of Southeast Wilson Avenue and Southeast Ninth Street. DUII — Kylen Scott Franson, 31, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 8:20 p.m. Aug. 3, in the area of Northeast Fourth Street and Northeast Lafayette Avenue. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 7:38 a.m. Aug. 4, in the 19700 block of Clarion Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at 2:57 a.m. Aug. 5, in the 900 block of Northwest Galveston Avenue. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 11:28 a.m. Aug. 5, in the 19700 block of Southwest Holygrape Street. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 3:24 p.m. Aug. 3, in the 21200 block of U.S. Highway 20. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 8:57 a.m. Aug. 3, in the 2000 block of Northeast Third Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 4:34 p.m. July 31, in the 600 block of Northeast Bellevue Drive. DUII — Jason Frederick Piper, 32, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 12:01 a.m.

Aug. 3, in the 100 block of Northeast Third Street. Prineville Police Department

Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and items stolen at 8:39 a.m. Aug. 3, in the area of Southeast Elm Street. Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office

Continued from D1 Wagner said the data centers are positive for the county, but he wants to recruit businesses that would provide more long-term jobs beyond the initial construction boom. McCabe served as a county commissioner for 16 years before being elected judge in 2008. The county judge has no judicial powers but serves as the administrator for county government and chair of the three-member county court. Wagner registered as an Independent following the 2008 primary. He said he considers himself fiscally conservative but mindful of environmental concerns. In the 2008 primary, Wagner lost to McCabe 37 percent to 68 percent. He said he decided to challenge McCabe again after the May primary, in which McCabe earned 34 percent of the vote, narrowly topping two Republican challengers. “When you see 65 percent of someone’s own party voted

Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported Aug. 3, in the 6400 block of Southwest Ermine Road in Crooked River Ranch. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at Aug. 4, in the 6800 block of Southwest Groundhog Road in Crooked River Ranch. Theft — A theft with an estimated loss of more than $2,100 and an act of criminal mischief were reported Aug. 5, in the area of The Cove Palisades State Park.

pioneer families of Bend, owns about 90 percent of the land under Mirror Pond, Oberst said. In looking at how to handle the silt problem, the committee will evaluate whether the city or the district should buy the land. Before those discussions got too far Monday, Bill Smith — who developed the Old Mill District — said the steering committee should reach out to the McKay family. Smith’s company also owns the Colorado Avenue Dam, just upstream of Mirror Pond. “We should get a feeling from the McKays (of) what they are willing to do,” Smith said. Oberst is doubtful either the city or the district wants to buy the property. The committee is planning to reach out to the public to gauge its sentiment about the future of the pond.

against them, I have to ask myself, ‘Why?’,” Wagner said. Crook County’s nearly 500 registered Independents nominated Wagner in a semi-online primary in June and July. Wagner spent 27 years with the state police as a trooper, a training officer and a public information officer. He said he also ran the state police training academy for two years and conducted internal investigations, among other duties. Wagner owned a small sheep ranch near Dallas, Ore., before moving to Crook County in 2004. — Reporter: 541-633-2184, jaschbrenner@bendbulletin.com

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DUII — Marty Carl Nottingham, 60, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 11:22 p.m. Aug. 3, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 near milepost 124. DUII — Krystal P. Sobolewski, 39, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 12:49 a.m. Aug. 4, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 near milepost 123. DUII — James Earl Lindsey Jr., 28, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 2:18 a.m. Aug. 4, in the area of West U.S. Highway 20 near milepost 17. DUII — James Leroy Graves, 51, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 9:34 a.m. Aug. 4, in the area of Northeast Yucca Avenue and Northeast 17th Street in Redmond. DUII — Michael A. Crowley, 30, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 12:43 a.m. Aug. 5, in the area of East U.S. Highway 20 and Eighth Street in Bend. DUII — Jenelle M. Burkhart, 30, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 12:50 a.m. Aug. 6, in the area of West U.S. Highway 20 near milepost 9.

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TUESDAY, AUGUST 7, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

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Man, 79, arrested after freeway chase ROSEBURG — Oregon State Police say they arrested a 79-year-old Monmouth man after a chase on Interstate 5 in southern Oregon that reached speeds of nearly 110 mph. Lt. Gregg Hastings says a state wildlife trooper was pacing a car headed southbound at 80 mph Monday afternoon in the Roseburg area and tried to stop the vehicle. The driver refused to stop. Other troopers saw the car and tried to stop it, but the driver increased his speed, passing other vehicles. The driver left the freeway, lost control and crashed into a ditch just before reaching a spot where two Myrtle Creek police officers were waiting with spike strips. Hastings says William Barnes Sr. was taken to the Douglas County jail for processing, cited for reckless driving and attempting to elude, and released. The trooper’s spokesman says Barnes reportedly said he didn’t stop because he thought troopers were chasing him on an unrelated matter. Hastings declined to elaborate.

2-year-old drowns in swimming pool GRANTS PASS — A 2year-old boy has drowned in a swimming pool in the Southern Oregon community of Kerby. Josephine County Sheriff Gil Gilbertson told The Grants Pass Daily Courier his office was called because the boy died while no one was watching him. Gilbertson says the boy’s family was visiting the home of a friend Saturday. The child’s name was not released.

Teen pleads guilty to killing Tigard man NEWPORT — An 18-yearold Portland-area man has pleaded guilty in the June 2011 slaying of a Tigard man in Lincoln City. The district attorney’s office said Monday that Joseph Anthony Marsala was sentenced on Friday to 23 years after pleading guilty to conspiracy to commit aggravated murder and other charges. Authorities say Marsala, another teenager and 49-year-old Darrin Dow of Tigard went to the coast together last year. Marsala was accused of hitting Dow in the head with a garden tool, stabbing him in the stomach and neck with a knife, and taking his Cadillac Escalade, credit cards and money. Police say the second teenager reported the attack.

Woman’s remains found near Roseburg ROSEBURG — The skeletal remains of a woman have been found in a rural area west of Roseburg. The Douglas County sheriff’s office said Monday that authorities learned of the discovery more than a month ago, and a search of the area on private property turned up clothing and other evidence. Sheriff’s spokesman Dwes Hutson says detectives did not immediately want to notify the public and have not yet decided whether the death was from foul play. He says it could take months to identify the remains. Hutson says there are about 20 different missing persons cases pending in the county.

Swimmer dies after dive from rock SCOTTS MILLS — A Salem man drowned Sunday afternoon while swimming at Scotts Mills County Park northeast of Salem. The Marion County sheriff’s office says 26-year-old Nicholi W. Zahler appeared stunned after diving into the water from a rock near the waterfall on Butte Creek. A bystander tried to help him but was pushed away, so the bystander assumed he was OK. The man’s girlfriend later noticed him missing. He was dead when he was pulled from the water. — From wire reports

Boyfriend Homicide suspect likely fled to Mexico sought • The man wanted in the 2007 death in Happy of a deputy sheriff won’t be extradited Valley killing MARION COUNTY

By Jonathan J. Cooper The Associated Press

KEIZER — An injured suspect who limped away from his Oregon home and two murder charges stemming from a car crash that killed his cousin and a sheriff’s deputy probably will never face justice in Oregon, the prosecutor said Monday. Investigators said they believe Alfredo De JesusAscencio fled to Mexico as prosecutors sought an indictment five years ago, and the U.S. extradition treaty with Mexico doesn’t apply in this case. Instead, prosecutors said, Mexican authorities have agreed to try De Jesus-Ascencio under Mexican law and issued a warrant for his arrest last year. Meanwhile, the family of Marion County sheriff’s deputy Kelly Fredinburg on Monday announced a reward of up to $20,000 for anyone who can help police find De Jesus-Ascencio and bring him to face a judge, a jury and a fallen deputy’s angry family. “I can’t relax until he’s caught. I’m going to do everything in my power, and this is one thing I can do, that is legal, to make that happen,” Kevin Fredinburg, the deputy’s brother, told reporters on Monday. Authorities believe De Jesus-Ascencio is hiding in the Mexican state of Michoacan, perhaps in the city of Puacaro. Officials declined to say why investigators be-

Jonathan J. Cooper / The Associated Press

From left, Marion County Sheriff Jason Myers, Kevin Fredinburg and Deputy District Attorney Donald Abar discuss the search for a man wanted in connection with the death Fredinburg’s brother — sheriff’s deputy Kelly Fredinburg — on Monday in Salem. Investigators say Alfredo De Jesus-Ascencio fled to Mexico five years ago to escape negligent homicide charges.

lieve he’s there. Police said in 2007 that Fredinburg was rushing to an emergency call when a Ford Crown Victoria driven by De Jesus-Ascencio crossed the center line between Salem and Woodburn, slamming into Fredinburg’s patrol car. The deputy had his lights and siren active at the time of the crash on Highway 99E between Salem and Woodburn, police said, and he died at the scene. He was 33. Oscar Ascencio Amaya, the defendant’s 19-year-old cousin who was a passenger in his car, also died. Investigators said they don’t believe alcohol was a factor in the crash, and it took them several weeks to piece together what happened. By the time a grand jury indicted him on two counts of criminally neg-

ligent homicide in August 2007, De Jesus-Ascencio had fled to Mexico. Oregon pros- De Jesusecutors and the Ascencio deputy’s family hoped to capture and extradite De Jesus-Ascencio to face trial in Salem, but it became clear in 2009 that the extradition treaty between the United States and Mexico doesn’t apply in this case, said Donald Abar, a deputy district attorney in Marion County. De Jesus-Ascencio would have to return to the United States and turn himself in or be captured by police to face trial in Oregon, Abar said. Investigators enlisted the help of a foreign prosecution team from the California Department of Justice, which has

Husband accused of torching FBI agent’s car The Associated Press PORTLAND — The husband of an FBI agent is accused of setting the agent’s government-owned car on fire with her guns and property inside. Portland Fire & Rescue investigators believe 44-

year-old David Powers set fire to his wife’s 2009 Dodge Charger. The couple is in the process of separating. According to a criminal complaint filed in federal court on Monday, Powers is married to an FBI agent identified as “J.A.”

She was out of the house on July 21 when her car burned inside her garage with her FBI-issued handgun, rifle and a personal gun inside. Powers was found in the couple’s home on with burns to his arms, hands and face.

extensive experience working with Mexican authorities, and federal prosecutors in Mexico City agreed to take the case last year. If authorities can find and arrest De Jesus-Ascencio, who is a Mexican citizen, he’ll face charges under a Mexican law that permits charges against Mexicans who commit crimes abroad. If convicted, the defendant would be sentenced under Mexican law and serve his sentence there. Until then, Kevin Fredinburg will wait and hope for results from the Oregon Officers Reward Fund he created to help police catch fugitives wanted for killing police officers. He hopes De JesusAscencio will be turned in by his family, he said. “I know justice will prevail,” Fredinburg said.

The Associated Press HAPPY VALLEY — Authorities in Clackamas County say they’re seeking a man suspected in the fatal shooting of a Happy Valley woman at her home The Oregonian reports that 33-year-old Jason D. Hogan was Hogan living in the home with the woman’s daughter, who was wounded. The woman was identified as 62-year-old Norma Jean Perrone. Her daughter is 29-year-old Gina Marie Perrone. She was taken to the hospital.

Domestic dispute A spokesman for the sheriff’s office, Sgt. Adam Phillips, says the daughter and Hogan were in a long-term relationship. He says the couple had a history of domestic violence, and he has a long criminal record. The shooting was reported late Sunday evening at the home in an unincorporated area near Happy Valley. A child at the home was taken into protective custody.

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St. Charles must prove itself safe

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e need more whistleblowers, or better yet, a more open medical establishment. How else can we make good decisions as con-

sumers of health care? It’s hard enough to learn in advance what a medical procedure will cost. It’s far more difficult to discover the safety record of the facility where it will be performed. Would you want to have surgery in a hospital where only 40 percent of the operating room staff say they would feel safe as a patient? Where only 15 percent think management is always interested in safety and only 21 percent say patient safety is never sacrificed? That’s the news in a Sunday Bulletin report about St. Charles Bend from reporter Markian Hawryluk, who gained access to that information only because a whistleblower made it available. The hospital has refused to release the full report. If you decide to go elsewhere, however, you have no way of knowing if you’ll be any safer. That’s because most information about medical safety isn’t made public, despite being collected in increasing volume and sophistication. At St. Charles, management response suggests a lack of focus on safety in the operating room. The safety culture survey numbers have been getting worse for several years, but key operating room leadership positions stayed vacant while the hospital lavished attention on building its primary care network and its administrative staff. It would be easy to blame the

poor survey results on labor strife, given that St. Charles has been in contentious negotiations. But there was employee dissatisfaction before there was a union, or the union likely wouldn’t be there. Unhappy staff doesn’t necessarily mean the patient is less safe, but — again — the information is hard to access. One worrisome indicator at St. Charles is a significant increase in surgical site infections in 2011 for colon surgery patients. There also is evidence that a hospital’s culture affects patient results, according to James Battle, a patient safety analyst with the federal Agency for Healthcare Quality and Research. “Those hospitals that have better culture have fewer injuries as measured by patient safety indicators,� he told Hawryluk. St. Charles is a public hospital and the only local option for many medical needs. It’s critical for management to focus on making the hospital safe for patients and satisfying for employees. Plus it needs to give citizens and potential patients the information to prove it. In addition, state and federal regulators need to make medical safety information public.

Do not regulate timber runoff with lawsuits

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he worst way to set forest policy is by lawsuit. That’s why the bipartisan bill introduced by Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler, R-Wash., should move forward. At issue is runoff from logging roads in forests. For 35 years, the Environmental Protection Agency has let states regulate the runoff. That looked set to change after a court decision in 2010. The Northwest Environmental Defense Center, located in Lewis & Clark Law School, won a lawsuit before the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. The court’s decision would mean that every source of runoff on forest roads would be required to get an industrial storm water runoff permit. New roads would need them. The hundreds of thousands of miles of existing private and public roads in Oregon’s forests would need them. You don’t have to be even a close reader of this newspaper to know what that would mean. Each permit could turn into a legal battleground. The lawsuits would come fast and furious to stall or stop the

roads as a way or stalling or stopping logging. The change would make it harder to do business on private forest land. It would be harder to raise money for schools on state forest land. It would be even harder to do anything on federal land. It’s not only people in the forest industry who think the ruling was bad news. Sen. Ron Wyden and Gov. John Kitzhaber, both Democrats and environmentalists, criticized the ruling’s implications. Herrera Beutler’s bill has bipartisan support in Congress, including from Oregon Reps. Kurt Schrader, D-Canby, and Greg Walden, R-Hood River. It doesn’t allow the 9th Circuit to set the law. Congress would set the law. It resolves the legal question raised by the lawsuit. It says basically that logging roads don’t need runoff permits, echoing legislation Wyden introduced earlier. Streams, creeks and rivers do need to be protected from damage from runoff. Thinning and timber sales also need to be protected against regulation by lawsuit.

My Nickel’s Worth November’s differences While I appreciate and agree with Dick Bryant’s views of July 26 (“Election will determine direction of the nationâ€?), I believe the “bullet pointsâ€? are overbroad. I am inclined to be more specific about the differences we can anticipate as a result of November’s election, as follows: • Whether we eliminate the government agencies that provide for clean water and clean air standards, safety regulations and oversight as they pertain to public safety; • Whether we diminish, eliminate or privatize the postal service; • Whether we privatize education for grades kindergarten through 12th; • Whether we divert taxpayer monies from infrastructure maintenance and improvement to enhance the existing budget of the Department of Defense; • Whether women will be lawfully permitted to prevent or eliminate unwanted pregnancies; • Whether we shall be a plutocracy (rule by the wealthy) or continue as a democracy; • Whether Medicare will be eliminated; • Whether Social Security will be privatized and thus exposed to the unregulated risk; • Whether the Affordable Care Act will be available to millions of uninsured Americans whose medical bills are now being paid by those of us who can and do pay for medical coverage; • Whether our personal portfolios will be exposed to unregulated greed and corruption;

• Whether our government will be subject to the undue influence of religion; • Whether America will have a middle class; and ... • Whether we choose to be a caring society or a callous one. Get involved! Carolyn Hill Bend

Abolish the death tax Retirees fortunate enough to have saved what most tables recommend for a comfortable retirement will be hard hit by a hefty death tax if they choose to retire in Oregon. These are not people with great wealth, but those who can afford to share their savings with the community in local shops and restaurants, support local charities and frequent small businesses — often the life blood of small communities. Oregon is one of only 17 states with a such a death tax, thus punishing the very people in the best position to support local revenues. This recent law, unless reversed by a November referendum, may cause many seniors to move out of Oregon. The mutual support of young and older citizens preserves the health and growth of community. The double taxation of seniors actively supporting this balance seems to take unfair advantage of both the seniors themselves and their children’s inheritance. Concerned retirees, community activists, small business owners and retailers should consider carefully how reversing the current law, to abolish the death tax, will greatly

benefit them and the seniors who support them. Ellen Atkin Bend

Knopp accepting dubious donation I found Tim Knopp’s statements justifying his accepting the $25,000 donation from Loren Parks to be extremely self-serving and a bit frightening coming from a likely future state senator. I suggest that Knopp might find it beneficial to do some background investigation of Parks before he accepts his donation solely on the proviso that he “mostly agrees with the donor’s political views and (that) his actions are not criminal.� Parks’ stories — about fixing women by sleeping with them, helping them to have multiple orgasms and hypnotizing them while having sex — make me want to just say, “eeeww, who is this guy offering me all this money, and what does he want of me as a senator?� The fact that Parks readily admits that he is not a medical doctor certainly doesn’t make the situation any better. When Kevin Mannix — a former Republican gubernatorial candidate — says that he can’t speak to these other things Parks does and prefers not to, it makes me realize that we dodged a bullet in rejecting Mannix. His words to the contrary, it seems to me that Knopp is simply trying to justify the unjustifiable. Ted Owens Redmond

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We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 550 and 650 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or email them to The Bulletin. Write: My Nickel’s Worth / In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 Fax: 541-385-5804 Email: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Obama’s negativity has created opportunity for Romney

D

uring the dog days of last summer’s debt ceiling negotiations, with Washington gridlocked and the president’s approval ratings slumping, a narrative coalesced among disappointed liberals. President Barack Obama was failing — they decided — because he was too moderate, too reasonable and too conciliatory. He didn’t have the ideological confidence required to actually fight for liberalism, or the brazenness required to really tear the Republicans apart. Apparently somebody at the White House bought into this narrative, because so far Obama’s re-election campaign has delivered just about everything that liberal partisans were begging for a year ago. Since the campaign kicked off, the president’s domestic policy rhetoric has become much more stridently left-wing than it was during the debtceiling debate. He’s dropped all but

a pro forma acknowledgment of the tough choices looming in our future, and doubled down on the comforting progressive fantasy that we can close the deficit and keep the existing safety net by soaking America’s millionaires and billionaires. To this bordering-on-McGovernite substance, he’s added Richard Nixon’s style, with a pitch to swing voters that started out negative and has escalated to frank character assassination. In Obama’s campaign ads, and in the rhetoric of his aides and allies, Mitt Romney isn’t just wrong on specific policies or too right-wing in general. He’s part Scrooge, part Gordon Gekko; an un-American, Asia-loving outsourcer; a tax avoider and possibly a white-collar felon. If you’re an undecided, stuck-in-themiddle kind of voter, the president isn’t meeting you halfway on the issues, or pledging to revive the dream of postpartisanship that he campaigned on

ROSS DOUTHAT last time. He’s just saying that you’ve got no choice but to stick with him, because Romney is too malignant to be trusted. By taking this line, Obama is testing the conceit that a harder-edged, more ideological liberalism would be a more politically successful liberalism as well. And at the moment, the president’s continued lead in swingstate polls provides modest but real evidence that his strategy is working. But Obama’s current edge may have more to do with the Romney campaign’s complacency than with the genius of his McGovern-meets-Nixon approach. In Romneyland, it seems to be an article of faith that 2012 will be a pure up-

or-down vote on the president’s performance, and that the most generic sort of Republican campaign — hooray for free enterprise and low taxes, with the details To Be Determined Later — is therefore the only kind of campaign they need to run. But as The New Republic’s William Galston has pointed out, even a referendum election tends to involve a two-step process, in which voters first decide whether they’re willing to eject the incumbent, and then decide whether they’re willing to roll the dice with his opponent. The Romney campaign is clearly afraid of talking too much about its candidate’s biography (all that money, all that Mormonism ...) or offering anything save bullet points and platitudes on policy (because details can be used against you ...). But a Republican candidate who won’t define himself is a candidate who’s easily defined as just another George W. Bush.

A Romney campaign that loosened up and actually took some chances, on the other hand, might find that the Obama White House’s slash-and-burn liberalism had opened up some unexpected opportunities. Because Obama has moved left on fiscal and social issues, there’s more space in the center — assuming, that is, that Romney can get over his fear of offending his own party’s interest groups. Because Obama has gone so negative, there’s room to accentuate the positive, and run as the candidate of (right-of-center) hope and change. Or he can keep doing what he’s been doing, in which case he stands a very good chance of losing oh-so-narrowly, and joining Thomas Dewey in the ranks of nominees who mistakenly believed that they could win the White House by default. — Ross Douthat is a columnist for The New York Times.


TUESDAY, AUGUST 7, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

D N  Mark A. Merryman, of Terrebonne Nov. 28, 1968 - Aug. 3, 2012 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals, Redmond - 541-504-9485 autumnfunerals.net Services: Celebration of Life was held 1:00 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 1, 2012, at Mark’s home in Terrebonne. Contributions may be made to:

Partners in Care, or Redmond Humane Society.

Cecile Kinnaman

FEATURED OBITUARY

O’Donnell helped to adapt ‘Hairspray’ for stage

June 27, 1930 - July 7, 2012 Our mother, sister, grandmother and aunt, Cecile M. Kinnaman, passed from this life peacefully on July 7, in Bend, Oregon. She bravely fought the complications of a stroke for four years. Cecile was an amazing woman. Born June 27, 1930, in Fall Cecile M. River, Kinnaman Massachusetts, to Marcel and Anita Goyette, she was the eldest of four children. She graduated from Dominican Academy High School in Fall River, then received a degree in lab technology from the Boston Dispensary. After graduating, she worked as a lab technician in Rhode Island. During her first marriage, she moved to California, where she had three children, Brian, Debbie and Paul. Her family grew when she married Ronald Kinnaman in 1966, to include his children, Martin and Leslie. She worked as Personnel Director for Basic Vegetable Products for several years, then as Director of Human Resources for American Home Foods, where she retired in 1986. After retiring, she and Ron moved to Bend. Cecile loved sewing for her children when they were young, growing a large garden, knitting, crocheting, and making greeting cards on her computer. She and Ron enjoyed their weekends boating on the Delta, snowmobiling with family and friends and traveling in their motorhome. Cecile was preceded in death by her brother, Roger Goyette, and her son, Brian McAfee. She is survived by her devoted husband of 46 years, Ronald Kinnaman; her children, Debra (Dave) Lambeth Graves, Paul (Lynn) McAfee, Martin Kinnaman, and Leslie (Jon) Hammond, eight grandchildren and seven great grandchildren. She is also survived by her brother, Renald (Janice) Goyette, sister, Jeannine (Aurel) Harmath and many nieces and nephews. Cecile was deeply loved by everyone in her family and by her many friends. We will carry her in our hearts forever. A Funeral Mass will be held at 10:30 a.m. on August 10, at St. Francis of Assisi “Old Town� Church in downtown Bend.

By Mark Kennedy The Associated Press

NEW YORK — Mark O’Donnell, the Tony Awardwinning writer behind such quirky and clever Broadway shows as “Hairspray and “Cry-Baby,� died Monday, his agent said. He was 58. Jack Tantleff, O ’ D o n nel l’s agent at the Paradigm agency, said the writer collapsed in the lobby of his O’Donnell apartment complex on the Upper West Side of Manhattan. “He was a huge talent, and a warm, witty and wonderful man who marched to his own drummer,� Tantleff said. O’Donnell won the 2003 Tony for best book of a musical for co-writing “Hairspray� with Thomas Meehan, and the pair earned Tony nominations in 2008 for doing the same for another John Waters work, “Cry-Baby.� O’Donnell was picked to help write the musical version of the 1988 Waters movie “Hairspray� because producer Margo Lion felt he “could appreciate Waters’ voice but was idiosyncratic enough to inject his own personality into the piece.� The story centers on an overweight white teenager who lives to dance on “The Corny Collins Show,� Baltimore’s version of “American Bandstand.� She also wants to integrate its all-white environs, and, along the way, be accepted for her full-figured self. “The structure I had in mind was: Girl does Mash Potato, girl charms Baltimore, girl integrates nation,� O’Donnell told The Associated Press in 2002. “My script was like a great Mad magazine article.� His other plays include “That’s It, Folks!� “Fables for Friends,� “The Nice and the Nasty,� “Strangers on Earth,� “Vertigo Park� and the musical “Tots in Tinseltown.� He wrote two novels, “Getting Over Homer� and “Let Nothing You Dismay,� and published two collections of comic stories, “Elementary Education� and “Vertigo Park and Other Tales.� He also adapted Georges Feydeau’s “Private Fittings� for the La Jolla Playhouse in California and a symphonic version of “Pyramus and Thisbe� for the Kennedy Center. He received a Guggenheim Fellowship and the George S. Kaufman Award. An autopsy is scheduled for today.

Obituary policy

• The state opts to drop a plan to limit lottery games at Hayden Island delis The Associated Press PORTLAND — Oregon’s state lottery has backed off a plan to curb the “lottery rowâ€? at a Portland strip mall along the Columbia River, where a group of restaurants has turned into a dozen gambling-focused establishments dealing in cigarettes, alcohol and lottery games. Neighbors say they’re trying to find other ways to combat the drug use, drunk driving and fighting that has accompanied the metamorphosis, The Oregonian reported. Oregon law forbids businesses with lottery games to earn more than 50 percent of revenue from them.

To meet that, the delis on Hayden Island’s Jantzen Beach sell cheap alcohol and wholesale cigarettes, an attraction drawing people across the river from Washington state, where video lottery terminals are illegal except for tribal casinos. More than a year ago, Gov. John Kitzhaber and Lottery Director Larry Niswender promised residents to address the issue. In November, Niswender limited the number of machines in strip malls — no more than half the establishments at such malls could host state video lottery terminals. By June, the lottery commission had balked, saying the rule would stymie business and that

Phone: 541-617-7825 Email: obits@bendbulletin.com Fax: 541-322-7254

Mail: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708

the lottery can’t be held solely accountable for the problem. Attorney Michael Mohr, whose firm represents several of the retailers, said the lottery would face “significant legal ramifications.� “Who goes and who stays? Will it be based on seniority, most investment, highest income to lottery? Having once granted the right to a location, any ‘cut’ will certainly be subject to legal challenges,� he said. Niswender said he will file a new proposal in August, but that means another round of public hearings for a solution that wouldn’t go into effect until 2015. Niswender said lottery row “just happened.� Five years ago, restaurants sold steaks and seafood at the mall called Harbor Island Shops. In 2008, a company that operates a Dotty’s Deli

took over the restaurants and opened two other storefronts. All began offering video poker. Other owners carved up restaurants into smaller delis specializing in lottery games. By 2011, the strip had about 70 machines. Video lottery sales were $10 million in 2011. Mike Leloff, the local precinct commander, said crime on the island as a whole is down, but he added an officer to patrol the lottery row. Five years ago, he said, his officers responded to 476 calls there. Last year the number was 628. State Rep. Tina Kotek, whose district includes Hayden Island, said she wants to reexamine the “50 percent rule.� “There is no pretense that these places are restaurants,� Kotek said. “... If there were more people eating in those restaurants, and lottery was a secondary reason to be there, there wouldn’t be these problems.�

Toads Continued from D1 It’s this precipitous decline that led Bowerman to spend years studying the amphibians, looking for ways to spare them from what looked to be an inevitable extinction. To ensure as many toadlets as possible made it to adulthood and back to the pond for breeding, he lobbied Sunriver’s owners association in the early 1980s to construct tunnels that would give the toads a way to make the trip to and from the pond without risking death on roads and bike paths. When that effort failed, he and others at the Nature Center formed the “Toad Patrol� in the late ’80s, an all-volunteer team made up largely of children who collect toadlets ready to leave the pond and ferry them to safety in plastic buckets. While the Toad Patrol soldiers on year after year, Bowerman no longer believes the toads are at risk of extinction. “While I was concerned 10 years ago that we could lose all of our toads, I’m not concerned now,� he said. “I’m still worried about their welfare, with the amount of traffic we have in there, but there’s always habitat in places they don’t have to cross the roads.� Increasingly, Bowerman and other researchers are coming to believe the Western toad is uniquely adapted for environments that have experienced sudden changes, and that these changes partially explain the swings in the toad population. Volcanic eruptions and forest fires, both common across the toad’s Pacific Northwest range, seem to create conditions where the Western toad can thrive. “Both of these kind of sterilize the landscape,� Bowerman said. “And it turns out the toads are kind of a pioneer species, that specialize in using these refreshed landscapes.� The toads were the first vertebrates to return to Spirit Lake after the 1981 eruption of Mount St. Helens, Bowerman said, and

Joe Kline / The Bulletin

The Toad Patrol collects Western toads from the shore of Aspen Lake near the Sunriver Nature Center on Thursday. From left, Jaymi Dickinson, 5, of Bend, Zach Mercer, 4, of Cincinnati, Steve Mercer, of Cincinnati, and Tyler Dickinson, 9, of Bend.

“While I was concerned 10 years ago that we could lose all of our toads, I’m not concerned now. I’m still worried about their welfare, with the amount of traffic we have in there, but there’s always habitat in places they don’t have to cross the roads.� — Jay Bowerman, principal researcher, Sunriver Nature Center

may have been adapting to similar — if less severe — conditions in the Sunriver area. Both Lake Aspen and the many golf course ponds across Sunriver are largely manmade, some dating to the area’s past as a World War II training center, but mostly to Sunriver’s development between the late 1960s and early 1980s. When they were new, the ponds supported large populations of toads, Bowerman said, but as they’ve aged, they’ve become less desirable and the toads have moved on. A few years ago, Holy Redeemer Parish in La Pine built a small pond to aid with fire suppression, and toads began appearing seemingly out of nowhere, Bowerman said. When toadlets began hatching, the priest contacted Bowerman to report the edge of his pond had turned black with tiny toads. “He called me up in great consternation the next summer and said, ‘We’re having

Deaths of note from around the world: Bud Riley, 86: Father of Oregon State University football coach Mike Riley and a former assistant coach at the school. Died Saturday in British Columbia, Canada, after a long illness. Maj. Ignacy Skowron, 97: Last known Polish survivor of the opening battle of World War II. Died Sunday in Kielce, Poland, after suffering circulatory, liver and pancreas problems. John Phelan, 81: Led the New York Stock Exchange into the modern era of com-

petition and huge trading volumes and provided calm at the center of the storm when stock prices crashed in October 1987. Died Saturday. Bernd Meier, 40: Goalkeeper of the German Bundesliga soccer club Borussia Dortmund. Died Thursday following a heart attack. Robert Hughes, 74: Eloquent, combative art critic and historian who lived with operatic flair and wrote with a sense of authority that owed more to Zola or Ruskin than to his own century. Died Monday in the Bronx, N.Y.

Weekly Arts & Entertainment Fridays In

a plague of toads!’ � Bowerman recalled. “‘Of biblical proportions!’� Exactly what it is about new ponds or changed landscapes that so suits the toads is not clear. The toads could be taking advantage of the lack of competition in new ponds, Bowerman said, or may encounter predators, parasites or bacteria in more mature ponds. On Thursday at the Nature Center, Jennifer Curtis — lead naturalist and head of the Toad Patrol — led about a dozen children around the edge of the lake, pointing out where they’re most likely to find young toads in need of a lift. The kids filled fivegallon buckets with a few layers of toadlets, then carted them a few hundred yards away and released them in an open meadow near the north edge of the Sunriver Airport runway. Only about 10 percent of the toads that make it to the meadow will reach adulthood and

get a chance to come back to Lake Aspen and breed. Those that do make it back breed prolifically, Curtis said, with female toads laying as many as 10,000 eggs during a single breeding season. While not all of those eggs will make it to the tadpole or toadlet stage, Curtis said the numbers illustrate how helping a handful of toads across the road can dramatically swing the population. For the kids enlisted as Toad Patrol members, the science took a backseat to the excitement of scooping up handfuls of squirming toadlets. Steve Mercer, visiting from Cincinnati, said he and his family had been riding their bikes by the Nature Center the night before when they spotted something going on around the lake. They stopped to inquire, and 4-year-old Zach Mercer learned his services were needed on the Toad Patrol. An hour or so into his first day on Toad Patrol with his son, Steve Mercer said there was a reasonable chance the remaining days of their vacation would consist of little but plucking toads from the edge of the lake — and that would be just fine with him. “This is great. This is going to be his memory,� he said. — Reporter: 541-383-0387, shammers@bendbulletin.com

Deschutes Memorial Chapel & Gardens ĆăĈćą/)JHIXBZĉćt#FOE

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Deschutes Memorial now displays obituaries on our website. Please go to www.deschutesmemorialchapel.com to leave condolence messages for the family and to learn about funeral/ memorial services. ng Central O re rvi Se

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Deadlines: Death Notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details.

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‘Lottery row’ goes on — for now

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Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, email or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825.

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OREGON NEWS

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THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, AUGUST 7, 2012

D6

WEAT H ER FOR EC A ST Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LP ©2012.

TODAY, AUGUST 7

WEDNESDAY Tonight: Mostly clear.

Today: Mostly sunny.

HIGH

LOW

90

54

66/53

62/55

Cannon Beach 61/55

Hillsboro Portland 83/53 85/54

Tillamook 67/51

Salem

64/51

90/57

96/65

Maupin

Corvallis Yachats

87/50

68/54

91/46

Oakridge

Cottage Grove

89/52

88/49

Coos Bay

Crescent

62/54

Gold Beach

98/55

Chemult

89/57

Unity 95/56

93/57

Vale 104/66

Hampton

Juntura

Burns

94/50

Riley 95/54

94/58

Frenchglen 99/57

Rome

91/48

Grants Pass 87/51

99/61

Brookings

Klamath Falls 90/48

Ashland

61/53

The Dalles

91/55

Chiloquin

Medford

62/52

• 104°

101/58

Paisley

95/57

Yesterday’s state extremes

Jordan Valley

91/48

Silver Lake

83/43

EAST Ontario Mostly sunny skies 103/67 with warm temperatures expected Nyssa today. 100/65

103/58

95/55

Christmas Valley

Port Orford 66/53

Baker City John Day

Brothers 93/48

Fort Rock 91/45

84/44

80/46

Roseburg

90/54

La Pine 89/42

Crescent Lake

65/54

Bandon

Spray 96/57

Prineville 94/53 Sisters Redmond Paulina 96/50 91/47 96/53 Sunriver Bend

Eugene

Florence

91/55

87/52

90/50

64/52

CENTRAL Mostly sunny skies with warm temperatures expected today.

92/56

Mitchell 87/53

96/55

Camp Sherman

86/52

90/51

Union

96/57

Granite

Warm Springs

Enterprise Joseph

La Grande

89/59

Madras

86/53

Meacham

Condon

100/59

Wallowa

87/49

92/60

94/61

98/59

88/51

100/62

Ruggs

Willowdale

Albany

Newport

Pendleton

99/67

93/62

86/51

63/51

Hermiston 98/64

Arlington

Wasco

Sandy

Government Camp 75/54

84/53

100/64

The Biggs Dalles 94/64

87/52

McMinnville

Lincoln City

Umatilla

Hood River

92/57

• 41°

Fields

Lakeview

McDermitt

99/62

90/49

Lakeview

99/55

-30s

-20s

-10s

Vancouver 77/61

Yesterday’s extremes (in the 48 contiguous states):

0s

10s

Billings 97/63

Portland 83/53

• 121°

Boise 98/64

Death Valley, Calif.

• 39° Truckee, Calif.

• 4.60”

30s

San Francisco 66/54

Marianna, Fla.

Las Vegas 108/86

Salt Lake City 96/68

Phoenix 111/88

Honolulu 87/73

60s

St. Paul 85/63

Kansas City 98/71

Chicago 92/74

Juneau 61/54

FRONTS

Halifax 79/61 Portland 79/59 Boston 80/68 New York 85/72 Philadelphia 89/72 Washington, D. C. 89/73

Columbus 87/64 Louisville 92/70 Nashville Charlotte 91/70 86/71

St. Louis 96/68 Little Rock 97/73

Birmingham 89/71 New Orleans 93/78

Mazatlan 91/74

To ronto 89/66

Green Bay 85/63

Des Moines 95/67

Omaha 95/68

100s 110s

Quebec 81/61

Buffalo

Houston 96/77 Monterrey 102/78

90s

Detroit 83/64 89/70

Oklahoma City 103/78

Chihuahua 92/70

80s

Thunder Bay 77/54

Dallas 101/78

La Paz 94/78

70s

Rapid City 91/67

Tijuana 82/64

Anchorage 66/50

50s

Winnipeg 79/58

Denver 93/64 Albuquerque 94/71

Los Angeles 79/67

40s

Bismarck 89/61

Cheyenne 89/59

HIGH LOW

Mostly sunny.

HIGH LOW

87 51

Mostly sunny.

HIGH LOW

88 52

90 51

BEND ALMANAC

PLANET WATCH

TEMPERATURE

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . .4:56 a.m. . . . . . 7:17 p.m. Venus . . . . . .2:35 a.m. . . . . . 5:24 p.m. Mars. . . . . .11:40 a.m. . . . . 10:40 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . .1:04 a.m. . . . . . 4:07 p.m. Saturn. . . . .11:53 a.m. . . . . 11:02 p.m. Uranus . . . .10:11 p.m. . . . . 10:40 a.m.

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend 24 hours ending 4 p.m.*. . 0.04” High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90/59 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . 0.04” Record high . . . . . . . . 95 in 1990 Average month to date. . . 0.09” Record low. . . . . . . . . 32 in 1980 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.61” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Average year to date. . . . . 6.37” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.30.07 Record 24 hours . . .0.53 in 1999 *Melted liquid equivalent

Sunrise today . . . . . . 6:01 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 8:21 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 6:02 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 8:19 p.m. Moonrise today . . . 10:47 p.m. Moonset today . . . 12:09 p.m.

Moon phases Last

New

First

Full

Aug. 9 Aug. 17 Aug. 24 Aug. 31

OREGON CITIES

FIRE INDEX

Yesterday Tuesday Wed. City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Precipitation values are 24-hour totals through 4 p.m.

Bend, west of Hwy. 97......Ext. Bend, east of Hwy. 97.....High Redmond/Madras .........Ext.

Astoria . . . . . . . .65/58/0.00 Baker City . . . . . .94/63/0.00 Brookings . . . . . .59/55/0.02 Burns. . . . . . . . . .93/51/0.00 Eugene . . . . . . . .83/57/0.00 Klamath Falls . . .90/48/0.00 Lakeview. . . . . . .91/41/0.00 La Pine . . . . . . . .91/43/0.00 Medford . . . . . . .98/61/0.00 Newport . . . . . . .63/55/0.00 North Bend . . . . .64/55/0.00 Ontario . . . . . . . .99/68/0.00 Pendleton . . . . .101/74/0.00 Portland . . . . . . .90/66/0.00 Prineville . . . . . . .92/55/0.06 Redmond. . . . . . .96/59/0.00 Roseburg. . . . . . .88/60/0.00 Salem . . . . . . . . .88/59/0.00 Sisters . . . . . . . . .93/51/0.00 The Dalles . . . . .104/76/0.00

Mod. = Moderate; Ext. = Extreme

. . . . .66/53/c . . . . . .65/55/c . . . . .98/55/s . . . . . .93/52/s . . . .61/53/pc . . . . .63/53/pc . . . . .96/54/s . . . . . .93/53/s . . . .87/50/pc . . . . .82/50/pc . . . . .90/48/s . . . . . .89/48/s . . . . .90/49/s . . . . . .90/51/s . . . .89/42/pc . . . . . .86/39/s . . . . .99/61/s . . . . . .96/60/s . . . . .63/51/c . . . . . .61/54/c . . . . .64/55/c . . . . . .65/55/c . . . .103/67/s . . . . .100/66/s . . . .100/62/s . . . . . .99/58/s . . . . .83/53/s . . . . .79/53/pc . . . .94/53/pc . . . . .90/51/pc . . . . .94/53/s . . . . . .89/48/s . . . .89/57/pc . . . . .86/56/pc . . . .86/51/pc . . . . .81/53/pc . . . .91/47/pc . . . . .85/43/pc . . . . .96/65/s . . . . . .91/59/s

PRECIPITATION

WATER REPORT Sisters ..............................High La Pine................................Ext. Prineville...........................Ext.

The following was compiled by the Central Oregon watermaster and irrigation districts as a service to irrigators and sportsmen.

Reservoir Acre feet Capacity Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . . 36,049 . . . . . . 55,000 Wickiup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144,871 . . . . . 200,000 Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . 74,981 . . . . . . 91,700 Ochoco Reservoir . . . . . . . . 28,782 . . . . . . 47,000 Prineville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114,545 . . . . . 153,777 The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is River flow Station Cubic ft./sec Deschutes RiverBelow Crane Prairie . . . . . . . 240 for solar at noon. Deschutes RiverBelow Wickiup . . . . . . . . . . 1,610 Crescent CreekBelow Crescent Lake . . . . . . . 138 LOW MEDIUM HIGH V.HIGH Little DeschutesNear La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 0 2 4 6 8 10 Deschutes RiverBelow Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164 Deschutes RiverAt Benham Falls . . . . . . . . . 2,099 Crooked RiverAbove Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . 1 Crooked RiverBelow Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . 214 Updated daily. Source: pollen.com Ochoco CreekBelow Ochoco Res. . . . . . . . . . 17.2 Crooked RiverNear Terrebonne . . . . . . . . . . . 109 Contact: Watermaster, 388-6669 LOW MEDIUM HIGH or go to www.wrd.state.or.us

To report a wildfire, call 911

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX

9

POLLEN COUNT

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

Saskatoon 87/58

Calgary 81/54

Seattle 80/57

20s

SATURDAY

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS -40s

FRIDAY Mostly sunny.

88 51

WEST Clouds at the coast, with partly to mostly sunny skies inland today.

Astoria

Mostly clear.

HIGH LOW

FORECAST: STATE Seaside

THURSDAY

Atlanta 83/70

Orlando 92/77 Miami 91/79

Yesterday Tuesday Wed. City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .102/76/0.00 101/76/pc . 98/75/pc Akron . . . . . . . . . .83/63/0.00 . . . 85/61/s . 86/65/pc Albany. . . . . . . . . .79/65/0.00 . . . 86/62/s . 87/63/pc Albuquerque. . . . .93/66/0.26 . . . 94/71/t . . .93/68/t Anchorage . . . . . .65/48/0.00 . .66/50/pc . . 66/52/c Atlanta . . . . . . . . .86/73/0.05 . . . 83/70/t . . .88/72/t Atlantic City . . . . .89/73/1.00 . .82/70/pc . 82/75/pc Austin . . . . . . . . . .97/70/0.00 100/75/pc . 99/75/pc Baltimore . . . . . . .92/75/0.01 . .89/71/pc . 91/71/pc Billings . . . . . . . . .97/62/0.00 . . . 97/63/s . 96/62/pc Birmingham . . . . .91/75/0.00 . . . 89/71/t . . .91/72/t Bismarck. . . . . . . .94/54/0.00 . . . 89/61/t . . 87/61/s Boise . . . . . . . . . .100/76/0.00 . . . 98/64/s . . 96/62/s Boston. . . . . . . . . .85/73/0.00 . . . 80/68/s . 85/70/pc Bridgeport, CT. . . .87/75/0.13 . . . 84/68/s . 85/69/pc Buffalo . . . . . . . . .76/61/0.00 . . . 83/64/s . 85/64/pc Burlington, VT. . . .79/67/0.00 . .83/58/pc . 86/62/pc Caribou, ME . . . . .78/68/0.14 . .82/60/pc . 82/61/pc Charleston, SC . . .89/73/0.25 . . . 87/75/t . . .88/75/t Charlotte. . . . . . . .92/73/1.11 . . . 86/71/t . . .85/72/t Chattanooga. . . . .90/73/0.00 . . . 88/69/t . . .91/71/t Cheyenne . . . . . . .91/60/0.00 . .89/59/pc . . 90/61/s Chicago. . . . . . . . .85/62/0.00 . .92/74/pc . 83/71/pc Cincinnati . . . . . . .89/62/0.00 . . . 87/64/s . 89/68/pc Cleveland . . . . . . .81/66/0.00 . . . 83/69/s . 83/69/pc Colorado Springs .94/64/0.00 . . . 90/61/t . . 89/60/s Columbia, MO . . .97/65/0.00 . . . 98/69/s . 95/69/pc Columbia, SC . . . .94/75/2.12 . . . 89/73/t . . .88/73/t Columbus, GA. . . .85/75/0.24 . . . 89/72/t . . .90/72/t Columbus, OH. . . .90/64/0.00 . . . 87/64/s . 88/68/pc Concord, NH. . . . .82/67/0.00 . . . 83/57/s . 89/63/pc Corpus Christi. . . .98/73/0.01 . .91/77/pc . 91/78/pc Dallas Ft Worth. .104/81/0.00 101/78/pc 100/77/pc Dayton . . . . . . . . .84/58/0.00 . . . 85/64/s . 88/68/pc Denver. . . . . . . . . .98/69/0.00 . . . 93/64/t . . 93/62/s Des Moines. . . . . .92/59/0.00 . .95/67/pc . 90/67/pc Detroit. . . . . . . . . .81/58/0.00 . . . 89/70/s . 86/68/pc Duluth. . . . . . . . . .85/56/0.00 . . . 80/63/s . . .75/59/t El Paso. . . . . . . . . .98/75/0.00 100/78/pc . 97/80/pc Fairbanks. . . . . . . 71/43/trace . .69/49/sh . 66/47/sh Fargo. . . . . . . . . . .91/58/0.00 . . . 84/64/s . . .85/60/t Flagstaff . . . . . . . .80/53/0.00 . . . 82/58/t . . 84/58/s

YOUR LOCAL, AWARD-WINNING HOME & LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE

Yesterday Tuesday Wed. City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . . .84/54/0.00 . .89/62/pc . 84/61/pc Green Bay. . . . . . .81/53/0.00 . . . 85/63/s . . .80/63/t Greensboro. . . . . .89/73/0.00 . . . 83/69/t . . .86/70/t Harrisburg. . . . . . .88/73/0.00 . .87/65/pc . 88/67/pc Hartford, CT . . . . .84/72/0.00 . . . 86/67/s . 88/69/pc Helena. . . . . . . . . .91/60/0.00 . . . 90/59/s . . 92/61/s Honolulu. . . . . . . .86/73/0.00 . . . 87/73/s . . 89/74/s Houston . . . . . . . .97/75/0.00 . .96/77/pc . 96/78/pc Huntsville . . . . . . .87/73/0.53 . . . 90/69/t . . .91/70/t Indianapolis . . . . .89/65/0.00 . . . 90/66/s . 92/69/pc Jackson, MS . . . . .96/74/0.33 . .93/72/pc . . .93/73/t Jacksonville. . . . . .91/75/0.19 . . . 88/77/t . . .89/77/t Juneau. . . . . . . . . .59/51/0.93 . . . 61/54/r . . .59/51/r Kansas City. . . . . .97/65/0.00 . . . 98/71/s . . .92/69/t Lansing . . . . . . . . .85/51/0.00 . .88/61/pc . 84/61/pc Las Vegas . . . . . .104/87/0.00 108/86/pc . 109/85/s Lexington . . . . . . .86/71/0.05 . .86/68/pc . 89/71/pc Lincoln. . . . . . . . . .97/60/0.00 . .95/68/pc . 91/68/pc Little Rock. . . . . . .97/77/0.00 . . . 97/73/s . 95/72/pc Los Angeles. . . . . .75/64/0.00 . .79/67/pc . 80/67/pc Louisville. . . . . . . .92/72/0.00 . . . 92/70/s . 92/72/pc Madison, WI . . . . .82/52/0.00 . .90/61/pc . 84/62/pc Memphis. . . . . . . .96/77/0.00 . . . 94/72/s . 95/72/pc Miami . . . . . . . . . .88/75/0.13 . .91/79/pc . 91/80/pc Milwaukee . . . . . .85/60/0.00 . .89/68/pc . 77/68/pc Minneapolis . . . . .86/61/0.00 . . . 85/63/s . . .82/63/t Nashville. . . . . . . .90/73/0.00 . .91/70/pc . 93/70/pc New Orleans. . . . .92/77/0.00 . . . 93/78/t . . .92/78/t New York . . . . . . .86/73/0.01 . . . 85/72/s . 86/71/pc Newark, NJ . . . . . .89/75/0.04 . . . 86/70/s . 88/70/pc Norfolk, VA . . . . . .90/73/0.57 . . . 85/73/t . . .86/75/t Oklahoma City . .105/77/0.00 103/78/pc . 99/69/pc Omaha . . . . . . . . .96/64/0.00 . .95/68/pc . 91/69/pc Orlando. . . . . . . . .94/75/0.37 . . . 92/77/t . . .91/77/t Palm Springs. . . .111/87/0.00 111/87/pc 114/88/pc Peoria . . . . . . . . . .87/58/0.00 . . . 96/68/s . 89/66/pc Philadelphia . . . . .89/76/0.00 . .89/72/pc . 90/72/pc Phoenix. . . . . . . .112/88/0.00 111/88/pc 112/87/pc Pittsburgh . . . . . . .82/66/0.00 . . . 87/61/s . 88/62/pc Portland, ME. . . . .83/71/0.01 . . . 79/59/s . 82/63/pc Providence . . . . . .86/73/0.00 . . . 85/67/s . 86/69/pc Raleigh . . . . . . . . .93/74/0.00 . . . 85/71/t . . .86/72/t

Yesterday Tuesday Wed. City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . . .98/60/0.00 . .91/67/pc . . 94/64/s Reno . . . . . . . . . . .98/61/0.00 . . . 96/62/s . . 97/65/s Richmond . . . . . . .89/77/0.00 . . . 86/71/t . . .91/73/t Rochester, NY . . . .77/59/0.00 . . . 84/63/s . 88/65/pc Sacramento. . . . . .94/55/0.00 . . . 99/61/s . . 99/63/s St. Louis. . . . . . . . .95/68/0.00 . . . 96/68/s . 95/73/pc Salt Lake City . . . .95/71/0.00 . . . 96/68/s . . 98/72/s San Antonio . . . . .98/73/0.00 100/75/pc . 99/75/pc San Diego . . . . . . .77/66/0.00 . .78/67/pc . 79/68/pc San Francisco . . . .69/56/0.00 . . . 71/55/s . . 71/54/s San Jose . . . . . . . .78/58/0.00 . . . 82/59/s . . 85/57/s Santa Fe . . . . . . . .87/59/0.08 . . . 86/60/t . . .85/61/t

Yesterday Tuesday Wed. City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Savannah . . . . . . .86/75/0.69 . . . 89/75/t . . .89/75/t Seattle. . . . . . . . . .82/60/0.00 . . . 80/57/s . . 73/55/s Sioux Falls. . . . . . .98/65/0.00 . .91/66/pc . 90/63/pc Spokane . . . . . . . 91/66/trace . . . 97/62/s . 93/60/pc Springfield, MO . .95/65/0.00 . . . 96/71/s . . .93/69/t Tampa. . . . . . . . . .92/75/0.27 . . . 92/76/t . . .91/76/t Tucson. . . . . . . . .106/76/0.00 102/80/pc 106/80/pc Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .102/67/0.00 . .102/75/s . 97/73/pc Washington, DC . .93/78/0.02 . .89/73/pc . 91/73/pc Wichita . . . . . . . .101/66/0.00 . .100/76/s . . .94/70/t Yakima . . . . . . . . .91/68/0.00 . . . 95/64/s . . 95/60/s Yuma. . . . . . . . . .110/86/0.00 111/85/pc 112/86/pc

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . . .68/61/0.00 . . .66/58/c . 70/55/sh Athens. . . . . . . . . .96/75/0.00 . .102/81/s . . 97/80/s Auckland. . . . . . . .61/46/0.00 . .59/47/sh . 56/47/sh Baghdad . . . . . . .108/75/0.00 . .110/82/s . 113/83/s Bangkok . . . . . . . .91/81/0.00 . . . 87/77/t . . .92/78/t Beijing. . . . . . . . . .90/75/0.00 . .93/74/pc . . .90/73/t Beirut . . . . . . . . . .90/81/0.00 . . . 89/81/s . . 90/81/s Berlin. . . . . . . . . . .75/63/0.09 . .70/56/pc . 68/54/pc Bogota . . . . . . . . .64/52/0.07 . .68/45/pc . 69/48/sh Budapest. . . . . . . .99/70/0.00 . . . 83/60/s . . 84/57/s Buenos Aires. . . . .59/46/0.00 . . . 58/51/r . 53/43/sh Cabo San Lucas . .93/77/0.00 . .92/79/pc . 94/79/pc Cairo . . . . . . . . . . .97/77/0.00 . .100/80/s . 102/79/s Calgary . . . . . . . . .86/57/0.00 . .81/54/pc . 81/56/pc Cancun . . . . . . . . .90/75/0.05 . . . 84/77/t . . .85/77/t Dublin . . . . . . . . . .64/52/0.00 . .68/54/sh . . 67/59/c Edinburgh. . . . . . .64/55/0.00 . . .64/46/c . 65/48/pc Geneva . . . . . . . . .72/55/0.00 . .75/53/pc . . 79/57/s Harare. . . . . . . . . .77/66/0.00 . . . 76/45/s . 74/47/pc Hong Kong . . . . . .90/81/0.00 . . . 90/83/t . . .91/93/t Istanbul. . . . . . . . .97/75/0.00 . . . 93/74/s . . 89/77/s Jerusalem . . . . . . .85/68/0.01 . . . 91/70/s . . 93/70/s Johannesburg. . . .61/37/0.00 . . .44/32/c . 51/35/pc Lima . . . . . . . . . . .64/61/0.00 . .67/61/pc . 68/62/pc Lisbon . . . . . . . . . .77/61/0.00 . . . 86/60/s . . 86/64/s London . . . . . . . . .70/55/0.00 . .63/60/sh . 75/59/pc Madrid . . . . . . . . .86/57/0.00 . . . 91/62/s . . 96/64/s Manila. . . . . . . . . .79/73/0.00 . . . 84/78/t . . .83/77/t

Mecca . . . . . . . . .106/88/0.00 . .108/89/s . 108/90/s Mexico City. . . . . .77/55/0.00 . . . 75/57/t . . .73/53/t Montreal. . . . . . . .73/63/0.00 . .87/65/pc . 84/63/pc Moscow . . . . . . . .82/61/0.00 . .90/67/pc . 77/55/pc Nairobi . . . . . . . . .81/54/0.00 . .74/59/sh . . .75/57/t Nassau . . . . . . . . .90/82/0.00 . .92/80/pc . . .89/79/t New Delhi. . . . . . .91/82/0.00 . .97/82/pc . . .98/82/t Osaka . . . . . . . . . .99/79/0.00 . . . 90/77/t . 89/73/pc Oslo. . . . . . . . . . . .61/55/0.00 . .67/54/sh . 65/52/sh Ottawa . . . . . . . . .81/57/0.00 . .88/64/pc . 85/62/pc Paris. . . . . . . . . . . .72/59/0.00 . .73/57/pc . 76/59/sh Rio de Janeiro. . . .77/61/0.00 . .76/61/pc . 78/62/pc Rome. . . . . . . . . . .93/72/0.00 . . . 91/71/s . . 89/69/s Santiago . . . . . . . .55/45/0.00 . . . 55/44/s . . 68/52/s Sao Paulo . . . . . . .66/54/0.00 . .70/51/pc . . 74/54/s Sapporo . . . . . . . .75/68/0.00 . .72/62/pc . 73/64/sh Seoul. . . . . . . . . . .95/77/0.00 . .91/69/pc . . 89/69/s Shanghai. . . . . . . .91/81/0.00 . . . 85/79/t . . .86/81/t Singapore . . . . . . .84/79/0.00 . .88/79/pc . . .89/81/t Stockholm. . . . . . .75/55/0.19 . .69/53/sh . 65/53/sh Sydney. . . . . . . . . .64/48/0.00 . . . 65/45/s . 67/47/pc Taipei. . . . . . . . . . .90/77/0.00 . . . 84/79/t . . .86/81/t Tel Aviv . . . . . . . . .90/79/0.00 . . . 91/79/s . . 93/79/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . . .84/77/0.00 . . . 89/76/t . . .88/74/t Toronto . . . . . . . . .79/61/0.00 . .89/66/pc . 81/64/pc Vancouver. . . . . . .77/63/0.00 . . . 77/61/s . . 73/57/s Vienna. . . . . . . . . .90/64/0.00 . .77/56/pc . 78/58/pc Warsaw. . . . . . . . .95/63/0.00 . .76/59/pc . 74/56/sh

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Stock listings, E2-3 Calendar, E4 Deeds, E4

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, AUGUST 7, 2012

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NASDAQ

CLOSE 2,989.91 CHANGE +22.01 +.74%

IN BRIEF Common Table to close its doors Common Table, a nonprofit restaurant in downtown Bend, will close Wednesday evening. While running the restaurant, which provides free meals to low-income and homeless people from its revenues, is challenging enough, renovations under way in the building housing the Common Table would have forced it to shut down for four months, according to statements on the restaurant’s Facebook page and the Downtown Bend Business Association’s website. Common Table opened in fall 2010 on Northwest Oregon Avenue near Bond Street. But the mission will continue, according to the statements. The Common Table steering committee and executive director are working on plans that will be released shortly, it said.

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DOW JONES

www.bendbulletin.com/business CLOSE 13,117.51 CHANGE +21.34 +.16%

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S&P 500

CLOSE 1,394.23 CHANGE +3.24 +.23%

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10-year Treasury

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$1612.90 GOLD CLOSE CHANGE +$6.90

Brokerage gets $400M bailout Knight Capital Group Inc. on Monday confirmed it has entered into a $400 million deal to rescue the struggling brokerage after a trading software glitch last week left it on the verge of collapse. In a filing with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, Knight said a group of investors agreed to purchase $400 million of 2 percent convertible preferred stock. — Staff and wire reports

Retail sales for July THOMSON REUTERS RETAIL COMPOSITE INDEX Year-to-year change based on monthly sales at stores open at least a year.* +4.3% +10% + 8

• The $8.8 billion deal would be the biggest ever for a U.S. retailer By Mark Scott New York Times News Service

Richard Schulze, the founder of Best Buy, offered to buy the electronics retailer on Monday in a deal that would value it as much as $8.8 billion. A deal near that price would be biggest ever buyout of a U.S. retailer, according to S&P Capital IQ data, topping the $8.4 billion buyout of Toys R Us in 2005. Schulze, who resigned from

the company’s board in June, said he would offer Best Buy shareholders $24-$26 for each of their shares in the electronics company, according to a letter sent to the board that he Schulze made public. The offer represents a premium of 36 percent on the low end of his offer and a premium of 47 percent on the high end from

the company’s closing share price on Friday. Best Buy shares closed Monday up 13.3 percent at $19.99 after hitting $20.96 earlier in the day. “There is no question that now is the moment of truth for Best Buy and that immediate and substantial changes are needed for the company to return to its market-leading ways,” Schulze said in a statement. “I am deeply concerned that further delay and indecision will

cause additional loss of both value and talented leaders who are now uncertain of the company’s future.” With a 20.1 percent stake in the company, the Best Buy founder is the company’s largest shareholder. In his letter, Schulze said he had held discussions with several private equity firms interested in participating in the deal, as well as with former Best Buy senior executives, including Brad Anderson and Allen Lenzmeier. See Best Buy / E3

EXECUTIVE FILE

Photos by Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Scott Philiben, president of CIES Corp., explains how his company’s fuel-gauge system sends electronic readings of fuel levels to airplane cockpits. The Redmond-based company unveiled its fuel gauge device in March, and has already shipped more than 1,000 units.

A high-flying fuel gauge • Company’s invention promises to solve a problem that has long been an issue for the aviation industry By Elon Glucklich The Bulletin

REDMOND — ne year of tinkering was all Scott Philiben needed to solve a problem that has plagued aviators since the birth of air travel: How to accurately read the level of fuel in an airplane without putting electrical wiring in the fuel tank and risking an explosion. Philiben, president of Redmondbased CIES Inc., is part of a development team that unveiled a remote fuel-gauge reading system. The device is less than a foot long, weighs about 5 pounds and vaguely resembles a pizza cutting utensil. Once attached to the wings of a plane, however, it is programmed to take precise readings of fuel levels and transmit them to pilots. Fuel is stored in the wings on a vast majority of aircraft. Accurately reading fuel levels has long been an issue for small airplanes and large commercial aircraft alike.

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+ 4

New York Times News Service

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*Excludes drug companies Sources: Company reports; Thomson Reuters New York Times News Service

accused of hiding transactions with Iranians By Jessica Silver-Greenberg New York Times News Service

Thwarting controls against money laundering, Standard Chartered Bank enabled Iranian banks and corporations to hide roughly 60,000 transactions worth at least $250 billion within the bank, New York state’s banking regulator charged Monday. The New York State Department of Financial Services accused the British bank, which it called a “rogue institution” of hiding the transactions in order to gain hundreds of millions of dollars in fees from January 2001 through 2010. Under U.S. law, transactions with Iranian banks are strictly monitored and subject to sanctions because of government concerns about the use of the nation’s banks to finance Iran’s nuclear programs and terrorist organizations. See Iran / E3

The basics What: CIES Inc. Where: 221 S.E. Timber Ave., Redmond Employees: Four Phone: 541-815-6731 Website: http://ciescorp.com

Almost 9 percent of plane crashes are caused by fuel-management problems, according to a 2009 risk management handbook published by the Federal Aviation Administration. The back-and-forth swaying of airplanes amid wind resistance and weather turbulence causes fuel to slosh back and forth within a fuel tank, often throwing off gauge readings. And fuel-level detectors embedded in the fuel tank come with their own hazards. See Gauge / E3

CIES’s fuel-gauge technology avoids the risk of explosion by using magnets and Wi-Fi to transmit readings. Other gauges require electrical wiring in a plane’s fuel tank.

Revolving door actually strengthens enforcement, study says By Edward Wyatt New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — The revolving door has long been the focus of government watchdogs here, a symbolic portal that business executives and lawyers pass through on their way to government posts and back again to the private sector. There, the thinking goes, they use their influence with former colleagues to reap benefits for themselves and their companies. But despite plenty of anecdotal accusations of influence-peddling, there has been relatively little empirical evidence of how the practice truly affects government regulation and law enforcement. Now, a group of accounting professors has produced a study showing that the revolving door actually toughens enforcement results at the Securities and Exchange Commission — the opposite of what government critics have long maintained. See SEC / E4

Computer security startups catch venture capitalists’ eyes By Nicole Perlroth and Evelyn M. Rusli

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CLOSE $27.852 CHANGE +$0.062

SEC

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+ 2

SILVER

Best Buy founder makes buyout offer British bank

Bernanke: Data mask struggles As economic data points have gone recently, last week’s unemployment report was good news: 163,000 net new jobs created in July, exceeding analysts’ expectations. But such broad statistics don’t tell the whole story, Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke said Monday. They mask the actual struggles of average Americans in an economic recovery still straining to gain traction. “Even though some key aggregate metrics — including consumer spending, disposable income, household net worth and debt service payments — have moved in the direction of recovery, it is clear that many individuals and households continue to struggle with difficult economic and financial conditions,” Bernanke said in a pre-recorded video speech for a Massachusetts conference.

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MENLO PARK, Calif. — The question is no longer who have hackers hit. It is who has not been hit. The list of organizations attacked by pranksters, criminal syndicates or foreign governments includes Google, LinkedIn and the Central Intelligence Agency.

TECH FOCUS Big companies are expected to spend $32.8 billion on computer security this year, up 9 percent from last year. Small and medium-size businesses will spend more on security than other information technology purchases in the next three years, according to the International Data Corp., the

research firm. Yet in Silicon Valley, with all the feverish talk of innovation and billion-dollar startups, few entrepreneurs and venture capitalists have been eager to take on the security juggernauts Symantec and McAfee — and in many cases cybercriminals — for a piece of that action. That has started to change. See Security / E3

Patrick Morley, CEO of Bit9, a cyber security company, says companies are paying closer attention to security. Evan McGlinn New York Times News Service


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THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, AUGUST 7, 2012

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D

C

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C 8.91 29.51 13.13 15.08 52.61 81.53 47.45 36.61 53.09 49.52 2.45 30.50 49.65 30.13 31.90 12.66 51.54 76.28 50.99 54.33 34.33 72.70 34.28 12.92 1.40 1.15 23.91 55.05 29.99 45.37 17.83 48.40 4.47 73.58 2.30 50.16 26.68 68.21 14.56 74.39 29.97 2.58 18.08 3.80 10.19

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0.38 1.60 2.17 1.13 0.80

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0.80 2.28 0.32 0.28 0.36 0.48

1.24 0.84 0.76 0.56 2.92 0.96

0.56 0.80 1.15 0.32 0.24 0.32 0.20 0.04 0.04 0.32 0.80 0.40 0.08 0.60 2.20 0.64

0.64 1.44 0.64 0.27 1.21 0.72 0.20

0.20

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5.50 7.92 44.77 26.62 27.06 43.81 105.74 55.12 54.44 39.60 9.01 6.56 21.89 54.29 44.32 26.76 16.66 10.55 9.35 8.63 14.08 10.78 12.79 22.62 64.43 58.44 8.68 7.91 45.25 3.22 11.49 100.42 5.89 33.79 34.59 11.25 11.07 12.20 1.37 24.20 15.30 20.47 25.01 48.94 2.13 6.73 28.89 40.03 21.91 8.81 8.16 29.78 9.37 12.02 35.69 51.31 65.97 42.24 43.90 31.98 1.62 14.30 17.65 35.00 17.32 56.37 29.71 8.08 72.21 53.63 45.64 5.86 46.39 178.45 21.53 62.35 9.44 155.61 53.51 57.66 21.21 17.46 102.08 10.63 .52 7.11 10.14 4.85 38.06 1.77 2.96 58.42 36.04 15.92 55.98 15.51 33.22 3.34 87.45 38.58 97.13 54.09 20.86 54.14 47.04 11.08 4.06 23.13 7.21 21.92 92.60 14.42 65.44 34.49 42.72 90.12 106.89 5.88 20.22 4.96 3.06 7.98 18.50 31.13 11.87 10.43 13.98 21.39 13.13 21.75 18.17 3.71 6.93 8.24 13.02 17.33 11.60 7.90 12.06 32.14 19.06 16.23 19.15 49.32 16.24 69.59 31.16 3.65 .89 35.99 6.34 10.16 21.35 125.22 52.95 21.08 86.30 33.74 9.15 .71 14.73 33.59 7.06 5.46 24.55 4.03 22.71 22.09 69.79 19.63 13.80 30.75 49.86 114.03 34.34 11.19 19.15 60.73 4.45 3.78 1.07 29.61 9.36 1.03

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8.83 20.62 41.35 3.10 .87 38.49 9.54 5.12 16.05 5.42 2.91 1.50 35.18 13.70 16.01 14.59 33.75 58.91 40.04 47.95 .12 37.52 3.63 7.97 22.40 26.78 62.98 20.97 18.71 38.49 19.85 64.26 31.48 2.32 18.52 16.60 7.92 64.23 4.39 23.61 24.90 .21 .12 36.01 9.53 1.74 18.19 3.68 4.70 29.80 57.64 15.11 16.35 47.23 10.38 6.69 43.03 13.18 13.56 4.71 4.86 40.06 13.40 18.57 36.32 1.30 102.02 10.86 11.26 642.82 21.95 56.94 47.45 11.07 206.55 4.48 16.15 25.05 5.65 1.79 .54 7.40 1.71 22.08 10.08 21.47 4.13 15.39 40.42 43.03 10.24 21.23 7.25 23.31 29.32 50.29 26.50 22.76 18.02 25.55 32.19 46.28 35.88 34.74 43.52 42.83 71.09 55.73 7.32 33.82 4.82 30.35 31.77 11.30 34.78 1.79 1.02 10.10 41.94 41.27 4.47 9.99 44.06 42.02 12.97 20.23 17.12 8.37 36.46 28.53 28.21 6.53 6.60 60.60 22.04 6.61 24.38 9.25 17.97 22.28 28.19 10.68 13.60 30.84 3.38 4.70 36.21 55.38 17.86 47.44 76.54 53.60 4.05 11.04 4.98 71.65 11.78 48.28 18.69 23.55 6.35 61.77 11.60 33.33 26.06 18.06 25.27 39.40 19.65 52.00 21.62 14.50 64.93 24.32 20.11 12.42 31.73 58.64 5.20 27.74 39.70 9.40 34.60 24.65 15.19 9.75 2.44

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D C 0.31 26.84 -1.48 31.36 +.43 1.64 81.90 -.23 0.32 6.32 +.06 1.04 63.25 +.55 0.56 54.56 -.26 0.16 6.35 +.03 0.40 13.45 +.32 37.88 +.18 .74 -.02

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53.25 11.65 34.97 89.77 111.36 17.62 8.92 6.84 24.94 5.78 6.98 60.55 26.40 22.82 15.68 23.52 54.21 26.46 28.22 20.31 20.86 17.05 11.10 9.11 56.31 14.62 63.01 13.34 43.42 24.13 27.93 23.73 12.43 16.91 56.09 56.07 27.11 64.43 57.49 121.33 34.99 90.76 140.20 112.16 40.18 120.71 45.07 119.38 75.62 42.80 63.58 111.61 127.47 108.48 31.23 84.48 51.35 47.01 59.88 30.43 94.91 91.64 21.86 14.47 133.45 108.86 69.68 64.73 76.91 70.20 110.46 105.06 90.76 79.22 123.38 61.43 110.20 39.38 82.12 29.51 21.73 23.87 65.60 16.52 73.65 34.98 43.44 6.77 72.29 20.37 33.42 45.40 1.30 18.00 42.92 8.16 39.41 55.57 42.55 21.27 3.06 13.49 3.50 23.87 18.30 38.09 19.35 5.65 16.68 31.95 40.67 42.73 15.05 52.29 8.15 11.04 18.33 19.54 5.43 61.30 26.31 19.25 13.81 132.00 31.08 13.63 5.84 7.94 6.82 198.76 55.83 11.20 32.80 17.66 87.37 10.11 8.96 21.75 59.62 490.80 13.88 13.46 6.00 22.52 19.35 12.13 4.94 8.05 7.14 32.75 12.49 13.19 1.02 16.27 42.48 8.90 15.45 29.61 1.01 30.49 10.28 36.30 39.69 22.12 26.14 39.34 .99 2.54 2.27 7.30 47.64 49.01 12.23 5.13

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D

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+.19 +.18 -.15 -.10 -.13 -.39 +.83 +.47 +1.13 +6.16 +.62 +1.63 -.02

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TUESDAY, AUGUST 7, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

Gauge Continued from E1 That issue came to the forefront in 1996, when a TWA flight from New York City to Paris exploded minutes after takeoff, killing more than 200. Follow-up investigations found the explosion was most likely caused by a spark from a fuel-reading gauge inside the fuel tank, which ignited the fuel. Philiben said tragedies like that can be a thing of the past, thanks to his company’s fuel gauge. CIES, founded in late 2010 by Philiben and Richard Kirkness, unveiled its digital fuel-level sender earlier this year. A 20-year Central Oregon resident, Philiben used to design planes for high-level executives at companies such as General Electric and AIG. But in recent years he’s been focusing his attention on aircraft safety issues. He served as vice president of Bend-based Precise Flight for more than a decade, developing technology to cut down on instances of birds striking planes. Philiben is convinced his fuel-gauge product can bring unparalleled accuracy to fuel-

Security Continued from E1 In the last 12 months, the initial public offerings of onceobscure security startups have outperformed the offerings from household names like Facebook and Zynga. Imperva, a data security company that went public last year, finished 2011 as the year’s top performing stock offering. Its shares jumped 93 percent on their first day of trading, and remain 8 percent above the offering price. Zynga stock, by comparison, has plunged 68 percent since its offering last December. Shares of Splunk, a data security company, jumped 70 percent from its offering in April. It raised $331 million in a secondary offering. Most recently, shares of Palo Alto Networks, a security startup, climbed 26 percent when they started trading in July. The reason for the enthusiasm? “People are starting to realize that the billions of dollars that have been invested into traditional network security is not working for them anymore,” said Ted Schlein, a partner at Kleiner Perkins Caufield &

gauge monitoring, and prevent disasters like the TWA crash from happening again. Many industry officials seem to agree. Cirrus Aircraft, a Minnesota-based maker of small, FAAcertified airplanes, signed an agreement to use CIES products. A successful demonstration of the product last month at EAA Airventure in Oshkosh, Wis., one of the world’s largest aviation conventions, spread the word of its accuracy. Now Philiben said he’s fielding calls and emails from some of the biggest airline manufacturers in the country. The company even developed a smartphone application, that can check fuel levels remotely and tell a user where the nearest fuel station is. How does your fuel readQ: The ing instrument work? device attaches A: magnetically to the plane, and is designed to monitor the flow of fuel. There are typically two or three of these devices that are put on the wing of a plane. The magnets take readings of fuel levels, kind of the same way that a compass can track your direction. As the fuel empties,

Byers, the venture capital firm. Security startups have also become red-hot takeover targets. Apple, which has avoided bigticket deals, agreed to acquire AuthenTec for $356 million in its second-largest acquisition to date. And last year, EMC Corp., which already owns RSA, acquired NetWitness. The price was not disclosed but people close to the acquisition talks say NetWitness sold for $400 million, more than 10 times its 12-month trailing revenue. Venture capitalists have taken notice. Last year, they collectively poured $935 million into tech security companies, nearly double the $498 million they invested during 2010, according to a MoneyTree report compiled by PricewaterhouseCoopers, the National Venture Capital Association and Thomson Reuters. “We’re seeing a flow of new entrepreneurs interested in the space,” said Asheem Chandna, a venture capitalist at Greylock who invested in Imperva and Palo Alto Networks. The rise of security startups is the product of a confluence of new technology, fear and

the magnet rotates, and sensors on the device track this change. The sensors measure the position of the magnets, which gives it a fuel reading, and then outputs that data through Wi-Fi right into the cockpit fuel gauge. Why is a product like Q: yours important for airplanes? Aviation fuel-level meaA: suring has never been accurate. In a plane, the fuel kind of moves all over the place. We said, if we can solve a problem, this is a good way of doing it. Accurate fuel reading is such an endemic problem in aviation. With our device, we can finally solve this difficult problem. And there’s the safety issue as well, with the device and its interaction with the fuel. We don’t touch the fuel at all. It’s totally noncontact. There are no parts in the fuel tank that can wear out. We don’t have any problems like that with our fuel system.

Div PE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

AlaskAir s Avista BkofAm BarrettB Boeing CascdeBcp CascdeCp ColSprtw Costco CraftBrew FLIR Sys HewlettP HmFedID Intel Keycorp Kroger Lattice LaPac MDU Res MentorGr Microsoft

... 1.16 .04 .44 1.76 ... 1.40 .88 1.10 ... .28 .53 .22 .90f .20 .46 ... ... .67 ... .80

34.85 27.78 7.64 25.58 72.89 4.77 48.12 53.55 96.50 8.70 20.86 18.69 10.07 26.31 8.23 22.46 3.86 11.42 22.26 15.42 29.95

12 17 8 36 13 ... 10 18 27 16 14 7 ... 11 8 22 9 ... 20 15 15

+.42 -.02 +.21 -.55 +.08 +.07 -.37 +1.53 -.71 -.02 +.07 +.43 -.11 +.08 -.01 +.26 +.03 +.22 -.01 -.07 +.20

-7.2 +7.9 +37.4 +28.2 -.6 +8.9 +2.0 +15.0 +15.8 +44.5 -16.8 -27.4 -3.2 +8.5 +7.0 -7.3 -35.0 +41.5 +3.7 +13.7 +15.4

Metal NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

Price (troy oz.) $1613.00 $1612.90 $27.852

contact fuel-level senders for propane tanks. I think that, if we can solve this problem for planes, then we can do it for boats, solve it for trucks, heavy equipment. We are definitely looking to expand into those fields eventually. Ford is coming out with its dual-fuel trucks, with a propane option. But it doesn’t come with a propane gauge. Our devices could tell someone not only how much propane they have in their tank, but where the nearest propane station is. —Reporter: 5 4 1 -6 1 7 -7 8 2 0 eglucklich@bendbulletin.com

people with a lot of money to invest. Major technological shifts, like the move to mobile devices and cloud storage, have redirected and increased the flow of information — for both employees and hackers. Hackers are getting more sophisticated, too. Last year was the year of the “Advanced Persistent Threat,” or APT, a computer attack in which hackers spend time researching a target and its intellectual property, figuring out who has access to it, and deploying any means necessary to steal it. RSA was the victim of such an attack last year. So were the military contractors Lockheed Martin and Northrop Grumman. Speaking at a security conference last year, Timothy McKnight, Northrop Grumman’s chief security officer, said the company was fending off several such attacks a day. “The vast majority of companies have already been breached,” Shawn Henry, the FBI’s former top computer security official, said in a recent interview. Patrick Morley, chief executive of Bit9, a startup that

blocks malware, says the steady stream of “bad news” has been a boon for business. Bit9 was founded a decade ago but was largely unknown until 2010, when Google’s password system was breached and toplevel executives started to pay attention. “In boardrooms, executives lifted their heads and asked, ‘Are we OK?’ ” Morley said. Investing in security can entail unusual challenges. In some cases, venture capitalists have received death threats from online criminals. In others, criminals have shut down their sites altogether. Ray Rothrock, an investment partner at Venrock, said he had received threatening emails from such people. On occasion, his firm has hired security guards to protect its offices. “The thing about security investments is that sometimes you don’t know where you’re going to land in terms of attracting attention from the bad guys,” Rothrock said. But, he said, the risks are still worth the rewards. “Security is a growing market and it will grow forever.”

Iran Continued from E 1 The bank “left the U.S. financial system vulnerable to terrorists, weapons dealers, drug kingpins and corrupt regimes,” the agency said in an order sent to the bank Monday. At the most extreme, the agency’s enforcement actions against the bank could include the revocation of its license to operate in New York. Beyond the dealings with Iran, the department said it discovered evidence that Standard Chartered operated “similar schemes” to do business with other countries, sanctioned by the United States, including Burma, Libya and Sudan. The department, led by Benjamin Lawsky, said it reviewed more than 30,000 bank documents, including internal emails, and that it investigated the bank because it routed the transactions through its New York operations. Under the order, Standard Chartered will have to pay for an independent monitor to ensure its operations comply with state law. In an emailed statement, a spokesman for Standard Chartered said the bank was reviewing its “historical U.S. sanctions compliance and is discussing that review with U.S. enforcement agencies and regulators.” He added that the bank “cannot predict when this review and these discussions will be completed or what the outcome will be.” The department alleges that Standard Chartered systematically scrubbed any identifying information from the transactions for powerful Iranian institutions, including the Central Bank of Iran and Bank Saderat, that are legally subject

Best Buy Continued from E1 “Bold and extensive changes are needed for Best Buy to return to market leadership,” Schulze wrote. “The company’s best chance for renewed success will be to implement these changes under a different ownership structure.” The Best Buy founder said he planned to pay for the acquisition by contrib-

Market recap

Name

Div PE

NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstBcp Weyerhsr

1.44 1.08 1.78 .08 .80 ... 1.68 .12 .70f .75 1.56 .89f .68 ... .36f .78 .32 .88 ... .60

Precious metals

What other plans do you Q: We have for the fuel sender? were approached A: by an Italian firm, seeing if we could supply non-

How are you marketQ: ing your fuel-sender device? Companies have been A: contacting us. Our big customer right now is Cirrus.

Northwest stocks Name

But we were approached by Mahindra as well. They’re a big tractor company, but they also have an aerospace division. And we’ve talked with Quest Aircraft in Idaho. They both heard about our product through other channels, without us reaching out to them … We have about 1,000 units in the field, which we’ve been shipping since March. This time next year, we anticipate being about three times the size we are right now.

YTD Last Chg %Chg

20 95.52 +.95 -.9 17 54.45 +.10 +9.5 21 48.92 +.08 +2.1 11 5.02 +.10 +10.6 12 40.04 +.32 +6.9 ... 1.49 +.01 -22.0 37 40.29 -.33 +10.2 18 156.56 +.31 -5.0 9 15.83 +.38 -24.8 13 31.40 +.68 -25.7 27 135.41 -.67 +51.7 10 30.06 +.10 -18.2 24 43.48 -.26 -5.5 ... 5.63 -.02 +15.6 15 12.27 -.05 -1.0 12 33.01 -.48 +22.0 13 16.05 +.16 +14.7 11 34.00 -.34 +23.4 12 19.97 +.09 +28.0 36 23.47 -.18 +25.7

Prime rate

Pvs Day

Time period

Percent

$1604.00 $1606.00 $27.790

Last Previous day A week ago

3.25 3.25 3.25

NYSE

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

BkofAm KnghtCap S&P500ETF AmIntlGrp BestBuy

1103834 7.64 +.21 853296 3.07 -.98 782661 139.62 +.27 552045 32.09 +.75 441295 19.99 +2.35

Last Chg

Gainers ($2 or more) Name

Last

Chg %Chg

ETrSPlat StMotr ChinaDEd BestBuy Renren

33.14 +7.30 +28.3 17.18 +3.11 +22.1 3.05 +.53 +21.0 19.99 +2.35 +13.3 4.20 +.44 +11.7

Losers ($2 or more) Name

Last

Chg %Chg

KnghtCap 3.07 -.98 -24.2 AssistLiv 10.77 -2.09 -16.3 OxfordRes 7.35 -1.07 -12.7 Supvalu 2.34 -.23 -8.9 FaTBBlSPBr 22.97 -2.09 -8.3

Amex

Name

Name

Last Chg

124709 3.58 +.46 50312 13.71 -.05 34663 3.70 +.02 33510 1.30 +.12 25512 2.09 +.04

Gainers ($2 or more)

Vol (00)

SiriusXM Cisco Zynga n Facebook n Microsoft

Gainers ($2 or more)

Last

Chg %Chg

Name

ASpecRlty MeetMe Vringo Augusta g BovieMed

3.45 2.28 3.58 2.27 2.59

+.55 +.35 +.46 +.23 +.26

NII Hldg 8.08 +1.28 Changyou 23.00 +3.63 GlobTcAdv 5.19 +.79 Homeow wt 5.51 +.84 Sohu.cm 40.86 +6.16

+19.0 +18.1 +14.7 +11.3 +11.2

Losers ($2 or more)

Last

Chg %Chg +18.8 +18.7 +18.0 +18.0 +17.8

Losers ($2 or more)

Name

Last

Chg %Chg

Name

Last

NavideaBio Ballanty AvalonHld BowlA FstWV

3.55 4.65 3.60 12.60 15.39

-.29 -.36 -.26 -.69 -.74

-7.6 -7.2 -6.7 -5.2 -4.6

TescoCp Exelixis FtSecG rsh AVEO Ph FrghtCar lf

10.23 -1.83 -15.2 4.85 -.73 -13.1 2.56 -.35 -12.0 8.83 -1.02 -10.3 19.15 -1.83 -8.7

281 142 33 456 22 5

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Diary 1,889 1,117 127 3,133 210 14

Last Chg

666488 2.20 +.04 318803 16.69 +.34 291092 2.94 +.22 269815 21.92 +.83 267410 29.95 +.20

Name

Diary Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Nasdaq

Most Active ($1 or more)

Vol (00)

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

to sanctions under U.S. law. The department accused the bank of undermining the safety of New York’s financial system through a range of violations including “falsifying business records” and “obstructing governmental administration,” according to the order. Suspecting that Iranian banks were using their financial institutions to finance its nuclear weapons program, the U.S. Treasury Department banned certain transactions between Iranian banks and U.S. financial institutions in 2008. The regulator said the bank engaged in so-called “U-turn” transactions, where a foreign institution routs money to a U.S. bank, which then transfers the money immediately to a separate foreign institution. The accusations are the latest to strike British banks. In July, a U.S. Senate panel found that HSBC was used by Iranians looking to evade sanctions and by Mexican drug cartels to funnel money back into the United States. Together, the allegations raise concerns that there is a broader pattern of illegal money freely flowing into the United States through international financial institutions. In the Standard Chartered investigation, the order said that the bank’s management created a formalized operating manual that showed staff members how to strip off any information from the transactions that might tie them to the sanctioned Iranian institution. The order says that executives at Standard Chartered sidelined concerns raised by its management in the United States, company emails show.

uting $1 billion of his own money, securing investments from private equity firms as well as debt financing. In his letter, Schulz said that “Credit Suisse, who I have retained as my financial adviser, is highly confident that it can arrange the necessary debt financing.” Best Buy has $2.2 billion in debt and $1.1 billion in cash on hand, according to Capital IQ data.

Indexes

Most Active ($1 or more) Vringo CheniereEn NovaGld g GoldStr g Rentech

E3

Chg %Chg

Diary 1,514 922 143 2,579 78 35

52-Week High Low

Name

13,338.66 10,404.49 5,390.11 3,950.66 499.82 381.99 8,327.67 6,414.89 2,498.89 1,941.99 3,134.17 2,298.89 1,422.38 1,074.77 14,951.57 11,208.42 847.92 601.71

Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

Last

Net Chg

%Chg

YTD %Chg

52-wk %Chg

13,117.51 5,082.36 489.29 7,964.10 2,426.58 2,989.91 1,394.23 14,519.92 794.35

+21.34 -3.95 -1.79 +24.55 +2.05 +22.01 +3.24 +46.77 +5.87

+.16 -.08 -.36 +.31 +.08 +.74 +.23 +.32 +.74

+7.37 +1.25 +5.30 +6.51 +6.51 +14.77 +10.86 +10.08 +7.21

+21.35 +16.47 +25.13 +15.49 +15.34 +26.82 +24.54 +23.78 +22.03

World markets

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed Monday. Market Close % Change

Key currency exchange rates Monday compared with late Friday in New York. Dollar vs: Exchange Rate Pvs Day

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

330.40 2,336.22 3,401.56 5,808.77 6,918.72 19,998.70 41,097.00 14,342.03 3,563.20 8,726.29 1,885.88 3,071.82 4,292.92 5,972.98

-.01 +1.39 +.81 +.37 +.77 +1.69 +.24 +1.54 +.43 +2.00 +2.01 +.67 +1.18 +.23

t s s s s s s s s s s s s s

1.0581 1.5611 1.0008 .002087 .1568 1.2399 .1289 .012784 .076178 .0317 .000886 .1488 1.0318 .0334

1.0556 1.5645 1.0005 .002076 .1569 1.2377 .1289 .012725 .076076 .0313 .000887 .1490 1.0298 .0334

Selected mutual funds YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret Amer Century Inv: EqInc 7.82 +8.8 GrowthI 27.48 +0.03 +11.8 Ultra 25.42 +0.09 +10.9 American Funds A: AmcpA p 20.66 +0.05 +10.2 AMutlA p 28.02 +0.01 +9.6 BalA p 19.82 +0.02 +9.9 BondA p 12.92 +0.01 +4.6 CapIBA p 52.70 +0.03 +9.1 CapWGA p 35.00 +0.08 +10.8 CapWA p 21.31 +0.05 +5.4 EupacA p 38.26 +0.22 +8.8 FdInvA p 38.86 +0.11 +10.5 GovtA p 14.61 +2.0 GwthA p 32.31 +0.12 +12.5 HI TrA p 11.07 +0.01 +8.4 IncoA p 17.76 +0.02 +8.0 IntBdA p 13.78 +0.01 +2.2 ICAA p 30.00 +0.07 +11.7 NEcoA p 27.17 +0.11 +14.3 N PerA p 29.34 +0.12 +12.2 NwWrldA 50.59 +0.27 +9.7 SmCpA p 37.06 +0.28 +11.7 TxExA p 13.07 +6.7 WshA p 30.80 +0.01 +9.7 Artisan Funds: Intl 22.82 +0.13 +15.1 IntlVal r 27.40 +0.13 +9.2 MidCap 37.32 +0.33 +13.3 MidCapVal 20.57 +0.09 +4.4 Baron Funds: Growth 55.59 +0.30 +9.0 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 14.19 +0.02 +4.1 DivMu 14.91 +2.4 BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 19.62 +0.01 +9.1 GlAlA r 19.01 +0.06 +5.4 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 17.70 +0.06 +4.9 BlackRock Instl:

EquityDv 19.66 +0.01 GlbAlloc r 19.10 +0.06 Cohen & Steers: RltyShrs 69.62 -0.12 Columbia Class A: TxEA p 14.26 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 29.74 +0.19 AcornIntZ 37.88 +0.22 LgCapGr 13.03 +0.15 Credit Suisse Comm: ComRet t 8.22 +0.01 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 9.53 +0.06 USCorEq1 11.78 +0.04 USCorEq2 11.57 +0.05 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 35.13 +0.03 Davis Funds Y: NYVenY 35.54 +0.03 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.45 +0.01 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq 18.42 +0.12 EmMktV 27.35 +0.21 IntSmVa 14.05 +0.10 LargeCo 11.01 +0.02 USLgVa 21.21 +0.10 US Small 22.17 +0.14 US SmVa 25.25 +0.22 IntlSmCo 14.30 +0.10 Fixd 10.35 IntVa 14.77 +0.10 Glb5FxInc 11.27 +0.01 2YGlFxd 10.13 Dodge&Cox: Balanced 74.51 +0.25 Income 13.81 +0.01 IntlStk 31.24 +0.18 Stock 114.80 +0.48 DoubleLine Funds: TRBd I 11.27 +0.01 TRBd N p 11.26 Dreyfus:

+9.2 +5.6 +15.7 +7.0 +9.2 +11.0 +8.4 +0.5 +4.9 +10.2 +10.0 +8.1 +8.3 +5.5 +7.5 +5.9 +4.9 +12.1 +11.7 +8.5 +9.3 +4.9 +0.7 +2.4 +3.7 +0.8 +11.9 +5.8 +6.8 +14.1 NA NA

Aprec 44.29 +0.07 Eaton Vance I: FltgRt 9.02 +0.01 GblMacAbR 9.82 +0.01 FMI Funds: LgCap p 16.94 FPA Funds: NewInco 10.65 FPACres 27.93 +0.09 Fairholme 28.55 +0.43 Federated Instl: TotRetBd 11.57 StrValDvIS 5.14 -0.01 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 22.19 +0.04 StrInA 12.59 +0.02 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 22.50 +0.05 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 14.02 +0.03 FF2010K 12.84 +0.03 FF2015 11.72 +0.03 FF2015K 12.90 +0.03 FF2020 14.16 +0.04 FF2020K 13.29 +0.03 FF2025 11.76 +0.04 FF2025K 13.40 +0.04 FF2030 13.99 +0.04 FF2030K 13.53 +0.04 FF2035 11.56 +0.04 FF2035K 13.58 +0.04 FF2040 8.06 +0.02 FF2040K 13.62 +0.05 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 12.63 +0.02 AMgr50 16.05 +0.04 AMgr20 r 13.26 +0.02 Balanc 19.79 +0.03 BalancedK 19.79 +0.03 BlueChGr 48.10 +0.28 CapAp 28.49 +0.04 CpInc r 9.22 +0.01 Contra 76.16 +0.14 ContraK 76.16 +0.15

+10.2 +5.1 +2.4 +11.1 +1.5 +5.2 +23.3 +4.8 +8.2 +12.5 +6.7 +12.7 +7.3 +7.4 +7.5 +7.5 +8.2 +8.2 +9.1 +9.1 +9.2 +9.4 +9.8 +9.8 +9.7 +9.9 +12.5 +7.8 +5.1 +9.7 +9.8 +13.4 +15.7 +10.1 +12.9 +13.0

DisEq 23.90 +0.04 DivIntl 27.95 +0.19 DivrsIntK r 27.93 +0.18 DivGth 28.94 +0.16 Eq Inc 45.70 +0.11 EQII 19.30 +0.01 Fidel 35.01 +0.04 FltRateHi r 9.87 +0.01 GNMA 12.00 GovtInc 10.94 GroCo 93.32 +0.74 GroInc 20.41 +0.06 GrowthCoK93.31 +0.75 HighInc r 9.16 +0.02 IntBd 11.11 +0.01 IntmMu 10.65 IntlDisc 30.34 +0.21 InvGrBd 12.05 +0.01 InvGB 7.98 +0.01 LgCapVal 10.96 +0.02 LowP r 38.99 +0.26 LowPriK r 38.99 +0.26 Magelln 70.82 +0.17 MidCap 28.59 +0.15 MuniInc 13.52 NwMkt r 17.46 +0.04 OTC 58.76 +0.81 100Index 10.04 +0.02 Puritn 19.32 +0.05 PuritanK 19.32 +0.05 SAllSecEqF12.65 +0.03 SCmdtyStrt 9.07 SCmdtyStrF 9.10 +0.01 SrsIntGrw 11.22 +0.05 SrsIntVal 8.74 +0.05 SrInvGrdF 12.05 +0.01 STBF 8.57 StratInc 11.27 +0.02 TotalBd 11.28 +0.01 USBI 12.03 +0.01 Value 70.62 +0.32 Fidelity Spartan: 500IdxInv 49.46 +0.12 500Idx I 49.46 +0.11

+11.1 +9.5 +9.6 +11.9 +12.2 +12.2 +13.1 +4.4 +2.9 +2.5 +15.4 +12.9 +15.5 +9.8 +3.7 +3.7 +9.9 +4.7 +5.1 +8.8 +9.1 +9.2 +12.7 +9.5 +6.0 +13.8 +7.4 +13.8 +10.2 +10.3 +12.6 +1.2 +1.4 +11.0 +8.2 +4.7 +1.6 +6.9 +5.2 +3.7 +11.3 +12.2 +12.2

Fidelity Spart Adv: ExMktAd r 38.35 +0.23 +9.4 500IdxAdv 49.46 +0.11 +12.2 TotMktAd r 40.22 +0.12 +11.7 USBond I 12.03 +0.01 +3.7 First Eagle: GlblA 47.99 +0.34 +6.4 OverseasA 21.50 +0.21 +5.6 Forum Funds: AbsStrI r 11.22 -0.02 +1.5 Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA p 12.69 +6.9 GrwthA p 48.52 +0.14 +8.7 HYTFA p 10.89 +8.7 IncomA p 2.19 +8.9 RisDvA p 36.76 +0.01 +5.6 StratInc p 10.56 +0.02 +7.8 USGovA p 6.91 +2.0 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv 13.20 +0.04 +9.8 IncmeAd 2.18 +0.01 +9.5 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.21 +8.4 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 21.71 +0.09 +9.6 Frank/Temp Temp A: GlBd A p 13.24 +0.04 +9.6 GrwthA p 17.77 +0.15 +9.1 WorldA p 14.84 +0.11 +8.0 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 13.27 +0.04 +9.4 GE Elfun S&S: US Eqty 43.27 +0.12 +11.7 GMO Trust III: Quality 23.31 +0.04 +11.8 GMO Trust IV: IntlIntrVl 19.16 +0.15 +2.5 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 10.91 +0.10 +5.8 Quality 23.31 +0.03 +11.8 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 7.25 +9.8 MidCapV 37.01 +0.03 +10.2 Harbor Funds:

Bond 12.83 CapApInst 41.32 +0.21 IntlInv t 56.99 +0.33 Intl r 57.62 +0.34 Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 31.05 +0.29 Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 40.27 +0.31 Hussman Funds: StrGrowth 11.15 -0.04 IVA Funds: Wldwide I r15.69 +0.09 Invesco Funds A: Chart p 17.37 +0.03 CmstkA 16.75 +0.07 EqIncA 8.97 +0.03 GrIncA p 20.27 +0.06 HYMuA 10.04 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 23.53 +0.15 AssetStA p 24.32 +0.15 AssetStrI r 24.56 +0.15 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 12.09 +0.01 JPMorgan R Cl: CoreBond 12.09 +0.01 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 12.08 +0.01 HighYld 8.01 +0.01 ShtDurBd 11.01 +0.01 USLCCrPls 22.17 +0.09 Janus T Shrs: PrkMCVal T21.24 +0.08 John Hancock Cl 1: LSBalanc 13.15 +0.04 LSGrwth 12.98 +0.04 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 18.87 +0.14 Longleaf Partners: Partners 28.94 +0.05 Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 14.70 +0.03 StrInc C 15.00 +0.04 LSBondR 14.64 +0.03

NA +12.0 +9.6 +9.9 +7.7 +8.3 -10.3 +2.1 +8.2 +11.0 +8.8 +9.8 +10.5 +8.8 +9.3 +9.4 +3.8 +4.0 +3.9 +9.1 +1.3 +12.3 +5.2 +8.5 +9.0 +12.3 +8.6 +8.7 +6.3 +8.4

StrIncA 14.92 +0.05 +6.8 Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdY 12.49 +0.03 +7.4 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 11.48 +0.03 +9.7 BdDebA p 7.94 +0.01 +7.9 ShDurIncA p4.62 +4.3 Lord Abbett C: ShDurIncC t 4.65 +0.01 +3.9 Lord Abbett F: ShtDurInco 4.61 +4.1 MFS Funds A: TotRA 14.90 +0.02 +7.8 ValueA 24.70 +0.02 +11.3 MFS Funds I: ValueI 24.82 +0.02 +11.5 MainStay Funds A: HiYldBA 6.02 +0.01 +8.2 Managers Funds: Yacktman p18.64 +0.07 +7.8 YacktFoc 20.06 +0.08 +7.4 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 7.21 +0.05 +8.7 MergerFd 15.87 +1.8 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.85 +0.01 +7.2 TotRtBdI 10.84 +0.01 +7.2 MorganStanley Inst: MCapGrI 33.98 +0.33 +3.2 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 29.45 +0.18 +8.5 GlbDiscZ 29.86 +0.19 +8.7 SharesZ 21.90 +0.09 +9.8 Neuberger&Berm Fds: GenesInst 47.97 +0.07 +3.3 Northern Funds: HiYFxInc 7.35 +0.01 +9.0 Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 28.26 +0.07 +4.5 Intl I r 17.94 +0.28 +8.4 Oakmark 47.25 +0.25 +13.3 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 7.29 +0.02 +8.4 GlbSMdCap14.15 +0.11 +6.9

Oppenheimer A: DvMktA p 32.42 +0.15 GlobA p 58.19 +0.38 GblStrIncA 4.27 +0.01 IntBdA p 6.49 +0.01 MnStFdA 36.05 +0.10 RisingDivA 16.99 +0.02 S&MdCpVl29.66 +0.24 Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 15.36 +0.01 S&MdCpVl25.10 +0.20 Oppenheimer C&M: RisingDvC p15.30 +0.01 Oppenheimer Roch: RcNtMuA 7.51 +0.01 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 32.10 +0.15 IntlBdY 6.49 +0.02 IntGrowY 28.11 +0.21 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 11.46 +0.01 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AlAsetAut r 10.94 +0.06 AllAsset 12.38 +0.06 ComodRR 6.84 +0.01 DivInc 12.08 +0.02 EmgMkCur10.31 +0.02 EmMkBd 12.21 +0.03 HiYld 9.43 +0.01 InvGrCp 11.11 +0.01 LowDu 10.57 RealRtnI 12.49 +0.02 ShortT 9.84 TotRt 11.46 +0.01 PIMCO Funds A: RealRtA p 12.49 +0.02 TotRtA 11.46 +0.01 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 11.46 +0.01 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 11.46 +0.01 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 11.46 +0.01 Perm Port Funds:

+10.6 +7.7 +8.6 +7.0 +12.1 +9.0 +0.1 +8.4 -0.4 +8.5 +14.1 +10.8 +7.3 +10.1 +7.4 +10.7 +8.9 +6.2 +10.2 +4.9 +11.4 +9.0 +10.2 +4.4 +7.4 +2.3 +7.5 +7.1 +7.3 +6.8 +7.4 +7.5

Permannt 47.50 +0.16 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 40.79 +0.09 Price Funds: BlChip 44.09 +0.10 CapApp 22.52 +0.02 EmMktS 30.95 +0.25 EqInc 25.28 +0.05 EqIndex 37.61 +0.09 Growth 36.56 +0.08 HlthSci 41.05 +0.07 HiYield 6.79 +0.01 InstlCpG 18.15 +0.09 IntlBond 9.93 +0.05 Intl G&I 12.13 +0.10 IntlStk 13.36 +0.13 MidCap 56.74 +0.36 MCapVal 23.72 +0.08 N Asia 15.53 +0.12 New Era 41.58 +0.20 N Horiz 34.68 +0.33 N Inc 9.92 +0.01 OverS SF 7.89 +0.05 R2010 16.24 +0.06 R2015 12.59 +0.04 R2020 17.40 +0.06 R2025 12.72 +0.05 R2030 18.23 +0.07 R2035 12.88 +0.06 R2040 18.31 +0.08 ShtBd 4.85 SmCpStk 34.60 +0.23 SmCapVal 37.33 +0.14 SpecIn 12.84 +0.02 Value 25.04 +0.06 Principal Inv: LgCGI In 9.92 +0.05 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 13.85 +0.06 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 11.25 +0.08 PremierI r 19.01 +0.19 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 39.48 +0.11

+3.1 +6.2 +14.1 +9.2 +8.6 +10.8 +12.1 +14.9 +25.9 +9.1 +12.6 +3.4 +5.3 +8.7 +7.6 +10.9 +11.6 -1.1 +11.8 +4.4 +7.8 +8.1 +8.7 +9.4 +9.8 +10.2 +10.5 +10.5 +2.1 +10.7 +8.3 +6.8 +11.1 +11.7 +9.8 +4.6 +2.6 +11.6

S&P Sel 21.96 +0.05 Scout Funds: Intl 30.34 +0.21 Sequoia 155.99 +0.32 TCW Funds: TotRetBdI 10.04 +0.01 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 17.93 +0.12 Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 25.69 +0.18 IncBuildC p18.66 +0.05 IntValue I 26.26 +0.18 Tweedy Browne: GblValue 24.31 +0.07 Vanguard Admiral: BalAdml 23.39 +0.05 CAITAdm 11.69 CpOpAdl 74.15 +0.12 EMAdmr r 34.00 +0.25 Energy 110.30 +0.77 EqInAdm n 50.05 +0.01 ExtdAdm 43.00 +0.27 500Adml 128.71 +0.30 GNMA Ad 11.10 +0.01 GrwAdm 35.94 +0.12 HlthCr 59.26 +0.04 HiYldCp 5.97 InfProAd 29.16 +0.04 ITBdAdml 12.14 +0.02 ITsryAdml 11.82 +0.01 IntGrAdm 56.66 +0.45 ITAdml 14.36 ITGrAdm 10.37 +0.02 LtdTrAd 11.19 LTGrAdml 11.02 +0.01 LT Adml 11.76 MCpAdml 96.72 +0.39 MuHYAdm 11.22 +0.01 PrmCap r 70.18 +0.11 ReitAdm r 95.05 -0.19 STsyAdml 10.79 STBdAdml 10.66 ShtTrAd 15.94 STIGrAd 10.81 +0.01

+12.2 +9.3 +7.2 +8.1 +5.2 +7.6 +7.1 +7.9 +11.3 +8.5 +4.9 +8.8 +7.4 -0.3 +10.7 +9.3 +12.2 +2.3 +13.7 +9.2 +9.1 +5.8 +5.5 +2.6 +9.0 +4.3 +6.8 +1.5 +10.6 +6.2 +8.5 +7.1 +9.6 +17.6 +0.6 +1.5 +0.8 +3.1

SmCAdm 36.46 TtlBAdml 11.20 TStkAdm 34.63 WellslAdm 59.02 WelltnAdm 58.07 Windsor 47.53 WdsrIIAd 50.57 Vanguard Fds: CapOpp 32.10 DivdGro 16.46 Energy 58.74 EqInc 23.88 Explr 76.00 GNMA 11.10 HYCorp 5.97 HlthCre 140.42 InflaPro 14.85 IntlGr 17.80 IntlVal 28.56 ITIGrade 10.37 LifeCon 17.06 LifeGro 22.79 LifeMod 20.43 LTIGrade 11.02 Morg 19.49 MuInt 14.36 PrmcpCor 14.63 Prmcp r 67.62 SelValu r 19.90 STAR 20.16 STIGrade 10.81 StratEq 20.22 TgtRetInc 12.11 TgRe2010 23.97 TgtRe2015 13.21 TgRe2020 23.39 TgtRe2025 13.29 TgRe2030 22.76 TgtRe2035 13.66 TgtRe2040 22.42 TgtRe2045 14.08 USGro 20.38 Wellsly 24.36 Welltn 33.62

+0.24 +0.01 +0.10 +0.05 +0.08 +0.18 +0.07

+9.2 +3.6 +11.7 +8.0 +8.8 +11.5 +11.8

+0.05 +8.8 +7.9 +0.41 -0.4 +0.01 +10.7 +0.57 +6.4 +0.01 +2.3 +9.0 +0.09 +9.2 +0.02 +5.7 +0.14 +8.9 +0.23 +7.2 +0.02 +6.7 +0.03 +6.2 +0.07 +8.8 +0.05 +7.5 +0.01 +10.5 +0.08 +11.6 +4.3 +0.01 +8.5 +0.11 +9.5 +0.04 +7.0 +0.07 +8.6 +0.01 +3.1 +0.08 +10.3 +0.02 +5.8 +0.05 +6.9 +0.03 +7.4 +0.06 +7.8 +0.04 +8.3 +0.07 +8.8 +0.04 +9.2 +0.07 +9.4 +0.05 +9.4 +0.08 +12.9 +0.02 +8.0 +0.05 +8.8

Wndsr 14.09 +0.06 WndsII 28.49 +0.03 Vanguard Idx Fds: ExtMkt I 106.13 +0.67 MidCpIstPl105.39 +0.42 TotIntAdm r23.20 +0.13 TotIntlInst r92.81 +0.56 TotIntlIP r 92.83 +0.55 500 128.69 +0.29 MidCap 21.30 +0.08 SmCap 36.42 +0.25 TotBnd 11.20 +0.01 TotlIntl 13.87 +0.08 TotStk 34.62 +0.10 Vanguard Instl Fds: BalInst 23.39 +0.05 DevMkInst 8.98 +0.05 ExtIn 43.00 +0.27 GrwthIst 35.94 +0.12 InfProInst 11.88 +0.02 InstIdx 127.88 +0.30 InsPl 127.89 +0.30 InsTStPlus 31.35 +0.10 MidCpIst 21.37 +0.09 SCInst 36.46 +0.24 TBIst 11.20 +0.01 TSInst 34.64 +0.11 ValueIst 22.26 +0.04 Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl 106.32 +0.25 MidCpIdx 30.52 +0.12 STBdIdx 10.66 TotBdSgl 11.20 +0.01 TotStkSgl 33.43 +0.10 Western Asset: CorePlus I 11.61 +0.01

+11.4 +11.8 +9.3 +8.5 +6.2 +6.3 +6.3 +12.1 +8.4 +9.1 +3.6 +6.2 +11.6 +8.5 +6.7 +9.3 +13.7 +5.8 +12.2 +12.2 +11.8 +8.5 +9.2 +3.6 +11.7 +10.2 +12.2 +8.5 +1.5 +3.6 +11.7 +6.5


E4

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, AUGUST 7, 2012

M 

If y ou hav e Marketplace ev ents you would like to submit, please contact Ashley Brothers at 541-383-0323, email business@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� at www.bendbulletin.com. Please allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication.

B C 

TODAY BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL HIGH DESERT CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7:15 a.m.; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541-420-7377. ORGANIZING WITH OUTLOOK FOR BUSY PEOPLE: Learn to integrate all components of Outlook 2007 via a webinar; registration required; $65; 8:30-10 a.m.; 503-260-8714 or info@simplifynw.com. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit; registration required; $35; 9 a.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. PHOTO MANAGEMENT TIPS AND TRICKS: Explore how to download digital photos from your camera and send them as email attachments. Learn to manage your photo files too! Bring your camera and USB cable to class. For ages 50 and older; $52 to $70; 10 a.m.-noon; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541388-1133. OPEN COMPUTER LAB: Practice computer skills and learn about e-readers; free; 3 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1050. REDMOND CHAMBER YOUNG PROFESSIONALS NETWORK: Free; 5:30 p.m.; Red Dog Depot, 3716 S.W. 21st Place; 541-923-6400. SMALL BUSINESS COUNSELING: Free; 5:30-7:30 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1037.

S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666.

MONDAY FORECLOSURE CLASS: Call 541318-7506, ext. 309 to reserve a seat; 5:30-7:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 20310 Empire Ave., Suite A110, Bend; 541-318-7506. FORECLOSURE PREVENTION CLASS: Learn about NeighborImpact’s Housing Center tools and services that can assist individuals struggling to pay their mortgages; free; 5:30-7:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 20310 Empire Ave., Suite A110, Bend; 541-318-7506, ext. 309, karenb@ neighborimpact.org or www.home ownershipcenter.org.

TUESDAY Aug. 14 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL HIGH DESERT CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7:15 a.m.; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541-420-7377. BEND CHAMBER MEMBER SUCCESS BRIEFING: Registration required; 10 a.m.; Bend Chamber of Commerce, 777 NW Wall St., Ste 200; 541-382-3221 or shelley@ bendchamber.org. OPEN COMPUTER LAB: Practice computer skills and learn about e-readers; free; 3 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1050. HOME BUYING CLASS: Registration required; free; 5:309:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 2303 S.W. First St., Redmond; 541-3187506, ext. 309.

WEDNESDAY BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL BEND CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7 a.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541749-0789. BUSINESS SUCCESS PROGRAM: Learn to grow your business; registration recommended; free; 7:30 a.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-382-3221 or www.bend chamber.org/events. ORGANIZING WITH OUTLOOK FOR BUSY PEOPLE: Learn to integrate all components of Outlook 2010 via a webinar; registration required; $65; 8:30-10 a.m.; 503-260-8714 or info@simplifynw.com. SUSTAINABILITY BUSINESS GROUP: Jay Coalsonn, the Executive Director of the Zero Waste Alliance, talks about engaging the community to create a zero waste economy; free; 9-10 a.m.; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; 541385-6908, ext. 11 or sweetpea@ envirocenter.org. BANKS AND OTHER FINANCIAL SERVICES: Registration required; free; 5:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 2303 S.W. First St., Redmond; 541318-7506, ext. 309.

THURSDAY BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL DESCHUTES BUSINESS NETWORKERS CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7 a.m.; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541610-9125. ADVICE AT SCHWAB: Free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541318-1794. PUBLIC MEETING OF THE CENTRAL OREGON AREA COMMISSION ON TRANSPORTATION TECHNICAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE: For more information, contact Andrew Spreadborough, 541-504-3306; free; 3-5 p.m.; Redmond City Hall, 716 S.W. Evergreen Ave.; 541-9237710. BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WILDFIRE CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 3:30 p.m.; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541-480-1765. ADVERTISING FEDERATION OF CENTRAL OREGON MOBILE MIXER: RSVP required; free; 4-5:30 p.m.; Bend Brewing Company, 1019 N.W. Brooks St.; 541-383-1599 or adfedco.org.

FRIDAY COFFEE CLATTER: Redmond Chamber of Commerce meeting; free; 8:30-9:30 a.m.; Juniper Golf Course, 1938 S.W. Elkhorn Ave., Redmond; 541-548-8198. CENTRAL OREGON REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT CLUB: Free; 11 a.m.; ServiceMaster Clean, 20806 Sockeye Place, Bend; 541-610-4006 or bobbleile@windermere.com. FREE TAX FRIDAY: Free tax return reviews; schedule an appointment at 541-385-9666 or www.myzoomtax .com; free; 2-4 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963

PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit; registration required; $35; 9 a.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. TECH PETTING ZOO: Take a handson look at some of the popular eReader and tablet devices on the market today; free; 1-3 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1050.

Aug. 21 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL HIGH DESERT CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7:15 a.m.; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541-420-7377. VISIT BEND BOARD MEETING: Open to the public; 8 a.m.; Bend Visitor Center, 750 N.W. Lava Road; 541-382-8048 or valerie@visitbend .com. OPEN COMPUTER LAB: Practice computer skills and learn about e-readers; free; 3 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1050. PARTNERS IN CARE BUSINESS AFTER HOURS: Registration required; 4:30 p.m.; Partners in Care, 755 S.W. Seventh St., Suite C, Redmond; 541-280-4187. CRR-TERREBONNE NETWORKING SOCIAL: Free; 5:30 p.m.; Desert Meadows Clubhouse, 520 N.E. Shoshone Ave., Redmond; 541-9232679 or www.crrchamber.com. SMALL BUSINESS COUNSELING: Free; 5:30-7:30 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1037.

WEDNESDAY

Aug. 15

Aug. 22

THURSDAY Aug. 16 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL DESCHUTES BUSINESS NETWORKERS CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7 a.m.; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541610-9125. EXPLORE THE BENEFITS OF WORKING WITH SCHWAB: Free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794. BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WILDFIRE CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 3:30 p.m.; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541-480-1765.

FRIDAY Aug. 17 TOWN HALL FORUM: Job creation in Central Oregon; registration required; 7:30 a.m.; Bend Golf and Country Club, 61045 Country Club Drive; www.bendchamber.org. CENTRAL OREGON REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT CLUB: Free; 11 a.m.; ServiceMaster Clean, 20806 Sockeye Place, Bend; 541-610-4006 or bobbleile@windermere.com. LEADER LUNCH: Lunch with Bend Chamber leadership for members; reservations required; cost of lunch; noon; Awbrey Glen Golf Club, 2500 N.W. Awbrey Glen Drive, Bend; 541382-3221. FREE TAX FRIDAY: Free tax return reviews; schedule an appointment at 541-385-9666 or www.myzoomtax. com; free; 2-4 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666.

SATURDAY Aug. 18 OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER

The Associated Press NEW YORK — Pfizer Inc. and Johnson & Johnson said Monday they are ending development of a oncepromising drug designed to treat Alzheimer’s disease after the treatment failed in two late-stage clinical trials. The companies hoped their drug bapineuzumab would slow the decline in physical and mental function for pa-

tients with Alzheimer’s. However, the drug did not work better than a placebo in two late-stage trials in patients who had mild to moderate Alzheimer’s disease. Johnson & Johnson made a big bet on bapineuzumab in 2009, agreeing to invest up to $1.5 billion initially. The drug is designed to prevent the buildup of plaque in the brain. Current treatments

for Alzheimer’s can only temporarily ease symptoms of the disease, which include increasing memory loss, confusion, wandering and aggression. The two companies said July 23 that the drug had failed in a different trial. All other studies are now being discontinued, and Johnson & Johnson said it will take a charge of $300 million to $400 million in the third quarter.

SEC

lawyers are more likely to follow aggressive enforcement practices that signal their competence to prospective employers. “There is nothing inherently evil or wrong about the revolving door,� Rajgopal concluded. Like any rigorous study, the exact conclusions Rajgopal are limited to the particular group studied, he noted, “but it suggests that legislation against this could be counterproductive.� The revolving door between the SEC and Wall Street has long been the subject of attention. In a July 2011 report, the Government Accountability Office found that while the SEC required documentation when former employees went to work for companies the agency oversaw, it did not consistently document the conflict-of-interest advice it gave current and former employees. In May 2011, the Project on Government Oversight published a database containing five years’ worth of SEC revolving-door data. It was based on statements filed by 219 former SEC employees from 2006 to 2010. The agency requires the filings when former employees represent outside clients before the agency within two years of leaving. Michael Smallberg, an investigator at the project, said that while the new study was valuable, it looked only at SEC lawyers who were involved in litigation against investment companies. “We found interactions between current and former SEC employees that occurred long before an investigation got to the litigation stage,� Smallberg said. “We don’t have any

disagreements with� the accounting group’s findings, he added. “But I don’t think a single study could possibly track all the ways that the revolving door could affect the SEC.�

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL BEND CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7 a.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541749-0789. MAC HELP: Free, friendly, technical advice for your Mac, iPad or iPhone; 10 a.m.-noon; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541388-1133. YOUNG PROFESSIONALS NETWORK: $5 for Bend Chamber Young Professionals Network members, $12 for nonmembers; 5 p.m.; Robberson Ford of Bend, 2100 N.E. Third St.; www.bendchamber .org. HOMEBUYING CLASS: Registration required; free; 5:30-9:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 2303 S.W. First St., Redmond; 541-318-7506, ext. 309. BUSINESS START-UP WORKSHOP: Registration required, contact 541383-7290 or http://noncredit.cocc. edu; $15; 6-8 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7700.

Pfizer, J&J end work on Alzheimer’s drug

BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL BEND CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7 a.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541749-0789. STONE LODGE BUSINESS AFTER HOURS: Registration required; 5 p.m.; Stone Lodge, 1460 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-382-3221 or www.bendchamber.org. UNDERSTANDING AND MANAGING CREDIT: Call 541-3187506, ext. 309 to reserve a seat; 5:30-7:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 2303 S.W. First St., Redmond; 541548-2380.

THURSDAY Aug. 23 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL DESCHUTES BUSINESS NETWORKERS CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7 a.m.; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541610-9125. GETTING THE MOST OUT OF SCHWAB.COM: Free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-3181794. BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WILDFIRE CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 3:30 p.m.; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541-480-1765.

FRIDAY Aug. 24 COFFEE CLATTER: Redmond Chamber of Commerce meeting; free; 8:30-9:30 a.m.; City of Redmond Public Works Training Room, 243 East Antler Avenue. CENTRAL OREGON REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT CLUB: Free; 11 a.m.; ServiceMaster Clean, 20806 Sockeye Place, Bend; 541-610-4006 or bobbleile@windermere.com. FREE TAX FRIDAY: Free tax return reviews; schedule an appointment at 541-385-9666 or www.myzoomtax .com; free; 2-4 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666.

MONDAY Aug. 27 OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit; registration required; $35; 9 a.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. FORECLOSURE PREVENTION CLASS: Learn about NeighborImpact’s Housing Center tools and services which can assist individuals struggling to pay their mortgages; free; 5:30-7:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 2303 S.W. First St., Redmond; 541-318-7506, ext. 309, karenb@neighborimpact.org or www.homeownershipcenter.org.

Continued from E1 The study, by researchers at Emory University, Rutgers, the University of Washington and Nanyang Technological University in Singapore, found that SEC enforcement lawyers who leave to join private law firms that specialize in commission matters actually produced tougher enforcement results than their peers while at the agency. The study also found no evidence that law firms that have hired large numbers of SEC alumni are able to extract more lenient enforcement outcomes from the agency. Results from the research were presented Monday in Washington at the annual meeting of the American Accounting Association.

A practical concern As financial markets and investment techniques have become more complicated, the SEC has tried to hire more specialists with work experience at Wall Street firms. To the degree that those new SEC employees favor Wall Street interests, the concept of rigorous oversight would be undermined. That is more than a theoretical concern. In May, the SEC barred a former investigator, Spencer Barasch, from representing clients before the commission for one year after finding that he left the agency and worked for Stanford Financial, which he had investigated while at the SEC. The company later was determined to be a running a $7 billion Ponzi scheme. Shivaram Rajgopal, an accounting professor at Emory and one of the authors of the new study, said that in most cases, the opposite occurs — SEC enforcement officials who want to work as defense

Study’s findings The new study, authored by Simi Kedia of Rutgers, Ed deHaan of the University of Washington and Kevin Koh of Nanyang, in addition to Rajgopal, collected data on the career paths of 336 SEC lawyers and their involvement in 284 SEC enforcement actions from 1990 through 2007. It found that roughly onethird of those lawyers left to join private law firms — the types of jobs most often cited as evidence of revolving-door outcomes. But the study found no evidence that the enforcement results produced by revolving-door lawyers while they were at the SEC differed from those of lawyers who remained at the SEC or who went on to other fields of work. In addition, revolving-door lawyers who specifically went on to law firms that specialized in SEC matters produced, while at the agency, more aggressive enforcement outcomes, with higher penalties, a greater likelihood of criminal charges and a greater chance that a chief executive was named as a defendant in the SEC action. Robert Khuzami, director of enforcement at the SEC, said those results “confirm what we have always observed and believed.� “By hiring someone who used to work at a regulator, a company wants their expertise, but it also wants them to have credibility within the agency,� Khuzami said. “They’re not going to have that if they cut corners and weren’t principled while they were there.�

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DEEDS Deschutes County

Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation to Nicholas F. and Lois J. Stevenson, Ponderosa Village, Lot 12, $175,900 Recontrust Company N.A. to Bank of America N.A., Huntington Meadows, Phases 5 and 6, Lot 114, $169,871.39 Clinton J. Potter Jr. and Lisa M. Potter to Further 2 Development LLC, Township 18, Range 12, Section 13, $203,078.83 Southwest Property Group LLC to Jeffrey A. and Ann K. Jernstedt, Painted Ridge at Broken Top, Lot 18, $290,000 James D. and Esther E. Lee to Donna R. Zigler, Township 22, Range 10, Section 14, $186,200 Martha S. Bibb trustee for Martha S. Bibb Revocable Trust to Douglas J. and Kathleen A. Wickham, $165,000 Lucille A. and James G. Julson trustees for Lucille A. Julson and James G. Julson Revocable Trust to Wayne and Jane Schultz, Panoramic View Estates, Lot 9, Block 6, $395,000 Joseph J. and Amy J. Fitzgerald who acquired title as Amy J. Sale to Paul and Wendy L. Taylor, Whitehorse, Phases 2-5, Lot 15, $219,950 Further 2 Development LLC to Clint J. Potter Jr. and Lisa M. Potter, Township 18, Section 13, $250,000 James G. and Darlene Ivy to Tumalo Enterprises LLC, Laidlaw, Lots 1-9 and 18-24, $670,000 Darrell E. and Linda M. Linklater to Elizabeth G. Marshall, Whitehorse, Phase 8, Lot 54,

$175,000 Federal National Mortgage Association to Richard J. Kuhn, Sagewood, Lot 26, $230,000 Kenneth M. and Adele T. Willmon trustees for Willmon Trust to Gayle A. Hecht trustee for Gayle A. Hecht Living Trust and Ron C. Hecht trustee for Ron C. Hecht Living Trust, Mountain View Park, Phase 2, Lot 51, $167,900 Terance O. Skjersaa and Claudine F. Skjersaa now known as Claudine F. Nadeau to Curtis Haynie, Skyline, Lot 8, Block A, $170,000 Lambert Neighbour to Jose A. and Kim Hernandez, Northcrest, Lot 48, $187,900 Gregg W. and Anne W. Geser to Adam L. and Mary C. Jones, Township 14, Range 11, Section 32, $535,000 Federal National Mortgage Association to Earl W. and Judith A. Ropp, Summerhaven, Phase 1, Lot 2, $221,500 Lon-Ist U.S. LLC to Stephen N. Wilkins and Kathy A. George, Westerly Subdivision, Lot 1, $235,000 Bank of New York Mellon fka Bank of New York to Landon and Megan Carter, Parkway Acres, Lot 15, Block 2, $197,500 Dennis G. Bennett trustee for Dennis Bennett Family Trust, River Village 1, Lot 13, Block 4, $426,500 Columbia State Bank to Kerry and Carina Classen, Tanager Village, Lot 2, $180,000 Michael Knighten Construction Co. Inc. to Amanda Deamicis, Shady Pines, Lot 3, $190,900 David G. and Pamela A. Hauge to Richard C. Cornuelle trustee for Richard C. Cornuelle Revocable

Trust and Brian G. Cornuelle trustee for Brian G. Cornuelle Revocable Trust, Wild Horse Ridge, Lot 5, $799,000 Peggy Lovegren who acquired title as Peggy Feingold to John C. and Annie P. Barnard, Oakview, Phase 6, Lot 9, $200,000 First American Title Insurance Company to Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation, Saddleback West, Lot 13, Block 10, $285,000 Alvin J. and Carol A. Rose to Douglas C. and Allison E. Larsen, Fairway Crest Village, Phase 3, Lot 53, Block 12, $377,500 Deutsche Bank National Trust Co. to Jerry D. and Amanda D. Wallace, Township 17, Range 13, Section 27, $165,000 Jacqueline Siewert-Schade trustee for Jacqueline SiewertSchade Living Trust to Steven R. and Carol J. Pearson, Fairway Crest Village, Phase 2, Lot 20, Block 1, $449,000 Michael B. and Marsha J. Jamison to Frances A. and Michael A. Sciaraffo, Forest Park 1, Lot 15, Block 1, $177,000 Hayden Homes LLC to Kurt A. Athey, Village at Cold Springs, Lot 45, $189,990 Patrick Todd to Nancy B. Stayer, Shevlin Ridge, Phase 4, Lot 80, $600,000 Shirlee D. Perkins who acquired title as Shirley D. Perkins and Heather M. Perkins trustees for James Gray Perkins Trust to Janet L. and Timothy N. Brittle trustees for Brittle Family Revocable Living Trust, Cluster Court, Unit 6, $175,000 Daniel W. and Suyapa M. Miller to Jean Nelsen, Partition Plat 200672, Parcels 1 and 2, $240,000


ATHOME

Food, F2-3 Home, F4

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, AUGUST 7, 2012

www.bendbulletin.com/athome

HOME

GARDEN

A flair for the unusual By Marielle Gallagher The Bulletin

Ron Steinberg’s method of gardening is not about neat pruning, straight edges or defined paths. He has a collector’s mentality, and his focus is bizarre and difficult-to-grow plants. “I like to grow different stuff for the challenge,” said Steinberg. As a result, his garden on Bend’s west side is a wild and lively show of spikes, spines and creeping vines. He has Turk’s caps lilies with blossoms that face down, sea holly with a blue stem and sharp-petaled flower, and fritillaria, a tropical plant that blooms red and yellow in early spring when snow still covers the ground.

In the kitchen with ... brewmaster Brian Faivre

Hot sauce: Good for spicing up more lackluster entrees. To cut down on weight, fill a little liquorstore bottle from the larger bottle.

By Penny Nakamura For The Bulletin

Ramen: A classic choice for a lightweight starch, but also consider instant couscous and dried potato flakes.

Before and after When Ron and his wife Michi Sato moved to Bend from Utah with their daughter Sydney, the backyard was full of juniper and Italian plum trees. There was a concrete patio out the back door and there “was no garden whatsoever,” said Steinberg. After removing eight juniper and seven plum trees, Steinberg built lava rock walls to form terraces, shaped stairs and paths in natural sandstone and added “I don’t know how many tons of horse manure” to amend the soil. They chose to leave one juniper tree, which Steinberg now wishes had been removed. “As a gardener, (juniper) just ruins (the soil). That’s why I can’t grow a lawn. It takes all the water and it puts off inches and inches of debris.” Steinberg shook a branch and berries and leaves came showering down. “See?” he said. See Steinberg / F5

AT THE MARKET

Trail mix: ’Nough said.

Wine: Pour it into a regular water bottle that you can use for its original purpose once the wine is gone.

Flask: A little treat for in camp. Or to get you to camp.

Cheese: For lunch and snacking. Hard cheese keeps longer, and the stronger the flavor, the less you need to take.

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin Scale borrowed from Trivia Antiques

trail FOOD

astes of the

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

At the Market is a weekly look at produce available at local farmers markets. What: Fennel About: Fennel is an interesting veggie, both in looks and in taste. The stalks resemble celery and are green, while the edible bulb is larger and pale green/white in color. Fennel has a mild, sweet anise flavor, but licorice haters should not be scared off, as a bit of cooking mellows the flavor. The texture is crisp and light when raw. Preparation: Fennel is versatile in that it works well raw and cooked. You can cook the top stems or discard them, as they tend to be a bit fibrous. Cut off the bottom end and slice the bulb in half. You will want to remove a hard center portion that is generally too tough to eat. The remaining fennel can be shaved into thin slices to put on top of a salad. Or make bigger chunks to throw into a veggie saute or pasta sauce. — Alandra Johnson, The Bulletin

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Garden, F5 Ask Martha, F6

• Weight may be king, but sometimes you want luxuries, too

By Jan Roberts-Dominguez For The Bulletin

When planning meals for a three-day, 16-mile hike into the high country, most people think in terms of ounces, not 2-pound porterhouse steaks. Seasoned backpackers are trained to scrutinize every bit of gear that they’ll be lugging through the wilderness — trimming away superfluous packaging; squirting 2.2 days worth of sunscreen and body lotion into itsy-bitsy bottles; rationing the crackers and

instant cocoa pouches (“Whaddaya mean, you want TWO hot chocolates after dinner? This isn’t Club Med, you know.”); forsaking the down pillow for a rolled-up fleece. So when my hiking partner suggested that we pack steaks to grill on our first night out, I just laughed. But he wasn’t kidding. At the time — a very long time ago — we were both working for a luxury hotel. This fellow was chummy with the chef. “I’ll have Chuck order a

good steak and freeze it for us,” he said. “It’ll be fun. By the time we reach camp it will be thawed enough to grill.” Which, of course, meant bringing along a grill. And charcoal. And starter fluid. And wine. And fresh vegetables. And potatoes for baking. I don’t even want to tell you how much our packs weighed. It was too embarrassing. Particularly when we had to fess up to other hikers along the trail that we were only on a two-day trek. See Trail food / F2

If you said Brian Faivre is a “hoppy” family man, with his new dream job as brewmaster for Deschutes Brewery, you wouldn’t be wrong. A decade ago, Faivre said he couldn’t have dreamed up the life he’s leading now. As a former self-proclaimed “computer geek,” Faivre was an information technology guy, and while the pay was good, the job was boring. On his first date with Marjon, who’s now his wife, they went to the San Francisco Brewing Company. The date was fortuitous. Faivre, with his hop fetish, got a job at this California microbrewery, and Marjon agreed to more dates. “I was a programmer during the dot-com boom era, but I didn’t love it, so I asked myself, ‘What’s the next step?’” recalled Faivre, while holding his 10-month-old son, Andrew. “When I was working in the San Francisco brewery, I loved what I was doing, but the pay was so low. I knew I wanted to go back to UC Davis, where I got my undergrad (computer science) degree, and do a masters in the brewers program.” With his newly minted masters diploma, Brian and Marjon Faivre then made their way north to Bend. Though Faivre was named the new head brewer in October, after former head brewer Larry Sidor left to start his own brewery, he was no newbie at the job. He had already been working the front lines at Deschutes Brewery for eight years. “I’m so grateful to have this opportunity,” said Faivre, 35, who’s one of the youngest brewers for a microbrewery this size. “There’s a lot of ways this company could’ve gone. We’re the fifth largest craft brewery in the country, so I feel very fortunate for this opportunity.” We caught up with the Faivres in their new NorthWest Crossing home, to see how the Deschutes brewmaster works in his own kitchen environment. Faivre hands off baby Andrew to his wife as he walks quickly to the outdoor barbecue to check his roast. When Faivre barbecues or smokes something, there’s always a bit of that computer geek that comes out, which has served him well both at home as master griller and at work as a professional brewer. See Faivre / F4

TODAY’S RECIPES • Dave & Margy’s Trail Salmon, F2 • Backpacker Salad, F2 • Bill’s Great Gorp, F2 • Sweet and Spicy Grilled Flank Steak, F2 • Pâte a Choux (Cream Puff Pastry), F3 • Pastry Cream (Creme Pâtissiere), F3 • Chocolate Glaze, F3 • Chicken Mechoui, F6


F2

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, AUGUST 7, 2012

F

Next week: Summer corn

Trail food

Andrew Scrivani / New York Times News Service

Flank steak, which comes from the abdomen of the cow, craves the strong flavors of either a marinade or a rub.

Steak marinades: Don’t leave your flank uncovered By Melissa Clark New York Times News Service

There are some steaks that need nothing more than a little salt and pepper to bring out their beefy goodness. Flank steak is not one of them. This brawny cut, from the abdomen of the cow, craves the strong flavors of either a marinade or a rub. The spicier and more garlicky the better, at least as far as I’m concerned. My favorite marinade-making method involves throwing a bunch of things into the blender, pureeing until smooth and slathering it over the meat. It’s so forgiving that as long as you don’t overdo the salt, it’s pretty hard to mess up. I like to add about a teaspoon of coarse kosher salt per pound of meat, or a little less if I’m planning to include salty ingredients in the marinade, like soy sauce or anchovies or capers. Then I use something acidic for brightness (here, both lime juice and zest), something sweet to heighten the browning (brown sugar), something spicy (jalapeno and sriracha for different types of heat), a handful of aromatics for flavor (garlic is non-negotiable, ginger and scallions are vibrant) and oil to keep the meat from sticking to the grill. Spices, condiments, fresh and dried herbs, and various fruits and vegetables in immediate need of a home are nice, too, but not necessary. Marinate the meat for as

Sweet and Spicy Grilled Flank Steak Makes 4 to 6 servings. Time: 30 minutes, plus marinating time 3 TBS coarsely chopped scallions 1 TBS peeled and finely chopped ginger 1 fresh jalapeno, seeded if desired, coarsely chopped 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped

1 TBS light brown sugar Zest of 1⁄2 lime 2 tsp lime juice 1 tsp sriracha or other hot sauce (or to taste) 2 TBS extra virgin olive oil 11⁄2 tsp coarse kosher salt 11⁄2 lbs flank steak

In a food processor, pulse together scallions, ginger, jalapeno, garlic, sugar, lime zest and juice, and sriracha. With the motor running, pour in oil until smooth. Season steak with salt. Place in a large bowl and pour marinade over meat. Turn to coat well with the mixture. Cover tightly and refrigerate for at least 2 hours or overnight. When you are ready to cook the steak, heat the grill to medium-high heat. Transfer meat to the grill and cook, covered, until it reaches the desired doneness (about 5 minutes per side for medium-rare). Let rest on a cutting board for 5 minutes, then slice thinly.

long as you have between now and dinner, even if that’s just the 20 minutes you need to light the coals. Overnight is ideal. Leave the meat on the counter if you are marinating for an hour or less; otherwise pop it into the fridge. If I don’t have a lot of time to let the marinade really soak in, sometimes I’ll save some to use as a sauce. This depends on how the marinade tastes raw. Dip your finger in and lick it clean. If you have the urge to dip again, save some to drizzle over the grilled meat. If you don’t, assume (hope, pray ...) that it’s the kind of thing

that needs to be cooked to be enjoyed. Because flank steak is so dense, it should be sliced thinly against the grain and served juicy and rare, or at least medium-rare. Well-done flank steak is sad, dry and rubbery. (Fans of well-done meat will do better splurging on a more tender cut.) Finally, always cook more flank steak than you need for dinner that night. Leftovers — piled into sandwiches, tossed into salads, rolled in tortillas, chopped into hash, and especially eaten straight out of the fridge — are the best part.

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Continued from F1 But my friend was right about one thing: After eight miles and several hours, the steak was almost completely thawed. It had also kept the bottle of champagne that the chef had tucked in for good measure — three MORE pounds of unnecessary baggage — nicely chilled. It was about 4 p.m. when we made camp. We dumped our gear, gave our trail-weary feet a brief soaking in the nearby stream, then set about preparing a feast of immense proportions. While the grill chef bustled about creating the least environmentally damaging way to construct a grilling pit, I speared chunks of fresh zucchini, mushrooms and onions on bamboo skewers, plopped a zip-topped bag of marinating cucumber slices down in the water to cool and wrapped potatoes in foil. Finally, with the sun only three fingers off the horizon and the potatoes snuggled up next to the charcoal, we headed down to the water’s edge to relax while the coals worked up a fine coating of ash. It was well past sundown before we finally sawed into our steaks. They were superb. Sitting on my rock, munching delicately charred fresh vegetables between sips of a pertinent Bordeaux, I savored the moment. The myriad stars splashed over the velvet alpine sky seemed too few to rate this restaurant.

Trail food tips Elegant repasts aside, my theory regarding trail food is simple: anything considered edible at the beginning of a hike will be downright exquisite by the fourth day. So it’s always a good idea to eat most of the good stuff at the beginning of a journey when the palate is most discriminating. On the other hand, with all the options out there these days, it’s easy to plan delectable meals and snacks for the entire journey. Some additional food for thought: • Don’t overlook instant couscous, a delicious pre-cooked and dried starch that’s also very lightweight. Just bring some water to a boil (flavored with a bit of salt or dried bouillon), stir in the couscous and any other dried veggies, such as tomatoes and onions, cover the pot and let it stand for 5 minutes. This is perfect backpacking food. • Potato flakes: lightweight and a wonderful way to give a little substance to a powdered soup or stew. • Can’t live without the taste of fresh-ground coffee? REI sells a spoon filter, made of plastic and fine-meshed netting. Just scoop up a serving size of ground coffee into this hinged spoon, clamp it shut and place it in your mug, along with boiling water. Stir until your coffee reaches the appropriate color. Of course, I make room for my cone filter, which means I’m packing soggy paper filters and grounds as they accumulate, but it’s worth it. And there are portable single-serving French presses to be had as well. • Bend-area friend and adventurer Dennis Hanson observes that “what to take depends on the trip length, your own tastes and how much weight you want to carry. To the extent possible, use the heavier fresh food early in the trip and then move down the trail to your lighter items. Commercial freeze-drieds are great for cutting weight in an overloaded pack, but too often you have to relish the sloppy taste of wet cardboard. Instead, consider dehydrated fresh food mixed with some creativity. Even some common lightweight foods (such as ramen noodles with pepperjack or Parmesan cheese) can make a lively dinner. Also, a number of delicious meals can be made ahead of time — fresh bread, desserts and chopped vegetable salads using beans, hummus, and tabbouleh.” • How about a pertinent chardonnay with that firstnight meal of salmon? Transfer the wine out of the heavy glass bottle into plastic water bottles. Once the wine’s gone, the plastic bottles can be returned to their original intended use. And while we’re on the subject of alcohol … if you are going to encounter clean snow fields, throw in some plastic 1.5-ounce “airline bottles” of your favorite liqueur for some adult-style

Thinkstock

Still-frozen salmon at the trailhead will be thawed in time for dinner. To cut down on the mess, look for salmon in a vacuumsealed pouch.

Dave & Margy’s Trail Salmon Makes 4 servings. Consider this meal for your first night on the trail: Trail-thawed salmon (still frozen at the trailhead, thawed by the time we were ready for dinner), nestled into a foil pouch with a bit of fresh lemon, fresh herbs, a splash of the house pinot gris, and a little salt and pepper, then placed in a dry frying pan over a backpacking stove. Heavenly! 1½ lbs of wild salmon filets or steaks (see note) Dry white wine (such as a nice pinot blanc, pinot gris, or Sauvignon Blanc) or cooking sherry

Generous squeeze of fresh lemon A few slices of Walla Walla sweet onion Butter 2 tsp fresh rosemary Salt and pepper to taste

Create a foil pan for the fish that is large enough to surround everything and partially enclose the top. Snuggle this pan into your largest backpacking skillet. Spread open the foil and place the salmon in the center. Pour on enough dry white wine to create a small amount of liquid around the salmon. Add the juice from half a lemon, a few slivers of butter, some slices of Walla Walla sweet onion, a sprinkling of salt and pepper, and about 2 teaspoons of fresh rosemary leaves. Snuggle the foil up and around the fish, leaving the top open so the fish will poach but not steam. Place the foil pouch and skillet over a backpacking stove and cook just until the fish will flake when gently prodded with a fork, about 10 to 15 minutes, depending on the thickness of the fish and the temperature of your environment. Every few minutes during cooking, baste the fish with some of the wine liquid. Note on salmon: Make sure that if you’re taking salmon along for your first night in the wilderness, you start with a frozen piece. Also, it’s less messy if you can buy the salmon in a vacuum-sealed pouch.

Backpacker Salad Makes 2 to 4 servings. This is the cucumber salad that I’ve been taking on backpacking trips for years. Salad purists may gasp at the use of packaged dressing, but it’s simple and quick, and quite transportable, which makes it perfect for the trail. 1 red onion, sliced 1 really good-flavored cucumber (preferably, an in-season local variety), peeled and thinly sliced

1 (.7 ounce) packet of Italian salad dressing mix ¾ C wine vinegar ¼ C salad oil

Place vegetables in large zip-lock bag. Add dressing packet contents, vinegar and oil. Seal pouch and squeeze to combine contents. Chill the pouch of salad in a snowbank, river or lake until ready to serve. Safety note: To avoid contaminating the contents of the pouch with untreated river or lake water, the pouch must be opened carefully, and none of the water droplets clinging to the outside of the container allowed to come in contact with the salad.

Bill’s Great Gorp There’s nothing fancy or unique about this gorp. It’s just really good and really simple to throw together. Bill Lauer introduced us to this particular blend years and years ago. We mix up large portions of it at the beginning of summer and pack it into small resealable plastic bags so we can grab some when we’re packing up for a hike. 1 box of Quaker Oats brand granola M & M’s

Unsalted (or lightly salted) peanuts Raisins

Mix the ingredients in a bowl and then store it in resealable plastic bags. Keeps for weeks and weeks.

Author, artist in Sunriver Jan Roberts-Dominguez will be showing watercolor paintings and signing copies of her latest cookbook, “Oregon Hazelnut Country — the Food, the Drink, the Spirit,” at the Sunriver Art Faire, taking place Friday through Sunday. Admission is free and there are plenty of artists, activities and foods to explore. She will be in the Sunriver Mall in booth 31. For more information and a complete listing of artists and activities, go to www.sunriver artfaire.com.

snow cones. Of course, who needs snow fields? My liquor of choice: Scotch. • Cheese is the hiker’s lunchtime staple. Hard cheese keeps longer without refrigeration, so take a variety and label them either by name or by day to be eaten. Two to four ounces are enough for one adult lunch with crackers, nuts, and fruit. And even though I could enjoy our pal Dan Bottom’s cheese of choice — Old Amsterdam — for an entire backpacking journey, if you’d like a little more variety than that, here are some other cheeses to consider: Danish fontina, dry Monterey jack, Kumminost and a smoked gouda; also, throw in a hunk of Parmigiano Reggiano (a little bit goes a long way, though), which can complement many noodle and couscous dinners. • For my husband Steve, lunch is one of the times he’s particularly hankering for a little extra flavor. So lately, we’ve been bringing along the “canned” tuna commercially packed in foil pouches, which we doctor up with squirts from single-serving sized packets of mayonnaise and mustard. One

time we were even able to add fresh wild onions we’d found along the trail. Ak-Mak is our preferred cracker for transporting tuna from pouch to mouth. • Another Steve topping for Ak-Mak is peanut butter and my homemade raspberry jam, each component packed into a plastic backpacking food tube. He’s also fond of carrying along Tabasco sauce to boost the flavor of otherwise tame offerings, such as the various freeze-dried entrees. This hot sauce comes in tiny, single-serving packets, but Steve’s particularly fond of carrying his very own little 1 ⁄8 fluid ounce bottle (I find ’em in liquor stores!), which can be brought from the pack and applied with a dramatic flourish. • Check out your favorite bulk-food source for some great trail food inspiration, such as dehydrated cooked lentils and refried beans. You’ll also find seasoning mixes, instant vegetable (and beef and chicken) stock powder and dried soup mixes in bulk form. — Jan Roberts-Dominguez is a Corvallis food writer, cookbook author and artist. Contact: janrd@proaxis.com.


TUESDAY, AUGUST 7, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

FOOD

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Pâte a Choux (Cream Puff Pastry) Makes 12 eclair or cream puff shells. Total time: About 1 hour. Note: For savory pâte a choux, omit the vanilla. 6 TBS (3⁄4 stick) butter, cut into ½-inch pieces and at room temperature 1 C water ½ tsp salt

Cream puffs can be filled with a variety of ingredients. One popular option: whipped cream and fruit such as cherries, peaches or figs.

Puff, the magic pastry 1 By Noelle Carter Los Angeles Times

Pâte a choux is the stuff of magic in the kitchen. Pipe a soft, sticky dough onto a baking sheet and slide it into a hot oven. In mere minutes the dough puffs up — practically exploding to double, even triple, its original size — right before your eyes. Out of the oven, pâte a choux cools to a golden-brown shell, crisp yet delicate and lighter than air. It’s downright mesmerizing. Maybe you’ve never heard of pâte a choux, but you’ve no doubt savored it at one time or another. Also known as cream puff dough, it’s the magic behind crisp eclair shells and towering cream puff pastries, savory profiteroles and cheesy gougeres. Even better? Pâte a choux is really simple to make. All it takes is butter, water, flour and eggs, perhaps a touch of sugar and salt, to get you started. Combine water, butter, sugar and salt in a pot or saucepan. Bring the mixture to a boil, then add some flour. Stir the mixture quickly — this part of the recipe does require some elbow grease — to evenly combine the ingredients and hydrate the flour. Move too slowly and the flour will cook up in lumps, just like dumplings. Stir the mixture just a few minutes over low heat to cook out any extra moisture and develop the gluten needed for good structure. As it’s stirred, the mixture will come together in a single mass, and you’ll notice a thin film forming on the bottom of the pan. At this point, it’s time to add the eggs. Most recipes call for adding the eggs one at a time using a mixer or stirring by hand to properly develop the dough (simple as it may sound, constant stirring can really tone an arm). But for the best volume, skip the mixer and the workout, and pull out the food processor. I learned about the trick in Rose Levy Beranbaum’s classic “The Pie and Pastry Bible.” It’s the fastest and easiest method I’ve tried

2

Finished pâte a choux puffs await filling. 3

½ tsp sugar Seeds from ½ vanilla bean 1¼ C (5.3 oz) flour 3 eggs 2 egg whites

Heat the oven to 400 degrees and place a rack in the center of the oven. On a sheet of parchment paper, using a permanent marker, draw templates of the eclairs or cream puffs to help you pipe the batter. For the eclairs, draw 12 rectangles measuring 41⁄2 by 11⁄2 inches, spacing the rectangles about 2 inches apart (they will puff and spread as they bake). For the cream puffs, draw 21⁄2 -inch circles, spacing the circles about 2 inches apart. Flip the parchment so the marker is on the underside of the sheet (you should still be able to see the templates) and place the parchment on a baking sheet. In a medium-size, wide, heavy-bottomed saucepan, combine the butter, water, salt, sugar and vanilla seeds, and bring to a rolling boil over high heat. Remove from heat and stir in the flour (stir quickly or the flour lumps will cook). Return the pan to low heat and cook, stirring frequently, for about 3 minutes to cook the flour slightly and rid the mixture of any starchy, floury taste. Remove the pan from the heat and place the dough in the bowl of a food processor or stand mixer. If using a food processor, process the dough for 15 seconds to cool slightly and release steam (leave the tube open), then add all of the eggs and egg whites at once. Immediately continue to process for 30 seconds to combine and form the batter. If using a stand mixer, beat the dough with the paddle attachment until most of the steam has subsided, then add the eggs and egg whites, 1 at a time, until each is incorporated and a batter is formed. Remove the batter to a bowl set over an ice bath and continue to stir gently just until the batter cools slightly and thickens (it should be thick enough to hold its shape when piped). Dab a little of the batter underneath the 4 corners of the parchment paper so it sticks to the baking sheet. Place the rest of the batter in a large pastry bag fitted with a large round tip (the hole should measure just over one-half inch in diameter). Pipe the batter evenly onto the paper to cover each of the templates; the piped batter will rise about one-half inch off the parchment paper. Place the sheet in the oven and bake for 30 to 35 minutes, until the pastry is richly golden and evenly colored on the sides and top, and is firm when tapped. Turn off the oven and place the handle of a wooden spoon in the door to keep it barely open. Leave the pastries in the oven for an additional 30 minutes to give them time to dry out and set up. Remove the pastries and place them on a rack, leaving a little space in between each. Prick the side or underside of each with the tip of a paring knife or skewer, and set aside until the pastries are cooled to room temperature, then use or fill as desired. Nutrition information for each of 12 servings: 118 calories; 4 g protein; 10 g carbohydrates; 0 fiber; 7 g fat; 4 g saturated fat; 62 mg cholesterol; 0 sugar; 125 mg sodium. — Inspired by a recipe by Rose Levy Beranbaum in “The Pie and Pastry Bible”

Pastry Cream (Creme Pâtissiere) 4

Makes 2½ cups. Total time: 20 minutes. Note: This makes enough pastry cream to fill roughly 6 eclairs in the above recipe. 3 TBS butter, cut into ½-inch pieces 2½ C half-and-half ½ C sugar ¼ tsp salt

1) Water, salt, butter and sugar is brought to a boil in the first step of making a pâte a choux dough. 2) After adding flour to the hot liquid, the dough is a big lump, like mashed potatoes. 3) Use a food processor to mix in all the eggs quickly and get a puffier dough. 4) Mark parchment paper when piping pâte a choux dough to get evenlysized cream puffs. Photos by Bob Chamberlin / Los Angeles Times

Pâte a choux is a quick, easy dough to make that puffs up in the oven and ends up with a crunchy exterior perfect for eclairs glazed in chocolate.

(all the eggs are added at once rather than one at a time), and it increased the volume of my pâte a choux by a third. And where most pâte a choux recipes call for adding whole eggs, Beranbaum also mentions substituting some egg whites, something I’ve seen in a few other recipes,

Chocolate Glaze

which helps to increase the overall structure and crispness of the baked pastry. Use the pastries in a day or so, or freeze until you need them (they keep well frozen; simply refresh them in a warm oven). Fill them with pastry cream and top with chocolate glaze for eclairs, or stuff them full of chicken salad or a mousse for profiteroles. Adding grated cheese to

the dough will give you classic gougeres, or be creative and fold other spices, even herbs or citrus zest, into the dough for other savory or sweet notes. In the summertime, my favorite is a classic cream puff. Halve the puffs (I like mine on the generous side) and fill with freshly whipped cream. Spoon over fresh fruit — cherries, berries, figs, perhaps thinly sliced nectarine ribbons macerated with a little sugar and liqueur — and serve. It makes for a dramatic presentation — magical, even.

1 (4-inch) piece split vanilla bean 2 eggs 2 egg yolks ¼ C cornstarch

Place the butter in a strainer set over a medium bowl. Place the bowl over a larger bowl of ice water to form an ice bath. In a medium, heavy-bottomed saucepan heated over medium-high heat, whisk together the half-and-half, sugar, salt and vanilla bean. Cook, stirring frequently, until the mixture comes to a boil, 5 to 7 minutes. Meanwhile, in a large bowl, whisk together the eggs, egg yolks and cornstarch. Whisk one-half cup of the boiling half-and-half into the egg mixture to temper the eggs, then slowly stir the egg mixture into the hot liquid. Increase the heat to high and cook, stirring frequently (and scraping all sides and the bottom of the pan), until the mixture thickens and comes to a boil. Immediately remove the pan from heat and pour the mixture over the butter in the strainer. Strain the pastry cream, then gently stir until the butter is completely incorporated. Place a sheet of plastic wrap over the surface of the cream to prevent a skin from forming and set aside until cooled. Use immediately or refrigerate until needed. Nutrition information for each ¼ cup serving: 185 calories; 4 g protein; 16 g carbohydrates; 0 fiber; 12 g fat; 7 g saturated fat; 105 mg cholesterol; 10 g sugar; 99 mg sodium.

Makes about 2½ cups of glaze. Total time: 15 minutes. 1 lb bittersweet or semisweet chocolate (chips or finely diced) ¼ C (½ stick) butter ½ C heavy cream

½ C water ¾ tsp vanilla extract 2 TBS corn syrup Pinch salt

Place the chocolate in a large bowl. In a medium saucepan, combine the butter, cream, water, vanilla, corn syrup and salt. Bring to a good simmer over high heat. Remove from heat. Pour the cream mixture over the chocolate and gently stir to combine, melting the chocolate and forming a glaze. The glaze will thicken as it cools. The glaze will keep for up to 1 week, covered and refrigerated. Rewarm slightly to thin. Nutrition information per tablespoon: 81 calories; 1 g protein; 7 g carbohydrates; 1 g fiber; 7 g fat; 4 g saturated fat; 7 mg cholesterol; 4 g sugar; 5 mg sodium.

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THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, AUGUST 7, 2012

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Next week: Organizing your garage

Faivre Continued from F1 Comparing the synergies between smoking meat and brewing beer, Faivre happily demonstrates a computer program he developed over a two-year period for perfectly smoking his specialty meats and chicken. “The red probe measures the ambient temperature, and the yellow line gives me an audible alert when the meat hits 225 degrees. It wirelessly sends data to this computer,” explained Faivre, pointing to the graph on his computer screen. “I actually got this idea from the brewery. We’re always trying to hit a certain temperature and maintain that temperature when we brew our beers. It’s temperature management.” The smoker with all its wiring is on the front porch, and Faivre proudly unscrews the top casing of the small black box to show the computer board he built for this electric smoker. His 3-year-old daughter Leila walks by, looking unimpressed by her dad’s electronic gizmos, but seems excited to eat whatever comes out of the smoker or barbecue. “Brian is a really good cook; he loves to cook,” says Marjon Faivre. “He wooed me with his cooking. When I was in my final year at acupuncture school, and stressed out, Brian would come over and cook a full week’s worth of meals and put it in Tupperware for me. He won me over with food.” Both Faivres have diverse ethnic backgrounds, which allows for a venerable United Nations of culinary tastes. “I’m half Iranian and half Norwegian,” explains Marjon Faivre. “Brian’s mother is half Japanese and half German, and his father was half French and half Irish.” Faivre admits he’s been cooking and experimenting with recipes since he was a young boy. His first successful recipe and cooking experiment was pancakes. From perfecting pancakes to craft beer and everything in between, he has become

Faivre smiles alongside his wife, Marjon, daughter, Leila, and son, Andrew.

Photos by Alex McDougall / The Bulletin

Deschutes Brewery brewmaster Brian Faivre tends to his grill at home. Faivre says that if he weren’t a professional brewer, he might have gone into the barbecue business.

fearless in his home kitchen. “I guess I learned to love to cook from my grandmother, who was a chef in a Las Vegas casino. I have really good memories of her gyoza and sushi, really good food,” recalled Faivre. “My dad did food services for the Air Force, and managed dining halls, and he cooked very well too.” A bowl of fresh berries and carrots rests artfully on the dining room table. Marjon explains they’ve already been to the NorthWest Crossing farmers market, a Saturday morning ritual they rarely miss. Faivre explains they like to buy locally as much as possible, supporting local butchers and farmers. “We were there today, and Brian says to me, ‘Maybe I should start barbecuing meats here,’” said Marjon, laughing. “Between brewing beer and being a father, I don’t think there’s going to be much time to set up a booth at the farmers market barbecuing meats, but you can see how passionate he is about his barbecue and smoker.” Faivre admits that if he

Faivre, a former computer programmer in California, developed a program to remotely monitor the temperature of meat he is smoking.

weren’t professionally brewing and crafting beers, he might have gone into the barbecue business. So serious are his passions, he set up a Deschutes Brewery University intensive class this summer, called “BBQ & Beer.” “We got the owners of Baldy’s Barbeque and Savory Spice to do this class for us; we do different intensive classes every first Tuesday of the month,” said Faivre.

“I don’t know if a lot of people know we do these classes, but it’s a good deal. We do six different beer pairings.” While Faivre loves his beers and ales, he says he has to watch how much he consumes, so he doesn’t get the ultimate beer belly. “I did work with a dietitian and nutritionist, because there has to be a limit. I enjoy my enjoyable calories like beer, but there does have to be a balance,” confessed Faivre, who

still looks athletically trim. “You are surrounded by beer. I run and we walk a lot. I have to do Q & A (quality assurance) tastings; they’re about 2- or 3ounce samples, but you do that four to eight times a day.” Yeah, tough job, but someone’s got to do it, right? The smoked and barbecued roast is resting on the cutting board for the prescribed 15 minutes before carving, and Faivre is trying to decide what’s his favorite beer. “Well, that changes; let’s see, there’s Twilight and Chainbreaker, I also love the stout and porter,” said Faivre, laughing at his inability to pick his favorite one, proving his beer crush is endless. What are the three ingredients you’ll always find in your home kitchen cupboard or refrigerator? Salt, pepper and olive oil. Favorite home meals you like to prepare? Barbecue, pulled pork, ribs, chicken, brisket, sausage, coq au vin, breakfast. What is your favorite home appliance in your kitchen? My smoker. What is your favorite hand tool/cooking utensil in your home kitchen? Thermometer, scale. What is your spice of choice? I love Mexican oregano and Hungarian paprika. I’m also fond of bouquet garni (bay leaves, thyme, parsley). What restaurants do you en-

joy, other than your own? Chow, Baldy’s Barbeque, Joolz Do you have a favorite cooking memory? Or favorite memorable meal you prepared? I love cooking for my family and friends. I occasionally will make pulled pork sandwiches for our brewing staff, which always makes me happy. My mom and her mom have always expressed love and caring through the preparation of meals — something that I have inherited. Does your family have a regular dinner or meal together? With our busy schedules, we still manage to most dinners and breakfasts together. Guilty food pleasures? Cold pizza and hot sauce for breakfast and my mom’s red velvet cake (that she was making years before it became trendy) for breakfast. What do you like to do outside of the kitchen? Our two kids (almost 4 and 10 months) keep us pretty occupied. We really enjoy walking and spending time outdoors with them. If you couldn’t be a chef, or in the food industry, what profession would you have chosen? I would love to run a barbecue joint. Favorite food quote or philosophy you often repeat to yourself? Simplicity! — Reporter: pnakamura@ bendbulletin.com

Facing a dishwasher stain? Try a solution of Tang By Al Heavens The Philadelphia Inquirer

A reader was wondering about a brown stain buildup in the dishwasher. Reader Sharon Garcia, of St. Davids, Pa., dealt with the same problem: “I had this problem for many years, and discovered that the only thing that would make the brown go away was Tang drink mix in the soap dispenser. It will have to probably run a few times if it has a lot of buildup. “I always ran it on hot without dishes when the buildup got bad. I also would open it during the rinse cycle and add some more. “A cheaper solution, I later discovered, was any inexpensive instant lemonade powder. Just check the label and make

sure the ingredients are the same, or similar to Tang. It must have something to do with the acidic component of citrus that breaks down the deposits on the walls. “I no longer have this problem. When the dishwasher finally died, I replaced it with one that has a stainless steel interior. Got tired of dealing with it.”

Efficient cooling Yes, it’s hot. Although most houses built in recent years have central air-conditioning and many older houses have been retrofitted, there are a lot of people out there sweltering in the summer heat. From the folks at Emerson, here are some energy-efficient approaches to cooling.

• Check the Seasonal Energy Efficiency Rating (SEER) of the unit. The higher the number, the more efficient the system — resulting in lower monthly energy bills. A SEER rating over 16 is great. • Check your refrigerant. If the label on your outside air conditioner says R-22, you’re going to need to upgrade. R-22 is ozone depleting and has been phased out in favor of environmentally friendlier R-410A. • Is your outside compressor unit free of debris? Many times, leaves and grass clippings can get stuck on the coils and restrict airflow. This causes the unit to work harder and ends up costing you more money. Questions? Email aheavens@ phillynews.com.

Mail-In Rebate • Aug. 1 - Sept. 4, 2012


TUESDAY, AUGUST 7, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

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F5

Next week: At the county fair

Planting an adventure in ‘Natural Companions’ “Natural Companions” by Ken Druse and Ellen Hoverkamp (Stewart, Tabori & Chang, $40) By William Hageman Chicago Tribune

With 16 books under his belt, garden expert Ken Druse was zeroing in on his next project. “I had met (photographer) Ellen Hoverkamp, who made these wonderful images, and I thought it would be great to work with her,” says Druse, a gardener, writer, photographer, designer, naturalist and podcaster (kendruse.typepad. com). “I wondered, what can we do together? And I had

Photos by Marielle Gallagher / The Bulletin

“I like to grow different stuff for the challenge,” says Ron Steinberg, standing in the lower level of his backyard garden space.

Steinberg

of weeds, but if there’s a weed here or this is encroaching there, that’s OK,” Steinberg explains. The encroaching plants and wispy vines seem to be a perfect style for the eccentricity of the plants. “When these plants are blooming and nobody else in town has got it — I come out here in the morning and go ‘Wow! How is that growing in Central Oregon?’ That is the big thing for me: to grow something that’s unusual.”

Continued from F1 Steinberg says if he were starting all over, he would remove the existing soil and add his own nutrient-rich soil. “Gardening is all about your soil. The better soil you have, the better the plants and the better it holds moisture so you don’t have to water as much.”

Meticulous beginnings Steinberg’s introduction to gardening was helping his father with his rose garden in Montreal. Every fall would begin the production of preparing the roses for winter. “He’d prune them back, and if they were a vine type he’d lay them down and bury them. It was a big deal,” said Steinberg, who chooses not to grow roses because they attract aphids. The main plant types Steinberg grows are clematis, cactus, fritillaria and allium. He grows at least 12 varieties of allium, including a hair allium, which looks like a little strawberry with long, wiry hair. Breeders in Japan, Canada, England and the U.S. create hybrid clematis varieties, according to Steinberg. “There’s maybe 1,000 different clematis. I don’t have room for 1,000, but I have 20 to bloom right now. … I’ve had as many as 40. … I like to grow the unusual or some of the ones that have super blooms.”

FROM TOP: A claret cup cactus, sea holly, a hot pink pad-type cactus and Centaurea macrocethala, all grown in Steinberg’s yard.

wanted to do something on combinations.” Their collaboration is “Natural Companions: The Garden Lover’s Guide to Plant Combinations” (Stewart, Tabori & Chang), a 256-page work that goes beyond matching up plants. The book, Druse says, is not a how-to as much as it is a travel guide suggesting possible itineraries. Combinations can be determined by obvious categories: color, shape, size, scent, etc. But the author encourages gardeners to go beyond the obvious. There are suggestions for an edible flower garden, for example, a cottage garden, and amazing groupings.

• AUGUST 1 - SEPTEMBER 7 - FOURTH ANNUAL SPRING BULB SALE (see gocomga.com for information and order form) • AUGUST 9 - THURSDAY 5:30-7:00pm LATE SEASON TOMATO CARE Hollinshead Community Garden, 1235 NE Jones Road, Bend (Bring a Chair) • AUGUST 23 - THURSDAY 12:15pm 30 MINUTE LUNCH & LEARN Native Plants. OSU Extension Service Office, 3893 SW Airport Way, Redmond • AUGUST 25 - SATURDAY 10:30-2:30pm OSU Extension Service DEMONSTRATION GARDEN OPEN HOUSE Mini-classes on the half hour, children’s activities all day 3893 SW Airport Way, Redmond • AUGUST 25 - SATURDAY 10:00-3:00pm Hollinshead Community Garden “GARDEN PARTY AND OPEN HOUSE” Classes on Harvesting at 10:00am. Tours of the garden, gardening Q&A, Hollinshead gardeners showing their gardens Hollinshead Community Garden, 1235 Jones Road, Bend • SEPTEMBER 6 - THURSDAY 5:30pm SEED SAVING Hollinshead Community Garden, 1235 Jones Road, Bend • SEPTEMBER 22 - SATURDAY 10:00am PREPARING THE GARDEN FOR WINTER Hollinshead Community Garden, 1235 Jones Road, Bend • SEPTEMBER 27 - THURSDAY 12:15pm 30 MINUTE LUNCH & LEARN - Winter Clean-up of Tools and Cover Crop Suggestions OSU Extension Service Demonstration Garden, 3893 SW Airport Way, Redmond

— Reporter: 541-383-0361 or mgallagher@bendbulletin.com

A clematis niobe blooms on a trellis in Steinberg’s backyard.

He has both pad and balltype cacti, including a claret cup cactus that he’s had for 14 years.

The space Framed by a trellis covered in different types of clematis blooming vibrant magenta and purple, Steinberg’s backyard is a multi-tiered space filled to the brim with foliage and blossoms. In the middle of the garden is a former pond that has been drained and is used as a cactus garden. A claret cup cactus blooms brilliant red and a Buddha head shrouded by milkweed and pink penstemon watches serenely from a perch. Garden decorations include tall pieces of rebar with ornate finial tops made by Steinberg. Paths are shaded by elder-

berry, centaurea, cashmere sage, painted daisies and taller plants of foxtail lily, echinops globe thistle and sea holly. Steinberg chooses to grow the more unusual varieties of common plants, like foxglove. “They’re normally pink and you see them all over the coast, but this foxglove is dark brown with a solid mass of tight, tight florets.” Being that the Steinbergs are building a smaller home in Bend and creating a new garden space there, Steinberg says he hasn’t planted anything new in two years, unless a friend gave him a plant, nor has he had a lot of time for garden maintenance. “The fact that it’s sort of out of control at the moment doesn’t bother me. I’m not a meticulous gardener, you know. It’s not full

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Preventing insect infestations By Kathy Van Mullekom Daily Press (Newport News, Va.)

No one really likes spiders, ants and other creepy crawlers invading home and yard. But they are a natural part of our environment and there are some best-practice ways to deal with them. “An essential aspect of landscape maintenance is insect control,” says Doug VanGundy, an entomologist with Central Life Sciences, which includes Amdro pest-control products. Here are VanGundy’s tips on preventing insect infestations on your property: Choose plants wisely. Native plants are less likely to attract unwanted pests. Combat insects with essen-

tial nutrients. One of the best defenses from problem pests is a strong, actively growing, wellmaintained plant. Proper fertilization is essential to maintaining landscape beauty and plant development, helping sustain optimum plant growth and resistance to insects, diseases and environmental stresses. Be an insect detective. Often, the evaluation of plant symptoms can provide an effective indication of the insect type. There are three common types of problem insects: 1. Sucking insects and mites cause damage by removing a plant’s life-sustaining sap from plant tissues. Symptoms include: wilting of plant tissues; stunting, curling or distortion

of new plant growth; rust coloration of the upper leaf surface; or sticky substance followed by black sooty appearance on the upper leaf surface. 2. Chewing insects consume plant tissue, such as leaves, stems and roots, or burrow into plant tissue. Symptoms include: silvering of leaf tissues; complete removal of leaf tissues; and holes in and around plant leaves, stems, branches and trunks. 3. Boring insects target the trunks, stems, bark, buds and roots of woody ornamental shrubs and trees. Symptoms include: holes in the bark; tunneling activity in leaf tissue; dead terminal growth on a plant; or the complete removal of strips of bark.

Offers valid while supplies last through August 19, 2012

F o r u m C e n t e r, B e n d ( A c r o s s f r o m B a r n e s & N o b l e ) 541-617-8840 w w w. w b u . c o m / b e n d


F6

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, AUGUST 7, 2012

RECIPE FINDER

Editor’s note: The Recipe Finder feature will return. If you are looking for a hard-to-find recipe or can answer a request, write Julie Rothman, Recipe Finder, The Baltimore Sun, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore, MD 21278, or email baltsunrecipefinder@gmail.com. Names must accompany recipes for them to be published.

Drying your own tomatoes MARTHA STEWART

Moroccan cuisine is : unique and delicious Q A: By Carole Kotkin McClatchy Newspapers

Moroccan food could well be poised to become the next major trend in American dining. Many consider it to be one of the world’s greatest cuisines, with its blend of Mediterranean, Middle Eastern and African ingredients and a generous dose of Asian spices. Moroccan cuisine represents centuries of cultural and religious differences that have come together in a sort of culinary harmony. Lemons (fresh and preserved), red onions, olives, chickpeas (garbanzo beans),

lentils, distilled flower waters, blood oranges, dates and nuts are some of the essentials of the well-stocked Moroccan pantry. These ingredients are made uniquely North African by the addition of a wide range of aromatic spices and seasonings: sugar, cumin, cinnamon, cayenne pepper, anise, mint, cardamom, turmeric and saffron. Just like India has its curry and France its herbs de Provence, Morocco has its ras el hanout: a blend of cumin, sweet paprika, nutmeg, mace, ginger, cilantro and cinnamon.

Chicken Mechoui Two 2-lb broiler-fryers, whole, split, or quartered 3 scallions, white part only, chopped 1 garlic clove (optional) 2 TBS roughly chopped cilantro 2 TBS roughly chopped flatleaf parsley

1 tsp salt 1 tsp sweet paprika Pinch of cayenne 1½ tsp ground cumin, preferably Moroccan 4 TBS unsalted butter, softened

Rinse the chicken and pat dry; trim away excess fat. Slide your fingers under the skin to loosen it from the flesh. Pound the scallions with the garlic, herbs, salt and spices in a mortar. Blend in the butter to make a paste (or use a food processor). Rub the paste under and over the chicken skin (and into the cavities if left whole). Arrange in a roasting pan and let marinate for at least 1 hour. Heat an outdoor grill or heat the broiler. Arrange the pieces of chicken skin side up over the coals or skin side down on a broiler pan under the broiler. After 5 minutes, turn and baste with any extra paste or the juices in the broiler pan. Continue turning and basting every 5 minutes until the chickens are done; timing will depend on the heat of the coals. Makes 4 servings. Nutrition information per serving: 445 calories (53 percent from fat), 26 g fat (11.8 g saturated, 9.4 g monounsaturated), 229 mg cholesterol, 51.2 g protein, 1.5 g carbohydrates, 0.8 g fiber, 944 mg sodium. — Adapted from “The Food of Morocco” by Paula Wolfert (Harper Collins, $45)

How do I make dried tomatoes at home? Since you likely have an abundance of tomatoes right now, oven-drying is an easy way to make use of them. The technique is often used by professional chefs, but it’s simple enough for you to do at home. All it requires is cooking tomatoes at a low temperature for several hours. The process removes excess moisture and concentrates flavors, making the tomatoes silky and chewy. Oven-drying works on any type of tomato, but keep these tips in mind: Small ones such as cherry or grape tomatoes can be cut in half of left whole; plum tomatoes should be cut in half, and large ones can be cut into 1⁄4-inch slices (for crisper pieces, slice them even thinner). Preheat the oven to 250 degrees. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper; if the tomato slices are very thin, use a nonstick baking mat. Place the tomatoes, cut sides up, about 1⁄2 inch to 1 inch apart. Sprinkle on any herbs you’d like, such as basil or oregano, and some salt and pepper. (If the tomatoes are lacking in sweetness, you can even sprinkle them with a little sugar.) Cook until the juices stop running and the tomatoes have shrunk a little. Small tomatoes will cook in about an hour; large ones may take up to four hours, but you can cook them as long as you’d like, depending on the texture you’re after. Keep in mind that the longer you dry them, the more intense the flavor will be. To store, let cool completely, and place in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to three days or in the freezer for up to two months.

Jim Wilson / New York Times News Service

Dry tomatoes in your oven at home. Small tomatoes take about an hour in a 250-degree oven, larger ones up to four hours, but you can vary the cooking times, depending on the texture you like.

Tony Cenicola New York Times News Service

Take a few simple steps in late summer to ensure that your amaryllis bulb will flower again in the winter.

Making an amaryllis bloom I have a potted amarylQ: lis. What can I do now to coax it to bloom again? Amaryllis are winterA: blooming bulbs with red, pink and white flowers that make them great for add-

ing natural holiday cheer to your home. To ensure that an amaryllis will bloom year after year, it’s important to recreate the bulb’s natural cycle, including the conditions that make the South American flower comfortable in a North American home. In late August and early September, cease watering the plant and place it in a cool, dark closet. (This reproduces the arid conditions that the bulb thrives in.) At the end of October, remove the plant from the closet and cut off any wilted leaves near the top of the bulb. Water the plant once thoroughly, and place it in a sunny window. Don’t water it again until you see signs of new growth. At first budding, begin to water it regularly and you will likely be rewarded with gorgeous blooms in time for the winter holidays. After the flowers fade, cut them off at the base. Then water and fertilize the plant regularly to keep the leaves green and recharge the bulb for next year’s flowers.

Choosing an area rug What size should an Q: area rug in my living room be? Follow these rules of A: thumb for a classic look: Get a rug large enough to accommodate all furniture, while allowing for 4 inches to 1 foot of bare floor on all sides, and at least 3 feet of bare space wherever traffic flows through the room. Often, however, a standard-size rug, a beloved family heirloom or a relic from a previous home will not quite fit into your new living room. In that case, too small is preferable to too large; you don’t want the rug to look like a failed wall-to-wall carpet. Place your furniture’s front legs on top of the rug. As long as the rug runs under the seating, it is big enough. Otherwise, it can be a tripping hazard. — Questions of general interest can be emailed to mslletters@ marthastewart.com. For more information on this column, visit www.marthastewart.com.


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Aussie's mini AKC, red tri's/merle's, males / females parents on site some toy size. Call 541-598-5314/788-7799

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Mini, 1 female, 1 male, both black, purebred, no papers. 1st shots. 8 weeks old, great temperament, mother & father on site $225 each 541-771-1164 wont last long! DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS? Non-commercial advertisers may place an ad with our "QUICK CASH SPECIAL" 1 week 3 lines, $12 or 2 weeks, $20! Ad must include price of single item of $500 or less, or multiple items whose total does not exceed $500. Call Classifieds at 541-385-5809

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German Shepherd, black, beautiful purebred, 14 wks, very sweet, great disposition, no papers, $400. 541-678-4484

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MANY thanks to Dr. Table, Oak, 5 chairs, Deborah LaPaugh, a like new, $425, Bend veterinarian at 541-633-3397. LaPaw Animal Hospital, Simpson Ave, who Just bought a new boat? generously donated 4 Sell your old one in the surgeries to cats res- classiieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! cued by Cat Rescue, 541-385-5809 Adoption & Foster Team in July. This is a BIG help to a small, The Bulletin no-kill, all-volunteer r ecommends extra nonprofit that gets no caution when purgovernment support. chasing products or www.craftcats.org. services from out of Thanks, Dr. LaPaugh & the area. Sending staff, for helping us & cash, checks, or the forgotten cats of credit information Central Oregon! may be subjected to FRAUD. For more Miniature Schnauzer puppies. Tail, 1st/2nd information about an shots done, parents advertiser, you may on site, $350/ea. call the Oregon 541-771-1830. State Attorney General’s Office Mini Daschund Pups! Consumer Protecgirls & boys, 8 weeks! tion hotline at $200! 541-410-2583 1-877-877-9392. Papillon 8 wk old male. Tri-color. Parents on site. Many reference $350 541 350-1684

Papillon Pups, AKC reg, 4 males, parents on site, $950+, call 541-771-8739. Poodle, miniature, registered adult stud, proven breeder, $450. Gina, 541-390-1015 POODLE (TOY) PUPS Well-socialized & lovable. 541-475-3889 Queensland Heelers standard & mini,$150 &

ING

Labradors, AKC Reg., German Shepherd choc & black, 2 females, purebred puppies, 3 males, 7 wks, svc dog ready Aug. 7 , $350 males, $400 females. trainable. 541-536-5385 http://www.welcomelabs.com 541-350-3025

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Hound, 10-week old male pup, great bloodlines, well mannered, $150. Call 541-447-1323 Kittens/cats avail. thru rescue group. Tame, shots, altered, ID chip, more. Sat/Sun 1-5, other days by appt. 65480 78th Bend, 541-389-8420, or up. 541-280-1537 http:// 541-788-4170; visit rightwayranch.wordpress.com www.craftcats.org for Shih Tzu, male, 1 1/2 yrs, photos & more. free to pet companion home only. Ref. reLab Pups AKC, black quired. 541-788-0090 & yellow, Master Hunter sired, perfor- Siberian Husky female mance pedigree, OFA pup red & white , 6 cert hips & elbows, mo. old, with leashes Call 541-771-2330 and crate, $500. www.kinnamanretrievers.com 503-510-4870. Labradoodle Puppies! Gorgeous multi-gen. Siberian Husky Pups, Iditarod bloodlines, 1 pups. 541-953-4487 male, 5 females, $400, 541-633-6894. Labradoodles - Mini & med size, several colors Yorkie AKC adorable 541-504-2662 male pup, health guar., www.alpen-ridge.com loves kids, potty trained, $750. 541-316-0005. Get your Yorkie male puppy, 6 mos, shots, vet check, business $600. 541-792-0375 Yorkie Puppies, ready GROW now, 1 little male left! $600, 541-536-3108

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Yorkies, 8 weeks, extremely friendly, UTD. $500-$600. Redmond, 541-280-4200 210

Furniture & Appliances Barn/shop cats FREE, GIANT yard sale to bensome tame, some not. efit rescued animals! We deliver! Fixed, shots, A1 Washers&Dryers Every Sat/Sun in Aug, etc. 541-389-8420 $150 ea. Full war10-4. Nonprofit, all volranty. Free Del. Also unteer, all proceeds for wanted, used W/D’s vet bills. Still need MALTESE, 10 wks, 541-280-7355 quality items! Tax de- purebred w/o papers, ductible. Call 1st & dew claws removed, take to 8950 Hwy 97, 1st shots, vet checked, GENERATE SOME exRedmond or we can health guaranteed. 1 citement in your pick up, 541-788-4170 male, 1 female $600. neighborhood! Plan a Chihuahua Pups, asor 389-8420. Thanks! 541-504-5509. garage sale and don't sorted colors, teacup, www.craftcats.org forget to advertise in 1st shots, wormed, PUPPIES! Malteseclassified! Goldendoodle, miniature Poodles, 1 male $150; $250,541-977-0035 541-385-5809. adult female. Perfect 1 female $200. Also 1 Chi-Pom female, 6 yrs companion dog, $450. Yorkie-Chihuahua male, Gorgeous Marble dining table 90x42”, excel$150. Cash. needs new home. Gina, 541-390-1015 lent condition. Seats 8; 541-546-7909 $150. 541-639-7279. Golden Retriever stud sits on 2 matching pedwanted to mate with Maltese purebred reg- estals. $975 cash NW Dachshund AKC mini English Cream istered male looking Redmond.541-410-6015 piebald male, $375. Golden Retriever. for Maltese female; Pix. 541-447-3060 541-279-6820. pick of litter stud fee. Mattress, king size Restonic, high quality, less 541-280-9092 Guinea Pigs, 2 males, than 1 yr old, best matDachshund AKC mini free to caring home Maltese Toy AKC (1), tress we’ve ever had! puppy, ready 8/25, $350. only! Cage & supplies Champ bloodlines, 1.75 Box springs & frame incl. www.bendweenies.com lb, $685. 541-420-1577 $495. 541-420-9801 541-508-4558 incl. 541-317-2827

Selling Springfield XDM Moffit convection oven, $600 obo. Call Terry .40 in excellent condi541-408-6869 tion with <1000 rnds shot, with (3) 16-rnd Where can you ind a clips and Blackhawk helping hand? snap holster $600. Also selling almost From contractors to new Savage 30-06 yard care, it’s all here 114 Am Classic w/ Alin The Bulletin’s pen 3x9 scope only fired 15 rnds $400. “Call A Service 541-771-9707 Professional” Directory Snake Avoidance 263 Training - Teach your dog to avoid poisonTools ous snakes. 541-410-2667 Attn: Hunters & RV’ers Like new Yamaha Wall tents (2): 12x14x5 EF3000 generator with frame, screen door w/cover, electric start, & stakes, $750; 12x20, quiet running. New no frame, $500. Spike $2250; asking $1500 tent 12x12 with fly, obo. 541-815-5409 $800. 541-382-3735 Scaffolding: Safeway 255 light-weight, 3 sections high, all attachments & Computers plank incl. $3200 new; Apple Computers (2), 1 sell $950. 541-419-9233. iMac, 20”,2.66 Ghz In265 tel Core 2,$375; Desk212 Building Materials top iMac, 27”, 2.8 Ghz Antiques & Intel Core i7 Memory, Bend Habitat SOLD, 541-771-5616. Collectibles RESTORE THE BULLETIN re- Building Supply Resale Antique Safe, quires computer adQuality at LOW great condition, $1800. vertisers with multiple PRICES 949-939-5690 (Bend) ad schedules or those 740 NE 1st selling multiple sys541-312-6709 Antiques wanted: tools, tems/ software, to disOpen to the public. furniture, fishing, close the name of the marbles, old signs, business or the term Sisters Habitat ReStore toys, costume jewelry. "dealer" in their ads. Building Supply Resale Call 541-389-1578 Quality items. Private party advertisLOW PRICES! ers are defined as 150 N. Fir. those who sell one 541-549-1621 computer. Open to the public. 257 Visit our HUGE 266 home decor Musical Instruments Heating & Stoves consignment store. New items Antiqued blue Piano, NOTICE TO arrive daily! needs tuning & small ADVERTISER 930 SE Textron, key repair, $250 firm. Since September 29, Bend 541-318-1501 541-923-0574 1991, advertising for www.redeuxbend.com used woodstoves has 258 been limited to modTravel/Tickets The Bulletin reserves els which have been the right to publish all certified by the Orads from The Bulletin DUCK TICKETS (2), egon Department of great seats, $125 & newspaper onto The Environmental Qualup. 541-573-1100. Bulletin Internet webity (DEQ) and the fedsite. eral Environmental 260 Protection Agency Misc. Items (EPA) as having met smoke emission stanWanted: Ceramic Gas BEDDING - Daughter dards. A certified got a bigger bed Pump Salt & Pepper woodstove may be Have 7+ twin sheet Shakers, “Flying A identified by its certifisets, 4+ twin comService, Brothers, Orcation label, which is forters & 2 twin duegon” 701-238-4039 permanently attached vet covers/shams. to the stove. The BulAll great shape. $65 246 letin will not knowall. 541-815-1764. Guns, Hunting ingly accept advertisBuying Diamonds ing for the sale of & Fishing uncertified /Gold for Cash woodstoves. Saxon’s Fine Jewelers CASH!! 541-389-6655 For Guns, Ammo & 267 Reloading Supplies. BUYING Fuel & Wood 541-408-6900. Lionel/American Flyer trains, accessories. DO YOU HAVE 541-408-2191. WHEN BUYING SOMETHING TO FIREWOOD... People Look for Information SELL To avoid fraud, About Products and FOR $500 OR The Bulletin LESS? Services Every Day through recommends payNon-commercial The Bulletin Classifieds ment for Firewood advertisers may only upon delivery BUYING & SELLING place an ad and inspection. All gold jewelry, silver with our and gold coins, bars, • A cord is 128 cu. ft. "QUICK CASH rounds, wedding sets, 4’ x 4’ x 8’ SPECIAL" class rings, sterling sil- • Receipts should 1 week 3 lines $12 ver, coin collect, vininclude name, or tage watches, dental phone, price and 2 weeks $20! gold. Bill Fleming, kind of wood purAd must 541-382-9419. chased. include price of single item of $500 Poulan Pro riding lawn • Firewood ads MUST include speor less, or multiple mower 42” 18½ hp cies and cost per items whose total good shape. $700 cord to better serve does not exceed OBO. 541-389-9268 our customers. $500. TWO burial plots and two concrete grave Call Classifieds at boxes in Garden of 541-385-5809 Devotion, Deschutes www.bendbulletin.com Memorial Gardens. Dry Lodgepole: $175 $1200 ea. or two for cord rounds; $210 cord HANDGUN SAFETY $2200. 541-475-6210. split.1½ Cord Minimum CLASS for concealed 37 yrs service to Cent. license. NRA, Police Wanted- paying cash Ore. 541-350-2859 for Hi-fi audio & stuFirearms Instructor, WE BUY dio equip. McIntosh, Mike Kidwell. Thurs., FIREWOOD LOGS JBL, Marantz, DyAug. 16, 6:30-10:30 pm. Juniper, Pine, naco, Heathkit, SanCall Kevin Centwise, for sui, Carver, NAD, etc. Tamarack, 500+ cords. reservations $40. 503-519-5918 Call 541-261-1808 541-548-4422

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SUPER TOP SOIL

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300 308

Farm Equipment & Machinery Tractor, 2006 Peterson, w/loader, scraper, 340 hrs., 541-447-7972

Screened, soil & compost mixed, no Wanted Used Farm Equipment & Machinrocks/clods. High huery. Looking to buy, or mus level, exc. for consign of good used flower beds, lawns, quality equipment. gardens, straight Deschutes Valley screened top soil. Equipment Bark. Clean fill. De541-548-8385 liver/you haul. 541-548-3949. 270

Lost & Found Found: Portion of boat top or RV cover? Reed Mkt Rd. Call to identify, 541-389-1100 Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS Found suitcase, on N. 97 Redmond at caution light. Call to identify, 541-923-2806 Lost ’Carlos’ part black Lab, pure black with a little white on chest, 100#s, 2 wks ago off OB Riley Rd. needs his meds. Small reward. 541-639-4315. LOST small female calico cat on July 2 Ridgeview Drive West area. 406-570-5051 Prescription glasses found Sunday at Cultus Lake, has silver frame, Personal Optical. 541-647-0197. REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal, don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend 541-382-3537 Redmond, 541-923-0882 Prineville, 541-447-7178; OR Craft Cats, 541-389-8420.

325

Hay, Grain & Feed 3A Livestock Supplies •Panels •Gates •Feeders Now galvanized! •6-Rail 12’ panels, $101 •6-Rail 16’ panels, $117 Custom sizes available 541-475-1255 I need 8-9 tons good grass hay, delivered & stacked, to Culver area. Call 541-546-2430 Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedding Straw & Garden Straw;Compost.546-6171 341

Horses & Equipment 2 Decker pack saddles, $450 each. 2 Ralide pack boxes, $250 both. 2-man crosscut saw, $80. 2 Cavalry nose bags, $15 ea. 2 lash cinches, $20 ea. 1 portable electric fence, $150. 541-382-3735 345

Livestock & Equipment

1977 14' Blake Trailer, refurbished by Frenchglen Blacksmiths, a Classy Classic. Great design for 286 multiple uses. Overhead tack box (bunkSales Northeast Bend house) with side and easy pickup bed access; manger with left HH FREE HH side access, windows Garage Sale Kit and head divider. Toyo Place an ad in The radial tires & spare; Bulletin for your ganew floor with mats; rage sale and recenter partition panel; ceive a Garage Sale bed liner coated in key areas, 6.5 K torsion Kit FREE! axles with electric KIT INCLUDES: brakes, and new paint, • 4 Garage Sale Signs $10,500. Call John at • $2.00 Off Coupon To 541-589-0777. Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!”

PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT at

1777 SW Chandler Ave., Bend, OR 97702

Get your business

GRO W

I NG

With an ad in The Bulletin's "Call A Service Professional" Directory

375

Meat & Animal Processing Angus beef ready end of Aug. $3.25 lb. includes cut & wrap. Call 541-548-7271. Historic J Spear Ranch grass-fed, totally natural locker beef. Only 9 head left @ $2.89/lb, incl cut & wrap, sold in whole or 1/2; 50% deposit reqd.541-573-2677 Good classiied ads tell the essential facts in an interesting Manner. Write from the readers view - not the seller’s. Convert the facts into beneits. Show the reader how the item will help them in some way.


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

G2 TUESDAY, AUGUST 7, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD Edited by Will Shortz

PLACE AN AD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . .11:00 am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Starting at 3 lines

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

*UNDER $500 in total merchandise

OVER $500 in total merchandise

7 days .................................................. $10.00 14 days ................................................ $16.00

Garage Sale Special

4 days .................................................. $18.50 7 days .................................................. $24.00 14 days .................................................$33.50 28 days .................................................$61.50

4 lines for 4 days.................................. $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

PRIVATE PARTY RATES

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702

PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday. 476

476

476

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

RV Salesperson EMPLOYMENT 410 - Private Instruction 421 - Schools and Training 454 - Looking for Employment 470 - Domestic & In-Home Positions 476 - Employment Opportunities 486 - Independent Positions

Employment

400 421

Schools & Training

TRUCK SCHOOL

www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

Garage Sales Garage Sales Garage Sales Find them in The Bulletin Classiieds

541-385-5809 476

FINANCE AND BUSINESS 507 - Real Estate Contracts 514 - Insurance 528 - Loans and Mortgages 543 - Stocks and Bonds 558 - Business Investments 573 - Business Opportunities

476

476

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities MANAGEMENT

BUS MECHANIC Crook County School District

has an immediate opening for a fulltime bus mechanic. $16.74 min per hour DOE. For complete job description and application packet go to

www.crookcounty.k12.or.us

or call 541-447-5099. Position closes 4 p.m., Aug. 10, 2012.

DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW?

Call The Bulletin before 11 a.m. and get an ad in to publish the next day!

541-385-5809. VIEW the Classifieds at:

Employment Opportunities

www.bendbulletin.com

CAUTION READERS:

Hoffmeyer Co. is seeking an energetic person for long-term employment, Will assist with conveyor belting installs, shipping, receiving, customer service. Job requires flexible work schedule including nights & weekends; some overnight travel. No experience required; will train. ODL REQUIRED. $9-$12/ hr. Application necessary. Please apply in person: 20575 Painters Ct., Bend, OR.

Field Service

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 971-673-0764 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Kevin O’Connell Classified Department Manager The Bulletin 541-383-0398

Apartment Manager for small complex in Bend. Fax resume to 541-388-6973 or email

manager97701@gmail.com

Banking

We are excited to announce an available position in Bend, Oregon. Branch Supervisor Salary Range: $ 29,000 - $40,000 EOE. For more details, please apply online: www.sofcu.com

Seeking responsible Management Team for established mobile home/ RV park in Redmond. Good people skills are required. Duties include some maintenance for one person and light clerical duties for the other. Basic computer skills preferred. Salaried position and a home is provided. Call 541-382-7667 to schedule interview.

Manicurist Urban Beauty Bar in downtown Bend, seeks one full-time Nail Tech, Tues-Sat; and one full-time Nail Tech/Aesthetician. Bring resume to: 5 NW Minnesota Ave., Bend.

Medical Biller Experienced with Medicare. Visit us at:

heartcentercardiology.com

Operations Manager

Sales -

Big Country RV, Inc., Central Oregon’s Largest RV Dealership, is growing and adding to our strong sales staff. We are looking for the right person who wants a career in one of the fastest growing industries in Central Oregon. Great opportunity for someone with prior vehicle sales experience. Exceptional inventory of New and Used RVs. Unlimited earning potential with an excellent benefit package to include: • IRA • Dental Plan • Medical Insurance • Up to 35% commission • Great Training

Technical/Industrial Hoffmeyer Co. Inc. seeks professional for Conveyor Belt sales in Central/ Southern Oregon territory. Previous industrial sales experience preferred. Pay based on experience. Please apply in person: 20575 Painters Ct., Bend. The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to FRAUD. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Big Country RV, Inc. Successful Central Oregon RV Dealership seeks Operations Manager to oversee 3 locations. Ideal candidate will have proven experience in management, budgeting, accounting, Must be able to work computers & production. weekends and have a Excellent compensation passion for the RV & benefit package, inbusiness. Please apcluding: Medical insurply in person, or drop ance, vacation, Simple resume off at: IRA. Please apply with Big Country RV, Inc. resume & cover letter to: 3500 N. Hwy 97 asherdw@msn.com Bend, OR 97701 or in person at 63500 N or email a resume to Hwy 97, Bend. accounting@bigcrv.com Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin' s web site will be able to click through automatically to your site.

Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Sales

Independent Contractor Sales We are seeking dynamic individuals.

Tick, Tock Tick, Tock... ...don’t let time get away. Hire a professional out of The Bulletin’s “Call A Service Professional” Directory today!

DOES THIS SOUND LIKE YOU? • OUTGOING & COMPETITIVE • PERSONABLE & ENTHUSIASTIC • CONSISTENT & MOTIVATED

Our winning team of sales & promotion professionals are making an average of $400 - $800 per week doing special events, trade shows, retail & grocery store promotions while representing THE BULLETIN newspaper as an independent contractor WE OFFER:

Electrician General Journeyman

Warm Springs Composite Products is looking for an individual to help a growing innovative light manufacturing plant. Basic Duties: Assist in troubleshooting and repairs of plant equipment. Install, repair and maintain all electrical and electronic equipment. Able to read and revise electrical schematics, Must be able to perform both electrical and mechanical preventive maintenance requirements and report, PLC experience. Minimum Skills: A minimum of 5 years in the industrial maintenance field with a valid Oregon State Electricians License in Manufacturing. A strong mechanical aptitude with the ability to perform light welding and fabrication duties. Successful applicant shall supply the normal hand tools required for both electrical and mechanical maintenance. Benefits: Full Family Medical, Vision, Dental, Life, Disability, Salary Incentives, Company Bonuses, Pension and 401K w/Company Matching and Above Pay Rate Scale. Please remit resume to: Warm Springs Composite Products PO Box 906, Warm Springs, OR 97761 Phone: 541-553-1143, Fax: 541-553-1145 Attn: Mac Coombs, mcoombs@wscp.com

Data Center Network Technicians Facebook is hiring! We’re seeking a highly motivated Data Center Network Technician to help us build a world-class facility at our Prineville, Oregon location. The ideal candidate will have 3+ years’ experience in data center network deployment, strong troubleshooting skills, a solid understanding of Layer 2 and Layer 3 network switching/routing, and experience in configuring and supporting Cisco, Juniper, and F5 devices. For more information please visit our careers page https://www.facebook.com/career or email ristine@fb.com.

•Solid Income Opportunity* *Complete Training Program* *No Selling Door to Door * *No Telemarketing Involved* *Great Advancement Opportunity* * Full and Part Time Hours * FOR THE CHANCE OF A LIFETIME, Call Adam Johnson 541-410-5521, TODAY!

486

Independent Positions $4500.00 / Week Established firm seeks 5 top sales people in Bend area. Car Bonus. Call (877) 332-6943 Say “goodbuy” to that unused item by placing it in The Bulletin Classiieds

Finance & Business

500 528

Loans & Mortgages WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

528

573

Loans & Mortgages

Business Opportunities

LOCAL MONEY:We buy secured trust deeds & note,some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 ext.13. Reverse Mortgages by local expert Mike LeRoux NMLS57716 Call to learn more.

541-350-7839 Security1 Lending NMLS98161

Get your business

GRO W

IN G

With an ad in

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Professional"

Need to get an ad in ASAP? You can place it online at: www.bendbulletin.com

Directory

541-385-5809

The Bulletin's "Call A Service

Advertise with a full-color photo in The Bulletin Classifieds and online.

Easy, flexible, and affordable ad packages are also available on our Web site. To place your Bulletin ad with a photo, visit www.bendbulletin.com, click on “Place an ad” and follow these easy steps:

541-385-5809

1. Choose a category, choose a

classification, and then select your ad package.

Independent Contractor

H Supplement Your Income H

2. Write your ad and upload your

digital photo.

Operate Your Own Business

FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF

Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor

&

Call Today &

We are looking for independent contractors to service home delivery routes in:

H Prineville H Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours.

Must have reliable, insured vehicle.

3. Create your account with any

major credit card.

All ads appear in both print and online Please allow 24 hours for photo processing before your ad appears in print and online.

To place your photo ad, visit us online at www.bendbulletin.com or call with questions 541-385-5809

Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 during business hours apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com www.bendbulletin.com


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, AUGUST 7, 2012 G3 636

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend Fully furnished loft Apt

RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - Roommate Wanted 616 - Want To Rent 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 630 - Rooms for Rent 631 - Condos & Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for Rent General 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space

Rentals

600 605

Roommate Wanted Share 3 bdrm home in Redmond. Prefer male, non smoking. $325 or $375 for master + 1/2 util. call Mike after 4:30 541-480-9761

682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 730 - New Listings 732 - Commercial Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740 - Condos & Townhomes for Sale 744 - Open Houses 745 - Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest Bend Homes 747 - Southwest Bend Homes 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 749 - Southeast Bend Homes 750 - Redmond Homes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson County Homes 757 - Crook County Homes 762 - Homes with Acreage 763 - Recreational Homes and Property 764 - Farms and Ranches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land 630

634

Rooms for Rent

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

Mt. Bachelor Motel has CHECK OUT THIS rooms, starting $150/ HOT DEAL! week or $35/nt. Incl $299 1st month’s rent! * guest laundry, cable & 2 bdrm, 1 bath WiFi. 541-382-6365 $530 & 540 Carports & A/C incl! Fox Hollow Apts. Just too many (541) 383-3152 collectibles? Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co *Upstairs only with lease*

Sell them in The Bulletin Classiieds

541-385-5809

Studios & Kitchenettes Furnished room, TV w/ cable, micro & fridge. Utils & linens. New owners.$145-$165/wk Share cozy mobile home 541-382-1885 in Terrebonne, $300 + utilities. 1-503-679-7496

Call for Specials! Limited numbers avail. 1, 2 and 3 bdrms. W/D hookups, patios or decks. MOUNTAIN GLEN, 541-383-9313 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

616

Want To Rent Looking for home, or AVAILABLE BEND AREA RENTALS portion, to rent. Will pay premium for right location & accommoda- • Cute 2 Bdrm/1 Bath Unit in Quad - Large, tions. 1-800-248-8840 shared yard in back. Private fenced patio. Some hdwd floors. WD hook-ups. Pets? $575. WTS Want to rent furnished • 2 Bdrm/1 Bath Apt. - very close to downtown. home/apt/studio or Lower end unit. Quite spacious. No Pets. roommate situation, will $625 WST. pay premium, down • Spacious 2 Bdrm/1 Bath SE Duplex - Sgl. gatown NW Bend. rage. Large fenced back deck. All new appl. car800-248-8840 pet, paint. W/D hook-ups. No pets. $650 WST. wtbwma@gmail.com • 2 Bdrm 1 Bath SE Duplex - Single garage. Maintained yard surrounds this end unit. FireHave an item to place insert. WD Hook-ups. New carpet & paint. No Pets. $650 WST sell quick? • 3 Bdrm 1 that in Secured 8 Plex - Close to Old If it’s under Mill District. Totally re-furbished. Coin-op laun$ dry on site. Private balcony. Upstairs, end unit. 500 you can place it in Nice!! No Pets. $675 WST The Bulletin • Nice 2 Bdrm/ 2.5 Bath Townhome - Private Classiieds for: deck off back. End unit. Gas Fireplace. Single garage. WD hoop-ups in laundry room area. $ Gas cooking. Must see. Small pet? $725. WST 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $

16 - 3 lines, 14 days

(Private Party ads only)

*** FOR ADDITIONAL PROPERTIES *** CALL 541-382-0053 &/or Stop By the Office at 587 NE Greenwood, Bend

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 (This special package is not available on our website)

Building/Contracting NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website www.hirealicensedcontractor. com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications. High Standard Const. Full Service general contractor, post frame construction #181477 541-389-4622 Debris Removal

JUNK BE GONE

I Haul Away FREE

For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel, 541-389-8107 Handyman

Landscaping/Yard Care

Landscaping/Yard Care

Nelson Landscape Maintenance More Than Service Peace Of Mind

Fire Protection

Fuels Reduction •Tall Grass •Low Limbs •Brush and Debris

Protect your home with defensible space

Landscape Maintenance

Full or Partial Service •Mowing •Edging •Pruning •Weeding Sprinkler Adjustments

Fertilizer included with monthly program

Its not too late for a beautiful landscape

•Lawn Restoration •Weed Free beds •Bark Installation EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential Free Estimates Senior Discounts

Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial

•Sprinkler Repair •Back Flow Testing •Thatch & Aerate • Summer Clean up

•Weekly Mowing •Bi-Monthly & Monthly Maintenance •Flower Bed Clean Up •Bark, Rock, Etc. •Senior Discounts

Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458 LCB#8759

Call The Yard Doctor for yard maintenance, thatching, sod, sprinkler blowouts, water features, more! Allen 541-536-1294 LCB 5012

on Wall Street in Bend, with parking. All utilities paid. Call 541-389-2389 for appt

Real Estate For Sale

Boats & RV’s

870

875

880

Boats & Accessories

Watercraft

Motorhomes

700 800

18.5’ ‘05 Reinell 185, V-6 Quiet 1 bdrm, new oak cabinets, micro., winVolvo Penta, 270HP, 850 745 dows, countertops and low hrs., must see, Snowmobiles carpet. Carport parkHomes for Sale $17,500, 541-330-3939 ing, laundry fac. No Bayliner 185 smoking. $575 + $500 BANK OWNED HOMES! Polaris 2003, 4 cycle, 18.5’ fuel inj, elec start, redep. Cat only. 209 NW 2008. 3.0L, open bow, FREE List w/Pics! verse, 2-up seat, Portland. 541-617-1101 www.BendRepos.com slim deck, custom cover, 4900 mi, $2500 bend and beyond real estate cover & trailer, exc. 20967 yeoman, bend or obo. 541-280-0514 638 cond., 30-35 total hrs., incl. 4 life vests, Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 860 ropes, anchor, stereo, depth finder, $12,000, Motorcycles & Accessories A sharp, clean 2Bdrm, 541-729-9860. 1½ bath apt, NEW Harley Davidson SoftCARPETS, neutral colors, great storage, priTail Deluxe 2007, vate patio, no pets/ white/cobalt, w/pasGOVERNMENT smkg. $555 incl w/s/g. senger kit, Vance & PROPERTY Call 541-633-0663 Hines muffler system SEALED BID SALE & kit, 1045 mi., exc. OFF-SITE REMOVAL 642 cond, $19,999, 19-ft Mastercraft ProHouse with attached 541-389-9188. Apt./Multiplex Redmond Star 190 inboard, garage 1,560 sq. ft., 3 1987, 290hp, V8, 822 bed, 1bath, Rager Harley Heritage Duplex, very clean & prihrs, great cond, lots of Ranger Station, Softail, 2003 vate, large 1300 sq ft 2 extras, $10,000 obo. 7615 Rageor Rd., $5,000+ in extras, bdrm 2 bath, garage 541-231-8709 Paulina, OR 97751 $2000 paint job, w/opener, fenced back30K mi. 1 owner, Bid opening: 8/23/12 yard, deck, fridge, DW, For more information W/D hkup, extra park- https://propertydisposal. please call gsa.gov ing, w/s/g paid, $710 + 541-385-8090 253-931-7556 dep. 541-604-0338 20.5’ 2004 Bayliner or 209-605-5537 205 Run About, 220 Call The Bulletin At HP, V8, open bow, 541-385-5809 exc. cond., very fast HD FAT BOY Place Your Ad Or E-Mail w/very low hours, 1996 lots of extras incl. At: www.bendbulletin.com Completely rebuilt/ tower, Bimini & customized, low custom trailer, 648 miles. Accepting of$19,500. fers. 541-548-4807 Houses for 541-389-1413 Rent General 750 HD Heritage Classic Redmond Homes PUBLISHER'S 2003, 100 yr. Anniv. NOTICE model. 10,905 Miles, All real estate adver- Looking for your next new tires, battery, tising in this newspaloaded w/ custom ex- 20.5’ Seaswirl Spyemployee? per is subject to the Place a Bulletin help tras, exhaust & der 1989 H.O. 302, Fair Housing Act wanted ad today and chrome. Hard/soft 285 hrs., exc. cond., which makes it illegal bags & much more. stored indoors for reach over 60,000 to advertise "any $11,995, life $11,900 OBO. readers each week. preference, limitation 541-306-6505 or 541-379-3530 Your classified ad or discrimination 503-819-8100. will also appear on based on race, color, bendbulletin.com Ads published in the 865 religion, sex, handiwhich currently re"Boats" classification cap, familial status, ATVs ceives over include: Speed, fishmarital status or na1.5 million page ing, drift, canoe, tional origin, or an inviews every month house and sail boats. tention to make any at no extra cost. For all other types of such preference, Bulletin Classifieds watercraft, please see limitation or discrimiGet Results! Class 875. nation." Familial staCall 385-5809 or 541-385-5809 tus includes children place your ad on-line under the age of 18 Polaris Predator 500 at living with parents or sport quad 2004. Runs bendbulletin.com & rides great. $2800/ legal custodians, GENERATE SOME exobo. 541-647-8931 pregnant women, and citement in your neigpeople securing cus764 Yamaha Grizzly 700 FI borhood. Plan a gatody of children under Farms & Ranches 2009, 543 mi, 2WD/ rage sale and don't 18. This newspaper 4WD, black w/EPS, forget to advertise in will not knowingly ac- WANTED: Ranch, will fuel injection, indepenclassified! 385-5809. cept any advertising work trade for findent rear suspension for real estate which is ished, Mt./Columbia winch w/handle conin violation of the law. River View, gated, trols & remote, ps, Our readers are residential developauto, large racks, exc. hereby informed that ment in the Columbia cond., $7850, Used out-drive all dwellings adverRiver Gorge, 541-322-0215 tised in this newspaparts - Mercury 509-767-1539. per are available on OMC rebuilt maan equal opportunity rine motors: 151 773 basis. To complain of $1595; 3.0 $1895; Acreages discrimination call 4.3 (1993), $1995. HUD toll-free at 541-389-0435 *** 1-800-877-0246. The toll free telephone CHECK YOUR AD Yamaha Kodiak 400, 875 number for the hear- Please check your ad 2005 4x4, 2500 lb winch, on the first day it runs gun rack & alum loading ing impaired is Watercraft to make sure it is corramp, only 542 miles, 1-800-927-9275. rect. Sometimes in- show room cond, $4800. Ads published in "Wastructions over the 541-280-9401 650 tercraft" include: Kayphone are misunderHouses for Rent aks, rafts and motorstood and an error 870 ized personal NE Bend can occur in your ad. Boats & Accessories watercrafts. For If this happens to your "boats" please see Luxury Home, 2450 ad, please contact us Class 870. sq.ft., 3 bdrm, 2.5 the first day your ad 17’ 1984 Chris Craft 541-385-5809 bath, office, 3 car gaappears and we will - Scorpion, 140 HP rage, mtn views., avail be happy to fix it as inboard/outboard, 2 7/20. 2641 NE Jill Ct. soon as we can. depth finders, troll$1650/mo. + dep. Deadlines are: Weeking motor, full cover, 541-420-3557. days 11:00 noon for EZ - Load trailer, next day, Sat. 11:00 $3500 OBO. a.m. for Sunday and 541-382-3728. Looking for your next Monday. employee? Kayak, Eddyline 541-385-5809 Place a Bulletin help Sandpiper, 12’, like Thank you! wanted ad today and new, $975, The Bulletin Classified reach over 60,000 541-420-3277. *** readers each week. 17’ Seaswirl, Your classified ad Powell Butte 6 acres, 175HP in/ outboard, will also appear on TURN THE PAGE 360 views, great horse open bow, new upbendbulletin.com, property, 10223 HousFor More Ads holster, $2900, currently receiving ton Lake Rd. $99,900. 541-389-9684. over 1.5 million page The Bulletin 541-350-4684 views, every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 541-385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com 652

Houses for Rent NW Bend Amazing views on 15th fairway of Rivers Edge. 4250 Sq.ft., 4/3.5, $2450/mo. Appt. 541-480-0612. 656

Houses for Rent SW Bend

BULLETIN CLASSIFIEDS Small A-frame on river, 3 Search the area’s most miles south of Bill Healy comprehensive listing of Bridge. Furnished; rent classiied advertising... or lease. Hot tub availreal estate to automotive, able, For additional info, merchandise to sporting call 541-884-5754. goods. Bulletin Classiieds appear every day in the 687 print or on line. Commercial for Call 541-385-5809 Rent/Lease www.bendbulletin.com

Warehouse - Industrial 541-390-1466 unit for rent. 5600 ERIC REEVE HANDY sq.ft., $2250/month, SERVICES. Home & Same Day Response near Bend High. Commercial Repairs, NOTICE: OREGON Aeration / Dethatching BOOK NOW! 541-389-8794. Carpentry-Painting, Landscape Contrac- Weekly / one-time service Pressure-washing, tors Law (ORS 671) avail. Bonded, insured, Honey Do's. On-time requires all busifree estimates! FIND YOUR FUTURE promise. Senior nesses that advertise COLLINS Lawn Maint. HOME IN THE BULLETIN Discount. Work guarto perform LandCall 541-480-9714 anteed. 541-389-3361 scape Construction Your future is just a page or 541-771-4463 which includes: Maverick Landscaping away. Whether you’re looking Mowing, weedeating, Bonded & Insured planting, decks, for a hat or a place to hang it, yard detailing, chain CCB#181595 fences, arbors, The Bulletin Classiied is saw work & more! water-features, and your best source. I DO THAT! installation, repair of LCB#8671 541-923-4324 Home/Rental repairs Every day thousands of irrigation systems to Holmes Landscape Maint Small jobs to remodels buyers and sellers of goods be licensed with the • Clean-up • Aerate Honest, guaranteed Landscape Contrac- • De-thatch • Free Est. and services do business in work. CCB#151573 these pages. They know tors Board. This • Weekly / Bi-wkly Svc. Dennis 541-317-9768 4-digit number is to be call Josh 541-610-6011 you can’t beat The Bulletin Classiied Section for included in all adverHome Improvement selection and convenience tisements which indi- Painting/Wall Covering - every item is just a phone cate the business has Kelly Kerfoot Const. call away. a bond, insurance and WESTERN PAINTING 28 yrs exp in Central OR! workers compensaThe Classiied Section is CO. Richard Hayman, Quality & honesty, from tion for their employeasy to use. Every item a semi-retired paintcarpentry & handyman ees. For your protecis categorized and every ing contractor of 45 jobs, to expert wall covtion call 503-378-5909 years. Small Jobs cartegory is indexed on the ering install / removal. or use our website: section’s front page. Welcome. Interior & Sr. discounts CCB#47120 www.lcb.state.or.us to Exterior. ccb#5184. Whether you are looking for Licensed/bonded/insured check license status 541-388-6910 541-389-1413 / 410-2422 a home or need a service, before contracting your future is in the pages of with the business. Picasso Painting: Mendoza Contracting The Bulletin Classiied. Persons doing land- Affordable, Reliable & Home Inspection Repairs scape maintenance Quality, repaints, decks, Decks, Pressure Wash, do not require a LCB more! 541-280-9081. Stain/paint interior/ext. license. 541-548-5226 CCB80653 CCB#194351

Sea Kayaks - His & Monaco Dynasty 2004, loaded, 3 slides, dieHers, Eddyline Wind Dancers,17’, fiberglass sel, Reduced - now boats, all equip incl., $129,900, 541-923paddles, personal flo8572 or 541-749-0037 tation devices,dry bags, spray skirts,roof rack w/ towers & cradles -- Just add water, $1250/boat Firm. 541-504-8557. 880

Motorhomes

Country Coach Intrigue 2002, 40' Tag axle. 400hp Cummins Diesel. Two slide-outs. 41,000 miles. Most options. $110,000 OBO 541-678-5712 CAN’T BEAT THIS! Look before you buy, below market value! Size & mileage DOES matter! Class A 32’ Hurricane by Four Winds, 2007. 12,500 mi, all amenities, Ford V10, lthr, cherry, slides, like new! New low price, $54,900. 541-548-5216

National Sea Breeze 2004 M-1341 35’, gas, 2 power slides, upgraded queen mattress, hyd. leveling system, rear camera & monitor, only 6k mi. Reduced to $41,300! 541-480-0617 RV CONSIGNMENTS WANTED We Do The Work, You Keep The Cash, On-Site Credit Approval Team, Web Site Presence, We Take Trade-Ins. Free Advertising. BIG COUNTRY RV Bend 541-330-2495

Redmond: 541-548-5254

Southwind 35.5’ Triton, 2008,V10, 2 slides, Dupont UV coat, 7500 mi. Avg NADA ret.114,343; asking $99,000. Call 541-923-2774

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale Tow car cover for HHR, by Coastline, new, Gulfstream Scenic $150. 541-728-1265 Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 in. kitchen slide out, new tires,under cover, hwy. miles only,4 door fridge/freezer ice- Winnebago Itasca Class maker, W/D combo, C 1999, 31K orig. mi, 29’, Interbath tub & great cond, queen rear shower, 50 amp pro- bed, A/C, gen, awning pane gen & more! $14,900 760-702-6254 $55,000. 541-948-2310

Hunter’s Delight! Package deal! 1988 Winnebago Super Chief, 38K miles, great shape; 1988 Bronco II 4x4 to tow, 130K mostly towed miles, nice rig! $15,000 both. 541-382-3964, leave msg.

Winnebago Outlook 32’ 2008, Ford V10 engine, Wineguard sat, TV, surround sound stereo + more. Reduced to $49,000. 541-526-1622 or 541-728-6793 881

Travel Trailers Itasca Sun Cruiser 1997, 460 Ford, Class A, 26K mi., 37’, living room slide, new awnings, new fridge, 8 new tires, 2 A/C, 6.5 Onan Gen., new batteries, tow pkg., rear towing TV, 2 tv’s, new Cardinal 33’ 2007, year hydraulic jack springs, round living, 8’ closet, 2 tandem axel, $15,000, slides, 2 TVs, surround sound, $22,800. In 541-385-1782 Prineville, 509-521-0369

Jayco Greyhawk 2004, 31’ Class C,

6800 mi., hyd. jacks, new tires, slide out, exc. cond, $49,900, 541-480-8648

Fleetwood 28’ Pioneer 2003, 13’ slide, sleeps 6, walk-around bed with new mattress; power hitch, very clean $11,500. Please call 541-548-4284. Pioneer 23’ 190FQ 2006, EZ Lift, $10,500, 541-548-1096

Immaculate!

Beaver Coach Marquis 40’ 1987. New cover, new paint (2004), new inverter (2007). Onan Springdale 29’ 2007, slide,Bunkhouse style, 6300 watt gen, 111K mi, sleeps 7-8, excellent parked covered $35,000 condition, $16,900, obo. 541-419-9859 or 541-280-2014 541-390-2504


G4 TUESDAY, AUGUST 7, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

BOATS & RVs 805 - Misc. Items 850 - Snowmobiles 860 - Motorcycles And Accessories 865 - ATVs 870 - Boats & Accessories 875 - Watercraft 880 - Motorhomes 881 - Travel Trailers 882 - Fifth Wheels 885 - Canopies and Campers 890 - RV’s for Rent

TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

AUTOS & TRANSPORTATION 908 - Aircraft, Parts and Service 916 - Trucks and Heavy Equipment 925 - Utility Trailers 927 - Automotive Trades 929 - Automotive Wanted 931 - Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 932 - Antique and Classic Autos 933 - Pickups 935 - Sport Utility Vehicles 940 - Vans 975 - Automobiles

881

882

Travel Trailers

Fifth Wheels

Sprinter 272RLS, 2009 29’, weatherized, like new, furnished & ready to go, incl Winegard Satellite dish,

Montana 3400RL 2008, 4 slides, no smokers or pets, limited usage, 5500 watt Onan gen, solar panel, fireplace, dual A/C, central vac, elect. awning w/sunscreen arctic pkg, rear receiver, alum wheels, 2 TVs, many extras. $35,500. 541-416-8087

Autos & Transportation

900 $26,995. 541-420-9964

Viking Tent trailer 2008, clean, self contained, sleep 5, easy to tow, great cond. $6500. 541-383-7150.

Montana 34’ 2003, 2 slides, exc. cond. throughout, arctic winter pkg., new 10-ply tires, W/D ready, $18,000, 541-390-6531

908

Aircraft, Parts & Service

1/3 interest in Columbia 400, located at Sunriver. $138,500. Call 541-647-3718 1/3 interest in wellequipped IFR Beech Bonanza A36, located KBDN. $55,000. 541-419-9510

Weekend Warrior Toy Executive Hangar Hauler 28’ 2007,Gen, at Bend Airport fuel station, exc cond. (KBDN) sleeps 8, black/gray 60’ wide x 50’ deep, interior, used 3X, w/55’ wide x 17’ high $24,999. bi-fold door. Natural MONTANA 3585 2008, 541-389-9188 gas heat, office, bathexc. cond., 3 slides, room. Parking for 6 king bed, lrg LR, Arccars. Adjacent to Looking for your tic insulation, all opFrontage Rd; great next employee? tions $37,500. visibility for aviation Place a Bulletin help 541-420-3250 bus. 1jetjock@q.com wanted ad today and 541-948-2126 reach over 60,000 Open Road 37' 2004 readers each week. 3 slides, W/D hookup, Your classified ad large LR w/rear winwill also appear on dow. Desk area. bendbulletin.com Asking $19,750 OBO which currently reCall (541) 280-7879 ceives over 1.5 milvisit rvt.com lion page views evad#104243920 ONLY 2 OWNERSHIP ery month at no for pics SHARES LEFT! extra cost. Bulletin Economical flying in Classifieds Get Reyour own Cessna sults! Call 385-5809 172/180 HP for only or place your ad $10,000! Based at on-line at BDN. Call Gabe at bendbulletin.com Professional Air! 541-388-0019 Pilgrim 27’, 2007 5th 882 wheel, 1 slide, AC, Redmond large exec. TV,full awning, excelFifth Wheels hangar for lease: lent shape, $23,900. Pvt. bath, heat, office, 541-350-8629 Alfa Ideal 2001, 31’, 3 lights. Call Ben, slides, island kitchen, 541-350-9729 AC/heat pump, gen916 erator, satellite sysTrucks & tem, 2 flatscreen TVs, hitch & awning incl. Heavy Equipment $16,000. (Dodge 3500 1 ton also available) Prowler AX6 Ex541-388-1529;408-4877 Regal treme Edition 38’ ‘05, Freightliner 2000, 24’ van box, 8.3L 4 slides,2 fireplaces, all 210 HP eng. in maple cabs, king bed/ good cond. $9000, bdrm separated w/slide 541-749-0724. glass dr,loaded,always garaged,lived in only 3 mo,brand new $54,000, Alpha “See Ya” 30’ still like new, $28,500, 1996, 2 slides, A/C, will deliver,see rvt.com, ad#4957646 for pics. heat pump, exc. cond. Cory, 541-580-7334 solid oak cabs, day & Hyster H25E, runs night shades, Corian, well, 2982 Hours, tile, hardwood. $9750 $3500, call SPRINTER 36’ 5th OBO/trade for small 541-749-0724 wheel, 2005, dual trailer, 541-923-3417 slides, bunk, 2 baths, queen bed air mattress, fold out couch. Very clean! $10,500 obo. 541-382-0865, leave message! Peterbilt 359 potable water truck, 1990, Carri-Lite Luxury 2009 3200 gal. tank, 5hp by Carriage, 4 slidepump, 4-3" hoses, outs, inverter, satelcamlocks, $25,000. lite sys, fireplace, 2 541-820-3724 flat screen TVs. $60,000. 925 541-480-3923 Taurus 27.5’ 1988 Utility Trailers Everything works, $1750/partial trade for car. 541-460-9127 885

Fleetwood Wilderness Canopies & Campers 36’, 2005, 4 slides, rear bdrm, fireplace, Arctic Fox Silver Edition 2005. 5 hrs on AC, W/D hkup beau- 1140, gen; air, slideout, dry tiful unit! $30,500. bath, like new, loaded! 541-815-2380 $16,900. Also 2004 Dodge Ram 3500 quad cab dually 4x4, 11,800 mi, SuperHitch, $26,950. OR both for $39,850. Call 541-382-6708

Big Tex Landscaping/ ATV Trailer, dual axle flatbed, 7’x16’, 7000 lb. GVW, all steel, $1400. 541-382-4115, or 541-280-7024. 932

Antique & Classic Autos

Funfinder189 2008,slide, A/C, awning, furnace,self contained, queen, sleeps 5, $11,500,541-610-5702 Lance 945 1995, 11’3”, all appl., solar panel, new battery, exc. cond., $5995, 541-977-3181

Chev Corvair Monza convertible,1964, new top & tranny, runs great, exlnt cruising car! $5500 obo. 541-420-5205

Komfort 25’ 2006, 1 slide, AC, TV, awning. USE THE CLASSIFIEDS! Chevy 1954, 5 window, NEW: tires, converter, 350 V-8, auto/ps, batteries. Hardly used. Door-to-door selling with needs minor me$19,500. 541-923-2595 fast results! It’s the easiest chanical work, exterior good, new paint; way in the world to sell. Need help ixing stuff? needs some gauges, Call A Service Professional gun metal grey, $6100 The Bulletin Classiied ind the help you need. obo. 503-504-2764, 541-385-5809 www.bendbulletin.com CRR.

H HEALTH

932

933

935

940

975

975

Antique & Classic Autos

Pickups

Sport Utility Vehicles

Vans

Automobiles

Automobiles

Chevy Trailblazer 2005, gold, LS 4X4, 6 cyl., auto, A/C, pdl, new tires, keyless entry, 66K mi., exc. cond. $8950. 541-598-5111

NISSAN QUEST 1996, 3-seat mini van, extra nice in and out $3,900. Sold my Windstar, need another van! 541-318-9999, ask for Bob. Ask about free trip to D.C. for WWII vets.

Dodge 1500 2001, 4x4 sport, red, loaded, rollbar, AND 2011 Moped Trike used 3 months, street legal. call 541-433-2384

INFINITI M30 1991 Con- Volvo 740 ‘87, 4-cyl,auto F250 XLT ‘95, 4WD vertible, always ga86k on eng.,exc. maint. Chevy Wagon 1957, Ford auto, long bed, 3/4 ton, raged, Most options: $2895, 541-301-1185. 4-dr., complete, 8600 GVW, white,178K www.youtu.be/yc0n6zVIbAc $2,900. 541-350-3353 $15,000 OBO, trades, mi, AC, pw, pdl, Sirius, or 541-923-1096 please call tow pkg., bedliner, bed 541-420-5453. rail caps, rear slide Looking for your 975 Excursion window, new tires, ra- Ford Chrysler 300 Coupe next employee? 2005, 4WD, diesel, Automobiles diator, water pump, 1967, 440 engine, Place a Bulletin help exc. cond., $19,900, hoses, brakes, more, auto. trans, ps, air, wanted ad today and call 541-923-0231. $5200, 541-322-0215 frame on rebuild, rereach over 60,000 AUDI QUATTRO Mercedes E320 2004, painted original blue, readers each week. CABRIOLET 2004, 71K miles, silver/silver, FIND IT! Want to impress the original blue interior, Your classified ad extra nice, low mileexc. cond, below Blue BUY IT! original hub caps, exc. will also appear on age, heated seats, relatives? Remodel Book, $14,500 Call chrome, asking $9000 bendbulletin.com new Michelins, all SELL IT! your home with the 541-788-4229 or make offer. help of a professional which currently rewheel drive, The Bulletin Classiieds 541-385-9350. ceives over 1.5 mil$12,995 Mercury Grand Marquis from The Bulletin’s 2004, runs excellent, lion page views 503-635-9494. GMC Denali 2003 “Call A Service very clean, 1 owner, every month at loaded with options. clear title, $4800. no extra cost. BulleProfessional” Directory Advertise your car! Exc. cond., snow 360-508-8748 (in Bend) tin Classifieds Chrysler SD 4-Door Add A Picture! tires and rims inGet Results! Call Reach thousands of readers! Mitsubishi 1930, CDS Royal 3000 GT cluded. 130k hwy 385-5809 or place Call 541-385-5809 Standard, 8-cylinder, 1999, auto., pearl miles. $12,000. your ad on-line at The Bulletin Classifieds body is good, needs white, very low mi. 541-419-4890. bendbulletin.com some restoration, $9500. 541-788-8218. runs, taking bids, BMW 525i 2004, Nissan Altima hybrid GMC Yukon SLT 2003 541-383-3888, New body style, 2011 $19,995 #155382 one owner, 4WD, 3rd Ford Ranger 1999, 4x4, 541-815-3318 Steptronic auto., The Bulletin recomrow seats, leather, 71K, X-cab, XLT, cold-weather packmends extra caution towing, $10,900 auto, 4.0L, $8900 age, premium packwhen purchasing age, heated seats, 541-382-4316 OBO. 541-388-0232 products or services extra nice. $14,995. from out of the area. Ford Ranger Edge Flare 503-635-9494. Sending cash, 2002, silver, super cab, checks, or credit in541-598-3750 4 door, 4WD, 4L V-6, Buicks Galore! No formation may be aaaoregonautosource.com pwr. options, 80K mi., FIAT 1800 1978, 5-spd, Truxedo box cover. junk! LeSabres, Lasubject to FRAUD. door panels w/flowers $11,950. PORSCHE 914 1974, Crosse & Lucernes For more informaExceptional. & hummingbirds, Roller (no engine), priced $3000-$8500 541-401-1307. tion about an adverJeep Cherokee 1990, white soft top & hard for serious buyers lowered, full roll cage, tiser, you may call 4WD, 3 sets rims & top, Reduced! $5,500. Ford Ranger XLT only. All are ‘98’s and 5-pt harnesses, racthe Oregon State tires, exlnt set snow newer. 541-318-9999. 541-317-9319 or ing seats, 911 dash & Attorney General’s 1998 X-cab tires, great 1st car! Ask about Free Trip to 541-647-8483 instruments, decent 2.5L 4-cyl engine, Office Consumer $1800. 541-633-5149 Washington, D.C. for shape, very cool! 5-spd standard trans, Protection hotline at The Bulletin WWII Veterans. $1699. 541-678-3249 long bed, newer mo1-877-877-9392. The Bulletin’s To Subscribe call tor & paint, new clutch Ford Thunderbird 1988, “Call A Service 541-385-5800 or go to & tires, excellent con3.8 V-6, 35K actual mi., TOYOTA PRIUS III Professional” Directory www.bendbulletin.com dition, clean, $4500. new hoses, belts, tires, 2011, Barcelona red, is all about meeting Call 541-447-6552 battery, pb, ps, cruise, exc. cond., warranty your needs. A/C, CD, exc. cond. in transfer, 12K mi., & out, 2nd owner, Find It in average 52 MPG. Call on one of the maint. records, must $24,000. The Bulletin Classifieds! professionals today! see & drive! 541-633-6200. 541-385-5809 Reduced! Now $3500, ksboorman@gmail.com obo. 541-330-0733 Jeep Compass 2009, Ford Galaxie 500 1963, 25K, 5-spd, 1-owner, 2 dr. hardtop,fastback, Ford Super Duty F-250 $13,599, 541-280-5866 390 v8,auto, pwr. steer & 2001, 4X4, very good radio (orig),541-419-4989 shape, V10 eng, $8800 Jeep Grand Cherokee Ford Mustang Coupe OBO. 541-815-9939 Ltd., 2001, V8, exlnt maintenance, 89K mi, 1966, original owner, $8200. 541-382-6345 V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199 GMC ½-ton Pickup, 1972, LWB, 350hi motor, mechanically 1000 1000 1000 A-1, interior great; Legal Notices Legal Notices Legal Notices body needs some Jeep Willys 1947,custom, TLC. $3131 OBO. small block Chevy, PS, Call 541-382-9441 LEGAL NOTICE GMC ½ ton 1971, Only OD,mags+ trailer.Swap TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705, et seq. and $19,700! Original low for backhoe.No am calls O.R.S. 79 5010, et seq. Trustee No.: FC27180 5 Loan No.: 0205257223 mile, exceptional, 3rd please. 541-389-6990 Title No.: 5045015 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by owner. 951-699-7171 RYAN R. CHACKEL AND HEIDI B. CHACKEL, as Grantor, to First American Title Insurance Co. of OR, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE What are you International Flat ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMIBed Pickup 1963, 1 looking for? NEE FOR SUNTRUST MORTGAGE, INC., ITS SUCCESSORS AND ASton dually, 4 spd. SIGNS, as Beneficiary, dated 05/01/07, recorded on 05/07/07, as DocuMercury Monterrey trans., great MPG, You’ll ind it in ment No. 2007 26172, in the mortgage records of DESCHUTES County, 1965, Exc. All original, could be exc. wood The Bulletin Classiieds Oregon. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obliga4-dr. sedan, in storhauler, runs great, tions secured thereby are presently held by DEUTSCHE BANK NAage last 15 yrs., 390 new brakes, $1950. TIONAL TRUST COMPANY AS TRUSTEE FOR STARM MORTGAGE High Compression 541-419-5480. 541-385-5809 LOAN TRUST 2007-4. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following deengine, new tires & liscribed real property situated in said county and state, to wit: Lot 140 of cense, reduced to Estates at Pronghorn, Phase 2, Deschutes County, Oregon. ACCOUNT Take care of $2850, 541-410-3425. NO.: 242336 The street address or other common designation, if any, of your investments the real property described above is purported to be: 66090 PRONGwith the help from HORN ESTATES DR, BEND, OR 97701 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or The Bulletin’s other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have Nissan Murano “Call A Service elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by SL-AWD 2004, 75k, said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Plymouth Barracuda Professional” Directory all-weather tires, tow Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735 (3); the default for which the foreclosure 1966, original car! 300 pkg, gold metallic, is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: monthly hp, 360 V8, centerbeige leather int., payments of $2,942.41 beginning 11/01/10 and continuing until payREDUCED! Ford lines, (Original 273 moonroof, $14,990. ments adjust to $5,725.39 beginning, 03/01/2012, together with title ex1978 truck, $1300 eng & wheels incl.) 541-317-5693 pense, costs, trustee's fees and any attorney's fees incurred herein by obo. V8 4 spd, runs 541-593-2597 reason of said default, and any further sums advanced by the beneficiary good, new battery, for the protection of the above described real property and its interest 933 spark plugs, rebuilt therein. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide incarb. Ex U-Haul, Pickups surance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as re541-548-7171 quired in the note and Deed of Trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable writToyota Tacoma 2003, Porsche Cayenne 2004, Chevy 3/4 ton 4x4, SR5 PreRunner, 2WD, ten evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, prop86k, immac, dealer 1995, extended cab, ARE canopy, original erty taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinmaint’d, loaded, now long box, grill guard, Tonneau cover, all silstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By $17000. 503-459-1580 running boards, bed ver, great cond, 73.5K reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the rails & canopy, 178K miles, runs great, no obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said miles, $4800 obo. problems, slight body sums being the following: Principal balance of $601,000.00 with interest 208-301-3321 (Bend) damage on pass. side, thereon at the rate of 5.875% per annum from 10/01/2010, together with $10,000 firm. any late charge(s), delinquent taxes, insurance premiums, impounds and Chevy Silverado 1998, 541-306-9055 / 550-7328 advances; senior liens and encumbrances which are delinquent or beblack and silver, pro come delinquent together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and any lifted, loaded, new 33” Toyota 4-Runner 4x4 Ltd, 935 attorney's' fees and court costs, and any further sums advanced by the tires, aluminum slot 2006, Salsa Red pearl, beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its wheels, tow pkg., drop Sport Utility Vehicles 49,990 miles, exlnt cond, interest therein. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that, First Amerihitch, diamond plate professionally detailed, can Title Insurance Company c/o Mortgage Lender Services, Inc., 81 Blue tool box, $12,000, or BMW X3, 2008, 33K, $26,595. 541-390-7649 Ravine Rd, Ste 100, Folsom CA 95630, the undersigned trustee will, on possible trade for newer dealer cert & maint’d, $28,500. 541-548-9939 September 25, 2012, at the hour of 01:00 PM in accord with the standard 940 Tacoma. 541-460-9127 of time established by O.R.S. 187.110, AT THE BOND STREET ENVans Chevrolet Tahoe LTZ TRANCE TO DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND, FIND YOUR FUTURE 2007 91K mi,4 heated BEND, OR, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interHOME IN THE BULLETIN cap. seats, 3rd row est in the said described real property which the Grantor has or had power Astro seating, tow pkg, Chevy to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together Your future is just a page Cargo Van 2001, $20,500.541-383-2488, with any interest which the Grantor his successors in interest acquired afaway. Whether you’re looking pw, pdl, great cond., c- 541- 647-3663 ter the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations for a hat or a place to hang it, business car, well thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonThe Bulletin Classiied is Chevy Tahoe LS 2001 maint, regular oil able charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named your best source. 4x4. 120K mi, Power changes, $4500, in O.R.S. 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the seats, Tow Pkg, 3rd please call Every day thousands of date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed row seating, extra 541-633-5149 buyers and sellers of goods and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire tires, CD, privacy tintand services do business in amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not ing, upgraded rims. these pages. They know Fantastic cond. $7995 then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default Dodge Caravan you can’t beat The Bulletin Contact Timm at complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the perClassiied Section for Sport 2003 541-408-2393 for info formance required under the obligation or to cure the default, by paying all selection and convenience 134,278 miles, great or to view vehicle. costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust - every item is just a phone cond, very comfortDeed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees. In construing this nocall away. able, $5000 OBO. tice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the sinCall a Pro 541-848-8539. gular includes plural, the word "Grantor" includes any successor in interThe Classiied Section is guera_blt@yahoo.com Whether you need a est to the Grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the easy to use. Every item fence ixed, hedges performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words is categorized and every "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, cartegory is indexed on the trimmed or a house if any. For Trustee Sale Information please call (916)939-0772. Dated: section’s front page. Need to get an ad built, you’ll ind 05/11/12 First American Title Insurance Company, Trustee By: Mortgage Whether you are looking for in ASAP? professional help in Lender Services, Inc., Agent, Lauren Meyer, Sr. Trustee Sale Officer. DIa home or need a service, RECT INQUIRIES TO: SunTrust Mortgage, Inc., as servicing agent c/o The Bulletin’s “Call a your future is in the pages of Mortgage Lender Services, Inc., 81 Blue Ravine Road, Ste. 100, Folsom, Fax it to 541-322-7253 Service Professional” The Bulletin Classiied. CA 95630 (916) 962-3453 MORTGAGE LENDER SERVICES, INC. MAY Directory BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY The Bulletin Classiieds INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. 541-385-5809 NPP0201808 PUB: 07/31/12, 08/07/12, 08/14/12, 08/21/12

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Lawn & Landscape Maintenance

Tile, Stone & Grout Cleaning & Sealing 541-388-7374

Chem-Dry of Central Oregon

20% OFF Top-Dressing

Add Organic Soil to your Lawn!

SAVE SOME MONEY & TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE GREAT DEALS OFFERED BY OUR LOCAL BUSINESSES!!

Perfect for Ceramic, Porcelain, Slate, Granite and Travertine

J.L. Scott 541-382-3883 Serving Central Oregon for Over 20 Years

TUESDAY, AUGUST 7, 2012

Serving Deschutes, Crook & Jefferson Counties

Offer valid with coupon only. Not valid with other offers. Minimums apply. Payment due at time of service. Expiration date: August 31, 2012

Independently Owned & Operated

Call or go online to Sign-up today. It’s Easy!

• Improve drainage & drought-resistance • Transform your lawn into organic, low-maintenance, healthy turf • Reduce the need for supplemental fertilizers Coupons expire 8/31/12

“Because weekends WERE NOT made for yard work!” Special Oil Change Price!

Special Oil Change Price!

We will beat any competitor’s price by 10% (With proof of competitor’s quote)

$

98

19 OIL CHANGES! CUSTOMER LOYALTY KEY TAGS ARE HERE!

murrayandholt.com

541-382-2222

d Street and Fran Right on the Corner of Thir Right on the Price.

klin in Bend.

S SERVICE HOUR 5:30pm M–F 7:45am to

Covers most vehicles. Diesels extra. Coupon expires 8/31/12.

541-408-3718

3 Oil Changes (Gas)

Special Oil Change Price!

The key tag includes 3 lube, oil & filters. The cost is only $ 5995 per tag.

Includes 5 quarts of oil, (blend of synthetic oil) replace oil filter, 21-point inspection, discounts up to 10%, roadside assistance, 12/12 warranty.

$

19

98

Special Oil Change Price!

CUSTOM GRANITE SLAB, QUARTZ & MARBLE KITCHEN & BATHROOM COUNTERTOPS

Special Oil Change Price!

each

$ 00 541-382-3173 $ Behind Bank of America

5

1000

on 3rd Street 1230 NE 3RD • BEND, OR

OFF

LUNCH

OFF

DINNER

Any two Lunch Entrees and two Beverages

Fish House

Coupon required, cannot combine with other offers, not valid with Lounge menu. Expires 9/4/12.

LUNCH 11:30–2:30, MON–FRI DINNER 4–9, MON–SAT

Any two Dinner Entrees and two Beverages

Coupon required, cannot combine with other offers, not valid with Lounge menu. Expires 9/4/12.

OFFERS VALID WITH COUPON ONLY. EXPIRES 9/4/12

Special Oil Change Price!

PROMOTIONAL PRICES START AT

$

1999 mo for 12 Months with 24-month agreement

Beyond Carpet Cleaning CARPET | TILE & GROUT | HARDWOOD | FURNITURE

Serving Central Oregon 541-706-9390 • 1-800-STEEMER Schedule Online at www.stanleysteemer.com Must present coupon at time of cleaning. An area is defined as any room up to 300 square feet. Baths, halls, staircases, large walk-in closets and area rugs are priced separately. Offer does not include protector. Residential only. With coupon only. Some restrictions may apply. Expires 8/31/12

Locally Owned - Giving Excellent Service!

OFFERS END 8/31/12

®

®

C.E. LOVEJOY’S COUPON

$

INTERNET & SATELLITE

*5228

$

10 OFF 50

Paws & Shop has a new home at the Old Mill Marketplace

Paws & Shop Humane Society of Central Oregon Thrift Store

FF 20% O ture Furni

Paws & Shop has a new location, but the mission is the same ... to help care for animals in need at the Humane Society of Central Oregon! NEW HOURS: Mon-Fri: 10 am to 6 pm Saturday: 10 am to 5 pm Closed Sunday

*Coupon must be presented at the time of purchase. Not to be combined with any other discounts or offers. Valid through 8/31/2012. Limit 1 coupon per visit, per household. EXPIRES 9/30/12 • Excludes purchases of Alcohol, Postage and Tobacco. Coupon valid at CE Lovejoy’s only. One coupon per family please. Value 1/20¢

5

$

160

when you make the purchase on the Goodyear Credit Card.1

1. Mail-In Rebate paid in the form of a Visa prepaid rebate card. To double your Mail-In Rebate, qualifying purchase must be made on the Goodyear Credit Card. Subject to credit approval. Offers valid on purchases between 07/01/12 - 08/31/12. Allow 6 to 8 weeks for delivery. See store associate for complete details and Rebate form. Additional terms and conditions apply.2

NO INTEREST IF PAID IN FULL WITHIN 6 MONTHS* on purchase of $250 or more made from 07/01/12 to 08/31/12. Interest will be charged to your account from the purchase date if the purchase balance is not paid in full within 6 months or if you make a late payment. Minimum payment required. See this ad for details.

GOODYEAR AUTO CARE • 61343 S. HWY 97 • BEND • 541-388-4189 3 Rooms Cleaned

$

99

With Coupon. Room is Considered 250 Sq. Ft. One Coupon per Customer. Fuel surcharge may apply. Expires 9/30/2012

$

74

With Coupon. Room is Considered 250 Sq. Ft. One Coupon per Customer. Fuel surcharge may apply. Expires 9/30/2012

$

541-330-3955

OXI Fresh of Central Oregon 541-593-1799

2625 NE Butler Mkt Rd, Bend ( 27th St)

Organize Your Kitchen with Pull Out Shelves

ANY OIL CHANGE

$

00

5

• Quality Dovetail Joinery • 100 lb. Load Capacity • Hand Crafted to Your Specifications

OFF

10% OFF ANY JOB

COMPLIMENTARY MULTI-POINT INSPECTION

FREE IN-HOME ESTIMATE

WITH EVERY MAINTENANCE SERVICE PROVIDED Expires 8-18-12

BW0812

Whole House Cleaning

Not valid with any other offers. Offer good through 9/30/2012.

Everyday: 11am-8pm

BW0812

2 Rooms Cleaned

Great Pies. Great Prices.

WE DELIVER!

321 SE Black Butte Blvd.

OR

MADE F RE S H R JUST FO YOU!

Dine In / Carry Out Only.

REDMOND 541-548-0436

80

by Mail-In Rebate when you purchase a set of four select Goodyear® or Dunlop® tires.

DOUBLE YOUR MAIL-IN REBATE UP TO

P I Z Z E R I A

LARGE CHEESE PIZZA

el st esiali i D c e Sp

GET UP TO

r Summeal! i c Spe

Grand Opening Special

$

550 SW Industrial Way, Suite 130 - Bend, OR • 541-617-5716

$

541.923.3234 1715 SW Highland Ave., Redmond www.linkpointnw.com

Licensed Bonded Insured CCB#154815

Present Coupon After Estimate Coupon Required. Exp 9-30-12 Cannot combine offers. One coupon per customer.

Handyman Gary (541) 390-7617 www.pulloutshelf.com

149

Up to 5 Rooms Cleaned

With Coupon. Room is Considered 250 Sq. Ft. One Coupon per Customer. Fuel surcharge may apply. Expires 9/30/2012 BW0812


C THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

C THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

SAVE SOME MONEY & TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE GREAT DEALS OFFERED BY OUR LOCAL BUSINESSES!!

SAVE SOME MONEY & TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE GREAT DEALS OFFERED BY OUR LOCAL BUSINESSES!!

Tile, Stone, Grout, Clean & Seal your first order of $15 or more!

your first order of $25 or more!

Lawn & Landscape Maintenance How clean is your tile? Dirt and grime begin to absorb into the pores of grout. Over time, the grout coloring becomes uneven which makes the entire floor look worn and dirty. Call Chem-Dry today and let our professional technicians extract the dirt and grime from your tile and stone surfaces. Our process also seals your tile and grout to resist mold, mildew and dirt. Don’t forget, we also clean carpet, area rugs & upholstery too!

541-388-7374 • Residential & Commercial Serving Deschutes, Crook & Jefferson Counties • Independently Owned & Operated

541-382-3173

5

Behind Bank of America on 3rd Street 1230 NE 3RD • BEND, OR

OFF

$

00

10

DINNER

Any two Lunch Entrees and two Beverages

Fish House

Any two Dinner Entrees and two Beverages

Coupon required, cannot combine with other offers, not valid with Lounge menu. Expires 9/4/12.

LUNCH 11:30–2:30, MON–FRI DINNER 4–9, MON–SAT

Coupon required, cannot combine with other offers, not valid with Lounge menu. Expires 9/4/12.

OFFERS VALID WITH COUPON ONLY. EXPIRES 9/4/12

541-382-2222

WAX PLUS Expires 8/31/12

$49.95 (CARS/SMALL SUVS) $59.95 (FULL SIZE TRUCK/SUV)

OFF

LUNCH

murrayandholt.com

INCLUDES: Hand Wash & Dry Wash System Applied Wax Tires & Wheels Cleaned Door Jams Wiped Out Tire Protect & Shine

* Mowing Services * Lawn Reseeding * De-thatching *Aeration *Fertilization

* Spring & Fall Clean Up * Trimming *Bark Installation * Top Dressing

• Allows more efficient watering and fertilizing • Enhances root growth & enriches surface soil • Decreases water run-off *Up to 2500 sq. ft., some restrictions may apply. Call for more details. Coupons expire 8/31/12

“Because weekends WERE NOT made for yard work!”

Custom Granite Slab, Quartz & Marble Kitchen & Bathroom Countertops F ree Quotes • Satisfaction Guaranteed 20 Years of Experience 541-408-3718

Vacuum Interior Wipe Dash, Doors & Center Console Clean Glass Treat Dash-Vinyl & Leather

Right on the Corner of Third Street and Franklin in Bend. Right on the Price.

August Aeration $49 *

Complete Landscape Maintenance Commercial & Residential

Serving Central Oregon for Over 20 Years

Chem-Dry of Central Oregon

$ 00

J.L. Scott 541-382-3883

SERVICE HOURS M–F 7:45am to 5:30pm

541-382-2222

WE WILL PAY YOU 00 *

$

150 CASH

• We Bundle Dish Network & CenturyLink Hi-Speed Internet • RV Setup & Installation • FREE Installation up to 6 rooms • FREE HD/DVR Upgrade for existing customers

Beyond Carpet Cleaning CARPET | TILE & GROUT | HARDWOOD | FURNITURE

Serving Central Oregon 541-706-9390 • 1-800-STEEMER Schedule Online at www.stanleysteemer.com

*$100 Cash for Dish Network *$50 Visa Cash Card for Century Link

**Must present coupon at time of cleaning. An area is defined as any room up to 300 square feet. Baths, halls, staircases, large walk-in closets and area rugs are priced separately. Offer does not include protector. Residential only. With Valpak® coupon only. Some restrictions may apply. Expires 8/31/12 *Must present coupon at time of cleaning. Minimum charges apply and cannot be combined with any other discounts. Must present coupon at time of service. Residential only; Valid at participating locations only. Certain restrictions may apply. Call for details. Combined living areas, L-shaped rooms and rooms over 300 sq. ft. are considered 2 areas. Baths, halls, staircases, large walk-in closets and area rugs are priced separately. Protector not included. Sectional sofas may not be separated. Sofas over seven (7) feet and certain fabrics may incur additional charges. Offer not applicable to leather furniture. Offer does not include protector.

Locally Owned - Giving Excellent Service!

INTERNET & SATELLITE

541.923.3234 1715 SW Highland Ave., Redmond www.linkpointnw.com

OFFERS END 8/31/12

®

®

MONEY-SAVING COUPONS! BRAKE

MAINTENANCE Install new disc pads/shoes, resurface drums/rotors. Most cars per axle. Ceramic or carbon metallic pads extra if required. Starting at

$

99

119

Bearing Repack Extra Most cars & light trucks. Expires 8/31/12

Humane Society of Central Oregon

Thrift Store

Lube, Oil, Filter & Tire Rotation

$

99

29

We Use Synthetic Blend Motor Oil

• Chassis Lube • Wash Exterior Front • New Oil Filter Window • Up to 5 Qts of 5W30 • Vacuum Front Kendall Synthetic Blend Floorboards • Tire Rotation • Top off most Fluids under the hood Most cars & light trucks. 3/4 & 1 Ton may require extra fee. Expires 8/31/12

500 NE Greenwood, Bend • 541-388-3448 Donations Accepted: Mon. – Sat. 10:00 am - 4:00 pm

We Fetch! - FURNITURE

PICK UP!

Call us for an appointment!

®

TO SUPERIOR PRODUCTS & UNEQUALLED SERVICE.

541-388-3448 Go to http://www.hsco.org/thrift_store

C.E. Lovejoy’s Brookswood Market • 19530 Amber Meadow Drive • Bend OR 97702

The power of oxygen is undeniable; Mother Nature has used oxygen to naturally purify the Earth for thousands of years. Now let the power of oxygen clean your carpets!

541-593-1799

shop, eat, smile.

CUSTOMER

The Humane Society Thrift Store truck is available for furniture pick-up with an appointment. Call us to find out more and to arrange a day and time for pick-up.

GOODYEAR AUTO CARE | 61343 S. HWY 97 • BEND • 541-388-4189

of Central Oregon

COMMITMENT

½

✓ Convenient Appointments ✓ FREE Estimate Over the Phone ✓ IICRC Certified Technician

OFF ANY LUNCH OR DINNER ENTREE*

*Buy one entrée, get 2nd entrée 1/2 off! Spaghetti w/meatballs ................ Spaghetti w/meat sauce ............ Spaghetti w/Italian Sausage ..... Lasagna ...........................................

Oxi Fresh uses a combination of its one of a kind Oxi Sponge Encapsulator, and Oxi Powder. This three part cleaning solution creates a powerful oxygenated cleaning system that breaks down the stains while encapsulating them, so that they can be efficiently removed from the carpet pile.

$7.00 $5.25 $7.00 $7.00

*Entrée Includes Salad & Garlic Bread*

WE DELIVER!

It is safe for children and pets, leaves no sticky residue, reduces returning stains and has an one hour average dry time.

www.oxifresh.com

Everyday: 11am-8pm

Organize Your Kitchen with Pull Out Shelves

Licensed Bonded Insured CCB#154815

Handyman Gary Authorized Dealer (541) 390-7617 • www.pulloutshelf.com

FREE In-home estimate

el st esiali i D c e Sp

P I Z Z E R I A MADE F RE S H R JUST FO YOU!

Great Pies. Great Prices. Not valid with any other offers. Offer good through 9/30/2012.

541-330-3955 2625 NE Butler Mkt Rd, Bend ( 27th St)

RESTORE FUEL ECONOMY! Diesel Injection Service • Improve Power & Performance • Reduce Emissions • Improved Throttle Response

REDMOND 541-548-0436 321 SE Black Butte Blvd.

Deposits accumulate in the entire diesel fuel system, including the fuel lines, injectors and combustion chambers. This causes rough idle, vibration at idle, loss of power, decreased mileage, increased smoke, slowed throttle response.

$

00

175

Most Diesel Trucks & Cars. Call for appt. Expires 8-18-12


TUESDAY, AUGUST 7, 2012

THE BULLETIN

C

C

THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

SAVE SOME MONEY & TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE GREAT DEALS OFFERED BY OUR LOCAL BUSINESSES!!

Organize Your Kitchen with Pull Out Shelves

$ 00 541-382-3173 $ Behind Bank of America

5

FREE IN-HOME ESTIMATE Licensed Bonded Insured CCB#154815

Present Coupon After Estimate Coupon Required. Exp 9-30-12 Cannot combine offers. One coupon per customer.

Handyman Gary (541) 390-7617 www.pulloutshelf.com

1000

on 3rd Street 1230 NE 3RD • BEND, OR

OFF

• Quality Dovetail Joinery • 100 lb. Load Capacity • Hand Crafted to Your Specifications

10% OFF ANY JOB

SAVE SOME MONEY & TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE GREAT DEALS OFFERED BY OUR LOCAL BUSINESSES!!

LUNCH

OFF

DINNER

Any two Lunch Entrees and two Beverages

Fish House

Coupon required, cannot combine with other offers, not valid with Lounge menu. Expires 9/4/12.

LUNCH 11:30–2:30, MON–FRI DINNER 4–9, MON–SAT

Beyond Carpet Cleaning CARPET | TILE & GROUT | HARDWOOD | FURNITURE

Any two Dinner Entrees and two Beverages

Serving Central Oregon 541-706-9390 • 1-800-STEEMER Schedule Online at www.stanleysteemer.com

Coupon required, cannot combine with other offers, not valid with Lounge menu. Expires 9/4/12.

Must present coupon at time of cleaning. An area is defined as any room up to 300 square feet. Baths, halls, staircases, large walk-in closets and area rugs are priced separately. Offer does not include protector. Residential only. With coupon only. Some restrictions may apply. Expires 8/31/12

OFFERS VALID WITH COUPON ONLY. EXPIRES 9/4/12

®

J.L. Scott 541-382-3883

l t se lis e Di cia e Sp

ANY OIL CHANGE

Lawn & Landscape Maintenance

20% OFF Top-Dressing

$

Add Organic Soil to your Lawn!

• Improve drainage & drought-resistance • Transform your lawn into organic, low-maintenance, healthy turf • Reduce the need for supplemental fertilizers

Serving Central Oregon for Over 20 Years

REDMOND 541-548-0436

$

99 BW0812

2 Rooms Cleaned

$

74

With Coupon. Room is Considered 250 Sq. Ft. One Coupon per Customer. Fuel surcharge may apply. Expires 9/30/2012

BW0812

Whole House Cleaning

$

149

80

Up to 5 Rooms Cleaned

Expires 9/30/2012 BW0812

DOUBLE YOUR MAIL-IN REBATE UP TO

by Mail-In Rebate when you purchase a set of four select Goodyear® or Dunlop® tires.

160

Grand Opening Special

5

$

LARGE CHEESE PIZZA

P I Z Z E R I A MADE F RE S H R JUST FO YOU!

Great Pies. Great Prices. Not valid with any other offers. Offer good through 9/30/2012.

WE DELIVER! Everyday: 11am-8pm

541-330-3955 2625 NE Butler Mkt Rd, Bend ( 27th St)

CUSTOM GRANITE SLAB, QUARTZ & MARBLE KITCHEN & BATHROOM COUNTERTOPS

PROMOTIONAL PRICES START AT

1999 mo for 12 Months with 24-month agreement

when you make the purchase on the Goodyear Credit Card.1

Expires 8-18-12

Dine In / Carry Out Only.

With Coupon. Room is Considered 250 Sq. Ft. One Coupon per Customer. Fuel surcharge may apply.

OXI Fresh of Central Oregon 541-593-1799

$

WITH EVERY MAINTENANCE SERVICE PROVIDED

3 Rooms Cleaned

Expires 9/30/2012

$

OFF

321 SE Black Butte Blvd.

With Coupon. Room is Considered 250 Sq. Ft. One Coupon per Customer. Fuel surcharge may apply.

OR

5

COMPLIMENTARY

Coupons expire 8/31/12

r Summeal! i c e Sp

GET UP TO

00

MULTI-POINT INSPECTION

“Because weekends WERE NOT made for yard work!”

$

OFFERS END 8/31/12

®

We will beat any competitor’s price by 10%

1. Mail-In Rebate paid in the form of a Visa prepaid rebate card. To double your Mail-In Rebate, qualifying purchase must be made on the Goodyear Credit Card. Subject to credit approval. Offers valid on purchases between 07/01/12 - 08/31/12. Allow 6 to 8 weeks for delivery. See store associate for complete details and Rebate form. Additional terms and conditions apply.2

(With proof of competitor’s quote)

NO INTEREST IF PAID IN FULL WITHIN 6 MONTHS* on purchase of $250 or more made from 07/01/12 to 08/31/12. Interest will be charged to your account from the purchase date if the purchase balance is not paid in full within 6 months or if you make a late payment. Minimum payment required. See this ad for details.

Locally Owned - Giving Excellent Service!

INTERNET & SATELLITE

GOODYEAR AUTO CARE • 61343 S. HWY 97 • BEND • 541-388-4189 C.E. LOVEJOY’S COUPON

$

541.923.3234

541-408-3718

1715 SW Highland Ave., Redmond www.linkpointnw.com

*5228

Paws & Shop has a new home at the Old Mill Marketplace

$

10 OFF 50

Paws & Shop Humane Society of Central Oregon Thrift Store

FF 20% O ture Furni

Paws & Shop has a new location, but the mission is the same ... to help care for animals in need at the Humane Society of Central Oregon! NEW HOURS: Mon-Fri: 10 am to 6 pm Saturday: 10 am to 5 pm Closed Sunday

*Coupon must be presented at the time of purchase. Not to be combined with any other discounts or offers. Valid through 8/31/2012. Limit 1 coupon per visit, per household. EXPIRES 9/30/12 • Excludes purchases of Alcohol, Postage and Tobacco. Coupon valid at CE Lovejoy’s only. One coupon per family please. Value 1/20¢

550 SW Industrial Way, Suite 130 - Bend, OR • 541-617-5716 Special Oil Change Price!

Chem-Dry of Central Oregon Serving Deschutes, Crook & Jefferson Counties Independently Owned & Operated

Tile, Stone & Grout Cleaning & Sealing 541-388-7374 Offer valid with coupon only. Not valid with other offers. Minimums apply. Payment due at time of service. Expiration date: August 31, 2012

$

Special Oil Change Price!

98

19 OIL CHANGES! CUSTOMER LOYALTY KEY TAGS ARE HERE!

murrayandholt.com

541-382-2222

3 Oil Changes (Gas)

Bend. d Street and Franklin in Right on the Corner of Thir Right on the Price.

S SERVICE HOUR 5:30pm M–F 7:45am to

Covers most vehicles. Diesels extra. Coupon expires 8/31/12.

Special Oil Change Price!

The key tag includes 3 lube, oil & filters. The cost is only $ 5995 per tag.

Includes 5 quarts of oil, (blend of synthetic oil) replace oil filter, 21-point inspection, discounts up to 10%, roadside assistance, 12/12 warranty.

$

1998 each

Special Oil Change Price!

Special Oil Change Price!

20% OFF

Special Oil Change Price!

Perfect for Ceramic, Porcelain, Slate, Granite and Travertine

Call or go online to Sign-up today. It’s Easy!


C THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

C THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

SAVE SOME MONEY & TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE GREAT DEALS OFFERED BY OUR LOCAL BUSINESSES!!

SAVE SOME MONEY & TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE GREAT DEALS OFFERED BY OUR LOCAL BUSINESSES!! $ 00

5

OFF

Beyond Carpet Cleaning

541-382-3173 Behind Bank of America on 3rd Street 1230 NE 3RD • BEND, OR

LUNCH

CARPET | TILE & GROUT | HARDWOOD | FURNITURE

Serving Central Oregon 541-706-9390 • 1-800-STEEMER Schedule Online at www.stanleysteemer.com **Must present coupon at time of cleaning. An area is defined as any room up to 300 square feet. Baths, halls, staircases, large walk-in closets and area rugs are priced separately. Offer does not include protector. Residential only. With Valpak® coupon only. Some restrictions may apply. Expires 8/31/12 *Must present coupon at time of cleaning. Minimum charges apply and cannot be combined with any other discounts. Must present coupon at time of service. Residential only; Valid at participating locations only. Certain restrictions may apply. Call for details. Combined living areas, L-shaped rooms and rooms over 300 sq. ft. are considered 2 areas. Baths, halls, staircases, large walk-in closets and area rugs are priced separately. Protector not included. Sectional sofas may not be separated. Sofas over seven (7) feet and certain fabrics may incur additional charges. Offer not applicable to leather furniture. Offer does not include protector.

$

00

10

OFF

DINNER

Any two Lunch Entrees and two Beverages

Fish House

Any two Dinner Entrees and two Beverages

Coupon required, cannot combine with other offers, not valid with Lounge menu. Expires 9/4/12.

LUNCH 11:30–2:30, MON–FRI DINNER 4–9, MON–SAT

Coupon required, cannot combine with other offers, not valid with Lounge menu. Expires 9/4/12.

OFFERS END 8/31/12

Organize Your Kitchen with Pull Out Shelves

OFFERS VALID WITH COUPON ONLY. EXPIRES 9/4/12

Licensed Bonded Insured CCB#154815

Handyman Gary Authorized Dealer (541) 390-7617 • www.pulloutshelf.com

FREE In-home estimate

®

®

l t se lis e Di cia e Sp

RESTORE FUEL ECONOMY! Diesel Injection Service • Improve Power & Performance • Reduce Emissions • Improved Throttle Response Deposits accumulate in the entire diesel fuel system, including the fuel lines, injectors and combustion chambers. This causes rough idle, vibration at idle, loss of power, decreased mileage, increased smoke, slowed throttle response.

REDMOND 541-548-0436 321 SE Black Butte Blvd.

½

OFF ANY LUNCH OR DINNER ENTREE* $7.00 $5.25 $7.00 $7.00

*Entrée Includes Salad & Garlic Bread*

WE DELIVER! Everyday: 11am-8pm

175

00

Most Diesel Trucks & Cars. Call for appt. Expires 8-18-12

Lawn & Landscape Maintenance

MADE F RE S H R JUST FO YOU!

* Mowing Services * Lawn Reseeding * De-thatching *Aeration *Fertilization

* Spring & Fall Clean Up * Trimming *Bark Installation * Top Dressing

541-330-3955

The power of oxygen is undeniable; Mother Nature has used oxygen to naturally purify the Earth for thousands of years. Now let the power of oxygen clean your carpets!

✓ Convenient Appointments ✓ FREE Estimate Over the Phone ✓ IICRC Certified Technician

Oxi Fresh uses a combination of its one of a kind Oxi Sponge Encapsulator, and Oxi Powder. This three part cleaning solution creates a powerful oxygenated cleaning system that breaks down the stains while encapsulating them, so that they can be efficiently removed from the carpet pile. It is safe for children and pets, leaves no sticky residue, reduces returning stains and has an one hour average dry time.

www.oxifresh.com

2625 NE Butler Mkt Rd, Bend ( 27th St)

Custom Granite Slab, Quartz & Marble Kitchen & Bathroom Countertops Free Quotes • Satisfaction Guaranteed 20 Years of Experience 541-408-3718

*Up to 2500 sq. ft., some restrictions may apply. Call for more details. Coupons expire 8/31/12

“Because weekends WERE NOT made for yard work!”

541-593-1799

Not valid with any other offers. Offer good through 9/30/2012.

• Allows more efficient watering and fertilizing • Enhances root growth & enriches surface soil • Decreases water run-off

Serving Central Oregon for Over 20 Years

of Central Oregon

Great Pies. Great Prices.

August Aeration $49 *

Complete Landscape Maintenance Commercial & Residential

P I Z Z E R I A

*Buy one entrée, get 2nd entrée 1/2 off! Spaghetti w/meatballs ................ Spaghetti w/meat sauce ............ Spaghetti w/Italian Sausage ..... Lasagna ...........................................

$

J.L. Scott 541-382-3883

WE WILL PAY YOU 00 *

$

150 CASH

MONEY-SAVING COUPONS! BRAKE

• We Bundle Dish Network & CenturyLink Hi-Speed Internet • RV Setup & Installation • FREE Installation up to 6 rooms • FREE HD/DVR Upgrade for existing customers

MAINTENANCE Install new disc pads/shoes, resurface drums/rotors. Most cars per axle. Ceramic or carbon metallic pads extra if required. Starting at

$

119

*$100 Cash for Dish Network *$50 Visa Cash Card for Century Link

Locally Owned - Giving Excellent Service!

INTERNET & SATELLITE Humane Society of Central Oregon

$

99

29

We Use Synthetic Blend Motor Oil

• Chassis Lube • Wash Exterior Front • New Oil Filter Window • Up to 5 Qts of 5W30 • Vacuum Front Kendall Synthetic Blend Floorboards • Tire Rotation • Top off most Fluids under the hood Most cars & light trucks. 3/4 & 1 Ton may require extra fee. Expires 8/31/12

GOODYEAR AUTO CARE | 61343 S. HWY 97 • BEND • 541-388-4189

COMMITMENT

Thrift Store

shop, eat, smile.

®

TO SUPERIOR

500 NE Greenwood, Bend • 541-388-3448 Donations Accepted: Mon. – Sat. 10:00 am - 4:00 pm

We Fetch! - FURNITURE

Bearing Repack Extra Most cars & light trucks. Expires 8/31/12

541.923.3234 1715 SW Highland Ave., Redmond www.linkpointnw.com

99

Lube, Oil, Filter & Tire Rotation

PRODUCTS &

PICK UP!

UNEQUALLED

Call us for an appointment!

CUSTOMER

The Humane Society Thrift Store truck is available for furniture pick-up with an appointment. Call us to find out more and to arrange a day and time for pick-up.

SERVICE.

541-388-3448 Go to http://www.hsco.org/thrift_store

C.E. Lovejoy’s Brookswood Market • 19530 Amber Meadow Drive • Bend OR 97702 murrayandholt.com

your first order of $15 or more!

your first order of $25 or more!

541-382-2222

WAX PLUS Expires 8/31/12

$49.95 (CARS/SMALL SUVS) $59.95 (FULL SIZE TRUCK/SUV) INCLUDES: Hand Wash & Dry Wash System Applied Wax Tires & Wheels Cleaned Door Jams Wiped Out Tire Protect & Shine Right on the Corner of Third Street and Franklin in Bend. Right on the Price.

Vacuum Interior Wipe Dash, Doors & Center Console Clean Glass Treat Dash-Vinyl & Leather SERVICE HOURS M–F 7:45am to 5:30pm

541-382-2222

Tile, Stone, Grout, Clean & Seal How clean is your tile? Dirt and grime begin to absorb into the pores of grout. Over time, the grout coloring becomes uneven which makes the entire floor look worn and dirty. Call Chem-Dry today and let our professional technicians extract the dirt and grime from your tile and stone surfaces. Our process also seals your tile and grout to resist mold, mildew and dirt. Don’t forget, we also clean carpet, area rugs & upholstery too!

Chem-Dry of Central Oregon 541-388-7374 • Residential & Commercial Serving Deschutes, Crook & Jefferson Counties • Independently Owned & Operated

Bulletin Daily Paper 08/07/12  

The Bulletin Daily print edition for Tuesday August 7, 2012

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