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JULY 26, 2012

THURSDAY 75¢

Serving Central Oregon since 1903 www.bendbulletin.com

MADRAS

Mountain View Hospital apt to join St. Charles system By Markian Hawryluk The Bulletin

Mountain View Hospital could be part of the St. Charles Health System by the end of the year after the Madras hospital’s board of directors announced plans to negotiate a transfer of assets to the Bend-based hospital system. The move would unite all four Central Oregon hospitals into a single integrated network, and help alleviate the significant financial challenges faced by the Madras hospital. “This is the right thing to do for the

regional delivery of health care services,” St. Charles CEO Jim Diegel said. “By bringing all four hospitals under the St. Charles umbrella, health care delivery will be better coordinated and structured to deliver high-quality, safe and efficient care.” The two parties will now negotiate the terms of the asset transfer, possibly including issues such as what services would be provided in Madras, what capital investments St. Charles would make, and even whether the name of the hospital will be changed. See Hospital / A5

Local defaults dry up under new state law • But what that means for homeowners is unclear By Elon Glucklich The Bulletin

Just two out-of-court foreclosure proceedings have been filed in Deschutes County since July 11, the date a new state law dramatically changed the relationship between lenders and borrowers. Notices of default, the first step for lenders to foreclose on a delinquent homeowner without taking

them to court, have virtually disappeared in Deschutes County and across the state since Oregon Senate Bill 1552 took effect two weeks ago. Nearly 10,000 default notices were issued in Deschutes County between 2009 and 2011, mortgage records filed with the county clerk’s office show. The Senate bill gives homeown-

Inside • Merkley’s plan to help homeowners, C1

ers a chance to mediate with their lender and discuss alternatives to foreclosure. Under the new law, discussions about short sales or deed transfers now must take place before the lender files a notice of default. See Defaults / A4

Warm Springs tribes paddle to revive past

Photos by Steve Mullensky / For The Bulletin

An array of canoes rests on the beach at Fort Worden State Park in Port Townsend, Wash., after completing a day’s paddle by various tribes from around the Olympic Peninsula area and Canada during their 24th annual canoe journey.

• The float — involving dozens of tribes from around the Northwest — ends Sunday in Olympia By Joel Aschbrenner The Bulletin

Members of the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs are floating down the Puget Sound today, paddling one of the last legs of a 500-mile canoe journey in an attempt to revitalize part of their culture all but lost for more than a century. The journey ends Sunday in Olympia, Wash. Thousands of tribal members from dozens of tribes

around the Pacific Northwest are expected to arrive by canoe for a celebration after this year’s annual canoe journey, hosted by the Squaxin Island Tribe. Each summer since 1988, tribes from around the Northwest have joined for the annual journey, paddling from one reservation to another. After weeks on the water, participants arrive at a host nation for a week of celebrating with traditional songs, dances and rituals.

NORTH KOREA: Kim Jong Un has a wife, A3 TODAY’S WEATHER Partly cloudy High 90, Low 50 Page C6

INDEX Business E1-4 Calendar B3 Classified G1-6 Comics B4-5 Crosswords B5, G2 Dear Abby B3 Editorials C4 Health F1-6

Horoscope B3 Local News C1-6 Obituaries C5 Oregon News C3 Outing B1-6 Sports D1-6 Stocks E2-3 TV & Movies B2

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July 17, the tribes portaged their canoe to Swinomish, Wash., where they began the trip down the Puget Sound. For the Warm Springs tribes, the journey helps preserve for younger generations the canoe culture largely forgotten since the tribes were moved inland to their reservation in the 1850s, said Jefferson Greene, captain of the canoe family. See Paddle / A5

Tribal canoes rest on the beach at Fort Worden State Park. Warm Springs tribal members joined four other tribes in floating the Columbia before portaging to the Puget Sound.

Gymnasts face a challenge in pink

Skype makes chats, user data more open to cops

By Will Graves

By Craig Timberg

The Associated Press

The Washington Post

LONDON — To go for the gold, gymnasts at the O2 Arena will first have to navigate the pink. Acres and acres and acres of it. The competition floor at the gymnastics venue is awash in yards of eyeInside popping pink fabric. • Bend Imagine the inside of resident the world’s largest Horner Barbie Dreamhouse ready to and you get the idea. race, D1 “It’s definitely a little bit in your face,” • U.S. British men’s team looks to member Sam Oldbe more golden, D1 ham said. And requires a bit of an adjustment for the athletes. U.S. men’s team captain Jonathan Horton joked earlier in the week he had to “squint” while at the training center a few buildings over, where the pink stuff is even more ubiquitous. Trying to differentiate between the chalk-covered high bar, cream-colored mat and

Skype, the online phone service long favored by political dissidents, criminals and others eager to communicate beyond the reach of governments, has expanded its cooperation with law enforcement authorities to make online chats and other user information available to police, said industry and government officials familiar with the changes. Surveillance of the audio and video feeds remains impractical — even when courts issue warrants, say industry officials with direct knowledge of the matter. But that barrier could eventually vanish as Skype becomes one of the world’s most popular forms of telecommunication. The changes to online chats, which are written messages conveyed almost instantaneously between users, result in part from technical upgrades to Skype that were instituted to address outages and other stability issues since Microsoft bought the company last year. Officials of the United States and other countries have long pushed to expand their access to newer forms of communications to resolve an issue that the FBI calls the “going dark” problem. See Skype / A4

TOP NEWS COLORADO: Funerals begin for victims, A3

For members of the Warm Springs group, called N’Chi Wanapum Canoe Family, the journey began in their home waters of the Columbia River. Tribal members launched their 18-person, 36-foot fiberglass canoe July 12 near Hood River. With four other tribes that call the Columbia Basin home, they floated downriver toward Vancouver battling whitecaps and strong headwinds. Upon reaching Fort Vancouver

LONDON OLYMPICS

Julie Jacobson / The Associated Press

Japan’s Kohei Uchimura, a gold medal favorite, practices Wednesday during a training session in London. He wiped out twice on the high bar, possibly due to visual difficulties.

the surrounding carpet can be tough. The mishaps continued during practice at the O2 on Wednesday.

And the Americans were hardly alone trying to work out the kinks. See Gymnastics / A5


THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, JULY 26, 2012

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Discoveries, breakthroughs, trends, names in the news — things you need to know to start your day.

TODAY

MONEY

It’s Thursday, July 26, the 208th day of 2012. There are 158 days left in the year.

Traders yearn for bygone risks and thrills as Wall Street retreats By Max Abelson Bloomberg News

NEW YORK — Sean George kneeled in the Church of St. Paul the Apostle in Manhattan. He wasn’t praying. A gash below his right brow bled into his eye and down his nose before a knee to his groin sent him to the floor. George, 39, head of creditderivatives trading at Jefferies Group, was making his Muay Thai debut at the church June 22 in a sport that allows kicking, elbowing and kneeing. His eye was swelling shut by the time he lost in a split decision. It was the happiest he’s been all year, he said. “Right now at work I’m making less risk decisions — and I enjoy taking risks,” said George, who headed investment-grade credit-defaultswap trading at Deutsche Bank before he joined Jefferies last year. “If you’re in it for the game and the fight, the game’s over and the fight’s over.” Wall Street set pay and profit records half a decade ago by wagering billions of borrowed dollars on lightly regulated products that didn’t exist a generation earlier. Now, the excitement and rewards that swelled even after the financial system almost collapsed in 2008 have been replaced by restrictions and malaise, according to interviews with more than two dozen current and former bankers and traders. Some, like George, are seeking their kicks in less regulated jobs. Others say they’re struggling to cope as JPMorgan Chase & Co. is being investigated for trades that caused at least $5.8 billion in losses, Goldman Sachs reported the worst first half since before Lloyd Blankfein became chief executive officer in 2006 and Barclays was fined a record 290 million pounds ($450 million) for trying to rig global interest rates. Banks face new restrictions designed to prevent another global credit crisis. Limits on proprietary trading, or bets with firms’ own money, and rules requiring them to hold more capital make it more difficult to use borrowed funds to boost returns. As the European sovereign-debt crisis escalates and economic growth in the United States and China slows,

“If you’re in it for the game and the fight, the game’s over and the fight’s over.” — Sean George, head of credit-derivatives trading at Jefferies Group

HAPPENINGS

lose in a day, fell to $92 million, the lowest in six years. Morgan Stanley’s $87.5 million over the past two quarters was the smallest in five years.

The allure of risk

Bloomberg News

Wall Street is “not the same industry that drew me in,” says Sean George, who heads trading at Jefferies Group but opened his own martial-arts training center in Stamford, Conn.

clients are refraining from the deals that power Wall Street profit. “There’s no sexiness, there’s no fun; there’s no intellectual intrigue, either,” said Ethan Garber, who ran proprietary credit-arbitrage portfolios for Credit Suisse and Bear Stearns Cos. “A lot of my friends who actually lingered for the last four years are all now getting fired anyway,” said Garber, 45, now CEO of IdleAir, a Knoxville, Tenn.-based firm that provides electricity at truck stops. “The air is taken out.” Wall Street’s five largest banks — JPMorgan, Bank of America, Citigroup, Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley — reported the lowest first-half revenue since 2008, and their

leverage has dropped an average of 44 percent. Shares of the firms are down an average 33 percent in the past 12 months, four times as big a decline as the 81-company Standard & Poor’s 500 Financials Index. Bonuses fell by 20 percent to more than 40 percent at the major commercial and investment banks last year, compensationconsulting firm Johnson Associates reported. Goldman Sachs, the most profitable firm in Wall Street history before it converted to a bank in 2008, is making less money, taking fewer risks and lowering pay. It reported that second-quarter profit dropped 11 percent as compensation in the year’s first half declined 14 percent. Value-at-risk, a measure of how much traders can

Risk is what drew George and the colleagues he respects to Wall Street, he said. He could bring in millions of dollars in a single month at his peak, and trading was so intense that during one creditdefault-swap deal he smashed a phone against his desk, sending part of it three rows away, “one of the records for the best break,” he said. Sam Polk, 32, who traded credit derivatives at Bank of America and the New Yorkbased hedge fund King Street Capital Management, described the lure of Wall Street before he walked away in 2010. “You could be a 20-something trader three years out of school, able to go to any restaurant or club or ballgame on any night that you wanted, and it was totally paid for,” he said. “It was a tremendous feeling of power.” Robert McTamaney, who helped run Goldman Sachs’s equities-trading business in Asia until last year, likened the shift on Wall Street to a “dulling down of the colors.” “The socks are higher, the skirts are longer,” he said. “It’s like styles: They change, and you’ve got to change with it or be left behind.” For George, the Muay Thai fighter, fulfillment is less about the money than the excitement. “People are sad,” he said of his colleagues on Wall Street. “They don’t have any risk. There is nothing to be stressed about. The upside is you get paid a little more than your base. The downside is, you’re fired.” George praised firms such as New York-based Jefferies that are less regulated than the biggest banks. Even so, Wall Street is “not the same industry that drew me in.” Two years ago he opened C3 Athletics, a martial-arts training center in Stamford, Conn. He already has scheduled another fight. “I’m excited about that,” he said.

MEDICINE

• GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney meets with British officials, including Prime Minister David Cameron, Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg, and former prime minister Tony Blair. • President Barack Obama says he will sign an executive order creating an office to improve the education of AfricanAmerican students.

IN HISTORY Highlights: In 1908, U.S. Attorney General Charles J. Bonaparte ordered creation of a force of special agents that was a forerunner of the Federal Bureau of Investigation. In 1912, the Edison Studios production “What Happened to Mary,” one of the first, if not very first, movie serials, was released with Mary Fuller in the title role. In 1953, Fidel Castro began his revolt against Fulgencio Batista with an unsuccessful attack on an army barracks in eastern Cuba. (Castro ousted Batista in 1959.) In 1962, the pilot episode of “The French Chef” starring Julia Child aired on WGBH-TV in Boston. Ten years ago: The Republican-led House voted, 295-132, to create an enormous Homeland Security Department in the biggest government reorganization in decades. Five years ago: The Senate passed, 85-8, a measure intensifying anti-terror efforts in the U.S. Wall Street suffered one of its worst losses of 2007, closing down more than 310 points. One year ago: Democratic Rep. David Wu of Oregon announced he would resign amid the political fallout from an 18-year-old woman’s allegations of an unwanted sexual encounter with him. The White House threatened to veto emergency legislation in the House that aimed to avert a threatened national default.

BIRTHDAYS Rock star Mick Jagger is 69. Actress Helen Mirren is 67. Olympic gold medal figure skater Dorothy Hamill is 56. Actor Kevin Spacey is 53. Actress Sandra Bullock is 48. Actor Jeremy Piven is 47. Actor Jason Statham is 45. Actress Kate Beckinsale is 39.

Study questions CT scans to rule out heart attacks By Marilynn Marchione The Associated Press

If you’re having chest pains, an advanced type of CT scan can quickly rule out a heart attack. New research suggests this might be good for hospitals, but not necessarily for you. These scans cut time spent in the hospital but didn’t save money, the study found. They also prompted more tests and treatments and gave relatively large doses of radiation to people at such low risk of a heart attack that they probably didn’t need a major test at all. There is no evidence that adding these tests saved lives or found more heart attacks, wrote Dr. Rita Redberg, a cardiologist at the University of California, San Francisco in an editorial. Her commentary accompanied the study in Thursday’s New England Journal of Medicine. And since radiation from the scans can raise the long-term risk of developing cancer, doctors “may legitimately ask whether the tests did more harm than good,” she wrote. Let’s be clear: None of this changes the advice to seek help quickly if you’re having chest pain or other signs of a heart attack. Any delay raises the risk of permanent heart damage. But more than 90 percent of the 6 million people who go to hospitals each year in the U.S. with chest pain have indiges-

tion, stress, muscle strain or some other problem — not heart disease. Doctors are afraid of missing the ones who do have it, and increasingly are using CT scans — a type of Xray — with an injected dye to get detailed views of arteries. More than 50,000 of these scans were done in Medicare patients in 2010, and their use is growing. Far more than that were done in younger patients like the ones in this study, who were 54 years old, on average. The test requires a substantial dose of radiation, which can raise the risk of cancer years down the road. In some cases, patients might just be told that a doctor wants the test. They may be too frightened to question it or unaware they can refuse or ask about other testing options without jeopardizing their care. The aim of the study was to see whether these heart scans,

called coronary CT angiography, were faster, better or less expensive than usual care, such as simpler tests or being kept a while for observation. Researchers led by Dr. Udo Hoffmann at Massachusetts General Hospital enrolled 1,000 patients who went to one of nine hospitals around the country during regular daytime, weekday hours with chest pain or other possible heart attack symptoms. All showed no clear sign of a heart attack on initial tests — an electrocardiogram and blood work. They were randomly assigned to further evaluation either with a CT angiography scan or whatever is standard at that hospital, such as a treadmill or other heart tests. Those given the CT scans spent an average of 23 hours in the hospital versus 30 hours for the others. More patients given

— From wire reports

the scans were sent home directly from the emergency room rather than being admitted — 47 percent versus 12 percent. Self Referrals Welcome

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THURSDAY, JULY 26, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

A3

T S

Where Medicaid grew, death rate Funerals begin dropped, a Harvard study finds for victims THEATER RAMPAGE

By Pam Belluck New York Times News Service

Into the maelstrom of debate over whether Medicaid should cover more people comes a new study by Harvard researchers who found that when states expanded their Medicaid programs and gave more poor people health insurance, fewer people died. The study, published online Wednesday in The New England Journal of Medicine, comes as states are deciding whether to expand Medicaid by 2014 under the Affordable Care Act, the

Obama administration’s health care law. The study, conducted by researchers from Harvard’s School of Public Health, analyzed data from three states that had expanded their programs in the last decade to cover a population not normally eligible for Medicaid: low-income adults without children or disabilities. The new law also expands coverage to a similar population nationally. Researchers looked at mortality rates in those states — Arizona, Maine and New York

— five years before and after the Medicaid expansions, and compared them with those in four neighboring states — Nevada, New Mexico, New Hampshire and Pennsylvania — that did not put such expansions in place. The number of deaths for people age 20-64 — adults too young to be considered elderly by the researchers — decreased in the three states with expanded coverage by about 1,500 combined per year, after adjusting for population growth in those states, said Dr. Benjamin D. Sommers, a physician and

an assistant professor of health policy and economics who was an author of the study. In the five years before the expansion, there were about 46,400 deaths per year, while in the five years after the expansion, there were about 44,900 deaths per year. During the same period, death rates in the four comparison states increased, said Sommers, who began a yearlong stint as an adviser to the federal Department of Health and Human Services after research for the study was completed, but before its publication.

Korean Central News Agency via Korea News Service

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, center, accompanied by his wife, Ri Sol Ju, right, waves to the crowd as they inspect the a new amusement park in Pyongyang.

Mystery woman revealed as North Korea’s first lady By Choe Sang-hun New York Times News Service

SEOUL, South Korea — She was first spotted at a gala concert for the country’s who’s who, dressed in a trim black suit in the Chanel tradition. Then she popped up at a kindergarten, trailing photographers who caught images of her smiling gently at children playing on a slide. Her latest appearance, at the inauguration of an amusement park, was yet another star turn: the cameras zooming in on the slim woman with the easy smile and fashionable polkadot jacket. Ri Sol Ju’s sudden appearance in the spotlight on Wednesday, in a photo from the

amusement park visit, had all the trappings of a Kate Middleton moment. Except this is North Korea, and Ri’s tantalizing public appearances were less a debut than a typically opaque North Korean-style acknowledgment that the mysterious 20-something leader of the country had taken a wife. State media made that clear with little fanfare, almost as an afterthought, in an announcement that the new amusement park had opened in Pyongyang. “While a welcoming song was resonating,” state television intoned, “Marshal Kim Jong Un appeared at the ceremony site, with his wife, Comrade Ri Sol Ju.”

The fact that Ri was introduced publicly at all was considered significant, the latest sign for North Korea analysts that Kim was breaking from the leadership style of his father, a dour man who was known for marrying beautiful performers but who never introduced them to the public. “Secrecy and shadows characterized the 17-year rule of Kim Jong Il,” said John Park, a research fellow at the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs at Harvard University. “In contrast, Kim Jong Un has already shown a pattern of being more open and engaging. He appears to enjoy public events and interacting with children and the common

Senate narrowly approves Obama’s tax proposal over GOP objections By Lisa Mascaro Tribune Washington Bureau

WASHINGTON — In a political gamble that will reverberate through the November campaigns, the Senate approved President Barack Obama’s plan to give tax breaks to all but the top 2 percent of American taxpayers over the objection of Republicans. Democrats believe Wednesday’s action will shift the debate in a Congress that has been stalemated by partisan inaction, giving momentum to Obama’s proposal — and drawing a contrast with Mitt Romney, the Republican presidential candidate — by sending it to

the GOP-led House. The Senate approved the measure 51-48, with two Democrats joining the solid Republican opposition. Failure by Congress to extend the tax rates from the George W. Bush administration would result in a tax increase on ordinary Americans, a prospect that poses enormous risk for both parties. At the same time, Democrats rejected a Republican proposal Wednesday, 45-54, to extend the tax cuts for all Americans. Two Republicans, Scott Brown of Massachusetts and Susan Collins of Maine, crossed party lines

to oppose the measure; one Democrat, Sen. Mark Pryor of Arkansas, joined the GOP. Emphasizing the importance of Wednesday’s vote, Vice President Joe Biden made an unusual appearance in the Senate to preside over the session, which provoked a spirited debate between party leaders in the usually cordial chamber. “Republicans should not force middle-class families off their fiscal cliff to protect more wasteful giveaways to millionaires and billionaires,” said Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev. “We’re on the side of the American people.”

soldier. Many of these recent appearances look like a re-enactment of his grandfather’s mingling with the people in better times.” The introduction of Ri followed weeks of surprises from Kim. First he was shown at the concert, beaming during a performance by Mickey Mouse, formerly considered a symbol of the corrupt West. Then he fired a hard-line top general and was reported to have taken away important financial perks from the military, moves that analysts saw as signs that he was trying to tame the powerful army — and even possibly make economic reforms that could allow the country to open up a bit to the world.

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in Colorado By Alexandra Zavis Los Angeles Times

AURORA, Colo. — Friends and families of those who died in last week’s movie theater massacre have begun the painful ritual of mourning and burying their loved ones. The first memorial service was held Wednesday at the Pathways Church in Denver for Gordon Cowden, 51, who was attending the Friday Batman movie premiere with his teenaged children when a gunman opened fire inside. In all, 12 people were killed and 58 injured. Cowden’s children escaped safely. Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper, Aurora Mayor Steve Hogan and Aurora Police Chief Dan Oates joined scores of friends and family members at the packed Pathways church Wednesday. The service was private, but the family released a statement describing Cowden as a loving father, outdoorsman, small business owner and “true Texas gentleman.” “A quick-witted world traveler with a keen sense of humor, he will be remembered for his devotion to his children and for always trying his best to do the right thing, no matter the obstacle,” the statement said. Photographs of Cowden with his four children were shown, said 19-year-old Alana Botdorf, who was among the mourners. “It was really hard to watch because you could tell what a great dad he was,” she said. “Front row at every play, ceremony and sporting event . I just hope everyone knows what an incredible man was taking tin the tragedy.” After the service, family members walked out of church carrying flowers and were embraced by well-wishers. “I’m just really glad that the family was able to get support from so many different people in the community because that is what they need now,” said Botdorf, who sent “love and prayers” to the other families affected by the tragedy. More funerals are planned this week in Aurora, Illinois, Nevada and Texas. “Just picked up my sister’s remains. The most difficult thing I have ever been asked to do,” tweeted Jordan Ghawi, whose 24-year-old sister, Jessica, died in the shooting. A memorial ser-

Hospital bills mount for some DENVER — Some of the victims fighting for their lives after being wounded in the movie-theater shooting rampage may face another challenge when they get out of the hospital: enormous medical bills without the benefit of health insurance. Members of the public, along with Warner Bros., the studio that released the Batman movie “The Dark Knight Rises,” have contributed nearly $2 million to help victims, though it’s not clear how much of that will cover medical expenses. One family is raising money on its own online. And three of the five hospitals treating victims said Wednesday they will limit or completely wipe out medical bills. Some of the victims, however, still face a long recovery ahead and the associated medical costs — without health insurance. There’s no exact count of how many of them don’t have insurance but statistics suggest many of them might not be covered. — The Associated Press

vice is planned for the aspiring sports journalist in San Antonio on Saturday. At least two of the victims will be buried with military honors: Jonathan Blunk, 26, a veteran who served five years in the U.S. Navy, and John Larimer, 27, who had been in the Navy for just over a year when he died. That was important to Blunk’s wife, Chantel, who said Blunk had been hoping to reenlist. If he died, he wanted it to be in battle, she told CNN. Blunk died while pushing a friend, Jansen Young, to the floor. “I think Jon just took a bullet for me, and I was thinking what a great hero he is,” Young told NBC’s “Today” show last Saturday.

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THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, JULY 26, 2012

Deschutes County notices of default A new state law and an Oregon Court of Appeals ruling have practically eliminated notices of default in Deschutes County, starting in mid-July. That trend could continue for months, as banks work out new foreclosure rules in Oregon.

Notices of default by month, 2012

143

150

132 126

120

117

117

95

Jackson kids get temporary guardian The Associated Press LOS ANGELES — A judge on Wednesday intervened in the turmoil roiling the Jackson family, appointing the son of Tito Jackson to serve as temporary guardian of Michael Jackson’s children in the absence of the family

matriarch. Superior Court Judge Mitchell Beckloff temporarily suspended Katherine Jackson as the children’s guardian because she was in Arizona and hadn’t spoken with them in several days. He appointed Tito Joe “TJ” Jackson to serve

as temporary guardian with the ability to control the hilltop home where the children live and to take on other supervision duties. Katherine Jackson told ABC News that she was hurt by the court ruling and it was “based on a bunch of lies.”

90 60

36 30 0 Jan.

Feb.

March

Source: Deschutes County Clerk’s records

Defaults Continued from A1 Further clouding the picture in Oregon is a state appellate court ruling last week against Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, a mortgage registration database created in the 1990s by some of the nation’s biggest banks. The ruling said nonjudicial foreclosures can be declared illegal if each change of title in a homeowner’s mortgage isn’t recorded with a county clerk before the process starts. MERS has said it will appeal the ruling to the Oregon Supreme Court. The country’s biggest mortgage holders seem to be scrambling to adjust to the new state law and the court ruling, attorneys representing creditors and homeowners said. So default notices have stopped in the meantime — at least for now. SB 1552 “put a huge burden on the state Attorney General’s Office to come up with the rules in the (mediation) process,” said Tamara MacLeod, an attorney specializing in creditors’ rights issues with Karnopp Petersen in Bend. The bill passed April 11. That gave the state three months to write rules, including the fees for lenders and homeowners to participate in mediation and the time frame to complete it. The state bill only impacts major lenders that service more than 250 mortgages a year. It’s designed to keep big lenders from using the “dualtrack” process, in which they negotiate with borrowers and start foreclosure proceedings on them at the same time. Wells Fargo, Bank of America, JPMorgan Chase, Citibank and Ally Bank hold 70 percent of the country’s mortgages, according to mortgagestats.com. “There’s going to be a lag period” in default notices, MacLeod said. “I would suspect that could possibly be up to four months, which would allow the mediation process to play out before lenders start filing notices of default again.” But it’s still a mystery what the halt in default notices means for Central Oregon homeowners. “What I’m hearing is that there is kind of a retooling period” for the lenders, said Megan Burgess, an attorney who specializes in real estate litiga-

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Greg Cross / The Bulletin

tion with Peterkin and Associates in Bend. In some cases, lenders are transferring homes from the nonjudicial track to the judicial path. The key difference is that judicial foreclosures give homeowners a chance to make the case to avoid foreclosure before a judge. It’s typically a costly and drawn-out process compared to the nonjudicial track. But in other cases, Burgess said, lenders are just holding off on default notices until they better understand the new rules. “I still think it’s more beneficial (for lenders) to go nonjudicial,” Burgess said. “Once they’ve figured things out, I think it will pick up again.” An average of 67 notices of default were issued each week in Deschutes County in 2009. The rate increased to 72 in 2010 but dropped to 45 in 2011. An average of 28 notices a week had been filed through June of this year. Fewer default notices could be a sign of recovery in the real estate market, said Kathy Ragsdale, CEO of the Central Oregon Association of Realtors. But if the drop-off is occurring because banks are waiting a few months to foreclose, that could be problematic for the local housing market. “The concern we might have then is that the market would be flooded with these properties that were held back on, in which case too many houses would come onto the market” and drive prices down, Ragsdale said. Others say the MERS ruling could have just as big an impact on the local housing market as SB 1552. Bruce Dunlap, principal broker with Central Oregon Realty Group and an investment real estate buyer, said some real estate investors considering the purchase of a property could be spooked if they see MERS as title holder. The concern would be that investors could take on a property only to have the transaction ruled illegal at a later date. The ruling “basically said that if any property has MERS (in its title history), anybody that has gotten a nonjudicial foreclosure notice has the right to appeal,” Dunlap said. — Reporter: 541-617-7820 eglucklich@bendbulletin.com

Website: AC/DC-playing virus hits Iran nuclear sites By Ladane Nasseri Bloomberg News

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates — Iran’s nuclear facilities have suffered a cyber attack that shut down computers and played music from the rock band AC/DC, the F-Secure Security Labs website says. A new worm targeted Iran’s nuclear program, closing down the “automation network” at the Natanz and Fordo facilities, the Internet security site reported, citing an email it said was sent by a scientist inside Iran’s Atomic Energy Organization. The virus also prompted several of the computers on site to play the song “Thunderstruck” by AC/DC at full volume in the middle of the night, according to the e-mail, part of which is published in English on the website. F-Secure Security Labs, which is linked to F-Secure, the Finnish maker of security and cloud software, said that while it was unable to verify the details of the attack described, it had confirmed that the scientist

who reported them was sending and receiving the emails from within Iran’s Atomic Energy Organization. Iran’s nuclear program and oil facilities have been subject to a succession of cyber attacks that the Foreign Ministry said in May were launched by hostile governments as part of a broader “soft war.” Iran accuses the United States and Israel of trying to sabotage its technological progress. Both countries say Iran’s nuclear activities may have military intent, an allegation that Iran denies. Mikko Hypponen, chief security officer at F-Secure Security Labs and the person involved in the correspondence, said he received three emails on July 22 from an individual with an aeoi.org.ir email address, receiving replies after he responded. After researching the person’s name on the Internet, Hypponen said he found “plenty of nuclear science papers and articles published by someone with this name.”

Skype Continued from A1 Microsoft has approached the issue with “tremendous sensitivity and a canny awareness of what the issues would be,” said an industry official familiar with Microsoft’s plans, who like several people interviewed for this article spoke on the condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to discuss the issue publicly. The company has “a long track record of working successfully with law enforcement here and internationally,” he added. The changes, which give the authorities access to addresses and credit card numbers under a formal request, have drawn quiet applause in law enforcement circles but hostility from many activists and analysts. Authorities had for years complained that Skype’s encryption and other features made tracking drug lords, pedophiles and terrorists more difficult. Jihadis recommended the service on online forums. Police listening to traditional wiretaps occasionally would hear wary suspects say to one another, “Hey, let’s talk on Skype.” Hacker groups and privacy experts have been speculating for months that Skype had changed its architecture to make it easier for governments to monitor, and many blamed Microsoft, which has an elaborate operation for complying with legal government requests in countries around the world. “The issue is, to what extent are our communications being purpose-built to make surveillance easy?” said Lauren Weinstein, cofounder of People for Internet Responsibility, a digital privacy group. “When you make it easy to do, law enforcement is going to want to use it more and more. If you build it, they will come.” Skype was slow to clarify the situation, issuing a statement recently that said, “As was true before the Microsoft acquisition, Skype cooperates with law enforcement agencies as is legally required and technically feasible.” But changes allowing police surveillance of online chats had been made since late last year, a knowledgeable industry official said Wednesday. In the United States, such requests require a court order, though in other nations rules vary. Skype has more than 600 million users, with some in nearly every nation in the world. Political dissidents relied on it extensively during the

Arab Spring to communicate with journalists, human rights workers and one another, in part because of its reputation for security. Skype’s resistance to government monitoring, part of the company ethos when European engineers founded it in 2003, resulted from both uncommonly strong encryption and a key technical feature: Skype calls connected computers directly rather than routing data through central servers, as many other Internet-based communication systems do. That makes it more difficult for law enforcement to intercept the call. The authorities long have been able to wiretap Skype calls to traditional phones. The company created a law enforcement compliance team not long after eBay bought the company in 2005, putting it squarely under the auspices of U.S. law. The company was later sold to private investors before Microsoft bought it in May 2011 for $8.5 billion. The new ownership had at least an indirect role in the security changes. Skype has endured periodic outages, including a disastrous one in December 2010. Company officials concluded that a more robust system was needed if the company was going to reach its potential. Industry officials said the resulting push for the creation of “supernodes,” which routed some data through centralized servers, made greater cooperation with law enforcement authorities possible. The access to personal information and online chats, which are kept in Skype’s systems for 30 days, remains short of what

some law enforcement officials have requested. The FBI, whose officials have complained to Congress about the “going dark” problem, issued a statement Wednesday night saying it could not comment on a particular company or service but that surveillance of conversations “requires review and approval by a court. It is used only in national security matters and to combat the most serious crimes.” Microsoft won a patent last year for “legal intercept” of Skype and similar Internetbased voice and video systems, but the application was filed before Microsoft acquired Skype. It is also possible, experts say, to monitor Skype chats as well as voice and video by hacking into a user’s computer, doing an end run around encryptions. “If someone wants to compromise a Skype communication, all they have to do is hack the endpoint — the person’s computer or tablet or mobile phone, which is very easy to do,” said Tom Kellermann, vice president of cybersecurity for Trend Micro, a cloud security company. Some industry officials, however, say Skype loses some competitive edge in the increasingly crowded world of Internet-based communications systems if users no longer see it as more private than rival services. “This is just making Skype like every other communication service, no better, no worse,” said one industry official, speaking on the condition of anonymity. “Skype used to be very special because it really was locked up. Now it’s like Superman without his powers.”

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THURSDAY, JULY 26, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

Former president of Philippines is out on bail New York Times News Service MANILA, Philippines — In a surprise ruling, a judge ordered former President Gloria Macapagal Arroyo of the Philippines released on bail Wednesday after finding that vote-rigging charges lodged against her were weak. Arroyo emerged smiling from a military hospital, where she had been detained for eight months. She boarded a van that whisked her past a handful of protesters to her home in the Manila suburb of Quezon City. The bond she posted to secure her release was 1 million pesos, or $24,000. “It is a reaffirmation of what our camp has been saying all along: that the charges against the former president are as thin as the soup made from boiling the shadow of a chicken that has been starved to death,” said Ferdinand Topacio, a lawyer on her legal team, in a statement paraphrasing Abraham Lincoln. In November, the government blocked Arroyo from leaving the country to obtain medical care for a bone ailment, because it suspected that she was trying to flee the country before charges of corruption and election fraud were filed. She sought treatment at a private hospital in the Philippines instead, and was arrested there a few days later, on Nov. 18.

Gymnastics Continued from A1 Three-time world champion and heavy gold medal favorite Kohei Uchimura wiped out twice on the high bar, including a frightening spill in which he flung himself 10 feet forward and came dangerously close to landing on the back of his neck. Horton bit it three times on the same event a short time later as he tried to complete a relatively routine release. The 2008 silver medalist on high bar is hardly blaming the games’ interior decorator, and neither are the rest of his teammates. “What’s that saying, that real men wear pink?” parallel bars world champion Danell Leyva said. “Well, real men compete on pink floors, too.” Then again, they don’t really have a choice. Besides, the color is the least of the issues for the Americans. Organizers are using equipment made by Gymnova, a France-based company that differs quite a bit from the stuff used by USA Gymnastics. Gymnova uses wood handles on the parallel bars and still rings, equipment that is made of fiberglass by U.S. equipment providers. The floor has foam underneath, not springs. “It’s definitely different,” U.S. floor exercise and vault specialist Jake Dalton said. “Your grip is different … it’s something you have to get used to.” Assistant U.S. coach Tom Meadows said it’s not unusual for it to take a while to get comfortable. The U.S. competed on equipment made outside the country at the world championships in Tokyo last fall, where the women won the team title and the men captured bronze. “There’s an adjustment period, but you get used to it,” Meadows said. Meadows pointed out it’s not the equipment as much as the mats that have been an obstacle in London. In the U.S., gymnasts compete on blue mats. The mats in London look a bit like red velvet cake, with the vanilla-color center affecting depth perception. Think about throwing yourself a dozen feet in the air and then trying to grab a narrow bar covered in white stuff that appears to bleed into the background. “That’s why you see guys missing releases in podium training,” Meadows said. Such mistakes need to be corrected by the time the team competition begins on Saturday. The next time the men walk onto the floor of the O2, it will be for real. And nothing, not even a rug better-suited for Hello Kitty, can be used as an excuse. “If you start thinking about that,” Dalton said, “you stop thinking about gymnastics.”

Paddle Continued from A1 “A lot of the youth in today’s world are not introduced to their ancestry,” Greene said. “Many of them were raised by parents who were never introduced to the history.” On the journey, children as young as 11 paddle alongside adults, sometimes traveling more than 30 miles in a day. They sing traditional songs, listen to elders talk about tribal canoe culture and trade beads with other tribes along the way. “To me it’s a real blessing to be out there in the canoes,” said Douglas Brisbois, 19, who has paddled with the canoe family for the past three years. “It’s something that is long gone from the Warm Springs culture.”

Hospital Continued from A1 Mountain View CEO Jeanine Gentry said there would not be a purchase price for the assets. “It’s less of a sale, and more, ‘We’re going to adopt you and promise to take care of you,’ ” she said. The boards of both organizations would have to approve the asset transfer agreement, but the parties believed that could happen by year’s end. The Madras hospital is currently owned by the hospital district, a public entity set up decades ago to operate the hospital for the community. The district receives some tax revenues from Jefferson County residents, although that funding makes up only a small portion of the hospital’s revenues. Gentry said 75 percent of the hospital’s revenues come from government programs — Medicaid, Medicare and the Indian Health Service — leaving the hospital in a fragile financial state. And with fed-

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The Warm Springs tribes first paddled in the canoe journey in 2010. Greene, 28, said he remembers shedding tears when he came ashore that first year, seeing hundreds of other tribal members singing, dancing and celebrating tribal culture.

After earning a management degree from Portland State University, Greene returned to Warm Springs to work for the tribes. In March he resigned as the development director for the Museum at Warm Springs to work on community projects, like the

canoe family. “I feel honored to be a part of it,” he said of the canoe family. “It’s something that just fell in my lap.” Before relocation, canoeing was a fundamental part of life for several of the tribes of Warm Springs, Greene said. The Columbia River was a gathering place. Tribes traveled up and down the river to trade and to communicate with other bands. Notable tribal members would be buried in their canoes, he said. “Canoes were looked at as a family member,” he said. “They would build these canoes as part as their family, part of their band.” The canoe family hopes to one day carve its own cedar canoe, but first they need tools, a work shed and approval to cut an old-growth tree on

eral and state health reforms putting additional pressure on those payments, the hospital is facing the possibility of further shortfalls. “We just don’t have a lot of money,” Gentry said. “We lost money last year. We’re hoping to break even this year, but that’s not a recipe for longterm sustainability.” The board considered many options for the hospital, including approaching larger hospital chains in Portland, such as Providence or Legacy. “St. Charles makes the most sense because our patients often go to St. Charles for part of their care, and we even share some of the same doctors,” Gentry said. The board also had the option of pursuing a lease agreement with St. Charles, along the lines of what Pioneer Memorial Hospital in Prineville had done in 2008. Under that arrangement, the nonprofit corporation leases the operation of the hospital to St. Charles but maintains ownership of the land, buildings and other fixed assets. St. Charles then

operates the hospital, hiring the staff and purchasing the equipment, and owning any profit or loss. If their margins exceed 2 percent, some of the profits are then shared with Pioneer. Mountain View’s board chose to follow the path chosen by the Redmond hospital. That hospital was also a district hospital that transferred its assets to St. Charles in 2001. The Redmond district continued to operate for about 31⁄2 years, but stopped collecting tax revenue after the transfer. It’s not clear whether the Mountain View Hospital District would continue to collect tax revenue and repurpose it for other health care needs, but Diegel said St. Charles would not have any claim to those funds if the assets are transferred. Mountain View recently put off a planned expansion of the hospital after it was unable to secure favorable financing terms. Hospital officials had been in the midst of reworking those plans to a less am-

bitious remodel but have put that work on hold pending the asset transfer. Diegel said the Madras hospital still needs significant updates, including adding a second operating room, updating the emergency department and investing in better imaging equipment. “The big question is how much and how fast,” he said. Diegel said that while St. Charles board members had expressed concerns that they might be inheriting Mountain View’s financial difficulties, he believed that St. Charles could bring efficiencies in areas such as billing, information technology and support services that would put the Madras hospital on a stronger financial footing. “When we assumed the operation of Prineville, Prineville was in even worse shape than Madras,” he said. “So we have been able to do it, and I believe we can do the same in Madras.” Diegel said St. Charles would work to retain the staff at Mountain View or try to re-

Steve Mullensky / For The Bulletin

Paddlers approach their landing spot along the beach at Fort Worden State Park on July 19 after crossing the Strait of Juan de Fuca during the annual tribal canoe journey.

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the reservation, Greene said. Carving cedar canoes is an art that has been all but lost among the Warm Springs tribes, Greene said. Historically, elders would seek out a old-growth cedar. After felling the tree, they would cut a flat surface on one side on which they would build a fire. They would then scoop out the charred portion, repeating several times to hollow out the log. The hollow log would be filled with water and volcanic rocks heated in a fire. The boiling water and steam would make the wood bow out, helping create the shape of the canoe. “They would create these canoes as a family and they would treat them as a gift from the creator,” Greene said.

position them within the St. Charles Health System. “I am very sensitive to the economy here and the fact that we have an 11 percent unemployment rate,” he said. Diegel said Gentry would continue to serve as CEO of the hospital after the transfer. “The bottom line for me is to improve patient safety, patient quality of care and access to services here,” Gentry said. “What I plan not to change is to have that small-town TLC kind of culture that we’re best at, to keep that and get the best of both worlds.” Mountain View’s publicly elected board of directors has the statutory authority to approve the transfer with a simple majority vote. But board members are eager to hear from Jefferson County residents about what the terms of the assets transfer should be. They have scheduled two public forums, Tuesday at 5:30 p.m. and Aug. 2 at 11 a.m., in the Metolius Conference Room at Mountain View Hospital.

— Reporter: 541-633-2184, jaschbrenner@bendbulletin.com

— Reporter: 541-617-7814 mhawryluk@bendbulletin.com


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THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, JULY 26, 2012

Rebels expect major battle for Syrian commerce capital By Elizabeth A. Kennedy The Associated Press

BEIRUT — Syrian troops rushed dozens of tanks and reinforcements Wednesday toward Aleppo, the country’s strategically vital commercial capital, in a bid to crush a rebel advance that has spread to wide swaths of the sprawling city. As five days of fighting in Aleppo intensified, and with rumors swirling of a final showdown in that city, neighboring Turkey tightened its

borders but said refugees will be allowed through. “We are expecting a big attack on Aleppo,” Mohammed Saeed, an activist based in Aleppo, told The Associated Press. “People are worried they might face random shelling while fleeing.” The rebels have made stunning advances over the past week, but the battle for control of Syria, a geographic and political linchpin at the heart of the Middle East, is far from over. And the potential for

wider, regional unrest is great. Israel’s foreign minister warned that his country will act immediately if it discovers Islamic militants such as Lebanon’s Hezbollah are raiding Syria’s chemical or biological weapons stocks. “For us, that’s a casus belli, a red line,” Avigdor Lieberman told Israel Radio. Israeli officials have reported a run on gas masks. Demand has almost doubled in the past few days, to 4,200 requests on Tuesday from a

years-old average of about 2,200, said Merav Lapidot, a spokeswoman for the Israeli postal service, which distributes the masks. On Monday, Syria threatened to unleash its chemical and biological weapons if it faces a foreign attack. The White House said Wednesday that the Syrian government’s assault on Aleppo with tanks and fixed-wing aircraft illustrates what it called “the depth of depravity” by Assad’s regime.

Gina Ferazzi / Los Angeles Times

People walk past the shattered windows of a Starbucks on Tuesday. Rioters threw chairs through the windows in a protest of last weekend’s police shootings in Anaheim, Calif.

ANAHEIM UNREST

Mom condemns violent protests of 2 police shootings By Gillian Flaccus The Associated Press

Tara Todras-Whitehill / New York Times News Service

Syrian refugees rest in a camp in Ramtha, Jordan. Fearing the fallout and the spread of the uprising in Syria, Jordanian officials are trying to dissuade opponents of the Syrian regime from turning to Jordan.

Jordan striving to restrain Syrian opposition refugees By Kareem Fahim New York Times News Service

AMMAN, Jordan — Fearing the fallout and the spread of the uprising in Syria, Jordanian officials have recently moved more forcefully to restrain opponents of the Syrian government who have fled to Jordan, activists here say. A Syrian opposition leader from Daraa said that intelligence agents tried to dissuade him from returning after a recent trip outside the country. Jordanian airline officials demanded he buy a ticket to go on to Damascus before he boarded the plane.

In another case, an artist once imprisoned in Syria said that since arriving in Jordan in March, he had been interrogated four times by intelligence agents who warned that he would be sent back to Syria if he engaged in conspicuous activism against the Syrian government. The episodes reflected Jordan’s perennially anxious state, battered by cycles of crises in the region, fearful of stronger neighbors and dependent on others for financial and military support. In recent weeks, Jordanian officials and commentators have made

dire predictions that refugees could overwhelm the country as the war worsens, strangling Jordan’s fragile economy and straining its resources. But officials are especially concerned that the uprising could unsettle the country’s already turbulent politics. Small but persistent demonstrations over the past year have focused on government corruption, and have resulted in increasingly bold expressions of anger directed at the country’s monarch, King Abdullah II. The king has tried to manage the call for change with a

Expert says al-Qaida in Iraq poses growing threat to U.S. By Brian Bennett Tribune Washington Bureau

WASHINGTON — The terrorist organization that was once the scourge of the U.S. occupation in Iraq and likely is responsible for more than 100 deaths in the country over the past few days has set its sights on launching attacks inside the United States, intelligence officials said. Al-Qaida in Iraq released a message earlier this week that threatened to strike at the “heart” of the United States, and several associates of al-Qaida in Iraq have been arrested in the United States and Canada over the past two years, said U.S. officials, a sign that the terrorist affiliate has tried to establish a network inside North America. The arrests highlight “the potential threat posed to the United States” from al-Qaida in Iraq, said Matthew Olsen, the director of the National Counterterrorism Center, during a hearing Wednesday held by the House Homeland Security Committee examining the current threat from terrorism to

the United States. Al-Qaida in Iraq has been known primarily for launching attacks against the American forces in Iraq and the Shiite-led government there, as well as helping to plot attacks in neighboring Jordan. But “there are networks and recruiting efforts in the U.S. and Canada,” said Seth Jones, an expert on al-Qaida at the RAND Corp. and author of “Hunting in the Shadows: the Pursuit of al-Qaida since 9/11.” “You can say pretty categorically that al-Qaida in Iraq appears to be strengthening from where it was two years ago,” said Jones, even as the organization’s senior leaders in Pakistan have been killed. The terrorist organization’s affiliate in Iraq was pummeled more than five years ago by a coalition of Sunni tribal leaders in western Iraq and U.S. forces, but experts who study al-Qaida say that the organization in Iraq has begun to rebuild, energized in the past year by the violent uprising in Syria next door and an influx of cash from wealthy benefactors in the Persian Gulf.

On Sunday, the day before the latest wave of attacks, alQaida in Iraq released an audio recording to mark the beginning of the Ramadan fast. The message announced a new campaign of violence against the Iraqi government, praised Syria’s uprising and made a call for new recruits to join the group. It also spoke directly to Americans. “You will soon witness how attacks will resound in the heart of your land, because our war with you has now started,” said a man that identified himself as Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, the pseudonym used by the head of al-Qaida in Iraq. Attacking the U.S. is easier said than done, said Rep. Michael McCaul, R-Texas, who sits on the House Homeland Security Committee and has been briefed on the threat to the U.S. from Iraq. “But when you have the leader signaling that it is time to go on the offensive, there is a heightened sense of concern for law enforcement and intelligence agencies here in the U.S.,” McCaul said.

limited reform program that his critics say hardly diminishes his grip on power. The Syrian conflict could worsen one of Jordan’s deep domestic schisms, between citizens of Palestinian descent and so-called East Bank Jordanians. The government seems set on not letting more Palestinians enter. Jordanian officials strongly deny that they turn back Palestinian refugees. In a report this month, an Interior Ministry official told Human Rights Watch that Jordan had not “sent any Palestinians back, period.”

ANAHEIM, Calif. — The mother of an unarmed man who was shot by Anaheim police officers has condemned violent protests against the killing, saying Wednesday she did not want them to become her son’s legacy. “I watched as my son took his last breath. I watched as his heart stopped beating for the last time,” Genevieve Huizar said, breaking into sobs. “Please, please, please stop the violence. It’s not going to bring my son back, and this is the worst thing any mother could go through.” Her news conference followed a fourth day of violent protests over Saturday’s police shooting of Manuel Diaz and the Sunday police shooting of another man who fired at police during a pursuit. A police dog escaped shortly after Diaz was shot Saturday and bit a bystander. In the latest wave of protest, as many as 600 demonstrators surged through downtown Tuesday night, smashing shop windows, setting trash fires and hurling rocks and bottles at police, authorities said.

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Huizar said her family had not participated in any violence. At an earlier news conference, Mayor Tom Tait said the U.S. attorney’s office had agreed to review the officer-involved shootings and that he planned to meet with members of that office and the FBI on Friday. “We will have a clear and complete understanding of these incidents” followed by a public dialogue on what actions should be taken, Tait said at a news conference. The shootings and resulting demonstrations marred the image of the Orange County city, which is home to Disneyland and the Angels baseball team but also has neighborhoods teeming with gritty apartments. Like much of California, the city of more than 330,000 has changed significantly since Disneyland put it on the map in 1955. With its growth spurt, the once mostly white population is now more than 50 percent Hispanic and there’s a sense of disenfranchisement from some in the Latino community.


O U TING

TV & Movies, B2 Calendar, B3 Dear Abby, B3

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Horoscope, B3 Comics, B4-5 Puzzles, B5

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, JULY 26, 2012

www.bendbulletin.com/outing

TRAIL UPDATE Snow lingers on higher trails Low-elevation trails have long been snowfree, but persistent snow is hanging on above 6,200-6,400 feet, said Chris Sabo, U.S. Forest Service trails specialist. The trails around Green and Moraine lakes, South Sister, Tam MacArthur Rim and Broken Top, and the connecting loop trials around the Three Sisters are all still mostly under snow and not yet clear of fallen trees. Green Lakes Trail is reportedly clear for the first half, but the snow gets increasingly deeper above that. Even the lakes are likely still icecovered, Sabo said. The 370 Road to Broken Top is still blocked by snow and is estimated to open in early August. Trail users not wellversed in hiking over snow risk losing the trail, becoming injured or damaging the trail tread, so for safety and resource protection, these high-country trails are not recommended for most users, Sabo said. “If folks are choosing to go out, even on the non-snow-covered trails, they really should consider enough essentials to spend a night out there if necessary — shelter, food, warmth,” he said.

Float a little lower

See Trails / B6

• Mellow and lovely, the Lower Deschutes offers a relaxing river excursion for the whole family

TE DESCHU

Length of river floated

Help fish enjoy Metolius habitat Help enhance the fish habitat in the Metolius River during a wood placement effort from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Friday. Deschutes Trout Unlimited will be working with a fisheries biologist from the Deschutes National Forest to place woody debris on existing logs and structures. Volunteers will meet at the Camp Sherman Store, 25451 S.W. Forest Service Road 1419, in Camp Sherman, at 9 a.m. An RSVP is requested to help in planning for the tools needed. Contact: dstaab@tu.org or 541-480-6976.

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Trout Creek

Frog Springs Clemens Dr.

SPOTLIGHT

Luelling Homestead (private) Mecca Flat

26

Warm Springs

Gateway

— From staff reports

T

he Deschutes River, which flows from Little Lava Lake in the Cascades to the Columbia River up north, offers everything from

adrenaline-filled whitewater rafting to family-friendly leisure floats. The 100-mile segment known as the

Warm Springs Boat Ramp (put in)

Lower Deschutes officially starts at Warm Springs, an hour north of Bend, and is a great launching point Fern Lane

for an easy, family-style day trip.

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Clark Dr.

Fir Lane

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Cora Dr.

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Madras Greg Cross / The Bulletin

Bowne is back in director’s seat Bend Theatre for Young People is hosting performances of two short plays today at 2 p.m. at the Greenwood Playhouse in Bend. The shows, “Cupivac on Cloud 9” and “The Trial,” are part of the group’s summer conservatory, and both are directed by Gary Bowne, the longtime artistic director of the theater group for children and teens. Bowne was involved in a serious bicycle accident last fall that left him in critical condition. He said Tuesday that for a time he did not believe he would be able to take part in any summer activities with the theater group. He is volunteering his services to direct the productions. The plays cost $8 for adults, $5 for children, and tickets are available at the door, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend. Contact: www.bend theatre.org or 541-4191395.

By Anne Aurand • The Bulletin

Redsides

Trout Creek Recreation Area Campground (take out)

Warm Springs Indian Reservation

Photos by An n e Aurand / The Bulletin

The Lower Deschutes was designated an Oregon Scenic Waterway in 1970 and a Federal Wild and Scenic River in 1988. Some segments of this stretch of river are so mellow that 7-year-old Clara Husaby, of Bend — seen with Brent Fenty and Kenai the dog — was able to try her hand at rowing.

The Class II (that means covering fascinating detritus. gentle) stretch of river that ends The girls didn’t catch any 9.5 miles downstream at Trout fish that day. My husband was Creek Campground lacks any too busy helping them to fish real whitewater, making it easy much on his own. But word is enough for even novice padthat this is a terrific fishery, and dlers to navigate, but it includes we passed at least a dozen anenough riffles to stay glers, even though it was interesting. The girls on midday in some brutal our cataraft — age 6 and Inside heat. • Find out 7 — dangled from the According to The Fly about boat in the still sections Fisher’s Place (www. boat of water and screamed flyfishersplace.com) in rentals, with exhilaration while Sisters, there might be fishing getting splashed in the 3,500 trout per mile in permits wave trains and small the stretch we floated. and more, The shop’s website offers rapids. B6 The Lower Deschutes tips about aquatic insect was designated an Orhatches and appropriate egon Scenic Waterway fishing gear. The busiin 1970 and a Federal Wild and ness is one of several that offers Scenic River in 1988. In other guided fishing trips if that’s words, it’s incredibly pretty — a your thing. Don’t forget a fishstunning canyon with huge baing license. salt cliffs, flanked with juniper Some rules: and sage. Alders line the river • Fishing from the boat is banks. We saw lots of osprey, prohibited. You must pull over several herons, a waxwing and and wade if you want to fling mergansers. a fly. It takes just a couple of hours • The Luelling Homestead, to float, if you keep moving. We about one-third of the way extended our day by stopping a down on river right (the east couple of times on shore to try some fishing, eat snacks and re- side), is the only private land on this stretch of river. Respect apply sunscreen. Our daughter private property. and her friend spent hours digSee Deschutes / B6 ging with sticks in the dirt, dis-

Why we haven’t heard back from Andromeda (or anywhere else) By Bill Logan For The Bulletin

SKY WATCH

To understand why we haven’t been able to communicate with intelligent life in other parts of the universe, one must first understand the enormous distances involved. The speed of light and radio

waves is 186,000 miles per second. The time it takes for light and radio waves to reach us from our sun — a distance of about 93 million miles — is 8.3 minutes. It takes almost 32 minutes to send a command over 352 million miles to the Mars rovers and 32 more minutes to see if it

obeyed. (For this reason, controllers must be careful not to send the rovers over a cliff.) Radio frequency transmissions below 30 million hertz per second (MHz) can rarely escape Earth’s ionosphere. Those frequencies are usually AM signals. They are used

for long-distance Earth communications because the ionosphere cannot absorb the radio waves, causing them to bounce around the Earth. DX (long-distance) ham radio operators have known this for almost a century. See Sky Watch / B6


B2

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, JULY 26, 2012

TV & M A different spin on the ‘Homeland’ story American, as in “Homeland�: Nimrode (Yoram Tolledano) The ties that bind Show- returns to an adoring wife time’s “Homeland� and the and two children who barely Israeli show “Prisoners of remember him; Uri (Ishai War� are unusually strong. Golan) to a former fiancee The deal to remake the Israeli who married his brother aforiginal for American televi- ter he was abducted. A third sion was struck even before story line involves the sister it was filmed, and of another capGideon Raff, crewho did not TV SPOTLIGHT tive ator of “Prisoners make it back of War,� was an alive; refusing to executive producer of “Home- accept his death, she still sees land.� He is now working on and hears him, and risks bethe second seasons of both. ing institutionalized. So what’s most interestThere is no equivalent to ing in watching “Prisoners Danes’ Carrie Mathison charof War� — now having its acter, the government opAmerican premiere online on erative who suspects that the Hulu — is how different the returning prisoner may have two series are, despite their been subverted by his captors. symbiotic relationship. The There is a skeptic, Haim (Gal question of which is better Zaid), an army psychologist comes up, of course, but it’s who “rehabilitates� Nimrode not that important. Or rather, and Uri by virtually reimpristhe shows have been shaped oning them while interrogatwith such varied intents that ing them about their captivity, the question doesn’t have a and who finds their behavior definitive answer. suspicious. The difference between But throughout the season the series can be summed up this part of the plot never by saying that “Prisoners of outweighs the family stories. War� is about soldiers, while (Two of the show’s 10 first“Homeland� is about Claire season episodes are online at Danes. The American show Hulu, with new episodes posthas focused on Danes’ high- ing on Saturdays.) wire performance as a trouIt’s clear from its spare look bled CIA officer, and has em- that “Prisoners of War� operphasized detection and sus- ated on a more slender propense over everyday events. duction budget than “HomeThe Israeli show has politi- land,� and it makes greater cal-thriller elements, but it’s use of conventional TV storeally an ensemble drama in rytelling methods, like fake which the cloak-and-dagger news reports and cheaply side is secondary to a natu- manipulative music. ralistic study of the effects of But its slower, quieter, more torture, absence and return contemplative approach feels on ordinary men and their more like a stylistic than fifamilies. nancial choice, and the relaThe contrast can be seen tionships among characters, immediately in the more com- especially family members, plicated setup of “Prisoners are often more finely drawn of War.� Two Israeli soldiers and more plausible than in come home, rather than one the American show.

L M T FOR THURSDAY, JULY 26

11 a.m., 1:25, 3:55, 6:50, 9:20 ICE AGE: CONTINENTAL DRIFT 3-D (PG) 11:40 a.m., 2:10, 4:45, 7:15, 9:50 KATY PERRY: PART OF ME 3-D (PG) 10:50 a.m. MADAGASCAR 3: EUROPE’S MOST WANTED (PG) 10:40 a.m., 1:05, 3:40 MAGIC MIKE (R) 12:50, 4:05, 7:25, 10:20 MARVEL’S THE AVENGERS (PG-13) 3:20, 9:45 MEN IN BLACK 3 (PG-13) 12:40, 7:10 PROMETHEUS (R) 10:45 a.m., 1:40, 4:40, 7:40, 10:40 SNOW WHITE AND THE HUNTSMAN (PG-13) 6:35, 9:40 TED (R) 11:15 a.m., 2, 4:55, 7:55, 10:30

BEND

By Mike Hale

Regal Pilot Butte 6

New York Times News Service

2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend, 541-382-6347

THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN (PG13) 1:15, 4:15, 7:45 THE BEST EXOTIC MARIGOLD HOTEL (PG-13) 12:45, 3:45, 6:45 THE DARK KNIGHT RISES (PG-13) 12:30, 4, 7:30 MOONRISE KINGDOM (PG-13) 1, 3:30, 6:30 SAVAGES (R) 1:30, 4:30, 7:15 TO ROME WITH LOVE (R) 1:45, 7 YOUR SISTER’S SISTER (R) 4:45

Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX

McMenamins Old St. Francis School

680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend, 541-382-6347

700 N.W. Bond St., Bend, 541-330-8562

THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN (PG13) 12:35, 3:35, 6:45, 9:55 THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN 3-D (PG-13) 1:10, 4:25, 7:45, 10:45 BRAVE (PG) 11:20 a.m., 1:55, 4:30, 7:05, 9:30 THE DARK KNIGHT RISES (PG-13) 10:30 a.m., 11:10 a.m., 11:30 a.m., 12:30, 1:30, 2:15, 3:15, 3:50, 4:15, 5, 6:15, 7, 7:30, 8, 9:15, 10, 10:35

ABRAHAM LINCOLN: VAMPIRE HUNTER (R) 9:15 ROCK OF AGES (PG-13) 6 After 7 p.m., shows are 21 and older only. Younger than 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.

Tin Pan Theater

THE DARK KNIGHT RISES IMAX (PG-13) 10:35 a.m., 2:20, 6:20, 10:10

• Open-captioned showtimes are bold. • There may be an additional fee for 3-D movies. • IMAX films are $15.50 for adults and $13 for children (ages 3 to 11) and seniors (ages 60 and older). • Movie times are subject to change after press time.

Redmond Cinemas 1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond, 541-548-8777

THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN (PG13) 3:15, 6:15, 9:15 THE DARK KNIGHT RISES (PG-13) 2:30, 6:05 , 9:30 ICE AGE: CONTINENTAL DRIFT (PG) 1:45, 4:15, 6:45, 9:15 TED (R) 1:45, 4, 6:15, 8:30

Madras, 541-475-3505

THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN (PG13) 3:40, 6:30

SISTERS

THE DARK KNIGHT RISES (DIGITAL — PG-13) 3:30, 7

Sisters Movie House 720 Desperado Court, Sisters, 541-549-8800

THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN (PG13) 7:30 THE BEST EXOTIC MARIGOLD HOTEL (PG-13) 4:45 THE DARK KNIGHT RISES (PG-13) 7

THE DARK KNIGHT RISES (PG-13) 5, 8:20 ICE AGE: CONTINENTAL DRIFT (PG) 3, 5:10, 7:20 SAVAGES (R) 4:10, 6:50

PRINEVILLE

ICE AGE: CONTINENTAL DRIFT (PG) 5, 7:15

Pine Theater 214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

PEOPLE LIKE US (PG-13) 5:15 TED (R) 7:45

THE DARK KNIGHT RISES (PG-13) 3:40, 7

Madras Cinema 5

As of press times, the complete

EDITOR’S NOTES:

REDMOND

MADRAS

869 N.W. Tin Pan Alley, Bend, 541-241-2271

ICE AGE: CONTINENTAL DRIFT (PG)

movie times were unavailable. Contact the theater for more information.

1101 S.W. U.S. Highway 97,

ICE AGE: CONTINENTAL DRIFT (UPSTAIRS — PG) 3:30, 6 Pine Theater’s upstairs screening room has limited accessibility.

Where Buyers And Sellers Meet

DESCHUTES COUNTY

FAIR & RODEO

1000’s Of Ads Every Day

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70 Years of Hearing Excellence

ONLY 6 DAYS 1 JULY 29-AUGUST UNTIL THE FAIR! Redmond, Oregon

Call 541-389-9690

L TV L   THURSDAY PRIME TIME 7/26/12

*In HD, these channels run three hours ahead. / Sports programming may vary. BD-Bend/Redmond/Sisters/Black Butte (Digital); PM-Prineville/Madras; SR-Sunriver; L-La Pine

ALSO IN HD; ADD 600 TO CHANNEL No.

BROADCAST/CABLE CHANNELS

BD PM SR L ^ KATU KTVZ % % % % KBNZ & KOHD ) ) ) ) KFXO * ` ` ` KOAB _ # _ # ( KGW KTVZDT2 , _ # / OPBPL 175 173

5:00 KATU News News News KEZI 9 News The Simpsons Electric Comp. NewsChannel 8 Meet, Browns Healthful Indn

5:30 World News Nightly News Evening News World News The Simpsons Fetch! With Ruff Nightly News Meet, Browns Clodagh Irish

6:00

6:30

KATU News at 6 (N) ’ Å NewsChannel 21 at 6 (N) Å Access H. Old Christine KEZI 9 News KEZI 9 News Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Travelscope Business Rpt. NewsChannel 8 News King of Queens King of Queens Time Goes By Ladies-Letters

7:00

7:30

Jeopardy! ‘G’ Wheel Fortune Jeopardy! ‘G’ Wheel Fortune How I Met 30 Rock ’ ‘14’ Entertainment The Insider ‘PG’ Big Bang Big Bang PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Ă… Live at 7 (N) Inside Edition Seinfeld ‘PG’ Seinfeld ‘PG’ Manifest Destiny ’ ‘G’ Ă…

8:00

8:30

9:00

9:30

Wipeout Single men and women tackle obstacles. (N) ’ ‘PG’ Ă… The Office ‘14’ Parks/Recreat Saving Hope Heartsick (N) ’ ‘14’ Big Bang Two/Half Men Big Brother (N) ’ Ă… Wipeout Single men and women tackle obstacles. (N) ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Take Me Out Episode 8 (N) ‘14’ Glee Choke ’ ‘14’ Ă… Oregon Art Beat Outdoor Idaho Doc Martin Social club. ’ ‘PG’ The Office ‘14’ Parks/Recreat Saving Hope Heartsick (N) ’ ‘14’ The Vampire Diaries ‘14’ Ă… The L.A. Complex ’ ‘14’ Manifest Destiny ’ ‘G’ Ă… World News Tavis Smiley ’

10:00

10:30

Rookie Blue (N) ‘14’ Ă… Rock Center With Brian Williams 3 My Guy Is Out There (N) Rookie Blue (N) ‘14’ Ă… News TMZ (N) ’ ‘PG’ Casebook of Sherlock Holmes Rock Center With Brian Williams Cops ‘PG’ Ă… ’Til Death ‘PG’ Charlie Rose (N) ’ ‘PG’ Ă…

11:00

11:30

KATU News (11:35) Nightline News Jay Leno News Letterman KEZI 9 News (11:35) Nightline Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ William and Kate-Wedding NewsChannel 8 Jay Leno ’Til Death ‘PG’ That ’70s Show PBS NewsHour ’ Ă…

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The First 48 ‘14’ Ă… The First 48 ‘PG’ Ă… The First 48 ‘14’ Ă… The First 48 (N) ‘PG’ Ă… Cajun Justice Cajun Justice Cajun Justice Cajun Justice *A&E 130 28 18 32 The First 48 Twist of Fate ‘14’ CSI: Miami Just One Kiss Murder on a CSI: Miami A priest is shot to death in CSI: Miami Broken A girl is murdered ››› “Open Rangeâ€? (2003, Western) Robert Duvall, Kevin Costner, Annette Bening. Cattle herdsmen battle a ruthless ››› “Open Rangeâ€? (2003) Robert *AMC 102 40 39 beach. ’ ‘14’ Ă… his church. ’ ‘14’ Ă… at a restaurant. ‘14’ Ă… rancher in 1882. Ă… Duvall, Kevin Costner. Ă… Dirty Jobs Cricket Farmer ’ ‘PG’ Swamp Wars ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Man-Eating Super Snake ’ ‘14’ Man-Eating Super Croc ‘14’ Ă… Gator Boys Stormin’ Gators ‘PG’ Man-Eating Super Snake ’ ‘14’ *ANPL 68 50 26 38 Infested! Driven Insane ’ ‘PG’ Kathy Griffin:... on Crutches ‘14’ Housewives/OC Housewives/OC Housewives/NJ Kathy Griffin Comedy Special Kathy Griffin: Seaman 1st Class What Happens Kathy Griffin BRAVO 137 44 The Dukes of Hazzard ‘PG’ Ă… The Dukes of Hazzard ‘PG’ Ă… My Big Redneck Vacation ‘PG’ My Big Redneck Vacation ‘PG’ Redneck Island ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Redneck Island ’ ‘PG’ Ă… CMT 190 32 42 53 The Dukes of Hazzard ‘PG’ Ă… Crime Inc. Deadly Prescriptions American Greed Mad Money Crime Inc. Deadly Prescriptions American Greed Paid Program Hair Restoration CNBC 51 36 40 52 Steve Jobs: Billion Dollar Hippie Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 Ă… Erin Burnett OutFront Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 Ă… Erin Burnett OutFront CNN 52 38 35 48 Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Ă… South Park ‘14’ (5:55) 30 Rock (6:26) 30 Rock Colbert Report Daily Show Chappelle Show South Park ‘MA’ South Park ‘MA’ (9:29) The Comedy Central Roast Bob Saget ‘MA’ Daily Show Colbert Report COM 135 53 135 47 Always Sunny Dept./Trans. City Edition Talk of the Town Local issues. Cooking Oregon Joy of Fishing Journal Get Outdoors Visions of NW The Yoga Show The Yoga Show Talk of the Town Local issues. COTV 11 Capitol Hill Hearings CSPAN 58 20 12 11 Capitol Hill Hearings Wizards-Place Phineas, Ferb Good-Charlie Gravity Falls ’ My Babysitter Code 9 (N) ‘G’ Jessie (N) ‘G’ Phineas, Ferb Gravity Falls ‘Y’ Austin & Ally ’ Good-Charlie Phineas, Ferb Gravity Falls ’ *DIS 87 43 14 39 Jessie ‘G’ Ă… Auction Kings Auction Kings Auction Kings Auction Kings Auction Kings Property Wars Property Wars Property Wars Property Wars Property Wars Property Wars Property Wars Property Wars *DISC 156 21 16 37 Auction Kings Keeping Up With the Kardashians Keeping Up With the Kardashians E! News (N) The Soup ‘14’ Mrs. Eastwood ›› “Shallow Halâ€? (2001) Gwyneth Paltrow, Jack Black. Chelsea Lately E! News *E! 136 25 Audibles (N) SportsCenter Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… ESPN 21 23 22 23 SportsCenter Special (N) (Live) 2012 ESPYs Ă… MMA Live (N) Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) Ă… NFL Live (N) Ă… SportsCenter Special (N) ESPN2 22 24 21 24 Top 25 College Football Plays Friday Night Lights ‘PG’ Ă… Friday Night Lights ‘PG’ Ă… Car Auctions Car Auctions NASCAR Racing 1995 Brickyard 400 From Indianapolis. Ă… NASCAR Racing ESPNC 23 25 123 25 White Shadow Mr. Hero Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. ESPNN 24 63 124 203 SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… ›› “Step Up 2 the Streetsâ€? (2008) Briana Evigan, Robert Hoffman. ››› “Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenixâ€? (2007, Fantasy) Daniel Radcliffe, Rupert Grint. The 700 Club ‘G’ Ă… FAM 67 29 19 41 (3:30) ›› “Step Upâ€? (2006) Hannity (N) On Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Ă… Hannity On Record, Greta Van Susteren The Five FNC 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Ă… Paula’s Cooking Chopped Dream’n of Redeem’n! Chopped Chopped ‘G’ Chopped Orzo It Seemed Chef Wanted With Anne Burrell 3 Days to Open With Bobby Flay *FOOD 177 62 98 44 Best Dishes “There’s Something About Maryâ€? How I Met How I Met Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Anger Anger Wilfred (N) ‘MA’ Louie (N) ‘MA’ BrandX With Louie ‘MA’ FX 131 Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l House Hunters Property Brothers ‘G’ Ă… Born Sellers Selling London House Hunters Hunters Int’l House Hunters Hunters Int’l HGTV 176 49 33 43 Hunters Int’l Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Great Lake Warriors (N) ‘14’ (11:01) Ice Road Truckers ‘PG’ *HIST 155 42 41 36 Great Lake Warriors ‘14’ Ă… Trading Spouses: Mommy Trading Spouses: Mommy Project Runway ‘PG’ Ă… Project Runway The unconventional challenge. ‘PG’ Project Runway The unconventional challenge. ‘PG’ LIFE 138 39 20 31 Wife Swap Hodge/Kolpin ’ ‘PG’ The Rachel Maddow Show (N) The Last Word The Ed Show The Rachel Maddow Show The Last Word Hardball With Chris Matthews MSNBC 56 59 128 51 The Ed Show (N) (7:53) Awkward. (8:24) Awkward. Snooki Snooki Snooki Awkward. ‘14’ Snooki Awkward. ‘14’ MTV 192 22 38 57 That ’70s Show That ’70s Show That ’70s Show (6:39) True Life Living with Tourette’s syndrome. ’ SpongeBob Victorious ‘G’ Victorious ‘G’ Figure It Out ‘G’ Splatalot (N) ‘G’ Victorious ‘G’ Victorious ‘G’ Hollywood Heights (N) ‘PG’ Ă… George Lopez George Lopez Friends ’ ‘PG’ Friends ’ ‘PG’ NICK 82 46 24 40 SpongeBob Disappeared ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Disappeared Lost Highway ‘PG’ 48 Hours: Hard Evidence ’ ‘14’ 48 Hours: Hard Evidence ’ ‘14’ 48 Hours: Hard Evidence ’ ‘14’ 48 Hours: Hard Evidence ’ ‘14’ OWN 161 103 31 103 Disappeared No Exit ‘PG’ Ă… Mariners Mariners Pre. MLB Baseball Kansas City Royals at Seattle Mariners From Safeco Field in Seattle. (N) (Live) Mariners Post. The Dan Patrick Show MLB Baseball ROOT 20 45 28* 26 (4:30) UFC: In the Moment ‘14’ Jail ‘14’ Ă… Jail ‘14’ Ă… Jail ‘14’ Ă… Worst Tenants Worst Tenants iMPACT Wrestling (N) ’ Ă… UFC Unleashed ’ MMA Uncensrd Ways to Die SPIKE 132 31 34 46 Jail ‘14’ Ă… “Wrong Turn 4: Bloody Beginningsâ€? (2011, Horror) Sean Skene. Ă… ›››› “The Silence of the Lambsâ€? (1991) Jodie Foster, Anthony Hopkins. Ă… ›› Saw III SYFY 133 35 133 45 ›› “Wrong Turn 3: Left for Deadâ€? (2009) Janet Montgomery. Ă… Behind Scenes Joel Osteen Joseph Prince Hillsong TV Praise the Lord (Live). Live-Holy Land The Evidence Bible Prophecy Creflo Dollar Praise the Lord TBN Classics TBN 205 60 130 Seinfeld ‘PG’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Big Bang Big Bang Sullivan & Son Big Bang Conan (N) ‘14’ *TBS 16 27 11 28 Friends ’ ‘PG’ Friends ’ ‘PG’ King of Queens King of Queens Seinfeld ‘PG’ Private Screenings: Ernest Borg- ›››› “Martyâ€? (1955, Drama) Ernest Borgnine, Betsy (7:45) ››› “From Here to Eternityâ€? (1953, Drama) Burt Lancaster, Montgomery Clift, Deborah ›››› “The Wild Bunchâ€? (1969, Western) William Holden. Aging outlaws TCM 101 44 101 29 nine Ă… Blair, Joe Mantell. Ă… Kerr. Lives intertwine at a Pearl Harbor base before the attack. Ă… become involved with Mexican revolutionaries. Ă… Four Houses ...and a Ferry ‘PG’ Four Weddings ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Four Weddings (N) ’ Ă… Four Weddings (N) ’ Ă… Four Weddings ’ Ă… *TLC 178 34 32 34 Say Yes: Bride Say Yes: Bride Toddlers & Tiaras ’ ‘PG’ Ă… The Mentalist ’ ‘14’ Ă… The Mentalist Red Rum ’ ‘14’ The Mentalist Paint It Red ’ ‘14’ The Mentalist ’ ‘14’ Ă… The Mentalist Scarlett Fever ‘14’ CSI: NY Manhattanhenge ’ ‘14’ *TNT 17 26 15 27 The Mentalist ’ ‘14’ Ă… Johnny Test ’ Regular Show Regular Show Total Drama Adventure Time Adventure Time Annoying Regular Show King of the Hill King of the Hill American Dad American Dad Family Guy ‘PG’ Family Guy ‘PG’ *TOON 84 Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Best Sandwich Best Sandwich Trip Flip ‘PG’ Trip Flip ‘PG’ Waterparks Waterparks Top Spot ‘PG’ Top Spot ‘PG’ *TRAV 179 51 45 42 Bourdain: No Reservations M*A*S*H ‘PG’ (6:32) M*A*S*H (7:05) M*A*S*H (7:43) Home Improvement ’ ‘G’ Home Improve. Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond King of Queens TVLND 65 47 29 35 Gunsmoke Eleven Dollars ‘G’ NCIS Guilty Pleasure ‘14’ Ă… NCIS Moonlighting ’ ‘14’ Ă… NCIS Tell-All ‘PG’ Ă… (DVS) Burn Notice Shock Wave (N) ‘PG’ (10:01) Suits All In (N) ‘PG’ (11:02) Political Animals ‘PG’ USA 15 30 23 30 NCIS Under Covers ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Hollywood Exes ’ ‘14’ 40 Greatest Feuds ’ ‘14’ ›› “Malibu’s Most Wantedâ€? (2003) Jamie Kennedy, Taye Diggs. ’ ›› “Soul Planeâ€? (2004) ’ VH1 191 48 37 54 Single Ladies ’ ‘14’ PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(5:55) ›› “Phenomenonâ€? 1996, Drama John Travolta. ’ ‘PG’ Ă… ››› “For Your Eyes Onlyâ€? 1981 Roger Moore. ’ ‘PG’ Ă… (10:10) ››› “Supermanâ€? 1978 Christopher Reeve. ’ ‘PG’ Ă… ENCR 106 401 306 401 (4:10) ››› “Bigâ€? 1988 ’ ‘PG’ FXM Presents ›› “Daredevilâ€? 2003 Ben Affleck. A blind attorney fights crime at night. ‘R’ Ă… FXM Presents › “Simon Sezâ€? 1999 ‘PG-13’ FMC 104 204 104 120 ›› “Daredevilâ€? 2003 Ben Affleck. A blind attorney fights crime at night. ‘R’ Ă… UFC Tonight UFC Insider Best of PRIDE Fighting UFC Unleashed (N) UFC Unleashed The Ultimate Fighter Brazil UFC Tonight Best of PRIDE Fighting Strangers FUEL 34 Golf Central (N) 19th Hole (N) LPGA Tour Golf Evian Masters, First Round From France. School of Golf GOLF 28 301 27 301 LPGA Tour Golf PGA Tour Golf RBC Canadian Open, First Round ›› “Little House on the Prairieâ€? (1974) Michael Landon. ‘G’ Ă… Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ HALL 66 33 175 33 The Waltons The Hiding Place ‘G’ (4:00) ››› “Vitoâ€? (5:45) ›› “Hereafterâ€? 2010, Drama Matt Damon, CĂŠcile de France, Jay Mohr. Death touches The Newsroom Amen The team True Blood Sookie considers life as a › “Your Highnessâ€? 2011, Comedy Danny McBride, James The Bourne HBO 425 501 425 501 2011 ’ three people in different ways. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… Franco, Natalie Portman. ’ ‘R’ Ă… Legacy learns about a protest. ‘MA’ Ă… human. ’ ‘MA’ Ă… ››› “Open Waterâ€? 2003 Blanchard Ryan. ‘R’ (6:45) “Open Water 2: Adriftâ€? 2006, Suspense Susan May Pratt. ‘R’ (8:45) ››› “Open Waterâ€? 2003, Suspense Blanchard Ryan. ‘R’ “Open Water 2: Adriftâ€? 2006 Susan May Pratt. ‘R’ IFC 105 105 (4:30) ›› “Water for Elephantsâ€? 2011, Drama Reese “The Cutting Edge: Going for the Goldâ€? 2006, Drama (8:15) ››› “The Rundownâ€? 2003, Adventure The Rock. A bounty hunter must ›› “Road Houseâ€? 1989, Action Patrick Swayze, Kelly Lynch. A legendary MAX 400 508 508 Witherspoon. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… Christy Carlson Romano. ’ ‘NR’ Ă… find his boss’ son in the Amazon. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… bouncer agrees to tame a notorious gin mill. ’ ‘R’ Ă… American Colony: Hutterites American Colony: Hutterites American Gypsies ‘PG’ American Gypsies ‘PG’ American Colony: Hutterites American Colony: Hutterites American Colony: Hutterites NGC 157 157 Odd Parents Odd Parents Planet Sheen Planet Sheen Dragonball GT Monsuno ‘Y7’ SpongeBob SpongeBob Fanboy-Chum Fanboy-Chum Planet Sheen T.U.F.F. Puppy NTOON 89 115 189 115 Dragonball GT Monsuno ‘Y7’ In Pursuit With Realtree RealTree’s Bow Madness Ult. Adventures The Season Wild Outdoors Bushman Show Hunt Masters Wild Outdoors Steve’s Outdoor Sasquatch Fear No Evil OUTD 37 307 43 307 Hunt › “The Heart Specialistâ€? 2006, Romance-Comedy Wood (6:45) ››› “Carol Channing: Larger Than Lifeâ€? 2011, (8:15) ››› “Lost in Translationâ€? 2003, Comedy-Drama Bill Murray. A middle- The Real L Word (N) ‘MA’ Polyamory: Mar- The Real L Word SHO 500 500 Harris, Zoe Saldana. ’ ‘R’ Ă… Documentary ’ ‘PG’ Ă… aged actor falls for a young woman in Tokyo. ‘R’ ried & Dating ‘MA’ Wrecked ‘14’ Wrecked ‘14’ Hard Parts Hard Parts Car Warriors Race Cars ‘14’ Wrecked ‘14’ Wrecked ‘14’ Hard Parts Hard Parts Unique Whips ‘14’ SPEED 35 303 125 303 Car Warriors Race Cars ‘14’ Starz Studios (5:50) ››› “Easy Aâ€? 2010 Emma Stone. ‘PG-13’ ›› “When a Stranger Callsâ€? 2006 Camilla Belle. ›› “The Sorcerer’s Apprenticeâ€? 2010 Nicolas Cage. ’ ‘PG’ Ă… (10:55) ›› “Tron: Legacyâ€? 2010 STARZ 300 408 300 408 Tron: Legacy (4:00) ››› “Lars and the Real Girlâ€? (5:50) › “Coldbloodedâ€? 1995 Jason Priestley. A crime lord “Satinâ€? 2010 Melissa Joan Hart. A lounge singer meets a “Hard Ride to Hellâ€? 2010, Horror Miguel Ferrer, Laura (10:35) ››› “Screamâ€? 1996, Horror Neve Campbell, TMC 525 525 2007 Ryan Gosling. ‘PG-13’ promotes his bookie to assassin status. jazz legend who inspires him. ’ ‘NR’ Ă… Mennell, Katharine Isabelle. ’ ‘NR’ Ă… David Arquette, Courteney Cox. ’ ‘R’ NBCSN 27 58 30 209 (3:00) XXX Summer Olympics Men’s Soccer Qualifying round: Honduras vs. Morocco, Mexico vs. Republic of Korea, United Arab Emirates vs. Uruguay, Great Britain vs. Senegal, Belarus vs. New Zealand. L.A. Hair L.A. Hair Confidential (N) L.A. Hair L.A. Hair Confidential L.A. Hair The Big Blow Out L.A. Hair L.A. Hair Confidential Ghost Whisperer Deja Boo ‘PG’ Girl Meets Gown ‘PG’ *WE 143 41 174 118 L.A. Hair The Big Blow Out


THURSDAY, JULY 26, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

A  & A  

Traveling with a stranger is a risky way to cut costs Dear Abby: I am planning a trip to Thailand next year and would like to find a traveling partner. I don’t care whether the person is male or female. My plan is to visit the country and rent a cabin for a month. My interest is solely to share expenses and have a platonic relationship with my travelmate because going alone is very expensive. Thanks for whatever input you can give me. — Traveler from Kansas City Dear Traveler: You’re welcome. My “input� is to urge you to rethink this. I do NOT recommend that you go to a foreign country and rent a cabin in the middle of nowhere with someone you don’t know because it could be dangerous. What if there is a medical emergency or your companion has misrepresented himor herself? Traveling, even with someone you DO know, can present problems unless you have a high degree of compatibility and similar habits. Low-budget tours are available, and I urge you to research them. Dear Abby: A few weeks ago my husband and I were having an argument. He stormed out of the house and was killed in a wreck while talking to his brother on his cellphone. His family blames me for arguing with him. While I feel sad that the last thing we did was argue, I feel his brother should shoulder some of the blame because he was on the cellphone with him, which is illegal in our state. Luckily, no one else was hurt in the crash, but I am very hurt that “John’s� family is so angry at me. Please remind folks not to drive while on a cellphone. — Idaho Widow Dear Widow: Please accept my sympathy for the tragic loss of your husband. It is important you understand that your former in-laws are angry at the fact that he is dead, and are looking for someone

DEAR A B B Y other than him to blame for their pain. If your brotherin-law knew John was on his cellphone while driving, then I’m sure he carries some guilt about it. But the fault lies with your husband, rest his angry soul. P.S. If your letter serves as a reminder to readers not to use a cellphone — or text — while driving, his death will not have been in vain. Dear Abby: I am dating a recently divorced man who was married to a very controlling woman for 31 years. I love him very much and see myself with him in the future. However, at the age of 53, he is interested in pursuing a singing career. I dated a musician for 16 years and I do not want a relationship with another one. I’m pretending to be supportive because I don’t want to be another woman telling him what to do or stifling his dreams. Inside I am dreading it. I become physically ill when I think of losing another man to music. On the other hand, I can’t imagine my life without him. Should I continue to pretend to support him and hope he fails, or let him know that I don’t want to be with a musician? — Out of Tune in Dayton, Ohio Dear Out of Tune: It is in neither of your best interests for you to continue lying to him because the truth will come to light eventually. He is not the person you dated for 16 years, so let him pursue his dream. The odds of a 53-year-old man becoming an overnight national sensation are long, but after 31 years of misery with his ex, if he can enjoy some success on the local level, please don’t begrudge him. — Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

Horoscope: Happy Birthday for Thursday, July 26, 2012 By Jacqueline Bigar This year you become focused on home, family and your immediate circle. Others might try to distract you, yet they get nowhere. At times you might seem closed down, as you are so deep in thought. Ask questions to verify what you are hearing if something seems out of kilter. If you are single, you might attract someone who has difficulty with your level of depth. Be willing to move on. If you are attached, spend more time with your significant other. Take on a project together, and you will become closer. SCORPIO can be possessive, and there is very little you can do to change this pattern. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH Deal with others individually. There is an element of confusion that marks your plans and interactions. Let go of the status quo, and be ready to adapt to different needs and ideas. Confirm statements. Tonight: Togetherness works. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHH You take quite a stand, and others immediately become challenging. See and understand how you provoke these responses. You might want to adapt some, at least in how you present your case. News comes in that forces you to take a different look at a situation. Tonight: Sort through answers. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHH Dive into your work and complete as many errands as possible. Deal with a partner on a one-on-one level. This person is changing. Your response seems more than adequate, and it reflects your understanding. Watch a tendency to overdo things. Tonight: Do for you. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHHH Tap into your innate creativity. You are a source of everchanging ideas and solutions. News comes indirectly that you might have had a premonition about. Stay tuned — there is more information coming. Tonight: Fun and games. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH You are energized and in touch with your needs. You might want to clarify a request from a partner, close friend or loved one. You know there is something you aren’t quite

getting. Rearrange your schedule if need be. Tonight: Head home. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH Observe what is happening with a key person. Clarify a situation, rather than allowing confusion to drift deeper into plans and ideas. It is very important to honor the natural transformation that a relationship goes through. Tonight: Out and about. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH Investigate and root out what might be going on with a daily matter or routine. Misunderstandings weave their way through this issue. You, as well as others, could use some explanation. As a result, you’ll revise your thinking. Tonight: Do some shopping. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHHH You must deal with an important project or decide to share some time with a special person in your life. You might not be aware of the implications of your actions. Know that others respect and like the way you handle yourself. Tonight: Consider starting your weekend early. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHH Take your time getting going. If you feel you need time off, take it now, as your dream life is active and you could be quite tired. Financial matters are subject to change, for better or for worse. Look at risks cynically, even though it’s not your normal attitude. Tonight: Take a break designed just for you. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHHH You might not realize what an unstoppable force you are. Others often look on with awe as you continue like the Energizer Bunny. Sometimes, as hard as you might try, simplifying a situation is very difficult. Tonight: Make plans with friends. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHH Others observe your actions. You might get jittery with this knowledge. Understand that you are unique in your own right; that is what draws others to you. Adjust your mental attitude, and decide to be flattered. Tonight: In the limelight. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH Reach out for more information. You might be more perplexed than you realize and could be thinking on a different level from many other people. This could explain why what you are hearing makes no sense. Tonight: Let your imagination plan your weekend. Š 2011 by King Features Syndicate

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C C  Please email event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� at www.bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

TODAY OREGON HIGH DESERT CLASSICS II: A class AA hunterjumper equestrian competition; proceeds benefit J Bar J Youth Services; free admission; 8 a.m.-5 p.m.; J Bar J Boys Ranch, 62895 Hamby Road, Bend; 541610-5826, agow@jbarj.org or www.jbarj.org/ohdc. JEFFERSON COUNTY FAIR & RODEO: The annual event features exhibits, a talent show, a dance and a rodeo; free admission, $6 in advance or $7 at the door for rodeo; 10 a.m.10 p.m.; Jefferson County Fair Complex, 430 S.W. Fairgrounds Road, Madras; 541-325-5050. TREEHOUSE PUPPETS IN THE PARK: With a performance of “Blow the Whistle!�; followed by a coordinated activity; free; 11 a.m.-noon; Quail Park, 2755 N.W. Regency St., Bend; 541389-7275 or www.bendparks andrec.org. DOG AGILITY SHOW: Dogstar Sports presents dogs performing agility tricks; free; 3-4 p.m.; Summit Assisted Living Center, 127 S.E. Wilson Ave., Bend; 541-317-3544 or activities@thesummital.com. INDIGENOUS SOLIDARITY SPEAKING TOUR: Learn about a proposed pipeline that is being blockaded by clans from the Wetsu’wet’en First Nation; donations of food accepted; free; 4 p.m.; Tin Pan Theater, 869 N.W. Tin Pan Alley, Bend; 541241-2271. MUNCH & MUSIC: Event includes a performance by rock ’n’ roll act Igor & the Red Elvises, food and arts and crafts booths, children’s area and more; dogs prohibited; free; 5:30-9 p.m.; Drake Park, 777 N.W. Riverside Blvd., Bend; www.munchand music.com. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: William Sullivan talks about his book “100 Hikes in the Central Oregon Cascades�; with a slide show; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 252 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-0866. BENEFIT CONCERT: The Quons perform; proceeds benefit Relay for Life; $10 suggested donation; 7-10 p.m.; Bend d’Vine, 916 N.W. Wall St.; 541-323-3277. RICHARD GREEN: The singersongwriter performs; free; 7 p.m.; Niblick and Greene’s, 7535 Falcon Crest Drive #100, Redmond; 541-548-4220. OTTMAR LIEBERT: The rock, jazz and flamenco guitarist performs; $29 or $39, plus fees; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-3170700 or www.towertheatre.org. “BOBBY GOULD IN HELL�: Volcanic Theatre Pub presents the play about a misogynistic narcissist interrogated by the devil; donations accepted; 8 p.m.; Century Center, 70 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-215-0516, derek@ volcanictheatrepub.com or www.actorsrealm.com. SLAUGHTER DAUGHTERS: The Kansas-based Americana band performs, with Wild Eye Revolvers and Avery James & The Hillandales; $5; 8 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; 541-7280879 or www.reverbnation .com/venue/thehornedhand. TWISTED WHISTLE: The Portland-based Americana band performs; free; 9 p.m.; The Summit Saloon & Stage, 125 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541749-2440. SPL: The Portland-based bass musician performs, with VTRN, DJ Ph3r and DJ bPollen; $5; 10 p.m.; Astro Lounge, 939 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-388-0116. IGOR & RED ELVISES: The campy Russian rock ’n’ roll group performs; $10; 10:30 p.m., doors open 9 p.m.; Players Bar & Grill, 25 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-389-2558 or www.randompresents.com.

FRIDAY OREGON HIGH DESERT CLASSICS II: A class AA hunterjumper equestrian competition; proceeds benefit J Bar J Youth Services; free admission; 8 a.m.-9 p.m.; J Bar J Boys Ranch, 62895 Hamby Road, Bend; 541610-5826, agow@jbarj.org or www.jbarj.org/ohdc. RUMMAGE SALE FUNDRAISER: Proceeds benefit the St. Thomas Altar Society; free admission; 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; St. Thomas Parish Center Gym, 1755 N.W. Maple Ave., Redmond; 541-923-3390. JEFFERSON COUNTY FAIR & RODEO: The annual event features exhibits, a talent show, dance and a rodeo; free admission, $6 in advance or $7 at the door for rodeo; 10 a.m.10 p.m.; Jefferson County Fair Complex, 430 S.W. Fairgrounds Road, Madras; 541-325-5050. TOUR OF HOMES: Featuring self-guided tours of homes throughout Central Oregon; free; noon-6 p.m.541-389-1058 or

Courtesy Mike Lane

Rock, jazz and flamenco guitarist Ottmar Liebert takes the stage at 7:30 tonight at the Tower Theatre in Bend. Tickets cost $29 or $39, plus fees. www.coba.org. BEND FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 2-6 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541408-4998, bendfarmersmarket@ gmail.com or http://bendfarmers market.com. SISTERS FARMERS MARKET: 3-6 p.m.; Barclay Park, West Cascade Avenue and Ash Street; www .sistersfarmersmarket.com. SUNRIVER FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 4-7 p.m.; Village at Sunriver, 57100 Beaver Drive; www .sunriverchamber.com. RICHARD GREEN: The singersongwriter performs; free; 7 p.m.; Niblick and Greene’s, 7535 Falcon Crest Drive #100, Redmond; 541548-4220. SHOW US YOUR SPOKES: Featuring a performance by the Moon Mountain Ramblers and Twisted Whistle; proceeds benefit Commute Options; $5; 7 p.m.; Parrilla Grill, 635 N.W. 14th St., Bend; 541-617-9600. IMPROV SHOW: Featuring a performance by Bend Improv Group; $8 in advance, $10 at the door; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541728-1237, mightyjustice@gmail .com or http://goo.gl/iDwKp. CLOVERDAYLE: The Portlandbased country musicians perform; $7; 9 p.m.-midnight; Maverick’s Country Bar and Grill, 20565 Brinson Blvd., Bend; 541-325-1886. THE MELODRAMATICS: The California-based reggae band performs, with Necktie Killer; $5; 9 p.m.; Liquid Lounge, 70 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend.

SATURDAY WINGS AND WHEELS: Event includes a display of antique cars and aircraft, aerial demonstrations, plane rides, a pancake breakfast and more; proceeds benefit New Generations; free admission, breakfast is $6, $4 ages 6-10, free ages 5 and younger; 7:30-11:30 a.m.; Sunriver Airport, 57200 River Road; 541-410-4113 or emartin@ sunriver-resort.com. OREGON HIGH DESERT CLASSICS II: A class AA hunter-jumper equestrian competition; proceeds benefit J Bar J Youth Services; free admission; 8 a.m.-9 p.m.; J Bar J Boys Ranch, 62895 Hamby Road, Bend; 541-610-5826, agow@jbarj .org or www.jbarj.org/ohdc. PRINEVILLE FARMERS MARKET: Free; 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Prineville City Plaza, 387 N.E. Third St.; 503-739-0643 or prinevillefarmersmarket@gmail .com. MADRAS SATURDAY MARKET: Free admission; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Sahalee Park, B and Seventh streets; 541-489-3239 or madrassatmkt@ gmail.com. RUMMAGE SALE FUNDRAISER: Proceeds benefit the St. Thomas Altar Society; free admission; 9 a.m.-noon; St. Thomas Parish Center Gym, 1755 N.W. Maple Ave., Redmond; 541-923-3390. VOLLEYBALL FOR BABIES: Volleyball competition; proceeds benefit March of Dimes and Bend Beach Volleyball courts; $20; 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; sand volleyball courts, across from Les Schwab Amphitheater, Bend; 541-419-3004 or marbell1@yahoo.com. URBAN SCRAMBLE: Race to the Old Mill District using a map and completing stunts, answering trivia and collecting items; a portion of proceeds benefits Healthy Beginnings; $20, $12 ages 14 and younger; 9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m., registration 8:30 a.m.; Troy Field, Bond Street and Louisiana Avenue, Bend; www.urbanscramble.even brite.com. CENTRAL OREGON SATURDAY MARKET: Featuring arts and crafts from local artisans; free admission; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; parking lot across from Bend Public Library, 600 N.W. Wall St.; 541-420-9015 or www .centraloregonsaturdaymarket.com. DOCUMENT SHREDDING AND DRUG DISPOSAL: The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office and

SecureShred partner to safely destroy personal documents and provide identity-theft prevention tips; outdated or unwanted prescription medications will be accepted for disposal; donations of nonperishable food accepted; 10 a.m.-1 p.m.; Sisters Sheriff’s Office, 703 N. Larch St.; 541-383-4431. JEFFERSON COUNTY FAIR & RODEO: The annual event features exhibits, a talent show, a dance and a rodeo; free admission, $6 in advance or $7 at the door for rodeo; 10 a.m.-10 p.m.; Jefferson County Fair Complex, 430 S.W. Fairgrounds Road, Madras; 541-325-5050. NORTHWEST CROSSING FARMERS MARKET: Free; 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; NorthWest Crossing, Mt. Washington and Northwest Crossing drives, Bend; 541-3821662, valerie@brooksresources. com or www.nwxfarmersmarket .com. SISTERS ARTS & CRAFTS FESTIVAL: Featuring arts, crafts, food, entertainment, a classic car cruise and a silent auction benefiting the Make-A-Wish Foundation of Oregon; free; 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Creekside Park, U.S. Highway 20 and Jefferson Avenue; 541-4200279 or centraloregonshows@ gmail.com. TOUR OF HOMES: Featuring selfguided tours of homes throughout Central Oregon; free; 10 a.m.-6 p.m.541-389-1058 or www.coba.org. SOLAR VIEWING: View the sun using safe techniques; included in the price of admission; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 11 a.m.-2 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Jane Kirkpatrick reads from her book “Where Lilacs Still Bloom�; included in the price of admission; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 2 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. BROOKSWOOD PLAZA FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 3-7 p.m.; Brookswood Meadow Plaza, 19530 Amber Meadow Drive, Bend; 541-323-3370 or farmersmarket@ brookswoodmeadowplaza.com. SUMMER CARNIVAL: With a bounce house, duck ring toss, jump rope and watermelon eating contests and more; free; 3-7 p.m.; C.E. Lovejoy’s Brookswood Market, 19530 Amber Meadow Drive, Bend; 541-388-1188 or diana@celovejoys .com. BEER FOR BOOBIES: Event features live music, a silent auction and a men’s best-chest competition; proceeds benefit Sara’s Project; free admission; 5-10 p.m.; Cross Creek Cafe, 507 SW 8th St., Redmond; 541-548-2883. POTTERY GAMES: Local potters compete for the best and biggest bowl, best bowl thrown blindfolded, no-hands throwing and tandem throwing; event is a precursor to NeighborImpact’s Empty Bowls fundraiser; free; 5-9 p.m.; Cindercone Clay Center, 50 S.E. Scott St., Bend; 541-280-0284 or www.neighborimpact.org. OREGON HIGH DESERT CLASSICS GRAND PRIX: A class AA hunterjumper equestrian competition; proceeds benefit J Bar J Youth Services; free admission; 5:30 p.m.; J Bar J Boys Ranch, 62895 Hamby Road, Bend; 541-610-5826, agow@ jbarj.org or www.jbarj.org/ohdc. “CARNIVAL OF THE ANIMALS�: The Central Oregon School of Ballet presents its summer ballet performance; $15, free ages 4 and younger; 7 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-389-9306. RICHARD GREEN: The singersongwriter performs; free; 7 p.m.; Niblick and Greene’s, 7535 Falcon Crest Drive #100, Redmond; 541548-4220. “BOBBY GOULD IN HELL�: Volcanic Theatre Pub presents the play about a misogynistic narcissist interrogated by the devil; $5; 9 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; 541-215-0516, derek@volcanictheatrepub.com or www.actorsrealm.com.

SUNDAY OREGON HIGH DESERT CLASSICS II: A class AA hunter-jumper equestrian competition; proceeds benefit J Bar J Youth Services; free admission; 8 a.m.-5 p.m.; J Bar J Boys Ranch, 62895 Hamby Road, Bend; 541-610-5826, agow@jbarj .org or www.jbarj.org/ohdc. SISTERS ARTS & CRAFTS FESTIVAL: Featuring arts, crafts, food, entertainment and a silent auction benefiting the Make-AWish Foundation of Oregon; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Creekside Park, U.S. Highway 20 and Jefferson Avenue; 541-420-0279 or centraloregonshows@gmail.com. TOUR OF HOMES: Featuring selfguided tours of homes throughout Central Oregon; free; 10 a.m.-6 p.m.541-389-1058 or www.coba .org. CHARITY GOLF CLASSIC: A shotgun-style golf tournament; includes cart, lunch, silent auction and awards ceremony; proceeds benefit United Way of Deschutes County; $175, $50 for nongolfers; noon; Crosswater Golf Course, 17600 Canoe Camp Drive, Sunriver; 541-593-1145 or www.sunriverresort.com/charitygolf. GOLF BALL DROP: Golf balls will be dropped onto a grid to select prize winners; proceeds benefit Wendy’s Wish; $5 for golf ball; 1 p.m.; Riverbend Park, Southwest Columbia Street and Southwest Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; www .wendyswish.org. SUMMER SUNDAY CONCERT: The roots music act Paul Thorn performs; free; 2:30 p.m., gates open 1 p.m.; Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-322-9383 or www.bendconcerts.com. ALISA FINEMAN AND KIMBALL HURD: The Monterey Bay-based singer-songwriters perform; call for Bend location; $15 in advance, $18 at the door; 7-9 p.m.; 541-306-0048 or windance2011@gmail.com.

MONDAY FLY WITH THE OWLS: Learn about owls with the staff of the High Desert Museum; free; 11 a.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7050 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar.

TUESDAY REDMOND FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 2-6:30 p.m.; Centennial Park, Seventh Street and Evergreen Avenue; 541-550-0066 or redmondfarmersmarket1@hotmail .com. TUESDAY FARMERS MARKET AT EAGLE CREST: Free admission; 2-6 p.m.; Eagle Crest Resort, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; 541-633-9637 or info@sustainableflame.com. CENTURY OF SERVICE: Bob Boyd uses historic images, artifacts and narrative to revisit the first 100 years of the U.S. Forest Service; $3, free for museum members; 6 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org.

WEDNESDAY DESCHUTES COUNTY FAIR: The annual event includes rides, exhibits, food, games and more; $10, $6 ages 6-12 and 62 and older, free ages 5 and younger; 10 a.m.-10 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-548-2711 or www .expo.deschutes.org. FLY WITH THE OWLS: Learn about owls with the staff of the High Desert Museum; free; 11 a.m.; Sisters Public Library, 110 N. Cedar St.; 541-617-7050 or www .deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. BEND FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 3-7 p.m.; Brooks Alley, between Northwest Franklin Avenue and Northwest Brooks Street; 541-408-4998, bendfarmersmarket@gmail.com or http://bendfarmersmarket.com.


B4

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, JULY 26, 2012

TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THURSDAY, JULY 26, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

BIZARRO

B5

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively.

SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

DAILY BRIDGE CLUB

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

Seeking a friendly duplicate bridge? Find five games weekly at www.bendbridge.org.

CANDORVILLE

SAFE HAVENS

LOS ANGELES TIMES DAILY CROSSWORD

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN


B6

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, JULY 26, 2012

C D  

Datebook is a weekly calendar of regularly scheduled nonprofit events and meetings. Listings are free but must be updated monthly to continue to publish. Please email event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” at www.bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Contact: 541-383-0351.

ORGANIZATIONS

TODAY COMMUNICATORS PLUS TOASTMASTERS: 6:30-7:45 p.m.; IHOP, Bend; 541-593-1656 or 541-480-0222. THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45-4 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752.

FRIDAY BEND KNIT-UP: $2; 10 a.m.-noon;

ROSIE BAREIS COMMUNITY CAMPUS, BEND; 541-728-0050. BINGO: 6 p.m.; American Legion Post #44, Redmond; 541-548-5688. THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45-4 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752.

SATURDAY NO EVENTS LISTED

SUNDAY BINGO: 12:30 p.m.; American Legion Post #44, Redmond;

541-548-5688. THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: 12:455 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752.

MONDAY THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45-5 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE: 7-9 p.m.; Sons of Norway Hall, Bend; 541-549-7311 or 541-848-7523.

TUESDAY BELLA ACAPPELLA HARMONY:

6 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-388-5038. BINGO: 6 p.m.; Eagles Lodge & Club, Prineville; 541-447-7659.

LA PINE CHAMBER TOASTMASTERS: 8-9 a.m.; Gordy’s Truck Stop, La Pine; 541-536-9771.

CRIBBAGE CLUB: 6 p.m.; Bend’s Community Center; 541-317-9022.

WEDNESDAY

THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Card games; 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752. HIGH DESERT RUG HOOKERS: 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-382-5337. HIGHNOONERS TOASTMASTER CLUB: Noon-1 p.m.; New Hope Church, Classroom D, Bend; 541390-5373 or 541-317-5052.

The Lower Deschutes day trip ends here, at the takeout spot at Trout Creek. Carry a river map to keep track of your location. Right before the takeout, you’ll see a large, vehicle-access campground on the right. As the river bends to the right, you’ll see the takeout. Anne Aurand The Bulletin

Deschutes Continued from B1 •River left, the west side of the river, is the Warm Springs Indian Reservation, and trespassing is prohibited. Special permits can be obtained in some instances. (Call The Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs at 541-553-2001 with questions.) This applies to the islands on the left side of the river, too. But there’s plenty to do on the right side of the river. A string of camps along the bank provides great picnic areas or overnight stops if you want to bring camping gear. Unfortunately, we missed a great spot at Grassy Camp for our lunch break because we were focused on nailing a little midriver riffle, and before we knew it we were downstream from the camp.

Logistics Obviously, you need a boat for this outing. We saw rafts, inflatable and hard-shelled kayaks and drift boats the day we went. Officials say canoes float this section, but canoeing would call for some more advanced paddling skills. If you don’t own a boat or can’t borrow one from a friend, there are plenty of places to rent one. Everyone needs a personal flotation device, too. Then you need to arrange a

Trails Continued from B1 Some lower-elevation trails have high numbers of fallen trees blocking access, Sabo said. This has been a heavy year for trees toppling, especially in beetle and fire kill areas. The main loop of Canyon Creek Meadow is blocked by about thirty downed trees and is “passable for agile hikers,” Sabo said, but not recommended for stock use. The upper meadows may still have some patchy snow. Black Crater Trail, a hikersonly trail in the Three Sisters Wilderness, is mostly snowfree, but there are some fallen trees. The Matthieu Lakes trail has light patchy snow, but is accessible to most trail traffic at this time. Trails out of the Three Creek Lake area are mostly snow-free, but may not be clear of trees. The Metolius Windigo trail has had sections cleared, but stock users should be aware of some “leaners”

Get ready to go BOAT RENTALS If you don’t have your own boat, don’t fret. Look up “raft rental” or “kayak rental” on the Internet to find various rental businesses. For a frame of reference, here are a few options available in Bend: • Ouzel Outfitters, www .oregonrafting.com, 541-3855947. Depending on boat size and other amenities, rafts can be rented from $75 to $100 a day so you can do it yourself. Comes with personal flotation devices. Deflated rafts can fit in the back of most cars and a pump can be obtained from the outfitter for inflating it at the put-in. Kayaks cost $35 a day. • Sun Country Tours, www.sun countrytours.com, 541-3826277. Doesn’t rent boats but will

shuttle to get your car from the put-in spot at Warm Springs — on U.S. Highway 26 — to the take-out spot at Trout Creek Campground. You could figure out a shuttle system with a second car, I suppose, but it would require a lot more time in a car for a couple of people. And, since we were just a one-car group, my husband called Afford-

(partially fallen trees) across the trail. The Mirror Lake area is just becoming snow-free. There are as many as two dozen fallen trees near the Pacific Crest Trail on the Six Lakes Trail. The Big Obsidian trail in the Newberry Crater area will be undergoing some maintenance. The trail is currently “rather rough,” Sabo said. “We’re going to do some tread maintenance, some railing work.” Be sure to wear proper footwear and clothing when attempting the trail, because it is an obsidian flow and even a minor fall can cause lacerations. The Flagline bike trail will remain closed for all uses until Aug. 15 for elk calving. The Edison-Lava and Dinah-MoeHum bike trails are now clear of fallen trees. Quinn Meadow Horse Camp trails are passable and in pretty good condition, Sabo said. The Metolius Windigo Trail from Lava Lake to Todd Horse

take you on a guided trip. $85 per kid, $95 per adult. Comes with all equipment and lunch. • Tumalo Creek Kayak & Canoe, www.tumalocreek.com, 541-317-9407. Rents inflatable kayaks and canoes by the day. Kayaks $60, canoes $75.

Management, Oregon State Parks and the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs: www. boaterpass.com. You will calculate the permit fee based on group size and date of outing.

FISHING LICENSES

From mom-and-pop operations to bigger commercial businesses, there are plenty of people who are willing to move your car from the put-in to the take-out. Prices vary, so check the Internet and call around. Here are a few options: • Affordable Deschutes Shuttle, 541-395-2649 or www.affordabledeschutes shuttle.com ($45) • Fish’s Shuttle Service, 541475-3129 ($45) • Linda’s River Shuttle, 541395-2488, www.4shuttles.com ($65)

Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife 61374 Parrell Rd., Bend, 541388-6363 Information about fishing regulations and purchasing licenses: www.dfw.state.or.us/resources/ licenses_regs/ Licenses are also available at most fishing shops and sporting goods stores.

PERMITS For permits and more information about the river from the Bureau of Land

able Deschutes Shuttle and arranged to have our car waiting for us where we finished. (Our cost: $45.) You also need a boater pass. Cost depends on the size of the group and the day you go. (For our group of four on a Saturday, it was $32.) For a decent outdoors adventure with kids, it didn’t consume our entire weekend. We left Bend at 8:30 a.m. and

Camp is clear. The trail from Dutchman Flat to the Swampy system is in good condition. Metolius River hiking trails may have delays and reroutes during trail work throughout August, on both the east and west sides. Leash regulations are in effect along the Deschutes River corridor, and on the trails for Green and Moraine lakes, South Sister and Broken Top. A dog closure is in effect for the summer at Scout Lake near Sisters. Self-issuing wilderness permits, different from the Northwest Forest Pass, are required and are available at the trailheads, Sabo said. Be sure to practice “leave no trace” ethics in all the wilderness and nonwildnerness areas. Mosquito populations are anywhere from nonexistent to a light nuisance to driving people crazy, Sabo said. The nuisance factor is dependent on the “time of day and the wind.... It’s mosquito season, that’s all we can say.” — Lydia Hoffman, The Bulletin

SHUTTLES

were launching our cataraft at 9:30 a.m. We played on the river for 4½ hours and got home by 4 p.m. And that was with a delay to fix a flat tire on the road out of Trout Creek and a quick stop for Mexican food in Madras. It was a great way to make special memories on a hot summer Saturday. — Reporter: 541-383-0304, aaurand@bendbulletin.com

Weekly Arts & Entertainment Inside

Every Friday

BINGO: 6 p.m.; American Legion Post #44, Redmond; 541-548-5688. THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45-4 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752.

BEND CHAMBER TOASTMASTERS: Noon-1 p.m.; The Environmental Center, Bend; 541-610-2308.

KIWANIS CLUB OF REDMOND: Noon-1 p.m.; Juniper Golf and Country Club, Redmond; 541-5485935 or www.redmondkiwanis.org.

BEND KNIT-UP: 5:30-8 p.m.; Barnes & Noble Booksellers, Bend; 541-728-0050.

PRIME TIME TOASTMASTERS: 12:05-1 p.m.; Home Federal Bank, Prineville; 541-416-6549.

BEND SUNRISE LIONS CLUB: 7 a.m.; Jake’s Diner, Bend; 541-286-5466.

REDMOND AREA TOASTMASTERS: Noon-1 p.m.; Ray’s Food Place, Redmond; 541-410-1758.

Sky Watch

lion years. Those transmissions are still in transit at the speed of light. If there is intelligent life in Andromeda and it detected the signals, interpreted the language and figured out how to send something back, it would be almost 5.8 million years before we got an answer. Languages rarely last more than 4,000 years on Earth, so will we understand their message if they answer? Likewise, if we heard an intelligent signal from Andromeda, could we send a message back? Would the civilization in Andromeda still be there? As you can surmise, communications with other intelligent life is a monumental challenge, but we’re still listening and transmitting.

Continued from B1 The U.S. Navy still uses antiquated but reliable very low frequencies (VLF) as well as modern satellite communications. Line-of-sight FM radio communication was invented around 1936. This mode was adopted for aural television transmissions in the early 1940s (visual is still AM). Because FM bandwidth is very wide, frequencies above 30 MHz became the standard allocated by the Federal Communications Commission. Signals above 30 MHz are absorbed by the ionosphere and escape into space. To date, Earth has been transmitting FM and higher signals into outer space for about 72 years. Around 1948, our closest star system, Proxima Centauri — only 4.22 light years away — would have heard the TV programs “The Voice of Firestone Televues,” “Missus Goes a Shopping” and “The World in Your Home,” which were transmitted four years earlier in 1944. If there was intelligent life in the Proxima Centauri system, we would have gotten an answer by now. Now consider the distance to our closest neighboring galaxy, Andromeda, almost 3 million light years distant. It may harbor 10,000 planets with intelligent life. They won’t hear those 1944 TV programs for another 3 mil-

Change your mind. Change your life.

Bill Logan is an expert solar observer and a volunteer amateur astronomer with the University of Oregon’s Pine Mountain Observatory. He lives in Bend. Contact: blogan0821@gmail.com.

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LOCALNEWS

News of Record, C2 Editorials, C4

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, JULY 26, 2012

LOCAL BRIEFING Man arrested on rape charges A Prineville man was arrested Wednesday on suspicion of rape, sex abuse and unlawful penetration, Prineville police said. Francisco R. Castillo, 54, was arrested after a victim came forward and reported years of alleged abuse. Anyone with information concerning Castillo is asked to call the police department at 541-447-4168.

Fire precaution level raised The industrial fire precaution level has been raised for the Deschutes and Ochoco national forests, Crooked River Grassland and Prineville District of the Bureau of Land Management. Activities such as blasting, welding, cutting metal, cable yarding and using power saws can only be done between 8 p.m. and 1 p.m. The regulations affect both commercial and personal-use firewood cutters and industrial operators.

www.bendbulletin.com/local

Bray verdict set for Monday By Scott Hammers The Bulletin

Thomas Bray will learn his fate Monday, when Deschutes County Circuit Court Judge Stephen Tiktin will issue his verdict on the 11 charges of rape, sodomy, strangulation and assault Bray faces. Defense attorney Stephen Houze and District Attorney Patrick Flaherty delivered their closing arguments Wednesday, summarizing the evidence presented over the prior six days. Bray, 38, is charged with sexually assaulting two women in February 2011, one a woman he met on the online dating site Match.com, and one who was a student when he taught an anatomy class at Central Oregon Community College. The Bulletin is not

identifying either of the alleged victims. Houze sought to undermine Bray the credibility of the women, portraying them as willing sexual partners who exaggerated or fabricated their accounts of their encounters with Bray. Addressing the claims of the COCC student — whom The Bulletin is identifying as alleged victim 2 — Houze read from the text messages she sent over the course of their nearly one-month relationship. Bray faces charges from two encounters with alleged victim 2, one in which he allegedly choked her with the belt of his bathrobe while the two were having sex, and one in

which he allegedly choked her in the elevator in the Franklin Crossing building where he lived. Houze read the woman’s often-explicit text messages sent to Bray, focusing on those sent shortly after the two encounters in which she was allegedly assaulted. In the messages, the woman expressed a desire for rough sex with Bray, in some cases referencing pornographic videos he’d shared with her. Had the woman truly been fearful following the choking incident less than a week after she began having sex with Bray, Houze said she would have reported it when police came to Bray’s apartment to investigate a dispute between the two that night. The woman showed an officer a mark on her leg where Bray allegedly

struck her with a cane, he said, but did not report the choking until months later. “There’s not investment in that relationship,” Houze said. “It’s not a relationship, it’s a sexual hookup.” Houze dismissed the suggestion raised by prosecutors that Bray had “groomed” alleged victim 2 through aggressive sex and proposals for group sex and sex in front of an audience at a Portland sex club. Houze again pointed to the messages suggesting she was willing to participate. He also noted an interview between alleged victim 2 and a Bulletin reporter shortly after Bray’s arrest, in which she described their “non-traditional” sex life but insisted she was never afraid for her safety. See Bray / C2

HEADSTANDS IN THE PARK

Redmond council fills open seat The Redmond City Council on Tuesday unanimously approved the appointment of former councilor Joe Centanni to the fill an open seat on the council. Mayor George Endicott recommended Centanni to fill an opening left by Councilor Ed Boero, who resigned because he’s moving to Bend. Endicott said Centanni brings financial expertise with his background as a certified public accountant. Centanni was elected in 2006 and served one term, deciding not to run for reelection in 2010. The council seat is one of three up for an election this November.

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Erika Anderson, 8, left, tries to balance on her head as her sister Megan Anderson, 11, middle, and mother Valerie Woodrich, 47, back, also try Wednesday evening while enjoying the music of Downhill Ryder at the 6th Annual Twilight Tunes at Compass Park in Bend’s Northwest Crossing neighborhood. Twilight Tunes will happen again from 6 p.m.-8 p.m. on Aug. 21, featuring the music of Bo Reynolds and Deb Yeager, and Rob Finchman. The event is put on by the NWX Business Association and benefits the Family Access Network through food sales.

County seeks horse’s owner The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office is looking for information about the owner of a horse found wandering near China Hat Road Sunday. The horse, a brown quarter horse gelding, was found wandering near mile post 9. He was extremely thin when deputies found him. The horse, which the Sheriff’s Office has temporarily named Maverick, was taken to the Sheriff’s Office’s Livestock Rescue Facility to recover. Anyone with information about a possible owner of the horse or with any other information about Maverick should call 541-6936911. Callers should reference case number 12-147332. See Briefing / C2

STATE NEWS • Portland

FEMA grant funds to county remain in dispute By Erik Hidle The Bulletin

Former Deschutes County Forester Joe Stutler said last week he was optimistic the county and the Federal Emergency Management Agency would reach an accord on disputed grant funds used for fire suppression work. But this week Stutler says talks have broken down as he fears losing grant funding for future work. Not so, says the Oregon Office of Emergency Management, which administers the grants for FEMA. Everything is still on course. “The best way to sum it up is the current system for implementing wildland fire predisaster mitigation is broken with the OEM and FEMA,”

The Bulletin

• Ashland

• Ashland: Defense contractor under investigation. • Portland: Activist prepares to end hunger strike today. Stories on C3

FEMA grants Federal Emergency Management Agency wildfire prevention grants awarded in Central Oregon: 2007: $1.3 million to Deschutes and Crook counties. 2008: $1.1 million to Deschutes and Crook counties. 2010: $3.9 million to Crook, Deschutes and Klamath counties.

Stutler said. Stutler retired as county forester earlier this year, but still works part time for the county to finalize a dispute over grant funds received from FEMA in

2007 and 2008 for fire suppression work. The conflict arose in 2010 when FEMA told the county that some work it completed with the grant money occurred in areas not approved by environmental impact studies. The county originally feared it would need to repay thousands in funds. But last week, both Stutler and the state said they believed the county wouldn’t have to reimburse FEMA. Both the state and county agree that an agreement on the 2007 grant appears near completion, but they disagree on how urgent the matter is. Stutler believes FEMA and the Oregon Office of Emergency Management are dragging their feet in retroactively ap-

proving work on the two disputed grants, and that in turn is jeopardizing a 2010 grant offered to Crook, Deschutes and Klamath counties. “If we wait until the end of the (federal) fiscal year on Sept. 30, our concern is the money that has been set aside for the 2010 grant will be withdrawn to deal with the fiscal issues ... in the (federal) budget.” A spokesman for the Oregon Office of Emergency Management, which assists in administration of grants for FEMA, says that isn’t true. While the state does plan to complete the review of the 2007 and 2008 grants before allowing work to begin on the 2010 grant, it does not believe there is an urgent time line for implementation. See FEMA / C2

Redmond’s Ridgeview High to get security cameras By Ben Botkin

REDMOND—TheRedmond School District board Wednesday unanimously approved a plan to put security cameras at Ridgeview High School. Principal Lee Loving said the 31-camera system will have a threefold purpose: deterring crime, protecting property and encouraging good student behavior. Loving’s presentation gave the board examples of how the cameras can aid the school. It

C

Obituaries, C5 Weather, C6

stores video for up to a month. Footage can be downloaded and kept longer if necessary, including as an investigative tool for police, he said. The cameras will have four screens in the school offices that can be accessed anytime. Additionally, police can access the cameras and see inside the school from laptops in emergencies. Loving said the cameras don’t cover every inch of the school. To stay within budget, the district focused on areas

with less student supervision. That means no cameras in classrooms. Instead, they are aimed at areas like parking lots, entries, hallways and lobbies. Cameras can also zoom in for close-ups of faces or license plates. The system, which will be installed by Reece Complete Security Solutions of Wilsonville, costs $66,700. Redmond High School doesn’t have a security camera system. But Loving said he would like to see possible sav-

ings from the Ridgeview project potentially help the other high school get improvements. In other business, the board unanimously appointed board member and Vice Chairwoman Cathy Miller as its new chairwoman. Jim Erickson, who is still a board member, has served as chairman for the past two years. Board member A.J. Losoya was appointed as the board’s vice chairman. Reporter: 541-977-7185; bbotkin@bendbulletin.com.

UNDERWATER MORTGAGES

Merkley offers plan for home refinancing By Andrew Clevenger The Bulletin

WASHINGTON — Hoping to save millions of American homes from going into foreclosure, Sen. Jeff Merkley, D-Ore., unveiled a plan Wednesday to help underwater homeowners refinance at a lower rate through a government-backed trust. Under Merkley’s Restoring American Homeownership plan, homeowners who owe more on their mortgages than their homes are worth but are current on their mortgage could pick one of three refinancing options, each designed to reduce the risk of default. To illustrate his plan, described in a 30-page report, Merkley envisioned a family that owes $240,000 on a house now worth $200,000. At an interest rate between 7 and 8 percent, the family’s monthly mortgage payment is about $1,770. Under the first option, the family could refinance with a 15-year mortgage at an interest rate of 4 percent. While monthly payments remain about the same, the family would be gaining equity — and getting out from underwater — after only three years, as compared with seven-plus years under the previous mortgage. See Merkley / C2

Chopper rescues injured climber By Dylan J. Darling The Bulletin

SISTERS — Despite darkness, an Oregon National Guard helicopter late Tuesday plucked an injured climber off North Sister Mountain. The crew of the Black Hawk helicopter used thermal imaging equipment to find Linh Pham, 46, and his climbing partner, John Dunsmoor, 54, of Portland shortly after 11 p.m. Tuesday, said Dept. Jim Whitcomb, assistant search and rescue coordinator for the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office. “That’s what they train for, night or day,” he said. The helicopter took Pham to St. Charles Bend, where Pham said he was treated for a dislocated left shoulder and returned home Wednesday. Dunsmoor stayed on the mountain, walked down alone Wednesday and drove home. Deschutes County search and rescue personnel called for help at 10 p.m. Tuesday and the helicopter flew to North Sister from Salem, said Staff Sgt. April Davis, a National Guard spokeswoman. An HH-60M, the helicopter is the latest model of the Black Hawk. Pham and Dunsmoor set out for the summit of North Sister at 7 a.m. Tuesday from a base camp about 7,600 feet up the east side of the 10,085-foot mountain, Pham said. See Climber / C2


C2

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, JULY 26, 2012

Merkley Continued from C1 The second option would be a more traditional 30-year mortgage at an interest rate of 5 percent. The benefit of this plan is that monthly payments would drop to $1,288, leaving the family with about $500 more each month and providing some leeway within a tight budget. In the third option, the mortgage would be split into two parts, with 95 percent of the principal financed at a 5 percent interest rate over 30 years. The remaining 5 percent of value would be a “soft� loan, with no interest or payments for five years. For the first five years, the family would pay only $1,020 monthly, leaving more money for other needs. After the second loan kicks in, payments increase to $1,288. To fund the program, a trust would be created that would sell bonds to private investors. Homeowners would use their new trust mortgages to pay their current mortgage holders, then pay back the trust under one of the three plans. The banks holding the original loan would benefit from having a risky loan off their books, and could be charged a “risk transfer fee� to participate in the program, providing another source of funding. If the original loan exceeded the actual value of the home by more than 140 percent, then the loan originator would be required to mark the mortgage down to 140 percent of the home’s value to qualify for the funding. Qualified homeowners would have up to three years to apply, so the mortgage industry is not overwhelmed by creating millions of loans over a few months. In Merkley’s vision, it’s a winwin, not least of all because the program would not require the creation of a taxpayer-funded agency permanently responsible for overseeing governmentbacked loans. Instead, the program would only exist until the last loan was repaid, less than 40 years from now. And unlike Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, governmentsponsored entities that owned or back about half the nation’s mortgages and were devastated when the housing market toppled in 2007, the government is not guaranteeing the new trust’s funds with taxpayer money. This removes the moral hazard that allows financial institutions to push the envelope with their investment strategies, said Merkley, knowing that the government will prop them back up if they fall flat. “Going back to 2009, there was a sentiment among me and my (Senate) colleagues that we should be responding aggressively to help American homeowners. There was kind of a troubling sense that things moved very quickly to help large financial institutions but we left out in the cold homeowners who were underwater,� Merkley said. When the housing market collapsed, American homeowners lost an estimated $7 trillion, which equates to about

“The foreclosure problem is still out there, big and looming ... We have to keep hammering at this thing.� — Julia Gordon, director of housing finance and policy for the Center for American Progress

$100,000 for every homeowner in the country. More than four million homes were foreclosed upon, and Merkley worries an additional 8 million homes are at risk of defaulting over the next five years. Previous efforts to help underwater homeowners refinance at today’s record-low interest rates have met with only modest success. While there are 11 million underwater mortgages, only 8 million are current on their monthly payments. Half of those are held by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, which made them ineligible for the Home Affordable Refinance Program, the government’s $75 billion refinancing program. To date, only 170,000 homes have refinanced through HARP, Merkley said. In part, this is because HARP is voluntary on the part of the mortgage holder, so homeowners don’t have the final say. Under the new proposal, homeowners would be free to go to any competing loan originator, which can lend with confidence knowing the trust will buy its new loan. “The families benefit by getting a lower interest rate. The neighborhood benefits by having fewer empty, defaulted homes,� Merkley said. “And the general economy benefits because you’ve set the foundation for a more successful home construction industry, and families that have lower mortgages are spending more money on (things like) repairing their homes, buying a car, taking a modest vacation, all things that help strengthen the broader economy.� Julia Gordon, director of housing finance and policy for the Center for American Progress, a Washington-based, progressive-leaning think tank, said policymakers have struggled with how to help homeowners who owe more than their homes are worth. “Being underwater means that you have no cushion, so any kind of income shock or unexpected event — when you have no equity you have no breathing room,� she said. “That often sends people straight down the path to foreclosure.� The issue has confounded lawmakers and other policy analysts for so long that a kind of “foreclosure fatigue� has set in, she said. But the issue isn’t going away. “The foreclosure problem is still out there, big and looming, but it feels like everything has been said,� Gordon said. “We have to keep hammering at this thing. The housing market is so important to the overall economy.� — Reporter: 202-662-7456, aclevenger@bendbulletin.com

N  R The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358.

at 9:49 a.m. July 24, in the area of Northeast Mason Drive. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 10:59 a.m. July 24, in the area of Southwest Ivy Court. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 1:37 p.m. July 24, in the area of Southeast Lynn Boulevard.

Prineville Police Department

BEND FIRE RUNS

POLICE LOG

Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and items stolen at 8:48 a.m. July 24, in the area of Northwest Cascade Loop. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and items stolen

Climber

feet, said Whitcomb, the assistant search and rescue coordinator. After hearing about Pham’s fall from her husband, Anita Dunsmoor called the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office to report the climbing accident and that’s when the rescue began. A search and rescue crew started a climb of North Sister but later called for the helicopter because of nightfall and rugged terrain, Whitcomb said. North Sister is considered the hardest of the Three Sisters to climb, Whitcomb said. Last September, Brian C. Jones, 37, of Eugene, fell to his death at about 9,000 feet on the west face of the mountain. Snowy weather hampered a rescue. A helicopter crew located his body the next day.

Continued from C1 Anita Dunsmoor, Dunsmoor’s wife, said she received a call from her husband saying they were on their way up the mountain around noon and he’d call when they were coming back down. At 6:30 p.m. Tuesday he called to say Pham had fallen, was injured but he’d helped him back to the base camp, Anita Dunsmoor said. “Whatever happened between noon and 6:30 p.m. that’s when all the adventure happened,� she said. The two men had nearly made it to the top but turned back around 3 p.m. because it was getting late, Pham said. They had descended about 1,000 feet when he fell at about 4 p.m. “(I) just slipped on the snow,� he said. He slid down about 200

— Reporter: 541-617-7812, ddarling@bendbulletin.com

FEMA

ecute a contract to begin the environmental assessment on the 2010 grant,� Stutler said. The county has decided it is time to get its partners involved in the discussion. “Our plan moving forward is to have a meeting and invite the Crook County commissioners, Klamath County commissioners and to create a united front with our congressional delegation,� said Deschutes County Commissioner Alan Unger. Unger said FEMA is attempting to change the expectations it previously laid out for the county, and he doesn’t believe that is fair. “They let us go ahead with (the fire suppression work) for three years and now they’ve changed their minds. That’s not right to have the federal government do that. That’s why people don’t like bureaucracy, and we aren’t going to put up with it.� — Reporter: 541-617-7837

Continued from C1 “For the 2010 grant, there is no (discussion on) dissolution of that at all,� said Dennis Sigrist, the state agency’s hazard mitigation officer. “I think it would be inappropriate to even suggest that as ... funding has been allocated for that, and it is awaiting approval.� Sigrist said he believes the funds will be rolled over into the next fiscal year come Sept. 30, but added he hasn’t received an absolute guarantee from FEMA. The disagreement over the urgency of the work is where the two sides appear to be fracturing in what just recently appeared to be a fruitful discussion bearing results. While the state says it is pausing on implementation of the 2010 grant to ensure nothing goes wrong with the scope of work, Stutler believes it is simply wasting time. “There is no reason that FEMA, that OEM, can’t ex-

ehidle@bendbulletin.com

LOC AL BRIEFING Continued from C1

record system. The clinics will close at 4 p.m. The Redmond, Bend Eastside, and Bend Westside clinics will have regular business hours Saturday.

BMC clinics to close early Friday All Bend Memorial Clinics in Bend, Sisters and Redmond will close early Friday while the clinics upgrade their electronic

— From staff reports

Bray Continued from C1 “Naive, gullible, groomed, taken advantage of — I think not,� he said. Turning his attention to alleged victim 1, Houze said various inconsistencies between her testimony in court and her comments to investigators last year suggested an effort to create an image of “purity and innocence� that would bolster her rape claim. Text messages, receipts from the restaurant where alleged victim 1 met Bray, and surveillance video indicate she had spent less than 20 minutes with Bray before agreeing to accompany him to his nearby apartment for wine, Houze said, not the hour she claimed while testifying last week. A urinalysis of a sample taken during a sexual assault exam performed on alleged victim 1 tested positive for marijuana, he said, contradicting her statement to the sexual assault nurse that she had not used drugs. Houze addressed the clothing alleged victim 1 was wearing on the night of her date with Bray, suggesting she would have had to willingly take some items off as opposed to her account of Bray tearing her clothing off. An antique pearl necklace was not broken and did not leave any marks on alleged victim 1’s neck, he said, despite her claim to have been choked at least 15 times. Her earrings left no marks behind her ears, and her earlobes were not torn, he said, despite her claim of being repeatedly slapped in the face until her earrings came off. And alleged victim 1’s snug pants, tucked into tall boots, could not have been removed without her assistance, Houze said. Taken together, the inconsistencies suggest alleged victim 1 was making an effort to present herself as “not that kind of girl,� Houze said. “You can’t trust her,� he said. “And if you can’t trust her, you can’t convict. This is America, we don’t do that here.� Flaherty and Deputy District Attorney Brigid Turner told Judge Tiktin they agreed that the case would hinge on the credibility of alleged victims 1 and 2, but said they believed he would ultimately find them credible and find Bray guilty. Turner said the relationship between alleged victim 2 and Bray was “kind of like

P  O    Rebecca Nonweiler, MD, Board Certified

For The Bulletin’s full list, including federal, state, county and city levels, visit www.bendbulletin.com/officials. Bend, OR 97701 Phone: 541-318-1298

CONGRESS U.S. Senate

Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore. 223 Dirksen Senate Office Building Washington, D.C. 20510 Phone: 202-224-5244 Web: http://wyden.senate.gov

Sen. Jeff Merkley, D-Ore.: 107 Russell Senate Office Building Washington, D.C. 20510 Phone: 202-224-3753 Web: http://merkley.senate.gov

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Tuesday 10:13 p.m. — Smoke odor reported, in the area of Hopi Road. 20 — Medical aid calls.

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a domestic violence relationship,� and that he controlled her by pushing her sexual boundaries. The control, she said, persisted for weeks and even months after their relationship ended with Bray’s arrest. Turner said Bray used his medical degree “to manipulate women, deceive women, and ultimately to rape women.� Flaherty echoed Turner’s remarks, saying Bray’s status as a doctor and a college instructor, and the more than 10 years of age on both women, made him a seemingly trustworthy figure. “At some level the most disturbing common piece of evidence, your honor, is that both (victims) put themselves in a position to be dominated because they trusted him,� Flaherty said. Flaherty asked Tiktin to recall the testimony of a nurse and a doctor who examined alleged victim 1 at St. Charles Bend. Both said alleged victim 1’s injuries were consistent with her story, Flaherty said, and noted that both said a physical assault of the type she described would not necessarily leave conspicuous injuries. The defense team’s assertion that alleged victim 1 made up the story of her rape is contradicted by alleged victim 1’s own testimony, Flaherty said, including elements of the testimony defense lawyers used in an attempt to discredit her. Flaherty noted her admission to Googling information on rape and a text message sent to a friend early in the morning she reported the incident — the defense focused on her statement to Bend Police that she wanted to be sure if her rape “counted� as rape — as an example of information that would not boost the believability of a false rape claim. “Why would she tell the police about doing Internet research?� Flaherty said. “Why would that be part of a fabrication?� Flaherty said the best explanation of such contradictions in alleged victim 1’s story is to conclude she’s telling the truth. If Bray, who waived his right to a jury trial, is found guilty of any or all charges, sentencing will be determined sometime after Tiktin announces his verdict. The most serious charge facing Bray, first-degree rape, carries a mandatory minimum prison sentence of nearly eight years. — Reporter: 541-383-0387, shammers@bendbulletin.com


THURSDAY, JULY 26, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

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O N Ashland defense contractor targeted in bid-rigging probe By Jeff Barnard The Associated Press

GRANTS PASS — Federal authorities are investigating whether a U.S. Army Corps of Engineers program manager made sure an Oregon defense contractor won nearly $160 million worth of contracts as part of a cozy relationship that included snowboarding and fishing vacations, trips to Singapore and Bali, and sex with female employees hired to work with him. Affidavits filed in U.S. District Court in Eugene outline findings and witness statements that allege Jerry Hodgson, a program manager for the corps in Omaha, Neb., rigged bids on eight contracts dating back to 2004 for Sky Research Inc. of Ashland. The company specializes in aerial surveys of old military bombing and gunnery ranges to find old weapons debris. No charges have been filed. Assistant U.S. Attorney Sean Hoar said the investigation is ongoing. “We take seriously our role as a financial steward of the public’s money and the trust that is put into us,” said corps Omaha District Assistant Special Counsel Tom Tracy. “We are looking into the allegations, and taking them seriously.” An attorney for Hodgson said the allegations against his client were unfounded. “Mr. Hodgson has enjoyed a long and distinguished career with the Omaha District of the Army Corps of Engineers,” his attorney, Andrew Strotman, said in an email. “These allegations are unfounded and inaccurately portray the contracting practices of both Mr. Hodgson and the Omaha District.”

Attorneys for Sky Research owners Sky (his singular legal name) and his wife, Anne Sky, did not immediately return calls for comment. An attorney for Sky Research issued a statement denying the allegations. “Although the company has not had much time to examine the information released last week, it appears that the accusation against it is the product of rumor and speculation,” Douglass Schmor said in a statement. “The company is finally in a position to gather evidence and other information about the accusation and is confident that it will be able to rebut it.” The investigation was first reported by the Eugene Register-Guard. Based on the affidavits, U.S. District Magistrate Judge Thomas Coffin in Eugene authorized search warrants that seized computers and records from offices of Sky Research in Oregon and Colorado and the homes of Sky and his wife, as well as Hodgson’s personal email account, according to court records unsealed last week. The investigation focused on potential charges of bribery of a public official, conspiracy to defraud the United States, wire fraud, padding bids and bid rigging, affidavits said. U.S. Army Special Agent Derek W. Lindbom wrote that the investigation was sparked by a confidential informant who contacted the Army’s inspector general in 2010 with allegations that Hodgson returned bids to Sky Research with instructions on how to change them so they would be sure to win a contract, that Sky Research hired personal assistants to work just with

him, and that Hodgson arranged for their salaries to be billed to the government. The informant also alleged that the Skys billed the government for a vacation to Singapore and Bali, listing it as a marketing cost, Hodgson arranged for them to be paid advances for work not yet finished to carry them through slow periods, the Skys arranged for cars to be sold below cost to Hodgson, and bought an airplane from Hodgson’s son, which was upgraded at government expense. When an investigator interviewed Hodgson, he admitted taking his kids on annual snowboarding vacations with Sky and his kids, and considered Sky a good friend, the affidavits said. Shown invoices for a fishing trip to Alaska paid for by Sky, Hodgson said he paid him back in cash, but couldn’t recall which account he had withdrawn the money from. Hodgson also acknowledged having a romantic relationship with one woman who worked at Sky Research, which included sex, and having sex with two others, an affidavit said. One former Sky Research program manager said she was fired after refusing to have sex with Hodgson. Hodgson denied statements from women who worked at Sky Research that he sat in on hiring interviews for women who would be working with him. Hodgson told investigators he first met Sky in 1997 or 1998 when working on a project at the former Lowry Bombing and Gunnery Range outside Denver. Sky Research has an office in the Denver suburb of

Englewood and a residence in Centennial, Colo., where employees told investigators that Hodgson was a frequent guest who was lavishly wined and dined because he was responsible for all the company’s contracts. The affidavit includes excerpts from emails indicating Hodgson told Sky Research how to massage bids to be sure to win a contract, and offered to pad contracts with extra money. “Based on discussions with afcee (Air Force Center for Engineering and Environment) today I think this will get funded — to whatever level I decide is appropriate,” read one from Hodgson to a Sky Research employee. “So we’ll want a scope put together (draft for me to massage) and an estimate (detailed) as we need it ready to go — timing is the key, plan is to capture monies I send back on other projects ... can’t let it sit or someone else will grab it — that’s why we need a “firm” cost/number. This is a huge deal for us and will put us so far ahead of everyone else doing this.” Former Sky Research project manager Andrew Biaggi told Lindbom that on a contract for work at Dyess Air Force Base outside Abilene, Texas, Hodgson told him to bid on work for 50 acres, when the site was actually only half an acre. Former Sky Research senior accountant Kimberly Walker told investigators she recalled one project in Puerto Rico had a profit of 400 percent. She said excess profits from one project were routinely used to cover cost overruns on another, a practice they referred to as “Jerrying.”

Rick Bowmer / The Associated Press

Hunger striker Cameron Whitten gives a thumbs-up Wednesday as he stands outside City Hall in Portland. Whitten has decided to start eating again.

After 55 days, activist ends his hunger strike By Steven Dubois The Associated Press

PORTLAND — When asked the inevitable how-doyou-feel question during his eight-week hunger strike, Cameron Whitten often joked by saying he felt like a million bagels, bonbons or whatever type of food popped into his head. Starting today, he will be able to eat a million bonbons — vegan bonbons. The Portland activist who began the hunger strike June 2 said he will start eating solid food again this morning. Whitten, who said his weight fell from 193 pounds to 159 pounds during the 55-day fast, declined to divulge the details of his first post-strike meal. A prominent figure in last fall’s Occupy Portland movement, Whitten started the strike just weeks after losing the May election to become mayor. His cause was housing, but it was largely overlooked by people leading busy lives, online skeptics who questioned his motives and those who focused on the encampment Whitten and his supporters set up on the

sidewalk outside City Hall. “People always try to find a way to divert themselves from addressing the issue, and that’s just a problem we have as Americans in general,” Whitten said. “We’re cynics, we’re skeptics and we don’t really want to focus on coming together as a collective and addressing problems.” City leaders paid little attention to the protest and refused to budge on the activist’s demand for a oneyear moratorium on foreclosures or the waiving of fines against the owner of a vacant lot that has been transformed into a highly visible homeless camp. He also wanted the Portland City Council to place a housing levy on the fall ballot. City Commissioner Amanda Fritz, the only commissioner to meet with Whitten on a regular basis, said voters would probably reject such a levy, and that would be a setback for the cause championed by Whitten. Leaders have instead developed plans for a regional housing summit to address the issue of affordable housing.

12 Announcing the 2012 Award Recipients One Million Plus Best Architectural Design ..........................Jim Guild Construction #30 Best Kitchen .............................................. r.d. Building & Design #27 Best Interior Finish .................................. Jim Guild Construction #30 Best Master Suite ...................................... r.d. Building & Design #27 Best Landscaping ..................................... Jim Guild Construction #30 Best Feature (Wood work craftsmanship) ..................................................................Jim Guild Construction #30 Best Value ................................................ Jim Guild Construction #30 Best of Show ............................................ Jim Guild Construction #30

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$700,000 - $850,000 Best Architectural Design ...........................r.d. Building & Design #12 Best Kitchen ............................................... r.d Building & Design #12 Best Interior Finish ................................ Blackrock Construction #34 Best Master Suite ................................... Blackrock Construction #34 Best Feature (Lift Slide door for panoramic view) ............................................................... Blackrock Construction #34 Best Value .............................................. Blackrock Construction #34 Best of Show ............................................. r.d. Building & Design #12

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Please visit all homes on the tour this Friday, Saturday, & Sunday • www.coba.org Official Sponsors:


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THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, JULY 26, 2012

E

The Bulletin

AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER

B  M C G B  J C  R  C

Chairwoman Publisher Editor-in-Chief Editor of Editorials

It should be easy to fire some teachers

S

ome people should be fired. Should this teacher? Students said he twisted their ears. They said he grabbed and lifted some people by their belts.

He swatted others on the back of the head. He twisted the nipples of males. He grabbed some people’s underwear and gave it a pull. He wrestled with them. He swore at them. He also allegedly put someone in a “physical hold.� Should it matter if the teacher was being playful? Should it matter if he was trying to get people’s attention? No. Does it matter that it was a Navy Junior Reserve Officers Training Corps (NJROTC) instructor? No. If it’s true he was doing those things, he should be fired. Students said Gerald Hollis, a NJROTC instructor at La Pine High School, did those things. The district filed a complaint against him in 2010 after the physical hold incident. Hollis stipulated to the facts. Oregon’s Teachers Standards and Practices Commission found that Hollis putting the student in the hold and yelling at him constitut-

ed gross neglect of duty in violation of state laws and rules. It said the same thing about roughhousing with students. As it did about the wrestling. As it did about inappropriate use of language. What did the commission do? It reprimanded him. It allowed Hollis to continue teaching. He remains a teacher at La Pine High School. In the world we live in, the district didn’t have a lot of choices. If it had tried to terminate him, he could have sued and pointed out that the state commission only issued a reprimand. The district could have lost and been forced to pay damages and keep him in his job. So in the world we live in, a teacher committing gross neglect of duty in violation of state laws and rules, gets to keep his job. Oregon’s laws, rules and union contracts get that wrong. They should change.

Kitzhaber’s cool schools program goes tepid

O

ne of Gov. John Kitzhaber’s top priorities a couple of years ago was a program he called “cool schools,� which, he said, would make money available to Oregon school districts for energy upgrades even as it put hundreds of Oregonians to work. To date, the program might be better called “tepid schools.� The response of school districts around the state has been decidedly tepid, as has the result. In fact, according to a recent article in The Oregonian, in the summer of 2011, with $15 million in low-cost loans available, only eight school districts lined up to borrow $5.4 million. And instead of the 400 to 600 yearlong jobs Kitzhaber expected the program to create or save, so far only 75 are actually in place. Things may well perk up this year, though they may well not. The program kicked off with a bunch of energy audits done in 100 of the state’s school districts. Those audits predicted energy savings of about $3.6 million a year if $40 million were spent on upgrades. Yet critics at school districts do not believe the savings are likely to be anywhere nearly as hefty as the

program envisions. The engineer for the Eugene School District was not alone in his assessment when he criticized the quality of the audit in an article by the Associated Press earlier this year. Part of the problem, some experts say, is that energy savings the auditors predicted are unrealistically high, and if they don’t pan out the program makes little sense for the school districts involved. Then there’s this: Most — though not all — schools in districts served by Pacific Power and Portland Gas & Electric are eligible for outright grants from a 3 percent excise tax levied on private utility customers’ bills. While the money cannot be used in places like La Pine, served as it is by an electric cooperative, most Bend schools have been able to take advantage of the free dollars, as have schools in the state’s largest school district. What school administrator in his right mind would pay even a small amount to borrow money that can be had free from somewhere else? Kitzhaber could turn out to be right about cool schools, but so far, it has not lived up to the hype.

My Nickel’s Worth Track coach should keep religion out of sports Congratulations to Kyle Will for being appointed head track coach at Bend High. I am sure you will do a great job! However, I feel compelled to respond to the annoying, growing tendency by athletes and coaches to insert comments about religious beliefs when discussing sports (“I am a very strong Christian and‌â€?). Kyle, I am happy for you that you have such strong beliefs, but they have nothing to do with your abilities as a coach and should remain private. Please remember that you are coaching in a public school and not all of your athletes share the same beliefs as you and could be intimidated by statements like this. As a coach, it is your job to make all students feel accepted and you must keep your religious and political views private. I have coached the Redmond High School Cross Country Ski Team for 13 years and the majority of my athletes and their families have held very different political and religious opinions than I; however, since these opinions are irrelevant to my coaching we do not discuss them and our parents and coaches all get along well. We have attempted to make all of our athletes feel as comfortable as possible, and are routinely told by athletes that their ski team feels like a family and that their biggest regret is not joining the team as freshmen. Coaches, please concentrate on

training, teaching technique, racing and forming relationships while you coach the kids, and keep religion private. D a vid Smullin Bend

local animal shelter or a dog breed rescue group, so we can stop puppy mills. Zoey Voyles, age 11 Bend

Puppy buyer beware

Election will determine direction of the nation

I would like to advise readers not to buy puppies without seeing them with their mother. If you buy puppies over the Internet, through newspaper ads or at pet stores without seeing them with their mother or seeing their living conditions, you could accidentally be supporting a puppy mill. Puppy mills are breeding facilities that treat dogs badly. Documented conditions include overbreeding, wire cages, little to no veterinary care, poor quality and/or lack of food and water, no protections from the elements, no socialization outside the cage and the killing of low-producing dogs. There are ways to avoid buying one of the 2 million to 4 million puppies born in puppy mills each year in the U.S. A great place to look for a puppy is your local shelter. Nationwide, one out of every four dogs in a shelter is a purebred, and mixed-breed dogs also make wonderful pets. If you want a specific dog breed, rescue groups exist for virtually every breed of dog. The only way to stop puppy mills is to stop buying the puppies. If you are getting a dog, please consider your

This is in response to Phil Calef’s “In My Viewâ€? piece of July 21. I totally agree with his assessment of where we are politically in this country today. The November elections are going to define the direction our nation will take in the future, i.e.: • Bigger government vs. smaller government; • Higher taxes vs. lower taxes; • Higher debt vs. lower debt; • More regulations vs. fewer regulations; • More or fewer private sector jobs vs. more or fewer public sector jobs; • Obama care yes vs. Obama care no. And the list goes on and on. We all need to study both sides of the issues, and become knowledgeable enough to be able to defend our point of view. Become familiar with the candidates and vote for those that support your views and are principled enough to carry out what they have promised. The future of our country depends on well-informed voters that are willing to vote on the issues and not on emotions. Get involved! Dick Bryant Redmond

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How to submit

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 550 and 650 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or email them to The Bulletin. Write: My Nickel’s Worth / In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 Fax: 541-385-5804 Email: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Dedication of community leaders is vital to HIV prevention By Daniel Halperin Los Angeles Times

This week, tens of thousands of delegates are meeting in Washington for the biennial International AIDS Conference, striving to advance an agenda for an AIDS-free generation. Achieving such an ambitious goal will require multiple strategies, but virtually all agree that male circumcision — which provides powerful protection against HIV infection as well as other health benefits for men and women — must be a core element. Yet although some prevention efforts in Africa have been successful, others have floundered. One of the lessons learned from these experiences is that when powerful Western donors set out to help people in poorer parts of the world, they sometimes end up creating more problems. However, when done properly, with local communities and their leaders engaged, international health initiatives can save millions of lives. On July 5, PBS’ “NewsHour� included a GlobalPost report on “Why a U.S. Circumcision Push Failed in Swaziland.� Long-term follow-up research

indicates this one-time procedure reduces HIV risk in heterosexual men by about 70 percent. As fewer men become infected, fewer women are exposed to the virus. Thus, if a recent program had been more effectively implemented, many thousands of new infections could have been prevented in Swaziland, which suffers from the world’s highest HIV rate. In late 2005, while I was employed by the U.S. Agency for International Development as its regional HIV prevention advisor and based in that small kingdom, we began funding the Family Life Association of Swaziland, or FLAS, to develop a pilot initiative for safe and affordable circumcision services. This was before the HIV-prevention benefits of the procedure were fully proved, so our small grant supported circumcision as part of general male health services. Studies in Africa show that men as well as women tend to view male circumcision favorably, primarily for reasons such as improved hygiene. The program was immediately inundated with clients. During the one-

year project, FLAS could barely keep up with the demand, even though knowledge of the program was spread mainly by word of mouth. Nonetheless, in late 2006 administrators of the U.S. government’s global AIDS program, PEPFAR, declined to renew its modest ($150,000 a year) funding, ruling that it conflicted with U.S. policy, which would not support circumcision until its HIV-prevention effect was definitively proven. The following year, after several clinical trials in Africa confirmed the effectiveness of circumcision, PEPFAR decided to undertake an ambitiously rapid scale-up in one nation in southern Africa, the world’s most hard-hit region. It eventually chose Swaziland, presumably in part because it had substantial experience with a circumcision program. Those of us involved in the original FLAS initiative there recognized that it was imperative, in reality and in public perception, for the Swazis to be in the driver’s seat of such a potentially crucial initiative. But the new project went in a very

different direction. The level of funding and foreign consultant presence grew dramatically. Although wellmeaning, this created the impression of a rashly developed U.S. initiative to persuade 80 percent of Swazi males to become circumcised within a year. The angry emails I received from friends and colleagues in Swaziland were consistent with what GlobalPost found: “Ask Swazi AIDS professionals about the campaign and many will privately — for fear of jeopardizing future U.S. funding — term it a ‘disaster’ and ‘an exercise in bullying.’ � Mahlubi Hadebe, prevention coordinator of Swaziland’s national HIV/ AIDS program, was quoted as saying, “(The American contractors) just would not listen. . . . You have to identify thought leaders in communities and use them to convey the message.� He and others also believed that some of the billboard and other messaging was poorly conceived: “Lisoka lisoka ngekusoka — which literally means ‘the lover boy is a lover boy thanks to circumcision’ — appeals to the playboy in the man.� (In contrast, a 2006 FLAS

poster read, “I’m circumcised and I’m proud. . . . And I’m still faithful to my partner.�) The head of Swaziland’s HIV/AIDS program, Derek von Wissell, told me recently, “The campaign was well-intended but . . . we were hardly involved. . . . It was a very regrettable use of resources.� Fortunately, there are better models in Africa. For years, foreign researchers, such as Robert Bailey of the University of Illinois at Chicago, have collaborated with Kenyans to establish a vigorous national program. Over the last three years, there have been about 400,000 circumcisions in Nyanza, boosting the proportion of men circumcised from 17 percent in 2007 to about 60 percent now. In addition to local ownership, some experts have observed something else that’s crucial: Programs are likely to be more effective if they are presented to local communities as part of integrated health services rather than being overtly linked to AIDS. — Daniel Halperin is an HIV prevention and public health researcher based at the University of North Carolina.


THURSDAY, JULY 26, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

C5

O D N Travis "Ted" Joanne Emma Franklin, of Prineville (formally from Dorris, CA) June 12, 1938 - July 22, 2012 Arrangements: Eternal Hills in Klamath Falls. Services: A private memorial service will be held by family at a later date.

Lee Wesley Hubbard, of Crooked River Ranch May 23, 1962 - July 13, 2012 Arrangements: Bel-Air Funeral Home, 541-475-2241 Services: Services will be held at a later date.

Marsha Ann Eiguren, of Bend May 25, 1945 - July 23, 2012 Arrangements: Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home, 541-382-2471, www.niswonger-reynolds.com

Services: Service will be 10:00 AM Monday August 20, 2012 at St. Francis (Historic) Catholic Church in Bend. Contributions may be made to:

Leukemia & Lymphoma Society, 736 Cole Street, San Francisco, California 94117.

Rebecca Cowell Corona, of Prineville (formerly of Santa Maria, California) Sept. 1, 1921 - July 21, 2012 Arrangements: Prineville Funeral Home, 541-447-6459 Services: At her request no public services will be held. Contributions may be made to:

Chase Bank - Prineville, in her memory.

Rev. James W. Dougherty, of Bend Sept. 20, 1927 - July 21, 2012 Arrangements: Baird Funeral Home (541) 382-0903 www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: A Memorial Service will take place on Saturday, July 28, 2012 at 12:00 PM at Redmond Assembly of God Church, located at 1865 W. Antler Ave. in Redmond. A reception will immediately follow. Contributions may be made to:

Partners In Care Hospice 2075 NE Wyatt Court Bend, Oregon 97701 www.partnersbend.org

Theodore Sizemore Dec. 28, 1988 - July 20, 2012 Ted’s life was cut short by a tragic accident on July 20, 2012. He was 23 years old. Ted graduated from Bend Senior High School in 2007, before moving to Corvallis, where he started his college career, later transferring to the OSU Cascades campus, where he was Ted Sizemore working on his degree in psychology. He was proud to be an Oregon State Beaver. Ted was an avid golfer who also enjoyed fishing, hiking, camping, downhill skiing, wakeboarding and boating with his family and friends. His quick wit and charm afforded him numerous friends and acquaintances. He was well liked and touched the lives and hearts of many people. Always a gentle spirit, Ted was Christian in faith. A generous and kind soul, Ted opted to be an organ donor and, as a result, three people's lives were saved due to his untimely passing. He leaves behind his immediate family: mother, Beatrice, father, James, and brother, Brandon, all of Bend; and grandfather, James Sr. of Salem. Also left behind are his grandmother, aunt, uncle, and two cousins from Southern California, and an aunt and cousin from Boston, Massachusetts. He was preceded in death by his great-grandparents, Ted and Beatrice Martinez, grandfather, Michael Martinez, and grandfather, Rick Walton. A Celebration of Life will be held at the family home on Saturday, July 28, 2012, at 11:00 a.m. located at 60625 Ridge Heights in Bend. The attire is casual (i.e. sundresses, shorts and flip flops, bright colors only). In lieu of flowers, the family has requested donations be made to the Humane Society of Central Oregon, 61170 SE 27th St., Bend, OR 97702 www. hsco.org, in honor of Ted Sizemore. Baird Funeral Home of Bend was honored to serve the family. (541) 382-0903 www.bairdmortuaries.com

Obituary policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, email or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825.

Deadlines: Death Notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details.

Phone: 541-617-7825 Email: obits@bendbulletin.com Fax: 541-322-7254

Mail: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708

D E 

 Deaths of note from around the world: John Atta Mills, 68: President of Ghana known for his historical significance in stabilizing democracy in that country. Died Tuesday, five months short of finishing his first term in office. Chad Everett, 75: Actor active since the 1960s, known for understated role as Dr. Joe Gannon on TV’s “Medical Center� from 1969-76. Died Tuesday at his home in Los Angeles after battling lung cancer. Chris Wedes, 84: TV clown “J.P. Patches� who entertained Seattle-area children for decades beginning with a blackand-white show starting in 1958. Died Sunday after being diagnosed with cancer in 2007. Louise Nippert, 100: Partowner and former majority owner of the Cincinatti Reds.

FEATURED OBITUARY

Died Monday at her home in a Cincinatti suburb of an unspecified illness. Hiroshi Daifuku, 92: Former chief of the U.N. Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization’s monuments and sites division. Died July 12 at his home in Washington of accidental choking. Ding Guangen, 83: Former chief of propaganda for the Chinese Communist Party who oversaw the party’s control of media and the arts in the 1990’s. Died July 22 in Beijing. Jim Carlen, 79: College football coach at South Carolina, West Virginia and Texas Tech. Died July 22 in Columbia, S.C. Gilbert Brown, 85: Economist at the World Bank who oversaw policy issues for Pakistan and Bangladesh. Died June 27 in McLean, Va. — From wire reports

Greg Wahl-Stephens / The Associated Press

Desiree Young, left, the mother of missing 7-year-old Kyron Horman, with stepmother Terri Harmon, listens during a June 2010 news conference in Portland. Terri Horman, the stepmother of Kyron Horman who vanished two years ago, has asked a judge to hold off hearing a suit that says she knows where the boy is. The lawsuit filed by Kyron Horman’s biological mother, Desiree Young, asks a judge to order Terri Horman to return Kyron or, if he’s dead, say where his remains are. The suit accuses her of kidnapping Kyron, by herself or with help.

Stepmother of missing boy seeks delay of lawsuit By Nigel Duara The Associated Press

Amy Sancetta / The Associated Press

Frank Pierson, then president of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, speaks during a news conference in 2003 about plans for the Academy Awards in Los Angeles. The Oscar-winning screenwriter of “Dog Day Afternoon� and “Cool Hand Luke� died Monday in Los Angeles after a short illness. He was 87.

Frank Pierson, Oscar-winning screenwriter, dies at 87 By William Yardley New York Times News Service

Frank Pierson, an Academy Award-winning screenwriter whose richly textured work included the scripts for “Cool Hand Luke� and “Dog Day Afternoon� and who later became an influential Hollywood leader and mentor, died Sunday in Los Angeles. He was 87. His death was announced by the Writers Guild of America, West, which Pierson twice served as president. He was also president of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences from 2001 to 2005. Pierson had been working as a correspondent for Time and Life magazines in the 1950s when he decided to try screenwriting. By 1958, he had quit journalism and sold his first script to the halfhour anthology show “AlcoaGoodyear Theater.� He was soon writing and directing full time for film and television, beginning with the 1962 television series “Have Gun — Will Travel.� He was nominated for Academy Awards for “Cat Ballou� (1965), a high-spirited Western with Jane Fonda and Lee Marvin, and the chaingang drama “Cool Hand Luke� (1967), with Paul Newman. He won, for original screenplay, for “Dog Day Afternoon,� directed by Sidney Lumet and released in 1975. Pierson said he struggled mightily with that script — and he later used his struggle as a teaching tool. He told students that he had been unable to capture the essence of the central character, the leader of an inept gang of bank robbers who winds up taking hostages. He broke through after concluding that the thief, based on a real-life robber and played by Al Pacino, was a pleaser, someone trying in his flawed way to make others happy. “I’ve never heard anyone speak of their own work more dispassionately and more usefully,� said Howard Rodman, the vice president of the Writers Guild of America, West. Part of Pierson’s legacy is

“I’ve never heard anyone speak of their own work more dispassionately and more usefully.� — Howard Rodman, vice president of Writers Guild of America, West

a single irresistible line from “Cool Hand Luke.� “What we’ve got here,� a prison warden (Strother Martin) says to the inmate Luke (Newman), “is failure to communicate.� Luke later uses the line himself, and it has been repeated and remixed in popular culture ever since. The American Film Institute ranked it in 2005 as the 11thbest movie quote of all time. Frank Romer Pierson was born in Chappaqua, N.Y., on May 12, 1925. When he was 18, his mother, Louise Randall Pierson, wrote a bestselling book based on their family life, “Roughly Speaking,� which was made into a movie of the same name in 1945. The story includes the tales of three sons who enlist to fight in World War II, one of them modeled after Frank. After serving in the Pacific, Pierson graduated from Harvard with a degree in cultural anthropology. His survivors include his wife, Helene; a daughter, Eve; a son, Michael; and five grandchildren. In recent years Pierson was a consulting producer of the TV series “Mad Men� and “The Good Wife.� Pierson was a devoted mentor. In the 1980s, he was a founding writer at the Sundance Screenwriters Lab, where he was known for rigor, frankness and more than one epiphany after eventually seeing merit in a work of which he had at first been wary. “We all learned from Frank,� Michelle Satter, the founding director of Sundance’s feature film program, wrote on the Sundance website Monday, “and when he spoke, it always got very quiet in the room.�

PORTLAND — The stepmother of an Oregon boy who vanished two years ago has asked a judge to hold off hearing a civil suit that says she knows where the boy is and must turn him over. The suit, filed by Kyron Horman’s biological mother Desiree Young, seeks $10 million and asks a judge to order Terri Horman to return Kyron or, if he’s dead, say where his remains are located. The boy was 7 when he disappeared June 4, 2010, after attending a science fair at his school. In the motion filed Tuesday to hold the case in abatement, Terri Horman says the civil suit seeks facts that could lead to a criminal prosecution. She wants the judge to stay the case by two years. “While one can sympathize with Young,� Horman’s attorney, Peter Bunch, wrote in the filing, “her lawsuit is, at its core, an attempt to circumvent established procedures for discovery in criminal proceedings and is an attack on Horman’s fundamental constitutional rights.� Investigators have long focused on Terri Horman, although they have not named her as a suspect or filed criminal charges. The civil lawsuit accuses her of kidnapping Kyron, by herself or with help.

When the lawsuit was filed June 1, Young’s attorney, Elden Rosenthal, said it would be on a “parallel track� with the criminal investigation. He would not say what kind of reaction the Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office gave when he informed them of Young’s decision to sue. Terri Horman believes the suit is working to advance the aims of local law enforcement. She points out that the judge hearing her divorce from Kyron’s father, Kaine Horman, delayed that case while the criminal investigation plays out. “Plainly and simply, Young’s lawsuit is a quest for information to move the criminal investigation forward and to taint any jury pool,� according to the filing. Civil allegations require a lower standard of proof — a preponderance of evidence — than criminal charges, which must be proven beyond a reasonable doubt. Compelling her to testify, Bunch wrote, could force Terri Horman to invoke her constitutional right against self-incrimination, pointing out the weak spots in her case. “The burden on Horman of being required to participate in this lawsuit before the district attorney and police have completed their investigation squarely jeopardizes her constitutional rights,� Bunch wrote.�

O   B Probe under way in OSU data breach CORVALLIS — Law enforcement authorities are investigating a security breach by an Oregon State University vendor who copied information from a data base and could have compromised the private information of 21,000 students and employees between 1996 and 2009. The Corvallis GazetteTimes reports the vendor provided check printing services in the cashier’s office and copied the data during software upgrades. The custom software was used to generate checks for emergency student aid and payroll draws School officials said they don’t believe the company acted maliciously. They wouldn’t name it, citing the investigation under way. Those who might be affected have been notified. The 30,000 to 40,000 checks contained information such as names, university ID, date, check number and amount. Records after 2004 did not include Social Security numbers.

State disciplines tax workers PORTLAND — Oregon officials have taken action against four Revenue Department workers who failed to catch a fraudulent tax return that resulted in a $2.1 million refund. Two employees have been reassigned to jobs in which

they will no longer have the authority to approve cash refunds. Two others received disciplinary action, but can stay in their current positions. The personnel moves followed an internal investigation into a bogus return submitted via Turbo Tax by 25-year-old Krystle Reyes of Salem. Reyes received the refund on a debit card and spent about $150,000 before twice reporting the card lost or stolen. At that point the ruse was discovered. The state has recovered about $1.9 million of the money.

Dog thought lost in shipwreck survives NEWPORT — One of two dogs thought lost in the wreck of a fishing boat on the central Oregon Coast has been found alive. Two men and their dogs were aboard the 48-foot vessel Two Mikes when it crashed into the north jetty at the mouth of Yaquina Bay late Sunday night. Shane LaGue and the captain, Todd Holt, survived with minor injuries. They thought the two dogs drowned. A yellow Lab named “Bob� did not survive and was recovered from the boat by the Coast Guard. But on Wednesday another fisherman found LaGue’s 6-month-old pit bull “Camo� running on the north jetty and brought him to the Lincoln County Animal Shelter in Newport. — From wire reports


THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, JULY 26, 2012

C6

W E AT H ER FOR EC A ST Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LP ©2012.

TODAY, JULY 26

FRIDAY

Today: Partly cloudy, chance thunderstorms.

HIGH

90

Mostly sunny.

Tonight: Partly cloudy, chance thunderstorms.

LOW

Astoria 65/56

61/55

Cannon Beach 60/54

Hillsboro Portland 83/59 85/57

Tillamook 67/55

Salem

64/54

86/60

90/63

Maupin

93/57

Corvallis Yachats

85/47

Prineville 92/51 Sisters Redmond Paulina 88/47 88/49 90/50 Sunriver Bend

63/55

Eugene

Florence

86/55

66/53

87/59

85/54

Coos Bay

87/47

Oakridge

Cottage Grove

Crescent

Roseburg

63/53

Silver Lake

86/44

Port Orford 66/53

Gold Beach 64/54

85/47

Vale 100/73

Juntura

Burns Riley

WEST Patchy fog early today, with clouds lingering near the coast.

Jordan Valley 92/58

Frenchglen 95/62

Yesterday’s state extremes

Rome

• 98° The

97/60

Dalles

89/55

82/51

Klamath Falls 86/50

85/54

• 39°

Fields

Lakeview

McDermitt

95/63

87/54

Meacham

96/52

-30s

-20s

Yesterday’s extremes (in the 48 contiguous states):

-10s

0s

Vancouver 75/59

10s

Calgary 68/53

Seattle 81/57

20s

30s

40s

Saskatoon Winnipeg 80/63 77/59

50s

60s

Thunder Bay 70/55

70s

80s

90s

100s 110s

Quebec 77/62

Bismarck 76/56

FRONTS

NORTHWEST NEWS

Should Columbia sturgeon be catch-and-release only? The Columbian, Vancouver, Wash.

Washington and Oregon will adopt a new Columbia River sturgeon accord for 2013 and beyond. The No. 1 question is: Will fishing shift solely to catch-and-release? Eliminating sturgeon retention in both the sport and commercial fisheries got widespread support at a public meeting in Portland last week, one of six sessions to gather opinion on future management of the declining population. “Shut it down to catch-andkeep fishing,’’ said Lance Beckman of White Salmon, a retired federal research biologist who studied sturgeon in several locales. “Fishing is really slow. Knowledgeable fishermen just aren’t catching fish — keepers or otherwise.’’ Eric Linde of Vancouver, a guide for 12 years, said the Columbia Gorge is a “wasteland’’ for sturgeon fishing. Anglers catch few sublegals, keepers or oversize sturgeon, he added. Sturgeon in the gorge used to be seen jumping, used to get caught on salmon lures, used to be seen feeding on shad. But not any more. “If you get a bite, it’s a big deal,’’ Linde said. “I think this is a catastrophic collapse. I vote for catch and release.’’ Tony Nigro of the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife said the population of legal-size (38 to 54 inches) sturgeon has dropped steadily in the past few years. The legal-size population estimate was 80,000 fish in 2011 and is 65,000 fish in 2012. Sturgeon harvests were cut 40 percent in 2010, 30 percent in 2011 and 38 percent for 2012. The good news is Washington and Oregon expect to see the legal-size population increase to about 115,000 in 2013 as more sturgeon reach 38 inches. The bad news is the states expect the population to drop again in a few years as sampling shows a decline in the number of younger age fish.

HIGH LOW

84 46

86 48

BEND ALMANAC

PLANET WATCH

TEMPERATURE

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . .6:18 a.m. . . . . . 8:10 p.m. Venus . . . . . .2:44 a.m. . . . . . 5:24 p.m. Mars. . . . . .11:49 a.m. . . . . 11:13 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . .1:44 a.m. . . . . . 4:45 p.m. Saturn. . . . .12:37 p.m. . . . . 11:47 p.m. Uranus . . . .10:59 p.m. . . . . 11:28 a.m.

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend 24 hours ending 4 p.m.*. . 0.00” High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86/54 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . 0.08” Record high . . . . . . . 104 in 1928 Average month to date. . . 0.46” Record low. . . . . . . . . 32 in 1966 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.57” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 Average year to date. . . . . 6.18” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.29.95 Record 24 hours . . .0.22 in 1987 *Melted liquid equivalent

Moon phases First

Full

July 26

Aug. 1

Last

New

Aug. 9 Aug. 17

FIRE INDEX

Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Precipitation values are 24-hour totals through 4 p.m.

Bend, west of Hwy. 97......Ext. Bend, east of Hwy. 97.....High Redmond/Madras .......High

Astoria . . . . . . . .64/55/0.00 Baker City . . . . . .87/47/0.00 Brookings . . . . . 58/48/trace Burns. . . . . . . . . .92/53/0.00 Eugene . . . . . . . .89/49/0.00 Klamath Falls . . .87/49/0.00 Lakeview. . . . . . .88/46/0.00 La Pine . . . . . . . .91/40/0.00 Medford . . . . . . .95/59/0.00 Newport . . . . . . .61/52/0.00 North Bend . . . . . .64/54/NA Ontario . . . . . . . .97/61/0.00 Pendleton . . . . . .94/54/0.00 Portland . . . . . . .85/57/0.00 Prineville . . . . . . .88/54/0.00 Redmond. . . . . . .90/49/0.00 Roseburg. . . . . . .89/56/0.00 Salem . . . . . . . . .87/53/0.00 Sisters . . . . . . . . .91/50/0.00 The Dalles . . . . . .98/60/0.00

Mod. = Moderate; Ext. = Extreme

. . . . .65/56/c . . . . .65/55/pc . . . . .93/57/s . . . . .90/53/pc . . . .63/53/pc . . . . . .63/54/c . . . . .92/57/s . . . . .90/54/pc . . . . .86/55/s . . . . .78/54/pc . . . . .86/50/s . . . . . .84/48/s . . . . .87/54/s . . . . . .86/50/s . . . .88/46/pc . . . . . .86/39/s . . . . .94/61/s . . . . . .92/58/s . . . . .62/55/c . . . . .62/54/pc . . . . .64/54/c . . . . . .64/55/c . . . .100/72/s . . . . . .99/67/s . . . . .93/58/s . . . . . .92/58/s . . . . .83/59/s . . . . . .74/58/s . . . .92/51/pc . . . . . .89/49/s . . . . .89/50/s . . . . . .88/49/s . . . .85/57/pc . . . . .82/55/pc . . . . .86/57/s . . . . .76/56/pc . . . .88/49/pc . . . . . .84/45/s . . . . .90/63/s . . . . . .86/60/s

PRECIPITATION

WATER REPORT Sisters ..............................High La Pine................................Ext. Prineville.........................High

The following was compiled by the Central Oregon watermaster and irrigation districts as a service to irrigators and sportsmen.

Reservoir Acre feet Capacity Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . . 38,245 . . . . . . 55,000 Wickiup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157,071 . . . . . 200,000 Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . 77,162 . . . . . . 91,700 Ochoco Reservoir . . . . . . . . 31,823 . . . . . . 47,000 Prineville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120,302 . . . . . 153,777 The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is River flow Station Cubic ft./sec Deschutes RiverBelow Crane Prairie . . . . . . . 485 for solar at noon. Deschutes RiverBelow Wickiup . . . . . . . . . . 1,550 Crescent CreekBelow Crescent Lake . . . . . . . 145 LOW MEDIUM HIGH V.HIGH Little DeschutesNear La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74.3 0 2 4 6 8 10 Deschutes RiverBelow Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161 Deschutes RiverAt Benham Falls . . . . . . . . . 2,001 Crooked RiverAbove Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . 6 Crooked RiverBelow Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . 218 Updated daily. Source: pollen.com Ochoco CreekBelow Ochoco Res. . . . . . . . . . 15.8 Crooked RiverNear Terrebonne . . . . . . . . . . . 74.3 Contact: Watermaster, 388-6669 LOW MEDIUM HIGH or go to www.wrd.state.or.us

To report a wildfire, call 911

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX

9

POLLEN COUNT

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

Halifax 76/59 P ortland Billings Portland 73/62 91/64 To ronto 83/59 St. Paul Green Bay • 110° Boston 83/65 85/67 81/65 Boise Palm Springs, Calif. 79/69 Buffalo Rapid City Detroit 84/69 97/63 New York 86/61 90/70 • 33° 90/77 Des Moines Cheyenne Stanley, Idaho Philadelphia Columbus 92/68 Chicago 84/59 94/70 94/78 88/73 Omaha San Francisco • 2.22” Salt Lake Washington, D. C. 92/65 Denver 63/54 City Staples, Minn. 98/78 90/62 Louis Las 97/72 Louisville Kansas City St.96/76 Vegas 98/74 92/73 Charlotte 106/81 99/74 Albuquerque Los Angeles Oklahoma City Nashville Little Rock 91/69 68/61 100/73 97/76 101/78 Phoenix Atlanta 107/86 Honolulu Birmingham 96/75 88/73 Dallas Tijuana 96/76 100/79 76/60 New Orleans 92/78 Orlando Houston 97/77 Chihuahua 93/77 97/71 Miami 91/79 Monterrey La Paz 99/77 95/73 Mazatlan Anchorage 90/75 63/51 Juneau 73/50

By Allen Thomas

Mostly sunny.

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS -40s

Mostly sunny.

HIGH LOW

83 46

OREGON CITIES

99/62

88/48

MONDAY

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE Sunrise today . . . . . . 5:48 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 8:35 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 5:49 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 8:34 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 2:27 p.m. Moonset today . . . . . . . .none

EAST Ontario Mostly sunny skies 100/72 with very warm temperatures Nyssa today. 97/68

91/60

89/49

Chiloquin

Medford Ashland

63/53

91/61

94/54

Paisley 94/61

Brookings

93/57

Unity

88/49

Grants Pass 91/55

Baker City John Day

Christmas Valley

Chemult

85/57

Hampton

Fort Rock 89/48

86/45

81/40

Bandon

84/54

Brothers 87/46

La Pine 88/46

Crescent Lake

64/53

90/50

91/56

HIGH LOW

88 48

CENTRAL Partly to mostly sunny with isolated thunderstorms today.

88/50

Union

Mitchell 93/52

91/55

Camp Sherman

84/56

85/51

Joseph

Granite Spray 98/52

Enterprise

Meacham 88/55

90/55

Madras

87/51

La Grande

Condon

Warm Springs

Wallowa

83/44

90/54

92/57

92/56

86/55

93/58

Ruggs

Willowdale

Albany

Newport

Pendleton

96/60

91/54

86/57

62/55

Hermiston 95/60

Arlington

Wasco

Sandy

Government Camp 75/52

84/57

96/60

The Biggs Dalles 91/57

83/57

McMinnville

Lincoln City

Umatilla

Hood River

SUNDAY Mostly sunny.

HIGH LOW

50

FORECAST: STATE Seaside

SATURDAY

“Our concern is a hole in the juvenile fish coming up that we’ll see pretty soon,’’ Nigro said. Harry Barber of Washougal, a member of the bistate Columbia River Recreational Advisory Group, said the threshold question is if there should be retention. If retention continues, what is a low enough harvest level to assure the population will rebuild, Barber asked. “The population has tanked and people should be held accountable,’’ Barber said. Jim Bridwell of Portland, also an advisory group member, said a ban on sturgeon retention needs to apply to the Columbia River gillnetters, too. “Growing the population should be the Nos. 1, 2 and 3 goals,’’ he said. Larry Swanson of Vancouver, another advisory group member, said to continue with the status quo in 2013, trying one more year with a small harvest. Barber said most commercial fall chinook salmon fishing now is upstream of the mouth of the Lewis River, an area typically used by sturgeon that time of year. In the fall, the river is warm and there is no “soak-time limit’’ (a time limit on how long the net can be fished before recovered and the catch removed). Barber asked state biologists if the handle and release of oversize sturgeon in fall gillnet fishing is a contributor to reduced spawning the following spring. Beckman said ending sturgeon harvest will not be enough to recover the population. “I’m a firm believer in hatchery supplementation,’’ he said. “It seems to fall on deaf ears in the Northwest.” He called for an aggressive hatchery program as soon as possible. “We’re out of time,’’ Beckman said. “If you start tomorrow, it will be 25 years before you see the contribution to the sturgeon fishery.’’

Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .102/77/0.00 . . . 99/76/t . 97/76/pc Akron . . . . . . . . . .87/56/0.00 . . . 92/69/t . . .84/65/t Albany. . . . . . . . . .82/59/0.00 . . . 88/72/t . . .85/64/t Albuquerque. . . . .95/65/0.00 . . . 91/69/t . . .92/68/t Anchorage . . . . . .66/50/0.00 . .63/51/pc . 64/51/sh Atlanta . . . . . . . . .98/76/0.00 . .96/75/pc . . .94/74/t Atlantic City . . . . .87/66/0.00 . .88/76/pc . . .94/76/t Austin . . . . . . . . . .95/74/0.00 . .97/77/pc . 98/75/pc Baltimore . . . . . . .87/69/0.00 . .97/76/pc . . .97/73/t Billings . . . . . . . . .91/59/0.00 . .91/64/pc . 95/66/pc Birmingham . . . . .97/76/0.00 . .96/76/pc . . .94/74/t Bismarck. . . . . . . .86/69/0.00 . .76/56/pc . . 84/63/s Boise . . . . . . . . . . .98/66/0.00 . . . 97/63/s . . 94/61/s Boston. . . . . . . . . .83/65/0.00 . . . 79/69/t . . .79/68/t Bridgeport, CT. . . .85/64/0.00 . . . 87/72/t . . .83/70/t Buffalo . . . . . . . . .84/60/0.00 . . . 84/69/t . . .81/64/t Burlington, VT. . . .79/62/0.00 . . . 72/63/t . 78/60/pc Caribou, ME . . . . .74/56/0.00 . .78/60/pc . 77/54/pc Charleston, SC . . .93/73/0.01 . .94/79/pc . 94/79/pc Charlotte. . . . . . . .93/72/0.05 . .99/74/pc . . .98/74/t Chattanooga. . . . .94/77/0.00 . .97/75/pc . . .92/72/t Cheyenne . . . . . . .82/60/0.03 . . . 84/59/s . 86/61/pc Chicago. . . . . . . . .99/70/0.01 . .88/73/pc . 85/73/pc Cincinnati . . . . . . .95/70/0.01 . . . 96/72/t . . .89/68/t Cleveland . . . . . . .89/61/0.00 . . . 91/69/t . . .81/69/t Colorado Springs . .85/69/NA . .84/58/pc . 86/60/pc Columbia, MO . .106/81/0.00 . . . 94/70/t . . 97/69/s Columbia, SC . . . .94/76/0.00 101/78/pc . . .99/79/t Columbus, GA. . .101/80/0.00 . . . 94/75/t . . .95/75/t Columbus, OH. . . .91/64/0.00 . . . 94/70/t . . .87/67/t Concord, NH. . . . .82/59/0.00 . . . 77/64/t . . 79/64/c Corpus Christi. . . .97/79/0.00 . .91/80/pc . 91/79/pc Dallas Ft Worth. .101/79/0.00 100/79/pc . 99/78/pc Dayton . . . . . . . . .93/67/0.00 . . . 94/70/t . . .87/67/t Denver. . . . . . . . . . .90/64/NA . .90/62/pc . 92/65/pc Des Moines. . . . .106/81/0.00 . . . 92/68/s . . 86/64/s Detroit. . . . . . . . . .90/61/0.00 . . . 90/70/t . . .83/68/t Duluth. . . . . . . . . .81/65/1.58 . . . 72/60/t . 76/60/pc El Paso. . . . . . . . . .95/73/0.00 . . 100/75/t . . .96/75/t Fairbanks. . . . . . . .70/55/0.00 . .78/54/pc . 72/50/sh Fargo. . . . . . . . . . .92/69/0.07 . . . 79/59/t . . 82/61/s Flagstaff . . . . . . . .79/54/0.00 . . . 82/56/s . 82/55/pc

Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . . .93/64/0.00 . .85/66/pc . . .82/65/t Green Bay. . . . . . .91/66/0.10 . .81/65/pc . . .77/61/t Greensboro. . . . . .88/72/0.00 . .97/75/pc . . .96/73/t Harrisburg. . . . . . .85/63/0.00 . . . 95/74/t . . .92/71/t Hartford, CT . . . . .85/61/0.00 . . . 85/72/t . . .82/69/t Helena. . . . . . . . . .89/54/0.00 . . . 86/56/s . . 87/57/s Honolulu. . . . . . . .86/75/0.00 . . . 88/73/s . . 89/74/s Houston . . . . . . . .93/75/0.00 . .93/77/pc . 95/78/pc Huntsville . . . . . . .94/74/0.00 . .96/75/pc . . .92/72/t Indianapolis . . . .103/74/0.00 . . . 95/71/t . 92/68/pc Jackson, MS . . . . .93/75/0.00 . .94/75/pc . . .93/76/t Jacksonville. . . . . .95/73/0.00 . . . 93/77/t . 96/78/pc Juneau. . . . . . . . . .65/47/0.00 . . .73/50/c . . 65/54/c Kansas City. . . . .106/83/0.00 . . . 92/73/t . . 96/70/s Lansing . . . . . . . . .92/62/0.00 . . . 83/65/t . . .81/64/t Las Vegas . . . . . .106/84/0.00 . .106/81/s . 105/81/s Lexington . . . . . . .96/73/0.00 . . . 95/73/t . 87/69/pc Lincoln. . . . . . . . .104/80/0.00 . .92/65/pc . . 91/68/s Little Rock. . . . . .102/77/0.00 101/78/pc . . .96/76/t Los Angeles. . . . . .70/61/0.00 . . . 68/61/s . . 69/62/s Louisville. . . . . . .100/78/0.00 . . . 98/74/t . . .91/73/t Madison, WI . . . . .98/66/0.28 . .89/64/pc . 83/62/pc Memphis. . . . . . . .97/79/0.00 . .96/78/pc . . .95/76/t Miami . . . . . . . . . .92/79/0.00 . . . 91/79/s . . 91/80/s Milwaukee . . . . . .96/70/0.24 . .84/71/pc . 79/68/pc Minneapolis . . . . .92/75/0.00 . . . 85/67/t . 79/62/pc Nashville. . . . . . . .96/78/0.00 . .97/76/pc . . .92/72/t New Orleans. . . . .92/77/0.09 . . . 92/78/t . . .92/78/t New York . . . . . . .85/67/0.00 . . . 90/77/t . . .89/72/t Newark, NJ . . . . . .89/69/0.00 . . . 93/77/t . . .88/71/t Norfolk, VA . . . . . .82/77/0.00 . .97/78/pc . 99/78/pc Oklahoma City . .103/80/0.00 . . 100/73/t . 100/75/t Omaha . . . . . . . .106/83/0.00 . . . 92/65/s . . 88/67/s Orlando. . . . . . . . .94/73/0.00 . . . 97/77/s . . 95/77/s Palm Springs. . . .110/78/0.00 . .106/76/s . 106/77/s Peoria . . . . . . . . .102/74/0.00 . .91/67/pc . . 89/66/s Philadelphia . . . . .87/70/0.00 . . . 94/78/t . . .95/74/t Phoenix. . . . . . . .106/86/0.00 . .107/86/s 108/87/pc Pittsburgh . . . . . . .84/59/0.00 . . . 90/70/t . . .84/66/t Portland, ME. . . . .80/63/0.00 . . . 73/62/t . . 76/61/c Providence . . . . . .83/62/0.00 . . . 82/72/t . . .80/67/t Raleigh . . . . . . . . .90/70/0.00 . .98/76/pc . . .99/73/t

Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . . .88/63/0.00 . . . 86/61/s . 88/68/pc Reno . . . . . . . . . . .96/60/0.00 . . . 92/60/s . . 90/59/s Richmond . . . . . . .89/71/0.00 . .99/77/pc . . .99/75/t Rochester, NY . . . .83/57/0.00 . . . 88/69/t . . .82/65/t Sacramento. . . . . .90/57/0.00 . . . 89/56/s . . 90/57/s St. Louis. . . . . . . .108/86/0.00 . . . 96/76/t . . 99/71/s Salt Lake City . . . .93/68/0.00 . . . 97/72/s . . 96/73/s San Antonio . . . . .96/78/0.00 . .97/76/pc . 98/75/pc San Diego . . . . . . .73/65/0.00 . . . 72/64/s . . 72/63/s San Francisco . . . .72/59/0.00 . . . 66/55/s . . 66/55/s San Jose . . . . . . . .78/57/0.00 . . . 76/56/s . . 77/56/s Santa Fe . . . . . . . .89/62/0.04 . . . 83/62/t . . .81/61/t

Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Savannah . . . . . . .99/77/0.00 . . . 96/77/t . 96/78/pc Seattle. . . . . . . . . .79/55/0.00 . . . 81/57/s . . 72/55/s Sioux Falls. . . . . . .95/77/0.00 . .89/61/pc . 87/62/pc Spokane . . . . . . . .85/60/0.00 . . . 93/60/s . . 90/58/s Springfield, MO .102/75/0.00 . . . 98/72/t . . 97/70/s Tampa. . . . . . . . . .90/79/0.00 . . . 92/77/s . . 92/77/s Tucson. . . . . . . . . .97/76/0.00 101/73/pc . 100/73/t Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .104/81/0.00 . . 100/77/t . . .99/76/t Washington, DC . .89/72/0.00 . .98/78/pc . . .97/75/t Wichita . . . . . . . .108/80/0.00 . . . 96/71/t 102/74/pc Yakima . . . . . . . . .83/54/0.00 . . . 93/57/s . . 91/58/s Yuma. . . . . . . . . .108/87/0.00 . .106/80/s . 107/80/s

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . . .82/59/0.00 . . . 77/59/s . . .78/61/t Athens. . . . . . . . . .93/73/0.00 . . . 96/78/s . . 94/80/s Auckland. . . . . . . .63/55/0.00 . .60/47/pc . 58/48/pc Baghdad . . . . . . .118/90/0.00 . .118/89/s . 120/88/s Bangkok . . . . . . . .88/81/0.00 . . . 88/77/t . . .85/76/t Beijing. . . . . . . . . .82/75/0.00 . . . 93/74/t . . .90/74/t Beirut . . . . . . . . . .88/81/0.00 . . . 88/79/s . . 87/79/s Berlin. . . . . . . . . . .90/61/0.00 . .84/63/pc . . 84/64/s Bogota . . . . . . . . .64/45/0.00 . .68/48/sh . 66/52/sh Budapest. . . . . . . .79/66/0.00 . . . 84/65/t . . .87/66/t Buenos Aires. . . . .57/30/0.00 . .57/36/pc . . 56/39/s Cabo San Lucas . .91/77/0.00 . .93/78/pc . 94/78/pc Cairo . . . . . . . . . . .99/77/0.00 . .101/77/s . . 98/76/s Calgary . . . . . . . . .73/57/0.00 . . . 68/53/t . . 79/58/s Cancun . . . . . . . . .88/75/0.00 . .89/77/pc . . .89/78/t Dublin . . . . . . . . . .64/46/0.00 . . .67/49/c . 66/45/pc Edinburgh. . . . . . .68/50/0.00 . . . 60/46/r . 64/45/pc Geneva . . . . . . . . .86/59/0.00 . . . 92/73/s . 89/68/pc Harare. . . . . . . . . .73/45/0.00 . . . 67/41/s . . 68/43/s Hong Kong . . . . . .84/77/0.00 . . . 88/81/t . . .88/81/t Istanbul. . . . . . . . .91/79/0.00 . .90/76/pc . 88/77/pc Jerusalem . . . . . . .93/68/0.00 . . . 93/73/s . . 90/71/s Johannesburg. . . .66/41/0.00 . . . 67/38/s . . 66/38/s Lima . . . . . . . . . . .72/64/0.00 . . . 72/65/s . . 73/65/s Lisbon . . . . . . . . . .82/63/0.00 . .78/60/pc . . 79/64/s London . . . . . . . . .79/61/0.00 . . . 81/63/s . . .80/55/t Madrid . . . . . . . . .97/70/0.00 . . . 95/67/t . . 94/65/s Manila. . . . . . . . . .88/79/0.00 . . . 87/77/t . . .86/76/t

Mecca . . . . . . . . .106/88/0.00 107/88/pc . 107/86/s Mexico City. . . . . .73/57/0.00 . . . 73/55/t . . .71/51/t Montreal. . . . . . . .77/57/0.00 . .77/65/sh . 79/61/pc Moscow . . . . . . . .81/64/0.00 . .79/62/pc . . .77/61/t Nairobi . . . . . . . . .75/55/0.00 . . .74/58/c . 73/58/sh Nassau . . . . . . . . .88/79/0.00 . .90/77/pc . 89/77/pc New Delhi. . . . . . .93/82/0.00 . . . 92/79/t . . .93/79/t Osaka . . . . . . . . . .93/77/0.00 . . . 89/78/t . . .89/76/t Oslo. . . . . . . . . . . .72/52/0.00 . . . 73/57/s . 69/55/sh Ottawa . . . . . . . . .81/57/0.00 . .79/64/sh . 81/61/pc Paris. . . . . . . . . . . .88/61/0.00 . . . 89/70/s . . .85/64/t Rio de Janeiro. . . .90/73/0.00 . . . 84/65/s . 79/66/pc Rome. . . . . . . . . . .82/64/0.00 . .87/68/pc . . 90/71/s Santiago . . . . . . . .61/30/0.00 . . . 62/48/s . . 66/45/s Sao Paulo . . . . . . .72/61/0.00 . .81/60/sh . 75/63/sh Sapporo . . . . . . . .73/73/0.00 . .79/68/sh . . 82/70/c Seoul. . . . . . . . . . .88/73/0.00 . .90/76/pc . 88/74/pc Shanghai. . . . . . . .93/81/0.00 . .91/80/pc . 93/80/pc Singapore . . . . . . .90/79/0.00 . . . 86/79/t . . .86/77/t Stockholm. . . . . . .81/63/0.00 . .73/57/pc . . 71/55/s Sydney. . . . . . . . . .66/48/0.00 . .61/48/pc . 62/44/pc Taipei. . . . . . . . . . .95/79/0.00 . . . 91/81/t . . .92/81/t Tel Aviv . . . . . . . . .91/79/0.00 . . . 91/79/s . . 90/79/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . . .90/77/0.00 . . . 87/76/t . . .88/77/t Toronto . . . . . . . . .82/61/0.00 . .83/65/sh . . .80/64/t Vancouver. . . . . . .72/57/0.00 . . . 75/59/s . 70/57/pc Vienna. . . . . . . . . .75/64/0.00 . .82/63/pc . 86/64/pc Warsaw. . . . . . . . .84/59/0.00 . .84/64/pc . 81/67/pc

Lawsuit planned over coal pollution By Matthew Brown The Associated Press

BILLINGS, Mont. — Environmentalists filed notice Wednesday that they plan to sue the six companies that co-own eastern Montana’s Colstrip power plant over alleged pollution violations. The Sierra Club and Montana Environmental Information Center say the plant’s owners failed to upgrade pollution control equipment as required under the Clean Air Act for older power generation facilities that undergo significant changes. Colstrip is the second largest coal-fired power plant west of the Mississippi River, burning over 10 million tons of the fuel a year to generate about 2,200 megawatts of electricity. That power is distributed on high-voltage transmission lines to customers in Mon-

tana, Oregon and Washington state. Over a two-decade period beginning in 1992, attorneys for the environmental groups claim at least eight “major modifications” were made to the Colstrip Steam Electric Station. Those changes “would result in emission increases of sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxide and particulate matter,” the groups stated in a Wednesday letter to the plant’s owners. Those pollutants can cause health problems in people and are linked to environmental problems including acid rain, haze and surface water degradation. “We’re pretty confident that over the long haul and with the amount of money invested in those plants, they much more qualify as upgrades rather than mainte-

nance,” said Ken Toole, a former Montana Public Service Commissioner and member of the Montana Environmental Information Center. The 60-day notice of the environmental groups’ intent to sue in federal court was sent to the plant’s six co-owners — PPL Montana, NorthWestern Energy, Puget Sound Energy, Portland General Electric, Avista and PacifiCorp. A spokesman for PPL Montana, which operates and owns a one-quarter stake in the plant, said changes made to the facility were part of a regular maintenance program. Spokesman David Hoffman said that falls outside the government’s criteria for a “new source” of pollution that would require additional review. Hoffman added that the threatened lawsuit appears to

stem from a coordinated campaign against companies that mine, ship or burn coal. Other lawsuits have targeted mining of the fuel in Montana and a proposed new railroad to service coal mines along the Tongue River. Environmental groups also have mounted campaigns against proposals to increase shipments of the fuel by rail to the West Coast for export overseas. “I see this as another effort to continue this attack on coal,” Hoffman said of Wednesday’s notice. “We take plants offline on a regular basis for maintenance, just like you might have oil changed in your car.” The first two units of the power plant began operating in the mid-1970s and two more units came online in 1984 and 1986.


SPORTS

Scoreboard, D2 Olympics, D3 MLB, D4

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, JULY 26, 2012

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

COLLEGE FOOTBALL COMMENTARY

TRACK & FIELD Bend’s Modin third at nationals Mitch Modin, who will be a senior at Bend’s Mountain View High School this fall, placed third in the young men’s division of the decathlon Tuesday at this year’s USATF Junior Olympic Track & Field Championships in Baltimore. Competing in his third decathlon in seven weeks, Modin scored 6,294 points, finishing behind only the Illinois duo of Scott Filip (6,727 points) and George Wayda (6,405). Modin, who was competing as a member of the Central Oregon Running Klub, was one of 25 athletes from across the country to take part in the decathlon at the national championships, which continue through Sunday. A sprinter and jumper for Mountain View’s track program, Modin scored best in the 400 (50.65 seconds, 785 points), 100 (11.44, 765) and high jump (6 feet, 2 3⁄4 inches, 714). “I’m loving the decathlon right now,” said Modin, who just took up the multi-event sport this summer. “There’s always something to do.”

It’s a whole new game in the Pac-12 By Chris Dufresne Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — To walk in cold on the Pac-12 Conference these days means parking in the Frankenstein lot at Universal Studios and ascending sky-bound escalators to the Gibson Amphitheatre. There, safe from the drone of backlot explosions, in the heart of Pac-12

media day, first-year Washington State coach Mike Leach is comparing quarterback Jeff Tuel to a Civil War general. “I would have to say that Jeff would be a little more like Stonewall Jackson,” Leach said. “... He’s not afraid to split the force, connect again, and attack from different angles.” It should be noted that Washington

State finished 4-8 last year and Jackson, the Confederate general, died after being accidentally shot by his troops. Leach, the cerebral, pirate-loving tinkerer who turned Texas Tech into a winner as he battled Craig James and sued ESPN, is one of several reasons why the Pac-12 has never seemed more hip, quirky, eclectic and volatile. See Pac-12 / D5

Damian Dovarganes / The Associated Press

Washington State coach Mike Leach takes questions during the Pac-12 college football media day on Tuesday.

LONDON OLYMPICS

U.S. aims to increase its medal haul from ’08 Games By Linda Robertson McClatchy Newspapers

A

— Bulletin staff report

WCL BASEBALL Bend falls to Kitsap on road BREMERTON, Wash. — The Bend Elks left 11 runners on base against the Kitsap Blue Jackets on Wednesday, losing on the road by a score of 7-3 in West Coast League baseball action. The Elks (19-20 WCL) scored three runs in the top of the third inning to take an early lead. But the BlueJackets responded with four runs in the bottom half of the inning and never trailed again. Kitsap had five hits in the inning against Bend starter Darin Gillies. Kitsap scored three insurance runs in the bottom of the eighth inning for the final score. Bend’s Brandon Snyder pitched 3 2⁄3 innings of shutout relief, surrendering only one hit while striking out four. Shawn O’Brien went four for four at the plate for the Elks, while Steven Halcomb and Jordan Copeland each added a pair of hits for Bend. Kitsap hosts Bend again in the second contest of a three-game series, today at 6:35 p.m. The Bend Elks’ splitsquad team, the Central Oregon Bucks, defeated the San Francisco Seals 2-0 on Wednesday night at Bend’s Vince Genna Stadium. — From wire reports

Laurent Cipriani / The Associated Press

Bend’s Chris Horner climbs during the 17th stage of the Tour de France on July 19. Horner, who finished in 13th place in the Tour, will compete in the men’s road race at the Olympics on Saturday.

Olympic first • At the age of 40, Bend cyclist Chris Horner will compete in the Summer Games for the first time when he heads to the start line in Saturday’s men’s road race By Amanda Miles The Bulletin

W

hat a July Chris Horner is having. The professional cyclist and Bend resident wrapped up the three-week Tour de France this past Sunday. And on Saturday, just six days after his second top-15 finish at the Tour in three years, he is scheduled to represent the United States in the men’s road race at the 2012 Olympic Games in London. “I feel really good,” Horner said by phone on Tuesday from his hotel outside of London, located near the southern section of the 156-mile course. “I think I exited the Tour de France probably in the best condition that I’ve left

On TV Olympic men’s cycling road race, 5 a.m., NBC

More coverage See D3; look for a preview of the London Olympics in Friday’s Bulletin

any tour. I really feel quite fresh considering I just left the Tour de France.” Horner spent much of the Tour de France — which he ultimately finished in 13th place — riding to help RadioShack-Nissan-Trek teammates Fabian Cancellara and Haimar Zubel-

Yankees 5 Mariners 2

Nationals 5 Mets 2

White Sox 8 Twins 2

Pirates Cubs

3 2

Angels Royals

11 6

Braves Marlins

7 1

Rays Orioles

10 1

Phillies Brewers

7 6

Tigers Indians

5 3

Cardinals 3 Dodgers 2

A’s 16 Blue Jays 0

Padres Giants

6 3

Rangers Red Sox

Reds Astros

5 3

Rockies D’backs

4 2

5 3

Roundup, D4

PAID ADVERTISEMENT

In Minnesota, big fish abound A Minnesota walleye displays his dental work before release back into the lake.

GARY LEWIS

NL

dia. Cancellara won the tour-opening prologue and was in possession of the leader’s yellow jersey for the first six stages, while Zubeldia finished a team-best sixth-place in the general classification standings. RadioShack also finished first in the team competition. In this Tour de France, Horner fared much better than he had in 2011, when he crashed during the seventh stage and withdrew with various injuries. And upon returning to Bend shortly afterward, his troubles were not over, as he suffered a blood clot and was briefly hospitalized before spending the next several months on blood-thinning medications. See Horner / D5

merican athletes saw the Stars and Stripes rise 110 times in Beijing as they won the medal count for the fourth consecutive Olympics. But host China usurped the United States in the gold medal tally. At the London Games, which open Friday, the United States hopes to reassert its dominance, even as athletes from Great Britain make the home team push for a spike in their medal count. Here’s a look at Team USA’s brightest hopes for podium finishes: Michael Phelps is back for what he swears will be his last Olympics. He went eight for eight in 2008. Can he win seven gold medals in London? The main obstacle to a sweep is likely to be U.S. teammate Ryan Lochte, the ex-Gator from Daytona Beach. “I feel it’s my time,” Lochte said. They will duel headto-head only twice, but given how close they have been in the past, those two races should be among the highlights of the Games. Phelps said Lochte’s victories over him at the 2011 world championships lifted him out of a competitive funk. He hates to lose. See Medal / D5

HUNTING & FISHING COMMENTARY

MLB AL

D

College football, D5 Hunting & Fishing, D5, D6

O

n this, my first trip to the Land of 10,000 Lakes, I pictured Minnesota when my grandparents were teenagers, in the 1930s. Flat land and timber, country churches and little white houses with big gardens, dirt roads, a dusty Model A in a gravel driveway, kids with fishing poles. On the highway headed north from Duluth to International Falls, we passed cars with canoes on top and rigs with boats in tow. At every intersection, a sign pointed the way to another lake. Our destination was Rainy Lake in Voyageurs National Park, named for the hardy

Gary Lewis / For The Bulletin

STRIKE IT RICH! PROSPECTING SUPPLIES & METAL DETECTORS

ENTER TO WIN A GOLD PROSPECTING PACKAGE valued at over French Canadians that plied the waters in birch-bark craft. Our canoe would be a 65-foot houseboat called the Chairman. On board was Steve Quinn, from In-Fisherman magazine, Mike Pehanich, senior writer for Bass Master, and Wes Remmer, from Cabela’s in Sidney, Neb. Close to the lake, we began to see outcrops of ancient granite, some of the oldest

rocks visible on the face of the planet. Here, at the heart of North America, it rises above the surface, an igneous structure that joins the Great Lakes to the Arctic and runs south into the United States. The Canadian Shield. Once, the ice here in northern Minnesota was two miles thick, and some of the surfaces still bear the ancient scars of the glaciers. See Minnesota / D6

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THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, JULY 26, 2012

O  A TELEVISION

SCOREBOARD

Today OLYMPICS 4 a.m.: Men’s soccer, Honduras vs. Morocco, qualifying round, NBC Sports Network. 6:30 a.m.: Men’s soccer, Mexico vs. South Korea, qualifying round, NBC Sports Network. 9 a.m.: Men’s soccer, United Arab Emirates vs. Uruguay, qualifying round, NBC Sports Network. Noon: Men’s soccer, Great Britain vs. Senegal, qualifying round, NBC Sports Network. 1:45 p.m.: Men’s soccer, Belarus vs. New Zealand (same-day tape), qualifying round, NBC Sports Network. GOLF 6:30 a.m.: European Tour, Lyoness Open, second round, Golf Channel. 9 a.m.: Champions Tour, Senior British Open Championship, first round, ESPN2. 9:30 a.m.: Web.com Tour, Nationwide Children’s Hospital Invitational, first round, Golf Channel. Noon: PGA Tour, Canadian Open, first round, Golf Channel. 3:30 p.m.: LPGA Tour, Evian Masters, first round (same-day tape), Golf Channel. BASEBALL 10:30 a.m.: MLB, Los Angeles Dodgers at St. Louis Cardinals or Tampa Bay Rays at Baltimore Orioles, MLB Network. 5 p.m.: MLB, Washington Nationals at Milwaukee Brewers or Pittsburgh Pirates at Houston Astros, MLB Network. 7 p.m.: MLB, Kansas City Royals at Seattle Mariners, Root Sports.

Friday GOLF 6:30 a.m.: European Tour, Lyoness Open, third round, Golf Channel. 9 a.m.: Champions Tour, Senior British Open Championship, second round, ESPN2. 9:30 a.m.: Web.com Tour, Nationwide Children’s Hospital Invitational, second round, Golf Channel. Noon: PGA Tour, Canadian Open, second round, Golf Channel. 3:30 p.m.: LPGA Tour, Evian Masters, second round (sameday tape), Golf Channel. BASEBALL 4 p.m.: MLB, Boston Red Sox at New York Yankees or Detroit Tigers at Toronto Blue Jays, MLB Network. 7 p.m.: MLB, Kansas City Royals at Seattle Mariners, Root Sports. BOXING 7 p.m.: Raymundo Beltran vs. Hank Lundy, ESPN2. OLYMPICS 7:30 p.m.: Opening ceremony (same-day tape), NBC. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

IN THE BLEACHERS

BASEBALL

Russia, 6-1, 6-4. Nina Bratchikova (6), Russia, def. Estrella Cabeza Candela, Spain, 6-0, retired. Alexandra Panova (2), Russia, def. Sandra Zaniewska, Poland, 4-6, 7-6 (6), 6-3. Bojana Jovanovski (5), Serbia, def. Valeria Solovieva, Russia, 6-2, 6-3. Aleksandra Krunic, Serbia, def. Laura Pous-Tio, Spain, 7-6 (5), 6-3. Olga Puchkova, Russia, def. Alberta Brianti, Italy, 3-6, 7-6 (2), 6-1. Mandy Minella (3), Luxembourg, def. Marta Domachowska, Poland, 6-4, 7-5.

WCL WEST COAST LEAGUE ——— League standings East Division W Wenatchee AppleSox 27 Bellingham Bells 25 Kelowna Falcons 24 Walla Walla Sweets 17 West Division W Corvallis Knights 23 Klamath Falls Gems 21 Bend Elks 19 Cowlitz Black Bears 18 Kitsap BlueJackets 11 ——— Wednesday’s Games Kitsap 7, Bend 3 Klamath Falls 4, Corvallis 1 Bellingham 4, Kelowna 2 Walla Walla 5, Wenatchee 4 Today’s Games Bend at Kitsap, 6:35 p.m. Klamath Falls at Corvallis, 6:40 p.m. Kelowna at Bellingham, 7:05 p.m. Wenatchee at Walla Walla, 7:05 p.m. Today’s Games Bend at Kitsap, 6:35 p.m. Klamath Falls at Cowlitz, 6:35 p.m. Kelowna at Bellingham, 7:05 p.m. Walla Walla at Wenatchee, 7:05 p.m.

L 13 15 18 24 L 20 20 20 22 33

SOCCER MLS

Wednesday’s summary

BlueJackets 7, Elks 3 Bend 003 000 000 — 3 11 4 Kitsap 004 000 03x — 7 8 2 Gillies, Snyder (4), Peterson (7) and Azevedo. Holback, Staples (7), Prihar (9) and Zarate. W — Holback. L — Gillies. 2B—Kitsap: Zarate, Burcham.

OLYMPICS Women’s soccer All Times PDT ——— FIRST ROUND GROUP E GP W D L GF GA Pts Brazil 1 1 0 0 5 0 5 Britain 1 1 0 0 1 0 3 New Zealand 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 Cameroon 1 0 0 1 0 5 0 Wednesday, July 25 Cardiff, Wales Britain 1, New Zealand 0 Brazil 5, Cameroon 0 ——— GROUP F GP W D L GF GA Pts Sweden 1 1 0 0 4 1 3 Japan 1 1 0 0 2 1 3 Canada 1 0 0 1 1 2 0 South Africa 1 0 0 1 1 4 0 Wednesday, July 25 Coventry, England Japan 2, Canada 1 Sweden 4, South Africa 1 ——— GROUP G GP W D L GF GA Pts United States 1 1 0 0 4 2 3 North Korea 1 1 0 0 2 0 3 France 1 0 0 1 2 4 0 Colombia 1 0 0 1 0 2 0 Wednesday, July 25 Glasgow, Scotland United States 4, France 2 North Korea 2, Colombia 0 Saturday, July 28 Glasgow, Scotland United States vs. Colombia, 9 a.m. France vs. North Korea, 11:45 a.m. Tuesday, July 31 Manchester, England United States vs. North Korea, 9:15 a.m. Newcastle, England France vs. Colombia, 9:15 a.m.

Schedule All Times PDT (Subject to change) ——— Today, July 26 Soccer Men At Hampden Park, Glasgow, Scotland Honduras vs. Morocco, 4 a.m. Spain vs. Japan, 6:45 a.m. At St James’ Park, Newcastle Mexico vs. South Korea, 6:30 a.m. Gabon vs. Switzerland, 9:15 a.m. At Old Trafford, Manchester United Arab Emirates vs. Uruguay, 9 a.m. Britain vs. Senegal, noon At City of Coventry Stadium Belarus vs. New Zealand, 11:45 a.m. At Millennium Stadium, Cardiff, Wales Brazil vs. Egypt, 11:45 a.m. ——— Friday, July 27 Archery At Lord’s Cricket Ground Men’s Individual ranking round, 1 a.m. Women’s Individual ranking round, 5 a.m. ——— Saturday, July 28 Archery At Lord’s Cricket Ground Men’s Team 1/8 eliminations, 1 a.m. Men’s Team quarterfinals, semifinals, bronze and gold medal matches, 7 a.m. Badminton

At Wembley Arena Men’s and Women’s Singles, Doubles and Mixed Doubles Prelims, 12:30 a.m. Men’s and Women’s Singles, Doubles and Mixed Doubles Prelims, 4:30 a.m. Men’s and Women’s Singles, Doubles and Mixed Doubles Prelims, 10:30 a.m. Basketball At Olympic Park-Basketball Arena Women China vs. Czech Republic, 1 a.m. Canada vs. Russia, 3:15 a.m. Turkey vs. Angola, 6:30 a.m. United States vs. Croatia, 8:45 a.m. Brazil vs. France, noon Australia vs. Britain, 2:15 p.m. Beach Volleyball At Horse Guards Parade Men’s and women’s Prelims (4 matches), 1 a.m. Men’s and women’s Prelims (4 matches), 6:30 a.m. Men’s and women’s Prelims (4 matches), noon Boxing At ExCeL Men’s Bantamweight (56kg) and Men’s Middleweight (75kg) round of 32, 5:30 a.m. Men’s Bantamweight (56kg) and Men’s Middleweight (75kg) round of 32, 12:30 p.m. Cycling (Road) At The Mall Men’s Road Race, 2 a.m. Equestrian (Eventing) At Greenwich Park Individual & Team Eventing: dressage, day 1, 2 a.m. Fencing At ExCeL Women’s Individual Foil round of 64, round of 32, round of 16, quarterfinals, 2:30 a.m. Women’s Individual Foil semifinals, bronze and gold medal matches, 10 a.m. Gymnastics At Artistic North Greenwich Arena Men’s qualification, 3 a.m. Men’s qualification, 7:30 a.m. Men’s qualification, noon Judo At ExCeL Men’s -60kg and Women’s -48kg elimination rounds, quarterfinals, 1:30 a.m. Men’s -60kg and Women’s -48kg repechages, semifinal contests, bronze and gold medal contests, 6 a.m. Rowing At Eton Dorney, Buckinghamshire Men’s Pairs, Lightweight Fours, Eights, Single Sculls, Double Sculls, Quadruple Sculls heats; Women’s Pairs, Single Sculls, Quadruple Sculls heats, 1:30 a.m. Shooting At The Royal Artillery Barracks Men’s 10-Meter Air Pistol qualification and final; Women’s 10-Meter Air Rifle qualification and final, 3:15 a.m. Soccer Women At City of Coventry Stadium Japan vs. Sweden, 4 a.m. Canada vs. South Africa, 6:45 a.m. At Millennium Stadium, Cardiff, Wales New Zealand vs. Brazil, 6:30 a.m. Britain vs. Cameroon, 9:15 a.m. At Hampden Park, Glasgow, Scotland United States vs. Colombia, Noon France vs. North Korea, 2:45 p.m. Swimming At Olympic Park-Aquatics Centre Men’s 100 Breaststroke, 400 Freestyle, 400 Individual Medley heats; Women’s 100 Butterfly, 400 Individual Medley, 4X100 Freestyle Relay heats, 2 a.m. Men’s 100 Breaststroke semifinals, 400 Freestyle final, 400 Individual Medley; Women’s 100 Butterfly semifinals, 400 Individual Medley final, 4X100 Freestyle Relay final, 11:30 a.m. Table Tennis

At ExCeL Men’s Singles Prelims; Women’s Singles Prelims, first round, 1 a.m. Men’s Singles and Women’s Singles first round, 6:30 a.m. Men’s Singles and Women’s Singles first round, 11 a.m. Team Handball Women At Copper Box Russia vs. Angola, 1:30 a.m. Spain vs. South Korea, 3:15 a.m. Croatia vs. Brazil, 6:30 a.m. Denmark vs. Sweden, 8:15 a.m. Montenegro vs. Britain, 11:30 a.m. Norway vs. France, 1:15 p.m. Tennis At Wimbledon Men’s and women’s Singles first round; Men’s and women’s Doubles first round, 3:30 a.m. Volleyball At Earls Court Women Algeria vs. Japan, 1:30 a.m. China vs. Serbia, 3:30 a.m. Britain vs. Russia, 6:45 a.m. Italy vs. Dominican Republic, 8:45 a.m. United States vs. South Korea, noon Brazil vs. Turkey, 2 p.m. Weightlifting At ExCeL Women’s 48kg group A (medal), 7:30 a.m.

TENNIS Professional Farmers Classic Wednesday At Los Angeles Tennis Stadium at UCLA Los Angeles Purse: $638,050 (WT250) Surface: Hard-Outdoor Singles Second Round Leonardo Mayer (3), Argentina, def. Flavio Cipolla, Italy, 6-0, 4-0, retired. Rajeev Ram, United States, def. Paul Capdeville, Chile, 6-3, 6-1. Sam Querrey (2), United States, def. Igor Sijsling, Netherlands, 6-2, 6-2. Bet-at-Home Cup Wednesday At Mercedes-Benz Sportpark Kitzbuehel Kitzbuehel, Austria Purse: $498,500 (WT250) Surface: Clay-Outdoor Singles Second Round Lukas Rosol, Czech Republic, def. Antonio Veic, Croatia, 6-3, 5-7, 6-3. Martin Klizan (5), Slovakia, def. Pavol Cervenak, Slovakia, 6-4, 6-4. Simone Bolelli, Italy, def. Florian Mayer (2), Germany, 6-2, 7-6 (4). Wayne Odesnik, United States, leads Jurgen Zopp, Estonia, 5-7, 7-5, 3-0, susp., rain. Attila Balazs, Hungary, leads Philipp Kohlschreiber (1), Germany, 3-0, susp., rain. Baku Cup Wednesday At Baki Tennis Akademiyasi Baku, Azerbaijan Purse: $220,000 (Intl.) Surface: Hard-Outdoor Singles Second Round Magdalena Rybarikova, Slovakia, def. Tamarine Tanasugarn, Thailand, 6-1, 6-0. Julia Cohen, United States, def. Alla Kudryavtseva,

MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT ——— Eastern Conference W L T Pts GF GA New York 11 5 5 38 37 29 Sporting Kansas City 11 6 4 37 26 19 Houston 9 5 7 34 31 25 D.C. 10 7 3 33 34 27 Chicago 9 7 4 31 22 22 Columbus 7 7 4 25 18 19 Montreal 7 13 3 24 30 42 New England 6 9 5 23 25 25 Philadelphia 6 10 2 20 20 21 Toronto FC 5 11 4 19 24 36 Western Conference W L T Pts GF GA San Jose 13 5 4 43 44 27 Real Salt Lake 12 7 3 39 33 26 Vancouver 9 6 7 34 25 26 Seattle 8 5 7 31 25 21 Los Angeles 9 10 3 30 38 35 Chivas USA 6 8 5 23 13 21 Colorado 7 13 1 22 27 30 FC Dallas 5 10 7 22 25 30 Portland 5 11 4 19 19 35 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. ——— Wednesday’s Game MLS All-Stars 3, Chelsea 2 Friday’s Game Vancouver at Real Salt Lake, 6 p.m. Saturday’s Games Houston at Toronto FC, 1:30 p.m. New York at Montreal, 4:30 p.m. Los Angeles at FC Dallas, 5 p.m. Columbus at Sporting Kansas City, 5:30 p.m. Seattle FC at Colorado, 6 p.m. Chicago at San Jose, 7:30 p.m. Chivas USA at Portland, 8 p.m.

GOLF Men World Golf Ranking Through July 22 Rank. Name Country 1. Luke Donald Eng 2. Tiger Woods USA 3. Rory McIlroy NIr 4. Lee Westwood Eng 5. Webb Simpson USA 6. Adam Scott Aus 7. Bubba Watson USA 8. Jason Dufner USA 9. Matt Kuchar USA 10. Justin Rose Eng 11. Graeme McDowell NIr 12. Zach Johnson USA 13. Hunter Mahan USA 14. Steve Stricker USA 15. Ernie Els SAf 16. Dustin Johnson USA 17. Phil Mickelson USA 18. Martin Kaymer Ger 19. Louis Oosthuizen SAf 20. Rickie Fowler USA 21. Jason Day Aus 22. Charl Schwartzel SAf 23. Francesco Molinari Ita 24. Brandt Snedeker USA 25. Sergio Garcia Esp 26. Bill Haas USA 27. Keegan Bradley USA 28. Ian Poulter Eng 29. Bo Van Pelt USA 30. Peter Hanson Swe 31. Paul Lawrie Sco 32. Nick Watney USA 33. Nicolas Colsaerts Bel 34. Jim Furyk USA 35. John Senden Aus 36. K.J. Choi Kor 37. David Toms USA 38. Martin Laird Sco 39. Carl Pettersson Swe 40. Thomas Bjorn Den 41. Fredrik Jacobson Swe 42. Bae Sang-moon Kor 43. Gonzalo Fernandez-Castano Esp 44. Rafael Cabrera Bello Esp 45. Mark Wilson USA 46. Alvaro Quiros Esp 47. Simon Dyson Eng 48. Geoff Ogilvy Aus 49. Jonathan Byrd USA 50. Kevin Na USA 51. Aaron Baddeley Aus 52. Branden Grace SAf 53. Anders Hansen Den 54. Ben Crane USA 55. Robert Karlsson Swe 56. Kyle Stanley USA 57. Michael Thompson USA 58. Alexander Noren Swe 59. Marcel Siem Ger 60. Padraig Harrington Irl 61. Robert Rock Eng 62. Greg Chalmers Aus 63. Jamie Donaldson Wal 64. Ryo Ishikawa Jpn 65. Matteo Manassero Ita 66. John Huh USA

Points 9.81 8.45 8.41 7.89 6.47 6.27 6.23 5.87 5.75 5.47 5.38 5.31 5.26 4.90 4.81 4.71 4.52 4.50 4.43 4.39 4.31 4.28 4.17 4.14 3.97 3.80 3.77 3.75 3.70 3.68 3.53 3.53 3.42 3.33 3.25 3.24 3.21 3.07 3.04 3.02 2.82 2.74 2.72 2.70 2.69 2.68 2.67 2.63 2.61 2.59 2.55 2.53 2.46 2.44 2.41 2.40 2.31 2.28 2.28 2.23 2.17 2.15 2.12 2.11 2.08 2.08

67. Retief Goosen 68. Rory Sabbatini 69. Miguel A Jimenez 70. Robert Garrigus 71. Johnson Wagner 72. Hiroyuki Fujita 73. Spencer Levin 74. Ryan Moore 75. George Coetzee

SAf SAf Esp USA USA Jpn USA USA SAf

2.08 2.07 2.07 2.07 2.05 2.05 2.03 2.02 1.99

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL American League BOSTON RED SOX — Assigned RHP Jose De La Torre to Pawtucket (IL). CLEVELAND INDIANS — Transferred 3B Lonnie Chisenhall to the 60-day DL. Designated OF Aaron Cunningham for assignment. MINNESOTA TWINS — Agreed to terms with C Brian Compton on a minor league contract. NEW YORK YANKEES — Placed 3B Alex Rodriguez on the 15-day DL. Recalled INF Ramiro Pena from Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (IL). Transferred INF Eduardo Nunez from Tampa (FSL) to Scranton/Wilkes-Barre. SEATTLE MARINERS — Recalled OF Trayvon Robinson from Tacoma (PCL). TAMPA BAY RAYS — Designated OF/DH Hideki Matsui for assignment. TORONTO BLUE JAYS — Agreed to terms with RHP Scott Copeland on a minor league contract. National League LOS ANGELES DODGERS—Optioned RHP Shawn Tolleson to Albuquerque (PCL). Transferred RHP Todd Coffey to 60-day DL. MIAMI MARLINS — Traded 3B Hanley Ramirez and LHP Randy Choate to the L.A. Dodgers for RHP Nathan Eovaldi and RHP Scott McGough. NEW YORK METS — Optioned C Mike Nickeas to Buffalo (IL). PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES — Agreed to terms with LHP Cole Hamels on a six-year contract through 2018. Assigned OF Jason Pridie outright to Lehigh Valley (IL). PITTSBURGH PIRATES — Promoted RHP Logan Kensing from Altoona (EL) to Indianapolis (IL) and LHP Jhonathan Ramos from Bradenton (FSL) to Altoona. Optioned RHP Evan Meek to Indianapolis. Recalled OF Starling Marte from Indianapolis. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association CLEVELAND CAVALIERS—Acquired G Jeremy Pargo, a second-round draft pick in 2014, and cash considerations from the Minnesota Grizzlies for G/F D.J. Kennedy. DALLAS MAVERICKS — Signed C Bernard James. MINNESOTA TIMBERWOLVES — Signed G Alexey Shved. NEW YORK KNICKS — Signed G Ronnie Brewer. UTAH JAZZ — Agreed to terms with G Randy Foye. FOOTBALL National Football League ARIZONA CARDINALS — Placed G Blake DeChristopher on the waived-injured list. BUFFALO BILLS — Signed DE Sean Ferguson. Released DE Lionel Dotson. CHICAGO BEARS — Placed WR Johnny Knox on the physically-unable-to-perform list. CINCINNATI BENGALS — Signed DT Brandon Thompson. DALLAS COWBOYS — Placed G Mackenzy Bernadeau, WR Danny Coale, CB Mike Jenkins, S Matt Johnson and C/G Kevin Kowalski on the physicallyunable-to-perform list. DETROIT LIONS — Released OT Johnny Culbreath. Signed OT Jonathan Scott, CB Drew Coleman and CB Justin Miller. GREEN BAY PACKERS — Signed G Greg Van Roten. Released G Grant Cook and S Charlie Peprah. JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS—Signed P Bryan Anger. MINNESOTA VIKINGS — Signed CB Josh Robinson. NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS — Signed DL Tim Bulman and TE Visanthe Shiancoe. Released RB Joseph Addai. NEW ORLEANS SAINTS — Agreed to terms with TE Derek Schouman. Signed WR Marques Clark. Waived WR Kevin Hardy. PHILADELPHIA EAGLES — Signed P Mat McBriar to a one-year contract. PITTSBURGH STEELERS — Placed S Damon Cromartie-Smith, NT Casey Hampton, LB James Harrison, RB Rashard Mendenhall, OT Max Starks and LB Jason Worilds on the physically-unable-to-perform list. SEATTLE SEAHAWKS—Signed C Max Unger to a multi-year contract. TENNESSEE TITANS — Waived OL Chandler Burden. Placed WR Kenny Britt and S Markelle Martin on the physically-unable-to-perform list. HOCKEY National Hockey League BOSTON BRUINS — Entered into a one-year affiliation agreement with South Carolina (ECHL). NEW YORK ISLANDERS — Agreed to terms with D Nathan McIver on a one-year, two-way contract. OTTAWA SENATORS — Re-signed F Stephane Da Costa to a one-year, two-way contract.

FISH COUNT Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Tuesday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 437 99 2672 1,217 The Dalles 495 130 2621 1,020 John Day 558 116 1716 800 McNary 741 72 806 326 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Tuesday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 236,424 18,906 60,979 26,903 The Dalles 181,791 16,250 34,001 15,727 John Day 163,733 16,015 20,572 10,246 McNary 160,515 8,988 16,018 6,570

S   B Shooting • Local takes world title: Bend’s Joe Cullison won the world championship in handgun silhouette and was named the IHMSA (International Handgun Metallic Silhouette Association) Ironman this past weekend in Oklahoma City. Cullison competed against shooters from the United States, Brazil, Australia, Canada and Paraguay. Silhouette target shooting consists of shooting small metal targets with pistols at ranges of up to 200 meters. The targets are shot both standing and lying down. Cullison has now claimed four world titles in handgun silhouette.

Baseball • Phillies, Hamels agree to megadeal: Cole Hamels and the Philadelphia Phillies have agreed to a $144 million, six-year contract that prevents the 2008 World Series MVP from becoming a free agent after the season. It’s the largest contract signed by a Philadelphia athlete and second-highest for a pitcher behind the $161 million deal the New York Yankees gave CC Sabathia in December 2008. The 28year-old Hamels becomes the third Phillies starter making $20 million per season, joining Roy Halladay and Cliff Lee. A three-time All-Star, Hamels passed up an opportunity to possibly get more money on the open market to stay with the team that drafted him in 2002. The lanky lefty

is 11-4 with a 3.23 ERA this season. He’s 85-58 with a 3.38 ERA in seven years in Philadelphia. • Marlins trade Ramirez to Dodgers: Former NL batting champion Hanley Ramirez was traded from Miami to the Los Angeles Dodgers on Wednesday, part of what appears to be the third big fire sale in Marlins’ history. Left-handed reliever Randy Choate also was dealt to the Dodgers. The Marlins received right-hander Nathan Eovaldi and minor league pitcher Scott McGough. The trade came two days after the Marlins sent pitcher Anibal Sanchez and infielder Omar Infante to the Detroit Tigers for pitching prospect Jacob Turner and two minor leaguers. • A-Rod out four to eight weeks: Alex Rodriguez dropped in the Safeco Field batter’s box holding his damaged left hand as he rocked on his back. The pain was such that he refused to let Yankees head athletic trainer Steve Donohue immediately remove his batting glove. “I just had a weird feeling that it wasn’t good,” Mark Teixeira said of witnessing the effects of Tuesday night’s eighth-inning pitch by Seattle starter Felix Hernandez that struck A-Rod flush. X-rays revealed A-Rod had a non-displaced fracture of the fifth metacarpal, an injury that could cost him anywhere from four to eight weeks. • Ripken’s mom abducted, now safe: Cal Ripken Jr.’s 74-year-old mother was found with her hands bound and blindfolded in the back seat of her car

Wednesday after being kidnapped at gunpoint at her home outside Baltimore a day earlier, police and friends said. Investigators do not know the kidnapper’s motive and there was no ransom demand for Vi Ripken’s release, Aberdeen Police Chief Henry Trabert said at a news conference. The gunman forced Ripken into her silver Lincoln Continental between 7 a.m. and 8 a.m. Tuesday, police said. She was found unharmed but shaken about 6:15 a.m. Wednesday near her home in Aberdeen, about 30 miles northeast of Baltimore, where her son’s Ripken Baseball complex is located.

Penn State football players say they’re staying in Happy Valley despite NCAA sanctions that will keep the Nittany Lions out of a bowl game for the rest of their careers. Flanked by more than two dozen teammates, seniors Michael Mauti and Michael Zordich vowed to restore Penn State to greatness after an unprecedented child sex abuse scandal that shattered the program’s image as a place where “success with honor” was the rule. Quarterback Matt McGloin also tweeted that he planned to stay.

Football

• MLS All-Stars top Chelsea: Eddie Johnson scored in stoppage time to give the Major League Soccer All-Stars a 3-2 victory over Chelsea on Wednesday. Chris Wondolowski and Chris Pontius also scored goals for the MLS All-Stars at PPL Park, in Chester, Pa.

• Penn State president says 4-year ban was floated: Penn State faced the threat of a four-year ban on playing football before the NCAA imposed sanctions this week over the school’s handling of the Jerry Sandusky child molestation scandal, a university spokesman said Wednesday. David La Torre said the potential for the multiyear “death penalty” was floated during discussions between Penn State President Rodney Erickson and NCAA officials before Penn State was hit Monday with a $60 million fine, a four-year bowl game ban, reduced football scholarships and the forfeiture of 112 wins. • Penn State players vow to stick together post-scandal: More than 30

Soccer

Basketball • Howard still wants to be traded: Orlando Magic general manager Rob Hennigan and assistant general manager Scott Perry met with All-Star center Dwight Howard and members of Howard’s inner circle in California on Wednesday, and during that meeting, Howard reiterated his trade request and said he will not sign another contract with the Magic, according to a source familiar with the discussion. According to the source, Hennigan

and Perry did not try to convince Howard to drop his trade request.

Golf • Larrazabal leads in Austria: Pablo Larrazabal overcame a lengthy rain delay to finish at 8-under 64 Wednesday and tie the course record in the opening round of the Austrian Open in Atzenbrugg. Play was suspended for the day because of darkness, with Thorbjorn Olesen of Denmark closing in on Larrazabal at 7 under after 14 holes.

Motor sports • NASCAR’s Allmendinger agrees to recovery program: Suspended NASCAR driver A.J. Allmendinger said Wednesday that he will participate in a recovery program, a sign that he wants to get back to racing as soon as possible and avoid a drawn-out fight over the accuracy of his failed drug test. Allmendinger said he will participate in NASCAR’s anti-drug program, which includes an evaluation by a substance abuse professional, counseling and rehabilitation. NASCAR has suspended Allmendinger indefinitely after a test of his backup urine sample conducted Tuesday confirmed an initial positive test in late June. The series has not identified the substance; Allmendinger has said he tested positive for a stimulant. — From wire reports


THURSDAY, JULY 26, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

OLY M PIC S

U.S. swimmers go for gold — and a tattoo

United States’ Megan Rapinoe, right, and Alex Morgan, center, celebrate together after Morgan scored her second goal during a match against France at the London 2012 Summer Olympics on Wednesday at Hampden Park Stadium in Glasgow, Scotland.

By Karen Crouse New York Times News Service

Chris Clark / The Associated Press

U.S. women’s soccer opens Games with a win By Joseph White The Associated Press

GLASGOW, Scotland — An early start to the Olympics turned into an early deficit for the U.S. women’s soccer team, which gave up two quick goals before unleashing an attack the rest of the world will find hard to stop. Abby Wambach used her size and strength to put in a header, Alex Morgan scored twice and Carli Lloyd added another with a 25-yard rocket to help the two-time defending goal medalists rally for a 4-2 victory over France on Wednesday. The Americans opened their London Games far from London and two days before the opening ceremony. Soccer starts its Olympics early so it has time to play a full tournament of games. The Americans allowed more goals in the first 15 minutes than they had allowed in any game since the World Cup final loss to Japan last year. Gaetane Thiney scored in the 12th and Marie-Laure Delie added a second in the 14th, finding holes in a supposedly impenetrable defense — a potential cause for U.S. concern as the grueling tournament progresses. But Wambach scored in the 19th, Morgan in the 32nd, Lloyd in the 56th and Morgan again in the 66th. Wambach now has 139 international goals in her pursuit of Mia Hamm’s record of 158, and 23-year-old “Baby Horse” Morgan — the secondyoungest player on the team — has a remarkable 19 this year alone. While the Americans are favored to win gold again — and even though the U.S. is now 13-0-1 all-

North Korea angered over flag flap GLASGOW, Scotland — London Olympic organizers mistakenly displayed the South Korean flag on a jumbo screen instead of North Korea’s before a women’s soccer match Wednesday, prompting the North Koreans to refuse to take the field for nearly an hour. The flag flap began during player introductions when a North Korean player was introduced along with a shot of the South Korean flag. The match against Colombia was delayed for more than an hour, and organizers apologized for the error. “If this matter couldn’t have been resolved, then I thought going on is nonsense,” coach Sin Ui Gun said through an interpreter after North Korea won 2-0. “We were angry because our players were introduced as if they were from South Korea, which may affect us very greatly as you might know.” — The Associated Press

time against France — it was hardly a surprise to see the French make it a game. The teams were level late in the second half in last year’s World Cup semifinals before the Americans finished off a 3-1 win, and France entered these Olympics on a 17-match winning streak. The United States plays Colombia

in its second group game on Saturday. France will face North Korea. The French took the lead from a deflected long ball that ended up at the foot of Thiney, who had plenty of time and space to unleash a 22yard shot into the upper right corner of the net, grazing the fingertips of leaping goalkeeper Hope Solo. Two minutes later, the Americans played a dangerous game of pinball deep in their own end, failing in five separate chances to clear a corner kick. Inevitably, the ball bounced to a French player, Delie, who put an easy shot past Solo, again off the goalie’s outstretched left hand, to make it 2-0. But the Americans are arguably stronger, deeper and more diverse than they’ve ever been, and they have the firepower to overcome such a deficit — and quickly. Wambach, who has the best header in women’s football, started the comeback by nodding in Megan Rapinoe’s corner kick. The goal awakened some of a crowd that so far had behaved as if watching a BBC documentary. Chants of “U-S-A!” began to echo in sections of Hampden Park, the 109year-old landmark that serves as Scotland’s national stadium. The 52,000-seat stadium was perhaps one-third full at kickoff, but the game needed to draw only a couple of thousand to surpass the all-time Scottish record for attendance at a women’s game. Organizers gave away some 30,000 tickets to schools and local clubs to keep the stands from being embarrassingly empty in a region where football is overwhelmingly a man’s game.

IOC can’t spare time for Munich memorial By Bill Plaschke Los Angeles Times

LONDON — hey’re not asking for much, these two elderly women who lost their husbands to the worst crime in Olympic history. They’re not asking for a speech or a video or even a prayer to commemorate the 40th anniversary of the murder of 11 Israelis at the 1972 Munich Games. They’re asking for a single minute. One minute. One breath of silence at these London Games’ opening ceremony. One brief remembrance of the lives that were lost on a day when terror triumphed over sport. One short but jarring condemnation of that terror. Why can’t the International Olympic Committee just give them that one minute? “Jacques Rogge, you have let terror win today,” said Illana Romano, the widow of slain Israeli weightlifter Yossef Romano. Romano was speaking Wednesday at a London news conference that should never have been held. She was joined by Ankie Spitzer, wife of slain fencing coach Andrei Spitzer, in a sad plea for a bit of human decency that should have long since been granted. Rogge is president of an International Olympic Committee that steadfastly has refused to allow the memory of the massacred Munich 11 to be part of the opening ceremony. Not once since that September day in 1972 has the IOC given the massacre’s survivors the honor or comfort of even one second of solemnity during the important and symbolic opening night. After four decades, two widows have been sadly reduced to begging for it. The athletes, pleaded Spitzer, “were killed at an Olympic venue. They should be honored there.” Armed with a petition contain-

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COMMENTARY ing more than 100,000 signatures, backed by support from worldwide leaders including President Barack Obama, the two women showed up in London with one last desperate plan. “If you believe that the 11 murdered athletes must be mentioned, stand for a spontaneous minute when the IOC president begins to speak,” Romano said. She has also asked the broadcast media to follow Bob Costas, the NBC announcer who has stated he will stage his own minute of silence when the Israeli team marches into the Olympic Stadium during the broadcast. That minute has not yet been endorsed by a network with a billion reasons not to upset the IOC, but at least Costas is trying. “Silence your microphones for a minute in memory of our loved ones and to condemn terrorism,” Romano said. I’ll be standing. I’ll be silent. And for that entire minute, I’ll be noting the shame that will surround Rogge as he speaks of the Olympic spirit while clearly violating it. Why can’t the IOC just give them that one minute? It’s politics, of course. There is no outfit more political than the IOC, backroom deal makers in altruistic clothing. Their Olympic vision has become as much about money and power as fairness and competition. Simply, and disgracefully, the IOC won’t honor the fallen Israeli athletes at the opening ceremony because they don’t want to anger the nearly 50 Arab and predominantly Muslim countries that are also competing in the Games. Rogge said the opening ceremony is “an atmosphere that is not fit to remember such a tragic incident.” So the atmosphere where one is

murdered is not fit for the memory of those murders? As usual, the IOC’s arrogance is tone-deaf to the point of being laughable. This week Rogge suddenly asked for a moment of silence for the fallen Olympians during an appearance at the Olympic village. It was neither planned nor televised nor heard by more than a smattering of officials. It was lame and pandering and did not satisfy the widows, who called it “shameful.” The 11 athletes were killed by the Palestinian group Black September because they were Israeli. At least one U.S. politician said in a conference call Wednesday that they are not being memorialized for the same reason. “This is politics; they’re afraid of offending Arab nations,” said U.S. Rep. Eliot Engel, D-N.Y., whose constituents include the Rockland Jewish Community Center, which spearheaded the petition. “The only reason they haven’t done this in 40 years is because it’s Israeli athletes.... If this had happened to athletes of any other country but Israel, there would have been this minute of silence years ago.” At the very least, the IOC has been inconsistent on this issue. As recently as 2002, the 9/11 flag was paraded into the Salt Lake City opening ceremony to honor those terrorism victims. “The IOC says it’s too political to honor the Israelis, but it’s quite the opposite,” said Engel, who has communicated with Rogge about the issue. “It’s political not to have the moment of silence. It’s a matter of decency.” Perhaps nothing has been more indecent than the reported recent exchange between Spitzer and Rogge, who told her that in this matter, his hands were tied. “Your hands are tied?” Spitzer reportedly replied. “My husband’s hands were tied. So were his feet.”

Missy Franklin is a 17-year-old sunbeam who daydreams about getting a tattoo, calling it one of her “big motivations” for making the 2012 U.S. Olympic swimming team in seven events. Franklin spent months considering where to put the five interlocking Olympic rings that are her sport’s most visible — or sometimes not — symbol of success, finally deciding on her hip. Although the iconic Olympic logo is popular body art for athletes from other countries and other sports, it is a particular mark of prestige among U.S. swimmers because of the fierce competition for Olympic berths — only two qualify in most events. Never mind the top 1 percent; the 49 members of the 2012 team represent close to the top one-tenth of a percent of the nation’s registered swimmers. “It’s like being a member of the Army Special Forces,” said Mike Bruner, who won two gold medals at the 1976 Olympics and was a member of the team that boycotted the 1980 Summer Games. What better badge of honor to identify membership in such an elite patriotic force? Elizabeth Beisel, who was 16 when she sat for her Olympic body art after competing in the 2008 Beijing Games, said, “It’s the one tattoo that parents will let you get.”

Marked for life Anthony Ervin, who sports tattoo sleeves on his arms, had the rings tattooed in Australia, shortly after tying for the gold in the 50-meter freestyle in the 2000 Sydney Games. “It was the first willing stain I made to my body,” said Ervin, who will also compete in the 50-meter freestyle in London. In Bruner’s heyday, tattoos adorned the biceps of bikers, not backstrokers, butterflyers or breaststrokers. Decades after his retirement, he was inspired to get his Olympic rings — representing the continents of Africa, the Americas, Asia, Australia and Europe — by all the swimmers he saw sporting the tattoos at the 2008 trials. Americans who forgo the rings tattoo these days walk the pool deck feeling practically naked. “I am in the minority,” conceded Natalie Coughlin, an 11-time Olympic medalist, who is making her third Summer Games appearance but has never visited a tattoo parlor. “It’s so funny,” she added, “because I love tattoos as works of art, but I can’t commit to one.” Coughlin, 29, is not shying from the pain of the artist’s needles. She is just shy. “If you have the Olympic rings anywhere where people can see it, even on your foot, it’s going to draw attention, and I don’t want that,” she said.

Rings as tattoos The trail of body ink can be traced to the late 1980s. Chris Jacobs, a freestyle sprinter who succeeded despite a prolonged youthful rebellion, is believed to have been the first U.S. swimmer with an Olympic rings tattoo. Jacobs, who won three medals at the 1988 Seoul Games, admired the maple leaf tattoo on the chest of Canadian breaststroker Victor Davis. On his way home from South Korea, Jacobs stopped in Hawaii to unwind and to get the Olympic rings tattoo near his racing suit line. It joined the longhorn he had tattooed four years earlier while he attended the University of Texas. “The tattoo guy told me, ‘You know you have to keep this dry for 10 days because the chlorinated water will totally kill it,’” Jacobs said in a telephone interview. “You have to have an amazingly tight alibi to miss one workout, so I came up with this virus with horrible symptoms and that bought me a few days.”

Later, Jacobs added a larger version of the rings on the inside of his right biceps, which caused him stress during his 20 years in the banking industry. Jacobs, now the chief operating officer of Sexiguru, a resortwear company, said he made sure his shirtsleeves covered the tattoo when he was at the office, and he wore workout tops that covered it at the gym. The idea that the rings tattoos could one day cause them discomfort in the workplace does not sink in with many swimmers. Nor do they all consider that their sleek bodies will eventually sag in certain spots. What is routinely discussed are the most painful places to position a tattoo: the abdomen or chest for men and the ankle or rib cage for women. “A lot of the guys want it where everybody can see it,” said Dana Vollmer, a two-time Olympian. “Women want it where they can see it only when they’re swimming. When I got mine, I was very conscious that someday I would be wearing a wedding dress, and I didn’t want the tattoo anywhere where it would be showing as I walked down the aisle.”

Breaking the rules Conor Dwyer saw the Olympic rings tattoos of his training mates at the University of Florida and yearned to have his own. That desire presented an obstacle more daunting than the competition for his first Olympic team. His maternal grandfather, Jim Dowdle, has two family rules: no jumping out of airplanes and no tattoos. After finishing second in the 400meter freestyle at the trials last month in Omaha to make the Olympic team, Dwyer made his way to the stands where his relatives, including Dowdle, were seated and shouted, “Can I get my rings tattoo?” Dwyer’s mother, Jeanne, said her father stood up and replied, “Yes, and as for the rest of you, you can get a tattoo if you make the Olympic team.” Some swimmers do not wait. When Nicholas Walkotten was in high school, he had the Olympic rings tattooed on his left shoulder blade after he qualified for the trials. Walkotten, now 26, has represented the U.S. abroad but never at the Olympics. “I’ve noticed some looks and maybe people staring at it and wanting to ask about it, but they never have,” said Walkotten, who was 84th in the 100 butterfly at last month’s trials. “No one’s ever said: ‘Why do you have that on your arm? You didn’t go.’” Jacobs, who started the tradition, said: “I would blame not making it on getting the tattoo beforehand. That’s like spending the bonus check before it arrives.”

Dreaming of ink Franklin, a rising senior at Regis Jesuit High School in Aurora, Colo., was in kindergarten when she drew a picture of a stick figure standing atop an awards podium beneath the Olympic rings. In the months leading to the trials, she gave a lot of thought to where she wanted a tattoo artist to place those rings. “That’s the only tattoo I would ever get,” she assured her parents, Dick and D.A., when they protested. Franklin said: “I don’t really want it to be seen unless I’m in a swimsuit. And it has to be somewhere where the skin’s always going to be tight.” Her plan after the London Games is to have a girls’ day out with Kara Lynn Joyce, another Olympian. Instead of buying matching shoes or purses, they will get their rings tattoos — maybe. “I’m a big baby when it comes to needles,” Joyce said. “I’m terrified of them.” Joyce, 26, considered getting the tattoo after competing in the 2004 and 2008 Olympics. “I’ve just chickened out,” she said, adding: “Missy can be pretty persuasive. So we’ll see.”

Doug Mills / The New York Times

U.S. Olympic swimmer Matt Grevers shows off his Olympic rings tattoo at the Olympic trials in Omaha, Neb., last month.


D4

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, JULY 26, 2012

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL STANDINGS, SCORES AND SCHEDULES

AL Boxscores Yankees 5, Mariners 2 New York I.Suzuki rf Jeter ss Cano 2b Teixeira 1b Granderson cf Ibanez dh a-J.Nix ph-dh Er.Chavez 3b An.Jones lf R.Martin c Totals

AB 5 4 5 4 4 3 1 2 4 3 35

R 0 2 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 5

H 1 3 2 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 10

BI 0 1 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 1 5

BB 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 1 4

SO 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 3 1 8

Avg. .261 .311 .319 .262 .249 .235 .244 .266 .224 .182

Seattle AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Ackley 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .220 M.Saunders cf 4 1 1 0 0 2 .262 J.Montero c 4 1 1 0 0 3 .258 Jaso dh 1 0 0 0 3 0 .287 Seager 3b 2 0 0 1 2 1 .240 Carp 1b 3 0 0 1 1 0 .146 C.Wells lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .254 Peguero rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .161 Kawasaki ss 3 0 0 0 0 1 .192 Totals 29 2 3 2 6 10 New York 100 000 040 — 5 10 0 Seattle 200 000 000 — 2 3 0 LOB—New York 8, Seattle 6. 2B—Cano (29), J.Nix (7). HR—Jeter (8), off Iwakuma. SB—Granderson (8). DP—New York 1; Seattle 1. New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Nova 5 2 2 2 6 5 107 4.08 Rapada 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 4 2.70 Phelps W, 2-3 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 2 20 2.70 D.Robertson H, 13 1 0 0 0 0 2 13 2.05 Soriano S, 26-28 1 1 0 0 0 1 10 1.58 Seattle IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Iwakuma 5 6 1 1 3 3 95 4.56 O.Perez H, 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 15 2.77 Kinney H, 1 1 0 1 1 0 2 21 2.70 Luetge L, 1-1 H, 7 1-3 2 2 2 0 0 9 1.98 Kelley BS, 2-2 2-3 2 1 1 1 1 27 3.77 Delabar 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 4.17 Kinney pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Nova pitched to 2 batters in the 6th. T—3:27. A—36,071 (47,860).

Angels 11, Royals 6 Kansas City A.Gordon lf A.Escobar ss L.Cain cf Butler dh Moustakas 3b S.Perez c Francoeur rf Hosmer 1b Y.Betancourt 2b Totals

AB 4 5 3 4 5 4 4 2 4 35

R 1 1 0 2 0 1 1 0 0 6

H 1 1 0 2 1 1 1 0 0 7

BI 0 0 0 3 0 0 3 0 0 6

BB 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 4

SO 2 2 2 1 1 0 3 1 1 13

Avg. .297 .305 .305 .296 .268 .330 .242 .232 .245

Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Trout lf 4 3 2 2 0 0 .356 Tor.Hunter dh 5 3 4 3 0 0 .278 Trumbo rf 4 1 2 1 1 0 .307 K.Morales 1b 5 0 0 1 0 2 .275 Callaspo 3b 4 1 3 1 1 0 .257 H.Kendrick 2b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .276 M.Izturis ss 4 0 1 1 0 1 .236 Bourjos cf 4 1 2 0 0 1 .230 Bo.Wilson c 2 2 1 1 0 0 .214 Totals 36 11 17 10 2 4 Kansas City 000 020 031 — 6 7 2 Los Angeles 331 100 03x — 11 17 1 E—Moustakas (10), Hosmer (7), M.Izturis (6). LOB—Kansas City 8, Los Angeles 6. 2B—Moustakas (24), Trout (20), Callaspo 2 (10), M.Izturis (10). HR— Butler (20), off Weaver; Francoeur (9), off S.Downs; Bo.Wilson (2), off Hochevar; Trout (16), off L.Coleman; Tor.Hunter (11), off L.Coleman. DP—Kansas City 2. Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hochevar L, 6-9 3 9 8 6 1 2 63 5.26 Teaford 4 6 1 1 0 1 58 4.70 L.Coleman 1 2 2 2 1 1 31 4.55 Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Weaver W, 13-1 5 3 2 2 2 8 101 2.26 Isringhausen 1 0 0 0 0 2 15 3.00 Hawkins 1 0 0 0 0 0 13 1.82 S.Downs 2-3 2 3 3 2 1 22 2.38 Jepsen H, 5 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 2 4.70 Frieri 1 2 1 1 0 2 22 1.23 Hochevar pitched to 2 batters in the 4th. Teaford pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. T—3:07. A—39,107 (45,957).

White Sox 8, Twins 2 Minnesota Span cf Revere rf Mauer c Willingham dh Morneau 1b Doumit lf Dozier ss A.Casilla 2b Mastroianni 2b J.Carroll 3b Totals

AB 4 5 3 3 4 4 3 3 0 4 33

R 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

H 2 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 6

BI 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 0 0 0 1 0 1 2 3 0 0 7

Avg. .285 .309 .328 .271 .253 .287 .236 .222 .263 .236

Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Blackburn L, 4-6 4 1-3 10 8 8 1 1 84 7.99 Fien 1 2-3 1 0 0 0 2 26 1.80 Burton 1 1 0 0 0 1 17 2.29 Perkins 1 0 0 0 0 2 11 3.09 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Peavy W, 8-7 6 6 2 1 2 6 121 3.15 Septimo 2 0 0 0 0 1 25 4.50 Crain 2-3 0 0 0 3 0 31 2.63 H.Santiago 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 4 3.76 T—3:09. A—32,261 (40,615).

Rangers 5, Red Sox 3 AB 3 4 4 3 4 4 3 0 3 3 31

R 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 3

H 0 2 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 5

BI 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2

BB 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 0 0 0 0 1 2 2 0 3 0 8

Avg. .282 .333 .267 .291 .261 .297 .219 .250 .270 .257

Texas AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Kinsler 2b 4 0 1 1 0 0 .275 Andrus ss 2 1 1 0 1 0 .298 Hamilton dh 3 0 0 0 1 1 .287 Beltre 3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .315 Mi.Young 1b 4 1 2 0 0 0 .270 N.Cruz rf 4 1 1 1 0 1 .258 Dav.Murphy lf 4 1 1 1 0 1 .279 Torrealba c 4 1 2 0 0 0 .228 Gentry cf 3 0 1 1 0 0 .339 Totals 32 5 10 4 2 3 Boston 100 101 000 — 3 5 0 Texas 000 300 11x — 5 10 0 LOB—Boston 3, Texas 7. 2B—Mi.Young (16), Dav.Murphy (13). HR—Middlebrooks (12), off D.Holland; Pedroia (7), off D.Holland; N.Cruz (13), off Albers. SB—Ciriaco (5). DP—Texas 1 (Andrus, Kinsler, Mi.Young). Boston Beckett L, 5-9 Albers Texas D.Holland W, 7-5 Mi.Adams H, 17 Nathan S, 20-21

IP 7 1 IP 7 2-3 1-3 1

H 9 1 H 5 0 0

R 4 1 R 3 0 0

National League

East Division Pct GB WCGB .602 — — .520 8 2½ .520 8 2½ .495 10½ 5 .495 10½ 5 Central Division Pct GB WCGB .541 — ½ .541 — ½ .500 4 4½ .423 11½ 12 .408 13 13½ West Division Pct GB WCGB .598 — — .546 5 — .545 5 — .430 16½ 11½

East Division Pct GB WCGB .598 — — .551 4½ — .480 11½ 7 .459 13½ 9 .455 14 9½ Central Division Pct GB WCGB .592 — — .567 2½ — .531 6 2 .454 13½ 9½ .412 17½ 13½ .343 24½ 20½ West Division Pct GB WCGB .561 — — .535 2½ 1½ .500 6 5 .420 14 13 .381 17½ 16½

New York Baltimore Tampa Bay Boston Toronto

W 59 51 51 49 48

L 39 47 47 50 49

Chicago Detroit Cleveland Kansas City Minnesota

W 53 53 49 41 40

L 45 45 49 56 58

Texas Oakland Los Angeles Seattle

W 58 53 54 43

L 39 44 45 57

Wednesday’s Games Chicago White Sox 8, Minnesota 2 L.A. Angels 11, Kansas City 6 N.Y. Yankees 5, Seattle 2 Detroit 5, Cleveland 3 Tampa Bay 10, Baltimore 1 Oakland 16, Toronto 0 Texas 5, Boston 3

ER BB SO NP ERA 4 2 3 114 4.57 1 0 0 11 2.35 ER BB SO NP ERA 3 1 7 100 4.74 0 0 0 4 3.00 0 0 1 14 2.23

L10 5-5 5-5 5-5 4-6 5-5

Str Home Away W-1 30-17 29-22 L-3 23-24 28-23 W-2 28-25 23-22 L-1 25-28 24-22 L-2 25-22 23-27

L10 4-6 8-2 4-6 3-7 4-6

Str Home Away W-3 27-22 26-23 W-1 28-21 25-24 L-1 26-25 23-24 L-1 17-30 24-26 L-3 19-30 21-28

L10 5-5 9-1 5-5 6-4

Str Home Away W-1 31-17 27-22 W-7 29-21 24-23 W-1 29-20 25-25 L-1 18-29 25-28

Today’s Games Tampa Bay (Shields 8-6) at Baltimore (Tillman 2-1), 9:35 a.m. Oakland (Milone 9-6) at Toronto (Laffey 2-1), 9:37 a.m. Detroit (Verlander 11-5) at Cleveland (McAllister 4-2), 4:05 p.m. Kansas City (Mendoza 4-6) at Seattle (Vargas 10-7), 7:10 p.m.

Washington Atlanta New York Miami Philadelphia

W 58 54 47 45 45

L 39 44 51 53 54

Cincinnati Pittsburgh St. Louis Milwaukee Chicago Houston

W 58 55 52 44 40 34

L 40 42 46 53 57 65

San Francisco Los Angeles Arizona San Diego Colorado

W 55 53 49 42 37

L 43 46 49 58 60

Wednesday’s Games Washington 5, N.Y. Mets 2 Pittsburgh 3, Chicago Cubs 2 Atlanta 7, Miami 1 Philadelphia 7, Milwaukee 6, 10 innings San Diego 6, San Francisco 3 Cincinnati 5, Houston 3 St. Louis 3, L.A. Dodgers 2, 12 innings Colorado 4, Arizona 2

L10 7-3 5-5 1-9 3-7 7-3

Str Home Away W-5 28-19 30-20 W-2 24-24 30-20 L-6 26-26 21-25 L-2 25-26 20-27 W-4 21-29 24-25

L10 8-2 6-4 6-4 3-7 5-5 1-9

Str Home Away W-7 31-18 27-22 W-1 33-16 22-26 W-2 28-21 24-25 L-6 26-23 18-30 L-1 24-21 16-36 L-9 24-24 10-41

L10 7-3 5-5 7-3 6-4 3-7

Str Home Away L-1 31-17 24-26 L-2 29-20 24-26 L-1 28-22 21-27 W-1 22-29 20-29 W-1 20-29 17-31

Today’s Games L.A. Dodgers (Capuano 10-5) at St. Louis (Westbrook 8-8), 10:45 a.m. Pittsburgh (A.J.Burnett 11-3) at Houston (Keuchel 1-2), 5:05 p.m. Washington (E.Jackson 5-6) at Milwaukee (Gallardo 8-7), 5:10 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Harvey 0-0) at Arizona (Miley 11-5), 6:40 p.m.

American League roundup

National League roundup

• Yankees 5, Mariners 2: SEATTLE — Pinch-hitter Jayson Nix lined a three-run double off reliever Shawn Kelley in the eighth inning, and New York rallied for a victory over Seattle to complete a 2-5 West Coast trip. Seattle got just one hit after Jesus Montero’s brokenbat single with one out in the first inning. • White Sox 8, Twins 2: CHICAGO — Dayan Viciedo homered and drove in four runs, and Chicago completed the three-game sweep of Minnesota. Jake Peavy (8-7) allowed two runs — one earned — and six hits in six innings with six strikeouts. • Angels 11, Royals 6: ANAHEIM, Calif. — Jered Weaver won his seventh straight start to tie a careerbest, and Mike Trout and Torii Hunter homered for Los Angeles in a win over Kansas City. The Angels won the rubber game of the three-game series without slugger Albert Pujols, who missed his second game of the season because of a bruised right elbow. • Tigers 5, Indians 3: CLEVELAND — Max Scherzer allowed two runs over seven innings to win his fourth straight decision and Detroit beat Cleveland for only the second time in eight games this season. • Rays 10, Orioles 1: BALTIMORE — David Price allowed one run over seven innings to earn his major league-leading 14th victory and Ryan Roberts homered and scored three runs against Baltimore in his Tampa Bay debut. • Rangers 5, Red Sox 3: ARLINGTON, Texas — Derek Holland struck out seven and pitched into the eighth inning and Texas took advantage of a couple of wild throws by Josh Beckett to score the go-ahead run against Boston. • Athletics 16, Blue Jays 0: TORONTO — Coco Crisp hit two home runs and Yoenis Cespedes had two RBI doubles to lead Oakland to its season-high seventh straight win.

• Pirates 3, Cubs 2: PITTSBURGH — Kevin Correia won his career-best fifth straight start and Garrett Jones hit a tiebreaking double to lead Pittsburgh over Chicago. • Nationals 5, Mets 2: NEW YORK — Stephen Strasburg struck out 11 in seven innings, Michael Morse and Danny Espinosa hit consecutive homers and Washington completed a sweep of free-falling New York. • Braves 7, Marlins 1: MIAMI — Juan Francisco homered and drove in three runs for Atlanta while the downsizing Marlins jettisoned yet another star player by trading Hanley Ramirez to Los Angeles. • Phillies 7, Brewers 6: PHILADELPHIA — Jimmy Rollins hit an RBI single off Milwaukee’s Francisco Rodriguez with two outs in the 10th and Philadelphia rallied late for the fourth straight day, completing its first three-game sweep of the season. • Padres 6, Giants 3: SAN FRANCISCO — Jesus Guzman hit two home runs and Chase Headley had one to hand Tim Lincecum another setback and San Diego avoided a sweep against San Francisco. • Reds 5, Astros 3: HOUSTON — Drew Stubbs delivered another huge hit in the ninth inning, a two-out, two-run double that rallied Cincinnati past Houston to its season-high seventh straight win. • Cardinals 3, Dodgers 2: ST. LOUIS — Rafael Furcal singled home the winning run with two outs in the 12th inning and St. Louis dampened the Dodgers debut of Hanley Ramirez, who went two for four with a triple and a walk. • Rockies 4, Diamondbacks 2: PHOENIX — Jeff Francis pitched 6 1⁄3 strong innings, Wilin Rosario hit a two-run homer and Colorado avoided a three-game sweep against Arizona.

T—2:43. A—44,104 (48,194). BB 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 5

Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. De Aza cf 4 1 1 0 0 0 .279 Youkilis 3b 2 0 1 1 0 0 .250 a-E.Escobar ph-3b 2 0 0 0 0 0 .195 A.Dunn 1b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .211 Konerko dh 3 0 1 1 0 1 .336 Rios rf 3 2 1 2 1 0 .314 Al.Ramirez ss 4 2 2 0 0 0 .268 Viciedo lf 4 1 3 4 0 0 .262 Jor.Danks lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .296 Flowers c 4 0 1 0 0 2 .182 Beckham 2b 4 1 1 0 0 2 .230 Totals 34 8 12 8 1 6 Minnesota 100 100 000 — 2 6 1 Chicago 022 220 00x — 8 12 1 a-grounded out for Youkilis in the 4th. E—Span (4), Viciedo (1). LOB—Minnesota 9, Chicago 4. 2B—Span 2 (26), Morneau (19), A.Dunn (13), Al.Ramirez (15), Viciedo (10), Flowers (4). HR— Viciedo (16), off Blackburn; Rios (16), off Blackburn. SB—De Aza (18). DP—Minnesota 1; Chicago 1.

Boston Ellsbury cf Ciriaco dh Pedroia 2b Ad.Gonzalez 1b C.Ross rf Middlebrooks 3b C.Crawford lf Nava lf Shoppach c Aviles ss Totals

American League

Athletics 16, Blue Jays 0 Oakland AB R H Crisp cf 6 3 3 J.Gomes lf 3 2 2 e-Moss ph-rf 1 0 1 Reddick rf 4 1 1 b-S.Smith ph-rf-lf 2 1 0 Cespedes dh 4 2 2 Carter 1b 3 2 1 Inge 3b 5 1 1 Sogard 3b 0 0 0 D.Norris c 4 2 2 Hicks ss 5 1 1 J.Weeks 2b 4 1 0 Totals 41 16 14

BI 2 1 1 1 0 2 3 2 0 1 2 0 15

BB 0 2 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 1 0 1 7

SO 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 3 1 7

Avg. .253 .263 .255 .272 .247 .302 .279 .201 .154 .206 .174 .217

Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Lawrie 3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .285 Rasmus cf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .242 c-R.Davis ph-cf 0 0 0 0 1 0 .255 Encarnacion 1b 2 0 1 0 1 1 .296 d-Y.Gomes ph-c 1 0 0 0 0 1 .209 Lind dh-1b 4 0 0 0 0 3 .227 Arencibia c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .242 a-Mathis ph-c-p 3 0 1 0 1 1 .253 K.Johnson 2b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .236 Snider lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .263 Vizquel ss 4 0 1 0 0 0 .214 Gose rf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .143 Totals 32 0 5 0 3 13 Oakland 181 011 022 — 16 14 0 Toronto 000 000 000 — 0 5 2 a-struck out for Arencibia in the 2nd. b-grounded into a fielder’s choice for Reddick in the 8th. c-walked for Rasmus in the 8th. d-struck out for Encarnacion in the 8th. e-singled for J.Gomes in the 9th. E—K.Johnson (9), Snider (1). LOB—Oakland 5, Toronto 8. 2B—Reddick (20), Cespedes 2 (15), Inge (12), D.Norris (1), Hicks (5), Encarnacion (20), Gose (1). HR—Crisp 2 (5), off A.Carpenter 2; Carter (6), off A.Carpenter. SB—Cespedes (8). Oakland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Griffin W, 3-0 6 3 0 0 2 9 104 2.25 Blevins 1 0 0 0 0 2 11 2.40 J.Miller 2 2 0 0 1 2 34 2.15 Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA R.Romero L, 8-7 1 1-3 4 8 8 6 1 66 5.75 Beck 2-3 2 1 1 0 0 20 5.87 A.Carpenter 4 3 3 3 1 5 67 6.43 Loup 2 2 2 1 0 1 27 3.68 Mathis 1 3 2 2 0 0 21 9.00 T—3:12. A—23,948 (49,260).

Rays 10, Orioles 1 Tampa Bay De.Jennings lf S.Rodriguez 2b B.Upton cf Zobrist 2b a-Fuld ph-lf Joyce rf Keppinger dh C.Pena 1b R.Roberts 3b Conrad 3b Lobaton c E.Johnson ss Totals

AB 3 1 5 3 2 3 4 3 2 1 3 4 34

R 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 2 3 0 1 0 10

H 1 0 2 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 3 1 11

BI 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 4 2 10

BB 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 2 1 0 0 1 7

SO 0 0 1 1 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 2 7

Avg. .239 .210 .246 .248 .400 .279 .322 .191 .500 .189 .240 .259

Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Markakis rf 3 1 1 0 0 0 En.Chavez cf 1 0 0 0 0 1 Hardy ss 3 0 2 1 0 1 C.Davis rf 1 0 0 0 0 0 Ad.Jones cf 3 0 1 0 0 0 Flaherty rf-2b 1 0 0 0 0 0 Wieters dh 4 0 0 0 0 3 Betemit 3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 Mar.Reynolds 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 Teagarden c 3 0 0 0 0 2 Quintanilla 2b-ss 3 0 2 0 0 1 St.Tolleson lf 3 0 0 0 0 2 Totals 33 1 7 1 0 13 Tampa Bay 502 030 000 — 10 Baltimore 100 000 000 — 1

Avg. .277 .177 .221 .255 .292 .207 .240 .252 .207 .071 .333 .185 11 0 7 0

a-singled for Zobrist in the 6th. LOB—Tampa Bay 8, Baltimore 5. HR—De.Jennings (7), off Mig.Gonzalez; R.Roberts (1), off Mig.Gonzalez; Lobaton (1), off Lindstrom. DP—Tampa Bay 1; Baltimore 3. Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Price W, 14-4 7 7 1 1 0 10 105 2.57 Howell 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 3.25 Badenhop 1 0 0 0 0 2 9 3.46 Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gonzalez L, 2-2 2 2-3 7 7 7 2 2 75 4.28 Lindstrom 2 1-3 1 3 3 3 2 43 3.28 Gregg 1 1 0 0 1 0 11 3.45 Ayala 1 1 0 0 0 2 14 2.77 Patton 1 1 0 0 0 1 13 3.07 Strop 1 0 0 0 1 0 13 1.43 T—2:52. A—19,582 (45,971).

Tigers 5, Indians 3 Detroit A.Jackson cf Berry lf Mi.Cabrera 3b Fielder 1b D.Young dh Boesch rf D.Kelly rf Jh.Peralta ss Avila c Infante 2b Totals

AB 4 4 4 2 4 4 1 4 3 3 33

R 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 5

H 1 3 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 8

BI 1 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

BB 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 6

SO 1 0 1 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 5

Avg. .316 .289 .328 .306 .269 .251 .176 .266 .240 .143

Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Choo rf 2 0 1 0 2 0 .294 A.Cabrera ss 4 0 1 0 0 2 .280 Kipnis 2b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .274 Brantley cf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .293 C.Santana c 4 0 0 0 0 0 .234 Hafner dh 4 1 1 1 0 3 .230 Damon lf 3 1 0 0 1 1 .232 Kotchman 1b 4 1 1 2 0 0 .233 Hannahan 3b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .235 Totals 31 3 5 3 4 8 Detroit 120 011 000 — 5 8 0 Cleveland 002 000 001 — 3 5 2 E—A.Cabrera 2 (12). LOB—Detroit 10, Cleveland 5. 2B—Avila (12), Choo (31), Brantley (28). HR— Kotchman (10), off Scherzer; Hafner (9), off Valverde. SB—Brantley (11). DP—Detroit 1; Cleveland 1. Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Scherzer W, 10-5 7 3 2 2 4 8 105 4.49 Benoit H, 22 1 1 0 0 0 0 13 2.87 Valverde S, 19-23 1 1 1 1 0 0 6 3.89 Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA D.Lowe L, 8-9 6 8 5 4 3 1 94 5.09 Rogers 1 0 0 0 1 0 25 2.49 C.Allen 1 1-3 0 0 0 1 2 21 0.00 Sipp 2-3 0 0 0 1 2 21 5.34 T—2:58. A—24,029 (43,429).

NL Boxscores Rockies 4, Diamondbacks 2 Colorado Fowler cf Scutaro 2b Cuddyer 1b A.Brown lf Colvin rf Pacheco 3b LeMahieu 3b W.Rosario c Rutledge ss Francis p Ottavino p Belisle p b-E.Young ph R.Betancourt p Totals

AB 5 1 4 4 4 4 0 4 4 3 0 0 1 0 34

R 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 4

H 3 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 2 0 0 0 1 0 9

BI 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

BB 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

SO 1 0 0 2 2 2 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 9

Avg. .302 .271 .260 .176 .278 .297 .229 .250 .356 .000 .000 .000 .255 ---

Arizona Drew ss Bloomquist 3b Kubel lf Goldschmidt 1b

AB 4 4 4 4

R 0 0 1 0

H 0 0 1 0

BI 0 0 1 0

BB 0 0 0 0

SO 1 1 0 1

Avg. .209 .301 .298 .288

J.Upton rf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .272 M.Montero c 3 1 3 1 1 0 .282 C.Young cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .218 Jo.McDonald 2b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .267 Cahill p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .122 Ziegler p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .333 a-Overbay ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .298 Bergesen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 31 2 5 2 2 8 Colorado 102 100 000 — 4 9 0 Arizona 100 000 100 — 2 5 0 a-struck out for Ziegler in the 7th. b-singled for Belisle in the 9th. LOB—Colorado 6, Arizona 5. 2B—Scutaro (15). 3B—Fowler (10). HR—W.Rosario (16), off Cahill; Kubel (22), off Francis; M.Montero (10), off Francis. SB—Fowler (9), E.Young (11). DP—Arizona 1. Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Francis W, 3-2 6 5 2 2 1 4 97 4.97 Ottavino H, 5 1 0 0 0 0 1 9 4.58 Belisle H, 13 1 0 0 0 0 1 16 2.25 Betancourt S, 17 1 0 0 0 1 2 21 3.00 Arizona IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cahill L, 8-9 6 2-3 8 4 4 2 6 108 3.86 Ziegler 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 2 2.61 Bergesen 2 1 0 0 0 3 31 0.00 Francis pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. T—2:49. A—23,385 (48,633).

Cardinals 3, Dodgers 2 (12 innings) Los Angeles Abreu lf Gwynn Jr. lf M.Ellis 2b Kemp cf Ethier rf H.Ramirez 3b Loney 1b L.Cruz ss A.Ellis c Harang p Elbert p Belisario p b-Uribe ph Lindblom p Choate p J.Wright p Totals

AB 3 2 5 5 5 4 4 5 5 3 0 0 1 0 0 0 42

R 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

H 1 0 1 0 1 2 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 8

BI 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

BB 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 0 0 1 3 1 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 9

Avg. .250 .241 .262 .341 .289 .249 .248 .239 .277 .053 ----.196 ----.000

St. Louis AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Furcal ss 5 0 1 1 1 1 .277 Jay cf 4 0 0 0 1 2 .301 Holliday lf 4 0 1 0 1 1 .317 Beltran rf 5 0 0 0 0 2 .287 Craig 1b 4 1 0 0 1 1 .296 Y.Molina c 5 0 1 0 0 1 .303 Freese 3b 4 1 2 0 0 0 .308 1-Greene pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .214 Salas p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 d-Berkman ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .281 2-J.Kelly pr 0 1 0 0 0 0 .154 Schumaker 2b 3 0 0 0 2 1 .308 Lohse p 1 0 0 1 0 1 .098 Boggs p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Descalso ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .235 Motte p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-M.Carpenter ph-3b2 0 1 0 0 1 .278 Totals 37 3 6 2 7 11 Los Angeles 010 001 000 000 — 2 8 1 St. Louis 010 010 000 001 — 3 6 0 Two outs when winning run scored. a-sacrificed for Boggs in the 8th. b-singled for Belisario in the 10th. c-struck out for Motte in the 10th. d-walked for Salas in the 12th. 1-ran for Freese in the 10th. 2-ran for Berkman in the 12th. E—Loney (5). LOB—Los Angeles 6, St. Louis 8. 2B—M.Ellis (7), Ethier (26), A.Ellis (9), Freese (18). 3B—H.Ramirez (3). DP—Los Angeles 2; St. Louis 1. Los Angeles Harang Elbert Belisario Lindblom

IP 7 1-3 0 1 2-3 1-3

H 2 0 0 1

R 2 0 0 0

ER BB SO NP ERA 2 4 8 116 3.39 0 1 0 5 2.45 0 0 1 11 2.63 0 1 0 9 3.15

Choate 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 2.39 J.Wright L, 4-3 1 1-3 3 1 1 1 1 27 3.73 St. Louis IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lohse 7 7 2 2 0 4 106 2.71 Boggs 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 1.76 Motte 2 1 0 0 0 1 22 2.72 Salas W, 1-3 2 0 0 0 1 3 37 4.38 Elbert pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. T—3:55. A—37,841 (43,975).

Reds 5, Astros 3 Cincinnati Cozart ss Stubbs cf Bruce rf Ludwick lf Chapman p Rolen 3b Frazier 1b Valdez 2b b-Paul ph-lf Mesoraco c c-Heisey ph Hanigan c H.Bailey p Ondrusek p Marshall p d-B.Phillips ph-2b Totals

AB 4 5 4 4 0 4 4 3 1 3 1 0 2 0 0 0 35

R 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 5

H 0 2 2 1 0 1 1 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 10

BI 0 3 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

BB 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 4

SO 3 1 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 10

Avg. .242 .230 .247 .243 --.212 .283 .237 .444 .226 .273 .269 .136 ----.298

Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Ma.Gonzalez ss 4 0 0 0 1 1 .275 Altuve 2b 4 1 3 0 1 0 .299 Maxwell cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .224 C.Johnson 3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .273 S.Moore 1b-rf 3 1 1 1 1 2 .222 J.D.Martinez lf 4 1 2 1 0 1 .244 Bogusevic rf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .219 Abad p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Corporan c 1 0 0 0 2 0 .333 1-Schafer pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .225 Del Rosario p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --X.Cedeno p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Fe.Rodriguez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Cordero p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --M.Downs 1b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .200 B.Norris p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .161 a-B.Francisco ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .267 C.Snyder c 1 0 1 0 0 0 .181 Totals 33 3 8 2 5 8 Cincinnati 001 000 013 — 5 10 4 Houston 000 000 030 — 3 8 0 a-flied out for B.Norris in the 7th. b-doubled for Valdez in the 9th. c-struck out for Mesoraco in the 9th. d-walked for Marshall in the 9th. 1-ran for Corporan in the 7th. E—Rolen (7), Ludwick (1), Mesoraco (1), Frazier (4). LOB—Cincinnati 8, Houston 8. 2B—Stubbs 2 (12), Paul (1), Mesoraco (7), Altuve (24), S.Moore (5), J.D.Martinez (12), C.Snyder (6). SB—Stubbs (20), Bruce (7), Altuve (17), Bogusevic (11). DP—Cincinnati 2. Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA H.Bailey 7 4 0 0 5 7 113 3.53 Ondrusek BS, 2-4 2-3 3 3 2 0 0 19 3.13 Marshall W, 3-3 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 4 2.63 Chapman S, 19-23 1 1 0 0 0 1 23 1.51 Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA B.Norris 7 5 1 1 1 7 99 5.05 Del Rosario 1-3 0 1 1 1 0 6 8.56 X.Cedeno 0 1 0 0 0 0 3 2.89 Fe.Rodriguez 2-3 1 0 0 1 0 8 6.21 Cordero L, 0-2 BS 2-3 2 3 3 1 2 28 23.14 Abad 1-3 1 0 0 0 1 11 3.86 X.Cedeno pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. T—3:24. A—16,077 (40,981).

Padres 6, Giants 3 San Diego Venable cf-rf Forsythe 2b Headley 3b Quentin lf Amarista lf Alonso 1b Guzman rf Maybin cf Jo.Baker c Ev.Cabrera ss Marquis p Thatcher p Gregerson p Street p Totals

AB 5 5 5 4 0 4 4 0 2 3 4 0 0 0 36

R 0 0 1 1 0 0 3 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 6

H 1 2 1 2 0 0 3 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 11

BI 2 0 1 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 3

SO 3 1 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 3 0 0 0 11

Avg. .242 .272 .267 .273 .291 .255 .251 .221 .257 .236 .211 --.000 ---

San Francisco AB R H BI BB SO Avg. G.Blanco rf-lf 4 1 1 0 0 0 .248 Theriot 2b 3 0 1 1 0 1 .282 Me.Cabrera lf 3 0 0 1 0 1 .356 Kontos p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Pagan cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .278 B.Crawford ss 3 0 0 0 1 1 .236 Belt 1b 4 1 1 0 0 2 .230 Arias 3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .246 Whiteside c 3 1 0 0 0 1 .143 Lincecum p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .107 Affeldt p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-Christian ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .194 Penny p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Schierholtz ph-rf 1 0 1 0 0 0 .253 Totals 31 3 6 2 1 9 San Diego 100 220 010 — 6 11 1 San Francisco 100 000 020 — 3 6 0 a-struck out for Affeldt in the 6th. b-singled for Penny in the 8th. E—Ev.Cabrera (4). LOB—San Diego 7, San Francisco 4. 2B—Venable (17), Pagan (17), Belt (14). HR—Headley (12), off Lincecum; Guzman (5), off Lincecum; Guzman (6), off Penny. SB—G.Blanco (17). DP—San Francisco 1. San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Marquis W, 4-5 7 1-3 3 3 1 1 8 104 3.48 Thatcher 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 5 3.42 Gregerson 0 1 0 0 0 0 7 3.05 Street S, 17-17 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 1 18 0.91 San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lincecum L, 4-11 4 2-3 7 5 5 3 8 102 5.88 Affeldt 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 2 13 2.31 Penny 2 4 1 1 0 0 18 3.97 Kontos 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 2.00 Gregerson pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. T—2:51. A—41,871 (41,915).

Phillies 7, Brewers 6 (10 innings) Milwaukee C.Gomez cf Morgan rf c-Bianchi ph Axford p e-C.Izturis ph Fr.Rodriguez p Braun lf Ar.Ramirez 3b Hart 1b R.Weeks 2b M.Maldonado c Ransom ss Estrada p Thornburg p a-Ishikawa ph L.Hernandez p b-Aoki ph-rf Totals

AB 6 4 1 0 0 0 4 5 5 4 5 3 2 0 1 0 2 42

R 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 6

H 2 1 0 0 0 0 3 0 2 4 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 15

BI 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 3

SO 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 2 2 0 0 0 1 10

Avg. .244 .229 .000 --.226 --.318 .278 .262 .200 .275 .212 .100 .250 .250 .000 .281

Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Rollins ss 6 0 1 1 0 0 .253 Victorino cf 4 2 1 0 1 0 .253 Utley 2b 4 1 3 3 1 1 .257 Howard 1b 4 0 1 0 1 2 .244 Pence rf 5 0 1 1 0 3 .267 Wigginton 3b 5 0 1 0 0 1 .234 Pierre lf 4 1 2 0 0 0 .308 Mayberry lf 0 1 0 0 1 0 .237 Kratz c 5 1 3 1 0 0 .375 1-Fontenot pr 0 1 0 0 0 0 .298 Worley p 2 0 1 0 0 0 .107 K.Kendrick p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .063 Bastardo p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-L.Nix ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .320 Papelbon p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Schwimer p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --f-Ruiz ph 0 0 0 1 0 0 .345 Totals 40 7 14 7 4 7 Milwaukee 010 002 020 1 — 6 15 0 Philadelphia 012 200 000 2 — 7 14 2 Two outs when winning run scored. a-singled for Thornburg in the 6th. b-struck out for L.Hernandez in the 8th. c-popped out for Morgan in the 8th. d-grounded out for Bastardo in the 8th. esacrificed for Axford in the 10th. f-hit a sacrifice fly for Schwimer in the 10th. 1-ran for Kratz in the 10th. E—Wigginton 2 (12). LOB—Milwaukee 13, Philadelphia 10. 2B—C.Gomez (9), Braun 2 (17), Ransom (10), Utley 2 (2), Pierre (7), Kratz 2 (2). HR—R.Weeks (10), off Worley; Braun (28), off Bastardo. SB—Hart

(3), R.Weeks (7), Utley (3). DP—Milwaukee 1; Philadelphia 1. Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP Estrada 4 8 5 5 3 4 83 Thornburg 1 2 0 0 0 0 15 L.Hernandez 2 2 0 0 0 0 26 Axford 2 0 0 0 0 3 26 Rodriguez L, 2-6 2-3 2 2 2 1 0 14 Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP Worley 5 1-3 10 3 3 1 6 90 K.Kendrick H, 2 1 2-3 1 0 0 1 2 33 Bastardo BS, 3-3 1 2 2 2 0 1 22 Papelbon 1 2 0 0 0 1 14 Schwimer W, 2-1 1 0 1 0 1 0 15 T—3:52. A—44,715 (43,651).

ERA 4.52 5.54 4.89 4.68 4.80 ERA 3.88 4.48 5.23 3.29 3.86

Braves 7, Marlins 1 Atlanta Bourn cf Prado 2b Heyward rf McCann c F.Freeman 1b J.Francisco 3b Constanza lf Janish ss Hanson p Medlen p b-Hinske ph Venters p Totals

AB 5 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 1 1 1 0 35

R 1 0 2 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 7

H 1 0 2 1 1 3 0 1 0 0 0 0 9

BI 2 0 1 0 1 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 7

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1

SO 2 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 5

Avg. .299 .304 .270 .242 .273 .241 .222 .184 .029 .167 .202 ---

Miami AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Reyes ss 3 0 1 0 1 2 .273 D.Solano 3b 1 1 0 0 3 1 .322 Ca.Lee 1b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .270 Morrison lf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .234 Ruggiano cf 4 0 2 1 0 1 .367 Bonifacio 2b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .273 Petersen rf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .200 Hayes c 4 0 0 0 0 4 .206 Nolasco p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .152 Da.Jennings p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-Cousins ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .163 LeBlanc p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Mujica p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Kearns ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .256 Totals 28 1 3 1 8 14 Atlanta 000 321 010 — 7 9 0 Miami 001 000 000 — 1 3 1 a-struck out for Da.Jennings in the 7th. b-reached on error for Medlen in the 9th. c-struck out for Mujica in the 9th. E—D.Solano (2). LOB—Atlanta 3, Miami 8. 2B—Heyward (18), Reyes (20), Ruggiano 2 (15). HR—J.Francisco (8), off Nolasco; Bourn (8), off Nolasco; Heyward (15), off LeBlanc. SB—Constanza (1), Reyes 2 (23), D.Solano 2 (4), Ruggiano (7), Bonifacio (26), Petersen (2). DP—Miami 1. Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hanson W, 11-5 5 3 1 1 7 7 108 4.39 Medlen 3 0 0 0 1 5 46 2.48 Venters 1 0 0 0 0 2 12 4.08 Miami IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Nolasco L, 8-9 5 1-3 8 6 6 1 3 83 4.80 Da.Jennings 1 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 22 1.35 LeBlanc 1 1 1 1 0 0 14 1.38 Mujica 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 4.14 Inherited runners-scored—Da.Jennings 1-0. T—2:46. A—36,711 (37,442).

Pirates 3, Cubs 2 Chicago AB R DeJesus cf 4 1 S.Castro ss 4 0 Rizzo 1b 3 1 LaHair rf 4 0 Clevenger c 3 0 Valbuena 3b 4 0 Barney 2b 3 0 Campana lf 3 0 Dempster p 2 0 Maine p 0 0 Corpas p 0 0 b-Re.Johnson ph 1 0 Camp p 0 0 Totals 31 2

H 2 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

BI 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

BB 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

SO 0 1 1 1 0 3 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 8

Avg. .267 .278 .323 .274 .250 .204 .263 .265 .094 .000 --.305 ---

Pittsburgh AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Presley lf 4 1 1 0 0 0 .231 Walker 2b 4 1 1 1 0 2 .293 A.McCutchen cf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .369 G.Jones rf 3 0 1 1 0 1 .264 Grilli p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Hanrahan p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --McGehee 1b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .236 P.Alvarez 3b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .228 McKenry c 3 1 1 1 0 2 .250 Barmes ss 3 0 0 0 0 0 .205 Correia p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .143 a-J.Harrison ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .229 J.Hughes p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 G.Hernandez rf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .083 Totals 29 3 5 3 0 8 Chicago 101 000 000 — 2 5 0 Pittsburgh 100 011 00x — 3 5 0 a-flied out for Correia in the 6th. b-struck out for Corpas in the 8th. LOB—Chicago 4, Pittsburgh 2. 2B—DeJesus (18), Barney (19), G.Jones (15). HR—Rizzo (5), off Correia; Walker (9), off Dempster; McKenry (8), off Dempster. Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP Dempster L, 5-5 6 5 3 3 0 6 93 Maine 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 5 Corpas 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 7 Camp 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP Correia W, 8-6 6 4 2 2 2 4 78 J.Hughes H, 10 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 Grilli H, 25 1 1 0 0 0 2 20 Hanrahan S, 29-32 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 T—2:32. A—33,935 (38,362).

ERA 2.25 5.29 3.38 2.74 ERA 4.24 1.90 1.91 2.06

Nationals 5, Mets 2 Washington Lombardozzi 2b Harper rf Zimmerman 3b LaRoche 1b Morse lf Espinosa ss Bernadina cf Leon c Strasburg p b-C.Brown ph H.Rodriguez p Stammen p S.Burnett p Storen p Clippard p Totals

AB 5 4 5 4 4 4 3 2 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 35

R 0 1 0 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

H 1 1 0 1 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7

BI 0 0 0 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

BB 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

SO 0 0 1 3 0 1 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 8

Avg. .261 .268 .273 .258 .295 .255 .295 .278 .323 .000 --.000 -------

New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Tejada ss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .310 Valdespin lf-rf 4 0 1 1 0 1 .292 D.Wright 3b 4 0 0 0 0 3 .340 I.Davis 1b 4 1 1 1 0 1 .209 Dan.Murphy 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .305 Nieuwenhuis rf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .256 El.Ramirez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 c-Ju.Turner ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .278 Thole c 2 1 1 0 1 0 .276 An.Torres cf 2 0 0 0 1 1 .216 Hefner p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .250 a-R.Cedeno ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .263 Byrdak p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Rauch p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Hairston lf 0 0 0 0 1 0 .250 Totals 30 2 4 2 3 12 Washington 020 100 200 — 5 7 0 New York 010 000 010 — 2 4 2 a-struck out for Hefner in the 6th. b-grounded out for Strasburg in the 8th. c-grounded out for El.Ramirez in the 9th. E—Thole (5), Dan.Murphy (11). LOB—Washington 7, New York 4. 2B—Harper (16), Espinosa (26), Thole (10). HR—Morse (7), off Hefner; Espinosa (9), off Hefner; LaRoche (18), off Byrdak; I.Davis (16), off Strasburg. DP—Washington 1. Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Strasburg W, 11-4 7 4 1 1 0 11 94 2.76 H.Rodriguez 0 0 1 1 2 0 11 5.19 Stammen H, 8 1-3 0 0 0 1 0 8 1.99 S.Burnett H, 22 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 1 2.13 Storen H, 2 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 4 10.80 Clippard S, 18-21 1 0 0 0 0 1 16 2.98 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hefner L, 1-4 6 6 3 2 2 7 110 5.40 Byrdak 2-3 1 2 2 1 0 16 4.82 Rauch 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 5 3.60 El.Ramirez 2 0 0 0 1 1 24 6.30 H.Rodriguez pitched to 2 batters in the 8th. T—2:53. A—35,517 (41,922).


THURSDAY, JULY 26, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

Pac-12 Continued from D1 It’s not the Southeastern Conference when it comes to grit, grits or national titles, but it’s safe to say the Pac-12’s modern makeover is in full swing. The once-sleepy league from Walnut Creek has dust flying everywhere. The money from a $3-billion television contract will soon start rolling in like oranges. The Pac-12 Network, with six regional networks and one national, debuts Aug. 15. Remember when you couldn’t find a Pac-12 game on TV? “It is very intense right now,” said Larry Scott, Pac-12 commissioner. The launch date is approaching with the league having yet to secure a contract with the mom-and-pop distributor ... DirecTV. “I know there’s a lot of anxiety,” Scott said. “It’s understandable ... it matters a lot.” California just completed a major renovation on venerable and vulnerable Memorial Stadium. USC cut ribbon on the John McKay Center. Jackhammers are displacing concrete in Seattle to make a home of Washington’s Husky Stadium. USC and Oregon enter the fall as national title contenders. Stanford is coming off consecutive major bowl trips. “I think we’re incredibly well-positioned,” Scott said. Four new coaches are set to infuse the conference like a quadruple jolt of caffeine. What an interesting mix of bolts and nuts: Leach, Rich Rodriguez (Arizona), Todd Graham (Arizona State) and Jim Mora (UCLA) join a league that already pays innovator Chip Kelly (Oregon), polarizer Lane Kiffin (USC) and fast-riser Steve Sarkisian (Washington). “All these coaching hires, they were national coaching hires,” Sarkisian said. Mike Riley, once a bright young mind at Oregon

Medal Continued from D1 “For the past three years my performances haven’t been too great and my training hasn’t gone too well,” Phelps said. “But it’s been good to feel excitement in the water again.” Coach Bob Bowman said it took longer than he expected for Phelps to come around, but when he did, he began hitting his time goals with the precision of the past. Phelps, 27, needs just three medals of any color to break Soviet gymnast Larisa Latynina’s record of 18 Olympic medals and buttress the argument that he is the greatest Olympian of all time. Missy Franklin, 17, has replaced her idol Natalie Coughlin as the star of the women’s swimming team. The cameras will love Franklin’s smile and Lochte’s physique. Dana Vollmer, Rebecca Soni and Jessica Hardy are among the veterans who will have to swim fast to hold off a strong contingent from Europe and the Australians. In track and field, the U.S. goal is 30 medals and redemption against Jamaica, which won the men’s and women’s sprints (and swept the women’s 100 meters) in Beijing. Justin Gatlin, back from a

Horner Continued from D1 This time around, Horner managed to avoid a lot of trouble and emerge from the race with the second-best placing of his career. The 40-year-old Horner was ninth in the 2010 edition of the tour. “You have to remember, it is very mentally taxing, too. It’s not just a physical effort — the Tour de France — it’s really mental, too,” Horner explained. “There’s not a lot of windows of opportunity where mentally you can really shut down and just turn off the mind and just keep pedaling the bike. You really have to be focusing what’s going on in the stage, what position you’re in, what’s coming up next on the stage during that day, and of course any kinds of dangers that might be around the corner.” Horner spent Monday traveling and said he went for a ride of about an hour on Tues-

Penn State running back has USC’s Kiffin calling a reverse LOS ANGELES — My, how times — and circumstances — have changed. Two years ago, the NCAA pounded USC with sanctions that gave Trojans upperclassmen freedom to transfer. USC Coach Lane Kiffin took to routinely bemoaning the period as the era of Trojans “free agency.” On Tuesday at Pac-12 Conference media day, Kiffin was asked what advice he would offer new Penn State Coach Bill O’Brien in the wake of NCAA penalties that make every Nittany Lions player a potential free agent. Kiffin said it was a tough situation. “You have coaches around the country calling your players,” he said. Coaches like ... Kiffin. Before, during and after his time onstage with Trojans quarterback Matt Barkley and safety T.J. McDonald, Kiffin not-so-subtly recruited Penn State running back Silas Redd. Kiffin never mentioned Redd’s name or responded directly to inquiries about the 5foot-10, 200-pound junior, who rushed for 1,241 yards and seven touchdowns last season. But his message was loud and clear: Please come to USC. After the NCAA slammed Penn State on Monday, USC

Gene J. Puskar / The Associated Press

Penn State running back Silas Redd, shown as he leaves a team meeting on Monday, is being pursued by USC.

contacted the school about its intent to recruit Redd, said a person who spoke anonymously because he was not authorized to comment publicly on the situation. Asked about Redd, Kiffin said he could not speak about Penn State players, but he calculatedly pointed out that the Trojans’ major concern was lack of depth at running back. Kiffin later said that senior Curtis McNeal, who gained 1,005 yards last season, suffered injuries in practices and during games. And that redshirt sophomore D.J. Morgan had not played very much. And that incoming freshman Nelson Agholor, regarded as a

possible complement to Robert Woods and Marqise Lee at receiver, was slated instead to open training camp on Aug. 6 as a running back. “As of today, that’s the direction he’s headed,” Kiffin said, later adding, “We would rather have Nelson be a receiver but the situation that we’re in today has made us move him there as of today.” Emphasis, purposely placed by Kiffin, was on today. That could change if Redd decides to join the Trojans, who are limited to 75 scholarship players — 10 below the allowable maximum — in each of the next three seasons. —Los Angeles Times

State, now answers as elder statesman. Jeff Tedford, a bolt of intellectual lightning when he took over at Cal a decade ago, is approaching AARP. You picture him with a pipe and sweater vest playing catch with Wally and the Beaver. The Pac-12, as a league, is really a league of nations. They may need operators with headsets to translate all of the

accents and languages. “I would hate to be a defensive coordinator in this league,” Rodriguez said at a lunch table under an umbrella. “How do you practice? How do you prepare?” All these hiccups, spin-offs and hybrids match the conference’s frenetic pace of zig-zag advancement. It is exciting to imagine what Leach might do with a quarter-

back of Tuel’s talents. Leach’s brainpower alone might be able to light Pullman. One week you might face a team without a tight end and a fullback, such as Washington State, and then have to prepare for a pro-style physical assault from Stanford. Mora, who spent most of his career in the cookie-cutter NFL, can’t wait to start baking.

four-year drug banishment, and Tyson Gay, back from hip surgery, intend to challenge world-record-holder Usain Bolt and his training partner Yohan Blake. The start will have huge implications: One false start and a runner is disqualified. Carmelita Jeter and Allyson Felix have their work cut out for them against ShellyAnn Fraser-Pryce and Veronica Campbell-Brown in the 100 and 200. Felix and Sanya Richards-Ross are attempting big doubles for the first time — Felix in the short sprints and Richards-Ross in her best event, the 400, and the 200. “The emphasis in my training has been on the quarter mile,” said Richards-Ross. “For the first time in a long time I’m feeling healthy, rejuvenated, fresh. I’m ready to run sub-49 seconds. The one thing the 400 requires is patience. It’s a thinker’s sprint. I learned so much in 2004 and 2008.” The men’s and women’s 400-meter relay teams botched baton handoffs four years ago. Under coaches Andrew Valmon and Amy Deem, those exchanges will get extra attention. The United States appears primed again to win the majority of medals in the hurdles and could produce some sur-

prises in the middle- and longdistance events with Jenny Simpson, Shalane Flanagan, Galen Rupp and Ryan Hall. Decathlete Ashton Eaton, of Bend, broke the world record during trials in Eugene. High jumper Jesse Williams and triple jumper Christian Taylor (another ex-Gator) hope to show their 2011 world titles were not flukes. In gymnastics, the world champion women’s team is being compared to the Magnificent Seven of 1996. Jordyn Wieber’s consistency and versatility make her the favorite for all-around gold, but Gabby Douglas upset Wieber at trials, and judges will find her charisma appealing. McKayla Maroney is considered a lock for vault gold. The men want to move up from world bronze and challenge China and Japan. Danell Leyva and John Orozco have emerged as the team’s young stars. They’re unlikely to unseat the king, Kohei Uchimura of Japan, but are capable of winning event medals, and 2008 silver medalist Jonathan Horton is back for more. LeBron James and Sylvia Fowles lead the basketball teams. The men, short on centers and always slow to adapt to international rules, looked vulnerable against Argentina.

“The majority of the world wants our men to lose,” women’s coach Geno Auriemma said. “They assume our women will win.” Watch the NBA pros now because they may not return in 2016. NBA owners are grumbling that Olympic summers put too much wear and tear on players — the injured Blake Griffin being a prime example of what can happen to an Olympian after a grueling season. “There’s another side to that story,” argues Jerry Colangelo, head of USA Basketball. “What we’ve done has brought great marketing value to the NBA around the globe. The best story the NBA had was when we marched to the gold medal in Beijing. That’s worth a lot. Basketball is the No. 2 sport behind soccer, and the Olympics (are) the springboard to increase interest.” Misty-May Treanor and Kerri Walsh Jennings won the past two Olympic beach volleyball tournaments without losing a set. Phil Dalhausser and Todd Rogers won in Beijing, and they will go for gold again at the makeshift beach at Horse Guards Parade in the middle of London. U.S. divers, formerly the best and most innovative in the world, have not won a

day after his bike arrived at the hotel. He said he also expected to train for about four hours each day on Wednesday and today before another short ride on Friday. And on Saturday, he will compete in his first Olympics. “There’s not a whole lot of downtime,” Horner noted. “But it’s probably better to have the Olympics one week after the tour versus two or three because it’s easier to keep your form from the Tour de France before the body shuts down. Maybe … by next weekend, the body wants to really shut down and go on vacation.” Horner said he would spend most of the rest of the days leading up to the race resting and sleeping. He is currently staying in the same hotel as the other members of the U.S. men’s and women’s road cycling teams. “There’s better training here … while we’re training on our bikes, but there’s also less dis-

tractions,” Horner said. Horner will get to experience life in the Athletes’ Village as well, though. He said the plan was to move out of the hotel and into the village today after his training session, and he will remain there for a total of three nights. He will not, however, march in Friday night’s opening ceremony, given the proximity of the event to his race, which is scheduled to begin at 10 o’clock local time the next morning. “None of the men’s team will attend, for sure. It would be way too taxing,” Horner said of the opening ceremonies. “It’d be a great experience, and I’d love to go do it, but you just don’t have the option. It’s not a possibility of standing five hours on your feet when you’re going to race the next day.” Of the five-rider Team USA’s possibilities in the men’s road race, Horner said: “The U.S. team really has a lot of good

cards to play. We have good cards to play if it’s a field sprint, and we have good cards to play if guys are attacking the last time on climb.” He called teammate Tyler Farrar “one of the best sprinters in the world” and also noted the form of Tejay van Garderen, who was fifth and the best young rider in this year’s Tour de France. So Horner will toe the start line at The Mall in London on Saturday, adding another highlight to his career. “In bike racing, you have the Tour de France and you have the Olympics, so you have two huge events back to back. And there’s really nothing that quite touches on the height of level in the sport that you can go to between doing those two. The highest level of the sport that you reach is the Tour de France and the Olympics.” And for Horner, all in the same month. — Reporter: 541-383-0393, amiles@bendbulletin.com

D5

FISHING REPORT

“It is different, it does present challenges,” he said. “But I like it.” Rodriguez’s spread offense is run-based and he is thankful to inherit a mold-fit senior in Matt Scott. “That was the best decision that coaching staff made,” Rodriguez said of the departed regime that elected to let Scott be a redshirt last season. Rodriguez carries the baggage of his failed experience at Michigan, but his years at West Virginia earned him guru status as a spread-offense originator. “You’ve seen one West Coast offense, you’ve seen all West Coast offenses,” Rodriguez said. “You see one spread, you’re not seeing all spreads. It can be entirely different.” Graham is a wild hair with wild offenses who arrived at Tempe from the tempest he left at Pittsburgh. Graham has a habit of quick-exiting programs in a hail of departing expletives. He promises tough love in the wake of Dennis Erickson. Graham was channeling Frank Kush when he moved summer practice back to torturous Camp Tontozona. Mora brings more of the same to Westwood. He was probably thinking “Junction Boys” by moving his training camp to the swelter of San Bernardino. He intersperses four-letter words between eight claps and brings a cutting edge UCLA has been desperately missing. He was also smart enough to nab Noel Mazzone, Arizona State’s freewheeling offensive coordinator. New guys, meet the old guys. In the Pac-12, you’re either moving forward or left behind. Kelly, coach of the reigning Rose Bowl champions, kept sharp this month by running with the bulls in Pamplona, Spain. It was a fitting way to prepare for a league where everything Pac-12 seems to be busting out of a gate.

Healthy fish populations on Hosmer Here is the weekly fishing report for selected areas in and around Central Oregon, provided by fisheries biologists for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife: ANTELOPE FLAT RESERVOIR: Fishing has been good, but boat anglers are catching more fish than bank anglers. A few hold-over fish from last year ranging from 14 to 18 inches long are still being caught. CLEAR LAKE RESERVOIR: Water levels will be dropping as irrigation demand increases. Trout fishing should remain good, as long as the reservoir permits good access. CRANE PRAIRIE RESERVOIR: High temperatures will likely push trout into the old river channels. DESCHUTES RIVER (Mouth to the Pelton Regulating Dam): Steelhead are beginning to arrive in the lower river. Anglers will find their best success from Macks Canyon downstream. Anglers are reminded that water temperatures in the Lower Deschutes can be very warm during the summer months, and warm water can cause excessive stress for fish to be released. Anglers are encouraged to fish early in the morning, or late in the evening when river temperatures are slightly cooler. HOSMER LAKE: Open to fishing and annual population sampling indicates that Atlantic salmon and brook trout populations are healthy. Fishing on Hosmer is restricted to fly fishing with barbless hooks. LAKE BILLY CHINOOK: Fishing for smallmouth bass should be great right now. Fishing for kokanee has been excellent. Kokanee are averaging about 10 to 11 inches long. NORTH TWIN: Anglers are reporting better than average fishing. PRINEVILLE RESERVOIR: Fishing for bass, crappie and bullhead catfish should be good. SOUTH TWIN LAKE: Fishing is good. The lake was treated last fall to remove bullhead catfish and stickleback and has been restocked with catchable and trophy fish. WALTON LAKE: Fishing should be good since more fish were stocked this week. With the warming temperatures, anglers should fish during the cooler times of the day and fish near the springs. WICKIUP RESERVOIR: Fishing is good, with opportunities for large kokanee.

medal since 2000. China’s splashless athletes have taken over the sport. David Boudia, Christina Loukas and Brittany Viola offer hope of a breakthrough, as does synchro springboard pair Troy Dumais and Kristian Ipsen. The sailing team, which includes 2008 gold medalist Anna Tunnicliffe, will encounter variable conditions in Weymouth. Fencer Mariel Zagunis goes for her third gold in saber. Queen Underwood will be one of the moving stories in women’s boxing. The women’s eight will row for its second consecutive Olympic title. The men’s and women’s volleyball and water polo teams are expected to be on the podium, as are the women’s soccer players, led by the ageless Abby Wambach. The men’s soccer team failed to qualify, and America’s favorite summer pastimes of baseball and softball have been removed from the Olympic schedule.

Heave Ho! Tug-O-War Contest at the

Deschutes County Fair Saturday, August 4 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm In The Bulletin

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See a full list of contests in the Deschutes County Fair Guide, publishing in The Bulletin on Wednesday, July 25


D6

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, JULY 26, 2012

H & F  C   FLY-TYING CORNER

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Goodale’s Popper, courtesy Fly & Field Outfitters.

Wherever northern pike, bass and predatory browns prowl the shoreline, they can be tempted with poppers on the surface. Cork and foam work great, but for subtlety, try deer hair in a frog pattern like Goodale’s Popper. For bass and browns, go with 0X tippet; for pike, use a steel leader. Work it inside and outside the weed line. At the splashdown, watch the rings dissipate. Now pop it with a quick upward twitch of the rod tip. After the third twitch, pick up the fly and cast to

the next spot. Tie this pattern on a No. 2/0 straight-eye hook with a wire weed guard. For the tail, use two dozen strands of barred tan rubber. Build the body with spun deer hair, alternating olive, chartreuse and black. Midway up the body, use two strands of barred rubber for legs. Finish the face with natural deer hair. Trim flat on the bottom and rounded on top, then trim divots on each side of the head for the glue-on mylar eyes. — Gary Lewis

Minnesota Continued from D1 The fish too are prehistoric: pike, walleye, sauger and muskellunge with jagged teeth and powerful jaws. We were armed with Cabela’s Platinum ZX spinning rods and Prodigy reels. Our guides, Billy Dougherty and Jon Balaski, had live minnows, leeches and nightcrawlers. Leaned into the corner of the boat were a couple of fly rods, a 6-weight for bass and an 8-weight in case we needed to tease a pike out of the cabbage. Ready for anything. We started with a onequarter ounce jig head and tipped the hook with a minnow. Here, the lake was 22 feet deep. Remmer dropped his bait in and lifted the rod when a walleye sucked the bait in. I caught the next spiny rayed walleye, then Wes boated the next six. With a boundary shared by Ontario and Minnesota, Rainy Lake covers 225,000 acres with 929 miles of shoreline. It is populated by 1,600 islands, which add another 635 miles of shoreline — big water, though rocky and shallow. To learn the lake fast, we studied charts, watched the wind and prowled bays with the depthfinder to look for sunken islands and schools of baitfish. We started each day on the hunt for walleye then switched to smallmouth in the afternoon and ended by trolling for pike. After lunch the first day, I threw a red and white popper with Cabela’s six-weight MTx fly rod. Against a rock cliff, I splashed the popper and when I chugged it, a fish broke water like someone had thrown a wheelbarrow in the lake. I set the hook and stripped line as the fish blasted away then turned to charge the

Please email Hunting & Fishing event information to sports@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� on our website at bendbulletin.com. Items are published on a space-availability basis, and should be submitted at least 10 days before the event.

FISHING

SHOOTING

CENTRAL OREGON BASS CLUB: Meets on the first Tuesday of each month at Abby’s Pizza in Redmond; 7 to 9 p.m.; new members welcome; www.cobc. us. DESCHUTES CHAPTER OF TROUT UNLIMITED: Meets on the first Monday of each month at the ONDA offices in Bend; meeting starts at 6:45 p.m. for members to meet and greet, and discuss what the chapter is up to; 541-306-4509; communications@deschutestu. org; www.deschutestu.org. THE SUNRIVER ANGLERS CLUB: Meets on the third Thursday of each month (except July and August) at 7 p.m. at the Sunriver Homeowners Aquatic & Recreation Center (SHARC); contact www.sunriveranglers. org. THE CENTRAL OREGON FLYFISHERS CLUB: Meets on the third Wednesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Bend Senior Center, 1600 SE Reed Market Road; contact: www. coflyfishers.org.

COSSA KIDS: The Central Oregon Shooting Sports Association’s NRA Youth Marksmanship Program is every third Saturday of the month from 10 a.m. to noon at the COSSA Range; the range is east of Bend off U.S. Highway 20 at milepost 24; contact Don Thomas, 541-389-8284. BEND TRAP CLUB: Trap shooting, five-stand and skeet shooting are all open Thursdays and Sundays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m; located east of Bend off U.S. Highway 20 at milepost 30; contact Bill Grafton at 541-383-1428 or visit www. bendtrapclub.com. CENTRAL OREGON SPORTING CLAYS AND HUNTING PRESERVE: 13-station, 100-target course and 5-stand open Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to dusk, and Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday from 11 a.m. to dusk (closed Wednesday); located at 9020 South Highway 97, Redmond; www.birdandclay.com or 541-383-0001. REDMOND ROD & GUN CLUB: Archery, pistol, and rifle are Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Saturdays, and Sundays from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; skeet is Tuesdays and Sundays from 10 a.m. to about 2 p.m.; sporting clays is the first and third Saturdays of each month from 10 a.m. to about 2 p.m.; trap is Wednesdays from 10 a.m. to about 2 p.m. and 5 p.m. to closing, and Sundays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.; non-members are welcome; check www.rrandgc.com for events and closures. PINE MOUNTAIN POSSE: Cowboy action shooting club that shoots at the Central Oregon Shooting Sports Association range on U.S. Highway 20 at milepost 24; second Sunday of each month; 541-318-8199 or www. pinemountainposse.com. HORSE RIDGE PISTOLEROS: Cowboy action shooting with pistols, rifles and shotguns at the Central Oregon Shooting Sports Association range on U.S. Highway 20 at milepost 24; first and third Sunday of each month at 10 a.m.; 541-4087027 or www.hrp-sass.com.

HUNTING

Gary Lewis / For The Bulletin

Sunset on Rainy Lake in Minnesota.

boat. That’s when I saw the bronze of its flanks, saw the popper pull from its mouth and the fish, a bigger bass than I have ever battled on a fly rod, turn straight away. To me, line slack, jaw slack, rod limp in hand, the bass looked as big as a Shetland pony. We trolled huge baitfish imitations for pike. I chose a Storm Giant Flatstick No. 22 in a black and silver pattern. Jon ran the motor at 3.4 to 3.6 mph and zigged and zagged. In the next hour, four 26- to 30-inch northern pike smashed the bait. On Rainy Lake, an angler can keep walleye smaller than 17 inches and no more than one over 28 inches. I expected small walleye, but in fact, these were big ones. I only caught a few in the 12inch range and most ran to 23 inches. Trolling for pike, when my

rod bent with the weight of a fish, I brought a 25½-incher to the net. The next time the rod slammed down, it was a 28-inch walleye with the 11inch stickbait in its mouth. The sting of losing that big smallmouth was lessened. That night, we deep-fried our walleye filets and relived the day’s bite on the deck of the houseboat. Fishing boats cruised the channel in the gathering dusk, with Canada on the starboard side and the United States off the port bow. They call these the Boundary Waters, and the line that divides two nations was defined by the route the French Canadian voyageurs established in the fur trade. Toward the end of that era, in the 1840s, some of our family headed south out of Ontario, through these waters to make homes on what was

then the American frontier. It wasn’t too hard to picture the land and water the way they saw it, nor the kids with fishing poles that were my grandparents not so long ago. White strokes of cirrus spanned the western sky like the first brush strokes on a master’s canvas, then shaded to lavender and rose, bright against the sky in the last light of day. — Gary Lewis is the host of “Adventure Journal� and author of “John Nosler — Going Ballistic,� “Black Bear Hunting,� “Hunting Oregon� and other titles. Contact Lewis at www. GaryLewisOutdoors.com.

LEARN THE ART OF TRACKING ANIMALS: Guided walks and workshops with a certified professional tracker; learn to identify and interpret tracks, sign and scat of the animals in Central Oregon; two or more walks per month all year; $35; ongoing, 8 a.m. to noon; 541-633-7045; dave@wildernesstracking.com; wildernesstracking.com. THE BEND CHAPTER OF THE OREGON HUNTERS ASSOCIATION: Meets the second Wednesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the King Buffet at the north end of the Wagner Mall, across from Robberson Ford in Bend; contact: ohabend.webs. com. THE OCHOCO CHAPTER OF THE OREGON HUNTERS ASSOCIATION: Meets the first Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Prineville Fire Hall, 405 N. Belknap St.; contact: 447-5029. THE REDMOND CHAPTER OF THE OREGON HUNTERS ASSOCIATION: Meets the third Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Redmond VFW Hall.

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B USIN E SS

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Stock listings, E2-3 Calendar, E4

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, JULY 26, 2012

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IN BRIEF SEC to create warlord rule Companies would have to disclose whether they buy metals from central African warlords under a rule the Securities and Exchange Commission is poised to adopt next month, said a person with knowledge of the agency’s deliberations. Once the rule is in place, the agency estimates 6,000 publicly traded companies — mostly manufacturers and retailers — must report to the SEC where they get their tin, tantalum, tungsten or gold. The rule is meant to halt the flow of mining money to those committing atrocities in the Democratic Republic of Congo by pressuring manufacturers to protect their reputations — not by issuing an outright ban on using the conflict metals.

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www.bendbulletin.com/business CLOSE 12,676.05 CHANGE +58.73 +.47%

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Telecommunications company plans to build data center in Bend Forecast: OREGON ECONOMY

• Navigata Communications, of Canada, is increasing its presence across the U.S. By Elon Glucklich The Bulletin

A Canadian telecommunications company wants to build a data center in Bend. Officials with British Columbia-based Navigata Communications say they will use the Bend facility they purchased last month, at 213 S.W. Columbia St., to house computer servers and boost the company’s backup data storage. That move comes as the company looks to increase its presence in the United States, said Jeff Mayhook, co-founder

of Navigata and president of the Navigata USA, the company’s American subsidiary based in Washougal, Wash. In recent years, the company has been pushing to expand its computer data storage, Mayhook said. The company launched its cloud computing spinoff company, Next Layer, last year. Cloud computing enables computer users to share information or data with other users in remote locations. “The data center has become a key part of the virtual

world,” Mayhook said. “More and more, government agencies and school districts would like to outsource a lot of their (online data). Therein lies the beauty of a data center.” Founded in 1957, Navigata provides phone and Internet service to about 6,000 customers worldwide, mainly in Canada. Major clients include the Province of British Columbia, and energy company BC Hydro. Bend marks Navigata’s first step into the U.S. data storage market. The company has five data centers across Canada. Why Bend? The city “has a strategic location,” Mayhook said.

“If you look at Highway 97, it seems poised as an area where we can reach out to many other cities, especially Portland, Seattle, Spokane and Boise,” he said. It could also help the company reach into the California market, with countless companies in the San Francisco and Los Angeles areas expanding their data use. Navigata purchased the 28,000-square-foot industrial building on Columbia Street in June, paying $1.8 million for the facility that once housed Bend pest control company Suterra, Deschutes County property records show. See Navigata / E3

A Worthy construction project

New home sales dropped in June Sales of new houses fell 8.4 percent in June after reaching a two-year high in May, suggesting that the slowdown in the U.S. economy might be making buyers more cautious. Sales declined to an annual rate of 350,000 in June and median prices of new homes fell to the lowest level since January, the Commerce Department reported Wednesday. Economists polled by MarketWatch had forecast sales to rise to a 375,000 rate last month.

MGM files for stock offering Metro-GoldwynMayer, the 88-year-old Hollywood studio that emerged from bankruptcy in late 2010, has filed for a possible public offering of its stock that would allow the former debt holders that are now its owners to start selling their holdings. MGM’s plans were disclosed in a brief statement explaining that it has filed a draft registration statement for an IPO with the Securities and Exchange Commission. There was no information about when the company might go through with the IPO or at what price. — From wire reports

Housing Estimates of housing units in Oregon counties ranked by greatest percentage of change. Listed are the top 3 in the state and rankings for Central Oregon counties.

April 1, 2010 housing unit est. July 1, 2011 housing unit est. Polk County 30,302 30,760 Curry County 12,613 12,800 Union County 11,489 11,591 Deschutes County 80,139 80,599 Crook County 10,202 10,212 Jefferson County 9,815 9,810 Oregon 1,675,562 1,684,193 Source: U.S. Census Bureau

CLOSE $27.445 CHANGE +$0.655

Alex McDougall / The Bulletin

Construction workers round out the steelwork for the Worthy Brewing Co. building on Northeast Bellevue Drive off U.S. Highway 20 in Bend. Once work wraps up in December, the $4.1 million brewery will span more than 28,000 square feet. A 30-barrel brew system and other beer-making equipment are on their way to the site, said Chad Kennedy, the company’s brewmaster and CEO.

“Personally, the big focus right now has been sort of on figuring out which beers we’re going to brew,” said Kennedy, formerly brewmaster of Laurelwood Brewing Co. in Portland. Assuming it opens to the public as planned in early 2013, Worthy Brewing will join at least 10 other operating breweries in Bend. — Jordan Novet, The Bulletin

Big banks should be split up, Citigroup’s ex-CEO says By Christina Rexrode The Associated Press

NEW YORK — Sandy Weill is having a change of heart. Weill, the aggressive dealmaker who built Citigroup on the idea that in banking, bigger is better, said Wednesday that he believes big banks should be broken up. Speaking on CNBC’s “Squawk Box,” the 79-year-old Weill appeared to shock the show’s anchors when he said that consumer banking units should be split from riskier investment banking units. That would mean dismembering Citigroup as well as other big U.S. banks, like

JPMorgan Chase and Bank of America. It’s an idea that’s traditionally more in line with the banking industry’s harshest critics, not its founding fathers. It’s Weill an ironic twist coming from an empire-builder who nursed Citigroup into a behemoth. And it’s directly opposed to the stance of the industry’s current leaders, like JPMorgan CEO Jamie Dimon, who have been trying to convince regulators and lawmakers of just the opposite, that big

banks do not need to be split. Weill said the radical change is necessary if U.S. banks want to rebuild trust and remain on top of the world’s financial system. Weill also criticized banks for taking on too much debt and not providing enough disclosure about what’s on their balance sheets. “Our world hates bankers,” he said. Big banks have been vilified in the financial crisis and its aftermath. Critics blame them for risky trading that created a housing bubble and eventually led to global economic upheaval. In some

circles, there’s still resentment that the government used taxpayer money to give bailout loans to the biggest banks, including Citigroup, because regulators believed that the financial system wouldn’t be able to handle their failure. But standalone investment banks, Weill said, wouldn’t take deposits, so they wouldn’t be bailed out. Banks that have both investment banking and consumer banking say it’s necessary to keep them together because they balance each other, ensuring stability no matter the economy. See Weill / E3

GDP likely to outpace job growth By Jordan Novet The Bulletin

Oregon’s gross domestic product should continue to rise in the next couple of years, but job growth might not be able to keep up, according to economist Bill Watkins. That’s why Watkins, executive director of the Center for Economic Research and Forecasting at California Lutheran University, predicts in his quarterly economic forecast that, at least heading into the first quarter of 2014, GDP growth in the state will outperform nonfarm payrolls. On average, Watkins’ department projects that GDP will jump 3.7 percent each quarter between the second quarter of 2012 and the first quarter of 2014, while payroll levels will increase about 1.3 percent per quarter during that period. Watkins, who is also director of the Central Oregon Economic Forecast Project, attributed the state’s situation to a few causes, including governmental blunders and big developments with relatively few workers, such as data centers. See Economy / E3

Watch out for Social Security card fees By Susan Tompor Detroit Free Press

The paper Social Security check will go the way of the Pink Princess rotarydial phone, PERSONAL the typeand FINANCE writer yes, sadly, Elvis in roughly seven months. Nearly 6 million people throughout the country still need to decide how they’re going to get their money. People can sign up for direct deposit to a bank or credit union account; or they could opt to have money deposited electronically via the Direct Express Debit MasterCard. But if they end up with the government-issued debit card, they must watch where they withdraw that money to avoid getting hit by a string of fees. Hint: It could cost you more than you’d imagine by going to an ATM at some huge national banks. See Fees / E3

Food prices are expected to jump in wake of drought By Ron Nixon New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — The worst drought in the United States in nearly a half-century is expected to drive up the price of milk, beef and pork next year, the government said Wednesday, as consumers bear some of the brunt ofthe sweltering heat that is driving up thecost of feed corn. Poultry prices are expected

to rise more immediately, the government said in a report. It estimated that consumer price indexes for chicken and turkey would rise 3.5 percent to 4.5 percent later this year. “The poultry category is the smallest animal category, and we expect to see more of an effect this year because they grow the fastest and will be first to be impacted by higher feed prices,” said Richard

Volpe, an economist with the Department of Agriculture. Figures released Wednesday by the department showed the largest percentage increase next year in its price indexes is expected for beef, a rise of 4 to 5 percent. The price of dairy products will increase 3.5 to 4.5 percent and eggs by 3 to 4 percent. Pork is expected to rise 2.5 to 3.5 percent. See Food / E4

A droughtdamaged field of corn was cut down for silage in Blair, Neb. Nati Harnik The Associated Press


E2

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, JULY 26, 2012

Consolidated stock listings N m

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A-B-C-D AAR 0.30 ABB Ltd 0.71 ABM 0.58 ACE Ltd 1.78 ACI Wwde AES Corp AFLAC 1.32 AG MtgeIT 2.80 AGCO AGL Res 1.84 AK Steel AMC Net AOL ASML Hld 0.59 AT&T Inc 1.76 ATMI Inc ATP O&G AU Optron 0.14 AVG Tch n Aarons 0.06 Aastrom AbtLab 2.04 AberFitc 0.70 AbdAsPac 0.42 Abiomed Abraxas AcaciaTc AcadiaPh AcadiaRlt 0.72 Accenture 1.35 AccoBrds AccretivH Accuray Accuride Achillion AcmePkt AcordaTh ActivsBliz 0.18 Actuant 0.04 Acuity 0.52 Acxiom Adecaogro AdobeSy Adtran 0.36 AdvAuto 0.24 AdvEnId AMD AdvSemi 0.11 AdventSoft Adventrx AdvActBear AdvisBd s AecomTch Aegon 0.13 AerCap Aeropostl AEterna gh Aetna 0.70 AffilMgrs Affymax Affymetrix Agilent 0.40 Agnico g 0.80 Agrium g 1.00 AirLease AirProd 2.56 Aircastle 0.60 Airgas 1.60 Aixtron 0.32 AkamaiT Akorn AlaskAir s AlaskCom 0.20 Albemarle 0.80 AlcatelLuc Alcoa 0.12 Alere AlxB Inc n AlexREE 2.04 Alexion Alexza rs AlignTech Alkermes AllegTch 0.72 Allergan 0.20 AlliData AlliancOne AlliBGlbHi 1.20 AlliBInco 0.48 AlliBern 0.98 AlliantEgy 1.80 AlliantTch 0.80 AlldNevG AlldWldA 1.50 AllisonT n 0.24 AllosThera AllotComm AllscriptH Allstate 0.88 AlnylamP AlonUSA 0.16 AlphaNRs AlpGPPrp 0.60 AlpTotDiv 0.66 AlpAlerMLP 1.00 AlteraCp lf 0.40 AlterraCap 0.56 Altria 1.64 Alumina 0.24 AmBev 1.15 Amarin Amazon Amdocs Amedisys Ameren 1.60 Amerigrp AMovilL 0.28 AmAxle AmCampus 1.35 ACapAgy 5.00 ACapAg pf 0.56 AmCapLtd ACapMtg n 3.60 AEagleOut 0.44 AEP 1.88 AEqInvLf 0.12 AmExp 0.80 AFnclGrp 0.70 AGreet 0.60 AmIntlGrp ARltyCT n 0.70 AmSupr AmTower 0.88 AmWtrWks 1.00 Ameriprise 1.40 AmeriBrgn 0.52 Ametek s 0.24 Amgen 1.44 AmicusTh AmkorTch Amphenol 0.42 AmpioPhm Amsurg Amylin Amyris Anadarko 0.36 Anadigc AnalogDev 1.20 Ancestry AngiesL n AngioDyn AnglogldA 0.49 ABInBev 1.57 Anixter 4.50 Ann Inc Annaly 2.27 Annies n Ansys AntaresP AntheraPh Anworth 0.83 Aon plc 0.63 A123 Sys Apache 0.68 AptInv 0.72 ApogeeE 0.36 ApolloGrp ApolloInv 0.80 ApolloRM 3.00 Apple Inc 10.60 ApldMatl 0.36 AMCC Approach Aptargrp 0.88 AquaAm 0.66 ArcelorMit 0.75 ArchCap ArchCoal 0.12 ArchDan 0.70 ArcosDor 0.24 ArcticCat ArenaPhm AresCap h 1.48 AriadP Ariba Inc ArkBest 0.12 ArmHld 0.16 ArmourRsd 1.20 ArmstrWld 8.55 ArrayBio Arris ArrowEl ArubaNet AsburyA AscenaRt s AscentSol h AshfordHT 0.44 Ashland 0.90 AsiaInfoL AspenIns 0.68 AspenTech AsscdBanc 0.20 AsdEstat 0.72 Assurant 0.84 AssuredG 0.36 AstexPhm AstoriaF 0.16 AstraZen 2.80 athenahlth AtlPwr g 1.15 AtlasAir AtlasEngy 1.00 AtlasPpln 2.24 Atmel ATMOS 1.38 AtwoodOcn AuRico g Aurizon g AuthenTec AutoNatn Autodesk Autoliv 1.88 AutoData 1.58 AutoZone Auxilium AvagoTch 0.60 AvalnRare AvalonBay 3.88 AvanirPhm

13.40 15.85 18.57 72.31 43.43 11.79 41.29 21.50 40.98 39.70 4.73 43.56 29.48 54.57 35.33 19.09 2.29 2.93 10.03 29.06 2.04 64.12 35.44 7.88 21.69 2.44 31.14 1.55 23.20 57.67 8.36 10.61 6.16 4.69 6.22 17.33 23.90 11.74 26.33 58.85 15.50 9.91 30.33 20.75 72.55 11.02 4.01 3.66 26.70 .70 24.13 44.70 15.30 4.06 11.06 19.37 .45 35.32 103.33 16.30 4.17 36.14 38.94 93.08 19.23 78.91 11.72 78.49 12.33 28.25 14.04 34.45 2.18 55.14 1.06 8.02 17.48 32.13 71.43 105.13 3.54 34.26 18.79 27.97 83.44 127.63 3.08 15.55 8.55 11.86 46.19 45.03 25.86 75.28 16.95 1.74 23.26 9.33 33.66 18.77 10.89 5.96 6.33 4.16 16.29 34.41 23.12 35.40 2.69 36.18 14.58 217.05 28.74 11.54 33.36 90.01 25.94 9.77 46.93 34.94 26.09 9.70 24.45 20.24 41.22 10.78 56.05 37.28 13.02 30.15 10.98 3.79 69.26 35.64 47.98 37.95 31.09 77.96 5.02 4.75 58.66 3.02 29.44 30.80 3.39 69.52 1.59 37.95 31.42 14.55 10.72 33.13 76.64 49.76 26.17 17.39 36.56 57.72 5.09 1.15 6.78 46.14 .69 83.57 27.04 16.08 28.03 7.65 19.76 574.97 10.47 5.08 25.98 49.35 26.30 14.29 39.17 5.31 26.71 12.95 37.98 9.49 16.43 17.53 44.37 11.13 24.58 7.49 43.37 4.47 13.17 32.73 14.38 26.12 18.32 1.04 7.37 66.82 10.81 28.26 22.42 12.20 14.84 33.31 11.53 2.43 9.09 45.45 92.22 13.55 43.04 30.50 32.36 5.96 35.53 42.40 6.46 4.49 5.10 39.17 31.94 51.92 55.41 378.39 26.09 34.21 1.44 145.32 2.86

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+.46 -.40 -.40 +.43 -.11

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D

C 6.48 2.80 19.71 5.63 40.34 1.81 32.51 20.84 75.60 3.05 33.16 62.64 74.20 47.57 30.38 1.12 12.78 12.81 17.28 21.05 106.06 39.24 14.89 49.26 2.29 1.23 56.20 14.05 9.21 296.48 4.78 1.62 69.03 56.20 15.82 14.73 39.95 53.95 3.57 37.10 22.92 37.59 26.98 15.42 25.79 82.25 17.35 75.11 49.22 46.62 .59 13.19 59.22 4.89 .90 7.46 41.15 72.12 15.51 10.64 57.35 22.59 112.45 77.02 28.03 15.98 17.93 56.10 10.69 59.27 27.07 102.25 21.55 22.69 31.36 30.90 29.84 39.48 11.81 18.11 25.35 43.22 38.98 2.83 22.73 9.05 3.04 16.91 5.38 32.63 23.85 82.33 64.00 53.24 27.86 63.48 18.87 27.76 69.15 14.47 75.54 70.54 15.89 74.93 29.29 23.50 19.49 3.89 107.85 22.35 2.21 23.09 5.14 6.92 7.20 11.14 21.73 29.83 12.28 .70 93.75 8.20 7.47 47.29 16.50 30.41 51.15 38.99 114.45 21.14 4.09 11.45 31.31 16.28 3.18 23.23 25.40 13.89 .19 57.76 34.86 13.13 11.69 41.70 54.77 87.08 2.60 4.83 120.85 8.85 57.76 24.01 10.26 4.42 59.09 .70 2.48 6.01 14.61 18.44 11.54 17.98 55.42 59.33 11.32 51.09 49.05 16.17 95.71 20.64 28.30 12.04 40.70 73.73 1.71 18.99 11.49 26.71 9.47 26.39 10.45 22.65 14.63 6.19 1.33 4.28 35.83 5.23 27.34 24.86 24.40 25.72 24.98 48.55 4.94 56.59 1.11 11.28 102.70 16.25 64.44 9.19 6.07 6.71 7.19 46.75 35.08 4.25 10.83 75.38 16.81 17.73 62.93 47.53 68.29 82.62 44.69 19.92 43.11 24.06 22.11 22.03 54.51 8.83 11.23 10.54 24.22 16.26 73.33 48.14 72.25

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0.38 1.60

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0.80 2.28

0.28 0.36 0.48

1.24 0.08 0.84 0.76 0.56 2.76 0.96

0.56 0.80 1.15 0.32 0.24 0.32 0.20 0.04 0.04 0.32 0.80 0.40 0.17 0.25 0.02 0.08 0.32 2.20 0.64

0.16 0.09 0.64 1.44 0.64 0.27 1.21 0.72 0.20

0.05

1.90 0.60 1.08 0.76 1.25 0.40

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1.20

5.12 4.57 7.18 43.19 25.16 26.34 37.16 95.69 54.68 52.66 34.83 8.95 6.75 21.98 51.75 48.48 42.06 25.82 10.32 16.61 13.99 13.93 10.29 13.41 9.02 8.22 10.36 16.96 65.42 53.96 8.61 45.14 4.09 11.40 105.06 5.00 35.10 11.63 10.39 11.51 14.56 1.23 12.10 20.40 24.50 45.60 2.04 6.86 6.40 28.70 40.95 19.78 8.28 8.15 29.36 7.71 14.00 35.02 6.19 46.41 76.68 41.36 44.25 30.93 1.69 13.39 19.03 15.33 49.48 8.07 70.81 53.38 5.56 48.50 161.37 21.18 63.49 8.67 157.95 52.34 21.00 17.36 11.95 20.95 102.08 10.02 6.91 9.18 5.99 38.50 2.87 44.25 35.60 16.21 56.60 13.55 31.51 3.22 85.24 34.74 22.79 91.98 19.27 54.05 42.68 10.82 3.48 25.83 6.40 29.34 90.58 43.87 12.86 64.53 42.81 87.23 106.21 19.76 4.51 3.78 7.01 18.51 31.67 9.25 10.05 13.75 19.25 12.15 21.17 16.66 6.77 7.96 12.13 16.40 10.80 7.34 11.24 32.21 14.18 19.94 22.70 29.92 15.78 17.52 48.84 16.17 68.97 27.05 .91 6.81 35.77 32.34 6.25 9.77 21.02 110.70 47.39 18.54 83.93 32.35 8.97 .60 13.89 33.43 6.37 5.95 22.39 3.71 3.61 20.73 67.23 16.56 12.41 29.83 46.70 106.79 10.35 31.43 10.15 51.37 3.59 3.53 1.34 1.02 28.35 9.21 4.27 1.17 8.83 18.44 39.99

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3.19 .82 37.89 9.36 4.80 15.91 5.34 2.16 2.82 1.81 35.12 13.26 15.77 14.04 29.29 51.04 37.50 43.61 35.25 82.63 2.38 8.11 22.01 25.16 62.00 20.00 17.44 37.96 2.84 18.80 10.16 60.30 58.88 2.30 16.96 14.98 62.74 4.67 22.95 .24 33.89 33.67 8.19 1.63 4.36 4.23 26.89 51.19 15.62 44.26 .74 9.70 6.79 42.75 15.77 .29 12.64 5.32 4.02 37.91 12.45 17.53 34.11 4.07 1.15 1.91 95.96 127.20 11.54 9.74 607.99 22.56 56.29 42.38 9.10 199.22 2.36 4.33 17.69 5.24 .57 7.03 1.62 21.78 23.43 17.90 4.15 13.85 37.39 21.15 51.27 7.24 22.01 28.11 48.13 18.49 21.14 24.51 35.17 19.65 27.16 30.28 46.07 33.10 30.72 40.11 25.02 41.90 53.67 7.19 31.30 8.63 29.46 28.23 34.77 1.77 42.07 36.99 3.97 9.42 40.34 12.40 19.55 6.40 15.97 7.88 34.71 29.00 28.00 5.88 5.32 60.87 21.84 6.62 24.05 22.46 22.62 26.60 9.76 13.74 29.68 3.12 4.45 54.37 16.42 43.25 75.33 48.30 3.42 4.68 70.33 10.62 45.46 17.78 23.62 6.41 33.82 32.73 31.52 16.96 25.46 47.58 34.54 18.35 51.07 17.20 14.46 66.19 21.55 12.19 56.80 7.62 27.87 39.82 8.69 34.02 23.80 14.06 9.57 2.33 28.31 80.44 5.85 14.21 70.07 53.61 6.28

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THURSDAY, JULY 26, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

Weill

Navigata

wrote. Weill said he hadn’t talked to JPMorgan’s Dimon or Vikram Pandit, Citigroup’s current CEO, about his new stance. Dimon was Weill’s protege before getting ousted in a power struggle in the late ’90s. Pandit took over at Citigroup after Weill’s friend, Chuck Prince, lost the job. Asked what he thought their reaction would be, Weill replied, “I don’t know. You’ll find out.” A Citigroup spokeswoman declined to comment. A JPMorgan spokesman didn’t immediately return a message seeking comment. In the same interview, Weill showed his fondness for the industry. He credited megabanks for providing capital markets that helped convert communist countries to capitalism, and moved poor people into the middle class. “It is really sad what is happening, and it’s sad for young people,” he said. “This was an industry that attracted a lot of really terrific people.” Weill retired as CEO of Citigroup in 2003 but remained chairman until 2006, building it into a giant that offered both consumer and investment banking. Asked about his aboutface, Weill said he had been getting his thoughts together over the past year. “I think the world changes,” he said, “and the world that we live in is different than the one that we lived in 10 years ago.”

Continued from E1 Investment banking, which offers services like trading stocks and packaging loans into securities, can be spectacularly profitable in the good times and spectacularly unprofitable in the bad. Consumer banking, the plain-vanilla business of making loans and accepting deposits, generally offers a steadier, if slower, way to make profits. Until the late ’90s, the Glass-Steagall Act largely kept consumer banks and investment banks separate. Glass-Steagall was created during the Great Depression. The separation rules were repealed in 1999. Weill’s professed conversion set off a flurry of reactions. The banking industry’s critics hailed it as proof that the biggest banks should be split. “Sanford Weill is one of many banking industry experts who have observed that too big to fail is often too big to manage,” Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio, said in a statement. Others were unimpressed. Joshua Brown, a New York investment adviser who writes the blog “The Reformed Broker,” called Weill “the original architect of Too Big To Fail” banking and noted that Weill didn’t apologize “for the Citigroup he built or its imitators.” “Perhaps this is about burnishing his legacy,” Brown

Fees Continued from E1 Not surprisingly, the Treasury is touting the popularity of its Direct Express debit card, launched four years ago. The card is an option for receiving Social Security benefits, especially for those who don’t have regular bank accounts for direct deposit. A study released last week showed that 95 percent of cardholders are satisfied with the Direct Express card. About 93 percent would recommend the card to someone else. More than 2 million active cardholders receive Social Security retirement benefits and Supplemental Security Income benefits, as well as other benefits. Thankfully, the government’s debit card does not have the outrageous fees of

The company expects the Bend data center to be operational by March 2013. Getting the data center ready means adding about 5,000 square feet to the building to house the operation’s computer servers. The Bend facility is likely to be the first in a number of data center projects Navigata unveils in the United States over the next several years, Mayhook said. While the company is focused on the planned construction, it is also in talks with local economic development officials about possible tax incentives, said Nate Liabraaten, business development manager with Econom-

ic Development for Central Oregon. That could include filing an enterprise zone application, which would offset some of the company’s property tax payments. Bend’s enterprise zone includes much of the industrial land just off of Highway 97 in the city. But it also reaches south to the industrial park known as the Shevlin Center, along Southwest Columbia Street. “They have yet to apply” for any incentives, Liabraaten said. “But they are in the (Bend) enterprise zone. … When a company is bringing in a sizeable operation, and eventually ramping up a good number of employees, a pack-

age of incentives and resources makes sense.” Navigata approached EDCO in late June, after purchasing the old Suterra building, Liabraaten said. The data center would add to Central Oregon’s growing computer hub, he said. Facebook and Apple chose Prineville to build data centers. “We’re thrilled to have another company come to Bend,” Liabraaten said. “There is kind of a formula that works for data centers in Central Oregon. It’s an industry that we haven’t seen in the past, but we’re excited about this hightechnology cluster.”

Continued from E1 “Cooling farms have huge value, create huge value and employ few people, which is to say their economic output growth rate exceeds their job growth rate,” Watkins wrote. “For example, Facebook’s $210 million, 300,000-square-foot facility employs less than 50 people, based on published reports we’ve seen.” As of December, there were 54 employees at Facebook’s data center facility in Prineville, according to an economic impact statement by Economic Development for Central Oregon. Intel’s expanding operations

in the Portland area also offer a prime example of Watkins’ point. While Intel contributed to 5.6 percent of Oregon’s economy in 2009, its workforce comprised 3.9 percent of all jobs in the state, according to a report Intel commissioned. Even as such projects boost the state’s GDP, and bring indirect economic impacts, they won’t directly translate to job growth, Watkins noted. “Oregonians in general will not directly benefit (from GDP growth), because they do not own the physical or human capital,” he wrote. But Ruth Lindley, EDCO’s marketing manager, said that’s not limited to Oregon. “It’s a problem every com-

munity (in the country) is facing,” she said. In any case, Watkins views recent public-sector mix-ups as additional factors contributing to GDP outperforming job growth in Oregon. “The fiascos associated with Facebook’s taxes and with the auto advertisement did huge damage,” Watkins wrote, referring to the state’s initial plan to tax Facebook for intangible assets and the U.S. Forest Service’s denial of a permit for Mercedes-Benz to shoot a car commercial in the Deschutes National Forest. “They were seen throughout the nation, and some investors saw all they needed to see to take Oregon off their poten-

tials lists.” Watkins also suggested that Oregon consider revamping its tax system and add training for jobs in science, technology, engineering and math. Affiliated with the Evangelical Lutheran Church of America, California Lutheran University is in Thousand Oaks, Calif., northwest of Los Angeles. Watkins and other consultants have received money from the city of Bend and Deschutes County to work on a road map to strengthen the region’s economy for the Deschutes Economic Alliance, a nonprofit corporation, according to The Bulletin’s archives.

At Chase, for example, it costs $3 for a noncustomer withdrawal from a Chase ATM. The $3 fee is the same at Bank of America for noncustomers to use ATMs in its banking centers. Walt Henderson, director of the electronic funds transfer strategy division for the U.S. Treasury, said Treasury is looking for opportunities to expand the network. An ATM locator is at the bottom of www.usdirectexpress.com, where cardholders can locate the surcharge-free ATMs by ZIP code. Plus, consumers can use the card for purchases and get cash back for free at many stores. Bottom line: Watch for the ways to get access to the money without paying extra fees. The U.S. Treasury has a push now to get people who re-

ceive paper checks to make a change before March 1, when paper checks will stop. A very limited group of retirees age 90 and older would still be able to receive a paper check as part of a waiver. Baby-boomer retirees and others who sign up for Social Security benefits now already are forced to deal with a nopaper mandate; they must use direct deposit or receive Social Security benefits via the debit card. Henderson said the Treasury is encouraged that more people are listening to the message and making a switch already. Now about 6 million paper checks are sent to federal benefits recipients, or 9 percent of total monthly payments. That’s down from 11 million checks, or 16 percent of total monthly payments in early 2010.

Continued from E1 Mayhook declined to disclose how many workers the data center would employ once operational, saying it was too early in the project to know for sure. A similar sized data center the company opened earlier this year in the British Columbia city of Kamloops was expected to employ about 18 people, according to media reports. “This is sort of a fledgling operation,” Mayhook said of the Bend project. “Frankly, the number of employees is all dependent on how the project evolves.”

Economy

other prepaid debit-card plastic that you might pick up off the shelf at the store. But it doesn’t mean consumers are completely off the hook. One free ATM withdrawal is allowed each month on the Direct Express Debit MasterCard. Additional ATM withdrawals are 90 cents. To get one free ATM withdrawal, consumers must go to one of about 60,000 ATMs in the network. That network includes ATMs at Comerica Bank, Charter One, PNC Bank, Privileged Status, Alliance One, the MasterCard ATM Alliance and MoneyPass. Plenty of bank names, though, aren’t in the network. And it could cost up to $3 or so a pop to get access to your Social Security money at some ATMs — no free withdrawals — if you go out of the network.

Northwest stocks Name

Div PE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

AlaskAir s Avista BkofAm BarrettB Boeing CascdeBcp CascdeCp ColSprtw Costco CraftBrew FLIR Sys HewlettP HmFedID Intel Keycorp Kroger Lattice LaPac MDU Res MentorGr Microsoft

... 1.16 .04 .44 1.76 ... 1.40 .88 1.10 ... .28 .53 .22 .90f .20 .46 ... ... .67 ... .80

34.45 27.16 7.07 23.07 74.03 5.03 45.73 50.77 93.75 8.38 19.27 17.78 9.97 25.13 7.89 21.25 3.54 10.40 22.04 14.74 28.83

15 17 8 32 13 ... 9 18 26 15 14 6 ... 11 8 21 9 ... 20 14 14

-.24 +.26 +.03 +2.11 +2.00 +.10 +.37 -1.09 -.33 -.03 +.17 -.21 +.30 +.13 +.04 +.14 +.22 -.19 -.07 -.01 -.32

-8.2 +5.5 +27.2 +15.6 +.9 +14.8 -3.1 +9.1 +12.5 +39.2 -23.1 -31.0 -4.1 +3.6 +2.6 -12.3 -40.4 +28.9 +2.7 +8.7 +11.1

Div PE

NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstBcp Weyerhsr

1.44 1.08 1.78 ... .80 ... 1.68 .12 .70f .75f 1.56 .89f .68 ... .36f .78 .32 .88 ... .60

Precious metals Metal NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

Price (troy oz.) $1607.00 $1608.00 $27.445

YTD Last Chg %Chg

20 93.51 +.55 -3.0 16 52.45 +.69 +5.5 20 48.25 +.08 +.7 14 4.27 -.03 -5.9 11 37.68 -.30 +.6 ... 1.48 -.02 -22.5 35 39.50 +.05 +8.0 19 160.02 -.91 -2.9 8 15.00 -.26 -28.7 11 26.04 -.23 -38.4 26 129.61 -1.93 +45.2 10 30.00 -.29 -18.4 29 50.41 -.07 +9.6 21 4.93 +.07 +1.2 15 12.55 -.11 +1.3 12 33.29 -.18 +23.1 13 15.67 -.11 +12.0 11 33.16 -.07 +20.3 12 19.57 +.21 +25.4 35 22.78 -.03 +22.0

Prime rate

Pvs Day

Time period

Percent

$1578.00 $1576.00 $26.790

Last Previous day A week ago

3.25 3.25 3.25

NYSE

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

BkofAm S&P500ETF SprintNex RegionsFn SPDR Fncl

1135470 7.07 +.03 1075377 133.96 +.04 581863 3.37 -.08 547539 6.91 +.26 442100 14.27 +.06

Last Chg

Gainers ($2 or more) Name

Last

InvenSen n LumberLiq MSEngy12 ZaleCp SolarWinds

12.32 41.31 22.49 3.16 49.48

Chg %Chg +3.13 +8.73 +4.41 +.59 +8.00

+34.1 +26.8 +24.4 +23.0 +19.3

Losers ($2 or more)

Amex

Name

Name

Last Chg

68325 12.81 -.07 68163 4.08 +.15 32914 5.38 +.06 31752 29.15 +2.07 26675 9.81 +.25

Gainers ($2 or more) Name

Last

Chg %Chg

Nevsun g NTS Rlty Rubicon g KeeganR g VirnetX

3.41 +.31 +10.0 3.26 +.25 +8.2 3.08 +.23 +8.1 2.93 +.21 +7.7 29.15 +2.07 +7.6

Losers ($2 or more)

Last

Chg %Chg

Name

Last

RadioShk iShS&P2050 IntlGame USG DiceHldg

2.60 25.66 11.76 15.76 7.19

-1.05 -7.19 -2.93 -3.49 -1.04

-28.8 -21.9 -19.9 -18.1 -12.6

WatscoB Medgenics Orbital OrientPap LGL Grp

66.05 -10.04 -13.2 11.17 -.88 -7.3 3.12 -.22 -6.6 2.19 -.14 -6.0 5.99 -.28 -4.5

1,611 1,406 106 3,123 93 77

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Diary

Cisco Microsoft SiriusXM PwShs QQQ Symantec

Vol (00)

Last Chg

601913 447189 418581 405113 393832

15.42 +.30 28.83 -.32 2.08 +.04 62.54 -.42 14.96 +1.79

Gainers ($2 or more) Name

Last

Stereotx rs RiverbedT Novavax RecovEn rs RoyalBcPA

2.09 +.48 +29.8 18.32 +3.77 +25.9 2.11 +.39 +22.7 2.40 +.40 +20.0 3.03 +.49 +19.3

Chg %Chg

Losers ($2 or more)

Name

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Nasdaq

Most Active ($1 or more)

Vol (00)

Chg %Chg

Name

Last

Netflix TripAdv n RF MicD Questcor TESSCO

60.28 36.18 3.58 38.50 19.25

Diary

Chg %Chg -20.11 -7.29 -.71 -6.12 -2.78

-25.0 -16.8 -16.5 -13.7 -12.6

Diary 252 160 45 457 24 8

— Reporter: 541-633-2117, jnovet@bendbulletin.com

Strategies to avoid fees with the federal Direct Express Debit MasterCard: • There’s no credit check, no minimum balance required or any up-front charge to sign up or monthly fee for the Direct Express debit card for Social Security benefits. • A consumer with the Direct Express card could go to any bank or credit union that displays the MasterCard acceptance mark and get cash from a teller — not an ATM — free of charge. In general, many people would not want to withdraw all their money from the card at the teller for safety reasons, such as the risk of having the money stolen. Money on the card is protected, even if the card is stolen. • Bill pay is free when you go to a biller’s website, such as Verizon or a utility company, and use the card to pay a bill. • There is a $1.50 fee to transfer money from the card to a personal bank account. • There’s a 3 percent fee to buy items outside of the U.S. • There’s a 75-cent monthly fee to get a paper statement. Go online to get account information at www.usdirectexpress.com or use the toll-free phone service, 800-333-1795. • One free replacement of the card is allowed each year. After that, there is a $4 fee to replace the card.

Indexes

Most Active ($1 or more) CheniereEn Vringo NovaGld g VirnetX NwGold g

— Reporter: 541-617-7820 eglucklich@bendbulletin.com

Stay card-fee free

Market recap

Name

E3

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

1,426 997 153 2,576 26 86

52-Week High Low

Name

13,338.66 10,404.49 5,450.20 3,950.66 490.39 381.99 8,408.20 6,414.89 2,498.89 1,941.99 3,134.17 2,298.89 1,422.38 1,074.77 14,951.57 11,208.42 847.92 601.71

Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

Last

Net Chg

%Chg

YTD %Chg

52-wk %Chg

12,676.05 4,934.00 481.08 7,607.56 2,313.40 2,854.24 1,337.89 13,980.87 769.31

+58.73 -19.51 -.73 +16.95 -4.08 -8.75 -.42 -1.52 +1.56

+.47 -.39 -.15 +.22 -.18 -.31 -.03 -.01 +.20

+3.75 -1.71 +3.53 +1.75 +1.54 +9.56 +6.38 +6.00 +3.83

+3.04 -5.19 +9.80 -6.69 -3.96 +3.24 +2.53 +1.16 -3.90

World markets

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed Wednesday. Market Close % Change

Key currency exchange rates Wednesday compared with late Tuesday in New York. Dollar vs: Exchange Rate Pvs Day

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

313.09 2,179.33 3,081.74 5,498.32 6,406.52 18,877.33 40,434.15 12,493.34 3,458.98 8,365.90 1,769.31 2,990.92 4,151.36 5,723.84

+.43 +.13 +.23 -.02 +.25 -.14 -.65 +1.06 -.05 -1.44 -1.37 -.25 -.24 +.01

s s s t s t t s t t t t t s

1.0326 1.5511 .9857 .002029 .1565 1.2160 .1289 .012801 .073554 .0305 .000869 .1436 1.0124 .0332

1.0228 1.5504 .9785 .002026 .1566 1.2061 .1289 .012791 .072911 .0303 .000870 .1433 1.0043 .0332

Selected mutual funds YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret Amer Century Inv: EqInc 7.58 +0.01 +5.5 GrowthI 26.39 -0.03 +7.4 Ultra 24.43 -0.09 +6.6 American Funds A: AmcpA p 19.89 +0.01 +6.1 AMutlA p 27.08 +0.06 +5.9 BalA p 19.29 +0.01 +7.0 BondA p 12.95 +4.8 CapIBA p 51.02 +0.10 +5.6 CapWGA p 33.19 +0.12 +5.1 CapWA p 21.13 +0.03 +4.5 EupacA p 35.98 +0.16 +2.3 FdInvA p 37.21 +0.10 +5.8 GovtA p 14.66 +2.4 GwthA p 30.87 +0.06 +7.4 HI TrA p 10.96 +7.2 IncoA p 17.28 +0.03 +5.1 IntBdA p 13.80 +2.3 ICAA p 28.64 +0.01 +6.7 NEcoA p 26.09 +0.06 +9.7 N PerA p 27.86 +0.14 +6.5 NwWrldA 48.03 +0.16 +4.1 SmCpA p 35.88 +0.12 +8.1 TxExA p 13.10 +0.01 +6.8 WshA p 29.80 +0.05 +6.1 Artisan Funds: Intl 21.40 +0.13 +7.9 IntlVal r 25.79 +0.15 +2.8 MidCap 35.47 +0.32 +7.7 MidCapVal 19.78 +0.08 +0.4 Baron Funds: Growth 54.17 +0.25 +6.2 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 14.22 +4.2 DivMu 14.93 +2.5 BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 18.96 +0.02 +5.4 GlAlA r 18.52 +0.03 +2.7 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 17.24 +0.02 +2.2 BlackRock Instl:

EquityDv 19.00 +0.02 GlbAlloc r 18.60 +0.02 Cohen & Steers: RltyShrs 67.57 +0.01 Columbia Class A: TxEA p 14.29 +0.01 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 28.62 +0.10 AcornIntZ 36.24 +0.18 LgCapGr 12.37 +0.04 Credit Suisse Comm: ComRet t 8.22 +0.07 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 8.97 +0.05 USCorEq1 11.30 USCorEq2 11.09 +0.01 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 34.02 -0.05 Davis Funds Y: NYVenY 34.41 -0.05 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.48 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq 17.37 +0.03 EmMktV 25.75 +0.06 IntSmVa 13.34 +0.08 LargeCo 10.56 USLgVa 20.04 +0.02 US Small 21.39 +0.05 US SmVa 24.11 +0.06 IntlSmCo 13.65 +0.07 Fixd 10.35 IntVa 13.78 +0.10 Glb5FxInc 11.27 2YGlFxd 10.13 Dodge&Cox: Balanced 71.31 +0.22 Income 13.80 IntlStk 28.91 +0.21 Stock 108.32 +0.42 DoubleLine Funds: TRBd I 11.32 TRBd N p 11.32 Dreyfus:

+5.6 +2.8 +12.3 +7.1 +5.1 +6.2 +2.9 +0.5 -1.3 +5.7 +5.4 +4.7 +4.8 +5.7 +1.4 -0.3 -0.4 +7.5 +5.6 +4.7 +4.4 +0.1 +0.7 -4.5 +3.7 +0.8 +7.1 +5.8 -1.1 +7.7 NA NA

Aprec 42.32 -0.06 Eaton Vance A: LgCpVal 18.09 -0.01 Eaton Vance I: FltgRt 9.00 GblMacAbR 9.81 LgCapVal 18.14 FMI Funds: LgCap p 16.30 FPA Funds: NewInco 10.63 FPACres 27.03 +0.02 Fairholme 27.11 -0.12 Federated Instl: TotRetBd 11.57 StrValDvIS 4.98 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 21.43 -0.03 StrInA 12.48 +0.02 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 21.72 -0.03 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 13.72 +0.01 FF2010K 12.57 +0.01 FF2015 11.46 +0.01 FF2015K 12.62 +0.01 FF2020 13.80 +0.01 FF2020K 12.96 +0.01 FF2025 11.41 +0.01 FF2025K 13.00 +0.01 FF2030 13.56 +0.02 FF2030K 13.11 +0.01 FF2035 11.15 +0.02 FF2035K 13.10 +0.02 FF2040 7.77 +0.01 FF2040K 13.13 +0.02 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 12.11 -0.01 AMgr50 15.71 +0.01 AMgr20 r 13.18 Balanc 19.26 -0.01 BalancedK 19.25 -0.02 BlueChGr 45.95 -0.06 CapAp 27.74 -0.10

+5.3 +6.4 +4.7 +2.1 +6.6 +6.9 +1.3 +1.8 +17.1 +4.7 +4.6 +8.7 +5.7 +8.8 +5.0 +5.1 +5.1 +5.2 +5.5 +5.6 +5.8 +5.8 +5.9 +6.0 +5.9 +6.0 +5.8 +5.9 +7.8 +5.5 +4.4 +6.8 +6.8 +8.3 +12.7

CpInc r 9.10 Contra 73.52 ContraK 73.52 DisEq 22.79 DivIntl 26.34 DivrsIntK r 26.33 DivGth 27.60 Eq Inc 43.81 EQII 18.57 Fidel 34.09 FltRateHi r 9.83 GNMA 11.98 GovtInc 10.99 GroCo 89.25 GroInc 19.58 GrowthCoK89.24 HighInc r 9.05 IntBd 11.12 IntmMu 10.68 IntlDisc 28.58 InvGrBd 12.07 InvGB 8.00 LgCapVal 10.54 LowP r 37.47 LowPriK r 37.46 Magelln 68.11 MidCap 27.54 MuniInc 13.56 NwMkt r 17.06 OTC 55.89 100Index 9.62 Puritn 18.84 PuritanK 18.84 SAllSecEqF12.12 SCmdtyStrt 9.07 SCmdtyStrF 9.10 SrsIntGrw 10.61 SrsIntVal 8.14 SrInvGrdF 12.07 STBF 8.57 StratInc 11.17 TotalBd 11.29 USBI 12.06 Value 67.54

-0.12 -0.12 -0.10 +0.13 +0.14 -0.04 +0.04 +0.02 -0.08

+0.22 -0.05 +0.22

+0.17 +0.01 +0.01 +0.01 -0.12 -0.13 -0.16 +0.01 +0.03 -0.57 -0.02 -0.02 -0.02 -0.02 +0.05 +0.06 +0.04 +0.05

+0.01 +0.01 +0.09

+8.4 +9.0 +9.1 +6.0 +3.2 +3.3 +6.7 +7.5 +7.9 +9.4 +3.8 +2.7 +2.9 +10.3 +8.3 +10.4 +8.3 +3.7 +3.9 +3.5 +4.8 +5.2 +4.7 +4.9 +4.9 +8.4 +5.4 +6.2 +11.0 +2.2 +9.1 +7.5 +7.6 +7.9 +1.2 +1.4 +4.9 +0.7 +4.8 +1.6 +5.8 +5.2 +3.8 +6.4

Fidelity Spartan: 500IdxInv 47.44 -0.01 +7.6 500Idx I 47.44 -0.01 +7.6 Fidelity Spart Adv: ExMktAd r 37.09 +0.08 +5.8 500IdxAdv 47.44 -0.01 +7.6 TotMktAd r 38.64 +7.3 USBond I 12.06 +3.9 First Eagle: GlblA 46.37 -0.02 +2.8 OverseasA 20.76 +2.0 Forum Funds: AbsStrI r 11.28 -0.02 +2.1 Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA p 12.76 +0.01 +7.2 GrwthA p 46.86 +0.02 +5.0 HYTFA p 10.92 +0.01 +8.9 IncomA p 2.14 +5.8 RisDvA p 35.62 +0.06 +2.4 StratInc p 10.47 +6.4 USGovA p 6.92 +1.9 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv 12.86 +0.03 +7.0 IncmeAd 2.13 +6.4 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.16 +5.5 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 20.83 +5.1 Frank/Temp Temp A: GlBd A p 12.90 +0.03 +6.8 GrwthA p 16.43 +0.08 +0.9 WorldA p 13.83 +0.06 +0.7 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 12.92 +0.02 +6.5 GE Elfun S&S: US Eqty 41.35 +0.03 +6.7 GMO Trust III: Quality 22.38 -0.03 +7.3 GMO Trust IV: IntlIntrVl 17.72 +0.09 -5.2 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 10.22 +0.03 -0.9 Quality 22.39 -0.02 +7.4 Goldman Sachs Inst:

HiYield 7.17 MidCapV 35.34 +0.07 Harbor Funds: Bond 12.84 -0.01 CapApInst 39.70 -0.01 IntlInv t 53.47 +0.32 Intl r 54.05 +0.32 Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 29.70 -0.03 Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 38.62 -0.02 Hussman Funds: StrGrowth 11.53 +0.04 IVA Funds: Wldwide I r15.22 +0.03 Invesco Funds A: Chart p 16.67 +0.07 CmstkA 15.98 -0.05 EqIncA 8.74 GrIncA p 19.54 HYMuA 10.04 +0.01 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 22.46 -0.01 AssetStA p 23.22 AssetStrI r 23.44 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 12.15 JPMorgan R Cl: CoreBond 12.16 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 12.15 +0.01 HighYld 7.93 ShtDurBd 11.01 USLCCrPls 20.99 +0.02 Janus T Shrs: PrkMCVal T20.52 +0.03 John Hancock Cl 1: LSBalanc 12.79 +0.01 LSGrwth 12.53 +0.02 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 17.69 Longleaf Partners: Partners 27.74 -0.08 Loomis Sayles:

+8.4 +5.3 +6.7 +7.6 +2.8 +3.1 +3.1 +3.8 -7.2 -0.9 +3.9 +5.9 +6.0 +5.9 +10.3 +3.8 +4.3 +4.4 +4.0 +4.4 +4.3 +7.5 +1.2 +6.3 +1.6 +5.5 +5.2 +5.3 +4.1

LSBondI 14.48 +0.02 +7.0 StrInc C 14.72 -0.02 +4.3 LSBondR 14.42 +0.02 +6.8 StrIncA 14.64 -0.02 +4.8 Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdY 12.42 -0.01 +6.4 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 11.02 +0.02 +5.3 BdDebA p 7.86 +6.6 ShDurIncA p4.61 +3.9 Lord Abbett C: ShDurIncC t 4.64 +3.5 Lord Abbett F: ShtDurInco 4.60 +3.8 MFS Funds A: TotRA 14.55 +0.03 +5.0 ValueA 23.60 +0.07 +6.3 MFS Funds I: ValueI 23.71 +0.08 +6.5 Managers Funds: Yacktman p18.09 +0.04 +4.6 YacktFoc 19.51 +0.05 +4.4 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 6.75 +0.06 +1.8 MergerFd 15.73 +0.9 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.85 +0.01 +7.0 TotRtBdI 10.84 +7.1 MorganStanley Inst: MCapGrI 33.26 +0.09 +1.0 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 28.08 +0.04 +3.5 GlbDiscZ 28.47 +0.05 +3.6 SharesZ 21.02 +0.01 +5.4 Neuberger&Berm Fds: GenesInst 47.04 +0.03 +1.3 Northern Funds: HiYFxInc 7.27 +7.6 Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 27.46 -0.09 +1.5 Intl I r 16.49 +0.08 -0.4 Oakmark 44.97 -0.02 +7.9 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 7.12 +0.01 +5.9

GlbSMdCap13.59 +0.02 Oppenheimer A: DvMktA p 30.67 -0.03 GlobA p 54.67 +0.39 GblStrIncA x4.23 IntBdA p 6.39 +0.01 MnStFdA 34.60 -0.07 RisingDivA 16.29 +0.02 S&MdCpVl28.54 +0.09 Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 14.74 +0.03 S&MdCpVl24.16 +0.07 Oppenheimer C&M: RisingDvC p14.68 +0.03 Oppenheimer Roch: RcNtMuA 7.51 +0.02 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 30.37 -0.02 IntlBdY 6.39 +0.01 IntGrowY 26.40 +0.18 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 11.47 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AlAsetAut r 10.67 +0.01 AllAsset 12.08 +0.01 ComodRR 6.82 +0.04 DivInc 12.00 EmgMkCur10.10 +0.04 EmMkBd 11.98 +0.02 HiYld 9.33 -0.01 InvGrCp 11.13 LowDu 10.57 RealRtnI 12.49 -0.01 ShortT 9.85 TotRt 11.47 PIMCO Funds A: RealRtA p 12.49 -0.01 TotRtA 11.47 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 11.47 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 11.47 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 11.47

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Perm Port Funds: Permannt 46.64 +0.32 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 39.31 +0.10 Price Funds: BlChip 42.38 -0.13 CapApp 21.94 +0.05 EmMktS 29.01 EqInc 24.37 +0.07 EqIndex 36.07 -0.01 Growth 35.12 -0.14 HlthSci 40.60 +0.49 HiYield 6.73 InstlCpG 17.39 -0.05 IntlBond 9.77 +0.02 Intl G&I 11.40 +0.01 IntlStk 12.55 +0.04 MidCap 54.69 +0.28 MCapVal 22.98 -0.02 N Asia 14.67 -0.05 New Era 39.61 +0.02 N Horiz 33.79 +0.27 N Inc 9.94 OverS SF 7.39 +0.04 R2010 15.79 R2015 12.20 +0.01 R2020 16.80 +0.01 R2025 12.24 +0.01 R2030 17.50 +0.02 R2035 12.33 +0.01 R2040 17.52 +0.02 ShtBd 4.85 SmCpStk 33.48 +0.12 SmCapVal 36.01 +0.05 SpecIn 12.72 +0.01 Value 23.95 +0.07 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 13.23 +0.01 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 10.77 +0.03 PremierI r 18.22 +0.02 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 37.89 S&P Sel 21.07

+1.2 +2.4 +9.7 +6.4 +1.8 +6.8 +7.5 +10.3 +24.5 +7.9 +7.9 +1.6 -1.0 +2.1 +3.7 +7.4 +5.5 -5.8 +8.9 +4.5 +1.0 +5.1 +5.4 +5.6 +5.7 +5.8 +5.7 +5.7 +2.0 +7.1 +4.4 +5.7 +6.3 +4.9 +0.1 -1.6 +7.1 +7.7

Scout Funds: Intl 28.46 +0.12 Sequoia 153.24 +0.47 TCW Funds: TotRetBdI 10.05 +0.01 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 16.51 +0.08 Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 24.25 +0.03 IncBuildC p18.00 +0.02 IntValue I 24.79 +0.03 Tweedy Browne: GblValue 23.37 -0.02 Vanguard Admiral: BalAdml 22.86 CAITAdm 11.72 +0.01 CpOpAdl 71.36 +0.92 EMAdmr r 31.92 +0.11 Energy 104.72 -0.06 EqInAdm n 48.12 +0.13 ExtdAdm 41.49 +0.10 500Adml 123.45 -0.03 GNMA Ad 11.10 -0.01 GrwAdm 34.38 -0.05 HlthCr 58.29 -0.05 HiYldCp 5.92 -0.01 InfProAd 29.14 -0.03 ITBdAdml 12.20 ITsryAdml 11.88 IntGrAdm 52.90 +0.38 ITAdml 14.39 +0.01 ITGrAdm 10.37 -0.01 LtdTrAd 11.19 LTGrAdml 11.22 +0.02 LT Adml 11.79 +0.01 MCpAdml 92.90 +0.12 MuHYAdm 11.24 +0.01 PrmCap r 67.30 +0.42 ReitAdm r 92.62 +0.01 STsyAdml 10.79 STBdAdml 10.67 ShtTrAd 15.94 STIGrAd 10.80 SmCAdm 35.27 +0.08

+2.5 +5.3 +7.7 -3.1 +1.6 +3.1 +1.9 +7.0 +6.0 +5.1 +4.7 +0.8 -5.4 +6.4 +5.5 +7.6 +2.2 +8.8 +7.5 +8.0 +5.7 +5.9 +3.0 +1.8 +4.4 +6.6 +1.4 +12.4 +6.3 +4.2 +7.2 +5.1 +14.6 +0.6 +1.5 +0.8 +2.9 +5.7

TtlBAdml 11.25 TStkAdm 33.26 WellslAdm 58.23 WelltnAdm 56.62 Windsor 45.70 WdsrIIAd 48.54 Vanguard Fds: CapOpp 30.89 DivdGro 15.99 Energy 55.77 EqInc 22.96 Explr 73.33 GNMA 11.10 HYCorp 5.92 HlthCre 138.14 InflaPro 14.84 IntlGr 16.62 IntlVal 26.55 ITIGrade 10.37 LifeCon 16.78 LifeGro 21.97 LifeMod 19.89 LTIGrade 11.22 Morg 18.74 MuInt 14.39 PrmcpCor 14.04 Prmcp r 64.84 SelValu r 19.33 STAR 19.58 STIGrade 10.80 StratEq 19.33 TgtRetInc 11.96 TgRe2010 23.52 TgtRe2015 12.89 TgRe2020 22.73 TgtRe2025 12.87 TgRe2030 21.95 TgtRe2035 13.13 TgtRe2040 21.51 TgtRe2045 13.51 USGro 19.51 Wellsly 24.03 Welltn 32.78 Wndsr 13.55

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WndsII 27.35 Vanguard Idx Fds: ExtMkt I 102.40 +0.24 MidCpIstPl101.22 +0.13 TotIntAdm r21.82 +0.12 TotIntlInst r87.28 +0.48 TotIntlIP r 87.30 +0.48 500 123.44 -0.03 MidCap 20.46 +0.03 SmCap 35.22 +0.07 TotBnd 11.25 +0.01 TotlIntl 13.04 +0.07 TotStk 33.25 Vanguard Instl Fds: BalInst 22.86 DevMkInst 8.40 +0.06 ExtIn 41.49 +0.10 GrwthIst 34.38 -0.05 InfProInst 11.87 -0.01 InstIdx 122.66 -0.03 InsPl 122.66 -0.04 InsTStPlus 30.10 MidCpIst 20.52 +0.03 SCInst 35.26 +0.07 TBIst 11.25 +0.01 TSInst 33.27 +0.01 ValueIst 21.43 +0.02 Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl 101.97 -0.03 MidCpIdx 29.31 +0.03 STBdIdx 10.67 TotBdSgl 11.25 +0.01 TotStkSgl 32.10 Western Asset: CorePlus I 11.62

+7.3 +5.5 +4.2 -0.1

+7.6 +4.1 +5.5 +3.9 -0.2 +7.2 +6.0 -0.2 +5.5 +8.8 +5.7 +7.7 +7.7 +7.3 +4.2 +5.6 +4.0 +7.3 +6.1 +7.6 +4.2 +1.5 +4.0 +7.3 +6.5


E4

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, JULY 26, 2012

M  

If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact Ashley Brothers at 541-383-0323, email business@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� at www.bendbulletin.com. Please allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication.

B C 

TODAY BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL DESCHUTES BUSINESS NETWORKERS CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Starts at 7 a.m.; visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541-610-9125. RENEWABLE ENERGY AND NATURAL BUILDING CLASSES: Professional-level workshops on solar hot water and solar electric components, as well as a handson natural building workshop as part of the Solwest Fair; free with paid fair admission; Grant County Fairgrounds, 411 N.W. Bridge St., John Day; 541-575-1900. ETFS EXPLAINED: Free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794. BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WILDFIRE CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 3:30 p.m.; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541-480-1765.

FRIDAY RENEWABLE ENERGY AND NATURAL BUILDING CLASSES: Professional-level workshops on solar hot water and solar electric components, as well as a handson natural building workshop as part of the Solwest Fair; free with paid fair admission; Grant County Fairgrounds, 411 N.W. Bridge St., John Day; 541-575-1900. EDWARD JONES COFFEE CLUB: Current market and economic update including current rates; free; 9 a.m.; Ponderosa Coffee House, 61292 S. U.S. Highway 97, Suite 105, Bend; 541-617-8861. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit; registration required; $35; 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. CENTRAL OREGON REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT CLUB: Free; 11 a.m.; ServiceMaster Clean, 20806 Sockeye Place, Bend; 541-610-4006 or bobbleile@windermere.com. FREE TAX FRIDAY: Free tax return reviews; schedule an appointment at 541-385-9666 or www.myzoomtax. com; free; 2-4 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666.

SATURDAY RENEWABLE ENERGY AND NATURAL BUILDING CLASSES: Professional-level workshops on solar hot water and solar electric components, as well as a handson natural building workshop as part of the Solwest Fair; free with paid fair admission; Grant County Fairgrounds, 411 N.W. Bridge St., John Day; 541-575-1900. LEADERS WITHOUT LIMITS INC.: Total Asset Protection Workshop with President/CEO David McCauley presenting; Register by June 30th and save $100; $299; 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; The Riverhouse Convention Center, 2850 N.W. Rippling River Court, Bend; 877-652-1868 or www.leaderswithoutlimits.biz.

SUNDAY RENEWABLE ENERGY AND NATURAL BUILDING CLASSES: Professional-level workshops on solar hot water and solar electric components, as well as a handson natural building workshop as part of the Solwest Fair; free with paid fair admission; Grant County Fairgrounds, 411 N.W. Bridge St., John Day; 541-575-1900.

TUESDAY BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL HIGH DESERT CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Starts at 7:15 a.m.; visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541-420-7377. PHOTO MANAGEMENT TIPS AND TRICKS: Explore how to download digital photos from your camera and send them as email attachments. Learn to manage your photo files, too! Bring your camera and USB cable to class. For ages 50 and older; $52 to $70; 10 a.m.-noon; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-388-1133.

WEDNESDAY BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL BEND CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7 a.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541749-0789.

THURSDAY Aug. 2 BUSINESS NETWORK

INTERNATIONAL DESCHUTES BUSINESS NETWORKERS CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Starts at 7 a.m.; visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541-610-9125. GETTING THE MOST OUT OF SCHWAB.COM: Free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-3181794. BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WILDFIRE CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 3:30 p.m.; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541-480-1765.

FRIDAY Aug. 3 CENTRAL OREGON REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT CLUB: Free; 11 a.m.; ServiceMaster Clean, 20806 Sockeye Place, Bend; 541-610-4006 or bobbleile@windermere.com. FREE TAX FRIDAY: Free tax return reviews; schedule an appointment at 541-385-9666 or www.myzoomtax .com; free; 2-4 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666.

TUESDAY Aug. 7 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL HIGH DESERT CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Starts at 7:15 a.m.; visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541-420-7377. ORGANIZING WITH OUTLOOK FOR BUSY PEOPLE: Learn to integrate all components of Outlook 2007 via a webinar; registration required; $65; 8:30-10 a.m.; 503-260-8714 or info@simplifynw.com. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit; registration required; $35; 9 a.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. PHOTO MANAGEMENT TIPS AND TRICKS: Explore how to download digital photos from your camera and send them as email attachments. Learn to manage your photo files, too! Bring your camera and USB cable to class. For ages 50 and older; $52 - $70; 10 a.m.-noon; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-388-1133. SMALL BUSINESS COUNSELING: Free; 5:30-7:30 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1037.

WEDNESDAY Aug. 8 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL BEND CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7 a.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541749-0789. ORGANIZING WITH OUTLOOK FOR BUSY PEOPLE: Learn to integrate all components of Outlook 2010 via a webinar; registration required; $65; 8:30-10 a.m.; 503-260-8714 or info@simplifynw.com. SUSTAINABILITY BUSINESS GROUP: Jay Coalsonn, the Executive Director of the Zero Waste Alliance, talks about engaging the community to create a zero waste economy; free; 9-10 a.m.; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; 541385-6908, ext. 11 or sweetpea@ envirocenter.org. BANKS AND OTHER FINANCIAL SERVICES: Registration required; free; 5:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 2303 S.W. First St., Redmond; 541318-7506, ext. 309.

THURSDAY Aug. 9 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL DESCHUTES BUSINESS NETWORKERS CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Starts at 7 a.m.; visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541-610-9125. ADVICE AT SCHWAB: Free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541318-1794. BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WILDFIRE CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 3:30 p.m.; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541-480-1765.

FRIDAY Aug. 10 CENTRAL OREGON REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT CLUB: Free; 11 a.m.; ServiceMaster Clean, 20806 Sockeye Place, Bend; 541-610-4006 or bobbleile@windermere.com.

FREE TAX FRIDAY: Free tax return reviews; schedule an appointment at 541-385-9666 or www.myzoomtax .com; free; 2-4 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666.

MONDAY Aug. 13 FORECLOSURE CLASS: Call 541-318-7506 extension 309 to reserve a seat; 5:30-7:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 20310 Empire Ave., Suite A110, Bend; 541-3187506. FORECLOSURE PREVENTION CLASS: Learn about NeighborImpact’s Housing Center tools and services which can assist individuals struggling to pay their mortgages; free; 5:30-7:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 20310 Empire Ave., Suite A110, Bend; 541-318-7506, ext. 309, karenb@ neighborimpact.org or www.home ownershipcenter.org.

TUESDAY Aug. 14 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL HIGH DESERT CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Starts at 7:15 a.m.; visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541-420-7377. HOME BUYING CLASS: Registration required; free; 5:309:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 2303 S.W. First St., Redmond; 541-3187506, ext. 309.

WEDNESDAY Aug. 15 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL BEND CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7 a.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541749-0789. MAC HELP: Free, friendly, technical advice for your Mac, iPad or iPhone; 10 a.m.-noon; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541388-1133. HOME BUYING CLASS: Registration required; free; 5:309:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 2303 S.W. First St., Redmond; 541-3187506, ext. 309. BUSINESS START-UP WORKSHOP: Registration required, contact 541383-7290 or http://noncredit.cocc .edu; $15; 6-8 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7700.

THURSDAY Aug. 16 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL DESCHUTES BUSINESS NETWORKERS CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Starts at 7 a.m.; visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541-610-9125. ETFS EXPLAINED: Free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541318-1794. BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WILDFIRE CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 3:30 p.m.; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541-480-1765.

FRIDAY Aug. 17 OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit; registration required; $35; 9 a.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. CENTRAL OREGON REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT CLUB: Free; 11 a.m.; ServiceMaster Clean, 20806 Sockeye Place, Bend; 541-610-4006 or bobbleile@windermere.com. FREE TAX FRIDAY: Free tax return reviews; schedule an appointment at 541-385-9666 or www.myzoomtax. com; free; 2-4 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666.

TUESDAY Aug. 21 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL HIGH DESERT CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Starts at 7:15 a.m.; visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541-420-7377. VISIT BEND BOARD MEETING: Open to the public; 8 a.m.; Bend Visitor Center, 750 N.W. Lava Road; 541-382-8048 or valerie@ visitbend.com. SMALL BUSINESS COUNSELING: Free; 5:30-7:30 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1037.

Geithner grilled about rate rigging By Ben Protess

Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner testifies before the House Financial Services Committee on Wednesday.

New York Times News Service

Timothy Geithner was grilled Wednesday about the interest-rate rigging scandal that has consumed the banking industry, as lawmakers at a House hearing questioned why he failed to thwart wrongdoing during the financial crisis. Republicans took aim at Geithner for, in their view, going easy on Wall Street despite knowing that some banks were trying to manipulate a key interest rate. When he ran the Federal Reserve Bank of New York in 2008, Geithner advocated broad reforms to the rate-setting process rather than curbing the bad behavior at specific banks. Geithner, now the Treasury secretary, also acknowledged on Wednesday that he never alerted federal prosecutors to the wrongdoing. The revelation further stoked the ire of Republicans, including

Food Continued from E1 The data is the first government estimate of how much prices could rise next year because of the drought that has gripped most of the country this summer, producing a lower-than-expected yield in corn, soybeans and several other commodity crops. Corn is now selling at about $8 a bushel — up 50 percent from where it was priced at just a month ago. Soybeans are at a record price of almost $17 a bushel, up from $13, just two months ago. Food prices overall rise about 1 percent for every 50 percent increase in corn prices, because corn is used in dozens of products, according to the Agriculture Department. Corn can be found in everything from soft drinks to baby food, but nearly half of the crop is used to feed livestock. “These are very corn-intensive operations,� said Bruce A. Babcock, an agriculture economist at Iowa State University, referring to raising livestock. “So customers will see an increase in the prices they pay for beef and dairy as the price of feed rises because of a drop in production.� According to the govern-

J. Scott Applewhite The Associated Press

some staunch detractors of Geithner. “It appears you treated it as a curiosity, or something akin to jaywalking, as opposed to highway robbery,� said Rep. Jeb Hensarling, R-Texas. The hearing before the House Financial Services Committee offered the latest forum to scrutinize regulators, who face criticism over their role in the rate-manipulation scandal. Lawmakers have pressed the New York Fed and its British counter-

part to explain why illegal actions went unchecked for years. Despite the scrutiny on Wednesday, Geithner escaped relatively unscathed from the more than two-hour hearing. Even as Republicans slammed Geithner for his actions as president of the New York Fed, many Democrats rushed to his defense. Rep. Barney Frank, D-Mass., declared that it was the banks, not regulators, that “grievously misbehaved.�

ment, 88 percent of the corn crop this year is now affected by the drought and 77 percent of the crop for soybeans, used in animal feed and some dairy alternatives, is affected. The Agriculture Department slashed its estimate for what was supposed to be the largest corn harvest on record. The government cut its corn yield forecast to 146 bushels an acre for the year, the lowest corn yield since 2003; the outlook last month was for 166 bushels. The soybean yield is projected to be 40 bushels per acre, down from an estimate of 43.9 last month. The most recent crop progress report shows that just 26 percent of the nation’s corn crop is rated either in good or excellent condition. About 45 percent of the crop is rated very poor or poor. Soybean conditions remain slightly better. About 31 percent of the soybean crop is rated good to excellent, while 35 percent is rated very poor or poor. Because of the dry weather, cattle farmers in a number of states have already started selling off or culling cattle because the drought has ruined grass for grazing and the price for corn for feed has

skyrocketed. Daniel Glickman, the agriculture secretary for former President Bill Clinton, said that as farmers started culling or selling their herds, meat prices could fall because of a glut of beef on the market. “So in the short term, that’s good for customers,� Glickman said. But the prices of beef, pork, chicken, eggs and dairy are expected to rise significantly later in the year, most likely around November, agriculture economists say. Ken Colombini, a spokesman for the National Corn Growers Association, a Washington trade group, said not all of the rise in food prices could be attributed to a rise in corn prices. “A drop in corn production is a factor, but animals are under other stresses related to the drought as well,� Colombini said. Ray Gilmer, a spokesman for the United Fresh Produce Association, said fruit and vegetable producers, for the most part, were not being affected by the drought. “Most of these operations are irrigated and the water is highly regulated so we are not having issues with our crops,� Gilmer said.

2012-2013 SCHOOL DIRECTORY REACH more than 70,000 Central Oregon adults in this special publication that will remain in households for months. The 2012-2013 School Directory contains comprehensive information on Central Oregon schools. This magazine is also distributed by the Chamber of Commerce and C.O. Visitor’s Association.

CALL TODAY! 541-382-1811 HURRY! Advertising Deadline is Monday, JULY 30

Publishes: Wednesday, August 15, 2012


H EALTH

Health Events, F2 People, F2 Money, F2

F

Fitness, F3 Medicine, F4-5 Nutrition, F6

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, JULY 26, 2012

www.bendbulletin.com/health

Live high, train low

8,000 ft

Training trick Some endurance athletes use altitude training to improve their performance. The idea is to train the body to maximize oxygen processing capacity. One way to do this is to spend your down hours at high elevation, for example, above 8,000 feet, and then train at a lower elevation, such as 4,000 feet or below.

7,000 ft

Altitude tents In areas where living above 8,000 feet is impractical, some athletes use altitude tents to mimic the effect. Altitude tents come in a variety of shapes and sizes, including ones that fit over your existing bed. Generally, the tent simulates the air of higher elevations by reducing the oxygen percent of the air a person breathes while in the tent. They generally cost $1,000 to $5,000.

Canopy

6,000 ft

Hose

Adjustable altitude generator

5,000 ft

Madras hospital curbs infections By Betsy Q. Cliff The Bulletin

In the past couple of years, Mountain View Hospital in Madras has had two patients who developed infections after surgery. For staff, it’s two too many. Along with eight other hospitals across the state, the 25-bed Mountain View was part of an 18MEDICINE month initiative to try to reduce surgical infections, central line infections and those caused by a bacteria called Clostridium difficile. Overall, the infection prevention initiative beat expectations. The hospitals that participated reduced the number of central line infections by 44 percent, much better than the target of a 20 percent reduction, and reduced surgical site infections by 50 percent, after aiming for 10 percent. Mountain View has not had a central line infection since January 2009. Because of difficulties with measurement of Clostridium difficile, the collaborative was unable to state a final result for that type of infection. Mountain View had none of this type of infection. See Infections / F4

Source: Journal of Applied Physiology, Hypoxico

4,000 ft Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

• Lower-oxygen tents are one tool in altitude training for athletes When people inhale fewer molecules of oxygen per breath, the body releases extra erytheading up to the Olympic trials earlier ropoietin, or EPO, a hormone that stimulates this year, local running star Max King the production of more red blood cells. Oxygen slept in an altitude training tent almost binds to red blood cells to get to the muscles. every night. The tent fits over a mattress Having more red blood cells allows more oxyin a spare room of his house, next gen to reach the muscles, thus improving to his treadmill and his stock of running FITNESS athletic performance. shoes. The effects can linger a few weeks afAltitude training — living, or at least ter altitude training ends. sleeping, for weeks or months at high altitude, For some time in the 1990s, using the tents say 8,000 feet — trains the body to adapt to a was controversial because of the boost in EPO. relative lack of oxygen. EPO is the same hormone that some athletes True altitude training, such as moving to the have used as a performance-enhancing drug. mountains of Colorado for several weeks, can But living at high altitude or traveling to training be simulated to some extent by using an altitude camps in the mountains was always a legal and tent in which an athlete breathes air that’s been natural way to stimulate EPO, and it was difficult deprived of some oxygen. to discern if an athlete had traveled or slept in a By Anne Aurand The Bulletin

L

Andy Zeigert tent. Many asked The Bulletin whether it even mattered. That controversy has generally passed and altitude tents are widely accepted in the United States.

A revolutionary concept In 1997, Drs. Ben Levine and Jim StrayGunderson of the Institute for Exercise and Environmental Medicine in Dallas published a landmark study that revolutionized how endurance athletes trained. Their study said living at high altitudes and traveling daily to lower elevations for intense training could boost performance by as much as 3 percent. See Altitude / F3

Vitamin D is tested often, but results are a bit quizzical But as the popularity of testing grows, some scientists and regulators caution that vitamin D A test for vitamin D that was once reserved is difficult to measure accurately. for patients with unusual bone fracturIn addition, no official standardizaing or those at risk for osteoporosis has NUTRITION tion exists for vitamin D testing — a now found popularity in doctor’s offices single blood sample sent to 10 different alongside tests for cholesterol and thylabs could return 10 different test reInside roid hormone during routine bloodwork. sults, said Dr. Gary Horowitz, director of • Where Research has shown that vitamin D is an clinical chemistry at Beth Israel Deaconvitamin important nutrient for maintaining strong ess Medical Center in Boston. The federal D comes bones, aids in the movement of muscles government is moving to make the tests from, F6 and helps the immune system fight off more reliable for the doctors and patients disease. Although vitamin D is produced who choose to use them, but in the meannaturally when skin is exposed to sunlight, lives time experts say not to put too much stock in the spent indoors mean that many Americans are vi- test alone when determining treatment. See Vitamin D / F6 tamin D deficient. By Jessica M. Morrison Chicago Tribune

Nancy Stone / Chicago Tribune / MCT

Harish Kothari, a medical technician, uses a pipette to fill test tubes with serum and a reagent which will be mixed to determine the levels of vitamin D in a person’s blood. Frequent testing of the vitamin provides little answers to its worth.

Cathy Luther, infection prevention nurse, uses a flashlight and Glo Germ Gel to check for cleanliness at Mountain View Hospital in Madras.

There’s an app for health By Carolyn Butler Special to The Washington Post

Ever wondered whether you should be using your smartphone for something slightly more worthwhile than playing Angry Birds? A growing number of experts are saying that mobile devices just may be the next big breakMONEY through in public health. “There is incredible potential for using cellphones and mobile apps to engage people about their health and wellness in a new way — to help them take better care of themselves and especially to manage chronic conditions like obesity, diabetes and high blood pressure — because of the immediacy and the interactive nature of the technology, and the fact that it is now so widespread,” says Susannah Fox, lead health researcher for the Pew Internet and American Life Project. See Apps / F2

HEALTH HIGHLIGHTS MONEY: Oregon has the highest hospital costs in the U.S., F2

FITNESS: A round of golf provides an excellent workout, F3

MEDICINE: Death rates vary among Central Oregon counties, F4

NUTRITION: Gluten-free doesn’t mean it’s good for you, F6


F2

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, JULY 26, 2012

H E  Editor’s note: Ongoing health classes and support groups now appear online only. See www.bendbulletin.com/ healthclasses and www .bendbulletin.com/ supportgroups. To submit an entry for either list, see instructions below.

M Oregon has highest hospital costs

Physician-dispensed drugs costlier, study says

The cost to provide a day of inpatient hospital care is higher in Oregon than in any other state.* Hospitals here say they spend approximately $2,818 to provide one day of care. Wyoming hospitals spend the least.

When workers get hurt on the job, more are getting their medication directly from their doctors rather than from a pharmacy, according to a new study. It may be easier for the patient to have the doctor dispense drugs, but it is driving up costs for employers, according to the study by the Workers Compensation Research Institute. The prices paid to physicians are generally higher than that paid to pharmacies, the study found. The cost of Vicodin quadruples when dispensed by physicians compared to the pharmacy. The study analyzed 5.7 million prescriptions paid under workers’ compensation for about 758,000 claims from 23 states. It examined the time periods from 2007 and 2008 to 2010 and 2011. The 23 states represent

$2,171-$2,817 $1,906-$2,164 $1,516-$1,885 $1,103-$1,499

CLASSE S HEART SCREENINGS: EKG and echo tests to check for life-threatening heart defects, for high school students, as part of an initiative by St. Charles Foundation’s Children’s Heart Fund; free; 5-8 p.m. Wednesday; preregister; The Heart Center, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-706-2787. INTRO TO IYENGAR YOGA: Yoga for flexibility, energy and vitality, all ages and levels welcome; free; 1011:15 a.m. Saturday; Iyengar Yoga of Bend; 660 N.E. Third St., Suite 5, Bend; 541-318-1186 or www. yogaofbend.com. WHEELCHAIR AND WALKER TUNE-UP EVENT: Free and open to the public; 10:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Wednesday; Brookside Place Assisted Living, 3550 S.W. Canal Blvd., Redmond; contact David Raschio, 541-504-1600.

How to submit Health Events: Email event information to healthevents@ bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” at www.bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing class listings must be updated monthly and will appear at www.bendbulletin.com/ healthclasses. Contact: 541-383-0358. People: Email info about local people involved in health issues to healthevents@ bendbulletin.com. Contact: 541-383-0358.

P  Dr. Kerie Raymond has joined Hawthorn Healing Arts Center. Dr. Raymond is a board-certified naturopathic physician specializing in family medicine and women’s health. She is a member of the Oregon Dr. Kerie Association of Raymond Nat u ropat h ic Physicians. She previously practiced in Seattle and at the Center for Integrated Medicine in Redmond.

Kids who watch a lot of TV unlikely to be athletic By Rene Lynch Los Angeles Times

Too much TV may do more than interfere with a child’s grades, it also might affect his or her athletic development — a potential problem for those parents who dream of raising the next Michael Phelps or Serena Williams. A study published in the International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity is believed to be the first to document the relationship between how much TV screen time a child logs and later explosive leg strength — a key indicator of athletic prowess. The other key finding, while significant, is perhaps less surprising: Kids who watch more TV early in life were likely to have wider waist measurements down the road, an indication that the lack of activity was putting young children on a path toward obesity. “Watching more television in early childhood forecasted lesser performance on a test of explosive muscular strength in later childhood. . . . This suggests that for some children, excessive television exposure was associated with the experience of a substantial level of impairment,” the study found.

*The national average is $1,910. Source: Kaiser Family Foundation

Scott Steussy / The Bulletin

Average cost of Vicodin $1.48 per pill at physicians’ offices

36 cents per pill at the pharmacy Source: Workers Compensation Research Institute

— By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun

Paying young people to stay on mom’s plan

Apps Continued from F1 “In a snap, clinicians can use cellphones to communicate with far-flung patients. In an instant, medical information can be relayed out to the field and forwarded to the people who need it. And just as quickly, those people can text back with questions or on-the-ground reports.” That said, Fox points out that most of us still aren’t capitalizing on all of this potential. “We are in a situation where we have the technology and we certainly have the need — just look at all of the statistics on the rise of obesity and other unhealthy trends,” she says. “But what we have not yet seen is an uptick in the percentage of people who are adopting and using these health apps.” In fact, according to Pew’s latest data, while 88 percent of Americans have a cellphone and about half of those are smartphones, only 10 percent of us have downloaded health-related apps on those devices, a figure that’s remained stable since 2010. Nonetheless, these apps continue to proliferate, says Brian Dolan, editor and co-founder of MobiHealthNews, which reports on the mobile health industry. According to Dolan’s company, the number of consumer health apps in the Apple Store has exploded from 2,993 in February 2010 to 13,619 this past April. “The growth is amazing, and it continues to accelerate,” he says. “But a persistent trend is that the majority of these apps are focused on tracking fitness or diet — there are two or three new BMI calculators released every month, for example — and far fewer are focused on what most people would consider true health problems, like chronic conditions or chronic condition management.” What’s more, the quality of apps is uneven and, unfortunately, untested, adds clinical psychologist Lee Ritterband, director of the behavioral health and technology program at the University of Virginia. “The problem is that there are very few apps that have real, solid empirical evidence behind them, or any scientific backing to what they are or what they say they do,” he says. Still, Ritterband believes that some early research shows promise. A study published this spring in the Archives of Internal Medicine found that remote health coaching supported by mobile technology, along with financial incentives, made a big difference in fruit and vegetable intake and daily activity levels among adults with elevated saturated fat levels and other bad diet and fitness habits. Participants used a personal digital assistant to immediately record their behaviors, received continually updated feedback and advice on their choices, and earned $175 if they reached and maintained their goals. A 2009 study found that people who received personalized text messages about weight control and

more than two-thirds of the workers’ compensation benefits paid in the United States. The study also found that prices paid for physician-dispensed prescriptions increased for several drugs commonly dispensed by physicians, while prices paid to pharmacies for the same drugs changed little or fell. For example, the average price per pill paid to physicians for Vicodin increased by 78 percent, 60 percent for Mobic and 24 percent for Flexeril over three years. The prices paid to pharmacies for the same drug fell by 8 percent, 21 percent, and 19 percent respectively. Find more information about the study here: www.wcrinet.org/result/ phys—disp—wc—result.html.

By Michelle Andrews Special to The Washington Post

The Associated Press file photo

10 smart app choices for your health We asked Brian Dolan of MobiHealthNews to suggest 10 standout health apps for Apple’s mobile devices, some of which are also available on Android and other mobile platforms. Here’s what he came up with:

ITRIAGE (free) Helps you evaluate any troubling symptoms and then suggests the best, nearest health-care facilities; gives you the wait times at some emergency rooms. GOODRX (free) Can compare prescription drug prices at virtually every pharmacy in the United States. Also provides coupons and cost-saving tips.

ZOCDOC (free) Makes it easier to find nearby doctors who accept your insurance plan and to book appointments, even at the last minute.

RUNKEEPER (free) Tracks your pace, distance, time and heart rate during runs and other fitness activities, and lets you share the information with friends. LOSEIT! (free) Helps motivate dieters by allowing them to set and log their daily caloric intake by doing such things as scanning the bar codes of foods they eat.

WITHINGS WIFI SCALE ($159 for the scale; the app is free) Monitors your weight, BMI,

other health issues two to five times a day dropped more pounds over a four-month period than those who received printed materials in the mail. “The best mobile apps and interventions can definitely make a big difference in health and wellness,” says Ritterband. Both he and Dolan stress that the most useful apps go beyond mere tracking — whether manual or automated with an associated device such as a scale or blood pressure cuff - and integrate some measure of personalized coaching. “We know very clearly that one size doesn’t fit all when it comes to the range of health issues: People need different things and need to be helped along and prompted given

body fat percentage and other health data when used with the associated wireless scale.

IBGSTAR DIABETES MANAGER ($75 for the meter; the app is free) Track your blood glucose levels and insulin usage and share information and trends with your health-care team with this app and its iPhoneenabled glucose meter.

IHEALTH BLOOD PRESSURE DOCK ($99.95 for the cuff; the app is free) An iPhone-enabled blood pressure cuff measures your systolic and diastolic pressure, heart rate and other vital signs with this app, which generates interactive graphs and tracks your numbers.

BEAM BRUSH (just received FDA clearance; will cost $50) A Bluetooth-enabled toothbrush and app tracks how often and how long you brush your teeth, serves as a timer so you can do 30 seconds in each quadrant of your mouth and even lets you program your favorite song to brush to.

ZEO MOBILE (headband is $149; the app is free) A sensor-embedded headband monitors your sleep patterns, including time in REM and deep sleep, and the app offers advice on how to become a better snoozer.

Young adults who need health insurance have more options than before under the health care overhaul, which generally allows them to stay on their parents’ plans until they reach age 26. But the provision gives employers new options too: They can encourage their young employees to join Mom and Dad’s plan rather than sign up for the company policy. Although experts say the practice is uncommon, some think more employers may consider this approach in the future. When the financial manager at the small Philadelphia communications company where Ross Burlingame works suggested that he sign up with his parents’ health plan rather than the one the company offered, the 24-year-old was taken aback. Could his company legally require him to go on his parents’ plan, even though its coverage wasn’t as good? After discussing it with the financial manager, he came to believe that her suggestion was well intentioned. She offered to give him a $400 monthly voucher to use for either plan. If he went on his parents’ plan, their premium increase would probably be smaller than that, she explained, if there was any additional cost. But if he signed up with the company plan, which has a $1,000 monthly premium, he’d owe $600 out of pocket each month. “When they explained that their plan cost more than the $400 they’d be giving me, it changed things,” he says. Burlingame says the hos-

pital that insures his father, a cardiothoracic surgeon, told him it would cost $140 a month to add him to the family plan. Human-resources experts say it is relatively common for employers to offer financial incentives to employees to influence their coverage decisions, especially in cases involving spouses. For example, if an employee’s spouse could sign up for coverage through his or her own job, “some plans apply a penalty if they don’t take the coverage that’s available to a spouse,” says J.D. Piro, national practice leader for the health and benefits legal practice at Aon Hewitt. “You could do that for the adult child as well.” As long as its guidelines are clearly spelled out and applied consistently, experts say, a company can provide financial incentives to encourage workers who have the possibility of coverage elsewhere to take it. The question is, why would employers want to do that? Young people generally have fewer health problems and are relatively inexpensive to insure. For a company that pays its own health claims, there probably wouldn’t be any financial benefit in discouraging a young employee from joining the company plan, say experts. But a company that buys insurance for its workers and pays premiums based on the number of people in the plan, as many small companies do, might find it advantageous to cover fewer people, says Dania Palanker, a senior health policy adviser at the National Women’s Law Center.

— Carolyn Butler, Special to the Washington Post

their particular needs,” says Ritterband, who notes that a recent research review of mobile interventions for diabetes management found that those with the most successful, significant impact made use of clinician involvement and tailored feedback and advice. It can be tough to find good advice on which apps are worth downloading. “Currently, consumers are really on their own when it comes to finding high-quality, worthwhile apps, and it’s mostly trial and error,” says Dolan. “The good news is that, for the most part, the majority of health apps are either free or cost a couple of dollars, so once you have the phone, it’s not that much of an investment to try them out.”

FREE INTRO CLASSES See Website in Bend since 1998

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THURSDAY, JULY 26, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

F3

F After injury, runners bare their soles

VITAL STATS

By Lenny Bernstein The Washington Post

A round of golf is a good workout Golfing is good for fitness. Consider these findings from a new report: • Walking an 18-hole round of golf, carrying a bag or using a pull cart, is equivalent to about a five-mile walk. • Walking 18 holes and carrying clubs burns about 2,000 calories. Riding in a cart reduces the game’s caloric expenditure to 1,300 calories. • When walking 18 holes, blood glucose levels fall by up to 20 percent for young players, 10 percent for the middle-aged, and 30 percent for the elderly players. • Older golfers tend to have better static and dynamic balance control and confidence than nongolfing older, healthy adults. • Regardless of handicap, sex, or course played, golfers exceed 10,000 steps during a typical round of golf — which meets the guideline for exercise recommended by most medical and clinical physicians. — Anne Aurand, The Bulletin Source: The Health & Wellness Benefits of Golf report by Walker Research Group for GOLF 20/20 and World Golf Foundation.

Olympic doctors fear diseases LONDON — A fist bump may be American athletes’ greeting of choice as they try to avoid illnesses that might wreck their Olympic dreams. Airplane illnesses and the rigors of long-haul travel are bigger concerns for Team USA’s medical team than any sporting injuries Michael Phelps and Tyson Gay may suffer on the way to London for the 2012 summer games. Cindy Chang, chief medical officer for the 529-member U.S. contingent, told athletes to take aisle seats so they can take regular walks and do stretching routines in the galley so their muscles don’t seize up aboard the jets carrying them across the Atlantic. Team USA won’t snub an extended hand of friendship, said Chang, who also works as head physician for the University of California, Berkeley teams, suggesting athletes may break with conventional handshakes. “A fist bump is the greeting,” said Chang with a laugh in an interview at the Olympic Village. “There are sanitary places all over that you can use. What you don’t want to do is shake someone’s hands and then touch your eyes or touch your nose and touch your face.” Chang’s team of 80 doctors is on hand to dispense advice on anything from the safety of London’s drinking water to getting into a regular sleeping pattern. — Bloomberg News

“I have really bad knees,” says Rebecca Ouding “I have an old knee injury that gets aggravated,” says Bud Uyeda. “I ran a marathon 20 years ago, and after that my arches collapsed,” says Dave Hafera. Not what you typically hear from people enjoying a fun run on a sunny summer Sunday recently. But there they were in Maryland’s Meadowbrook Park at the Naked Foot 5K, happily joining 450 others despite injuries that usually spell the end of running careers. Their secret? After years of frustration trying to cure these ailments, all have switched to running barefoot or in the minimalist shoes that mimic running shoeless. “I would not be running if I were not running barefoot,” says Uyeda, who, to be totally honest, had to sit out this event because of a minor car accident Friday. Nearly three years after it was reignited by the remarkable book “Born to Run,” bare-

Altitude Continued from F1 They created a “live high, train low” training mantra, a new way to improve endurance sports performance. It meant moving to places such as Colorado or Utah, where a person can live in the mountains and drive downhill, where they can maximize a workout. Because there’s less oxygen for the body to work with at a high altitude, training there gets scaled back. At high altitudes, an athlete can’t push his body as hard, can’t train his muscles to work as rapidly as necessary for competition. Geographically relocating to “live high, train low” can be “very expensive and logistically often a real pain,” said XC Oregon Director JD Downing, who coaches elite adult cross-country skiers. Altitude training periods need to be at least three to four weeks long to provide lasting benefits, he said, and the more time spent at an ideal altitude — 7,000 to 8,500 feet — the better the benefits. “We’d like to do them more often, but cost and missed work time has been the biggest impediment to XC Oregon skiers doing these types of camps. Over the past 15 years we’ve only had a handful of skiers ever do them,” he said. Fortunately, “Central Oregon has a good enough altitude mix for many workout locations — 2,000 to 7,500 feet,” Downing said. “We seem to be able to shortcut the process a little bit just by moving workouts around the region as much as possible.” On the other hand, some athletes use tents to simulate the effects of high altitude. Tents, or rather, the air pumped in from an altitude generator, make “live high, train low” concepts more convenient and feasible. After sleeping all night at the equivalent of 8,000 feet, a Bend athlete can step out in the morning and exercise at 3,600 feet. King first tried an altitude tent during the three months leading up to a U.S. Cross Country Championship race in 2006. “I had a phenomenal race. That started it,” he said. A couple of years later, his racing life justified buying a tent, he said. He figured he only had to improve a little bit to win back the $1,500 cost of the tent. He believes altitude training has helped him run faster in both high- and low-altitude races. It also has made a difference in how he feels at high races such as the TransRockies race in Colorado’s mountains. Since he’s been altitude training, he’s experienced fewer side effects of altitude — nausea, appetite problems, headaches — at that event. “When you include everything that enhances performance, you reach your potential,” he said. “It’s one piece of the pie.”

“Kids run barefoot when they’re 2 and 3 years old and they don’t think about it. They have fun. We want to reinvigorate that feeling in adults.” — Scott Jones, organizer of the Naked Foot 5K

foot running is less a fad than a realistic alternative to traditional running shoes for people who have struggled with lowerleg injuries. Minimalist shoes are not for everyone, probably not even for most of us, but the anecdotal evidence of their place in the world of running is hard to deny. Minimalist shoes now account for 12 percent of running shoe sales (though it’s just 4 percent without Nike’s Free line), according to one report, and the practice is mainstream enough that Naked Foot runs are being held in 10 cities this summer.

An imperfect tool But tents are imperfect. They can cost a couple of thousand dollars. They also can pose “a significant challenge for most people as they can feel very claustrophobic, tend to develop odors, can be very hot, and are a huge inconvenience for non-athlete sleeping partners,” Downing said. And, in recent years, some research has questioned whether altitude-acclimatization in tents is that helpful. One recent study published in the Journal of Applied Physiology concluded that four weeks of “live high, train low” routines, using altitude-simulated rooms, “did not improve endurance performance or any of the measured, associated physiological variables.” Using a double-blind, placebo-controlled study, researchers at the University of Zurich in Switzerland studied 16 endurance cyclists for performance measures during and after they spent 16 hours a day in either low-oxygen rooms corresponding to about 9,800 feet or in normal-air rooms. All the cyclists trained the same. The high-altitude group didn’t have faster time trials or better oxygen processing capacity (known as VO2 max). Literature on the topic is without solid consensus “because there are so many variables that affect performance,” said Stephanie Howe, who teaches exercise science and health and fitness at Central Oregon Community College. “There’s a lot we still don’t know about training and tents.” Howe is known locally as a competitive cross-country skier and runner, but is also finishing her doctorate in exercise physiology, for which she’s extensively researched altitude training. She doesn’t practice altitude training at home and she doesn’t advocate using tents. Using tents to increase red blood cells is just one piece of a training puzzle, she said. In a tent, an athlete may not sleep as well, is more likely to become dehydrated, and may have an inhibited appetite, she said, all of which can hurt performance. “You might get some benefits (from using a tent) but the potential for negative consequences is higher, in my opinion,” she said. Another thing about tents is that they can’t replicate the other aspects of actual highaltitude living, such as air pressure. “At true altitude you have a change in pressure. In tents, it’s a change of oxygen,” said Howe. The percent of oxygen in the air is similar — 20.9 percent — at every altitude. What changes with altitude is the air pressure. At 8,000 or 10,000 feet for example, the air pressure is lower, sometimes referred to as thinner air. Bodies can’t get and use oxygen as well in those conditions, Howe said. Manipulating the percent of oxygen in the air of a tent chamber simu-

Matt McClain / The Washington Post

Abigail Daley runs in the Naked Foot 5K in Maryland. Running barefoot, some say, has become a “cure” for injured athletes.

“The goal is to get a lot of people out and having fun running again,” says Scott Jones, Naked Foot organizer who staged a 1K run for children before the main event. “Kids run barefoot when they’re 2 and 3 years old and they don’t think about it. They have fun. We want to reinvigorate that feeling in adults.” I wrote about barefoot run-

ning in October 2009, when author Christopher McDougall introduced us to the Tarahumara Indians of Mexico’s Copper Canyon, who run 100-mile races in sandals made from old tires, and to the free-spirited ultramarathoner Micah True, who died on a run in New Mexico in March. McDougall’s best-seller is now being made into a movie.

“If you go to real altitude you get more physiological changes. You have factors like barometric pressure that you can’t do with this (simulated altitude) therapy. Barometric pressure changes the structure of your cells.”

spending weeks at a time above 12,000 feet in elevation, essentially constantly altitude training. But then he lived for some time at sea level in Washington, during which time he climbed Mount Rainier without any acclimation training. He experienced some uncomfortable effects of altitude. So this year, in preparation for another Rainier climb, he slept for six weeks in an altitude tent. With Max King, he recently summited Rainier quickly and felt good doing it, he said. But he said he’s “up in the air” about how he feels about using the tent. “I think it gives perhaps a small advantage, but might not be worth the cost,” he said.

— Bart Bowen, coach and owner of Powered by Bowen

lates what a body can process at higher elevations, she said. “If you go to real altitude you get more physiological changes,” said Bart Bowen, a coach and owner of Powered by Bowen, a sports performance training facility. “You have factors like barometric pressure that you can’t do with this (simulated altitude) therapy. Barometric pressure changes the structure of your cells.”

Altitude training Altitude training is not just for Olympic hopefuls and professional athletes; it’s practiced by all kinds of endurance athletes — runners, cyclists, cross-country skiers, swimmers, mountaineers. Brett Yost, a Central Oregon Community College math teacher, has been sleeping in an altitude tent to acclimate his body for mountaineering challenges. Before he settled in Bend, Yost had lived and worked in the mountains of Colorado,

Altitude therapy Triathlete Jim Rantala, a nurse at Cascade Surgicenter, has tested another training alternative, called altitude therapy at Powered by Bowen in Bend. Starting in January, Rantala went to the facility where he breathed through a mask attached to an altitudesimulating generator three to five times a week, an hour per session. Powered by Bowen rents out altitude tents but is also at an experimental stage of offering altitude training therapy. While athletes breathe the oxygen-depleted air through the mask, Bowen can monitor their blood saturation levels — how much oxygen is in the blood — from a sensor that shoots light through the end

As I said then, barefoot running is not for me. I have no major leg injuries, except occasional plantar fasciitis, and I like my comfy running shoes, though I do wear orthotics with a gel liner. The theory behind barefoot running is that the soft raised heel of running shoes encourages you to land on the rear part of the foot, which wasn’t designed to take the kind of forces running generates, leading to injuries for some people. By ridding yourself of that crutch, you are forced onto your mid- or forefoot, which can take that pounding, and you begin to run as people have for thousands of years. Harvard’s Daniel Lieberman has published landmark research that supports running barefoot, interest groups and exercise organizations have weighed in, and a mild controversy continues. More companies have produced a wider variety of minimalist running shoes, but earlier this year, Vibram was sued over claims it has made about its path-breaking FiveFingers shoe.

of the finger. Most healthy people have 98 to 99 percent blood saturation. Exercise can reduce that into the low 90s. In high altitudes like that of Mount Everest, saturation can drop below 80 percent, when brain cells start to die. Increasing relative altitude might take someone’s levels down to 92 or maybe even 85 percent. This makes the body adapt and work better under oxygen-deprived conditions. In therapy, as his body adjusted and his red blood cells increased, Rantala cranked up the simulated altitude much higher than one would typically use while sleeping in an altitude tent. At times Rantala was in simulated altitudes near 21,000 feet, but only for short periods of time. Rantala did this leading up to a half Ironman event in Hawaii in early June. That race didn’t go well for him, he said, but he attributed that to conditions such as wind, not altitude training. At another half Ironman in Washington in July he said he ran well and took fourth in his age division. He’s 57. Generally speaking, he believes his body began working more efficiently after two months of the therapy. He shaved about 45 seconds off his minutes-per-mile running pace. “I feel stronger. I think that I can recover faster when I’m training or racing,” he said. “I just didn’t feel like I was losing as much energy. I had more strength to keep going.” — Reporter: 541-383-0304, aaurand@bendbulletin.com


F4

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, JULY 26, 2012

M A survey with teeth: Most of us are clueless about good dental habits

Regional disparities The 2009 death rate for residents of Deschutes and Crook Counties was lower than the statewide average of 8 per 10,000 residents. Jefferson County death was higher, in part due to a higher percentage of deaths from unintentional injuries.

Crook County

Deschutes County

Jefferson County

7.1

6.7

9.5

Cancer ........... 24.3%

Cancer ........... 23.8%

Cancer ........... 20.3%

Heart disease ...............17%

Heart disease ........... 20.6%

Heart disease ...........13.9%

Chronic lower respiratory disease ............. 9.8%

Chronic lower respiratory disease ........... 6.61%

Chronic lower respiratory disease ..............7.9%

Death rate per 10,000 Top 3 killers

Source: Central Oregon Health Council

Greg Cross / The Bulletin

Pop quiz: How often should you floss? If you think twice a week sounds about right, you’re like most Americans surveyed in the American Dental Association’s first oral health quiz. And you’d be wrong, as they were, about that and many other dental basics, netting them the lowly grade of “D” on the quiz. “We’re hoping that this sets the low bar,” said Dr. Ada Cooper, a dentist in New York and an ADA spokeswoman. The ADA released the survey results alongside the launch of mouthhealthy.org, which aims to bring oral health enlightenment to the masses. You can take a modified version of the quiz on the site. Vigilance about the state of your mouth and small habit changes

can go a long way toward preventing tooth decay and catching a problem before it becomes more costly, Cooper said. Here are some common misconceptions people have about their teeth, according to the ADA’s survey of 1,500 adults, which was conducted in May. Survey says: 90 percent of respondents believe they should brush after every meal. ADA says: Brush only twice a day. Survey says: 65 percent of respondents believe they should replace their toothbrush twice a year. ADA says: Replace your toothbrush every three to four months,

or sooner if the bristles become frayed. Survey says: 75 percent of respondents don’t know what age to take their child to the dentist for the first time. ADA says: A child’s first trip to the dentist should be within six months after the first tooth appears or no later than the child’s first birthday. Survey says: 81 percent of respondents think that sugar causes cavities. ADA says: Cavities are caused by germs in the mouth that feed on sugar and then produce acid which attacks tooth enamel. In time, the acid attacks weaken the enamel to the point where a

cavity forms. Survey says: 59 percent of respondents don’t realize cavitycausing germs can be passed from person to person. ADA says: Yes, they can. Parents and caregivers can pass bacteria that cause cavities to their children by pre-chewing food, sharing utensils or licking a pacifier to clean it. Survey says: 53 percent of respondents think you should floss twice a week. ADA says: Floss once a day. Tooth brushing doesn’t clean between the teeth so germs can grow there and cause tooth decay and gum disease. — By Alexia Elejalde-Ruiz, Chicago Tribune

Amid severe outbreak, is it time for a whooping cough booster? By Amy Hubbard Los Angeles Times

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Invisible gel is spread on all touchable surfaces of a room at Mountain View Hospital in Madras. A black light will show where the gel is left behind after the cleaning staff is finished.

Infections Continued from F1 Infections “have an incredible impact on patients,” said Melissa Parkerton, collaborative director for the Oregon Patient Safety Commission who headed the initiative. “They can be unpleasant and costly, and even deadly.” Parkerton was “very pleased” with the results of the initiative, she said. “I was incredibly impressed with how much they accomplished.” Each year hundreds of Oregon patients develop serious infections in hospitals, according to a report released last spring by the state. Infections add between $7,000 and $35,000 on average to a hospital bill, the report found, and some can cost much more. In addition, they can take an incredible physical and emotional toll on families. That is part of what motivated Mountain View to participate. “Some of the infections people can get are life-altering,” said Cathy Luther, an infection preventionist at the hospital. “I look at most patients and say, ‘What if this was my family member?’ ”

Combating infection As part of the project, Mountain View changed the way it did a number of things in the hospital to try to make it less infection-friendly. One of the biggest started with the way rooms are cleaned. “If all the surfaces (in a room) aren’t clean,” Luther said, “the patient can get an infection even if everything else is done right.” To test cleanliness, Luther spread invisible gel on all touchable surfaces of a room after a patient left but before the cleaning staff came in. The gel shows up under black light and if any was still left after cleaning, Luther saw room for improvement. At the beginning of the project, it happened a lot. The staff was getting the rooms cleaned to her satisfaction just over half the time. So they educated cleaning staff and discussed their importance, Luther said. They stressed the “high-touch” areas of a room during training with new staff. By the end of the project, the rooms were fully cleaned, with no gel left,

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93 percent of the time. For the two surgical site infections, Luther said, the hospital spent considerable time analyzing exactly what caused the issue. “It was totally communication,” she said. “We realized we needed to do a little further training with the staff. (The analyses) were very powerful.”

Learning from others The hospital also spent time talking to the other hospitals who were part of the initiative. Both large and small hospitals participated and each brought different strengths and challenges, said Parkerton. Small hospitals such as Mountain View don’t have the same amount of resources that large ones do, said Parkerton, including a fleet of people to track data and ensure infection prevention. “But what they do have is a sense of community that’s really impressive. Everyone knows each other and they can do things faster.” As an example, she said,

changes can often be made more quickly at smaller hospitals because it there is less bureaucracy. Many of the hospitals participating in the project, including Mountain View, did not have enough time to tackle the issue of infections caused by Clostridium difficile. Parkerton said they plan to start a new collaborative this fall to address those types of infections. A large part of that effort will focus on the appropriate use of antibiotics. C. difficile bacteria sometimes flourish and cause disease after a person takes antibiotics, wiping out other bacteria that keep the C. difficile in check. It’s unclear if Mountain View will be a formal part of the new collaborative, but Luther said they will be working on C. difficile and other infections. “Our goal is to have people come into the hospital and get well,” she said. “Not to have any complications from being a patient.” — Reporter: 541-383-0375, bcliff@bendbulletin.com

With the nation’s attention focused on dire news about whooping cough, parents’ inclination may be to hustle their children — or themselves — in for a booster shot. Will there be a run on the whooping cough vaccine? If there is, doctors should be able to handle the demand. The supply of whooping cough — or pertussis — vaccines is fine, according to a spokesman with the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta. “The CDC is not aware of any supply issues as far as vaccines that protect against pertussis,” said Thomas Skinner in an email to the Los Angeles Times. For a parent with a child sick with whooping cough, it can be a terrifying ordeal. Whooping cough is an extremely contagious bacterial disease characterized by a “whooping” noise as the patient gasps for breath. The coughing fits can lead to vomiting or even short losses of consciousness, according to the National Library of Medicine. Infants can have spells of choking with whooping cough. Many parents are meticulous about getting their children to the doctor for the multiple shots — five — needed to protect against the disease. The first shot is at 2 months and the last one when the child is 4 to 6 years old. But the vaccine wears off. As the Associated Press reported, a booster is recommended at about age 11, and health officials have debated moving it up earlier. Now officials are saying the number of reported cases

of whooping cough is nearly twice what it was at this time last year. With 18,000 cases in 2012 so far, the final number is expected to be the highest since 1959. The number of deaths in 2012, however, doesn’t seem to be skyrocketing. There are nine so far this year, according to the CDC. Last year there were 14, but in 2010 there were 27. “The vast majority of deaths each year occur among children less than 1 year,” Skinner said. “However, there are typically one to three deaths that occur in senior adults, usually over the age of 65.” Only infant deaths have been reported in 2012. As infants are the most vulnerable to the disease, it’s recommended that any adult who is around an infant get a pertussis vaccine. The death rate today from pertussis is a far cry from the 1920s, when, according to the CDC, about 6,000 children died each year from the disease — more than from diphtheria, scarlet fever and measles combined. The vaccine was developed in the 1930s and came into wider use in the ‘40s. The number of reported cases took a dive from 156,517 in 1947 to 74,715 in 1948. The lowest number of reported cases, according to the CDC, was 1,010 in 1976. But in 2003 — after decades in which reported cases numbered in the thousands — cases shot up into the tens of thousands, where they have remained. The rise in reported cases may be due in part to better tests and increased aware-

“The vast majority of deaths each year occur among children less than 1 year. However, there are typically one to three deaths that occur in senior adults, usually over the age of 65.” — Thomas Skinner, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

ness. But it’s clear this year that more 13- and 14-yearolds are contracting the disease. The CDC’s Skinner confirmed that the agency is investigating whether the rise in the illness among young teens is due to a change in the vaccine that occurred in 1997. That year the vaccine used to immunize children was altered because the U.S. took a version of the vaccine off the market due to possible neurological side effects. But Dr. Anne Schuchat, director of CDC’s National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, noted to The Times recently that studies attempting to confirm that link “have not been consistent.” Schuchat said the drop in protection from the current vaccine is likely to blame for the increase. The vaccine produces 95 percent protection within two years. But recent studies in California show protection dropping to 70 percent within five years. “That may be why we are seeing this increase,” she said.


M EDICI N E

THURSDAY, JULY 26, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

F5

COPING WITH ARTHRITIS

Making modifications to maintain an active life By Jane E. Brody New York Times News Service

Arthritis is the leading cause of disability in the United States. But with a few simple adjustments, life can be easier and less painful for the millions of people who now permit this common condition to limit what they are able to do and enjoy. The changes can be as simple as playing with grandchildren on the couch or at a table, instead of on the floor, said one knowledgeable grandfather, Dr. Kenneth Brandt, who is also an orthopedic surgeon and clinical professor of medicine at the University of Kansas Medical Center in Kansas City. The trick is to decide what activities are important to you and then modify them in ways that ease symptoms like pain, stiffness and fatigue. Arthritis may be a mechanical disability, but it need not turn people into couch potatoes. “There’s a whole body to pay attention to,” Brandt said in an interview. “You shouldn’t neglect everything else that’s important to you and to your general health, including physical activity.” Even with relatively advanced arthritis, it is important to maintain an exercise regimen, with modifications as needed to minimize overuse of damaged joints. “You should exercise affected joints,” Brandt said. “Muscles around the joints can atrophy — use them or lose them — and result in even more pain and stiffness.” He suggested consulting a physical therapist or exercise physiologist to help design “an exercise program that permits loading joints appropriately.”

Simplify kitchen chores Let’s say you enjoy cooking — or even if you don’t — you have to cook for yourself or your family. In an article called “Cooking With Ease” in the magazine Arthritis Self-Management, Nancy Callinan, an occupational therapist in Minneapolis, described adaptations readily available to both ordinary and gourmet cooks with troubled joints. For starters, why struggle to open a jar or can? Why exhaust yourself standing up for long periods to prepare food? There are tools and stools that can make the tasks so much easier. Sam Farber, a retired entrepreneur, invented the widely imitated OXO Good Grips kitchen tools in response to his wife Betsey’s mild arthritis. I own at least a dozen that have greatly eased my hours in the kitchen. Whether for opening wine bottles or slicing bread, Brandt recommends a “judicious investment” in tools designed to make culinary tasks easier. In her article, Callinan also wondered why anyone with arthritis would spend hours

Chris Gash / New York Times News Service

Arthritis is the leading cause of disability in the U.S., but with a few simple adjustments, life can be easier and less painful for those affected.

washing and cutting up vegetables, cheese, meat, poultry, even garlic — when every supermarket carries food that is already washed, sliced, diced, shredded or chopped. If you must do it yourself, she advised, invest in a mandolin, food processor and/or tabletop mixer. Whether in the kitchen, bedroom, bathroom or laundry room, frequently used items can be made more easily accessible, minimizing the amount of bending and reaching you must do. Dishes, glasses and silverware can be stored on pull-out shelves or a Lazy Susan, for example. Perhaps you can install hooks near your stove to hang frequently used cookware. Rather than trying to lift large, heavy containers of flour, detergent or other products purchased in bulk, consider transferring them to smaller storage containers that are easier to lift and handle, Callinan suggested. Even before arthritis became an issue, I learned to spend the bulk of food-prep time sitting on a stool. If this is not possible at your counter, consider doing your prep work on a chair at the kitchen table or on a rolling cart. Rather than heavy ceramic or glass bowls, I now mainly use lightweight plastic or stainless steel for preparing food. Nor do I cook every

day. Rather, I prepare food in batches and set aside or freeze portions for later use. Callinan lauds the ease of meal preparation in a slow cooker, good for preparing everything from soup to dessert. It is important, too, to pace oneself. When planning a dinner party or special event, I break up the needed chores over the course of several days. Lists help limit the number of shopping trips and last-minute excursions for forgotten items. I also review planned recipes and list the amounts of needed ingredients (say, a tablespoon of minced parsley for one recipe and a quarter cup for another) so that I can prep them all at once. I regard the filling as the most important part of a pie, and I long ago gave up making my own crust when I discovered how well Pillsbury does it, in a form that unrolls right into the pie plate. Callinan suggested keeping things simple. “Your guests are coming to your home to see you, not to have a four-star dining experience,” she wrote. More and more often these days, I plan one-dish company meals like stews or casseroles, plus a salad. I serve storebought appetizers with fruit and ice cream or sherbet for dessert. You might also consider potluck gatherings. After all, it is the company that should make the event most enjoyable, and if each guest has to make only one dish, chances are the food will be delightful as well.

Ask and you shall receive If you are uncertain about how to make needed adjustments in your routines and home, ask your doctor to refer you to an occupational therapist trained and certified to help people with all kinds of disabilities get the most out of life with the least discomfort. I’ve also learned to ask for help when I need it. My hands and my OXO tool are not big enough to open certain jars from big-box stores, so before leaving the store I ask someone bigger and younger to unscrew the tops for me. And having failed to master the art of opening those hard plastic clamshell-type packages (knives are too dangerous and scissors hard to manipulate), I plan to ask stores to do that for me as well. “It’s surprising how many people don’t know they can get help just by asking for it, even from a total stranger,” Dr. Brandt said. Nor should someone with arthritis be too proud to accept help offered by a stranger. Recently, when a friend and I were leaving the subway with suitcases in hand, two young folks offered to carry them up to the street for us. Although neither of us is particularly feeble, we graciously accepted.

Some herbs ease migraine symptoms By Drs. Kay Judge and Maxine Barish-Wreden McClatchy Newspapers

Headaches, including migraine and tension-type headaches, are a huge medical concern in the United States, affecting more than 45 million Americans. While some people are affected by headaches only intermittently, many have frequent debilitating symptoms that lead to work absences and loss of income. The American Academy of Neurology and the American Headache Society recently published new guidelines for the prevention of migraine headaches, and the updated guidelines now endorse the use of several alternative therapies to help keep migraine headaches at bay. The botanical supplement that received the most attention in the new guidelines is Petadolex, which is the herb butterbur. Studies have shown that 75 mg of Petadolex taken twice daily can reduce the frequency, duration and intensity of migraine headaches by close to 50 percent, which

is comparable to many of the prescription medications used to prevent migraines. Butterbur seems to work by reducing spasms in arteries in the brain; it also acts as an anti-inflammatory agent. Butterbur is also effective in reducing allergy symptoms, so if you have both migraine headaches and allergies, butterbur would be a good choice for you. It is generally well tolerated, though in sensitive people it may actually cause headaches and allergic-type symptoms, especially in those who are allergic to ragweed, marigolds and similar plants. The main concern with butterbur however is that if not prepared properly, it can be contaminated with pyrrolizidine alkaloids, which are carcinogenic; they can also cause liver and kidney damage. If you try butterbur, be sure to purchase a product that says “PA-Free,” like Petadolex. Data suggest that Petadolex is safe in kids ages 6-17; it is not recommended in pregnancy or during lactation, however. Other supplements may also

help to prevent migraine headaches; magnesium is probably one of the best. Many people in the U.S. are felt to be magnesium-deficient, either from poor diet or from the daily consumption of stomach acid medications and diuretics. Coffee, alcohol, soda and salt can also lower magnesium levels. The dose that seems to be the most effective for headache prevention is 600 mg of magnesium taken at bedtime. If you are prone to loose stools, look for magnesium glycinate or magnesium gluconate, which are less likely to cause diarrhea. If you have kidney disease, do not take high-dose magnesium supplements without talking with your doctor. Coenzyme Q10 (ubiquinol) may also reduce headaches, usually by about 30 percent; studies have shown that 100 mg three times daily is the effective dose; kids need smaller doses. The main side effect from Coenzyme Q10 is on your wallet — it’s expensive. Melatonin may also be useful for both migraines and cluster headaches; doses range from 3 to 10 mg at bedtime.

Vino Wong / Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Andre Castro leads the teen pregnancy education efforts at Meadow Creek High School in Norcross, Ga. While teen pregnancy rates have dropped, officials fear they could rise again if tight education budgets cause a cut in prevention programs.

Budget cuts could impair progress on teen pregnancy, experts warn By Edward Mitchell

Christy Ware, who was a teen mother at age 14, now works with pregnant teens.

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

ATLANTA — Andre Castro still remembers the days when teen pregnancy seemed an unsolvable problem. Young people were having unprotected sex at increasingly early ages. Pregnancy rates were rising across the country. Community leaders were frozen, debating the wisdom of abstinence-only education versus early childhood sex education. But those days are long gone, said Castro, the director of Adolescent Health and Youth Development Programs for Gwinnett County’s health department. Since 2005 at Meadowcreek High School, Castro has overseen a health program that exposed all students to both abstinence and sex education, as well as targeted counseling. “Every student who entered Meadowcreek in ninth grade was touched by the program, and this is our second or third year with no new teen pregnancies,” he said. Meadowcreek is not a wholly unusual success story. In communities nationwide, the tide has turned against teenage pregnancy, said Bill Albert, an official at the National Campaign to Prevent Teen & Unplanned Pregnancy. “The decline has been nothing short of extraordinary,” he said. “We have seen more than a 40 percent decline in teen pregnancy and birth rates. We’ve seen declines in all 50 states and all age and ethnic groups.” But teenage pregnancy remains a significant problem. What’s more: Some fear the progress, much of it sparked in the classroom, could be lost because of school budget cuts. “Without the funding to provide comprehensive

Phil Skinner Atlanta JournalConstitution

health and improved sex ed curricula in schools, and without access to affordable, teen-friendly health services, many of our young people won’t have access to the important information and services they need,” said Vikki Millender-Morrow, president of the Georgia Campaign for Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention. School budget cuts may limit the reach of educational drives going forward. “Schools are strapped for funds, so who’s going to pay for teachers to be educated or for other health professionals to come into the school system?” Millender-Morrow asked. Castro has already seen the effects of budget cuts. “I started out as one-man operation, and I’m back down to a one-man operation,” he said. “The lack of funding could result in rising teen pregnancy rates.” Just as worrisome as the possibility of more teens becoming pregnant is the fear that teens who are already pregnant will drop out of school. According to a report released in June by the National Campaign to Prevent Teen & Unplanned Pregnancy, teen pregnancy increases school dropout rates. The report listed Gwinnett and DeKalb counties in Georgia as districts where teen pregnancy

rates have harmed graduation rates. “There really is a link between teen pregnancy and high school dropouts,” Millender-Morrow said. “It is the Number One reason that girls drop out of high school.” At Meadowcreek, Castro sought to keep teen parents in school by hiring caseworkers to assist them with day care, and making up class credits. “Those students ended up a year behind, but they graduated,” he said. But budget cuts could make similar efforts financially infeasible going forward. Parents may have to take the lead in the struggle against teen pregnancy, said social worker and one-time teen mom Christy Ware, who now works with pregnant teens. “We need to hold parents more accountable,” she said. “The state offers so many things, but if we don’t change the (family) environment, we’re not changing anything.” That is one way to keep making progress, Castro said. “We’re going to have to approach this as a community, and not as separate institutions. All of us — parents, religious institutions, schools, public health agencies — have to come together to develop things that will meet (youth) needs, as opposed to what we think they need.”


F6

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, JULY 26, 2012

N DIET TRENDS

CHANGING HABITS

Where your body gets vitamin D Vitamin D, which fights disease and helps muscles move and the body absorb calcium, is made by the skin when exposed to sunlight and is found in some foods. Limited exposure to sunlight and poor diet mean that many Americans are deficient.

Gluten-free isn’t always healthier Going gluten-free is a trendy thing to do: Singer-songwriter Miley Cyrus is touting it. Snack giant Frito-Lay is introducing gluten-free products. But experts at Kansas State University say going gluten-free is not necessary for everyone, and that in general, gluten-free doesn’t always mean healthier. Glutenfree products can contain as many calories as gluten options. And, a gluten-free diet can lack a sufficient amount of fiber if the gluten-free dieter doesn’t boost vegetable and fruit consumption. However, for the 1 percent of the population with a digestive disorder called celiac disease, giving up gluten products takes away unpleasant symptoms such as nausea and diarrhea triggered by eating gluten, which is a mixture of proteins found in wheat, barley and rye. Source: Kansas State University

— Anne Aurand, The Bulletin

Stay hydrated with juicy fruit When the mercury hits 90 and above, tempers can get pretty fired up, too. But another glass of water or a slice of watermelon might help, because irritability is a classic side effect of dehydration. Remember the old adage to drink eight glasses of water a day? Well, in 2004, the Institute of Medicine issued new general fluid recommendations indicating women should drink 11 cups per day and men 15 cups. These amounts include the water in all food and beverages we consume. It turns out that 80 percent of our water intake is from drinking water and other beverages, and the other 20 percent is from food. Watermelon, a summertime favorite, is made up of more than 90 percent water. Other high water content foods include lettuce, peaches, broccoli and citrus fruit. It’s worth noting that iceberg lettuce, often dismissed as having little nutritional value as compared with its dark green leafy cousins, is a better source of water. Just go easy on the blue cheese dressing. — By Carolyn O’Neil, The Atlanta JournalConstitution

FROM SUNLIGHT

FROM FOOD

• Amount of vitamin D the skin produces depends on latitude, time of day (the most is produced 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.), cloud cover and skin color.

• The torso produces the most while the face and hands produce little.

Vitamin D in winter: When the sun is at a lower angle, atmosphere will block some or all of UVB light necessary for D production. 50˚ Megan Tan / Minneapolis Star Tribune

Victor Celadita encourages daughter Amelia, 5, and son Victor, 2, to sample a nonpesticide strawberry from the Untiedt’s Vegetable Farm stand at a farmers market in Minneapolis.

Better eating is a tall order By Daniela Hernandez Star Tribune (Minneapolis)

MINNEAPOLIS — Michelle Beaulieu was browsing through herbs and fresh vegetables one recent morning at the Midtown Farmers Market — one of six Minneapolis markets where shoppers can use electronic benefit cards and get a $5 Market Bucks subsidy to buy local produce. “It’s a good relief on my budget,” said Beaulieu, who earns about $12,000 a year in her job with AmeriCorps. “My options are pretty limited. Most of the time I do my grocery shopping at Target.” Market Bucks is one of dozens of efforts across the country — from New York City’s proposed ban on 20-ounce pop bottles to more healthful snacks in Minneapolis parks — that have sprung up in the latest attack on the nation’s obesity epidemic. More than one-third of Americans are obese, and in Minnesota, every county has an adult obesity rate above 21 percent, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Yet changing ingrained eating habits is difficult, and so far, there is limited evidence to link specific programs with lower rates of obesity or related ailments such as diabetes and heart disease. One reason is that people think of food as a matter of personal choice — not, like cigarettes, as something hazardous, said Simone French, director of the University of Minnesota’s Obesity Prevention Center. Changing food habits, French said, might require changing the entire “food environment” surrounding consumers. “We’ve gotten desensitized about supersized portions. You don’t even think a 20- or 32-ounce drink looks weirdly huge,” French said. “There is no moderation in our food environment.” As a result, single strategies in isolation might not suffice to lower obesity or change eaters’ relationships with food, according to Rebecca Payne, a

coordinator in the CDC’s Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity and Obesity. Market Bucks, which began in 2010, was initially funded by the CDC as one of 50 local projects across the country to cut tobacco use and obesity. Although price isn’t the only thing consumers consider, cost can be a barrier. “Food is priced in a way that less healthful foods are cheap,” French said. “Hazardous, empty calories with no net value at all cost hardly anything.” Estimates by the Yale Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity suggest that a 10 percent decrease in fruit prices could result in a 7 percent hike in sales. Market Bucks may be succeeding. Between 2010 and 2011, the number of electronicbenefit customers at the Midtown, Minneapolis Municipal and Northeast Minneapolis farmers markets more than doubled from 736 to 1,587, according to a Blue Cross report. And nearly 60 percent of the 160 customers surveyed said they would keep shopping there even if Market Bucks were eliminated. Olmsted County in southeastern Minnesota, which also received a CDC grant, is trying another strategy to change the food environment. The county Health Department worked with Rochester Technical and Community College and its food vendor, Lancer Hospitality, to make healthful snacks and meals more affordable for students. It subsidized a 25 percent discount on foods such as fruit, vegetables with low-fat dips, baked chips, smoothies and trail mix with yogurt-covered raisins. Sales of several items increased by as much as 30 percent compared with the previous year, according to Michelle Komosinski, a grant coordinator at the Olmsted County Department of Health. “If healthy food is made more accessible and cheaper than junk food, people are more apt to eat it,” said Peter Virnig, a manager at Lancer.

AUGUST 2012 EVENTS

Member of WE HONOR VETERANS Program

Community Education Family Education workshop on Alzheimer’s Disease Friday, August 17 • 8:30 am - 4:30 pm

Pet Loss Grief Support Tuesday evenings • 6:00 pm - 7:30 pm Contact Sharen M An open, drop-in group for anyone anticipating or currently experiencing the loss of an animal companion

Grief Relief Support – Monthly Potluck Lunch Tuesday, August 14 • Beginning at Noon Partners In Care, large conference room All events take place at Partners In Care and are no-charge unless noted.

www.partnersbend.org

Hospice | Home Health | Hospice House | Transitions

Canada

45˚ 40˚ 35˚ 30˚ Mexico

50˚ and north None October through early April 35-50˚ None November through early March 0-35˚ Available year-round

Vitamin D occurs naturally in a few foods; others are fortified. Examples include: • Fatty fish including salmon, tuna and mackerel • Beef liver, cheese and egg yolks in small amounts • Mushrooms in small amounts • U.S. milk is fortified with 400 IU per quart • Many cereals, some orange juices and yogurts are fortified. Recommended intake: In international units

0-12 mths 1-70 years 71 and older

400 600 800

Source: U.S. National Institutdes of Health, Vitamin D Council; Chicago Tribune © 2012 McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Vitamin D Continued from F1 “If your doctor thinks it’s important to have the test, I would have it,” said Christopher Sempos, coordinator for the federal Vitamin D Standardization Program. “But a lot of deciding how to treat an individual is more than just measuring the blood test. You have to trust the physician to use clinical judgment and not just rely solely on a clinical lab test.” Two methods dominate vitamin D testing: commonly used immunoassays that use antibodies to detect vitamin D and an elaborate chromatographic method that separates vitamin D based on chemical properties. “Immunoassays . allow laboratories relatively inexpensively and relatively simply to make these measurements,” said Earle Holmes, professor of pathology and pharmacology at Loyola Medicine in Maywood, Ill. “On the other hand, the (liquid chromatography) method is a much more complicated method that requires more expertise and is a lot more expensive to operate.” Both methods have strengths and weaknesses, but research has shown there can be discrepancies in the results. Difficulty arises in part because the vitamin D value that doctors use to judge whether a patient is

deficient is based on levels of two chemicals added together. The chemicals stick to proteins in the blood and can be difficult to separate during testing, which may distort the results. “This is a time of great interest in vitamin D, and lots of new methods are going to come into the field,” said Holmes, who is studying the performance of vitamin D tests in an ongoing effort to find the best one for his laboratory. “It is our responsibility to test everything to see if it meets our needs.” Before marketing a new vitamin D immunoassay, manufacturers must receive FDA clearance by showing that the test performs as well or better than a previously approved test. Once a test is on the market, participating laboratories often voluntarily submit to proficiency testing by independent organizations that check how well their results compare to the average obtained with the same method. But neither of these efforts aims to find out how accurate a test is at measuring vitamin D. “If you want to see how close people are to the truth, get the true value and then compare routine methods to that,” said Horowitz. The Vitamin D Standardization Program, launched in 2010 as a joint initiative of the National Institutes of Health, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the

National Institute for Standards and Technology, aims to do just that. “The goal of the program is to standardize any method that’s used to measure vitamin D, no matter how it’s designed,” said Sempos, program coordinator for the NIH Office of Dietary Supplements. The CDC started a similar standardization program for cholesterol testing during the 1950s that continues to verify laboratory tests to guarantee accurate and consistent results regardless of method. Although the vitamin D program is just under way, Horowitz says patients don’t need to worry too much about the accuracy of test results. “The bad news is that the tests are inaccurate,” said Horowitz. “The good news is that it doesn’t really matter.” In temperate zones, like the one spanning the northern half of the U.S., vitamin D deficiency is common because exposure to sunlight is limited. If you are healthy and live in one of these areas, Horowitz said, you probably don’t need a vitamin D test to know you are deficient. “If we didn’t make money by doing tests, I really don’t know that vitamin D would make the cut,” he said. “It’s amazing in retrospect how many of these tests we do. Five years ago we didn’t do this kind of volume. It’s just the test du jour.”


THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, JULY 26, 2012 G1

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Items for Free Crib, White, Spool, mattress,bumpers,drop side, FREE, 541-385-1033 208

Pets & Supplies The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to fraud. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Aussie's mini AKC, red tri's/merle's, males / females parents on site some toy size. Call 541-598-5314/788-7799

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Pets & Supplies

Pets & Supplies

Furniture & Appliances

Guns, Hunting & Fishing

Computers

Building Materials

Gardening Supplies & Equipment

Farmers Column

Found black kitty with hazel eyes, off NE Lotno Dr & NE Ross Rd. Litter trained, loves to play. Call 541-848-2635 to ID. Lost at Scout Lake Sunday 7/22 a black canvas bag with picnic blankets, a change of clothes. If found please contact Shellie at 541-410-9762 or sjschiel@gmail.com. Lost: Black Lab female, 2 yrs, China Hat/Sunriver/ LaPine area. “Gray” may still have collar on. 541-410-5822; 541-593-2298 541-420-5312

Produce & Food

Donated vet services or Neptune has the bigsponsors needed for gest blue eyes & Nora, Hannah (photo), sweet personality, but Kittle, Winnie & Amy, is very shy & needs a sweet cats rescued quiet home. Shots, after their owner died neutered, ID chip, & they had nowhere more. Adoption fee to go. All need some waived for seniors dental work to be 50+. Visit Sat/Sun adoptable & short1-5. CRAFT, 65480 term foster care. If 78th St., Bend, call you can help, please 541-389-8420 or see contact CRAFT, PO www.craftcats.org. Box 6441, Bend 97708. To visit them or the sanctuary, call 541-389-8420 or see www.craftcats.org. DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS? Non-commercial advertisers may place an ad with our "QUICK CASH SPECIAL" 1 week 3 lines, $12 or 2 weeks, $20! Ad must include price of single item of $500 or less, or multiple items whose total does not exceed $500. Call Classifieds at 541-385-5809

www.bendbulletin.com

Fix Bend Meow! $10 CAT SPAY/NEUTER! 97702 ZIP CODE The Bend Spay & Neuter Project is offering cat spay and neuter surgeries for only $10! Offer is good for ONE cat (adult or kitten), living in the 97702 zip code area. PLEASE CALL OUR CLINIC TODAY 541-617-1010 or VISIT OUR WEBSITE AT www.bendsnip.org

Barn/shop cats FREE, some tame, some not Foster kittens ready for so much. We deliver! homes! Fixed, shots, Fixed, shots.389-8420 ID chip, more. 8950 Hwy 97, Redmond, 2 mi. N of Tumalo Rd overpass. Adoption fee & application reqd. 541-788-4170 for info.

Border Collie

Adult male free to loving home. Sweet, loyal dog needs adult home, preferably no other dogs. Loves to walk, excellent with voice commands. Call /text 541-777-0704.

Call a Pro Whether you need a fence ixed, hedges trimmed or a house built, you’ll ind professional help in The Bulletin’s “Call a Service Professional” Directory

541-385-5809

Papillon Pups, AKC reg, 4 males, parents on site, $950+, call 541-771-8739. Poodle puppy, toy purebred, black/white/brown female, 3 months, adorable! $350. Call 541-317-8687

Poodle pups, toy, for SALE. Also Rescued Poodle Adults for adoption, to loving homes. 541-475-3889

Range, Whirlpool, like Call Classifieds at new, $200. White 541-385-5809 dishwasher, $50. www.bendbulletin.com Couch & chairs, $150. Rocking chair, $100. Call The Bulletin At Call 541-306-4486 Poodle, toy, small black 541-385-5809 female, 9 wks, 1st shots, Table, Oak, 5 chairs, $150. 541-382-2194 like new, $425, Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com 541-633-3397. Pugs,beautiful,AKC,fawn, ready 8/3, shots, $600 Hunters in Silvies The Bulletin & $550, 541-526-5038. Hunt Unit.Cabin in r ecommends extra Queensland Heelers the pines available, caution when purstandard & mini,$150 & running water and chasing products or up. 541-280-1537 http:// amenities, green services from out of rightwayranch.wordpress.com yard. Or private lothe area. Sending cation to set up your cash, checks, or Check out the camp trailer. credit information classiieds online www.elkridgecabin.c may be subjected to www.bendbulletin.com om 541-589-1130 FRAUD. For more Updated daily information about an advertiser, you may Iver Johnson Skeeter, Scottish Terrier AKC call the Oregon Side by side, dbl. barpups, 2 female, 1 male, State Attorney rel shotgun, $300, shots, dewclaws, General’s Office 541-548-3408. wormed, $400 ea., will Consumer Protecdeliver, 541-447-1304. tion hotline at Shih-Tzu mix, 12-wks 1-877-877-9392. male, rescued, $200. 503-310-2514.

German Shepherd purebred puppies, ready Aug. 7 , $350 males, $400 females. Sponsors needed for 541-350-3025 tiny Caden, rescued from a farm where the Hound, 10-week old male cats were being shot pup, great bloodlines, & starved. Vets could well mannered, $150. not save his badly inCall 541-447-1323 jured eyes. He's reKittens/cats avail. thru covering but needs a rescue group. Tame, special home later shots, altered, ID chip, since he is blind. Bills more. Sat/Sun 1-5, for vet visits & surother days by appt. gery were a lot for a 65480 78th, Bend, small non-profit res389-8420, 788-4170, cue to handle. No vets visit www.craftcats.org will donate these serfor photos & more. vices. Many thanks if you are able to help. Need to get an Tax-ded. CRAFT, PO Box 6441, Bend ad in ASAP? 97708, 541-389-8420, You can place it www.craftcats.org. online at: Wolf-Husky Pups, very www.bendbulletin.com friendly and healthy, $400. 541-977-7019

541-385-5809

Boxer/English Bulldog

Lab pups, AKC, 5 left; 8 wks old. Master hunter sired. 541-447-7972

(Valley Bulldog) puppies, Lab Pups AKC, black

CKC Reg’d, brindles & fawns, 1st shots. $500$700. 541-325-3376

& yellow, Master Hunter sired, performance pedigree, OFA cert hips & elbows, Call 541-771-2330

Chihuahua(3/4)/Sheltie (1/4) cross, 6 mos, black www.kinnamanretrievers.com & tan. 1 male, $150; 1 female, $175. Shots & Labradoodles - Mini & wormed. 541-410-8907 med size, several colors 541-504-2662 www.alpen-ridge.com

Labradors, AKC Reg., choc & black, 2 females, 3 males, 7 wks, svc dog trainable. 541-536-5385

Furnishings from log cabin: dark Oak secre- Carry concealed in 33 tary desk, $125; Queen states. Sat. July 28th, 8 bed, incl very nice matam,Redmond Comfort tresses, solid wood Suites.Qualify For Your head/foot/side boards, Concealed Handgun $250; small table lamps Permit. OR/UT permit $5-$15; paintings (3); classes, $50 for OR, dark Oak small cabinet $60 for UT, $100/ both. TV stand, $25; dark Oak www.PistolCraft.com bifold beveled glass mirCall Lanny at ror, $125; (2) solid 541-281-GUNS (4867) maple chairs, & 2 oak to Pre-Register. chairs, $25 each; recliner/rocker, $45. CASH!! 541-593-5868 For Guns, Ammo & GENERATE SOME exReloading Supplies. 541-408-6900. citement in your neighborhood! Plan a garage sale and don't DO YOU HAVE forget to advertise in SOMETHING TO classified! SELL 541-385-5809. FOR $500 OR LESS? Leather recliner, $100. Non-commercial Wooden rocking chair, advertisers may $75. Pole lamp, $10. place an ad 541-504-2627 with our Mattress & Frame, King "QUICK CASH size, $200, SPECIAL" 541-475-3697. 1 week 3 lines $12 or Where can you ind a 2 weeks $20! helping hand? Ad must From contractors to include price of single item of $500 yard care, it’s all here or less, or multiple in The Bulletin’s items whose total “Call A Service does not exceed $500. Professional” Directory

Yard sale items needed for fundraiser for local rescue group! Nonprofit, no-kill, all volunteer Cat Rescue, Adoption & Foster Team is not supported by your tax dollars like other groups & needs donations of quality items of all kinds! Tax deductible & all proceeds benefit the animals. Call 1st & take to 8950 Hwy 97, Redmond or we can pick up, 541-788-4170 or 389-8420. Sale is Aug. 11-12th but we have room to store your items now. Thanks for your help! www.craftcats.org

Clover (photo), Yogi & http://www.welcomelabs.com Willa, nice aban- Maltese-Poodle puppies, doned senior cats, cream & rust, no shedneed sponsors/good ding. Males $250; fe- Yorkie AKC male pup, homes. All were ema- males, $300, cash. health guar., shots, sociated & matted when 541-546-7909 cialized, potty trained, rescued & Willa had a $750. 541-316-0005. tumor removed from Maltese Toy AKC (1), her face. With care & Champ bloodlines, 1.75 Yorkie long-haired Chigood food they are lb, $795. 541-420-1577 huahua puppies, 2 doing well, but need black & gold males, quiet homes to spend $250 each, cash. the rest of their years. 541-546-7909 Adoption fee waived for right homes. DoYorkie Puppies, ready nations for initial vet now, 2 male,1 female, care & surgery greatly $600, 541-536-3108 appreciated, tax-de- Manx/Scottish Fold 210 kittens, very friendly, ductible. CRAFT, PO Box 6441, Bend 10 wks, $75 -$200. Furniture & Appliances 97708. To visit, call 541-241-4914 541-389-8420. www.craftcats.org A1 Washers&Dryers $150 ea. Full warranty. Free Del. Also Find exactly what wanted, used W/D’s you are looking for in the 541-280-7355 CLASSIFIEDS Misha is a rescued, sweet but very shy Bedroom dresser & 2 bed stands, $75 obo. Siamese mix needing King size mattress, a quiet home. Shots, boxspring & frame, spayed, ID chip, $75 obo. Kitchen table more. Adoption fee & 4 chairs, $75 obo. waived for seniors 541-548-2404 50+. Visit Sat/Sun Dachshund pups! 2 1-5. CRAFT, 65480 Couches, matching: 3males 10 wks, short78th St., Bend, call cushion, $300; 2-cushhair, $250; parents on 541-389-8420 or see ion, $200; or both for site. 1st shots & www.craftcats.org. wormed. 541-508-2167 $450. 541-504-2627

THE BULLETIN reBend Habitat Pasture for Rent, 20 quires computer adRESTORE SUPER TOP SOIL acres,Redmond,COI vertisers with multiple Building Supply Resale www.hersheysoilandbark.com water 916-719-0870 Quality at LOW ad schedules or those Screened, soil & comPRICES selling multiple syspost mixed, no 375 740 NE 1st tems/ software, to disrocks/clods. High hu541-312-6709 close the name of the mus level, exc. for Meat & Animal Processing Open to the public. business or the term flower beds, lawns, "dealer" in their ads. gardens, straight Historic J Spear Ranch Private party advertis- Sisters Habitat ReStore screened top soil. grass-fed, totally natuers are defined as Building Supply Resale Bark. Clean fill. De- ral locker beef. Only 9 Quality items. those who sell one liver/you haul. head left @ $2.89/lb, LOW PRICES! computer. 541-548-3949. incl cut & wrap, sold in 150 N. Fir. whole or half. Call for 270 257 541-549-1621 details: 541-573-2677 Lost & Found Open to the public. Musical Instruments 383

Ibanez Bass Guitar; Peavey Amp; Fender case;Tuner; Stand; Extras. Professionally appraised, like new. $695. Bob 541-385-7242 Piano, Upright, $200 OBO, please call 541-504-5961 260

Misc. Items 2 Cedar chaise lounges, exlnt cond, $99 both, obo. 541-504-3833

Buying Diamonds /Gold for Cash Saxon’s Fine Jewelers 541-389-6655 BUYING Lionel/American Flyer trains, accessories. 541-408-2191. BUYING & SELLING All gold jewelry, silver and gold coins, bars, rounds, wedding sets, class rings, sterling silver, coin collect, vintage watches, dental gold. Bill Fleming, 541-382-9419. Casket, handcrafted, Alder wood, 6’6” x 2’, white satin lined with pillow, locks, handles, corner pcs, beautiful workmanship, $1000 obo. 541-420-6780 Christmas, 9’ Artificial, not pre-lit, storage incl, $40, 389-8120. Outdoor Gas Firepit, tile accent, you haul. $50. 541-382-6806

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Heating & Stoves

NOTICE TO ADVERTISER Since September 29, 1991, advertising for used woodstoves has been limited to models which have been certified by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as having met smoke emission standards. A certified woodstove may be identified by its certification label, which is LOST: Orvis Fly Box, w/ flies, 7/16, at Crooked permanently attached River, 541-330-0098 to the stove. The Bulletin will not know- Lost prescription glass ingly accept advertisat Cline Falls, Reding for the sale of mond. 541-923-0317. uncertified REMEMBER: If you woodstoves. have lost an animal, don't forget to check 267 The Humane Society Fuel & Wood in Bend 541-382-3537 Redmond, 541-923-0882 WHEN BUYING Prineville, FIREWOOD... 541-447-7178; OR Craft Cats, To avoid fraud, 541-389-8420. The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood Farm only upon delivery and inspection. Market • A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’ • Receipts should include name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased. 325 • Firewood ads MUST include speHay, Grain & Feed cies and cost per cord to better serve Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedding Straw & Garden our customers. Straw;Compost.546-6171

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THOMAS ORCHARDS Kimberly, OR U-Pick: Dark Sweet & Rainier Cherries, Apricots, early semi-cling peaches, Ready Picked: Dark Sweet Cherries, Apricots, early semi cling peaches BRING CONTAINERS Open 7 days/wk 8-6 pm only 541-934-2870. Visit us on Facebook for updates Also we are at the Bend Farmer’s Market at Drake Park & St. Charles

Employment

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Schools & Training

TRUCK SCHOOL

www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235 476

Employment Opportunities Administrative Assist.

Report to, and perform duties directly for Board of Directors. Duties include general office tasks, identifying and seeking new donors, and maintaining past donors. Must be proficient in Excel, Word, and PowerPoint. Experience with Non-Profit organizations, and Marketing is preferred. Approximately 5-10 hours per week, with additional hours required during events. Send resume to: Bend Surgery Center Foundation PO Box 6329 Bend, OR 97708 Caregiver – All Shifts avail. Apply in person. Interviews this week. 1099 NE Watt Way, Bend.

POOL TABLE, awesome USA made, heavy slate, alder wood, 3½’x 7’, perfect for family, complete w/accys, $1999. Call 541-389-2530 or LEARN TO SHOOT 503-260-7637 212 333 LIKE THE COPS plus Antiques & Utah Permit class. Wanted- paying cash Poultry, Rabbits, Collectibles for Hi-fi audio & stu$99. Sisters, 1:00 pm & Supplies dio equip. McIntosh, All Year Dependable Sunday 7/29. 1916 Victor Victrola, great JBL, Marantz, Dy- Firewood: Split, Del. Laying hens (10), 5-9 Call 817-789-5395 Bend. Pine, Lodgecond., includes records, naco, Heathkit, Sanor 503-585-5000. pole Avail. 1 for $175 eggs/day, FREE. Also $500. 541-280-2892 reacttrainingsystems.com sui, Carver, NAD, etc. or 2 for $330. Cash or beautiful bantys. Please Call 541-261-1808 19th Century Scandinacheck. (Credit Card call 541-815-7402. vian upright spinning Oregon’s 262 OK). 541-420-3484. 345 wheel, excellent cond, Largest 3 Day Commercial/Ofice $500. 541-815-7775 Livestock & Equipment GUN & KNIFE Dry Lodgepole: $175 Equipment & Fixtures cord rounds; $210 cord Antiques wanted: tools, SHOW furn., fishing, marbles, split.1½ Cord Minimum July 27-28-29 Ice Cream case, 16 tub, 37 yrs service to Cent. old sports gear, radios, Portland Expo 2008, w/all access., early stereo gear. Ore. 541-350-2859 Center must sell! $1500 obo. Call 541-389-1578 Special Guests – Moffit convection Dry seasoned Tamarack oven, $750 obo. Terry Oregon Military red fir, $165/cord rnds; 541-408-6869 Vehicle Collectors 1977 14' Blake Trailer, $185/cord split. refurbished by Club of Oregon Call 541-977-4500 or 263 Frenchglen Black- COMMUNICATIONS I-5 exit #306B 541-416-3677 Visit our HUGE smiths, a Classy ClasFirst Presbyterian Admission $9 Tools sic. Great design for home decor Church of Bend Fri. 12-6, Sat. 9-5, 269 multiple uses. Over- is hiring a Communicaconsignment store. Sun.10-4 10” Powermatic 66, exlnt head tack box (bunk- tion Assistant to work New items cond, has router shaper Gardening Supplies 1-800-659-3440 house) with side and closely with Communiarrive daily! cable insert, $1200. CollectorsWest.com & Equipment easy pickup bed ac- cations Director fulfilling 930 SE Textron, 541-948-2601 cess; manger with left communication plan for Bend 541-318-1501 Pre-64 Winchester Model Dewalt 4 piece cordside access, windows church, supporting pasFor newspaper www.redeuxbend.com 12,12 Ga Shotgun Deand head divider. Toyo tors, & helping church less tools set, 3 batdelivery, call the luxe Field 2 barrel set, radial tires & spare; serve congregation & teries w/case, $180. Circulation Dept. at $650, 541-548-3408 new floor with mats; community. 30-hours a 541-480-5950 Large doll's 541-385-5800 center partition panel; week with benefits. Must To place an ad, call house. Furnished. 3 Pre-64 Winchester Model Generator,Generac 6250, bed liner coated in key have computer & 541-385-5809 floors, 9 rooms. Fun 12, 20 ga., $500, multi-circuit, on wheels, areas, 6.5 K torsion web-based marketing & or email 541-548-3408 project to work on. $350, 541-497-3858 axles with electric communications expericlassified@bendbulletin.com $250. 541-549-3090 brakes, and new paint, ence. Will report to Ruger LC9 with laser, $10,500. Call John at Church Administrator. 9mm, light carry, NIB, Over-the-bed truck tool box, polished alum., Oak swivel rocker desk 541-589-0777. Applicants send resume $410. 541-788-6365 chair, $155. Oak ice $250. 541-279-9013 to blevet@bendfp.org chest, $165 (top needs Snake Avoidance refinishing.) Training - Teach your Phone 541-593-5868 dog to avoid poisonous snakes. The Bulletin reserves 541-410-2667 the right to publish all ads from The Bulletin newspaper onto The Walther P22, w/3 Bulletin Internet webmags, all papers, site. holster, case, accessories, pkg. retail over $400, selling $300 firm, 541-408-0148. 215 Coins & Stamps Private collector buying postage stamp albums & collections, world-wide and U.S. 573-286-4343 (local, cell #) 241

Bicycles & Accessories

Wanted: Collector seeks high quality fishing items. Call 541-678-5753, or 503-351-2746 247

Sporting Goods - Misc.

10.5' x 10.5' canvas Russian wooden stake wall tent. Unopened from Mtn. Bike 18” 15 spd, Army Surplus in Bend, silver, exc. cond., $80 never used. $350 OBO firm. 541-504-0707 Call 541-420-0794 for 245 pics. Golf Equipment 249

Golf bag carrier, remote controlled, $200, 541-382-9211.

Art, Jewelry & Furs

Golf cart Club Car, full top, windshield, $1175. 503-933-0814

Cash for Gold Douglas Fine Jewelry

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Guns, Hunting & Fishing

541-389-2901 253

TV, Stereo & Video

AR-15 Bushmaster A2, 2005 Sony Trinitron 34” HDTV, surround, exc, w/case & magazines, $200. 541-480-5950 $595, 541-788-4325.

To place your ad, visit www.bendbulletin.com or 541-385-5809


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

G2 THURSDAY, JULY 26, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD Edited by Will Shortz

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Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Apt./Multiplex Redmond

Legal Asst./Secretary: WE ARE a small law office specializing in criminal defense and domestic relations. We are sad to see one of our legal assistants leave, but excited at the opportunity to meet you and find out if you're a good match for our office. We offer medical & dental insurance, retirement benefits & vacation/sick leave. YOU ARE a self motivated problem solver, good at dealing with people in stressful situations, proficient with Microsoft Office, Outlook, Word & Excel programs. You have legal experience and a sense of humor. Send cover letter and resume to: Box 20165893, c/o The Bulletin, PO Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708

Manicurist Urban Beauty Bar in downtown Bend, seeks one full-time Nail Tech, Tues-Sat; and one full-time Nail Tech/Aesthetician. Bring resume to: 5 NW Minnesota Ave., Bend. MEDICAL RECORDS

Specialty medical practice seeking experienced Medical Records Technician. Generous benefits. Send cover letter & resume to Box 20166790 c/o The Bulletin, PO Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708.

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Employment Opportunities COMMUNICATIONS

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Estate Sales

Sales Northeast Bend

Sales Southeast Bend

Sales Redmond Area

Sale this week by 3 Generation Estate DEEDY'S ESTATE Sale: Fri.-Sun.,8-2, 628 SALES CO. is on NE Lafayette, antique Saturday and Sunfurniture, railroad day, July 28 & 29. memorabilia, pottery, SEE FRIDAY'S glassware, books, PAPER FOR DETAILS magazines, vintage INFORMATION CALL kitchen items, clothing, 541-419-4742 hats, purses, sewing & art supplies,much more Southwest Bend. Sat. only, 9am-4pm. Kitch- BIG Garage Sale enware, outdoor sofa, Too much to list! plants, decor, art, ga- 20535 Sunderland Ave, rage shelving, etc. Friday-Saturday, 9-4. 60824 Whitney Place (turn left at Brooks- Car parts, early Mustang wood Plaza onto Am- parts, 12’ utility trailer, ber Meadow Rd, then books on tape, speakers, TV w/VHS, CD/ left on Whitney). cass radio w/speakers, clothes, drill sharpener, 282 Fri-Sat 7/27-28, 9-3, Sales Northwest Bend 1610 NE Rumgay Lane (corner of Rumgay & BIG SALE! Fri. 8-2, Butler Mkt Rd. Come Here First! 626 NW Lindsay Ct off HH FREE HH Galveston.

HUGE Sale

Garage/Barn - Tumalo, 3

households of furniture, antiques, fine china, toys, artwork, garden stuff, jetted tub, tons of good clothing -all ages, Tools, Tools, Tools! Loads of horse tack, saddles, blankets, troughs, trailer, fence chargers & much more! Lots of free & $1 items - it’s all got to go! 65010 Gerking Market Rd, Fri. July 27, 9 am -6 pm, Sat & Sun July 28th & 29th, 9 am - 4 pm.

Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classiieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates!

541-385-5809 Multi-Family Yard Sale! Fri-Sat, 9-4, 20276 Halfway Rd. Children’s clothes, toys, furniture & much more! SADDLE BACK Home Owners Yard Sale - 1 Mi. West of Shevlin Park,Fri-Sat-Sun, 9-4, Furniture, elec. dryer, large oak entertaiment center, 2001 Polaris RMK Snowmobile, 1965 Dodge Stock truck, large compost bins, wheelbarrells, exercise equip., horse tack, large stock tanks, lift chair, sofa’s, child’s Razor Scooter. 284

Sales Southwest Bend 19380 River Woods Dr., 7/27-28, 9-4, furniture, baby items, leather chair,bikes, exc. prices. Huge Garage Sale! hunting, fishing, boat, car parts, sporting goods, household, Fri & Sat. 8:30-5. 60957 So. Hwy 97. Multi-Family Garage Sale! Patio/household/ children’s furniture, collectibles, tools, etc. Fri-Sat, 7/27-28, 9-5, 19917 SW Hollygrape.

Many friends sale! Sat. Household items, col7/28 only 8:30-2:30. A lectibles, stain glass few antiques, col- sander & supplies, old lectibles, lots of decor trunks, sm dog carrier, items, no junk (with tools, Skillsaw, antiques, one exception) 61329 cast iron, gas edger, 1998 Taurus station Robin Hood Lane. old hand painted Moving Sale: Sat. 7/28, wgn, saws & more! Sat-Sun, 8-3, Furniture,clothes, 7/28-29, 9-4, 333 NW collectibles, books, re- Greenwood (corner of cycled wood projects, 4th & Greenwood). 20888 SE Westview Dr Moving Sale: Sat. 9-5, Huge Yard Sale to ben20454 Karch Dr., 11 efit a Congo adoption. 7/27-28, 8-4, mo. old La-Z-Boy sofa Fri-Sat, 1039 NW Dogwood Ave & recliner, cd’s, more! Woodside Ranch Multi- Moving Sale: 354 NW Hemlock Ct. Antiques Family Sale! Teen & more, everything clothing, decor, lamps, art, linens, golf items, must go, Sat. only, 9-4 Sat 8-5, 20423 Heritage. 290

Sales Redmond Area

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Sales Other Areas

$5 FRIDAY Moving Barn/Shop Sale: Fri. & Sat. 9-5, 14870 Sale! 2873 SW Indian Bozarth Rd., Powell Garage Sale Kit Ave. Everything $5 or Butte. Vans, trailers, Place an ad in The less! Starts 10 am Fri.; snowmobiles, tools, & Bulletin for your galeftovers on Saturday! much more! rage sale and reBIG YARD SALE! The ceive a Garage Sale Greens in Redmond, Big Yard Sale: Sat. & Kit FREE! 3749 SW Tommy ArSun.,July 28th & 29th, mour Ln, Fri-Sat 7/279am - 3 pm, houseKIT INCLUDES: 28, 4-5. Vintage tools, hold & kitchen items, • 4 Garage Sale Signs fishing equip, glass, lin• $2.00 Off Coupon To clothes, tools, jewelry, ens & LOTS of misc! Use Toward Your antiques, collectibles, Next Ad camping equip., Disney, Elvis, Coke, • 10 Tips For “Garage Please no early sales. western, true war books, Sale Success!” Dick Tracy, oil lamps, 52141 Stearns Rd., cookie jars, M&M glassoff Burgess Rd in La ware, Coke trays, FriPine. PICK UP YOUR Sun, 8-4, 4365 SW Ben GARAGE SALE KIT at Hogan Dr., The Greens. Huge Ranch Retire1777 SW Chandler ment & Moving Sale: End Of Estate Sale: Ave., Bend, OR 97702 69070 Hurtley Ranch Sat. Only 8-5, 3041 Rd,. Sat. & Sun., 8-5, SW Pumice Pl, lots of Sisters, Follow Signs. great items. Shop tools, complete ENORMOUS 1-Day GaGarage / Estate Sale, Powder River roping Yard & household items, rage Sale, Fri, July 27, arena w/electronic 7-3. Umatilla Sports collectibles, furniture, roping chute, saddles Complex, 3000 Umatilla. more. Fri & Sat, 9-5. & tack, farm impleAll proceeds to Central 20721 Liberty Lane. ments, corral panels, Oregon All Stars to heated stock waterPeople Look for Information World Series Regionals! ers, t-posts, building About Products and materials, furniture & Services Every Day through H ESTATE SALE H appl., power poles, irH ome full of quality The Bulletin Classifieds rigation pipe & misc., near new furniture for like new snowmobiles, every room, kitchenGarage / Vintage / Guy good snowmobile Sale! 1154 NE 9th St. ware, tools, décor & gear, ATV’s, 4 place Friday-Sunday, 7/27-29, more . See website enclosed trailer - like 8:00am -3:00pm for detail & pic, new, and much more! Fri-Sat 9-4 numbers Moving Sale! Too much Fri. 8 a.m., 843 NW to fit in new home, all SALE! Cement mixer, 17th, off Ivy & 19th must go! Sat., 9-6, lawnmower, men’s bike, Attic Estates & 539 NE Majesty Lane. camping & fishing gear, Appraisals & much more misc. Multi-FamilyGarage Sale! 541-350-6822 Sat-Sun, 7/28-29, 9-4, Sat 7/28, 7am-1pm only. 12697 Lost Lake Dr, off for pics & more info Tools, housewares, Davis Loop, Prineville. go to atticestatesanbooks & clothes. 1751 dappraisals.com NE Taurus Ct. (Butler Sat. only 8-4. ContracMkt to Wells Acres to Estate Sale! Lifetime actor tools & table saws Daggett to Taurus Ct.) cumulation of power/ windows, tires. Furnihand/air/garden tools, ture: sectional, bunkMulti-Family Garage Sale construction materials, bed & more. 17334 Sat., 8-2, 20952 Lupine old wagon parts colBeaver Pl., off HunAve, Outdoor furniture, lectible models & more! tington Road. clothing, tools, & misc. Fri & Sat 7/27-28, 9-4, Multi-Family Sale: Fri & 5800 SW Haddock Rd, NOTICE Sat, 8-1. PC hardware, CRR (Terrebonne) board games, stereo sp- Garage Sale July 27- Remember to remove your Garage Sale signs krs, Turkish rug, clothes, 28, 9am to 4pm. (nails, staples, etc.) kitchenware, RV accys, 2068 SW 31st St., after your Sale event Tule racks, safe, very Redmond. Antiques, is over! THANKS! clean toilet. TOO MUCH 1950s Soda Fountain From The Bulletin to list! 20647 Sierra Dr. Stools & miscellaand your local utility Sat., 7/28 8-3, 2890 NE neous! 541-480-5229 companies. Lotno. BIG Sale! Furniture, crafts, household, Garage Sale: Sat. July 28th, 8-4, 3165 SW brand name chothing & Cascade Vista Dr., shoes, sports equip, www.bendbulletin.com horse tack; FREE items! furniture & misc.

Clearance. Clearance. Clearance.

541-385-5809

Powersports Tech needed in Bend. Dealership exp. preferred, drug free work environment. Ken 541-647-5151

First Presbyterian Church of Bend is hiring a Communication Director to work closely Look at: with leaders to develop & Bendhomes.com execute a communication plan that supports for Complete Listings of the church's mission Area Real Estate for Sale serving our congregation & community. Part- Remember.... time, 20 hrs/week. Does Add your web adnot include benefits. Exdress to your ad and perience in computer, readers on The web-based marketing, Bulletin' s web site social media & commuwill be able to click nications. Will report to through automatically Church Administrator. to your site. Applicants send resume to blevet@bendfp.org Roofers & laborers needed. Experienced & entry level. Apply at DO YOU NEED McMurray & Sons A GREAT Roofing at 920 SE 9th EMPLOYEE St., Bend OR. RIGHT NOW? 541-385-0695 Call The Bulletin before 11 a.m. and get an ad in to pubSales lish the next day!

541-385-5809. VIEW the Classifieds at:

www.bendbulletin.com

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads The Bulletin

Field Service

Technical/Industrial Hoffmeyer Co. Inc. seeks professional for Conveyor Belt sales in Central/ Southern Oregon territory. Previous industrial sales experience preferred. Pay based on experience. Please apply in person: 20575 Painters Ct., Bend.

Rentals

School Psychologist Half-time school psych, OR license required. $18,500 $29,700, partial benefits. Send appl, resume & cover letter to Lake Co. ESD 357 N. L St., Lakeview OR 97630 or dgoss@lakeesd.k12.or.us

The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to FRAUD. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

500 528

Loans & Mortgages WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

Business Opportunities

We are seeking dynamic individuals.

DOES THIS SOUND LIKE YOU? • OUTGOING & COMPETITIVE • PERSONABLE & ENTHUSIASTIC • CONSISTENT & MOTIVATED

Our winning team of sales & promotion professionals are making an average of $400 - $800 per week doing special events, trade shows, retail & grocery store promotions while representing THE BULLETIN newspaper as an independent contractor WE OFFER:

•Solid Income Opportunity* *Complete Training Program* *No Selling Door to Door * *No Telemarketing Involved* *Great Advancement Opportunity* * Full and Part Time Hours * FOR THE CHANCE OF A LIFETIME, Call Adam Johnson 541-410-5521, TODAY! Electrician General Journeyman

Warm Springs Composite Products is looking for an individual to help a growing innovative light manufacturing plant. Basic Duties: Assist in troubleshooting and repairs of plant equipment. Install, repair and maintain all electrical and electronic equipment. Able to read and revise electrical schematics, Must be able to perform both electrical and mechanical preventive maintenance requirements and report, PLC experience. Minimum Skills: A minimum of 5 years in the industrial maintenance field with a valid Oregon State Electricians License in Manufacturing. A strong mechanical aptitude with the ability to perform light welding and fabrication duties. Successful applicant shall supply the normal hand tools required for both electrical and mechanical maintenance. Benefits: Full Family Medical, Vision, Dental, Life, Disability, Salary Incentives, Company Bonuses, Pension and 401K w/Company Matching and Above Pay Rate Scale. Please remit resume to: Warm Springs Composite Products PO Box 906, Warm Springs, OR 97761 Phone: 541-553-1143, Fax: 541-553-1145 Attn: Mac Coombs, mcoombs@wscp.com

Share cozy mobile home in Terrebonne, $300 + utilities. 1-503-679-7496 630

Rooms for Rent Mt. Bachelor Motel has rooms, starting $150/ week or $35/nt. Incl guest laundry, cable & WiFi. 541-382-6365 Quiet room in Awbrey Hgts. Furnished, full house privileges; no smkg / pets / drugs. Aug. 1st. $350 incl utils; $100 dep. 541-815-9938 Studios & Kitchenettes Furnished room, TV w/ cable, micro & fridge. Utils & linens. New owners.$145-$165/wk 541-382-1885 634

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

CHECK OUT THIS

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Houses for Rent General PUBLISHER'S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, marital status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women, and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-877-0246. The toll free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

Fluency with PHP is a must. Experience with javascript and integrating third-party solutions and social media applications required. Desired experience includes: HTML5, jQuery (and/or experience in client side javascript frameworks), MySQL, Python, Django, Joomla. Experience in Google App Engine is a plus. Top-notch skills with user interface and graphic design a big plus.

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Independent Contractor Sales

605

Roommate Wanted

Veterinary Technician HOT DEAL! Licensed, Full-time $299 1st month’s rent! * The Colorado Cat Clinic 2 bdrm, 1 bath is seeking an experi$530 & 540 enced LVT who is detail Carports & A/C incl! oriented and has a great Fox Hollow Apts. attitude. Must work very (541) 383-3152 well with others, but also Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co be able to self-motivate *Upstairs only with lease* and take initiative. Consistency & positive com636 munication skills necessary. Salary commensu- Apt./Multiplex NW Bend rate with experience. We offer great benefits for Fully furnished loft Apt on Wall Street in full time employees: Bend, with parking. All holiday pay, PTO, mediutilities paid. Call cal + dental after 90 541-389-2389 for appt days. Please bring cover 650 letter, resume & referHouses for Rent 638 ences to clinic (655 NW York Dr) or send e-mail NE Bend Apt./Multiplex SE Bend catclinic@bendbroadband.com NO CALLS PLEASE. Luxury Home, 2450 A sharp, clean 2Bdrm, sq.ft., 3 bdrm, 2.5 1½ bath apt, NEW Looking for your next CARPETS, neutral colbath, office, 3 car gaemployee? ors, great storage, prirage, mtn views., avail Place a Bulletin help vate patio, no pets/ 7/20. 2641 NE Jill Ct. wanted ad today and smkg. $535 incl w/s/g. $1650/mo. + dep. reach over 60,000 Call 541-633-0663 541-420-3557. readers each week. Your classified ad Web Developer will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at Are you a technical star who can also communo extra cost. nicate effectively with non-technical execuBulletin Classifieds tives, employees, customers? Would you like Get Results! to work hard, play hard in beautiful Bend, OR, Call 385-5809 the recreation capital of the state? Then we’d or place like to talk to you. your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com Our busy media company that publishes numerous web and mobile sites seeks a great developer who is also a smart thinker, creFinance ative problem solver, excellent communicator, and self-motivated professional. & Business

Hoffmeyer Co. is seeking an energetic person for long-term employment, Will assist with conveyor belting installs, ship- Sales ping, receiving, cus- Telephone prospecting tomer service. Job reposition for important quires flexible work professional services. schedule including Income potential nights & weekends; $50,000. (average insome overnight travel. come 30k-35k) opNo experience reportunity for adquired; will train. ODL vancement. Base & LOCAL MONEY:We buy REQUIRED. $9-$12/ Commission, Health secured trust deeds & hr. Application necesand Dental Benefits. note,some hard money sary. Please apply in Will train the right perloans. Call Pat Kelley person: 20575 Paintson. Fax resume to: 541-382-3099 ext.13. ers Ct., Bend, OR. 541-848-6408. Sales

600

Duplex, very clean & private, large 1300 sq ft 2 bdrm 2 bath, garage w/opener, fenced backyard, deck, fridge, DW, W/D hkup, extra parking, w/s/g paid, $710 + dep. 541-604-0338

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Background in media desired but not required. This is a full-time position with benefits. If you've got what it takes, e-mail a cover letter, resume, and portfolio/work sample links and/or repository (GitHub) links to resume@wescompapers.com. This posting is also on the web at www.bendbulletin.com/developer. EOE/Drug Free Workplace Driver

CIRCULATION SINGLE COPY UTILITY DRIVER We are looking for a Single Copy Utility Driver for the Bulletin Newspaper. • Must have ability to work independently with little or no supervision and monitor own time/results. • Serve as sales person for various promotions including events and other single copy promotions. • Serves as the point person for sales and deliveries. • Must assume financial responsibility for all rack collections. • Assist in maintaining current vehicle maintenance. • Perform special newspaper and promotional deliveries as assigned. • Schedules may change periodically and may require both day and night shifts and/or split shifts, as needed. • Perform all other duties assigned by management.

Please email resume to: lkeith@bendbulletin.com EOE/Drug Free Workplace

Independent Contractor

H Supplement Your Income H

Operate Your Own Business

FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF

Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor

& Call Today & We are looking for independent contractors to service home delivery routes in:

H Prineville H Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours.

Must have reliable, insured vehicle. Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 during business hours apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, JULY 26, 2012 G3

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Houses for Rent NE Bend

Multiplexes for Sale

Homes for Sale

Homes with Acreage

Boats & Accessories

Motorhomes

Travel Trailers

Fifth Wheels

Trucks & Heavy Equipment

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com, currently receiving over 1.5 million page views, every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 541-385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Newer duplex in quiet neighborhood, $240,000. Ad #2362 TEAM Birtola Garmyn Prudential High Desert Realty 541-312-9449 www.BendOregon RealEstate.com 740

Condo/Townhomes for Sale Westside Terrace cottage, 2 bdrm,1.5 bath, 1100 approx sq.ft.,den/ office, gas fireplace, 9 yrs. old, townhouse $195,000541-680-9699 745

Homes for Sale 652

Houses for Rent NW Bend

Bend home on 5 acres w/Cascade views, $375,000 Ad #2492 TEAM Birtola Garmyn Prudential High Desert Realty 541-312-9449 www.BendOregon RealEstate.com

3 bdrm + office, 2 bath, w/barn on 1 fenced acre, lrg garden area, RV parking. $975. 1st/last/dep. pets neg. 101 ILLINOIS RIVER 541-388-3609 RD., SELMA Amazing views on The gateway to Illinois 15th fairway of Rivers River Canyon. Last Edge. 4250 Sq.ft., privately owned par4/3.5, $2450/mo. cel of the Historic Appt. 541-480-0612. Deer Creek Ranch. Gold mine, Ranch Secluded 2 Bdrm 2 bath, house, 169 acres, W/D, 2 decks, elec heat + woodstove, no smkg/ spectacular land pets. $625/mo. $1000 w/gravity fed pure dep. 541-382-0007 water source off Squaw Creek. Suit659 able for grapes! Full of Houses for Rent history. John Wayne’s horse, Handsome Sunriver Boy, is buried here. Property offers ex3 Bdrm, 2 bath, energy treme privacy, efficient appl., storage trees/meadows. bldg., covered deck, paved rd., 55750 Snow Fenced/cross fenced, Goose Rd, no smoking, borders BLM. pets ?, $695+dep, must $1,500,000. MLS see, 541-593-3546 or #201203318 541-550-6097 Karen Malanga, Broker The Hasson Company 541-390-3326

Real Estate For Sale

700 726

Timeshares for Sale Great location with Deschutes River views! Nicely appointed, turn-key fully-furnished, 2 bdrm, 2 bath, 1/10th Timeshare/fractional. Enjoy the serenity of the flowing river below, blue sky above & all the beauty Central Oregon and Eagle Crest Resort have to offer. $10,500 MLS#201203509, John L. Scott Real Estate 541-548-1712

4270 sq ft, 6 bdrm, 6 ba, 4-car, corner, .83 acre mtn view, by owner. $590,000 541-390-0886 See: bloomkey.com/8779

1592 sq.ft., 3 bdrm, 2 NOTICE: 17’ 1984 Chris Craft All real estate adver- bath, site-built, 2 car - Scorpion, 140 HP shop tised here in is sub- garage, 24x36 inboard/outboard, 2 ject to the Federal w/10’ ceilings & 220V depth finders, trollall on 1.22 treed Fair Housing Act, power, ing motor, full cover, acre lot in CRR. which makes it illegal EZ - Load trailer, $195,000. to advertise any pref- http://bend.craigslist.org/ $3500 OBO. erence, limitation or 541-382-3728. reo/3069581828.html discrimination based Call 541-633- 9613 on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, 764 familial status or naFarms & Ranches tional origin, or intention to make any such 35-Acre irrigated farm 17’ Seaswirl, preferences, limita175HP in/ outboard, close to Prineville, tions or discrimination. open bow, new uppresently in hay, cattle We will not knowingly holster, $2900, & onions. Price reaccept any advertis541-389-9684. duced to $298,000! ing for real estate 541-410-3425. which is in violation of this law. All persons WANTED: Ranch, will work trade for finare hereby informed ished, Mt./Columbia that all dwellings adRiver View, gated, vertised are available residential developon an equal opportument in the Columbia nity basis. The BulleRiver Gorge, 18.5’ ‘05 Reinell 185, V-6 tin Classified Volvo Penta, 270HP, 509-767-1539. low hrs., must see, 750 $17,500, 541-330-3939 773 Redmond Homes Acreages 18.5’ Bayliner 185 2008. 3.0L, open bow, *** slim deck, custom Looking for your next cover & trailer, exc. CHECK YOUR AD employee? Please check your ad cond., 30-35 total hrs., Place a Bulletin help on the first day it runs incl. 4 life vests, wanted ad today and to make sure it is corropes, anchor, stereo, reach over 60,000 rect. Sometimes indepth finder, $12,000, readers each week. structions over the 541-729-9860. Your classified ad phone are misunderwill also appear on 1988 373V stood and an error 19.5’ bendbulletin.com Ranger Bass Boat, can occur in your ad. which currently reMercury 115 Motor, If this happens to your ceives over Ranger trailer, trolling ad, please contact us 1.5 million page elec. motor, fish finder the first day your ad views every month & sonor, 2 live wells & appears and we will at no extra cost. all accessories, new be happy to fix it as Bulletin Classifieds batteries & tires, great soon as we can. Get Results! cond., $6500. Deadlines are: WeekCall 385-5809 or 541-923-6555. days 11:00 noon for place your ad on-line next day, Sat. 11:00 at a.m. for Sunday and bendbulletin.com Monday. 541-385-5809 756 Thank you! Jefferson County Homes The Bulletin Classified 19.5’ Ski Nautique 1995, *** mint cond., custom steNEW TOWNHOME reo, tandem trailer, Powell Butte 6 acres, Very clean, new con$11,750, 541-420-9670 struction in Madras. 360 views, great horse Well built, dbl. garage property, 10223 HousLake Rd. $99,900. with landscaped front ton 541-350-4684 yard and fenced backyard. Don’t miss 775 this one! $75,000 Manufactured/ MLS#201201561 19-ft Mastercraft ProMobile Homes DD Realty Group LLC Star 190 inboard, 866-346-7868 1987, 290hp, V8, 822 Very nice, well maint, hrs, great cond, lots of 2/2, near Costco/FoFIND IT! extras, $10,000 obo. rum, Senior Park BUY IT! w/pool, $39,500, call 541-231-8709 SELL IT! owner, 541-280-0955. The Bulletin Classiieds

4 Bedroom, 3.5 bath, 3734 sq. ft., .32 acre corner lot Beautiful lodge-style home w/hand crafted timber trusses inside & out. Hardwood, Slab granite, Travertine, Heated Floors, Main level master and oversized 757 4+ car garage. Astonishing HOME ... a Crook County Homes must see! $750,000 Tina Roberts, Broker, FSBO: 1152 sq.ft,2 bdrm, 541-419-9022 1 bath,stick built house, TOTAL Property .19 acre in Prineville city limits, paved street, Resources, fully fenced yards. 541-330-0588 Great rental ($595), BANK OWNED HOMES! asking $49,000. 1001 FREE List w/Pics! NW Locust Ave. DO www.BendRepos.com NOT DISTURB TENbend and beyond real estate ANTS. 541-420-3906. 20967 yeoman, bend or

Boats & RV’s

800 850

Snowmobiles Polaris 2003, 4 cycle, fuel inj, elec start, reverse, 2-up seat, cover, 4900 mi, $2500 obo. 541-280-0514 860

$

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at 140 (This special package is not available on our website)

Building/Contracting NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website

Home Improvement

Computer/Cabling Install QB Digital Living •Computer Networking •Phone/Data/TV Jacks •Whole House Audio •Flat Screen TV & Installation 541-280-6771 www.qbdigitalliving.com CCB#127370 Elect Lic#9-206C

Debris Removal

JUNK BE GONE

I Haul Away FREE

For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel, 541-389-8107 Electrical Services Quality Builders Electric • Remodels • Home Improvement • Lighting Upgrades • Hot Tub Hook-ups 541-389-0621 www.qbelectric.net CCB#127370 Elect Lic#9-206C Handyman ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES. Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. On-time promise. Senior Discount. Work guaranteed. 541-389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded & Insured CCB#181595 I DO THAT! Home/Rental repairs Small jobs to remodels Honest, guaranteed work. CCB#151573 Dennis 541-317-9768 Mendoza Contracting

Home Inspection Repairs Decks, Pressure Wash, Stain/paint interior/ext. 541-548-5226 CCB80653

BAJA 150 scooter 2008, garaged, 300 mi., like new $725. 541-233-6520.

Nelson Landscape Harley Davidson SoftTail Deluxe 2007, Maintenance Quality & honesty, from white/cobalt, w/pasServing Kelly Kerfoot Const.

28 yrs exp in Central OR!

carpentry & handyman jobs, to expert wall covering install / removal.

Sr. discounts CCB#47120 Licensed/bonded/insured 541-389-1413 / 410-2422

Landscaping/Yard Care

www.hirealicensedcontractor. com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications. High Standard Const. Full Service general contractor, post frame construction #181477 541-389-4622

Landscaping/Yard Care

Motorcycles & Accessories

More Than Service Peace Of Mind

Fire Protection Fuels Reduction •Tall Grass •Low Limbs •Brush and Debris Protect your home with defensible space

Landscape Maintenance

Full or Partial Service •Mowing •Edging •Pruning •Weeding Sprinkler Adjustments

Fertilizer included with monthly program

Its not too late for a beautiful landscape

•Lawn Restoration •Weed Free beds •Bark Installation EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential Free Estimates Senior Discounts

541-390-1466

Central Oregon Residential & Commercial

•Sprinkler Repair •Back Flow Testing •Thatch & Aerate • Summer Clean up

•Weekly Mowing •Bi-Monthly & Monthly Maintenance •Flower Bed Clean Up •Bark, Rock, Etc. •Senior Discounts

Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458 LCB#8759

USE THE CLASSIFIEDS! Door-to-door selling with fast results! It’s the easiest way in the world to sell. The Bulletin Classiied

541-385-5809

senger kit, Vance & Hines muffler system & kit, 1045 mi., exc. cond, $19,999, 541-389-9188.

Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

HD FAT BOY 1996

Used out-drive parts - Mercury OMC rebuilt marine motors: 151 $1595; 3.0 $1895; 4.3 (1993), $1995. 541-389-0435

Completely rebuilt/ customized, low miles. Accepting offers. 541-548-4807 Advertise your car! Add A Picture!

Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

avail. Bonded, insured, Moped, gas-free, street free estimates!

Maverick Landscaping Mowing, weedeating, yard detailing, chain saw work & more! LCB#8671 541-923-4324

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530

Harley Heritage Softail, 2003 $5,000+ in extras, $2000 paint job, 30K mi. 1 owner, For more information please call 541-385-8090 or 209-605-5537

Call The Yard Doctor HD Heritage Classic 2003, 100 yr. Anniv. for yard maintenance, model. 10,905 Miles, thatching, sod, sprinnew tires, battery, kler blowouts, water loaded w/ custom exfeatures, more! tras, exhaust & Allen 541-536-1294 chrome. Hard/soft LCB 5012 bags & much more. $11,995, Aeration / Dethatching 541-306-6505 or BOOK NOW! 503-819-8100. Weekly / one-time service COLLINS Lawn Maint. Call 541-480-9714

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500. 541-389-1413

legal, never used, $775. 503-933-0814 865

ATVs

Holmes Landscape Maint

• Clean-up • Aerate Same Day Response • De-thatch • Free Est. Polaris Predator 500 NOTICE: OREGON • Weekly / Bi-wkly Svc. sport quad 2004. Runs Landscape Contrac- call Josh 541-610-6011 & rides great. $2800/ tors Law (ORS 671) obo. 541-647-8931 requires all busi- Painting/Wall Covering nesses that advertise Yamaha Grizzly 700 FI to perform Land- WESTERN PAINTING 2009, 543 mi, 2WD/ scape Construction CO. Richard Hayman, 4WD, black w/EPS, which includes: a semi-retired paintfuel injection, indepenplanting, decks, ing contractor of 45 dent rear suspension fences, arbors, years. Small Jobs winch w/handle conwater-features, and trols & remote, ps, Welcome. Interior & installation, repair of auto, large racks, exc. Exterior. ccb#5184. irrigation systems to cond., $7850, 541-388-6910 be licensed with the 541-322-0215 Landscape Contrac- BULLETIN CLASSIFIEDS 870 tors Board. This Search the area’s most 4-digit number is to be Boats & Accessories comprehensive listing of included in all adverclassiied advertising... tisements which indicate the business has real estate to automotive, a bond, insurance and merchandise to sporting workers compensa- goods. Bulletin Classiieds tion for their employ- appear every day in the print or on line. 12’ Smoker Craft, ees. For your protecCall 541-385-5809 5hp motor, located in tion call 503-378-5909 Sunriver. Now $775 or use our website: www.bendbulletin.com obo. 503-319-5745. www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before contracting 14’ aluminum boat, with the business. trailer, 25hp Johnson, Picasso Painting: Persons doing land- Affordable, Reliable & Minn Kota trolling motor scape maintenance Quality, repaints, decks, w/battery, 3 life jackets, do not require a LCB more! 541-280-9081. oars, anchor, $1200. license. 541-548-3610 CCB#194351

875

Country Coach Intrigue Springdale 29’ 2007, 2002, 40' Tag axle. slide,Bunkhouse style, 400hp Cummins Diesleeps 7-8, excellent sel. Two slide-outs. condition, $16,900, 41,000 miles. Most 541-390-2504 options. $110,000 OBO 541-678-5712 CAN’T BEAT THIS! Look before you buy, below market value ! Size & mileage DOES matter, Class A 32’ Hurricane by Four Winds, 2007. 12,500 mi, all amenities, Ford V10, lthr, cherry, slides, like new! New low price, $54,900. 541-548-5216

Sprinter 272RLS, 2009 29’, weatherized, like new, furnished & ready to go, incl Winegard Satellite dish, $26,995. 541-420-9964

Open Road 37' 2004 3 slides, W/D hookup, large LR w/rear window. Desk area. Asking $19,750 OBO Call (541) 280-7879 visit rvt.com ad#104243920 for pics

Hyster H25E, runs

well, 2982 Hours, $3500, call 541-749-0724

Pilgrim 27’, 2007 5th wheel, 1 slide, AC, Peterbilt 359 potable water truck, 1990, TV,full awning, excel3200 gal. tank, 5hp lent shape, $23,900. pump, 4-3" hoses, 541-350-8629 camlocks, $25,000. Pioneer 23’ 190FQ 541-820-3724 2006, EZ Lift, $10,500, 541-548-1096 925 Utility Trailers

Viking Tent trailer 2008, clean, self Gulfstream Scenic Big Tex Landscapcontained, sleep 5, Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Regal Prowler AX6 Exing/ ATV Trailer, easy to tow, great Cummins 330 hp dietreme Edition 38’ ‘05, dual axle flatbed, cond. $6500. sel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 4 slides,2 fireplaces, all 7’x16’, 7000 lb. 541-383-7150. in. kitchen slide out, maple cabs, king bed/ GVW, all steel, new tires,under cover, bdrm separated w/slide $1400. hwy. miles only,4 door glass dr,loaded,always 541-382-4115, or fridge/freezer icegaraged,lived in only 3 541-280-7024. maker, W/D combo, mo,brand new $54,000, Interbath tub & still like new, $28,500, shower, 50 amp prowill deliver,see rvt.com, 931 pane gen & more! Weekend Warrior Toy ad#4957646 for pics. Automotive Parts, $55,000. Hauler 28’ 2007,Gen, Cory, 541-580-7334 541-948-2310 fuel station, exc cond. Service & Accessories sleeps 8, black/gray SPRINTER 36’ 5th interior, used 3X, Car Tow Dolly, ACME, wheel, 2005, dual $24,999. like new, all access, slides, queen bed hyd. brakes, $1100 541-389-9188 air mattress, fold out Hunter’s Delight! PackOBO, 541-389-9268 couch. $10,500 obo. age deal! 1988 Win541-382-0865, nebago Super Chief, Looking for your Custom Toyota Tundra leave message! 38K miles, great next employee? side bed tool box, shape; 1988 Bronco II Place a Bulletin help front hitch, tailgate 4x4 to tow, 130K wanted ad today and step, weather tech reach over 60,000 mostly towed miles, floor mats, $700. Tim readers each week. nice rig! $15,000 both. 360-771-7774 Your classified ad 541-382-3964, leave will also appear on msg. Jeep wheels (4) & stud Taurus 27.5’ 1988 bendbulletin.com tires, upgraded alumiItasca Sun Cruiser Everything works, which currently renum wheels, 255/55R1997, 460 Ford, Class $1750/partial trade for ceives over 1.5 mil17MS, $275. A, 26K mi., 37’, living car. 541-460-9127 lion page views evCall 541-389-2530 or room slide, new awery month at no 503-260-7637 nings, new fridge, 8 People Look for Information extra cost. Bulletin new tires, 2 A/C, 6.5 We Buy Junk Classifieds Get ReAbout Products and Onan Gen., new batCars & Trucks! sults! Call 385-5809 Services Every Day through teries, tow pkg., rear Cash paid for junk or place your ad towing TV, 2 tv’s, new The Bulletin Classifieds vehicles, batteries & on-line at hydraulic jack springs, catalytic converters. bendbulletin.com tandem axel, $15,000, Serving all of C.O.! 541-385-1782 Call 541-408-1090 882

Fifth Wheels

Jayco Greyhawk 2004, 31’ Class C, 6800 mi., hyd. jacks, new tires, slide out, exc. cond, $49,900, 541-480-8648

Monaco Dynasty 2004, loaded, 3 slides, diesel, Reduced - now $129,900, 541-9238572 or 541-749-0037

932

Alfa Ideal 2001, 31’, 3 Wilderness Advantage slides, island kitchen, 31’, 2004. 2 slides, 2 AC/heat pump, gen- TVs, micro, solar sys, erator, satellite sys- $17,950. (Also avail: tem, 2 flatscreen TVs, 2003 Ford F250 Diesel hitch & awning incl. X-cab.) 541-385-5077 $16,000. (Dodge 3500 885 1 ton also available) 541-388-1529;408-4877 Canopies & Campers Alpenlite 36’ 2002, all weather, 3 slides, king bed, side-byside fridge, non smoking, king dome, Onan gen. & much more. $19,000. 541-914-5372

Antique & Classic Autos

Chev Corvair Monza convertible,1964, new top & tranny, runs great, exlnt cruising car! $5500 obo. Arctic Fox Model 860 541-420-5205 2003 short box truck camper,37 hrs on gen., Chevy 1954, 5 window, 350 V-8, auto/ps, solar panel, air, Magic needs minor mefan, slide-out. Like new, chanical work, exte$12,500. 541-548-3818 rior good, new paint; or 541-480-9061. needs some gauges, Lance 835 gun metal grey, $6100 obo. 503-504-2764, Camper, 2000 CRR. Great cond, used very little, bathroom with shower, plus outside shower & awning. Easy loading electric jacks. New tags! $9000 obo. 541-420-9110

National Sea Breeze 2004 M-1341 35’, gas, Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 2 power slides, up1996, 2 slides, A/C, graded queen matheat pump, exc. cond. tress, hyd. leveling solid oak cabs, day & system, rear camera night shades, Corian, Lance-Legend 990 Chevy Wagon 1957, & monitor, only 6k mi. tile, hardwood. $9750 11’3" 1998, w/ext-cab, 4-dr., complete, A steal at $43,000! OBO/trade for small exc. cond., generator, $15,000 OBO, trades, 541-480-0617 trailer, 541-923-3417 solar-cell, large refrig, please call AC, micro., magic fan, RV CONSIGNMENTS 541-420-5453. bathroom shower, WANTED removable carpet, We Do The Work, You custom windows, outKeep The Cash, door shower/awning On-Site Credit set-up for winterizing, THE BETTER WAY Approval Team, elec. jacks, CD/steWeb Site Presence, Carri-Lite Luxury 2009 reo/4’ stinger. $7500. TO BUY A CAR! We Take Trade-Ins. by Carriage, 4 slideBend, 541.279.0458 Free Advertising. outs, inverter, satel’00 Chevy Suburban BIG COUNTRY RV lite sys, fireplace, 2 Great people mover Bend 541-330-2495 flat screen TVs. #105428 ................ $6,741 Autos & Redmond: 541-548-5254 $60,000. ‘79 Jeep CJ-7 541-480-3923 Transportation Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classiieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! Southwind 35.5’ Triton, 2008,V10, 2 slides, Dupont UV coat, 7500 mi. Avg NADA ret.114,343; asking $99,000. Call 541-923-2774

541-385-5809

900

’07 Chevy Cobalt LT #333184A .......... $11,995

’10 Chevy Cobalt

908

Aircraft, Parts & Service

Watercraft Tow Dolly, 2010 Stehl, Fleetwood Wilderness surge brakes, new 36’, 2005, 4 slides, Ads published in "Wastraps, tongue wheel, rear bdrm, fireplace, tercraft" include: Kayaux. lights & ramps, AC, W/D hkup beauaks, rafts and motorexc. cond., $850, tiful unit! $30,500. ized personal 541-480-6992. 1/3 interest in Colum541-815-2380 watercrafts. For bia 400, located at "boats" please see Winnebago Itasca Class Sunriver. $138,500. Class 870. C 1999, 31,135 orig. Call 541-647-3718 541-385-5809 miles, great condition, Queen rear bed, two 1/3 interest in wellTVs, microwave, autoequipped IFR Beech steps, sleeps 5, outBonanza A36, loside shower, exterior Montana 3400RL 2008, 4 cated KBDN. $55,000. TV plug & radio, gen- slides, no smokers or 541-419-9510 erator, $14,900. pets, limited usage, 760-702-6254 5500 watt Onan gen, Executive Hangar at Bend Airport Kayak, Eddyline solar panel, fireplace, (KBDN) Sandpiper, 12’, like dual A/C, central vac, new, $975, elect. awning w/sun- 60’ wide x 50’ deep, w/55’ wide x 17’ high 541-420-3277. screen arctic pkg, rear bi-fold door. Natural receiver, alum wheels, 2 gas heat, office, bathTVs, many extras. room. Parking for 6 $35,500. 541-416-8087 Winnebago Outlook cars. Adjacent to 32’ 2008, Ford V10 Frontage Rd; great engine, Wineguard Montana 34’ 2003, visibility for aviation sat, TV, surround 2 slides, exc. cond. bus. 1jetjock@q.com sound stereo + more. throughout, arctic 541-948-2126 Sea Kayaks - His & Reduced to $49,000. winter pkg., new Hers, Eddyline Wind 541-526-1622 or Dancers,17’, fiberglass 10-ply tires, W/D 541-728-6793 boats, all equip incl., ready, $18,000, paddles, personal flo541-390-6531 Find It in tation devices,dry bags, spray skirts,roof rack w/ The Bulletin Classifieds! towers & cradles -- Just 541-385-5809 ONLY 2 OWNERSHIP add water, $1250/boat SHARES LEFT! Firm. 541-504-8557. 881 Economical flying in your own Cessna 880 Travel Trailers 172/180 HP for only Motorhomes $10,000! Based at MONTANA 3585 2008, exc. cond., 3 slides, BDN. Call Gabe at Bounder Freightliner king bed, lrg LR, ArcProfessional Air! 1999,Cummings Turbo tic insulation, all op541-388-0019 Diesel, 43K mi., new tions $37,500. tires, 1 owner, W/D, ice Redmond large exec. 541-420-3250 maker, 1 slide, 2 TV’s, hangar for lease: CD, DVD player, die- Cardinal 33’ 2007, year Pvt. bath, heat, office, sel gen, very clean, round living, 8’ closet, 2 lights. Call Ben, Get your $39,000, 541-526-1099 slides, 2 TVs, surround 541-350-9729 $22,800. In business (10-5) or 503-442-3966 sound, Prineville, 509-521-0369 916 Trucks & Coachmen GROW Heavy Equipment Freelander, 2011 27’, queen bed, 1 Fleetwood 28’ Pioneer with an ad in slide, HDTV, DVD, 2003, 13’ slide, sleeps Freightliner 2000, 4000w generator, diThe Bulletin’s 6, walk-around bed with 24’ van box, 8.3L nette, couch, 450 “Call A Service new mattress; power 210 HP eng. in Ford V10, 28K miles, hitch, very clean Professional” good cond. $9000, like new, $48,000. $11,500. Please call 541-749-0724. 541-923-9754 Directory 541-548-4284.

ING

Rare Find 6-Cyl #836691 ................ $7,995

#110478A .......... $12,995

’08 Ford Fusion 29 MPG! #183344 ............. $13,890

’10 Dodge Journey Deal Of The Week #232806 ............. $13,995

’11 Nissan Versa 32 MPG! #461150 ............. $13,995

’10 Toyota Corolla LE #318632 ............. $14,977

’11 Suzuki SX-4 33 MPG! #302264 ............. $15,995

’11 VW Jetta Sedan #347612 ............. $16,200

’10 Nissan Altima Hybrid 33 MPG!

#114849A .......... $17,299

’11 Nissan Cube Room Galore! #208360 ............. $17,495

’10 Chrysler Town & Country Quad Seating #232518 ............. $18,027

’11 Subaru Impreza AWD #511600A .......... $18,477

’07 Mini Cooper “S” Turbo #T81224 ............. $18,995

’06 Lexus IS 350 Very Clean #001824 ............. $22,886

’06 Dodge 2500 Quad Cab 4x4, Nice Lift! #288175 ............. $28,995

’12 Jeep Wrangler Rubicon 6-Spd Hard Top #164879 ............. $30,995

’11 Nissan Titan SL Crew Cab

#306328 ............. $32,485

’06 BMW X3 3.0si #J20768 ............. $32,985 Through 7/30/12 All vehicles subject to prior sale, does not include tax, license or title and registration processing fee of $100. Vin#’s posted at dealership. See Hertz Car Sales of Bend for details.

541-647-2822 535 NE Savannah Dr, Bend HertzBend.com


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

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Antique & Classic Autos

Antique & Classic Autos

Antique & Classic Autos

Pickups

Pickups

Pickups

Pickups

Sport Utility Vehicles

Sport Utility Vehicles

Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, Chevy 3/4 ton 4x4, GMC ½-ton Pickup, auto. trans, ps, air, 1995, extended cab, Mercury Monterrey 1972, LWB, 350hi long box, grill guard, frame on rebuild, re1965, Exc. All original, motor, mechanically running boards, bed painted original blue, Ford F250 2011 Super Ford Ranger 1999, 71K, 4-dr. sedan, in storA-1, interior great; rails & canopy, 178K original blue interior, Duty Lariat Edition X-cab, XLT, auto, age last 15 yrs., 390 Ford Galaxie 500 1963, miles, $4800 obo. body needs some original hub caps, exc. QUIET diesel, low 4.0L, $8900 OBO. 2 dr. hardtop,fastback, High Compression 208-301-3321 (Bend) TLC. $3131 OBO. chrome, asking $9000 mileage with 5th 390 v8,auto, pwr. steer & 541-388-0232 engine, new tires & liCall 541-382-9441 or make offer. wheel hitch, toolbox radio (orig),541-419-4989 cense, reduced to Chevy Silverado 1998, 541-385-9350. and tonneau cover. $2850, 541-410-3425. black and silver, pro Find exactly what Available for showing Ford Mustang Coupe lifted, loaded, new 33” in Bend. $40,000 you are looking for in the 1966, original owner, tires, aluminum slot OBO (317) 966-2189. V8, automatic, great Just too many CLASSIFIEDS wheels, tow pkg., drop International Flat shape, $9000 OBO. Chrysler SD 4-Door hitch, diamond plate Bed Pickup 1963, 1 collectibles? 530-515-8199 Ford F250 XLT ‘95, 4WD 1930, CDS Royal tool box, $12,000, or ton dually, 4 spd. auto, long bed, 3/4 ton, Ford Ranger XLT Standard, 8-cylinder, possible trade for newer trans., great MPG, Sell them in 8600 GVW, white,178K body is good, needs Tacoma. 541-460-9127 could be exc. wood 1998 X-cab Ford Mustang GT mi, AC, pw, pdl, Sirius, The Bulletin Classii eds some restoration, hauler, runs great, 2.5L 4-cyl engine, Convertible - 1987 tow pkg., bedliner, bed runs, taking bids, new brakes, $1950. 5-spd standard trans, V8, 5-spd, leather, rail caps, rear slide 541-383-3888, Take care of long bed, newer mo541-419-5480. CD player, maroon window, new tires, ra541-385-5809 541-815-3318 tor & paint, new clutch paint, excellent cond, your investments diator, water pump, & tires, excellent con- Call The Bulletin At hoses, brakes, more, low miles, $7500. with the help from dition, clean, $4500. $5200, 541-322-0215 Call 541-504-4981 541-385-5809 Call 541-447-6552 The Bulletin’s Place Your Ad Or E-Mail Ford F-350 XLT 2003, “Call A Service At: www.bendbulletin.com 4X4, 6L diesel, 6-spd Professional” Directory manual, Super Cab, short box, 12K Warn REDUCED! Ford FIAT 1800 1978, 5-spd, winch, custom bumper Plymouth Barracuda Dodge 1500 2001, 4x4 1978 truck, $1600 & canopy, running door panels w/flowers 1966, original car! 300 obo. V8 4 spd, runs sport, red, loaded, boards, 2 sets tires, & hummingbirds, hp, 360 V8, centergood, new battery, rollbar, AND 2011 wheels & chains, many Ford Super Duty F-250 white soft top & hard GMC ½ ton 1971, Only lines, (Original 273 spark plugs, rebuilt 2001, 4X4, very good Moped Trike used 3 extras, perfect, ONLY top, Reduced! $5,500. $19,700! Original low eng & wheels incl.) carb. Ex U-Haul, shape, V10 engine, months, street legal. 29,800 miles, $27,500 mile, exceptional, 3rd 541-317-9319 or 541-593-2597 541-548-7171 $9800, 541-815-9939 call 541-433-2384 OBO, 541-504-8316. owner. 951-699-7171 541-647-8483

Chevy Tahoe LS 2001 4x4. 120K mi, Power seats, Tow Pkg, 3rd row seating, extra tires, CD, privacy tinting, upgraded rims. Fantastic cond. $7995 Contact Timm at 541-408-2393 for info or to view vehicle.

Chevy Trailblazer 2005, gold, LS 4X4, 6 cyl., auto, A/C, pdl, new tires, keyless entry, 66K mi., exc. cond. $8950. 541-598-5111

Say “goodbuy” to that unused item by placing it in The Bulletin Classiieds

Ford Excursion 2005, 4WD, diesel, exc. cond., $19,900, call 541-923-0231.

541-385-5809

loaded with options. Exc. cond., snow tires and rims included. 130k hwy miles. $12,000. 541-419-4890.

Garage Sales Garage Sales Garage Sales Find them in The Bulletin Classiieds

541-385-5809

GMC Denali 2003

Jeep Cherokee 1990, 4WD, 3 sets rims & tires, exlnt set snow tires, great 1st car! $1800. 541-633-5149

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Meshem J. Jackson, as grantor to AmeriTitle, as Trustee, in favor of Long Beach Mortgage Company, as Beneficiary, dated May 25, 2004, recorded May 28, 2004, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2004, at Page 31722, beneficial interest having been assigned to Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee for Long Beach Mortgage Loan Trust 2004-4, as covering the following described real property: Lot Sixteen (16), COPPER RIDGE PHASE 2, 3 & 4, City of Redmond, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 1913 S.W. 37th Street, Redmond, OR 97756. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $1,268.67, from March 1, 2010, and monthly payments in the sum of $1,231.01, from March 1, 2011, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $149,828.27, together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.063% per annum from February 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on October 18, 2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 06-15-2012. By: /s/:Kelly D. Sutherland. KELLY D. SUTHERLAND, Successor Trustee. SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC, 1499 SE Tech Center Place, Suite 255, Vancouver, WA 98683, www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa, Telephone: (360) 260-2253, Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647. S&S 10-105585

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Norman Kelly Whitlow, as grantor to AmeriTitle, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, FA, as Beneficiary, dated May 19, 2006, recorded May 26, 2006, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2006, at Page 36778, beneficial interest having been assigned to Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. as Trustee for WAMU Mortgage Pass Through Certificates Series 2006-PR4, as covering the following described real property: Lot Forty-Six (45) Red Hawk unit Five, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 2062 NW Jackpine Place, Redmond, OR 97756. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $1,300.64, from August 1, 2011, monthly payments in the sum of $1,300.97, from February 1, 2012, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $224,516.10, together with interest thereon at the rate of 0% per annum from July 1, 2011, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on October 24, 2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 06-15-2012. By: /s/:Kelly D. Sutherland. KELLY D. SUTHERLAND, Successor Trustee, SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC, 1499 SE Tech Center Place, Suite 255, Vancouver, WA 98683, www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa, Telephone: (360) 260-2253, Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647. S&S 11-108221

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Eric Meloling, unmarried, as grantor to Western Title & Escrow Company, as Trustee, in favor of JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A., as Beneficiary, dated January 22, 2008, recorded January 25, 2008, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2008, at Page 03777, as covering the following described real property: Lots 1 and 2, block 11, KENWOOD, Deschutes County, Oregon. EXCEPTION THEREFROM the South 63-50 feet. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 1519 NW 18th Street, Bend, OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $1,754.61, from November 1, 2011, and monthly payments in the sum of $1,493.48, from February 1, 2012, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $211,869.70, together with interest thereon at the rate of 7.375% per annum from October 1, 2011, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on September 19, 2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 05-25-2012. By: /s/: Kelly D. Sutherland. KELLY D. SUTHERLAND, Successor Trustee. SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC, 1499 SE Tech Center Place, Suite 255, Vancouver, WA 98683, www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa, Telephone: (360) 260-2253, Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647. S&S 12-109373.

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Elizabeth A. Elling and R. Mark Elling, as grantor to Deschutes County Title Company, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, FA, as Beneficiary, dated March 29, 2006, recorded March 31, 2006, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2006, at Page 22351, beneficial interest having been assigned to Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. as Trustee for WAMU Mortgage Pass Through Certificates Series 2006-PR3, as covering the following described real property: Lot Nine, Block Forty-Two, Center Addition to Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 676 N.E. Franklin Avenue, Bend, OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $1,502.00, from July 1, 2010,, monthly payments in the sum of $1,499.94, from February 1, 2011, and monthly payments in the sum of $1,143.41, from May 1, 2011, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $214,566.54, together with interest thereon at the rate of 4.563% per annum from June 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on October 24, 2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 06-14-2012. By: /s/: Kelly D. Sutherland. KELLY D. SUTHERLAND, Successor Trustee. SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC, 1499 SE Tech Center Place, Suite 255, Vancouver, WA 98683, www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa, Telephone:(360) 260-2253, Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647. S&S 10-105558

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Richard Gross and Linda Gross, as tenants by the entirety, as grantor to AmeriTitle, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, as Beneficiary, dated April 21, 2006, recorded April 28, 2006, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2006, at Page 29545, beneficial interest now held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor in interest by purchase from the FDIC as Receiver of Washington Mutual Bank, as covering the following described real property: Lots Twenty-Four (24), and Twenty-Five (25), Rivers Edge Village, Phase III, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 3167 N.W. Quiet River Lane, Bend, OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $2,399.99, from October 1, 2009, and monthly payments in the sum of $5,261.81, from January 1, 2012, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $414,386.17, together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.95% per annum from September 1, 2009, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on October 15, 2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 06-14-2012. By: /s/: Kelly D. Sutherland. KELLY D. SUTHERLAND, Successor Trustee. SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC, 1499 SE Tech Center Place, Suite 255, Vancouver, WA 98683, www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa, Telephone: (360) 260-2253, Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647. S&S 09-103593

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Brian Michael Sarno, unmarried, as grantor to Western Title & Escrow Company, as Trustee, in favor of Chase Manhattan Mortgage Corporation, as Beneficiary, dated October 1, 2004, recorded October 8, 2004, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2004, at Page 60673, beneficial interest having been assigned to JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor by merger to Chase Home Finance LLC, successor by merger to Chase Manhattan Mortgage Corporation, as covering the following described real property: Lot 23, Block 12, FIRST ADDITION TO WHISPERING PINES ESTATES, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 65333 - 76th Street, Bend, OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $810.23, from September 1, 2011, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $88,281.86, together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.875% per annum from August 1, 2011, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on October 11, 2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, OR, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 06-08-2012. By: /s/:Kelly D. Sutherland. KELLY D. SUTHERLAND, Successor Trustee, SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC, 1499 SE Tech Center Place, Suite 255, Vancouver, WA 98683, www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa, Telephone:(360) 260-2253, Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647. S&S 11-108662


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THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, JULY 26, 2012 G5

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Loreen Cooper, a single person, Linda L. Curtiss, a single person, as grantor to Western Title Company, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, FA, as Beneficiary, dated October 13, 2006, recorded October 23, 2006, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2006, at Page 70710, and re-recorded on October 25, 2006, in Book 2006, at Page 71264, beneficial interest now held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor in interest by purchase from the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver for Washington Mutual Bank, formerly known as Washington Mutual Bank, FA as covering the following described real property: Lot 20, Block GG, Deschutes River Woods, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 19665 Manzanita Lane, Bend, OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $1,635.72, from June 1, 2010, and monthly payments in the sum of $1,409.49, from January 1, 2012, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $166,615.29, together with interest thereon at the rate of 7.125% per annum from May 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on October 12, 2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 06-09-12. By: /s/: Kelly D. Sutherland. KELLY D. SUTHERLAND, Successor Trustee. SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC, 1499 SE Tech Center Place, Suite 255, Vancouver, WA 98683, www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa, Telephone: (360) 260-2253, Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647, S&S 11-106387 1000

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by David I. Epstein, as grantor to First American Title Ins. Co., as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, FA, as Beneficiary, dated June 6, 2006, recorded June 15, 2006, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2006, at Page 41453, beneficial interest now held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor in interest by purchase from the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver of Washington Mutual Bank, formerly known as Washington Mutual Bank, FA as covering the following described real property: Lot 13 of Forest Meadow, Phase 1, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 61198 Forest Meadow Place, Bend, OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $2,199.50, from February 1, 2010, and monthly payments in the sum of $3,242.61, from January 1, 2012, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $398,400.00, together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.625% per annum from January 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on October 1, 2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 05-31-2012. By: /s/: Kelly D. Sutherland. KELLY D. SUTHERLAND, Successor Trustee. SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC. 1499 SE Tech Center Place, Suite 255, Vancouver, WA 98683, www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa, Telephone: (360) 260-2253, Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647. S&S 10-104649

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by David Schaefer and Ginger M. Schaefer, as grantor to AmeriTitle, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, FA, as Beneficiary, dated May 12, 2006, recorded May 17, 2006, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book Book 2006, at Page 34085, beneficial interest having been assigned to U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee, successor in interest to Bank of America, National Association, as successor by merger to LaSalle Bank NA as trustee for WaMu Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates Series 2006-AR8 Trust, as covering the following described real property: Lot Four (4), Block Seventeen (17), FAIRWAY POINT VILLAGE IV, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 4 Cypress Lane, nka 58009 Cypress Lane, Sunriver, OR 97707. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $3,273.38, from September 1, 2011, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $602,000.00, together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.525% per annum from August 1, 2011, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on October 15, 2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 06-14-2012. By: /s/: Kelly D. Sutherland. KELLY D. SUTHERLAND, Successor Trustee, SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC, 1499 SE Tech Center Place, Suite 255, Vancouver, WA 98683, www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa, Telephone: (360) 260-2253, Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647, S&S 11-108617.

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by John E. Berg and Denise Carnine, husband and wife, as grantor to Deschutes County Title Company, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, FA, as Beneficiary, dated October 20, 2006, recorded October 30, 2006, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2006, at Page 72307, beneficial interest now held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor in interest to Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver for Washington Mutual Bank as covering the following described real property: Lot One Hundred Ten, Ponderosa Pines First Addition, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 14910 S. Sugar Pine Way, La Pine, OR 97739. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $1,426.15, from April 1, 2011, and monthly payments in the sum of $1,399.42, from August 1, 2011, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $142,355.00, together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.375% per annum from March 1, 2011, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on October 10, 2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, OR, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 06-07-2012. By: /s/:Kelly D. Sutherland. KELLY D. SUTHERLAND, Successor Trustee. SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC, 1499 SE Tech Center Place, Suite 255, Vancouver, WA 98683, www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa, Telephone:(360) 260-2253, Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647. S&S 10-105637

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Robert F. Jordan and Barbara A. Jordan, as tenants by the entirety, as grantor to Deschutes County Title Company, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, FA, as Beneficiary, dated December 8, 2006, recorded December 21, 2006, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2006, at Page 83089, beneficial interest now held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor in interest by purchase from the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver for Washington Mutual Bank, formerly known as Washington Mutual Bank, FA as covering the following described real property: LOT SIX, BLOCK TWO, KNOLL HEIGHTS, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 1623 S.W. Knoll Avenue Units 1-4, Bend, OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $1,860.39, from April 1, 2010, monthly payments in the sum of $2,396.25, from September 1, 2011, and monthly payments in the sum of $2,147.59, from February 1, 2012, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $330,736.23, together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.75% per annum from March 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on October 15, 2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 06-14-2012. By: /s/: Kelly D. Sutherland. KELLY D. SUTHERLAND, Successor Trustee. SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC, 1499 SE Tech Center Place, Suite 255, Vancouver, WA 98683, www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa, Telephone: (360) 260-2253, Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647. S&S 10-104966

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by David Ainsworth and, Katherine Ainsworth, Husband and Wife, as grantor to Western Title & Escrow Company, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, FA, as Beneficiary, dated December 29, 2006, recorded January 3, 2007, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2007, at Page 00387, beneficial interest now held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor in interest by purchase from the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver of Washington Mutual Bank, formerly known as Washington Mutual Bank, FA as covering the following described real property: Lot 17, Block 103, Deschutes River Recreation Homesite, Unit 8, Part 11, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 16330 Sparks Drive, La Pine, OR 97739. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $1,205.82, from June 1, 2011, and monthly payments in the sum of $1,208.09, from August 1, 2011, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $155,677.78, together with interest thereon at the rate of 0% per annum from May 1, 2011, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on October 15, 2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 06-14-2012. By: /s/: Kelly D. Sutherland. KELLY D. SUTHERLAND, Successor Trustee, SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC, 1499 SE Tech Center Place, Suite 255, Vancouver, WA 98683, www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa, Telephone: (360) 260-2253, Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647. S&S 11-108317


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

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LEGAL NOTICE CITY OF BEND PROJECT NUMBER WA0902 SURFACE WATER IMPROVEMENT PROJECT Bid Package 102 Skyliners Rd. & USFS Rd. 4606

LEGAL NOTICE CITY OF BEND PROJECT NUMBER WA0902 SURFACE WATER IMPROVEMENT PROJECT Bid Package 101 USFS Rd. 4603

Mortenson is requesting sealed bids for Bid Package No. 102 Skyliners Rd. & USFS Rd. 4606 from pre-qualified bidders. "Approved PreQualified Bidders Only" This package consists of: Furnish and Install Additional appurtenances not purchased by the GM/GC Install Approximately 37,000 lf welded steel cement mortar lined and coated pipeline Sealed bid must be received prior to 2:00 p.m. on Thursday August 16, 2012 at: M.A. Mortenson Construction, C/o City of Bend, 710 NW Wall St. 2ND Floor, Bend, OR 97701 Attention: Gary Rea, Sr. Project Manager. Bids must be physically received at the location listed by the deadline. No faxed or electronic (email) submissions will be accepted. There will be a formal bid opening in the City of Bend Council Chambers at 2:30 p.m. following the submission deadline. Bids will not be accepted after the stated opening date and time. Late bids will be returned unopened. The invitation to bid, addenda, and notification of bid results for this bid may be viewed, printed or ordered via M.A. Mortenson Company's FTP site: ftp://ftp2.mortenson.co m/SeattleEstimating/B END%20BIDDING%2 0FILES/BP%20102% 20Skyliners%20Rd.% 20&%20USFS%20Rd .%204606/ - Log In (user name - SeattleEstFTP / password n33dle) - (Upon zip file opening use 11050003-102 for password) Pre-bid meeting is scheduled for Thursday August 2, 2012, from 10:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. and will be held at the City of Bend Council Chambers located at 710 NW Wall St., Bend, OR 97701. The pre-bid is for pre-qualified bidders only and all bidders are encouraged to attend. Pre-bid is not mandatory. Bid documents can be viewed at Central Oregon Builders Exchange (COBE) 1902 NE 4th St. Bend, OR 97701, M.A. Mortenson Company, 10230 NE Points Drive, Suite 300, Kirkland, WA 98033 or on the M.A. Mortenson ftp site. M.A. Mortenson Company reserves the right to reject any or all bids not in compliance with bid package procedures and per ORC 279B.100.

Notice of Invitation to Bid Mortenson is requesting sealed bids for Bid Package No. 101 USFS Rd. 4603 from pre-qualified bidders. "Approved Pre-Qualified Bidders Only" This package consists of: Furnish and Install Approximately 1,700 lf restrained DI pipeline & appurtenances Approximately 100 lf of welded steel epoxy lined and coated pipeline & appurtenances HDPE outlets, branch piping, fittings, flanges, valves, etc. & appurtenances Receive & Install Approximately 2.5 miles of HDPE pipe furnished by others

The Forest Service, Fremont-Winema and Deschutes National Forests, Chemult and Crescent Ranger Districts, have prepared a draft decision memo (DM) for the issuance of a special use authorization to add to existing fiber optic line connections in a designated corridor from La Pine, Oregon to Chemult, Oregon and to operate and maintain these lines. Plowing would occur in Township (T) 24 south (S), Range (R) 9 east (E), Willamette Meridian (WM), section 30; T 25 S, R 8 E, WM, sections 15, 20, 29, 31, 32; T 26 S, R8E, WM, sections 5, 6, 7, 8, 17, 20, 29, 32; T 27 S, R 8 E, WM, sections 5, 8, 17, 20. This fiber optic network would provide reliable internet service to communities in the vicinity of La Pine, Gilchrist, Crescent, and Chemult. The draft DM is available for review at the Chemult Ranger District office and at the FremontWinema National Forests website: http://www.fs.fed.us/ nepa/fs-usda-pop.p hp/?project=39709. If you would like a copy of the draft DM or additional information, please contact Catherine Callaghan, 1301 South G Street, Lakeview, OR 97630, 541-947-6326, ccallaghan@fs.fed.u s. The Deciding Officials are Fred L. Way, Fremont-Winema Forest Supervisor and John Allen, Deschutes Forest Supervisor.

Sealed bid must be received prior to 3:00 p.m. on Thursday August 16, 2012 at: M.A. Mortenson Construction, C/o City of Bend, 710 NW Wall St. 2ND Floor, Bend, OR 97701 Attention: Gary Rea, Sr. Project Manager. Bids must be physically received at the location listed by the deadline. No faxed or electronic (email) submissions will be accepted. There will be a formal bid opening in the City of Bend Council Chambers at 3:30 p.m. following the submission deadline. Bids will not be accepted after the stated opening date and time. Late bids will be returned unopened. The invitation to bid, addenda, and notification of bid results for this bid may be viewed, printed or ordered via M.A. Mortenson Company's FTP site: ftp://ftp2.mortenson.co m/SeattleEstimating/B How to Comment and Timeframe END%20BIDDING%2 The opportunity to 0FILES/BP%20101% comment ends 30 20USFS%20Rd.%204 days following the 603/ Log In (user date of publication name - SeattleEstof this legal notice in FTP / password the newspaper of n33dle) - (Upon zip record (36 CFR file opening use §215.6(a)(2)); the 11050003-BP101 for Klamath Falls Herpassword) ald & News and the Pre-bid meeting is Bend Bulletin. Only scheduled for Thursthose who submit day August 2, 2012, timely and substanfrom 10:00 p.m. to tive comments will 1:00 p.m. and will be be accepted as apheld at the City of pellants. ComBend Council Chamments should be bers located at 710 submitted to Fred L. NW Wall St., Bend, Way, Forest SuperOR 97701. The visor, by one of the pre-bid is not mandafollowing methods; tory but we strongly mail: 1301 South G encourage the apStreet, Lakeview, proved pre-qualified OR 97630; telebidders to attend. phone: Bid documents can be 541-947-2151, fax: viewed at Central Or541-947-6399, or egon Builders Exemail: change (COBE) 1902 comments-pacificNE 4th St. Bend, OR northwest-winema-c 97701, M.A. Mortenhemult@fs.fed.us son Company, 10230 (please put "Bend NE Points Drive, Suite Broadband CE" in 300, Kirkland, WA the subject line). Of98033 or on the M.A. fice hours, for those Mortenson ftp site. who wish to hand M.A. Mortenson deliver their comCompany reserves ments or provide the right to reject any them orally, are 7:45 or all bids not in coma.m. to 4:30 p.m., pliance with bid packMonday - Friday Published:July 24, 2012 age procedures and (except Federal per ORC 279B.100. holidays) Gary Rea (§215.6(a)(4)(ii)). Sr. Project Manager Published:July 24, 2012 Acceptable formats M.A. Mortenson for electronic comCompany Gary Rea ments are text or gary.rea@mortenson.com Sr. Project Manager html email, Adobe 206-588-9214 M.A. Mortenson portable document Company format, and formats gary.rea@mortenson.com viewable in Mi206-588-9214 crosoft Office applications. For appeal eligibility, each individual or representative from each organization submitting substantive comments must either sign the comments or verify identity upon reWhether you’re quest. Find them in looking for a home The Bulletin or need a service, your future is in Classiieds! Garage Sales these pages.

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx1672 T.S. No.: 1355344-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Mary Norsen, An Unmarried Woman, as Grantor to First American Title Insurance Company Of Oregon, as Trustee, in favor of World Savings Bank, Fsb, Its Successors and/or Assignees, as Beneficiary, dated April 10, 2007, recorded April 16, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-21439 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot fifty (50), Forest Grove Estates, Phase 3 and 4 Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 588 SW Hillwood Ct. Bend OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due November 1, 2011 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $711.78 Monthly Late Charge $24.07. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $156,574.30 together with interest thereon at 2.000% per annum from October 01, 2011 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on November 01, 2012 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: June 25, 2012. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-413812 07/26/12, 08/02, 08/09, 08/16 1000

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Caroline R. Payne and Kevin S. Payne, as grantor to Amerititle, a Oregon corporation, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, A Washington Corporation, as Beneficiary, dated December 6, 2005, recorded December 29, 2005, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2005, at Page 89662, beneficial interest now held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A. as covering the following described real property: Lot Eleven (11) of Stonehedge on the Rim, Phase II, City of Redmond, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 2141 SW Newberry Avenue, Redmond, OR 97756. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $2,142.03, from September 1, 2011, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $270,629.01, together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.25% per annum from August 1, 2011, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on October 10, 2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, OR, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 06-07-2012. By: /s/:Kelly D. Sutherland. KELLY D. SUTHERLAND, Successor Trustee. SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC, 1499 SE Tech Center Place, Suite 255, Vancouver, WA 98683, www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa, Telephone:(360) 260-2253, Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647, S&S 11-108494

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Kirk D. Kowalke, as grantor to Western Title Company, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, FA, as Beneficiary, dated March 13, 2006, recorded March 15, 2006, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2006, at Page 17918, beneficial interest now held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor in interest by purchase from the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver for Washington Mutual Bank, formerly known as Washington Mutual Bank, FA as covering the following described real property: See complete Legal Description attached hereto as Exhibit "A". COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 3848 S.W. 35th Place, Redmond, OR 97756. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $1,600.83, from February 1, 2010, and monthly payments in the sum of $2,466.29, from January 1, 2012, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $340,000.00, together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.65% per annum from January 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on October 1, 2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 05-31-2012. By: /s/: Kelly D. Sutherland. KELLY D. SUTHERLAND, Successor Trustee, SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC, 1499 SE Tech Center Place, Suite 255, Vancouver, WA 98683, www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa, Telephone: (360) 260-2253, Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647. S&S 10-104638. Exhibit "A" Lot 61, CASCADE VIEW ESTATES, PHASE 7. EXCEPTING THEREFROM the following described parcel: BEGINNING at the corner common to Lots 61 and 60, CASCADE VIEW ESTATES, Phase 7, and Lot 5, Block 7, SOUTH HEIGHTS ADDITION; thence along the South line of said Lot 61, North 89°39'54" West, 119.00 feet to the Northeast right-of-way of SW Cascade Vista Drive; thence along said right-of-way, North 27°15'23" West, 31.36 feet; thence leaving said right-of-way, North 72°00'11" East 97.01 feet to the line common to said Lots 61 and 60; thence along said common line, South 35°03'42" East, 71.52 feet to the point of beginning.

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0031152283 T.S. No.: 12-01073-5 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust dated as of May 23, 2006 made by, DAN L TAYLOR, as the original grantor, to WESTERN TITLE AND ESCROW COMPANY, as the original trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICAN BROKERS CONDUIT, as the original beneficiary, recorded on May 26, 2006, as Instrument No. 2006-36686 of Official Records in the Office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, Oregon (the "Deed of Trust"). The current beneficiary is: Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee for American Home Mortgage Assets Trust 2006-2, Mortgage-Backed Pass-Through Certificates Series 2006-2, (the "Beneficiary"). APN: 155897 LOT EIGHTEEN (18), IN BLOCK THREE (3), OF TAMARACK PARK, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 2858 NE DAGGETT LANE, BEND, OR Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default(s) for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; and which defaulted amounts total: $4,532.00 as of June 28, 2012. By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $214,659.74 together with interest thereon at the rate of 3.29600% per annum from January 1, 2012 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all Trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as the duly appointed Trustee under the Deed of Trust will on November 8, 2012 at the hour of 01:00 PM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, At the front entrance to the Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond St. Bend, OR County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of the Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, Trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 11000 Olson Drive Ste 101, Rancho Cordova, CA 95670 916-636-0114 FOR SALE INFORMATION CALL: 714-573-1965 Website for Trustee's Sale Information: www.priorityposting.com TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "Trustee" and 'Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 7/9/2012 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Megan Curtis, Authorized Signature

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