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Desperate to save clan, Syria’s Assad resolved not to flee, yield By Marc Fisher The Washington Post

More than a decade before the Arab Spring, there was the Damascus Spring. In the first months after Bashar Assad took over Syria in 2000, a wave of free expression broke out after he sent signals that were interpreted to mean that he planned to relax his father’s autocratic control. Dissidents formed 70 dialogue clubs, met openly and published two critical opinion Inside magazines. • U.N. holds Then, as sudobservers denly as the new back, A3 era had begun, Assad’s forces cracked down. Those who spoke out were arrested, and economic reforms stalled. “We saw that the Spring was only a way to have the people accept the transfer of power from the father to the son,” said Mohammad al-Abdallah, a Syrian activist who took part in the dialogue, only to find himself and his father and brother arrested months later. “It was clear Assad was no reformer.” Today, as Assad’s government responds with unrelenting force to a popular uprising of the sort that has brought down regimes across the Middle East over the past 18 months, Syria’s ruler has embraced his image as a global pariah. He will not flee and will not bend to foreign pressure, he has said publicly and privately. See Assad / A7

BEND

Potential Heart-transplant police cuts cause holding pattern concern • 11-year-old Gabriel Lawson of Bend awaits a new heart in California, where he is confined to a hospital

• Reductions – some drastic – are forecast if calls rise and money is tight By Hillary Borrud The Bulletin

Local law enforcement officials are worried about the Bend Police Department’s plan to stop investigating certain crimes due to budget shortfalls and a projected rise in calls. Some of the proposed cutbacks would be drastic. Depending upon the department’s workload, detectives could stop investigating all property crimes and thefts of property worth less than $100,000 this year, unless the incident is part of a series of crimes or the victim is over 65 years old. By 2016, detectives could stop investigating sex abuse or rape, unless the victim is a child younger than 14 years old or someone with a disability or over the age of 65. The plan, which was requested by the Bend City Council, caught other local law enforcement officials by surprise last month. At a meeting of public safety officials in May, Deschutes County District Attorney Patrick Flaherty called the plan a “doomsday approach,” according to minutes. City officials said concerns were overblown, due to miscommunication and misinterpretation of the plan. “I think it was a little misinterpreted that these were things that were definitely going to happen and that’s not the case,” said City Councilor Jim Clinton. See Police / A5

Crime in Bend The Bend Police Department recently presented a plan to reduce services in future years if calls for service and crime levels increase. The department would need to increase its budget by $200,000 to $300,000 annually in order to keep up with projected call and crime levels, Chief Jeff Sale told the City Council in May. Violent crimes and property crimes declined for years in Bend, then increased sharply in 2010 and declined in 2011. Bend Police Department is projecting an average annual increase of 13 percent in the future.

DNA reveals slave owners in first lady’s family tree

UNIFORM CRIME REPORT STATISTICS

Submitted photo

Gabriel Lawson has been at the Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital in Palo Alto, Calif., for more than a month, awaiting a heart transplant.

By Rachel L. Swarns New York Times News Service

REX, Ga. — Joan Tribble held tightly to her cane as she ventured into the cemetery where her people were buried. There lay the pioneers who once populated Georgia’s rugged frontier, where striving white men planted corn and cotton, fought for the Confederacy and owned slaves. The settlers interred here were mostly forgotten over the decades as their progeny scattered across the South, embracing unassuming lives. But one line of her family took another path, heading north on a tumultuous, winding journey that ultimately led to the White House. The white men and women buried here are the forebears of Tribble, a retired bookkeeper who delights in her two grandchildren and her Sunday church mornings. They are also ancestors of Michelle Obama, the first lady. See Obama / A6

SUNDAY

We use recycled newsprint

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By Markian Hawryluk The Bulletin

At a time when most kids his age are enjoying the freedom of summer vacation, Gabriel Lawson just wants to get out of the hospital. The 11-year-old Bend boy has been stuck at the Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital on the campus of Stanford University in Palo Alto, Calif., for more than a month waiting for a new heart. A combination of congenital heart defects has left his heart muscle significantly weakened and prone to abnormal rhythms. Normally, heart transplant patients are asked to stay in the general vicinity of the hospital in case a heart becomes available. But Gabriel’s heart is no

longer responding to an implanted defibrillator that is supposed to shock it back to normal. His doctors fear that if he has another occurrence of the irregular heartbeat outside of the hospital, the heart may not resume a normal rhythm and he could die. That has left Gabriel confined to the hospital, where he spends his days reading, playing computer games and walking the halls he has come to know all too well. Asked what he would most like to do if he got a new heart, Gabriel responded, “Just to be out of the hospital.” For now, the Lawson family is in a holding pattern, waiting for news that the right-size heart in Gabriel’s

blood type is available. Doctors have told them the average waiting time for children needing a transplant is about three to four months, and Gabriel is nearly halfway through that period. “That’s the million-dollar question,” his father, Seth Lawson, said. “It could be tonight or it could be a year from now. It’s just really hard to say.” Lawson has been on short-term leave from work so he and the rest of the family — including his wife, Melanie, and two other sons, Zane, 15, and Connor, 2 — can be at the hospital. He is also considering whether to request a transfer within his company to a branch in the Palo Alto area. See Heart / A4

The chart below is based on data provided by the FBI and the Bend Police Department. Although the data are based on the same reports, the FBI statistics are generally lower due to their calculation method. The BPD provided more recent data, but the FBI data cover a longer period of time. Incidents per 1,000 population

BPD Part 1 crimes Includes all violent and property crimes

60 50 40 30 20 10 0

FBI data Property crime Violent crime ’03

’04

’05

’06

’07

’08

’09

’10

’11

VIOLENT CRIME STATS IN BEND In addition to overall data, the FBI tracks individual types of crimes. Below are the incident rates over the same period for specific violent crimes. Incidents per 1,000 population 3 Assault Robbery Forcible rape Murder

2

1

0 ’03

’04

’05

’06

’07

’08

’09

’10

Sources: Bend Police Department, Federal Bureau of Investigation Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

The Bulletin An Independent Newspaper

Vol. 109, No. 169, 48 pages, 7 sections

INDEX Business Books Classified

G1-6 F4-6 E1-8

Community C1-8 Crosswords C7, E2 Local News B1-6

Milestones Obituaries Opinion

TODAY’S WEATHER C6 B4 F1-3

Sports D1-6 Stocks G4-5 TV & Movies C2

Mostly sunny High 72, Low 46 Page B6

TOP NEWS EGYPT: Voting under a cloud, A3 GREECE: Fears of turmoil, A3


THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, JUNE 17, 2012

A2

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Chris Rock, left, and Tom Lennon in a scene from the movie “What to Expect When You’re Expecting.” A growing league of dads are staying home, at least part-time.

Is there a Dad Divide to go with the Mommy Wars? By Leanne Italie The Associated Press

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Oregon Lottery results As listed at www.oregonlottery.org

POWERBALL

The numbers drawn Saturday night are:

8 14 15 16 27 26 The estimated jackpot is now $50 million.

MEGABUCKS The numbers drawn Saturday night are:

16 18 21 31 34 35 The estimated jackpot is now $4.2 million.

Booze to keep flowing for Democratic convention

It’s Sunday, June 17, the 169th day of 2012. There are 197 days left in the year.

The Associated Press

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POLITICS

FATHER’S DAY

STOP, START OR MISS YOUR PAPER?

NEW YORK — Hey, Mr. Mom. What’s up, Workaholic? Whether they say it out loud or acknowledge it at all, that work-home divide traditionally reserved for the Mommy Wars can also rear between dads who go off to the office every day and the kind in the trenches with the kids. There are bound to be rifts, given the growing league of dads staying home at least parttime. But do the paths of work dads and home dads intertwine enough to make them care quite so deeply as the ladies? How exactly are they perceived, not by researchers or journalists, but by each other? “To be a stay-at-home dad requires a lot of confidence in who you are,” said Paxton Helms, 41, in Washington, D.C. He became one about four years ago, when his daughter was 3 months old. A son followed and he now takes parttime contracts as an international development consultant, with flexible hours. His wife also works part-time. “The strangest thing that ever happened to me as a (stayat-home dad) was riding on the Metro with both my kids and a guy asking me, ‘So where’s Mom?’ I couldn’t even think why in the world somebody would be asking me that question, so I couldn’t even muster an answer,” he said. Other at-home dads worry about jealousy from working brethren (What are they really thinking about all that time spent with the women?). Or suspicion that they’re out of work. And dads on both sides of the divide report the occasional cold shoulder. “It seems that they try to avoid me or don’t want to talk about what life is like for them,” said dad-of-one Donald DeLong, 55, a Bloomfield Township, Mich., attorney who acknowledges a “deeply rooted need to work and ‘earn a living.’ ” “When I do talk to them, the topics stay guy-safe. That is, sports, cars. After all we’re both still guys. We don’t talk about that sensitive touchyfeely stuff.” Other at-home dads, those by choice or pushed out of the job market, said they’ve endured some snark, but they consider it more of a dad-on-dad discomfort than a serious divide. Martin Weckerlein, 33, is among them. He simply doesn’t have the time to care. He was a tank commander in the Germany military, then a bank worker for six years before he gave it up to be an at-home for his three kids, ages 8, 3 and 9 months. The family lives in suburban Washington, D.C., where his wife has a government job. “When I’m with other dads who are my age, whether they work or stay at home, they tend to be pretty accepting and even curious as to how that works that we can afford me staying home, what I do during the day with the kids, and they say it must be nice to have that time,” he said. “When I am talking with men who aren’t fathers or who are older, their questions usu-

ally focus on what my career goals are after I am done being home with my kids. They seem to assume this is only a temporary thing for our family, a pause in my career for a few years, instead of an investment in our family,” Weckerlein explained.

The stereotypes Yes, Mr. Mom comes up, the newest iteration in the shape of Chris Rock and his goofy band of dads with infants strapped to their chests in the movie “What to Expect When You’re Expecting.” It’s been nearly 30 years since Michael Keaton was that guy on screen, setting the kitchen on fire and making his kids miserable in “Mr. Mom,” but the lingering moniker feels more like yesterday for Weckerlein and other at-home dads. “I hate that phrase, Mr. Mom. I can’t imagine my wife going into the office and saying, ‘Hi everyone, it’s Mrs. Dad,’ ” said Dan Zevin, a humorist, at-home dad to two and author of a new book, “Dan Gets a Minivan: Life at the Intersection of Dude and Dad.” In Boston, 32-year-old Nolan Kido is no stereotype. He’s the exhausted at-home dad of an 11-week-old daughter as his wife completes her dental education. He deferred work on his doctoral degree in accounting after doing some recession-era math: his earning power versus her earning power in the face of more than $360,000 in student loans.

“At the very beginning they were a little weirded out, like what do we talk about, what’s the common themes, but now the impression that I get more is actually jealousy,” he said of his working dad friends. “It’s not, like, mean kinds of things but just, ‘Oh, I wish I could stay home’ or ‘Oh, I’d love to go to that park.’ ” The number of at-home dads who are primary caregivers for their children reached nearly 2 million in 2010, or one in 15 fathers, according to one estimate. Al Watts, president of the National At-Home Dad Network, believes a more accurate count is about 7 million, using broader definitions that include part-time workers. That amounts to one-third of married fathers in the U.S. Watts, in Omaha, has been home with kids for a decade, since the oldest of his four was a baby. He sees a subtle shift in attitudes emanating from working dads. “Eight years ago, one of my wife’s customers, when he found out that I was an at-home dad he said, ‘Oh you know, I’d really love to do that.’ I knew what he really meant was that he assumed he could then just hang out at home and play video games and watch TV and not have to go to work anymore,” Watts said. “Now when I have those conversations, they’re generally like, ‘You know, I really wish I could do that. But then they find out I have four kids and they’re like, ‘Well, I couldn’t do that!’ ”

RALEIGH, N.C. — Adding a twist to blue laws in an increasingly red state, North Carolina’s Republican-led legislature is toasting a measure intended to keep the booze flowing at the Democratic National Convention. President Barack Obama and other Democratic Party headliners are set to be in Charlotte for the nominating soiree held every four years, which kicks off with a Labor Day party at a stock car track. The state’s government-run liquor stores are closed Sundays and for the Monday holiday, presenting a potential problem for bars, restaurants and hotels needing to replenish depleted alcohol stocks. The convention is expected to draw tens of thousands of people who will spend millions on food and libations. To the rescue is a bipartisan group of lawmakers in Raleigh sponsoring a bill to keep the Alcoholic Beverage Control stores in Mecklenburg County, which includes Charlotte, open for Labor Day 2012. Co-sponsored by Republicans and Democrats from the Charlotte area, the measure flowed through the state House last week on a voice vote and is awaiting approval in the Senate. Rep. Bill Brawley, a Mecklenburg Republican, said helping Charlotte be fully prepared to quench the thirsts of the arriving politicos and media horde is just good manners. “The political party of the people attending is not material,” said Brawley, one of the bill’s primary sponsors. “Our state will treat them the way we would want our own people to be treated when they visit other states.” Democratic Gov. Beverly Perdue, who has frequently clashed with the Republicans who took control of the General Assembly two years ago, said she would sign the bill into law.

IN HISTORY Highlights: In 1775, the Revolutionary War Battle of Bunker Hill resulted in a costly victory for the British, who suffered heavy losses. In 1885, the Statue of Liberty arrived in New York Harbor aboard the French ship Isere. In 1961, Soviet ballet dancer Rudolf Nureyev defected to the West while his troupe was in Paris. In 1972, President Richard M. Nixon’s eventual downfall began with the arrest of five burglars inside Democratic national headquarters in Washington, D.C.’s Watergate complex. Ten years ago: A judge in San Francisco tossed out the second-degree murder conviction of Marjorie Knoller for the dog-mauling death of neighbor Diane Whipple, but let stand Knoller’s conviction for involuntary manslaughter. (However, Knoller’s murder conviction was reinstated in 2008.) Five years ago: Thirty-five people were killed in the bombing of a police academy bus in Kabul, Afghanistan; the Taliban claimed responsibility. One year ago: The United Nations endorsed the rights of gay, lesbian and transgender people for the first time ever, passing a resolution hailed as historic by the U.S. and other backers and decried by some African and Muslim countries. A Saudi woman defiantly drove through Riyadh while others brazenly cruised by police patrols in the first forays of a challenge to Saudi Arabia’s male-only driving rules.

BIRTHDAYS Singer Barry Manilow is 69. Movie producer-directorwriter Bobby Farrelly is 54. Actor Greg Kinnear is 49. Actress Kami Cotler (TV: “The Waltons”) is 47. Tennis player Venus Williams is 32. — From wire reports

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• It’s Father’s Day. • Michelle Obama delivers a commencement address at Oregon State University in Corvallis. B3 • Greece votes for the second time in two months in an effort to elect a government that will resolve the nation’s political and economic turmoil. A3

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SUNDAY, JUNE 17, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

A3

T S U.N. suspends observers in Syria

In Greece, fears that voting won’t resolve ongoing turmoil By Rachel Donadio and Steven Erlanger New York Times News Service

By Patrick J. McDonnell Los Angeles Times

BEIRUT — The United Nations’ decision to suspend its observer mission in Syria could increase pressure on Syrian President Bashar Assad to comply with a faltering U.N. peace plan that many view as a last chance to avoid all-out civil war in the strife-torn Middle Eastern nation. But the observer pullback announced Saturday could also put pressure on Russia, whose alliance with Assad has led to increasing tension with Washington. Moscow helped craft the peace initiative and is determined to keep it alive, knowing that its failure could accelerate demands for harsher international action. The U.N. cited escalating violence in its decision to suspend the monitoring mission, a crucial component of special U.N. envoy Kofi Annan’s plan. The suspension of the observer mission — and the possibility that Annan’s entire effort may be on the verge of collapse — may also be a blunt message to Assad, who Annan has said has the “first responsibility” to implement the peace process. Few independent Syriawatchers believe that Assad could withdraw his troops and armor from populated areas and allow nonviolent protests, both mandates in the peace plan, and still hold on to power in the deeply divided nation of 23 million.

Adam Ferguson / New York Times News Service

Egyptian men line up Saturday outside a polling station in Cairo. Egyptians began two days of voting on Saturday, a day after military rulers moved to consolidate power by shutting down the Parliament and seizing the sole right to issue laws.

Egyptians vote under a cloud of uncertainty By Ernesto Londono The Washington Post

CAIRO — Egyptians expressed wariness Saturday as they lined up in sweltering heat to vote in the runoff election for a replacement for ousted autocrat Hosni Mubarak. In sharp contrast to recent elections, the mood in Cairo and across the country was largely tense as Egyptians contemplated the polarizing choice between Mohamed Morsi, a conservative Islamist, and Ahmed Shafiq, who was Mubarak’s last prime minister. With the country’s lower house of parliament dissolved,

the constitution suspended and the revolution pronounced all but dead, the outcome of the presidential vote that continues today could not be more consequential. “This is a decisive moment, but nobody feels confident about anything,” said Samia, 45, a Shafiq supporter who asked to be identified by her first name because of her government job. “It’s like rolling the dice and hoping for the best.” The runoff began two days after a court ruling led to the dissolution of the lower house of Egypt’s Islamist-dominated parliament, a move that activ-

Unmanned Air Force space plane lands in California after 15 months By Alicia Chang The Associated Press

LOS ANGELES — An unmanned Air Force space plane steered itself to a landing early Saturday at a California military base, capping a 15-month clandestine mission. The spacecraft, which was launched from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida in March 2011, conducted in-orbit experiments during the mission, officials said. It was the second such autonomous landing at the Vandenberg Air Force Base, 130 miles northwest of Los Angeles. In 2010, an identical unmanned spacecraft returned to Earth after seven months and 91 million miles in orbit. The latest homecoming was set in motion when the stubbywinged robotic X-37B fired its

engine to slip out of orbit, then pierced through the atmosphere and glided down the runway like an airplane. “With the retirement of the Space Shuttle fleet, the X-37B OTV program brings a singular capability to space technology development,” said Lt. Col. Tom McIntyre, the X-37B’s program manager. “The return capability allows the Air Force to test new technologies without the same risk commitment faced by other programs. We’re proud of the entire team’s successful efforts to bring this mission to an outstanding conclusion.” With the second X-37B on the ground, the Air Force planned to launch the first one again in the fall. An exact date has not been set. The twin X-37B vehicles

are part of a military program testing robotically controlled reusable spacecraft technologies. Though the Air Force has emphasized the goal is to test the space plane itself, there’s a classified payload on board — a detail that has led to much speculation about the mission’s ultimate purpose. Some amateur trackers think the craft carried an experimental spy satellite sensor judging by its low orbit and inclination, suggesting reconnaissance or intelligence gathering rather than communications. Harvard astrophysicist Jonathan McDowell, who runs Jonathan’s Space Report, which tracks the world’s space launches and satellites, said it’s possible it was testing some form of new imaging.

ists and some leading political figures described as a soft military coup. A small movement of boycotters urged voters to spoil their ballots in what they saw as an illegitimate election under military rule. The once-repressed Muslim Brotherhood has thrived since the revolt that overthrew Mubarak. The group dominated the parliament and took a sizable share of the seats in a body tasked with writing a new constitution. After the dissolution of the lower house of parliament this week, though, the military junta assumed all legislative powers.

ATHENS, Greece — Greeks head to the polls today for the second time in two months with a pervasive sense of dread that any government that comes to power will fail to resolve the political and economic turmoil that threatens the country’s future — and the financial stability of Europe itself. Even if the establishment center-right party New Democracy ekes out a victory in a race that polls show as tight, Greece faces weeks or months of negotiations with European lenders over the terms of its austerity program, which all parties agree are too onerous to enforce on its rapidly shrinking economy. A victory by the leftist party Syriza promises a more serious confrontation, especially with Germany, over how — and perhaps whether — to keep Greece in the eurozone. The winner will also face an uphill battle to inject confidence into a paralyzed economy that depends heavily on the continued infusion of money by the European Central Bank. The bank, based in Frankfurt, Germany, has become the last lifeline for a financial system that has all but seized up and a deficit-ridden government that has little ability to raise new revenues or borrow money to continue its operations.

On Monday, as Greece tries to determine whether it has a viable new government, leaders of the G-20 group of developed and emerging economies will gather in Mexico, where they are expected to debate ways to keep the Greek crisis and the weakness of the bigger economies of Spain and Italy from undermining the euro and dragging the global economy into a new recession. Central bankers from Tokyo to Washington have already pledged to intervene in financial markets if necessary to shore up those economies, but the Greek drama nonetheless threatens to keep investors on edge for weeks to come. “I would be very surprised if — ta-da! — everything is clear,” said Peter Westaway, chief economist for Europe at Vanguard Asset Management. “We could be in for a protracted period of uncertainty, which would not be helpful, either.” If, as in the May elections, there is no clear winner, political leaders have said they are committed to forming a government no matter what. In any event, the new government will have to open new talks with the big European powers and press for a more generous bailout. “They will be sitting around the table with each other, and then some compromises can be struck,” Westaway said.


A4

THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, JUNE 17, 2012

2 Japanese reactors are ordered restarted New York Times News Service TOKYO — Brushing aside widespread public opposition to avoid electric power shortages, Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda ordered the reactivation of two nuclear reactors at a plant in western Japan on Saturday, making it the nation’s first plant to go back online since the crisis last year in Fukushima. The decision to restart the Ohi nuclear plant ends the temporary freeze of Japan’s nuclear power industry, when all 50 of the country’s functional reactors were idled after the triple meltdown at the Fukushima Daiichi plant. Despite Noda’s vows to strengthen the Ohi plant against the same sort of earthquake and tsunami that knocked out the Fukushima plant in March 2011, the Japanese people have remained deeply divided on the safety of nuclear power. Even after the prime minister made an appeal on June 8 on national television, opinion polls showed that more Japanese opposed restarting the Ohi plant than supported it. Noda urged the nation to return to nuclear power to avoid electricity shortages that could cause blackouts and cripple industry at a time of rising competition with China and the rest of Asia. Saturday’s decision was seen here as a victory for the still-powerful nuclear industry and its backers in the business world, whose political support has been crucial to the otherwise unpopular Noda. It remains to be seen how the broader public will react to the restart order.

Heart donation Children make up about 9 percent of the current waiting list for a heart donation, and on average they account for a similar percentage of all heart transplants done in the U.S. Age

Younger than 1 1-5 6-10 11-17 18-34 35-49 50-64 65 and older Total Submitted photo

Gabriel Lawson, 11, must wear a mask when he walks outside of his germ-filtering room at the Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital in Palo Alto, Calif.

2012 waiting list*

2012 transplants*

37 94 66 77 317 617 1,455 518 3,191

28 18 11 35 54 120 244 87 597

Continued from A1 Gabriel’s heart troubles started in 2008, when he started experiencing seizures. Multiple trips to the emergency room couldn’t identify the source of the trouble. Eventually, his father insisted the boy be admitted to the hospital to determine the cause of the problem. A battery of tests finally identified the heart defect. “It was a parent’s intuition kind of thing,” Lawson said. “Something is not right.” Gabriel was flown to Mary Bridge Children’s Hospital in Tacoma, Wash., where doctors put in an implantable cardioverter defibrillator, commonly called an ICD. The defibrillator senses when the heart is not beating normally and can shock it back into a normal rhythm. The doctors told the Lawsons their son had a condition known as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, a thickening of the heart walls. “Although this is a relatively common disorder, Gabe has an unusually complicated form of it,” said Dr. Urszula Tajchman, a pediatric cardiologist in Bend. Most patients with the disorder, she said, are identified when they’re much older, usually when symptoms occur. Although for many, sudden death is the first sign anything is wrong, Tajchman said. It’s one of the conditions Tajchman checks for in annual heart screenings of high school students throughout Central Oregon.

Covering the cost To donate funds for Gabriel Lawson’s medical care, visit sites.google.com/site/ gabesheart/.

Gabriel’s seizures, which were the result of potentially lethal arrhythmia, helped to diagnose his troubles early. “Although arrhythmias are common in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, it is less common to have these malignant arrhythmias so frequently at such a young age,” Tajchman said. Gabriel’s heart is also stiffer than normal, and when his heart rate goes up, his heart muscle doesn’t get enough oxygen. That makes it even more likely for him to develop arrhythmias.

Pediatric transplants If Gabriel gets a new heart, he will likely be only the second child in Central Oregon to get a new heart in the past decade. Tajchman said a teenage patient of hers received a transplant about six to seven years ago, and earlier this year, a local 3-yearold girl died while waiting for a transplant. “Success rates of heart transplants are pretty good,” said Dr. Daniel Bernstein, a cardiologist on Gabriel’s transplant team. “They’re dramatically better than they were 20 or 30 years ago, and here at Packard Children’s our survival rate is somewhat above that of the national average.” If Gabriel does get a heart

transplant, he has a 90 percent chance of being alive in five years, and an 85 percent change of being alive in 10 years, Bernstein said. “The chance of him being alive 20 years from now is a little harder to predict, because there weren’t as many transplants (done 20 years ago). It was still a little more experimental.” There are people who have lived longer than 30 years past pediatric transplant, he said. “We just don’t know what percentage of patients who are transplanted today will get 30 or more years out of their hearts.” After the transplant, Gabriel’s biggest concern will be the risk of organ rejection. To prevent rejection, he will have to take drugs that weaken his immune system, and those come with certain limitations and side effects. “Hearts are a little more at risk (for rejection) than kidneys,” Bernstein said. “The risk is highest in the first three to six months.” Doctors at Packard perform about 14 to 17 pediatric heart transplants each year. Nationally, 350 kids get new hearts each year, compared with 3,500 adults. Demand for pediatric hearts is lower, but so is the supply. Bernstein said cases like Gabriel’s underscore the need for people to be organ donors. “Just increasing the awareness of organ donation is really critical because without the organ donation, he can’t survive,” he said. To be viable for transplant, a

110 88 43 132 220 384 1,013 332 2,322

*2012 data as of June 1. Data does not include patients who needed heart-lung transplant. Source: Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network

Heart

2011 transplants

heart must be received by Packard Children’s within four to seven hours after it is harvested. That limits the region from which Gabriel’s new heart can come.

Life in the hospital Gabriel said the notion of getting a new heart is still a little weird to him. “It seems unnatural,” he said. He is hoping a new heart will let him run and be more active. Any sort of physical activity leaves him out of breath. He hasn’t had the energy to attend school since November. He had a tutor for a while at home and attended school at a classroom within the hospital until the start of the summer break. “There’s actually like 21 kids that need different types of transplants, like lungs or kidneys,” Gabriel said. He sees many of them as he walks the halls of the hospital or spends time in a common playroom. But he said he misses his friends at home. Gabriel must wear a mask if he ventures out of the safety of his germ-filtering room. “It muffles my voice a little bit,” he said. Doctors have stabilized Gabriel with medications that keep his heart rhythms steady. Bernstein said there’s no artificial limit on how long they can keep Gabriel stable while they wait for a heart. “He is at risk for having one of these events at any time, and even though he’s in the hospital, it’s possible he may not survive

Greg Cross / The Bulletin

that. Of course, keeping him in the hospital would give him the best odds of surviving it,” he said. “The bigger issue for him and his family is how long they can withstand the psychological stress of being in the hospital.” The ongoing saga is also taking a toll on the family’s finances. The family has insurance coverage through Lawson’s job with Coca-Cola. But the copays and deductibles combined with the uncovered costs associated with care — including the $25,000 cost of a 90-minute medical flight — have left the family in significant debt. The Lawsons have fallen into the gap that commonly affects middle-class families with a very sick child. They don’t make enough to comfortably cover the costs of care, but they make too much to qualify for many of the assistance programs available to the indigent or uninsured. “I’m not dirt poor. We’re lower middle class, like 85 percent of America,” Lawson said. “We don’t qualify for any of these different kinds of programs, but I don’t make enough to cover all the expenses even though I have really good insurance. It’s a real conundrum.” Gabriel has been sponsored by the Redmond High School Sparrow Club, which has been raising funds to help pay for his care. Nonetheless, the family is facing the possibility of being more than six figures in the hole. “Not yet,” Lawson said, “but we’re working on it.” — Reporter: 541-617-7814 mhawryluk@bendbulletin.com


SUNDAY, JUNE 17, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

A5

CAR BOMBINGS

26 die on last day of Iraq pilgrimage By Kay Johnson and Sinan Salaheddin The Associated Press

Dean Guernsey / The Bulletin

Bend police officers respond to a robbery at a US Bank branch on Third Street on June 8. The Bend Police Department presented a plan last month to scale back investigations and certain other work, in response to budget cuts and projected increases in calls for service. The plan raised concerns from officials at other local public safety agencies.

Police Continued from A1 “They’re only going to happen if the serious (crime) increases a lot and we’re not able to provide more resources to the police,” Clinton said. Meanwhile, it’s unclear whether crime will rise over the next five years as police projected. Bend’s rate of violent and property crime was on the decline for years, until a spike in certain crimes in 2010. The service reduction plan prioritizes various types of work when police are busy, Chief of Police Jeff Sale told the City Council in early May. It doesn’t guarantee that lower-priority incidents will go ignored, Sale said. Sale said what would be handled one day may not the next day if there are more serious crimes. “Those priorities are going to shift all the time,” he said. The plan is to keep as many patrol officers as possible on the streets, and they will continue responding to serious crimes and writing reports. There just might not be a detective available to follow up. Mayor Jeff Eager said the city has been budgeting conservatively, and the police department’s plan is based on these figures. If the city continues to receive more property tax revenue than anticipated, as it did this year, that could prevent some of the cuts to police services. “There’s a lot of stuff that could change between now and 2016 that could prevent those service reductions at that time,” Eager said on Friday. Clinton said the reduction plan is based on a worst-case scenario in which the police budget would remain essentially flat, increasing only 2 percent a year, and calls for service would continue to increase 7 percent to 9 percent a year. As Bend has grown into a

city, residents have continued to expect a small-town level of attention to minor crimes, Clinton said. “Traditionally, people have thought of this as a town of 25,000 people where the police didn’t have so much serious crime to deal with so they could engage in a lot of things that small towns traditionally do, but big towns don’t, such as a stolen bicycle or somebody ripped off a chair from my porch,” Clinton said.

Crime rate fluctuates Violent crimes and property crimes declined for years in Bend, with a 26 percent drop from 2003 to 2010, according to an analysis of FBI reports. However, while property crimes remained low in 2010, the number of aggravated assaults increased from 117 in 2009 to 197 in 2010. That is the latest data available from the bureau. Statistics collected by the Bend Police Department also show an increase in violent crimes and property crimes in 2010 — 35 percent — and then an 8 percent decrease in these crimes in 2011. Bend’s statistics are reported differently from the FBI’s numbers, so they are not comparable. Despite the general decline in violent and property crimes, the number of calls for police service has continued to increase, according to police data. “The last few years, there’s been a fairly steady increase in call volume, which is kind of weird because our population hasn’t been going up,” Eager said.

Officials call for collaboration Public safety officials said their main concern was that Bend police did not bring the plan to their attention until recently. It’s important to work together in case some cuts can be avoided, Flaherty said. “All the governmental enti-

Suspect in deadly robbery in Canada arrested at border The Associated Press EDMONTON, Alberta — The man wanted in a deadly armored car heist at a university in western Canada that left three armed guards dead was arrested at gunpoint by U.S. border officials in Washington state, police said Saturday. Edmonton police Supt. Bob Hassel said in a news release that Travis Baumgartner was stopped near a border crossing in Lynden, Washington, southwest of Abbotsford, British Columbia. Officials said Baumgartner was in his pickup truck and was alone. Police said a sum of money was found in the truck when Baumgartner was arrested. Police had earlier called it a “significant” sum. Baumgartner, 21, had been on the run since Friday when four armed guards were gunned down, three of them fatally. He faces three counts of first-degree murder and one count of attempted murder. Baumgartner was the fifth member of a G4S Cash Solutions crew that was reloading bank machines at a University

of Alberta mall and residence where the shooting happened, police said. The armored truck was found abandoned but running not far from the security company’s offices. Dead at the scene were Michelle Shegelski, 26; Eddie Rejano, 39; and Brian Ilesic, 35. “We’re grateful to the border officials at Lynden, Washington, for their excellent work in arresting a man we believe was armed and extremely dangerous,” Hassel said in a statement. Canadian police officials were on their way to the U.S. to bring Baumgartner back to Edmonton. Employees at the nearby duty-free shop in Lynden said they watched part of the arrest from their front window. A worker who would only give her first name, Adrienne, said she saw two border patrol vehicles with lights flashing and officers standing outside with their guns drawn. She said she didn’t hear any shots fired. “It’s pretty scary,” she said. “Luckily nothing here happened.”

ties need to work cooperatively together to resolve the city’s budgetary crisis so Bend PD will continue to investigate aggravated theft cases,” Flaherty said. Deschutes County Circuit Court Judge Michael Sullivan said he has lots of questions about how cuts at the Bend Police Department might displace work onto other public safety agencies, and all the agencies need to work together to minimize the impact. However, he acknowledged there are limits to what this can accomplish when all government agencies are undergoing cuts. “There will be certain things we’ve done in the past we won’t be able to in the future,” Sullivan said. The Sheriff’s Office, the District Attorney’s Office and the Oregon State Police will have to decide how to respond if crime victims ask them to look into incidents that Bend police have stopped investigating. A burglary ring, for example, might operate inside Bend as

well as unincorporated areas of the county, Sullivan said. “If the city doesn’t cover those, since the sheriff has had their fair share of cuts as well, what do they not do in the future, so they can have those cross-jurisdictional investigations that need to get done?” Sullivan said. It could tarnish the community’s image and have a drastic effect on victims if police stop investigating serious personto-person crimes such as sex abuse of children ages 14 and older, Sullivan said. “I would certainly hope that with diminished resources, we would always look at personto-person crimes involving children as a top priority,” Sullivan said.

BAGHDAD — Two car bombs in Iraq’s capital killed at least 26 people Saturday on the last day of a Shiite pilgrimage already hit by multiple bombings. The blasts, one in a heavily guarded area close to a revered shrine, raised the week’s death toll to more than 100 and cast further doubt on the divided government’s ability to secure the country after the American withdrawal. Black plumes of smoke filled the sky over Baghdad’s northern Kazimiyah neighborhood, where the shrine to eighth-century saint Imam Moussa alKadhim draws hundreds of thousands of pilgrims each year. One of the bombs tore into throngs of people who packed the streets nearby, carrying aloft symbolic coffins and beating their chests in mourning to mark his martyrdom. Three days before, nearly two dozen coordinated bombs around the country killed 72 people. Al-Qaida’s Iraqi affiliate on Saturday claimed responsibility for that attack, which marked one of the deadliest days in Iraq since the last U.S. troops left in December. The fierce wave of bombings targeting Shiites suggests that the al-Qaida-allied Sunni militants are

stepping up their periodic attacks — which recently have come every few weeks — to try to exploit sectarian cracks in the elected government of Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki and possibly spark another round of the bloodshed between Sunni and Shiite Muslims that brought Iraq to the brink of civil war only a few years ago. Shiite religious commemorations are frequent targets of these attacks, although overall levels of violence are still down considerably from then. The sheer number of blasts during the al-Kadhim pilgrimage shows the ability of alQaida to retain and perhaps rebuild its bombings networks despite heavy blows struck to the organization by U.S. forces and allied Sunni militias prior to the American withdrawal. The bombers’ ability to penetrate so close to the shrine indicates the challenges faced by Iraq’s security forces in securing huge religious gatherings. “Those behind the attacks, they’ve become more determined now and see more of an opportunity because of the dysfunctional political process,” said Salman Shaikh, director of the Brookings Doha Center and an analyst on regional politics.

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A6

THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, JUNE 17, 2012

Obama Continued from A1 The discovery of this unexpected family tie between the nation’s most prominent black woman and a white, silverhaired grandmother from the Atlanta suburbs underscores the entangled histories and racial intermingling that continue to bind countless American families more than 140 years after the Civil War. The link was established through more than two years Richard Perry / New York Times News Service of research into Obama’s roots, which included DNA tests of Joan Tribble at the grave of her great-great-grandfather, a Georwhite and black relatives. Like gia slave-owner who is also an ancestor of first lady Michelle many African-Americans, Obama, in Rex, Ga. Research into Obama’s white relatives Obama was aware that she had underscores the history of racial intermingling that binds countwhite ancestry, but knew little less American families decades after the Civil War. more. Now, for the first time, the white forebears who have “I can’t really change anything. But I can be remained hidden in the first open-minded to people and accept them and lady’s family tree can be identified. And her blood ties are not hope they’ll accept me.” only to the dead. She has an en— Joan Tribble tire constellation of white distant cousins who live in Georgia, South Carolina, Alabama, Texas and beyond, who in turn of household owned human didn’t tell you anything about are only now learning of their property, and masters typically it?’ What I think is that they labored alongside their slaves. blocked it out.” kinship to her. Those relatives include Charles was a man of modest Contemporary America professionals and blue-collar means — he would ultimately emerged from that multiracial workers, a retired construction become a teacher — whose par- stew, a nation peopled by the worker, an accountant, a dieti- ents were only a generation or heirs of that agonizing time tian and an insurance claims so removed from illiteracy. who struggled and strived with Melvinia was not a precious little knowledge of adjuster, among others, privileged house slave their own origins. By 1890, cenwho never imagined they like Sally. She was illiter- sus takers counted 1.1 million had black relatives. Most Related ate and no stranger to la- Americans of mixed ancestry. had no idea that their an- • Michelle Obama in boring in the fields. She cestors owned slaves. All four of Obama’s grandCorvallis, had more biracial chil- parents had multiracial foreMany of them, like B3 dren after the Civil War, bears. There were Irish imTribble, 69, are still giving some of the white migrants who nurtured their grappling with their Shieldses hope that her dreams in a new land and free wrenching connection to the White House. “You re- relationship with Charles was African-Americans who saally don’t like to face this kind consensual. vored liberty long before the “To me, it’s an obvious love Civil War. Some were classiof thing,” said Tribble, whose ancestors owned the first lady’s story that was hard for the fied as mulatto by the census, great-great-great-grandmother. South to accept back then,” said while others claimed Cherokee Some of Tribble’s relatives Aliene Shields, a descendant ancestry. have declined to discuss the who lives in South Carolina. There were even tantalizing People who knew Melvinia hints of a link to a Jewish fammatter beyond the closed doors of their homes, fearful that they said she never discussed what ily with ties to the Charleston, might be vilified as racists or happened between them, S.C., synagogue that became forced to publicly atone for their whether she was raped or treat- the birthplace of the American ed with affection, whether she Jewish Reform Movement in forebears. Tribble has decided to openly was loved and loved in return. the 19th century. accept her history and her new Somewhere along the way, she Obama’s ancestors ultimatedecided to keep the truth about ly moved north, with some arextended family. “I can’t really change any- her son’s heritage to herself. riving in Illinois as early as the Ruth Wheeler Applin, who 1860s. Others settled in Marything,” said Tribble, who would like to meet Obama one day. knew Melvinia and Dolphus, land, Michigan and Ohio. “But I can be open-minded to suspected that Melvinia had Dolphus’ daughter, Pearl people and accept them and been raped by her master. But Lewis, moved to Cleveland. Applin, who married Melvinia’s Pearl’s granddaughter, Jewell hope they’ll accept me.” grandson and lived with her for Barclay, still remembers DolComplicated histories several years in the 1930s, nev- phus, a stern, fair-skinned man The bloodlines of Obama er asked that sensitive question. with narrow lips and an aquiand Tribble extend back to a Melvinia died in 1938. line nose. There were whispers 200-acre farm that was not far “You know,” Applin said in the family that he was half from here. One of their com- in an interview in 2010, “she white. mon ancestors was Henry might not have wanted nobody “Slave time, you know how Wells Shields, Tribble’s great- to know.” Applin died this year the white men used to fool with great-grandfather. He was a at 92. them black women, that’s what farmer and a family man who For many members of that I heard,” Barclay said. grew cotton, Indian corn and first generation to emerge from Barclay said she would like sweet potatoes. He owned bondage, the experience of to meet white members of her Obama’s maternal great-great- slavery was so shameful and family. Tribble and Sherry great-grandmother, Melvinia painful that they rarely spoke George, a great-granddaughter Shields, who was about 8 years of it. This willful forgetting per- of Charles Marion Shields, said old when she arrived on his vaded several branches of the they would also like to meet farm sometime around 1852. first lady’s family tree, passed their black extended family. The DNA tests and research along like an inheritance from Others remain reluctant. “I indicate that one of his sons, one generation to the next. don’t think there’s going to be a Charles Marion Shields, is the Obama declined to comment ‘Kumbaya’ moment here,” said likely father of Melvinia’s son on the findings about her roots, one of Charles Shields’ greatDolphus, who was born around as did her mother and brother. grandchildren, who spoke on 1860. Dolphus T. Shields was But over and over, the black the condition of anonymity, the first lady’s maternal great- members of her extended fam- fearful that the ancestral ties great-grandfather. His identity ily said their parents, grandpar- to slavery might besmirch the and that of his mother, Melvinia, ents and other relatives did not family name. were first reported in an article discuss slavery or the origins of DNA testing in The New York Times in 2009, the family’s white ancestry. The discovery comes as an which also indicated that he Nor was the topic much dismust have had a white father. cussed within Obama’s imme- increasing number of AmeriMelvinia was a teenager, diate family. She and her broth- cans, black and white, confront perhaps around 15, when she er, Craig Robinson, watched the their own family histories, takgave birth to her biracial son. mini-series “Roots,” about Alex ing advantage of widespread Charles was about 20. Haley’s family’s experience in access to DNA testing and onSuch forbidden liaisons slavery. During summers, the line genealogical records. Jenacross the racial divide inevi- family would visit relatives who nifer Hochschild, a professor of tably bring to mind the story lived in a South Carolina town African and African-American of Thomas Jefferson and his dotted with old rice plantations. studies at Harvard who has slave, Sally Hemings. Obama’s But they never discussed how studied the impact of DNA testancestors, however, lived in a those plantations might be con- ing on racial identity, said this world far removed from the nected to their personal history. was uncharted territory. “This is a whole new social elegance of Jefferson’s MontiNomenee Robinson, Obama’s cello, his 5,000-acre mountain paternal uncle, said he found arena,” Hochschild said. “We estate with 200 slaves. They himself stymied whenever he don’t have an etiquette for this. were much more typical of the tried to delve into the past. His We don’t have social norms.” “More or less every white ordinary people who became line of the family also has white person knows that slave ownentangled in America’s en- ancestry, relatives say. trenched system of servitude. “All of these elderly people in ers raped slaves,” she continmy family, they would say, ‘Boy, ued. “But my great-grandfaNo easy life I don’t know anything about ther? People don’t know what In Clayton County, Ga., slavery time,’ ” he said. “And they feel. They don’t know what where the Shields family lived, I kept thinking, ‘You mean they’re supposed to feel. I think only about a third of the heads your mother or grandmother it’s really hard.”

13 inmates killed in Turkish prison fire The Associated Press ANKARA, Turkey — Inmates in a prison in southeast Turkey set beds and blankets alight, starting a fire that killed 13 prisoners, Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan and other officials said early today. Erdogan said the fire affected a ward housing 18 inmates in the prison in the mainly Kurdish city of San-

liurfa. He said some inmates set their bedding on fire following a fight that broke out inside the ward late Saturday. It was not immediately clear if the victims had died of burns or from asphyxiation. Erdogan said five other inmates were hospitalized for smoke inhalation. None was in serious condition. A pro-Kurdish legislator,

imprisoned for alleged links to an outlawed Kurdish rebel group, was staying in a separate ward and was not affected by the fire, the region’s governor, Celalettin Guvenc told reporters. Guvenc said authorities had launched an investigation into the incident, including into possible delays by authorities or firefighters in responding to the fire.

More fire crews battling destructive Colorado blaze

George, a hospital respiratory therapy manager, struggled to describe her reaction to the revelations. Her grandfather, McClellan Charles Shields, and Dolphus Shields were half brothers. They both lived in Birmingham, Ala., where George grew up. “I’m appalled at slavery,” said George, 61. “I don’t know how that could have even gone on in a Christian nation. I know that times were different then. But the idea that one of our ancestors raped a slave. ...” She trailed off for a moment, considering the awful possibility. “I would like to know the answer, but I would not like to know that my great-grandfather was a rapist,” she said. “I would like to know in my brain that they were nice to her and her children. It would be easier to live with that.” Tribble, who began researching her roots before Obama became the first lady, said she was shocked to learn that her ancestors owned slaves. “My family, well, they were just your most basic people who never had a lot,” Tribble said. “I never imagined that they owned slaves.” Her mother, Lottie Bell Shields, was an orphan who picked cotton as a girl and was passed from relative to relative in a family that could ill afford an extra mouth to feed. She never got past the seventh grade. Yet even before she took the DNA test, Tribble had a strong feeling that her family and the first lady’s family were related. She still remembers the moment when she laid eyes on an old black-and-white photograph of Dolphus Shields. She was sitting at her kitchen table in her house in the Atlanta suburbs when she saw him staring out of the pages of The New York Times: This stern, bespectacled African-American man who happened to share her mother’s last name. Tribble never had any doubts about her family’s ethnic background. Yet when she stared at the photograph that day, she said she felt something entirely unexpected: a strong stirring of recognition. “I just thought, ‘Well, he looks like somebody who could be in my family,’ ” she said.

By Thomas Peipert The Associated Press

DENVER — Additional crews were joining the fight Saturday against a wildfire in northern Colorado that has scorched about 85 square miles and destroyed at least 181 homes, the most in state history. The High Park Fire burning 15 miles west of Fort Collins surpasses the Fourmile Canyon wildfire, which destroyed 169 homes west of Boulder in September 2010. More than 1,630 personnel are working on the Fort Collins-area fire, officials said in a news release Saturday night. The figure represents an increase of more than 100 firefighters from a day earlier. The lightning-caused blaze, which is believed to have killed a 62-yearold woman whose body was found in her cabin, was 20 percent contained. The fire’s incident commander said full containment could be two to four weeks away. Fire information officer Brett Haberstick said hot and dry conditions were expected to continue, but crews have made progress in containing a 200acre spot fire that erupted Thursday afternoon north of the Cache La Poudre River, a critical line of defense against northward growth.

“Two 20-person hotshot crews worked throughout the day to secure lines around the perimeter of this spot fire,” the officials said in a release. Firefighters have extinguished other incursions north of the river, but the most recent one appeared to be more serious. National Weather Service meteorologist Kyle Fredin said some rain was expected in the fire zone Saturday evening, but it will not be enough to put the fire out. “We need a rain that will really last all day,” he said. “But it’s better than dry wind at this point.” But crews were bracing for difficult conditions today with wind gusts expected to hit 50 mph along ridge tops and in Poudre Canyon and temperatures in the 90s. The fire was reported June 9 and has since raced through large swaths of private and U.S. Forest Service land. It was 45 percent contained late Saturday.

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SUNDAY, JUNE 17, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

40 years later, Watergate crime scene is an afterthought

Assad Continued from A1 In Assad’s mind, his presence and control are the only protection from mass killings for his Alawite clan — a Shiite sect that makes up about 12 percent of Syria’s population. “He has no illusions about how he is perceived around the world,” said the Rev. Patrick Henry Reardon, pastor of All Saints Antiochian Orthodox Church in Chicago, who met with Assad for 90 minutes in December. “But he sees it as an almost metaphysical necessity that he must hold his country together and, to do so, he’s got to knock a few heads.” When Assad took over Syria after the death of his father, longtime autocrat Hafez Assad, the new president was widely perceived as a reformer, someone who might apply Western ideas of modernity and openness to ruling an Arab state. After all, he had lived in London, married a British-born woman and become an advocate of new media technologies. He was a big fan of Phil Collins, ELO and the Beatles. Unlike his tougher older brother Basil, who died in a car crash in 1994, Bashar al-Assad had not been trained to rule; he was a physician, a scientist, secular and worldly in style and rhetoric. In his inaugural address, Assad issued what sounded to many like a call for change: “We should face ourselves and our society bravely, and conduct a brave dialogue … in which we reveal our points of weakness.” But the government’s reaction to the Damascus Spring proved to be a more accurate indicator of how Assad would rule. Despite his rhetoric about shaping a more modern and democratic society, Assad adopted a narrative in which Syria was ever under assault by a conspiracy of radical Islamists, the United States and Israel. “In his mind, if Syria becomes the North Korea of the Middle East for 10 years, so be it,” said David Lesch, a historian at Trinity University in San Antonio and author of a book about Assad. Even as his government denied any role in mass killings of villagers, Assad addressed Syria’s parliament this month, offering a muscular defense of harsh responses to what he views as an existential assault on his country. “No rational human being likes blood,” he said. “But when a surgeon goes into the operation room, cuts a wound, the wound bleeds, the surgeon cuts and amputates. Do we condemn the surgeon because his hands are bloodstained, or do we praise him for saving a human being’s life?”

‘Power is an aphrodisiac’ When Assad first took office, he looked like a different sort of Arab ruler, backing away from some of the imperial trappings of power. He broke with tradition and took his wife to Damascus restaurants without bodyguards. He even drove himself around. But Assad soon “began to believe that the future of Syria was entirely wrapped up with his own future,” said Lesch, who met regularly with the Syrian leader over most of the past decade. “Power is an aphrodisiac, and when you are surrounded by sycophants, you begin to believe them.” He also learned that though he inherited his position from his father, his authority depended on satisfying Syria’s military and security forces, as well as his family’s Alawite clan, Lesch said. Lesch got a firsthand look at Assad’s reluctance to confront his security forces in 2007, when the scholar was invited to meet with the president. Lesch was held at the Damascus airport and interrogated for three hours by a security officer who kept twirling his gun on his fingers. When Lesch met with Assad and told him what had happened, the president professed to be appalled, Lesch said, but claimed he could not do anything about the mistreatment. “He needs the security forces for other things,” Lesch said. “He just has rationalized that that’s the way it has to be in Syria.” Publicly, Assad rejects the idea that the current uprising stems from the frustration of young people who see no future in a country with few jobs and an entrenched cronyism. Assad blames colonialism. He blames foreign forces. He blames “media forgeries.” He blames “internal sedition.”

A7

B y Jessica Gresko The Associated Press

The Associated Press file photo

“No rational human being likes blood,” Bashar Assad said while addressing the Syrian Parliament this month. “But when a surgeon goes into the operation room, cuts a wound, the wound bleeds, the surgeon cuts and amputates.”

That’s all propaganda, and Assad doesn’t believe a word of it, argues Abdallah, who was imprisoned from 2005 to 2006 for opposing Assad. Now at the Syrian Center for Political and Strategic Studies in Washington, Abdallah said Assad is clinging to tactics that worked in his father’s day, but cannot succeed in an era of online video and satellite TV. Assad said this month that only “a monster” could order the massacres that rebels insist were committed by progovernment militias. Assad, of course, doesn’t see himself as a monster, but as a leader defending his family, his sect and his vision of Syria as a bulwark against radical Islamists, said Eyal Zisser, a scholar of Syrian history at Tel Aviv University in Israel. “Assad has no options. He sees what happened to the other leaders,” Zisser said. “He is alone. All he has is the military and the Alawites — people ready to fight, not for him, but to save themselves.”

Determined to stay Leaving the country is a possibility Assad has considered and rejected. “He told me he and his family could get out, but the Alawites would be massacred, as well as the other minorities, and he therefore could not just leave,” said Malcolm Hoenlein, executive vice chairman of the Conference of Presidents of Major American Jewish Organizations, who spent more than three hours in one-on-one conversation with Assad during a visit last year. Assad is not isolated from information. He regularly sends family and staff links to interesting websites, according to emails a Syrian dissident provided to Britain’s Guardian newspaper. One email, apparently from Assad to his wife, featured lyrics to a country song by Blake Shelton: “I’ve been a walking heartache / I’ve made a mess of me / The person that I’ve been lately / Ain’t who I wanna be.” But there is little introspection in the emails, many of which detail Asma Assad’s shopping ventures, as she arranged for shipment of furniture from London, fondue sets from Amazon.com and the latest Harry Potter DVD from Lebanon. Political psychologists Jerrold Post and Ruthie Pertsis of George Washington University see Assad as one of a number of world leaders whom they call “second-choice sons who became leaders by default.” Assad, Israel’s Benjamin Netanyahu, India’s Rajiv Gandhi and U.S. President John F. Kennedy each had to come to terms with an unexpected rise to power after the death of a brother who had been groomed for that role. Assad, who grew up expecting his brother Basil to follow their father, remained a publicly quiet, shy figure until 1994, when Basil was killed in a car crash. That, Post said, explains why Assad often seems “disengaged,” such as when he told ABC’s Barbara Walters in December that he doesn’t control Syria’s military forces. “This isn’t what he bargained for,” Post said. “His father yanked him out of his medical residency. But he doesn’t want to see the Assad dynasty die on his watch, so he is living this jarring disconnect, as if he can’t stand the reality of what’s going on around him.” None of those interviewed who have met with Assad in the past few years believe he will leave Syria voluntarily, unless all is lost. “He is determined to do everything opposite to what (Hosni) Mubarak did,” Lesch said, “and that means fight to the end.”

WASHINGTON — When the Watergate complex was built in the 1960s, it was just a group of buildings on the western edge of the nation’s capital. Then, 40 years ago today, police in Washington arrested five men breaking into the office of the Democratic National Committee there. Scandals, from Monicagate to Troopergate, haven’t been the same since. Thesedays,though,there’s little marking the location of the 1972 crime that ultimately led to the resignation of President Richard Nixon. The office building that was the site of the break-in is still in use, though tenants have changed. The adjacent hotel where the burglars stayed is currently closed. And another hotel across the street where a lookout watched the night of the break-in, with a walkie-talkie on hand, has been turned into a college dorm. Jane Freundel Levey, the chief historian for Cultural Tourism DC, a coalition of city cultural and heritage groups, says there’s talk of installing a set of historical signs in the Foggy Bottom neighborhood where the buildings sit. If that happens, the spaces that played a part in the Watergate drama will certainly be marked, she said. “We are a nation of people who make pilgrimages,” she said, adding that people like knowing when they’re standing on a historic spot. Now, however, most tourists visiting Washington head to see the Capitol, the Declaration of Independence, the theater where President Abraham Lincoln was shot and the Smithsonian museums, where interactive exhibits and tour guides await. There’s nothing like that at the Watergate, which sits along the banks of the Potomac River next to the city’s John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts. The site is about a halfmile from the nearest subway station and not on the route of the city’s red, double-decker tour buses. The surrounding neighborhood is full of George Washington University students and federal government workers, but the Watergate is a little farther away. “It’s somewhat quiet down there,” said Carolyn Crouch, founder of Washington Walks, a group that takes people on neighborhood walking tours and who leads a tour of the area about twice each year. “It’s really pretty peaceful.” What visitors get if they make the trek is city dwellers, going about their business. The Democratic National

Susan Walsh / The Associated Press

The Watergate complex is seen from the top floor of the Watergate Office Building in Washington. The office building that was the site of the infamous break-in is still in use, but with different tenants. The adjacent hotel where the burglars stayed is closed. The hotel across the street where a lookout watched the night of the break-in has been turned into a college dorm.

Committee, the burglars’ target, moved out of the Watergate long ago. The group’s offices are now across town, just south of the U.S. Capitol. The sixthfloor office space the committee once occupied now houses the office of the Iraqi embassy’s military attaché and a doctor’s office. A real estate company that bought the building in 2011 has plans for millions of dollars of upgrades, but half the building is currently vacant. Empty, too, are the more than 200 rooms of the Watergate Hotel, the building next to the office where the burglars checked into rooms 214 and 314 under assumed names. When police arrived to search the rooms, they found electrical equipment, blue surgical gloves and thousands of dollars in brand-new 100-dollar bills. The hotel was closed for renovations in 2007, and its current owners have said they plan to make changes

including adding more than 100 rooms, but the hotel won’t open until at least 2013. Perhaps the biggest changes have been to what was the Howard Johnson’s Motor Lodge across the street from the Watergate office building. That’s where former FBI agent Alfred C. Baldwin III sat in a hotel room and listened to telephone wiretaps placed by the burglars at the Democratic National Committee offices during a first, undetected burglary in May. Baldwin was in room 723 on the night of the second fateful caper, June 17. The hotel’s owners eventually capitalized on the room’s fame, installing a brass plaque declaring the space “The Watergate Room” in 1996. Inside, they hung framed reproductions of newspapers from that era and stocked the room with Watergate videos and books. It didn’t last.

George Washington University bought the hotel three years later and turned it into a dorm. Students assigned to the seventh floor initially participated in Watergate-related activities, and Room 723 remained empty because of its historical significance. But the university changed its mind in 2001, gathering up memorabilia that had been in the room, depositing it in the school’s archives and assigning the room to students. Sarah Steckler, who graduated in 2007 and is now an attorney in New York, lived in the room her freshman year. She said she remembers students taking pictures with the plaque outside her door or knocking and asking to see inside. The students, born years after Nixon’s infamous resignation, were generally disappointed with what they saw. “Inside it was a standard dorm room,” she said.

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A 8 THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, JUNE 17, 2012

China makes landmark space launch By Barbara Demick Los Angeles Times

BEIJING — It might not have been a giant step for mankind, but the launch Saturday of a piloted space capsule to dock with China’s space station prototype marked the country’s breakthrough into the exclusive club once made up only of the United States and Russia. And as far as womankind is concerned, there was another first. One of the three astronauts in the Shenzhou 9 capsule was 33-year-old Liu Yang, the first Chinese woman in space. Shenzhou 9 was launched at 6:37 p.m. against a vivid blue sky from the Jiuquan satellite launch center at the edge of the Gobi desert. Televised nationally, the launch prompted a round of applause in the command center as the capsule separated from its carrier rocket and entered orbit. “Today’s successful launch is a great first step,” CCTV host Kang Hui said. “I hope the astronauts will bring us more good news like this in the coming days.” The trickiest part of the 13day mission will come when the capsule docks with the Tiangong 1 space module, a prototype of a space station about the size of a school bus, which is orbiting approximately 213 miles above Earth. The docking is expected Monday. The same docking procedure was carried out in November by an unmanned capsule, the Shenzhou 8, but the degree of difficulty is greater when carrying a crew.

Space station plans The Chinese were excluded from the International Space Station by a vote of the U.S. Congress, citing fear of technology transfers. The Chinese have said they will build their own, smaller station by 2020, the year funding for the International Space Station expires. China’s appetite and budget for space exploration appears to be growing as others are getting out of the business. “Ironically, by the time they finish their space station in the early 2020s, the Chinese might be the only people left up there. Absent changes in current U.S., Russian and European space policies, the International Space Station will be decommissioned and deorbited in 2020,” analyst Gregory Kulacki noted in a report last week by the Union of Concerned Scientists. China’s objective is to test docking mechanisms and life-support systems that will be essential if Beijing is to achieve its objective of operating its own space station. The Chinese, who sent their first man into space in 2003, have also said they want to send a man to the moon. As latecomers to the space race, the Chinese are still substantially behind, perhaps by as much as 40 years, in the estimation of Morris Jones, an Australian scholar who published a book on the Chinese space industry. “Right now, the Chinese space program is roughly the same as the American space program towards the very end of the 1960s, though clearly they are not in a position to fly to the moon,” Jones said. Jones sees China’s space ambitions in much the same light as America’s and Russia’s, serving military, technological and propaganda goals. “Human spaceflight is a very advanced achievement, and China is attempting to show its growing strength,” he said. In the live television coverage, a camera in the capsule showed a large red banner behind the astronauts with the ubiquitous Chinese character fu, meaning luck. After the Shenzhou 9 separated from its carrier rocket, the astronauts waved to the camera, and workers at the command center waved a Chinese flag.

Myanmar’s Suu Kyi accepts 1991 Nobel Peace Prize The Associated Press OSLO, Norway — Myanmar opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi declared Saturday that the Nobel Peace Prize she won while under house arrest 21 years ago helped to shatter her sense of isolation and ensured that the world would

demand democracy in her military-controlled homeland. Suu Kyi received two standing ovations inside Oslo’s city hall as she gave her long-delayed acceptance speech to the Norwegian Nobel Committee in front of Norway’s King Harald, Queen Sonja and

about 600 dignitaries. The 66year-old champion of political freedom praised the power of her 1991 Nobel honor both for saving her from the depths of personal despair and shining an enduring spotlight on injustices in Myanmar. Suu Kyi, who since winning

freedom in 2010 has led her National League for Democracy party into opposition in Myanmar’s parliament, offered cautious support for the first tentative steps toward democratic reform in her country. But she said progress would depend both on maintaining foreign

pressure on the army-backed government — and on carefully managing the ethnic tensions threatening the country. “If I advocate cautious optimism, it is not because I do not have faith in the future, but because I do not want to encourage blind faith.”


B2

THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, JUNE 17, 2012

Graduation

the Distinguished Service Award, an honor recognizing Continued from B1 persons or organizations that The number of students have made “exceptional conwho graduated Saturday is 25 tributions” to OSU-Cascades, percent more than in 2011. Central Oregon, Oregon or the Calling this world. Last fall, year’s graduating Bruckner pledged class “Pioneers in “Students, $800,000 to OSUthe building of a you are Cascades,allowing university,” Johnthe school to finalambassadors son said the gradize the purchase uates’ success at for OSUof the Graduate & the small school Cascades and Research Center. over the past four Bob Eberhard, for Central years has helped president of Eberconvince the state Oregon, and hard’s Dairy Prodand the commu- we can’t wait ucts of Redmond, nity that the time gave the keynote to see what is right to invest in address. the expansion of you will do.” An OSU graduOSU-Cascades. ate, Eberhard — Becky Johnson, spoke of his near“Students, you OSU-Cascades ly 50 years buildare ambassadors vice president ing the dairy his for OSU-Cascades and for Central Orfather started. He egon, and we can’t recounted strugwait to see what gling in the early you will do,” Johnson said. days, when he was asked to Former Bend Mayor Allen sell the company’s products Bruckner was recognized dur- to restaurant owners but ing Saturday’s ceremony with soon realized he knew very

little about the restaurant business or how the dairy’s products might be used. Finding a mentor — in Eberhard’s case, a chef with 25 years of experience — “saved my bacon,” Eberhard said. Eberhard urged the graduating class to enjoy life and “be a good business friend.” “The number one thing you have to offer is honesty,” he said. “You only have one name, and only you can decide what it stands for. My father used to say, ‘Everyone is honest until they prove themselves dishonest — and you only do it once.’ ” The 2012 graduating class will be the final OSUCascades class to graduate students from programs offered by the University of Oregon. Starting next year, all programs offered by the University of Oregon at the Bend campus will be transferred to OSU, although the faculty teaching such classes will remain the same.

Geothermal

ter tracer work, said Michael Campana, a water resources professor at Oregon State University. After reviewing the companies’ plan for the experiment, Campana said he had no problem with the amounts of chemicals Rhodamine WT and fluorescein being used, nor the metallic elements cesium, rubidium and lithium. Critics of the experiment have raised concerns about the chemicals and metals being toxic. “Keep in mind that just about every substance is toxic — it’s the dose that matters,” Campana wrote in an email.

Continued from B1

Quakes and water quality As the companies proceed, there are still concerns about the stimulation triggering earthquakes and chemicals used to track the spread of the created reservoir coming into contact with the aquifer, or natural groundwater reservoir. AltaRock and Davenport officials say they will monitor the earthquake situation closely, shutting down the operation if the temblors become too strong. This summer they are establishing an underground array of seismometers, cali-

brated to detect the slightest rumbling, near the experimental well. Data from the array of about 20 seismometers will be available online before the experiment starts, said Doug Perry, president of Davenport Newberry. “When they actually do the stimulation you’ll be able to see it in real time,” he said. They also say a combination of steel and concrete casing inside the first 6,500 feet of the well will keep the water out of the aquifer. On the Newberry Volcano the deepest sections of the aquifer are 1,000 feet down. The chemicals and naturally occurring metallic elements set to go down the well are commonly used in groundwa-

— Reporter: 541-617-7812, ddarling@bendbulletin.com

For The Bulletin’s full list, including federal, state, county and city levels, visit www.bendbulletin.com/officials.

1300 N.W. Wall St. Bend, OR 97701 Web: www.deschutes.org Phone: 541-388-6571 Fax: 541-382-1692 County Commission

Tammy Baney, R-Bend Phone: 541-388-6567 Email: Tammy_Baney@ co.deschutes.or.us Alan Unger, D-Redmond Phone: 541-388-6569 Email: Alan_Unger@co.deschutes. or.us Tony DeBone, R-La Pine Phone: 541-388-6568 Email: Tony_DeBone@ co.deschutes.or.us

CROOK COUNTY 300 N.E. Third St. Prineville, OR 97754 Phone: 541-447-6555 Fax: 541-416-3891 Email: administration@co.crook.or.us Web: co.crook.or.us Crook County Judge Mike McCabe Phone: 541-447-6555 Email: mike.mccabe@co.crook.or.us County Court

Ken Fahlgren Phone: 541-447-6555 Email: ken.fahlgren@co.crook.or.us Seth Crawford Phone: 541-447-6555 Email: seth.crawford@co.crook.or.us

Jodie Barram Phone: 541-388-5505 Email: jbarram@ci.bend.or.us Scott Ramsay Phone: 541-388-5505 Email: sramsay@ci.bend.or.us

CITY OF REDMOND 716 S.W. Evergreen Ave. Redmond, OR 97756 Phone: 541-923-7710 Fax: 541-548-0706

Mayor George Endicott Phone: 541-948-3219 Email: George.Endicott@ ci.redmond.or.us Jay Patrick Phone: 541-508-8408 Email: Jay.Patrick@ci.redmond. or.us Ed Boero Phone: 541-604-5399 Email: Ed.Boero@ci.redmond.or.us Margie Dawson Phone: 541-604-5400 Email: Margie.Dawson@ ci.redmond.or.us Shirlee Evans Phone: 541-604-5401 Email: Shirlee.Evans@ci.redmond. or.us Camden King Phone: 541-604-5402 Email: Camden.King@ci.redmond. or.us Ed Onimus Phone: 541-604-5403 Email: Ed.Onimus@ci.redmond.or.us

CITY OF SISTERS JEFFERSON COUNTY 66 S.E. D St. Madras, OR 97741 Phone: 541-475-2449 Fax: 541-475-4454 Web: www.co.jefferson.or.us

520 E. Cascade Avenue P.O. Box 39 Sisters, OR 97759 Phone: 541-549-6022 Fax: 541-549-0561 City Council

County Commission

Mike Ahern, John Hatfield, Wayne Fording Phone: 541-475-2449 Email: commissioner@co. jefferson.or.us

CITY OF BEND 710 N.W. Wall St. Bend, OR 97701 Phone: 541-388-5505 Web: www.ci.bend.or.us City Manager Eric King Phone: 541-388-5505 Email: citymanager@ci.bend.or.us City Council

Tom Greene Phone: 541-388-5505 Email: tgreene@ci.bend.or.us Jeff Eager Phone: 541-388-5505 Email: jeager@ci.bend.or.us Kathie Eckman Phone: 541-388-5505 Email: keckman@ci.bend.or.us Jim Clinton Phone: 541-388-5505 Email: jclinton@ci.bend.or.us Mark Capell Phone: 541-388-5505 Email: mcapell@ci.bend.or.us

Email: dvarcoe@ci.la-pine.or.us Stu Martinez Phone: 541-536-1432 Email: smartinez@ci.la-pine.or.us

CITY OF PRINEVILLE 387 N.E. Third St. Prineville, OR 97754 Phone: 541-447-5627 Fax: 541-447-5628 Email: cityhall@cityofprineville.com Web: www.cityofprineville.com City Council

City Council

David Asson Phone: 503-913-7342 Email: dasson@ci.sisters.or.us Wendy Holzman Phone: 541-549-8558 wholzman@ci.sisters.or.us Lon Kellstrom Phone: 541-480-9975 Email: lkellstrom@ci.sisters.or.us Pat Thompson Phone: 541-610-3780 Email: pthompson@ci.sisters.or.us Sharlene Weed Phone: 541-549-1193 Email: sweed@ci.sisters.or.us

CITY OF LA PINE P.O. Box 3055 16345 Sixth St. La Pine, OR 97739 Phone: 541-536-1432 Fax: 541-536-1462 City Council

Kathy Agan Phone: 541-536-1432 Email: kagan@ci.la-pine.or.us Ken Mulenex Phone: 541-536-1432 Email: kmulenex@ci.la-pine.or.us Don Greiner Phone: 541-536-1432 Email: dgreiner@ci.la-pine.or.us Dan Varcoe Phone: 541-536-1432

Can you work a camera, and capture a great picture? And can you tell us a bit about it? Email your color or black and white photos to readerphotos@ bendbulletin.com and we’ll pick the best for publication. Submission requirements: Include as much detail as possible — when and where you took it, and any special technique used — as well as your name, hometown and phone number. Photos must be high resolution (at least 6 inches wide and 300 dpi) and cannot be altered.

— Reporter: 541-383-0387, shammers@bendbulletin.com

P  O DESCHUTES COUNTY

Well shot! RE ADER PHOTOS

Betty Roppe Phone: 541-447-5627 Email: broppe@cityofprineville.com Jack Seley Phone: 541-447-5627 Email: jseley@cityofprineville.com Stephen Uffelman Phone: 541-447-5627 Email: suffelman@cityofprineville.com Dean Noyes Phone: 541-447-5627 Email: dnoyes@cityofprineville.com Gordon Gillespie Phone: 541-447-5627 Email: ggillespie@cityofprineville.com Jim MacDonald Phone: 541-447-5627 Email: jmacdonald@cityofprineville.com

CITY OF MADRAS 71 S.E. D Street Madras, OR 97741 Phone: 541-475-2344 Fax: 541-475-7061 City Council

Mayor Melanie Widmer Phone: 541-475-2344 Email: mwidmer@ci.madras.or.us Tom Brown Phone: 541-475-2344 Email: thbrown@ci.madras.or.us Royce Embanks Jr. Phone: 541-475-2344 Email: rembanks@ci.madras.or.us Jennifer Flowers Phone: 541-475-2344 Email: jflowers@ci.madras.or.us Richard Ladeby Phone: 541-475-2344 Email: rladeby@ci.madras.or.us Jon Young Phone: 541-475-2344 Email: jyoung@ci.madras.or.us Kevin O’Meara Phone: 541-475-2344 Email: komeara@ci.madras.or.us

CITY OF CULVER 200 W. First St. Culver, OR 97734 Phone: 541-546-6494 Fax: 541-546-3624 City Council

Nancy Diaz, Laura Dudley, Amy McCully, Wayne Johnson, J.B. Schumacher, Shannon Poole Phone: 541-546-6494

CITY OF METOLIUS 636 Jefferson Ave. Metolius, OR 97741 Phone: 541-546-5533 City Council

Susie Binder, Bill Reynolds, Tia Powell, Patty Wyler Phone: 541-546-5533

TAKING FLIGHT While kayaking on Hosmer Lake during summer 2011, Scott Nelson photographed this egret with a simple Canon PowerShot SD550, 1/320 seconds at f4.9. — Submitted by Scott Nelson, of Bend

Week

as ambassador to El Salvador.

Continued from B1 Needing 60 votes to override the cloture motion, the Senate voted 62-37 in her favor. Nine Republicans joined the Democrat majority, and all 37 no votes came from Republicans.

Merkley (D) ..................Y Wyden (D) ....................Y

U .S. SENATE VOTE • Confirm Mari Carmen Aponte

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SUNDAY, JUNE 17, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

B3

O N CORVALLIS

Friends help couple rebuild shop after fire tension of ourselves.” And out of the ashes came CORVALLIS — Early on a pleasant surprise: Friends, the morning of Jan. 17, Joanne family, work associates, neighand Bill Storch woke up to the bors and contractors have lent sound of an explosion. a helping hand in one way or Rushing to the window, they another. saw a fire swallowing the twoWithin days of the fire, the story wood shop beStorches rehind their Corvallis ceived phone property. The build- “Neither one of calls from more ing housed their us figured we than 25 local business, Storch could function woodshops that Woodworking, and offered space contained profes- without a they could use in sional carpentry shop. We’ve the interim. equipment, count- gotten so our Joanne Storch less hand tools and listed more than keepsake wood tools are an 80 individuals pieces. who helped in extension of F i r e f i g h t e r s ourselves.” some way, from were at the scene sorting through from 3:30 a.m. until — Bill Storch the post-blaze 11 p.m. that day, debris, offering first to battle the 80shop and storfoot-tall flames and age space, cookthen to manage the smolder- ing up meals on long working embers. days and breaking a sweat to An independent fire inspec- tip up framed walls or install tor determined that an electri- the roof’s plywood. cal cord stored underneath the “People really come shop most likely started the through, and they enjoy helpblaze; a metal canoe stored ing,” Bill Storch said. nearby was probably jostled That group included Bill by strong winds and landed Storch’s 83-year-old father, on the cord. Dana. The Storches were shak“He’s here almost every en, but not disheartened: day,” Joanne Storch said. They planned to rebuild the The Storches also were shop. They began sorting happy with the work of Henthrough debris the Saturday derer Design + Build, which morning following the Tues- installed the supporting floor day fire. joists, and The Village Builder, “Neither one of us figured which installed plywood wall we could function without a sheathing over the frames. shop,” Bill Storch said. “We’ve The Village Builder crew gotten so our tools are an ex- even brought Joanne Storch By Gail Cole

Corvallis Gazette-Times

Jesse Skoubo / Corvallis Gazette-Times

Joanne Storch of Corvallis is engaged in rebuilding framing on a wood shop on her property. In January, fire destroyed the building that housed Storch Woodworking, the business owned by Joanne and her husband, Bill. But friends, family, work associates, neighbors and contractors have helped the Storches rebuild.

on board to help cut the plywood (in fact, she built the shop’s framing herself). “I felt like I was part of the team,” she said. Both say the new project is far from over. There’s still drywall and wainscoting to install, oak floor to lay and doors to build and install. Even with the help of friends

OSU, Michelle Obama’s brother eager to welcome the first lady to Corvallis

and family, much of the work is done by Bill and Joanne. Neither expect their new space to compare to its predecessor, built by Bill Storch in 1981 and filled with decades worth of memories and family antiques along with their tools. But they consider themselves fortunate to benefit

from the good deeds of the community. “People really do care — it’s amazing,” Bill Storch said.

Vancouver, Wash., may ban aerial fireworks sales The Associated Press PORTLAND — The Vancouver, Wash., City Council is considering a ban on aerial fireworks, bad news for Oregonians who found refuge from their own state’s ban on the devices by crossing the state line. The Oregonian reports the council approved a first reading of the ordinance June 11 and has scheduled a public hearing and second reading for Monday. The proposed restrictions were based on safety concerns of emergency responders and residents. Fireworks can be legally used from July 1 to the Fourth of July. The proposal would still permit hand-held sparkling devices, cones, fountains, sparklers, ground spinners, snakes and smoke devices. If the ordinance passes, it would take effect next year.

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541-549-9388

By Jonathan J. Cooper The Associated Press

PORTLAND — Officially, Michelle Obama is coming to Oregon today to deliver a commencement address at Oregon State University in Corvallis. While the first lady’s there, though, she’ll also be meeting her newest nephew, born four months ago to her brother and his wife. With an official visit from his sister, Craig Robinson will be merging his two very public roles, as first brother-in-law and as head coach of Oregon State’s men’s basketball team. “It’s really nice to see how excited Oregon State, Corvallis and the state of Oregon are about her visit,” Robinson said. “That’s a good feeling, as a big brother, to know so many people have warm feelings for your sister coming to town.” Robinson doesn’t tap into his sister’s star power very often, he said, but he thought she could bring some worthwhile attention to the university. He also takes his players every year for an insider’s experience in Washington. “It gives the guys ... on the team a great experience, to be able to go to Washington, play a game, have the first family support you and get a tour of the White House. It’s a really meaningful experience,” he said. Robinson played basketball at Princeton and played professionally in Europe for two years. He coached for two years at Illinois Institute of Technology before leaving in 1990 for a career in finance. A decade later, he returned to coaching as an assistant at Northwestern, then as head coach at Brown. OSU hired Robinson in 2008, when Barack Obama was an Illinois senator seeking the presidency. He said his brother-in-law’s job hasn’t changed his job all that much. Obama and Robinson are close, he said, even if they don’t see each other as frequently as they did when both lived in Chicago. Obama is making her second trip to Corvallis, and Robinson brings his family to Washington once or twice a year, he said. Robinson insisted, as do school officials, that he merely opened the door. OSU sealed the deal because of its public health initiatives that fit well

Ted S. Warren / The Associated Press

First Lady Michelle Obama will be reunited with her brother, Oregon State University men’s basketball coach Craig Robinson, when the first lady delivers the commencement address at OSU today. The two are shown together here at the 2008 Democratic National Convention in Denver.

with the first lady’s agenda to improve health and combat childhood obesity. The university is promoting its work on the One Health Initiative, which aims to improve collaboration between experts involved in health, including doctors, nurses, dentists, veterinarians and environmental experts. “University graduations typically don’t attract a lot of attention,” said Steve Clark, an OSU spokesman. “In this case, we’re receiving, certainly, regional attention across the Pacific Northwest and national attention, too.” OSU’s graduating class of nearly 5,000 students will be its largest ever, Clark said. Obama will be given an honorary doctorate in public health. Officials expect more than 30,000 people to pack Reser Stadium for the graduation ceremony. Visitors will have to pass through metal detectors, and the university is encouraging them to arrive as early as possible. The doors will open at 12:30 p.m. Obama’s OSU graduation speech will be her third this year. She spoke at Virginia Tech and North Carolina A&T. The Corvallis trip is part of a Western swing for the first lady this week. She has campaign events scheduled Tuesday and Wednesday in Nevada and Colorado, battleground states in the president’s re-election bid. Robinson campaigned for Obama in 2008 and expects to

be involved again this year. “Whatever help they need, I’m willing to give and looking forward to giving it,” he said.

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SUNDAY, JUNE 17, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

B5

WEST NEWS

4 vanish in avalanche on McKinley By Nigel Duara The Associated Press

Kevin Wright / National Park Service / The Associated Press

Climbers hike through the area where an avalanche swept Japanese climbers off a hill during their descent from Alaska’s Mount McKinley. One of the five climbers in the party survived a fall into a crevasse. The other four tumbled into the avalanche debris and haven’t been seen since.

Yesterday Continued from B1 “You can say that we are pretty well tied up just now with our new pulp mill in western Canada,” said Mr. Gipson. “But just as soon as that is out of the way we will be free to turn our attention to Bend, and I see no reason why we will not start construction here just as soon as we possibly can get around to it.” These two statements — From Dr. Brooks and Mr. Gipson — are the most important, as regards Bend’s manufacturing development, that ever have been made. Both men are notably conservative, and on every previous visit have been careful to not make a statement that might in any way unfairly raise hopes or tend to “boom.” While admitting when here before, they have, up to Monday, never allowed themselves to be quoted as saying that such a mill was positively decided upon, and forthcoming this summer. “Why should we build anywhere but at Bend?” said Mr. Mueller. “We are heavily interested in the town. The mill sites are here, the railroads are here, and our timber is conveniently situated. Yes, our mill will be at Bend, as far as it is possible to see now.” In speaking of the new mill’s effects upon population, J.P. Keyes, who has done much of the mill construction work for the Brooks companies for many years, did not hesitate to state that the establishment of even one of the mills will practically double the population of the town, while the two mills, with a double payroll of over 1,000 men, would mean an increase of Bend’s population of between 3,000 and 4,500 people, considering only the workers and their dependents. The third announcement of great importance to Bend is that a $40,000 electrical power plant will be erected immediately, which means that a plant will be put in operation that will not only be able to care for the town, for a number of years, but also will be in a position to supply power for the mills.

75 YEARS AGO For the week ending June 16, 1937

Film actor runs from 1,200 San Francisco girls Film Actor Robert Taylor visited the San Francisco girls high school today, and pandemonium broke loose. Twelve hundred shrieking

girls, flourishing textbooks for autographs, mobbed the movie actor and forced him to flee the school auditorium by climbing down a steel fire escape. Taylor ran across the school yard like a truant with the throng of girls, their classroom inhibition gone, in pursuit. Finally he ducked through a basement exit and into a taxi cab.

Miss Earhart flies over the African wild FORT LAMY, Africa — Amelia Earhart, on her leisurely flight around the world, arrived here from Gao at 12:55 p.m., Greenwich time today. Miss Earhart averaged 135 miles an hour over one of the most difficult sections of her flight across Africa. She was obliged to fly low to follow the few landmarks and was hampered by dense vapors arising from the forests. Nearing Fort Lamy, she flew over a herd of hippopotami in the Chari river. Three Frenchmen comprising the crew of the Fort Lamy airport sheltered her plane in the only hanger. Miss Earhart had lunch at the home of Field Commander L.E. Thomas. The plane will be refueled after sunset because of the intense heat.

Social Security Act is costly for Oregon Oregon’s social security burden during 1938 may total $4,000,000 to $12,000,000 it was revealed late Wednesday at the meeting of the legislative interim committee on state and local revenues. Old age assistance became the state’s biggest financial problem when the 1937 legislature reduced the age limit from 70 to 65 years and increased the maximum benefits to $30 a month. The committee was set up to study means of gaining additional revenues to meet the growing budget.

An avalanche on Alaska’s Mount McKinley swept a Japanese climbing team off a hill as they tried to descend on a rope line, leaving four presumed dead. One climber survived after tumbling 60 feet into a crevasse. U.S. National Park Service officials say five people were traveling as one rope team early Thursday morning as part of a Miyagi Workers Alpine Federation expedition on the Alaska mountain. Park Service spokeswoman Maureen McLaughlin said Hitoshi Ogi, 69, survived the fall. He was able to climb out. The other four fell into the avalanche debris and haven’t

participation of girls in sports within their own school. One board member commented that many girls of grade school age are not emotionally equipped to accept defeat in direct sports competition.

Osprey add interest to Mirror Pond Mirror Pond visitors this week included a pair of osprey, those graceful birds generally known as “fish hawks.” The birds attracted considerable attention as they swooped over the pines at riverside, scouted the river, then occasionally dived for fish. Their batting average was low, possibly one fish out of 20 dives. Harassing the osprey were birds that are nesting in the Mirror Pond area. Blackbirds dived on the fishing birds, threw them off course and ruined their nose dives toward the water. Through the years, these birds, not more than a pair or two at a time, have fished the Mirror Pond. Once they drew the criticism of ardent Bend anglers, it was proposed that the osprey be shot. But a naturalist who enjoyed the antics of the osprey objected. He was the late Robert W. Sawyer. The birds, he said, had as much right as man to fish in the Deschutes — and had been getting their trout from the river long before man appeared on the local scene. Sawyer got considerable backing, including a nod from professional naturalists who noted that osprey in their power dives frequently come up with weakling fish. Some of those fish are possibly diseased, it was pointed out. Osprey, by removing such fish, protect the trout that remain in the river. Since that day, some 20 years ago, there has been no local campaign to rid the Mirror Pond of osprey. The birds now are welcome visitors. They add to the interest of Bend’s beautiful Mirror Pond.

50 YEARS AGO For the week ending June 16, 1962

Inter-school girls’ sports ban is voted The State Board of Education Monday approved a ban on grade school sports competition among girls, starting this fall. This means that 6th, 7th and 8th grade girls from one school cannot compete with girls’ teams from another school. The new code does not affect

25 YEARS AGO For the week ending June 16, 1987

City sees growth in Bend’s future Picture Bend with 50,000 residents — its boundaries stretching north to Cooley Road, south to China Hat, east to Hamby-Ward roads and west to Entrada lodge. Picture downtown Bend with a new City Hall, a motel/ hotel and a high-rise parking structure.

been seen since. The climbers are presumed dead by either snow burial or injuries suffered in falls. Snowfall and wind have impeded a search for the missing climbers. Ogi spoke to Park Service employees after the event. He said the climbers were descending the mountain together when the avalanche began, McLaughlin said. They sped up, trying to get down the mountain faster, but the rope connecting them broke when the avalanche struck. Ogi was the lowest person on the rope team. He looked for the other four but couldn’t find them. “He wasn’t sure of all the events,” McLaughlin said, add-

That’s what Bend will look like 20 years from now — at least in the minds of the city commissioners. The commissioners and city staff spent about 8 hours at a retreat in Sunriver and what emerged was a plan for Bend. A key component of the strategy is a long-range annexation policy. Increasing the city population from its current 18,700 to 50,000 may seem like a lofty goal, but in fact the urban area surrounding Bend isn’t too far from that population size now, City Manager Larry Patterson pointed out. About 24,000 people now live in the area surrounding Bend’s city limits, bringing the total urban area population to about 42,000. Unlike city residents, people outside the city limits don’t pay taxes for the city streets, police, sewers and other services they use when they come into Bend, Patterson said. Downtown also was a focus of the “pro-growth” vision. Finding a new City Hall — called a “city service center” — ranked high on the commissioners’ wish list. Discussions also focused on a high-rise parking structure downtown and possibly a large community center capable of handling conventions, Patterson said. Under the commissioner’s vision, the downtown area would expand east to Division Street, south to Florida, north to Portland and west to the Deschutes River. The timber remains the foundation of the community under the commissioner’s vision, but other economic and industrial development also was foreseen. Encouraging recreational manufacturers to locate here was discussed, as well as the possibility of luring a brewery to the area. Patterson said the next step for the commissioners is to take their vision of Bend to community groups to see what they think. Adjustments would be made in response to community comments, he said.

ing that Ogi spoke through a translator and was exhausted. The four missing climbers include 64-year-old Yoshiaki Kato, 50-year-old Masako Suda, 56-year-old Michiko Suzuki, and 63-year-old Tamao Suzuki. There was new snow on the route, but the weather on Thursday was calm, McLaughlin said. “Where the avalanche occurred, the vast majority (of the new snow) was not on the main route,” McLaughlin said. “A small sliver of it was, and that’s what took them.” McLaughlin called the avalanche “an unlucky, random event.” “Avalanches do occur in this vicinity, but it’s not common,

she said. The climbers were attempting the busiest route, West Buttress, during the height of mountaineering season. Climbers attempted the route on 92 percent of attempts on Mount McKinley in 2011. The Park Service said in a news release that nearly 400 people were on the Alaska mountain on Saturday. Mount McKinley, also known as Denali, is North America’s tallest peak. While not a particularly tall peak by global standards, its latitude makes for far thinner air than is found in mountains closer to the equator. That, combined with the weather and temperatures, makes it a particularly dangerous climb.

N B  Ackerman to head PUC Commission SALEM — Gov. John Kitzhaber has chosen Susan Ackerman to chair the Oregon Public Utility Commission. The three-member commission regulates customer rates and services of the state’s investor-owned electric, natural gas and telephone utilities. Ackerman was appointed to the PUC in 2010 to serve out the remaining two years of Lee Beyer’s term. She is starting a second term that will expire in 2016.

Possible tsunami boat is inspected ILWACO, Wash. — Washington wildlife officials are testing samples taken from a 20-foot boat that could be debris from the Japanese tsunami to make sure it wasn’t carrying invasive species or pathogens. Ecology spokesman Curt Hart says the fiberglass boat was pulled from the beach Saturday and thoroughly cleaned at a maintenance service yard at Cape Disap-

pointment State Park. The boat was found beached at the park Friday. Hart says state and federal officials are still trying to determine whether it is debris from the Japanese tsunami.

2 fired from state Black Affairs panel PORTLAND — Gov. John Kitzhaber has fired two members of the Oregon Commission on Black Affairs. He sent letters Thursday to Clifford Walker of Portland and Willie Woolfolk of Medford saying they were terminated immediately. The Oregonian reports no reason was given publicly for the firings, but both men acknowledged conflict with the commission. They were given the option of resigning and refused. Woolfolk has been on the commission more than four years. Walker has been on the commission five years. The Commission on Black Affairs has nine members. The commission works for economic, social, legal and political equality for Oregon blacks. — From wire reports

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B 6 THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, JUNE 17, 2012

W E AT H ER FOR EC A ST Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LP ©2012.

TODAY, JUNE 17

MONDAY Tonight: Mostly clear.

Today: Mostly sunny.

Ben Burkel

Bob Shaw

HIGH

LOW

72

46

Astoria 59/52

57/52

Cannon Beach 57/52

Hillsboro Portland 67/55 66/50

Tillamook 62/52

Salem

58/48

69/52

74/59

Maupin

76/50

Corvallis Yachats

66/44

Prineville 73/46 Sisters Redmond Paulina 79/43 68/44 75/46 Sunriver Bend

60/50

Eugene

Florence

71/49

65/50

70/45

73/49

Coos Bay

74/42

Oakridge

Cottage Grove

Crescent

Roseburg

63/50

Silver Lake

76/40

Port Orford 61/48

Gold Beach 62/51

Vale

EAST Mostly sunny skies Ontario and pleasant con89/57 ditions.

91/58 89/56

Juntura

Burns Riley

86/47

83/43

81/41

Jordan Valley

83/42

81/45

Frenchglen 88/47

Yesterday’s state extremes

Rome

• 91°

92/47

Medford

85/46

Chiloquin

Medford

80/40

Klamath Falls 83/41

Ashland

68/50

77/46

72/47

Paisley 88/52

Brookings

78/43

Unity

84/40

Grants Pass 87/50

81/41

CENTRAL Mostly sunny skies and pleasant conditions.

Baker City John Day

Christmas Valley

Chemult

78/52

62/39

WEST Partly cloudy today with patchy fog at the coast this morning.

83/48

• 33°

Fields

Lakeview

McDermitt

90/52

85/46

Meacham

95/46

-30s

-20s

Yesterday’s extremes (in the 48 contiguous states):

-10s

0s

Vancouver 60/52

10s Calgary 68/48

20s

30s

40s

Winnipeg 70/57

50s

60s

Thunder Bay 77/56

70s

80s

90s

100s 110s

Quebec 82/62

Halifax 68/49 Portland To ronto Portland 60/50 Bismarck 77/69 67/55 • 111° 82/60 St. Paul Green Bay Boston Billings 79/63 81/68 Detroit 65/53 Buffalo Brentwood, Calif. Rapid City 85/53 Boise 83/69 84/67 New York 88/61 88/49 • 28° 72/58 Des Moines Chicago Cheyenne Philadelphia 85/68 88/71 Stanley, Idaho Columbus 87/58 78/59 84/67 Omaha San Francisco • 3.39” Salt Lake Washington, D. C. 88/71 68/53 City 80/62 Las Washington, Iowa Denver Louisville 95/64 Kansas City Vegas 96/61 90/71 86/72 St. Louis 106/82 Charlotte 88/74 83/62 Albuquerque Los Angeles Oklahoma City Nashville Little Rock 93/64 73/63 91/71 91/67 92/70 Atlanta Phoenix Honolulu Birmingham 85/64 111/82 86/73 Dallas Tijuana 90/66 93/74 78/59 New Orleans 89/75 Orlando Houston 90/71 Chihuahua 91/73 91/71 Miami 87/75 Monterrey La Paz 98/74 95/66 Mazatlan Anchorage 89/73 66/51 Juneau 59/46

FRONTS

WEST NEWS

Washington drive may test public shift on gay marriage By Lornet Turnbull The Seattle Times (MCT)

SEATTLE — The belief that public opposition to same-sex marriage has softened in recent years will face an important test this fall, when Washington voters decide whether to throw out a new state law legalizing such unions. National groups on each side of the debate are expected to pour big money and political muscle into what is sure to be a nasty referendum fight here — as well in Maine and Maryland, where gay marriage also is up for a vote. On this issue, there’s no question the nation remains divided. But gay rights supporters are buoyed by what they believe has been a significant shift in public attitudes in the three years since Maine voters repealed that state’s same-sexmarriage law. During that time, national polls have shown support reaching 50 percent or better. In states where gay marriage has been approved, conservatives have crossed their party to embrace a traditionally liberal position. And President Barack Obama’s public endorsement last month of gay marriage triggered new conversations on a topic sure to figure prominently in a contentious presidential election. Approval of gay marriage by voters in any of these states would be a huge symbolic victory for the gay rights movement. “This is clearly a turningpoint year when it comes to marriage,” said Michael Cole-Schwartz, of the Human Rights Campaign, one of the major organizations in the country actively involved in defending Washington state’s new marriage law. “There are a slew of polls showing majority support, the president of the United States is lending his endorsement to the cause, and you have these

Partly cloudy.

HIGH LOW

HIGH LOW

64 37

Partly cloudy.

HIGH LOW

71 41

76 46

BEND ALMANAC

PLANET WATCH

TEMPERATURE

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . .6:58 a.m. . . . . 10:28 p.m. Venus . . . . . .4:25 a.m. . . . . . 7:07 p.m. Mars. . . . . .12:32 p.m. . . . . . 1:08 a.m. Jupiter. . . . . .3:50 a.m. . . . . . 6:38 p.m. Saturn. . . . . .3:05 p.m. . . . . . 2:24 a.m. Uranus . . . . .1:36 a.m. . . . . . 2:00 p.m.

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend 24 hours ending 4 p.m.*. . 0.00” High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84/46 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . 0.07” Record high . . . . . . . . 95 in 1961 Average month to date. . . 0.44” Record low. . . . . . . . . 26 in 1955 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.14” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 Average year to date. . . . . 5.46” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.30.07 Record 24 hours . . .0.95 in 1944 *Melted liquid equivalent

Sunrise today . . . . . . 5:22 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 8:51 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 5:22 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 8:51 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 3:57 a.m. Moonset today . . . . 7:23 p.m.

Moon phases New

First

June 19 June 26

Full

Last

July 3

July 10

OREGON CITIES

FIRE INDEX

Yesterday Sunday Monday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Precipitation values are 24-hour totals through 4 p.m.

Bend, west of Hwy. 97...Mod. Bend, east of Hwy. 97....Mod. Redmond/Madras ........Low

Astoria . . . . . . . .67/55/0.01 Baker City . . . . . .78/35/0.00 Brookings . . . . . .87/68/0.00 Burns. . . . . . . . . .82/35/0.00 Eugene . . . . . . . .85/51/0.00 Klamath Falls . . .84/48/0.00 Lakeview. . . . . . .82/46/0.00 La Pine . . . . . . . .86/39/0.00 Medford . . . . . . .91/56/0.00 Newport . . . . . . .64/52/0.00 North Bend . . . . . .68/54/NA Ontario . . . . . . . .85/53/0.00 Pendleton . . . . . .87/50/0.00 Portland . . . . . . .84/60/0.00 Prineville . . . . . . .84/45/0.00 Redmond. . . . . . .87/42/0.00 Roseburg. . . . . . .88/55/0.00 Salem . . . . . . . . .86/56/0.00 Sisters . . . . . . . . .88/46/0.00 The Dalles . . . . . .91/59/0.00

Mod. = Moderate; Ext. = Extreme

. . . .59/52/sh . . . . .58/50/sh . . . . .78/43/s . . . . .63/40/pc . . . . .68/50/s . . . . . .70/50/s . . . . .84/42/s . . . . . .70/38/s . . . .71/49/pc . . . . . .63/47/c . . . . .83/41/s . . . . . .70/36/s . . . .85/46/pc . . . . . .78/39/s . . . . .76/38/s . . . . . .67/39/s . . . .88/52/pc . . . . .74/47/pc . . . .59/48/sh . . . . .56/49/sh . . . .61/50/pc . . . . .60/48/sh . . . .89/57/pc . . . . . .76/51/s . . . . .77/55/s . . . . .70/49/pc . . . .67/55/pc . . . . .62/51/sh . . . . .73/46/s . . . . . .69/41/s . . . . .75/46/s . . . . . .65/39/s . . . .78/52/pc . . . . .71/53/sh . . . .69/52/pc . . . . .63/49/sh . . . . .68/44/s . . . . . .64/40/s . . . . .74/59/s . . . . .66/50/pc

PRECIPITATION

WATER REPORT Sisters .............................Mod. La Pine.............................Mod. Prineville........................Mod.

The following was compiled by the Central Oregon watermaster and irrigation districts as a service to irrigators and sportsmen.

Reservoir Acre feet Capacity Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . . 47,917 . . . . . . 55,000 Wickiup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 191,590 . . . . . 200,000 Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . 79,651 . . . . . . 91,700 Ochoco Reservoir . . . . . . . . 39,413 . . . . . . 47,000 Prineville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137,709 . . . . . 153,777 The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is River flow Station Cubic ft./sec Deschutes RiverBelow Crane Prairie . . . . . . . 443 for solar at noon. Deschutes RiverBelow Wickiup . . . . . . . . . . 1,340 Crescent CreekBelow Crescent Lake . . . . . . . 123 LOW MEDIUM HIGH V.HIGH Little DeschutesNear La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75.7 0 2 4 6 8 10 Deschutes RiverBelow Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127 Deschutes RiverAt Benham Falls . . . . . . . . . 2,001 Crooked RiverAbove Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . 28 Crooked RiverBelow Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . 226 Updated daily. Source: pollen.com Ochoco CreekBelow Ochoco Res. . . . . . . . . . 6.95 Crooked RiverNear Terrebonne . . . . . . . . . . . 75.7 Contact: Watermaster, 388-6669 LOW MEDIUM HIGH or go to www.wrd.state.or.us

To report a wildfire, call 911

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX 4

POLLEN COUNT

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

Saskatoon 75/52

Seattle 63/53

THURSDAY

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS -40s

WEDNESDAY Partly cloudy.

60 39

Nyssa

Hampton

Fort Rock 83/41

76/39

69/38

Bandon

69/47

Brothers 77/40

La Pine 76/38

Crescent Lake

62/50

72/46

68/43

Union

Mitchell 75/46

73/48

Camp Sherman

71/52

68/43

Joseph

Granite Spray 78/47

Enterprise

Meacham 72/48

67/46

Madras

63/43

La Grande

Condon

Warm Springs

Wallowa

66/42

71/50

74/53

74/49

72/51

77/55

Ruggs

Willowdale

Albany

Newport

Pendleton

78/57

70/52

69/52

59/48

Hermiston 79/57

Arlington

Wasco

Sandy

Government Camp 54/41

66/51

79/55

The Biggs Dalles 73/58

67/52

McMinnville

Lincoln City

Umatilla

Hood River

Mostly cloudy.

HIGH LOW

FORECAST: STATE Seaside

TUESDAY

ballot battles around the country taking place in an environment we’ve not seen before,” Cole-Schwartz said. In Maine, gay-marriage supporters are so convinced that attitudes have changed that they will ask voters to reconsider their 2009 vote. In the years since that defeat, activists have gone door to door to gauge sentiment on this issue, talking to people who voted for or against the measure, were on the fence or didn’t vote at all. “We saw attitudes had changed; we saw the results of education,” said David Farmer, with the gay-marriage advocacy group Mainers United for Marriage. “People were anxious to talk to us.” Still, backers of gay marriage know they are bucking history in this fight: In 30 states, Americans have banned gay marriage in their constitutions, voting against it every time it has come before them. The most recent: More than 60 percent of North Carolinians voted in favor of a ban last month. Voters in Hawaii, which also bans gay marriage, in 1998 approved a constitutional amendment that gave the Legislature the right to define marriage. The National Organization for Marriage (NOM), which is helping to bankroll efforts to defeat gay marriage in states, says a shift in attitude is little more than urban myth. “The idea of this growing bubble is part of the other side’s strategy to get people to think they are part of this growing majority,” said Chris Plante, regional coordinator for NOM. Plante also is deputy director of Preserve Marriage Washington, the campaign NOM backs in Washington, which recently turned in 247,331 signatures to the secretary of state — more than any other referendum in state history. Over last weekend, the Secretary of State’s Office said it

appears that nearly 1,000 of them were obtained fraudulently, but that number is not enough to keep the referendum off the ballot. Through its Referendum 74, the campaign wants voters to undo what the Legislature did in February when it passed, and Gov. Chris Gregoire signed, the state’s same-sexmarriage bill. The campaign wants people to “reject” Referendum 74; gay-marriage supporters are seeking a vote to approve the measure. “The truth is the majority of Americans still believe that marriage should be defined as between one man and one woman,” Plante said. “If we succeed in getting that message out there, then we win.” But Julie Shapiro, a law professor at Seattle University, said it is disingenuous for conservatives to argue a shift in attitudes hasn’t really occurred. People tend to soften their view around gay marriage as they encounter more people who are gay — the parents and friends of their children, coworkers, neighbors or friends of friends, she said. “The real question is whether attitudes have shifted enough to change the outcome of an election,” Shapiro said. The ballot issues are surfacing in a year when Americans will decide who will lead the country for the next four years. The election is likely to boost voter turnout, Shapiro and others note. Proponents of gay marriage are hoping it will help drive a key constituency to the polls, as it did in 2008: the under-30 population, which supports same-sex marriage at rates exceeding that of older Americans. Gay rights supporters also are hopeful that endorsements by Obama and the NAACP will spur support within African-American and other minority communities.

Yesterday Sunday Monday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . . .95/71/0.00 . .96/72/pc . 93/72/pc Akron . . . . . . . . . .88/62/0.00 . . . 83/67/t . . .86/67/t Albany. . . . . . . . . .81/57/0.00 . .81/58/pc . 82/61/pc Albuquerque. . . . .90/66/0.00 . .93/64/pc . . 95/65/s Anchorage . . . . . .66/45/0.00 . .66/51/sh . 67/52/pc Atlanta . . . . . . . . .83/63/0.00 . .85/64/pc . 88/66/pc Atlantic City . . . . .74/51/0.00 . . . 67/58/s . 70/67/pc Austin . . . . . . . . . .96/72/0.00 . .95/73/pc . 95/73/pc Baltimore . . . . . . .81/55/0.00 . .80/64/pc . . 81/65/c Billings . . . . . . . . .82/50/0.00 . .85/53/pc . 74/52/pc Birmingham . . . . .87/71/0.00 . . . 90/66/s . . 89/68/s Bismarck. . . . . . . .75/57/0.20 . .82/60/pc . 76/55/pc Boise . . . . . . . . . . .83/50/0.00 . . . 88/49/s . . 74/47/s Boston. . . . . . . . . .64/57/0.00 . .65/53/pc . 71/60/pc Bridgeport, CT. . . .75/58/0.00 . . . 71/55/s . 75/61/pc Buffalo . . . . . . . . .84/65/0.00 . . . 84/67/t . . .81/71/t Burlington, VT. . . .85/54/0.00 . .79/64/pc . 82/64/pc Caribou, ME . . . . .67/50/0.00 . . . 77/49/s . . 77/55/s Charleston, SC . . .83/63/0.00 . . . 82/66/s . 83/67/pc Charlotte. . . . . . . .82/63/0.00 . . . 83/62/s . 86/65/pc Chattanooga. . . . .86/67/0.00 . .87/66/pc . 89/66/pc Cheyenne . . . . . . .73/50/0.00 . . . 87/58/s . . 87/53/s Chicago. . . . . . . . .94/71/0.00 . .85/68/pc . 92/75/pc Cincinnati . . . . . . .88/63/0.00 . . . 84/68/t . . .91/70/t Cleveland . . . . . . .88/66/0.00 . . . 84/68/t . . .86/70/t Colorado Springs .78/58/0.00 . . . 91/59/s . . 90/58/s Columbia, MO . . .94/70/0.00 . . . 87/71/t . 94/73/pc Columbia, SC . . . .85/61/0.00 . . . 85/63/s . 88/65/pc Columbus, GA. . . .87/65/0.00 . . . 87/63/s . . 89/67/s Columbus, OH. . . .89/67/0.00 . . . 84/67/t . 90/70/pc Concord, NH. . . . .71/48/0.00 . . . 70/49/s . 75/55/pc Corpus Christi. . . .93/77/0.01 . . . 90/77/t . 88/77/pc Dallas Ft Worth. . .93/73/0.00 . .93/74/pc . 92/73/pc Dayton . . . . . . . . .90/66/0.00 . . . 83/68/t . 90/70/pc Denver. . . . . . . . . .80/55/0.00 . . . 96/61/s . . 97/61/s Des Moines. . . . . .85/68/0.29 . .88/71/pc . 93/74/pc Detroit. . . . . . . . . .87/66/0.00 . . . 83/69/t . . .86/72/t Duluth. . . . . . . . . .72/58/0.28 . .73/59/pc . . .72/59/t El Paso. . . . . . . . . .93/70/0.00 . . . 97/76/s . 104/78/s Fairbanks. . . . . . . .69/48/0.02 . .76/50/pc . 77/52/pc Fargo. . . . . . . . . . .75/64/0.09 . .82/63/pc . . .80/58/t Flagstaff . . . . . . . .82/39/0.00 . . . 81/46/s . . 82/48/s

Yesterday Sunday Monday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . . .92/65/0.01 . . . 82/62/t . 89/74/pc Green Bay. . . . . . .84/66/0.00 . .79/63/pc . . .82/70/t Greensboro. . . . . .80/58/0.00 . . . 81/62/s . 85/64/pc Harrisburg. . . . . . .80/60/0.00 . .79/58/pc . 81/68/sh Hartford, CT . . . . .81/53/0.00 . .74/55/pc . 77/62/pc Helena. . . . . . . . . .81/44/0.00 . .71/50/pc . 62/45/sh Honolulu. . . . . . . .85/74/0.00 . . . 86/73/s . . 85/74/s Houston . . . . . . . .86/75/0.00 . . . 91/73/t . . .88/74/t Huntsville . . . . . . .88/70/0.00 . .90/66/pc . . 88/67/s Indianapolis . . . . .93/68/0.00 . . . 86/69/t . 89/72/pc Jackson, MS . . . . 88/69/trace . . . 91/68/s . . 91/69/s Jacksonville. . . . . .83/69/0.00 . . . 84/68/s . . 86/71/s Juneau. . . . . . . . . .54/46/0.34 . . . 59/46/r . 60/49/sh Kansas City. . . . . .89/67/0.00 . . . 86/72/t . . 94/74/s Lansing . . . . . . . . .89/67/0.00 . . . 83/64/t . 88/74/pc Las Vegas . . . . . .103/76/0.00 . .106/82/s . 105/80/s Lexington . . . . . . .84/68/0.00 . . . 84/68/t . 88/70/pc Lincoln. . . . . . . . . .83/61/0.00 . .90/72/pc . . 98/73/s Little Rock. . . . . . .93/70/0.00 . .92/70/pc . . 92/69/s Los Angeles. . . . . .69/63/0.00 . . . 73/63/s . 70/60/pc Louisville. . . . . . . .90/71/0.00 . . . 90/71/t . . 91/73/s Madison, WI . . . . .85/73/0.00 . .82/63/pc . 90/72/pc Memphis. . . . . . . .91/73/0.00 . .93/73/pc . . 91/73/s Miami . . . . . . . . . .88/74/0.00 . . . 87/75/s . 86/77/pc Milwaukee . . . . . .85/66/0.00 . .81/65/pc . 89/72/pc Minneapolis . . . . .83/66/0.18 . .81/68/pc . 86/67/pc Nashville. . . . . . . .89/68/0.01 . .91/67/pc . . 92/69/s New Orleans. . . . .87/75/0.00 . . . 89/75/t . 88/75/pc New York . . . . . . .80/60/0.00 . .72/58/pc . 77/63/pc Newark, NJ . . . . . .79/62/0.00 . .74/59/pc . 78/62/pc Norfolk, VA . . . . . .74/65/0.00 . . . 77/59/s . 82/66/pc Oklahoma City . . .91/70/0.00 . .91/71/pc . 94/70/pc Omaha . . . . . . . . .81/63/0.06 . .88/71/pc . . 95/73/s Orlando. . . . . . . . .86/72/0.00 . . . 90/71/s . 90/71/pc Palm Springs. . . .100/70/0.00 . .110/74/s . 109/71/s Peoria . . . . . . . . . .93/71/0.00 . . . 87/70/t . 93/73/pc Philadelphia . . . . .82/60/0.00 . .78/59/pc . . 79/65/c Phoenix. . . . . . . .106/78/0.00 . .111/82/s . 111/80/s Pittsburgh . . . . . . .82/60/0.00 . . . 82/66/t . . .83/66/t Portland, ME. . . . .64/53/0.00 . . . 60/50/s . 63/57/pc Providence . . . . . .72/52/0.00 . . . 69/52/s . 73/58/pc Raleigh . . . . . . . . .80/53/0.00 . . . 82/62/s . . .86/64/t

Yesterday Sunday Monday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . . .81/51/0.00 . .88/61/pc . 82/57/pc Reno . . . . . . . . . . .93/60/0.00 . . . 96/66/s . . 88/53/s Richmond . . . . . . .81/56/0.00 . .81/61/pc . 84/63/pc Rochester, NY . . . .84/59/0.00 . .86/67/pc . . .82/69/t Sacramento. . . . .105/62/0.00 . . . 98/60/s . . 89/57/s St. Louis. . . . . . . . 96/76/trace . . . 88/74/t . 96/75/pc Salt Lake City . . . .87/58/0.00 . . . 95/64/s . . 94/62/s San Antonio . . . . .96/75/0.00 . .95/73/pc . 95/75/pc San Diego . . . . . . .68/63/0.00 . . . 70/61/s . . 68/61/s San Francisco . . . .87/55/0.00 . .71/54/pc . 65/52/pc San Jose . . . . . . . .98/59/0.00 . . . 85/57/s . 76/54/pc Santa Fe . . . . . . . .81/63/0.00 . .86/53/pc . . 88/54/s

Yesterday Sunday Monday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Savannah . . . . . . .86/66/0.00 . . . 83/64/s . . 86/68/s Seattle. . . . . . . . . 70/60/trace . .63/53/sh . 63/52/sh Sioux Falls. . . . . . .81/59/0.00 . . . 87/70/s . . .88/66/t Spokane . . . . . . . .77/50/0.00 . .74/48/pc . 56/47/sh Springfield, MO . .91/68/0.00 . . . 88/69/t . . 91/70/s Tampa. . . . . . . . . .91/73/0.00 . . . 90/69/s . 92/68/pc Tucson. . . . . . . . .100/69/0.17 . .105/75/s . 106/75/s Tulsa . . . . . . . . . . .91/73/0.00 . .90/72/pc . . 92/71/s Washington, DC . .82/63/0.00 . .80/62/pc . . 81/65/c Wichita . . . . . . . . .90/66/0.05 . .92/73/pc . . 94/73/s Yakima . . . . . . . . .88/54/0.00 . . . 75/52/s . 67/47/pc Yuma. . . . . . . . . .101/71/0.00 . .109/79/s . 112/79/s

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . . .66/57/0.00 . .64/56/pc . 65/51/sh Athens. . . . . . . . . .86/77/0.00 . . . 90/69/s . . 81/67/s Auckland. . . . . . . .54/41/0.00 . .58/54/sh . 59/55/sh Baghdad . . . . . . .117/84/0.00 . .118/84/s . 116/81/s Bangkok . . . . . . . .93/81/0.00 . . . 86/76/t . . .88/77/t Beijing. . . . . . . . . .97/61/0.00 . .101/73/s 101/77/pc Beirut . . . . . . . . . .82/77/0.00 . . . 85/76/s . . 83/75/s Berlin. . . . . . . . . . .73/59/0.18 . .74/55/pc . . .81/60/t Bogota . . . . . . . . .64/50/0.00 . .66/50/sh . 66/51/sh Budapest. . . . . . . .84/55/0.00 . . . 90/66/s . . 89/68/s Buenos Aires. . . . .52/36/0.00 . . .49/42/c . 53/43/pc Cabo San Lucas . .88/75/0.00 . . . 92/73/s . 94/73/pc Cairo . . . . . . . . . . .99/73/0.00 . .104/72/s . 102/71/s Calgary . . . . . . . . .73/45/0.00 . .68/48/sh . 62/49/sh Cancun . . . . . . . . .84/72/0.00 . . . 86/76/t . . .87/77/t Dublin . . . . . . . . . .59/50/0.00 . .57/48/sh . 53/45/sh Edinburgh. . . . . . .52/48/0.00 . .53/43/sh . 55/44/sh Geneva . . . . . . . . .86/55/0.00 . .80/61/sh . . .85/62/t Harare. . . . . . . . . .70/39/0.00 . . . 68/46/s . 70/51/pc Hong Kong . . . . . .84/79/0.00 . . . 87/79/t . . .88/81/t Istanbul. . . . . . . . .84/72/0.00 . . . 80/69/s . . 78/69/s Jerusalem . . . . . . .90/72/0.00 . . . 93/71/s . . 89/69/s Johannesburg. . . .57/41/0.00 . .57/39/pc . 61/45/pc Lima . . . . . . . . . . .70/66/0.00 . .75/64/pc . 74/65/pc Lisbon . . . . . . . . . .73/63/0.00 . .73/64/pc . 71/55/pc London . . . . . . . . .64/54/0.00 . .64/56/sh . 65/45/sh Madrid . . . . . . . . .88/59/0.00 . . . 91/62/s . 87/61/pc Manila. . . . . . . . . .88/77/0.00 . . . 85/75/t . . .83/75/t

Mecca . . . . . . . . .117/88/0.00 . .113/86/s . 110/84/s Mexico City. . . . . .66/61/0.35 . . . 68/53/t . . .73/53/t Montreal. . . . . . . .81/57/0.00 . .81/64/pc . . 78/65/c Moscow . . . . . . . .70/59/0.00 . . . 77/58/s . . 71/54/s Nairobi . . . . . . . . .70/57/0.00 . .69/55/pc . 70/57/sh Nassau . . . . . . . . .90/77/0.00 . .88/74/pc . . .88/75/t New Delhi. . . . . .109/90/0.00 110/89/pc 110/90/pc Osaka . . . . . . . . . .77/68/0.00 . . . 80/69/t . . 82/70/c Oslo. . . . . . . . . . . .55/46/0.00 . .61/51/sh . 62/47/sh Ottawa . . . . . . . . .81/54/0.00 . .83/64/pc . . 79/65/c Paris. . . . . . . . . . . .64/59/0.00 . .69/58/pc . 67/51/sh Rio de Janeiro. . . .88/66/0.00 . .74/65/pc . 80/67/pc Rome. . . . . . . . . . .86/61/0.00 . . . 80/65/s . . 86/72/s Santiago . . . . . . . .63/48/0.00 . .52/50/sh . . 55/50/s Sao Paulo . . . . . . .75/59/0.00 . .70/58/sh . 74/61/sh Sapporo . . . . . . . .68/63/0.00 . .64/54/sh . 66/55/sh Seoul. . . . . . . . . . .84/66/0.00 . .82/64/pc . 85/66/pc Shanghai. . . . . . . .84/70/0.00 . .81/73/sh . . .84/72/t Singapore . . . . . . .90/81/0.00 . .87/81/pc . 87/81/pc Stockholm. . . . . . .59/48/0.14 . .65/51/sh . 66/50/pc Sydney. . . . . . . . . .59/54/0.00 . . . 65/49/s . . 64/47/s Taipei. . . . . . . . . . .86/77/0.00 . .88/77/pc . . .89/78/t Tel Aviv . . . . . . . . .88/72/0.00 . . . 90/71/s . . 87/70/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . . .70/66/0.00 . . . 81/66/t . . 79/67/c Toronto . . . . . . . . .81/64/0.00 . . .77/69/c . . 82/68/c Vancouver. . . . . . .61/55/0.00 . .60/52/sh . 60/51/sh Vienna. . . . . . . . . .86/59/0.00 . .86/67/pc . . 85/65/s Warsaw. . . . . . . . .81/46/0.00 . .79/64/pc . 84/65/pc


COMMUNITYLIFE

TV & Movies, C2 Calendar, C3 Horoscope, C3 Milestones, C6 Puzzles, C7

THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, JUNE 17, 2012

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www.bendbulletin.com/community

SPOTLIGHT Play will benefit Soroptimist Cascades Theatrical Company’s Tuesday evening performance of the Andrew Bergman comedy “Social Security” will be a benefit for Soroptimist International of Bend. Doors open at 6:30 p.m.; show time is 7:30 p.m. Prior to the show, Soroptimist International will host a buffet of complimentary appetizers and cash bar. Soroptimist is a worldwide women’s organization with a mission to improve the lives of women and girls in local communities and around the world. Greenwood Playhouse is located at 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend. Tickets are $25 and can be purchased at www.sibend.org. Contact: www.sibend.org.

Desert museum free to military The High Desert Museum recently announced its participation in the Blue Star Museums program. Featuring more than 1,500 museums across the country, the program offers all activeduty military personnel and their families free admission to participating museums from May 28 to Sept. 3. The free admission is available for all activeduty military (including Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines, Coast Guard, National Guard and Reserve members) and up to five family members. For a complete list of participants, visit www.arts.gov/bluestar museums. For information on the High Desert Museum, visit www.high desertmuseum.org or contact 541-382-4754.

Buy a golf ball for charity Golf balls are on sale now for the St. Charles Foundation’s Wendy’s Wish Golf Ball Drop on July 29 in Riverbend Park. The event raises funds to pay for nonmedical expenses of individuals undergoing cancer treatment. The public is invited to purchase numbered golf balls for $5 each or $20 for five. The balls will then be dropped from a helicopter onto a grid featuring golf holes. Prizes will be awarded based on the distance the golf balls land relative to the four primary sponsor holes. Balls are available at the following Bend locations: Pro Golf of Bend, M Jacobs, Miller Lumber Co., GoodLife Brewing Co., St. Charles Foundation, St. Charles Cancer Center and Backporch Coffee Roasters. Contact: www.wendys wish.org, 541-788-5366 or 541-419-5736.

Contact us Have a story idea or submission? Contact us! • Community events: Email event information to communitylife@ bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” at www.bend bulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Contact: 541-3830351. — From staff reports

Photos courtesy Barb Gonzalez

Jet-boat passengers, having donned life vests in Agness, enter the Foster Creek Rapids just outside the Wild Rogue Wilderness Area. Jerry’s Rogue Jets travel upriver 52 miles from Gold Beach to Blossom Bar, combining the excitement of rapids with first-class viewing of wildlife.

RUSH ROGUE A juvenile bear clambers up a Rogue River hillside near Huggins Canyon. On the day of the author’s trip, passengers spotted four bears along the river.

THE OF THE • Jet-boating on one of Oregon’s scenic rivers

By John Gottb erg Anderson • For the Bulletin

GOLD BEACH — Jet-boat pilot Jeff Laird was showing off. Skipping across the rapids of the lower Rogue River at about 35 mph, Laird suddenly slowed and shifted the boat into reverse. His constant companion, a yellow Lab named Sadie, looked at him inquisitively as he sharply turned the steering wheel and locked the boat into a 360-degree spin. Port Orford

Blossom Bar

Rogue River

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Wild and Scenic portion of Agness Rogue River

Tu Tu’Tun Lodge

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ch Gold Beach Bend

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Galice Merlin

Grants Pass 199

Gold Beach

Greg Cross / The Bulletin

A Columbia black-tailed doe and two spotted fawns study a passing jet boat in the Tate Creek area of the Wild Rogue Wilderness.

The boat’s prow dipped. A young family rid- lock and Douglas fir trees. Wind whips through ing in front shrieked when a sheet of cold water your hair, the chilly spray of water lightly stings doused a protective window. Three rows be- your cheeks, as the broad, flat, powerful boat hind them, nervous laughter erupted. careens through the Rogue’s curves, dodging Then someone shouted: “Look! On the shore- rocks and salmon fishermen as it goes. line! There’s a bear!” Indeed, a juvenile black bear had been Jerry’s Rogue Jets I traveled with Jerry’s Rogue Jets, direct dedrinking from the river. Startled by the alert, he looked up and turned away from the wa- scendants of the Rogue River mail boats that began operating upriver to ter, clambering into a thicket NORTHWEST TRAVEL pioneer homesteads as early as of live oak and azaleas in full 1895. bloom on a hillside above HugIn two weeks: Laird’s grandfather, Jerry gins Canyon. Olympic National Park Boice — inspired by the deBoat passengers quickly forvelopment of jet boats in New got the thrill of the spin and began snapping away with cameras and iPhones. Zealand — brought hydro-jet technology to Jet-boating on the Rogue River is a nature the Southern Oregon Coast in 1958. He found cruise with all the excitement of a theme-park the shallow-draft boats, previously unknown ride. The 52 miles upriver from Gold Beach to as commercial craft in the United States, to be Blossom Bar, in the Wild Rogue Wilderness, perfect for navigating the rocky Rogue River comprise a natural reserve that bears, black- waters. Instead of having a protruding outboard motailed deer, cougars, beavers and river otters share with bald eagles, ospreys, mergansers tor, a hydro-jet uses a pump that takes in water through an impeller, mounted flush to the hull and great blue herons. Yet unlike Disney’s Jungle Cruise, this is not of the boat, then forces it out through a nozzle a quiet run up a sleepy river. It’s a playful, rapid- on the transom. See Rogue / C4 ly paced run through a corridor of spruce, hem-

A world of entertainment is coming to the Tower Theatre By David Jasper The Bulletin

“This season, starting in September, we’re bringing the world to Bend,” says Ray Solley, executive director of the Tower Theater Foundation. For its 2012-2013 season, the Tower Theatre will host three distinct series: Marquee, CenterStage and LessonPLAN. Together, they’ll represent “buckets of activity” at the historic downtown theater.

Marquee Series The Marquee Series

features Tower collaborations with three area theater companies: Shore Thing Productions will start the season early with its concert staging of the musical “1776” June 29 through July 1. With music and lyrics by Sherman Edwards and book by Peter Stone, it features an all-female cast. It’s the complete Broadway musical, using selected props, costumes, choreography and interaction between actors, explains Solley, but it is presented as a concert rather than a fully staged

production. “Ironically, this way actually makes the lyrics resonate more fully and emotionally. You’re more engaged and less distracted by special lights, movement and set pieces,” Solley says. In September, Cat Call Productions will stage its fourth musical, “The Producers,” Sept. 14-22. The Mel BrooksThomas Meehan musical is the fourth in a series of annual shows from Bend company Cat Call Productions, which last year staged “Chicago” to sellout crowds.

Sept. 17 and 18 will be “dark” nights, meaning the show won’t be in production those evenings. But, Solley says, rather than keep the theater closed, they’ll keep the interest humming by offering screenings of two Mel Brooks films, “Young Frankenstein” (Sept. 17) and “Blazing Saddles” (Sept. 18). “We want everyone to experience the insanity of Mel Brooks,” Solley says. The Marquee Series will continue, and conclude, with Cascades Theatrical Company’s production of the

classic “A Christmas Carol” Dec. 21-23.

CenterStage Series The CenterStage Series starts off strong with the endurance, discipline and martial arts skills of 20 Kung Fu masters in the Shaolin Warriors’ show “Voices of the Masters” on Oct. 9. The show features “the agility and grace of gymnasts with the showmanship of Cirque du Soleil performers,” Solley quotes The Washington Post. See Tower / C7


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THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, JUNE 17, 2012

TV & M Aliens in ‘Falling Skies’ aren’t cute and cuddly

L M T  FOR SUNDAY, JUNE 17

BEND

TUESDAY: Just can’t get enough of Bristol Palin? You’re in luck. The new reDon’t miss ality series, “Bristol Palin: “FALLING SKIESâ€? — We Life’s a Tripp,â€? devotes 10 ephad hoped that the aliens isodes to her adventures as a depicted in Steven Spiel- single mom in Alaska after a berg’s sci-fi thriller would controversial appearance on be as meek and cute as E.T. “Dancing With the Stars.â€? 10 Alas, not quite. And so the p.m., Lifetime. battle to thwart them figWEDNESDAY: Cue the ures to get even bloodier as poopy-diaper jokes. “Baby Season 2 opens. Daddyâ€? is a new The saga picks sitcom about a TV SPOTLIGHT up three months young man (Jeanafter Tom (Noah Luc Bilodeau) Wyle) made the bold move to who is forced into fatherenter an enemy spaceship in hood after his ex-girlfriend an effort to gain some under- deposits their baby daughter standing of the strange crea- on his doorstep. And you tures that turned Earth into thought there were no great a wasteland. 9 p.m. Sunday, ideas left in Hollywood. 8:30 p.m., ABC Family. TNT. WEDNESDAY: “Inside Menâ€? Other bets is a tense four-part caper SUNDAY: It was a case that drama about three normal, caused a great deal of fan everyday blokes who plan a outrage and took far too long huge cash heist at the secuto solve. But “The Killingâ€? rity depot where they work. finally has Sarah (Mireille Can they get away with it? 10 Enos) and Holder (Joel Kin- p.m., BBC America. THURSDAY: If you hear naman) apprehending Rosie Larsen’s murderer in the lots of little girls screaming show’s Season 2 finale. Re- tonight, don’t panic, just be aware that “Justin Bieber: ally. 9 p.m., AMC. MONDAY: “One Nation Un- All Around the Worldâ€? is on der Dog: Stories of Fear, Loss the air. It’s a special tied to & Betrayalâ€? is a documen- the teen heartthrob’s new altary that follows eight case bum, “Believe.â€? 8 p.m., NBC. FRIDAY: Don Friesen, a studies examining the complex relationships between two-time winner of the San humans and canines. Includ- Francisco International ed: A look at a support group Comedy Competition, gets for owners of deceased pets. his own stand-up special with “Don Friesen: Ask 9 p.m., HBO. MONDAY: TV’s rip-off art- Your Mom.â€? Highly freists are at it again in “The netic and relatively “clean,â€? Glass House,â€? a new reality he’s also hilarious. 10 p.m., that has contestants living Showtime. SATURDAY: Break out the together in a home equipped with cameras ‌ um, just like bug spray — and lots of it. In they do on “Big Brother.â€? It’s “Arachnoquake,â€? an earthset to debut Monday night quake unleashes giant albi— unless it’s hit with a court no spiders on New Orleans. 9 p.m., Syfy. injunction. 10:02 p.m., ABC. By Chuck Barney

Contra Costa Times (MCT)

Regal Pilot Butte 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend, 541-382-6347

BERNIE (PG-13) 1:15, 4:15, 7:15 THE BEST EXOTIC MARIGOLD HOTEL (PG-13) 12:30, 3:30, 6:30 FOR GREATER GLORY (R) Noon, 3, 6 HYSTERIA (R) 12:45, 3:45, 6:45 MEN IN BLACK 3 (PG-13) 1, 4, 7 MONSIEUR LAZHAR (PG-13) 12:15, 3:15, 6:15

Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend, 541-382-6347

BATTLESHIP (PG-13) 12:20, 3:50, 6:55, 10:05 THE DICTATOR (R) 10:25 MADAGASCAR 3: EUROPE’S MOST WANTED (PG) 11:10 a.m., 12:35, 2:40, 4:25, 6:10, 7:30, 9:55 MADAGASCAR 3: EUROPE’S MOST WANTED (PG) 12:45, 3:45, 7:50, 9:05 MARVEL’S THE AVENGERS (PG-13) 11 a.m., 2:30, 6, 9:20 MARVEL’S THE AVENGERS 3-D (PG13) 11:30 a.m., 3, 6:30, 9:50 MEN IN BLACK 3 (PG-13) 12:05, 7:05 MEN IN BLACK 3 3-D (PG-13) 3:40, 9:45 PROMETHEUS (R) 11:50 a.m., 3:20, 6:50, 10 PROMETHEUS 3-D (R) : 6:05, 9 PROMETHEUS IMAX (R) Noon, 3:30, 7, 10:10 ROCK OF AGES (PG-13) 11:25 a.m., 12:25, 2:55, 4:10, 6:25, 7:25, 9:30, 10:30

SNOW WHITE AND THE HUNTSMAN (PG-13) 11:15 a.m., 12:15, 2:45, 4, 6:15, 7:15, 9:15, 10:15 THAT’S MY BOY (R) 11:40 a.m., 12:40, 3:10, 4:20, 6:40, 7:40, 9:40, 10:35 WHAT TO EXPECT WHEN YOU’RE EXPECTING (PG-13) 11:05 a.m., 2:35

McMenamins Old St. Francis School 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend, 541-330-8562

21 JUMP STREET (R) 9:30 THE HUNGER GAMES (PG-13) 2:30, 6 MIRROR MIRROR (PG) Noon After 7 p.m., shows are 21 and older only. Younger than 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.

Tin Pan Theater 869 N.W. Tin Pan Alley, Bend, 541-241-2271

THE FAIRY (no MPAA rating) 7:30 MAN ON A MISSION (no MPAA rating) 5:30

SISTERS

EDITOR’S NOTES: • Open-captioned showtimes are bold. • There may be an additional fee for 3-D movies. • IMAX films are $15. • Movie times are subject to change after press time.

Sisters Movie House 720 Desperado Court, Sisters, 541-549-8800

MADAGASCAR 3: EUROPE’S MOST WANTED (PG) 3, 5:15, 7:30 MEN IN BLACK 3 (PG-13) 2:30 PROMETHEUS (R) 2:15, 5, 7:45 ROCK OF AGES (PG-13) 2:15, 5, 7:45 SNOW WHITE AND THE HUNTSMAN (PG-13) 4:45, 7:30

MADRAS

SNOW WHITE AND THE HUNTSMAN (PG-13) 1:25, 4:05, 6:40, 9:25

PRINEVILLE

Madras Cinema 5

Pine Theater

1101 S.W. U.S. Highway 97, Madras, 541-475-3505

214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

MADAGASCAR 3: EUROPE’S MOST WANTED 3-D (PG) Noon, 4:50, 7 MADAGASCAR 3: EUROPE’S MOST WANTED (PG) 2:10, 9:20 MEN IN BLACK 3 (PG-13) 12:10, 2:25, 4:40, 7:10, 9:35 PROMETHEUS 3-D (R) 2:15, 9:15 PROMETHEUS (R) 11:45 a.m., 4:15, 6:50 ROCK OF AGES (PG-13) 12:10, 2:25, 4:40, 7:10, 9:35

MADAGASCAR 3: EUROPE’S MOST WANTED (UPSTAIRS — PG) 1:10, 3:30, 6, 8:10 ROCK OF AGES (PG-13) 1, 4, 7 Pine Theater’s upstairs screening room has limited accessibility.

REDMOND Redmond Cinemas 1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond, 541-548-8777

DUKE Duke is a friendly and sweetnatured 5 year old Bloodhound mix who’s looking for a new companion. He is a true hound and needs someone who is looking to go on long walks and allow him to do what he does best, sniff! Duke loves to follow his nose and may not be completely trustworthy off leash. If you think this hound boy is the one for you, come down and adopt him today!

MADAGASCAR 3: EUROPE’S MOST WANTED (PG) 11:30 a.m., 1:45, 4, 6:15, 8:30 PROMETHEUS (R) 11:15 a.m., 1:45, 4:15, 6:45, 9:15 ROCK OF AGES (PG-13) 11:30 a.m., 2, 4:30, 7, 9:30 SNOW WHITE AND THE HUNTSMAN (PG-13) 1, 3:45, 6:30, 9:15

HUMANE SOCIETY OF CENTRAL OREGON/SPCA 61170 S.E. 27th St. BEND

Where Buyers And Sellers Meet 1000’s Of Ads Every Day

Care for loved ones. Comfort for all. 541-389-0006 www.evergreeninhome.com

(541) 382-3537 Sponsored by:

miraclesinyourlife.com

Deschutes Veterinary Clinic

L TV L   SUNDAY PRIME TIME 6/17/12

*In HD, these channels run three hours ahead. / Sports programming may vary. BD-Bend/Redmond/Sisters/Black Butte (Digital); PM-Prineville/Madras; SR-Sunriver; L-La Pine

ALSO IN HD; ADD 600 TO CHANNEL No.

BROADCAST/CABLE CHANNELS

BD PM SR L ^ KATU KTVZ % % % % KBNZ & KOHD ) ) ) ) KFXO * ` ` ` KOAB _ # _ # ( KGW KTVZDT2 , _ # / OPBPL 175 173

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2012 NBA Finals Oklahoma City Thunder at Miami Heat Game 3. From AmericanAirlines Arena in Miami. Jimmy Kimmel Beach Boys Comedy.TV ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Primetime: What Would You Do? KATU News (11:35) Cars.TV (1:00) 2012 U.S. Open Golf Championship Final Round (N) ’ (Live) Ă… NewsChannel Grey’s Anatomy Golden Hour ‘14’ Grey’s Anatomy ’ ‘14’ Ă… Off-Rockers Off-Rockers News Love-Raymond VersaCut Evening News The Unit Bad Beat ’ ‘14’ Ă… 60 Minutes (N) ’ Ă… Blue Bloods The Job ‘14’ Ă… The Good Wife ’ ‘14’ Ă… (10:01) The Mentalist ‘14’ Ă… News Cold Case ‘14’ (4:59) 2012 NBA Finals Oklahoma City Thunder at Miami Heat (N) (Live) Ă… Jimmy Kimmel The Insider ‘PG’ Entertainment Tonight (N) ’ ‘PG’ Primetime: What Would You Do? KEZI 9 News The Insider ‘PG’ NUMB3RS Robin Hood ‘PG’ Ă… Bones ’ ‘14’ Ă… American Dad Cleveland Show The Simpsons Bob’s Burgers Family Guy ‘14’ American Dad News Two/Half Men Big Bang Big Bang (4:00) OSU Commencement Ă… Victor Borge Alfie Boe: Live - Royal Festival Hall, London Oscar Hammerstein II -- Out of My Dreams ’ ‘G’ Use Your Brain to Change Your Age With Dr. Daniel Amen ‘G’ Ă… Yoga-Arthritis (1:00) 2012 U.S. Open Golf Championship Final Round (N) ’ (Live) Ă… ››› “An Officer and a Gentlemanâ€? (1982, Drama) Richard Gere, Debra Winger. Backroads Off-Rockers NewsChannel 8 Sports Sunday MLS Soccer: Timbers at Galaxy King of Queens King of Queens Heartland Little Secrets ’ ‘PG’ › “Zoomâ€? (2006, Comedy) Tim Allen, Courteney Cox Arquette. Ă… Meet, Browns Meet, Browns Troubadour, TX Showcases Ă… Qi Gong: Deeper Flow With Lee Victor Borge Alfie Boe: Live - Royal Festival Hall, London Oscar Hammerstein II -- Out of My Dreams ’ ‘G’ Use Your Brain to Change Your Age With Dr. Daniel Amen ’ ‘G’ Ă… BASIC CABLE CHANNELS

Criminal Minds Masterpiece ‘14’ Criminal Minds Today I Do ‘14’ Criminal Minds Coda ‘PG’ Ă… The Glades (N) ‘14’ Ă… Longmire A Damn Shame (N) ‘14’ (11:01) Longmire ‘14’ Ă… *A&E 130 28 18 32 Criminal Minds ’ ‘14’ Ă… ››› “The Shawshank Redemptionâ€? (1994, Drama) Tim Robbins, Morgan Freeman, Bob Gunton. An innocent man The Killing Donnie or Marie The killer The Killing What I Know Sarah and (10:01) The Killing Sarah and Holder (11:02) Breaking Bad Pilot Teacher *AMC 102 40 39 goes to a Maine penitentiary for life in 1947. Ă… is within reach. ’ ‘14’ Ă… Holder close the case. ’ ‘14’ learns he is dying. ‘MA’ close the case. ‘14’ Ă… Gator Boys ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Tanked ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Call of Wildman Call of Wildman Gator Boys (N) ’ ‘PG’ Call of Wildman Redneck Road. Gator Boys ’ ‘PG’ *ANPL 68 50 26 38 Gator Boys ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Housewives/NYC Orange County Social Housewives/OC Don’t Be Tardy for the Wedding New Jersey Social (N) Housewives/NJ What Happens Housewives/NJ BRAVO 137 44 ›› “Legally Blonde 2: Red, White & Blondeâ€? (2003) ’ Ă… (9:15) ››› “A League of Their Ownâ€? (1992, Comedy-Drama) Tom Hanks, Geena Davis. ’ Ă… CMT 190 32 42 53 (4:00) ››› “A League of Their Ownâ€? (1992) Tom Hanks. ’ Ă… The Costco Craze: Inside the American Greed Mark Weinberger Divorce Wars Big Mac: Inside McDonald’s American Greed Mark Weinberger Paid Program LightVac CNBC 51 36 40 52 Greek Tragedy Danger. Rich Piers Morgan Tonight CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Presents Ă… Piers Morgan Tonight CNN Newsroom CNN Presents Ă… CNN 52 38 35 48 CNN Presents Ă… Futurama ‘PG’ (6:31) Futurama (7:02) Futurama (7:33) Futurama (8:04) Futurama (8:35) Futurama (9:06) Futurama (9:37) Futurama Futurama ‘14’ (10:39) Tosh.0 Workaholics Katt Williams COM 135 53 135 47 (3:56) ›› “Office Spaceâ€? (1999) (4:30) City Club of Central Oregon Talk of the Town Local issues. Cooking Oregon Joy of Fishing Journal Get Outdoors Visions of NW The Yoga Show The Yoga Show Talk of the Town Local issues. COTV 11 British Road to the White House Q&A British Road to the White House Washington This Week CSPAN 58 20 12 11 Q & A Austin & Ally ’ Shake It Up! ‘G’ A.N.T. Farm ‘G’ Jessie ‘G’ Ă… Shake It Up! ‘G’ A.N.T. Farm ‘G’ Good-Charlie Jessie ‘G’ Ă… *DIS 87 43 14 39 Austin & Ally ’ Austin & Ally ’ (6:05) “Let It Shineâ€? (2012) Tyler James Williams. ’ ‘G’ Ă… MythBusters ’ ‘PG’ Ă… MythBusters Dodge a Bullet ‘PG’ MythBusters Duel Dilemmas ‘PG’ MythBusters (N) ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Head Games (N) ’ ‘PG’ Ă… MythBusters ’ ‘PG’ Ă… *DISC 156 21 16 37 MythBusters Square Wheels ‘PG’ Keeping Up With the Kardashians Keeping Up With the Kardashians Keeping Up With the Kardashians Keeping Up With the Kardashians Keeping Up With the Kardashians Mrs. Eastwood Mrs. Eastwood Chelsea Lately The Soup ‘14’ *E! 136 25 SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter Ă… SportsCenter Ă… ESPN 21 23 22 23 MLB Baseball Boston Red Sox at Chicago Cubs From Wrigley Field in Chicago. (N) (Live) College Baseball NCAA World Series, Game 6: Teams TBA From Omaha, Neb. (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) Ă… 2012 U.S. Open Golf Championship Final Round (N) Ă… ESPN2 22 24 21 24 SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… ››› “Elevateâ€? (2011, Documentary) ››› “Elevateâ€? (2011, Documentary) Tennis From July 4, 2004. (N) Ă… ESPNC 23 25 123 25 30 for 30 Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. EURO Tonight H-Lite Ex. ESPNN 24 63 124 203 College Football Live Special ›› “Prince of Persia: The Sands of Timeâ€? (2010) Jake Gyllenhaal. Premiere. ››› “Beetlejuiceâ€? (1988, Comedy) Michael Keaton, Alec Baldwin. FAM 67 29 19 41 (4:30) ››› “The Blind Sideâ€? (2009, Drama) Sandra Bullock, Tim McGraw. Fox News Sunday Geraldo at Large (N) ‘PG’ Ă… Huckabee Stossel Geraldo at Large ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Fox News Sunday FNC 54 61 36 50 Huckabee (N) Food Network Star Guy Live ‘G’ Cupcake Wars L.A. Marathon (N) Food Network Star (N) Iron Chef America Chopped Sunny Side Apps *FOOD 177 62 98 44 Mystery Diners Invention Hun. Diners, Drive (2:30) Star Trek ››› “Wantedâ€? (2008, Action) James McAvoy, Morgan Freeman, Angelina Jolie. ››› “Takenâ€? (2008, Action) Liam Neeson, Maggie Grace. ››› “Takenâ€? (2008, Action) Liam Neeson, Maggie Grace. FX 131 For Rent ’ ‘G’ House Hunters Hunters Int’l Holmes on Homes ‘G’ Ă… Holmes Inspection ’ ‘G’ Ă… Holmes Inspection ’ ‘G’ Ă… Holmes Inspection ’ ‘G’ Ă… Holmes on Homes Bar None ‘G’ HGTV 176 49 33 43 For Rent ’ ‘G’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Ice Road Truckers (N) ‘14’ Ă… (10:01) Swamp People ‘PG’ Ă… Cajun Pawn Cajun Pawn *HIST 155 42 41 36 Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars “Blue Lagoon: The Awakeningâ€? (2012) Denise Richards. ‘14’ Ă… Drop Dead Diva Freak Show ‘PG’ The Client List (N) ‘14’ Ă… “Blue Lagoon: The Awakeningâ€? LIFE 138 39 20 31 › “Fool’s Goldâ€? (2008) Matthew McConaughey, Kate Hudson. Ă… Caught on Camera Predator Raw: The Unseen Tapes Predator Raw: The Unseen Tapes Sex Slaves: Addiction Erasing Hate Meet the Press ‘G’ Ă… MSNBC 56 59 128 51 Caught on Camera I’m Alive! Fantasy Factory Fantasy Factory Fantasy Factory Fantasy Factory Fantasy Factory Fantasy Factory Fantasy Factory Fantasy Factory Ridiculousness Ridiculousness ››› “Jackass 2.5â€? (2007) ’ MTV 192 22 38 57 Rob Dyrdek’s Fantasy Factory ’ Victorious ‘G’ Victorious ‘G’ Victorious ‘G’ My Wife & Kids My Wife & Kids George Lopez George Lopez Yes, Dear ‘PG’ Yes, Dear ‘PG’ Friends ’ ‘PG’ Friends ’ ‘PG’ NICK 82 46 24 40 Figure It Out ‘Y’ Figure It Out ‘Y’ Victorious ‘G’ Oprah’s Next Chapter ‘PG’ Ă… Oprah’s Next Chapter ’ ‘14’ Oprah’s Next Chapter (N) Oprah’s Next Chapter 50 Cent (N) Oprah’s Next Chapter Oprah’s Next Chapter 50 Cent OWN 161 103 31 103 (4:00) Oprah’s Next Chapter ‘14’ Bull Riding CBR Texas Redneck Bull Bash MLS Soccer Portland Timbers at Los Angeles Galaxy (N) MLB Baseball San Francisco Giants at Seattle Mariners From Safeco Field in Seattle. ROOT 20 45 28* 26 Paid Program ›› “The Day After Tomorrowâ€? (2004, Action) Dennis Quaid, Jake Gyllenhaal, Ian Holm. ’ ›› “The Day After Tomorrowâ€? (2004, Action) Dennis Quaid. ’ SPIKE 132 31 34 46 (4:07) ››› “Lethal Weapon 2â€? (1989, Action) Mel Gibson. ’ Ă… ››› “Edward Scissorhandsâ€? (1990) Johnny Depp, Winona Ryder. Premiere. Ă… ›› “Pirates of the Caribbean: At World’s Endâ€? (2007) Johnny Depp. Jack Sparrow’s friends join forces to save him. SYFY 133 35 133 45 Eureka The same lousy day. ‘PG’ Joel Osteen Kerry Shook BelieverVoice Creflo Dollar ››› “The Passion of the Christâ€? (2004, Drama) Jim Caviezel, Monica Bellucci. Changed Lives: Prophecies of A Father’s Heart ‘G’ A Letter to Dad TBN 205 60 130 ›› “Last Holidayâ€? (2006) Queen Latifah, GĂŠrard Depardieu. Ă… ››› “Hitchâ€? (2005, Romance-Comedy) Will Smith, Eva Mendes, Kevin James. Ă… (10:35) ››› “Hitchâ€? (2005) Will Smith. Ă… *TBS 16 27 11 28 (4:00) ›› “The House Bunnyâ€? ››› “Rio Bravoâ€? (1959, Western) John Wayne, Dean Martin, Ricky Nelson. Sheriff and deputies ›››› “Fort Apacheâ€? (1948, Western) John Wayne, Henry Fonda. A cavalry (9:45) ›› “The Circleâ€? (1925, Drama) Eleanor Boardman, ››› “L’Avventuraâ€? (1960) Monica TCM 101 44 101 29 try to hold rancher’s brother in jail. Ă… officer is held responsible for Apache attacks. Ă… (DVS) Malcolm McGregor, Eugenie Besserer. Vitti, Gabriele Ferzetti. American Gypsy Wedding American Gypsy Wedding American Gypsy Wedding Sister Wives (N) Sister Wives (N) American Gypsy Wedding Sister Wives ’ Sister Wives ’ *TLC 178 34 32 34 American Gypsy Wedding ›› “Sherlock Holmesâ€? (2009, Action) Robert Downey Jr., Jude Law. Ă… (DVS) Falling Skies Worlds Apart ‘14’ Falling Skies (N) ‘14’ Ă… (11:01) Falling Skies ‘14’ Ă… *TNT 17 26 15 27 (3:15) ›››› “The Dark Knightâ€? (2008) Ă… Regular Show Regular Show ››› “Fantastic Mr. Foxâ€? (2009) Voices of George Clooney. Level Up ‘PG’ Level Up ‘PG’ Venture Bros. King of the Hill King of the Hill Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Loiter Squad *TOON 84 Sand Masters Sand Masters Sand Masters Sand Masters Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Barbecue Paradise ‘G’ Ă… *TRAV 179 51 45 42 Hotel Impossible ‘G’ Ă… (5:48) M*A*S*H (6:24) M*A*S*H M*A*S*H ‘PG’ M*A*S*H ‘PG’ M*A*S*H ‘PG’ M*A*S*H ‘PG’ Love-Raymond Love-Raymond (10:12) The King of Queens ‘PG’ King of Queens King of Queens TVLND 65 47 29 35 (5:12) M*A*S*H The Nurses ‘PG’ Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU USA 15 30 23 30 Law & Order: SVU Single Ladies ’ ‘14’ Mob Wives Chicago ’ ‘14’ Mob Wives Chicago (N) ’ ‘14’ Tough Love: New Orleans (N) ‘14’ Mob Wives Chicago ’ ‘14’ Tough Love: New Orleans ’ ‘14’ VH1 191 48 37 54 Single Ladies ’ ‘14’ PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(6:10) ››› “Bigâ€? 1988, Fantasy Tom Hanks. ’ ‘PG’ Ă… ››› “Tangledâ€? 2010 Voices of Mandy Moore. (9:45) ›› “The Touristâ€? 2010 Johnny Depp. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… Carlito’s Way ENCR 106 401 306 401 (4:20) “That Thing You Do!â€? 1996 ›› “27 Dressesâ€? 2008 Katherine Heigl. ‘PG-13’ Ă… FXM Presents › “What Happens in Vegasâ€? 2008 Cameron Diaz. ‘PG-13’ Ă… › “All About Steveâ€? 2009 Ă… FMC 104 204 104 120 (4:30) › “All About Steveâ€? 2009 Sandra Bullock. Motorcycle The Ultimate Fighter Brazil The Ultimate Fighter Brazil (N) UFC 146: Dos Santos vs. Mir Prelims UFC Tonight The Ultimate Fighter Brazil FUEL 34 Live From the U.S. Open (N) (Live) Live From the U.S. Open U.S. Open GOLF 28 301 27 301 ›› “The Greatest Game Ever Playedâ€? (2005, Drama) Shia LaBeouf, Stephen Dillane. (5:56) ›› “Personally Yoursâ€? (2000) Valerie Bertinelli. ‘PG’ Ă… “Operation Cupcakeâ€? (2012) Dean Cain, Kristy Swanson. ‘G’ Ă… Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘G’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘G’ HALL 66 33 175 33 (3:57) ››› “Dad’s Homeâ€? ‘PG’ › “Big Mommas: Like Father, Like Sonâ€? 2011 Martin Lawrence. Malcolm and ››› “Crazy, Stupid, Love.â€? 2011 Steve Carell. A suddenly single 40-some- True Blood Authority Always Wins Bill Girls She Did (N) (10:35) Girls She (11:05) True Blood Bill and Eric meet HBO 425 501 425 501 his stepson go under cover at a girls school. Ă… thing needs help finding his groove again. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… and Eric meet Salome. ‘MA’ ‘MA’ Ă… Did ‘MA’ Ă… Salome. ’ ‘MA’ Ă… (5:15) ›› “King Arthurâ€? 2004 Clive Owen. Arthur and his knights embark on a rescue mission. ‘PG-13’ Comedy Bang! Bunk ‘14’ ›› “King Arthurâ€? 2004, Historical Drama Clive Owen, Keira Knightley. ‘PG-13’ Last King-Scot IFC 105 105 (3:30) ›››› ››› “Inceptionâ€? 2010, Science Fiction Leonardo DiCaprio, Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Ellen Page. A ››› “Hannaâ€? 2011, Action Saoirse Ronan. A teenage assassin must elude ››› “Rising Sunâ€? 1993, Mystery Sean Connery, Harvey Keitel. Detectives MAX 400 508 508 “Alienâ€? 1979 ‘R’ thief enters people’s dreams and steals their secrets. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… the agents of a ruthless operative. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… investigate a murder at a Japanese corporation. ’ ‘R’ Ă… Taboo Odd Couples Taboo Secret Lives Taboo Living With the Dead ‘14’ Taboo Odd Couples Taboo Secret Lives Taboo Living With the Dead ‘14’ Taboo Freaky Remedies NGC 157 157 Power Rangers Wild Grinders Wild Grinders Avatar: Air. Avatar: Air. Legend-Korra Odd Parents SpongeBob SpongeBob Fanboy-Chum Fanboy-Chum Invader ZIM ’ Invader ZIM ’ NTOON 89 115 189 115 Legend-Korra Realtree Truth Hunting Friends of NRA Bone Collector Hunt Masters Your Weapon Hunt Adventure Realtree Wildgame Ntn Mathews Wardens Operation Elk Dummy OUTD 37 307 43 307 Hunt Adventure Wildgame Ntn (4:30) Homeland Homeland Marine One Saul investigates Carrie’s theories. The Borgias Alexander prepares to The Big C Vaya Nurse Jackie ’ Nurse Jackie (N) The Big C Fly The Borgias The Confession Lucrezia Nurse Jackie ’ The Big C Fly SHO 500 500 The Vest ’ ‘14’ ’ ‘14’ Ă… end his fast. ’ ‘MA’ Ă… Con Dios ‘MA’ ‘MA’ Ă… ‘MA’ Ă… Away (N) ‘MA’ falls for a new suitor. ‘MA’ ‘MA’ Ă… Away ’ ‘MA’ Wind Tunnel With Dave Despain Guys Garage Car Crazy ‘G’ Continental Tire Sports Car Challenge Mid-Ohio ARCA RE/MAX Series Racing Michigan SPEED 35 303 125 303 NASCAR Victory Lane (7:20) ›› “Are We There Yet?â€? 2005 Ice Cube. ›› “Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tidesâ€? 2011 Johnny Depp. ‘PG-13’ Ă… 30 Minutes STARZ 300 408 300 408 (4:50) ››› “True Liesâ€? 1994, Action Arnold Schwarzenegger, Tom Arnold. ‘R’ Ă… (4:15) › “29 Palmsâ€? 2002 Rachael ›› “The Distinguished Gentlemanâ€? 1992, Comedy Eddie Murphy, Lane Smith. ›› “The Mechanicâ€? 2011 Jason Statham. An elite hit-man (9:35) › “Death Racersâ€? 2008 Violent J. Contestants com- (11:10) ››› “The Roadâ€? 2009 Viggo TMC 525 525 Leigh Cook. ’ ‘R’ Ă… Con man goes to Washington as a senator. ’ ‘R’ Ă… teaches his deadly trade to an apprentice. pete in a cross-country killing race. ’ ‘R’ Mortensen. ’ ‘R’ Ă… Costas Tonight ‘PG’ Game On! Fight Night 36 MLS Soccer New York Red Bulls at Chicago Fire From Toyota Park in Bridgeview, Ill. Costas Tonight ‘PG’ NBCSN 27 58 30 209 (4:30) Cycling Tour de Suisse, Stage 9 (N) Bridezillas ‘14’ Ă… Bridezillas (N) ‘14’ Ă… Bridezillas Where Are Th. Bridezillas ‘14’ Ă… Bridezillas ‘14’ Ă… Amazing Wedding Cakes ‘G’ *WE 143 41 174 118 Bridezillas Where Are Th.


SUNDAY, JUNE 17, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

A  & A  

Daughter’s salute to dad is shared by all this holiday Dear Abby: It’s Father’s Day, and I’d like to salute one particular unsung hero — my dad. He was there for me and my sister despite a difficult workload throughout our childhood. He has always been generous with love and affection, and I have no doubt that he has sacrificed things he wanted personally for our benefit. Dad has been the calming voice during times of strife. He can fix anything from a broken washing machine to a broken heart. He has not only nurtured us, but our children as well. He has been our role model when it comes to setting an example of what a man, husband, father and grandfather should be. He is never judgmental and has always shown us the best in ourselves. He’s consistent in his love of God, country and family. He is patient, kind, generous and smart in ways I only wish I could be. To top it off, he found us the best mother we could have hoped for. They have been married 58 years. My unsung hero doesn’t wear a cape, but I do believe he has certainly earned a halo. — Sharon in Brandon, Fla. Dear Sharon: What a sweet letter. I’m printing it to honor not only your father but also the millions of men who dedicate themselves daily to raising their children with love and support. In addition, I’d like to extend a Happy Father’s Day to fathers everywhere — not only birth fathers but also stepfathers, foster fathers and those caring individuals who mentor youngsters whose parents are absent or deceased. Bless you all. Dear Abby: Will you please help librarians across the country clarify something that is generally misrepresented to the public? Patrons who need assistance operating a computer MAY be able to get help at their local library. That’s “may,� not “can.� Too often, people are instructed to go to their library and use a

DEAR ABBY computer to file taxes, redeem a gift, print pictures, etc. The fact is, not every library has computers with Internet access. Most do, but not all. Further, many libraries lack sufficient staff to offer oneon-one support to operate a computer. To someone who is proficient, it may seem strange that a person can’t simply lay a hand on a mouse and go. The reality is, computers and the Internet are not intuitive to those who haven’t been exposed to them — and there are many. While I don’t know of a librarian who wouldn’t like to offer unlimited assistance to computer users, libraries nationwide are losing staff due to budget cuts. At the same time, use of libraries is steadily increasing. It’s frustrating to disappoint patrons who expect to receive instruction in computer operation. We prefer they leave our building happy. So, Abby, please spread the word. Computers and Internet services vary from library to library. Readers should ask their librarian about what services are available at their local branch. — Concerned Citizen, Easthampton, Mass. Dear Concerned Citizen: Thank you for shining a light on this important subject. Readers, if this letter is as disturbing to you as it is to me, write your congressional representative and express your concern. For lower- and middle-income people of every age, libraries have performed — and continue to perform — a vital function. Their budgets must not be slashed to the point that they can no longer fulfill their mission of informing and educating the public. — Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

Horoscope: Happy Birthday for Sunday, June 17, 2012 By JACQUELINE BIGAR This year you naturally seem to attract more optimistic people. You also demonstrate an ability to handle whatever you must. You gain insight about yourself as well as others. The unexpected keeps your year lively. If you are single, you could meet someone who might not be all that he or she presents him- or herself to be. If you are attached, the two of you benefit from spending more special time together. A fellow GEMINI might seem very different, yet he or she has your same veracity. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH Your newfound optimism and cheer have an impact on many people you come into contact with. Make long-distance calls in the morning. Maintain a sense of humor when someone gets confused, or you could have a misunderstanding. Tonight: Go for the element of surprise. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHH Do some intense research before you donate any funds or make an important purchase. Rest assured that you probably can find a better buy. The question is: Do you want to go through the hassle? Be honest with yourself. Tonight: Your treat. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHH Your energy is irresistible to many people. There is an aura of confusion, as people might not be completing their thoughts. A parent or someone you look up to might be capable of wild reversals at this point. Tonight: The ball is in your court. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHH Your focus might be completely dedicated to finishing a project. You enjoy working like this because your mind relaxes and worries less about the apple of your eye seeing your vulnerabilities. Tonight: Make it early. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHHH Emphasize what is good in a friendship instead of what is negative. By being open, you’ll also see a situation in a different light. You could be nearly stunned by what you hear. Tonight: Express your caring in a meaningful way for the other party. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH Do not hesitate to take

the lead in an emotional situation. You tend to appear cool, calm and collected, while others seem to dissemble in front of you. An older relative or friend lets you know how much you are appreciated. Tonight: In the limelight. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHHH Keep reaching out for a friend at a distance — he or she does not intend to be evasive, nor unavailable. Give this person the benefit of the doubt. Your smiling ways make all the difference. Tonight: Let your spirit soar. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHHH Keep your day as clear as possible, with the exception of spending quality time with your sweetie. When you express your feelings, this person’s response could be a little off. Know that it’s not because he or she doesn’t care. Tonight: Act as if there is no tomorrow. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHH You might want to try a new approach or do something far differently than you have been. The only person holding you back is yourself. Perhaps you are making a judgment about what others might think. You need to lead more often than many other signs. Tonight: Say “yes� to an invitation. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHH You could be well aware of what is happening around you. You also must develop a better health and/or exercise routine. You often pretend that you are doing enough for your well-being. Just be realistic. Tonight: Get a head start on tomorrow. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHHH No one needs to tell you what to do. You are in the mood to visit with a special friend or two, and you’re full of energy. Your caring means more than you think to one person. Note his or her expression when you are around. Tonight: Pretend it is Friday night. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHH Make today about family and those in your immediate circle. Yes, a neighbor might attempt to nudge his or her way into your schedule. Do what is politically correct, and you will not be sorry. Tonight: A spontaneous get-together at your pad. Š 2011 by King Features Syndicate

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C C  Please email event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� at www.bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

TODAY FATHER’S DAY AT THE MUSEUM: Fathers can visit the museum for free; included in the price of admission; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free for fathers and ages 4 and younger; 9 a.m.5 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www. highdesertmuseum.org. DEMOLITION DERBY: The Bend/Sunrise Lions Club hosts a derby; proceeds benefit the club’s charitable causes; $12, $6 ages 6-12, free ages 5 and younger; 11 a.m. gates open, 1 p.m. derby; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-410-4667. “SOCIAL SECURITY�: Cascades Theatrical Company presents a comedy about a couple whose tranquility is destroyed by family members; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 2 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org. SUMMER SUNDAY CONCERT: The roots-rock act Harley Bourbon performs; free; 2:30-4:30 p.m.; Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-3229383 or www.bendconcerts. com. “THE COMPLETE WORKS OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE (ABRIDGED)�: Innovation Theatre Works presents the humorous adaptation of 37 Shakespeare plays in 90 minutes; $15, $12 students and seniors; 6 p.m.; Innovation Theatre Works, 1155 S.W. Division St., Bend; 541-5046721 or www.innovationtw.org. BILLY MANZIK: The Californiabased folk rocker performs; free; 7 p.m.; Broken Top Bottle Shop & Ale Cafe, 1740 N.W. Pence Lane, Suite 1, Bend; 541-728-0703. THE MARK CROSS BAND: The singer-songwriter performs with his band; free; 7 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www. silvermoonbrewing.com. THE YAWPERS: The roots-rock act performs; $6 in advance, $10 at the door; 8 p.m.; The Sound Garden, 1279 N.E. Second St., Bend; 541-633-6804 or www. thesoundgardenstudio.com.

MONDAY “KOCH BROTHERS EXPOSED�: A screening of the documentary about the corruption of billionaires Charles and David Koch; free; 6 p.m., doors open 5:30 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-318-8169. “DRUM CORPS INTERNATIONAL TOUR�: A screening of the nation’s top marching music ensembles performing; $15; 6:30 p.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347.

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin file photo

Standing on his crumpled Plymouth Satellite, Wild Bill Taylor of Salem raises his hands high after winning the large car division at the Demolition Derby in 2008. This year’s Demolition Derby will be today at the Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center in Redmond.

WEDNESDAY BEND FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 3-7 p.m.; Brooks Alley, between Northwest Franklin Avenue and Northwest Brooks Street; 541-408-4998, bendfarmersmarket@gmail.com or http://bendfarmersmarket.com. MUSIC IN THE CANYON: Countryfied performs country music; free; 5:30-8 p.m.; American Legion Community Park, 850 S.W. Rimrock Way, Redmond; www.musicinthecanyon. com. “THE METROPOLITAN OPERA, LE COMTE ORY�: Starring Juan Diego Florez, Joyce DiDonato and Diana Damrau in an encore presentation of Rossini’s masterpiece; opera performance transmitted in high definition; $12.50; 6:30 p.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347. FULL DRAW FILM TOUR: A showcase of outdoor independent filmmakers and their archery short films; $13.50, $11 children; 7 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www. towertheatre.org. YOGOMAN BURNING BAND: The Bellingham, Wash.-based reggae band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-3825174 or www.mcmenamins.com. “SOCIAL SECURITY�: Cascades Theatrical Company presents a comedy about a couple whose tranquility is destroyed by family members; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www. cascadestheatrical.org. “THE COMPLETE WORKS OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE (ABRIDGED)�: Innovation Theatre Works presents the humorous adaptation of 37 Shakespeare plays in 90 minutes; $15, $12 students and seniors; 7:30 p.m.; Innovation Theatre Works, 1155 S.W. Division St., Bend; 541-504-6721 or www. innovationtw.org.

TUESDAY REDMOND FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 2-6:30 p.m.; Centennial Park, Seventh Street and Evergreen Avenue; 541-550-0066 or redmondfarmersmarket1@ hotmail.com. TUESDAY MARKET AT EAGLE CREST: Free admission; 2-6 p.m.; Eagle Crest Resort, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; 541-633-9637 or info@ sustainableflame.com. “SOCIAL SECURITY�: Cascades Theatrical Company presents a comedy about a couple whose tranquility is destroyed by family members; proceeds benefit Soroptimist International of Bend; $25; 7:30 p.m., reception 6:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-728-0051 or www.sibend.org. CROSSING WATER AND SAND: Israeli harpist Sunita Staneslow performs, with Laura Zaerr and Rebecca Hilary Smith, and dancing by Jennifer HeidenSmith; $15; 7:30 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Cascade School of Music, 200 N.W. Pacific Park Lane, Bend; 541-382-6866 or www.ccschoolofmusic.org. THE SKABBS: The Lawndale, Calif.-based rock band performs; free; 8 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; 541-7280879 or www.reverbnation. com/venue/thehornedhand.

THURSDAY TUMALO FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 3-6 p.m.; Tumalo Garden Market, off of U.S. Highway 20 and Cook Avenue; 541-7280088, earthsart@gmail.com or http://tumalogardenmarket.com. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Craig Johnson reads from his book “As the Crow Flies�; free; 4 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 422 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-526-1491. BENEFIT GALA: Featuring a silent auction, refreshments and music by the Moon Mountain Ramblers; proceeds benefit Full Access; $30, $50 per couple; 6-9 p.m.; Deschutes Brewery Mountain Room, 901 S.W. Simpson Ave., Bend; www.fullaccess.org. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Craig Johnson reads from his book “As the Crow Flies�; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 252 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-0866. ANDY FRASCO & THE U.N.: The blues act performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www. mcmenamins.com. “PARENTS NIGHT OUT�: A screening of the presentation by Harvey Karp about raising happy children; $12.50; 7:30 p.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541382-6347 or www.fathomevents. com. “SOCIAL SECURITY�: Cascades

Theatrical Company presents a comedy about a couple whose tranquility is destroyed by family members; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www. cascadestheatrical.org. “THE COMPLETE WORKS OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE (ABRIDGED)�: Innovation Theatre Works presents the humorous adaptation of 37 Shakespeare plays in 90 minutes; $15, $12 students and seniors; 7:30 p.m.; Innovation Theatre Works, 1155 S.W. Division St., Bend; 541-504-6721 or www. innovationtw.org. DIRTY FILTHY MUGS: The Los Angeles-based punk band performs; $5; 8 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; 541-7280879 or www.reverbnation. com/venue/thehornedhand. LAST BAND STANDING: A battle of the bands competition featuring local acts; free; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Liquid Lounge, 70 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend; www. lastbandstanding.net.

FRIDAY 4 PEAKS MUSIC FESTIVAL: Camping music festival features performances by Poor Man’s Whiskey, Melvin Seals and JGB, The Mother Hips and more; $70 in advance, $80 at the gate, free ages 9 and younger; 1:309:45 p.m.; Rockin’ A Ranch, 19449 Tumalo Reservoir Road, Tumalo; www.4peaksmusic.com. BEND FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 2-6 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-4084998, bendfarmersmarket@gmail. com or http://bendfarmersmarket. com. SISTERS FARMERS MARKET: 3-6 p.m.; Barclay Park, West Cascade Avenue and Ash Street; www. sistersfarmersmarket.com. VFW DINNER: A dinner of chickenfried steak; $7; 5 p.m.; VFW Hall, 1503 N.E. Fourth St., Bend; 541-389-0775. BENEFIT EVENT: See white buffalo and hear storytelling; with live music and a barbecue; $25 in advance, $30 at the door; 6:30-10 p.m.; Silver Horse Ranch, 63950 Tyler Road, Bend; 541-408-4080 or www. silverhorseranch.com. “THE TOY SHOP AT MIDNIGHT�: Terpsichorean Dance Studio presents a dance performance about toys who come to life at night; proceeds benefit the studio’s scholarship fund; $9 in advance, $10 at the door; 7 p.m.; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541-389-5351 or www. terpsichoreanbendoregon.com. “SOCIAL SECURITY�: Cascades Theatrical Company presents a comedy about a couple whose

tranquility is destroyed by family members; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www. cascadestheatrical.org. “THE COMPLETE WORKS OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE (ABRIDGED)�: Innovation Theatre Works presents the humorous adaptation of 37 Shakespeare plays in 90 minutes; $15, $12 students and seniors; 7:30 p.m.; Innovation Theatre Works, 1155 S.W. Division St., Bend; 541-504-6721 or www. innovationtw.org. “OLEANNA�: Thoroughly Modern Productions presents the story of a college professor’s heated conversation with his student; $15 in advance, $18 at the door; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626, 2ndstreettheater@gmail.com or www.2ndstreettheater.com.

SATURDAY YARD SALE FUNDRAISER: Proceeds benefit Bend Genealogical Society; free; 8 a.m.-3 p.m.; Rock Arbor Villa, Williamson Hall, 2200 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541317-9553 or www.orgenweb. org/deschutes/bend-gs. PRINEVILLE FARMERS MARKET: Free; 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Prineville City Plaza, 387 N.E. Third St.; 503-739-0643 or prinevillefarmersmarket@gmail. com. COUNTRY QUILT SHOW: Featuring quilts for sale, awards, raffle and more; $2, free ages 11 and younger; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Crooked River Elementary School, 640-641 N.E. Third St., Prineville; 541-447-8048. MADRAS SATURDAY MARKET: Free admission; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Sahalee Park, B and Seventh streets; 541489-3239 or madrassatmkt@gmail. com. 4 PEAKS MUSIC FESTIVAL: Camping music festival features performances by Poor Man’s Whiskey, Melvin Seals and JGB, The Mother Hips and more; $70 in advance, $80 at the gate, free ages 9 and younger; 10 a.m.9:45 p.m.; Rockin’ A Ranch, 19449 Tumalo Reservoir Road, Tumalo; www.4peaksmusic.com. CENTRAL OREGON SATURDAY MARKET: Featuring arts and crafts from local artisans; free admission; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; parking lot across from Bend Public Library, 600 N.W. Wall St.; 541-420-9015 or www. centraloregonsaturdaymarket.com. BITE OF BEND: Food festival includes local food booths offering bites of their creations, a beer garden, wine, a Top Chef competition, a children’s area and live music; proceeds benefit the Boys & Girls Clubs of Central Oregon; free admission; 11 a.m.-10 p.m.; downtown Bend; 541-3230964 or www.thebiteofbend.com.

65th Annual Blow-out Celebration

ROCKHOUND SHOW & POW WOW JEWELRY, GEM & MINERAL SHOW June 21-24 • Crook County Fairgrounds • Prineville, OR 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday-Saturday • 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday âœŚ FREE admission âœŚ Public welcome âœŚ Dealer booths - Inside & out - Vendors from all over the world âœŚ Field trips âœŚ Showcase displays & auction - Open to the public âœŚ Potluck dinner at 6:30 p.m. on set-up day âœŚ Excellent selection of materials âœŚ Obsidian * Jade * Petrified Wood * Jasper * Plume Agate Limb Casts * Moss Agate * Thunder Eggs * Crystals Precious Gems * A wide variety of Faceting Rough & Lots More

For More Information Prineville Rockhound Pow Wow Rock & Gem Show Contact 541-447-5298 or Richknightr@gmail.com www.prinevillerockhoundpowwow.com


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THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, JUNE 17, 2012

A young osprey peers through the leaves of an alder tree beside the Rogue River near Agness. The fish hawks enjoy an ample diet of migratory salmon and steelhead, as well as trout and other freshwater fish that populate the Southern Oregon river.

Photos courtesy Barb Gonzalez

River pilot Jeff Laird navigates his jet boat through a narrow Rogue River canyon just west of the town of Agness. Jerry’s Rogue Jets have been navigating the river since 1958, and are direct descendants of mail-boat service that began serving remote pioneer homesteads in 1895.

Jet-boat travelers get a close-up look at the underside of the historic Patterson Bridge, built in 1932 by noted bridge designer Condé McCullough. Scores of swallows live beneath the structure, considered the most advanced concrete bridge in America when it opened.

Rogue Continued from C1 Thrust is provided by the volume of water projected from the boat; steering the highly maneuverable vessel is merely a matter of directing the water nozzle to one side or the other. Jerry Boice and his older brother, Court, were the original pilots and tour guides. A third brother, Alden Boice, was a marine mechanic who built and maintained the company’s original fleet of two wooden jet boats. (The 12 boats in the the current fleet are all aluminum.) In 1972, Alden and Bill McNair — a University of Oregon graduate whose family owned a cabin 20 miles upriver from Gold Beach — purchased control of the company. The original boat tours ran upriver 32 miles to Agness, a tiny former mill town with a population of fewer than 100 people. Travelers would break there for lunch before returning back downstream to Gold Beach. Jeff Laird, 47, said he learned to run jet boats when

he was 10. Perhaps not coincidentally, that was about the time — in the mid-1970s — when pilots began testing their mettle on the river waters upstream from Agness. The narrow, rocky section had long been thought to be unnavigable in a motorized boat. But Alden Boice had purchased the Paradise Lodge, nearly 20 miles above Agness, and young Jeff learned to navigate the way to “Uncle Alden’s.” The upper section of whitewater was added to the Rogue jet operations soon thereafter, and by the time Laird turned 21 and went to work as a river pilot, he was already a seasoned veteran. “I can run in 6 inches of water when the boat is fully loaded,” boasted Laird, adding: “I’d rather have this job than a 9-to-5.” Today, Laird is one of several Boice descendants who work as commercial pilots for Jerry’s Rogue Jets. But everyday operations are in the hands of McNair’s sons, Scott and Nic. Bill McNair himself can often be found upriver in a drift boat, casting a line for the spring chinook or fall steel-

head that make the Rogue one of the most popular fishing rivers in the West.

Gold Beach to Agness My all-day excursion began on the Rogue riverfront in Gold Beach, a town of 2,500 people that is a six-hour (275mile) drive southwest of Bend. The ominous, half-submerged wreck of the Mary D. Hume, a historic schooner that plied Pacific waters for 97 years before coming to rest here in 1978, is a colorful introduction to the harbor area. But it is hardly indicative of the river experience ahead. I joined a group of about 30 travelers on the 104-mile trip to Blossom Bar and back. (Shorter trips are also available for visitors who might not want to brave the upper-river whitewater.) The McNair brothers provided a safety briefing in the ticketsales area, offering the use of fleece-lined, waterproof jackets to passengers not properly attired. Then we marched out to the dock. Laird’s friendly dog watched as we found seats on seven padded benches within

a broad, 12-foot beam. We had plenty of observers as we powered out into the tidal estuary. Cormorants spread their wings atop each piling in the water. Harbor seals followed us under the historic Patterson Bridge, which was considered the most advanced concrete bridge in America when it was built by noted designer Conde McCullough in 1932. Scores of swallows swooped from nests built beneath the structure. A mated pair of bald eagles roosted in a large cottonwood tree on the riverbank, as a herd of Guernsey cattle grazed beneath. Laird, a keen-eyed observer of wildlife, pointed out a beaver lodge at Cannery Riffle, site of a former salmon cannery at the upper limit of tidal inflow. A little farther upstream, he spotted a Columbia blacktailed doe and her two spotted fawns near the river’s bank. Despite speeds averaging more than 30 mph, Laird always looked for animals, slowing or stopping to share the sights with passengers. About six miles above the Patterson Bridge, on the north side of the Rogue, Laird indicated the rustically elegant Tu Tu’ Tun Lodge. Taking its name from the native Tututni Indians, the original residents of the lower Rogue River region, the Tu Tu’ Tun has been acclaimed as one of the finest hotels in North America since opening in 1970. Nearby, teepees rose on the grounds of an RV park and resort. As we wove through a fleet of private fishing boats — one angler proudly held up a weighty chinook he had caught that morning — Laird pointed to undeveloped, forested acreage that he said was owned by Pete Sampras. The retired tennis star’s wife, actress Bridgette Wilson, was born and raised in Gold Beach, moving to Hollywood after winning a Miss Teen USA contest in 1990. Another celebrity resident of the Gold Beach area, Laird said, is 93-year-old Bobby Do-

err. As we passed, he pointed out the remote home of the Baseball Hall of Fame second baseman, a former Boston Red Sox teammate of the great Ted Williams.

of the eight original streams designated as “wild and scenic” in a congressional act in 1968. That list has now grown to 156 rivers in 42 states, but the Rogue remains unique. The river rises near Crater Lake, pours through a narrow gorge above Union Creek, drifts gently past Medford and through Grants Pass, then enters rugged landscape along the northern edge of the Siskiyou Mountains. Two years ago, I rafted 45 miles of wilderness below Grants Pass; the jet-boat excursion provided the final link to the Pacific. We stopped twice — once for a rest stop, once for lunch at the Cougar Lane Lodge — in remote Agness, where the temperature was a good 10 degrees warmer than it had been amid the misty sea breezes of the coast. Continued next page

Wild and scenic Perhaps it should have been no surprise that celebrity athletes like Sampras and Doerr would find refuge on the Rogue River. More than 200 miles long, the Rogue was one

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SUNDAY, JUNE 17, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

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Sadie, the yellow Labrador companion of river pilot Jeff Laird, scans the harbor at the mouth of the Rogue River as a jet boat departs.

Following a change of ownership to Kyle Ringer in 2009, the cedar-planked hotel remains a destination for visitors from around the world. A member of the Unique Inns hotel group, it is annually ranked by Condé Nast Traveler magazine among the “World’s Top 25 Small Hotels.”

In Gold Beach

Photos courtesy Barb Gonzalez

The Tu Tu’ Tun Lodge spreads along the north bank of the Rogue River about six miles upriver from U.S. Highway 101. Taking its name from the region’s original Indian tribe, it has often been acclaimed among North America’s finest hotels since first opening in 1970. Once a steam schooner, cannery tender and whaling vessel, the Mary D. Hume operated in Pacific waters starting in 1881. Damaged in 1978 while being lifted into a cradle for display, it now slowly decays near the mouth of the Rogue River.

Expenses Gas, Bend to Gold Beach (round-trip), 561 miles @ $4.30/gallon: $96.49 Lunch, Barnacle Bistro: $14 Lodging, Tu Tu’ Tun Lodge (one night): $272.60 Dinner-breakfast meal package, Tu-Tu’ Tun: $67.50 Jet boat excursion: $90 Lunch, Cougar Camp Lodge, Agness: $15 Dinner, Anna’s Wine Bistro: $36 Lodging, Pacific Reef Resort (one night): $98.63 Breakfast, Breakfast at Tiffany’s: $11.45 Lunch, en route: $11.95 Total: $713.62

If you go INFORMATION • Gold Beach Visitor Center. South Beach Park, 24080 Shirley Lane, Gold Beach; 541-247-7526, 800-525-2334, www.gold beach.org • Oregon Coast Visitors Association. 137 N.E. First St., Newport; 888-6282101, www.visittheoregon coast.com

LODGING • Cougar Lane Lodge. 04219 Agness Road, Agness; 541-247-7233. Rates from $50 • Pacific Reef Resort. 29362 Ellensburg Ave., Gold Beach; 541-247-6658, 800-808-7263, www .pacificreefresort.com. Rates from $59 • Tu Tu’ Tun Lodge. 96550 North Bank Rogue Road, Gold Beach; 541-247-6664, 800-864-6357, www.tutu tun.com. Rates from $255 summer, $145 winter.

DINING • Anna’s by the Sea Wine Bistro. 29672 Stewart St., Gold Beach; 541-2472100, www.annasby thesea.com. Dinner only. Moderate • Barnacle Bistro. 29805 Ellensburg Ave., Gold Beach; 541-247-7799, www.barnaclebistro .com. Lunch and dinner. Moderate • Breakfast at Tiffany’s. 29692 Ellensburg Ave., Gold Beach; 541-2474606. Breakfast and lunch. Budget to moderate • Port Hole Cafe. 29975 Harbor Way, Gold Beach; 541-247-7411, www.port holecafe.com. Lunch and dinner. Moderate • Rollin’ in Dough Bistro. 94257 North Bank Rogue Road, Wedderburn; 541247-4438, www.facebook .com. Breakfast and lunch. Budget • Spinner’s Seafood, Steak & Chophouse. 29430 Ellensburg Ave., Gold Beach; 541-247-5160, www.spinnersrestaurant .com. Dinner only. Moderate to expensive

From previous page The river divides the hamlet in two; a paved road from Gold Beach, which follows the south bank of the Rogue, was linked by bridge to the north bank (with its historic post office) only in 1962. A rough gravel road continues north from here 35 miles to the logging village of Powers, itself linked to Coos Bay and Roseburg. Just above the Agness bridge, the Rogue is joined by the Illinois River, a wild and scenic stream in its own right. A little farther, we passed Foster Creek, the usual takeout point for whitewater rafting trips. Then we moved into the Wild Rogue Wilderness. Suddenly, we were dodging giant boulders and sweeping past brush-covered islands. Each time that it appeared we might have a perilous collision, Laird swung the boat sharply to the left or right. A beautiful double waterfall tumbled from one rocky canyon wall just before we reached Blossom Bar, named for the wild azaleas that flourish above the riverside rocks. But although its name suggests serenity, Blossom Bar is the most hazardous of any Rogue rapid. Jet boats cannot penetrate its rocky picket fence. After a quick look, we turned around to run the

Devils Staircase. It went against common logic, but the 345-foot elevation gain between Gold Beach and Blossom Bar wasn’t half as thrilling as the descent of Devil’s Staircase. “There may be a little bump here,” Laird said, as he navigated the hellish cataract. Sixty seconds later, there wasn’t a single person aboard the boat who wasn’t drenched from head to toe. But the 70-degree warmth of the spring day, coupled with the drying effect of the boat’s velocity, quickly flushed the moisture from our skin and clothes. And our afternoon return to Gold Beach, following our lunch stop, was a delightful run. We even saw four black bears on three different sightings. All smiles, we were back in Gold Beach by about 4 p.m. And after a stop at the Jerry’s Rogue Jets museum and gift shop, across the parking lot from the ticket building, we were ready to return to our hotels to relax before dinner.

Tu Tu’ Tun Lodge I split my two nights of lodging between two inns. Having heard much about the Tu Tu’ Tun, I splurged to stay there on my first night in Gold Beach. It isn’t cheap — from now until mid-Oc-

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tober, prices begin at $255 per night, not including a $67.50-per-guest meal package — but it delivers top-end service, comfort and luxury in a location where that might be considered hard to come by. Pronounced “Two Tootin’,” the riverside lodge has 16 beautiful rooms and suites along with three private houses. Most of the rooms have private patios or balconies and wood-burning fireplaces; some also have outdoor soaking tubs. Guests get acquainted daily at an early-evening hors d’oeuvres reception in the main lodge building. Immediately after, gourmet meals are served family-style. The main entree on my visit was a baked sturgeon that could have been pulled from the waters of the Rogue itself. Breakfast, meanwhile, may be delivered to your room on request. From my room, I could see deer wandering the grounds of the lodge, walking around the edge of a fenced herb-andvegetable garden and across a six-hole, pitch-and-putt golf course. Kayaks are available for river play, and a heated lap pool invites serious swimmers. There’s also a private cabana where spa treatments may be arranged.

Wanting to explore the little town of Gold Beach, I also spent a night after jet-boating at the Pacific Reef Resort, a delightful in-town property with a back-door trail that leads just a couple of hundred yards through bunchgrass to a Pacific beach. Modestly priced — especially compared to the Tu Tu’ Tun — this “resort” offers a choice between motel rooms and two-story condominium rentals by the side of U.S. Highway 101.

The condos have full kitchens, and the hotel owners are about to open a renovated restaurant next door to the property. Besides jet-boating, the town offers horseback rides on the beach, nature walks in old-growth cedar and myrtle forests, and a well-organized historical museum. And I found a couple of intriguing restaurants. The Barnacle Bistro is a casual cafe with good sandwiches and a couple of nightly gourmet specials. Anna’s by the Sea Wine Bistro is a quirky off-the-highway spot with European wines and preparations its owner-chef designates “Nouvelle Canadian Prairie Cuisine.” I’m not sure what that means. But I’m quite certain it didn’t include Rogue River bear. — Reporter: janderson@ bendbulletin.com

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THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, JUNE 17, 2012

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Milestones guidelines and forms are available at The Bulletin, or send a stamped, self-addressed envelope to: Milestones, The Bulletin, P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708. To ensure timely publication, The Bulletin requests that notice forms and photos be submitted within one month of the celebration.

Parents differ on how to help adult children

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commissioned by Ameriprise Financial. “Women and men may be predisposed to help family members in different ways, which can cause disagreements and add to family tension if plans aren’t discussed upfront,” said Suzanna de Baca, vice president of wealth strategies at Ameriprise Financial.

By Janice D’Arcy The Washington Post

Milt and Mary Lou (Moore) Anderson

Anderson Ronald and Helen (Gard) Goldsmith

Goldsmith

great-grandchildren. Mr. Goldsmith worked as a parts professional for Cummins Northwest Inc. for 37 years until his retirement in 1997. Mrs. Goldsmith worked as an assistant in the accounting department for Marsh McClennan Insurance Co. for 20 years until her retirement in 1998. She enjoys traditional rug hooking and quilting. They both enjoy traveling in their motor home, camping and spending time with family. They have lived in Central Oregon for 24 years.

Ronald and Helen (Gard) Goldsmith, of Sisters, celebrated their 60th anniversary with a trip to Crater Lake Lodge. The couple were married May 24, 1952, at Wings of Healing Temple in Portland; Dr. Thomas Wyatt officiated their wedding. They have four children, Joanne and Wayne (and Beth), both of Denver, Juanita Young, of Wenatchee, Wash., and Diane (and Vern) Hampton, of Milwaukie; three grandchildren; and six

Milt and Mary Lou (Moore) Anderson, of Bend, celebrated their 60th wedding anniversary with a trip to Victoria, B.C., Canada, the same area where they spent their honeymoon. The couple were married May 24, 1952 in Rockaway. They have three children, Debi (and Bruce) Maudlin, Cathy, and Robert (and

Debbie), all of Bend; five grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren. Mr. Anderson worked as a field engineer for Pacific Power for 41 years before his retirement in 1993. Mrs. Anderson worked as a secretary for the Bend-La Pine School District for 20 years before her retirement in 1990. They have lived in Central Oregon for 52 years.

Just in time for parents who are welcoming home college graduates this summer, a new survey finds that mothers are more likely to talk about finances with their adult children while fathers are more likely to quietly slip the kids money. The survey of about 1,600 baby boomers and their relatives was

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McDonald David and Lisa (Evert) McDonald, of Bend, celebrated their 35th wedding anniversary June 11 with a family dinner celebration. The couple were married June 11, 1977, at the St. Francis of Assisi Historic Catholic Church in Bend, which is where they were first introduced at a wedding rehearsal. They have four children, Eilean (and Kris) Karpstein, Anna (and McCoy) Martin, and Erin (and Jeff) Woods, all of Bend, and Luke (and Megan), of Portland; and 11 grandchildren.

Mr. McDonald was a rancher and also worked in the road construction industry until his retirement in 2006. He enjoys farming and making handmade juniper furniture. Mrs. McDonald owned and operated a small motel for 13 years and now owns a vacation home rental company in Bend. She enjoys gardening and interior design. They both enjoy traveling and spending time with their grandchildren. Mr. McDonald was born and raised in Central Oregon. Mrs. McDonald has lived in Central Oregon for 40 years.

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Steve and Gina Dietz, a boy, Dalton Scott Dietz, 1 pound, 11 ounces, May 27. Christopher and Erika Fields, a girl, Hope Noelani Fields, 6 pounds, 5 ounces, May 30. James Knutson and Eleni Jansik, a boy, James Allan Knutson Jr., 7 pounds, 11 ounces, May 29. Eddie and Guadalupe Jaimes, a girl, Samantha Mariah Jaimes, 7 pounds, May 30. Amanda Holt, a boy, Grant Michael John Holt, 6 pounds, 14 ounces, May 30. Kenneth and Meagan Swartwout, a boy, Grady Martin Swartwout, 8 pounds, May 31. Adam and Richelle Sellers, a boy, Zander Luke Sellers, 7 pounds, 3 ounces, June 2. CJ and Amanda Ferrari, a boy, Oliver John Ferrari, 8 pounds, 11 ounces, June 1. Aaron Malinowski and Kristie Carpenter, twins, girls, Ophelia Rae Malinowski, 4 pounds, 9 ounces, and Amelia Lee Malinowski, 4

Delivered at St. Charles Redmond Travis and Tori Seeger, a girl, Madison June Seeger, 6 pounds, 12 ounces, May 30. James and Ashley Borden, a boy, Lucas James Borden, 7 pounds, 1 ounce, May 31. Michael Leach and Amber Barnes, a girl, Jasmine Joann Marie HerdLeach, 8 pounds, June 3. Frank and Cera Hartness, twins, a boy, Weston Russell Hartness, 5 pounds, 15 ounces, and a girl, Elaina Marie Hartness, 6 pounds, 5 ounces, June 4. David Crouse and Kelly Carter, a boy, Bently Allan Christopher Crouse, 6 pounds, 6 ounces, June 6. Joshua and Megan Powers, a boy, Heath Leighton Powers, 6 pounds, 15 ounces, June 7.

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Douglas and Jane (Wooton) Cleavenger, of Bend, will celebrate their 25th wedding anniversary June 20. The couple were married June 20, 1987, at Aspen Hall in Bend. They met while running near Central Oregon Community College and ran together 10 miles the morning of their wedding. They have two children, Tim, of Redmond,

Wash., and Odessa, of Bend. Mr. Cleavenger worked as a network administrator for Central Electric Co-op until his retirement in 2011. He now owns and operates Time2Race Sports Timing, which times running and cycling events. Mrs. Cleavenger is a registered nurse at St. Charles Health System. Mr. Cleavenger has lived in Central Oregon for 36 years, Mrs. Cleavenger 29 years.

A perfect barbecue wine By S. Irene Virbila Los Angeles Times

Think South of France, Rhone Valley. Inky dark, with the taste of sun-baked blackberries, brambles, something wild and woolly. This is a Côtes de Ventoux from the hills just below the famous Mt. Ventoux, one of the stages in the Tour de France bicycle race. The current vintage, 2010, is perfect for a burger bash or to wash down a rack of

baby back ribs. Too intense for sipping on its own, this is a wine that needs food, and food with big, bold flavors. It’s inexpensive enough that you can by it by the case to have on hand for summer’s barbecues. Region: Côtes de Ventoux, Rhone Valley Price: About $9 Style: Full-bodied and intense What it goes with: Burgers and barbecue

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SUNDAY, JUNE 17, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

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Submitted photo

The Shaolin Warriors will perform “Voices of the Masters” Oct. 9 at the Tower Theatre.

Continued from C1 Then it’s a political shift when The Capitol Steps bring their brand of political song retooling — “Take the Money and Run for President,” “You Can’t Hide This Biden Guy” — on Oct. 30, just a week before Election Day. On Nov. 26, the Punch Brothers, whose progressive string music can be heard on “The Hunger Games” soundtrack, will perform. The rest of the CenterStage Series is as follows: • Dec 17 — Moscow Boys Choir will sing in “Christmas Around the World.” • Jan. 6 and 7 — Cirque Ziva presents three shows by gymnasts from Hebei, China. • Feb. 7 — Celtic Crossroads, connecting traditional Irish music with percussive dance. • March 10 — Ladysmith Black Mambazo, the South African group that rose to Grammy-winning prominence on Paul Simon’s “Graceland.” • April 13 — Molly Ringwald, late film director John Hughes’ muse, will sing American standards she grew up on as the daughter of jazz pianist Bob Ringwald. All shows in the CenterStage Series will begin at 7:30 p.m., with the addition of a

Ladysmith Black Mambazo will perform March 10 at the Tower Theatre.

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Tower

Submitted photo

3 p.m. matinee when Cirque Ziva performs Jan. 6. Ticket prices vary from $25 to $55.

LessonPLAN Series The “PLAN” in LessonPLAN is an acronym for “Performing Live Arts Now.” The intention of the series is to bring students into the theater and take performers into schools. Each performer will offer a workshop or educational matinee show for students in addition to an evening performance. Most shows will begin at 6 p.m. Mallory Lewis, daughter of Lamb Chop puppeteer and ventriloquist Shari Lewis, will offer “A Very Lamb Chop Holiday” on Dec. 1. On March 1, actor Tom Dugan, known for his roles in “On Golden Pond” and the TV show “Bones,” will present his one-man show “Nazi Hunter — Simon Wiesenthal,”

chronicling Wiesenthal’s pursuit of Adolf Eichmann, Josef Mengele and other Nazis. On April 15, Patrick Garner will give an inventive performance in “Thomas Edison: Inventor, Lecturer and Prankster.” Finally, on May 2, Sign Stage will present its adaptation of “The Ugly Duckling,” a performance that will feature both speaking and sign language. Tickets for LessonPLAN shows are $8 for kids and $12 for adults, except for “Nazi Hunter,” for which they are $15 and $25. Tickets to all three series go on sale June 28 to Tower Theatre members, July 19 to the public. Anyone can become a member at any time by visiting www.towertheatre.org, or call 541-317-0700. — Reporter: 541-383-0349, djasper@bendbulletin.com

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THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, JUNE 17, 2012

Ohio’s little-known haven • Highlands Nature Sanctuary lures visitors with gorge, wildflowers By Bob Downing Ak ron Beacon Journal

BAINBRIDGE, Ohio — Little-known Highlands Nature Sanctuary is a gem. The 2,200-acre preserve sits along the Rocky Fork Gorge west of Chillicothe in Highland County, Ohio, 65 miles from Cincinnati and 50 miles from Columbus. It is a stunning wilderness tract that was acquired and saved from development over the last 17 years by a grassroots group formed in 1995 by a husband and wife. The sanctuary stretches 10 miles from Rocky Creek State Park east to Paint Creek State Park, with a wild, 100-foot-deep gorge of fossil-filled limestone with fern-filled grottoes, cliffs, springs, caves, waterfalls and old-growth forests. Here are slump rocks that have toppled from cliffs. They create rock-filled gardens at the bottom of the narrow canyon. It is cliff country, a vertical-walled place with a special beauty, an enchanting place of solitude. Ohio has other gorges, but most are not as big, long or imposing as Rocky Creek Gorge. The sanctuary is one of my favorite outdoor spots in Ohio, especially since it has added hiking. I had visited in 2000 in its early days before any trails existed. It was smaller, primitive, more a dream than reality. What was being developed by Larry Henry and his then-wife, Nancy Stranahan, both onetime state naturalists, seemed unlikely to ever take off. Preserving Eastern wilderness in southern Ohio seemed an impossible dream. To date, there have been 53 acquisitions costing in excess of $9 million for the private nature preserve, thanks to donations and contributions. Perhaps two-thirds of the land identified in the sanctuary’s management plan has been acquired. The newest purchase covers 85-acre God’s Country and Black Gum Woods. It adds nearly a mile of protected stream bank to the sanctuary’s western end. A new trail is planned there later this year.

Cedar Run is a pretty, cliff-lined stream that empties into the Rocky Fork Gorge in the private Highlands Nature Sanctuary west of Chillicothe in Ohio’s Highland County.

Photos by Bob Downing / Akron Beacon Journal / MCT

Morning fog hovers over Taloden Pond on the Taloden Woods Trail at Ohio’s Highlands Nature Sanctuary in Highland County.

Adding hiking trails is a big plus. To date, 14 miles of backcountry trails offer access to the heart of the sanctuary. It’s a hiker’s paradise. The gray cliffs of dolomite dominate the preserve. They are powerful and striking, the rocks up to 420 million years old. The gorge was created by a meltwater-swollen stream during the retreat of the last glacier. The stream reversed itself and carved the canyon.

The sanctuary, once a sacred spot for the Shawnees and Iroquois, offers spectacular spring wildflowers, among the best in Ohio, with its limestone-rich soil. Trilliums, bluebells and anemones abound in April. Columbines, bellworts, miterworts, cohosh and wild geraniums grow there. There are rare and endangered plants, including white cedars, sullivantia (found in only three states), the threebird-orchid and yellow wood poppies. The scenery is very special. Great blue herons and bald eagles are found along the stream. Junipers are growing in what used to be farm fields. Cedars line the top of the gorge at the western edge of Appalachia. You’ll find white-tailed deer, pileated woodpeckers and wild turkeys. The stream itself is pristine, among the cleanest in Ohio. It has pools and riffles that turn into whitewater at high levels. It houses lots of freshwater mollusks and 63 species of fish. Caves that once catered to tourists have been reclaimed for bats, although the four species are threatened by disease. There are 23 caves, six of which have been closed to humans. Three distinct bioregions meet here: Kentucky bluegrass, western Appalachian foothills and Midwest plains. It is one of America’s botanical hot spots. The sanctuary celebrates the Eastern forest in its small forest museum that overlooks the gorge. It is run by a nonprofit group but is a state-dedicated nature preserve. It gets no state money for operations, just a designation. It also surrounds a stateowned nature preserve along the gorge: the 85.8-acre Miller State Nature Preserve off Barrett’s Mill Road. It is known for its snow trilliums, American columbo, pink shooting star, barren strawberry and Walter’s violet. The Millers donated the land with its natural stone arch to the state in 1982. It is a geologic

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Hiking in cliff country

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The Three Sisters, three large rocks that have toppled into Rocky Fork from the nearby cliffs, stand sentry at the Ohio Highlands Nature Sanctuary.

and botanical preserve. My favorite trail on a threeday spring visit was Barrett’s Rim, a two-mile hike. The sanctuary touts the trail as being the jewel of the gorge. The trail started crossing a tall-grass prairie and then slipped into the woods. It dropped into the gorge near pretty Kellogg’s Branch and ran under the cliffs and next to the gurgling stream. Then, bam, the cliffs are there. They stand up to 80 feet tall and stretch for nearly a mile. It provokes a wild feeling,

and you are sure that you can’t possibly be in Ohio. The trail is tucked at the base of the dolomite cliffs and next to the stream. The rock is tough, gray-brown and filled with holes.

Botanical paradise Barrett’s Rim is a botanical treasure, filled with verdant plant life. Vegetation thrives on the rock walls, turning them green. The cliffs are home to thousands of saxifrages, Sullivantia sullivantii. It is found only in Ohio and

two other states. The trail climbs past the Portal, a water-carved ravine, to ascend to the wooded plateau. It then returns hikers to the trailhead. Both the 1.25-mile Cedar Run Trail and the two-mile Kamelands Loop offer access to the inner gorge. The Kamelands Loop also features a rock bridge along the trail. The 0.33-mile Etawah Woods Trail begins near the forest museum and dead-ends on the creek near the Three Sisters, three picturesque house-size boulders that have toppled from the cliffs into the stream. There are 66 stone steps leading hikers into the rock-walled inner gorge. It is one of the few places in Ohio where the gray polypod or resurrection fern grows. “Foot for foot, this trail offers some of the most beautiful scenery” in the sanctuary and in the Arc of Appalachia, organizers say. The Etawah (pronounced etta-WA) Trail was named after an American Indian maiden who reputedly leaped into the gorge to join a lost lover. On one occasion, Shawnee Indians tied captive Daniel Boone to a tree overnight in the gorge. The Ravenswood Listening Trail offers up-high views into the Hozho Canyon. The Taloden Woods Trail, a onemile loop with another onemile spur option, climbs a forested ridge. Hikers must have a day pass, $6 for adults and $3 for children. That includes admission to the

More information • Contact the sanctuary at 7660 Cave Road, Bainbridge, OH 45612, 937-365-1935 or visit www.arcofappalachia.org. • For lodging, call 937-3651936 or go to www .forest-lodging.org.

Appalachian Forest Museum. The preserve is open to the public from 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekends from April through October. Members can hike daily year-round. The most useful information sheet is the trail guide with directions to trailheads scattered across the preserve. Most of the trails are moderate in difficulty, but they are short. The longest is a three-mile loop. They may be steep, rocky, narrow and uneven. Etawah Woods, a 47-acre tract, was the first to be acquired in 1995. It is one of the prettiest sections of the gorge with arborvitae on the cliffs and hemlocks and Canada yew deep in the gorge. Since 2005, the sanctuary has been working to improve visitor services and build its appeal. The sanctuary offers lodging in four old houses it has acquired along the gorge. What could be better than sitting on a deck with a favorite beer after hiking four trails, watching a full moon rise over the gorge with redbud in bloom and hearing coyotes howling across the gorge?


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THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, JUNE 17, 2012

SCO R EB O AR D RUNNING Local Dry Canyon Run 2012 Saturday Redmond Redmond High School (Place, name, hometown, time) 10K 1, Allison Maxson, Tacoma, 37:36.9. 2, James Shanahan, Welches, 41:30.7. 3, Rigo Ramirez, Redmond, 42:01.2. 4, Gary Lacasse, Crooked River, 42:32.0. 5, Neal Richards, Bend, 44:53.4. 6, Ted Wolfe, Bend, 46:28.2. 7, Chip Maxson, Tacoma, 47:06.6. 8, Peter Hatton, Bend, 47:56.4. 9, Shelly Zekmeister, Redmond, 52:56.4. 10, Josh Weston, Bend, 54:29.2. 11, Jodi Husband, Redmond, 55:06.3. 12, Walt Carter, Prineville, 55:30.3. 13, Meghan Detwiler, Bend, 57:30.3. 14, Marjorie McGreevy, Sunriver, 57:54.3. 15, Erin Bevando, Bend, 58:31.7. 16, Beth Pengra, Redmond, 1:00:42.9. 17, Alanna McGlone, Bend, 1:03:15.4. 18, Justin Finestone, Bend, 1:03:56.0. 19, Sarah-Gail Permantie, Redmond, 1:08:47.9. 20, Susan Permantier, Redmond, 1:09:06.6. 21, Sarah Ballard, Bend, 1:10:43.4. 22, Lavon Medlock, Redmond, 1:11:37.4. 23, Dan Shoop, Bend, 1:12:07.4. 24, Sarah Shoop, Bend, 1:12:07.8. 25, Amber Peterse, Redmond, 1:13:18.8. 26, Lew Hollander, Redmond, 1:17:17.6. 27, Jennifer Smith, Bend, 1:18:26.9. 28, Nancy Karnofski, Longview, 1:19:25.4. 29, Nancy Green, Ridgefield, 1:19:25.7. 5K 1, Alex Stevens, Redmond, 16:41.6. 2, Josh Wageman, Meridian, 16:51.2. 3, James Blanchard, Prineville, 19:41.1. 4, David Merrick, Corvallis, 20:14.6. 5, Richard Kirtley, Redmond, 20:18.7. 6, Chase Huff, Redmond, 20:48.3. 7, Shaun Kooch, Terrebonne, 21:57.2. 8, Sam Erickson, Redmond, 22:39.2. 9, Tracen Cardoza, 23:25.4. 10, Russ McIntosh, Redmond, 23:26.9. 11, Zachary Imel, Bend, 23:46.5. 12, Kaileb Sheets, Redmond, 23:48.6. 13, Logan Falco, 24:27.8. 14, Brandon Huff, Redmond, 24:33.2. 15, Brad Carrell, Redmond, 25:02.7. 16, Deb Shaffer, Redmond, 25:03.4. 17, Delray Rhohn, Culver, 25:42.4. 18, Gena Huff, Redmond, 26:01.4. 19, Matt Shaffer, Redmond, 27:10.2. 20, Jeff Winters, Terrebonne, 27:22.7. 21, Marina Sheets, Redmond, 28:11.5. 22, Tanner Litton, 28:12.1. 23, Gage Decamp, Redmond, 28:18.5. 24, Michela Aiello, Bend, 28:23.6. 25, Joe Decamp, Redmond, 29:11.0. 26, Sydney Bevando, Bend, 29:49.4. 27, Rayna Bevando, Bend, 30:03.7. 28, Jeanne Swenson, Bend, 30:19.8. 29, Gabe Caudell, Redmond, 31:05.6. 30, Kathryn Bottoms, Prineville, 31:14.7. 31, Lydia Deross, Redmond, 31:26.2. 32, Leann Morrison, Redmond, 31:36.8. 33, Faith Irick, 32:00.6. 34, Tina Decamp, Redmond, 32:37.8. 35, Lori Dejarnatt, Madras, 32:57.0. 36, Carla Rice-Smith, Bend, 36:21.3. 37, Savannah Stalker, Bend, 36:25.5. 38, Jan Stalker, Bend, 36:56.3. 39, Livia Weston, Bend, 41:52.7. 40, Cera Lamken, Redmond, 42:59.8. 41, Annette Fullmer, Redmond, 43:41.8. 42, Laurie Jarvis, Bend, 43:50.5. 43, Marcy Ochsner, Bend, 51:11.6. 44, Cherie Fox, Prineville, 51:12.0. 45, Barbara Lewis, Culver, 51:12.5. 46, Mary Tollenaar, Bend, 52:18.2. 47, Ronald Tollenaar, Bend, 52:18.9. 48, Bonnie Dellett, Bend, 55:46.1. 49, Stephanie Soto, Terrebonne, 55:46.5. 50, Angela Renzi, Redmond, 56:32.9. 51, Wendy Weber, Redmond, 58:53.6. 52, Suzie Weber, Redmond, 58:54.0. 53, Jack Weber, Redmond, 58:54.0.

PADDLE SPORTS Local Bend Paddleboard Challenge June 16, Bend Overall 5-mile race — 1, Cyril Burgierre. 2, John Rollert. 3, John Schalka. 50+ Men’s 5-mile race — 1, John Schalka. 2, Bob Rueter. 3, Dennis Oliphant. Men’s 12’6” board 5-mile race — 1, John Agostino. 2, Tye Josue. 3, Stefan Halushka. Women’s overall 5-mile race — 1, Kerri Stewart. 2, Isabella Barna. 3, Brit Oliphant. Junior women 5-mile race — 1, Brit Oliphant. Men’s surfboard class short course — 1, Erik Sieber. Women’s surfboard class short course — 1, Kirsten Heron. 2, Suzie Miller. 3, Nicolette Swift. Junior men’s short course — 1, Jack Barrett. Junior women’s short course — 1, Ely Logeais. Men’s sprint — 1, Cyril Burgierre. 2, Paul Willerton. 3, Jason Bowerman.

GOLF The Bulletin welcomes contributions to its weekly local golf results listings and events calendar. Clearly legible items should be faxed to the sports department, 541-3850831, emailed to sports@bendbulletin.com, or mailed to P.O. Box 6020; Bend, OR 97708.

Local Club Results AWBREY GLEN Wednesday Men’s Sweeps, June 13 Hot Ball 1, Gerald Heck/Bud Johnson/Roy Fullerton/Rick Thompson, 132. 2, Bert Larson/Ken Waskom/Ed Hagstrom/Larry Haas, 132. 3, Bill Macri/Dennis Magill/Ron Lemp/blind draw, 132. Women’s Sweeps, June 14 Nine-Hole Scramble 1, Barbara Chandler/Alicia Mehlis/Lorchid Macri, 43. 2, Rosie Long/Darlene Warner/Patty Stark, 50. Women’s Match Play, June 14-15 Match Play Round Robin Betsy Ross Flight — 1, Barb LaBissoniere/Roxy Mills, 62. 2, Rosie Cook/Carol Lee, 53. Martha Washington Flight — 1, Edith McBean/Sonya McLaughlin, 70. 2, Molly Mount/Carmen West, 55. Dolly Madison Flight — 1, Deb Warren/Anne Goldner, 63. 2, Chris Larson/Donna Waskom 57. BLACK BUTTE RANCH Men’s Club, June 13 Best Ball Glaze Meadow Golf Course 1 (tie), Byron Kirchert/Lee Stenseth/Chuck Leutwyler/Wally Schultz; Tim Shuler/Jerry Kvanvig/Jerry Lawhun/Norm Sanesi. 2, Dean Alpine/Todd Biddle/ Warren Zielinski/blind draw. Women’s Golf Club, June 12 at Big Meadow Waltz 1-2-3 1, Anne Zick/Jackie Kvanvig/Marie Andrews/J.L. Abbott, 132. 2, Debbie Kronick/Barbara Schulz/Ellie Rutledge/Sheri Dawson, 133. 3 (tie), Judy Osborne/ Betty Carlsmith/Carolyn Hayden/Valerie Collins, 138; Pixie Carson/Jane Krause/Pat Burnham, 138. CROOKED RIVER RANCH Men’s Golf Club, June 12 Stroke Play A Flight (0-14 handicaps) — Gross: 1, John Smallwood, 74. 2, Mac Kilgo, 75. 3 (tie), Jim Martin, 79. Darrell Wells, 79. Net: 1, Gary Johnson, 62. 2, Al Kellogg, 64. 3 (tie), Herb Parker, 66; Bob Holloway, 66. B Flight (15-19) — Gross: 1, Calvin Mobley, 80. 2, Scott Eberle, 86. 3, Roger Ferguson, 87. 4, Art Crossley, 88. Net: 1, Bill Rhoads, 68. 2, Joe Griffin, 69. 3 (tie), Vene Dunham, 70; Cary Poole, 70. C Flight (20 and higher) — Gross: 1 (tie), Len Johnson, 84; Gerry Skaurud, 84. 3, John Cress, 92. 4, Jim Lester, 93. Net: 1, A.K. Majors, 62. 2, Eddie Maroney, 63. 3, Herb Koth, 65. 4 (tie), David Wildt, 68; Doug Wyant, 68. EAGLE CREST Men’s Day Club Championship, June 13 at Resort Course Match Play First Flight — Tim Swope def. Steve Peccia, 19 holes. Second Flight — Ron Wolfe def. Joe Perry, 4 & 3. Third Flight — Ray Braun def. Jerry Rogers, 2 & 1. Fourth Flight — Mike Reynolds def. Bob Hocker, 1 up. Fifth Flight — Dave Rygh def. Mark Osborn, 3 & 2. Sixth Flight — Pat Kenny def. Ray Dupuis, 4 & 3. Seventh Flight — Ernie Brooks def. Cliff Schrock, 2 & 1. Two Net Best Ball 1, Dennis O’Donnell/Mike Narzisi/Phil Chappron/ Gary Sowles, 119. 2, Jim Kelly/Jim Whitehurst/Don Greenman/Ned Ongaro, 120. 3, Ray Schadt/Mike Thurlow/Roger Duby/Billy Balding, 121. 4, Jerry Coday/Bill Radanof/Larry Clark/Mac Heitzhausen, 123. 5, Bill Martin/Steve Austin/Geo Steelhammer/Bob Reed, 126. 6, Ken Murrill/Sam Puri/Mike Bessonette/Bill Houck, 128.

THE GREENS AT REDMOND Ladies of the Greens, June 5 Golfer of the Week, Fewest Putts Golfer of the Week — Anita Epstein, 26/25. Fewest Putts — Ethelmae Hammock 15; Lois Houlberg, 15. Ladies of the Greens, June 12 Net Stroke Play Super Seniors — 1, Pat Elliott, 27. 2, Evelyn Kakuska, 27. 3, Bev Tout, 28. 4, Hazel Schieferstein, 29. 5, Doris Babb, 31. 6, Bert Gantenbein, 31. Seniors — 1, Marilyn Feis, 27. 2, Hazel Blackmore, 28. 3, Julie Fountain, 28. 4, Lynne Ekman, 29. 5, Carole Wolfe, 29. 6, Vivian Webster, 29. Kids — 1, Myrn Grant, 26. 2, Dee Baker, 28. 3, Karlene Grove, 30. 4, Linda Kanable, 31. 5, Diane Miyauchi, 32. 6, Janie Adams, 32 Golfer of the Week — Myrn Grant, 45/26. Fewest Putts — Sally Wegner, 14; Dee Baker, 14; Karlene Grove, 14. Men’s Club, June 14 Net Stroke Play Flight A — 18 Holes: 1, Steve Adamski, 56. 2, Marv Bibler, 57. 3 (tie), Darwin Thies, 59; Steve Warwick, 59. Flight B — 18 Holes: 1, Ron Jondahl, 52. 2, Gene Cartwright, 53. 3, Miles Hutchins, 54. 4, Ron Minnice, 55. 5, Pee Wee Blackmore, 56. Nine Holes: 1. Louie Rogerson, 23. 2, Phil Weimer, 25. KPs — Joe Carpenter, Nos. 4, 14; Arlie Holm, No. 6; Norm Olson, No. 16. Golfers of the week — Flight A: Steve Adamski. Flight B: Ron Jondahl. MEADOW LAKES Meadow Lakes Men’s Association U.S. Open Night June 13 Best Ball Gross: 1, Jake Shinkle/Caleb Henry, 34. 2, Les Bryan/Dewey Springer, 37. Net: 1, Patrick Andrade/ Scott Grasle, 32. 2 (tie), Mark Payne/Tony Ashcraft, 34; Steve Kidder/Lee Budke, 34. 4 (tie), Steve Reynolds/Britton Coffer, 35; Len Sullivan/Curtis Scofield, 35; Hank Simmons/Jordie Simmons, 35; Johnnie Jones/Greg Lambert, 35; John Mitchell/Dwain Storm, 35. KPs — A Flight: Scott Grasle, No. 4; Dwain Storm, No. 8. B Flight: Len Sullivan, No. 4; Dave Holmes, No. 8. Ladies of the Lake, June 14 Stroke Play Gross: 1, Norma McPherren, 53. Net: 1, Lee Miller, 41. 2, Patricia McLain, 44. QUAIL RUN Men’s Golf Club, June 13 Two Net Best Ball of Four 1, Ron Bamer/Chuck Towner/Ron Moye/Doug Massey. 2, Jerry Smith/Jim Ulrey/Jim Myers/Joseph Maes KPs — Erve Remmele, No. 2; Jim Myers, No. 10. Women’s Club, June 14 Stroke Play Flight A — Gross: 1, Deb Aiken, 93. Net: 1, Sandy Haniford, 72. 2, Linda Dyer, 73. Flight B — Gross: 1, Kathy Hayter, 107. Net: 1, Vivian Taylor, 74. 2, Thelma Jansen, 76. SUNRIVER RESORT Women’s Golf Association, June 13 at Woodlands Best Ball Flight 1 — 1, Karen Padrick/Doris Yillik, 65. 2, Marianne Martin/Alice Holloway, 65. 3, Mary Condy/ Joni Cloud, 66. 4, Nancy Cotton/Julie Sagalewicz, 69. Flight 2 — 1, Sallie Hennessy/Midge Thomas, 61. 2, Terry Mandel/Audrey Charles, 64. 3, Diana Norem/ Jan Bull, 65. 4, Carol Cassetty/Andi Northcote, 67. Chip-in — Joni Cloud, No. 14. Birdies — Jule Sagalewicz, No. 5; Nancy Cotton, No. 5; Mary Condy, No. 7. Men’s Club Home & Home With Juniper, June 13 at Woodlands Two Net Best Balls 1, Brian Guilfoyle/Virgil Martin/Mike Sullivan/Allen Hare, 116. 2, Ken Shell/Greg Cotton/Scott Martin/Randy Schneider, 116. 3, Ron Bures/Jim Zant/Jim Hanson/Dale Carver, 118. 4, Terry Tjaden/Clint Mooers/Joe Woischke/Woodie Thomas, 119. 5, Peter Knaupp/Tom Woodruff/Kip Gerke/ Pat Ross, 121. 6, Dan Weybright/Steve Peters/Frank Vulliet/Blind Draw, 121. Individual Stroke Play — Gross: 1, Mike Calhoun, 70. Net: 1, Allan Hare, 61. KPs — Terry Tjaden, No. 5; Mike Calhoun, No. 7; Ken Shell, No. 12; Dan Frantz, No. 17. WIDGI CREEK Men’s Club, JUNE 13 Three Net Best Balls Blue Tees — 1, Mitch Cloninger/John Deetz/ John Cosgrave, 202. 2, Bob Brydges/Daryl Hjeresen/ Randy Edwards, 206. 3, Greg Watt/Jim Hammett/Mark Miller, 211. White Tees — 1, Bill Ormsby/Ken Lucas/Larry Strunk/Peter Gulick, 189. 2, Dave Garrison/Tony Bailey/Mike Boynton/Eric Lonnquist, 198. 3, Ken Schofield/Ron Stassens/Rich Belzer/Bill Lindsay, 199. 4, Jeff Lewis/Rich Friscia/Jim Weitenhagen/John Ramsey, 204. KPs — Ron Stassens, No. 2; Jim Hammett, No. 11. Horserace — Greg Watt/John Ramsey. 2, Bob Brydges/Peter Gulick. 3, John Cosgrave/Ron Stassens. Women’s Club, June 13 Lone Ranger 1, Nancy Snyder/Kathy Madrigal/Kathi Loring/Sue Sherrer, 130. 2, Pam Brooks/Chris Fitzgibbons/Diane Struve/Jan Guettler, 133. 3, Jan Sandburg/Pam Meals/ Demy Schleicher/Carole Colby, 139. KPs (No. 5) — A Flight: Phyllis Pengelly. B Flight: Hilary Kenyon. C Flight: Cheryl Shay. Thursday Men’s League, June 14 Team Match Play Rivals def. Circus Act, 5-0. On The Rocks def. The Dukes of Hosel, 5-1. The Lip-Outs def. Younger Than Most, 5-1. Flippin’ Birdies def. The Nomads, 5-1. SixPac def. Footwedge, 4-2. Individual Stroke Play Gross: 1, Dan Heater, 36. 2, Fran Ostlund, 37. 3, Jim Leiser, 39. 4, Nelson Von Stroh, 41. 5 (tie), Bob Brydges, 42; Greg Watt, 42; Craig Everett, 42. Net: 1, Mark Capps, 33. 2, Jim Wellock, 33.5. 3, Joe Weherly, 36.5. 4 (tie), Jeff Gray, 37; John Cosgrave, 37; Barry Helm, 37. Hole-In-One Report May 8 WIDGI CREEK Kyle Stanton, Bandon No. 5. . . . . . . . . . . . . 138 yards. . . . . . . . gap wedge June 2 WIDGI CREEK Rick Younger, Albany No. 18. . . . . . . . . 247 yards (par 4) . . . . . . . . hybrid June 8 WIDGI CREEK Ray Clang, West Linn No. 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . 129 yards. . . . . . . . . . 3-wood June 14 JUNIPER Mario Salinas, Redmond No. 16. . . . . . . . . . . . 165 yards. . . . . . . . . . 5-wood

PGA Tour U.S. Open Saturday At The Olympic Club San Francisco Purse: TBA ($7.85 million in 2011) Yardage: 7,170; Par: 70 Third Round a-amateur Graeme McDowell 69-72-68—209 Jim Furyk 70-69-70—209 Fredrik Jacobson 72-71-68—211 Lee Westwood 73-72-67—212 Ernie Els 75-69-68—212 Blake Adams 72-70-70—212 Nicholas Colsaerts 72-69-71—212 Webb Simpson 72-73-68—213 Kevin Chappell 74-71-68—213 John Senden 72-73-68—213 a-Beau Hossler 70-73-70—213 Jason Dufner 72-71-70—213 John Peterson 71-70-72—213 Retief Goosen 75-70-69—214 Martin Kaymer 74-71-69—214 Matt Kuchar 70-73-71—214 Tiger Woods 69-70-75—214 Casey Wittenberg 71-77-67—215 a-Hunter Hamrick 77-67-71—215 Padraig Harrington 74-70-71—215 Justin Rose 69-75-71—215 Sergio Garcia 73-71-71—215 Charlie Wi 74-70-71—215 Aaron Watkins 72-71-72—215

Michael Thompson David Toms Adam Scott Scott Langley Kevin Na Raphael Jacquelin Hunter Mahan Steve LeBrun Angel Cabrera a-Jordan Spieth Alex Cejka Jonathan Byrd Robert Karlsson Steve Stricker Nick Watney K.J. Choi Charl Schwartzel Bob Estes Phil Mickelson Branden Grace Matteo Manassero Ian Poulter a-Patrick Cantlay Rickie Fowler Jeff Curl Francesco Molinari Hiroyuki Fujita Darron Stiles Morgan Hoffmann Marc Warren Alistair Presnell Kevin Streelman Nicholas Thompson Davis Love III Zach Johnson K.T. Kim Matthew Baldwin Rod Pampling Keegan Bradley Michael Allen Jae-Bum Park Jesse Mueller Simon Dyson Jason Day Jason Bohn Bo Van Pelt Joe Ogilvie Stephen Ames

66-75-74—215 69-70-76—215 76-70-70—216 76-70-70—216 74-71-71—216 72-71-73—216 72-71-73—216 73-75-69—217 72-76-69—217 74-74-69—217 78-69-70—217 71-75-71—217 70-75-72—217 76-68-73—217 69-75-73—217 73-70-74—217 73-70-74—217 74-73-71—218 76-71-71—218 71-74-73—218 76-69-73—218 70-75-73—218 76-72-71—219 72-76-71—219 73-75-71—219 71-76-72—219 75-71-73—219 75-71-73—219 72-74-73—219 73-72-74—219 70-74-75—219 76-72-72—220 74-74-72—220 73-74-73—220 77-70-73—220 74-72-74—220 74-74-73—221 74-73-74—221 73-73-75—221 71-73-77—221 70-74-77—221 75-73-74—222 74-74-74—222 75-71-76—222 70-75-78—223 78-70-76—224 73-75-76—224 74-73-79—226

U.S. Open Tee Times At Olympic Club (Lake Course) San Francisco Yardage: 7,170; Par: 70 All Times PDT (a-amateur) Today Final Round 9:20 a.m. — Stephen Ames; Joe Ogilvie 9:30 a.m. — Bo Van Pelt; Jason Bohn 9:40 a.m. — Jason Day; Simon Dyson 9:50 a.m. — Jesse Mueller; J.B. Park 10:00 a.m. — Michael Allen; Keegan Bradley 10:10 a.m. — Rod Pampling; Matthew Baldwin 10:20 a.m. — K.T. Kim; Zach Johnson 10:30 a.m. — Davis Love III; Nicholas Thompson 10:40 a.m. — Kevin Streelman; Alistair Presnell 10:50 a.m. — Marc Warren; Morgan Hoffmann 11:00 a.m. — Darron Stiles; Hiroyuki Fujita 11:10 a.m. — Francesco Molinari; Jeff Curl 11:20 a.m. — Rickie Fowler; a-Patrick Cantlay 11:30 a.m. — Ian Poulter; Matteo Manassero 11:40 a.m. — Branden Grace; Phil Mickelson 11:50 a.m. — Bob Estes; Charl Schwartzel noon — K.J. Choi; Nick Watney 12:10 p.m. — Steve Stricker; Robert Karlsson 12:20 p.m. — Jonathan Byrd; Alex Cejka 12:30 p.m. — a-Jordan Spieth; Angel Cabrera 12:40 p.m. — Steve LeBrun; Hunter Mahan 12:50 p.m. — Raphael Jacquelin; Kevin Na 1:00 p.m. — Scott Langley; Adam Scott 1:10 p.m. — David Toms; Michael Thompson 1:20 p.m. — Aaron Watkins; Charlie Wi 1:30 p.m. — Sergio Garcia; Justin Rose 1:40 p.m. — Padraig Harrington; Hunter Hamrick 1:50 p.m. — Casey Wittenberg; Tiger Woods 2:00 p.m. — Matt Kuchar; Martin Kaymer 2:10 p.m. — Retief Goosen; John Peterson 2:20 p.m. — Jason Dufner; a-Beau Hossler 2:30 p.m. — John Senden; Kevin Chappell 2:40 p.m. — Webb Simpson; Nicolas Colsaerts 2:50 p.m. — Blake Adams; Ernie Els 3:00 p.m. — Lee Westwood; Fredrik Jacobson 3:10 p.m. — Jim Furyk; Graeme McDowell

WNBA

L 2 3 4 9 L 4 3 8 11 11

Saturday’s Summary

Knights 9, Elks 4 Corvallis 001 001 610 — 9 12 3 Bend 100 102 000 — 4 10 3 Burke, Jackson (6), Barker (6) and Lund. Gillies, Bunda (6), McAlister (7), Snyder (8) and Ausbun. W — Barker. L — Bunda. 2B — Corvallis: Hamilton, Hofmann. 3B — Corvallis: Hamilton.

College NCAA College World Series Glance At TD Ameritrade Park Omaha Omaha, Neb. All Times PDT Double Elimination x-if necessary ——— Friday, June 15 Game 1 — UCLA 9, Stony Brook 1 Game 2 — Arizona 4, Florida State 3, 12 innings Saturday, June 16 Game 3 — Arkansas 8, Kent State 1 Game 4 — South Carolina 7, Florida 3 Today, June 17 Game 5 — Stony Brook (52-14) vs. Florida State (48-16), 2 p.m. Game 6 — UCLA (48-14) vs. Arizona (44-17), 6 p.m. Monday, June 18 Game 7 — Kent State (46-19) vs. Florida (47-19), 2 p.m. Game 8 — Arkansas (45-14) vs. South Carolina (46-17), 6 p.m. Tuesday, June 19 Game 9 — Game 5 winner vs. Game 6 loser, 5 p.m. Wednesday, June 20 Game 10 — Game 7 winner vs. Game 8 loser, 5 p.m. Thursday, June 21 Game 11 — Game 6 winner vs. Game 9 winner, 5 p.m. Game 12 — Game 8 winner vs. Game 10 winner, 6 p.m. Friday, June 22 x-Game 13 — Game 6 winner vs. Game 9 winner, 2 p.m. x-Game 14 — Game 8 winner vs. Game 10 winner, 6 p.m. If only one game is necessary, it will start at 5 p.m.

NBA NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION NBA Playoff Glance All Times PDT (x-if necessary) (Best-of-7) ——— FINALS Oklahoma City 1, Miami 1 Tuesday, June 12: Oklahoma City 105, Miami 94 Thursday, June 14: Miami 100, Oklahoma City 96 Today, June 17: Oklahoma City at Miami, 5 p.m. Tuesday, June 19: Oklahoma City at Miami, 6 p.m.

GB — — 1½ 3 4½ 4 GB — 3 5 7 7½ 9½

MLS MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT ——— Eastern Conference W L T Pts GF D.C. 9 4 3 30 29 Sporting Kansas City 9 3 1 28 19 New York 8 3 2 26 26 Columbus 5 4 4 19 13 Houston 5 4 4 19 15 Chicago 5 5 3 18 15 New England 5 7 2 17 18 Montreal 4 7 3 15 19 Philadelphia 2 8 2 8 8 Toronto FC 1 10 0 3 8 Western Conference W L T Pts GF Real Salt Lake 10 3 2 32 25 San Jose 8 3 3 27 27 Vancouver 7 3 4 25 17 Seattle 7 4 3 24 17 Colorado 6 7 1 19 20 Chivas USA 4 7 3 15 9 Portland 3 5 4 13 12 FC Dallas 3 9 4 13 16 Los Angeles 3 8 2 11 15 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. ——— Saturday’s Games D.C. United 1, Philadelphia 0 Vancouver 1, Colorado 0 Houston 2, FC Dallas 1 Montreal 4, Seattle FC 1 New England 0, Columbus 0, tie Sporting Kansas City 2, Toronto FC 0 Real Salt Lake 3, Chivas USA 0 Today’s Games New York at Chicago, 5 p.m. Portland at Los Angeles, 7 p.m.

Spain 4, Ireland 0 Monday, June 18 At Gdansk, Poland Croatia vs. Spain, 11:45 a.m. At Poznan, Poland Italy vs. Ireland, 11:45 a.m. GROUP D GP W D L GF GA PTS France 2 1 1 0 3 1 4 England 2 1 1 0 4 3 4 Ukraine 2 1 0 1 2 3 3 Sweden 2 0 0 2 3 5 0 Monday, June 11 At Donetsk, Ukraine France 1, England 1 At Kiev, Ukraine Ukraine 2, Sweden 1 Friday, June 15 At Donetsk, Ukraine France 2, Ukraine 0 At Kiev, Ukraine England 3, Sweden 2 Thursday, June 19 At Kiev, Ukraine Sweden vs. France, 11:45 a.m. At Donetsk, Ukraine England vs. Ukraine, 11:45 a.m. QUARTERFINALS Thursday, June 21 At Warsaw, Poland Czech Republic vs. Group B second place, 11:45 a.m. Friday, June 22 At Gdansk, Poland Group B winner vs. Greece, 11:45 a.m. Saturday, June 23 At Kiev, Ukraine Group C winner vs. Group D second place, 11:45 a.m. Sunday, June 24 At Donetsk, Ukraine Group D winner vs. Group C second place, 11:45 a.m. SEMIFINALS Wednesday, June 27 At Donetsk, Ukraine Warsaw quarterfinal winner vs. Donetsk quarterfinal winner, 11:45 a.m. Thursday, June 28 At Warsaw, Poland Gdansk quarterfinal winner vs. Kiev quarterfinal winner, 11:45 a.m. FINAL Sunday, July 1 At Kiev, Ukraine Semifinal winners, 11:45 a.m.

MOTOR SPORTS

SOCCER

WCL

BASKETBALL

Leaders PLAYOFFS / THROUGH Friday SCORING G FG FT PTS AVG James, MIA 20 221 154 616 30.8 Bryant, LAL 12 132 79 360 30.0 Durant, OKC 17 165 119 485 28.5 Anthony, NYK 5 52 31 139 27.8 Nowitzki, DAL 4 34 38 107 26.8 Wade, MIA 20 174 99 455 22.8 Westbrook, OKC 17 145 73 380 22.4 Parker, SAN 14 102 71 282 20.1 Garnett, BOS 20 159 65 384 19.2 Griffin, LAC 11 84 42 210 19.1 Davis, ORL 5 39 17 95 19.0 Gay, MEM 7 48 33 133 19.0 Lawson, DEN 7 56 12 133 19.0 Pierce, BOS 20 120 110 377 18.9 Jefferson, UTA 4 36 1 73 18.3 Paul, LAC 11 70 41 194 17.6 Duncan, SAN 14 101 41 243 17.4 Rondo, BOS 19 141 39 329 17.3 J. Johnson, ATL 6 38 18 103 17.2 Harden, OKC 17 84 94 290 17.1 REBOUNDS G OFF DEF TOT AVG Smith, ATL 5 10 58 68 13.6 Hibbert, IND 11 45 78 123 11.2 Bynum, LAL 12 46 87 133 11.1 Millsap, UTA 4 17 27 44 11.0 Garnett, BOS 20 31 175 206 10.3 Faried, DEN 7 25 45 70 10.0 Randolph, MEM 7 27 42 69 9.9 Boozer, CHI 6 10 49 59 9.8 McGee, DEN 7 23 44 67 9.6 Gasol, LAL 12 38 76 114 9.5 ASSISTS G AST AVG Rondo, BOS 19 227 11.9 Paul, LAC 11 87 7.9 Conley, MEM 7 50 7.1 Parker, SAN 14 95 6.8 Nelson, ORL 5 33 6.6 Lawson, DEN 7 42 6.0 Westbrook, OKC 17 102 6.0 Kidd, DAL 4 24 6.0 Miller, DEN 7 42 6.0 Watson, CHI 6 33 5.5

WOMEN’S NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION All Times PDT ——— Eastern Conference W L Pct Chicago 7 2 .778 Connecticut 7 2 .778 Indiana 5 3 .625 Atlanta 4 5 .444 New York 3 7 .300 Washington 2 5 .286 Western Conference W L Pct Minnesota 10 0 1.000 Los Angeles 7 3 .700 San Antonio 4 4 .500 Phoenix 2 6 .250 Seattle 2 7 .222 Tulsa 0 9 .000 ——— Saturday’s Games Indiana 84, Chicago 70 San Antonio 98, Los Angeles 85, OT Today’s Games Connecticut at Atlanta, noon Phoenix at Tulsa, 1 p.m. Minnesota at Seattle, 6 p.m. Monday’s Game Washington at Los Angeles, 7:30 p.m.

BASEBALL WEST COAST LEAGUE ——— League standings East Division W Wenatchee AppleSox 11 Bellingham Bells 10 Kelowna Falcons 5 Walla Walla Sweets 3 West Division W Corvallis Knights 10 Bend Elks 7 Cowlitz Black Bears 3 Kitsap BlueJackets 5 Klamath Falls Gems 1 Saturday’s Games Corvallis 9, Bend 4 Kitsap 8, Kelowna 7 Wenatchee 13, Cowlitz 0 Today’s Games Corvallis at Bend, 5:05 p.m. Kelowna at Kitsap, 5:05 p.m. Cowlitz at Wenatchee, 6:05 p.m.

x-Thursday, June 21: Oklahoma City at Miami, 6 p.m. x-Sunday, June 24: Miami at Oklahoma City, 5 p.m. x-Tuesday, June 26: Miami at Oklahoma City, 6 p.m.

GA 19 10 18 13 16 17 18 22 15 23 GA 14 17 15 13 19 17 15 26 21

International 2012 European Championship Glance All Times PDT ——— FIRST ROUND GROUP A GP W D L GF GA PTS x-Czech Republic 3 2 0 1 4 5 6 x-Greece 3 1 1 1 3 4 4 Russia 3 1 1 1 5 3 4 Poland 3 0 2 1 2 3 2 x-advanced to quarterfinals Friday, June 8 At Warsaw, Poland Poland 1, Greece 1 At Wroclaw, Poland Russia 4, Czech Republic 1 Tuesday, June 12 At Wroclaw, Poland Czech Republic 2, Greece 1 At Warsaw, Poland Poland 1, Russia 1 Saturday, June 16 At Warsaw, Poland Greece 1, Russia 0 At Wroclaw, Poland Czech Republic 1, Poland 0 GROUP B GP W D L GF GA PTS Germany 2 2 0 0 3 1 6 Portugal 2 1 0 1 3 3 3 Denmark 2 1 0 1 3 3 3 Netherlands 2 0 0 2 1 3 0 Saturday, June 9 At Kharkiv, Ukraine Denmark 1, Netherlands 0 At Lviv, Ukraine Germany 1, Portugal 0 Wednesday, June 13 At Lviv, Ukraine Portugal 3, Denmark 2 At Kharkiv, Ukraine Germany 2, Netherlands 1 Sunday, June 17 At Kharkiv, Ukraine Portugal vs. Netherlands, 11:45 a.m. At Lviv, Ukraine Denmark vs. Germany, 11:45 a.m. GROUP C GP W D L GF GA PTS Spain 2 1 1 0 5 1 4 Croatia 2 1 1 0 4 2 4 Italy 2 0 2 0 2 2 2 Ireland 2 0 0 2 1 7 0 Sunday, June 10 At Gdansk, Poland Spain 1, Italy 1 At Poznan, Poland Croatia 3, Ireland 1 Thursday, June 14 At Poznan, Poland Italy 1, Croatia 1 At Gdansk, Poland

IndyCar Milwaukee IndyFest Results Saturday At The Milwaukee Mile West Allis, Wis. Lap length: 1 mile (Starting position in parentheses) All cars Dallara chassis 1. (2) Ryan Hunter-Reay, Chevrolet, 225 laps. 2. (6) Tony Kanaan, Chevrolet, 225. 3. (8) James Hinchcliffe, Chevrolet, 225. 4. (20) Oriol Servia, Chevrolet, 225. 5. (5) E.J. Viso, Chevrolet, 225. 6. (4) Helio Castroneves, Chevrolet, 225. 7. (13) Alex Tagliani, Honda, 225. 8. (22) Ed Carpenter, Chevrolet, 225. 9. (11) Graham Rahal, Honda, 225. 10. (3) Rubens Barrichello, Chevrolet, 225. 11. (21) Scott Dixon, Honda, 225. 12. (14) Will Power, Chevrolet, 225. 13. (7) Simon Pagenaud, Honda, 224. 14. (19) Ryan Briscoe, Chevrolet, 224. 15. (9) Marco Andretti, Chevrolet, 224. 16. (25) Mike Conway, Honda, 224. 17. (18) Charlie Kimball, Honda, 224. 18. (15) Katherine Legge, Chevrolet, 220. 19. (1) Dario Franchitti, Honda, 193, contact. 20. (24) Takuma Sato, Honda, 107, contact. 21. (16) James Jakes, Honda, 106, contact. 22. (10) J.R. Hildebrand, Chevrolet, 105, mechanical. 23. (12) Justin Wilson, Honda, 93, mechanical. 24. (23) Simona de Silvestro, Lotus, 62, contact. 25. (17) Josef Newgarden, Honda, 48, mechanical. Race Statistics Winners average speed: 122.020 mph. Time of Race: 1:52:17.8119. Margin of Victory: 5.1029 seconds. Cautions: 5 for 51 laps. Lead Changes: 5 among 5 drivers. Lap Leaders: Franchitti 1-63, Castroneves 64-68, Hinchcliffe 69, Viso 70-96, Castroneves 97-141, Hunter-Reay 142-225. Points: Power 274, Hinchcliffe 243, Dixon 239, Hunter-Reay 233, Castroneves 231, Pagenaud 216, Franchitti 205, Kanaan 200, Briscoe 193, Servia 173. NASCAR Sprint Cup Quicken Loans 400 Lineup After Saturday qualifying; race today At Michigan International Speedway Brooklyn, Mich. Lap length: 2 miles (Car number in parentheses) 1. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 203.241 mph. 2. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 202.037. 3. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 201.816. 4. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 201.72. 5. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 201.472. 6. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 201.461. 7. (21) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 201.444. 8. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 201.37. 9. (20) Joey Logano, Toyota, 201.247. 10. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 201.179. 11. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 200.882. 12. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 200.725. 13. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 200.686. 14. (55) Mark Martin, Toyota, 200.591. 15. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 200.39. 16. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 200.384. 17. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 200.317. 18. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 200.133. 19. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 200.111. 20. (22) A J Allmendinger, Dodge, 199.944. 21. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 199.612. 22. (33) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 199.54. 23. (23) Scott Riggs, Chevrolet, 199.474. 24. (13) Casey Mears, Ford, 198.555. 25. (2) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 198.473. 26. (51) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 198.238. 27. (98) Michael McDowell, Ford, 198.118. 28. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 197.922. 29. (19) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 197.78. 30. (26) Josh Wise, Ford, 197.699. 31. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 197.395. 32. (83) Landon Cassill, Toyota, 197.087. 33. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 197.055. 34. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 197.028. 35. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 196.829. 36. (36) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 196.818. 37. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 196.77. 38. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 196.673. 39. (93) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 193.107. 40. (32) Ken Schrader, Ford, owner points. 41. (10) Tony Raines, Chevrolet, owner points. 42. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, owner points. 43. (49) J.J. Yeley, Toyota, 195.117. Failed to Qualify 44. (30) David Stremme, Toyota, 194.295. 45. (74) Stacy Compton, Chevrolet, 193.606.

NHRA NATIONAL HOT ROD ASSOCIATION Thunder Valley Nationals Qualifying Results Saturday At Bristol Dragway Bristol, Tenn. First-Round Pairings Top Fuel — 1. Antron Brown, 3.814 seconds, 323.12 mph vs. 16. Scott Palmer, 4.045, 299.33; 2. Tony Schumacher, 3.822, 320.66 vs. 15. Dom Lagana, 4.019, 302.28; 3. Terry McMillen, 3.823, 315.27 vs. 14. Cory McClenathan, 3.927, 307.79; 4. Doug Kalitta, 3.835, 321.81 vs. 13. Khalid alBalooshi, 3.920, 314.24; 5. Hillary Will, 3.837, 308.35 vs. 12. Bruce Litton, 3.881, 309.34; 6. Steve Torrence, 3.840, 318.02 vs. 11. Clay Millican, 3.870, 314.61; 7. Spencer Massey, 3.844, 321.58 vs. 10. David Grubnic, 3.856, 316.30; 8. Bob Vandergriff, 3.855, 319.07 vs. 9. Shawn Langdon, 3.855, 316.08. Did Not Qualify: 17. Pat Dakin, 4.160, 291.19; 18. Brandon Bernstein, 4.221, 298.93; 19. Chris Karamesines, 4.320, 245.27; 20. Morgan Lucas, 4.778, 303.78; 21. Ike Maier, 5.712, 173.25. Funny Car — 1. Bob Tasca III, Ford Mustang, 4.063, 310.48 vs. 16. Blake Alexander, Chevy Monte Carlo, 4.188, 301.67; 2. Mike Neff, Mustang, 4.072, 310.70 vs. 15. Alexis DeJoria, Toyota Camry, 4.156, 304.53; 3. Jack Beckman, Dodge Charger, 4.077, 310.13 vs. 14. Tim Wilkerson, Mustang, 4.131, 302.75; 4. Ron Capps, Charger, 4.091, 306.40 vs. 13. Courtney Force, Mustang, 4.131, 304.60; 5. John Force, Mustang, 4.094, 312.71 vs. 12. Tony Pedregon, Camry, 4.130, 306.26; 6. Matt Hagan, Charger, 4.096,

307.79 vs. 11. Cruz Pedregon, Camry, 4.128, 304.19; 7. Jeff Arend, Camry, 4.110, 309.63 vs. 10. Jim Head, Toyota Solara, 4.128, 305.49; 8. Johnny Gray, Charger, 4.120, 309.56 vs. 9. Robert Hight, Mustang, 4.124, 304.12. Did Not Qualify: 17. Todd Lesenko, 4.289, 282.78; 18. Bob Bode, 5.617, 290.76. Pro Stock — 1. Allen Johnson, Dodge Avenger, 6.623, 207.78 vs. 16. Shane Gray, Chevy Camaro, 6.746, 204.66; 2. Mike Edwards, Pontiac GXP, 6.641, 207.27 vs. 15. Larry Morgan, Ford Mustang, 6.744, 205.22; 3. Vincent Nobile, Avenger, 6.659, 207.43 vs. 14. Kurt Johnson, GXP, 6.708, 205.26; 4. Jason Line, GXP, 6.662, 206.95 vs. 13. Warren Johnson, GXP, 6.700, 205.47; 5. V. Gaines, Avenger, 6.673, 206.26 vs. 12. Ron Krisher, GXP, 6.698, 206.16; 6. Rodger Brogdon, GXP, 6.678, 206.04 vs. 11. Erica Enders, Chevy Cobalt, 6.696, 206.23; 7. Greg Anderson, Camaro, 6.680, 206.32 vs. 10. Jeg Coughlin, Avenger, 6.693, 206.16; 8. Ronnie Humphrey, GXP, 6.680, 206.01 vs. 9. JR Carr, Ford Mustang, 6.692, 204.48. Did Not Qualify: 17. Grace Howell, 6.755, 203.40.

HOCKEY NHL NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE 2012 NHL Draft Order At CONSOL Energy Center Pittsburgh June 22-23 First Round 1. Edmonton 2. Columbus 3. Montreal 4. N.Y. Islanders 5. Toronto 6. Anaheim 7. Minnesota 8. Carolina 9. Winnipeg 10. Tampa Bay 11. Washington (from Colorado) 12. Buffalo 13. Dallas 14. Calgary 15. Ottawa 16. Washington 17. San Jose 18. Chicago 19. Tampa Bay (from Detroit) 20. Philadelphia 21. Buffalo (from Nashville) 22. Pittsburgh 23. Florida 24. Boston 25. St. Louis 26. Vancouver 27. Phoenix 28. N.Y. Rangers 29. New Jersey 30. Los Angeles (optional to Columbus) — Los Angeles will send its first-round pick in 2012 or 2013 to Columbus, at Columbus’ option.

TENNIS Professional AEGON Classic Saturday At The Queen’s Club London Purse: $890,000 (WT250) Surface: Grass-Outdoor Singles Semifinals Marin Cilic (6), Croatia, def. Sam Querrey, United States, 6-3, 3-6, 6-3. David Nalbandian (10), Argentina, def. Grigor Dimitrov, Bulgaria, 6-4, 6-4. Nuernberger Gastein Ladies Saturday At TC Wels 76 Bad Gastein, Austria Purse: $220,000 (Intl.) Surface: Clay-Outdoor Singles Semifinals Alize Cornet (7), France, def. Ksenia Pervak (3), Kazakhstan, 6-2, 6-2. Yanina Wickmayer (2), Belgium, def. Mandy Minella, Luxembourg, 7-6 (3), 6-3. Queen’s Club Saturday At Edgbaston Priory Club Birmingham, England Purse: $220,000 (Intl.) Surface: Grass-Outdoor Singles Quarterfinals Zheng Jie, China, def. Roberta Vinci (4), Italy, 6-3, 5-7, 6-4. Ekaterina Makarova (8), Russia, def. Hsieh Su-wei (13), Taiwan, 3-6, 6-3, 6-3. Melanie Oudin, United States, leads Irina Falconi, United States, 6-4, 5-7, 1-0, susp., rain. Jelena Jankovic (5), Serbia, leads Misaki Doi, Japan, 2-0 (15-40), susp., rain. Gerry Weber Open Saturday At Gerry Weber Stadion Halle, Germany Purse: $938,000 (WT250) Surface: Grass-Outdoor Singles Semifinals Roger Federer (2), Switzerland, def. Mikhail Youzhny, Russia, 6-1, 6-4. Tommy Haas, Germany, def. Philipp Kohlschreiber (8), Germany, 7-6 (5), 7-5.

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL American League BOSTON RED SOX — Placed RHP Josh Beckett on the 15-day DL, retroactive to June 12. Recalled RHP Clayton Mortensen from Pawtucket (IL). MINNESOTA TWINS — Recalled RHP Liam Hendriks from Rochester (IL). Optioned RHP Lester Oliveros to Rochester. OAKLAND ATHLETICS — Released OF Manny Ramirez from his minor league contract. Recalled RHP Tyson Ross and INF Eric Sogard from Sacramento (PCL). Optioned RHP Evan Scribner and INF Adam Morales to Sacramento. Assigned INF Kila Ka’aihue outright to Sacramento. TEXAS RANGERS — Selected the contract of RHP Justin Grimm from Frisco (TL). Optioned RHP Yoshinori Tateyama to Round Rock (PCL). Transferred RHP Neftali Perez to the 60-day DL. TORONTO BLUE JAYS — Placed RHP Drew Hutchison on the 15-day DL. Recalled RHP Robert Coello from Las Vegas (PCL). National League CHICAGO CUBS — Agreed to terms with RHP Paul Blackburn, RHP Josh Conway, INF Stephen Bruno, LHP Michael Heesch and C Chadd Krist on minor league contracts. MIAMI MARLINS — Placed RHP Sandy Rosario on the 15-day DL. Recalled RHP Chris Hatcher from New Orleans (PCL). NEW YORK METS — Placed OF Jason Bay on the 7-day concussion DL. Activated INF Justin Turner from the 15-day DL. Agreed to terms with RHP Matt Koch, SS Branden Kaupe, RHP Brandon Welch, RHP Corey Oswalt, C Tomas Nido, 2B Richie Rodriguez, RHP Paul Sewald, RHP Robert Whalen, RHP Matthew Bowman, C Stefan Sabol, RHP Tyler Vanderheiden, RHP Timothy Peterson and 3B Jeff Reynolds on minor league contracts. Assigned Koch, Welch, Rodriguez, Sewald, Whalen, Bowman, Sabol, Vanderheiden, Peterson and Reynolds to Brooklyn (NYP) and Kaupe, Oswalt and Nido to Kingsport (Appalachian). PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES — Recalled C Erik Kratz from Lehigh Valley (IL). Optioned RHP B.J. Rosenberg to Lehigh Valley.

FISH COUNT Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Friday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 2,539 283 248 76 The Dalles 1,928 184 53 14 McNary 1,107 52 27 6 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Friday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 186,448 10,219 8,021 2,384 The Dalles 134,451 8,697 2,296 1,035 John Day 118,066 7,706 2,215 1,361 McNary 110,622 5,153 5,007 2,245


SUNDAY, JUNE 17, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

O  A

U.S. OPEN NOTEBOOK

TELEVISION

Els’ eagle puts him in contention

Today MOTOR SPORTS 10 a.m.: NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Quicken Loans 400, TNT. 2 p.m.: NHRA, Ford Thunder Valley Nationals (sameday tape), ESPN. BASEBALL 10:30 a.m.: MLB, New York Yankees at Washington Nationals, TBS. 1 p.m.: MLB, San Francisco Giants at Seattle Mariners, Root Sports. 2 p.m.: College World Series, Stony Brook vs. Florida State, ESPN2. 5 p.m.: MLB, Boston Red Sox at Chicago Cubs, ESPN. 6 p.m.: College World Series, UCLA vs. Arizona, ESPN2. SOCCER 11:30 a.m.: UEFA European Championship, Portugal vs. Netherlands, ESPN. 11:30 a.m.: UEFA European Championship, Denmark vs. Germany, ESPN2. 2 p.m.: MLS, New York Red Bulls at Chicago Fire, NBC Sports Network. 4 p.m.: MLS, Portland Timbers at Los Angeles Galaxy, CW. 7 p.m.: MLS, Portland Timbers at Los Angeles Galaxy (same-day tape), Root Sports. GOLF 1 p.m.: U.S. Open, final round, NBC. CYCLING 4:30 p.m.: Tour de Suisse, Stage 9 (same-day tape), NBC Sports Network. BASKETBALL 5 p.m.: NBA playoffs, Oklahoma City Thunder at Miami Heat, ABC.

Monday SOCCER 11:30 a.m.: UEFA European Championship, Croatia vs. Spain, ESPN. 11:30 a.m.: UEFA European Championship, Italy vs. Republic of Ireland, ESPN2. BASEBALL 2 p.m.: College World Series, Kent State vs. Florida, ESPN2. 4 p.m.: MLB, Atlanta Braves at New York Yankees, ESPN. 6 p.m.: College World Series, Arkansas vs. South Carolina, ESPN2. 6:30 p.m.: MLB, Seattle Mariners at Arizona Diamondbacks, Root Sports.

RADIO Today BASKETBALL 5 p.m.: NBA playoffs, finals, Oklahoma City Thunder at Miami Heat, KICE-AM 940. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

S   B Baseball • South Carolina beats Florida 7-3: Michael Roth turned in another strong College World Series start, Erik Payne’s bases-loaded triple scored the go-ahead runs and South Carolina began the last leg of its pursuit of a third straight national title with a 7-3 win over Florida on Saturday night in Omaha, Neb. South Carolina (46-17) extended its record NCAA-tournament win streak to 22 games by beating its SEC rival. • Hogs beat CWS newcomer Kent State 8-1 on 4hitter: DJ Baxendale and Brandon Moore combined on a four-hitter, Jake Wise homered for the first time since February and Arkansas defeated Kent State 8-1 on Saturday to spoil the Golden Flashes’ first appearance in the College World Series in Omaha, Neb. Baxendale didn’t allow a hit until Sawyer Polen’s infield single with two out in the fifth. He held the Flashes (46-19) scoreless until Jimmy Rider homered in the sixth.

D3

By Lynn Debruin The Associated Press

Eric Gay / The Associated Press

Tiger Woods and Jim Furyk make their way to the 18th green during the third round of the U.S. Open Championship golf tournament Saturday at The Olympic Club in San Francisco.

Olympic Club tests the best with every shot By Bill Pennington New York Times News Service

SAN FRANCISCO — t is all Rory’s fault. With every toothy, this-iseasy grin from Rory McIlroy one year ago at the U.S. Open — and there were hundreds as he won the event at 16 under par — an unsmiling sense of dread developed in the greater community of golf pros who knew that this year’s Open would become a punishing payback. Twenty players were under par last year at the Congressional Country Club. Eighteen more were no worse than 2 over par. Oh, boy. Get ready for four days of reckoning at The Olympic Club in 2012. Those fears were not unfounded. “I think we all knew the USGA was going to come out firing,” said Nick Watney, one of the 153 players in the 156-man field who were over par at the midway point of this year’s tournament. “And they haven’t disappointed. What did you expect? It’s certainly what we all expected.” Tiger Woods said: “Look, this isn’t Congressional. This is really hard. Shot after shot.” To be fair, the idea that the U.S. Open would have playing conditions as difficult as any other golf competition was not conceived in 2012, nor was it a mindset adopted in the previous century. The U.S. Open was meant to be a stern test of golf — maybe the sternest test — since the 1800s. “It is one of the things that has always set the event apart,” said Mike Davis, the executive director of the U.S. Golf Association. A series of events conspired to make the conditions at The Olympic Club so taxing, rather than a conspiracy from golf’s leaders to wreak vengeance on the world’s best golfers for McIlroy’s unabashed success.

I

GOLF COMMENTARY For starters, the Open’s visit to Congressional heralded the first of three consecutive stops at old-style, traditional golf courses. (Merion Golf Club outside Philadelphia will host the event next year.) These choices, especially Congressional and Merion, raised concerns that their layouts were either not challenging enough or not long enough for modern golfers using modern equipment. That 20 players were under par last year — no player under par might be more typical — ramped up the pressure to guarantee that the competition at Olympic was in no way as forgiving. Because two successive unduly merciful championships would only heighten the focus on Merion, which does not need the added attention. It is hosting its first U.S. Open since 1981. The other, perhaps pivotal factor was the weather. Congressional was tamed by rain before and during the championship, making the greens soft and vulnerable. Returning to the Bay Area, where it rarely rains in mid-June, the USGA knew it had a predictable weather pattern that assured a workable plan for a course that would seem difficult in the practice rounds then turn much more dastardly once play began. And that is what has happened. “The golf course was a totally different animal Thursday than it was during Wednesday’s practice round,” said Luke Donald, the world’s No. 1 player, who did not make the cut after two over-par rounds. “We just don’t play golf courses this firm. We don’t play anything close to this.” Few players, including Donald, were complaining about the course setup. But its unrelenting ferocity might have surprised. “It just keeps coming at you,” said Graeme McDowell, the 2010

champion, who played the first two rounds in a tidy 1 over par. “You get worn down. Every little mistake costs you.” Asked Friday if he would like to send a message to the USGA’s Davis, McDowell all but whispered, “Be nice to us.” Watney likened the Open at Olympic to a boxing match, which is not a comparison made every day on the genteel PGA Tour. “It is like boxing in that you know you’re not going to win every round,” Watney said. “You’re good one round, then getting beat up the next round. And sometimes in the middle of a round you’re in trouble, and you just try to hold on until your head clears.” David Toms, one of the midway point leaders, said the Olympic setup required the players to be imaginative even if that sometimes backfired. “It’s a fair test but it will make you do some crazy things,” Toms said. “Like hit a shot to a front pin from 220 yards where you try to land it short because you know if you land it on the green, the ball will run off the back. “Except when you do land it short, sometimes it doesn’t get there. So it can make you kind of silly sometimes.” Short and safe might beat the alternative — just ask Woods. His shot to the 17th green Friday landed well in front of the hole, then ran off the back of the green and 30 yards down a side hill. He made par only because he was fortunate not to be blocked by several trees in the vicinity. Can anyone leading the championship expect to be so lucky with the title on the line late today? One thing is certain: McIlroy will not have to worry about any such fate. He did not make the cut and hurriedly and somberly packed a bag, dashing from the Olympic Club as several dozen golfers remained to slash and flail in his wake.

SAN FRANCISCO — Ernie Els hasn’t won a major championship in 10 years. But after his chip-in for eagle on No. 17 on Saturday at The Olympic Club, the South African found himself tied for fourth at the U.S. Open, just three shots back at 2-over 212 entering the final round. “To come back and play the last 12 holes in 5 under is quite amazing, and obviously the shot on 17 is what dreams are made of,” he said. Els won the 2002 British Open and he’s a two-time U.S. Open champ, winning in 1994 and 1997. At age 42, this is his 20th U.S. Open. “I feel that my mental attitude this week has been quite good,” Els said. “I’ve had a couple of train wrecks out there (an 8 on the par-5 16th and double bogey on No. 4) the first day. So hopefully I got those out of the way. “Experience helps around here. For some reason I’m patient again this week and that’s kind of my virtue in major championship golf ... the ability to be patient and wait it out. And I think you’re going to have to do that tomorrow.” First-time ace John Peterson had never made a hole-in-one before. He was easy to tell Saturday at the U.S. Open. Peterson’s tee shot on the par-3 13th from 180 yards out landed about 15 feet short of the pin, caught the ridge and trickled in for an ace. He tossed his 7-iron, threw his hands in the air almost fell when he leaped to chest-bump his caddie. “When it went in, man, I don’t know what I did. I want to watch the replay,” said Peterson, whose thirdround 72 left him four shots behind leaders Jim Furyk and Graeme McDowell. “I hope y’all have a replay so I can see it again. But I went nuts. I know that. I tried to chest-bump my caddie and I missed.” Miniature golf Players teed off from the most forward box Saturday on the par-3 15th, which played at 107 yards. That didn’t make it easy. The hole location was four paces from the edge, tucked in the front-left corner. “The flag on 15 is one the hardest flags I’ve ever seen on a par 3,” said Lee Westwood, who took par on the hole all three rounds. No. 15 played at 150 yards Thursday, and 143 on Friday.

Cycling • Fields earns Olympic berth at U.S. men’s BMX trials: Connor Fields has won the U.S. men’s BMX trials to automatically qualify for the London Olympics, holding off Corben Sharrah, Mike Day and Barry Nobles in the final. Fields will be joined on the team by David Herman, who earned a spot by leading USA Cycling’s power rankings, and a discretionary selection to be announced later.

Tennis • Cilic beats Querrey to advance to Queen’s final: Sixth-seeded Marin Cilic of Croatia beat American Sam Querrey in the Queen’s Club semifinals 6-3, 3-6, 6-3 on Saturday in London. Querrey, who is unseeded, won the title in 2010. Cilic will play 10thseeded David Nalbandian of Argentina. Federer vs. Haas in Halle, goes for record 6th win: Roger Federer will face wild card Tommy Haas of Germany in a bid to win the Gerry Weber Open in Halle, Germany, for a record sixth time today. The 87thranked Haas defeated defending champion Philipp Kohlschreiber 7-6 (5), 7-5 on Saturday. Federer eased past Mikhail Youzhny of Russia by 6-1, 6-4 to reach his seventh final. Cornet, Wickmayer advance to Gastein Ladies final: Second-seeded Yanina Wickmayer of Belgium beat unseeded Mandy Minella of Luxembourg 7-6 (3), 6-3 on Saturday to advance to the final of the Gastein Ladies in Bad Gastein, Austria. She will face Alize Cornet of France, who beat Ksenia Pervak of Kazakhstan 6-2, 6-2. China’s Zheng Jie into Aegon Classic semifinals: Zheng Jie of China overcame the rain and a busy schedule to beat Roberta Vinci 6-3, 5-7, 6-4 and reach the semifinals of the Aegon Classic on Saturday in Birmingham, England. The rain returned to delay the second quarterfinal, between former topranked player Jelena Jankovic of Serbia and Misaki Doi of Japan. — From wire reports

Open Continued from D1 In a U.S. Open that has lived up to its reputation this week, it was difficult for anyone to get too far ahead. McDowell and Furyk were two shots ahead of Fredrik Jacobson, who had a 68. Another shot behind was a group that included Lee Westwood, whose Saturday-best 67 gave him another shot at his first major; and Ernie Els, who holed a long pitch for eagle on the 17th that carried him to a 68. The Big Easy is a twotime U.S. Open champion, with that first title coming 18 years ago. “Experience helps around here,” Els said. “For some reason, I’m patient again this week and that’s been kind of my virtue in major championship golf, the ability to be patient and wait it out. And I think you’re going to have to do that tomorrow.” Thirteen players were separated by four shots going into today, a list that includes 17year-old Beau Hossler, who followed bogeys with birdies for a 70. Woods, who has never won a major from behind, was five shots back. His round ended with a shot from the middle of the 18th fairway that hung up in the right collar of rough, and a stubbed chip that took a hard turn to the left some 10 feet away. When he two-putted for his sixth bogey, his day got a little worse. Climbing the hill toward the fabled clubhouse at Olympic, a photographer brushed past him and Woods banged his hand into the camera. He shook it several times, but later said he was fine. The real hurt came from Olympic. “It was just a tough day on the greens, and most of the day, I just kept getting that halfnumber, right in between clubs all day,” said

U.S. Open leaderboard

Ben Margot / The Associated Press

Graeme McDowell watches his drive on the 11th hole during the third round of the U.S. Open Championship Saturday at The Olympic Club in San Francisco.

Woods, who was either well long or short on his approach shots. Furyk, the only player who has not had a round over par in this championship, and McDowell played together in the opening two rounds. Both are similar players who appear to be a good fit for Olympic — control off the tee and a strong fight to avoid bogeys. McDowell referred to Furyk as a “plodder,” which at the U.S. Open is a high compliment. “It doesn’t have to look or be fancy. It has to work,” Furyk said. “And I think we have styles of games where we put the ball into play, we put the ball on the green and take our chance at the putt and then move on.” But this was not shaping up as a two-man race for McDowell and Furyk. “Looking at the leaderboard, you’ve got to look down as far as the guys at 3 or 4 (over) as

Through Saturday’s third round Graeme McDowell 69-72-68—209 Jim Furyk 70-69-70—209 Fredrik Jacobson 72-71-68—211 Lee Westwood 73-72-67—212 Ernie Els 75-69-68—212 Blake Adams 72-70-70—212 Nicholas Colsaerts 72-69-71—212 Webb Simpson 72-73-68—213 Kevin Chappell 74-71-68—213 John Senden 72-73-68—213 a-Beau Hossler 70-73-70—213 Jason Dufner 72-71-70—213 John Peterson 71-70-72—213

having a realistic chance of winning this tournament,” McDowell said. That includes some regular characters, such as Westwood and Els and even two-time U.S. Open champion Retief Goosen, who was five shots behind. And it features newcomers to this stage like Nicolas Colsaerts, the big hitter from Belgium — and even a high school kid. For every bogey Hossler made, he answered with a birdie on the next hole. His only big blunder came on the 11th, when he was too aggressive with a downhill putt and missed his par putt from 6 feet. Two holes later, he hit a heavy chip from the hazard that rolled back down a slope for another bogey. The kid just wouldn’t go away, though, and suddenly he is dreaming big. “My goal now is to win the tournament,” he said.


SUNDAY, JUNE 17, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

Game 3

MLB

Players embrace baseball scoring appeals process By Josh Dubow The Associated Press

OAKLAND, Calif. — Oakland’s Coco Crisp tracked Robinson Cano’s drive to right-center. He seemed ready to make the catch — until he got caught between deciding whether to jump or stay on his feet and the ball bounced off his glove. Cano easily got into second base as New York Yankees teammate Curtis Granderson came around to score. Official scorer Chuck Dybdal ruled it a two-base error. To many at the ballpark, the call seemed routine. But the Yankees were bewildered. They filed an appeal with Major League Baseball the following day to give Cano an RBI double. And their wish was quickly granted by MLB executive vice president Joe Torre, a pattern that is being repeated much more frequently under a streamlined appeals process for official scoring calls. “You can see it and then you can appeal,” Cano said. “It’s a good thing you can appeal, because sometimes those things, maybe can be the one that — you can hit 2,000 hits. Maybe a double, you can hit 500 doubles. Or the RBI — you can get 1,000 RBIs. Who knows? You know how hard it is to get a hit or double in this game.” Don’t forget how hard it is to pitch. The Mets took a shot at getting R.A. Dickey’s one-hit gem against Tampa Bay on Wednesday belatedly changed from a one-hitter to a no-hitter. But no luck. That appeal got turned down. “We took advantage of the process,” Mets manager Terry Collins said. “You can do it, so we gave it a shot. We didn’t win it. We didn’t expect to win it. Just gave it a try. If we had won it, we’ve got another no-hitter.” Both cases have their roots in player complaints about official scoring during last year’s collective bargaining talks, leading to a new appeals process and an effort by MLB to try and bring more consistency to official scoring decisions from city to city and scorer to scorer. Team officials are not supposed to “initiate communication” with scorers and MLB will punish people who “intimidate, influence or pressure” scorers into changing calls. Instead, a player or team can appeal any call to MLB within 24 hours after it is made. While baseball will not release numbers on how many appeals there have been this year, scorers, teams and players say it is up considerably from last year when 12 of 58 plays appealed under the old system were overturned. “It’s a good thing because

Ben Margot / The Associated Press file

Oakland Athletics center fielder Coco Crisp can’t get to a ball hit by New York Yankees’ Robnson Cano during the third inning of a baseball game in Oakland, Calif., on May 25. Crisp was charged with a two-base error on the play, but the Yankees later appealed the official scoring to MLB and the scoring was ruled a two-RBI double for Cano.

it’s less of a distraction as the game goes on and there’s a call that, at face value, you say, ‘That’s a hit or that’s an error,’ ” Angels manager Mike Scioscia said. “There’s a process in place where you ask the league to take a look. It’s one less distraction that can happen in the dugout, where guys are saying, ‘Are you (kidding) me?’ ” After a successful appeal, the call and corresponding statistics are changed with no fanfare or announcement. In the play involving Cano and Crisp on May 25 in Oakland, A’s starter Tyson Ross had three earned runs added to his ledger just hours after being sent down to TripleA from 5.94 to 6.51 without throwing an additional pitch. “That’s unfortunate because I believe I should have caught that,” Crisp said. “That works out in my favor but Tyson doesn’t deserve those runs. It should have been an error.” Baltimore’s Nick Johnson was on the winning side of an appeal earlier this year when Torre ruled a ball Eduardo Nunez of the Yankees allowed to fall in left field on May 1 should have been a double not an error. “I like it,” Johnson said of the new process. “I think it’s going to work well. Just another set of eyes to take another look at it. You hear back from them in two, three days and go from there.” Minnesota scorer Stew Thornley said he has had calls overturned on appeal and likes the new process better than the confrontations with

D5

players or team officials that used to be more frequent. He sympathizes with players who are upset about calls they disagree with, because he used to do his share of complaining before becoming a scorer himself. “You think you got jobbed by a scorer’s call, you’re unhappy. I totally understand that,” Thornley said. “That’s part of the job. That’s why any clown out there can’t do it because boy, I used to be one of those clowns. ‘Boy if I were doing this job.’ Then you find out what it’s like to do it from the hot seat and get some of that criticism.” While baseball’s rules say judgment calls by an official scorer should only be changed if they are to be determined to be “clearly erroneous,” players who like the new process acknowledge there is rarely unanimity on disputed calls. Oakland shortstop Cliff Pennington said when he polls teammates about disputed calls, the clubhouse verdict is usually split. “We’re judges the same way you think of a judge in court,” New York scorer Billy Altman said. “It’s not completely possible to standardize that. No court can standardize how judges approach things. ... If every call was black and white, they would not need an official scorer. These are judgment calls. They can go either way.” The streamlined appeals process is just one change in how baseball is handling official scorers this season. MLB also brought at least

one scorer from every city to New York this offseason to try to bring common standards to an admittedly subjective process. Like past efforts to try and make strike zones consistent from umpire to umpire, MLB wants scoring decisions applied consistently. “We want more uniformity of calls,” MLB senior vice president Phyllis Merhige said. “A little less variation of what gets called one way in one city and different in another city or among different scorers in the same city.” To help achieve that, scorers looked at tapes of last year’s appealed and overturned calls and had breakout sessions addressing press box announcements, how to deal with a ball getting lost in the sun or lights, sacrifice bunts and defensive indifference. One of the most specific sessions was led by Tampa Bay scorer Bill Mathews, who is also the head baseball coach at Eckerd College. He gave scorers clues on what to look for in terms of how hard a ball is hit, the angle a player takes and a fielder’s position when a ball is caught. “There’s still human judgment,” Mathews said. “Scoring is about judgment, feel and knowledge of the game. It’s about making tough decisions under pressure at the right time. That’s what makes it fun. I’d say 94 percent of plays are a piece of cake. That 6 percent are what you take home and lose sleep over because you just want to get it right.” There has been a strong trend leading to fewer errors in the big leagues with the 11 highest fielding percentages of all-time coming in the past 11 seasons. Errors per game have dropped about 25 percent the past 40 years because of better fielding, improved groundskeeping, better replays that allow scorers to see bad hops or other factors that could change an error to a hit. Some also believe scorers today are less likely to hand out errors and more likely to give batters the benefit of the doubt with a hit. But many players still believe scorers are too quick to call errors, failing to recognize how difficult it is to get a hit or field a ball cleanly in the big leagues. “In Toronto, they mostly score hits as errors,” Blue Jays infielder Omar Vizquel said. “The guy is pretty tough. He must have 10 Gold Gloves because he can make every play out there. I don’t know if it’s something personal or if he knows about baseball. Sometimes there are some calls that are very questionable.”

Continued from D1 “You’ve got the two best teams in the league right now going against each other,” Wade said Saturday, when practices resumed after a day off for both clubs. “So it’s going to be a very tough game, but we have to find a way to win it. And it’s about taking, like I said, one possession at a time, one second, one minute at a time to make sure we reach our goal — and that’s to win the game.” A Game 3 victory assures nothing, a lesson the Heat learned the hard way last year. That win in Dallas was Miami’s final victory of the season. But there are certain truths that will come from the outcome tonight. The winner will have homecourt advantage. The winner will be two games away from a championship. And the losing club will see what appears to be an already razor-thin margin for error in this series become even more precarious. “We have no other choice,” said Thunder star Kevin Durant, the league’s scoring champion. “We lost at home. Tough loss. We’ve got to get over it, get ready for a tough Game 3. You know, the series is going to be tough. We know that. We know that. You’ve just got to be ready. It’s going to be a fun one.” By now, the Heat aren’t shy to say they’re completely exhausted about dissecting what went wrong in last year’s finals. Still, they know the importance of not letting one loss turn into another — because when that happened against the Mavericks a year ago, there was a parade in Dallas not long afterward. “I don’t know if we were any more motivated in Game 2,” Erik Spoelstra said. “What we were was angry about our performance in Game 1. ... You want to throw your best punches out there, and may the best team win. We didn’t throw our best punches in Game 1.” Add up the numbers from the first two games of the series, and it turns into something close to a statistical dead heat. Both teams are shooting 47 percent. Both have made 14 tries from threepoint range (though Miami is shooting a better percentage). The Thunder have grabbed four more rebounds, the Heat whistled for two more fouls. The Thunder outscored Miami by 16 points in the paint during their Game 1 win; the Heat outscored the Thunder by 16 points in the paint during their victory in Game 2. Of course, the only stat that really matters is the one that’s identical: one win

David Santiago / The Associated Press

Oklahoma City Thunder assistant coach Brian Keefe, right, gives instructions to Kevin Durant during the team’s practice on Saturday in Miami.

Next up NBA Finals, Oklahoma City Thunder at Miami Heat • When: Today, 5 p.m. • TV: ABC • Radio: KICE-AM 940

each, headed into today. And if the young Thunder were supposed to be rattled by losing the home-court edge, no one told them. “We have all the right pieces, from the best scorer in the league, most athletic point guard in the league to the best shot blocker to the best post defender, best wing defender and our bench is one of the best,” James Harden said. “This is a perfect team. We are young guns. We get it done. It has to start in Game 3.” Even their young-looking coach doesn’t sound worried about the stakes the Thunder will face. “I’ve seen all year long a group that’s always committed, that always sticks by one another, that believes in the work that we put in,” Scott Brooks said. “And that’s who they are. It’s not going to change. They’ve always had great ability to bounce back after a tough loss and we expect the guys to come back (Sunday) night with better effort, better play and for 48 minutes.” The Heat expect the same. It’s no secret that falling short last year has been a source of inspiration throughout this season for James and the Heat, and that continues even now. “I’m enjoying it,” James said. “I’m having fun with these first two games. I mean, this is a great opportunity for myself and for our team, for both teams. It’s a lot of fun being out there and competing at a high level, you know, the intense moment where every possession counts. That’s what it’s all about. As a competitor you have to enjoy these moments and you love these moments.”

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Charity Continued from D1 After all, if you want to play the equivalent of 5½ rounds of golf in a single day, four-hour rounds are not an option. A golf cart is part of the deal, and golfers can drive it right to the edge of the green. The round starts at 6:30 a.m., but Tetherow provides all the food and drink — including adult beverages — a marathon golfer could want. Tetherow also implements time-friendly rules such as a threeputt maximum and playing lost balls like lateral hazards. In other words, there is no time to overthink a shot. “That’s what I really got from that,” says Zadow, who will not play in this year’s marathon because of a planned family vacation to Arizona. “You feel like if you mess up a shot, it’s like: ‘That’s OK, I have another 400 shots to improve on it,’ ” Zadow says with a laugh. Van der Velde, who is the 47-year-old managing partner of Tetherow, and his team dreamed up the marathon last spring after van der Velde was disappointed with some of the course’s more traditional fundraising efforts, which would raise decent money but largely go unnoticed. So Tetherow changed its focus to finding a more enjoyable and unique format. “You can have some fun with these things if you do the right stuff,” van der Velde says. “I figured if you do the right thing you could probably raise 50 (thousand) to 100,000 (dollars) a year and really move the needle. That would be cool.” That kind of money is still a ways away. But the cool part has already arrived.

Last year, 12 of the 17 participating golfers finished all 100 holes. And van der Velde and Zadow, among others, kept going just to finish out their sixth round. Van der Velde, who had one knee replaced in 2010 and another last fall, had little problem getting around the course. He even played well enough to shoot a 67 in the third round, he recalls. “I was feeling better than I thought I would,” van der Velde said. “I was tired. Then the dinner (the marathon includes a three-course dinner reception) was good, and I don’t think I went to bed before 9 or 10 that night. It’s not like I was exhausted and just collapsed on the couch.” Zadow, who was playing with his brother-inlaw, had one goal for the day: make par at least once on each of the golf course’s 18 holes. After 100 holes he still had one yet to par: Tetherow’s treacherous par-4 16th hole. Zadow made par on the par-3 14th hole. Then he scored a 4 on the 15th, a par 4. Then came the 16th and pay dirt — another par. Two more holes to play and Zadow made par on those, too, to finish on a five-hole streak of pars. Not bad. “It takes me a while to warm up, apparently,” he jokes. Finish on a run like that and you might want to play some more. And if not for dinner being served, Zadow might have. Looking back on it, after all, he wasn’t THAT tired. “I don’t know, for some reason getting up early, starting early, and mentally I think the focus is not as intense as playing in a full round and your scoring is not quite as important,” he says. Maybe we should all golf like we’ve already played 100. — Reporter: 541-617-7868, zhall@bendbulletin.com.

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THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, JUNE 17, 2012

INDYCAR

Hunter-Reay wins at Milwaukee By Chris Jenkins The Associated Press

WEST ALLIS, Wis. — As long as his boss went to the trouble of bringing IndyCar racing back to the Milwaukee Mile, Ryan Hunter-Reay figured he might as well bring home the winner’s trophy. Hunter-Reay took the lead from Helio Castroneves on the 142nd lap, didn’t cough it up on a couple of restarts and held on to the IndyCar race Saturday at the Milwaukee Mile. It was a doubly sweet win for Michael Andretti, who fields cars for Hunter-Reay as a team owner and served as the event promoter for the race. “It really is amazing,” HunterReay said. “Milwaukee has been so important to IndyCar for so long, and I think this is a huge event for Milwaukee. These two belong together. So I really thank Michael for sticking his neck out, coming back here and really doing it the right way.” It was the sixth career victory and first this season for Hunter-Reay. He also won at Milwaukee in 2004 in the nowdefunct Champ Car Series, starting from the pole and leading every lap. Tony Kanaan was second, followed by James Hinchcliffe, Oriol Servia and E.J. Viso. Scott Dixon had to serve a drive-through penalty for jumping a restart and finished 11th. He questioned the penalty immediately afterward — and as it turns out, he was right. “I’m actually very excited to see what the hell they’re talking about,” Dixon said. “I’m disappointed.” IndyCar race director Beaux Barfield acknowledged after the race that officials made a mistake. He said a failure in their timing and scoring sys-

Jeffrey Phelps / The Associated Press

Ryan Hunter-Reay puts up his fist as he wins the IndyCar race at the Milwaukee Mile in West Allis, Wis. on Saturday.

tem caused them to look at the wrong replay. What officials looked at was a replay of a previous restart that was waved off by officials at the time and didn’t count. Dixon did commit a potential infraction on that restart — but he didn’t do so on the subsequent restart that ended up counting and should not have been penalized. “It was obviously the wrong call, based on the reality of the situation,” Barfield said. Barfield took responsibility for the mistake, and said Chip Ganassi Racing officials were “very gracious” when presented with an explanation. Barfield said there wasn’t anything officials can do to undo the mistake. Last year’s Milwaukee winner, Dario Franchitti, started

from pole position and dominated the early stages of the race. But he fell back in the field and then spun out and hit the wall on lap 195. Franchitti tangled with Ryan Briscoe shortly before he spun, and said afterward that contact might have broken something on his car. “I was on Ryan’s inside, but he just kept coming down there,” Franchitti said. “I just don’t think his spotter told him I was there.” Points leader Will Power finished 12th. Hinchcliffe moved up to second in the points. It was a boost for the historic but financially troubled Milwaukee track, which has been hosting racing since 1903 but originally was left off the 2012 IndyCar schedule after not hosting any major racing

events in 2010 and drawing a lackluster crowd for IndyCar last year. Milwaukee was put back on this year’s schedule after Andretti agreed to serve as the race’s promoter — and Andretti announced just before Saturday’s race that the event would return in 2013. “We’re going to be back here next year, and hopefully for a long time after that,” Andretti said. Despite the race being a late addition to the schedule — and then a rain delay that pushed the start back — the race drew a significantly better crowd than last year. Franchitti was untouchable in the early stages of the race, leading the first 60-plus laps before making his first pit stop. The race went green until Si-

mona de Silvestro spun on lap 67, bringing out a caution. Franchitti was shuffled back to fourth on the restart, after a few drivers were on pit road when the caution came out — including Viso, who took the lead on the restart. Justin Wilson then blew an engine on lap 94, pulling to the

inside wall and scrambling to get out of the car when it briefly caught fire. It was a tough reversal of fortune for Wilson, who won last week at Texas. After a round of pit stops under caution, Castroneves — who didn’t pit after Wilson’s incident — took the lead. With Castroneves’ tires later wearing out, Hunter-Reay waited for the right moment, then passed him for the lead on lap 142. “We pounced,” Hunter-Reay said. “We were right there ready to go when somebody slipped up.” Kanaan is known for his aggressiveness on restarts, but said he was just worried about not getting passed on restarts and defending his position during Saturday’s race. “Do you even know how to do that?” Hinchcliffe asked jokingly in the post-race news conference. Kanaan took the good-natured ribbing in stride, answering, “I do not know how to do that.”

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Joey Logano races to fifth Nationwide win of year The Associated Press BROOKLYN, Mich. — Joey Logano followed up his Sprint Cup victory at Pocono last weekend with a win on the Nationwide Series on Saturday at Michigan International Speedway. Logano held off James Buescher for his fifth Nationwide win of the year and 14th of his career. He has won four of the past five races in the No. 18 Joe Gibbs Racing Toyota. “I’ve just had a lot of confidence in myself lately and my abilities and knowing what I can do,” Logano said. “There hasn’t been an opportunity that we let slip up yet.” Kurt Busch, back from a one-week suspension, finished third. There was a red flag with seven laps to go after an accident involving Josh Richards and Jamie Dick. Flames shot briefly out of Dick’s car, but both drivers were evaluated and released after the crash. Buescher tried to pass Logano on the inside in the final seconds but wasn’t able to. “We took a shot at it at the end,” Buescher said. “As long as you’re in position, that’s all you can ask for.” Logano took only a couple questions before leaving for an extra practice for Sprint Cup racers Saturday night. The Cup cars have been exceeding 200 mph this week, and NASCAR made a tire switch for today’s race. Logano was anxious to make it to practice after the Nationwide race, but was told he had to take a couple questions in the media room first. “It’s killing me right now,” Logano said. “I learned a lot that I need to go work on in my Home Depot car.” Danica Patrick went into an early spin and finished 18th after a problem-filled race. Pole winner Austin Dillon finished fifth. Also on Saturday: A m b rose takes Sprint Cup pole at over 203 mph BROOKLYN, Mich. — The last time anyone was this fast in qualifying in NASCAR’s top series, Richard Petty was

M PA I C E L E B R AT E S

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F I F T Y- N I N E Y E A R S

2012 MIRROR POND AMATEUR INVITATIONAL CENTRAL OREGON’S PREMIER MEN’S INDIVIDUAL S T R O K E P L AY G O L F T O U R N A M E N T

Carlos Osorio / The Associated Press

Joey Logano celebrates after winning the NASCAR Nationwide Series Alliance Truck Parts 250 on Saturday at Michigan International Speedway in Brooklyn, Mich.

still driving. He’s an owner now, but when Marcos Ambrose won the Sprint Cup pole at Michigan International Speedway for Richard Petty Motorsports, the Hall of Famer was on hand to put the accomplishment in perspective. Ambrose posted a speed of 203.241 mph, the first time since 1987 the 200 mph mark was broken during Sprint Cup qualifying. “I can’t hardly remember that far back,” Petty said. “To be able to do it on a flatter race track, not Daytona or Talladega, that is unheard of.” Ambrose made his first Sprint Cup pole a memorable one on a day 19 drivers surpassed 200 mph on the newly paved surface at MIS. Speeds have been soaring since drivers began testing sessions, and NASCAR decided to alter the left-side tires for the race today, but that change didn’t affect qualifying.

The last pole winner to break 200 mph in this series was Bill Elliott, a quartercentury ago at Talladega. Ambrose had the 11th-fastest pole-winning speed in series history. Brown, Tasca, Johnson top NHRA qualifying BRISTOL, Tenn. — Antron Brown retained the No. 1 position in Top Fuel qualifying, and Bob Tasca and Allen Johnson also kept the top spots in the NHRA Thunder Valley Nationals. Brown set both ends of Bristol Dragway’s Top Fuel track records during his second qualifying attempt Friday night with a 3.814-second pass at 323.12 mph. Tasca topped the Funny Car field with his Friday night pass of 4.063 seconds at 310.48 mph. In Pro Stock, Tennessee driver Allen Johnson also remained on top with his Friday night run of 6.623 at 207.75.

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Foster homes needed: PEOPLE giving pets GENERATE SOME NEED TO CANCEL kittens & spec. needs EXCITEMENT away are advised to YOUR AD? HANDGUN SAFETY cats. No-kill, all-volThe Bulletin IN YOUR be selective about the CLASS for concealed unteer rescue proClassifieds has an NEIGBORHOOD. new owners. For the license. NRA, Police vides food, supplies, Plan a garage sale and protection of the ani"After Hours" Line Firearms Instructor, Lt. vet care & more; you don't forget to advermal, a personal visit to Call 541-383-2371 Gary DeKorte. Tue provide a safe, loving tise in classified! the animal's new 24 hrs. to cancel June 19th, 6:30-10:30 short-term home. See 541-385-5809. home is recomyour ad! pm. Call Kevin Centwww.craftcats.org or mended. wise, for reservations GET FREE OF CREDIT call 541-389-8420 or Sofa table, Rustic wood $40. 541-548-4422 CARD DEBT NOW! 541-598-5488. $60, please call Cut payments by up Call The Bulletin At 541-312-3130. Free King Charles Toy to half. Stop creditors 541-385-5809 Spaniel, female, 4 POODLE, AKC Stan- Stove, 2-oven, Maytag from calling. dard, 9 weeks old. yrs., to good senior ceramic convection Place Your Ad Or E-Mail 866-775-9621. Male apricot. $500. $150. Microwave, all At: www.bendbulletin.com home, 541-788-0090 (PNDC) 503-999-7542 phases $50. DishGerman Shepherd pups, MANTIS Deluxe Tiller. washer $50. Oregon’s 1 black, 1 black & tan, 541-382-9211 NEW! FastStart enLargest 3 Day $450. 541-620-0946 gine. Ships FREE. GUN & KNIFE One-Year The Bulletin German Shepherd Pups, SHOW Money-Back Guarr ecommends extra 8 wks, 1 male,1 female, antee when you buy June 15-16-17 caution when pur$250, 541-390-8875 DIRECT. Call for the Portland Expo Poodle pups, toy, for chasing products or DVD and FREE Good Center SALE. Also Rescued Get your kitty fix here! services from out of Soil book! THIS MONTH Poodle Adults for Volunteers needed to the area. Sending 877-357-5647. The Duel Elite Truck adoption, to loving care for cats & kittens cash, checks, or (PNDC) Traveling Showcase homes. 541-475-3889 @ no-kill, all voluncredit information - tour the Trucks & teer rescue sanctuary. may be subjected to Swamp Cooler, Mobile Queensland Heelers enter to win! General chores, small FRAUD. For more MasterCool, $295, details at maint. jobs, groom/ standard & mini,$150 & information about an 541-382-6773. up. 541-280-1537 http:// www.CollectorsWest.com interact w/ cats, more. advertiser, you may Fri. 12-6, Sat. 9-5, www.craftcats.org or rightwayranch.wordpress.com The Bulletin Offers call the Oregon Sun 10-4 call 541-389-8420, Free Private Party Ads State Attorney Adm. $9 (includes 647-2181, 598-5488. • 3 lines - 3 days General’s Office Showcase tour) • Private Party Only Consumer Protec• Total of items advertion hotline at Rem 788-243cal scope, tised must equal $200 1-877-877-9392. $350. Sav. 24V 223/ or Less Shetland Sheepdogs 20ga, $450. Win. 94- • Limit 1 ad per month Trapper model 44mag • 3-ad limit for same Registered, (Shelties), $550. Sav. Model 2 females - $300 3 item advertised within Golden Retriever gor99E? 243/with scope, Males- $250 to loving 3 months 212 geous, almost white $450. 541-475-1202 homes 541-977-3982 Call 541-385-5809 coat, 2 years old. All Antiques & Fax 541-385-5802 Ruger M77 30-06, fired shots, neutered, well Shih Tzu male, 1 yr., pet Collectibles 20 rounds, sling, 4x trained and loves evcompanion home only, scope, sheepskin Wanted- paying cash eryone! You will fall in $200, 541-788-0090 for Hi-fi audio & stuThe Bulletin reserves case, 30 rounds love! Moving and undio equip. McIntosh, the right to publish all ammo, cleaning kit. able to take with famJBL, Marantz, Dyads from The Bulletin $725. 541-383-2059. ily. $500. Call naco, Heathkit, Sannewspaper onto The 541.848.0278 UTAH + OR CCW: Orsui, Carver, NAD, etc. Bulletin Internet webegon and Utah ConCall 541-261-1808 site. Hound Puppies (3), 7 cealed License Class. weeks, lots of color, Sat June 30, 9:30 a.m. 261 St. Bernard Puppies, $150 ea.,541-447-1323 - Madras Range. Utah dry mouth, 1st shots, Medical Equipment -$65; OR+UT $100. dewormed, $400, King Charles Spaniel 245 Inc. photo for Utah, 541-280-8069 Male Puppy, $300, Call Paul Sumner ATTENTION DIABETGolf Equipment priceless little guy, ICS with Medicare. (541)475-7277 for preYorkie AKC pups, small, 541-788-0090. Get a FREE talking reg., email,map, info big eyes, shots, health Driver, New Cleveland meter and diabetic guarantee,2 boys,1 girl, Classic, 270 gram, KITTEN EXTRAVAWanted: Collector testing supplies at NO $950+, 541-316-0005. graphite, regular flex, GANZA! Local rescue seeks high quality COST, plus FREE $249, 541-788-1653. group has kittens fishing items. home delivery! Best 210 avail., variety of colCall 541-678-5753, or of all, this meter elimi246 ors, fur length,, some Furniture & Appliances 503-351-2746 nates painful finger w/extra toes. Small Guns, Hunting pricking! Call 255 adoption fee: altered, 888-739-7199. & Fishing A1 Washers&Dryers shots, ID chip, free vet Computers (PNDC) $150 ea. Full warvisit & more; discount Baretta Neos .22 Pistol, ranty. Free Del. Also for 2. Sat & Sun 10-5, THE BULLETIN re263 semi-auto, 2 clips, wanted, used W/D’s for other days/times quires computer adcase, almost new, $250 Tools 541-280-7355 call 541-788-4170. At vertisers with multiple OBO, 916-952-4109. main foster home bead schedules or those Consignment Tool ween Bend/Redmond: Air conditioner, Haier Browning Citori White selling multiple sysAuction June 30 8950 S. Hwy 97, 7000 btu portable, tems/ software, to disLightning 20ga, 28” Nels Anderson Rd., Rdmd, NE of Gift Rd, like new$169. barrels,6 choke tubes, close the name of the Bend. All classes of look for signs. Adopt a 541-410-7005 very good shape, business or the term tools are accepted kitten & get a free $950. Beretta AL391 "dealer" in their ads. 541-480-0795. adult mentor cat at Area Rugs (3), 5x7, Urika, 28" barrel, 5 Private party advertisTurmon Enterprises LLC rescue sanctuary! beiges, golds, blues, choke tubes, hard ers are defined as www.craftcats.org or $45 ea, 541-312-3130 case, excellent cond, Craftsman air compresthose who sell one CraftCats on Face$950. 541-388-4230 sor, like new, $250. computer. Fridge, White Kenmore, book.com 541-408-2585 top freezer, icemaker, CASH!! 260 Lab Pups AKC, black $150; 541-388-8554 For Guns, Ammo & Dewalt 13” planer, like Misc. Items & yellow, Master Reloading Supplies. new, $450. Hunter sired, perfor541-408-6900. 541-408-2585 mance pedigree, OFA 1243 sq. ft. carpet; twin cert hips & elbows, bed w/drawers & ex- Rigid 10” jointer, exc. Don’t miss the Call 541-771-2330 tra pull-out; computer GUN DOG EXPO cond. $400. www.kinnamanretrievers.com armoire 541-815-1828 Visit our HUGE June 22-23-24, 541-408-2585 home decor Portland, OR. See: Lab pups, Choc., AKC, 2 Buying Diamonds 265 consignment store. www.GunDogExpo.com males, hunting & com/Gold for Cash New items Building Materials petition, sire: FC/AFC Saxon’s Fine Jewelers arrive daily! Way to Go Call of the DO YOU HAVE 541-389-6655 930 SE Textron, REDMOND Habitat Wild. Sire & dam OFA SOMETHING TO Bend 541-318-1501 BUYING RESTORE certified hips & elbows. SELL www.redeuxbend.com Lionel/American Flyer avail 6/18,541-670-8044 Building Supply Resale FOR $500 OR trains, accessories. kona_thomas@hotmail.com Quality at LESS? 541-408-2191. LOW PRICES GENERATE SOME exNon-commercial Labradoodles - Mini & 1242 S. Hwy 97 citement in your advertisers may BUYING & SELLING med size, several colors 541-548-1406 neighborhood! Plan a place an ad All gold jewelry, silver 541-504-2662 Open to the public. garage sale and don't with our and gold coins, bars, www.alpen-ridge.com forget to advertise in "QUICK CASH rounds, wedding sets, 269 classified! class rings, sterling silSPECIAL" Lionhead baby bunnies, 541-385-5809. ver, coin collect, vin- Gardening Supplies 1 week 3 lines $12 variety color, $15 ea. tage watches, dental or 541-548-0747 & Equipment Love Seat, beige, great gold. Bill Fleming, 2 weeks $20! cond., $75, call 541-382-9419. Maltese, Toy (1), AKC Ad must 541-312-3130. champ lines, 6 wks, For newspaper include price of Casket, hancrafted, Al$500. 541-420-1577 delivery, call the single item of $500 Loveseat recliner, light der wood, 6’6” x 2’, Circulation Dept. at or less, or multiple tan fabric. $60 obo. white satin lined with Parakeet Breeder; fe541-385-5800 items whose total 541-419-6408. pillow, locks, handles, male Quaker parrot; To place an ad, call does not exceed corner pcs, beautiful male lemon yellow Moving Sale 6/15-6/22 541-385-5809 $500. workmanship, $1200 ringneck parakeet; La-Z-Boy hideabed $125. or email obo. 541-420-6780 classified@bendbulletin.com male lovebird; breeder Queen boxspring matCall Classifieds at China, set of 12. Fresh yellow canaries; male tress/heavy metal frame, 541-385-5809 Cockatiel. In La Pine Flowers by Excel $50. $100. Lots more! www.bendbulletin.com 541-410-9473 Call 541-536-3813 541-389-6380.

Prompt Delivery Rock, Sand & Gravel Multiple Colors, Sizes

Consignment Tool Auction June 30 Nels Anderson Rd., Bend. All classes of Instant Landscaping Co. tools are accepted 541-389-9663 541-480-0795. SUPER TOP SOIL Turmon Enterprises LLC www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & com- Wanted Used Farm post mixed, no Equipment & Machinrocks/clods. High huery. Looking to buy, or mus level, exc. for consign of good used flower beds, lawns, quality equipment. gardens, straight Deschutes Valley screened top soil. Equipment Bark. Clean fill. De541-548-8385 liver/you haul. 541-548-3949. Look at: Bendhomes.com 270 for Complete Listings of Lost & Found Area Real Estate for Sale Found bike helmet, Hill325 ridge Rd. Owner’s name inside, call to Hay, Grain & Feed I.D. 541-306-6239 Found: Boat Motor, on 1st quality grass hay, 70# way out of Prineville bales, barn stored, $220/ Reservoir, call to ID, ton. Also 700# sq. bales, $77 ea. Patterson Ranch, 541-390-6237. Sisters, 541-549-3831 Found cell phone on Empire, call to idenGood classiied ads tell tify, 1-760-917-1969 the essential facts in an Found HP computer interesting Manner. Write cover, MS COA, west from the readers view - not of C&D Auto. Call the seller’s. Convert the 541-389-7955 facts into beneits. Show Lost mothers wedding the reader how the item will help them in some way. ring, near Old Mill District. Reward!! 541-410-2009. Lost Turtle, aquatic, NW Elgin & 16th, Fri., 6/8. 541-306-4171

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads The Bulletin

3A Livestock Supplies •Panels •Gates •Feeders Now galvanized! •6-Rail 12’ panels, $101 •6-Rail 16’ panels, $117 Custom sizes available 541-475-1255

REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal, don't forget to check The Humane Society Want to buy Alfalfa standing, in Central in Bend 541-382-3537 Ore. 541-419-2713 Redmond, 541-923-0882 341 Prineville, 541-447-7178; Horses & Equipment OR Craft Cats, 541-389-8420. COLT STARTING Reward - Lost Bracelet We build solid foundations. Check us out. Silver, pink & red 541-419-3405 Chamilia / Pandora style bracelet. Senti- www.steelduststable.com mental value. Lost 345 6/4/12. 541-382-5673 Livestock & Equipment 275

Auction Sales Baker City antique store going out of business! June 24, @ 11:00 am. Preview 9:00 am., 1780 Main Street, Baker City, Ore. Call Don at Grandkids Inheritance 1-541-620-129 Consignment Tool Auction June 30 Nels Anderson Rd., Bend. All classes of tools are accepted 541-480-0795. Turmon Enterprises LLC

Farm Market

300

1977 14' Blake Trailer, refurbished by Frenchglen Blacksmiths, a Classy Classic. Great design for multiple uses. Overhead tack box (bunkhouse) with side and easy pickup bed access; manger with left side access, windows and head divider. Toyo radial tires & spare; new floor with mats; center partition panel; bed liner coated in key areas, 6.5 K torsion axles with electric brakes, and new paint, $10,500. Call John at 541-589-0777. BOER and Nubian goats, does, wethers and bucks. 541-923-7116

308

Farm Equipment & Machinery (15) Main line irrigation pipe, 40’ x 5”, $1.80/ft. 541-604-4415

358

Farmers Column 10X20 STORAGE BUILDINGS for protecting hay, firewood, livestock etc. $1496 Installed. 541-617-1133. CCB #173684. kfjbuilders@ykwc.net

40HP Century motor w/ Berkly pump & panel. $1500. Two 275 gal. fuel tanks w/ stands, $250 ea; Lewco hay grapple, $1500; misc. Want to buy Alfalfa main line $1.00 per ft. standing, in Central Ore. 541-419-2713 Call 541-475-6724


E2 SUNDAY, JUNE 17, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

PU Z ZL E A NS W ER O N PAG E E 3

PLACE AN AD

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PRIVATE PARTY RATES

Monday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday. . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . 11:00 am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat.

Starting at 3 lines

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

*UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00 *Must state prices in ad

Garage Sale Special 4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . . . . $20.00

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $18.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $24.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $33.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $61.50

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

(call for commercial line ad rates)

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave., Bend, Oregon 97702

PLEASE NOTE; Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday.

Employment

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Schools & Training

421

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Schools & Training

Looking for Employment

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

ATTEND COLLEGE I have 30+ years exp in housekeeping, pet, ONLINE from Home. farm & ranch care. *Medical, *Business, Call 541-388-2706 *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. 476 Computer available. Employment Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Opportunities Call 866-688-7078 www.CenturaOnline.c om (PNDC) DO YOU NEED

AIRLINES ARE HIRING - Train for hands TRUCK SCHOOL on Aviation Maintewww.IITR.net nance Career. FAA Redmond Campus approved program. Student Loans/Job Financial aid if qualiWaiting Toll Free fied - Housing avail1-888-438-2235 able. Call Aviation Institute of Need help ixing stuff? Maintenance. Call A Service Professional 1-877-804-5293. ind the help you need. (PNDC) www.bendbulletin.com

280

Estate Sales

Joyce Coats

A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW?

Call The Bulletin before 11 a.m. and get an ad in to publish the next day!

541-385-5809.

282

Sales Northwest Bend BARN/GARAGE SALE Camping gear, antiques, clothing, sports equip. books, movies, tack, fishing, PFD & more! Sat., 9-4, Sun., 10-2 18467 Fryrear Ranch Rd., Bend Chimps Inc Giant Estate/Barn Sale: June 22nd & 23rd, 8-5, Hooker Creek Ranch, 65525 Gerking Market Rd., Tumalo. Shop our boutique w/designer clothes, shoes & newer items. Home decor, appl., furniture, snowmobile & much more! Huge Garage Sale, Fri., Sat. & Sun., 9-4. 18602 Couch Mkt. Rd. Tools, some horse tack, household, furniture, lots more, too much to list.

Looking for truck driver to pull 53’ Refrigerated Van, run 48 states. Must be willing to be out 3 weeks at a time. Looking for team player, and at least 2 yrs. experience Company is based out of Prineville, OR. E-mail resume to:

caveslogistics@ yahoo.com or call

541-977-6362.

VIEW the Classifieds at:

www.bendbulletin.com

ESTATE SALE

63285 SKYLINE RANCH RD., Bend

Friday - Saturday - Sunday June 15 -16 -17 Look What I Found! 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. ONLY! You'll find a little bit of Crowd control admittance numbers everything in issued at 8:00 am Friday. The Bulletin's daily garage and yard sale (Take Newport Ave. west to Shevlin Park Rd., Newport changes to Shevlin Park Rd. at College section. From clothes Way--continue straight on Shevlin Park Rd. for to collectibles, from 1.4 miles--Turn in-- right at Shevlin Sand and housewares to hardGravel and go 1.4 miles and turn right on Skyline ware, classified is Ranch Rd. Go ½ mile to sale sight. ) always the first stop for GRAVEL & CONCRETE TRUCKS TRAVEL THIS cost-conscious ROAD, USE CAUTION!!! consumers. And if you're planning your Joyce Coats owned Mtn. Country Mercantile. There are over 15,000 pieces of quilting and other fabric; own garage or yard Over 150 bolts of fabric and batting; Hundreds of sale, look to the clasbuttons and notions and lace and trim; Lots of patsifieds to bring in the terns and stencils and measures; Some precut quilt buyers. You won't find blocks and partial quilts; Bernina 1230 Sewing maa better place chine; Thread by the dozens; Two Rowenta irons; for bargains! Featherweight machine; and over 15 old Singer and Call Classifieds: White machines; Three hand crank sewing ma541-385-5809 or chines; Cutters; Lots of Yarn for knitting; Spinning Wheel. Two large quilting frames; Truly a sewers email classified@bendbulletin.com

Driver-

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Sales Northeast Bend

HH F R E E G ara g e

S ale

HH K it

Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE! KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet

PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT at

1777 SW Chandler Ave., Bend, OR 97702

dream!! Other items include; Hires Root Beer Sliding large Cooler -works and is RARE. Most of the furniture is Ethan Allen. Brocade, Leather, Floral and Hide abed Sofas; Four Overstuffed chairs and ottomans; Two Queen size bedroom sets; Oak 290 dresser; three tri-fold mirrors; Cheval Mirror; Two dining tables with six chairs each; Hundreds of Sales Redmond Area Books; Lots of Lamps; Antelope Head; Victorian secretary; Antique tables; Kitchen Queen; Hall 2-family sale. Sat. Sun Tree; Two in use Cast Iron Stoves ; Wheelchair; 9-3, 1681 NW Larch Sofa and coffee and end tables-lots; Rockers; Tree Ct.. furniture Large oak computer desk and Three sided recepand home decor. tionist desk; Three drawer oak file cabinet ; Mirrors: Pictures; Remington prints; Pfaltzgraf dish set; Clothing ; Purses include-Coach; Dooney & Burke; 292 Gucci; Tiganello and etc.; Stained glass windows; Sales Other Areas Cedar Chest; Antique large commode; Kirby and Royal vacuums; Black Kitchen stove; Pots and Pans; Linens; costume and silver jewelry; Light Moving Furniture Sale Box; Copier; Wheelbarrows; Hoses; some yard 6/15-6/22, LaZBoy sofa/ items. Parking in field follow signs!!!! hideabed, queen boxspring mattress/heavy Handled by... Deedy's Estate Sales Co. metal frame, lots lots 541-419-4742 days • 541-382-5950 eves more!! 51725 Little www.deedysestatesales.com

Deschutes Ln, LaPine Call 1st 541-536-3813

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

Just bought a new boat? Check out the Sell your old one in the classiieds online classiieds! Ask about our www.bendbulletin.com Super Seller rates! Updated daily 541-385-5809

Experienced CPA Immediate opening for a licensed CPA w/ 4 to 9 years of recent public accounting experience. Please visit www.bendcpa.com/jobs for application information.

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $ 500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for: $ $

10 - 3 lines, 7 days 16 - 3 lines, 14 days

(Private Party ads only)

Electrician General Journeyman

Warm Springs Composite Products is looking for an individual to help a growing innovative light manufacturing plant. Basic Duties: Assist in troubleshooting and repairs of plant equipment. Install, repair and maintain all electrical and electronic equipment. Able to read and revise electrical schematics, Must be able to perform both electrical and mechanical preventive maintenance requirements and report, PLC experience. Minimum Skills: A minimum of 5 years in the industrial maintenance field with a valid Oregon State Electricians License in Manufacturing. A strong mechanical aptitude with the ability to perform light welding and fabrication duties. Successful applicant shall supply the normal hand tools required for both electrical and mechanical maintenance. Benefits: Full Family Medical, Vision, Dental, Life, Disability, Salary Incentives, Company Bonuses, Pension and 401K w/Company Matching and Above Pay Rate Scale. Please remit resume to: Warm Springs Composite Products PO Box 906, Warm Springs, OR 97761 Phone: 541-553-1143, Fax: 541-553-1145 Attn: Mac Coombs, mcoombs@wscp.com

ADVERTISING SALES ASSISTANT

A position is available in The Bulletin Advertising department for a Retail Sales Assistant. This position assists outside sales representatives and managers with account and territory management, accurate paperwork, on-deadline ad ordering, and with maintaining good customer service and relationships.

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Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Facilities and Facilities and Maintenance Maintenance Construction Construction Manager in the Park Services Supervisor division is responsible in Park Services for managing a park division, supervises division and supervise crews who are staff in Park Services. engaged in Apply on-line at maintenance, repair, www.bendparksandre and construct district c.org. EOE. Prefacilities, parks, site employment drug test furnishings, and required. custodial services. Apply on-line at Job posting close on www.bendparksandre June 27, 2012. c.org. EOE. Preemployment drug test required. Job posting close on FIND IT! BUY IT! June 27, 2012. SELL IT! The Bulletin Classiieds Education

Oregon State University Cascades in Bend, Oregon Human Resources Specialist Oregon State University – Cascades in Bend is seeking applicants for a 12-month, full-time (1.0 FTE) professional faculty position as a Human Resources Specialist. The Human Resources Specialist performs a broad range of professional human resources management and administration responsibilities including, but not limited to, recruitment and selection and managing time and reporting/payroll functions @ OSU-Cascades. Preferred qualifications include experience in performing duties in human resources management in an institution of higher education, or comparable environment. To see complete position description w/additional required qualifications and to apply on-line go to http://oregonstate.edu/jobs and review posting #0009098. The closing date is 7/2/12. OSU is an AA/EOE.

DESCHUTES COUNTY CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

FinancialController Big R is a 50 year old company based in White City, Oregon, and is seeking a highly motivated, teamoriented individual for the role of Financial Controller. The Controller is responsible for all financial accounting and reporting. Candidate must have a basic understanding of corporations, strong background in accounting, with senior-level accounting experience. A 4-year accounting related degree along with CPA certification and/or 10+ years of experience in finance required. Please submit resume to lnewport@bigRoregon.com

CAUTION READERS: Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state.

Duties include but are not limited to: Scheduling ads, organizing paperwork, proofing ads, taking photos, doing layout for ads, filing and working with customers of The Bulletin regarding their advertising programs.

BEHAVIORAL HEALTH DEPUTY DIRECTOR (2012-00022) – Behavioral Health Division. Full-time position $7,036 - $9,451 per month for a 172.67 hour work month. DEADLINE DATE EXTENDED, OPEN UNTIL FILLED.

A strong candidate must possess excellent communication, multi-tasking and organizational skills. The person must be able to provide excellent customer service and easily establish good customer rapport. The best candidates will have experience with administrative tasks, handling multiple position responsibilities, proven time management skills and experience working within deadlines.

DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES PROGRAM MANAGER (2012-00010) - Behavioral Health Division. Full-time position $5,933 - $7,970 per month for a 172.67 hour work month. DEADLINE DATE EXTENDED, OPEN UNTIL FILLED, WITH SECOND REVIEW OF APPLICATIONS ON MONDAY, 06/18/2012.

Two years in business, advertising, sales, marketing or communications field is preferred. The position is hourly, 40 hours per week offers a competitive compensation plan with benefits.

TO APPLY ONLINE FOR THE ABOVE LISTED POSITIONS, PLEASE VISIT OUR WEBSITE AT www.deschutes.org/jobs Deschutes County Personnel Dept., 1300 NW Wall Street, Suite 201, Bend, OR 97701 (541) 388-6553.

If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Kevin O’Connell Classified Department Manager The Bulletin 541-383-0398

Deschutes County provides reasonable accommodations for persons with disabilities. This material will be furnished in alternative format if needed. For hearing impaired, please call TTY/TDD 711.

Advertise your car! Add A Picture!

Please send a cover letter and resume to Sean Tate, Bulletin Advertising Manager at state@bendbulletin.com, or mail to Sean Tate at The Bulletin, 1777 SW Chandler Ave, Bend, OR 97702. No phone calls please. Please submit your application by July 1, 2012. Equal Opportunity Employer

EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER

We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 971-673-0764

Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809 476

476

476

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Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

HEALTHCARE Food Service Project Engineer Central Oregon GenServer position, non Certified Nursing tipped, start at eral Contractor is Assistant (CNA) looking for an experi$9.50/hr., no exp. Redmond School Disenced full time connecessary, willing to trict 7.5 hr/day CNA; struction Project Entrain the right person. Start date: 8/30/12 gineer, with min. 2 yrs Must have good per- Salary - $13.70/hr; commercial project sonality and flexible Approx. 191-days/yr; management experischedule. Must fill out Great benefits; Postence. Degree in Conapplication at 2920 ing closes 8/22/12. struction ManageNE Conners, Bend. Please visit the District ment (or equivalent) No phone calls website at required. Competitive please. www.redmond.k12.or.us Wage & benefit packto review posting, job age. Box 20145418, description & how to General c/o The Bulletin, PO apply. Contact Carol Central Box 6020, Bend, OR Gustaveson at Oregon 97708 carol.gustaveson Community @redmond.k12.or.us College for additional Find It in information. has openings listed The Bulletin Classifieds! below. Go to 541-385-5809 https://jobs.cocc.edu Garage Sales to view details & apply online. Human Garage Sal es Receptionist, F-T, for Resources, Metolius busy vet clinic. Hall, 2600 NW Col- Garage Sal es Customer service, lege Way, Bend OR computer/phone Find them 97701; (541)383 skills, multi-tasking 7216. For hearing/ in experience required. speech impaired, Reply: The Bulletin Oregon Relay dvc@bendbroadband.com Services number is Classiieds 7-1-1. COCC is an AA/EO employer. 541-385-5809 Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and Assistant Director of IT Position Bookstore readers on The Responsible for the Bulletin' s web site daily operations of the will be able to click Bookstore. Includes through automatically operations, manageto your site. ment, merchandising, 20 hours per week, inventory, and cash7 a.m.-11 a.m., Mon. ier point-of-sales. -Fri., weekends and Tick, Tock after-hours as neces$42,691-$50,822. sary. $12.-$15. DOE. Closes June 17. Tick, Tock...

Interested persons should email resume to Jobs@bendsurgery.com

Supervisor of Science Lab Technicians and Tutors Responsible for super- Manicurist - Urban vising science tutors Beauty Bar in downand provide town Bend, seeks 1 discipline-specific tufull-time Nail Tech, tor training (Biology, Tues-Sat; and 1 full-time Nail Tech/ Chemistry, and PhysiAesthetician. Bring cal Science Labs). resume to: 5 NW MinMust have working nesota Ave., Bend. knowledge of Biology and Chemistry at college level. Medical/ OR Nurse $3348-$3986/mo. Closes June 25. Information Systems Technician (Part Time) Provide daily support to all facets of Banner’s (college database software) student system working w/other IST & ITS staff. Requires AA + exp. $15.61-$18.60 at 20hr/wk. Closes July 1. Custodian (2 Full-Time /1 Part-Time) Responsible for cleaning and maintaining assigned areas of campus buildings. $10.65-$12.67/hr. + shift diff. Closes July

9. _________________ Assistant Professor of Automotive Technology Provide instruction to students in a Master Automotive Technician Certificate program and Automotive Management Associate of Applied Science degree program. Start Fall 2012. $38,209-$46,309 for 9 months/yr. Closes June 28.

Full-Time, 4-10 hr. shifts, Mon.-Fri. Scrub and circulating experience required. Job offers excellent benefit package. Interested persons should email their resume to jobs@bendsurgery.com Open until filled. Medical Pre/Post-op RN

Full-Time, 4-10 hr. shifts, Mon.-Fri. Critical care or ASC experience preferred. Job offers excellent benefit package. Interested persons should email their resume to jobs@bendsurgery.com Open until filled.

Mortgage Loan Processor: Come Grow With Us! Bank of the Cascades is looking for a Mortgage Loan Processor that has minimum 1 year previous loan processing experience. Please see full job description and apply on-line at www.botc.com. Bank of the Cascades is an Equal Opportunity Employer (EOE/AA/MF/D/V)

Adjunct Instructor of Computer & Information Systems Provide instruction in Computer and Information Systems courses such as Introduction to Computers, Computer Concepts, Software Office Clerk/ Applications, ProReceptionist gramming, and Operating Systems. Start Bend lawn firm seeks part-time office clerk/ Fall 2012. receptionist. 10:30 $38,209-$46,309 for 9 a.m. - 3:00 p.m., Mon. months/yr. Open - Fri. Duties include Until Filled. reception desk coverage and file manageAssistant Professor I ment. Applicant must of Emergency be highly motivated Medical Services with excellent com(Tenure Track) munication, organizaProvide paramedic protion and customer gram courses instrucservice skills. Applition. See website for cant must be able to required qualificalift 50 pound boxes, tions. Start Fall 2012. be over 18 years of $38,209-$46,309 for 9 age, have a high months/yr. Closes school diploma or July 19. GED, have own car, valid driver’s license Part-Time Instructors and proof of auto inCOCC is always looksurance. Hourly wage ing for talented indiis $15.00, no benefits. viduals to teach Send resume to: part-time in a variety Office Manager, Bryof disciplines. Check ant Lovlien & Jarvis, our web site for in591 SW Mill View structor needs. All poWay, Bend, OR sitions pay $500 per 97702. load unit (1 LU = 1 class credit), with ad- PHARMACY TECHNIditional perks. CIAN - Full-time in La Pine. Seeking experienced certified techniGeneral laborer seacian, good customer sonal for summer. service skills, pleasApply in person 400 ant, compassionate. NW Paul Jasa Way, Call Leah 541-419-4688 Madras, Oregon. or lbish70@gmail.com Prepress Systems Analyst The Prepress Systems Analyst works with other staff members in day to day production of The Bulletin's products and Commercial Print work in order to ensure efficient prepress processing and a successful run on press. A primary task is to monitor and ensure that The Bulletin's file output, proofing and plating software and computers are performing to specification. This position requires knowledge of computer hardware, software and operating systems, as well as in depth experience with litho plate production and offset printing. This is a hands - on position, frequently involving work with Commercial Print customers during job planning, when bringing work in, and at times when troubleshooting problems. Technical expertise with Postscript workflows, and a thorough knowledge of prepress layout software is required. This position is eligible for benefits. The Bulletin is an equal opportunity employer and a drug free workplace. If you are interested in applying for this position, submit your resume by Monday June 18th to James Baisinger, c/o The Bulletin. 1777 SW Chandler Ave. P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708.

...don’t let time get away. Hire a professional out of The Bulletin’s “Call A Service Professional” Directory today!

RV Salesperson

Social Services

Behavioral Health Quality Coordinator

Join our growing Behavioral Health team to design, implement, and oversee our Behavioral Health Quality Management program in collaboration with the Behavioral Health and Quality Managers. This position is responsible for identifying and planning Quality Improvement objectives; assuring compliance with state and federal requirements for submission of QI plans; reporting and monitoring performance measures. The ideal candidate will have a minimum of 3 years post-licensure clinical experience in psychiatric and substance abuse health care, managed care organization experience preferred. Requires RN, Master’s or Doctoral degree and license/certification in behavioral health related field. To review the full job description and complete the online application, please visit www.pacificsource.com/careers.

634

Finance & Business

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

500

Limited numbers avail. 1, 2 & 3 bdrms w/d hookups, patios or decks. Mountain Glen 541-383-9313

528

Loans & Mortgages

Reverse Mortgages by local expert Mike LeRoux NMLS57716

NMLS98161

573

Business Opportunities WARNING The Bulletin recommends that you investigate every phase of investment opportunities, especially those from out-of-state or offered by a person doing business out of a local motel or hotel. Investment offerings must be registered with the Oregon Department of Finance. We suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-503-378-4320, 8:30-noon, Mon.-Fri.

Big Country RV, Inc., Central Oregon’s Largest RV Dealership, is growing and adding to our strong sales staff. We are looking for the right person who wants a career in one of the fastest growing industries in Central Oregon. Great opportunity for the right individual in a wellestablished, well-run environment. ExcepA Classified ad is an tional inventory of new EASY WAY TO and used RVs. UnlimREACH over 3 million ited earning potential Pacific Northwesternwith an excellent benJust too many ers. $525/25-word efit package to incollectibles? classified ad in 30 clude: daily newspapers for • IRA 3-days. Call the PaSell them in • Dental Plan cific Northwest Daily The Bulletin Classiieds • Medical Insurance Connection (916) • Up to 35% commis288-6019 or email sion elizabeth@cnpa.com 541-385-5809 • Great Training for more info (PNDC) Must be able to work weekends and have a passion for the RV business. Please apply in person, or drop resume off at: Big Country RV, Inc. 3500 N. Hwy 97 Bend, OR 97701 or email a resume to accounting@bigcrv.com

Security

See our website for available Security sitions, along with 42 reasons to join team!

our pothe our

www.securityprosbend.com

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Manager

Regional Production Manager sought for The La Grande Observer, in La Grande, OR. We are seeking an experienced production leader who has the ability to recruit, train and supervise staff to lead us to the next level. This individual will supervise the pressroom, pre-press and mailroom operations and requires experience with a 6-unit Goss Community press. CTP and computer experience also required. The ideal candidate will possess a hands-on management style to coincide with excellent people skills. Ability to grow commercial print revenue while maintaining excellent quality is also required. The Observer is part of Western Communications, Inc. which is family owned and consists of seven newspapers, five in Oregon and two in California. The Observer publishes three times a week and also prints our sister paper as well located in Baker City, also a three times a week publication. We offer competitive compensation and benefits package to coincide with a culture that embraces change and recognizes success. If you are ready to join a progressive family operation, please send your resume to;

Kari Borgen, Regional Publisher: publisher@lagrandeobserver.com No phone calls please. EOE Sales

Independent Contractor Sales We are seeking dynamic individuals.

DOES THIS SOUND LIKE YOU? • OUTGOING & COMPETITIVE • PERSONABLE & ENTHUSIASTIC • CONSISTENT & MOTIVATED

Our winning team of sales & promotion professionals are making an average of $400 - $800 per week doing special events, trade shows, retail & grocery store promotions while representing THE BULLETIN newspaper as an independent contractor WE OFFER:

•Solid Income Opportunity* *Complete Training Program* *No Selling Door to Door * *No Telemarketing Involved* *Great Advancement Opportunity* * Full and Part Time Hours * FOR THE CHANCE OF A LIFETIME, Call Adam Johnson 541-410-5521, TODAY!

Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

Ever Consider a Re- College Way Townverse Mortgage? At homes adjacent to least 62 years old? COCC starting $1050/ Stay in your home & month. 541-388-1239 cascadiapropertymgmt.com increase cash flow! Safe & Effective! Call 642 Now for your FREE DVD! Call Now Apt./Multiplex Redmond 888-785-5938. 3 bdrm, 2 bath, fenced (PNDC) yard, no smkg. Avail LOCAL MONEY:We buy 7/3. 807 NE Larch secured trust deeds & Ave. $725 mo. Megan note,some hard money 541-771-6599 loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 ext.13. 648

541-350-7839 Security1 Lending

The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to FRAUD. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Call for Specials!

Located by BMC/Costco, WARNING 2 bdrm, 2 bath duplex, The Bulletin recom55+,2350 NEMary Rose mends you use cau- Pl, #1, $795 no smoking tion when you proor pets, 541-390-7649 vide personal SPRING IN FOR A information to compaGREAT DEAL!! nies offering loans or $299 1st month’s rent! * credit, especially 2 bdrm, 1 bath those asking for ad$530 & 540 vance loan fees or Carports & A/C incl! companies from out of Fox Hollow Apts. state. If you have (541) 383-3152 concerns or quesCascade Rental Mgmt. Co tions, we suggest you *Upstairs only with lease* consult your attorney or call CONSUMER 636 HOTLINE, Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 1-877-877-9392.

Call to learn more.

EOE

THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, JUNE 17, 2012 E3 THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD PUZZLE ANSWER

Advertise VACATION SPECIALS to 3 million Pacific Northwesterners! 30 daily newspapers, six states. 25-word classified $525 for a 3-day ad. Call (916) 288-6019 or visit www.pnna.com/advert ising_pndc.cfm for the Pacific Northwest Daily Connection. (PNDC)

Houses for Rent General PUBLISHER'S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, marital status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women, and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-877-0246. The toll free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Rented your property? The Bulletin Classifieds has an "After Hours" Line. Call 541-383-2371 24 hours to cancel your ad! 650

Houses for Rent Extreme Value AdverNE Bend tising! 30 Daily newspapers $525/25-word A quiet newer 3 bdrm, classified, 3-days. 2.5 bath, 1692 sq.ft., Reach 3 million Pamtn views. dbl. gacific Northwesterners. rage w/opener. $1195 For more information 541-480-3393,610-7803. call (916) 288-6019 or When buying a home, email: 83% of Central elizabeth@cnpa.com Oregonians turn to for the Pacific Northwest Daily Connection. (PNDC) SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY BENEFITS. WIN or Pay Nothing! Start Your Application In Under 60 Seconds. Call Today! Contact Disability Group, Inc. Licensed Attorneys & BBB Accredited. Call 888-782-4075. (PNDC) Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Rentals

600

Call 541-385-5809 to place your Real Estate ad. Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com, currently receiving over 1.5 million page views, every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 541-385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

PUZZLE IS ON PAGE E2

Real Estate For Sale

652

Golf Course Home Single level 2600 sq ft, 3 or 4 bdrm, 3 bath, office, oversized 3-car garage, gas heat, AC. Avail 6/20/12. $1995 mo. 541-410-0671 659

Houses for Rent Sunriver

870

Boats & Accessories

700

40 Wooded Acres w/ Mountain Views Above Tumalo Creek

732

Patsy Roome, Broker 541-420-2723

Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale

745

Homes for Sale

15’ Klamath, 40hp Mariner, 2hp Honda troll, Calkins, cover. $4500 707-218-0249, Sunriver

18.5’ ‘05 Reinell 185, V-6 Volvo Penta, 270HP, low hrs., must see, $17,500, 541-330-3939

½ acre in Prineville OR industrial park 24'x80' shop with 40'x60' unfinished addition, $160,000. Call for more info; can send pics. 541-604-0344

775

4270 sq ft, 6 bdrm, 6 ba, Manufactured/ 4-car, corner, .83 acre Mobile Homes mtn view, by owner. $590,000 541-390-0886 12’x40’, 1/1, lots of upSee: bloomkey.com/8779 grades, Senior Park. north side of Bend. BANK OWNED HOMES! FREE List w/Pics! $6,500. 541-382-6530 www.BendRepos.com Very nice, well maint, bend and beyond real estate 2/2, near Costco/Fo20967 yeoman, bend or rum, Senior Park People Look for Information w/pool, $39,500, call owner, 541-280-0955. About Products and Services Every Day through The Bulletin Classifieds

19.5’ 1988 373V Ranger Bass Boat, Mercury 115 Motor, Ranger trailer, trolling elec. motor, fish finder & sonor, 2 live wells & all accessories, new batteries & tires, great cond., $6500. 541-923-6555.

19-ft Mastercraft ProStar 190 inboard, 1987, 290hp, V8, 822 hrs, great cond, lots of extras, $10,000 obo. 541-231-8709

Boats & RV’s Great Selection of Homes on Our Web Site www.thegarnergroup.com The Garner Group 541-383-4360

800 850

Snowmobiles Polaris 2003, 4 cycle, fuel inj, elec start, reverse, 2-up seat, cover, 4900 mi, $2500 obo. 541-280-0514 860

Motorcycles & Accessories

748

Northeast Bend Homes

CRAMPED FOR CASH?

Use classified to sell those items you no longer need. Call 541-385-5809

19’ Glass Ply, Merc cruiser, depth finder, trolling motor, trailer, $3500, 541-389-1086 or 541-419-8034.

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500. 541-389-1413

Mt. View Park, exlnt view! 1500 sf, 3 bdrm 2 bath, dbl garage, nice open plan, large 20.5’ Seaswirl SpyTrex deck, lrg corner Harley Davidson Softder 1989 H.O. 302, lot. Community pool & Tail Deluxe 2007, 285 hrs., exc. cond., hot tub. By owner, white/cobalt, w/passtored indoors for $209,000. senger kit, Vance & life $11,900 OBO. Call 541-388-4209 Hines muffler system 541-379-3530 or 541-536-4243 & kit, 1045 mi., exc. cond, $19,999, 750 Ads published in the 541-389-9188. "Boats" classification Redmond Homes Harley Heritage include: Speed, fishSoftail, 2003 ing, drift, canoe, $5,000+ in extras, Looking for your next house and sail boats. $2000 paint job, employee? For all other types of 30K mi. 1 owner, Place a Bulletin help watercraft, please see For more information wanted ad today and Class 875. please call reach over 60,000 541-385-5809 541-385-8090 readers each week. or 209-605-5537 Your classified ad will also appear on HD FAT BOY bendbulletin.com GENERATE SOME exwhich currently re1996 citement in your neigceives over Completely rebuilt/ borhood. Plan a ga1.5 million page customized, low rage sale and don't views every month miles. Accepting offorget to advertise in at no extra cost. fers. 541-548-4807 classified! 385-5809. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line Honda VT700 at Used out-drive Shadow 1984, 23K bendbulletin.com parts - Mercury mi, many new parts, OMC rebuilt mabattery charger, 753 rine motors: 151 good condition. $1595; 3.0 $1895; Sisters Homes Now for $1000, 4.3 (1993), $1995. cash! 541-598-4351

541-389-0435

OWNER FINANCE NO BANK FEES!

Houses for Rent NW Bend

773

Acreages

Wonderful Tollgate home, swimming, tennis, bike trails, 3 bdrm, 2 bath on 1/2 Acre, vaulted ceilings, $15,000-$25,000 down, $235,000 purchase price. Lease Purchase OK too. Best Schools! Jack at 541-419-2502.

865

ATVs

875

Watercraft We buy motorcycles, ATV’s, snowmobiles & watercrafts. Call Ken at 541-647-5151.

762

Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

Homes with Acreage

1592 sq.ft., 3 bdrm, 2 We buy motorcycles, bath, site-built, 2 car ATV’s, snowmobiles attached heated ga& watercrafts. rage, 24x36 heated, VILLAGE PROPERTIES Call Ken at finished shop w/10’ Sunriver, Three Rivers, 541-647-5151. ceilings & 220V power, La Pine. Great 630 all on 1.22 treed acre Selection. Prices range lot in CRR, too much to Rooms for Rent $425 - $2000/mo. list, $195,000. Call View our full 541-504-8730 Mt. Bachelor Motel has inventory online at rooms, starting $150/ Village-Properties.com 771 week or $35/nt. Incl 1-866-931-1061 Lots guest laundry, cable & Just bought a new boat? WiFi. 541-382-6365 Sell your old one in the Studios & Kitchenettes classiieds! Ask about our Large Custom Furnished room, TV w/ Super Seller rates! Home Sites cable, micro & fridge. Yamaha YFZ450 2005 541-385-5809 in NorthWest Utils & linens. New Sport Race quad, built Crossing. 687 owners.$145-$165/wk 4-mil stroked to 470cc, 541-382-1885 Commercial for The Garner Group lots of mods, $4950 obo Call 541-647-8931 541-383-4360 Rent/Lease 634 870 Apt./Multiplex NE Bend Office/Warehouse loBoats & Accessories cated in SE Bend. Up to 30,000 sq.ft., comAlpine Meadows petitive rate, 14’ Classic P-14 Townhomes 541-382-3678. Seaswirl, 20HP 1, 2 & 3 bdrm apts. motor, Bimini Top, Starting at $625. Warehouse - Industrial new seats, Eagle 541-330-0719 unit for rent. 5600 finder, trailer, ready Professionally sq.ft., $2250/month, to go, $1600, managed by near Bend High. 541-923-2957. Norris & Stevens, Inc. 541-389-8794.

Coleman Canoe, with roof rack, $75, 541-330-1338.

Inflatable Raft,Sevylor Fishmaster 325,10’3”, complete pkg., $650 Firm, 541-977-4461.

Kayak, Eddyline Sandpiper, 12’, like new, $975, 541-420-3277. Take care of your investments with the help from The Bulletin’s “Call A Service Professional” Directory


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

E4 SUNDAY, JUNE 17, 2012 • THE BULLETIN 880

880

880

880

881

885

932

933

975

Motorhomes

Motorhomes

Motorhomes

Motorhomes

Travel Trailers

Canopies & Campers

Antique & Classic Autos

Pickups

Automobiles

Beaver Patriot 2000, Country Coach Intrigue Walnut cabinets, so2002, 40' Tag axle. lar, Bose, Corian, tile, 400hp Cummins Die4 door fridge., 1 slide, sel. Two slide-outs. W/D. $75,000 41,000 miles. Most 541-215-5355 options. $110,000 OBO 541-678-5712

RV CONSIGNMENTS WANTED We Do The Work, You Keep The Cash, On-Site Credit Approval Team, Web Site Presence, We Take Trade-Ins. Free Advertising. BIG COUNTRY RV Bend 541-330-2495

Hunter’s Delight! Package deal! 1988 Winnebago Super Chief, 38K miles, great Springdale 29’ 2007, shape; 1988 Bronco II slide,Bunkhouse style, 4x4 to tow, 130K sleeps 7-8, excellent mostly towed miles, condition, $16,900, nice rig! $15,000 both. 541-390-2504 541-382-3964, leave Redmond: 541-548-5254 msg. Inverter 2500 watts, Heart Interface, $300. 541-382-6806

Chev 1-ton RV 94K, 1967, stove, sink, fridge, 2 double beds, rebuilt 350. New: rear end, clutch, exhaust, tires, etc. $995. 541-410-1685

Coachman Freelander 2011, 27’, queen bed, 1 slide, HD TV, DVD player, 450 Ford, $49,000, please call 541-923-5754.

personals

Fleetwood Discovery 40X 2008, 31K miles, MUST SELL SOON, 3 slides, 1-owner, great shape, $129,975 OBO, call Bill 541-771-3030 Say “goodbuy” to that unused item by placing it in The Bulletin Classiieds

Itasca Sun Cruiser 1997, 460 Ford, Class A, 26K mi., 37’, living room slide, new awnings, new fridge, 8 new tires, 2 A/C, 6.5 Onan Gen., new batteries, tow pkg., rear towing TV, 2 tv’s, new hydraulic jack springs, tandem axel, $15,000, 541-385-1782

Southwind 35.5’ Triton, Sprinter 272RLS, 2009 29’, weatherized, like 2008,V10, 2 slides, Dunew, furnished & pont UV coat, 7500 mi. ready to go, incl WineAvg NADA ret.114,343; gard Satellite dish, asking $99,000. $26,995. 541-420-9964 Call 541-923-2774 TRADE? 2004 Bounder by Fleetwood 35’ 3 slides, loaded. 44k, very clean, reliable w/8.1 Workhouse chassis, $45,000. 541-382-1853

541-385-5809 CAN’T BEAT THIS! Look before you buy, below market value ! Size & mileage DOES matter, Class A 32’ Hurricane by Four Winds, 2007. 12,500 mi, all amenities, Ford V10, lthr, cherry, slides, like new, can see anytime, $58,000. 541-548-5216

Monaco Dynasty 2004, loaded, 3 slides, $159,000, 541-923- 8572 or 541-749-0037 (cell)

St. Jude Prayer, May the Sacred Heart of Jesus be adored, glorified, Monaco LaPalma 37’, loved & preserved 2004 w/ 2 slides, 25k throughout the world, mi., loaded, $42,500. now & forever. Sacred 541-923-3510. Heart of Jesus, pray for us; St. Jude Worker of Miracles, pray for us; Gulfstream Scenic Helper of the Hopeless, Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, pray for us. Cummins 330 hp dieSay this prayer 9 times a sel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 day & by the eighth in. kitchen slide out, day, your prayer shall new tires,under cover, National Sea Breeze be answered. It has hwy. miles only,4 door 2004 M-1341 35’, gas, never been known to fridge/freezer ice2 power slides, upfail.Publication must be maker, W/D combo, graded queen matpromised. Thank you Interbath tub & St. Jude for Granting tress, hyd. leveling me my Petition, JH. shower, 50 amp prosystem, rear camera pane gen & more! & monitor, only 6k mi. Thank you St. Jude & $55,000. A steal at $43,000! Sacred Heart of 541-948-2310 541-480-0617 Jesus. j.d.

Winnebago Outlook 32’ 2008, Ford V10 eng, Wineguard sat, TV, sur- round sound stereo + more. Reduced to $49,000. 541-526-1622 or 541-728-6793 881

Travel Trailers SPRINGDALE 2005 27’, has eating area slide, A/C and heat, new tires, all contents included, bedding towels, cooking and eating utensils. Great for vacation, fishing, hunting or living! $15,500 541-408-3811

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 (This special package is not available on our website)

Building/Contracting

Handyman

Landscaping/Yard Care

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com 882

Fifth Wheels

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $12,750. 541-923-3417.

Painting/Wall Covering

NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website

Carri-Lite Luxury 2009 by Carriage, 4 slideouts, inverter, satellite sys, fireplace, 2 flat screen TVs. $60,000. 541-480-3923

Escaper 29’ 1991, 2 slides, A/C, elec/gas fridge, walk around queen bed, elec. front jacks, $4000 OBO, 541-382-8939 or 541-777-0999.

www.hirealicensedcontractor. com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. USE THE CLASSIFIEDS! Some other trades also require addi- Door-to-door selling with tional licenses and fast results! It’s the easiest certifications. way in the world to sell. Computer/Cabling Install The Bulletin Classiied

Call a Pro Whether you need a fence ixed, hedges trimmed or a house built, you’ll ind professional help in The Bulletin’s “Call a Service Professional” Directory

541-385-5809 Landscaping/Yard Care

541-385-5809

Spring Clean Up

•Leaves •Cones •Needles •Debris Hauling •Aeration •Dethatching Compost Top Dressing Weed free Bark & flower beds ORGANIC PROGRAMS

Landscape Maintenance

Full or Partial Service •Mowing •Edging •Pruning •Weeding Sprinkler Adjustments

Fleetwood Wilderness 36’, 2005, 4 slides, rear bdrm, fireplace, AC, W/D hkup beautiful unit! $30,500. 541-815-2380

Montana 34’ 2003, 2 slides, exc. cond. throughout, arctic winter pkg., new 10-ply tires, W/D ready, $23,000, 541-948-5793

More Than Service Peace of Mind

Debris Removal

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 28’ 2007,Gen, fuel station, exc cond. sleeps 8, black/gray interior, used 3X, $24,999. 541-389-9188

Need to get an ad in ASAP? You can place it online at: www.bendbulletin.com

541-385-5809 People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through The Bulletin Classifieds

Fertilizer included with monthly program

MONTANA 3585 2008, exc. cond., 3 slides, king bed, lrg LR, Arctic insulation, all options $37,500. 541-420-3250 Open Road 37' 2004 3 slides, W/D hookup, large LR w/rear window. Desk area. Asking $19,750 OBO Call (541) 280-7879 visit rvt.com ad#104243920 for pics

Weekly, monthly or one time service. Electrical Services

EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential

Pilgrim 27’, 2007 5th wheel, 1 slide, AC, TV,full awning, excellent shape, $23,900. 541-350-8629

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541-390-1466 Same Day Response

Handyman

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Landscape Construction which includes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-features, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be licensed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be included in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before contracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

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Quality Painter: Fast Friendly Service Steve King Painting

CCB# 60218,

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Taurus 27.5’ 1988

Everything works, $1750/partial trade for car. 541-460-9127

Wilderness Advantage 31’, 2004. 2 slides, 2 TVs, micro, solar sys, $17,950. (Also avail: 2003 Ford F250 Diesel X-cab.) 541-385-5077 885

Canopies & Campers

Lance-Legend 990 *** 11’3" 1998, w/ext-cab, CHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad exc. cond., generator, International Flat on the first day it runs solar-cell, large refrig, Bed Pickup 1963, 1 to make sure it is corAC, micro., magic fan, ton dually, 4 spd. rect. Sometimes inbathroom shower, trans., great MPG, structions over the removable carpet, could be exc. wood phone are misundercustom windows, out- FIAT 1800 1978, 5-spd, hauler, runs great, stood and an error door shower/awning door panels w/flowers new brakes, $1950. can occur in your ad. set-up for winterizing, & hummingbirds, 541-419-5480. If this happens to your elec. jacks, CD/stewhite soft top & hard ad, please contact us reo/4’ stinger. $8500. top, Reduced! $5,500. the first day your ad Bend, 541.279.0458 541-317-9319 or Mazda B4000 2004 appears and we will 541-647-8483 Cab Plus 4x4. 4½ yrs be happy to fix it as or 95,000 miles left on soon as we can. ext’d warranty. V6, Autos & Deadlines are: Week5-spd, AC, studded Transportation days 12:00 noon for tires, 2 extra rims, next day, Sat. 11:00 tow pkg, 132K mi, all a.m. for Sunday; Sat. records, exlnt cond, 12:00 for Monday. If $9500. 541-408-8611 Ford Galaxie 500 1963, we can assist you, 2 dr. hardtop,fastback, 935 please call us: 390 v8,auto, pwr. steer & 541-385-5809 radio (orig),541-419-4989 Sport Utility Vehicles The Bulletin Classified 908 Ford Mustang Coupe Aircraft, Parts 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great & Service shape, $9000 OBO. CHEVY 530-515-8199

900

SUBURBAN LT 2005, low miles., good tires, new brakes, moonroof Reduced to $15,750 541-389-5016.

Chevrolet Camaro 1996,

V6, 135K mi, recent tune-up. $2600 obo. 541-408-7134, lv msg

1/3 interest in Columbia 400, located at GMC ½ ton 1971, Only Chevy Camero 2010, Sunriver. $138,500. $19,700! Original low 2SS/RS, 6-spd manual, Call 541-647-3718 mile, exceptional, 3rd Chevy Tahoe LS 2001 black on black, 11,800 owner. 951-699-7171 miles, $27,500, call 4x4. 120K mi, Power 1/3 interest in well541-815-9679 seats, Tow Pkg, 3rd equipped IFR Beech row seating, extra Bonanza A36, lotires, CD, privacy tint- Honda Accord EX cated KBDN. $55,000. ing, upgraded rims. Mercury Monterrey 541-419-9510 2004, V6, auto, Fantastic cond. $7995 1965, Exc. All original, leather, loaded, 78K Contact Timm at 916 4-dr. sedan, in stormi., perfect cond., 541-408-2393 for info age last 15 yrs., 390 Trucks & $11,500, or to view vehicle. High Compression 541-693-4767. Heavy Equipment engine, new tires & license, reduced to Infiniti I30 Limited $2850, 541-410-3425. 9’ DUMP BED 1999, 4 dr. luxury car, Ford Excursion with hydraulic lift, leather & woodgrain 2005, 4WD, diesel, interior, power winfor 1-ton flatbed exc. cond., $19,900, dows & seats, side truck, + 2 alumicall 541-923-0231. airbags, Bose sound num tool boxes. system, sunroof, 3.0 L $1700 obo. V6, must see! $6000 541-410-6945 GMC Denali 2003 Plymouth Barracuda obo. 541-350-4779 loaded with options. 1966, original car! 300 Exc. cond., snow hp, 360 V8, centerUSE THE CLASSIFIEDS! tires and rims inlines, (Original 273 cluded. 130k hwy eng & wheels incl.) Door-to-door selling with miles. $12,000. 541-593-2597 fast results! It’s the easiest 541-419-4890. 933 way in the world to sell. INT. Dump 1982, w/arPickups The Bulletin Classiied borhood, 6k on rebuilt 392, truck refurbished, 541-385-5809 *** has 330 gal. water CHECK YOUR AD tank w/pump & hose. Please check your ad Mini Cooper Clubman Everything works, on the first day it runs S 2010 hatchback Reduced - now $5000 to make sure it is cor- Jeep Cherokee 1990, $23,995 #tz32432 OBO. 541-977-8988 rect. Sometimes in4WD, 3 sets rims & structions over the tires, exlnt set snow phone are mistires, great 1st car! understood and an error $1800. 541-633-5149 can occur in your ad. If this happens to your 541-598-3750 ad, please contact us aaaoregonautosource.com Peterbilt 359 potable the first day your ad water truck, 1990, appears and we will BULLETIN CLASSIFIEDS 3200 gal. tank, 5hp be happy to fix it Search the area’s most pump, 4-3" hoses, as soon as we can. camlocks, $25,000. Deadlines are: Week- Jeep Willys 1947,custom, comprehensive listing of classiied advertising... 541-820-3724 small block Chevy, PS, days 12:00 noon for OD,mags+ trailer.Swap real estate to automotive, next day, Sat. 11:00 925 for backhoe.No am calls merchandise to sporting a.m. for Sunday; Sat. goods. Bulletin Classiieds Utility Trailers please. 541-389-6990 12:00 for Monday. If appear every day in the we can assist you, print or on line. JEEP WRANGLER X please call us: 2002 6 cyl., 5 spd., Call 541-385-5809 541-385-5809 A/C, hard top, exc. www.bendbulletin.com The Bulletin Classified cond., $11,000. Big Tex Landscap* * * 541-419-4890. ing/ ATV Trailer, dual axle flatbed, 7’x16’, 7000 lb. Mitsubishi 3000 GT GVW, all steel, 1999, auto., pearl Range Rover 2005 Chevy 3/4 ton 4x4, $1400. white, very low mi. HSE, nav, DVD, 1995, extended cab, 541-382-4115, or $9500. 541-788-8218. local car, new tires, long box, grill guard, 541-280-7024. running boards, bed 51K miles. rails & canopy, 178K $24,995. Need to sell a miles, $4800 obo. 503-635-9494 931 Vehicle? 208-301-3321 (Bend) Call The Bulletin Automotive Parts, and place an ad toService & Accessories Chevy Silverado 1998, black and silver, pro day! Ask about our Range Rover, Cargo Box, Thule Ex- lifted, loaded, new 33” "Wheel Deal"! 2006 Sport HSE, pedition, 86”, $200, tires, aluminum slot wheels, tow pkg., drop for private party nav, AWD, heated 541-330-8774. hitch, diamond plate advertisers seats, moonroof, tool box, $12,000, or We Buy Junk local owner, possible trade for newer Cars & Trucks! Harman Kardon, Tacoma. 541-460-9127 Cash paid for junk $23,995. 541-385-5809 vehicles, batteries & 503-635-9494 Dodge 1500 2001, 4x4 catalytic converters. sport, red, loaded, Porsche 911 Carrera Serving all of C.O.! rollbar, AND 2011 1984, platinum metallic, 940 Call 541-408-1090 Moped Trike used 3 $14,900, looks & runs Vans months, street legal. great, custom sound call 541-433-2384 Want to impress the system, 178K mi, 541-383-2440. relatives? Remodel Ford Windstar 1995,7 passenger, 140k, 3.8 your home with the PORSCHE 914 1974, V6, no junk. Drive it help of a professional Roller (no engine), away for $1750; from The Bulletin’s lowered, full roll cage, Nissan Quest 1996, 5-pt harnesses, rac“Call A Service 7 passenger, 152k, ing seats, 911 dash & 3.0 V6, new tires, Professional” Directory Ford F-150 1995, 112K, instruments, decent ready for next 152k, 4X4, long bed, auto, shape, very cool! $4500. 541-318-9999, very clean, runs well, 932 $1699. 541-678-3249 ask for Bob. new tires, $6000. Antique & 541-548-4039. Saab 9-3 SE 1999 Classic Autos 975 Ford F-250 Super Duty convertible, 2 door, 1999,7.3LTurbo Diesel, Automobiles Navy with black soft Chevy Pickup 1951, 4WD,6-spd. stick trans, top, tan interior, very restored. $13,500 obo; crew cab, A/C, pw,pdl, good condition. 541-504-3253 or AUDI QUATTRO short wide bed, cloth $5200 firm. 503-504-2764 CABRIOLET 2004, bucket seats, cruise, 541-317-2929. extra nice, low mileSilver Star front bumper w/winch, $9000, needs age, heated seats, tires & glow plugs, new Michelins, all 541-419-2074 Looking for your wheel drive, $12,995 next employee? 503-635-9494. Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and Chevy Wagon 1957, reach over 60,000 4-dr., complete, BMW 325i Convertible, readers each week. $15,000 OBO, trades, 1989, nice car, $3150, Your classified ad please call 541-548-6099. will also appear on Ford F350 2010, Gas V8, 541-420-5453. bendbulletin.com 5.4L, 4WD, X-cab, BMW 525i 2004, which currently re8000 mi., loaded w/exChrysler 300 Coupe New body style, ceives over 1.5 miltras, always garaged, 1967, 440 engine, Steptronic auto., lion page views Ford warranty,$31,900, auto. trans, ps, air, cold-weather packHome: 541-549-4834 every month at frame on rebuild, reage, premium packCell: 541-588-0068. no extra cost. Bullepainted original blue, age, heated seats, tin Classifieds original blue interior, Ford F-350 XLT 2003, extra nice. $14,995. Get Results! Call original hub caps, exc. 4X4, 6L diesel, 6-spd 503-635-9494. 385-5809 or place chrome, asking $9000 manual, Super Cab, your ad on-line at or make offer. short box, 12K Warn bendbulletin.com Buicks Galore! No 541-385-9350. winch, custom bumper junk! LeSabres, La& canopy, running Crosse & Lucernes boards, 2 sets tires, priced $5000-$8500 The Bulletin recomwheels & chains, many for serious buyers mends extra caution extras, perfect, ONLY Chrysler SD 4-Door only. All are ‘03’s and when purchasing 29,800 miles, $27,500 1930, CDS Royal newer. 541-318-9999. products or services OBO, 541-504-8316. Standard, 8-cylinder, Ask about Free Trip to from out of the area. body is good, needs Washington, D.C. for Ford Ranger XLT Sending cash, some restoration, WWII Veterans. checks, or credit in1998 X-cab runs, taking bids, formation may be 2.5L 4-cyl engine, 541-383-3888, 5-spd standard trans, Buick Lucerne CX subject to FRAUD. 541-815-3318 long bed, newer mo2006, 65K, 3.8 V6, For more informator & paint, new clutch cloth interior, 30mpg tion about an adver& tires, excellent conhwy, $7500. Buick tiser, you may call COLLECTOR CAR dition, clean, $4500. Park Avenue 1992, the Oregon State AUCTION Call 541-447-6552 leather, 136K, 28 Attorney General’s Sat. July 7th, mpg hwy. $2500. Office Consumer ROSEBURG , OR Bob, 541-318-9999 Find exactly what Protection hotline at a Graffiti Weekend Ask me about the 1-877-877-9392. you are looking for in the Free Trip to WashEvent, call now for CLASSIFIEDS ington, D.C. for info 541-689-6824 petersencollectorcars.com WWII Veterans.

Lance 11.6 camper Mdl What are you 1130, 1999. Ext’d cab, looking for? fully self-contained. Incl catalytic heater, You’ll ind it in TV/VCR combo. Very well taken care of, The Bulletin Classiieds clean. Hauls easily, very comfortable. 541-385-5809 $6999. 541-382-1344

GMC ½-ton Pickup, 1972, LWB, 350hi motor, mechanically A-1, interior great; body needs some TLC. $4000 OBO. Call 541-382-9441

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THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, JUNE 17, 2012 E5

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PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

541-385-5809

File No. 7023.100139 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Michael J. Carter SR. and Molly C. Carter, as tenants by the entirety, as grantor, to Fidelity National Title Insurance Company, as trustee, in favor of Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., as beneficiary, dated 02/11/10, recorded 03/05/10, in the mortgage records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon, as 2010-09570, covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: Commencing at the Southeast corner of North 1/2 of the Northeast 1/4 of Section 8, Township 22 South, Range 10 East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon; thence West, on the South line of said tract, 1980 feet to the point of beginning; thence North, parallel to the East line of said tract, 683.04 feet; thence West to the U.S. Forest Boundary; thence South, along said boundary line, 682.37 feet to the Southeast corner of said tract; thence East; along the South line of said tract, 668.50 feet to the point of beginning; Save and Except; beginning at the Southwest corner of the Northwest 1/4 of the Northeast 1/4 of said Section 8; thence North 00 degrees 37' 39" West, along the West line of the Northwest 1/4 of the Northeast 1/4, 359.32 feet; thence South 89 degrees 54' 18" East, 668.87 feet to the Westerly right-of way of Read Road; thence South 00 degrees 33' 40" East, 360.00 feet to the South line of the Northwest 1/4 of the Northeast 1/4; thence North 89 degrees 50' 48" West, along the South line of the Northwest 1/4 of the Northeast 1/4, 668.50 feet to the point of beginning; Also save and except any portion lying within the limits of public roads. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 51945 READ LOOP LA PINE, OR 97739-9466 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $1,568.32 beginning 01/01/12 and $1,583.08 beginning 03/01/12; plus late charges of $63.40 each month beginning 01/16/12; plus prior accrued late charges of $0.00; plus advances of $30.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: $220,860.54 with interest thereon at the rate of 5.375 percent per annum beginning 12/01/11; plus late charges of $63.40 each month beginning 01/16/12 until paid; plus prior accrued late charges of $0.00; plus advances of $30.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on August 27, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in the City of Bend, County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physical offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid information is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwesttrustee.com. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes received less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. For further information, please contact: Kathy Taggart Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 CARTER, MICHAEL J. SR. and MOLLY C. (TS# 7023.100139) 1002.213939-File No. Publication Dates: May 27, June 3, 10 and 17, 2012. 1002.213939

S41026 kk

File No. 7023.94578 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by File No. 8771.20001 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by COLE D. WALKER, A MARRIED PERSON AND ROBIN WALKER, HUSAspen Sons, LLC, an Oregon Limited Liability Company, as grantor, to BAND AND WIFE, as grantor, to Western Title and Escrow, as trustee, in American Title Insurance Company, as trustee, in favor of LaSalle Bank favor of Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., as beneficiary, dated 02/10/05, recorded National Association, a national banking association, as beneficiary, dated 02/24/05, in the mortgage records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon, as 01/31/07, recorded 02/08/07, in the mortgage records of Deschutes 2005-10818, covering the following described real property situated in said County, Oregon, as 2007-08227 and subsequently assigned to RI - Bend, county and state, to wit: LLC, a California Limited Liability Company by Assignment recorded as 2012-010661, covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: A parcel of land situate in the Northwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter (NW 1/4 SE 1/4) of Section 13, Township 17 South, Range 12, Fee Parcel: A portion of the Northwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon (NW1/4SW1/4) of Section Four (4), Township Eighteen (18) South, and more particularly described as follows: Beginning at a point, Range Twelve (12) East of the Willamette Meridian, a #5 plastic-capped steel rod set at the CE 1/16 corner of Section 13; Deschutes County, Oregon, being more particularly described as follows: thence along the East 1/16 Section Line, South 00 degrees Commencing at the Northwest corner of Lot Five (5) in Block One Hundred 21'36" West 1323.74 feet to a #5 plastic-capped steel rod set at the Thirty (130) of Bend Park Second Addition, filed as CS05642 in Southeast 1/16 corner; thence along the South 1/16 Section Line, Deschutes County Surveyor's Official Records; thence North 89 degrees North 89 degrees 14'20" West, 334.28 feet to a #5 x 30" plastic-capped 55'56" East along the North line of said Lot 5 a distance of 38.24 feet to steel rod; thence along a line parallel with the East 1/16 Line a 5/8" rebar with a cap stamped "TYE ENGINEERING" also being the North 00 degrees 21'36" East 1323.94 feet to a point along the point of beginning; thence South 00 degrees 02'43" East, parallel with East West Center Quarter Section Line; thence along said Center 1/4 Line, the West line of said Lot 5, a distance of 127.50 feet to a 5/8" rebar with South 89 degrees 12' 16" East 334.28 feet to the point of beginning. a cap stamped "TYE ENGINEERING"; thence South 89 degrees EXCEPTING THEREFROM the Northerly 30 feet dedicated to the public 55'56" West 188.16 feet to a point of the East right-of-way line of for road purposes, by an instrument, including the terms and provisions SE Third Street; thence along said East right-of-way line South 00 degrees thereof, recorded December 18, 1979, in Book 313, Page 555, of Deeds. 11'06" East 199.83 feet to a 5/8" rebar with a cap stamped "TYE ENGINEERING"; thence North 89 degrees 55'56" East 222.00 feet PROPERTY ADDRESS: to a 5/8" rebar with a cap stamped "TYE ENGINEERING"; thence 21875 REPINE DRIVE BEND, OR 97701 South 00 degrees 04'04" East 26.00 feet to a 5/8" rebar with a cap stamped Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to "TYE ENGINEERING"; thence North 89 degrees 55'56" East 208.00 feet to a point on the centerline of vacated Fourth Street, said point being satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the marked by a 5/8" rebar with a cap stamped "TYE ENGINEERING"; default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when thence along said centerline North 00 degrees 21'15" East 353.34 feet due the following sums: monthly payments of $2,152.50 beginning to the South right-of-way line of Wilson Avenue marked by a 5/8" rebar with 03/01/11; plus late charges of $94.18 each month beginning 03/16/11; a cap stamped "TYE ENGINEERING"; thence along said South right-of-way plus prior accrued late charges of $0.00; plus advances of $4,076.39; line South 89 degrees 55'56" West 244.60 feet to the point of beginning. together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees TOGETHER WITH those portions of vacated Taft Avenue, vacated incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by Fourth Street, and the vacated alley accruing to said property. the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and EASEMENT PARCEL 1: An easement for ingress and egress contained its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. in Instrument Recorded April 14, 1978, in Book 271, Page 585, By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the Deed Records. EASEMENT PARCEL 2: An easement contained in obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said Instrument Recorded February 28, 2005, in Volume 2005, Page 11810, sums being the following, to wit: $281,051.98 with interest thereon at the Deschutes County Records. rate of 6.25 percent per annum beginning 02/01/11; plus late charges of $94.18 each month beginning 03/16/11 until paid; plus prior accrued late PROPERTY ADDRESS: charges of $0.00; plus advances of $4,076.39; together with title expense, 694 Southeast 3rd Street Bend, OR 97702 costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default penalties/premiums, if applicable. has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when September 19, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the due the following sums: monthly payments of $26,164.41 beginning standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: 03/01/10; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced Bond, in the City of Bend, County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the the execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution sums being the following, to wit: $4,186,376.00 with interest thereon at the of the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and rate of 6 percent per annum beginning 02/01/10; together with title the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by trustee. reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physical September 5, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no Bond, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of information is also available at the trustee's website, the execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which www.northwesttrustee.com. the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, of the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by trustee. payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physical trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive provided by said ORS 86.753. information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes information is also available at the trustee's website, received less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will www.northwesttrustee.com. be honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, terms of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of if any. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwestbeing cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts For further information, please contact: provided by said ORS 86.753. Kathy Taggart Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes reNorthwest Trustee Services, Inc. ceived less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms WALKER, COLE D. of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the (TS# 7023.94578) 1002.194698-File No. plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which Publication Dates: June 17, 24, July and 8, 2012. 1002.194698 is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" 1000 include their respective successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of Legal Notices auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at LEGAL NOTICE www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. PUBLIC AUCTION Public auction to be For further information, please contact: held Saturday, June Nanci Lambert 30, 2012 at 1:30 P.M., Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. at Jamison Street Self P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 Storage, 63177 JamiAspen Sons, LLC son St., Bend OR (TS# 8771.20001) 1002.215208-File No. 97701. (Unit B-123, Parilee McCracken). Publication Dates: June 3, 10, 17 and 24, 2012. 1002.215208 PUBLIC NOTICE The Bend Park & Recreation District Board of Directors will meet in a work session at 5:30 p.m., Tuesday, June 19, 2012, at the district office, 799 SW Columbia, Bend, Oregon. Agenda items include presentation of draft conceptual plan for Discovery Park, presentation of information regarding the Bend La Pine Schools/Bend Park & Recreation District intergovernmental agreement, and a report on information gathered from public meetings regarding a proposed bond measure. The board will not meet in a business session. The June 19, 2012, board report is posted on the district’s website, www.bendparksandrec.org. For more information call 541-389-7275.

PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

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TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

E6 SUNDAY, JUNE 17, 2012 • THE BULLETIN 1000

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PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

File No. 7777.18033 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by File No. 7023.100461 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by File No. 7763.29283 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Tina Bryant and Greg Bryant, as Tenants by the entirety, as grantor, to Mark S. Capps, as grantor, to Fidelity National Title Insurance Company, John J. Slivkoff and Nadia Slivkoff, as tenants by the entirety, as grantor, Amerititle, as trustee, in favor of Wells Fargo Financial Oregon, Inc., as as trustee, in favor of Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., as beneficiary, dated to Amerititle, as trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, FA, as benbeneficiary, dated 05/25/06, recorded 06/01/06, in the mortgage records of 04/24/06, recorded 05/01/06, in the mortgage records of DESCHUTES eficiary, dated 09/13/06, recorded 09/15/06, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as 2006-38210, covering the following deCounty, Oregon, as 2006-29807, covering the following described real Deschutes County, Oregon, as 2006-63003, covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: property situated in said county and state, to wit: scribed real property situated in said county and state, to wit: Lot Eight (8), Rock Crest, Deschutes County, Oregon.

Lot 75, Skyliner Summit at Broken Top-Phase 1, Deschutes County, Oregon.

Lot Twelve (12), Ammon Estates, Deschutes County, Oregon

PROPERTY ADDRESS: 1345 NW CANYON DR REDMOND, OR 97756

PROPERTY ADDRESS: 2483 NW Hosmer Lake Drive Bend, OR 97701

PROPERTY ADDRESS: 15774 Dawn Road La Pine, OR 97739

Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $1,610.42 beginning 05/01/11; plus late charges of $0.00 each month beginning 05/16/11; plus prior accrued late charges of $1,046.76; plus advances of $50.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: $323,455.62 with interest thereon at the rate of 3.5 percent per annum beginning 04/01/11; plus late charges of $0.00 each month beginning 05/16/11 until paid; plus prior accrued late charges of $1,046.76; plus advances of $50.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on September 13, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physical offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid information is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwesttrustee.com. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes received less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com.

Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $2,081.94 beginning 01/01/12; plus late charges of $104.10 each month beginning 01/16/12; plus prior accrued late charges of $0.00; plus advances of $45.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: $391,893.96 with interest thereon at the rate of 6.375 percent per annum beginning 12/01/11; plus late charges of $104.10 each month beginning 01/16/12 until paid; plus prior accrued late charges of $0.00; plus advances of $45.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on September 6, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in the City of Bend, County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physical offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid information is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwesttrustee.com. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes received less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com.

Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $772.31 beginning 11/01/10; plus late charges of $0.00 each month beginning 11/16/10; plus prior accrued late charges of $85.47; plus advances of $0.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: $173,166.67 with interest thereon at the rate of 3.353 percent per annum beginning 10/01/10; plus late charges of $0.00 each month beginning 11/16/10 until paid; plus prior accrued late charges of $85.47; plus advances of $0.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on September 10, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physical offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid information is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwesttrustee.com. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes received less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com.

For further information, please contact: Kathy Taggart Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 BRYANT, TINA L. and GREGORY C. AKA GREG (TS# 7777.18033) 1002.215519-File No.

For further information, please contact: Kathy Taggart Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 CAPPS, MARK S. (TS# 7023.100461) 1002.215033-File No.

For further information, please contact: Heather L. Smith Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 Slivkoff Jr., John J. and Nadia (TS# 7763.29283) 1002.215595-File No.

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File No. 7023.100437 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Timothy G. Montgomery and Kimberly D. Montgomery, husband and wife, File No. 7345.25871 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Randy C. Whitecotton, Cindy L. Whitecotton, husband & wife, as grantor, as grantor, to Fidelity National Title Ins Co, as trustee, in favor of Wells to First American Title Insurance Company of Oregon, as trustee, in favor Fargo Bank, N.A., as beneficiary, dated 10/01/08, recorded 10/07/08, in of JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A., as beneficiary, dated 02/27/06, recorded the mortgage records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon, as 2008-40991, 03/05/07, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as covering the following described real property situated in said county and 2007-13069 and subsequently assigned to Federal National Mortgage Asstate, to wit: sociation ("FNMA"), covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: Lot Eight (8), Block Three (3), Brookside, recorded March 31, 1978, in Cabinet B, Page 427, Lot 9 in Block 11 East of Eastwood, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. Deschutes County, Oregon. PROPERTY ADDRESS: PROPERTY ADDRESS: 63371 VOGT ROAD BEND, OR 97701-8523 1662 Northeast Crestridge Drive Bend, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $1,057.04 beginning due the following sums: monthly payments of $1,071.42 beginning 01/01/12 and $1,036.06 beginning 03/01/12; plus late charges of $44.43 09/01/11; plus late charges of $0.00 each month beginning 09/16/11; plus each month beginning 01/16/12; plus prior accrued late charges of $88.86; prior accrued late charges of $160.71; plus advances of $1,058.65; toplus advances of $27.04; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees gether with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees inand attorney's fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further curred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above debeneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its scribed real property and its interest therein; and prepayment interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. penalties/premiums, if applicable. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: $209,348.60 with interest thereon at the sums being the following, to wit: $140,477.36 with interest thereon at the rate of 3.75 percent per annum beginning 08/01/11; plus late charges of rate of 6.125 percent per annum beginning 12/01/11; plus late charges of $0.00 each month beginning 09/16/11 until paid; plus prior accrued late $44.43 each month beginning 01/16/12 until paid; plus prior accrued late charges of $160.71; plus advances of $1,058.65; together with title excharges of $88.86; plus advances of $27.04; together with title expense, pense, costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason of said of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the prodefault; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of tection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayprepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. ment penalties/premiums, if applicable. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on September 19, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the August 31, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the stanstandard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: indard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside side the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public the City of Bend, County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physi"Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physical offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt cal offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid information is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwestinformation is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwesttrustee.com. trustee.com. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the perfortrust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses mance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. ORS 86.753. Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes re- Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes received less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be ceived less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" inis secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of clude their respective successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorpoauction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northrated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. westtrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. For further information, please contact: Kathy Taggart Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 MONTGOMERY, TIMOTHY G. and KIMBERLY D. (TS# 7023.100437) 1002.214442-File No. Publication Dates: June 3, 10, 17 and 24, 2012. 1002.214442

For further information, please contact: Nanci Lambert Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 Whitecotton, Randy C. and Cindy L. (TS# 7345.25871) 1002.216240-File No. Publication Dates: June 17, 24, July and 8, 2012. 1002.216240

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Legal Notices

PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE File No. 7023.100419 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Tessie M Michelsen and Michael H Price, wife and husband, as grantor, to Fidelity National Title Ins Co, as trustee, in favor of Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., as beneficiary, dated 05/03/06, recorded 05/10/06, in the mortgage records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon, as 2006-32540, covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: The Northerly forty-five (45) feet of lot eighteen (18), and the South thirty-five (35) feet of lot nineteen (19), in block one hundred nineteen (119), first addition to Bend Park, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 653 NE 12TH ST BEND, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $1,166.97 beginning 01/01/12 and $1,172.68 beginning 03/01/12; plus late charges of $46.90 each month beginning 01/16/12; plus prior accrued late charges of $0.90; plus advances of $15.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: $155,908.93 with interest thereon at the rate of 6.625 percent per annum beginning 12/01/11; plus late charges of $46.90 each month beginning 01/16/12 until paid; plus prior accrued late charges of $0.90; plus advances of $15.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on August 31, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in the City of Bend, County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physical offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid information is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwesttrustee.com. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes received less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. For further information, please contact: Kathy Taggart Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 MICHELSEN-PRICE, TESSIE M. and PRICE, MICHAEL H. (TS# 7023.100419) 1002.214359-File No. Publication Dates: June 3, 10, 17 and 24, 2012. 1002.214359


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, JUNE 17, 2012 E7

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PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

File No. 7763.10559 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by File No. 8324.20018 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by File No. 7763.29609 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Roy E. Winchell and, April L. Winchell, as grantor, to Western Title ComEdward H. Torcom and Donna K. Torcom, as tenants by the entirety husDavid Schalock and Tamra S. Schalock, husband and wife, as grantor, to pany, as trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, FA, as beneficiary, band and wife, as grantor, to Harris Trust and Savings Bank, as trustee, in Deschutes County Title Company, as trustee, in favor of Washington Mudated 12/01/05, recorded 12/12/05, in the mortgage records of Deschutes favor of Harris Trust and Savings Bank, as beneficiary, dated 03/31/05, tual Bank, FA, as beneficiary, dated 12/04/07, recorded 12/26/07, in the County, Oregon, as 2005-85260, covering the following described real recorded 04/01/05, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as 2007-65795, coverproperty situated in said county and state, to wit: as 2005-19635 covering the following described real property situated in ing the following described real property situated in said county and state, said county and state, to wit: to wit: Lot 16, Block 103, Deschutes River Recreation Homesites, Unit 8, Part II, Deschutes County, Oregon. Lot 2, in Cinder Butte Estates West, Lot Six, Block Three, Ellinger's Addition to the Townsite of Redmond, Deschutes County, Oregon. Deschutes County, Oregon. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 16320 Sparks Drive Lapine, OR 97739 PROPERTY ADDRESS: PROPERTY ADDRESS: 3124 Northwest Lynch Lane Redmond, OR 97756 839 Northwest Dogwood Avenue Redmond, OR 97756 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the due the following sums: monthly payments of $949.20 beginning 09/01/10; default for which foreclosure is made is grantors' failure to satisfy the loan default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when plus late charges of $0.00 each month beginning 09/16/10; plus prior acupon maturity beginning on 04/01/2012 (Payment Default as of 4/1/2011) due the following sums: monthly payments of $1,884.76 beginning crued late charges of $192.42; plus advances of ($649.88); together with and pay the following sums: principal balance of $457,000.00 with ac04/01/11; plus late charges of $0.00 each month beginning 04/16/11; plus title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein by crued interest from 03/01/2011; Plus lenders fees and costs of $210.00; prior accrued late charges of $206.16; plus advances of ($18.15); toreason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for Plus prior accrued late charges of $2,353.82; together with title expense, gether with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees inthe protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein by reason of said curred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepay- By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said ment penalties/premiums, if applicable. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the sums being the following, to wit: $111,657.86 with interest thereon at the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on rate of 6.5 percent per annum beginning 08/01/10; plus late charges of the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, sums being the following, to wit: $237,572.05 with interest thereon at the $0.00 each month beginning 09/16/10 until paid; plus prior accrued late said sums being the following, to wit: principal balance of $457,000.00 rate of 7 percent per annum beginning 03/01/11; plus late charges of charges of $192.42; plus advances of ($649.88); together with title exwith interest thereon at the note rate of 5.375 percent per annum begin$0.00 each month beginning 04/16/11 until paid; plus prior accrued late pense, costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason ning 03/01/2011; Plus lenders fees and costs of $210.00; Plus prior accharges of $206.16; plus advances of ($18.15); together with title exof said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the procrued late charges of $2,353.82; together with title expense, costs, pense, costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason tection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason of said default; of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the proprepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the tection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. September 18, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the penalties/premiums, if applicable. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inSeptember 19, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on side the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, August 27, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the stanstandard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inin the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public dard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside side the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physipursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's cal offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physirequested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physical offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no cal offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive information is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwestrecord legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid trustee.com. information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid information is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwestinformation is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwest- Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, trustee.com. at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have trustee.com. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the perforand by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or mance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the perforactually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said mance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with ORS 86.753. actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes reORS 86.753. ceived less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be ORS 86.753. Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes rehonored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms ceived less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes reof the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the ceived less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" inplural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which clude their respective successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" inauction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorpois secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of rated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northclude their respective successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorpowesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northrated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. For further information, please contact: westtrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. Heather L. Smith For further information, please contact: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. For further information, please contact: Heather L. Smith P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 Nanci Lambert Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Winchell, Roy E. and April L. Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 (TS# 7763.29609) 1002.216150-File No. P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 Schalock, David & Tamra S. Torcom, Edward H. and Donna K. (TS# 7763.10559) 1002.216237-File No. Publication Dates: June 17, 24, July and 8, 2012. 1002.216150 (TS# 8324.20018) 1002.214334-File No. Publication Dates: June 17, 24, July and 8, 2012. 1002.216237 Publication Dates: May 27, June 3, 10 and 17, 2012. 1002.214334 1000 1000 1000 1000

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PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

File No. 8510.20053 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by File No. 7023.100275 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Jeffrey C. Service and Tavia M. Service, Tenants by the Entirety, as Randall F. Nash and Linda F. Nash, as grantor, to Fidelity National Title grantor, to First American Title Company of Oregon, as trustee, in favor of Insurance Company, as trustee, in favor of Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., as ING Bank, FSB, as beneficiary, dated 01/04/07, recorded 01/09/07, in the beneficiary, dated 08/05/05, recorded 08/11/05, in the mortgage records of mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as 2007-01329, coverDESCHUTES County, Oregon, as 2005-53004, covering the following deing the following described real property situated in said county and state, scribed real property situated in said county and state, to wit: to wit: Lot Twenty-one (21), Yardley Estates, Phase 1, Lot 30 of Vista Meadows, Phase 2, City of Redmond, Deschutes County, Oregon. Deschutes County, Oregon. PROPERTY ADDRESS: PROPERTY ADDRESS: 20651 SIERRA DRIVE BEND, OR 97701-8746 1665 Northwest Teakwood Lane Redmond, OR 97756 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $1,660.05 beginning due the following sums: monthly payments of $1,087.10 beginning 12/01/11 and $1,637.45 beginning 03/01/12; plus late charges of $68.84 11/01/11; plus late charges of $54.36 each month beginning 11/16/11; each month beginning 12/16/11; plus prior accrued late charges of plus prior accrued late charges of $108.72; plus advances of $0.00; to$619.56; plus advances of $50.00; together with title expense, costs, gether with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees intrustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein by reason of said decurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the fault; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayinterest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. ment penalties/premiums, if applicable. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: $260,904.00 with interest thereon at the sums being the following, to wit: $213,935.48 with interest thereon at the rate of 5 percent per annum beginning 10/01/11; plus late charges of rate of 5.75 percent per annum beginning 11/01/11; plus late charges of $54.36 each month beginning 11/16/11 until paid; plus prior accrued late $68.84 each month beginning 12/16/11 until paid; plus prior accrued late charges of $108.72; plus advances of $0.00; together with title expense, charges of $619.56; plus advances of $50.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason of said costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepaythe above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. ment penalties/premiums, if applicable. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on September 18, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the September 14, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: instandard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, side the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public in the City of Bend, County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at pubauction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real lic auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physi"Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physical offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt cal offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid information is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwestinformation is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwesttrustee.com. trustee.com. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the perfortrust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses mance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. ORS 86.753. Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes re- Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes received less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be ceived less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" inis secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of clude their respective successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorpoauction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northrated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. westtrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. For further information, please contact: Nanci Lambert Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 Service, Jeffrey C. (TS# 8510.20053) 1002.216239-File No. Publication Dates: June 17, 24, July and 8, 2012. 1002.216239

For further information, please contact: Kathy Taggart Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 NASH, RANDALL F. and LINDA F. (TS# 7023.100275) 1002.215790-File No. Publication Dates: June 17, 24, July and 8, 2012. 1002.215790

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PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE File No. 7023.100723 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Deri L. Frazee, Steven Summerfield, Lucinda Summerfield, as grantor, to Fidelity National Title Insurance Company, as trustee, in favor of Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., as beneficiary, dated 07/10/06, recorded 07/14/06, in the mortgage records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon, as 2006-48272, covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: Lot 8 in Block 2 of Loe Brothers Town N' Country Second Addition, City of Sisters, Deschutes County, Oregon. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 222 W BLACK CRATER AVE SISTERS, OR 97759-1499 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $1,766.11 beginning 02/01/12 and $1,759.13 beginning 03/01/12; plus late charges of $70.36 each month beginning 02/16/12; plus prior accrued late charges of $0.00; plus advances of $30.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: $196,219.92 with interest thereon at the rate of 7 percent per annum beginning 01/01/12; plus late charges of $70.36 each month beginning 02/16/12 until paid; plus prior accrued late charges of $0.00; plus advances of $30.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on September 13, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in the City of Bend, County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physical offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid information is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwesttrustee.com. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes received less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. For further information, please contact: Kathy Taggart Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 FRAZEE, DERI L. and SUMMERFIELD, STEVEN and LUCINDA (TS# 7023.100723) 1002.215530-File No. Publication Dates: June 10, 17, 24 and July 1, 2012. 1002.215530


OPINION&BOOKS

Editorials, F2 Commentary, F3 Books, F4-6

THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, JUNE 17, 2012

JOHN COSTA

Excellence is under challenge

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aybe it takes a recession. And a severe one at that to make us consider what’s critically important to the future. After all, you can’t look out unless you’re in the cave, you can’t look over the edge unless you are at the brink. Across the country, there is a renewed focus on higher education. Some of that comes from the revolution in online education, some of it from the enormous and escalating cost of a degree. But a lot of it comes from the recognition that more than ever, advanced education is the irreplaceable ingredient for success. In Central Oregon, there is heightened excitement over the strong possibility that the Cascades branch of Oregon State University will expand dramatically. It’s hard for anyone who was involved in the birth of the branch a decade ago, when friends were hard to find, not to be both astonished and gratified at the growing success of that institution. If there’s a moral to this story, it’s that tenacity and effective leadership go a long way. But successful education has other required elements, among which a commitment to excellence is the most vital and the most difficult to define. Making sure that everyone gets a diploma or a degree is worthy. That’s Gov. John Kitzhaber’s goal. The governor is committed to a 40/40/20 plan, which translated means — although the language is open for interpretation — that by 2025, 40 percent of students will earn a bachelor’s degree, 40 percent will have an associate’s or career certificate and the remaining 20 percent will have a high school diploma. No question that a highly educated population and workforce are critical for a state and nation’s future. But what is the relationship between a degree or diploma and a meaningful education? Are we just pumping people through, or are we really lifting them up? Two weeks ago, the University of Virginia, one of the nation’s finest public universities, fired its president, Teresa Sullivan, who lasted only two years at the helm of a university, founded by Thomas Jefferson, which prides itself on the long tenure of its leadership. The official reason for the dismissal is couched in the usual bureaucratic gobbledygook of “differences in philosophy” between Sullivan and the appointed Board of Visitors of the university. But The Washington Post reported this week that the rupture occurred after Sullivan offered the board a memo listing strategic concerns, which effectively questioned the future excellence of the prestigious university. According to The Post, Sullivan’s Academic Strategy memo, “… identified five areas of broad concern. “First, a siloed budgeting model that frustrates innovation and collaboration. “Second, a projection that fully half of the U-Va. faculty will depart by 2020, mainly because of retirement. “Third, a ‘reputation gap’: In many academic areas, Sullivan suggests, the university is ‘reputed to be better than we actually are.’ “Fourth, the ‘fragile’ Top 10 stature of many university departments and professional schools, driven by a precariously small number of actual academic stars. “Lastly, … overhauling the curriculum to lavish far more attention on upper-level classes and to convert many lower-level courses to a ‘hybrid’ model, partly delivered online. Her reasoning: Many U-Va. students arrive already having taken many introductory courses as Advanced Placement or International Baccalaureate-level classes in high school.” It must be particularly difficult for the board of a vaunted institution for its designated leader to suggest that its excellence is under challenge. But in Oregon’s race to get everyone something, its leaders should pay particular attention to Sullivan’s warnings that numbers and preconceptions cannot substitute for excellence in education. — John Costa is editor-in-chief of The Bulletin. Contact: 541-383-0337, jcosta@bendbulletin.com

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www.bendbulletin.com/opinion

ANALYSIS

Testing negative • Research increasingly shows that frequent medical exams – like physicals, Pap smears, lab work, EKGs, mammograms – have no benefits and may be harmful, so why do Americans keep getting them?

By Elisabeth Rosenthal New York Times News Service

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or decades, scientific research has shown that annual physical

exams — and many of the screening tests that routinely accompany them — are in many ways pointless or (worse) dangerous, because they can lead to unneeded procedures. The last few years have produced a steady stream of new evidence against the utility of popular tests: Prostate specific antigen blood tests to detect prostate cancer? No longer recommended by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. Routine EKGs? No use. Yearly Pap smears? Nope. So why do Americans, nearly alone on the planet, remain so devoted to the ritual physical exam and to all of these tests, and why do so many doctors continue to provide them? Indeed, the last decade has seen a boom in what hospitals and health care companies call “executive physicals” — batteries of screening exams for apparently healthy people, purporting to ferret out hidden disease with the zeal of Homeland Security officers searching for terrorists. See Tests / F5

Ping Zhu / New York Times News Service

“ The issue of confronting waste in the American health care system has grown increasingly important. But when this issue comes up in the political arena it becomes about rationing and death panels.” — Dr. Christine Cassell, president, American Board of Internal Medicine Foundation

BOOKS INSIDE ISRAEL: Parliament mulls limits on book discounts, F4

TRIP: Father, son journey strengthens bond, F4

‘WATCH’: ‘Antigone’ retold with GIs in Afghanistan, F4

IRVING: Author on familiar ground in ‘One Person,’ F5


F 2 THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, JUNE 17, 2012

E Privacy concerns not big enough to block FISA

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The Bulletin AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER

B  M C G B  J C  R  C

Chairwoman Publisher Editor-in-Chief Editor of Editorials

regon Sen. Ron Wyden’s hold on the renewal of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act highlights an important privacy concern for Americans. It would

be wrong, though, to block FISA from being reauthorized. FISA gives the intelligence community a nimble tool to collect communications about terrorists and other enemies overseas. It essentially does not require a warrant. The legislation is due to sunset on Dec. 31. The reauthorization would extend it through June 2017. Wyden, a Democrat, put a hold on that bill. If he didn’t, the reauthorization could pass the Senate on a quick voice vote. Wyden would prefer a shorter reauthorization to give Congress time to consider FISA’s impact. Others have gone further — far too far — insisting FISA’s reauthorization should be blocked until Congress gets more answers. Wyden doesn’t dispute that FISA has been useful. He is concerned it could be used to circumvent traditional warrant requirements for Americans. Communications from Americans in the United States are inevitably swept up in FISA searches. Wyden wants a ballpark number of how often that happens. He also wants more protections in place to ensure there are not warrantless searches of those communications. The reply from the intelligence community has been that it is not “reasonably possible� to identify

the number of people in the United States whose communications have been reviewed. A different answer about what is reasonably possible may be coming. Wyden and Sen. Mark Udall, DColorado, have requested a review by inspectors general in the intelligence community to determine if it is feasible to get an estimate. We can see how concern about that unknown number would drive Wyden to put a hold on the bill. It is also not hard to imagine scenarios in which there could be a legitimate intelligence need to analyze data already collected. More importantly, there are already guidelines requiring a court order before an American can be targeted under FISA. But also consider what little we do know about how FISA is used. Senate intelligence chairwoman Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., says there have been relatively few incidents of non-compliance with the law. They were inadvertent — human error or technical defect. She wrote that no willful efforts have been found to circumvent or violate the law. Wyden raises important privacy questions but that does not mean that the bill should be blocked.

Job training program should be adaptable

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n audit from Secretary of State Kate Brown’s office says the state faces a shortage of bookkeepers, preschool teachers and legal secretaries in the coming years. Central Oregon won’t have enough pharmacy technicians, the report says, but the state could end up with too many massage therapists and medical transcriptionists. The audit looks at ways to match job training with workforce demand, focusing on the so-called middle-skill jobs that require some post-high school training, but less than a bachelors degree. It’s an important issue, especially in a time of high joblessness, and it’s been cited in national reports of employers who say they can’t find qualified employees. Focusing attention on the issue has value, especially as the Oregon Education Investment Board works to develop its new goals, which include having 40 percent of the state’s residents earn a post-high school certificate or associates degree. We’re not so sure, though, about the audit’s monetary recommendations. One suggests using incen-

tives to encourage career and technical programs for specific jobs or industries. Industry moves quickly and government moves slowly, making it unlikely such incentives could be applied effectively. The other urges the state to provide more funding for career and technical training. We can’t evaluate that without knowing far more detail, such as what other program would lose those resources and how such programs could remain timely and relevant. These workforce training issues get attention from the Oregon Workforce Investment Board and the Department of Community Colleges and Workforce Development, in addition to the education system. Additional collaboration among the three groups — as recommended by the audit — clearly has potential to make their efforts more effective. In a time of climbing tuition and growing student debt loads, it’s critical to focus on assuring graduates are trained for jobs that exist. It’s just as important to educate students who can adapt to a changing job market.

End state-funded abortions By Jeff Jimerson growing, grassroots movement of concerned citizens — fueled by a passion for freedom, and armed with the facts — have created a rare opportunity to set Oregon taxpayers free from being forced to spend $1.5 million on 3,500 abortions every year. If you’re like most people we talk with, you’ll be surprised to learn how anyone with an Oregon Health Plan card in their pocket can receive an unlimited number of “free� abortions for any reason at any time, at taxpayer expense. Truth be told, one-third of all abortions in Oregon today are fully funded with our state tax dollars. In other words, if you pay taxes in Oregon you pay for abortions in Oregon. These hidden truths are being brought to light through Oregon 2012 Initiative No. 25 — www.Oregon2012.org — and the work of countless volunteers across the state, myself included, now racing to gather enough signatures for voters to weigh in this November. We need at least 150,000 signatures by July 2. Not everyone’s happy with this effort. Some opposing groups are labeling Initiative No. 25 as “antichoice.� And that, in a word, is nonsense. For anyone who is honest about giving people freedom to choose, and for anyone who specifically believes taxpayers should have choices with how their money is being spent — especially concerning highly controversial issues such as abortion — then Initiative No. 25 is by definition “pro-choice� because it creates a choice that currently doesn’t exist.

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I N MY VIEW I’ve witnessed people sign our petition who have confessed to supporting abortion rights. The reality is, not everyone who wants access to abortion wants to pay for someone else to have the procedure. How so? Today in Oregon, if an individual wishes to fund abortions, they have the freedom to send a personal contribution to their favorite abortion provider. It’s their checkbook after all. They can do what they want with it. However, at the same time millions in state tax dollars are now going directly to these same abortion providers — many of which are for-profit businesses — in the form of state reimbursement payments for services rendered. Thousands of Oregon taxpayers, like me, who don’t wish to fund abortions now have no way to opt-out. This initiative gives us that choice. Here’s something else that might shock you. I’ve witnessed people sign our petition who have confessed to supporting abortion rights. The reality is, not everyone who wants access to abortion wants to pay for someone else to have the procedure. As one woman who signed our petition told me, “I support abortion rights, but that doesn’t mean I want to pay for abortions.� Initiative No.

25 would give her the freedom she desires. On the back of our petition sheets you’ll find these 27 simple words: “No public funds shall be used to pay for any abortion, except to save the life of the mother or as may be required by federal law.� This easyto-understand statement is free from complicated “legalese� and it covers the bases by protecting the mother’s life, as well as acknowledging federal law that allows for funding abortions in cases of rape and incest. The federal Hyde Amendment — which prohibits the use of federal tax dollars from funding abortions except in the rare circumstances described above — has been the law for 35 years. But individual states can still spend their own money as they wish. Our initiative brings Oregon up to speed with how most of the country has been handling abortion funding for decades. Let abortion remain a private issue, and let it be funded with private — not public — money. Initiative No. 25 is a normal, mainstream concept we believe — and public opinion surveys confirm — the majority of Oregon voters will support on election day. Oregonians are a diverse people with a wide range of personal beliefs and opinions on the difficult subject of abortion. Not everyone fits neatly into a “pro-life� or “pro-choice� box. Initiative No. 25 is a fair and balanced approach to finding common ground on this often-polarizing issue. It doesn’t block anyone from choosing abortion. It gives taxpayers freedom to choose. It belongs on the November ballot. — Jeff Jimerson is co-chief petitioner for Oregon 2012 Initiative No. 25.

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Some students in U.S. wish they were ‘not special’ By Yvonne Abraham The Boston Globe

“I

feel like Dorothy Gale, plucked up by the tornado� in the Wizard of Oz, David McCullough Jr. says. A couple of weeks ago, McCullough — son of the well-known author — was a fairly anonymous and enormously beloved English teacher at Wellesley High School. Now he’s a YouTube superstar, more popular than even roller-skating parrots. His trip to Oz comes via a commencement speech he gave at Wellesley High on June 1. So far, the video of that address — now known as the “You Are Not Special� speech — has been viewed more than a million times. He has fielded calls from Australia, Germany and Israel. And, in what is probably a first for anything remotely

connected with Wellesley, the speech is even admired by Rush Limbaugh, who recently made it the subject of one of his frothing, free-verse rants. The part of the speech everybody has focused on “sounds like a slap-down of spoiled rich kids,� McCullough says. “Yes, you’ve been pampered, cosseted, doted upon, helmeted, bubblewrapped,� he told graduating seniors. “Yes, capable adults with other things to do have held you, kissed you, fed you, wiped your mouth, wiped your bottom, trained you, taught you, tutored you, coached you, listened to you, counseled you, encouraged you, consoled you, and encouraged you again. ... But do not get the idea you’re anything special. Because you’re not.� Nobody on the football field that afternoon was offended by these words.

Students knew that McCullough was teasing them. And the speech was far more than that one passage: His point, beautifully rendered, was that students should forgo easy accolades in favor of genuine achievements, that they should “resist the easy comforts of complacency, the specious glitter of materialism, the narcotic paralysis of self-satisfaction.� But it’s the slap-down part of the speech driving those YouTube clicks. Because it speaks to a popular view of kids today — that they’re coddled and overpraised, that a culture in which everybody gets a trophy spawns a generation of adults who think they deserve prizes for showing up. This is, of course, a largely middleclass phenomenon. The only reason McCullough can playfully take his students down a peg or two is that they’re

up so many pegs to begin with. His is not the kind of commencement address one would ever hear at the Phoenix Charter Academy in Chelsea, for example. Few of the students there could be described as coddled. They’re kids other schools, and even some of their parents, have given up on. Beth Anderson, the school’s executive director, has seen scores of her students achieve superhuman feats, overcoming overwhelming disadvantages to graduate and go to colleges they thought they’d never see. “For Wellesley, (McCullough) is right, and I thought his speech was pretty uplifting,� she says. “What occurred to me is how much our students have to battle ... to become one of the many unspecial students who are graduating this year.�

There’s only one word to describe those kids. “I have to call them special,� says Mary Skipper, headmaster at TechBoston Academy in Dorchester. “They are.� All but a few of this year’s 88 TechBoston graduates are going on to college, most to four-year schools. Many of them will be the first in their families to finish high school or attend college. Anderson and Skipper want their graduates’ children to have all the advantages their parents didn’t — to one day find themselves listening to a commencement speaker ribbing them for being overpraised, saying, as McCullough did, “none of you is exceptional.� — Yvonne Abraham is a columnist for The Boston Globe.


SUNDAY, JUNE 17, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

C No accountability in phone service By Harold Meyerson Los Angeles Times

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ave you ever heard anyone — anyone — rave about their phone carrier’s service? Say, “Wow, that customer service rep solved my problem in no time flat?” If you haven’t, there’s a reason: The companies don’t compete on service. Indeed, their service contracts are designed to keep you from jumping to other carriers unless you pony up several hundred bucks. “Phone carriers aren’t trying to gain consumers through quality service,” says Parul Desai, the communications policy counsel for Consumers Union. No phone company “says we’ll take care of this; we’ll come right over and fix it.” They have no reason to: Their mandatory arbitration clauses make it all but impossible for disgruntled customers to sue them, and their early termination fees lock those customers into their contracts. In a 2009 Government Accountability Office survey, mobile phone users said they wouldn’t switch carriers because of those fees. Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., introduced a bill that year that would have limited those charges, but it didn’t go anyplace. I admit that I paid no attention at the time to Klobuchar’s bill, but I sure will the next time it’s introduced. Here’s why: Last month, after a night of unmemorable music, I emerged from a Washington jazz club to find I had been transported to Kafka’s Castle. I’d silenced my phone during the performance, and when I turned it back on, I could neither make nor receive calls or messages. Instead, I got a strange recording when calling voicemail: “Your account could not be validated,” it said. “Please contact customer services.”

Using my girlfriend’s phone, I called Sprint, my carrier, and got routed to its service center in the Philippines. The guy on the other end informed me I had terminated my account and switched to AT&T. I explained I had done no such thing, whereupon he transferred me to another representative, who also told me I had terminated my account and switched to AT&T. Which I again disputed. Thirty minutes and three such conversations later — each unfolding as though the earlier conversations had never taken place — I was told I would be transferred to a manager who would straighten things out. Then the line went dead. Undaunted, I called back. Three more employees told me that I’d gone over to AT&T. I disputed it, was put on hold and was cut off yet again. The next morning I finally got through to Mr. Fix-It. I’d been “ported out,” he told me — phone company lingo for what happens when you terminate your account to go to another carrier. With me on the line, he dialed AT&T’s customer service center. Then we began working our way through AT&T’s labyrinth, finally reaching that company’s fix-it gal. A three-way, sporadically audible investigation of what had happened then ensued. By my third hour on the call, I had surveyed the complete collection of both companies’ hold music and announcements. My favorite was AT&T’s coda to several of its product advertisements: “Because your time should be spent enjoying life, not waiting for it to catch up.” Eventually, the AT&T lady figured out that a fellow Washingtonian who lives in my ZIP Code and had an account number identical to mine — which sounds impossible, but that’s what she said — had switched to AT&T. Apparently, the Sprint guy

admitted, his company’s computer, having found a match or near-match of some identifying numbers, had terminated my account, even though the other guy and I had different names, street addresses, phone numbers and birthmarks. “Sprint computers do that,” he said. I was instructed to report to a nearby AT&T store with two photo IDs and three Sprint bills to prove I was me. Once I did, and the AT&T lady received confirmation from the store clerk — still via my girlfriend’s phone — she told the Sprint guy that I could return to Sprint’s fold. The AT&T person signed off with “Thank you for choosing AT&T,” which, I was compelled to point out, was precisely what I hadn’t done. The Sprint guy then began porting me back — a process, he said, that would reactivate my phone within 48 hours. He also said that my next Sprint bill probably would include a $200-plus fee for terminating my contract early and a $36 fee for reactivating my phone, but added that I “could dispute it.” He then scampered off the line. I’d been on the phone for 4 hours and 35 minutes. Three days later, when I called Sprint to complain that I still didn’t have my service back, they once again dropped the call — that’s three out of four calls dropped, if you’re keeping score at home. A few days after that, still service-less, I dropped by a Verizon store to open a new account. I told them I’d like to keep my phone number. They then discovered that AT&T had not ported the number back to Sprint, as both AT&T and Sprint assured me had been done. AT&T, in a three-way call with Verizon, told me that my account had been transferred to their fraud unit, which was closed for the weekend. When I called on Monday, the fraud unit told me they

didn’t have the account; it was in AT&T’s porting office after all. By then, I’d overheard the name and address of the party whose account had been confused with mine. He was a fellow Washingtonian currently in Kabul, Afghanistan. I emailed him and he graciously responded. Turns out he had indeed switched his service from Sprint to AT&T. His phone number is the same as mine except that two sequential digits are reversed, and he shares my ZIP Code. That was apparently enough for either Sprint or AT&T to transpose my account number with his and switch off my service. And, I fear, his service too. AT&T finally ported over my account to Verizon after I thought to mention that, because I wasn’t their customer and had no contract with them, I wasn’t bound by their mandatory arbitration agreement: I was, in short, free to sue. When they ported over my account, however, I heard the AT&T person tell the Verizon person that my fellow Washingtonian had just lost his service in the process. It’s a zero-sum game, I guess. I had gone 12 days without service. What have I learned from all this, other than that we need something like Kolbuchar’s bill to compel the carriers to improve their service? First, have a girlfriend or some significant other close by during such encounters to dissuade you from throwing things and hurting passersby. Second, live in a ZIP Code where you’re the only resident. And third, avoid phone carriers that drop not only your calls but also your account and then promise to bill you for it. I’d call Sprint and tell them that, but they’d only drop the call.

Newsday

S

ome things in life never change. For one, Uncle Sam will always waste billions on subsidies to farmers. A renewal of the nation’s main farm and food-aid bill is making its way through Congress, reminding us yet again (as if we needed a reminder!) of what’s wrong with the way things work in Washington. But first let me get the ritual denunciations out of the way. Like its predecessors over the years, this new farm bill offers juicy giveaways to agribusiness under the guise of helping the couple with the pitchfork in the famous Grant Wood painting. To be sure, three-quarters of the bill’s trillion dollar cost over the next decade would be for nutrition programs (mainly food stamps). But this aid for the needy is yoked to $140 billion in agricultural subsidies. There’s a lot of self-congratulation going on in Congress right now because the new Senate farm bill,

unlike the law currently in place, eliminates $5 billion a year in fixed annual subsidies — essentially, free cash — for farmers. But the bill does contain costly new versions of crop insurance that will transfer more of the risk of farming onto the backs of taxpayers, whose sacroiliacs are already pretty sore from bearing the risks of Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac and the toobig-to-fail banks. We’ll get a wasteful farm bill no matter how much policy wonks and pundits jump up and down. The question is whether we can learn anything from the persistence of this ridiculous program. I think we can. Federal aid to agriculture got going in a big way during the Great Depression, when many farmers, like the Joads in “The Grapes of Wrath,” were desperate. But these policies have endured long past the conditions they were meant to remedy. Before long the land was covered in a crazy-quilt of farm programs,

many of them contradictory. Over the years, laws and tax dollars have been used to prop up the price of healthy items like milk and fruit, which should be more affordable, and to subsidize the production of a lethal weed — tobacco. Farmers have been discouraged from planting high-water crops in wet places, and encouraged to plant them in dry ones. Each market intervention seemed to require offsetting new ones, as with a patient who takes medication to counteract the effects of other medications. And where, you might ask, is the outcry in Congress? Conservatives should be complaining of agricultural socialism. Liberals should condemn corporate welfare cloaked in denim overalls. Both sides would be right. Alas, such cries are faint because by now, everyone takes farm subsidies for granted. Every state, including the ones mainly full of soybeans, has two senators. Iowa is an important presidential primary venue. And democracy is about compro-

Bloomberg News

WASHINGTON — he White House messed up its history. That’s the contention of critics who pointed to references recently appended to the biography pages of past presidents on the White House website. Scholars of Calvin Coolidge, the president who is our focus, found an error. The Coolidge “Did You Know?” item says that “On Feb. 22, 1924, Calvin Coolidge became the first president to make a public radio address to the American people.” Alas, Coolidge was not the first, as a retired archivist with the National Archives and Records Administration, Jerry Wallace, noted in an email to us. The first chief executive to deliver a radio address was Warren G. Harding, whose dedication of the Lincoln Memorial was carried over the airwaves on May 30, 1922. What the White House did was introduce its own comments and facts to the extant biographies of the presidents on the White House pages. Some commentators such as Seth Mandel at Contentions, the Commentary magazine blog, interpret the effort to draw such parallels as an intrusion on past presidents. Mandel sees the Obama administration comments as evidence that the president, like many of his young devotees, doesn’t “have much mem-

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ory of the political world before the arrival of The One.” The real story here is not the specific Coolidge error or whether you like the new White House comments. It is that accurate history is becoming much harder to deliver than it used to be. The Internet and databases have raised the bar for all writing on history. Your author, a student of Coolidge, discovered this firsthand in researching an iconic quote long attributed to Silent Cal. Coolidge endured severe setbacks in life. Yet he persevered. The Coolidge quotation that captures that perseverance best was printed in a pamphlet in the 1930s by New York Life Insurance Co., where the 30th president served as a director: “Nothing in this world can take the place of persistence. Talent will not; nothing is more common than unsuccessful people with talent. Genius will not; unrewarded genius is almost a proverb. Education will not; the world is full of educated derelicts. Persistence and determination alone are omnipotent. The slogan ‘press on’ has solved and will always solve the problem of the human race.” Historians have slammed anyone who dared suggest it was not uttered by Coolidge. In the 1990s, the “Dear Abby” advice column attributed the quotation to Ray Kroc, the wizard behind McDonald’s. It was promptly corrected by the late Lawrence Wi-

kander, curator of the Coolidge Memorial Room at the Forbes Library in Coolidge’s adult hometown of Northampton, Mass. Abby published Wikander’s note in her column: “After Coolidge retired from public life, he served as a director of the New York Life Insurance Co., and his inspirational statement was distributed to that company’s agents in the 1930s.” “Persistence” has appeared in anthology after anthology down the decades, including the Yale Book of Quotations (Page 173, 2006) and William Safire’s book “Good Advice.” But we found evidence that suggests the quotation was probably not Coolidge’s. The discovery occurs now because of technology, specifically the advent of searchable PDF files. Delve into obscure trade journals or regional newspapers and you’ll find “persistence” cited in the Middletown (New York) Daily Times Press in November 1914 — again without credit. In 1910, when Coolidge was still a very junior politician, “persistence” was published in the Locomotive Engineers’ Monthly Journal and the Crockery and Glass Journal without any attribution. In 1956, Norman Vincent Peale wrote that a Chicago real estate mogul, Arthur Rubloff, hung “persistence” on his wall, believing it to be an old Arabic verse.

Sandusky exploited parental absences

It remains conceivable that Coolidge did write “persistence,” perhaps as a very young Northampton Republican. But it’s doubtful. It is also doubtful that he intentionally plagiarized. Coolidge wrote his own speeches much of the time and removed one he hadn’t written from a collection to be published, probably because it was not his. The more likely sequence was that Coolidge cited “persistence,” the quote was attributed to him and he did not notice. The only sure thing one can say at this point about Coolidge and “persistence” is that our article is not definitive. It is an update. More to come. The same tentativeness holds for the White House website, which will doubtless see updates; the little bullets that might be wrong will be corrected far faster than they would have been in the days before, say, the arrival of the database ProQuest, or before Twitter. All history is accelerating. The historian Pieter Geyl called history “an argument without end” and said “that is why we love it so.” Because of technology, this old argument can only become more accurate. Who can’t love that? The best step for historians is to check and recheck, then hunt some more. And then, as someone said, “press on.” — Amity Shlaes, a Bloomberg columnist, is the author of “Coolidge.”

— Maureen Dowd is a columnist for The New York Times.

— Harold Meyerson is editor at large of the American Prospect and wrote this column for the Los Angeles Times.

mise. The price of food stamps — which themselves increase the demand for food — has been agricultural subsidies. There is a cautionary tale in all this. Once initiated, special-interest government programs are hard to get rid of, even when they’ve outlived their usefulness. They build up organized constituencies, and these motivated groups lobby all too effectively. Beneficiaries also propagate sentimental myths — the family farmer, our cherished agrarian heritage — about the programs they so passionately defend. Because no one lobbies for the general interest, these costly legacies accumulate: the weapons even the Pentagon doesn’t want, the tax subsidies to big oil companies, the unneeded military bases and post offices Uncle Sam won’t close. So yes, we can learn from the latest farm bill. Unfortunately, the lesson is one we already know all too well. — Daniel Akst is a columnist for Newsday.

‘Argument without end’ advances with technology By Amity Shlaes

MA U R E E N DOWD

BELLEFONTE, Pa. — tanding a few feet away from Jerry Sandusky, as he laughed and reminisced with friends in the front row of the courtroom, made me want to take a shower. Just not in the Penn State locker room. The lead witness in Sandusky’s trial — the former defensive coach at Penn State is charged with molesting 10 boys over 15 years — was a nicelooking, short-haired 28-year-old in white shirt and tie, a narrow parenthesis of a man. He seemed confident enough when he started, but, as he talked, he grew more and more agitated, running his hand and fist over his face, sliding glances at the 68-year-old, no-neck monster Sandusky at the defense table, staring at the pictures of himself as a young boy with a big grin and bowl cut, relishing the thrilling new world of football heroes that Sandusky had opened up to him. In the photos the prosecution put up on a screen, Sandusky’s hand was usually gripped on the boy’s shoulder. By the end of his testimony, he looked haunted and acted jittery. His pain seemed fresh. The prosecution charges that Sandusky used his charity for disadvantaged kids — Second Mile — as a perverted recruiting tool, putting asterisks next to the names of boys who were fatherless and blond, making up weird contracts for boys to sign, giving them money, ostensibly for doing good schoolwork, but really as a way to keep them from fleeing — and telling. Like pedophile priests, Sandusky was especially vile because he targeted vulnerable boys. Later, when victims finally spoke up, there was a built-in defense: Those boys were trouble; you can’t believe them. The first witness, who met Sandusky through Second Mile, said he was 13 when the nightmare started. His father was not in the picture and he didn’t get along with his stepfather, so he mostly lived with his grandmother. The attention, trips and sports-equipment presents from Sandusky, who “would act like he was my dad” in front of others, seemed heaven-sent, until hell yawned when Jerry kept putting his hand on the boy’s knee in his car. “Basically, like, I was his girlfriend,” the witness said, adding: “It freaked me out extremely bad.” The horror grew worse. After racquetball and basketball games, the coach would say, “Let’s get a shower.” It would begin with a soap battle with liquid soap from the dispenser, the witness said, escalate to bearhugging, slapping, rubbing, soaping, wrestling, maneuvering the child on the ground, kissing his thighs, forcing him to give and receive oral sex, and attempting anal sex. “I was a little kid. He was a big guy,” the witness said, adding that he weighed “a hundred pounds, soaking wet.” When he tried to push the slab of an older man away, he said, Sandusky would get mad and “play box” with open-hand slaps. Asked why he didn’t tell his mother, he replied bluntly that he was “too scared,” and “other than that, the other things were nice and I didn’t want to lose that” — going from unloved kid to a petted mascot for a legendary football team. They never spoke of “the shower thing.” “It was basically like, whatever happened there never really happened,” he said. On road trips to bowl games, Sandusky would share a room with the boy, then covertly put a hand under the cover to grope him before he was awake. When the boy would wake up, he said Sandusky would act as though he’d been doing sit-ups next to the bed. If the boy was recalcitrant, Jerry would threaten to send him home. It’s hard to believe that a monster like Sandusky was harbored by Happy Valley for so long. It was an open joke in Penn State football circles that you shouldn’t drop your soap in the shower when Jerry was around. Only the boys in the shower weren’t laughing.

Farm subsidies a sad lesson in spending By Dan Akst

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THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, JUNE 17, 2012

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BOOKS THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, JUNE 17, 2012

www.bendbulletin.com/books

‘The Watch’ a modern ‘Antigone’ with GIs

Author’s book tells of journey with son

ISRAEL

“The Watch” By Joydeep Roy-Bhattacharya (Hogarth, 304 pgs., $25)

“Father’s Day: A Journey into the Mind & Heart of My Extraordinary Son” By Buzz Bissinger (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 256 pgs., $26)

By Jim Higgins Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

By William Hageman

“The fog of war” doesn’t begin to describe what awaits the American soldiers in Joydeep RoyBhattacharya’s novel “The Watch.” Manning a remote post in Afghanistan’s Kandahar province, they’re assaulted by a violent, lacerating sandstorm, then ambushed by insurgents. After losing several men, they fight off the attackers. Then, still numb with exhaustion and grief, they face an even more shocking sight: A legless Pashtun woman has come to demand the release of her late brother’s body for burial. He was a leader of the insurgents. Roy-Bhattacharya has built his novel on the Greek myth of Antigone. Her brother had been killed in a duel with his brother, who also died. King Creon orders Polynices’ body left to rot, and decrees death to any who would disobey this order. Antigone disobeys the order. Nizam keeps her vigil outside the base, uncowed by the soldiers’ threats. Roy-Bhattacharya gives a viewpoint chapter to Nizam and to several American soldiers who consider her request with suspicion. To his credit, his soldiers are differentiated and don’t share the same views of Nizam, military discipline and the American mission in Afghanistan. Roy-Bhattacharya consulted with front-line officers to get his details right. His description of the firefight in a sandstorm is gripping and terrifying; so are his overlapping accounts of the ethical and military decisions that young men, fatigued, distraught and unsupported, have to make.

Chicago Tribune

B- Publishers Weekly ranks the bestsellers for the week ending June 9. Hardcover fiction 1. “Kiss the Dead” by Laurell K. Hamilton (Berkley) 2. “The Storm” by Clive Cussler (Putnam) 3. “Gone Girl” by Gillian Flynn (Crown) 4. “Calico Joe” by John Grisham (Doubleday) 5. “11th Hour” by James Patterson (Little, Brown) 6. “Stolen Prey” by John Sandford (Putnam) 7. “Spring Fever” by Mary Kay Andrews (St. Martin’s) 8. “The Innocent” by David Baldacci (Grand Central) 9. “The Bourne Imperative” by Eric Van Lustbader (Grand Central) 10. “A Blaze of Glory” by Jeff Shaara (Ballantine Books) Hardcover nonfiction 1. “The Amateur” by Edward Klein (Regnery Publishing) 2. “The Great Destroyer” by David Limbaugh (Regnery) 3. “It Worked for Me” by Colin Powell (Harper) 4. “Killing Lincoln” by Bill O’Reilly (Henry Holt) 5. “The Skinny Rules” by Bob Harper (Ballantine) 6. “Wild” by Cheryl Strayed (Knopf) 7. “How Excellent Companies Avoid ...” by Neil Smith Palgrave (Macmillan) 8. “American Grown” by Michelle Obama (Crown) 9. “Cronkite” by Douglas Brinkley (Harper) 10. “I Hate Everyone...” by Joan Rivers (Berkley) — McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Photos by Ariel Schalit / The Associated Press

An Israeli boy reads a book behind a counter at a Hebrew Book Week fair in Tel Aviv on Wednesday. The Israeli parliament, under pressure from local authors, are considering a bill to limit booksellers from selling books at a discount.

Taking a stab at price cuts • Parliament considers limit on discounted books in an effort to protect author profits By Amy Teibel The Associated Press

JERUSALEM — In the land of the People of the Book, the discounted book may soon be a thing of the past. Israeli authors have launched a battle to stop the country’s two leading bookstore chains from discounting their works, claiming the price slashing has cut into their royalties. With support from Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, they persuaded an influential committee of government ministers to back their call for tough limits on discounts. The parliament is expected to approve a bill enshrining the limits. A similar debate has played out around the world, as publishers, authors and book retailers all struggle to capture their piece of a hypercompetitive market. Several countries, including France, Germany and Mexico, have all passed laws that bar booksellers from cutting prices in a bid to protect their local publishing industries. The issue has touched a sensitive nerve in Israel. Jews are known as the “People of the Book” because their identity is rooted in the Bible. But literary books are also a big part of Israeli culture. Last year, the country produced 6,302 new Israeli titles, according to the National Library of Israel. For a country of fewer than 8 million people, that is a strong number, roughly on par with the U.S., Germany and Britain in per capita terms, according to data compiled by the U.N. cultural agency UNESCO. Some of its authors enjoy worldwide reputations, with one Nobel literature laureate, S.Y. Agnon, to its credit and contemporary novelist Amos Oz a regular contender in recent years.

The big booksellers Price-slashing is a common feature of the competition between Israel’s two largest booksellers, Steimatzky and Tzomet Sfarim. The deep discounts — as low as $6 a book as opposed to catalogue prices ranging $15 or $20 — have been welcomed by consumers and benefited younger, unknown authors. But the low prices are anathema to the established authors, publishers, editors and others in the book-making food chain who find themselves sharing a shrunken purse, an especially difficult situation given that the domestic market is relatively small and the market for Is-

Israeli author Eli Tziper holds a copy of his book “The treasure of the Hebrew rhyme” at a Hebrew Book Week fair in Tel Aviv on Wednesday.

“As the People of the Book, we are committed to maintaining the income of the authors who create our cultural treasures.” — Benjamin Netanyahu, prime minister, Israel

raeli literature in the original Hebrew is thereby limited. Pricing is a contentious issue in the book business worldwide at a time of major changes in the industry, with big competition from e-books. Amazon’s deep discounting of top-selling e-books in the U.S. led publishers to set the prices themselves instead of leaving that to booksellers, a move that prompted a government lawsuit accusing publishers of price-fixing.

Effect of e-books E-books have also been a main driver in the decline of brick-and-mortar bookstores. Bookstores have been an essential part of the publishing ecosystem, where people often stumble upon new books as they browse and chat with other readers, and their precarious state is of concern to publishers, booksellers and writers, many of whom fear a future market dominated by e-books. In Israel, the move to ebooks hasn’t affected the local market, said Amnon BenShmuel, managing director of the Book Association of Israel. “All we care about is that people read more books. We don’t care if they are e-books or traditional,” he said. Instead, he said, the issue is the concentration of the market. Steimatzky and Tzomet Sfarim capture 80 percent of all book sales here, according to government data. Critics of the discounts accuse these booksellers of destroying the Israeli publishing industry by putting their profits above all considerations, a charge the booksellers deny. “The competition between the two main booksellers is

the problem,” Ben-Shmuel said. “Authors are sick of working for free. That is why the industry is facing difficulties here.” The uproar has taken center stage as Israel marks its annual celebration of reading, the Hebrew Book Week, when book fairs are held across the country. Earlier this month, 10 leading Israeli authors, including Oz and David Grossman, said they did not want their books sold at a discount at the fair, saying, “We can no longer participate in the humiliation of our works in particular, and Hebrew literature in general.”

Minimum royalties The bill, which is expected to be approved in parliament in coming weeks, would bar retailers from slashing the marked price on new books for the first 18 months after they are released. Royalties would be set at a minimum of 8 percent of the book’s marked price for the first 6,000 sold and at least 10 percent for all books sold after that number. The bill, according to a statement put out by the prime minister’s office, “is designed

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to protect literature and authors in Israel.” “As the People of the Book, we are committed to maintaining the income of the authors who create our cultural treasures,” Netanyahu said. In a statement, Steimatzky’s chief executive, Iris Barel, welcomed the new legislation and said her company would comply with whatever is decided. “The Steimatzky chain has worked incessantly in the last two years to promote a law that promises proper compensation for Israeli authors and a variety of original Hebrew books to the Israeli public,” she said. The company declined further comment. David Gilo, director of the Israel Antitrust Authority, had opposed the bill, arguing that the government shouldn’t intervene in a competitive market and warning that prices might go up to the point that customers won’t buy. But Culture Minister Limor Livnat predicted free market pressures would compel publishers to keep books at “reasonable” rates.

Buzz Bissinger’s new book is a physical and metaphorical journey. “Father’s Day: A Journey into the Mind & Heart of My Extraordinary Son” is Bissinger’s account of a 12-day, 3,600-mile crosscountry drive he took in 2007 with his then-24-yearold son Zach. This deeply personal memoir is informed by Zach’s, and Bissinger’s, histories. Zach is the younger of Bissinger’s twin boys, born three minutes after brother Gerry. In those three minutes, Zach suffered a lack of oxygen that resulted in trace brain damage. Zach has an IQ of about 70. He has the comprehension skills of an 8-year-old. He is also a savant with inexplicable skills, including a mastery of maps and directions. “Father’s Day” takes the Bissingers’ trip — the itinerary was built around cities in which Zach has lived — and interweaves it with Zach’s complicated story. By the end, the trip becomes a journey of discovery for both. You seem to have been very tough on yourself over the years. Did the trip mellow you any? I still fly off the handle. I wish I did not, but my buttons get pressed very easily. And Zach always knew that. But we now have a shared experience that is unique and memorable and will remain that way. Who learned more about the other on the trip, you or Zach? I think I learned more. People have asked that: What did you learn? The things he did, things he liked. I definitely learned so much about him, in particular empathy, which I’d never seen before. He really wants independence, which shows he’s growing. You got a new view of him. He has a wonderful intellect. He has developed a wonderful life for himself. And to me that’s the definition of character.

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THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, JUNE 17, 2012

BOOK THEFT

‘Genius’ author’s new book takes old-fashioned approach to fiction Feds recover pilfered “A Hologram for the King” By Dave Eggers (McSweeney’s, 312 pgs., $25) By Michiko Kakutani New York Times News Service

The hero of Dave Eggers’ absorbing new novel “A Hologram for the King” is a pennyante Job named Alan Clay, who finds himself in an absurd situation. Alan is deeply in debt, unable to pay his daughter’s college tuition and plagued by a scary golf-ballsize lump on the back of his neck. He’s betting everything on a last-ditch chance at a big payday, hoping he can sell the Saudi king, Abdullah, on a lucrative technology contract — a contract that depends on Alan’s going to a real estate development in Saudi Arabia and making an elaborate holographic presentation to the king, who may or may not even show up. “Hologram” is studded with allusions to a rich array of literary classics, but Eggers uses a new, pared down, Hemingwayesque voice to recount his story, a voice that stands in sharp contrast to the baroque, hyperventilated one he employed in his dazzling 2000 debut book, “A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius.” Gone are the self-conscious

commentary and postmodern pyrotechnics of “Genius.” Gone too are the less effective exercises in mimicry and pastiche featured in his 2002 novel “You Shall Know Our Velocity.” In any case, he demonstrates in “Hologram” that he is master of this more old-fashioned approach as much as he was a pioneering innovator with “Genius.” In Eggers’ telling, the 54year-old Alan is not just another hapless loser undergoing a midlife crisis. Rather, his sad-funny-dreamlike story unfolds to become an allegory about the frustrations of middle-class America, about the woes unemployed workers and sidelined entrepreneurs have experienced in a newly globalized world in which jobs are being outsourced abroad. On Alan’s way to Saudi Arabia a fellow passenger complains that America has “become a nation of indoor cats,” a “nation of doubters, worriers, overthinkers.” A U.S. architect, who has designed a couple of the tallest buildings in the world, tells Alan he has been working for 10 years in Dubai, Singapore, Abu Dhabi and China, where “the dreaming’s being done” now. A summary of such moments may make “Hologram” sound like a schematic lesson on the United States’ decline, but it’s not. Thanks to Eggers’

uncommon ability to access his characters’ emotions and channel their every mood, we are instantly immersed in Alan’s story, rooting for him somehow to win an audience with the king and turn his life around. He holes up in his Jidda hotel room, scrolling through the personal photos on his laptop, “the vast grid of his life in thumbnails,” and like Saul Bellow’s Herzog, writes letters he never sends. When a European woman named Hanne comes on to him, Alan finds himself wishing he could go home. All he wants to do is drink by himself and watch old Red Sox DVDs. It doesn’t take long for Alan to discover the incongruities of life in the kingdom, where the wretched excesses made possible by oil money coexist with ancient mores regarding women, where a craving for the modern conveniences of life coexists with a suspicion of the West. The analogies to Samuel Beckett’s “Waiting for Godot” seem completely intentional. Eggers wisely does not strain to try to turn Alan’s story into an existential parable of the human condition like “Godot.” Instead, he has achieved something that is more modest and equally satisfying: the writing of a comic but deeply affecting tale about one man’s travails that also provides a bright, digital snapshot of our times.

‘People Who Eat Darkness’ a black tale of crime in Tokyo “People Who Ea t D arkness: The True Story of a Young Woman W h o V a n i shed from the Streets Of Tok y o — and the Evil that Swallowed Her Up” By Richard Lloyd Parry (Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 454 pgs., $16) By Dwight Garner New York Times News Service

The title of Richard Lloyd Parry’s true-crime book “People Who Eat Darkness,” is creepy, especially now that zombies are in the news. Its sleek cover, which features a blurry sketch of a serial rapist and murderer, is creepier still. I read “People Who Eat Darkness” over the course of two days and always placed it face down in the kitchen, lest a glimpse of it unnerve the children and animals in the house. Parry is the Tokyo bureau chief of The Times of London, and his book is an account of a killing that he covered for his newspaper and that he hasn’t been able to shake. You may not be able to shake it either. It’s the story of Lucie Blackman, a blond, outgoing, 21year-old former British Airways flight attendant who disappeared into the teeming streets of Tokyo in 2000. The police’s only lead was a phone call placed to her best friend in

which a man claimed she had joined a religious cult. Blackman was not found for months. What happened to her is not pretty, we belatedly discover, so not pretty that the author is forced to consider dire problems of social etiquette. “What do you say,” he asks, “to the woman whose daughter has recently been chopped up and buried in a cave?” This story, when you think it cannot get darker, does. Blackman’s killer, it turns out, had been drugging, raping and murdering young women for some three decades, almost directly under the noses of an incompetent or willfully blind Japanese police force. This material is so bleak, and so miserably entrancing, that all Parry really needs to do is set out the facts and, essentially, stay out of the way. Early on, however, I feared he was going to step on his own journalism by overwriting, by seeding clouds that were already black and brewing. There are a few too many references to “Alice in Wonderland.” Cicadas in Tokyo, he writes, “sneered” in the trees. I was wrong to worry. Parry finds his voice, and it’s a sturdy one. His book becomes not merely an exemplary piece of reportage but a sustained and quietly profound work of moral inquiry as well. It becomes ominous in ways that go well beyond the calculated shock value of its cover.

Parry writes exceedingly well about what is known in Japan as the “water trade,” a term that encompasses the range of night life in Roppongi, which the author refers to as “a spectrum of sleaziness and elegance, cheapness and expense, openness and exclusivity.” Among the take-aways of “People Who Eat Darkness” is that Japan is not a good place to be the victim of a terrible crime. This book is a scorching indictment of bumbling law enforcement there. “Japan has the cuddliest police in the world,” Parry writes, comparing them to “a tribe of earnest Boy Scouts.” “People Who Eat Darkness” is surprisingly soulful, especially in its portrait of Blackman, a young woman who still traveled with a favorite stuffed animal, who read self-help books like “The Rules” and who confided to her diary how she loathed, more than anything else, her sense that “every single part of me from head to toe is completely average.” The author had hoped to find her alive. He confesses he “dreamed one of the oldest male dreams of all: of being the knight who rides to the dark tower, slays the dragon, frees the missing damsel, and basks forever in the glory.” That being impossible, he’s done something nearly as good. He’s restored her to life in this vivid book.

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antique Mormon tome

By Michelle Boorstein The Washington Post

On Tuesday, federal marshals barreled into a condominium in Herndon, Va., and found a most unusual book: a leather-bound first edition of the Book of Mormon. They also found the man who allegedly pilfered the prized tome — worth between $50,000 and $100,000 — from a suburban Phoenix antique book shop, authorities said. Jay Michael Linford, a fellow Mormon bookseller who had been “like a grandson” to the shop’s owner, was arrested at his friend’s home and charged with theft and trafficking in stolen property. The theft and arrest spotlighted the market for “Mormonia” — memorabilia about Mormonism — that has been thriving as Mitt Romney’s presidential candidacy, television shows and a Broadway play have stoked interest in the faith.

One of 5,000 printed The news last month that Helen Spencer Schlie’s first edition had been stolen spread quickly through the small, tight-knit world of rare-book dealers, who were aware of Schlie’s book as one of 5,000 original copies printed in 1830 and viewed by Mormons as sacred text. But the theft didn’t elicit much sympathy for the Mesa, Ariz., widow, who had become something of a pariah for removing individual pages from the book and offering them for sale. “Divine intervention,” a prominent Salt Lake City bookseller said about the theft. Ken Sanders, who has overseen security for the Antiquarian Booksellers’ Association of America, said, “It’s incomprehensible how someone could use their religion to mask what is, to me, just out and out greed. “ To Schlie, the theft turned out to be heartbreaking for more than monetary reasons. The accused was a business partner and one of her closest friends, who chatted with her by phone for hours each week and helped her publish a book

“For Mormons, the Book of Mormon has become the holy grail of collecting. It’s like an old-school biggame hunter goes and bags their Book of Mormon.” — Ken Sanders, overseer of security, Antiquarian Booksellers’ Association of America

of her poetry. “My other grandchildren haven’t had much interest in my projects, and here’s this young man who is a contemporary with my older grandchildren, but he has made things happen,” Schlie, 88, said Wednesday, her voice quivering. Schlie and Linford were both steeped in the growing business subculture of Mormonia. Linford, 48, had founded Experience Press in Palmyra, N.Y., a business intended to serve the growing number of tourists interested in Mormonism’s birthplace. The company produced handmade books that were meant to look like the originals and that sold for $100 to $1,000. Linford and Schlie also worked together on video interviews with people who owned some of the prized first editions of the Book of Mormon. The videos were intended to be sold as mini-documentaries to buyers of the replica books.

Selling individual pages Schlie, a convert to Mormonism, attracted sharp criticism a few years ago when she started removing pages from the first edition that her husband acquired in 1967. “Some people were disturbed I’d taken a perfectly good book apart, but each page in its lifetime is capable of touching hundreds of thousands of lives,” she said. There were plenty of takers for the pages — priced at $2,500 to $4,500 — including some affluent Mormons. Mormonism teaches that the text is God’s word, which was written on gold plates, buried in Upstate New York and found by a prophet named Joseph Smith, who translated them into English. “For Mormons, the Book of

Mormon has become the holy grail of collecting. It’s like an old-school big-game hunter goes and bags their Book of Mormon,” Sanders said. No one knows how many of the original 5,000 copies are left. At the time they were printed, it was unheard of to print thousands of books in one run, and it was particularly noteworthy because there were no Mormons at the time. The run is considered part of the unusual history of Mormonism’s rapid spread during a period when Americans were experimenting with new religions. Linford, who had residences in the District of Columbia and Arizona, seemed to have run into financial trouble lately, a former employee said. Buyers had ordered more books than the replica company was making, and Linford and a partner lived far away and saw the company as more of a hobby, Mark Burris said.

‘Never in a safe place’ Burris said that Schlie had long had trouble organizing her book business. He described working for her for a few months last year to help her auction books on eBay. The 1830 Book of Mormon, he said, was kept on the arm of the couch where he was sleeping. “It was never in a safe place. The first thing she’d tell someone when she met them is where she kept the book,” Burris said. Schlie said she realized that the book was gone Memorial Day when she went to show it to some Mormon missionaries from Asia who wanted their photos taken with it. Mesa police said the day Linford allegedly took the book, he contacted a rarebook dealer in the Dallas-Fort Worth area and asked whether the man was interested in buying some pages of a first edition Book of Mormon. A few days later, Mesa police said, Linford sold two pages of the book for $7,500. Schlie said the theft will not deter her from carrying out her plan, once she gets the book back from authorities. Those plans include selling the remaining 500 pages and using the money to buy an ice cream store whose profits will help fund Mormon missionaries, she said.


B U SINESS THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, JUNE 17, 2012

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Central Oregon’s open for business • Expandinoregon.com gets makeover and highlights about 50 lots, buildings in region By Jordan Novet The Bulletin

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ommercial land and buildings in the state and region could change hands and get business tenants more quickly, through an update to a website the state agency Business Oregon maintains. The new site, www.expandin oregon.com, allows state, city or county employees to quickly assemble a package of suitable properties for site selectors seeking new homes for companies. Gov. John Kitzhaber announced the new website last month after touring Facebook’s data center in Prineville, according to a news release. “Connecting industrial employers with the developable sites they need to grow or locate in Oregon is one of the most important things we can do to get Oregonians back to work,” Kitzhaber said in the release. While acknowledging that the website still has bugs, Business Oregon employees appear pleased with it. “I certainly wouldn’t say we’ve arrived at perfection, but we’re doing much better, and the way that we’ve tried to do that is to build a lot of win-wins,” said Ted Werth, Business Oregon’s recruitment specialist. See Website / G3

The 204,000-square-foot former Cessna manufacturing facility near the Bend Municipal Airport, shown here in 2009 after Cessna vacated it, is the second-largest building in Central Oregon that’s posted on an online state-run database of vacant sites and bare land in Oregon. Rob Kerr / The Bulletin file photo

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News of Record, G2 Stocks/mutual funds, G4-5 Sunday Driver, G6

Large lots and buildings available in Central Oregon A recently redesigned database on the state agency Business Oregon’s website lists large lots and industrial-scale buildings for lease or for sale across the state. The idea is to encourage site selectors to bring businesses to the sites or buildings. The website promotes nearly 50 lots and buildings in Central Oregon, with the most available in Redmond.

Madras

26

97

26

2 sites Largest: 120 acres JEFFERSON COUNTY

Terrebonne 1 building: 6,500 square feet

Madras

Redmond 16 buildings Largest: 205,000 square feet

3 sites

CROOK COUNTY

Largest: 73 acres

Terrebonne

Sisters

Sisters

20

10 buildings

Prineville

Redmond

126

Prineville

Largest: 30,160 square feet 1 site: 15 acres

4 buildings Largest: 100,000 square feet 2 sites: Largest: 46 acres

Bend 20

Bend DESCHUTES COUNTY

La Pine 1 site: 77.8 acres

Struggling to make it in America • American Apparel struggles to keep the ‘made in America’ label By Shan Li Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — Ofelia Lopez scrutinizes the hem on a hot-pink shirt fresh off the assembly line, making sure the stitching is just right. All around her, rows of workers rapidly attach sleeves, adhere labels and churn out piles of garments. Lopez, a G u a te m a l a native, has worked in the apparel industry for 22 years. Now a team super visor, she keeps a watchful eye “I want to prove myself and I on her group want to prove ‘made in Amertoiling on a ica’ is a smart business,” said vast factory Dov Charney, senior partner floor, where of American Apparel. the whir of sewing machines and the hiss of industrial steam irons drown out most other sounds. This could be a clothing factory in Guatemala, China or Vietnam. But it’s in an industrial area of downtown Los Angeles, where American Apparel Inc. is engaged in an epic — and, so far, money-losing — struggle to prove that clothes can still be made for a profit in America. The company’s seven-story factory, a former Southern Pacific Railway freight depot, is the biggest garment—making facility in the U.S., according to an industry trade group. Here, 4,500 workers staggered over two shifts cut, sew, fold, box and ship clothes to the company’s 253 stores and other clothiers worldwide. See Apparel / G5

8 buildings Largest: 204,000 square feet 2 sites: Largest: 300 acres

97 MILES

La Pine Source: Business Oregon

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5

10

Greg Cross / The Bulletin

Photos by Gary Friedman / Los Angeles Times

Alicia Luisjuan works at the American Apparel factory in Los Angeles. The company is engaged in an epic — and, so far, money-losing — struggle to prove that clothes can still be made for a profit in the United States.

Won’t you meet your neighbor via social network? By Randall Stross New York Times News Service

Nurturing a baby and a startup business • Does motherhood factor into the success, stability of a company? By Hannah Seligson New York Times News Service

Fledgling companies are like sticky-fingered toddlers. You’ve got to watch them every single minute. And yet a small group of women is proving that it’s possible to start a high-growth technology company and have children at the same time. They are dispelling the image of the tech entrepreneur as a single, usually male, wunderkind. Consider Jennifer Fleiss, 28, co-founder of Rent the Runway, an online dress and accessories rental site with 2.5 million members.

She gave birth to a daughter, Daniella, in December. And there’s Carley Roney, 43, co-founder of the XO Group, a publicly traded media company valued at $300 million. Her three children range in age from 4 to 14. Divya Gugnani, meanwhile, is the founder and chief executive of Send the Trend, an e-commerce site for accessories and beauty items that was bought by QVC in February. In May, Gugnani, 35, gave birth to her son, Ashvin. And the list goes on. The average age of a firsttime founder of a company is 39 — meaning that startup life for some entrepreneurs is less about video game marathons on Saturdays and more about balancing parental responsibilities. See Baby / G3

Jenny Fleiss, co-founder of Rent the Runway who secured venture funding before giving birth to her daughter, Daniella, left, at the company’s offices in New York. Some entrepreneurial moms are proving it’s possible to start a high-growth technology company. Michael Falco New York Times News Service

I don’t know many of my neighbors. I blame genetics: I’m hard-wired for shyness. Or so I thought until I signed up with Nextdoor.com, a neighborhood-based social network. There I have discovered a comfortable place for even a borderline recluse like myself. “As you get older, the community that is most valuable to you is the one in which you live,” said Nirav Tolia, chief executive of Nextdoor, which is based in San Francisco. “The neighborhood is where you buy a home, where your kids go to school, where you spend the majority of your physical life.” See Neighbor / G2

Won’t you be my neighbor? Nextdoor.com provides social networks for neighborhoods, offering members a chance to exchange ideas with people who live nearby. Handout via New York Times News Service


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THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, JUNE 17, 2012

M     N  R DEEDS Deschutes County

Lance R. Dyer and Ann M. Emond-Dyerto Jeffrey R. May, Tollgate Seventh Addition, Lot 339, $225,000 Recontrust Company N.A. to Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation, Meadow Village, Lot 6, Block 18, $310,000 Julie Mero who took title as Julie Martynowicz to Brondum Commercial LLC, Quiet Canyon, Lot 31, $165,000 Terance O. and Claudine F. Skjersaa to Andrew P. and Amanda S. Conde, Park Addition, Lot 5, Block 27, $315,000 Pamela Armstrong to Further 2 Development LLC, Braeburn, Phase 2, Lot 55, $266,756.20 Leroy E. and Janice L. Chastain to Earle E. and Teresa L. Merchant, Partition Plat 200210, Parcel 1, $327,500 Henry W. Newhouse and Elsan Zimmerly to David and Carolyn Brock, Fieldstone Crossing P.U.D., Phase 2, Lot 52, $180,000 Gerald Sawyer to Kevin P. and Hedy F. Donnelly, Mountain Village East 4, Lot 16, Block 25, $150,000 Kevin P. and Barbara McElwee to Neal S. and Janice L. Rote, Partition Plat 1995-60, Parcel 2, Township 16, Range 12, Section 9, $610,000 Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation to Michael S. Wurtz, Dobbin Acres, Lot 6, Block 1, $179,900 Further 2 Development LLC to Richard B. and Pamela C. Armstrong, Braeburn, Phase 2, Lot 55, $293,000 Igor Podgorny to Igor A. Podgorny and Natalia S. Podgornaia trustees for Podgorny Family Trust, Williamsburg Park, Lot 12, $200,000 Roger D. and Peggy J. White to Gregory L. and Lori M. Jordan, Saddleback West, Lot 2, Block 5, $375,000 John P. Audette III and Victoria L. Audette trustees for John P. Audette III and Victoria L. Audette Joint Trust to William Dragon Jr. and Suzanne G. Dragon, Broken Top, Phase 2-H, Lot 225, $750,000 John J. and Brenda L. Audia to Jeffrey Gibbons, Northwest Crossing, Phase 5, Lot 181, $775,000 Hugh L. Hull and Cyril E. Smith trustees for Hugh L. Hull and Cyril E. Smith Family Trust to Jack L. Wolff, RiverRim P.U.D., Phase 9, Lot 291, $295,000 First American Title Insurance Company to Bank of New York Mellon, Tall Pines, Fifth Addition, Lot 7, Block 24, $274,407.61 Federal National Mortgage Association to Cheryl Sixkiller, Juniper Hill, Phase 1, Lot 9, $249,900 Bank of America N.A. successor by merger to BAC Home Loans Servicing LP fka Countrywide Home Loans Servicing LP to James R. and Susan B. Lewis, Awbrey Butte Homesites, Phase 22, Lot 3, Block 22, $360,400 Bradley S. Siemens to Stanley K. Suenegaand and Kyle M. Skidgel, Plateau Estates, Lot 4, Block 4, $290,000 Crook County

Northwest Trustee Services Inc. to Federal National Mortgage Association, Buena Villa Estates, Lot 7, $165,745.11 OneWest Bank FSB to Gregory R. and Lisa M. Kelso, First Fairways Subdivision, Lots 15 and 16, $163,000 J Bar T Ranch Inc. to Thomas J. and Georgia P. Fitzgerald trustees for Thomas J. Fitzgerald and Georgia P. Fitzgerald Family Trust, Township 15, Range 14, Section 15, $429,900 Eugene and Julie Kolbe to Ben F. Tuma and Matthew E. Moore, Brasada Ranch 4, Lot 405, $405,000 Quality Loan Service Corporation of Washington to Green Tree Servicing LLC, Deer Ridge Subdivision, Phase 5, Lot 99, $187,756.92

If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact Ashley Brothers at 541-383-0323, email business@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� at www.bendbulletin.com. Please allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication.

BEYOND THE GRAPEVINE

Labeled Cameron Hughes Wine bottles at the Cameron Hughes Wine facility in Calistoga, Calif.

Bypassing the grape but enjoying its fruit By Nicole LaPorte New York Times News Service

Cameron Hughes sees nothing romantic about being a winemaker. Having a rolling vineyard to call his own? Taking that first sip of a homegrown pinot noir? He can live without it, thanks — and he does, even as he has become a prominent name in the California wine industry. Hughes, who started by selling wine out of the back of his Volvo station wagon in 2002, is a wine negociant, or wine merchant. He does not own a vineyard or a winery. Instead, from offices in San Francisco and Calistoga, Calif., he outsources all the labor that goes into making a bottle of wine — growing the grapes, crushing and fermenting them, and other steps in the process — to others. “All we do is bring the barrels,� Hughes said. Actually, he does a bit more than that. During the worldwide wine glut of the recent recession, his company, Cameron Hughes Wine, flourished as he bought up excess wine from wineries, repackaged it under his own label and sold it at a discount. One of the first wines he ever sold was a syrah from the Lodi region of California that had a retail price of $28. Hughes sold it at Costco for $8.99 under his generic-sounding Lot series — it was Lot 1. (Per nondisclosure agreements he has with sellers, he does not reveal where his so-called bulk wines come from, but merely describes their aromas, flavors and area of origin.) Initially, Hughes said, he “stood in Costco doing my carnival barking act� as he tried to sell his wines to customers. “You’d hear me on the other side of the store, talking about wine. I had store managers come over and be like, ‘Dude, you’ve got to tone it down.’� Hughes has stormed in on a profession that many consider sacred and has imbued it with

Photos by Peter DaSilva / New York Times News Service

Cameron Hughes, who has become a prominent name in the California wine industry, samples wine blends. Hughes doesn’t own vineyards or wineries, and outsources all the labor that goes into making a bottle of wine.

some capitalistic swagger — not unlike Fred Franzia, the vintner behind Trader Joe’s discount wine, Charles Shaw, aka Two Buck Chuck. Negociants like Hughes are much more common in Europe. In the United States, “most people want to have a vineyard,� said Liz Thach, a professor of management and wine business at Sonoma State University. “The soil, the terroir, they want to have the whole thing. We have more than 7,000 wineries in the U.S. and most of them are very small and run by people who want to have a small, family business and the pride that goes into that.� It is notoriously difficult to make a profit on a vineyard, and some wealthy owners pour money into tending grapes knowing full well that they may lose money for years. Winemaking is “a labor

of love for many, many people,� Hughes said. “And it is for us, too, but we figured out how to make a buck, too.� Most of his bucks were made buying and selling bulk wine, but these days, Hughes puts most of his resources behind actually making wine — or, rather, having others make it for him. Working with wineries and vineyards in California, Oregon and Washington, as well as in Europe, he is on track to produce 300,000 cases of wine — equaling 5,000 tons of crushed grapes — this year. That’s even as poor harvests have resulted in a projected wine shortage for the next several years. In some cases, Hughes pairs a vineyard with a winery to create a wine according to specifications that he devises with his three winemakers and viticulturist. “We outsource the work,

but we oversee it very closely,� Hughes said. “We visit these vineyards numerous times. We have our viticulturist traveling the state right now, visiting all the vineyards. When the time comes for crushing and fermenting, our winemakers are there as well, getting daily lab updates.� In other instances, Hughes might come in just after wine has been fermented, assemble various blends and then send them to the barrel to age. Either way, the low-overhead nature of his business means that his wines, sold in places as diverse as Sam’s Club, boutique wine shops and on the Internet, are 50 percent to 70 percent cheaper, he said, than they would be under their winery’s label. So how did he enter this idiosyncratic profession? “Purely by accident,� he says. After starting out as a cel-

lar rat — a low-level winery employee — at Corbett Canyon, a popular inexpensive wine label, he decided that he didn’t want to be a wine producer and went into wine sales and marketing instead. A few years later, when he was working for a French wine importing company, he first heard about negociants. When the importer went bust not long thereafter, Hughes saw a place for himself in the wine world. “I bought 500 cases of Napa Valley cabernet, I had a guy bottle it up for me, and I sold it out of the back of my Volvo station wagon.� After struggling to the point that he teetered on the edge of bankruptcy, he said, he got his big break in 2004, when he persuaded Costco to start selling his Lot series. Because both he and the origins of his wine were unknowns, building trust among customers was its own kind of labor. At Costco in San Francisco, where Hughes would stand for hours personally selling his wine, “They’re like, ‘I’ve never heard of it,’ and they’d walk on by,� he recalled. “I used to tell people, ‘If you don’t like it, I’ll come wash your car for you.’ You just did whatever it took to get people to try it.� Thach said she admired Hughes’ “heady vision.� “He worked really hard to get Costco to pay attention to him, and when they did, it put him on the map,� she said. Over the years, Hughes has built up his business “one foxhole at a time,� as he puts it — in 2011, he sold 80 different Lot wines, compared with three his first year. And never once did he have to wash a car.

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Neighbor Continued from G1 Nextdoor’s site provides a house-by-house map of neighbors who are members — although members can choose not to have their names attached to their addresses — as well as a forum for posting items of general interest; classified listings for buying, selling or giving away things; and a database for neighbor-recommended local services. The company, which introduced its service in October, says it has set up more than 2,000 such neighborhoods in the U.S., each containing about 500 to 750 households. These mostly follow boundaries defined by Maponics, a supplier of geographic data. Nextdoor’s interior pages are private, unlike those of some other neighborhood-themed websites. In a Nextdoor neighborhood, everything, including the directory of members, is visible only to fellow members, so marketers can’t vacuum up names and addresses. Nor does the information appear on search engine results. To keep out interlopers, Nextdoor requires new members to prove that they actually live at their claimed residences, either by allowing a 1-cent transaction to be processed on a credit card tied to the address, by having an existing neighborhood member vouch for their identity or by other means. Once their addresses are verified, they can look at the map to see who else has joined. Currently, 20 percent of households in my neighborhood in a San Francisco suburb are Nextdoor members. Members don’t need to visit the website to stay abreast of postings. They can opt to receive posts by email — imme-

diately or in daily digests — or to get a text message in the case of urgent alerts. The service is free and, for now at least, carries no advertising. On its frequently-askedquestions page, the company says it plans to enlist local businesses to give members special offers that are unavailable elsewhere. This, the company says, will help “generate support for local businesses, in turn strengthening their own neighborhoods.� In the meantime, the company relies on capital raised from investors that include Benchmark Capital and Shasta Ventures. “At Facebook,� Tolia said, “it can feel out of place to see advertisements alongside pictures of your vacation or the announcement of your marriage.� At Nextdoor, he says, ads for local plumbers and electricians will be a natural fit because users are looking for recommendations anyway. When Tolia flips the switch to add advertising, however, he may find that Nextdoor’s members view ads as an intrusion there, too. On the online forum in my own Nextdoor neighborhood, there was a kerfuffle last week after one member asked for recommendations for a good gardener. Some members responded cheerfully, but then, seemingly out of the blue, someone offered a testimonial for a local insurance agent. That caused several members to express dismay over what appeared to be advertising. “I think we should not allow advertising notices� to be posted at all, one member said, and others vowed to leave the site if ads were permitted to sneak in. This little outburst shows how residents are protective of neighborhood space, whether physical or virtual.

Neighborhood identity has not been destroyed by the Internet. Robert Sampson, a sociology professor at Harvard, said: “There’s a common misreading that technology inevitably leads to the decline of the local community. I don’t believe that. Technology can be harnessed to facilitate local interactions.� Sampson is careful not to overstate the closeness of neighbors’ relationships with one another. These are not the ties of close friendship, nor are they anonymous. They form a network of acquaintances, which he defines as people who share a working trust even though they are not good friends. In his new book, “Great American City: Chicago and the Enduring Neighborhood Effect,� Sampson argues that worries about the supposed loss of community in cities are nothing new. In 1938, for example, the sociologist Louis Wirth described “anonymous� and “superficial� social relations as essential elements of urbanism. But Sampson says that this ignores the way that a city was, and remains, ordered by distinctive neighborhoods — what he calls “the enduring significance of place.� Back in its very early days, Facebook was an exclusive social network built around a neighborhood of sorts: the Harvard campus. Residency was verified by the universityissued email address. But when Facebook expanded beyond campuses, it left the atomic unit of the neighborhood behind. This has created the opportunity for a startup like Nextdoor to come along and create something that Facebook no longer is: an online network defined by reallife proximity.

Local since 1989

for appointments call 541-382-4900

AUTHORIZED DEALER • copy • print • scan • fax Bob Browning Owner

www.synergyoffice.com

541- 388 -1797 MEMORIAL

In our effort to provide dental care to children in Deschutes County who can’t afford it, the Kemple Memorial Children’s Dental Clinic wishes to thank the following dentists for their volunteered services in May.

Dentists volunteering in their own offices in May 2012 Dr. Scott Anderson

Dr. Ginny Murtague

Dr. Susan Armstrong

Dr. Casey O’Neill

Dr. Scot Burgess

Dr. Michael Olin

Dr. Bradley Burkett

Dr. Zack Porter

Dr. David Cauble

Dr. Maurine Porter

Dr. Steve Christensen

Dr. Catherine Quas

Dr. Karen Coe

Dr. Daniel Radatti

Dr. Yoli DiGiulio

Dr. Steven Rogers

Dr. Greg Everson

Dr. Brian Rosenzweig

Dr. Matt Falkenstein

Dr. Medhi Salari

Dr. Rex Gibson

Dr. Todd Schock

Dr. David Gobeille

Dr. Ken Shirtcliff

Dr. Brad Hester

Dr. Marika Stone

Dr. Dennis Holly

Dr. Andrew Timm

Dr. Jeff Johnson

Dr. Jeff Timm

Dr. Mark Keener

Dr. Ryan Timm

Dr. Nicholas Misischai

Dr. Steve Timm

At the Kemple Memorial Children’s Dental Clinic, our mission is to improve the health and well-being of children in Deschutes County by facilitating urgent dental services for children (K-12) whose families cannot access basic dental care.


SUNDAY, JUNE 17, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

Baby Continued from G1 Fleiss, Roney and Gugnani all have husbands with highpowered jobs, so there are no stay-at-home fathers to take charge of their households. On the other hand, financial resources for child care are ample. Yet much of the investment world, heavily dominated by men, remains skeptical about a woman’s ability to combine running a fast-growing tech startup and motherhood, Gugnani says. She raised $3 million from investors before becoming pregnant. “All of the women I know who went to raise money did it when they didn’t have kids,” she said. “There is total discrimination in the startup world against women who are pregnant.” Making pregnancy and motherhood a focal point of the investment process is an outdated way of thinking, she adds. Female entrepreneurs are less numerous and raise less money than their male counterparts. Women make up 10 percent of the founders at high-growth tech companies, “and they raise 70 percent less money than men do because of their lack of access to capital,” said Lesa Mitchell of the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation, where she is vice president for initiatives on advancing innovation.

Photos by Michael Falco / New York Times News Service

Carley Roney, a mother of two who founded the XO Group with her husband, with their sons, Cairo, 8, and Dublin, 4, at the company’s offices in New York.

Time management Roney says venture capitalists will assert that a female entrepreneur’s pregnancy and motherhood aren’t factors in deciding whether to invest in a firm — that it’s all about good ideas and the management team. “But I can pretty much guarantee you, behind closed doors it is a factor,” she said. That is why, Roney said, “in those first moments of having a business and having a baby, the baby was a complete and total secret.” At a startup, which lacks much corporate infrastructure, founders typically do the jobs of at least five people. “The expectation of the devotion of your time, particularly if you are a founder, is that you should be doing this and nothing else — if you aren’t, you are not giving everything you have to the company,” Roney explained. Fleiss was able to secure $15 million in Series B venture funding last year, shortly before she gave birth. If she had

Website Continued from G1 The website can be accessed from Business Oregon’s home page, www.oregon4biz.com, which contains information about industries, business financing and other topics. It’s not the only tool real estate agents and economic-development officials use to lure companies. Other websites, such as the Commercial Brokers Association, are populated with listings around the state. And Oregon isn’t unique in listing properties for businesses. States from coast to coast run similar websites. If updated frequently and marketed well, though, Business Oregon hopes the site will spark more recruitment, expansion, relocation and job creation in Central Oregon and around the rest of the state. That’s not to mention the benefits for real estate brokers and construction workers. If nothing else, the revamped website can draw more attention to empty buildings and bare land all over Oregon, such as a 508,000-square foot former Nike distribution center in Wilsonville, a 1,000-acre lot for lease in Irrigon and the 204,000-square-foot former Cessna airplane factory. In Central Oregon, 50 properties are listed for sale or lease on the site. Across the state, there are more than 1,100 posted. The database of properties — which are intended for companies that do business outside the state, Werth said — has come a long way since being introduced in the early 2000s, under the name Oregon Prospector. The latest version escorts interested parties to custom areas on the site where they can look at details on specific properties cities and counties want to pitch, Werth said. It’s steps ahead of the old way of

Divya Gugnani, founder of Send the Trend, with her 3-week-old son, Ashvin, in her office in New York.

been pregnant as she pitched the company in the first round of financing, when it was still an unproved entity, she says, she would have talked to mentors and advisers about how to present that fact. Investors do need a full picture of a founder’s other life commitments, Fleiss contends. “I don’t agree that men should be considered in the same exact context as women around aspects of raising a family,” she said. Certain factors like breastfeeding and body recovery require a women to take more time off, she notes. Fleiss took 10 weeks of maternity leave,

On the Web To check out the state’s revamped website featuring available commercial land and buildings for sale or lease, visit www.expandin oregon.com.

sending out many emails with many attachments, he said. The website prods local brokers or representatives of the properties to keep their listings up to date, preventing the promotion of places that are no longer available, he said. And for the first time, Werth said, the site lets utility companies log in and see how suitors might want to use the sites or buildings, to make sure they can provide the energy projects require. Still, the website is not without problems. In spreadsheets users can export from the website, “Deschutes” is spelled wrong for about 30 properties, which could lead site selectors to miss out on sites in La Pine, Redmond and Sisters. Some properties in Redmond show up when users search by city but not by county. And a few properties have incorrect addresses. One building in Bend has the address “Hwy 99,” but state Highway 99 doesn’t run through Central Oregon. Despite the flaws, the website has added time-saving functions for filtering out sites, such as minimum and maximum price points and whether they are in enterprise zones — which allow property tax breaks in exchange for new development and employment. In Central Oregon, Redmond stands out with 19 properties. La Pine lags, with one. Just five sites exceed 50 acres in size. No sites larger than 50 acres are listed in Crook County.

she says, while her husband, Andrew Fleiss, a principal at the private equity firm Liberty Partners in Manhattan, took a week off. Aileen Lee, a partner at Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, a venture capital firm in Menlo Park, Calif., put it this way: “If someone was having some surgery that was going to put them out for three months, it’s something you should consider, with a man or a woman. What is the impact of having the CEO or visionary out for three months?” Lee stresses that pregnancy is not a red flag for her and that she backs companies for the long run. Of her 11 port-

More than half of the 50 properties are in enterprise zones. Available properties vary in scale, ranging from a 1,500square-foot office building for lease in Sisters to 300 acres for sale in the Bend’s Juniper Ridge planned development. Five sites in Central Oregon — in La Pine, Madras, Prineville and Redmond — have been certified by Business Oregon as shovel-ready, meaning that development issues have been cleared up and construction can begin no more than 180 days after a purchase or lease. Most recently, last month Business Oregon certified a 73-acre lot in northeast Redmond’s Desert Rise Industrial Park, near two lots that were previously certified, according to a news release. Two local brokers for properties listed said they think highly of the remodeled website. It shows more data than other websites for listing commercial and industrial properties, said Jim Prosser, an agent at Century 21 Gold Country Realty Inc. of Bend. Prosser, who lists three Bend buildings for sale or lease on expandinoregon.com, signed up for an account on the old Oregon Prospector website two years ago, to increase the likelihood of closing deals. He would like to see Business Oregon promote the website even more than it does now. “We’re just after exposure,” Prosser said. Patty Cordoni, an agent with Re/Max Revolution in Sisters, liked what she saw on the redesigned website, thinking it could help move the eight Sisters buildings she has posted. “I would imagine with the new one, we’re going to (get) higher visibility with it,” Cordoni said. — Reporter: 541-633-2117, jnovet@bendbulletin.com

folio companies, three are run by women with children, including Rent the Runway, Fleiss’ company. Last year, Paige Craig, an angel investor in 61 tech companies, said on the Business Insider site that “I’m probably going to get myself in a bit of trouble here” before he stated that “a pregnant founder/CEO is going to fail her company.” Clearly, he was being hyperbolic because he wrote the post after deciding to invest in a crowdsourced financing company called Profounder, one of whose founders, Jessica Jackley, was pregnant with twins. He knew about her pregnancy before making his decision. Craig said he wrote the post not as a rallying cry against investing in women with children but to raise the question: “So I have this bias, let me dig in, and is it justified?” If investors meet a male founder of a company, they don’t care whether he has two or three children because they assume that his wife will take care of them, Craig says. “But with a female founder,” he added, “it’s a whole different story.” He does say that women who have just started a company “should probably put kids off for a year, when you can step back.” But, Craig said, he still had

confidence in Jackley, who is also a co-founder of the online lending site Kiva. The issue of children, it seems, plays differently for male founders. Neil Blumenthal, 31, cofounder of Warby Parker, an eyewear seller, said his family responsibilities never came up with investors, although his wife, Rachel, is also an entrepreneur and was pregnant at the time he and his co-founders sought investments. Their son, Griffin, is now 14 months old. He said his wife, who runs Rachel Leigh, a jewelry company, deals with more of the child care — about a 60-40 split — because his company is younger and in a more intense stage of growth. David Liu is CEO of the XO Group, which he founded with his wife, Roney. He said that they “co-parent,” but that the division of labor sometimes means that he travels more for work so that Roney can be at home. Like others, Liu sees a double standard in the startup investment world. “I think there are a lot of challenges for women because VCs are thinking: ‘Uh-oh. When are those women going to get pregnant? When are they going to get distracted?’ I think that kind of stuff is pervasive, and it’s unfortunate.” But some investors say they truly don’t factor motherhood into the equation. “Whether a female founder is pregnant, has children or is planning to have children is not a concern of mine, and frankly none of my business,” said Brad Feld, who has done early-stage investing for 20 years and is managing director of the Foundry Group, an investment firm based in Boulder, Colo. Feld said those issues have never been discussed at the firm. Of the 43 companies in which it has invested, however, only two were started by women, one of whom has children.

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EQUAL HOUSING LENDER

G3

Fleiss, Roney and Gugnani are hardly alone in finding ways to start companies while caring for young children. Jessica Herrin, 39, has two daughters and is the founder and chief executive of Stella & Dot, a social sales company based in San Francisco that generates more than $100 million in revenue a year. She says she “didn’t want to be on some venture capital firm’s timeline about how fast and when I should grow my company when I had two young kids and was still nursing.” Instead, she approached a few individual investors who had backed her previous company, WeddingChannel.com, and raised $350,000. (WeddingChannel was acquired by the XO Group in 2006.) Before she accepted a check, Herrin says, she told Doug Mackenzie, her investor at Radar Partners: “This company is going to have an initial slower pace of growth than it otherwise would because I want to go to swim class with my daughter on Friday afternoon.” Alexandra Wilkis Wilson, 35, is a co-founder of the Gilt Groupe, the shopping website. In 2010, two and half years after the company started, Wilson had her first child, a son. Her co-founder, Alexis Maybank, 37, has two children, one born in February this year and the other in September 2010. Wilson, who is also head of national sales for the Gilt City site, says that it’s possible to have children and run a startup but that timing is everything. “Back in 2007, when we had eight employees, it would have been hard to balance with the pace I was working.”


SUNDAY, JUNE 17, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

Apparel Continued from G1 American Apparel may be best known for its hip stores, racy ads and controversial chief executive, Dov Charney. But this factory and the thousands it employs are what truly make the company stand out, said Sarah Friedman, executive director of the National Association for the Sewn Products Industry. Few other U.S. clothing manufacturers employ more than a few hundred workers, she noted. “American Apparel is very, very remarkable,” she said. “Any time you have a retailer with thousands of employees still in the U.S. — that is pretty remarkable.” At the helm is Charney, 43, an outspoken advocate for local manufacturing who founded the company 14 years ago. In a recent interview he acknowledged pressure from other company executives, board members and consultants to move manufacturing abroad. “I want to prove myself,” he said, “and I want to prove ‘made in America’ is a smart business.” Charney conceded that the company’s finances could eventually push it to start making some products overseas. “To say that I’m never going to import from overseas would be unreasonable,” he said during an interview at his colorful factory office strewn with new designs being tested for fit. “At this time our business concept is to make everything here. But I wouldn’t rule anything out.”

Photos by Gary Friedman / Los Angeles Times

Workers in the American Apparel garment dye factory in South Gate, Calif. The company’s trademark cotton is knit and dyed in Southern California.

American Apparel’s profit struggle REVENUE IN MILLIONS 2011

400 200 0

25 -25 -75

2011

-125

AlaskAir s Avista BkofAm BarrettB Boeing CascdeBcp CascdeCp ColSprtw Costco CraftBrew FLIR Sys HewlettP HmFedID Intel Keycorp Kroger Lattice LaPac MDU Res MentorGr Microsoft

Div PE ... 1.16 .04 .44 1.76 ... 1.40 .88 1.10f ... .28 .53f .22 .90f .20f .46 ... ... .67 ... .80

15 16 ... 38 13 ... 9 18 25 14 15 8 ... 12 7 22 6 ... 20 14 11

YTD Last Chg %Chg 34.58 26.34 7.90 20.01 71.99 4.68 45.32 50.18 91.44 7.48 19.98 21.64 10.29 27.34 7.43 22.81 3.76 9.81 21.90 14.82 30.02

-.63 +.09 +.24 -.08 +.14 +.11 +.37 +.83 +1.61 +.14 +.03 +.05 +.31 +.36 +.15 +.23 -.09 +.13 +.12 +.32 +.68

-7.9 +2.3 +42.1 +.3 -1.9 +6.8 -3.9 +7.8 +9.7 +24.3 -20.3 -16.0 -1.1 +12.7 -3.4 -5.8 -36.7 +21.6 +2.1 +9.3 +15.6

AT A GLANCE

Source: American Apparel, Bloomberg

A worker throws wet dye products into an extractor at the garment dye factory.

ing officer, has seen both sides of the problem. His 28-year career includes 15 years at underwear giant Fruit of the Loom, where he oversaw factories in Kentucky, North Carolina and Mississippi. When many of those factories closed, he supervised the company’s transition to manufacturing in lower-wage countries such as Honduras and Mexico. Bailey joined American Apparel in 2002 and quickly set out to retool the retailer’s operations. His key innovation, borrowed from his years at Fruit of the Loom, was implementing a “team-based” manufacturing method that upped productivity and — he says — positions the company to successfully make it in America.

Behind the machines On an open factory floor with light streaming in from large windows, workers are divided into teams, with each responsible for sewing one style of clothing from start to finish. A team, made up of five to 20 workers with their sewing machines pushed together, starts with fabric that has been cut on

NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

© 2012 McClatchy-Tribune News Service

each completed garment, at a “piece rate.” Although everyone is guaranteed minimum wage — $8 an hour — factory workers typically earn $11 an hour, on average, and the fastest teams can earn $18. Supervisors clock their teams several times a week and devote time to training slow workers. The company provides a welcoming workplace for its largely immigrant workforce. Banners such as “Legalize LA” hanging on its downtown factory building proclaim corporate support for immigration reform, and Charney has marched for workers’ rights. Supervisors are generally bilingual. There is a medical clinic staffed with a doctor and nurses. Factory employees also get subsidized meals and free massages; masseurs in light blue American Apparel tops are sprinkled through the factory. “They’re all here because

the fourth floor. The first person sews the sleeves. The next may attach a zipper. The items are passed among the team members, one after another. At the end, there’s a finished shirt or skirt that is inspected by a quality control worker and then boxed up and sent down a conveyor belt to the distribution warehouse next door. American Apparel’s skilled workforce can churn out 120,000 T-shirts in a day and quickly whip out new designs. Bailey said the fast turnaround from design to factory to store is a key advantage when jockeying for shoppers with competitors such as Forever 21 and H&M. “I’ve had ideas on Monday and had them hanging in a storefront on Friday in Manhattan,” Bailey said. The company’s products cost more than its fast-fashion rivals’ — a simple cotton T-shirt can sell for $21 if it comes from American Apparel and as little as $8 if from Target. Bailey said superior fabrics and better designs justify the higher price tag. In the factory, motivation is key: Employees are paid for

NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstBcp Weyerhsr

1.44 1.08 1.78 ... .80f ... 1.68 .12 .70f .75f 1.56 .89f .68 ... .36f .78f .32 .88 ... .60

21 101.75 +1.73 +5.6 15 49.15 +.98 -1.1 20 47.52 +.18 -.9 15 4.49 +.13 -1.1 12 39.40 +.39 +5.2 ... 1.72 +.01 -9.9 33 37.62 +.22 +2.9 20 166.96 +.25 +1.3 11 17.97 -.23 -14.6 8 24.41 +.63 -42.3 29 129.54 +.22 +45.1 12 35.36 -.03 -3.8 30 52.54 +.21 +14.2 24 5.62 +.19 +15.4 16 12.45 +.11 +.5 12 31.58 +.57 +16.7 13 15.88 +.12 +13.5 11 32.45 +.42 +17.7 12 19.17 +.22 +22.9 32 20.79 +.21 +11.4

Price (troy oz.)

541-706-6900

$1627.00 $1627.00 $28.734

NYSE

Most Active ($1 or more)

641 NW Fir Redmond

Name

Vol (00)

Last Chg

BkofAm S&P500ETF SPDR Fncl SprintNex Citigroup

1932515 7.90 +.24 1407525 134.14 +1.36 793004 14.34 +.21 702532 3.09 -.01 591377 28.31 +.40

Gainers ($2 or more)

Amex

Name

$1620.00 $1618.40 $28.401

Vol (00)

Last Chg

130287 1.72 +.01 115858 14.10 +1.06 81781 1.09 -.16 70566 9.58 -.49 26588 5.99 +.01

Gainers ($2 or more)

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Chg %Chg

Name

Last

PhxNMda SunTr wtB Danaos E-CDang GFI Grp

5.55 2.71 4.53 6.65 3.43

+.85 +.35 +.56 +.82 +.38

UraniumEn EntGmg rs Electrmed CheniereEn PowrREIT

2.29 +.41 +21.8 2.40 +.35 +17.1 2.70 +.22 +8.9 14.10 +1.06 +8.1 8.77 +.61 +7.5

Losers ($2 or more) Name

Last

Chg %Chg

SrcCp pf 27.56 -7.62 -21.7 AcornIntl 2.72 -.58 -17.6 DrxRsaBear 30.61 -4.01 -11.6 ChinZenix 2.45 -.31 -11.2 AAR 10.34 -1.23 -10.6

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Nasdaq

Name

Name

+18.1 +14.8 +14.1 +14.1 +12.5

Indexes

Most Active ($1 or more)

Rentech CheniereEn GoldStr g NwGold g NovaGld g

Chg %Chg

Losers ($2 or more)

Microsoft Cisco Intel Oracle PwShs QQQ

Vol (00) 483319 405716 396111 370462 359639

Last Chg 30.02 17.10 27.34 27.70 62.99

+.68 +.18 +.36 +.79 +.77

Gainers ($2 or more) Name

Last

ChinGerui ATP O&G BroadVisn AntheraPh ModusLink

2.69 +.67 +33.2 5.23 +1.20 +29.8 12.37 +2.46 +24.8 2.74 +.51 +22.9 3.29 +.57 +21.0

Chg %Chg

Losers ($2 or more)

Name

Last

Chg %Chg

Name

Last

IntTower g TanzRy g GoldenMin AdcareHlt Orbital

2.67 4.11 4.68 3.40 3.60

-.38 -12.5 -.39 -8.7 -.38 -7.5 -.25 -6.8 -.24 -6.2

ATA Inc Micrvis rs CharmCom Synutra LeGaga

3.18 -1.17 -26.9 2.27 -.72 -24.1 6.16 -1.84 -23.0 4.50 -1.12 -19.9 4.00 -.75 -15.8

Diary 2,106 921 115 3,142 81 42

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

www.expresspros.com

www.denfeldpaints.com

Most Active ($1 or more)

Diary Pvs Day

400 SW Bluff Dr Ste 200 Bend , OR 97702

541-382-4171 541-548-7707

Market recap YTD Last Chg %Chg

Charney argues that the “made in America” model is not just a marketing gimmick but also a smart long-term strategy for retail. American manufacturing will prove to be cost-effective as international transportation costs shoot up and overseas wages rise, Charney said, pointing to China as a prime example. “As that happens to the worldwide economy,” he said, “it’s going to make a lot of sense to manufacture in the United States or in Los Angeles.” Even at night, the downtown L.A. factory’s huge parking lot is often jammed with cars. Light glows from its windows, and workers inside are still hunched over sewing machines. Charney insists that the company is heading into an upswing, cautiously estimating that it may show a profit by next year. He rejects any suggestion that moving operations overseas may cure what ails American Apparel, but it’s an option that analysts say the company has to consider if its struggles continue. “In 50 years, would you say American Apparel will be around?” Charney said. “Levi’s has been around for a long time, and I hope American Apparel will be around for that long. There’s still lots of tricks up my sleeve.” No one knows whether those tricks will keep its factories open in Los Angeles. The company might go the way of San Francisco-based Levi’s, which closed its last U.S. factory in 2003, moving like much of the industry to find cheap labor in Asia and Latin America. Economists say the city would benefit from American Apparel’s staying put. “American Apparel occupies an important niche in the job market in Los Angeles,” said Sung Won Sohn, an economics professor at Cal State Channel Islands and vice chairman of Forever 21. “Some immigrants qualify for high-paying jobs, and others qualify for only minimum-wage jobs. They provide employment to a lot of immigrants who don’t qualify for the high-paying jobs. “If they were to move out of L.A., that would be a shame,” he added.

541-389-1505

2121 NE Division Bend

Call 541-389-9690

Div PE

Smart or gimmicky?

7:30 AM - 5:30 PM MON-FRI 8 AM - 3 PM SAT.

70 Years of Hearing Excellence

Name

ads alongside sexy models (including a few porn actresses) in skimpy outfits. Wolfgang’s Vault, a San Francisco company that sells concert recordings and merchandise, buys plain American Apparel T-shirts and prints retro music designs on them. They are pricier than many competitors’ but worth the extra cost, said Annelise Poda, the company’s order fulfillment manager. “They are good-quality cotton, really soft, and people really like them,” Poda said. “Our designs mirror the original concert T-shirts from the ’60s and ’70s, which have a slim, youthful fit. The American Apparel T-shirts have that kind of fit.”

Providing unparalled service across a variety of industries since 1983.

Self Referrals Welcome

Precious metals Metal

$-39.3 million ’06 ’07 ’08 ’09 ’10 ’11

• Founded . . . . . . . . . . . 1998 • Headquarters . . Los Angeles • CEO . . . . . . . . Dov Charney • Employees . . . . . . . . 11,000 • Retail stores . . . . . . . . . 253

Northwest stocks Name

’06 ’07 ’08 ’09 ’10 ’11

NET INCOME IN MILLIONS

How important is it? A native Canadian who attended Tufts University in Boston, Charney started selling Tshirts under the label American Apparel in 1987 with seed money cobbled together from his father, family friends, former classmates and parents of friends. Charney began his manufacturing operations in South Carolina before settling in downtown Los Angeles in 1997. In recent years, Charney has battled multiple wrongful-termination and sexual harassment lawsuits brought by at least eight employees. The latest two suits, filed by five retail employees last spring, are now in arbitration, according to company lawyer Peter Schey. The company denies wrongdoing, but it acknowledged in response to a previous lawsuit that it operates “a sexually charged workplace” where employees deal with “sexual conduct, speech and images as part of their jobs.” It was an unusual admission for a publicly traded company, but investors are more likely focused on the firm’s finances. American Apparel has suffered nine straight quarterly losses. The company booked sales of $547.3 million in 2011 but posted a net loss of $39.3 million. Shares closed Friday at 87 cents, down from their 52-week high of $1.13 last July 15. “There’s been a lot of discussion about the importance of American companies employing American workers. But when it comes to fashion items, that doesn’t necessarily resonate with shoppers,” said Anthony Dukes, a business professor at the University of Southern California who has studied the retail industry. “There’s not a lot of evidence to suggest that ‘made in America’ is a great model.” Marty Bailey, 52, is out to prove him wrong. The burly Kentucky native, who is the company’s chief manufactur-

$547.3 million

600

they want to earn, and the more successful they are, the more successful the company is,” Bailey said. “These people are professional apparel workers, and they are better and faster than training people in Honduras how to operate a $5,000 machine, who don’t even know how to flush a toilet because they haven’t seen one.” Besides paying higher wages, the company has faced other drawbacks of managing a U.S. workforce. Productivity slipped dramatically after the company was forced to dismiss 1,600 workers from its downtown factory after an immigration audit in 2009, Bailey said. The company had to hire and train thousands of new workers. It has tightened its hiring practices to ensure that all its employees are working legally. Lopez, the team supervisor, jumped to American Apparel four years ago after toiling in other Los Angeles outfits, many with sweatshop conditions. She now earns $12 an hour. “The pay is better here than at previous places I have worked,” said Lopez, 43. “If you are a fast sewer, you can earn a good salary.” Oishang Mai, a 60-year-old who worked for decades as a mechanic at garment factories in Guangzhou, China, says conditions are better than busing tables at Chinese restaurants, the only job he could find after moving to the U.S. two years ago. “I’ve been working at clothing factories for decades,” Mai said. “I’m glad to have a job doing something I’m trained in.” In addition to the two large buildings downtown, the company owns four smaller manufacturing operations in Southern California. Fabric for the company’s trademark cotton T-shirts, which come in 52 colors, is knit and dyed in those facilities before getting trucked downtown for sewing. On a recent day, Bailey climbs into a company van and heads to the American Apparel factory in South Gate, Calif., where much of the company’s denim is cut, sewn and dyed. In a cavernous warehouse, about 300 workers churn out shorts, skirts and brightly colored skinny jeans. From washing machines the size of compact cars, workers pull out piles of jeans freshly dyed a deep forest green and shove them into equally giant dryers that can hold 200 pounds at once. “At first we commissioned the dyeing” from nearby companies, Bailey said. “But we ended up chasing the product all over L.A. So we ended up buying this in 2008. It made sense to do it ourselves.” While other manufacturers are fleeing the United States, American Apparel appears to be doubling down. In addition to blue jeans, the company recently added sandals and other shoes to its lineup of products — all made in house. Its slogan, “Made in America. Sweatshop Free,” is prominently featured on its billboards, websites and print

G5

Chg %Chg

Diary 230 218 43 491 4 10

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

1,753 749 111 2,613 64 43

52-Week High Low 13,338.66 10,404.49 5,627.85 3,950.66 481.60 381.99 8,496.42 6,414.89 2,498.89 1,941.99 3,134.17 2,298.89 1,422.38 1,074.77 14,951.57 11,208.42 860.37 601.71

Name Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

Last

Net Chg

%Chg

YTD %Chg

52-wk %Chg

12,767.17 5,091.24 483.05 7,664.27 2,288.54 2,872.80 1,342.84 14,010.58 771.32

+115.26 +34.04 +2.26 +81.44 +7.13 +36.47 +13.74 +143.10 +8.98

+.91 +.67 +.47 +1.07 +.31 +1.29 +1.03 +1.03 +1.18

+4.50 +1.43 +3.95 +2.50 +.45 +10.27 +6.78 +6.22 +4.10

+6.35 -1.30 +13.18 -4.20 +.95 +9.80 +5.61 +4.18 -1.33

World markets

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed yesterday. Market Close % Change

Key currency exchange rates Friday compared with late Thursday in New York. Dollar vs: Exchange Rate Pvs Day

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

297.58 2,118.95 3,087.62 5,478.81 6,229.41 19,233.94 37,738.58 13,390.69 3,447.07 8,569.32 1,858.16 2,811.00 4,107.01 5,503.45

+1.92 +.74 +1.82 +.22 +1.48 +2.26 +.80 +2.34 +.91 +.01 -.71 +1.34 +.42 +.14

s s s s s s s s s s t s s s

1.0082 1.5678 .9773 .002006 .1571 1.2637 .1289 .012705 .071835 .0309 .000860 .1432 1.0522 .0334

.9978 1.5533 .9744 .001994 .1569 1.2600 .1289 .012615 .071377 .0307 .000857 .1424 1.0492 .0334


G6

THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, JUNE 17, 2012

S D 

Fiat compact packs power Caravan’s electric problems have 2 possible sources

By Warren Brown Special to The Washington Post

It is the motorized equivalent of a little dog with a big mouth — a cute toy pup that yap-yaps at everything bigger than itself, confident that it could outrun or outmaneuver the object of its taunts. It is a confidence born of experience, possessed in ample measure by the 2012 Fiat 500 Abarth. With an overall length of 144.4 inches, the front-wheeldrive Abarth hatchback, along with its Fiat 500 REVIEW siblings, is one of the smallest cars on sale in the United States. The Abarth is seven inches shorter and two inches narrower than the Mini Cooper, one of the most popular subcompact automobiles sold in this country. The only car smaller is the Smart Fortwo coupe, which is 106.1 inches long. You thus would expect the Abarth, distinguished by its red-and-yellow stylized astrological scorpion badge, to act its size. But it doesn’t. It has a pane-rattling exhaust note as loud as that of some large motorcycles. It is loud enough and reasonably fast enough — going from 0 to 60 mph in about seven seconds by the time you reach the third gear of its five-speed manual transmission — to attract unwelcome uniformed attention. Thankfully, it’s so cute — with its huggable exterior styling and smartly designed two-tone interior — it affords you contrite wriggle room. You apologize for the car’s outsized decibel levels, saying that the noise is the product of history, the legacy of late car designer and racer Carlo Alberto Abarth (Karl Albert Abarth, for those of you who know he was a native Austrian and naturalized Italian). As for the ticket-territory speed, you apologize even more, express embarrassment that you somehow went so fast in a car so small. You promise to be more careful, and at the moment you actually mean it, especially when the law enforcement officer correctly points out that your tiny Fiat 500 Abarth is no match for a tree, a wall, a signpost, or even a subcompact

By Paul Brand The Star Tribune (Minneapolis)

open that causes the erratic behavior.

I have a 2005 Dodge Caravan with the 3.8I have a 2006 Dodge DuQ : liter engine. Everything Q : rango with the 4.7-liter but the rear tailgate lock V-8 engine and 62,400 miles.

Courtesy of Fiat

The 2012 Fiat 500 Abarth economy sports hatchback is a tiny car for experienced drivers. It’s Italian cute, but the author doesn’t recommend it for newbie drivers or families.

Fiat 500 Abarth Base price: $22,000 As tested: $23,700 including $1,000 in options. Body style/layout: Frontengine, front-wheel-drive two-door economy sports hatchback. Engine/transmission: Turbocharged 1.4-liter, 16-valve in-line fourcylinder engine linked to a five-speed manual transmission. Mileage: Averaged 21 miles in the city and 33 miles on the highway at a consistent 65 mph during test drive.

Toyota Corolla, Chevrolet Sonic or Mini Cooper. It is the downside of Italian cute, and largely why I still don’t recommend that parents buy a Fiat 500 of any type for newbie drivers in the family. The Fiat 500 line comes with ample standard safety equipment — for example, ventilated front disc brakes and solid rear discs in the Abarth along with knee-bolster air bags for front passengers. But small has its

limits. In National Highway Traffic Safety Administration testing, the car gets three of five stars — a marginal-togood rating — for overall crash safety. It gets a sorry two-star rating in side-impact collisions. As a parent, I simply cannot recommend a car with such a crash-safety rating for younger drivers. I want to see at least four stars. But for the more experienced motorists among us, the Fiat 500 Abarth is a hoot. That’s because there is more to automobile safety than crash safety. There’s also the matter of active safety — the ability, which usually comes with driving experience, to avoid a collision in the first place. The Abarth has lots of active safety. Steering is quick and nimble. The car comes with a sports-tuned suspension — McPherson struts up front, torsion beam in rear, with front and rear stabilizer bars. There is electronic stability and traction control to help keep you from skidding out of control or rolling over. Handling is remarkable. The Abarth knows its way around curves and in sharp turns. And it has a turning radius of 37.6 feet, small enough to make a U-turn on

will quit working. When I unhook the battery, it resets, and they all work well for a while. Then the same thing happens again. My wife thinks the problem is in the tilt steering wheel. Sometimes the lights won’t go to bright. When I hit the high beam lever, the wipers engage. I took the trim off the steering wheel, and all the wires were good. Could all this be part of the same problem? My instincts say no. My Alldata automotive database pulled up Chrysler bulletin 08-040-04 dated December 2004 that describes a flash reprogramming of the body control module to address two issues. First, if the vehicle theft alarm system is activated, the alarm is triggered when unlocking the rear tailgate with the remote key fob. And secondly, the driver/passenger power door lock switches become inoperative. Your issue with the door locks may well be related to this bulletin. But not the high beam/ turn signal problem. It’s likely the issue is in the multifunction switch that controls the high beams and turn signals. The harness for this switch flexes each time the steering wheel is tilted up or down and may have developed an internal short or

A:

a suburban street without hitting a curb. But the real fun is in its turbocharged 1.4-liter gasoline engine, which delivers a maximum 160 horsepower and 170 foot-pounds of torque (compared with 101 horsepower and 98 foot-pounds of torque in the base Fiat 500 Pop). The Abarth scoots. It’s addictive. It moves so fast and well, you want to drive it the longest way home. I loved driving it so much, especially in congested urban traffic, I didn’t mind accepting the risks suggested by NHTSA’s so-so crash-test results. The appearance of the Abarth caps the relaunch of the Fiat 500, line which went on sale in America earlier this year. Prediction: The fun-todrive, cute, reasonably wellmade Abarth will sell well.

Aside from the chrome grille wrinkling from an 11-below wind chill factor a few winters ago, I am currently experiencing a subtle vibration when accelerating between 30 and 37 mph. It does not seem to matter whether the engine is cold or warm. The subtle vibration is especially noticeable when accelerating up a slight grade. I’ve suspected a fuel injector or fuel filter clog, or possibly a transmission issue. I noticed the vibration after I had my snow tires removed and my regular wheels and tires installed. Any ideas? Has the vehicle ever had its transmission fluid and filter changed? With the cold weather you described, the “severe service” maintenance schedule calls for transmission fluid and filter replacement at 60,000 miles. The correct transmission fluid for this vehicle is ATF+4 fluid. The torque converter clutch can operate in both a partial and fully engaged mode. Slippage in either mode could be causing the shudder you’re experiencing. Have a scan tool check for any engine or transmission fault codes, try a transmission conditioner like Trans-Tune and, if it has not been done yet, have the fluid and filter changed.

A:

— Brand is an automotive troubleshooter and former race car driver. Email questions to paulbrand@startribune.com. Include a daytime phone number.

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GM factory closure skims surface of continent’s automotive glut By Alex Webb Bloomberg News.

PARIS — General Motors’ move to shutter the first German car factory since World War II addresses only a fraction of the supply glut hobbling the European auto industry. “One would need to close at least one factory per volume manufacturer in Europe, which would be about five factories in total,” said Philippe Houchois, a UBS analyst in London, referring to Renault, PSA Peugeot Citroen, Fiat and Ford as the other four companies needing to shut plants. Hamstrung by political pressure not to cut jobs, Europe’s carmakers have balked at shutting unprofitable plants, closing just two in the past four years: a GM facility in Belgium and a Fiat factory in Sicily. With demand softening, overcapacity in western Europe may more than double to about 2 million vehicles in 2012, according to researcher IHS Automotive. The region’s car market will contract 7 percent this year, the European Automobile Manufacturers’ Association, or ACEA, said last week. GM’s announcement Wednesday to shut a factory in Bochum, Germany, reflects the difficulties that European automakers face. The move will take until 2017 to carry out after the Detroit-based automaker agreed to extend job guarantees. “Even GM seems to need five years to close down its

most marginal plant,” said David Arnold, a sales specialist with Credit Suisse in London. The prolonged closure “highlights once again that there will be no easy or indeed quick solution to the European overcapacity problem.” Car sales across the region tumbled 7.1 percent in the first four months of the year, with the Italian, French and Greek markets all plunging 18 percent or more, according to ACEA data. Opel is in negotiations with unions to keep the Bochum plant open until GM stops making the Zafira minivan at the factory at the end of 2016, the Ruesselsheim, Germanybased GM unit said Wednesday. Opel would extend job protections by two years through 2016 and in exchange ask workers to delay wage increases set for this year. “Under the current economic conditions and outlook, there will be no further product allocation for Bochum after the Zafira goes out of production,” Doris Klose, an Opel spokeswoman, said by telephone. “It is currently being negotiated with the unions whether something else might be produced there.” The deepening crisis has some carmakers calling for intervention. French Industry Minister Arnaud Montebourg said Wednesday his government is considering financial support for automakers after Renault Chief Operating Officer Carlos Tavares said he

would welcome “any kind of measure of support.” The French government owns 15 percent of Renault. The region’s auto executives Thursday started their annual two-day gathering, led by current ACEA President and Fiat CEO Sergio Marchionne. The CEO is pushing for an industrywide plan under the auspices of the European Union that would draw up a blueprint for factory shutdowns in an effort to discourage member states from offering incentives to protect local jobs. Thus far, his efforts have been thwarted by German automakers, which don’t have the same capacity glut in Europe as their French, Italian and American counterparts, because they make vehicles in demand in markets like the U.S. and China. “Now that GM has opened the way, other manufacturers may find the courage to follow,” Houchois said. “The industry is now capable of financing its own restructuring. This will be much more difficult three years from now, especially if the macroeconomic situation doesn’t improve.” Fiat was the first European automaker to close a factory in its home country since the 2008 financial crisis when it shut a plant in Sicily in December. Before Fiat’s move, GM was the only other carmaker to shut a factory in the region in the past four years, closing a facility in Antwerp, Belgium, in 2010.

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S U N D AY, AY A Y,, J U N E 1 7 , 2 0 1 2 Y

BESH WITH HIS BOYS: FROM LEFT, LUKE, ANDREW, JACK, AND BRENDAN

FOOD, FAMILY &

Fatherh~~d CHEF JOHN BESH’S BESH S RECIPE FOR HAVING IT ALL

© PARADE Publications 2012. All rights reserved.


Walter Scott,s

PARADE

Got a question?

Email us at personality@parade.com

JIMMY WALTER SCOTT ASKS … RECALLS HIS STANDOUT SNL MOMENT AT

Jimmy Fallon

The 37-year-old Saturday Night Live alum and host of Late Night With Jimmy Fallon has a new musical comedy album, Blow Your Pants Off, featuring Paul McCartney, Bruce Springsteen, and more. What was it like singing with such music legends? I couldn’t

believe it was happening! I grew up idolizing these singers. You couldn’t get bigger than Paul McCartney in my house. What was the first impression you ever did? It was James Cagney when I was 2 years old. I’m on tape saying, “You dirty rat!” As I got older, I started doing Rodney Dangerfield, Steve Martin, and anyone on Saturday Night Live. Do you have any TV addictions? My wife and I love watching reality TV shows—any of the Housewives, The Amazing Race, and Survivor. I gotta stay up on my video games, too. Were you the class clown as a kid? I always wanted to make the teacher laugh. One of my big jokes in fourth grade was when I pointed to a nun’s habit and said, “Is that felt?” And she said, “No,” and I rubbed my hands on it and said, “Now it is!” I thought I was so funny. I found the right job, I think. Email your questions to Walter Scott at personality@parade.com. Letters can be sent to P.O. Box 5001, Grand Central Station, New York, N.Y. 10163-5001.

P The Watergate complex in Washington, D.C.

Q: Does anyone work in the office where the Watergate burglary took place? —Darrell Brown, Austin, Tex.

A: Today marks 40 years

since the infamous breakin that led to President Nixon’s resignation, and the suite on the sixth

floor of the Watergate office building where the crime occurred is empty and up for rent. At 2,040 square feet, the space is going for about $7,500 a month. See more photos of the historic building, still a D.C. tourist attraction, ct o , at Parade.com/watergate. gate. Q: How did The Bachelorette’s Emily ily Maynard explain the reality show to her daughter? —Joline S., San Diego

A: “She doesn’t

know a lot about

what’s going on. I don’t even think I’ve mentioned the word bachelorette to her,” Maynard says of her daughter, Ricki, 6. “She loves any kind of chaos in the house. I told her it was a very elaborate family video she can watch wayy down w wa dow the road.” The 26 26-year-old single mom was prote protective of her dau daughter while fillming the dating show. d ““People will p Bachelorette E Emily Maynard

see that Ricki’s life wasn’t really affected.” The Bachelorette airs Mondays on ABC at 8 p.m. ET.

Hugh Jackman, dad of two, talks about his favorite Father’s Day gift.

“THE BEST IS A HANDWRITTEN CARD. I DON’T KNOW WHERE SOME OF MY AWARDS ARE, BUT I CAN TELL YOU EXACTLY WHERE THOSE CARDS ARE. I TREASURE THEM MOST.” Tell us your favorite Father’s Day gifts (to give or receive!) at Facebook.com/parademag

NNNNNNNNNNNNN WIN IT!

ICE AGE IS BACK! Win a screening in your hometown What’s your Random Act of Niceness? Tell us and you could win a special hometown screening of Ice Age: Continental Drift for your family and friends. NO PURCHASE NECESSARY. To enter and for official rules, go to Parade.com/niceness.

NNNNNNNNNNNNN

PHOTOS, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: VIRGINIA SHERWOOD/NBC; MARC PIASECKI/GETTY IMAGES; BLUE SKY STUDIOS/ TWENTIETH CENTURY FOX FILM CORPORATION; CRAIG SJODIN/ABC; JOE SOHM/GETTY IMAGES

Parade.com /fallon

2 • June 17, 2012

© PARADE Publications 2012. All rights reserved.


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What ttoo re rread, ea ad d, see, sseee, e, and an nd d do do this thiiss week th w wee For more, go to Parade.com/picks G GE T READ DY GET READY FOR THE FIRST DAY OF

T The he addictive sci-fi series eries Falling Skiess returns with more Fa re S Skitters ki and dM Mechs h and da two-hour season premiere (TNT, June 17, 9 p.m. ET) that shows Tom (Noah Wyle, above) returning from the aliens’ ship—but why did they let him go? Cool thrills for hot nights.

SUMMER

Whoops!

BIG COUNTRY

FORGOT FATHER’S DAY? No worries. Send Dad a fun e-card and he’ll think you’ve planned it for weeks! Scan this tag with your smartphone for your choice of free Father’s Day cards.

June 20 IS THE LONGEST DAY OF THE YEAR—USE EVERY MINUTE OF IT IT. HERE ARE SOME GREAT IDEAS IDEAS. FORD, TOUGH In 1960s Montana, a 15-yearold boy’s life is upended when his parents are jailed for bank robbery, his twin sister runs off, and he’s banished across the border. Then things get worse. Canada brings new twists to author Richard Ford���s favorite themes: fate, family, and the American experience.

(1) Build a towering sand sculpture—turrets and all. For tips and tricks, go to sandcastlecentral.com. (2) Read an excerpt from the new novel The Age of Miracles by Karen Thompson Walker at Parade.com/miracles. It’s a “what if?” story in which the earth’s rotation slows, resulting in ever-longer days. (3) Hit (then rehit) the links. Want a goal? The most holes played in 12 hours by a single golfer walking the fairways is 221, by Scott Holland, at Banff, Canada, in 2005, according to Guinness World Records. (4) Pick strawberries, then use them to make your own scrumptious ice cream. Go to Parade.com/berries for the recipe. (5) Take a one-day course online. Get access to classes from some of the world’s top schools by downloading the free iTunes U app.

Two great showmen bare their souls in new albums. Alan Jackson (above) is beloved for honky-tonks like “Good Time,” but on Thirty Miles West, he strikes a deep, personal chord with “When I Saw You Leaving,” a song written for his wife, who successfully battled cancer. You’ll hear plenty of Kenny Chesney’s stadium rock persona on Welcome to the Fishbowl, but it’s the laid-back, off-season Chesney who wins out with “Come Over,” a sad, slow-burning song about not being able to let go of a love. To enter for a chance to win tickets to see Kellie Pickler, Brantley Gilbert, and more at the Ram Jam concert in Nashville, go to Parade.com/country

PHOTOS, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: JAMES DITTIGER/TNT; TNT; RICK DIAMOND/GETTY IMAGES FOR CMT; DANNY CLINCH; JONATHAN OAKES/GETTY IMAGES; LUIS ERNESTO SANTANA

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4 • June 17, 2012

© PARADE Publications 2012. All rights reserved.


Ask Marilyn By Marilyn vos Savant Sunscreen manufacturers recommend that their products be applied 15 to 30 minutes before exposure to sunlight. If you first apply a sunscreen when you’re already in the sunshine, how is its effectiveness altered? —Linda Weller, Fresno, Calif.

The effectiveness is delayed at least 15 minutes while the product dries. This can be significant exposure depending on the time of day and the fairness of one’s skin. And if you do this repeatedly—say, over the course of a weeklong vacation—you’ll build up a low level of UV radiation damage without even noticing it. There’s no such thing as a safe suntan, including “base” tans intended to delay burning. If one’s natural skin color has changed after UV exposure, the skin has been damaged. Got a question for Marilyn? Visit Parade.com/askmarilyn

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© PARADE Publications 2012. All rights reserved.


COVER and OPENING PHOTOGRAPHS by PETER FRANK EDWARDS

WHAT’S FOR DINNER,

DAD?

Rummaging around in the kitchen of his Slidell, La., home, John Besh—a former U.S. Marine turned awardwinning celebrity chef who runs nine restaurants and has written a pair of highly regarded cookbooks—stumbled upon something that made his stomach sink: a crumpled-up fast-food bag. He snatched up the offending item, showed it to his wife, Jenifer, and asked, “Really?” “Yes,” she answered, unapolo-

getically. Turns out, Jenifer, who isn’t naturally drawn to the kitchen and has her hands full raising four active boys with a husband who works nights, had picked up the quickie meal. “You know,” she said, “if you were half as concerned about what your boys eat as what your customers eat, we’d have a healthier family.” Sobering stuff for Besh, who not only enjoys a booming career as the handsome, happy face of New Orleans cooking but is a vocal

A FEW YEARS AGO, CHEF John Besh REALIZED HE’D BEEN WHIPPING UP DELICIOUS FOOD FOR EVERYONE IN THE WORLD—EXCEPT THOSE HE CARED MOST ABOUT. HERE’S HOW HE MADE ROOM FOR FAMILY MEALS. WRITTEN by BRUCE FEILER

© PARADE Publications 2012. All rights reserved.


Clockwise from top left: The guys gather round the grill—from left, Brendan, Jack, Andrew, John, and Luke; Besh’s grilled avocado and tomato salad; Andrew gets ready for the next course; Jenifer joins the fun; grilled rib eye steak; grilled corn on the cob.

champion of eating local. A rare combination of good ol’ boy (he hunts and fishes) and cutting-edge culinary master (he won a James Beard Foundation Award in 2006), Besh, 44, opened Restaurant August in 2001 and has since added seven more eateries in the New Orleans area, plus one in San Antonio. He is also a ubiquitous presence on reality cooking shows (his own, Chef John Besh’s Family Table, is scheduled to air on PBS in April 2013) and makes scores of appearances sup-

porting everyone from beleaguered fishermen in the Gulf of Mexico to marines in the Persian Gulf. Besh knew Jenifer, a childhood schoolmate and his wife of 19 years, was right, and he vowed to make amends. “That moment was a turning point,” he explains on a sunny afternoon in his kitchen, as he prepares shrimp and pasta for his brood—Brendan, now 16; Jack, 11; Luke, 9; and Andrew, 7. “We needed a plan.” He’s not the only one who’s con-

cerned about his clan’s eating habits. The past few years have seen an explosion of interest in the family dinner. In 2003, then president George W. Bush made a public service announcement with his mom, former first lady Barbara Bush, endorsing the rituals of family dinners. (The president joked that he grew up enjoying family dinner, “so long as my mother wasn’t cooking.”) Since then, celebrities like Jamie Lee Curtis and George Lopez, and even Major

League Baseball teams like the Boston Red Sox and Los Angeles Dodgers, have taken up the cause. One reason for all the interest is a wave of research that says children and teens who eat with their families are less likely to drink or smoke, do drugs, get pregnant, suffer from depression, and develop eating disorders. Studies have also found that children who enjoy family meals have larger vocabularies, better manners, higher self-esteem, and more resilience.

Dishing It Out Scan here or go to Parade.com/besh to get John Besh’s recipes for grilled rib eye steak, grilled avocado and tomato salad, coleslaw, grilled corn on the cob, lemon icebox pie, and lemon-blackberry cheesecake, and for behindthe-scenes footage of our cover shoot with the Besh family.

June 17, 2012 • 7

© PARADE Publications 2012. All rights reserved.


What’s more, research out of the Univerdrunken driver and paralyzed and Besh sity of Michigan found that the amount began helping prepare family meals. of mealtime children share with their “Through food I found I could make families at home was the single strongest people happy,” he recalls. Jenifer, 44, grew predictor of high academic achievement up with similar rituals, though her four scores. “When you look at the research, siblings were more raucous. “My sister which is staggering, you realize all the was always arguing her constitutional things you worry about as a parent can be rights [at the dinner table].” improved just by sitting down to regular But when the couple had their “comedinners,” says Laurie David, a producer of to-dinner” showdown, they realized that if An Inconvenient Truth and the author of they wanted to reclaim their past, they The Family Dinner: Great Ways to Connect needed to update old customs to meet With Your Kids, One Meal at a Time. their new reality. The first step in their There’s just one problem: Nearly strategy: stocking the pantry. “If you wait everything in contemporary life seems to Cold comfort: John and the boys make lemon icebox pie, which until you’re hungry to think about dinner, can be prepped in advance and frozen until ready to serve. conspire against regular family dinners. you’ll make bad choices,” says Jenifer. Besh From both parents working full time, to children plowing through mountains of home- immediately filled the house with basics—pastas, work every night, to those never-ending “Let me just answer this one last text!” interrup- grains, oils, spices. Jenifer was in charge of protein-rich tions, dinnertime has become prime time for anything but eating. In fact, some reports foods, such as chicken, shrimp, and ground beef. say the number of families sitting down together at night has been cut by a third over a Next up: planning ahead. They started sketching three-decade period. out weekly menus, with Besh prepping extra food, The Beshes can relate. John grew up in a family of six kids in which dinner was a which Jenifer could then repurpose on hectic school mandatory formality—napkins in your lap, ball caps off your head, no elbows on the table. nights. “Instead of cooking one chicken, cook two,” His father, a pilot, “tossed around current events and asked us to dispense judgment.” Besh she says. “If you’re preparing pasta tonight, fix extra first dreamed of becoming a chef when he was 9 years old, after his father was hit by a for tomorrow. If you’re making hamburgers for Monday, make meatballs on the side for Thursday.” LEGAL NOTICE

If You Purchased Automotive Filters From a Retailer, Your Rights Could Be Affected By a Class Action Settlement Para una notificación en Español, llamar o visitar nuestro website Settlements have been reached with Champion Will I Get a Payment? No. Payment to individual Laboratories, Inc. (“Champion”), Purolator Prod- class members is not practical because of the associucts NA, LLC, Purolator Products Company, LLC, ated costs. The Settlement Fund will be distributed to ArvinMeritor, Inc. (“Purolator”), Honeywell Inter- charities or other beneficiaries approved by the court national (“Honeywell”), Wix Filtration Corp. LLC that best represent the Class’ interests. Further infor(“Wix”), Affinia Group Inc. (“Affinia”), Cummins mation regarding these charities and other beneficiaFiltration Inc. (“Cummins”), Donaldson Company, ries are available on the settlement website. Inc. (“Donaldson”), and Baldwin Filters, Inc. (“Bald- What Are My Rights? If you do not want to take part win”) (“Defendants”) about the prices of automotive in the Settlements, you have the right to opt out. To and light truck oil, air, and fuel filters (“Filters”). The opt out, you must do so by 9/3/2012. If you do not value of the Indirect Purchaser Class Settlement is opt out, you will release certain legal rights against $6,018,750 (“Settlement Fund”). Defendants, as described in the settlement agreeWhat Are The Settlements About? Plaintiffs ments. Class members have the right to object to the claim that Defendants violated U.S. antitrust laws Settlements. If you object to any of the Settlements, and the laws of AZ, AR, CA, DC, FL, HI, IL, IA, KS, you must do so by 9/3/2012. You may speak to your ME, MI, MN, MS, MA, NE, NV, NH, NM, NY, NC, own attorney at your own expense. ND, PR, RI, SD, TN, UT, VT, WV, WI, and WY (the A Final Approval Hearing to consider Settlement “states”), by conspiring to fix Filter prices. Defendants approval and a request for litigation expenses incurred, deny liability but settled to avoid litigation burdens. attorneys’ fees of up to one-third of the Settlement Who Is a Class Member? You are a class member Fund, and an incentive award of up to $500 for each if, while residing in one of the states, you, between class representative is at 10:00 a.m. on 10/4/2012, at January 1, 1999 and March 8, 2012, purchased the United States District Court for the Northern DisDefendants’ Filters for your own use from: Advance trict of Illinois in Courtroom 1703. The date, courtAuto Parts Inc., Ashland, Inc., Autozone, Inc., room, time and location may change. Bridgestone Retail Operations, LLC d/b/a Firestone Where Can I Get More Information? This Legal Complete Auto, General Parts, Inc., Genuine Parts Notice is not a complete description of the case, Company, Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company d/b/a Settlement terms, approval process, or your rights. For Goodyear Gemini Automotive Care, Jiffy Lube more information, please contact: Indirect Purchasers International, Inc., Midas, Inc., O’Reilly Automotive, Filter MDL, PO Box 2009, Chanhassen, MN 55317Inc., Pennzoil-Quaker State Company, The Pep Boys- 2009 or Manny, Moe & Jack, Sears, Roebuck & Co., Texaco, www.IndirectPurchasers Inc., and Wal-Mart Stores, Inc., or their parents, FilterSettlement.com affiliates, subsidiaries, d/b/a’s, predecessors or successors in interest. 1-866-224-5376

ut it is the duo’s most innovative idea that has proved the most effective: They’ve stopped stressing about having to eat dinner every night at six. First they turned “family dinner” into “family breakfast.” As Besh writes in his latest book, My Family Table: A Passionate Plea for Home Cooking, which lays out lavishly illustrated recipes from each phase of their new routine, “As a chef, I seldom have the opportunity to be that typical father who is able to spend time in the evenings with the lads. So I figure if I’m to have any quality time with them, it has to be early morning.” Besh takes this meal on himself, with a repertoire of all the kids’ favorites—pain perdu, buttermilk pancakes, cheesy grits, and biscuits. He also leaves wraps on the table, just in case someone’s in a hurry. Even more inventive is the Beshes’ approach to evenings. During the school year, with the boys eating lunch as early as 10:30 a.m. (the cafeteria can be overcrowded), they come home hungry, and with sports practices starting as late as 5:30 p.m. (so that parents who work can coach), the family is rarely home during dinner hour. So Jenifer began serving “dinner” every day at 4 p.m. One of the boys says grace, she serves her jury-rigged meal (it might be continued on page 17

B

FOOD STYLING BY MILES LANDREM; GROOMING BY JULIA VU

LEGAL NOTICE

8 • June 17, 2012

© PARADE Publications 2012. All rights reserved.


It scares other bacon to bits.

Introd oduccin ng neew Ossca ar Ma Maye y r Butch cher e Thi hick ck Cutt Bacon. Th Thes esee he hear arty ty,, thick cuts are han a d trimmed and smoked with na atural hardwood ds for up to 14 4 ho hours. Ladies and gentlemen en,, this is bacon.. Š 2012 2012 K raft raf Food Fo oo ods

Š PARADE Publications 2012. All rights reserved.


Sunday with ... You own a general store in Marshfield Hills, Mass. What prompted you to buy it? I’m a history buff, and during the Civil War, they used the I’M A ROAD-TRIP GUY. attic to sew Union I’D LOVE TO army uniforms. PACK UP AS A It was for sale, FAMILY AND DO A CROSS-COUNTRY and frankly I was TREK.” concerned. I wanted to keep it as a community focal point. Half of it is a general store and the other half is a post office. I want this generation of kids to be able to walk down the road, get a Popsicle, and hang out on the front porch on a summer day. My sister-in-law runs it; it’s a very sweet little place.

comedy gold as a 40-Year-Old Virgin, an oblivious Office boss, and a reluctant singleton fumbling with Crazy, Stupid, Love. Now Steve Carell, 49, is putting a darkly humorous spin on the apocalypse in Seeking a Friend for the End of the World, a (last chance at) love story costarring Keira Knightley. Thankfully, real life is less complicated, he tells Shawna Malcom. “We don’t live this strange lifestyle,” says the low-key, L.A.-based star, who has two children with his wife, Nancy. “It’s very ordinary, which is what I love about it.” Seeking a Friend takes place in the weeks before an asteroid is due to destroy Earth. Did you think about how you’d spend those last precious days? My thoughts gravitated toward food, like a very good pizza. We’ve had deep-dish delivered from Giordano’s, Gino’s East, and Lou Malnati’s in Chicago. You can just call and have it shipped to you on dry ice.

What item do you always have in stock? One of my favorite things is called an emergency clown nose. It’s one of those indispensable gift items.

Steve Carell The comic actor opens up about last meals, vacuuming, and why he wants to preserve the past

Thanks to your films, you’ve emerged as a romantic What was your worst leading man. Is that where pre-fame gig? you saw your career going? At one point, I was a wine I know you’re asking that with a telemarketer. Talking people sense of irony because clearly, no. into buying wine on the phone How did I end up in is not an easy job films with people like to begin with, but Find out the gift he Keira Knightley and when you don’t know got from the cast Julianne Moore? All anything about wine of The Office that made him very these beautiful leading and you really don’t emotional at ladies and me—it’s drink it, it becomes Parade.com/carell kind of shocking. even more difficult.

Now that you’ve made it, what are you happy to let someone else do for you? And what do you still like to do yourself? I don’t mind having someone else mow my lawn. But I enjoy vacuuming. We just got a cordless vacuum cleaner that’s the best! It’s so handy. And recently I cleaned the gutters. If it’s something I can actually do and I have the time, I’ll do it.

What do you do on Sundays? Sundays are reserved for family. We try to plan different things every week, whether it’s going to a kids’ museum, the beach, or taking bike rides around our neighborhood. [The kids] are 8 and 11, and they still like hanging out with us, so we’re taking advantage of it. I know it won’t always be that way. Can Steve Carell still go see a movie in a theater? I went to see The Avengers with my family the other day. No one even noticed. I don’t cause a stir. Even when I try. [laughs]

PHOTO: JACK GUY/CORBIS OUTLINE

H

e has mined

10 • June 17, 2012

© PARADE Publications 2012. All rights reserved.


Manner Up! Modern etiquette made easy

Q: My cousin Kerry got married nine months ago and though I wasn’t able to attend the ceremony, I sent a check as a wedding gift. I just found out that the check still hasn’t been cashed, and my bank’s policy is that checks over six months old are void. Kerry and I aren’t that close, so I’m not sure what to do: Should I send her a replacement with a note explaining that the check was never cashed? Or is that too awkward? —Alexandra J.,

ILLUSTRATION: GRAFILU

Youngstown, Ohio

A: Good manners are running amok here! Asking “Why didn’t you cash my check?” may seem a little awkward, but any discomfort on your cousin’s end will surely fade amid the warm glow of cold, hard cash. Remember, you wanted her to have the gift, and she probably lost it in the throes of wedding fever. I’ll bet your coz was too polite to ask you to replace it, so she didn’t say anything. My advice: Send a new check with a note. Even though you’re not in frequent contact, it’s a nice way to check up on the newlyweds. And hey, it’s been nine months; maybe you’ll soon have a reason to send another congratulatory check. —Judith Newman Send your questions to Parade.com/mannerup

SWEAT. SCORE. AS YOU GET OLDER, REALLY GREAT. BUT DON’T FORGET TO VACCINATE. Now’s the time to help prevent Shingles with ZOSTAVAX® (Zoster Vaccine Live). ZOSTAVAX is a vaccine that helps prevent Shingles in adults 50 years of age or older. Shingles is caused by the same virus that causes chickenpox. The virus stays in your body and can resurface at any time as Shingles—a painful, blistering rash. And no matter how healthy you feel, your risk increases as you get older. The sooner you get vaccinated with ZOSTAVAX, the better your chances of protecting yourself from Shingles. In fact, the ACIP* of the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) recommends that appropriate adults 60 years of age and older get vaccinated to help prevent Shingles.

Talk to your health care professional to see if ZOSTAVAX is right for you. ZOSTAVAX is given as a single shot. ZOSTAVAX cannot be used to treat Shingles, or the nerve pain that may follow Shingles, once you have it. For more information, visit ZOSTAVAX.com or call 1-877-9 SHINGLES.

ABOUT ZOSTAVAX ZOSTAVAX is a vaccine that is used for adults 50 years of age or older to prevent Shingles (also known as zoster).

Important Safety Information 𰁴 ZOSTAVAX does not protect everyone, so some people who get the vaccine may still get Shingles. 𰁴 You should not get ZOSTAVAX if you are allergic to any of its ingredients, including gelatin or neomycin, have a weakened immune system, take high doses of steroids, or are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. You should not get ZOSTAVAX to prevent chickenpox. 𰁴 Talk to your health care professional if you plan to get ZOSTAVAX at the same time as PNEUMOVAX®23 (Pneumococcal Vaccine Polyvalent) because it may be better to get these vaccines at least 4 weeks apart. 𰁴 Possible side effects include redness, pain, itching, swelling, hard lump, warmth, or bruising at the injection site, as well as headache. 𰁴 ZOSTAVAX contains a weakened chickenpox virus. Tell your health care professional if you will be in close contact with newborn infants, someone who may be pregnant and has not had chickenpox or been vaccinated against chickenpox, or someone who has problems with their immune system. Your health care professional can tell you what situations you may need to avoid. You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088. Please read the Patient Information on the adjacent page for more detailed information. *ACIP=Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices

Before you get Shingles, get vaccinated. Having trouble paying for your Merck medicine? Merck may be able to help. Visit www.merck.com/merckhelps

Copyright © 2012 Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp., a subsidiary of Merck & Co., Inc. All rights reserved. VACC-1016603-0022 05/12

© PARADE Publications 2012. All rights reserved.


You should read this summary of information about ZOSTAVAX before you are vaccinated. If you have any questions about ZOSTAVAX after reading this page, you should ask your health care provider. This information does not take the place of talking about ZOSTAVAX with your doctor, nurse, or other health care provider. Only your health care provider can decide if ZOSTAVAX is right for you.

Who should not get ZOSTAVAX? You should not get ZOSTAVAX if you: 𰁴𰀁 𰀁𰁂𰁓𰁆𰀁𰁂𰁍𰁍𰁆𰁓𰁈𰁊𰁄𰀁𰁕𰁐𰀁𰁂𰁏𰁚𰀁𰁐𰁇𰀁𰁊𰁕𰁔𰀁 ingredients. 𰁴𰀁 𰀁𰁂𰁓𰁆𰀁𰁂𰁍𰁍𰁆𰁓𰁈𰁊𰁄𰀁𰁕𰁐𰀁𰁈𰁆𰁍𰁂𰁕𰁊𰁏𰀁𰁐𰁓𰀁𰁏𰁆𰁐𰁎𰁚𰁄𰁊𰁏𰀏 𰁴𰀁 𰀁𰁉𰁂𰁗𰁆𰀁𰁂𰀁𰁘𰁆𰁂𰁌𰁆𰁏𰁆𰁅𰀁𰁊𰁎𰁎𰁖𰁏𰁆𰀁 system (for example, an immune deficiency, leukemia, lymphoma, or HIV/AIDS). 𰁴𰀁 𰀁𰁕𰁂𰁌𰁆𰀁𰁉𰁊𰁈𰁉𰀁𰁅𰁐𰁔𰁆𰁔𰀁𰁐𰁇𰀁𰁔𰁕𰁆𰁓𰁐𰁊𰁅𰁔𰀁𰁃𰁚𰀁 injection or by mouth. 𰁴𰀁 𰀁𰁂𰁓𰁆𰀁𰁑𰁓𰁆𰁈𰁏𰁂𰁏𰁕𰀁𰁐𰁓𰀁𰁑𰁍𰁂𰁏𰀁𰁕𰁐𰀁𰁈𰁆𰁕𰀁𰁑𰁓𰁆𰁈𰁏𰁂𰁏𰁕𰀏

What is ZOSTAVAX and how does it work? ZOSTAVAX is a vaccine that is used for adults 50 years of age or older to prevent shingles (also known as zoster).

You should not get ZOSTAVAX to prevent chickenpox.

ZOSTAVAX contains a weakened chickenpox virus (varicella-zoster virus). ZOSTAVAX works by helping your immune system protect you from getting shingles. If you do get shingles even though you have been vaccinated, ZOSTAVAX may help prevent the nerve pain that can follow shingles in some people. ZOSTAVAX does not protect everyone, so some people who get the vaccine may still get shingles. ZOSTAVAX cannot be used to treat shingles, or the nerve pain that may follow shingles, once you have it.

Children should not get ZOSTAVAX. How is ZOSTAVAX given? ZOSTAVAX is given as a single dose by injection under the skin. What should I tell my health care p rovider before I get ZOSTAVAX? You should tell your health care provider if you: 𰁴𰀁 𰀁𰁉𰁂𰁗𰁆𰀁𰁐𰁓𰀁𰁉𰁂𰁗𰁆𰀁𰁉𰁂𰁅𰀁𰁂𰁏𰁚𰀁𰁎𰁆𰁅𰁊𰁄𰁂𰁍𰀁 problems. 𰁴𰀁 𰀁𰁕𰁂𰁌𰁆𰀁𰁂𰁏𰁚𰀁𰁎𰁆𰁅𰁊𰁄𰁊𰁏𰁆𰁔𰀍𰀁𰁊𰁏𰁄𰁍𰁖𰁅𰁊𰁏𰁈𰀁𰁏𰁐𰁏𰀎 prescription medicines, and dietary supplements. 𰁴𰀁 𰀁𰁉𰁂𰁗𰁆𰀁𰁂𰁏𰁚𰀁𰁂𰁍𰁍𰁆𰁓𰁈𰁊𰁆𰁔𰀍𰀁𰁊𰁏𰁄𰁍𰁖𰁅𰁊𰁏𰁈𰀁 allergies to neomycin or gelatin. 𰁴𰀁 𰀁𰁉𰁂𰁅𰀁𰁂𰁏𰀁𰁂𰁍𰁍𰁆𰁓𰁈𰁊𰁄𰀁𰁓𰁆𰁂𰁄𰁕𰁊𰁐𰁏𰀁𰁕𰁐𰀁𰁂𰁏𰁐𰁕𰁉𰁆𰁓𰀁 vaccine. 𰁴𰀁 𰀁𰁂𰁓𰁆𰀁𰁑𰁓𰁆𰁈𰁏𰁂𰁏𰁕𰀁𰁐𰁓𰀁𰁑𰁍𰁂𰁏𰀁𰁕𰁐𰀁𰁃𰁆𰁄𰁐𰁎𰁆𰀁 pregnant. 𰁴𰀁 𰀁𰁂𰁓𰁆𰀁𰁃𰁓𰁆𰁂𰁔𰁕𰀎𰁇𰁆𰁆𰁅𰁊𰁏𰁈𰀏

Tell your health care provider if you expect to be in close contact What do I need to know about (including household contact) with shingles and the virus that causes it? newborn infants, someone who Shingles is caused by the same may be pregnant and has not had virus that causes chickenpox. Once chickenpox or been vaccinated against you have had chickenpox, the virus chickenpox, or someone who has can stay in your nervous system for problems with their immune system. many years. For reasons that are Your health care provider can tell you not fully understood, the virus may what situations you may need to avoid. become active again and give you shingles. Age and problems with the Can I get ZOSTAVAX with other immune system may increase your vaccines? chances of getting shingles. Talk to your health care provider if you plan to get ZOSTAVAX at the Shingles is a rash that is usually on same time as the flu vaccine. one side of the body. The rash begins as a cluster of small red spots that Talk to your health care provider if often blister. The rash can be painful. you plan to get ZOSTAVAX at the Shingles rashes usually last up to 30 same time as PNEUMOVAX®23 (Pneumococcal Vaccine Polyvalent) days and, for most people, the pain because it may be better to get these associated with the rash lessens as vaccines at least 4 weeks apart. it heals. Copyright ©2006 Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp., a subsidiary of Merck & Co., Inc. All rights reserved.

9989115

What are the possible side effects of ZOSTAVAX? The most common side effects that people in the clinical studies reported after receiving the vaccine include: 𰁴𰀁 𰀁𰁓𰁆𰁅𰁏𰁆𰁔𰁔𰀍𰀁𰁑𰁂𰁊𰁏𰀍𰀁𰁊𰁕𰁄𰁉𰁊𰁏𰁈𰀍𰀁𰁔𰁘𰁆𰁍𰁍𰁊𰁏𰁈𰀍𰀁 hard lump, warmth, or bruising where the shot was given. 𰁴𰀁 𰀁𰁉𰁆𰁂𰁅𰁂𰁄𰁉𰁆 The following additional side effects have been reported with ZOSTAVAX: 𰁴𰀁 𰀁𰁂𰁍𰁍𰁆𰁓𰁈𰁊𰁄𰀁𰁓𰁆𰁂𰁄𰁕𰁊𰁐𰁏𰁔𰀍𰀁𰁘𰁉𰁊𰁄𰁉𰀁𰁎𰁂𰁚𰀁𰁃𰁆𰀁 serious and may include difficulty in breathing or swallowing. If you have an allergic reaction, call your doctor right away. 𰁴𰀁 𰀁𰁄𰁉𰁊𰁄𰁌𰁆𰁏𰁑𰁐𰁙 𰁴𰀁 𰀁𰁇𰁆𰁗𰁆𰁓 𰁴𰀁 𰀁𰁉𰁊𰁗𰁆𰁔𰀁𰁂𰁕𰀁𰁕𰁉𰁆𰀁𰁊𰁏𰁋𰁆𰁄𰁕𰁊𰁐𰁏𰀁𰁔𰁊𰁕𰁆 𰁴𰀁 𰀁𰁋𰁐𰁊𰁏𰁕𰀁𰁑𰁂𰁊𰁏 𰁴𰀁 𰀁𰁎𰁖𰁔𰁄𰁍𰁆𰀁𰁑𰁂𰁊𰁏 𰁴𰀁 𰀁𰁏𰁂𰁖𰁔𰁆𰁂 𰁴𰀁 𰀁𰁓𰁂𰁔𰁉 𰁴𰀁 𰀁𰁓𰁂𰁔𰁉𰀁𰁂𰁕𰀁𰁕𰁉𰁆𰀁𰁊𰁏𰁋𰁆𰁄𰁕𰁊𰁐𰁏𰀁𰁔𰁊𰁕𰁆 𰁴𰀁 𰀁𰁔𰁘𰁐𰁍𰁍𰁆𰁏𰀁𰁈𰁍𰁂𰁏𰁅𰁔𰀁𰁏𰁆𰁂𰁓𰀁𰁕𰁉𰁆𰀁𰁊𰁏𰁋𰁆𰁄𰁕𰁊𰁐𰁏𰀁 site (that may last a few days to a few weeks) Tell your health care provider if you have any new or unusual symptoms after you receive ZOSTAVAX. For a complete list of side effects, ask your health care provider. Call 1-800-986-8999 to report any exposure to ZOSTAVAX during pregnancy. What are the ingredients of ZOSTAVAX? Active Ingredient: a weakened form of the varicella-zoster virus. Inactive Ingredients: sucrose, hydrolyzed porcine gelatin, sodium chloride, monosodium L-glutamate, sodium phosphate dibasic, potassium phosphate monobasic, potassium chloride. This page summarizes important information about ZOSTAVAX. If you would like more information, talk to your health care provider or visit the website at www.ZOSTAVAX.com or call 1-800-622-4477. Rx only Issued June 2011 Distributed by: Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp., a subsidiary of Merck & Co., Inc. Whitehouse Station, NJ 08889, USA VACC-1016603-0022 05/12

7-MINUTE SOLUTION

IMPROVE YOUR GOLF GAME WITH YOGA Increase flexibility and focus with these moves from Katherine Roberts, founder of Yoga for Golfers Slow Breaths Sit it cross-legged and place your fingertips lightly on your rib cage. Inhale and exhale for a count of four. Repeat five times. Golf benefit: Enhances focus, relieves muscle tension.

1

2

Window Washers Lie with your feet wider than hip-width apart, heels close to your glutes. Allow your legs to fall to the right on your inhale; exhale as they fall to the left. Repeat five times. Golf benefit: Improves hip flexibility for easier turning mid-swing.

3

Revolving Side Angle Kneel on your right knee, with your left knee at a 90-degree angle. Place your hands together and twist your upper torso until your right elbow is on the outside of your left knee. Hold for three deep breaths; switch sides. Golf benefit: Strengthens shoulders and hands.

4

Warriorr III Stand on one leg, and nd as you lower your ur upper body parallel to floor floor, lift your opposite leg and extend arms. Repeat three times; switch sides. Golf benefit: Supports core stability, increases power.

ILLUSTRATIONS: MCKIBILLO CKIBILLO

Patient Information about ZOSTAVAX® (pronounced “ZOS tah vax”) Generic name: Zoster Vaccine Live

12 • June 17, 2012

© PARADE Publications 2012. All rights reserved.


Sunday Joe One thing I loved about my dad is that he believed in the American dream and was a hopeless romantic. He taught us that if you worked hard and loved what you did, you’d be successful. Even when he was out of work for a year and a half, he always believed that better days were ahead. And you know what? He was right to have faith in his God and in his country. MIKA BRZEZINSKI: My father taught me to look at failure as a good thing, even if you don’t realize it at the time, because it opens the door to other opportunities. When I called him the day I was fired from CBS, weeping, that’s what he told me, and he was right. It was like getting a gentle, fatherly, loving embrace over the phone. It made me feel like the little girl he used to hug when I fell down. JOE: I think the quality I admired most in my father was how joyous he was. He just loved life. He loved his wife, he loved his family, and he threw himself at everything he did with great gusto. This is my second Father’s Day without him. He

Lessons From Dad The hosts of MSNBC’s Morning Joe on what they learned from their fathers

TAKE YOUR DAUGHTER TO WORK Mika with her father, Zbigniew, at the White House.

passed away last year, and it’s still hard to believe he’s gone. MIKA: What I admire most is my father’s moral compass; it guides everything he does. One thing

both he and my mother imparted to us was to always have goals. They really felt that part of building kids was to educate them, to teach them to have

interests so they can contribute. The only thing I didn’t listen to was how hard to study. I got into trouble with every report card. JOE: The worst trouble I ever got into was when I was 5 years old and my ne’er-do-well friend across the street coaxed me into going into our neighbors’ house and opening up all of their Christmas presents while they were away. This was the great scandal of 1969. The punishment was extreme. I was not allowed to watch Mr. Ed for a week. MIKA: I try to incorporate the lessons my father taught me as a parent. Sometimes I wonder if I’m measuring up. I feel challenged by today’s society and technology and everything that kids seem to get so easily now. JOE: Mika and I both work very long hours. I often find myself dragging when I get home, but then I remember how active my father was, and how energetic and joyous he was. And that gets me up out of the chair so I can be that kind of father to my kids. Tune in to Morning Joe on MSNBC, weekdays from 6 a.m. to 9 a.m.

EEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE EEEEEEEEEEEE

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PHOTO: COURTESY OF MIKA BRZEZINSKI. CARTOONS, FROM LEFT: ANDREW ARMSTRONG; DONNA BARSTOW

JOE SCARBOROUGH:

Mika Brzezinski and Joe Scarborough

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14 • June 17, 2012

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Homemaker Invents A Shine That Lasts Miracle Polish Ends Struggle With Tarnishing Metals. By D.H. Wagner

L

ately I have noticed quite a few newspapers and magazines praising a polish formulated by a homemaker. The articles report that Donna Maas grew frustrated with rubbing and scrubbing her silver, brass and other metals only to see them quickly become dull and tarnished again. Determined to put an end to her constant battle with tarnish Donna formulated a metal cleaner and it’s transforming the industry. Anita Gold, nationally syndicated columnist and expert on the restoration of antiques calls MAAS (named after its inventor) “The best and most amazing polish in the world.” Ms. Gold wrote in her column, “A truly miraculous polish referred to as “miracle polish” that’ll turn the most disastrous pieces into the most de-brightful is MAAS Fine Polishing Creme For All Metals, which cleans, restores, preserves and polishes to perfection any brass, copper, chrome, silver, stainless steel, aluminum, gold or any other metal with amazing results – no matter how badly stained, spotted, discolored, flood-damaged, weathered, dirty, dingy, drab, or dull they may be.” Since I had an old brass lamp in desperate need of restoration, this journalist decided to put MAAS to the test. The lamp had been stored in the garage and was in far worse condition than I remembered. I was flabbergasted as I watched the polishing creme wipe away layers and years of tarnish. Never have I used anything so easy. The lamp actually looks better than when I purchased it. Better yet, months later it’s still glowing! The polish worked so effortlessly, I decided to refurbish my mother’s collection of antique brass and copper cookware. The badly stained pots and pans developed black spots that had been impossible to remove. MAAS wiped away the years of built-up residue even from the most discolored pieces. While polishing the pots and pans, I noticed MAAS applying a shine on the stainless steel sink. So I cleaned the entire sink with the creme. WOW! The shine is unbelievable

and although I wash dishes every day, the shine keeps-on-shining. And it’s no longer covered with ugly water spots – water just rolls off the protective finish and down the drain. An independent consumer study of 28 metal polishes reports, “MAAS Polishing Creme has no equals in all around polishing performance...” MAAS retained its shine longer than every polish tested. Good Housekeeping Institute recommends MAAS for restoring heavily tarnished heirlooms stating, MAAS cleans best and gives lasting results.” The Miami Herald says “Polishing product can renew old silver.” The Chicago Tribune headline sums it all up by saying “One Amazing Polish Is The Best At Everything.” How did a homemaker come up with something the industry’s experts couldn’t? The reporter in me had to find out. During our interview Donna explained, “I enjoy the warmth that beautifully polished metals add to a home. However, not the hours it took to keep them tarnish free. The harsh cleaners always left my hands dry and burning – one instant silver dip smelled so bad I felt sick. When I read the label, I discovered it contained cancercausing ingredients. That's when I became determined to find a better way to care for the metals in my home.” And that she did. Her formula developed in conjunction with a chemist friend quickly restores and leaves a deep, rich one-of-a-kind luster beyond anything I've ever seen. “To my surprise,” Donna reveals, “the formula far exceeded my original goal. MAAS restores glass fireplace doors, clouded crystal vases, fiberglass, linoleum and even plastic.

The restorations were so remarkable everyone suggested that I sell my invention on television.” Donna sent samples of her polish to televised shopping channels and both QVC and The Home Shopping Network asked Donna to personally appear on TV to demonstrate her product. 17,000 viewers called during MAAS’ debut and encore performances quickly brought a million dollars in record-breaking sales. Leona Toppel was about to throw away a brass chandelier. “No amount of elbow grease could shine it up. With very little effort (a big plus for me because I suffer from arthritis) MAAS made that chandelier look like new. It’s been years and to everyone's surprise it’s still glowing.” “MAAS outperforms every polish I’ve tried,” Donna beams with satisfaction. “So if you’re as tired as I was of cleaning metals just to see tarnish reappear a few weeks later, MAAS it!”

At Last, A Polish That Keeps Metals Shining! Finally, you can restore every metal and more to it’s original beauty with MAAS easy wipe-on, wipe-off, no-wait polish. Just send $12.95 plus $5.95 S&H for one large 4 oz. tube of MAAS. Save when you order two tubes and receive a FREE polishing cloth (total value $33.85) for only $19.95 plus $5.95 S&H. Illinois residents add 7.25% sales tax. Mail your order to: MAAS – DEPT. 𰀸𰀞𰀟𰀞𰀙𰀟𰀚 7101 Adams Street, Suite 3 Willowbrook, IL 60527-8432 (Please make checks payable to MAAS) Order online at www.maasinc.com © PARADE Publications 2012. All rights reserved.


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John Besh | from page 8 Asian chicken salad with leftover chicken,

Sloppy Joe sliders with that extra stash of beef from Monday, or easy pork grillades), then everyone piles into the SUV and heads back out again. When the family returns around 7:30, she dispatches the boys to the shower, then gathers them back in the kitchen for dessert. Not surprisingly, 11-year-old Jack declares this the best part of his day (his favorite treat is lemon icebox pie). Notice the new routine: three family meals being served during the course of a day—and none of them at a traditional dinnertime. “Instead of feeling guilty because you don’t have the six o’clock thing,” reasons Jenifer, “just come together as a family whenever you have the time.” Those who endorse family dinner love this idea. Can’t do it every night? Try it for just one day. Not home for supper? Gather everyone for a bedtime How to make family snack. Weekdays too busy? Aim meals more palatable— for weekends. As important as not to mention more the dinner part is, it’s the family fun? These three famous dads have part that matters more. As Marsome ideas. … shall Duke, an Emory University psychologist, puts it, “Families who share meals have children who know more about their “We play history and are better able to and that makes my kids laugh. They get balance life’s ups and downs. to pick any topics Dinner is an excellent time to do they want. When you’re that, but it’s not the only time.” laughing, you’re talking.” —STEPHEN COLBERT The highlight of the Beshes’ (father of Madeline, 16; Peter, schedule occurs on Sundays. 13; and John, 9) After morning mass, Dad cooks for everyone. Relatives stop by, “I’ll try to provoke crawfish are boiled, jambalaya gets stirred up—and the family that’s been coming and going all by asking things like week hangs out all afternoon. ‘Would you rather be happy, successful, “To me,” says Besh, “it’s not a or good?’ or ‘Would proper Sunday without everyyou rather be body coming together.” respected or loved?’ ” What does Besh treasure most —DR. MEHMET OZ (father of Daphne, 26; Arabella, 22; Zoe, 18; about those moments? “I feel the and Oliver, 13) same way I felt when I cooked for my father—happy. People are “I have one rule: talking, people are laughing.” He pauses, then grabs his youngest, at the table. That Andrew, who has wandered by, includes the TV, smartphones, whatever. and pulls him into his lap. “Give The objective is to see, your daddy a kiss,” he says. hear, and connect

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June 17, 2012 • 17

© PARADE Publications 2012. All rights reserved.


/(*$/127,&(

'HHSZDWHU+RUL]RQ2LO6SLOO Economic and Property Damages Settlement Providing Money to Individuals and Businesses If you have economic loss or property damage because of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, you could get money from a class action settlement with BP Exploration & Production Inc. and BP America Production Company (“BP”). Go to DeepwaterHorizonSettlements.com for more information, including information on how to file a claim.

WHO IS INCLUDED IN THE ECONOMIC & PROPERTY DAMAGES SETTLEMENT? The Economic and Property Damages (“E&PD”) Settlement Class includes people, businesses, and other entities in the states of Louisiana, Alabama and Mississippi, and certain counties in Texas and Florida, that were harmed by the oil spill. The website DeepwaterHorizonSettlements. com has detailed descriptions and maps to help you determine whether a geographic location may be included in the E&PD Settlement. Additionally, you can call 1-866-992-6174 or e-mail questions@DeepwaterHorizonEconomicSettlement. com to find out if a geographic location is included.

WHAT DOES THE ECONOMIC & PROPERTY DAMAGES SETTLEMENT PROVIDE? The E&PD Settlement makes payments for the following types of claims: (1) Seafood Compensation, (2) Economic Damage, (3) Loss of Subsistence, (4) Vessel Physical Damage, (5) Vessels of Opportunity Charter Payment, (6) Coastal Real Property Damage, (7) Wetlands Real Property Damage, and (8) Real Property Sales Damage. There is no limit on the total dollar amount of the E&PD Settlement; all qualified claims will be paid.

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GET BENEFITS FROM THE ECONOMIC & PROPERTY DAMAGES SETTLEMENT

TO

You need to submit a Claim Form to request a payment. You can get a copy of the various Claim Forms by visiting the website or by calling 1-866-992-6174. Claims can be submitted online or by mail. If you have questions about how to file your claim, you should call the toll-free number for assistance.

The deadline to submit most E&PD claims will be April 22, 2014 or six months after the E&PD Settlement becomes effective (that is, after the Court grants “final approval” and any appeals are resolved), whichever is later. There will be an earlier deadline to submit E&PD Seafood Compensation claims. The earlier deadline to submit Seafood Compensation claims will be 30 days after final approval of the Settlement by the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Louisiana (regardless of appeals). Actual claim filing deadlines will be posted on the website as they become available. Valid claims will be paid as they are approved, beginning shortly after the Court-Supervised Settlement Program commences. It is highly recommended that E&PD Settlement Class Members complete and submit their claim forms promptly. Please read the Medical Benefits Settlement notice because you may also be eligible for benefits from that settlement.

YOUR OTHER OPTIONS If you do not want to be legally bound by the E&PD Settlement, you must Opt Out or exclude yourself by October 1, 2012 or you won’t be able to sue BP over certain economic and property damage claims. If you stay in the E&PD Settlement, you may object to it by August 31, 2012. The Detailed Notice explains how to exclude yourself or object. The Court will hold a hearing on November 8, 2012 to consider whether to approve the E&PD Settlement. You or your own lawyer may ask to appear and speak at the hearing at your own cost. The Court will also consider Class Counsel fees, costs, and expenses including an interim payment of $75 million and additional awards equal to 6% of class claims and benefits paid. Class Counsel fees, costs and expenses under the Economic and Property Damages Settlement Agreement and the Medical Benefits Settlement Agreement jointly cannot exceed $600 million. Class members’ payments will not be reduced if the Court approves the payment of Class Counsel fees, costs, and expenses because BP will separately pay these attorney fees, costs, and expenses.

DeepwaterHorizonSettlements.com

„

1-866-992-6174 © PARADE Publications 2012. All rights reserved.


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'HHSZDWHU+RUL]RQ2LO6SLOO Medical Benefits Settlement Providing Benefits to Clean-Up Workers and Certain Gulf Coast Residents If you have a medical claim related to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, you could get benefits from a class action settlement with BP Exploration & Production Inc. and BP America Production Company (“BP”). Go to DeepwaterHorizonSettlements.com for more information, including information on how to file a claim.

WHO

INCLUDED IN THE MEDICAL BENEFITS SETTLEMENT? IS

The Medical Class includes (1) clean-up workers and (2) certain people who resided in specific geographic areas in coastal and wetlands areas along the Gulf Coast during specific periods in 2010. The website DeepwaterHorizonSettlements.com has detailed descriptions and maps to help you determine whether a geographic location may be included in one of these zones. Additionally, you can call 1-866-992-6174 or e-mail info@DeepwaterHorizonMedicalSettlement. com to find out if a geographic location is included.

WHAT

MEDICAL BENEFITS SETTLEMENT PROVIDE? DOES THE

The benefits of the Medical Benefits Settlement include: (1) payments to qualifying people for certain acute (short-term) and chronic (ongoing) medical conditions occurring after exposure to oil or chemical dispersants; (2) provision of periodic medical examinations to qualifying people; and (3) creation of a Gulf Region Health Outreach Program, consisting of projects to strengthen the healthcare system. Benefits (1) and (2) will be provided only after the Court grants final approval and any appeals are resolved.

HOW TO GET BENEFITS FROM THE MEDICAL BENEFITS SETTLEMENT You need to submit a Claim Form to request benefits. You can get a copy of the Claim Form by visiting the

website or by calling 1-866-992-6174. Claims can be submitted by mail. If you have questions about how to file your claim, you should call the toll-free number for assistance. The deadline for filing a Claim Form is one year after the Medical Benefits Settlement becomes effective (that is, after the Court grants “final approval” and any appeals are resolved). The exact date of the claim filing deadline will be posted on the website. It is highly recommended that Medical Class Members complete and submit their claim forms promptly. Please read the Economic and Property Damages Settlement notice because you may also be eligible for a payment from that settlement.

YOUR OTHER OPTIONS If you do not want to be legally bound by the Medical Benefits Settlement, you must Opt Out or exclude yourself by October 1, 2012 or you won’t be able to sue BP over certain medical claims. If you stay in the Medical Benefits Settlement, you may object to it by August 31, 2012. The Detailed Notice explains how to exclude yourself or object. The Court will hold a hearing on November 8, 2012 to consider whether to approve the Medical Benefits Settlement. You or your own lawyer may ask to appear and speak at the hearing at your own cost. Class Counsel will ask the Court to consider an award of fees, costs, and expenses of 6% of the value of the benefits actually provided under the Medical Benefits Settlement Agreement. Class Counsel fees, costs, and expenses under the Medical Benefits Settlement Agreement and the Economic and Property Damages Settlement Agreement jointly cannot exceed $600 million. Class members’ payments will not be reduced if the Court approves the payment of Class Counsel fees, costs, and expenses because BP will separately pay these attorney fees, costs, and expenses.

DeepwaterHorizonSettlements.com

„

1-866-992-6174 © PARADE Publications 2012. All rights reserved.


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On Nutrisystem you add in fresh grocery items. © PARADE Publications 2012. All rights reserved.


Bulletin Daily Paper 06/17/12