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La Pine water, sewer employees to get vacation payouts By Hillary Borrud The Bulletin

Four employees of the La Pine water and sewer districts will receive payouts totalling $7,300 for unused vacation time later this month. Each employee will be able to carry over only 80 hours of vacation when the city of La Pine takes over

the districts on July 2. A couple of employees accumulated 120 hours of vacation, while one had none, according to figures released by the sewer and water districts. A fifth employee, Operations Manager Donna Zigler, must be paid for unused vacation time because she will be laid off when the city absorbs the

two utility districts. La Pine water and sewer district commissioner Brian Earls said the districts had no choice but to pay for the accrued vacation time employees will not be able take with them on June 30. “Legally, we’re responsible to pay this out,” he said. See Payouts / A5

La Pine districts’ board meeting When: 5 p.m. Tuesday Where: La Pine City Hall, 16345 Sixth St., La Pine

Legal bills drive up Deschutes spending • The county is on track to spend $500,000 more than last year By Hillary Borrud The Bulletin

Deschutes County’s spending on outside lawyers and settlements nearly doubled this year, due to legal bills for two federal lawsuits and the county’s dispute with District Attorney Patrick Flaherty. The county is on track to spend $500,000 more this year on legal bills and workers’ compensation than it did last year. In the first 11 months of this fiscal year, the county spent $1.5 million. During the same period last year, the county had spent $1 million. The spending is part of the county’s risk management budget, which also covers items such as unemployment and vehicle insurance. Interim County Administrator Erik Kropp said the cost will be spread among departments and will not significantly impact any department’s budget. Spending on outside lawyers increased in part because one of the county’s lawyers resigned, so that work was transferred to private firms. Kropp said the county has spent $200,000 on outside firms so far this year. See Deschutes / A4

PRO RIDERS WOW CROWDS AT BLITZ TO THE BARREL RACE

U.S. accuses Russia of supplying Syria with attack copters By Colum Lynch The Washington Post Photos by Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Nick Gibson launches off a jump during the Blitz to the Barrel mountain bike race on Tuesday. Riders started at Wanoga Sno-park and pedaled down the Funner and C.O.D. trails and through Tetherow Golf Course to 10 Barrel Brewing Co. in Bend. Fifteen professional women and 20 pro men were scheduled to compete for $20,000 in prizes at the invitation-only event. Professional cyclist Katie Compton, of Delaware, races across Tetherow Golf Course on Tuesday on her way to winning the Blitz to the Barrel race.

The Obama administration on Tuesday accused Russia of planning to supply attack helicopters to Syria, a move that U.S. officials warned would dramatically escalate the crisis and belie Moscow’s claim that it is not supporting President Bashar Assad’s violent crackdown on dissent. Russia, a longtime ally and supplier of arms to the Syrian government, has acknowledged that it is continuing to honor contractual military shipments to Damascus, while stressing that it is not providing weapons that could be used against opponents of the government. But in an unusually direct rebuke, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton on Tuesday dismissed such assertions as “patently untrue.” See Syria / A5

Adam Craig, of Bend, won the men’s division. Chris Fillmore and Brooke Blackwelder took home prizes for the best jumps at Tetherow Golf Course. For more on the Blitz to the Barrel, see Page D1.

Social network linked to 3 child rape cases By Nicole Perlroth New York Times News Service

SAN FRANCISCO — In the latest cautionary tale of the risks of using social networks to connect with strangers, three men have been accused of raping children they met using a mobile app designed for flirting between adults. The rape charges startled managers of Skout, the social networking app, who said they thought they had adequate safeguards in place. It took three years for the start-

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up to find a promising business model. After switching from a Foursquare-like location checkin service to a flirting app that connects people with strangers nearby, the company was attracting millions of new users a month. The company started a separate, more protected, service for 13- to 17-year-olds last year after noticing that minors had gained access to the app. The company, based in San Francisco, got a vote of confidence in April when it secured $22 mil-

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lion in financing from Andreessen Horowitz, one of Silicon Valley’s leading venture capital firms. But in each rape case, the men are accused of posing as teenagers in a Skout forum for 13- to 17-yearolds. In one case, a 15-year-old Ohio girl said she had been raped by a 37-year-old man. In the second, a 24-year-old man has been accused of raping a 12-year-old girl in Escondido, Calif. In the third, a 21-year-old man from Waukesha, Wis., is facing charges that he sexually assaulted a 13-year-old boy.

“I’m disgusted by what’s happened here,” Christian Wiklund, Skout’s founder, said in an interview Monday. “One case is too many. When you have three, it looks like a pattern. This is my worst fear.” Wiklund said he had no choice but to suspend the service for minors, which he said made up a “significant” portion of its member base, while he worked with security experts to add better safeguards. See Skout / A4

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By Gina Kolata New York Times News Service

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, an influential group that recently recommended against routine PSA tests to detect prostate cancer, issued a draft statement Tuesday recommending that healthy postmenopausal women should not take low doses of calcium or vitamin D supplements to prevent fractures. The group, an independent panel of experts in prevention and primary care appointed by the federal Department of Health and Human Services, also considered use of the supplements by healthy premenopausal women and men. For those groups, it said, there was insufficient evidence to recommend taking vitamin D with or without calcium to prevent fractures. See Supplements / A5

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Women advised against taking calcium, vitamin D to prevent fractures

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TOP NEWS IRAQ: Bombs kill at least 44, A3 PENN STATE: Coach testifies, A3


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Artificial sweeteners: doubts by the spoonful By Kenneth Chang New York Times News Service

White. Pink. Blue. Yellow. On restaurant tables everywhere, the colors of the sweetener packets instantly identify the contents. Sugar. Saccharin. Aspartame. Sucralose. Reaching for one to pour into a cup of coffee or tea can sometimes feel like sweetener roulette, with the swirl of confusing, conflicting assertions about which are safe and which are not. Alissa Kaplan Michaels, for one, never picks pink. She still associates saccharin with cancer. The Food and Drug Administration sought to ban it in the 1970s, because rats that gorged on the chemical developed bladder cancer. But Congress imposed a moratorium to delay the ban, and the pink packets of Sweet’N Low remained on restaurant tables. The FDA withdrew its ban proposal in 1991, and the warnings were taken off saccharin in 2000 after research showed that it acts differently in rats and humans, and no conclusive increase in cancers was observed in people. Michaels, a public relations consultant in New York, knows this. But, she said, “It’s the cancer in the rats. I can’t get that out of my head.” Although many people have nagging worries about artificial sweeteners, they still use mountains of them — globally, artificial sweeteners are a $1.5-billion-a-year market — to avoid sugar and calories. The scientific world is also a dichotomy of conclusions. For any of the sweeteners, one can as easily find a study that offers reassuring analysis of safety as one that enumerates potential alarming effects. And it is possible that there could be longterm effects in humans that will become evident only after people have been consuming these sweeteners for decades. Thus hearsay, mythology and whim guide the choices of many people. The FDA places the three main artificial sweeteners available today in the same category: “generally recognized as safe.” The manufacturers cite multitudes of health studies to back up that assertion. “Based on conventional food safety considerations, the scientific community feels that these have been very adequately tested for any potential toxicities,” said Dr. Gary Williams, a professor of pathology at New York Medical College who has been involved in safety reviews of artificial sweeteners, some financed by the manufacturers.

A little is a lot Part of Williams’ confidence about safety is that the artificial sweeteners are much more intensely sweet than sugar, so people consume very little of them. Most of the white stuff in the packets is filler. Safety tests in animals looked at doses that were hundreds or thousands of times higher. But critics — particularly of aspartame, sold as Equal or

NutraSweet — say that health problems like headaches, neurological disorders and cancers are occurring, but that regulators are ignoring them. The Center for Science in the Public Interest, a health advocacy group, slaps an “avoid” label on saccharin and aspartame, but deems sucralose and neotame — a newer, more intense sweetener, chemically similar to aspartame — to be safe. The center also warns against acesulfame potassium, a less common sweetener that is rarely found in tabletop packets but is combined with other sweeteners in soda and baked goods. For those who turn to stevia, a sweetener derived from a plant, the center gives it a “caution,” because cancer studies were conducted in only one species of lab animals. A Google search instantly turns up worries that many have about the various sweeteners: Does NutraSweet cause brain cancer? Is Splenda really in the same chemical family as DDT? What about the studies that suggest that artificial sweeteners, despite their dearth of calories, cause weight gain? Dr. Walter Willett, chairman of the nutrition department at the Harvard School of Public Health, says people can make rational decisions, taking into account risks and uncertainty. “The world is almost never black and white, and we rarely operate with absolute certainty about anything,” he said. “What is most important is to avoid risks that are large and clear, like smoking, obesity and regular consumption of fullstrength soda.”

Chemical concerns Saccharin, aspartame, sucralose and acesulfame potassium are all molecules that sidle up to certain proteins on the surface of the tongue, tickling neurons that then send a signal that exclaims to the brain: “Sweet!” The concerns arise over what happens to the artificial sweeteners after they are swallowed. Consider aspartame. It is essentially two amino acids connected by a molecular snippet known as a methyl ester. Certain people — about 1 in 25,000 in the U.S. — have a genetic condition that prevents them from metabolizing one of the amino acids, phenylalanine, and those people are warned away from aspartame. Many foods contain the same two amino acids, in higher quantities. “It’s not like these are totally foreign, unique substances,” Willett said. “It doesn’t absolutely prove they’re harmless, but it makes it less likely that there’s a huge surprise waiting for us.” Others look at the same components of aspartame and see poisons. The two amino acids,

while essential for the human diet, cause problems when present out of balance, they say. The third part, the methyl ester, turns into methanol, which is a poison — though fruit juices have higher concentrations of methanol. Woodrow Monte, emeritus professor of nutrition at the University of Arizona, ascribes a host of ills, including multiple sclerosis, to low-level methanol poisoning. The scientific literature contains findings that can alarm or reassure. A huge study at a cancer research institute in Italy found that rats given aspartame had higher rates of leukemia and lymphomas. The National Cancer Institute in Maryland, however, reviewed health data from a half a million retirees and found no correlation between beverages with aspartame and these cancers. Meanwhile, sucralose, as the Splenda manufacturer, McNeil Nutritionals, notes in its advertising, starts out as sugar. Chemical reactions excise bits of the sugar molecules and replace them with chlorine atoms. The chlorine effectively camouflages the molecules, and most pass through the body undigested. Hence, zero calories. But some wonder if the chlorine in the sucralose molecules that are absorbed by the body might cause a problem. Michael Jacobson, the executive director of the Center for Science in the Public Interest, said the animal testing of sucralose was sufficient for a “safe” rating. The durability of sucralose molecules gives rise to a different concern. Measurable levels of sucralose have been found in the water supply, raising questions about what happens to various animals when they consume it.

Weighing the risks With the questions about artificial sweeteners, some may even wonder: How bad is sugar, anyway? White sugar offers the purest taste of sweetness. It is natural. But its deleterious health effects are the best established: It can make you fatter. In terms of relative risk — the known dangers of sugar and weight gain versus the uncertainties of artificial sweeteners — “artificially sweetened beverages are much less bad than the full-sugar beverages,” Willett said. Still, diet sodas are less than optimal. “I view them like a nicotine patch,” he said. The better solution to protect health: Eat and drink less sweet stuff.

NEW YORK — Finally, some good news for older dads. A new study hints that their children and even their grandchildren may get a health benefit because of their older age. It’s based on research into something called telomeres — tips on the ends of chromosomes. Some previous studies have associated having longer telomeres with better health and longer lives. Telomeres haven’t been proven to cause those benefits in the general population, but a number of researchers think they may hold secrets for things like longevity and cancer. As you age, telomeres shorten. However, previous studies have shown that the older a man is when he becomes a father, the longer the telomeres his children tend to have. The new research confirms that and finds it’s extended to his grandchildren. That’s a cheerier result for older dads than some other studies in recent years that indicate their kids are at heightened risk for things like autism, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. The new work didn’t look at health outcomes. That’s a future step, said researcher Dan T.A. Eisenberg of Northwestern University. He presents the results with colleagues in Monday’s issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Carol Greider of Johns Hopkins University, who shared a Nobel Prize in 2009 for telomere research but who didn’t participate in the new study, said it’s no surprise that the telomere effect would extend beyond children to grandchildren. She cautioned that since older fathers also tend to pass more potentially harmful genetic mutations, it’s “not at all clear” whether advanced paternal age gives an overall health benefit to children. In a statement, the Northwestern researchers said their study shouldn’t be taken as a recommendation that men reproduce at older ages, because there’s a risk of mutations. The researchers’ work involved an analysis of telomeres in blood samples from a large, multigenerational study in the Philippines. One analysis of about 2,000 people confirmed the idea that the older your dad was when you were born, the longer your telomeres tend to be. That held true throughout the age range of the fathers, who were 15 to 43 at the time their sons or daughters were born. Researchers then extended that another generation: The older your father’s father was when your father was born, the longer your telomeres tend to be. That analysis included 234 grandchildren. A separate analysis found no significant effect from the mother’s father.

TODAY It’s Wednesday, June 13, the 165th day of 2012. There are 201 days left in the year.

HAPPENINGS • Senior U.S. and Indian officials meet in Washington in a third strategic dialogue to consider ways of expanding security, economic and other ties of growing importance to both powers. • German Chancellor Angela Merkel seeks to forge a compromise on proposals for a European growth initiative with the country’s opposition leaders. The center-right government needs the support of opposition parties to secure a two-thirds majority for the EU’s fiscal treaty in Parliament. • International assisted-suicide groups gather for a six-day convention in Switzerland.

IN HISTORY Highlights: In 1942, the first of two four-man Nazi sabotage teams arrived in the United States during World War II. The first group disembarked from a U-boat off Long Island, N.Y.; the second one arrived several days later on the Florida coast. (The eight were arrested after one of them went to U.S. authorities; six of the saboteurs were executed.) In 1944, Germany began launching flying-bomb attacks against Britain during World War II. In 1966, the Supreme Court ruled in Miranda v. Arizona that criminal suspects had to be informed of their constitutional right to consult with an attorney and to remain silent. Ten years ago: U.S. Roman Catholic bishops opened an extraordinary closed-door meeting in Dallas on the sex scandal that was shaking the church as they crafted a plan for a zero-tolerance policy for pedophile priests. Five years ago: In Beirut, Lebanon, a powerful car bombing killed Walid Eido, a prominent anti-Syrian legislator. Insurgents blew up the two minarets of a revered Shiite shrine in Samarra, Iraq, a year after the shrine’s golden dome was destroyed in a bombing. One year ago: Facing off in New Hampshire, Republican White House hopefuls condemned President Barack Obama’s handling of the economy from the opening moments of their first major debate of the 2011-12 campaign season, and pledged emphatically to repeal his historic year-old health care overhaul.

BIRTHDAYS Artist Christo is 77. Magician Siegfried (Siegfried & Roy) is 73. U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon is 68. Actor Stellan Skarsgard is 61. Comedian Tim Allen is 59. Actress Ally Sheedy is 50. Singer David Gray is 44. Singer-musician Rivers Cuomo (Weezer) is 42. Actor Chris Evans is 31. Actress Kat Dennings is 26. Actress Ashley Olsen is 26. Actress Mary-Kate Olsen is 26. — From wire reports

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WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

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T S Bombs kill at least 44 during Iraq pilgrimage

Former assistant coach testifies against Sandusky

Bulletin wire reports BAGHDAD — Four coordinated car bombs tore into processions of Shiite pilgrims across Baghdad early today, killing at least 44 people and wounding dozens more in Iraq’s latest spasm of sectarian-fueled violence, police and medical workers said. The death toll was expected to rise in today’s attacks — the third this week targeting the annual pilgrimage commemorating the 8th century death of a revered imam. The bombings have threatened to ratchet up sectarian violence. Two police officers said the first bomb struck pilgrims in a procession at around 5 a.m. in the northern neighborhood of Taji, killing seven and wounding 22 people. Within hours, three more explosions hit other processions in different parts of the city, killing at least 13 more and wounding 54 people, police officers said. All officials spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to talk to the media. The pilgrims were making their way to the shrine for a revered Shiite imam for the annual commemoration that climaxes on Saturday.

BELLEFONTE, Pa. — On a Friday night before spring break in 2001, Mike McQueary, then a graduate assistant football coach at Penn State, was at home watching the movie “Rudy.” The Notre Dame-based movie so inspired McQueary that he jumped off the sofa and drove to the football team’s facilities to do some work. He never made it to his office to review playbooks and game videos. Instead, he stopped first at his locker to drop off a pair of sneakers. There, McQueary had an encounter that changed his life and damaged the reputation of the university’s football program, one almost as storied as Notre Dame’s. McQueary’s story of that encounter has no heroes, and Tuesday, under oath, McQueary told that story to the jury here sitting in judgment of Jerry Sandusky, the former Penn State assistant coach charged with being a serial pedophile. McQueary could be the most

Crime boss’s girlfriend gets 8-year prison sentence New York Times News Service BOSTON — Catherine Greig, the longtime girlfriend of crime boss James “Whitey” Bulger, was sentenced Tuesday to eight years in prison for her role in helping Bulger elude the authorities during the 16 years the two spent in hiding. “It’s not merely harboring,” Judge Douglas Woodlock said of Greig’s crimes before handing down the sentence, which also included a $150,000 fine. “It was for a long duration; it involved harboring someone accused of the most serious crimes imaginable.” Greig, 61, sat mostly expressionless through the day’s proceedings in U.S. District Court. As part of a plea agreement in March, she admitted that she left Boston in 1995 to join Bulger, who had gone into hiding in December 1994. Bulger, once believed to be the king of Boston’s underground crime world, also acted as an FBI informant and had been tipped off by an agent about a looming indictment.

By Ken Belson New York Times News Service

Gene J. Puskar / The Associated Press

Penn State University assistant football coach Mike McQueary arrives at the Centre County Courthouse to testify in the child sexual abuse trial of former Penn State University assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky in Bellefonte, Pa., on Tuesday. Sandusky is charged with 52 counts of child sexual abuse involving 10 boys over 15 years.

important prosecution witness in the commonwealth of Pennsylvania’s case against Sandusky: He offers an eyewitness account of a sexual assault, perhaps a rape, and he claims to have told people of the attack in the hours and days after he saw it. On Tuesday, as he had a

Method to track firearm use stalled by foes By Erica Goode New York Times News Service

Identifying the firearm used in a crime is one of the biggest challenges for criminal investigators. But what if a shell casing picked up at a murder scene could immediately be tracked to the gun that fired it? A technique that uses laser technology and stamps a numeric code on shell casings can do just that. But the technology, called microstamping, has been swept up in the larger national debate over gun laws and Second Amendment rights, and efforts to require gun makers to use it have stalled across the nation. “I think it is one of these things in law enforcement that would just take us from the Stone Age to the jet age in an instant,” said Commissioner Frederick Bealefeld of the Baltimore Police Department. “I just can’t comprehend the opposition to it.” But legislation proposed in several states to require gun manufacturers to use the technique has met with fierce opposition. Opponents, including the gun industry and the National Rifle Association, argue that microstamping is ineffective and its cost prohibitive. By linking guns to their original purchasers, they say, it unfairly targets legal gun owners, when the guns used in most crimes are illegally obtained. The issue has become so heated that in New York, where the state Assembly is expected to debate a microstamping bill as early as today, one gun maker, the Remington Arms Co., has threatened to pull its business out

of the state if the bill becomes law. “Such a mandate could force Remington to reconsider its commitment to the New York market altogether,” said Teddy Novin, a company spokesman. In California, legislation signed by Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger in 2007 has been held up while the attorney general’s office makes sure the technology is unencumbered by patents. A gun rights group, the Calguns Foundation, went so far as to pay a $555 fee to extend a lapsing patent held by the developer to further delay the law from taking effect. “It was a lot cheaper to keep the patent in force than to litigate over the issues,” said Gene Hoffman, the chairman of the foundation. Todd Lizotte, an engineer who developed the technique in the 1990s, said he wants the patents to lapse and the technology to be in the public domain. Microstamping works much like an ink stamp. Lasers engrave a unique microscopic numeric code on the tip of a gun’s firing pin and breach face. When the gun is fired, the pressure transfers the markings to the shell casings. By reading the code imprinted on casings found at a crime scene, police officers can identify the gun that was fired and track it to the purchaser. In response to the critics, Lizotte said that no new technology was tamper-proof, but that erasing the microscopic code was not easy. The technology is steadily evolving and becoming more reliable

North Dakota voters reject effort to abolish property tax By Monica Davey New York Times News Service

Voters in North Dakota on Tuesday rejected a constitutional amendment to abolish the property tax, turning aside arguments by advocates of the measure who say the tax has proved inconsistent and is in conflict with the basic concept of property ownership. The result, which showed North Dakotans overwhelmingly opposing a property tax ban in unofficial returns, ended those advocates’ immediate hopes of making North Dakota the first in the nation to take such a step. There, a powerful coalition

number of times under oath before, McQueary said he alerted Paterno the next day, then told university officials, including the athletic director and the administrator in charge of overseeing the university’s campus police department. “I made sure he knew it was

sexual and wrong,” McQueary said of his conversation with Paterno the morning after the shower incident. “There was no doubt.” One of Sandusky’s lawyers, not surprisingly, spent much of Tuesday afternoon trying to impeach McQueary’s credibility. And indeed, McQueary sounded less sure of himself under cross-examination by Karl Rominger, one of Sandusky’s lawyers. Persistently and often effectively, Rominger got McQueary to admit that there were inconsistencies in his statements Tuesday and those he made to investigators and in other courts. McQueary admitted, for instance, that he had first said the incident took place in 2002 but later revised that to 2001. McQueary also admitted that he had provided a variety of potential ages for the boy. McQueary did his best to stand his ground. “I recalled a lot of things in my life that are very clear and vivid, and I don’t remember the dates,” he said, by way of explaining the inconsistencies in his testimonies.

of groups, including business leaders and public workers, strongly opposed the idea and raised significantly more money than the other side to spread a message that ending the property tax would mean chaos in the state capital, Bismarck, an increase in other taxes and an end to most decision making by local city councils and county boards. Though the property tax ban failed, state lawmakers said they had grasped the depth of residents’ frustrations and were all but certain to tackle concerns about unfair property tax exemptions and rising assessments and tax bills.

Residents gathered thousands of signatures to bring the question to the ballot, and the state’s political leaders say they plan to draw up changes in the coming months. On another ballot measure in the state, North Dakotans voted to allow the retirement of a nickname, Fighting Sioux, for sports teams connected to the University of North Dakota, unofficial results showed. The issue has been a matter of fierce debate in the state for years, as some tried to comply with NCAA policy banning such imagery and others lobbied for the longstanding name as a school tradition.

and cost effective, he said, and waiting until it is foolproof makes no sense. For his part, Lizotte said microstamping had nothing to do with gun rights. “I’m a Second Amendment

guy,” he said, adding that he is a member of the NRA. “I just want to be part of the solution of protecting rights, because every time something bad happens with a firearm, my rights get curtailed.”

Democrat wins race to succeed Giffords New York Times News Service TUCSON, Ariz. — Ron Barber, whom former Rep. Gabrielle Giffords picked as her successor, defeated his Republican rival Tuesday in a closely followed special election seen by many political strategists as a testing ground for the power of national issues in deciding competitive races. Barber’s win over Jesse Kelly was largely secured by voters in Pima County, the largest of the four counties that make up the 8th Congressional District and also home to Tucson, Giffords’ former hometown. Turnout there and in most others of the district was high for a special election, reflecting the significance of the race and Giffords’ draw on voters. With 66 percent of precincts reporting, Barber, a Democrat, had secured roughly 53 percent of the vote. Kelly had 45 percent, while Charlie Manolakis, the Green Party candidate, came in at a distant third, with 2.3 percent. It was a contest full of emotion, making results in an already volatile district even harder to predict. The Southern Arizona district is majority Republican, but many of its Republican voters espouse liberal views on social issues, as do many of the independents, who make up 30 percent of the electorate.


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THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13, 2012

Single women gaining limited acceptance in Iran By Thomas Erdbrink New York Times News Service

TEHRAN — When Shoukoufeh, an English literature student from a backwater town, set out to rent an apartment for herself here in the capital, she first stopped at a jewelry store and picked up a $5 wedding ring. Accustomed to living with lies to navigate the etiquette of Iranian society, where women are traditionally expected to live with their parents or a husband, the 24-year-old would prominently flash her fake white-gold band to real estate agents and landlords who would otherwise be reluctant to lease an apartment to a single woman. “To them and my neighbors, my roommate and I are two married women away from their husbands to pursue our studies,” she explained. “In reality, we are of course both single.” There are no official statistics on the number of women living by themselves in big cities in Iran. But university professors, real estate agents, families and many young women all say that a phenomenon extremely rare just 10 years ago is becoming commonplace, propelled by a continuous wave of female students entering universities and a staggering rise in divorces. The shift has left clerics and politicians struggling to deal with a generation of young

Skout Continued from A1 The cases raise larger questions about the safety of social networking apps and sites, which often forbid minors from using them or sequester them from adult users. But those sites find it nearly impossible to control who goes where. In Skout’s case, a majority of its users sign in through Facebook, which officially forbids members under the age of 13. Facebook has acknowledged that younger children find ways onto the site. It said last week that it was finetuning controls that would allow children under 13 to join the service. Dating apps and sites are not the only places on the Web where illegal sexual behavior has been reported recently. Tuesday, investors at Balderton Capital, a venture capital firm based in London, told a British technology site that it was returning a 13 percent stake in Sulake, a Finnish social gaming company, after discovering that one of the company’s products, Habbo, had been used by sexual predators and for teenage sex chats. But even when sites monitor for sexual predators and evict them, the predators often simply move to other social networks. In 2009, after Myspace said it had successfully removed 90,000 sex offenders from its site, more than 8,000 of them immediately popped up on Facebook. New apps for smartphones that use GPS to show where users are have prompted new worries. Skout lets users trade photos, instant messages and virtual gifts. But like other new social networking apps — like Highlight, Circle and About.me — Skout can check a user’s location on a map. Wiklund said the app for minors was designed with safeguards like parental controls. The GPS location feature is an opt-in and it never shows a user’s location with greater accuracy than half a mile. He said a quarter of the company’s 75member staff monitored the community for illicit behavior. It also uses machine-learning technology — which it calls “the creepinator” — to monitor photos for nudity and check chats for inappropriate sexual messages, profanity, spamming, copyright infringement and violent behavior. Wiklund said Skout removed “tens of thousands of devices a month” from the service. But in at least one case, according to the police, a 13year-old boy sent nude photos to Daniel Schmidt, a 21-yearold posing as a 16-year-old in Skout’s under-17 community, before the two agreed to meet

women carving out independent lives in a tradition-bound society, away from the guidance of fathers and husbands. Desperate to stop the trend, the government introduced a campaign to promote quick and cheap marriages — but it backfired, experts said, by cheapening an institution deeply anchored in Iran’s ancient culture. That has left the young women to develop strategies to fend for themselves in a society where social codes are often based on deep suspicion of female sexuality. Shoukoufeh, who would not give her full name for fear of losing her lease, said that prying eyes often peek through the cracks of doors whenever she walks down the hallway. But she said she draws strength from her parents, who support her choice to live alone. “They know I want to be independent,” she said decisively. “They understand times have changed.” University enrollments have been rising strongly in Iran over the last decade, and women now account for nearly 60 percent of the total. In the same period, divorces have increased by 135 percent. “Many of my friends, especially those who came from small towns to study in Tehran, are living by themselves,” Shoukoufeh said. “For many girls of my age group, living single is the norm now.”

in a secluded Milwaukee park. There, the police said, the two were found in a sexual act. Schmidt has been charged with one count of second-degree sexual assault of a child. A Skout spokeswoman, Lydia Chan, said the company monitored and prescreened all public photos, but, citing a continuing police investigation, she would not say whether it had picked up on the nude photos in this case. In another case, in Portsmouth, Ohio, a 15-year-old girl said she had chatted with Gene Zimmerman, a 37-yearold man posing as a teenager on Skout, before they agreed to meet, the police said. She told detectives that she had thought the man was going to give her a car ride to meet her boyfriend. Instead, he took her to his apartment and raped her, the police said. Zimmerman was charged with firstdegree rape. In the third case, after a 12-year-old girl went missing near Escondido, Calif., her mother notified the police. They checked her cellphone and discovered that she had met someone through Skout. They said they found the girl at the home of Christopher Bradley Nutt, 24. He has been charged with several counts, including sex with a minor, child molesting and using a child for pornography. He has pleaded not guilty. “We’re seeing more of these cases,” said Lt. Craig Carter of the Escondido Police Department. “Parents need to be aware that their kids could be on these websites. In this case, if her parents had taken her phone and looked at her messages on Skout, they would have immediately seen inappropriate responses for someone that is 12 years old.” Wiklund said he had learned of all three cases through local news outlets and contacted the law enforcement officials to aid in their investigations. He said the company suspended the app for teenagers Tuesday and banned all their devices, which were registered with the app using unique device numbers. It said it was working with a task force of experts to scrutinize company practices and improve age verification. Andreessen Horowitz has no plans to abandon its investment in Skout. Scott Weiss, an investment partner there who led the investment in Skout, said one reason the firm invested in company was its safety and security protocols. “I thought we were doing a lot, but obviously we have to do better,” Weiss said by phone Tuesday. “This is a five-alarm fire. The entire company is re-evaluating everything it’s doing.”

Feds say U.S. horse operation was a front for cartel cash The Associated Press OKLAHOMA CITY — In the stables at a prominent quarter horse track in New Mexico, workers quietly nicknamed Jose Trevino Morales’s stables as the “Zetas’ stables” and say they often saw people show up with bags of cash to buy the horses. On Tuesday, authorities raided those stables and a horse ranch in Oklahoma accusing Trevino and others of running a sophisticated money-laundering operation connected to one of Mexico’s most powerful and ruthless drug cartels. Federal authorities accuse Trevino’s older brother, Miguel Angel Trevino Morales, a key figure in the Zetas drug operation, of setting up the horse operation that the younger brother ran from the sprawling ranch near Lexington, Okla., south of Oklahoma City. Millions of dollars went through the operation, which bought, trained, bred and raced quarter horses throughout the southwest United States, including the famed Ruidoso Downs track in New Mexico. Jose Trevino, his wife and five others were arrested. Seven others, including another Trevino brother, were charged but remain at large. “This case is a prime example of the ability of Mexican drug cartels to establish footholds in legitimate U.S. industries and highlights the serious threat money laundering causes to our financial system,” said Richard Weber, the chief of the IRS’ criminal investigation unit. The indictment, unsealed Tuesday, describes how the Trevino brothers and a network quietly arranged to purchase quarter horses with drug money at auction and disguise the source of the funds used to buy them so that the Zetas’ involvement would be masked. They would often

Brett Deering / The Associated Press

FBI agents overlook a horse ranch under investigation Tuesday in Lexington, Okla. Federal agents raided the Oklahoma ranch and a prominent quarter horse track in New Mexico on Tuesday, alleging the brother of a high-ranking official in a Mexican drug cartel used a horse-breeding operation to launder money.

Deschutes Continued from A1 These lawyers handled two costly federal cases. Steve Kulin, a Redmond business owner who is blind, sued the county in 2008. Kulin said the county violated the Americans with Disabilities Act through its in-home occupation ordinance, which lays out the size of office space and number of employees allowed for in-home businesses, and through its decision not to grant Kulin’s request for exceptions to the ordinance so that he could have more employees. On June 1, a U.S. District Court judge ruled in Kulin’s favor on part of the lawsuit, finding that Kulin should be allowed one more employee and more space for his business. That case cost the county more than $99,000 in legal fees, according to information provided by the county. Dora Rivera Murillo, a former nurse at the Deschutes County jail, sued the county in June 2011. That lawsuit is still pending in the U.S. District Court of Oregon, but so far it has cost the county nearly $94,000 in legal fees. In addition to the federal cases, the county hired outside lawyers to defend its interests because the county’s top civil lawyer — Mark Pilliod — was the target of a

pay in cash, or use fake names, which helped keep the owners and the money a secret. Since 2008, the operation racked up millions of dollars in transactions in California, New Mexico, Oklahoma and Texas, prosecutors said. The New York Times first reported the raids and the alleged connection to the Zetas cartel, citing a months-long investigation and several anonymous sources. The operation, Tremor Enterprises LLC, started small, but worked in plain sight. Some horses carried names with drug references, like Number One Cartel and Coronita Cartel. Over time, the horses and the operation earned a place on some of the most elite stages in the industry. One horse named Mr. Piloto won a $1 million prize at Ruidoso Downs on Labor Day 2010, going off at odds of 22-1. His trainer, Felipe Quintero, 28, was one of the seven arrested Tuesday. The Zetas are one of Mexico’s most powerful drug cartels, with a reputation for willing to commit atrocities including kidnapping, decapi-

tating and dismembering enemies. The elder Trevino is the second-in-command and one of the U.S. and Mexican governments’ most wanted men, known for his brutality. One technique favored by Miguel Angel Trevino Morales is the “guiso,” or stew, in which enemies are placed in 55-gallon drums and burned alive. Underscoring the threat of the Zetas, the U.S. Embassy in Mexico issued a travel advisory Tuesday, warning the arrests could result in some form of retaliation and urged U.S. citizens in Mexico to maintain a low profile. Jose Trevino and his horse operation in the United States appeared to work with little fear of getting caught by authorities. Three stable workers at the Ruidoso Downs Race Track and Casino told The Associated Press on Tuesday that Trevino’s stables were known as the “Zetas’ stables,” and two of the workers described seeing people from Mexico show up to the stables with duffel bags of cash to purchase horses. The AP agreed to let the workers, who refused

to give their names, speak anonymously because they feared retaliation from the Zetas cartel. It wasn’t just the cash purchases that caught the attention of those in the quarter horse racing industry. The amount of money Trevino and his network paid for horses also raised eyebrows. Debbie Schauf, the director of the Oklahoma Quarter Horse Racing Association, said Jose Trevino showed up a few years ago and quickly earned a reputation for always paying his bills and shelling out handsome prices for some of the top horses in the country. Quarter horses are smaller but more muscular than thoroughbreds and can run short distances faster than other horses. “They were also recognized for taking care of their business. They paid their bills and didn’t cause any trouble. You didn’t have a food vendor or veterinarian calling to say they couldn’t get these guys to pay their bills. They were good citizens in the horse industry,” she said.

grand jury inquiry Flaherty initiated last year. Flaherty ended the grand jury investigation after Pilliod issued a mea culpa and paid $100 toward costs the county government incurred complying with the grand jury. The county also paid for Pilliod’s defense attorney and for lawyers to prepare a letter to the Oregon State Bar regarding Flaherty’s handling of the grand jury. Legal fees related to Flaherty totaled more than $20,000 in the current budget year. The total cost since April 2011 is more than $98,000. Workers’ compensation costs accounted for a large part of the increase in risk management costs: in the first 11 months of the fiscal year, they were up $300,000 over last year. Kropp attributed the higher cost to a couple of factors. “We paid out more claims,” Kropp said. Rising health care costs also drove up workers’ compensation expenses. Several claims paid this year were for incidents three to four years ago. Some of these were for employees who slipped and fell at work, Kropp said. The county tries to prevent these injuries by clearing sidewalks and parking lots during the winter, spreading sand in front of entrances and providing traction devices that employees can attach

to their shoes. The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office always has the most employees who report injuries at work. Kropp said that’s because it’s a large department and the type of work is more likely to lead to injury. Sheriff Larry Blanton said many claims in his office result from “general wear and tear on the body from a business where it comes with the territory.” “We’re doing everything and anything we can to try to

encourage additional physical fitness that will help with that,” Blanton said. “At the jail also, we end up having physical confrontations with inmates from time to time.” Kropp said it’s difficult to predict whether next year will also be an expensive one for the county’s risk management budget. “It’s more risky than betting on the stock market,” Kropp said.

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WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

Payouts Continued from A1 Board members said they plan to vote next week on proposed labor agreements with the two small unions — the water district union with three employees, the sewer district with two. Both districts’ boards are scheduled to meet at 5 p.m. June 19 at La Pine City Hall. Earls would not say Tuesday what terms are contained in the proposed contracts. “At this point, we don’t want to comment on what’s in there because we don’t want to mess anything up,” Earls said. La Pine City Manager Steve Hasson said that while the city will recognize the two unions, the proposed contracts to be voted on by the sewer and water districts will not be binding for the city. Instead, the city’s labor attorney and staff will bargain with the employee unions once the city absorbs the districts, Hasson said. Last month, the City Council adopted personnel policies to prepare for taking over the sewer and water districts and their employees. The city limited the amount of vacation hours workers will be able to carry over from their district jobs to their city jobs to 80 hours. The city also set the pay for oncall workers at $50 a week, down from the $200 per week currently paid by the districts. — Reporter: 541-617-7829, hborrud@bendbulletin.com

Supplements Continued from A1 The supplements also have been studied to see if they prevent cancer. But, the group said, there is insufficient evidence to say they do or do not. The cancer studies included ones testing the supplements to prevent all cancers as well as ones asking about colorectal cancer, prostate cancer and breast cancer. Their analysis of the effects of the supplements included 137 studies, including randomized controlled trials, the gold standard for clinical evidence. The low doses that the group referred to, at least for the postmenopausal women, were a typical level of 1,000 international units or less of vitamin D a day and 400 milligrams or less of calcium. At that dose, said Dr. Kirsten Bibbins-Domingo, a member of the task force who is an associate professor of medicine at the University of California in San Francisco, “there is sufficient evidence to say they do not prevent fractures.” “When you take a vitamin supplement or any therapy for an extended period of time, you have to ask, ‘What is the evidence that it works and what is the evidence of harms?’ ” Bibbins-Domingo said. “It is clear that lower doses of calcium and vitamin D do not prevent fractures, and there is a small but measurable risk of kidney stones,” she said. So with no evidence of benefit, there is no reason to risk harm. Dr. Ethel Siris, who directs Columbia University’s osteoporosis center, said she and other osteoporosis experts already knew the supplements did not prevent fractures. “That’s why when a patient with osteoporosis says, ‘I will just take calcium and vitamin D,’ we say, ‘That’s not enough,’” Siris said. But Bibbins-Domingo said the task force recommendations did not apply to people with osteoporosis. For most people, she said, there is no need for these supplements and good reason for many not to take them. “Vitamin D and calcium are part of a healthy diet,” Bibbins-Domingo said. “Most people can achieve sufficient doses with a healthy diet.”

Australian coroner confirms: Dingo took baby in 1980 case

A5

RUSSIA

Huge anti-Putin protest signals growing resolve

By Rod McGuirk The Associated Press

CANBERRA, Australia — The dingo really did take the baby. Thirty-two years after a 9-week-old infant vanished from an Outback campsite in a case that bitterly divided Australians and inspired a Meryl Streep film, the nation overwhelmingly welcomed a ruling that finally closed the mystery. A coroner in the northern city of Darwin concluded Tuesday that a dingo, or wild dog, had taken Azaria Chamberlain from her parents’ tent near Ayers Rock, the red monolith in the Australian desert now known by its Aboriginal name Uluru. That is what her parents, Lindy Chamberlain-Creighton and Michael Chamberlain, had maintained from the beginning. The eyes of the parents welled with tears as the findings of the fourth inquest into their daughter’s disappearance were announced, watched by people around Australia on live television. “We’re relieved and delighted to come to the end of this saga,” a tearful but smiling Chamberlain-Creighton, since divorced and remarried, told reporters outside the court. The first inquest in 1981 had also blamed a dingo. But a second inquest a year later charged Chamberlain-Creighton with murder and her husband with being an accessory after the fact. She was convicted and served more than three years in prison before that decision was overturned. A third inquest in 1995 left the cause of death open. “The dingo has done it. I’m absolutely thrilled to bits,” said Yvonne Cain, one of the 12 jurors in the 1982 trial that convicted a then-pregnant Chamberlain-Creighton of murder. “I’d always had my doubts and have become certain she’s innocent.” Cain said she still encounters people who doubt the couple’s innocence, but they inevitably misunderstand what evidence there was against them. “When people say she’s guilty, I say: ‘You have no idea what they’re talking about — I was there,’ ” she said.

A notorious case The case became famous internationally through the 1988 movie “A Cry in the Dark,” in which Streep played the mother.

Syria Continued from A1 “We have confronted the Russians about stopping their continued arms shipments to Syria,” she said in Washington. The shipments, while legal, set the stage for a new diplomatic confrontation with the Obama administration at a time when Washington and its European and Arab allies have been struggling to persuade Russia to step up diplomatic pressure on Assad to bring an end to nearly 15 months of bloodshed. The shipments, which U.S. officials said were thought to be en route to Damascus, would also arrive at a time when the Syrian government is escalating its use of force against opposition strongholds, including the use of existing reserves of Russian-built attack helicopters. Underlining growing concerns, the United Nations’ top peacekeeping official on Tuesday acknowledged for the first time that Syria is in the midst of a civil war. “Clearly what is happening is that the government of Syria lost some large chunks of territory, several cities, to the opposition and wants to retake control,” the official, Herve Ladsous, told the Reuters and Agence France-Presse news agencies in an interview. Asked whether the conflict could be characterized as a “full-scale civil war,” he answered: “Yes, I think we can say that.” U.S. and U.N. officials have said that the violence in Syria

The Associated Press file photo

Patrina Malone / The Associated Press

LEFT: Michael, left, and Lindy Chamberlain leave a courthouse in Alice Springs, Australia, in 1982. RIGHT: Lindy Chamberlain-Creighton speaks to the media as her ex-husband, Michael Chamberlain, right, listens outside a coroner’s court in Darwin, Australia, on Tuesday. Settling a notorious 1980 case that split the nation and led to a mistaken conviction, an Australian coroner confirmed that a dingo took the Chamberlains’ baby in the Australian Outback more than 32 years ago.

Many Australians initially did not believe that a dingo was strong enough to take away the baby, whose body has never been recovered. Public opinion swayed harshly against the couple; some even spat on Chamberlain-Creighton and howled like dingoes outside her house. No similar dingo attack had been documented at the time, but in recent years the wild dogs native to Australia have been blamed for three fatal attacks on children. Few doubt the couple’s story today, but the latest inquest — which the family had fought to get — made it official that Azaria was killed in a dingo attack. An expert on dingo behavior, Brad Purcell, said he was not surprised that a dingo would enter a tent and take a baby while older siblings slept. Purcell suspects that many people blamed ChamberlainCreighton for leaving the baby in a tent where a dingo could have been attracted by her crying. “She was almost being condemned because she wasn’t acting as a responsible parent,” Purcell told Australian Broadcasting Corp. But not all Australians accept the latest ruling. A policeman who was at Uluru the night Azaria disappeared said he still believes the first coroner’s finding that there was some human intervention. Frank Morris, who has since retired from the police force, said while he was not trying to blame the parents, he thought someone played a part in moving clothing Azaria wore that night. “We don’t know who. That is the $64,000 question,” Morris said. “If you go to court enough times, you are bound to get a

win sooner or later,” Morris added of the parents’ victory Tuesday. The parents and the eldest of their three surviving children, Aiden Chamberlain, 38, on Tuesday collected Azaria’s new death certificate. The son made national news in 2006 when he used as his wedding car the same yellow sedan that took the family to Uluru in 1980 and that a forensic scientist wrongly determined was spattered with an infant’s blood. Years later, more sophisticated tests determined the “blood” was a combination of spilled milk and a chemical sprayed during manufacture under the car’s dashboard.

is increasingly taking on the specter of a sectarian conflict, with government-backed Shiite militiamen from the minority Alawite sect battling with anti-government forces drawn from the Sunni majority. The violence is also increasingly threatening the 300 or so U.N. monitors in the country. On Tuesday, a team of observers trying to reach a northern town engulfed by fighting for the past week were turned back by angry crowds throwing stones and metal rods. Three of their vehicles were fired upon, but the United Nations said later in a statement that the source of the gunfire was unclear. Observers had been trying to reach the town, Haffeh, since Thursday, three days after government troops launched a major offensive aimed at driving out rebels from the Free Syrian Army. The town lies on the edge of the heartland of Assad’s Alawite sect and is surrounded by Alawite villages, raising fears that Haffeh’s residents could be targeted in a massacre if government troops succeed in crushing the rebels. Dozens of people are dying daily in attacks on protesters and in the shelling of towns and cities across Syria as the government battles to assert its control over the many areas that have fallen under the sway of the rebels. On Tuesday, 51 people were killed nationwide, including 10 who died in the eastern town of Deir al-Zour when Syrian forces fired mortar rounds at an anti-government demonstration and a family of five that died when a mortar shell

landed on their home, according to the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights. The U.N. monitoring mission said observers had witnessed heavy shelling over the city of Homs on Monday and devastation in nearby towns that the government is trying to retake. Ahmad Fawzi, a U.N. spokesman, told reporters in Geneva that the mission is amassing evidence about the government’s use of attack helicopters. “If they had been used before, it has not been documented; this time, it has been documented,” Fawzi said. “Our observers have videotaped helicopters in the skies with fire coming out of them ... so whether (they are) helicopters with machine guns on them, or helicopter gunships ... we have not been able to make

‘Final triumph of truth’ “We’re relieved and delighted to come to the end of this saga,” a tearful but smiling Chamberlain-Creighton told reporters outside the court. She later said she was undecided whether the coroner’s finding was a cause for celebration. “I celebrate the final triumph of truth, but I don’t celebrate her death and the two are so intertwined — I have no idea what I feel about that,” she told Nine Network television in a paid exclusive interview. Coroner Elizabeth Morris said she was “satisfied that the evidence is sufficiently adequate, clear, cogent and exact and that the evidence excludes all other reasonable possibilities.” The findings mirror those of the first coroner’s inquest in 1981. But that inquest found that somebody had later interfered with Azaria’s clothing, which was later found relatively unscathed in the desert. A second coroner’s inquest triggered a Northern Territory Supreme Court trial that

resulted in ChamberlainCreighton being found guilty of slashing her daughter’s throat and making it look like a dingo attack. She was convicted in 1982 and sentenced to life in prison with hard labor. She was released in 1986 after evidence was found that backed up her version of events: the baby’s jacket, found near a dingo den, which helped explain the condition of the rest of the baby’s clothing. A Royal Commission, the highest form of investigation in Australia, debunked much of the forensic evidence used at her trial and her conviction was overturned. A third inquest could not determine the cause of death. The fourth inquest heard new evidence of dingo attacks, including three fatal attacks on children since the third inquest. Morris, the coroner, noted that dingo experts disagree on whether a dingo could have removed the clothing so neatly and without causing more damage. “It would have been very difficult for a dingo to have removed Azaria from her clothing without causing more damage than what was observed on it; however, it would have been possible for it to have done so,” she said. Michael Chamberlain said his quest for a death certificate that acknowledged his daughter had been killed by a dingo had seemed to be a “mission impossible.” “This battle to get to the legal truth about what caused Azaria’s death has taken too long,” Chamberlain said. “However, I am here to tell you that you can get justice even when you think that all is lost. But truth must be on your side.”

that distinction yet, but, yes, they are being used, and we have observed them being used.” Clinton, speaking at the Brookings Institution, said officials were extremely concerned about the possibility of the Syrian government acquiring more attack helicopters. She acknowledged that Syria was increasingly awash in arms, supplied not only by Russia but also by Arab countries backing the rebels. “There are lots of weapons on the black market,” she said. “There’s money that’s avail-

New York Times News Service MOSCOW — Tens of thousands of protesters thronged central Moscow in a drenching rain Tuesday, voicing renewed fury at President Vladimir Putin and defying recent efforts by his government to clamp down on the political opposition movement. The large turnout, rivaling the big crowds that had gathered at the initial antigovernment rallies in December, suggested that the tough new posture adopted by the Kremlin against the protests was emboldening rather than deterring Putin’s critics. On Friday, Putin signed a new law that imposes steep financial penalties on participants in rallies that cause harm to people or property. On Sunday, officials arrested five more people on charges related to the last protest, which ended in a melee between demonstrators and riot police officers. And Monday, the authorities searched the homes of several opposition leaders and issued summonses ordering seven of them to appear for questioning Tuesday so they could not attend the rally. Despite these measures, organizers said more than 50,000 people joined in Tuesday’s protest, braving the rains that soaked many participants beforehand and the claps of thunder and lightning that dispersed the crowd about four hours later. The police, who typically offer a muted estimate of crowd size, put the official tally at 15,000. Even the physical absence of some of the opposition’s most prominent leaders seemed to strengthen rather than weaken the protesters’ resolve. “It means that we were not afraid of the tough actions of the powers and the police,” said Dmitry Gudkov, a member of Parliament and a leader of the opposition, adding that the government could achieve more through negotiation. “We need dialogue with the authorities and we need to pursue political reforms, constitutional reforms and the reform of the judicial system. It is the only way out of this political crisis in Russia — the only way out.”

able. There seems to be an increasing capacity in the opposition both to defend themselves and to take the fight to the Syrian military in an irregular way. But there’s no doubt that the onslaught continues, the use of heavy artillery and the like.”

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THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13, 2012

W  B Karzai calls for end to Afghan airstrikes KABUL, Afghanistan — President Hamid Karzai of Afghanistan issued an impassioned call for the end of international airstrikes in his country Tuesday, branding them as an “illegitimate use of force” and saying that the need to protect civilian life demanded a complete halt to those operations, even in cases when troops are under attack. Hours later, the allied commander in Afghanistan, Gen. John Allen, reiterated significant changes to rules concerning the use of airstrikes announced earlier this week, issuing a statement in which he said he had given the order that “no aerial munitions be delivered against civilian dwellings.” But he added the caveat that the strikes would be permitted as an absolute last resort in self-defense “if no other options are available.”

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Former PM: Murdoch tried to change policy LONDON — As the judicial inquiry into the British press sifts painstakingly through competing claims about the influence of Rupert Murdoch’s newspapers, former Prime Minister John Major disclosed Tuesday, for what he said was the first time, that Murdoch withdrew his newspapers’ support for the Conservatives after Major refused a demand for changes in his policies on Europe. The assertion, which came during a morning of testimony, offered some clues to the extent of Murdoch’s perceived influence on British public life — a key issue under scrutiny by Lord Justice Sir Brian Leveson’s inquiry into a phone-hacking scandal involving Murdoch’s newspapers. There was no immediate response from Murdoch, who has told the inquiry that he never asked for anything from British prime ministers. But it was the second time in two days that a former prime minister had given an account of his relationship with Murdoch that differed diametrically in tone and content from that given by Murdoch, who testified before the panel in April. On Monday, former Prime Minister Gordon Brown denied Murdoch’s account of a telephone conversation, saying it never took place. Murdoch’s News Corp. said he stood by his version of events.

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Churches, Britain in gay marriage tiff LONDON — The British government headed for a bruising showdown Tuesday with Anglican and Roman Catholic Church leaders over Prime Minister David Cameron’s contentious plan to legalize same-sex marriage, presaging what some clerics called the most serious rift between church and state in centuries. Just two days before a deadline for public responses to the plan, the Church of England and Roman Catholic bishops insisted in public statements that marriage was the union of a man and a woman. Cameron, who leads a coalition government with the junior Liberal Democrats, has depicted himself as an ardent support of same-sex marriage, going beyond existing laws covering civil partnerships, which were introduced eight years ago. — From wire reports

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B

SAVVYSHOPPER Homegrown cow TV & Movies, B2 Dear Abby, B3 Comics, B4 Puzzles, B5

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13, 2012

www.bendbulletin.com/savvyshopper

IN BRIEF

Deals drive shoppers’ choices

Still sensitive in the post-recession economy, consumers are continuing to cut back and seek deals when grocery shopping, according to a recent survey by MaxPoint Interactive. The survey, reported in May in the trade magazine Progressive Grocer, says shoppers are spending more overall per trip, up from $250 in August 2007 to $277 in August 2011. Despite the larger bill, they are employing various techniques to save money. Two in five respondents said they are purchasing more store brand and generic items. Three in five decide which brand of item to purchase while in the store based on price, coupons and promotions. Among moms, more than 40 percent between the ages of 25-54 have started shopping at multiple grocery stores to get the best deals and prices. Half of respondents use coupons and 26 percent use digital coupons. Also, 25 percent said they’ve cut back on buying prime cuts of meat and seafood. Contact: www .progressivegrocer.com.

Beef cuts There are myriad ways to butcher a cow. But here are some of the most standard cuts.

CHUCK • Chuck 7-bone pot roast • Chuck pot roast • Chuck steak • Chuck eye steak • Shoulder top blade steak • Shoulder pot roast • Shoulder steak • Shoulder center • Shoulder petite tender • Shoulder petite tender medallions • Boneless short ribs

SHANK AND BRISKET • Shank cross cut • Brisket flat cut

RIB Graphic by Greg Cross / The Bulletin

• Locker beef becomes popular with locavores who prefer bulk pricing

Beware of secret shopper jobs If a letter and cashier’s check shows up in the mail announcing you’ve been selected as a secret shopper, it’s probably too good to be true. The regional office of the Better Business Bureau has been receiving inquiries from consumers who have gotten emails and letters from such alleged employers. And it’s warning consumers to beware. The ploy urges recipients to deposit the cashier’s check into their personal banking account. Then they’re asked to shop at a list of stores, rating the experience. It then instructs the recipient to wiretransfer the remainder of the check back to a specified location. The problem is the cashier’s check is fake. In essence, the consumer has just sent their own money to someone else via wire transfer. The shopper is also on the hook for the “secret� purchases. The BBB advises avoiding job opportunities that require up-front payments or money wiring, lack verifiable contact information or contain unrealistic or unsubstantiated earnings claims. Contact: www.bbb.org.

Spending up for Father’s Day A National Retail Federation survey expects spending on gifts for Dad to climb by 10 percent over last year, with the average person planning to shell out about $117. The most common expenditure for fathers, the survey says, is on a special outing like golf, dining out or a sporting event — those kinds of gifts are expected to amount to $2.3 billion nationally. The survey predicts shoppers will spend about $1.7 billion each on electronics and apparel. Gift cards, sporting goods, books and music round out the most popular gifts. The survey, conducted by BIGinsight, polled 8,789 consumers between May 2 and May 8. Contact: www.nrf.com. — Heidi Hagemeier, The Bulletin

PLATE AND FLANK

By Heidi Hagemeier • The Bulletin

T

• Rib roast • Rib steak • Ribeye roast • Ribeye steak • Back ribs

• Skirt steak • Flank steak

his year, Borlen Cattle Co. will have its

LOIN

biggest year ever selling beef.

roughly 100 head of cattle this year, co-owner

• Porterhouse steak • T-bone steak • Tenderloin roast • Tenderloin steak

Matt Borlen said. A good part of that is due

SIRLOIN

The ranch near Alfalfa will sell

• Tri-tip roast • Tri-tip steak • Top sirloin steak

to customers like Deschutes Brewery, which serves Borlen’s beef in its pubs. Another part of his business, Borlen said, comes from interest in buying beef in bulk. Borlen sells to individuals what’s sometimes called locker beef, a term used to describe buying whole beef, sides and quarters. While ranchers have long sold beef this way, Borlen said he senses it’s become more popular of late. “I think there is more interest,� he said, “especially with the prices of commodity beef going up and with more people interested in knowing where their meat came from.� Purchasing bulk beef for the home freezer can be attractive for a number of reasons. Buyers get to speak with the producer about the cattle and perhaps even visit the ranch. Upon purchase, they can work directly with the

ROUND • Top round steak • Bottom round roast • Bottom round steak • Eye round roast • Eye round steak • Round tip roast • Round tip steak • Sirloin tip center roast • Sirloin tip center steak • Sirloin tip side steak

Inside • Terms to know when purchasing a whole, half or quarter of beef, B6

butcher on how the beef is cut and packaged, sometimes getting unusual cuts. And for those who eat a lot of beef, the resulting price per pound can at times be competitive with or even cheaper than buying a similar-quality product in the grocery store. Experts recommend thinking about your eating and cooking habits, as well as doing a bit of research, before leaping in and packing a freezer full of meat. The initial outlay for a side, for instance, varies, but at $3 per pound can range from $1,275 to $1,500. See Beef / B6

OTHER

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Lanny Berman, co-owner of Butcher Boys in Prineville, stands with stacks of wrapped locker beef. He says the two stacks together are what a buyer would take home from a larger half-cow. One stack equals the amount of meat a buyer should expect to get from a quarter of a cow.

• Ground beef • Cubed steak • Beef for stew, kabobs, stir-fry or fajitas Source: Cattlemen’s Beef Board and National Cattlemen’s Beef Association

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NEW YORK — Lots of tweens and teenagers are gearing up for sleepaway camp, making sure they have stocked up on a season’s worth of bathing suits, sunblock and bug spray. For some female campers, that process may now include a visit to the waxing salon for removal of the hair on their legs and underarms, above the lips and even at the bikini line; a keratin straightening to reduce the frizz factor from humidity, swimming and rain; or anti-acne facial. “It’s about grooming and cleanliness,� said Elizabeth Harrison, an Upper West Side mother and a founder of a public relations firm, who took the older of two daughters, Charlotte, for a full leg and moderate bikini wax last year at age 12 before she left for camp in Maine. “Last summer, she started to sort of say, ‘I’ve got a lot of hair on my legs.’ It seemed like a natural and smart thing to do so she wouldn’t have to worry.�

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Illustration by Coco Masuda New York Times News Service

Maggie Santos, the manager at J. Sisters, a Midtown salon specializing in waxing, said that about 40 percent of hair-removal services in late May and the first few weeks of June are for clients younger than 16. See Wax / B6

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B2

THE BULLETIN â&#x20AC;˘ WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13, 2012

TV & M

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Suitsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; promises new plot twists The story twists around like a runaway roller-coaster car in Thursdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s episode, succeedBy David Wiegand ing in reminding us where we San Francisco Chronicle left off last season, that Mike Summerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just a week away is still romantically conflicted, and bromance is in the air with but also resolving what Jesthe return of USAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sexy legal sica has done after learning series â&#x20AC;&#x153;Suits.â&#x20AC;? that Mike is a As it kicks off fraud. In addiTV SPOTLIGHT its second seation, the show son Thursday, welcomes a new the show wastes no time be- player, a long-absent member fore making it clear there will of the firm who will shake be more complications to the things up at the office. lives and careers of its hunky Series regulars Rick Hoffleading men this year. man, as the oily and insecure Patrick J. Adams plays Louis, and Sarah Rafferty, Mike Ross, whose ability to as Harveyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s smart secretary retain seemingly every piece Donna, are back, but the pilot of information he reads has focuses most heavily on the made formal education a three main characters. crashing bore for much of his The relationship between life. No matter: Suave super- Harvey and Mike is nicely lawyer Harvey Specter (Ga- multilayered. On the one briel Macht) saw potential in hand, Harvey plays the prothe kid and hired him as an tective big brother to Mike. At associate at the high-pow- the same time, he wants Mike ered firm of Pearson Hard- to grow up and take greater man, overseen by the formi- responsibility in his career dable Jessica Pearson (Gina and, by extension, his life. Torres). Trouble is, if anyone That sometimes calls for semfinds out that Mike is a col- itough love, but thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what a lege dropout and a fraud, mentorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s good for. Harvey could get canned and Adams and Macht are terdisbarred. rific, with the former loosenThereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a whole subplot ing up quite considerably this focusing on Mikeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s personal year as Mike. It makes sense, life. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s crushing big time in a way, because Mike is on paralegal Rachel Zane not only adjusting to life as a (Meghan Markle), but heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sup- â&#x20AC;&#x153;suit,â&#x20AC;? but, under Harveyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tuposed to be in a relationship telage, becoming more at ease with Jenny Griffith (Vanessa in his own skin as he grows Ray), who is the ex-girlfriend up. Torres is cool, sexy and of Mikeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s drug-dealing for- commanding as Jessica, and mer best friend Trevor (Tom Markle, Hoffman and RafLipinski). The only reasons to ferty contribute greatly to care about any of this are that the energy of the showâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s core Rachel and Mike, portrayed ensemble. by two of TVâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most attractive USA scores big with shows actors, are clearly meant to be like â&#x20AC;&#x153;Suits,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Psychâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Burn together, and that Trevor has Noticeâ&#x20AC;? because its shows are decided to get back at Mike by often grounded primarily in outing him to Jessica Pearson the notion that TV should be as a college dropout. entertaining. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Suitsâ&#x20AC;? 10 p.m. Thursday, USA

L M T 

FOR WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13

MARVELâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S THE AVENGERS 3-D (PG13) Noon, 3:15, 7, 10:20

BEND

MEN IN BLACK 3 (PG-13) 11:55 a.m., 3:10, 6:40, 9:25 MEN IN BLACK 3 3-D (PG-13) 12:55, 4:20, 7:40, 10:10

Regal Pilot Butte 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend, 541-382-6347

BERNIE (PG-13) 1:15, 4:15, 7:15 THE BEST EXOTIC MARIGOLD HOTEL (PG-13) 12:30, 3:30, 6:30 CROOKED ARROWS (PG-13) 12:15, 3:15, 6:15 FOR GREATER GLORY (R) Noon, 3, 6 MEN IN BLACK 3 (PG-13) 1, 4, 7 SOUND OF MY VOICE (R) 12:45, 3:45, 6:45

DARK SHADOWS (PG-13) 12:25, 3:50, 6:45 THE DICTATOR (R) 1:25, 4:40, 8, 10:30

MEN IN BLACK 3 (PG-13) 2, 4:30, 7, 9:30

PROMETHEUS IMAX (R) 12:30, 3:40, 7:05, 10:05

PROMETHEUS (R) 1:45, 4:15, 6:45, 9:15

SNOW WHITE AND THE HUNTSMAN (PG-13) 11:35 a.m., 1:05, 2:50, 4:10, 6, 7:20, 9, 10:30

SNOW WHITE AND THE HUNTSMAN (PG-13) 3:45, 6:30, 9:15

WHAT TO EXPECT WHEN YOUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;RE EXPECTING (PG-13) 11:40 a.m., 2:55, 6:20, 9:05

SISTERS

700 N.W. Bond St., Bend, 541-330-8562

THE CABIN IN THE WOODS (R) 9:30 THE HUNGER GAMES (R) 6 After 7 p.m., shows are 21 and older only. Younger than 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.

THE HUNGER GAMES (PG-13) 12:50, 4

MADAGASCAR 3: EUROPEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S MOST WANTED 3-D (PG) 12:40, 3:55, 7:30, 10, 10:15

THE FAIRY (no MPAA rating) 8:30

MARVELâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S THE AVENGERS (PG-13) 3:30, 6:30, 9:30

PROMETHEUS (R) 4:15, 6:50

720 Desperado Court, Sisters, 541-549-8800

PROMETHEUS 3-D (R) 9:15

CHIMPANZEE (G) 5:30 MADAGASCAR 3: EUROPEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S MOST WANTED (PG) 5, 7:15 MEN IN BLACK 3(PG-13) 7:30

SNOW WHITE AND THE HUNTSMAN (PG-13) 4:05, 6:40, 9:25

PRINEVILLE

PROMETHEUS (R) 5, 7:45 SNOW WHITE AND THE HUNTSMAN (PG-13) 4:45, 7:30

Pine Theater 214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

MADAGASCAR 3: EUROPEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S MOST WANTED (PG) 4, 6:30 SNOW WHITE AND THE HUNTSMAN (UPSTAIRS â&#x20AC;&#x201D; PG-13) 6

1101 S.W. U.S. Highway 97, Madras, 541-475-3505

MADAGASCAR 3: EUROPEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S MOST WANTED 3-D (PG) 4:50, 7

MAN ON A MISSION (no MPAA rating) 6

MARVELâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S THE AVENGERS (PG13) 11:30 a.m., 2:45, 6:30, 9:50

Sisters Movie House

Madras Cinema 5

869 N.W. Tin Pan Alley, Bend, 541-241-2271

MADAGASCAR 3: EUROPEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S MOST WANTED (PG) 9:20

MEN IN BLACK 3 (PG-13) 4:40, 7:10, 9:35

MADRAS

Tin Pan Theater

MADAGASCAR 3: EUROPEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S MOST WANTED (PG) 12:15, 1:15, 3:30, 4:30, 6:50, 7:50, 9:15

1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond, 541-548-8777

PROMETHEUS (R) 11:45 a.m., 3, 6:10, 9:20

McMenamins Old St. Francis School

â&#x20AC;˘ Open-captioned showtimes are bold. â&#x20AC;˘ There may be an additional fee for 3-D movies. â&#x20AC;˘ IMAX films are $15. â&#x20AC;˘ Movie times are subject to change after press time.

Redmond Cinemas MADAGASCAR 3: EUROPEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S MOST WANTED (PG) 1:45, 4, 6:15, 8:30

680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend, 541-382-6347

CHERNOBYL DIARIES (R) 9:35

EDITORâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S NOTES:

THE METROPOLITAN OPERA: ANNA BOLENA (no MPAA rating) 6:30

Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX BATTLESHIP (PG-13) 12:10, 3:25

REDMOND

Pine Theaterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s upstairs screening room has limited accessibility.

Get A Taste For Food, Home & Garden Every Tuesday In AT HOME

7:30 AM - 5:30 PM MON-FRI 8 AM - 3 PM SAT.

for appointments call 541-382-4900

541-382-4171 541-548-7707 2121 NE Division Bend

641 NW Fir Redmond

www.denfeldpaints.com

L TV L

 

WEDNESDAY PRIME TIME 6/13/12

*In HD, these channels run three hours ahead. / Sports programming may vary. BD-Bend/Redmond/Sisters/Black Butte (Digital); PM-Prineville/Madras; SR-Sunriver; L-La Pine

ALSO IN HD; ADD 600 TO CHANNEL No.

BROADCAST/CABLE CHANNELS

BD PM SR L ^ KATU KTVZ % % % % KBNZ & KOHD ) ) ) ) KFXO * ` ` ` KOAB _ # _ # ( KGW KTVZDT2 , _ # / OPBPL 175 173

5:00 KATU News News News KEZI 9 News The Simpsons Electric Comp. NewsChannel 8 Meet, Browns Primal Grill

5:30 World News Nightly News Evening News World News The Simpsons Fetch! With Ruff Nightly News Meet, Browns Scandinavian

6:00

6:30

KATU News at 6 (N) â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ă&#x2026; NewsChannel 21 at 6 (N) Ă&#x2026; Access H. Old Christine KEZI 9 News KEZI 9 News Two/Half Men Two/Half Men In the America Business Rpt. NewsChannel 8 News King of Queens King of Queens The Return of Sherlock Holmes

7:00

7:30

Jeopardy! â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Wheel Fortune Jeopardy! â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Wheel Fortune How I Met 30 Rock â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Entertainment The Insider â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Big Bang Big Bang PBS NewsHour (N) â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ă&#x2026; Live at 7 (N) Inside Edition Seinfeld â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Seinfeld â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Monarchy: Royal Family

8:00

8:30

9:00

9:30

10:00

10:30

11:00

11:30

The Middle â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Suburgatory â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Modern Family (9:31) Duets The pairs perform party songs. â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; KATU News (11:35) Nightline Off-Rockers Up All Night â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU News Jay Leno Dogs in the City (N) â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ă&#x2026; Criminal Minds â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ă&#x2026; (DVS) CSI: Crime Scene Investigation News Letterman The Middle â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Suburgatory â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Modern Family (9:31) Duets The pairs perform party songs. â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; KEZI 9 News (11:35) Nightline So You Think You Can Dance Auditions: Salt Lake City (N) â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; News TMZ (N) â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Family Guy â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Family Guy â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Moments to Remember: My Music Number 204 â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ă&#x2026; Nature Hummingbirds are tiny and tough. â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Off-Rockers Up All Night â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU NewsChannel 8 Jay Leno Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Next Top Model â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Next Top Model â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Cops â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ă&#x2026; â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Til Death â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Til Death â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; That â&#x20AC;&#x2122;70s Show Monarchy: Royal Family World News Tavis Smiley (N) Charlie Rose (N) â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ă&#x2026; PBS NewsHour â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ă&#x2026;

BASIC CABLE CHANNELS

Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Barter Kings Barter Kings *A&E 130 28 18 32 The First 48 Caught Up â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ă&#x2026; CSI: Miami An explosion threatens CSI: Miami Eric Delko returns as an CSI: Miami A popular musician bursts â&#x20AC;şâ&#x20AC;ş â&#x20AC;&#x153;Two Weeks Noticeâ&#x20AC;? (2002, Romance-Comedy) Sandra Bullock, Hugh (10:15) â&#x20AC;şâ&#x20AC;ş â&#x20AC;&#x153;Overboardâ&#x20AC;? (1987, Comedy) Goldie Hawn, Kurt Russell. An am*AMC 102 40 39 agentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; lives. â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ă&#x2026; expert witness. â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ă&#x2026; into flames. â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ă&#x2026; Grant. A millionaire confronts his feelings for his lawyer. Ă&#x2026; nesiac millionairess is duped by a cunning carpenter. Ă&#x2026; River Monsters: Unhooked â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Tanked Fish Out of Water â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Tanked Polar Opposites â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Call of Wildman Call-Wildman Gator Boys â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ă&#x2026; Tanked Polar Opposites â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; *ANPL 68 50 26 38 Swamp Wars â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ă&#x2026; Housewives/NJ Housewives/NYC Million Dollar LA Housewives/OC Million Dollar LA Around the World in 80 Plates (N) Around the World in 80 Plates BRAVO 137 44 â&#x20AC;şâ&#x20AC;şâ&#x20AC;ş â&#x20AC;&#x153;A League of Their Ownâ&#x20AC;? (1992, Comedy-Drama) Tom Hanks, Geena Davis, Madonna. â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ă&#x2026; My Big Redneck Vacation â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; CMT 190 32 42 53 â&#x20AC;şâ&#x20AC;ş â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Rookieâ&#x20AC;? (1990) Clint Eastwood. A young detective teams up with a two-fisted veteran cop. â&#x20AC;&#x2122; American Greed Art Williams Jr. Mad Money â&#x20AC;şâ&#x20AC;şâ&#x20AC;ş â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Pixar Storyâ&#x20AC;? (2007) Narrated by Stacy Keach. Paid Program 21st Century CNBC 51 36 40 52 â&#x20AC;şâ&#x20AC;şâ&#x20AC;ş â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Pixar Storyâ&#x20AC;? (2007) Narrated by Stacy Keach. Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 Ă&#x2026; Erin Burnett OutFront Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 Ă&#x2026; Erin Burnett OutFront CNN 52 38 35 48 Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Ă&#x2026; South Park â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; (5:49) 30 Rock (6:21) 30 Rock Colbert Report Daily Show Chappelle Show Chappelle Show (8:56) Futurama (9:27) Futurama (9:58) Futurama Futurama â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Daily Show Colbert Report COM 135 53 135 47 Always Sunny Dept./Trans. City Edition Bend City Council Work Session Bend City Council Get Outdoors Visions of NW The Yoga Show The Yoga Show Talk of the Town Local issues. COTV 11 Capitol Hill Hearings CSPAN 58 20 12 11 Capitol Hill Hearings Wizards-Place Phineas, Ferb Good-Charlie Austin & Ally â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Austin & Ally â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Jessie Beauty & the Beasts â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;şâ&#x20AC;şâ&#x20AC;ş â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wizards of Waverly Place: The Movieâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Phineas, Ferb Shake It Up! â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Jessie â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ă&#x2026; *DIS 87 43 14 39 Jessie â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ă&#x2026; American Guns â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ă&#x2026; American Guns â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ă&#x2026; American Guns â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ă&#x2026; American Guns (N) â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ă&#x2026; Fast Nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Loud (N) â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ă&#x2026; American Guns â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ă&#x2026; *DISC 156 21 16 37 American Guns â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ă&#x2026; (4:00) â&#x20AC;ş â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Hot Chickâ&#x20AC;? (2002) Heroes Gone Wrong E! News (N) Keeping Up With the Kardashians Keeping Up With the Kardashians The Soup â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; The Soup â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Chelsea Lately E! News *E! 136 25 Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) Ă&#x2026; SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă&#x2026; SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă&#x2026; SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă&#x2026; SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă&#x2026; ESPN 21 23 22 23 (4:00) MLB Baseball New York Yankees at Atlanta Braves (N) (Live) EURO Tonight Football Live SportsCenter Ă&#x2026; Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) Ă&#x2026; NFL Live Ă&#x2026; X Games Classix (N) ESPN2 22 24 21 24 WNBA Basketball Los Angeles Sparks at Connecticut Sun (N) Ă&#x2026; Golf Ă&#x2026; Golf: US Open Golf Ă&#x2026; 2002 U.S. Open Official Film Golf From June 14, 2007. Ă&#x2026; 1999 U.S. Open Official Film Golf Ă&#x2026; 2002 U.S. Open Official Film ESPNC 23 25 123 25 Golf Ă&#x2026; SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă&#x2026; SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă&#x2026; H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. ESPNN 24 63 124 203 SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă&#x2026; â&#x20AC;şâ&#x20AC;ş â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Cinderella Storyâ&#x20AC;? (2004) Hilary Duff, Jennifer Coolidge. Melissa & Joey Melissa & Joey â&#x20AC;şâ&#x20AC;ş â&#x20AC;&#x153;Stick Itâ&#x20AC;? (2006, Comedy-Drama) Jeff Bridges, Missy Peregrym. The 700 Club â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ă&#x2026; FAM 67 29 19 41 (4:00) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Another Cinderella Storyâ&#x20AC;? Hannity (N) On Record, Greta Van Susteren The Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Reilly Factor Ă&#x2026; Hannity On Record, Greta Van Susteren The Five FNC 54 61 36 50 The Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Reilly Factor (N) Ă&#x2026; Paulaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cooking Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Restaurant: Impossible â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Restaurant: Impossible â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Restaurant: Impossible Restaurant: Impossible (N) Food Network Star Guy Live â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; *FOOD 177 62 98 44 Best Dishes (3:00) â&#x20AC;şâ&#x20AC;şâ&#x20AC;ş â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gridiron Gangâ&#x20AC;? Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men â&#x20AC;ş â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Bounty Hunterâ&#x20AC;? (2010, Romance-Comedy) Jennifer Aniston, Gerard Butler. â&#x20AC;ş â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Bounty Hunterâ&#x20AC;? (2010) Jennifer Aniston. FX 131 House Hunters Income Property (N) â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ă&#x2026; Property Brothers (N) â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ă&#x2026; House Hunters Hunters Intâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;l Property Brothers â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ă&#x2026; HGTV 176 49 33 43 House Hunters House Hunters House Hunters House Hunters Hunters Intâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;l Restoration Restoration Restoration Cajun Pawn Cajun Pawn Cajun Pawn Cajun Pawn Cajun Pawn Cajun Pawn Restoration Restoration Restoration Restoration *HIST 155 42 41 36 Restoration Reba â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ă&#x2026; Monster Monster Wife Swap Kraut/Hardin â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Wife Swap â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ă&#x2026; Wife Swap â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ă&#x2026; Coming Home Slam Dunk (N) â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Coming Home (N) â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ă&#x2026; LIFE 138 39 20 31 Reba â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ă&#x2026; The Rachel Maddow Show (N) The Last Word The Ed Show The Rachel Maddow Show The Last Word Hardball With Chris Matthews MSNBC 56 59 128 51 The Ed Show (N) (6:23) Teen Wolf Friendzone â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Snooki, JWoww Teen Mom Separation Anxiety â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Teen Mom Letting Go â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ă&#x2026; Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Best Dance Crew Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Best Dance Crew MTV 192 22 38 57 (5:13) Teen Wolf Isaacâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s father is murdered. â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Figure It Out â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Yâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Victorious â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Friends â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Friends â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Hollywood Heights â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ă&#x2026; Yes, Dear â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Yes, Dear â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Friends â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Friends â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; NICK 82 46 24 40 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ragsâ&#x20AC;? (2012, Musical) Max Schneider, Keke Palmer. â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ă&#x2026; Mystery Diagnosis â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ă&#x2026; Mystery Diagnosis â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ă&#x2026; 48 Hours: Hard Evidence â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 48 Hours: Hard Evidence â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 48 Hours: Hard Evidence â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 48 Hours: Hard Evidence â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; OWN 161 103 31 103 Mystery Diagnosis â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ă&#x2026; Boys in the Hall Mariners Pre. MLB Baseball San Diego Padres at Seattle Mariners From Safeco Field in Seattle. (N) (Live) Mariners Post. The Dan Patrick Show MLB Baseball ROOT 20 45 28* 26 MLB Baseball: Padres at Mariners Auction Hunters Auction Hunters Auction Hunters Auction Hunters SPIKE 132 31 34 46 Auction Hunters Auction Hunters Auction Hunters Auction Hunters Auction Hunters Auction Hunters Auction Hunters Auction Hunters (9:14) Auction Hunters â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Haunted Collector Ă&#x2026; Haunted Collector Haunted Collector (N) Ghost Hunters â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ă&#x2026; Haunted Collector SYFY 133 35 133 45 (4:30) â&#x20AC;şâ&#x20AC;ş â&#x20AC;&#x153;Alien Resurrectionâ&#x20AC;? (1997) Sigourney Weaver. Ă&#x2026; Behind Scenes Turning Point Joseph Prince End of the Age Praise the Lord (Live). Ă&#x2026; Always Good Jesse Duplantis Easter Exper. Creflo Dollar Praise the Lord TBN Classics TBN 205 60 130 King of Queens King of Queens Seinfeld â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Seinfeld â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Family Guy â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Family Guy â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Family Guy â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Conan (N) â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; *TBS 16 27 11 28 Friends â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Friends â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;şâ&#x20AC;şâ&#x20AC;şâ&#x20AC;ş â&#x20AC;&#x153;West Side Storyâ&#x20AC;? (1961, Musical) Natalie Wood, Richard Beymer, Russ Tamblyn. Tragedy (7:45) â&#x20AC;şâ&#x20AC;şâ&#x20AC;ş â&#x20AC;&#x153;Black Legionâ&#x20AC;? (1937) Humphrey Bogart. (9:15) â&#x20AC;şâ&#x20AC;şâ&#x20AC;ş â&#x20AC;&#x153;And the Pursuit of Happinessâ&#x20AC;? (1986, Drama) Laura Black. Aus- â&#x20AC;şâ&#x20AC;ş â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a Big Countryâ&#x20AC;? (1951, Drama) TCM 101 44 101 29 clouds the romance of two young lovers. Ă&#x2026; Autoworker joins black-robed hate group. Ă&#x2026; tralian journalist joins her daughter in no-nuke protest. Ethel Barrymore. Ă&#x2026; My Big Fat Gypsy Wedding â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; American Gypsy Wedding American Gypsy Wedding Strictly Irish Dancing (N) â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; American Gypsy Wedding *TLC 178 34 32 34 Say Yes, Dress Say Yes, Dress Toddlers & Tiaras â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ă&#x2026; Law & Order Gunshow â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Law & Order C.O.D. â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Law & Order Murder Book â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Dallas (N) â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ă&#x2026; (10:15) Dallas (N) â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ă&#x2026; (11:13) Dallas â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ă&#x2026; *TNT 17 26 15 27 Law & Order Damaged â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Johnny Test â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Regular Show Regular Show Wrld, Gumball Adventure Time Johnny Test (N) NinjaGo: Mstrs Level Up â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; King of the Hill King of the Hill American Dad American Dad Family Guy â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Family Guy â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; *TOON 84 Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Man v. Food â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Man v. Food â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Best Sandwich Best Sandwich Bggage Battles Bggage Battles Man v. Food â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Man v. Food â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; *TRAV 179 51 45 42 Man v. Food â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Man v. Food â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Bourdain: No Reservations (6:12) M*A*S*H â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ă&#x2026; (6:50) M*A*S*H (7:26) M*A*S*H Home Improve. Home Improve. Love-Raymond Love-Raymond King of Queens King of Queens (11:15) The King of Queens â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; TVLND 65 47 29 35 Bonanza The Colonel â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ă&#x2026; NCIS Dog Tags â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ă&#x2026; NCIS Internal Affairs â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ă&#x2026; NCIS A girl is kidnapped. â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Royal Pains Imperfect Storm â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Necessary Roughness (N) â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; (11:01) Fairly Legal â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ă&#x2026; USA 15 30 23 30 NCIS Tribes â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ă&#x2026; T.I. and Tiny T.I. and Tiny T.I. and Tiny Basketball Wives Reunion â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Mob Wives Chicago â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;şâ&#x20AC;şâ&#x20AC;ş â&#x20AC;&#x153;Boyz N the Hoodâ&#x20AC;? (1991) Larry Fishburne, Ice Cube. â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;şâ&#x20AC;şâ&#x20AC;ş â&#x20AC;&#x153;Baby Boyâ&#x20AC;? (2001) â&#x20AC;&#x2122; VH1 191 48 37 54 T.I. and Tiny PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(6:40) â&#x20AC;şâ&#x20AC;şâ&#x20AC;ş â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Mask of Zorroâ&#x20AC;? 1998 Antonio Banderas. â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PG-13â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ă&#x2026; Thorne A lawman pursues two serial killers who work together. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Blade Runner: The Final Cutâ&#x20AC;? ENCR 106 401 306 401 (4:50) â&#x20AC;şâ&#x20AC;şâ&#x20AC;ş â&#x20AC;&#x153;That Thing You Do!â&#x20AC;? 1996 â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ă&#x2026; FXM Presents â&#x20AC;şâ&#x20AC;şâ&#x20AC;ş â&#x20AC;&#x153;Black Hawk Downâ&#x20AC;? 2001, War Josh Hartnett, Ewan McGregor. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Râ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ă&#x2026; FXM Presents â&#x20AC;şâ&#x20AC;şâ&#x20AC;ş â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jarheadâ&#x20AC;? 2005 Jake Gyllenhaal. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Râ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ă&#x2026; FMC 104 204 104 120 (4:30) â&#x20AC;şâ&#x20AC;şâ&#x20AC;ş â&#x20AC;&#x153;Black Hawk Downâ&#x20AC;? 2001, War Josh Hartnett. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Râ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ă&#x2026; UFC Reloaded UFC 136: Edgar vs. Maynard III Edgar vs Maynard and Aldo vs Florian. Clean Break (N) Octane Acad UFC: Johnson vs. McCall From Fort Lauderdale, Fla. The Ultimate Fighter: Brazil FUEL 34 Live From the U.S. Open Live From the U.S. Open 19th Hole Live From the U.S. Open GOLF 28 301 27 301 (4:00) Live From the U.S. Open Little House on the Prairie â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Little House on the Prairie â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Little House on the Prairie â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Little House on the Prairie â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Frasier â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Frasier â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Frasier â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Frasier â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; HALL 66 33 175 33 The Waltons The Roots â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ă&#x2026; (4:30) â&#x20AC;şâ&#x20AC;ş â&#x20AC;&#x153;Exporting Raymondâ&#x20AC;? 2010, â&#x20AC;ş â&#x20AC;&#x153;Yogi Bearâ&#x20AC;? 2010, Comedy Voices of Dan Aykroyd, (7:25) â&#x20AC;şâ&#x20AC;şâ&#x20AC;ş â&#x20AC;&#x153;Kung Fu Panda 2â&#x20AC;? 2011, Comedy Voices of Veep Tears â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Girls Leave Me True Blood Sookie and Lafayette Real Time With Bill Maher Journalist HBO 425 501 425 501 Documentary â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ă&#x2026; Justin Timberlake, Anna Faris. â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ă&#x2026; Jack Black, Angelina Jolie. â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ă&#x2026; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;MAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ă&#x2026; Alone â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;MAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; E.J. Dionne. â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;MAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ă&#x2026; clean up a mess. â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;MAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ă&#x2026; â&#x20AC;şâ&#x20AC;şâ&#x20AC;ş â&#x20AC;&#x153;Training Dayâ&#x20AC;? 2001, Crime Drama Denzel Washington, Ethan Hawke. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Râ&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;şâ&#x20AC;şâ&#x20AC;ş â&#x20AC;&#x153;Training Dayâ&#x20AC;? 2001, Crime Drama Denzel Washington, Ethan Hawke. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Râ&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;şâ&#x20AC;şâ&#x20AC;ş â&#x20AC;&#x153;Night of the Living Deadâ&#x20AC;? 1968, Horror Duane Jones. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;NRâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; IFC 105 105 (4:45) â&#x20AC;şâ&#x20AC;şâ&#x20AC;ş â&#x20AC;&#x153;Intolerable Crueltyâ&#x20AC;? 2003, Romance-Comedy â&#x20AC;ş â&#x20AC;&#x153;I Know What You Did Last Summerâ&#x20AC;? 1997, Horror Jen- (8:15) â&#x20AC;şâ&#x20AC;ş â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Sixth Manâ&#x20AC;? 1997, Comedy Marlon Wayans. A ghost helps his â&#x20AC;şâ&#x20AC;şâ&#x20AC;ş â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rise of the Planet of the Apesâ&#x20AC;? 2011 James Franco. A medical experiMAX 400 508 508 George Clooney. â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PG-13â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ă&#x2026; nifer Love Hewitt. â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Râ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ă&#x2026; younger brother bask in basketball glory. â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PG-13â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ă&#x2026; ment results in a superintelligent chimp. â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PG-13â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ă&#x2026; Taboo Strange Love â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Locked Up Abroad â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Locked Up Abroad (N) â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Locked Up Abroad â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Locked Up Abroad â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Taboo Strange Love â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Shark Men Hammered â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; NGC 157 157 Wild Grinders Avatar: Air. Avatar: Air. Iron Man: Armor Iron Man: Armor SpongeBob SpongeBob Fanboy-Chum Fanboy-Chum Planet Sheen T.U.F.F. Puppy NTOON 89 115 189 115 Iron Man: Armor Iron Man: Armor Wild Grinders Shooting Gallery Amer. Rifleman Border Battles Impossible Best Defense Shooting USA Ă&#x2026; Amer. Rifleman Impossible Your Weapon Shooting Gllry OUTD 37 307 43 307 Shooting USA Ă&#x2026; (3:45) â&#x20AC;şâ&#x20AC;ş â&#x20AC;&#x153;Re(5:45) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dead Man Runningâ&#x20AC;? 2009, Action Danny Dyer, 50 Cent, Tamer Has- â&#x20AC;şâ&#x20AC;şâ&#x20AC;ş â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Rockâ&#x20AC;? 1996, Action Sean Connery, Nicolas Cage, Ed Harris. Alcatraz Island terrorists All Access: Victor â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Lonely Place to Dieâ&#x20AC;? 2011, Action Melissa George, Ed SHO 500 500 member Meâ&#x20AC;? san. Nick has 24 hours to pay back a loan shark. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Râ&#x20AC;&#x2122; threaten to gas San Francisco. â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Râ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ortiz Speleers, Eamonn Walker. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;NRâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Supercars 101 Cars 101 Cars-Drive Barrett-Jackson Special Edition Supercars Supercars 101 Cars 101 Cars-Drive Barrett-Jackson Special Edition Unique Whips â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; SPEED 35 303 125 303 Supercars (7:10) â&#x20AC;şâ&#x20AC;ş â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cars 2â&#x20AC;? 2011 Voices of Owen Wilson. â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ă&#x2026; â&#x20AC;şâ&#x20AC;ş â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tidesâ&#x20AC;? 2011 Johnny Depp. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PG-13â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ă&#x2026; Resident Evil STARZ 300 408 300 408 (4:50) â&#x20AC;şâ&#x20AC;şâ&#x20AC;ş â&#x20AC;&#x153;Courageousâ&#x20AC;? 2011 Alex Kendrick. â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PG-13â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ă&#x2026; (4:55) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Momentumâ&#x20AC;? 2003 Lou Gossett Jr. Government â&#x20AC;&#x153;Black and Blue: Legends of the Hip-Hop Copâ&#x20AC;? 2005, (9:35) â&#x20AC;şâ&#x20AC;ş â&#x20AC;&#x153;Barbershopâ&#x20AC;? 2002, Comedy Ice Cube. A barbershop owner con- â&#x20AC;ş â&#x20AC;&#x153;3 Strikesâ&#x20AC;? 2000 â&#x20AC;ş â&#x20AC;&#x153;In the Mixâ&#x20AC;? 2005 Usher. A disc jockey becomes a TMC 525 525 agents pursue people who have telekinesis. Documentary â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Râ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ă&#x2026; bodyguard for a mobsterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s daughter. â&#x20AC;&#x2122; siders selling his establishment. â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PG-13â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ă&#x2026; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Râ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ă&#x2026; Fight Night 36 Triathlon Ironman World Championship Motorcycle Racing Poker After Dark Cash 200K Darts Poker After Dark Cash 200K NBCSN 27 58 30 209 (4:00) â&#x20AC;ş â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bloodsportâ&#x20AC;? (1988) CSI: Miami Gang members. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ghost Whisperer â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ă&#x2026; Ghost Whisperer Voices â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; L.A. Hair *WE 143 41 174 118 Kendra on Top Kendra on Top â&#x20AC;şâ&#x20AC;ş â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bring It Onâ&#x20AC;? 2000, Comedy Kirsten Dunst. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PG-13â&#x20AC;&#x2122;


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13, 2012 â&#x20AC;˘ THE BULLETIN

A  & A  

Couple headed for the altar trips over boyfriendâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fling Dear Abby: My boyfriend, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wally,â&#x20AC;? and I have been friends for several years, and a couple for nearly two. He recently brought up the subject of marriage, and we agreed that we are likely altar-bound. Only one thing gives me pause. A few months ago, Wally got plastered and had a fling with a female friend. He regretted it immediately and said it was what made him realize I am â&#x20AC;&#x153;The One.â&#x20AC;? (He is getting help for his drinking now.) The problem is, the woman is still pursuing him. She buys him gifts or brings him vegan meals. He has asked her repeatedly to stop, to no avail. Because Wally is a vegetarian and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not, I suspect sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s trying to prove she would be a better partner for him. I have asked Wally to cut off contact with her, but he wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t. He feels bad for her because she has few friends and lives in an isolated little town. What do you suggest I do? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Unwilling to Share Dear Unwilling to Share: Raise the subject of marriage with Wally again, and tell him his continued contact with the woman he cheated with is hurtful to you and a threat to your relationship. Ask how he would feel if you continued to see and accept gifts from a man youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d had a drunken fling with. If he says he wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be thrilled, perhaps heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be able to understand your reaction. If he says heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d be fine with it, then Wally isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t the man for you. Dear Abby: My 13-year-old niece, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Amelia,â&#x20AC;? is a beautiful young girl. She has only two flaws â&#x20AC;&#x201D; she lies constantly and sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s boy-crazy. I have to listen to my sister talk on and on about how hard it is to trust her. My sister and brother-in-law have set many rules and limits for my niece. I think her punishments for breaking rules fit the crime â&#x20AC;&#x201D; grounding, having things taken away, etc. Lately, she keeps trying to

DEAR ABBY get boysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; phone numbers and meet with them. She has also been caught sexting three times and lying about it. As her punishment this time, my sister and her husband shaved Ameliaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s head. I am shocked and devastated for my niece. I think it was extremely inappropriate. When I try to talk to my sister about my concerns, she tells me she had no choice because her daughter had so many warnings. I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know what to do. I think my niece will need counseling. My sister says I am overreacting. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Worried Aunt in Utah Dear Worried Aunt: Ameliaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s parents went off the deep end. What was done to her was awful, and you are not overreacting. Instead of shaving her daughterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s head, your sister should have tried to understand why she is lying and desperately seeking attention from boys. If I ever heard of a family in need of family therapy, it is your sisterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. Love, attention and less draconian punishments are what Amelia needs, not months of public shaming. Dear Abby: My husband committed suicide 20 years ago. He left a note, but I never shared it with our children, as they were very young at the time. They are all happy, successful adults. Should I share the note with them? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Anonymous Down South Dear Anonymous: Your children are probably curious about why their father chose to end his life. Let them know the note exists, share it with them if they would like to see it and answer any questions they may have. They have a right to know. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

Horoscope: Happy Birthday for Wednesday, June 13, 2012 By Jacqueline Bigar This year you might rely more on your creativity than you normally do. The results will be excellent, though you often might be challenged by a partner or loved one. Make this OK, as you will learn where there might be room for improvement with a plan. If you are single, you meet people with ease, but often discover that they are difficult, withdrawn or depressed. If you do not want this type of relationship, move on. If you are attached, avoid nitpicking over money with a partner. It wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t help; instead, it will cause tremendous irritation. ARIES is a loyal and fun friend. The Stars Show the Kind of Day Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH A serious edge to your communication style could color an important relationship. Consider moving in a new direction, which would allow more of your ingenuity and humor to emerge. You could turn a difficult situation into one that is far easier. Tonight: All smiles. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHH You might want to play a passive or laid-back role in what is happening. You also might not have much of a choice, considering your obligations and energy level. You can push yourself only so far. Return calls. Tonight: Check that your budget is in order. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHHH Keep your long-term goals in mind. You could be concerned by a loved one and his or her attitude. Understand your limitations, and know that you can do only so much. Recognize what you want from this situation, and quietly walk toward that goal. Tonight: Chat away. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHH You often are sought out to handle difficult situations or to give advice. Such is the case today, but you also are juggling your own needs. A family member can be downright depressing. Walk away from negativity, whether it is personal or professional. Tonight: Indulge yourself for a change. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHH You could opt to detach from what is occurring at the moment, and you might be a lot happier as a result. Conversations could be unduly heavy or serious. The more you avoid this energy and just deal with the issue, the better. Tonight: Get together with friends.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH Deal with a partner directly. Hopefully this person can identify what is causing a sense of tension or concern with your budget. A conversation for only your ears could be more significant than you realize. Listen to what is being shared. Tonight: Out to dinner with a loved one. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH You might feel overwhelmed and could be making this feeling even more intense by either ignoring it or inflating it. Your best bet is to just energize and get done what you must. As soon as you clear out some of your responsibilities or errands, you will feel better. Tonight: Stay sensitive to a loved one. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHH Remain even when dealing with an associate or someone who is a part of your daily life. If you feel negatively about a request or situation, be sure to weigh the pros against the cons before announcing your concerns. Also, ask for feedback from a friend or loved one. Tonight: Know when to call it a night. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHH Much is happening around you. Do you really want to be involved? Choose your battles wisely. Allow more friends and fun to permeate your relationships. Understand what is needed from you. Tonight: Already in weekend mode. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHH You are well-grounded on the basics of life, and you know how to encourage others. Someone around you could feel quite dejected, but youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll help this person get through it. Maintain a high level of privacy. Tonight: A must event. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHHH Keep communication flowing. News or a call from a friend at a distance might put you off. Listen carefully, and youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll find that there are mitigating circumstances here. Not all is as it seems. Tap into your imagination, and you will see a situation differently. Tonight: Become a creature of the night. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHH Your ability to move past a restriction is admirable, but a partner keeps blocking the path, leaving you in limbo. Detach as much as you can to gain understanding. Timing will be on your side later. Let go of a hassle for now. Tonight: Dinner for two. Š 2011 by King Features Syndicate

B3

C C  Please email event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Submit an Eventâ&#x20AC;? at www.bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

TODAY KENGARDEN 2012 ROOTS TOUR: Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best kendama players show off their tricks; free; 1-5 p.m.; Des Chutes Historical Museum, 129 N.W. Idaho Ave., Bend; 541-633-7205 or http://wabisabibend.com. BEND FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 3-7 p.m.; Brooks Alley, between Northwest Franklin Avenue and Northwest Brooks Street; 541-408-4998, bendfarmersmarket@gmail.com or http://bendfarmersmarket.com. PICKINâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; AND PADDLINâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; MUSIC SERIES: Includes boat demonstrations in the Deschutes River and music by bluegrass act Pitchfork Revolution; proceeds benefit Bend Paddle Trail Alliance; free; 4-7 p.m. demonstrations, 7-10 p.m. music; Tumalo Creek Kayak & Canoe, 805 S.W. Industrial Way, Suite 6, Bend; 541-317-9407. â&#x20AC;&#x153;THE METROPOLITAN OPERA, ANNA BOLENAâ&#x20AC;?: Starring Anna Netrebko, Ekaterina Gubanova, Jane Seymour and Ildar Abdrazakov in an encore presentation of Donizettiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s masterpiece; opera performance transmitted in high definition; $12.50; 6:30 p.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347. SOCRATES CAFE: A philosophical sharing session and discussion of contributing to an evolving society; free; 6:308:30 p.m.; Dudleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bookshop Cafe, 135 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-749-2010. â&#x20AC;&#x153;QUEEN OF THE SUNâ&#x20AC;?: Slow Food High Desert presents a screening of the film, preceded by a potluck dinner; free; 7 p.m., dinner at 6:15 p.m.; Cascade Culinary Institute, 2555 N.W. Campus Village Way, Bend; 541-390-5362. REDWOOD SON: The Portlandbased Americana act performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. â&#x20AC;&#x153;SOCIAL SECURITYâ&#x20AC;?: Cascades Theatrical Company presents a comedy about a couple whose tranquility is destroyed by family members; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org. â&#x20AC;&#x153;THE COMPLETE WORKS OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE (ABRIDGED)â&#x20AC;?: Innovation Theatre Works presents the humorous adaptation of 37 Shakespeare plays in 90 minutes; $15, $12 students and seniors; 7:30 p.m.; Innovation Theatre Works, 1155 S.W. Division St., Bend; 541-5046721 or www.innovationtw.org.

THURSDAY BILLY MANZIK: The Californiabased folk rocker performs; free; 6:30-8:30 p.m.; Bend Brewing Company, 1019 N.W. Brooks St.; 541-383-1599. THE SINGING CHEF: Celebrity chef Andy LoRusso demonstrates cooking techniques and provides samples; proceeds benefit the Assistance League of Bend; $35; 6:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-3170700 or www.towertheatre.org. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Lily Raff McCaulou reads from her memoir â&#x20AC;&#x153;Call of the Mildâ&#x20AC;?; free; 7 p.m.; Dudleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bookshop Cafe, 135 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-749-2010. HANZ ARAKI & KATHRYN CLAIRE: The Irish fiddle duo performs, with Chris Hayes; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. â&#x20AC;&#x153;SOCIAL SECURITYâ&#x20AC;?: Cascades Theatrical Company presents a comedy about a couple whose tranquility is destroyed by family members; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org. â&#x20AC;&#x153;THE COMPLETE WORKS OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE (ABRIDGED)â&#x20AC;?: Innovation Theatre Works presents the humorous adaptation of 37 Shakespeare plays in 90 minutes; $15, $12 students and seniors; 7:30 p.m.; Innovation Theatre Works, 1155 S.W. Division St., Bend; 541-5046721 or www.innovationtw.org. COMEDY NIGHT: Marc Yaffee and Adam Stone perform; $10; 7:30 p.m., doors open 6 p.m.; The Original Kayoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dinner House and Lounge, 415 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-323-2520.

Submitted photo

The Pickinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; and Paddlinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Music Series returns, kicking off with bluegreass act Pitchfork Revolution. The event will be held from 4 to 10 tonight at Tumalo Creek Kayak & Canoe in Bend. ANGIE AND THE CAR WRECKS: The Centralia, Wash.-based rock band performs, with Wild Eye Revolvers; $5; 8 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; 541728-0879 or www.reverbnation. com/venue/thehornedhand. LAST BAND STANDING: A battle of the bands competition featuring local acts; free; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Liquid Lounge, 70 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend; www .lastbandstanding.net.

FRIDAY BEND FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 2-6 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541408-4998, bendfarmersmarket@ gmail.com or http://bendfarmers market.com. SISTERS FARMERS MARKET: 3-6 p.m.; Barclay Park, West Cascade Avenue and Ash Street; www. sistersfarmersmarket.com. SISTERS WINE & BREW FESTIVAL: Wineries and breweries of the Pacific Northwest offer selections of their products; live music, art vendors and more will be on hand; free admission; 3-9 p.m.; Village Green Park, 335 S. Elm St.; 541-385-7988 or www.sisters wineandbrew.com. BEND BICYCLE FILM FESTIVAL: A screening of local short films about cycling in Central Oregon; proceeds benefit Bend Endurance Academy; $12 in advance, $15 at the door; 6 and 8:30 p.m.; GoodLife Brewing Co., 70 S.W. Century Drive, 100-464; 541-335-1346 or info@ bendbicyclefilmfestival.com. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Kim McCarrel talks about her book â&#x20AC;&#x153;Riding Central Oregon Horse Trailsâ&#x20AC;?; with a slide show; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 422 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-526-1491. RED ROCK SQUARE DANCE: Spectators and dancers welcome; free; 7-10 p.m.; Redmond Grange, 707 S.W. Kalama Ave.; 541-923-8804. â&#x20AC;&#x153;SOCIAL SECURITYâ&#x20AC;?: Cascades Theatrical Company presents a comedy about a couple whose tranquility is destroyed by family members; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org. â&#x20AC;&#x153;THE COMPLETE WORKS OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE (ABRIDGED)â&#x20AC;?: Innovation Theatre Works presents the humorous adaptation of 37 Shakespeare plays in 90 minutes; $15, $12 students and seniors; 7:30 p.m.; Innovation Theatre Works, 1155 S.W. Division St., Bend; 541-504-6721 or www .innovationtw.org. RUPERT WATES: The British folk musician performs; $8 in advance, $10 at the door; 7:30 p.m.; The Sound Garden, 1279 N.E. Second St., Bend; 541-633-6804 or www .thesoundgardenstudio.com. â&#x20AC;&#x153;OLEANNAâ&#x20AC;?: Thoroughly Modern Productions presents the story of a college professorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s heated conversation with his student; $15 in advance, $18 at the door; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626, 2ndstreettheater@gmail.com or www.2ndstreettheater.com. PEEWEE MOORE: The Austin, Texas-based country act performs, with Johnny Outlaw and The Johnson Creek Stranglers; $5; 8 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; 541-728-0879 or www.reverbnation.com/ venue/thehornedhand. BILLY MANZIK: The Californiabased folk rocker performs; $5;

9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www.silver moonbrewing.com.

STORYSTARS 2012: Bobby Norfolk, one of the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s premier storytellers, performs; free; 1 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.tower theatre.org.

SATURDAY

â&#x20AC;&#x153;OLEANNAâ&#x20AC;?: Thoroughly Modern Productions presents the story of a college professorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s heated conversation with his student; $15 in advance, $18 at the door; 3 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626, 2ndstreettheater@gmail.com or www.2ndstreettheater.com.

3:THIRTY3: Run or walk up and down the butte for three hours and thirty-three minutes; followed by an after party; registration required; proceeds benefit Cascade Youth & Family Center; $40; 7-10:30 a.m.; Pilot Butte State Park, Northeast Pilot Butte Summit Drive, Bend; 541306-9613 or www.333bend.com. LITTLE COMMUTERS PARADE: Decorate your bike, wagon or scooter in the west-side parking lot, then parade across the footbridge and back; kicks off Commute Options Week; free; 8:30 a.m. decorating, 9:45 a.m. parade; Old Mill District, 661 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-330-2647 or www.commuteoptions.org. PRINEVILLE FARMERS MARKET: Free; 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Prineville City Plaza, 387 N.E. Third St.; 503-739-0643 or prinevillefarmersmarket@gmail.com. CLASSIC CAR EXPO: A show of classic cars restored to their original condition; free, $10 to enter a car; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Cascade Village Shopping Center, 63455 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; www .cascadevillage.net. MADRAS SATURDAY MARKET: Free admission; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Sahalee Park, B and Seventh streets; 541-489-3239 or madrassatmkt@ gmail.com. ALPACA SHEARING FESTIVAL AND CAR SHOW: Featuring live music, demonstrations, a barbecue, a silent auction, a classic-car show and adoptable animals; proceeds benefit the Humane Society of Redmond; donations of pet food requested, $20-$25 to enter a car; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Crescent Moon Ranch, 70397 Buckhorn Road, Terrebonne; 541-923-2285 or www.redmondhumane.org. CENTRAL OREGON SATURDAY MARKET: Featuring arts and crafts from local artisans; free admission; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; parking lot across from Bend Public Library, 600 N.W. Wall St.; 541-420-9015 or www .centraloregonsaturdaymarket.com. SUMMER SHOOTOUT MARBLE TOURNAMENT: Learn to play marbles and then play in a tournament, with lawn games and more; registration required; proceeds benefit the Deschutes County Historical Museumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s educational programs; $10 before June 12, $15 after; 10 a.m.; Des Chutes Historical Museum, 129 N.W. Idaho Ave., Bend; 541-389-1813 or www.deschuteshistory.org. SISTERS WINE & BREW FESTIVAL: Wineries and breweries of the Pacific Northwest offer selections of their products; live music, art vendors and more will be on hand; free admission; 11 a.m.-8 p.m.; Village Green Park, 335 S. Elm St.; 541-3857988 or www .sisterswineandbrew .com. SOLAR VIEWING: View the sun using safe techniques; included in the price of admission; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 11 a.m.-2 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. RIDE FOR TWO RIVERS: Cycling event features 55-mile or 18-mile rides; proceeds benefit the National Forest Foundation; $100 for ride and dinner, $80 for ride, $50 for dinner; reduced prices for children; noon; FivePine Lodge & Conference Center, 1021 Desperado Trail, Sisters; 503-241-0467.

SPRING RECITAL: Gotta Dance presents performances in tap, jazz, ballet and more; $10; 4 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-322-0807 or www .gottadancestudioandcompany.com. GREAT STRIDES: A 5K walk for cystic fibrosis; registration required; proceeds benefit the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation; donations required; 3:30 p.m. registration, 4:30 p.m. walk; Sam Johnson Park, Southwest 15th Street, Redmond; 541-4806703, greatstrides.redmond@gmail .com or www.cff.org/greatstrides. THE DIRTY HEADS: The reggae-rock band performs, with the Wheeler Brothers; $29; 6:15 p.m., doors open 5:30 p.m.; Century Center, 70 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; http://theoutsidegames.com. FATHERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S DAY TRIBUTE EVENT: Watch the Bend Elks play the Corvallis Knights; proceeds benefit Central Oregon Council on Aging programs; $7, $25 for priority seating, reception and meal, $15 for reserved seating and meal; 6:30 p.m.; Vince Genna Stadium, Southeast Fifth Street and Roosevelt Avenue, Bend; 541-678-5483 or www.councilonagnig.org. GROWN-UP SPELLING BEE: Spelling competition for adults, with prizes; free; 7-9 p.m.; Dudleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bookshop Cafe, 135 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-749-2010. â&#x20AC;&#x153;SOCIAL SECURITYâ&#x20AC;?: Cascades Theatrical Company presents a comedy about a couple whose tranquility is destroyed by family members; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org. â&#x20AC;&#x153;THE COMPLETE WORKS OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE (ABRIDGED)â&#x20AC;?: Innovation Theatre Works presents the humorous adaptation of 37 Shakespeare plays in 90 minutes; $15, $12 students and seniors; 7:30 p.m.; Innovation Theatre Works, 1155 S.W. Division St., Bend; 541-504-6721 or www.innovationtw.org. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Kristy Athens reads from her book â&#x20AC;&#x153;Get Your Pitchfork On!: The Real Dirt on Country Livingâ&#x20AC;?; free; 7:30 p.m.; The Nature of Words, 224 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-647-2233, info@ thenatureofwords.org or www .thenatureofwords.org. â&#x20AC;&#x153;OLEANNAâ&#x20AC;?: Thoroughly Modern Productions presents the story of a college professorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s heated conversation with his student; $15 in advance, $18 at the door; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626, 2ndstreettheater@gmail.com or www.2ndstreettheater.com. VA VA VOOM BURLESQUE VIXENS: The Humboldt County burlesque act performs, with Avery James and the Hillandales and Kentuckyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Long Rifle; a portion of proceeds benefits Keep-A-Breast; $8 in advance, $10 at the door; 8 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; 541-728-0879 or www.reverbnation.com/venue/ thehornedhand.


B4

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13, 2012

TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

BIZARRO

B5

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively.

SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

DAILY BRIDGE CLUB

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

Seeking a friendly duplicate bridge? Find five games weekly at www.bendbridge.org.

CANDORVILLE

SAFE HAVENS

LOS ANGELES TIMES DAILY CROSSWORD

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN


B6

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13, 2012

Wax

Beef

Continued from B1 Kimara Ahnert, who runs a salon bearing her name on Madison Avenue, said that she is seeing not only an influx of moms bringing daughters in for precamp hair removal or eyebrow shaping, but also the occasional son for a facial or a quick wax over the nose to separate the dreaded unibrow. And Rita Hazan, founder of a Manhattan salon that carries her name, said that based on last year, she expects an uptick of about 30 percent in their youngest waxing clientele from now through the second half of June, and a 20 percent increase in tweens and young teenagers seeking keratin straightening treatments. “If you do it once or twice a year, it’s not that much chemical for a young kid, and you’re relieving them of their own insecurities,” said Hazan, who sometimes recommends only treating the hairline or the “problematic parts” to reduce exposure to chemicals. Jill Greenspan, a stay-athome mother in Livingston, N.J., plans to take her daughter, Taylor, 11, to Warren-Tricomi’s Plaza Hotel location next week for a $250 hair-taming treatment that the salon calls Absolute Frizz Control in preparation for two months of sleepaway camp in Pennsylvania. “She hates blow-drying her hair, so I guess it makes it a little easier,” Greenspan said. “It’s just one less thing she has to stress about.” These procedures might sound like superficial beautifiers for precocious adolescents, but the impetus to have them is typically fueled by the basic desire to fit in, suggested Dr. Laura Kastner, a psychologist specializing in teenagers and a clinical associate professor at the University of Washington. “It’s more about peer conformity than peer pressure,” she said. “The pressure really comes from within.” In school, she added: “Kids can struggle and get typecast. They can go to camp and literally remake themselves, like the way people do when they go to college.” The makeovers, though, are often mild. Salon representatives said that it’s common for teenagers and tweens to wax just the lower legs, underarms and outer bikini line, rather than having a full-on Brazilian. Maxwax, with locations on the Upper East Side and Upper West Side, calls this more-modest option a Goody Two-Shoes, perhaps to the chagrin of some young ladies. “It’s about making sure your child is comfortable,” said Bobbi Brown, the makeup entrepreneur, who has written two books for teenagers. “If she’s going to be in a bunk with all these girls, and she feels insecure because she hasn’t taken care of the hair on her lip or her legs, you know what? You do whatever you can do to make her feel good when she gets there.” There may be psychological costs to hairiness, but professional grooming for camp also has its price. Hazan’s keratin treatment starts at $350. A so-called Teen Clean Facial at Ahnert’s salon is $130. J Sisters, where a quick upperlip defuzzing costs $25, offers discounts of 15 percent for all students, including middle and high school, with official ID. Waxing poses greater risks for younger clients (who have thin skin) than for adults, said Dr. Nanette Silverberg, director of pediatric and adolescent dermatology at St. Luke’sRoosevelt Hospital. “Thinner skin burns more easily with hot wax,” she said. “Although the wax would obviously be intended to stick to the hair, in a younger patient you might potentially cause some open areas of skin. You have to proceed with caution.” In spite of, or because of, the trepidation, a precamp visit to the salon can seem like a new feminine rite of passage. “I always envisaged myself with camp friends on the porch, with those pink razors and buckets of warm water and shaving cream,” said Marni Shapiro, an Upper West Side mother and retail analyst who brought her only daughter, Emily, to Maxwax for a precamp lower-leg wax last year, when she was 12. “I felt this was easier.” Emily brought a friend to hold her hand, and the waxing turned out less painful than expected, her mother said. “After the first pull, she was fine.” But Emily is not planning a repeat treatment this summer.

Continued from B1 “Buying beef is an investment,” said Thor Erickson, a chef instructor who teaches butchering and charcuterie — the art of making sausages and other cured or smoked meats — at Central Oregon Community College’s Cascade Culinary Institute. “It’s worth it to figure out if it’s right for you and what it is that you want.”

Beef terms

Prepared for beef The first step in deciding whether to go bulk is knowing if you’re ready for that much meat. Access to a chest or upright freezer is a must. Erickson noted that a whole cow translates into about 300 pounds of meat. In a publication on buying beef, the Oklahoma State University Extension Service advises allotting about 1 cubic foot of freezer space for every 35 to 40 pounds of cut, wrapped meat. In addition to beef, area producers sell other whole animals, including pigs, lambs and goats. A whole pig is on average 175 pounds and a lamb, 45 pounds. Even in a freezer, the meat is only good for so long. The official line is beef will last in the freezer for up to nine months, with the exception of ground beef at about three months. Experts say beef often does last longer but the quality can begin to break down. “The colder it is, the better it’s wrapped, the longer it keeps,” Borlen said. Given the time constraints, it’s important to think about how much meat your family intends to eat. How much beef a whole, side or other portion produces will depend on a number of factors. The weight of the animal is key. Also, the breed might also play a role. For instance, a breed that tends to carry more fat might result in a smaller amount of meat. Borlen said he regularly sells to customers who team up with friends to split locker beef. Sometimes the friends must compromise. Sharing a side, for instance, means all parties must negotiate who gets various cuts — there is only one tenderloin, for example. Or perhaps they must agree upon how thick they want the butcher to cut their steaks. “Most of the time it works out pretty well,” he said.

Rancher relations There isn’t a centralized place to find ranchers who sell locker beef. But there are a few resources. Besides word of mouth, people recommended checking online at the Central Oregon Food Policy Council (centraloregonfood policy.org) or on Craigslist .com, or searching for “beef in Central Oregon.” Area butchers and slaughterhouses have contacts, as well. The next move then is to know what is important to you in buying beef. “The questions become about whether it is a matter or principle or savings,” Erickson said. You must think about if you’re interested in how the cattle were raised and what they ate. Questions can include whether the cows are raised with organic practices, if they’re given hormones or antibiotics, whether they’re fed grain or are strictly grass-fed and whether that grain was corn or something else. Asking about grain versus grass has a few implications. Grass-fed beef is nutritionally superior, but you might not be accustomed to the taste, which is sometimes said to be more like wild game. Corn-fed cattle will taste more like what you buy in grocery stores that isn’t labeled grass-fed. And there are other possibilities. For instance, Borlen’s cattle eat spent grains from area breweries in the last months of their lives, particularly barley. Grain develops more fat marbling in the meat, which is associated with flavor.

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Lanny Berman, co-owner of Butcher Boys in Prineville, steadies a half-cow in the company cooler last week. Separated lengthwise, the other half of the same animal hangs in the back left.

About beef cuts WWW.CHEFSRESOURCES.COM/ CUTS-OF-BEEF A foodie’s website on beef cuts.

WWW.BEEFITS WHATSFORDINNER.COM/ MEATCASE.ASPX An interactive look at beef cuts and cooking tips from the National Cattlemen’s Association.

“They develop all these different flavors depending on what they ate,” Borlen said. “Grass-fed, ones that eat sagebrush, will taste a little more gamey and will not taste like corn-fed.” Some heritage breeds will also influence the beef’s flavor. The upbringing and breed of the animal will factor into price. Grass-fed beef is likely to be more expensive, although perhaps still cheaper per pound than similar grassfed cuts in the grocery store. Many ranchers will allow you to come out to the property to see how it operates before making a purchase. “I always recommend going out to the farms to see the animals and talk to the farmer,” Erickson said. “It makes you feel better about consuming that animal.” Another way to aid your decision is to see if you can try the meat. Borlen noted that several area stores, such as Nature’s General Store, carry beef from area ranches that also sell direct to consumers. A number of regional beef producers are also selling at area farmers markets and at www.central oregonlocavore.com. “There’s a lot of beef that’s raised in Central Oregon,” Borlen said, “so there are a lot of options.”

Making the purchase Aside from production questions, there are a few more queries to make of the rancher before writing a check. Borlen and Lanny Berman — co-owner of Butcher Boys, a USDA-certified slaughtering plant in Prineville — said the most common misconception about buying locker beef is how the pricing works. It can vary by rancher, so it’s important to ask the right questions. Ranchers will quote a price per pound. Erickson said the next question should be what the price includes. Sometimes the amount encompasses everything, including the butchering, wrapping, freezing and delivery of the beef. Other times that cost might just be for the meat and the consumer is expected to pay the butcher separately for the processing. Erickson said it’s worth asking whether the price includes the kill fee and the butcher fee. Normally, Berman said, beef is sold at carcass weight, meaning what the animal weighs after it is slaughtered, its limbs are removed and it’s hanging on a rail. It’s sometimes called hanging weight. For instance, if a cow is 1,000 pounds live, its hanging weight will likely be between 570 and 610 pounds. That means a 600-pound carcass at $3 per pound will be $1,800. But then the carcass loses another 25 to 40 percent of the 600 pounds in the butchering pro-

cess. The buyer goes home with more than 300 pounds of meat. Berman said the going carcass weight seems to be about $3 to $3.85 per pound, which at that price usually includes the butcher’s costs. “The prices really range,” he said. “It just depends on what that person thinks their beef is actually worth.” Then while working out the deal, Erickson said you will talk to the rancher about what part of the cow you will be getting. Buying a side is buying a half of beef, except you’re buying the forequarter and hindquarter from one side of the animal. Picture the cow with a dotted line down its spine. When buying a quarter, it’s important to consider whether you want a forequarter or a hindquarter. A hindquarter will be more expensive. “Most of the good steaks come from the back end,” Erickson said. If you use a lot of ground beef, the Oklahoma State Extension Service said it might be worth getting a forequarter. The cuts in a forequarter — chuck, rib, brisket, plate and full flank — often are a bit tougher. Many are used for ground beef. Hindquarters, which include the round, loin and flank, produce more steaks and roasts. Once you’re ready to buy, you must also be ready to wait. Purchasing locker beef is often on a first-come, first-serve basis. Some small producers might have all their cattle reserved for the year, while others might have the meat available in five to six weeks. “There are some ranchers that are booked up to a year and a half in advance,” Borman said.

Working with the butcher Once your cow is ready for slaughter, it’s time to talk to the butcher. Ranchers regularly have a relationship with a particular butcher. When you connect, it’s good to have put some thought into how you want the meat cut and wrapped. “The way you have an animal butchered is about personal taste and what you want to make,” Erickson said. “It takes research and homework.” The standard method in the U.S., Erickson said, divides the beef into steaks from the T-bone, ribeye, round and sirloin; roasts from the chuck, round and sirloin; and ground beef and stew meat. He advised thinking about how you cook when considering your cuts. Buying locker beef provides the opportunity to get unusual cuts or thicknesses. Perhaps you want short ribs or prefer thicker steaks or would rather the ribs be saved as a roast. There are even those with their own Kitchen Aid meat grinder-attachments who want to make their own ground beef. The butcher should be willing to walk you through the

Here are a few terms that at times pop up when purchasing a whole, half or quarter of beef. Locker beef: An old-school in pastures. They then move term for wholes, halves and on to a feedlot, where they quarters. Before people had eat a grain diet for three to six freezers at home, they might months. Grain typically creates rent a locker at the butcher and marbling in the meat. store their beef there. Grain-finished: Regularly used Rail beef: Whole carcasses. for cattle that eat grass most The beef in grocery stores is at of their lives but spend the last times called “boxed beef.” portion right before slaughter eating grain. Hang time: The length of time Grass-finished: Sometimes the beef hangs in cold storage called grass-fed beef, these at the butcher. It’s considered cattle have been raised on essential for killing pathogens pasture their entire lives. and ridding water retention Grass-finished beef is from the meat. Hanging weight: The weight of often described as having a the cow after initial butchering, distinctly different taste. Natural: The U.S. Department including the removal of the of Agriculture defines natural extremities. It still includes as containing no artificial the bones and other parts that flavoring, added color, later get trimmed. Sometimes chemical preservatives or called the carcass weight. synthetic ingredients. Live weight: The weight of the Organic: Producers must go animal when alive. through a U.S. Department of Forequarter/hindquarter: Agriculture process to earn The front end and back end the certified organic label. of a cow, respectively. When Both grass- and grain-fed buying a side of beef, picture beef can qualify as organic. the dotted line going down the Some producers might use cow’s spine. You’re getting part of both a forequarter and a organic practices but haven’t gone through the sometimeshindquarter. expensive process to become Grain-fed: The cattle spend certified organic. most of their lives eating grass Sources: Cattlemen’s Beef Board, National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Thor Erickson, Matt Borlen

process. Also, the National Association of Meat Purveyors produces a meat buyer’s guide that shows cuts number by number. You can provide the number of a certain cut you want to the butcher (for resources, see “About beef cuts”). “There are so many cuts, people don’t always realize what they could have,” Borlen said, noting you can even ask for soup bones and dog bones. You can even ask for a longer hanging time for the beef, which Berman said will make it a little more tender. Locker beef carcasses un-

dergo a hanging time at the plant. Berman said it’s an important step and that Butcher Boys hangs carcasses for roughly 14 days. “Basically, the most important reason is to, number one: kill any pathogens, and number two: dry them out a little,” he said. Finally, the butcher will wrap the meat and put it in the freezer. Then it’s time for eating. And planning the next meal only requires going as far as your freezer. — Reporter: 541-617-7828, hhagemeier@bendbulletin.com

Part-Time

Instructors Needed If you’ve ever thought about teaching at the college level, Central Oregon Community College wants to meet you! We are especially interested in finding instructors for our classes in Madras, Deer Ridge Correctional Institution, Prineville and Redmond. Bring your resume and college transcripts (if available) to:

Job Fair Tuesday, June 19, 2012 . 4:30-6:30PM COCC Redmond Campus Building 1, Room 114

What You Need to Know • Positions available for credit and noncredit instructors. • Most credit classes require a Master’s in the subject area and teaching experience is preferred. • Positions available for teaching one or two classes per term. • Compensation for most credit classes is $500 per credit per term. • Current needs in credit classes include literature, business, psychology, sociology and other areas. Also, writing and math instructors needed in Madras. • Current needs for noncredit classes include health and wellness, group fitness instructors with certification/licensure and teaching experience. • We are also seeking instructors to teach introductory courses in Windows, computer concepts (IC3 certification), Office applications (MOS certifications) and a CIS instructor in Prineville. What the Job Fair Will Provide • Opportunities to speak with department faculty. • Information about applying for teaching positions. • Details on teaching both credit and noncredit classes. • Details on teaching in Madras, Deer Ridge Correctional Institution, Prineville and Redmond.

Find It All Online bendbulletin.com

For more information and to apply, please visit https://jobs.cocc.edu or call (541) 383-7216


LOCALNEWS

C

Editorials, C4 Obituaries, C5 Weather, C6

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13, 2012

LOCAL BRIEFING Board sets rules for Waldo planes The Oregon State Aviation Board this week issued temporary rules for floatplanes landing on Waldo Lake. Floatplanes will be limited to daytime landings on the eastern half of the lake for the next six months. Pilots who intend to land on the lake will also be required to check their plane for invasive species and file a flight plan with the Oregon Department of Aviation. The flight plans will give the board an idea of how many planes are landing on the lake, said aviation department director Mitch Swecker. In April, the Oregon State Marine Board reaffirmed a controversial ban on gas-powered motor boats on the lake while lifting restrictions on floatplanes.

www.bendbulletin.com/local

Ex-girlfriend testifies School board interviews against accused killer BEND-LA PINE

until three weeks before the night of the attack — said The ex-girlfriend of accused he had threatened to kill killer Richard Ward Clarke her, her child and another told jurors Tuesday ex-girlfriend, Galyn that Clarke threatened Sisson. to kill her and another Blair said she had woman he dated, while an intimate relationa former cellmate reship with Clarke counted Clarke’s bragand was even talkging about killing his Clarke ing about marriage roommate. with him until he In prerecorded video began selling drugs. testimony shown during the Blair also said she was third day of Clarke’s murder uncomfortable and jealous trial in Deschutes County Cirabout his previous relationcuit Court, Jessica Blair — who ship with Sisson. See Clarke trial / C2 claims to have dated Clarke By Holly Pablo The Bulletin

candidates for open seat By Ben Botkin The Bulletin

The Bend-La Pine School Board interviewed three candidates Tuesday for appointment to an open board seat. The selected candidate will fill the Zone 2 seat that was held by Kelly Goff, who died in May. The appointed board member’s seat will be up for election in May 2013. The board will research the candidates further and discuss an appointment on Thursday. A decision could be

made then, or at the board’s meeting in July. Here’s a look at the candidates — Julie Craig, Collin Robinson and William Ruiter: • Craig is on the board of Growing Tree Children’s Center in Bend. She also works for the state as an administrative assistant for the Regional Solutions Center and as a code enforcement technician for the City of Bend. She said the district needs to keep attracting the best teachers possible.

“Just continuing that level of quality for our kids is very important,” she said. • Robinson runs a freelance graphics and Web design business, and has volunteered as a youth soccer coach and as a regional director for Oregon Parent-Teacher Association. Robinson said the district needs to look at technology and lower class sizes, particularly for kindergarten through fifth grade. See Bend-La Pine / C2

Splashing in the sunshine

Bend says it’s not tied to solicitors The city of Bend recently sent out letters to Bend water customers about the annual testing of water system backflows, and would like to advise residents that the city is not affiliated with any door hangers or phone solicitations about backflow tests. The city has sent the letters via the U.S. Postal Service. Any other solicitations are from individual vendors. If customers have any concerns about the legitimacy of a vendor, call the City of Bend Safe Drinking Program at 541-317-3010. A list of State Certified Backflow Testers can also be found at www.bendoregon.gov/ crossconnection. — Bulletin staff reports

More briefing and News of Record, C2

CIVIC CALENDAR Pints and Politics; The Oregon League of Conservation Voters staff, volunteers and local candidates will discuss Oregon’s political landscape and opportunities to elect pro-environment candidates; 7 to 9 p.m. June 27; The Wine Shop and Beer Tasting Bar, 55 N.W. Minnesota Avenue, Bend; 541-350-8781 or nikki@olcv.org. — Contact: 541-383-0354, news@bendbulletin.com. In emails, please write “Civic Calendar” in the subject line. Include a contact name and number.

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

L

idia Harmon, 5, of Redmond, runs through the water

feature at Redmond’s Centennial Park while cooling 71 degrees and evening temperatures dipping into the midoff with friends and family Tuesday afternoon.

The Bulletin

In a story headlined “Crook County man may have the plague,” which appeared Tuesday, June 12, on Page C1, information about the patient’s location was unclear because of incorrect information. The man remains hospitalized at St. Charles Bend.

Correction An editorial headlined “New system improves access to Oregon’s courts,” which appeared Monday, June 11, on Page B4, contained incorrect information. The Deschutes County Circuit Court front desk is open but the records department is closed and phones are not answered after 2 p.m. each weekday. The Bulletin regrets the error.

30s. For a detailed five-day forecast, see Page C6.

Redmond approves 2012-13 budget By Erik Hidle

Clarification

Today is forecast to be mostly sunny, with a high near

REDMOND — The Redmond City Council approved a 2012-13 fiscal year budget Tuesday night, passing with a 6-1 vote a projected $12.9 million in general fund expenditures for the coming fiscal year.

While the city has run into a few hiccups in budget planning since early May budget meetings, the document remains largely unchanged from what was originally proposed by the budget committee. A major adjustment was made to the airport fund as a

result of Allegiant Air’s impending departure from the Redmond Airport this summer. The airline currently makes up approximately 11 percent of the airport’s income. The city now expects to spend $4.1 million on airport operations in the coming fiscal year, a reduc-

tion of about $812,000 in expenses. Overall, the city expects to see higher incomes this year than projected. Medical insurance expenses should cost the city slightly less than imagined. See Redmond / C5

“If everything stays the same, then revenue will be better than projected. ... We should be able to make our budget, unless property taxes come in way less than (expected).” — Jason Neff, budget manager, Redmond

Bend teen has penchant for science By Megan Kehoe The Bulletin

OUR SCHOOLS, OUR STUDENTS Educational news and activities, and local kids and their achievements. • School Notes and submission info, C2

When every one of Cole Fuller’s 500 silkworm eggs perished earlier this year, the middle school student was faced with a choice. He could either call it quits, giving up on the months he had already invested in his research project, or he could find a way to overcome the grave mishap.

“It was hard, but I just thought ‘Well, I’ve come this far,’” Cole, 13, said. “I knew at that point though, I had to do it fairly quickly.” Recently, Cole, a seventh-grader at Rimrock Expeditionary Alternative Middle School in Bend, presented his project at the Northwest Science Expo and placed second in the animal science and microbiology category.

The project, which researched temperature and its impact on silkworm growth rate and survivability, took six months to complete. Cole, who worked mostly at the Bend Science Station, built three incubators out of buckets in which to place the silkworms eggs. Each incubator had a controlled temperature between 77 and 86 degrees. See Fuller / C2

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Rimrock Expeditionary Alternative Learning Middle School seventh-grader Cole Fuller displays his science project on the front deck of his family’s Bend home on Monday.


C2

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13, 2012

Fuller L O C AL BRIEFING Continued from C1

Cops wait tables for fundraiser Central Oregon law enforcement officers will participate in the Tip-A-Cop fundraiser at Applebee’s on Thursday to raise money for Special Olympics Oregon. During the event, which will take place at the restaurant on Northeast Third Street from 5 to 9 p.m., officers will act as celebrity waiters and donate their tips to Special Olympics Oregon.

Bend dryer fire damages salon A fire that broke out at Plethora Salon in southwest Bend on Tuesday was caused by a clothes dryer, the Bend Fire Department said. The fire department responded to the fire at 11:15 a.m., and arrived to find smoke and flames coming from the salon’s dryer. Workers were able to contain the fire to the dryer. Fire crews extinguished the flames upon arrival.

Continued from C1 Cole said the project was challenging at times. After the first batch of silkworms died, he decided to order more and started the experiment over again from scratch. He was able to complete the project just in time, and discovered that once the eggs hatched, the silkworms thrived in the highest temperature incubator. Cole’s findings not only earned him a second place award at the Northwest Science Expo, but he was also nominated to attend the Broadcom Masters National Science Fair in Washington, D.C., at the end of the summer to present his project a second time. Science is Cole’s main passion in life. At home, Cole stacks his bookshelves with volumes about nature and biology. He keeps a wide variety of pets, including frogs, fish, a dog — even cockroaches. On the kitchen table, he keeps a copy of “The Atlas of the Living World” by David Attenborough. The naturalist author

Bend-La Pine

Cole Fuller, 13 Rimrock Expeditionary Alternative Learning Middle School seventh-grader Favorite Movies: The “Life” series Favorite TV Shows: “The Simpsons” “Modern Family,” “The Office” Favorite Books: The “Leviathan” series by Scott Westerfeld Hobbies: Photography, skiing, swimming and diving

is his hero and role model, and Cole says he wants to be like him when he grows up. Cole’s science teacher at REALMS, Eric Beck, says the student has a natural curiosity and love for learning that motivates him to do well in school.

‘Knowing more than me’ “I tease him sometimes that he should stop knowing more than me about things,” Beck said. Beck also says Cole has integrity and does the right thing, even when no one

Photos by Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Rimrock Expeditionary Alternative Learning Middle School seventh-grader Cole Fuller shows some of the items from his science project at his Bend home Monday.

is watching. Next year, Cole plans to enter the Science Expo again. He said some of the judges at the competition suggested he do another research project about silkworms and the effect that humidity has on silk production, but Cole says he wants to pursue a project about bacteria instead. “I’ve had enough of silkworms,” Cole said. “They smell disgusting, they’re finicky and they die for no apparent reason.” —Reporter: 541-383-0354, mkehoe@bendbulletin.com

Foster program seeks volunteers The Deschutes County Citizen Review Board of Oregon’s Foster Care Review Program is seeking volunteers to help ensure children and families in the child welfare system get the support and services they need. Volunteers help with foster care case reviews and advocacy. Volunteer training is provided by professional staff of the Oregon Department of Justice. Interested individuals are encouraged to apply to the board by visiting www.ojd.state .or.us/crb. For more information, call 1-888530-8999 ext. 8585 or email crb.volunteer .resources@ojd.state .or.us.

POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Prineville Police Department

Theft — A theft was reported at 1:40 p.m. June 11, in the area of Southeast Lynn Boulevard.

BEND FIRE RUNS Monday 5:15 p.m. — Authorized controlled burning, 1255 N.E. Ninth St. 22 — Medical aid calls.

Press logs from the Bend Police and other Deschutes County police departments are currently unavailable, due to a system update.

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The Bulletin Call a reporter: Bend ................541-633-2160 Redmond ........ 541-617-7837 Sisters............. 541-617-7837 La Pine ........... 541-383-0348 Sunriver ......... 541-383-0348 Deschutes ...... 541-617-7829 Crook ............. 541-504-2336 Jefferson ....... 541-504-2336 Salem ..............541-419-8074 D.C. .................202-662-7456 Education .......541-633-2161 Public Lands ....541-617-7812 Public Safety ....541-383-0387 Projects .......... 541-617-7831

Clarke trial Continued from C1 Clarke is accused of beating his roommate, Matt Fitzhenry, to death with a pink baseball bat in October 2010. Clarke was enraged at the possibility of Sisson dating Fitzhenry, Blair said, and his rage was heightened whenever Sisson and Fitzhenry hung around the house. Clarke talked about whether killing Sisson was worth going to prison for and at one point, Blair testified, he sat on the porch for a few hours with a baseball bat talking about how much he wanted to kill Sisson. “He just didn’t seem like himself anymore,” Blair told jurors. She said she noticed Clarke appeared more anxious and quiet around the time the relationship ended. She also noted that Clarke always carried a pair of gloves, saying if he ever wanted to commit a crime, there would be no trail of fingerprints for police to follow.

Cellmate testimony Rimrock Expeditionary Alternative Learning Middle School seventh-grader Cole Fuller checks in on his frog, Kurt, at his family’s Bend home Monday afternoon.

S  N 

— Bulletin staff reports

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Continued from C1 “If they’ve been taught how to learn at a young age, they will continue to do that,” Robinson said. • Ruiter worked at Lumbermens Insurance & Financial Services from 1981 to 2004 before retiring. He also taught speech therapy in Indiana from 1970 to 1971 and has volunteered for reading and book club programs at Bend schools. Ruiter said the district appears to be well-managed, without talk of contract disputes. “The staff’s happy,” he said. “The kids are happy. It looks like you’re manag-

REUNIONS Bend High School Class of 1977 will hold a reunion July 20-21; $35-45; for registration, visit www.bhs1977 .com or contact Maureen Renwick Barteling, 541-420-3015 or Kathy Ingraham Rowles, 541-350-6298. Crook County High School Class of 1972 will hold a reunion July 20-21; no-host social at Prineville Golf and Country Club Friday, picnic and dinner and music Saturday; to register or for more information, contact Carolyn Puckett at 541-4475291, or Fred Gerke, 541-312-0188. Redmond High School Class of 1987 will hold a reunion Aug. 3-5; $30 per person plus $8 for Sunday Buckaroo Breakfast; Deschutes County Fairgrounds; contact Lara Chan, 541-526-1626. Crook County High School Class of 1962 will hold a reunion Aug. 3-5; hors d’oeuvres, picnic, dinner at Meadow Lakes Golf Club and golfing; register by July 1; contact Janice Wood Anderson, 541-419-2436. Redmond High School Class of 1962 will hold a reunion Aug. 4 at Eagle Crest; to register or for information, contact Janet (McKinnon) Hodgers, 541-6171498, Jim Pierce, 541-548-2644, or Cherie (Hebert) Douglas, 541-279-1730. Bend High School Class of 1962 will hold a reunion Aug. 10-12; for information, visit www.bshs62.com or contact Mike Stenkamp at 541382-1739 or Susie Chopp Penhollow at 541-382-2724. Bend High School Class of 1972 will hold a reunion Aug. 10-11; $25 per person; visit www .bendclassof72.com to register; contact Patty Smiley Stell at 541388-1325 or stell@bendcable.com. Bend High School Class of 1992 will

hold a reunion Aug. 10-12; formal dinner Aug. 11 at Awbrey Glen; for registration information, contact Emily Anderson Stewart at 541-8151414, eanderson@blackbutteranch .com or quicksilvermonk@gmail .com. The Second (Indianhead) Division Association; for anyone who served in the Second Infantry Division at any time; Aug. 23-26, Reno, Nev.; for information or to register, contact Bob Haynes, 224-225-1202 or 2idahq@comcast.net or visit www.2ida.org. Bend High School Class of 1967 will hold a reunion Aug. 24-25; dinner at Awbrey Glen and more; register by July 1; for registration information, contact Frank Wilson at 541-3892363 or email bendclassof67@ gmail.com. Bend High School Class of 1952 will hold a reunion Sept. 7-9; hors d’oeurves and tours Friday, class picnic and catered dinner Saturday; brunch Sunday; $30 per person; register by July 31; contact Joanne Lubcke at 541-389-1075, JoAnn Austin at 541-306-3181 or Darlyne Haynes at 541-382-1560. USS Columbus CA-74/CG-12/SSN762 reunion; Sept. 12-16; Holiday Inn Portland Airport; for registration information, contact Allen R. Hope, president, 3828 Hobson Road, Fort Wayne, IN, 46815-4505, 260486-2221 (8 a.m.-5 p.m. EST) or hope4391@frontier.com. Madras High School Class of 1962 will hold a reunion Sept. 14-15; Inn at Cross Keys Station Hotel, Madras; register by June 15; contact 503370-9066 or dhyder5@comcast.net. Friends, family and classmates from other years are welcome to attend.

COLLEGE NOTES Abigail Askren, of Bend, has been named to the spring 2012 dean’s list

at Northwest Nazarene University in Nampa, Idaho. The following local students have been named to the spring 2012 dean’s list at the University of Portland: Rosalie Baber, Tessa Daniels, Madeline Eberhard, Joshua Guyer, Kellie Riper, Amber Schlossmacher, Sara Stenkamp, Jenna Stevens, Brandon Morgan, Seth Schneider and Claire Seibold. Jane Muir, of Bend, has been named to the Laureate Society for the spring 2012 semester at Whitworth University in Spokane, Wash. Jesse Prichard, of Sisters, received a Bachelor of Arts degree in communication from Whitworth University in Spokane, Wash. Amy Mendoza, of Bend, received Master of Science in health care management and pathologists’ assistant degrees from Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science in North Chicago, Ill. Melinda Miles, of Bend, received a Master of Science in pathologists’ assistant degree from Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science in North Chicago, Ill. The following local students have been selected as distinguished students in their programs at Oregon State University-Cascades Campus: Kyle Skidgel, of Redmond, Master of Arts in teaching — secondary; Caroline Ervin, of Prineville, business; Chelsea Ramsey, of Redmond, human development and family sciences; and Vanessa Ragsdale, of Bend, liberal studies. The following local students have been selected as distinguished students in their programs at University of Oregon: Jerome Johnson, of Bend, general social science; and Heather Springer, of Bend, psychology.

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School briefs: Items and announcements of general interest. Phone: 541-633-2161 Email: pcliff@bendbulletin.com

Other school notes: College announcements, military graduations or training completions, reunion announcements. Phone: 541-383-0358 Email: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

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The inmate — whom prosecutors asked not be identified — testified from the stand that while they shared a cell at the Deschutes County jail, Clarke began asking how much jail time he could face if convicted for murder. The cellmate advised him to be quiet about the crime. The cellmate — now serving a sentence in Snake River Correctional Institution for coercion — later began prying for information in hopes that acting as a jailhouse informant would help him in a future plea bargain. “Did you really do that, dude?” the cellmate said he asked Clarke. “I asked him if he really killed that dude. (Clarke said) something like, ‘Yeah, we got into a

ing money well.”

School days restored In other business, the board unanimously approved a proposal Tuesday to restore two days of class for elementary and high schools for the next school year, and two and a half days for middle schools. The calendar isn’t finalized, though, because it’s part of a tentative agreement reached with the Bend Education Association. Members of the BEA, the local teachers union, still must vote on ratifying the agreement. The union is voting on the proposal this week and may have unofficial results by Thursday. — Reporter: 541-977-7185, bbotkin@bendbulletin.com

fight over some girl.’ He said he was pretty mad.” The cellmate said Clarke admitted to being surprised at news that Fitzhenry was still alive when taken to the hospital, since he had struck him with the bat more than 10 times. The cellmate was not offered a deal, but agreed to testify anyway. He told jurors telling the truth and becoming a “snitch” has put him in an awkward and difficult situation. “I’ve been having a moral dilemma about this whole thing. My whole life I was taught not to tattletale,” he said. “It’s a set of orders that I usually adhere to, but I just figured I’m trying to do the right thing in my life.” As he walked past Clarke after testifying, the inmate whispered, “Sorry, bro.”

Other witnesses Other witnesses called to the stand included a crime scene analyst who led jurors through a gruesome set of photos. In prerecorded video testimony, a third roommate, Chris Hodgkins, testified to his whereabouts that day — which included a trip to Safeway with Fitzhenry. Video surveillance shows the two at the grocery store a few hours before a neighbor called 911 to report the crime. Bend police Detective Jason Maniscalco interviewed Hodgkins and Clarke the night of the crime. In a video clip shown in court Tuesday, Hodgkins keels over in his chair and exclaims, “What? What?” when he hears Fitzhenry is dead. Maniscalco said Hodgkins seemed genuinely surprised, whereas Clarke was emotionless. The trial continues today at 9 a.m. — Reporter: 541-633-2160, hpablo@bendbulletin.com

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WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

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O N A FIRST FOR OREGON

Medical marijuana grower convicted in federal case By Jeff Barnard The Associated Press

Photos by Ross William Hamilton / The Oregonian

A notice indicating the sign-in sheet is full is placed in the lobby of the Society of St. Vincent de Paul’s Portland Council on June 1. Oregon charities reportedly are dipping into reserves, scaling back programs or turning people away amid high demand for private and public aid.

Charities struggle to keep up with demand for services The Associated Press PORTLAND — Economists say the recession is over, but Oregon churches and charity organizations say they don’t see it. Demand for private and public aid is rising, they say, and the money to provide it is down. Organizations are dipping into reserves, scaling back programs or turning people away, The Oregonian reported Tuesday. Others are dealing with volunteer burnout and donor fatigue. For example, at Lake Grove Presbyterian Church in wealthy Lake Oswego, a job mentorship program was so popular that it had to be closed to new applicants this spring, and food aid has been rationed. At one point, says Tedd Tritt, 67, he was mentoring 25 people in the church’s “Job Seekers” program he joined when he retired three years ago. “That’s nuts, because you’re not helping them very much,” he said. “The whole purpose of the program is to provide oneon-one help.” The church provides a month’s supply of groceries to families in need but has had to limit that to three months per household. “Then we have to tell them that we have to help somebody else,” the Rev. Libby Boatwright said.

State services The state government continues to report record demand for food stamps and cash assistance, and it says that each week 500 to 600 Oregonians are out of work or see unemployment benefits expire. That’s up from 450 to 500 per week at the beginning of the year and is expected to continue at the higher pace through 2012. Officials in social service organizations say many Oregonians seeking their help have never been in that position before. Many are educated and live in nice homes, but a job loss or medical emergency took away their economic security. As federal stimulus dollars disappear and Congress cuts discretionary spending, charities get less from Washington. This year, the Society of St. Vincent de Paul’s Portland

GRANTS PASS — The owner of a Grants Pass bicycle shop has become the first registered medical marijuana grower in Oregon to be convicted on federal charges since the U.S. Attorney’s Office started cracking down on abusers of the state law. Authorities said Jason Michael Scott Nelson, 36, was one of four medical marijuana growers from southwestern Oregon who pooled their harvests and made monthly shipments from Portland to Boston in pods loaded with furniture bought from Goodwill. The other three faced state charges. “Our hope was to expose the lie about these huge operations that are just benevolently supplying medicine to sick people,” said Amanda Marshall, U.S. Attorney for Oregon. “Now we have the opportunity with this conviction to be able to have one more bit of evidence out there so people can be thinking critically whether or not this is what they want in their communities.”

Gun, drug charges A U.S. District Court jury in Medford convicted Nelson on Friday of conspiracy to grow and sell more than 100 marijuana plants, growing more than 100 marijuana plants, and possession of unregistered machine guns, silencers and short-barreled rifles. The jury also found his house in a rural area outside Grants Pass should be forfeited as part of an illegal drug operation. A judge on Monday ordered Nelson held pending sentencing Aug. 13.

Selma informant

‘Train wreck’ law

After state police arrested Elizabeth Saul, of Selma, in Portland, she told investigators about three men providing marijuana to her, and one of them led investigators to Nelson, Myers said. The marijuana was selling for $2,400 to $2,700 a pound and the group had made two other shipments. Authorities said when investigators searched Nelson’s property, they found a room elaborately set up for growing marijuana, mature and immature plants, and another room hidden behind a gun safe that contained 29 heat-sealed packages of trimmed marijuana buds. Investigators also found three fully automatic assault rifles, two silencers and two short-barreled rifles that were not properly registered. Richard Michael Sherman testified he passed on mari-

Marshall’s predecessor, Dwight Holton, cited shipments of medical marijuana tracked to other states last year when he characterized Oregon’s medical marijuana law as a “train wreck.” Medical marijuana advocates have said they are eager to work with federal authorities to control the illegal sales of medical pot, because they reduce supplies available to qualified patients. Oregon was one of the first states in the nation to make it legal to grow and use marijuana for medical purposes. Since then, marijuana advocates failed to win passage of a measure to make medical marijuana available to patients through dispensaries, but hope to qualify a measure making marijuana legal for the November ballot.

— Amanda Marshall, U.S. Attorney for Oregon

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Truck hits cougar, closing interstate Marisol Ramos holds her 2-week-old baby while she waits with her sons Daniel, 5, and Jose, 3, for assistance in the lobby of the Society of St. Vincent de Paul’s Portland Council on June 1.

Council received about $30,000 from the federal Emergency Food & Shelter Program, down from $50,000 last year, so it has reduced the number of families it helps with rent. The amount of non-perishables the statewide Oregon Food Bank received through the federal agricultural commodities program dropped 60 percent this year. That comes as the cost of a case of tuna jumped 28 percent and peanut butter spiked 71 percent.

Dipping into reserves To make up the difference, the nonprofit used reserves for the first time in its 30-year history. “We raised $2 million in the current fiscal year and dipped into our reserves by $2.5 million to buy food,” said Food Bank CEO Rachel Bristol. “That’s not sustainable in the long term. And the signs are it’s going to get harder.” Bristol, retiring this month after 29 years at the Food Bank,

said she’s still optimistic. The Food Bank and its partners are finding new ways to get fresh fruits and vegetables that used to go to waste, she said. The recession has required Oregon’s network to be more creative, such as using community gardens or schoolbased pantries. “In my experience, you have these waves of support when recessions hit, and then you hit a period of fatigue where things kind of level off,” she says. “It’s more of a struggle to keep up, and then it’s like the community catches its breath again.”

THE DALLES — A semitrailer hit a cougar crossing Interstate 84 in the dark, killing the animal. The Oregon State Police said about 100 gallons of diesel fuel leaked from a damaged fuel line. The westbound lanes west of The Dalles were closed for about six hours Tuesday morning for the cleanup. The cougar was described as a 2-year-old male. It was hit about 1:15 a.m. The westbound lanes were reopened about 7:30 a.m.

Camp for homeless sought in Eugene EUGENE — Homeless advocates asked the Eugene City Council on

Father’s Day Weekend Special!

Medford drops planned blackout for stargazers The Associated Press MEDFORD — Stargazers in Medford will have to head out of town to find the nighttime darkness they need to watch this summer’s Perseid meteor shower. The Mail Tribune reports that the City Council voted last week to drop the idea of turning out streetlights in some west Medford neighborhoods to save electricity and improve summertime stargazing.

Nelson was arrested in May 2011 based on information stemming from the arrest of a woman shipping 74 pounds of pot from Portland to Boston in a load of furniture, said Grants Pass police Detective Ray Myers of Rogue Area Drug Enforcement.

juana from Nelson to Saul. Sherman said he worked in Nelson’s bike shop, trimmed marijuana buds for him, and lived rent-free at a house next to his. Sherman pleaded guilty three weeks ago to a federal charge of conspiracy to manufacture marijuana and testified against Nelson. He has yet to be sentenced. Nelson testified that he was registered with the state to grow marijuana for four patients, and only six pounds of the packaged marijuana was his. At harvest time last fall, federal agents heaped hundreds of plants on dump trucks and hauled them away from five large cooperative medical marijuana gardens in Jackson County, which lies at the tip of the Green Triangle of prime marijuana growing country in Northern California and Southern Oregon.

“Now we have the opportunity with this conviction to be able to have one more bit of evidence out there so people can be thinking critically whether or not this is what they want in their communities.”

The decision was based on a survey finding 71 percent of the residents didn’t like the idea, fearing they would be less safe. Council member John Michaels says he still likes the idea, and says 300 cities across the country are considering it. The plan called for turning out streetlights on some residential streets during July and August. Streetlights would have stayed on at intersections and high-traffic streets.

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Monday night to provide land where they could establish a camp for the homeless. Patrice Dotson wore a white robe and a halo on her head and called herself the angel of shelter. She said she’s trying to earn her wings by working to create a homeless shelter. The Register-Guard reports Mayor Kitty Piercy thanked them for their comments. Occupy Eugene operated a

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EQUAL HOUSING LENDER

camp last fall that was open to the homeless. Authorities closed the camp in Washington-Jefferson Park in December after a man was fatally beaten. — From wire reports


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THE BULLETIN â&#x20AC;˘ WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13, 2012

E

The Bulletin

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Online expansion a smart decision

I

n the school year ending this week, about 200 students who live in the Bend-La Pine district turned to statewide charter schools so they could study online full time.

Hundreds of others have been home-schooled, many depending on a variety of online options to provide a full curriculum. Last week, Bend-La Pine invited them all to come home, while also offering new options to its existing students. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a smart move. The new Bend-La Pine Online program greatly expands the districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s previous online offering. Instead of focusing solely on high school, it will serve students in all grades, K-12. Instead of offering only part-time online services, it will also present a full-time program. Students in all grades will have the option of taking a class or two online, or being full-time online students. Students who have attended a statewide charter will be able to get local coordination and advice, as well as the chance to participate in extracurricular activities and mix online courses with classes in a bricks-and-mortar school. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a significant increase in options for Bend-La Pine residents without significant additional strain on the budget. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s because state dollars will follow additional enrollments, and Bend-La Pine expects to run the program with existing staff and resources, at least initially. State school funding is a complicated matter, but for this purpose, the figure that matters is called the Average Daily Measurement. For each full-time student in 2012-13, Bend-La Pine expects to receive an ADM of $5,982 from the state. If that student attends a statewide online charter school, the ADM goes to its sponsoring district. So, for example, the Scio School District â&#x20AC;&#x201D; which sponsors Oregon Connections Academy â&#x20AC;&#x201D; received the ADM for the roughly 90 Bend-La Pine district residents

who attended that online charter school in 2011-12. About another 90 Bend-La Pine residents attended Oregon Virtual Academy, sponsored by the North Bend district. The dollar amount of the ADM varies by district, so the amount Scio and North Bend receive isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t exactly the same as what Bend-La Pine gets. For home-schooled students, Bend-La Pine receives no funding unless it provides some specific services. So if a home-schooled student decided to enroll in the new online program, Bend-La Pine would receive the ADM for that student, which would cover the costs. Those costs include three teachers and some time from one administrator, plus the fee Bend-La Pine pays to a private company â&#x20AC;&#x201D; K12 Inc. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; to provide the curriculum. Bend-La Pine has an established relationship with the company, which has been providing the curriculum for the districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more limited existing program. The district will pay K12 $4,000 to $4,900 per full-time student for the new program, according to Bob Jones, the director of alternative education for Bend-La Pine. The payment will be prorated for parttime students and those who do not participate for a full year. Online instruction is becoming a hot topic, with plenty of debate about its potential to improve or to destroy education. Critical questions swirl around funding, testing and the role of the teacher. This move by Bend-La Pine, however, is clearly a smart one. The district will provide more options for students while learning about the challenges such programs present. It will be better placed to address the more complex questions as online education develops.

ODOT on right track

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regonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s gas tax, as taxes go, has some things going for it. In general, people who use the roads more pay more. Revenues go to improve transportation. The tax encourages conservation and less dependence on foreign oil by increasing the price. The gas tax, though, may be doomed. The Oregon Department of Transportation believes gas tax revenues will not grow as fast as vehicle miles traveled. Total gasoline and diesel fuel taxes generated $492 million in 2011. After fuel tax revenues are redistributed to cities, counties and other jurisdictions, ODOTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s share is about 12 percent of its legislatively adopted budget. One chokepoint for the gas tax is hybrid cars or electric vehicles. The gas tax doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do a good job of capturing their impact. Their

numbers are growing. It doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t capture electric vehicles at all. ODOT initially wanted to put a state GPS unit in every kind of car to track mileage. That was invasive. That was Big Brother-ish. The ideas being developed now give consumers choices and are initially only for electrics and hybrids. There might be a phone app. There might be a way to use mileage data collected by insurance companies or to buy mileage packages and reconcile them if a vehicle is under or over. What there wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be is a state-ordered black box in a car tracking locations and mileage. ODOT is planning proposals for the 2013 Legislature. So far, it seems to understand what was very wrong about the earlier plan and is on a better road.

My Nickelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Worth Capital gains tax would not work Regarding the May 9 letter â&#x20AC;&#x153;Reforming capital gains tax the way to balance budgets,â&#x20AC;? I once had similar thoughts about capital gains taxation â&#x20AC;&#x201D; that is, it should be taxed at the same rate as income. But then it came to me that capital gains are not earned in just the year that they are realized, but often over many years, sometimes even decades. How much of that apparent profit has been diminished by inflation due to the systematic devaluation of the dollar caused by our governmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s spending more that it takes in and making up the difference with the printing press? If it were practical to adjust the apparent profit to eliminate inflation from that capital gain, I would have no problem with Ann Kellyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s contention. However, the governmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s take on the properly revalued dollars would likely be much less or even nothing. I understand that in the 100-plus years since the establishment of the Federal Reserve, charged with the express purpose of maintaining the value of the dollar, a dollar in the early 1900s is now worth three cents. That is how our government has rewarded savers of its currency. Fred Chaimson Bend

Pet Parade is for kids Recently, I read Barbara Buxtonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s letter in The Bulletin about the an-

nual Pet Parade, held on July 4. She has a point â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the parade is for children, their pets and decorated trikes, bikes and wagons. The Pet Parade is the single event that kids can participate in during the many adult-themed ones. The parade route has gotten too long, to include adults and their dogs to the exclusion of the real purpose of the parade. We remember being in the parade as children and think it is time to give the parade back to children and children only. Believe me, we are not alone in this opinion. Andrea DuPree Bend

PERS is not to blame I am sorry, Ann Plummer, that the private company that you worked long and hard for eliminated your pension. (June 2 letter, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Why should taxpayers prop up pension returns?â&#x20AC;?) However, donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t take it out on public employee retirees; they had nothing to do with your loss. Take it out on the company executives who made the economic decision to eliminate your pension. Take it out on your union, if you belonged to one, for not defending your pension more strongly. Take it out on the court system that allowed your company to break its agreement with you, assuming that the pension was a contractual agreement. There are a host of people and institutions to blame. But to attack public employees for being able to keep a benefit you lost makes little sense. Public employees are not the enemy.

We are just workers who, like you, expect their retirement to be funded. I would imagine that those in charge of eliminating your pension smiled as they read your letter. After all, if they can get workers to attack and blame other workers for their problems, their job becomes easier. I often feel that the Industrial Workers of the World, the Wobblies, have the right idea. Have all workers of all jobs form one big union, because an affront to one is an affront to all. Michael McGinnis Madras

Coal can be clean With all of the controversy about using coal to generate electricity, a thing or two should be brought to light before itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s condemned. Comparing coal burning to a common wood stove goes like this: If you want to produce the most heat with the least amount of smoke, you must provide enough air to support complete combustion. When you do this, the smokestack will put out no more pollutants than a well-tuned automobile engine. I know this from my years of working in a sawmill boiler room. Of course, the type of coal you burn has a lot to do with this situation, too. The environmentalists know this, but they want to ban all coal burning. Coal can be a very efficient source of power when burned correctly. So before we ban it, letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s study it further. Randy Avery Prineville

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We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 550 and 650 words, signed and include the writerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Worth or In My View and send, fax or email them to The Bulletin. Write: My Nickelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Worth / In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 Fax: 541-385-5804 Email: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Four-year â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; is not what Central Oregon needs By Jonathan Kahnoski hate being the skunk at the picnic, but why all the talk about a four-year â&#x20AC;&#x153;university?â&#x20AC;? Everyone is excited, but no one is explaining why statewide taxpayers and local residents should spend $111 million â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the latest estimate â&#x20AC;&#x201D; to build a campus in Bend. And whatever happened to the campus in Juniper Ridge? Is that campus no longer part of the master plan? First, letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s get the terminology correct. College classes are offered by academic departments; e.g. calculus by the mathematics department or Shakespeare by the English department. A college is a cluster of departments associated with a broad academic interest: arts and sciences, education or engineering. Colleges offer four-year undergraduate degrees â&#x20AC;&#x201D; bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in art or science â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and sometimes postgraduate degrees â&#x20AC;&#x201D; masterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in

I

art or science, and perhaps doctorates â&#x20AC;&#x201D; in major academic fields. Colleges can be standalone institutions, like Reed College in Portland, or one of several colleges making up a university, either undergraduate and postgraduate or postgraduate only. Generally, a true university consists of two or more colleges, offers postgraduate studies leading to a Ph.D. and has a serious commitment to conducting research. Massachusetts, by law, requires a school to offer two doctorate degrees to be called a university. Thus, the University of Oregon, Oregon State University and Portland State University are true universities; Western, Eastern and Southern Oregon universities and the Oregon Institute of Technology are not. Oregon State UniversityCascades Campus is not a university, except by affiliation with OSU in Corvallis. Technically, it isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even a college, because it offers only upperdivision coursework for degrees in a

I N M Y VIEW smattering of academic fields â&#x20AC;&#x201D; e.g., biology but no chemistry, physics or mathematics. Before we spend $111 million to build a new campus, we should ask: What are we trying to accomplish? Some say Central Oregon needs a four-year college to allow local young people to earn a degree here rather than go elsewhere. Unfortunately, Oregon already has more college campuses than it can support adequately and cannot afford a campus in every community wanting one. Several existing campuses are struggling with shrinking budgets and declining enrollment. Adequate funding for OSUCascades will always be a challenge. Some believe a university will enrich the community intellectually and culturally. Perhaps, but beware! A campus of 5,000 students can transform a small community like Bend

from fiscally conservative and socially moderate to across-the-board leftist. If you doubt me, look at what happened to Santa Cruz, Calif., after the University of California opened its campus nearby. A quaint, artsy beach and surfing tourist town became Berkeley on the Bay. Is that what Central Oregon wants to become? Some say a university will attract business. I am skeptical. Four Oregon cities have â&#x20AC;&#x153;universities:â&#x20AC;? Klamath Falls (OIT), La Grande (EOU), Monmouth (WOU) and Ashland (SOU). Not one of these towns has experienced significant business growth attributable to their local colleges. Furthermore, letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s say Central Oregon advertises it has a â&#x20AC;&#x153;university.â&#x20AC;? Business visitors come and discover OSU-Cascades offers few undergraduate degrees and no doctorates, does little or no research and has no campus library of its own â&#x20AC;&#x201D; â&#x20AC;&#x153;sharingâ&#x20AC;? the library at the community college miles away. Will visitors think local

officials allowed civic pride to exaggerate things? What happens to the communityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s credibility? What is the opportunity cost to the rest of the community of raising $1 million to $4 million for OSU-Cascades? Even if half of the $4 million is new money that wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be donated elsewhere, the remaining $2 million would not be available to St. Charles, or the United Way or other local charities. With double-digit unemployment and barely noticeable economic growth, can this community raise such huge sums and still support the local agencies? Who believes that? To spur growth in the local economy, we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t need another generalpurpose college or university like all the others. We need a school focused on STEM â&#x20AC;&#x201D; science, technology, engineering, mathematics â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and business. Next month, this skunk â&#x20AC;&#x201D; with a Bachelor of Arts in English, 1971 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; will offer ideas for such a school. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jonathan Kahnoski lives in Sunriver.


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13, 2012 â&#x20AC;˘ THE BULLETIN

Redmond

O D N 

Dale Moyer Dec. 15, 1940 - June 11, 2012

Rhonda Sue Hurt, of Prineville

Audrey Baldwind Morawski, of Redmond Oct. 26, 1923 - June 9, 2012 Arrangements: Autumn FuneralsRedmond (541-504-9485) www.autumnfunerals.net Services: A private service will be held at a later date. Contributions may be made to:

Hospice of Redmond & Sisters, 732 SW 23rd, Redmond, OR 97756.

Betty J. Howard, of Bend Jan. 7, 1924 - June 10, 2012 Arrangements: Baird Funeral Home of Bend (541) 382-0903 www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: No Services. Contributions may be made to:

Partners In Care Hospice 2075 NE Wyatt Court Bend, Oregon 97701 www.partnersbend.org

Dale Moyer, of Bend Dec. 15, 1940 - June 11, 2012 Arrangements: Autumn FuneralsRedmond (541-504-9485) www.autumnfunerals.net Services: Private Interment at Redmond Memorial Cemetery; Celebration of Life, 1:30pm Fri. June 15, 2012, Redmond Grange Hall, 707 SW Kalama, Redmond. Contributions may be made to:

American Diabetes Association.

Jean Lucille Smalley, of Redmond Aug. 17, 1945 - June 8, 2012 Arrangements: Redmond Memorial Chapel 541-548-3219 please sign our guestbook www.redmondmemorial.com

Services: Memorial Service, 1 PM Friday June 15, 2012 Community Presbyterian, Redmond, OR. Contributions may be made to:

Redmond Boys and Girls Club.

Nov. 14, 1975 - June 10, 2012 Arrangements: Whispering Pines Funeral Home, 541-416-9733 Services: A Celebration of Life will be held at Eastside Church in Prineville, Oregon on Wednesday June 13, 2012 at 2:00 PM. Contributions may be made to:

Lupus Foundation, 800 5th Ave., Suite 4100, Seattle, WA.

Roberta L. Jackson, of La Pine March 6, 1961 - June 6, 2012 Arrangements: Baird Memorial Chapel, La Pine, OR. 541-536-5104 www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: A private gathering of family and friends will take place at a later date. Contributions may be made to:

Contributions to help pay funeral expenses in Robertaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s memory would be appreciated. Contributions may be sent payable to: Baird Memorial Chapel, P.O. Box 1530, La Pine, OR 97739.

Norma Ruth Wiser, of Redmond May 16, 1937 - June 9, 2012 Arrangements: Autumn FuneralsRedmond (541-504-9485) www.autumnfunerals.net Services: Celebration of Life 1:00pm Saturday, June 23 at the family residence.

Dale Moyer of Bend passed away June 11, 2012, in Bend, surrounded by his wife and family. Dale was born to Sam and Geneva Moyer December 15, 1940, in Gooding, Idaho. His family moved to Powell Butte in 1955. He graduated from Redmond High School in 1959, and on September 9, 1962, he married Pat Hollenbeck, and together they raised three children. Dale worked for Country Fresh Dairy in Redmond for thirteen years then was a route salesman for Franz Bakery until he retired in 1994. He then increased his herd of cattle and became a full time farmer, a life he loved. Dale was a man of great integrity, a hard worker and he never met a stranger. He enjoyed camping, elk hunting, and working with Pat, as best friends, farming and gardening. He liked dandelions because they announced spring was here and it was time to plant. Dale is survived by his wife, Pat; children, Steve (Lylah) of Redmond, Julie of Newberg, Scott (Jennifer) of Beavercreek; and three grandchildren, Steven, Serena, and Korey. He is preceded in death by his parents, grandparents, and his beloved border collie, Candy. A celebration of Daleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life will be held Friday, June 15, 2012, at 1:30 p.m., at The Redmond Grange Hall, located at 707 SW Kalama Ave. in Redmond. In lieu of flowers, contribution may be made to the American Diabetes Association.

D E 

 Deaths of note from around the world: Gene Selznick, 82: Beach volleyball player who pioneered the sport in Southern California and twice coached U.S. teams in the Olympics. Died Sunday in Los Angeles.

Obituary policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, email or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825.

Deadlines: Death Notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details.

Phone: 541-617-7825 Email: obits@bendbulletin.com Fax: 541-322-7254

Mail: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708

J. Michael Riva, 63: Oscarnominated production designer whose film credits include â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Amazing Spider-Man,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Few Good Menâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Color Purple.â&#x20AC;? Died Thursday in New Orleans after suffering a stroke. Teofilo Stevenson, 60: Cuban boxer and the three-time Olympic heavyweight champion with a devastating right hand and a gentlemanly demeanor. His death from heart disease was announced Monday in Cuba. Elinor Ostrom, 78: First and only woman to win a Nobel Prize in economics. Died Tuesday in Bloomington, Ind., of cancer. Ghassan Tueni, 86: Veteran Lebanese journalist and politician who headed one of the Arab worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s leading newspapers, An-Nahar, for decades. Died Friday in Beirut. Roger Jongewaard, 76: Longtime Mariners executive who presided over the drafting of Ken Griffey Jr. and Alex Rodriguez. Died Monday of a heart attack. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; From wire reports

William (Bill) McGahan William (Bill) McGahan, 82, died June 1st, 2012, at Sky Lakes Medical Center. Bill was born October 30, 1928, at St. Charles Hospital in Bend, Oregon, to Lloyd and Catherine (Botz) McGahan. His mother died one month after his birth, so he was shuffled back and forth from Grandparents to aunts and uncles. He had some hard years as a child, but he grew up pretty responsible. He missed a few days of graduating at Bend High School in Bend, so his dad said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;If you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t go to school, then you work.â&#x20AC;? And work he did. He spent time working at Evans Fly Co. as a kid, and then Shevlin Hixon Mill, working on the green chain until the mill shut down. He met and married the love of his life, Wilma Jaques, on June 26, 1949, a year before she graduated from Bend High also. They spent one year in Prineville working for a mill, and then he got a job back in Bend as a trucker for Bend Portland Truck, hauling freight. He was hauling diesel fuel during some time, from Portland to Burns to Bend. In 1959, Bend Portland transferred him to Klamath Falls to manage the terminal there, of which he went back to driving and hauling everything there was. He stuck with the changes from Bend Portland, TransWestern and Systems 99 until they shut down a few days before he was to retire. After retiring for a year, he went to work for Jim Miglaiccio and Clough Oil hauling fuel, until health issues forced him to retire. He loved to be out in the woods, cutting down trees and supplying everyone he could with wood. He was an avid hunter and loved to fish and camp out, Bar-B-Qâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, family, friends, and watching and being involved with his kids and grandkids â&#x20AC;&#x201C; in their sports and their lives. He also loved hiking up mountains and around lakes. He and Wilma had their first child, Kathy, born February 9th, 1952, in Bend, and their second, son, Mark, born July 14th, 1962, in Klamath Falls. During all his years as being a trucker from 1949 to 1990, he was awarded a huge trophy from the NAPL Safety Council for traveling 2,500,000+ accident-free miles. He was always very proud of his job and very seldom missed a day. He is survived by his wife, Wilma of almost 63 years; daughter and son-in-law, Kathy and Tim Kennon; son and daughter-in-law, Mark and Shawn McGahan; grandkids, Chris and Trent McGahan; sister, Frances Bushnell (90) of Prineville, Oregon; and numerous nieces, nephews and cousins. At his request, there will be no services. All he wanted was a Pizza Party. Just a celebration of his life on Friday, June 15th, 2012, at Miaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and Piaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s between 5-7 pm. In lieu of flowers, please consider donating to the Cancer Treatment Center and Sky Lakes Medical Center or a charity of your choice. Davenportâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Chapel of the Good Shepherd is in charge of arrangements, (541) 883-3458. 2680 Memorial Drive, Klamath Falls, Oregon 97601.

FEATURED OBITUARY

Rutherford was Scarlettâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s little sister in â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Gone With the Windâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; By Robert Jablon The Associated Press

LOS ANGELES â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Ann Rutherford, the demure brunette actress who played the sweetheart in the long-running Andy Hardy series and Scarlett Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Haraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s youngest sister in â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gone With the Wind,â&#x20AC;? has died. She was 94. A close friend, Anne Jeffreys, said she was at Rutherfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s side when the actress died Monday evening at home Rutherford in Beverly Hills. Rutherford died of heart problems and had been ill for several months. Rutherford was a frequent guest at â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gone With the Windâ&#x20AC;? celebrations in Georgia and, as one of the few remaining actors from the movie, continued to attract fans from around the world, Jeffreys said. She was also known for the Andy Hardy series, a hugely popular string of comical, sentimental films that starred Lewis Stone as a small-town judge and Mickey Rooney as his spirited teenage son. Rutherford first appeared in the second film of the series, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re Only Young Once,â&#x20AC;? in 1938, and she went on 11 more. She played Polly Benedict, the ever-faithful girlfriend that Andy always returned to, no matter what other, more glamorous girl had caught his eye. It was said she won the part of Carreen â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the youngest of the three Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hara sisters in â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gone With the Windâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; because Judy Garland was filming â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Wizard of Oz.â&#x20AC;? Rutherford told the Times in 2010 that MGM head Louis Mayer was going to refuse her the role, calling it â&#x20AC;&#x153;a nothing part.â&#x20AC;? But Rutherford, who was a fan of the novel, burst into tears and he relented. In 1989, she was one of 10 surviving â&#x20AC;&#x153;GWTWâ&#x20AC;? cast members who gathered in Atlanta for the celebration of the filmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 50th anniversary.

Continued from C1 Last week, the city refinanced $13 million worth of outstanding debt into a single bond issuance, bringing the interest rate from 4.8 percent to 2.9 percent. Those changes should boost city revenues, but staff choose not to modify expenditures based on the positive projections. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If everything stays the same, then revenue will be better than projected,â&#x20AC;? said budget manager Jason Neff. â&#x20AC;&#x153;(Because of the changes,) we should be able to make our budget, unless property taxes come in way less than (expected).â&#x20AC;? The decision to not increase expenditures is typical for Redmond. For the past few years, the process of setting a city budget has been described as â&#x20AC;&#x153;austere.â&#x20AC;? While the city tax rate has been set identically to last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x201D; $4.41 per $1,000 of property value â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

C5

a few councilors regretted the number couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be reduced. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re running lean,â&#x20AC;? said Councilor Ed Onimus, â&#x20AC;&#x153;too lean to really do our job. I wish we could cut taxes, but we canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t. We just donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have it there.â&#x20AC;? The budget currently calls for the city to pull $432,212 from reserves for sustained city operations and $255,000 from reserves to pay for capital improvements. If incomes are higher than expected, the reserve fund could be spared. Councilor Jay Patrick was the lone dissenting vote on the budget adoption. He said he couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t vote yes, as he disagrees with a 5-percent increase in stormwater fees, the decision to devote additional staff time to the Redmond Development Commission and the authorization of $70,000 to hire a citywide parks planner â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a position that will be shared with the Redmond Area Park and Recreation District. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Reporter: 541-617-7837, ehidle@bendbulletin.com

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re running lean, too lean to really do our job. I wish we could cut taxes, but we canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t. We just donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have it there.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Ed Onimus, city councilor, Redmond

Find It All Online bendbulletin.com

Holly Davis, 58, passed away unexpectedly and peacefully at her home of natural causes on 11 April, 2012, in Bend, Oregon. Holly was born September 24, 1953, in San Antonio, Texas. She was raised in Corvallis, Oregon, and graduated from Corvallis High School. She enjoyed a long and prosperous career in sales and marketing. She later became a gifted ceramics artist and established her own studio to create and sell her artwork. She was one of four children born to Gerald and Ann Davis. She was pre-deceased by her nephew, Mike Larson. She is survived by her parents; her sisters, Lynne Larson and Amy Davis (Brian Dueltgen) her brother,Tom Davis (Janet); her nephew, Nick Larson (Danielle) and their children, Henry and Vivian; her nephews, Phil and Steven Davis; her nieces, Catherine Davis, Natalie Dueltgen, and Bailey Rose Dueltgen; many loving friends; and her beloved dog, Ripley and cat, Cara Mia. Holly loved music, interior design, spending time with friends, and expressing herself through art. A celebration of Hollyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life will take place in Portland, Oregon, on 17 June. If desired, donations may be made to the Central Oregon Humane Society. Those wishing to leave personal remembrances of Holly and expressions of sympathy may sign the online guestbook at http://www.autumnfunerals.net/

Harry C. Teel, Jr. 1927-2012 Harry passed away June 2, 2012, in Redmond, Oregon, at the age of 85, of natural causes. He was surrounded by his loving family and he had the support of his many great friends. Harry led a spirited and accomplished life and was loved for his frankness, humor, desire for excellence, commitment to causes, and the guidance he provided others. In 1944, at the age of 17, Harry joined the Marine Corps to fight in WWII, turning 18 in the middle of the Pacific. His service took him to Okinawa, Iwo Jima, and Tsingtao, China, before finally returning home to meet the love of his life, and wife of 62 years, Delores (Dee), in 1948, on the beach at Ocean Lake, Oregon. Harry and Dee attended Oregon State College (now OSU) where they developed a life-long love of the University and were great supporters of the schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s athletic teams. Harry eventually became President of the Beaver Club, helping to raise spirit and funds for the benefit of student athletes, alumni, athletic programs, and sports facilities. In 1956, Harry joined the engineering firm, CH2M, in Corvallis, OR, where he first provided architectural design services for the firmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s many clients. He flourished at CH2M for 30 years; rising to become Vice President of Construction Management Services, a practice area he defined and developed, and created many projects throughout the U.S. and internationally. He also advised on the formation of the School of Engineering Management within the Civil Engineering Department at OSU. Harry had great civic pride and a sense that one had to participate and give back to their community; he was elected and served on the Corvallis City Council for four years. He was a founder and first President of the Benton County YMCA, spearheading building of a new recreational center in Corvallis; was on the Board of Directors of COCC; served on the Central Oregon Economic Community Development Council; and was a founding member of the McKenzie Masters Invitational, now in its 22nd year. Outside all of his professional and civic interests, however, was his real love - fly fishing. As a boy he fished with his father on the Deschutes River; the two of them driving for hours on gravel roads from Portland, to fish that great river. Eventually, he fished all the great rivers of the West and beyond. He last fished on the Madison River at Ennis, Montana, in October 2011, catching and releasing many beautiful rainbows. When Harry retired from CH2M-Hill, he and Dee moved to Sisters, OR, opening The Fly Fishersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Place, which became a welcome stop for fishermen in route to the rivers and lakes of Central Oregon. Harry and Dee made a multitude of new friends and Harry took them, family, and clients fly fishing to Patagonia, New Zealand, Alaska, and Montana. Harry was the first author in what would become a series of fly fishing guides for Western rivers. His first book, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The No-Nonsense Guide to Fly Fishing Central & Southeastern Oregon,â&#x20AC;? was a culmination of his love and knowledge of the rivers and lakes that were first among his favorite places on earth. His second book was â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Guide to Fly Fishing the Ennis Area of Montana.â&#x20AC;? It was his desire to share these areas with others so they too could have the enjoyment of fly fishing. Harryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s love of Central and Eastern Oregonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s beautiful landscapes and history often led him to whisking off Dee or one of his friends; driving for hours on the back roads to be immersed in the land and to talk for hours. Harry will be greatly missed, most deeply by his family, and also by his friends and all those who had the great joy to know him. Harry is survived by his wife, Delores, in Redmond, OR; his sons, Brad Teel and wife, Alicia, of Corvallis, OR; and Bruce Teel and wife, JoAnne Dunec, of Berkeley, CA; daughter, Sue Simes, and husband, David, of Vancouver, WA; son, Brett Teel, of Camas, WA; and daughter, Shelley Teel, of Tualatin, OR; grandchildren Celeste, Travis, Nicole, Jason, Andrew, Kylie, and Brian; great-grandchildren Maia, Kaya, Cole, and Bella; and his German Shorthair, Willie. A celebration of his life will be held Saturday, July 14, 2012, at the Lodge at Black Butte Ranch, OR, at 1 p.m. Fly rods will be present. Please sign our guestbook at redmondmemorial.com.


THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13, 2012

C6

W E AT H ER FOR EC A ST Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LP ©2012.

TODAY, JUNE 13 Today: Mainly sunny, pleasant, afternoon breezes.

HIGH Ben Burkel

THURSDAY

70

Bob Shaw

FORECAST: STATE Astoria 59/47

Seaside

55/47

Cannon Beach 54/48

Hillsboro Portland 67/50 66/45

Tillamook 60/45

Salem

56/44

68/48

74/48

Maupin

73/38

Corvallis Yachats

68/44

64/45

69/32

68/45

Coos Bay

69/30

Oakridge

Cottage Grove

Crescent

Chemult

68/48

Gold Beach

Juntura

Burns

78/42

72/31

Riley 72/38

72/42

Frenchglen

WEST Morning clouds, then partly cloudy, with a few mountain showers today. CENTRAL Mostly sunny skies can be expected, with cooler than normal temperatures.

Ontario EAST 80/54 Mostly sunny skies can be expected, Nyssa with cooler than 80/51 normal temperatures.

Jordan Valley 77/45

Yesterday’s state extremes

Rome

• 86°

79/41

Ontario

76/40

Chiloquin 70/36

Klamath Falls 74/37

Ashland

63/46

67/30

Paisley 78/49

Brookings

Vale 82/52

74/34

Medford

62/48

69/41

67/42

72/32

Silver Lake

68/27

Grants Pass 78/44

Unity

Christmas Valley

Port Orford 61/46

71/40

Hampton

Fort Rock 70/31

68/28

62/23

Roseburg

59/47

Baker City John Day

Brothers 69/29

La Pine 69/29

Crescent Lake

59/45

Bandon

Spray 73/43

70/35

65/43

56/36

Prineville 70/34 Sisters Redmond Paulina 65/30 70/32 72/33 Sunriver Bend

Eugene

Florence

64/40

Union

Granite

67/30

58/48

64/39

Joseph

Mitchell 71/35

72/36

Camp Sherman

69/46

Enterprise

Meacham 67/44

64/42

Madras

58/37

La Grande

Condon

Warm Springs

Wallowa

62/36

67/44

71/46

73/37

69/45

77/47

Ruggs

Willowdale

Albany

Newport

Pendleton

76/51

68/45

68/46

57/44

Hermiston 77/49

Arlington

Wasco

Sandy

Government Camp 53/37

67/46

77/50

The Biggs Dalles 70/49

67/47

McMinnville

Lincoln City

Umatilla

Hood River

72/46

• 39°

Fields

Lakeview

McDermitt

78/48

74/41

Lakeview

78/41

-30s

-20s

Yesterday’s extremes (in the 48 contiguous states):

Death Valley, Calif. Fraser, Colo.

• 2.25” Shreveport, La.

Honolulu 85/72

0s

Vancouver 64/52

10s

20s

Calgary 61/45

30s

Saskatoon 75/53

Seattle 63/50

40s

Winnipeg 76/59

50s

60s

Thunder Bay 69/50

70s

80s

90s

100s 110s

Quebec 63/50

Halifax 67/51 P ortland Billings To ronto Portland 67/56 83/53 68/51 67/50 St. Paul Green Bay Boston 75/61 70/53 Boise 68/60 Buffalo 76/47 Detroit 70/52 New York 73/57 Salt Lake Rapid City 75/62 Des Moines City 85/60 Philadelphia Columbus 79/62 Chicago 89/57 75/53 82/63 Cheyenne 70/56 Omaha San Francisco 85/51 Washington, D. C. 84/66 64/52 82/65 Denver Louisville Kansas City 89/57 81/56 83/65 St. Louis Charlotte 81/61 Las 89/63 Albuquerque Los Angeles Vegas Oklahoma City Nashville Little Rock 92/63 69/61 103/79 85/70 84/60 85/65 Phoenix Atlanta Birmingham 108/78 89/69 90/67 Dallas Tijuana 90/73 74/56 Chihuahua 98/67

Anchorage 57/47

La Paz 95/66 Juneau 55/45

Mazatlan Monterrey 103/70 87/76

FRONTS

HIGH LOW

78 48

80 48

BEND ALMANAC

PLANET WATCH

TEMPERATURE

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . .6:40 a.m. . . . . 10:22 p.m. Venus . . . . . .4:43 a.m. . . . . . 7:34 p.m. Mars. . . . . .12:38 p.m. . . . . . 1:20 a.m. Jupiter. . . . . .4:03 a.m. . . . . . 6:49 p.m. Saturn. . . . . .3:21 p.m. . . . . . 2:40 a.m. Uranus . . . . .1:51 a.m. . . . . . 2:16 p.m.

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend 24 hours ending 4 p.m.*. . 0.00” High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75/45 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . 0.07” Record high . . . . . . . . 92 in 1933 Average month to date. . . 0.34” Record low. . . . . . . . . 26 in 1968 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.14” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 Average year to date. . . . . 5.36” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.30.00 Record 24 hours . . .1.74 in 1950 *Melted liquid equivalent

Sunrise today . . . . . . 5:22 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 8:50 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 5:22 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 8:50 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 1:47 a.m. Moonset today . . . . 3:33 p.m.

Moon phases New

First

June 19 June 26

Full

Last

July 3

July 10

OREGON CITIES

FIRE INDEX

Yesterday Wednesday Thursday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Precipitation values are 24-hour totals through 4 p.m.

Bend, west of Hwy. 97...Mod. Bend, east of Hwy. 97......Low Redmond/Madras ........Low

Astoria . . . . . . . .60/53/0.12 Baker City . . . . . .74/50/0.02 Brookings . . . . . .63/48/0.00 Burns. . . . . . . . . .82/51/0.00 Eugene . . . . . . . .72/55/0.01 Klamath Falls . . .76/41/0.00 Lakeview. . . . . . .79/39/0.00 La Pine . . . . . . . .75/42/0.00 Medford . . . . . . .83/53/0.00 Newport . . . . . . .57/52/0.09 North Bend . . . . . .63/54/NA Ontario . . . . . . . .86/57/0.00 Pendleton . . . . . .80/56/0.00 Portland . . . . . . .66/54/0.03 Prineville . . . . . . .71/45/0.00 Redmond. . . . . . .76/47/0.00 Roseburg. . . . . . .75/55/0.00 Salem . . . . . . . . .69/55/0.11 Sisters . . . . . . . . .79/47/0.00 The Dalles . . . . . .76/62/0.00

Mod. = Moderate; Ext. = Extreme

. . . .59/47/pc . . . . . .59/48/c . . . . .71/40/s . . . . .71/38/pc . . . .63/46/pc . . . . .66/48/pc . . . . .76/41/s . . . . .75/43/pc . . . .68/44/pc . . . . .69/49/pc . . . . .74/37/s . . . . . .74/41/s . . . . .74/41/s . . . . . .70/43/s . . . .69/29/pc . . . . .68/35/pc . . . .78/49/pc . . . . . .80/51/s . . . .57/44/pc . . . . .57/46/pc . . . .59/46/pc . . . . .60/48/pc . . . . .80/54/s . . . . .78/53/pc . . . . .77/47/s . . . . . .75/50/s . . . .67/50/pc . . . . .68/51/pc . . . .70/34/pc . . . . .70/38/pc . . . . .72/36/s . . . . . .74/41/s . . . .68/48/pc . . . . .71/50/pc . . . .68/46/pc . . . . .70/48/pc . . . .70/32/pc . . . . .67/36/pc . . . . .74/48/s . . . . . .74/52/s

PRECIPITATION

WATER REPORT Sisters ...............................Low La Pine.............................Mod. Prineville..........................Low

The following was compiled by the Central Oregon watermaster and irrigation districts as a service to irrigators and sportsmen.

Reservoir Acre feet Capacity Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . . 49,036 . . . . . . 55,000 Wickiup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 193,770 . . . . . 200,000 Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . 79,906 . . . . . . 91,700 Ochoco Reservoir . . . . . . . . 40,022 . . . . . . 47,000 Prineville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139,326 . . . . . 153,777 The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is River flow Station Cubic ft./sec Deschutes RiverBelow Crane Prairie . . . . . . . 446 for solar at noon. Deschutes RiverBelow Wickiup . . . . . . . . . . . 818 Crescent CreekBelow Crescent Lake . . . . . . . 165 LOW MEDIUM HIGH V.HIGH Little DeschutesNear La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208 0 2 4 6 8 10 Deschutes RiverBelow Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . 238 Deschutes RiverAt Benham Falls . . . . . . . . . 1,646 Crooked RiverAbove Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . 64 Crooked RiverBelow Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . 226 Updated daily. Source: pollen.com Ochoco CreekBelow Ochoco Res. . . . . . . . . . 9.58 Crooked RiverNear Terrebonne . . . . . . . . . . . 208 Contact: Watermaster, 388-6669 LOW MEDIUM HIGH or go to www.wrd.state.or.us

To report a wildfire, call 911

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX 6

POLLEN COUNT

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

Bismarck 80/59

• 115° • 25°

-10s

HIGH LOW

73 43

Partly cloudy and warm.

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS -40s

HIGH LOW

72 42

SUNDAY Partly cloudy and warmer.

Partly cloudy and mild.

HIGH LOW

35

SATURDAY

Mostly sunny and pleasant.

Tonight: Mainly clear and colder.

LOW

FRIDAY

Houston 93/75

New Orleans 90/74

Orlando 91/73 Miami 90/76

Yesterday WednesdayThursday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . . .85/68/0.00 . .92/74/pc . 93/73/pc Akron . . . . . . . . . .88/68/0.01 . . . 71/50/s . . 79/61/s Albany. . . . . . . . . .70/62/0.45 . .77/55/sh . 80/57/pc Albuquerque. . . . .92/68/0.00 . . . 92/63/s . . 94/63/s Anchorage . . . . . .50/46/0.23 . .57/47/sh . 59/47/pc Atlanta . . . . . . . . .86/70/0.00 . .89/69/pc . 87/68/pc Atlantic City . . . . .74/66/0.56 . .74/61/sh . 71/62/pc Austin . . . . . . . . . .96/72/0.10 . .96/76/pc . 95/75/pc Baltimore . . . . . . .75/68/0.33 . .81/63/pc . . 79/63/s Billings . . . . . . . . .82/47/0.00 . . . 83/53/t . 79/56/pc Birmingham . . . . .85/66/0.00 . .90/67/pc . 91/70/pc Bismarck. . . . . . . .78/38/0.00 . . . 80/59/t . . .81/59/t Boise . . . . . . . . . . .89/59/0.00 . . . 76/47/s . . 75/47/s Boston. . . . . . . . . .74/60/0.00 . .68/60/sh . 68/56/pc Bridgeport, CT. . . .71/63/0.17 . .70/61/sh . 72/60/pc Buffalo . . . . . . . . .78/68/0.26 . . . 70/52/s . . 74/58/s Burlington, VT. . . .77/65/0.12 . .74/55/pc . . 78/57/s Caribou, ME . . . . .78/55/0.00 . .68/50/sh . . 74/53/s Charleston, SC . . .83/69/2.13 . . . 88/71/t . . 86/69/s Charlotte. . . . . . . .85/70/0.09 . .89/63/pc . . 86/66/s Chattanooga. . . . .86/69/0.00 . . . 88/64/s . 88/66/pc Cheyenne . . . . . . .76/47/0.00 . .85/51/pc . 81/51/pc Chicago. . . . . . . . .78/63/0.00 . . . 70/56/s . 76/62/pc Cincinnati . . . . . . .86/65/0.00 . . . 77/51/s . . 82/60/s Cleveland . . . . . . .84/70/0.00 . . . 69/55/s . . 78/57/s Colorado Springs .86/49/0.00 . .84/54/pc . 84/54/pc Columbia, MO . . .82/59/0.02 . .81/59/pc . . 87/66/s Columbia, SC . . . .85/71/0.17 . .89/69/pc . . 87/67/s Columbus, GA. . . .90/69/0.05 . .93/69/pc . 91/68/pc Columbus, OH. . . .87/69/0.00 . . . 75/53/s . . 81/63/s Concord, NH. . . . .77/57/0.00 . .71/54/sh . 78/55/pc Corpus Christi. . . .93/80/0.00 . .90/79/pc . 90/78/pc Dallas Ft Worth. . .91/70/0.00 . . . 90/73/t . 90/74/pc Dayton . . . . . . . . .85/68/0.00 . . . 75/51/s . . 81/60/s Denver. . . . . . . . . .87/53/0.00 . .89/57/pc . 89/58/pc Des Moines. . . . . .77/57/0.00 . .79/62/pc . 85/67/pc Detroit. . . . . . . . . .83/70/0.00 . . . 73/57/s . . 76/60/s Duluth. . . . . . . . . .64/45/0.00 . .66/54/pc . . .70/60/t El Paso. . . . . . . . .102/71/0.00 102/72/pc . 101/73/s Fairbanks. . . . . . . .59/50/0.06 . .65/44/sh . 70/46/pc Fargo. . . . . . . . . . .73/41/0.00 . . . 75/61/t . . .80/62/t Flagstaff . . . . . . . .83/41/0.00 . . . 81/41/s . . 78/42/s

Yesterday WednesdayThursday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . . .74/65/0.00 . . . 72/50/s . 79/58/pc Green Bay. . . . . . .73/55/0.00 . . . 70/53/s . 75/57/pc Greensboro. . . . . .84/69/0.05 . .87/61/pc . 83/62/pc Harrisburg. . . . . . .74/69/1.65 . .79/62/pc . 79/63/pc Hartford, CT . . . . .74/58/0.10 . .71/60/sh . 77/57/pc Helena. . . . . . . . . .78/44/0.00 . . . 71/46/t . 74/43/pc Honolulu. . . . . . . .83/71/0.00 . . . 85/72/s . . 86/71/s Houston . . . . . . . .95/69/3.04 . .93/75/pc . 93/75/pc Huntsville . . . . . . .85/66/0.00 . . . 88/63/s . 90/67/pc Indianapolis . . . . .83/65/0.00 . . . 76/55/s . . 81/63/s Jackson, MS . . . . .81/68/0.90 . .89/68/pc . 92/69/pc Jacksonville. . . . . .89/72/0.66 . . . 90/72/t . 88/68/pc Juneau. . . . . . . . . .52/44/0.09 . .55/45/sh . 56/45/sh Kansas City. . . . . .83/55/0.00 . . . 83/65/t . 88/70/pc Lansing . . . . . . . . .76/65/0.00 . . . 71/47/s . 78/57/pc Las Vegas . . . . . .104/72/0.00 . .103/79/s . 101/78/s Lexington . . . . . . .84/66/0.00 . . . 78/54/s . . 83/62/s Lincoln. . . . . . . . . .81/49/0.00 . . . 86/67/t . 91/71/pc Little Rock. . . . . . .88/70/0.03 . .85/65/pc . 88/67/pc Los Angeles. . . . . .66/61/0.00 . . . 69/61/s . . 67/61/s Louisville. . . . . . . .86/68/0.00 . . . 81/56/s . . 84/63/s Madison, WI . . . . .71/53/0.00 . . . 72/51/s . 79/61/pc Memphis. . . . . . . .83/70/0.09 . . . 86/65/s . . 89/71/s Miami . . . . . . . . . .87/76/0.00 . .90/76/pc . 91/78/pc Milwaukee . . . . . .73/61/0.00 . . . 66/53/s . 72/60/pc Minneapolis . . . . .69/51/0.00 . .75/61/pc . . .81/67/t Nashville. . . . . . . .85/65/0.00 . . . 84/60/s . . 89/66/s New Orleans. . . . .88/71/0.00 . . . 90/74/t . . .91/74/t New York . . . . . . .72/65/0.35 . .75/62/sh . 78/63/pc Newark, NJ . . . . . .74/66/0.47 . .75/62/sh . 76/62/pc Norfolk, VA . . . . . .81/70/0.17 . . . 81/67/s . . 78/64/s Oklahoma City . . .85/67/0.00 . . . 85/70/t . 88/71/pc Omaha . . . . . . . . .77/55/0.00 . . . 84/66/t . 87/71/pc Orlando. . . . . . . . .92/71/0.44 . . . 91/73/t . 92/73/pc Palm Springs. . . .107/73/0.00 . .105/71/s . 102/70/s Peoria . . . . . . . . . .76/57/0.00 . . . 78/55/s . . 84/63/s Philadelphia . . . . .72/68/0.59 . .82/63/sh . 79/63/pc Phoenix. . . . . . . .107/79/0.00 . .108/78/s . 104/77/s Pittsburgh . . . . . . .83/69/0.24 . . . 74/50/s . . 81/59/s Portland, ME. . . . .68/59/0.00 . .67/56/sh . 72/55/pc Providence . . . . . .70/59/0.00 . .70/61/sh . 73/57/pc Raleigh . . . . . . . . .83/71/0.00 . .87/64/pc . . 82/62/s

Yesterday WednesdayThursday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . . .80/45/0.02 . .85/60/pc . 81/58/pc Reno . . . . . . . . . . .88/54/0.00 . . . 87/57/s . . 90/57/s Richmond . . . . . . .80/70/0.02 . . . 84/63/s . . 80/62/s Rochester, NY . . . .79/67/0.90 . . . 72/54/s . 76/58/pc Sacramento. . . . . .95/58/0.00 . . . 92/60/s . . 93/62/s St. Louis. . . . . . . . .82/64/0.00 . . . 81/61/s . . 87/66/s Salt Lake City . . . .86/54/0.00 . . . 89/57/s . . 87/59/s San Antonio . . . . .96/79/0.00 . .95/76/pc . 95/76/pc San Diego . . . . . . .67/61/0.00 . . . 67/60/s . . 66/60/s San Francisco . . . .74/53/0.00 . . . 65/52/s . . 68/52/s San Jose . . . . . . . .85/57/0.00 . . . 73/54/s . . 75/53/s Santa Fe . . . . . . . .87/60/0.00 . .84/57/pc . . 85/55/s

Yesterday WednesdayThursday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Savannah . . . . . . .89/71/0.03 . . . 90/72/t . . 87/71/s Seattle. . . . . . . . . .65/56/0.03 . .63/50/pc . 64/50/pc Sioux Falls. . . . . . .72/43/0.00 . . . 80/66/t . . .84/67/t Spokane . . . . . . . 74/52/trace . . . 69/46/s . 69/47/pc Springfield, MO . .82/60/0.00 . .84/62/pc . 87/66/pc Tampa. . . . . . . . . .89/76/0.00 . . . 91/77/t . 91/75/pc Tucson. . . . . . . . .104/68/0.00 . .103/70/s . 101/70/s Tulsa . . . . . . . . . . .89/69/0.00 . . . 84/70/t . 88/71/pc Washington, DC . .77/70/0.17 . .82/65/pc . . 80/65/s Wichita . . . . . . . . .87/64/0.00 . . . 83/68/t . 87/70/pc Yakima . . . . . . . . .82/56/0.00 . . . 77/47/s . . 74/50/s Yuma. . . . . . . . . .106/70/0.00 . .109/75/s . 103/72/s

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . . .61/48/0.00 . .58/46/pc . 64/54/pc Athens. . . . . . . . . .91/62/0.00 . . . 93/70/s . . 92/73/s Auckland. . . . . . . .59/45/0.00 . .54/44/pc . . 56/47/c Baghdad . . . . . . .108/81/0.00 . .111/82/s . 114/81/s Bangkok . . . . . . . .90/81/0.00 . . .93/80/c . . .93/78/t Beijing. . . . . . . . . .88/61/0.00 . .88/60/sh . 79/61/sh Beirut . . . . . . . . . .81/70/0.00 . . . 83/74/s . . 82/73/s Berlin. . . . . . . . . . .70/57/0.00 . .72/50/sh . 63/52/pc Bogota . . . . . . . . .66/48/0.00 . .65/50/sh . 64/50/sh Budapest. . . . . . . .70/57/0.00 . . . 71/55/t . 75/56/pc Buenos Aires. . . . .61/54/0.00 . . . 71/60/t . . 70/54/c Cabo San Lucas . .91/73/0.00 . . . 92/71/s . . 91/72/s Cairo . . . . . . . . . . .93/72/0.00 . . . 95/71/s . . 96/70/s Calgary . . . . . . . . .73/48/0.00 . . . 61/45/r . 63/44/sh Cancun . . . . . . . . .84/77/0.00 . . .86/78/c . . .85/77/t Dublin . . . . . . . . . .57/48/0.00 . . .60/47/c . 58/48/sh Edinburgh. . . . . . .57/41/0.00 . . .55/42/c . . 53/46/c Geneva . . . . . . . . .61/52/0.00 . .63/49/sh . 72/53/pc Harare. . . . . . . . . .68/41/0.00 . . . 67/46/s . . 65/41/s Hong Kong . . . . . .90/81/0.00 . . . 85/77/t . . .86/77/t Istanbul. . . . . . . . .86/70/0.00 . . . 86/73/s . 82/69/pc Jerusalem . . . . . . .92/62/0.00 . . . 92/65/s . . 91/67/s Johannesburg. . . .64/37/0.00 . . . 59/37/s . . 57/37/s Lima . . . . . . . . . . .73/68/0.00 . .73/68/pc . . 75/67/s Lisbon . . . . . . . . . .70/59/0.00 . . . 76/58/s . 76/62/pc London . . . . . . . . .57/50/0.00 . .65/47/sh . 64/54/sh Madrid . . . . . . . . .77/55/0.00 . . . 84/57/s . . 86/63/s Manila. . . . . . . . . .90/81/0.00 . . . 87/79/t . . .91/79/t

Mecca . . . . . . . . .108/86/0.00 . .111/86/s . 113/84/s Mexico City. . . . . .84/63/0.00 . . . 77/51/t . 77/52/pc Montreal. . . . . . . .77/64/0.00 . . .73/58/c . . 73/53/s Moscow . . . . . . . .79/63/0.00 . .69/60/sh . 76/57/pc Nairobi . . . . . . . . .75/57/0.00 . .72/53/pc . . .73/55/t Nassau . . . . . . . . .90/79/0.00 . . . 87/79/t . . .90/81/t New Delhi. . . . . .106/84/0.00 113/93/pc . 114/95/s Osaka . . . . . . . . . .72/66/0.00 . .77/66/pc . 79/65/pc Oslo. . . . . . . . . . . .59/52/0.00 . .64/44/pc . . 64/48/c Ottawa . . . . . . . . .73/64/0.00 . . . 73/56/s . . 73/50/s Paris. . . . . . . . . . . .61/52/0.00 . . .61/54/c . 67/59/sh Rio de Janeiro. . . .79/68/0.00 . .77/68/pc . . 79/68/c Rome. . . . . . . . . . .79/64/0.00 . . . 76/59/s . 75/59/pc Santiago . . . . . . . .61/48/0.00 . .50/41/sh . . 61/38/c Sao Paulo . . . . . . .72/32/0.00 . .71/59/pc . 74/56/pc Sapporo . . . . . . . .64/55/0.00 . .59/48/pc . 61/51/pc Seoul. . . . . . . . . . .86/64/0.00 . .81/67/sh . . 81/67/c Shanghai. . . . . . . .86/72/0.00 . .81/71/pc . 90/73/pc Singapore . . . . . . .86/82/0.00 . . . 86/79/t . 86/80/pc Stockholm. . . . . . .68/50/0.00 . . . 66/51/r . 67/49/sh Sydney. . . . . . . . . .66/55/0.00 . .64/49/pc . 66/45/pc Taipei. . . . . . . . . . .79/73/0.00 . . . 85/76/t . . .82/78/t Tel Aviv . . . . . . . . .84/70/0.00 . . . 87/69/s . . 89/68/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . . .64/61/0.00 . . .70/58/c . 76/64/pc Toronto . . . . . . . . .81/68/0.00 . .68/51/pc . 73/58/pc Vancouver. . . . . . .64/59/0.00 . .64/52/pc . 63/52/pc Vienna. . . . . . . . . .72/55/0.00 . .64/55/sh . 70/56/pc Warsaw. . . . . . . . .72/55/0.00 . . . 72/56/t . . .66/49/t


S P ORTS

Scoreboard, D2 MLB, D3

D

Prep sports, D5 Tee to Green, D6

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13, 2012

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

PREP SPORTS Summit pitcher takes top honor The Storm’s Kevin Hamann is named the Class 5A pitcher of the year, D5

MOUNTAIN BIKING Bend’s Craig wins local race Bend’s Adam Craig and Delaware’s Katie Compton won the men’s and women’s Blitz to the Barrel Dash for Cash mountain bike races on Tuesday in an event that started at Wanoga Sno-park and ended at 10 Barrel Brewing on Galveston Avenue in Bend. Craig, a 2012 U.S. Olympic hopeful in mountain biking, defended his 2011 Blitz title, finishing ahead of runner-up Barry Wicks, third-place finisher Ryan Trebon, fourth-place finisher Chris Sheppard and Josh Carlson, who placed fifth. Compton, an eighttime U.S. cyclocross national champion, bested last year’s Blitz winner, Kelli Emmett, who took second. Alice Pennington, the 2010 Blitz champ, placed third in the women’s race, with Serena Bishop Gordon finishing fourth and Brooke Blackwelder ending the day in fifth. Craig and Compton each earned a $3,000 paycheck for their efforts. The men’s and women’s runners-up both took home $2,000, while third-, fourthand fifth-place riders received checks worth $1,500, $1,000 and $500, respectively. — Bulletin staff report

PREP RODEO State rodeo championships

Locals aim for state titles By Elise Gross The Bulletin

A number of Central Oregon high school rodeo stars will seek to defend their state titles starting today at the Oregon High School Rodeo Association state championships. The four-day event, held at the Crook County Fairgrounds in Prineville and the Willis family ranch in Culver, consists of eight club teams from around the state, including the Central Oregonbased Tri-County High School Rodeo Club. A total of nearly 40 cowboys and cowgirls compete on the Tri-County team, according to club secretary Kerri Jo Talburt. Leading the pack for Tri-County is senior-to-

be T.J. McCauley, of Redmond, who is currently ranked first in the OHSRA all-around standings and will look to repeat his 2011 all-around win. McCauley, who also won the tie-down competition at state last year, is ranked first in team roping, fourth in steer wrestling, and third in tie-down roping. State ranking is based on points scored in rodeos throughout the season. Competitors in the state finals also have the opportunity to earn bonus points, which count toward state ranking. The top four finishers in the season-ending OHSRA standings will qualify for the National High School Finals Rodeo in Rock Springs, Wyo., July 15-21. See Rodeo / D5

The Oregon High School Rodeo Association state championships begin today. All performances are at the Crook County Fairgrounds unless otherwise noted.

SCHEDULE

MORE INFORMATION

Today: Cutting, 10 a.m., Willis ranch in Culver Thursday: Slack, first performance 10 a.m.; second performance 6 p.m. Friday: Third performance, 6 p.m. Saturday: Finals, noon

Cost: $8 per go-round; $4 for children 12 and under or $20 for a season ticket good for all performances Notes: The top 20 competitors in the OHSRA season-ending standings in each rodeo discipline are eligible for the state finals. Those events are: bareback riding, saddle bronc riding, bull riding, team roping, tie-down roping, steer wrestling, barrel racing, boys and girls cutting, breakaway roping, goat tying and pole bending. For more information, go to www.ohsra.org.

GOLF: U.S. OPEN

Woods, field, face big test at Olympic By Doug Ferguson The Associated Press

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Oregon Open competitor Jeff Coston hits his approach on the 17th hole at Broken Top Club in Bend Tuesday during the first round of the Oregon Open. Coston is the first-round leader after shooting a 66.

WCL BASEBALL Elks stay hot, beat Sweets Bend banged out 12 hits and five pitchers combined to strike out 11 Walla Walla hitters as the Elks knocked off the visiting Sweets 6-4 on Tuesday night at Vince Genna Stadium to improve to 7-2 in West Coast League play. The Elks, who have won five straight, scored twice in the first inning and two more times in the second to take control of the game. Ryne Clark posted an RBI triple in the first inning that sparked Bend early, while Parker Guinn started the scoring in the second by knocking in Shawn O’Brien with a single. Elk first baseman Bo Walter paced the Bend offense, ending the day four for four with an RBI and one run scored. Clark went two for five with a triple, an RBI and two runs scored and Guinn added two hits, an RBI and a run. Daniel Chavez, the Elks’ starter, went three innings to earn the victory. Chavez struck out four against three walks and allowed just two hits and no runs. Bend is off until Saturday, when the Elks host Corvallis.

Oregon Open Where: Broken Top Club, Bend What: 54-hole stroke play Today: Tee times start at 7:30 a.m. and run through 2:40 p.m. Thursday: The field will be cut to 70 players for the final round Admission: Free

These guys are good, too • The difference between a club pro and a tour pro can be a fine line, as evidenced by the Oregon Open By Zack Hall The Bulletin

• See D5 for a report on the first round of the Oregon Open; see D6 for results

Central Oregon can be gorgeous this time of year. But don’t blame the many club professionals at the Oregon Open Invitational for wishing — like any other high-level golfer — that they

NBA FINALS

Durant powers Thunder past Heat in Game 1 By Brian Mahoney

— Bulletin staff report

The Associated Press

CORRECTION The last name of Olympic Trials officiating crew members Jim and Carol McLatchie was misspelled in a story headlined “Official business” that appeared in Tuesday’s Bulletin on page D1. The Bulletin regrets the error.

could be in San this TEE TO Francisco week. GREEN The Oregon Open, an annual major championship in the PGA of America’s Pacific Northwest section, is miles away from this week’s U.S. Open in actual geo-

graphic distance, not to mention pomp, prestige and prize money. But against the backdrop of ponderosa pines and the partially obscured, snowcapped Cascade range on a breezy Tuesday afternoon, many of the club pros preparing for the Oregon Open’s first round on Broken Top Club’s driving range looked the part of tour pro. In reality, the gap between an elite club pro and a touring pro is not as wide as some might think. See Oregon Open / D5

Jeff Roberson / The Associated Press

Oklahoma City’s Kevin Durant and Miami’s Dwyane Wade chase a loose ball during the second half at Game 1 of the NBA finals on Tuesday night in Oklahoma City. Durant scored 36 points in the game.

OKLAHOMA CITY — Kevin Durant showed LeBron James how to play the fourth quarter in the NBA Finals. Durant scored 17 of his 36 points in another nightmarish final period for James and his team, leading a Thunder storm that overwhelmed the Heat and gave Oklahoma City a 105-94 victory over Miami in Game 1 on Tuesday night. Teaming with Russell Westbrook to outscore the Heat in the second half by themselves, Durant struck first in his head-to-head matchup with James, who had seven points in the final quarter and was helpless to stop the league’s three-time scoring champion. See Finals / D5

SAN FRANCISCO — Beaten down at Augusta, now the man to beat at the U.S. Open. The expectations that have followed Tiger Woods this year are a lot like the fairways at The Olympic Club — up, down, often sideways. He couldn’t close out tournaments the way he once did. He lost his putting stroke. His left Achilles tendon might Inside be more of • A look a problem at the than he was layout for letting on. He the U.S. had his worst Open, D4 finish ever at the Masters. He missed a cut. And in the midst of such a gloomy outlook, Woods won by five shots at Bay Hill and delivered an uppercut fist pump at Memorial when he chipped in for birdie to complete a stunning rally for his second win of the year. So when the question came up Tuesday at the U.S. Open — whether Woods had to win a major to end such prognosticating — he all but rolled his eyes. “I think even if I do win a major championship, it will still be, ‘You’re not to 18 yet’ or ‘When will you get to 19?’ It’s always something with you guys,” Woods said. See U.S. Open / D4

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D2

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13, 2012

O  A

SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION Today

Thursday

SOCCER 8:45 a.m.: UEFA European Championship, Denmark vs. Portugal, ESPN. 11:30 a.m.: UEFA European Championship, Netherlands vs. Germany, ESPN. CYCLING 2 p.m.: Tour de Suisse, Stage 5 (same-day tape), NBC Sports Network. BASEBALL 4 p.m.: MLB, Yankees at Braves, ESPN. 7 p.m.: MLB, San Diego Padres at Seattle Mariners, Root Sports. BASKETBALL 5 p.m.: WNBA, Los Angeles Sparks at Connecticut Sun, ESPN2.

SOCCER 8:45 a.m.: UEFA European Championship, Italy vs. Croatia, ESPN2. 11:30 a.m.: UEFA European Championship, Spain vs. Ireland, ESPN2. GOLF 9 a.m.: U.S.. Open, first round, ESPN. Noon: U.S.. Open, first round, NBC. 2 p.m.: U.S. Open, first round, ESPN. CYCLING 2 p.m.: Tour de Suisse, Stage 6 (same-day tape), NBC Sports Network. BASEBALL 5 p.m.: MLB, Arizona Diamondbacks at Texas Rangers or Chicago White Sox at St. Louis Cardinals, MLB Network. 7 p.m.: MLB, San Diego Padres at Seattle Mariners, Root Sports. BASKETBALL 6 p.m.: NBA playoffs, Miami Heat at Oklahoma City Thunder, ABC.

RADIO Thursday BASKETBALL 6 p.m.: NBA playoffs, Miami Heat at Oklahoma City Thunder, KICEAM 940. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

S   B Baseball • Yankees’ Rivera says surgery successful: New York Yankees closer Mariano Rivera said Tuesday’s surgery on his injured right knee “went perfectly” and he is looking forward to beginning his rehabilitation. The 42-year-old career saves leader tore his right anterior cruciate ligament and damaged meniscus in the knee while shagging fly balls in batting practice May 3. A blood clot in his right calf delayed the surgery until Tuesday. Rivera used his Twitter account to tell fans the surgery was a success. • Dodgers extend Ethier: The Los Angeles Dodgers signed outfielder Andre Ethier to a five-year deal through 2017 on Tuesday, keeping him and Matt Kemp together in the middle of the lineup. It’s the team’s first major move under a new ownership group that includes former Los Angeles Lakers star Magic Johnson. Ethier avoided arbitration last winter, agreeing to a $10.95 million contract for this season. He could have tested free agency at season’s end. Ethier leads the National League with 53 RBIs. The 30-year-old right fielder is a two-time All-Star who was batting .287 with 10 home runs going into Tuesday night’s game against the Los Angeles Angels. • Clemens closing arguments focus on key witness: Roger Clemens’ lawyers tore into the prosecutors’ case against the former pitching great during closing arguments Tuesday, attacking the government for bringing the matter to court in the first place and mounting one last assault against Clemens’ chief accuser. “This is outrageous!” said attorney Rusty Hardin, his face reddening as he pounded the podium three times. Both sides received two hours to sum up their arguments before a jury of eight women and four men that will decide whether Clemens lied to Congress in 2008 about performance-enhancing drugs and several related matters. “He chose to lie, he chose to mislead, he chose to provide false statements, to impede Congress’ legitimate investigation,” prosecutor Gil Guerrero said. “Now it’s your turn to hold him accountable on every single count. You are the final umpires here.” Guerrero accused Clemens of coming up with a “cover story” about the injections received from his former strength coach, Brian McNamee. Clemens told Congress the injections were for vitamin B12 and the local anesthetic lidocaine, but McNamee testified that he injected the pitcher with steroids and HGH. • CWS will use video review: For now, only an umpire’s call on whether a home run really is a home run will be subject to video review at the College World Series. NCAA vice president for football and baseball Dennis Poppe said Tuesday that officials would have to think long and hard about adding other situ-

ations that could be reviewed. Division I baseball leaders for several years have discussed the possibility of using instant replay, Poppe said, but didn’t take action until after a home run was wrongly ruled a double at last year’s CWS.

Soccer • U.S. ties in World Cup qualifying: Marco Pappa scored on a free kick in the 83rd minute, giving host Guatemala a 1-1 tie with the United States in a World Cup qualifier on Tuesday night. Clint Dempsey put the United States ahead in the 40th minute. Seeking its seventh straight appearance in soccer’s showcase, the U.S. (1-0-1) tops Group A of North and Central America and the Caribbean on goal difference over Jamaica (1-0-1), which tied 0-0 at Antigua and Barbuda. Guatemala (0-1-1) is last with one point. The top two teams advance to next year’s six-nation regional finals, which will produce three qualifiers for the 2014 tournament in Brazil.

Football • Penn State witness says he saw shower assault: A former Penn State assistant coach whose account led to Joe Paterno’s downfall testified Tuesday that he heard a “skin-on-skin smacking sound” in a campus locker room one night in 2001 and saw something that was “more than my brain could handle.” There was Jerry Sandusky standing naked in the showers behind a boy, slowly moving his hips, Mike McQueary told the jury. He said he had no doubt he was witnessing anal sex. McQueary, one of the star witnesses in the child sexual abuse case against Sandusky, testified that he slammed his locker shut loudly as if to say, “Someone’s here! Break it up!” Then, he said, he went upstairs to his office to try to make sense of what he had seen. Sandusky, 68, is on trial on charges he molested 10 boys over a 15-year period.

Motor sports • IndyCar misses illegal parts on winner’s car: IndyCar CEO Randy Bernard acknowledges that technicians missed the illegal parts on the car Justin Wilson used to win at Texas Motor Speedway last weekend. Wilson was docked five points by IndyCar and Dale Coyne Racing was fined $7,500 on Monday for failing an inspection after the race. IndyCar says that Wilson’s car had unapproved pieces of bodywork fitted to its sidepods. Bernard tells The Associated Press during a stop at the Iowa Speedway says it was simply “human error” to blame for Wilson’s car getting by inspectors before the race. Other drivers say Wilson’s car gained an edge because of the parts. —From wire reports

PREP SPORTS

Yanina Wickmayer (2), Belgium, def. Mariana Duque-Marino, Colombia, 6-3, 6-4. Estrella Cabeza Candela, Spain, def. Laura PousTio, Spain, 3-6, 6-3, 6-3. Lara Arruabarrena-Vecino, Spain, leads Ksenia Pervak (3), Kazakhstan, 0-0 (30-15), susp., rain. Irina-Camelia Begu (6), Romania, leads Kathrin Woerle, Germany, 4-4 (15-0), susp., rain. Yvonne Meusburger, Austria, leads Petra Martic (5), Croatia, 1-0, susp., rain.

IN THE BLEACHERS

Baseball ——— Class 5A All-state teams ——— Player of the year — Andrew Moore, sr., North Eugene Pitcher of the year — Kevin Hamann, sr., Summit Coach of the year — Mike Clopton, Wilson First team Pitchers: Daniel Aranda, sr., Lebanon; Kevin Hamann, sr., Summit; Cody Walker, sr., Hood River Valley, Jake Lessel, sr., Churchill; Jamie Flynn, jr., Ashland. Catchers: Kyle Beam, jr., Hood River Valley; Kruze Mingus, sr., Summit; Infielders: Tommy Lane, jr., Pendleton; Mason Dunning, sr., Putnam; Austin Andrews, jr., Wilson; Andrew Moore, sr., North Eugene; Lane Richards, sr., Pendleton; Joe Balfour, jr., Sherwood. Outfielders: Jimmy Cleary, sr., Corvallis; Bret Bafaro, sr., Liberty; Reese Merriman, sr., Pendelton; Chase Cochran, sr., Crescent Valley; Josh Spencer, sr., Dallas. Utility: J.J. Keim, sr., Corvalis; DH: Scott Schepige, jr., Dallas. Second team Pitchers: Josh Havig, sr., Dallas; Gerhett Moser, jr., Wilson; Kenyan Middleton, sr., Milwaukie; Clayton Gelfand, jr., Wilsonville. Catcher: Bret Moskal, jr., Dallas; Luke Rappe, jr., Lebanon. Infielders: Konner Reddick, sr., Summit; Jackson Soto, so., West Albany; Jonah Koski, jr., Bend; Jacob Dezarn, sr., Churchill; Kendall, Main, sr., Sandy; Ethan Schlecth, sr., Albany. Outfielders: John Carroll, jr., Mountain View; Ryan Delaney, sr., North Eugene; Justin Erlandson, sr., Bend; Eli Skiles, sr., Putnam; Jake Peterson, sr., Cleveland. Utility: Ben Kramer, sr., Bend. DH: Camran Pollick, jr., Hermiston. Honorable mention Taylor Bonawitz, sr., Sherwood; Trent Waggoner, sr., Willamette; Chase Kearney, sr., Churchill; Alex Rose, sr., Liberty; Chris Sampson, sr., Cleveland; Billy Hansen, Ashland; Nolan McCall, so., The Dalles Wahtonka; Kinkade Fast, jr., Dallas; Jon Dailey, sr., Sherwood; Zach Selby, sr., Willamette, Lathan Alger, sr., Pendleton; Jalen Drath, jr., Willamette; Colton Muir, jr., Wilsonville. ——— Class 4A All-state teams ——— Player of the year — Conor Harber, sr., Astoria Coach of the year — Levi Webber, Philomath First team Pitchers: Conor Harber, sr., Astoria; Greg Hurd, sr., Hidden Valley; Shane Groth, sr., Sisters. Catchers: Joey Morgan, so., Sisters; Tony Machuca, sr., Ontario. Infielders: Brady Baker, sr., Ontario; Jake Herkolotz, sr., North Valley; Kody Kuhlman, sr., Klamath Union; Ryan Smith, jr., Siuslaw; Erik Long, sr., Elmira; Jerren Larimer, sr., Crook County. Outfielders: Erich Regan, sr., La Salle; Stephen Coskey, jr., Philomath; Erik Jacobs, sr., La Grande; Jake McGraw, sr., Yamhill-Carlton. Utility: Jake Thompson, jr., Siuslaw. Second team Pitchers: Tyler Jackson, sr., Philomath; Cody Anderson, sr., North Bend; Kyle Palmer, sr., Madras. Catchers: Joe Whisler, jr., Klamath Union; Brandon Calder, sr., Philomath. Infielders: Beau Howard, sr., Mazama; Jackson Northcutt, sr., Philomath; Grayson Partian, jr., Banks; Kole Nakamura, jr., Ontario; Travis Boggs, jr., Elmira; Marco Carmendia, jr., North Valley; Outfielders: Jaime Schmidt, jr., Hidden Valley; D.J. McKenna, sr., South Umpqua; Jordan Weems, so., Sisters; Zach Williamson, sr., North Marion. Utility: Tyler Gulbransen, jr., Hidden Valley. Third team Pitchers: Tanner Alexander, jr., Ontario; Blake Updike, sr., Scappoose; Cameron Reese, sr., South Umpqua. Catchers: Justin Cleveland, sr., Crook County; Jordan Brown, sr., Madras. Infielders: Eric Raya, sr., Scappoose; Paul Revis, jr., Scappoose; Dylan Shuler, jr., McLoughlin, Nicky Blumm, jr., Sisters; Dillon Blankenship, jr., Baker; Kyle Garrison, sr., Hidden Valley. Outfielders: Dillon Smith, sr., Astoria; Kaleb Byers, sr., Philomath; Brandan Hopper, sr., North Marion; Max Benton, sr., Crook County. Utility: Colten Richards, sr., Baker. Honorable mention Cody Crawford, jr., Cascade; Troy Norton, jr., La Salle; Justin Rice, jr., Sweet Home; Zane Sather, sr., Ontario; Steven Parker, jr., North Valley; Sean Hays, jr., La Salle; Nathan Kruryak, jr., Gladstone; Ethan Kane, sr., Astoria; Clay Duryee, jr., North Bend; C.J. Stith, Molalla; Shea Rue, sr., Banks; Jesse Fay, jr., Elmira; Dayton Stafford, sr., Crook County; Dusty Scheider, sr., La Pine; Walter Brattain, so., Philomath; Jeremy White, sr., Sweet Home; Conner Haskell, jr., Cascade; Conner Clack, so., South Umpqua; Trace Webster, sr., Gladstone; Mikael Hill, sr., Philomath; Jack Pfau, sr., Molalla; Joey Bell, sr., Sutherlin; Joey Lefebrue, sr., Brookings-Harbor; Keeton Luther, sr., Newport; Hunter Bidwell, sr., Sweet Home; Dylan Smith, jr., Mazama; Isaac Sanders, sr., Brookings-Harbor; Jake Morris, sr., McLoughlin; Damion Henderson, sr., Sutherlin; Chris McGahan, sr., Klamath Union; Ryan Reeves, jr., Ontario; Donovan Hampton, sr., Central; A.J. Griganti, sr., Brookings-Harbor; Nick Nelson, sr., Seaside; Brandon Cutsforth, jr., Central; Jordan Rogers, sr., La Grande.

MOTOR SPORTS Local MADRAS DRAGSTRIP ——— June 9 Results (ET, MPH, dial) Jr. Thunder — W: Katie Day, 12.10, 50.62, 11.18. High School — W: Casey Ladd, 2006 Halfscale, 11.01, 62.59, 10.94. R/U: Jeffery Taylor, 11.81, 58.59, 11.99. Sportsman — W: James Love, 1970 Buick Grand Sport, 8.42, 75.38, 8.34. R/U: George Fix, 1977 Nova, 8.47, 79.37, 8.35. Semis: Dan Barnes. Pro — W: Annie Hausinger, 1970 Plymouth GTX, 6.98, 94.14, 6.97. R/U: Denny Robbins, 1968 Nova, 6.88, 98.47, 6.90. Semis: Joe Kirkwood. Motorcycle/Snowmobile — W: Buffy Taylor, 1991 Yamaha, 6.78, 100.45, 6.72. R/U: Jeffery Taylor, 1969 Ford, 7,58, 84.75, 7.45. Semis: James Taylor; Mitch Taylor. Jr. Lightning — W: Casey Ladd, 2006 Halfscale, 8.06, 80.36, 8.05. R/U: Dustin Day, 8.45, 74.75, 8.46. Semis: Shelby Smith. Super Pro — W: Tom Stockero, 1967 Camaro, 6.48, 105.14, 6.46. R/U: Gary Ericksen, 1969 Ford, 7.20, 96.57, 7.21 dial. Semis: Jim Lovoi. Jackpot — W: Rob Kennard, 1982 S-10 Chevy, 6.89, 99.78, 6.90. R/U: Jerry Bugge, 1964 Dodge, 7.32, 92.02, 7.28. Semis: Tim Kendall; Fred Lang. June 10 Results (ET, MPH, dial) Jr. Thunder — W: Katie Day, 11.67, 53.76, 11.70. High School — W: Trenton Kropf, 1961 Chev Biscayne, 8.99, 76.53, 8.99. R/U: Jeffery Taylor, 11.93, 59.29, 11.90. Semis: Casey Ladd. Sportsman — W: Dan Barnes, PU, 9.27, 72.70, 9.23. R/U: James Love, 1970 Buick Grand Sport, 8.35, 80.50, 8.37. Semis: Dan Swick. Pro — W: Robert Hensell, 1971 Camaro, 6.99, 97.83, 6.98. R/U: Rob Kennard, 1982 S-10 Chevy, 6.90, 99.56, 6.90. Semis: Larry Holm. Super Pro — W: Rodney Gregg, 1963 Dodger 440, 6.43, 106.89, 6.46. R/U: Tom Stockero, 1967 Camaro, 6.47, 102.74, 6.50. Semis: Don Belcher. Motorcycle/Snowmobile — W: James Taylor, 1985 Honda, 7.70, 92.59, 7.69. R/U: Jeffery Taylor, 7.44, 91.46, 7.45. Semis: Mike Merritt. Jr. Lightning — W: Dustin Day, 8.34, 76.40, 8.34. R/U: Casey Ladd, 2006 Halfscale, 7.95, 81.52, 7.90. Semis: Shelby Smith. Jackpot — W: George Fix, 1977 Nova, 8.41, 79.93, 8.25. R/U: Andy Uppendahl, 1965 Mustang, 6.53, 108.43, 6.54.

BASEBALL WCL WEST COAST LEAGUE ——— League standings East Division W Wenatchee AppleSox 7 Bellingham Bells 7 Kelowna Falcons 3 Walla Walla Sweets 3 West Division W Bend Elks 7 Corvallis Knights 6 Kitsap BlueJackets 4 Cowlitz Black Bears 2 Klamath Falls Gems 1 Tuesday’s Games Bend 6, Walla Walla 4 Corvallis 4, Cowlitz 0 Kelowna 5, Kitsap 2 Bellingham 6, Klamath Falls 1

L 2 3 2 6 L 2 4 8 5 8

Walla Walla 000 000 103 — 4 9 2 Bend 221 000 10x — 6 12 5 Smith, Arlt (3), Anderson (8) and Turner. Chavez, Priestely (4), Birosak (5), Keane (7), Grazzini (9) and Guinn. W — Chavez. L — Smith. HR—Walla Walla: O’Neil.

(x-if necessary) (Best-of-7) ——— FINALS Oklahoma City 1, Miami 0 Tuesday, June 12: Oklahoma City 105, Miami 94 Thursday, June 14: Miami at Oklahoma City, 6 p.m. Sunday, June 17: Oklahoma City at Miami, 5 p.m. Tuesday, June 19: Oklahoma City at Miami, 6 p.m. x-Thursday, June 21: Oklahoma City at Miami, 6 p.m. x-Sunday, June 24: Miami at Oklahoma City, 5 p.m. x-Tuesday, June 26: Miami at Oklahoma City, 6 p.m.

College

Tuesday’s summary

Tuesday’s Summary

Elks 6, Sweets 4

NCAA College World Series Glance At TD Ameritrade Park Omaha Omaha, Neb. All Times PDT Double Elimination x-if necessary ——— Friday, June 15 Game 1 — Stony Brook (52-13) vs. UCLA (47-14), 2 p.m. Game 2 — Arizona (43-17) vs. Florida State (48-15), 6 p.m. Saturday, June 16 Game 3 — Kent State (46-18) vs. Arkansas (44-20), 2 p.m. Game 4 — South Carolina (45-17) vs. Florida (4718), 6 p.m. Sunday, June 17 Game 5 — Game 1 loser vs. Game 2 loser, 2 p.m. Game 6 — Game 1 winner vs. Game 2 winner, 6 p.m. Monday, June 18 Game 7 — Game 3 loser vs. Game 4 loser, 2 p.m. Game 8 — Game 3 winner vs. Game 4 winner, 6 p.m. Tuesday, June 19 Game 9 — Game 5 winner vs. Game 6 loser, 5 p.m. Wednesday, June 20 Game 10 — Game 7 winner vs. Game 8 loser, 5 p.m. Thursday, June 21 Game 11 — Game 6 winner vs. Game 9 winner, 5 p.m. Game 12 — Game 8 winner vs. Game 10 winner, 6 p.m. Friday, June 22 x-Game 13 — Game 6 winner vs. Game 9 winner, 2 p.m. x-Game 14 — Game 8 winner vs. Game 10 winner, 6 p.m. If only one game is necessary, it will start at 5 p.m.

SOCCER MLS MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT ——— Eastern Conference W L T Pts GF D.C. 8 4 3 27 28 New York 8 3 2 26 26 Sporting Kansas City 8 3 1 25 17 Columbus 5 4 3 18 13 Chicago 5 5 3 18 15 New England 5 7 1 16 18 Houston 4 4 4 16 13 Montreal 3 7 3 12 15 Philadelphia 2 7 2 8 8 Toronto FC 1 9 0 3 8 Western Conference W L T Pts GF Real Salt Lake 9 3 2 29 22 San Jose 8 3 3 27 27 Seattle 7 3 3 24 16 Vancouver 6 3 4 22 16 Colorado 6 6 1 19 20 Chivas USA 4 6 3 15 9 Portland 3 5 4 13 12 FC Dallas 3 8 4 13 15 Los Angeles 3 8 2 11 15 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. ——— Saturday’s Games Colorado at Vancouver, 4 p.m. D.C. United at Philadelphia, 4 p.m. FC Dallas at Houston, 4:30 p.m. Columbus at New England, 4:30 p.m. Seattle FC at Montreal, 4:30 p.m. Toronto FC at Sporting Kansas City, 5:30 p.m. Real Salt Lake at Chivas USA, 7:30 p.m. Sunday’s Games New York at Chicago, 2 p.m. Portland at Los Angeles, 4 p.m.

GA 19 18 10 13 17 18 15 21 14 21 GA 14 17 9 15 18 14 15 24 21

World Cup Qualifying North and Central America and the Caribbean Third round Top two in each group advance All Times PDT ——— GROUP A GP W D L GF GA Pts United States 2 1 1 0 4 2 4 Jamaica 2 1 1 0 2 1 4 Guatemala 2 0 1 1 2 3 1 Antigua 2 0 1 1 1 3 1 Friday, June 8 United States 3, Antigua and Barbuda 1 Jamaica 2, Guatemala 1 Tuesday, June 12 At St. John’s, Antigua Antigua 0, Jamaica 0 At Guatemala City Guatemala 1, United States 1 Friday, Sept. 7 Guatemala vs. Antigua Jamaica vs. United States Tuesday, Sept. 11 Antigua vs. Guatemala At Columbus, Ohio United States vs. Jamaica, 5:11 p.m. Friday, Oct. 12 Antigua and Barbuda vs. United States Guatemala vs. Jamaica Tuesday, Oct. 16 Jamaica vs. Antigua United States vs. Guatemala

BASKETBALL NBA NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION NBA Playoff Glance All Times PDT

Thunder 105, Heat 94 MIAMI (94) James 11-24 7-9 30, Battier 6-9 1-2 17, Haslem 2-6 0-0 4, Chalmers 5-7 0-0 12, Wade 7-19 5-5 19, Bosh 4-11 1-2 10, Miller 1-2 0-0 2, Anthony 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 36-78 14-18 94. OKLAHOMA CITY (105) Durant 12-20 8-9 36, Ibaka 5-10 0-1 10, Perkins 2-2 0-0 4, Westbrook 10-24 7-9 27, Sefolosha 2-5 5-6 9, Collison 4-5 0-0 8, Harden 2-6 0-0 5, Fisher 3-5 00 6, Cook 0-0 0-2 0. Totals 40-77 20-27 105. Miami 29 25 19 21 — 94 Oklahoma City 22 25 27 31 — 105 3-Point Goals—Miami 8-19 (Battier 4-6, Chalmers 2-4, Bosh 1-3, James 1-3, Miller 0-1, Wade 0-2), Oklahoma City 5-17 (Durant 4-8, Harden 1-2, Fisher 0-1, Sefolosha 0-2, Westbrook 0-4). Fouled Out— None. Rebounds—Miami 38 (Haslem 11), Oklahoma City 52 (Collison 10). Assists—Miami 20 (Wade 8), Oklahoma City 22 (Westbrook 11). Total Fouls—Miami 19, Oklahoma City 16. Technicals—Battier, Westbrook. A—18,203 (18,203).

Gerry Weber Open Tuesday At Gerry Weber Stadion Halle, Germany Purse: $938,000 (WT250) Surface: Grass-Outdoor Singles First Round Marcel Granollers (6), Spain, def. Mischa Zverev, Germany, 6-4, 6-2. Radek Stepanek, Czech Republic, def. Andreas Seppi (7), Italy, 7-6 (6), 4-6, 7-6 (7). Lukas Lacko, Slovakia, def. Konstantin Kravchuk, Russia, 2-6, 6-2, 6-3. Florian Mayer, Germany, def. Tim Smyczek, United States, 6-4, 6-4. Viktor Troicki, Serbia, def. Benjamin Becker, Germany, 6-2, 7-6 (6). Tommy Haas, Germany, def. Bernard Tomic, Australia, 5-2, retired.

DEALS

WNBA WOMEN’S NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION All Times PDT ——— Eastern Conference W L Pct Chicago 6 1 .857 Connecticut 6 1 .857 Indiana 4 2 .667 Atlanta 3 5 .375 New York 3 6 .333 Washington 1 5 .167 Western Conference W L Pct Minnesota 9 0 1.000 Los Angeles 6 1 .857 San Antonio 3 4 .429 Phoenix 2 5 .286 Seattle 1 6 .143 Tulsa 0 8 .000 Tuesday’s Games No games scheduled Today’s Games Seattle at Chicago, 5 p.m. Los Angeles at Connecticut, 5 p.m.

Queen’s Club Tuesday At The Queen’s Club London Purse: $890,000 (WT250) Surface: Grass-Outdoor Singles First Round Nicolas Mahut, France, def. Guillermo Garcia-Lopez, Spain, 6-4, 6-2. Jamie Baker, Britain, def. Oliver Golding, Britain, 7-6 (1), 6-3. Edouard Roger-Vasselin, France, def. Evgeny Korolev, Kazakhstan, 6-7 (5), 6-2, 6-4. Steve Darcis, Belgium, def. Ruben Ramirez Hidalgo, Spain, 7-6 (2), 7-5. Matthew Ebden, Australia, def. Mathias Bachinger, Germany, 7-6 (5), 6-3. Kevin Anderson (9), South Africa, def. James Ward, Britain, 4-6, 6-3, 6-4. Gilles Muller (14), Luxembourg, def. Liam Broady, Britain, 6-2, 6-1. Ivo Karlovic (16), Croatia, def. Lleyton Hewitt, Australia, 6-3, 6-2. Ryan Sweeting, United States, def. Dmitry Tursunov, Russia, 6-4, 7-6 (6). Grigor Dimitrov, Bulgaria, def. Bobby Reynolds, United States, 6-3, 7-5. Sergiy Stakhovsky, Ukraine, def. Flavio Cipolla, Italy, 6-4, 6-1. Yen-hsun Lu, Taiwan, def. Igor Kunitsyn, Russia, 4-6, 7-6 (4), 6-3. Simone Bolelli, Italy, def. Ernests Gulbis, Latvia, 6-3, 6-4. Sam Querrey, United States, def. Olivier Rochus, Belgium, 6-1, 6-7 (4), 6-4. Xavier Malisse, Belgium, def. Adrian Ungur, Romania, 6-4, 6-4. Alex Bogomolov Jr. (13), Russia, def. Martin Klizan, Slovakia, 6-2, 7-6 (5). Denis Istomin (12), Uzbekistan, def. Kenny de Schepper, France, 6-4, 7-6 (4). Marcos Baghdatis (11), Cyprus, def. Frederico Gil, Portugal, 7-6 (2), 4-6, 6-2. Lukas Rosol, Czech Republic, def. Victor Hanescu, Romania, 6-4, 7-6 (5). Ivan Dodig, Croatia, def. Frank Dancevic, Canada, 6-1, retired. Go Soeda (15), Japan, def. Bjorn Phau, Germany, 6-2, 6-2. Ruben Bemelmans, Belgium, def. Malek Jaziri, Tunisia, 6-4, 1-6, 6-3. David Nalbandian (10), Argentina, def. Vasek Pospisil, Canada, 4-6, 6-2, 6-2. Paolo Lorenzi, Italy, vs. Tatsuma Ito, Japan, 6-7 (8), 6-4, susp., darkness.

Transactions GB — — 1½ 3½ 4 4½ GB — 2 5 6 7 8½

TENNIS Professional AEGON Classic Tuesday At Edgbaston Priory Club Birmingham, England Purse: $220,000 (Intl.) Surface: Grass-Outdoor Singles First Round Melanie Oudin, United States, def. Sorana Cirstea (10), Romania, 3-6, 6-3, 6-2. Tara Moore, Britain, def. Iveta Benesova (11), Czech Republic, 6-1, 6-2. Casey Dellacqua, Australia, def. Garbine Muguruza Blanco, Spain, 6-2, 3-6, 6-2. Michelle Larcher de Brito, Portugal, def. Bojana Jovanovski, Serbia, 3-6, 7-5, 6-4. Anne Keothavong, Britain, def. Tamira Paszek (12), Austria, 6-2, 7-5. Andrea Hlavackova, Czech Republic, def. Michaella Krajicek, Netherlands, 6-2, 6-7 (6), 4-0, retired. Elena Vesnina, Russia, def. Olivia Rogowska, Australia, 6-3, 6-2. Zheng Jie, China, vs. Alla Kudryavtseva, Russia, 6-4, 4-6, 6-3. Urszula Radwanska, Poland, def. Samantha Murray, Britain, 6-4, 6-4. Melanie South, Britain, def. Mirjana Lucic, Croatia, 6-1, 4-6, 6-3. Misaki Doi, Japan, def. Noppawan Lertcheewakarn, Thailand, 6-4, 3-6, 6-3. Melinda Czink, Hungary, def. Anna Tatishvili, Georgia, 7-6 (5), 3-6, 6-3. Laura Robson, Britain, def. Grace Min, United States, 6-4, 6-1. Sesil Karatantcheva, Kazakhstan, def. Tamarine Tanasugarn, Thailand, 6-4, 6-2. Marina Erakovic (9), New Zealand, def. Ayumi Morita, Japan, 5-0, retired. Anastasia Rodionova, Australia, def. Abigail Spears, United States, 7-6 (3), 1-6, 6-1. Stephanie Foretz Gacon, France, def. Eleni Daniilidou (16), Greece, 6-4, 6-2. Heather Watson, Britain, def. Paula Ormaechea, Argentina, 6-4, 3-6, 6-3. Virginie Razzano, France, def. Alberta Brianti, Italy, 6-4, 7-5. Irina Falconi, United States, def. Alexandra Cadantu, Romania, 6-2, 6-0. Timea Babos (14), Hungary, vs. Alison Riske, United States, 6-4, 4-6, 3-3, susp., darkness. Chang Kai-chen, Taiwan, leads Elena Baltacha (15), Britain, 6-4, 2-3, susp., darkness. Nuernberger Gastein Ladies Tuesday At TC Wels 76 Bad Gastein, Austria Purse: $220,000 (Intl.) Surface: Clay-Outdoor Singles First Round Mandy Minella, Luxembourg, def. Ajla Tomljanovic, Croatia, 6-3, 6-4. Alize Cornet (7), France, def. Edina Gallovits-Hall, Romania, 7-5, 7-5. Sarah Gronert, Germany, def. Eva Birnerova, Czech Republic, 6-2, 6-0. Richel Hoogenkamp, Netherlands, def. Julia Goerges (1), Germany, 3-6, 6-3, 6-3. Carla Suarez Navarro (4), Spain, def. Marta Domachowska, Poland, 6-4, 7-5. Sacha Jones, Australia, def. Yuliya Beygelzimer, Ukraine, 4-6, 6-3, 6-1.

BASEBALL American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES—Activated 2B Brian Roberts from the 60-day DL. Transferred OF Nolan Reimold to the 60-day DL. Optioned SS Steve Tolleson to Norfolk (IL). CHICAGO WHITE SOX—Agreed to terms with 1B Keon Barnum, 2B Joey DeMichele, SS Nick Basto, RHP Anthony Bucciferro, 1B Alex Williams, RHP Adam Lopez, OF Kale Kiser, 2B Eric Grabe, RHP Storm Throne, RHP James Hudelson, SS Jake Brown, 3B Corey Thompson and 3B Steve Nikorak and assigned them to Bristol (APPY). Agreed to terms with RHP Chris Beck, RHP Brandon Brennan, RHP Zach Isler, 2B Micah Johnson, RHP Brandon Hardin, 1B Abe Ruiz, 3B Thomas McCarthy, SS Zachary Voight, RHP Cory McGinnis, LHP Zachary Toney and C Zachary Fisher and on minor league contracts and assigned them to Great Falls (NW). CLEVELAND INDIANS—Acquired RHP Esmil Rogers from Colorado for cash considerations. Designated C Luke Carlin for assignment. DETROIT TIGERS—Placed RHP Octavio Dotel on the 15-day DL, retoractive to June 3. Recalled RHP Luke Putkonen from Toledo (IL). KANSAS CITY ROYALS—Activated 2B Chris Getz from the 15-day DL. Optioned 2B Johnny Giavotella to Omaha (PCL). TEXAS RANGERS—Placed RHP Alexi Ogando on the 15-day DL. Recalled LHP Michael Kirkman from Round Rock (PCL). Agreed to terms with OF Lewis Brinson, 3B Joey Gallo, RHP Collin Wiles, OF Jamie Jarmon, OF Nick Williams and RHP Eric Brooks. TORONTO BLUE JAYS—Released OF Vladimir Guerrero from his minor league contract. Optioned INF Yan Gomes and RHP Chad Beck to Las Vegas (PCL). Recalled LHP Aaron Laffey and LHP Evan Crawford from Las Vegas. National League CHICAGO CUBS—Fired hitting coach Rudy Jaramillo. Named minor league hitting coordinator James Rowson interim hitting coach and Tom Beyers interim minor league hitting coordinator. LOS ANGELES DODGERS—Agreed to terms with OF Andre Ethier on a five-year contract through 2017. NEW YORK METS—Agreed to terms with C Kevin Plawecki on a minor league contract. SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS—Agreed to terms with RHP Chris Stratton. WASHINGTON NATIONALS—Agreed to terms with 2B Anthony Renda, OF Brandon Miller, C Spence Kieboom, OF Hayden Jennings, RHP Derek Self, C Craig Manuel, RHP Brian Rauh, 3B Carlos Lopez, LHP Elliott Waterman, OF Jordan Poole, RHP Ronald Pena, RHP Blake Schwartz, RHP David Fischer, 1B Bryan Lippincott, SS James Brooks, C Austin Chubb, RHP Will Hudgins, OF Casey Selsor, RHP Kevin Dicharry, SS Hunter Bailey, RHP Leonard Hollins, RHP Michael Boyden and 2B Mike McQuillan on minor league contract. FOOTBALL National Football League CHICAGO BEARS—Waived CB Donovan Warren. DETROIT LIONS—Signed WR Jarett Dillard. Released OT Quinn Barham. NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS—Claimed TE Jake Ballard off waivers from the N.Y. Giants. Placed TE Brad Herman on injured reserve. NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS—Claimed TE Jake Ballard off waivers from the New York Giants. Placed TE Brad Herman on injured reserve. HOCKEY National Hockey League ST. LOUIS BLUES—Declined to exercise the 2012-13 contract option on Peoria (AHL) coach Jared Bednar. SOCCER Major League Soccer COLORADO RAPIDS—Re-signed D Drew Moor. COLLEGE MICHIGAN STATE—Promoted men’s assistant basketball coach Dwayne Stephens to associate head coach.

FISH COUNT Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Monday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 1,477 169 167 40 The Dalles 1,044 125 43 11 John Day 1,426 124 25 9 McNary 1,167 12 24 2 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Monday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 177,468 9,210 7,225 2,154 The Dalles 128,307 8,126 2,127 990 John Day 115,075 7,362 2,114 1,323 McNary 106,156 4,892 4,895 2,225


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

D3

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL STANDINGS, SCORES AND SCHEDULES

Boxscores Athletics 8, Rockies 5 Oakland J.Weeks 2b Crisp cf Reddick rf S.Smith lf Inge 3b Moss 1b K.Suzuki c Pennington ss Colon p a-Cowgill ph Doolittle p Balfour p R.Cook p Totals

AB 4 4 4 4 3 4 4 4 2 1 0 1 0 35

R 1 0 1 1 2 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 8

H 2 0 0 2 2 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 10

BI 0 0 0 2 2 3 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 8

BB 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

American League SO 1 0 2 1 1 2 1 0 2 0 0 1 0 11

Avg. .228 .165 .267 .265 .229 .235 .219 .209 .000 .244 --.000 ---

East Division Pct GB WCGB .590 — — .574 1 — .574 1 — .500 5½ 4½ .484 6½ 5½ Central Division Pct GB WCGB .557 — — .533 1½ 2½ .459 6 7 .424 8 9 .417 8½ 9½ West Division Pct GB WCGB .581 — — .524 3½ 3 .435 9 8½ .429 9½ 9

National League

New York Baltimore Tampa Bay Toronto Boston

W 36 35 35 31 30

L 25 26 26 31 32

Chicago Cleveland Detroit Kansas City Minnesota

W 34 32 28 25 25

L 27 28 33 34 35

Colorado AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Colvin cf 2 1 1 1 2 0 .304 Scutaro ss 5 1 2 0 0 1 .268 C.Gonzalez lf 5 0 1 0 0 3 .323 Cuddyer rf 5 1 1 1 0 1 .271 Helton 1b 4 2 1 1 1 1 .240 Pacheco 3b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .296 Nelson 2b 4 0 1 1 0 2 .231 Nieves c 3 0 2 1 1 0 .333 Guthrie p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Mat.Reynolds p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 b-E.Young ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .259 Brothers p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Ottavino p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 c-Fowler ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .280 Roenicke p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 35 5 11 5 5 10 Oakland 006 010 100 — 8 10 0 Colorado 400 010 000 — 5 11 0 a-flied out for Colon in the 6th. b-walked for Mat. Reynolds in the 6th. c-struck out for Ottavino in the 8th. LOB—Oakland 4, Colorado 9. 2B—S.Smith 2 (8), Inge (6), Pacheco (8). 3B—Scutaro (3). HR—Moss 2 (3), off Guthrie 2; Pennington (2), off Guthrie; Inge (7), off Brothers; Colvin (7), off Colon; Helton (6), off Colon. DP—Oakland 2; Colorado 1.

Texas Los Angeles Oakland Seattle

W 36 33 27 27

L 26 30 35 36

Oakland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Colon W, 6-6 5 9 5 5 3 4 107 4.21 Doolittle H, 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 17 3.60 Balfour H, 3 2 0 0 0 0 3 25 3.13 R.Cook S, 1-2 1 1 0 0 1 2 21 0.67 Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Guthrie L, 3-5 5 8 7 7 2 5 102 6.91 Mat.Reynolds 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 3.91 Brothers 1 1 1 1 0 3 18 4.64 Ottavino 1 0 0 0 0 2 12 1.69 Roenicke 1 1 0 0 0 0 9 1.91 T—3:07. A—33,635 (50,398).

• Yankees 6, Braves 4: ATLANTA — Alex Rodriguez hit his 23rd career grand slam, matching Hall of Famer Lou Gehrig’s record, and New York scored six runs in the eighth inning to rally for a win over Atlanta. Nick Swisher hit a tiebreaking two-run homer off Cory Gearrin two batters after Rodriguez connected against Jonny Venters. • Nationals 4, Blue Jays 2: TORONTO — Bryce Harper homered off the restaurant in center field, Danny Espinosa added a two-run blast, and Washington beat Toronto to extend its winning streak to five games. • Red Sox 2, Marlins 1: MIAMI — Clay Buchholz outpitched Mark Buehrle, and Boston snapped a fourgame losing streak with a victory over Miami. The game was scoreless until Boston’s Kelly Shoppach hit an RBI double in the seventh inning and came home on a single by Mike Aviles. • Mets 11, Rays 2: ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Chris Young settled down after a shaky first inning to get his first win in more than a year and New York beat Tampa Bay. Young allowed nine hits over 5 2⁄3 innings, walked two and struck out four in his second major league outing since returning from shoulder surgery that sidelined him most of last season. • Reds 7, Indians 1: CINCINNATI — Johnny Cueto allowed only one runner to reach second base during his second complete game of the season, and Joey Votto hit a two-run homer to lead Cincinnati over Cleveland. • Orioles 8, Pirates 6: BALTIMORE — Brian Roberts returned from a 13-month layoff to get three hits and an RBI, and Baltimore homered three times in a victory against Pittsburgh. • Royals 2, Brewers 1: KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Billy Butler drove in the go-ahead run in the eighth inning, and the Royals got a superb start from Luis Mendoza to spoil Zack Greinke’s return to Kansas City with a win over Milwaukee.

Twins 11, Phillies 7 Philadelphia Rollins ss Pierre lf a-Mayberry ph-lf Pence rf Thome dh Victorino cf Wigginton 1b Ruiz c Fontenot 3b M.Martinez 2b Totals

AB 5 2 2 4 4 5 5 4 5 4 40

R 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 1 2 7

H 4 0 0 0 2 1 0 2 2 3 14

BI 2 0 1 0 2 0 1 0 0 1 7

BB 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 4

SO 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 4

Avg. .251 .319 .221 .276 .270 .252 .254 .350 .341 .444

Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Span cf 2 3 1 1 3 0 .286 Revere rf 5 0 3 2 0 1 .340 Mauer c 4 0 2 2 1 1 .305 Willingham lf 5 1 1 1 0 1 .287 Morneau 1b 5 0 1 0 0 2 .246 Doumit dh 5 2 3 0 0 1 .268 1-Mastroianni pr-dh 0 0 0 0 0 0 .211 Plouffe 3b 5 3 3 3 0 0 .231 Dozier ss 5 0 0 0 0 2 .227 J.Carroll 2b 4 2 3 2 0 0 .255 Totals 40 11 17 11 4 8 Philadelphia 000 403 000 — 7 14 1 Minnesota 140 121 20x — 11 17 0 a-grounded out for Pierre in the 6th. 1-ran for Doumit in the 8th. E—Pence (3). LOB—Philadelphia 10, Minnesota 9. 2B—Rollins 2 (11), Ruiz (13), Mauer (14), Morneau (11), Doumit (8), Plouffe (7), J.Carroll (9). HR—Span (2), off K.Kendrick; Plouffe (10), off K.Kendrick; Willingham (12), off Savery. DP—Minnesota 1. Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA K.Kendrick L, 2-6 4 8 6 6 2 2 77 5.08 Savery 2 5 3 3 0 3 37 4.12 Rosenberg 2-3 2 2 2 0 2 18 21.60 Diekman 1-3 1 0 0 2 1 20 4.50 Qualls 1 1 0 0 0 0 16 4.68 Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Blackburn W, 3-4 5 8 4 4 2 1 95 7.68 Duensing 1-3 2 3 3 1 1 22 3.48 Al.Burnett H, 3 2-3 1 0 0 1 0 11 2.30 Burton H, 10 1 2 0 0 0 0 16 3.65 Perkins 1 1 0 0 0 2 14 3.51 Capps 1 0 0 0 0 0 13 2.96 T—3:15. A—32,622 (39,500).

Cubs 4, Tigers 3 Detroit AB A.Jackson cf 4 Boesch rf 4 Coke p 0 Mi.Cabrera 3b 4 Fielder 1b 4 D.Young lf 4 Jh.Peralta ss 3 Laird c 4 Worth 2b 2 a-Berry ph-rf 1 Scherzer p 1 b-R.Santiago ph-2b 2 Totals 33

R 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 3

H 1 1 0 1 1 2 0 0 1 0 0 1 8

BI 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 3

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 2

SO 2 2 0 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 9

Avg. .322 .240 --.316 .315 .259 .257 .299 .196 .286 .000 .216

Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Campana cf 5 0 2 0 0 0 .280 S.Castro ss 5 0 0 0 0 3 .302 DeJesus rf 4 1 1 0 1 0 .272 A.Soriano lf 3 0 1 0 1 1 .276 Camp p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --LaHair 1b 3 1 0 0 1 3 .304 Clevenger c 3 1 1 0 1 1 .281 Barney 2b 3 1 1 3 1 0 .269 I.Stewart 3b 2 0 0 0 2 2 .201 Maholm p 3 0 0 0 0 2 .045 C.Coleman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Russell p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Marmol p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Re.Johnson ph-lf 1 0 1 0 0 0 .294 Totals 32 4 7 3 7 12 Detroit 000 000 300 — 3 8 2 Chicago 010 002 01x — 4 7 0 a-walked for Worth in the 7th. b-singled for Scherzer in the 7th. c-singled for Marmol in the 8th. E—Jh.Peralta 2 (4). LOB—Detroit 6, Chicago 11. 2B—D.Young (13), DeJesus (13), Barney (14). SB—Campana 3 (21), Barney (4). DP—Chicago 1. Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Scherzer 6 5 3 3 5 8 116 5.76 Coke L, 1-3 2 2 1 0 2 4 50 4.10 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Maholm 6 6 2 2 1 7 88 4.91 Coleman BS, 1-1 1-3 2 1 1 1 0 11 4.80 Russell 1 0 0 0 0 2 16 2.20 Marmol W, 1-2 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 10 6.48 Camp S, 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 0 18 2.76 Maholm pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. T—3:15. A—41,164 (41,009).

White Sox 6, Cardinals 1 Chicago De Aza cf Beckham 2b A.Dunn lf Crain p Reed p Konerko 1b 1-Lillibridge pr-1b Rios rf Pierzynski c Al.Ramirez ss O.Hudson 3b Quintana p N.Jones p a-Viciedo ph Thornton p Jor.Danks lf Totals

AB 5 4 4 0 0 4 0 4 4 4 4 1 0 1 0 1 36

R 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

H 1 1 1 0 0 3 0 0 3 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 11

BI 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 6

BB 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2

SO 2 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 7

Avg. .305 .236 .227 ----.373 .189 .293 .297 .220 .186 .000 --.262 --.500

St. Louis Furcal ss Y.Molina c

AB R H BI BB SO Avg. 4 0 0 0 0 1 .299 4 0 1 0 0 0 .329

Tuesday’s Games Baltimore 8, Pittsburgh 6 Washington 4, Toronto 2 Boston 2, Miami 1 Cincinnati 7, Cleveland 1 N.Y. Mets 11, Tampa Bay 2 N.Y. Yankees 6, Atlanta 4 Texas 9, Arizona 1

L10 8-2 6-4 6-4 4-6 3-7

Str Home Away W-5 19-12 17-13 W-3 17-14 18-12 L-1 19-12 16-14 L-2 16-14 15-17 W-1 14-19 16-13

L10 5-5 5-5 4-6 4-6 7-3

Str Home Away W-1 16-18 18-9 L-1 16-16 16-12 L-1 13-16 15-17 W-1 9-20 16-14 W-1 12-18 13-17

L10 5-5 6-4 5-5 4-6

Str Home Away W-2 16-11 20-15 L-1 16-14 17-16 W-1 13-16 14-19 L-3 10-16 17-20

Washington Atlanta New York Miami Philadelphia

W 37 34 33 32 29

L 23 28 29 30 34

Cincinnati Pittsburgh St. Louis Milwaukee Houston Chicago

W 33 32 31 28 26 21

L 27 28 31 33 35 40

Los Angeles San Francisco Arizona Colorado San Diego

W 40 35 30 24 21

L 23 27 31 36 41

East Division Pct GB WCGB .617 — — .548 4 — .532 5 1 .516 6 2 .460 9½ 5½ Central Division Pct GB WCGB .550 — — .533 1 1 .500 3 3 .459 5½ 5½ .426 7½ 7½ .344 12½ 12½ West Division Pct GB WCGB .635 — — .565 4½ — .492 9 3½ .400 14½ 9 .339 18½ 13

Today’s Games Washington (Strasburg 7-1) at Toronto (Drabek 4-6), 9:37 a.m. Pittsburgh (Correia 2-5) at Baltimore (Matusz 5-6), 4:05 p.m. Boston (Doubront 6-3) at Miami (Nolasco 6-4), 4:10 p.m. Cleveland (D.Lowe 7-4) at Cincinnati (Latos 4-2), 4:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Kuroda 5-6) at Atlanta (T.Hudson 4-2), 4:10 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Dickey 9-1) at Tampa Bay (Price 8-3), 4:10 p.m. Arizona (Miley 7-2) at Texas (M.Harrison 8-3), 5:05 p.m.

Chicago Cubs 4, Detroit 3 Kansas City 2, Milwaukee 1 Minnesota 11, Philadelphia 7 Chicago White Sox 6, St. Louis 1 Oakland 8, Colorado 5 L.A. Dodgers 5, L.A. Angels 2 San Diego 5, Seattle 4 San Francisco 6, Houston 3

L10 8-2 6-4 4-6 3-7 1-9

Str Home Away W-5 18-10 19-13 L-3 14-14 20-14 W-1 19-12 14-17 L-1 17-17 15-13 L-3 12-19 17-15

L10 5-5 7-3 4-6 5-5 4-6 3-7

Str Home Away W-1 18-13 15-14 L-1 19-11 13-17 L-2 14-14 17-17 L-1 16-17 12-16 L-1 18-14 8-21 W-2 13-15 8-25

L10 7-3 7-3 7-3 3-7 4-6

Str Home Away W-1 22-10 18-13 W-1 20-13 15-14 L-1 15-16 15-15 L-6 15-19 9-17 W-1 14-20 7-21

Detroit (Porcello 3-4) at Chicago Cubs (Garza 2-4), 5:05 p.m. Milwaukee (Wolf 2-5) at Kansas City (Hochevar 3-7), 5:10 p.m. Philadelphia (Hamels 8-3) at Minnesota (Walters 2-1), 5:10 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Peavy 6-1) at St. Louis (Lynn 9-2), 5:15 p.m. Oakland (Milone 6-5) at Colorado (Outman 0-2), 5:40 p.m. L.A. Angels (C.Wilson 7-4) at L.A. Dodgers (Eovaldi 0-2), 7:10 p.m. San Diego (Marquis 0-1) at Seattle (Noesi 2-6), 7:10 p.m. Houston (Happ 4-6) at San Francisco (M.Cain 7-2), 7:15 p.m.

MLB roundup

Holliday lf 4 1 2 0 0 1 .279 Beltran rf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .289 Craig 1b 4 0 2 1 0 1 .352 Freese 3b 4 0 2 0 0 1 .271 Greene 2b 4 0 2 0 0 1 .217 S.Robinson cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .273 Wainwright p 2 0 1 0 0 0 .071 b-Chambers ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .207 Rzepczynski p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Boggs p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Salas p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 35 1 11 1 0 7 Chicago 020 000 040 — 6 11 0 St. Louis 000 001 000 — 1 11 0 a-struck out for N.Jones in the 7th. b-struck out for Wainwright in the 7th. 1-ran for Konerko in the 8th. LOB—Chicago 5, St. Louis 7. 2B—De Aza (11), Jor.Danks (1), Y.Molina (15), Holliday (10), Craig (7). 3B—O.Hudson (2). HR—A.Dunn (21), off Rzepczynski; Pierzynski (11), off Boggs. DP—Chicago 3; St. Louis 1. Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP Quintana W, 2-1 5 1-3 10 1 1 0 4 76 N.Jones H, 3 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 5 Thornton H, 10 1 0 0 0 0 1 19 Crain 1 1 0 0 0 1 12 Reed 1 0 0 0 0 1 14 St. Louis IP H R ER BB SO NP Wainwright L, 5-7 7 5 2 2 2 7 99 Rzepczynski 1-3 3 2 2 0 0 14 Boggs 2-3 2 2 2 0 0 12 Salas 1 1 0 0 0 0 16 T—2:40. A—40,972 (43,975).

ERA 1.98 2.32 3.04 1.96 4.35 ERA 4.75 5.48 2.63 5.30

Rangers 9, Diamondbacks 1 Arizona G.Parra lf Bloomquist ss J.Upton rf Kubel dh Goldschmidt 1b M.Montero c C.Young cf A.Hill 2b J.Bell 3b Totals

AB 3 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 30

R 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1

H 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 4

BI 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1

BB 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 0 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 7

Avg. .269 .297 .245 .293 .288 .250 .265 .277 .167

Texas AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Kinsler 2b 5 1 3 1 0 1 .280 Andrus ss 5 1 1 0 0 0 .292 Hamilton lf 5 0 1 1 0 2 .335 Beltre 3b 4 1 2 0 1 1 .300 Mi.Young dh 5 2 2 0 0 1 .286 Dav.Murphy rf 5 1 3 2 0 1 .263 Torrealba c 4 1 1 0 1 1 .232 Moreland 1b 4 1 2 2 0 0 .283 Gentry cf 3 1 1 2 0 0 .340 Totals 40 9 16 8 2 7 Arizona 000 000 010 — 1 4 0 Texas 100 005 21x — 9 16 0 LOB—Arizona 3, Texas 10. 2B—Bloomquist (11), Kinsler (22), Dav.Murphy (10), Moreland (7), Gentry (5). 3B—Andrus (5). HR—M.Montero (5), off Lewis; Dav.Murphy (6), off I.Kennedy. DP—Texas 1. Arizona IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA I.Kennedy L, 5-6 5 2-3 10 6 6 1 4 95 4.32 Ziegler 2-3 2 2 2 0 0 12 2.63 Zagurski 2-3 1 0 0 1 2 20 4.50 Breslow 1 3 1 1 0 1 27 2.93 Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lewis W, 5-5 9 4 1 1 1 7 105 3.13 T—2:37. A—39,140 (48,194).

Royals 2, Brewers 1 Milwaukee Hart 1b Aoki rf

AB R H BI BB SO Avg. 4 0 1 0 0 2 .253 3 0 0 0 0 0 .293

Braun lf Ar.Ramirez 3b 2-C.Gomez pr Green dh R.Weeks 2b Ransom ss a-Kottaras ph M.Maldonado c b-Conrad ph Morgan cf Totals

4 3 0 4 3 3 1 3 1 2 31

• Rangers 9, Diamondbacks 1: ARLINGTON, Texas — Colby Lewis retired the first 16 batters and finished with a four-hitter, leading Texas over Arizona. Lewis (5-5) struck out seven and walked one as Texas ended Arizona’s five-game winning streak. • White Sox 6, Cardinals 1: ST. LOUIS — A.J. Pierzynski hit a two-run homer, rookie left-hander Jose Quintana allowed one run over 5 1⁄3 innings and the streaking Chicago White Sox beat St. Louis. • Twins 11, Phillies 7: MINNEAPOLIS — Trevor Plouffe had a homer, a double and three RBIs to lead Minnesota past Philadelphia. Ben Revere and Jamey Carroll each had three hits and two RBIs, and Josh Willingham also homered for the Twins, who have won 10 of 13. • Cubs 4, Tigers 3: CHICAGO — Darwin Barney had three RBIs, and the Chicago Cubs used shortstop Jhonny Peralta’s two throwing errors in the eighth inning to push across the winning run in a victory over Detroit. • Athletics 8, Rockies 5: DENVER — Bartolo Colon settled down after a rough start, Brandon Moss hit two home runs, including a towering shot off the facing of the third deck, and Oakland beat Colorado in the first meeting between the teams in three years. • Dodgers 5, Angels 2: LOS ANGELES — Former Angel Juan Rivera hit a three-run home run, and Andre Ethier added his 500th career RBI in the eighth inning, helping the Dodgers rally to beat the Angels and end their 10-game road winning streak. • Padres 5, Mariners 4: SEATTLE — Clayton Richards pitched seven strong innings, Everth Cabrera had an RBI triple in a four-run sixth and San Diego hung on to top Seattle. • Giants 6, Astros 3: SAN FRANCISCO — Madison Bumgarner had a season-high 12 strikeouts and hit his first major league home run to lead San Francisco over Houston in the lone National League game.

0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 5 1 3 8

.310 .255 .258 .230 .166 .219 .236 .216 .079 .227

Kansas City AB R H BI BB SO Avg. A.Gordon lf 4 2 2 1 0 0 .248 Getz 2b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .279 Butler dh 4 0 2 1 0 2 .298 1-Maier pr-dh 0 0 0 0 0 0 .190 Hosmer 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .219 Francoeur rf 4 0 2 0 0 1 .272 Moustakas 3b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .272 A.Escobar ss 3 0 1 0 0 0 .288 Dyson cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .254 Quintero c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .224 Totals 32 2 9 2 0 9 Milwaukee 000 000 100 — 1 5 0 Kansas City 100 000 01x — 2 9 2 a-struck out for Ransom in the 9th. b-grounded into a fielder’s choice for M.Maldonado in the 9th. 1-ran for Butler in the 8th. 2-ran for Ar.Ramirez in the 9th. E—Getz (2), Moustakas (8). LOB—Milwaukee 7, Kansas City 7. 2B—A.Gordon (18), Moustakas (15). HR—A.Gordon (5), off Greinke. SB—C.Gomez (6). DP—Kansas City 1. Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Greinke 7 6 1 1 0 8 105 2.96 Rodriguez L, 0-4 1 3 1 1 0 1 15 4.50 Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Mendoza 6 1 1 1 2 4 74 4.89 Crow BS, 2-3 1 1 0 0 0 1 14 2.96 G.Holland W, 2-2 1 1 0 0 1 1 21 4.05 Broxton S, 15-17 1 2 0 0 0 2 23 1.52 Mendoza pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. T—2:36. A—24,258 (37,903).

Orioles 8, Pirates 6 Pittsburgh Presley lf Walker 2b A.McCutchen cf McGehee 1b Hague dh P.Alvarez 3b Tabata rf Barajas c Barmes ss Totals

AB 4 5 4 3 4 4 4 4 4 36

R 2 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 6

H 1 2 1 2 1 0 2 0 1 10

BI 0 3 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 6

BB 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 3

SO 1 1 1 0 1 2 1 1 0 8

Avg. .235 .278 .324 .215 .211 .195 .226 .232 .193

Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg. B.Roberts 2b 4 0 3 1 0 1 .750 Hardy ss 5 2 2 1 0 0 .251 C.Davis dh 5 1 2 2 0 0 .301 Ad.Jones cf 5 2 4 2 0 0 .310 Wieters c 4 0 0 0 1 0 .250 Betemit 3b 2 0 0 0 1 2 .217 a-Andino ph-3b 0 0 0 0 1 0 .243 Mar.Reynolds 1b 4 1 2 2 0 1 .215 Pearce lf 4 1 1 0 0 0 .235 En.Chavez rf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .171 1-Flaherty pr-rf 1 1 0 0 0 0 .179 Totals 37 8 15 8 3 4 Pittsburgh 100 001 202 — 6 10 2 Baltimore 021 014 00x — 8 15 1 a-walked for Betemit in the 7th. 1-ran for En.Chavez in the 6th. E—Barmes (8), Resop (3), Ad.Jones (5). LOB— Pittsburgh 7, Baltimore 9. 2B—Presley (6), Walker (11), Ad.Jones (11). HR—McGehee (2), off W.Chen; Walker (4), off Gregg; Mar.Reynolds (4), off Lincoln; Ad.Jones (18), off Lincoln; C.Davis (11), off Resop. SB—A.McCutchen (12), Tabata (7).

DP—Pittsburgh 2. Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lincoln L, 3-2 4 1-3 9 4 4 1 3 87 3.15 J.Cruz 2-3 0 0 0 1 1 16 2.01 Resop 1 3 4 3 0 0 24 4.15 Slaten 2 3 0 0 1 0 38 0.00 Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA W.Chen W, 6-2 6 1-3 8 4 4 2 4 103 3.68 Ayala 1 2-3 1 0 0 0 3 23 1.82 Gregg 1-3 1 2 2 1 0 11 4.58 Ji.Johnson S, 19 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 6 1.26 T—3:22. A—15,618 (45,971).

Mets 11, Rays 2 New York Nieuwenhuis cf Valdespin dh D.Wright 3b Duda rf Dan.Murphy 2b I.Davis 1b Bay lf Thole c Quintanilla ss Totals

AB 4 5 4 5 5 4 5 5 4 41

R 3 2 1 1 1 1 0 0 2 11

H 3 2 1 2 1 2 0 1 2 14

BI 0 4 0 1 2 3 0 0 0 10

BB 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 3

SO 0 0 0 0 3 1 1 0 1 6

Avg. .295 .184 .352 .266 .283 .174 .182 .269 .333

Tampa Bay AB R H BI BB SO Avg. De.Jennings lf 5 0 0 0 0 0 .257 C.Pena 1b 3 1 0 0 2 1 .195 B.Upton cf 5 1 2 0 0 0 .286 Joyce rf 4 0 3 0 0 0 .293 Matsui dh 3 0 1 1 1 0 .179 Rhymes 3b 2 0 0 1 0 1 .241 a-Sutton ph-3b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .237 J.Molina c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .188 E.Johnson ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .269 S.Rodriguez 2b 3 0 2 0 1 0 .225 Totals 34 2 9 2 4 5 New York 100 020 620 — 11 14 0 Tampa Bay 200 000 000 — 2 9 2 a-struck out for Rhymes in the 7th. E—J.Molina (3), E.Johnson (7). LOB—New York 6, Tampa Bay 10. 2B—Nieuwenhuis (10), Valdespin (3), S.Rodriguez (8). HR—I.Davis (6), off Howell. SB—Valdespin (2), D.Wright (7). DP—Tampa Bay 1. New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA C.Young W, 1-0 5 2-3 9 2 2 2 4 106 3.38 Rauch H, 6 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 2 4.81 Byrdak 2-3 0 0 0 2 0 17 3.63 Batista 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 3 3.45 El.Ramirez 1 0 0 0 0 0 12 10.80 F.Francisco 1 0 0 0 0 0 8 5.33 Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cobb L, 2-3 6 2-3 7 6 5 3 6 109 4.70 Howell 1-3 3 3 3 0 0 21 5.50 C.Ramos 2 4 2 2 0 0 37 2.40 T—3:18. A—17,334 (34,078).

Yankees 6, Braves 4 New York Jeter ss Granderson cf Teixeira 1b Al.Rodriguez 3b Cano 2b Swisher rf An.Jones lf 1-Wise pr-lf C.Stewart c b-Er.Chavez ph Rapada p R.Soriano p Sabathia p a-Martin ph-c Totals

AB 5 5 2 5 4 4 3 0 3 1 0 0 2 2 36

R 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

H 2 2 0 1 1 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 9

BI 0 0 0 4 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

BB 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

SO 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 6

Avg. .316 .254 .250 .276 .299 .250 .224 .125 .245 .261 ----.000 .208

Atlanta Bourn cf

AB R H BI BB SO Avg. 5 1 1 0 0 2 .317

Prado lf 5 1 1 0 0 0 .318 McCann c 5 1 2 0 0 2 .239 Uggla 2b 3 1 1 0 2 1 .265 M.Diaz rf 3 0 1 3 0 0 .254 Heyward rf 1 0 0 1 0 0 .245 C.Jones 3b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .306 F.Freeman 1b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .250 Simmons ss 3 0 2 0 1 0 .257 Minor p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .042 Venters p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Gearrin p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-D.Ross ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .241 C.Martinez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 36 4 10 4 3 9 New York 000 000 060 — 6 9 0 Atlanta 300 000 100 — 4 10 0 a-flied out for Sabathia in the 8th. b-flied out for C.Stewart in the 8th. c-lined out for Gearrin in the 8th. 1-ran for An.Jones in the 8th. LOB—New York 7, Atlanta 9. 2B—Swisher (17), McCann 2 (7), Uggla (14), M.Diaz (4), Simmons (2). HR—Al.Rodriguez (10), off Venters; Swisher (10), off Gearrin. SB—Wise (4), Bourn (17). New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Sabathia W, 8-3 7 10 4 4 2 6 109 3.80 Rapada H, 5 1 0 0 0 1 1 19 3.50 Soriano S, 10-11 1 0 0 0 0 2 12 2.01 Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Minor 7 1-3 5 1 1 1 4 100 6.01 Venters L, 3-3 0 3 4 4 1 0 19 4.50 Gearrin 2-3 1 1 1 0 1 18 3.38 C.Martinez 1 0 0 0 1 1 21 4.13 Venters pitched to 4 batters in the 8th. T—3:04. A—41,452 (49,586).

Red Sox 2, Marlins 1 Boston AB R Podsednik cf 4 0 Pedroia 2b 4 0 Youkilis 1b 3 0 Sweeney rf 0 0 Middlebrooks 3b 4 1 Ad.Gonzalez rf-1b 3 0 Shoppach c 4 1 Aviles ss 4 0 D.McDonald lf 4 0 Buchholz p 2 0 Padilla p 0 0 b-Ortiz ph 1 0 Aceves p 0 0 Totals 33 2

H 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 1 2 0 0 0 0 6

BI 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 2

BB 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 5

Avg. .370 .273 .219 .308 .300 .260 .280 .259 .200 .000 .000 .301 ---

Miami AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Reyes ss 4 0 2 0 0 0 .278 Infante 2b 3 0 2 0 1 1 .301 H.Ramirez 3b 4 0 2 0 0 1 .258 Stanton rf 4 0 0 0 0 4 .288 Morrison lf 4 1 2 1 0 1 .235 1-Ruggiano pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .400 G.Sanchez 1b 4 0 0 0 0 3 .195 Coghlan cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .140 J.Buck c 3 0 0 0 1 0 .163 Buehrle p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .063 Cishek p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-Dobbs ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .299 Mujica p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Choate p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 33 1 8 1 2 12 Boston 000 000 200 — 2 6 0 Miami 000 000 100 — 1 8 2 a-struck out for Cishek in the 8th. b-struck out for Padilla in the 9th. 1-ran for Morrison in the 9th. E—Infante (6), H.Ramirez (3). LOB—Boston 7, Miami 7. 2B—Shoppach 2 (8). 3B—Reyes (5). HR—Morrison (5), off Buchholz. DP—Boston 1; Miami 1. Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Buchholz W, 7-2 7 5 1 1 2 9 103 5.38 Padilla H, 14 1 2 0 0 0 2 24 4.50 Aceves S, 15-18 1 1 0 0 0 1 14 4.83 Miami IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Buehrle L, 5-7 7 5 2 2 1 4 96 3.41 Cishek 1 0 0 0 0 0 16 1.95 Mujica 2-3 1 0 0 0 0 14 4.28 Choate 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 5 0.48 T—2:55. A—29,326 (37,442).

Nationals 4, Blue Jays 2 Washington Lombardozzi lf Harper rf Zimmerman 3b LaRoche 1b Morse dh Desmond ss Espinosa 2b Ankiel cf J.Solano c Totals

AB 4 4 4 4 4 3 4 4 3 34

R 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 4

H 1 3 0 1 1 0 2 0 2 10

BI 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 4

BB 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1

SO 0 0 2 1 0 1 1 1 0 6

Avg. .286 .307 .239 .261 .200 .266 .233 .225 .400

Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Lawrie 3b 3 1 1 0 1 1 .275 Rasmus cf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .248 Bautista rf 2 1 2 2 2 0 .235 Encarnacion 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .284 K.Johnson 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .250 Y.Escobar ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .246 Cooper dh 2 0 0 0 1 0 .302 a-Arencibia ph-dh 1 0 0 0 0 0 .227 R.Davis lf 3 0 0 0 1 3 .240 Mathis c 3 0 0 0 0 2 .188 b-Vizquel ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .208 Totals 31 2 5 2 5 8 Washington 001 200 100 — 4 10 0 Toronto 000 020 000 — 2 5 0 b-popped out for Mathis in the 9th. LOB—Washington 4, Toronto 8. 2B—LaRoche (15), Espinosa (14), Bautista (8). HR—Harper (7), off H.Alvarez; Espinosa (6), off H.Alvarez; J.Solano (1), off H.Alvarez; Bautista (18), off Wang. SB—Desmond (8), Bautista (4). DP—Toronto 2. Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Wang W, 2-2 5 4 2 2 5 5 95 4.67 Detwiler H, 1 1 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 15 3.67 Stammen H, 3 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 13 1.78 S.Burnett H, 11 1 0 0 0 0 0 6 1.29 Clippard S, 9-10 1 0 0 0 0 2 14 2.22 Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA H.Alvarez L, 3-6 7 9 4 4 0 3 101 3.87 Oliver 1 1 0 0 0 2 11 1.64 Frasor 2-3 0 0 0 1 1 22 3.97 E.Crawford 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 8 7.04 T—2:52. A—22,538 (49,260).

Reds 7, Indians 1 Cleveland Choo rf A.Cabrera ss Kipnis 2b C.Santana c Brantley cf Damon lf Kotchman 1b Sipp p Accardo p Chisenhall 3b J.Gomez p J.Smith p Jo.Lopez 1b Totals

AB 4 4 4 4 4 3 3 0 0 3 2 0 1 32

R 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

H 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 6

BI 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 1 0 0 2 0 1 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 7

Avg. .271 .291 .284 .225 .286 .184 .215 ----.216 .500 --.260

Cincinnati AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Heisey cf 4 2 2 0 0 0 .270 Valdez ss 5 1 3 1 0 1 .226 Votto 1b 4 1 2 3 1 0 .357 B.Phillips 2b 5 0 2 0 0 0 .274 Bruce rf 4 0 0 1 0 1 .260 Frazier 3b 3 0 1 0 1 1 .277 Ludwick lf 3 1 1 0 1 1 .206 Hanigan c 3 1 1 0 1 0 .287 Cueto p 4 1 1 0 0 1 .083 Totals 35 7 13 5 4 5 Cleveland 100 000 000 — 1 6 2 Cincinnati 001 010 23x — 7 13 0 E—Choo (1), C.Santana (5). LOB—Cleveland 4, Cincinnati 10. 2B—Choo (17), Frazier (9). HR—Votto (11), off Sipp. SB—Heisey (2). DP—Cleveland 1. Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA J.Gomez L, 4-5 5 6 2 1 4 2 92 4.71 J.Smith 1 1 1 1 0 1 11 3.46 Sipp 1 1 1 1 0 2 16 6.65 Accardo 1 5 3 3 0 0 23 3.95 Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cueto W, 7-3 9 6 1 1 0 7 122 2.46 J.Smith pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. T—2:41. A—24,758 (42,319).

Giants 6, Astros 3 Houston Altuve 2b Bixler rf Lowrie ss J.D.Martinez lf

AB 4 4 4 4

R 1 0 0 0

H 1 2 0 0

BI 0 2 0 0

BB 0 0 0 0

SO 1 1 3 1

Avg. .325 .250 .284 .230

Maxwell cf c-Schafer ph C.Johnson 3b M.Downs 1b J.Castro c Norris p D.Carpenter p Lyon p a-Bogusevic ph W.Wright p d-C.Snyder ph e-Wallace ph Totals

3 0 4 4 4 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 35

0 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 7 3 1 13

.229 .246 .284 .167 .261 .182 .500 --.228 .000 .194 .385

San Francisco AB R H BI BB SO Avg. G.Blanco cf 4 1 0 0 1 1 .276 Theriot 2b 5 0 0 0 0 2 .252 Me.Cabrera lf 4 0 2 1 0 1 .366 Posey c 3 1 1 0 1 1 .291 Sandoval 3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .292 Arias 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .235 Schierholtz rf 2 2 2 0 1 0 .261 Belt 1b 3 1 1 2 1 0 .227 B.Crawford ss 3 0 2 2 1 1 .226 Bumgarner p 3 1 1 1 0 0 .125 Romo p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Burriss ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .215 Hensley p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Ja.Lopez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --S.Casilla p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 32 6 9 6 5 9 Houston 001 000 011 — 3 7 1 San Francisco 001 200 12x — 6 9 1 a-singled for Lyon in the 8th. b-struck out for Romo in the 8th. c-walked for Maxwell in the 9th. d-was announced for W.Wright in the 9th. e-flied out for C.Snyder in the 9th. E—J.Castro (4), B.Crawford (11). LOB—Houston 6, San Francisco 8. 2B—Bixler (1), J.Castro (7). HR—Bumgarner (1), off Norris; Belt (1), off W.Wright. SB—Altuve (11), Bixler (3), C.Johnson (3), G.Blanco (7). DP—Houston 1 (M.Downs). Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Norris L, 5-4 3 1-3 3 3 3 3 5 80 4.81 D.Carpenter 2 2-3 2 0 0 1 1 36 4.68 Lyon 1 1 1 1 1 2 32 2.55 W.Wright 1 3 2 2 0 1 19 4.50 San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Bumgarner W, 8-4 7 2-3 6 2 1 0 12 98 3.08 Romo H, 10 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 5 0.52 Hensley 2-3 0 1 1 1 0 14 2.59 Ja.Lopez 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 3.29 S.Casilla S, 17-18 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 4 1.42 Ja.Lopez pitched to 1 batter in the 9th. T—3:12. A—42,100 (41,915).

Padres 5, Mariners 4 San Diego Venable rf Forsythe 2b Headley 3b Quentin dh Alonso 1b Denorfia lf Maybin cf Hundley c E.Cabrera ss Totals

AB 4 5 4 2 4 4 4 4 3 34

R 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 5

H 1 0 1 1 1 2 1 1 2 10

BI 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 4

BB 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 4

SO 1 2 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 7

Avg. .277 .290 .273 .432 .259 .275 .218 .174 .278

Seattle AB R H BI BB SO Avg. I.Suzuki rf 5 1 2 0 0 0 .266 Ackley 2b 5 0 1 0 0 1 .248 J.Montero dh 5 0 1 0 0 1 .257 Seager 3b 4 0 0 1 0 1 .268 Smoak 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .231 Olivo c 4 0 1 0 0 1 .198 M.Saunders cf 4 1 3 1 0 0 .281 Figgins lf 4 1 2 0 0 1 .185 Ryan ss 2 0 0 0 1 0 .157 a-Kawasaki ph 1 1 1 1 0 0 .200 Totals 38 4 12 3 1 6 San Diego 001 004 000 — 5 10 0 Seattle 000 100 003 — 4 12 0 a-singled for Ryan in the 9th. LOB—San Diego 7, Seattle 8. 2B—M.Saunders (18), Figgins (5). 3B—Denorfia (3), E.Cabrera (1). HR—M.Saunders (7), off Thatcher. SB—E.Cabrera 3 (8), M.Saunders (10). DP—San Diego 1; Seattle 1. San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Richard W, 3-7 7 8 1 1 1 3 96 4.30 Gregerson 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 2 21 3.95 Thatcher 0 2 2 2 0 0 4 3.31 Street S, 6-6 2-3 2 1 1 0 1 16 1.46 Seattle IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA F.Hernandez L, 4-5 6 9 5 5 3 3 92 3.70 Kelley 2 0 0 0 0 3 24 3.63 Pryor 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 11 1.69 Furbush 2-3 0 0 0 1 1 20 2.70 Thatcher pitched to 2 batters in the 9th. T—3:02. A—13,084 (47,860).

Dodgers 5, Angels 2 Los Angeles (A) AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Trout cf 4 0 0 0 1 2 .345 Tor.Hunter rf 4 0 1 0 1 1 .275 Pujols 3b-1b 5 0 2 0 0 1 .263 K.Morales 1b 3 1 0 0 1 0 .287 Callaspo 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .242 Trumbo lf 3 0 1 0 1 1 .325 M.Izturis 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .219 Aybar ss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .221 Conger c 4 0 1 0 0 0 .300 Williams p 4 1 1 0 0 0 .250 Walden p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 35 2 6 0 4 8 Los Angeles (N) AB R H BI BB SO Avg. D.Gordon ss 3 1 1 0 1 1 .236 A.Ellis c 3 2 1 0 1 2 .307 Ethier rf 4 1 2 1 0 0 .291 J.Rivera 1b 4 1 2 4 0 1 .245 Hairston Jr. 2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .343 Abreu lf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .312 Jansen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --A.Kennedy 2b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .226 J.Wright p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-Loney ph-1b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .255 Uribe 3b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .241 Gwynn Jr. cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .267 Harang p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .037 E.Herrera 2b-lf 0 0 0 0 1 0 .300 Totals 29 5 6 5 3 7 Los Angeles (A) 001 001 000 — 2 6 1 Los Angeles (N) 000 100 04x — 5 6 2 a-was announced for J.Wright in the 8th. E—Callaspo (3), A.Kennedy (4), D.Gordon (11). LOB—Los Angeles (A) 10, Los Angeles (N) 3. 2B—Pujols (17), Williams (1). HR—J.Rivera (3), off Williams. SB—D.Gordon 3 (20). DP—Los Angeles (A) 1. Los Angeles (A) IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Williams L, 6-4 7 2-3 6 5 5 3 7 102 4.20 Walden 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 8 3.15 Los Angeles (N)IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Harang 7 6 2 0 4 5 118 3.59 J.Wright W, 3-2 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 4.39 Jansen S, 10-13 1 0 0 0 0 2 10 2.35 T—2:49. A—55,279 (56,000).

Leaders Through Tuesday’s Games AMERICAN LEAGUE BATTING—Konerko, Chicago, .373; Hamilton, Texas, .335; Trumbo, Los Angeles, .325; Jeter, New York, .316; MiCabrera, Detroit, .316; Fielder, Detroit, .315; AdJones, Baltimore, .310. RUNS—Kinsler, Texas, 47; De Aza, Chicago, 44; Granderson, New York, 44; AdJones, Baltimore, 44; Kipnis, Cleveland, 43; Hamilton, Texas, 42; Cano, New York, 41. RBI—Hamilton, Texas, 62; MiCabrera, Detroit, 51; ADunn, Chicago, 47; Bautista, Toronto, 46; Encarnacion, Toronto, 44; Willingham, Minnesota, 42; Fielder, Detroit, 40; Kipnis, Cleveland, 40; Pierzynski, Chicago, 40. HOME RUNS—Hamilton, Texas, 22; ADunn, Chicago, 21; Bautista, Toronto, 18; Granderson, New York, 18; AdJones, Baltimore, 18; Encarnacion, Toronto, 17; Ortiz, Boston, 14; Reddick, Oakland, 14; Trumbo, Los Angeles, 14. NATIONAL LEAGUE BATTING—MeCabrera, San Francisco, .366; Votto, Cincinnati, .357; DWright, New York, .352; Ruiz, Philadelphia, .350; YMolina, St. Louis, .329; Altuve, Houston, .325; McCutchen, Pittsburgh, .324. RUNS—CGonzalez, Colorado, 48; Uggla, Atlanta, 46; Bourn, Atlanta, 44; MeCabrera, San Francisco, 44; Pence, Philadelphia, 43; Furcal, St. Louis, 41; DWright, New York, 41. RBI—Ethier, Los Angeles, 54; CGonzalez, Colorado, 48; Beltran, St. Louis, 46; LaRoche, Washington, 42; Stanton, Miami, 42; Uggla, Atlanta, 41; Votto, Cincinnati, 41. HOME RUNS—Beltran, St. Louis, 18; CGonzalez, Colorado, 16; Braun, Milwaukee, 15; Stanton, Miami, 14; Bruce, Cincinnati, 13; Hart, Milwaukee, 13; Pence, Philadelphia, 13.


D4

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13, 2012 112th U.S. OPEN GOLF CHAMPIONSHIP

Par 4 Yards 520

• JUNE 14-17

San Francisco treat

What contributes to such a brutal start is changing the opening hole to a par 4 for the first time. The hole moves slightly to the right, then drops down a slope toward the green. There is plenty of room to run the ball onto the green for those who can’t reach the green in two. The danger is the mowing down the rough left and long of the green, so any miss is likely to run into thick brush.

12

4

14

2

11 3

1

8

Par 5 Yards 670

15

6

With a new tee that won’t be used every day, this becomes the longest hole in U.S. Open history. If length isn’t enough, it's a sharp dogleg to the left and the fairway narrows right at 300 yards. The hole continues to bend to the left until the green, and shots that miss the green long or to the left will bounce even farther away because of the closely mown grass beyond the green.

7 Clubhouse

10

The Olympic Club

18

(Lake Course)

9 16

Length: 7,170 yards Par: 34-36 – 70

Television coverage (all times PDT)

First and second rounds June 14-15, 9 a.m. to noon, ESPN; noon-2 p.m., NBC Sports; 2-7 p.m., ESPN

Par 3 Yards 247 A new tee offers an incredible view of San Francisco, including the top of the Golden Gate bridge on a clear day. More daunting is the hole, which plays downhill to a relatively small green and is guarded by bunkers on both sides. The USGA also will use a forward tee from about 230 yards. Even from the tips, expect the players to be hitting a long to mid-iron because of the change in elevation.

17

Third round June 16, 1-7 p.m., NBC Sports Final round June 17, 1-7 p.m., NBC Sports

Par 4 Yards 489

Par 4 Yards 449

A new tee means this will play some 50 yards longer than it did in 1998. This hole is unique in that it has the only fairway bunker on the course, but the new tee means players will need a 295-yard drive if they choose to carry it. Because players could clear the bunker at the turn of a slight dogleg left in 1998, they were left with a wedge. Expect to see longer clubs this time.

Par 4 Yards 438

Par 4 Yards 451

With a two-tee start, half of the field will start on this par 4 that features typical Olympic traits. The fairway bends to the right, and the turf slopes strongly to the left toward Lake Merced. The green has bunkers on each side close to the front, and a closely mown area from the middle and back portions could present more problems for errant shots.

The first hole that offers a realistic shot at birdie, and the one par 4 that can be reached from the tee. Players who hit iron off the tee will have a sand wedge to the green. Around the green, there is only 5- to 6-inch rough to increase the penalty for those trying to drive the green, which also is guarded by bunkers.

Par 4 Yards 498 The opposite of No. 4, this hole bends to the right with the fairway sloping to the left. Large trees guard the right side of the tee shot. The difference is that the approach shot plays downhill, with help from a prevailing wind, and the green is relatively straightforward.

Par 3 Yards 200 This is a new hole and will play about 60 yards longer. The clubhouse is perched above the green, and a large hill to the right will provide a natural amphitheater. The green slopes from right to left and is set at an angle. Any shot veering too far left could catch a large cypress tree.

Par 5 Yards 522

This will play 35 yards longer than in 1998, starting with a claustrophobic tee shot because of the chute of Monterey pine and cypress trees. The fairway has been shifted slightly to the left. The approach shot, again most likely featuring a hanging lie, is to a green with bunkers and a closely mown collection area.

Par 3 Yards 199

Par 4 Yards 288

The shape of the tee shot is important. In classic Olympic fashion, the fairway bends sharply to the left, but the ground slopes to the right. The fairway narrows at 265 yards, leaving an uphill approach from a hanging lie to a difficult green that slopes severely from back left to front right. The green drops off sharply, with a collection area to the right.

The shortest par 3 at Olympic, this will be a 9-iron or wedge, but accuracy is paramount. Similar to the short par-4 seventh, there will be only the deep, 5- to 6-inch rough around for those missing the green. Still, this is the best birdie opportunity on the par 3s.

The U.S. Open will be hosted at the Olympic Club’s Lake Course in San Francisco, Calif., for the fifth time in the tournament’s storied history, and the first time since 1998. Lee Janzen won the event that year, beating the late Payne Stewart by one stroke.

13 5

Par 4 Yards 428 Pay no attention to the yardage. This is another difficult hole, with a tight fairway beyond 270 yards that might force players to opt for 3-wood or hybrid off the tee. The approach is to an elevated green that is both shallow and severely sloped from back to front. An extra club is needed for the elevation change, yet anything long makes for a very difficult par.

Par 3 Yards 154

This will be a mid-iron for most players, but distance control is everything to this long green with bunkers coming into play for front hole locations. The change from 1998 is that the left of the green is now closely mown, so a miss could run all day into a dry water hazard. Players should still be able to play a shot from the hazard if they wind up there.

Par 4 Yards 424 The angle on this left-to-right hole has been enhanced by moving the fairway several yards to the right, making it more likely that a tee shot could run through the fairway. The second shot will be a short iron to a green that slopes from front to back.

Par 4 Yards 430 This fairway also was shifted, to the left, to create a sharper left-to-right dogleg. Players can smash a driver here, though that could lead to a hanging lie because of the slope in the fairway. The two-tiered green slopes from back to front.

Par 4 Yards 419 This is a severely elevated hole that bends hard to the left and is guarded by trees down the left side. This most likely will be a 3-wood or a hybrid off the tee, though driver would leave only a flip wedge to the green. Anything too far left will lead to a punch shot under the trees.

For the first time in a U.S. Open at Olympic, this will be a par 5 instead of a par 4. That doesn’t make the drive any easier, because the fairway slopes more severely (to the right) than any other hole. Players have to hit a hard draw to eliminate the roll to the right. Finding the fairway or first cut leaves a good chance to reach the green in two. The green slopes strongly from left to right and back to front, and any approach missing long or to the right will tumble down a collection area under the trees. One bad shot eliminates the ease of birdie.

Par 4 Yards 344 It’s not the toughest closing hole in a U.S. Open, but it’s the signature hole at Olympic, with the clubhouse on the horizon. This offers a birdie, but the tee shot (most likely a 3-iron) must find the narrow fairway. The approach is semi-blind because of the elevated green, and players will be able to see only the top half of the flagstick. The green slopes from back to front and is surrounded by thick rough.

U.S. Open champions at The Olympic Club YEAR

WINNER

1955

Jack Fleck (p)

1966 1987 1998

Billy Casper (p) Scott Simpson Lee Janzen

(won in playoff) SOURCE: USGA

U.S. Open Continued from D1 “I’ve dealt with that my entire career, ever since I was an amateur and playing all the way through and to professional golf. It hasn’t changed.” Even so, this U.S. Open figures to go a long way toward figuring out how close he is to returning to the top of golf. Woods couldn’t stop talking about how the U.S. Open presents the toughest test players face all year — so tough that he probably won’t be talking to Phil Mickelson, his longtime rival who will be playing with him in the opening two rounds. “This is one of those championships that I think the guys talk the least to one another because it’s so difficult,” he said. Woods looks as equipped as ever. Two weeks ago, he played so well at Muirfield Village that he was ranked in the middleof-the-pack in putting and still rallied from four shots behind to win. He has talked about playing well in spurts, and conceded after that win — the

Ed DeGasero, AP

73rd of his PGA Tour career — that he hit the ball great all four rounds. Just like that, he became the betting favorite at Olympic Club to get his 15th major — and first since the 2008 U.S. Open — and resume his pursuit of the record 18 majors won by Jack Nicklaus. Then again, his win at Bay Hill made him the pre-tournament rage at the Masters, and he tied for 40th. “I guess lately, we don’t know what to expect from him,” Steve Stricker said. “When he wins, we’re all eager to look ahead and think that he’s going to be back to where he was in the early 2000s or whenever he was at the top of his game. I think that just shows you the ability that he has, and what people see in the type of player that he is, and the type of shots that he’s been able to hit over the years, and the uncanny ability to just get it done and win golf tournaments. “So when he does win one, I think that’s why we’re all quick to hop on his bandwagon.” Woods sees a different trend from the first major of the

year. He managed his game at Bay Hill, in part because of a sloppy start by Graeme McDowell that gave Woods a cushion and allowed him to play the shots he needed to win the tournament. “When I went into Augusta, I did not feel comfortable hitting the ball up,” Woods said. “And I got back into a lot of my old patterns. Unfortunately, it didn’t work out. But that’s what made playing Muirfield so nice. I had those shots, and I was doing it the correct way. And I had compression, hitting the ball high and hitting it long. That was fun.” Olympic is all about hitting it in the fairway, and the right spots on the green. The golf course is longer than when Woods tied for 18th in 1998, though that isn’t the biggest change. The greens have been resurfaced, and they roll so fast that it’s difficult to get the ball close. Plus, the USGA has shaved some areas off the green to form large collection areas. A slight miss could send the ball some 30 yards away. Woods told of the par-3 13th during a practice round in

which he hit the green, and the ball rolled down a slope and just inside a hazard. “I think this probably tests the player more than any other championship,” Woods said. “We have to shape the ball. We have to hit the ball high. We have to hit the ball low. Our short game’s got to be dialed in.” The difference for this U.S. Open is the variety that USGA executive director Mike Davis brings to the toughest test in golf. Instead of mangled rough around the greens, he has created areas of tightly mown grass that sends errant shots down the slope and gives players options of putting, chipping, flop shots, anything to get it close. The tees can change. The 16th measures 670 yards, though there is an option to play it 100 yards shorter. “He throws wrinkles at you,” Woods said. “But overall, I think this is just the most demanding test that there is in golf.” Another wrinkle was putting Woods and Mickelson together, along with Masters champion Bubba Watson, for

the opening rounds. Together, they have won 19 majors, with Woods doing most of that damage. Woods and Mickelson last played together at Pebble Beach, where Mickelson dusted him and rallied to win in February. In the majors, Mickelson topped him in the final round of the 2009 Masters (won by Angel Cabrera), though Woods beat him soundly at Torrey Pines on his way to winning the U.S. Open. “I don’t think we’re going to talk about a lot,” Woods said. “This is a major championship. We’ve got work to do.” Mickelson seems to have embraced the grouping. His only concern is feeling “mentally lethargic” on Thursday and Friday of PGA Tour events, though he promises that won’t be the case at the U.S. Open, where he has finished second a record five times. Playing with Woods should cure whatever ails him. “I get excited to play with Tiger. I love it,” he said. “I think we all do. He gets the best out of me. I think when it’s time to tee off on Thursday I’ll be

ready to play. ... The one player I’m most concerned about, if I play my best golf that may have a chance to beat me, is Tiger.” This is far from a two-man show at Olympic, and it goes beyond the other guy in their group with a pink driver and a green jacket — Watson. Rory McIlroy is the defending champion and got a shot of confidence from the St. Jude Classic last week, despite a double bogey from the water on the last hole that cost him a chance at winning. Giving his recent run of three missed cuts, McIlroy was happy to be playing Sunday, much less contending. Luke Donald is No. 1 in the world and knows he will be taken more seriously if he can finally add a major. Ditto for Lee Westwood, No. 3 in the world, who has given himself more chances than Donald in the majors and still hasn’t won one. But it starts with Woods, as it has since he won the first of his 14 majors as a 21-year-old at Augusta. “It’s going to be a wonderful test,” he said.


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

D5

PREP NOTEBOOK

Summit’s Hamann named pitcher of year in Class 5A Bulletin staff report After leading his team to the Class 5A state baseball final, Summit senior Kevin Hamann has been named the 5A pitcher of the year. Hamann went 16-1 with 113 strikeouts in 97 1⁄3 innings this season. Joining him on the all-state first team is Storm senior catcher Kruze Mingus, who hit .341 in 2012. Central Oregon is also well represented on the 5A all-state second team. Summit’s Konner Reddick (first base), Bend High’s Jonah Koski (third base), Justin Erlandson (outfield) and Ben Kramer (utility) and Mountain View’s John Carroll (outfield) were all selected to the second team. The Class 5A all-state baseball team is selected by 5A league representatives. For a complete list of the 5A all-state baseball team, see Page D2.

Storm duo selected for Oregon All-Star Series Summit teammates Kevin Hamann and Konner Reddick will play in this weekend’s Reser’s Oregon All-Star Series, which showcases the state’s top Class 6A and 5A baseball players in a three-game series at Oregon State University’s Goss Stadium in Corvallis. Hamann and Reddick, who helped lead the Storm to the Class 5A state title game this season, will play for the South squad. Summit’s C.J. Colt, along with Thurston’s Phil Dube, will coach the South squad. The South and the North will play a doubleheader Saturday and a single game Sunday. Saturday’s opener begins at 1 p.m.; Sunday’s game is set to start at noon. For more information, go to www.oregonallstarseries.com. Locals to play in Class 4A baseball all-star event Madras pitcher Kyle Palmer and

Rodeo Continued from D1 The Tri-County High School Rodeo Club also returns 2011 barrel racing state champion Stevie Rae Willis, of Terrebonne, who is ranked second in the girls all-around standings. Powell Butte’s Jessie Loper, currently first in goat tying, is another Central Oregon cowgirl to watch. Terrebonne’s Riley Rae Sappington and Powell Butte’s Harley Byram are ranked first and third in the rookie division, respectively. Loper and Tri-County teammate Courtney Hibbs, of Prineville, are top contenders in goat tying, an event in

Crook County shortstop Jerren Larimer have been selected to play in the 2012 Oregon 4A High School Baseball All-Star Series this Saturday and Sunday at Legion Field in Roseburg. The three-game event pits two teams, North and South squads, made up of some of the top seniors from Class 4A schools across the state. Madras coach Adam Randall has been chosen to coach in the series. The 4A All-Star Series starts Saturday at 7 p.m. with one nine-inning game. Two seven-inning contests will be played on Sunday, the first of which is scheduled for noon. Central Oregonians receive all-state baseball awards Sisters pitcher Shane Groth and catcher Joey Morgan and Crook County shortstop Jerren Larimer have been named to the 2012 Class 4A all-state baseball first team. Groth, a senior, and Morgan, a sophomore, this season helped lead the Outlaws to the 4A state quarterfinals, while Larimer was named the Intermountain Conference Hybrid player of the year. Madras pitcher Kyle Palmer was selected to the all-state second team, as was Sisters outfielder Jordan Weems. The Class 4A all-state baseball team is selected by 4A league representatives. For the complete all-state teams, see Page D2. Elks coach promoted at Whitman College WALLA WALLA, Wash. — Bend Elks head coach Sean Kinney has been named interim head coach at his alma mater, Whitman College. Kinney, was an assistant at Whitman since he graduated from the school in 2005, takes over for Jared Holowaty, who resigned after the 2012 season. Kinney’s Elks teams went 67-50 over the past two seasons, and the club is 72 so far this summer.

which Talburt says her team is “really strong.” On the boys side, freshman Kyle Easterly, of Terrebonne, is ranked fifth in the rookie all-around standings. Redmond’s David Peebles will attempt to win another state title in bareback riding. Peebles was also part of the TriCounty club’s winning 2011 boys team, which returns all four members. The team expects to face tough competition from the Intermountain Rodeo Club’s Hermiston and Klamath Falls representatives, said Talburt. “It’s kind of a horse race,” Talburt added. Reporter: 541-383-0305, egross@bendbulletin.com

Jeff Roberson / The Associated Press

Miami’s LeBron James grabs a loose ball as Oklahoma City’s Serge Ibaka defends on Tuesday night.

Finals Continued from D1 “They didn’t make many mistakes in the fourth quarter,” James said. Westbrook turned around a poor shooting start to finish with 27 points, 11 assists and eight rebounds for the Thunder, keying a strong finish to the third period that gave the Thunder the lead for good. Durant took over from there. Scoring in nearly every way possible, Durant finished 12 of 20 from the field and added eight rebounds. He and Westbrook outscored the Heat 41-40 over the final two periods, showing that maybe this time it will be offense that wins championships. “Those guys they came out on fire. They were passing the ball well, knocking down shots,” Durant said. “We just wanted to keep playing. It’s a long game.” James finished with 30 points, his most in any of his 11 finals games, but had only one basket over the first 8:15 of the fourth, when the Thunder seized control of a game they trailed for all but the final few seconds of the first three quarters. James averaged just three points in the fourth quarters of the Heat’s six-game loss to Dallas last year, taking almost all the heat for Miami’s finals failure. He was good in this one, Durant was just better. And when fans chanted “MVP! MVP!” late in the game, they weren’t talking about James, the guy who won the regular-season award. They meant Durant, who is in a race with James for his first ring

Oregon Open Continued from D1 “There is a fine line,” Don Bies, a 74-year-old Seattle pro who has played in a total of 602 PGA and Champions tour tournaments in his long golf career, said while standing in the shadow of Broken Top’s opulent clubhouse. “They can almost look as good, but there is just a little something that is hard to put your finger on,” Bies added. Just how good are the best of the Northwest pros, many of whom have some experience on the PGA, Nationwide or Champions tours but are generally working professionals who teach the game or run the day-to-day operations of the business? “The best of these golfers could play and make cuts on the Nationwide Tour,” said Bend’s Jim Wilkinson, a former player on the Champions Tour (pro golf’s 50-and-over circuit) who is now an instructor at Broken Top and is a spectator this week at the Oregon Open. That is pretty high praise, considering that golf’s best young talent plays on the Nationwide Tour, the PGA Tour’s top developmental circuit. Bend’s Brandon Kearney, a 32-year-old pro who has played on the developmental Canadian Tour and has attempted numerous times to earn his way onto the PGA Tour through its National Qualifying School, agrees with Wilkinson. Give the most talented golfers at the Oregon Open a chance to play every day and they too could be competitive on bigger stages of pro golf, said Kearney, who is an assistant pro at Bend Golf and

— and maybe the title of best player in the game. Game 2 is Thursday night in Oklahoma City. Dwyane Wade had 19 points but shot just seven of 19 for the Heat, while Shane Battier provided some rare offense by scoring 17 points, his high this postseason. Turning to a small lineup late in the third quarter, the Thunder improved to 9-0 at home in the postseason. Defensive ace Thabo Sefolosha helped defend James during the Thunder’s comeback, relieving Durant of the burden so he could focus on his scoring. And right now, nobody does it better. Heat coach Erik Spoelstra said his team, pushed to seven games against Boston in a grueling conference finals the Heat finally won Saturday, preferred this quick turnaround. But perhaps they ran out of gas against the young Thunder, whose core players are all 23 and younger and look as if they could keep playing all night. “Honestly, I think we just came out with a lot more intensity on the defensive end. Made them feel us a little bit,” Westbrook said of the second half, when the Thunder outscored the Heat 58-40. James and Wade both were bent over, hands on knees, during one stoppage with about seven minutes remaining. Durant kept pouring it on, racing down the court to throw down a fast-break dunk and later adding a three-pointer that pushed it to 87-81 with 6 1⁄2 minutes remaining. The Heat got within four points, but Durant hit two quick baskets

and Westbrook added another for a 10-point lead with 3:35 to go. “They just made more plays than us,” Wade said. “They got a couple offensive rebounds that kind of hurt us. Got a couple of open shots and from that point we were kind of playing from behind.” It’s been a rapid rise toward the top for the Thunder, who started 329 in 2008-09, their first season here after moving from Seattle. Fans were clearly embracing the finals’ arrival in Oklahoma City, where cars, buildings and even fans’ hair seemed to be painted some form of orange or blue. Fans standing until the Thunder’s first basket didn’t have to wait long, Durant knocking down a baseline jumper 70 seconds in. He made his first three shots, including two three-pointers, but his teammates missed their first six attempts in falling into an early hole. Durant made sure they were fine at the end. Both superstars tried to downplay their individual matchup, Durant insisting it was about the team and James adamant that he didn’t care about the best player in the game argument. It was James’ supporting cast that stepped up bigger to start, the Heat hitting five of their six threepoint attempts in jumping to a 29-22 lead after one quarter. Spoelstra kept Chris Bosh as a reserve, the role he has played since returning from a nine-game absence with a strained lower abdominal muscle. Smart decision, as Battier hit his first three three-point attempts in the opening minutes to spark Miami’s strong start.

Washington pro fires 66 at Oregon Open

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Oregon Open competitor Don Bies watches his drive on the 18th hole at Broken Top Club in Bend on Tuesday during the first round of the Oregon Open. Bies has played in more than 600 PGA Tour and Champions Tour events in his career.

Country Club. “I wouldn’t say immediately that anyone would go out there and be the champion of the tour right away,” Kearney said. “But at the same time, if you give a lot of these guys an opportunity to play on a regular basis, I think everybody would get better and take advantage of that.” There is plenty of evidence at the Oregon Open — with its field of 96 pros and 96 amateurs — that the tournament is loaded with high-caliber talent. At least 12 players at Broken Top this week have in the course of their careers played in at least one PGA or Champions tour event (including majors such as the PGA Championship, which is run by the PGA of America). And even more in the field have played in a Nationwide tournament. Washington’s Jeff Coston — who spent 1988 as an exempt player on the PGA Tour

and has played in 72 PGA and Champions tour events — made the cut and shot a final-round 67 to finish in a tie for 56th place at May’s Senior PGA Championship. At 56, Coston, who won the 2004 Oregon Open, is still among the best in the section. Pat Fitzsimons, a 61-yearold former Prineville Golf and Country Club head pro who is now at Salem Golf Club, scored 11 top-10 finishes in his PGA Tour career and won the 1975 Los Angeles Open. Lon Hinkle, a 62-year-old pro from Big Fork, Mont., is perhaps the most decorated golfer in the Oregon Open field with three PGA Tour wins and 57 top-10 finishes in 459 events. And Bies won the PGA Tour’s 1975 Greater Hartford Open and won seven times on the Champions Tour, including the 1989 Tradition. Of course, golfers who play on the regular tour are there for a reason. Just last month Jeff Gove,

Jeff Coston, a professional from Semiahmoo Resort in Blaine, Wash., fired a 6-under-par 66 Tuesday at breezy Broken Top Club in Bend to take the first-round lead of the Oregon Open Invitational. Coston, a former PGA Tour player who won the Oregon Open in 2004, holds a two-stroke lead over three pros. John Kawasoe, of Astoria Golf and Country Club, 2008 Oregon Open champion Corey Prugh, of Manito Golf and Country Club in Spokane, Wash., and Chris Griffin, of Pro Golf of Tacoma, Wash., are tied for second place after each shot 68. The Oregon Open is a 54-hole individual stroke-play tournament that features the best club professionals from the Pacific Northwest. Play is scheduled to continue with today’s second round. The final round is scheduled for Thursday. Louis Bennett, the head pro at Broken Top, took advantage of his home course with a 3-under 69, which puts the Bend High School graduate in a 6-way tie for fifth place. Zach Lampert, head pro at Meadow Lakes Golf Course in Prineville, and Bend amateur Jesse Heinly are in a five-way tie for 11th place after each shot a first-round 70. For full results, see page D6.

a Nationwide player from Seattle, who has missed seven of 11 cuts this season, won the Northwest PGA’s Washington Open by 11 strokes. “There is definitely something to be said for that as well,” Kearney said of a tour player dominating a Northwest PGA event. “It’s about the stage, really,” said Fitzsimons Tuesday as he smacked balls down the practice range. “If you were an actor, it would be the difference between performing in front of a high school or on Broadway.” PGA Tour players, for example, often tee off from a tee box lined well down the fairway by thousands of spectators “I used to be more comfortable doing that, but I couldn’t do that in a million years now,” Fitzsimons said. Physically, a tour pro and a

club pro are similar. Bies said it comes down to small differences, including the ability for a golfer to play his best golf at the right moment. Bies, for instance, said he tended to play better out on tour than in tournaments staged closer to home. “Thank the Lord for that,” Bies said with a laugh. Coston, who shot a 6-under-par 66 Tuesday, said it is almost impossible to compare playing at the Oregon Open and playing on tour. “The tour is a different animal,” Coston said. “Going to play every week for your living. … The guys here get paid whether they are here or not. Everybody wants to play well, but a lot of guys are here just to get away.” “Those guys out there (on tour) will rip your heart out and then show it to you.”

Still the Pacific Northwest section has produced plenty of tour players, including Portland’s Peter Jacobsen, who won the 1978 Oregon Open. And a great performance at the Oregon Open, such as Coston’s 66, can be akin to a well-played round on tour, Fitzsimons said. “A (breezy) day like today, if a guy goes out and shoots 4 or 5 under par today, he’s capable of playing on tour,” said Fitzsimons, adding that pros today have to make their way to the top out of a large pool that now includes more international players. “But there are only 150 guys out there (on the PGA Tour). The numbers game is really difficult.” — Reporter: 541-617-7868, zhall@bendbulletin.com

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D6

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13, 2012

T EE T O GR EEN

G W

GOLF SCOR EBOARD Local Oregon Open Invitational 54-Hole Stroke Play June 12-14 First Round at Broken Top Club 6,922 Yards, Par 72 a-amateur Jeff Coston, Semiahmoo G&CC John Kawasoe, Astoria G&CC Corey Prugh, Manito G&CC Chris Griffin, Pro Golf Discount-Tacoma Louis Bennett, Broken Top Club Brian Thornton, Meridian Valley CC Scott Erdmann, Oswego Lake CC David Phay, Whidbey G&CC Reid Martin-a, Everett G&CC Tim Hval, Portland GC David Nuhn-a, University of Idaho GC Jesse Heinly-a, Tetherow GC Tyler Simpson-a, Trysting Tree GC Zach Lampert, Meadow Lakes GC George Carlson-a, Rose City GC Hans Reimers-a, Columbia Edgewater CC Mike Roters, Gateway Golf Discount Todd Strible-a, Broken Top Club Darren Black, Rainier G&CC Greg Manley, Meridian Valley CC Jim Coleman-a, Yellowstone CC Matt Cowell, Lake Padden GC Michael Combs-a, Canyon Lakes GC Jeff Fought, Black Butte Ranch Cameron Fife, Persimmon CC Brent Walsh, Coeur d’ Alene GC Rob Gibbons, Arrowhead GC Jason Aichele, Meadow Springs CC Mitch Runge, Tacoma C&GC Ryan Benzel, Pro Golf Discount-Lynnwood Chris Myrvold, Rock Creek CC Tom Carey, Meriwether National Casey McCoy, The Dalles CC Lon Hinkle, Eagle Bend GC Taylor Garbutt-a, Tetherow GC Jeff Marsh, Orchard Hills CC Scott Adams, Twin Lakes Village GC Jonathan Schrader, Interbay Golf Center Justin St. Clair, Emerald Valley GC Austin Landis-a, Arrowhead GC Bob Rannow, Sandpines GL Brandon Kearney, Bend G&CC Clayton Moe, Tetherow GC Martin Chuck, Tour Striker Darek Franklin, Willamette Valley CC Luke Bennett, Lake Padden GC Steve Stull, Canyon Lakes GC Michael Kloenne-a, Columbia Edgewater CC Charlie Rice-a, Bend G&CC Issac Henry-Cano, Twin Lakes G&CC John Pennington Jr.-a, Eugene CC Kyle Schrader-a, Tumwater Valley GC Ryan Jones-a, Manito G&CC Mike Schoner, Lakeview G&CC Caitlin McCleary-a, The Dalles CC Caleb Taskinen-a, Oregon Golf Association Josh Garber, The Vintage Club Tye Gabriel-a, Oregon Golf Club Jason Pitt, Chewelah G&CC Chris Lisk, Glendale CC Chuck Milne, Vanco Driving Range Ryan Malby, Village Greens GC Brandon Lorain-a, Heron Lakes GC John D’Amelio, Inglewood GC Harry Paik-a, Widgi Creek GC Bill Raschko, Albany, OR Jim Pliska-a, Royal Oaks CC Sean Arey, Trysting Tree GC Don Bies, Seattle GC Jesse Van Schoiack-a, Meadow Springs CC Tom Baker, Black Butte Ranch Mickey Morey-a, Oswego Lake CC Randy Heriot-a, Rainier G&CC Randy Kirby-a, Chewelah G&CC Rob Clark, Wenatchee G&CC James Chrisman-a, Awbrey Glen GC Vance Lynch, Emerald Valley GC Kristian Sorensen-a, Emerald Valley GC Jay Poletiek-a, Rose City GC Luke Baker, Deer Park GC Mark Poirier, The Highlands GC Glen Griffith, Spring Hill CC Jake Irving-a, Spring Hill CC Jeff Bender, Canyon Lakes GC Nick Mandell-a, Canyon Lakes GC Todd O’Neal, Emerald Valley GC Grove, Russell Avondale G&TC Stevens, Bryan Bear Creek CC Dave Hunter-a, Allenmore GC Tyler McDougall-a, Wenatchee G&CC Fred Haney, The Reserve Vineyards Bruce Stewart, Arrowhead GC Craig Wilcox, Meriwether National Ryan Dahl, Horn Rapids Declan Watts-a, Awbrey Glen GC Derek Barron, Tacoma Firs Golf Center Jeff Ward-a, Bend G&CC Paul Labby-a, Tualatin CC Jeff Wilson-a, Inglewood GC Noah Horstman, Illahe Hills CC Todd Pence, The Fairways GC Pat Huffer, Crooked River Ranch Byron Patton-a, Broadmoor GC Bill Winter-a, Columbia Edgewater CC Tim Fraley, Awbrey Glen GC Tim O’Neal-a, Royal Oaks CC Brad Karns-a, Royal Oaks CC Matt Reams, Grants Pass GC Bill Morach, Eugene CC Curtis Rystadt-a, Pumpkin Ridge GC Chris Peterson, Meadow Springs CC Joe Peccia, Rock Creek CC Beau Wangler-a, Yakima Elks GC Sean Fredrickson, Tualatin CC Chris Van der Velde, Tetherow GC Scott Krieger, Broadmoor GC Matt Clemo-a, Meriwether National George Mack Jr., Black Butte Ranch Daniel Wendt, The Brasada Club Tim McElhinny, Painted Hills GC Brian Boudreau-a, Astoria G&CC Glenn Horton-a, Tualatin CC Nate Westfall-a, Ocean Dunes Ted Bainbridge-a, Broken Top Club Todd Sickles, Quail Run GC Scott Larsen, Golf Larz Nick Atkin-a, Canyon Lakes GC Justin Bos, Black Rock Creek GC Casey Garland-a, Pumpkin Ridge GC Jason Lehtola, Hamilton GC Ron Seals-a, Awbrey Glen GC Mark Matthews-a, Oregon Amateur Golf Tour Grant Davis-a, The Golf Club at Black Rock Bob Turnquist, The Oregon GC Brian Trowbridge-a, Creekside GC Charles Cushman-a, Broken Top Club Taylor Ferris, Allenmore GC Chris Condon-a, Tetherow GC Tracy Vass-a, Whidbey G&CC Robert Tercero-a, Whidbey G&CC Alex Gruber-a, Emerald Valley GC Alex Williams-a, West Seattle GC Greg McCormick-a, Suntides GC Tony Battistella-a, Juniper GC Andy Rodby-a, Juniper GC Colin Carlson, The Golf Club at Black Rock Mark Shields-a, Tetherow GC Mike Palmer-a, Lake Chelan GC Doug Parisio-a, Meadow Springs CC Justin Walsworth-a, Quail Run GC Dan O’Berg-a, Canyon Lakes GC Scott Wacker-a, The Oregon GC Jerry Mowlds, Pumpkin Ridge GC Kris Runge, Twin Lakes G&CC Robert Overdorf-a, The Home Course Eric DuLong-a, Waverley CC Steve Hval-a, Portland GC Jason Strobbe-a, The Oregon GC Will McCarter-a, The Pro Golf Club Bruce Furman, Langdon Farms GC Mark Tunstill, Mallard Creek GC Dillon Middleton-a, Mallard Creek GC Pat Fitzsimons, Salem GC Ty Kohler-a, The Oregon GC Justin Hardy-a, MeadowWood GC Bob Humphrey-a, Tualatin CC David Baker-a, Black Butte Ranch Brendon Bain, Black Butte Ranch Marv Osterhout-a, Twin Lakes G&CC Dave Miller-a, Rainier G&CC

66 68 68 68 69 69 69 69 69 69 70 70 70 70 70 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 74 74 74 74 74 74 74 74 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 76 76 76 76 76 76 76 76 76 76 76 76 76 76 76 76 76 76 76 76 76 76 77 77 77 77 77 77 77 77 77 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 79 79 79 79 79 79 79 79 79 79 79 79 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 81 81 81 81 81 81 81 81 81 81 81 82 82 82 83 83 83 83 83 83 83 84 84 84 84 84 84 85 85 85 85 85 85 86 86 86 86 86 86

Chuck DaSilva, Rock Creek CC Jeff Brown-a, Meadow Lakes GC Barry Walters, Yakima Elks GC Tom Mallory-a, Auburn GC Marc Fillmore, The Golf Club at Black Rock Andy Heinly, Pro Golf of Bend Doug Bennett-a, Lake Padden GC David Varelia-a, Meridian Valley CC Wes Hayden, Meridian Valley CC Dave Mahnke-a, Shadow Hills CC Erik Nielsen, Bend G&CC David Nygaard-a, Astoria G&CC Scott Overbo-a, Tacoma C&GC Andy Baida-a, Grants Pass GC Ron Minor-a, The Golf Club at Black Rock Mills Sinclair-a, Paradise Valley CC Duane Oster-a, Rock Creek CC Bill Wangler-a, Yakima Elks GC Don Noldge-a, Juniper GC Dick Howells-a, Black Butte Ranch Seth Westfall, Bear Creek CC Barry Kramer-a, Lake Padden GC

86 86 87 87 88 88 88 90 90 90 90 91 91 92 95 97 101 105 107 NC NC NC

Club Results The Bulletin welcomes contributions to its weekly local golf results listings and events calendar. Clearly legible items should be faxed to the sports department, 541-3850831, emailed to sports@bendbulletin.com, or mailed to P.O. Box 6020; Bend, OR 97708. ASPEN LAKES Men’s League, June 12 Stroke Play 1, Jerry Hines, 72. 2, Dale Holub, 73. 3, Denny Bennett, 75. AWBREY GLEN Saturday Men’s Game, June 9 Net Better Ball 1. Bud Johnson/Bill Macri, 57. 2, Ken Waskom/ Bert Larson, 63. 3, Larry Hinkle/Jim Lee, 64. Gross Skins — Ron Knapp/Bob Johanson, Nos. 2, 18; Larry Hinkle/Jim Lee, No. 8. BEND GOLF AND COUNTRY CLUB Men’s Daily Game, June 7 Sweet 16 First Flight (9 handicap or less) — Gross: 1, Charlie Rice, 63. Net: 1, Kevin Rueter, 58. 2 (tie), Scott Holmberg, 62; Bob Roach, 62; Jim Keller, 62. Second Flight (10-12) — Gross: 1, Jerry Mattioda, 69. Net: 1, Jim Rodgers, 59. 2, Manco Snapp, 60. Third Flight (13 and higher) — Gross: 1, Jay Bennett, 68. Net: 1, John Collins, 55. 2, Larry Patterson, 58. DESERT PEAKS Wednesday Twilight League, June 6 Stroke Play Gross: 1, Francisco Morales, 35. 2, Brian Ringering, 37. 3 (tie), Chuck Schmidt, 38; Ed McDaniel, 38. Net: 1 (tie), Gary Burtis, 34; Shane Bush, 34; Trimble Cannon, 34. 4 (tie), Corey Browne, 35; Steve Davis, 35; Don Gish, 35; Bob Ringering, 35; Russ Scholl, 35. KPs — 7 handicap or less: Chuck Schmidt. 8 or more: Steve Thill. LDs — 7 handicap or less: Sid Towell. 8 or more: Dean Hunt. Team Standings — Brunoe Logging, 26-30. Good Old Boys, 40-24. Bel Air Funeral Home, 34-30. The Good, Bad & Ugly -35-29. Try Two Farms, 2826. Oregon Embroidery, 24-32. Keith Manufacturing, 33-31. Schmidt House, 34-22. Identity Zone, 29-35. Earnest Electric, 37-19. Team George, 32-32. Thursday Men’s Club, June 7 Stableford 1, Al Dupont, 39. 2, Ken Southwick, 36. 3 (tie), Gerry Ellis, 35; Don Gish, 35; Dick Pliska, 35. KP — Don Gish. LD — Don Gish. Friday Night Couples, June 8 Net Chapman 1, Scott Ditmore & Vicki Moore, 33.4. 2, Dick & Patty Pliska, 33.5. 3, Curt Olson & Margaret Sturza, 35.3. Sunday Group Play, June 10 Stroke Play Gross: 1, Chuck Schmidt, 71. 2, Mike Gardner, 74. 3 (tie), Fred Blackman, 75; Spud Miller, 75; Gary Hopson, 75. Net: 1, Russ Scholl, 66. 2, Rich Vigil, 67. 3, Gary Whittle, 68. KP — Spud Miller. LD — Brad Mondoy. MEADOW LAKES Men’s Association Member-Guest, June 9-10 Saturday Scramble, Sunday Best Ball Gross: 1, Jeff Brown/Tom Brown, 137. 2, Caleb Henry/Steve Sheppherd, 139. Net: 1, Tom Liljeholm/ Randy Dickau, 126. 2, Les Bryan/Jim Bryan, 129. 3, Jim Montgomery/Coy Scroggins, 130. 4, George Lienkaemper/Bob Lind, 131. Saturday KPs — A Flight: Mark Payne, Nos. 13, 17; Darrell Linklater, No. 4; Paul Beebe, No. 8. B Flight: Ron Edgerly, No. 4; Fred Bushong, No. 8; Dewey Springer, No. 13; George Lienkaemper, No. 17. Sunday KPs — A Flight: Rob Dudley, Nos. 8, 17; Steve Sheppherd, No. 4; Jeff Storm, No. 13. B Flight: Ron Edgerly, No. 4; Brian Jordan, No. 8; Jim Bryan, No. 13; Bob Lind, No. 17. Saturday Skins — Gross: Caleb Henry/Steve Sheppherd, Nos. 14, 15. Net: Jeff Brown/Tom Brown, No. 9; Caleb Henry/Steve Sheppherd, No. 14. Sunday Honey Pot — Gross: 1, Jim Montgomery/Coy Scroggins, 71. 2, Tom Liljeholm/Randy Dickau, 72. Net: 1, Jeff Brown/Tom Brown, 59. 2, Dewey Springer/Darrell Linklater, 64. 3 (tie), Rick Fosburg/ Jim Richards, 65; Fred Bushong/Art Crossely, 65. Net Horse Race (Alternate Shot) — 1, Darrell Linklater/Dewey Springer. 2, Jake Shinkle/Caleb Henry. 3, Jeff Brown/Clay Smith. 4, Jim Montgomery/ Coy Scroggins. Couples Golf & Grub, June 10 Criers & Whiners 1, Gene & Sharon Taylor, 36. 2, Garry & Karen Peterson, 38. KPs — Men: Garry Peterson, No. 8. Women: Kathy Koon, No. 8. Senior League, June 12 Stroke Play Gross: 1, John McCulloch, 41. 2, Nelson Haas, 42. Net: 1, Phil Horton, 30. 2, Cliff Garrett, 31. 3, Trevor Russell, 32. 4, John Traven, 33. KPs — Gary Williams, No. 4; Harold Simpson, No. 8.

Hole-In-One Report May 31 OLD BACK NINE AT MOUNTAIN HIGH Jake Miller, Bend No. 11. . . . . . . . . . . 122 yards. . . . . pitching wedge

Calendar The Bulletin welcomes contributions to its weekly local golf events calendar. Items should be mailed to P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708; faxed to the sports department at 541385-0831; or emailed to sports@bendbulletin. com. ——— LEAGUES Tuesdays — The Men’s Club at River’s Edge Golf Course in Bend plays weekly tournaments. Members of the men’s club and others interested River’s Edge Golf Club men with an established USGA handicap are invited to participate. For more information or to register, call River’s Edge at 541-389-2828. Tuesdays — The Ladies League at Lost Tracks Golf Club in Bend plays weekly at 9 a.m. All women golfers are welcome. For more information, call the pro shop at 541-385-1818. Tuesdays — Black Butte Ranch Women’s Golf Club accepts women golfers of all levels. Cost to join is $40 plus green fees for the 2012 season. For more information or to register, call the Big Meadow golf shop at 541595-1500. Tuesdays — Ladies of the Greens women’s golf club at The Greens at Redmond golf course plays weekly from May through October. New members are welcome. For more information, call the Greens at Redmond at 541923-0694. Tuesdays — The Men’s Club at Aspen Lakes Golf Course in Sisters plays at 8:30 a.m. through the golf sea-

son. New members are welcome. For more information, call Aspen Lakes at 541-549-4653. Wednesdays — The Women’s Club at River’s Edge Golf Course in Bend plays weekly in tournaments that tee off at 9:30 a.m. Members are welcome and should sign up by the preceding Saturday for the tournaments. For more information, or to register, call River’s Edge at 541-389-2828. Wednesdays — Juniper Ladies Golf Club plays weekly between 8 a.m. and 10 a.m. All women players welcome. For more information visit www.juniperladies. com. Wednesdays — Men’s Golf Association at Meadow Lakes Golf Course in Prineville plays weekly at 5 or 5:30 p.m. All men are welcome. For more information, call Zach Lampert at 541-447-7113. Wednesdays — Ladies Club at Desert Peaks in Madras. Times vary each week. For more information, call Desert Peaks at 541-475-6368. Wednesdays — Men’s club at Aspen Lakes Golf Course in Sisters plays every Wednesday morning. For more information, call Aspen Lakes at 541-549-4653. Wednesdays — Men’s club at Sunriver Resort plays weekly tournaments at the Meadows or Woodlands courses with shotgun starts around 9 a.m. Cost is $55 for annual membership. For more information, email Don Olson at d.s.olson@msn.com or go to www.srmensgolf. com. Wednesdays — Women’s club at Sunriver Resort plays weekly tournaments at the Meadows or Woodlands courses with shotgun starts approximately 9 a.m. There are both nine-hole and 18-hole groups. For more information, call Sue Revere at 541-593-9223. Wednesdays — Widgi Creek Women’s Golf Association at Widgi Creek Golf Club in Bend is a weekly golf league. For more information, call the Widgi Creek clubhouse at 541-382-4449. Wednesdays — Widgi Creek Men’s Club at Widgi Creek Golf Club in Bend is a weekly golf league. For more information, call the Widgi Creek clubhouse at 541-382-4449. Thursdays — Quail Run Golf Course women’s 18-hole golf league plays at 8 a.m. during the golf season. Interested golfers are welcome. For more information, call Penny Scott at 541-598-7477. Thursdays — Ladies of the Lakes golf club at Meadow Lakes Golf Course is a weekly women’s golf league. All women players welcome. For more information, call the Meadow Lakes pro shop at 541447-7113. ——— CLINICS OR CLASSES Mondays — Junior golf clinic at Meadow Lakes Golf Course in Prineville will run every Monday from 10 a.m. to noon from June 18 through July 9. Meadow Lakes PGA teaching professional Vic Martin will be lead instructor for the clinic. Cost is $25 per golfer. Advanced sign-up and payment is required. For more information or to register, call 541-447-7113. Wednesdays — Golf clinic for senior golfers at Missing Link Family Golf Center in Redmond. Golf instructor Kenneth Johnson will introduce golfers to fundaments of golf swings. Classes held from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. Cost is $15. For more information or to register, call 541-923-3426. Thursdays — Ladies golf clinic at Juniper Golf Course in Redmond. Students will be introduced to the fundamentals of golf by Stuart Allison, Juniper’s director of instruction. Clinic begins at 8:30 a.m. on June 14, June 14, June 28, July 12, July 26, Aug. 9, Aug. 23, Sept. 6, and Sept. 20. Cost is $20 per class and each is open to the public. For more information or to register: call 480-5403015 or email pro@stuartallisongolf.com. Saturdays — Get Golf Ready clinic at Juniper Golf Course runs the first four Saturdays in June from noon to 1:30 p.m. each day. Teaching professional Stuart Allison teaches set up, ball-flight laws, short-game shots, rules and etiquette. Bring your own clubs, or clubs will be available if needed. The classes are geared toward beginner golfers but all levels are welcome. Drop-ins are welcome and cost $25 for each session. For more information or to register: call 480-540-3015 or email pro@stuartallisongolf.com. June 18-20 — Youth golf lessons for children ages 8 to 14 at Lost Tracks Golf Club in Bend offered by the Bend Park & Recreation District. Sessions are 9 a.m. to noon and are taught by PGA professional Bob Garza and his staff. Each session includes on-course instruction, lesson on golf etiquette, and a maximum student/teacher ratio of 8-to-1. Equipment will be provided for those students without their own. Cost is $55 for residents of the Bend Park & Recreation District, $74 for others. To register, call 541-389-7275 or visit www.bendparksandrec.org. June 18-20 — Women-only lessons at Lost Tracks Golf Club in Bend offered by the Bend Park & Recreation District. Sessions are 5:30 to 7 p.m. and are taught by PGA professional Bob Garza. Each session includes oncourse instruction and a maximum student/teacher ratio of 8-to-1. Equipment will be provided for those students without their own. Cost is $55 for residents of the Bend Park & Recreation District, $74 for others. To register, call 541-389-7275 or visit www.bendparksandrec.org. June 25-27 — Youth golf lessons for children ages 8 to 14 at Lost Tracks Golf Club in Bend offered by the Bend Park & Recreation District. Sessions are 9 a.m. to noon and are taught by PGA professional Bob Garza and his staff. Each session includes on-course instruction, lesson on golf etiquette, and a maximum student/teacher ratio of 8-to-1. Equipment will be provided for those students without their own. Cost is $55 for residents of the Bend Park & Recreation District, $74 for others. To register, call 541-389-7275 or visit www.bendparksandrec.org. July 9-11 — Adult coed golf lessons at Lost Tracks Golf Club in Bend offered by the Bend Park & Recreation District. Sessions are 5:30 to 7 p.m. and are taught by PGA professional Bob Garza. Each session includes oncourse instruction and a maximum student/teacher ratio of 8-to-1. Equipment will be provided for those students without their own. Cost is $55 for residents of the Bend Park & Recreation District, $74 for others. To register, call 541-389-7275 or visit www.bendparksandrec.org. July 16-18 — Youth golf lessons for children ages 8 to 14 at Lost Tracks Golf Club in Bend offered by the Bend Park & Recreation District. Sessions are 9 a.m. to noon and are taught by PGA professional Bob Garza and his staff. Each session includes on-course instruction, lesson on golf etiquette, and a maximum student/teacher ratio of 8-to-1. Equipment will be provided for those students without their own. Cost is $55 for residents of the Bend Park & Recreation District, $74 for others. To register, call 541-389-7275 or visit www.bendparksandrec.org. July 30-Aug. 3 — Oregon State University’s Junior Golf Camp in Corvallis is for boys and girls ages 12 through 18. Camp attendees will receive instruction by Oregon State women’s golf coach Risë Alexander and assistant coach Kailin Downs, a former professional golfer and Mountain View High School standout. Cost is $995, and includes instruction, room, board, t-shirt, green fees and practice ball expenses). Cost is $845 for golfers who do not need room and board. For more information or to register, visit www.oregonstategolfcamp.com. ——— TOURNAMENTS June 14-16 — Best of Bend Best Ball at Pronghorn Club in Bend, Brasada Canyons Golf Club in Powell Butte, and Tetherow Golf Club in Bend. Tournament is an amateur two-man best ball with gross and net divisions for both men and women. The first round starts with a 1 p.m. shotgun start at Pronghorn, followed by 9 a.m. start at Brasada and a 1 p.m. start at Tetherow. Cost is $595 per golfer or $1,190 per team and includes three rounds of golf, cocktail reception, lunch, and an awards dinner. For more information visit www.bestofbendbestball.com or call tournament coordinator Stein Swenson at 541318-5155. June 15 — Aspen Lakes Outlaw Open at Aspen Lakes Golf Course in Sisters is a tournament fundraiser for the Sisters High School athletics teams. Four-person

scramble begins with a 1:30 p.m. shotgun. Dinner and auction following the round. Register as a team or individually. Entry fee is $125 per player before May 26 and $130 after. Includes green fees, cart and dinner. For more information, call Suzanne Lind at 541-549-4045 or log on to www.outlawopen.org. June 16 — The Seventh Annual RC Scramble at Crooked River Ranch is a four-person scramble tournament. Proceeds to benefit Redmond Christian Church’s youth ministries. Tournament begins with an 8 a.m. shotgun start. Cost is $70 per person before June 3 and $80 per person after. Price includes green fees, cart, dinner and prizes. Sponsorships also available. For more information or to get a registration form call the Redmond Christian Church at 541-548-2974. June 16-17 — Central Oregon Scramble is a threeperson scramble at Juniper Golf Course in Redmond. For more information, call 541-548-3121, or download an entry form at www.playjuniper.com. June 18 — Central Oregon Junior Golf Association tournament at Bend Golf and Country Club. Tee times begin at 10 a.m. For more information, call Woodie Thomas at 541-598-4653, email cojga@hotmail.com, or visit www.cojga.com. June 21 — Golfers for Scholars golf tournament at Eagle Crest Resort Course in Redmond. Four-person scramble begins with 8:30 a.m. shotgun. Cost is $70 per person and includes cart, range balls and barbecue lunch. Proceeds to benefit the Redmond Realtors Association’s high school scholarship program. To register or for more information, call Tina DeCamp at 541-504-7453. June 22 — Leadership Bend’s Chip-in for Children 100-Hole Golf Marathon at Tetherow Golf Club in Bend. Event begins at 7:30 a.m., and object is to finish as many golf holes as possible, up to 100. To participate as a twoperson team golfers will need to raise at least $1,500 and golf 100 holes. Individuals who raise $1,250 can play 72 holes, or 54 holes for $1,000. Entry fee includes golf, cart, prizes, breakfast, lunch, snacks and three-course dinner for two. Proceeds from the event benefit Central Oregon youth programs and children’s charities including Family Access Network, Grandma’s House, Healthy Beginnings and the Bend-La Pine Education Foundation. For more information on sponsorship opportunities, visit www. bendgolfmarathon.com. June 22-24 — The 59th Men’s Mirror Pond Amateur Invitational, Central Oregon’s longest-running golf tournament, at Bend Golf and Country Club attracts top amateur male golfers from Oregon and beyond for 36 holes of individual stroke-play competition over two days. A practice round is scheduled for June 22, followed by tournament play on both Saturday and Sunday. Nonmember entry fee is $220 and includes practice round, tee prize, hosted tournament dinner, 36-hole stroke-play event, and additional contests. All male players age 18 and over with a handicap of 27 or better are welcome. Players can register in three divisions: open (age 18 and older), senior (age 50 and older) and super senior (age 65 and older). To register, call the Bend G&CC golf shop at 541-382-2878 or Garry Mode at 541-420-0704. Entry forms also available online at www.bendgolfclub.com (click the “Tournaments” tab). June 23 — The 18th annual Three Sisters Open Women’s Golf Tournament at Juniper Golf Club in Redmond. The team scramble begins with an 8 a.m. shotgun start and is for women golfers of all abilities. Proceeds will benefit Quota International of Central Oregon and Bend Women’s Scholarship Fund. Cost is $100 per player and includes golf, use of a cart, continental breakfast, lunch, tee gift and prizes. Space is limited and entries will be accepted on a first-come basis. For more information or to register, call Susie or Tess at 541-382-7446 or email to signpro@signprooregon.com. June 25 — Central Oregon Junior Golf Association tournament at Crooked River Ranch. Tee times begin at 8 a.m. For more information, call Woodie Thomas at 541-598-4653, email cojga@hotmail.com, or visit www. cojga.com. June 26 — Central Oregon Golf Tour skins game at Black Butte Ranch’s Big Meadow course. The Central Oregon Golf Tour is a competitive golf series held at golf courses throughout Central Oregon. Gross and net competitions open to all amateur golfers of all abilities. Prize pool awarded weekly, and membership not required. For more information or to register: 541-633-7652, 541-3185155, or www.centraloregongolftour.com. June 26 — Central Oregon Junior Golf Association’s looper tournament at Awbrey Glen Golf Club’s Loop Course in Bend. Event is for 6- to 8-year-olds. Golf begins at 4 p.m. Cost is $15 to register for three events, plus an $8 per-event fee. For more information, call Woodie Thomas at 541-598-4653, email cojga@hotmail.com, or visit www.cojga.com. June 28 — The Central Oregon Builders Association is hosting two golf tournaments in one day at River’s Edge Golf Course in Bend. Four-person shamble tees off with an 8 a.m. shotgun start. Cost is $125 per person or $500 per team to play in one tournament. Fee includes lunch, tee and raffle prizes. Proceeds to benefit the COBA Government Affairs Program. For more information or to register, call Andy High at 541-389-1058 or email him at andyh@coba.org. June 28 — Central Oregon Golf Tour tournament at Crosswater Club in Sunriver. The Central Oregon Golf Tour is a competitive golf series held at golf courses throughout Central Oregon. Gross and net competitions open to all amateur golfers of all abilities. Prize pool awarded weekly, and membership not required. For more information or to register: 541-633-7652, 541-318-5155, or www.centraloregongolftour.com. June 30 — Second annual St. Thomas Academy Golf Tournament at Juniper Golf Course in Redmond. Scramble begins with 8:30 a.m. shotgun. Cost is $85 per player or $340 per team and includes green fees, cart and barbecue lunch. Individual contests and prizes also included. All proceeds go to educational materials for the children at St. Thomas Academy in Redmond. For more information or to register, call St. Thomas at 541-548-3785 or visit redmondacademy.com. June 30 — Cross Country tournament at Meadow Lakes Golf Course in Prineville. Golfers tee off from one tee box and play to a different tee box. Play begins at 8 a.m. Cost is $20 plus green fees. For more information or to register, call the Meadow Lakes pro shop at 541447-7113. July 7-8 — Prineville Invitational Pro-Am at Prineville Golf Club. Friday practice round and evening horse race for professionals also available. For more information, contact Prineville GC at 541-480-3566. July 8 — The Audrey Ditmore Memorial Golf Tournament is an 18-hole four-person scramble at Desert Peaks Golf Club in Madras. Cost is $100 per team and includes green fees, KP and long drives, and barbecue lunch. For more information or to register, call Desert Peaks at 541-475-6368, visit www.desertpeaksgolf.com, or email desertpeaksgolf@gmail.com. July 9 — Central Oregon Seniors Golf Organization event at John Day Golf Course in John Day. The format is individual gross and net best ball, as well as team best ball. Cash prizes awarded at each event. Tournament series is open to men’s club members at host sites, and participants must have an Oregon Golf Association handicap. Cost is $150 for the season plus a $5 per-event fee. For more information, call Ron Meisner at 541-548-3307. July 9 — Central Oregon Junior Golf Association tournament at Tetherow Golf Club in Bend. Tee times begin at noon. For more information, call Woodie Thomas at 541-598-4653, email cojga@hotmail.com, or visit www. cojga.com. July 10 — Central Oregon Junior Golf Association’s looper tournament at Awbrey Glen Golf Club’s Loop Course in Bend. Event is for 6- to 8-year-olds. Golf begins at 4 p.m. Cost is $15 to register for three events, plus an $8 per-event fee. For more information, call Woodie Thomas at 541-598-4653, email cojga@hotmail.com, or visit www.cojga.com. July 13 — Golf tournament at Eagle Crest Resort’s Ridge course in Redmond to benefit the Boys & Girls

Clubs of Central Oregon and Kiwanis Club of Redmond. Four-person scramble begins at 8 a.m. Entry fee is $125 per person or $500 per team and includes continental breakfast, barbecue lunch, prizes for the first- and second-place teams, men’s and women’s long-drive contest, and closest-to-the-pin contest on every hole. Awards ceremony and silent auction to follow tournament. Sponsorships are available. For more information, contact Brandy Fultz at 541-504-9060, or email to bfultz@ bgcco.org. July 13 — The 31st annual St. Charles Medical Center golf tournament at Eagle Crest Resort’s Resort Course. This tournament is a four-person Texas scramble with awards for men, ladies and mixed doubles. Prizes for men’s and women’s long-drive competition. Shotgun start at 8:30 a.m. Entry fee is $95 per player and includes continental breakfast, golf, cart, range balls, prizes and catered lunch. For more information, call Jan at 541923-9766. July 16 — Central Oregon Junior Golf Association tournament at Kah-Nee-Ta High Desert Resort & Casino on the Warm Springs Indian Reservation. Tee times begin at 1 p.m. For more information, call Woodie Thomas at 541-598-4653, email cojga@hotmail.com, or visit www. cojga.com. July 16-17 — Peter Jacobsen’s Legends of Oregon golf tournament at a Central Oregon golf course to be determined. Tournament is a two-net shamble, and each team will include an Oregon “legend” in group to round out fivesome. University of Oregon alumni and coaches scheduled to be on hand include Mike Bellotti, Joey Harrington, and Jacobsen. Cost is $5,000 per foursome. The field is limited to the first 18 groups to sign up. Proceeds benefit the Duck Athletic Fund. For more information, call 541-346-5433, or visit www. legendsoforegon.com. July 19 — Couples Nine-Hole Golf Outing at Aspen Lakes Golf Course. Golf begins with 4:30 p.m. shotgun start and three-course dinner at Brand 33 Restaurant begins at 7 p.m. Cost is $90 per couple and includes golf and dinner. For more information or to register, call the Aspen Lakes pro shop at 541-549-4653. July 19 — Central Oregon Golf Tour tournament at Black Butte Ranch’s Big Meadow course. The Central Oregon Golf Tour is a competitive golf series held at golf courses throughout Central Oregon. Gross and net competitions open to all amateur golfers of all abilities. Prize pool awarded weekly, and membership not required. For more information or to register: 541-633-7652, 541318-5155, or www.centraloregongolftour.com. July 19-20 — Diamond in the Rough Ladies Invitational at Crooked River Ranch is a 36-hole tournament for two-person teams. Thursday’s round is a best ball followed by a Friday Chapman. Open to any golfer with an official USGA handicap. For more information or to register, call Crooked River Ranch at 541-923-6343, or visit www.crookedriveranch.com.

Professional Men World Golf Ranking Through Sunday Rank. Name Country 1. Luke Donald Eng 2. Rory McIlroy NIr 3. Lee Westwood Eng 4. Tiger Woods USA 5. Bubba Watson USA 6. Matt Kuchar USA 7. Justin Rose Eng 8. Hunter Mahan USA 9. Jason Dufner USA 10. Dustin Johnson USA 11. Steve Stricker USA 12. Martin Kaymer Ger 13. Phil Mickelson USA 14. Webb Simpson USA 15. Charl Schwartzel SAf 16. Louis Oosthuizen SAf 17. Adam Scott Aus 18. Zach Johnson USA 19. Jason Day Aus 20. Rickie Fowler USA 21. Graeme McDowell NIr 22. Sergio Garcia Esp 23. Bill Haas USA 24. Keegan Bradley USA 25. Peter Hanson Swe 26. Brandt Snedeker USA 27. Nick Watney USA 28. Ian Poulter Eng 29. Paul Lawrie Sco 30. Bo Van Pelt USA 31. K.J. Choi Kor 32. Martin Laird Sco 33. Francesco Molinari Ita 34. Thomas Bjorn Den 35. Nicolas Colsaerts Bel 36. Jim Furyk USA 37. Carl Pettersson Swe 38. John Senden Aus 39. Mark Wilson USA 40. Alvaro Quiros Esp 41. Bae Sang-moon Kor 42. David Toms USA 43. Ernie Els SAf 45. Aaron Baddeley Aus 46. Gonzalo Fernandez-Castano Esp 47. Fredrik Jacobson Swe 48. Simon Dyson Eng 49. Geoff Ogilvy Aus 50. Robert Karlsson Swe 51. Kevin Na USA 52. Ben Crane USA 53. Anders Hansen Den 54. Branden Grace SAf 55. Rafael Cabrera Bello Esp 56. Kyle Stanley USA 57. K.T. Kim Kor 58. Paul Casey Eng 59. Robert Rock Eng 60. Spencer Levin USA 61. Ryo Ishikawa Jpn 62. Johnson Wagner USA 63. Matteo Manassero Ita 64. Miguel Angel Jimenez Esp 65. Greg Chalmers Aus 66. Rory Sabbatini SAf 67. Hiroyuki Fujita Jpn 68. Y.E. Yang Kor 69. George Coetzee SAf 70. Charles Howell III USA 71. Ryan Moore USA 72. Retief Goosen SAf 73. John Huh USA 74. Ryan Palmer USA 75. Gary Woodland USA

Points 10.29 9.01 8.16 6.71 6.21 5.97 5.67 5.41 5.30 5.09 5.03 5.02 4.98 4.81 4.70 4.68 4.67 4.62 4.54 4.53 4.35 4.23 4.05 3.99 3.93 3.73 3.64 3.63 3.62 3.42 3.34 3.23 3.20 3.20 3.18 3.16 3.04 3.03 3.00 2.96 2.92 2.92 2.87 2.77 2.72 2.71 2.70 2.66 2.63 2.61 2.58 2.56 2.54 2.52 2.46 2.42 2.36 2.36 2.26 2.25 2.21 2.21 2.20 2.19 2.18 2.18 2.18 2.12 2.11 2.10 2.07 2.06 2.05 2.05

PGA Tour U.S . OPE N S i t e : San Francisco. S c h e d u l e : Thursday-Sunday. Co u r s e : The Olympic Club, Lake Course (7,170 yards, par 70). P u r s e : TBA ($7.85 million in 2011). Winner’s share: TBA ($1.44 million in 2011). T e l e v i s i o n : ESPN (ThursdayFriday, 9 a.m.-noon, 2-7 p.m.; Monday playoff, if necessary, 9-11 a.m.), NBC (ThursdayFriday, noon-2 p.m.; SaturdaySunday, 1-7 p.m.; Monday playoff, if necessary, 11 a.m.conclusion). L a s t y e a r : Rory McIlroy won at Congressional in Bethesda, Md., shattering the tournament scoring records at 16-under 268. McIlroy became the second player from Northern Ireland to win the event in three years, following Graeme McDowell in 2010 at Pebble Beach. L a s t w e e k : Dustin Johnson won the St. Jude Classic in Memphis, Tenn., in his second event following a back injury that sidelined him nearly three months. John Merrick finished second, a stroke back. ... Lee Westwood won the Nordea Masters in Sweden for his 22nd European Tour title. The Englishman also won the event in 1996 and 2000. N o t e s : Tiger Woods won the 2008 tournament at Torrey Pines for the last of his 14 major victories. He also won in 2000 at Pebble Beach and 2002 at Bethpage. Woods won the Memorial two weeks ago in his last start to match Jack Nicklaus for second place on the PGA Tour career victory list with 73. ... McIlroy tied for seventh in Memphis after missing the cuts in three straight worldwide starts. He won the Honda Classic in March. ... Lee Janzen won the 1998 tournament at Olympic. Jack Fleck (1955), Billy Casper (1966) and Scott Simpson (1987) also won the event at the course.

European Tour S AIN T O M E R OP E N S i t e : Lumbres, France. S c h e d u l e : Thursday-Sunday. Co u r s e : Aa Saint-Omer Golf Club (6,835 yards, par 71). P u r s e : $624,580. Winner’s share: $104,105. T e l e v i s i o n : None. L a s t y e a r : Australia’s Matthew Zions won his first European Tour title, finishing at 8 under for a seven-stroke victory. A ll T i m e s P D T


B U S IN E S S

E

Stock listings, E2-3 Calendar, E4 News of Record, E4

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13, 2012

s

NASDAQ

CLOSE 2,843.07 CHANGE +33.34 +1.19%

s

DOW JONES

www.bendbulletin.com/business CLOSE 12,573.80 CHANGE +162.57 +1.31%

s

S&P 500

CLOSE 1,324.18 CHANGE +15.25 +1.17%

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BONDS

10-year Treasury

CLOSE 1.66 CHANGE +4.40%

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$1,612.70 s SILVER GOLD CLOSE CHANGE +$17.20

Verizon sets new data rate structure

HOUSING FOR HEROES

IN BRIEF State agrees to land swaps The Oregon State Land Board voted Tuesday to proceed with land exchanges on two pieces of Central Oregon property. The board voted to swap an 80-acre parcel of land south of the Prineville Airport in Crook County with an adjacent parcel held by PremierWest Bank, which took ownership after it foreclosed on the land in 2010. The board also approved a swap of 256 acres of state land with 120 acres owned by the Tumalo Irrigation District, adjacent to the Tumalo Reservoir in Deschutes County. The Crook County swap gives the state a piece of prime, industrial-ready land in Prineville’s enterprise zone. Similarly zoned land has opened the door for large companies like Facebook and Apple to build data centers in the area. The Land Board consists of Oregon’s governor, the secretary of state and the state treasurer.

Airport activity increases in May Passenger boardings at Redmond Airport last month increased slightly year over year, according to figures released Tuesday. Total boardings for the first five months of the year, however, have declined almost 2 percent. In May, 18,944 passengers took off from Redmond Airport, 28 more than in May 2011. For the year to date, the airport has recorded 91,954 boardings, 1,747 fewer than during the same period last year.

Oregon jobless rate flat in May Economists say Oregon added 6,900 jobs in May, but the unemployment rate was essentially unchanged. The state Employment Department said Tuesday that Oregon’s seasonally adjusted unemployment rate was 8.4 percent in May. The job growth was driven largely by hiring in the transportation and utilities sector. There was also strong growth in the professional services and manufacturing sectors. — Staff and wire reports

Unemployment Unemployment in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) has remained unchanged since January.

UNEMPLOYMENT RATES, APRIL OECD E.U. Euro area

7.9% 10.3 11.0

RATES IN SELECTED COUNTRIES Spain Portugal Ireland France Italy U.S. Canada Germany Mexico Australia Japan S. Korea

24.3

15.2 14.2 10.2 10.2 8.1 7.3 5.4 5.0 4.9 4.6 3.4

Source: OECD © 2012 McClatchy-Tribune News Service

CLOSE $28.943 CHANGE +$0.337

By Peter Svensson The Associated Press

Photos by Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Renovations continue, left, on one of three apartment buildings at the Housing for Heroes complex on Northeast Dekalb Avenue in Bend on Monday. Four veterans live in another building, center, where work was completed in January. Renovations on the third building are expected to begin at the end of this month.

For struggling veterans, a new place to call home • Renovations are under way on apartment buildings

Housing for Heroes For more information about the Housing for Heroes affordable-housing complex, contact Central Oregon Veterans Outreach at 541-383-2793.

By Rachael Rees The Bulletin

Without Housing for Heroes, a Bend affordable-housing complex for veterans, Richard Bonebrake said he would be homeless. Central Oregon Veterans Outreach, a nonprofit organization, completed renovations on the first of three Housing for Heroes apartment buildings in January, providing Bonebrake, a 64-year-old U.S. Navy veteran, a permanent place to live. The fourplex of two-bedroom apartments on Northeast Dekalb Avenue also houses three other veterans. “Without this situation, there wouldn’t have been any place I could have afforded,” he said. Bonebrake, who’s lived

Richard Bonebrake, a 64-year-old U.S. Navy veteran, moved into the Housing for Heroes complex in Bend in February. The site offers affordable housing for veterans.

in Bend for 20 years, suffers from a service-related disability — chronic obstructive pulmonary disease — which requires him to use an oxygen tank. Because of his need for oxygen, he said, he’s struggling to find a job and can’t work

as a cook or repair machinery, jobs he had before he was diagnosed in January 2011. To create affordable housing for homeless, low-income, disabled or disadvantaged veterans and their families, COVO teamed up with the city of Bend and the Oregon

Housing and Community Services Department to fund the $1 million project that will house 12 veterans upon its expected September completion. The project has been broken into three renovation phases, based on when the three foreclosed and bankowned apartment buildings could be purchased. “We expect to have phase two completed and phase three started before the end of the month,” Chuck Hemingway, executive director of COVO, said Monday. See Veterans / E3

AT WORK FTC levies first fine over More than 7 in 10 U.S. teens collection of will be jobless this summer personal data By Hope Yen

Colleen Knaggs, 18, of Flagstaff, Ariz., has been unable to find a job for the past two years.

The Associated Press

By Edward Wyatt New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — The Federal Trade Commission assessed an $800,000 fine Tuesday against Spokeo, a data collector that the commission said violated federal law by compiling and selling people’s personal information for use by potential employers in screening job applicants. The action is the FTC’s first case addressing the sale of Internet and social media data for use in employment screening. Spokeo, of Pasadena, Calif., agreed to settle the civil charges without admitting that they are true. The trade commission alleged that Spokeo violated the Fair Credit Reporting Act by marketing its consumer profiles without making sure that they would be used for legal purposes, failing to insure their accuracy and neglecting to tell consumers of its own responsibilities under federal law. See Data / E3

WASHINGTON — Once a rite of passage to adulthood, summer jobs for teens are disappearing. Fewer than three in 10 American teenagers now hold jobs such as running cash registers, mowing lawns or busing restaurant tables from June to August. The decline has been particularly sharp since 2000, with employment for 16-to-19-year olds falling to the lowest level since World War II. And teen employment may never return to pre-recession levels, suggests a projection by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. The drop in teen employment, steeper than for other age groups, is partly a cultural shift. More youths are spending summer months in school, at music or learning camps or in other activities geared for college. But the decline is especially troubling for teens for whom college may be out of reach, leaving them increasingly idle and with few options to earn wages and job experience.

Felicia Fonseca The Associated Press

Older workers, immigrants and debt-laden college graduates are taking away lowerskill work as they struggle to find their own jobs in the weak economy. Upper-income white teens are three times as likely to have summer jobs as poor black teens, sometimes capitalizing on their parents’ social networks for help. Overall, more than 44 percent of teens who want summer jobs don’t get them or work fewer hours than they prefer. “It’s really frustrating,” said Colleen Knaggs, describing her fruitless efforts to find work for the past two years. The 18-year-old graduated

from high school last week in Flagstaff, Ariz., the state that ranks highest in the share of U.S. teens who are unable to get the summer work they desire, at 58 percent. Wanting to be better prepared to live on her own and to save for college, Knaggs says she submitted a dozen applications for summer cashier positions. She was turned down for what she believes was her lack of connections and work experience. Instead of working this summer, she’ll now be babysitting her 10-year-old brother, which has been the extent of her work so far, aside from volunteering at concession stands. See Teens / E3

NEW YORK — Verizon Wireless, the nation’s largest cellphone company, is dropping nearly all of its phone plans in favor of pricing schemes that encourage consumers to connect their nonphone devices, like tablets and PCs, to Verizon’s network. The new plans will become available on June 28, and reflect Verizon’s desire to keep growing now that nearly every American already has a phone. The plans let subscribers share a monthly data allowance over up to 10 devices. It’s the biggest revamp in wireless pricing in years, and one that’s likely to be copied by other carriers. AT&T Inc. has already said that it’s looking at introducing shared-data plans soon. Change, across the industry, was inevitable. See Verizon / E3

U.S. wireless market Verizon holds an estimated 32.6 percent share of the U.S. wireless market. AT&T 30.9%

Verizon 32.6% Share of all wireless devices

Sprint All other carriers T-Mobile Nextel 9.9% 16.7% 9.9%

Sources: The companies AP

U.S.-backed battery maker claims it has breakthrough By Bill Vlasic and Matthew L. Wald New York Times News Service

DETROIT — Lauded during a visit by President Barack Obama, A123 Systems was supposed to be a centerpiece of his administration’s effort to use $2 billion in government subsidies to jump-start production of sophisticated electric batteries in the United States. Instead, the company, which makes lithium-ion batteries for electric cars, has stumbled along with the rest of the nascent industry and threatens to give more ammunition to critics of the president’s heavy spending on new energy technologies. A123 had to cut workers at its new factory in Livonia, Mich., financed in part with the promise of a $249 million government grant, after its battery for one new electric vehicle faltered and required an expensive recall. Completion of the factory has been delayed. Yet as much as A123 represents the risks of the government’s battery technology program, it also represents its promise. On Tuesday, A123 Systems unveiled a new battery technology that the company says is a breakthrough in the industry. See Battery / E4


E2

THE BULLETIN â&#x20AC;˘ WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13, 2012

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A-B-C-D AAR 0.30 ABB Ltd 0.71 ABM 0.58 ACE Ltd 1.78 AES Corp AFLAC 1.32 AG Mtge n 2.80 AGCO AGL Res 1.84 AK Steel 0.20 AMC Net n AOL ASML Hld 0.59 AT&T Inc 1.76 ATP O&G AU Optron 0.14 AVI Bio h Aarons 0.06 AbtLab 2.04 AberFitc 0.70 AbdAsPac 0.42 Abiomed AboveNet Abraxas AcaciaTc Accenture 1.35 AccoBrds AccretivH Accuray Achillion AcmePkt AcordaTh AcornEngy 0.14 ActionSemi ActiveNet ActivePw h ActivsBliz 0.18 Actuant 0.04 Actuate Acuity 0.52 Acxiom AdamsEx 0.65 AdobeSy Adtran 0.36 AdvAuto 0.24 AdvEnId AMD AdvSemi 0.11 Adventrx AdvActBear AecomTch AegeanMP 0.04 Aegon 0.13 Aegon cap 1.59 AerCap Aeropostl AEterna gh Aetna 0.70 AffilMgrs Affymax Affymetrix Agilent 0.40 Agnico g 0.80 Agrium g 1.00 AirLease AirProd 2.56 AirTrnsp Aircastle 0.60 Airgas 1.60 AkamaiT Akorn AlaskAir s AlaskCom 0.20 Albemarle 0.80 AlcatelLuc Alcoa 0.12 Alere AlexBaldH 1.26 AlexREE 2.04 AlexcoR g Alexion Alexza h AlignTech Alkermes AllegTch 0.72 Allergan 0.20 AlliData AlliHold 2.67 AlliancOne AlliBInco 0.48 AlliBern 0.98 AlliantEgy 1.80 AlliantTch 0.80 AlldNevG AlldWldA 1.50 AllisonT n 0.24 AllosThera AllotComm AllscriptH Allstate 0.88 AlnylamP AlphaNRs AlpGPPrp 0.60 AlpTotDiv 0.66 AlpAlerMLP 1.00 AlteraCp lf 0.32 AlterraCap 0.56 Altria 1.64 AmBev 1.23 AmTrstFin 0.40 Amarin Amazon Amdocs Amedisys Ameren 1.60 Amerigrp AFTxE 0.50 AMovilL s 0.28 AmAxle AmCampus 1.35 ACapAgy 5.00 AmCapLtd ACapMtg n 3.60 AEagleOut 0.44 AEP 1.88 AEqInvLf 0.12 AmExp 0.80 AFnclGrp 0.70 AGreet 0.60 AmIntlGrp ARltyCT n 0.70 AmSupr AmTower 0.84 AmWtrWks 1.00 Amerigas 3.20 Amrign Ameriprise 1.40 AmeriBrgn 0.52 Ametek 0.36 Amgen 1.44 AmkorTch Amphenol 0.42 AmpioPhm Amylin Amyris Anadarko 0.36 AnalogDev 1.20 Ancestry AngiesL n AnglogldA 0.49 ABInBev 1.57 Anixter 4.50 Ann Inc Annaly 2.37 Annies n Ansys AntaresP AntheraPh Anworth 0.90 Aon plc 0.60 A123 Sys Apache 0.68 Apache pfD 3.00 AptInv 0.72 ApolloGM 1.15 ApolloGrp ApolloInv 0.80 ApolloRM n 3.00 Apple Inc 10.60 ApldIndlT 0.84 ApldMatl 0.36 AMCC Approach ApricusBio AquaAm 0.66 ArQule ArborRT 0.30 ArcelorMit 0.75 ArchCap ArchC pfC 1.69 ArchCoal 0.12 ArchDan 0.70 ArcosDor 0.24 ArenaPhm AresCap 1.48 AriadP Ariba Inc ArkBest 0.12 ArmHld 0.16 ArmourRsd 1.20 ArmstrWld 8.55 ArrayBio Arris ArrowEl ArubaNet AsburyA AscenaRt s AshfordHT 0.44 Ashland 0.90 AspenIns 0.68 AspenTech AsscdBanc 0.20 AsdEstat 0.72 Assurant 0.84 AssuredG 0.36 AstexPhm AstoriaF 0.16 AstraZen 2.80 athenahlth AtlPwr g 1.15 AtlasEngy 1.00 AtlasPpln 2.24 Atmel AtwoodOcn AuRico g Aurizon g AuthenTec AutoNatn AutoNavi Autodesk Autoliv 1.88 AutoData 1.58 AutoZone Auxilium AvagoTch 0.60 AvalnRare AvalonBay 3.88 AvanirPhm AVEO Ph

12.04 16.43 20.50 72.09 12.33 40.64 20.92 41.32 38.14 5.06 37.89 27.21 48.93 34.98 4.58 3.92 .63 27.44 61.96 31.36 7.50 21.45 83.59 2.95 34.56 57.35 9.59 10.76 6.06 6.16 22.75 21.62 8.05 1.68 14.95 .89 11.69 26.22 6.57 54.14 13.31 10.28 31.77 29.33 73.35 13.77 5.91 4.27 .51 24.31 15.99 4.59 4.06 22.45 11.39 16.95 .41 42.88 102.52 12.79 4.93 39.47 41.25 82.52 20.25 79.34 5.04 11.20 85.80 30.26 14.63 34.72 2.18 59.70 1.56 8.52 18.96 48.97 69.36 5.15 93.72 .36 30.51 15.89 28.91 91.37 124.51 38.85 2.86 8.23 11.84 45.10 47.30 29.27 76.92 18.11 1.78 27.01 10.91 34.40 11.54 8.27 6.14 4.13 15.67 33.62 22.22 33.43 36.62 29.12 11.53 216.42 28.78 11.55 32.92 58.68 5.24 24.23 9.43 43.40 33.27 9.23 23.88 18.99 39.73 10.44 56.48 39.18 14.40 30.19 10.81 3.93 66.39 33.99 40.37 11.74 48.33 37.00 51.98 68.62 4.50 54.69 3.36 27.51 2.47 63.59 37.30 26.38 14.03 36.82 69.01 54.72 25.62 16.78 36.30 63.58 3.27 2.12 6.83 46.75 1.58 83.27 48.25 27.10 12.67 33.24 7.48 19.12 576.16 36.24 10.83 5.53 26.00 3.09 23.97 6.47 5.25 14.05 38.02 26.04 5.86 31.93 13.40 7.88 15.53 16.85 44.70 11.52 23.50 7.04 47.60 3.24 13.14 34.47 13.88 24.35 19.63 8.04 66.00 28.50 21.72 12.35 15.35 33.42 11.94 1.82 8.99 41.66 80.00 13.57 30.59 32.23 6.98 38.75 8.61 4.89 4.61 36.87 11.99 32.30 54.44 53.70 386.65 22.70 33.92 1.41 139.19 2.89 11.17

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AveryD 1.08 AvisBudg Avnet Avon 0.92 Axcelis AXIS Cap 0.96 B&G Foods 1.08 BB&T Cp 0.80 BCE g 2.17 BE Aero BGC Ptrs 0.68 BHP BillLt 2.20 BHPBil plc 2.20 BJsRest BMC Sft BP PLC 1.92 BPZ Res BRE 1.54 BRFBrasil 0.42 BabckWil Bacterin Baidu BakrHu 0.60 BallCorp 0.40 BallyTech BanColum 1.12 BcBilVArg 0.57 BcoBrad pf 0.81 BcoMacro BcoSantSA 0.82 BcoSBrasil 0.36 BcpSouth 0.04 BkofAm 0.04 BkHawaii 1.80 BkIreld rs BkMont g 2.80 BkNYMel 0.52 BkNova g 2.20 Bankrate n Banro g BarcUBS36 BarcGSOil Barclay 0.39 Bar iPVix BarVixMdT Bard 0.76 BarnesNob Barnes 0.40 BarrickG 0.80 BasicEnSv Baxter 1.34 BaytexE g 2.64 Bazaarvc n BeacnRfg Beam Inc 0.82 BeazerHm BebeStrs 0.10 BectDck 1.80 BedBath Belden 0.20 Belo 0.32 Bemis 1.00 Berkley 0.36 BerkH B BerryPet 0.32 BestBuy 0.64 BigLots BBarrett BioRefLab Biocryst Biodel rs BiogenIdc BioMarin BioMedR 0.86 BioSante rs BlkRKelso 1.04 Blckbaud 0.48 BlackRock 6.00 BlkEEqDv 0.68 BlkGlbOp 2.28 BlkIntlG&I 0.88 Blackstone 0.40 BlockHR 0.80 Blucora BdwlkPpl 2.13 Boeing 1.76 Boise Inc 0.48 BonTon 0.20 BonanzaC n BoozAllenH 0.36 BorgWarn BostPrv 0.04 BostProp 2.20 BostonSci BttmlnT BoydGm Brandyw 0.60 Braskem 0.65 BreitBurn 1.82 BridgptEd BrigStrat 0.44 Brightpnt BrigusG g Brinker 0.64 Brinks 0.40 BrMySq 1.36 BristowGp 0.80 BritATob 4.02 Broadcom 0.40 BroadrdgF 0.64 BroadSoft Broadwd h BrcdeCm Brookdale BrkfldAs g 0.56 BrkfInfra 1.50 BrkfldOfPr 0.56 BrklneB 0.34 BrwnBrn 0.34 BrownShoe 0.28 BrownFB 1.40 BrukerCp Brunswick 0.05 Buckeye 4.15 BuckTch 0.32 Buckle 0.80 Buenavent 0.63 BuffaloWW BldrFstSrc BungeLt 1.08 C&J Egy n CA Inc 1.00 CBL Asc 0.88 CBOE 0.48 CBRE GRE 0.54 CBRE Grp CBS B 0.40 CF Inds 1.60 CH Robins 1.32 CIT Grp CLECO 1.25 CME Grp 8.92 CMS Eng 0.96 CNA Fn 0.60 CNH Gbl CNO Fincl 0.08 CPFL En s 1.84 CSX s 0.56 CTC Media 0.52 CVB Fncl 0.34 CVR Engy 0.32 CVR Ptrs 2.09 CVS Care 0.65 CYS Invest 2.00 Cabelas CblvsNY s 0.60 Cabot 0.80 CabotOG s 0.08 CACI CadencePh Cadence CalDive CalaGDyIn 0.74 CalaStrTR 0.84 CalAmp Calgon Calix CallGolf 0.04 Callidus CallonPet Calpine CalumetSp 2.24 CAMAC En CamdenPT 2.24 Cameco g 0.40 Cameron CampSp 1.16 CIBC g 3.60 CdnNRy g 1.50 CdnNRs gs 0.42 CP Rwy g 1.40 CdnSolar Canon CapOne 0.20 CapitlSrce 0.04 CapFedFn 0.30 Caplease 0.26 CapsteadM 1.70 CpstnTrb h CarboCer 0.96 CardnlHlth 0.95 CareFusion CareerEd CaribouC Carlisle 0.72 CarlyleG n CarMax Carmike Carnival 1.00 CarpTech 0.72 Carrizo Carters Caseys 0.60 CatalystH Caterpillar 1.84 CathayGen 0.04 Cavium CedarF 1.62 CelSci Celanese 0.30 Celestic g Celgene CellTher rsh Cellcom 1.71 CelldexTh Celsion Cemex 0.32 Cemig pf s 1.18 CenovusE 0.88 Centene CenterPnt 0.81 CnElBras pf 0.87 CenElBras 0.65 CentEuro CEurMed CFCda g 0.01 CentAl CntryLink 2.90 Cenveo Cepheid Cerner s

C 27.70 13.21 30.88 15.80 1.16 32.76 25.52 29.01 40.97 43.70 6.15 63.96 55.92 40.94 43.25 39.02 2.52 48.97 15.87 24.34 1.30 117.94 39.27 41.17 46.19 61.06 6.47 14.94 11.74 6.05 8.00 13.14 7.49 45.19 5.29 53.15 20.68 50.24 18.93 4.52 37.90 20.46 11.95 19.60 51.85 98.48 15.15 24.20 38.54 9.85 50.39 43.34 17.20 24.08 60.93 2.47 6.07 72.84 71.52 32.05 5.84 31.98 38.15 81.26 37.70 20.04 38.23 16.53 23.01 3.62 2.89 134.15 36.27 18.11 2.25 9.75 24.72 173.02 7.18 12.85 7.02 12.39 15.12 12.62 26.14 72.58 6.76 5.11 15.20 15.46 66.01 8.25 102.06 5.87 17.46 7.17 11.16 11.09 17.01 19.07 17.22 5.05 .92 30.85 22.08 34.25 39.70 98.65 34.13 20.88 26.66 .29 4.57 16.31 31.77 33.16 16.42 8.52 25.97 11.61 88.87 15.24 21.05 49.15 29.46 37.77 40.98 81.20 4.08 58.83 18.22 25.44 18.10 26.94 7.61 16.09 32.46 168.74 57.92 33.95 41.08 275.26 23.42 28.17 37.51 6.68 24.70 21.77 8.53 10.66 24.54 20.57 45.39 14.05 34.88 11.54 36.49 33.59 48.86 3.13 10.48 2.29 7.99 9.20 7.07 13.02 7.72 5.59 5.09 4.05 16.42 22.92 .70 65.82 19.50 45.94 31.50 68.87 81.53 26.92 71.64 3.44 40.64 53.08 6.56 11.60 4.14 13.90 .99 73.49 41.79 24.31 6.21 10.98 51.23 21.80 27.50 13.91 33.82 43.61 20.64 52.58 59.91 88.87 87.05 16.07 26.66 27.53 .40 38.26 7.40 63.07 .75 6.88 4.19 2.07 5.30 17.82 31.60 26.90 20.30 9.14 6.64 2.90 5.63 20.56 7.28 37.38 2.08 37.77 80.35

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11.33 10.22 20.20 21.38 13.05 30.93 13.95 47.85 14.30 6.76 3.54 3.61 42.05 53.49 46.40 46.74 44.18 4.80 1.06 15.24 27.03 10.19 12.00 3.67 8.22 13.69 20.45 9.87 28.96 27.39 18.89 6.38 51.10 44.91 16.11 105.18 100.97 6.13 6.38 57.50 25.28 18.71 79.45 104.15 27.61 20.54 78.09 39.44 1.82 18.20 .62 1.58 13.80 27.61 53.40 18.38 7.02 10.49 144.51 33.39 20.02 2.25 27.36 4.62 81.79 2.22 72.18 1.41 33.04 14.20 31.07 23.32 18.36 1.07 7.26 43.48 5.66 23.93 13.45 9.95 24.17 13.26 18.96 23.79 .21 39.55 11.48 9.28 19.33 68.40 .44 9.68 25.85 17.37 109.66 66.35 17.98 18.67 22.55 4.93 22.19 1.51 39.64 9.32 85.01 18.14 33.49 1.68 11.04 5.67 31.89 16.44 16.01 7.89 13.14 9.83 51.27 7.08 92.76 14.08 78.00 35.35 30.32 37.25 73.03 10.46 13.23 36.02 14.75 26.17 4.09 47.75 38.64 4.22 24.80 26.35 23.97 22.76 4.29 9.27 17.71 26.97 18.26 18.50 14.32 28.32 16.60 62.56 6.99 106.55 12.95 167.58 7.43 13.94 58.91 64.16 646.98 25.48 2.71 1.19 12.01 25.19 14.37 32.02 36.87 27.45 37.64 16.67 64.17 33.30 50.55 34.48 51.68 47.50 16.02 29.80 31.72 27.67 17.81 51.38 21.41 38.04 30.69 52.35 28.00 46.41 36.71 29.46 70.42 61.63 17.21 73.36 27.13 53.14 41.74 17.53 42.70 21.45 21.11 62.76 8.02 59.62 18.52 21.70 17.93 55.17 33.90 43.48 52.21 53.25 51.88 29.35 11.00 6.69 27.11 14.24 47.61 31.77 136.56 8.58 5.04 5.38 6.12

C

N m

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D

C 59.40 10.30 28.18 17.35 22.39 2.00 .66 55.40 23.96 20.26 48.56 2.25 3.29 2.49 4.31 4.34 18.31 10.25 26.54 13.96 21.17 43.15 2.55 4.23 37.27 22.70 64.08 142.66 4.86 12.27 2.42 89.78 56.18 33.28 43.28 52.37 11.90 17.68 39.45 53.72 11.94 3.61 62.04 13.42 44.47 22.37 127.85 6.19 17.85 51.02 47.09 74.30 1.30 4.59 34.34 1.71 25.65 10.61 32.17 8.96 .90 11.50 5.47 11.76 9.25 10.04 19.95 41.34 7.85 44.97 19.52 1.22 16.45 46.34 28.42 53.95 70.10 50.38 47.19 34.40 21.56 100.70 9.67 39.10 65.04 10.29 22.35 30.99 49.19 6.98 16.54 24.12 66.74 64.23 80.19 12.25 2.90 6.85 26.39 30.15 42.18 20.65 11.57 57.68 52.94 47.59 18.43 11.62 73.97 14.51 47.42 125.59 156.46 24.98 167.22 132.92 81.24 55.18 20.03 21.07 36.85 38.46 24.42 58.50 45.83 25.90 58.04 46.97 39.33 68.00 7.36 5.16 3.29 56.18 92.51 72.73 15.91 18.16 15.37 36.24 10.07 130.58 52.06 26.69 1.67 12.56 19.68 52.90 35.95 6.11 7.21 34.76 1.36 6.93 11.12 19.03 .29 .85 64.93 24.03 26.92 18.98 12.24 25.00 7.15 8.64 16.72 43.05 56.81 8.73 16.63 1.48 33.25 23.19 15.65 1.72 50.66 24.24 22.19 30.58 66.95 23.99 20.70 30.34 36.48 3.55 11.37 12.26 .04 4.16 18.69 26.32 133.01 15.52 88.01 3.89 14.09 24.43 6.07 82.71 2.56 71.42 59.99 43.83 44.39 5.86 4.31 36.28 14.26 4.92 12.70 27.92 6.58 149.03 52.40 8.10 1.86 44.26 50.59 20.48 13.67 6.57 27.76 7.10 1.57 6.60 47.33 1.73 19.23 75.78 63.04

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N m

D

SnydLance 0.64 SocQ&M 1.04 SodaStrm Sohu.cm SolarWinds Solazyme Solera 0.40 Solitario Solutia 0.15 SonicAut 0.10 SonicCorp SonocoP 1.20 Sonus SonyCp 0.32 Sothebys 0.32 Sourcefire SouthnCo 1.96 SthnCopper 2.04 SwstAirl 0.04 SwtGas 1.18 SwstnEngy Spansion SpectraEn 1.12 SpectPh SpiritAero SpiritAir Splunk n Spreadtrm 0.40 SprintNex SprottSilv SprottGold StaarSur STAG Indl 1.08 StageStrs 0.40 Stamps.cm SP Matls 0.76 SP HlthC 0.71 SP CnSt 0.89 SP Consum 0.62 SP Engy 1.10 SPDR Fncl 0.22 SP Inds 0.75 SP Tech 0.39 SP Util 1.40 StMotr 0.36 StdPac StanBlkDk 1.64 Staples 0.44 StarScient Starbucks 0.68 StarwdHtl 0.50 StarwdPT 1.76 StateStr 0.96 Statoil ASA 1.12 StlDynam 0.40 Steelcse 0.36 Stereotax h Stericycle Steris 0.68 Sterlite 0.18 SMadden StewEnt 0.16 StifelFin StillwtrM StoneEngy Stratasys StratHotels StratH pfC 2.06 StreamHlt Stryker 0.85 SturmRug 0.81 SumitMitsu SunHlth SunLfFn g 1.44 SunCoke n Suncor gs 0.44 SunesisPh Sunoco 0.80 SunocoL s 1.71 SunPower SunriseSen SunstnHtl Suntech SunTrst 0.20 SupEnrgy Supvalu 0.35 SurWest 0.40 SusqBnc 0.20 SwRCmATR SwERCmTR SwftEng SwiftTrans SwisherH lf SykesEnt Symantec SymetraF 0.28 Synacor n Synaptics Synchron SynrgyP rs Synopsys Synovus 0.04 Synovus pf 2.06 SyntaPhm Sypris 0.08 Sysco 1.08 TAL Intl 2.32 TAM SA TCF Fncl 0.20 TD Ameritr 0.24 TE Connect 0.84 TECO 0.88 THQ h TICC Cap 1.08 TIM Part n TJX s 0.46 TRWAuto TTM Tch tw telecom TaiwSemi 0.52 TakeTwo Talbots TalismE g 0.27 TangerFac 0.84 Tangoe n TanzRy g TargaRes 1.46 TargaRsLP 2.49 Targacept Target 1.20 TASER TataMotors 0.45 Taubmn 1.85 TeamHlth TechData TeckRes g 0.80 Teekay 1.27 TeekayTnk 0.63 TlCmSys TlcmArg 0.93 TelcmNZ s 0.91 TelItalia 0.57 TelefBrasil 1.86 TelefEsp 1.75 TeleNav TelData 0.49 Tellabs 0.08 TempurP Tenaris 0.76 TenetHlth Tenneco Teradata Teradyn Terex Ternium 0.75 TeslaMot Tesoro TesseraTch 0.40 TetraTech TevaPhrm 0.98 TxCapBsh Texas Inds TexInst 0.68 TexRdhse 0.36 Textron 0.08 Theragen Theravnce ThermoFis 0.52 ThomCrk g ThomsonR 1.28 Thor Inds 0.60 Thoratec 3D Sys 3M Co 2.36 ThrshdPhm TibcoSft Tidwtr 1.00 Tiffany 1.28 TW Cable 2.24 TimeWarn 1.04 Timken 0.92 Titan Intl 0.02 TitanMach TitanMet 0.30 TiVo Inc TollBros Trchmrk s 0.60 Toro Co 0.88 TorDBk g 2.88 Total SA 3.02 TotalSys 0.40 TowerGrp 0.75 TowerSm h TowersWat 0.40 Towerstm TractSupp 0.80 TrCda g 1.76 TrnsatlPet TransDigm Transocn 3.16 Travelers 1.84 Travelzoo Trex TriValley TrianglCap 2.00 TriangPet TrimbleN

C 25.59 53.04 35.15 44.63 43.90 12.06 42.20 1.12 27.57 14.48 8.83 30.85 2.35 13.07 30.72 50.67 47.31 29.46 8.99 43.88 26.57 10.57 27.91 11.72 23.56 18.60 30.43 19.20 2.92 12.20 13.92 8.10 14.02 17.50 23.10 34.57 36.61 34.09 43.21 64.52 14.09 34.90 28.21 36.83 12.54 4.93 63.53 12.76 4.06 53.04 50.80 20.57 43.42 22.90 10.41 8.51 .30 88.04 30.80 7.51 38.99 6.81 30.88 9.25 23.80 45.98 5.96 30.20 3.49 51.78 36.56 5.98 5.76 21.18 13.51 28.20 2.52 46.90 33.71 5.09 6.45 10.04 1.74 21.68 20.02 4.18 21.32 9.46 8.19 7.72 17.66 9.93 2.05 15.54 14.57 11.64 12.87 26.57 17.52 4.77 29.00 1.72 16.37 5.87 6.49 28.60 32.73 22.12 10.96 16.93 32.34 17.85 .68 9.67 25.90 41.70 37.82 9.00 24.66 13.70 10.75 2.45 10.90 30.85 20.58 4.53 43.33 35.68 4.29 58.16 5.32 21.90 73.84 22.28 47.00 30.98 26.93 4.14 1.38 11.04 9.21 8.84 23.89 12.31 5.57 20.76 3.48 23.87 32.44 4.73 27.17 68.69 14.10 17.30 19.04 29.66 22.92 13.55 6.45 38.81 38.85 32.92 28.24 17.80 24.52 2.08 18.19 50.31 3.23 28.17 28.71 31.53 31.91 86.73 6.39 26.27 46.35 55.53 77.88 35.33 47.27 21.15 26.94 11.21 8.23 25.10 47.84 72.33 76.03 43.60 23.34 19.90 .79 60.25 3.82 87.92 41.20 1.03 126.84 42.67 61.94 21.94 30.04 .07 21.02 5.11 46.34

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WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

Data

Veterans

Continued from E1 The FTC also charged that Spokeo created fake endorsements of its service and posted those comments on news and technology websites and blogs. In fact, the commission said, the comments were made up by Spokeo’s employees. The trade commission normally does not have the ability to assess fines, but in this instance it was allowed to do so under the Fair Credit Reporting Act. In a statement posted on its corporate blog, Spokeo said it has made changes to its business practices and website to ensure that it does not violate the act’s consumer protections. “It has never been our intention to act as a consumer reporting agency,” the company’s statement said. “We are a technology company organizing people-related data in innovative ways. We do not create our own content, we do not possess or have access to private financial information, and we do not offer consumer reports.” The FTC alleged otherwise. In its complaint, filed in Federal District Court in Los Angeles, it said that from 2008 to 2010, Spokeo sold “coherent people profiles” that could include an individual’s address, phone number, marital status, approximate age, email address, hobbies, ethnicity, religion, participation on social media sites, photos and other information. More advanced versions of its subscription product offered customized searches or access to more individual searches. The services were marketed to human resources departments, background screening companies and employment recruiters, and were promoted as tools to help users decide whether to interview or hire job candidates. In 2010, Spokeo changed its “terms of service” posted on its website to state that it was not a consumer reporting agency and that consumers may not use its profiles for purposes that are covered by the Fair Credit Reporting Act. But the FTC said that the company failed to revoke or restrict access by subscribers who had already been using the site for those purposes. The FTC voted 4-0, with one commissioner not participating, to refer the complaint to the Justice Department for possible further charges.

Continued from E1 Phase one and three received funding through Oregon Housing and Community Services, he said, from the Neighborhood Stabilization Program — a federal initiative to help nonprofits and local governments purchase foreclosed or bank-owned properties. A federal Community Development Block Grant through the city of Bend funded phase two. “This provides needed housing to a deserving population,” said Jim Long, affordable housing manager for the city. “These guys served ... (and) this is a way of giving back.” Hemingway estimates the region has 220 homeless veterans. COVO provides temporary housing for homeless veterans at the Bethlehem Inn, or through transitional housing,

Verizon Continued from E1 In the first quarter of this year, phone companies, for the first time, reported a drop in the number of phones on contract-based plans, which are the most lucrative. To keep service revenues rising, the phone companies are betting on increased data usage, and that means getting more data-hungry devices on their networks. Verizon’s new “Share Everything” plans, announced Tuesday, include unlimited phone calls and texting, and will start at $90 per month for one smartphone and 1 gigabyte of data. If used only with a smartphone, “Share Everything” prices are lower than for current plans with unlimited calling and texting, but higher than plans with limited calling and texting. The plans will push many subscribers toward spending more, by including unlimited calling and texting by default. Unlimited calling plans provide peace of mind, but not many people need them, and the average number of

such as Home of the Brave — a housing complex for veterans going through a two-year reintegration program. But once the veterans cleared up the wreckage that kept them in the cycle of homelessness, Hemingway said, they couldn’t find a permanent housing option. “Homeless veterans typically come with certain baggage,” he said. “They often have very little income, bad credit and criminal history — all of which keep them from being able to rent a place from a typical landlord.” Unlike other housing programs, Hemingway said, the Housing for Heroes apartments are permanent housing options, exclusively available to veterans. “We can provide barrierfree housing so they can become stabilized,” he said. “We don’t care if you’ve been evicted, have had a closed

bank account, have bad credit or a criminal convictions. We’re going to give you a second chance.” Veterans with federal housing vouchers can use them at Housing for Heroes, Hemingway said. But for veterans without vouchers, COVO offers subsidies of between $200 and $250 a month to meet the $450-a-month rent. Veterans can stay as long as they want at the complex, he said. However, if they want to move into their own places, their time at Housing for Heroes can help them build good rental histories and restore their credit. “Veterans can have their own place to live and manage their own life …,” he said. “A lot of these men and women have been alienated from society for a long time. This is a way to get them back into the community.”

minutes used is declining. From the carrier’s perspective, providing unlimited access is an efficient use of its network, because calling and texting take up very little capacity. Data usage, on the other hand, consumes a lot of network resources. The savings will come to subscribers who add more devices like tablets to their plans. In such cases, the new pricing system will be cheaper compared with separate data plans for each device. Today, few consumers put tablets on data plans, probably because they dread paying an extra $30 or so per month on top of their phone bills. Under “Share Everything,” adding a tablet to a plan will cost $10 per month. Verizon’s limited-calling and texting plans will disappear, except for one $40per-month plan intended for “dumb” phones. Verizon is keeping its limited-data plans for single nonphone devices, like the $30 tablet plan. Current Verizon customers will be able to switch to the new plans or keep their

old ones, with one exception. Those who have unlimiteddata plans for their smartphones won’t be able to move those to new phones, unless they pay the full, unsubsidized price for those phones. (For example, an iPhone 4S that costs $200 with a twoyear contract costs $650 unsubsidized, with no contract.) Verizon stopped signing people up for unlimited-data plans last summer. Under the new plans, subscribers can stop worrying about monitoring the number of calling minutes or text messages their families use in a month, but they’ll have to keep a close eye on data consumption. Verizon will allow subscribers to adjust their data allowance from month to month, but if they go over their monthly allotment, that will cost $15 per gigabyte. The data allowances start at $50 per month for 1 gigabyte. That’s enough for prudent two-smartphone users who use Wi-Fi a lot, but Verizon recommends getting 2 gigabytes for $60. After that, each additional 2 gigabytes cost an extra $10 per month.

AlaskAir s Avista BkofAm BarrettB Boeing CascdeBcp CascdeCp ColSprtw Costco CraftBrew FLIR Sys HewlettP HmFedID Intel Keycorp Kroger Lattice LaPac MDU Res MentorGr Microsoft

Div PE ... 1.16 .04 .44 1.76 ... 1.40 .88 1.10f ... .28 .53f .22 .90f .20f .46 ... ... .67 ... .80

15 16 ... 38 13 ... 9 18 25 14 15 8 ... 11 7 23 7 ... 20 14 11

YTD Last Chg %Chg 34.72 26.08 7.49 20.35 72.58 4.76 44.89 49.91 88.50 7.46 20.51 21.70 9.37 26.52 7.17 21.50 4.60 9.67 22.06 14.60 29.29

+.15 -.03 +.21 +.72 +2.47 +.27 +1.05 +.64 +.59 +.18 -.13 +.29 +.26 +.54 +.11 +.15 +.12 +.18 -.04 +.16 +.40

-7.5 +1.3 +34.7 +2.0 -1.0 +8.7 -4.8 +7.2 +6.2 +23.9 -18.2 -15.8 -9.9 +9.4 -6.8 -11.2 -22.6 +19.8 +2.8 +7.7 +12.8

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Market recap

Name

Div PE

NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstBcp Weyerhsr

1.44 1.08 1.78 ... .80f ... 1.68 .12 .70f .75f 1.56 .89f .68 ... .36f .78f .32 .88 ... .60

Precious metals Metal

Continued from E1 “I feel like sometimes they don’t want to go through the training,” said Knaggs, who is now bracing for a heavier debt load when she attends college in the fall. Economists say teens who aren’t getting jobs are often those who could use them the most. Many are not moving on to more education. “I have big concerns about this generation of young people,” said Harry Holzer, labor economist and public policy professor at Georgetown University. He said the income gap between rich and poor is exacerbated when lower-income youths who are less likely to enroll in college are unable to get skills and training. “For young high school graduates or dropouts, their early work experience is more closely tied to their success in the labor market,” he said. Andrew Sum, director of the Center for Labor Market Studies at Northeastern University, said better job pathways are needed for teens who don’t attend fouryear colleges, including paid internships for high school seniors and increased postsecondary training in technical institutes. “We are truly in a labor market depression for teens,” he said. “More than others, teens are frequently off the radar screens of the nation’s and states’ economic policymakers.” Washington, D.C., was the jurisdiction most likely to have teens wanting summer work but unable to get it or working fewer hours than desired, with more than three in five in that situation. It was followed by Arizona, California, Washington state, Florida, Tennessee, North Carolina and Nevada. On the other end of the

scale, Wyoming, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Nebraska, South Dakota and Kansas had teens who were more often able to find work. All those states have fewer immigrant workers. The figures are based on an analysis of Census Bureau Current Population Survey data from June to August 2011 by Northeastern’s Center for Labor Market Studies. They are supplemented with research from Christopher Smith and Daniel Aaronson, two Federal Reserve economists, as well as interviews with Labor Department economists and Challenger, Gray & Christmas, a national job placement firm. About 5.1 million, or just 29.6 percent, of 16-to-19 year olds were employed last summer. Adjusted for seasonal factors, the rate dips to 25.7 percent. In 1978, the share reached a peak of nearly 60 percent before waves of immigration brought in new low-skill workers. Teen employment remained generally above 50 percent until 2001, dropping sharply to fresh lows after each of the past two recessions. Out of more than 3.5 million underutilized teens who languished in the job market last summer, 1.7 million were unemployed, nearly 700,000 worked fewer hours than desired and 1.1 million wanted jobs but had given up looking. That 3.5 million represented a teen underutilization rate of 44 percent, up from roughly 25 percent in 2000. By race and income, blacks, Hispanics and teens in lower-income families were least likely to be employed in summer jobs. The figure was 14 percent for African-American teens when their family income was less than $40,000 a year, compared to 44 percent of white teens with family income of $100,000-$150,000.

541-389-1505

Northwest stocks Name

— Reporter: 541-617-7818, rrees@bendbulletin.com

Teens

E3

YTD Last Chg %Chg

22 107.60 +.14 +11.7 15 48.87 +1.17 -1.7 20 47.00 +.09 -1.9 15 4.37 +.10 -3.7 12 39.44 +1.46 +5.3 ... 1.70 +.03 -11.2 33 37.25 +.42 +1.9 20 167.58 +3.93 +1.7 11 18.16 +.14 -13.7 8 24.03 +.93 -43.2 30 133.01 +2.80 +49.0 12 35.19 +.34 -4.2 31 53.04 +.21 +15.3 24 5.44 +.20 +11.7 16 12.36 +.14 -.2 12 30.63 +.76 +13.2 13 15.79 +.24 +12.9 11 31.30 +.31 +13.6 11 18.49 -.03 +18.5 32 20.72 +.54 +11.0

Prime rate

Pvs Day

Time period

Percent

$1598.00 $1595.50 $28.606

Last Previous day A week ago

3.25 3.25 3.25

NYSE

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

S&P500ETF BkofAm SPDR Fncl Bar iPVix iShEMkts

1620389 1421337 809496 598610 531471

Last Chg 132.92 7.49 14.09 19.60 38.16

+1.51 +.21 +.21 -.35 +.78

Gainers ($2 or more) Name

Last

Chg %Chg

Theragen 2.08 +.32 +18.2 LDK Solar 2.13 +.31 +17.0 StratJPM35 24.65 +3.03 +14.0 ElsterGrp 15.49 +1.69 +12.2 ETr2xSSD 22.18 +2.16 +10.8

Losers ($2 or more) Name

Last

Chg %Chg

FactsetR GCSaba DrxIndiaBr YPF Soc Natuzzi

91.70 -12.87 -12.3 7.50 -1.01 -11.9 31.84 -3.94 -11.0 10.25 -.87 -7.8 2.82 -.23 -7.5

Amex

Most Active ($1 or more) Name CheniereEn NovaGld g NwGold g Rentech GoldStr g

Last Chg

71502 12.95 +1.09 34143 5.91 +.12 30339 10.23 +.41 23964 1.71 -.01 22520 1.24 +.01

Gainers ($2 or more) Name

Last

MtnPDia g CheniereEn Nevsun g VistaGold USAntimny

3.75 +.36 +10.6 12.95 +1.09 +9.2 3.88 +.28 +7.8 3.21 +.23 +7.7 4.78 +.33 +7.4

Chg %Chg

Losers ($2 or more)

Nasdaq

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

Zynga n PwShs QQQ ArenaPhm A123 Sys Microsoft

Gainers ($2 or more) Name

Last

Ramtrn FstSolar PMFG ColonyBk Orexigen

2.42 +.61 +33.7 14.95 +2.62 +21.2 8.57 +1.07 +14.3 6.50 +.80 +14.0 3.67 +.41 +12.6

Last

Chg %Chg

BreezeE eUnits2yr GoldStdV g MeetMe OrientPap

7.10 -1.45 -17.0 11.00 -1.00 -8.3 2.59 -.20 -7.2 2.53 -.16 -5.9 2.30 -.14 -5.7

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Chg %Chg

Name

Last

PrimaBio n MidPenn Zynga n Iridex PhotoMdx

3.84 -.56 -12.7 9.55 -1.25 -11.6 4.98 -.57 -10.3 3.40 -.29 -8.0 11.04 -.84 -7.1

Diary 2,376 667 99 3,142 35 55

Last Chg

572087 4.98 -.57 441302 62.56 +.76 374069 7.88 +.81 344320 1.58 +.54 342740 29.29 +.40

Losers ($2 or more)

Name

Diary Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Vol (00)

Indexes

Chg %Chg

Diary 266 187 34 487 7 9

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

1,723 754 118 2,595 33 62

52-Week High Low

Name

13,338.66 10,404.49 5,627.85 3,950.66 481.58 381.99 8,496.42 6,414.89 2,498.89 1,941.99 3,134.17 2,298.89 1,422.38 1,074.77 14,951.57 11,208.42 860.37 601.71

Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

Last

Net Chg

%Chg

YTD %Chg

52-wk %Chg

12,573.80 5,035.06 477.75 7,557.82 2,277.61 2,843.07 1,324.18 13,837.41 761.53

+162.57 +43.13 +1.18 +98.55 +37.37 +33.34 +15.25 +155.03 +10.52

+1.31 +.86 +.25 +1.32 +1.67 +1.19 +1.17 +1.13 +1.40

+2.92 +.31 +2.81 +1.08 -.03 +9.13 +5.29 +4.91 +2.78

+4.12 -2.58 +11.98 -7.07 -1.86 +6.14 +2.82 +1.48 -4.09

World markets

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed Tuesday. Market Close % Change

Key currency exchange rates Tuesday compared with late Monday in New York. Dollar vs: Exchange Rate Pvs Day

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

s s s s s t s t t t t s s s

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

+4.6

WelltnAdm 55.90 +0.37 Windsor 45.28 +0.58 WdsrIIAd 48.46 +0.60 Vanguard Fds: CapOpp 30.35 +0.44 DivdGro 15.93 +0.13 Energy 53.74 +0.70 EqInc 22.64 +0.25 Explr 74.13 +0.91 GNMA 11.09 +0.01 HYCorp 5.78 HlthCre 134.96 +1.04 InflaPro 14.66 -0.04 IntlGr 16.61 +0.21 IntlVal 26.42 +0.41 ITIGrade 10.15 -0.03 LifeCon 16.62 +0.07 LifeGro 21.89 +0.22 LifeMod 19.80 +0.13 LTIGrade 10.51 -0.07 Morg 18.88 +0.22 MuInt 14.20 -0.01 PrmcpCor 13.80 +0.19 Prmcp r 63.52 +0.89 SelValu r 19.12 +0.22 STAR 19.46 +0.15 STIGrade 10.72 -0.01 StratEq 19.16 +0.26 TgtRetInc 11.84 +0.03 TgRe2010 23.19 +0.10 TgtRe2015 12.72 +0.08 TgRe2020 22.44 +0.17 TgtRe2025 12.71 +0.11 TgRe2030 21.70 +0.21 TgtRe2035 12.99 +0.14 TgtRe2040 21.29 +0.24 TgtRe2045 13.37 +0.15 USGro 19.65 +0.23 Wellsly 23.56 +0.07 Welltn 32.36 +0.21 Wndsr 13.42 +0.18 WndsII 27.30 +0.34 Vanguard Idx Fds: ExtMkt I 101.83 +1.22

292.01 2,104.53 3,046.91 5,473.74 6,161.24 18,872.56 37,270.27 12,979.69 3,425.60 8,536.72 1,854.74 2,797.08 4,118.29 5,507.31

+.21 +.32 +.14 +.76 +.33 -.43 +.63 -.70 -.83 -1.02 -.66 +.33 +.17 +.61

.9933 1.5570 .9737 .001982 .1569 1.2498 .1289 .012581 .071331 .0303 .000856 .1414 1.0406 .0333

.9889 1.5498 .9704 .002000 .1570 1.2498 .1289 .012588 .071137 .0306 .000854 .1405 1.0406 .0334

Selected mutual funds YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret Amer Century Inv: EqInc x 7.38 -0.01 +2.7 GrowthI 26.53 +0.29 +8.0 Ultra 24.52 +0.23 +7.0 American Funds A: AmcpA p 19.84 +0.18 +5.4 AMutlA p 26.87 +0.26 +4.5 BalA px 18.91 +0.06 +4.9 BondA p 12.74 -0.03 +2.8 CapIBA p 50.19 +0.39 +2.9 CapWGA p 33.04 +0.43 +3.3 CapWA p 20.82 -0.02 +2.3 EupacA p 35.75 +0.46 +1.7 FdInvA p 36.85 +0.45 +4.5 GovtA p 14.53 -0.01 +1.4 GwthA p 30.75 +0.34 +7.0 HI TrA p 10.75 -0.02 +4.2 IncoA p 17.05 +0.12 +2.7 IntBdA p 13.69 -0.02 +1.3 ICAA p 28.38 +0.35 +5.7 NEcoA p 26.03 +0.27 +9.5 N PerA p 27.58 +0.32 +5.4 NwWrldA 47.45 +0.48 +2.9 SmCpA p 35.64 +0.33 +7.4 TxExA p 12.87 -0.01 +4.5 WshA p 29.32 +0.34 +3.8 Artisan Funds: Intl 21.04 +0.27 +6.1 IntlVal r 25.38 +0.22 +1.2 MidCap 36.27 +0.46 +10.1 MidCapVal 19.83 +0.19 +0.7 Baron Funds: Growth 52.96 +0.18 +3.8 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 13.98 -0.03 +2.1 DivMu 14.83 +1.5 BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 18.68 +0.20 +3.4 GlAlA r 18.41 +0.13 +1.4 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 17.10 +0.12 +1.0 BlackRock Instl:

EquityDv 18.73 +0.20 GlbAlloc r 18.51 +0.13 Cohen & Steers: RltyShrs 65.53 +0.68 Columbia Class A: TxEA p 14.06 -0.01 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 28.99 +0.35 AcornIntZ 35.86 +0.27 LgCapGr 12.52 +0.13 Credit Suisse Comm: ComRet t 7.43 -0.01 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 8.96 +0.11 USCorEq1 11.20 +0.13 USCorEq2 10.98 +0.14 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 33.91 +0.43 Davis Funds Y: NYVenY 34.29 +0.44 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.27 -0.01 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq 17.45 +0.28 EmMktV 26.03 +0.44 IntSmVa 13.32 +0.09 LargeCo 10.43 +0.12 USLgVa 19.84 +0.30 US Small 21.15 +0.28 US SmVa 23.82 +0.31 IntlSmCo 13.67 +0.09 Fixd 10.33 IntVa 13.88 +0.21 Glb5FxInc 11.11 -0.02 2YGlFxd 10.10 Dodge&Cox: Balanced 70.41 +0.78 Income 13.64 -0.03 IntlStk 29.08 +0.48 Stock 106.78 +1.64 DoubleLine Funds: TRBd I 11.20 TRBd N p 11.20 Dreyfus:

+3.5 +1.5 +8.3 +4.9 +6.5 +5.1 +4.2 -9.2 -1.4 +4.8 +4.4 +4.3 +4.5 +2.9 +1.9 +0.8 -0.6 +6.2 +4.5 +3.5 +3.1 +0.2 +0.5 -3.8 +2.3 +0.5 +5.0 +3.6 -0.5 +5.5 NA NA

Aprec 41.75 +0.45 Eaton Vance A: LgCpVal 17.76 +0.21 Eaton Vance I: FltgRt 8.92 GblMacAbR 9.77 +0.02 LgCapVal 17.80 +0.21 FMI Funds: LgCap p 16.14 +0.20 FPA Funds: NwInc 10.68 FPACres 27.18 +0.18 Fairholme 27.15 +0.49 Federated Instl: TotRetBd 11.41 -0.02 StrValDvIS 4.87 +0.04 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 21.41 +0.21 StrInA 12.25 -0.02 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 21.69 +0.21 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 13.48 +0.07 FF2010K 12.34 +0.05 FF2015 11.25 +0.05 FF2015K 12.39 +0.06 FF2020 13.54 +0.08 FF2020K 12.71 +0.07 FF2025 11.17 +0.08 FF2025K 12.73 +0.09 FF2030 13.27 +0.10 FF2030K 12.83 +0.10 FF2035 10.90 +0.10 FF2035K 12.81 +0.12 FF2040 7.60 +0.07 FF2040K 12.84 +0.12 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 11.96 +0.16 AMgr50 15.56 +0.06 AMgr20 r 13.02 +0.01 Balanc 19.02 +0.14 BalancedK 19.03 +0.15 BlueChGr 45.82 +0.57 CapAp 27.75 +0.29

+3.4 +4.4 +3.3 +1.2 +4.6 +5.8 +1.0 +1.5 +17.3 +2.8 +1.8 +8.6 +3.3 +8.7 +3.2 +3.2 +3.2 +3.3 +3.5 +3.5 +3.6 +3.6 +3.6 +3.7 +3.5 +3.6 +3.4 +3.6 +6.5 +3.9 +3.0 +5.0 +5.1 +8.0 +12.7

CpInc r 8.94 Contra 73.46 ContraK 73.45 DisEq 22.36 DivIntl 25.99 DivrsIntK r 25.96 DivGth 27.26 Eq Inc 43.02 EQII 18.26 Fidel 33.37 FltRateHi r 9.72 GNMA 11.93 GovtInc 10.87 GroCo 88.97 GroInc 19.23 GrowthCoK88.94 HighInc r 8.84 IntBd 10.99 IntmMu 10.57 IntlDisc 28.12 InvGrBd 11.86 InvGB 7.85 LgCapVal 10.46 LowP r 37.09 LowPriK r 37.08 Magelln 67.37 MidCap 27.39 MuniInc 13.33 NwMkt r 16.46 OTC 56.37 100Index 9.44 Puritn 18.64 PuritanK 18.64 SAllSecEqF11.97 SCmdtyStrt 8.14 SCmdtyStrF 8.16 SrsIntGrw 10.54 SrsIntVal 7.96 SrInvGrdF 11.87 STBF 8.53 StratInc 10.96 TotalBd 11.09 USBI 11.88 Value 66.69

+0.01 +0.72 +0.72 +0.32 +0.29 +0.28 +0.32 +0.43 +0.21 +0.38 -0.01 -0.01 -0.02 +1.03 +0.20 +1.03 -0.01 -0.02 -0.01 +0.27 -0.03 -0.02 +0.13 +0.38 +0.38 +0.75 +0.30 -0.01 +0.02 +0.78 +0.11 +0.13 +0.13 +0.16 +0.02 +0.02 +0.12 +0.10 -0.02 -0.02 -0.03 -0.03 +0.76

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Fidelity Spartan: 500IdxInv 47.12 +0.54 +6.3 500Idx I 47.13 +0.54 +6.3 Fidelity Spart Adv: ExMktAd r 36.85 +0.45 +5.1 500IdxAdv 47.13 +0.55 +6.3 TotMktAd r 38.19 +0.44 +6.1 USBond I 11.88 -0.03 +2.1 First Eagle: GlblA 45.64 +0.35 +1.2 OverseasA 20.40 +0.12 +0.2 Forum Funds: AbsStrI r 11.20 -0.01 +1.4 Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA p 12.49 -0.01 +4.5 GrwthA p 47.04 +0.47 +5.4 HYTFA p 10.70 -0.01 +6.2 IncomA p 2.10 +0.01 +3.3 RisDvA p 35.89 +0.32 +3.1 StratInc p 10.25 +3.7 USGovA p 6.89 +1.1 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv 12.51 +0.04 +3.2 IncmeAd 2.08 +0.01 +3.4 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.11 +2.5 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 20.35 +0.19 +2.7 Frank/Temp Temp A: GlBd A p 12.54 +0.04 +3.0 GrwthA p 16.22 +0.12 -0.4 WorldA p 13.72 +0.12 -0.1 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 12.57 +0.04 +2.9 GE Elfun S&S: US Eqty 41.23 +0.44 +6.4 GMO Trust III: Quality 22.98 +0.22 +4.9 GMO Trust IV: IntlIntrVl 17.91 +0.23 -5.3 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 10.18 +0.15 -1.3 Quality 22.99 +0.22 +4.9 Goldman Sachs Inst:

HiYield 7.03 MidCapV 35.24 +0.40 Harbor Funds: Bond 12.66 -0.03 CapApInst 40.31 +0.43 Intl r 54.02 +0.87 Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 30.05 +0.31 Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 38.79 +0.44 Div&Gr 20.06 +0.22 Hussman Funds: StrGrowth 11.73 -0.08 IVA Funds: Wldwide I r15.06 +0.09 Invesco Funds A: Chart p 16.65 +0.20 CmstkA 15.93 +0.23 EqIncA 8.63 +0.07 GrIncA p 19.33 +0.24 HYMuA 9.85 -0.01 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 22.82 +0.28 AssetStA p 23.56 +0.29 AssetStrI r 23.78 +0.29 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 12.00 -0.02 JPMorgan R Cl: CoreBond 12.00 -0.02 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 11.99 -0.02 HighYld 7.77 -0.01 IntmTFBd 11.31 -0.01 ShtDurBd 10.98 USLCCrPls 20.91 +0.24 Janus T Shrs: PrkMCVal T20.39 +0.20 John Hancock Cl 1: LSBalanc 12.69 +0.08 LSGrwth 12.42 +0.11 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 17.31 +0.20 Longleaf Partners: Partners 26.71 +0.28

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Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 14.32 +0.02 +5.0 StrInc C 14.71 +0.06 +3.6 LSBondR 14.26 +0.02 +4.8 StrIncA 14.63 +0.06 +3.9 Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdY 12.22 +4.3 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 10.90 +0.14 +3.8 BdDebA p 7.74 -0.01 +4.2 ShDurIncA p4.57 -0.01 +2.6 Lord Abbett C: ShDurIncC t 4.60 -0.01 +2.3 Lord Abbett F: ShtDurInco 4.57 +2.6 MFS Funds A: TotRA 14.36 +0.07 +3.4 ValueA 23.39 +0.22 +4.9 MFS Funds I: ValueI 23.50 +0.22 +5.0 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 6.68 +0.07 +0.8 MergerFd 15.77 +0.03 +1.2 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.64 -0.01 +4.5 TotRtBdI 10.63 -0.02 +4.5 MorganStanley Inst: MCapGrI 34.16 +0.08 +3.8 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 27.37 +0.19 +0.8 GlbDiscZ 27.73 +0.19 +0.9 SharesZ 20.52 +0.19 +2.9 Neuberger&Berm Fds: GenesInst 46.79 +0.41 +0.8 Northern Funds: HiYFxInc 7.13 -0.01 NA Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 27.66 +0.23 +2.3 Intl I r 16.64 +0.12 +0.5 Oakmark 44.64 +0.61 +7.1 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 7.01 +0.03 +3.4 GlbSMdCap13.84 +0.12 +2.7 Oppenheimer A:

DvMktA p 30.36 +0.39 GlobA p 54.49 +0.68 GblStrIncA 4.13 IntBdA p 6.21 -0.01 MnStFdA 34.41 +0.39 RisingDivA 16.20 +0.21 S&MdCpVl28.76 +0.23 Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 14.64 +0.19 S&MdCpVl24.37 +0.19 Oppenheimer C&M: RisingDvC p14.58 +0.18 Oppenheimer Roch: RcNtMuA 7.35 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 30.04 +0.39 IntlBdY 6.21 -0.01 IntGrowY 26.24 +0.25 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 11.25 -0.03 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AlAsetAut r 10.31 -0.02 AllAsset 11.78 -0.01 ComodRR 6.13 -0.02 DivInc 11.70 -0.02 EmgMkCur 9.99 +0.02 EmMkBd 11.61 -0.01 HiYld 9.14 -0.01 InvGrCp 10.77 -0.04 LowDu 10.45 -0.01 RealRtnI 12.32 -0.04 ShortT 9.80 TotRt 11.25 -0.03 PIMCO Funds A: RealRtA p 12.32 -0.04 TotRtA 11.25 -0.03 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 11.25 -0.03 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 11.25 -0.03 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 11.25 -0.03 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 46.66 +0.29

+3.5 +0.8 +4.1 +1.8 +7.0 +3.6 -2.9 +3.2 -3.3 +3.3 +10.6 +3.7 +2.1 +2.8 +5.0 +3.7 +3.0 -5.4 NA +1.4 +5.2 +4.7 +6.1 +2.8 +5.6 +1.7 +5.1 +5.4 +4.9 +4.6 +5.0 +5.1 +1.2

Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 39.02 +0.44 Price Funds: BlChip 42.68 +0.44 CapApp 21.71 +0.13 EmMktS 29.05 +0.41 EqInc 24.04 +0.31 EqIndex 35.83 +0.41 Growth 35.38 +0.33 HlthSci 38.19 +0.50 HiYield 6.60 InstlCpG 17.51 +0.19 IntlBond 9.67 -0.01 Intl G&I 11.42 +0.16 IntlStk 12.62 +0.18 MidCap 55.36 +0.60 MCapVal 22.16 +0.22 N Asia 14.87 +0.16 New Era 38.39 +0.56 N Horiz 33.79 +0.32 N Inc 9.75 -0.02 OverS SF 7.35 +0.11 R2010 15.59 +0.10 R2015 12.05 +0.09 R2020 16.61 +0.14 R2025 12.12 +0.12 R2030 17.34 +0.17 R2035 12.23 +0.13 R2040 17.39 +0.19 ShtBd 4.83 SmCpStk 33.21 +0.41 SmCapVal 35.65 +0.42 SpecIn 12.50 +0.01 Value 23.36 +0.31 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 13.18 +0.17 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 10.90 +0.13 PremierI r 18.69 +0.23 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 37.49 +0.43 S&P Sel 20.80 +0.24 Scout Funds: Intl 28.48 +0.37

+1.3 +10.4 +5.3 +1.9 +4.8 +6.2 +11.2 +17.1 +5.0 +8.6 +0.3 -0.9 +2.7 +5.0 +3.6 +6.9 -8.7 +8.9 +2.2 +0.4 +3.8 +4.1 +4.4 +4.7 +4.8 +4.9 +4.9 +1.4 +6.3 +3.4 +3.4 +3.6 +4.2 +1.3 +0.9 +6.0 +6.3 +1.8

Sequoia 152.18 +1.10 TCW Funds: TotRetBdI 9.88 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 16.47 +0.07 Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 24.10 +0.30 IntValue I 24.65 +0.31 Tweedy Browne: GblValue 22.58 +0.01 Vanguard Admiral: BalAdml 22.66 +0.14 CAITAdm 11.56 -0.01 CpOpAdl 70.10 +1.01 EMAdmr r 32.03 +0.55 Energy 100.90 +1.31 EqInAdm n 47.46 +0.52 ExtdAdm 41.26 +0.50 500Adml 122.55 +1.41 GNMA Ad 11.09 +0.01 GrwAdm 34.28 +0.38 HlthCr 56.95 +0.44 HiYldCp 5.78 InfProAd 28.79 -0.09 ITBdAdml 11.95 -0.05 ITsryAdml 11.74 -0.04 IntGrAdm 52.86 +0.67 ITAdml 14.20 -0.01 ITGrAdm 10.15 -0.03 LtdTrAd 11.16 LTGrAdml 10.51 -0.07 LT Adml 11.59 -0.01 MCpAdml 92.91 +1.13 MuHYAdm 11.04 -0.01 PrmCap r 65.92 +0.93 ReitAdm r 89.03 +0.91 STsyAdml 10.76 -0.01 STBdAdml 10.62 -0.01 ShtTrAd 15.92 STIGrAd 10.72 -0.01 SmCAdm 34.78 +0.46 TtlBAdml 11.08 -0.02 TStkAdm 33.05 +0.38 WellslAdm 57.08 +0.16

+5.3 -3.3 +0.3 +0.6 +3.3 +4.5 +3.2 +2.8 +1.2 -8.8 +4.1 +4.9 +6.3 +1.8 +8.1 +5.0 +4.6 +4.2 +3.4 +1.7 +1.7 +2.7 +3.9 +0.9 +4.7 +4.1 +4.2 +4.8 +2.9 +9.2 +0.2 +0.9 +0.5 +1.9 +4.2 +2.1 +6.0 +3.6

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MidCpIstPl101.22 +1.22 TotIntAdm r21.71 +0.32 TotIntlInst r86.84 +1.29 TotIntlIP r 86.86 +1.29 500 122.53 +1.42 MidCap 20.46 +0.24 SmCap 34.74 +0.46 TotBnd 11.08 -0.02 TotlIntl 12.98 +0.19 TotStk 33.04 +0.39 Vanguard Instl Fds: BalInst 22.66 +0.14 DevMkInst 8.34 +0.13 ExtIn 41.26 +0.50 GrwthIst 34.28 +0.39 InfProInst 11.73 -0.03 InstIdx 121.76 +1.40 InsPl 121.77 +1.41 InsTStPlus 29.91 +0.34 MidCpIst 20.52 +0.24 SCInst 34.77 +0.45 TBIst 11.08 -0.02 TSInst 33.06 +0.39 ValueIst 21.24 +0.25 Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl 101.23 +1.17 MidCpIdx 29.32 +0.36 STBdIdx 10.62 -0.01 TotBdSgl 11.08 -0.02 TotStkSgl 31.90 +0.37 Western Asset: CorePlus I 11.37 -0.02 Yacktman Funds: Fund p 18.14 +0.16 Focused 19.37 +0.16

+4.2 -0.6 -0.5 -0.5 +6.3 +4.1 +4.1 +2.1 -0.6 +6.0 +4.5 -1.0 +4.9 +8.1 +4.2 +6.3 +6.3 +6.1 +4.2 +4.2 +2.1 +6.1 +4.4 +6.3 +4.2 +0.9 +2.1 +6.0 +3.8 +3.6 +3.1


E4

THE BULLETIN â&#x20AC;˘ WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13, 2012

M 

If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact Ashley Brothers at 541-383-0323, email business@bendbulletin.com or click on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Submit an Eventâ&#x20AC;? at www.bendbulletin.com. Please allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication.

Battery

B C 

TODAY BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL BEND CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7 a.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541749-0789. INDISPENSABLE COMMUNICATION SKILLS: Business success program; reservations recommended; free; 7:30 a.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-382-3221 or www.bend chamber.org. HOMEBUYING CLASS: Registration required; free; 5:30-9:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 2303 S.W. First St., Redmond; 541-318-7506, ext. 109.

THURSDAY BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL DESCHUTES BUSINESS NETWORKERS CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7 a.m.; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541610-9125. TOWN HALL FORUM: After a brief presentation, Deschutes County Commissioners Tammy Baney, Tony DeBone and Alan Unger will answer your questions about Deschutes County government; registration required, 541-382-3221; $30 for members and $45 for nonmembers; 7:30 a.m.; Bend Golf and Country Club, 61045 Country Club Drive; www.bendchamber.org. SEMINAR TO EXPLAIN UNCLAIMED PROPERTY REPORTING: Local businesses and organizations can learn more about reporting unclaimed property to the state; half-day seminar; registration required; contact Carolyn Harris at 503-986-5290 or visit http:// oregonstatelands.us/dsl; free; 8:30 a.m.-noon; Deschutes County administration building, 1300 N.W. Wall St., Bend. CENTRAL OREGON FORUM DISCUSSING HOUSING FOR PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES: 9:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; contact Rich Zebrowski, Abilitree Supported Living Program manager, 541-3888103, ext. 203 or richz@abilitree .org. INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT FOR AN UNPREDICTABLE WORLD: Registration required; free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794 or luiz.soutomaior@ schwab.com. LIVE CONTRACTOR EDUCATION COURSE: Registration required; class continues June 15-16; $299; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Redmond campus, 2030 S.E. College Loop, Redmond; 541-383-7290 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu.

FRIDAY CENTRAL OREGON REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT CLUB: Free; 11 a.m.; ServiceMaster Clean, 20806 Sockeye Place, Bend; 541-610-4006 or bobbleile@windermere.com. FREE TAX FRIDAY: Free tax return reviews; schedule an appointment at 541-385-9666 or www.myzoomtax .com; free; 2-4 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666.

SATURDAY CLEAN UP AND SPEED UP YOUR PC 2: Registration required; $59; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541383-7270 or http://noncredit .cocc.edu.

SUNDAY OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit; registration required; $35; 9 a.m.12:30 p.m.; Sandwich Factory, 277 N.E. Court Street, Prineville; 541447-6384 or www.happyhour

training.com.

MONDAY TRACTOR SAFETY TRAINING: Three-day Central Oregon Farm and Tractor Safety Training and Certification Course, sponsored by the OSU Extension Service; open to ages 14-17; registration required before June 8; class continues June 19-20; $50; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-548-2711.

TUESDAY BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL HIGH DESERT CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7:15 a.m.; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541-420-7377. BREAKFAST WITH THE CHAMBER: Crooked River Ranch-Terrebonne Chamber of Commerce meeting; open to the public; free; 8 a.m.; Diegoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Spirited Kitchen, 447 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-923-2679 or www.crrchamber.com. VISIT BEND BOARD MEETING: Open to the public; 8 a.m.; Bend Visitor Center, 750 N.W. Lava Road; 541-382-8048 or valerie@ visitbend.com. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit; registration required; 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. JOB FAIR: Central Oregon Community College will host a job fair aimed at finding part-time instructors to teach credit and noncredit classes in Madras, Deer Ridge Correctional Institution, Prineville and Redmond; bring a rĂŠsumĂŠ and copy of college transcripts, if available; 4:30-6:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Redmond campus, 2030 S.E. College Loop, Redmond; 541383-7270 or www.jobs.cocc.edu. SENIOR FINANCIAL SCAMS, HOW TO PROTECT FAMILY AND FRIENDS: With Steve Esselstyn, Community Liaison, Bend Police Department; free; 6 p.m.; Mid Oregon Credit Union, 1386 N.E. Cushing Drive, Bend; 541-3821795.

WEDNESDAY June 20 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL BEND CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7 a.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541749-0789.

THURSDAY June 21 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL DESCHUTES BUSINESS NETWORKERS CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7 a.m.; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541610-9125. DESIGNING HEALTHFUL, LIVABLE COMMUNITIES: Dr. Richard Jackson, pediatrician and chair of Environmental Health Sciences at UCLA, will speak on how the built environment, transportation choices, architecture, and urban planning affect health, especially in children; tickets can be purchased through City Club of Central Oregon; $20 includes lunch; 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-815-3951 or info@cityclubco.com. GETTING THE MOST OUT OF SCHWAB.COM: Registration required; free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794 or luiz.soutomaior@schwab.com. ABCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S OF INTERNET SECURITY: Registration required; free; 6 p.m.; Mid Oregon Credit Union, 1386 N.E. Cushing Drive, Bend; 541-382-1795 or www.midoregon.com.

FRIDAY June 22 CENTRAL OREGON REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT CLUB: Free; 11 a.m.; ServiceMaster Clean, 20806 Sockeye Place, Bend; 541-610-4006 or bobbleile@windermere.com. FREE TAX FRIDAY: Free tax return reviews; schedule an appointment at 541-385-9666 or www.myzoomtax .com; free; 2-4 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666.

MONDAY June 25 FILE IT, FIND IT: Registration required; class continues June 27; $59; 1-4 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541383-7270 or http://noncredit .cocc.edu. PHOTOSHOP ELEMENTS, BEGINNING: Registration required; contact http://noncredit.cocc.edu or 541-383-7270; $59; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541383-7700.

TUESDAY June 26 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL HIGH DESERT CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7:15 a.m.; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541-420-7377. WILL THE REAL INDEPENDENT CONTRACTORS PLEASE STAND UP?: Kurt Barker and Jon Napier from Karnopp Petersen LLP and Evan Dickens from Jones & Roth will address questions about independent contracting; registration required; $25 for members and $45 for nonmembers; 11 a.m.; Bend Golf and Country Club, 61045 Country Club Drive; www.bendchamber.org.

WEDNESDAY June 27 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL BEND CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7 a.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541749-0789. THOSE LABOR LAWS DO APPLY TO YOU: What every non-union employer needs to know about the National Labor Relations Act, with Tamara Russell and Todd Lyon; registration required; $15; 7:309:30 a.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-382-1795 or www.midoregon.com. THE BULLETIN BUSINESS AFTER HOURS: Registration required; 5 p.m.; The Bulletin, 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave., Bend; 541-382-3221 or www.bendchamber.org.

THURSDAY June 28 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL DESCHUTES BUSINESS NETWORKERS CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7 a.m.; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541610-9125. ETFS EXPLAINED: Registration required; free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794 or luiz.soutomaior@schwab.com.

FRIDAY June 29 EXPLORING THE BUSINESS OF OUTDOOR PHOTOGRAPHY: Registration required; $395; Cascade Center of Photography, 390 S.W. Columbia St., Suite 110, Bend; contact 541-241-2266 or welcome@ ccophoto.com. EDWARD JONES COFFEE CLUB: Current market and economic update including current rates; free; 9 a.m.; Ponderosa Coffee House, 61292 S. U.S. Highway 97, Suite 105, Bend; 541-617-8861.

N  R

BANKRUPTCIES Chapter 7 Filed June 5

Paul J. Lane, P.O. Box 1250, La Pine. Charles L. Trego, P.O. Box 1116, Bend. Filed June 6

Fernando Bustillos, 1112 S.W. U.S. Highway 97, Space 15, Madras. Bradford James Wilson, 2485 N.E. Saranac Place, Bend. William Stuart Buck V, 2422 S.W. 33rd St., Redmond. Linda Marie Hendrix, 1833 S.W. Canal Blvd. #11, Redmond. Charles Lee Hendrix, P.O. Box 542, Redmond.

Hans Thomas Johnson, 1860 N.E. Altura Drive, Bend. Jamie Hopple, 1847 N.E. Veronica Lane, Bend. Filed June 7

Donald E. Carter, 10945 S.W. Shad Road, Terrebonne. Craig D. Zagurski, 63225 Eastview Drive, Bend. Susan Marie Rodgers, 893 S.E. E St., Madras. Erik Gordon Hotvedt, 1313 N.E. Thompson Drive, Bend. Brian Lee Cook, 101 S.W. Cleveland Ave., Bend. Filed June 8

Heather Dawn Rogen, 3800 N.E. 21st Drive, Redmond. Michael Allen Bowman, P.O. Box

1157, La Pine. Filed June 9

Rusty E. Ridenour, 2042 N.E. Third St., Prineville.

Continued from E1 The advance uses a new chemistry that could permit the creation of a simpler, lighter, longer-lasting battery pack that does not require a system to cool or heat it. The success or failure of the new technology may well determine the fate of A123. It will also render an early verdict on Obamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s broader push to promote electric cars and build a domestic industry to develop and manufacture advanced batteries to run them. The presidentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s prediction of 1 million electric cars on the road by 2015 seems unattainable, given the tepid demand for the first models on the market. So far this year, combined sales of the Chevrolet Volt plug-in hybrid and Nissan Leaf electric car total less than 10,000 vehicles. The slow sales have become a campaign issue, and the failure of the solar-panel company Solyndra has also drawn intense criticism of the administrationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s clean-energy subsidies. In response to the Solyndra bankruptcy, which cost taxpayers about half a billion dollars, the Energy Department has tightened controls on loans related to electric cars and other fuel-saving technology. In the case of Fisker Automotive, which received the defective A123 batteries, the government froze its loans when the company missed production schedules.

Slow but steady Executives of A123, which is based in Waltham, Mass., say the company has gotten off to a slower start than anticipated because the market for electric cars has failed to grow. The company reported a loss of $125 million in the first quarter of this year, as revenues dropped 40 percent from the year earlier. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been softer than what we and everyone else expected,â&#x20AC;? said David Vieau, chief executive of A123. Yet the major automakers remain committed to electric vehicles so far, and GM has given A123 the contract to supply batteries for the Chevrolet Spark, an all-electric minicar due next year. The government, for its part, recently gave A123 an extra two years to meet production targets at its Michigan factory and earn the full $249 million grant, which is being disbursed in chunks. So far, only about half the money has been given to the company. In addition to the factory grant, A123 has received about $14 million in Energy Department money for re-

Stephen McGee / New York Times News Service

Joe Parker, left, and Dwayne Washington load batteries at the A123 Systems plant in Livonia, Mich. A123 unveiled a new battery technology that might determine the companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fate.

search and development. The government may have financed the company because â&#x20AC;&#x153;these guys have some new chemistry, some new ideas,â&#x20AC;? rather than the ability to commercialize the product, said professor Prashant Kumta, a materials science expert at the University of Pittsburgh, who began working on lithium-ion batteries in the 1990s. He said that A123 had been â&#x20AC;&#x153;a bit of a disappointmentâ&#x20AC;? because it had not put much product into the market.

Risky business The Energy Department said it would not comment on the viability of individual companies. But a spokeswoman, Jen Stutsman, said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The market for electrified vehicles is expected to triple by 2017 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; which is why automakers in every part of the world are racing to introduce new models of hybrid and electric vehicles.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;The investments being made today will help ensure that the jobs that support this rapidly growing industry are created here in the United States,â&#x20AC;? she said. Supporters of the energy programs say it is unrealistic to expect every governmentbacked company to thrive immediately. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We should be willing to take on some of the risks for the new energy economy, even if some of these startups fail,â&#x20AC;? said Rep. Diana DeGette of Colorado, the ranking Democrat on the House Energy and Commerce subcommittee that investigated Solyndra. But former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, the presumed Republican nominee for president, has attacked subsidies to energy firms as a waste of taxpayer dollars. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When Mitt Romney is president, government will stop meddling in the marketplace,â&#x20AC;? a Romney spokeswoman, Andrea Saul, said on the cam-

paignâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website. Industry analysts contend that the expectations of a million electric cars by mid-decade were overly optimistic to begin with. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There really was no good reason to think it was going to happen in that timeframe,â&#x20AC;? said Ted Nordhaus, chairman of the Breakthrough Institute, which researches energy policy.

Bogged down A123 Systems is a prime example of how a promising venture can bog down in the harsh realities of the automotive marketplace. Founded in 2001, the company has been primarily focused on making lithium-ion battery packs specifically for cars, like the Fisker Karma and a forthcoming all-electric version of the Chevrolet Spark, a minicar made by General Motors. But the company stumbled when it was forced to recall potentially defective batteries planned for use in the Fisker vehicle. And with the future market for electric cars in question, A123 might not survive solely on batteries for those models. A123 is hoping the new technology it is unveiling Tuesday, called Nanophosphate EXT, will help it enter new markets. The company says the new electrolyte chemistry eliminates the need for heating and cooling in extreme temperatures. That would avoid the addition of costly and heavy temperature-management equipment and prolong the life of the battery. The technology could be used to produce batteries for telecommunications equipment, military vehicles, and hybrid gas-electric cars that employ start-and-stop engine systems. It also could yield batteries that could be used to replace the millions of ordinary lead-acid batteries in cars currently on the road. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a hedge against the market for electric vehicles,â&#x20AC;? Vieau said.

Summer Shootout Marble Tournament Des Chutes Historical Museum

Saturday June 16 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Registration $10.00 per person early bird, $15.00 after June 12.

Filed June 11

Rebecca Jan Chaulet, P.O. Box 1129, Bend. Michael J. Gartner, 53345 Holtzclaw Road, La Pine. Chapter 13 Filed June 7

David R. Clark, 19699 Mountaineer Way, Apt. E121, Bend. Filed June 8

James Calvin Swindle, 11235 S.W. JL Ranch Road, Powell Butte. Ronald Lee Broaddus, 1935 S.W. 35th St., Redmond.

Two categories: Children 7 to 11, Grand Prize is a bicycle from Hutchâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, Young at Heart 12 years and up, Grand prize is an Xbox More great prizes from Sharc Water Park, Sun Mountain Fun Center, the Art Station, the Old Mill District and Wabi Sabi. No need to know how to play, tournament starts with lessons and practice time. Each participant receives a t-shirt and goody bag.

Registration forms available at www.DeschutesHistory.org, or by calling 541.389.1813


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Australian Shepherds Kittens available, in foster care. Visit by Regd minis born 5/12/12 appt. only, call for #. Champ lines & health Adult cats & older kitclearances. True structens at rescue sancture & temperament. tuary, 65480 78th St., (541)639-6263 or Bend, Sat/Sun 1-5; mountainviewminiaussies other days by appt. @yahoo.com 541-647-2181. Altered, shots, ID chip, more. Info: 389-8420. Map, photos, more at www.craftcats.org Lab Pups AKC, black & yellow, Master (Valley Bulldog) puppies, Hunter sired, perforCKC Reg’d, brindles & mance pedigree, OFA fawns, 1st shots. $700. cert hips & elbows, 541-325-3376 Call 541-771-2330 Boxer/English Bulldog

CATS Rescued adult companion cats FREE to seniors, disabled & veterans! Tame, altered, shots, ID chip, more. Will always take back if circumstances change. Photos, info at www.craftcats.org. 389-8420, 647-2181. Sat/Sun 1-5, other days by appt. 65480 78th St., Bend.

FREE Llama Manure Shovel ready, you haul! Call 541-389-7329 Organ, Yamaha, like new, you haul, FREE, Chihuahua Pups, as541-389-4030 sorted colors, teacup, 1st shots, wormed, 208 $250,541-977-4686 Pets & Supplies Dachshund AKC minis, short & longhair, B/tan & choc/tan, F $375; M The Bulletin recom$325. 541-420-6044 mends extra caution or 541-447-3060 when purchasing products or services from out of the DO YOU HAVE area. Sending cash, SOMETHING TO checks, or credit inSELL formation may be FOR $500 OR subjected to fraud. LESS? For more informaNon-commercial tion about an adveradvertisers may tiser, you may call place an ad with the Oregon State our Attorney General’s "QUICK CASH Office Consumer SPECIAL" Protection hotline at 1 week 3 lines, $12 1-877-877-9392. or 2 weeks, $20! Ad must include price of single item of $500 or less, or multiple items Aussie mini X, 10 wks, whose total does shots/wormed. 1 fenot exceed $500. male, $100; 3 males, $75 ea; 541-420-9522 Call Classifieds at 541-385-5809 Aussie Puppy, Blue www.bendbulletin.com Merle toy, blue eyes and family raised born 4/20/12 almost 8 German Shepherd Pups, weeks shots/worming 8 wks, 1 male,1 female, $400 541-233-7899 $250, 541-390-8875

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Labradoodles - Mini & med size, several colors 541-504-2662 www.alpen-ridge.com

Lionhead baby bunnies, variety color, $15 ea. 541-548-0747 Maltese, Toy (1), AKC champ lines, 6 wks, $500. 541-420-1577

Mini Aussie female, 1st shots, wormed $300 cash. 541-678-7599 POODLE, AKC Standard, 9 weeks old. Male apricot. $500. 503-999-7542

Poodle pups, toy, for SALE. Also Rescued Poodle Adults for adoption, to loving homes. 541-475-3889 Queensland Heelers standard & mini,$150 & up. 541-280-1537 http://

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Shetland Sheepdogs Registered, (Shelties), 2 females - $300 3 Males- $250 to loving homes 541-977-3982 Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

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Sponsors needed for THE BULLETIN reAnnie, Blaine, Clark, The Bulletin reserves quires computer adDawn, Echo, Flora, vertisers with multiple the right to publish all Garth, Hannah, Irene, ad schedules or those ads from The Bulletin Jewel, Kittles, Lincoln, selling multiple sysnewspaper onto The Nora & Shadow, cats tems/ software, to disBulletin Internet webfound in a rural home close the name of the site. where their owner died business or the term alone a couple of days "dealer" in their ads. earlier after a long illPrivate party advertisness. All of the cats ers are defined as needed vet care & 241 those who sell one some still need prof. computer. Bicycles & grooming, one may Accessories need an eye removed 260 & another has broken Misc. Items teeth. Nonprofit Cat Cannondale R500 Road Rescue, Adoption & Bike, dk green, 54cm, 1243 sq. ft. carpet; twin Foster Team was converted to flat bar bed w/drawers & exasked by law officials (drops incl), exc cond, tra pull-out; computer to remove the cats but $400. 541-382-2259 armoire 541-815-1828 can't provide funding. This is a big financial Buying Diamonds 246 hit for a small, no-kill /Gold for Cash Guns, Hunting volunteer group, so Saxon’s Fine Jewelers & Fishing donations of quality 541-389-6655 food & litter & funding BUYING CASH!! would be greatly apLionel/American Flyer For Guns, Ammo & preciated, also caring trains, accessories. Reloading Supplies. short-term foster & 541-408-2191. 541-408-6900. adoptive homes. 541389-8420 598-5488, BUYING & SELLING info@craftcats.org All gold jewelry, silver DO YOU HAVE mail: PO Box 6441, and gold coins, bars, SOMETHING TO Bend OR 97708; or rounds, wedding sets, SELL visit www.craftcats.org, class rings, sterling silFOR $500 OR ver, coin collect, vinLESS? tage watches, dental Non-commercial gold. Bill Fleming, advertisers may 541-382-9419. place an ad with our "QUICK CASH St. Bernard Puppies, SPECIAL" dry mouth, 1st shots, 1 week 3 lines $12 dewormed, $400, or 541-280-8069 2 weeks $20! Garden lights, 4 matchAd must ing, 1 similar, out of old include price of Brand Restaurant, 7+ ft, single item of $500 $250 all. 541-604-1686 or less, or multiple Power Washer, Husky, items whose total new, 1800 PSI, $139. does not exceed 541-317-2890. $500. St. Bernard Pups Swamp Cooler, Mobile Purebred by experienced Call Classifieds at MasterCool, $295, breeders, $400. 5 girls 541-385-5809 2 boys left. All receive 541-382-6773. www.bendbulletin.com 1st shots & 3 doses of Wanted- paying cash de-wormer prior to for Hi-fi audio & stuadoption. Doug & Holly HANDGUN SAFETY dio equip. McIntosh, McIntosh 541.588.0274 CLASS for concealed JBL, Marantz, Dyor email license. NRA, Police naco, Heathkit, Sansisterssaints@gmail.com Firearms Instructor, Lt. sui, Carver, NAD, etc. Gary DeKorte. Tue Yorkie, adult reg, fenced Call 541-261-1808 June 19th, 6:30-10:30 yard, needs loving pm. Call Kevin Cent263 family, un-altered wise, for reservations $400, 541-233-3534 Tools $40. 541-548-4422 Yorkie AKC pups, small, Craftsman air compresbig eyes,shots,parents sor, like new, $250. Oregon’s in home, 1 boy, 1 girl, 541-408-2585 Largest 3 Day $950+, 541-316-0005. Dewalt 13” planer, like GUN & KNIFE 210 new, $450. SHOW 541-408-2585 Furniture & Appliances June 15-16-17 Portland Expo Rigid 10” jointer, exc. Center cond. $400. A1 Washers&Dryers THIS MONTH 541-408-2585 $150 ea. Full warThe Duel Elite Truck ranty. Free Del. Also 265 Traveling Showcase wanted, used W/D’s Building Materials - tour the Trucks & 541-280-7355 enter to win! La Pine Habitat details at www.CollectorsWest.com GENERATE SOME exRESTORE Fri. 12-6, Sat. 9-5, citement in your Building Supply Resale Sun 10-4 neighborhood! Plan a Quality at Adm. $9 (includes garage sale and don't LOW PRICES Showcase tour) forget to advertise in 52684 Hwy 97 classified! 541-536-3234 541-385-5809. Open to the public . Ruger M77 30-06, fired 20 rounds, sling, 4x Loveseat recliner, light 266 scope, sheepskin tan fabric. $60 obo. Heating & Stoves case, 30 rounds 541-419-6408. ammo, cleaning kit. NOTICE TO $725. 541-383-2059. Sofa,sectional $150,2bed ADVERTISER $100 ea, Dinette set, Since September 29, $150, 503-349-5000. Need to get an 1991, advertising for ad in ASAP? used woodstoves has The Bulletin been limited to modYou can place it r ecommends extra els which have been online at: caution when purcertified by the Orchasing products or www.bendbulletin.com egon Department of services from out of Environmental Qualthe area. Sending ity (DEQ) and the fed541-385-5809 cash, checks, or eral Environmental credit information Protection Agency may be subjected to Smith & Wesson .44 (EPA) as having met Mag, leather holster, FRAUD. For more smoke emission stan629 Classic, $600, information about an dards. A certified 541-410-0557. advertiser, you may woodstove may be call the Oregon identified by its certifiWanted: Collector State Attorney cation label, which is seeks high quality General’s Office permanently attached fishing items. Consumer Protecto the stove. The BulCall 541-678-5753, or tion hotline at letin will not know503-351-2746 1-877-877-9392. ingly accept advertising for the sale of XD9, 4mags, $600. uncertified Glock 27, 4mags, laser, woodstoves. $700. 541-647-8931

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD... To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery and inspection. • A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’ • Receipts should include name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased. • Firewood ads MUST include species and cost per cord to better serve our customers.

Dry seasoned tamarack red fir, $165 rnd, $185 split 541-977-4500 or 541-416-3677 FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classiieds 269

Gardening Supplies & Equipment For newspaper delivery, call the Circulation Dept. at 541-385-5800 To place an ad, call 541-385-5809 or email

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Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for 325 flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight Hay, Grain & Feed screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. De- 1st quality grass hay, 70# liver/you haul. bales, barn stored, $220/ 541-548-3949. ton. Also 700# sq. bales, $77 ea. Patterson Ranch, 270 Sisters, 541-549-3831 Lost & Found 3A Livestock Supplies Found bike helmet, Hill- •Panels •Gates •Feeders Now galvanized! ridge Rd. Owner’s •6-Rail 12’ panels, $101 name inside, call to •6-Rail 16’ panels, $117 I.D. 541-306-6239 Custom sizes available 541-475-1255 Found: Boat Motor, on way out of Prineville Want to buy Alfalfa Reservoir, call to ID, standing, in Central 541-390-6237. Ore. 541-419-2713 Lost precious 7lb Po- Wheat Straw: Certified & meranian female, all Bedding Straw & Garden black, white face, mi- Straw;Compost.546-6171 crochipped, “Ebony,” 345 5/15, 78th St between Bend & Red- Livestock & Equipment mond. 541-639-3222 BOER and Nubian REMEMBER: If you goats, does, wethers have lost an animal, and bucks. don't forget to check 541-923-7116 The Humane Society in Bend 541-382-3537 358 Redmond, Farmers Column 541-923-0882 Prineville, 10X20 STORAGE 541-447-7178; BUILDINGS OR Craft Cats, for protecting hay, 541-389-8420. firewood, livestock etc. $1496 Installed. Just too many 541-617-1133. collectibles? CCB #173684. kfjbuilders@ykwc.net Sell them in (15) Main line irrigation The Bulletin Classiieds pipe, 40’ x 5”, $1.80/ft. 541-604-4415

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Regional Production Manager sought for The La Grande Observer, in La Grande, OR. We are seeking an experienced production leader who has the ability to recruit, train and supervise staff to lead us to the next level. This individual will supervise the pressroom, pre-press and mailroom operations and requires experience with a 6-unit Goss Community press. CTP and computer experience also required. The ideal candidate will possess a hands-on management style to coincide with excellent people skills.

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with cabinet shop experience who can multi task. High energy for a fast paced environment needed. We offer an excellent benefits package. Pay is D.O.E. Please email your resume to: Employment.resumes@ ymail.com

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Garage Sale, Fri. & Sat. 8-4. 19233 Shoshone Rd. (DRW) Guns, fishing, tools, clothes, and a lot more. Many collectables.

Fri. & Sat., June 15 & Estate Sale!Great Stuff! Martha's Garage Sale Fri. & Sat.,9-5, 61355 Thur-Fri., June 14-15, 16, 8am-5pm, Multi8am-5pm. Nice qualWard Rd,home decor, Family Garage Sale! Furniture, Maytag selfity items! Tommy Batools, furniture, more! cleaning convection hama men’s shirts, oven, king bed, 50” Moving sale 6/14-17,9-5 Dooney & Burke HDTV, books, clothes, 61600 Ward Rd. Some handbags, Ralph Lau286 collectibles & antiques; electronics & more. ren women’s wear, new items each day! 1050 NE Butler china hutch, gun Sales Northeast Bend Market Rd, Apt. #48. cabinet, lamps, anMoving Sale, Sat. Only, tique chairs, jewelry, Cedar Creek 9-12, 61710 CamelJust bought a new boat? and much more. Townhomes 16th lia St. Furniture, appl., 1752 SW Canyon Dr. Sell your old one in the Annual Multi-family household items, etc. classiieds! Ask about our Garage Sale! Multi-household Sale! Super Seller rates! Fri & Sat, June 15-16, Sale Fri. 8-4: Benefits Collectibles, craft/cards 541-385-5809 8am-5pm. 1050 NE scrapbooking, kids 4-H, furniture, games Butler Mkt Rd, corner toys, clothes & furnitoys, baby, electronics, Guns, knives, tools, 8th & Butler Mkt. ture. Sat, 8-2, 345 SW 20662 Cherry Tree Ln. fishing, boating, ar28th St.. Redmond. chery & camping HH FREE HH equip. Fri. & Sat. 15th South Side Storage Find exactly what Community Garage Garage Sale Kit & 16th 8 to ?. 1204 Sale - Sat, 8-1, 20205 you are looking for in the NE Dempsey Dr. Place an ad in The Badger Rd. Many ofBulletin for your gaCLASSIFIEDS fice items, W/D, cabirage sale and re- Moving Sale: Wed-Thurs, nets, tables, dishware, ceive a Garage Sale 10-3, 20776 Alpine Ridge 292 tools & so much more. Pl. Furniture & more; all Kit FREE! (If is it raining we will Sales Other Areas must go! 541-330-1823 postpone to 6/23.) KIT INCLUDES: Prineville, Saturday • 4 Garage Sale Signs Multi Family Garage 290 June 16th, 8 - Noon. • $1.00 Off Coupon To Sale: Fri. 8-4, Sat. 2958 NW Century Dr. Use Toward Your 9-2, 2952 NE Pacific Sales Redmond Area Next Ad Crest Dr. • 10 Tips For “Garage 3 Family Yard Sale! Yard Sale - Powell Sale Success!” Jun. 15-16, 9-4. Alfalfa Butte, 8150 SW 288 • And Inventory Sheet Rd & Hahlen Lane, Desert Sage Ln., Sales Southeast Bend Powell Butte (6 mi S of former contractor with PICK UP YOUR Powell Butte post office) new stoves, windows, GARAGE SALE KIT at College-bound Students & lighting fixtures 1777 SW Chandler Garage Sale, Fri-Sat People Look for Information girls clothes size 4 Ave., Bend, OR 97702 only, 8-3. Camping, 7, toys, & other odds About Products and skis, kitchen supplies, & ends. Fri. June 15, books, & much more. Services Every Day through 9-4, Sat. June 16,9-2. The Bulletin Classifieds 1798 SE Pitts Dr.

Finance & Business

500

Medical Pre/Post-op RN

528 Full-Time, 4-10 hr. shifts, Mon.-Fri. Critical care or ASC experience preferred. Job offers excellent benefit package. Interested persons should email their resume to jobs@bendsurgery.com Open until filled.

Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin' s web site will be able to click through automatically to your site. The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to FRAUD. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Say “goodbuy” to that unused item by placing it in The Bulletin Classiieds

Loans & Mortgages WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

Call a Pro Whether you need a fence ixed, hedges trimmed or a house built, you’ll ind professional help in The Bulletin’s “Call a Service Professional” Directory

541-385-5809

Rentals

682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 730 - New Listings 732 - Commercial Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740 - Condos & Townhomes for Sale 744 - Open Houses 745 - Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest Bend Homes 747 - Southwest Bend Homes 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 749 - Southeast Bend Homes 750 - Redmond Homes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson County Homes 757 - Crook County Homes 762 - Homes with Acreage 763 - Recreational Homes and Property 764 - Farms and Ranches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land 642

650

Apt./Multiplex Redmond

Houses for Rent NE Bend

LOCAL MONEY:We buy secured trust deeds & note,some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 ext.13.

600

3 bdrm, 2 bath, fenced yard, no smkg. Avail 7/3. 807 NE Larch Ave. $725 mo. Megan 541-771-6599

Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

630

Rooms for Rent

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $ 500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for:

Reverse Mortgages by local expert Mike LeRoux NMLS57716

Call to learn more.

541-385-5809

RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - Roommate Wanted 616 - Want To Rent 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 630 - Rooms for Rent 631 - Condos & Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for Rent General 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space

541-350-7839 Security1 Lending NMLS98161

Prepress Systems Analyst The Prepress Systems Analyst works with other staff members in day to day production of The Bulletin's products and Commercial Print work in order to ensure efficient prepress processing and a successful run on press. A primary task is to monitor and ensure that The Bulletin's file output, proofing and plating software and computers are performing to specification. This position requires knowledge of computer hardware, software and operating systems, as well as in depth experience with litho plate production and offset printing. This is a hands - on position, frequently involving work with Commercial Print customers during job planning, when bringing work in, and at times when troubleshooting problems. Technical expertise with Postscript workflows, and a thorough knowledge of prepress layout software is required. This position is eligible for benefits. The Bulletin is an equal opportunity employer and a drug free workplace. If you are interested in applying for this position, submit your resume by Monday June 18th to James Baisinger, c/o The Bulletin. 1777 SW Chandler Ave. P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708.

Mt. Bachelor Motel has rooms, starting $150/ week or $35/nt. Incl guest laundry, cable & WiFi. 541-382-6365

Studios & Kitchenettes $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days Furnished room, TV w/ $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days cable, micro & fridge. Utils & linens. New (Private Party ads only) owners.$145-$165/wk 541-382-1885

Tick, Tock Tick, Tock... ...don’t let time get away. Hire a professional out of The Bulletin’s “Call A Service Professional” Directory today! 634

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

Alpine Meadows Townhomes 1, 2 & 3 bdrm apts. Starting at $625. 541-330-0719

Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

Sales

Independent Contractor Sales We are seeking dynamic individuals.

DOES THIS SOUND LIKE YOU? • OUTGOING & COMPETITIVE • PERSONABLE & ENTHUSIASTIC • CONSISTENT & MOTIVATED

Our winning team of sales & promotion professionals are making an average of $400 - $800 per week doing special events, trade shows, retail & grocery store promotions while representing THE BULLETIN newspaper as an independent contractor WE OFFER:

•Solid Income Opportunity* *Complete Training Program* *No Selling Door to Door * *No Telemarketing Involved* *Great Advancement Opportunity* * Full and Part Time Hours * FOR THE CHANCE OF A LIFETIME, CALL Adam Johnson 1-406-565-3742, TODAY!

Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809 Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com Call for Specials! Limited numbers avail. 1, 2 and 3 bdrms. W/D hookups, patios or decks. MOUNTAIN GLEN, 541-383-9313 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc. Located by BMC/Costco, 2 bdrm, 2 bath duplex, 55+,2350 NEMary Rose Pl, #1, $795 no smoking or pets, 541-390-7649

SPRING IN FOR A GREAT DEAL!!

$299 1st month’s rent! * 2 bdrm, 1 bath $530 & 540 Carports & A/C incl! Fox Hollow Apts. (541) 383-3152

648

Houses for Rent General

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com, currently receiving over 1.5 million page views, every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 541-385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com 652

Houses for Rent NW Bend

Golf Course Home PUBLISHER'S Single level 2600 sq ft, NOTICE 3 or 4 bdrm, 3 bath, All real estate adveroffice, oversized 3-car tising in this newspagarage, gas heat, AC. per is subject to the Avail 6/20/12. $1995 Fair Housing Act mo. 541-410-0671 which makes it illegal to advertise "any What are you preference, limitation or discrimination looking for? based on race, color, religion, sex, handiYou’ll ind it in cap, familial status, marital status or na- The Bulletin Classiieds tional origin, or an intention to make any 541-385-5809 such preference, limitation or discrimi659 nation." Familial status includes children Houses for Rent under the age of 18 Sunriver living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women, and In River Meadows a 3 bdrm, 1.5 bath, 1376 people securing cussq. ft., woodstove, tody of children under brand new carpet/oak 18. This newspaper floors, W/S pd, $895. will not knowingly ac541-480-3393 cept any advertising or 541-610-7803 for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are TURN THE PAGE hereby informed that For More Ads all dwellings adverThe Bulletin tised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity 687 basis. To complain of Commercial for discrimination call HUD toll-free at Rent/Lease 1-800-877-0246. The toll free telephone Office/Warehouse lonumber for the hearcated in SE Bend. Up ing impaired is to 30,000 sq.ft., com1-800-927-9275. petitive rate, 541-382-3678. 650

Houses for Rent NE Bend

A quiet newer 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath, 1692 sq.ft., mtn views. dbl. garage w/opener. $1195 Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co *Upstairs only with lease* 541-480-3393,610-7803.

Want to impress the relatives? Remodel your home with the help of a professional from The Bulletin’s “Call A Service Professional” Directory


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809 Real Estate For Sale

700 732

Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale ½ acre in Prineville OR industrial park 24'x80' shop with 40'x60' unfinished addition, $160,000. Call for more info; can send pics. 541-604-0344 740

Condo/Townhomes for Sale $125,900 townhouse 2 bdrm/2 bath. Near shops/ hospital. Passive solar heat, wood stove, garage, private patio. HOA's $207/mo. 1953 NE Otelah Pl. Call 503-881-6540 745

Homes for Sale Enchanted river setting on 2+ acres, $527,700. Ad #2022 TEAM Birtola Garmyn Prudential High Desert Realty 541-312-9449 www.BendOregon RealEstate.com

announcements OFFICIAL PUBLIC NOTICE The Libertarian Party of Oregon (LPO) will hold a candidate nominating convention at 11:00AM on Saturday, June 23, at the Beaverton City Library, 12375 Southwest 5th Street. All Oregon electors (voters) registered with the Libertarian Party are eligible to vote in this event. Questions? Contact Tim Reeves, LPO Chair, at timothy.reeves@tentha mendmentcenter.com or 503-704-0286.

personals St. Jude Prayer, May the Sacred Heart of Jesus be adored, glorified, loved & preserved throughout the world, now & forever. Sacred Heart of Jesus, pray for us; St. Jude Worker of Miracles, pray for us; Helper of the Hopeless, pray for us. Say this prayer 9 times a day & by the eighth day, your prayer shall be answered. It has never been known to fail.Publication must be promised. Thank you St. Jude for Granting me my Petition, JH. Thank you St. Jude & Sacred Heart of Jesus. j.d.

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13, 2012 F3

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Homes for Sale

Homes for Sale

Jefferson County Homes

Boats & Accessories

Boats & Accessories

Motorhomes

Motorhomes

Used out-drive parts - Mercury OMC rebuilt marine motors: 151 $1595; 3.0 $1895; 4.3 (1993), $1995. 541-389-0435

CAN’T BEAT THIS! Look before you buy, below market value ! Size & mileage DOES matter, Class A 32’ Hurricane by Four Winds, 2007. 12,500 mi, all amenities, Ford V10, lthr, cherry, slides, like new, can see anytime, $58,000. 541-548-5216

800

Need to get an ad in ASAP? Fax it to 541-322-7253

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 (This special package is not available on our website)

Building/Contracting NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website www.hirealicensedcontractor. com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications. Computer/Cabling Install QB Digital Living •Computer Networking •Phone/Data/TV Jacks •Whole House Audio •Flat Screen TV & Installation 541-280-6771 www.qbdigitalliving.com CCB#127370 Elect Lic#9-206C

Debris Removal

JUNK BE GONE

I Haul Away FREE

Landscaping/Yard Care

More Than Service Peace Of Mind

Spring Clean Up

•Leaves •Cones •Needles •Debris Hauling •Aeration •Dethatching Compost Top Dressing Weed free Bark & flower beds ORGANIC PROGRAMS

Over 7 acres private acres at CRR. $112,900 Nelson Landscape MLS#201106739. Call Julie Fahlgren, Maintenance Broker 541-550-0098 Serving Central Oregon Crooked River Realty Residential & Commercial 5 acres adjoins public •Sprinkler land over Deschutes Activation & Repair River. $79,900. MLS •Back Flow Testing #201102328. Call Linda Lou •Thatch & Aerate Day-Wright, Broker, • Spring Clean up 541-771-2585 •Weekly Mowing •Bi-Monthly & Monthly Crooked River Realty

Maintenance •Flower Bed Clean Up •Bark, Rock, Etc. •Senior Discounts

Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458 LCB#8759

Full or Partial Service •Mowing •Edging •Pruning •Weeding Sprinkler Adjustments

Call The Yard Doctor for yard maintenance, thatching, sod, sprinkler blowouts, water features, more! Allen 541-536-1294 LCB 5012

Fertilizer included with monthly program

Aeration / Dethatching BOOK NOW!

Landscape Maintenance

Weekly, monthly or one time service. EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential Free Estimates Senior Discounts

541-390-1466

Same Day Response

The Bulletin Classiieds

Landscaping/Yard Care

Weekly / one-time service avail. Bonded, insured, free estimates!

COLLINS Lawn Maint. Call 541-480-9714 Maverick Landscaping Mowing, weedeating, yard detailing, chain saw work & more! LCB#8671 541-923-4324

Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com NOTICE: OREGON Updated daily Landscape ContracElectrical Services tors Law (ORS 671) Holmes Landscape Maint requires all busi• Clean-up • Aerate Quality Builders Electric nesses that advertise • De-thatch • Free Est. • Remodels to perform Land- • Weekly / Bi-wkly Svc. • Home Improvement scape Construction call Josh 541-610-6011 • Lighting Upgrades which includes: • Hot Tub Hook-ups planting, decks, Painting/Wall Covering 541-389-0621 fences, arbors, www.qbelectric.net water-features, and All About Painting CCB#127370 Elect installation, repair of Interior/Exterior/Decks. Lic#9-206C irrigation systems to Mention this ad get be licensed with the Handyman 15% Off interior or Landscape Contracexterior job. tors Board. This Restrictions do apply. ERIC REEVE HANDY 4-digit number is to be SERVICES. Home & Free Estimates. included in all adverCommercial Repairs, CCB #148373 tisements which indiCarpentry-Painting, 541-420-6729 cate the business has Pressure-washing, a bond, insurance and WESTERN PAINTING Honey Do's. On-time workers compensaCO. Richard Hayman, promise. Senior tion for their employa semi-retired paintDiscount. Work guarees. For your protecing contractor of 45 anteed. 541-389-3361 tion call 503-378-5909 years. Small Jobs or 541-771-4463 or use our website: Welcome. Interior & Bonded & Insured www.lcb.state.or.us to Exterior. ccb#5184. CCB#181595 check license status 541-388-6910 I DO THAT! before contracting Home/Rental repairs with the business. Pro Painter - 20+ yrs in Small jobs to remodels Persons doing landCentral OR, new conHonest, guaranteed scape maintenance struction specialist, free work. CCB#151573 do not require a LCB estimates, CCB# license. 60218, 541-977-8329. Dennis 541-317-9768 For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel, 541-389-8107

Boats & RV’s

Private nice area close COUNTRY LIVING Remodeled home, big 14’ Classic P-14 in at Crooked River NEAR SISTERS. backyard, shop, Seaswirl, 20HP Ranch. 3 bdrm., 2 17160 MOUNTAIN $167,900 motor, Bimini Top, bath, very nice DBL VIEW RD - SISTERS Ad #2902 new seats, Eagle car garage, $116,900, $249,900. TEAM Birtola Garmyn finder, trailer, ready MLS 201202001. Prudential High Desert This immaculate 3 bedto go, $1600, Call Julie Fahlgren room home sits on Realty 541-312-9449 541-923-2957. 850 Broker 541-550-0098 just over one acre and www.BendOregon has been beautifully Crooked River Realty RealEstate.com Snowmobiles upgraded with many Like new 2400 sq.ft., Price Reduced 1783 sq. stone and tile feaSisters home close to ft. LOG HOME 1.49 Polaris 2003, 4 cycle, tures. Tile over radifuel inj, elec start, retown. $229,000. Ad acre rim lot. Double ant floor heating proverse, 2-up seat, #2892 garage. $259,000. vides very cover, 4900 mi, $2500 TEAM Birtola Garmyn MLS 201109591. comfortable and effiobo. 541-280-0514 Prudential High Desert 18.5’ ‘05 Reinell 185, V-6 cient warmth. This Call Nancy Popp BroRealty 541-312-9449 The Bulletin ker 541-815-8000 Volvo Penta, 270HP, single story home has www.BendOregon Crooked River Realty To Subscribe call low hrs., must see, a maple kitchen with RealEstate.com $17,500, 541-330-3939 541-385-5800 or go to quality stainless steel The Bulletin’s Gorgeous cedar home appliances, 9 foot www.bendbulletin.com 19.5’ 1988 373V “Call A Service on almost 16 acres, ceilings and has been Ranger Bass Boat, 860 $474,900 beautifully land- Professional” Directory Mercury 115 Motor, Ad #2632 scaped. The living Motorcycles & Accessories is all about meeting Ranger trailer, trolling TEAM Birtola Garmyn room has a full stone your needs. elec. motor, fish finder Prudential High Desert wall with nooks and a & sonor, 2 live wells & Realty 541-312-9449 real wood fireplace. It Call on one of the all accessories, new www.BendOregon is nestled among the professionals today! batteries & tires, great RealEstate.com trees in an area of upcond., $6500. scale homes. Great Price Reduced - Cus541-923-6555. Remodeled, near affordable value, just tom home near CRR Deschutes, minutes to Sisters!! entrance and golf! In- Harley Davidson Heripull-through tage Classic 2000, Gary Everett, CCIM cludes garage, shop, garage. $129,900. Softail, 7200 mi, many Principal Broker greenhouse. ReAd #3162 extras, $8000. Call 541-480-6130 duced to $154,900. TEAM Birtola Garmyn 541-419-5634 Remax MLS 201200663. Prudential High Desert Call Nancy Popp Bro- Harley Davidson SoftRealty 541-312-9449 19-ft Mastercraft Proker 541-815-8000 www.BendOregon Golf course home, 2363 Tail Deluxe 2007, Star 190 inboard, RealEstate.com white/cobalt, w/passq ft, 3 bdrm 3 bath + Crooked River Realty 1987, 290hp, V8, 822 senger kit, Vance & bonus room, hrs, great cond, lots of Look at: 762 Hines muffler system $299,000. extras, $10,000 obo. Bendhomes.com Homes with Acreage & kit, 1045 mi., exc. MLS#201103975 541-231-8709 for Complete Listings of cond, $19,999, Call Nancy Popp 541-389-9188. Broker, 541-815-8000 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 30x48 Area Real Estate for Sale RV/Auto Garage, 1.66 Crooked River Realty Serene setting, 1 acre, Harley Heritage acre rim lot, $159,900, Softail, 2003 corner lot in CRR, MLS#201202284 $5,000+ in extras, $70,000Ad #3382 NOTICE: Call Nancy Popp, Princ. $2000 paint job, TEAM Birtola Garmyn All real estate adverBroker 541-815-8000 30K mi. 1 owner, Prudential High Desert 19’ Glass Ply, Merc tised here in is sub- Crooked River Realty For more information Realty 541-312-9449 cruiser, depth finder, ject to the Federal please call www.BendOregon 771 trolling motor, trailer, Fair Housing Act, 541-385-8090 RealEstate.com $3500, 541-389-1086 which makes it illegal Lots or 209-605-5537 or 541-419-8034. to advertise any prefGorgeous Bend erence, limitation or Mountain views. Driveacreage, 4 Bdrm home HD FAT BOY discrimination based way in place. 1.02 + shop, $235,000 on race, color, reli1996 acres. $53,900 Ad #2072 gion, sex, handicap, Completely rebuilt/ MLS#201103466 TEAM Birtola Garmyn 20.5’ 2004 Bayliner familial status or nacustomized, low Call Melody Curry, Prudential High Desert 205 Run About, 220 tional origin, or inten- Broker, 541-771-1116 miles. Accepting ofRealty 541-312-9449 HP, V8, open bow, tion to make any such Crooked River Realty fers. 541-548-4807 www.BendOregon exc. cond., very fast preferences, limitaRealEstate.com w/very low hours, tions or discrimination. Mountain views. 1.22 lots of extras incl. 1.5 acres adjoining foracres $52,500 We will not knowingly tower, Bimini & est land, $189,900. MLS#201105164. accept any advertiscustom trailer, Honda VT700 Ad #2802 Call Melody Curry, ing for real estate $19,500. Shadow 1984, 23K TEAM Birtola Garmyn Broker, 541-771-1116 which is in violation of 541-389-1413 mi, many new parts, Prudential High Desert this law. All persons Crooked River Realty battery charger, Realty 541-312-9449 are hereby informed 2.09 acres, huge Casgood condition. www.BendOregon that all dwellings adcade Views, $99,900 Now for $1000, RealEstate.com vertised are available MLS#201104501 cash! 541-598-4351 on an equal opportu- Melody Curry, Broker, River Meadows nity basis. The Bulle20.5’ Seaswirl SpyResort Chalet Home, 541-771-1116 tin Classified 865 der 1989 H.O. 302, $184,900 Crooked River Realty 285 hrs., exc. cond., Ad #8142 ATVs Owner will carry! fanstored indoors for TEAM Birtola Garmyn 749 tastic 1/2 acre lot with life $11,900 OBO. Prudential High Desert Southeast Bend Homes views. $59,900. MLS 541-379-3530 Realty 541-312-9449 201008725 www.BendOregon 3 Bdrm, 1 level, approx. Call Julie Fahlgren, RealEstate.com Ads published in the 4 yrs. old, like new, Broker 541-550-0098 "Boats" classification 1322 sq.ft., dbl. garage Crooked River Realty Like new home in the include: Speed, fishw/opener, nice open big pines, 1.4 acres, Yamaha YFZ450 2005 ing, drift, canoe, plan, A/C,media panel, Price reduction! $75,900 Ad #2462 Sport Race quad, built house and sail boats. quiet cul-de-sac, low $44,500 1.16 acre TEAM Birtola Garmyn 4-mil stroked to 470cc, maint. yard, on land For all other types of MLS#201105165 Prudential High Desert lots of mods, $4950 obo lease, $68,000, watercraft, please see Call Melody Curry, Realty 541-312-9449 Call 541-647-8931 503-810-5661. Class 875. Broker, 541-771-1116 www.BendOregon 541-385-5809 870 Crooked River Realty RealEstate.com 756 Boats & Accessories 4270 sq ft, 6 bdrm, 6 ba, 773 4-car, corner, .83 acre Jefferson County Homes Acreages mtn view, by owner. GENERATE SOME ex$590,000 541-390-0886 1.05 Acres, Jefferson 13920 SW Commercial citement in your neigSee: bloomkey.com/8779 view, $149,900, Loop. $20,000 borhood. Plan a gaMLS#20120184 Call MLS#201108857 BANK OWNED HOMES! rage sale and don't Linda Lou Day-Wright 12’ Smoker Craft, FREE List w/Pics! Call Melody Curry, forget to advertise in 541-771-2585 5hp motor, located Broker, 541-771-1116 www.BendRepos.com classified! 385-5809. Crooked River Realty Crooked River Realty bend and beyond real estate in Sunriver. $875 20967 yeoman, bend or obo. 503-319-5745.

5-Acre corner lot, flat & fully treed. $49,900. MLS#201109114, Call Nancy Popp, Principal Broker 541-815-8000 Crooked River Realty

*** CHECK YOUR AD

Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 11:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday and Monday. 541-385-5809 Thank you! The Bulletin Classified *** Nice mountain views, 3.09 acres, $95,950 MLS#201101554. Call Linda Lou Day-Wright, Broker, 541-771-2585 Crooked River Realty Nice Smith Rock views, 5.3 Acres, near entrance of The Ranch, MLS#2710905 Call Linda Lou Day-Wright, Broker, 541-771-2585 Crooked River Realty 775

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes 12’x40’, 1/1, lots of upgrades, Senior Park. north side of Bend. $6,500. 541-382-6530 3 Bdrm., 2 bath, just under 2 fenced acres, 2001 manufactured in great cond., $79,900, MLS#201201999, Call Julie Fahlgren, Broker, 541-550-0098 Crooked River Realty

875

Watercraft

Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 in. kitchen slide out, Inflatable Raft,Sevylor new tires,under cover, Fishmaster 325,10’3”, hwy. miles only,4 door complete pkg., $650 fridge/freezer iceFirm, 541-977-4461. maker, W/D combo, Interbath tub & shower, 50 amp propane gen & more! $55,000. 541-948-2310 Kayak, Eddyline Sandpiper, 12’, like new, $975, 541-420-3277. Hunter’s Delight! Package deal! 1988 Win880 nebago Super Chief, 38K miles, great Motorhomes shape; 1988 Bronco II 4x4 to tow, 130K mostly towed miles, nice rig! $15,000 both. 541-382-3964, leave msg. Beaver Patriot 2000, Walnut cabinets, solar, Bose, Corian, tile, 4 door fridge., 1 slide, W/D. $75,000 541-215-5355

Jayco Greyhawk 2004, 31’ Class C,

6800 mi., hyd. jacks, new tires, slide out, exc. cond, $49,900, 541-480-8648

Chev 1-ton RV 94K, 1967, stove, sink, fridge, 2 double beds, Monaco Dynasty 2004, rebuilt 350. New: rear loaded, 3 slides, end, clutch, exhaust, $159,000, 541-923- 8572 tires, etc. $995. or 541-749-0037 (cell) 541-410-1685

Coachman Freelander 2011, 27’, queen bed, 1 slide, HD TV, DVD player, 450 Ford, $49,000, please call 541-923-5754.

Country Coach Intrigue 2002, 40' Tag axle. 400hp Cummins Diesel. Two slide-outs. 41,000 miles. Most options. $110,000 OBO 541-678-5712

Fleetwood Discovery 40X 2008, 31K miles, MUST SELL SOON, 3 slides, 1-owner, great shape, $129,975 OBO, call Bill 541-771-3030

Southwind 35.5’ Triton, 2008,V10, 2 slides, Dupont UV coat, 7500 mi. Avg NADA ret.114,343; asking $99,000. Call 541-923-2774 TRADE? 2004 Bounder by Fleetwood 35’ 3 slides, loaded. 44k, very clean, reliable w/8.1 Workhouse chassis, $45,000. 541-382-1853

Winnebago Outlook 32’ 2008, Ford V10 eng, Wineguard sat, TV, sur- round sound stereo + more. Reduced to $49,000. 541-526-1622 or 541-728-6793 881

Travel Trailers

Fleetwood 24’ Pioneer Spirit, 2007, good cond, minor dent on front saves you $$! $8000. 541-419-5634 SPRINGDALE 2005 27’, has eating area slide, A/C and heat, new tires, all contents included, bedding towels, cooking and eating utensils. Great for vacation, fishing, hunting or living! $15,500 541-408-3811

Monaco LaPalma 37’, 2004 w/ 2 slides, 25k mi., loaded, $42,500. Springdale 29’ 2007, slide,Bunkhouse style, 541-923-3510. sleeps 7-8, excellent condition, $16,900, 541-390-2504

National Sea Breeze 2004 M-1341 35’, gas, 2 power slides, upgraded queen mat- Sprinter 272RLS, 2009 tress, hyd. leveling 29’, weatherized, like system, rear camera new, furnished & & monitor, only 6k mi. ready to go, incl WineA steal at $43,000! gard Satellite dish, 541-480-0617 $26,995. 541-420-9964 RV CONSIGNMENTS WANTED We Do The Work, You Keep The Cash, On-Site Credit Approval Team, Web Site Presence, We Take Trade-Ins. Free Advertising. BIG COUNTRY RV Bend 541-330-2495

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 28’ 2007,Gen, fuel station, exc cond. sleeps 8, black/gray interior, used 3X, $24,999. 541-389-9188 Redmond: 541-548-5254


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

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Pickups

Sport Utility Vehicles

Sport Utility Vehicles

Sport Utility Vehicles

Sport Utility Vehicles

Ford Ranger XLT 1998 X-cab BOATS & RVs 805 - Misc. Items 850 - Snowmobiles 860 - Motorcycles And Accessories 865 - ATVs 870 - Boats & Accessories 875 - Watercraft 880 - Motorhomes 881 - Travel Trailers 882 - Fifth Wheels 885 - Canopies and Campers 890 - RV’s for Rent

AUTOS & TRANSPORTATION 908 - Aircraft, Parts and Service 916 - Trucks and Heavy Equipment 925 - Utility Trailers 927 - Automotive Trades 929 - Automotive Wanted 931 - Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 932 - Antique and Classic Autos 933 - Pickups 935 - Sport Utility Vehicles 940 - Vans 975 - Automobiles

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Fifth Wheels

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $12,750. 541-923-3417.

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Autos & Transportation

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Aircraft, Parts & Service

1/3 interest in Columbia 400, located at Sunriver. $138,500. Call 541-647-3718

Carri-Lite Luxury 2009 by Carriage, 4 slideouts, inverter, satellite sys, fireplace, 2 flat screen TVs. $60,000. 541-480-3923

1/3 interest in wellequipped IFR Beech Bonanza A36, located KBDN. $55,000. 541-419-9510

Escaper 29’ 1991,

Executive Hangar

2 slides, A/C, elec/gas fridge, walk around queen bed, elec. front jacks, $4000 OBO, 541-382-8939 or 541-777-0999.

Chrysler SD 4-Door 1930, CDS Royal Standard, 8-cylinder, body is good, needs some restoration, runs, taking bids, 541-383-3888, 541-815-3318 BULLETIN CLASSIFIEDS Search the area’s most comprehensive listing of classiied advertising... real estate to automotive, merchandise to sporting goods. Bulletin Classiieds appear every day in the print or on line. Call 541-385-5809 www.bendbulletin.com

at Bend Airport (KBDN) 60’ wide x 50’ deep, w/55’ wide x 17’ high bi-fold door. Natural gas heat, office, bath- FIAT 1800 1978, 5-spd, door panels w/flowers room. Parking for 6 & hummingbirds, cars. Adjacent to white soft top & hard Frontage Rd; great top, Reduced! $5,500. visibility for aviation 541-317-9319 or bus. 1jetjock@q.com 541-647-8483 541-948-2126

Keystone Laredo 2009, $30,000, 541-419-3301 or 541-419-4649 for more info.

Trucks & Heavy Equipment

9’ DUMP BED with hydraulic lift, for 1-ton flatbed truck, + 2 aluminum tool boxes. $2700 obo. 541-410-6945

USE THE CLASSIFIEDS!

Ford Galaxie 500 1963, 2 dr. hardtop,fastback, 390 v8,auto, pwr. steer & radio (orig),541-419-4989 Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199

Door-to-door selling with fast results! It’s the easiest way in the world to sell. The Bulletin Classiied

541-385-5809 Montana 34’ 2003, 2 slides, exc. cond. throughout, arctic winter pkg., new 10-ply tires, W/D ready, $23,000, 541-948-5793

INT. Dump 1982, w/arborhood, 6k on rebuilt 392, truck refurbished, has 330 gal. water tank w/pump & hose. Everything works, Reduced - now $5000 OBO. 541-977-8988

GMC ½ ton 1971, Only $19,700! Original low mile, exceptional, 3rd owner. 951-699-7171

Mercury Monterrey 1965, Exc. All original, 4-dr. sedan, in storage last 15 yrs., 390 High Compression engine, new tires & liPeterbilt 359 potable cense, reduced to water truck, 1990, $2850, 541-410-3425. 3200 gal. tank, 5hp pump, 4-3" hoses, camlocks, $25,000. 541-820-3724 MONTANA 3585 2008, exc. cond., 3 slides, 925 king bed, lrg LR, Arctic insulation, all opUtility Trailers tions $37,500. Plymouth Barracuda 541-420-3250 1966, original car! 300 hp, 360 V8, centerOpen Road 37' 2004 lines, (Original 273 3 slides, W/D hookup, Big Tex Landscapeng & wheels incl.) large LR w/rear wining/ ATV Trailer, 541-593-2597 dow. Desk area. dual axle flatbed, 933 Asking $19,750 OBO 7’x16’, 7000 lb. Call (541) 280-7879 GVW, all steel, Pickups visit rvt.com $1400. ad#104243920 541-382-4115, or for pics 541-280-7024. Chevy 3/4 ton 4x4, 1995, extended cab, long box, grill guard, Automotive Parts, running boards, bed Service & Accessories rails & canopy, 178K miles, $4800 obo. (4) 2008 Dodge diesel 208-301-3321 (Bend) rims, 17”, like new. Chevy Silverado 1998, $200. 541-279-5816 black and silver, pro (4) snow tires and rims, lifted, loaded, new 33” 21570R15, 50%, tires, aluminum slot $100. 541-279-5816 wheels, tow pkg., drop hitch, diamond plate Tires, Cooper Discov- tool box, $12,000, or erer M&S studded, possible trade for newer 245/70R16 $450 obo Tacoma. 541-460-9127 set and Nokian Vativa M&S 245/70R16 Chevy Silverado 2500 HD 2007 extra cab, $450 obo set. Both early model, grill sets are in excellent guard, side steps, tow shape! 541-306-9937 pkg., 6L, 115,440 all We Buy Junk hwy miles, exc. cond., serviced regularly, Cars & Trucks! white, $19,200, Call Cash paid for junk 541-419-3301 or vehicles, batteries & 541-419-4649. catalytic converters. Serving all of C.O.! Dodge 1500 2001, 4x4 Call 541-408-1090 sport, red, loaded, rollbar, AND 2011 Where can you ind a Moped Trike used 3 helping hand? months, street legal. call 541-433-2384 From contractors to yard care, it’s all here Dodge 1500 STL Quad Cab Hemi 4x4, 21,000 in The Bulletin’s miles, $16,500. “Call A Service 541-318-6185 Professional” Directory 931

Pilgrim 27’, 2007 5th wheel, 1 slide, AC, TV,full awning, excellent shape, $23,900. 541-350-8629

Taurus 27.5’ 1988

Everything works, $1750/partial trade for car. 541-460-9127

Wilderness Advantage 31’, 2004. 2 slides, 2 TVs, micro, solar sys, $17,950. (Also avail: 2003 Ford F250 Diesel X-cab.) 541-385-5077 USE THE CLASSIFIEDS! Door-to-door selling with fast results! It’s the easiest way in the world to sell. The Bulletin Classiied

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Canopies & Campers

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Antique & Classic Autos

Chevy Pickup 1951, Ford F-150 1995, 112K, restored. $13,500 obo; 541-504-3253 or 503-504-2764

GMC ½-ton Pickup, 1972, LWB, 350hi motor, mechanically A-1, interior great; body needs some TLC. $4000 OBO. Call 541-382-9441

Antique & Classic Autos

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Fleetwood Wilderness 36’, 2005, 4 slides, rear bdrm, fireplace, AC, W/D hkup beautiful unit! $30,500. 541-815-2380

2.5L 4-cyl engine, 5-spd standard trans, long bed, newer motor & paint, new clutch & tires, excellent condition, clean, $4500. Call 541-447-6552

4X4, long bed, auto, very clean, runs well, new tires, $6000. 541-548-4039.

Lance 11.6 camper Mdl 1130, 1999. Ext’d cab, Ford F-250 Super Duty fully self-contained. 1999,7.3LTurbo Diesel, Incl catalytic heater, 4WD,6-spd. stick trans, TV/VCR combo. Very crew cab, A/C, pw,pdl, well taken care of, short wide bed, cloth clean. Hauls easily, bucket seats, cruise, very comfortable. Chevy Wagon 1957, Silver Star front bumper $7300. 541-382-1344 4-dr., complete, w/winch, $9000, needs $15,000 OBO, trades, tires & glow plugs, Lance-Legend 990 please call 541-419-2074 11’3" 1998, w/ext-cab, 541-420-5453. exc. cond., generator, Ford F-350 XLT 2003, solar-cell, large refrig, Chrysler 300 Coupe 4X4, 6L diesel, 6-spd AC, micro., magic fan, 1967, 440 engine, manual, Super Cab, bathroom shower, auto. trans, ps, air, short box, 12K Warn removable carpet, frame on rebuild, rewinch, custom bumper custom windows, outpainted original blue, & canopy, running door shower/awning original blue interior, boards, 2 sets tires, set-up for winterizing, original hub caps, exc. wheels & chains, many elec. jacks, CD/stechrome, asking $9000 extras, perfect, ONLY reo/4’ stinger. $8500. or make offer. 29,800 miles, $27,500 Bend, 541.279.0458 541-385-9350. OBO, 541-504-8316.

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $1950. 541-419-5480.

Mazda B4000 2004 Chevy Tahoe LS 2001 Toyota Highlander 2009 #145676 $29,995 4x4. 120K mi, Power Cab Plus 4x4. 4½ yrs seats, Tow Pkg, 3rd or 95,000 miles left on row seating, extra ext’d warranty. V6, tires, CD, privacy tint5-spd, AC, studded ing, upgraded rims. tires, 2 extra rims, Fantastic cond. $7995 Jeep Cherokee 1990, Porsche Cayenne 2004, tow pkg, 132K mi, all 4WD, 3 sets rims & 86k, immac, dealer #B08376 541-598-3750 Contact Timm at records, exlnt cond, 541-408-2393 for info tires, exlnt set snow maint’d, loaded, now aaaoregonautosource.com $9500. 541-408-8611 or to view vehicle. tires, great 1st car! $17000. 503-459-1580 $1800. 541-633-5149 Advertise your car! FIND IT! 940 Add A Picture! BUY IT! Reach thousands of readers! Vans SELL IT! Call 541-385-5809 Range Rover 2005 HSE, nav, DVD, The Bulletin Classiieds The Bulletin Classifieds local car, new tires, Ford Windstar 1995,7 51K miles. passenger, 140k, 3.8 935 $24,995. V6, no junk. Drive it Jeep Willys 1947,custom, away for $1750; 503-635-9494 Sport Utility Vehicles small block Chevy, PS, Ford Excursion Nissan Quest 1996, OD,mags+ trailer.Swap 2005, 4WD, diesel, 7 passenger, 152k, for backhoe.No am calls 3.0 V6, new tires, exc. cond., $19,900, please. 541-389-6990 ready for next 152k, call 541-923-0231. $4500. 541-318-9999, CHEVY Range Rover, Find It in ask for Bob. SUBURBAN LT 2006 Sport HSE, The Bulletin Classifieds! GMC Denali 2003 2005, low miles., nav, AWD, heated 541-385-5809 loaded with options. good tires, new seats, moonroof, Exc. cond., snow Just bought a new boat? brakes, moonroof local owner, tires and rims inSell your old one in the JEEP WRANGLER X Harman Kardon, Reduced to classiieds! Ask about our cluded. 130k hwy 2002 6 cyl., 5 spd., $23,995. $15,750 Super Seller rates! miles. $12,000. A/C, hard top, exc. 503-635-9494 541-389-5016. 541-385-5809 541-419-4890. cond., $11,000. 541-419-4890.

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Tarie L. Berger and Robert W. Berger, as grantor to Amerititle, as Trustee, in favor of American General Financial Services (DE), Inc., as Beneficiary, dated January 30, 2007, recorded February 5, 2007, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2007, at Page 07458, beneficial interest having been assigned to Springleaf Financial Services, Inc., fka American General Financial Services, Inc., d/b/a American General Financial Services (DE), Inc., as covering the following described real property: Lot Thirteen (13), Block H, Deschutes River Woods, Deschutes County Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 59910 Hopi Road, Bend, OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $945.00, from January 10, 2012, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $139,548.51, together with interest thereon at the rate of 7% per annum from December 10, 2011, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on September 17, 2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 05-15-2012. By: /s/: Kelly D. Sutherland. KELLY D. SUTHERLAND, Successor Trustee. SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC, 1499 SE Tech Center Place, Suite 255, Vancouver, WA 98683, www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa, Telephone: (360) 260-2253, Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647. S&S 12-109468.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Christopher S. Huffine, a single man, as grantor to AmeriTitle, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, FA, as Beneficiary, dated November 5, 2007, recorded November 9, 2007, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as Instrument No. 2007-59053, beneficial interest now held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor in interest to Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver for Washington Mutual Bank as covering the following described real property: Lot Fourteen (14), Westside Pines Phase 11, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 2595 N.W. Monterey Pines Drive, Bend, OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $1,563.27, from April 1, 2010, and monthly payments in the sum of $1,554.80, from April 1, 2011, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $245,600.00, together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.375% per annum from March 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on August 30, 2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 04-27-2012. By: /s/: Kelly D. Sutherland. KELLY D. SUTHERLAND, Successor Trustee. SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC, 1499 SE Tech Center Place, Suite 255, Vancouver, WA 98683, www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa, Telephone: (360) 260-2253, Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647. S&S 10-104532.

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Geoffrey W. Hays and Kellene S. Hays, as tenants by the entirety, as grantor to Deschutes County Title Company, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, as Beneficiary, dated April 1, 2006, recorded April 10, 2006, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as Instrument No. 2006-24425, beneficial interest now held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor in interest by purchase from the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver for Washington Mutual Bank as covering the following described real property: Lot Six in Block Four of Crestridge Estates, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 7145 N.W. Poplar Drive, Redmond, OR 97756. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $2,417.35, from September 1, 2009, monthly payments in the sum of $2,536.23, from February 1, 2010, and monthly payments in the sum of $2,418.92, from February 1, 2011, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $417,000.00, together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.025% per annum from August 1, 2009, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on August 30, 2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 04-27-20-12. By: /s/: Kelly D. Sutherland. KELLY D. SUTHERLAND, Successor Trustee. SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC, 1499 SE Tech Center Place, Suite 255, Vancouver, WA 98683, www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa, Telephone: (360) 260-2253, Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647. S&S 10-103954.

LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON DESCHUTES COUNTY WELLS FARGO BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE HOLDERS OF THE FIRST FRANKLIN MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2006-FF15 MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-FF15, through their loan servicing agent SELECT PORTFOLIO SERVICING, INC., Plaintiff/s, v. JENNIFER R. OSTROM; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., MERS; NATIONPOINT LOAN SERVICES; BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.; ANY UNKNOWN PERSONS CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN Lot 15, Block 6, Summerfield Phase IV, Deschutes County, Oregon, Defendant/s. Case No.: 11CV0894 NOTICE OF SALE UNDER WRIT OF EXECUTION REAL PROPERTY Notice is hereby given that I will on July 12, 2012 at 11:30 AM in the main lobby of the Deschutes County Sheriff's Office, 63333 W. Highway 20, Bend, Oregon, sell, at public oral auction to the highest bidder, for cash or cashier's check, the following real property, known as 2203 SW 28th Street, Redmond, Oregon 97756, to wit, Lot 15, Block 6, Summerfield Phase IV, Deschutes County, Oregon Said sale is made under a Writ of Execution in Foreclosure issued out of the Circuit Court of the State of Oregon for the County of Deschutes, dated May 24, 2012, to me directed in the above-entitled action wherein Wells Fargo Bank, National Association, as trustee for the holders of the First Franklin Mortgage Loan Trust 2006-FF15 Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2006-FF15, through their loan servicing agent, Select Portfolio Servicing, Inc., as plaintiff/s, recovered Corrected General Judgment of Foreclosure on May 7, 2012, against Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., MERS, Nationpoint Loan Services, and Bank of America, N.A. as defendant/s. BEFORE BIDDING AT THE SALE, A PROSPECTIVE BIDDER SHOULD INDEPENDENTLY INVESTIGATE: (a)The priority of the lien or interest of the judgment creditor; (b)Land use laws and regulations applicable to the property; (c)Approved uses for the property; (d)Limits on farming or forest practices on the property; (e)Rights of neighboring property owners; and (f)Environmental laws and regulations that affect the property. LARRY BLANTON Deschutes County Sheriff Anthony Raguine, Civil Technician Date: June 11, 2012 Published in Bend Bulletin Date of First and Successive Publications:June 13, 2012; June 20, 2012; June 27, 2012 Date of Last Publication: July 4, 2012 Attorney:Matthew Booth, OSB #082663 McCarthy &Holthus, LLP 8995 SW Miley Rd., Suite 103 Wilsonville, OR 97070 (503) 694-1145 Conditions of Sale:Potential bidders must arrive 15 minutes prior to the auction to allow the Deschutes County Sheriff's Office to review bidder's funds. Only U.S. currency and/or cashier's checks made payable to Deschutes County Sheriff's Office will be accepted. Payment must be made in full immediately upon the close of the sale.


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13, 2012 F5

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AUDI QUATTRO CABRIOLET 2004, extra nice, low mileage, heated seats, new Michelins, all wheel drive, $12,995 503-635-9494.

BMW 525i 2004,

New body style, Steptronic auto., cold-weather package, premium package, heated seats, extra nice. $14,995. 503-635-9494.

Infiniti I30 Limited Porsche 911 Carrera 1999, 4 dr. luxury car, 1984, platinum metallic, Saab 9-3 SE 1999 convertible, 2 door, leather & woodgrain $14,900, looks & runs Navy with black soft interior, power wingreat, custom sound top, tan interior, very dows & seats, side system, 178K mi, good condition. airbags, Bose sound 541-383-2440. $5200 firm. Chevrolet Camaro 1996, system, sunroof, 3.0 L 541-317-2929. V6, 135K mi, recent V6, must see! $6000 PORSCHE 914 1974, obo. 541-350-4779 tune-up. $2600 obo. Roller (no engine), 541-408-7134, lv msg lowered, full roll cage, Mitsubishi 3000 GT 5-pt harnesses, racChrysler 300C, 2006. 1999, auto., pearl Just too many ing seats, 911 dash & loaded, only 6,000 white, very low mi. instruments, decent collectibles? miles, health forces $9500. 541-788-8218. shape, very cool! sale, call for details, $1699. 541-678-3249 541-420-6215 Sell them in Nissan Altima 2009, 47K People Look for Information The Bulletin Classiieds miles, 30+ mpg, exc. Check out the About Products and cond., 1 owner, exFind exactly what classiieds online Services Every Day through tended warranty, snow you are looking for in the 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds tires. $14,700. www.bendbulletin.com CLASSIFIEDS Updated daily 541-419-6057 Buick Lucerne CX 2006, 65K, 3.8 V6, cloth interior, 30mpg hwy, $7500. Buick Park Avenue 1992, leather, 136K, 28 mpg hwy. $2500. Bob, 541-318-9999 Ask me about the Free Trip to Washington, D.C. for WWII Veterans.

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Brian K Lantzy, A Married Man, as grantor to Western Title Company, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, FA, as Beneficiary, dated June 14, 2006, recorded June 19, 2006, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2006, at Page 42254, beneficial interest now held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association as covering the following described real property: Lot 12, Block 8, Deschutes, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 603 N.W. Delaware Avenue, Bend, OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $1,605.93, from August 1, 2011, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $291,985.00, together with interest thereon at the rate of 3.125% per annum from July 1, 2011, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on August 30, 2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 04-27-2012. By: /s/: Kelly D. Sutherland. KELLY D. SUTHERLAND, Successor Trustee. SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC, 1499 SE Tech Center Place, Suite 255, Vancouver, WA 98683, www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa, Telephone: (360) 260-2253, Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647. S&S 12-108882.

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Oscar S. Chen, joint tenants, Jane Chen, joint tenants, as grantor to Western Title Company, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, FA, as Beneficiary, dated January 19, 2007, recorded January 26, 2007, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2007, at Page 05256, beneficial interest now held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor in interest by purchase from the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver for Washington Mutual Bank, formerly known as Washington Mutual Bank, FA as covering the following described real property: Lot 14, SAVANNAH ESTATES PHASE 3, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 2462 S.W. 33rd Street, Redmond, OR 97756. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $1,832.02, from April 1, 2010, and monthly payments in the sum of $1,952.75, from September 1, 2011, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $280,000.00, together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.75% per annum from March 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on August 30, 2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 04-27-20-12. By: /s/: Kelly D. Sutherland. KELLY D. SUTHERLAND, Successor Trustee. SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC, 1499 SE Tech Center Place, Suite 255, Vancouver, WA 98683, www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa, Telephone: (360) 260-2253, Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647. S&S 10-104980.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by John W. Cooper and Lisa D. Cooper, as tenants by the entirety, as grantor to AmeriTitle, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, FA, as Beneficiary, dated March 2, 2007, recorded March 12, 2007, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2007, at Page 14777, beneficial interest now held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor in interest from the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver for Washington Mutual Bank as covering the following described real property: Lot Two (2), Block Two (2), Plateau Estates, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 10290 N.W. Oak Lane, Redmond, OR 97756. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $2,567.75, from October 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $349,269.07, together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.625% per annum from September 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on September 14, 2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 05-14-2012. By: /s/: Kelly D. Sutherland. KELLY D. SUTHERLAND, Successor Trustee. SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC, 1499 SE Tech Center Place, Suite 255, Vancouver, WA 98683, www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa, Telephone: (360) 260-2253, Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647. S&S 11-106084. 1000

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PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by LUKE Q SEVERSON, as grantor(s), to AMERITITLE, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 04/17/2009, recorded 04/22/2009, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as Recorder's fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception Number 2009-16620, and subsequently assigned to BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. by Assignment recorded 06/09/2011 in Book/Reel/Volume No. at Page No. as Recorder's fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2011-20872, covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: LOT TEN 10, CARLEY MEADOWS, PHASE 1, RECORDED OCTOBER 19, 2006, IN CABINET H. PAGE 102, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 3256 SOUTHWEST PERIDOT AVENUE REDMOND, OR 97756 Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations that the Trust Deed secures and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $1,030.60 beginning 07/01/2010; plus late charges of $41.22 each month beginning with the 07/01/2010 payment plus prior accrued late charges of $-123.66; plus advances of $0.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. By reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the Trust Deed secures are immediately due and payable, said sums being the following to wit: $128,854.56 with interest thereon at the rate of 5.00 percent per annum beginning 06/01/2010 until paid, plus all accrued late charges thereon together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interests therein. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., the undersigned Trustee will on Wednesday, August 15, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, Bend, Deschutes County, OR, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the Trust Deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by paying to the Beneficiary the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of notice of default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, together with the Trustee's and attorney fees not exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, that the Trust Deed secures, and the words "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: April 11, 2012 RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. For further information, please contact: RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA. 93063 (800) 281-8219 (TS# 12-0024263) 1006.157397-FEI Publication Dates: May 23, 30, June 6 and 13, 2012. 1006.157397

LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY DESCHUTES THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE HOLDERS OF THE CERTIFICATES, FIRST HORIZON MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES SERIES FH06-AA6, BY FIRST HORIZON HOME LOANS, A DIVISION OF FIRST TENNESSEE BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, MASTER SERVICER, IN ITS CAPACITY AS AGENT FOR THE TRUSTEE UNDER THE POOLING AND SERVICING AGREEMENT, through their loan servicing agent NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC, Plaintiff, vs. MELISSA M. JACOBSON; OCCUPANTS OF THE PROPERTY, Defendants. Case No. 12CV0239. SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION. To: To: Melissa M. Jacobson. Address: 822 NE Hidden Valley Dr., Bend, OR 97701. You are hereby required to appear and defend the Complaint filed against you in the above entitled cause within thirty (30) days from the date of service of this summons upon you, and in case of your failure to do so, for want thereof, Plaintiff will apply to the court for the relief demanded in the Complaint. NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: READ THESE PAPERS CAREFULLY! You must “appear” in this case or the other side will Win automatically. To “appear” you must with the court a legal paper called a “motion” or “answer.” The “motion” or “answer” (or “reply”) must be given to the court clerk or administrator Within 30 days of the date of first publication specified herein along with the required filing fee. It must be in proper form and have proof of service on the plaintiffs attorney or, if the plaintiff does not have an attorney, proof of service on the plaintiff. If you have questions, you should see an attorney immediately. If you need help in finding an attorney, you may call the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at (503) 684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at (800) 452-7636. The relief Sought in the Complaint is the foreclosure of the property located at 822 NE Hidden Valley Dr., Bend, OR 97701. Date of first publication: June 6, 2012. I certify that the foregoing is an exact and complete copy of the original summons in the above entitled cause. Matthew Booth, OSB#082663, Russell Whittaker, OSB# 115540. Matthew Booth, OSB #082663 Russen Whittaker, #115540 8995 SW Miley Road, Ste. 103 Wilsonville, OR 97070 Phone: (503) 694-1145 Fax: (503) 694-1460 mbooth@mccarthyholtus.com rwhittaker@mccarthyholtus.com Attorneys for Plaintiff 1000

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LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON DESCHUTES COUNTY US Bank National Association, not in its individual capacity, but solely as legal title trustee for LVS Title Trust I Plaintiff/s, v. Thomas J. Iams aka Thomas Joseph Iams II; Alison M. Iams; Sun Meadows Owners Association; State of Oregon; and Occupants of the premises Defendant/s. Case No.: 11CV0806 NOTICE OF SALE UNDER WRIT OF EXECUTION REAL PROPERTY Notice is hereby given that I will on July 5, 2012 at 11:00 AM in the main lobby of the Deschutes County Sheriff's Office, 63333 W. Highway 20, Bend, Oregon, sell, at public oral auction to the highest bidder, for cash or cashier's check, the following real property, known as 20561 Sun Meadow Way, Bend, Oregon 97702, to wit, Lot Thirteen Sun Meadow, Deschutes County, Oregon Said sale is made under a Writ of Execution issued out of the Circuit Court of the State of Oregon for the County of Deschutes, dated May 24, 2012, to me directed in the above-entitled action wherein US Bank National Association, not in its individual capacity, but solely as legal title trustee for LVS Title Trust I as plaintiff/s, recovered General Judgment of Foreclosure (with Money Awards) on May 3, 2012, against Thomas J. Iams aka Thomas Joseph Iams II, Alison M. Iams, Sun Meadows Owners Association, State of Oregon, and all occupants of 20561 Sun Meadow Way, Bend, OR 97702 as defendant/s. BEFORE BIDDING AT THE SALE, A PROSPECTIVE BIDDER SHOULD INDEPENDENTLY INVESTIGATE: (a)The priority of the lien or interest of the judgment creditor; (b)Land use laws and regulations applicable to the property; (c)Approved uses for the property; (d)Limits on farming or forest practices on the property; (e)Rights of neighboring property owners; and (f)Environmental laws and regulations that affect the property. LARRY BLANTON Deschutes County Sheriff Anthony Raguine, Civil Technician Date: June 4, 2012 Published in Bend Bulletin Date of First and Successive Publications:June 6, 2012; June 13, 2012; June 20, 2012 Date of Last Publication: June 27, 2012 Attorney:SiaRezvani, OSB #020892 Warren Allen LLP 850 NE 122nd Avenue Portland, OR 97230-2096 (503) 255-8795 Conditions of Sale:Potential bidders must arrive 15 minutes prior to the auction to allow the Deschutes County Sheriff's Office to review bidder's funds. Only U.S. currency and/or cashier's checks made payable to Deschutes County Sheriff's Office will be accepted. Payment must be made in full immediately upon the close of the sale. LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON DESCHUTES COUNTY Gregory Lynn Roesch, Plaintiff/s, v. Robin K. Woolhiser; Janis L. Champoux; Angela Causer, and Occupants of the Property, Defendant/s. Case No.: 12CV0064 NOTICE OF SALE UNDER WRIT OF EXECUTION REAL PROPERTY Notice is hereby given that I will on July 12, 2012 at 11:00 AM in the main lobby of the Deschutes County Sheriff's Office, 63333 W. Highway 20, Bend, Oregon, sell, at public oral auction to the highest bidder, for cash or cashier's check, the following real property, known as 163 SE 3rd Street, Bend, Oregon 97702, to wit, Lots One (1) and Two (2) in Block Four (4) of Terminal Addition, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. Except that part of Lot 1 described as follows: Beginning at the Northeast corner of said Lot 1; thence South along the East line of said Lot a distance of 11.3 feet; thence North 57° 55' West, a distance of 21.15 feet to the North line of said lot; thence East along said North line a distance of 18 feet to the point of beginning. NOTE: This legal description was created prior to January 1, 2008. Tax Parcel Number: 106154 Said sale is made under a Writ of Execution issued out of the Circuit Court of the State of Oregon for the County of Deschutes, dated May 24, 2012, to me directed in the above-entitled action wherein Gregory Lynn Roesch as plaintiff/s, recovered General Judgment of Foreclosure and Money Award on April 19, 2012, against Robin K. Woolhiser and Janis L. Champoux as defendant/s. BEFORE BIDDING AT THE SALE, A PROSPECTIVE BIDDER SHOULD INDEPENDENTLY INVESTIGATE: (a)The priority of the lien or interest of the judgment creditor; (b)Land use laws and regulations applicable to the property; (c)Approved uses for the property; (d)Limits on farming or forest practices on the property; (e)Rights of neighboring property owners; and (f)Environmental laws and regulations that affect the property. LARRY BLANTON Deschutes County Sheriff Anthony Raguine, Civil Technician Date: June 11, 2012 Published in Bend Bulletin Date of First and Successive Publications:June 13, 2012; June 20, 2012; June 27, 2012 Date of Last Publication: July 4, 2012 Attorney:Jeffrey A. Trautman, OSB #041090 Fetherston Edmonds, LLP 960 Liberty Street SE Suite 110 Salem, OR 97302 (503) 581-1542 Conditions of Sale:Potential bidders must arrive 15 minutes prior to the auction to allow the Deschutes County Sheriff's Office to review bidder's funds. Only U.S. currency and/or cashier's checks made payable to Deschutes County Sheriff's Office will be accepted. Payment must be made in full immediately upon the close of the sale.


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

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LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF SALE 1. Name of Grantor: SHAWN CADY, 5100 Remmington Park Drive, Flower Mount, TX 75028. 2. Name of Trustee: TERRENCE B. O'SULLIVAN, Merrill O'Sullivan, LLP, 805 SW Industrial Way, Suite 5, Bend, OR 97702. 3. Name of Beneficiary: FRANCIS HANSEN & MARTIN LLP, 1148 NW Hill St., Bend, OR 97702. 4. Legal Description of the real property covered by the Line of Credit Trust Deed: Lot Six (6), Block Four (4), FIRST ADDITION RIVER FOREST ACRES, recorded August 8, 1966, in Cabinet A, Page 137, Deschutes County, Oregon. 5. Date of Line of Credit Trust Deed: July 8, 2009. 6. Document Number of Mortgage Records where Line of Credit Trust Deed is recorded: Document No. 2009-29697, Deschutes County Records. 7. Date of Recording of Line of Credit Trust Deed: July 13, 2009. 7A. Date of Re-Recorded Line of Credit Trust Deed: February 6, 2012. Re-Recorded Instrument No: 2012-03829, Deschutes County Records. 8. The beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to ORS 86.735(3); The default for which foreclosure is made is the following: (A) Failure to pay the entire principal and interest due under the note on or before August 30, 2011. 9. By reason of the default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on all obligations secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable. The sums owing on all obligations secured by the trust deed are: Principal balance, interest, and costs through March 6, 2012, in the amount of $123,738.13, with interest accruing at a rate of 9% per annum (OR $24.14 per diem). 10. Both Beneficiary and Trustee have elected to sell said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Line of Credit Trust Deed. The undersigned trustee will on Friday, August 3, 2012, at 10:00 a.m., in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, on the west steps of the courthouse, located at 1164 NW Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. 11. Any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorneys fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. 12. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor' includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by the trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: March 7, 2012. Terrence B. O’Sullivan, Trustee. STATE OF OREGON ss. County of Deschutes. The foregoing instrument was signed or acknowledged before me, Wendy Cave on this 7th day of March, 2012, by TERRENCE B. O'SULLIVAN. Wendy Cave, NOTARY PUBLIC FOR OREGON. My Commission Expires: 8/4/12. LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON DESCHUTES COUNTY Federal National Mortgage Association, its successors in interest and/or assigns, Plaintiff/s, v. Karla I. Hayes, and Occupants of the Premises, Defendant/s. Case No.: 11CV0967 NOTICE OF SALE UNDER WRIT OF EXECUTION REAL PROPERTY Notice is hereby given that I will on July 12, 2012 at 11:15 AM in the main lobby of the Deschutes County Sheriff's Office, 63333 W. Highway 20, Bend, Oregon, sell, at public oral auction to the highest bidder, for cash or cashier's check, the following real property, known as 2336 Northwest Summerhill Drive, Bend, Oregon 97701, to wit, Lot Twenty-Five (25), Phase 2, SHEVLIN MEADOWS, PHASES 1 and 2, Deschutes County, Oregon Said sale is made under a Writ of Execution in Foreclosure issued out of the Circuit Court of the State of Oregon for the County of Deschutes, dated May 24, 2012, to me directed in the above-entitled action wherein Federal National Mortgage Association as plaintiff/s, recovered General Judgment of Foreclosure on April 27, 2012, against Karla I. Hayes and Occupants of the Premises as defendant/s. BEFORE BIDDING AT THE SALE, A PROSPECTIVE BIDDER SHOULD INDEPENDENTLY INVESTIGATE: (a)The priority of the lien or interest of the judgment creditor; (b)Land use laws and regulations applicable to the property; (c)Approved uses for the property; (d)Limits on farming or forest practices on the property; (e)Rights of neighboring property owners; and (f)Environmental laws and regulations that affect the property. LARRY BLANTON Deschutes County Sheriff Anthony Raguine, Civil Division Date: June 11, 2012 Published in Bend Bulletin Date of First and Successive Publications:June 13, 2012; June 20, 2012; June 27, 2012 Date of Last Publication: July 4, 2012 Attorney:Tony Kullen, OSB #090218 Routh Crabtree Olsen, PC 621 SW Alder Street, Suite 800 Portland, OR 97205-3623 (503) 977-7840 Conditions of Sale: Potential bidders must arrive 15 minutes prior to the auction to allow the Deschutes County Sheriff's Office to review bidder's funds. Only U.S. currency and/or cashier's checks made payable to Deschutes County Sheriff's Office will be accepted. Payment must be made in full immediately upon the close of the sale. LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 1717090001 T.S. No.: 1205527OR Reference is made to that certain deed made by, STEPHEN M GREEN AND THERESA M GREEN HUSBAND AND WIFE as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. acting solely as nominee for Provident Funding Associates, L.P. its successors and assigns, as Beneficiary, dated 9/11/2007, recorded 09/18/2007, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2007-50535 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 150153 LOT FOURTEEN (14) IN BLOCK TWO (2) OF THE WINCHESTER, CITY OF BEND DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 1897 NE CARSON WAY, BEND, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Installment of Principal and Interest plus impounds and/or advances which became due on 2/1/2012 plus late charges and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $1,705.83 Monthly Late Charge $75.85 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $227,295.04 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.5% per annum from 1/1/2012 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that First American Title Company, the undersigned trustee will on 9/17/2012 at the hour of 01:00 PM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, at At the front entrance to the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond St., Bend, OR County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 5/10/2012 First American Title Company c/o Seaside Trustee, Inc. 3 First American Way Santa Ana, California 92707 (805)644-9300 Signature By: Laura Soza, Authorized Signor P949373 5/23, 5/30, 6/6, 06/13/2012

PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by BRENT E KEYS, A Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by SIMON T. SHACKELL AND LYNNE V. SHACKELL, HUSBAND AND WIFE AS TENANTS SINGLE MAN, as grantor(s), to SECURITY TITLE GUARANTY CO., as BY THE ENTIRETY, as grantor(s), to DESCHUTES COUNTY TITLE Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSCOMPANY, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 03/30/2007, recorded 04/06/2007, in TRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 06/23/2006, recorded the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as Recorder's 06/29/2006, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception Number 2007-20003, and subseRecorder's fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception Number 2006-44965, quently assigned to U.S. BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS and subsequently assigned to BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. by Assignment TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF THE LXS 2007-15N recorded 09/06/2011 in Book/Reel/Volume No. at Page No. as Recorder's TRUST FUND by Assignment recorded 01/17/2012 in Book/Reel/Volume fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2011-31198, covering the folNo. at Page No. as Recorder's fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception No. lowing described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: 2012-001075, covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: LOT SIXTEEN, BLOCK SEVEN, REPLAT OF BLOCKS SIX AND SEVEN, RIVERSIDE, LOT ONE HUNDRED THIRTY-TWO (132), DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. PARKS AT BROKEN TOP, PHASE 4, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 202 NORTHWEST THURSTON AVENUE BEND, OR 97701 PROPERTY ADDRESS: 61402 DAVIS LAKE LOOP BEND, OR 97702 Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations that the Trust Deed secures and a notice of default Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the real property to has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the satisfy the obligations that the Trust Deed secures and a notice of default default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the due the following sums: monthly payments of $783.10 beginning default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when 03/01/2010; plus late charges of $39.16 each month beginning with the due the following sums: monthly payments of $2,772.15 beginning 03/01/2010 payment plus prior accrued late charges of $-156.44; plus ad09/01/2011; plus late charges of $112.43 each month beginning with the vances of $360.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and 09/01/2011 payment plus prior accrued late charges of $-336.76; plus adattorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further vances of $60.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above deattorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further scribed real property and its interest therein. sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above deBy reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all sums owing on scribed real property and its interest therein. the obligation that the Trust Deed secures are immediately due and payBy reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all sums owing on able, said sums being the following to wit: $221,111.76 with interest the obligation that the Trust Deed secures are immediately due and paythereon at the rate of 4.25 percent per annum beginning 02/01/2010 until able, said sums being the following to wit: $528,760.36 with interest paid, plus all accrued late charges thereon together with title expense, thereon at the rate of 2.88 percent per annum beginning 08/01/2011 until costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said paid, plus all accrued late charges thereon together with title expense, default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the proteccosts, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said tion of the above described real property and its interests therein. default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protecWHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that, RECONTRUST COMPANY, tion of the above described real property and its interests therein. N.A., the undersigned Trustee will on Friday, August 10, 2012 at the hour WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that, RECONTRUST COMPANY, of 10:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS N.A., the undersigned Trustee will on Friday, August 10, 2012 at the hour 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes of 10:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, Bend, Deschutes County, OR, sell at 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, Bend, Deschutes County, OR, sell at real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described the execution by grantor of the Trust Deed, together with any interest real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the exthe execution by grantor of the Trust Deed, together with any interest ecution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby sewhich the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the excured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge ecution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby seby the Trustee. cured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, by the Trustee. at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the reinstated by paying to the Beneficiary the entire amount then due (other sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default reinstated by paying to the Beneficiary the entire amount then due (other occurred) and by curing any other default complained of notice of default than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required unoccurred) and by curing any other default complained of notice of default der the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, and in addition to paying that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required unsaid sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default by der the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, and in addition to paying paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default by that the Trust Deed secures, together with the Trustee's and attorney fees paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation not exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753. that the Trust Deed secures, together with the Trustee's and attorney fees In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" not exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753. includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other perIn construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" son owing an obligation, that the Trust Deed secures, and the words includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other per"Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, son owing an obligation, that the Trust Deed secures, and the words if any. "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: April 03, 2012 Dated: April 03, 2012 RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. For further information, please contact: RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. For further information, please contact: 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. SIMI VALLEY, CA. 93063 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 (800) 281-8219 SIMI VALLEY, CA. 93063 (TS# 11-0085369) 1006.143227-FEI (800) 281-8219 (TS# 12-0007445) 1006.153332-FEI Publication Dates: May 23, 30, June 6 and 13, 2012. 1006.143227 Publication Dates: May 23, 30, June 6 and 13, 2012. 1006.153332 TURN THE PAGE Find exactly what Find It in The Bulletin People Look for Information Need help ixing stuff? For More Ads The Bulletin Classifieds! you are looking for in the About Products and To Subscribe call Call A Service Professional CLASSIFIEDS The Bulletin 541-385-5809 Services Every Day through 541-385-5800 or go to ind the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com The Bulletin Classifieds www.bendbulletin.com 1000

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PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by MICHAEL L STARK AND JESSE A STARK, TENANTS BY ENTIRETY, as grantor(s), to WESTERN TITLE AND ESCROW, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 06/21/2007, recorded 06/27/2007, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as Recorder's fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception Number 2007-36010, and subsequently assigned to GREENPOINT MORTGAGE FUNDING, INC. by Assignment recorded 03/04/2010 in Book/Reel/Volume No. N/A at Page No. N/A as Recorder's fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2010-9302, covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: UNIT 3, RUSTY HILLS CONDOMINIUMS, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON, AS DESCRIBED IN THAT CERTAIN DECLARATION OF UNIT OWNERSHIP RECORDED JULY 1, 1980 IN BOOK 324, PAGE 39, DEED RECORDS AND RE-RECORDED JULY 23, 1981 IN BOOK 344, PAGE 845, DEED RECORDS, APPERTAINING TO A TRACT OF LAND SITUATED IN LOTS 6-11, BLOCK 7, REPLAT OF BLOCKS 6 AND 7, RIVERSIDE ADDITION AS DESCRIBED IN DECLARATION WHICH DECLARATION IS INCORPORATED HEREIN BY REFERENCE AND MADE A PART HEREOF AS IF FULLY SET FORTH HEREIN, TOGETHER WITH A PERCENTAGE OF THE COMMON ELEMENTS AS SET FORTH IN SAID DECLARATION APPERTAINING TO SAID UNIT, AND ALSO TOGETHER WITH THE COMMON AREAS AS SET FORTH ON THE PLAT OF RUSTY HILLS CONDOMINIUMS. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 2155 NW HILL STREET #3 BEND, OR 97701 Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations that the Trust Deed secures and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $950.72 beginning 02/01/2009; plus late charges of $47.54 each month beginning with the 02/01/2009 payment plus prior accrued late charges of $-47.54; plus advances of $6,827.39; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. By reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the Trust Deed secures are immediately due and payable, said sums being the following to wit: $165,943.78 with interest thereon at the rate of 6.88 percent per annum beginning 01/01/2009 until paid, plus all accrued late charges thereon together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interests therein. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., the undersigned Trustee will on Wednesday, July 18, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, Bend, Deschutes County, OR, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the Trust Deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by paying to the Beneficiary the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of notice of default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, together with the Trustee's and attorney fees not exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, that the Trust Deed secures, and the words "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: March 13, 2012 RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. For further information, please contact: RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA. 93063 (800) 281-8219 (TS# 10-0020712) 1006.89368-File No. Publication Dates: June 6, 13, 20 and 27, 2012. 1006.89368

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE The Trustee, under the terms of the Trust Deed described herein, at the direction of the Beneficiary, hereby elects to sell the property described in said Trust Deed to satisfy the obligations secured thereby. A. PARTIES TO THE TRUST DEED: Grantor: DEAN L. ROGERS, Trustee: ROBERT A. SMEJKAL, Attorney at Law, Beneficiary: MT. TOM, LLC, an Oregon limited liability company. B. DESCRIPTION OF THE PROPERTY: "Lot 2 of PINE RIDGE PLAZA, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon." C. TRUST DEED INFORMATION: Dated: May 19, 2008, Recording Date: May 19, 2008, Instrument No.: 2008-21836, Recording Place: Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. D. DEFAULT: The Grantor is in default and the Beneficiary elects to foreclose the Trust Deed by reason of the Grantor's failure to pay: (1) the entire balance of the Promissory Note which became due in full on May 19, 2011; and (2) real property taxes for 2011-2012 in the amount of $6,721.60, plus interest. E. AMOUNT DUE: By reason of the default, the Beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the Trust Deed immediately due and payable, those sums being the principal amount of $170,000.00, plus accrued interest as of February 22, 2012, in the amount of $6,223.56, plus interest on the principal amount at the rate of 17% per annum from February 23, 2012, until paid; plus late fees, attorney fees and foreclosure costs, and amounts advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of the Trust Deed and/or applicable law. F. ELECTION TO SELL: NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Beneficiary and the Trustee, by reason of said default, have elected, and do hereby elect, to foreclose said Trust Deed by advertisement and sale pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes §86.705 et seq., and to cause to be sold at public auction to the highest bidder, for cash or certified funds, the interest in said described property which the Grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution of the Trust Deed, together with any interest the Grantor acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed together with the expenses of sale, including the compensation of the Trustee as provided by law, and the reasonable fees of the Trustee's attorney. G. DATE, TIME AND PLACE OF SALE: Date & Time: August 10, 2012, at 1:00 p.m. Place: Inside the front entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, regon. H. RIGHT TO REINSTATE: NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that at any time prior to five (5) days before the sale, this foreclosure proceeding may be dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the Trustee of the entire amount then due (other than a portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed, and in addition to paying said sums or by tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses to the Trustee actually incurred by Beneficiary and the Trustee in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with the Trustee's fees and attorney's fees. I. NOTICE: The Federal Fair Debt Practices Act requires we state that this is an attempt to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. J. MISCELLANEOUS: In construing this Notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "Grantor" includes any successor in interest to the Grantor, as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by the Trust Deed, and the words "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30 day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed term lease, you may be entitled to receive, after the date of the sale, a 60 day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out. To be entitled to either a 30 day or 60 day notice, you must give the Trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed term lease, you must give the Trustee a copy of the rental agreement. If you do not have a fixed term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the Trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is July 11, 2012. The name of the Trustee and the Trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about your rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. The purchaser at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to a tenant to refund any deposit or prepaid rent that was paid to a landlord. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the Lawyer Referral Service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this Notice. If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included in this notice. There are government agencies and nonprofit organizations that give you information about foreclosure and help you decide what to do. For the name and telephone number of an organization near you, please call the statewide telephone contact number at 1-800-SAFENET (1-800-723-3638). You may also wish to talk to a lawyer. If you need help finding a lawyer, you may call the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at 1-503-684-3763, or toll free in Oregon at 1-800-452-7636, or you may visit its website at www.osbar.org/public/ris/ris.html. Legal assistance may be available if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to http://www.lawhelp.org/program/694/index.cfm. DATED this 23rd day of March, 2012. ROBERT A. SMEJKAL, Trustee, PO Box 1758, Eugene, OR 97440


Bulletin Daily Paper 06/13/12