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JUNE 8, 2012

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RESTORING A RIVER

After 40 years, salmon return to Upper Deschutes By Dylan J. Darling

Ex-RPA chief arrested in 2nd student sex case • Bremont charged with abuse of female pupil in ’05-’06 while he headed Central Linn High

The Bulletin

By Ben Botkin

After a more than 40-year absence, adult salmon will swim again in the Upper Deschutes River, starting today. “We are returning the missing link,” said Brett Hodgson, district biologist for the Oregon Department Inside of Fish and Wildlife in Bend. • Fish run is A ceremony is planned this lower than morning, with speakers from expected, Portland General Electric, the A5 Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs and ODFW. The power company and tribes are the owners of the hydroelectric project, which produces enough electricity to supply a town the size of Salem, while the state agency oversees the fishery on the river. Jim Bartlett, fish passage biologist with PGE, is set to drive the truck carrying the first fish — about a half dozen or so — about 10 miles around the Pelton Round Butte dam complex. A biologist from the tribes will also be aboard. “It’s a glorious day for everybody, and the fish,” Bartlett said. See Salmon / A5

The Bulletin

old female student at Central Linn High School in Halsey between December 2005 and March 2006, Oregon State Poing in West Linn, where he has lice said. lived under house arrest with Bremont Bremont was booked relatives since his first arrest. Thursday into Linn County It’s the latest twist in a case that Jail on a charge of secondbegan in February, when Bremont, degree sexual abuse, police said. 39, was arrested on allegations of The Linn County District Attorsexually abusing a female student in ney’s Office didn’t return a call for 2009 and 2010 while leading RPA. comment. Neither did the Central In the latest case, Bremont is ac- Linn School District. See Bremont / A5 cused of sexually abusing a 17-year-

Michael Bremont, the former director of Redmond Proficiency Academy, faces a second criminal case alleging he sexually abused a female student — this time while principal of Central Linn High School. Oregon State Police detectives arrested Bremont on Thursday morn-

BEND ELKS SET FOR TONIGHT’S HOME OPENER

Moving upstream Beginning today, half of the returning adult spring chinook salmon that were reared in the Upper Deschutes River and its tributaries will return to waters above the Pelton Round Butte Dam Complex. The fish are trapped just below the reregulating dam downstream of Pelton Dam, then hauled by truck 10 miles to be released upstream of Round Butte Dam. Transport truck

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Reregulating dam

K

Pelton Dam

Elks’ home opener against Klamath Falls at 6:35 tonight. The Elks opened the 2012 sea-

Pick-up point WARM SPRINGS INDIAN RESERVATION

yle Lammers, 18, right, and his brother Zack Lammers, 20, unroll banners to hang on the outfield wall at Vince Genna Stadium on Thursday in preparation for the Bend

son with two road wins at Klamath Falls, but lost their last two games at Wenatchee.

Lake Simtustus

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Wi l ow

Cre ek

26

Thursday’s game was called due to rain.

RAPE CASE

Accuser’s Web activity can be used as evidence, court rules By Scott Hammers The Bulletin

A ruling issued by the Oregon Supreme Court on Thursday provides some clues as to the planned defense of accused rapist Bray Thomas Bray and exposes some of the shortcomings of state laws intended to protect victims’ rights. Bray, 38, is accused of first-degree rape and other charges stemming from an incident in February 2011. A Central Oregon Community College instructor at the time, Bray is alleged to have assaulted a then24-year-old woman in his downtown Bend apartment, a few days after meeting her on Match.com. Bray has pleaded not guilty. Portland defense attorney Stephen Houze has in recent months repeatedly appeared in Deschutes County Circuit Court to argue that Bray’s defense team should be granted access to online searches and websites viewed by his accuser from a few days before the incident until nearly a month afterward. In the opinion issued Thursday, justices sided with Bray, and indicated his defense attorneys intend to use the search records to suggest the woman consented to having sex with him. See Bray / A5

INSIDE: An in-depth season preview Madras

with a schedule, rosters and a breakDrop-off point

Round Butte Dam

U.S. firms feel the pinch of Europe’s woes

down of the West Coast League. Metolius

Lake Billy Chinook

Elks shortstop Ryan Dunn makes a play against the Corvallis Knights last season.

Culver Deschutes River 97

Crooked River

To Redmond and Bend Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

By Zachary A. Goldfarb The Washington Post

Ryan Brennecke Bulletin file photo

As al-Qaida loses a leader, its power shifts from Pakistan By Eric Schmitt New York Times News Service

The death this week of al-Qaida’s deputy leader, Abu Yahya al-Libi, is likely to accelerate a shift Al-Libi in power from the group’s dwindling leadership in Pakistan to its increasingly autonomous franchises, particularly the branch in Yemen, whose focus on attacking U.S. interests is sure to continue, according to U.S. counterterrorism officials.

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For now, Ayman al-Zawahri, al-Qaida’s nominal leader, still holds the broad influence he has consolidated since Osama Al-Zawahri bin Laden’s death last year. But the hierarchical structure of global jihad may be loosening. Libi’s death in a drone strike has torn at the link between the group’s embattled leadership in Pakistan and its far-flung affiliates across the Middle East and Africa.

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Vol. 109, No. 160, 68 pages, 7 sections

Libi’s killing may even augur increased violence as younger, more impetuous fighters vie to seize the mantle of global leadership, analysts say. Tops on that list are leaders from the affiliate in Yemen, formally known as al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula, or AQAP, who three times in the past three years have tried unsuccessfully to blow up commercial airliners bound for the United States. The most recent plot was thwarted last month when the suicide bomber turned out to be simultaneously

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working for the Saudi, British and U.S. intelligence agencies. “Libi’s death won’t have an impact on AQAP,” said Will McCants, a former State Department counterterrorism official who now works for the Center for Naval Analyses. After the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, the presence of bin Laden, along with most of al-Qaida’s founding members, in Pakistan gave the core leaders a depth of experience and standing with their allies. See Al-Qaida / A3

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From manufacturers in the Midwest to upscale retail shops in Manhattan, a wide variety of American companies are feeling the pinch of Europe’s economic contraction, helping to hold back recovery in the United States. Ford, the iconic car company, says Europeans are not only buying fewer cars, but are replacing fewer parts. Kraft Foods, behind such brands as Swedish Fish and Dentyne, says sales of candy and gum in Europe are lagging. And jeweler Tiffany & Co. says fewer Europeans are shopping at its flagship Fifth Avenue store. See Europe / A5

TOP NEWS SYRIA: U.N. monitors barred, A3 CAMPAIGN: Ad blitz begins, A3


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JUNE 8, 2012

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• President Barack Obama meets with President Benigno Aquino of the Philippines in Washington, D.C. • Friends of Oregon teenager Sam Mullane, who was fatally shot May 31 by state troopers, will hold a memorial service for him in Yachats.

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Ed Alcock / New York Times News Service

The Cantine California started parking in Paris in April, the latest in a recent American culinary invasion. Jordan Feilders, left, with one of his cooks, designed the truck to “speak” English, with phrases such as “Tasty Cupcakes” and “Fresh Cut Fries.”

Food trucks in France, too, selling (gasp!) American food

Highlights: In 1972, during the Vietnam War, a South Vietnamese Air Force jet dropped napalm onto the village of Trang Bang. Associated Press photographer Nick Ut captured the image of a screaming 9-year-old girl, Phan Thi Kim Phuc, as she ran naked and severely burned from the scene of the explosion. In 1982, President Ronald Reagan became the first American chief executive to address a joint session of the British Parliament. Ten years ago: Serena Williams won the French Open, defeating her older sister, Venus, 7-5, 6-3. Five years ago: Defense Scretary Robert Gates announced the Bush administration was replacing Gen. Peter Pace as chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and recommending Adm. Mike Mullen for the job. One year ago: Meredith Vieira ended her five-year run on NBC’s “Today” show, telling viewers her decision was “right, but it’s hard.”

BIRTHDAYS Today’s Birthdays: Former first lady Barbara Bush is 87. Comedian Joan Rivers is 79. Singer Nancy Sinatra is 72. Musician Boz Scaggs is 68. “Dilbert” creator Scott Adams is 55. Actor-director Keenen Ivory Wayans is 54. Rapper Kanye West is 35. — From wire reports

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By Julia Moskin New York Times News Service

PARIS — An artisanal taco truck has come to Paris. The Cantine California started parking here in April, the latest in a recent American culinary invasion that includes chefs at top restaurants, trendy menu items like cheesecake, bagels and bloody Marys, and notions like chalking the names of farmers on the walls of restaurants. In France, there is still a widespread belief that the daily diet in the U.S. consists of grossly large servings of fast food. But in Paris, American food is suddenly being seen as more than just restauration rapide. Among young Parisians, there is currently no greater praise for cuisine than “tres Brooklyn,” a term that signifies a particularly cool combination of informality, creativity and quality. All three of those traits come together in the American food trucks that have just opened here, including Cantine California, which sells tacos stuffed with organic meat (still a rarity in France), and a hugely popular burger truck called Le Camion Qui Fume (The Smoking Truck), owned by Kristin Frederick, a California native who graduated from culinary school here. “I got every kind of pushback,” said Frederick, 31. “People said: ‘The French will never eat on the street. The French will never eat with their hands. They will never pay good money for food from a truck.’ (Her burger with fries costs 10 euros, about $13.) And, ‘You will never get permission from the authorities.’” But Frederick did, and so the scarf-wearing hipsters were lining up at her truck on a recent Sunday evening. As vintage clothing shops propped open their doors nearby and two young men strummed guitars outside a gallery, the smell of onions caramelizing wafted out over the cobblestones.

and decorated with bright phrases like “Fresh Cut Fries” and “Real Cheese.” In designing it, Feilders said, he chose for it to “speak” in English. “We drive by the Louvre every day,” Feilders said. “And I imagine the kings and queens of France looking out the window, thinking, ‘What the heck was that?’”

Nouveau street food Street food itself isn’t new to France. At outdoor markets, there is often a truck selling snacks like pizza, crepes or spicy Moroccan merguez sausages, cooked on griddles and stuffed into baguettes. But the idea of street food made by chefs, using restaurant-grade ingredients, techniques and technology, is very new indeed. Gilles Choukroun, a chef and outspoken advocate for the globalization of French cuisine, said that about five years ago chefs here began to pay attention to street food, as they saw their counterparts in New York, Los Angeles and London trying new ideas outside the confines of a restaurant kitchen. “The French understand that many new cuisines are coming to light in your country,” he wrote in an email in French. “There are more and more young leaders in the U.S., creating a truly new and interesting cuisine.”

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‘Trans-Atlantic food vibe’ American chefs are at the helm of some of Paris’s hippest restaurants, like Daniel Rose of Spring, Kevin O’Donnell of L’Office and Braden Perkins of Verjus. And the city’s collective crush on high-end hamburgers continues: Parisians are paying 29 euros, or just over $36, for the popular burger at Ralph’s, the Hamptons-Wyoming-chic restaurant in the palatial Ralph Lauren store. “Younger Parisians are really into the New York food scene and the California lifestyle,” said Jordan Feilders, 28, who started Cantine California in March. “There’s a good transAtlantic food vibe going on Twitter and Facebook.” Feilders was raised in France, but his family has roots in Canada and the United States, and he was living in Los Angeles before moving back to Paris last year to inaugurate the truck. From the start, he said, his vision included stylish visuals, American cupcakes and fresh tortillas. The truck is chocolate brown

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FRIDAY, JUNE 8, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

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T S Senate advances farm bill By Ron Nixon New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — The Senate on Thursday voted to advance a farm bill that will set the nation’s nutrition and agriculture policy for the next five years. The vote was 90-8. With the vote, the Senate will begin about two weeks of debate to consider the bill and amendments, according to Sen. Debbie Stabenow, DMich., chairwoman of the Agriculture Committee and managing the legislation. The bill is expected to cost about $969 billion over the next 10 years, but cuts overall spending by $23 billion. The cuts mainly reflect the elimination of direct payments to farm landowners, which cost about $5 billion a year, and cuts about $4.5 billion over 10 years from the food-stamp program. The Obama administration wanted to cut overall spending more deeply but opposed reductions in the food-stamp programs. Among other provisions, the bill would eliminate direct payments to farmers and make expanded crop insurance program the primary safety net for farmers. The government now spends about $7 billion a year on crop insurance to pay about two-thirds of the cost of farmers’ premiums. Under the federal program, farmers can buy insurance that covers poor yields, declines in prices or both. The bill has drawn opposition from Southern cotton, peanut, and rice farmers who say that without direct payments the proposed farm bill would hurt them financially and affect their long-term stability. Stabenow said the new insurance program was fair to all crop producers. Sens. Tom Coburn, ROkla., and Richard Durbin, D-Ill., said they would jointly introduce an amendment that will cap crop insurance subsidies.

Syria bars monitors Ad blitz focuses from massacre site on 9 swing states CAMPAIGN 2012

By Neil Macfarquhar and Rick Gladstone

New York Times News Service

By Jeremy W. Peters

ANTAKYA, Turkey — The Syria conflict escalated to a dangerous new level Thursday when government troops and their civilian supporters blocked unarmed U.N. monitors from investigating a massacre of farm families, prompting denunciations of Damascus from diplomats who have struggled vainly to find a workable, consensus solution to the crisis. The monitors were thwarted from reaching the hamlet of Qubeir, just west of Hama, to check on what activists say was the slaying of as many as 78 people, half of them women and children, who were shot, garroted and in some cases burned alive. The monitors themselves were fired upon, U.N. officials said. The standoff at a government checkpoint seemed to symbolize the international paralysis over how to stem the bloodshed. It would be the fourth massacre in two weeks and suggested that the Syrian conflict was spiraling, seemingly daily, toward a sectarian civil war, pitting a government dominated by the Alawite sect against members of a Sunni Muslim majority feeling vulnerable to slaughter with no consequence. The Qubeir victims were all thought to be Sunnis. The massacre and the government’s attempt to prevent the monitors from investigating it came as Kofi Annan, the special envoy from the United Nations and the Arab League, addressed both the General Assembly and the Security Council in an effort to salvage his six-point peace plan from irrelevance. He warned that the already terrible violence would only increase without concerted international pressure, which should be exerted through some kind of “contact group” involving key international powers and Syria’s neighbors. “We cannot allow mass killing to become part of everyday

New York Times News Service

Bebeto Matthews / The Associated Press

U.N. International Envoy Kofi Annan, left, listens as U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon speaks at a news conference on Thursday. Annan proposed tasking a group of world powers and key regional players including Iran to come up with a strategy to end the 15-month conflict in Syria, U.N. diplomats said.

reality in Syria,” Annan told the General Assembly, while blaming both sides for the intensification. “If things do not change, the future is likely to be one of brutal repression, massacres, sectarian violence and even all-out civil war. All Syrians will lose.” Annan said that since his visit to Damascus last week, and despite promises from President Bashar Assad to respect the peace plan, which includes a cease-fire, there had been more violence throughout Syria with worse shelling of cities. The government-backed militia “seem to have free rein with appalling consequences,” he said. Armed opposition elements had intensified their attacks as well, he said. U.N. monitors stationed across the country, including the hotpots of Deir al-Zour, Idlib, Homs and Hama, as well as Aleppo, Syria’s biggest city, have all reported increased shelling and firing. “You see a more than serious uptick in violence in all the places where we are,” said Jean-Marie Guehenno, a senior deputy to Annan. Opposition activists said that an assault on the town of Hiffeh, just east of Latakia, which began Monday, in-

cluded the first use of missiles fired from helicopter gunships since the protests that started in March 2011 escalated into armed clashes last fall. The violence is intensifying for several reasons, diplomats and other analysts believe. First, Assad has been known to follow his late father, Hafez Assad, on the way he rules. His father crushed an insurgency in 1982 by wiping out an entire neighborhood in Hama. Second, the support of Russia, China and Iran, along with the continued declaration of the international community that there will be no military intervention, has left him assured of no real consequences to his actions. “They feel they are in control and don’t need to listen,” said a U.N. diplomat familiar with Annan’s negotiations. “Assad is just too comfortable.” Third, Assad knows that if he stops the violence and actually engages in a political process, his government will be doomed by a mass protest movement. “I think this regime all along has believed there is a security solution,” said Mona Yacoubian, a senior adviser on the Middle East at the Stimson Center in Washington. “It can simply kill its way out of this.”

In Mali, an Islamist extremist haven takes shape By Edward Cody The Washington Post

PARIS — A vast new sanctuary is emerging for al-Qaida’s African followers in the desert wastelands of northern Mali, where Tuareg secessionists, allied with extremist Muslim guerrillas, have shaken off government rule and declared an independent Islamist state. The haven taking shape in West Africa — more than 250,000 square miles, including the legendary city of Timbuktu — risks turning into an outland much like the re-

Al-Qaida Continued from A1 “Now, with most of their well-known figures out of the picture, it will be hard for alQaida’s core to maintain its role as the example for its affiliates to follow,” said one U.S. official who follows classified counterterrorism reports. Bin Laden himself, in the documents that Navy SEALs recovered from his house in Abbottabad, Pakistan, worried about “the rise of lower leaders who are not as experienced, and this would lead to the repeat of mistakes.” U.S. counterterrorism officials said Libi had played a pivotal role as the organization’s theological traffic cop, enforcing a unified message and ensuring that younger fighters did not go off the rails. Senior al-Qaida leaders worried, for instance, about attacks that killed Muslim civilians. “He kept the movement on track, on message and in line,” said Jarret Brachman, author of “Global Jihadism” and a consultant to the U.S. govern-

mote areas of Afghanistan, Pakistan, Somalia and Yemen where terrorists linked to alQaida seek safety from U.S. and other efforts to hunt them down, according to European diplomats, academic experts and reports from the region. The self-proclaimed Islamic state in northern Mali provides for the first time a territorial base for al-Qaida in the Islamic Maghreb, the northern Africa offshoot of the terrorist group founded by Osama bin Laden, said a senior European diplomat, who discussed the

situation on the condition of anonymity. “Every week that goes by is important because it gives AQIM more time to implant itself,” he said. In addition, the would-be Islamist state is home to a Tuareg guerrilla unit allied with AQIM that has an unknown number of shoulderfired ground-to-air missiles and other weapons packed in from Libya during the fall of Moammar Gadhafi. The possibility of AQIM getting access to the Russian-made missiles has raised fears of terrorist at-

tacks on French and other civilian airliners that regularly fly over the region, which lies just south of Algeria and borders Mauritania on the west and Niger on the east. The Tuareg tribes of northern Mali, ethnically different from black Africans, have long sought independence, or at least autonomy, from the black-dominated government in Bamako, the capital far to the south. Popular support for the independence movement has swelled, particularly in the past few years.

ment about terrorism. “Al-Qaida’s global movement cannot endure without an iron-fisted traffic cop.” Even with the network’s operatives in Pakistan under siege, al-Qaida’s wings in Yemen, North Africa and even Iraq have had little difficulty sustaining a wave of violence, a trend that is likely to continue well after Libi’s death, officials said. In Somalia, al-Shabab, the most recently anointed al-Qaida affiliate, is reeling from a series of setbacks on the ground, including from a U.S.-backed force of African Union troops in Mogadishu, the capital. Still, the organization’s ranks include several dozen foreign fighters, some with U.S. passports that could allow them to slip back into the country. In North Africa, al-Qaida in the Islamic Maghreb has stepped up its kidnappings for ransoms, offering al-Qaida affiliates a financial model for survival as other sources of money have been eliminated by allied counterterrorism efforts. The group has also been

bolstered by Tuareg rebels returning from Libya with heavy weapons, possibly including surface-to-air missiles. The rebels joined forces with Islamic extremists to seize the northern half of Mali after a military coup toppled the civilian government. But U.S. officials express their deepest concerns over the Yemeni affiliate, led by Nasser al-Wuhayshi, a Saudi who served as bin Laden’s personal secretary in the 1990s and who has overseen attacks against both Yemen and the U.S. The Yemeni branch gained notoriety in December 2009

when a U.S.-born cleric, Anwar al-Awlaki, supervised the training of a young Nigerian man who attempted to blow up a U.S. jetliner that was headed to Detroit, using a bomb in his underwear. Ten months later, the organization packed explosives in printer cartridges and placed them on cargo planes bound for Chicago. Both plots failed, as did the most recent one involving the double agent, but the operations quickly elevated the Yemeni al-Qaida branch to the top of the affiliates and positioned the group’s leaders as the logical heirs to al-Zawahri.

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HENDERSON, Nev. — The presidential campaigns and their allies are zeroing in mainly on nine swing states, bombarding them with commercials in the earliest concentration of advertising in modern politics. With so many resources focused on persuading an ever-shrinking pool of swing voters like those here in Nevada, the 2012 election is likely to go down in history as the one in which the most money was spent reaching the fewest people. Much of the heaviest spending has not been in big cities with large and expensive media markets but in small and mediumsized metropolitan areas in states with little individual weight in the Electoral College: Cedar Rapids and Des Moines in Iowa (six votes); Colorado Springs and Grand Junction in Colorado (nine votes); Norfolk and Richmond in Virginia (13 votes). Since the beginning of April, four-fifths of the ads that favored or opposed a presidential candidate have been in television markets of modest size. Nowhere is this more apparent than in southern Nevada, where a costly and contentious fight is playing out for six electoral votes. Already, ads about President Barack Obama or Mitt Romney have been run nearly 6,000 times in and around Las Vegas since April 11, more than in any other media market in the country during that period, according to the Kantar Media’s Campaign Media Analysis Group. And the $5 million spent by both sides during that eightweek stretch translates into the highest rate of spending per electoral vote anywhere by far. All this effort is to reach just 1.4 million registered voters, a sign of how tight this election is expected to be. And it points to how the country’s growing partisan divide has redrawn the political geography, with fewer states than ever not firmly designated “red” or “blue.” Given the volatility of the electorate, the map of swing states could easily expand or contract from the current nine — Colorado, Florida, Iowa, North Carolina, New Hampshire,

Romney raised more than Obama in May Mitt Romney’s presidential campaign shot past President Barack Obama’s in fundraising in May, collecting more than $76.8 million, nearly $17 million more than his Democratic rival. The Republican success suggests that Romney is the beneficiary of the usual cash rush from donors who are eager to back the presumptive nominee now that the party has united behind him. The amount raised for Romney and his party was nearly double what they collected the prior month, and it was disclosed just hours after Obama’s campaign announced Thursday that its joint fundraising operation with the Democratic National Committee had raised $60 million. The fundraising announcements came on a day of dueling speeches from Romney and Obama. Campaigning in St. Louis, Romney accused the president of not believing in or understanding America’s free enterprise system. Meanwhile, Obama told students at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, that Congress was holding up the economic recovery by blocking bills like one to keep student loans affordable. — New York Times News Service

Nevada, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Virginia — in the weeks and months ahead. But no recent general election advertising strategy has covered so little ground so early. In the spring of 2000, George W. Bush and Al Gore fought an air war in close to 20 states. In early 2004, there were the “Swing Seventeen.” And in 2008, the Obama campaign included 18 states in its June advertising offensive, its first of the general election.

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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JUNE 8, 2012


FRIDAY, JUNE 8, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

Europe Continued from A1 Europe is suffering a financial crisis, fueled by dwindling investor confidence in the debts of such countries as Greece, Portugal, Spain and Italy and a beleaguered banking sector. In the United States, analysts are worried less about the financial system and more about the impact on companies outside Wall Street. For companies in sectors such as food, apparel, hotels and technology, sales and profits will lag if the European crisis does not ease. The effect is direct, as Europeans buy fewer U.S. products and services, and indirect, as Europe’s

Bray Continued from A1 “Specifically, defendant contends that the victim was sufficiently uncertain about what had transpired that she felt the need to conduct an Internet search regarding the legal definition of ‘rape’ before reporting the incident to the police,” Justice Jack Landau wrote. “That fact, defendant asserts, would tend to contradict her claim that defendant repeatedly and forcibly raped her.” At the core of the case is a voter-approved constitutional amendment enacted in 1999. Among other things, the amendment provided crime victims the right to refuse interviews, depositions or other discovery requests by the criminal defendant or persons acting on behalf of the defendant. The state Legislature adopted laws to address the process for such refusals, and the arguments over the specifics of those laws form the bulk of the court’s ruling. In the Bray case, his defense team had attempted to obtain the Internet records from Google but were rebuffed. The company said it would not turn over the records without a court order or the victim’s consent. From late last year until this spring, Deschutes County prosecutors and Bray’s attorneys clashed over whether the law required the records be turned over. Prosecutors were ordered to request the victim’s consent by the Deschutes County Circuit Court, but they refused to do so, citing the constitutional amendment. On March 28, prosecutors filed a claim alleging a violation of the woman’s constitutional rights, and on April 6, the victim’s claim was denied in circuit court. For the Supreme Court, the timing of the victim’s claim was key. In setting standards for the appeal of a court ruling in such a case, the Legislature established an appeal period of seven days after the ruling — appeals filed later would be regarded as invalid. In the case recently before the Supreme Court, Bray’s attorneys claimed that the clock began ticking on April 6, when the ruling against the alleged victim was announced orally in court. The woman’s attorneys contend the appeal period began on May 14, when the court issued its written order. In writing the Supreme Court’s official opinion, Justice Landau wrote that the court was not persuaded by the claims made by the woman’s attorney, as the state statute does not distinguish between orders issued orally or in writing. In a concurring opinion, Chief Justice Paul De Muniz wrote that he is concerned that the statutes created by the Legislature fail to adequately protect victims’ constitutional rights. Of the four appeals of the victims’ rights amendment the Supreme Court has considered since 1999, three “suffered from fatal jurisdictional defects and had to be dismissed,” De Muniz wrote. As a result, justices did not even consider the claims that victims’ rights had been violated in those three cases, only whether notice of the appeal had been provided to the proper parties at the correct time. “Even though these appeals involve constitutional rights — with all the importance that the constitutional grant of those rights suggests — we cannot ignore legislatively prescribed limitations on the ability to appeal decisions involving them,” De Muniz wrote. A scheduling conference is set in Deschutes County Circuit Court for this morning to determine how the criminal case against Bray will proceed. — Reporter: 541-383-0387, shammers@bendbulletin.com

crisis creates financial uncertainty in the United States and slows economic growth, leading American consumers and businesses to pull back, too. “The crisis in Europe has affected the U.S. economy by acting as a drag on our exports, weighing on business and consumer confidence, and pressuring U.S. financial markets and institutions,” Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke said Thursday. The problems in Europe add to the reasons that big U.S. companies, despite record profitability, haven’t revved up domestic hiring enough to bring the unemployment rate below 8 percent. Other factors include the lingering wounds

in the U.S. economy from the financial crisis and recession, as well as fears that the economy could dip back into recession if an automatic series of tax hikes and sharp spending cuts takes effect at year’s end. The auto sector and its suppliers are among the most exposed to Europe’s problems. “It’s a really, really tough environment,” Ford chief executive Alan Mulally said recently, comparing the auto business in Europe to what it was like in the United States in 2008 and 2009, just before the auto bailout. “We’re not just seeing this on the new-vehicle side, but we’re seeing consumers, who are coming in for service, they’re not coming in as

much and they’re not spending as much.” American companies vulnerable to Europe’s slowdown have already begun to significantly roll back overhead. Staples, the Framingham, Mass., office-supply chain, sold fewer supplies, particularly computers, in Europe this year and laid off hundreds of overseas employees. “We expect trends in Europe to remain challenging,” Michael Miles, the president of Staples, said last month. “We’ll remain, and continue to be, consolidating business units, centralizing functions and reducing layers in complexity with an eye toward lower costs and better execution.”

Goodyear Tire & Rubber, headquartered in Akron, Ohio, said that owners of consumer and commercial vehicles in Europe were buying fewer tires and dealers were selling out less frequently as a result. In response, the company reduced production. “While the U.S. economy is showing signs of modest improvements,” Goodyear’s chief executive, Richard Kramer, “we expect that other economies, such as Europe, will remain volatile. Now in that environment, we will continue to plan our business cautiously and do so with discipline, focusing on intense cost control and prioritizing cash and earnings.” Precisely quantifying the

A5

impact of Europe’s problems on American companies and U.S. employees is impossible. When Europe’s economy slows, U.S. companies’ European operations are the first to suffer. Still, the spillover effects can be significant. “As the uncertainty in Europe continues with the unemployment rate hitting 11 percent, that’s had a direct impact on stocks here in the U.S. That has a direct relation to a drop in consumer confidence in the past few months,” said Alec Gutierrez, an auto industry analyst at Kelley Blue Book. “It’s rather significant for the U.S. auto industry in that consumer confidence is highly correlated to consumer auto sales.”

Fewer salmon than usual in Lower Deschutes • Fish researchers aren’t sure what has caused the low numbers By Dylan J. Darling The Bulletin

As chinook salmon make their historic return to the Upper Deschutes River, the overall run of the fish in the lower stretches of the river is less than expected, for unknown reasons. The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife expected 1,859 wild and 14,400 hatchery fish to return this spring, one of the most robust runs since the

Salmon Continued from A1

Millions spent PGE and the tribes spent more than $100 million on a submerged tower, completed in late 2009, which restarted fish migrating downstream. Since then, young salmon — both chinook and sockeye — and steelhead have been released upstream of the dam complex, passing through the tower en route to the sea. Collected by the tower,

Bremont Continued from A1

Redmond case Bremont became the director of RPA, a public charter school, when it opened in 2009. Bremont’s alleged abuse of a student attending the Redmond school began in October 2009, when she was 15, court records show. Court documents in the Redmond case allege Bremont’s relationship with the girl progressed from flirting and text messages, leading to sexual abuse in his motor home during a school trip. Bremont is charged in Deschutes County Circuit Court with one count of third-degree sodomy, one count of third-degree at-

hatcheries on the river started more than 40 years ago. But as of the end of last month, the agency counted 150 wild fish and 500 hatchery fish. Fish researchers have no idea what has caused the low run of spring chinook salmon, but the river isn’t alone in the phenomenon, said Jason Seals, assistant district biologist for the ODFW in The Dalles. “The run never showed anywhere,” he said. Spring chinook salmon

runs in rivers leading into the Columbia River and the Columbia itself are below expectations, said Chuck Tracy, salmon staff officer for the Pacific Fishery Management Council. The council establishes sport and commercial ocean fishing guidelines for the West Coast. “It’s not just the Deschutes (River),” he said. “The Snake (River) and the Upper Columbia (River) and all the tributaries are seeing the same thing.”

the fish are hauled around the dam complex on their way downstream. Now the fish are returning as adults, and the effort is beginning to return half of them to the waters where they grew up, said Mike Gauvin, ODFW mitigation coordinator at the dam complex. In all, the scientists involved with the project hope to see about 400 adult chinook return this year, with about 200 moved upstream, but so far the run has been low and late. Just to make sure there are enough fish for today’s ceremony, some adults — which

were likely released as fry upstream of the dams in winter 2009 — have been kept at the Round Butte Fish Hatchery. “We are hoping we have at least 10,” Gauvin said.

tempted rape, two counts of second-degree sexual abuse and 10 counts of third-degree sexual abuse. The Redmond school put Bremont on paid administrative leave immediately after his arrest, and he resigned in March. A trial readiness hearing for the case is scheduled for Jan. 3, with a trial potentially starting later that month. Chief Deputy District Attorney Mary Anderson said she doesn’t believe the new Linn County case will change the schedule of the Central Oregon case if Bremont is out of jail while both are pending. “If he is released, it shouldn’t affect our case,” she said. But if Bremont were to stay in custody in Linn County, the case in that jurisdiction would take precedence, she said.

‘Trap-and-haul’ The three dams of the complex, built in the 1950s and ’60s, created a blockade for migrating salmon and steelhead. But the hitch was with downstream migration of young salmon, rather than the upstream migration of the adults. Adult fish returning from years at sea found their way up and around the dams, using a

By late Thursday afternoon, Bremont had posted $600 bail on a $6,000 bond and was released, Linn County Jail staff said.

Central Linn to Redmond Bremont first came to the Central Linn School District in 2002 as the high school’s vice principal. The following year, he became the principal. While he was principal at Central Linn High, Bremont persuaded the school district to let him pay rent and live on the school’s campus in a building that was formerly a day-care center, according to a Dec. 6, 2004, story that appeared in The Register-Guard of Eugene. Bremont asked to live on the high school’s campus to balance family time with the demands of his job, according to the story.

Throughout the whole Columbia River system, scientists forecast a run of 314,000 spring chinook salmon, Tracy said. So far, there have been 209,000, with only about a week left in the run. While high water levels in the rivers may have delayed the start of the run, he said it’s unclear what has caused the low numbers. The ODFW ended chinook salmon fishing season more than seven weeks early on the Lower Deschutes River — from Sherars Falls to the mouth — in response to the

slim run. The agency closed the season Thursday. It started in April 15 and had been expected to last until July 31. The low chinook run isn’t a harbinger that the other seagoing fish in the Deschutes River will have low runs this year, because of their different life cycles and food sources, Seals said. “Just because the chinook run is low does not mean that sockeye (salmon) or steelhead are also going to be low,” he said.

3-mile fish ladder and a tramway, but confusing currents in Lake Billy Chinook caused their ocean-bound offspring to become lost. In the late 1960s, a state interagency committee decided to replace the Upper Deschutes salmon and steelhead run with a hatchery, which was completed at the base of Round Butte dam in 1968. A similar committee, led by the ODFW and the tribes, led the plans to reintroduce adult fish following a new federal power license for PGE that called for improved fish passage. To move the adult fish up-

stream, scientists are using a “trap-and-haul” technique. The trap is at the entrance to the old fish ladder. There, scientists collect adult fish trying to swim upstream and sort through them, separating fish headed to the hatchery and those staying in the river. The fish are trapped at river mile 100 and will be hauled and then released at river mile 110, Bartlett said. The trip should take about 20 minutes. “It’s really completing the upstream migration,” he said. “It’s completing the life cycle.”

Bremont left Central Linn High in 2006 and went to Redmond High School, where he was the assistant principal of instruction and curriculum. In Redmond, he had a role in putting proficiency-based learning in place for students. That work led to the district’s opening of Redmond Proficiency Academy, a charter

school devoted to proficiencybased education. That model of education allows individual students to progress in coursework at their own pace after showing proficiency and develop classes and projects based on individual interests and talents.

— Reporter: 541-617-7812, ddarling@bendbulletin.com

— Reporter: 541-617-7812, ddarling@bendbulletin.com

—Reporter: 541-977-7185, bbotkin@bendbulletin.com

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FAMILY

TV & Movies, B2 Calendar, B3 Dear Abby, B3

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JUNE 8, 2012

www.bendbulletin.com/family

SUMMER READING PROGRAMS

IN BRIEF

Juniper Swim & Fitness Center will offer swim lesson assessments for children from 9 to 11 a.m. and 2 to 4 p.m. Saturday. An experienced aquatic specialist will watch the children in the water and then make recommendations for which class each child is suited, based on skill. Lessons will start June 18. The swim center offers a wide range of classes for infants to adults. Evening and weekend lesson times are also available. Contact: www.juniper swimandfitness.com or 541-389-7665.

Editor’s Note: Good Question is a biweekly feature in which a local expert answers a question related to family life. Have a question about your family? Send it to family@ bendbulletin.com. By Megan Kehoe The Bulletin

With summer break Q: coming up, how do I keep my elementary school-age child from falling behind in his or her education? Especially if our family is on a limited income, and can’t enroll our child in summer classes or camps? Paul Dean is the principal of Highland Elementary School, a magnet school in Bend. He has been principal of the school for three years and an educator for 22 years. On the first day of summer break, Dean suggests, take your child to the public library. This sets a precedent for the rest of the summer, and if the family keeps up with it, doesn’t allow students to fall out of the habit of reading. “If a child does nothing (education-related) but read over the summer, that in and of itself is fantastic,” Dean said. See Question / B6

Academy to host camp Two teachers will host a camp for ages 7-12 at the Cascades Academy in Bend from June 2529. The camp, which will run from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., will focus on integrated arts as well as movement. Activities will include drawing, learning about international folktales and legends, improvisational play and guided movements. Cost is $150. Contact: Libby Rice at 541-749-0644 or Kimberly Ladkin at 541-390-5004.

A:

Lil’ rides kick off Commute Options

— Alandra Johnson, The Bulletin

BEST BETS FOR FAMILY FUN Details, B3

Sisters Rodeo Get in on the fun buckaroo action during this weekend-long rodeo in Sisters. Kids are free tonight, and there’s a parade Saturday. Yeehaw!

Beatles Singalong Got some Beatles lovers in your family (and, really, who doesn’t)? Time to check out this singalong event, which should be a blast, in Bend on Saturday night. The event, which includes local musicians performing and the crowd singing along to Beatles tunes, doubles as a fundraiser for KPOV.

Correction A story titled “Talking Care,” which appeared Friday, June 1, on Page B1, misspelled Nancy Webre’s name. The Bulletin regrets the error.

GOOD QUESTION

How do I keep my kid learning this summer?

Swim assessment set for Saturday

Kids of all ages are invited to bring their bikes, trikes, scooters, skateboards and other vehicles to the Old Mill District in Bend on June 16 for the Little Commuters Parade. The free event is a kickoff to Commute Options Week. The event starts with bike and vehicle decorating at 8:30 a.m. in the west parking lot at the Old Mill, with art supplies and fresh flowers provided. The parade will begin at 9:45 a.m. on the west side of the footbridge and will wind across the bridge and through the shops, then will circle back along the trail by the river to the bridge. Children who participate will learn about helmet safety and will learn information promoting travel by bike or walking. Kids can enter to win raffle prizes. Contact: www .commuteoptions,org.

B

Horoscope, B3 Comics, B4-5 Puzzles, B5

© 2012 Collaborative Summer Library Program

• Area libraries to host plethora of programs to encourage kids to read, learn and dream By Alandra Johnson • The Bulletin

S

chool’s almost out, but that’s no reason to put away the books. Local libraries are giving kids plenty of reasons to keep

reading all summer long, thanks to their Summer Reading Programs. This year’s theme for the programs in all three local counties is “Dream Big — Read!” With that focus, libraries are hosting all sorts of events that focus on nighttime and dreaming, featuring everything from stargazing to owls (see lists for details). Heather McNeil, youth services manager for the Deschutes Public Library system, says this year’s theme is great. “It’s been a lot of fun putting this together.” The library system will host overnight events at the Downtown Bend, East Bend and Redmond public libraries, during which kids and parents are invited to sleep over and experience the library at night. This is the first year the library has hosted a sleepover event, although it’s something McNeil has considered for several years. She says the event will be family-focused, with parents and kids making family crests, participating in relay races and singing together.

Deschutes Public Library system’s Summer Reading Programs All events are free and take place at the area library unless otherwise noted.

StoryStars Who: Bobby Norfolk Where: Tower Theatre, Bend When: June 16, 1 p.m. Free tickets available at all libraries Saturday.

Special programs Reach For the Stars: Children experience an indoor planetarium. Ages 6–11. Limited to 30 kids. Free passes available the day of the event. Downtown Bend: June 21, 10:15 a.m. and 11:30 a.m. La Pine: June 20, 10:30 a.m. Redmond: June 21, 3 p.m. Sisters: June 19, 2 p.m. Sunriver area: June 20, 2 p.m.

Teenagers will also be invited to a late-night lock-in event at the library from 7 to 11 p.m. McNeil is also excited to bring Bobby Norfolk to Bend for the StoryStars presentation. The free event at the Tower Theatre on June 16 will feature this nationally renowned storyteller. Norfolk, who is from St. Louis, has won an Emmy for his work and has a unique, vaudeville-like style, according to McNeil. “He’s bigger than life, you can’t help but laugh,” said McNeil. The event is for all ages, but is best for those age 3 and older. See Program / B6

Wake Up, Sleeping Beauty: Stevens Puppets from Chicago performs its marionette show of Sleeping Beauty. Bend: Juniper Elementary School, 1300 N.E. Norton Ave., July 17, 5:30 p.m. Redmond: Lynch Elementary School, 1314 Kalama St., July 18, 11:30 a.m. Sisters: July 18, 3 p.m. Sunriver Area: July 17, 11 a.m. Fly with the Owls: The High Desert Museum staff will talk about owls and bring one for children to see in person. Downtown Bend: July 30, 11 a.m. La Pine: Aug. 2, 11 a.m. Sisters: Aug. 1, 11 a.m.

Overnight at the Library: Kids and parents get to sleep over at the library. The evening will include lots of games, crafts, stories and activities. Ages 6–11 — children must be accompanied by their parent. Registration required, beginning June 16. Downtown Bend: July 13, 7 p.m. East Bend: July 28, 7 p.m. Redmond: June 30, 7 p.m.

Ages 0–5, June 11–Aug. 18 Downtown Bend Baby Steps: 10:15 a.m. Monday and 11:30 a.m. Wednesdays Toddlin’ Tales: 10:15 and 11 a.m. Tuesday, 10:15 a.m. Wednesdays Preschool Parade: 1:30 p.m. Tuesday and 10:30 a.m. Fridays

Make Magic: Magician Bill Mitchell performs. Bend: Highland Magnet School, 701 N.W. Newport Ave., July 9, 5:30 p.m. La Pine: July 9, 2 p.m. Redmond: July 9, 10:30 a.m.

East Bend Toddlin’ Tales: 9:30 a.m. Wednesdays Preschool Parade: 11 a.m. Wednesdays Saturday Stories: 10 a.m. Saturdays See Deschutes / B6

Story Times

Inside: More library events Summer Reading Program events for Crook and Jefferson County libraries, Page B6

How to be a friend to your kids on Facebook By Janice D’Arcy The Washington Post

Since Facebook is exploring lifting its age restrictions for users, I asked an expert how parents might prepare to supervise their children on social media sites. Stephen Balkam is head of the Family Online Safety Institute, which helps companies share online safety practices. Why is it a concern that kids younger than 13 are on Facebook if those kids have a parent monitoring their use? There are plenty of underage kids on Facebook without their parents’ permission or knowledge. If a 12-year-old says she is 21 to get onto Facebook, then her default is to an open, public profile. Even those who do have parents monitoring their use, it would be better for the tweens to have a specially built part of Facebook.

Q. A.

How can a parent Q. best introduce and monitor their child’s use of social media sites? First of all, make sure to have a conversation with your child. Sit down and talk through a family safety contract, and set the house rules for using Facebook and other sites. Next, friend your child on Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr and other sites. If your child steps over the boundaries, then enforce a sanction that is reasonable and related to what has happened.

A.


B2

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JUNE 8, 2012

TV & M 

Find local movie times and film reviews inside today’s GO! Magazine.

ABC Family pegs friendly shows “Bunheads� 9 p.m. Monday

TV SPOTLIGHT

“Baby Daddy� 8:30 p.m. Wednesday

this time, Michelle accepts. Michelle sobers up on the long drive back to the town of Paradise, where Hubbell’s mother Fanny (Kelly Bishop, “Gilmore Girls�) runs a dance studio and teaches classes to young “bunheads,� as female dancers are called in the ballet world. The series was created by Amy Sherman-Palladino of “Gilmore Girls� and shares a similar mix of whimsy and sassiness. Michelle isn’t in love with Hubbell, and she isn’t a cruel woman, but she’s made her choice, no matter how impulsive, and there don’t seem to be many other options out there for her right now. How can Michelle have a lively, if rocky, romantic life if she’s married to Hubbell? And, as is clear in the pilot, the union is a real marriage: They have sex upstairs while the townfolk gather downstairs to welcome them to Paradise. Not that we’d want TV shows to follow cliches anymore than they already do, but we’re not sure at first how much we like a lead character who marries a man she doesn’t love because she’s on the rebound from a bad audition. Yeah, she’s drunk, and it is Vegas, but the character loop-the-loops are initially a challenge. Later this month, Jean-Luc Bilodeau, who played the teenaged son in “Kyle XY,� stars as “Baby Daddy,� a new sitcom from Dan Berendsen (“The Nine Lives of Chloe King�). Bilodeau plays Ben, working as a New York bartender and sharing space with his older, pro-hockeyplayer brother Danny (Derek Theler) and his friend Tucker (Tahj Mowry). The show’s premise at first seems unmis-

By David Wiegand San Francisco Chronicle

The line separating shows airing on the ABC Family channel and those airing on ABC itself is getting blurrier all the time as our general notion of what constitutes “family entertainment� inevitably evolves. That evolution is measured most obviously in how sex and relationships are depicted on TV. There was a time, not all that long ago, when you might be surprised to find unmarried people having sex on an ABC Family show, but that’s not the case today, as evidenced by two new shows premiering this month. The first is “Bunheads,� premiering Monday, starring Broadway’s Sutton Foster as dancer Michelle Simms, who’s been at least halfway around the career block and is still looking for her ticket away from tiny feathered costumes and high kicks behind rows of breast-baring stars of Vegas revues. At the start of the pilot episode, Michelle has pinned all her hopes on a forthcoming audition for the musical “Chicago.� The audition is so important, she can’t allow herself to get delayed by ever-present stage-door-johnny Hubbell Flowers (Alan Ruck), although she’s nothing if not kind as she brushes him off by sending him to dinner with two other dancers. The audition is over before it starts, leaving Michelle with a freshly popped balloon and a good reason to get drunk. Once again, Hubbell proposes marriage and promises her a beautiful home by the sea and

takably “Three Dudes and a Baby,� when an infant shows up on their doorstep and, reviewing his recent dating history against the presumed age of the baby, Ben remembers Angela, whom he dated for a few weeks before they were “intimate.� In a show on ABC itself, he might have said “hooked up.� The other characters include Ben and Danny’s mom Bonnie (Melissa Peterman, “Reba�) and a girl from the boys’ childhood named Riley (Chelsea Kane) who has definitely outlived her old nickname: “Fatpants.� Ben is clueless about the fact that Riley is crushing on him, while Riley is similarly unaware that Danny is crushing on her. Both shows are agreeable additions to the ABC Family stable, even if they don’t really break any new ground. “Baby Daddy� is easier to like from the start, thanks to an appealing cast and the bond Ben feels for his new daughter. “Bunheads� will take some work and it could just as easily become either annoying or likable. “Gilmore Girls� struck gold because of casting and because the whimsy was nonetheless still credible.

P’ G   M  This guide, compiled by Orlando (Fla.) Sentinel film critic Roger Moore, should be used along with the Motion Picture Association of America rating system for selecting movies suitable for children. Films rated G, PG or PG-13 are included in this weekly listing, along with occasional R-rated films that may have entertainment or educational value for older children with parental guidance.

‘MADAGASCAR 3: EUROPE’S MOST WANTED’ Rating: PG for some mild action and rude humor. What it’s about: The madcap critters from “Madagascar� make their way to Monte Carlo and join a circus. The kid attractor factor: Madcap “Madagascar� critters, a circus, chases and cute ‘n’ cuddly penguin hijinks. Good lessons/ bad lessons: It’s a cartoon, “The rules of physics don’t apply to us.� Violence: Slapstick, mostly involving French-accented animal control officers. Language: Disney clean. Sex: King Julien flirts with a bear. Drugs: Don’t be silly. Parents’ advisory: Suitable for all ages, especially the very young, this is Dreamworks’ most kidfriendly film franchise.

‘PROMETHEUS’ Rating: R for sci-fi violence. What it’s about: Humans go in search of aliens, and find “Aliens.� The kid attractor factor: Stateof-the-art science fiction, dazzling 3D visuals, a prequel to an epic scary movie franchise.

Submitted photo

Gloria the hippo (voiced by Jada Pinkett Smith), Alex the lion (voiced by Ben Stiller), Melman the giraffe (voiced by David Schwimmer) and Marty the zebra (voiced by Chris Rock) star in “Madagascar 3: Europe’s Most Wanted.� See local movie times in today’s GO! Magazine. Good lessons/ bad lessons: Remember what your mother said — “Don’t touch that! You don’t know where it’s been!� Violence: Quite a bit, with a particularly graphic surgery scene. Language: A scattering of profanity. Sex: Discussed. Drugs: None. Parents’ advisory: Quite similar to “Alien� in structure and goal, if not as intense, it’s a bit harsh for younger kids but barely worthy of an R. OK for 14 and older.

‘SNOW WHITE AND THE HUNTSMAN’ Rating: PG-13 for intense sequences of violence and action, and brief sensuality.

What it’s about: An evil queen chases Snow White into the forest, where “the fairest of them all� plans her revenge. The kid attractor factor: Kristen “Twilight� Stewart and Chris “Thor� Hemsworth. Good lessons/ bad lessons: “When a woman stays young and beautiful, the world is hers.� Violence: Plentiful, and plenty bloody. Language: Mild profanity. Sex: Suggested. Drugs: Alcohol is consumed “to forget.� Parents’ advisory: Pretty far removed from the Disney “Heigh Ho� version, this action-fantasy may be too scary for the very young and OK for 10 and older.

L  TV L   FRIDAY PRIME TIME 6/8/12

*In HD, these channels run three hours ahead. / Sports programming may vary. BD-Bend/Redmond/Sisters/Black Butte (Digital); PM-Prineville/Madras; SR-Sunriver; L-La Pine

ALSO IN HD; ADD 600 TO CHANNEL No.

BROADCAST/CABLE CHANNELS

BD PM SR L ^ KATU KTVZ % % % % KBNZ & KOHD ) ) ) ) KFXO * ` ` ` KOAB _ # _ # ( KGW KTVZDT2 , _ # / OPBPL 175 173

5:00 KATU News News News KEZI 9 News The Simpsons Electric Comp. NewsChannel 8 Meet, Browns Ciao Italia ‘G’

5:30 World News Nightly News Evening News World News The Simpsons Fetch! With Ruff Nightly News Meet, Browns Jacques Pepin

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Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty *A&E 130 28 18 32 Duck Dynasty (2:30) ››› ›› “The Chronicles of Riddickâ€? (2004, Science Fiction) Vin Diesel, Colm Feore, Thandie Newton. ›› “Saharaâ€? (2005, Adventure) Matthew McConaughey, Steve Zahn, PenĂŠlope Cruz. Adventurers search for a Con- ›› “The Chronicles of Riddickâ€? (2004) *AMC 102 40 39 federate ship in Africa. Ă… Vin Diesel. Ă… “Coach Carterâ€? A fugitive fights an invading ruler and his army. Ă… Whale Wars: Battle Scars ‘PG’ Seal Wars (N) ’ ‘PG’ Whale Wars Setting the Trap ‘PG’ Whale Wars (N) ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Louisiana Lockdown (N) ’ ‘14’ Whale Wars ’ ‘PG’ Ă… *ANPL 68 50 26 38 Louisiana Lockdown ‘14’ Ă… Million Dollar LA Housewives/OC Housewives/OC Don’t Be Tardy Don’t Be Tardy ›› “The Wedding Plannerâ€? (2001) Jennifer Lopez. (11:08) “The Wedding Plannerâ€? BRAVO 137 44 2012 CMT Music Awards From the Bridgestone Arena in Nashville. ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Dallas Cowboys Cheerleaders: Jennie Garth Melissa & Tye Melissa & Tye Dallas Cowboys Cheerleaders: Singing Bee CMT 190 32 42 53 Nightmares Mob Money: Murders and American Greed Robert McLean Mad Money Mob Money: Murders and American Greed Robert McLean Insanity! NutrBullet CNBC 51 36 40 52 American Greed Mob Money Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 Ă… Erin Burnett OutFront 24/7 Pacquiao/Bradley ’ Ă… Anderson Cooper 360 Ă… Erin Burnett OutFront CNN 52 38 35 48 Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Ă… South Park ‘14’ Always Sunny Always Sunny Daily Show Colbert Report (7:54) Tosh.0 (8:25) Tosh.0 Workaholics (9:27) Tosh.0 Aziz Ansari: Dangerously The Half Hour The Half Hour COM 135 53 135 47 Always Sunny Dept./Trans. Talk of the Town Local issues. Redmond HS Graduation Paid Program Journal Get Outdoors Visions of NW The Yoga Show The Yoga Show Talk of the Town Local issues. COTV 11 Politics & Public Policy Today CSPAN 58 20 12 11 Politics & Public Policy Today Austin & Ally ’ A.N.T. Farm ‘G’ A.N.T. Farm ‘G’ Jessie (N) ‘G’ Phineas, Ferb Fish Hooks ‘G’ Austin & Ally ’ Good-Charlie Phineas, Ferb Austin & Ally ’ *DIS 87 43 14 39 A.N.T. Farm ‘G’ A.N.T. Farm ‘G’ Shake It Up! ‘G’ Good-Charlie Gold Rush: Alaska ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Gold Rush: Alaska ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Deadliest Catch (N) ’ Ă… Deadly Seas The Bering Sea ‘PG’ Flying Wild Alaska (N) ‘PG’ Ă… Deadly Seas The Bering Sea ‘PG’ *DISC 156 21 16 37 Gold Rush: Alaska ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Ice Loves Coco Ice Loves Coco Ice Loves Coco ‘PG’ E! News (N) Sex & the City Sex & the City Sex & the City Sex & the City Fashion Police (N) ‘14’ Chelsea Lately E! News *E! 136 25 College Baseball NCAA Tournament, Super Regional -- Texas Christian vs. UCLA From Los Angeles. (N) SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… ESPN 21 23 22 23 Soccer Boxing Kelly Pavlik vs. Scott Sigmon From Las Vegas. (N) Ă… Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) Ă… NBA Tonight (N) Soccer ESPN2 22 24 21 24 College Baseball: NCAA Tournament, Super Regional Friday Night Lights ‘PG’ Ă… ››› “The Year of the Yaoâ€? (2004) Ă… (8:45) ››› “The Year of the Yaoâ€? (2004, Documentary) Ă… 30 for 30 Ă… ESPNC 23 25 123 25 Friday Night Lights ‘PG’ Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. ESPNN 24 63 124 203 SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… ››› “Freaky Fridayâ€? (2003) Jamie Lee Curtis, Lindsay Lohan. ››› “Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factoryâ€? (1971, Fantasy) The 700 Club ‘G’ Ă… FAM 67 29 19 41 ›› “Confessions of a Teenage Drama Queenâ€? (2004, Comedy) Hannity (N) On Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Ă… Hannity On Record, Greta Van Susteren The Five FNC 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Ă… Best Dishes Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Best Thing Ate Best Thing Ate Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Mystery Diners Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive *FOOD 177 62 98 44 Best Dishes Two/Half Men Two/Half Men › “Armageddonâ€? (1998) Bruce Willis, Billy Bob Thornton. A hero tries to save Earth from an asteroid. UFC on FX (N) ››› “Avatarâ€? (2009) FX 131 Property Bro Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Yard - Disney House Hunters Motor Homes Motor Homes House Hunters Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l HGTV 176 49 33 43 Property Bro American Pickers ‘PG’ Ă… American Pickers ‘PG’ Ă… American Pickers ‘PG’ Ă… American Pickers Fast Eddie ‘PG’ (11:01) American Pickers ‘PG’ *HIST 155 42 41 36 Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ American Pickers ‘PG’ Ă… Hatfields & McCoys (Part 2 of 3) ‘14’ Ă… Hatfields & McCoys (Part 3 of 3) ‘14’ Ă… Hatfields & McCoys (Part 3 of 3) ‘14’ Ă… LIFE 138 39 20 31 America’s Most Wanted ‘14’ The Rachel Maddow Show (N) Lockup Inside Anamosa Lockup Miami’s prison system. Lockup New Mexico Lockup Inside Wabash Lockup Return to Pelican Bay MSNBC 56 59 128 51 The Ed Show (N) (5:46) 2012 MTV Movie Awards ’ ‘14’ Teen Mom Taking It Slow ’ ‘PG’ Teen Mom To Be With You ‘PG’ Teen Mom The Last Straw ‘PG’ Teen Mom ’ ‘PG’ Ă… MTV 192 22 38 57 (5:12) Punk’d Mac Miller ’ ‘14’ SpongeBob Victorious ‘G’ Victorious ‘G’ The Fairly OddParents Abracatastrophe ‘Y’ Ă… Kung Fu Panda Friends ’ ‘14’ Friends ’ ‘14’ Friends ’ ‘14’ Friends ’ ‘14’ Friends ’ ‘14’ Friends ’ ‘14’ NICK 82 46 24 40 SpongeBob Police Women of Maricopa Police Women of Maricopa Police Women of Maricopa Lives on Fire (N) ’ ‘PG’ Unfaithful: Stories of Betrayal ‘14’ Police Women of Maricopa OWN 161 103 31 103 Police Women of Maricopa Mariners Pre. MLB Baseball Los Angeles Dodgers at Seattle Mariners From Safeco Field in Seattle. (N) (Live) Mariners Post. The Dan Patrick Show MLB Baseball ROOT 20 45 28* 26 Rev3 Triathlon Boys in the Hall Mariners (5:56) ››› “A Bronx Taleâ€? (1993, Drama) Robert De Niro, Chazz Palminteri, Lillo Brancato. ’ ›› “Brooklyn’s Finestâ€? (2009) Richard Gere. Three conflicted cops have an appointment with destiny. SPIKE 132 31 34 46 (4:49) Gangland One Blood ‘14’ ›› “Alien vs. Predatorâ€? (2004) Sanaa Lathan, Raoul Bova. WWE Friday Night SmackDown! (N) ’ Ă… Insane or Inspired? (N) Haunted Collector SYFY 133 35 133 45 (3:30) ›› “Alien Resurrectionâ€? Behind Scenes Hal Lindsey The Harvest Perry Stone TBN Highlights of 2011 Frederick Price Life Focus ‘PG’ Secrets Creflo Dollar Israel: Journey of Light Ă… TBN 205 60 130 Friends ‘PG’ King of Queens King of Queens Seinfeld ‘PG’ Seinfeld ‘PG’ House of Payne House of Payne House of Payne House of Payne ›› “RVâ€? (2006, Comedy) Robin Williams, Jeff Daniels. Ă… *TBS 16 27 11 28 Friends ‘PG’ ››› “The Spiral Staircaseâ€? (1946, Suspense) Dorothy ›› “Gaslightâ€? (1940) Anton Walbrook. A ruthless man ›››› “The Innocentsâ€? (1961, Horror) Deborah Kerr, Mar- (8:15) ›› “The Black Catâ€? (1934, Horror) Boris Karloff, ›› “The Town That Dreaded SunTCM 101 44 101 29 McGuire, George Brent. Ă… tin Stephens, Pamela Franklin. Ă… Bela Lugosi, David Manners. subjects his wife to psychological torture. Ă… downâ€? (1976) Ben Johnson. Say Yes: Bride Say Yes: Bride *TLC 178 34 32 34 Say Yes: Bride Say Yes: Bride Say Yes: Bride Say Yes: Bride Say Yes: Bride Say Yes: Bride Say Yes: Bride Say Yes: Bride Say Yes: Bride Say Yes: Bride DC Cupcakes: Takes New York The Mentalist Bloodshot ’ ‘14’ The Mentalist Carnelian Inc ‘14’ ›› “The Mummy Returnsâ€? (2001, Adventure) Brendan Fraser, Rachel Weisz. Ă… ›› “The Mummy Returnsâ€? (2001) Ă… *TNT 17 26 15 27 The Mentalist Scarlett Fever ‘14’ Johnny Test ’ Regular Show Level Up ‘PG’ Wrld, Gumball Adventure Time NinjaGo: Mstrs Cartoon Planet ‘G’ King of the Hill King of the Hill American Dad American Dad Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ *TOON 84 Ghost Adventures ‘PG’ Ă… Ghost Adventures ‘PG’ Ă… The Dead Files Surrounded ‘PG’ Ghost Adventures ‘PG’ Ă… *TRAV 179 51 45 42 Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Truck Stop USA Truck Stop USA Bizarre Foods/Zimmern (6:13) M*A*S*H Point of View ‘PG’ (6:52) M*A*S*H (7:24) M*A*S*H Home Improve. Home Improve. Love-Raymond Love-Raymond (10:12) The King of Queens ‘PG’ King of Queens King of Queens TVLND 65 47 29 35 Bonanza The Way Station ‘G’ Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Fairly Legal Force Majeure ‘PG’ Common Law Ex-Factor (N) ‘PG’ Suits Dog Fight ‘PG’ Ă… USA 15 30 23 30 Law & Order: SVU › “Wild Wild Westâ€? (1999, Action) Will Smith, Kevin Kline, Kenneth Branagh. ’ Single Ladies ’ ‘14’ Single Ladies ’ ‘14’ Storytellers Norah Jones (N) ‘PG’ VH1 191 48 37 54 Saturday Night Live ’ ‘14’ Ă… PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(6:10) ›› “Step Up 3â€? 2010, Drama Rick Malambri. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… ››› “Easy Aâ€? 2010 Emma Stone. ‘PG-13’ Ă… (9:35) ›› “Tron: Legacyâ€? 2010 Jeff Bridges. ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Jon Mnemonic ENCR 106 401 306 401 (4:45) ››› “Cry-Babyâ€? 1990 ›› “There’s Something About Maryâ€? 1998 Cameron Diaz, Matt Dillon. ‘R’ Ă… › “Me, Myself & Ireneâ€? 2000, Comedy Jim Carrey, RenĂŠe Zellweger. ‘R’ Ă… FMC 104 204 104 120 (4:30) › “Me, Myself & Ireneâ€? 2000, Comedy Jim Carrey. ‘R’ Ă… UFC: Johnson vs. McCall Prelims GMac Big Wave Attack Mississippi Grind ‘PG’ UFC: Postfight Show UFC: Johnson vs. McCall Prelims From BankAtlantic Center in Sunrise, Fla. ‘14’ FUEL 34 Golf Central (N) 19th Hole (N) PGA Tour Golf Champions: Regions Tradition, Second Round LPGA Tour Golf GOLF 28 301 27 301 PGA Tour Golf PGA Tour Golf FedEx St. Jude Classic, Second Round Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ‘PG’ Frasier ‘PG’ HALL 66 33 175 33 The Waltons The Scholar ‘G’ (4:00) ›› “50 First Face Off With Weigh-In Live: 24/7: Road to 24/7 Pacquiao/ 24/7 Pacquiao/ 24/7 Pacquiao/ Weigh-In Live: The Ricky Ger- Veep Full Disclo- Real Time With Bill Maher Journalist Real Time With Bill Maher Journalist HBO 425 501 425 501 Datesâ€? ’ Max Kellerman Pacquiao Pacquiao Bradley ‘PG’ Bradley ‘MA’ Bradley (N) Pacquiao vais Show ‘MA’ sure ’ ‘MA’ E.J. Dionne. ’ ‘MA’ Ă… E.J. Dionne. (N) ‘MA’ Ă… Arrested Dev. Arrested Dev. Arrested Dev. Arrested Dev. Comedy Bang! Bunk (N) ‘14’ ›› “Teethâ€? 2007, Comedy Jess Weixler, John Hensley. ‘R’ Comedy Bang! Bunk ‘14’ ››› “Napoleon Dynamiteâ€? IFC 105 105 (4:20) › “Little Fockersâ€? 2010 Robert ›› “Unknownâ€? 2011, Suspense Liam Neeson, Diane Kruger. An accident Strike Back ’ (10:45) MAX on Femme Fatales Strike Back ’ ›› “The Art of Warâ€? 2000, Suspense Wesley Snipes. A U.N. operative is MAX 400 508 508 De Niro. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… victim finds a man using his identity. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… framed for a Chinese diplomat’s murder. ’ ‘R’ Ă… ‘MA’ Ă… Set ‘PG’ Ă… (N) ‘MA’ Ă… ‘MA’ Ă… Lockdown Total Control ‘14’ Lockdown ‘14’ 21st Century Sex Slaves ‘14’ Lockdown Total Control ‘14’ Lockdown ‘14’ 21st Century Sex Slaves ‘14’ The Link ‘14’ NGC 157 157 Odd Parents Odd Parents Odd Parents Wild Grinders Planet Sheen Odd Parents Odd Parents SpongeBob SpongeBob Fanboy-Chum Fanboy-Chum Planet Sheen T.U.F.F. Puppy NTOON 89 115 189 115 Wild Grinders Spanish Fly Wanna Fish Pro Fishing Strike King Pro Bassmasters In Palatka, Florida. Hook-N-Look Big Water Major League Fishing Project West. Extremes Amer. Archer OUTD 37 307 43 307 Zona’s Show (4:30) ›› “Leaves of Grassâ€? 2009 (6:15) ››› “The Company Menâ€? 2010, Drama Ben Affleck. Corporate down- ››› “Another Happy Dayâ€? 2011 Ellen Barkin. A woman attends her son’s ››› “The Rockâ€? 1996, Action Sean Connery, Nicolas Cage. Premiere. AlcaSHO 500 500 Edward Norton. ’ ‘R’ Ă… sizing throws three men into turmoil. ’ ‘R’ Ă… wedding at the estate of her ex-husband. ‘R’ traz Island terrorists threaten to gas San Francisco. ’ ‘R’ NCWTS Setup NASCAR Racing Camping World Truck Series: WinStar World Casino 400K (N) (Live) NASCAR Perfor. Formula 1 Debrief (N) Mobil The Grid Formula One Racing Canadian Grand Prix, Practice SPEED 35 303 125 303 SPEED Center (5:35) ›› “Are We There Yet?â€? 2005 Ice Cube. (7:15) ››› “The Ides of Marchâ€? 2011 Ryan Gosling. ’ ‘R’ Ă… Spartacus: Gods of the Arena ’ Spartacus: Gods of the Arena ’ Spartacus: Gods of the Arena ’ STARZ 300 408 300 408 Dragonheart ’ (4:00) ›› “Lara Croft Tomb Raider: ››› “Dead Againâ€? 1991, Mystery Kenneth Branagh. Premiere. An amnesiac ››› “The Glass Shieldâ€? 1994 Michael Boatman. Premiere. A police rookie ›› “The Mechanicâ€? 2011 Jason Statham. An elite hit-man (11:35) ››› TMC 525 525 The Cradle of Lifeâ€? 2003 may be the reincarnation of a murdered pianist. ’ ‘R’ Ă… falsely implicates a murder suspect. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… teaches his deadly trade to an apprentice. “Transsiberianâ€? Belmont Stakes Access Costas Tonight Poker After Dark Cash 200K Darts Costas Tonight NBCSN 27 58 30 209 IndyCar Racing IndyCar 36 ‘PG’ Belmont Classics CSI: Miami Collision ’ ‘14’ Ă… CSI: Miami Double Jeopardy ‘14’ CSI: Miami Driven ’ ‘14’ Ă… CSI: Miami Free Fall ’ ‘14’ Ă… Ghost Whisperer Lost Boys ‘PG’ Bridezillas Valique & Melissa ‘14’ *WE 143 41 174 118 CSI: Miami Deviant ’ ‘14’ Ă…


FRIDAY, JUNE 8, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

A   & A 

Man’s motorcycle madness is driving wife over the edge Dear Abby: My husband, “Chris,� wanted a motorcycle for seven years. Last year I finally gave in, with the stipulation that he take a safety course and buy a good helmet and riding gear. Two months later, Chris was in a crash and suffered several broken bones and a concussion. The hospital bill was more than $60,000. His accident was a reality check for me. Ever since, I have been petrified of losing him. Every time Chris rides I worry, pray and often cry until he returns or calls to say he’s OK. I have begged him to get rid of the bike. The stress is taking a toll on me physically and emotionally and creating tension between us. I’m afraid it would be selfish to insist he get rid of something he loves; on the other hand, I feel Chris is selfish for not taking my feelings into consideration. I’m torn between wanting him safe and wanting him to be happy. What should I do? — Stressed Out in Philly Dear Stressed Out: If his close call wasn’t enough to convince your husband to rethink his motorcycle riding, and your begging and obvious distress haven’t dissuaded him, accept that short of hogtying Chris, you can’t stop him from riding. You can, however, protect yourself from some of the fallout that might result from another accident. Tell Chris that if his heart is set on riding, you want him to buy a life insurance policy and sign an organ donor card, because healthy young men on motorcycles are the most desired organ donors — a fact shared with me by a former executive director of an organ donation registry. That way you will be provided for in case of a tragedy — and it will ensure that part of him lives on when he is removed from life support. It’s also important that you find ways to lessen your

DEAR ABBY stress. So start making time for activities you can enjoy while you’re on your own. It’ll give you less time to worry and something else on which to concentrate. Dear Abby: I am a woman who last year discovered I was gay. I was married with children. When I told my husband I was gay, he embraced and supported me with a great deal of love. We told our children in an open and honest way, and they, too, have supported me. I have also told a select group of friends whom I felt I could trust. One of these friends is the mother of one of my son’s classmates. Her daughter asked her mom why I was always with a woman and her response was, “It’s her girlfriend.� Her daughter asked more questions, so her mother told her I was gay — outing me to her daughter and my son’s classmates! I am beyond hurt, and I am considering dissolving my friendship with this person. I am unsure what I should say or do. Can you help? — Confused in Seattle Dear Confused: Once a “secret� is shared, there is no guarantee that it will remain a secret. When you began coming out to your friends, you revealed who you are. You CAN’T be both in and out of the closet. Please forgive your friend. Her daughter asked honest questions and was given honest answers. That is a good thing. There are worse things than being known as gay in Seattle — such as being gay in a place that’s less accepting. So start celebrating who you are and the rest will fall into place. — Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

Horoscope: Happy Birthday for Friday, June 8, 2012 By Jacqueline Bigar Exciting events and impulsive people mark your year. You actually will enjoy the excitement. You’ll receive what you desire when you least expect it. This year is a lucky one, with Jupiter, the planet of good fortune, in your sign. If you are single, you could meet several lifelong friends. One of them could become more than a friend. If you are attached, the two of you will enjoy socializing more together this year. AQUARIUS can be zany yet full of ideas. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHHH You find that others support you in every direction you seem to want to head. If you want someone to play devil’s advocate, consider looking at a different day. Your immediate entourage seems very caring, but they’re not up for the job. Tonight: Just don’t be alone. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHH You don’t need to establish anything. You just need to be yourself. As an opportunity comes forward to better understand an older friend or boss, do not turn away. A meeting could be more important than you realize. Say “yes� to an opportunity. Tonight: Leader of the gang. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHH You seem to be on top of the world right now. It’s as if you see many light years ahead of the here and now. You wonder about different ideas and whether they will work. You might not get powerful feedback until later in the day, if at all. Tonight: You can daydream all you want now. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHH Others make the first move, which ultimately could be quite comforting. You do not have all the answers, nor do you claim to. It seems as if several people have given you more power than you really want or deserve. Tonight: You are happiest relating to others on a one-on-one level. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH You are a bundle of energy that others cannot help but notice. You naturally draw people in. This newfound charisma and vitality will tend to increase your natural gregarious tendencies. A partner or friend makes a suggestion. Yes, this person might have an agenda ... but do you really care? Tonight: In the whirlwind of living.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH Pace yourself. You might have to hang in there for longer than you want, but if you are efficient, you could clear out a lot of tasks faster than you think. A friend or loved one might be impatient about wanting to see you. Enjoy this person’s aggravation, because it is flattering! Tonight: Go out with a friend or two. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHHH Your imagination could get you into a lot more trouble than you might think is possible. When your mind keeps drifting to yonder lands and a certain someone, the answer is to call or visit this person. Be careful — you could flub up right now with others around you. Consider taking the day off. Tonight: All fun and flirtation. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHH If you can take some time for yourself, do so. Relax at home. Only when you are ready should you reach out for someone. A child or younger person could be very dominating. Do you really mind? Tonight: Make it simple and close to home. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHH You gain much more freedom when others are mellow. You even can let out that creative imp that lives within you. You feel so much more in sync. Some of you might want to play devil’s advocate. Tonight: Just don’t be alone. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHH Your sensitivity to your budget is appreciated. Still, you might want to cross your t’s and dot your i’s. You suddenly might realize that there is a vagueness that you need to clarify, though it might not pertain to the budget. Tonight: Your treat. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHH You are full of excitement and energy. Others seem more flexible. Be open to someone’s somewhat wild idea. Listen to a suggestion more openly. Ironically, it might originally have been your idea! Tonight: The world is your oyster. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHH You do not always need to be “on.� Allow yourself to call in to work today if possible. Whether you are retired or not, do absolutely what you desire. Your intuition points to the correct way to handle a child or younger friend. Trust your judgment. Tonight: Not to be found. Š 2011 by King Features Syndicate

F C 

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A weekly compilation of family-friendly events throughout Central Oregon.

Please email event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� at www.bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

Find a full community events calendar inside today’s GO! Magazine.

TODAY BEND FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 2-6 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541408-4998, bendfarmersmarket@ gmail.com or http://bendfarmers market.com. ST. FRANCIS COCKTAIL PARTY: See archival materials from the history of the St. Francis school; free; 5-11 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-389-4854, grivera@saintfrancisschool.net or www.saintfrancisschool.net. “MURDER AT THE BANQUET�: Bend Theatre for Young People presents a one-act comic murder mystery; $6, $3 students; 7 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend; 541-419-1395. CASCADE CHORALE: The group performs “Carmina Burana,� poems set to music, under the direction of James Knox; donations accepted; 7 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-383-7512, jwknox@cocc.edu or http://cascadechorale.org. SISTERS RODEO: A PRCA rodeo performance with roping, riding, steer wrestling and more; $12, free ages 12 and younger; 7 p.m.; Sisters Rodeo Grounds, 67637 U.S. Highway 20; 541-549-0121 or www.sistersrodeo.com. “THE COMPLETE WORKS OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE (ABRIDGED)�: Innovation Theatre Works presents the humorous adaptation of 37 Shakespeare plays in 90 minutes; $15, $12 students and seniors; 7:30 p.m.; Innovation Theatre Works, 1155 S.W. Division St., Bend; 541-5046721 or www.innovationtw.org. “THE IRON LADY�: A screening of the PG-13-rated 2011 movie; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541-475-3351 or www.jcld.org.

SATURDAY BIG PINE WALK-RUN-BIKE: 5K or 10K walk/run, or a 25 or 50 mile bike ride; proceeds benefit youth activity scholarships; $20; 8 a.m.; Finley Butte Park, Walling Lane and Finley Butte Road, La Pine; www.bigpine.org. MADRAS SATURDAY MARKET: Free admission; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Sahalee Park, B and Seventh streets; 541-489-3239 or madrassatmkt@gmail.com. PORSCHE SHOW AND SHINE: A show of all years and models of Porsches; free, $20 to enter a car; 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; Des Chutes Historical Museum, 129 N.W. Idaho Ave., Bend; president@ highdesertpca.com. CENTRAL OREGON SATURDAY MARKET: Featuring arts and crafts from local artisans; free admission; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; parking lot across from Bend

Public Library, 600 N.W. Wall St.; 541-420-9015 or www.central oregonsaturdaymarket.com. CRUISE TO THE CENTER OF OREGON: See cars in a variety of makes and models; with vendors and train rides; free for spectators, donations of nonperishable food accepted; 10 a.m.-3 p.m., gates open 8 a.m.; Crook County Fairgrounds, 1280 S. Main St., Prineville; 541-8153320 or www.ccrodders.com. RUNNING ON FAITH: A 5K run, followed by kids mini run, live music and more; $20, free for kids; 10 a.m.; Troy Field, Bond Street and Louisiana Avenue, Bend; 541-3894854, grivera@saintfrancisschool. net or www.saintfrancisschool.net. SISTERS ART IN THE PARK: Featuring arts, crafts and a silent auction benefiting the Make-AWish Foundation of Oregon; free; 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Creekside Park, U.S. Highway 20 and Jefferson Avenue; 541-420-0279 or centraloregonshows@gmail.com. RAPTORS OF THE DESERT SKY: See hawks, owls and other raptors soaring through a forest clearing, and hear a biologist talk about the birds; daily through Labor Day; $3 or $2 members, plus museum admission; free ages 4 and younger; 11:30 a.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www .highdesertmuseum.org. BEND PRIDE CELEBRATION: Gay pride festival includes live music, entertainers and vendors; free; noon6 p.m.; Riverbend Park, Southwest Columbia Street and Southwest Shevlin Hixon Drive; 541-385-3320 or www.humandignitycoalition.org. “MURDER AT THE BANQUET�: Bend Theatre for Young People presents a one-act comic murder mystery; $6, $3 students; 1 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend; 541-419-1395. SISTERS RODEO: Featuring a parade and a PRCA rodeo performance with roping, riding, steer wrestling and more; $12-$18; 9:30 a.m. parade, 1 and 7 p.m. rodeo; Sisters Rodeo Grounds, 67637 U.S. Highway 20; 541-549-0121 or www.sisters rodeo.com. HOOTENANNY FRIENDRAISER: Meet the Chimps Inc. ape troop and learn about protecting chimpanzees; registration requested; proceeds benefit the sanctuary; $25; 1:30-3 p.m.; Hooker Creek Ranch, Chimps Inc. Sanctuary, 5525 Gerking Market Road, Bend; 541-410-4122, chimpinc@yahoo.com or http:// chimps-inc.org. “THE BEAR AND I�: Les Joslin talks about his relationship with Smokey Bear, followed by a tour of a restored ranger station; included in the price of admission; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 2 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www .highdesertmuseum.org. BEND GAME NIGHT: Play available board games or bring your own; free; 6 p.m.-midnight; East Bend Public Library, 62080 Dean Swift Road; 541-318-8459. “THE SNOW QUEEN�: Redmond School of Dance presents the ballet; $12 or $6 ages 11 and younger in advance, $14 or $8 children at the door; 7 p.m.; Redmond High School, 675 S.W. Rimrock Way; 541-5486957 or www.redmondschool ofdance.com.

BEATLES SINGALONG: Local acts perform Beatles material with community members joining in; with a silent auction, trivia and costume contests and more; proceeds benefit KPOV; $10-$12 in advance, $15 adults at the door, $5 ages 17 and younger; 7-10 p.m., doors open 6:30 p.m.; Century Center, 70 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-322-0863 or www.kpov.org. “THE COMPLETE WORKS OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE (ABRIDGED)�: Innovation Theatre Works presents the humorous adaptation of 37 Shakespeare plays in 90 minutes; $15, $12 students and seniors; 7:30 p.m.; Innovation Theatre Works, 1155 S.W. Division St., Bend; 541-504-6721 or www .innovationtw.org. COURTNEY HUFFMAN: The soprano soloist performs; $35, $10 students and children; 7:30 p.m.; First United Methodist Church, 680 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-306-3988 or www .highdesertchambermusic.com.

SUNDAY GARDEN FAIR: Vendors sell crafts, arts and plants; with school tours; free admission; 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church & School, 2450 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-389-4854, grivera@ saintfrancisschool.net or www .saintfrancisschool.net. SISTERS ART IN THE PARK: Featuring arts, crafts and a silent auction benefiting the Make-AWish Foundation of Oregon; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Creekside Park, U.S. Highway 20 and Jefferson Avenue; 541-420-0279 or centraloregonshows@gmail.com. RAPTORS OF THE DESERT SKY: See hawks, owls and other raptors soaring through a forest clearing, and hear a biologist talk about the birds; daily through Labor Day; $3 or $2 members, plus museum admission; free ages 4 and younger; 11:30 a.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www .highdesertmuseum.org. FIDDLERS JAM: Listen or dance at the Oregon Old Time Fiddlers Jam; donations accepted; 1-3:30 p.m.; VFW Hall, 1836 S.W. Veterans Way, Redmond; 541-447-7395. SISTERS RODEO: Featuring a buckaroo breakfast and a PRCA rodeo performance with roping, riding, steer wrestling and more; $12-$18; 7-11 a.m. breakfast, 1 p.m. rodeo; Sisters Rodeo Grounds, 67637 U.S. Highway 20; 541-5490121 or www.sistersrodeo.com. “THE SNOW QUEEN�: Redmond School of Dance presents the ballet; $12 or $6 ages 11 and younger in advance, $14 or $8 children at the door; 2 p.m.; Redmond High School, 675 S.W. Rimrock Way; 541-5486957 or www.redmondschool ofdance.com. SUMMER SUNDAY CONCERT: The folk-rock act Poor Moon performs; free; 2:30-4:30 p.m.; Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-322-9383 or www.bendconcerts.com. FESTIVAL OF THE ARTS: Featuring displays of paintings, quilts, jewelry and more; with a performance of a play called “Noah’s Flood�; free; 3 p.m.; Community Presbyterian Church, 529 N.W. 19th St., Redmond; 541-548-3367 or www.redmondcpc.org.

SUNRIVER MUSIC FESTIVAL YOUNG ARTIST SCHOLARSHIP CONCERT: A showcase of the top 2012 Young Artist Scholarship recipients; $10 suggested donation; 5 p.m.; Holy Trinity Church, 18143 Cottonwood Road; 541-593-9310, tickets@sunrivermusic.org or www.sunrivermusic.org. “THE COMPLETE WORKS OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE (ABRIDGED)�: Innovation Theatre Works presents the humorous adaptation of 37 Shakespeare plays in 90 minutes; $15, $12 students and seniors; 6 p.m.; Innovation Theatre Works, 1155 S.W. Division St., Bend; 541-504-6721 or www.innovationtw.org.

MONDAY CASCADE CHORALE: The group performs “Carmina Burana,� poems set to music, under the direction of James Knox; donations accepted; 7 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-383-7512, jwknox@ cocc.edu or http://cascadechorale.org.

TUESDAY TUESDAY MARKET AT EAGLE CREST: Free admission; 2-6 p.m.; Eagle Crest Resort, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; 541-633-9637 or info@sustainableflame.com.

WEDNESDAY KENGARDEN 2012 ROOTS TOUR: America’s best kendama players show off their tricks; free; 1-5 p.m.; Des Chutes Historical Museum, 129 N.W. Idaho Ave., Bend; 541-6337205 or http://wabisabibend.com. BEND FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 3-7 p.m.; Brooks Alley, between Northwest Franklin Avenue and Northwest Brooks Street; 541-408-4998, bendfarmersmarket@gmail.com or http://bendfarmersmarket.com. PICKIN’ AND PADDLIN’ MUSIC SERIES: Includes boat demonstrations in the Deschutes River, and music by bluegrass act Pitchfork Revolution; proceeds benefit Bend Paddle Trail Alliance; free; 4-7 p.m. demonstrations, 7-10 p.m. music; Tumalo Creek Kayak & Canoe, 805 S.W. Industrial Way, Suite 6, Bend; 541-317-9407. “THE COMPLETE WORKS OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE (ABRIDGED)�: Innovation Theatre Works presents the humorous adaptation of 37 Shakespeare plays in 90 minutes; $15, $12 students and seniors; 7:30 p.m.; Innovation Theatre Works, 1155 S.W. Division St., Bend; 541-504-6721 or www.innovationtw.org.

THURSDAY HANZ ARAKI & KATHRYN CLAIRE: The Irish fiddle duo performs, with Chris Hayes; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-3825174 or www.mcmenamins.com. “THE COMPLETE WORKS OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE (ABRIDGED)�: Innovation Theatre Works presents the humorous adaptation of 37 Shakespeare plays in 90 minutes; $15, $12 students and seniors; 7:30 p.m.; Innovation Theatre Works, 1155 S.W. Division St., Bend; 541-504-6721 or www .innovationtw.org.

S  T  L   Y E  For the week of June 8-14 Story times are free unless otherwise noted. Barnes & Noble Booksellers 2690 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-318-7242

ONCE UPON A STORY TIME: All ages; 11 a.m. Friday.

Downtown Bend Public Library 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7097

BABY STEPS: Ages 0-18 months; 10:15 a.m. Monday and 11:30 a.m. Wednesday. TODDLIN’ TALES: Ages 18-36 months; 10:15 a.m. and 11 a.m. Tuesday and 10:15 a.m. Wednesday. PRESCHOOL PARADE: Ages 3-5; 10:30 a.m. Friday, 1:30 p.m. Tuesday.

Between the Covers 645 N.W. Delaware Ave., Bend; 541-385-4766

STORY TIME: 2 p.m. Thursday. C.E. Lovejoy’s Brookswood Market 19530 Amber Meadow Drive, Bend; 541-388-1188

STORY TIME: All ages; 11 a.m. Thursday. Crook County Public Library 175 S.W. Meadow Lakes Drive, Prineville; 541-447-7978

PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Ages 3 and older; 6:30 p.m. Tuesday and 11 a.m. Thursday. WEE READ: Ages 0-3; 10 a.m. Monday and Wednesday.

East Bend Public Library

unless noted, events included with admission ($15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger)

WILD WEDNESDAYS: Ages 7-12; treasure hunt; 12:30 p.m. to close Wednesday. BACKPACK EXPLORERS: Ages 3-4; explore museum’s animal habitat, share stories and songs; 10 to 11 a.m. Thursday; $15 per child nonmembers, $10 per child members. TOTALLY TOUCHABLE TALES: Ages 2-5; storytelling about animals and people of the High Desert; 10:30 a.m. Tuesday.

62080 Dean Swift Road; 541-330-3760

TODDLIN’ TALES: Ages 0-3; 9:30 a.m. Wednesday. PRESCHOOL PARADE: Ages 3-5; 11 a.m. Wednesday. SATURDAY STORIES: Ages 0-5; 10 a.m. Saturday. High Desert Museum 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; www. highdesertmuseum.org; 541-382-4754;

Jefferson County Public Library 241 S.W. Seventh St., Madras; 541-475-3351

BABIES AND TODDLERS STORY TIME: 10:10 a.m. Tuesday. PRESCHOOL AND OLDER STORY TIME: Ages 3-5; 10:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Tuesday. SPANISH STORY TIME: All ages; 1 p.m. Wednesday.

La Pine Public Library 16425 First St.; 541-312-1090

FAMILY STORY TIME: All ages; 10:30 a.m. Thursday. Redmond Public Library 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1054

BABY STEPS: Ages 0-18 months; 11 a.m. Thursday. PRESCHOOL PARADE STORY TIME: Ages 3-5; 10:15 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. Wednesday. TODDLIN’ TALES: Ages 18 to 36 months; 10:15 a.m. Thursday. Sisters Public Library 110 N. Cedar St.; 541-312-1070

FAMILY FUN STORY TIME: Ages 05; 10:30 a.m. Thursday. Sunriver Area Public Library 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1080

FAMILY FUN STORY TIME: Ages 05; 10:30 a.m. Tuesday.

Get A Taste For Food, Home & Garden Every Tuesday In AT HOME


B4

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JUNE 8, 2012

TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


FRIDAY, JUNE 8, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

BIZARRO

B5

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively.

SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

DAILY BRIDGE CLUB

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

Seeking a friendly duplicate bridge? Find five games weekly at www.bendbridge.org.

CANDORVILLE

SAFE HAVENS

LOS ANGELES TIMES DAILY CROSSWORD

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN


B6

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JUNE 8, 2012

Program Continued from B1 Last year, the Deschutes Public Library system had about 5,000 kids and teens and about 800 adults participate in summer reading programs. Jane Ahern with the Crook County Library is excited about several events this summer, including a kickoff program with juggler Charlie Brown, who will help teach children how to juggle after his performance. The event will also include free balloon animals, face painting and refreshments. The library in Prineville will host the Dragon Theater Puppets, who will perform two shows for kids. Magician Bill Mitchell will also perform. In addition to fun programming, kids who participate in reading programs can earn all sorts of prizes just by reading a few books. All three library systems are giving away books as well as other large grand prizes for kids who complete reading this summer — younger children can participate by having their parents read aloud to them. Contact each participating library for details about how the program and prize giveaways work. — Reporter: 541-617-7860, ajohnson@bendbulletin.com

For grown-ups Adults can also join a summer reading program in Deschutes or Crook county. Find details by visiting www .deschuteslibrary.org or calling the Crook County Library at 541-447-7879.

Question Continued from B1 At the beginning and end of every school year, Bend-La Pine Schools issue a districtwide test that’s meant to show where students are in relation to state benchmarks. These tests also show what students forget over the course of a summer, and Dean says it becomes obvious which students have been exercising their reading skills over the course of the summer and which ones haven’t. “Some students have a significant drop, while others maintain,” Dean said. “We know that the ones who maintain are the kids with structured reading at home.” Dean recommends that children read daily, either by silent

Crook County Library

Jefferson County Library

www.crooklib.org, 541-447-7978

www.jcld.org, 541-475-3351

Programs are for preschool-age through middle school-age children. Kickoff party: 10 a.m.-noon June 16 at Library Park behind the library. Event will include juggler Charlie Brown, who will provide juggling instruction to kids, as well as free refreshments, hula hooping and balloon animals.

CHILDREN’S PROGRAMS June 19, 6:30 p.m.: High Desert Museum staff will bring an owl to the library; will also include animal pelts for children to touch. June 20, 11 a.m. and June 21, 1 p.m.: Stellaluna story time. June 26, 6:30 p.m. and June 28, 1 p.m.: Campfire songs.

Deschutes Continued from B1 La Pine Family Fun: 10:30 a.m. Thursdays Redmond Baby Steps: 11 a.m. Thursdays Toddlin’ Tales: 10:15 a.m. Thursdays Preschool Parade: 10:15 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. Wednesdays Sisters Family Fun: 10:30 a.m. Thursdays Sunriver Area Family Fun: 10:30 a.m. Tuesdays

Night Crawlers This is a weekly program with crafts, stories and games for kids ages 6–11. Programs include: Week 1: Out of the World: Kids “travel” to planets. Week 2: Creatures of the Night: Learn about nocturnal animals like leopards and possums. (Program will not take place in La Pine or Sunriver) Week 3: Night Shivers: Scary, funny stories and spooky portrait craft. Week 4: Star Watch: Kids design their own stars of the night. Week 5: Monster Mash Up: Kids create their own monsters to take home and hear fun monster stories.

reading, being read to or reading aloud to younger siblings. He recommends that parents have their children summarize what they’ve read at the end of each day, or draw pictures based on the reading as a way of having “homework” assignments throughout the summer. If your family is going on vacation somewhere during the break, Dean says this is a great opportunity for parents to integrate reading and writing through relevant experiences. For example, parents can have their children research the destination they’re visiting and act as a tour guide. Dean also says writing is an important skill to keep up during the summer. Parents could have children keep summer journals where they can re-

June 27, 10 and 11 a.m.: Puppet show. July 10, 6:30 p.m.; July 11, 11 a.m. and July 12, 1 p.m.: “Goodnight Moon” story time. July 17, 6:30 p.m.; July 18, 11 a.m. and July 19, 1 p.m.: Bedtime story time. July 24, 6:30 p.m. and July 25, 11 a.m.: Dreams story time. July 26, 1 and 2 p.m.: Magician Bill Mitchell performs. July 28, 1 p.m.: Family movie screening. July 31, 6:30 p.m.; Aug. 1, 11 a.m. and Aug. 2, 1 p.m.: Campfire stories with Anita Hoffman.

TEEN PROGRAMS All events from 6-7:30 p.m. unless otherwise noted. June 21: Games, root beer floats June 28: Jewelry making June 30: Movie marathon with both versions of “Footloose,” noon-4 p.m. July 5: Pizza, movie, crafts, 6-8:30 p.m. July 12: Bingo, prizes, snack July 19: Breakfast for dinner cooking demonstration July 26: Dance, snacks and soda Aug. 2: Duct tape and other crafts

Week 6: Let’s Go Batty: Learn about bats with stories and activities. Week 7: Dream Big — Party: Final celebration for the summer program.

July 17: Star Watch July 24: Monster Mash Up July 31: Let’s Go Batty Aug. 7: Dream Big — Party!

Downtown Bend: 10:30 a.m. Thursdays, beginning June 28 July 5: Creatures of the Night July 12: Night Shivers July 19: Star Watch July 26: Monster Mash Up Aug. 2: Let’s Go Batty Aug. 9: Dream Big—Party!

Sisters: 1 p.m. Tuesdays, beginning June 26 July 3: Creatures of the Night July 10: Night Shivers July 17: Star Watch July 24: Monster Mash Up July 31: Let’s Go Batty Aug. 7: Dream Big—Party!

East Bend: 1 p.m. Thursdays, beginning June 28 July 5: Creatures of the Night July 12: Night Shivers July 19: Star Watch July 26: Monster Mash Up Aug. 2: Let’s Go Batty Aug. 9: Dream Big— Party! La Pine: 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays, beginning June 27 (no program July 4) July 11: Night Shivers July 18: Star Watch July 25: Monster Mash Up Aug. 1: Let’s Go Batty Aug. 8: Dream Big — Party! Redmond: 10:30 a.m. Tuesdays, beginning June 26 July 3: Creatures of the Night July 10: Night Shivers

flect and write creatively. Any activities that involve children using math skills is also highly beneficial. Many math-related apps are available on smartphones and tablet computers. If your family does not own technology like that, Dean says math can be incorporated into everyday activities. If you’re on a road trip, have your child calculate how far it will be to the next town and how long it will take. Talk your child through the math problem. This not only allows children to exercise their math skills, but also shows them

Sunriver Area: 1 p.m. Wednesday, beginning June 27 (no program July 4) July 11: Night Shivers July 18: Star Watch July 25: Monster Mash Up Aug. 1: Let’s Go Batty Aug. 8: Dream Big — Party!

Teen Summer Program Rockin’ Rockets: Ages 10–17; Kids learn what makes rockets go and how they have been used for space exploration. Downtown Bend: July 12, 2-3:30 p.m. La Pine: July 16, 2-3:30 p.m. Redmond: July 19, 2-3:30 p.m. Sisters: July 11, 2-3:30 p.m. Sunriver Area: July 24, 2-3:30 p.m.

how math can be used to solve everyday problems. “It may require a bit more effort, but it’s important to keep math at the forefront,” Dean said. He says it’s a good idea to have an agreement with your child about limiting the amount of TV he or she

Week 5: Grand Finale: The event includes a pizza party with games, prizes and live music at the Rodriguez Annex. Madras: At the Rodriguez Annex, 23 p.m. Tuesdays starting June 26. Warm Springs: At the Early Childhood Education Center, 2-3 p.m. Wednesdays starting June 27. No program July 4. Culver: At Culver Elementary School library, 2-3 p.m. Thursdays starting June 28.

© 2012 Collaborative Summer Library Program

Glow-in-the-Dark Crafts: Ages 10–17; kids create glow-in-the dark projects and learn how it works. Downtown Bend: July 19, 2-3:30 p.m. East Bend: June 29, 2-3:30 p.m. La Pine: June 6, 1:30 p.m. Redmond: July 12, 2-3:30 p.m. Game Days: Ages 10–17; kids can play video or board games with buddies. Downtown Bend: June 21 and Aug. 9, 2-3:30 p.m. La Pine: June 27, July 25 and Aug. 29, 2-4 p.m. Late-Night Lock-in: Ages 12-17; Teens get to hang out in the library after hours and join in activities and games with supervision from library staff. Permission slip is required. Downtown Bend: June 15, 7-11 p.m.

watches during the summer, and how much time he or she spends playing video games. Dean says to encourage children to get outside and play, focusing on exercising their bodies as well as their minds during the summer break.

Capture It: A Photography Workshop: Ages 12-17; Teens should bring a camera and learn about software and editing tools. Sisters: Aug. 9, 2:30-4 p.m. Do-it-Yourself Spa Day: Ages 12-17; Teens can create their own beauty treatments with supplies provided. Downtown Bend: June 28, 2-3:30 p.m. East Bend: July 13, 2-3:30 p.m. Redmond: July 26, 2-3:30 p.m. Terrific Tie Dye: Ages 12-17; Teens can learn to tie dye; supplies and bandanas provided. Downtown Bend: Aug. 16, 2-3:30 p.m. Redmond: June 28, 2-3:30 p.m.

$

100 OFF

— Reporter: 541-383-0354, mkehoe@bendbulletin.com

Oreck Air Purifiers starting at just $149!

for appointments call 541-382-4900 856 NW Bond • Downtown Bend • 541-330-5999 www.havenhomestyle.com

Week 1: Wishes and Dreams: A local pilot will show a video of trick flying and talk about flying experiences. Week 2: Pajama Party: Kids are encouraged to wear their pajamas and the event focuses on bedtime. Week 3: Hoo Hoo: Night and nocturnal animals are the focus. Week 4: Night Sky: A local astronomer will visit and talk about the planets and stargazing.

7:30 AM - 5:30 PM MON-FRI 8 AM - 3 PM SAT. 541-382-4171 541-548-7707 2121 NE Division Bend

641 NW Fir Redmond

www.denfeldpaints.com

Ends 6/30/12!


LOCALNEWS

News of Record, C2 Editorials, C4

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JUNE 8, 2012

L O C AL BRIEFING Warm Springs men face charges Two Warm Springs men facing charges of murder and first-degree manslaughter were arraigned Wednesday in Jefferson County Circuit Court. The charges against Neal Anderson, 23, and James Ryan Johnson, 31, are in connection with the death of Dennis Jones, a 48-year-old man from the Seattle area, according to police and the Oregon Judicial Information Network. Jones’ body was discovered by a fisherman hiking through an abandoned railroad tunnel near Warm Springs on May 30. The defendants have a pretrial conference scheduled for July 12. Both are being held in jail without bail.

www.bendbulletin.com/local

Trial opens in bat slaying • Prosecutors say the crime grew out of a Bend man’s obsession with his ex-girlfriend By Sheila G. Miller The Bulletin

Prosecutors in opening arguments Thursday told the jury that the man on trial in his roommate’s death beat him into a bloody pulp because of the roommate’s relationship with a woman. Richard Ward Clarke, of Bend, is charged with murder in the October 2010 beating death of his roommate, Matt Fitzhenry. Clarke is accused of taking a pink baseball bat

to his roommate because he was obsessed with a former girlfriend and was convinced his roommate was sleeping with her. On Thursday, the jury heard opening arguments and from several witnesses. Deschutes County Deputy District Attorney Van McIver said Clarke, 26, was obsessed with a woman with whom he’d been in an on-and-off five-year relationship, and grew angry about her grow-

ing friendship and potential sexual relationship with Fitzhenry. What began as roommate tension over paying rent and buying toilet paper crumbled. “His anger turned to rage, which turned to obsession,” McIver told jurors. “He was telling people that he wanted Matt dead. He wanted him to suffer.” McIver described Clarke as being involved with methamphetamine, cocaine

and intravenous drugs, and read Clarke’s angry journal entries, which included references to and at least one specific example of how he would kill his ex-girlfriend. And after an argument, McIver said, Clarke snapped and trashed his roommate’s belongings before beating him with a bat, then leaving the scene. Fitzhenry died about two minutes before reaching St. Charles Bend. See Trial / C2

OFF THE WALL — AND FUN

Power back on at Deer Ridge The Deer Ridge Correctional Institution has returned to normal operations after undergoing a planned power outage Tuesday and Wednesday to repair damaged power lines. During the outage, Department of Corrections staff and contractors replaced the damaged power cables and conduit. — Bulletin staff reports

Have a story idea or submission? Contact us!

The Bulletin Call a reporter: Bend ................541-633-2160 Redmond ........ 541-617-7837 Sisters............. 541-617-7837 La Pine ........... 541-383-0348 Sunriver ......... 541-383-0348 Deschutes ...... 541-617-7829 Crook ............. 541-504-2336 Jefferson ....... 541-504-2336

• School news and notes: Email news items and notices of general interest to pcliff@bendbulletin.com. Email announcements of teens’ academic achievements to youth@bendbulletin.com. Email college notes, military graduations and reunion info to bulletin@bendbulletin.com. Details: School coverage runs Wednesday in this section. Contact: 541-383-0358

• Obituaries, Death Notices: Details on the Obituaries page inside. Contact: 541-617-7825, obits@bendbulletin.com

• Community events:

The Bulletin

WASHINGTON — The House Natural Resources Committee approved a bill Thursday that would transfer more than 900 acres of federal property in the La Pine area to Deschutes County and the city for a permanent rodeo grounds and a wastewater treatment plant. The committee passed the measure by unanimous consent, indicating a lack of objections from either Republicans or Democrats. The bill would convey two

Details: The Milestones page publishes Sunday in Community Life. Contact: 541-383-0358

“This land allows the city to expand and enhance this venue with newer, larger facilities.” — U.S. Rep. Greg Walden

Incorporated in 2006, La Pine has worked to develop economic opportunities locally over the past few years, but it is surrounded by federally owned land, the statement reads. “Their annual rodeo, dubbed ‘The Greatest Little

Rodeo in Oregon,’ draws thousands of people into the area,” Walden wrote. “This land allows the city to expand and enhance this venue with newer, larger facilities.” Deschutes County Commissioner Tony DeBone, a former member of the La Pine Park and Recreation District and La Pine Rodeo Association boards, recalled looking at a map spread out on a pool table at the Parks and Recreation building with fellow rodeo board member Ann Gawith back before La Pine was a city. See La Pine / C2

State bans trapping near trails, campsites By Lauren Dake The Bulletin

SALEM — The Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission approved the state’s first ban on trapping near public trails and campgrounds Thursday. The move comes after a man’s dog was caught in a trap near the Metolius River earlier in the year. Traps will no longer be allowed within 50 feet of a public trail or 300 feet of a trailhead or public campground. After Jack Williamson’s wheaten terrier, Kieri, was caught in a body-gripping trap in Camp Sherman in February, he started a crusade to change statewide trapping rules. Williamson’s 8-year-old dog died from the injuries suffered from the trap. The West Linn resident gathered more than 1,500 signatures petitioning for changes to trapping rules. He pushed for the agency to ban large bodygripping traps on land, put up warning signs at trailheads and markers set within 100 feet of a trail in certain areas, and increase ethics training for trappers. Craig Starr, the president of the Oregon Bow Hunters, pointed out that the Metolius River trail where Williamson’s dog was caught has long been a fisherman’s trail. He asked for a stronger definition of what “public trails” are and not allow trails that have been “usurped by yuppies or other urbanites” be “limited so Fluffy can run loose without worry.” He encouraged commissioners to not let “urbanites try to impose their urban lifestyle on rural folks trying to eke out a living” on rural lands. Although the commission decided not to regulate marking where traps are located, Scott Robbins, of Bend, said it would help assuage his concerns if he knew where the traps were set. “I’m a recreational user of public lands,” Robbins told the commission. “It’s very concerning to me to learn there are traps on lands that might injure myself, or my dog. “Give me an opportunity to keep my dogs from getting trapped. I don’t know how to do that other than if you give me some warning.” The commission’s staff did not recommend mandating signs for several reasons, including how the it enforce the issue if the signs were removed by weather or vandalized. See Trapping / C2

MOUNTAIN VIEW HIGH SCHOOL

Police investigate possible canal drowning Body found in canal

Odem Medo Rd. 97

rt Wa

Yew Ave.

Airpo

• Births, engagements, marriages, partnerships, anniversaries:

large parcels to the county and a smaller, 10-acre lot where the library stands to the city. The largest lot, 750 acres east of the railroad tracks and north of Reed Road, would be used to expand the city’s wastewater treatment plant, while 150 acres west of U.S. Highway 97 on both sides of Sixth Street is the proposed site for a permanent rodeo grounds. Rep. Greg Walden, R-Hood River, was too busy to attend Thursday’s hearing, but submitted a statement in support of the legislation.

REDMOND

y

Email event information to communitylife@bend bulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” at www .bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Details: The calendar appears on Page 3 in Community Life. Contact: 541-383-0351

By Andrew Clevenger

.

Email event information to news@bendbulletin.com, with “Civic Calendar” in the subject, and include a contact name and phone number. Contact: 541-383-0354

House panel approves land transfer

lvd

• Civic Calendar notices:

LA PINE

lB

Mail: My Nickel’s Worth or In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 Details on the Editorials page inside. Contact: 541-383-0358, bulletin@bendbulletin.com

27th St.

Submissions: • Letters and opinions:

na

Business ........ 541-383-0360 Education .......541-633-2161 Public lands .....541-617-7812 Public safety.....541-383-0387 Projects .......... 541-617-7831

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Using his legs for a big spring, Ryder Barnett, 5, left, hovers while Corbin Brown, 4, bounces alongside him Thursday in the toddler area at Bouncing Off The Wall in Bend. Both boys are from Bend. Bouncing Off The Wall offers bouncing for kids, along with a Velcro wall, jousting poles and a variety of other activities at its indoor facility. Bouncing Off The Wall is open from 6 to 9 p.m. on the first and third Wednesdays of each month through August. For more information, call 541-306-6587, or go to info@bouncing offthewallbend.com.

Ca

Salem ..............541-554-1162 D.C. .................202-662-7456

C

Obituaries, C5 Weather, C6

REDMOND

Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center

Greg Cross / The Bulletin

Redmond police are investigating a possible drowning after a body was found in a Central Oregon Irrigation District Canal on the south end of Redmond. “It’s an ongoing investigation, but we are not looking for any other cause of death other than drowning at this point,” said Redmond Police Sgt. Curtis Chambers. “At this point, we don’t suspect any crimes.” Police found the body just after 8 a.m. Thursday in the canal behind the 3000 block of

U.S. Highway 97. The identity of the presumed drowning victim has yet to be released as police attempt to notify the next of kin. Chambers said an autopsy is under way and results are expected back in the “next few days.” An update on the case will likely be released next week. Police said there is no immediate danger to the public because the death does not appear to be a crime. — Bulletin staff report

Joe Kline / The Bulletin

Graduates in the Mountain View High School choir sing “The Battle Hymn of the Republic” during the school’s commencement ceremony Thursday evening at the Deschutes County Fairgrounds in Redmond.


C2

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JUNE 8, 2012

Trapping Continued from C1 Another issue addressed was how often the traps are checked. Nicholas Cady, legal director with Cascadia Wildlands, a Eugene-based conservation group, pushed, along with others, for the traps to be checked every 24 hours. “Based on the high number of pet deaths due to the den-

La Pine Continued from C1 “We figured out that we were talking federal land,� he said. The land transfers would help provide a permanent home for Frontier Days, the city’s 25year-old Fourth of July celebration, and the La Pine Rodeo, which has roots that stretch back for a century, he said. Additionally, the wastewater treatment plant would

sity of traps in the state, and the incidental trapping of our state’s emerging predator populations, this is exactly what needs to happen in Oregon.� But Jim Soares, a trapper from Wallowa, said a 24-hour trap check would be costly and result in more traps being set in populated areas. “Every trapper wants to avoid that,� he said. “The last thing we want is any domes-

ticated animals caught. It’s not good for us and it’s not at all preferred.� Currently, depending on the type of trap, they must be checked every 48 or 76 hours. The commission did not change the current rules. The wildlife commission looks at the state’s trapping rules every two years.

enable the number of residents within the city limits to grow. “We were on the verge of maxing out capacity in 2005 because of the new houses going in. That was really a hard limit on growth within the urban boundary,� DeBone said. “All of a sudden La Pine is starting to become the right size, and the right mix of commercial opportunities and residential.�

Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., introduced the land transfer bill in the Senate in February 2011 with Sen. Jeff Merkley, D-Ore., as a co-sponsor. The full Senate approved the measure by voice vote eight months later. The bill now awaits a vote on the House floor. If it clears that hurdle, it will be sent to President Barack Obama to be signed into law.

— Reporter: 541-554-1162, ldake@bendbulletin.com

— Reporter: 202-662-7456, aclevenger@bendbulletin.com

N  R POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Prineville Police Department

Unauthorized use — A vehicle was reported stolen and an arrest made at 2:29 a.m. June 6, in the area of

Northeast Third Street.

U.S. Highway 20.

Theft — Thefts were reported and three arrests made at 2:29 a.m. June 6, in the area of Northeast Third Street.

17 — Medical aid calls.

BEND FIRE RUNS Tuesday 5:34 p.m. — Brush or brush-andgrass mixture fire, 1835 Northeast U.S. Highway 20. 7:25 p.m. — Brush or brush-andgrass mixture fire, 1835 Northeast

Wednesday 3:47 p.m. — Unauthorized burning, 65050 97th St. 13 — Medical aid calls.

Press logs from the Bend Police and other Deschutes County police departments are currently unavailable, due to a police department system update.

P  O   

Trial Continued from C1 While lodged in the Deschutes County jail, McIver told jurors, Clarke told several inmates he’d committed the murder. To one inmate, he said he’d flown into a rage after asking to borrow a lighter and being refused. “ ‘The dude was snoring when he hit the ground,’� McIver told jurors Clarke had bragged. “Then he hit him nine to 13 more times as he lay on the ground and stomped on him.� Clarke and the inmate then allegedly discussed possible defense strategies. After getting a search warrant, McIver said, Clarke’s clothes were sent to the Oregon State Police crime lab and analyzed. The dozens of stains tested positive for Fitzhenry’s blood. The bat believed to have been used in Fitzhenry’s beating was found in some bushes on McMenamin’s Old St. Francis School property several days after the bludgeoning. McIver said a friend would testify the bat was found along a walking route often used by Clarke. But Clarke’s defense attorney, Jacques DeKalb, told another story. He asked jurors to pay close attention to the facts of the case, especially the scientific evidence. And he said his client did not kill Fitzhenry. “You will hear a lot more about this in our case from Mr. Clarke, that he did not kill Matt Fitzhenry. He did not do that,� DeKalb said. “He wasn’t the perpetrator of Matthew Fitzhenry’s death. He was there. He was very close to what was going on but he did not anticipate and he did not participate in the death of Mr. Fitzhenry.� DeKalb told jurors the police had quickly focused

on Clarke to the detriment of the case, making assumptions about the evidence. He also blamed poor police work, alleging the blood spatter found on Clarke’s clothing wasn’t consistent with what it would have looked like had he done the beating. After opening statements, prosecutors called several witnesses who spoke of finding Fitzhenry seriously injured in his home. First to the witness stand was Wesley Welch, the neighbor who lived in an apartment above Fitzhenry, Clarke and another roommate. Welch called 911 on Oct. 17, 2010, after he heard a disturbance in the home below him, he testified. Welch said he went outside to stand on the staircase and listen to the fight, which he said seemed one-sided and culminated in a series of loud thumps with screams of exclamation in between them. Several Bend police officers testified they’d arrived on scene after Welch called in the disturbance, but because of a dispatch error, they never approached the Georgia Avenue home. Instead, they walked around the neighborhood for 15 minutes before leaving. Several minutes later, Welch testified, he entered the home to find Fitzhenry in a pool of blood, lying against a wall and snoring. Officers told jurors when they entered the home they found a smashed television in the front room before seeing Fitzhenry. While officers secured the scene and took photos, paramedics cared for Fitzhenry. With several police cars and an ambulance on scene, officers

For The Bulletin’s full list, including federal, state, county and city levels, visit www.bendbulletin.com/officials.

LEGISLATURE

CROOK COUNTY

Senate

300 N.E. Third St. Prineville, OR 97754 Phone: 541-447-6555 Fax: 541-416-3891

Sen. Ted Ferrioli, R-District 30 (includes Jefferson, portion of Deschutes) 900 Court St. N.E., S-323 Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-986-1950 Email: sen.tedferrioli@state.or.us Web: www.leg.state.or.us/ferrioli Sen. Chris Telfer, R-District 27 (includes portion of Deschutes) 900 Court St. N.E., S-423 Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-986-1727 Email: sen.christelfer@state.or.us Web: www.leg.state.or.us/telfer Sen. Doug Whitsett, R-District 28 (includes Crook, portion of Deschutes) 900 Court St. N.E., S-303 Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-986-1728 Email: sen.dougwhitsett@state.or.us Web: www.leg.state.or.us/whitsett House

Rep. Jason Conger, R-District 54 (portion of Deschutes) 900 Court St. N.E., H-477 Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-986-1454 Email: rep.jasonconger@state.or.us Web: www.leg.state.or.us/conger Rep. John Huffman, R-District 59 (portion of Jefferson) 900 Court St. N.E., H-476 Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-986-1459 Email: rep.johnhuffman@state.or.us Web: www.leg.state.or.us/huffman Rep. Mike McLane, R-District 55 (Crook, portion of Deschutes) 900 Court St. N.E., H-385 Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-986-1455 Email: rep.mikemclane@state.or.us Web: www.leg.state.or.us/mclane Rep. Gene Whisnant, R-District 53 (portion of Deschutes County) 900 Court St. N.E., H-471 Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-986-1453 Email: rep.genewhisnant@state.or.us Web: www.leg.state.or.us/whisnant

— Reporter: 541-617-7831, smiller@bendbulletin.com

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Email: administration@co.crook.or.us Web: co.crook.or.us Crook County Judge Mike McCabe Phone: 541-447-6555 Email: mike.mccabe@co.crook.or.us

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Well maintained home, close to the river trail. Wood floors, gas fireplaces, large master suite. Fenced yard, paver patio, wrap around decks. MLS#201203962 $325,000 DIRECTIONS: 3rd St to west on Empire Ave, left on O.B. Riley Rd, right on Archie Briggs, right on Riverstone Dr, left on Angler Ave. 63081 Angler Ave.

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541-382-4123 AWBREY BUTTE- 4 bedroom, 2.5 bath, 2213 sq.ft. home on large landscaped lot. Views of Pilot Butte, city lights & great southern exposure. MLS#201103293 $375,000 DIRECTIONS: NW Summit Dr to NW Farewell Dr to 1169 NW Redfield Circle.

DEBBIE JOHNSON, BROKER 541-480-1293

DESCHUTES COUNTY 1300 N.W. Wall St. Bend, OR 97701 Web: www.deschutes.org Phone: 541-388-6571 Fax: 541-382-1692 County Commission

and Welch testified, Clarke walked past the home. One police officer testified he found it strange that Clarke didn’t seem concerned about what might be going on in his home. “I asked him if he found it odd that there was this much action in front of his house,� Det. Jeff Frickey testified. “He said he figured it was none of his business. It was very confusing to me.� Initially, Welch told police he didn’t know who the voices belonged to. But in an interview days after the bludgeoning, he told a detective when he first heard the altercation he thought, “What’s (Clarke) so mad about?� During cross-examination, defense attorneys pressed Welch on why he hadn’t reported his theory to police earlier. Welch testified he’d been told not to tell police theories, only things he knew for sure. Defense attorneys also pushed Welch on the comings and goings of people in the house. Welch testified many people came and went and the door wasn’t always locked. Prosecutors will continue to present their case today.

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Overlooking the Deschutes River from the back & River’s Edge Golf Course from the front. 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath, 2612 sq. ft. Master suite sitting area opens to river view. MLS#201204300 $499,900 DIRECTIONS: 3rd St. to west on NW Mt. Washington, north on Golf View Dr. 3120 Golf View Dr

NATALIE VANDENBORN, BROKER 541-508-9581

OPEN SUNDAY 12-3

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Overlooking the Deschutes River from the back & River’s Edge Golf Course from the front. 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath, 2612 sq. ft. Master suite sitting area opens to river view.

NW CROSSING - Affordable housing with some restrictions including income limitations & land lease. 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 1301 sq. ft. Close to trails & shops. MLS#201204044 $170,000 DIRECTIONS: Newport Ave. to south on Mt. Washington Dr. 766 NW Mt. Washington Dr.

5 bedroom, 3 bath Pahlisch EuroCraftsman, private back yard. Big kitchen, large rooms. Near Pine Nursery Park, elementary school & Lava Ridges pool. MLS#201203625 $325,000 Directions: From Parkway, east on Empire Ave, north on Desert Sage. 7 homes down from the pool. 63144 Desert Sage.

Tammy Baney, R-Bend Phone: 541-388-6567 Email: Tammy_Baney@ co.deschutes.or.us Alan Unger, D-Redmond Phone: 541-388-6569 Email: Alan_Unger@co.deschutes. or.us Tony DeBone, R-La Pine Phone: 541-388-6568 Email: Tony_DeBone@ co.deschutes.or.us

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KARIN JOHNSON, BROKER 541-639-6140

DAVID GILMORE, BROKER 541-312-7271

SUE CONRAD, BROKER, CRS 541-480-6621


FRIDAY, JUNE 8, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

C3

O N Alleged fraud spurs state to more scrutiny of tax refunds

FLORAL PATTERNS

O  B 

State plans tax on prepaid phones

By Steven Dubois The Associated Press

PORTLAND— The electronic tax return of a Salem woman accused of swindling more than $2 million from the state was manually approved by reviewers, and the Oregon Department of Revenue said Thursday it will re-examine big refunds to ensure there were no additional blunders. Authorities allege 25year-old Krystle Reyes used Turbo Tax — the popular tax preparation computer program — to file a faked 2011 income tax return with the state in which she reported earnings of $3 million and claimed a refund of $2.1 million. Turbo Tax issued Reyes a Visa debit card with the full refund amount, and she used the card to spend more than $150,000 before her arrest. Derrick Gasperini, a Revenue Department spokesman, said the size of the refund claim triggered the return to be flagged for an inspection.Multiple people looked at the electronic document and erroneously approved the massive refund, he said, adding that the highest-level reviewer is ultimately responsible. “We do not have that many $2.1 million refund claims,” he said. “It absolutely should have been caught and was not.” Reyes was arrested Wednesday on charges of aggravated theft and computer crime. She has been released from the Marion County Jail and has a court date scheduled for July 5. She could not be located for comment and it is unknown if she has hired a lawyer. Because of the mistake in approving Reyes’ return, Gasperini said the Revenue Department, which processes $7 billion in tax returns each year, will review its internal controls to make sure a similar error does not happen again. Moreover, reviewers will take another look at all large-dollar refunds to determine if the state authorized other incorrect and expensive refunds. “We’re looking at the largest ones and working down the list to the smaller and smaller ones,” he said. “I’m not exactly sure where we are stopping.”

Don Ryan / The Associated Press

Nearly 20,000 flowers in the shape of a mandala created a horticultural presence Thursday in Pioneer Courthouse Square in downtown Portland. The flowers, whose pattern was inspired by Navajo Indians and Tibetan monks, will go on sale next Wednesday.

Take buyout or risk layoff? HP workers look at options By Bennett Hall Corvallis Gazette-Times

CORVALLIS — With another round of Hewlett-Packard job cuts looming over Corvallis, hundreds of the global tech titan’s local employees are once again asking themselves: Should I stay or should I go? In a bid to right the faltering company, new CEO Meg Whitman last month announced plans to slash 8 percent of HP’s worldwide workforce, a staggering 27,000 jobs, by 2014. Some of those cuts will doubtless come from layoffs, but first the corporation is offering what it calls enhanced early retirement, or EER, to qualifying employees. As with a similar program offered in 2007, eligibility is determined through a point system based on age and years of service. Workers need at least 65 points to qualify. According to local financial planners who work with Hewlett-Packard employees, the terms of the early retirement deal are much like previous buyout offers. Qualifying employees get two months’ base pay, plus a half-month’s salary for each year they’ve been with the company. The total payment, which goes into the employee’s retirement account, is capped at 14

months’ salary. Workers who opt for EER also have the option to stay on the company health plan for up to two years. But they have to make up their minds quickly. HP employees have until June 22 to decide whether to take the early retirement package or stay on and hope they don’t lose their jobs in the layoffs to follow. “For some it’s perfect timing, and others are nervous,” said Megan Schneider of Hurley Financial Group, a former HP engineer whose financial planning practice focuses on Hewlett-Packard employees. About 60 people looking for guidance on that decision attended a seminar hosted by Schneider on Tuesday in Corvallis. While it will be a tough call for some, Schneider described the enhanced early retirement offer as generous. “I don’t think they had to do that,” she said. “We all thought 2007 would have been the last EER offer.” There are limits to the deal, however. Eric Cheney of Security First Advisors, another ex-HP engineer, said the company has put a ceiling on the number of people who can take the package. Most of those who take early retirement will be gone by Aug.

1, Cheney said. But he added that the company also reserves the right to keep key employees on the job for up to a year. And after the retirements will come the layoffs. Hewlett-Packard typically is secretive about these matters, refusing to release job cut details or even current employment figures for individual HP sites. But based on his experience with past workforce reductions, Cheney predicts early retirement will make up the bulk of this one here in Corvallis — especially since the site has already shed thousands of jobs over the last 10 to 15 years.

SALEM — The Kitzhaber administration plans to charge a 75-centa-month tax on prepaid cellular phones, despite the objections of Verizon and T-Mobile and a possible court fight. People who use other cellphones, or land lines, already pay the tax. It raises $80 million a year to support 911 services. Emergency responders tried to persuade the Legislature to make the change last year, but the idea of a tax increase went nowhere. Now, the state tax department tells The Associated Press that legislative lawyers have determined the department already has the authority to levy the tax. It is not clear when the tax would take effect. But big cellphone carriers are crying foul. They fear that they won’t be able to collect from prepaid customers and will wind up paying the tax themselves.

Eugene pedestrian killed in hit-and-run EUGENE — Oregon State Police and Lane County sheriff’s deputies are looking for the hitand-run driver who struck and killed a man who was walking near Lane Community College. Police say the 18-yearold wa s wa l k i ng on the shoulder of a road

Wednesday night when he was struck from behind by a pickup truck that didn’t stop. The victim died early Thursday at Sacred Heart Medical Center at RiverBend. Police say he is a Eugenearea resident who may have been a part-time student at the college. Witnesses described the pickup as a dark-colored, possible late-1990s to early2 0 0 0 mo d e l C h e v r ol e t with an extended cab. It is believed that the truck body is raised or lifted about six inches.

Fewer blue ribbons expected at state fair SALEM — The Oregon State Fair is changing some of its competitions this year, and it probably means fewer blue ribbons will be awarded. Fair spokesman Chris Havel says that last year, hundreds of cooking, crafts, farm and garden categories had only one entrant. This year, similar categories with fewer than five contestants might be combined or entrants may be invited to show their work without competing. The Statesman Journal reports that well-known competitions with sponsors won’t be affected. The Oregon State Fair runs Aug. 24 to Sept. 3 at the fairgrounds in Salem. — From wire reports

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C4

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JUNE 8, 2012

E Health reform must deliver on promised savings

T

The Bulletin

AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER

B  M C G B  J C  R  C

Chairwoman Publisher Editor-in-Chief Editor of Editorials

he state announced one of the new features of Oregon’s reform of Medicaid recently: Providers that aren’t participating will get paid less.

How convenient. Create a reform. Promise savings, and then have the “savings� come from just paying less to providers that aren’t joining in. This issue began with the 201113 budget. The budget developed by Gov. John Kitzhaber and the Legislature had embedded in it risks and assumptions — as any budget does. One key assumption was $239 million in general fund savings from the Medicaid reforms. It was a squishy assumption. When the budget was passed, we couldn’t find a legislator who believed those savings would be real. Kitzhaber hoped to cover the gap with federal money. On June 1, Judy Mohr Peterson, the state Medicaid director, issued a memo outlining how the state will cover the $239 million. There aren’t any real savings. Kitzhaber did get an agreement that still must be finalized for some federal money. It may cover $230 million of the shortfall. That leaves the state with at least $9 million to cover. Peterson wrote there will be $2 million in cuts in administration of the Oregon Health Authority. Dr. Bruce Goldberg, director of the OHA, said no decisions have been

made yet about how those cuts will be made. Another $2.5 million will come by paying less to Medicaid providers who are not part of the reform. It will be about 2 percent less for fee-for-service providers and 1 percent for others. Maybe that’s just another incentive for providers to join the reform, but it could also be seen as the state of Oregon trying to force them to join. Goldberg said it was done that way because the federal government is interested in changing how health care is delivered — not in propping up the old system. So the decision was made to cut payments to providers who aren’t participating in the reform. The plan is to ask the Legislature for the remaining $4.5 million in the 2013 session. Oregon’s health care transformation for Medicaid is full of promises — better care, healthier Oregonians and control of costs. We hope it will deliver all those things. These are still early days of the reform. The groups of providers that will trying to deliver on the promises haven’t even been approved by the state yet. But the reform must do better than relying on federal handouts and just paying less for the same care.

Washington liquor woes shouldn’t daunt Oregon

A

necdotally, at least, the state of Washington’s move to private liquor sales has not lived up to expectations. Prices are higher than many expected, and the state’s new marketing requirements are confusing, to say the least. Yet those interested in getting the state of Oregon out of the booze business need not be discouraged by what they’ve seen so far. Realistically, there was bound to be confusion when Washington’s new private sales law went into effect, and that has been borne out by early reports on the switch, which became effective June 2. Washingtonians have told reporters all over the state that they’ve been shocked by the higher prices they’ve paid at their local supermarkets for alcohol they used to purchase from state-owned stores. They apparently failed to recognize just how much a pair of new taxes would drive up the cost of that evening martini. Yet a 27 percent tax increase, 10 percent for distribution and an additional 17 percent retail spirits tax, could have done little else.

To add insult to pocketbook injury, state law does not allow for the taxes to be included on the price tag for a bottle, and stores like Costco have resorted to putting displays up above their booze laying out all the costs that will be added at the checkout register. Those taxes — called fees, in the way governments phrase such things these days — should have come as no surprise. They were, after all, included in the ballot measure ending state liquor sales. Over the next six years, they’re projected to pump $42 million in additional revenues to the state and another $38 million into local communities. Oregonians who want to get the state’s liquor control commission out of the sales business need not be put off by what they’ve seen in Washington, however. There’s no reason to assume that privatization must be accompanied by a whopping tax increase, after all. We’d hope those supporting a change in Oregon would not view it as a get-rich-quick scheme for state and local governments. It needn’t be that way, and it shouldn’t.

My Nickel’s Worth Citing the Bible We are responding to an In My View letter, “What would Jesus think about gay marriage?� by Allan Smyth, published May 30. He writes, “It is interesting to read what the Bible actually says about the topic.� It is also interesting to note that he gives several Old Testament Scriptures regarding many pages of rules for ritual holiness, worship and daily conduct. He also has several New Testament Scriptures, but only one addresses the title of his topic. In the New Testament, there are scriptures that address this topic: 1 Corinthians 7:2-3 and 1 Thessalonians 4:3-5. Matthew 19:4-6 reads, “ ‘Haven’t you read,’ he replied, ‘that at the beginning, the Creator made them male and female and said, for this reason a man will leave his father and mother and be united to his wife, and the two will become one flesh. So they are no longer two, but one. Therefore what God has joined together, let man not separate.’ � (NIV version.) We believe that the Holy Bible (God’s word) condones and sanctifies marriage only between a man and a woman. Elsie Burris and Linda Hill Prineville

Rest of the story On Sunday, I read with interest the Associated Press story on the front page regarding the Vietnam “napalm girl� turning 40. Truly an amazing story: her terrible physical suffering, the Communist gov-

ernment’s prevention of her going to school and propagandizing her story, relief from that government while she studied in Cuba and met her husband, her defection to Canada after their honeymoon, the book and documentary about her life, and her international efforts to help victims of war. However, what grabbed my attention was this: “One day (age 19) while visiting a library, (Kim) Phuc, found a Bible. For the first time, she started believing her life had a plan.â€? But there are more details than the AP article gave. Here are Kim’s own words from an interview in Faith Today: “My life was like a cup of coffee: very dark, with hatred, anger, bitterness, sorrow ‌â€? Of finding the Bible, she says, “I couldn’t stop reading it.â€? Her curiosity drove her to church, where “I heard the Gospel explained to me for the first time. The love of God changed my life. I knew that Jesus died on the cross and paid for my sins. So I asked God, ‘Do you forgive me?’ â€? She asked God, “How can I clean everything in my heart if it’s full of coffee?â€? The answer, she explains, was in letting her cup be poured out every day “until it became empty and God spilled his love into my cup.â€? And that’s the rest of the story. Sheree Cade Bend

Standards for political cartoons John Costa’s Sunday editorial regarding The Bulletin’s letter policy brings up many challenging ques-

tions. Particularly with political subjects, a policy of culling letters based on facts and coherence is long overdue. I would also suggest the paper consider similar standards for political cartoons. Saturday’s, depicting a military officer chastising the president over his biofuel program for the Defense Department, is a prime example. The cartoon suggests President Barack Obama’s plan is unwanted and a waste. In fact, the opposite is true. The military has long been working on conversion to non-fossil fuels because it has recognized the risks of a petroleum product supply chain. If it relies on fossil fuels, they are a threat to our strategic influence and the military’s own operational effectiveness. This is why it is working hard to develop alternate sources to fuel ships, planes and tanks. If history is any guide, successes from this will filter down to everyday civilian uses. Unfortunately, the Republican Party is against this project. It has legislated the Defense Department into only using fossil fuels — something the military has consistently said it doesn’t want. Curious that the party that always claims to support the troops is actually micromanaging the military, thus doing the opposite. A good cartoon takes a point and presents it in a particularly clever or funny way. But when it takes a position and suggests support for that point by reversing the facts, then The Bulletin’s readers don’t deserve it taking up space on the editorial page. Jim Roberts Bend

Letters policy

In My View policy

How to submit

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 550 and 650 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or email them to The Bulletin. Write: My Nickel’s Worth / In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 Fax: 541-385-5804 Email: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

‘Dreamhouse’ project shows Bend High at its best I

think I first heard Robert Tadjiki talk about his “Dreamhouse� sometime between September 2003 and June 2005, when my youngest daughter was a student in his life skills class at Bend High. And a dream it was, one that’s taken nearly 10 years to fulfill. Tadjiki is like that, a dreamer. He’s also dogged, or has been in this case, when he’s trying to accomplish something he truly believes in. Add adjectives like “fervent� and “persuasive� and you begin to get a sense of what it took to bring this beautiful building, complete with tables, sprinkling system and all the amenities a small commercial greenhouse needs, to life. Monday was dedication day for the Dreamhouse. Tadjiki was there, of course, as were his students and life skills students from the High Desert

Middle School, along with parents, teachers, supporters and others. While the speechifying at such events tends to make me sleepy, the things said Monday crystallized for me what’s so important about the changes in special education over the last 40 years and what makes Bend High such a special place. At one point in the ceremony, Tadjiki began talking about the “old� special education. Back in 1972, he pointed out, special ed kids “attended� Bend High in a modular building completely separate from the rest of the student body. They were marched, en masse, into the school cafeteria for lunch, holding a rope “like preschoolers,� Tadjiki said, his voice rising in outrage. Fast-forward to Monday, when H.D. Weddel, Bend High’s principal,

JANET ST E V E N S

told his audience that the way life skills students are treated today “creates the culture of the school.� I’m in no position to know if that is true, but I do know that the way they’re treated certainly reflects the culture of Bend High. I don’t doubt it has its divisions, its jocks and geeks and all the rest. I do know, however, that it’s a particularly tolerant place where students and faculty tend to embrace differences rather than ridicule them. Tadjiki, with his ability to sway others to his way of seeing the world, has helped create that culture. He works hard to assure that “normal� kids and

life skills students get together on a regular basis for a whole variety of reasons, a mixing-up that lowers barriers and gives students on both sides of the equation something valuable that they likely would miss otherwise. Just as Tadjiki has pulled the larger Bend High population into his vision for his students, he’s worked to draw the larger community in, as well. Thus his students have long had internships at Eastside Gardens on Bend’s Northeast 27th Street. And thus the plants grown in the new Dreamhouse will find their way there, as well as to Lowe’s and into the food at the downtown restaurant 900 Wall, among others. Lowe’s, in fact, has helped in other ways, most notably with a $53,000 grant that went to help pay for the building. So why a greenhouse? It’s all about

horticulture therapy, a practice that traces its roots back to the 19th century and Dr. Benjamin Rush, he of Lewis & Clark and “Rush’s thunderbolts� fame. The thunderbolts, by the way, were what one website describes as “powerful laxatives� that made their way west with the explorers. Horticulture therapy is a far more benign practice that improves skills, provides training and soothes, among its other benefits. Tadjiki first encountered horticulture therapy when he was teaching in Chicago, and he’s worked to bring it to Bend ever since. It’s been a long haul, but worth the effort. His students will benefit, of course, but so will others at Bend High, and so will the community at large. — Janet Stevens is deputy editor of The Bulletin.


FRIDAY, JUNE 8, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

O

WEST NEWS

D N  Arrene F. Powell, Formerly of Central Oregon Jan. 15, 1924 - June 4, 2012 Arrangements: Deschutes Memorial Chapel, (541)382-5592;

www.deschutesmemorialchapel.com

Services: A funeral service will be held at 4:30 pm, Sat. 6-9-2012 at NiswongerReynolds Funeral Chapel in Bend, Oregon. Interment will take place at Pilot Butte Cemetery at 1:00 pm on Monday 6-11-2012.

Darrell A. Meyer, of Boring, OR Mar. 9, 1950 - Dec. 27, 2011 Services: Memorial service held at: Bend Harley Davidson Dealership, 63028 Sherman Rd., Bend, OR, June 16, 2012, 11a.m. RSVP Cam 703.943.7982.

Leona M. Gridley, of Redmond Mar. 31, 1937 - June 3, 2012 Arrangements: Autumn FuneralsRedmond (541-504-9485) www.autumnfunerals.net Services: Memorial Service: 10am Sat. June 9, Autumn Funerals, 485 NW Larch Ave., Redmond; followed by a graveside service. Contributions may be made to:

Your local Humane Society.

Russell Ward Johnson, of Bend July 8, 1946 - June 4, 2012 Arrangements: Deschutes Memorial Chapel, (541)382-5592;

www.deschutesmemorialchapel.com

Services: No Services will be held at this time. Contributions may be made to:

Partners In Care Hospice, 2075 NE Wyatt Ct. Bend, OR 97701.

Nora Rosalie Copeland, of Redmond Jan. 12, 1923 - June 5, 2012 Arrangements: Redmond Memorial Chapel, 541-548-3219 Services: Memorial Service to be held Monday June 11, 2012 at 1:30 PM at Redmond Memorial Chapel, 717 SW 6th Street, Redmond, Oregon. Contributions may be made to:

Boys and Girls Club of Redmond, 1379 SW 15 St., Redmond, OR 97756.

Ronald Pankratz, of Bend Oct. 18, 1925 - June 5, 2012 Arrangements: Deschutes Memorial Chapel, (541)382-5592;

www.deschutesmemorialchapel.com

Services: 11:00 AM, Saturday, June 9, 2012 at First Presbyterian Church, 230 NE Ninth St., Bend. Contributions may be made to:

Partners In Care Hospice, 2075 NE Wyatt Ct. Bend, OR 97701.

Obituary policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, email or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825.

Deadlines: Death Notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details.

Phone: 541-617-7825 Email: obits@bendbulletin.com Fax: 541-322-7254

Mail: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708

FEATURED OBITUARY

Eugene Ferkauf, 91, was pioneer of discount retail By Douglas Martin New York Times News Service

Eugene Ferkauf, the founder of the E.J. Korvette chain of discount department stores, whose 1950s strategy of low prices, quick turnover and high volume helped shape today’s retail landscape, died Tuesday at his home in New York City. He was 91. His family announced the death. Ferkauf was one of the first businessmen to grasp the emergence of a new breed of postwar consumer. Seeing a population of Americans financially better off, impatient to get on with their lives after World War II and susceptible to the advertising shown on the latest new thing, their television sets, he concluded that victory belonged to the very bold. Ferkauf would not only discount, he would discount more deeply than anyone ever had. Seeing people streaming to

the suburbs, he imagined the sort of sprawling, free-standing, conveniently situated, nofrills variety store that came to define U.S. retailing. After he built it, Sam Walton came to New York to pick his brain; two years later, Walton founded Wal-Mart. By the mid1960s, the Korvette chain had dozens of stores, including one on Fifth Avenue in Manhattan, and scores of imitators had followed Ferkauf’s model. A Time magazine cover story in 1962 quoted Malcolm McNair, a retailing professor at Harvard Business School, as rating Ferkauf among the six greatest merchants in U.S. history, along with the likes of Frank W. Woolworth and J.C. Penney. Ferkauf, however, declined to put his name on the store, giving rise to a false but widely held bit of lore that the name was a clever amalgam of ethnic, numeric and historical references.

D E 

 Deaths of note from around the world: Bob Welch, 65: Former member of Fleetwood Mac who later had a solo career; he was the band’s guitarist from 1971 to 1974. Solo hits included “Sentimental Lady� in 1977 and “Ebony Eyes� in 1978. Died Thursday in Nashville of apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound.

Philip Tobias, 86: Worldrenowned anthropologist who did pioneering research on the evolutionary links between primates and humans. Studied and taught at University of the Witwatersrand in South Africa, and was also an outspoken opponent of apartheid. Died Thursday in Johannesburg after a long illness. — From wire reports

John Walker / Fresno Bee/MCT

Under the peeling paint of the roof, Joe Roman, streets supervisor for the city of Chowchilla, Calif., explores the landmark Mammoth Orange drive-in stand, which is on blocks in storage in the city’s corporation yard.

Mammoth Orange food stand again a hot commodity By Diana Marcum Los Angeles Times

CHOWCHILLA, Calif. — This city is in a pickle over a giant orange. The onetime attraction sits rotting in the city storage yard, the end of the road for the last of the Central Valley’s fruit-themed food stands that once dotted state Highway 99 from Bakersfield to Tracy. There’s still a key in its cash register and a soda fountain that might work. But spiderwebs drape the ice bin, bird droppings paint the floor and the orange dimple paint is peeling. So city worker Joe Roman is perplexed about a sudden, impassioned competition to buy and salvage the ersatz fruit. “It was just sitting here year after year,� said the streets supervisor. “People would ask ‘Hey, why do you guys have an orange?’� Now the City Council will decide this month among hotly contested bids and competing visions of how to honor history and a type of architecture that gave the world doughnut-shaped doughnut shops, elephant-inspired carwashes and hot dog stands in buns. A relic of the post-World War II era, the Mammoth Orange stand marks a time when people breezed through sprawling groves with backdrops of blue skies in cars with no air conditioning. Back then, Highway 99 was the Main Street of California, cutting a path from Calexico to Canada, before the interstate highway system muscled it and its roadside architecture aside. The orange’s new moment in the sun began with Kathy Parrish. She’s 70 years old, farms 70 acres of almonds, largely by herself, and runs a fruit stand on Avenue 9 in nearby Madera. Parrish grew up in Chowchilla. Her daughter worked

at Mammoth Orange during summers in the ’70s, when it was located six miles south in Fairmead. The orange had originally been on a two-lane road in Chowchilla but was moved to the side of Highway 99 in 1954. Its final owners were Doris and Jim Stiggins, of Chowchilla, who bought the stand in 1981 and operated it until a controversial $40 million Caltrans project put the Stigginses out of business in 2007. In 2008, Chowchilla’s redevelopment agency bought the 10-foot orange, planning to restore it to mint condition and move it near the original site as part of a museum. But no museum ever opened, Parrish knew, so where was the orange? She put the question to a Stiggins relative who was visiting her fruit stand. “He told me, ‘That orange is rotting under a flapping tarp at the city yard,’� she said. Parrish decided she should restore the shell and set up an orange juice stand next to her antique windmill and cottonhauling trailer planted with petunias. She brought her idea before the City Council, which seemed eager to get the orange off its hands. That’s when Dale Thomas, vice president of the Chowchilla District Historical Society, cried foul. “They were selling a registered California historical landmark without proper notice or bidding. We were really upset when we found out,� he said. Thomas went to the people he felt had the biggest claim to the orange — the residents of Fairmead. Chowchilla is now auctioning the orange as a surplus item. The historical society hopes to win the bid, then lease the orange to the Friends of Fairmead for $1 a year, once the group finds a spot for it and money to move it.

Leona M. Gridley March 31, 1937 – June 3, 2012 Leona M. Gridley, long-time resident of Redmond, passed away peacefully in her home on June 3, 2012. Leona was born to Delmar and Eleanora Pepperling on March 31, 1937. She grew up in Sisters, Oregon, and graduated from Sisters High School where she met the love of her life and future husband, David Gridley. She was Sisters’ May Day Queen, and participated in cheerleading, majorettes, choir, theater and dance. Leona and David were married on December 18, 1954. They raised their four children in Madras, moving them to Redmond in 1972. Leona was an avid sports fan, following all of her children and grandchildren in football, baseball, cheerleading, gymnastics and basketball. She enjoyed participating in bowling leagues with David. Leona also had a special place in her heart for her cats, Miss and Sophie. Family members describe Leona as the “thread that tied the family together,� as her warm spirit and home always brought relatives and friends together from far and wide. She was affectionately known as ‘Mother Tums’ to all. She will be greatly missed by family, friends and the Redmond community. Leona was preceded in death by her husband, as well as both of her parents, and brother, Gary. She is survived by her four children: Mickey Gridley of Seattle, WA, wife, Michelle and children, Madison and Mac; Victoria Grensky of Jacksonville, Oregon, husband, Ron, children, Lexi, Jillian and Christian; Bob Gridley of The Dalles, Oregon, wife, Jan and son, Bo; and Steven Gridley of Tasmania, Australia, wife, Jacqui and children, Sarah Kate and Jason, as well as great-granddaughter, Emma Grace. She is also survived by her sisters, Chris Dickens, Crystal Burton and Lydia Pepperling; and brother, Bruce Pepperling. A celebration of life will be held on Saturday, June 9, at 10:00 am, at Autumn Funerals, 485 NW Larch Avenue, Redmond with a graveside service to follow. Memorial contributions may be made to your local Humane Society.

C5


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JUNE 8, 2012

C6

W E AT H ER FOR EC A ST Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LP ©2012.

TODAY, JUNE 8 Today: Partly to mostly cloudy, evening showers developing, breezy.

HIGH Ben Burkel

58

Bob Shaw

SATURDAY Tonight: Mainly cloudy, scattered rain or snow showers, chilly.

LOW

35

58 32

FORECAST: STATE WEST Mostly cloudy with scattered rain showers.

Astoria 59/47

Seaside

54/49

Cannon Beach 54/49

Hillsboro Portland 58/50 58/44

Tillamook 60/43

Salem

56/43

Newport

57/32

60/41

Coos Bay

56/30

Oakridge

Crescent

57/46

Chemult

60/46

Gold Beach

Silver Lake

55/27

55/48

Nyssa 67/38

61/31

64/34

Frenchglen

60s

66/37

Rome

• 77°

72/36

Ontario

70s

56/31

60/41

Yesterday’s state extremes

Jordan Valley

62/35

Klamath Falls 59/34

71/44

Juntura

Burns

61/32

Chiloquin

Medford Ashland

56/46

72/45

Vale 72/45

Paisley 66/46

Brookings

57/36

63/38

59/33

59/33

Grants Pass 66/45

Unity

Christmas Valley

Port Orford 55/47

John Day

Riley

Fort Rock 58/31

55/28

50/23

Roseburg

EAST Chance of showers, mainly over Ontario the higher terrain.

59/36

Hampton 55/30

CENTRAL Partly to mostly cloudy with a few showers.

Baker City

Brothers 57/29

La Pine 56/29

Crescent Lake

56/45

Bandon

Spray 65/38

58/35

61/39

54/33

Prineville 57/34 50s Sisters Redmond Paulina 53/30 58/32 60/33 Sunriver Bend

Cottage Grove

58/39

Union

Granite

55/30

58/46

63/41

Joseph

Mitchell 59/35

60/36

Camp Sherman

Enterprise

Meacham 62/40

58/38

Madras

55/34

La Grande

Condon 61/37

Wallowa

54/33

60/42

Willowdale

61/38

Eugene

59/48

65/42

Ruggs

65/43

Warm Springs

55/47

Florence

Pendleton

68/45

Wasco

Maupin

Albany 61/46

Hermiston 69/45

Arlington

64/39

40s

Corvallis Yachats

64/46

Sandy

59/47

62/45

55/50

59/44

Government Camp 43/33

58/46

70/45

The Biggs Dalles 67/46

59/46

McMinnville

Lincoln City

Umatilla

Hood River

• 28°

Fields

Lakeview

McDermitt

68/37

61/35

Lakeview

72/35

-30s

-20s

Yesterday’s extremes (in the 48 contiguous states):

-10s

0s

Vancouver 58/47 Seattle 58/50

10s

Calgary 63/43

20s

TUESDAY

HIGH LOW

30s

Saskatoon 79/61

40s

Winnipeg 79/58

50s

60s

Thunder Bay 75/48

70s

80s

90s

100s 110s

Quebec 72/56

Bismarck 80/63

FRONTS

HIGH LOW

66 40

HIGH LOW

75 47

76 48

BEND ALMANAC

PLANET WATCH

TEMPERATURE

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . .6:17 a.m. . . . . 10:06 p.m. Venus . . . . . .5:07 a.m. . . . . . 8:11 p.m. Mars. . . . . .12:46 p.m. . . . . . 1:35 a.m. Jupiter. . . . . .4:19 a.m. . . . . . 7:03 p.m. Saturn. . . . . .3:41 p.m. . . . . . 3:00 a.m. Uranus . . . . .2:10 a.m. . . . . . 2:35 p.m.

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend 24 hours ending 4 p.m.*. . 0.00” High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61/41 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . 0.06” Record high . . . . . . . . 90 in 1931 Average month to date. . . 0.22” Record low. . . . . . . . . 26 in 1974 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.13” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 Average year to date. . . . . 5.24” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.29.91 Record 24 hours . . .0.31 in 1964 *Melted liquid equivalent

Sunrise today . . . . . . 5:22 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 8:47 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 5:22 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 8:47 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . . . . .none Moonset today . . . 10:15 a.m.

Moon phases Last

New

First

Full

June 11 June 19 June 26

OREGON CITIES

July 3

FIRE INDEX

Yesterday Friday Saturday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Precipitation values are 24-hour totals through 4 p.m.

Bend, west of Hwy. 97.....Low Bend, east of Hwy. 97......Low Redmond/Madras ........Low

Astoria . . . . . . . .58/51/0.84 Baker City . . . . . 63/32/trace Brookings . . . . . .57/48/0.31 Burns. . . . . . . . . .59/29/0.07 Eugene . . . . . . . .63/51/0.29 Klamath Falls . . .62/37/0.03 Lakeview. . . . . . .61/28/0.00 La Pine . . . . . . . .59/36/0.00 Medford . . . . . . .69/51/0.09 Newport . . . . . . .59/50/0.47 North Bend . . . . .59/54/0.29 Ontario . . . . . . . .77/38/0.00 Pendleton . . . . . .63/40/0.13 Portland . . . . . . .65/52/0.47 Prineville . . . . . . .61/40/0.00 Redmond. . . . . . 66/39/trace Roseburg. . . . . . .65/51/0.22 Salem . . . . . . . . .63/52/0.42 Sisters . . . . . . . . .67/41/0.00 The Dalles . . . . . .63/48/0.13

Mod. = Moderate; Ext. = Extreme

. . . .59/47/sh . . . . .62/50/sh . . . .59/36/sh . . . . .55/37/sh . . . .56/46/sh . . . . .63/48/pc . . . .63/33/sh . . . . .58/33/sh . . . .58/46/sh . . . . .61/46/sh . . . .59/34/pc . . . . .57/36/pc . . . .61/35/pc . . . . .58/34/pc . . . .56/29/sh . . . . .54/32/pc . . . .66/46/pc . . . . . .67/46/c . . . .55/50/sh . . . . .57/50/sh . . . .57/46/sh . . . . .58/48/sh . . . .72/45/pc . . . . .65/46/pc . . . . .65/42/c . . . . .63/44/sh . . . .58/50/sh . . . . .61/51/sh . . . .57/34/pc . . . . .58/35/pc . . . .62/35/pc . . . . .58/35/pc . . . .60/46/sh . . . . .63/47/sh . . . .59/47/sh . . . . .62/47/sh . . . .58/32/sh . . . . . .53/35/c . . . . .64/46/c . . . . .62/48/sh

Yesterday Friday Saturday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . . .79/63/1.41 . .88/69/pc . 92/74/pc Akron . . . . . . . . . .79/52/0.00 . .79/55/pc . 82/64/pc Albany. . . . . . . . . .73/46/0.00 . . . 77/54/t . . .72/47/t Albuquerque. . . . .92/63/0.00 . . . 95/59/s . . 96/60/s Anchorage . . . . . .57/45/0.00 . . . 62/49/r . 61/46/pc Atlanta . . . . . . . . .84/64/0.00 . . . 87/64/s . 87/67/pc Atlantic City . . . . .79/56/0.52 . .85/62/pc . 88/66/pc Austin . . . . . . . . . .90/73/0.00 . . . 90/70/t . 93/71/pc Baltimore . . . . . . .80/56/0.04 . .85/66/pc . . 89/71/s Billings . . . . . . . . .76/47/0.00 . . . 87/54/t . 68/49/sh Birmingham . . . . .86/62/0.00 . .88/68/pc . 89/68/pc Bismarck. . . . . . . .84/58/0.00 . . . 80/63/s . . .88/61/t Boise . . . . . . . . . . .80/48/0.00 . .70/41/pc . 59/40/sh Boston. . . . . . . . . .65/54/0.04 . . . 75/60/t . . .77/54/t Bridgeport, CT. . . .73/58/0.10 . .82/61/pc . . .80/59/t Buffalo . . . . . . . . .72/52/0.00 . . . 76/60/t . . .77/63/t Burlington, VT. . . .76/54/0.00 . . . 75/53/t . 71/45/pc Caribou, ME . . . . .70/46/0.00 . . . 71/52/t . 65/46/sh Charleston, SC . . .82/61/0.00 . .85/66/pc . . 88/67/s Charlotte. . . . . . . .81/58/0.00 . . . 85/63/s . . 89/65/s Chattanooga. . . . .85/58/0.00 . . . 86/60/s . 87/66/pc Cheyenne . . . . . . .74/48/0.00 . .87/52/pc . 90/51/pc Chicago. . . . . . . . .82/54/0.00 . .85/69/pc . . 90/70/s Cincinnati . . . . . . .82/49/0.00 . . . 84/56/s . . 86/63/s Cleveland . . . . . . .78/55/0.00 . .76/60/pc . 79/65/pc Colorado Springs .85/56/0.01 . . . 85/53/s . . 88/53/s Columbia, MO . . .82/57/0.00 . . . 86/61/s . . 90/67/s Columbia, SC . . . .83/60/0.00 . . . 88/65/s . . 89/65/s Columbus, GA. . . .86/68/0.00 . .88/67/pc . . .89/69/t Columbus, OH. . . .82/52/0.00 . . . 83/59/s . . 85/64/s Concord, NH. . . . .70/48/0.01 . . . 77/53/t . . .73/49/t Corpus Christi. . . .95/73/0.00 . . . 91/74/t . 91/76/pc Dallas Ft Worth. . .76/67/0.11 . . . 92/75/t . 95/77/pc Dayton . . . . . . . . .81/52/0.00 . . . 82/58/s . . 86/64/s Denver. . . . . . . . . .86/55/0.11 . .91/59/pc . . 93/58/s Des Moines. . . . . .81/60/0.00 . .88/66/pc . . 90/69/s Detroit. . . . . . . . . .83/55/0.00 . .84/66/pc . 87/69/pc Duluth. . . . . . . . . .79/51/0.00 . . . 79/58/t . 75/64/pc El Paso. . . . . . . . .101/65/0.00 . .103/78/s . 104/79/s Fairbanks. . . . . . . .76/50/0.00 . .82/57/pc . 80/56/pc Fargo. . . . . . . . . . .93/71/0.00 . .86/64/pc . 93/71/pc Flagstaff . . . . . . . .79/34/0.00 . . . 81/43/s . . 77/41/s

Activists stage rally against hate crimes in Springfield

PRECIPITATION

WATER REPORT Sisters ...............................Low La Pine...............................Low Prineville..........................Low

The following was compiled by the Central Oregon watermaster and irrigation districts as a service to irrigators and sportsmen.

Reservoir Acre feet Capacity Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . . 50,169 . . . . . . 55,000 Wickiup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 192,242 . . . . . 200,000 Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . 80,306 . . . . . . 91,700 Ochoco Reservoir . . . . . . . . 40,162 . . . . . . 47,000 Prineville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140,781 . . . . . 153,777 The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is River flow Station Cubic ft./sec Deschutes RiverBelow Crane Prairie . . . . . . . 446 for solar at noon. Deschutes RiverBelow Wickiup . . . . . . . . . . . 753 Crescent CreekBelow Crescent Lake . . . . . . . 212 LOW MEDIUM HIGH V.HIGH Little DeschutesNear La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . 296 0 2 4 6 8 10 Deschutes RiverBelow Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . 234 Deschutes RiverAt Benham Falls . . . . . . . . . 1,646 Crooked RiverAbove Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . 72 Crooked RiverBelow Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . 226 Updated daily. Source: pollen.com Ochoco CreekBelow Ochoco Res. . . . . . . . . . 11.0 Crooked RiverNear Terrebonne . . . . . . . . . . . 296 Contact: Watermaster, 388-6669 LOW MEDIUM HIGH or go to www.wrd.state.or.us

To report a wildfire, call 911

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX 4

POLLEN COUNT

tempted intimidation, hinderAll four were charged with ing prosecution and evidence intimidation. Prosecutors tampering. made Booster’s charge a felPolice said they interviewed ony. The other three are to be him while trying to track prosecuted in juvenile court down the other suspects and on misdemeanor charges. told him to keep quiet. Instead, Harrison said investigapolice said, he told 22-year- tors are still trying to idenold Eugene resident Matthew tify the people responsible for Booster to flee spray-painting and then deleted swastikas and a series of text “We outnumber racist messages messages that the others, and throughout a he and Booster neighborhood in will work together which one of the had exchanged. Prosecutors to eliminate hate.” suspects resides. later decided The graffiti was — Sheri Moore, not to press reported SunSpringfield the charges as day and Moncity councilor long as Ricker day at several cooperates as a locations. witness in the After the rally, case, said Police Capt. Rich participants asked downtown Harrison. business owners to post “Hate Police said Booster was Free Zone” leaflets. driving a yellow pickup truck Marion Malcolm, who flying a Confederate flag on coordinates a Community Memorial Day in downtown Alliance of Lane County Springfield. Booster and three program called Springfield teens inside yelled racial slurs Alliance for Equality and and got out of the truck to Respect, commended police chase the 15-year-old, who and city officials for their had been walking and escaped response. by hiding in bushes until his “They have stayed on the mother arrived, police said. case,” Malcolm said.

Yesterday Friday Saturday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . . .82/52/0.00 . .81/63/pc . 85/67/pc Green Bay. . . . . . .84/51/0.00 . . . 81/65/t . 87/67/pc Greensboro. . . . . .79/55/0.00 . . . 83/58/s . . 85/63/s Harrisburg. . . . . . .80/56/0.10 . .83/60/pc . 84/65/pc Hartford, CT . . . . .76/53/0.00 . . . 80/58/t . . .79/53/t Helena. . . . . . . . . .72/34/0.00 . . . 70/44/t . 57/39/sh Honolulu. . . . . . . .86/74/0.00 . . . 87/72/s . . 86/73/s Houston . . . . . . . .94/72/0.04 . . . 89/72/t . . .91/74/t Huntsville . . . . . . .87/58/0.00 . . . 87/65/s . 87/67/pc Indianapolis . . . . .83/53/0.00 . . . 85/62/s . . 89/68/s Jackson, MS . . . . .88/66/0.00 . . . 90/69/t . . .88/71/t Jacksonville. . . . . .84/72/0.27 . . . 85/71/t . . .87/71/t Juneau. . . . . . . . . .52/48/0.06 . .55/44/sh . 59/43/pc Kansas City. . . . . .83/61/0.00 . .86/65/pc . 89/71/pc Lansing . . . . . . . . .80/51/0.00 . .81/63/pc . 85/67/pc Las Vegas . . . . . . .95/69/0.00 . .100/77/s . . 97/72/s Lexington . . . . . . .80/49/0.00 . . . 81/57/s . . 85/65/s Lincoln. . . . . . . . . .87/62/0.00 . .89/67/pc . 93/71/pc Little Rock. . . . . . .84/60/0.00 . .88/66/pc . 90/70/pc Los Angeles. . . . . .74/60/0.00 . .69/60/pc . 67/59/pc Louisville. . . . . . . .82/57/0.00 . . . 85/63/s . . 88/67/s Madison, WI . . . . .82/48/0.00 . .84/63/pc . . 89/65/s Memphis. . . . . . . .84/65/0.00 . . . 89/69/s . 89/72/pc Miami . . . . . . . . . .93/81/0.00 . . . 89/76/t . . .88/76/t Milwaukee . . . . . .79/52/0.00 . .77/63/pc . . 85/67/s Minneapolis . . . . .82/65/0.00 . . . 87/68/t . . 91/71/s Nashville. . . . . . . .82/56/0.00 . . . 87/61/s . 89/68/pc New Orleans. . . . .88/75/0.00 . . . 88/74/t . . .87/74/t New York . . . . . . .78/58/0.01 . .84/65/pc . . .85/63/t Newark, NJ . . . . . .80/59/0.00 . .85/63/pc . . .85/65/t Norfolk, VA . . . . . .78/55/0.00 . . . 85/62/s . . 90/69/s Oklahoma City . . .77/65/0.05 . .86/66/pc . 87/70/pc Omaha . . . . . . . . .87/65/0.00 . . . 89/68/s . 92/73/pc Orlando. . . . . . . . .86/71/0.91 . . . 89/73/t . . .91/74/t Palm Springs. . . .103/71/0.00 . .101/69/s . . 96/68/s Peoria . . . . . . . . . .82/52/0.00 . . . 85/62/s . . 88/68/s Philadelphia . . . . .80/58/0.00 . .85/61/pc . 87/67/pc Phoenix. . . . . . . .103/76/0.00 . .106/75/s . 101/74/s Pittsburgh . . . . . . .77/50/0.00 . .82/56/pc . 86/62/pc Portland, ME. . . . .59/47/0.00 . . . 70/52/t . 69/48/pc Providence . . . . . .70/51/0.13 . . . 80/58/t . . .78/55/t Raleigh . . . . . . . . .81/54/0.00 . . . 85/59/s . . 90/65/s

Yesterday Friday Saturday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . . .79/53/0.40 . . . 83/63/s . 87/55/pc Reno . . . . . . . . . . .82/46/0.00 . . . 78/45/s . . 67/43/s Richmond . . . . . . .81/54/0.00 . . . 85/61/s . . 90/65/s Rochester, NY . . . .77/52/0.04 . . . 78/60/t . . .76/61/t Sacramento. . . . . .85/54/0.00 . . . 83/55/s . . 85/57/s St. Louis. . . . . . . . .83/59/0.00 . . . 88/62/s . . 89/70/s Salt Lake City . . . .76/45/0.00 . . . 89/62/s . 75/49/pc San Antonio . . . . .88/75/0.00 . . . 91/73/t . 93/74/pc San Diego . . . . . . .68/61/0.00 . .68/60/pc . 67/59/pc San Francisco . . . .67/51/0.00 . .65/50/pc . . 71/51/s San Jose . . . . . . . .74/51/0.00 . . . 74/51/s . . 81/54/s Santa Fe . . . . . . . .89/57/0.00 . . . 83/58/s . . 85/57/s

FINANCING

899/Mo.

Freightliner Diesel

SALE $222,499

1.99%!!

240 Months at $899/Mo. 20% Down + License - On Approved Credit*

2011 Winnebago VIA 25Q $

519/Mo.

1.99%!!

Stk.#WB76, VIN# 46293 Mercedes Diesel

SALE $128,750 240 Months at $519/Mo. 20% Down, License - On Approved Credit*

2012 Jayco GreyHawk 31FS Stk.#J1484, VIN# 47895 $

379/Mo.

SALE $93,995

1.99%!!

240 Months at $379/Mo. 20% Down, + License - On Approved Credit*

2012 Jayco Eagle 266RKS $

179/Mo.

Stk.#J1474, VIN# M0188

SALE $28,995 144 Months at $179/Mo. 20% Down, + License - On Approved Credit*

Jay Feather X17C Stk.#J1394 VIN# JC0219

$

112/Mo.

$

SALE 17,995 1.99%!!

$

156/Mo.

20505 ROBAL ROAD • BEND

1.99%

2012 Winnebago $ Journey 34Y Stk.#WB101, VIN# F8190

144 Months at $112/Mo. 20% Down, + License - On Approved Credit*

541.678.REST (7378)

Mecca . . . . . . . . .108/88/0.00 . .107/86/s . 107/85/s Mexico City. . . . . .81/57/0.00 . . . 79/55/t . . .79/51/t Montreal. . . . . . . .73/52/0.00 . . . 75/57/t . 71/57/pc Moscow . . . . . . . .63/57/0.00 . .64/51/sh . 68/55/pc Nairobi . . . . . . . . .79/59/0.00 . . . 75/59/t . . .75/59/t Nassau . . . . . . . . .91/81/0.00 . . . 87/77/t . . .89/78/t New Delhi. . . . . .100/81/0.00 103/83/pc . 106/85/s Osaka . . . . . . . . . .84/64/0.00 . . . 76/66/r . 78/64/sh Oslo. . . . . . . . . . . .63/43/0.00 . .69/52/pc . 61/49/sh Ottawa . . . . . . . . .77/52/0.00 . . . 73/56/t . 69/57/pc Paris. . . . . . . . . . . .73/59/0.00 . .67/48/sh . 68/54/pc Rio de Janeiro. . . .73/68/0.00 . .73/64/sh . 73/63/sh Rome. . . . . . . . . . .79/57/0.00 . .76/64/pc . . .81/64/t Santiago . . . . . . . .72/28/0.00 . .64/48/pc . . 60/48/c Sao Paulo . . . . . . .63/54/0.00 . .63/56/sh . 64/60/sh Sapporo . . . . . . . .70/59/0.00 . .68/55/sh . 66/51/pc Seoul. . . . . . . . . . .82/63/0.00 . . . 81/66/t . 85/65/pc Shanghai. . . . . . . .86/72/0.00 . .84/68/pc . 88/73/pc Singapore . . . . . . .91/82/0.00 . . . 87/82/t . . .86/81/t Stockholm. . . . . . .64/41/0.00 . .65/49/pc . 60/49/sh Sydney. . . . . . . . . .61/48/0.00 . . . 59/45/s . . 60/48/s Taipei. . . . . . . . . . .95/81/0.00 . .93/79/pc . . 92/78/c Tel Aviv . . . . . . . . .86/66/0.00 . . . 84/66/s . . 87/68/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . . .75/61/0.00 . .76/64/sh . 75/62/sh Toronto . . . . . . . . .77/55/0.00 . . . 79/65/t . 69/56/sh Vancouver. . . . . . .55/48/0.00 . .58/47/sh . 59/49/sh Vienna. . . . . . . . . .79/57/0.00 . .79/63/pc . . 71/58/c Warsaw. . . . . . . . .68/52/0.00 . .77/62/sh . 75/59/pc

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Yesterday Friday Saturday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Savannah . . . . . . .80/67/0.02 . .86/66/pc . . 87/68/s Seattle. . . . . . . . . .61/48/0.65 . .58/50/sh . 60/51/sh Sioux Falls. . . . . . .87/66/0.00 . .86/70/pc . 91/72/pc Spokane . . . . . . . .63/38/0.02 . .59/42/sh . 55/42/sh Springfield, MO . .77/58/0.00 . . . 83/60/s . . 88/68/s Tampa. . . . . . . . . .83/72/2.17 . . . 87/75/t . . .89/73/t Tucson. . . . . . . . .102/62/0.00 . .104/72/s . 103/71/s Tulsa . . . . . . . . . . .82/65/0.00 . .86/66/pc . 89/71/pc Washington, DC . .83/58/0.00 . .85/64/pc . . 89/69/s Wichita . . . . . . . . .84/67/0.00 . .88/65/pc . 90/70/pc Yakima . . . . . . . . .64/41/0.09 . . .66/41/c . 63/45/sh Yuma. . . . . . . . . .101/69/0.00 . .104/73/s . 103/73/s

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . . .68/54/0.00 . .63/53/sh . 63/50/sh Athens. . . . . . . . . .82/60/0.00 . . . 85/69/s . . 87/67/s Auckland. . . . . . . .57/50/0.00 . .60/52/sh . 57/49/sh Baghdad . . . . . . .108/81/0.00 . .106/75/s . 105/75/s Bangkok . . . . . . . .93/81/0.00 . . . 91/79/t . . .91/81/t Beijing. . . . . . . . . .90/66/0.00 . . . 97/68/s . . .94/68/t Beirut . . . . . . . . . .79/70/0.00 . . . 78/70/s . . 81/71/s Berlin. . . . . . . . . . .68/50/0.00 . .71/57/sh . 65/51/pc Bogota . . . . . . . . .68/52/0.00 . .65/51/sh . 64/49/sh Budapest. . . . . . . .81/55/0.00 . .85/65/pc . . .84/64/t Buenos Aires. . . . .50/27/0.00 . . . 47/36/s . . 58/41/s Cabo San Lucas . .93/73/0.00 . . . 93/69/s . . 93/71/s Cairo . . . . . . . . . . .99/75/0.00 . . . 90/67/s . . 92/68/s Calgary . . . . . . . . .66/41/0.00 . . . 63/43/t . 59/42/sh Cancun . . . . . . . . .86/81/0.00 . . . 87/77/t . . .87/78/t Dublin . . . . . . . . . .57/50/0.00 . .55/48/sh . . 58/50/c Edinburgh. . . . . . .57/43/0.00 . .53/52/sh . 61/52/sh Geneva . . . . . . . . .82/57/0.00 . .69/55/sh . 73/53/pc Harare. . . . . . . . . .70/41/0.00 . . . 68/44/s . . 71/45/s Hong Kong . . . . . .91/82/0.00 . .89/82/pc . . .89/81/t Istanbul. . . . . . . . .73/64/0.00 . . . 80/63/s . . 78/64/s Jerusalem . . . . . . .82/64/0.00 . . . 85/63/s . . 86/65/s Johannesburg. . . .63/43/0.00 . .63/38/pc . 50/34/pc Lima . . . . . . . . . . .73/66/0.00 . .74/66/pc . . 73/67/s Lisbon . . . . . . . . . .72/61/0.00 . .71/56/sh . 74/66/pc London . . . . . . . . .63/54/0.00 . .61/50/sh . 63/50/sh Madrid . . . . . . . . .81/70/0.00 . . . 84/55/s . 83/59/pc Manila. . . . . . . . . .88/79/0.00 . . . 80/77/t . . .84/77/t

IS PLEASED TO ANNOUNCE ...

1.99%!!

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Partly cloudy and warm.

Mostly sunny and much warmer.

Mostly sunny and much milder.

Mostly to partly cloudy skies, chance of showers early, breezy.

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

Halifax 66/44 Portland To ronto Portland 70/52 80/65 58/50 St. Paul Green Bay • 108° Boston 87/68 Billings 81/65 Boise 75/60 Buffalo Death Valley, Calif. Detroit 70/41 87/54 76/60 New York 84/66 Rapid City • 19° 84/65 Des Moines 83/63 Cheyenne Philadelphia Columbus 88/66 Chicago Stanley, Idaho 87/52 83/59 85/61 85/69 San Francisco • 5.13” Salt Lake Washington, D. C. Omaha 62/50 City 89/68 85/64 Las Craig Municipal Denver 89/62 Kansas City Vegas 91/59 Louisville Airport, Fla. 86/65 St. Louis 100/77 85/63 Charlotte 88/62 85/63 Albuquerque Los Angeles Oklahoma City Nashville 95/59 69/60 86/66 87/61 Phoenix Atlanta 106/75 Little Rock Birmingham Honolulu 87/64 87/72 Dallas 88/66 Tijuana 88/68 92/75 71/56 New Orleans 88/74 Orlando Houston 89/73 Chihuahua 89/72 98/71 Miami 89/76 Monterrey La Paz 100/71 97/64 Mazatlan Anchorage 82/70 62/49 Juneau 55/44

The Associated Press SPRINGFIELD — Community activists have rallied against hate crimes after authorities accused four young white people of threatening a biracial teenager on Memorial Day. Meanwhile, police arrested a fifth person and investigated spray-painted swastikas and racist messages in a neighborhood where one suspect lives, the Eugene Register-Guard reported Thursday. At the gathering of about 50 people outside City Hall on Wednesday afternoon, Springfield City Councilor Sheri Moore told the rally participants she has an adopted son who is black, and her family has experienced discrimination. But, she said, only a minority of local residents have racist attitudes. “Springfield, as you can see, is a community of caring people,” Moore said. “We outnumber the others, and will work together to eliminate hate.” That came hours after police announced they had booked Brandon James Ricker, 19, on charges of at-

MONDAY

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SPORTS

Scoreboard, D2 NBA, D3 Golf, D3

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MLB, D4 Tennis, D5 Adventure Sports, D6

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JUNE 8, 2012

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

ADVENTURE SPORTS

RODEO

FOOTBALL

First main event tonight in Sisters

Lawsuit says NFL hid brain injury links

The first main performance of the Sisters Rodeo is scheduled for tonight at 7 o’clock at the Sisters Rodeo Grounds. Rodeo festivities started on Wednesday with an Xtreme Bulls event and continued Thursday with slack, but today is the official kickoff of the 72nd Sisters Rodeo. Tonight is family night as children 12 and under receive free entry into the rodeo. Multiple local cowboys and cowgirls are scheduled to compete in tonight’s opening rodeo. Bareback riders Brian Bain (Culver), Austin Foss (Terrebonne) and Steve Peeples (Redmond) are all on tonight’s day sheet. Redmond bulldogger Shane Erickson will also compete this evening, as will Terrebonne barrel racer Brenda Mays. Two performances are scheduled for Saturday — the afternoon show starts at 1 p.m. and the evening rodeo begins at 7 — with the final rodeo performance set for Sunday at 1 p.m. For more information, go to www.sistersrodeo.com.

• Thousands of former players file By Barry Wilner The Associated Press

Mark Morical / The Bulletin

Eric Helie, front, and Bob Gilbert, both of Redmond, ride their mountain bikes in the Radlands trail network on Wednesday with Smith Rock State Park in the background.

The Radlands • New mountain bike trail system taking shape in Redmond features rocky terrain Editor’s note: Mountain Bike Trail Guide, by Bulletin outdoors writer Mark Morical, features various trails in Central Oregon and beyond. The trail guide appears in Adventure Sports on alternating Fridays through the riding season.

WCL Elks rained out at Wenatchee

Radlands trails east of Redmond 97

B

ob Gilbert barreled down a steep, rockstrewn section of singletrack, then glanced back at the challenging section of trail he had just descended. The trail included a long, flat, smooth piece of lava rock. To the trail MARK builders in the Radlands — a MORICAL network of mountain biking trails currently being built east of Redmond — this sort of rock is called “beautiful slab.” “When we’re designing the trail, we always go on the hunt for some beautiful slab,” says Gilbert, one of the main volunteer trail designers of the Radlands. “We try to flag it so it will be smooth. A lot of those climbing/descending areas are that sort of rock. It’s fun stuff, that’s what we live for.” See Radlands / D6

WENATCHEE, Wash. — Thursday night’s West Coast League baseball game between the Bend Elks and the Wenatchee AppleSox was rained out. It has not been announced when the game will be made up. The Elks will play their home opener tonight against the Klamath Falls Gems at Vince Genna Stadium in Bend. First pitch is scheduled for 6:35 p.m. The two-game series will conclude Saturday night at 6:35. Bend will then host a three-game series with Walla Walla starting Sunday at 5:05 p.m.

Upas Ave.

High Desert Sports Complex

Maple Ave.

Neg us W ay

— Bulletin staff report

North Loop

Negus Transfer Station Hemlock Ave.

Proposed South Loop

BUS 97

Antler Ave.

126

126

Highland Ave. 97

REDMOND Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

NEW YORK — Scores of lawsuits involving thousands of former players touched by concussions and brain injuries have been consolidated into one master complaint, setting up a massive and potentially costly case for the NFL. Lawyers for the players filed the complaint Thursday in Philadelphia, accusing the NFL of hiding information that linked football-related head trauma to permanent brain injuries. Among the illnesses cited were dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. The plaintiffs hope to hold the NFL responsible for the care of players suffering from those health problems. “The NFL must open its eyes to the consequences of its actions,” said Kevin Turner, a former running back with the Patriots and Eagles who has been diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). “The NFL has the power not only to give former players the care they deserve, but also to ensure that future generations of football players do not suffer the way that many in my generation have.” Also named in the suit was helmet-maker Riddell, Inc. The suit accuses the NFL of “mythologizing” and glorifying violence through the media, including its NFL Films division. “The NFL, like the sport of boxing, was aware of the health risks associated with repetitive blows producing sub-concussive and concussive results and the fact that some members of the NFL player population were at significant risk of developing long-term brain damage and cognitive decline as a result,” the complaint charges. See Lawsuit / D5

— Bulletin staff report

NBA PLAYOFFS

I’ll Have Another trains with exercise rider Jonny Garcia at Belmont Park in Elmont, N.Y., on Thursday. The horse will attempt to win the Belmont Stakes and Triple Crown on Saturday.

Elks kick off 2012 home schedule A season preview of Bend’s West Coast League baseball team, including roster, schedule and opponents, See special section around the front of Business

TENNIS

The Russian tennis star, above, will face Sara Errani in Saturday’s women’s final, D5

By Harvey Araton New York Times News Service

Mike Groll / The Associated Press

Could Triple Crown winner help revive fading sport? By Frank Eltman The Associated Press

NEW YORK — y Saturday night, the horse racing world will know if a chestnut colt named I’ll Have Another has done what 11 other contenders have failed to do since 1978: Win the Triple Crown. But even if he beats his competitors in the Belmont Stakes, questions remain over whether that singular triumph can reinvigorate a sport that has experienced precipitous drops in fan interest, gambling dollars and prestige in the American sports landscape. And the home of Saturday’s pivotal race is an emblem of racing’s troubles: Last month, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo replaced management of the agency that oversees racing at Belmont, Aqueduct and Saratoga following

B

Sharapova going to French final

Experienced hand of Fisher points to another NBA finals

HORSE RACING COMMENTARY years of scandal and mismanagement. The three tracks stage more than one third of all the country’s top stakes races and generate a large chunk of gambling income nationwide. “Just having the Triple Crown on the line is a shot in the arm for the business and from a public relations point of view, we have seen a media bump already,” said Alex Waldrop, president and chief executive officer of the National Thoroughbred Racing Association. “We will absolutely have a superstar on our hands if I’ll Have Another wins the race. We have to be prepared to take advantage of that; the problem is we don’t know how many more races he may have.” See Triple Crown / D5

Inside

• Miami beats Boston to send the OKLAHOMA CITY — You Eastern series to Game 7, D3 knew it was coming. You knew that if he stayed on the court long enough in the fourth quarter there would was thanked for his effort have to be at least one Derek with an unsettling attempt to Fisher moment, a chance to oust him after he challenged uncoil that pedestrian the work practices of looking but still-danthe union’s executive gerous southpaw jumpdirector, Billy Hunter. er, to send a forget-meThen the Lakers not to old friends in Los demonstrated their Angeles. gratitude to Fisher for It is fair to say that no Fisher five championship player has had a more rings and countless tumultuous time of it big shots, much like this contracted NBA season the two he drained down the than the former Kobe Bryant stretch of Oklahoma City’s running mate known as Fish. 107-99 Game 6 victory, by And that no one deserved to showing him the door. The be fitted more for an NBA fiimplication was that if he was nals cap late Wednesday night too old and slow to start, then after the Thunder won the he might as well be finished. Western Conference title by But there he was late rallying in the second half to Wednesday night, helping the defeat the San Antonio Spurs. Thunder finish the job with Before a single ball was Kevin Durant, Russell Westdribbled in December, Fisher brook and James Harden, was on the job as the president burying a left-corner 3 ball of the players union throughthat gave his team a 96-91 lead out tortuous lockout negotiawith just more than four mintions. For all the hours toiled, utes left. See Fisher / D5 all the leadership exerted, he


D2

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JUNE 8, 2012

S  B

SCOREBOARD

Track and field RODEO Local Sisters Rodeo Thursday First go-round results from Thursday’s slack competition (Place, name, hometown, score or time, money won) ——— Tie-down Roping — 1st go-round 1, Jake Hannum, Plain City, Utah, 9.1, $1,810.43. 2, Blane Cox, Cameron, Texas, 9.5, $1,498.29. 3, Ryle Smith, Oakdale, Calif., 9.7, $1,186.14. 4, Clay Schricker, Adrian, 9.8, $874. 5, Clint Robinson, Spanish Fork, Utah, 9.9, $561.86. 6, Jeff Coelho, Echo, 10.1, $312.14. Steer wrestling 1st go-round 1, Cody Cabral, Hilo, Hawaii, 5.0, $1,893.67. 2, Casey McMillen, Redmond, 5.4, $1,646.67. 3, Sean Santucci, Prineville, 5.6, $1,399.67. 4, Jordan Luenella, Shoreline, Wash., 5.8, $1,152.67. 5, Travis Taruscio, Stanfield, 5.9, $905.67. 6, Billy Bugenig, Ferndale, Calif., 6.0, $658.67. 7, Christian Radabaugh, Prineville, 6.1, $411.67. 8, Sterling Lambert, Fallon, Nev., 6.7, $164.67. Barrel Racing — leaders (barrel racers only compete once for rodeo) 1, Jackie Gudmundson, Monroe, Wash., 17.62. 2, Jody Hale, Echo, 17.63. 3, Viki Friedrich, Salkum, Wash., 17.76. 4, Gaylene Buff, Westwald, B.C., 17.85. 5, Jillian Connolly, Odessa, Wash., 17.94. 6, Darcy LaPier, Newberg, 17.96. 7, Kelley Petrak, Turner, 18.00. 8, Reiney Hatch, Ukiah, Calif., 18.01.

BASEBALL WCL WEST COAST LEAGUE ——— League standings East Division W Wenatchee AppleSox 4 Walla Walla Sweets 3 Bellingham Bells 2 Kelowna Falcons 0 West Division W Corvallis Knights 4 Kitsap BlueJackets 4 Bend Elks 2 Cowlitz Black Bears 2 Klamath Falls Gems 0 Thursday’s Games Bend at Wenatchee, ppd., rain Bellingham at Kitsap, ppd., rain Cowlitz 3, Kelowna 1 Today’s Games Klamath at Bend, 6:35 p.m. Kelowna at Cowlitz, 6:35 p.m. Bellingham at Kitsap, 6:35 p.m. Corvallis at Wenatchee, 7:05 p.m. Saturday’s Games Klamath at Bend, 6:35 p.m. Bellingham at Kitsap, 6:35 p.m. Corvallis at Wenatchee, 7:05 p.m. Sunday’s Games Walla Walla at Bend, 5:05 p.m. Kitsap at Kelowna, 6:05 p.m. Klamath at Bellingham, 6:05 p.m. Corvallis at Wenatchee, 6:05 p.m.

L 2 3 2 2 L 1 2 2 3 4

College NCAA Division I Super Regionals All Times PDT Double Elimination x-if necessary ——— At Alex Box Stadium Baton Rouge, La. Today, June 8, Stony Brook (50-12) at LSU (46-16), 9 a.m. Saturday, June 9, Stony Brook at LSU, 9 a.m. x-Sunday, June 10, Stony Brook at LSU, 10 a.m. At Hi Corbett Field Tucson, Ariz. Today, June 8, St. John’s (40-21) at Arizona (41-17), noon Saturday, June 9, St. John’s at Arizona, noon x-Sunday, June 10, St. John’s at Arizona, noon At Dick Howser Stadium Tallahassee, Fla. Today, June 8, Stanford (41-16) at Florida State (46-15), 4 p.m. Saturday, June 9, Stanford at Florida State, 3 p.m. x-Sunday, June 10, Stanford at Florida State, 4 p.m. At Jackie Robinson Stadium Los Angeles Today, June 8, TCU (40-20) at UCLA (45-14), 6 p.m. Saturday, June 9, TCU at UCLA, 6 p.m. x-Sunday, June 10, TCU at UCLA, 7 p.m. At Alfred A. McKethan Stadium Gainesville, Fla. Saturday, June 9, N.C. State (43-18) at Florida (45-18), 11 a.m. Sunday, June 10, N.C. State at Florida, 10 a.m. x-Monday, June 11, N.C. State at Florida, 10 a.m. At Baylor Ballpark Waco, Texas Saturday, June 9, Arkansas (42-19) at Baylor (48-15), 2 p.m. Sunday, June 10, Arkansas at Baylor, 1 p.m. x-Monday, June 11, Arkansas at Baylor, 1 p.m. At Carolina Stadium Columbia, S.C. Saturday, June 9, Oklahoma (42-23) at South Carolina (43-17), 5 p.m. Sunday, June 10, Oklahoma at South Carolina, 4 p.m. x-Monday, June 11, Oklahoma at South Carolina, 4 p.m. At PK Park Eugene Saturday, June 9, Kent State (44-17) at Oregon (45-17), 8 p.m. Sunday, June 10, Kent State at Oregon, 7 p.m. x-Monday, June 11, Kent State at Oregon, 4 p.m.

SOCCER MLS MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT ——— Eastern Conference W L T Pts GF D.C. 8 4 3 27 28 New York 8 3 2 26 26 Sporting Kansas City 8 3 1 25 17 Columbus 5 4 3 18 13 Chicago 5 5 3 18 15 New England 5 7 1 16 18 Houston 4 3 4 16 12 Montreal 3 7 3 12 15 Philadelphia 2 7 2 8 8 Toronto FC 1 9 0 3 8 Western Conference W L T Pts GF Real Salt Lake 9 3 2 29 22 San Jose 8 3 3 27 27 Seattle 7 3 3 24 16 Colorado 6 6 1 19 20 Vancouver 5 3 4 19 13 Chivas USA 4 6 3 15 9 Portland 3 5 4 13 12 FC Dallas 3 8 4 13 15 Los Angeles 3 8 2 11 15 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. ——— Sunday’s Game Houston at Vancouver, 4 p.m.

GA 19 18 10 13 17 18 12 21 14 21 GA 14 17 9 18 14 14 15 24 21

GOLF PGA Tour St. Jude Classic Thursday At TPC Southwind Memphis, Tenn. Purse: $5.6 million Yardage: 7,239; Par 70 (35-35) First Round a-denotes amateur Jeff Maggert 35-31—66 John Merrick 33-33—66 Arjun Atwal 33-34—67 Jeff Overton 33-34—67 J.J. Henry 34-33—67 Seung-Yul Noh 32-35—67 Robert Allenby 35-33—68 Rory McIlroy 35-33—68 Padraig Harrington 35-33—68 Chad Campbell 36-32—68 Ken Duke 34-34—68 Davis Love III 34-34—68 Y.E. Yang 34-34—68 John Daly 33-35—68

Lee Janzen J.J. Killeen Troy Kelly Kevin Stadler Bryce Molder Fredrik Jacobson Tim Clark Kevin Kisner Luke Guthrie Skip Kendall Charles Howell III Paul Stankowski Danny Lee Chris Riley Dustin Johnson Gavin Coles Troy Matteson Steve Flesch Boo Weekley Joe Ogilvie Mathew Goggin Nick O’Hern Sean O’Hair Jason Bohn J.B. Holmes Tim Petrovic Chris Couch Omar Uresti Kyle Thompson Gary Christian Zack Miller Duffy Waldorf Brendon de Jonge Roland Thatcher Shaun Micheel Brett Wetterich Shane Bertsch Spencer Levin Patrick Sheehan Sung Kang William McGirt Dustin Morris Nathan Green Kyle Stanley Bill Lunde Kelly Kraft Edward Loar Steve Wheatcroft Matt McQuillan Joe Durant Robert Gamez Tommy Gainey Hunter Haas Robert Karlsson Marco Dawson George McNeill Martin Laird Heath Slocum Cameron Beckman Stuart Appleby Neal Lancaster Craig Barlow Billy Horschel Ryo Ishikawa John Peterson Kyle Reifers Daniel Chopra David Hearn Woody Austin Bart Bryant Brian Gay Henrik Stenson Jhonattan Vegas Greg Owen Kent Jones Bob Estes Martin Flores Miguel Angel Carballo Will Claxton Alexandre Rocha Matt Jones Scott Stallings John Rollins Frank Lickliter II Billy Hurley III Ted Potter, Jr. Tim Herron Zach Johnson Stephen Ames Rich Beem Josh Teater Mark Anderson Austin Gutgsell Roberto Castro Justin Leonard Derek Lamely Scott Verplank Vaughn Taylor D.J. Trahan Scott Brown Steven Bowditch Jamie Lovemark Jason Kokrak Garrett Willis David Toms Robert Garrigus Camilo Villegas Ryan Palmer Chris DiMarco Richard H. Lee Audie Johnson Ted Purdy Will MacKenzie Graeme McDowell Jimmy Walker Scott Dunlap a-Cody Proveaux Dicky Pride David Duval Ryuji Imada Marc Turnesa Joey Snyder III Peter Lonard Robert Damron Hank Kuehne Brian Harman Fran Quinn Todd Hamilton Brendon Todd Stephen Gangluff Jason Gore Tommy Biershenk Chris Kirk Bobby Gates Kris Blanks Russell Knox Patrick Reed Charlie Beljan Jonathan Fly Harrison Frazar Matt Bettencourt Garth Mulroy

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LPGA Tour Wegmans Championship Thursday At Locust Hill Country Club Pittsford, N.Y. Purse: $2.5 million Yardage: 6,534; Par 72 (35-37) First Round Ryann O’Toole 35-34—69 Beatriz Recari 34-35—69 Giulia Sergas 33-36—69 Na Yeon Choi 33-37—70 Paula Creamer 34-36—70 Jeong Jang 34-36—70 Cristie Kerr 32-38—70 Ai Miyazato 34-36—70 Mika Miyazato 36-34—70 Se Ri Pak 36-34—70 Sandra Gal 35-36—71 Lorie Kane 35-36—71 Candie Kung 34-37—71 Mo Martin 35-36—71 Suzann Pettersen 35-36—71 Jenny Shin 35-36—71 Shanshan Feng 34-38—72 Marcy Hart 34-38—72 Brittany Lang 36-36—72 Maude-Aimee Leblanc 35-37—72 Stacy Lewis 36-36—72 Sydnee Michaels 36-36—72 Inbee Park 36-36—72 Christine Song 34-38—72 Sun Young Yoo 35-37—72 Karlin Beck 37-36—73 Dori Carter 35-38—73 Taylor Coutu 36-37—73 Sophie Gustafson 35-38—73 Jennifer Johnson 37-36—73 Jimin Kang 36-37—73 I.K. Kim 36-37—73 Meena Lee 35-38—73 Amelia Lewis 33-40—73 Stephanie Louden 35-38—73 Jennifer Rosales 37-36—73 So Yeon Ryu 35-38—73 Alison Walshe 35-38—73 Christel Boeljon 35-39—74 Sandra Changkija 36-38—74 Katie Futcher 37-37—74 Hee-Won Han 35-39—74 Mina Harigae 34-40—74

Chicago Connecticut Indiana Atlanta New York Washington

4 1 .800 — 4 1 .800 — 4 1 .800 — 2 4 .333 2½ 2 5 .286 3 1 4 .200 3 Western Conference W L Pct GB Minnesota 8 0 1.000 — Los Angeles 5 1 .833 2 San Antonio 2 3 .400 4½ Phoenix 2 4 .333 5 Seattle 1 5 .167 6 Tulsa 0 6 .000 7 ——— Thursday’s Games No games scheduled Today’s Games Connecticut at Indiana, 4 p.m. New York at Washington, 4 p.m. San Antonio at Atlanta, 4:30 p.m. Tulsa at Chicago, 5:30 p.m. Phoenix at Los Angeles, 8 p.m.

IN THE BLEACHERS

TENNIS Professional French Open Thursday At Stade Roland Garros Paris Purse: $23.47 million (Grand Slam) Surface: Clay-Outdoor Singles Women Semifinals Sara Errani (21), Italy, def. Sam Stosur (6), Australia, 7-5, 1-6, 6-3. Maria Sharapova (2), Russia, def. Petra Kvitova (4), Czech Republic, 6-3, 6-3.

DEALS Transactions Mi Jung Hur Pat Hurst Jessica Korda Belen Mozo Haru Nomura Anna Nordqvist Angela Oh Gerina Piller Morgan Pressel Lizette Salas Kris Tamulis Lexi Thompson Momoko Ueda Mariajo Uribe Karrie Webb Michelle Wie Heather Bowie Young Irene Cho Chella Choi Tanya Dergal Wendy Doolan Jodi Ewart Katherine Hull Karine Icher Eun-Hee Ji Tiffany Joh Catriona Matthew Kristy McPherson Na On Min Becky Morgan Azahara Munoz Grace Park Pornanong Phatlum Karin Sjodin Sarah Jane Smith Cheyenne Woods Ashli Bunch Nicole Castrale Moira Dunn Meaghan Francella Julieta Granada Natalie Gulbis Amy Hung Danielle Kang Christina Kim Ilhee Lee Brittany Lincicome Pernilla Lindberg Dewi Claire Schreefel Hee Kyung Seo Jennifer Song Angela Stanford Karen Stupples Yani Tseng Amy Yang Hannah Yun Amanda Blumenherst Meredith Duncan Kathleen Ekey Veronica Felibert Caroline Hedwall Haeji Kang Mindy Kim Jee Young Lee Rebecca Lee-Bentham Ji Young Oh Hee Young Park Jane Rah Alena Sharp Stephanie Sherlock Victoria Tanco Beth Bader Cydney Clanton Jacqui Concolino Lisa Ferrero Numa Gulyanamitta Leta Lindley Janice Moodie Jin Young Pak Stacy Prammanasudh Reilley Rankin Danah Bordner Laura Davies Lisa Grimes Maria Hernandez Vicky Hurst Wendy Ward Lori Atsedes Diana D’Alessio Ayaka Kaneko Jennie Lee Seon Hwa Lee Paige Mackenzie Jane Park Maria Hjorth Karen Davies Song-Hee Kim Jessica Shepley Anna Grzebien Elisa Serramia Minea Blomqvist Laura Diaz Jennifer Gleason Julie Peluso Stephanie Kono Jessica Carafiello Alison Curdt

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Champions Tour Regions Tradition Thursday At Shoal Creek Birmingham, Ala. Purse: $2.2 million Yardage: 7,234; Par: 72 (36-36) First Round Bill Glasson 34-32—66 Dan Forsman 34-32—66 Fred Funk 33-34—67 Bernhard Langer 35-33—68 Brad Bryant 33-36—69 Russ Cochran 35-34—69 Tom Lehman 34-35—69 Bruce Fleisher 36-33—69 Morris Hatalsky 35-35—70 Kirk Triplett 35-35—70 Gary Hallberg 35-35—70 Jeff Sluman 36-34—70 Larry Mize 35-35—70 Wayne Levi 35-35—70 Joey Sindelar 36-34—70 Mike Goodes 36-34—70 Tom Jenkins 35-36—71 Peter Senior 36-35—71 Olin Browne 37-34—71 Mike Reid 38-33—71 Fulton Allem 37-35—72 Andrew Magee 37-35—72 Hale Irwin 37-35—72 Corey Pavin 36-36—72 Keith Fergus 34-38—72 Chien Soon Lu 35-37—72 Eduardo Romero 36-36—72 Loren Roberts 38-34—72

Steve Pate Jim Gallagher, Jr. Jim Thorpe Hal Sutton Mark McNulty Brad Faxon Fred Couples Jay Haas Mark Brooks Fuzzy Zoeller Scott Simpson Larry Nelson Rod Spittle Michael Allen Mark Calcavecchia Andy Bean Bruce Vaughan Roger Chapman Bob Tway Bobby Clampett Denis Watson Peter Jacobsen Jay Don Blake David Frost John Cook Kenny Perry Sandy Lyle Ted Schulz Gil Morgan Mark Wiebe David Eger Bob Gilder Steve Lowery Craig Stadler Jerry Pate Chip Beck D.A. Weibring Steve Jones J.L. Lewis Vicente Fernandez Tom Pernice Jr. David Peoples Dana Quigley Allen Doyle Tom Purtzer Tom Kite Mike McCullough Bobby Wadkins

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HOCKEY NHL NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE All Times PDT (x-if necessary) (Best-of-7) ——— STANLEY CUP FINALS Los Angeles 3, New Jersey 1 Wednesday, May 30: Los Angeles 2, New Jersey 1, OT Saturday, June 2: Los Angeles 2, at New Jersey 1, OT Monday, June 4: Los Angeles 4, New Jersey 0 Wednesday, June 6: New Jersey 3, Los Angeles 1 Saturday, June 9: Los Angeles at New Jersey, 5 p.m. x-Monday, June 11: New Jersey at Los Angeles, 5 p.m. x-Wednesday, June 13: Los Angeles at New Jersey, 5 p.m.

BASKETBALL NBA NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION NBA Playoff Glance All Times PDT (x-if necessary) (Best-of-7) ——— CONFERENCE FINALS EASTERN CONFERENCE Boston 3, Miami 3 Monday, May 28: Miami 93, Boston 79 Wednesday, May 30: Miami 115, Boston 111, OT Friday, June 1: Boston 101, Miami 91 Sunday, June 3: Boston 93, Miami 91, OT Tuesday, June 5: Boston 94, Miami 90 Thursday, June 7: Miami 98, Boston 79 Saturday, June 9: Boston at Miami, 5:30 p.m. WESTERN CONFERENCE Oklahoma City 4, San Antonio 2 Sunday, May 27: San Antonio 101, Oklahoma City 98 Tuesday, May 29: San Antonio 120, Oklahoma City 111 Thursday, May 31: Oklahoma City 102, San Antonio 82 Saturday, June 2: Oklahoma City 109, San Antonio 103 Monday: June 4: Oklahoma City 108, San Antonio 103 Wednesday, June 6: Oklahoma City 107, San Antonio 99 Thursday’s Summary

Heat 98, Celtics 79 MIAMI (98) James 19-26 5-9 45, Battier 3-7 0-0 8, Haslem 2-6 2-2 6, Chalmers 3-6 0-0 9, Wade 6-17 5-5 17, Bosh 3-8 1-2 7, Miller 0-3 0-0 0, Cole 1-2 0-0 2, Jones 0-0 2-2 2, Howard 0-1 2-2 2, Turiaf 0-0 0-0 0, Anthony 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 37-76 17-22 98. BOSTON (79) Pierce 4-18 1-2 9, Bass 5-8 2-3 12, Garnett 6-14 00 12, Rondo 8-14 5-7 21, Allen 3-7 3-4 10, Stiemsma 0-0 0-0 0, Pietrus 1-4 0-0 2, Dooling 0-2 0-0 0, Daniels 3-4 2-2 8, Hollins 1-1 0-0 2, Pavlovic 0-1 0-0 0, Williams 0-0 0-0 0, Moore 1-2 1-2 3. Totals 32-75 14-20 79. Miami 26 29 19 24 — 98 Boston 16 26 19 18 — 79 3-Point Goals—Miami 7-16 (Chalmers 3-4, Battier 2-4, James 2-4, Cole 0-1, Miller 0-3), Boston 1-14 (Allen 1-3, Dooling 0-1, Daniels 0-1, Pietrus 0-3, Pierce 0-6). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Miami 50 (James 15), Boston 43 (Bass 7). Assists—Miami 15 (James 5), Boston 14 (Rondo 10). Total Fouls— Miami 21, Boston 19. Technicals—Chalmers, James, Garnett. A—18,624 (18,624).

WNBA WOMEN’S NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION All Times PDT ——— Eastern Conference W L Pct

GB

BASEBALL Major League Baseball MLB—Suspended Washington minor league RHP Josh Wilkie (Syracuse-IL) 50 games a second violation of drug abuse under the Minor League Drug Prevention and Treatment Program. Announced the resignation of executive vice president of baseball development Jimmie Lee Solomon. Named Rob Manfred executive vice president of economics and league affairs. American League CHICAGO WHITE SOX—Placed OF Kosuke Fukudome on the 15-day DL, retroactive to June 4. Purchased the contract of OF Jordan Danks from Charlotte (IL). KANSAS CITY ROYALS—Agreed to terms with RHP Kyle Zimmer on a minor league contract. MINNESOTA TWINS—Optioned RHP Cole De Vries to Rochester (IL). NEW YORK YANKEES—Placed RHP Freddy Garcia on the bereavement list. Recalled RHP Ryota Igarashi from Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (IL). TEXAS RANGERS—Placed LHP Derek Holland on the 15-day DL, retroactive to June 6. Recalled RHP Tanner Scheppers from Round Rock (PCL). Designated LHP John Gaub for assignment. Agreed to terms with RHP Alec Asher, OF Preston Beck, OF Royce Bolinger, 2B Cam Schiller, RHP Cody Kendall, RHP John Niggli, RHP Casey Shiver, RHP Keone Kela, LHP Sam Stafford, 2B Janluis Castro, C Charles Moorman, RHP Josh McElwee, RHP Coby Cowgill, SS Gabriel Roa, LHP Austen Thraikill, LHP Joseph Burns, OF Barrett Serrato and RHP Paul Schwindel on minor league contracts. TORONTO BLUE JAYS—Optioned RHP Robert Coello to Las Vegas (PCL). Recalled RHP Chad Beck from Las Vegas. National League ATLANTA BRAVES—Agreed to terms with RHP Lucas Sims on a minor league contract. HOUSTON ASTROS—Agreed to terms with SS Carlos Correa on a minor league contract. LOS ANGELES DODGERS—Named Bob Wolfe executive vice president. PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES—Recalled INF-OF Michael Martinez from Lehigh Valley (IL). Placed 2B Freddy Galvis on the 15-day DL. ST. LOUIS CARDINALS—Placed LHP Jaime Garcia on the 15-day DL, retroactive to June 6. Recalled RHP Fernando Salas from Memphis (PCL). SAN DIEGO PADRES—Selected the contract of RHP Jason Marquis from San Antonio (Texas). Placed LHP Eric Stults on the 15-day DL, retroactive to June 4. Transferred INF Jason Bartlett from the 15- to the 60-day DL. WASHINGTON NATIONALS—Reinstated RHP Brad Lidge from the 15-day DL. Recalled 1B-OF Tyler Moore from Syracuse (IL). Placed C Carlos Maldonado on the 15-day DL, retroactive to May 30, and RHP Henry Rodriguez on the 15-day DL, retroactive to June 6. FOOTBALL National Football League JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS—Released DE Aaron Kampman. NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS—Signed TE Bo Scaife. Released WR Chad Ochocinco, DL Markell Carter, TE Nick Melillo and OL Jon Opperud. NEW ORLEANS SAINTS—Signed QB Luke McCown to a one-year contract and RB Joe Banyard to a three-year contract. OAKLAND RAIDERS—Agreed to terms with DE Jack Crawford, DT Christo Bilukidi and LB Nathan Stupar. PHILADELPHIA EAGLES—Named Joe Banner strategic advisor to the owner and Don Smolenski president. HOCKEY National Hockey League CALGARY FLAMES—Released associate coach Craig Hartsburg. CAROLINA HURRICANES—Announced the retirement of equipment manager Wally Tatomir. Promoted assistant equipment manager Jorge Alves to equipment manager. Signed G John Muse to a one-year contract. COLORADO AVALANCHE—Agreed to terms with F David Jones on a four-year contract. DALLAS STARS—Named Bob Bassen director of the alumni association and business development. SOCCER Major League Soccer TORONTO FC—Announced the resignation of coach Aron Winter. COLLEGE BUFFALO—Named Allen Greene senior associate athletic director for administration. CLEMSON—Agreed to terms with football coach Dabo Swinney on a three-year contract extension through 2017. COLLEGE of CHARLESTON—Named Joe Wallace director of men’s basketball operations. HOUSTON BAPTIST—Named Alisha Keltner assistant volleyball coach. LANGSTON—Named Mike Garrett director of athletics. LOUISVILLE—Announced junior F Stephan Van Treese has been granted his release from the men’s basketball team. MARY HARDIN-BAYLOR—Promoted women’s golf coach Darla Kirby to associate athletic director and Doak Fleming to athletic events manager. OKLAHOMA STATE—Named Jay Udwadia men’s tennis coach. QUEENS (N.C.)—Named Jim Vahrenkamp cross country and track and field coach. SACRAMENTO STATE—Promoted Brandon Laird to men’s associate basketball head coach. WASHINGTON (MO.)—Named Melissa Brooks women’s assistant basketball coach. WINTHROP—Named Kevin Cook women’s basketball coach. WYOMING—Extended the contract of men’s basketball coach Larry Shyatt through the 2016-17 season.

FISH COUNT Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Wednesday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 1,374 122 90 27 The Dalles 1014 89 31 1 John Day 1863 105 14 6 McNary 1077 68 10 0 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Wednesday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 169,687 8,376 6,448 1953 The Dalles 122,163 7,529 1,970 957 John Day 109,518 6,860 2,019 1,290 McNary 99,050 4,618 4,811 2,219

• Kynard repeats as NCAA high jump champion: Kansas State’s Erik Kynard successfully defended his high jump title Thursday in the NCAA outdoor track and field championships in Des Moines, Iowa, clearing 7 feet, 8 inches. Kynard held off Indiana’s Derek Drouin in a thrilling final, though his stab at tying the collegiate record of 7-9 3⁄4 fell short. Boise State’s Kurt Felix won the decathlon with 8,062 points, while Tim Glover defended his title in the javelin with a throw of 268 feet. Southern Illinois’s Jeneva McCall, won the women’s hammer throw at 225-3 after finishing second last year, and TCU’s Whitney Gipson took the long jump at 22-4 1⁄2. Texas A&M’s Natosha Rogers won the 10,000 meters in 32 minutes, 41.63 seconds.

Gymnastics • Leyva takes early lead at U.S. championships: Defending champion Danell Leyva grabbed the early lead at the U.S. men’s gymnastics championships Thursday night in St. Louis, sneaking past John Orozco in the final rotation with a polished parallel bars routine. Leyva, also the world champion in the event, scored 15.800 points to finish at 91.850, just ahead of Orozco’s 91.8. Leyva and Orozco were more than a point ahead of Sam Mikulak, the 2010 junior champion. Chris Brooks and Jonathan Horton rounded out the top five as the U.S. Olympic picture began to take shape.

Football • Patriots release WR Ochocinco: The New England Patriots released receiver Chad Ochocinco on Thursday, cutting loose the six-time Pro Bowl selection after one season in which he was more active on Twitter than on the field. “Thoroughly enjoyed the oppurtunity to play for the ‘Patriot’ organization... fans were ... wicked awesome, I wish all of you the best,” he tweeted at about the same time the team was announcing he had been released. Ochocinco, 34, played in 15 games in his only season with the Patriots, starting three and catching 15 passes for 276 yards. • Saints make new offer to QB Drew Brees: The New Orleans Saints have made a new contract offer to recordsetting quarterback Drew Brees, said a person familiar with the situation. The person spoke to The Associated Press Thursday on condition of anonymity because the team and the quarterback have not publicly discussed the new offer. The person did not provide details about financial changes in the new offer, but added, “as always, there is a lot to get through and no deal is imminent.” The Saints have placed their one-year franchise tag on Brees, barring him from negotiating with other teams.

Baseball • Roger Clemens’ wife takes stand at perjury trial: Debbie Clemens took the stand at the perjury trial of her husband, Roger Clemens. Debbie Clemens entered the courtroom in the waning minutes of Thursday’s session and answered questions about her personal background and early relationship with her husband before court adjourned for the day. She is expected to testify today that she received a shot of human growth hormone from Clemens’ former strength coach, Brian McNamee, about a decade ago — and that her husband was not present. McNamee testified earlier in the trial that he gave Debbie Clemens a shot of HGH and that Roger Clemens was present.

Golf • Woods, Mickelson, Watson together at Olympic: Tiger Woods, Phil Mickelson and Masters champion Bubba Watson will play in the same group for the opening two rounds of the U.S. Open in San Francisco. It will be the first time Woods and Mickelson have been paired in the U.S. Open since the USGA grouped players off the world ranking at Torrey Pines in 2008. The rankings were used for another big group — Luke Donald, Rory McIlroy and Lee Westwood. — From wire reports


FRIDAY, JUNE 8, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

O  A

GOLF ROUNDUP

Two shoot 66 to lead Tradition

TELEVISION Today GOLF 6 a.m.: European Tour, Nordea Masters, third round, Golf Channel. 9 a.m.: LPGA Tour, LPGA Championship, second round, Golf Channel. Noon: PGA Tour, St. Jude Classic, second round, Golf Channel. 3:30 p.m.: Champions Tour, Regions Tradition, second round, Golf Channel. SOCCER 8:30 a.m.: UEFA European Championship, Poland vs. Greece, ESPN. 11:30 a.m.: UEFA European Championship, Russia vs. Czech Republic, ESPN. 4 p.m.: Men, World Cup qualifier, United States vs. Antigua & Barbuda, ESPN. BASEBALL 9 a.m.: College, NCAA super regionals, Stony Brook at LSU, ESPN2. Noon: College, NCAA super regionals, St. John’s at Arizona, ESPN2. 4 p.m.: MLB, New York Mets at New York Yankees or Detroit Tigers at Cincinnati Reds, MLB Network. 4 p.m.: College, NCAA super regionals, Stanford at Florida State, ESPN2. 6 p.m.: College, NCAA super regionals, TCU at UCLA, ESPN. 7 p.m.: MLB, Los Angeles Dodgers at Seattle Mariners, Root Sports. TENNIS 11 a.m.: French Open, men’s semifinal (sameday tape), NBC. CYCLING Noon: Criterium du Dauphine, stage 5 (same-day tape), NBC Sports Network. MOTOR SPORTS 4:30 p.m.: IndyCar, Firestone 550, qualifying, NBC Sports Network. BOXING 7 p.m.: Kelly Pavlik vs. Scott Sigmon, ESPN2.

Saturday GOLF 4:30 a.m.: European Tour, Nordea Masters, final round, Golf Channel. 11 a.m.: LPGA Tour, LPGA Championship, third round, Golf Channel. Noon: PGA Tour, St. Jude Classic, third round, CBS. 4:30 p.m.: Champions Tour, Regions Tradition, third round, Golf Channel. TENNIS 6 a.m.: French Open, women’s final, NBC. SOCCER 8:45 a.m.: UEFA European Championship, Netherlands vs. Denmark, ESPN. 11:30 a.m.: UEFA European Championship, Germany vs. Portugal, ESPN. BASEBALL 9 a.m.: College, NCAA super regionals, LSU vs. Stonybrook, ESPN2. Noon: College, NCAA super regionals, Arizona vs. St. John’s, ESPN2. 1 p.m.: MLB, Washington Nationals at Boston Red Sox or Texas Rangers at San Francisco Giants, MLB Network. 3 p.m.: College, NCAA super regionals, Florida State vs. Stanford, ESPN2. 4 p.m.: MLB, Los Angeles Dodgers at Seattle Mariners, Fox. 6 p.m.: College, NCAA super regionals, UCLA vs. TCU, ESPN2. 7 p.m.: MLB, Oakland Athletics at Arizona Diamondbacks, MLB Network. 8 p.m.: College, NCAA

super regionals, Oregon vs. Kent State, ESPNU. GYMNASTICS 10 a.m.: 2012 Visa Championships, NBC. TRACK AND FIELD Noon: Adidas Grand Prix, NBC. HORSE RACING 1:30 p.m.: 144th Belmont Stakes, NBC. MOTORSPORTS 2 p.m.: Motorcycle racing, AMA Motocross: Moto 2, NBC Sports Network. 5 p.m.: IndyCar racing, Firestone 550, NBC Sports Network. 10 p.m.: Auto racing, Global Rallycross Championship (sameday tape), ESPN2. HOCKEY 5 p.m.: NHL playoffs, Stanley Cup finals, Los Angeles Kings at New Jersey Devils, NBC. BASKETBALL 5:30 p.m.: NBA playoffs, Boston Celtics at Miami Heat, ESPN. CYCLING 8:30 p.m.: Criterium du Dauphine, stage 6 (same-day tape), NBC Sports Network. 9:30 p.m.: Tour de Suisse, stage 1 (sameday tape), NBC Sports Network.

Sunday TENNIS 6 a.m.: French Open, men’s final, NBC. SOCCER 8:45 a.m.: UEFA European Championship, Spain vs. Italy, ESPN. 11:30 a.m.: UEFA European Championship, Republic of Ireland vs. Croatia, ESPN. BASEBALL 10 a.m.: College, NCAA super regionals, Florida vs. North Carolina State, ESPN2. 10 a.m.: MLB, New York Mets at New York Yankees, TBS. 1 p.m.: College, NCAA super regionals, Baylor vs. Arkansas, ESPN2. 1 p.m.: MLB, Los Angeles Dodgers at Seattle Mariners, Root. 4 p.m.: College, NCAA super regionals, South Carolina vs. Oklahoma, ESPN2. 5 p.m.: MLB, Detroit Tigers at Cincinnati Reds, ESPN. 7 p.m.: College, NCAA super regionals, UCLA vs. TCU (if necessary), ESPN2. 7 p.m.: College, NCAA super regionals, Oregon vs. Kent State, ESPNU. MOTORSPORTS 10 a.m.: NASCAR, Sprint Cup: Pocono 400, TNT. 11 a.m.: Formula One racing, Canadian Grand Prix, Fox. GOLF 11 a.m.: LPGA Tour, LPGA Championship, final round, Golf Channel. Noon: PGA Tour, St. Jude Classic, final round, CBS. 4:30 p.m.: Champions Tour, Regions Tradition, final round, Golf Channel. GYMNASTICS 1 p.m.: 2012 Visa Championships, NBC. CYCLING 4 p.m.: Criterium du Dauphine, stage 7 (same-day tape), NBC Sports Network. 7 p.m.: Tour de Suisse, stage 2 (same-day tape), NBC Sports Network.

RADIO Saturday BASKETBALL 5:30 p.m.: NBA playoffs, Boston Celtics at Miami Heat, KICE-AM 940. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

D3

Charles Trainor Jr. / The Associated Press

Miami Heat forward LeBron James (6) shoots over Boston Celtics forward Paul Pierce (34) during the first half in Game 6 of the Eastern Conference finals, Thursday in Boston.

Heat roll over Celtics, force Game 7 in East By Brian Mahoney The Associated Press

BOSTON — LeBron James pushed away elimination, right along with any defender who tried to stop him. He wasn’t going to let another season end in Boston. The Eastern Conference finals, and his chase of an NBA championship, are headed back to Miami for a Game 7. James had 45 points and 15 rebounds, overwhelming the Celtics and leading the Heat to a 98-79 victory Thursday night that forced the decisive game. “He was absolutely fearless tonight, and it was contagious,” Heat coach Erik Spoelstra said. “The way he approached the last 48 hours, and not only LeBron, but everybody else. Nobody likes getting dirt thrown on your face before you’re even dead. He showed great resolve.” James shot 19 of 26 from the field and finished four points shy of his playoff career-high while playing 45 minutes, not sitting down until the victory was long secured. After two days of questions about the Heat’s future and his own history, James provided his response in resounding fashion in a building where Miami had lost 15 of its previous 16 games. “In an environment like this, you want to have a big game,” he said. “I wanted to be there for my teammates, no matter what was going on throughout the course of the game. “This was a gut check for us, and it’s good to see we were able to bounce back after that loss, after that Game 5 loss at home.” Dwyane Wade added 17 points for the Heat, who need a victory at home Saturday night to return to the NBA finals. And if James plays like this again, Miami should have no problem getting it. “He played amazing. He was locked in from the beginning of the game like I’ve never seen him before,” Wade said. Rajon Rondo had 21 points and 10 assists for Boston. Kevin Garnett and Brandon Bass each scored 12 points, but Paul Pierce had only nine on fourof-18 shooting. In the site of some of James’ biggest disappointments, the only disappointed ones Thursday were the thousands of fans who hoped to see a celebration but instead filed out of the TD Garden midway through the fourth quarter, just before the league MVP called it a night. “He was comfortable all night,” Rondo said. “We didn’t get into his air space.” Miami barely won Game 2 before dropping the next three games, but this one was never in doubt. James was a one-man force on what’s supposed to be a Big Three, carrying the Heat in the first half while Wade made only one of six shots.

NBA PLAYOFFS: EASTERN CONFERENCE FINAL The Celtics were hoping to complete a comeback from a 2-0 deficit, as Oklahoma City did in the Western Conference, and advance to face the Thunder in the NBA finals. But they missed 13 of 14 three-point attempts and will have to win a second straight game in Miami to play for the title. James’ season was twice ended in Boston while playing for Cleveland, the Celtics emerging as the winner in a Pierce-James duel in Game 7 of the 2008 East semifinals, then beating the Cavs in Game 6 of the second round two years later. That was James’ last game with Cleveland, leaving that summer for Miami and the All-Star help that Wade and Chris Bosh could provide. He needed none of it Thursday. He had 30 points by halftime and spent the night silencing the Celtics crowd and perhaps some of the doubters he somehow still has. He set the tone for the game by making six of seven shots and scoring 14 points in the first quarter, and he made sure the Heat were never challenged from there. “I hope now you guys can stop talking about LeBron and he doesn’t play in big games,” Celtics coach Doc Rivers said. “He was pretty good tonight. So we can put that to bed and go play Game 7.” Meanwhile, Pierce, whose threepointer over James was the biggest basket of Boston’s Game 5 victory, missed 13 of 16 shots through three quarters, including all six three-point attempts. The Heat obviously weren’t deflated by that loss and came to fight, scoring 10 straight points to build a 10-point lead shortly after Mario Chalmers was called for a technical foul after getting mixed up with Ray Allen. They extended it to 12 points later in the period, taking a 26-16 lead into the second after shooting 58 percent in the period. Wade finally got on the board with a jumper to open the second, but he seemed strangely passive even with Miami trying to save its season. No matter. James didn’t need the help. He had consecutive baskets for a 15-point lead and came up with a basket every time the Celtics tried to get any rhythm. He soared high above the rim — and any other player — for a follow dunk after the Celtics had crept within eight in the final 2 minutes of the half. Miami led 55-42 at the break. James made 12 of his first 13 shots before missing from the perimeter on his final attempt of the half. Only Rondo kept it from being a blowout, scoring 19 points and adding five assists in the half.

The Associated Press BIRMINGHAM, Ala. — Bill Glasson swiftly polished off his round at Shoal Creek, finishing before lunchtime and leaving the rest of the Regions Tradition field chasing. Dan Forsman didn’t catch up until about four hours later Thursday when he completed a run of four straight birdies at No. 14. Forsman and Glasson shared the first-round lead at 6-under 66 in the Regions Tradition, the second of the Champions Tour’s five major championships. Glasson and Fulton Allem were first on the course and done by 11 a.m., finishing up in 3 hours, 21 minutes. The solo lead held up longer than that, though Glasson might not have noticed because he said he wouldn’t spend the afternoon monitoring the scoreboard. “My philosophy is I need all the birdies to make up for the impending bogeys I’m going to make,” he said. “So it doesn’t do any good for me to watch. I just need to make as many birdies as I can. “This course will get you, there’s no doubt about it. It’s about one of the best courses in the country.” Glasson has overcome tougher obstacles. He has undergone 25 surgeries, including back and neck fusions. This is the first time he’s held at least a share of the lead since the 1997 Las Vegas Invitational, where he claimed the last of his seven PGA Tour titles. Fred Funk was a stroke back, and Bernard Langer opened with a 68. The event was held at Sunriver’s Crosswater Club from 2007 to 2010. Also on Thursday: Maggert, Merrick tied at 66 MEMPHIS, Tenn. — Jeff Maggert and John Merrick shot 4-under 66 to share the first-round lead in the St. Jude Classic, leaving U.S. Open champion Rory McIlroy two strokes back. Maggert took advantage Self Referrals Welcome

541-706-6900

Linda Stelter / The Associated Press

Dan Forsman acknowledges the gallery after finishing the first round of the Tradition Thursday in Shoal Creek, Ala.

of teeing off in the first group with calm conditions for the first seven holes, and finished with four birdies, an eagle and two bogeys. Three battle for LPGA lead PITTSFORD, N.Y. — Beatriz Recari, Ryann O’Toole and Giulia Sergas shot 3-under 69 to share the first-round lead in the LPGA Championship, while defending champion Yani Tseng matched her high score of the year with a 76. The top-ranked Tseng, a 10-stroke winner last year in the major championship, had six bogeys and only two birdies on the narrow Locust Hill Country Club course. Westwood tops Nordea Masters BRO, Sweden — Thirdranked Lee Westwood shot an 8-under 64 to take a threestroke lead after the second round at the European Tour’s Nordea Masters. The Englishman was at 12 under at Bro Hof Slott. Sweden’s Peter Hanson (68), Scotland’s Lloyd Saltman (64) and Spain’s Carlos del Moral (67) were tied for second.


D4

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JUNE 8, 2012

MAJ OR LEAGU E BAS EB ALL Texas Kinsler 2b Andrus ss Hamilton cf Beltre 3b Mi.Young dh N.Cruz rf Dav.Murphy lf Napoli c Moreland 1b Totals

AB 4 4 4 4 3 3 2 3 3 30

R 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

H 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 2 4

BI 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1

Brewers 4, Cubs 3 (10 innings)

SLIDING BY

AL Boxscores Athletics 7, Rangers 1 SO 2 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 6

Chicago Re.Johnson rf Camp p Campana cf Barney 2b S.Castro ss A.Soriano lf Russell p Corpas p f-Cardenas ph C.Coleman p Je.Baker 1b c-LaHair ph-1b Mather cf-lf I.Stewart 3b K.Hill c Garza p a-DeJesus ph-rf Totals

Avg. .272 .297 .341 .300 .284 .260 .253 .259 .272

Oakland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. J.Weeks 2b 4 2 1 0 1 0 .224 Crisp cf 4 1 2 4 1 0 .169 Reddick dh 4 0 0 0 0 3 .265 Cespedes lf 1 0 1 0 0 0 .275 1-Cowgill pr-rf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .247 S.Smith rf-lf 4 0 2 1 0 1 .240 Inge 3b 2 1 0 0 2 0 .191 Moss 1b 3 2 1 1 1 0 .167 K.Suzuki c 3 1 0 0 0 0 .207 Pennington ss 2 0 0 1 1 1 .196 Totals 30 7 7 7 6 6 Texas 000 100 000 — 1 4 0 Oakland 101 400 10x — 7 7 0 1-ran for Cespedes in the 1st. LOB—Texas 3, Oakland 7. 2B—Hamilton (12), S.Smith (6). 3B—Crisp (1). HR—Crisp (1), off Darvish; Moss (1), off Scheppers. SB—Crisp (8), Pennington 2 (9). SF—Pennington. DP—Oakland 1. Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Darvish L, 7-4 5 1-3 6 6 6 6 4 110 3.72 Scheppers 1 2-3 1 1 1 0 2 25 5.40 M.Lowe 1 0 0 0 0 0 9 3.09 Oakland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA McCarthy W, 5-3 7 3 1 1 0 5 88 2.79 Balfour 1 1 0 0 1 0 23 3.49 Blevins 1 0 0 0 0 1 15 1.78 T—2:31. A—14,779 (35,067).

Paul Sancya / The Associated Press

Detroit Tigers’ Don Kelly (32) disrupts Cleveland Indians second baseman Jason Kipnis from completing a double play in the eighth inning in Detroit on Thursday. The Tigers won 7-5.

STANDINGS, SCORES AND SCHEDULES

White Sox 4, Blue Jays 3 Toronto Lawrie 3b Rasmus cf Bautista rf K.Johnson dh Cooper 1b Y.Escobar ss Arencibia c Vizquel 2b McCoy lf a-Y.Gomes ph-lf Totals

AB 4 5 4 4 3 4 2 4 3 1 34

R 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 3

H 0 1 1 1 1 2 0 0 1 0 7

BI 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2

BB 1 0 1 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 5

SO 1 1 0 2 0 0 1 2 0 0 7

Avg. .281 .246 .229 .251 .364 .257 .231 .196 .333 .185

Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. De Aza cf 3 0 1 0 1 0 .296 Beckham 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .229 A.Dunn 1b 4 1 0 0 0 2 .215 Konerko dh 3 1 2 0 1 0 .371 1-Jor.Danks pr-dh 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Rios rf 4 1 2 3 0 0 .293 Pierzynski c 4 0 0 0 0 0 .297 Viciedo lf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .265 Al.Ramirez ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .213 O.Hudson 3b 4 0 2 1 0 0 .188 Totals 34 4 9 4 2 3 Toronto 030 000 000 — 3 7 0 Chicago 100 002 001 — 4 9 1 Two outs when winning run scored. a-grounded into a fielder’s choice for McCoy in the 8th. 1-ran for Konerko in the 8th. E—Al.Ramirez (5). LOB—Toronto 10, Chicago 6. 2B—Bautista (7), Y.Escobar (8). HR—Rios (6), off H.Alvarez. DP—Toronto 1.

American League Baltimore Tampa Bay New York Toronto Boston

W 32 32 31 30 29

L 25 25 25 27 28

Chicago Cleveland Detroit Kansas City Minnesota

W 32 30 26 24 22

L 25 26 31 31 34

Texas Los Angeles Oakland Seattle

W 33 29 26 26

L 25 29 32 33

East Division Pct GB WCGB .561 — — .561 — — .554 ½ ½ .526 2 2 .509 3 3 Central Division Pct GB WCGB .561 — — .536 1½ 1½ .456 6 6 .436 7 7 .393 9½ 9½ West Division Pct GB WCGB .569 — — .500 4 3½ .448 7 6½ .441 7½ 7

Thursday’s Games Detroit 7, Cleveland 5 Oakland 7, Texas 1 Tampa Bay 7, N.Y. Yankees 3 Boston 7, Baltimore 0 Chicago White Sox 4, Toronto 3

Tigers 7, Indians 5 AB 5 4 4 4 2 4 3 1 4 4 35

R 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 5

H 2 1 2 1 1 1 0 0 2 1 11

BI 0 2 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 5

BB 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 4

SO 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 3

Avg. .281 .296 .279 .232 .274 .282 .202 .185 .221 .216

Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Berry cf 4 1 1 0 0 2 .306 Boesch rf 4 2 2 1 0 0 .227 Ma.Young lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Mi.Cabrera 3b 4 1 1 2 0 1 .323 Fielder 1b 3 1 1 1 1 0 .318 D.Young dh 4 0 1 1 0 2 .261 Jh.Peralta ss 4 1 2 0 0 0 .264 Kelly lf-rf 3 0 1 1 1 0 .184 Worth 2b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .190 Holaday c 2 0 0 0 0 0 .167 Totals 32 7 10 6 2 6 Cleveland 000 102 200 — 5 11 1 Detroit 400 300 00x — 7 10 1 a-popped out for Duncan in the 8th. E—Jo.Lopez (2), Fielder (7). LOB—Cleveland 8, Detroit 4. 2B—A.Cabrera (15), Kipnis (5), Jo.Lopez (7), Boesch (10). HR—Mi.Cabrera (13), off D.Lowe. SB—Kipnis (14). DP—Cleveland 1; Detroit 2. Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP D.Lowe L, 7-4 5 9 7 7 1 4 80 Barnes 2 0 0 0 0 1 22 Accardo 1 1 0 0 1 1 15 Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP Crosby W, 1-1 5 1-3 5 3 3 3 2 91 Villarreal 1 1-3 1 1 1 0 1 18 Coke 0 3 1 1 0 0 11 Benoit H, 14 1 1-3 2 0 0 1 0 29 Valverde S, 10-13 1 0 0 0 0 0 15 Coke pitched to 3 batters in the 7th. T—2:51. A—40,851 (41,255).

ERA 3.72 0.00 1.54 ERA 9.35 1.35 4.37 2.52 4.24

Red Sox 7, Orioles 0 Baltimore En.Chavez rf Hardy ss Ad.Jones cf a-N.Johnson ph Wieters c C.Davis dh Mar.Reynolds 1b Betemit 3b Flaherty lf Andino 2b Totals

AB 4 4 3 0 4 4 2 3 2 3 29

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 4

BI 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

BB 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 6

Avg. .159 .260 .303 .181 .241 .294 .218 .224 .183 .245

Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Nava lf 3 1 2 2 2 0 .306 Pedroia 2b 4 1 0 1 1 0 .280 Youkilis 1b-3b 4 1 2 1 1 0 .246 Ortiz dh 4 0 0 0 1 1 .304 Middlebrooks 3b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .312 Sweeney cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .302 Ad.Gonzalez rf-1b 4 1 3 2 0 0 .272 Aviles ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .262 D.McDonald cf-rf 3 2 1 0 1 0 .197 Shoppach c 4 1 1 0 0 1 .275 Totals 33 7 9 6 7 3 Baltimore 000 000 000 — 0 4 2 Boston 222 000 01x — 7 9 1 a-walked for Ad.Jones in the 9th. E—En.Chavez (2), Andino (8), Buchholz (1). LOB—Baltimore 5, Boston 9. 2B—C.Davis (9), Nava (11), Youkilis (5), Ad.Gonzalez (21), D.McDonald (6). DP—Boston 3. Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Matusz L, 5-6 2 4 5 4 5 0 67 4.82 Mig.Gonzalez 4 2 1 1 2 2 55 2.45 Gregg 1 1 0 0 0 0 13 3.86 O’Day 1 2 1 1 0 1 20 1.98 Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Buchholz W, 6-2 9 4 0 0 1 6 125 5.77 Matusz pitched to 1 batter in the 3rd. T—2:50. A—37,307 (37,495).

L10 3-7 4-6 6-4 6-4 6-4

Str Home Away L-1 14-13 18-12 W-1 19-11 13-14 L-1 16-12 15-13 L-1 16-12 14-15 W-1 14-16 15-12

L10 7-3 4-6 3-7 6-4 7-3

Str Home Away W-1 15-16 17-9 L-1 16-16 14-10 W-1 13-16 13-15 L-1 8-20 16-11 W-1 9-17 13-17

L10 3-7 6-4 4-6 5-5

Str Home Away L-2 15-11 18-14 L-1 16-14 13-15 W-2 13-16 13-16 W-1 9-13 17-20

Today’s Games Kansas City (Hochevar 3-6) at Pittsburgh (Bedard 3-6), 4:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets (J.Santana 3-2) at N.Y. Yankees (Kuroda 4-6), 4:05 p.m. Philadelphia (Blanton 4-6) at Baltimore (Arrieta 2-7), 4:05 p.m. Detroit (Porcello 3-4) at Cincinnati (Latos 4-2), 4:10 p.m. Tampa Bay (Hellickson 4-2) at Miami (Nolasco 6-3), 4:10 p.m. Washington (Strasburg 6-1) at Boston (Doubront 6-2), 4:10 p.m. Toronto (Drabek 4-6) at Atlanta (Beachy 5-4), 4:35 p.m. Chicago Cubs (T.Wood 0-2) at Minnesota (Walters 2-1), 5:10 p.m. Houston (W.Rodriguez 4-4) at Chicago White Sox (Floyd 4-5), 5:10 p.m. Cleveland (Tomlin 2-3) at St. Louis (Westbrook 4-5), 5:15 p.m. L.A. Angels (C.Wilson 6-4) at Colorado (White 2-3), 5:40 p.m. Oakland (Milone 6-5) at Arizona (D.Hudson 2-1), 6:40 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Eovaldi 0-2) at Seattle (Millwood 3-5), 7:10 p.m. Texas (M.Harrison 7-3) at San Francisco (Zito 5-2), 7:15 p.m.

Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA H.Alvarez 7 7 3 3 1 2 108 3.76 Oliver 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 4 1.89 Frasor 2-3 0 0 0 1 0 11 4.50 Cordero L, 1-3 2-3 2 1 1 0 0 12 5.79 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Peavy 6 4 3 2 5 4 117 3.05 Thornton 1 1 0 0 0 1 13 3.28 N.Jones 1 1 0 0 0 1 13 1.52 Reed W, 1-1 1 1 0 0 0 1 14 4.58 Peavy pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. T—2:50. A—25,743 (40,615).

Cleveland Choo rf A.Cabrera ss Kipnis 2b C.Santana dh Jo.Lopez 3b Brantley cf Duncan lf a-Damon ph-lf Kotchman 1b Marson c Totals

National League Washington Atlanta New York Miami Philadelphia

W 32 32 32 31 28

L 23 25 26 26 31

Cincinnati Pittsburgh St. Louis Milwaukee Houston Chicago

W 31 29 30 26 24 19

L 25 27 28 31 33 38

Los Angeles San Francisco Arizona Colorado San Diego

W 37 33 27 24 19

L 21 25 30 32 39

East Division Pct GB WCGB .582 — — .561 1 — .552 1½ ½ .544 2 1 .475 6 5 Central Division Pct GB WCGB .554 — — .518 2 2½ .517 2 2½ .456 5½ 6 .421 7½ 8 .333 12½ 13 West Division Pct GB WCGB .638 — — .569 4 — .474 9½ 5 .429 12 7½ .328 18 13½

Thursday’s Games L.A. Dodgers 8, Philadelphia 3 N.Y. Mets 3, Washington 1 Milwaukee 4, Chicago Cubs 3, 10 innings San Francisco 8, San Diego 3 Atlanta 8, Miami 2 Pittsburgh 5, Cincinnati 4, 10 innings St. Louis 14, Houston 2

L10 5-5 6-4 5-5 5-5 3-7

Str Home Away L-1 18-10 14-13 W-4 12-11 20-14 W-1 19-12 13-14 L-3 16-13 15-13 L-6 12-19 16-12

L10 5-5 7-3 4-6 7-3 2-8 4-6

Str Home Away L-1 16-11 15-14 W-1 16-11 13-16 W-2 13-11 17-17 W-2 14-16 12-15 L-2 18-14 6-19 L-2 12-15 7-23

L10 5-5 8-2 6-4 7-3 2-8

Str Home Away W-4 21-9 16-12 W-2 18-11 15-14 W-2 12-16 15-14 L-2 15-15 9-17 L-2 14-20 5-19

Today’s Game San Diego (Volquez 2-5) at Milwaukee (Marcum 4-3), 5:10 p.m.

American League roundup

National League roundup

• Red Sox 7, Orioles 0: BOSTON — Clay Buchholz pitched a four-hitter for his third career shutout — all against Baltimore — leading Boston over the Orioles. Buchholz (6-2) struck out six and walked one. His other complete games were a five-hitter in an 11-0 win on June 4, 2010, and a no-hitter on Sept. 1, 2007, his second big league start and appearance. • Tigers 7, Indians 5: DETROIT — Miguel Cabrera homered, Brennan Boesch broke out of a slump with a pair of hits and Casey Crosby earned his first major league win as Detroit beat Cleveland. • Athletics 7, Rangers 1: OAKLAND, Calif. — Coco Crisp hit a solo homer and bases-loaded triple to match his season total for extra-base hits and Oakland won a series for the first time since May 4-6 against Tampa Bay. The Athletics outscored the Rangers 24-8 in winning three of the four games. • White Sox 4, Blue Jays 3: CHICAGO — Orlando Hudson singled in the winning run with two outs in the ninth inning to lead Chicago over Toronto. Dayan Viciedo had a one-out single, and advanced to second on a wild pitch. • Rays 7, Yankees 3: NEW YORK — David Price struck out eight over five scrappy innings to become the AL leader in wins and Tampa Bay beat New York to avoid a three-game series sweep. Price (8-3) finished his night by retiring two of the Yankees’ most dangerous hitters with the bases loaded.

• Los Angeles 8, Phillies 3: PHILADELPHIA — Aaron Harang got his 100th career victory as Los Angeles overcame a two-run, sixth-inning deficit, and the Dodgers beat Philadelphia. • Pirates 5, Reds 4: CINCINNATI — Michael McKenry drove in the first earned run allowed by Aroldis Chapman with an RBI double in the 10th inning, rallying Pittsburgh over Cincinnati. • Braves 8, Marlins 2: MIAMI — Jason Heyward hit two solo homers to center and Atlanta completed a three-game sweep of Miami. • Mets 3, Nationals 1: WASHINGTON — Knuckleballer R.A. Dickey (9-1) tossed four-hit ball for scoreless 7 1⁄3 innings and extended the longest shutout streak of his career to 24 2⁄3 innings as New York defeated Washington. • Brewers 4, Cubs 3: MILWAUKEE — Norichika Aoki homered twice, including a drive off Casey Coleman (0-1) leading off the 10th inning as Milwaukee beat Chicago. • Giants 8, Padres 3: SAN DIEGO — Matt Cain (7-2) struck out nine in seven innings, allowing three runs — none earned — and seven hits to win his sixth straight start as San Francisco beat San Diego. • Cardinals 14, Astros 2: HOUSTON — David Freese hit a grand slam and a two-run homer and rookie Lance Lynn struck out a career-high 11 in earning his ninth win as St. Louis cruised past Houston.

HR—Martin (6), off Howell. DP—New York 1.

Rays 7, Yankees 3 Tampa Bay E.Johnson ss Zobrist dh De.Jennings lf B.Upton cf S.Rodriguez 3b C.Pena 1b Lobaton c Joyce rf Sutton 2b Totals

AB 5 4 5 4 4 4 3 3 4 36

R 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 2 1 7

H 1 1 1 2 0 0 2 1 2 10

BI 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 2 6

BB 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 3

SO 3 2 1 0 0 3 0 2 1 12

Avg. .246 .200 .270 .280 .224 .196 .273 .285 .250

New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Jeter ss 3 0 0 0 2 1 .319 Granderson cf 5 0 0 0 0 4 .249 Teixeira 1b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .245 Al.Rodriguez 3b 4 1 1 0 1 2 .275 Cano 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .290 Swisher rf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .250 An.Jones dh 2 0 0 0 1 1 .224 b-Ibanez ph-dh 1 0 1 1 0 0 .255 J.Nix lf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .219 c-Er.Chavez ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .276 Wise lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .130 C.Stewart c 2 0 1 1 0 0 .239 a-Martin ph-c 2 1 1 1 0 1 .210 Totals 34 3 6 3 5 13 Tampa Bay 012 200 002 — 7 10 1 New York 010 000 011 — 3 6 2 a-struck out for C.Stewart in the 7th. c-grounded out for J.Nix in the 8th. E—E.Johnson (6), Al.Rodriguez (3), Swisher (2). LOB—Tampa Bay 6, New York 10. 2B—E.Johnson (4), De.Jennings (3), B.Upton (10), Sutton 2 (4).

Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Price W, 8-3 5 3 1 1 4 8 109 2.40 W.Davis 2 0 0 0 0 4 21 2.28 McGee 1-3 1 1 1 1 0 10 1.93 Jo.Peralta H, 14 2-3 1 0 0 0 1 12 4.13 Howell 2-3 1 1 1 0 0 20 4.08 Rodney 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 2 1.01 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Sabathia L, 7-3 7 7 5 3 1 12 121 3.69 Eppley 2-3 1 0 0 0 0 3 3.97 Rapada 2-3 0 1 1 1 0 11 4.30 Wade 2-3 2 1 1 1 0 16 2.84 T—3:30. A—39,891 (50,291).

NL Boxscores Giants 8, Padres 3 San Francisco G.Blanco rf-lf Theriot 2b Me.Cabrera lf c-Schierholtz ph-rf Posey c Pagan cf Belt 1b Arias 3b B.Crawford ss M.Cain p b-Pill ph Affeldt p S.Casilla p Totals

AB 5 5 4 1 5 5 4 5 5 2 1 0 0 42

R 2 1 2 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8

H 2 4 1 0 2 2 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 15

BI 1 1 0 0 2 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 8

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 0 0 1 0 2 2 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 8

Avg. .288 .284 .364 .242 .296 .321 .236 .233 .225 .172 .224 .000 .000

San Diego

AB R H BI BB SO Avg.

Maybin cf 5 1 0 0 0 0 .218 Denorfia rf 4 0 1 0 1 0 .256 Alonso 1b 4 1 0 0 1 1 .261 Headley 3b 5 0 3 2 0 2 .260 Guzman lf 5 0 0 0 0 3 .247 Jo.Baker c 4 0 0 0 1 1 .210 Forsythe 2b 4 0 1 0 1 1 .500 E.Cabrera ss 4 0 3 0 0 1 .258 Marquis p 2 1 1 0 0 1 .500 a-Kotsay ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .279 Brach p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Hinshaw p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 d-Quentin ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .481 Ohlendorf p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 38 3 9 2 4 10 San Francisco 211 000 211 — 8 15 4 San Diego 003 000 000 — 3 9 1 a-flied out for Marquis in the 6th. b-popped out for M.Cain in the 8th. c-lined out for Me.Cabrera in the 8th. d-was hit by a pitch for Hinshaw in the 8th. E—Pagan (5), Theriot (1), Arias (4), Belt (2), Marquis (1). LOB—San Francisco 9, San Diego 13. 2B—G.Blanco (10), Theriot (4), Belt (8), Headley (15), E.Cabrera (6). HR—Posey (7), off Marquis; Pagan (5), off Brach; G.Blanco (3), off Hinshaw. SB—Theriot (3), Me.Cabrera (10), Pagan (12). DP—San Francisco. San Francisco Cain W, 7-2 Affeldt Casilla S, 15-16 San Diego Marquis L, 0-1 Brach Hinshaw Ohlendorf

IP 7 2-3 1 1-3 IP 6 1 1 1

H 7 1 1 H 9 2 2 2

R 3 0 0 R 4 2 1 1

ER BB SO NP ERA 0 1 9 116 2.41 0 1 1 18 2.53 0 2 0 27 1.46 ER BB SO NP ERA 2 1 6 91 3.00 2 0 1 18 3.98 1 0 0 19 4.91 1 0 1 22 9.00

T—3:05. A—22,015 (42,691).

AB 3 0 1 5 5 4 0 0 1 0 2 1 4 4 4 2 1 37

R 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 3

H 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 1 1 0 7

BI 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 3

BB 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

SO 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 3 1 1 0 8

Avg. .261 --.274 .269 .303 .263 ----.172 .000 .250 .311 .258 .194 .176 .091 .272

Milwaukee AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Aoki rf 5 3 3 2 0 0 .303 Morgan cf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .228 d-C.Gomez ph-cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .261 Braun lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .301 Hart 1b 4 1 2 1 0 1 .255 Kottaras c 3 0 1 1 0 1 .245 Fr.Rodriguez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --e-Ar.Ramirez ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .249 1-Greinke pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .154 Axford p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --R.Weeks 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .160 Ransom 3b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .236 Maysonet ss 3 0 0 0 0 0 .200 Wolf p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .100 Veras p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-M.Maldonado ph-c2 0 0 0 0 1 .192 Totals 33 4 6 4 2 9 Chicago 000 000 120 0 — 3 7 2 Milwaukee 000 101 010 1 — 4 6 1 No outs when winning run scored. a-was hit by a pitch for Garza in the 7th. b-struck out for Veras in the 7th. c-homered for Je.Baker in the 8th. d-sacrificed for Morgan in the 8th. e-was intentionally walked for Fr.Rodriguez in the 8th. f-flied out for Corpas in the 10th. 1-ran for Ar.Ramirez in the 8th. E—Je.Baker (1), I.Stewart (5), Ransom (3). LOB— Chicago 7, Milwaukee 6. 2B—K.Hill (1), Garza (1), Hart 2 (16). HR—LaHair (12), off Fr.Rodriguez; Aoki (2), off Garza; Aoki (3), off C.Coleman. DP—Milwaukee 1. Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Garza 6 3 2 2 1 6 98 3.99 Camp 1 0 0 0 0 2 13 2.37 Russell 0 1 1 1 0 0 4 2.16 Corpas BS, 1-1 2 1 0 0 1 1 29 0.00 C.Coleman L, 0-1 0 1 1 1 0 0 3 2.77 Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Wolf 6 2-3 4 1 0 2 6 117 5.45 Veras H, 7 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 2 4.28 Fr.Rodriguez 1 3 2 2 0 1 27 4.68 Axford W, 1-2 2 0 0 0 0 1 23 3.22 Russell pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. C.Coleman pitched to 1 batter in the 10th. T—3:22. A—30,123 (41,900).

Dodgers 8, Phillies 3 Los Angeles D.Gordon ss E.Herrera 3b J.Rivera lf Ethier rf Hairston Jr. 2b Loney 1b Castellanos rf-lf Gwynn Jr. cf Treanor c Harang p b-De Jesus ph J.Wright p d-Abreu ph Sh.Tolleson p Belisario p Totals

AB 5 3 4 1 4 5 5 4 4 2 1 0 1 0 0 39

R 1 2 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 8

H 1 0 2 1 2 2 0 1 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 12

BI 0 1 0 2 2 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 8

BB 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

SO 2 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 7

Avg. .229 .293 .242 .305 .358 .257 .118 .271 .300 .040 .292 .000 .325 -----

Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Rollins ss 4 1 2 0 1 0 .251 Pierre lf 5 0 0 0 0 0 .319 Pence rf 5 1 2 1 0 0 .266 Wigginton 3b 3 0 1 1 0 1 .272 Victorino cf 3 0 1 0 1 0 .249 Fontenot 2b 4 0 3 1 0 0 .414 Mayberry 1b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .225 Schneider c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .258 c-Ruiz ph-c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .356 Hamels p 2 1 1 0 0 0 .231 a-Thome ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .100 Savery p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Qualls p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Valdes p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --e-Luna ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .300 Totals 35 3 10 3 3 4 Los Angeles 000 103 004 — 8 12 2 Philadelphia 003 000 000 — 3 10 3 a-flied out for Hamels in the 6th. b-grounded out for Harang in the 7th. c-flied out for Schneider in the 8th. d-singled for J.Wright in the 9th. e-walked for Valdes in the 9th. E—E.Herrera (2), Castellanos (1), Wigginton 2 (7), Fontenot (1). LOB—Los Angeles 7, Philadelphia 9. 2B—Ethier (19). SB—Pierre (10).DP—Los Angeles 2. Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Harang W, 5-3 6 8 3 3 1 3 92 3.95 J.Wright H, 2 2 2 0 0 0 1 26 4.62 Sh.Tolleson 0 0 0 0 2 0 10 Belisario 1 0 0 0 0 0 7 1.17 Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hamels L, 8-3 6 6 4 3 1 6 107 2.93 Savery 2 1 0 0 1 0 28 3.12 Qualls 1-3 5 4 3 0 0 18 5.32 Valdes 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 10 2.13 Sh.Tolleson pitched to 2 batters in the 9th. T—3:06. A—44,096 (43,651).

Mets 3, Nationals 1 New York AB R H Nieuwenhuis cf-rf 5 1 1 Thole c 5 0 1 D.Wright 3b 4 1 2 Duda rf 4 1 2 F.Francisco p 0 0 0 Dan.Murphy 2b 5 0 2 Hairston lf 3 0 0 I.Davis 1b 3 0 0 Quintanilla ss 3 0 2 Dickey p 3 0 0 Parnell p 0 0 0 A.Torres cf 0 0 0 Totals 35 3 10

BI 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

BB 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 4

SO 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 5

Avg. .293 .283 .362 .262 --.290 .282 .161 .308 .115 --.216

Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Lombardozzi lf-2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .289 Harper cf-rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .276 Zimmerman 3b 4 1 2 1 0 1 .245 LaRoche 1b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .269 Morse rf-lf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .250 Desmond ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .257 Espinosa 2b 2 0 0 0 0 1 .220 Gorzelanny p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .500 a-Nady ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .151 Mic.Gonzalez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --J.Solano c 3 0 1 0 0 0 .286 Wang p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Ankiel cf 0 0 0 0 2 0 .223 Totals 30 1 5 1 3 8 New York 000 020 100 — 3 10 0 Washington 000 000 001 — 1 5 0 a-grounded out for Gorzelanny in the 8th. LOB—New York 11, Washington 5. 2B—Duda (6). 3B—D.Wright (2). HR—Duda (10), off Wang; Zimmerman (3), off F.Francisco. SB—Nieuwenhuis (4), D.Wright (6), Dan.Murphy (4). S—Dickey. DP—New York 2; Washington 1. New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Dickey W, 9-1 7 1-3 4 0 0 2 8 105 2.44 Parnell H, 12 2-3 0 0 0 1 0 8 2.81 Frncisco S, 15-18 1 1 1 1 0 0 14 5.55 Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Wang L, 1-2 5 1-3 8 2 2 3 1 84 5.11 Gorzelanny 2 2-3 1 1 1 1 4 42 3.38 Mic.Gonzalez 1 1 0 0 0 0 15 0.00 T—2:47. A—32,096 (41,487).

Braves 8, Marlins 2 Atlanta Bourn cf Prado 3b McCann c Uggla 2b M.Diaz lf Venters p O’Flaherty p

AB 4 5 4 4 3 0 0

R 2 1 0 0 0 0 0

H 3 2 0 0 0 0 0

BI 3 3 0 0 0 0 0

BB 1 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 0 0 0 3 0 0 0

Avg. .305 .324 .248 .267 .246 -----

d-D.Ross ph C.Martinez p Heyward rf Hinske 1b Simmons ss Minor p a-J.Francisco ph Durbin p Constanza lf Totals

1 0 4 3 3 1 1 0 2 35

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 2 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 8 9 8 3 6

.245 .000 .246 .221 .333 .045 .231 --.240

Miami AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Reyes ss 4 1 2 1 1 0 .278 Infante 2b 5 0 1 0 0 2 .300 H.Ramirez 3b 3 0 0 0 2 0 .263 Stanton rf 5 1 1 1 0 3 .296 Ruggiano cf 2 0 1 0 2 0 .357 Morrison 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .216 D.Solano lf 3 0 2 0 0 0 .500 Cishek p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Choate p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Webb p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 c-Do.Murphy ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .140 Mujica p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Da.Jennings p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Hayes c 3 0 1 0 1 2 .281 Buehrle p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .067 b-Dobbs ph-lf 2 0 1 0 0 0 .301 Totals 34 2 9 2 6 9 Atlanta 000 002 114 — 8 9 0 Miami 000 010 010 — 2 9 0 a-popped out for Minor in the 6th. b-flied out for Buehrle in the 6th. c-struck out for Webb in the 8th. d-flied out for O’Flaherty in the 9th. LOB—Atlanta 3, Miami 11. 2B—Ruggiano (2), D.Solano 2 (2), Hayes (5). HR—Prado (4), off Buehrle; Heyward (7), off Cishek; Heyward (8), off Mujica; Bourn (6), off Da.Jennings; Reyes (1), off Minor; Stanton (14), off O’Flaherty. DP—Atlanta 1. Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Minor W, 3-4 5 4 1 1 5 4 103 6.57 Durbin H, 5 1 1 0 0 0 1 20 4.87 Venters H, 11 1 0 0 0 1 0 9 3.27 O’Flaherty H, 10 1 2 1 1 0 2 18 3.74 C.Martinez 1 2 0 0 0 2 18 3.77 Miami IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Buehrle L, 5-6 6 3 2 2 1 3 91 3.49 Cishek 1 1 2 2 1 1 21 1.82 Choate 1-3 1 0 0 0 1 8 0.52 Webb 2-3 1 0 0 0 1 13 3.57 Mujica 1-3 2 3 3 1 0 14 4.74 Da.Jennings 2-3 1 1 1 0 0 14 1.80 Cishek pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. T—3:14. A—22,402 (37,442).

Pirates 5, Reds 4 (10 innings) Pittsburgh Presley lf Walker 2b Resop p A.McCutchen cf G.Jones 1b McGehee 1b P.Alvarez 3b Tabata rf Barmes ss McKenry c Correia p J.Hughes p a-Hague ph J.Cruz p Watson p Grilli p Hanrahan p d-J.Harrison ph-2b Totals

AB 5 5 0 4 2 1 4 4 3 3 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 35

R 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

H 2 1 0 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9

BI 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 0 2 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 8

Avg. .235 .270 .000 .332 .246 .195 .200 .219 .191 .193 .158 .000 .224 --------.226

Cincinnati AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Cozart ss 4 0 1 0 1 0 .245 Heisey cf 5 0 0 0 0 2 .254 Votto 1b 5 1 3 0 0 2 .354 B.Phillips 2b 5 0 2 0 0 0 .272 Bruce rf 3 1 2 2 2 1 .263 Frazier 3b 5 0 0 0 0 1 .260 Ludwick lf 5 2 2 2 0 2 .214 Mesoraco c 4 0 0 0 0 0 .184 Leake p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .300 b-Cairo ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .128 Marshall p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Arredondo p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Hanigan ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .297 1-Negron pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Chapman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 39 4 10 4 4 9 Pittsburgh 000 201 100 1 — 5 9 0 Cincinnati 010 011 001 0 — 4 10 0 a-flied out for J.Hughes in the 7th. b-lined out for Leake in the 7th. c-walked for Arredondo in the 9th. d-struck out for Hanrahan in the 10th. 1-ran for Hanigan in the 9th. LOB—Pittsburgh 3, Cincinnati 9. 2B—Presley (5), Walker (10), Barmes (10), McKenry (3), Votto 2 (24). HR—Bruce (13), off Correia; Ludwick (7), off Correia; Ludwick (8), off Hanrahan. DP—Cincinnati 1. Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP Correia 5 8 3 3 1 4 71 J.Hughes 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 J.Cruz H, 10 2-3 0 0 0 1 1 19 Watson H, 5 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 7 Grilli H, 14 1 0 0 0 0 1 6 Hanrahan W, 3-0 1 1 1 1 1 0 15 Resop S, 1-1 1 1 0 0 1 1 25 Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP Leake 7 7 4 4 0 5 80 Marshall 1 0 0 0 0 0 6 Arredondo 1 0 0 0 0 1 9 Chapman L, 4-1 1 2 1 1 0 2 27 Correia pitched to 3 batters in the 6th. T—3:07. A—23,106 (42,319).

ERA 4.29 1.93 2.11 3.57 1.64 2.86 3.49 ERA 4.97 3.32 2.03 0.30

Cardinals 14, Astros 2 St. Louis AB R H Furcal ss 5 2 3 c-Descalso ph-2b 1 0 0 Beltran rf 3 2 1 T.Cruz c 1 0 0 Holliday lf 3 1 2 Ma.Adams 1b 1 0 0 Craig 1b-lf 5 2 3 Freese 3b 5 2 2 Y.Molina c 2 1 1 E.Sanchez p 0 0 0 Salas p 0 0 0 d-S.Hill ph 1 0 0 S.Freeman p 0 0 0 Greene 2b-ss 6 1 1 S.Robinson cf 5 3 3 Lynn p 1 0 0 a-Chambers ph-rf 2 0 0 Totals 41 14 16

BI 2 0 2 0 0 0 2 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 14

BB 0 0 1 0 2 0 1 1 3 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 10

SO 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 3 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 1 11

Avg. .319 .225 .276 .175 .276 .273 .382 .271 .328 --.000 .143 --.210 .276 .111 .250

Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Schafer cf 3 0 0 0 1 3 .251 Lyon p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --J.Castro c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .261 Altuve 2b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .323 Lowrie ss 4 1 2 1 0 0 .288 J.D.Martinez lf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .240 Wallace 1b-3b 4 1 1 0 0 2 .429 C.Johnson 3b-rf 4 0 1 1 0 1 .291 Bogusevic rf-p 4 0 1 0 0 2 .226 C.Snyder c-1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .198 Happ p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .091 D.Carpenter p 1 0 1 0 0 0 1.000 R.Cruz p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --W.Wright p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 b-Maxwell ph-cf 2 0 0 0 0 0 .229 Totals 34 2 7 2 2 13 St. Louis 003 011 702 — 14 16 0 Houston 110 000 000 — 2 7 1 a-struck out for Lynn in the 7th. b-fouled out for W.Wright in the 7th. c-grounded out for Furcal in the 8th. d-reached on error for Salas in the 9th. E—C.Snyder (2). LOB—St. Louis 13, Houston 7. 2B—Lowrie (11), Wallace (2), C.Johnson (12). HR— Beltran (16), off Happ; S.Robinson (2), off R.Cruz; Freese (11), off W.Wright; Freese (12), off Bogusevic; Lowrie (10), off Lynn. St. Louis IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lynn W, 9-2 6 6 2 2 2 11 103 2.66 E.Sanchez 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 2.70 Salas 1 1 0 0 0 1 13 5.94 S.Freeman 1 0 0 0 0 0 6 5.40 Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Happ L, 4-6 4 2-3 5 4 4 5 6 106 4.54 D.Carpenter 1 3 1 1 1 1 39 5.57 R.Cruz 1 3 5 5 2 3 39 5.40 W.Wright 1-3 2 2 2 1 0 8 3.86 Lyon 1 0 0 0 1 1 14 2.31 Bogusevic 1 3 2 2 0 0 27 18.00 T—3:45. A—22,265 (40,981).


FRIDAY, JUNE 8, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

Triple Crown

Christophe Ena / The Associated Press

Maria Sharapova celebrates winning her semifinal match against Petra Kvitova at the French Open tennis tournament in Roland Garros stadium in Paris, Thursday. Sharapova won in two sets 6-3, 6-3.

Sharapova makes French Open final By Eddie Pells The Associated Press

PARIS — One victory Thursday finished Maria Sharapova’s climb back to the top of the tennis rankings. With one more on Saturday, she’ll be the French Open champion and complete a career Grand Slam. Not a bad way to spend springtime in Paris. Sharapova defeated Petra Kvitova 6-3, 6-3 in the windblown semifinals at Roland Garros. The second-seeded Russian needs a victory over 21st-seeded Sara Errani, a 75, 1-6, 6-3 winner over No. 6 Samantha Stosur, to become the 10th woman to win all four major tournaments. “I always dreamed of being on the final stage here and I finally have that opportunity,� Sharapova said. “And I’m more than excited.� When she won match point on a second-serve ace, Sharapova raised her palms to the sky, looked up and smiled — one of the sport’s biggest stars letting the fans and photographers share a special moment. Sharapova has long been the headliner at almost any tournament she enters, though this latest win will officially put her on the top line of the women’s rankings when the new list comes out Monday. It’s a perch that may have felt unreachable three years ago, when the Russian was recovering from shoulder surgery and dropped as low as 126th.

TENNIS: F R ENCH OPEN But from that point, she has made a steady climb back. This year, she has won two tournaments and finished runner-up in three more, including the Australian Open. That, plus the performance at Roland Garros, has helped push her back to No. 1, the spot she first captured in 2005 and held for 17 non-consecutive weeks, the last on June 8, 2008. “It’s pretty special,� Sharapova said. “A few years ago after my shoulder surgery, I don’t know if I had a ranking, but it was over 100. And I thought ‘Well, I did it one time. So maybe again, I can try to do it.’ � Her match against fourthseeded Kvitova, who defeated Sharapova in the Wimbledon final last year, wasn’t exactly a walk in the park, but Kvitova struggled with the blustery wind more than her opponent did. And she couldn’t get a handle on Sharapova’s serve. The Russian placed 78 percent of her first serves in. “It’s tough to return her,� Kvitova said. “She plays very fast. It’s a different game compared to matches before.� Next up is Errani, who played a terrible second set against Stosur but took advantage when the U.S. Open champion got a case of the nerves and started hitting balls five and 10 feet out in the final set.

Lawsuit Continued from D1 “Despite its knowledge and controlling role in governing player conduct on and off the field, the NFL turned a blind eye to the risk and failed to warn and/or impose safety regulations governing this well-recognized health and safety problem.� In response, the NFL cited the many health programs it runs for current and former players, and a series of medical benefits to former NFL players to help them after football. Those include joint replacement, neurological evaluations and spine treatment programs, assisted living partnerships, long-term care insurance, prescription benefits, life insurance programs, and a Medicare supplement program. “The NFL has long made player safety a priority and continues to do so,� the league said in a statement. “Any allegation that the NFL sought to mislead players has no merit. It stands in contrast to the league’s many actions to better protect players and advance the science and medical understanding of the management and treatment of concussions.� The league added that in partnership with the NFL Players Association it has spent more than a billion dollars on pensions, medical and disability benefits for retired players. Turner, however, sees little positive coming from those programs. “For the longest time, about the first 10 years after I retired in January 2000, I thought I had just turned into a loser overnight,� he said. “I couldn’t figure out what was wrong. It was a very scary proposition — until I found out there were a lot more guys just like me. I find they had been through some of the same struggles. I realized this is no longer a coincidence.� Attorneys for the players said they were not trying to tear apart the NFL, only to ensure that it lives up to its obligations to provide a safer

Continued from D1 Doug Reed, director of the Race Track Industry Program at the University of Arizona, predicts a Triple Crown victory will spark something like the bump a presidential candidate enjoys after a political convention. But, he notes, there have been monumental changes in the culture since Affirmed won the Kentucky Derby, Preakness and Belmont Stakes 34 years ago. “The media back then was nothing like it is today, with the Internet and so many other things to attract attention,� he said. He recalls there were slight upticks in interest after the release of the films “Secretariat� and “Seabiscuit� in recent years, but it didn’t last. “Everything moves so much faster,� Reed said. “Will there be interest in horse racing because of the Triple Crown? Yes, but it will probably fade.� The Jockey Club, which advocates for thoroughbred breeding and racing, commissioned a 2011 study and developed recommendations to improve the sport. The study found that since 2000, the amount bet — called the handle — is down by 37 percent, track attendance has fallen by 30 percent, and starts per horse and race days both dropped 14 percent. Only 22 percent of the public had a positive impression of racing, the report said. Jockey Club President Jim Gagliano said recommendations include a new

Fisher Continued from D1 Fisher added a banker off the dribble from the right side to make it 103-97. While playing every fourth-quarter minute, he fought through the Spurs’ trademark screens while chasing Tony Parker. He was the veteran on the floor as the Thunder’s core of kiddie stars ascended to the stage that Fisher knows his way around like the freeways of LA. “It’s a lot of trust to put on a guy that’s only been around for a couple of months,� he said of coach Scott Brooks’ decision to play him over starter and defensive ace Thabo Sefolosha. “But at the same time, that’s what I was brought here for.� Too proud was Fisher to make this more about being sent away by the Lakers than being wanted by the Thunder. Too classy was he to gloat about how the Thunder ended the Lakers’ season in the second round. “I don’t ever get any happiness from seeing people that I was close to or worked with for a long time not to be successful,� he said. “All this is great, but life still comes back to family, friends and loved ones.� Rewards come in strange, mysterious ways, especially in the playoffs. As the Lakers, like the Spurs, face an uncertain future with an aging infrastructure, is the country ready for a long encampment in the spotlight by a team from a heartland outpost known as Tornado Alley? Can the hedonistic NBA culture embrace a franchise that asks its crowd to participate in prayer to an authority much higher than its young multimillionaire dunkers? While Oklahoma City has

sport. And that it offers proper care for those who have retired from the game. Mary Ann Easterling echoed those thoughts. She will remain a plaintiff despite the April suicide of her husband, former Atlanta Falcons safety Ray Easterling, who had been a named plaintiff in a suit filed last year. Easterling, 62, suffered from undiagnosed dementia for many years that left him angry and volatile, his widow said. He acted out of character, behaving oddly at family parties and making risky business decisions that eventually cost them their home. They were married 36 years and had one daughter. She believes the NFL has no idea what families go through. “I wish I could sit down with (NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell) and share with him the pain. It’s not just the spouses, it’s the kids, too,� Easterling, 59, told The Associated Press from her home in Richmond, Va. “Kids don’t understand why Dad is angry all the time. “I think the thing that was so discouraging was just the denial by the NFL.� The list of notable former players connected to concussion lawsuits is extensive and includes the family of Dave Duerson, who shot himself last year. According to an AP review of 81 lawsuits filed through May 25, the plaintiffs include 2,138 former players. The total number of plaintiffs in those cases is 3,356, which includes players, spouses and other relatives or representatives. Some of the plaintiffs are named in more than one complaint, but the AP count did not include duplicated names in its total. The master suit contains a provision to allow other players to join it as plaintiffs and attorneys expect that to happen. “I just want the NFL to stand up and be accountable for its actions,� Turner said. “That is how we can prevent more people from suffering and keeping this game that has plenty of benefits. But we can make it safer and I am hoping that’s what we do.�

branding effort called “America’s Best Racing,� intended to showcase the sport’s top races and personalities. He said an affiliation with NBC Sports, which aired a series of races before this year’s Kentucky Derby helped boost viewership on Derby day by 6 percent over 2011. Plans are to attract a younger audience with online video games and social networking, including blogging by some of the sport’s top personalities. There are even plans for reality based television shows. One idea is to follow a syndicate of inexperienced horse owners, showing the process of developing a potential winner from the yearling auctions to actual competition. A turnaround of the New York Racing Association, whose three tracks accounted for about one-third of the national wagering handle of $11 billion in 2011, is seen as a key to the sport’s fortunes. Cuomo last month struck a deal to create a new NYRA board after years of scandal, a dispute over $8.5 million in winnings that hadn’t been paid to bettors, and concerns about treatment of horses and backstretch workers. The new board is charged with enhancing racing at the state’s three tracks, although officials have not said how it will do that. It also will try to integrate racing with video slot machines and other electronic gambling as Cuomo pushes to expand gambling in New York. “NYRA has been a very important cornerstone in the national racing market for

no courtside celebrity conga line seats, Durant is not Tim Duncan and the Thunder are far from the second coming of the Spurs. Here there is enough star power to challenge the notion that supreme NBA talent must invariably migrate to the vacationland hot spots like South Beach. Durant and Westbrook didn’t need to. They signed long-term deals, forgoing their first crack at free agency and establishing the Thunder as the anti-Heat for the foreseeable future. When asked if the Thunder could be the league’s premier franchise in the commercially potent way that Magic and Kobe’s Lakers and Jordan’s Bulls have been, Fisher called it “a loaded question.� But he proceeded to say: “I think our game has been and will always be built around stars. And when you have Kevin Durant, you have Russell Westbrook, James Harden, those

a long time,� said Eric Mitchell, editorial director and editor-in-chief of the Lexington, Ky.-based magazine The BloodHorse. The three NYRA tracks last year staged 39 of the 112 Grade 1, or top level, races in the country. “A lot of the most talented and wellbred juvenile horses make their starts in New York,� he said, noting that the Saratoga race card every summer holds two of the sport’s marquee races outside the Triple Crown, the Travers and Whitney Stakes. “It has been shown that people are more likely to wager on the quality races, so the more stakes races you have, the better horses and more competitive fields will find more people wagering on those races,� Mitchell said. “If NYRA were to go away, that would create an awfully big vacuum.� Justin Nicholson, a 26-year-old who left Georgetown law school to join a family business that develops race horses in Elkton, Md., is encouraged by the moves to overhaul NYRA and the Jockey Club initiatives toward attracting younger fans. “The greatest thing is the stories that we have to tell,� he said. “We need to get serious about an aggressive marketing strategy. When people see all great stories that surround horse racing, they will begin to feel invested in the sport. What happens is we spend a lot of time responding to criticism rather than showing the positive stories.�

types of players, I think you’re capable of drawing interest with people interested in seeing how far a team like that can go.� If that sounded like a bit of a hedge, remember that Fisher spent 12-1/2 of his 16 seasons dribbling past the likes of Jack Nicholson at courtside. He was Phil Jackson’s coach on the court and Bryant’s confidant. The roots are deep in many aspects of LA life. As he dressed Wednesday night, he asked a reporter from Los Angeles for the outcome of the Kings-Devils Stanley Cup finals game and shook his head in disappointment when told New Jersey had won to stay alive. He hadn’t checked his phone to see if Bryant had checked in with a congratulatory text, but that would have to wait until after an informal chat with a blond woman who was chatting up the Thunder’s joyous players before they departed the room.

In how many markets would the state governor — in this case Mary Fallin — wait around until midnight for Fisher, who was the last to dress, in the stall next to center Kendrick Perkins, his old Celtics adversary. “I hope you like our fans and community support,� Fallin told Fisher as they shook hands. “The Thunder is America’s team.� Not quite yet, but perhaps soon enough, with the irrepressible Durant — who closed out the Spurs with 14 rebounds and five assists to go with 34 points while playing all 48 minutes of Game 6 — having taken the mythical baton from Bryant after it was messengered here by Fisher. Most dynamic player in the West on the conference’s best team with more room to grow, personally and collectively, beginning next week. There is a great Fish story to tell about the Thunder, but that isn’t it.

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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JUNE 8, 2012

A D V EN T U R E SP ORTS

Radlands Continued from D1 The Radlands — officially called the Northeast Redmond Trail Complex, but that will never stick — calls for about 30 miles of trails to be built east of Redmond. About five miles of singletrack exist, starting from a trailhead at the High Desert Sports Complex on Maple Avenue, home to the Smith Rock BMX racetrack. That marks the north end of the trail system that is planned to reach as far south as state Highway 126 in years to come. The Radlands project is a collaborative effort of the Central Oregon Trail Alliance, the Redmond Area Parks and Recreation District, and corporate sponsors Trinity Bikes, REI and altrec.com. Tom Holt, a financial planner for the outdoor gear company altrec.com in Redmond, has spearheaded the project for about two years since he began looking for mountain bike trails to ride near Redmond. “You would think it (the area east of Redmond) would be a flat experience,” Holt says. “But there are a number of elevation changes, and inherent in the area is the rock. We were deliberate in incorporating the rocks into the trail. In the rock-intensive places, the building was slow and challenging.” The Radlands — intended for cyclists, runners and hikers — currently includes two loops that will make up the upperleft quadrant of the future 30-mile complex. One loop is considered easy, and the other is intermediate. An expertsonly trail is also in the works. Signs will eventually be posted to note the difficulty of the trails, according to Gilbert. On Wednesday, I rode both loops with Gilbert and Eric Helie, owner of Trinity Bikes in Redmond and a trail-building volunteer. Recent significant rainfall put the trail in nice, tacky shape. (In midsummer, the Radlands could become extremely dusty.) The first thing that struck me as I pedaled along the trail were the dramatic views: the Cascade Range to the west and Smith Rock State Park to the north. Twisty old juniper trees dotted the barren landscape. The lava rock comes into play quickly on the intermediate loop. Some rock sections are particularly tricky, with the rocks jutting up sharply for several feet at a time, similar to the Horse Ridge trails east of Bend. But other rocky sections in the Radlands incorporate the “beautiful slab,” which looks somewhat terrifying but is actually a joy to ride on a full-suspension mountain bike. Several well-placed turns give a flow to a trail that is not inherently so because of the lava rock. The shorter, easier loop features fewer rocky, technical sections than the intermediate loop. “When you build a trail you find the

A S  C   Please email Adventure Sports event information to sports@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Items are published on a space-availability basis, and should be submitted at least 10 days before the event.

CLIMBING

Mark Morical / The Bulletin

Redmond’s Bob Gilbert rides down a rocky, technical section in the Radlands trail network on Wednesday.

Breaking down the trail: The Radlands DIRECTIONS From Bend, take U.S. Highway 97 north to Redmond. Turn right on state Highway 126/Evergeeen Avenue. Turn left on Ninth Street. Turn right on Negus Way. Stay straight to go onto Maple Avenue. The High Desert Sports Complex and the Radlands trailhead is on the left.

RATING Technically intermediate to advanced; aerobically easy to intermediate.

TRAIL FEATURES The planned 30-mile system currently includes about five miles of trails in two loops. One loop is easy and the other is intermediate. Many of the trails include technical riding over lava rock. Views include the Cascade Range and Smith Rock State Park.

small rocks that would be intrusive,” Gilbert says. “There’s a lot of work. You pull out one rock and there’s 10 more underneath it. You just have to leave some. A lot of this area is lava residue. It creates for hard trail-building in some spots, but the valleys with more dirt makes for really fast trail-building.” The current five miles of trail in the Radlands are the fruits of several volunteer trail-work parties staged since last fall.

Helie calls the existing trails “the tip of the iceberg.” Plans call for a trail to lead bikers right into “Shredmond,” a cleverly named dirtjump park located near the Radlands trailhead which features rival the Lair free-ride park west of Bend. Helie says that many folks in Redmond, including himself, thought that the area east of town was “just desolate BLM land.” But add some creative trail builders and some hard work, and it becomes so much more — it becomes a place that Redmond mountain bikers have never really had. “It’s great for Redmond,” Helie says. “Even though we’re in this mega-cycling area, we’re kind of … it’s its own little bubble here. There’s a lot of people who ride but it’s not like the masses like Bend is. I think having stuff like this will definitely get people more into cycling, which is great.” The current trails are located on Deschutes County land, where the western portion of the Radlands will be built. The eastern half of the trail system is planned for BLM land. Holt says the project so far has exceeded his expectations in how quickly the existing five miles of trail have been designed and built. “We are talking about a years-long project,” Holt says. “One of the things I like is that these trails are going to be here forever.” And those trails are no doubt going to be rad. — Reporter: 541-383-0318, mmorical@ bendbulletin.com

BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY CLIMBING: Competition team; ages 10-18; focuses on rope/sport climbing with opportunities to compete in USA Climbing’s Sport Climbing Series; 4-6 p.m.; Mondays through Thursdays through July 2; mike@ bendenduranceacademy.org; www. BendEnduranceAcademy.org. BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY CLIMBING: Development team; ages 10-18; focuses on rope/sport climbing with trips to regional bouldering/climbing areas; 4-6 p.m.; Mondays and Wednesdays through July 2; mike@ bendenduranceacademy.org; www. BendEnduranceAcademy.org.

CYCLING MBSEF CYCLING PROGRAM: Through August for both road biking (age 12 and older) and mountain biking (age 8 and older); 541-388-0002, mbsef@mbsef. org, www.mbsef.org. BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY CYCLING PROGRAMS: Includes options in youth development, junior teams, U23/collegiate teams, camps, races and shuttles; ages 6 and older; mountain biking, road cycling and cyclocross; info@ bendenduranceacademy.org; www.bendenduranceacdemy.org.

MULTISPORT

4-6 p.m.; for all ages; weekly classes and open pool; equipment provided to those who preregister, first-come, first served otherwise; Cascade Swim Center, Redmond; $3; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org

ROLLER DERBY RENEGADE ROLLER DERBY: Practice with the Renegades Sundays from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at Bend’s Midtown Ballroom; drop-in fee of $7; loaner gear available; contact nmonroe94@gmail.com. PRACTICE WITH THE LAVA CITY ROLLER DOLLS ALL-FEMALE ROLLER DERBY LEAGUE: 3 to 5 p.m. on Sundays and 8-10 p.m. on Tuesdays; at Central Oregon Indoor Sports Center; $6 per session, $40 per month; deemoralizer@lavacityrollerdolls. com or 541-306-7364.

RUNNING REDMOND RUNNING GROUP: Meets at 8 a.m. on Saturdays for a 4- to 8-mile run; contact Dan Edwards at rundanorun1985@ gmail.com or 541-419-0889. FOOTZONE NOON RUNS: Noon on Wednesdays at FootZone, 845 N.W. Wall St., Bend; seven-mile loop with shorter options; free; 541-317-3568. TEAM XTREME’S RUNNING CLUB IN REDMOND: Meets at 8 a.m. on Saturdays at Xtreme Fitness Center, 1717 N.E. Second St.; 2- to 5-mile run; free; 541-923-6662.

THE URBAN GPS ECOCHALLENGE: Trips on paths and trails along Deschutes River through Old Mill District shops and Farewell Bend Park daily at 9 a.m. and 1:30 p.m.; like a scavenger hunt with clues and checkpoints; $65, includes guide, GPS and instruction, water, materials; 541389-8359, 800-962-2862; www. wanderlusttours.com.

SCUBA DIVING

PADDLING

SKIING AND SNOWBOARDING

MBSEF STAND-UP PADDLEBOARDING: MBSEF is offering stand-up paddleboarding for juniors ages 12 and older; sessions will run in June, July, and August; 541-388-0002; mbsef@ mbsef.org; www.mbsef.org. KAYAKING CLASSES: Sundays,

BASIC BEGINNER SCUBA DIVING CLASSES: Central Oregon Scuba Academy at Cascade Swim Center in Redmond, ongoing; certification for anyone 12 and older; vacation refresher and dive industry career classes for certified divers; cost varies; Rick Conners at 541-3122727 or 541-287-2727.

ALPINE, NORDIC, AND FREERIDE SUMMER CAMPS: MBSEF will hold summer alpine, nordic, and freeride ski and snowboard camps at Mt. Bachelor June 15-29; 541388-0002, mbsef@mbsef.org, www.mbsef.org.

ATTENTION TOUR OF HOMES™ ADVERTISERS

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BUSINESS

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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JUNE 8, 2012

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IN BRIEF Bend room-tax collections up Lodging taxes collected in the city of Bend in April increased 8.3 percent over April 2011, totaling $233,578, according to Visit Bend, the city’s tourism promotion agency. For the fiscal year to date, transient room tax collections have reached about $2.8 million, an increase of 6.4 percent over the previous fiscal year, according to figures released Thursday by Visit Bend. The agency’s fiscal year begins July 1 and ends June 30. Lodging taxes serve as an indicator of tourism activity.

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Wealth increases Household wealth climbed in the first quarter by the most in seven years, bolstered by a jump in stocks prices and more stable home values. Net worth for households and nonprofit groups increased by $2.83 trillion from January through March, the biggest gain since the last three months of 2004, to $62.9 trillion, the Federal Reserve said Thursday. — Staff and wire reports

Central Oregon fuel prices Price per gallon for regular unleaded gas and diesel, as posted Thursday at AAA Fuel Price Finder (www.aaaorid.com).

GASOLINE • Safeway, 80 N.E. Cedar St. Madras . . . . . . .$4.09 • Chevron, 1210 U.S. Highway 97, Madras . . . . . . . . . .$4.15 • Space Age, 20635 Grandview Drive, Bend. . . . . . . . . . . . .$4.19 • Texaco, 178 Fourth St., Madras . . . . . . . . . .$4.19 • Ron’s Oil, 62980 U.S. Highway 97, Bend. . . . . . . . . . . . $4.23 • Chevron, 2005 U.S. Highway 97, Redmond . . . . . . . $4.24 • Chevron, 3405 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend. . . . . . . . . . . . $4.29 • La Pine Mini Mart, 52530 U.S. Highway 97, La Pine. . . . . . . . . . $4.29 • Chevron, 1001 Railway, Sisters . . $4.29

DIESEL • Chevron, 1210 U.S. Highway 97, Madras . . . . . . . . . $3.99 • Chevron, 398 N.W. Third St., Prineville . . . . . . . . .$4.19 • Chevron, 2005 U.S. Highway 97, Redmond . . . . . . . $4.26 Ashley Brothers / The Bulletin

SILVER

CLOSE $28.519 CHANGE -$0.957

Memory-care facility planned in Bend Bernanke By Jordan Novet The Bulletin

Beaverton-based Touchmark plans to add a memorycare facility, the final element to the master plan for the southwest Bend senior-living complex that opened in 2003. The new 39,000-squarefoot building will join the homes and apartments that offer independent living, residential and home care

for those ages 55 and older at the nearly 25-acre development at Mt. Bachelor Village. Memory-care facilities provide secure living for people with Alzheimer’s or other kinds of dementia. The state Department of Human Services must endorse them, according to state administrative rules. See Memory care / E3

signals no steps to aid economy

Rendering courtesy of Touchmark

The new phase of Touchmark at Mt. Bachelor Village in southwest Bend, center, would feature memory care and residential care if it receives approval from the city of Bend.

State’s economy improved in April A gauge of Oregon’s economy, the Oregon Index of Economic Indicators, rose 0.6 percentage points month over month in April, according to a report released Wednesday. Gains in consumer sentiment, residential building permits and other measurements caused the increase, continuing a pattern in play since November. “Initial unemployment claims fell to their lowest level since last December,” wrote the author of the index, University of Oregon economist Tim Duy. “Although claims remain elevated relative to their pre-recession level, their overall decline over the past year is consistent with improving labor market conditions.”

t

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Shoppers walk around the Old Mill District, where about 95 percent of stores and restaurants are occupied.

STILL SHOPPING • Bend’s 4 retail centers are bringing in new stores and keeping occupancy rates high By Rachael Rees • The Bulletin

L

ike their counterparts across the country, Bend’s four major shopping centers appear to have come through the recession, with several expecting to see new tenants soon.

A visit to each of the centers — Bend Factory Stores, Bend River Promenade, Cascade Village Shopping Center and the Old Mill District — this week showed store occupancy levels between 57 and 95 percent. As a whole, Bend’s retail sector has occupancy levels at more than 90 percent, said Steve Toomey, broker and partner at Compass Commercial Real Estate Services. Compared to the office and industrial property markets, he said, retail is strong. However, some shopping centers have higher occupancy rates

than others, which can be seen by visiting them. Currently, the Old Mill District is about 95 percent occupied, according to The Bulletin’s survey, followed by Cascade Village Shopping Center at 77 percent, Bend River Promenade at 64 percent and Bend Factory Stores at 57 percent occupancy. “The Bend River Promenade has been sluggish for the last couple years,” Toomey said. “But as of right now, we’re working on negotiating three new lease deals for the shopping center.” See Shopping / E3

Bend’s shopping centers BEND FACTORY STORES Built: 1992 Major retail anchors include: Columbia Sportswear, Maurices and Nike Factory Store Commercial tenants: 17 Vacant storefronts: 13

BEND RIVER PROMENADE, FORMERLY THE BEND RIVER MALL Built: 1979 / Major remodel: 2006 Major retail anchors include: Sears, Macy’s and Kohls Commercial tenants: 14 Vacant storefronts: 8

CASCADE VILLAGE SHOPPING CENTER, FORMERLY THE MOUNTAIN VIEW MALL Built: 1980 / Major remodel: 2005 Major retail anchors include: J.C. Penney, Ross Dress for Less and Best Buy Commercial tenants: 33 Vacant storefronts: 10

OLD MILL DISTRICT Built: 2000 Major retail anchors include: Victoria’s Secret, Gap and American Eagle Outfitters Commercial tenants: 56 Vacant storefronts: 3

By Martin Crutsinger The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Slumping job growth has alarmed some economists who fear the U.S. economy is in trouble. Ben Bernanke doesn’t appear to be one of them. The Federal Reserve chief sketched a hopeful outlook in testimony to a congressional panel Thursday and sent no signals that the Fed will take further steps soon to aid the economy. Bernanke acknowledged that Europe’s debt crisis poses risks to the U.S. financial markets. He also noted that U.S. unemployment remains high at 8.2 percent. And he said the Fed is prepared to take steps to boost the U.S. economy if it weakens. But he said Fed officials still need to study the most recent economic trends, including job growth. See Bernanke / E3

China cuts lending rate amid slowing economy By Keith Bradsher New York Times News Service

Faced with a sharply slowing economy, weak exports and faltering investment, China’s central bank unexpectedly announced late Thursday that it would cut interest rates by a quarter of a percentage point. The action, by the People’s Bank of China, represents the strongest measure taken this year by the Chinese government to counteract an economic malaise that has infected Europe and the United States and now seems to be affecting China faster and more extensively than most policymakers or private economists had anticipated. The interest rate cut is the first by the central bank since December 2008, the last time policymakers in China were deeply worried that they might be behind in responding to an economy slipping downhill faster than they expected. See China / E3

PAID ADVERTISEMENT

AUTO NEWS

GE builds green-car testing ground for corporate fleets • Corporations are emerging as the early adopters of alternative-power vehicles By David Shaffer Star Tribune (Minneapolis)

MINNEAPOLIS — One of the world’s top leasing companies is betting that corporations with fleets of cars and trucks increasingly will want them to be powered by electricity and other alternatives to fossil fuels. That bet will be partly tested at a half-mile track in Minnesota. To showcase green vehicles to corporate clients, GE Capital Fleet Services, a major player in commercial vehicle leasing, has built the

test track and a showroom filled with Chevrolet Volts, Nissan Leafs and more exotic alternatives at its U.S. headquarters in Eden Prairie, Minn. Industry officials said GE’s “Vehicle Innovation Center,” which opened last week, is the first of its kind — a place where fleet managers from around the country will be invited to test drive everything from a small plug-in electric car to a semitrailer truck powered by liquefied natural gas. The center is the vision of

Debora Frodl, GE’s global alternative fuels leader, who says commercial vehicle fleets are emerging as early adopters of hybrid electrics and other alternative-power vehicles. “We are seeing it,” Frodl said of the corporate shift to alternative-fuel vehicles. “It’s real.” GE’s fleet services business already has 1.4 million vehicles under lease, and helps clients by advising them on cars and trucks that best suit their needs. Then GE acquires and finances the vehicles and, finally, tracks how well they perform. See GE / E4

Let High Desert Bank help you build the Home of Your Dreams. We offer competitive financing for owner-occupied, home construction: • Terms available up to 24 months • Make interest-only payments during construction • Permanent mortgage loan commitment required • Licensed and bank approved general contractor required

Contact us today to start building the home of your dreams Zak Sundsten, Vice President 541-848-4692: Phone 541-848-4445: Fax

“Local Service – Local Knowledge”

1000 SW Disk Dr. | Bend, OR 97702 541-848-4444 • www.highdesertbank.com


E2

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JUNE 8, 2012

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A-B-C-D AAR 0.30 ABB Ltd 0.71 ABM 0.58 ACE Ltd 1.78 AES Corp AFLAC 1.32 AGCO AGL Res 1.84 AK Steel 0.20 AMC Net n AMN Hlth AOL ASML Hld 0.59 AT&T Inc 1.76 ATP O&G AU Optron 0.14 AVI Bio AXT Inc Aarons 0.06 Aastrom AbtLab 2.04 AberFitc 0.70 AbdAsPac 0.42 Abiomed AboveNet Abraxas AcaciaTc AcadiaHl n AcadiaRlt 0.72 Accenture 1.35 AccoBrds AccretivH Accuray Achillion AcmePkt ActiveNet ActivsBliz 0.18 Actuant 0.04 Acuity 0.52 Acxiom AdobeSy Adtran 0.36 AdvAuto 0.24 AdvEnId AMD AdvSemi 0.11 AdvOil&Gs Adventrx AdvActBear AecomTch AegeanMP 0.04 Aegon 0.13 AerCap Aeropostl AeroViron AEterna gh Aetna 0.70 AffilMgrs Affymax Affymetrix Agilent 0.40 Agnico g 0.80 Agrium g 1.00 AirLease AirProd 2.56 Aircastle 0.60 Airgas 1.60 Aixtron 0.32 AkamaiT Akorn AlaskAir s AlaskCom 0.20 Albemarle 0.80 AlcatelLuc Alcoa 0.12 Alere AlexREE 1.96 Alexion Alexza h AlignTech Alkermes AllegTch 0.72 Allergan 0.20 AlliData AlliancOne AlliBInco 0.48 AlliBern 0.98 AlliantEgy 1.80 AlldNevG AllisonT n 0.24 AllosThera AllotComm AllscriptH Allstate 0.88 AlnylamP AlphaNRs AlpGPPrp 0.60 AlpTotDiv 0.66 AlpAlerMLP 1.00 AlteraCp lf 0.32 AlterraCap 0.56 Altria 1.64 Alumina 0.24 AlumChina AmBev 1.23 AmTrstFin 0.40 Amarin Amazon Amdocs Amedisys Ameren 1.60 Amerigrp AFTxE 0.50 AMovilL s 0.28 AmAxle AmCampus 1.35 ACapAgy 5.00 AmCapLtd ACapMtg n 1.90 AEagleOut 0.44 AEP 1.88 AEqInvLf 0.12 AmExp 0.80 AFnclGrp 0.70 AGreet 0.60 AmIntlGrp ARltyCT n 0.70 AmSupr AmTower 0.84 AmWtrWks 1.00 Ameriprise 1.40 AmeriBrgn 0.52 Ametek 0.36 Amgen 1.44 AmkorTch Amphenol 0.42 Amylin Amyris Anadarko 0.36 Anadigc AnalogDev 1.20 Ancestry AngiesL n AnglogldA 0.49 ABInBev 1.57 Ann Inc Annaly 2.37 Annies n Ansys AntaresP AntheraPh Anworth 0.90 Aon plc 0.60 A123 Sys Apache 0.68 AptInv 0.72 ApolloCRE 1.60 ApolloGM 1.15 ApolloGrp ApolloInv 0.80 ApolloRM n 1.05 Apple Inc 10.60 ApldIndlT 0.84 ApldMatl 0.36 AMCC Approach Aptargrp 0.88 AquaAm 0.66 ArQule ArborRT 0.30 ArcelorMit 0.75 ArchCap ArchCoal 0.12 ArchDan 0.70 ArcosDor 0.24 ArcticCat ArdeaBio ArenaPhm AresCap 1.48 AresCmcl n AriadP Ariba Inc ArkBest 0.12 ArmHld 0.16 ArmourRsd 1.20 ArrayBio Arris ArrowEl ArubaNet AsburyA AscenaRt s AscentSol h AshfordHT 0.44 Ashland 0.90 AsiaInfoL AspenIns 0.68 AspenTech AsscdBanc 0.20 Assurant 0.84 AssuredG 0.36 AstoriaF 0.16 AstraZen 2.80 athenahlth AtlPwr g 1.15 AtlasAir AtlasEngy 1.00 AtlasPpln 2.24 Atmel ATMOS 1.38 AtriCure AtwoodOcn AuRico g Aurizon g AuthenTec AutoNatn Autodesk Autoliv 1.88 AutoData 1.58 AutoZone Auxilium AvagoTch 0.60 AvalnRare AvalonBay 3.88 AvanirPhm AVEO Ph AveryD 1.08 AvisBudg Avista 1.16 Avnet

11.54 16.37 20.39 72.55 12.36 40.90 40.22 37.88 6.01 38.24 5.92 27.47 47.28 34.16 5.84 3.91 .70 3.98 27.38 2.23 61.20 32.13 7.42 21.30 83.44 2.88 34.02 16.57 22.74 58.86 9.35 10.97 6.26 6.21 23.42 14.60 11.78 25.97 53.48 13.70 31.32 29.80 73.72 13.68 5.76 4.36 2.86 .49 24.32 15.62 4.96 4.22 11.69 17.28 23.77 .45 42.00 103.23 13.48 4.95 39.96 39.72 79.14 20.41 80.02 11.24 85.45 14.56 29.07 14.11 33.80 2.21 60.34 1.57 8.55 19.35 70.40 90.38 .34 30.32 15.16 31.22 90.74 124.13 2.88 8.16 12.10 44.69 28.27 19.35 1.79 25.64 10.86 34.07 11.00 9.57 6.11 4.15 15.65 33.01 22.91 32.75 3.82 10.25 37.43 30.20 11.59 218.80 29.22 11.34 33.11 61.21 5.14 23.50 9.20 43.59 32.61 9.02 23.83 18.70 39.48 10.52 55.24 38.91 14.51 30.15 10.48 4.00 65.34 34.32 48.26 36.98 51.38 69.10 4.60 54.55 27.15 2.73 63.20 1.86 36.84 25.07 13.69 36.36 67.60 25.25 16.61 34.90 64.45 3.13 2.13 6.73 46.60 1.01 83.48 26.94 16.35 12.50 34.30 7.51 19.08 571.72 35.87 10.61 5.56 27.50 51.94 24.16 6.23 5.33 14.47 38.23 6.12 32.13 13.97 36.56 31.96 6.42 15.53 17.50 16.23 44.59 11.97 23.62 6.99 3.11 12.43 33.82 13.68 25.06 18.37 .69 8.24 64.69 10.12 28.75 21.28 12.03 33.67 12.27 8.84 40.99 76.02 13.56 44.09 30.70 29.41 7.06 33.77 9.54 39.84 8.18 4.68 4.64 36.54 32.65 56.93 53.15 383.88 21.57 32.95 1.45 140.15 2.80 11.83 28.09 13.37 25.97 30.38

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Avon 0.92 Axcelis AXIS Cap 0.96 B&G Foods 1.08 BB&T Cp 0.80 BBCN Bcp BCE g 2.17 BE Aero BGC Ptrs 0.68 BHP BillLt 2.20 BHPBil plc 2.20 BJsRest BMC Sft BP PLC 1.92 BPZ Res BRE 1.54 BRFBrasil 0.42 BabckWil Bacterin Baidu BakrHu 0.60 BallCorp 0.40 BallyTech BalticTrdg 0.40 BanColum 1.12 BcBilVArg 0.57 BcoBrad pf 0.81 BcoMacro BcoSantSA 0.82 BcoSBrasil 0.36 BcpSouth 0.04 BankMutl 0.04 BkofAm 0.04 BkAm wtA BkHawaii 1.80 BkIreld rs BkMont g 2.80 BkNYMel 0.52 BkNova g 2.20 BkOzarks s 0.48 Bankrate n BankUtd 0.68 BarcUBS36 BarcGSOil Barclay 0.39 Bar iPVix Bard 0.76 BarnesNob Barnes 0.40 BarrickG 0.80 BasicEnSv Baxter 1.34 BaytexE g 2.64 Bazaarvc n BeacnRfg Beam Inc 0.82 BeazerHm BectDck 1.80 BedBath Belden 0.20 Belo 0.32 Bemis 1.00 BenchElec Berkley 0.36 BerkH B BerryPet 0.32 BestBuy 0.64 BigLots BBarrett BioRefLab BioFuelE h BiogenIdc BioMarin BioMedR 0.86 BioSante rs BioScrip BlkHillsCp 1.48 BlkRKelso 1.04 Blckbaud 0.48 BlackRock 6.00 BlkEEqDv 0.68 BlkGlbOp 2.28 BlkIntlG&I 0.88 Blackstone 0.40 BlockHR 0.80 Blount BdwlkPpl 2.13 BobEvans 1.00 Boeing 1.76 Boise Inc 0.48 BonTon 0.20 BoozAllenH 0.36 BorgWarn BostPrv 0.04 BostProp 2.20 BostonSci BoydGm BradyCp 0.74 Brandyw 0.60 Braskem 0.65 BreitBurn 1.82 Bridgeline BridgptEd BrigStrat 0.44 Brightpnt BrigusG g Brinker 0.64 Brinks 0.40 BrMySq 1.36 BristowGp 0.80 Broadcom 0.40 BroadrdgF 0.64 BroadSoft Broadwd h BrcdeCm Brookdale BrkfldAs g 0.56 BrkfInfra 1.50 BrkfldOfPr 0.56 BrklneB 0.34 BrwnBrn 0.34 BrownShoe 0.28 Brunswick 0.05 Buckeye 4.15 BuckTch 0.32 Buckle 0.80 Buenavent 0.63 BuffaloWW BldrFstSrc BungeLt 1.08 C&J Egy n CA Inc 1.00 CBL Asc 0.88 CBOE 0.48 CBRE GRE 0.54 CBRE Grp CBS B 0.40 CF Inds 1.60 CGI g CH Robins 1.32 CIT Grp CLECO 1.25 CME Grp 8.92 CMS Eng 0.96 CNH Gbl CNO Fincl 0.08 CNOOC 6.81 CPFL En s 1.84 CSG Sys CSX s 0.56 CTC Media 0.52 CVB Fncl 0.34 CVR Engy 0.32 CVR Ptrs 2.09 CVS Care 0.65 CYS Invest 2.00 Cabelas CblvsNY s 0.60 Cabot 0.80 CabotOG s 0.08 CACI Cadence CalDive CalaGDyIn 0.74 CalaStrTR 0.84 Calix CallGolf 0.04 Calpine CalumetSp 2.24 CamdenPT 2.24 Cameco g 0.40 Cameron CampSp 1.16 CIBC g 3.60 CdnNRy g 1.50 CdnNRs gs 0.42 CP Rwy g 1.40 CdnSolar Canon CapOne 0.20 CapitlSrce 0.04 CapFedFn 0.30 CapsteadM 1.84 CpstnTrb h CarboCer 0.96 CardnlHlth 0.95 Cardiom gh CardioNet Cardtronic CareFusion CareerEd Carlisle 0.72 CarMax Carnival 1.00 CarpTech 0.72 Carrizo Carters CashAm 0.14 CatalystH Caterpillar 1.84 CathayGen 0.04 Cavium CedarF 1.62 CelSci Celanese 0.30 Celestic g Celgene CellTher rsh Cellcom 1.71 CelldexTh Celsion Cemex 0.32 Cemig pf s 1.18 CenovusE 0.88 Centene CenterPnt 0.81 CenElBras 0.65 CentEuro CEurMed CFCda g 0.01 CentAl CntryLink 2.90 Cenveo Cepheid CeragonN Cerner s CerusCp ChRvLab ChrmSh ChartInds CharterCm

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0.80 1.44

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2.72 0.90 0.40 0.55 0.40 0.08

3.40 1.24 0.24 1.05 0.24 0.48 0.60 0.05 0.69 3.07 0.32 0.52 1.08 0.85

0.86 1.20 2.07 0.32 0.46

0.24 0.30

2.44 0.72 0.20 0.40 0.70 0.10 0.20 0.20

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11.90 8.29 45.94 12.38 25.25 66.80 15.65 29.56 3.49 48.40 5.98 29.82 28.92 34.83 1.68 9.79 7.15 45.79 80.60 18.22 76.00 31.49 2.18 70.51 8.48 8.09 50.44 12.41 16.44 8.72 12.94 19.56 8.11 43.97 3.11 10.25 13.71 10.89 38.15 19.14 6.23 21.74 17.08 10.00 69.65 1.81 9.25 36.06 32.98 6.54 13.40 85.05 37.43 25.73 51.88 21.38 45.69 26.84 4.57 23.32 14.19 5.07 9.94 38.85 1.28 25.60 20.36 21.83 26.04 41.57 20.51 20.77 1.71 8.30 25.67 4.39 47.16 45.74 83.95 16.71 34.87 42.01 41.10 37.15 41.27 2.40 41.86 22.31 45.80 20.78 29.62 94.13 36.61 12.80 63.23 24.53 8.71 17.88 1.74 83.15 39.56 10.20 31.01 3.09 122.42 9.37 27.69 56.88 63.84 29.47 38.00

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M-N-O-P M&T Bk MAP Phm MB Fncl MBIA MCG Cap MDC MDU Res MELA Sci MEMC MFA Fncl MGIC MGM Rsts MI Homes MIPS Tech MKS Inst MRC Gbl n MSC Ind MSCI Inc MTR Gam Macerich MackCali Macys MagelnHl MagicJck s MagnaInt g MagHRes MAKO Srg ManTech MgHiYP ManhAssc Manitowoc MannKd ManpwrGp Manulife g MarathnO s MarathP n MarchxB MktVGold MV OilSv s MV Semi n MktVRus MkVEMBd MktVJrGld MktV Agri MktVIndo MktVCoal MarkWest MarIntA MarrVac n MarshM MartMM MarvellT Masco Masimo Mastec MasterCrd Mattel MattrssF n Mattson MaximIntg MaxwllT McClatchy McCorm McDrmInt McDnlds McGrwH McKesson McMoRn McEwenM MeadJohn MeadWvco Mechel MedAssets

2.80 79.10 12.01 0.04 19.37 9.58 0.56 4.52 1.00 26.90 0.67 22.24 2.78 1.72 0.96 7.62 2.47 11.21 13.97 6.57 0.60 26.94 20.82 1.00 68.44 33.52 5.34 2.20 56.09 1.80 27.58 0.80 36.49 40.81 14.99 1.10 39.73 4.16 24.34 0.84 23.69 0.19 2.08 46.24 0.08 11.10 1.80 0.86 35.77 0.52 10.72 0.68 25.00 1.00 37.24 0.08 3.25 0.15 45.99 35.38 31.13 0.58 24.93 1.24 25.01 1.59 20.85 0.30 46.82 0.45 26.04 0.48 24.14 3.16 49.16 0.52 37.54 27.22 0.92 32.16 1.60 66.65 0.24 12.23 0.30 12.99 19.30 16.31 1.20 415.71 1.24 31.54 29.05 1.79 0.88 25.70 6.90 2.19 1.24 55.52 10.47 2.80 88.38 1.02 43.79 0.80 87.77 9.18 2.58 1.20 81.12 1.00 27.47 5.84 11.30

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N m MediaGen MedProp MediCo Medicis Medifast Medivation Mednax Medtox Medtrnic MeetMe MelcoCrwn Mellanox MensW MentorGr MercadoL Merck MercGn MergeHlth Meritage Meritor MeruNetw Metalico Methanx MetLife MetLf equn MetroPCS MetroHlth MKors n Microchp MicronT MicrosSys MicroSemi Microsoft Micrvis rsh MidAApt MdwGold g MillMda n MillerEnR MindrayM Mitcham MitekSys MitsuUFJ MizuhoFn MModal MobileMini MobileTele Modine Mohawk Molex MolexA MolinaHlth MolsCoorB Molycorp Momenta Monsanto MonstrBv s MonstrWw Montpelr Moodys MorgStan MS China MSDSEur MorgHtl Mosaic MotrlaSolu Motricity Movado MuellerWat MurphO Mylan MyriadG NCR Corp NETgear NIC Inc NICESys NII Hldg NPS Phm NQ Mobile NRG Egy NTN Buzz NTT DOCO NV Energy NXP Semi NYSE Eur Nabors NasdOMX NBGrce rs NatFnPrt NatFuGas NatGrid NOilVarco NatPenn NatRetPrp Nationstr n Nautilus NavideaBio NaviosMar Navistar NektarTh NeoStem Neonode NetApp NetEase Netflix NtScout NetSolT h NetSuite Neurcrine NeuStar Nevsun g NwGold g NJ Rscs NwOriEd s NY CmtyB NY Times Newcastle NewellRub NewfldExp NewmtM NewpkRes Newport NewsCpA NewsCpB Nexen g NextEraEn NiSource NielsenH NikeB NipponTT NobleCorp NobleEn NokiaCp NorandaAl NordicAm Nordion g Nordson Nordstrm NorflkSo NA Pall g NoWestCp NoestUt NDynMn g NthnO&G NorTrst NorthropG NStarRlt NwstBcsh NovaGld g Novartis Novavax NovoNord NuSkin NuVasive NuanceCm Nucor NutriSyst NvCredStr NuvMuVal NuvQPf2 Nvidia NxStageMd OCZ Tech OGE Engy OReillyAu OasisPet ObagiMed OcciPet OceanRig n Oceaneer s Och-Ziff Oclaro OcwenFn OdysMar OfficeDpt OfficeMax Oi SA OilStates OldDomFrt OldNBcp OldRepub Olin OmegaHlt Omncre Omnicell Omnicom OmniVisn OnSmcnd

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0.10 1.52 0.30 1.00 0.80 0.40 1.40 0.17 0.17 0.20 2.40 0.96 1.44 0.60 0.88 0.26 0.16 1.20 0.40 0.50 1.08 1.88 1.48 1.37 1.20 2.20 0.60 0.48 2.46 2.50 0.80 1.46 0.70 0.80 0.47 0.66

1.57

2.16 0.72 0.47

6.16 0.36 0.71 0.80 1.68 0.28 1.20

3.62 9.01 22.48 35.06 17.75 84.99 62.08 26.70 37.05 2.71 11.90 60.12 28.85 14.24 71.90 38.33 43.62 2.35 26.85 5.36 1.79 2.48 29.50 29.52 59.31 6.23 9.35 36.04 31.74 5.67 51.28 17.44 29.23 3.08 66.36 1.19 13.04 4.21 30.38 16.31 2.30 4.40 3.00 12.56 15.11 17.94 5.99 67.13 23.75 20.46 17.77 38.74 21.33 15.01 78.61 74.50 8.19 21.13 36.45 13.41 19.34 48.09 4.35 47.69 48.23 .64 26.33 3.37 45.92 21.39 22.67 20.71 31.79 11.51 37.80 10.88 8.06 7.42 15.82 .15 15.92 17.25 19.88 24.77 13.61 22.11 1.18 13.15 44.96 51.12 67.42 8.56 26.86 18.58 3.38 2.81 13.42 24.11 6.98 .43 5.75 31.31 63.61 64.64 21.39 .46 47.24 6.70 31.53 3.77 9.78 42.75 27.14 12.02 6.61 6.62 18.05 29.00 50.69 5.55 12.16 19.29 19.47 16.26 66.25 25.11 27.34 107.36 20.77 31.87 84.63 2.83 8.20 13.33 8.69 51.21 47.66 66.00 2.35 35.95 37.10 2.52 17.26 42.76 59.35 5.03 11.44 6.00 52.18 1.26 135.42 42.84 20.26 20.89 37.30 10.52 8.98 10.20 8.74 11.89 15.82 4.74 53.80 97.21 25.58 13.45 84.94 14.53 46.21 7.28 2.46 16.72 3.06 2.08 4.43 11.19 66.75 42.05 11.15 10.00 20.19 21.15 32.89 13.91 47.73 14.07 6.74

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Oncolyt g ONEOK s 1.22 OnyxPh OpenTxt OpenTable OpkoHlth OpntTch 0.60 Opnext OptimerPh Oracle 0.24 OraSure OrbitalSci Orexigen OrientEH OshkoshCp OvShip OwensMin 0.88 OwensCorn OwensIll OxfordInds 0.60 PDL Bio 0.60 PF Chng 1.05 PG&E Cp 1.82 PHH Corp PimcoTR 0.50 PLC pfA 1.81 PLC pfS 1.88 PLX Tch PMC Sra PNC 1.60 PNC pfP PNM Res 0.58 POSCO 2.22 PPG 2.36 PPL Corp 1.44 PSS Wrld PVH Corp 0.15 Paccar 0.80 PacBiosci PacDrill n PacEthanol PacSunwr PackAmer 1.00 PainTher PallCorp 0.84 PanASlv 0.15 Panasonic 0.06 Pandora n PaneraBrd ParPharm ParamTch ParaG&S Parexel ParkDrl ParkerHan 1.64 ParkerVsn PartnerRe 2.48 PatrkInd PatriotCoal Patterson 0.56 PattUTI 0.20 Paychex 1.28 PeabdyE 0.34 Pebblebrk 0.48 PeetsCfeT Pendrell Pengrth g 0.84 PnnNGm PennVa 0.23 PennVaRs 2.08 PennWst g 1.08 PennantPk 1.12 Penney PennaRE 0.64 PennyMac 2.20 Penske 0.44 PensonW h Pentair 0.88 PeopUtdF 0.64 PepBoy PepcoHold 1.08 PepsiCo 2.15 PeregrinP h PerfectWld 2.00 Pericom PerkElm 0.28 Perrigo 0.32 PetSmart 0.56 PetChina 5.15 PetrbrsA 1.03 Petrobras 1.03 PetroDev PtroqstE Pfizer 0.88 PhrmAth Pharmacyc PhilipMor 3.08 PhilipsEl 1.00 Phillips66 n PhnxCos PhotrIn PiedNG 1.20 PiedmOfc 0.80 Pier 1 0.16 PilgrimsP PimcoHiI 1.46 PinnclEnt PinWst 2.10 PionDrill PioNtrl 0.08 PitnyBw 1.50 PlainsAA 4.18 PlainsEx Plantron 0.40 PlatUnd 0.32 PlumCrk 1.68 Polaris s 1.48 Polycom s PolyMet g PolyOne 0.20 Polypore Popular rs PortGE 1.08 PortglTel 0.85 PostPrp 1.00 Potash 0.56 Power-One PwshDB PwShCurH PS Agri PS Oil PS USDBull PwShHiYD 0.31 PSTechLdr 0.04 PSFinPf 1.25 PS SrLoan 1.25 PS SP LwV 0.87 PShNatMu 1.10 PSHYCpBd 1.12 PwShPfd 0.93 PShEMSov 1.49 PSIndia 0.02 PwShs QQQ 0.49 PSS&PBW 2.21 Pozen Praxair 2.20 PrecMxNik 0.09 PrecCastpt 0.12 PrecDrill Prestige PriceTR 1.36 PrSmrt 0.60 priceline PrimoWtr PrinFncl 0.72 PrivateB 0.04 ProLogis 1.12 ProShtDow ProShtMC ProShtQQQ ProShtS&P PrUShS&P ProUltDow 0.29 PrUltQQQ s PrUShQQQ ProUltSP 0.27 ProShtHY PrUShtFin ProUShL20 ProShtEafe ProShtEM PrUltSCh25 ProUltSEM ProUltSOG ProUltSBM ProUltFin 0.25 ProUPShD30 ProUltO&G 0.05 ProUBasM 0.05 PrUPR2K PrUPD30 s 0.22 ProShtR2K PrUPQQQ s ProUltR2K 0.01 ProSht20Tr PrUltSP500 0.03 PrUSSilv rs PrSUltNG rs PrUVxST rs PrUltSYen rs ProSUltGold PrShtVixST PrUltCrude PrUShCrde ProVixSTF ProUltSGld ProUltSlv s ProUShEuro ProctGam 2.25 ProgrssEn 2.48 ProgsvCp 0.41 ProgWaste 0.56 PUShDow rs ProUSR2K PrUShEur PUSSP500 rs PUPSR2K rs PUShQQQ rs PrUltSRE rs ProspctCap 1.22 ProspBcsh 0.78 Protalix ProtLife 0.72 Prudentl 1.45 PruShHiY 1.47 PSEG 1.42 PubStrg 4.40 PulseElec 0.10 PulteGrp PPrIT 0.36

3.60 41.32 43.60 47.50 39.95 4.64 26.90 1.06 15.19 27.18 10.38 11.78 3.12 8.42 20.18 10.89 28.68 28.95 19.46 46.26 6.28 50.98 44.61 16.04 105.08 25.38 25.16 6.04 6.35 58.63 25.12 18.64 78.21 102.58 27.65 20.51 78.79 37.78 2.00 7.99 .66 1.59 27.07 4.11 52.29 18.29 6.86 10.69 143.71 34.01 20.33 2.23 26.83 4.88 80.79 2.33 72.08 12.62 1.85 32.91 15.04 30.66 24.31 21.52 60.70 1.07 7.39 43.30 5.48 23.28 13.58 9.95 24.65 12.74 18.79 23.57 .22 39.25 11.55 8.67 19.29 67.68 .46 9.64 8.18 26.08 104.63 65.57 130.24 19.05 20.09 22.90 5.05 21.94 1.64 36.73 83.60 18.14 31.83 1.75 5.84 31.61 16.52 15.57 7.99 13.00 10.04 50.85 7.73 95.27 14.00 78.48 35.29 30.50 37.15 36.96 74.19 11.04 .92 13.37 34.56 14.91 26.00 3.98 48.70 38.60 4.11 25.06 23.89 26.58 24.12 22.74 9.23 26.19 17.61 24.04 26.75 25.20 18.39 14.27 28.12 16.61 62.27 19.93 6.59 104.67 13.05 164.08 7.89 13.84 58.30 65.93 636.15 1.18 24.54 13.99 31.72 37.24 28.89 27.58 37.90 16.90 63.08 50.11 34.87 50.96 35.95 48.32 15.88 51.36 32.36 29.47 31.66 27.73 17.86 50.69 22.03 38.01 30.74 51.99 46.70 28.09 45.90 36.45 29.34 68.95 63.51 32.88 17.18 43.23 79.34 75.31 27.67 52.22 41.43 18.01 41.70 21.25 62.76 57.53 21.89 17.67 56.23 34.22 44.20 53.41 54.10 52.76 29.63 10.85 41.44 6.64 26.87 47.94 19.55 31.65 136.56 1.91 8.88 5.39

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D

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m W w

m m

W M

m

m w m m

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M

m m m

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M W& W WM W W W W W M W W W W W W W W W M W W W W W W W W m W M W WW W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W m W W W W W W W Wm Wm Wm W W W m W W W W m W W m W W WW W w W W W W W m W

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FRIDAY, JUNE 8, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

Memory care

China

Continued from E1 Touchmark, which submitted site plans to the city of Bend late last month, is the second company in recent months to seek approval for a new memory-care facility in Bend. Founded in 1980, Touchmark has been steadily adding memory care to its retirement communities around the country. It runs 11 in eight states and one Canadian province. The company now wants to add memory care in Bend so it can offer a wider variety of services for both current residents and others, said Tom Biel, an executive vice president. “If their needs change, then we’re here for them,” Biel said. The memory-care sector appears to be on the rise locally. Frontier Management LLC of Durham, which runs a memory-care unit next to its Aspen Ridge Retirement Community in northeast Bend, received site-plan approval in April from the city for another memory-care facility on Powers Road, between Southeast Third Street and Parrell Road. Memory care also is available at the Cascade View Nursing Center on Southeast Wilson Avenue in Bend, as well as in Redmond, La Pine, Madras and Prineville, according to The Bulletin’s archives. The demand for memory care could continue to increase locally, said Scott Neil, the assistant manager of Touchmark’s Bend location. “With the population in Central Oregon, especially as a popular retirement destination … you do see that need increasing,” he said. Across North America, too, the number of people with Alzheimer’s alone — excluding other types of dementia — will quadruple in the next 15 to 20 years, Neil said. The new facility will cost about $10 million to build. The first floor will comprise 32 studios for memory care, and the second will have 19 homes where residential care will be provided. Residential care offers round-the-clock support but encourages independence. After the expansion, Touchmark will take on about 30 new employees, bringing the total to around 115, Biel said. He would like to see construction start as soon as possible and finish sometime next year.

Continued from E1 Many economists believe that China’s leaders are behind the curve again this year, after two months of near-paralysis on economic policy this spring. China’s National Bureau of Statistics is scheduled to release a long list of economic indicators for May on Saturday, including industrial production and the consumer price index. Yu Song, an economist in the Beijing office of Goldman Sachs, said government policymakers are certain to have those figures already. The decision to cut inter-

Shopping Continued from E1 Fellow Compass Commercial broker Russell Huntamer said the office is finishing letters of intent with three national companies that would fill roughly 8,000 square feet at the Promenade and has interest from two other national restaurants. “The level of attention that national retailers are giving to Bend has sharply increased over the last couple months,” Huntamer said. “They are positioning themselves to take advantage of whatever rebound in the economy that we are seeing.” The Promenade, located on Northeast Third Street near Butler Market Road, is home to Sears, Macy’s and Kohls. Previously known as the Bend River Mall, most of it was built in 1979 and remodeled in 2006. An additional remodel to the current Verizon building occurred in 2008. Combined, Huntamer said, the two projects created outside entrances for many store fronts that previously had inside-only customer access. Further north, the Cascade Village Shopping Center houses J.C. Penney, Ross Dress for Less and Best Buy. Built in 1980, it was formerly called Mountain View Mall and was converted in 2005 to an open-air design. Representatives from Cascade Village Shopping Center declined to comment for this story.

The national picture Nationally, vacancies at all mall types — lifestyle centers, regional malls and super-regional malls — stood

— Reporter: 541-633-2117, jnovet@bendbulletin.com

AlaskAir s Avista BkofAm BarrettB Boeing CascdeBcp CascdeCp ColSprtw Costco CraftBrew FLIR Sys HewlettP HmFedID Intel Keycorp Kroger Lattice LaPac MDU Res MentorGr Microsoft

Div PE ... 1.16 .04 .44 1.76 ... 1.40f .88 1.10f ... .28 .53f .22 .90f .20f .46 ... ... .67 ... .80

14 16 ... 39 12 ... 9 18 25 14 16 8 ... 11 7 23 7 ... 20 14 11

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Metal NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

Price (troy oz.) $1590.00 $1586.60 $28.519

— Reporter: 541-617-7818, rrees@bendbulletin.com

Bright outlook for Bend

Bernanke Continued from E1 For now, Bernanke said he foresees moderate growth this year. He said he’s mindful that all that could change, if Europe’s crisis quickly worsened or U.S. job growth stalled. “As always, the Federal Reserve remains prepared to take action as needed to protect the U.S. financial system and economy in the event that financial stresses escalate,” he told the Joint Economic Committee. The Fed could buy more bonds to try to further reduce long-term interest rates, which might encourage more borrowing and spending. Or it could extend its plan to keep short-term rates near zero beyond late 2014 until an even later date. But most economists don’t expect a major announcement at the Fed’s next policy meeting June 19-20, despite signals this week from some other Fed members in favor of considering further action. For one thing, long-term U.S. interest rates have already touched record lows. Even if rates dropped further, analysts say they might provide little benefit for the economy. They say it’s unlikely that many businesses and consumers who aren’t borrowing now at super-low rates would do so if rates declined a bit more. And Bernanke could face pressure not to pursue further stimulus before the November election because such steps could be perceived as helping President Barack Obama win re-election. “The Fed stimulative effects have really run their course,” Obama’s Republican opponent, Mitt Romney, argued in a television interview last week. John Ryding and Conrad DeQuadros, economists at RDQ Economics, said there

Div PE

NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstBcp Weyerhsr

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541-389-1505

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Last Previous day A week ago

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BkofAm S&P500ETF GenElec SPDR Fncl Bar iPVix

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Luxury Hotel Series

$

1000 OFF

www.northwestcrossing.com

Now From $799 (2 pc qn.)

www.expresspros.com

541- 678 - REST (7378)

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PwShs QQQ Microsoft SiriusXM Cisco MicronT

Last Chg

367932 62.27 362378 29.23 352898 1.86 331851 16.58 330076 5.67

-.25 -.12 -.06 -.11 -.08

Gainers ($2 or more) Name

Last

Chg %Chg

CharmCom VitesseS MGP Ing HovnEn pf A LCA Vis

7.40 2.50 4.10 4.19 5.34

+.96 +.30 +.46 +.46 +.57

+14.9 +13.6 +12.6 +12.3 +11.9

Losers ($2 or more)

Name

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Award-winning neighborhood on Bend’s westside.

400 SW Bluff Dr Ste 200 Bend , OR 97702

Locally, Bend Factory Stores on South Third Street had nearly half its 30 spaces vacant, the survey showed. Built in 1992, it’s home to Columbia Sportswear, a Nike Factory Store and an Eddie

Most Active ($1 or more)

was nothing in the testimony to “tip Bernanke’s hand” before the June meeting of the Fed’s policy committee. “Yes, the Fed chairman said the Fed stands ready to act if Europe poses a threat to the U.S. financial system or the economy,” they wrote in a note to clients. “However, he gave no specifics.” Many analysts are worried that the U.S. economy is suffering a midyear slump just as in 2010 and 2011. They’re concerned in particular about the job market. From December through February, the economy added an average 252,000 jobs a month. But since then, job growth has slowed to a lackluster 96,000 a month. In May, U.S. employers added just 69,000 jobs — the fewest in a year. Bernanke said the Fed is still assessing the most recent employment data. Like many economists, Bernanke suggested that a warm winter might have prompted some hiring that normally would have occurred later. That could have weakened hiring temporarily in the spring. If that’s true, hiring might bounce back. Still, Bernanke said some of the winter hiring might have made up for excessive job cuts during the recession. If so, and if those companies have completed such “catchup” hiring, then stronger economic growth might be needed to boost hiring, Bernanke said. “That is the essential question we will have to look at,” he told the panel. The government said last week that the economy grew at a sluggish annual rate of 1.9 percent in the first three months of 2012. Paul Edelstein, an economist at IHS Global Insight, said he thought Bernanke didn’t seem alarmed by the weak hiring in May. “His view is that it isn’t a sign that the economy is falling apart,” Edelstein said.

Providing unparalled service across a variety of industries since 1983.

Market recap

Name

Precious metals

Bauer Outlet. Despite the vacancies, Rick Cordes, co-owner of the Bend Factory Stores property, wrote in an email: “Overall sales are up nicely from last year, and we do not anticipate losing any tenants in the next year.” The shopping center’s website states that a Brooks Brothers Factory Store will open in spring 2012 and occupy two spaces near the Van Heusen store, but Sherry Short, the general manager, said she could not provide any more information. Built in 2000, the Old Mill District contains Victoria’s Secret, Gap, American Eagle Outfitters and other retailers. Noelle Fredland, marketing director of the Old Mill District, said the retail, restaurant and office development in southwest Bend has three spaces available and interested parties for each. While several stores have moved out of the Old Mill, other retailers quickly moved in. “Serendipity closed in March, and Sweet Tooth Candy Shoppe is opening in July,” Fredland said. “The Duck Store is leaving end of June, and Lids Locker Room is moving in this summer.” The Old Mill is seeing a strong increase in sales almost across the board, Fredland said.

at 5.7 percent in the first quarter, according to data from The CoStar Retail Report, published by CoStar Group, a commercial real estate information company. In 2006, vacancy was at 3.3 percent, and in 2010 it reached 6.2 percent, showing an improvement but still below prerecession levels. Jesse Tron, spokesman for the International Council of Shopping Centers, a Manhattan-based trade group, said redevelopment, such as transforming enclosed malls to open-air shopping centers has helped combat vacancies. “You have minimal new development in the pipeline,” he said. “Developers are reinvesting in current properties, to make them the most desirable for the consumer and tenant.” Tron said outlet malls performed well in the recession, and the few large shopping centers built during the period were outlets. He attributed their success to consumers focus on price. “In the throes of the recession, the consumer was looking for price, period,” he said. “Now coming out of the recession, the consumer is looking for value. They want to make sure they are getting the most bang for their buck, and a lot of outlets provide brand names for a better price.”

Northwest stocks Name

fifth for good customers; the previous discount had been one-tenth. Banks will also pay less interest on deposits, however, which could hurt savers. The one-year deposit rate will drop to 3.25 percent from 3.5 percent, the People’s Bank of China said on its website. Liu Li-Gang, the chief economist for greater China in the Hong Kong office of ANZ, a big Australian bank, said the People’s Bank of China’s decision to reduce interest rates represented a clear shift in direction, showing that it “has formally entered into a stage of policy easing from that of a policy fine-tuning.”

est rates suggests that the Chinese economy performed poorly last month, he wrote in a research note, and that Premier Wen Jiabao ordered policymakers to take action. Lowering interest rates makes it easier for companies and individuals to borrow money and start spending again. The People’s Bank of China announced that the regulated one-year corporate lending rate would drop to 6.31 percent, from 6.56 percent, effective Friday. In a parallel move that will amplify the practical effect of the rate cut, the central bank also said commercial banks would be allowed to further reduce the lending rate by a

Chg %Chg

Name

Last

TitanMach Ubiquiti n Metabolix Covenant XenoPort

26.06 -7.25 -21.8 13.63 -2.27 -14.3 2.16 -.26 -10.7 3.38 -.37 -9.9 5.49 -.58 -9.6

Diary

Chg %Chg

Diary 210 245 30 485 5 6

E3

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

1,009 1,475 142 2,626 41 28

52-Week High Low

Name

13,338.66 10,404.49 5,627.85 3,950.66 474.18 381.99 8,496.42 6,414.89 2,498.89 1,941.99 3,134.17 2,298.89 1,422.38 1,074.77 14,951.57 11,208.42 860.37 601.71

Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

Last

Net Chg

%Chg

YTD %Chg

52-wk %Chg

12,460.96 5,008.92 476.75 7,519.83 2,253.11 2,831.02 1,314.99 13,762.32 760.34

+46.17 -6.61 +3.46 +2.37 +2.98 -13.70 -.14 -18.81 -4.83

+.37 -.13 +.73 +.03 +.13 -.48 -.01 -.14 -.63

+1.99 -.21 +2.60 +.57 -1.11 +8.67 +4.56 +4.34 +2.62

+2.78 -2.45 +11.72 -7.73 -4.18 +5.44 +2.02 +.84 -4.07

World markets

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed Thursday. Market Close % Change

Key currency exchange rates Thursday compared with late Wednesday in New York. Dollar vs: Exchange Rate Pvs Day

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

292.90 2,104.57 3,071.16 5,447.79 6,144.22 18,678.29 37,246.46 13,545.32 3,473.96 8,639.72 1,847.95 2,759.26 4,156.72 5,476.39

+.52 +.01 +.42 +1.18 +.82 +.85 -.08 +.88 +.27 +1.24 +2.56 -.06 +1.27 +.86

s s s s s s t s s s s t s s

.9946 1.5553 .9759 .001992 .1571 1.2601 .1289 .012551 .071593 .0309 .000859 .1405 1.0492 .0336

.9912 1.5474 .9721 .001959 .1571 1.2546 .1289 .012632 .070982 .0309 .000851 .1393 1.0448 .0335

Selected mutual funds YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret Amer Century Inv: EqInc 7.40 +0.01 +2.1 GrowthI 26.43 -0.03 +7.6 Ultra 24.47 -0.05 +6.8 American Funds A: AmcpA p 19.83 -0.04 +5.3 AMutlA p 26.69 +0.04 +3.8 BalA p 18.91 +0.03 +4.3 BondA p 12.76 +0.02 +2.9 CapIBA p 49.87 +0.04 +2.3 CapWGA p 32.83 +0.04 +2.6 CapWA p 20.85 +0.01 +2.5 EupacA p 35.68 +0.09 +1.5 FdInvA p 36.66 +0.03 +3.9 GovtA p 14.53 +1.3 GwthA p 30.68 -0.05 +6.8 HI TrA p 10.76 +0.05 +4.2 IncoA p 16.96 +0.04 +2.1 IntBdA p 13.70 +0.01 +1.3 ICAA p 28.25 +0.01 +4.7 NEcoA p 25.94 +9.1 N PerA p 27.52 +0.03 +5.2 NwWrldA 47.36 +0.12 +2.7 SmCpA p 35.70 -0.03 +7.6 TxExA p 12.88 -0.02 +4.5 WshA p 29.09 +0.08 +3.0 Artisan Funds: Intl 20.96 +0.03 +5.7 IntlVal r 25.46 +0.07 +1.5 MidCap 36.31 -0.26 +10.3 MidCapVal 19.84 -0.06 +0.7 Baron Funds: Growth 53.25 -0.31 +4.4 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 13.99 +2.1 DivMu 14.83 -0.02 +1.4 BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 18.54 +0.05 +2.6 GlAlA r 18.37 -0.01 +1.2 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 17.06 -0.02 +0.8 BlackRock Instl:

EquityDv 18.58 +0.04 GlbAlloc r 18.47 -0.01 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 48.51 -0.26 Cohen & Steers: RltyShrs 65.51 -0.41 Columbia Class A: TxEA p 14.07 -0.02 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 28.95 -0.14 AcornIntZ 36.00 +0.12 LgCapGr 12.50 -0.09 Credit Suisse Comm: ComRet t 7.50 -0.01 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 9.14 +0.02 USCorEq1 11.21 -0.02 USCorEq2 10.99 -0.02 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 33.76 -0.05 Davis Funds Y: NYVenY 34.14 -0.05 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.26 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq 17.46 +0.01 EmMktV 25.97 -0.01 IntSmVa 13.62 +0.06 LargeCo 10.41 USLgVa 19.73 -0.03 US Small 21.24 -0.13 US SmVa 23.91 -0.12 IntlSmCo 13.97 +0.04 Fixd 10.33 IntVa 14.15 Glb5FxInc 11.16 2YGlFxd 10.13 Dodge&Cox: Balanced 69.95 -0.07 Income 13.64 -0.01 IntlStk 28.97 +0.04 Stock 105.82 -0.14 DoubleLine Funds: TRBd I 11.19

+2.7 +1.3 +4.6 +8.2 +4.9 +6.3 +5.5 +4.0 -8.3 -1.1 +4.4 +4.0 +3.9 +4.0 +2.7 +1.3 +0.3 +5.4 +3.4 +3.5 +3.2 +1.0 +0.5 -3.8 +2.3 +0.5 +4.3 +3.6 -0.9 +4.6 NA

TRBd N p 11.18 Dreyfus: Aprec 41.44 +0.10 Eaton Vance A: LgCpVal 17.69 Eaton Vance I: FltgRt 8.92 +0.01 GblMacAbR 9.77 -0.01 LgCapVal 17.75 +0.01 FMI Funds: LgCap p 16.04 +0.01 FPA Funds: NwInc 10.67 FPACres 27.19 -0.02 Fairholme 27.11 -0.02 Federated Instl: TotRetBd 11.42 +0.02 StrValDvIS 4.82 +0.02 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 21.31 -0.06 StrInA 12.27 +0.02 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 21.60 -0.05 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 13.45 FF2010K 12.32 FF2015 11.23 FF2015K 12.37 +0.01 FF2020 13.51 +0.01 FF2020K 12.69 +0.01 FF2025 11.14 FF2025K 12.70 +0.01 FF2030 13.24 +0.01 FF2030K 12.80 +0.01 FF2035 10.87 FF2035K 12.77 FF2040 7.58 FF2040K 12.80 +0.01 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 11.87 AMgr50 15.55 +0.01 AMgr20 r 13.01 +0.01 Balanc 18.94 +0.01 BalancedK 18.94 +0.01

NA +2.6 +3.5 +3.2 +1.2 +3.7 +5.2 +0.9 +1.5 +17.1 +2.8 +0.8 +8.1 +3.4 +8.2 +3.0 +3.0 +3.0 +3.1 +3.3 +3.4 +3.3 +3.4 +3.4 +3.5 +3.2 +3.3 +3.2 +3.3 +5.7 +3.8 +2.9 +4.5 +4.6

BlueChGr 45.61 CapAp 27.65 CpInc r 8.93 Contra 73.14 ContraK 73.12 DisEq 22.12 DivIntl 25.96 DivrsIntK r 25.93 DivGth 27.19 Eq Inc 42.68 EQII 18.09 Fidel 33.15 FltRateHi r 9.71 GNMA 11.93 GovtInc 10.88 GroCo 88.61 GroInc 19.11 GrowthCoK88.58 HighInc r 8.83 IntBd 11.00 IntmMu 10.58 IntlDisc 28.14 InvGrBd 11.88 InvGB 7.86 LgCapVal 10.37 LowP r 37.10 LowPriK r 37.09 Magelln 67.03 MidCap 27.88 MuniInc 13.34 NwMkt r 16.41 OTC 55.91 100Index 9.36 Puritn 18.56 PuritanK 18.56 SAllSecEqF11.88 SCmdtyStrt 8.21 SCmdtyStrF 8.23 SrsIntGrw 10.52 SrsIntVal 7.93 SrInvGrdF 11.88 STBF 8.53 StratInc 10.98 TotalBd 11.11

-0.17 -0.12 +0.03 -0.19 -0.20 -0.02 +0.14 +0.14 -0.04 +0.06 +0.02 -0.01 +0.01 +0.02 -0.61 +0.03 -0.61 +0.05 +0.01 -0.01 +0.16 +0.02 +0.01 -0.01 -0.12 -0.12 -0.11 -0.10 -0.02 +0.03 -0.70 -0.01 -0.01

+0.03 +0.03 +0.01 +0.02 +0.02

+7.5 +12.3 +5.6 +8.4 +8.5 +2.8 +1.7 +1.8 +5.1 +3.9 +4.5 +6.4 +2.1 +1.9 +1.7 +9.5 +5.2 +9.6 +4.8 +2.3 +2.5 +1.9 +2.8 +3.1 +3.0 +3.8 +3.9 +6.6 +4.6 +4.0 +6.1 +2.2 +6.1 +5.3 +5.4 +5.8 -8.4 -8.2 +4.1 -1.9 +2.8 +1.0 +3.5 +3.1

USBI 11.90 +0.02 +2.2 Value 66.51 -0.12 +4.8 Fidelity Spartan: 500IdxInv 46.79 -0.01 +5.5 500Idx I 46.80 +5.6 Fidelity Spart Adv: ExMktAd r 36.85 -0.22 +5.1 500IdxAdv 46.80 +5.6 TotMktAd r 37.98 -0.04 +5.5 USBond I 11.90 +0.02 +2.2 First Eagle: GlblA 45.67 +0.04 +1.2 OverseasA 20.51 +0.03 +0.7 Forum Funds: AbsStrI r 11.18 +0.01 +1.2 Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA p 12.49 -0.02 +4.5 GrwthA p 46.90 +0.01 +5.1 HYTFA p 10.71 -0.03 +6.3 IncomA p 2.09 +0.01 +2.8 RisDvA p 35.75 +0.10 +2.7 StratInc p 10.25 +0.04 +3.7 USGovA p 6.89 +0.01 +1.1 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv 12.51 +0.08 +3.2 IncmeAd 2.07 +0.01 +2.9 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.11 +0.01 +2.5 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 20.23 +0.03 +2.1 Frank/Temp Temp A: GlBd A p 12.55 +0.08 +3.1 GrwthA p 16.21 +0.06 -0.5 WorldA p 13.68 +0.07 -0.4 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 12.57 +0.08 +2.9 GE Elfun S&S: US Eqty 41.02 -0.02 +5.9 GMO Trust III: Quality 22.81 -0.01 +4.1 GMO Trust IV: IntlIntrVl 17.87 -0.02 -5.5 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 10.14 +0.02 -1.6

Quality 22.82 -0.01 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 7.02 +0.03 MidCapV 35.20 -0.11 Harbor Funds: Bond 12.64 CapApInst 40.20 -0.12 Intl r 53.79 +0.17 Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 30.08 -0.09 Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 38.79 -0.11 Div&Gr 19.94 +0.02 Hussman Funds: StrGrowth 11.75 -0.06 IVA Funds: Wldwide I r15.13 -0.01 Invesco Funds A: Chart p 16.55 -0.03 CmstkA 15.77 EqIncA 8.58 GrIncA p 19.17 +0.02 HYMuA 9.85 -0.01 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 22.68 -0.03 AssetStA p 23.41 -0.04 AssetStrI r 23.63 -0.04 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 12.00 JPMorgan R Cl: CoreBond 12.00 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 11.99 HighYld 7.76 +0.04 IntmTFBd 11.32 -0.01 ShtDurBd 10.98 USLCCrPls 20.82 -0.01 Janus T Shrs: PrkMCVal T20.39 -0.06 John Hancock Cl 1: LSBalanc 12.66 LSGrwth 12.38 -0.01 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 17.38 +0.07

+4.1 +5.3 +4.9 NA +8.9 +2.6 +4.4 +4.3 +3.1 -5.5 -1.5 +3.1 +4.0 +3.6 +3.5 +7.4 +4.9 +5.2 +5.3 +2.5 +2.7 +2.7 +4.6 +1.7 +0.8 +5.5 +1.0 +4.0 +3.9 +3.5

Longleaf Partners: Partners 26.75 -0.04 +0.4 Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 14.29 +4.7 StrInc C 14.66 +0.01 +3.3 LSBondR 14.24 +0.01 +4.6 StrIncA 14.58 +0.01 +3.6 Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdY 12.20 +0.01 +4.2 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 10.81 +2.9 BdDebA p 7.74 +0.02 +4.1 ShDurIncA p4.58 +0.01 +2.7 Lord Abbett C: ShDurIncC t 4.60 +2.2 Lord Abbett F: ShtDurInco 4.57 +2.6 MFS Funds A: TotRA 14.32 +0.02 +3.2 ValueA 23.28 +0.06 +4.4 MFS Funds I: ValueI 23.39 +0.06 +4.5 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 6.67 +0.03 +0.6 MergerFd 15.75 +0.02 +1.0 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.64 +0.01 +4.4 TotRtBdI 10.64 +0.01 +4.5 MorganStanley Inst: MCapGrI 34.48 -0.13 +4.7 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 27.28 +0.09 +0.5 GlbDiscZ 27.65 +0.10 +0.7 SharesZ 20.40 +0.02 +2.3 Neuberger&Berm Fds: GenesInst 46.98 -0.15 +1.2 Northern Funds: HiYFxInc 7.10 NA Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 27.60 -0.05 +2.0 Intl I r 16.84 +0.23 +1.8 Oakmark 44.28 +0.02 +6.2 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 7.00 +0.02 +3.2

GlbSMdCap13.90 +0.03 Oppenheimer A: DvMktA p 30.35 +0.18 GlobA p 54.44 +0.04 GblStrIncA 4.13 +0.01 IntBdA p 6.23 +0.01 MnStFdA 34.14 -0.02 RisingDivA 16.09 -0.01 S&MdCpVl28.80 -0.22 Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 14.54 -0.01 S&MdCpVl24.41 -0.19 Oppenheimer C&M: RisingDvC p14.49 -0.01 Oppenheimer Roch: RcNtMuA 7.35 -0.01 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 30.03 +0.17 IntlBdY 6.23 +0.01 IntGrowY 26.25 +0.27 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 11.26 +0.02 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AlAsetAut r 10.35 +0.04 AllAsset 11.80 +0.04 ComodRR 6.18 DivInc 11.70 +0.04 EmgMkCur10.04 +0.01 EmMkBd 11.62 +0.07 HiYld 9.13 +0.04 InvGrCp 10.78 +0.04 LowDu 10.45 RealRtnI 12.34 ShortT 9.81 TotRt 11.26 +0.02 PIMCO Funds A: RealRtA p 12.34 TotRtA 11.26 +0.02 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 11.26 +0.02 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 11.26 +0.02 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 11.26 +0.02

+3.2 +3.5 +0.7 +4.1 +2.1 +6.2 +2.9 -2.8 +2.5 -3.2 +2.6 +10.5 +3.7 +2.3 +2.9 +5.0 +4.1 +3.2 -4.7 +5.9 +1.9 +5.3 +4.5 +6.2 +2.8 +5.8 +1.8 +5.1 +5.6 +5.0 +4.6 +5.0 +5.1

Perm Port Funds: Permannt 46.51 -0.36 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 38.81 -0.02 Price Funds: BlChip 42.53 -0.04 CapApp 21.65 +0.03 EmMktS 28.96 +0.17 EqInc 23.87 +0.02 EqIndex 35.58 Growth 35.25 -0.05 HlthSci 37.94 -0.21 HiYield 6.59 +0.03 InstlCpG 17.46 -0.05 IntlBond 9.70 -0.02 Intl G&I 11.42 +0.06 IntlStk 12.60 +0.07 MidCap 55.25 -0.34 MCapVal 22.15 -0.05 N Asia 14.78 +0.09 New Era 38.65 -0.08 N Horiz 33.67 -0.23 N Inc 9.76 +0.01 OverS SF 7.34 +0.04 R2010 15.55 +0.01 R2015 12.02 +0.01 R2020 16.57 +0.01 R2025 12.08 R2030 17.29 +0.01 R2035 12.19 R2040 17.33 ShtBd 4.83 SmCpStk 33.17 -0.22 SmCapVal 35.68 -0.21 SpecIn 12.49 +0.02 Value 23.19 -0.03 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 13.09 -0.02 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 10.94 -0.04 PremierI r 18.73 -0.08 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 37.27 -0.03 S&P Sel 20.66

+0.9 +0.8 +10.0 +5.0 +1.6 +4.0 +5.4 +10.7 +16.4 +4.7 +8.3 +0.6 -0.9 +2.5 +4.8 +3.6 +6.3 -8.1 +8.5 +2.2 +0.3 +3.5 +3.8 +4.1 +4.3 +4.5 +4.5 +4.6 +1.3 +6.1 +3.5 +3.2 +2.9 +3.5 +1.7 +1.1 +5.4 +5.6

Scout Funds: Intl 28.44 +0.15 Sequoia 152.53 +0.20 TCW Funds: TotRetBdI 9.87 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 16.46 +0.15 Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 24.08 +0.25 IntValue I 24.62 +0.25 Tweedy Browne: GblValue 22.58 +0.18 Vanguard Admiral: BalAdml 22.59 CAITAdm 11.57 -0.02 CpOpAdl 69.67 -0.50 EMAdmr r 31.89 +0.06 Energy 101.43 -0.20 EqInAdm n 47.06 +0.09 ExtdAdm 41.28 -0.25 500Adml 121.69 -0.01 GNMA Ad 11.09 +0.02 GrwAdm 34.12 -0.07 HlthCr 56.53 -0.09 HiYldCp 5.77 +0.02 InfProAd 28.84 ITBdAdml 11.97 +0.03 ITsryAdml 11.76 +0.01 IntGrAdm 52.91 +0.34 ITAdml 14.21 -0.02 ITGrAdm 10.15 +0.02 LtdTrAd 11.16 -0.01 LTGrAdml 10.53 +0.05 LT Adml 11.60 -0.02 MCpAdml 92.77 -0.47 MuHYAdm 11.05 -0.02 PrmCap r 65.58 -0.31 ReitAdm r 88.93 -0.63 STsyAdml 10.77 STBdAdml 10.63 +0.01 ShtTrAd 15.92 -0.01 STIGrAd 10.73 +0.01 SmCAdm 34.73 -0.20 TtlBAdml 11.09 +0.02

+1.7 +4.8 +5.2 -3.4 +0.3 +0.4 +3.3 +4.2 +3.3 +2.2 +0.7 -8.4 +3.2 +4.9 +5.6 +1.7 +7.6 +4.2 +4.4 +4.4 +3.5 +1.8 +1.8 +2.7 +3.9 +0.9 +4.9 +4.1 +4.1 +4.9 +2.4 +9.1 +0.3 +0.9 +0.5 +2.0 +4.0 +2.2

TStkAdm 32.86 WellslAdm 56.89 WelltnAdm 55.66 Windsor 45.02 WdsrIIAd 47.98 Vanguard Fds: CapOpp 30.16 DivdGro 15.87 Energy 54.02 EqInc 22.45 Explr 74.18 GNMA 11.09 HYCorp 5.77 HlthCre 133.96 InflaPro 14.68 IntlGr 16.63 IntlVal 26.35 ITIGrade 10.15 LifeCon 16.59 LifeGro 21.81 LifeMod 19.75 LTIGrade 10.53 Morg 18.80 MuInt 14.21 PrmcpCor 13.73 Prmcp r 63.19 SelValu r 19.08 STAR 19.41 STIGrade 10.73 StratEq 19.12 TgtRetInc 11.83 TgRe2010 23.16 TgtRe2015 12.69 TgRe2020 22.38 TgtRe2025 12.67 TgRe2030 21.62 TgtRe2035 12.94 TgtRe2040 21.21 TgtRe2045 13.32 USGro 19.56 Wellsly 23.48 Welltn 32.23 Wndsr 13.34 WndsII 27.03

-0.04 +0.13 +0.10 -0.05 +0.07

+5.4 +3.2 +3.5 +4.5 +4.9

-0.22 +0.05 -0.11 +0.05 -0.50 +0.02 +0.02 -0.22

+2.2 +2.9 -8.4 +3.2 +3.8 +1.7 +4.3 +4.2 +4.3 +1.7 -1.1 +3.8 +2.8 +3.4 +3.1 +4.8 +7.6 +2.7 +1.8 +2.3 +2.6 +3.6 +1.9 +4.3 +3.0 +3.3 +3.2 +3.2 +3.3 +3.3 +3.4 +3.5 +3.5 +8.4 +3.2 +3.5 +4.5 +4.8

+0.11 +0.08 +0.02

+0.05 -0.07 -0.02 -0.05 -0.31 -0.02 +0.03 +0.01 -0.12 +0.01

-0.01

-0.07 +0.05 +0.06 -0.01 +0.05

Vanguard Idx Fds: MidCpIstPl101.07 -0.51 TotIntAdm r21.67 +0.03 TotIntlInst r86.68 +0.12 TotIntlIP r 86.70 +0.12 500 121.67 MidCap 20.43 -0.11 SmCap 34.69 -0.21 TotBnd 11.09 +0.02 TotlIntl 12.96 +0.02 TotStk 32.85 -0.04 Vanguard Instl Fds: BalInst 22.59 -0.01 DevMkInst 8.31 +0.02 ExtIn 41.28 -0.25 GrwthIst 34.12 -0.07 InfProInst 11.75 InstIdx 120.91 InsPl 120.91 -0.01 InsTStPlus 29.74 -0.04 MidCpIst 20.49 -0.11 SCInst 34.73 -0.20 TBIst 11.09 +0.02 TSInst 32.87 -0.04 ValueIst 21.07 +0.01 Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl 100.52 -0.01 MidCpIdx 29.27 -0.15 STBdIdx 10.63 +0.01 TotBdSgl 11.09 +0.02 TotStkSgl 31.72 -0.04 Western Asset: CorePlus I 11.36 Yacktman Funds: Fund p 18.02 +0.03 Focused 19.26 +0.05

+4.1 -0.8 -0.7 -0.7 +5.5 +4.0 +3.9 +2.1 -0.8 +5.4 +4.2 -1.3 +5.0 +7.6 +4.4 +5.6 +5.6 +5.5 +4.1 +4.0 +2.2 +5.5 +3.6 +5.6 +4.1 +0.9 +2.2 +5.4 +3.7 +2.9 +2.6


E4

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JUNE 8, 2012

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If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact Ashley Brothers at 541-383-0323, email business@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� at www.bendbulletin.com. Please allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication.

D  Sunriver Resort’s Sage Springs Club and Spa has been named a 2012 Best Resort Spa by CondÊ Nast Traveler. Sage Springs ranked 33rd out of the Top 100 Resort Spas in the annual readers’ choice survey. This is the fourth consecutive year that Sage Springs has been ranked in the top 100. For in-

formation, visit www.sunriverresort.com/spa. The Sunriver Owners Association has received the 2012 Oregon Brownfields Award for the Sunriver Homeowners Aquatic and Recreation Center project. The award is given for development of property that was previously hindered

by hazardous substances, contaminants or pollutants. Development of the SHARC project involved cleanup of asbestos-containing material that remained from the former military facility that occupied the site in the 1940s. For information, visit www.sunriverowners.org.

B   C  TODAY MAIL MERGE USING WORD, OUTLOOK AND EXCEL: Registration required; $59; 9 a.m.-noon; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. CENTRAL OREGON REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT CLUB: Free; 11 a.m.; ServiceMaster Clean, 20806 Sockeye Place, Bend; 541-610-4006 or bobbleile@windermere.com. FREE TAX FRIDAY: Free tax return reviews; schedule an appointment at 541-385-9666 or www.myzoomtax .com; free; 2-4 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666.

SATURDAY FILE IT, FIND IT: Registration required; $59; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Madras Campus, 1170 E. Ashwood Road, Madras; 541-383-7270 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit; registration required; contact 541-447-6384 or www .happyhourtraining.com; $35; 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. QUICKBOOKS PRO BEGINNING: Register by June 6; $59; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; COCC Crook County Open Campus, 510 S.E. Lynn Blvd., Prineville; 541-383-7270 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu.

MONDAY FOOD CODE UPDATES: Information session for restaurant owners and managers on new health department regulations; 2-3 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 866-697-8717 or http://helpingrestaurants.com. FORECLOSURE CLASS: 5:30-7:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 20310 Empire Ave., Suite A110, Bend; call 541-318-7506, ext. 309 to reserve a seat. FORECLOSURE PREVENTION CLASS: Learn about NeighborImpact’s Housing Center tools and services that can assist individuals struggling to pay their mortgages; free; 5:30-7:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 20310 Empire Ave., Suite A110, Bend; 541-318-7506, ext. 109, karenb@neighborimpact.org or www.homeownershipcenter.org.

TUESDAY BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL HIGH DESERT CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7:15 a.m.; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541-420-7377. HANDS ON — WINDOWS 7: For people age 50 and older; bring a laptop with Windows 7 on it to each class; $29 or $39; 10 a.m.-noon; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-388-1133. HOMEBUYING CLASS: Registration required; free; 5:30-9:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 2303 S.W. First St., Redmond; 541-318-7506, ext. 109.

WEDNESDAY BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL BEND CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7 a.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541749-0789. INDISPENSABLE COMMUNICATION SKILLS: Business success program; reservations recommended; free; 7:30 a.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541382-3221 or www.bendchamber.org. HOMEBUYING CLASS: Registration required; free; 5:30-9:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 2303 S.W. First St., Redmond; 541-318-7506, ext. 109.

THURSDAY BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL DESCHUTES BUSINESS NETWORKERS CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7 a.m.; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541610-9125. TOWN HALL FORUM: After a brief

presentation, Deschutes County Commissioners Tammy Baney, Tony DeBone and Alan Unger will answer questions about Deschutes County government; registration required; $30 for members and $45 for nonmembers; 7:30 a.m.; Bend Golf and Country Club, 61045 Country Club Drive; www.bendchamber.org. SEMINAR TO EXPLAIN UNCLAIMED PROPERTY REPORTING: Local businesses and organizations can learn more about reporting unclaimed property to the state; halfday seminar; registration required; contact Carolyn Harris at 503-9865290 or visit http://oregonstatelands. us/dsl; free; 8:30 a.m.-noon; Deschutes County administration building, 1300 N.W. Wall St., Bend. CENTRAL OREGON FORUM DISCUSSING HOUSING FOR PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES: 9:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; contact Rich Zebrowski, Abilitree Supported Living Program manager, 541-3888103, ext. 203 or richz@abilitree .org. INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT FOR AN UNPREDICTABLE WORLD: Registration required; free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794 or luiz.soutomaior@ schwab.com. LIVE CONTRACTOR EDUCATION COURSE: Registration required; class continues June 15-16; $299; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Redmond campus, 2030 S.E. College Loop, Redmond; 541-383-7290 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

FRIDAY June 15 CENTRAL OREGON REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT CLUB: Free; 11 a.m.; ServiceMaster Clean, 20806 Sockeye Place, Bend; 541-610-4006 or bobbleile@windermere.com. FREE TAX FRIDAY: Free tax return reviews; schedule an appointment at 541-385-9666 or www.myzoomtax .com; free; 2-4 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666.

SATURDAY June 16 CLEAN UP AND SPEED UP YOUR PC 2: Registration required; $59; 9 a.m.4 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

SUNDAY June 17 OLCC ALCOHOL SERVICE PERMIT CLASS: Registration required; $35; 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Sandwich Factory, 277 N.E. Court Street, Prineville; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com.

MONDAY June 18 TRACTOR SAFETY TRAINING: A three-day Central Oregon Farm and Tractor Safety Training and Certification Course, sponsored by the OSU Extension Service; open to ages 14-17; registration required before June 8; class continues June 19-20; $50; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-548-2711.

a.m.-1 p.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. JOB FAIR: Central Oregon Community College will host a job fair aimed at finding part-time instructors to teach credit and noncredit classes in Madras, Deer Ridge Correctional Institution, Prineville and Redmond; bring a rĂŠsumĂŠ and copy of college transcripts, if available; 4:30-6:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Redmond campus, 2030 S.E. College Loop, Redmond; 541-3837270 or www.jobs.cocc.edu.

WEDNESDAY June 20 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL BEND CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7 a.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-749-0789.

THURSDAY June 21 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL DESCHUTES BUSINESS NETWORKERS CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7 a.m.; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541-610-9125. DESIGNING HEALTHFUL, LIVABLE COMMUNITIES: Dr. Richard Jackson, pediatrician and chair of Environmental Health Sciences at UCLA, will speak on how the built environment, transportation choices, architecture and urban planning affect health, especially in children; tickets can be purchased through City Club of Central Oregon; $20 includes lunch; 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-8153951 or info@cityclubco.com. GETTING THE MOST OUT OF SCHWAB.COM: Registration required; free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794 or luiz.soutomaior@schwab.com.

FRIDAY June 22 CENTRAL OREGON REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT CLUB: Free; 11 a.m.; ServiceMaster Clean, 20806 Sockeye Place, Bend; 541-610-4006 or bobbleile@windermere.com. FREE TAX FRIDAY: Free tax return reviews; schedule an appointment at 541-385-9666 or www.myzoomtax .com; free; 2-4 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666.

MONDAY June 25 FILE IT, FIND IT: Registration required; class continues June 27; $59; 1-4 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. PHOTOSHOP ELEMENTS, BEGINNING: Registration required; contact http://noncredit.cocc.edu or 541-383-7270; $59; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541383-7700.

TUESDAY June 26

TUESDAY June 19 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL HIGH DESERT CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7:15 a.m.; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541-420-7377. BREAKFAST WITH THE CHAMBER: Crooked River Ranch-Terrebonne Chamber of Commerce meeting; open to the public; free; 8 a.m.; Diego’s Spirited Kitchen, 447 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-923-2679 or www.crrchamber.com. VISIT BEND BOARD MEETING: Open to the public; 8 a.m.; Bend Visitor Center, 750 N.W. Lava Road; 541382-8048 or valerie@visitbend.com. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit; registration required; contact 541-447-6384 or www .happyhourtraining.com; $35; 9

BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL HIGH DESERT CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7:15 a.m.; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541-420-7377. WILL THE REAL INDEPENDENT CONTRACTORS PLEASE STAND UP?: Kurt Barker and Jon Napier from Karnopp Petersen LLP and Evan Dickens from Jones & Roth will address questions about independent contracting; registration required; $25 for members and $45 for nonmembers; 11 a.m.; Bend Golf and Country Club, 61045 Country Club Drive; www.bendchamber.org.

WEDNESDAY June 27 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL BEND CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7 a.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-749-0789.

Best Buy founder quits board, may take company private Schulze’s early exit, coming just two weeks before he MINNEAPOLIS — Best was to relinquish his chairBuy Co. Inc. Chairman Rich- manship at Best Buy’s anard Schulze resigned Thurs- nual shareholders meeting and one year before day from the board of he was to step down directors, paving the way for the company’s from the board, added billionaire founder and fresh drama to what largest investor to take has been one of the the struggling elecmost tumultuous tronics retailer private, Schulze years in the compawith new owners and ny’s history. management. Last month, an in“I continue to believe vestigation by the board’s in Best Buy and its future audit committee determined and care deeply about its that former CEO Brian Dunn customers, employees and had an inappropriate relationshareholders,� Schulze said ship with a female employee. in a statement. “There is an The board also concluded urgent need for Best Buy that Schulze knew of the reto reinvigorate growth by lationship in December but reconnecting with today’s failed to inform the board. “By unilaterally confrontcustomers and building pathways to the next generation ing the CEO, the chairman of consumers. failed to act in a manner con“Accordingly, I have shared sistent with good governance my view with the board and practices, and he created seritoday informed (the board) of ous risks of employee retalimy (resignation) in order to ation and company liability,� explore all available options the report said. for my ownership stake.� As a result, Schulze agreed

to step down as chairman this month in favor board member Hatim Tyabji and resign from the board entirely in 2013. He would retain the title of chairman emeritus but would not have any direct role in the company. “I understand and accept the findings of the Audit Committee,� Schulze said in a statement at the time. He now appears to have second thoughts. Former executives and analysts say that Schulze, even in retirement, was always going to exert some influence at Best Buy, given his nearly 21 percent ownership stake and close relationships he still enjoys with people throughout the company. Given his attachment to Best Buy, Schulze would also have a hard time completely walking away from the company, industry observers say. Indeed, Schulze has increased his stake in Best Buy, acquiring another 3 million shares in March.

GE

they can reduce or eliminate engine idling during delivery stops, he said. “There are gains to be had,� See said. Lisa Jerram, a senior researcher in Washington, D.C., for Pike Research, which tracks clean technology, said companies face a tough decision when weighing the economics of switching to alternative-fuel vehicles. It often means budgeting more to acquire vehicles while trying to project the future price of gasoline, she said. “There is no question, there is a lot of interest,� said Jerram, who recently wrote a report on alternative-fuel cars for fleet operators. Her report concluded that a mid-size battery-electric car offers the lowest cost of ownership if driven 120,000 miles. Much of the $35,000 total plug-in vehicle cost was the initial purchase, she found. Experts said fleet managers also must consider the cost of installing charging and fueling stations, as well as their employees’ driving patterns and distances.

By Thomas Lee

Star Tribune (Minneapolis)

Continued from E1 Frodl said corporate fleet managers are interested in alternative-powered vehicles because, unlike many consumers, they look at a vehicle’s cost, including fuel, over its expected life. Alternativepowered vehicles typically carry a higher price tag but save on fuel. “Many consumers look only at the up-front cost,� she said. “Fleet managers look at the total cost of ownership.� GE, which also makes plug-in electric charging stations, has said it plans to acquire 25,000 electric vehicles for its corporate fleet by 2015. Some employees of GE fleet leasing in Eden Prairie already drive gas-electric cars that are recharged at plug-in stations in front of the corporate offices. Though the company didn’t disclose the cost of the Vehicle Innovation Center, a city planner said its value was assessed at $949,000. GE also upgraded its adjacent headquarters building with dis-

plays about GE innovations. Phil Russo, executive director of NAFA Fleet Management Association, a trade group for fleet managers, said a 2012 survey of its members found that 62 percent considered clean-energy technology an important or very important consideration in vehicle choice. Only fuel economy ranked higher, he said. “That is a major shift away from what it used to be,� said Russo. Russo said government vehicle fleets have been moving to alternative-fuel vehicles for some time, often because of mandates. In the past two years, more corporations have turned to green vehicles, in part to reduce their carbon footprints and enhance their reputation as green companies, he said. “The greening of a company is certainly attractive to the early adopters,� said Kevin See, lead analyst for electric vehicles at Lux Research in Boston. Some companies, like FedEx and Coca-Cola, can save on electric vehicles because


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Items for Free Curved bricks for tree wells, free, you haul, 541-350-1972. 208

Pets & Supplies The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to fraud. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

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Misc. Items

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Golden Retriever AKC Pups, Hunting & Competition lines, Excellent pedigree. 541-743-5998 , lartho@q.com , http://www.stoneflyretrievers.com Golden Retriever Pups, AKC reg, 6 males, 1 female, well socialized, $500 ea, ready 6/18, 541-447-2223. Hound Mix, 3/4 walker, 1/4 black & tan, 1 male, 1 female, 7 mo., $100 ea., 541-447-1323 Kittens, new, available! Also great rescued cats. 65480 78th St., Bend, Sat/Sun 1-5; other days by appt. 541-647-2181. Altered, shots, ID chip, more. Info: 389-8420. Map, photos, more at www.craftcats.org Lab/Heeler mix female, free to a good home. We moved and can't keep her, she loves to swim and play ball and frisbee! Call 541-290-9395 Lab Pups AKC, black & yellow, Master Hunter sired, performance pedigree, OFA cert hips & elbows, Call 541-771-2330

AKC Black Lab Pups. Champion bloodlines. Health certificate. Raised with love. $600. 541-280-5292. Aussie Puppy, Blue Merle toy, blue eyes and family raised born 4/20/12 almost 8 weeks shots/worming www.kinnamanretrievers.com $400 541-233-7899 Labradoodles - Mini & med size, several colors 541-504-2662 USE THE CLASSIFIEDS! Door-to-door selling with fast results! It’s the easiest way in the world to sell. The Bulletin Classiied

541-385-5809 Australian Shepherds Regd minis born 5/12/12 Champ lines & health clearances. True structure & temperament. (541)639-6263 or mountainviewminiaussies @yahoo.com

Barn cats/ mousers ready to work in your barn, shop or home in exchange for safe shelter, food & water. Altered, shots. We deliver! 541-389-8420 Border Collie/Kelpie cross working dog pups. 2 males left. Great dispositions & very cute. $150. 541-350-2824, 541-350-7813 Boston Terrier Pups, 6 females, 6 wks, $300, non papered, parents on site, 541-943-3366

Boxer/ Bulldog (Valley Bulldog) new litter,CKC Reg., taking deposits. $700. 541-325-3376

www.alpen-ridge.com

Mini Aussie female, 1st shots, wormed $300 cash. 541-678-7599 Papillon-mix with toy poodle, 1 male left. 8 wks. Black/white, will be pretty. $150. 541 350-1684 Pit Bull puppies, (2) females, black with white chest & black with grey chest. Sweet natured parents. $100 each 541-382-3751 Pitbull Purebred Pups, blue’s & seal brindles, $200 OBO, call Polly, 541-280-8720

Desk, Corner Computer, large, sturdy, $28, 541-536-1333. Dresser, solid oak $350; Entry table, $75; book case $20; all exc. cond. 541-647-1333 Entertainment Centers (1)1-piece,$150,(1) oak 4-piece, $400, pics avail., 541-208-5053. Fridge, Amana side by side, with water / ice dispenser, $300 obo. 541-389-9680 GENERATE SOME excitement in your neighborhood! Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 541-385-5809. Loveseat Rocker, floral earthtones, $50. 541-678-5605 Maytag ceramic convention 2-oven stove $150. 541-382-9211 Microwave, all phases $100. Dishwasher $100. 541-382-9211 NEED TO CANCEL YOUR AD? The Bulletin Classifieds has an "After Hours" Line Call 541-383-2371 24 hrs. to cancel your ad! Refrigerator: white 26 cu.ft. Kenmore $150. Cash, you haul. 541-382-9211 Rocker Recliner, beautiful brown leather, like new, $225. 541-923-9867 Rocker/recliner,La-Z-Boy taupe fabric, was $65, now $50 541-749-0024 Table lamps, (2) 29” matching , floral, $50 pair. 541-678-5605 The Bulletin r ecommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to FRAUD. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Cannondale R500 Road Bike, dk green, 54cm, converted to flat bar (drops incl), exc cond, $400. 541-382-2259 246

Guns, Hunting & Fishing AR-15 Custom rifle .223 w/9 mags & ammo. $1200. 541-647-8931 Browning Citori 20 ga, 3” 28” barrels, grade 1 like new. $1400 OBO 541-383-3029. CASH!! For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Supplies. 541-408-6900. Don’t miss the GUN DOG EXPO June 22-23-24, Portland, OR. See: www.GunDogExpo.com DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS? Non-commercial advertisers may place an ad with our "QUICK CASH SPECIAL" 1 week 3 lines $12 or 2 weeks $20! Ad must include price of single item of $500 or less, or multiple items whose total does not exceed $500. Call Classifieds at 541-385-5809

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Ruger LC9 with LaserMax, only 30 rounds shot. $400. 541-408-3288 Ruger Mini-14 tactical rifle w/8mags & ammo, $900. 541-647-8931 Smith & Wesson .44 Mag, leather holster, 629 Classic, $600, 541-410-0557. S&W 357 mag combat Mdl 19-3 6” brl. Collector condition. $650. 541-312-2785. Wanted: Collector seeks high quality fishing items. Call 541-678-5753, or 503-351-2746 255

Computers 212

THE BULLETIN requires computer adPoodle pups, toy, for vertisers with multiple SALE. Also Rescued ad schedules or those Poodle Adults for Antique Hutch - 6’x3’ selling multiple sysadoption, to loving tems/ software, to dis100 yrs + $200 OBO homes. 541-475-3889 close the name of the for info. 541-388-5696 business or the term Queensland Heelers Antique Mills putter with "dealer" in their ads. standard & mini,$150 & wood shaft, $150. Private party advertisup. 541-280-1537 http:// 541-318-5732 ers are defined as rightwayranch.wordpress.com those who sell one Redbone & Bloodhound Antiques wanted: tools, computer. furn., fishing, marbles, cross, 2.5 yrs., great old sports gear, cos257 house dog or kids dog, tume jewelry, rock $100, 541-447-1323 Musical Instruments posters. 541-389-1578 Antique weather vane Everett upright piano, with trees & deer, excellent cond, 48” tall $150. 541-318-5732 x 58” wide, $920 obo. 541-389-9680 Antiques & Collectibles

Shetland Sheepdogs Registered, (Shelties), Chihuahua Pups, as2 females - $300 3 sorted colors, teacup, Males- $250 to loving 1st shots, wormed, homes 541-977-3982 Beer “Pump”,1940, $500, $250,541-977-4686 made in England by Gaskell & Chambers, Chihuahua Pups, toy, 3 Spay your mother cat for only $45, we will 541-408-4613 females, 1 male, alter her litter for free! $200, 541-678-0786. Bend Spay & Neuter Civil War Soldier daguerreotype in uniChi-Pom mix pups, Project will spay/neuform with scabbard Adorable fluffy, fuzzy ter the first four kit$150. 541-343-8270 & loving, 6 wks, 2 tens, aged 8-12 males, $200 each weeks. Kittens MUST Pooley Armoire, 1 of a be at least 2 lbs. Ad541-480-2824 kind, pictures avail., ditional kittens $5 $900 OBO, must see, Dachshund AKC minis, each. Call today for 541-280-5053. short & longhair, B/tan appt. 541-617-1010. & choc/tan, F $375; M The Bulletin reserves $325. 541-420-6044 the right to publish all or 541-447-3060 ads from The Bulletin newspaper onto The Don’t miss the Bulletin Internet webGUN DOG EXPO site. June 22-23-24, Portland, OR. See: St. Bernard Puppies, www.GunDogExpo.com dry mouth, 1st shots, dewormed, $400, Vintage Doilies, many DO YOU HAVE 541-280-8069 styles, 20 @ $10 each SOMETHING TO 541-318-5732 Yorkie, adult reg, fenced SELL yard, needs loving FOR $500 OR 240 family, un-altered LESS? Crafts & Hobbies $400, 541-233-3534 Non-commercial advertisers may Yorkie AKC pups, small, place an ad with Pottery studio: evbig eyes,shots,parents our in home, 1 boy, 1 girl, erything must go: "QUICK CASH $950+, 541-316-0005. clay, glazes, tools, SPECIAL" raw materials, min210 1 week 3 lines, $12 erals, pumps, and Furniture & Appliances or 2 weeks, $20! more. Saturday from Ad must include 10-4 p.m. or call: price of single item 541-480-0696. A1 Washers&Dryers of $500 or less, or Some free items.45 $150 ea. Full warmultiple items NW Irving. Bend. ranty. Free Del. Also whose total does wanted, used W/D’s not exceed $500. 241 541-280-7355 Bicycles & Call Classifieds at Baker china cabinets, 2 541-385-5809 Accessories all-glass fronts, 1 dry www.bendbulletin.com bar, 81” H x 36” wide, $890 obo. Other cabiFree adult female cat, nets. 541-389-9680 spayed, shots current, to loving home. Coffee Table, 27”x27”, clear glass,shelf below, 541-550-0202 $199, 541-330-8774 2007 GT Downhill German Shepherd AKC Racer Pro, all the puppies, born March Computer desk, oak & TV stand, very nice. bells & whistles, $500, 27, 1st & 2nd shots, 541-408-4613. Emily 541-647-8803 $35 ea. 541-706-1051

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Misc. Items 9-pc full comforter with matching items, $60. 541-678-5605

Buying Diamonds /Gold for Cash

Employment

Showtime’s hit Dexter DVD set, seasons 1-5 SUPER TOP SOIL $75. 541-318-5732 www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & comThe Bulletin Offers post mixed, no Free Private Party Ads rocks/clods. High hu• 3 lines - 3 days mus level, exc. for • Private Party Only flower beds, lawns, 421 • Total of items advergardens, straight Schools & Training tised must equal $200 screened top soil. or Less Bark. Clean fill. De- AIRLINES ARE HIR• Limit 1 ad per month liver/you haul. ING - Train for hands • 3-ad limit for same 541-548-3949. on Aviation Mainteitem advertised within nance Career. FAA 3 months 270 approved program. Call 541-385-5809 Lost & Found Financial aid if qualiFax 541-385-5802 fied - Housing availWanted- paying cash LOST 36”x48” mtn landable. Call Aviation Infor Hi-fi audio & stuscape painting, vicinstitute of dio equip. McIntosh, ity of Baker Rd & Hwy Maintenance. JBL, Marantz, Dy97. 541-382-6757 1-877-804-5293. naco, Heathkit, San(PNDC) sui, Carver, NAD, etc. Need to get an Call 541-261-1808 ATTEND COLLEGE ad in ASAP? ONLINE from Home. 261 You can place it *Medical, *Business, Medical Equipment *Criminal Justice, online at: *Hospitality. Job ATTENTION DIABET- www.bendbulletin.com placement assistance. ICS with Medicare. Computer available. Get a FREE talking 541-385-5809 Financial Aid if qualimeter and diabetic fied. SCHEV certified. testing supplies at NO Lost precious 7lb PoCall 866-688-7078 meranian female, all COST, plus FREE www.CenturaOnline.c black, white face, mihome delivery! Best om (PNDC) crochipped, “Ebony,” of all, this meter elimi5/15, 78th St benates painful finger TRUCK SCHOOL tween Bend & Redpricking! Call www.IITR.net mond. 541-639-3222 888-739-7199. Redmond Campus (PNDC) Student Loans/Job REMEMBER: If you Waiting Toll Free have lost an animal, 262 1-888-438-2235 don't forget to check Commercial/Ofice The Humane Society 470 Equipment & Fixtures in Bend 541-382-3537 Domestic & Redmond, Legal size 4-drawer file In-Home Positions 541-923-0882 cabinet, lt. gray metal, Prineville, $60 . 541-678-5605 541-447-7178; Caregiver, live-in fulltime, housing & food OR Craft Cats, 265 included; salary nego. 541-389-8420. Building Materials Compassionate, responsible, kind. RefMADRAS Habitat erences & backFarm RESTORE ground check req’d. Building Supply Resale Market Contact Maureen, Quality at 541-385-8906 or LOW PRICES 541-480-1380 84 SW K St. 476 541-475-9722 Open to the public. Employment Prineville Habitat Opportunities ReStore 325 Building Supply Resale AV Tech - Swank AuHay, Grain & Feed 1427 NW Murphy Ct. dio Visuals is seeking a PT Audio Visual 541-447-6934 1st quality grass hay for Technician in SunriOpen to the public. horses. Barn stored, no ver. For more inforrain, 2nd cutting, $220/ 266 mation or to apply ton. Patterson Ranch, please visit Heating & Stoves Sisters, 541-549-3831 www.swankav.com Become a NOTICE TO Want to buy Alfalfa ADVERTISER standing, in Central Team Member. EOE Ore. 541-419-2713 Since September 29, Caregiver – Night 1991, advertising for Shifts avail. Apply in Wheat Straw: Certified & used woodstoves has person. Interviews this been limited to mod- Bedding Straw & Garden week. 1099 NE Watt els which have been Straw;Compost.546-6171 Way, Bend. certified by the OrLooking for your egon Department of Caregivers Environmental Qualnext employee? Home Instead Seity (DEQ) and the fedPlace a Bulletin nior Care is cureral Environmental help wanted ad rently seeking CarProtection Agency today and egivers in Sisters (EPA) as having met reach over and surrounding arsmoke emission stan60,000 readers eas to provide dards. A certified in-home care to seeach week. woodstove may be niors, allowing them Your classified ad identified by its certifito remain at home will also cation label, which is for as long as posappear on permanently attached sible. Candidates bendbulletin.com to the stove. The Bulmust be able to lift which currently letin will not knowup to 25lbs assist w/ receives over ingly accept advertistransfers. Shifts in1.5 million page ing for the sale of clude Sat/Sun and views every uncertified flexibility needed. woodstoves. month at no Training provided. extra cost. Pellet Earth Stove, ivory Ability to pass backBulletin color, 28” x 28”, perground checks and Classifieds fect cond, $700 obo. valid ODL. Contact 541-389-9680 Get Results! 541-330-6400 or fax Call 541-385-5809 resume to 267 541-330-7362. or place your ad Fuel & Wood on-line at

400

300

bendbulletin.com

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD... To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery and inspection. • A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’ • Receipts should include name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased. • Firewood ads MUST include species and cost per cord to better serve our customers.

333

Poultry, Rabbits, & Supplies

HELP WANTED! Immediate opening

No experience nec. Exc. training program. Opportunity for advancement, full or part time. Call 541-550-8801.

Eggs, farm fresh, extra Saxon’s Fine Jewelers large browns, $2.50/ 541-389-6655 dozen, 541-433-2112 BUYING DO YOU NEED Lionel/American Flyer 341 A GREAT trains, accessories. Horses & Equipment EMPLOYEE 541-408-2191. RIGHT NOW? BUYING & SELLING COLT STARTING Call The Bulletin All gold jewelry, silver We build solid foundabefore 11 a.m. and and gold coins, bars, tions. Check us out. get an ad in to pubrounds, wedding sets, 541-419-3405 lish the next day! class rings, sterling silwww.steelduststable.com 541-385-5809. ver, coin collect, vinVIEW the 350 tage watches, dental Classifieds at: gold. Bill Fleming, Horseshoeing/ www.bendbulletin.com 541-382-9419. Farriers GENERATE SOME EXCITEMENT LARGE west side Bend MAINTENANCE North Unit Irrigation IN YOUR equestrian center on Dry seasoned tamarack District is accepting NEIGBORHOOD. 80 acres now boardrnd, $185 red fir, $165 applications for a Plan a garage sale and ing. Indoor/outdoor split 541-977-4500 or Damtender at Wickiup don't forget to adverarena, indoor hot/cold 541-416-3677 Reservoir. The tise in classified! showers, automated Damtender is responLodgepole Pine, 541-385-5809. exerciser, extensive sible for day-to-day trail system. Call for GET FREE OF CREDIT dry rounds, $160/cord. operation and mainteinfo, 541-306-7507. Available now, nance of Wickiup CARD DEBT NOW! local delivery. dam. See Cut payments by up 358 541-389-0322. www.northunitid.com to half. Stop creditors Farmers Column for job description and from calling. 269 application, or con866-775-9621. Gardening Supplies 10X20 STORAGE tact (541) 475-3625. (PNDC) BUILDINGS & Equipment Handbag, Black Watch MANUFACTURING for protecting hay, plaid, wood with firewood, livestock Central Oregon mill is leather handles new BarkTurfSoil.com etc. $1496 Installed. accepting resumes for $40. 541-318-5732. 541-617-1133. Instant Landscaping Co. a full time CCB #173684. PROMPT DELIVERY LaTour Eiffel handbag Forklift Operator kfjbuilders@ykwc.net 541-389-9663 & wallet, new in bag, with cabinet shop ex$125. 541-318-5732 (15) Main line irrigation perience who can pipe, 40’ x 5”, $1.80/ft. MANTIS Deluxe Tiller. multi task. High enFor newspaper 541-604-4415 NEW! FastStart energy for a fast paced delivery, call the gine. Ships FREE. environment needed. Circulation Dept. at Pasture for Lease,2+ irriOne-Year We offer an excellent 541-385-5800 gated acre, w/attached Money-Back Guarbenefits package. Pay To place an ad, call 1 acre dry lot, equine antee when you buy is D.O.E. 541-385-5809 only, $50-$75/head/mo, DIRECT. Call for the or email 541-678-3264. classified@bendbulletin.com DVD and FREE Good Please email Soil book! Want to buy Alfalfa your resume to: 877-357-5647. standing, in Central Employment.resumes@ (PNDC) Ore. 541-419-2713 ymail.com

Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin' s web site will be able to click through automatically to your site.

Sales - Garden center Sales Person needed with 2-3 years experience required, including good knowledge of Central Oregon plants. Please Email your resume to melissa@schultzfa rmandgarden.com or fax to 541-923-2576.

The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to FRAUD. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Ever Consider a Reverse Mortgage? At least 62 years old? Stay in your home & increase cash flow! Safe & Effective! Call Now for your FREE DVD! Call Now 888-785-5938. (PNDC) Reverse Mortgages by local expert Mike LeRoux NMLS57716

Call to learn more.

541-350-7839 Security1 Lending NMLS98161

573

Business Opportunities A Classified ad is an EASY WAY TO REACH over 3 million Pacific Northwesterners. $525/25-word classified ad in 30 daily newspapers for 3-days. Call the Pacific Northwest Daily Connection (916) 288-6019 or email elizabeth@cnpa.com for more info (PNDC) Advertise VACATION SPECIALS to 3 million Pacific Northwesterners! 30 daily newspapers, six states. 25-word classified $525 for a 3-day ad. Call (916) 288-6019 or visit www.pnna.com/advert ising_pndc.cfm for the Pacific Northwest Daily Connection. (PNDC) Extreme Value Advertising! 30 Daily newspapers $525/25-word classified, 3-days. Reach 3 million Pacific Northwesterners. For more information call (916) 288-6019 or email: elizabeth@cnpa.com for the Pacific Northwest Daily Connection. (PNDC)

Wastewater Operator I CITY OF MADRAS Operates and maintains the City’s utility systems, which include wastewater, water and stormwater. Reports to the Utilities Supervisor. The position requires the equivalent to an Associate’s Degree in SECURITY chemistry, biology, or SOCIAL DISABILITY BENa wastewater treatEFITS. WIN or Pay ment discipline, plus Nothing! Start Your one year of experiApplication In Under ence in wastewater 60 Seconds. Call Totreatment operations. day! Contact DisabilCertifications required ity Group, Inc. Liare Oregon Wastecensed Attorneys & water Treatment Level I and Oregon WasteBBB Accredited. Call water Collections Lev888-782-4075. el I. Additional indus(PNDC) try training or certification may substitute Looking for your for some higher edunext employee? cation. Must possess Place a Bulletin help valid Oregon commercial driver’s li- wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 cense with a Class B readers each week. rating, as well as Your classified ad tanker and air-brake will also appear on endorsements. bendbulletin.com Monthly salary range: which currently re$2,797-$3,165 DOQ. ceives over 1.5 milExcellent benefit lion page views package including every month at fully paid PERS. Send no extra cost. completed city application form, letter of Bulletin Classifieds interest and resume to Get Results! Call “Wastewater Opera385-5809 or place tor I Recruitment”, your ad on-line at City of Madras, 71 SE bendbulletin.com “D” Street, Madras, OR 97741-1685. For a complete job description and application go to Rentals www.ci.madras.or.us Closing date: June 20, 2012. Equal Opportunity Employer

600

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Finance & Business

500 528

Loans & Mortgages

630

Rooms for Rent Studios & Kitchenettes Furnished room, TV w/ cable, micro & fridge. Utils & linens. New owners.$145-$165/wk 541-382-1885 634

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

Alpine Meadows Townhomes 1, 2 & 3 bdrm apts. Starting at $625. 541-330-0719

Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

Check out the classiieds online www.b e n d b u lle tin .c o m Updated daily Call for Specials! Limited numbers avail. 1, 2 and 3 bdrms. W/D hookups, patios or decks. MOUNTAIN GLEN, 541-383-9313 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use cauLocated by BMC/Costco, tion when you pro2 bdrm, 2 bath duplex, vide personal information to compa- 55+,2350 NEMary Rose nies offering loans or Pl, #1, $795 no smoking or pets, 541-390-7649 credit, especially those asking for adSPRING IN FOR A vance loan fees or GREAT DEAL!! companies from out of $299 1st month’s rent! * state. If you have 2 bdrm, 1 bath concerns or ques$530 & 540 tions, we suggest you Carports & A/C incl! consult your attorney Fox Hollow Apts. or call CONSUMER (541) 383-3152 HOTLINE, Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co 1-877-877-9392. *Upstairs only with lease*


F2 FRIDAY, JUNE 8, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

636

650

658

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend

Houses for Rent NE Bend

Houses for Rent Redmond

Real Estate For Sale

When buying a home, 83% of Central Oregonians turn to

Spacious Country home in NE Redmond. 2 master bdrm/bath suites, large living rm, spacious kitchen/dining, $725, taking applications, 541-419-1917.

700

648

Houses for Rent General Rented your property? The Bulletin Classifieds has an "After Hours" Line. Call 541-383-2371 24 hours to cancel your ad! 650

Houses for Rent NE Bend

Call 541-385-5809 to place your Real Estate ad. Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com, currently receiving over 1.5 million page views, every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 541-385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

732 659

Houses for Rent Sunriver In River Meadows a 3 bdrm, 1.5 bath, 1376 sq. ft., woodstove, brand new carpet/oak floors, W/S pd, $895. 541-480-3393 or 541-610-7803 687

Commercial for Rent/Lease Office/Warehouse located in SE Bend. Up to 30,000 sq.ft., competitive rate, 541-382-3678.

A quiet newer 3 bdrm, Warehouse - Industrial 2.5 bath, 1692 sq.ft., Call The Bulletin At unit for rent. 5600 541-385-5809 mtn views. dbl. gasq.ft., $2250/month, rage w/opener. $1195 Place Your Ad Or E-Mail near Bend High. 541-480-3393,610-7803. At: www.bendbulletin.com 541-389-8794.

860

870

Homes for Sale

Motorcycles & Accessories

Boats & Accessories

Boats & RV’s

Honda CB900 Custom, 1981, exc. cond., 27K, All real estate adver50 mpg., tune-up, tised here in is subready for summer, ject to the Federal $1595, 541-279-7092 Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any pref850 erence, limitation or discrimination based Snowmobiles on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, Polaris 2003, 4 cycle, familial status or nafuel inj, elec start, re- Honda Shadow Arrow tional origin, or intenverse, 2-up seat, 2006, exlnt cond, low tion to make any such cover, 4900 mi, $2500 mi, always garaged, preferences, limitaobo. 541-280-0514 $3900. 541-420-4869 tions or discrimination. We will not knowingly 860 accept any advertising for real estate Motorcycles & Accessories Honda VT700 which is in violation of CRAMPED FOR Shadow 1984, 23K this law. All persons mi, many new parts, CASH? are hereby informed Use classified to sell battery charger, that all dwellings adthose items you no good condition. vertised are available longer need. Now for $1000, on an equal opportuCall 541-385-5809 cash! 541-598-4351 nity basis. The Bulletin Classified Piaggio LT50 Scooter Just too many 2003 , rarely driven in 9 yrs, only 660 miles, collectibles? mint condition; plus 2 helmets, a Mote Tote Sell them in tow bar and tie down accessories, all for The Bulletin Classiieds only $1750. Harley Davidson HeriCall 541-389-3044 tage Classic 2000, 541-385-5809 Softail, 7200 mi, many 865 extras, $8000. Call 749 ATVs 541-419-5634 Southeast Bend Homes Harley Davidson Soft- We buy motorcycles, 3 Bdrm, 1 level, approx. Tail Deluxe 2007, ATV’s, snowmobiles 4 yrs. old, like new, white/cobalt, w/pas& watercrafts. 1322 sq.ft., dbl. garage senger kit, Vance & Call Ken at w/opener, nice open Hines muffler system 541-647-5151. plan, A/C,media panel, & kit, 1045 mi., exc. quiet cul-de-sac, low cond, $19,999, maint. yard, on land 541-389-9188. lease, $68,000, 503-810-5661. Harley Heritage Softail, 2003 762 $5,000+ in extras, Homes with Acreage $2000 paint job, We buy motorcycles, 30K mi. 1 owner, ATV’s, snowmobiles 1592 sq.ft., 3 bdrm, 2 For more information & watercrafts. bath, site-built, 2 car please call Call Ken at attached heated ga541-385-8090 541-647-5151. rage, 24x36 heated, or 209-605-5537 finished shop w/10’ 744 ceilings & 220V power, all on 1.22 treed acre HD FAT BOY Open Houses lot in CRR, too much to 1996 list, $195,000. Call OPEN HOUSE Completely rebuilt/ 541-504-8730 NW Rainbow Dr. customized, low Terrebonne miles. Accepting of775 Follow signs at fers. 541-548-4807 Manufactured/ Crooked River Ranch Sat., June 9, 10 -3 Mobile Homes Nearly 5 acres 3 bdrm, HD FXST Softail 2 bath. $349,400. Yamaha YFZ450 2005 Very nice, well maint, 2003 Annv Edition See Sat. ad for more Sport Race quad, built 2/2, near Costco/Fo- 12200 mi: Inc. Extras details or check 4-mil stroked to 470cc, rum, Senior Park Excl Cond; $8,900 MLS# 201103620 lots of mods, $4950 obo w/pool, $39,500, call 541-504-6912 541-410-6225 Call 541-647-8931 owner, 541-280-0955.

NOTICE:

Edited by Will Shortz

Beautiful updated, cozy 1 bdrm, 2 bath 1100 sq. ft. condo, 2 blocks from downtown, along banks of Deschutes, A/C, 1 parking spot, indoor pool, hot tub & sauna, credit & ref. check, min. 1 yr. lease, no pets. $675, utilities included. Kerrie, 541-480-0325.

745

Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale

800

½ acre in Prineville OR 745 industrial park 24'x80' shop with 40'x60' Homes for Sale unfinished addition, $160,000. Call for 4270 sq ft, 6 bdrm, 6 ba, more info; can send 4-car, corner, .83 acre mtn view, by owner. pics. 541-604-0344 $590,000 541-390-0886 See: bloomkey.com/8779

$125,900 townhouse 2 bdrm/2 bath. Near shops/ hospital. Passive solar heat, wood stove, garage, private patio. HOA's $207/mo. 1953 NE Otelah Pl. Call 503-881-6540

BANK OWNED HOMES! FREE List w/Pics! www.BendRepos.com

14’ Classic P-14 Seaswirl, 20HP motor, Bimini Top, new seats, Eagle finder, trailer, ready to go, $1600, 541-923-2957.

14’ Klamath Deluxe, 2001,15hp Mercury, + electric trolling motor, low hours, trailer & seats included, $3250. 541-977-0903

18.5’ ‘05 Reinell 185, V-6 Volvo Penta, 270HP, low hrs., must see, $17,500, 541-330-3939 19.5’ 1988 373V Ranger Bass Boat, Mercury 115 Motor, Ranger trailer, trolling elec. motor, fish finder & sonor, 2 live wells & all accessories, new batteries & tires, great cond., $6500. 541-923-6555.

19-ft Mastercraft ProStar 190 inboard, 1987, 290hp, V8, 822 hrs, great cond, lots of extras, $10,000 obo. 541-231-8709

19’ Glass Ply, Merc cruiser, depth finder, trolling motor, trailer, $3500, 541-389-1086 or 541-419-8034.

bend and beyond real estate 20967 yeoman, bend or

Where can you ind a helping hand? From contractors to yard care, it’s all here in The Bulletin’s “Call A Service Professional” Directory

‘94 Volvo 850 Sedan Auto, leather, moonroof Vin# 139030

$

1,999

‘99 Mercury Cougar Coupe Auto Vin# 601857

280

282

286

288

290

Estate Sales

Sales Northwest Bend

Sales Northeast Bend

Sales Southeast Bend

Sales Redmond Area

Garage Sale - Great Acre Sale - June 7th, 8th BARLEYCORN LANE Kurt Kendrick Benefit stuff! Collector knives, & 9th, Everything must Auction & Yard Sale, neighborhood garage swords, radial arm go! 25239 Cultous Ln, June 9th, 9am-4pm, sale in Nottingham saw, gas cans, some Bend (Just off Alfalfa Redmond Grange Square off SE 15th Ford accessories, & Mkt. Rd), follow signs. Hall. Live music! Golf Fri. 8-5, Sat. 8-? much, much more! Fri ALLEY SALE! Sat., 9-3 gift certificates, $300 Cabinets, old DeWalt 6/8, 8-5; Sat 6/9, 8-4, tattoo, dairy heifer, 1 ONLY. 6 households! radial arm saw, tools, 65530 78th St., Bend. ton hay, 1.5 cords Lots of great stuff: foosball table, clothes, wood, wall tent wood furniture, snowboard stereo & spkrs, kitMulti-Family Sale: Fri. stove, handcrafted gear, toys, clothes, chen items, women’s & Sat., 9-4, rain/shine, Juniper jewelry box. Star Wars collectibles, socks, etc. Sat. 8-4, Lots of household Yard sale includes $4 kitchen items, etc. 20611 Daisy Lane. items, vintage wicker clothing bag sale, too Lemonade stand! Bechairs, heavy iron pot much to list! tween NE Franklin & Garage Sale: Sat.-Sun., rack, bedding, dishes, www.giveforward.com/ 8:30-3:30, canoe, furEmerson , and NE 520 NW Riverside CureKurt ESTATE SALE niture, antiques, more, 6th & 7th; park on 7th. Blvd. Cash only. 6498 SE Nighthawk, 22574 Calgary Dr. Moving/Yard Sale, Sat Prineville (Juniper Our First Sale! Sat., 8-3, A Mega Yard Sale & Sun, Jun 9-10, 8-3, Canyon) • Fri-Sat, 8-5, SALE, MULTI-FAMILY. 2 Households into 1! To Support Youth 4424 NE Walnut Ave, (see ad in Thur’s paper) Sat. only 8 - 3. Quality items priced to weather permitting. Missions! Antiques, 1158 SE Teakwood Dr. sell, Kitchen, garden, furniture & other Don't miss it! fishing, camping...Too Multi-family Sale, Sat treasures! Sat., 6/9, only, 8am-3pm, 1232 much to list. 610 NW at Pomegranate 7:30-2:30 Eastmont 290 SW Rimrock Way. Portland Ave. Church 62425 Sales Redmond Area Kids clothes, tools, Saturday, June 9, Eagle Rd 284 antiques, furniture, 10am-4pm men’s & women’s ESTATE SALE! Antiques, vintage, gar- Sales Southwest Bend Bear Creek Village clothes, household Beautiful home, imden & artisan goods: e-bayer empties storgoods & decor. maculate things! AnGreat prices! Pome- Estate/Yard Sale Fri. 9-4 age! Multiple sellers, & Sat. 9-3, to benefit tiques include ma- Parking Lot Sale - loads granate Home & GarFri. & Sat. 9-2. Signs Bend Junior Bowlers. hogany secretary den, 120 NE River of all kinds of great up at 9! NO EARLY BIRDS! desk, small furn. & Mall Ave., just north stuff in the Highland Held rain or shine. Totables, pictures, cranof Macy’s. See Baptist Church parktally enclosed. 60058 berry lamps, Rose HH FREE HH pomegranate-home.com ing lot Saturday, June Cinder Butte Rd., Chintz dishes, Fosto9 8a to 4p. 3100 SW DRW, follow signs, 1.3 Garage Sale Kit ria, Oriental & CloiLook What I Found! Highland Ave., Redmiles from Baker Rd. Place an ad in The sonne, silver, jewelry & You'll find a little bit of Bulletin for your gamond. 541-548-4161. Furniture, lamps, side watches, beautiful everything in rage sale and reProceeds support tables, kitchen table w/ dining set, newer full The Bulletin's daily ceive a Garage Sale mission teams to Peru 4 chairs, small kitchen bed, quality kitchengarage and yard sale Kit FREE! and Moldova. appl., dishes, framed & ware, linens, ladies section. From clothes unframed art, colclothing, tools, garage, to collectibles, from World Famous MultiKIT INCLUDES: lectibles, books, 40 yrs outdoor fountain, housewares to hardFamily Garage Sale • 4 Garage Sale Signs of Playboy. shelving, health care ware, classified is Tetherow Crossing, • $1.00 Off Coupon To items, three bikes, 4675 NW 62nd St. Use Toward Your always the first stop for People Look for Information much more! Next Ad Sat., Jun. 9, 8am-4pm cost-conscious About Products and 2257 NW Maple Ct., • 10 Tips For “Garage Lots of quality items, consumers. And if off 22nd & Maple Services Every Day through Sale Success!” all priced to sell! Conyou're planning your Friday & Saturday, 9-4. The Bulletin Classifieds • And Inventory Sheet signment quality own garage or yard Crowd control numclothing, tools, BBQ, sale, look to the clas- Garage Sale:Fri. & Sat. bers Friday 8:00 a.m PICK UP YOUR Honda 4-wheeler, reel sifieds to bring in the 9-4, 60976 Snow- GARAGE SALE KIT at Attic Estates & Appraislawnmower, trail bike, buyers. You won't find berry Pl, books, tools, als 541-350-6822 1777 SW Chandler RV car tow pkg, staa better place atticestatesandappraisgolf equip,much more! Ave., Bend, OR 97702 tionary bike, Sony surfor bargains! als.com round system, 2 nice Call Classifieds: Multi-Family Sale: Fri., chairs, kayak loading Golf clubs, bags, sets 541-385-5809 or Sat., Sun., 8-6, Ansystem, dozens of (Taylor Made, Callatiques, furniture, camp email flower pots, Meade classified@bendbulletin.com way & more), elecgear, household, art- Garage Sale: Fri. & telescope, camp tronics, furniture, work, reloading equip., Sat., 8-12, 3137 NE stove, Hi-Lift jack, dog 282 tools. 35th & Rein19032 Shoshone Rd Barrington Ct.(Provihouse, computer. deer. Fri.-Sat., 9-3. Sales Northwest Bend dence), furniture, kids AND much more!! Pinebrook Blvd. Neigtoy elec. tractor, balHUGE ANNUAL borhood Sale:Sat. 8-4, ance bikes/bike, toys, $$ BAG LADIES $$ 292 River Ranch near Wal Mart, many clothes,camping gear. Crooked of Union St. yard sale. Seniors Yard & Plant Sales Other Areas homes participating. All table items Garage Sale - Saturday Sale Fri. & Sat. 9-5. ONE DOLLAR! Relay for Life Yard Sun. 9-2. (June 8, 9, Huge Moving Sale. 40 8-4. Kids toys, baby Sat. 9-3, Sale, Sat., 7-4, 60525 10). Senior Center, clothing, family items. yrs of treasures. 6/9 & Weather Permitting, Brookswood Blvd. 6710 Ranch House 2945 Red Oak Dr. 6/10, 9-4. 53346 Riv1319 NW Union St. Benefits American Place, Crooked River erview Dr., LaPine. The Annual $1 Sale! Cancer Society Ranch. Msg. Phone 541-536-1015. Kearney St. Boutique Estate/Yard Sale, Fri & Relay for Life. 541-504-8236 Sat., 6/9, 10am, no Sat, 9am-4pm, 18431 Find exactly what early birds please! June 8 and 9, 834 NW Pinehurst Rd. AnSCANDIA SALE 355 NE Kearney Negus Lane. 8-4 on you are looking for in the tiques, household gds, SAT., JUNE 9, 8-3, (same st. as Taco Bell) books, clothing, furFriday, 8-1 on Sat., 1 block South of Fred CLASSIFIEDS 541-382-8131 niture, & lots more! misc., boat, micro, TV Meyer 541-382-6206 Big and Tall Men’s Estate Sale: Old skis, bikes, huge amount XXL clothes/ shoes, tools, household items, furniture, electronics, big screen TVs,too much to list! SATURDAY ONLY, June 9! 8-4 2802 N.E. Ocker St, Bend

12’ Aluminum Boat, 5HP motor, $875, 503-319-5745.

SALE

740

Condo/Townhomes for Sale

10’ Topper sailboat, complete, $600 cash, or best offer. Bend, 503-838-6274

$

2,999

‘04 VW Passatt 4Motion

‘04 Ford Expedition Eddie Bauer

Auto, Leather, Moonroof, Alloy wheels $ Vin# 248838

Moonroof, 3rd Seat, Rear Air, Leather, Running Board, Premium Wheels Vin# A96453 $

‘05 SATURN VUE

‘05 Subaru Outback 2.5i

10,999

Low Miles Vin# 833095

$

16,999

All Weather, Auto, Moonroof, Alloys $

10,999 Vin# 356098

16,999

‘99 Subaru Impreza Outback Sport Wagon ‘01 TOYOTA 4RUNNER LIMITED ‘03 HUMMER H2 5-Speed Vin# F01088

$

6,999

4WD, Moonroof, clean!! $ Vin# 332527

11,488

Vin# 641651

$

7,599

‘98 SUBARU FORESTER Vin# 763743

$

8,999

18,999

‘02 PORSCHE BOXTER ROADSTER S CONVERTIBLE

‘00 Subaru Outback Wagon 2.5 ‘04 CHEVY TAHOE 5-Speed Auto, Rear air! Vin# 216330

Leather, Loaded, Premium Wheels. $ Vin# 113566

$

11,999

‘05 CHEVY EQUINOX

Manual, Leather $ Vin# 661399 19,999

‘10 HONDA CRV 4WD

AWD, Moonroof Low miles, moonroof $ Vin# 048898 11,999 Vin# 021956 $20,488

Flea Market

‘99 Dodge 1500 Quad Cab 4x4 Sport Auto, Running Boards, Bed Liner, Alloy Wheels $ Vin# 166703

8,999

‘99 Isuzu Rodeo LS 4WD Auto, Low Miles, Alloy Wheels $ Vin# 328811

8,999

‘06 FORD EXPLORER V6 XLT AWD, Automatic Vin# A18848

$

9,995

‘06 VW GTI

‘07 VOLVO XC90 AWD

‘07 JEEP LIBERTY 4X4

‘06 SUBARU OUTBACK LL BEAN

2 door, turbo, sporty. Leather, moonroof, auto, 3rd seat $ Vin# 196390 12,999 Vin# 387162 $21,999

Moonroof, heated seats. $ Vin# 646827

14,999

‘04 TOYOTA CAMRY Vin# 155018

$

Auto, Loaded, Leather, Moonroof $ Vin# 206258 21,999

‘04 FORD F350 KING RANCH CREW CAB

bed, (white). 14,999 Loaded, 6.0 Diesel, long $ Vin# A34788 23,999

‘05 VOLVO V50 WAGON

‘05 FORD EXPEDITION XLT

‘04 DODGE DURANGO LTD

‘05 TOYOTA HIGHLANDER LIMITED ‘08 BMW 335xi Twin Turbo

4x4, 3rd seat, running boards, low miles. ‘09 SUBARU LEGACY SEDAN LIMITED Leather, Moonroof $ $ Low Miles Vin# 061953 10,488 Vin# A51497 14,999 Moonroof, Nav., Leather, $ Vin# 217519 26,999

AWD, Leather, Loaded, Moonroof Auto, Leather, Moonroof, Rear Air, 3rd row! 4WD, Leather, 3rd Seat, Alloy Wheels $ $ Vin# 142655 14,999 Vin# 065446 $30,999 10,999 Vin# 113752

877-266-3821 Thank you for reading. All photos are for illustration purposes – not actual vehicles. All prices do not include dealer installed options, documentation, registration or title. All vehicles subject to prior sale. All lease payments based on 10,000 miles/year. Prices good through June 10, 2012.


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JUNE 8, 2012 F3

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880

Boats & Accessories

Watercraft

Motorhomes

Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp die20.5’ 2004 Bayliner sel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 205 Run About, 220 in. kitchen slide out, HP, V8, open bow, new tires,under cover, Inflatable Raft,Sevylor exc. cond., very fast hwy. miles only,4 door Fishmaster 325,10’3”, w/very low hours, fridge/freezer icecomplete pkg., $650 lots of extras incl. maker, W/D combo, Firm, 541-977-4461. tower, Bimini & Interbath tub & custom trailer, shower, 50 amp pro$19,500. pane gen & more! 541-389-1413 $55,000. 541-948-2310 Kayak, Eddyline Sandpiper, 12’, like new, $975, 541-420-3277. Hunter’s Delight! Pack20.5’ Seaswirl Spyage deal! 1988 Winder 1989 H.O. 302, nebago Super Chief, 285 hrs., exc. cond., 880 38K miles, great stored indoors for Motorhomes shape; 1988 Bronco II life $11,900 OBO. 4x4 to tow, 130K 541-379-3530 mostly towed miles, nice rig! $15,000 both. Ads published in the 541-382-3964, leave "Boats" classification msg. include: Speed, fishJamboree 24’ 1982, ing, drift, canoe, Chevy 350, 66K, all house and sail boats. 2002 Country Coach new: cam, lifters, trans, For all other types of Intrigue 40' Tag axle. paint, brakes, batteries, watercraft, please see 400hp Cummins Dieupholstery, tires, fuel Class 875. sel. Two slide-outs. pump. Large fridge/ 541-385-5809 41,000 miles. Most freezer, 4-burner stove/ options. $110,000 oven, solar charging, OBO 541-678-5712 $5250 OBO, 541-5491736 or 808-936-7426. GENERATE SOME exTURN THE PAGE citement in your neigFor More Ads borhood. Plan a garage sale and don't The Bulletin Jayco Greyhawk forget to advertise in 2004, 31’ Class C, classified! 385-5809. 6800 mi., hyd. jacks, new tires, slide out, exc. cond, $49,900, 541-480-8648

875

Watercraft Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

personals St. Jude Novena. May the Sacred Heart of Jesus be adored, glorified, loved and preserved throughout the world, now and forever. Sacred Heart of Jesus, pray for us; St. Jude, worker of miracles, pray for us; St. Jude, helper of the hopeless, pray for us. Say this prayer 9 times a day. It has never been known to fail. Publication must be promised. Thank you, Jesus & St. Jude. M.L.

Beaver Patriot 2000, Walnut cabinets, solar, Bose, Corian, tile, 4 door fridge., 1 slide, W/D. $75,000 541-215-5355

Coachman Freelander 2011, 27’, queen bed, 1 slide, HD TV, DVD player, 450 Ford, $49,000, please call 541-923-5754.

Handyman

www.hirealicensedcontractor. com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications. Computer/Cabling Install QB Digital Living •Computer Networking •Phone/Data/TV Jacks •Whole House Audio •Flat Screen TV & Installation 541-280-6771 www.qbdigitalliving.com CCB#127370 Elect Lic#9-206C

Debris Removal

JUNK BE GONE

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Peace Of Mind

Spring Clean Up

•Leaves •Cones •Needles •Debris Hauling •Aeration •Dethatching Compost Top Dressing Weed free Bark & flower beds ORGANIC PROGRAMS

Landscape Maintenance

Full or Partial Service •Mowing •Edging •Pruning •Weeding Sprinkler Adjustments

Fertilizer included with monthly program Weekly, monthly or one time service. EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential Free Estimates Senior Discounts

1000

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LEGAL NOTICE Auction Notice: B-2, 10x10 rented by: Lucio Valencia of Bend, OR; B-64, 10x10 rented by: Derek Clark of Bend, OR; B-13, 5x5 rented my: Jessica M. Jones of Bend, OR. June 16, 9:00 a.m., Bend Self Stor, 63273 Nels Anderson Rd., Bend, OR 97701, 541-389-1664. PUBLIC NOTICE The Four Rivers Vector Control district will be applying an adult mosquito control insecticide within the district and in Sunriver on some evenings throughout the summer. The product is applied with an ultra low volume fog machine and is target specific to Mosquitos. The product is labeled by the Environmental Protection Agency for residential and recreational areas.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0030486039 T.S. No.: 12-01107-3 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust dated as of April 7, 2005 made by, JAMES D. ATWOOD, JILL L ATWOOD, as the original grantor, to DESCHUTES COUNTY TITLE , as the original trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICAN HOME MORTGAGE ACCEPTANCE, INC., CORPORATION ITS SUCCESSORS AND OR ASSIGN, as the original beneficiary, recorded on April 29, 2012, as Instrument No. 2005-26220 of Official Records in the Office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, Oregon (the "Deed of Trust"). The current beneficiary is: Deutsche Batik National Trust Company, as Indenture Trustee for American Home Mortgage Investment Trust 2005-2, (the "Beneficiary"). APN: 137730 LOT THIRTY-SIX (36), BLOCK ELEVEN (11), OREGON WATER WONDERLAND UNIT NO. 1, RECORDED JULY 17, 1969, IN CABINET A, PAGE 343, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. APN: 137730 Commonly known as: 55400 BIG RIVER DR, BEND, OR Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default(s) for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; and which defaulted amounts total: $4,650.21 as of May 17, 2012. By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $144,557.89 together with interest thereon at the rate of 3.58700% per annum from December 1, 2011 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all Trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as the duly appointed Trustee under the Deed of Trust will on October 1, 2012 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of the Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs. Trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 135 Main Street, Suite 1900, San Francisco, CA 94105 415-247-2450 FOR SALE INFORMATION CALL: 714.730.2727 Website for Trustee's Sale Information: www.lpsasap.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "Trustee" and 'Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: May 23, 2012 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Natalie Gold, Authorized Signature

541-385-5809

541-385-5809 London Aire Motor Home, class C, 28 ft.

1990, in exc. shape, ready to go. Sleeps 6, Upgrade your camping experience! $11,995. Call 541-389-7955

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 (This special package is not available on our website)

Building/Contracting

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Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classiieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates!

Monaco Dynasty 2004, loaded, 3 slides, $159,000, 541-923- 8572 or 541-749-0037 (cell) Fleetwood Discovery 40X 2008, 31K miles, Take care of MUST SELL SOON, 3 slides, 1-owner, great your investments shape, $129,975 OBO, with the help from call Bill 541-771-3030 The Bulletin’s CAN’T BEAT THIS! “Call A Service Look before you Professional” Directory buy, below market value ! Size & mileage DOES matter, Class A 32’ Hurricane by Four Winds, 2007. 12,500 mi, all amenities, Ford V10, lthr, cherry, slides, like new, can see Monaco LaPalma 37’, 2004 w/ 2 slides, 25k anytime, $58,000. mi., loaded, $42,500. 541-548-5216 541-923-3510.

NOTICE: Oregon state I DO THAT! law requires any- Home/Rental repairs one who contracts Small jobs to remodels for construction work Honest, guaranteed to be licensed with the work. CCB#151573 Construction Con- Dennis 541-317-9768 tractors Board (CCB). An active license Landscaping/Yard Care means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website More Than Service

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Landscaping/Yard Care

Nelson Landscape Maintenance Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial

•Sprinkler Activation & Repair •Back Flow Testing •Thatch & Aerate • Spring Clean up

•Weekly Mowing •Bi-Monthly & Monthly Maintenance •Flower Bed Clean Up •Bark, Rock, Etc. •Senior Discounts

Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458

1000

1000

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0068795806 T.S. No.: 12-01031-5 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust dated as of September 19, 2006 made by, STEVEN D. HANSON, A SINGLE PERSON, as the original grantor, to FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INS CO, as the original trustee, in favor of Wells Fargo Bank, NA, as the original beneficiary, recorded on September 26, 2006, as Instrument No. 2006-64988 of Official Records in the Office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, Oregon (the "Deed of Trust"). The current beneficiary is: Wells Fargo Bank, NA, (the "Beneficiary"). APN: 187342 LOT THREE HUNDRED NINETY-ONE (391), BROKEN TOP, PHASE III F, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 19589 BLUE LAKE LOOP, BEND, OR Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default(s) for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; together with other fees and expenses incurred by the Beneficiary; and which defaulted amounts total: $9,094.94 as of May 14, 2012. By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $463,795.93 together with interest thereon at the rate of 2.87500% per annum from January 1, 2012 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all Trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as the duly appointed Trustee under the Deed of Trust will on September 24, 2012 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of the Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, Trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 11000 Olson Drive Ste 101, Rancho Cordova, CA 95670 916-636-0114 FOR SALE INFORMATION CALL: 714.730.2727 Website for Trustee's Sale Information: www.lpsasap.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: May 22, 2012 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee John Catching, Authorized Signature A-4249193 05/25/2012, 06/01/2012, 06/08/2012, 06/15/2012

LCB#8759

1000

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Call The Yard Doctor for yard maintenance, thatching, sod, sprinkler blowouts, water features, more! Allen 541-536-1294 LCB 5012

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Aeration / Dethatching BOOK NOW! Weekly / one-time service avail. Bonded, insured, free estimates!

COLLINS Lawn Maint. Call 541-480-9714 Maverick Landscaping Mowing, weedeating, yard detailing, chain saw work & more! LCB#8671 541-923-4324 Holmes Landscape Maint

• Clean-up • Aerate • De-thatch • Free Est. • Weekly / Bi-wkly Svc. call Josh 541-610-6011 Painting/Wall Covering

All About Painting Quality Builders Electric Interior/Exterior/Decks. • Remodels 541-390-1466 Mention this ad get • Home Improvement Same Day Response 15% Off interior or • Lighting Upgrades NOTICE: OREGON exterior job. • Hot Tub Hook-ups Landscape Contrac- Restrictions do apply. 541-389-0621 tors Law (ORS 671) Free Estimates. www.qbelectric.net requires all busiCCB #148373 CCB#127370 Elect nesses that advertise 541-420-6729 Lic#9-206C to perform Landscape Construction BULLETIN CLASSIFIEDS Excavating which includes: Search the area’s most planting, decks, comprehensive listing of Levi’s Dirt Works: All fences, arbors, classiied advertising... your excavation needs: water-features, and real estate to automotive, Small jobs for Homeinstallation, repair of merchandise to sporting owners - job or hr., Utilirrigation systems to goods. Bulletin Classiieds ity lines,Concrete, Public be licensed with the appear every day in the Works, Subcontracting, Landscape ContracCustom pads, Driveway print or on line. tors Board. This grading - low cost-get rid Call 541-385-5809 of pot holes & smooth out 4-digit number is to be www.bendbulletin.com your drive,Augering,ccb# included in all adver194077, 541-639-5282 tisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and Handyman workers compensa- WESTERN PAINTING CO. Richard Hayman, tion for their employERIC REEVE HANDY a semi-retired paintees. For your protecSERVICES. Home & ing contractor of 45 tion call 503-378-5909 Commercial Repairs, years. Small Jobs or use our website: Carpentry-Painting, Welcome. Interior & www.lcb.state.or.us to Pressure-washing, Exterior. ccb#5184. check license status Honey Do's. On-time 541-388-6910 before contracting promise. Senior with the business. Pro Painter - 20+ yrs in Discount. Work guarPersons doing landanteed. 541-389-3361 Central OR, new conscape maintenance or 541-771-4463 struction specialist, free do not require a LCB Bonded & Insured estimates, CCB# license. 60218, 541-977-8329. CCB#181595

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0144645553 T.S. No: 12-01064-3

A-4251332 06/01/2012, 06/08/2012, 06/15/2012, 06/22/2012 1000

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx3348 T.S. No.: 1361098-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Donna Sue Freeborn, as Grantor to Western Title & Escrow Co, as Trustee, in favor of Accubanc Mortgage A Division of National City Bank Of Indiana, as Beneficiary, dated October 21, 2005, recorded October 26, 2005, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2005-73187 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit A tract of land located in the Southeast one-quarter (SE1/4) of Section Twenty- Seven (27), Township Fourteen (14) South, Range Thirteen (13) East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, being more particularly described as follows: Commencing at the South one-quarter corner of said Section 27; thence North 00° 05' 34" East 47.00 feet; thence South 89° 53' 53" East 301.91 feet to the true point of beginning for said tract; thence North 24° 32' 21" West 143.65 feet; thence along an arc of a 175.00 foot radius curve to the right 132.27 feet, the chord of which bears North 02° 53' 13" West, 129.14 feet; thence North 18° 45' 56" East 172.07 feet; thence along an arc of a 100.00 foot radius curve to the left 24.25 feet, the chord of which bears North 11° 49' 01" East, 24.20 feet; thence North 04° 52' 07" East 82.30 feet; thence East 388.46 feet; thence South 07° 53' 30" East 534.14 feet; thence North 89° 53' 53" West 462.93 feet to the true point of beginning. Commonly known as: 1085 Ne Oneil Wy Redmond OR 97756. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due December 1, 2011 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $2,975.02 Monthly Late Charge $131.85. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $389,836.38 together with interest thereon at 6.500% per annum from November 01, 2011 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on September 07, 2012 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: May 02, 2012. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust dated as of June 13, 2005 made by KRISTIN K. POWERS, as the original grantor, to FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY , as the original trustee, in favor of Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., as the original beneficiary, recorded on June 20, 2005, as Instrument No. 2005-38490 of Official Records in the Office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, Oregon (the "Deed of Trust"). The current beneficiary is: U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee for Banc of America Funding 2007-C Trust, (the "Beneficiary"). APN: 204125 LOT 105, HUNTER'S HIGHLAND AT HIGH POINTE PHASES IV AND V. DESCHUTES, OREGON. Commonly known as: 2576 NE LYNDA LANE, BEND, OR Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default(s) for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due: together with late charges due; together with other fees and expenses incurred by the Beneficiary; and which defaulted amounts total: $7,206.05 as of May 2, 2012. By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $288,000 00 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.75000% per annum from December 1, 2011 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all Trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as the duly appointed Trustee under the Deed of Trust will on September 14, 2012 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187-110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of the Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, Trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 135 Main Street, Suite 1900, San Francisco, CA 94105 415-247-2450 FOR SALE INFORMATION CALL: 714.730.2727 Website for Trustee's Sale Information: www.lpsasap.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "Trustee" and 'Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: May 4, 2012 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Elida Rosado, Authorized Signature

Reach thousands of readers!

A-4242948 05/18/2012, 05/25/2012, 06/01/2012, 06/08/2012

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

R-409755 06/01, 06/08, 06/15, 06/22

S41026 kk

Used out-drive parts - Mercury OMC rebuilt marine motors: 151 $1595; 3.0 $1895; 4.3 (1993), $1995. 541-389-0435

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Advertise your car! Add A Picture!

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

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TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

F4 FRIDAY, JUNE 8, 2012 • THE BULLETIN 880

881

882

Motorhomes

Travel Trailers

Fifth Wheels

National Sea Breeze Springdale 29’ 2007, 2004 M-1341 35’, gas, slide,Bunkhouse style, 2 power slides, upsleeps 7-8, excellent graded queen matcondition, $16,900, tress, hyd. leveling 541-390-2504 system, rear camera & monitor, only 6k mi. FIND IT! A steal at $43,000! BUY IT! 541-480-0617 SELL IT! Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale RV CONSIGNMENTS WANTED We Do The Work, You Keep The Cash, On-Site Credit Approval Team, Web Site Presence, We Take Trade-Ins. Free Advertising. BIG COUNTRY RV Bend 541-330-2495

The Bulletin Classiieds

Sprinter 272RLS, 2009 29’, weatherized, like new, furnished & ready to go, incl Winegard Satellite dish, $26,995. 541-420-9964

Redmond: 541-548-5254

Montana 34’ 2003, 2 slides, exc. cond. throughout, arctic winter pkg, new 10ply tires, W/D ready, price reduced, Now $18,000, 541-390-6531

MONTANA 3585 2008, exc. cond., 3 slides, king bed, lrg LR, Arctic insulation, all options $37,500. 541-420-3250

Pilgrim 27’, 2007 5th wheel, 1 slide, AC, TV,full awning, excellent shape, $23,900. 541-350-8629

ING

882

Taurus 27.5’ 1988

Everything works, $1750/partial trade for car. 541-460-9127 Winnebago Outlook 32’ 2008, Ford V10 eng, Wineguard sat, TV, sur- round sound stereo + more. Reduced to $49,000. 541-526-1622 or 541-728-6793 881

Call a Pro Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $12,750. 541-923-3417.

Travel Trailers

Whether you need a fence ixed, hedges trimmed or a house built, you’ll ind professional help in The Bulletin’s “Call a Service Professional” Directory

541-385-5809 885

Fleetwood 24’ Pioneer Spirit, 2007, good cond, minor dent on front saves you $$! $8000. 541-419-5634

Carri-Lite Luxury 2009 by Carriage, 4 slideouts, inverter, satellite sys, fireplace, 2 flat screen TVs. $60,000. 541-480-3923

Jayco Eagle 2000 26’ $10,500 OBO. 14’ slide, awning, air, heat, gently used. 541-595-2003 SPRINGDALE 2005 27’, has eating area slide, A/C and heat, new tires, all contents included, bedding towels, cooking and eating utensils. Great for vacation, fishing, hunting or living! $15,500 541-408-3811

Fleetwood Wilderness 36’, 2005, 4 slides, rear bdrm, fireplace, AC, W/D hkup beautiful unit! $30,500. 541-815-2380 Keystone Laredo 2009, $30,000, 541-419-3301 or 541-419-4649 for more info.

900 908

Aircraft, Parts & Service

932

933

935

975

Utility Trailers

Antique & Classic Autos

Pickups

Sport Utility Vehicles

Automobiles

Big Tex Landscaping/ ATV Trailer, dual axle flatbed, 7’x16’, 7000 lb. GVW, all steel, $1400. 541-382-4115, or 541-280-7024.

Dodge 1500 2001, 4x4 sport, red, loaded, rollbar, AND 2011 Moped Trike used 3 months, street legal. call 541-433-2384

GMC ½ ton 1971, Only Dodge 1500 STL Quad Cab Hemi 4x4, 21,000 $19,700! Original low miles, $16,500. mile, exceptional, 3rd 541-318-6185 owner. 951-699-7171

Ford Excursion 2005, 4WD, diesel, exc. cond., $19,900, call 541-923-0231.

931

Get your Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 28’ 2007,Gen, business fuel station, exc cond. sleeps 8, black/gray interior, used 3X, GROW Southwind 35.5’ Triton, $24,999. 2008,V10, 2 slides, Du541-389-9188 pont UV coat, 7500 mi. with an ad in Avg NADA ret.114,343; The Bulletin’s asking $99,000. Looking for your Call 541-923-2774 “Call A Service next employee? Professional” Tioga 30’ 2005, like new Place a Bulletin help condition. E450 Super wanted ad today and Directory reach over 60,000 Duty, always garage readers each week. stored, 17,345 nonSurge Guard protecYour classified ad smoker miles, awning, tor 50 amp, like will also appear on never cooked in, A/C, new, $200. Reese bendbulletin.com sleeps 8. Motivated, 16k 5th wheel hitch which currently renow $39,500. For dew/KwikSlide, $600. ceives over 1.5 miltails call 541-480-3217 541-788-1974. lion page views every month at no People Look for Information TRADE? 2004 extra cost. Bulletin About Products and Bounder by FleetClassifieds Get ReServices Every Day through wood 35’ 3 slides, sults! Call 385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds loaded. 44k, very or place your ad clean, reliable w/8.1 on-line at Workhouse chassis, bendbulletin.com $45,000. 541-382-1853 Fifth Wheels

Autos & Transportation

925

Canopies & Campers Lance 11.6 camper Mdl 1130, 1999. Ext’d cab, fully self-contained. Incl catalytic heater, TV/VCR combo. Very well taken care of, clean. Hauls easily, very comfortable. $7300. 541-382-1344 Lance-Legend 990 11’3" 1998, w/ext-cab, exc. cond., generator, solar-cell, large refrig, AC, micro., magic fan, bathroom shower, removable carpet, custom windows, outdoor shower/awning set-up for winterizing, elec. jacks, CD/stereo/4’ stinger. $8500. Bend, 541.279.0458

Automotive Parts, Service & Accessories Tires (4) P215/70-R16, 1/3 interest in Colum- Goodyear Fortero, good bia 400, located at cond $85. 928-581-9190 Sunriver. $138,500. Traction Snow Tires (4), Call 541-647-3718 has Snowflake, 235/ 70R16, great shape, 1/3 interest in welllots of tread, $250, equipped IFR Beech 541-408-0531 Bonanza A36, located KBDN. $55,000. We Buy Junk 541-419-9510 Cars & Trucks! Cash paid for junk Executive Hangar vehicles, batteries & at Bend Airport catalytic converters. (KBDN) Serving all of C.O.! 60’ wide x 50’ deep, Call 541-408-1090 w/55’ wide x 17’ high 932 bi-fold door. Natural Antique & gas heat, office, bathroom. Parking for 6 Classic Autos cars. Adjacent to Frontage Rd; great Chevy Pickup 1951, visibility for aviation restored. $13,500 obo; bus. 1jetjock@q.com 541-504-3253 or 541-948-2126 503-504-2764 Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

Jeep Cherokee 1990, Mercury Monterrey 4WD, 3 sets rims & 1965, Exc. All original, tires, exlnt set snow 4-dr. sedan, in stortires, great 1st car! age last 15 yrs., 390 Ford F-150 1995, 112K, $1800. 541-633-5149 4X4, long bed, auto, High Compression very clean, runs well, Just bought a new boat? engine, new tires & linew tires, $6000. Sell your old one in the cense, reduced to 541-548-4039. classiieds! Ask about our $2850, 541-410-3425. Super Seller rates! Ford F150 XLT 1993, 541-385-5809 Find It in 164K, X-cab, $3100, The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-647-7415 541-385-5809 Ford F-350 XLT 2003, 4X4, 6L diesel, 6-spd manual, Super Cab, short box, 12K Warn winch, custom bumper Jeep Willys 1947,custom, small block Chevy, PS, & canopy, running boards, 2 sets tires, OD,mags+ trailer.Swap wheels & chains, many for backhoe.No am calls Plymouth Barracuda extras, perfect, ONLY please. 541-389-6990 1966, original car! 300 29,800 miles, $27,500 hp, 360 V8, centerOBO, 541-504-8316. lines, (Original 273 eng & wheels incl.) 541-593-2597 933

Pickups

Honda Ridgeline RTL 2011- 7,500 miles. #010391. $31,995

GMC ½-ton Pickup, 1972, LWB, 350hi motor, mechanically A-1, interior great; body needs some TLC. $4000 OBO. Call 541-382-9441

Buick Lucerne CX 2006, 65K, 3.8 V6, cloth interior, 30mpg hwy, $7500. Buick Park Avenue 1992, leather, 136K, 28 mpg hwy. $2500. Bob, 541-318-9999 Ask me about the Free Trip to Washington, D.C. for WWII Veterans.

Chevrolet Camaro 1996,

V6, 135K mi, recent tune-up. $2600 obo. 541-408-7134, lv msg Chrysler 300C, 2006. loaded, only 6,000 miles, health forces sale, call for details, 541-420-6215 Infiniti I30 Limited 1999, 4 dr. luxury car, leather & woodgrain interior, power windows & seats, side airbags, Bose sound system, sunroof, 3.0 L V6, must see! $6000 obo. 541-350-4779

Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218. Porsche Cayenne 2004, 86k, immac, dealer Need to sell a maint’d, loaded, now Vehicle? $17000. 503-459-1580 Call The Bulletin and place an ad today! Range Rover 2005 Ask about our HSE, nav, DVD, "Wheel Deal"! local car, new tires, for private party 51K miles. advertisers $24,995. 503-635-9494

ONLY 3 OWNERSHIP SHARES LEFT! Economical flying in your own Cessna 541-598-3750 172/180 HP for only International Flat aaaoregonautosource.com Chevy Wagon 1957, $10,000! Based at Bed Pickup 1963, 1 4-dr., complete, *** BDN. Call Gabe at ton dually, 4 spd. $15,000 OBO, trades, CHECK YOUR AD Professional Air! trans., great MPG, Please check your ad please call 541-388-0019 could be exc. wood on the first day it runs 541-420-5453. Range Rover, hauler, runs great, to make sure it is cor916 new brakes, $1950. 2006 Sport HSE, Chrysler 300 Coupe rect. Sometimes in541-419-5480. nav, AWD, heated 1967, 440 engine, Trucks & structions over the seats, moonroof, auto. trans, ps, air, Heavy Equipment phone are mislocal owner, frame on rebuild, re- understood and an error Mazda B4000 2004 Harman Kardon, painted original blue, Cab Plus 4x4. 4½ yrs can occur in your ad. $23,995. original blue interior, If this happens to your or 95,000 miles left on 503-635-9494 original hub caps, exc. ext’d warranty. V6, ad, please contact us chrome, asking $9000 5-spd, AC, studded the first day your ad or make offer. tires, 2 extra rims, appears and we will 940 541-385-9350. tow pkg, 132K mi, all be happy to fix it Vans 1982 INT. Dump w/Arrecords, exlnt cond, as soon as we can. borhood, 6k on rebuilt $9500. 541-408-8611 Deadlines are: WeekFord Lift Van, 1995, 392, truck refurbished, days 12:00 noon for drivable, needs work, 935 has 330 gal. water Chrysler SD 4-Door next day, Sat. 11:00 $900 cash obo. Bend, tank w/pump & hose. 1930, CDS Royal a.m. for Sunday; Sat. Sport Utility Vehicles 503-838-6274 Everything works, Standard, 8-cylinder, 12:00 for Monday. If Reduced - now $5000 body is good, needs we can assist you, Ford Windstar 1995,7 OBO. 541-977-8988 some restoration, please call us: passenger, 140k, 3.8 runs, taking bids, 541-385-5809 V6, no junk. Drive it 541-383-3888, The Bulletin Classified CHEVY away for $1750; 9’ DUMP BED 541-815-3318 *** SUBURBAN LT Nissan Quest 1996, with hydraulic lift, 2005, low miles., 7 passenger, 152k, for 1-ton flatbed 3.0 V6, new tires, good tires, new truck, + 2 alumiready for next 152k, brakes, moonroof num tool boxes. Chevy 3/4 ton 4x4, $4500. 541-318-9999, Reduced to 1995, extended cab, $2700 obo. ask for Bob. $15,750 long box, grill guard, 541-410-6945 541-389-5016. running boards, bed 975 rails & canopy, 178K FIAT 1800 1978, 5-spd, miles, $4800 obo. door panels w/flowers Automobiles 208-301-3321 (Bend) & hummingbirds, white soft top & hard Chevy Silverado 1998, AUDI QUATTRO top, Reduced! $5,500. black and silver, pro CABRIOLET 2004, 541-317-9319 or lifted, loaded, new 33” extra nice, low mile541-647-8483 Peterbilt 359 potable tires, aluminum slot age, heated seats, water truck, 1990, wheels, tow pkg., drop Chevy Tahoe, 1999, new Michelins, all 3200 gal. tank, 5hp very clean, loaded, hitch, diamond plate wheel drive, pump, 4-3" hoses, 23,600k on new motor; tool box, $12,000, or $12,995 camlocks, $25,000. new tires & battery, possible trade for newer 503-635-9494. 541-820-3724 $5000. 541-330-1151 Tacoma. 541-460-9127 Chevy Tahoe LS 2001 Ford Galaxie 500 1963, Chevy Silverado 2500 Say “goodbuy” 4x4. 120K mi, Power HD 2007 extra cab, BMW 525i 2004, 2 dr. hardtop,fastback, seats, Tow Pkg, 3rd early model, grill to that unused New body style, 390 v8,auto, pwr. steer & row seating, extra guard, side steps, tow Steptronic auto., radio (orig),541-419-4989 item by placing it in tires, CD, privacy tintpkg., 6L, 115,440 all cold-weather packing, upgraded rims. hwy miles, exc. cond., The Bulletin Classiieds Ford Mustang Coupe age, premium packFantastic cond. $7995 1966, original owner, serviced regularly, age, heated seats, Contact Timm at V8, automatic, great white, $19,200, Call extra nice. $14,995. 541-408-2393 for info 541-385-5809 shape, $9000 OBO. 541-419-3301 or 503-635-9494. or to view vehicle. 541-419-4649. 530-515-8199

541-385-5809 Nissan Altima 2009, 47K miles, 30+ mpg, exc. cond., 1 owner, extended warranty, snow tires. $14,700. 541-419-6057 Porsche 911 Carrera 1984, platinum metallic, $14,900, looks & runs great, custom sound system, 178K mi, 541-383-2440. PORSCHE 914 1974, Roller (no engine), lowered, full roll cage, 5-pt harnesses, racing seats, 911 dash & instruments, decent shape, very cool! $1699. 541-678-3249 Saab 9-3 SE 1999 convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

Toyota Camry Solara SLE 2007, V6 Convertible, 23,000 mi., exc. cond., loaded, extras, Blizzard Pearl with Ivory Leather. $22,800. 541-408-7830

Volkswagen Convertible, 2006, 55K mi, 2.5L eng, 5 spd, lots of extras, new tires. $11,900. 541-728-4355

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0019891290 T.S- No-: 12-01273-3 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust dated as of November 10, 2005 made by, CAROLYN S. CRAWFORD AND GLENDA L. MADDOX, NOT AS TENANTS IN COMMON, BUT THE RIGHT OF SURVIVORSHIP, as the original grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OR OREGON, as the original trustee, in favor of HSR BLOCK MORTGAGE CORPORATION, A MASSACHUSETTS CORPORATION, as the original beneficiary, recorded on November 17, 2005, as Instrument No. 2005-79280 of Official Records in the Office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, Oregon (the "Deed of Trust"). The current beneficiary is: Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee for Soundview Home Loan Trust 2006-OPT2, Asset-Backed Certificates, Series 2006-OPT2, (the "Beneficiary"). APN; 121177 LOT 1 IN BLOCK 3 OF HIGH COUNTRY, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON APN: 121177 Commonly known as: 61154 TAPADERA ST, BEND, OR Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default(s) for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; and which defaulted amounts total: $5,984 00 as of May 17, 2012 By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $100,462.95 together with interest thereon at the rate of 9.24000% per annum from December 1, 2011 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all Trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as the duly appointed Trustee under the Deed of Trust will on October 1, 2012 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of the Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, Trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 135 Main Street, Suite 1900, San Francisco, CA 94105 415-247-2450 FOR SALE INFORMATION CALL: 714.730.2727 Website for Trustee's Sale Information: www.lpsasap.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "Trustee" and 'Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: May 23, 2012 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Natalie Gold, Authorized Signature A-4251333 06/01/2012, 06/08/2012, 06/15/2012, 06/22/2012

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0021694096 T.S. No.: 11-04351-6

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0159339308 T.S. No.: 12-01009-5

Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust dated as of May 12, 2006 made by, KENNETH P. ALDRICH AND TIFFANY ALDRICH, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY., as the original grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE CO., as the original trustee, in favor of AMERICAN HERITAGE LENDING, as the original beneficiary, recorded on May 26, 2006, as Instrument No. 2006-36487 of Official Records in the Office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, Oregon (the "Deed of Trust"). The current beneficiary is: U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee for Structured Asset Investment Loan Trust, Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2006-BMC3, (the "Beneficiary"). APN: 17 1429 00 01500 LOT 24, BEND CASCADE VIEW ESTATES, TRACT 2, UNIT 2, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 62770 JUNIPER RD, BEND, OR Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default(s) for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; together with other fees and expenses incurred by the Beneficiary; and which defaulted amounts total: $67,695.33 as of May 15, 2012. By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $346,416.20 together with interest thereon at the rate of 8.22500% per annum from June 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all Trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as the duly appointed Trustee under the Deed of Trust will on September 25, 2012 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State off Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of the Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, Trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 1920 Main Street, Suite 1120, Irvine, CA 92614 949-252-4900 FOR SALE INFORMATION CALL: 714.730.2727 Website for Trustee's Sale Information: www.lpsasap.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: May 24, 2012 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Michael Busby, Authorized Signature

Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust dated as of April 13, 2007 made by, BENNETT N. MARKS AND SHELLEY F. MARKS, HUSBAND AND WIFE, as the original grantor, to FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as the original trustee, in favor of Wells Fargo Bank, NA, as the original beneficiary, recorded on April 20, 2007, as Instrument No. 2007-22845 of Official Records in the Office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, Oregon (the "Deed of Trust"). The current beneficiary is: Wells Fargo Bank, NA, (the "Beneficiary"). APN: 15 13 20 AC 00801 THE SOUTH HALF OF THE WEST HALF OF THE SOUTH HALF (S1/2W1/2S1/2) OF LOT TWO (2) IN BLOCK FOUR (4) OF RANCH WAY ACRES, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. EXCEPTING THEREFROM THE EASTERLY 10.00 FEET. Commonly known as: 1956 SW 24TH STREET, REDMOND, OR Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default(s) for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; together with other fees and expenses incurred by the Beneficiary; and which defaulted amounts total: $5,670.91 as of May 14, 2012. By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $134,832.44 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.87500% per annum from December 1, 2011 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all Trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as the duly appointed Trustee under the Deed of Trust will on September 24, 2012 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of the Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, Trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 11000 Olson Drive Ste 101, Rancho Cordova, CA 95670 916-636-0114 FOR SALE INFORMATION CALL: 714.730.2727 Website for Trustee's Sale Information: www.lpsasap.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "Trustee" and 'Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: May 22, 2012 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee John Catching, Authorized Signature

A-4250494 06/01/2012, 06/08/2012, 06/15/2012, 06/22/2012

A-4249196 05/25/2012, 06/01/2012, 06/08/2012, 06/15/2012


MUSIC: Poor Moon kicks off free concert series, PAGE 3

EVERY FRIDAY IN THE BULLETIN JUNE 8, 2012

RODEO (ro’deo) The public exhibition of the skills of cowboys Saddle up for the

Sisters Rodeo this weekend! PAGE 10

MOVIES: ‘Prometheus’ and four others open, PAGE 26


PAGE 2 • GO! MAGAZINE C O N TAC T U S EDITOR

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JUNE 8, 2012

inside

Cover design by Althea Borck, file photo by Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Ben Salmon, 541-383-0377 bsalmon@bendbulletin.com

REPORTERS

MUSIC RELEASES • 9

RESTAURANTS • 20

Breanna Hostbjor, 541-383-0351 bhostbjor@bendbulletin.com David Jasper, 541-383-0349 djasper@bendbulletin.com Alandra Johnson, 541-617-7860 ajohnson@bendbulletin.com Jenny Wasson, 541-383-0350 jwasson@bendbulletin.com

• Scissor Sisters, The Walkmen and more

• A review of Range at Brasada Ranch

COVER STORY • 10

OUT OF TOWN • 22

• A guide to the lingo of the Sisters Rodeo

DESIGNER

FINE ARTS • 12

• The B-52s kick off concert series at the Oregon Zoo in Portland • A guide to out of town events

Althea Borck, 541-383-0331 aborck@bendbulletin.com

• Innovation begins “The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged)” GAMING • 25 • Curtains up for CTC’s “Social Security” • A preview of “Diablo III” • Art Exhibits lists current exhibits • What’s hot on the gaming scene

SUBMIT AN EVENT GO! MAGAZINE is published each Friday in The Bulletin. Please submit information at least 10 days before the edition in which it is printed, including the event name, brief description, date, time, location, cost, contact number and a website, if appropriate. Email to: events@bendbulletin.com Fax to: 541-385-5804, Attn: Community Life U.S. Mail or hand delivery: Community Life, The Bulletin 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

ADVERTISING

MUSIC • 3 • Poor Moon kicks off Les Schwab Amphitheater’s free Sunday concerts • Sing along with the Beatles and KPOV • A bunch of local bands play Bend Pride • Mickey Avalon returns to Domino Room • Dan Hicks and the Hot Licks in Kimberly • Pitchfork Revolution picks, you paddle • Songwriters come to The Horned Hand • Last Band Standing update

541-382-1811

GOING OUT • 8 Take advantage of the full line of Bulletin products. Call 541-385-5800.

The Bulletin

• Rubedo at The Horned Hand • A listing of live music, DJs, karaoke, open mics and more

OUTDOORS • 15

MOVIES • 26

• Great ways to enjoy the outdoors

• “Prometheus,” “Bernie,” “Madagascar 3: Europe’s Most Wanted,” “Crooked Arrows” and “Sound of My Voice” open in Central Oregon • “Act of Valor,” “John Carter,” “Journey 2: The Mysterious Island” and “Machine Gun Preacher” are out on Blu-ray and DVD • Brief reviews of movies showing in Central Oregon

CALENDAR • 16 • A week full of Central Oregon events

PLANNING AHEAD • 18 • A listing of upcoming events • Talks and classes listing


GO! MAGAZINE •

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JUNE 8, 2012

PAGE 3

music

POOR MOON Courtesy Kyle Johnson

Poor Moon is, from left, Christian Wargo, Peter Murray, Casey Wescott and Ian Murray. The band is scheduled to release its debut album on Subpop Records in August.

• Seattle folk-pop band kicks off Les Schwab Amphitheater’s free Summer Sunday Concerts series By Ben Salmon The Bulletin

N

o one likes to hear a successful musician complain about their work or their life. But that doesn’t mean those complaints are without merit. Christian Wargo — principal songwriter in Poor Moon, the folk-pop band that kicks off Les Schwab Amphitheater’s free

Summer Sunday Concerts series this weekend (see “If you go”) — is aware of his good fortune, and its relation to his own diligence. “I really don’t have any business being in this industry. I have no musical training,” he said last week in a telephone interview from his home in Seattle, a day after playing Washington’s giant Sasquatch! music festival. “So I’m only getting better because I keep

doing it. And that’s all I’m trying to do is satisfy myself by getting to the next level for me.” When he emphasizes those last two words — “for me” — you get the sense that Poor Moon is indeed about making music with friends and touring the country and playing for people, but also about Wargo getting back to doing something for himself by playing music on his terms.

You see, for the past four years, Wargo has been a permanent, full-time member of one of the world’s best and most popular indie-folk bands, Fleet Foxes, which rocketed to international success on the strength of its 2008 self-titled debut and then released an outstanding sophomore album, “Helplessness Blues,” in 2011. Continued next page

If you go What: Poor Moon When: 2:30-4:30 p.m. Sunday Where: Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend Cost: Free Contact: www.bendconcerts .com For the full Summer Sunday Concerts schedule, see Page 4.


PAG E 4 • GO! MAGAZINE

music

sing along with the Beatles The Associated Press file photo

John Lennon, Ringo Starr, Paul McCartney and George Harrison in 1964.

• KPOV community radio hosts third annual singalong fundraiser By Ben Salmon The Bulletin

I

have more than 200 tracks by the Beatles on my iTunes. I am going to put them on shuffle and let the song titles guide this story. For those of you who are excited about Bend community radio station KPOV’s third annual Beatles Singalong fundraiser, “It Won’t Be Long” now. The event happens Saturday night at the Century Center. I know, I know … you’re all pumped up for this, right? Well try to “Act Naturally” — you don’t want to come off like a weirdo. Oh wait, yes you do: Part of the fun of these things is really getting into it. Dress up like your favorite Beatle or character from a Beatles song, or at least dress like you’re from the 1960s. (There’s a costume competition.) Take part in the trivia contest. Win either and you’ll be famous, if not “Across the Universe” then certainly among those in attendance. The centerpiece of the singalong, of course, is when everyone, “All Together Now,” belts out some of the Fab Four’s most memorable and singable tunes. Don’t worry, if y’all get going too fast and need to “Slow Down” or you just plain need some “Help!” there will be a gang of local artists there to lead the way, including Boxcar Stringband, Broken Down Guitars, the Gospel Choir of the Cascades, Subliminal, Noah Stroup and the Rockhounds. Lyrics will be projected onto a

If you go What: KPOV’s Beatles Singalong When: 7 p.m. Saturday, doors open 6:30 p.m. Where: Century Center, 70 S.W. Century Drive, Bend Cost: $10-$12 advance, available at www .kpov.org or KPOV, 501 N.W. Bond St., Bend; $15 at the door, $5 for ages 17 and younger Contact: www.kpov.org or 541-322-0863

screen so everyone can “Come Together” as one voice. Now, as for the “Money,” tickets cost $10 for KPOV members and $12 for nonmembers in advance (see “If you go” for outlets), or $15 at the door, and $5 for your “Little Child” or anyone younger than 18, really. Refreshments will include Three Creeks beer, Volcano Vineyards wine and sangria, food from Crazy Delicious and sweets from Ida’s Cupcake Cafe. There will also be a raffle for an electric guitar and amplifier, plus a silent auction, with proceeds going to the independent, mostly volunteer-run station. I must say, I have never heard of such a great cause “In My Life.” OK, that’s all. “The End.” — Reporter: 541-383-0377, bsalmon@bendbulletin.com

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JUNE 8, 2012

From previous page And while Wargo (and other talented songwriters in the group) contributed to Fleet Foxes’ music, there is no question the band is primarily a vehicle for frontman and songwriter Robin Pecknold. With the Foxes’ success came bigger tours, bigger venues, bigger buses, and an increasingly impersonal feel to touring. And that’s why, for Wargo, Poor Moon is the perfect antidote right now. “It has been a real breath of fresh air for us,” he said. “Being in the van together with your bros, you get to see where you’re going, as opposed to a bus tour, where you go to bed and then you wake up in the next backstage area and it can be a little monotonous. “You know, being in charge of getting yourself to the show and finding hotels, it’s been fun,” he continued. “We really have enjoyed it a lot. I couldn’t actually see myself getting into a bus right now.” Besides being closer to band mates, touring on a smaller scale also provides more opportunities to meet and make connections with fans, he said. “In the smaller clubs, (there’s) just an energy that you can’t quite get when you’re playing theaters,” Wargo said. “It’s all around just been great. I love it.” And then, as if he is suddenly hearing himself and seeing you, the reader, rolling your eyes, he further explains how big-time touring, for all its benefits, can also become a grind. “Getting to the stage where you’re playing a lot of theaters and flying everywhere and touring in a bus and having a crew that does the setup for you,” he said, his voice beginning to trail off. “I mean, that’s what you …” And then: “Everyone’s like, ‘Oh what do you have to complain about?’ But honestly, the thing I have to complain about is boredom. I get bored out of my mind. It’s like, I have nothing to do. You can only watch so many back-to-back episodes of ‘Game of Thrones’ in your bunk. “Sometimes you just feel like ‘Oh my God, what am I going to do today?’” he said. “I like to be busy.” But enough about Fleet Foxes. Seattle’s Subpop Records didn’t sign Poor Moon because of another songwriter’s skill. Over the past 15 years, Wargo has helmed a num-

Summer Sunday Concerts schedule June 17 — Harley Bourbon (roots-rock) June 24 — Y La Bamba (Mexican-American indie-folk) July 1 — Mosley Wotta (hiphop) July 8 — Portland Cello Project (indie orchestra) July 22 — The Farewell Drifters (Americana) July 29 — Paul Thorn (roots ’n’ blues) Aug. 12 — The Features (poprock)

ber of good bands, including the New Wave-y combo Scientific and the indie-pop outfit Crystal Skulls. And now rises Poor Moon, which is rooted in Wargo’s sharing of songs via email with fellow Fox Casey Wescott and his friends Ian and Peter Murray, two brothers with their own band, The Christmas Cards. Eventually, the quartet decided to turn their digital exploits into a real band that, so far, has drawn heavily from the “ton” of songs Wargo has stockpiled while busy with Fleet Foxes. Their first release is the five-song “Illusion” EP, which finds Wargo mining a beautifully downcast vein, where fingerpicked guitars flutter around gauzy oohs and aahs. The songs are quiet, but the band injects enough pop and melody to keep things from dragging. A full-length album is due in August. Beyond that, who knows? “This group of songs … has been mostly coming from my bedroom,” Wargo said. “Developing a musical language with a new group of people is difficult. You have to … have a lot of trust and the ability to communicate musical ideas. So I thought it would be cool to release this stuff and start playing with the band and then see what the future holds in terms of more collaboration and exploration. “Start off with this batch of songs and then leave yourself some room to become anything.” — Reporter: 541-383-0377, bsalmon@bendbulletin.com

DOWNLOAD A POOR MOON SONG AT WWW.BENDBULLETIN.COM/FREQUENCY


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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JUNE 8, 2012

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CURRENTLY ON TAP AT THE BULLETIN’S MUSIC BLOG, FREQUENCY: • The poster and partial lineup for the 2012 Sisters Folk Festival • A review and tons of photos of The Shins, Tenacious D and Beck in Bend • A preview of the live music coming to Central Oregon this summer And much more! Join us, won’t you? www.facebook.com/frequencyblog

www.youtube.com/frequencyblog

www.twitter.com/frequencyblog

www.bendbulletin.com/frequency

WEEKLY RECAP Last Band Standing has moved to Liquid Club & Lounge, (70 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend), but last night’s semifinal happened too late for us to tell you which two bands advanced. And the second semi goes down at 8 p.m. Thursday. Doors open at 7 p.m. Admission is free. For

JUNE

more info, visit www.lastbandstanding.net. The top two vote-getters from each semifinal round will move on to the June 21 final: Last week’s semifinal: 3 Beers 2 Function, Avery James and The Hillandales, Broken Down Guitars, Jaccuzi, Truck Stop Gravy, The Vaulted Next week’s semifinal: All You All, Cadence, Death of a Hitman, Greyside, The Human Microphone, Kleverkill

14 Singing Chef

“1776” In Concert 15 Caldera Film Fest Revolutionary Female Cast

16 Story Stars 17 Urban Pointe Dancers 23-24 “Peter & Wolf” Ballet

— Ben Salmon

25 “Where the Yellowstone Goes” 26 Tommy Emmanuel

Bend Pride features lots of local music

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he eighth annual Bend Pride celebration Saturday will feature so much great local art for such a great cause that we had to find room for it here in the music section. This year, Pride is happening at Riverbend Park in Bend, and it starts at noon with spoken word by Jason Graham of Mosley Wotta. Here’s the musical lineup after that:

12:45-1:15 p.m. — Jumpin’ Joyce Respess 1:30-2:10 p.m. — Sons of Dirt 2:15-3:15 p.m. — All You All 3:30-5 p.m. — Jaccuzi 5:15-6 p.m. — Rural Demons Also planned: Innovation Theatre Works will perform a special sneakpeek scene from its current production of “The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged)” at 2:10 p.m. There will be lots of vendors and

nonprofits on hand, as well as coffee, smoothies, soda, beer, wine and a cocktail of the day available for purchase if you’re 21 or older. Visit the Human Dignity Coalition’s website (below) to see all the local events lined up for Pride month. Bend Pride; noon-6 p.m. Saturday; free; Riverbend Park, 799 S.W. Columbia St., Bend; www.human dignitycoalition.org. — Ben Salmon

Singing Chef

29-30 “1776” In Concert

Food and Music of Italy

Tickets & Information 541-317-0700 www.towertheatre.org “The Tower Theatre”


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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JUNE 8, 2012

Upcoming Concerts

A Sustainable Cup Drink it up!

J une 15 — Billy Manzik (folk), Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, Bend, www.silvermoonbrewing. com.

• Fair trade coffee makes a thoughtful gift

June 15 — Rupert Wates (folk), The Sound Garden, Bend, www. thesoundgardenstudio.com.

• Convenient before or after the mountain

June 15 — Coyote Music Festival (desert jams), Summer Lake Hot Springs, Paisley, www. coyotemusicfestival.com.

• Supporting many of your favorite non-proits

June 16 — The Dirty Heads (reggae), Century Center, Bend, www.theoutsidegames.com.

• 2 great locations!

June 16 — Carrie Clark and the Lonesome Lovers (Americana), Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, Bend, www.silvermoonbrewing. com.

www.strictlyorganic.com Café & Roastery– 6 SW Bond @ Arizona Coffee Bar – 450 Powerhouse Dr. @ the Old Mill

June 16 — Va Va Voom (burlesque), The Horned Hand, Bend, www.reverbnation. com/venue/thehornedhand. June 17 — Harley Bourbon (roots-rock), Les Schwab Amphitheater, Bend, www. bendconcerts.com. June 17 — The Yawpers (rootsrock), The Sound Garden, Bend, www.thesoundgardenstudio. com. June 19 — The Skabbs (punk), The Horned Hand, Bend, www.reverbnation. com/venue/thehornedhand.

MICKEY AVALON Submitted photo

Bad boy Mickey Avalon is back in Bend When the foul-mouthed Hollywood glam-rapper Mickey Avalon performed in Bend nearly 18 months ago, we put him on the cover of GO! Magazine, a striking rooftop photo that was so L.A. Back then, he told The Bulletin he had “tons” of songs waiting to be released, no big surprise given that his only official album to that point came out in 2006. Industry politics and record label problems were to blame for holding up his sophomore effort, Avalon said. But he saw light at the end of the tunnel. “Everything’s gonna get out. That’s not even a question,” he told The Bulletin. “I didn’t work that much and make that many songs for no one to hear ‘em.” He was right. Avalon is now on Suburban Noize Records, and his new album “Loaded” was released in April. If for some reason you’re hungry for more of the guy’s salacious tales of sleazy parties and sexual conquests, “Loaded” delivers. The beats are simple, visceral and super club-

friendly, while the song titles range from “Girlfriend,” “Dance” and “Drugs” to “California Crack Cocaine,” “Tight Blue Jeans” and “Party in my Pants.” I’ll leave it to you to dig deeper into the lyrics. Mickey Avalon, with Millionaires and Maintain; 8 p.m. Sunday, doors open 7 p.m.; $20 plus fees in advance (outlets listed at the website below), $25 at the door; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; www .randompresents.com.

Dan Hicks, Hot Licks discover Kimberly We write a lot in this section about shows in Bend, Sisters, Redmond and occasionally beyond. Rarely do we stretch the meaning of the word “beyond” this far. But that’s the draw of Dan Hicks, a well-known Bay Area musician who’s bringing his band, the Hot Licks, to the Diamond Hitch Mule Ranch in Kimberly on Tuesday. (His host is Jody Foss, who has for years been bringing concerts to the vast rural area between Central Oregon and La Grande/Baker City.) Continued next page

June 20 — Yogoman Burning Band (dancerock), McMenamins Old St. Francis School, Bend, www. mcmenamins.com. June 21 — Dirty Filthy Mugs (punk), The Horned Hand, Bend, www.reverbnation. com/venue/thehornedhand. June 21 — Andy Frasco & the U.N. (party blues), McMenamins Old St. Francis School, Bend, www.mcmenamins.com. June 22 — Sasparilla (blues), The Horned Hand, Bend, www.reverbnation. com/venue/thehornedhand. June 22-24 — 4 Peaks Music Festival (mucho jams), Rockin’ A Ranch, Tumalo, www.4peaksmusic.com. June 23 — Panama Gold (indie rock), The Horned Hand, Bend, www.reverbnation. com/venue/thehornedhand. June 23 — Steve Roth (retrorock), Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, Bend, www. silvermoonbrewing.com. June 23 — Whitey Morgan and the 78’s at The Bite of Bend (honky-tonk), downtown Bend, www.thebiteofbend.com.


DAN HICKS Submitted photo

From previous page Hicks is one of those artists’ whose reputation among artists and musicologists far exceeds his name recognition with the general public. He started out as the drummer for the proto-psych band The Charlatans, founded the Hot Licks in the late 1960s and has been blending rock, pop, folk, jazz and swing music ever since. Well, except for a long hiatus where he focused on acting and other things. His 2007 “Duets” album features guest spots by Willie Nelson, Elvis Costello, Jimmy Buffet, Bette Midler and Tom Waits, to name a few, and he even appeared on the cover of Rolling Stone in 1973! Think about that when you’re seeing him perform in the cozy confines of a mule ranch on Tuesday. Bone up for the show at www.danhicks.net. Dan Hicks and the Hot Licks; 8 p.m. Tuesday, BBQ dinner at 6 p.m.; $30 (concert), $10 (dinner), $20 (group camping), available at the website below; Diamond Hitch Mule Ranch, state Highway 19, milepost 107 (1.5 miles from Kimberly); www .mulesacrossamerica.com or 541-934-2140.

Pickin’ & Paddlin’ kicks off Wednesday In just a few years, Bend’s waterfront Pickin’ & Paddlin’ concert series has grown from a few folks with instruments jamming along the Deschutes River to the kind of event that makes summers here so great. Here’s the concept: At 7 p.m. one Wednesday a month, the folks at Tumalo Creek Kayak & Canoe will host a shindig on the land

between the river and their shop near the Old Mill District, with food, beer and live music by a band from the bluegrass/Americana world. Show up early (between 4 and 7 p.m.) and you can try out Tumalo Creek’s boat and stand-up paddleboards with some help from the experts. It’s free, but the beer (and the pint glass) will cost you. Proceeds will go to the Bend Paddle Trail Alliance, which is working to turn the Colorado Dam into a whitewater recreation area. Next week’s band is easygoing bluegrassers The Pitchfork Revolution. The rest of the lineup includes The Shook Twins (July 25), Eight Dollar Mountain (Aug. 29) and Polecat (Sept. 19). The Pitchfork Revolution at Pickin’ & Paddlin’; 7 p.m. Wednesday (boat demos from 4-7 p.m.); free; Tumalo Creek Kayak & Canoe, 805 S.W. Industrial Way, Bend; www.tumalocreek.com or 541-317-9407.

Songwriters gather at The Horned Hand How much Oregon-based, folk-singin’ excitement can you pack into one place on a Tuesday night? The answer may roll into Bend next week when The Horned Hand hosts “The Lone Rangers Tour” featuring a trio of singer-songwriters, two of whom are celebrating new releases, and the other we’ve gushed about on these pages many times before. The lineup includes Gregory Rawlins from La Grande, who is touring behind his third solo album, the brand new “ELWHA.” Then there’s Tyler Fortier, the talented and

prolific Eugene artist who put out three albums in 2011, all of them great, and has played Bend several times over the past few years. Rounding out the bill is another Eugenian, Mike Surber, whose new album “The Long Con” was produced by Fortier. That make sense, since the two guys have similar takes on folk music: warm and intimate yet well-worn and rough-hewn, and never lacking in memorable melodies. Hear all three by Googling their names and adding “music” to your search. Tyler Fortier, Mike Surber and Gregory Rawlins; 8 p.m. Tuesday; free; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave.,

GO! MAGAZINE •

Bend; www.reverbnation .com/venue/thehornedhand.

How ‘bout an Irish, Celtic roundup? OK! Fans of Irish and/or Celtic music have lots of reasons to get out and do a jig this week. • On Saturday, local Celticflavored folk-punkers Five Pint Mary will heat up the M&J Tavern (102 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend). Also on the bill: The debut of Shortpants Romance and the Wisdom Hares! 9 p.m. Free. • This one’s more for the daylight types: On Sunday afternoon, harpist Rebecca Hilary Smith and her friends Irene Goodnight (fiddle) and

Michael Scott (cello) will play Celtic tunes at Strictly Organic Coffee (6 S.W. Bond St., Bend). 1-3 p.m. Free. • On Thursday night, McMenamins Old St. Francis School (700 N.W. Bond St., Bend) welcomes back Irish flute player Hanz Araki, who’ll be joined by fiddler Kathryn Claire and guitarist Chris Hayes as they celebrate the release of the “As I Roved Out: Songs of Spring” CD. 7 p.m. Free. • Finally, Five Pint Mary will be back at it Thursday, this time raging (the good kind) at The Summit Saloon & Stage (125 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend). 9 p.m. Free. — Ben Salmon

5th Annual Coyote Music Festival June 15, 16, 17 2012 at Summer Lake Hot Springs Where Eclectic Music, Beautiful Vistas and Healing Water Come Together Jelly Bread Tony Smiley Mo Wo & BPollen The Human Revolution Shireen Amini Anastacia

Kinetic Origins of Rhythm Organik Time Machine Raise the Vibe RevelleveR Milo Estrada DJ Mr. WU

Mantrayana Sound Healing Crystal Bowls Didgeridoos Fire Dancers

Rock ~ Blues ~ Jazz ~ Electronica ~ Tribal ~ World ~ Fusion Flamenco~ Folk ~ Roots ~ Country

Information: www.coyotemusicfestival.com Healer s summerlakehotsprings.com s Vendor s (541) 943-3931 W e i t o i rksh ctiv

K ids A

Advanced Tickes $85.00, at the gate $105.00 Purchase tickets at bendticket.com

ops

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www.smolichmotors.com

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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JUNE 8, 2012

going out Looking for something to do? Check out our listing of live music, DJs, karaoke, open mics and more happening at local nightspots. Find lots more at www.bendbulletin.com/events.

TODAY HELEOS: Blues and rock; 6 p.m.; Country Catering Co., 900 S.E. Wilson Ave., Bend; 541-383-5014. EDMOND WADESON: 6:30 p.m.; River Rim Coffeehouse, 9570 Amber Meadow Drive, Suite 190, Bend; 541-728-0095. LINDY GRAVELLE: Country and pop; 7 p.m.; Brassie’s Bar at Eagle Crest Resort, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; 541-548-4220. LORI FLETCHER’S DECO MOON JAZZ: 7 p.m.; Common Table, 150 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-639-5546. PAT THOMAS: Country; 7 p.m.; Tumalo Feed Co., 64619 U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-382-2202. DIRTY HAND FAMILY BAND: Rockabilly; $5; 8 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; www.reverbnation. com/venue/thehornedhand. DJ CHRIS: Live DJ; 8 p.m.; Checkers Pub, 329 S.W. 6th St., Redmond; 541-548-3731. KARAOKE: 8 p.m.; Rivals Sports Bar, Grill & Poker, 2650 N.E. Division St., Bend; 541-550-7771. THE SUBSTITUTES: Classic rock; 8:30 p.m.; Northside Bar & Grill, 62860 Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541-383-0889. DJ RADA AND DJ HUFF: 9 p.m.; Liquid Lounge, 70 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend. DJ SUGAR: 9 p.m.; Seven, 1033 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-760-9412. PRISTINE BLUE: Country; 9 p.m.; Maverick’s Country Bar and Grill, 20565 Brinson Blvd., Bend; 541-325-1886. SONS OF DIRT: Rock, with Death of a Hitman; 9 p.m.; Third Street Pub, 314 S.E. Third St., Bend; 541-306-3017. TONE RED: Americana; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331. DJ STEELE: 10 p.m.; The Summit Saloon

Submitted photo

HIGHLIGHTS

THE PSYCHEDELIC SOUNDS OF RUBEDO

& Stage, 125 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-749-2440.

SATURDAY ALLAN BYER: Folk; 10 a.m.; Chow, 1110 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend; 541-728-0256. ACOUSTIC CAFE WITH SHANTEL FESSENDEN: 6 p.m.; River Rim Coffeehouse, 9570 Amber Meadow Drive, Suite 190, Bend; 541-728-0095. PAMELA MCGUIRE TRIO: Jazz; 6 p.m.; Scanlon’s, 61615 Athletic Club Drive, Bend; 541-382-8769. FINN MILES AND LAUREN KERSHNER: Pop; 6:30 p.m.; Common Table, 150 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-639-5546. CASEY PARNELL: Rock and pop; 7 p.m.; portello winecafe, 2754 N.W. Crossing Drive, Bend; 541-385-1777. LINDY GRAVELLE: Country and pop; 7 p.m.; Brassie’s Bar, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; 541-548-4220. LIVE WIRE: Country and rock; 7 p.m.; Old Mill Brew Werks, 384 S.W. Upper Terrace Drive, Bend; 541-633-7670. PAT THOMAS: Country; 7 p.m.; Tumalo Feed Co., 64619 U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-382-2202. BEATLES SINGALONG: Sing along with local bands; benefits KPOV; 7 p.m.; $10$12 advance, $15 at door, $5 for under 18; Century Center, 70 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; www.kpov.org. (Pg. 4) SAGEBRUSH ROCK: Classic rock; 7:30 p.m.; Checkers Pub, 329 S.W. 6th St., Redmond; 541-548-3731. HOPELESS JACK & THE HANDSOME DEVIL: Blues; $5; 8 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; www.reverbnation. com/venue/thehornedhand. KARAOKE W/ ROCKIN’ ROBIN: 8 p.m.; Kelly D’s, 1012 S.E. Cleveland Ave., Bend; 541-389-5625.

No matter what musical trends come and go — delirious brostep, stompalong beard-folk, reverberant chillwave, whatever — it seems there’s always a pack of odd, talented kids hanging around the fringes, guitars cranked up, trying to do new things with prog-rock. Influenced by exploratory heavies like Tool, The Mars Volta and, if they’ve done their homework, King Crimson, they stretch and warp melodies, time signatures and visual and lyrical themes like sonic taffy. On its newest album, the Denver, Colo.-based trio Rubedo finds

KARAOKE WITH BIG JOHN: 8 p.m.; Rivals Sports Bar, Grill & Poker, 2650 N.E. Division St., Bend; 541-550-7771. THE SUBSTITUTES: Classic rock; 8:30 p.m.; Northside Bar & Grill, 62860 Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541-383-0889. CHARLES BUTTON BAND: Blues; $5; 9-11 p.m.; The Original Kayo’s Dinner House and Lounge, 415 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-323-2520. DJ SUGAR: 9 p.m.; Seven, 1033 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-760-9412. DJS SWEET T3A AND JEFFE: 9 p.m.; Liquid Lounge, 70 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend. FIVE PINT MARY: Celtic rock, with Shortpants Romance and the Wisdom Hares; 9 p.m.; M & J Tavern, 102 N.W. Greenwood, Bend; 541-389-1410. (Pg. 7) PRISTINE BLUE: Country; 9 p.m.; Maverick’s Country Bar and Grill, 20565 Brinson Blvd., Bend; 541-325-1886. THE SINDICATE: Reggae; $5; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3888331 or www.silvermoonbrewing.com. DJ STEELE: 10 p.m.; The Summit Saloon & Stage, 125 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-749-2440.

SUNDAY REBECCA HILARY SMITH AND FRIENDS: Classics and Celtic; 1 p.m.; Strictly Organic Coffee Co., 6 S.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-330-6061. (Pg. 7) ACOUSTIC OPEN MIC: with Burnin’ Moonlight, PA provided; 4 p.m.; Taylor’s Sausage Deli & Pub, 913 N.E. 3rd St., Bend; 541-383-1694. BOBBY LINDSTROM: Rock and blues; 4 p.m.; 10 Barrel Brewing Co., 1135 N.W. Galveston Ave., Bend; 541-585-1007. LISA DAE AND ROBERT LEE TRIO: Jazz; 5 p.m.; Northside Bar & Grill, 62860 Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541-383-0889.

the middle ground between just-plain-rock and the kind of over-the-top experimentalism that elicits cringes. “Massa Confusa” is a 10-track army of psychedelic sounds, where bassist Alex Trujillo and drummer Gregg Ziemba build unconventional (but solid) foundations for Kyle Gray to adorn with synthesizers and acrobatic vocals that sound like Flaming Lip Wayne Coyne being dragged outside his comfort zone. The result is an unnerving album that could soundtrack unrest in a pink-streaked cloud city just after sunset. Huh? I know. Anyway, they’re at The Horned Hand Sunday. Details below.

LITTLE BLACK DRESS: Jazz; 6 p.m.; 5 Fusion & Sushi Bar, 821 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-323-2328. MICKEY AVALON: Hip-hop; $20$25; 8 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; www. randompresents.com. (Pg. 6) RUBEDO: Rock, with The Hoot Hoots; 8 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; www.reverbnation. com/venue/thehornedhand.

MONDAY BEND POETRY SLAM: 8 p.m., signups at 7:30 p.m.; $3 donation; Astro Lounge, 939 N.W. Bond St.; 541-388-0116.

TUESDAY SUBLIMINAL: Sublime tribute; 6 p.m.; 10 Barrel Brewing Co., 1135 N.W. Galveston Ave., Bend; 541-585-1007. UKULELE JAM: 6:30 p.m.; Cascade Lakes Brewing Company - The Lodge, 1441 S.W. Chandler Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-388-4998. TYLER FORTIER: Americana, with Gregory Rawlins and Mike Surber; 8 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; www.reverbnation. com/venue/thehornedhand. (Pg. 7)

WEDNESDAY OPEN MIC: 6:30 p.m.; M & J Tavern, 102 N.W. Greenwood, Bend; 541-389-1410. OPEN MIC/ACOUSTIC JAM: with Bobby Lindstrom; 6:30-9 p.m.; Taylor’s Sausage Deli & Pub, 913 N.E. 3rd St., Bend; 541-383-1694. KARAOKE W/ ROCKIN’ ROBIN: 7 p.m.; Kelly D’s, 1012 S.E. Cleveland Ave., Bend; 541-389-5625. REDWOOD SON: Americana; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; www. mcmenamins.com.

— Ben Salmon

DSKILES BAND: Blues; 8 p.m.; Northside Bar & Grill, 62860 Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541-383-0889. REGGAE NIGHT W/ MC MYSTIC: Music; 9 p.m.; Astro Lounge, 939 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-388-0116.

THURSDAY OPEN MIC: 6-8 p.m.; Strictly Organic Coffee Co., 6 S.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-330-6061. BILLY MANZIK: Folk; 6:30-8:30 p.m.; Bend Brewing Company, 1019 N.W. Brooks St.; 541-383-1599. HANZ ARAKI & KATHRYN CLAIRE: Irish music, with Chris Hayes; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; www. mcmenamins.com. (Pg. 7) THE ROCKHOUNDS: Acoustic; 7 p.m.; Kelly D’s, 1012 S.E. Cleveland Ave., Bend; 541-389-5625. ANGIE AND THE CAR WRECKS: Twangpunk, with Wild Eye Revolvers; $5; 8 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; www.reverbnation. com/venue/thehornedhand. LAST BAND STANDING: A battle of the bands competition featuring local acts; free; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Liquid Lounge, 70 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend; www.lastbandstanding.net. (Pg. 5) OPEN MIC JAM: with Scott Foxx; 8 p.m.; Northside Bar & Grill, 62860 Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541-383-0889. DISCOTHEQUE DJS: Alt-electroncia; with Critical Hit and more; 9 p.m.; The Blacksmith Restaurant, 211 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-318-0588. FIVE PINT MARY: Celtic rock; 9 p.m.; The Summit Saloon, 125 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-749-2440. (Pg. 7) n T O SUBMIT: Email events@bendbulletin.com. Deadline is 10 days before publication. Please include date, venue, time and cost.


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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JUNE 8, 2012

PAGE 9

music releases Travis Porter

Melody Gardot

“FROM DAY 1” RCA Records There’s beauty in diversity, sure, but there can be beauty in singlemindedness, too. Over the past few years the three men of the Atlanta hip-hop group Travis Porter — Quez, Ali and Strap — have become auteurs of the strip club, making buoyant, electrifying soundtrack music for late nights full of tossed-in-the-air dollar bills. What Too $hort was to 1980s corner walkers, this group is to the modern-day pole dancer. The apotheosis of the style was “Make It Rain,” originally released in 2010 and one of the great hip-hop anthems of recent years. A thumping, swerving, punchy number, it was salacious and comic in equal measure, a genuine triumph. That song closes out “From Day 1,” the long-in-the-cooker majorlabel debut from this group, and it sets the tone as well. From “Pop a Rubber Band” to “Wobble” to songs with unprintable titles, these men know their milieu; they never met a stripper they didn’t want to rap about. This is an exuberantly raunchy album but also an intuitively musical one. Quez in particular

“THE ABSENCE” Verve Records Last time out, on her 2008 album “My One and Only Thrill,” Philadelphia chanteuse Melody Gardot cast a subtle torch-singer spell, working with former Joni Mitchell producer Larry Klein. That album worked a gray-day Billie Holiday mood, and “The Absence,” a collaboration with Brazilian-born producer and guitarist Hector Pereira, maintains a gauzy, low-key vibe. Instead of evoking a smoky

has a mature gift for melody — he’s lighthearted in tone, adding a sense of fun to the proceedings. Ali can sound testy and saucy and Strap, with his rich accent, often sounds like he’s swallowing his words. Songs like “Ballin’,” with their ostentatious swoops and turns in vocal delivery, recall rappers like Nelly and Bone Thugs-N-Harmony, Midwesterners who bent hip-hop into new shapes. Only a pair of songs near the end of the album, “Party Time” and “That Feeling,” appear to be reaching for a broader idea, trading strip-club throbbing for pop-ear breeze. But here, the rappers sound loose, almost uncomfortable. They want to go back to the club. — Jon Caramanica, The New York Times

Here and there July 22 — With Florence + The Machine; McMenamins Edgefield, Troutdale; SOLD OUT; www.cascadetickets.com or 800-514-3849.

“MAGIC HOUR” Casablanca Records Only the Scissor Sisters could make this work. The New York band’s fourth album, “Magic Hour,” is a delightful hodgepodge of dance styles and collaborators that seem unnervingly mismatched. One minute, Jake Shears and the gang are working with neosoul crooner John Legend. The next, Shears is rapping and hot up-and-coming rapper Azealia Banks is singing the hook. Yet, the Scissor Sisters make it all fit together by making a dance album that’s shockingly all about, well, fun! “Baby Come Home,” the Legend collaboration, is a throwback

to the Elton John-styled, ’70sinfluenced dance numbers like “Take Your Mama” that made them stars in the first place. “Inevitable,” a sleek soul number built with Pharrell, actually feels timeless, as Shears shows off his falsetto and Ana Matronic gets to belt out some big notes. For the first single, “Only the Horses,” they team up with hitmaking producer Calvin Harris for a song that could easily sit next to Harris’ work with Rihanna or Ne-Yo, while keeping the band’s quirkiness intact. After all, that quirkiness suits them well, in the playfully Prince-ish “Keep Your Shoes On” and in Matronic’s diva turn, “Let’s Have a Kiki.” The experimentation pays off big with “Shady Love,” where

Grass Widow

The Walkmen “HEAVEN” Fat Possum Records “While I Shovel Snow,” one of the best tracks on The Walkmen’s last album, 2010’s “Lisbon,” was its most understated, and it seems to have suggested the direction for “Heaven,” the New York/Philly quintet’s sixth full-length (not including their song-by-song cover of Harry Nilsson’s “Pussy Cats”). The album does occasionally unleash the band’s unhinged rock ’n’ roll side, but the overall mood is restrained, nuanced, and spacious. This is a pretty album, in the way that albums from The

Scissor Sisters

Parisian melancholy, however, “The Absence” finds its source of sadness and longing through

National can be pretty. “I was the Duke of Earl, but it couldn’t last,” Hamilton Leithauser croons introspectively on album-opener “We Can’t Be Beat,” and there’s an element of doo-wop to what The Walkmen do there, and on “No One Ever Sleeps,” a track that also features Fleet Foxes’ Robin Pecknold. Fans of “The Rat,” the band’s signature anthem, may be disappointed, but “Heaven” offers plenty of rarefied pleasures. — Steve Klinge, The Philadelphia Inquirer

“INTERNAL LOGIC” HLR Records The women in the San Francisco trio Grass Widow sing in clear and pretty harmonies over buzzing, nettlesome music — thin, staccato, slightly dissonant. It’s a group sound that’s counterintuitive all the time: reverbed and reassuring on the top, dry and interrogative on the bottom. That’s a really good idea, but Grass Widow has stretched it about as far as it can go. Its limitations were apparent from the trio’s beginnings three years ago but seemed fresh or accidental. At this point, on “Internal Logic,” the band’s third full-length album,

they amount to a kind of grim commitment. To what? To semiproficiency, to plainness, maybe even to the abrogation of pleasure. Oh, it’s not as bad as all that. There’s been some growth. The vocal patterns among band mem-

the yearning concept of saudade in the fado music of Portugal, where Gardot lived for a time, before moving on to Buenos Aires, as she was writing songs. That, along with the sunnier rhythms of Brazilian bossa nova, which come to the fore in the lead single, “Mire,” and the bluesy “Goodbye,” in which she growls like Louis Armstrong, suffuses “The Absence” with a sophisticated, worldly melancholy, with which Gardot always seems entirely at home. — Dan DeLuca, The Philadelphia Inquirer

Shears teams up with Banks for a thrilling slice of booty-shaking electro-pop that will stand as one of the year’s best singles. With “Magic Hour,” the Scissor Sisters aim to build a good time and hit the mark time and time again. — Glenn Gamboa, Newsday

bers (the bassist Hannah Lew, the guitarist Raven Mahon and the drummer Lillian Maring) have become stronger and more careful, whether in unison, closer harmony or counterpoint. And the best of this album’s tightly composed songs — “Under the Atmosphere,” “Spock on Muni” — have moments of beauty in their choruses. Conceptually, “Internal Logic” is all set. But something’s missing here, and it’s something to do with music alone: sound, feeling, groove, attack, dynamics. The brittle, attenuated feeling of this album becomes wearying, like a three-course meal of nothing but grapefruit. — Ben Ratliff, The New York Times


PAGE 10 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JUNE 8, 2012

cover story

An d y Tullis / The Bulletin file photo

A bull dogger grabs a steer at the 2010 Sisters Rodeo. Find out what a bull dogger is by using the handy rodeo glossary below.

RODEO DICTIONARY Sound like you know what you’re talkin’ about at the Sisters Rodeo this weekend By Breanna Hostbjor T he B u lletin

E

very cultural subset, hobby and sport has its own particular set of jargon. It makes perfect sense to its adherents, but leaves newcomers baffled. And yes, this is a story about the rodeo. And you already know what chaps and spurs are. What more could you possibly need? That depends. Are you content to call that dude in chaps “that dude in chaps,” or would you rather refer to him by his title, which might be a bull dogger or a hazer? And when a rider is disqualified for the mark out rule, are you

fine to shrug and accept his fate, or would you rather know what just happened? If the second option in those two scenarios appeals to you — or if you just want to have a better grasp on some of the things you might see and hear at this weekend’s Sisters Rodeo (see “If you go” and “Schedule”) — take a look at the following primer on rodeo lingo. And if you still find yourself completely stymied, we suggest nodding wisely, staring at the toes of your boots and mumbling something about “stock.” • Barrel man. At the Sisters Rodeo, this is J.J. Harrison, the guy cracking jokes as he hides in

a barrel in the middle of the arena. The barrel is meant to distract the bulls from downed riders. There are also bullfighters for this (see below), but they’re less blase while staring down a snorting, kicking animal. • Bucking strap. A fleece-lined strap pulled tightly around a bull’s body to encourage it to buck. But before you begin to entertain fears of animal cruelty, rest assured that the strap is relatively soft. “It don’t hurt them at all,” said Glenn Miller, the president of the Sisters Rodeo Association. “It just irritates them.” Continued next page

If you go What:Sisters Rodeo Where:Sisters Rodeo Grounds, 67637 U.S. Highway 20 When:See schedule Page 11. Cost:Tonight: $12, $30 box seats, free ages 12 and younger Saturday and Sunday: $12, $15 or $18, $30 box seats Contact:www.sistersrodeo .com or 541-549-0121


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TONIGHT 7 p.m. rodeo performance (family night)

SATURDAY 9:30 a.m. parade 1 and 7 p.m. rodeo performances

SUNDAY 7-11 a.m. buckaroo breakfast 9 a.m. cowboy church service 1 p.m. rodeo performance

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin file photo

Mike Beers, one half of a roping team, lassoes the feet of a calf at last year’s rodeo. Beers is called a heeler. The expression on his face is called a grimace.

mal they’re riding with one hand. The other — the off arm — must remain in the air for the duration of the ride. If the off arm touches the horse or bull, the rider is disqualified. (So much for hanging on for dear life.) • Pick up men. When a rider stays on his bucking mount

— Reporter: 541-383-0351, bhostbjor@bendbulletin.com

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“When they nod their head to open the gate, the first jump out of the gate their feet have to be up like they’re laying back … and they (have) to be spurring when they come out,” said Miller. • Off arm. Roughstock riders (see below) are only allowed to hold on to the ani-

for eight seconds, the run receives a score, and the cowboy isn’t disqualified. But the joy of completing a ride is, we imagine, tempered by the fact that he’s still on a horse that’s trying to pitch him off, and now he has to get down. That’s where pick up men come in. These gentlemen ride up beside the cowboy on the bronc and help him off by letting him grab onto their nice, sedate mounts. • Piggin’ string. Calf ropers use this string to tie up the calves that they’ve lassoed. “They usually carry that in their mouths when they’re roping, and when they drop off the horse it’s right handy

PAGE 11

for them,” said Miller. So take note, entrepreneurs: There’s probably a sizeable market out there for flavored piggin’ strings. • Roughstock group. These are the guys you probably watch when rodeo graces ESPN: the bareback, saddle bronc and bull riders. The calf ropers, team ropers, bull doggers and barrel racers fill out the rodeo set.

CENTRAL OREGON

Schedule

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From previous page • Bull doggers. Also known as steer wrestlers. According to Miller, these are the guys that “jump off their horse and wrastle a steer down.” • Bullfighters. No, not the kind of bullfighting you’d get in Barcelona, so you won’t hear anyone shouting “toro!” or waving capes. These guys are also known as rodeo clowns. They have one of the most dangerous jobs at the show. “They steer the bull toward them(selves) so that the bull rider can get up safe,” said Miller. We imagine they also have near-Olympian sprint times. • Hazer. This rider uses his horse to guide a steer toward the bull dogger. Also much nicer than the hazers from your fraternity days. • Header and heeler. The two people in a team roping set. “The header ropes the head first, and then the heeler needs to catch both hind feet,” said Miller. Catching only one back foot nets the team a fivesecond penalty. • Mark out rule. This one’s for bareback and saddle bronc riders. They must position themselves correctly as they start their ride, or face disqualification.

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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JUNE 8, 2012


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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JUNE 8, 2012

fine arts

Bite-sized Shakespeare • Innovation Theatre Works in Bend tackles the Bard’s 37 plays in a 90-minute production By David Jasper The Bulletin

I

If you go

n 1981, Adam Long, Daniel What: “The Complete Works Singer and Jess Winfield (as of William Shakespeare Jess Borgeson) founded the (Abridged)” Reduced Shakespeare Company When: 7:30 p.m. Wednesdays (RSC), “a pass-the-hat act perthrough Saturdays, 6 p.m. forming a 20-minute version of Sundays, through June 24 ‘Hamlet’ at Renaissance Faires,” Where: Innovation Theatre according to www.reduced Works, 1155 S.W. Division St., shakespeare.com. “The company Bend develops a fast, funny and physical performance style to keep Cost: $15, $12 for students and their audiences from walking seniors away. It works.” Contact: www.innovationtw It worked so well that by 1987, .org or 541-504-6721 the three had developed “The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged).” Says the website: “The company thinks that would be cheap and easy and that this will be its swan song. In- “that would hopefully be a hit,” he stead, interest in the RSC begins said. So Hills approached CTC to to snowball.” The play, which famously con- make sure they weren’t planning denses Shakespeare’s 37 plays a revival, as it had when it brought into one 90-minute piece, still the play back for a short summer works, judging from a recent re- 2007 run on the heels of a successhearsal at Innovation Theatre ful 2006 full-length run. “Basically, they gave their blessWorks in Bend (see “If you go”). The fast-paced comedy stars ing, and they’ve been totally awesome. Pretty much, I Clinton K. Clark, would say, between Skye Stafford and Alastair Morley “They encourage 80 and 90 percent of all the props and Jaques as themselves. you to make it costumes we’re using The three appeared are theirs from their together earlier this more timely, if production. They season in another In- you come up novation production, with a great gag, have been incredibly generous,” Hills said. “Mr. Marmalade,” and Jaques is repris- to go ahead and “We’re very happy ing his role from a use it. There are about that.” The folks at ReCascades Theatrical a lot of places duced Shakespeare Company production updated of the same play sev- in the script that Company naturally lend the script a year or eral years back. two back, says Hills, Earlier, the plan themselves to so it’s different from had been to end the what theatergoers season with a pro- improvisation.” duction of the musi- — Brad Hills, director would have seen five years ago. cal “She Loves Me.” In fact, said Hills, However, says Brad Hills, artistic director of Innova- the play lends itself to improvisation and director of “The Complete tion, and the playwrights incorWorks,” the theater’s financial porated into new material from struggles this season forced him companies that had come up with to cancel that production and look their own gags while staging “The for something, frankly speaking, Complete Works.” No overprotec-

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Alastair Morley Jaques, left, and Clinton K. Clark star in “The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged)” at Innovation Theatre Works in Bend. The play runs through June 24.

tive scribes, they welcome it when companies craft a new gag, to the point that they collect alternatives to what they’d originally written. “They encourage you to make it more timely, if you come up with a great gag, to go ahead and use it. There are a lot of places in the script that naturally lend themselves to improvisation,” Hills said. “It is fairly unusual, and it’s to their great credit,” he said. Then again, “It’s a good thing for them. Because the play stays fresh, (and) more people want to do it. “We’ve come up with some very

good things,” he added, among them a new version of the song “Stairway to Heaven” at the end of “Romeo and Juliet.” Updates are evident in the play’s Facebook and iPod references. There are some moments of audience participation, but fret not. Even if you think of “Hamlet” as a small town, you won’t be intimidated by this Shakespeare play after you hear a “Star Wars” reference or see “Titus Andronicus” interpreted as a cooking show. Even the “Romeo and Juliet” line “call me but love, and I’ll be new baptized” is played for laughs: It’s

interpreted as “butt love.” Yes, the playwrights keep the focus on the zany. Though they clearly know their Shakespeare, you don’t need to. But if you did pay attention in English class and do know your Shakespeare, actor Stafford notes there are some treats for diehard lovers of the man. “It’s going to be entertaining no matter what,” said Clark. “I mean … I’m running around in a wig, speaking in falsetto more than half the play.” — Reporter: 541-383-0349, djasper@bendbulletin.com


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JUNE 8, 2012

fine arts

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PAGE 13

A comedy to cure what ails you • ‘Social Security’ production at CTC shows you’re never too old to fall in love By David Jasper The Bulletin

I

magine you’re in your golden years: Would you rather live a life of drab housecoats and sparring with your unhappy adult daughter (and her boring accountant husband), or ditch all that noise for one more shot at love before it’s — not to put too fine a point on it — curtain time? That question touches on what’s at stake for Sophie, played by Patty Rosen, in Cascades Theatrical Company’s production of “Social Security,” a Broadway comedy about late-life love opening tonight at CTC’s Greenwood Playhouse in Bend (see “If you go”). Playwright Andrew Bergman’s comedy credentials are undeniable: Bergman, dubbed “The Unknown King of Comedy” by New York Magazine in the 1980s, came up with the story and co-wrote “Blazing Saddles,” and had a hand in the creation of “Fletch,” “Soapdish,” “The Freshman” and “Honeymoon in Vegas,” among others. Another comedy veteran, Mike Nichols, directed the play when it opened on Broadway in 1986, according to Huffington Post. With CTC’s production, that duty falls to Sandy Silver, who believes comedy is the hardest of acting’s forms. Imagine then her surprise when Fred Giacomini showed up for an audition. Giacomini had no experience, just interest, in acting when Lana Shane, the theater’s operations manager, presented him to Silver. “Lana came in and said, ‘There’s a guy in the lobby who wants to know what all this is about. He loves theater, but he’s never been on stage. Can he sit in on an audition?’” Silver says. “I said, ‘Absolutely.’ So Fred came in, sat down and after a while, I said, ‘So, you think you’d like to give it a go?’ “I had him read for me,” she says, “and he blew me away. He had never, ever, been on stage before.” Giacomini walked away with a lead role. He plays David, the

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

From left, Bill Casler, Gina Osborne, Fred Giacomini and Audrey Colton Smith appear in a recent rehearsal for the comedy “Social Security.”

If you go What: “Social Security” When: Opens at 7:30 tonight with champagne reception; performances at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday, 2 p.m. Sundays, through June 24

randy husband to Barbara (Audrey Colton Smith), an art-dealing power couple in Manhattan accustomed to, and far more comfortable with, hosting and hobnobbing with famous artists than, say, spending time with Barbara’s more mundane family out on Long Island. Who should stop by but Barbara’s sister, Trudy (Gina Osborne) and her husband, Martin (played by Bill Casler). Tension builds as

Where: Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend Cost: $20 for adults, $15 for seniors 60 and older, $12 for students Contact: www.cascadestheatrical .org or 541-389-0803

they hem and haw around the reason for leaving their home in Mineola, but these two really hail, the scene makes quite clear, from Squaresville. It seems the frumpy twosome’s college-aged daughter, Sarah, has been avoiding their helicoptering ways, refusing even to take their twice-daily calls. We never see Sarah, but take it on faith from the slightly creepy David that she is

quite physically mature. Then Martin and Trudy let loose the news that Sarah has been having “menageries,” as Martin calls her trysts with an Irishman and Peruvian, with whom they believe she may or may not be living in Buffalo. Note: The language here gets quite descriptive, so check your delicate sensibilities at the door. Q: What does all this have to do with late-life love? A: We’re getting there. The real reason Buffalo-bound Martin and Trudy are there is to deposit Barbara and Trudy’s mother, Sophie — who, by the way, they make wait in the parked car while they drop this news-bomb on the ill-prepared David and Barbara. But then Maurice Koenig (Ed Mierjeski), a wealthy nonagenar-

ian artist, comes to dinner. He’s transfixed, and Sophie is transformed. Could love be an antidote for getting old? Maybe, Bergman’s play suggests. “It is obviously a comedy, which I think is much-needed now,” director Silver says. “People need to be able to come into the theater and laugh.” The play, however, also touches on a social theme affecting many in late middle-age: their aging parents. “As far as the care of an elderly parent, and how you deal with it — I think that’s appropriate now,” she adds. But the main part of the story, she emphasizes, “is to show that you are never too old to fall in love.” — Reporter: 541-383-0349, djasper@bendbulletin.com


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fine arts

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JUNE 8, 2012

ART EXHIBITS ALLEDA REAL ESTATE: Featuring paintings by Janice Rhodes; through June; 25 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Suite 1, Bend; 541-633-7590. AMBIANCE ART CO-OP: Featuring gallery artists; 435 S.W. Evergreen Ave., Redmond; 541-548-8115. ART BY KNIGHT: Featuring oil paintings by Laurel Knight and bronze sculpture by Steven L. Knight; 236 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend; 541-633-7488 or www. ArtbyKnight.com. ARTISTS’ GALLERY SUNRIVER: Featuring works by Vern Bartley, Greg Cotton, Deni Porter and Peter Roussel; through June, reception from 4-7 p.m. Saturday; 57100 Beaver Drive, Building 19; 541-593-4382 or www. artistsgallerysunriver.com. ATELIER 6000: Featuring “Works on Paper”; through June 29; 389 S.W. Scalehouse Court, Suite 120, Bend; 541-330-8759 or www. atelier6000.com. BEND CITY HALL: Featuring “INSIDE::OUT” works exploring how Bend’s external environment inspires its internal environment; through Sept. 28; 710 N.W. Wall St.; 541-388-5505. CAFE SINTRA: Featuring “3 Points of View,” a continually changing exhibit of photographs by Diane Reed, Ric Ergenbright and John Vito; 1024 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-8004. CANYON CREEK POTTERY: Featuring pottery by Kenneth Merrill; 310 N. Cedar St., Sisters; 541-549-0366 or www.

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“The Way Home,” by Helen Brown, will be on display through June 24 at the Sunriver Lodge Betty Gray Gallery. canyoncreekpotteryllc.com. CASCADE CENTER OF PHOTOGRAPHY: Featuring prints from the “Africa Series” and “Buddha Series”; through June; 390 S.W. Columbia St., Suite 110, Bend; 541-241-2266. DON TERRA ARTWORKS: Featuring more than 200 artists; 222 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541549-1299 or www.donterra.com. DOWNTOWN BEND PUBLIC LIBRARY: Featuring “Joys of Summer”; through Aug. 6; 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1037. FRANKLIN CROSSING: Featuring “Art in the Atrium,” works by Yuji Hiratsuka, with gallery artists; through June; 550 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; 541-382-9398. FURNISH.: Featuring works by Marjorie Wood Hamlin; 761 N.W. Arizona Ave., Bend; 541-617-8911. GHIGLIERI GALLERY: Featuring original Western-themed and African-inspired paintings and

sculptures by Lorenzo Ghiglieri; 200 W. Cascade Ave., Sisters; 541-549-8683 or www.artlorenzo.com. THE GOLDSMITH: Featuring pastel art by Nancy Bushaw; 1016 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-647-2676. HELPING YOU TAX AND ACCOUNTING: Featuring paintings by Carol Armstrong; 632 S.W. Sixth St., Suite 2, Redmond; 541-504-5422. JENNIFER LAKE GALLERY: Featuring paintings by Jennifer Lake; 220 W. Cascade Ave., Sisters; 541-549-7200 or www. jenniferlakegallery.com. JILL’S WILD (TASTEFUL) WOMEN WAREHOUSE: Featuring works by Jill Haney-Neal; Tuesdays and Wednesday only; 601 North Larch St, Suite B, Sisters; 541-617-6078 or www.jillnealgallery.com. JUDI’S ART GALLERY: Featuring works by Judi Meusborn Williamson; 336 N.E. Hemlock

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2115 NE HWY 20 • BEND • 541-678-5699

St., Suite 13, Redmond; 360-325-6230. KAREN BANDY DESIGN JEWELER: Featuring new abstract horse paintings; through July 6; 25 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Suite 5, Bend; www.karenbandy.com or 541-388-0155. LAHAINA GALLERIES: Featuring paintings and sculptures by Frederick Hart, Robert Bissell, Alexi Butirskiy, Aldo Luongo, Dario Campanile, Hisashi Otsuka, David Lee, Mollie Jurgenson, Katherine Taylor, Donna Young and more; 425 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Suite 307, Old Mill District, Bend; 541-388-4404 or www. lahainagalleries.com. LUBBESMEYER FIBER STUDIO: Featuring fiber art by Lori and Lisa Lubbesmeyer; 450 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Suite 423, Old Mill District, Bend; 541-330-0840 or www.lubbesmeyerstudio.com. MARCELLO’S ITALIAN CUISINE AND PIZZERIA: Featuring several local artists; 4 Ponderosa Road, Sunriver; 541-593-8300. MOCKINGBIRD GALLERY: Featuring “Seeing Light through Color,” works by Kent R. Wallis and Xiaogang Zhu; through June; 869 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541388-2107 or www.mockingbirdgallery.com. MOSAIC MEDICAL: Featuring mixed-media collage paintings by Rosalyn Kliot; 910 S. U.S. Highway 97, Suite 101, Madras; 541-475-7800. NORTH RIM LODGE: Featuring

photography by Eva Gill; through July; 1500 N.W. Wild Rye Circle, Bend; 541-388-3001. PATAGONIA @ BEND: Featuring photography by Mike Putnam; 920 N.W. Bond St.; 541-382-6694. QUILTWORKS: Featuring quilts by Candy Woods and a group show, “Digitally Textured,” quilts by Photos 2 Fiber; through July 4; 926 N.E. Greenwood Ave., Suite B, Bend; 541-728-0527. RED CHAIR GALLERY: Featuring “The Shape of Color,” works by Barbara Werdell, Linda Swindle and Julia Kennedy; through June; 103 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-306-3176 or www. redchairgallerybend.com. REDMOND PUBLIC LIBRARY: Featuring the Central Oregon Woodworkers exhibit; through June 16; 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1064. ROTUNDA GALLERY: Featuring works from the 2012 bachelor of fine arts graduating class; through June 15; Robert L. Barber Library, Central Oregon Community College; 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7564. SAGE CUSTOM FRAMING AND GALLERY: Featuring paintings by Diane Hodiak; through June; 834 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-382-5884. SISTERS AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE: Featuring fiber art by Rosalyn Kliot; 291 E. Main Ave.; 541-549-0251. SISTERS GALLERY & FRAME SHOP: Featuring landscape photography by Gary Albertson; 252 W. Hood Ave.; 541-549-9552 or www.garyalbertson.com. SISTERS PUBLIC LIBRARY: Featuring “Connecting Threads: Fiber Art Exhibit”; through June 27; Sisters Public Library, 110 N. Cedar Ave.; 541-312-1070. SUNRIVER AREA PUBLIC LIBRARY: Featuring “Reflections in Acrylic and Clay,” works by Dori Kite and Kim Jones; through June; 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1080. SUNRIVER LODGE BETTY GRAY GALLERY: Featuring Watercolors of Central Oregon; through June 24; 17600 Center Drive; 541-382-9398. THUMP COFFEE: Featuring works by Julia Junkin; through June; 25 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-388-0226. TUMALO ART CO.: Featuring “Nature’s Bounty,” works by Annie Ferder and Nancy Becker; through June; 450 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Suite 407, Bend; 541-385-9144 or www. tumaloartco.com.


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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JUNE 8, 2012

PAGE 15

outdoors Outing shorts are trimmed versions of stories published in The Bulletin in the past several weeks. For the complete stories, plus more photos, visit www.bendbulletin.com/outing.

Breitenbush Hot Springs

Three Deschutes waterfalls

V

J

isiting a cluster of three waterfalls on

ust north of Detroit on state Highway 22, Breitenbush Hot Springs is a great place to

the Deschutes River gives

hike on verdant trails, soak in natural hot springs

people a chance to see

and eat scrumptious vegetarian food. The health

some beautiful scenery

and wellness resort offers cabins for overnight

without driving more

visits or can be a long day trip from Bend.

than 20 minutes away

— Bulletin staff

from town.

If you go

The portion of the river

Getting there: From Bend, drive west on U.S. Highway 20. After about 50 miles, go straight on state Highway 22 at the junction. Drive about 30 miles to Detroit and turn right on state Highway 46. After about nine miles, just past Cleator Bend Campground, turn right on the single lane bridge crossing the Breitenbush River. Go left at each of the three forks on this 1.2 miles of gravel road. Signs will help you find

where Benham Falls, Dillon Falls and Lava Island Falls come together offers people a number of outdoor activities including hiking, bike riding, fishing and in

Lodge

It also gives people a

To Hwy 46 S Ow pott l T ed ra il

chance to learn about the region’s history — its geologic prehistory,

Devil’s Hole

the people who settled — Bulletin staff

Footbridge washed out 4685

De vil ’s Cr ee k

Mac McLean / The Bulletin file photo

The 25-foot-tall Benham Falls marks a point where the intersection of a 6,600-year-old lava flow and what is now called Benham Butte almost stopped the Deschutes River in its tracks.

Breitenbush Hot Springs trails

S. Br eiten bush Gorg e Tra il S. F ail Tr st ork Emerald Fore Brei tenb ush Cliff Rive Trai r l

earliest inhabitants and the area.

River bush reiten B k r N. Fo

46

some areas boating.

the parking lot. Cost: Day use rates: $14-$26 per adult plus $12 for lunch or dinner. Reservations and advance payment required; call well in advance. Overnight rates range from $72 to $119 per person depending on time of week and type of room, and include meals and classes Reservations and information: 503-854-3320, office@ breitenbush.com; www.breitenbush.com

Devi l’s

Ridg e Tra il

Devil’s Peak

Detroit

4,538ft

FEET 0

1,000

Bend

If you go Getting there: From Bend, head south on Cascade Lakes Highway. Turn left on Forest Road 41 — intersection is almost immediately after the Widgi Creek Golf Course — and follow the signs. For a bigger adventure, you can head to the Meadow Camp Picnic Area, which is off of Forest Road 100,

and hike 8½ miles from Meadow Camp Picnic Area to the top of Benham Falls. Difficulty: Easy to moderate Cost: Northwest Forest Pass or pay a $5 day-use fee Contact: Deschutes National Forest, 541-383-5300

O R E G O N 46

Little Sweden

22

Detroit

Breitenbush Hot Springs Resort Idanha

Detroit Lake

Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin


PAGE 16 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JUNE 2012 • FR THE8,BULLETIN

event calendar j TODAY PATIO SALE FUNDRAISER: Proceeds benefit church activities; free admission; 8 a.m.-5 p.m.; Holy Redeemer Catholic Church, 16137 Burgess Road, La Pine; 541-536-3571. BEND FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 2-6 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-408-4998, bendfarmersmarket@gmail.com or http:// bendfarmersmarket.com. ST. FRANCIS COCKTAIL PARTY: See archival materials from the history of the St. Francis school; free; 5-11 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-389-4854, grivera@saintfrancisschool.net or www. saintfrancisschool.net. FRACTALS, PHYSICS AND ART: Richard Taylor talks about art and the use of fractal analysis and computers; $10, $8 Sunriver Nature Center members, $3 students; 6:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Hitchcock Auditorium, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-593-4394. CASCADE CHORALE: The group performs “Carmina Burana,” poems set to music, under the direction of James Knox; donations accepted; 7 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541383-7512, jwknox@cocc.edu or http:// cascadechorale.org. SISTERS RODEO: A PRCA rodeo performance with roping, riding, steer wrestling and more; $12, free ages 12 and younger; 7 p.m.; Sisters Rodeo Grounds, 67637 U.S. Highway 20; 541-549-0121 or www.sistersrodeo.com. (Story, Page 10) “SOCIAL SECURITY”: Opening night of Cascades Theatrical Company’s presentation of a comedy about a couple whose tranquility is destroyed by family members; with a champagne and dessert reception; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3890803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org. (Story, Page 13) “THE COMPLETE WORKS OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE (ABRIDGED)”: Innovation Theatre Works presents the humorous adaptation of 37 Shakespeare plays in 90 minutes; $15, $12 students and seniors; 7:30 p.m.; Innovation Theatre Works, 1155 S.W. Division St., Bend; 541-504-6721 or www.innovationtw.org. (Story, Page 12) “THE IRON LADY”: A screening of the PG-13-rated 2011 movie; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541-4753351 or www.jcld.org. DIRTY HAND FAMILY BAND: The San Francisco-based rockabilly band performs; $5; 8 p.m.; The Horned

Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; 541-728-0879 or www.reverbnation. com/venue/thehornedhand. PRISTINE BLUE: The Portland-based country band performs; free; 9 p.m.; Maverick’s Country Bar and Grill, 20565 Brinson Blvd., Bend; 541-325-1886.

SATURDAY June 9 BIG PINE WALK-RUN-BIKE: 5K or 10K walk/run, or a 25 or 50 mile bike ride; proceeds benefit youth activity scholarships; $20; 8 a.m.; Finley Butte Park, Walling Lane and Finley Butte Road, La Pine; www.bigpine.org. PATIO SALE FUNDRAISER: Proceeds benefit church activities; free admission; 8 a.m.-3 p.m.; Holy Redeemer Catholic Church, 16137 Burgess Road, La Pine; 541-536-3571. MADRAS SATURDAY MARKET: Free admission; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Sahalee Park, B and Seventh streets; 541-489-3239 or madrassatmkt@gmail.com. PORSCHE SHOW AND SHINE: A show of all years and models of Porsches; free, $20 to enter a car; 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; Des Chutes Historical Museum, 129 N.W. Idaho Ave., Bend; president@highdesertpca.com. CENTRAL OREGON SATURDAY MARKET: Featuring arts and crafts from local artisans; free admission; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; parking lot across from Bend Public Library, 600 N.W. Wall St.; 541-420-9015 or www.centraloregonsaturdaymarket. com. CRUISE TO THE CENTER OF OREGON: See cars in a variety of makes and models; with vendors and train rides; free for spectators, donations of nonperishable food accepted; 10 a.m.-3 p.m., gates open 8 a.m.; Crook County Fairgrounds, 1280 S. Main St., Prineville; 541-815-3320 or www.ccrodders.com. RUNNING ON FAITH: A 5K run, followed by kids mini run, live music and more; $20, free for kids; 10 a.m.; Troy Field, Bond Street and Louisiana Avenue, Bend; 541389-4854, grivera@saintfrancisschool.net or www.saintfrancisschool.net. SISTERS ART IN THE PARK: Featuring arts, crafts and a silent auction benefiting the Make-A-Wish Foundation of Oregon; free; 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Creekside Park, U.S. Highway 20 and Jefferson Avenue; 541420-0279 or centraloregonshows@gmail. com. RAPTORS OF THE DESERT SKY: See hawks, owls and other raptors soaring through a forest clearing, and hear a biologist talk about the birds; daily through Labor Day; $3 or $2 members, plus museum admission; free ages 4 and

younger; 11:30 a.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-3824754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. BEND PRIDE CELEBRATION: Gay pride festival includes live music, entertainers and vendors; free; noon-6 p.m.; Riverbend Park, Southwest Columbia Street and Southwest Shevlin Hixon Drive; 541-3853320 or www.humandignitycoalition.org. (Story, Page 5) SISTERS RODEO: Featuring a parade and a PRCA rodeo performance with roping, riding, steer wrestling and more; $12-$18; 9:30 a.m. parade, 1 and 7 p.m. rodeo; Sisters Rodeo Grounds, 67637 U.S. Highway 20; 541-549-0121 or www. sistersrodeo.com. HOOTENANNY FRIENDRAISER: Meet the Chimps Inc. ape troop and learn about protecting chimpanzees; registration requested; proceeds benefit the sanctuary; $25; 1:30-3 p.m.; Hooker Creek Ranch, Chimps Inc. Sanctuary, 5525 Gerking Market Road, Bend; 541-410-4122, chimpinc@yahoo.com or http://chimpsinc.org. “THE BEAR AND I”: Les Joslin talks about his relationship with Smokey Bear, followed by a tour of a restored ranger station; included in the price of admission; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 2 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www. highdesertmuseum.org. BEND GAME NIGHT: Play available board games or bring your own; free; 6 p.m.midnight; East Bend Public Library, 62080 Dean Swift Road; 541-318-8459. “THE SNOW QUEEN”: Redmond School of Dance presents the ballet; $12 or $6 ages 11 and younger in advance, $14 or $8 children at the door; 7 p.m.; Redmond High School, 675 S.W. Rimrock Way; 541-5486957 or www.redmondschoolofdance. com. BEATLES SINGALONG: Local acts perform Beatles material with community members joining in; with a silent auction, trivia and costume contests and more; proceeds benefit KPOV; $10-$12 in advance, $15 adults at the door, $5 ages 17 and younger; 7-10 p.m., doors open 6:30 p.m.; Century Center, 70 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541322-0863 or www.kpov.org. (Story, Page 4) “SOCIAL SECURITY”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents a comedy about a couple whose tranquility is destroyed by family members; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3890803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org. “THE COMPLETE WORKS OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE (ABRIDGED)”: Innovation Theatre Works presents the humorous adaptation of 37 Shakespeare plays in 90

DON’T MISS ... TODAY THRU SUNDAY Sisters Rodeo: Proudly stopping traffic on U.S. Highway 20 for 72 years.

RAPTORS OF THE DESERT SKY DAILY THRU LABOR DAY Whoa, hold on. VELOCIRAPTORS CAN FLY? Why was there nothing to warn us about this in “Jurassic Park”? Why?? A raptor at right flies in front of a crowd at the museum. Courtesy Lee Schaefer / High Desert Museum

SATURDAY Bend Pride: An LBGTQ (and supporters) party. Not resident lions, as we’d hoped.

SATURDAY Beatles Singalong: Better than the cicada singalong, which gets old fast.

SUNDAY Summer Sunday Concert: Poor Moon plays for free. It might be why they’re poor.

THURSDAY The Singing Chef: He puts the tune in tuna and the dough in do-re-mi.

minutes; $15, $12 students and seniors; 7:30 p.m.; Innovation Theatre Works, 1155 S.W. Division St., Bend; 541-504-6721 or www.innovationtw.org. COURTNEY HUFFMAN: The soprano soloist performs; $35, $10 students and children; 7:30 p.m.; First United Methodist Church, 680 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-306-3988 or www.highdesertchambermusic.com.

and Lounge, 415 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-323-2520. PRISTINE BLUE: The Portland-based country band performs; free; 9 p.m.; Maverick’s Country Bar and Grill, 20565 Brinson Blvd., Bend; 541-325-1886. THE SINDICATE: The Portland-based rock band performs; $5; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www. silvermoonbrewing.com.

HOPELESS JACK & THE HANDSOME DEVIL: The Portland-based blues band performs; $5; 8 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; 541-728-0879 or www.reverbnation. com/venue/thehornedhand.

SUNDAY

CHARLES BUTTON BAND: The blues band performs; $5; 9-11 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; The Original Kayo’s Dinner House

GARDEN FAIR: Vendors sell crafts, arts and plants; with school tours; free admission; 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; St. Francis of

June 10


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THE8,BULLETIN IDAY, JUNE 2012 • FRIDAY, JUNE 8, 2012

june 8-14

Assisi Catholic Church & School, 2450 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-389-4854, grivera@saintfrancisschool.net or www. saintfrancisschool.net. SISTERS ART IN THE PARK: Featuring arts, crafts and a silent auction benefiting the Make-A-Wish Foundation of Oregon; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Creekside Park, U.S. Highway 20 and Jefferson Avenue; 541420-0279 or centraloregonshows@gmail. com. RAPTORS OF THE DESERT SKY: See hawks, owls and other raptors soaring through a forest clearing, and hear a biologist talk about the birds; daily through Labor Day; $3 or $2 members, plus museum admission; free ages 4 and younger; 11:30 a.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway

97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www. highdesertmuseum.org. FIDDLERS JAM: Listen or dance at the Oregon Old Time Fiddlers Jam; donations accepted; 1-3:30 p.m.; VFW Hall, 1836 S.W. Veterans Way, Redmond; 541-447-7395. SISTERS RODEO: Featuring a buckaroo breakfast and a PRCA rodeo performance with roping, riding, steer wrestling and more; $12-$18; 7-11 a.m. breakfast, 1 p.m. rodeo; Sisters Rodeo Grounds, 67637 U.S. Highway 20; 541-549-0121 or www.sistersrodeo.com. “SOCIAL SECURITY”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents a comedy about a couple whose tranquility is destroyed by family members; $20, $15

PAGE 17

LIVE MUSIC & MORE See Going Out on Page 8 for what’s happening at local night spots.

seniors, $12 students; 2 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www. cascadestheatrical.org. “THE SNOW QUEEN”: Redmond School of Dance presents the ballet; $12 or $6 ages 11 and younger in advance, $14 or $8 children at the door; 2 p.m.; Redmond High School, 675 S.W. Rimrock Way; 541-548-6957 or www. redmondschoolofdance.com. SECOND SUNDAY: Robert McDowell and Ellen Waterston read from a selection of their works; followed by an open mic; free; 2 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1034 or www.deschuteslibrary. org/calendar. SUMMER SUNDAY CONCERT: The folkrock act Poor Moon performs; free; 2:304:30 p.m.; Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-3229383 or www.bendconcerts.com. (Story, Page 3) FESTIVAL OF THE ARTS: Featuring displays of paintings, quilts, jewelry and more; with a performance of a play called “Noah’s Flood”; free; 3 p.m.; Community Presbyterian Church, 529 N.W. 19th St., Redmond; 541-548-3367 or www. redmondcpc.org. SUNRIVER MUSIC FESTIVAL YOUNG ARTIST SCHOLARSHIP CONCERT: A showcase of the top 2012 Young Artist Scholarship recipients; $10 suggested donation; 5 p.m.; Holy Trinity Church, 18143 Cottonwood Road; 541-593-9310, tickets@sunrivermusic.org or www. sunrivermusic.org. “THE COMPLETE WORKS OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE (ABRIDGED)”: Innovation Theatre Works presents the humorous adaptation of 37 Shakespeare plays in 90 minutes; $15, $12 students and seniors; 6 p.m.; Innovation Theatre Works, 1155 S.W. Division St., Bend; 541-504-6721 or www. innovationtw.org. MICKEY AVALON: The hip-hop act performs, with Millionaires and Maintain; $20 plus fees in advance, $25 at the door; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-7882989 or www.randompresents.com. (Story, Page 6) RUBEDO: The Denver-based rock band performs, with The Hoot Hoots; free; 8 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; 541-728-0879 or www. reverbnation.com/venue/thehornedhand.

MONDAY June 11 CASCADE CHORALE: The group performs “Carmina Burana,” poems set

to music, under the direction of James Knox; donations accepted; 7 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541383-7512, jwknox@cocc.edu or http:// cascadechorale.org.

TUESDAY June 12 TUESDAY MARKET AT EAGLE CREST: Free admission; 2-6 p.m.; Eagle Crest Resort, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; 541-633-9637 or info@sustainableflame. com. “SLOW LEARNERS”: Richard Clinton talks about “Two Hundred Years of Unheeded Warnings”; free; 6 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1037 or www. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. TYLER FORTIER: The Eugene-based Americana artist performs, with Gregory Rawlins and Mike Surber; free; 8 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; 541-728-0879 or www. reverbnation.com/venue/thehornedhand. (Story, Page 7)

WEDNESDAY June 13 KENGARDEN 2012 ROOTS TOUR: America’s best kendama players show off their tricks; free; 1-5 p.m.; Des Chutes Historical Museum, 129 N.W. Idaho Ave., Bend; 541-633-7205 or http:// wabisabibend.com. BEND FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 3-7 p.m.; Brooks Alley, between Northwest Franklin Avenue and Northwest Brooks Street; 541-408-4998, bendfarmersmarket@gmail.com or http:// bendfarmersmarket.com. PICKIN’ AND PADDLIN’ MUSIC SERIES: Includes boat demonstrations in the Deschutes River, and music by bluegrass act Pitchfork Revolution; proceeds benefit Bend Paddle Trail Alliance; free; 4-7 p.m. demonstrations, 7-10 p.m. music; Tumalo Creek Kayak & Canoe, 805 S.W. Industrial Way, Suite 6, Bend; 541-317-9407 or www.tumalocreek.com. (Story, Page 7) “QUEEN OF THE SUN”: Slow Food High Desert presents a screening of the film, preceded by a potluck dinner; free; 7 p.m., dinner at 6:15 p.m.; Cascade Culinary Institute, 2555 N.W. Campus Village Way, Bend; 541-390-5362. REDWOOD SON: The Portland-based Americana act performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. “SOCIAL SECURITY”: Cascades

Theatrical Company presents a comedy about a couple whose tranquility is destroyed by family members; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org. “THE COMPLETE WORKS OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE (ABRIDGED)”: Innovation Theatre Works presents the humorous adaptation of 37 Shakespeare plays in 90 minutes; $15, $12 students and seniors; 7:30 p.m.; Innovation Theatre Works, 1155 S.W. Division St., Bend; 541-5046721 or www.innovationtw.org.

THURSDAY June 14 BILLY MANZIK: The California-based folk rocker performs; free; 6:30-8:30 p.m.; Bend Brewing Company, 1019 N.W. Brooks St.; 541-383-1599. THE SINGING CHEF: Celebrity chef Andy LoRusso demonstrates cooking techniques and provides samples; proceeds benefit the Assistance League of Bend; $35; 6:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. HANZ ARAKI & KATHRYN CLAIRE: The Irish fiddle duo performs, with Chris Hayes; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. “SOCIAL SECURITY”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents a comedy about a couple whose tranquility is destroyed by family members; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www. cascadestheatrical.org. “THE COMPLETE WORKS OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE (ABRIDGED)”: Innovation Theatre Works presents the humorous adaptation of 37 Shakespeare plays in 90 minutes; $15, $12 students and seniors; 7:30 p.m.; Innovation Theatre Works, 1155 S.W. Division St., Bend; 541-504-6721 or www.innovationtw.org. ANGIE AND THE CAR WRECKS: The Centralia, Wash.-based rock band performs, with Wild Eye Revolvers; $5; 8 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; 541728-0879 or www.reverbnation. com/venue/thehornedhand. LAST BAND STANDING: A battle of the bands competition featuring local acts; free; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Liquid Lounge, 70 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend; www.lastbandstanding.net. (Story, Page 5) n SUBMIT AN EVENT at www.bendbulletin. com/submitinfo or email events@bendbulletin.com. Deadline is 10 days before publication. Questions? Contact 541-383-0351.


PAGE 18 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JUNE 8, 2012

planning ahead JUNE 15-21 JUNE 15-16 — SISTERS WINE & BREW FESTIVAL: Wineries and breweries of the Pacific Northwest offer selections of their products; live music, art vendors and more will be on hand; free admission; 3-9 p.m. June 15, 11 a.m.-8 p.m. June 16; Village Green Park, 335 S. Elm St.; 541-385-7988 or www. sisterswineandbrew.com. JUNE 15-17, 19-21 — “SOCIAL SECURITY”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents a comedy about a couple whose tranquility is destroyed by family members; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students ($25 June 19); 7:30 p.m. June 15-16 and June 19-21, 2 p.m. June 17; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org. JUNE 15-17, 20-21 — “THE COMPLETE WORKS OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE (ABRIDGED)”: Innovation Theatre Works presents the humorous adaptation of 37 Shakespeare plays in 90 minutes; $15, $12 students and seniors; 7:30 p.m. June 15-16 and June 20-21, 6 p.m. June 17; Innovation Theatre Works, 1155 S.W. Division St., Bend; 541-504-6721 or www.innovationtw.org. JUNE 15-16 — “OLEANNA”: Thoroughly Modern Productions presents the story of a college professor’s heated conversation with his student; $15 in advance, $18 at the door; 8 p.m. both days, 3 p.m. June 16; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-3129626, 2ndstreettheater@gmail.com or www.2ndstreettheater.com. JUNE 15 — BEND BICYCLE FILM FESTIVAL: A screening of local short films and about cycling in Central Oregon; proceeds benefit Bend Endurance Academy; $12 in advance, $15 at the door; 6 and 8:30 p.m.; GoodLife Brewing Co., 70 S.W. Century Drive, 100-464; 541-335-1346 or info@ bendbicyclefilmfestival.com. JUNE 15 — AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Kim McCarrel talks about her book “Riding Central Oregon Horse Trails”; with a slide show; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 422 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-526-1491. JUNE 16 — 3:THIRTY3: Run or walk up and down the butte for three hours and thirty three minutes; followed by an after party; registration required; proceeds benefit Cascade Youth & Family Center; $40; 7-10:30 a.m.; Pilot Butte State Park, Northeast Pilot Butte Summit Drive, Bend; 541-306-9613 or www.333bend. com. JUNE 16 — LITTLE COMMUTERS PARADE: Decorate your bike, wagon or scooter in the west-side parking lot, then parade across the footbridge and back; kicks off Commute Options Week; free; 8:30 a.m. decorating, 9:45 a.m. parade;

Submitted photo

Cars are displayed at last year’s Alpaca Shearing Festival and Car Show. This year’s event takes place June 16 in Terrebonne. Old Mill District, 661 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-330-2647 or www. commuteoptions.org. JUNE 16 — CLASSIC CAR EXPO: A show of classic cars restored to their original condition; free, $10 to enter a car; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Cascade Village Shopping Center, 63455 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; www.cascadevillage.net. JUNE 16 — ALPACA SHEARING FESTIVAL AND CAR SHOW: Featuring live music, demonstrations, a barbecue, a silent auction, a classic-car show and adoptable animals; proceeds benefit the Humane Society of Redmond; donations of pet food requested, $20-$25 to enter a car; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Crescent Moon Ranch, 70397 Buckhorn Road, Terrebonne; 541-923-2285 or www. redmondhumane.org. JUNE 16 — CENTRAL OREGON SATURDAY MARKET: Featuring arts and crafts from local artisans; free admission; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; parking lot across from Bend Public Library, 600 N.W. Wall St.; 541-420-9015 or www. centraloregonsaturdaymarket.com. JUNE 16 — SUMMER SHOOTOUT MARBLE TOURNAMENT: Learn to play marbles and then play in a tournament,

with lawn games and more; registration required; proceeds benefit the Deschutes County Historical Museum’s educational programs; $10 before June 12, $15 after; 10 a.m.; Des Chutes Historical Museum, 129 N.W. Idaho Ave., Bend; 541-389-1813 or www. deschuteshistory.org. JUNE 16 — SOLAR VIEWING: View the sun using safe techniques; included in the price of admission; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 11 a.m.-2 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. JUNE 16 — RIDE FOR TWO RIVERS: Cycling event features 55-mile or 18-mile rides; proceeds benefit the National Forest Foundation; $100 for ride and dinner, $80 for ride, $50 for dinner; reduced prices for children; noon; FivePine Lodge & Conference Center, 1021 Desperado Trail, Sisters; 503-241-0467. JUNE 16 — SPRING RECITAL: Gotta Dance presents performances in tap, jazz, ballet and more; $10; 4 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-322-0807 or www.

gottadancestudioandcompany.com. JUNE 16 — GREAT STRIDES: A 5K walk for cystic fibrosis; registration required; proceeds benefit the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation; donations required; 3:30 p.m. registration, 4:30 p.m. walk; Sam Johnson Park, Southwest 15th Street, Redmond; 541-480-6703, greatstrides. redmond@gmail.com or www.cff. org/greatstrides. JUNE 16 — THE DIRTY HEADS: The reggae-rock band performs, with the Wheeler Brothers; $28; 6:15 p.m., doors open 5:30 p.m.; Century Center, 70 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; http:// theoutsidegames.com. JUNE 16 — FATHER’S DAY TRIBUTE EVENT: Watch the Bend Elks play the Corvallis Knights; proceeds benefit Central Oregon Council on Aging programs; $7, $25 for priority seating, reception and meal, $15 for reserved seating and meal; 6:30 p.m.; Vince Genna Stadium, Southeast Fifth Street and Roosevelt Avenue, Bend; 541-6785483 or www.councilonagnig.org. JUNE 16 — AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Kristy Athens reads from her book “Get Your Pitchfork On!: The Real Dirt on Country Living”; free; 7:30

p.m.; The Nature of Words, 224 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-647-2233, info@thenatureofwords.org or www. thenatureofwords.org. JUNE 16 — CARRIE CLARK & THE LONESOME LOVERS: The Seattle-based folk act performs a CD-release show; $5; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541388-8331 or www.silvermoonbrewing. com. JUNE 17 — DEMOLITION DERBY: The Bend/Sunrise Lions Club hosts a derby; proceeds benefit the club’s charitable causes; $12, $6 ages 6-12, free ages 5 and younger; 11 a.m. gates open, 1 p.m. derby; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-410-4667. JUNE 17 — SUMMER SUNDAY CONCERT: The roots-rock act Harley Bourbon performs; free; 2:30-4:30 p.m.; Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-3229383 or www.bendconcerts.com. JUNE 20 — MUSIC IN THE CANYON: Countryfied performs country music; free; 5:30-8 p.m.; American Legion Park, 850 S.W. Rimrock Way, Redmond; www.musicinthecanyon.com.


planning ahead

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JUNE 8, 2012

JUNE 20 — YOGOMAN BURNING BAND: The Bellingham, Wash.-based reggae band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www. mcmenamins.com. JUNE 21 — BENEFIT GALA: Featuring a silent auction, refreshments and music by the Moon Mountain Ramblers; proceeds benefit Full Access; $30, $50 per couple; 6-9 p.m.; Deschutes Brewery Mountain Room, 901 S.W. Simpson Ave., Bend; www.fullaccess.org. JUNE 21 — “PARENT’S NIGHT OUT”: A screening of the presentation by Harvey Karp about raising happy children; $12.50; 7:30 p.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347 or www.fathomevents.com. JUNE 21 — LAST BAND STANDING: A battle of the bands competition featuring local acts; free; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Liquid Lounge, 70 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend; www.lastbandstanding.net.

GO! MAGAZINE •

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JUNE 22-23 — 4 PEAKS MUSIC FESTIVAL: Camping music festival features performances by Poor Man’s Whiskey, Melvin Seals and JGB, The Mother Hips and more; $70 in advance, $80 at the gate, free ages 9 and younger; 1:30-9:45 p.m. June 22, 10 a.m.-9:45 p.m. June 23; Rockin’ A Ranch, 19449 Tumalo Reservoir Road, Tumalo; www.4peaksmusic.com. JUNE 22-23 — “THE TOY SHOP AT MIDNIGHT”: Terpsichorean Dance Studio presents a dance performance about toys who come to life at night; proceeds benefit the studio’s scholarship fund; $9 in advance, $10 at the door; 7 p.m.; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541-389-5351 or www. terpsichoreanbendoregon.com. JUNE 22-24 — “SOCIAL SECURITY”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents a comedy about a couple whose tranquility is destroyed by family members; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m. June 2223, 2 p.m. June 24; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3890803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org. JUNE 22-24 — “THE COMPLETE WORKS OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE (ABRIDGED)”: Innovation Theatre Works presents the humorous adaptation of 37 Shakespeare plays in 90 minutes; $15, $12 students and seniors; 7:30 p.m. June 22-23, 6 p.m. June 24; Innovation Theatre Works, 1155 S.W. Division St., Bend; 541504-6721 or www.innovationtw.org. JUNE 22-23 — “OLEANNA”: Thoroughly Modern Productions presents the story of a college professor’s heated conversation with his student; $15 in advance, $18 at the door; 8 p.m. both days, 3 p.m. June 23; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626, 2ndstreettheater@ gmail.com or www.2ndstreettheater.com. JUNE 23-24 — BITE OF BEND: Food festival includes local food booths offering bites of their creations, a beer garden, wine, a Top Chef competition, a children’s area and live music; proceeds benefit the Boys & Girls

PAGE 19

Available only at Bend and Redmond locations.

One Free Kids Meal, per Adult Entree with this coupon.

Bend 541-318-5720 • Redmond 541-923-4777 The Bulletin file photo

Ch e fBette Fraser willteach a cla sson how to cook with fresh herbs. See the listing below for more information.

Talks & classes TANGO AND MILONGA TRASPIE WORKSHOPS: All-level dance workshops; $20 per workshop; 11 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Saturday and 1 p.m.4:30 p.m. Sunday; Terpsichorean Dance Studio, 1601 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend; bendtango@gmail.com or 541-330-4071. FARM TO TABLE: A locally sourced meal followed by a discussion of raw milk, farming and the political climate; $40 for dinner and lecture (must be purchased in advance), $10 in advance, $15 at the door for presentations; 2 p.m. Sunday; Windy Acres Farm, 3320 N.W. Stahancyk Lane, Prineville; www. windyacresdairy.com or 541-447-5389. COOKING CLASS WITH CHEF BETTE: Learn to cook with fresh herbs;

Clubs of Central Oregon; free admission; 11 a.m.-10 p.m. June 23, 11 a.m.-7 p.m. June 24; downtown Bend; 541-323-0964 or www.thebiteofbend.com. JUNE 23 — SCLERODERMA AWARENESS WALK: Walk to benefit the Scleroderma Angel Foundation and the Scleroderma Research Foundation; $20 in advance, $25 day of walk, free ages 13 and younger; 11 a.m., 10:30 a.m. registration; American Legion Park, 850 S.W. Rimrock Way, Redmond; 541-480-1958 or mzann@ bendbroadband.com. JUNE 24 — BEND BEER RUN: A 5K loop through Drake Park, with beer stops along the way; in conjunction with the Bite of Bend; ages 21 and older only; registration required; $20 in advance, $30

registration required; $50; 6 p.m. Wednesday; register for Bend location; www.welltraveledfork.com, chefbette@ welltraveledfork.com or 541-312-0097. GET TO KNOW YOUR DIGITAL CAMERA: Gain a basic knowledge of your camera’s controls and menus; bring your camera and manual; registration required by Saturday; $59; 9 a.m.-noon June 16; Cascade Center of Photography, 390 S.W. Columbia St., Suite 110, Bend; www.ccophoto. com/get-to-know-your-digital-camera or 541-241-2266. DEEP SEA CLAY: Practice basic clay skills and create sculptures and habitats; $90; 9 a.m. ages 8-12, 1 p.m. ages 6-8, June 18-21; Art Station, 313 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; www.artscentraloregon.org or 541-617-1317. after June 22; noon; Drake Park, 777 N.W. Riverside Blvd.; 541-350-3929 or www. thebiteofbend.com. JUNE 26 — TOMMY EMMANUEL: The Grammy-nominated fingerstyle guitarist performs; $35-$46; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre. org. JUNE 28 — BOOKPLATE AUCTION AND RECEPTION: Featuring an announcement of the 2012 The Nature of Words authors, live and silent auctions and readings by NOW’s students; proceeds benefit The Nature of Words; $35; 5:30-8:30 p.m.; Atelier 6000, 389 S.W. Scalehouse Court, Suite 120, Bend; 541-647-2233 or www. thenatureofwords.org.

“Gregorian, Gospel & Gershwin” Organ Concert scheduled for

June 8th at St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church

has been rescheduled for

September 7th

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PAGE 20 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JUNE 8, 2012

restaurants

Home, home on the Range Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Powell Butte’s Range Restaurant & Bar at Brasada Ranch occupies a spacious, high-ceilinged building.

• Chef Adrian Carpenter inspires fine dining in a casual setting at Brasada Ranch

Range Restaurant & Bar at Brasada Ranch

Adrian said. “I’ve been used to air shipments three times a week; now, I can get things the next day by truck. The resources are so much closer.”

Location: 16986 S.W. Brasada Ranch Road (off Alfalfa Road), Powell Butte Hours: 5 p.m.-close Tuesday to Saturday. (Ranch House open for three meals daily.) Price range: Appetizers $12 to $18, entrees $29 to $42. (Ranch House breakfast $7 to $12, lunch $7 to $15.) Credit cards: American Express, Discover, MasterCard, Visa Children’s menu: Yes Vegetarian menu: Changing menu features salads and vegetarian entrees Alcoholic beverages: Full bar Outdoor seating: Extensive deck seats three dozen guests,

By John Gottberg Anderson For The Bulletin

I

t’s time to add Range at Brasada Ranch to your list of the top restaurants in Central Oregon. By any measure — quality cuisine, efficient and attentive service, romantic atmosphere — the finedining restaurant at this destination resort, on the southwest flank of Powell Butte, more than holds its own against any in Bend or its neighboring communities. A lion’s share of the credit goes to executive chef Adrian Carpenter, who moved to Bend a year ago from Aspen, Colo., and set to work building a restaurant already the envy of many resorts with a much longer history than Brasada. Carpenter and his wife, Susan — who runs the front of the house at

Range and manages the casual-dining cafe in the resort’s nearby Ranch House — came to Oregon with a broad range of experience throughout the West. A few years back, in fact, they were partners in the Dogwood Grill, honored as Aspen’s “best new restaurant” in 2006 by Aspen Magazine. Immediately prior to moving to Brasada, Adrian was sous chef at the Little Nell, a famed hotel at the foot of Aspen’s ski slopes. He also worked in Arizona, Montana and California, and his mentors included renowned chefs Charles Dale and Traci des Jardins. The move to Central Oregon offered an opportunity to better pursue his interest in farm-to-table cuisine. “We have a great pool of products coming from the Pacific Northwest,”

Wide-ranging menu The relationships Adrian Carpenter has built with regional providers are evident in the ever-changing menu Range offers. Much produce comes from Windflower Farms in Alfalfa, just down the road from Brasada. Wild-game charcuterie is smoked in-house. Eggs and cheese are local products. And Carpenter uses everything from goat to pheasant to stinging nettles in his recipes. When my dining companion and I visited for dinner recently, we sampled a wide range of fare. Continued next page

with fire pit beyond Reservations: Highly recommended Contact: www.brasada.com/ dining, 541-526-6865 or 866373-4882

Scorecard OVERALL: AFood: A-. Adventurous and finely executed menu of gourmet cuisine. Service: A. Polished and professional, from table service to wine selection. Atmosphere: A. Unquestionably romantic, with a distant view of the Cascades. Value: B+. Plan to visit for a special occasion; this is not an inexpensive meal.


restaurants

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JUNE 8, 2012

From previous page And while it would be impossible to say that everything was perfect — each of us had particular likes and dislikes — the creativity and execution of the menu has left us looking forward to a return visit. An amuse bouche featured a chilled spoonful of truffle-flavored cauliflower panicotta topped with minced porcini mushrooms. Organic chicken-liver pate was remarkably soft and velvety. It was served with long slices of lightly grilled bread, sweet apricot preserves and tart grain mustard. A “butcher’s board” offered several choices of charcuterie, the best of which were house-smoked venison sausage and hand-mixed duck rillettes. Seared albacore tuna didn’t have as delicate a flavor as we might have hoped; it was dusted a little too heavily with smoked paprika, and was overpowered by a jellied sour orange. Shaved serrano chilies and miners’ lettuce were nice complements, however.

More meal choices A hearty teff-flour crepe was Carpenter’s version of an Ethiopian vegetarian recipe that he learned from winter visitors. Buckwheat pancakes were sandwiched around morel mushrooms and fava beans and dressed with balsamic vinegar. The pancakes were topped with red cabbage; I thought they could have used something more, like sour cream. Gnocchi-like gnudi dumplings, made with stinging nettles, were another hearty dish. They were filled with the tender meat of young goat, braised in red wine, and presented with large porcini mushrooms and ricotta cheese. This was an unusual and delicious dish. Wonderful as well was a soup of spinach and French sorrel, pureed in a potato-and-leek base. It was offered with a brioche, Redmond’s Juniper Grove chevre cheese and a mix of potatoes with crunchy hazelnuts. A wild arugula salad was fresh and well balanced, served with sweet strawberries and golden beets, tart Crater Lake bleu cheese, Marcona almonds and vinaigrette dressing. A rib and shoulder of lamb, cooked medium rare, were laid upon a bed of creamy polenta. A garlicky ratatouille of spring vegetables was a fine side, along with baby artichoke hearts. The most adventurous entree, certainly, was a “game bird trio” of duck, quail and pheasant. The latter bird, presented finely chopped in a consomme with faro (a grain) and minced vegetables, was not exceptional; the other two were wonderful indeed. The duck breast was cooked rare and served with a mash of sweet on-

GO! MAGAZINE •

PAGE 21

Local Service. Local Knowledge. 541-848-4444

Care for loved ones. Comfort for all. 541-389-0006 www.evergreeninhome.com

1000 SW Disk Dr. • Bend www.highdesertbank.com

EQUAL HOUSING LENDER

Mongolian Grill - Seafood - Sushi - Salad - Dessert

ALL YOU CAN EAT! C HINE SE • A ME R IC A N • JA PA NE SE

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

The stinging nettle gnudi at the Range Restaurant & Bar at Brasada Ranch in Powell Butte.

5.99

Dinner Buy 1, Get 1 Buffet FREE!

With coupon. Expires 7/15/12. Not valid on June 17. Coupon can be used with up to 4 people. Monday - Friday only.

REG. $11.99. Mon.-Sat. after 4pm. Sunday all day. Not valid on June 17. With purchase of 2 beverages. With coupon. Expires 7/15/12.

Lunch $ Buffet

NO MSG

2000 NE 3rd • Bend (behind NE 3rd McDonalds) • (541) 388-2988

Next week: Bend-O Bento Visit www.bendbulletin.com/ restaurants for readers’ ratings of more than 150 Central Oregon restaurants.

ions and a tangy rhubarb chutney. Even better was the quail, stuffed with Peruvian quinoa and Medjool dates, and served with a pistachio sauce that set off the flavor perfectly.

Outstanding service Throughout our meal, from the moment we were greeted and seated, service was outstanding. Hostess Susan Carpenter, a polished restaurant professional, assisted with pairings of wines primarily from West Coast vineyards, while our server was personable and attentive in taking and delivering our orders in a timely fashion. The Range occupies a spacious, high-ceilinged building that was constructed in rustic style just a couple of years ago. It offers an unquestionably romantic mood for dining, especially in summer when diners can watch the sun disappearing over the volcanic peaks of the Cascade Mountains. When we dined, it was a little too cool to take advantage of a broad flagstone patio, but numerous other guests gathered after dinner around a large fire pit and roasted s’mores in lieu of dessert. Many Range diners make arrangements to overnight at Brasada Ranch, thus avoiding a dark 25-minute return drive to Bend. Those who do often plan breakfast the following morning at the Ranch House. But after our outstanding dinner at Range, we were less than impressed by the next day’s first meal, which we ordered at a counter before it was delivered.

My “skillet” was not much different from my companion’s frittata. Both egg dishes, unevenly cooked, were carried to our table in cast-iron skillets. We were never offered condiments nor toast for our meals. We had to flag down a server to get refills on our coffee. The best part of the meal was a fruit bowl that we shared, containing cantaloupe and honeydew melon, strawberries, blueberries and pineapple. However, the view of the Cascades, now illuminated by the morning sun, was the same as it had been the previous night at the Range. And that was enough to bring smiles to our faces.

Spring Meat Packages $

8500

Spring Variety Pack 2 2 2 2 2

pounds pounds pounds pounds pounds

Ground Italian Sausage (Sweet or Hot) Ground Breakfast Sausage (Sage or Maple) Smoked Link Sausage (Kielbasa or Andouille) Wagyu Ground Beef • 2 pounds Smoked BBQ Pork Smoked Ham Hocks • 1 pound Smoked Bacon $

7500

Grill Pack

4 3/4” Pork Loin Chops (Bone In) • 4 Jumbo Wagyu Beef Hot Dogs 4 Fresh Bratwursts • 2 pounds Wagyu Ground Beef 2 pounds Smoked BBQ Pork • 1 pound Smoked Bacon

— Reporter: janderson@ bendbulletin.com

SMALL BITES The Pastrami Old World Deli opened last week for First Friday. Owner Kryste Adams has established the New York-style Jewish deli in the former location of the Letzer’s Deli satellite shop, next to Remax Key Properties. The deli serves soup, salads and sandwiches from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. every day but Sunday. 431 N.W. Franklin Ave., Suite 150, Bend; 541-706-1556, www.facebook.com/pastramideli. Baldy’s Barbeque has announced plans to open a full-service restaurant in the Forum Shopping Center on Bend’s east side by July 1. Owner Brian Dioguardi, who also has locations on Bend’s west side and in Redmond, said he would close his takeout counter at the Shop ’n’ Go Shell station (2699 N.E. Greenwood Ave.) and move into the former Yoko’s Restaurant, next door to the original location of Hola! The new Baldy’s will serve breakfast as well as lunch and dinner. A $10,000 remodeling project is under way. 2670 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Suite 720, Bend; 541-388-4227, www.baldysbbq.com.

541-330-6328 • 63595 Hunnell Road • Bend, Oregon 97701

Kayo’s Comedy & Blues Lounge The Charles Button Band Saturday June 9th 9:00 pm - 11:00 pm Doors Open at 8pm

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EAT | DRINK | LAUGH 415 N Hwy 97 • Bend 541-323-2520 facebook.com/KayosClub


PAGE 22 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JUNE 8, 2012

out of town The following is a list of other events “Out of Town.”

Oregon Zoo concerts Summer lineup

June 22 — The B-52s; $33-$53 June 24 — Jimmy Cliff; $28-$48 June 29 — Leo Kottke/ Jake Shimabukuro; $24-$44 July 1 — k.d. lang and the Siss Boom Bang; $38.50-$58.50 July 19 — Grace Potter and the Nocturnals; $22-$42 July 20 — The Head and The Heart; $20-$40 July 22 — Ziggy Marley; $28-$48 Aug. 4 — Johny Clegg Band/Ladysmith Black Mambazo; $28-$48 Aug. 10 — Supertramp’s Roger Hodgson; $28-$48 Aug. 11 — Melissa Etheridge; $39.50$59.50 Aug. 17 — Buddy Guy/ Jonny Lang; $34-$54 Aug. 18-19 — Pink Martini; $34-$54 Aug. 24 — Trombone Shorty and Orleans Avenue/Robert Randolph and the Family Band; $24-$44 Aug. 26 — Rosanne Cash/Madeleine Peyroux; $26-$46 Sept. 14 — Chicago; $38-$58

‘Sunsets at the Zoo’ July 11 — Laura Veirs July 25 — Portland Cello Project Aug. 8 — Y La Bamba Aug. 22 — Thomas Mapfumo

Submitted photo

The B-52s will perform June 22 at the Oregon Zoo in Portland.

• B-52s kick off longtime series in Portland By Jenny Wasson The Bulletin

H

ave you ever been to the zoo and all the animals are sleepy and sluggish from the heat? Well, the Oregon Zoo is offering numerous opportunities this summer to see its animals in a new light: at sunset. Located in Portland, the zoo kicks off its summer concert series June 22 with The B-52s. Along with sweet tunes, the series allows patrons to observe animals at dusk, when some are more active. Since 1979, the Oregon Zoo has hosted bands from every genre during the summer months. This year’s highlights include Jimmy Cliff, Grace Potter and the Nocturnals, Pink Martini, Rosanne Cash and Chicago. See the full lineup at left. “We’re making an Oregon summer tradition even better this year,” said Kim Smith, zoo director, in a news release.

“Warm evenings in Portland are meant to be spent outside with good food and friends — and if you’re listening to amazing music on the zoo concert lawn, that’s a perfect recipe for summer fun.” Tickets for the summer concerts are currently on sale. Shows begin at 7 p.m. Ticket holders can enter the zoo at 4 p.m., allowing time to explore the zoo grounds. During concerts, there will be more options for food and beverages. The zoo is also presenting a new “Sunsets at the Zoo” series. Happening every other Wednesday in July and August, the event features live music by local bands, activities and regional food, beer and wine. “Sunsets at the Zoo” are free with zoo admission. For more information, visit www.oregonzoo.org or call 503-226-1561. — Reporter: 541-383-0350, jwasson@bendbulletin.com

CONCERTS June 8 — Dan Hicks and the Hot Licks, The Shedd Institute, Eugene; www. theshedd.org or 541-434-7000. June 8 — Showtek (Live), Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* June 9 — Dan Hicks and the Hot Licks, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* June 10 — Thrice, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TF* June 11 — Primus, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www.brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. June 11 — Tinariwen, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* June 11 — The Used, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* June 12 — Dan Hicks and the Hot Licks, Diamond Hitch Mule Ranch, Kimberly; www.mulesacrossamerica. com or 541-934-2140. June 12 — Primus, Cuthbert Amphitheater, Eugene; TW* June 14 — Tribal Seeds, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TF* June 15 — Melissa Etheridge/Maia Sharp, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www. brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. June 16 — Collective Soul, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* June 16 — Dandy Warhols, Doug Fir Lounge, Portland; TF* June 16 — Tedeschi Trucks Band, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www.brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. June 17 — John Fogerty, McMenamins Edgefield, Troutdale; CT* June 17 — KIN — Rodney Crowell and Mary Karr, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* June 17 — Tedeschi Trucks Band, Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; TM* June 17 — The Temper Trap, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* June 19 — Spectrum Road, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* June 21 — Jonathan Coulton, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* June 21 — Nickelback, Rose Garden, Portland; www.rosequarter.com or 877-789-7673. June 22 — Bush, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www.brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. June 23 — Farmer Jason, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www.brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. June 24 — Natalie Merchant with the Rogue Valley Symphony, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www.brittfest.org or 800-882-7488.

June 27 — Foster the People, McMenamins Edgefield, Troutdale; SOLD OUT; CT* June 27 — Leftover Salmon/ Brokedown in Bakersfield, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www.brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. June 27 — Tommy Emmanuel, McDonald Theatre, Eugene; TW* June 28 — Jake Shimabukuro/Leo Kottke, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www.brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. June 29 — The Crystal Method/Chris Lake/SOFI, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www.brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. June 30 — Trace Adkins, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www.brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. July 1 — Katchafire/J Boog, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www.brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. July 1 — Pink Martini/Storm Large, Cuthbert Amphitheater, Eugene; TW* July 3 — Ben Harper, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www.brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. July 3 — Justin Townes Earle, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* July 5 — Ben Harper, McMenamins Edgefield, Troutdale; CT* July 5 — An Evening with Dukes of September Rhythm Revue: Featuring Donald Fagen, Michael McDonald and Boz Scaggs; Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www.brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. July 6 — Vagabond Opera, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TF* July 13 — Kris Kristofferson, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www.brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. July 13 — Lyle Lovett, Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; TM* July 13 — Marina & The Diamonds, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* July 13-15 — Oregon Country Fair, Veneta; TW* July 14 — The Beach Boys, Cuthbert Amphitheater, Eugene; TW* July 14 — Tommy Emmanuel, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www.brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. July 15 — Ringo Starr & His All Starr Band, McMenamins Edgefield, Troutdale; CT* July 19 — John Mayall, The Shedd Institute, Eugene; www.theshedd.org or 541-434-7000. July 19-22 — The String Cheese Incident, Horning’s Hideout, North Plains; SOLD OUT; TM* July 21 — Earth, Wind & Fire, Maryhill Winery, Goldendale, Wash.; www. maryhillwinery.com or 877-627-9445. July 22 — Florence + The Machine, McMenamins Edgefield, Troutdale; SOLD OUT; CT*


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JUNE 8, 2012

July 23 — Earth, Wind & Fire, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www. brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. July 25 — Dirty Projectors, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; CT* July 25 — Emmylou Harris & Her Red Dirt Boys and Steve Martin & Steep Canyon Rangers, Cuthbert Amphitheater, Eugene; TW* July 26 — Emmylou Harris & Her Red Dirt Boys and Steve Martin & Steep Canyon Rangers, McMenamins Edgefield, Troutdale; SOLD OUT; CT* July 26 — Fiona Apple, Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; TM* July 26 — Ziggy Marley, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www. brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. July 27 — Steve Martin & Steep Canyon Rangers, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www.brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. July 28 — Beats Antique/ Inspired Flight, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www.brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. July 28 — Chris Isaak, Maryhill Winery, Goldendale, Wash.; www.maryhillwinery.com or 877-627-9445. July 31 — An Evening with Yanni, Cuthbert Amphitheater, Eugene; TW* Aug. 3 — An Evening with Yanni, Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; TM* Aug. 3 — Hot Tuna, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Aug. 3-5 — Oregon Jamboree: Lineup includes Rascal Flatts, Dierks Bentley and Wynonna & the Big Noise; Sweet Home; www.oregonjamboree.com or 888-613-6812. Aug. 3-5 — Pickathon: Lineup includes Neko Case, Dr. Dog, Blitzen Trapper and the Bruce Molsky Bands; Pendarvis Farm, Happy Valley; www.pickathon.com. Aug. 5 — Alison Krauss & Union Station, Maryhill Winery, Goldendale, Wash.; www.maryhillwinery.com or 877-627-9445. Aug. 5 — Warped Tour, Rose Quarter Riverfront, Portland; TW* Aug. 7-11 — Oregon Festival of American Music: Entitled “Le Jazz Hot: America in Paris, 1919-39,” the festival focuses on the rich mix of music from the Americas that filled the cultural scene in Paris; www.theshedd.org or 541-434-7000. Aug. 9 — Kaskade, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* Aug. 9 — Sigur Ros, McMenamins Edgefield, Troutdale; SOLD OUT; CT*

*Tickets TM: Ticketmaster, www .ticketmaster.com or 800745-3000 TW: TicketsWest, www .ticketswest.com or 800992-8499 TF: Ticketfly, www.ticket fly.com or 877-435-9489 CT: Cascade Tickets, www .cascadetickets.com or 800-514-3849 Aug. 9-12 — Northwest String Summit: Lineup includes Yonder Mountain String Band, Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe, New Riders of the Purple Sage, Darol Anger and the Furies and Deadly Gentlemen; Horning’s Hideout, North Plains; www.stringsummit. com. Aug. 14 — Buddy Guy/Jonny Lang, Cuthbert Amphitheater, Eugene; TW* Aug. 17 — Norah Jones, McMenamins Edgefield, Troutdale; SOLD OUT; CT* Aug. 17-19 — Willamette Country Music Festival: Lineup includes Rodney Atkins, Sugarland, Martina McBride, The Band Perry and Trace Adkins; Brownsville; www. willamettecountrymusicfestival. com or 541-345-9263. Aug. 21 — Michael Franti & Spearhead, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www.brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. Aug. 23 — fun., Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www.brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. Aug. 23 — Michael Franti & Spearhead/Trombone Shorty, Cuthbert Amphitheater, Eugene; TW* Aug. 24 — The Avett Brothers, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www. brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. Aug. 24 — fun., Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; TM* Aug. 25-26 — The Avett Brothers, McMenamins Edgefield, Troutdale; CT* Aug. 26 — Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue/Ozomatli, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www. brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. Aug. 31 — Brandi Carlile, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www. brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. Aug. 31 — Diana Krall, Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; TM* Sept. 2 — Amon Tobin, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* Sept. 5 — Bonnie Raitt, Cuthbert Amphitheater, Eugene; TW* Sept. 6 — Slightly Stoopid, Britt

out of town Pavilion, Jacksonville; www. brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. Sept. 7 — Bonnie Raitt, McMenamins Edgefield, Troutdale; TW* Sept. 11 — Crosby, Stills & Nash, Cuthbert Amphitheater, Eugene; TW* Sept. 11 — Heart, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www.brittfest.org or 800-882-7488.

LECTURES & COMEDY June 16 — Garrison Keillor, Cuthbert Amphitheater, Eugene; TW* June 16 — Jane Lynch, Newmark Theatre, Portland; TM*

SYMPHONY & OPERA June 25-July 29 — Summer Festival: Featuring André Watts, the Emerson Quartet, Time for Three and Edgar Meyer; presented by Chamber Music Northwest; various locations in Portland; www.cmnw.org or 503-294-6400. June 29-July 15 — Oregon Bach Festival: Featuring Joshua Bell, Guy Few, Nadina Mackie Jackson, John Scott and The 5 Browns; various locations in

Eugene and around Oregon; www.oregonbachfestival.com or 800-457-1486. July 19 — Black & White Gala/ Michael Kaeshammer: Celebrate 50 years of the Britt Festival; Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www. brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. Aug. 3 — Gala 50th Opening/ Sarah Chang/Britt Orchestra, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www. brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. Aug. 4 — Anton Nel/Britt Orchestra, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www.brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. Aug. 10 — André Watts/Britt Orchestra, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www.brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. Aug. 11 — Nurit Bar-Josef/ Britt Orchestra, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www.brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. Aug. 12 — Calder Quartet, Southern Oregon University, Ashland; www.brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. Aug. 17 — Westwater Photochoreography/Sara Daneshpour/Britt Orchestra, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www. brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. Aug. 18 — Symphony Pops/ Britt Orchestra, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www.brittfest.org or 800-882-7488.

GO! MAGAZINE •

Aug. 19 — Farewell Concert/ Alisa Weilerstein/Britt Orchestra, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www.brittfest.org or 800-882-7488.

THEATER & DANCE Through June 17 — “Black Pearl Sings!”: Play by Frank Higgins; featuring a cappella renditions of little-known American folk songs; Portland Center Stage; Gerding Theater at the Armory, Portland; www.pcs.org or 503-445-3700. Through June 22 — Oregon Shakespeare Festival: “Seagull” (through June 22) and “Troilus and Cressida” (through Nov. 4) are currently running in the New Theatre. “The White Snake” (through July 8), “Medea/Macbeth/ Cinderella” (through Nov. 3), “Animal Crackers” (through Nov. 4) and “Romeo and Juliet” (through Nov. 4) are currently in production at the Angus Bowmer Theatre; Ashland; www.osfashland.org or 800-219-8161. Through June 24 — “It Ain’t Nothin’ but the Blues”: A stirring retrospective of blues classics; Portland Center Stage; Gerding Theater at the Armory, Portland; www.pcs.org or 503-445-3700.

Continued next page

PAGE 23


541.943.3931 Tickets: bendticket.com

Information: coyotemusicfestival.com

5th Annual Coyote Music Festival

June 15, 16 & 17 2012

Summer Lake Hot Springs; Paisley, OR

PAGE 24 • GO! MAGAZINE From previous page June 9 — “Dance United”: Oregon Ballet Theatre; Keller Auditorium, Portland; www.obt.org or 888-922-5538. June 14-17 — “Sweet Charity”: 1966 smash hit musical comedy by Neil Simon; part of the 2012 Shedd Theatricals season; The Shedd Institute, Eugene; www.theshedd. org or 541-434-7000. July 18-Aug. 12 — “Jersey Boys,” Keller Auditorium, Portland; TM* July 26-29 — JAW: A Playwrights Festival: Featuring six new plays drawn from a national search; Gerding Theator at the Armory, Portland; www.pcs.org or 503-445-3700.

EXHIBITS Through June — Museum of Natural and Cultural History: The following exhibits are on display: “We are Still Here — Gordon Bettles and the Many Nations Longhouse” (through June), “The Art of Nature by Becky Uhler” (through June 24) and “Out in Space, Back in Time: Images from the Hubble Telescope” (through Feb. 2013); Eugene; natural-history. uoregon.edu or 541-346-3024. Through June 2 — 47th Annual Shell Show, Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, Portland; www.omsi.edu or 800-955-6674.

LIMIT ONE COUPON PER PERSON PER VISIT • COUPON EXPIRES 6/12/12 Call for reservations, location & times: 541.783.7529 ext.209

out of town Through June 17 — Portland Art Museum: The following exhibits are currently on display: “Emerging: New Photography Acquisitions” (through June 17), “Figure Writing Reflected in Mirror” (through Sept. 2), “5 Monets/100 Days” (through Aug. 5) and “Cornerstones of a Great Civilization: Masterworks of Ancient Chinese Art” (through Nov. 11); Portland; www. portlandartmuseum.org or 503-226-2811. Through June 18 — Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art: The following exhibits are on display: “Visions of the Orient: Western Women Artists in Asia, 1900-1940” (through June 18) and “Russel Wong: The Big Picture” (through Aug. 19); Eugene; jsma.uoregon. edu or 541-346-3027. Through June 24 — “The Wonder of Learning”: Exhibit explores the creative, intellectual and social capacity of children; Portland Children’s Museum, Portland; www.portlandcm.org or 503-223-6500. Through June 26 — “Interpretations: Working in a Series”: Presented by the High Desert Art League of Bend; Elsinore Framing & Fine Art, Salem; 503-581-4642. Through July 1 — OMSI Film Festival: Featuring 28 films; Oregon Museum of Science and

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JUNE 8, 2012

Kelly/Prints”: Featuring more than 80 prints by the American artist Ellsworth Kelly; Portland Art Museum, Portland; www. portlandartmuseum.org or 503-226-2811. June 22-24 — Summer Arts Festival, Fir Grove Park, Roseburg; www.uvarts.com or 541-672-2532. July 1-Sept. 9 — “Tough by Nature: Portraits of Cowgirls and Ranch Women of the American West”: Featuring works by artist Lynda Lanker; Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art, University of Oregon, Eugene; jsma.uoregon.edu or 541-346-3027. Courtesy Michael Wilson

Do u b le bassist Edgar Meyer is one of the guest artists at the 42nd annual Summer Festival. Presented by Chamber Music Northwest, the classical music festival runs June 25-July 29 at various locations in Portland. Industry, Portland; www.omsi.edu or 503-797-4640. Through July 22 — “Focus on Nature: Wildcats of the World”: Featuring works by Rochelle Mason and Linda DuPuis-Rosen; World Forestry Center Discovery Museum, Portland; www.worldforestry.org or 503-228-1367. Through July 28 — “Generations: Betty Feves”: A retrospective exhibit on the works of Betty Feves; Museum of Contemporary Craft: Portland; www. museumofcontemporarycraft.org or 503-223-2654. Through July 29 — Oregon Museum of Science and Industry: The following exhibits are currently on display: “Ocean Soul” (through July 29) and “Wild Minds: What Animals Really Think” (through Aug. 19); Portland; www.omsi.edu or 800-955-6674. Through August — “Sense-ational Summer: Perceiving the World Around Us,” The Science Factory, Eugene; www.sciencefactory.org or 541-682-7888. Through Sept. 3 — “Nature Unleashed: Inside Natural Disasters”: New interactive exhibition takes a look at natural disasters; Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, Portland; www.omsi.edu or 800-955-6674. Through Oct. 7 — “Outdoor Sculpture Exhibition: Featuring works by Pacific Northwest sculptors; Maryhill Museum of Art, Goldendale, Wash.; www.maryhillmuseum.org or 509-773-3733. Through Nov. 15 — Maryhill Museum of Art: The following exhibits are currently on display: “British Painting from the Permanent Collection” (through Nov. 15) and “Ceramics from the Permanent Collection” (through

Nov. 15); Goldendale, Wash.; www.maryhillmuseum.org or 509-773-3733. Through Dec. 2013 — “The Sea & Me”: A new children’s interactive exhibit; Oregon Coast Aquarium, Newport; www.aquarium.org or 541-867-3474. June 8 — World Ocean Day, Oregon Coast Aquarium, Newport; www.aquarium.org or 541-867-3474. June 9 — Bowling for Rhinos, Sunset Lanes, Beaverton; 503-2261561 or www.oregonzoo.org. June 9-Sept. 3 — “The Subject is Light: The Henry and Sharon Martin Collection of Contemporary Realist Paintings”: Featuring 23 paintings by living artists of Cape Cod; Maryhill Museum of Art, Goldendale, Wash.; www.maryhillmuseum.org or 509-773-3733. June 10 — Safari Benefit Dance: Fundraiser features square dance and raffle; Wildlife Safari, Winston; 541-839-4301. June 16 — Eugene Mini Maker Fair: A family-friendly showcase of invention, creativity and resourcefulness; Science Factory, Eugene; www.sciencefactory.org or 541-682-7888. June 16 — Isham Historic Family Recognition, Brooks Historical Society, Brooks; www. oregonpioneers.com/marion/ brookshistoricalsociety or 503-390-0698. June 16-Sept. 16 — “California Impressionism: Selections from The Irvine Museum”: Featuring works by California artists from the late 19th and early 20th centuries; Portland Art Museum, Portland; www.portlandartmuseum.org or 503-226-2811. June 16-Sept. 16 — “Ellsworth

July 20-22 — Salem Art Fair & Festival: Features more than 200 artists and craftspeople, live music and activities; Salem; www. salemart.org. Aug. 4-Dec. 31 — “Timberrr! A Nostalgic Look Back at Working in the Woods”: Featuring vintage photographs and rare motion picture films; World Forestry Center Discovery Museum, Portland; www.worldforestry.org or 503-228-1367. Aug. 7-Feb. 16 — “Reflecting on Eric Gronborg”: Works employ archetypes of functional ceramic traditions as conceptual vehicles to explore contemporary culture; Museum of Contemporary Craft: Portland; www. museumofcontemporarycraft.org or 503-223-2654. Aug. 17-Jan. 5 — “Design with the Other 90%: Cities”: Exhibit explores design solutions that address the challenges created by rapid urban growth in informal settlements; Museum of Contemporary Craft: Portland; www. museumofcontemporarycraft.org or 503-223-2654.

MISCELLANY June 9 — Taste of Summer, Jacksonville; www.brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. June 23 — Elgin Stampeders Annual Train Robbery, Wallowa Union Scenic Railway, Elgin; www.eaglecaptrain.com or 800-323-7330. June 30-July 1 — The Oregon Green Expo, Jackson County Fairgrounds, Central Point; www. theoregongreenexpo.com or 541-773-8200. June 30-July 1 — Pacific Northwest Juggling Convention, Oregon State University, Corvallis; pnwjc.blogspot.com. July 21-22 — Lavender DAZE Festival, Hood River Lavender Farms, Odell; www.lavenderfarms. net or 888-528-3276.


GO! MAGAZINE •

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JUNE 8, 2012

PAGE 25

gaming

The devil is in the details • ‘Diablo III’ sets a new watermark for action role-playing games

TOP 10 ACROSS THE BOARD The editors of Game Informer Magazine rank the top games for June: 1. “Max Payne 3” (PS3, X360) 2. “Diablo III” (PC) 3. “Minecraft Xbox 360 Edition” (X360) 4. “Awesomenauts” (X360)

By Adam Biessener Game Informer Magazine

N

o game in my memory has inspired such passions between announcement and release as “Diablo III.” The follow-up to one of the most popular PC games of all time was destined for a historic level of scrutiny to begin with, and one controversial decision by Blizzard after another poured jet fuel on the already blazing bonfires of fan anticipation and outrage. Five minutes with the final game is enough to settle the question of whether the art style is too kittens-and-rainbows for a gothic McClatchy-Tribune News Service horror-themed game (it’s not). The “Diablo III” is a fitting addition to one of gaming’s most celebrated franchises. auction house, radical skill system redesign and always-online requirements are much more seri- torch well and sets a new standard. made joining up with friends or ‘DIABLO III’ ous threats to “Diablo III’s” appeal. The story is finally respectable random Internet people so effort9 (out of 10) The ultimate tally comes out well even if it’s not BioWare-caliber, less. Without saying a word, I’ve in Blizzard’s favor, but not without and much better integrated into the teamed up with buddies using the reservations. gameplay. Combat is still the heart quick-join or one-click invite funcPC The first five days after launch and soul of the game, and hits all tionality. We naturally start using Blizzard Entertainment were rocky for would-be heroes as the notes fans expect. Skills that our skills to build off of each other, ESRB rating: M for Mature server problems, extended emer- would be laughably overpowered tackling enemies that would be gency maintenance, and bouts in any other game start unlocking difficult or impossible alone even of crippling lag rendered “Dia- before level 10, and they’re not just without the significant boosts monblo III” unplayable during peak ultimate attacks — many are what tirely), would severely limit one of sters get in multiplayer games. hours — exactly what fans pass for regular attacks in the foremost joys of “Diablo III:” “Diablo III’s” combat is the REVIEW “Diablo III”. had feared would hapexperimenting with new skills and best the genre has ever seen. The pen after less-than-stellar “Cleave,” for example, is runes and the tactics they allow. loot game, on the other hand, is results from pre-release a basic barbarian skill that Don’t expect to spam one skill brought down by the presence of stress tests. The issues baffled hits everything in an arc in front of over and over and win with any the auction house and uninspired many, since Blizzard managed the you like a truck. Not only does it regularity. The most impressive itemization and stat design. Sets launches of the last two “World of build fury to spend on even more aspect of “Diablo III” is how its en- and legendary items are almost Warcraft” expansions with very powerful attacks, the secondary ef- emy design forces players just far entirely restricted to the level-cap few issues. Players who prefer to fects added onto it via the rune sys- enough out of their comfort zone to game, which removes one of the confront hell’s minions alone were tem make it even better. My favor- make them think on their feet with- better hooks from the first 40 hours rightfully furious that Blizzard’s ite, “Rupture,” makes slain enemies out completely screwing over any you play any given character. decision to remove traditional of- explode for even more damage and one build or archetype. Regular “Diablo III” is a great game, and fline single-player from the game leads to occasional hilarious chain monsters employ dozens of varia- every bit the landmark achievelocked them out of the game they reactions of demons popping off tions on ranged attacks, nasty me- ment in the genre that everyone had dropped $60 on. As of this like fireworks across the whole lee strikes, teleports, buffs, debuffs, expected out of Blizzard. The writing one week after launch, the screen. and zones of death on the ground. presentation and combat are secservers have been rock-solid for The ability to re-specialize your Mini-bosses come with randomly ond to none, and the co-op focus two days and the rough start will character with no restriction or generated special abilities, like is well executed and a natural hopefully be forgotten, but play- cost still divides the “Diablo” com- vortex monsters who suck you into fit for the genre. Whether or not ers with no interest in multiplayer munity, but I wouldn’t have it any melee, mortar foes who passively you stick with the game for the have every right to be angry at any other way. Part of the genius of the launch devastating fireballs, and long term through “Inferno” difserver outage. system is tied to the enormous vari- frozen enemies and their deadly ficulty, I can’t imagine the gamer Server problems aside, “Diablo ety of skills within each of the five frost mines. that wouldn’t have a great time III” is an excellent action/role-play- classes. Having to pay (or, heaven I’ve never played a game that with “Diablo III” for a trip or two ing game that carries the genre’s forbid, start a new character en- encouraged co-op so strongly and through the story.

5. “Dragon’s Dogma” (PS3, X360) 6. “Tribes: Ascend” (PC) 7. “The Walking Dead” (PS3, X360, PC) 8. “Botanicula” (PC) 9. “Prototype 2” (PS3, X360, PC) 10. “Gravity Rush” (Vita) McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Gaming gadgets SAFEGUARD YOUR DEVICES FROM WATER DAMAGE Dry Corp’s DryCASE ($39.99) promises protection for your cellphone, camera or MP3 player in up to 100 feet of water. Once you slip your device into the see-through plastic bag, you lock the pair of clamps at the top of the case to close it. Then you take the air out of the case with the included pump, put on the safety cap and let it sit a recommended 10 minutes to complete the vacuum seal. After the air is removed, the seal keeps your device and any touchscreen controls or buttons fully accessible. Details: www.drycase.com The G-Project G-Go wireless Bluetooth speaker from Life Lab International is water-resistant and makes a great poolside addition. Four AA batteries are all you need to power the portable device. Since it is water-resistant, no need worry when an afternoon thunderstorm hits while relaxing at the beach. A set of fresh batteries can give you up to 8 hours of listening but that can vary depending on your volume levels. It has a carrying handle so you can take it where you want; you can hang it on a fence even or even take your tunes in the shower. Details: www.enterg-project. com $69.99 — Gregg Ellman, McClatchy-Tribune News Service


PAGE 26 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JUNE 8, 2012

movies

Ke rry Brown / 20th Century Fox / The Associated Press

Loga n Marshall- G reen, left, N o o m i R a p a c e and Michael Fassbender explore an alien world in “Prometheus.”

A gorgeous, intense trip • ‘Prometheus’ will leave audiences breathless and filled with questions

R

idley Scott’s “Prometheus” is a magnificent science fiction film, all the more intriguing because it raises questions about the origin of human life and doesn’t have the answers. It’s in the classic tradition of golden age sci-fi, echoing Scott’s “Alien,” but creating a world of its own. I’m a pushover for material like this; it’s a seamless blend of story, special effects and pitch-perfect casting, filmed in sane, effective 3-D that doesn’t distract. A scene at the outset shows a world with apparently only one animal being, a pale humanoid who

stalks a high ridge surrounded by spectacular scenery. This person eats something that causes painful vomiting and quick body decay. The vomit is followed into flowing water, where it seems to morph into living cellular structures. Where is this place? Is it Earth? Who is the being, and why alone and naked? Is the scene a visualization of the theory that life first arrived on Earth from outer space? Cut to a human spaceship in the year 2093, qualifying “Prometheus” for a flash-forward spanning more years than the opening of “2001.” The trillion-dollar ship

Prometheus is en route to a distant world that seems pointed to in prehistoric cave paintings. There’s reason to believe human life may have originated there. It’s an Earth-sized moon orbiting a giant planet, and at first it seems a disappointment: no growing things, unbreathable atmosphere. But the crew notices straight lines on the surface, and as we all know, nature makes no straight lines. The lines lead to a vast dome or pyramid, and the film will mostly take place inside the dome and the Prometheus. But let’s put the plot on hold and introduce two of the crew

ROGER EBERT

“Prometheus” 124 minutes R, for sci-fi violence including some intense images, and brief language

members: Elizabeth Shaw (Noomi Rapace) wears a cross around her neck and believes life ultimately had a divine origin. Her boyfriend, Charlie Holloway (Logan Mar-

shall-Green), accuses her, a scientist, of dismissing centuries of Darwinism. What they find in the pyramid leaves the question open. Alien humanoids, found in suspended animation, incredibly have DNA that is a perfect match for our own. So they could somehow have brought life to Earth — but why? And from this moon where they slumber inside their pyramid, or from another planet around a distant star? Why did they stop here? What are they waiting for? The film then develops horror scenes comparable to “Alien,” although it depends more on action and weaponry than on “Alien’s” use of shadows and silence. Continued next page


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JUNE 8, 2012

movies

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PAGE 27

Jack Black is truly perfect in clever ‘Bernie’ I

would buy a used coffin from this man. In Richard Linklater’s droll comedy “Bernie,” Jack Black plays an East Texas funeral director named Bernie Tiede, and it is surely one of the best performances of the year. I had to forget what I knew about Black. He creates this character out of thin air, it’s like nothing he’s done before, and it proves that an actor can be a miraculous thing in the right role. Black is not a giant. He stands 5 foot 6. Yet the word for Bernie Tiede is “hovering.” He seems to hover above even those taller than him. He is solicitous, gentle, tactful. When Marjorie Nugent’s husband dies, he is the angel at her shoulder, creating the impression that no client has ever touched him quite so much as she. That’s a triumph because Marjorie (Shirley MacLaine) is the most disliked woman in Carthage. She was a real woman, and Bernie Tiede’s story is factual, based on a celebrated Texas Monthly article named “Midnight in the Garden of East Texas” by Skip Hollandsworth. The late Mr. Nugent, apparently a prince of a fellow, owned the local bank. Marjorie took over after his passing and started throwing loan applications into the wastebasket and otherwise offending the locals. Was it her money that attracted

Bernie Tiede? No one can say. Bernie was known and liked by almost everyone in town, sang in the church choir, served on charity boards, organized civic functions, provided a sympathetic shoulder. His origins were obscurely in Arkansas, but his manner was such that he got the job at the Carthage funeral home almost just by presenting himself. Among his many abilities was the tact to convince mourners he sincerely believed they had selected precisely the right coffin. Bernie’s courtship of Marjorie is a masterpiece of social delicacy. In the odd dance between the two, he never seems to want anything in particular. Not sex, certainly; there were those in Carthage who assumed Bernie was gay, and there were rumored to be a few who knew. Nor was he boldly after her money, although he suggested purchases which

in embellishing her lifestyle did nothing to diminish his. Surely Marjorie knew she was hated in the town, and surely she enjoyed being paid tribute; MacLaine allows the slightest of smiles to sometimes shine out from a fixed frown. They began to be seen around town, especially at the theatrical and artistic events Bernie supported and sometimes performed in. They shared such sublimated sexual experiences as holding hands while having simultaneous massages in a (respectable) local spa. There are flat-footed ways this story could have been told. Richard Linklater finds a tricky note difficult to define. “Bernie” never declares itself a comedy; often when we laugh we’re thinking, “I can’t believe I’m seeing this.” An unspoken compact grows

between Bernie and Marjorie in which neither one declares exactly what’s going on, but the fiction is maintained that Bernie believes her worthy of his kindest attentions, and she believes that at last a man has gotten her right. (Generally known spoiler.) But a relationship this problematic can’t last forever, and eventually Bernie shoots Marjorie four times in the back. And now Linklater surpasses himself. Bernie’s attempts to conceal the death are based on the ability of many good funeral directors to instinctively know what people really think about one another. In Marjorie’s case, no one liked her and she isn’t particularly missed. Bernie redoubles his local charities and continues to lead his accustomed lifestyle. Only a curious state’s attorney

named Danny Buck Davidson (Matthew McConaughey) eventually sniffs out something wrong, and even as he comes under suspicion, Bernie Tiede remains a man who knows exactly how to behave in difficult situations. Richard Linklater has made all kinds of movies, most of them very good. They have little else in common: He worked with Black in a completely different mode in “School of Rock” and has made such films as “Dazed and Confused,” “Before Sunrise,” “Waking Life” and “Me and Orson Welles.” Why did he make “Bernie”? I suspect he read the magazine article and knew it was a natural movie. Anyone could have seen that. His genius was to see Jack Black as Bernie Tiede.

From previous page For me the most spellbinding scenes involved the crew members exploring the passages and caverns inside the pyramid, obviously unvisited in aeons, and their experiences with some of the hibernating alien beings. One of the key members of the crew is David (Michael Fassbender), an android, who knows or can figure out more or less everything, even alien languages, and is sort of a walking, talking, utterly fearless HAL 9000.

The alien race in “Prometheus” shares a body characteristic that reminded me of “Alien” and countless films since: Elements can detach from them and enter into other bodies as hostile parasites. This leads to an astonishing sequence in which Elizabeth, alone on the ship, discovers she is pregnant with an alien Something, and somehow finds the will to control a robot surgery device that removes it. Her later showdown with a waning oxygen

supply shows equal resourcefulness; Noomi Rapace (“The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo”) continues here the tradition of awesome feminine strength begun by Sigourney Weaver in “Alien.” There is another strong woman on board, Meredith Vickers (Charlize Theron), who represents the corporation that privately financed the Prometheus. She treats the others like her employees, which they are, and believes she always speaks for

the company’s wishes. The ship’s captain, Janek (Idris Elba), makes no pretensions of scientific expertise like the others but is a no-nonsense, working pilot. Janek has the most interesting evolution in the film, from an irreverent hipster in his first scenes into a man with the ability to intuit the truth about what he’s seeing. The most tantalizing element of the film is how it plays with the role of these DNA twins of ours. Did they create life on Earth? The

possibility of two identical DNAs as a coincidence is unthinkable. Charlie digs at Elizabeth, suggesting their existence disproves her beliefs. Her obvious response: Where did they come from? This puzzle is embedded in an adventure film that has staggering visuals, expert horror, mind-challenging ideas and enough unanswered questions to prime the inevitable sequel.

ROGER EBERT

“Bernie” 98 minutes PG-13, for some violent images and brief strong language

Millennium Entertainment / The Associated Press

Shirley MacLaine portrays Marjorie Nugent, left, and Jack Black portrays the title role in “Bernie.”

— Roger Ebert is a film critic for The Chicago Sun-Times.

— Roger Ebert is a film critic for The Chicago Sun-Times.


PAGE 28 • GO! MAGAZINE

movies

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JUNE 8, 2012

ON LOCAL SCREENS Here’s what’s showing on Central Oregon movie screens. For showtimes, see listings on Page 31.

Reviews by Roger Ebert unless otherwise noted.

HEADS UP “But I’m a Cheerleader” — Megan (Natasha Lyonne) is a typical teenager coming of age in anything but typical fashion. Megan’s super normal suburban existence is filled with friends, pom-poms and rah-rah enthusiasm until her straight laced parents (Mink Stole and Bud Cort) suspect that their “little poodle” may, in fact, be showing deviant tendencies. In a complete panic, Megan’s parents elicit the help of her friends and the guidance of a rehabilitation camp to mount an all out intervention. Mike (an out-of-drag RuPaul Charles), a True Directions counselor, leads the intervention and before Megan can pack her pom-poms she is whisked off to learn how to be a perfect woman. True Directions is run under the strict, all-seeing eyes of sadistic Mary (Cathy Moriarty). Megan dutifully gets with the deprogramming so she can quickly return to her life of boyfriends, football games, and her absolute favorite activity — cheerleading. Everything seems perfect, but the fun begins when her hormones start to rage, and her friends and family wonder where she’ll find love! Part of Tin Pan Theater’s Pride Film Festival, the film screens at various times tonight through Sunday. 81 minutes. (R) — Synopsis from Lionsgate Entertainment

“The Fairy” — Dom works the night shift in a small hotel near the industrial seaport of Le Havre. One night, a woman named Fiona arrives, with no luggage and no shoes. She tells Dom that she is a fairy, and grants him three wishes. However, before she is able to grant the third wish, she mysteriously disappears. By this point, Dom has fallen in love with Fiona, and sets out on a quest to find her, leading the two on a series of comic misadventures. This film screens at Tin Pan Theater, Tuesday through Thursday. 94 minutes. (no MPAA rating) — Synopsis from Kino Lorber, Inc.

“Fish Out of Water” — “Fish Out of Water” is a genre-bending feature documentary that uses animation and academic interviews to dissect the seven Bible verses used to condemn homosexuality and justify marriage discrimination. Director Ky Dickens shows, through animated illustrations of the oft-quoted Bible passages and revelatory commentary on them by celebrated scholars, that the Bible is misinterpreted and misquoted regarding same-sex relationships. Part of Tin Pan Theater’s Pride Film Festival, the film screens at various times tonight through

Courtesy Paramount Pictures

Marty the zebra (voiced by Chris Rock), Alex the lion (voiced by Ben Stiller), Gloria the hippo (voiced by Jada Pinkett Smith) and Melman the giraffe (voiced by David Schwimmer) team up with a crew of circus animals in “Madagascar 3: Europe’s Most Wanted.” Sunday. 86 minutes. (no MPAA rating) — Synopsis from film’s website

“Hedwig and The Angry Inch” — Adapted from the critically acclaimed off-Broadway rock theatre hit, “Hedwig and The Angry Inch” tells the story of an “internationally ignored” rock singer, Hedwig, and her search for stardom and love. Born a boy named Hansel whose life’s dream is to find his other half, Hedwig reluctantly submits to a sex change operation in order to marry an American GI and get over the Berlin Wall to freedom. The operation is botched, leaving her with the aforementioned “angry inch.” Finding herself high, dry and divorced in a Kansas trailer park, she pushes on to form a rock band and encounters a lover/protégé in young Tommy Gnosis, who eventually leaves her, steals her songs and becomes a huge rock star. Through a collage of songs, flashbacks and animation, Hedwig tells her life story while on a tour of chain strip-mall seafood restaurants, trying to capitalize on her tabloid celebrity as the supposed ex-lover of famed rock star, Tommy Gnosis. Somewhere between the crab cakes and the cramped motel rooms, between the anguish and the acid-wash, she pursues her dreams and discovers the origin of love. Part of Tin Pan Theater’s Pride Film Festival, the film screens at various times tonight through Sunday. 91 minutes. (R) — Synopsis from New Line Cinema

“The Metropolitan Opera: Anna Bolena” — Anna Netrebko opened The Metropolitan Opera’s 2011-12 season with her portrayal of the ill-fated queen driven insane by her unfaithful

king, singing one of opera’s greatest mad scenes. David McVicar’s Met premiere production also stars Ekaterina Gubanova as her rival, Jane Seymour, and Ildar Abdrazakov as Henry VIII. Marco Armiliato conducts the first of Donizetti’s Tudor trilogy. The opera was originally transmitted Oct. 15, 2011. The encore screening begins at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday at the Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. Cost is $12.50. 190 minutes. (no MPAA rating) — Synopsis from The Metropolitan Opera

“Rock of Ages” — Journey and REO Speedwagon ride again in a musical romance featuring old rock tunes and a cast that includes Tom Cruise, Alec Baldwin, Mary J. Blige, Catherine ZetaJones and Julianne Hough. Catch a late night screening Thursday at local theaters. (PG-13) — The Associated Press

“The Tempest: Starring Christopher Plummer” — “The Tempest” pits the desire for revenge against the demands of love and asks if man is capable of creating a brave new world. The story focuses on Prospero (Christopher Plummer), the banished Duke of Milan. Marooned on a distant island with his daughter, Miranda (Trish Lindström), Prospero has spent 12 years perfecting his magic arts. Now, with the help of the spirit Ariel (Julyana Soelistyo), he raises a storm at sea, bringing within his grasp the enemies who robbed him of his dukedom. Captured LIVE over two days at the legendary Stratford Shakespeare Festival in Canada, this theatrical event also features a post-screening Q&A segment, captured live in New York with

Christopher Plummer and director Des McAnuff, hosted by producer Barry Avrich. The event screens at 7 p.m. Thursday at the Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. Cost is $15. 155 minutes. (no MPAA rating) — Synopsis from National CineMedia

“That’s My Boy” — Adam Sandler tries to grow up as a bad dad hoping to make things right with his estranged grown son (Andy Samberg). Catch a late night screening Thursday at local theaters. (R) — The Associated Press

WHAT’S NEW “Bernie” — Richard Linklater’s droll comedy stars Jack Black as an East Texas funeral director named Bernie Tiede, and it is surely one of the best performances of the year. Bernie is superb at his job: solicitous, gentle, tactful. When Marjorie Nugent’s husband dies, he is the angel at her shoulder, creating the impression that no client has ever touched him quite so much as she. That’s a triumph because Marjorie (Shirley MacLaine) is the most disliked woman in Carthage. Based on an almost unbelievable true story, balanced at a peculiar angle between pathos and satire. Rating: Three and a half stars. 98 minutes. (PG-13) “Crooked Arrows” — The high-school sports drama “Crooked Arrows” has two — but only two — original selling points: Its protagonists are Native Americans, and the sport in question is lacrosse. That’s something you don’t see every day. Other than that, however, the film’s moves are taken straight out of the

“Bad News Bears” playbook. Roster of struggling but plucky players? Check. Troubled and reluctant coach seeking redemption? Check. Arrogant arch rivals seeking comeuppance? Climactic, highstakes game? Inspirational message about the power of believing in yourself? Check, check and check. The lacrosse angle aside, “Crooked Arrows” seems less interested in breaking ground than in following a path that has been trod a thousand times before. This film was not given a star rating. 104 minutes. (PG-13) — Michael O’Sullivan, The Washington Post

“Madagascar 3: Europe’s Most Wanted” — “Madagascar 3: Europe’s Most Wanted” is a riot of splashy colors, silly 3-D gimmicks, big, broad kidfriendly gags — and those professionally pesky penguins. And for adults, there’s the charming spectacle of Oscar winner Frances McDormand as a Frenchaccented animal control officer. The third film in this unlikely animated franchise takes those New York refugees from remote Africa, where they’ve been stranded, to Monte Carlo and other points in the Eurozone as they try to get back to the friendly and confining Central Park Zoo. It’s repetitious, as animated sequels usually are. It’s running low on new ideas, though some of the conclusions these critters — lion, zebra, hippo and giraffe — reach about their fates may surprise you. But it’s also funny, a farce closer to “Shrek the Third” than, say, “Toy Story 3.” This film is available locally in 3-D. Rating: Two and a half stars. 90 minutes. (PG) — Roger Moore, McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Continued next page


movies

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JUNE 8, 2012

NEW DVD & B L U - R AY RELEASES

From previous page

The following movies were released the week of June 5.

“Act of Valor” — Actual Navy SEALs are used in a war thriller involving the freeing of a kidnapped CIA agent and a field operation to prevent terrorists from entering the U.S. through tunnels from Mexico. The action footage is nonstop and effective. The characters are not seen in any depth. The SEALs seem real, all right, but are required to do little character acting. The film opens and closes with strong appeals to patriotism, but in between it’s a Friday night special for teenage action fans. DVD Extras: Deleted scenes and audio commentary; Blu-ray Extras: Five additional featurettes and a music video. Rating: Two and a half stars. 101 minutes. (R) “John Carter” — A Civil War veteran (Taylor Kitsch) finds himself transported to Mars, where he lands in the middle of a planetary war between two humanlike cities, with the local four-armed race of Tharks in the middle. Lots and lots of action, a terrific heroine in Dejah Thoris (Lynn Collins), an intriguing alien design and well-done special effects. Director Andrew Stanton lacks the kind of tightly written script he had in “Finding Nemo,” and as science fiction this is a couple of notches down from

GO! MAGAZINE •

Courtesy Disney

Taylor Kitsch and Lynn Collins star in “John Carter.” his “WALL-E,” but the movie is competent weekend action. DVD and Blu-ray Extras: Featurettes, audio commentary, deleted scenes and bloopers. Rating: Two and a half stars. 132 minutes. (PG-13) “Journey 2: The Mysterious Island” — A transcendently goofy boy’s own adventure tale, with young Josh Hutcherson and his mom’s boyfriend (Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson) rescuing his grandfather (Michael Caine) from a lost island in the South Pacific, after teaming up with a helicopter pilot (Luis Guzman) and his sultry daughter (Vanessa Hudgens). With elephants as small as dogs, lizards the size of dinosaurs, bees so big you can ride them bareback, an exploding volcano, the lost city of Atlantis, Captain Nemo’s submarine Nautilus, and The Rock performing “It’s a Wonderful World” with a ukulele. It’s even in 3-D. I’m exhausted just describing it. Fun in the 1950s Disney adventure movie way. DVD Extras: Gag reel and deleted scenes; Blu-ray Extras:

Additional featurette. Rating: Two and a half stars. 94 minutes. (PG) “Machine Gun Preacher” — Inspired by the story of Sam Childers (Gerard Butler), an ex-con, drug addict and thief who was born again and since 1999 has been leading a crusade on behalf of the orphans of South Sudan. All well and good when he’s building an orphanage, but when he takes up arms and fights alongside local freedom fighters, the spirituality gets a little muddled. Director Marc Forster and writer Jason Keller seem uncertain where they’re going or what they’re saying. No extras were listed with this film. Rating: Two stars. 127 minutes. (R) COMING UP: Movies scheduled for national release June 12 include “Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows,” “Ghost Rider: Spirit of Vengeance,” “Thin Ice” and “Tyler Perry’s Good Deeds.” — “DVD and Blu-ray Extras” from wire and online sources

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Smith Rock BMX Sat., June 9, 2012 Sign-ups: 3pm-5pm Race Fee: $20.00

During the event, a raffle and BBQ will be held to benefit our local Sparrow, Dom. Contact: Sunny Harmeson • 541-410-0808 www.highdesertbmx.org BMX!” Bike - You Can Race “If You Can Ride A

“Prometheus” — A magnificent science fiction film, raising questions about the origin of human life. The spaceship Prometheus arrives at an Earthsized moon and discovers a vast pyramid containing aliens slumbering in suspended animation. The film combines tantalizing ideas and startling horror. Noomi Rapace plays a crew member with awesome fortitude, Michael Fassbinder is an intriguing android, and Charlize Theron is the ice queen representing the company that financed the ship. Staggering visuals, expert horror, mind-challenging ideas and enough unanswered questions to prime the inevitable sequel. This film is available locally in 3-D and IMAX. Rating: Four stars. 124 minutes. (R) “Sound of My Voice” —060612 Two Los Angeles documentary filmmakers infiltrate a San Fernando Valley cult group led by an ethereal young woman (Brit Marling) who claims to be from the year 2054. Whether that and

several other things are true is the question at the center of a lowbudget but compelling weird tale. Rating: Three stars. 85 minutes. (R)

STILL SHOWING “Battleship” — Alien spacecraft splash down in the Pacific where war games are being conducted by Allied navies, leading to a battle where a whole lot of stuff is blown up real good. Similar to the Transformers movies, but more entertaining because of a better plot, good characters and a kind of inspiring third act. As summer action entertainment goes, not at all bad. Rating: Two and a half stars. 130 minutes. (PG-13) “The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel” — A charming, funny, heartwarming movie making good use of seven superb veteran actors. They’re Brits on limited incomes who have taken their chances on a retirement hotel in India, run on a shoestring with boundless optimism by Dev Patel.

Continued next page

PAGE 29


movies

PAGE 30 • GO! MAGAZINE

www.bgcco.org

Great Futures Start HERE.

O F C E N T R A L O R E G O N

From previous page An amazing cast, including Judi Dench, Maggie Smith, Bill Nighy, Penelope Wilton and, in the best, most surprisingly moving role, Tom Wilkinson. Rating: Three and a half stars. 124 minutes. (PG-13) “The Cabin in the Woods” — Five college students head out for a weekend in an isolated cabin, and find it contains unguessable levels of reality. The trailer and opening minutes reveal that the cabin is a set for a laboratory experiment — but the plot takes such bizarre turns that’s the least of it. With Kristen Connolly, Chris Hemsworth, Richard Jenkins. Produced and co-written by horror legend Joss Whedon. Rating: Three stars. 105 minutes. (R) “Chernobyl Diaries” — Other than the setting, there’s little about “Chernobyl Diaries” to distinguish it from all of the other horror films where a group of good-looking people find themselves in a deadly situation and make silly decisions as they are picked off one by one. As with so many of these films, it’s not the destination but the journey that either makes or breaks the movie. The journey here has six tourists taking a trip to the abandoned city of Pripyat. This was once the home for the workers at the Chernobyl nuclear reactor until the accident left the area lifeless. If you have any hopes of enjoying the film, leave your brain at the concession stand. Director Oren Peli (“Paranormal Activity”) ignores quick solutions — such as a van full of people with cellphones who never try to call for help — to keep the story moving ahead. Otherwise, it’s a huge meltdown. This film was not given a star rating. 93 minutes. (R) — Rick Bentley, The Fresno Bee

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JUNE 8, 2012

“Chimpanzee” — Disney’s 2012 movie offering for Earth Day is a gorgeous and technically dazzling look inside the world of chimpanzees — their use of tools, their nurturing instincts, their means of organization during fights and hunts for smaller monkeys, whom they sometimes eat. But “Chimpanzee” is also a throwback, a documentary that follows a baby chimp named Oscar as he struggles to learn the ways of his tribe and to survive in the dense rain forests of Africa’s Ivory Coast. It’s moving and entertaining as well as informative. Rating: Three stars. 84 minutes. (G) — Roger Moore, McClatchy-Tribune News Service

“Dark Shadows” — Tim Burton’s film is all dressed up with nowhere to go, an elegant production without a central drive. There are wonderful things in the film, but they aren’t what’s important. It’s as if Burton directed at arm’s length, unwilling to find juice in the story. Johnny Depp is flawless as the vampire Barnabas, transported from the 18th century to 1972, but the other characters get lost in arch mannerisms. As always with Burton, the visual style is wonderful. Rating: Two and a half stars. 112 minutes. (PG-13) “The Dictator” — Sacha Baron Cohen establishes a claim to be the best comic filmmaker now working. “The Dictator” is funny, obscene, disgusting, scatological, vulgar and crude, and also merciless political satire. With Ben Kingsley, John C. Reilly, Anna Faris and a great cameo from Megan Fox, who shows up for sex but draws the line at an all-night cuddle. Rating: Three stars. 85 minutes. (R) “For Greater Glory” — Lavishly

Wilson Webb / Sony Pictures / The Associated Press

Will Smith, left, and Tommy Lee Jones return to their starring roles in “Men in Black 3.” produced English-language epic about the 1926-1929 war in Mexico between the federal government and the insurgent Cristeros. The government had effectively banned the Catholic Church, and the Cristeros were fighting for religious liberty (only for Catholics, apparently). Long and perhaps too detailed. Strong performances by Andy Garcia, Ruben Blades, Eva Longoria. Rating: Two and a half stars. 143 minutes. (R) “The Hunger Games” — Jennifer Lawrence is strong and convincing as the lead in a science-fiction parable set in a future where poor young people are forced into deadly combat for the entertainment of the rich. The earth-toned naturalism of forest hunting scenes is in odd contrast to the bizarre oddballs at the top in this society. An effective entertainment, but too long, and it avoids many obvious questions about this society’s morality. Rating: Three stars. 142 minutes. (PG-13) “Marvel’s The Avengers” — A threat to Earth from the smirking Loki, resentful adoptive brother of the Norse god Thor, causes

Nick Fury (Samuel L. Jackson) to assemble all of the Avengers: Iron Man (Robert Downey Jr.), Captain America (Chris Evans), the Hulk (Mark Ruffalo), Thor (Chris Hemsworth), Black Widow (Scarlett Johansson) and Hawkeye (Jeremy Renner). The result is sort of like an All-Star Game for Marvel superheroes. Exactly what you’d expect, although more of the same. Gets the job done. This film is available locally in 3-D. Rating: Three stars. 142 minutes. (PG-13) “Men in Black 3” — Fifteen years after the original and a decade after the blah sequel, this third installment is the best in the series. Tommy Lee Jones and Will Smith are back as anti-alien Agents K and J, and Josh Brolin has a moviestealing role as the young Agent K, looking and sounding uncannily like Jones. Rick Baker, Hollywood’s top-ranking creature creator, creates a gob-smacking gallery of aliens, and the time travel plot even works in the Apollo 11 moon launch. This film is available locally in 3-D. Rating: Three stars. 103 minutes. (PG-13)

“Mirror Mirror” — A retelling of the fairy tale in a sumptuous fantasy setting, with Julia Roberts and Lily Collins wearing the costumes of a career by the late, legendary Japanese designer Eiko Ishioka. They are the Queen and her stepdaughter, Snow White, Armie Hammer plays the charming Prince, and in this version more screen time is given than ever before to the Seven Dwarfs. Looks great, but the dialogue is rather flat, the movie sort of boring, and there’s not much energy. Rating: Two and a half stars. 106 minutes. (PG) “Snow White and the Huntsman” — “Snow White and the Huntsman” reinvents the legendary story in a film of astonishing beauty and imagination. It’s the last thing you would expect from a picture with this title. Starring Kristen Stewart, capable and plucky, as Snow White, and Charlize Theron as the evil Queen, with Chris Hemsworth as the Huntsman and Sam Claflin as the loyal Prince William. Two extraordinary locations, the Dark Forest and a fairyland, are triumphs of special effects. Rating: Three and a half stars. 127 minutes. (PG-13) “What to Expect When You’re Expecting” — An all-star comedy about five couples in search of pregnancy. They’re so much in synch that three deliveries and an adoption occur on the same day. The actors are likable, the movie is cheerful, but there’s too much story, and I grew weary of the round-robin as all the stories were kept updated. With Cameron Diaz, Jennifer Lopez, Elizabeth Banks, Anna Kendrick, Brooklyn Decker, Matthew Morrison, Chace Crawford, Chris Rock, Dennis Quaid and others in a plot that risks gridlock. Rating: Two and a half stars. 109 minutes. (PG-13)

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movies

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JUNE 8, 2012

GO! MAGAZINE •

M O V I E T I M E S • For the week of June 8

EDITOR’S NOTES: • Open-captioned showtimes are bold. • There may be an additional fee for 3-D movies. • IMAX films are $15. • Movie times are subject to change after press time.

SNOW WHITE AND THE HUNTSMAN (PG-13) Fri, Mon-Thu: 4:45, 7:30 Sat-Sun: 2, 4:45, 7:30

MADRAS Madras Cinema 5 Courtesy Diyah Pera

Curt (Chris Hemsworth), Holden (Jesse Williams), Jules (Anna Hutchison), Marty (Fran Kranz) and Dana (Kristen Connolly) star in “The Cabin in the Woods.”

BEND Regal Pilot Butte 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend, 541-382-6347

BERNIE (PG-13) Fri-Sat: 1:15, 4:15, 7:15, 9:30 Sun-Thu: 1:15, 4:15, 7:15 THE BEST EXOTIC MARIGOLD HOTEL (PG-13) Fri-Sat: 12:30, 3:30, 6:30, 9:10 Sun-Thu: 12:30, 3:30, 6:30 CROOKED ARROWS (PG-13) Fri-Sat: 12:15, 3:15, 6:15, 8:40 Sun-Thu: 12:15, 3:15, 6:15 FOR GREATER GLORY (R) Fri-Sat: Noon, 3, 6, 9 Sun-Thu: Noon, 3, 6 MEN IN BLACK 3 (PG-13) Fri-Sat: 1, 4, 7, 9:20 Sun-Thu: 1, 4, 7 SOUND OF MY VOICE (R) Fri-Sat: 12:45, 3:45, 6:45, 8:50 Sun-Thu: 12:45, 3:45, 6:45

Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend, 541-382-6347

BATTLESHIP (PG-13) Fri-Tue: 12:10, 3:25, 6:35, 9:40 Wed-Thu: 12:10, 3:25 CHERNOBYL DIARIES (R) Fri-Thu: 9:35 DARK SHADOWS (PG-13) Fri-Thu: 12:25, 3:50, 6:45 THE DICTATOR (R) Fri-Thu: 1:25, 4:40, 8, 10:30 THE HUNGER GAMES (PG-13) Fri-Thu: 12:50, 4 MADAGASCAR 3: EUROPE’S MOST WANTED (PG)

Fri-Thu: 12:15, 1:15, 3:30, 4:30, 6:50, 7:50, 9:15 MADAGASCAR 3: EUROPE’S MOST WANTED 3-D (PG) Fri-Thu: 12:40, 3:55, 7:30, 10, 10:15 MARVEL’S THE AVENGERS (PG-13) Fri-Thu: 11:30 a.m., 2:45, 6:30, 9:50 MARVEL’S THE AVENGERS 3-D (PG-13) Fri-Thu: Noon, 3:15, 7, 10:20 MEN IN BLACK 3 (PG-13) Fri: 11:55 a.m., 3:10, 6:40, 9:25 Sat: 11:55 a.m., 3:10, 6:40, 9:25 Sun: 11:55 a.m., 3:10, 6:40, 9:25 Mon: 11:55 a.m., 3:10, 6:40, 9:25 Tue-Thu: 11:55 a.m., 3:10, 6:40, 9:25 MEN IN BLACK 3 3-D (PG-13) Fri-Thu: 12:55, 4:20, 7:40, 10:10 THE METROPOLITAN OPERA: ANNA BOLENA (no MPAA rating) Wed: 6:30 PROMETHEUS (R) Fri-Thu: 11:45 a.m., 3, 6:10, 9:20 PROMETHEUS IMAX (R) Fri-Thu: 12:30, 3:40, 7:05, 10:05 ROCK OF AGES (PG-13) Thu night/Fri morning: 12:01 a.m. SNOW WHITE AND THE HUNTSMAN (PG-13) Fri-Mon: 11:35 a.m., 1:05, 2:50, 4:10, 6, 7:20, 9, 10:30 Tue, Thu: 11:35 a.m., 1:05, 2:50, 4:10, 6, 7:20, 9, 10:30 Wed: 11:35 a.m., 1:05, 2:50, 4:10, 6, 7:20, 9, 10:30 THE TEMPEST: STARRING CHRISTOPHER PLUMMER (no MPAA rating) Thu: 7

THAT’S MY BOY (R) Thu night/Fri morning: 12:01 a.m. WHAT TO EXPECT WHEN YOUR EXPECTING (PG-13) Fri-Thu: 11:40 a.m., 2:55, 6:20, 9:05

McMenamins Old St. Francis School 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend, 541-330-8562

THE CABIN IN THE WOODS (R) Fri-Thu: 9:30 THE HUNGER GAMES (R) Fri, Mon-Thu: 6 Sat-Sun: 2:30, 6 MIRROR MIRROR (PG) Sat-Sun: Noon After 7 p.m., shows are 21 and older only. Younger than 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.

Tin Pan Theater 869 N.W. Tin Pan Alley, Bend, 541-241-2271

BUT I’M A CHEERLEADER (R) Fri-Sat: 7:30 Sun: 5:30 THE FAIRY (no MPAA rating) Tue-Thu: 8:30 FISH OUT OF WATER (no MPAA rating) Fri-Sat: 5 Sun: 3 HEDWIG AND THE ANGRY INCH (R) Fri-Sat: 10 Sun: 8 The theater is closed on Mondays.

REDMOND Redmond Cinemas 1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond, 541-548-8777

MADAGASCAR 3: EUROPE’S MOST WANTED (PG) Fri, Mon-Thu: 1:45, 4, 6:15, 8:30 Sat-Sun: 11:30 a.m., 1:45, 4, 6:15, 8:30 MEN IN BLACK 3 (PG-13) Fri, Mon-Thu: 2, 4:30, 7, 9:30 Sat-Sun: 11:30 a.m., 2, 4:30, 9:30 PROMETHEUS (R) Fri, Mon-Thu: 1:45, 4:15, 6:45, 9:15 Sat-Sun: 11:15 a.m., 1:45, 4;15, 6:45, 9:15 SNOW WHITE AND THE HUNTSMAN (PG-13) Fri, Mon-Thu: 3:45, 6:30, 9:15 Sat-Sun: 1, 3:45, 6:30, 9:15

1101 S.W. U.S. Highway 97, Madras, 541-475-3505

MADAGASCAR 3: EUROPE’S MOST WANTED 3-D (PG) Fri-Sun: Noon, 4:50, 7 Mon-Thu: 4:50, 7 MADAGASCAR 3: EUROPE’S MOST WANTED (PG) Fri-Sun: 2:10, 9:20 Mon-Thu: 9:20 MARVEL’S THE AVENGERS (PG-13) Fri-Sun: 12:30, 3:30, 6:30, 9:30 Mon-Thu: 3:30, 6:30, 9:30 MEN IN BLACK 3 (PG-13) Fri-Sun: 12:10, 2:25, 4:40, 7:10, 9:35 Mon-Thu: 4:40, 7:10, 9:35 PROMETHEUS (R) Fri-Sun: 11:45 a.m., 4:15, 6:50 Mon-Thu: 4:15, 6:50 PROMETHEUS 3-D (R) Fri-Sun: 2:15, 9:15 Mon-Thu: 9:15 SNOW WHITE AND THE HUNTSMAN (PG-13) Fri-Sun: 1:25, 4:05, 6:40, 9:25 Mon-Thu: 4:05, 6:40, 9:25

PRINEVILLE SISTERS Sisters Movie House 720 Desperado Court, Sisters, 541-549-8800

CHIMPANZEE (G) Sat-Sun: 3:30 Mon-Thu: 5:30 MADAGASCAR 3: EUROPE’S MOST WANTED (PG) Fri, Mon-Thu: 5, 7:15 Sat-Sun: 3, 5, 7:15 MEN IN BLACK 3(PG-13) Fri-Sun: 5:30, 8 Mon-Thu: 7:30 PROMETHEUS (R) Fri, Mon-Thu: 5, 7:45 Sat-Sun: 2:15, 5, 7:45

PAGE 31

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MADAGASCAR 3: EUROPE’S MOST WANTED (PG) Fri: 3:30, 6, 8:10 Sat-Sun: 11 a.m., 1:15, 3:30, 6, 8:10 Mon-Thu: 4, 6:30 SNOW WHITE AND THE HUNTSMAN (UPSTAIRS — PG13) Fri: 4, 7 Sat-Sun: 1, 4, 7 Mon-Thu: 6 Pine Theater’s upstairs screening room has limited accessibility.

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PAGE 32 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JUNE 8, 2012

ONLY IN THE BULLETIN’S GO! MAGAZINE

YOU CAN WIN TICKETS TO TO THE CONCERT OF YOUR CHOICE INCLUDING:

JULY 21ST • CHRIS ISAAK AUGUST 7TH • THE OUTLAW ROADSHOW WITH COUNTING CROWS AUGUST 15TH • NORAH JONES AUGUST 22ND • MICHAEL FRANTI & SPEARHEAD AUGUST 24TH • ZZ TOP SEPTEMBER 1ST • BRANDI CARLILE SEPTEMBER 11TH • HUEY LEWIS & THE NEWS


Friday, June 8, 2012 • The Bulletin

West Coast League standouts, now and then 2012 players to watch

WCL alumni watch

RHP, Mitch Gueller, Bellingham Bells A 6-foot-3-inch right-hander, Gueller went 6-0 with a 0.80 earned-run average and 70 strikeouts in 43 2/3 innings this season for W.F. West High School in Chehalis, Wash., this spring. Gueller has committed to Washington State University, but could turn pro this summer after being drafted 54th overall in this year’s MLB draft by the Philadelphia Phillies. Also a standout hitter, Gueller consistently hits 90 mph with his fastball and has been recorded as high as 95 mph.

CF, Jacoby Ellsbury, Boston Red Sox (Bend Elks, 2002) A Madras High product, Ellsbury had an MVP-worthy season for the Red Sox last year, batting .321 with 32 home runs and 39 stolen bases. (He finished second in the American League MVP voting to Detroit pitcher Justin Verlander.) Ellsbury has spent most of this season on the disabled list with a dislocated shoulder, but was cleared to begin throwing Thursday.

SS, Tanner Rahier, Wenatchee AppleSox The University of San Diego signee did not play for his high school team in Palm Desert, Calif., his senior year, instead opting to play travel ball for an elite wood-bat league. MLB scouts took notice as he was selected by the Cincinnati Reds in the second round of this year’s draft. If he does not sign with the Reds, Rahier could be one of the top all-around shortstops in the West Coast League this season. LHP, Travis Radke, Bend Elks Radke, a freshman for the University of Portland this spring, was stellar in his first year of college ball. He went 7-4 while holding opponents to just a .197 batting average, the second-best mark in the West Coast Conference in 2012. A native of Thousand Oaks, Calif., Radke was named the WCC freshman of the year and was selected to the Louisville Slugger Freshman All-American Team this year. Nationally, Radke ended the season ranked 12th in hits allowed per nine innings (5.97), 30th in WHIP (1.00) and 39th in ERA (2.03). INF, Shane Zeile, Walla Walla Sweets As a freshman at UCLA this spring, Zeile hit .367 in a part-time role, starting 14 games and seeing action in 15 others. He posted 22 hits in 60 at-bats for the Bruins in 2012 and expects to be a major contributor to the program in 2013. Zeile’s uncle, Todd Zeile, played in the major leagues for 15 years.

1B/3B, Chris Davis, Baltimore Orioles (Kelowna Falcons, 2005) In his first full season with Baltimore, Davis is hitting .295 with nine home runs and 23 RBIs in 47 games. Davis made headlines earlier this season when he earned a win on the mound, pitching the final two innings in a crazy 17-inning game the Orioles won 9-6 over the Red Sox at Fenway Park. RHP, Tommy Hanson, Atlanta Braves (Aloha Knights, 2005) Hanson, the West Coast Collegiate Baseball League pitcher of the year in 2005, has won 38 games in 3 1/2 years in the major leagues and is 6-4 with 3.34 earned-run average this season for the Braves. LHP, Tommy Milone, Oakland Athletics (Wenatchee AppleSox, 2006) A rookie this season with the A’s, Milone is 6-5 in 11 starts for Oakland. The former USC pitcher has struck out 41 batters in 71 1/3 innings in 2012 against 17 walks. RHP, Jason Hammel, Baltimore Orioles (Wenatchee AppleSox, 2001) A seven-year major league veteran, Hammel is having a career season with the Orioles in 2012. The former Wenatchee and Treasure Valley (Ore.) Community College standout is 6-2 with a 1.45 earned-run average for Baltimore this season.

The schedule for the Bend Elks’ season, which began last Friday, is below. The first home game is this Friday. (Schedule is subject to change):

1 2 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 16 17 18 19 20 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

Fri Sat Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat

July at Klamath Falls W, 6-4 at Klamath Falls W, 9-3 at Wenatchee L, 8-1 at Wenatchee L, 7-4 at Wenatchee late 6:35pm Klamath Falls 3:35pm Klamath Falls 5:05pm Walla Walla 12:05pm Walla Walla 6:35pm Walla Walla 6:35pm Corvallis 5:05pm Corvallis 6:40pm at Corvallis 6:35pm Top Speed* 1:05pm Top Speed* 6:35pm Kitsap 6:35pm Kitsap 6:35pm Kitsap 6:35pm at Kelowna 6:05pm at Kelowna 6:35pm at Kelowna 7:05pm at Walla Walla 7:05pm at Walla Walla 7:05pm at Walla Walla 6:35pm Cowlitz 6:35pm Cowlitz

1 2 3 4 6 7 8 10 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 24 25 25 26 27 27 28 28 31

Sun Mon Tue Wed Fri Sat Sun Tue Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Tue Wed Wed Thu Fri Fri Sat Sat Tue

August 5:05pm Redding* 6:35pm Kelowna 6:35pm Kelowna 6:35pm Kelowna 6:35pm Wenatchee 6:35pm Wenatchee 6:35pm Wenatchee 6:35pm Walnut Creek* 6:35pm Bellingham 6:35pm Bellingham 6:35pm Bellingham 5:15pm at Corvallis 6:35pm Corvallis 6:35pm Corvallis 6:40pm at Corvallis 6:40pm at Corvallis 7:05pm at Bellingham 7:05pm at Bellingham 6:05pm at Bellingham 6:35pm San Francisco* 6:35pm San Fran. (ss)* 6:35pm at Kitsap 6:35pm at Kitsap 6:35pm at Kitsap 6:35pm NW Honkers (ss)* 6:35pm at Kitsap 4:00pm NW Honkers (ss)** 6:35pm Cowlitz

1 Wed 2 Thu 3 Fri 4 Sat 4 Sat 5 Sun 7 Tue 7 Tue 8 Wed 9 Thu 11-13 15, 17-18 21 Tue 22 Wed

6:35pm Cowlitz 6:35pm Klamath Falls 6:35pm Klamath Falls 6:35pm Bridgetown (ss)* 7:05pm at Klamath Falls 7:05pm at Klamath Falls 6:35pm NW Star Acad.* 6:35pm at Cowlitz 6:35pm at Cowlitz 6:35pm at Cowlitz WCL Divisional Playoffs WCL Championships 6:35pm Olympia* 6:35pm Olympia*

• The Elks summer collegiate team returns to Bend for its 13th season, with plenty of talent on the roster

On the flip side • Turn the page over for more information on the Elks, including a look at Vince Genna Stadium, a breakdown of Bend’s roster, and a rundown at all of the teams in the West Coast League.

looks especially strong this year on the mound. University of Portland left-hander Travis Radke went 7-4 with a 2.09 earned-run average this spring — he was the West Coast Conference freshman of the year and a Louisville Slugger Freshman All-American — while right-hander Clay Bauer, a sophomore at College of San Mateo who has committed to play at Oregon State in the fall, struck out 68 hitters in 661⁄3 innings this spring. The Elks, who lost in the WCL West Divisional Series last summer to eventual WCL champion Corvallis, also have two pitchers on their roster who were selected in this week’s MLB draft. Andrew Sopko, a Montana high school standout, was picked by the San Diego Padres in the 14th round, and Bauer’s teammate at the College of San Mateo, Daniel Grazzini, was selected in the 35th round by the San Francisco Giants. If either Sopko or Grazzini pitches for Bend this season, the Elks could have one of the best rotations in the league. Bend also should have plenty of pop at the plate. Ryne Clark, a former NCAA Division I quarterback at San Diego State, will likely be a top-of-the-order hitter after leading the College of the Desert in Palm Springs, Calif., in most offensive categories this spring. Clark, a right-handed hitting outfielder, hit .331 as a sophomore this year. Gonzaga shortstop Steven Halcomb, St. Mary’s College infielder Darian Ramage and Oregon State outfielder Joey Matthews all expect to be major contributors at the plate this summer. Spectators this season at Genna Stadium could also see some familiar faces in Elk uniforms. Bend High graduates Grant Newton (Seattle University) and Michael Hirko (George Fox) are on Bend’s early-season roster, as are Linfield College teammates Justin Huckins (Summit) and Jo Carroll (Mountain View). The Elks, who had six players from its 2011 squad drafted by major league teams this week, open a five-game homestand this evening at 6:35 p.m. — Beau Eastes

OPENING NIGHT ~ FREE Magnetic Calendar

SAT

JUNE 9

6:35PM Klamath Falls Gems

Cap Night

SAT

JUNE 16 6:35PM Corvallis Knights

San Diego Chicken

SUN JUNE 17 5:05PM Top Speed (PWBL)

Father’s Day Special! ~ Dad’s Get in FREE with their families!

FRI

Silipint Mug Giveaway

TUES JULY 3

6:35PM Kelowna Falcons

Fireworks Night ~ FIRST EVER Fireworks display at Vince Genna Stadium

WED JULY 4

6:35PM Kelowna Falcons

July 4th Celebration ~ Watch Pilot Butte Fireworks from the field & Salute to our Vets!

SUN JULY 8

5:05PM Wenatchee Apple Sox Ice Cream Social

Friday, June 8th 6:35pm vs. Klamath Falls Gems

FREE ADMISSION!

TUES JULY 17 6:35PM Corvallis Knights

Baseball Giveaway Night

THUR AUG 2

Cap Night

6:35PM Klamath Falls Gems

• Open the page for a season schedule and a look at past and present West Coast League standouts.

• Kids get in free at Wednesday night home games.

6:35PM Klamath Falls Gems

JULY 14 6:35PM Bellingham Bells

On this page

• Tuesday home games are “$2 Tuesdays”; tickets, beers and hot dogs cost $2 each.

JUNE 8

JUNE 29 6:35PM Cowlitz Bears

ow in its 13th year of existence, the Bend Elks have produced more than their fair share of highlights over the years. The club has cultivated major league players (Jacoby Ellsbury, Eric Sogard and Brian Barden), led the West Coast League in attendance multiple times and has earned a spot in the league playoffs each of the past four seasons. Bend’s one glaring omission on its resume? A WCL championship. The Elks, who celebrate their 2012 home opener tonight at Vince Genna Stadium against WCL West Division rival Klamath Falls, are again gearing up for another shot at the league title. Bend, which typically is carried by its pitching,

* nonleague **doubleheader (ss) split squad

FRI

SAT

Baseball is back N

Bend Elks schedule

June

BEND ELKS 2012 SEASON PREVIEW

TICKET INFO: 541.312.9259

General Admission Tickets or Hot Dogs & Sodas and More! Just $2 each! JUNE 12, 19; JULY 3, 10, 17, 24, 31; AUGUST 7, 21 (All games start at 6:35PM) Sponsored by:

Kids under 12 admitted FREE when accompanied by an adult.

WWW.BENDELKS.COM

Sponsored by: The Center & Super Ropes

Saturday, June 9th 6:35pm vs. Klamath Falls Gems


Bend Elks Preview • Friday, June 8, 2012 • The Bulletin

The West Coast League

Vince Genna Stadium

A look at the Bend Elks’ league, which includes teams from Oregon, Washington and Canada:

• General admission tickets to all games are available at the Pro Image store at the Cascade Village Shopping Center and at Vince Genna Stadium. • For more information contact the Bend Elks at 541-312-9259 or visit www.bendelks.com. • Group tickets: Contact Randi Holm at randi@bendelks.com.

A look at the home of the Bend Elks, including ticket prices and a map of the stadium grounds:

Seating and tickets

East Division • Bellingham Bells: The Bells could be tough this season if right-hander Mitch Gueller, a Washington State signee who was the 54th overall pick in this year’s MLB draft, does not sign with the Philadelphia Phillies. Utah Valley State pitcher Adam Gunn, who went 8-3 this spring, is also expected to play a significant role in Bellingham’s rotation this summer. • Wenatchee AppleSox: The AppleSox, who lost in the East Divisional Series to Walla Walla in 2011, expect to compete for a division title this year with a strong middle infield, which will be anchored by Hawaii second baseman Stephen Ventimilia. As a true freshman this spring, Ventimilia started all 55 of the Warriors’ games at second base, hitting .293 in addition to scoring 42 runs. • Walla Walla Sweets: In just their second season last summer, the Sweets advanced to the WCL Championship Series before falling to Corvallis in two games. Walla Walla looks to have one of the stronger bullpens in the league with the return of North Dakota State closer Simon Anderson, who last season with the Sweets went 2-1 with five saves and a 3.31 earned-run average. • Kelowna Falcons: The Falcons will lean heavily on Louisiana Tech starting pitcher Phil Maton this season. The 6-foot-3-inch right-hander went 7-6 with a 2.94 earned-run average this spring, striking out 73 batters against just 22 walks.

Stadium stats

Box seats • One season box seat, third-base side; $150 • One season box seat, first-base side: $125 • One season box seat, behind home plate: $125 • Four season box seats, third-base side: $600 • Four season box seats, first-base side: $500 • Four season box seats, behind home plate: $500 • Day of game: $10 each seat

• Capacity: 2,500 • Opened: 1946 • Dimensions: Left field, 330 feet; center field, 390 feet; right field: 330 feet • 2011 highlights: The Elks helped the West Coast League set its seventh consecutive attendance record as the Bend club led the league with 50,513 fans passing through its gates during WCL games. As a whole, the league increased attendance by 15 percent from 2010 with more than 330,000 spectators attending WCL contests in 2011.

Preferred seats • One season preferred seat: $110 • Two season preferred seats:$220 • Four season preferred seats:$400 • Day of game: $7.50 each seat

General admission

Tickets are $5 each and can be upgraded to preferred seats for $2.50 more the day of game. For $100, spectators can get 35 general admission seats for the season.

Parking

Beer garden Hot drink booth

Home team dugout

Infield

Outfield

Press box Scorekeeper and announcer

West Division Visitor team dugout

• Bend Elks: The Elks could have one of the better pitching staffs in the WCL this season with left-hander Travis Radke, a freshman all-American for the University of Portland this spring, and Gonzaga signee Andrew Sopko, who was selected in the 14th round of this year’s MLB Draft. • Corvallis Knights: The 2011 WCL champions, the Knights have won the West Division each of the past five years. Carson Kelly, a standout at Beaverton’s Westview High who was selected in the second round of this year’s MLB draft, highlights the Corvallis roster. • Cowlitz Black Bears: Santa Clara right-hander Tommy Nance could be the Black Bears’ staff ace this summer. The 6-foot-4-inch Nance, who was a junior in the spring, led Santa Clara in starts (15) and innings (941⁄3) en route to posting a 4-6 record and a 4.20 earned-run average. • Kitsap BlueJackets: The BlueJackets look to build around a group of local community college players. Edmonds (Wash.) Community College shortstop Taylor Brennan, who was drafted in the 29th round of the 2011 MLB draft, should be a presence in the middle infield. Outfielder Tyler Baumgartner, who just finished his eligibility at Bellevue (Wash.) College and has committed to play at Oregon next year, is expected to carry some of the load offensively for Kitsap. • Klamath Falls Gems: Now in their second season in the WCL, the Gems will rely on a pair of University of Portland players, Nick Armenta and Bo Cornish. Armenta hit .267 while starting 31 games in the outfield for UP this spring, while Cornish, a catcher, batted .169 in 41 games, 33 of which he started.

Bend Elks roster

Concessions Entrance and ticket booth

How to get there

Concessions

Parking

Vince Genna Stadium

Third St.

Second St.

Main office 97

Bend Fieldhouse

Wilson Ave.

97

Fifth St.

BUS

Fourth St.

Division St.

Roosevelt Ave. Parking

Completed in spring 2009, the Bend Fieldhouse is home to six indoor batting cages, the Elks’ office headquarters, and restrooms for the public. When the batting cage nets are drawn back, the Fieldhouse boasts a regulation-size infield. Built for approximately $1 million, the Fieldhouse also houses an apparel and equipment shop, as well as the Elks’ ticket office.

Reed Market Road

Graphic by The Bulletin

Source: The Bend Elks

A look at the players who will make up the roster for the Bend Elks this season, with position, latest school attended and year in school this spring.

Pitchers

Infielders

Clay Bauer RHP, College of San Mateo, so. The 6-foot-6-inch Bauer went 4-6 in 13 starts for the Bulldogs this spring, striking out 68 batters in 66 1⁄3 innings. He gave a verbal commitment to Oregon State last fall. Dave Birosak LHP, Cal State Fullerton, jr. Birosak made 13 appearances for the Titans this year, striking out five and walking one in eight innings. Sean-Luke Brija RHP, Gonzaga, fr. The Reno, Nev., product pitched 9 1⁄3 innings in his first season with the Zags, going 0-1 with a 1.93 earned-run average. J.R. Bunda RHP, University of Portland, jr. A relief specialist for the Pilots in 2012, Bunda went 1-0 with a 3.24 earned-run average in 19 appearances. In 25 innings this spring, opponents hit just .220 against Bunda. Daniel Chavez RHP, College of San Mateo, so. Chavez was the Bulldogs’ ace this season, leading the team in wins (eight), earned-run average (1.21) and innings pitched (89 1⁄3). The 6-foot-3-inch right-hander returns to Bend after going 6-3 with a 1.84 ERA for the Elks last summer. Michael Dingilian RHP, Cal Poly, fr. Dingilian pitched just six innings for the Mustangs in 2012 after going 9-1 with a 0.83 earned-run average as a senior at Chaminade High School in West Hills, Calif., in 2011.

Coaches

Deck seating

330 feet

Kyle Doyle LHP, Seattle Pacific, fr. Doyle finished 2012 with a 1-2 record while making 19 relief appearances for the Redhawks. In 24 innings this spring, Doyle struck out 20 and walked 12. Matt Fielding LHP, Oregon State, fr. The 5-foot-9-inch Fielding pitched in three games for the Beavers this year, striking out one and walking three in 11⁄3 innings. As a senior at Rocklin (Calif.) High School in 2010, Fielding went 11-2 with a 1.15 earned-run average. Darin Gillies RHP, Arizona State, fr. Gillies made 10 starts for the Sun Devils in 2012, ending the year with a 1-4 record and a 5.03 earnedrun average. The 6-foot4-inch right-hander struck out 29 hitters in 391⁄3 innings this season. Daniel Grazzini RHP, College of San Mateo, so. Grazzini struck out 17 and walked just three in 16 2⁄3 innings of work for the Bulldogs this spring. Last summer with the Elks, Grazzini went 1-1 with a 4.77 earned-run average over 17 innings. Austin Guzzon LHP, Palomar College, fr. Guzzon saw limited action with Palomar this spring, striking out four batters in 4 1⁄3 innings. Trevor Hildenberger RHP, Cal, so. In 10 2⁄3 innings for the Bears this year, Hildenberger struck out two hitters and walked three while giving up nine runs. Hildenberger ended the season with one save and a 4.22 earned-run average in nine appearances.

Head coach: Sean Kinney

Justin Huckins RHP, Linfield College, so. A 2010 graduate of Bend’s Summit High, Huckins posted a 1.30 earned-run average over 19 1⁄3 innings for the Wildcats. Huckins ended the 2012 season with a 2-0 record and one save. Brent Jones RHP, Cornell, fr. Jones broke into the Big Red starting rotation as a freshman this season, ending the year 4-2 with a 4.50 earned-run average. In 48 innings, Jones fanned 40 batters, the second-highest mark on the team. Patrick Keane RHP, St. Mary’s College, jr. Keane, a three-year letterman for the Gaels, led St. Mary’s with 23 appearances this spring, all but one of which was out of the bullpen. The junior right-hander went 4-0 with a 2.44 earned-run average and a team-high seven saves, striking out 36 batters in 48 innings. Josh McAlister RHP, Arizona State, so. McAlister pitched just 7 1⁄3 innings for the Sun Devils this spring, allowing two runs in five appearances. Derek Peterson RHP, Gonzaga, fr. Peterson held opposing hitters to a .228 batting average over 29 1⁄3 innings for the Zags this season. The redshirt freshman went 3-0 in 2012 in 22 relief appearances for Gonzaga. Jared Priestley RHP, Oregon, HS Priestley, who graduated from Roseburg High School this spring and committed to Oregon in the fall, was named the Southern Oregon Hybrid pitcher of the year earlier this season.

Travis Radke LHP, University of Portland, fr. Radke went 7-4 with a 2.09 earned-run average while holding hitters to a .197 batting average en route to being named the West Coast Conference freshman of the year this spring. The 6-foot-4-inch left-hander fanned a team-high 85 batters in 86 innings. Brandon Synder LHP, University of Portland, so. A transfer from Washington State, Snyder went 1-2 with a 3.00 earned-run average in his first season with the Pilots. Snyder made 20 appearances, all in relief, for UP this spring. Andrew Sopko RHP, Gonzaga, HS A high school senior at Loyola Sacred Heart in Missoula, Mont., Sopko was drafted by the San Diego Padres in the 14th round of this year’s MLB Draft. Sopko went 12-2 with a 2.52 earned-run average and 136 strikeouts against 36 walks in 110 1⁄3 innings for his American Legion club last summer. Andrew Woeck RHP, Western Nevada College, so. Woeck went 8-3 with a 1.95 earned-run average for Western Nevada this spring, striking out 96 batters in 83 innings. Woeck led the team with three complete games and two shutouts. Danny Zandona RHP, Cal Poly, fr. Zandona threw 13 innings for the Mustangs this season, ending the year 0-1 with a 4.85 earnedrun average in seven appearances, all but one of which came in relief.

Jo Carroll INF, Linfield College, fr. A graduate of Mountain View High School in Bend, Carroll appeared in just two games this season for the Wildcats. He was an all-state honorable mention selection for Mountain View during his senior year of high school in 2011. Jordan Copeland INF, Washington State, fr. In 20 games with the Cougars this season Copeland, a middle infielder, hit .231 in 13 at-bats. Tucker Esmay INF, Arizona State, fr. Esmay appeared in 23 games for the Sun Devils this year, recording three hits in 17 at-bats. Esmay’s father, Tim Esmay, is Arizona State’s head coach.

Steve Halcomb INF, Gonzaga, jr. Halcomb, who played for the Elks in 2010, started all of the Zags’ 56 games this year at shortstop and hit .297 in 219 at-bats.

Michael Hirko INF, George Fox, fr. Hirko did not make an appearance for the Bruins this spring. As a senior at Bend High in 2011 he hit .351.

Jordan Harlowe INF, Linfield College, jr. In his first season at Linfield, Harlowe hit .304 and started 27 games. The Baker High graduated posted 22 RBIs for the Wildcats, the fourth-best mark on the team.

Grant Newton INF, Seattle Pacific, fr. Newton made 20 starts and appeared in 34 games for the Redhawks as a freshman this spring. The Bend High product hit .247 and knocked in 10 runs in 77 at-bats.

Cullen Hendrickson INF, Seattle University, jr. In 28 at-bats for the Redhawks this year, Hendrickson hit .286 with six singles and two doubles. He batted .207 in 27 games with the Elks last summer.

Shawn O’Brien 1B, St. Mary’s College, jr. O’Brien hit .234 while starting 16 games for the Gaels in 2012. A member of the Elks in 2011, O’Brien recorded 18 hits in 77 atbats this spring for SMC.

Shaun Chase C, Oregon, fr. Chase started 18 games for the Ducks this season, hitting .178 with two home runs and nine RBIs in 73 at-bats.

Kyle Gallegos C, San Jose State, jr. A junior college transfer, Gallegos started 41 of the Spartans’ 51 games this spring and ended the season with a .258 batting average.

Parker Guinn C, Washington, fr. Guinn had just two at-bats for the Huskies this year, going one for two on the season. As a senior at Gig Harbor (Wash.) High School in 2011 he hit .450 and was an all-state second-team selection.

Sky Kelley OF, Willamette, jr. An all-Northwest Conference honorable mention selection for the Bearcats this spring, Kelley batted .325 and hit eight home runs in 26 games.

Will Sparks OF, Washington, so. Sparks was used mainly as a pinch hitter this spring, recording just 11 at-bats in 15 games.

Bo Walter OF, College of San Mateo, so. One of Bend’s most consistent hitters in 2011 — he hit .304 over 37 games — Walter batted .260 for the College of San Mateo this spring.

Tommy Pluschkell INF, Cal Poly, jr. After redshirting in 2011, Pluschkell started 28 games for the Mustangs in 2012 and hit .264. Pluschkell appeared in 34 of Cal Poly’s 56 contests this season. Darian Ramage INF, St. Mary’s College, fr. A switch-hitter, Ramage saw time in 20 games for the Gaels this spring, hitting .267 in 15 at-bats. Jordan Spencer INF, Oregon, fr. Spencer saw time at first base and on the mound for the Ducks this season. As an infielder, he hit .111 in 18 at-bats. As a pitcher, Spencer went 4-2 with a 4.26 earned-run average. Spencer made 12 appearances on the mound for Oregon, six of which were starts.

Catchers Taylor Ausbun C, Air Force, jr. Ausbun, who started his baseball career at the University of Oregon, batted .125 in nine game for the Falcons. Ausbun played for Bend in 2010 and hit .143 in 12 games.

Outfielders Ryne Clark OF, College of the Desert, so. A former quarterback at San Diego State, Clark led the College of the Desert, a community college in Palm Springs, Calif., in hits (46), doubles (11), average (.331) and RBIs (24) this season. Logan Frandsen OF, Oregon State, HS A senior at Las Lomas High School in Walnut Creek Calif., this spring, Frandsen has committed to play for the Beavers in the fall. As a junior Frandsen hit .410 with three home runs and 17 RBIs.

Assistant coaches: Johnny Hirko, Ryan Jordan, Joe Dominiak, Demetre Kokoris

Joey Matthews OF, Oregon State, jr. Matthews, a junior college transfer, hit .267 in 47 games for the Beavers this spring. He started 24 games for Oregon State in 2012 after hitting .349 for Sacramento City College in 2011.

Nick Wagner OF, Oregon, so. Wagner, who was a 44thround draft pick in the 2009 MLB draft out of high school, hit .260 in 29 games for the Elks last season. He did not play in a game for the Ducks this spring.

Zane Yanzick OF, Oregon State, fr. Yanzick, who transferred from Wake Forest, hit .176 in 34 at-bats for the Demon Deacons in 2011. He did not play college baseball this spring. Last summer Yanzick played for the Bellingham Bells in the WCL and batted .125 in 28 games.

Bulletin Daily Paper 06/08/12  

The Bulletin Daily print edition for Friday June 8, 2012

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