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DESCHUTES COUNTY

Schwab State official backs DA enforcing child support venue gets noise exception By Hillary Borrud The Bulletin

The director of Oregon’s Division of Child Support was in Bend on Wednesday to speak in favor of District Attorney Patrick Flaherty’s proposal to take over enforcement of certain child support cases. Jean Fogarty said the com-

munity could benefit from the District Attorney’s Office once again handling cases in which a parent who has been ordered by the court to pay child support is choosing not to do so. The District Attorney’s Office turned that work over to the state more than a decade ago. “I’m fully in support of his ef-

Fetus’ DNA blueprint built out of parental samples

forts to take back this work,” Fogarty said. Fogarty said Deschutes County prosecutors have told her they can improve the payment rate for parents in these cases. “An increased performance, of course, floats everybody’s boat in the state, and it also benefits the core mission of getting money to

families,” Fogarty said. Fogarty, along with Flaherty and Chief Deputy District Attorney Mary Anderson, addressed Deschutes County commissioners Wednesday. It was the third time the District Attorney’s Office presented the case for the change to county commissioners. See Child support / A6

By Scott Hammers

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The Bend City Council approved changes to a recently passed noise ordinance Wednesday, granting broad exceptions to the operators of the Les Schwab Amphitheater. With the changes, the amphitheater will not be affected by daytime noise limits that apply to other venues and events within the city. The ordinance exempts outdoor venues with a capacity for more than 5,000 spectators — a category that includes only the amphitheater, which is owned by William Smith Properties, the company that operates the Old Mill District. The blanket ban adopted in May prohibiting outdoor amplified sound between 10 p.m. and 7 a.m. that is clearly audible from a residential property would remain in effect. Councilor Mark Capell said the management of the amphitheater has made an effort to be good neighbors, but worried what might happen if the ownership of the facility changed. “If all of a sudden the situation changed, what’s our recourse?” Assistant City Attorney Gary Firestone told councilors the changes would apply to any future operators of the amphitheater, and that any changes would have to be approved by future councils. Amphitheater Director Marney Smith reported that the three concerts held over the Memorial Day weekend generated no noise complaints to the Bend Police Department. Music venues near the center of towns often get shut down due to noise issues, she said, and the amphitheater has always made an effort to balance the interests of concertgoers with those of nearby residents. See Noise / A4

By Andrew Pollack New York Times News Service

For the first time, researchers have determined virtually the entire genome of a fetus using only a blood sample from the pregnant woman and a saliva specimen from the father. The accomplishment heralds an era in which parents might find it easier to know the complete DNA blueprint of a child months before it is born. That would allow thousands of genetic diseases to be detected prenatally. But the ability to know so much about an unborn child is likely to raise serious ethical considerations as well. It could increase abortions for reasons that have little to do with medical issues and more to do with parental preferences for traits in children. “It’s an extraordinary piece of technology, really quite remarkable,” said Peter Benn, professor of genetics and developmental biology at the University of Connecticut, who was not involved in the work. “What I see in this paper is a glance into the future.” The paper, published Wednesday in the journal Science Translational Medicine, was written by genome scientists at the University of Washington. They took advantage of new high-speed DNA sequencing and some statistical and computational acrobatics to deduce the DNA sequence of the fetus with about 98 percent accuracy. The process is not practical, affordable or accurate enough for use now, experts said. The University of Washington researchers estimated that it would cost $20,000 to $50,000 to do one fetal genome today. See DNA / A4

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Congress may widen insurance subsidy as farmers take on risks By Ron Nixon New York Times News Service

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

S

ix-year-old Gavin Peden attempts to get a better look at the cowboys backstage Wednesday night while attending the Xtreme Bulls performance at the Sisters Rodeo with his mother, Moriah Peterson, 26. The pair decided to

have some fun and dress up as rodeo clowns for the night. For ticket and schedule information, see Page D1. For results from Wednesday’s event, see Page D2.

WASHINGTON — At the same time that high crop prices are prompting farmers to expand into millions of acres of land once considered unsuitable for farming, Congress is considering expanding a federal insurance program that reimburses farmers for most losses or drops in prices. The combination could cost the government billions of dollars if the newly farmed land does not yield enough crops and especially if crop prices fall. Advocates, including farm interest lobbyists and lawmakers with a long history of creating and protecting benefits, argue that the new program would save Washington money by replacing a long-standing one costing $5 billion a year, known as direct payments, that pays owners of farmland a set amount regardless of whether they have planted crops. See Crops / A4

Scientists extol teamwork over a solitary ‘eureka’ By Suzy Khimm The Washington Post

The United States needs its heroes, and it’s no different when it comes to innovation. “From Thomas Edison to Iron Man, you have this idea of single combat warriors working feverishly in the threadbare

den of solitude,” scientist Eric Isaacs said at a Washington conference in May, dropping a reference to the Marvel superhero who discovers a boundless source of clean energy. But it’s rarely the case that ideas are born, fully fledged, out of the heads of geniuses, just in time

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to save the world — outside the realm of fiction, at least. “Romantic myths about creative loners can’t be allowed to overshadow the fact that it’s a big collective enterprise … a multidisciplinary team, a system designed to maximize discovery,” said Isaacs, who

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happens to oversee one such facility, Chicago’s Argonne National Lab, the federal government’s first science and engineering research lab. The problem is, the myth of the lone genius toiling away still reigns supreme in the eyes of ordinary Americans and

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politicians alike. And so policymakers neglect the links in the innovation chain that come after that first “eureka” moment. The possibilities often fall by the wayside, leaving breakthroughs in the lab instead of in the hands of consumers. See Innovation / A6

TOP NEWS OBITUARY: Ray Bradbury, 91, C5


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More bacteria found on men’s office devices ScienceNOW It’s true what they say: Your keyboard is crawling with bacteria. But if you’re a woman, you may have less to worry about. Researchers who took swabs from office equipment in New York, San Francisco and Tucson, Ariz., found more than 500 types of bacteria, most of which normally live

on our skin or in our nasal, oral and intestinal cavities. Chairs and phones accumulated the most bacteria, followed by desktops, keyboards and computer mice. In a few cases, hardy microbes commonly found in hot springs and volcanic islands appeared in the mix, perhaps tracked into the office following someone’s vacation to St. Lucia or

Yellowstone. New York and San Francisco’s bacterial diversity was virtually identical, while Tucson’s microbes tended to be heavy on desert-soil bacteria in addition to the human-derived species. San Francisco offices were the least contaminated. And while the offices of men and women had the same types of species, women’s of-

fices had, on average, 10 to 20 percent fewer of them. Differences in hygiene may account for that, the research team reported in the online journal PLoS ONE. Men are known to wash their hands and brush their teeth less frequently than women, the researchers write, and are generally “perceived to have a more slovenly nature.”

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If you’re NASA, what do you do with 2 ex-spy telescopes? • Check out the mysteries of dark matter, perhaps ... By Dennis Overbye New York Times News Service

The phone call came like a bolt out of the blue, so to speak, in January 2011. On the other end of the line was someone from the National Reconnaissance Office, which operates the nation’s fleet of spy satellites. They had some spare unused “hardware” to get rid of. Was NASA interested? So when John Grunsfeld, the physicist and former astronaut, walked into his office a year later to start his new job as NASA’s associate administrator for space science, he discovered that his potential armada was a bit bigger than he knew. Sitting in a room in upstate New York were two telescopes the same size as the famed Hubble Space Telescope, but built to point down at the Earth instead of up at the heavens. NASA, struggling to get human space exploration moving again, had spent the previous year trying to figure out how good these telescopes were and what, if anything, they could be used for. Working with a small band of astronomers for the past couple of months, Grunsfeld, famous as the Hubble telescope’s in-orbit repairman, has now come up with a plan, which was presented to the public earlier this week at a meeting at the National Academy of Sciences in Washington. It is to turn one of the telescopes loose on the cosmos pointing in its rightful direction, outward, to investigate the mysterious dark energy that is speeding up the universe’s expansion. If the plan succeeds — and Congress, the Office of Management and Budget and the Academy of Sciences have yet to sign on — it could shave hundreds of millions of dollars and several years off a quest that many scientists say is the most fundamental of our time and that NASA had said it could not undertake until 2024 at the earliest. “This is a total game changer,” said David Spergel of

NASA via New York Times News Service

Astronaut John Grunsfeld, pictured during work on the Hubble Space Telescope in 2002, come up with a plan to use a hand-me-down spy telescope, pointing it away from the Earth rather than at it in an attempt to grasp the mysterious dark energy that is speeding up the universe’s expansion.

Princeton, co-chairman of a committee on astronomy and astrophysics for the National Academy of Sciences, which sets priorities for NASA and other agencies. Alan Dressler, of the Carnegie Observatories in Pasadena, Calif., who reported to the academy committee on the scientific potential of a mission with the NRO-1 telescope, as astronomers are calling it, called himself “really excited.” He told the gathering, “I think this is a tremendous opportunity for this community.” The two telescopes have a 94-inch-diameter primary mirror, just like Hubble, but are shorter in focal length, giving them a wider field of view: “Stubby Hubbles,” in the words of Matt Mountain, director of the Space Telescope Science Institute, adding, “They were clearly designed to look down.” Grunsfeld said his first reaction was that the telescopes would be a distraction. “We were getting something very expensive to handle and store,” he said. This spring he asked a small group of astronomers if one of the telescopes could be used as is to study dark energy. The answer, he said, was:

“Don’t change a thing. It’s perfect.” Astronomers have lobbied for a space mission to investigate dark energy ever since observations of the exploding stars known as supernovae indicated that the expansion of the universe was speeding up, the discovery that won three U.S. astronomers the Nobel Prize. The fate of the universe, as well as the nature of physics, scientists say, depends on the nature of this dark energy. But a decade of wrangling between agencies and astronomers over money and technical specifications had resulted in no consensus on a mission until 2010, when a committee of the National Academy of Sciences that was charged with determining astronomical priorities cobbled together a plan that would do the trick. In its report, “New Worlds, New Horizons,” the committee gave that mission the highest priority in space science for the next decade. The $1.5 billion project was called Wfirst, for Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope. Among its virtues was that it would search for exoplanets — planets beyond our solar system. But NASA, hobbled by

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HAPPENINGS • The Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission votes on proposed revisions to state trapping regulations. • Attorney General Eric Holder testifies before the House Judiciary Committee regarding Operation Fast and Furious, a botched guntrafficking investigation gambit by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives. • The Human Rights Campaign, a Washington, D.C.-based civil rights group, releases a nationwide survey of more than 10,000 gay and lesbian young people.

IN HISTORY Highlights: In 1769, frontiersman Daniel Boone first began to explore presentday Kentucky. In 1929, the sovereign state of Vatican City came into existence as copies of the Lateran Treaty were exchanged in Rome. In 1942, the World War II Battle of Midway ended in a decisive victory for American forces over the Imperial Japanese. In 1972, the musical “Grease” opened on Broadway, having already been performed in lower Manhattan. In 1998, in a crime that shocked the nation, James Byrd Jr., a 49-year-old black man, was hooked by a chain to a pickup truck and dragged to his death in Jasper, Texas. (Two white men were later sentenced to death for the crime; a third received life with the possibility of parole.) Ten years ago: Kennedy cousin Michael Skakel was convicted in Norwalk, Conn., of beating Greenwich neighbor Martha Moxley to death when they were 15 in 1975. (Skakel, who continues to maintain his innocence, was sentenced to 20 years to life in prison.) Five years ago: After three days in jail for a recklessdriving probation violation, Paris Hilton was released by Los Angeles County sheriff’s officials to be sent home under house arrest. (The next day, a judge ordered Hilton back to jail, where she spent 2½ weeks.) One year ago: Moammar Gadhafi stood defiant in the face of the heaviest and most punishing NATO airstrikes to date, declaring in an audio address carried on Libyan state television, “We will not kneel!”

BIRTHDAYS Singer Tom Jones is 72. Actor Ken Osmond (“Leave It to Beaver”) is 69. Actor Liam Neeson is 60. Singersongwriter Prince is 54. TV personality Bear Grylls is 38. Rock musician Eric Johnson (The Shins) is 36. Actor-comedian Bill Hader is 34. Tennis player Anna Kournikova is 31. Actor Michael Cera is 24. Actress Shelley Buckner is 23. — From wire reports

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mismanagement of the James Webb Space Telescope, has said that it will have no money to launch Wfirst until 2024 or later, if all goes well. But, given a green light and some money, a mission with the repurposed telescope could be started in 2020. But, Moore added, “we have no money.” Building the telescope can amount to a quarter to half the cost of a space astrophysics mission, astronomers said. Moore estimated that having it already could save the nation $250 million. It gets better. The telescope’s short length means its camera could have the wide field of view necessary to inspect large areas of the sky for supernovae. Even bigger advantages come, astronomers say, from the fact that the telescope’s diameter, 94 inches, is twice as big as that contemplated for Wfirst, giving it four times the light-gathering power, from which a whole host of savings cascade. Instead of requiring an expensive launch to a solar orbit, the telescope can operate in geosynchronous Earth orbit, complete its survey of the sky four times faster, and download data to the Earth faster.

It’s Thursday, June 7, the 159th day of 2012. There are 207 days left in the year.

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Ohio school withholds diplomas for families’ excessive cheering The Associated Press CINCINNATI — A suburban Cincinnati high school held onto four graduates’ diplomas and required community service as punishment for what it describes as overly boisterous cheering by their families during the graduation ceremony. The mother of one of the graduates, who was one of the leading tacklers on the Mount Healthy school football team, doesn’t think he should get flagged for excessive

celebration. “What does that have to do with him?” Traci Cornist said. She doesn’t dispute there was a lot of loud cheering for Anthony Cornist. Cornist also said she teaches her children to be accountable for their own actions, but she doesn’t think he should be punished for what other people do. Schools Superintendent Lori Handler said Wednesday the problem wasn’t the loudness of the yells, but their long

duration, which she said halted the ceremony. After past disruptions, a new policy was implemented this year aimed at making sure that all parents can hear their children’s names called and celebrated. When they ordered graduation tickets, parents agreed that “any disruptive behavior” would result in their child’s diploma being held until 20 hours of community service is completed, she said.

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THURSDAY, JUNE 7, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

T S Civilian death toll rises to 24 Is Walker in Wisconsin a on Afghanistan’s deadliest day ANALYSIS

portent for Romney in November? By Dan Balz The Washington Post

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker provided a template for Republicans looking ahead to the presidential race with his victory in Tuesday’s recall election: big money, powerful organization and enormous enthusiasm among his base. Can Mitt Romney match that in November? Both sides will examine the results for clues as to whether Wisconsin, which hasn’t voted for a Republican presidential candidate since 1984 but has been fiercely competitive in two of the last three elections, will again become a true battleground. If it does become as competitive as it was in 2000 and 2004, the electoral map will become far more challenging for President Barack Obama. In defeating Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett, Walker dealt a sizable blow to Wisconsin Democrats, progressives and the ranks of organized labor, who together threw everything they could into the effort to send the governor home before his term was half over. Whether he significantly damaged the president, who kept his distance from the contest, is less clear. Romney was quick to seize on the results and claim broader implications. In a statement issued by his campaign, he said, “Tonight’s results will echo beyond the borders of Wisconsin. Gov. Walker has shown that citizens and taxpayers can fight back — and prevail — against the runaway government costs imposed by labor bosses.” Obama had no comment on the outcome.

Romney’s route Romney can hope to replicate Walker’s model in two areas. The first is money. Walker raised more than $30 million for his recall campaign, with some from large donations that exceeded the normal limits because of the laws governing recall elections. Barrett raised $4 million. Romney won’t raise significantly more than Obama. But the presumptive GOP nominee can count on Republican super PACs to give him an overall advantage. Obama began the campaign more than a year ago amid assumptions that he would easily raise more than his Republican opponent. But Obama advisers worry that they will be heavily outspent by GOP super PACs. Other than the state of the economy, that potential funding disparity is the campaign’s biggest concern. Money may not decide the election in the end, but Romney and the Republicans currently appear to have the edge there. Walker’s victory was a party victory. The Republican Governors Association spent more than $9 million in his behalf. The Republican National Committee, led by Reince Priebus, a former Wisconsin GOP chair, and the state Republican Party combined for a total effort in mobilizing voters. All that paid dividends in defining Barrett and building an organization that proved superior to what many Democrats considered a fine get-out-the-vote operation of their own that was run by their party and the unions. DNC Chairman Debbie Wasserman Schultz, of Florida, said before the election that the recall would be a “dry run” for the Democrats’ ground operation for November. What Republicans showed in Wisconsin on Tuesday was their ability to run a superior voter mobilization operation, at least in this one election. Democrats doubt they can do that elsewhere. Obama officials say they see little evidence that Romney is as well organized as they are in the battleground states. But the Wisconsin effort gives the GOP something to build on.

By Alissa J. Rubin and Taimoor Shah New York Times News Service

KABUL, Afghanistan — Violence took the lives of at least two dozen Afghan civilians and possibly many more Wednesday, making it the deadliest day for Afghan civilians so far this year. The day included a complex suicide attack in Kandahar City and a NATO airstrike that Afghan officials and residents said had killed women and children in eastern Afghanistan, according to Afghan officials and residents. Last week, the head of the

U.N. Afghanistan office, Jan Kubic, said that in the first quarter of this year, civilian casualties had dropped for the first time since the United Nations began keeping statistics in 2007. That positive trend has appeared to be eroding in recent days. Another official in the office, James Rodehaver, said, “One thing we can say is that this has been the deadliest day of the year so far for civilians.” The alleged civilian casualties caused by a NATO airstrike took place in rural Logar province, and for much of the day there were

conflicting accounts of what had happened. By evening a NATO spokesman said that international forces and the Afghans had opened a joint investigation. According to Logar residents, including health workers who received the bodies of the dead, Western special operations forces, working with their Afghan counterparts, received word that a Taliban commander was using a civilian home for the night with some of his fighters. The joint force prepared to attack the house. As the soldiers’ force approached, they came un-

der fire from the Taliban and called in the airstrike, said Din Mohammed Darwish, the spokesman for the governor of Logar. “The airstrike not only damaged the house that the Taliban occupied, but it also has destroyed the adjacent house, which belonged to two brothers, Abdul Qayum and Abdul Bashir,” Darwish said. Seven women, 11 children and one man were in the adjacent house, and all of them were killed, according to health clinic workers in Sajawand, the village where the incident occurred.

ENTERPRISE’S FINAL BERTH

Christopher T. Gregory / New York Times News Service

The space shuttle Enterprise is loaded onto the Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum on the Hudson River in New York. The Enterprise, which arrived in the city in April, traveled the last leg of its voyage Wednesday morning. A quick look at where NASA’s shuttles will spend their retirements: Discovery: Flown in April to Smithsonian’s Udvar-Hazy Center near Washington Dulles International Airport in Virginia, taking the place of Enterprise. Fleet leader with 39 missions. Oldest survivor of the real shuttles. First flight in 1984, 39th and last in February-March 2011. Spent 365 days in space, traveled 148 million miles. Endeavour: Still at Kennedy Space Center. Will be flown in September to California Science Center in Los Angeles. Youngest shuttle, built as replacement for the destroyed Challenger. First flight in 1992, 25th and last in May-June 2011. Spent 299 days in space, traveled 123 million miles. Atlantis: Still at Kennedy Space Center. Will be trans-

ported down the road to the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in November. First flight in 1985, 33rd and last in July 2011. Spent 307 days in space, traveled 126 million miles. Enterprise: Flown in April from Smithsonian to New York. Prototype shuttle used in five approach-and-landing tests at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif., in 1977; dropped off back of modified jumbo jets with two-man astronaut crews and guided to landings. Never flew in space nor was it designed to do so. Used in NASA tests and traveling exhibits, then given to Smithsonian in 1985.

A3

New Syria massacre reported as pressure mounts The Washington Post BEIRUT — There were unconfirmed reports of a fresh massacre in Syria on Wednesday as representatives from 55 countries assembled in Washington to explore ways to sharpen the impact of economic sanctions against the Syrian government. The reports said dozens of civilians in a small village near the central city of Hama were slain by pro-government militias Wednesday afternoon, echoing the circumstances of the killings of more than 100 people in the village of Houla on May 25. Two activists in Hama said Wednesday that at least 30 people, and possibly many more, had been killed in Qubair, northwest of Hama, after the pro-government militias known as the shabiha raided the village. Government forces had blocked roads leading to the village and prevented activists from gathering evidence of the killings, they said. But one of the activists, Asem Abu Mohammed, said he had received frantic calls for help from people in the village starting in the late afternoon. Another activist, Mousab al-Hamadi, said people in the village told him that many women and children were among those who had been hacked to death with knives by the militiamen. Senior Obama administration officials invoked the Houla massacre multiple times Wednesday as they sought to encourage allies to toughen sanctions against Syria.

— The Associated Press

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N   B Delay possible in WikiLeaks trial

Jury selected in Sandusky case

FORT MEADE, Md. — An exhaustive search for government records assessing the impact of the WikiLeaks disclosures could delay the court-martial of the Army private charged with causing the biggest intelligence leak in U.S. history, a military judge said Wednesday. With the defense accusing prosecutors of sitting on evidence potentially favorable to Pfc. Bradley Manning, the judge indicated she would consider his lawyers’ request for a stay of proceedings. The trial is set to begin Sept. 21. “The court is certainly willing to entertain any good-cause motions for continuance,” Col. Denise Lind said from the bench during a pretrial hearing at Fort Meade that is scheduled to continue through Friday. Lind didn’t say when she would rule on the defense motion. Manning, a 24-year-old Crescent, Okla., native, is charged with knowingly aiding al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula by allegedly causing hundreds of thousands of classified war logs, video clips and diplomatic cables to be published on the secret-sharing website WikiLeaks.

BELLEFONTE, Pa. — A jury dominated by people with Penn State loyalties was selected Wednesday to decide Jerry Sandusky’s fate in the child sexual abuse scandal that rocked the university and led to football coach Joe Paterno’s downfall. The seven women and five men who will hear opening statements on Monday include an engineering administrative assistant at Penn State, a dance teacher in the continuing education program and a professor who has been on the faculty for 24 years. Also: a Penn State senior, a retired soil sciences professor with 37 years at the university, a man with bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the school and a woman who has been a season ticketholder since the 1970s. Sandusky, a 68-year-old former assistant football coach, is charged with sexually abusing 10 boys over a 15-year span. Picking the jury took less than two days, moving along more swiftly than some had expected, given that the rural area is rich with Penn State employees, alumni and fans, many of whom have strong opinions about the case. — From wire reports

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THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, JUNE 7, 2012

W  B Talks begin over Spanish bailout BERLIN — The bargaining has begun over a deal to rescue Spain’s ailing banks, confronting Europe with urgent choices about whether to try to enforce onerous bailout terms on Madrid as the crisis spreads to the region’s largest economies. The question has seemingly become one of when and not if Spain’s banks will receive assistance from European countries, with investors on Wednesday predicting an imminent rescue and pushing up stocks and bonds on both sides of the Atlantic. Spain, the eurozone’s fourth-largest economy, is too big too fail and possibly too big to steamroll, changing the balance of power in negotiations over a bailout. Political leaders in Madrid are insisting that emergency aid to their banks avoid the stigma in capital markets that has hobbled countries like Greece, Portugal and Ireland after accepting tough rescue terms. Madrid’s trump card in this latest game of eurozone poker is that the consequences of a Spanish default and exit from the eurozone would likely be so catastrophic that policymakers in Berlin will be willing to bend their bailout rules for Spain.

Mubarak worsens in uncertain Egypt CAIRO — Hosni Mubarak’s health sharply deteriorated Wednesday, days after he was sentenced to life in prison, and specialists were evaluating whether to transfer him to a better-equipped hospital outside the penal system, security officials said. The deposed leader’s health scare added to the uncertainty engulfing Egypt, where powerful political groups are seeking to bar Mubarak’s former prime minister from the presidential runoff and derail the election. Officials at Cairo’s Torah prison said the 84-year-old Mubarak’s condition had moved to a “dangerous” phase and that doctors administered oxygen five times to help him breathe. He was also suffering from shock, high blood pressure and severe depression, according to the officials, who spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak to the media.

Britain’s Philip said to be on the mend LONDON — The condition of Prince Philip, who is in the hospital with a bladder infection, has “improved considerably” and he is in “good spirits,” Buckingham Palace in London said Wednesday. The statement came as Queen Elizabeth II visited her husband in the hospital, after she came away from hosting a lunch for Commonwealth leaders to mark her Diamond Jubilee. Her 90-year-old husband would remain in the private Edward VII Hospital for the next few days, the statement said.

Russian protesters in line for big fines MOSCOW — The Kremlin-controlled upper house of Russia’s parliament on Wednesday approved a controversial measure that imposes stiff fines on protests that don’t match the government’s tight rules. The bill, which President Vladimir Putin is expected to sign into law in the next few days, levies fines of as much as $20,000 on organizers of demonstrations that have been banned, draw larger crowds than permitted, take place at a time or location not approved or turn violent. Those who attend such protests would face fines of as much as $10,000. The measure also provides for up to 200 hours of community service as a punishment for violators. The legislation, which has aroused a public outcry among Russian activists, was passed by the upper chamber, or Federation Council, after just two hours of discussion, following a painstaking and at times fiery debate in the lower house on Tuesday. — From wire reports

Noise Continued from A1 “If we don’t continue to be good neighbors, our ability to do business as an amphitheater would be impacted,” she said. “It’s in our best interest to continue to be good neighbors.” Overly restrictive limits on noise would make it difficult for the amphitheater to continue to attract national-caliber performers, Smith said.

Councilor Scott Ramsay said he could support an even broader exception for venues such as Drake Park and the Athletic Club of Bend. Ramsay called outdoor concerts a “vibrant” part of the community, and recalled how someone had recently reported to him that the recent concert by The Shins at the amphitheater was too quiet, and wondered if the city noise ordinance might be responsible. A second reading will be

heard on the noise ordinance at a future council meeting. In other action Wednesday, the council approved Police Chief Jeff Sale’s proposal for cracking down on false alarms generated by home and business security systems. Sale has claimed his department spends an estimated $111,000 responding to false alarms. Councilors split 4-3, with Mayor Jeff Eager and councilors Tom Greene and Scott

Ramsay opposing the new rules. Repeating objections he raised at an earlier meeting, Eager said he could not support the requirement that home and business owners register their alarm systems with the city. Owners of alarm systems will now be subject to fines of $100 for a first false alarm, $150 for a second, and $300 for each additional false alarm. Councilors also discussed

Crops Continued from A1 Crop insurance has existed for decades, with the government now spending about $7 billion a year to pay about two-thirds of the cost of farmers’ premiums. Under the federal program, farmers can buy insurance that covers poor yields, declines in prices or both. On Tuesday, the Senate began debate on a farm bill, passed by the Agriculture Committee in April, that would set up another crop insurance subsidy, costing $3 billion a year, to cover any losses farmers suffer, known as deductibles, before their crop insurance policies kick in. “Congress must give farmers the certainty they need to keep this industry thriving,” the Senate majority leader, Harry Reid, D-Nev., said Wednesday. “This measure will create jobs and cut subsidies, and includes important reforms to make farm and food stamp programs more accountable and more defensible.” The change from the existing direct payment program to the crop insurance subsidies as the primary safety net for farmers means that “payments are going to people who are actually farming,” Sen. Debbie Stabenow, D-Mich., chairwoman of the Agriculture Committee, said Wednesday. The Senate measure would cut about $23 billion in spending over the next 10 years, although that is far less than the Obama administration wanted.

DNA Continued from A1 But the cost of DNA sequencing is falling at a blistering pace, and accuracy is improving as well. The researchers estimated that the procedure could be widely available in three to five years. Others said it would take somewhat longer. It is already possible to determine the DNA sequence of a fetus by acquiring fetal cells through amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling, which involves testing the placental tissue. But these procedures are invasive and carry a slight risk of inducing a miscarriage. For couples worried about passing on a genetic disease, it is also possible to use in vitro fertilization and have an embryo genetically tested before implantation into the womb. But the technique described in the paper would not require complete cells from the fetus and would make such DNA testing easier and less risky. “If this sort of thing is ever to be used on a widespread basis, I think it necessarily has to be noninvasive,” said Jay Shendure, associate professor of genome sciences at the University of Washington, who supervised the research team. The genome was determined from blood samples taken 18.5 weeks into the pregnancy, although the researchers said the technique could probably be applied in the first trimester, as early as or even earlier than some invasive techniques. The technique takes advantage of the discovery in the 1990s that fragments of DNA from the fetus can be found in a pregnant woman’s blood plasma, probably the result of fetal cells dying and breaking apart. These fragments can be genetically analyzed, providing that the fetal DNA fragments can be distin-

Deborah Kates / New York Times News Service

A tractor works a hilly field in Stutsman County, N.D. As farmers respond to high crop prices by expanding into millions of acres once considered unsuitable for farming, Congress is considering adding to a federal insurance program that reimburses them for most losses or price drops.

Crop insurance supporters say insurance programs provide an important safety net for farmers who are subject to the whims of weather, pests and volatile markets. Farmers actually have to plant crops to receive insurance subsidies unlike the existing direct payment programs. “Cuts in the crop insurance program would reduce the effectiveness of the most important risk-management tool farmers have,” said Sam Willett, senior director of public policy at the National Corn Growers Association. Even some farmers argue that the subsidies are already generous to agribusinesses, especially with the government facing large deficits. Jim Faulstich, a farmer and rancher in Highmore, S.D., said he was in favor of farmers having crop insurance

but added that the insurance should not be used to make money at taxpayer expense. “If we as farmers expect taxpayers to support premium subsidies, it’s only fair that we grow on land that is capable of supporting it,” he said. “Could some of this land be profitable without the crop insurance subsidy? I think not.” The sharp rise in the price of corn, wheat, soybeans and other crops, driven in large part by the growth of Asian economies, has caused farmers to plant land long prone to erosion and flooding. In the prairies and rolling hills of the northern Great Plains in the Dakotas and in Montana, millions of acres that are home to ducks and other waterfowl, and attractive grounds for hunters, are rapidly being turned into corn,

“Our capacity to generate data is outstripping our ability to interpret it in ways that are useful to physicians and patients.” — University of Washington research paper

guished from the far more numerous fragments that come from the mother herself. The analysis of fetal DNA fragments found in a pregnant woman’s blood is already used in new commercially available tests of the fetus’ gender, its paternity and whether it has Down syndrome. But reconstructing an entire genome from DNA fragments is much more difficult. Such information would allow detection of so-called Mendelian disorders, like cystic fibrosis, Tay-Sachs disease and Marfan syndrome, which are caused by mutations in a single gene. More than 3,000 such diseases collectively occur in about 1 percent of births. The mutations can be inherited from the parents or they can arise spontaneously in the fetus. Researchers led by Dennis Lo at the Chinese University of Hong Kong first showed in 2010 that reconstructing a fetal genome would be possible. Other work toward this goal has been done by Stephen Quake and colleagues at Stanford University. But Lo’s team used a maternal sample obtained invasively. And it could determine only the inherited mutations, not the spontaneous ones. The University of Washington researchers, using an approach partly developed by a graduate student, Jacob O.

Kitzman, did not need an invasive test. And they were able to detect 39 of 44 such spontaneous mutations, though with a huge number of false positives. “This will be a step toward having a better and better prenatal diagnosis that detects more and more at a reliable cost,” said Dr. Arthur Beaudet, chairman of molecular and human genetics at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston. Beaudet, who was not involved in the work, said that spontaneous mutations account for about 10 percent of cases of mental retardation and other learning disabilities. The ability to sequence an entire fetal genome is likely to raise numerous issues. “There are some scenarios that are extremely troubling,” said Marcy Darnovsky, associate executive director of the Center for Genetics and Society, a public interest group in Berkeley, Calif. The tests will spur questions on “who deserves to be born,” she said. Use of the approach could lead to an increase in abortions because some parents might terminate the pregnancy if the fetus was found to have a genetic disease. But it is also possible that parents may be tempted to terminate if the fetus lacked a favorable trait like athletic prowess. “You could start doing things more toward the direction of positive selection,” said

soybean and wheat fields. In some Montana counties, once-marginal land is selling for nearly $2,000 an acre, up from about $300 in 1991, as the high crop prices drive the need for more areas for farm production. According to data from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, since 2007, South Dakota has lost nearly 500,000 acres of grassland to farming. In North Dakota, more than 1 million acres have become farmland over the same time period. “Land that was once considered marginal is now being looked at more from a farm production and financial standpoint,” said Bruce Brock, a real estate auctioneer in Le Mars, Iowa. ‘With commodity prices being what they are, people are looking everywhere for land they can plant corn or some other high-priced crop.”

Dr. Stephen Brown, associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Vermont. Moreover, a full fetal genome sequence would turn up numerous mutations for which information is lacking as to whether they cause disease, posing a dilemma for expectant parents and their doctors. “Our capacity to generate data is outstripping our ability to interpret it in ways that are useful to physicians

and dismissed the idea of passing a resolution calling for a constitutional amendment overturning the Citizens United ruling by the Supreme Court. The 2010 ruling lifted some restrictions on spending in federal elections, allowing independent groups to campaign more directly for or against a candidate without disclosing the names of their donors. — Reporter: 541-383-0387, shammers@bendbulletin.com,

Brock said he recently sold about 1,300 acres of pastureland in South Dakota that fetched a price of about $2,600 an acre. The same land would have gone for $200 to $300 if it had remained grassland, he said. By guaranteeing income, farmers say, crop insurance removes almost any financial risk for planting land where crop failure is almost certain. “When you can remove nearly all the risk involved and guarantee yourself a profit, it’s not a bad business decision,” said Darwyn Bach, a farmer in St. Leo, Minn., who said that he is guaranteed about $1,000 an acre in revenue before he puts a single seed in the ground because of crop insurance. “I can farm on low-quality land that I know is not going to produce and still turn a profit.” For years, the government provided an incentive for farmers and landowners to keep marginal land in conservation because years of farming had led to topsoil erosion. In 1985, the government started the Conservation Reserve Program, which paid farmers to let lands stay wild. Today, the government pays about $50 an acre for farmers to keep their lands in conservation. But with land prices skyrocketing, many farmers are more likely to sell land than take a modest payment to preserve grassland. Environmentalists, hunting groups and even some farmers say the prospect of expanding insurance will only speed the push to turn grasslands into farms. Crop insurance programs do not require farmers to adopt any conservation methods for the land.

and patients,” the University of Washington researchers wrote in their paper. “That is, although the noninvasive prediction of a fetal genome may be technically feasible, its interpretation — even for known Mendelian disorders — will remain a major challenge.”

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THURSDAY, JUNE 7, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

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THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, JUNE 7, 2012

‘Band of Brothers’ honored CT scans raise on anniversary of D-Day children’s cancer risk, study finds By Greg Keller

The Associated Press

SA I N T E -M A R I E -DUMONT, France — With World War II-era military planes darting overhead and Normandy’s Utah Beach visible in the distance, a bronze statue emerged from beneath a camouflage parachute, in tribute to a man whose quiet leadership was chronicled in the book and television series “Band of Brothers.” The unveiling of the Colorado-made statue of Pennsylvania native Maj. Dick Winters was one of many events marking Wednesday’s 68th anniversary of D-Day, the Allied operation that paved the way for the end of the war. The 12-foot-tall bronze statue in the Normandy village of Sainte-Marie-du-Mont shows Winters with his weapon at the ready. But Winters — a native of Ephrata, Pennsylvania, who died last year at age 92 — only accepted serving as the statue’s likeness after monument planners agreed to dedicate it to the memory of all junior U.S. military officers who served that day. “There were many Dick Winters in this war, and all

Innovation Continued from A1 That was the upshot of the New America Foundation’s event on the future of innovation. Too often, Isaacs said, the conversation about research and development in Washington stops at that first phase: funding research aimed at letting scientists make discoveries in peace. Capitol Hill’s conception of research relies on a notion that’s practically deistic, said Daniel Sarewitz, a professor at Arizona State University: “You put in money, and good things happen.” And that faith has kept R&D budgets relatively steady in recent decades.

Support for D’s But what gets forgotten are the two “Ds” that come after R&D — “demonstration and deployment,” which are essential to applying basic research to real-life problems and creating commercial products, said Andrew Revkin of Dot Earth. That’s where the scientists think the real support is lacking — not only from the government, but also from the private sector, which has scaled back its most ambitious applied research in recent decades. During the 20th century heyday of innovation, American corporations had their own massive R&D labs, with the resources, capacity and business interest to commercialize their findings — Xerox Park, IBM and the famous AT&T Bell Labs. Bell researchers invented everything from the transistor and the laser to information theory, which made possible the development of the Internet. During these labs’ golden

Remy de la Mauviniere / The Associated Press

A statue depicting U.S. Maj. Dick Winters was unveiled Wednesday near the beaches where the D-Day invasion of France began in 1944. Winters, chronicled in the book and television series “Band of Brothers,” only agreed to the statue after planners agreed to dedicate it to all U.S. junior officers who fought that day.

deserve the bronze and glory of a statue,” said former Pennsylvania Governor Tom Ridge, present as the bronze statue, draped in a camouflage parachute, was unveiled. Also attending were four or five D-Day vets, including two who served in Winters’ “Easy Company,” Al Mampre and Herb Suerth Jr. Winters “was a humble,

simple person thrust into a position of leadership in which he excelled,” said Suerth, who heads the association of former Easy Company vets, only 19 of whom survive. The statue was made in Loveland, Colorado, and transported here, to a roadside between the village of Sainte-Marie-duMont and Utah Beach, distant but visible behind the statue.

years, market conditions were significantly more forgiving — particularly for AT&T, which had a monopoly on phone service. Now that competition is fierce, and the bottom line is king, “corporations are not willing to do this anymore — invest in the long term,” Isaacs said. That has largely left academic researchers and a handful of government labs to carry out R&D, and they often end up one step removed from the market of real-world applications. There’s still one arena in which the government, the private sector and universities collaborate closely: the Pentagon, which helped give birth to many of the past century’s biggest breakthroughs. But the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency alone isn’t enough to puzzle out, say, the next generation of car batteries, solar cells and computer hardware. Fostering this kind of innovation goes well beyond funding basic R&D, and that’s where it gets complicated. Government tax credits, for instance, could help new technology overcome the “valley of death” — the long path from pilot models to fully commercialized products. But such tax credits fall victim to partisan bickering. Republicans don’t like them for clean energy; Democrats oppose those for oil and gas. Clean energy lost out the last time around. Congress let a whole slew of tax credits for the industry expire last year. New America’s Michael Lind proposed another idea: Use the bond market to create a “national R&D bank” that could tap into private capital, as Maine and California have done. The idea is similar to

the “clean energy investment bank” proposed in 2008 to provide debt-financing for private investors to commercialize new research. But both proposals would invariably run into resistance from freemarket purists who insist that the government shouldn’t be picking winners and losers. Finally, changes could come from universities by encouraging academic researchers to bring their innovations to the real world. Of course, too-cozy ties between private corporations and college scientists raise concerns that academic inquiry would be co-opted by the corporate bottom line.

It was here that Winters and his small band of men dropped out of the sky soon after midnight on June 6, 1944, on a death-defying mission to destroy four German 105mm artillery guns that threatened the Allied invasion force. During the ceremony, World War II-era military aircraft flew overhead, including a U.S. artillery spotting plane just like those that would have darted through the skies on D-Day. Master Sergeant Frank Barnett, 37, a paratrooper from Anniston, Alabama, serving at the U.S. Air Force base in Ramstein, Germany, attended the ceremony with other members of the 435th Air Ground Operations Wing. Barnett and 18 colleagues had made the trip to Utah Beach to participate in a parachute jump over the same Normandy fields where Winters and his “Easy Company” landed soon on D-Day. The paratroopers, dressed in military fatigues, said they’ve all watched “Band of Brothers” ‘‘four or five times.” “It’s important for us on the airborne side to remember everything they did,” Barnett said. “They are the Greatest Generation.”

ed the light bulb with the help of 40-odd scientists. “Edison was nothing more than director of a great laboratory,” he said. Even Marvel superhero Tony Stark, aka Iron Man, recognized the importance of institutional support. After being attacked for war profiteering off his company’s weapons division, he described “the millions we’ve saved by advancing medical technology or kept from starvation with our intelli-crops.” He added: “All those breakthroughs, military funding, honey.”

By Denise Grady New York Times News Service

CT scans in children can cause small but significant increases in the risk of leukemia and brain cancer, a new study finds. Researchers say the results do not mean that CT scans should be avoided entirely — they can be vitally important in certain situations, like diagnosing severe head injuries — but that the test should be performed only when necessary, and with the lowest possible dose of radiation. CT, or computed tomography, scans take X-rays from various angles and combine them to create cross-sectional images, and they involve much more radiation than traditional X-ray techniques. Concern about potential harm from the scans has grown as their use has climbed steeply; at least 4 million children a year receive scans in the United States, and researchers estimate that a third of the scans are unnecessary or could be replaced by safer tests, like ultrasound or magnetic resonance imaging, which do not use radiation. The new study, published online Wednesday in The Lancet, a British medical journal, is based on the records of nearly 180,000 children who had scans from 1985 to 2002 in Britain. There were 74 cases of leukemia and 135 cases of brain cancer in the group. The authors estimated the radiation doses and found that the more scans the children had and the more radiation they received, the higher their risk. Children under 15 who had two or three scans of the head had triple the risk of brain cancer compared with the general population, the

researchers found, and five to 10 scans tripled the risk of leukemia. But the baseline risk is extremely low — 4.5 cases of leukemia per 100,000 people under 20, and 3.5 cases of cancer of the brain or central nervous system — so that even tripled, it remains small. “The basic message for childhood cancers is that they are rare,” said Mark S. Pearce, the first author of the study, from Newcastle University and the Royal Victoria Infirmary. In response, the American College of Radiology issued a statement urging parents not to refuse needed CT scans, especially for potentially life-threatening conditions like head and spine injuries, pneumonia complications and chest infections. But the organization also lists conditions for which CT should not be the first choice; one is suspected appendicitis in children, for which the group recommends that ultrasound be used first, followed by CT only if the ultrasound is equivocal. The Lancet study has limitations: It is observational, meaning that the researchers just looked at what happened to patients without picking them at random to be treated or not, which provides more solid evidence but cannot be justified ethically in studies of radiation. In this case, all the children received scans; there is no unexposed control group. And the researchers say they do not know why the children had the scans, although they excluded those whose cancer diagnosis came so soon after the CT scan that it may have been present before the scan was performed.

Success in Silicon Valley Despite the quandary over solutions, perhaps it’s no surprise that one area of innovation that’s flourishing is Silicon Valley. In the tech industry, the myth of the solitary genius holds some basis in fact, particularly in its latest incarnation. Unlike energy, health or other resourceintensive fields, the “app economy” doesn’t typically need huge teams of research scientists and engineers. Just a guy wearing a hoodie in his college dorm will do. But the same conditions don’t hold for other industries — ones that could arguably do more to affect the future of the American economy and job creation. After all, even the most storied inventors in U.S. history typically had teams and institutions supporting them. The birthplace of Silicon Valley is memorialized in Dave Packard’s old car garage in Palo Alto, Calif., but Packard and Bill Hewlett created the first prototype of their new oscillator at Stanford University. And Isaacs points out that Edison invent-

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Child support Continued from A1 Federal and state money would cover much of the cost, but the county would have to pay $89,000 to $92,000 annually at a time when the county is laying off employees and keeping jobs vacant in other departments. Interim County Administrator Erik Kropp said the timing of the district attorney’s request was unfortunate because this would be a great program to support if the county had the money to spend. “I’m concerned about the cost to the county,” Kropp said. “Next year’s proposed budget includes elimination of eight positions out of our Sheriff’s Office, about eight in other county departments, about five or six layoffs, and I’m concerned about the timing of adding additional costs to the county at a time when we’re cutting elsewhere.” The county budget committee, composed of the three

county commissioners and three citizen members, rejected the proposal in late May. But on Wednesday, commissioners said they will reconsider the request when they vote later this month on next year’s budget. The District Attorney’s Office would not take over all child support cases. The neediest families — for example, those that receive welfare or have a child in the juvenile justice system — would continue to have their child enforcement cases handled by the state’s Division of Child Support. Commissioner Alan Unger said prosecutors in the District Attorney’s Office could pitch in to help the state increase enforcement without the cost of hiring administrative staff. Under such an arrangement, the District Attorney’s Office would not be compensated for its work, Fogarty said. Kropp said this setup would be more cost-effective. Flaherty said it would actually be more cost-effective to have two offices, although he

did not go into detail. Unger said he worried that although the District Attorney’s Office would receive more money for support enforcement, the Division of Child Support would lose some money for cases that involve poorer families. Fogarty said the Division of Child Support would probably lose $250,000 to $260,000 in federal money if the county takes over its portion of enforcement cases. Anderson said the District Attorney’s Office hopes to take over some of the child support enforcement caseload by January. Flaherty said he hopes the county will not delay a decision. “The economic conditions as Erik (Kropp) has mentioned are difficult, but they’re especially difficult for families that are not getting the child support that they have due,” Flaherty said. — Reporter: 541-617-7829, hborrud@bendbulletin.com

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OUTING

TV & Movies, B2 Calendar, B3 Dear Abby, B3

B

Horoscope, B3 Comics, B4-5 Puzzles, B5

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, JUNE 7, 2012

www.bendbulletin.com/outing

TRAIL UPDATE Trails slowly open up Cooler temperatures have slowed the melting process on wilderness trails, said Chris Sabo, U.S. Forest Service trails specialist. Sabo reported four inches of new snow fell at Willamette Pass this week and high elevations around Central Oregon are “a little wintery.” The snow line for the general area is 5,400-5,600 feet and there may be patchy snow below that, Sabo said. The Cascade Lakes Highway is open between Dutchman Flat Sno-park and Elk Lake, but parking is not possible until Devils Lake, where there are some wide, paved areas along the road. Dutchman Flat has three to four feet of snow. Trailheads along the highway, including Devils, Todd, Green and Mirror lakes and access to South Sister are blocked by snow.

See Trails / B6

Photos by David Jasper / The Bulletin

The Little Deschutes River, left, and Deschutes River meet in Sunriver, just an easy paddle upstream from the public boat ramp at Spring River Road.

SPOTLIGHT Dairy will host raw milk event Windy Acres Dairy, 3320 N.W. Stahancyk Lane, in Prineville, is hosting “Farm to Table: Freedom of Choice” on Sunday. The event will feature presentations by raw milk advocates from Canada, California and Florida: Michael Schmidt, the creator of Cow Share Canada and champion of raw milk and food freedom; Mark McAfee, founder of McAfee Farms and Organic Pastures Dairy near Fresno, Calif.; and Pete Kennedy, president of the Farm-To-Consumer Legal Defense Fund. A three-course meal to be served at 2 p.m., prepared by chef Lynn Wright, will feature meats and dairy items from Windy Acres as well as other Central Oregon foodstuffs. Presentations begin at 4 p.m., followed by an auction and square dancing. Tickets to the event cost $40 in advance if attending the luncheon, which is limited to 100 participants. Nonluncheon tickets cost $10 in advance and $15 at the door. Contact: www.Windy AcresDairy.com.

The

sun, the river

• Navigating the calm waters of Deschutes, Little Deschutes through the soothing community of Sunriver By David Jasper The Bulletin

think I want to move to Sunriver. After 10½ years in Central Oregon, I’m finally beginning to understand the appeal of the resort community south of Bend: It’s pretty, it’s clean, it’s conveniently located and the people are friendly. I assume the friendliness stems from the fact that people in Sunriver are often on vacation or are retirees on permanent vacation. That, or they work for institutions that serve the vacation set, so being nice is a job requirement. This all started in April, when I wrote in this space about spring mountain biking along the Deschutes River to Sunriver (and getting slightly discombobulated by its roundabout system). Then, a couple of weeks back, my oldest daughter and I pedaled our bikes around

I

Sunriver’s paths while her sisters attended a pool party at the fitness club Mavericks at Sunriver, and before the day was through, she began saying we should move there. After a stress-free day spent hanging out down there, who was I to disagree? Perhaps even better was last Friday, a mostly sunny day (or was it partly cloudy? Anyone know the difference?) when the temperature hovered around 80. I remember it warmly as I now sit indoors huddled with a jacket over my shoulders. Such are the fickle days of June weather in Central Oregon. Fortunately, Map Guy and I were prepared to take advantage of what would be the last sunny and warm day for a while by canoeing up the Deschutes River to the confluence of the Little Deschutes River, one of the Deschutes’ tributaries, and upstream. See Outing / B6

— From staff reports

Corrections A story titled “Water always wins,” which appeared Thursday, May 31, on Page B1, contained incorrect directions. The Meadow Camp Picnic Area is off of Forest Road 100, which turns off the Cascade Lakes Highway before the Widgi Creek Golf Course. A brief headlined “Healthy urban planning lecture,” which published Sunday, June 3, on Page D1, included incorrect price information. The “Designing Healthful, Livable Communities” presentation on June 21 costs $20 for any attendee. The Bulletin regrets the error.

Swallows take to the air over the Little Deschutes.

Three kayakers relax while drifting down the Little Deschutes River near its confluence with the Upper Deschutes.

Columnist recounts intro to hunting in memoir By David Jasper The Bulletin

Submitted photo

Grand Central Publishing will release a new book next week by Bulletin columnist Lily Raff McCaulou titled “Call of the Mild: Learning to Hunt My Own Dinner.” The book is a memoir about Raff McCaulou’s transition from Manhattan, where she worked in independent film production and knew “fun,

artsy people,” she writes, to a life in Central Oregon, where she began hunting two years after the move. During their courtship, her husband, Scott McCaulou, took her fly-fishing on the Deschutes River. Though he does not hunt, fly-fishing would become her “gateway drug” to learning to hunt at age 26. In her April 16 column, Raff

McCaulou wrote, “I suddenly decided to pull on camouflage and pick up a gun. My reasons were complicated. The short explanation is that I wanted to better understand the traditions of the rural communities I was writing about. I also wanted to learn more about where my food comes from and how humans fit into the ecosystem.” Raff McCallou, now 32,

says her first hunting safety class amid children in Culver in late 2006 was such a “funny, bizarre experience” that she began taking notes, thinking she may write an article down the line. Instead, while spending a year doing a journalism fellowship at the University of Michigan in 2009-10, she began writing the book. See Book / B6


B2

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, JUNE 7, 2012

TV & M

‘Dallas’ reboot delivers buckets of soapy fun to see “who shot J.R.?� (the first time). TNT’s version rides the By Chuck Barney coattails of that storied past by Contra Costa Times weaving in classic characters Everywhere you look these such as J.R., Bobby (Patrick days, things are being down- Duffy) and Sue Ellen (Linda sized and diminished. Even Gray) with the youngsters, the great J.R. Ewing isn’t im- and does it better than the mune to the trend. CW’s “90210,� which pretty Larry Hagman’s iconic char- much relegated the old guard acter doesn’t show up until to bit-player status in its first nearly 15 minutes season. into the premiere In the “DalTV SPOTLIGHT episode of TNT’s las� reboot — or new update of the extended “Dallas,� and he logs precious saga, as producers prefer to little camera time in the opener. pitch it — we have Josh HenMoreover, the conniving derson cast as John Ross, the Texas oilman who once was duplicitous son of J.R. and Sue larger than life now appears Ellen. He’s determined to drill old and feeble. Age, of course, for oil on Southfork Ranch, has taken its toll, and appar- despite the strident objections ently, so have three marriages, of Bobby, who continually refour shootings and too many minds everyone that “Mama� sinful shenanigans to count. never wanted Ewing land to But don’t go thinking for a suffer such desecration. moment that ol’ J.R. will be Then there’s Jesse Metcalfe, nothing but a marginal util- who plays Christopher, the adity player in this new-look soap opted son of Bobby and his wife, that introduces the next gener- Ann (Brenda Strong). He wants ation of Ewings. He may have to take the family business in lost a little zip off his fastball, a dramatic new direction via but he’s still got game, and J.R. alternative energy sources. is still very much capable of Naturally, this puts Christopher taking down others with despi- at odds with John. Amping up cable deeds. So, amen to that. the tension is the fact that these “Dallas� represents yet cousins have feelings for the another attempt by the idea- same woman, Elena Ramos starved folks in Hollywood to (Jordana Brewster). breathe new life into a former“Dallas� is teeming with ly popular brand (See: “Mel- the soapy plots, delectable eye rose Place,� “90210,� “Bionic candy and bad blood we crave Woman,� “Hawaii Five-0,� in our TV guilty pleasures. “Charlie’s Angels,� and so on.) It also maintains the general In this case, we’re talking tone of the original without ultra-popular. “Dallas� was a devolving into camp. global sensation that aired on Though Hagman’s camera CBS for 14 seasons (1978-91) time may have waned, his and eventually appeared in reputation and sense of commore than 90 countries. It also mand are such that you feel struck one of the greatest rat- J.R.’s presence even when he’s ings gushers in American TV not on screen. history when 83 million viewLet the back-stabbing ers tuned in on Nov. 21, 1980, begin. “Dallas� 9 p.m. June 13, TNT

L M T 

FOR THURSDAY, JUNE 7

SISTERS Sisters Movie House

BEND

720 Desperado Court, Sisters, 541-549-8800

Regal Pilot Butte 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend, 541-382-6347

CHIMPANZEE (G) 6:15 MEN IN BLACK 3 (PG-13) 6:45 SNOW WHITE AND THE HUNTSMAN (PG-13) 6:30

THE BEST EXOTIC MARIGOLD HOTEL (PG-13) 12:30, 3:30, 6:30 DARLING COMPANION (PG-13) 1:15, 7:15 FOR GREATER GLORY (R) Noon, 3, 6 THE HUNGER GAMES (PG-13) 12:45, 3:45, 6:45 MARVEL’S THE AVENGERS (PG13) 12:15, 3:15, 6:15 MEN IN BLACK 3 (PG-13) 1, 4, 7 MY WAY (R) 4:15

Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend, 541-382-6347

BATTLESHIP (PG-13) 11:50 a.m., 2:55, 6:20, 9:40

MADRAS 20th Century Fox via The Associated Press

Logan Marshall-Green, from left, Noomi Rapace and Michael Fassbender in a scene from “Prometheus.� PROMETHEUS (R) Thu night/Fri morning: 12:01 a.m. PROMETHEUS IMAX (R) Thu night/Fri morning: 12:01 a.m. SNOW WHITE AND THE HUNTSMAN (PG-13) Noon, 1, 3:15, 3:45, 4:15, 6:30, 7, 7:30, 9:25, 9:55, 10:25 WHAT TO EXPECT WHEN YOUR EXPECTING (PG-13) 12:10, 3:25, 6:40, 9:45

McMenamins Old St. Francis School

CHERNOBYL DIARIES (R) 1:30, 4:45, 8, 10:30 CHIMPANZEE (G) 12:30 DARK SHADOWS (PG-13) 12:50, 4:05, 7:20, 10:05 THE DICTATOR (R) 1:20, 4:40, 10:05 THE HUNGER GAMES (PG-13) 11:35 a.m., 2:50, 6, 9:10 MARVEL’S THE AVENGERS (PG13) 11:30 a.m., 12:15, 2:45, 3:30, 6:10, 7:05, 9:20, 10:15

700 N.W. Bond St., Bend, 541-330-8562

MEN IN BLACK 3 (PG-13) 11:55 a.m., 3:05, 4:30, 6:05, 7:45, 9:05, 10:20 MEN IN BLACK 3 IMAX (PG-13) 12:05, 3:30, 6:55, 9:30

1101 S.W. U.S. Highway 97, Madras, 541-475-3505

EDITOR’S NOTES:

BATTLESHIP (PG-13) 4, 6:40, 9:20 DARK SHADOWS (PG-13) 7:15 DICTATOR (R) 5:20, 9:55 MARVEL’S THE AVENGERS 3-D (PG13) 3:30, 6:30, 9:30 MEN IN BLACK 3 (PG-13) 4:40, 7, 9:15 PROMETHEUS 3-D (R) Thu night/Fri morning: 12:01 a.m. SNOW WHITE AND THE HUNTSMAN (PG-13) 4:15, 6:50, 9:25

• Open-captioned showtimes are bold. • There may be an additional fee for 3-D movies. • IMAX films are $15. • Movie times are subject to change after press time.

REDMOND

PRINEVILLE

Redmond Cinemas 1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond, 541-548-8777

CABIN IN THE WOODS (R) 9 SAFE HOUSE (R) 6 After 7 p.m., shows are 21 and older only. Younger than 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.

Tin Pan Theater

MARVEL’S THE AVENGERS 3-D (PG-13) 11:45 a.m., 3, 6:45, 10

Madras Cinema 5

Pine Theater 214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

BATTLESHIP (PG-13) 3:30, 6:15, 9 MARVEL’S THE AVENGERS (PG-13) 3:15, 6:15, 9:15 MEN IN BLACK 3 (PG-13) 4:30, 7, 9:30 SNOW WHITE AND THE HUNTSMAN (PG-13) 3:45, 6:30, 9:15

MEN IN BLACK 3 (UPSTAIRS — PG13) 4:15, 7:20 SNOW WHITE AND THE HUNTSMAN (PG-13) 4, 7 Pine Theater’s upstairs screening room has limited accessibility.

869 N.W. Tin Pan Alley, Bend, 541-241-2271

FISH OUT OF WATER (no MPAA rating) 6 THE SQUID AND THE WHALE (R) 8:30

MEN IN BLACK 3-D (PG-13) 12:20, 3:40, 6:50, 9:35 NATIONAL THEATRE LIVE: FRANKENSTEIN — REVERSE CASTING (no MPAA rating) 7 THE PIRATES! BAND OF MISFITS (PG) 1:10 PROMETHEUS 3-D (R) Thu night/Fri morning: 12:01 a.m.

856 NW Bond • Downtown Bend • 541-330-5999 www.havenhomestyle.com

L TV L

 

THURSDAY PRIME TIME 6/7/12

*In HD, these channels run three hours ahead. / Sports programming may vary. BD-Bend/Redmond/Sisters/Black Butte (Digital); PM-Prineville/Madras; SR-Sunriver; L-La Pine

ALSO IN HD; ADD 600 TO CHANNEL No.

BROADCAST/CABLE CHANNELS

BD PM SR L ^ KATU KTVZ % % % % KBNZ & KOHD ) ) ) ) KFXO * ` ` ` KOAB _ # _ # ( KGW KTVZDT2 , _ # / OPBPL 175 173

5:00 KATU News News News KEZI 9 News The Simpsons Electric Comp. NewsChannel 8 Meet, Browns Healthful Indn

5:30 World News Nightly News Evening News World News The Simpsons Fetch! With Ruff Nightly News Meet, Browns Clodagh Irish

6:00

6:30

KATU News at 6 (N) ’ Å NewsChannel 21 at 6 (N) Å Access H. Old Christine KEZI 9 News KEZI 9 News Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Jonathan Bird Business Rpt. NewsChannel 8 News King of Queens King of Queens Time Goes By Ladies-Letters

7:00

7:30

8:00

8:30

9:00

9:30

10:00

10:30

Jeopardy! ‘G’ Wheel Fortune Duets Songs That Inspire Performing songs that inspire. (N) ’ ‘PG’ Rookie Blue A Good Shoot ‘14’ Jeopardy! ‘G’ Wheel Fortune The Office ‘14’ Parks/Recreat Saving Hope Pilot (N) ‘14’ Ă… Rock Center With Brian Williams How I Met 30 Rock ’ ‘14’ Big Bang 2 Broke Girls Person of Interest ’ ‘14’ Ă… The Mentalist Pink Tops ’ ‘14’ Entertainment The Insider ‘PG’ Duets Songs That Inspire Performing songs that inspire. (N) ’ ‘PG’ Rookie Blue A Good Shoot ‘14’ Big Bang Big Bang Take Me Out (N) ’ ‘PG’ Ă… (8:58) The Choice (N) ‘PG’ Ă… News TMZ (N) ’ ‘PG’ PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Ă… Alfie Boe: Live - Royal Festival Hall, London Alfie Boe: Live - Royal Festival Hall, London Live at 7 (N) Inside Edition The Office ‘14’ Parks/Recreat Saving Hope Pilot (N) ‘14’ Ă… Rock Center With Brian Williams Seinfeld ‘PG’ Seinfeld ‘PG’ Breaking Pointe (N) ‘PG’ The Vampire Diaries ‘14’ Ă… Cops ‘14’ Ă… ’Til Death ‘PG’ Claiming-Title “California State of Mind: The Legacyâ€? World News Tavis Smiley (N) Charlie Rose (N) ’ ‘PG’ Ă…

11:00

11:30

KATU News (11:35) Nightline News Jay Leno News Letterman KEZI 9 News (11:35) Nightline Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ 3 Steps to Incredible Health!-Joel NewsChannel 8 Jay Leno ’Til Death ‘PG’ That ’70s Show PBS NewsHour ’ Ă…

BASIC CABLE CHANNELS

The First 48 ‘14’ Ă… The First 48 One of Ours ‘PG’ The First 48 ‘14’ Ă… The First 48 A Simple Plan ‘14’ Cajun Justice Cajun Justice (11:01) Longmire Pilot ‘14’ Ă… *A&E 130 28 18 32 The First 48 ‘14’ Ă… CSI: Miami Dissolved Julia spins out CSI: Miami Seeing Red Horatio tries CSI: Miami Out of Time Recalling the ›› “Heartbreak Ridgeâ€? (1986, War) Clint Eastwood, Marsha Mason, Everett McGill. Marine sergeant sees ex-wife, ›› “Heartbreak Ridgeâ€? (1986, War) *AMC 102 40 39 of control. ’ ‘14’ Ă… to save Yelina. ’ ‘14’ Ă… team’s formation. ‘14’ Ă… readies recruits for Grenada. Ă… Clint Eastwood. Ă… River Monsters: Unhooked ‘PG’ River Monsters: The Lost Reels Yellowstone: Battle for Life ’ ‘G’ Ă… Man-Eating Super Croc ‘14’ Ă… Yellowstone: Battle for Life ‘G’ *ANPL 68 50 26 38 Swamp Wars ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Housewives/OC Housewives/OC The Real Housewives of New York City Ă… Housewives Don’t Be Tardy Don’t Be Tardy Don’t Be Tardy Kathy (N) Don’t Be Tardy (11:31) Kathy BRAVO 137 44 Behind the Music ’ ‘PG’ Ă… CMT Music Awards Red Carpet 2012 CMT Music Awards From the Bridgestone Arena in Nashville. ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Crossroads CMT 190 32 42 53 (4:30) 2012 CMT Music Awards ’ ‘PG’ Ă… American Greed Mad Money Cocaine Cowboys ‘14’ Jillian Michaels Wealth-Trading CNBC 51 36 40 52 Cocaine Cowboys ‘14’ Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 Ă… Erin Burnett OutFront Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 Ă… Erin Burnett OutFront CNN 52 38 35 48 Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Ă… South Park ‘14’ (5:54) 30 Rock (6:25) 30 Rock Colbert Report Daily Show (7:57) Futurama (8:27) Futurama (8:58) Futurama (9:28) The Comedy Central Roast ‘14’ Ă… Daily Show Colbert Report COM 135 53 135 47 Always Sunny Dept./Trans. Talk of the Town Local issues. Mt. View High School Graduation Paid Program Journal Get Outdoors Visions of NW The Yoga Show The Yoga Show Talk of the Town Local issues. COTV 11 Capitol Hill Hearings CSPAN 58 20 12 11 Capitol Hill Hearings Austin & Ally ’ Shake It Up! ‘G’ A.N.T. Farm ‘G’ ››› “Geek Charmingâ€? (2011, Comedy) Sarah Hyland. ’ ‘G’ Ă… Jessie ‘G’ Ă… Good-Charlie Shake It Up! ‘G’ *DIS 87 43 14 39 Austin & Ally ’ Austin & Ally ’ Shake It Up! ‘G’ Good-Charlie Auction Kings Auction Kings Auction Kings Auction Kings Auction Kings Auction Kings Auction Kings Auction Kings Auction Kings Final Offer Heavy Metal (N) ‘PG’ Auction Kings Auction Kings *DISC 156 21 16 37 Auction Kings Khloe & Lamar Khloe & Lamar Khloe & Lamar Khloe & Lamar E! News (N) The Soup ‘14’ Mrs. Eastwood Keeping Up With the Kardashians Keeping Up With the Kardashians Chelsea Lately E! News *E! 136 25 SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… ESPN 21 23 22 23 NBA Countdown NBA Basketball Miami Heat at Boston Celtics (N) (Live) Ă… MLB 2012: Field of Dreams (N) Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) Ă… E:60 MMA Live (N) Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) Ă… NBA Tonight (N) NASCAR Now NFL Live Ă… ESPN2 22 24 21 24 SportsCenter Special Ă… Friday Night Lights ‘PG’ Ă… Friday Night Lights ‘PG’ Ă… Russo & Steele Car Auctions Horse Racing Horse Racing Horse Racing Horse Racing SportsCentury Ă… ESPNC 23 25 123 25 White Shadow Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. ESPNN 24 63 124 203 SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… ››› “Elfâ€? (2003, Comedy) Will Ferrell, James Caan, Bob Newhart. ›› “Austin Powers in Goldmemberâ€? (2002) Mike Myers. Premiere. The 700 Club ‘G’ Ă… FAM 67 29 19 41 (4:30) ››› “Holesâ€? (2003) Sigourney Weaver, Jon Voight. Hannity (N) On Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Ă… Hannity On Record, Greta Van Susteren The Five FNC 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Ă… Paula’s Cooking Chopped Step Right Up! Chopped ‘G’ Chopped Gotta Grill! Chopped Grilltastic! Sweet Genius Plane Genius (N) Sweet Genius Lofty Genius *FOOD 177 62 98 44 Best Dishes (3:30) ›› “21â€? (2008, Drama) How I Met How I Met How I Met How I Met Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men ›› “Pineapple Expressâ€? (2008) Seth Rogen, James Franco. FX 131 House Hunters Million Dollar Selling NY Selling LA ‘G’ Selling London House Hunters Hunters Int’l House Hunters Hunters Int’l HGTV 176 49 33 43 House Hunters House Hunters House Hunters House Hunters Hunters Int’l Mountain Men ‘PG’ Ă… Swamp People Turf War ‘PG’ Swamp People ‘PG’ Ă… Swamp People (N) ‘PG’ Ă… Mountain Men Mayhem (N) ‘PG’ (11:01) Swamp People ‘PG’ Ă… *HIST 155 42 41 36 Swamp People ‘PG’ Ă… Reba ‘PG’ Ă… Hatfields & McCoys (Part 1 of 3) ‘14’ Ă… Hatfields & McCoys (Part 2 of 3) ‘14’ Ă… Hatfields & McCoys (Part 2 of 3) ‘14’ Ă… LIFE 138 39 20 31 Reba ‘PG’ Ă… The Rachel Maddow Show (N) The Last Word The Ed Show The Rachel Maddow Show The Last Word Hardball With Chris Matthews MSNBC 56 59 128 51 The Ed Show (N) Punk’d ’ ‘14’ Punk’d ’ ‘PG’ Punk’d ’ ‘14’ Punk’d ’ ‘14’ Punk’d ’ ‘14’ Punk’d ’ ‘PG’ Punk’d ’ ‘14’ Punk’d ’ ‘14’ Punk’d ’ ‘14’ Punk’d (N) ‘14’ Pauly D Project Ridiculousness Ridiculousness MTV 192 22 38 57 Punk’d ’ ‘14’ SpongeBob “Ragsâ€? (2012, Musical) Max Schneider, Keke Palmer. ’ ‘G’ Ă… Friends ’ ‘PG’ Friends ’ ‘PG’ Friends ’ ‘PG’ Friends ’ ‘PG’ Friends ‘PG’ Friends ‘PG’ Friends ’ ‘PG’ Friends ’ ‘PG’ NICK 82 46 24 40 SpongeBob Undercover Boss: Abroad ‘PG’ Undercover Boss: Abroad ‘PG’ OWN 161 103 31 103 True Crime With Aphrodite Jones True Crime With Aphrodite Jones True Crime With Aphrodite Jones True Crime With Aphrodite Jones Undercover Boss: Abroad ‘PG’ UFC Reloaded UFC 140: Jones vs. Machida Jon Jones faces Lyoto Machida. UFC Insider UFC Unleashed ‘PG’ Bensinger The Dan Patrick Show ROOT 20 45 28* 26 MLB Baseball: Mariners at Angels Jail ‘14’ Ă… Jail ‘14’ Ă… Jail ‘14’ Ă… Jail ‘14’ Ă… Jail ‘14’ Ă… iMPACT Wrestling (N) ’ Ă… UFC Unleashed ’ ‘PG’ MMA Uncensrd Ways to Die SPIKE 132 31 34 46 Jail ‘14’ Ă… ›››› “Aliensâ€? (1986) Sigourney Weaver. A task force goes to eradicate a horrific space predator. ›› “Alien vs. Predatorâ€? (2004) Sanaa Lathan, Raoul Bova. ›› “Alien Resurrectionâ€? (1997) SYFY 133 35 133 45 Haunted Collector Behind Scenes Joel Osteen Joseph Prince Hillsong TV Praise the Lord (Live). Ă… Live-Holy Land The Evidence Bible Prophecy Creflo Dollar Praise the Lord TBN Classics TBN 205 60 130 Friends ’ ‘PG’ King of Queens King of Queens Seinfeld ‘PG’ Seinfeld ‘PG’ Family Guy ‘PG’ Family Guy ‘14’ Big Bang Big Bang Men at Work (N) Big Bang Conan (N) ‘14’ *TBS 16 27 11 28 Friends ’ ‘14’ ›› “Jailhouse Rockâ€? (1957, Musical) Elvis Presley, Judy Tyler. Strumming ›› “State Fairâ€? (1962, Musical) Pat Boone, Bobby Darin. Premiere. The an- ››› “Rebel Without a Causeâ€? (1955, Drama) James Dean, Natalie Wood. ›› “The Girl He Left Behindâ€? (1956, TCM 101 44 101 29 ex-convict gets agent, turns rock ’n’ roll star. Ă… (DVS) nual state fair spells adventure for a Texas family. Volatile teens with feckless parents witness tragedy. Ă… Comedy) Tab Hunter. Ă… Toddlers & Tiaras ’ ‘PG’ Ă… On the Fly ‘PG’ On the Fly ‘PG’ Undercover Boss ’ ‘PG’ Ă… On the Fly ‘PG’ On the Fly ‘PG’ Tattoo School Tattoo School On the Fly ‘PG’ On the Fly ‘PG’ *TLC 178 34 32 34 Four Weddings ’ ‘PG’ Ă… The Mentalist Flame Red ’ ‘14’ The Mentalist ’ ‘14’ Ă… The Mentalist ’ ‘14’ Ă… The Mentalist Red Rum ’ ‘14’ CSI: NY Cold Reveal ‘14’ Ă… CSI: NY ... Comes Around ’ ‘14’ *TNT 17 26 15 27 The Mentalist ’ ‘14’ Ă… Level Up ‘PG’ Regular Show MAD ‘PG’ Total Drama Adventure Time Adventure Time MAD ‘PG’ Regular Show King of the Hill King of the Hill American Dad American Dad Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ *TOON 84 Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Bggage Battles Bggage Battles Mysteries at the Museum ‘PG’ Bizarre Foods/Zimmern *TRAV 179 51 45 42 Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Bourdain: No Reservations (6:13) M*A*S*H ‘PG’ Ă… (6:52) M*A*S*H (7:24) M*A*S*H Home Improve. Home Improve. Love-Raymond Love-Raymond King of Queens King of Queens King of Queens King of Queens TVLND 65 47 29 35 Bonanza The Artist ‘G’ Ă… NCIS Hiatus ‘14’ Ă… NCIS Trojan Horse ’ ‘PG’ Ă… NCIS In the Zone ’ ‘14’ Ă… NCIS Legend ‘14’ Ă… NCIS Legend ‘14’ Ă… Royal Pains ‘PG’ Ă… USA 15 30 23 30 NCIS Hiatus ‘14’ Ă… Basketball Wives Reunion ‘14’ Single Ladies ’ ‘14’ 40 Most Shocking Hip Hop Moments ’ ‘14’ Yo: The Story of Yo! MTV Raps › “Wild Wild Westâ€? (1999) ’ VH1 191 48 37 54 Basketball Wives Finale ’ ‘14’ PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(6:10) ›› “Father of the Bride Part IIâ€? 1995 Steve Martin. ‘PG’ Ă… ›› “Bringing Down the Houseâ€? 2003 Steve Martin. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… “Don’t Be a Menace to South Centralâ€? Let Me In 2010 ENCR 106 401 306 401 (4:10) ›› “The Recruitâ€? 2003 FXM Presents ››› “Batman Beginsâ€? 2005, Action Christian Bale, Michael Caine. ‘PG-13’ Ă… FXM Presents ››› “Batman Beginsâ€? 2005, Action Christian Bale. ‘PG-13’ Ă… FMC 104 204 104 120 (4:30) ›› “X-Men: The Last Standâ€? 2006 ‘PG-13’ UFC Tonight UFC Insider Best of PRIDE Fighting UFC Unleashed (N) Ă… Big Wave Awards The Ultimate Fighter Live Ultimate Fighter Finale: Al Iaquinta vs. Mike Chiesa. ’ FUEL 34 Golf Central (N) 19th Hole (N) PGA Tour Golf Champions: Regions Tradition, First Round LPGA Tour Golf GOLF 28 301 27 301 PGA Tour Golf PGA Tour Golf FedEx St. Jude Classic, First Round Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ HALL 66 33 175 33 The Waltons The Courtship ‘G’ (4:45) ›› “Win a Date With Tad Hamilton!â€? 2004, Ro24/7 Pacquiao/ ›› “Just Wrightâ€? 2010 Queen Latifah. A physical therapist Abraham Lincoln: True Blood Soul of Fire Sookie sum- True Blood And When I Die Sookie Katie Morgan on Katie Morgan’s HBO 425 501 425 501 mance-Comedy Kate Bosworth. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… Bradley ‘MA’ falls in love with her patient. ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Vampire mons her powers. ‘MA’ Ă… gains valuable allies. ‘MA’ Sex Toys ’ Porn 101 ‘MA’ ››› “District 9â€? 2009, Science Fiction Sharlto Copley. ‘R’ (7:15) ››› “Training Dayâ€? 2001, Crime Drama Denzel Washington, Ethan Hawke. ‘R’ (9:45) ››› “District 9â€? 2009, Science Fiction Sharlto Copley, Jason Cope. ‘R’ IFC 105 105 (4:00) › “Virusâ€? (5:45) ››› “Rise of the Planet of the Apesâ€? 2011 James Franco. A medical ››› “Inceptionâ€? 2010, Science Fiction Leonardo DiCaprio, Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Ellen Page. A ›››› “Alienâ€? 1979, Science Fiction Tom Skerritt, John Hurt. A horrific spaceMAX 400 508 508 1999 ‘R’ experiment results in a superintelligent chimp. ‘PG-13’ Ă… thief enters people’s dreams and steals their secrets. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… ship stowaway attacks interstellar miners. ’ ‘R’ Ă… Amish: Out of Order ‘PG’ Amish: Out of Order ‘PG’ American Colony: Hutterites American Colony: Hutterites Amish: Out of Order ‘PG’ Amish: Out of Order ‘PG’ The Great American Manhunt ‘G’ NGC 157 157 The Fairly OddParents ‘Y’ Ă… The Fairly OddParents ‘G’ Ă… Dragonball GT Monsuno ‘Y7’ SpongeBob SpongeBob Fanboy-Chum Fanboy-Chum Planet Sheen T.U.F.F. Puppy NTOON 89 115 189 115 Dragonball GT Monsuno ‘Y7’ Bow Madness Ult. Adventures Savage Wild Wild Outdoors The Crush Bone Collector Wild Outdoors Trophy Hunt Timbersports Hunter Journal OUTD 37 307 43 307 (4:30) Wardens Whitetail Nation Major League Fishing (5:05) ›› “Letters to Julietâ€? 2010, Drama Amanda Seyfried. A young woman “Orchids: My Intersex Adventureâ€? “No Look Passâ€? 2011 Premiere. Emily Tay strives for suc- “Ultrasuede: In Search of Halstonâ€? 2010 The “casual chicâ€? (11:05) Red Light Comedy: Live SHO 500 500 finds an old note to someone’s lover. ’ ‘PG’ Ă… 2010 Premiere. ‘NR’ cess. on and off basketball courts. ‘NR’ of milliner/couturier Halston. ‘NR’ Ă… From Amsterdam (N) ‘MA’ Ă… Wrecked ‘14’ Wrecked ‘14’ Hard Parts Hard Parts Car Warriors ‘14’ Wrecked ‘14’ Wrecked ‘14’ Hard Parts Hard Parts Unique Whips ‘14’ SPEED 35 303 125 303 Car Warriors ‘14’ (6:41) ››› “The Rockâ€? 1996, Action Sean Connery, Nicolas Cage. ’ ‘R’ Ă… Magic City ’ ‘MA’ Ă… Magic City Time and Tide ‘MA’ › “Resident Evil: Afterlifeâ€? 2010 STARZ 300 408 300 408 (4:35) ››› “Gattacaâ€? 1997 Ethan Hawke. Ă… (4:15) ››› “The Roadâ€? 2009 Viggo (6:15) “In My Sleepâ€? 2009, Drama Philip Winchester. Premiere. Marcus fears ›› “Flypaperâ€? 2011, Comedy Patrick Dempsey. A man ›› “Charlie Bartlettâ€? 2007, Comedy-Drama Anton Yelchin, (11:15) › “Fall: The Price of Silenceâ€? TMC 525 525 Mortensen. ’ ‘R’ Ă… he has committed murder in his sleep. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… tries to protect a bank teller. ’ ‘NR’ Ă… Robert Downey Jr., Hope Davis. ’ ‘R’ 2000 Michael Madsen. ’ 137th Preakness Stakes From Pimlico Race Course in Baltimore. ’ Poker After Dark Cash 200K Darts Costas Tonight NBCSN 27 58 30 209 138th Kentucky Derby From Churchill Downs in Louisville. ’ Ă… L.A. Hair Charity Case (N) L.A. Hair Charity Case L.A. Hair L.A. Hair Charity Case Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ Ă… L.A. Hair Charity Case *WE 143 41 174 118 L.A. Hair


THURSDAY, JUNE 7, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

A  & A  

Potluck guest can’t stomach being given an assignment Dear Abby: My husband and I were invited to a dinner party at a couple’s home. We accepted the invitation with pleasure, only to be told afterward that it was going to be a “potluck.� My husband and I were raised to never go to someone’s home empty-handed, so we were happy to bring a dish to contribute to the meal. When I called the hostess to ask if we could bring dessert or perhaps an appetizer, she informed me that the menu had already been planned and we were assigned a side dish neither of us had ever heard of. Then she told me she would email me the recipe. Abby, I was shocked and, frankly, offended. I would never tell a guest what to bring and what recipe to follow. When my husband told me he was willing to give the dish a try, I told him I would not attend a dinner party where I was commanded to bring a specific dish. My husband stayed home with me that evening, but says he can’t understand what the big deal was. Was I wrong to refuse to participate? Or should I have gone along with the program and kept my mouth shut? — Lost My Appetite Dear Lost: Having accepted the invitation you should have gone to the dinner, taken the side dish and made the best of it. You may have missed out on a memorable and enjoyable evening. Dear Abby: I was in a passionate relationship for three years with my first real boyfriend. We were very young and desperately in love. I adored him completely, without hesitation. Then we had some irreconcilable differences and parted. I went though a period of self-reflection and didn’t date again for almost four years. During that period, I thought

DEAR ABBY and prayed. Then I met someone special, “Zack.� We have been seeing each other for five years now, and our relationship is solid. It’s wonderful in every aspect — except that I am not in love with him. We plan to be married in six months. I’m not sure if it’s the right thing to do, though. I have hesitated for years despite pressure from my family. I enjoy spending time with Zack more than with anyone else. We understand each other and he knows me so well that it’s uncanny. We’re compatible with the same interests and similar beliefs. Zack knows that I love him but am not “in love� with him, but he still wants to marry me. Is it wrong to marry your best friend? — Unsure in California Dear Unsure: No, it’s not wrong to marry your best friend. But because you have reservations about marrying Zack, you should be honest and break the engagement. It will be less painful for both of you and far cheaper than divorce. Dear Abby: The grandfather of a friend recently died. The sister of this friend and I had dated not long ago. I would like to send a condolence card to the family. Would it be proper to send one card addressed to “The Smiths� or should I send a card to the family and a separate one to “Lisa� (the woman I dated)? — Jay Dear Jay: You are a thoughtful person. A letter or card of condolence should be sent to the family, and a separate condolence should be sent to Lisa. — Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

Horoscope: Happy Birthday for Thursday, June 7, 2012 By Jacqueline Bigar This year you are able to launch into action quite easily. Others find you to be unusually charming, but be careful about how you express your stronger feelings. Learn to handle your anger so that it does not explode under you. If you are single, you draw someone close to you with ease. Shop around a little, for your own sake. If you are attached, the two of you seem to understand each other better because of unique new methods of self-expression. Enjoy! You could be very attracted to a CAPRICORN. In some ways, he or she is the opposite of you. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH An important meeting, whether it is with one person or many, could be exciting and invigorating. Your mind drifts to family and loved ones in the meantime, as there is a matter you want to take care of. Someone pushes hard to have his or her way. Tonight: Where your friends are. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHH Others listen to your suggestions and watch you take the first step. You must make a decision. With your finances, you could be luckier than you think. Still, be aware of the risk you might be taking. Tonight: Till the wee hours. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHH You could be quite irritated by a personal matter. Calm down, and know that the presently difficult situation will work out in your favor. Remain sensitive to a loved one at a distance. Tonight: Consider a weekend getaway. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHHH You do best when dealing with one individual. You could be concerned about a conversation you think might have a volatile tone. Worry less — you are going to land on your feet. Note what is working in your life as well as what is not working. Tonight: Have a chat with a loved one. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHHH Others seek you out. You might take a comment a little too personally that was not intended to be hurtful. Get together with like minds in a meeting. There is an element of good luck that emerges from the combination of people. Tonight: Where the action is. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHH Use care with your temper.

Whatever you say and do, you could end up apologizing for; however, the other party might remember for a long time. Focus on funneling your energy in a positive fashion. Tonight: Sign up for a class, or decide to get more exercise. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH News from a distance causes you to smile. You feel as if a long-term concern can be let go. Be careful about swallowing your frustration or anger. You might not like the end result. Let someone know when he or she pushes too far. Tonight: Where there is music. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHH You could be overwhelmed by everything that a partner drops on your plate. You might need to put your hand up as if to say, “Halt.� A meeting might be very provocative, as someone is trying very hard to dominate it. This person wants everyone to agree with him or her. Tonight: Head home. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHH You are likely to state your case loud and clear. You could encounter a problem with an older relative or friend who does not see eye-to-eye with you. Listen to what is going on with this person. Ultimately, everything will fall into place. Tonight: With a favorite person. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHH You could be overwhelmed when handling a financial matter. This issue could involve your dayto-day life or someone you care a lot about. Be aware if you detach too much, because the other party might feel as if you simply are not interested. Tonight: Stay within your budget. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHHH You’ll put your best foot forward. To a partner or key person, your efforts seem irrelevant. This person needs to express his or her anger, but the issue might not really be about you. Give yourself space, and you’ll find that others are more open and creative. Tonight: Do what you love. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HH It is not really necessary for you to handle someone’s distress. Perhaps it would be better to let this person work through it on his or her own. A healthy distance might be good for both of you. A parent or loved one is extremely nurturing. Tonight: Get some extra R and R. Š 2011 by King Features Syndicate

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C C  Please email event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� at www.bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

TODAY SISTERS RODEO SLACK PERFORMANCE: Slack performance, with breakfast concessions; free; 8 a.m.; Sisters Rodeo Grounds, 67667 U.S. Highway 20; 541-549-0121 or www.sistersrodeo.com. TUMALO FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 3-6 p.m.; Tumalo Garden Market, off of U.S. Highway 20 and Cook Avenue; 541-728-0088, earthsart@gmail.com or http:// tumalogardenmarket.com. “NATIONAL THEATRE LIVE, FRANKENSTEIN�: London’s National Theatre presents a play based on Shelley’s Gothic horror novel; $15; 7 p.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347. SCOTT PEMBERTON BAND: The Portland-based rockers perform; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www .mcmenamins.com. “THE COMPLETE WORKS OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE (ABRIDGED)�: Preview night for Innovation Theatre Works’ presentation of 37 Shakespeare plays in 90 minutes; $10; 7:30 p.m.; Innovation Theatre Works, 1155 S.W. Division St., Bend; 541-504-6721 or www .innovationtw.org. COMEDY NIGHT: Rickey Shackleford and John Crist perform; $10; 7:30 p.m., doors open 6 p.m.; The Original Kayo’s Dinner House and Lounge, 415 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-323-2520. ASLEEP AT THE WHEEL: The Western swing band performs; $38-$50; 8 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.tower theatre.org. LAST BAND STANDING: A battle of the bands competition featuring local acts; free; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Liquid Lounge, 70 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend; www.lastbandstanding.net.

FRIDAY PATIO SALE FUNDRAISER: Proceeds benefit church activities; free admission; 8 a.m.-5 p.m.; Holy Redeemer Catholic Church, 16137 Burgess Road, La Pine; 541-536-3571. BEND FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 2-6 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-408-4998, bendfarmersmarket@gmail.com or http://bendfarmersmarket .com. ST. FRANCIS COCKTAIL PARTY: See archival materials from the history of the St. Francis school; free; 5-11 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-389-4854, grivera@saintfrancisschool.net or www.saintfrancisschool.net. FRACTALS, PHYSICS AND ART: Richard Taylor talks about art and the use of fractal analysis and computers; $10, $8 Sunriver Nature Center members, $3 students; 6:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Hitchcock Auditorium, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-593-4394. CASCADE CHORALE: The group performs “Carmina Burana,� poems set to music, under the direction of James Knox; donations accepted; 7 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-383-7512, jwknox@cocc.edu or http://cascadechorale.org. SISTERS RODEO: A PRCA rodeo performance with roping, riding, steer wrestling and more; $12, free ages 12 and younger; 7 p.m.; Sisters Rodeo Grounds, 67667 U.S. Highway 20; 541-549-0121 or www.sisters rodeo.com. “SOCIAL SECURITY�: Opening night of Cascades Theatrical Company’s presentation of a comedy about a couple whose tranquility is destroyed by family members; with a champagne and dessert reception; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org. “THE COMPLETE WORKS OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE (ABRIDGED)�: Innovation Theatre Works presents the humorous adaptation of 37 Shakespeare plays in 90 minutes; $15, $12 students and seniors; 7:30 p.m.; Innovation Theatre Works, 1155 S.W. Division St., Bend; 541-5046721 or www.innovationtw.org. “THE IRON LADY�: A screening of the PG-13-rated 2011 movie;

Submitted photo

Hip-hop act Mickey Avalon will perform at 8 p.m. at the Domino Room in Bend. Tickets are $20 plus fees in advance. free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541-475-3351 or www.jcld.org. DIRTY HAND FAMILY BAND: The San Francisco-based rockabilly band performs; $5; 8 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; 541-728-0879 or www.reverbnation .com/venue/thehornedhand. PRISTINE BLUE: The Portlandbased country band performs; free; 9 p.m.; Maverick’s Country Bar and Grill, 20565 Brinson Blvd., Bend; 541-325-1886.

SATURDAY BIG PINE WALK-RUN-BIKE: 5K or 10K walk/run, or a 25 or 50 mile bike ride; proceeds benefit youth activity scholarships; $20; 8 a.m.; Finley Butte Park, Walling Lane and Finley Butte Road, La Pine; www .bigpine.org. PATIO SALE FUNDRAISER: Proceeds benefit church activities; free admission; 8 a.m.-3 p.m.; Holy Redeemer Catholic Church, 16137 Burgess Road, La Pine; 541-536-3571. MADRAS SATURDAY MARKET: Free admission; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Sahalee Park, B and Seventh streets; 541-489-3239 or madrassatmkt@ gmail.com. PORSCHE SHOW AND SHINE: A show of all years and models of Porsches; free, $20 to enter a car; 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; Des Chutes Historical Museum, 129 N.W. Idaho Ave., Bend; president@highdesert pca.com. CENTRAL OREGON SATURDAY MARKET: Featuring arts and crafts from local artisans; free admission; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; parking lot across from Bend Public Library, 600 N.W. Wall St.; 541-420-9015 or www .centraloregonsaturdaymarket.com. CRUISE TO THE CENTER OF OREGON: See cars in a variety of makes and models; with vendors and train rides; free for spectators, donations of nonperishable food accepted; 10 a.m.-3 p.m., gates open 8 a.m.; Crook County Fairgrounds, 1280 S. Main St., Prineville; 541-8153320 or www.ccrodders.com. RUNNING ON FAITH: A 5K run, followed by kids mini run, live music and more; $20, free for kids; 10 a.m.; Troy Field, Bond Street and Louisiana Avenue, Bend; 541-389-4854, grivera@saintfrancisschool.net or www.saintfrancisschool.net. SISTERS ART IN THE PARK: Featuring arts, crafts and a silent auction benefiting the Make-A-Wish Foundation of Oregon; free; 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Creekside Park, U.S. Highway 20 and Jefferson Avenue; 541-420-0279 or central oregonshows@gmail.com. RAPTORS OF THE DESERT SKY: See hawks, owls and other raptors soaring through a forest clearing, and hear a biologist talk about the birds; daily through Labor Day; $3 or $2 members, plus museum admission; free ages 4 and younger; 11:30 a.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www .highdesertmuseum.org. BEND PRIDE CELEBRATION: Gay pride festival includes live music, entertainers and vendors; free; noon-6 p.m.; Riverbend Park, Southwest Columbia Street and Southwest Shevlin Hixon Drive; 541-385-3320 or www.human dignitycoalition.org. SISTERS RODEO: Featuring a parade and a PRCA rodeo performance with roping, riding, steer wrestling and more; $12-$18; 9:30 a.m. parade, 1 and 7 p.m. rodeo; Sisters Rodeo Grounds, 67667 U.S. Highway 20; 541-549-0121 or www.sisters rodeo.com. HOOTENANNY FRIENDRAISER: Meet the Chimps Inc. ape troop and learn about protecting chimpanzees; registration requested; proceeds

benefit the sanctuary; $25; 1:30-3 p.m.; Hooker Creek Ranch, Chimps Inc. Sanctuary, 5525 Gerking Market Road, Bend; 541-410-4122, chimpinc@yahoo.com or http:// chimps-inc.org. “THE BEAR AND I�: Les Joslin talks about his relationship with Smokey Bear, followed by a tour of a restored ranger station; included in the price of admission; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 2 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www .highdesertmuseum.org. BEND GAME NIGHT: Play available board games or bring your own; free; 6 p.m.-midnight; East Bend Public Library, 62080 Dean Swift Road; 541-318-8459. “THE SNOW QUEEN�: Redmond School of Dance presents the ballet; $12 or $6 ages 11 and younger in advance, $14 or $8 children at the door; 7 p.m.; Redmond High School, 675 S.W. Rimrock Way; 541-5486957 or www.redmondschool ofdance.com. BEATLES SINGALONG: Local acts perform Beatles material with community members joining in; with a silent auction, trivia and costume contests and more; proceeds benefit KPOV; $10-$12 in advance, $15 adults at the door, $5 ages 17 and younger; 7-10 p.m., doors open 6:30 p.m.; Century Center, 70 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-322-0863 or www.kpov.org. “SOCIAL SECURITY�: Cascades Theatrical Company presents a comedy about a couple whose tranquility is destroyed by family members; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org. “THE COMPLETE WORKS OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE (ABRIDGED)�: Innovation Theatre Works presents the humorous adaptation of 37 Shakespeare plays in 90 minutes; $15, $12 students and seniors; 7:30 p.m.; Innovation Theatre Works, 1155 S.W. Division St., Bend; 541-504-6721 or www .innovationtw.org. COURTNEY HUFFMAN: The soprano soloist performs; $35, $10 students and children; 7:30 p.m.; First United Methodist Church, 680 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-306-3988 or www .highdesertchambermusic.com. HOPELESS JACK & THE HANDSOME DEVIL: The Portland-based blues band performs; $5; 8 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; 541-728-0879 or www.reverbnation.com/venue/ thehornedhand. CHARLES BUTTON BAND: The blues band performs; $5; 9-11 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; The Original Kayo’s Dinner House and Lounge, 415 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-323-2520. PRISTINE BLUE: The Portlandbased country band performs; free; 9 p.m.; Maverick’s Country Bar and Grill, 20565 Brinson Blvd., Bend; 541-325-1886. THE SINDICATE: The Portland-based rock band performs; $5; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3888331 or www.silvermoonbrewing .com.

SUNDAY GARDEN FAIR: Vendors sell crafts, arts and plants; with school tours; free admission; 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church & School, 2450 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-389-4854, grivera@ saintfrancisschool.net or www .saintfrancisschool.net. SISTERS ART IN THE PARK: Featuring arts, crafts and a silent auction benefiting the Make-AWish Foundation of Oregon; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Creekside Park, U.S. Highway 20 and Jefferson

Avenue; 541-420-0279 or centraloregonshows@gmail.com. RAPTORS OF THE DESERT SKY: See hawks, owls and other raptors soaring through a forest clearing, and hear a biologist talk about the birds; daily through Labor Day; $3 or $2 members, plus museum admission; free ages 4 and younger; 11:30 a.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www .highdesertmuseum.org. FIDDLERS JAM: Listen or dance at the Oregon Old Time Fiddlers Jam; donations accepted; 1-3:30 p.m.; VFW Hall, 1836 S.W. Veterans Way, Redmond; 541-447-7395. SISTERS RODEO: Featuring a buckaroo breakfast and a PRCA rodeo performance with roping, riding, steer wrestling and more; $12-$18; 7-11 a.m. breakfast, 1 p.m. rodeo; Sisters Rodeo Grounds, 67667 U.S. Highway 20; 541-5490121 or www.sistersrodeo.com. “SOCIAL SECURITY�: Cascades Theatrical Company presents a comedy about a couple whose tranquility is destroyed by family members; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 2 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org. “THE SNOW QUEEN�: Redmond School of Dance presents the ballet; $12 or $6 ages 11 and younger in advance, $14 or $8 children at the door; 2 p.m.; Redmond High School, 675 S.W. Rimrock Way; 541-5486957 or www.redmondschool ofdance.com. SECOND SUNDAY: Robert McDowell and Ellen Waterston read from a selection of their works; followed by an open mic; free; 2 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1034 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. SUMMER SUNDAY CONCERT: The folk-rock act Poor Moon performs; free; 2:30-4:30 p.m.; Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-322-9383 or www.bendconcerts.com. FESTIVAL OF THE ARTS: Featuring displays of paintings, quilts, jewelry and more; with a performance of a play called “Noah’s Flood�; free; 3 p.m.; Community Presbyterian Church, 529 N.W. 19th St., Redmond; 541-5483367 or www.redmondcpc.org. SUNRIVER MUSIC FESTIVAL YOUNG ARTIST SCHOLARSHIP CONCERT: A showcase of the top 2012 Young Artist Scholarship recipients; $10 suggested donation; 5 p.m.; Holy Trinity Church, 18143 Cottonwood Road; 541-593-9310, tickets@sunrivermusic.org or www.sunrivermusic.org. “THE COMPLETE WORKS OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE (ABRIDGED)�: Innovation Theatre Works presents the humorous adaptation of 37 Shakespeare plays in 90 minutes; $15, $12 students and seniors; 6 p.m.; Innovation Theatre Works, 1155 S.W. Division St., Bend; 541-504-6721 or www.innovationtw.org. MICKEY AVALON: The hip-hop act performs, with Millionaires and Maintain; $20 plus fees in advance, $25 at the door; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-7882989 or www.randompresents.com. RUBEDO: The Denver-based rock band performs, with The Hoot Hoots; free; 8 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; 541-7280879 or www.reverbnation.com/ venue/thehornedhand.

MONDAY CASCADE CHORALE: The group performs “Carmina Burana,� poems set to music, under the direction of James Knox; donations accepted; 7 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-383-7512, jwknox@ cocc.edu or http://cascade chorale.org.


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THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, JUNE 7, 2012

TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THURSDAY, JUNE 7, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

BIZARRO

B5

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively.

SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

DAILY BRIDGE CLUB

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

Seeking a friendly duplicate bridge? Find five games weekly at www.bendbridge.org.

CANDORVILLE

SAFE HAVENS

LOS ANGELES TIMES DAILY CROSSWORD

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN


THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, JUNE 7, 2012

C D  

Datebook is a weekly calendar of regularly scheduled nonprofit events and meetings. Listings are free but must be updated monthly to continue to publish. Please email event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” at www.bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Contact: 541-383-0351.

O R GANIZATIONS

MOUNT BACHELOR QUILTERS GUILD: 6:15 p.m.; Partners in Care, Bend; www.quiltsqq.com or mbqginfo@gmail.com.

SATURDAY

TODAY

BINGO: 1 p.m.; Bend’s Community Center; 541-323-3344.

THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45-4 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752.

INTERCAMBIO SPANISH/ENGLISH CONVERSATION GROUP: 9:3011:30 a.m.; Green Plow Coffee Roasters, Redmond; 541-504-9877.

REDMOND MASONIC LODGE: 7 p.m.; Masonic Lodge, Redmond; 541-279-7272.

SUNDAY

SWEET ADELINES: 6:30 p.m.; Redmond Senior Center; 541-447-4756.

BINGO: 12:30 p.m.; American Legion Post #44, Redmond; 541-548-5688.

SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE: 7-9 p.m.; Sons of Norway Hall, Bend; 541-549-7311 or 541-848-7523.

THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: 12:45-5 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752.

TUESDAY

BINGO: 6 p.m.; American Legion Post #44, Redmond; 541-548-5688.

MONDAY

BINGO: 6 p.m.; Eagles Lodge & Club, Prineville; 541-447-7659.

THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45-4 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752.

THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45-5 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752.

BIRDING BY EAR: 7:30-9 a.m.; Sawyer Park, Bend; www .ecaudubon.org or 541-390-9931.

FRIDAY BEND KNIT-UP: $2; 10 a.m.-noon; Rosie Bareis Community Campus, Bend; 541-728-0050.

CENTRAL OREGON COALITION FOR ACCESS: 3-4:30 p.m.; Deschutes Services Building, Bend; 541-815-0482. CRIBBAGE CLUB: 6:30 p.m.; Bend’s Community Center; 541-317-9022. THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Card games; 11:30 a.m.-4 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752. HIGH DESERT CORVETTE CLUB: 7 p.m.; Mazatlan Mexican Restaurant, Redmond; 541-549-6175. HIGH DESERT RUG HOOKERS: 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-382-5337. PFLAG CENTRAL OREGON: 6:30 p.m.; Nativity Lutheran Church, Bend; 541-317-2334 or www .pflagcentraloregon.org.

WEDNESDAY AMERICAN LEGION POST 4: 6:30

Outing

Trails

Continued from B1 From the spot in my backyard where my trusty aluminum canoe resides about 364 days a year, we loaded it atop my family minivan and made the always surprisingly quick trip down U.S. Highway 97 to South Century Drive. We had to negotiate one roundabout before we put in at a boat launch conveniently located on the shoulder of Spring River Road where it traverses the Deschutes. Note: The launch site is on the east side of the river; keep an eye out for signs. The head-in parking area is on the north side of Spring River Road, while the ramp is on the south side. Rather than make things easy on ourselves, we went ahead and parked, took down the boat, loaded paddles, food, cameras, water, sunscreen, the almighty flotation devices and my $7 Aquatic Invasive Species Prevention Permit, which I then realized had expired but tossed in the boat as a show of semigood faith. After a break in the traffic, we carried the boat across Spring River Road. I took the front of the boat, Map Guy insisting upon the back, claiming he’s an ace when it comes to steering. It soon became clear that Map Guy’s chief steering skill involved jamming the paddle in the water and using it as a rudder — which, to the poor guy (me) paddling away up front, is tantamount to using the paddle as a big old boat brake. After maybe 25 to 30 minutes of paddling upstream, we reached the Little Deschutes River, which neatly merged with the also-calm-here Upper Deschutes. I kind of expected a whirlpool or something dramatic. Of course, the scenery is pretty dramatic, in a dropdead-gorgeous sort of way that, again, makes you want to move to the area, like the lucky ducks with waterfront houses and docks we’d passed a few minutes earlier. If you’re looking for a great canoe or kayak experience, get thee to this spot: The current can be strong, but any capable paddler will be able to negotiate this whitewaterfree stretch. We opted for less forceful currents of the Little Deschutes, whose winding curves and oxbows I’d heard about but had never experienced firsthand. Within view are Paulina Peak to the southeast and Mount Bachelor to the west, but it’s the close-ups you get that remind you why it’s great to get off of land and on the water. Amid the willows and breeze-blown grasses we spotted a lone elk that took off be-

Continued from B1 Elk Lake trailhead is still partially blocked and the area has patchy snow. In the Jefferson Wilderness area, access to all the trailheads is open, but snow and fallen trees (reportedly moderate to very heavy) are blocking the trails at various distances, Sabo said. He warned that it appears trees affected by the 2003 B&B Complex Fire are falling readily. “Folks can be running into 30-60 trees per mile down across the trail, blocking it. It’s going to be some hurdles. It’s going to be a while before we’re going to get to much of that, but some of the trail clearing has started,” Sabo said. Expect heavy blowdown in beetle and fire kill areas, even with only moderate winds, Sabo said. It is important throughout the year to choose campsites carefully, due to potential for trees falling during the night, he said. In the Three Sisters Wilderness, some trail clearing is in progress. Millican, Scott Pass and Pole Creek trails have been cleared for one to one and a half miles, Sabo said. Park Meadow trailhead is still blocked by snow. In the Diamond Peak Wilderness, Pretty Lake trailhead is accessible and the trail is clear of snow for a mile and a half. Yoran Lake trailhead is accessible, but only half a mile of the trail is clear or has only patchy snow. Oldenberg Lake, in the Crescent Lake area, is snow-free and has light

Book Continued from B1 “I think one of the reasons I decided to write this book is because it became a bigger and bigger subject the more I got into it,” she said. “There was no way to write it in an article. It was too big. (Hunting) made me think about so many different things, and forced me to confront so many different things in terms of what I believe, how I live and how I judge other people.” At 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, the of-

David Jasper / The Bulletin

From the bank of the Little Deschutes River, Mount Bachelor, left, and the peak of Broken Top can be seen above nearby willows.

SUNRIVER South Century Dr. To Bend Spring River Rd.

97

Deschutes River Little Deschutes River

South Century Dr.

Portions of rivers paddled

rt Rd. Vanderve 97 Greg Cross / The Bulletin

If you go Getting there: From Bend, take U.S. Highway 97 south and exit at South Century Drive. Head west approximately 2.7 miles; continue due west onto Spring River Road. Parking is on the right before the bridge at the Deschutes River. Difficulty: Easy Cost: Free Contact: www.deschutes river.org or 541-382-4077

fore we could get a closer look. We also saw plenty of swallows — which tended to swarm when we floated beneath their muddy homes under various bridges — along with redwing blackbirds, ducks and one great blue heron. The Little Deschutes, which begins in Klamath County, flows through Crosswater Golf Course here. The water is clear, and shallow spots enable you to see all sorts of things, from the occasional darting fish to a great many golf balls resting on the bottom. Along one stretch of grassy bank, we beached the canoe and partook of lunch. As usual, Map Guy, when he wasn’t trying to identify scat piles, mocked everything from my height to the purportedly high pitch of my voice. Map Guy can make fun of me all he

ficial date the book will publish, Raff McCaulou will read from “Call of the Mild” at Powell’s City of Books in Portland. At 7 p.m. June 14, she will read at Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe in downtown Bend. At noon on June 16, she will give a book signing at Costco in Bend. Raff McCaulou’s Bulletin column runs on Mondays on the Local section front. “Call of the Mild” is available in local bookstores and at amazon. com. — Reporter: 541-383-0349. djasper@bendbulletin.com

wants, because he shared his almond butter sandwich with me, and complimented my choice of outing. Map Guy encouraged me to imitate the high-pitched warble of the “Barry Gibb Talk Show” sketch from “Saturday Night Live,” which got him doing more laughing than criticizing. I’d like to take this opportunity to apologize to any golfers who may have been teed off due to a terrible falsetto coming off the Little Deschutes. Map Guy did most of the rudder operating the entire way back. Rather than end our trek any sooner by helping paddle, I lazed in the boat and soaked up rays and scenery. What had amounted to an hour and a half, including lunch break, of upstream paddling became just a 20-minute float back to Spring River Road. Once we disembarked, we decided to move the van closer to the canoe rather than lug the 17-foot beast across the busy road. Checking the odometer in the van, I noticed that we’d driven just 15 miles from my house to the boat ramp. That’s close enough that I think I’ll hold off on a move to the area just yet, but the thought is tempting. — Reporter: 541-383-0349, djasper@bendbulletin.com

p.m.; VFW Hall, Bend; cabinetman@ dldrury.com or 541-480-7600. BEND KNITUP: 5:30-8 p.m.; Barnes & Noble Booksellers, Bend; 541-728-0050. BINGO: 6 p.m.; American Legion Post #44, Redmond; 541-548-5688. THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45-4 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752. KIWANIS CLUB OF REDMOND: Noon-1 p.m.; Juniper Golf and Country Club, Redmond; 541-548-5935 or www.redmondkiwanis.org. NEWCOMERS CLUB OF BEND: Hospitality coffee for women; RSVP required; 10 a.m.; 541-317-8613 or www.newcomersclubofbend.com. WEDNESDAY MORNING BIRDERS: 7 a.m.; Nancy P’s Baking Co., Bend; www.ecaudubon.org or jmeredit@ bendnet.com.

numbers of fallen trees on the trail. Many Lakes is opening up. In lower elevations, the trails continue to be in pretty good shape. The Tumalo Falls trail is clear for a mile. The North Fork trail is still blocked by snow and closed to mountain bikers. The trail into Swampy Lakes from Phil’s and the Tumalo Falls trail is not recommended for cyclists and runners due to patchy snow and fallen trees, Sabo said. Most of the crater floor is now accessible at Newberry Crater, Sabo said. Clearing of blowdown is expected to start within the next week. Paulina and Lakeshore Line trails are mostly snow-free. The Crater Rim trial and the road to Paulina Peak are still blocked by snow. The Peter Skene Ogden trail is fully clear, from Paulina Falls down to Ogden Campground. Black Butte and Metolius River trails are in good condition, Sabo said. Forest Road 370 to Todd Lake is blocked by snow. The road to the Three Creeks Lake area is blocked by snow three miles out, Sabo said. The Cascade Lakes Highway reconstruction has begun at the Seventh Mountain Resort to put a trail underpass in place. The highway will also be resurfaced this summer from the Bend city limits to Mount Bachelor. McKenzie Pass Highway is still closed to motorized vehicles, with access for hikers and bikers only, Sabo said. — Lydia Hoffman, The Bulletin

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LOCALNEWS

News of Record, C2 Editorials, C4

Obituaries, C5 Weather, C6

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, JUNE 7, 2012

LOCAL BRIEFING 2 from Prineville held in burglary Two Prineville residents have been arrested in connection to a burglary that took place Monday, Prineville Police said. Jaime Frank Nichol, 37, and Sarah Marie Nelson, 27, were arrested on suspicion of possession of stolen property and possession of methamphetamine. The burglary took place at an unoccupied residence, where about $1,000 worth of personal items, electronics and firearms were stolen. Following the burglary, police arrested Nichol during a traffic stop after finding him to be in possession of stolen property and drugs. Nelson was later arrested at a home on Northwest Beaver Street, where police executed a search warrant and recovered some of the stolen items. The investigation into the burglary is ongoing, and police say more arrests are likely.

C www.bendbulletin.com/local

Logging road runoff may get EPA exemption By Andrew Clevenger The Bulletin

WASHINGTON — The Environmental Protection Agency intends to create an exception for rainwater runoff from logging roads so loggers don’t have to get pollution permits under the federal Clean Water Act, as required by a recent court ruling. In 2010, in response to a case arising from the Tillamook State Forest in Oregon, the 9th U.S. Cir-

cuit Court of Appeals ruled that logging road runoff is a possible source of pollution under the Clean Water Act. Even though the EPA specifically excluded water runoff from logging roads, the court ruled that because the runoff doesn’t dissipate naturally, but is channeled through ditches and culverts, it can dump harmful silt and sediment into streams and rivers. The 9th Circuit’s ruling has

been appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court, which in December 2011 asked the Solicitor General’s Office to submit a brief explaining the government’s position. Last month, the solicitor general urged the Supreme Court not to hear the case, arguing that it would be better for the EPA to revise its regulations or allow Congress to rewrite the law than have the justices decide the issue. See Logging / C2

SISTERS SCHOOL DISTRICT

Board cuts 6 teaching positions • Budget to trim 5 calendar days By Ben Botkin The Bulletin

FARMERS MARKET SEASON KICKS OFF

— Bulletin staff report

STATE NEWS

• Salem • Newport

• Medford

• Newport: Tsunami debris from Japan washes ashore. • Salem: Governor appoints Rosenblum to become attorney general this month. • Medford: Companies seek permit to build natural gas pipeline.

SISTERS — The Sisters School District board on Wednesday unanimously approved a budget for the upcoming school year that trims teaching jobs. The $10.5 million budget was balanced by cutting the equivalent of 6.2 full-time certified teaching positions. Budget planners had faced a gap of $1.3 million. Other steps the district plans to bridge the shortfall include cutting five school days and tapping into reserves. The school calendar, though, hasn’t been finalized because union negotiations are under way. School board members said the budget plan represents tough choices. “There are no good alternatives in this kind of economy,” said board member Don Hedrick. The district’s budget situation comes from a combination of a drop in state dollars, declining enrollment and increased costs tied to the state pension system. The district is eliminating a physical education teacher, a business teacher, an English teacher and part-time drama and film teachers. A full-time counselor and part-time counselor are also cut. The bulk of the positions cut will impact the high school. Officials have said the district will look for alternative programs to replace classes that would be impacted by the layoffs. Those options — still in the works — include partnering with community groups to provide courses or online classes. Superintendent Jim Golden said attendees provided good feedback to the district at a forum on Tuesday. He said he has to look at the system as a whole. “Every decision affects somebody,” he said. — Reporter: 541-977-7185, bbotkin@bendbulletin.com

Forest Service adds to air tanker fleet

Stories on C3

By Dylan J. Darling The Bulletin

Have a story idea or submission? Contact us!

The Bulletin Call a reporter: Bend ................541-633-2160 Redmond ........ 541-617-7837 Sisters............. 541-617-7837 La Pine ........... 541-383-0348 Sunriver ......... 541-383-0348 Deschutes ...... 541-617-7829 Crook ............. 541-504-2336 Jefferson ....... 541-504-2336 Salem ..............541-554-1162 D.C. .................202-662-7456 Business ........ 541-383-0360 Education .......541-633-2161 Public lands .....541-617-7812 Public safety.....541-383-0387 Projects .......... 541-617-7831

Submissions: • Letters and opinions: Mail: My Nickel’s Worth or In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 Details on the Editorials page inside. Contact: 541-383-0358, bulletin@bendbulletin.com

• Civic Calendar notices: Email event information to news@bendbulletin.com, with “Civic Calendar” in the subject, and include a contact name and phone number. Contact: 541-383-0354

• Obituaries, Death Notices: Details on the Obituaries page inside. Contact: 541-617-7825, obits@bendbulletin.com

• Community events: Email event information to communitylife@bend bulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” at www .bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Details: The calendar appears on Page 3 in Community Life. Contact: 541-383-0351

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

eorge and Carol Dodd, of Bend, sample a variety of jams and spreads in front

G

of the Packer Orchards and Bakery booth during the first Bend Farmers Mar-

ket of the season on Wednesday. Bend Farmers Markets are held downtown from 3 to 7 p.m. on Wednesdays through early October, and at St. Charles Medical Center from 2 to 6 p.m. on Fridays through late September. For a full schedule of farmers markets throughout Central Oregon, visit www.bendbulletin.com/farmersmarkets.

The U.S. Forest Service has added four air tankers from Alaska, California and Canada to help it revive the federal fleet after a crash and an emergency landing last weekend. The additional planes increase the fleet of air tankers from nine to 13, said Jennifer Jones, spokeswoman for the National Interagency Fire Center in Boise, Idaho. The planes are used to drop retardant that assist in stopping wildfires from spreading. Fire season has started in the Southwestern United States, where the crash and emergency landing occurred. The air tankers involved in the incidents were Lockheed P-2 Neptunes, 50year-old planes originally designed to chase submarines. The crash of Tanker 11 in Utah killed the pilot and co-pilot. The crew of Tanker 55, which made an emergency landing in Nevada, was not hurt. “The pilots of Tanker 11 lost their lives protecting public safety and natural resources,” Tom Harbour, director of fire and aviation management for the U.S. Forest Service, said in a prepared statement. “As the entire fire and aviation community grieves their loss, we must ensure that we maintain our capability to fulfill our responsibilities to be prepared to respond vigorously to wildfires threatening people, communities, infrastructures and natural and cultural resources.” See Air tankers / C2

Boys & Girls Club opens doors at new location in Redmond By Holly Pablo The Bulletin

REDMOND — When Heather Powell joined the Boys & Girls Clubs of Central Oregon eight years ago, she was lost. “I had no concept of reality and was going down a bad path,” Powell said. “It was there that I gained the support and encouragement I needed that would soon become the motivation and drive to turn my life around.” The center became Powell’s safe haven. Now, the 18-year-

old dreams of becoming an elementary school teacher. During Wednesday’s ribbon-cutting ceremony at the club’s new location, visitors wandered through brightly painted rooms and viewed bulletin boards decorated to match the programs and clubs to be offered on-site. Programs include arts and crafts, photography, journalism, science and technology. It’s the culmination of a decadelong vision to establish a permanent spot for the center

to expand and grow, said board member Jo Anne Sutherland. Sutherland said she got goosebumps upon hearing that the now-closed nonprofit Cascade Child Center wished to donate its property to the Boys & Girls Club. It was an easy decision for the club and a key factor was the building’s close proximity to local schools. It’s across from Obsidian Middle School and near M.A. Lynch Elementary. See Club / C2

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Heather Powell, 18, Boys & Girls Clubs of Central Oregon Youth of the Year, shares a hug with Lorina Nance, the club’s art coordinator, during the Redmond facility’s opening ceremony Wednesday. A large thank-you card sits on the table in front of them for attendees of the opening to sign.


C2

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, JUNE 7, 2012

Logging

Well shot! READER PHOTOS Can you work a camera, and capture a great picture? And can you tell us a bit about it? Email your color or black and white photos to readerphotos@bendbulletin.com and we’ll pick the best for publication. Submission requirements: Include as much detail as possible — when and where you took it, and any special technique used — as well as your name, hometown and phone number. Photos must be high resolution (at least 6 inches wide and 300 dpi) and cannot be altered.

HUSBAND AND WIFE WINNERS Colin Mahood and Tania Piper — husband and wife — coincidentally launch their kayaks at the same time during the Pole Pedal Paddle in Bend on May 19. Mahood and Piper both finished in first place in their respective divisions. Mahood was part of Tai Turbo, which won Open Team with a time of 1:47:12. Piper won Female Individuals 35-39 with a time of 2:22:18. — Submitted by Raimie Hedman

P  O    For The Bulletin’s full list, including federal, state, county and city levels, visit www.bendbulletin.com/officials.

CONGRESS

LEGISLATURE

U.S. Senate

Senate

Sen. Jeff Merkley, D-Ore.: 107 Russell Senate Office Building Washington, D.C. 20510 Phone: 202-224-3753 Web: http://merkley.senate.gov

Sen. Ted Ferrioli, R-District 30 900 Court St. N.E., S-323 Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-986-1950 Email: sen.tedferrioli@state.or.us Web: www.leg.state.or.us/ferrioli

Bend office: 131 N.W. Hawthorne Ave., Suite 208 Bend, OR 97701 Phone: 541-318-1298 Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore. 223 Dirksen Senate Office Building Washington, D.C. 20510 Phone: 202-224-5244 Web: http://wyden.senate.gov Bend office: 131 N.W. Hawthorne Ave., Suite 107 Bend, OR 97701 Phone: 541-330-9142

Sen. Chris Telfer, R-District 27 900 Court St. N.E., S-423 Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-986-1727 Email: sen.christelfer@state.or.us Web: www.leg.state.or.us/telfer Sen. Doug Whitsett, R-District 28 900 Court St. N.E., S-303 Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-986-1728 Email: sen.dougwhitsett@state.or.us Web: www.leg.state.or.us/whitsett House

U.S. House of Representatives

Rep. Greg Walden, R-Hood River 2182 Rayburn House Office Building Washington, D.C. 20515 Phone: 202-225-6730 Web: http://walden.house.gov/

Rep. Jason Conger, R-District 54 900 Court St. N.E., H-477 Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-986-1454 Email: rep.jasonconger@state.or.us Web: www.leg.state.or.us/conger

Bend office: 1051 N.W. Bond St., Suite 400 Bend, OR 97701 Phone: 541-389-4408 Fax: 541-389-4452

Rep. John Huffman, R-District 59 900 Court St. N.E., H-476 Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-986-1459 Email: rep.johnhuffman@state.or.us Web: www.leg.state.or.us/huffman

STATE OF OREGON

Rep. Mike McLane, R-District 55 900 Court St. N.E., H-385 Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-986-1455 Email: rep.mikemclane@state.or.us Web: www.leg.state.or.us/mclane

Gov. John Kitzhaber, Democrat 160 State Capitol, 900 Court St. Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-378-4582 Fax: 503-378-6872 Web: http://governor.oregon.gov Secretary of State Kate Brown, Democrat 136 State Capitol Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-986-1616 Fax: 503-986-1616 Email: oregon.sos@state.or.us Superintendent of Public Instruction Susan Castillo 255 Capitol Street N.E. Salem, Oregon 97310 Phone: 503-947-5600 Fax: 503-378-5156 Email: superintendent.castillo @state.or.us Web: www.ode.state.or.us Treasurer Ted Wheeler, Democrat 159 Oregon State Capitol 900 Court St. N.E. Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-378-4329 Email: oregon.treasurer @state.or.us Web: www.ost.state.or.us Attorney General John Kroger, Democrat 1162 Court St. N.E. Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-378-4400 Fax: 503-378-4017 Web: www.doj.state.or.us Labor Commissioner Brad Avakian 800 N.E. Oregon St., Suite 1045 Portland, OR 97232 Phone: 971-673-0761 Fax: 971-673-0762 Email: boli.mail@state.or.us Web: www.oregon.gov/boli

Rep. Gene Whisnant, R-District 53 900 Court St. N.E., H-471 Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-986-1453 Email: rep.genewhisnant@state.or.us Web: www.leg.state.or.us/whisnant

DESCHUTES COUNTY 1300 N.W. Wall St. Bend, OR 97701 Web: www.deschutes.org Phone: 541-388-6571 Fax: 541-382-1692 County Commission

Tammy Baney, R-Bend Phone: 541-388-6567 Email: Tammy_Baney@ co.deschutes.or.us Alan Unger, D-Redmond Phone: 541-388-6569 Email: Alan_Unger@co.deschutes. or.us Tony DeBone, R-La Pine Phone: 541-388-6568 Email: Tony_DeBone@ co.deschutes.or.us

Find It All Online bendbulletin.com

Air tankers Continued from C1 The air tankers from Alaska and Canada are Convair CV-580s, converted twin-engine airliners that are about 50 years old. They’ll be available to fly on fires around the country, according to the Forest Service. The air tankers in California are Grumman S-2Ts, which were designed to track submarines and are also more than 50 years old.

The California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection operates the S-2T tankers, which will be used to fight fires in California, Cal Fire Director Ken Pimlott said in a written statement. Cal Fire has prepared the tankers to respond to fires about a month earlier than it typically does. The CV-580s carry about 2,100 gallons of retardant. The S-2Ts have a capacity of about 1,200 gallons, Jones said. — Reporter: 541-617-7812, ddarling@bendbulletin.com

N  R POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Prineville Police Department

Theft — A theft with an estimated loss of $1,000 was reported at 9:21 p.m. June 5, in the area of Northeast Combs Flat Road. Oregon State Police

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 4:57 p.m. June 5, in the area of U.S. Highway 20 and Old Bend Redmond Highway.

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 7:19 p.m. June 5, in the area of O’Neil Highway near milepost 4. DUII — Heather B. Eller, 19, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 8:38 p.m. June 5, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 near milepost 194. DUII — Justin Murray Adamson, 31, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 9:27 p.m. June 5, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 near milepost 126.

Press logs from the Bend Police and other Deschutes County police departments are currently unavailable, due to a police department system update.

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Continued from C1 In the meantime, Congress has issued a moratorium on the requirement to get permits for logging road runoff until Sept. 30. In its announcement, the EPA indicated that it intends to distinguish between runoff from logging roads and runoff “associated with industrial activity.� To address the 9th Circuit’s concerns, the EPA is asking for public input on best practices to minimize pollution. Chris Winter, a lawyer with Portland’s Crag Law Center who represents the Northwest Environmental Defense Center — the group that filed the initial lawsuit over the runoff water quality — said his client intends to weigh in on the EPA’s proposed changes. “At this point, we think it’s appropriate for EPA to provide clarity for all the stakeholders, and NEDC will definitely be participating in the process,� Winter said. “Our position on this point is that the large, industrial (logging) operators should be subject to (National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System) permitting.� The EPA could work with smaller, family-owned “mom and pop� timber operations to ensure that proper protections are in

Club Continued from C1 But relocating the club was not without difficulty — the lot and building needed renovation. Executive Director Lisa Maxwell said the roof’s shingles were falling apart and overgrown roots made the driveways impassable. To get its new building ready, the club raised nearly $250,000 in cash and $160,000 in in-kind donations during the past year. The project is entering a new phase. The club wants to raise $1.4 million to build a 10,000-square-foot gymnasium that will double as a community center. “The reality is that there’s such a great need for a youth center here,� said Tracy Cooper, who served on the Cascade Child Cen-

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place rather than subjecting them to the same permitting process, he said. The Oregon Department of Forestry, which became involved in the case because it owns the land subject to the NEDC’s lawsuit, has not formulated an opinion about the EPA’s proposal, said Kevin Weeks, a department spokesman. “We’re still in the process where not only our analysts but our attorneys are studying the proposal that the EPA is moving forward with,� he said. The Supreme Court is expected to decide this month whether it will hear the case. Public comment on the EPA’s announcement closes June 22. Almost half the 751 million acres of forested land in the United States is publicly owned and 80 percent of the country’s fresh water originates in those forests. Almost 14,500 miles of logging roads have been built on the federally owned O&C lands, including on 2.7 million acres in Western Oregon originally granted to the Oregon and California Railroad Co. to develop an interstate rail line. More than half the U.S. population relies on forestlands for good-quality water, while an estimated 60 million people rely on National Forest System land as their primary source of drinking water, according to the U.S. Forest Service. — Reporter: 202-662-7456, aclevenger@bendbulletin.com

ter’s board of directors. “It’s a big transformation and a winwin situation.� The Redmond branch serves 260 members, ages 5 to 18. Maxwell said the club expects membership to increase with the new location. — Reporter: 541-633-2160, hpablo@bendbulletin.com

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THURSDAY, JUNE 7, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

C3

O N Rosenblum to take AG post this month Some Washington By Jonathan J. Cooper The Associated Press

SALEM — Ellen Rosenblum, the Democratic candidate for Oregon attorney general, will be taking the job early. Gov. John Kitzhaber said Wednesday he’ll appoint the former judge to succeed John Kroger, who is resigning to become president of Reed College in Portland. Rosenblum will be sworn in as Oregon’s first female attorney general on June 29. Kroger, a Democrat, decided last year not to run for reelection as a result of a health condition he hasn’t disclosed publicly. Rosenblum won the Demo-

cratic nomination for attorney general last month. This fall, she’ll face Republican James Buchal, a Portland attorney who launched a write-in campaign for the party’s nomination after nobody stepped up to be on the primary ballot. An unofficial count released Wednesday showed Buchal with nearly 13,000 GOP writein votes. Taking office early will help with a smooth transition, Rosenblum said in an interview. “It’s a wonderful opportunity to try to hit the ground running, and I think it will serve the people well, especially if I’m elected in November,” she said. Rosenblum was a federal

prosecutor in Eugene and Portland for nine years before she was appointed a Multnomah County trial court judge in 1989. She became an Oregon Court of Appeals judge in 2005 and retired from the bench last year. “This is a historic moment,” Kitzhaber said. “Throughout her career, Ellen has been an advocate for the people of Oregon.” The attorney general runs the Oregon Department of Justice, which is responsible for collecting child support, providing legal advice to state agencies, enforcing consumerprotection laws and helping district attorneys with criminal prosecutions.

“Ellen will be a fantastic attorney general and we will all work to make sure she has a smooth transition,” Kroger said. Buchal has litigated business disputes and represented businesses fighting the government. He calls himself a libertarian and said his goal as attorney general would not be to win every case. “When you get into this mind-set where the government always has to win, we end up with more and more complexity and everything grinds to a halt,” Buchal said. “If you keep electing people who are sort of lifetime government people, I’m not sure they can even see the problem.”

Rick Bowmer / The Associated Press

A man looks at the massive dock with Japanese lettering that washed ashore Wednesday on Agate Beach near Newport. A nearly 70-foot-long dock was torn loose from a fishing port in northern Japan by last year’s tsunami and drifted across thousands of miles of Pacific Ocean, a Japanese Consulate official said.

Tsunami debris drifts from Japan to Newport A nearly 70-foot-long dock that floated ashore on an Oregon beach was torn loose from a fishing port in northern Japan by last year’s tsunami and drifted across thousands of miles of Pacific Ocean, a Japanese Consulate official said Wednesday. A commemorative plaque on the dock showed it was one of four owned by Aomori Prefecture that broke loose from the port of Misawa on the northern tip of the main island, Deputy Consul Hirofumi Murabayashi said from Portland.

One of the four docks turned up several weeks later on an island south of Misawa, but the other two are still missing, said Akihisa Sato, an engineer with Zeniya Kaiyo Service, the dock’s Tokyo-based manufacturer. The docks weigh 165 tons each, Sato said. The one that floated to Oregon was first spotted floating offshore Monday, and mistaken by several people for a barge, said Chris Havel, spokesman for the Ore-

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Salem pear canner Boring plus Dull bows out of business equals excitement Then there were three. After failing recently to acquire the bankrupt Snokist Growers of Yakima, Wash., Truitt Brothers of Salem is bowing out of pear canning. Truitt Brothers is urging its 50 growers to do business with Northwest Packing of Vancouver, Wash. The Capital Press reported that also still in the pear canning game are Del Monte Foods of San Francisco, which operates a plant in Yakima, and Independent Foods of Yakima, which primarily cans pears that it grows.

Ex-con indicted in fatal golf club attack Police say a man beat an acquaintance to death in Medford with a golf club in an unprovoked attack. TravisDonaldAsbillwasindicted Tuesday by a Jackson County grand jury on a murder charge in Sunday’s slaying of Donald William Mack at his home. The Mail Tribune reported that the 29-year-old Asbill had been out of state prison for a little more than a year after serving seven years for an attempted murder conviction.

Tickets available for first lady’s speech Oregon State University says tickets will be available for 1,000 members of the general public to hear first lady Michelle Obama give the commencement address at the graduation ceremony June 17 in Reser Stadium. The Oregonian reports people can reserve up to two tickets online on the OSU commencement website and can pick up the tickets June 12 and 13.

The 38 members of the Boring Community Planning Organization gave a unanimous “aye” vote Tuesday in favor of declaring the Clackamas County town “a pair for the ages” with the Scottish village of Dull. The organization hopes the publicity and sale of Dull and Boring T-shirts will boost tourism. The Oregonian reports the Boring declaration wishes “continued freedom, successful commerce, safety and prosperity for each community and its residents.” The 72-year-old greatgrandson of the town namesake, Bob Boring, said the partnership with Dull was fun and exciting.

Teacher in student sex case back in jail A Salem teacher charged with having a sexual relationship with a student has been jailed a third time, with bond at $1 million. He’s accused of violating his release terms by making contact with the student online. The Salem Statesman Journal reports 49-year-old Michael Montgomery, who taught languages at Sprague High School, has been charged with contempt of court in addition to the sex abuse charges he faced. Montgomery was arrested and then released April 16 when he posted 10 percent of $50,000 bail. On May 2, he was accused of contacting the student at a concert and arrested. On May 24, he posted $200,000 bail. Six days later, he was again arrested. Online jail records showed him in custody Wednesday. — The Associated Press

gon Department of Parks and Recreation. It washed ashore early Tuesday on Agate Beach, a mile north of Newport on the central Oregon Coast. It’s made of concrete with a metal pontoon and measures 66 feet long, 19 feet wide and 7 feet high. The distance between Japan and Oregon is roughly 5,000 miles. A starfish native to Japan was among the marine life still clinging to the structure after the long voyage, Havel said. — The Associated Press

Pipeline builders seek permit for underground gas conduit The Associated Press MEDFORD — Companies that want to build a natural gas pipeline across southwestern Oregon are again seeking approval in Washington, D.C., this time for building a route to export American gas to Asia. The line would connect a transmission hub in southern Klamath County to the proposed Jordan Cove natural gas terminal at Coos Bay. The pipe would be underground, 3 feet in diameter. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission approved the pipeline in 2009 but withdrew the license after the project developers switched strategies from importing gas to exporting it.

The Medford Mail Tribune reports the developers will hold meetings the week of June 25 in Medford, Roseburg, Klamath Falls and Coos Bay. The timetable calls for construction of the terminal in 2014 and the pipeline in 2015.

liquor consumers find bargains in Oregon By Steven DuBois The Associated Press

PORTLAND — Savvy shoppers from Washington state regularly flock to Oregon because it lacks a sales tax. Now, anecdotal evidence suggests they are being joined by drinkers searching for cheaper alcohol. Oregon liquor stores near the state line report an uptick in business from Washington residents who say they’re paying more for spirits, not less, since the privatization of the staterun sales system took effect June 1. “Oh God, yes. I’ve had a lot of customers coming over from Washington complaining; they are not happy with the prices,” said Sylvia Pike, manager at The Dalles Liquor Store. “They are saying things like: ‘I’m boycotting Washington’ and ‘I’m not buying my booze there anymore.’” Washington voters approved Initiative 1183 last fall, taking the state out of the liquor business for the first time since Prohibition. The measure allows stores larger than 10,000 square feet and smaller stores in some areas to sell liquor. Supporters touted the measure as a free-market reform that would give consumers more choices and lower prices. Those in favor included warehouse giant Costco Wholesale Corp., one of many big-box stores that can negotiate volume discounts for some products or sell their own labels more cheaply. However, the initiative also imposed an additional 10 percent distributor fee and 17 percent retail fee on spirits to reimburse the state for millions of dollars in lost revenue. The result was higher prices for consumers at many retail outlets. Oregon law allows the sale of packaged hard liquor only at stores run by state-contracted agents who are compensated based on their sales. The profits are divided by the state, cities and counties. Oregon’s prices, consistent across the state, were already a little cheaper than in Washington. Agents from border stores in Astoria, Hermiston, Milton-Freewater, Portland, Rainier and The

Dalles said Washington residents have always been regular customers, but there have been more of them, and many new faces, since the initiative took effect. “We got hit pretty hard this weekend,” said owner-agent Trudi Seadorf of The Dalles Liquor Store. “In a good way. I’m not complaining one bit.” Christie Scott, a spokeswoman for the Oregon Liquor Control Commission, said most stores submit sales figures at the end of the month, so it’s too soon to say if the anecdotal reports accurately reflect a surge in sales. Scott said the agency analyzed the possibility of higher Washington prices before the initiative took effect. The study showed that Oregon’s 17 border stores could see a $3.6 million to $7 million boost in revenue over a two-year period. Traci Brumbles, owneragent of the Rainier Liquor Store, just across the Columbia River from Longview, Wash., said she has run the numbers and her business was up 15 percent in the past few days compared with the same time last month. In one extreme example of a price difference, she noted that a bottle of Patron Silver tequila that sells for $49.95 at all Oregon liquor stores was selling for an extra $13 at a Longview grocery store. Along with the new fees, Washington residents accustomed to shopping in no-sales tax Oregon are unhappy with the 20.5 percent retail sales tax now included at the cash register in their state. When Washington had state-run liquor stores, the tax was included in the purchase price on the shelf, so nobody paid much attention. A shopper at the Rainier store, Kris Delaney, a retiree from Winlock, Wash., told the Longview Daily News she supported liquor privatization in Washington, “Until I found out the tax was added on — a big one.”

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THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, JUNE 7, 2012

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The Bulletin

AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER

B  M C G B  J C  R  C

Chairwoman Publisher Editor-in-Chief Editor of Editorials

Energy plan may be unrealistic distraction

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magine, if you can, a state where all new electricity needs for the next 10 years can be met by improvements in efficiency and conservation.

Sound realistic? We didn’t think so, either. Or at least it’s realistic only if the state doesn’t grow much — hardly a result we’d seek. That, however, is the first key goal in Gov. John Kitzhaber’s draft energy plan released this week. The 10-year proposal also sets ambitious goals for regulatory reform and transportation system changes. We’ve become accustomed to a governor who thinks big: Consider his plans for vast education reform, and for a whole new structure to provide health care to the poor. The energy plan certainly follows the think-big approach. Hundreds of Oregonians and organizations provided input, according to the governor’s cover letter, making nearly 200 suggestions that became part of the plan. Three core strategies are detailed, starting with conservation and efficiency. Strategy two envisions “removing finance and regulatory barriers� for clean energy infrastructure. It suggests “streamlined permitting� to overcome “disjointed local, state and federal regulatory processes,� and “a new regional infrastructure bank to leverage public and private investment ....�

We’re fully in favor of tearing down regulatory barriers — not just on energy issues — although this also sounds like shifting a lot of control to Salem. It will be critical to avoid replacing one set of regulatory barriers with a new, centralized one. Strategy three cites transportation as the biggest contributor to carbon emissions, while reporting that fuel costs eat up 7 percent of Oregonians’ income. It seeks to address this problem by converting large fleets to alternative fuels. Can’t argue with that if it’s done right, though costs will surely be an issue. Public input is being solicited through July 31, and the plan is available on the Oregon Department of Energy site (www.oregon. gov/energy). Look on the lower right under Current Topics. Email comments can be sent to tenyearenergyplan@odoe.state.or.us. The energy plan marks a third major initiative from Kitzhaber’s office during a period of severe constraints to the state’s budget and its ability to fulfill its obligations. Energy is a critical subject, to be sure, but this is a time to focus on repairing the state’s economy, not to put up new barriers to growth.

My Nickel’s Worth Pay freeze for 911? In reviewing the Deschutes County budget in an article May 23, The Bulletin notes that most county employees have gone without a pay increase recently for at least a year, except the 911 employee union. Do readers and voters think another 911 district tax base proposal might stand a better chance of passage if the 911 union members agreed to a pay freeze? Carl Vertrees Redmond

Good move on Bowman Dam

Bulletin plays down medical facts on sugar

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I’ll call out your opening sentence in the editorial “Flavored milk foes need better target,� which was, “If the evidence against flavored milk were as definitive as some suggest, we’d be all in favor of banning it from our schools.� I’m not a journalist paid to find facts, but it’s not hard to find that The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends zero sugared beverages per day. The American Heart Association recommends reduced intake of added sugars. AHA reports, “Soft drinks and other sugar-sweetened beverages are the number one source of added sugars in the American diet.� It is not true when the paper

ust when you think partisan politics have reached such a temperature that Congress can accomplish nothing, something comes along to change your mind. Thus the U.S. House of Representatives, on a voice vote, approved Rep. Greg Walden’s Jobs and Water Security Act without opposition. Walden, R-Hood River, introduced the measure just about a year ago. It will, if approved by the Senate, do two things. One is simply a matter of common sense. The Crooked River between the dam and the city of Prineville bears a “wild and scenic� designation, which limits development on it. The designation, which dates back to 1988, places one boundary through the middle of Bowman Dam, a placement most agree was made in error. Moving the boundary downstream a quarter-mile will allow Portland General Electric to begin planning a hydro power-generating facility at the dam. Equally important, the change will allow for the release of some 5,100 acre-feet of water into the river above Prineville, which, in turn, will give that city the right to with-

draw more badly needed water from wells in the area. Though Water Watch of Oregon contends that the measure doesn’t do anything for the river or the fish therein, we’d argue that 5,100 acre-feet, which will flow the length of the wild and scenic stretch of the Crooked River, is nothing to sneeze at. Meanwhile, the extra water that will be withdrawn from wells could hardly go to a more deserving community. Crook County continues to have the highest unemployment rate in the state at nearly 14 percent, with the only real bright spot being the decisions of Apple and Facebook to locate facilities there. If those companies are to expand and others like them are to consider the area, an adequate water supply is critical. Now Walden’s bill moves to the Senate, where both Oregonians, Jeff Merkley and Ron Wyden, have said in the past they agree with at least the idea of the legislation. We hope they still do, and that they’re willing to fight for it, preferably unchanged. It’s a measure that does no harm to the Crooked River, and indeed enhances at least a portion of it, even as it does the citizens of Crook County some real good.

wrote the focus on sugared beverages is too narrow. Kids are getting these liquid candy bars five times a week from our schools when the science says it should be zero. Why is The Bulletin not putting these facts about the evidence of flavored milk early in the April 27 article “Flavored milk debate heats up,� by Patrick Cliff instead of a kooky observation about out-of-the-area people signing the petition? It’s not like this is muckraking, hard-to-get journalistic information. The Los Angeles Unified School District banned flavored milk. Can’t you report why? The Bulletin has had it out for this cultural change even before a June 24, 2010, editorial that started, “Those ever-vigilant food police are at it again.� I’m looking for some basic journalism. Please explain why the AAP and AHA are not the evidence you’re looking for? Lloyd Fassett Bend

Lower speed near school With the opening of Ridgeview High School, increasing traffic, plus intersecting feeder streets and wildlife and livestock in the area, I feel it is imperative to lower the speed to 45 mph as it is north of Highway 126. Also, no passing the entire length of South Canal.

Each intersecting street from state Highway 126 south to Elkhorn — i.e., Obsidian, Wickiup and Southwest Coyote — are located on curves, hills or both. As there have been fatalities in years past, it seems prudent to lower the speed. Jane Jenkins Redmond

Issue fit kids permits to obtain flavored milk It is encouraging to learn that our educational leaders are focusing on strategic issues such as what type of milk to offer our students. The issue seems to be divided between flavored milk, which contains added sugar, and unflavored milk, while both provide essential vitamins and nutrients. This is a very critical issue, but it would seem that an objective solution is available and simple. Those students who prefer flavored milk would obtain a waiver from the health office, based on their BMI (body mass index), and would be issued a permit to purchase flavored milk. Those who do not have such a permit would be limited to plain milk. This solution is very practical and supports our efforts to reduce the obesity issue that concerns many of our citizens. Joseph Rodgers Bend

Letters policy

In My View policy

How to submit

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 550 and 650 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or email them to The Bulletin. Write: My Nickel’s Worth / In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 Fax: 541-385-5804 Email: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Empower people who are in habit of doing right thing By Robert M. Sapolsky For The Los Angeles Times

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s John Edwards a criminal or merely a sleazebag of breathtaking proportions? The jury couldn’t quite make up its mind. But various reasonable questions come to mind in the wake of the mistrial. For example: Whoa, close call, can you believe that this guy might have been president? What exactly was he thinking? And then there’s: Why didn’t he have a shred of willpower when it comes to honesty and doing the right thing? The spectacle reminds me of something moving about honesty I read recently, in, of all places, a scientific journal. In a 2010 report in the prestigious Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Harvard psychologists Joshua Greene and Joseph Paxton asked a great question: When people are confronted with the opportunity to lie, what differs in the brains of people who succumb to the temptation and those who don’t? For the study, each subject was placed in an MRI machine, a brain

scanner that indicates the ongoing levels of activity in different brain regions. The volunteers had a simple task. There would be a series of virtual coin tosses by a computer, and before each one, the subject had to predict the outcome. Guess right, and there’d be a financial reward. But there was a twist. Subjects were told a great piece of nonsense, namely that the purpose of the study was to determine whether people had better paranormal powers at predicting the future when the predictions were made in private. To examine this, scattered through the series of coin tosses would be the occasional instance where instead of a subject entering the prediction before the toss, he would privately make his prediction. Then, after the coin toss, he’d be asked: So, did you guess right? In other words, people were given the opportunity to lie, to claim that they had predicted correctly and then reap the financial reward. How could Greene and Paxton tell if someone were lying? Coin tosses being what they are, across, say, 50 instances in which a subject had to register a prediction beforehand, he’d

be correct roughly half the time — mere chance. If for the tosses where there was the opportunity to cheat the subject’s success rate skyrocketed, odds were that there was a liar in the brain scanner. To start, here’s some demoralizing news — fewer than half of the people were in the clear-cut honest range, with success rates remaining around 50 percent when they had the chance to cheat. About a third seemed to be lying often enough that their success rates were well above 50 percent at those times. The remaining subjects had success rates that were somewhere in between, and thus hard to classify. (Remarkably, the cheaters included one doozy of a scoundrel who claimed something close to perfect accuracy when given the chance to lie.) What went on in the brains of people when temptation beckoned? Let’s start with the “liars� — the people who lied with sufficient frequency that they could be detected statistically. Central to the results was a region called the prefrontal cortex, or the PFC. This is one interesting part of the brain — it’s all about self-dis-

cipline, gratification postponement, emotional regulation, control of impulsiveness. It’s the part of the brain that keeps you from being a serial murderer, that makes you a good dinner guest who proclaims the fare was delicious even when you’re about to sprint for the porcelain throne. It makes you do what’s hard to do when it is the right thing to do. It’s bigger and more complex in humans than in any other species, is our most recently evolved brain region and is the last part of our brains to fully mature. So when the opportunity to cheat arose, the activity in the PFCs of liars shot up like crazy. The scans showed the trace of an epic moral battle — do it, don’t, yes do it, no don’t — that the liars lost. And the larger the percentage of lies told, the greater the overall PFC activity. And what were levels of activity in the PFCs of those who, from a statistical standpoint, never lied? Greene and Paxton present two differing views in moral philosophy about honesty: Is honesty an act of will; does it require a person working hard to refrain from doing the wrong thing? Or is it an act

of grace, effortless because temptation isn’t tempting? In the study’s paradigm, it was grace all the way — among the unequivocally honest, there was no increase in PFC activity when the chance to cheat arose. Their PFC neurons weren’t successfully wrestling Satan into submission. There was no wrestling. It was simple — you don’t do that, it’s wrong, period. In the face of real life’s temptations, a majority of us are not going to get by on pure grace. We resist, but sometimes it takes work. Lots. Or perhaps we succumb and thereby shock ourselves with what we are capable of. We ooze our human frailties. And yet there are those who glide through minefields of enticement, doing the difficult, rare, brave, correct thing as naturally as breathing. It can seem hard to believe that a person could really be this way. But a hightech brain scanner documented that it’s possible. It’s an achievable goal. And should be. Even for someone who would be president. — Robert M. Sapolsky is a professor of neuroscience at Stanford University and the author of “A Primate’s Memoir.�


THURSDAY, JUNE 7, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

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O D N  Alma Ellender Weed, of Bend April 20, 1910 - May 29, 2012 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals, Bend (541) 318-0842 www.autumnfunerals.net Services: A memorial service will be held at the First United Methodist Church, 680 NW Bond St., Bend, OR 97701 on Monday, June 11, 2012 at 11:00 AM. A graveside service will be held on Tuesday at 2:00 PM at the Hudson Park-Woodbine Cemetery in Rainier, OR. Contributions may be made to:

First United Methodist Church, 680 NW Bond St., Bend, OR 97701 in Alma’s honor.

Robert L. Bennett “Bob�, of Prineville July 23, 1927 - June 5, 2012 Arrangements: Prineville Funeral Home, 541-447-6459 Services: There will be a private family gathering. Contributions may be made to:

Hospice.

David Bruce Gindraux, of Bend Nov. 18, 1952 - June 5, 2012 Arrangements: Baird Funeral Home of Bend, 541-382-0903 www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: A gathering of friends will take place. Contributions may be made to:

Partners In Care Hospice, 2075 NE Wyatt Ct., Bend, OR 97701, (541) 382-5882, www.partnersbend.org

Douglas R. Studwell, of Bend June 6, 1918 - June 4, 2012 Arrangements: Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home, 541-382-2471, www.niswonger-reynolds.com

Services: A rosary & visitation will be held Fri., June 8, 2012 at 7PM in NiswongerReynolds Funeral home with a Funeral Mass following on Sat., June 9, 2012 at 10:00 AM in the Historic St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church, Lava & Franklin. Contributions may be made to:

The veterans organization of one's choice.

Arrene F. Powell, Formerly of Central Oregon Jan. 15, 1924 - June 4, 2012 Arrangements: Deschutes Memorial Chapel, (541)382-5592;

www.deschutesmemorialchapel.com

Services: 4:00 pm, Sat. 6-9-2012, Deschutes Memorial Chapel, Bend, Oregon, Interment, Pilot Butte Cemetery, Bend, OR, Mon. 6-11-2012 10:00 AM.

B. Lucille Richardson, of Bend June 5, 1915 - June 2, 2012 Arrangements: Deschutes Memorial Chapel, (541)382-5592;

www.deschutesmemorialchapel.com

Services: 2:00 PM, Friday, June 08, 2012 at Deschutes Memorial Mausoleum Chapel, 63875 N. Hwy. 97, Bend. Contributions may be made to:

Partners In Care Hospice, 2075 NE Wyatt Ct., Bend, OR 97701.

Obituary policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, email or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825.

Deadlines: Death Notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details.

Phone: 541-617-7825 Email: obits@bendbulletin.com Fax: 541-322-7254

Mail: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708

Ronald D. Pankratz

Patricia Earlene Anderson

Oct. 18, 1925 - June 5, 2012.

May 27, 1934 - May 27, 2012

Ronald D. Pankratz of Bend, passed away June 5, 2012. Ronald was born to Peter and Tena Pankratz on Oct. 18, 1925, in Florence, Kansas. He was raised on a family farm until he joined the U. S. Navy in 1943. While in the Navy, he attended the University of Oklahoma, graduating in 1946. Ronald served as a Naval officer for 11 years and then made his career as an engineer in the aerospace industry. He married Irene Stovall of Florence, Kansas, on Dec. 27, 1948, in Baltimore, Maryland. They made their home in many parts of the country with his career in the Navy and in the aerospace industry. He retired from Thiokol Chemical Corporation in 1985. He and Irene moved to Bend, Oregon, in 2000, to be near one of their daughters. Ronald is survived by his wife, Irene; two daughters, Sheryl (Jim) Sorensen of Denver, Colorado, and Linda (Bob) Baron of Bend; four grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren. He is also survived by his brother, Earl; and his sister, Lenora. He is preceded in death by his parents. A memorial service will be held in the chapel at the First Presbyterian Church in Bend, on Saturday, June 9, 2012, at 11:00 a.m. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Hospice of Bend, 2075 NE Wyatt Court, Bend, OR 97701.

Patricia Earlene Anderson of Bend, Oregon, passed away at her home on May 27, 2012. She was 78. A Memorial Service will be held on Saturday, June 9, 2012, at 1:00 p.m. at Grace Baptist Church, located at 566 NE Clay Avenue, in Bend, Oregon. A reception will immediately follow. Patricia was born May 27, 1934, in Colorado Springs, Colorado, to Earl and Gertrude (Knowles) Anderson. She earned a bachelor’s degree from Southwest Missouri State College in Springfield, Missouri. She spent her career as a teacher for the Madras School District, living and teaching on the Warm Springs Indian Reservation. She moved to Bend upon retiring. She belonged to Delta Kappa Gamma, an organization of educators. A lifelong Southern Baptist, she was an active and faithful member of Grace Baptist Church. She is survived by her two sisters, Elva A. Harmon of Tulsa, Oklahoma and Nancy Anderson of Springfield, Missouri. Other survivors include 13 nieces and nephews. She was preceded in death by her parents, a brother and three sisters. In lieu of flowers, please send contributions to the Grace Baptist Church or to a charity of your choice. Baird Funeral Home of Bend is in charge of the arrangements, 541-382-0903. www.bairdmortuaries.com

Douglas R. Studwell Sr. June 6, 1918 - June 4, 2012 Douglas R. Studwell Sr., passed away in Bend, on Monday, June 4, 2012. Doug was born in Port Chester, New York, on June 6, 1918, the 7th of eleven children of Howard Sr. and Louise Studwell. Doug attended Horton ElemenDouglas tary Studwell Sr. School, Junior High and High School in Port Chester. Like many children in that time and generation, he left school before graduation to go to work. Doug's father, Howard, was a 50-year member of Putnam Engine and Hose Fire Company in Port Chester. Following his father's lead, Doug joined Harry Howard Hook & Ladder Co. on December 11, 1936. Doug and six of his brothers were all long-time members of the Port Chester Fire Department with the family representing well over 300 years of firefighting tradition. Doug served in all firemanic and parliamentary offices of Harry Howard. Doug met Harriet McElroy of Port Chester, in 1939, and they married in November, 1941. He became part of the second group of draftees in 1941 and served four years in the U.S. Army during WWII as a Sergeant. After the war, Doug returned to Port Chester and began working for the Village of Port Chester in 1947. In May 1951, he became a paid firefighter for the Village, serving until August 1980, when he retired. For the past four years, Doug has been living in Bend, to be closer to family and is a parishioner of St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church. Doug has three sons, Douglas Jr. (Aileen), Craig (Janice), and Keith (Sue); along with eight grandchildren and two greatgrandchildren. Harriet, his wife of 69 years, passed away in June, 2010. Craig and Keith are also active exempt members of Harry Howard. A viewing and rosary will be held at 7 p.m. on Friday, June 8, at Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home and a memorial Mass at 10 a.m. on Saturday, June 9, at St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church in downtown Bend. His final resting place will be the Deschutes Memorial Gardens in Bend. Those who wish may make remembrances to the Bend Band of Brothers veterans group, Please visit the online registry for the family at www.niswonger-reynolds.com

D E 

 Deaths of note from around the world: Vladimir Krutov, 52. One of the Soviet Union’s all-time great ice hockey players and part of the national team’s formidable KLM Line. With Igor Larionov and Sergei Makarov formed one of the most potent scoring lines that hockey has ever seen, and led the Soviet team to gold in the 1984 and 1988 Olympics. Died Wednesday in Moscow. The Russian Hockey Federation did not give a cause of death. William Lee Miller, 86. Historian and ethicist whose work examined the rocky landscape where religion, morality and American political leadership meet. Taught many years at the University of Virginia. Known for books about the roiling national debate over slavery. Died May 27 in New York City of congestive heart failure. Prince Tomohito of Mikasa, 66. Cousin of Emperor Akihito of Japan and the eldest son of Prince Mikasa. Sixth in line to the Chrysanthemum Throne. Known for writing books that went beyond norm of Imperial family. Died Wednesday of cancer in Tokyo. — From wire reports

Jonathan Alcorn / For The Washington Post

Ray Bradbury was acclaimed for “Fahrenheit 451� and other fiction that reflected broader human themes. He died Tuesday in Los Angeles at 91.

Author Ray Bradbury lifted fantasy to literary heights By Lynell George Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — Ray Bradbury, the writer whose expansive flights of fantasy and vividly rendered space-scapes have provided the world with one of the most enduring speculative blueprints for the future, has died. He was 91. Bradbury died Tuesday night in Los Angeles, his agent Michael Congdon confirmed. His family said in a statement that he had suffered from a long illness. Author of more than 27 novels and story collections — most famously “The Martian Chronicles,� “Fahrenheit 451,� “Dandelion Wine� and “Something Wicked This Way Comes� — and more than 600 short stories, Bradbury has frequently been credited with elevating the often-maligned reputation of science fiction. Some say he single-handedly helped to move the genre into the realm of literature. “The only figure comparable to mention would be (Robert A.) Heinlein and then later (Arthur C.) Clarke,� said Gregory Benford, a University of California, Irvine, physics professor who is also a Nebula Award-winning science fiction writer. “But Bradbury, in the ’40s and ’50s, became the name brand.� Much of Bradbury’s accessibility and ultimate popularity had to do with his gift as a stylist — his ability to write lyrically and evocatively of lands an imagination away, worlds he anchored in the here and now with a sense of visual clarity and small-town familiarity. The late Sam Moskowitz, the pre-eminent historian of science fiction, once offered this assessment: “In style, few match him. And the uniqueness of a story of Mars or Venus told in the contrasting literary rhythms of Hemingway and Thomas Wolfe is enough to fascinate any critic.� As influenced by George Bernard Shaw and William Shakespeare as he was by Jules Verne and Edgar Rice Burroughs, Bradbury was an expert of the taut tale, the lastsentence twist. And he was more celebrated for short fiction than his longer works. “It’s telling that we read Bradbury for his short stories,� said Benford. “They are glimpses. The most important thing about writers is how they exist in our memories. Having read Bradbury is like having seen a striking glimpse out of a car window and then being whisked away.�

Complex themes Bradbury’s poetically drawn and atmospheric fictions — horror, fantasy, shadowy American gothics — explored life’s secret corners: what was hidden in the margins of the official family narrative, or the white noise whirring uncomfortably just below the placid surface. He offered a set of metaphors and life puzzles to ponder for the rocket age and beyond, and has influenced a wide swath of popular culture — from children’s writer R.L. Stine and singer Elton John (who with songwriter Bernie Taupin penned the hit “Rocket Man� as a homage), to architect Jon Jerde who enlisted

FEATURED OBITUARY Bradbury to consider and offer suggestions about reimagining public spaces. Bradbury frequently attempted to shrug out of the narrow “sci-fi� designation, not because he was put off by it, but rather because he believed it was imprecise. “I’m not a science fiction writer,� he was frequently quoted as saying. “I’ve written only one book of science fiction (“Fahrenheit 451�). All the others are fantasy. Fantasies are things that can’t happen, and science fiction is about things that can happen.� It wasn’t merely semantics. His stories were multilayered and ambitious. Bradbury was far less concerned with mechanics — how many tanks of fuel it took to get to Mars and with what rocket — than what happened once the crew landed there, or what they would impose on their environment. “He had this flair for getting to really major issues,� said Paul Alkon, emeritus professor of English and American literature at the University of Southern California. “He wasn’t interested in current doctrines of political correctness or particular forms of society. Not what was wrong in ’58 or 2001 but the kinds of issues that are with us every year.�

‘I’m not a futurist’ Whether describing a fledgling Earthling colony bullying its way on Mars (“— And the Moon Be Still as Bright� in 1948) or a virtual-reality babysitting tool turned macabre monster (“The Veldt� in 1950), Bradbury wanted his readers to consider the consequences of their actions: “I’m not a futurist. People ask me to predict the future, when all I want to do is prevent it.� He long maligned computers — stubbornly holding on to his typewriter — and hated the Internet. He said ebooks “smell like burned fuel� and refused to allow his publishers to release electronic versions of his works until last year, when he finally agreed that Simon & Schuster could release the first digital copy of “Fahrenheit 451.� Ray Douglas Bradbury was born Aug. 22, 1920, in Waukegan, Ill., to Leonard Spaulding Bradbury and the former Esther Marie Moberg. As a child he soaked up the ambience of small-town life — wraparound porches, fireflies and the soft, golden light of late afternoon — that would later become a hallmark of much of his fiction. “When I was born in 1920,� he told The New York Times Magazine in 2000, “the auto was only 20 years old. Radio didn’t exist. TV didn’t exist. I was born at just the right time to write about all of these things.� As a child, Bradbury was romanced by fantasy in its many forms — Grimm’s Fairy Tales and L. Frank Baum (the author of “The Wonderful Wizard of Oz�), the world’s fairs and Lon Chaney Sr., Buck Rogers and “Amazing Stories.� But with the magic came the nightmares. Bradbury spoke often of the night visions that kept him sweating and sleepless in the first decade of his life. Writing became a release

valve of sorts. He often told, and elaborately embroidered, the story of the epiphany that led him to become a writer. A visit to the carnival at 12 brought him face to face with Mr. Electrico, a magician who awakened Bradbury to the notions of reincarnation and immortality. “He was a miracle of magic, seated at the electric chair, swathed in black velvet robes, his face burning like white phosphor, blue sparks hissing from his fingertips,� he recalled in interviews. “He pointed at me, touched me with his electric sword — my hair stood on end — and said, ‘Live forever.’� After a series of moves, the Bradbury family settled in Los Angeles in 1934. Ray dabbled in drama and journalism, fell in love with the movies and periodically sent jokes to the George Burns and Gracie Allen radio show. He read constantly and his writing output steadily increased and improved. While at Los Angeles High, Bradbury became involved with the Los Angeles Science Fantasy Society where he met and got critiques of his work from science fiction writers Heinlein, Henry Kuttner and Jack Williamson. Bradbury graduated in 1938, with not enough money for college. Poor eyesight kept him out of the military, but he kept writing. Bradbury married Marguerite McClure in 1947, the same year he published his first collection of short stories — “Dark Carnival� (Arkham House) — a series of vignettes that revisited his childhood hauntings.

Literary breakthrough His first big break came in 1950, when Doubleday collected some new and previously published Martian stories in a volume titled “The Martian Chronicles.� A progression of pieces that were at once adventures and allegories taking on such freighted issues as censorship, racism and technology, the book established him as an author of particular insight and note. Bradbury’s follow-up bestseller, 1953’s “Fahrenheit 451,� was based on two earlier short stories and written in the basement of the library at the University of California, Los Angeles, where he fed the typewriter 10 cents every half-hour. “You’d type like hell,� he often recalled. “I spent $9.80 and in nine days I had ‘Fahrenheit 451.’ � Books like “Fahrenheit 451� and “The Illustrated Man� — the 1951 collection in which “The Veldt� appeared — not only became best-sellers and ultimately films but cautionary tales that became part of the American vernacular. A stroke in late 1999 slowed him but didn’t stop him. He began dictating his work over the phone to one of his daughters, who helped to transcribe and edit. In 2007 he began pulling rare or unfinished pieces from his archives. “Now and Forever,� a collection of “Leviathan ’99� and “Somewhere a Band Is Playing,� was published in 2007 and “We’ll Always Have Paris Stories� in 2009. His 90th birthday, in 2010, was cause for a weeklong celebration in Los Angeles.


THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, JUNE 7, 2012

C6

W E AT H ER FOR EC A ST Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LP ©2012.

TODAY, JUNE 7 Today: Mostly cloudy, rain showers, afternoon breezes.

HIGH Ben Burkel

FRIDAY Tonight: Partial clearing and colder.

LOW

62

Bob Shaw

HIGH LOW

37 WEST Rain will be likely, with snow above 7,000 feet today.

Astoria 59/47

56/49

Cannon Beach 56/48

Hillsboro Portland 63/51 61/46

Tillamook 63/46

Salem

58/46

62/46

67/49

Maupin

66/40

Corvallis Yachats

60/32

Prineville 61/36 Sisters Redmond Paulina 57/32 62/34 64/35 Sunriver Bend

57/50

Eugene

Florence

62/47

59/49

61/34

62/47

Coos Bay

62/32

Oakridge

Cottage Grove

Crescent

Roseburg

58/49

Silver Lake

61/29

Port Orford 58/49

Gold Beach

Baker City 67/40

John Day

Unity 63/41

66/41

Vale 77/51

63/37

Jordan Valley

63/34

69/45

Rome

Klamath Falls 61/37

Ashland

58/49

• 71°

74/43

Medford

57/35

67/50

Brookings

Yesterday’s state extremes

62/39

Chiloquin

Medford

58/50

69/41

Frenchglen

Paisley

64/50

76/51

71/41

62/33

60/36

Grants Pass

EAST Skies will be partly Ontario to mostly cloudy, 77/52 but rain will hold off until tonight.

Juntura

Burns Riley

Christmas Valley

Chemult

62/50

59/32

CENTRAL Skies will be cloudy, with a chance of rain today.

Nyssa

Hampton

Fort Rock 62/33

61/30

54/25

Bandon

56/35

Brothers 61/31

La Pine 62/31

Crescent Lake

58/48

62/37

61/39

65/41

Mitchell 63/37

64/38

Camp Sherman

64/48

62/38

Union

Granite Spray 67/40

Enterprise Joseph

La Grande 66/43

60/41

Madras

58/37

Meacham

Condon

Warm Springs

Wallowa

57/36

62/43

67/44

66/39

64/47

68/45

Ruggs

Willowdale

Albany

Newport

Pendleton

69/48

66/43

62/48

56/47

Hermiston 69/48

Arlington

Wasco

Sandy

Government Camp 46/36

63/47

70/48

The Biggs Dalles 69/50

61/48

McMinnville

Lincoln City

Umatilla

Hood River

64/45

• 25°

Fields

Lakeview

McDermitt

72/46

63/39

Lakeview

75/38

-30s

-20s

-10s

0s

Yesterday’sVancouver 58/49 extremes Seattle (in the 48 contiguous states):

• 103° Tucson, Ariz.

• 23° Ely, Nev.

• 3.49” Marianna, Fla.

Honolulu 86/72

10s

20s

Calgary 66/46

30s

Saskatoon 72/55

40s

Winnipeg 79/66

50s

60s

70s

Thunder Bay 69/49

80s

90s

100s 110s

Quebec 67/52

Halifax 61/43 P ortland Billings Bismarck To ronto Portland 67/50 75/51 77/55 75/57 63/51 St. Paul Green Bay Boston 81/68 77/60 Boise Detroit 68/55 Buffalo Rapid City 75/47 74/56 New York Chicago 75/61 75/55 74/62 76/60 Des Moines Cheyenne Philadelphia Columbus 83/62 Salt Lake 73/49 77/55 79/60 City Omaha San Francisco Washington, D. C. 85/66 78/59 64/51 80/62 Las Denver Louisville Kansas City Vegas 81/57 82/59 83/63 St. Louis 96/76 Charlotte 84/59 80/60 Albuquerque Los Angeles Oklahoma City Nashville Little Rock 91/63 76/62 88/64 83/59 86/62 Phoenix Atlanta 104/76 83/64 Birmingham Dallas Tijuana 87/63 85/69 75/57 Houston 91/72

Chihuahua 101/71

La Paz 95/64 Juneau 57/49

Mazatlan 86/69

New Orleans 90/77

Orlando 88/72 Miami 89/76

Monterrey 97/73

FRONTS

56 34

Mostly to partly cloudy, chance of showers very early, breezy.

MONDAY Mostly sunny and warmer.

Mostly sunny and milder.

HIGH LOW

HIGH LOW

66 38

74 44

BEND ALMANAC

PLANET WATCH

TEMPERATURE

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . .6:12 a.m. . . . . 10:02 p.m. Venus . . . . . .5:12 a.m. . . . . . 8:19 p.m. Mars. . . . . .12:47 p.m. . . . . . 1:39 a.m. Jupiter. . . . . .4:23 a.m. . . . . . 7:06 p.m. Saturn. . . . . .3:45 p.m. . . . . . 3:04 a.m. Uranus . . . . .2:14 a.m. . . . . . 2:38 p.m.

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend 24 hours ending 4 p.m.*. . 0.00” High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61/28 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . 0.06” Record high . . . . . . . . 90 in 1931 Average month to date. . . 0.19” Record low. . . . . . . . . 27 in 1963 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.13” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 Average year to date. . . . . 5.21” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.30.07 Record 24 hours . . .0.44 in 1941 *Melted liquid equivalent

Sunrise today . . . . . . 5:23 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 8:46 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 5:22 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 8:47 p.m. Moonrise today . . . 11:33 p.m. Moonset today . . . . 9:05 a.m.

Moon phases Last

New

First

June 11 June 19 June 26

OREGON CITIES

Full

July 3

FIRE INDEX

Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Precipitation values are 24-hour totals through 4 p.m.

Bend, west of Hwy. 97.....Low Bend, east of Hwy. 97......Low Redmond/Madras ........Low

Astoria . . . . . . . .59/42/0.01 Baker City . . . . . 62/33/trace Brookings . . . . . .58/40/0.00 Burns. . . . . . . . . 62/26/trace Eugene . . . . . . . .69/37/0.00 Klamath Falls . . 62/30/trace Lakeview. . . . . . .61/25/0.17 La Pine . . . . . . . .63/29/0.00 Medford . . . . . . .71/44/0.14 Newport . . . . . . .59/43/0.00 North Bend . . . . .61/43/0.00 Ontario . . . . . . . 67/40/trace Pendleton . . . . . .66/40/0.00 Portland . . . . . . .66/46/0.00 Prineville . . . . . . .60/33/0.02 Redmond. . . . . . .65/31/0.00 Roseburg. . . . . . .71/43/0.12 Salem . . . . . . . . .67/42/0.00 Sisters . . . . . . . . .67/28/0.00 The Dalles . . . . . .67/48/0.00

Mod. = Moderate; Ext. = Extreme

. . . . . 59/47/r . . . . .57/48/sh . . . . .67/40/c . . . . .60/36/sh . . . .58/49/sh . . . . .61/49/sh . . . .67/38/sh . . . . .63/36/sh . . . . . 62/47/r . . . . .60/45/sh . . . . .61/37/c . . . . .61/32/pc . . . .63/39/pc . . . . .62/35/pc . . . .62/31/sh . . . . .61/28/sh . . . . . 67/50/r . . . . .65/46/pc . . . . . 56/47/r . . . . .55/47/sh . . . . . 58/48/r . . . . .57/47/sh . . . .77/52/pc . . . . .73/47/pc . . . . . 68/45/r . . . . .68/44/pc . . . . . 63/51/r . . . . .60/50/sh . . . .61/36/sh . . . . .64/35/sh . . . . . 64/37/r . . . . .64/35/pc . . . .62/50/sh . . . . .63/47/sh . . . . . 62/48/r . . . . .60/46/sh . . . .62/34/sh . . . . .59/32/sh . . . . . 67/49/r . . . . .67/48/sh

PRECIPITATION

WATER REPORT Sisters ...............................Low La Pine...............................Low Prineville..........................Low

The following was compiled by the Central Oregon watermaster and irrigation districts as a service to irrigators and sportsmen.

Reservoir Acre feet Capacity Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . . 50,361 . . . . . . 55,000 Wickiup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 191,485 . . . . . 200,000 Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . 80,452 . . . . . . 91,700 Ochoco Reservoir . . . . . . . . 40,142 . . . . . . 47,000 Prineville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141,073 . . . . . 153,777 The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is River flow Station Cubic ft./sec Deschutes RiverBelow Crane Prairie . . . . . . . 446 for solar at noon. Deschutes RiverBelow Wickiup . . . . . . . . . . . 749 Crescent CreekBelow Crescent Lake . . . . . . . 212 LOW MEDIUM HIGH V.HIGH Little DeschutesNear La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . 321 0 2 4 6 8 10 Deschutes RiverBelow Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . 206 Deschutes RiverAt Benham Falls . . . . . . . . . 1,693 Crooked RiverAbove Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . 57 Crooked RiverBelow Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . 226 Updated daily. Source: pollen.com Ochoco CreekBelow Ochoco Res. . . . . . . . . . 11.0 Crooked RiverNear Terrebonne . . . . . . . . . . . 321 Contact: Watermaster, 388-6669 LOW MEDIUM HIGH or go to www.wrd.state.or.us

To report a wildfire, call 911

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX 1

POLLEN COUNT

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

59/49

Anchorage 61/51

HIGH LOW

SUNDAY

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS -40s

Partly to mostly cloudy, chance of showers late, breezy.

58 35

FORECAST: STATE Seaside

SATURDAY

Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . . .84/68/0.01 . . . 85/70/t . 89/70/pc Akron . . . . . . . . . .75/46/0.00 . .77/52/pc . 79/58/pc Albany. . . . . . . . . .70/48/0.01 . . . 74/52/t . 78/53/pc Albuquerque. . . . .92/62/0.00 . . . 91/63/s . . 93/63/s Anchorage . . . . . .57/44/0.00 . .61/51/pc . 62/49/sh Atlanta . . . . . . . . .81/64/0.00 . .83/64/pc . 88/68/pc Atlantic City . . . . .70/50/0.00 . . . 75/60/t . 78/63/pc Austin . . . . . . . . . .96/68/0.00 . . . 91/73/t . . .92/72/t Baltimore . . . . . . .77/50/0.00 . . . 80/60/t . . 82/62/s Billings . . . . . . . . .72/52/0.00 . .75/51/pc . . .87/55/t Birmingham . . . . .85/66/0.00 . . . 87/63/s . . 88/66/s Bismarck. . . . . . . .88/64/0.00 . . . 77/55/t . 80/63/pc Boise . . . . . . . . . . .65/37/0.00 . .75/47/pc . 70/40/pc Boston. . . . . . . . . .61/52/0.00 . . . 68/55/t . 74/60/pc Bridgeport, CT. . . .71/52/0.00 . . . 72/58/t . 76/62/pc Buffalo . . . . . . . . .69/48/0.00 . .74/56/pc . 76/58/pc Burlington, VT. . . .71/49/0.03 . .75/50/pc . . .77/57/t Caribou, ME . . . . .63/45/0.07 . .69/44/pc . . .73/51/t Charleston, SC . . .76/67/1.37 . .82/66/pc . . 85/64/s Charlotte. . . . . . . .73/57/0.52 . .80/60/pc . . 85/61/s Chattanooga. . . . .81/59/0.00 . . . 83/59/s . . 85/62/s Cheyenne . . . . . . .82/49/0.00 . .73/49/pc . . 85/53/s Chicago. . . . . . . . .76/52/0.00 . . . 74/62/s . 86/70/pc Cincinnati . . . . . . .76/50/0.00 . .78/55/pc . . 82/58/s Cleveland . . . . . . .74/48/0.00 . .74/55/pc . . 78/62/s Colorado Springs .86/51/0.00 . . . 77/52/t . . 86/54/s Columbia, MO . . .82/62/0.01 . . . 83/58/s . . 86/65/s Columbia, SC . . . .78/64/0.00 . .84/63/pc . . 89/62/s Columbus, GA. . . .86/69/0.00 . .87/66/pc . 90/68/pc Columbus, OH. . . .77/52/0.00 . .77/55/pc . . 79/59/s Concord, NH. . . . .67/46/0.20 . .72/47/pc . . .78/54/t Corpus Christi. . . .93/72/0.00 . . . 91/74/t . . .89/74/t Dallas Ft Worth. . .95/70/0.98 . . . 85/69/t . 86/70/pc Dayton . . . . . . . . .76/48/0.00 . .77/54/pc . . 79/60/s Denver. . . . . . . . . .91/58/0.00 . . . 81/57/t . . 89/59/s Des Moines. . . . . .79/64/0.00 . .83/62/pc . 87/68/pc Detroit. . . . . . . . . .79/50/0.00 . .75/61/pc . 78/65/pc Duluth. . . . . . . . . .72/51/0.02 . . . 69/58/t . . .72/56/t El Paso. . . . . . . . . .98/65/0.00 . .100/69/s . 102/71/s Fairbanks. . . . . . . .68/50/0.05 . .79/58/pc . 84/57/pc Fargo. . . . . . . . . . .87/68/0.00 . . . 82/64/t . 82/64/pc Flagstaff . . . . . . . .77/34/0.00 . . . 78/40/s . . 78/44/s

Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . . .79/49/0.00 . .78/56/pc . 80/64/pc Green Bay. . . . . . .79/47/0.00 . .77/60/pc . . .80/64/t Greensboro. . . . . .68/54/0.41 . .78/57/pc . . 82/58/s Harrisburg. . . . . . .74/48/0.00 . . . 76/55/t . 80/59/pc Hartford, CT . . . . .70/50/0.15 . . . 75/54/t . 79/57/pc Helena. . . . . . . . . .63/45/0.00 . . . 73/46/s . . .76/45/t Honolulu. . . . . . . .84/73/0.00 . . . 86/72/s . . 86/72/s Houston . . . . . . . .97/77/0.00 . . . 91/72/t . . .92/74/t Huntsville . . . . . . .84/61/0.00 . . . 84/60/s . . 87/62/s Indianapolis . . . . .77/52/0.00 . . . 80/60/s . . 83/64/s Jackson, MS . . . . .86/69/0.00 . . . 90/67/s . 89/67/pc Jacksonville. . . . . .87/69/0.02 . . . 84/66/t . 87/66/pc Juneau. . . . . . . . . .60/48/0.00 . .57/49/sh . 56/47/sh Kansas City. . . . . .84/63/0.00 . . . 83/63/s . . 86/68/s Lansing . . . . . . . . .77/46/0.00 . .78/55/pc . 80/64/pc Las Vegas . . . . . . .87/68/0.00 . . . 96/76/s . 100/76/s Lexington . . . . . . .74/51/0.00 . . . 79/57/s . . 80/60/s Lincoln. . . . . . . . . .88/62/0.00 . .85/64/pc . . 89/69/s Little Rock. . . . . . .85/63/0.00 . . . 86/62/s . 88/64/pc Los Angeles. . . . . .72/58/0.00 . . . 76/62/s . . 70/60/s Louisville. . . . . . . .75/54/0.00 . . . 82/59/s . . 84/62/s Madison, WI . . . . .78/46/0.00 . .78/57/pc . 83/66/pc Memphis. . . . . . . .83/65/0.00 . . . 87/62/s . . 89/67/s Miami . . . . . . . . . .88/77/0.04 . . . 89/76/t . . .90/76/t Milwaukee . . . . . .70/50/0.00 . .72/58/pc . 76/65/pc Minneapolis . . . . .82/62/0.00 . . . 81/68/t . . .83/66/t Nashville. . . . . . . .80/56/0.00 . . . 83/59/s . . 87/62/s New Orleans. . . . .94/77/0.00 . . . 90/77/t . . .90/77/t New York . . . . . . .72/54/0.00 . . . 76/60/t . 79/62/pc Newark, NJ . . . . . .73/53/0.63 . . . 78/59/t . 81/61/pc Norfolk, VA . . . . . .70/59/0.00 . . . 78/62/t . . 82/59/s Oklahoma City . . .76/66/0.85 . .88/64/pc . 88/67/pc Omaha . . . . . . . . .88/65/0.00 . .85/66/pc . . 89/69/s Orlando. . . . . . . . .87/72/0.15 . . . 88/72/t . . .90/72/t Palm Springs. . . . .98/67/0.00 . .104/73/s . 102/71/s Peoria . . . . . . . . . .78/54/0.00 . . . 80/57/s . . 84/66/s Philadelphia . . . . .74/54/0.00 . . . 79/60/t . 83/60/pc Phoenix. . . . . . . .101/74/0.00 . .104/76/s . 105/76/s Pittsburgh . . . . . . .74/47/0.00 . . . 74/50/t . 78/56/pc Portland, ME. . . . .63/48/0.03 . .67/50/pc . . .72/55/t Providence . . . . . .65/48/0.16 . . . 75/56/t . 78/60/pc Raleigh . . . . . . . . .74/57/0.04 . .79/58/pc . . 83/59/s

Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . . .89/68/0.00 . . . 75/55/t . 84/62/pc Reno . . . . . . . . . . .69/38/0.00 . .81/51/pc . . 80/48/s Richmond . . . . . . .73/54/0.00 . . . 80/58/t . . 84/59/s Rochester, NY . . . .74/47/0.02 . . . 77/57/t . 79/58/pc Sacramento. . . . . .81/55/0.00 . .85/55/pc . . 84/54/s St. Louis. . . . . . . . .80/59/0.00 . . . 84/59/s . . 87/66/s Salt Lake City . . . .63/41/0.00 . . . 78/59/s . . 90/61/s San Antonio . . . . .95/74/0.00 . . . 92/74/t . . .92/72/t San Diego . . . . . . .72/60/0.00 . . . 69/61/s . . 68/61/s San Francisco . . . .63/50/0.00 . .67/51/pc . . 65/50/s San Jose . . . . . . . .73/50/0.00 . .76/53/pc . . 73/51/s Santa Fe . . . . . . . .89/55/0.00 . . . 86/52/s . . 83/57/s

Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Savannah . . . . . . .79/69/0.62 . .83/66/pc . 86/66/pc Seattle. . . . . . . . . 61/43/trace . . . 59/49/r . 58/50/sh Sioux Falls. . . . . . .86/64/0.00 . . . 85/67/t . 87/67/pc Spokane . . . . . . . .52/40/0.17 . . . 67/43/r . 59/41/sh Springfield, MO . .81/60/0.00 . . . 81/56/s . . 84/64/s Tampa. . . . . . . . . .84/73/0.11 . . . 86/75/t . . .88/74/t Tucson. . . . . . . . .103/68/0.00 . .102/68/s . 104/68/s Tulsa . . . . . . . . . . .86/68/0.00 . .83/62/pc . . 85/66/s Washington, DC . .75/58/0.03 . . . 80/62/t . . 83/63/s Wichita . . . . . . . . .86/67/0.00 . .86/65/pc . . 88/67/s Yakima . . . . . . . . .69/41/0.00 . . . 67/45/r . 67/44/pc Yuma. . . . . . . . . . .98/71/0.00 . .104/73/s . 104/72/s

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . . .64/50/0.00 . .68/53/sh . 63/51/sh Athens. . . . . . . . . .82/64/0.00 . . . 89/68/s . . 84/66/s Auckland. . . . . . . .66/55/0.00 . . . 58/50/s . 60/50/sh Baghdad . . . . . . .111/77/0.00 . .107/78/s . 105/76/s Bangkok . . . . . . . .95/81/0.00 . . . 90/79/t . . .89/80/t Beijing. . . . . . . . . .88/70/0.00 . .91/65/pc . 99/70/pc Beirut . . . . . . . . . .79/70/0.00 . . . 80/69/s . . 79/69/s Berlin. . . . . . . . . . .59/41/0.09 . . .68/55/c . 71/57/sh Bogota . . . . . . . . .68/45/0.00 . .64/49/sh . 65/51/sh Budapest. . . . . . . .73/46/0.00 . .79/61/pc . . .83/65/t Buenos Aires. . . . .43/36/0.00 . .50/35/pc . . 54/38/s Cabo San Lucas . .93/72/0.00 . . . 94/70/s . . 93/69/s Cairo . . . . . . . . . . .93/68/0.00 . . . 96/69/s . . 92/67/s Calgary . . . . . . . . .61/52/0.00 . .66/46/pc . 63/43/sh Cancun . . . . . . . . .88/81/0.00 . . . 87/76/t . . .86/76/t Dublin . . . . . . . . . .64/50/0.00 . . . 55/51/r . 60/48/sh Edinburgh. . . . . . .55/50/0.00 . .57/50/sh . 60/53/sh Geneva . . . . . . . . .70/55/0.00 . . . 80/59/t . 69/55/sh Harare. . . . . . . . . .64/45/0.00 . . . 67/43/s . . 68/43/s Hong Kong . . . . . .93/81/0.00 . .90/81/pc . 90/82/pc Istanbul. . . . . . . . .79/64/0.00 . .74/63/pc . . 77/65/s Jerusalem . . . . . . .88/66/0.00 . . . 81/62/s . . 83/64/s Johannesburg. . . .63/43/0.00 . . . 60/45/s . . 64/39/s Lima . . . . . . . . . . .70/66/0.00 . .74/67/pc . . 75/66/s Lisbon . . . . . . . . . .72/64/0.00 . . .70/61/c . 71/60/pc London . . . . . . . . .64/54/0.00 . . . 62/53/r . 62/52/sh Madrid . . . . . . . . .90/64/0.00 . .83/55/pc . . 84/55/s Manila. . . . . . . . . .91/81/0.00 . . . 82/78/t . . .85/78/t

Mecca . . . . . . . . .111/88/0.00 . .109/84/s . 107/83/s Mexico City. . . . . .79/61/0.75 . . . 79/55/t . . .77/55/t Montreal. . . . . . . .70/52/0.00 . . . 74/54/t . . .75/59/t Moscow . . . . . . . .72/54/0.00 . . . 72/58/r . 64/51/sh Nairobi . . . . . . . . .75/55/0.00 . . . 75/60/t . . .75/60/t Nassau . . . . . . . . .91/79/0.00 . . . 90/77/t . . .88/77/t New Delhi. . . . . .100/81/0.00 102/84/pc 103/83/pc Osaka . . . . . . . . . .86/68/0.00 . .83/64/pc . 79/64/sh Oslo. . . . . . . . . . . .63/41/0.00 . . .61/45/c . 63/50/sh Ottawa . . . . . . . . .73/48/0.00 . . . 75/54/t . . .75/55/t Paris. . . . . . . . . . . .68/57/0.00 . .74/53/sh . 68/52/sh Rio de Janeiro. . . .77/73/0.21 . . . 79/66/t . 74/63/sh Rome. . . . . . . . . . .73/59/0.00 . . . 81/60/s . 83/62/pc Santiago . . . . . . . .63/30/0.00 . . . 62/48/s . 62/49/pc Sao Paulo . . . . . . .64/61/0.54 . . . 65/55/r . 63/56/sh Sapporo . . . . . . . .72/63/0.00 . .66/54/sh . 68/55/sh Seoul. . . . . . . . . . .82/64/0.00 . .82/64/pc . . .81/66/t Shanghai. . . . . . . .81/70/0.00 . .83/70/sh . 86/72/pc Singapore . . . . . . .91/79/0.00 . . . 87/82/t . . .86/81/t Stockholm. . . . . . .61/45/0.00 . .64/47/sh . 65/49/pc Sydney. . . . . . . . . .59/50/0.00 . . . 61/46/s . . 60/46/s Taipei. . . . . . . . . . .88/75/0.00 . .91/79/pc . 93/79/pc Tel Aviv . . . . . . . . .82/68/0.00 . . . 85/66/s . . 82/64/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . . .70/63/0.00 . .77/65/sh . 78/65/sh Toronto . . . . . . . . .75/55/0.00 . . . 75/57/t . . .75/64/t Vancouver. . . . . . .61/50/0.00 . . . 58/49/r . 57/47/sh Vienna. . . . . . . . . .68/43/0.00 . .77/62/pc . . .79/63/t Warsaw. . . . . . . . .64/48/0.00 . .68/57/pc . 77/61/sh


SPORTS

Scoreboard, D2 Horse racing, D3 NBA, D3 College football, D3

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, JUNE 7, 2012

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

MLB Pair of locals picked in draft Local baseball standouts Tommy Richards and Jason Wilson each were picked up by Major League Baseball clubs Wednesday during the third and final day of the 2012 MLB draft. Richards, a Bend High graduate and a senior second baseman at Washington State University, was drafted by the Baltimore Orioles in the 24th round, and Wilson, a senior right-hander at Western Oregon University who graduated from Bend’s Summit High, was selected by the Tampa Bay Rays in the 26th round. Richards, who hit .289 this season, set a WSU single-season record for fielding percentage by a second baseman (.983) and was involved in 47 of the Cougars’ Pac-12 leading 64 defensive double plays. Wilson went 5-2 for the NCAA Division II Wolves in 2012, striking out 58 batters in 62 innings. Around the state, Oregon State University senior infielder Ryan Dunn was selected in the 17th round of the draft Wednesday, also by Tampa Bay, and Beaver senior catcher Ryan Gorton was picked up by the Oakland Athletics in the 31st round. Three players from the University of Oregon were also selected during the final day of this year’s draft. Outfielder Aaron Jones, a drafteligible sophomore, was selected by the Colorado Rockies in the 18th round; redshirt junior right-hander Joey Housey was picked in the 27th round by the Cincinnati Reds; and senior right-hander Alex Keudell, the 2012 Pac-12 pitcher of the year, was drafted by Tampa Bay in 27th round.

GOLF

Local takes title at Bend Ladies Invitational • Bend’s Tiffany Schoning wins for the second time By Zack Hall The Bulletin

Tiffany Schoning wants to win as much as she can this summer before turning professional later this year. The Bend resident is off to a good start. Schoning shot a 3-over-par 75 Wednesday at Bend Golf and Country Club to win the 36-hole Bend Ladies Invitational at 6 over, seven strokes better than Bend’s Nettie Morrison.

It was just the tournament Schoning needed to start her last summer as an amateur golfer. “Having the four or five players that are really good and right there with you is important to have that competition,� Schoning said under sunny skies just off Bend’s 18th green. “It doesn’t matter if there are 20 people who can beat you or two people who can beat you, it’s still helpful to have that competition. See Golf / D5

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Tiffany Schoning tees off on No. 9 while playing in the final round of the Bend Ladies Invitational at Bend Golf and Country Club on Wednesday afternoon. Schoning won the tournament.

SISTERS RODEO

Bulls 1, cowboys 0

The Bulletin

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

WCL BASEBALL

Wenatchee tagged Bend starter J.R. Bunda for five runs en route to defeating the Elks 7-4 on Wednesday in West Coast League baseball action. The host AppleSox (4-2 WCL) have won two games in a row against the Elks and go for the series sweep tonight at Paul Thomas Stadium at 7 p.m. Trailing 3-1 after 51⠄2 innings, Wenatchee scored three runs in the bottom of the sixth inning to grab its first lead of the game. Wenatchee tacked on three more runs, which was enough for AppleSox starter Jake Fife, who earned the win after striking out nine and scattering six hits and three runs over seven innings. Bunda took the loss, striking out three and walking three in 51⠄3 innings of work. The Elks (2-2) ended the game with 10 hits, three by Darian Ramage. The St. Mary’s College shortstop went three for five with a double, two RBIs and one run scored.

The rodeo takes place at the Sisters Rodeo Grounds and continues today. For more information, go to www.sistersrodeo.com.

TODAY

SATURDAY

Slack starts at 8 a.m., free

Parade, 9:30 a.m. Afternoon rodeo starts at 1 p.m. Evening rodeo starts at 7 p.m. • Reserved seats for each rodeo start at $12, box seats are $30; infants must have a ticket

FRIDAY Family Night: Rodeo starts at 7 p.m., children 12 and under are free • Adult general admission is $12, box seats are $30

of Cheyenne, Wyo., is thrown into the air shortly after his bull exited

the bucking shoot while competing in the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association Xtreme Bulls performance to kick off the Sisters Rodeo on Wednesday night. (For results, see Scoreboard, D2.) The rodeo

SUNDAY Final performance starts at 1 p.m. • Reserved seats start at $12, box seats are $30; infants must have a ticket

continues with the slack competition today at 8 a.m.; admission is free. The rodeo runs through the weekend.

They waited as long as they possibly could, but it became too risky. The salmon just never arrived. Citing lower than expected returns of fish, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife closed the Deschutes River to spring chinook fishing, effective today. According to Rod French, an ODFW fish biologist based in The Dalles, HUNTING returns are run& FISHING ning far below pre-run estimates of 1,859 wild and 14,400 hatchery spring chinook. He estimated only about 500 hatchery fish have returned to Deschutes hatcheries as of May 31, and only 150 wild fish have returned. “The run may just be extremely late, but typically 65 percent of the run has returned by (May 31),� French said. “Letting the season continue is not a chance we can take and still protect wild fish and ensure our hatcheries get enough fish for broodstock.� The season, which opened on April 15 this year from the mouth of the Deschutes to Sherars Falls, was originally scheduled to close July 31. French said he has taken calls from many frustrated anglers, but he added that most of them understand that if ODFW did not take action, it could hamper the numbers of spring chinook available in the future. “We’re likely not to meet our broodstock needs and we’ll be well below our escapement goals for wild fish,� French said. See Chinook / D5 PAID ADVERTISEMENT

NHL: STANLEY CUP FINALS

New Jersey avoids elimination, beats L.A. on late goals By Greg Beacham The Associated Press

NBA PLAYOFFS

Oklahoma City reaches NBA finals with 107-99 win over San Antonio, D3

C

owboys watch as Clayton Savage

2012 Sisters Rodeo schedule

— From wire reports

Thunder close out Spurs

Spring chinook fishing closed on Deschutes By Mark Morical

— Bulletin staff report

Elks fall to AppleSox again

D

Golf, D3 MLB, D4 Tennis, D5 Hunting & Fishing, D6

Julie Jacobson / The Associated Press

New Jersey’s Zach Parise (9) celebrates with Ilya Kovalchuk after Kovalchuk’s open net goal in the third period during Game 4 of the Stanley Cup finals on Wednesday in Los Angeles.

LOS ANGELES — When Adam Henrique decided to face playoff elimination by shaving his beard into a bristly mustache, the New Jersey Devils realized their remarkable rookie isn’t exactly buckling under the pressure of the Stanley Cup finals. Martin Brodeur probably has pads older than his teammate, and the NHL’s winningest goalie was acutely aware of the stakes riding on his every save in Game 4. After the 22-year-old clutch scorer and the 40-year-old goalie teamed up to put the Stanley Cup back in its crate, the Devils headed home still nursing the chance of a comeback for all ages. See NHL / D5

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D2

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, JUNE 7, 2012

O  A TELEVISION

SCOREBOARD

Today TENNIS 5 a.m.: French Open, women’s semifinals, ESPN2. GOLF 6 a.m.: European Tour, Nordea Masters, second round, Golf Channel. 9 a.m.: LPGA Tour, LPGA Championship, first round, Golf Channel. Noon: PGA Tour, St. Jude Classic, first round, Golf Channel. 3:30 p.m.: Champions Tour, Regions Tradition, first round, Golf Channel. BASEBALL 10 a.m.: MLB, Los Angeles Dodgers at Philadelphia Phillies or New York Mets at Washington Nationals, MLB Network. 4 p.m.: MLB, Tampa Bay Rays at New York Yankees or Baltimore Orioles at Boston Red Sox, MLB Network. CYCLING 1 p.m.: Criterium du Dauphine, stage 4 (same-day tape), NBC Sports Network. BASKETBALL 5:30 p.m.: NBA playoffs, Eastern Conference finals, Miami Heat at Boston Celtics, ESPN.

Friday GOLF 6 a.m.: European Tour, Nordea Masters, third round, Golf Channel. 9 a.m.: LPGA Tour, LPGA Championship, second round, Golf Channel. Noon: PGA Tour, St. Jude Classic, second round, Golf Channel. 3:30 p.m.: Champions Tour, Regions Tradition, second round, Golf Channel. SOCCER 8:30 a.m.: UEFA European Championship, Poland vs. Greece, ESPN. 11:30 a.m.: UEFA European Championship, Russia vs. Czech Republic, ESPN. 4 p.m.: Men, World Cup qualifier, United States vs. Antigua & Barbuda, ESPN. BASEBALL 9 a.m.: College, NCAA super regionals, Stony Brook at LSU, ESPN2. Noon: College, NCAA super regionals, St. John’s at Arizona, ESPN2. 4 p.m.: MLB, New York Mets at New York Yankees or Detroit Tigers at Cincinnati Reds, MLB Network. 4 p.m.: College, NCAA super regionals, Stanford at Florida State, ESPN2. 6 p.m.: College, NCAA super regionals, TCU at UCLA, ESPN. 7 p.m.: MLB, Los Angeles Dodgers at Seattle Mariners, Root Sports. TENNIS 11 a.m.: French Open, men’s semifinal (same-day tape), NBC. CYCLING Noon: Criterium du Dauphine, stage 5 (same-day tape), NBC Sports Network. MOTOR SPORTS 4:30 p.m.: IndyCar, Firestone 550, qualifying, NBC Sports Network. BOXING 7 p.m.: Kelly Pavlik vs. Scott Sigmon, ESPN2.

RADIO Today BASKETBALL 5:30 p.m.: NBA playoffs, Eastern Conference finals, Miami Heat at Boston Celtics, KICE-AM 940. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

GOLF

All Times PDT (x-if necessary) (Best-of-7) ——— STANLEY CUP FINALS Los Angeles 3, New Jersey 1 Wednesday, May 30: Los Angeles 2, New Jersey 1, OT Saturday, June 2: Los Angeles 2, at New Jersey 1, OT Monday, June 4: Los Angeles 4, New Jersey 0 Wednesday, June 6: New Jersey 3, Los Angeles 1 Saturday, June 9: Los Angeles at New Jersey, 5 p.m. x-Monday, June 11: New Jersey at Los Angeles, 5 p.m. x-Wednesday, June 13: Los Angeles at New Jersey, 5 p.m.

IN THE BLEACHERS

Local BEND LADIES INVITATIONAL June 5-6 At Bend Golf And Country Club 36-Hole Stroke Play Overall — Gross: 1, Tiffany Schoning, Bend CC, 150. Net: 1, Vicki Taylor, Bend CC, 143. First Flight — Gross: 1, Nettie Morrison, Bend CC, 157. 2, Amy Anderson, Bend CC, 158. 3, Kailin Downs, Diamond Woods GC, 164. 4, Athena Douglas, Illahe Hills CC, 165. 5, Rosie Cook, Awbrey Glen GC, 166. Net: 1, Dianna Richard, Royal Oaks CC, 146. 2, Barbara Walley, Bend CC, 149. 3, Sandra Divito, Royal Oaks CC, 152. 4, Elaine Edrington, Persimmon GC, 154. 5 (tie), Peggy Zarosinski, Riverside CC, 155; Julie Eggen, Riverside CC, 155. Second Flight — Gross: 1, Linda Phillips, Tualatin CC, 176. 2 (tie), Janet Windman, Bend CC, 178; Debbi Smith, Bend CC, 178; Tsuyako Dennis, Illahe Hills CC, 178. 5 (tie), Connie Martin, Persimmon GC, 184; Jenni Baxter, Royal Oaks CC, 184. Net: 1 (tie), Dotti Johnson, Astoria CC, 150; Julie Gish, Heron Lakes GC, 150. 3, Janet Elliott, Heron Lakes GC, 152. 4, Shan Wattenburger, Juniper GC, 153. 5, Yon Thompson, Royal Oaks CC, 154. Third Flight — Gross: 1, Trudy Allen, Royal Oaks CC, 187. 2, Julie Homer, Ranch Hills GC, 191. 3, Jodie Hadjuk, Persimmon GC, 193. 4, Mary Johnson, Tualatin CC, 194. 5, Kathy Smith, Tualatin CC, 195. Net: 1, Judy Westwood, Oswego Lake CC, 150. 2, Cindi Eielson, Bend CC, 151. 3 (tie), Terri Zagone, Tualatin CC, 158; Judy Bergs, Royal Oaks CC, 158. 5, Jane Egelhoff, Tualatin CC, 159. Fourth Flight — Gross: 1, Sharon Davenport, Royal Oaks CC, 188. 2, Debra Stevens, Tualatin CC, 193. 3, Brenda Carper, Gresham GC, 198. 4, Susy Wagner, Tualitin CC, 199. 5, Dona Holmes, Royal Oaks CC, 204. Net: 1, Ellen Kimura, Bella Collina GC, 146. 2, Connie Ingram, Corvallis CC, 148. 3, Jacki Smith, Stone Creek GC, 152. 4 (tie), Jane Roberts, Illahe Hills CC, 157; Sydney Bunch, Tualatin CC, 157; Heidi Folliard, The Reserve GC, 157. Tuesday KPs — First Flight: Carol Lee, No. 16. Second Flight: Tsuyako Dennis, No. 6. Third Flight: Judy Westwood, No. 3. Fourth Flight: Connie Ingram, No. 11. Tuesday LDs — First Flight: Tiffany Schoning, No. 9. Second Flight: Jenni Baxter, No. 9. Third Flight: Jane Egelhoff, No. 10. Fourth Flight: Karin Ross, No. 10. Wednesday KPs — First Flight: Carol Lee, Awbrey Glen GC, No. 16. Second Flight: Tsuyako Dennis, Illahe Hills CC, No. 6. Third Flight: Judy Westwood, Oswego Lake CC, No. 3. Fourth Flight: Connie Ingram, Corvallis CC, No. 11. Wednesday LDs — First Flight: Tiffany Schoning, Bend CC, No. 9. Second Flight: Jenni Baxter, Royal Oaks CC, No. 9. Third Flight: Jane Egelhoff, Tualatin CC, No. 10. Fourth Flight: Karin Ross, Club Green Meadows, No. 10. Monday Blindfolded 50-Yard Shot — Judie Bell-Putas, Bend CC, 4 feet. Monday “Broken Shafts” Putting Course — 1 (tie), Kailin Downs, Diamond Woods GC, 17; Rosie Cook, Awbrey Glen GC, 17. 3 (tie), Judie Bell-Putas, Bend CC, 19; Tiffany Schoning, Bend CC, 19; Mary Jensen, Tetherow GC, 19; Shan Wattenburger, Juniper GC, 19; Julie Gish, Heron Lakes GC, 19. Tuesday Skins — Gross: Rosie Cook, No. 4; Tiffany Schoning, No. 9; Mary Lou Potter, No. 10; Yon Thompson, No. 13; Athena Douglas, No. 15; Nettie Morrison, No. 17; Amy Anderson, No. 18. Net: Debra Stevens, No. 2; Sharon Davenport, No. 9; Mary Lou Potter, No. 10; Yon Thompson, No. 13; Jenni Baxter, No. 14; Sue Powell, No. 17.

BASKETBALL NBA

Cat 2/3 — 1, Virginia Matthys, Seattle, 57:28.70. 3, Melodie Buell, Bend, 58:42.20. Cat 2/3 (35+) — 1, Stephanie Armesto, Hood River, 58:40.20. 4, Marcia Thuren, Bend, 1:02:33.00.

RODEO Sisters Rodeo Wednesday ——— Xtreme Bulls First go-round 1. Corey Maier, Timber Lake, S.D., 86 points, $1,184.40. 2. Guytin Tsosie, Farmington, N.M. 84, $908.04. 3. Jake Charlton, Bend, 81, $671.16. 4. Sammy Matthews, Springville, Calif., 79, $434.28. 5. Keith Roquemore Cottonwood, Calif., 76, $276.36. 6. Shane Proctor, Grand Coulee, Wash., 72, $197.40 7. Ty Hamaker, Centennial, Wyo., 69, $157.92. Final go-round 1. Garrett Vig, Newell, S.D., 82 points, $2,632.00. Aggregate 1. Corey Maier, $3,158.40. 2. Guytin Tsosie, $2,421.44. 3. Jake Charlton, $1,789.76. 4. Sammy Matthews, $1,158.08. 5. Keith Roquemore, $736.96. 6. Shane Proctor, $ 526.40. 7. Ty Hamaker, $421.12.

BASEBALL

CYCLING Local Oregon Enduro Series Race No. 1 June 2-3, Bend Division winners and Central Oregon Finishers (Place, name, hometown, overall time after five stages) Men Pro — 1, Adam Craig, Bend, 41:56.90. 4, Carl Decker, Bend, 43:03.20. 27, Timmy Evans, Bend, 45:44.10. 36, Tony Armichardy, Bend, 46:48.00. 43, Jermey Tufts, Bend, 1:21:08.00. 44, Kirt Voreis, Bend, 2:17:08.00. Cat 1 19-39 — 1, Andy Olsson, Hood River, 44:40.50. 2, Luke Mason, Bend, 45:25.30. 5, John Frey, Bend, 45:59.60. 34, Adam Aguilar, Bend, 52:46.70. 36, Don Thuren, Bend, 54:01.40. Cat 1 40+ — David Hemming, Banks, 45:37.90. 2, Paul Thomasberg, Bend, 46:02.30. 9, Darrell Jamieson, Bend, 50:29.60. 11, Justin Serna, Bend, 51:33.40. 12, Leigh Meyer, Bend, 52:21.60. Cat 2 Junior (13-18) — 1, Winter Nason, Santa Rosa, Calif., 49:46.00. 4, Greyfin Eastland, Bend, 55:27.40. Cat 2 (19-39) — 1, (first name unavailable) Norgan, Bend, 46:52.10. 5, Chris Chambers, Bend, 49:42.60. 13, Matt Christensen, Bend, 51:28.00. 17, Alex Pfiffner, Bend, 51:57.50. Cat 2 (40+) — 1, Trey Clay, Tumwater, Wash., 50:21.10. 8, Billy Thomas, Bend, 55:10.70. Cat 3 (open) — 1, Jason Oman, Bend, 49:50.30. 2, Jeff Johnston, Bend, 50:53.80. 6, Nathan Connolly, Bend, 52:44.20. 15, Daniel Kester, Bend, 56:58.80. Women Pro — 1, Mary Moncorge, Fairfax, 51:03.60. 5, Lindsey Voreis, Bend, 52:20.40. 6, Tina Brubaker, Bend, 52:32.10. Cat 1 (open) — 1, Shana Sweitzer, Hood River, 52:20.50.

WCL WEST COAST LEAGUE ——— League standings East Division W L Wenatchee AppleSox 4 2 Walla Walla Sweets 3 3 Bellingham Bells 2 2 Kelowna Falcons 0 1 West Division W L Corvallis Knights 4 1 Kitsap BlueJackets 4 2 Bend Elks 2 2 Cowlitz Black Bears 1 3 Klamath Falls Gems 0 4 Wednesday’s Games Corvallis 6, Klamath Falls 4 Cowlitz 4, Kelowna 2 Wenatchee 7, Bend 4 Walla Walla 4, Kitsap 3 Today’s Games Kelowna at Cowlitz, 6:35 p.m. Bellingham at Kitsap, 6:35 p.m. Bend at Wenatchee, 7:05 p.m. ——— Wednesday’s Results ——— Bend 000 030 010 — 4 9 1 Wenatchee 000 013 21x — 7 10 2 Bunda, Gillies (6), McAlister (6), Peterson (8) and Gallegos; Fife, Jackson (8), Kerns (9) and Schultz. W—Fife. L—Bunda. S—Kerns. 2B—Bend: Ramage, Carroll; Wenatchee: Rapacz. 3B—Bend: Clark; Wenatchee: Gunsolus.

Double Elimination x-if necessary ——— At Alex Box Stadium Baton Rouge, La. Friday, June 8, Stony Brook (50-12) at LSU (46-16), 9 a.m. Saturday, June 9, Stony Brook at LSU, 9 a.m. x-Sunday, June 10, Stony Brook at LSU, 10 a.m. At Hi Corbett Field Tucson, Ariz. Friday, June 8, St. John’s (40-21) at Arizona (41-17), noon Saturday, June 9, St. John’s at Arizona, noon x-Sunday, June 10, St. John’s at Arizona, noon At Dick Howser Stadium Tallahassee, Fla. Friday, June 8, Stanford (41-16) at Florida State (4615), 4 p.m. Saturday, June 9, Stanford at Florida State, 3 p.m. x-Sunday, June 10, Stanford at Florida State, 4 p.m. At Jackie Robinson Stadium Los Angeles Friday, June 8, TCU (40-20) at UCLA (45-14), 6 p.m. Saturday, June 9, TCU at UCLA, 6 p.m. x-Sunday, June 10, TCU at UCLA, 7 p.m. At Alfred A. McKethan Stadium Gainesville, Fla. Saturday, June 9, N.C. State (43-18) at Florida (45-18), 11 a.m. Sunday, June 10, N.C. State at Florida, 10 a.m. x-Monday, June 11, N.C. State at Florida, 10 a.m. At Baylor Ballpark Waco, Texas Saturday, June 9, Arkansas (42-19) at Baylor (48-15), 2 p.m. Sunday, June 10, Arkansas at Baylor, 1 p.m. x-Monday, June 11, Arkansas at Baylor, 1 p.m. At Carolina Stadium Columbia, S.C. Saturday, June 9, Oklahoma (42-23) at South Carolina (43-17), 5 p.m. Sunday, June 10, Oklahoma at South Carolina, 4 p.m. x-Monday, June 11, Oklahoma at South Carolina, 4 p.m. At PK Park Eugene Saturday, June 9, Kent State (44-17) at Oregon (45-17), 8 p.m. Sunday, June 10, Kent State at Oregon, 7 p.m. x-Monday, June 11, Kent State at Oregon, 4 p.m.

SOFTBALL College NCAA Division I World Series Glance At ASA Hall of Fame Stadium Oklahoma City ——— Championship Series (Best-of-3) Monday, June 4: Oklahoma 4, Alabama 1 Tuesday, June 5: Alabama 8, Oklahoma 6 Wednesday, June 6: Alabama 5, Oklahoma 4, Alabama wins series 2-1

HOCKEY College NCAA Division I Super Regionals All Times PDT

NHL NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE

NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION NBA Playoff Glance All Times PDT (x-if necessary) (Best-of-7) ——— CONFERENCE FINALS EASTERN CONFERENCE Boston 3, Miami 2 Monday, May 28: Miami 93, Boston 79 Wednesday, May 30: Miami 115, Boston 111, OT Friday, June 1: Boston 101, Miami 91 Sunday, June 3: Boston 93, Miami 91, OT Tuesday, June 5: Boston 94, Miami 90 Today, June 7: Miami at Boston, 5:30 p.m. x-Saturday, June 9: Boston at Miami, 5:30 p.m. WESTERN CONFERENCE Oklahoma City 4, San Antonio 2 Sunday, May 27: San Antonio 101, Oklahoma City 98 Tuesday, May 29: San Antonio 120, Oklahoma City 111 Thursday, May 31: Oklahoma City 102, San Antonio 82 Saturday, June 2: Oklahoma City 109, San Antonio 103 Monday: June 4: Oklahoma City 108, San Antonio 103 Wednesday, June 6: Oklahoma City 107, San Antonio 99 Wednesday’s Summary

Thunder 107, Spurs 99 SAN ANTONIO (99) Leonard 2-7 0-0 5, Duncan 11-23 3-4 25, Diaw 01 0-0 0, Parker 12-27 4-5 29, Ginobili 4-12 0-0 10, S.Jackson 6-7 5-6 23, Splitter 0-0 0-0 0, Neal 2-6 2-3 7, Green 0-1 0-0 0, Blair 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 37-84 14-18 99. OKLAHOMA CITY (107) Durant 9-17 12-15 34, Ibaka 4-8 2-3 10, Perkins 2-8 0-0 4, Westbrook 9-17 6-7 25, Sefolosha 4-5 0-0 9, Harden 4-9 5-6 16, Collison 0-1 0-0 0, Fisher 4-7 0-0 9. Totals 36-72 25-31 107. San Antonio 34 29 18 18 — 99 Oklahoma City 20 28 32 27 — 107 3-Point Goals—San Antonio 11-26 (S.Jackson 6-7, Ginobili 2-8, Leonard 1-3, Neal 1-3, Parker 1-4, Green 0-1), Oklahoma City 10-18 (Durant 4-8, Harden 3-4, Westbrook 1-1, Sefolosha 1-2, Fisher 1-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—San Antonio 43 (Duncan 14), Oklahoma City 50 (Durant 14). Assists—San Antonio 20 (Parker 12), Oklahoma City 18 (Westbrook, Durant 5). Total Fouls—San Antonio 24, Oklahoma City 18. Technicals—S.Jackson. A—18,203 (18,203).

WNBA WOMEN’S NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION All Times PDT ——— Eastern Conference W L Pct Chicago 4 1 .800 Connecticut 4 1 .800 Indiana 4 1 .800 Atlanta 2 4 .333 New York 2 5 .286 Washington 1 4 .200 Western Conference W L Pct Minnesota 8 0 1.000 Los Angeles 5 1 .833 San Antonio 2 3 .400 Phoenix 2 4 .333 Seattle 1 5 .167 Tulsa 0 6 .000 ——— Wednesday’s Game Minnesota 79, Seattle 55 Today’s Games No games scheduled

TENNIS Professional French Open Wednesday At Stade Roland Garros Paris Purse: $23.47 million (Grand Slam) Surface: Clay-Outdoor Singles Men

GB — — — 2½ 3 3 GB — 2 4½ 5 6 7

Quarterfinals Rafael Nadal (2), Spain, def. Nicolas Almagro (12), Spain, 7-6 (4), 6-2, 6-3. David Ferrer (6), Spain, def. Andy Murray (4), Britain, 6-4, 6-7 (3), 6-3, 6-2. Women Quarterfinals Maria Sharapova (2), Russia, def. Kaia Kanepi (23), Estonia, 6-2, 6-3. Petra Kvitova (4), Czech Republic, def. Yaroslava Shvedova, Kazakhstan, 3-6, 6-2, 6-4.

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES—Reinstated LHP Zach Britton from the 60-day DL and optioned him to Norfolk (IL). Transferred RHP Stu Pomeranz to the 60-day DL. Signed LHP Jamie Moyer to a minor-league contract and assigned him to Norfolk. CLEVELAND INDIANS—Activated OF Johnny Damon from the 3-day paternity list. Optioned C Luke Carlin to Columbus (IL). Claimed RHP Chris Schwinden off waivers from Toronto and optioned him to Columbus. DETROIT TIGERS—Placed C Alex Avila on the 15day DL. Selected the contract of C Bryan Holaday from Toledo (IL). Designated C Omir Santos for assignment. Recalled RHP Jose Ortega from Toledo. OAKLAND ATHLETICS—Placed RHP Andrew Carignan on the 15-day DL. Designated 1B Kila Ka’aihue for assignment. Selected the contracts of 1B Brandon Moss and RHP Evan Scribner from Sacramento (PCL). TAMPA BAY RAYS—Activated 1B-OF Brandon Allen from the 15-day DL and designated him for assignment. National League ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS—Placed INF Lyle Overbay on the paternity list. Recalled OF A.J. Pollock from Reno (PCL). CHICAGO CUBS—Placed RHP Blake Parker on the 60-day DL. Selected the contract of RHP Manuel Corpas from Iowa (PCL). CINCINNATI REDS—Optioned INF Mike Costanzo to Louisville (IL). Recalled INF/OF Kristopher Negron from Louisville. HOUSTON ASTROS—Agreed to terms with RHP Brady Rodgers. NEW YORK METS—Activated OF Jason Bay from the 15-day DL. Placed RHP Chris Young on the paternity list. Reinstated RHP Pedro Beato from the 15-day DL. Designated INF Josh Satin for assignment. PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES—Activated 1B Jim Thome from the 15-day DL. Optioned INF Pete Orr to Lehigh Valley (IL). FOOTBALL National Football League INDIANAPOLIS COLTS—Waived OL Jake Kirkpatrick. NEW YORK GIANTS—Signed coach Tom Coughlin to a contract extension through the 2014 season. OAKLAND RAIDERS—Re-signed DL Desmond Bryant. SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS—Promoted Ethan Waugh to senior personnel assistant. Named Scott Brown and Chip Flanagan regional scouts. TENNESSEE TITANS—Promoted Blake Beddingfield from scouting coordinator to director of college scouting. WASHINGTON REDSKINS—Claimed CB Morgan Trent off waivers from Jacksonville. Waived CB Leigh Torrence. HOCKEY National Hockey League EDMONTON OILERS—Agreed to terms with general manager Steve Tambellini on a contract extension. FLORIDA PANTHERS—Agreed to terms with executive vice president and general manager Dale Tallon on a multiyear contract extension. MONTREAL CANADIENS—Fired assistant coaches Randy Cunneyworth and Randy Ladouceur. OTTAWA SENATORS—Signed F Jean-Gabriel Pageau to a three-year, entry-level contract. SOCCER Major League Soccer PORTLAND TIMBERS—Traded F Jorge Perlaza to Philadelphia for F Danny Mwanga. COLLEGE IOWA—Basketball F Jarrod Uthoff announced he’s transferring from Wisconsin. KANSAS STATE—Signed athletic director John Currie to a contract extension through June 2018. MANHATTAN—Announced men’s basketball F Ashton Pankey is transferring from Maryland. MARIAN—Named Todd Lickliter men’s basketball coach. NORTH TEXAS—Named David Anwar men’s assistant basketball coach.

FISH COUNT Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Tuesday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 1,618 132 90 29 The Dalles 2,166 133 17 2 John Day 2,304 164 28 14 McNary 1,543 71 10 2 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Tuesday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 168,313 8,254 6,358 1,926 The Dalles 121,149 7,440 1,939 956 John Day 107,655 6,755 2,005 1,284 McNary 97,973 4,550 4,801 2,219

S   B Softball • Alabama wins NCAA title: Jackie Traina threw a five-hitter and delivered a key RBI single, and Alabama became the first Southeastern Conference team to win an NCAA softball title, beating Oklahoma 54 in the final game of a best-of-three series that ended early today in Oklahoma City. Traina gave up three home runs — two to Lauren Chamberlain, including one in the seventh inning — but fanned her Oklahoma counterpart, Keilani Ricketts, to end the game. Alabama (60-8) took advantage of Ricketts’ wildness to score four runs in the fourth inning. The Crimson Tide overcame an early 3-0 deficit in a game delayed almost three hours at the start due to steady rain on Wednesday night. Oklahoma (5410) had won 12 straight games, including the opening game of the championship series, before losing two in a row.

Track & field • Ducks start fast at NCAAs: Oregon’s Lanie Thompson set the school record in the women’s 3,000-meter steeplechase and Luke Puskedra was fourth in the 10,000 meters to highlight the Ducks’ first day of the NCAA Track & Field Championships in Des Moines, Iowa. Oregon’s women also advanced English Gardner in the 100 meters, Phyllis Francis in the 400, Anne Kesselring and Laura Roesler in the 800, Kimber Mattox in the steeplechase and the 400 relay team on to finals. For the men, Mike Berry moved on in the 400 meters, while Elijah Greer advanced in the 800. Mattox, a Bend High graduate, was seventh in her heat in 10 minutes, 8.39 seconds and advanced to Friday’s final based on time. • U.S. stars to enter inaugural Hall of Fame: Olympic champions Michael John-

son, Dan O’Brien and Babe Didrikson will be among the 24 athletes inducted into the Hall of Fame being opened by track and field’s governing body later this year. Edwin Moses, Carl Lewis and Jesse Owens had been previously announced as inductees to the inaugural class for the hall, being opened to celebrate the IAAF’s 100th year.

Baseball • Wife of Clemens accuser disputes testimony: Brian McNamee’s estranged wife gave a different account Wednesday from her husband’s about how he started collecting alleged medical waste from injecting Roger Clemens with performanceenhancing drugs. McNamee, Clemens’ former strength coach, testified last month that because of his wife’s nagging, he brought medical waste from a steroids injection of Clemens home in 2001. He said he showed it to her, and she said, “all right,” and he said he stored it in a FedEx box. But Eileen McNamee testified Wednesday that when she first saw the FedEx box and asked him about it, her husband said it wasn’t of her concern. She said that McNamee said he was saving things for his “protection.” That motive, however, is consistent with McNamee’s testimony that the goal, prompted by his wife’s nagging, was to have evidence to prevent McNamee from becoming the sole fall guy if the purported drug abuse became known. Clemens’ lawyers hope Eileen McNamee, who has been given immunity to testify, will help discredit her husband, the government’s chief witness.

Football • Coughlin gets extension from Giants: Tom Coughlin has signed a two-year contract extension through the 2014 season

with the New York Giants. The 65-year-old Coughlin, who led the team to its second Super Bowl win under him in February, has coached the Giants since 2004. His contract was in its final year. • Ex-Bengals player sentenced: Former Bengals linebacker Nate Webster was sentenced Wednesday in Ohio to 12 years in prison for having sex with the underage teen daughter of a former assistant coach for the Cincinnati team. Webster, 34, was sentenced Wednesday In Hamilton County Common Pleas Court in Cincinnati. A jury convicted him in April on four counts of unlawful sexual conduct with a minor, and he could have been sentenced to up to 20 years. • Jury chosen in Sandusky case: A jury was selected Wednesday in the child molestation scandal that brought down Joe Paterno, and the makeup of the panel left no doubt this is Penn State country. The seven women and five men who will hear opening statements on Monday in the case against former Penn State assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky include an engineering administrative assistant at Penn State, a dance teacher in the school’s continuing education program and a professor who has been on the faculty for 24 years. They also include a Penn State senior, a retired soil sciences professor with 37 years at the university, a man with bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the school and a woman who has been a football season ticket holder since the 1970s.

Cycling • Norwegian wins Criterium du Dauphine leg: Edvald Boasson Hagen of Norway led a sprint finish to win the third stage of the Criterium du Dauphine race in France, while Bradley Wiggins of Britain re-

tained the overall lead. The 25-year-old Sky rider edged Germany’s Gerald Ciolek in second place and Borut Biozic of Slovenia in third after the 103-mile trek from Givors to La Clayette. Wiggins, the Sky team leader, kept the yellow jersey for a third straight day by finishing in the 140-rider pack that crossed in Hagen’s wake with the same time: 4 hours, 22 minutes, 13 seconds.

Soccer • Timbers make trade: The Portland Timbers have announced that they have acquired forward Danny Mwanga from the Philadelphia Union in exchange for forward Jorge Perlaza. Mwanga, the No. 1 overall pick in the 2010 MLS Super Draft, is a local favorite, having played at Portland’s Jefferson High School before going to Oregon State. He played as a youngster for the Timbers Alliance club, the Westside Timbers. Mwanga, a native of the Congo, has 12 goals and nine assists over three seasons and 63 appearances for the Union. Perlaza, who is from Colombia, joined the Timbers in their inaugural MLS season and has six goals and two assists in 41 appearances.

Olympics • IOC positive on Rio progress: The IOC says Rio de Janeiro is making “great strides” in preparations for the 2016 Olympics but warns of tight deadlines and a considerable increase in the amount of work after the London Games. The IOC coordination commission ended its annual three-day visit on Wednesday, saying Rio officials and local organizers must be prepared to take center stage after Rio Mayor Eduardo Paes receives the Olympic flag in 67 days in London. — From wire reports


THURSDAY, JUNE 7, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

NBA PLAYOFFS: WESTERN CONFERENCE FINALS

HORSE RACING

GOLF

I’ll Have Another made 4-5 favorite at Belmont

Tseng ready to defend her LPGA Championship By John Kekis The Associated Press

By Beth Harris The Associated Press

NEW YORK — I’ll Have Another went into lockdown on Wednesday, moving into a secured barn shortly after the colt was made the early 4-5 favorite to win the Belmont Stakes in his quest to become the 12th Triple Crown champion and first in 34 years. The Kentucky Derby and Preakness winner was the last of the 12 Belmont horses to arrive at the detention barn, showing up four minutes past the noon check-in deadline. The chestnut colt calmly walked a few hundred yards down a dirt path from where he had been stabled since arriving May 20 and stepped into the barn with a horde of media tracking his every move. “No complaints, no hurdles,” trainer Doug O’Neill said. “He’s being good.” Whether he’s good enough to end the 34-year drought of Triple Crown winners will be decided Saturday, when I’ll Have Another breaks from the No. 11 post under Mario Gutierrez. He’ll have to contend with 11 rivals. “We’re going to see how the pace sets up,” O’Neill said. “If they’re crawling, hopefully we’ll be leading the crawl and if they’re flying, hopefully we’ll be sitting in behind the horses flying.” Just two Belmont winners have come out of the No. 11 post since 1905. The last was Sarava, a 70-1 shot who ended War Emblem’s Triple Crown bid in 2002. I’ll Have Another bucked history in the Derby as the first horse to win from the 19th post. Dullahan was the 5-1 second choice and drew post No. 5. The colt finished third in the Kentucky Derby and sat out the Preakness. “Five is as good as any,” trainer Dale Romans said. “It doesn’t matter going a mile and a half with my horse. I didn’t want to be down on the rail or way outside.” Union Rags was the third betting choice at 6-1 and will break from post No. 3 under new jockey John Velazquez. The colt got bumped at the start by Dullahan in the Derby and rallied from 17th to finish seventh. He also skipped the Preakness to prepare for the 1 1⁄2-mile Belmont.

D3

Eric Gay / The Associated Press

Oklahoma City Thunder forward Kevin Durant celebrates against the San Antonio Spurs during the second half of Game 6 of the Western Conference finals on Wednesday in Oklahoma City.

Thunder beat Spurs, head to NBA finals By Jeff Latzke The Associated Press

OKLAHOMA CITY — After years of nagging Oklahoma City Thunder coach Scott Brooks not to take him out of games, Kevin Durant finally got his wish. And now, he’s one big step closer to making his basketball dreams come true. Durant had 34 points and 14 rebounds while playing all of regulation for the first time all season, and the Thunder claimed a spot in the NBA finals by beating the San Antonio Spurs 107-99 on Wednesday night. Russell Westbrook added 25 points for the Thunder, who trailed Game 6 of the Western Conference finals by 18 in the first half and erased a 15-point halftime deficit before pulling ahead to stay in the fourth. “It’s an amazing moment for him to play like this in this moment, in this setting, and I wasn’t going to take him out,” Brooks said. “I was not going to take him out. I don’t care how many times he looked at me fatigued. He has enough, and I think all of our guys have enough to play. You just have to fight through it.” Durant grabbed the final rebound, dribbled the ball across halfcourt and raised his right fist to celebrate with a sold-out crowd wearing free white T-shirts. The franchise will play for the NBA title for the first time since 1996, before relocating from Seattle. Even before the final buzzer, Durant indulged by hugging his mother and brother seated courtside after a foul was called with 14 seconds remaining. “I never want to take those moments for granted,” Durant said. “I know it’s just one step closer to our dreams, but it felt good.” Tony Parker had 29 points and 12 assists for San Antonio, but only eight of the points and two assists came in the second half. The Thunder outscored the Spurs 59-36 after falling behind 63-48 at halftime and getting a challenge from Brooks that he said had “nothing to do” with committing eight turnovers against only six assists

while allowing San Antonio to shoot nine for 15 on three-pointers. “It just had everything to do with who we are as men, who we are as a team, the type of spirit that we want to show every time down the court,” Brooks said. “It was all about that, about body language, about being a family. I thought our guys did that the first possession of that second half and they did not look back.” Tim Duncan chipped in 25 points and 14 rebounds, and Stephen Jackson scored 23 as San Antonio lost its fourth straight after becoming only the fourth team in NBA history to win 20 games in a row. In the process, the Spurs pushed past Oklahoma City for the best record in the league and home-court advantage in the playoffs. But the Thunder took that back by winning Game 5 in San Antonio on Monday night. “There’s not much to complain about,” San Antonio’s Manu Ginobili said. “We had a great run. We just couldn’t beat these guys.” The Thunder, only three years removed from a 329 start that had them on pace for the worst record in NBA history, went through the only three West teams to reach the finals since 1998 — Dallas, the Los Angeles Lakers and San Antonio — to earn their shot at the title. Game 1 of the NBA finals will be Tuesday night in Oklahoma City against either Boston or Miami. The Celtics lead that series 3-2 and can earn a trip to the finals with a win at home in Game 6 tonight. The Thunder took the lead for good early in the fourth quarter, getting nine of their first 13 points on free throws as the fouls started to pile up for San Antonio — six on the defensive end and three on the offensive end in the first seven minutes. Even Durant drew what he thought was his first charge of the season, stepping in front of Ginobili. Derek Fisher and James Harden hit three-pointers in a three-possession span to increase the lead to 9993 with 3:13 remaining. Jackson, who had made his previous six three-pointers, and Parker both missed threes that would have gotten the Spurs within 103102 in the final minute.

PITTSFORD, N.Y. — Sometimes, expectations can create all sorts of problems, even for the top-ranked player in women’s golf. Yani Tseng knows from experience. With five majors already won and having captured the LPGA Tour Player of the Year award for the second straight year, wrapping it up with four events still on the 2011 calendar, Tseng went into the offseason somewhat awestruck at what she’d accomplished in such a short time and what the future might hold. “At the beginning of this year, I was putting so much pressure (on myself), the most pressure I’ve ever had in Next up my whole life,” said Tseng, who turned pro in 2007 and joined LPGA the tour full-time the next year. Championship “In January, I would just stay • When: home. I wouldn’t go out. It was Today through Sunday no fun.” It didn’t take long for that to • TV: Golf change. After celebrating her Channel 23rd birthday in late January, (coverage the Taiwanese star won Thai- of first two land for the second straight rounds starts time and has remained atop at 9 a.m.; the world rankings, a near coverage cinch to win player of the year of third and again. fourth rounds ‘‘I don’t feel as much pres- at 11 a.m.) sure (now), but the people around me, they say ... I’m getting picky, I want to try to be perfect all the time,” Tseng said. “But that’s not me. The more relaxed I am, the better I play. The week of Thailand, the second week, I kind of calmed down a little bit. That week ... was huge for me. After Thailand, I know that I can still keep the momentum going. At the beginning of this year, I was afraid. I didn’t know if I could do it again.” Not much to worry about. Tseng won three of the first five events on the 2012 LPGA Tour, leads the player of the year rankings by a wide margin over Sun Young Yoo and Stacy Lewis, and enters this week’s LPGA Championship at Locust Hill Country Club as the defending champion. “I didn’t expect this. When I win the first (major), I never thought I’m going to win a second major,” said Tseng, who finished third in the first major this year, the Kraft Nabisco Championship, just one shot out of a playoff. “I never thought about winning five. I never think about it, but now I’m thinking I can win more, of course.” Tseng ran away with last year’s LPGA Championship, winning by 10 shots over Morgan Pressel and Cindy LaCrosse. Tseng tees off on today’s opening round in a threesome with Lewis, who has won two of her past three starts, and Paula Creamer.

COLLEGE FOOTBALL COMMENTARY

Not so fast on that playoff system By Bryan Burwell St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS — he lords of college football are a rather predictable lot. For years they have perpetrated the biggest hoax in American sports on us, the bogus notion that the rigged system of the Bowl Championship Series was a legitimate national championship game for college football. And now after all these years — and without the common decency to at least take the masks off their faces — these scoundrels now want us to trust them when they tell us this time they’re really going to get it right. Over the past few months we’ve heard a lot of chatter from the folks who created the failed BCS system that they’re finally ready to ditch it and give college football fans exactly what they want, a legitimate championship playoff system. Except now we’re finding out that everyone isn’t exactly ready to join the parade for a fourteam playoff process ... at least not until they get some assurances the process will include some crafty sleight of hand that provides them with a guaranteed golden ticket to college football’s new Final Four. “I think if the Big Ten presidents were to vote today, we would vote for the status quo. We think it best serves college football,” Nebraska chancellor Harvey Perlman

T

told reporters on Monday at the conclusion of the Big Ten spring meetings in Chicago. This is what you might call the old “Okee-doke.” Even while the momentum seems to be building for a major landscape change in college football — even while college athletic administrators, conference commissioners and university presidents of all the major BCS schools are scheduled to meet several times over the next three weeks to hammer out the details of the four-team playoff — there are too many voices coming out of the Big Ten meetings (and in perfect self-serving harmony off on the western horizon we’re getting more of the same from the men who run the Pac-12) who are conducting a fierce public back peddle on progress. “If you asked our athletic directors, our football coaches or our chancellors and presidents, we don’t find the fault with the (current BCS) system that a lot of others do,” said Big Ten commissioner Jim Delany. “We think it has served us well but, obviously over time, it’s been battered and criticized.” So even while a little less than a week ago we were getting so many positive vibes from the Southeastern Conference spring meetings that change was not only inevitable, it was being greeted with open arms, we get a

bunch of shifty double-talk from the Big Ten. Like I said, it’s all quite predictable. It’s also a wonderful reason not to trust these guys and a warning of why we should begin the business of lowering expectations and preparing for the disturbing possibility that a legitimate college football playoff system is no longer as inevitable as we hoped. Recently, incoming Big 12 commissioner Bob Bowlsby said he believed a June 26 meeting in Washington, D.C., of the BCS presidential oversight committee could produce an announcement about the framework of a new playoff system. Throughout college football, there was plenty of positive talk that two meetings of the Division I conference commissioners on June 13 and June 20 could provide the oversight committee with everything it needs to determine a workable playoff structure. Now I fear when the process is announced in July, we’ll find out it’s another elaborate charade, another BCS concoction full of flaws that satisfies no one and only ensures that the non-BCS schools won’t be treated fairly. In Chicago we heard Delany contradict himself repeatedly (he wants automatic conference bids, he doesn’t want automatic bids; he loves the BCS status quo, he hates the BCS system; he loves the four-

team playoff proposal, a plus-one system is what the Big Ten really wants.) When you have as powerful a figure in college football as Delany spinning in five different directions about how the playoff system ought to work, it reinforces why we need to dial back our previous enthusiasm that a real football playoff was on the horizon. While I still believe the best possible solution would be an eight-team playoff, for the time being I think the four-team system is at the very least a good starting point to build upon. In the meantime, though, watch these men carefully. When they show us the plan, read the fine print carefully. Then read it again. And it might be wise to pass it on to someone else to analyze too — perhaps someone with a well-trained legal eye for devious loopholes that gerrymander favors for the major BCS conferences and exclude the Boise States of the world — and only then should you get comfortable with the idea that these conniving characters have really done what they say they’re doing. And then read it again, because the only thing that’s certain when you’re dealing with these characters is that they have a long, predictable history of trying to sell you different versions of the same ugly pig.

Associated Press file

Yani Tseng has already won three times on the LPGA Tour this season.

McIlroy tuning up for U.S. Open defense at St. Jude Classic MEMPHIS, Tenn. — Rory McIlroy tends not to play a tournament the week before a major. Then again, he tends not to miss three straight cuts. With his game in need of a tuneup, McIlroy added the St. Jude Classic to his schedule to play a few more competitive rounds before the U.S. Open. He is among 29 players in Memphis getting ready for the Open by competing, even though no one has won a PGA Tour event and then the U.S. Open the following week. “I feel like that’s just what I need ... especially going into next week,” McIlroy said Wednesday after his pro-am practice round. “But I mean I would love to play well here and obviously try and win the tournament, and that would give me a great confidence boost going into next week.” McIlroy won The Honda Classic in March and lost in a playoff at Quail Hollow that returned him to No. 1 in the world. Then, he missed the cut in The Players Championship, the BMW PGA Championship in England and the Memorial. He hadn’t missed three consecutive cuts since August 2008 when he was ranked No. 164 in the world. — The Associated Press


D4

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, JUNE 7, 2012

M AJOR L EAGUE BASEBALL STANDINGS, SCORES AND SCHEDULES

AL Boxscores Mariners 8, Angels 6 Seattle I.Suzuki rf Ackley 2b Seager 3b J.Montero dh Smoak 1b M.Saunders cf Olivo c Carp lf Figgins lf Ryan ss Totals

AB 5 4 4 5 5 5 5 3 0 4 40

R 3 1 0 1 0 2 0 1 0 0 8

H 2 2 2 2 0 3 0 1 0 0 12

BI 2 0 4 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 8

BB 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

SO 0 1 2 0 2 0 1 1 0 0 7

Avg. .259 .248 .274 .263 .229 .277 .202 .167 .181 .164

Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Trout lf-cf 4 1 1 0 1 1 .329 M.Izturis 3b 3 2 0 0 2 0 .230 Pujols 1b 5 0 2 0 0 0 .244 K.Morales dh 4 2 2 3 1 1 .293 Trumbo rf 3 1 1 0 1 1 .337 H.Kendrick 2b 2 0 1 1 1 0 .254 Aybar ss 4 0 1 1 0 0 .219 Conger c 3 0 1 1 0 0 .333 Bourjos cf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .219 a-Callaspo ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .234 Calhoun lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .273 Totals 32 6 10 6 6 4 Seattle 020 023 010 — 8 12 2 Los Angeles 022 020 000 — 6 10 1 a-flied out for Bourjos in the 8th. E—Carp (2), Noesi (1), Aybar (8). LOB—Seattle 8, Los Angeles 7. 2B—Ackley (12), Seager (17), Carp (3), Pujols 2 (14), Aybar (8). HR—I.Suzuki (4), off D.Carpenter; K.Morales (7), off Noesi. SB— M.Saunders (9). DP—Seattle 3. Seattle IP H R ER BB SO NP Noesi 4 4 6 6 5 1 76 Kelley W, 1-2 1 1-3 4 0 0 0 2 26 Pryor H, 1 1 2-3 1 0 0 1 0 12 League H, 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 Wilhelmsen S, 2-3 1 1 0 0 0 1 14 Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP Williams L, 6-3 5 2-3 9 7 5 0 6 99 Cassevah BS, 2-2 0 1 0 0 1 0 5 D.Carpenter 2 1-3 2 1 1 1 1 33 S.Downs 1 0 0 0 0 0 17 Cassevah pitched to 2 batters in the 6th. Noesi pitched to 2 batters in the 5th. T—3:14. A—37,342 (45,957).

ERA 5.99 3.68 2.25 3.76 3.48 ERA 4.02 7.20 5.68 0.00

Athletics 2, Rangers 0 Texas Kinsler 2b Andrus ss Hamilton cf Beltre 3b Mi.Young dh N.Cruz rf Dav.Murphy lf Napoli c Moreland 1b Totals

AB 4 4 4 4 3 3 2 3 3 30

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 2 0 5

BI 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1

SO 1 0 1 1 0 2 0 0 1 6

Avg. .276 .303 .343 .301 .288 .264 .257 .264 .263

Oakland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. J.Weeks 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .223 Crisp cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .158 Reddick rf 3 1 1 0 0 0 .270 Cespedes lf 3 1 3 1 0 0 .269 S.Smith dh 3 0 0 0 0 0 .233 Inge 3b 3 0 1 1 0 1 .196 Moss 1b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Rosales 1b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .250 K.Suzuki c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .211 Pennington ss 3 0 1 0 0 0 .198 Totals 29 2 6 2 0 3 Texas 000 000 000 — 0 5 0 Oakland 010 100 00x — 2 6 0 LOB—Texas 4, Oakland 3. 2B—Reddick (9), Cespedes (8). 3B—Cespedes (1). DP—Texas 1; Oakland 2. Texas IP H R Lewis L, 4-5 8 6 2 Oakland IP H R Colon W, 5-6 8 5 0 Fuentes S, 5-7 1 0 0 T—2:04. A—15,044 (35,067).

ER BB SO NP ERA 2 0 3 101 3.38 ER BB SO NP ERA 0 1 5 100 3.92 0 0 1 12 4.15

Twins 4, Royals 2 Minnesota Revere cf J.Carroll 3b Willingham lf Morneau dh Doumit c Plouffe 1b Dozier ss A.Casilla 2b Mastroianni rf Totals

AB 5 4 3 4 4 4 4 3 4 35

R 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

H 2 1 1 2 2 0 0 0 1 9

BI 0 1 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 4

BB 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2

SO 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 2 0 6

Avg. .307 .239 .286 .237 .255 .186 .246 .232 .152

Kansas City AB R H BI BB SO Avg. A.Gordon lf 3 1 1 0 1 0 .242 Y.Betancourt ss 4 1 1 2 0 1 .277 Butler dh 4 0 1 0 0 1 .296 Moustakas 3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .278 Francoeur rf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .274 Hosmer 1b 3 0 1 0 1 1 .220 Giavotella 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .226 Dyson cf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .265 Quintero c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .227 a-B.Pena ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .266 Totals 34 2 7 2 2 6 Minnesota 100 020 100 — 4 9 1 Kansas City 200 000 000 — 2 7 1 a-struck out for Quintero in the 9th. E—Dozier (8), Y.Betancourt (4). LOB—Minnesota 7, Kansas City 7. 2B—Doumit (6). 3B—Revere (2). HR—Y.Betancourt (2), off Blackburn. SB—A.Casilla (8). DP—Minnesota 1 ); Kansas City 2. Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP Blackburn W, 2-4 5 5 2 2 2 1 92 Manship H, 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 21 Burton H, 9 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 3 17 Perkins H, 9 2-3 1 0 0 0 1 13 Capps S, 14-15 1 0 0 0 0 1 20 Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP F.Paulino 2-3 1 1 0 0 0 13 Mendoza L, 2-3 5 5 2 2 2 2 71 K.Herrera 2-3 2 1 1 0 1 13 Mijares 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 8 Crow 1 0 0 0 0 1 16 G.Holland 1 1 0 0 0 1 10 T—3:04. A—18,386 (37,903).

ERA 7.75 3.86 3.57 3.00 3.22 ERA 1.67 5.36 3.34 2.19 3.20 4.76

Indians 9, Tigers 6 Cleveland Choo rf A.Cabrera ss Kipnis 2b C.Santana c Brantley cf Damon lf Cunningham lf Kotchman 1b LaPorta dh Chisenhall 3b Totals

AB 5 5 4 5 4 2 0 4 4 4 37

R 3 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 9

H 3 2 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 9

BI 0 1 1 0 3 2 0 2 0 0 9

BB 0 0 1 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 4

SO 2 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 7

Avg. .278 .297 .275 .232 .282 .187 .200 .214 .182 .231

Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Berry cf 4 1 1 1 0 1 .310 R.Santiago 2b 4 0 0 1 0 0 .193 Mi.Cabrera 3b 4 2 2 2 0 0 .325 Fielder 1b 3 0 1 1 1 0 .318 D.Young dh 4 0 0 0 0 0 .261 Boesch rf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .222 Jh.Peralta ss 4 1 2 0 0 1 .259 Kelly lf 4 1 1 1 0 1 .178 Holaday c 4 1 1 0 0 0 .250 Totals 35 6 8 6 1 3 Cleveland 300 231 000 — 9 9 0 Detroit 001 140 000 — 6 8 1 E—Boesch (1). LOB—Cleveland 5, Detroit 3. 2B—Choo (15), Berry (4), Mi.Cabrera (17), Jh.Peralta (11). 3B—Jh.Peralta (1). HR—Brantley (1), off Scherzer; Kotchman (4), off Scherzer; Kelly (1), off J.Gomez; Mi.Cabrera (12), off J.Gomez. SB—Damon (1). Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP J.Gomez W, 4-4 5 7 6 6 1 0 66 Sipp H, 8 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 J.Smith H, 9 1 0 0 0 0 1 14 Pestano H, 15 1 0 0 0 0 0 8 C.Perez S, 19-20 1 1 0 0 0 1 13 Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP Scherzer L, 5-4 4 1-3 7 8 5 3 2 92 Below 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 3 L.Marte 1 2 1 1 0 1 15 Coke 1 0 0 0 1 3 24 Benoit 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 Valverde 1 0 0 0 0 0 14 T—2:42. A—31,350 (41,255).

ERA 4.97 6.53 3.38 2.28 2.70 ERA 5.88 2.36 2.35 3.97 2.66 4.43

Dodgers 6, Phillies 5

American League

National League

East Division Pct GB WCGB .571 — — .564 ½ — .554 1 — .536 2 1 .500 4 3 Central Division Pct GB WCGB .554 — — .545 ½ ½ .446 6 6 .436 6½ 6½ .393 9 9 West Division Pct GB WCGB .579 — — .500 4½ 3 .441 8 6½ .439 8 6½

East Division Pct GB WCGB .593 — — .554 2 — .554 2 — .544 2½ ½ .483 6 4 Central Division Pct GB WCGB .564 — — .509 3 2½ .509 3 2½ .446 6½ 6 .429 7½ 7 .339 12½ 12 West Division Pct GB WCGB .632 — — .561 4 — .474 9 4½ .429 11½ 7 .333 17 12½

Baltimore New York Tampa Bay Toronto Boston

W 32 31 31 30 28

L 24 24 25 26 28

Chicago Cleveland Detroit Kansas City Minnesota

W 31 30 25 24 22

L 25 25 31 31 34

Texas Los Angeles Seattle Oakland

W 33 29 26 25

L 24 29 33 32

Wednesday’s Games Cleveland 9, Detroit 6 N.Y. Yankees 4, Tampa Bay 1 Baltimore 2, Boston 1 Minnesota 4, Kansas City 2 Toronto 4, Chicago White Sox 0 Seattle 8, L.A. Angels 6 Oakland 2, Texas 0

L10 3-7 7-3 3-7 6-4 5-5

Str Home Away W-2 14-13 18-11 W-3 16-11 15-13 L-2 19-11 12-14 W-3 16-12 14-14 L-3 13-16 15-12

L10 7-3 4-6 3-7 6-4 7-3

Str Home Away L-2 14-16 17-9 W-2 16-16 14-9 L-3 12-16 13-15 L-1 8-20 16-11 W-1 9-17 13-17

L10 4-6 6-4 5-5 3-7

Str Home Away L-1 15-11 18-13 L-1 16-14 13-15 W-1 9-13 17-20 W-1 12-16 13-16

Today’s Games Cleveland (D.Lowe 7-3) at Detroit (Crosby 0-1), 10:05 a.m. Texas (Darvish 7-3) at Oakland (McCarthy 4-3), 12:35 p.m. Tampa Bay (Price 7-3) at N.Y. Yankees (Sabathia 7-2), 4:05 p.m. Baltimore (Matusz 5-5) at Boston (Buchholz 5-2), 4:10 p.m. Toronto (H.Alvarez 3-5) at Chicago White Sox (Peavy 6-1), 5:10 p.m.

Washington Atlanta Miami New York Philadelphia

W 32 31 31 31 28

L 22 25 25 26 30

Cincinnati Pittsburgh St. Louis Milwaukee Houston Chicago

W 31 28 29 25 24 19

L 24 27 28 31 32 37

Los Angeles San Francisco Arizona Colorado San Diego

W 36 32 27 24 19

L 21 25 30 32 38

Wednesday’s Games San Francisco 6, San Diego 5 L.A. Dodgers 6, Philadelphia 5 Washington 5, N.Y. Mets 3 Atlanta 2, Miami 1 Cincinnati 5, Pittsburgh 4 St. Louis 4, Houston 3 Milwaukee 8, Chicago Cubs 0 Arizona 6, Colorado 1

L10 6-4 5-5 6-4 5-5 3-7

Str Home Away W-2 18-9 14-13 W-3 12-11 19-14 L-2 16-12 15-13 L-3 19-12 12-14 L-5 12-18 16-12

L10 6-4 7-3 4-6 6-4 2-8 4-6

Str Home Away W-1 16-10 15-14 L-1 16-11 12-16 W-1 13-11 16-17 W-1 13-16 12-15 L-1 18-13 6-19 L-1 12-15 7-22

L10 4-6 8-2 6-4 7-3 2-8

Str Home Away W-3 21-9 15-12 W-1 18-11 14-14 W-2 12-16 15-14 L-2 15-15 9-17 L-1 14-19 5-19

Today’s Games L.A. Dodgers (Harang 4-3) at Philadelphia (Hamels 8-2), 10:05 a.m. N.Y. Mets (Dickey 8-1) at Washington (Wang 1-1), 10:05 a.m. Chicago Cubs (Garza 2-4) at Milwaukee (Wolf 2-5), 11:10 a.m. San Francisco (M.Cain 6-2) at San Diego (Marquis 0-0), 12:35 p.m. Atlanta (Minor 2-4) at Miami (Buehrle 5-5), 4:10 p.m. Pittsburgh (Correia 2-5) at Cincinnati (Leake 2-5), 4:10 p.m. St. Louis (Lynn 8-2) at Houston (Happ 4-5), 5:05 p.m.

American League roundup

National League roundup

• Indians 9, Tigers 6: D ETR O I T — Michael Brantley hit a three-run homer after a Detroit error kept a firstinning rally going, and Johnny Damon added a tworun single and an impressive catch in left field to help Cleveland beat the Tigers. • Athletics 2, Rangers 0: OAKLAND, Calif. — Yoenis Cespedes went three for three and Bartolo Colon pitched eight sparkling innings, leading Oakland to the victory over Texas. • Yankees 4, Rays 1: NEW YORK — Ivan Nova took a two-hitter into the ninth inning, Mark Teixiera and Robinson Cano homered and New York beat Tampa Bay for the second straight night. • Mariners 8, Angels 6: ANAHEIM, Calif. — Ichiro Suzuki homered and scored three times for Seattle, and Kyle Seager drove in four runs against Los Angeles. Michael Saunders added three hits to complete an impressive road trip. Saunders went 19 for 39 (.487) during Seattle’s nine-game jaunt to Texas, Chicago and Anaheim, including five games with at least three hits. • Blue Jays 4, White Sox 0: CHICAGO — Brandon Morrow pitched a two-hitter for his third shutout of the season, and Jose Bautista and Rajai Davis homered for Toronto against Chicago. • Twins 4, Royals 2: KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Nick Blackburn shook off a slow start and pitched five effective innings, helping the Twins pick up another win. • Orioles 2, Red Sox 1: BOSTON — Wei-Yin Chen scattered seven hits over seven innings and Baltimore set a franchise record with its seventh straight victory in Boston.

• Dodgers 6, Phillies 5: PHILADELPHIA — Dee Gordon hit a go-ahead single to back Chris Capuano and Los Angeles held on to beat struggling Philadelphia. Jimmy Rollins, Shane Victorino and Ty Wigginton homered for the Phillies, who have lost a season-worst five straight games. • Braves 2, Marlins 1: MIAMI — Randall Delgado pitched into the seventh inning and contributed his first RBI of the season before three relievers completed a two-hitter to help Atlanta beat Miami. • Reds 5, Pirates 4: CINCINNATI — Johnny Cueto allowed six hits over 7 2⁄3 innings and Ryan Ludwick drove in three runs with a bases-loaded double, leading Cincinnati past Pittsburgh. • Nationals 5, Mets 3: WASHINGTON — Edwin Jackson pitched seven effective innings, Adam LaRoche hit a three-run homer and Washington beat the New York Mets. • Giants 6, Padres 5: SAN DIEGO — Gregor Blanco homered and scored twice and Madison Bumgarner prevailed in a matchup of lefties as San Francisco beat San Diego. • Cardinals 4, Astros 3: HOUSTON — Allen Craig and Daniel Descalso homered to back Adam Wainwright in St. Louis’ victory over Houston. • Brewers 8, Cubs 0: MILWAUKEE — Zack Greinke had a season-high 12 strikeouts and Milwaukee rediscovered its offense against Chicago. • Diamondbacks 6, Rockies 1: PHOENIX — Paul Goldschmidt homered and drove in three runs while extending his hitting streak to 14 games and rookie Wade Miley pitched eight sharp innings as Arizona rolled to a win over Colorado.

Yankees 4, Rays 1 Tampa Bay De.Jennings lf B.Upton cf Joyce rf Zobrist 2b Matsui dh C.Pena 1b S.Rodriguez ss J.Molina c Rhymes 3b Totals

AB 4 4 3 4 4 3 3 3 2 30

R 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

H 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 4

BI 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

BB 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 1 2 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 6

Avg. .273 .275 .284 .199 .125 .200 .229 .183 .265

New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Jeter ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .323 Granderson cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .255 Al.Rodriguez dh 2 0 0 0 1 1 .276 Cano 2b 3 1 1 1 0 0 .290 Teixeira 1b 3 1 1 1 0 1 .249 Ibanez lf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .250 1-Wise pr-lf 0 1 0 0 0 0 .130 Swisher rf 3 1 1 1 0 1 .250 Er.Chavez 3b 3 0 1 1 0 0 .279 Martin c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .206 Totals 28 4 5 4 1 4 Tampa Bay 000 000 001 — 1 4 0 New York 010 100 02x — 4 5 0 1-ran for Ibanez in the 8th. LOB—Tampa Bay 4, New York 1. 2B—S.Rodriguez (7), Swisher (15), Er.Chavez (6). 3B—De.Jennings (3), B.Upton (1). HR—Teixeira (10), off Cobb; Cano (9), off Cobb. DP—New York 1. Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cobb L, 2-2 7 5 4 4 1 4 105 4.13 Badenhop 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 9 3.70 Howell 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 2 3.71 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Nova W, 7-2 8 4 1 1 1 5 103 5.09 R.Soriano S, 8-8 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 1.80 Nova pitched to 2 batters in the 9th. Cobb pitched to 3 batters in the 8th. T—2:33. A—38,370 (50,291).

Blue Jays 4, White Sox 0 Toronto Lawrie 3b Rasmus cf Bautista rf Arencibia c Y.Escobar ss K.Johnson 2b Y.Gomes 1b Cooper dh 2-McCoy pr-dh R.Davis lf Totals

AB 5 4 4 5 4 3 4 4 0 4 37

R 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 4

H 1 1 1 2 1 1 0 3 0 3 13

BI 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 4

BB 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2

SO 0 0 1 2 0 1 1 0 0 0 5

Avg. .286 .247 .228 .234 .252 .251 .192 .366 --.253

Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. De Aza cf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .296 Beckham 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .228 A.Dunn dh 3 0 0 0 1 0 .219 Viciedo lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .265 Rios rf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .289 Pierzynski c 3 0 2 0 0 0 .303 1-Lillibridge pr-1b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .192 Al.Ramirez ss 3 0 0 0 0 0 .217 Flowers 1b-c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .211 O.Hudson 3b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .159 Totals 29 0 2 0 2 5 Toronto 000 011 002 — 4 13 1 Chicago 000 000 000 — 0 2 1 1-ran for Pierzynski in the 8th. 2-ran for Cooper in the 9th. E—K.Johnson (7), Rios (2). LOB—Toronto 9, Chicago 4. HR—Bautista (15), off Quintana; R.Davis (4), off H.Santiago. SB—R.Davis 2 (12). DP—Chicago 2. Toronto Morrow W, 7-3 Chicago Quintana L, 1-1 N.Jones Ohman

IP 9 IP 6 2-3 0

H 2 H 9 2 0

R 0 R 2 0 0

ER BB SO NP ERA 0 2 5 119 2.90 ER BB SO NP ERA 2 1 1 92 2.05 0 0 1 12 1.57 0 0 0 3 5.40

Crain 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 2 24 2.08 H.Santiago 1 2 2 2 1 1 31 4.35 Ohman pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. T—2:50. A—25,672 (40,615).

Orioles 2, Red Sox 1 Baltimore En.Chavez rf Hardy ss Ad.Jones cf Wieters c C.Davis dh Mar.Reynolds 1b Betemit 3b Flaherty lf Andino 2b Totals

AB 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 30

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 2

H 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 5

BI 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 1 0 5

Avg. .155 .264 .307 .246 .295 .222 .222 .172 .249

Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Aviles ss 3 0 0 1 0 0 .266 Pedroia 2b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .285 Youkilis 1b 3 0 1 0 1 0 .236 Ortiz dh 3 0 0 0 1 1 .310 Middlebrooks 3b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .321 Ad.Gonzalez rf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .263 1-Podsednik pr-lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .387 Saltalamacchia c 4 0 1 0 0 0 .278 D.McDonald lf-rf 2 1 1 0 0 1 .190 a-Sweeney ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .302 Byrd cf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .273 b-Nava ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .305 Totals 32 1 7 1 2 7 Baltimore 000 002 000 — 2 5 0 Boston 001 000 000 — 1 7 0 a-struck out for D.McDonald in the 9th. b-struck out for Byrd in the 9th. 1-ran for Ad.Gonzalez in the 7th. LOB—Baltimore 1, Boston 8. 2B—D.McDonald (5). DP—Boston 2. Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA W.Chen W, 5-2 7 7 1 1 0 4 100 3.49 Strop H, 11 1 0 0 0 2 1 21 1.23 Ji.Johnson S, 18 1 0 0 0 0 2 16 1.38 Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Beckett L, 4-6 8 5 2 2 0 5 92 4.04 Padilla 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 4.70 T—2:31. A—37,243 (37,495).

NL Boxscores Cardinals 4, Astros 3 St. Louis Furcal ss Descalso 2b Motte p Beltran rf Craig lf Freese 3b Y.Molina c Ma.Adams 1b Chambers cf Wainwright p V.Marte p b-Robinson ph E.Sanchez p Rzepczynski p Boggs p Greene 2b Totals

AB 4 4 0 4 4 4 4 3 3 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 33

R 0 1 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

H 1 1 0 1 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7

BI 0 1 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 1 3 0 2 1 3 0 3 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 15

Avg. .313 .227 --.275 .366 .267 .326 .278 .273 .038 --.256 ------.212

Houston Altuve 2b Lowrie ss F.Martinez rf J.D.Martinez lf 3-Schafer pr C.Johnson 3b Wallace 1b Maxwell cf J.Castro c Norris p a-Bogusevic ph X.Cedeno p Fe.Rodriguez p

AB 5 3 5 4 0 5 4 5 4 2 1 0 0

R 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0

H 2 0 0 1 0 1 2 0 3 1 1 0 0

BI 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0

BB 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 0 2 3 0 0 2 0 3 0 1 0 0 0

Avg. .329 .283 .067 .244 .256 .292 .500 .235 .261 .190 .226 .000 ---

c-Ma.Gonzalez ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .261 1-Happ pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .095 2-W.Wright pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Lyon p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 39 3 12 3 3 11 St. Louis 301 000 000 — 4 7 3 Houston 000 003 000 — 3 12 0 a-singled for Norris in the 6th. b-fouled out for V.Marte in the 7th. c-singled for Fe.Rodriguez in the 8th. 1-ran for Ma.Gonzalez in the 8th. 2-ran for Happ in the 8th. 3-ran for J.D.Martinez in the 9th. E—Beltran (1), Furcal (6), Ma.Adams (3). LOB— St. Louis 2, Houston 13. 2B—Beltran (6), Freese (9). 3B—C.Johnson (2). HR—Descalso (3), off Norris; Craig (7), off Norris. DP—St. Louis 1. St. Louis IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Wainwright W, 5-6 5 2-3 7 3 3 1 8 114 4.97 V.Marte H, 8 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 3 4.10 E.Sanchez H, 2 2-3 0 0 0 1 1 19 3.00 Rzepczynski 0 1 0 0 0 0 6 5.06 Boggs H, 8 1 2 0 0 0 0 12 2.10 Motte S, 10-13 1 1-3 1 0 0 1 2 20 2.92 Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Norris L, 5-3 6 7 4 4 0 12 96 4.65 X.Cedeno 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 10 3.00 Fe.Rodriguez 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 22 3.80 Lyon 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 2.42 Rzepczynski pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. T—3:21. A—18,517 (40,981).

Brewers 8, Cubs 0 Chicago AB R Campana cf 4 0 S.Castro ss 4 0 DeJesus rf 3 0 A.Soriano lf 4 0 LaHair 1b 4 0 Clevenger c 3 0 Barney 2b 2 0 I.Stewart 3b 2 0 Maholm p 1 0 a-Cardenas ph 1 0 R.Wells p 0 0 Corpas p 0 0 b-Re.Johnson ph 1 0 Marmol p 0 0 Totals 29 0

H 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

BI 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

BB 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

SO 4 0 2 1 2 2 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 15

Avg. .277 .310 .274 .263 .307 .333 .277 .199 .053 .179 .333 --.259 ---

Milwaukee AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Aoki rf 4 2 3 0 1 0 .289 C.Gomez cf 5 0 0 0 0 0 .261 Braun lf 3 1 1 1 1 2 .307 Morgan lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .233 Hart 1b 3 1 1 1 0 1 .250 Kottaras 1b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .240 R.Weeks 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .163 J.Perez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Ransom ss-3b-2b 4 1 1 1 0 2 .244 Conrad 3b 2 0 1 2 1 0 .083 Maysonet ss 1 1 1 0 0 0 .219 M.Maldonado c 3 1 2 0 1 0 .208 Greinke p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .154 Veras p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Green ph-3b 1 1 1 3 0 0 .231 Totals 32 8 11 8 4 6 Chicago 000 000 000 — 0 3 2 Milwaukee 000 410 03x — 8 11 0 a-struck out for Maholm in the 5th. b-struck out for Corpas in the 8th. c-homered for Veras in the 8th. E—DeJesus (1), Clevenger (1). LOB—Chicago 5, Milwaukee 6. 2B—S.Castro (8), A.Soriano (11), Aoki 2 (7), Braun (10), Ransom (6). HR—Green (1), off Marmol. DP—Chicago 1; Milwaukee 2. Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Maholm L, 4-5 4 6 4 4 1 3 81 5.10 R.Wells 2 2 1 0 3 0 35 3.72 Corpas 1 0 0 0 0 2 11 0.00 Marmol 1 3 3 3 0 1 30 6.75 Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Greinke W, 7-2 7 2 0 0 2 12 109 3.13 Veras 1 1 0 0 0 2 16 4.33 J.Perez 1 0 0 0 1 1 13 5.14 T—2:44. A—27,112 (41,900).

Los Angeles AB D.Gordon ss 4 E.Herrera 3b 3 Abreu lf 3 Elbert p 0 Lindblom p 0 d-J.Rivera ph 1 Jansen p 0 Ethier rf 5 A.Ellis c 4 Loney 1b 4 A.Kennedy 2b 3 Coffey p 0 Castellanos lf 2 Gwynn Jr. cf 3 Capuano p 2 b-Hairston Jr. ph-2b 1 Totals 35

R 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 2 0 0 6

H 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 1 0 0 1 0 0 7

BI 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 5

BB 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 7

SO 0 0 3 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 1 0 1 2 1 1 12

Avg. .230 .306 .316 ----.231 --.302 .307 .253 .233 --.167 .271 .105 .352

Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Rollins ss 4 1 1 2 0 2 .247 Pierre lf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .329 Pence rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .263 Ruiz c 3 1 1 0 0 0 .358 Victorino cf 4 1 1 1 0 0 .248 Wigginton 3b 4 1 3 2 0 0 .271 Mayberry 1b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .231 e-Thome ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .105 Galvis 2b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .226 a-Fontenot ph-2b 1 1 0 0 2 0 .360 K.Kendrick p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .083 Valdes p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Luna ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .300 Bastardo p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Diekman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Schwimer p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --f-Schneider ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .271 Totals 32 5 7 5 2 8 Los Angeles 002 003 001 — 6 7 0 Philadelphia 010 030 001 — 5 7 1 a-walked for Galvis in the 5th. b-walked for Capuano in the 6th. c-flied out for Valdes in the 7th. dreached on a strikeout and passed ball for Lindblom in the 9th. e-struck out for Mayberry in the 9th. f-popped out for Schwimer in the 9th. E—Mayberry (1). LOB—Los Angeles 10, Philadelphia 4. 2B—E.Herrera (6), Loney (13), Wigginton (6). 3B—Gwynn Jr. (3). HR—Victorino (7), off Capuano; Wigginton (6), off Capuano; Rollins (3), off Capuano. DP—Los Angeles 1. Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Capuano W, 8-2 5 4 4 4 1 5 92 2.82 Coffey H, 1 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 1 19 6.35 Elbert H, 6 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 7 3.31 Lindblom H, 13 1 1 0 0 0 1 12 2.51 Jansen S, 9-12 1 1 1 1 1 1 32 2.20 Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA K.Kendrick L, 2-5 5 2-3 4 5 5 5 6 112 4.44 Valdes BS, 1-1 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 1 15 2.25 Bastardo 1 1 0 0 0 3 21 2.45 Diekman 2-3 1 1 0 2 2 26 4.15 Schwimer 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 5 6.75 T—3:37. A—44,216 (43,651).

Nationals 5, Mets 3 New York Nieuwenhuis lf b-Hairston ph-lf A.Torres cf D.Wright 3b Duda rf Dan.Murphy 2b I.Davis 1b Thole c Quintanilla ss Hefner p a-Valdespin ph Byrdak p Batista p Totals

AB 3 1 4 4 2 4 2 4 2 1 1 0 0 28

R 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 3

H 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

BI 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 3

BB 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 5

SO 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 7

Avg. .295 .290 .216 .359 .257 .288 .164 .287 .261 .333 .143 --.000

Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Lombardozzi lf 4 1 1 0 1 1 .299 Clippard p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Harper cf 5 1 1 0 0 0 .285 Zimmerman 3b 3 2 1 0 1 0 .239 LaRoche 1b 3 1 2 4 0 0 .273 Morse rf 3 0 2 1 1 0 .250 Desmond ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .258 Espinosa 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .222 Flores c 4 0 1 0 0 0 .269 E.Jackson p 3 0 0 0 0 1 .167 S.Burnett p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Bernadina ph-lf 0 0 0 0 1 0 .239 Totals 33 5 9 5 4 4 New York 001 100 100 — 3 3 2 Washington 300 010 10x — 5 9 2 a-struck out for Hefner in the 7th. b-struck out for Nieuwenhuis in the 8th. c-walked for S.Burnett in the 8th. E—Dan.Murphy 2 (9), E.Jackson (2), Desmond (8). LOB—New York 4, Washington 9. 2B—I.Davis (6). HR—LaRoche (9), off Hefner. SB—Harper (3). DP—New York 1; Washington 1. New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hefner L, 1-3 6 7 4 3 1 3 99 5.32 Byrdak 2-3 1 1 1 1 0 15 3.94 Batista 1 1-3 1 0 0 2 1 30 3.52 Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA E.Jackson W, 2-3 7 3 3 2 4 6 100 3.11 S.Burnett H, 9 1 0 0 0 0 1 9 1.00 Clippard S, 5-6 1 0 0 0 1 0 15 2.55 T—2:46. A—27,335 (41,487).

Braves 2, Marlins 1 Atlanta Bourn cf Prado 3b McCann c Uggla 2b F.Freeman 1b Hinske 1b Heyward rf Simmons ss Delgado p Venters p O’Flaherty p c-J.Francisco ph Kimbrel p Constanza lf Totals

AB 4 4 4 3 2 1 4 3 3 0 0 1 0 4 33

R 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

H 1 0 3 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 6

BI 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2

BB 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

SO 1 1 0 1 0 1 1 2 2 0 0 0 0 1 10

Avg. .297 .322 .255 .272 .253 .230 .241 .267 .263 ----.233 --.261

Miami AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Reyes ss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .274 Infante 2b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .303 H.Ramirez 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .267 Stanton rf 2 1 1 0 1 0 .298 Morrison 1b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .221 Ruggiano lf-cf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .333 Petersen cf 2 0 1 1 0 0 .212 a-D.Solano ph-lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .455 J.Buck c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .164 Jo.Johnson p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .063 Choate p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Do.Murphy ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .143 Mujica p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 29 1 2 1 1 9 Atlanta 000 200 000 — 2 6 0 Miami 000 010 000 — 1 2 0 a-grounded out for Petersen in the 8th. b-grounded out for Choate in the 8th. c-grounded out for O’Flaherty in the 9th. LOB—Atlanta 7, Miami 2. 2B—McCann (5), Stanton (16). DP—Miami 1. Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Delgado W, 4-5 6 1-3 2 1 1 1 7 80 4.26 Venters H, 10 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 5 3.43 O’Flaherty H, 9 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 3.48 Kimbrel S, 17-18 1 0 0 0 0 1 17 1.71 Miami IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Jo.Johnson L, 3-4 7 2-3 6 2 2 3 9 113 4.56 Choate 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 6 0.53 Mujica 1 0 0 0 0 0 7 3.70 T—2:30. A—22,619 (37,442).

Reds 5, Pirates 4 Pittsburgh Presley lf Walker 2b A.McCutchen cf G.Jones rf b-Tabata ph-rf Hague 1b McGehee 3b Barajas c Barmes ss Slaten p a-P.Alvarez ph J.Hughes p Lincoln p J.Harrison ss Totals

AB 4 4 3 3 1 4 4 4 2 0 1 0 1 1 32

R 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 4

H 1 2 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 7

BI 0 1 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

BB 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 8

Avg. .228 .272 .333 .242 .219 .229 .196 .234 .188 --.199 .000 .000 .229

Cincinnati AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Cozart ss 3 0 0 0 1 0 .245 Heisey cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .263 Votto 1b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .348 B.Phillips 2b 4 2 2 1 0 0 .269 Bruce rf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .257 Frazier 3b 2 1 1 0 2 0 .274 Chapman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Ludwick lf 4 1 1 3 0 1 .207 Hanigan c 3 0 1 1 1 1 .297 Cueto p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .050 Ondrusek p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Marshall p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Valdez 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .188 Totals 29 5 7 5 4 7 Pittsburgh 000 000 040 — 4 7 0 Cincinnati 010 400 00x — 5 7 0 a-singled for Slaten in the 8th. b-grounded out for G.Jones in the 8th. LOB—Pittsburgh 3, Cincinnati 6. 2B—Barajas (7), Ludwick (6). HR—A.McCutchen (10), off Ondrusek; B.Phillips (6), off Lincoln. SB—Frazier (1). Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lincoln L, 3-1 4 6 5 5 2 5 66 2.40 Slaten 3 1 0 0 1 1 27 0.00 J.Hughes 1 0 0 0 1 1 21 2.00 Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cueto W, 6-3 7 2-3 6 3 3 1 6 118 2.63 Ondrusek 0 1 1 1 0 0 2 2.74 Marshall H, 6 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 6 3.48 Chapman S, 6-7 1 0 0 0 0 2 9 0.00 Ondrusek pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. T—2:44. A—16,859 (42,319).

Giants 6, Padres 5 San Francisco G.Blanco rf Theriot 2b Me.Cabrera lf Posey c Pagan cf Pill 1b b-Belt ph-1b Arias 3b B.Crawford ss Bumgarner p Hensley p Ja.Lopez p Romo p Totals

AB 5 5 5 4 4 3 1 4 3 2 1 0 0 37

R 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 6

H 2 1 2 1 1 2 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 11

BI 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1

SO 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 2

Avg. .284 .258 .366 .293 .320 .227 .226 .234 .226 .103 .000 -----

San Diego AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Denorfia rf 5 2 2 0 0 1 .256 Maybin cf 4 1 1 1 1 1 .224 Headley 3b 5 0 1 2 0 1 .251 Quentin lf 4 2 1 0 0 0 .481 Guzman 1b 4 0 2 1 0 1 .255 Forsythe 2b 2 0 1 0 2 0 .625 Hundley c 4 0 1 0 0 2 .164 E.Cabrera ss 3 0 0 1 1 0 .226 Richard p 1 0 0 0 1 1 .040 Brach p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Alonso ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .267 Gregerson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Kotsay ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .286 Thatcher p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 34 5 9 5 5 7 San Francisco 300 012 000 — 6 11 0 San Diego 200 011 100 — 5 9 1 a-fouled out for Brach in the 6th. b-struck out for Pill in the 8th. c-grounded out for Gregerson in the 8th. E—Forsythe (1). LOB—San Francisco 7, San Diego 7. 2B—Me.Cabrera (14), Denorfia (9), Headley (14). 3B—Denorfia (1), Guzman (1). HR—G.Blanco (2), off Richard; Maybin (2), off Bumgarner. SB—Forsythe (1). DP—San Francisco 2. San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Bumgarner W, 7-4 6 7 4 4 4 4 101 3.26 Hensley H, 7 1 2-3 2 1 1 1 1 37 1.96 Ja.Lopez H, 7 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 2 3.29 Romo S, 3-3 1 0 0 0 0 2 18 0.54 San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Richard L, 2-7 5 2-3 10 6 4 0 1 93 4.58 Brach 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 6 3.26 Gregerson 2 0 0 0 1 1 25 4.32 Thatcher 1 1 0 0 0 0 12 2.35 T—3:00. A—22,269 (42,691).

Diamondbacks 6, Rockies 1 Colorado Fowler cf Scutaro ss C.Gonzalez lf Cuddyer rf Giambi 1b Pacheco 3b W.Rosario c LeMahieu 2b Outman p Roenicke p a-E.Young ph Ottavino p Brothers p b-Nelson ph R.Betancourt p Totals

AB 4 4 3 4 3 3 3 3 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 30

R 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

H 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

BI 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

BB 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 2 0 0 2 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 7

Avg. .288 .258 .319 .276 .256 .297 .250 .250 .000 .000 .235 .000 --.225 ---

Arizona AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Pollock lf 5 0 2 1 0 0 .245 R.Roberts 3b 5 1 1 0 0 1 .233 C.Young cf 2 1 0 0 2 1 .264 Goldschmidt 1b 4 2 3 3 0 0 .288 M.Montero c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .250 A.Hill 2b 4 1 2 1 0 0 .266 G.Parra rf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .275 Jo.McDonald ss 3 0 1 1 1 0 .292 Miley p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .391 c-J.Bell ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .214 D.Hernandez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 34 6 11 6 3 5 Colorado 000 010 000 — 1 3 0 Arizona 113 000 10x — 6 11 0 a-grounded out for Roenicke in the 6th. b-grounded out for Brothers in the 8th. c-doubled for Miley in the 8th. LOB—Colorado 3, Arizona 8. 2B—Giambi (3), Goldschmidt 2 (16), A.Hill (10), Jo.McDonald (6), J.Bell (1). HR—Goldschmidt (7), off Ottavino. SB— Pollock (1), G.Parra (11). Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Outman L, 0-2 3 7 5 5 2 1 69 8.18 Roenicke 2 1 0 0 1 0 29 2.14 Ottavino 1 2 1 1 0 2 20 1.29 Brothers 1 0 0 0 0 2 14 4.91 R.Betancourt 1 1 0 0 0 0 14 2.14 Arizona IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Miley W, 7-2 8 3 1 1 0 5 102 2.53 D.Hernandez 1 0 0 0 1 2 15 2.59 Ottavino pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. T—2:36. A—23,069 (48,633).

Leaders Through Wednesday’s Games AMERICAN LEAGUE BATTING—Konerko, Chicago, .366; Hamilton, Texas, .343; Trumbo, Los Angeles, .337; MiCabrera, Detroit, .325; Jeter, New York, .323; Fielder, Detroit, .318; Ortiz, Boston, .310. RUNS—Kinsler, Texas, 45; De Aza, Chicago, 40; Hamilton, Texas, 40; Granderson, New York, 39; AdJones, Baltimore, 39; Kipnis, Cleveland, 39; Cano, New York, 38; Ortiz, Boston, 38. RBI—Hamilton, Texas, 58; MiCabrera, Detroit, 47; Encarnacion, Toronto, 43; Bautista, Toronto, 40; ADunn, Chicago, 39; Willingham, Minnesota, 39; Ortiz, Boston, 37; Pierzynski, Chicago, 37. HOME RUNS—Hamilton, Texas, 21; ADunn, Chicago, 18; Encarnacion, Toronto, 17; Granderson, New York, 17; AdJones, Baltimore, 16; Bautista, Toronto, 15; Reddick, Oakland, 14. STOLEN BASES—De Aza, Chicago, 13; Kipnis, Cleveland, 13; RDavis, Toronto, 12; BUpton, Tampa Bay, 11; Dyson, Kansas City, 10; MIzturis, Los Angeles, 10; JWeeks, Oakland, 10. NATIONAL LEAGUE BATTING—MeCabrera, San Francisco, .366; DWright, New York, .359; Ruiz, Philadelphia, .358; Votto, Cincinnati, .348; McCutchen, Pittsburgh, .333; Altuve, Houston, .329; YMolina, St. Louis, .326. RUNS—CGonzalez, Colorado, 45; MeCabrera, San Francisco, 42; Uggla, Atlanta, 41; Pence, Philadelphia, 40; Bourn, Atlanta, 39; Furcal, St. Louis, 39; DWright, New York, 38. RBI—Ethier, Los Angeles, 46; CGonzalez, Colorado, 45; Beltran, St. Louis, 42; Stanton, Miami, 40; LaRoche, Washington, 39; Braun, Milwaukee, 37; Cuddyer, Colorado, 37; HRamirez, Miami, 37; Uggla, Atlanta, 37. HOME RUNS—Beltran, St. Louis, 15; Braun, Milwaukee, 14; CGonzalez, Colorado, 14; Pence, Philadelphia, 13; Stanton, Miami, 13; Bruce, Cincinnati, 12; Kemp, Los Angeles, 12. STOLEN BASES—Bonifacio, Miami, 20; Campana, Chicago, 18; Reyes, Miami, 16; Bourn, Atlanta, 15; SCastro, Chicago, 15; DGordon, Los Angeles, 14; Maybin, San Diego, 14; Schafer, Houston, 14.


THURSDAY, JUNE 7, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

D5

TENNIS: FRENCH OPEN

Nadal eases into semis; Ferrer next By Howard Fendrich The Associated Press

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Bend’s Nettie Morrison tees off on No. 11 during the final round of the Bend Ladies Invitational at Bend Golf and Country Club on Wednesday afternoon. Morrison finished as the tourney’s runner-up.

Golf Continued from D1 Schoning still dominated the field to win the tournament despite an injury to her left hip that she suffered during her Monday practice round. The pain was severe enough that Schoning used a golf cart in the tournament and walked with a noticeable limp. Schoning, who won the tournament in 2009, entered the day with a one-stroke lead over Portland-area amateur Dianna Richard, who faded early despite Schoning carding three early bogeys. Amy Anderson, the defending Bend Ladies Invitational champion, closed to within one stroke on the front nine but struggled

on the back nine. And Schoning — a 23year-old former Summit High standout — seized control with a birdie on the par-4 12th hole. “I was a little down on myself, and I was able to mentally get back with it,” Schoning said of her strong finish. Morrison, who at 67 has long been among the best amateur golfers in Central Oregon, said she was impressed with the way Schoning was able to stay on an even keel throughout the tournament. Schoning — who plans to turn pro in November and join The Cactus Tour, Arizona-based developmental tour — wasn’t always able to do that in her younger days, said Morrison, who has been paired

with Schoning often in recent years in the Bend Ladies Invitational. Morrison said if Schoning continues to improve that aspect of her game and adds some distance off the tee, she could have a bright future in the professional ranks. “I think she has the tools to give it as good a try as any of the other kids out there,” said Morrison, who has won the Bend Ladies Invitational two times. “There are only a few that are ever going to make that next step (to the top levels of pro golf). But I think she can be down there and be in that mix and not be behind.” Though Schoning said she didn’t play her best golf Wednesday, the Bend Ladies

Invitational represented a continuation of quality golf. In the last tournament of her collegiate career, Schoning finished one shot short of first place in April’s Big Sky Conference Championship. Schoning, who was named to the Big Sky’s all-conference team, even posted a secondround 68, her best score of the season. Still, she said her game is a work in progress. “I played well enough to win, and that’s all that matters,” said Schoning. “I am confident with various parts of my game, but there are a few that need a lot of work. Once I get that under control, I’ll be OK.” — Reporter: 541-617-7868, zhall@bendbulletin.com

NHL Continued from D1 Henrique scored the tiebreaking goal with 4:29 to play, Brodeur made 21 saves, and New Jersey beat the Los Angeles Kings 3-1 on Wednesday night to avoid a sweep in the finals. After making a series of stunning saves in a performance that evoked his greatest moments, Brodeur said he believes in the Devils’ comeback chances “more than yesterday.” “You know, I think we wanted to make them jump on a plane and come to New Jersey,” Brodeur said. “We had to go anyway. Might as well get a game over there.” Game 5 is Saturday night in Newark, N.J. Patrik Elias and Ilya Kovalchuk also scored third-period goals as the Eastern Conference champion Devils disappointed Los Angeles’ long-suffering fans who have waited nearly 45 years for their franchise’s first championship. A few minutes after Drew Doughty tied it for the Kings, Henrique scored his third enormous goal of the postseason, taking a pass from David Clarkson and rocketing a wrist shot past Jonathan Quick, the Kings’ nearly unbeatable goalie. The Calder Trophy finalist ended two of the Devils’ first three playoff series with overtime goals, and he kept New Jersey alive with his latest. “It’s fun. This is where every kid dreams of playing one day,” Henrique said. “We know it’s going to be a tough task to come back, (but) there’s no quit in the group in here. We know we can do it. We know we can put four together and come back.” Quick stopped 21 shots for the Kings, but lost his streak of nearly 139 shutout minutes right when he probably could have wrapped up the Conn Smythe Trophy as playoff MVP. The Kings had allowed just one third-period goal in their previous nine games.

Chinook Continued from D1 Broodstock are large fish from which eggs are taken to raise hatchery fish. The fish trap at Pelton Dam near Lake Billy Chinook is where chinook are collected for broodstock or for reintroduction into the Upper Deschutes River Basin, including the

Julie Jacobson / The Associated Press

New Jersey’s Adam Henrique scores the game-winning goal past Los Angeles Kings goalie Jonathan Quick in the third period of Game 4 of the Stanley Cup finals on Wednesday in Los Angeles.

Kovalchuk added an emptynetter that sent fans streaming forlornly out into a warm evening in Southern California. “We stayed alive,” said Elias, who has two of the Devils’ five goals in the series. “Marty had to work hard, but he gave us a chance. All we’ve got to do it keep playing hard.” With a golden chance for a Hockeywood ending, Los Angeles dropped to 15-3 in its spectacular postseason run, failing to win the title on its first try — and in its 200th playoff game, no less — in front of the faithful fans who have never seen the Stanley Cup. The Kings should head to New Jersey with confidence: They have won all 10 of their road playoff games this spring and 12 straight overall — both NHL postseason records. But after never trailing in the Stanley Cup finals, the Kings never led in Game 4. “I think (wrapping it up) was definitely on our minds, but they found a way to get a late goal,” Kings captain Dustin Brown said. “We’ve just got to hit the reset button. We’ve been in this situation now four times in the playoffs, and we’ve always come back with

a big rebound game.” Los Angeles set an NHL record by taking a 3-0 lead in all four of its playoff series, but failed three times to close out its opponents in Game 4. Vancouver and Phoenix also won Game 4 before losing Game 5. The Devils became just the sixth of 26 teams in finals history to force a Game 5 after falling behind 0-3. Only the 1942 Toronto Maple Leafs ever rallied with four straight wins in the finals, and only three teams in NHL history have done it in any playoff round. “I think the last three games could have gone our way as easily as they’ve gone L.A.’s way,” Devils coach Peter DeBoer said. “We finally got rewarded tonight.” After a tight-checking game between two very tight teams, Elias’ rebound goal with 12:04 to play put a hush over Staples Center. But 62 seconds later —and six seconds after Clarkson went off with a questionable boarding penalty — Mike Richards passed Anze Kopitar’s faceoff win to Doughty, who rocketed a long shot past Brodeur for the fourth goal of his breakthrough postseason. But after so many minutes

of tight defense, New Jersey won it with a stunning goal in transition: Former Kings forward Alexei Ponikarovsky got the puck to Clarkson, who found Henrique across the ice for his first goal since ending the Eastern Conference finals with an overtime goal. “That’s probably the best feeling I’ve ever had in my whole career,” Clarkson said. “I saw (Henrique) coming, so I got it to him, and the shot was incredible.” The Kings opened their first Stanley Cup finals in 19 years with two tense overtime victories in New Jersey, surviving largely on the brilliance of Quick. Los Angeles then returned home and routed the Devils 4-0 in Game 3 on Monday night, setting the stage for a celebration. But the Devils got into the details, and the Kings must regroup. “We couldn’t score,” Kopitar said. “We had a couple of chances, and we didn’t bear down. We didn’t get a couple of bounces in, and you have to create your own bounces. They played with a little more desperation than we did, and we have to correct that in Game 5.”

Crooked and Metolius rivers. French said that by May 31, only 46 spring chinook had arrived at the Pelton trap. By that time last year, 528 chinook had arrived. He added that only 156 wild spring chinook had made it to the weir at Warm Springs as of May 31. Last year at that time, the number of wild chinook at the weir was 1,034.

“Things are not rosy,” French said. “We can’t jeopardize escapement anymore. And we need a certain amount for natural production. We thought the fish were coming. But they haven’t shown up. And we can’t continue to harvest the few that have shown up.” French said it is quite uncommon for a pre-run prediction to be as far off as the one

for this spring. “We expected a very large return, and it did not materialize at all,” French said. “That’s not normal.” The biologist estimated that the predicted run of more than 14,000 hatchery spring chinook may turn out to be only about 1,500. — Reporter: 541-383-0318, mmorical@bendbulletin.com

PARIS — It was about time Rafael Nadal faced some sort of test at the French Open. Not that this one lasted all that long or was all that taxing. Still, after dropping a total of 19 games through his first four matches — the fewest at Roland Garros in 30 years — Nadal finally found himself in an even-as-can-be set at the outset of his quarterfinal against 12th-seeded Nicolas Almagro. While Novak Djokovic and Roger Federer have been forced to come back from two-set deficits in Paris, this qualified as a tight spot for Nadal. They went to a tiebreaker, and when Almagro’s backhand return of a 121 mph serve landed out to cede the set, Nadal leaned forward and yelled, “Come on!” Maybe it signaled excitement. Perhaps relief. This much was clear, in case anyone harbored any doubt: Nadal can summon his best play when he needs it. Moving closer to a record seventh French Open championship, Nadal reached the semifinals by beating Almagro 7-6 (4), 62, 6-3 to improve to 50-1 at the clay-court Grand Slam tournament. “I played well. I applied my strategy. I tried to do my best,” Almagro said. “But he was at such a high level.” As he always is at Roland Garros. This year, though, Nadal’s level has been even higher than usual. Not only has he won all 15 sets he’s played, but get this: Nadal has won 60 of his 61 service games so far, 54 in a row since getting broken in the second set of his first-round victory over Simone Bolelli of Italy. He’s saved 16 of 17 break points, including going four for four against Almagro. “If I’d not lost any set and not lost my serve, it would have been a miracle,” the second-seeded Nadal said. “It’s just impossible to achieve that.” The next player who will try to stop him is No. 6 David Ferrer, who, like Nadal and Almagro, is from Spain. Ferrer reached his third major semifinal, but first at Roland Garros, by eliminating No. 4 Andy Murray 6-4, 6-7 (3), 6-3, 6-2 in a match interrupted by a half-hour rain delay early in the third set. Ferrer recalled watching on TV when countrymen Sergi Bruguera, Juan Carlos Ferrero and Carlos Moya won French Open trophies. “This tournament, I think, is very special for all the Spanish players — and also for me,” Ferrer said. Would be even better, of course, if he can get past his pal Nadal, who has won 15 of their 19 career meetings. “Winning a match against Rafa is almost impossible,” Ferrer acknowledged. “He is in such good shape.”

Sharapova, Kvitova advance to semis PARIS — Whether she’s enjoying a cafe lunch, shopping on the ChampsÉlysées or notching another victory on the soft red clay, Maria Sharapova sure enjoys these trips to the French Open. “What girl doesn’t love Paris?” she said. Two more wins and she’ll love it even more. Sharapova moved another step closer to filling in the last piece of the career Grand Slam, defeating Kaia Kanepi of Estonia 6-2, 6-3 Wednesday to reach the semifinals at Roland Garros. Second-seeded Sharapova rolled through her 23rdseeded opponent in 74 minutes, a much different scene than the three-set win over Klara Zakopalova in the fourth round that took more than three hours. “I’m happy with the way I improved in this match,” Sharapova said. Her next opponent will be fourth-seeded Petra Kvitova, the Wimbledon champion who ended 142nd-ranked qualifier Yaroslava Shvedova’s upset-filled run with a 3-6, 6-2, 6-4 victory. Sharapova leads their alltime series 3-2. Kvitova beat Sharapova in last year’s Wimbledon final, while Sharapova won the most recent match, on clay this year in Stuttgart. In today’s other semifinal, No. 6 Samantha Stosur will face No. 21 Sara Errani. The Italian, who reached her first Grand Slam semifinal, has had more success as a doubles player before excelling in singles this week. She and her doubles partner, Roberta Vinci, won their semifinal match Wednesday and will play for the title. — The Associated Press

The other men’s semifinal Friday will be No. 1-ranked Djokovic against No. 3 Federer. Djokovic is bidding to become the first man to win four consecutive major titles since Rod Laver 43 years ago. Federer wants to add to his record 16 Grand Slam titles and end a drought of more than two years without one. Ferrer and Federer are both 30 — the last two of the record 37 thirtysomethings who were in the draw — and it’s the first time two French Open semifinalists were at least that old since Laver and Ken Rosewall in 1969.


D6

THE BULLETIN â&#x20AC;˘ THURSDAY, JUNE 7, 2012

H U N T I NG & F ISH I NG

H & F  C  

COMMENTARY

Free Fishing Weekend: Some advice for children G A RY LEWIS

T

his Saturday and Sunday, you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t need a fishing license to angle for trout or panfish in Oregon. It is Free Fishing Weekend, when for two days, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife waives all fishing license requirements for anglers of all ages. Kids, if you want to fish, this is the best time of the year to hit up a parent, grandparent or friend to take you. They donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to get a license and you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t need one. And if they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have the fishing know-how, you can find special events where the tackle and techniques are provided free of charge. It is your right as a young person to pester your favorite older person to take you fishing. Use guilt if you have to. Their dad/mom/grandma/ grandpa/friend took them fishing when they were little. They should take you and continue the tradition. Many lakes and ponds will be stocked with fish. Your best bets for easy trout? Jefferson County Pond in Madras and Shevlin Pond in Bend are restricted to anglers age 17 and younger. If everyone wants to fish, go to Walton Lake east of Prineville, Devils Lake or Sprague Gravel Pit. East of Burns, try Burns Pond, which is scheduled for stocking this week. Hatchery trout are used to regular feedings. They should be hungry by the time you get there. For those of you without fishing rods and tackle, ODFW has scheduled Free Fishing Weekend events on Saturday at Prineville Kidâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pond and Caldera Springs in Sunriver from 9 a.m. to noon.

Gary Lewis / For The Bulletin

Mike Hungerford battles a rainbow at Devilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lake while Grandpa Dennis cheers him on.

Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to need a rod and reel. Buy, beg, or borrow a rod that is 5 to 7 feet in length and equipped with at least four or five line guides. Rig the reel with 6-pound test line. There are two ways to fish with bait: suspended from a float, or on the bottom. A float, also called a bobber, is good because it gives a positive indication of a fishâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s interest. And it makes it easy for your parents to watch your line while youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re exploring. Cut 24 inches of four-pound line to use as a leader and connect it to the main line with a swivel. Tie a No. 8-12 hook to the end of the leader. The float will attach to the main line above the swivel. You may need to add some lead weight above the swivel, depending on the type of bait you use. Choose one of several baits. Worms or salmon eggs work well for trout when fished under a bobber.

When fishing deeper water, use a sliding sinker to bring your bait down to the fish. Slide a bullet sinker on your main line, then tie on a leader between 18 and 36 inches long. Use a jar bait like Berkley Power Bait or Gulp that floats up off the bottom. Prop the rod on a forked stick and sit back and watch. Tell your adult to bring a chair. One of the easiest ways to rig is with a fly-and-bubble setup. Casting bubbles are designed to be filled with water. A piece of surgical tubing or a hollow tapered peg attaches to plugs at both ends of the bubble. Pull one plug out and fill the bobber with water and then feed the fishing line through the center. Tie a swivel to the end of the line, and then add a 30-inch section of leader with a fly on the end. Your best bet? A red tag Woolly Worm or a black Woolly Bugger.

If this is your first fishing trip or the first in a long time, study up. One of the best resources for local waters is the fifth edition of the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fishing Central Oregonâ&#x20AC;? book, found at local stores. Another good bet is the ODFW web site at www.dfw.state.or.us. Older folks like to plan things. Build the anticipation by asking lots of questions. Help them organize their fishing gear. Beg for your own tackle box then practice casting in the yard. Kids, hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the best part. Your mom and dad or grandma and grandpa want to take you fishing. In fact, they want to catch fish nearly as badly as you do. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Gary Lewis is the host of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Adventure Journalâ&#x20AC;? and author of â&#x20AC;&#x153;John Nosler â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Going Ballistic,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Black Bear Hunting,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hunting Oregonâ&#x20AC;? and other titles. Contact Lewis at www. GaryLewisOutdoors.com.

Clear Lake recently stocked with rainbows Here is the weekly fishing report for selected areas in and around Central Oregon, provided by fisheries biologists for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife: CENTRAL ZONE ANTELOPE FLAT RESERVOIR: The reservoir was recently stocked with legal-sized fish. Fishing should be good for these fish, and there may be a few larger holdovers still available. BEND PINE NURSERY POND: The pond was recently stocked with rainbow trout. CLEAR LAKE RESERVOIR: Clear Lake has recently been stocked

FISH REPORT with both legal- and trophy-sized rainbow trout, and should offer a great opportunity to catch a limit. CRANE PRAIRIE RESERVOIR: It is a good time of year to target large brook trout, and rainbow trout fishing should be picking up. CRESCENT LAKE: Kokanee fishing has been good. DAVIS LAKE: Water is much higher than normal, and all boat ramps are accessible. Please note this is a fly-fishing only lake. Please check your synopsis for the regulations for this water body. DESCHUTES RIVER (Mouth to

FLY-TYING CORNER

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Skip Morrisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pan-fish, courtesy of www.skip-morris-fly-tying.com If bluegill and crappie were any bigger, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d be dangerous. Voracious feeders, these pan-fish are great sport on a fly rod. When the fish are close to the surface, they can be taken on dries and nymphs, but in the middle of the day, when the fish are lower in the water column, a deeper running pattern is called for. Tie on Skip Morrisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pan-fish fly. With its hook riding point up, the SMP is less apt to pick up weeds. Cast it then pull it back with short strokes or let it sink all the way to the bottom. Vary the retrieve with stops and starts with the rod tip close to the water. Tie this pattern with orange single-strand floss on a No. 8-14 wet fly hook. Build the body with the floss or with sparkle dubbing and rib with gold oval tinsel or wire. For the eyes, use bead chain, secured with crisscrossed turns of floss. Invert the hook. For the wing, use orange marabou over yellow marabou. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Gary Lewis

the Pelton Regulating Dam): Due to unexpected low returns of both wild and hatchery spring Chinook, the Deschutes River will close to angling for spring chinook beginning at 12:01 am today. Fishery managers want to protect wild fish and ensure the hatcheries on the Deschutes are able to collect enough broodstock. EAST LAKE: The road to East Lake is open and the boat ramps are clear. The lake is scheduled to be stocked with 3,500 Atlantic salmon this week. LAKE BILLY CHINOOK: The smallmouth bass bite is starting to pick up with the warming temperatures.

LITTLE LAVA LAKE: Open to fishing. METOLIUS RIVER: Trout fishing has been good. Insect hatches should offer lots of opportunities for good dry-fly fishing. The river upstream from the Allingham Bridge opened May 26. OCHOCO RESERVOIR: Fishing has been good. PAULINA LAKE: Kokanee anglers are catching their limit, and large browns are biting. SHEVLIN YOUTH FISHING POND: Shevlin has been stocked and is fishing well. WALTON LAKE: Fishing should be good for the legal-sized fish that were recently stocked.

Please email Hunting & Fishing event information to sports@bendbulletin.com or click on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Submit an Eventâ&#x20AC;? on our website at bendbulletin.com. Items are published on a space-availability basis, and should be submitted at least 10 days before the event.

FISHING COCC FLY-FISHING CLASS SERIES: Fly Fishing on the Crooked River is Saturday, June 16, from 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., $179; Fly Fishing Intermediate on the Crooked River is Saturday, June 23, from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., $125; Fly Fishing Advanced on the Deschutes River is Saturday, July 14, from 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., $199; contact 541-383-7270 or noncredit. cocc.edu. CENTRAL OREGON BASS CLUB: Meets on the first Tuesday of each month at Abbyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pizza in Redmond; 7 to 9 p.m.; new members welcome; www.cobc.us. DESCHUTES CHAPTER OF TROUT UNLIMITED: Meets on the first Monday of each month at the ONDA offices in Bend; meeting starts at 6:45 p.m. for members to meet and greet, and discuss what the chapter is up to; 541-306-4509; communications@deschutestu. org; www.deschutestu.org. BEND CASTING CLUB: The Bend Casting Club is a group of local fly anglers from around Central Oregon who are trying to improve their casting technique; club meets on the fourth Wednesday of each month, from 6 to 8 p.m., at the Orvis Casting Course in Bendâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Old Mill District; 541-306-4509 or bendcastingclub@gmail. com. THE SUNRIVER ANGLERS CLUB: Meets on the third Thursday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Sunriver Fire Station; contact: www. sunriveranglers.org. THE CENTRAL OREGON FLYFISHERS CLUB: Meets on the third Wednesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Bend Senior Center, 1600 SE Reed Market Road; contact: www. coflyfishers.org.

HUNTING LEARN THE ART OF TRACKING ANIMALS: Guided walks and workshops with a certified professional tracker; learn to identify and interpret tracks, sign and scat of the animals in Central Oregon; two or more walks per month all year; $35; ongoing, 8 a.m. to noon; 541-633-7045; dave@ wildernesstracking.com; wildernesstracking.com. THE BEND CHAPTER OF THE OREGON HUNTERS ASSOCIATION: Meets the second Wednesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the King Buffet at the north end of the Wagner Mall, across from Robberson Ford in Bend; contact: ohabend.webs.com. THE OCHOCO CHAPTER OF THE OREGON HUNTERS

Local Service. Local Knowledge. 541-848-4444 1000 SW Disk Dr. â&#x20AC;˘ Bend www.highdesertbank.com

EQUAL HOUSING LENDER

ASSOCIATION: Meets the first Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Prineville Fire Hall, 405 N. Belknap St.; contact: 447-5029. THE REDMOND CHAPTER OF THE OREGON HUNTERS ASSOCIATION: Meets the third Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Redmond VFW Hall.

SHOOTING WOMENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S TARGET TRAINING: At the Redmond Rod & Gun Club on Saturday, June 9; club will supply firearms, ammunition and rifles; door prizes and refreshments offered; $15 per person; preregister at www.bendselfdefense. com or contact Jennifer at 541974-3555 or Gary at 541-504-1513. COSSA KIDS: The Central Oregon Shooting Sports Associationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s NRA Youth Marksmanship Program is every third Saturday of the month from 10 a.m. to noon at the COSSA Range; the range is east of Bend off U.S. Highway 20 at milepost 24; contact Don Thomas, 541-389-8284. BEND TRAP CLUB: Trap shooting, five-stand and skeet shooting are all open Thursdays and Sundays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m; located east of Bend off U.S. Highway 20 at milepost 30; contact Bill Grafton at 541-383-1428 or visit www. bendtrapclub.com. CENTRAL OREGON SPORTING CLAYS AND HUNTING PRESERVE: 13-station, 100-target course and 5-stand open Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to dusk, and Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday from 11 a.m. to dusk (closed Wednesday); located at 9020 South Highway 97, Redmond; www. birdandclay.com or 541-383-0001. REDMOND ROD & GUN CLUB: Rifle and pistol are Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Saturdays and Sundays from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.; skeet is Tuesdays and Sundays beginning at 10 a.m.; trap is Wednesdays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 5 p.m. to closing, and Sundays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.; non-members are welcome; www. rrandgc.com. PINE MOUNTAIN POSSE: Cowboy action shooting club that shoots at the Central Oregon Shooting Sports Association range on U.S. Highway 20 at milepost 24; second Sunday of each month; 541-3188199 or www.pinemountainposse. com. HORSE RIDGE PISTOLEROS: Cowboy action shooting with pistols, rifles and shotguns at the Central Oregon Shooting Sports Association range on U.S. Highway 20 at milepost 24; first and third Sunday of each month at 10 a.m.; 541-408-7027 or www.hrp-sass. com.


B USINESS

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Stock listings, E2-3 Calendar, E4 News of Record, E4

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, JUNE 7, 2012

NASDAQ

CLOSE 2,844.72 CHANGE +66.61 +2.40%

IN BRIEF Mt. Bachelor gets $1.2M permit Deschutes County has issued Mt. Bachelor ski area a building permit valued at $1.2 million for a two-story, 8,670-square-foot building. Dave Rathbun, Mt. Bachelor’s president and general manager, said Wednesday that the building would temporarily house employee locker rooms and eventually become the administration building.

Nasdaq tries to make amends The Nasdaq stock exchange tried to make amends with investors ensnared by technical problems on the day Facebook went public. But the apology was not universally accepted. Nasdaq said Wednesday that it would hand out $40 million in cash and credit to reimburse investment firms that lost money on Facebook’s opening day because of computer glitches at the exchange. Nasdaq’s chief rival, the New York Stock Exchange, fired off a statement condemning the move, saying Nasdaq was giving itself an unfair advantage and rewarding itself for its own mistakes. One broker, Knight Capital, said the planned reimbursements weren’t nearly enough, encapsulating the complaints that other brokers and investment firms were making privately. Facebook went public May 18 amid great fanfare, but computer glitches at the Nasdaq threw the day into chaos.

Dow soars on stimulus hopes

DOW JONES

CLOSE 12,414.79 CHANGE +286.84 +2.37%

s

S&P 500

CLOSE 1,315.13 CHANGE +29.63 +2.30%

s

BONDS

10-year Treasury

CLOSE 1.66 CHANGE +5.06%

s

$1,632.80 s SILVER GOLD CLOSE CHANGE +$17.60

• They’re also conducting a broader inquiry into the firm’s $2B loss By Jim Puzzanghera Los Angeles Times

WASHINGTON — Federal banking regulators have been meeting daily with JPMorgan Chase & Co. executives to reduce the risks in the trading portfolio that led to the loss of more than $2 billion and are conducting a broader inquiry into risk management at the nation’s largest bank. “We are not limiting our

inquiry to the particular transactions at issue. We are assessing the adequacy of risk management throughout the bank,” Thomas Curry, head of the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency, told the Senate Banking Committee on Wednesday. “If corrective action is warranted, we will pursue appropriate informal or formal remedial measures.” Among those measures

could be forcing bank executives to return some of their compensation, a process known as clawback, Curry said. The OCC is the chief regulator of JPMorgan’s banking activities and has 65 examiners in the bank’s offices. In response to questioning from senators, Curry said the agency was reviewing whether the agency should have caught

The Associated Press file photo

the risky trades before they resulted in such huge losses. “We are looking at whether there were gaps in our assessment or risk controls,” Curry said. Although JPMorgan’s London-based chief investment office created the complex trading portfolio in 2007, the OCC did not begin focusing on the potential problems until April — just weeks before Chief Executive Jamie Dimon announced the huge losses. See JPMorgan / E3

5

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Tenants are being sought for this new east-side retail development, called 2500 Twin Knolls. It has more than 12,000 square feet of space, and the monthly rent — 75 cents to $1.10 per square foot — is rock bottom for a brand-new building, according to Greg Jacobs, principal broker at Colm Commercial Real Estate.

Open for business on Bend’s east side

4 3 2 1

’00 ’02 ’04 ’06 ’08 ’10 ’12 Source: ECB © 2012 McClatchy-Tribune News Service

DETROIT — At 118 miles per gallon, the Honda Fit electric vehicle is the most fuelefficient in the United States. But getting that mileage isn’t cheap — and it isn’t always good for the environment. Honda announced the eyepopping figure Wednesday, making the small, four-door hatchback more efficient than electric rivals like the Ford Focus, Nissan Leaf and Mitsubishi i-MiEV. It goes on the market this summer in Oregon and California. The electric Fit has an estimated price tag nearly twice as high as the gasoline-powered version. It would take 11 years before a driver makes up the difference and begins saving on fuel. With gas prices falling, the high sticker price for electric vehicles is becoming more of a barrier for American buyers, even though the vehicles are far more efficient than their gas-powered counterparts. That’s hurting sales of electrics. Through May, carmakers sold just over 10,000 electric vehicles, less than 0.2 percent of U.S. car and truck sales. That’s because the numbers don’t add up for the average consumer. See Honda / E3

PERSONAL FINANCE

• Developer hopes relatively low rent, build-to-suit option attracts tenants By Elon Glucklich The Bulletin

In commercial real estate, a developer’s pain can be a business owner’s gain. Take the brand-new office and retail complex on Bend’s east side, called 2500 Twin Knolls, for instance. Unveiled last month, the new building on Northeast Twin Knolls Drive features more than 12,000 square feet of space. The monthly rent — 75 cents to $1.10 per square foot, including real

estate taxes, insurance, repairs and other expenses — is rock bottom for a brand-new building, said Greg Jacobs, principal broker at Colm Commercial Real Estate, the group listing Twin Knolls, which is near U.S. Highway 20 and Purcell Boulevard. Rent there could have been higher — 20 to 25 percent more, Jacobs said. Its east-side location brings lower lease rates. So does being entangled in the commercial real estate crash. See Twin Knolls / E3

2500 Twin Knolls Pilot Butte State Park

BEND

20

Bear Creek Rd.

Windy Knolls Dr. Twin Knolls Dr.

By Hugo Martin

LOS ANGELES — In the 1970s, disco-themed skating rinks were all the rage. In the ’80s it was paintball battlefields, followed in the ’90s by urban skateboard parks. And now comes the zip line — an elevated cable ride that zips harnessed riders downhill at high speeds, powered by gravity. Across the nation, these rides stretch over canyons,

vineyards, island tourist towns and even zoos. Since 2001, the number of zip lines built in the U.S. has soared from 10 to more than 200, according to zip line experts. “They are spreading like fast-food hamburger joints,” said Mike Teske, technical director for a Maui-based zip line company who also heads a panel drafting national safety standards for zip lines. See Zip lines / E4

New rules aim to help make (401)k fees clearer By Eve Mitchell Contra Costa Times

Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

Across the nation, zip lines’ popularity is soaring Los Angeles Times

1.00%

Honda Fit gets 118 mpg, but costs add up The Associated Press

Interest rates

ECB RATE

The all-electric 2013 Honda Fit EV is seen during its debut at the Los Angeles Auto Show on Nov. 16, 2011.

By Tom Krisher and Jonathan Fahey

— Staff and wire reports

The European Central Bank, which sets rates for the 16 euro nations, left its key rate unchanged.

CLOSE $29.476 CHANGE +$1.086

Bank regulators working to reduce risk at JPMorgan

27th St.

Stocks on Wall Street surged Wednesday as remarks from a Federal Reserve official stirred stimulus hopes and after stocks in Europe rose when the European Central Bank appeared to keep the door open to making a future cut to its benchmark interest rate. Dennis Lockhart, president of the Atlanta Federal Reserve, said Wednesday that if needed to help growth, “further monetary actions to support the recovery will certainly need to be considered.” The gains in equities gave two of the main market gauges their best daily performance in 2012 and propelled the Dow Jones industrial average back into positive territory for the year. The Dow closed up 286.84 points, or 2.37 percent, at 12,414.79, giving it a 1.6 percent gain so far this year. The Standard & Poor’s 500-stock index gained 29.63 points, or 2.30 percent, to 1,315.13.

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Purcell Blvd.

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www.bendbulletin.com/business

Brent Ng takes off from Hogsback Ridge on the Catalina Zipline Eco-Tour in Avalon, Calif. Zip lines have become a boom industry. Bob Chamberlin Los Angeles Times

WALNUT CREEK, Calif. — Millions of employees put money in 401(k) plans to build a retirement nest egg. But most don’t know that the plans they invest in charge fees that can make that nest egg smaller. Starting this summer, new federal rules will make it easier for employees to get a handle on these fees, which are subtracted from an account’s value. Information about fees is already provided by some plan providers, but not all. Some make the information available on websites and others include it on quarterly statements, according to Catherine Collinson, president of the Los Angelesbased Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies. The new rules will bring consistency to the disclosure process while making it easier for consumers to understand the fees they are paying, she said. See 401(k) / E3


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THE BULLETIN â&#x20AC;˘ THURSDAY, JUNE 7, 2012

Consolidated stock listings N m

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A-B-C-D AAR 0.30 ABB Ltd 0.71 ABM 0.58 ACE Ltd 1.78 ACI Wwde AES Corp AFLAC 1.32 AGCO AGIC Cv2 1.02 AGL Res 1.84 AK Steel 0.20 AOL ASML Hld 0.59 AT&T Inc 1.76 ATP O&G AU Optron 0.14 AVI Bio AXT Inc Aarons 0.06 Aastrom AbtLab 2.04 AberFitc 0.70 AbdAsPac 0.42 Abiomed AboveNet Abraxas AcadiaHl n AcadiaRlt 0.72 Accenture 1.35 AccoBrds AccretivH Accuray Achillion AcmePkt ActiveNet ActivePw h ActivsBliz 0.18 Actuant 0.04 Acuity 0.52 Acxiom AdobeSy Adtran 0.36 AdvAuto 0.24 AdvEnId AMD AdvSemi 0.11 AdvOil&Gs Adventrx AdvActBear AdvisBd AecomTch AegeanMP 0.04 Aegon 0.13 AerCap Aeropostl AEterna gh Aetna 0.70 AffilMgrs Affymax Affymetrix Agilent 0.40 Agnico g 0.80 Agrium g 0.45 AirLease AirProd 2.56 Aircastle 0.60 Airgas 1.60 Aixtron 0.32 AkamaiT Akorn AlaskAir s AlaskCom 0.20 Albemarle 0.80 AlcatelLuc Alcoa 0.12 Alere AlexREE 1.96 AlexcoR g Alexion Alexza h AlignTech Alkermes AllegTch 0.72 Allergan 0.20 Allete 1.84 AlliData AlliancOne AlliBInco 0.48 AlliBern 0.98 AlliantEgy 1.80 AlliantTch 0.80 AlldNevG AlldWldA 1.50 AllisonT n 0.24 AllosThera AllotComm AllscriptH Allstate 0.88 AlphaNRs AlpGPPrp 0.60 AlpTotDiv 0.66 AlpAlerMLP 1.00 AlteraCp lf 0.32 AlterraCap 0.56 Altria 1.64 Alumina 0.24 AlumChina Alvarion h AmBev 1.23 Amarin Amazon Amdocs Amedisys Ameren 1.60 Amerigrp AFTxE 0.50 AMovilL s 0.28 AmAxle AmCampus 1.35 ACapAgy 5.00 AmCapLtd ACapMtg n 1.90 AEagleOut 0.44 AEP 1.88 AEqInvLf 0.12 AmExp 0.80 AFnclGrp 0.70 AGreet 0.60 AIG wt AmIntlGrp ARltyCT n 0.70 AmSupr AmTower 0.84 AmWtrWks 1.00 Ameriprise 1.40 AmeriBrgn 0.52 Ametek 0.36 Amgen 1.44 AmkorT lf Amphenol 0.42 Amylin Amyris Anadarko 0.36 Anadigc AnalogDev 1.20 Ancestry AngiesL n AnglogldA 0.49 ABInBev 1.57 Anixter 4.50 Ann Inc Annaly 2.37 Annies n Ansys AntaresP Anworth 0.90 Aon plc 0.60 A123 Sys Apache 0.68 AptInv 0.72 ApolloGM 1.15 ApolloGrp ApolloInv 0.80 ApolloRM n 1.05 Apple Inc 10.60 ApldMatl 0.36 AMCC Approach ApricusBio AquaAm 0.66 ArQule ArcelorMit 0.75 ArchCap ArchCoal 0.12 ArchDan 0.70 ArcosDor 0.24 ArdeaBio ArenaPhm AresCap 1.48 AriadP Ariba Inc ArkBest 0.12 ArmHld 0.16 ArmourRsd 1.20 ArrayBio Arris ArrowEl ArubaNet AsburyA AscenaRt s AscentSol h AshfordHT 0.44 Ashland 0.90 AspenTech AsscdBanc 0.20 Assurant 0.84 AssuredG 0.36 AstoriaF 0.16 AstraZen 2.80 athenahlth AtlPwr g 1.15 AtlasAir AtlasEngy 1.00 AtlasPpln 2.24 Atmel ATMOS 1.38 AtwoodOcn AuRico g Aurizon g AuthenTec AutoNatn Autodesk Autoliv 1.88 AutoData 1.58 AutoZone Auxilium AvagoTch 0.52 AvalnRare AvalonBay 3.88 AvanirPhm AVEO Ph AveryD 1.08 AvisBudg Avista 1.16 Avnet Avon 0.92 Axcelis AXIS Cap 0.96 B&G Foods 1.08

11.53 16.13 21.53 72.33 38.68 12.45 40.53 40.81 8.04 37.70 5.99 27.40 47.34 34.56 5.93 3.97 .73 4.02 27.40 2.18 61.04 32.64 7.38 21.37 83.45 2.87 16.25 22.92 58.42 9.45 11.51 6.40 6.47 24.31 14.70 .82 12.10 25.73 54.29 13.85 31.69 29.63 73.71 13.60 6.02 4.46 2.95 .50 24.12 94.65 16.19 5.01 4.29 11.61 17.82 .43 42.43 101.68 13.69 4.77 39.77 40.93 78.21 20.73 78.75 11.05 85.06 14.86 28.99 13.98 33.47 2.26 60.51 1.58 8.64 19.18 70.55 5.16 90.84 .35 31.22 15.60 31.12 91.06 40.22 125.13 3.08 8.17 12.28 44.44 48.49 29.29 77.93 19.37 1.78 25.83 10.59 34.09 9.72 6.13 4.14 15.66 33.77 22.93 32.58 3.96 10.29 .47 37.28 11.67 217.64 29.16 11.78 32.81 63.06 5.09 23.43 9.19 43.97 32.94 9.05 23.94 19.27 39.48 10.46 55.38 39.25 14.50 10.38 29.90 10.41 4.05 65.79 34.95 48.37 37.29 51.00 69.98 4.63 54.15 27.54 2.98 62.16 1.99 37.32 25.06 14.00 37.71 68.12 56.86 25.96 16.77 35.95 65.10 3.15 6.76 47.14 1.04 83.59 27.13 12.00 34.81 7.63 19.05 571.46 10.65 5.76 28.22 2.61 24.39 6.19 14.47 38.10 6.20 32.17 14.01 31.96 6.45 15.64 16.65 44.53 12.33 23.35 7.03 3.19 12.45 34.00 13.79 25.33 18.74 .86 8.34 64.38 21.64 11.93 34.04 12.55 8.76 40.90 75.10 13.58 44.08 31.31 29.48 7.27 33.85 39.89 8.38 5.00 4.56 36.90 33.11 56.89 53.09 387.96 22.46 32.97 1.47 141.18 2.92 11.94 28.21 13.60 26.00 30.50 16.31 1.21 32.96 24.67

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BB&T Cp 0.80 BBCN Bcp BCE g 2.17 BE Aero BG Med BGC Ptrs 0.68 BHP BillLt 2.20 BHPBil plc 2.20 BJsRest BMC Sft BP PLC 1.92 BPZ Res BRE 1.54 BRFBrasil 0.42 BabckWil Bacterin Baidu BakrHu 0.60 BallCorp 0.40 BallardPw BallyTech BanColum 1.12 BcBilVArg 0.57 BcoBrad pf 0.81 BcoSantSA 0.82 BcoSBrasil 0.36 BcpSouth 0.04 BkofAm 0.04 BkAm pfH 2.05 BkAm wtA BkHawaii 1.80 BkIreld rs BkMont g 2.80 BkNYMel 0.52 BkNova g 2.20 Bankrate n BankUtd 0.68 Banner Cp 0.04 Banro g BarcUBS36 BarcGSOil Barclay 0.39 Bar iPVix Bard 0.76 BarnesNob Barnes 0.40 BarrickG 0.80 BasicEnSv Baxter 1.34 BaytexE g 2.64 BeaconFed 0.28 BeacnRfg Beam Inc 0.82 BeazerHm BebeStrs 0.10 BectDck 1.80 BedBath Belo 0.32 Bemis 1.00 BenchElec Berkley 0.36 BerkH B BerryPet 0.32 BestBuy 0.64 BigLots BBarrett BioRefLab Biocryst BioFuelE h BiogenIdc BioMarin BioMedR 0.86 BioSante rs BlkRKelso 1.04 Blckbaud 0.48 BlackRock 6.00 BlkBldAm 1.58 BlkEEqDv 0.68 BlkGlbOp 2.28 BlkIntlG&I 0.88 Blackstone 0.40 BlockHR 0.80 Blount BdwlkPpl 2.13 BobEvans 1.00 BodyCentrl Boeing 1.76 Boise Inc 0.48 BonTon 0.20 BonanzaC n BoozAllenH 0.36 BorgWarn BostPrv 0.04 BostProp 2.20 BostonSci BoydGm BradyCp 0.74 Brandyw 0.60 Braskem 0.65 BreitBurn 1.82 Bridgeline BridgptEd BrigStrat 0.44 Brightpnt BrigusG g Brinker 0.64 BrMySq 1.36 BristowGp 0.80 Broadcom 0.40 BroadrdgF 0.64 BroadSoft Broadwd h BrcdeCm Brookdale BrkfldAs g 0.56 BrkfInfra 1.50 BrkfldOfPr 0.56 BrklneB 0.34 BrooksAuto 0.32 BrwnBrn 0.34 BrownShoe 0.28 BrownFB 1.40 BrukerCp Brunswick 0.05 Buckeye 4.15 BuckTch 0.32 Buckle 0.80 Buenavent 0.63 BuffaloWW BldrFstSrc BungeLt 1.08 C&J Egy n CA Inc 1.00 CBL Asc 0.88 CBOE 0.48 CBRE GRE 0.54 CBRE Grp CBS B 0.40 CEVA Inc CF Inds 1.60 CH Robins 1.32 CIT Grp CLECO 1.25 CME Grp 8.92 CMS Eng 0.96 CNH Gbl CNO Fincl 0.08 CPFL En s 1.84 CSX s 0.56 CTC Media 0.52 CVB Fncl 0.34 CVR Engy 0.32 CVR Ptrs 2.09 CVS Care 0.65 CYS Invest 2.00 Cabelas CblvsNY s 0.60 Cabot 0.80 CabotOG s 0.08 CACI Cadence CalDive CalaCvOp 1.14 CalaStrTR 0.84 Calix CallGolf 0.04 CallonPet Calpine CalumetSp 2.24 CamdenPT 2.24 Cameco g 0.40 Cameron CampSp 1.16 CIBC g 3.60 CdnNRy g 1.50 CdnNRs gs 0.42 CP Rwy g 1.40 CdnSolar Canon CapOne 0.20 CapitlSrce 0.04 CapFedFn 0.30 Caplease 0.26 CapsteadM 1.84 CpstnTrb h CarboCer 0.96 CardnlHlth 0.95 Cardiom gh Cardtronic CareFusion CareerEd Carlisle 0.72 CarMax Carnival 1.00 CarpTech 0.72 Carrizo CarrolsR s Carters CashAm 0.14 CatalystH Caterpillar 1.84 CatoCp 1.00 Cavium CedarF 1.62 CedarRlty 0.20 CelSci Celanese 0.30 Celestic g Celgene CellTher rsh Cellcom 1.71 CelldexTh Celsion Cemex 0.32 Cemig pf s 1.18 CenovusE 0.88 Centene CenterPnt 0.81 CnElBras pf 0.87 CenElBras 0.65 CentEuro CEurMed CFCda g 0.01 CentAl CntryLink 2.90 Cenveo Cepheid CeragonN Cerner s ChRvLab ChrmSh

C 28.39 10.24 40.39 41.49 5.75 6.12 63.23 55.03 42.25 43.71 38.19 2.83 49.90 15.97 23.91 1.20 119.12 40.65 40.56 1.19 45.88 61.34 6.35 14.85 5.93 7.94 12.79 7.64 25.10 3.39 44.79 5.39 53.50 20.27 50.80 17.87 22.70 18.49 4.50 38.35 20.95 11.84 19.65 97.68 15.90 23.82 40.45 10.87 50.36 43.98 19.30 23.64 60.78 2.51 6.25 72.73 71.87 5.74 30.77 13.88 37.85 80.68 37.67 19.89 38.18 18.35 21.93 3.46 .30 134.11 37.99 18.39 2.80 9.55 25.62 170.56 22.89 7.08 12.75 6.94 12.50 15.74 14.19 26.89 38.44 14.76 69.02 6.69 5.10 16.74 16.90 67.37 8.06 104.13 5.66 7.33 27.90 11.60 10.54 17.30 2.04 19.06 16.94 4.86 .94 31.53 34.04 40.14 34.22 20.73 28.77 .30 4.76 16.06 31.84 32.10 16.41 8.57 9.54 25.90 11.87 88.65 14.69 20.69 49.16 29.16 39.51 40.81 82.91 3.54 60.00 17.00 25.64 17.55 26.59 7.59 16.11 31.93 18.46 168.92 58.04 34.40 41.17 269.51 23.28 38.75 6.68 24.23 20.89 8.76 10.48 24.62 20.86 44.84 13.94 35.15 11.74 36.93 33.37 45.00 10.54 2.51 11.66 9.12 7.94 5.50 4.38 16.97 22.43 66.13 19.64 46.67 31.78 68.91 81.08 28.64 72.68 3.20 39.44 50.61 6.31 11.46 4.12 13.90 .95 75.52 41.48 .40 27.49 24.51 6.97 50.86 28.46 31.82 44.91 21.57 5.47 52.70 43.40 89.47 86.66 30.03 26.14 26.04 5.02 .40 39.10 7.55 65.31 .88 7.15 4.42 2.18 5.40 17.48 31.60 37.33 20.15 9.21 6.56 3.17 5.65 20.86 7.46 37.33 2.31 36.87 8.49 78.22 32.82 7.34

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ChartInds CharterCm ChkPoint Cheesecake ChelseaTh Chemtura CheniereEn CheniereE 1.70 ChesEng 0.35 ChespkLdg 0.88 ChesMidst 1.62 Chevron 3.60 ChicB&I 0.20 Chicos 0.21 ChildPlace Chimera 0.48 ChinaLife 0.55 ChinaMble 2.14 ChinaUni 0.16 Chipotle Chiquita ChrisBnk Chubb 1.64 ChurchDwt 0.96 CIBER CienaCorp Cigna 0.04 Cimarex 0.48 CinciBell CinnFin 1.61 Cinemark 0.84 Cintas 0.54 Cirrus Cisco 0.32 Citigroup 0.04 CitzRpB rs CitzSoBk 0.04 CitrixSys CityNC 1.00 ClaudeR g CleanEngy CleanH s ClearChn s 6.08 Clearwire ClevBioL h CliffsNRs 2.50 Clorox 2.56 CloudPeak Coach 1.20 CobaltIEn CocaCola 2.04 CocaCE 0.64 Coeur CogentC Cognex 0.44 CognizTech Coinstar ColdwtrCrk Colfax ColgPal 2.48 CollctvBrd ColonPT 0.72 ColonyFncl 1.36 ColumLb h Comcast 0.65 Comc spcl 0.65 Comerica 0.60 CmcBMO 0.92 CmclMtls 0.48 CmclVehcl CmwREIT 2.00 CmtyHlt CommVlt CBD-Pao 0.22 CmplGnom CompSci 0.80 Compuwre ComScore ComstkMn ComstkRs Comverse Con-Way 0.40 ConAgra 0.96 ConchoRes ConcurTch Conns ConocPhil s 2.64 ConsolEngy 0.50 ConslCm h 1.55 ConEd 2.42 ConstantC ConstellA ContlRes Cnvrgys 0.20 CooperCo 0.06 Cooper Ind 1.24 CooperTire 0.42 CopaHold 2.10 CopanoEn 2.30 Copart s Copel 0.94 Corcept CoreLabs 1.12 CoreLogic CorinthC CorOnDem Corning 0.30 CorpExc 0.70 CorpOffP 1.10 CorrectnCp 0.80 Cosan Ltd 0.28 CostPlus Costco 1.10 Cott Cp CousPrp 0.18 Covance CovantaH 0.60 CoventryH 0.50 Covidien 0.90 CrackerB 1.60 Crane 1.04 Cray Inc Credicp 2.30 CS VS3xSlv CSVS2xVxS CSVelIVSt s CSVSVixST CredSuiss 0.82 CrSuiHiY 0.32 CredoPtr Cree Inc Cresud 0.30 CreXus 1.17 Crocs CrosstxLP 1.32 CrwnCstle CrownHold Ctrip.com CubeSmart 0.32 CubistPh CullenFr 1.92 Cummins 1.60 Curis CurEuro 0.26 CurAstla 3.98 CurJpn CurtisWrt 0.36 CushTRet 0.90 Cyberonics Cyclacel h Cymer CypSemi 0.44 Cytec 0.50 DCT Indl 0.28 DDR Corp 0.48 DFC Glbl DHT Hldgs 0.08 DNP Selct 0.78 DR Horton 0.15 DST Sys 0.80 DSW Inc 0.72 DTE 2.35 DanaHldg 0.20 Danaher 0.10 Darden 1.72 Darling DaVita DeVry 0.30 DealrTrk DeanFds DeckrsOut Deere 1.84 DejourE g Delcath Dell Inc DelphiAu n DeltaAir Deluxe 1.00 DemndMda DenburyR Dndreon DenisnM g Dennys Dentsply 0.22 DeutschBk 0.92 DBGoldSh DBGoldDL DBGoldDS DevonE 0.80 Dex One DexCom Diageo 2.68 DiamndF lf DiaOffs 0.50 DiamRk 0.32 DianaCont 1.00 DianaShip DiceHldg DicksSptg 0.50 Diebold 1.14 DigitalGen DigitalRlt 2.92 DigRiver DigitalGlb Dillards 0.20 DirecTV A DREBear rs Dx30TBr rs DxEMBll rs 2.24 DxFnBull rs DrxTcBull DirSCBear DirFnBear DirLCBear DrxDNGBull 0.08 DirDGldBr 1.98 DirDGldBll 1.02 DrxTcBear DrxEnBear DrxSOXBll DirEMBear Dir30TrBull 0.54 DrxMCBull 4.69 DrxREBull 2.00 DirxSCBull DirxLCBull DirxEnBull Discover 0.40 DiscCm A DiscCm C DiscovLab

C 64.09 63.75 53.23 31.17 1.33 14.06 12.94 20.23 18.21 18.11 25.28 99.80 35.33 14.44 46.87 2.81 34.57 51.02 13.43 411.21 5.42 1.05 71.41 53.50 3.53 13.89 44.21 51.14 3.57 36.19 22.54 36.00 28.39 16.68 27.14 14.99 6.66 76.95 47.04 .71 13.86 59.58 6.30 1.20 1.84 48.59 71.05 15.06 62.84 23.50 74.61 26.80 18.95 18.55 33.98 60.11 62.85 .70 28.78 98.33 21.24 21.61 17.00 .69 29.76 29.26 28.60 36.96 11.94 9.03 17.84 22.16 48.85 37.99 2.14 26.36 9.11 18.05 2.22 14.45 6.07 33.85 24.96 91.65 65.31 15.22 53.58 28.67 14.92 61.27 20.99 19.47 71.44 14.29 82.15 69.33 15.32 80.97 27.47 24.79 20.59 4.02 125.53 16.49 2.82 20.19 12.83 36.48 22.69 26.18 11.79 22.00 87.78 7.67 7.25 46.31 15.96 32.00 51.78 59.70 37.99 11.25 120.63 27.58 8.09 9.34 42.50 20.21 3.05 14.35 24.15 7.59 9.86 16.74 15.20 54.70 33.64 18.71 11.37 41.20 54.86 95.75 4.80 125.13 99.38 123.99 30.07 8.30 39.57 .49 53.72 13.28 59.60 5.85 14.01 16.74 .71 10.89 15.31 51.78 58.65 57.76 13.00 51.32 49.81 14.26 83.83 28.90 26.74 15.90 53.32 73.51 .24 1.58 12.22 29.00 10.61 23.46 9.26 15.44 6.27 1.52 4.41 37.10 35.88 12.26 49.61 4.84 60.09 .82 10.81 97.88 20.73 59.70 10.07 7.63 7.48 9.85 47.20 37.08 12.13 71.88 15.18 16.24 67.12 44.18 27.16 55.44 70.01 78.12 47.14 21.30 26.67 23.82 20.94 40.45 13.44 11.21 12.75 26.12 17.22 78.40 32.53 65.25 47.73 69.43 36.43 31.60 50.30 46.59 2.48

+2.83 +.24 +1.31 +.74 +.02 +.43 +.44 +.42 +1.21 +.24 +1.11 +3.31 +1.19 -.04 +.74 +.09 +1.10 +1.19 +.25 +9.37 +.18 -.02 +1.32 +.36 +.12 +.61 +.84 +.39 +.11 +.93 +.53 +.38 +.92 +.57 +1.39 +.28 +.17 +3.27 +.64 +.01 +.40 +1.74 +.21 +.01 +.04 +1.47 +1.09 +.08 -1.11 +.84 +1.37 +.64 +.38 +.47 +1.11 +1.75 +3.56 +.95 +1.08 +.08 +.50 +.18 +.01 +.73 +.67 +.41 +.81 +.47 +.48 +.47 +.72 +2.20 +.07 -.04 +.36 +.32 +.02 +.07 +1.16 +.09 +1.22 +.36 +4.20 +2.04 -1.84 +1.71 +.76 +.25 +.72 +.15 +.35 +2.42 +.33 +.90 +1.03 +1.19 +2.14 +.81 -.17 +.32 -.08 -.15 +.05 +.08 +1.93 +.36 +1.20 +.73 +1.09 +.17 +1.01 -.01 +.23 +.20 +.33 +.88 +.58 +.86 +.66 +.26 +3.41 +2.16 -1.23 +.66 -3.33 +1.04 -.03 +.55 +.43 +.12 +.26 +.09 +.89 +.44 +.66 +.24 +.52 +.62 +3.42 +.03 +1.22 +1.92 -.85 +.59 +.05 +1.73 -.03 +1.62 +.81 +1.58 +.15 +.36 +.66 +.06 +.07 +.45 +1.12 +.86 +.61 +.49 +1.01 +.57 +.28 +1.28 +.88 +.64 +.51 +.27 +1.86 +.05 +.06 +.73 +.03 +.92 +.40 +.69 -.34 +.02 +.13 +.56 +1.60 +.01 +1.02 -.01 +.11 +3.97 +.28 +1.43 +.46 +.23 +.17 +.29 +1.59 +1.13 +2.54 +1.67 +.26 +.64 +1.14 -.06 -1.92 +3.11 +5.58 +6.03 +3.35 -1.71 -2.43 -1.77 +2.22 -.33 +.01 -.94 -1.32 +2.40 -1.68 -5.43 +2.10 +4.05 +3.27 +4.42 +3.12 +.55 +1.28 +.94 -.04

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2.00 27.82 0.60 45.53 0.65 29.07 42.51 9.82 48.70 79.28 104.80 2.11 52.25 3.00 30.03 1.80 79.95 0.36 35.22 1.04 10.91 1.31 0.60 22.01 1.26 55.74 1.28 31.69 1.36 41.39 3.25 18.02 43.43 0.48 4.40 61.32 0.12 2.12 1.72 48.63 0.60 26.09 1.00 22.69 0.68 13.87 1.65 25.15 1.52 66.37 0.60 32.76 2.00 19.63 3.65 .61 1.12 9.62

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0.15

0.20 2.85 0.68 0.88 3.06 0.40 0.88 0.20 0.40 1.04 1.52 0.76 1.02 1.25 1.28 1.01 0.98 1.17 0.80 1.60 1.30 0.28 1.00 2.04 0.18 0.32

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0.64 1.44 0.64 0.27 1.21 0.72 0.20

0.05

1.90 0.48 1.08 0.76 0.24 1.25 0.40

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OcwenFn OdysMar OfficeDpt OfficeMax Oi SA 6.16 OilStates OldDomFrt OldNBcp 0.36 OldRepub 0.71 Olin 0.80 OmegaHlt 1.68 Omncre 0.28 Omnicom 1.20 OmniVisn OnSmcnd ONEOK s 1.22 Oneok Pt s 2.54 OnyxPh OpenTxt OpenTable OpkoHlth Opnext OptimerPh Oracle 0.24 OraSure OrbitalSci Orexigen OrientEH Oritani 0.60 OshkoshCp OvShip OwensMin 0.88 OwensCorn OwensIll OxfordInds 0.60 PDL Bio 0.60 PF Chng 1.05 PG&E Cp 1.82 PHH Corp PimcoTR 0.50 PLX Tch PMC Sra PNC 1.60 PNC pfP PNM Res 0.58 POSCO 2.22 PPG 2.36 PPL Corp 1.44 PSS Wrld PVH Corp 0.15 Paccar 0.80 PacBiosci PacEth rs PacSunwr PaciraPhm PackAmer 1.00 PallCorp 0.84 PanASlv 0.15 Panasonic 0.06 Pandora n PaneraBrd ParPharm ParamTch ParaG&S Parexel ParkStrlg ParkDrl ParkerHan 1.64 ParkerVsn Parkwy 0.30 PartnerRe 2.48 PatriotCoal Patterson 0.56 PattUTI 0.20 Paychex 1.28 PeabdyE 0.34 Pebblebrk 0.48 PeetsCfeT Pendrell Pengrth g 0.84 PnnNGm PennVa 0.23 PennVaRs 2.08 PennWst g 1.08 PennantPk 1.12 Penney PennaRE 0.64 PennyMac 2.20 Penske 0.44 PensonW h Pentair 0.88 PeopUtdF 0.64 PepBoy PepcoHold 1.08 PepsiCo 2.15 PeregrinP h PerfectWld 2.00 PerkElm 0.28 Prmian 1.46 Perrigo 0.32 PetSmart 0.56 PetrbrsA 1.03 Petrobras 1.03 PetroDev Petrolog n PtroqstE Pfizer 0.88 PhrmAth Pharmacyc PhilipMor 3.08 PhilipsEl 1.00 Phillips66 n PhnxCos PhotrIn PiedNG 1.20 PiedmOfc 0.80 Pier 1 0.16 PilgrimsP PimCpOp 1.56 PimIncStr2 0.96 PimcoHiI 1.46 PinnclEnt PinWst 2.10 PionDrill PioNtrl 0.08 PitnyBw 1.50 PlainsAA 4.18 PlainsEx Plantron 0.40 PlatUnd 0.32 PlumCrk 1.68 Polaris s 1.48 Polycom s PolyMet g PolyOne 0.20 Polypore Popular rs PortGE 1.08 PortglTel 0.85 PostPrp 1.00 Potash 0.56 Power-One PSCrudeDS PwshDB PS Agri PS Oil PS USDBull PwSClnEn 0.14 PwShHiYD 0.31 PSTechLdr 0.04 PSFinPf 1.25 PS SP LwV 0.87 PShNYMu 1.00 PShNatMu 1.10 PSHYCpBd 1.12 PwShPfd 0.93 PShEMSov 1.49 PSIndia 0.02 PwShs QQQ 0.49 Powrwv rs Pozen Praxair 2.20 PrecMxNik 0.09 PrecCastpt 0.12 PrecDrill Prestige Pretium g PriceTR 1.36 priceline PrimoWtr PrinFncl 0.72 PrisaB 0.08 PrivateB 0.04 ProLogis 1.12 ProShtDow ProShtQQQ ProShtS&P PrUShS&P ProUltDow 0.29 PrUltQQQ s PrUShQQQ ProUltSP 0.27 PrUShtFin ProUShL20 ProShtEafe ProShtEM PrUltSCh25 ProUltSEM ProUltSOG ProUltSBM ProUltFin 0.25 ProUPShD30 ProUltO&G 0.05 ProUBasM 0.05 PrUPR2K PrUPD30 s 0.22 ProShtR2K PrUPQQQ s ProUltR2K 0.01 ProSht20Tr PrUltSP500 0.03 PrUSSilv rs PrUVxST rs PrUltSYen rs ProSUltGold PrShtVixST PrUltCrude PrUShCrde ProVixSTF ProUltSGld ProUltSlv s ProUShEuro ProceraN ProctGam 2.25 ProgrssEn 2.48 ProgsvCp 0.41 ProgWaste 0.56 PUShDow rs ProUSR2K PrUShEur PUSSP500 rs PUPSR2K rs PUShQQQ rs PrUltSRE rs ProspctCap 1.22 ProspBcsh 0.78 Protalix ProtLife 0.72 ProvidFS 0.52 Prudentl 1.45 Prud UK 0.80

C 16.75 +.12 3.13 +.14 2.11 +.09 4.52 +.31 11.22 -.05 65.03 +1.83 42.29 +1.33 11.16 +.24 9.98 +.25 19.79 +.60 21.36 +.37 32.99 +1.15 47.24 +.68 14.52 +.71 6.84 +.10 41.32 +1.16 53.93 +.96 44.35 +.19 48.33 +.92 40.10 +.31 4.61 +.01 1.08 +.10 15.39 +.39 27.53 +.83 10.22 +.27 11.33 +.59 3.37 +.12 8.34 +.42 13.43 +.03 19.98 +.81 11.16 +.95 28.72 +.16 28.22 +.22 19.14 +.66 47.22 +3.38 6.35 +.04 51.03 +.21 44.43 +1.05 16.34 +.68 104.93 -.20 6.11 +.02 6.48 +.23 58.70 +1.47 25.19 +.10 18.77 +.35 77.70 +2.17 101.81 +2.82 27.56 +.32 20.82 +.37 80.25 +.59 37.84 +1.22 2.09 +.01 .64 +.04 1.70 -.02 11.45 +.64 26.84 +.45 54.63 +.08 18.59 +.89 6.78 +.30 10.97 +.69 143.73 +3.04 34.69 +.15 20.40 +1.04 2.25 +.04 26.83 +.72 4.57 +.12 4.95 +.15 80.25 +1.89 2.29 +.17 10.88 +.27 72.70 +1.18 1.84 -.06 32.99 +.23 15.22 +.09 30.37 +.86 24.08 +.42 21.89 +.83 60.53 +1.37 1.12 +.02 7.52 +.09 43.74 +.48 5.50 +.34 23.53 -.02 13.52 +.40 9.94 +.48 24.88 +.61 12.76 +.57 18.94 +.49 23.84 +.66 .36 +.19 39.52 +.37 11.40 +.05 8.76 +.01 19.51 +.19 67.49 +.49 .47 -.01 9.76 +.19 26.08 +.56 17.64 +.64 105.44 +.72 65.89 +2.01 19.00 +.25 19.90 +.32 23.34 +1.57 14.35 +.70 4.96 +.41 21.91 +.31 1.48 -.02 34.77 +.68 83.07 +1.16 18.28 +.87 31.53 +1.63 1.71 +.08 5.75 +.12 31.65 +.96 16.69 +.38 15.84 +.38 7.94 +.05 17.98 -.01 10.17 +.02 13.13 +.01 10.06 +.48 50.91 +.57 7.69 +.37 94.53 +5.01 14.06 +.64 78.91 +1.27 35.44 +1.61 31.59 +.65 37.25 +.51 37.06 +.70 75.59 +1.61 11.62 +.57 .94 +.16 13.08 +.57 35.97 +1.16 14.76 +.58 25.99 +.48 4.07 +.11 49.01 +1.27 39.07 +.86 4.20 +.09 51.59 -1.21 25.23 +.46 26.23 +.39 24.37 +.37 22.71 -.19 4.28 +.09 9.21 +.16 26.29 +.63 17.63 +.09 26.67 +.36 24.41 -.09 25.23 -.10 18.35 +.02 14.29 +.09 28.01 +.26 16.62 +.64 62.52 +1.40 .80 +.04 6.86 +.08 104.19 +2.10 13.15 +.21 161.65 +3.26 7.93 +.32 14.04 +.27 15.02 +.93 57.70 +2.13 642.51 +22.68 1.23 +.06 24.30 +.74 3.04 +.08 13.83 +.30 32.00 +.84 37.38 -.95 27.47 -.66 37.91 -.89 16.92 -.80 62.57 +2.83 50.56 +2.25 34.57 -1.69 50.96 +2.26 48.09 -2.82 15.93 +.60 51.45 -1.48 32.53 -1.02 30.00 -1.70 32.03 -2.03 27.82 -1.90 17.91 -.87 50.87 +2.67 22.32 -1.70 37.90 +2.28 30.67 +1.43 52.98 +3.58 46.12 +3.01 27.92 -.70 46.42 +2.97 36.91 +1.74 29.38 +.57 68.98 +4.56 60.33 -4.19 17.65 -2.97 42.90 +.58 82.16 -.05 74.54 +5.14 28.43 +.69 50.87 -1.27 41.89 -3.25 17.42 -.03 44.01 +2.29 21.22 -.43 20.74 +.61 61.80 +.64 56.69 +.38 21.99 +.84 18.00 -.22 56.71 -2.86 33.83 -1.74 44.44 -3.36 53.47 -3.99 53.11 -4.27 52.14 -3.89 29.27 -1.38 10.86 +.16 40.94 +.40 6.53 +.16 26.74 +1.31 14.02 +.24 47.84 +1.85 21.44 +.66

N m

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PruShHiY 19.62 -.33 PSEG 1.42 31.39 +.44 PubStrg 4.40 136.53 +2.86 PulteGrp 8.76 +.60 PPrIT 0.36 5.35 +.03

Q-R-S-T QEP Res 0.08 QIAGEN QLT QR Energy 1.95 Qihoo360 QlikTech Qlogic Qualcom 1.00 QualityS s 0.70 QuanexBld 0.16 QuantaSvc QntmDSS QuantFu h QstDiag 0.68 QuestSft Questar 0.65 Questcor QuickLog QksilvRes Quiksilvr RAIT rs 0.32 RF MicD RLJ LodgT 0.66 RPC s 0.32 RPM 0.86 RTI IntlM Rackspace RadianGrp 0.01 RadioShk 0.50 RailAmer Ralcorp RLauren 1.60 Rambus RamcoG 0.65 Randgold 0.40 RangeRs 0.16 RareEle g RJamesFn 0.52 Rayonier s 1.60 Raytheon 2.00 RealD RealPage RltyInco 1.75 RedHat RedwdTr 1.00 Reeds RegalBel 0.76 RegalEnt 0.84 RgcyCtrs 1.85 RegncyEn 1.84 Regenrn RegionsFn 0.04 Regis Cp 0.24 ReinsGrp 0.72 RelStlAl 0.60 RenaisRe 1.08 ReneSola Renren RentACt 0.64 Rentech 1.06 RentechN n 1.06 RepubAir RepubSvc 0.88 RschMotn ResMed ResoluteEn ResoluteF ResrceCap 0.80 RetailOpp 0.52 RexEnergy ReynAmer 2.36 Richmnt g RigelPh RioTinto 1.45 RitchieBr 0.45 RiteAid RiverbedT RobbMyer 0.20 RobtHalf 0.60 RockTen 0.80 RockwlAut 1.70 RockColl 1.20 RockwdH RofinSinar RogCm gs 1.58 Rollins 0.32 Roper 0.55 RosttaG rs RosettaR RossStrs s 0.56 Roundys n 0.92 RousePr n 0.07 Rovi Corp Rowan RoyalBk g 2.28 RBScotlnd RBSct prN RylCarb 0.40 RoyDShllB 3.44 RoyDShllA 3.44 RoyGld 0.60 Rubicon g RubiconTc RubyTues Ryanair Ryder 1.16 Ryland 0.12 SAIC 0.48 SAP AG 0.82 SBA Com SCANA 1.98 SEI Inv 0.30 SK Tlcm SLGreen 1.00 SLM Cp 0.50 SM Energy 0.10 SpdrDJIA 3.56 SpdrGold SpdrEuro50 1.54 SpdrIntRE 1.40 SP Mid 1.65 S&P500ETF 2.64 Spdr Div 1.76 SpdrHome 0.16 SpdrS&PBk 0.39 SpdrBarcCv 1.87 SpdrLehHY 3.67 SpdrNuBST 0.30 SpdrNuBMu 0.86 SpdrLe1-3bll SpdrS&P RB0.46 SpdrRetl 0.53 SpdrOGEx 0.38 SpdrOGEq 0.11 SpdrMetM 0.51 SPX Cp 1.00 SS&C Tech STEC STMicro 0.40 STR Hldgs SVB FnGp SXC Hlth SabaSftw lf SABESP 2.96 SabraHltc 1.32 Safeway 0.70 StJoe StJude 0.92 Saks Salesforce SalixPhm SallyBty SamsO&G SJuanB 1.45 SanderFm 0.68 SanDisk SandRdge SandRdg n 1.85 Sanmina Sanofi 1.76 Sanofi rt Santarus Sapient 0.35 SaraLee 0.46 Satcon h SavientPh Schlmbrg 1.10 Schnitzer 0.75 Schulmn 0.76 SchwUSMkt 0.59 SchwUSLgC 0.59 Schwab 0.24 SciClone SciGames Scotts 1.20 ScrippsNet 0.48 SeabGld g SeacoastBk SeadrillLtd 3.28 SeagateT 1.00 SealAir 0.52 Sealy SearsHldgs 0.33 SeattGen SelCmfrt SelMedHld SempraEn 2.40 Semtech SenHous 1.52 SensataT Sequenom ServiceCp 0.24 SvcSource SvArts rsh ShandaG s 1.02 ShawGrp Sherwin 1.56 ShipFin 1.56 Shire 0.45 ShufflMstr Shutterfly SiderurNac 0.43 Siemens 4.04 SigmaAld 0.80 SignatBk SignetJwlrs 0.48 SilganHld 0.48 SilicGrIn SilicnImg SilcnLab SilicnMotn Slcnware 0.28 SilvStd g SilvWhtn g 0.30 SilvrcpM g 0.10 SimonProp 4.00 Sina Sinclair 0.48 Sinovac h SiriusXM SironaDent SixFlags s 2.40 Skechers Skullcdy n

26.90 16.04 7.77 17.07 19.78 22.42 14.22 58.41 29.42 16.49 21.93 2.00 .60 54.64 24.22 20.30 44.01 2.18 3.98 2.50 4.23 4.14 17.92 11.08 25.99 21.78 44.90 2.45 4.59 23.31 63.81 145.22 4.88 12.25 91.52 58.59 4.32 33.65 42.60 50.68 11.93 17.26 39.78 55.27 12.17 4.18 60.07 14.12 44.21 22.41 133.02 5.95 18.13 50.79 47.67 76.35 1.22 4.51 34.65 1.72 22.87 5.58 26.16 10.34 31.76 8.95 11.36 5.37 12.15 10.25 41.27 6.57 7.54 44.85 20.03 1.29 17.31 45.20 27.59 52.06 69.09 50.45 46.62 19.08 34.67 21.51 99.38 11.30 39.59 63.76 10.53 12.60 24.12 31.37 49.35 6.73 16.41 23.86 65.70 63.37 78.68 2.81 9.06 6.89 30.24 42.84 21.58 11.47 57.53 52.45 47.50 18.27 11.92 74.99 14.56 51.91 123.93 157.21 27.26 35.44 168.10 131.97 54.79 19.91 20.85 36.76 38.12 24.40 24.17 45.82 25.54 58.48 48.13 30.69 40.74 68.45 23.74 7.44 5.22 3.29 55.90 93.50 7.80 70.76 15.29 18.99 15.36 38.68 10.08 136.98 52.86 26.66 1.72 13.60 53.97 35.09 6.31 18.49 7.31 34.39 1.38 6.79 11.09 20.55 .35 .77 64.59 25.53 19.70 31.72 31.37 12.42 6.65 8.56 43.18 54.83 16.57 1.41 33.61 23.67 15.66 1.61 50.48 21.99 20.61 9.34 65.37 24.35 20.71 30.72 3.75 11.41 11.79 .05 4.00 25.87 128.83 15.98 86.98 13.25 27.09 6.28 82.28 69.93 58.87 43.79 42.78 6.08 4.60 35.54 14.69 5.07 12.71 28.12 6.62 149.12 54.58 8.16 2.07 1.92 43.87 49.55 18.19 14.39

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C


THURSDAY, JUNE 7, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

Twin Knolls Continued from E1 The property was in foreclosure this time last year, after its original developers failed to keep up with payments. That lowered the price significantly for the new development team, IA Twin Knolls LLC, based in Colorado, which bought it in September. If the building was near downtown Bend or the Old Mill District, the rent would also likely be higher, Jacobs said. Those areas on the west side offer a more attractive environment for shoppers. That underscores a problem for some local commercial real estate officials: How do you sell or lease property on the east side? Compass Commercial Real Estate, one of Central Oregon’s largest real estate companies, lists average retail rental prices on the west side at about $1.50 a square foot per month, with some as high as $3 a square foot. Right now, there’s a higher demand for commercial space in the west than in the east, Jacobs said. Compass and Fratzke Commercial Real Estate, another Bend real estate company, list three or four west-side retail properties available for every one on the east side. East of Third Street, available properties are fewer and

Honda Continued from E1 • The electric Fit needs 28.6 kilowatt hours of electricity to go 100 miles. At the national average price of 11.6 cents per kilowatt hour, that costs $3.30. A gas-powered automatictransmission Fit, which gets 31 miles per gallon, needs to burn 3.2 gallons to travel 100 miles. At the national average price of $3.57 per gallon of gasoline, that’s $11.52. • People drive an average of almost 13,500 miles a year, so a typical driver would spend $445 on electricity for an electric Fit over a year, and $1,552 on gasoline for a regular Fit. • Honda has valued the price of an electric Fit at $29,125 after a $7,500 federal tax credit. That’s $12,210 more than the gas-powered Fit — a savings of $1,107 per year to make up the difference between the electric and the gas-powered version. Customers don’t want to

“With a flooded market of office space, there’s so many opportunities out there. The team we have on board, a contractor, engineer, architect, they’ve all pledged 90-day build-outs. In theory, if someone takes a space, in about 90 days it would be designed to their need.” — Greg Jacobs of Colm Commercial Real Estate, on 2500 Twin Knolls

farther between. The west side may be a more favorable environment for some business owners, Jacobs said. But he hopes 2500 Twin Knolls can help spur activity on the east side, though many of the calls on the property have come from existing east-side business owners. “The bulk of our interest has been from tenants from the immediate area, wanting to upgrade from their existing building,” he said. According to Deschutes County property records, the deed for a “Twin Knolls Industrial Park” was purchased back in 1995. The property changed hands several times, until Santa Cruz developers Wesley and Laura Brown bought the property in late 2005 for $500,000 and started building the complex in 2006. But in 2009, LibertyBank — which itself failed and was absorbed by another bank later that year — repossessed

the partially built facility. IA Twin Knolls LLC, bought it in September, for $850,000. It could have cost well over $1 million had it not been foreclosed on, Jacobs said. “The new guys paid pennies on the dollar” for the property, he said. “What that allows them to do is offer custombuilt spaces for tenants at less than average retail rate.” Because the developers paid less than in a traditional sale, and because a large supply of vacant commercial space is available throughout Bend, they’re giving tenants the chance to lease space, then have it tailored to their business. The aim is to give business owners an incentive to set up shop at 2500 Twin Knolls, knowing they can sign a lease and then have it built to suit their work environment. “With a flooded market of office space, there’s so many opportunities out there,” Jacobs said. “The team we have

spend the extra money up front and wait for years for payback, said Geoff Pohanka, who runs 13 auto dealerships in Virginia and Maryland, including three that sell the Nissan Leaf and Chevrolet Volt electric cars. “People are smart. They’re looking for the deal,” he said. “Is somebody going to fork out $15,000 more for something that gets them less range than their car now? It’s not happening.” At first, Honda will only be leasing Fit EVs in Oregon and California, for $389 per month. The subcompact seats up to five people and can be recharged in three hours with a 240-volt charging station. A fully charged Fit EV can go 82 miles, meaning a daily commute could cost nothing for gasoline. And leases can make sense for consumers. Carmakers can lower rates and subsidize deals in order to make a car — especially one with new,

expensive technology — more attractive to buyers. Jesse Toprak, vice president of market intelligence for the car buying site TrueCar.com, said he tested an electric Chevrolet Volt, driving it less than 35 miles a day from his Los Angeles-area home to work and back. The cost of leasing it — $369 a month — is comparable to the $300 he would spend on gas. “In a lot of these cases, I’m surprised that people are not lining up to get these things,” he said. The comparison between gas and electric cars also can vary with geography, largely because energy prices vary wildly across the country. In Oregon, where gasoline is 18 percent more expensive than the national average and electricity is 16 percent lower, an electric Fit will save $121 per month in fuel. In Connecticut, which has the highest power prices in the country, the monthly savings are just

Northwest stocks Name AlaskAir s Avista BkofAm BarrettB Boeing CascdeBcp CascdeCp ColSprtw Costco CraftBrew FLIR Sys HewlettP HmFedID Intel Keycorp Kroger Lattice LaPac MDU Res MentorGr Microsoft

Div PE ... 1.16 .04 .44 1.76 ... 1.40f .88 1.10f ... .28 .53f .22 .90f .20f .46 ... ... .67 ... .80

14 16 ... 39 12 ... 9 18 24 14 16 8 ... 11 7 23 7 ... 20 14 11

YTD Last Chg %Chg 33.47 26.00 7.64 20.53 69.02 5.51 44.95 49.27 87.78 7.76 21.61 22.35 9.24 26.07 7.13 21.95 4.72 9.27 22.29 14.27 29.35

+.84 +.28 +.54 +.46 +1.44 +.12 +1.32 +1.29 +1.01 +.23 +.23 +.67 +.35 +.64 +.23 +.09 +.36 +.43 +.33 +.15 +.85

-10.9 +1.0 +37.4 +2.9 -5.9 +25.8 -4.7 +5.8 +5.4 +28.9 -13.8 -13.2 -11.2 +7.5 -7.3 -9.4 -20.5 +14.9 +3.9 +5.2 +13.1

NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

Price (troy oz.) $1620.00 $1632.80 $29.476

— Reporter: 541-617-7820, eglucklich@bendbulletin.com

$83. The fuel used to generate electric power and the cost of gasoline also vary by region —and that affects how environmentally friendly an electric car purchase is. In Midwestern states that rely heavily on coal, driving an electric car produces 18 percent fewer greenhouse gas emissions than driving a typical gasoline-powered car, according to the Union of Concerned Scientists. Surprisingly, driving an electric car there produces 50 percent more greenhouse gases than driving a 50 mpg electric hybrid. In the Northeast and Northwest, where a bigger portion of the power is produced with nuclear reactors, hydroelectric dams, natural gas-fired power plants and wind farms, an electric car will produce 76 percent fewer greenhouse gas emissions than a typical gasoline-powered car and 56 percent fewer emissions than a hybrid.

(401)k Continued from E1 The fees pay for overhead administrative costs such as record-keeping and legal compliance requirements, along with expenses in cases where the fund is actively managed. (Some funds, such as index funds, do not have management fees.) In May, the Transamerica Center released its 13th annual retirement survey, which found that 71 percent of employees with 401(k)s did not realize they involved fees. That number is not at all surprising to Timothy Yee, co-founder of Oakland, Calif.-based Green Retirement Plans, a consultant to 401(k) plan providers. “I think the reason for that is when (employees) look at their statement it simply says beginning balance and ending balance and it will tell them if it went up or down based on the market,” Yee said. “People think it’s free.” That is not the case. “Some people think their employer pays their plan costs, but when they receive disclosure information under the new law, they may learn otherwise. Those who do actually realize they pay some plan costs may be concerned when they receive disclosures showing how

JPMorgan Continued from E1 “Our interest and concern intensified during the month as losses increased within the portfolio, up to the point that the institution itself announced the significance of the losses that occurred,” Curry said. The Federal Reserve, which regulates JPMorgan’s larger bank holding company, has been working with the OCC to remove the risk from the portfolio. Curry said the goal was a “soft landing” for those investments. Curry said it still was unclear exactly what happened with the portfolio, which was supposed to reduce the credit risks of the bank, not increase them. “It’s a very complicated investment strategy, both in terms of its size and complexity,” Curry said. “We are looking to determine what the actual strategy behind that investment scheme was and

Market recap

Name

Div PE

NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstBcp Weyerhsr

1.44 1.08 1.78 ... .80f ... 1.68 .12 .70f .75f 1.56 .89f .68 ... .36f .78f .32 .88 ... .60

Precious metals Metal

on board, a contractor, engineer, architect, they’ve all pledged 90-day build-outs. In theory, if someone takes a space, in about 90 days it would be designed to their need.” 2500 Twin Knolls contains seven ground-floor spaces and eight second-floor spaces of varied sizes, from about 1,000 to 2,500 square feet. The build-out strategy means those spaces are flexible, however. One tenant, which Jacobs described as a local “training and education” business, has already agreed to take space in the Twin Knolls complex. Four or five others have shown interest — all existing east-side business owners. While east-side properties can be more difficult to market throughout the community, said Terry O’Neil, broker with The Lowes Group, lower prices on that side of town still make them attractive to many business owners. “People have to ask themselves what the value of their investment is, O’Neil said. Is paying more up front for a space that sees more foot traffic worth it? Or would a business owner be more suited finding a bargain property? “Each side of town has its specific type of use,” O’Neil said.

YTD Last Chg %Chg

22 107.07 +1.56 +11.1 15 47.82 +.76 -3.8 20 46.67 +.43 -2.6 15 4.52 +.31 -.4 12 37.84 +1.22 +1.0 ... 1.66 -.04 -13.1 33 37.06 +.70 +1.4 19 161.65 +3.26 -1.9 11 18.99 +.18 -9.7 8 25.53 +.68 -39.6 29 128.83 +.55 +44.3 11 35.03 +1.16 -4.7 31 53.47 +1.06 +16.2 24 5.41 +.17 +11.1 16 12.23 +.17 -1.3 11 29.70 +.48 +9.8 13 15.78 +.38 +12.8 11 30.97 +.46 +12.4 12 18.89 +.06 +21.1 31 20.11 +.74 +7.7

Prime rate

Pvs Day

Time period

Percent

$1617.00 $1615.20 $27.992

Last Previous day A week ago

3.25 3.25 3.25

NYSE

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

BkofAm S&P500ETF SPDR Fncl SprintNex iShEMkts

3453008 7.64 +.54 1587727 131.97 +2.90 940782 13.98 +.40 638171 2.72 +.19 536536 38.03 +1.08

Last Chg

Gainers ($2 or more) Name

Last

Chg %Chg

HovnanE 2.01 +.31 +18.2 CSGlobWm 7.25 +1.07 +17.3 HovnEnt un 12.07 +1.67 +16.1 InvenSen n 11.58 +1.48 +14.7 IronMtn 32.32 +3.92 +13.8

Losers ($2 or more) Name

Last

TempurP PrUVxST rs DrxRsaBear iP SESPX CSVS2xVxS

22.39 17.65 36.93 27.60 8.09

Chg %Chg -21.28 -2.97 -6.17 -4.24 -1.23

Amex

Name

Name

Last Chg

70397 12.94 +.44 58255 6.34 -.17 43059 1.25 +.01 36097 10.12 +.12 22934 20.86 +.75

Gainers ($2 or more) Name

Last

Medgen wt HallwdGp Argan TravelCtrs Metalico

2.46 +.31 +14.4 9.23 +.88 +10.5 14.15 +1.30 +10.1 4.77 +.41 +9.4 2.54 +.19 +8.1

Chg %Chg

Losers ($2 or more) Name

Last

-48.7 -14.4 -14.3 -13.3 -13.2

PacBkrM g BovieMed Accelr8 Aurizon g WT EurDbt

10.45 -.91 2.60 -.20 2.92 -.20 5.00 -.29 18.92 -1.08

2,684 379 77 3,140 64 18

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Diary Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Nasdaq

Most Active ($1 or more)

Vol (00)

Vol (00)

Facebook n PwShs QQQ Microsoft MicronT Intel

606355 545119 459574 347591 327316

Last Chg 26.81 62.52 29.35 5.75 26.07

+.94 +1.40 +.85 +.16 +.64

Gainers ($2 or more) Name

Last

DigitalGen Enphase n ColonyBk BG Med SpanBrd rs

12.13 +2.54 +26.5 6.69 +1.36 +25.5 7.57 +1.52 +25.1 5.75 +.93 +19.3 3.49 +.51 +17.1

Chg %Chg

Losers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

those fees reduce their plan accounts,” Rich Rausser, senior vice president of client services of White Plains, N. Y.-based Pentegra Retirement Services, said in an email. The new rules, which also apply to 403(b) plans offered by nonprofits and pension plans, were developed by the U.S. Department of Labor. They go into effect Aug. 30. However, when investors will actually get the information on fees will depend on their plan. The new rules require plan providers to disclose fees before a plan is selected as well as on an annual basis and what the fees cover. Starting in November, that information will be included in statements sent out quarterly, along with the amount of fees deducted from an account. Fees are typically deducted on a quarterly basis. Fees depend on various factors such as the type of account that’s involved and the number of employees at a company who participate in a plan. Typically, smaller plans have higher fees. For example, fees average 1.3 percent for a small plan with 100 participants and $5 million in assets and 1.08 percent for a large plan with 1,000 participants and $50 million in assets, according to the 401k Averages Book.

also if there were any other factors driving that strategy other than attempting to mitigate known risks in that portfolio.” Sen. Bob Corker, R-Tenn., said it was not realistic to think banking regulators could prevent complex trades like the ones that caused JPMorgan’s loss. “I think it’s a fool’s errand to think regulators are going to be ahead of bankers,” he said. Curry and other banking regulators said the more than $2 billion loss at no point threatened the solvency of JPMorgan or posed a threat to the financial system. Part of the reason for that was the increased amount of capital held by the bank to offset losses. Federal Reserve Gov. Daniel Tarullo said the most recent stress test of JPMorgan showed that it could withstand a trading loss of at least $28 billion combined with another $56 billion in credit losses.

Indexes

Most Active ($1 or more) CheniereEn NovaGld g GoldStr g NwGold g CFCda g

E3

Name

Last

Chg %Chg

-8.0 -7.1 -6.4 -5.5 -5.4

MattrssF n 28.00 -7.30 -20.7 SelCmfrt 20.61 -5.32 -20.5 Conns 15.22 -1.84 -10.8 Homeow wt 2.53 -.27 -9.6 PrimaBio n 4.40 -.44 -9.1

315 155 22 492 9 6

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Diary

Diary 2,086 442 110 2,638 37 22

52-Week High Low

Name

13,338.66 10,404.49 5,627.85 3,950.66 474.18 381.99 8,496.42 6,414.89 2,498.89 1,941.99 3,134.17 2,298.89 1,422.38 1,074.77 14,951.57 11,208.42 860.37 601.71

Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

Last

Net Chg

%Chg

YTD %Chg

52-wk %Chg

12,414.79 5,015.53 473.29 7,517.46 2,250.13 2,844.72 1,315.13 13,781.13 765.17

+286.84 +146.85 +5.84 +178.83 +38.47 +66.61 +29.63 +310.84 +19.08

+2.37 +3.02 +1.25 +2.44 +1.74 +2.40 +2.30 +2.31 +2.56

+1.61 -.08 +1.85 +.54 -1.24 +9.20 +4.57 +4.48 +3.27

+3.04 -1.43 +11.08 -6.98 -3.45 +6.33 +2.78 +1.72 -2.90

World markets

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed Wednesday. Market Close % Change

Key currency exchange rates Wednesday compared with late Tuesday in New York. Dollar vs: Exchange Rate Pvs Day

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

291.39 2,104.45 3,058.44 5,384.11 6,093.99 18,520.53 37,273.38 13,427.15 3,464.52 8,533.53 1,801.85 2,760.83 4,104.66 5,429.85

+2.25 +2.43 +2.42 +2.36 +2.09 +1.43 +.50 +3.50 +1.28 +1.81 +1.05 +1.79 +.30 +1.88

s s s s s s s s s s s s s s

.9912 1.5474 .9721 .001959 .1571 1.2546 .1289 .012632 .070982 .0309 .000851 .1393 1.0448 .0335

.9741 1.5369 .9631 .001949 .1575 1.2446 .1289 .012701 .070258 .0302 .000847 .1386 1.0362 .0334

Selected mutual funds YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret Amer Century Inv: EqInc 7.39 +0.12 +2.0 GrowthI 26.46 +0.61 +7.7 Ultra 24.52 +0.56 +7.0 American Funds A: AmcpA p 19.87 +0.37 +5.5 AMutlA p 26.65 +0.49 +3.6 BalA p 18.88 +0.28 +4.2 BondA p 12.74 -0.02 +2.7 CapIBA p 49.83 +0.68 +2.2 CapWGA p 32.79 +0.76 +2.5 CapWA p 20.84 +0.03 +2.4 EupacA p 35.59 +0.92 +1.2 FdInvA p 36.63 +0.83 +3.8 GovtA p 14.53 -0.02 +1.3 GwthA p 30.73 +0.67 +7.0 HI TrA p 10.71 +0.03 +3.7 IncoA p 16.92 +0.24 +1.9 IntBdA p 13.69 -0.02 +1.3 ICAA p 28.24 +0.62 +4.7 NEcoA p 25.94 +0.56 +9.1 N PerA p 27.49 +0.64 +5.1 NwWrldA 47.24 +1.07 +2.4 SmCpA p 35.73 +0.74 +7.7 TxExA p 12.90 -0.03 +4.7 WshA p 29.01 +0.61 +2.7 Artisan Funds: Intl 20.93 +0.55 +5.5 IntlVal r 25.39 +0.58 +1.2 MidCap 36.57 +0.91 +11.1 MidCapVal 19.90 +0.40 +1.0 Baron Funds: Growth 53.56 +1.23 +5.0 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 13.99 -0.03 +2.1 DivMu 14.85 -0.03 +1.6 BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 18.49 +0.37 +2.3 GlAlA r 18.38 +0.24 +1.2 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 17.08 +0.22 +0.9 BlackRock Instl:

EquityDv 18.54 +0.38 GlbAlloc r 18.48 +0.24 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 48.77 +1.09 Cohen & Steers: RltyShrs 65.92 +1.49 Columbia Class A: TxEA p 14.09 -0.03 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z e 29.09 +0.29 AcornIntZ x35.88 +0.63 LgCapGr 12.59 +0.25 Credit Suisse Comm: ComRet t 7.51 +0.10 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 9.12 +0.26 USCorEq1 11.23 +0.26 USCorEq2 11.01 +0.27 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 33.81 +0.87 Davis Funds Y: NYVenY 34.19 +0.88 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.26 -0.01 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq 17.45 +0.41 EmMktV 25.98 +0.62 IntSmVa 13.56 +0.37 LargeCo 10.41 +0.23 USLgVa 19.76 +0.56 US Small 21.37 +0.54 US SmVa 24.03 +0.63 IntlSmCo 13.93 +0.36 Fixd 10.33 -0.01 IntVa 14.15 +0.43 Glb5FxInc 11.16 -0.03 2YGlFxd 10.13 Dodge&Cox: Balanced 70.02 +1.33 Income 13.65 IntlStk 28.93 +0.87 Stock 105.96 +2.66 DoubleLine Funds: TRBd I 11.19

+2.5 +1.3 +5.1 +8.9 +5.1 +6.8 +5.1 +4.7 -8.2 -1.3 +4.6 +4.2 +4.0 +4.2 +2.7 +1.2 +0.1 -0.1 +5.4 +3.6 +4.2 +3.8 +0.7 +0.5 -3.8 +2.3 +0.5 +4.4 +3.7 -1.1 +4.7 NA

TRBd N p 11.19 Dreyfus: Aprec 41.34 +0.93 Eaton Vance A: LgCpVal 17.69 +0.41 Eaton Vance I: FltgRt 8.91 GblMacAbR 9.78 +0.04 LgCapVal 17.74 +0.41 FMI Funds: LgCap p 16.03 +0.32 FPA Funds: NwInc 10.67 -0.01 FPACres 27.21 +0.43 Fairholme 27.13 +1.01 Federated Instl: TotRetBd 11.40 -0.01 StrValDvIS 4.80 +0.06 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 21.37 +0.43 StrInA 12.25 +0.03 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 21.65 +0.43 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 13.45 +0.14 FF2010K 12.32 +0.13 FF2015 11.23 +0.12 FF2015K 12.36 +0.13 FF2020 13.50 +0.16 FF2020K 12.68 +0.16 FF2025 11.14 +0.17 FF2025K 12.69 +0.19 FF2030 13.23 +0.21 FF2030K 12.79 +0.20 FF2035 10.87 +0.21 FF2035K 12.77 +0.24 FF2040 7.58 +0.15 FF2040K 12.79 +0.24 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 11.87 +0.27 AMgr50 15.54 +0.17 AMgr20 r 13.00 +0.03 Balanc 18.93 +0.26 BalancedK 18.93 +0.26

NA +2.4 +3.5 +3.1 +1.3 +3.7 +5.1 +0.9 +1.6 +17.2 +2.6 +0.3 +8.4 +3.2 +8.5 +3.0 +3.0 +3.0 +3.0 +3.2 +3.3 +3.3 +3.3 +3.3 +3.4 +3.2 +3.3 +3.2 +3.2 +5.7 +3.8 +2.8 +4.5 +4.6

BlueChGr 45.78 CapAp 27.77 CpInc r 8.90 Contra 73.33 ContraK 73.32 DisEq 22.14 DivIntl 25.82 DivrsIntK r 25.79 DivGth 27.23 Eq Inc 42.62 EQII 18.07 Fidel 33.16 FltRateHi r 9.70 GNMA 11.91 GovtInc 10.88 GroCo 89.22 GroInc 19.08 GrowthCoK89.19 HighInc r 8.78 IntBd 10.99 IntmMu 10.59 IntlDisc 27.98 InvGrBd 11.86 InvGB 7.85 LgCapVal 10.38 LowP r 37.22 LowPriK r 37.21 Magelln 67.14 MidCap 27.98 MuniInc 13.36 NwMkt r 16.38 OTC 56.61 100Index 9.36 Puritn 18.57 PuritanK 18.57 SAllSecEqF11.88 SCmdtyStrt 8.21 SCmdtyStrF 8.23 SrsIntGrw 10.49 SrsIntVal 7.90 SrInvGrdF 11.87 STBF 8.53 StratInc 10.96 TotalBd 11.09

+1.09 +0.55 +0.06 +1.49 +1.49 +0.53 +0.65 +0.64 +0.67 +0.86 +0.39 +0.68 +0.01 -0.03 +2.03 +0.41 +2.03 +0.04 -0.02 -0.02 +0.77 -0.03 -0.02 +0.23 +0.83 +0.82 +1.54 +0.66 -0.03 +0.11 +1.45 +0.22 +0.26 +0.26 +0.27 +0.10 +0.10 +0.29 +0.20 -0.03 +0.02 -0.02

+7.9 +12.8 +5.2 +8.7 +8.8 +2.9 +1.2 +1.2 +5.3 +3.8 +4.4 +6.5 +2.0 +1.7 +1.7 +10.3 +5.0 +10.4 +4.2 +2.2 +2.6 +1.3 +2.6 +3.0 +3.1 +4.2 +4.2 +6.8 +5.0 +4.1 +5.9 +3.5 +6.1 +5.4 +5.5 +5.8 -8.4 -8.2 +3.8 -2.2 +2.7 +1.0 +3.3 +2.9

USBI 11.88 -0.03 +2.0 Value 66.63 +1.59 +5.0 Fidelity Spartan: 500IdxInv 46.80 +1.07 +5.6 500Idx I 46.80 +1.07 +5.6 Fidelity Spart Adv: ExMktAd r 37.07 +0.86 +5.7 500IdxAdv 46.80 +1.07 +5.6 TotMktAd r 38.02 +0.87 +5.6 USBond I 11.88 -0.03 +2.0 First Eagle: GlblA 45.63 +0.84 +1.1 OverseasA 20.48 +0.36 +0.6 Forum Funds: AbsStrI r 11.17 -0.01 +1.1 Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA p 12.51 -0.04 +4.7 FoundAl p 9.99 +0.18 +1.1 GrwthA p 46.89 +0.96 +5.0 HYTFA p 10.74 -0.02 +6.5 IncomA p 2.08 +0.03 +2.3 RisDvA p 35.65 +0.62 +2.4 StratInc p 10.21 +0.04 +3.3 USGovA p 6.88 +1.0 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv 12.43 +0.12 +2.6 IncmeAd 2.06 +0.02 +2.4 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.10 +0.03 +2.0 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 20.20 +0.36 +2.0 Frank/Temp Temp A: GlBd A p 12.47 +0.12 +2.4 GrwthA p 16.15 +0.44 -0.9 WorldA p 13.61 +0.34 -0.9 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 12.49 +0.12 +2.3 GE Elfun S&S: US Eqty 41.04 +0.93 +5.9 GMO Trust III: Quality 22.82 +0.41 +4.1 GMO Trust IV: IntlIntrVl 17.89 +0.44 -5.4 GMO Trust VI:

EmgMkts r 10.12 +0.28 Quality 22.83 +0.41 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 6.99 +0.03 MidCapV 35.31 +0.75 Harbor Funds: Bond 12.64 -0.02 CapApInst 40.32 +0.91 Intl r 53.62 +1.58 Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 30.17 +0.76 Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 38.90 +0.96 Hussman Funds: StrGrowth 11.81 -0.12 IVA Funds: Wldwide I r15.14 +0.24 Invesco Funds A: Chart p 16.58 +0.30 CmstkA 15.77 +0.37 EqIncA 8.58 +0.13 GrIncA p 19.15 +0.39 HYMuA 9.86 -0.02 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 22.71 +0.45 AssetStA p 23.45 +0.46 AssetStrI r 23.67 +0.47 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 12.00 -0.03 JPMorgan R Cl: CoreBond 12.00 -0.03 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 11.99 -0.03 HighYld 7.72 +0.04 IntmTFBd 11.33 -0.02 ShtDurBd 10.98 USLCCrPls 20.83 +0.52 Janus T Shrs: PrkMCVal T20.45 +0.37 John Hancock Cl 1: LSBalanc 12.66 +0.17 LSGrwth 12.39 +0.22 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 17.31 +0.43

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Longleaf Partners: Partners 26.79 +0.67 +0.5 Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 14.29 +0.09 +4.7 StrInc C 14.65 +0.13 +3.2 LSBondR 14.23 +0.09 +4.6 StrIncA 14.57 +0.13 +3.5 Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdY 12.19 +0.03 +4.1 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 10.81 +0.26 +2.9 BdDebA p 7.72 +0.03 +3.8 ShDurIncA p4.57 +2.5 Lord Abbett C: ShDurIncC t 4.60 +2.2 Lord Abbett F: ShtDurInco 4.57 +0.01 +2.5 MFS Funds A: TotRA 14.30 +0.18 +3.0 ValueA 23.22 +0.51 +4.1 MFS Funds I: ValueI 23.33 +0.51 +4.2 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 6.64 +0.16 +0.2 MergerFd 15.73 +0.06 +0.9 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.63 -0.02 +4.3 TotRtBdI 10.63 -0.02 +4.4 MorganStanley Inst: MCapGrI 34.61 +0.66 +5.1 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 27.19 +0.50 +0.2 GlbDiscZ 27.55 +0.50 +0.3 SharesZ 20.38 +0.37 +2.2 Neuberger&Berm Fds: GenesInst 47.13 +0.95 +1.5 Northern Funds: HiYFxInc 7.07 NA Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 27.65 +0.48 +2.2 Intl I r 16.61 +0.48 +0.4 Oakmark 44.26 +1.05 +6.2 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 6.98 +0.07 +2.9

GlbSMdCap13.87 +0.31 Oppenheimer A: DvMktA p 30.17 +0.72 GlobA p 54.40 +1.45 GblStrIncA 4.12 +0.01 IntBdA p 6.22 +0.03 MnStFdA 34.16 +0.73 RisingDivA 16.10 +0.39 S&MdCpVl29.02 +0.65 Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 14.55 +0.35 S&MdCpVl24.60 +0.56 Oppenheimer C&M: RisingDvC p14.50 +0.35 Oppenheimer Roch: RcNtMuA 7.36 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 29.86 +0.72 IntlBdY 6.22 +0.03 IntGrowY 25.98 +0.69 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 11.24 -0.02 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AlAsetAut r 10.31 +0.08 AllAsset 11.76 +0.08 ComodRR 6.18 +0.07 DivInc 11.66 +0.01 EmgMkCur10.03 +0.10 EmMkBd 11.55 +0.08 HiYld 9.09 +0.04 InvGrCp 10.74 -0.03 LowDu 10.45 RealRtnI 12.34 -0.07 ShortT 9.81 TotRt 11.24 -0.02 PIMCO Funds A: RealRtA p 12.34 -0.07 TotRtA 11.24 -0.02 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 11.24 -0.02 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 11.24 -0.02 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 11.24 -0.02

+3.0 +2.9 +0.7 +3.8 +1.9 +6.2 +3.0 -2.1 +2.6 -2.4 +2.7 +10.6 +3.1 +2.2 +1.8 +4.8 +3.7 +2.9 -4.7 +5.5 +1.8 +4.6 +4.0 +5.7 +2.8 +5.8 +1.8 +4.9 +5.6 +4.8 +4.5 +4.8 +4.9

Perm Port Funds: Permannt 46.87 +0.56 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 38.83 +0.86 Price Funds: BlChip 42.57 +0.99 CapApp 21.62 +0.27 EmMktS 28.79 +0.66 EqInc 23.85 +0.53 EqIndex 35.58 +0.81 Growth 35.30 +0.80 HlthSci 38.15 +0.74 HiYield 6.56 +0.02 InstlCpG 17.51 +0.41 IntlBond 9.72 +0.02 Intl G&I 11.36 +0.30 IntlStk 12.53 +0.34 MidCap 55.59 +1.19 MCapVal 22.20 +0.47 N Asia 14.69 +0.28 New Era 38.73 +1.11 N Horiz 33.90 +0.69 N Inc 9.75 -0.02 OverS SF 7.30 +0.19 R2010 15.54 +0.20 R2015 12.01 +0.18 R2020 16.56 +0.28 R2025 12.08 +0.23 R2030 17.28 +0.34 R2035 12.19 +0.26 R2040 17.33 +0.38 ShtBd 4.83 SmCpStk 33.39 +0.79 SmCapVal 35.89 +0.84 SpecIn 12.47 +0.05 Value 23.22 +0.53 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 13.11 +0.34 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 10.98 +0.27 PremierI r 18.81 +0.43 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 37.30 +0.85 S&P Sel 20.66 +0.47

+1.7 +0.8 +10.1 +4.8 +1.0 +4.0 +5.4 +10.9 +17.0 +4.2 +8.6 +0.8 -1.4 +2.0 +5.4 +3.8 +5.6 -7.9 +9.2 +2.1 -0.3 +3.5 +3.7 +4.1 +4.3 +4.5 +4.5 +4.6 +1.3 +6.8 +4.1 +3.0 +3.0 +3.6 +2.0 +1.6 +5.5 +5.6

Scout Funds: Intl 28.29 +0.70 Sequoia 152.33 +2.61 TCW Funds: TotRetBdI 9.87 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 16.31 +0.38 Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 23.83 +0.52 IntValue I 24.37 +0.53 Tweedy Browne: GblValue 22.40 +0.35 Vanguard Admiral: BalAdml 22.59 +0.28 CAITAdm 11.59 -0.03 CpOpAdl 70.17 +1.62 EMAdmr r 31.83 +0.79 Energy 101.63 +3.05 EqInAdm n 46.97 +1.04 ExtdAdm 41.53 +0.97 500Adml 121.70 +2.77 GNMA Ad 11.07 GrwAdm 34.19 +0.75 HlthCr 56.62 +0.78 HiYldCp 5.75 +0.02 InfProAd 28.84 -0.17 ITBdAdml 11.94 -0.05 ITsryAdml 11.75 -0.04 IntGrAdm 52.57 +1.49 ITAdml 14.23 -0.03 ITGrAdm 10.13 -0.03 LtdTrAd 11.17 LTGrAdml 10.48 -0.14 LT Adml 11.62 -0.03 MCpAdml 93.24 +2.14 MuHYAdm 11.07 -0.02 PrmCap r 65.89 +1.51 ReitAdm r 89.56 +1.99 STsyAdml 10.77 STBdAdml 10.62 -0.01 ShtTrAd 15.93 STIGrAd 10.72 -0.01 SmCAdm 34.93 +0.86 TtlBAdml 11.07 -0.04

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TStkAdm 32.90 WellslAdm 56.76 WelltnAdm 55.56 Windsor 45.07 WdsrIIAd 47.91 Vanguard Fds: CapOpp 30.38 DivdGro 15.82 Energy 54.13 EqInc 22.40 Explr 74.68 GNMA 11.07 HYCorp 5.75 HlthCre 134.18 InflaPro 14.68 IntlGr 16.52 IntlVal 26.27 ITIGrade 10.13 LifeCon 16.59 LifeGro 21.81 LifeMod 19.75 LTIGrade 10.48 Morg 18.87 MuInt 14.23 PrmcpCor 13.78 Prmcp r 63.50 SelValu r 19.10 STAR 19.38 STIGrade 10.72 StratEq 19.24 TgtRetInc 11.83 TgRe2010 23.15 TgtRe2015 12.69 TgRe2020 22.38 TgtRe2025 12.67 TgRe2030 21.63 TgtRe2035 12.94 TgtRe2040 21.21 TgtRe2045 13.32 USGro 19.63 Wellsly 23.43 Welltn 32.17 Wndsr 13.35 WndsII 26.98

+0.75 +0.32 +0.77 +1.06 +1.08

+5.6 +3.0 +3.4 +4.6 +4.7

+0.71 +0.34 +1.63 +0.49 +1.83

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Vanguard Idx Fds: MidCpIstPl101.58 +2.32 TotIntAdm r21.64 +0.57 TotIntlInst r86.56 +2.28 TotIntlIP r 86.58 +2.28 500 121.67 +2.77 MidCap 20.54 +0.47 SmCap 34.90 +0.87 TotBnd 11.07 -0.04 TotlIntl 12.94 +0.34 TotStk 32.89 +0.75 Vanguard Instl Fds: BalInst 22.60 +0.29 DevMkInst 8.29 +0.23 ExtIn 41.53 +0.98 GrwthIst 34.19 +0.75 InfProInst 11.75 -0.07 InstIdx 120.91 +2.75 InsPl 120.92 +2.75 InsTStPlus 29.78 +0.68 MidCpIst 20.60 +0.48 SCInst 34.93 +0.87 TBIst 11.07 -0.04 TSInst 32.91 +0.76 ValueIst 21.06 +0.49 Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl 100.53 +2.29 MidCpIdx 29.42 +0.67 STBdIdx 10.62 -0.01 TotBdSgl 11.07 -0.04 TotStkSgl 31.76 +0.73 Western Asset: CorePlus I 11.36 -0.01 Yacktman Funds: Fund p 17.99 +0.33 Focused 19.21 +0.33

+4.6 -0.9 -0.9 -0.9 +5.5 +4.5 +4.6 +1.9 -0.9 +5.5 +4.2 -1.5 +5.6 +7.8 +4.4 +5.6 +5.6 +5.6 +4.6 +4.6 +2.0 +5.6 +3.5 +5.6 +4.6 +0.8 +2.0 +5.6 +3.7 +2.7 +2.3


E4

THE BULLETIN â&#x20AC;˘ THURSDAY, JUNE 7, 2012

M 

If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact Ashley Brothers at 541-383-0323, email business@bendbulletin.com or click on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Submit an Eventâ&#x20AC;? at www.bendbulletin.com. Please allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication.

B C 

TODAY BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL DESCHUTES BUSINESS NETWORKERS CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7 a.m.; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541610-9125. DECISION MAKING AND PROBLEM SOLVING: Management seminar; registration required; $85; 8 a.m.noon; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7290 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu. GETTING THE MOST OUT OF SCHWAB.COM: Registration required; free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794 or luiz.soutomaior@schwab.com. PUBLIC MEETING OF THE CENTRAL OREGON AREA COMMISSION ON TRANSPORTATION EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE: Free; 2:30-3:30 p.m.; City of Redmond Public Works Training Room, 243 East Antler Ave.; for more information, contact Andrew Spreadborough, 541-5043306. HOUSING CENTERS OF NEIGHBORIMPACT REALTORS OPEN HOUSE: Free; 4-6 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 20310 Empire Ave., Suite A110, Bend; 541-3187506 x309.

FRIDAY MAIL MERGE USING WORD, OUTLOOK AND EXCEL: Registration required; $59; 9 a.m.-noon; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. CENTRAL OREGON REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT CLUB: Free; 11 a.m.; ServiceMaster Clean, 20806 Sockeye Place, Bend; 541-610-4006 or bobbleile@windermere.com. FREE TAX FRIDAY: Free tax return reviews; schedule an appointment at 541-385-9666 or www.myzoomtax .com; free; 2-4 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666.

SATURDAY FILE IT, FIND IT: Registration required; $59; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Madras Campus, 1170 E. Ashwood Road, Madras; 541-383-7270 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit; registration required; contact 541447-6384 or happyhourtraining. com; $35; 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www .happyhourtraining.com. QUICKBOOKS PRO BEGINNING: Register by June 6; $59; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; COCC - Crook County Open Campus, 510 S.E. Lynn Blvd., Prineville; 541-383-7270 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu.

MONDAY FOOD CODE UPDATES: Information session for restaurant owners and managers on new health department regulations; 2-3 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 866-697-8717 or http://helpingrestaurants.com. FORECLOSURE CLASS: 5:30-7:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 20310 Empire Ave., Suite A110, Bend; 541318-7506; call 541-318-7506, ext. 309 to reserve a seat. FORECLOSURE PREVENTION CLASS: Learn about NeighborImpactâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Housing Center tools and services, which can assist individuals struggling to pay their mortgages; free; 5:30-7:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 20310 Empire Ave., Suite A110, Bend; 541-318-7506, ext. 109, karenb@ neighborimpact.org or www .homeownershipcenter.org.

TUESDAY BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL HIGH DESERT CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7:15 a.m.; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541-420-7377. HANDS ON â&#x20AC;&#x201D; WINDOWS 7: For people age 50 and older; bring a laptop with Windows 7 on it to each class; $29 or $39; 10 a.m.-noon; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-388-1133. HOMEBUYING CLASS: Registration required; free; 5:30-9:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 2303 S.W. First St., Redmond; 541-318-7506, ext. 109.

WEDNESDAY BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL BEND CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7 a.m.; Bend Senior Center,

1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541749-0789. INDISPENSABLE COMMUNICATION SKILLS: Business success program; reservations recommended; free; 7:30 a.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-382-3221 or www.bend chamber.org. HOMEBUYING CLASS: Registration required; free; 5:30-9:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 2303 S.W. First St., Redmond; 541-318-7506, ext. 109.

THURSDAY June 14 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL DESCHUTES BUSINESS NETWORKERS CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7 a.m.; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541610-9125. TOWN HALL FORUM: After a brief presentation, Deschutes County Commissioners Tammy Baney, Tony DeBone and Alan Unger will answer questions about Deschutes County government.; registration required; $30 for members and $45 for nonmembers; 7:30 a.m.; Bend Golf and Country Club, 61045 Country Club Drive; www.bendchamber .org. SEMINAR TO EXPLAIN UNCLAIMED PROPERTY REPORTING: Local businesses and organizations are invited to learn more about reporting unclaimed property to the state at a half-day seminar; registration required; contact Carolyn Harris at 503-986-5290 or visit http:// oregonstatelands.us/dsl; free; 8:30 a.m.-noon; Deschutes County administration building, 1300 N.W. Wall St., Bend. CENTRAL OREGON FORUM DISCUSSING HOUSING FOR PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES: 9:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; contact Rich Zebrowski, Abilitree Supported Living Program manager, 541-3888103 ext. 203 or richz@abilitree.org. INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT FOR AN UNPREDICTABLE WORLD: Registration required; free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794 or luiz.soutomaior@ schwab.com. LIVE CONTRACTOR EDUCATION COURSE: Registration required; class continues June 15-16; $299; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Redmond campus, 2030 S.E. College Loop, Redmond; 541-383-7290 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu.

FRIDAY June 15 CENTRAL OREGON REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT CLUB: Free; 11 a.m.; ServiceMaster Clean, 20806 Sockeye Place, Bend; 541-610-4006 or bobbleile@windermere.com. FREE TAX FRIDAY: Free tax return reviews; schedule an appointment at 541-385-9666 or www.myzoomtax .com; free; 2-4 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666.

Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit; registration required; contact 541447-6384 or happyhourtraining .com; $35; 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happy hourtraining.com. JOB FAIR: Central Oregon Community College hosts a job fair aimed at finding part-time instructors to teach credit and noncredit classes in Madras, Deer Ridge Correctional Institution, Prineville and Redmond; bring a rĂŠsumĂŠ and copy of college transcripts, if available; 4:30-6:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Redmond campus, 2030 S.E. College Loop, Redmond; 541383-7270 or www.jobs.cocc.edu.

WEDNESDAY June 20 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL BEND CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7 a.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541749-0789.

THURSDAY June 21 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL DESCHUTES BUSINESS NETWORKERS CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7 a.m.; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541610-9125. DESIGNING HEALTHFUL, LIVABLE COMMUNITIES: Dr. Richard Jackson, pediatrician and chair of Environmental Health Sciences at UCLA, will speak on how the built environment, transportation choices, architecture and urban planning affect health, especially in children; tickets can be purchased through City Club of Central Oregon; $20 includes lunch; 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-815-3951 or info@ cityclubco.com. GETTING THE MOST OUT OF SCHWAB.COM: Registration required; free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794 or luiz.soutomaior@schwab.com.

FRIDAY CENTRAL OREGON REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT CLUB: Free; 11 a.m.; ServiceMaster Clean, 20806 Sockeye Place, Bend; 541-610-4006 or bobbleile@windermere.com. FREE TAX FRIDAY: Free tax return reviews; schedule an appointment at 541-385-9666 or www.myzoomtax .com; free; 2-4 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666.

MONDAY June 25

CLEAN UP AND SPEED UP YOUR PC 2: Registration required; $59; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc .edu.

MONDAY

TUESDAY

June 18

June 26

TRACTOR SAFETY TRAINING: A three-day Central Oregon Farm and Tractor Safety Training and Certification Course, sponsored by the OSU Extension Service; open to ages 14-17; registration required before June 8; class continues June 19-20; $50; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-548-2711.

BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL HIGH DESERT CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7:15 a.m.; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541-420-7377. WILL THE REAL INDEPENDENT CONTRACTORS PLEASE STAND UP?: Kurt Barker and Jon Napier from Karnopp Petersen LLP and Evan Dickens from Jones & Roth will address questions about independent contracting; registration required; $25 for members and $45 for nonmembers; 11 a.m.; Bend Golf and Country Club, 61045 Country Club Drive; www.bendchamber.org.

June 16

TUESDAY June 19 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL HIGH DESERT CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7:15 a.m.; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541-420-7377. BREAKFAST WITH THE CHAMBER: Crooked River Ranch-Terrebonne Chamber of Commerce meeting; open to the public; free; 8 a.m.; Diegoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Spirited Kitchen, 447 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-923-2679 or www.crrchamber.com. VISIT BEND BOARD MEETING: Open to the public; 8 a.m.; Bend Visitor Center, 750 N.W. Lava Road; 541-382-8048 or valerie@visitbend .com. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the

Continued from E1 Mt. Bachelor ski area has proposed a zipline course from Pine Marten Lodge to the West Village Lodge as part of its expansion plan, according to a draft environmental impact statement. A decision on the expansion plan is expected early next year.

Wide appeal The zip line craze is being fueled by a resurgence in the popularity of outdoor activities, greater availability of insurance and cheaper construction costs for zip line platforms due to the housing slump, according to builders and operators. The prices to ride vary widely: It costs $10 to ride an 800-foot zip line at a KOA camp in Santa Paula, Calif., for instance, but $112 to ride two zip lines at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park. In addition, builders and operators point out, zip lines have wide appeal to both young and old. The only physical demand is the climb up the steps of the platforms, where guests wearing harnesses are hooked to a pulley that allows them to travel along the zip linesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; steel cable, with typical speeds reaching 35 to 45 mph and faster. The most advanced zip lines have built-in brakes. On the basic models, riders must slow themselves with a gloved hand.

Fans ... and foes Like roller skating and paintball battles, the promise of an adrenaline rush draws many first-time riders. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I tried it because going to the movies and going bowling is getting boring,â&#x20AC;? Tyler Montague, 21, a graphic design intern from Huntington Beach, Calif., said after a three-hour tour at Action Zipline Tours in the mountains near Big Bear Lake in California.

Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times

Andrea Grieve celebrates her third wedding anniversery with a zip line excursion in Big Bear, Calif., in March.

Other riders say they try a zip line once â&#x20AC;&#x201D; just to check it off their before-you-die bucket list. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m 64 years old, and I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll do it again,â&#x20AC;? John Rockwood, a retiree from Buffalo, N.Y., said after joining his wife, Julia, on the Big Bear zip line. Not everyone is thrilled by zip lines â&#x20AC;&#x201D; especially in areas where critics say proposed routes can spoil scenic views or disturb wildlife. Near Big Sur, for instance, activists are fighting a proposed zip line in Jacks Peak County Park. And some residents of Los Angelesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Venice Beach, where a zip line has been proposed, have expressed concern about safety and noise from screaming patrons.

Safety issues Zip lines have become such a boom industry, particularly in California, that a private group is setting new voluntary safety standards for these rides. The guidelines are being written by Pennsylvania-based ASTM Inc., formerly known as the American Society for Testing and Materials. The group has previously drafted safety rules for helmets, medical devices and steel products. The work began two years ago, and officials estimate that the voluntary rules could be drafted in the next year or two. In the meantime, zip line operators said they are relying primarily on safety standards

written by the Association for Challenge Course Technology, an Illinois group that began writing guidelines in 1994 primarily for zip lines and rope courses used by churches, Boy Scouts and schools, among other private groups. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everyone agrees that new standards are a good thing,â&#x20AC;? Teske said. No government agency keeps records of zip line injury rates, but zip line operators and insurance providers say injuries are typically severe but very rare. A worker was killed and another man injured last year while making modifications to a zip line in Hawaii, home to more than a dozen zip lines. In 2010, actor Hugh Jackman injured his eye when he rode a zip line for an Oprah Winfrey television special in Australia and ran into lighting gear. But most zip line injuries, say zip line operators, take place on lines built by amateurs who ignored safety requirements. Since the craze took off a few years ago, the number of insurance firms in the country willing to write policies for commercial zip line operations has grown from about two to 10, said Robert Monaghan, executive vice president at HibbsHallmark & Co., a Texas insurance firm that has written zip line policies for several years. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Insurance is reasonable if they build it properly, train their staff properly and subject themselves to third-party inspections,â&#x20AC;? he said.

June 22

FILE IT, FIND IT: Registration required; class continues June 27; $59; 1-4 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc .edu. PHOTOSHOP ELEMENTS, BEGINNING: Registration required; contact http://noncredit.cocc.edu or 541-383-7270; $59; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541383-7700.

SATURDAY

Zip lines

WEDNESDAY June 27 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL BEND CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7 a.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541749-0789. THE BULLETIN BUSINESS AFTER HOURS: Registration required; 5 p.m.; Bend Golf and Country Club, 61045 Country Club Drive; www .bendchamber.org.

ONLINE SECURITY PROBLEMS

Google warns Gmail users of state-sponsored attack By David Pierson Los Angeles Times

BEIJING â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Google Inc. is warning some users of its Gmail service that their computers could have been compromised by a state-sponsored cyberattack. The search engine company alerted the users with a pink banner on their email service, explaining the company wanted to thwart third parties from accessing their accounts. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If you see this warning, it does not necessarily mean that your account has been hijacked,â&#x20AC;? Eric Grosse, Googleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s vice president for security engineering, said in a blog post. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It just means that we believe you may be a target, of phishing or malware for example, and that you should take immediate steps to secure your account.â&#x20AC;? Grosse said Google could not explain how it knew the accounts were being compromised without aiding hackers, but added, â&#x20AC;&#x153;our de-

tailed analysis â&#x20AC;&#x201D; as well as victim reports â&#x20AC;&#x201D; strongly suggest the involvement of states or groups that are state-sponsored.â&#x20AC;? Though Grosse did not name China, the move immediately brought the country to mind because of its suspected cyberhacking capabilities and massive online censorship apparatus. China was accused of hacking Google and several other foreign companies in 2010. Google shuttered its China-based search engine shortly thereafter. Grosse suggested users protect their Gmail accounts by signing up for a verification system in which Google would send a new account password through mobile text messaging. But micro-bloggers in China tweeted Wednesday that the process was not secure because text messages were widely believed to be monitored by the Chinese authorities.

Some passwords compromised, LinkedIn says LinkedIn Corp., owner of the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s biggest professional-networking website, on Wednesday confirmed reports that some user passwords were compromised in a security breach. The Mountain View, Calif.-based company apologized to customers in a blog post and said that members will know if their accounts were affected because their passwords will no longer be valid. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We take the security of our members very seriously,â&#x20AC;? the company said. The service has more than 160 million users. LinkedIn said on its Twitter site earlier Wednesday that it was investigating reports of stolen passwords. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Bloomberg News

N  R

PERMITS City of Bend

Tucker H. Spohr, 19907 Ashwood, $103,214 Floyd C. Antonsen, 3219 N.E. Spring Creek, $191,878 Daniel B. McNairy, 61177 River Bluff Trail, $150,996 Adam Albright, 321 N.W. Drake, $315,409 Brooks Resources Corporation, 2330 N.W. Frazer, $182,657 Brookswood Bend LLC, 19717 S.W. Aspen Meadows, $197,716

Long Term Bend Investors LLC, 60959 S.E. Miles, $178,603 Brookswood Bend LLC, 19722 S.W. Aspen Meadows, $289,475 Bridges at Shadow Glen LLC, 20884 S.E. Tamar, $235,775 Grandmaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s House of Central Oregon, 1600 N.E. Rumgay, $190,000 Bend Equity Group LLC, 2489, N.E. Saranac, $149,123 City of Redmond

Maynard Alves Land and Livestock Redmond LLC, 601 East Antler Ave., $109,744 Church of Christ of Latter Day

Saints, 450 S.W. Rimrock Way, $195,000 Deschutes County

Mt. Bachelor Inc., 13001 Century Drive, Bend, $1,280,000 Ronald D. Faris, 69025 Goodrich Road, Sisters, $118,278.28 James and Brenda Allen, 18830 Macalpine Loop, Bend, $435,231.06 Ross Built, 60705 Billadeau Road, Bend, $448,376.94 Barry Helm Revocable Trust, 61597 Hosmer Lake Drive, Bend, $570,682.73


H EALTH

Health Events, F2 People, F2 Nutrition, F2

Money, F3 Medicine, F4-5 Fitness, F6

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, JUNE 7, 2012

F www.bendbulletin.com/health

MONEY

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Martita Marx, who has osteoarthritis in her hands, shows the braces she wears that help to correct her hand form for better joint health.

Gardening sows pain for hands • Use proper tools, movement to avoid pain and injury By Markian Hawryluk The Bulletin

Just as soon as winter begins to loosen up its grip on Central Oregon, gardeners emerge from their homes eager to make the most of a short growing season. MEDICINE Yet for many, the tasks of gardening can become painful and frustrating. Individuals with arthritis or other types of hand or wrist conditions often find gardening to be painful. According to Trish Dyer, a hand therapist at St. Charles Bend, arthritis doesn’t have to be a thorn in your side. “If you have weakness or if you have a joint that’s painful and unstable, then it’s hard to do anything,” she said. “I’m looking at, this is what you usually would do and how can I help you get back to that level of activity.” See Hands / F5

Broken

independence • Medicare reimbursement policy linked to increase in wheelchair breakdowns over past 5 years By Markian Hawryluk The Bulletin

O

Workouts, times 2 (or even 3) By Courtney Rubin New York Times News Service

NEW YORK — One of the most popular sprints among New York’s female fitness fanatics isn’t on any race calendar: it’s the two-minute 350-yard dash from a class at Barry’s Bootcamp in Chelsea to one at Flywheel Sports in the Flatiron district. Another popular sprint: FITNESS the one-miler from Flywheel in Flatiron to 23rd Street and the Hudson River for Holly Rilinger’s Training Camp. A third sisterhood of traveling panters ducks out of cooldowns at SoulCycle on the Upper West Side and scuttles down three steep staircases to make a barre-method toning class at Pure Yoga next door. These women (and nearly all of them are women) who sweat through double and occasionally triple workouts at different boutique fitness outfits in the same day aren’t major-league athletes or required to look good for a living. Most are professionals with full-time jobs, yet they manage to spend some two hours a day — and upward of $500 a month — exercising. (By comparison, a membership at the upscale Equinox gym chain ranges from $149 to $183 a month.) See Exercise / F6

Photos by Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Shelly and Jim Palmer take their dog Sophie on a walk at Hollinshead Park in Bend on Monday. Wheelchair breakdowns, which are becoming more common, represent a traumatic loss of independence for individuals like Palmer, who rely on their chairs for mobility.

ver the past seven years, Shelly Palmer’s wheelchair has needed two new motors, eight batteries, five tires and a retrofitted right armrest. The wheelchair has stopped working at times, requiring emergency on-site repairs from her vendor. If it were a car, it might have qualified for replacement under Oregon’s lemon law. But as far as wheelchairs go, Palmer’s ride is one of the more reliable. She doesn’t abuse it nearly as much as people who rely on their chairs as surrogate vehicles. “The quality of my life is greatly affected by my ability to interact with and contribute to my friends and the community,” the 62-year-old Bend woman said. “Without the use of a dependable wheelchair, I would

not be able to enjoy the important aspects of my life.” Palmer has used a wheelchair for 17 years, allowing her to get to the library, to go shopping, visit friends or attend the theater despite her multiple sclerosis. She doesn’t see herself as wheelchair-bound or confined to a chair; her chair has come to represent her independence. “At the beginning of a person’s disability, it’s an enemy, because it’s a symbol of a loss of freedom,” she said. “But it is just part of me now. I don’t really think of myself as being separate from it.” When a wheelchair breaks down, however, it can lead to feelings of helplessness and anxiety. A nonfunctioning wheelchair no longer empowers the individual — it represents a renewed loss of mobility and freedom. “My wheelchair is my legs,” Palmer said. “It just has to be trustworthy.” See Wheelchair / F3

Grass-fed beef called the healthier choice By Anne Aurand The Bulletin

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Mike Duggan, owner of DD Ranch, grazes about 180 head of cattle — Port Orford with red Angus cross — on 200 acres of his property and 350 acres of rented property near Terrebonne. DD Ranch is one of several regional ranches that produces grass-fed beef from cattle that exclusively eat grass and forage.

nutritional content, cattle should spend their entire lives eating only grass and pasture diets, according to the study. In other words, a mostly grass-fed cow isn’t as good as an exclusively grass-fed cow.

Grass-fed beef is nutritionally superior to its more prevalent and less expensive grain-fed counterpart, according to research and nutrition experts. Grass to grain Grass-fed beef is lower in Cows traditionoverall fat, has a NUTRITION ally foraged on healthier combinagrass from pastures. tion of fatty acids, But after World War II, this has more vitamins and has country had a surplus of corn, more cancer-fighting antioxiallowing the development of dants than grain-fed beef, acthe feedlot system in which cording to the summary of a cattle could eat grain and gain Nutrition Journal article from weight faster, said Scott Dug2010 that summarized three gan, an agricultural science decades worth of research. teacher at Sisters High School. But to maximize the favorThe system kept farmers from able fatty acid profile, includgoing bankrupt and helped ing the ratio of omega-6 fatty feed a growing nation. acids to omega-3 fatty acids, See Cows / F2 and to guarantee the elevated

HEALTH HIGHLIGHTS YOU KNOW THE GRILL: Tips on how to reduce cancer-causing agents in grilled meats, F2

GROWTH SPURT: Analysis projects medical costs will grow 7.5 percent next year, F3

RISKY BUSINESS: Study finds safety measures usually lead to individuals increasing risks, F5


F2

THE BULLETIN â&#x20AC;˘ THURSDAY, JUNE 7, 2012

H  E  Editorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s note: Ongoing health classes and support groups now appear online only. See www.bendbulletin.com/ healthclasses and www .bendbulletin.com/ supportgroups. To submit an entry for either list, see instructions below.

CLASSES HEALTHY BEGINNINGS SCREENINGS: Free health screenings for ages 0-5; Friday; Bend; call for location, 541-383-6357. HORMONE BALANCE SEMINAR: Community education program on hormone basics for men and women, sponsored by Custom Care RX; $50 advance, $60 at the door; 8:30 a.m. registration, 9 a.m.-12 p.m. Saturday; St. Charles Bend, Education Center, 25000 Neff Road, Bend; 541-3893671, michelle@homecareiv.com or www.customcare-rx.com. HORMONE BALANCE SEMINAR FOR HEALTH CARE PROFESSIONALS: Sponsored by Custom Care RX; $80 advance, $90 at the door; 8:30 a.m. registration, 9 a.m.-12 p.m. Saturday; St. Charles Bend, Education Center, 25000 Neff Road, Bend; 541-3893671, michelle@homecareiv.com or www.customcare-rx.com. MEDICARE ABCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S AND Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: PacificSource Medicare presents a series on making informed decisions about Medicare; free; 4:30 p.m. today; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-330-2577. THE VASUDEVA EXPERIENCE: Yoga practice accompanied by music; $15 advance, $20 at the door; 7-9 p.m. Friday; Mandala Yoga Community, 55 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; mandalayogabend.com. TOWN HALL MEETING: The Central Oregon Health Council and Rep. Jason Conger discuss Oregonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s latest health care reform efforts and consumer impact; 6-9 p.m. Friday; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; rhenderson@ stcharleshealthcare.org or www.cohealthcouncil.org.

How to submit Health Events: Email event information to healthevents@ bendbulletin.com or click on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Submit an Eventâ&#x20AC;? at www.bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing class listings must be updated monthly and will appear at www.bendbulletin.com/ healthclasses. Contact: 541-383-0358. People: Email info about local people involved in health issues to healthevents@ bendbulletin.com. Contact: 541-383-0358.

P  A new Deschutes County School Based Health Center will be opening in Sisters to serve youth from birth to 20 years old. Services include physical exams, immunizations, vision, dental and sports physicals; fees are on a sliding scale. The public is invited to a groundbreaking for the new clinic 11 a.m. Friday in the McKenzie Meadows development, 1700 West McKinney Butte Road, Sisters. The clinic is expected to open in December.

N BETTER CHOICES

Marinating is 1 way to reduce cancer-causing agents in grilled meat What you grill and how you grill it can potentially increase your risk of cancer. When any kind of meat, poultry or fish is cooked at high temperatures â&#x20AC;&#x201D; especially well-done or charred â&#x20AC;&#x201D; cancercausing compounds called heterocyclic amines (HCAs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) form. These substances can theoretically damage DNA in ways that make cancer more likely, according to the American Institute for Cancer Research. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Diets that feature big portions of red and processed meat have been shown to make colorectal cancer more likely,â&#x20AC;? said American Institute for Cancer Research

registered dietitian Alice Bender. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Evidence that grilling itself is a risk factor is less strong, but it only makes sense to take some easy cancer-protective precautions.â&#x20AC;? The American Institute for Cancer Research offers four strategies to make backyard grilling a little bit healthier. â&#x20AC;˘ Reduce red meat. Grill more vegetables such as asparagus, onions, mushrooms, zucchini, eggplant and corn on the cob, or even fruits such as pineapples, apples or pears. Plant foods contain phytochemicals, many of which provide their own anti-cancer protection. â&#x20AC;˘ Marinate meat. Marinating a minimum of a half-hour in a solution that contains

Thinkstock

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Anne Aurand, The Bulletin

Cows

Local beef

Continued from F1 â&#x20AC;&#x153;We couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have all the fast-food businesses without it,â&#x20AC;? Duggan said. When exclusively grassfed, cattle can take up to two and a half years to reach slaughter weight, said Duggan, who also works summers on his parentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; DD Ranch near Terrebonne, where they raise grassfed cattle. Feeding cattle a higher-carbohydrate diet of grains â&#x20AC;&#x201D; mainly corn â&#x20AC;&#x201D; can fatten them to their slaughter weight in 18 months, Duggan said. Duggan said itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s unnatural. The altered diet for the cows carries along the food chain and affects the human diet. Since scientists have realized that the nutritional value of beef drops when cows are corn-fed, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been a movement toward returning to that traditional way of feeding cattle.

Nutritional differences Here are some of the nutritional differences, as explained by Shelley McGuire, a national spokeswoman for the American Society for Nutrition and associate professor of nutrition at Washington State University: Fat: Pasture-fed animals are leaner than grain-fed animals. The difference is reflected in the fat content of the muscle, the part we eat. Gram-for-gram, grass-fed beef has less fat, known as marbling, than beef from a feedlot. This also means lower saturated fats and cholesterol, a good idea for people at risk for obesity and heart disease. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Of course, flavor and juiciness are directly related to marbling, so thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a tradeoff here,â&#x20AC;? McGuire said. Calories: The difference in fat content is directly linked to lower-calorie content. A steak from a grass-fed animal will have fewer total calories and more protein than the same size steak from a corn-fed animal. Omega-3: (Fatty acids linked to improved heart health and mental health.)

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Mike Duggan looks over some of his grass-fed cattle. When possible, ask the producer about the herdâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s diet when seeking grass-fed beef.

Forages such as grass and clover generally have more omega-3 fatty acids than grains such as corn, McGuire said, so when cattle eat those things instead of grains, it results in greater omega-3 levels in the meat. But, she said, because thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s less fat in the grass-fed beef, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s probably a comparable amount of omega-3 in a similar size steak of both types. Fatty acid profiles (such as omega-3 vs. omega-6) vary depending on when the animal is slaughtered. Bottom line, she said: Beef shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be a personâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s primary source of omega-3. Try fish. Conjugated linoleic acid: (CLA is a potent anti-carcinogen found almost exclusively in ruminant fats, such as beef and butter.) Bacteria in the rumen â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a stomach compartment in a cow â&#x20AC;&#x201D; produce more CLA when cattle have access to grass fibers. So, grass-fed animals tend to have more CLA than their grain-fed counterparts. However, as with omega-3 fatty acids, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a bit of variability. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You may get slightly more CLA if you eat a grass-fed steak, but if you want to make sure you get enough CLA you should probably use butter instead of margarine on your potato,â&#x20AC;? McGuire said. Vitamin E: There is some evidence that vitamin E content of grass-fed animals is greater than that of grain-fed animals, although the literature is somewhat inconsistent, she said.

Buyer beware Grass-fed beef can be purchased in Central Oregon directly from ranches, at farmers markets, from some retail stores and centraloregonlocavore.com,

Forget the chewing gum: It may interfere with memory, study finds By Julie Deardorff Chicago Tribune

Having trouble remembering phone numbers or a professorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lecture? Try spitting out your chewing gum. A new British study suggests that chewing flavorless gum can interfere with short-term memory. The research, published in The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, challenges the prevailing notion that chewing gum â&#x20AC;&#x201D; at least when itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s flavored â&#x20AC;&#x201D; is a performance enhancer that can boost brain power. It also provides further proof that human beings are woefully inept at completing two tasks at once. Some argue that gum improves concentration by trig-

vinegar or lemon juice has been shown to reduce the formation of HCAs. Why marinades are protective is still unclear but acidity is believed to play a role. â&#x20AC;˘ Partially pre-cook in the microwave, oven or stove, to reduce the amount of time the meat sits on the grill exposed to high heat. â&#x20AC;˘ Cook slow on low. To reduce HCAs and PAHs, slow down the cooking time with a low flame and keep burning and charring to a minimum.

Thinkstock

New research from Cardiff University challenges the prevailing notion that chewing gum can boost brain power.

gering an increase in blood flow through the brain, said lead author Michail Kozlov of Cardiff University. But his team found that an oral activity such as gum chewing can interfere with the process thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s normally used to remember verbal content.

The researchers used classic short-term memory challenges, with and without gum. In one test, the volunteers were told to chew vigorously and asked to remember a sequence of randomly ordered letters, such as P, V, B, C, D, G, T. Another group repeated the experiment, but chewed naturally. In the second test, students chewed the flavorless gum and tried to pick up the missing item in the sequence. For example, 7 is missing from this list of digits ranging 1 through 9: 28149365. It didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t matter whether the volunteers chewed vigorously or naturally. In both cases, â&#x20AC;&#x153;chewing has an overall adverse affect on serial recall,â&#x20AC;? researchers wrote.

an online local food market. When a retailer sells beef that is marketed as grass-fed, it typically means that the cattle ate only grass or forage for their entire lifetime. But sometimes cattle that ate mostly grass but were fed grains during the final months of their lives are marketed as grassfed, said Duggan. Some in the industry call exclusively grass-fed cows â&#x20AC;&#x153;grass-finished,â&#x20AC;? indicating that the cow ate only grass and forage until the day of its slaughter and was never fed any grains. The distinction is important, Duggan said, because nutrition benefits of grass feeding can diminish if the cow is fed grain in those final months of life. If the meat doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t say grass-finished, ask the rancher or the retailer to specify if the cattle ever ate grain, he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Grass-finishedâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; and â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;grass-fedâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; are sort of interchangeable (terms) as far as the USDA is concerned,â&#x20AC;? said Jim Males, a professor of animal sciences at Oregon State University in Corvallis. Both imply, but donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t guarantee, an exclusively grass-fed cow. At this point, there is no federal requirement that regulates the term grass-fed, although there are some certifications â&#x20AC;&#x201D; through the U.S. Department of Agriculture or the Food Alliance, a Portlandbased voluntary certification program, for example â&#x20AC;&#x201D; that can help a consumer know the claim has been verified. Not all grass-finished beef producers go to the expense of getting certified. Correspondingly, not all beef marketed as grass-fed was actually grass-finished.

At Whole Foods Market in Bend, according to meat team leader Derek Rusaw, â&#x20AC;&#x153;grassfedâ&#x20AC;? label means the cattle were raised on grass only, and never fed grain. The store also sells â&#x20AC;&#x153;naturalâ&#x20AC;? beef, which is from pastureraised cattle that had grain introduced later in their lives. They are considered a â&#x20AC;&#x153;grainfinishedâ&#x20AC;? beef. Whole Foods sells organic beef, which was also â&#x20AC;&#x153;grassfinished,â&#x20AC;? Rusaw said. Organic doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t always mean grass-finished, Duggan said, although thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s often overlap. If a package of beef doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t claim the product was either grass-fed or grass-finished, the cow was grain-fed. Most beef purchased at grocery stores was finished on grains, which could be a mix of corn, barley and others. Of course, grass-fed beef will cost more than conventional beef, mostly due to increased costs of raising grassfed cattle. But Duggan said thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a market for the higher-priced product, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a viable business for his family. â&#x20AC;&#x153;People started asking for it. Also, when a cow is grain-fed in a feedlot, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s had hormones in-

Here are some regional ranches that retail grass-fed beef to interested consumers: â&#x20AC;˘ DD Ranch, Terrebonne, www.ddranch.net, 541-548-1432 â&#x20AC;˘ Celtic Cow Ranch, Paulina Mountains, www .celticcowranch.com/beef .htm, 541-350-3571 â&#x20AC;˘ Dancing Cow, Prineville, 541-306-0226 â&#x20AC;˘ Painted Hills Natural Beef, Fossil, www.painted hillsnaturalbeef.com, 541-763-2333 â&#x20AC;˘ Rudio Creek Ranch, Kimberly, www.rudio creekranch.com, 503-798-9731

jected and been fed antibiotics. People are asking for hormonefree beef,â&#x20AC;? Duggan said. DD Ranch cows are not given hormones or antibiotics, he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;People want health benefits and also have a problem with the feedlot confinement feeding issue,â&#x20AC;? he said, speaking of the environment in which feedlot cattle live. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That whole grass-finished market is growing every year,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Reporter: 541-383-0304, aaurand@bendbulletin.com

ATTENTION:

Oriental Rug Owners Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t send your valuable rugs out of town!

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541-382-9498

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Licensed â&#x20AC;˘ Bonded â&#x20AC;˘ Insured

Community Education Series

Member of WE HONOR VETERANS Program

ELDER ABUSE AWARENESS Friday, June 15, 2012 | 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM â&#x20AC;˘ What is elder abuse? â&#x20AC;˘ Who is at risk? â&#x20AC;˘ Ways to prevent elder abuse â&#x20AC;˘ Mandatory reporters; who, how and what happens

PRESENTERS: Deschutes County - Adult Protective Services Seating is limited. RSVP required. Call 541-382-5882 or email Lisa lisamh@partnersbend.org Location: Partners In Care; large conference room 2075 NE Wyatt Court, Bend

www.partnersbend.org

Hospice | Home Health | Hospice House | Transitions


THURSDAY, JUNE 7, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

F3

M New study on the privately insured cites higher cost of doctor visits, surgery and drugs

VITAL S T ATS Growth spurt An analysis by PricewaterhouseCoopers’ Health Research Institute projected that medical costs will grow by 7.5 percent in 2013. Inpatient care and physician fees represent the largest segment of private health insurance spending, each representing nearly a third of total costs. But outpatient spending is growing at a faster rate, according to the report.

Private health insurance benefits by spending category SEGMENT

2011 SHARE

AVERAGE GROWTH, 2007-2012

Inpatient

31%

8.2%

Outpatient

18%

10%

Drugs

15%

8%

Physicians

32%

5.4%

4%

6.1%

Other

Source: PricewaterhouseCoopers

Greg Cross / The Bulletin

INVESTING

Wheelchair

High court ruling may end rally for hospital securities

Continued from F1 But according to a recent analysis, power wheelchairs, particularly the type used by individuals with spinal cord injuries, are breaking down at an increasing rate. In an ongoing survey of more than 700 wheelchair-dependent spinal cord injury patients, from 2006 to 2011, 53 percent reported a breakdown requiring repairs in any six-month period. That’s up from 45 percent from 2004 to 2006. The researchers suggested the spike in problems represents a decrease in wheelchair quality stemming from changes in Medicare reimbursement policies and a lack of enforcement of standards. With lawmakers looking for ways to cut spending, rather than increase it, the trend is likely to continue.

By Brian Chappatta Bloomberg News

NEW YORK — Investors betting President Barack Obama’s health-care law will limit hospitals’ unpaid bills have helped fuel the best returns in the municipal market. But the Supreme Court may quash the rally this month. Hospital securities have returned 17 percent in the last year, the most of 10 industries in a Barclays Capital index tracking the $3.7 trillion market for local-government debt. The Supreme Court will probably decide sometime in June if the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act is constitutional. The law would force citizens to get insurance or pay a fine, the so-called individual mandate at the center of the case, and would expand state-run Medicaid programs to cover more of the uninsured. Some investors bought bonds of lower-rated hospitals, anticipating that the requirement would cut unpaid bills, said Bill Black of Invesco Ltd., which oversees $20 billion in munis. “There are investors out there who believed the healthcare reform was going to be constitutional,” said Black, a senior portfolio manager. “If that does happen, then those people made the right bet. If the whole thing is overturned, they’re going to own hospitals that will continue to struggle.” Municipal interest rates close to the lowest levels since the 1960s are drawing buyers to weaker credits. Hospitals and health-care providers have an average Standard & Poor’s rating of A-, seventh-highest. In the lead-up to the decision, Black said he’s buying hospitals rated BBB, two steps above speculative grade. He’s avoiding moving down the rating scale in part because of concern that weaker facilities may suffer should the mandate be struck down. In an April report, Moody’s Investors Service said losing the individual mandate “would remove health-care reform’s best feature for not-for-profit hospitals.” Credit risk would rise even if the rest of the law were upheld, said Moody’s. Uncompensated costs totaled about $57 billion in 2008, though hospitals get reimbursed for most of that through government programs, according to the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation in Menlo Park, Calif. “The most expensive way to enter the health-care system is through a hospital’s emergency room,” said Chris Ryon, who helps manage $7.5 billion of municipals, including about $1.5 billion of hospital debt, at Thornburg Investment Management in Santa Fe, N.M. At the end of fiscal 2010, 41 hospitals that weren’t part of a larger system had speculative grades from S&P, up from 38 in 2009, according to a report. “You’re going to have good hospitals and bad hospitals,” Ryon said. “Hopefully you’ll own the hospitals that will be strong and will survive.”

Fixed pricing The data showed the average number of breakdowns increased from 1.03 per user during 2004 to 2006, to 1.42 during 2006 to 2011. When those breakdowns occurred, users were more likely to endure some negative repercussions. Nearly one in four breakdowns left the users stranded, and nearly one in 10 caused individuals to miss work or a doctor’s appointment. “What was surprising to me was that we could see significant decline in such a short period of time,” said Dr. Michael Boninger, chair of the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at the University of Pittsburgh and senior author of the study. Medicare, the federal health insurance plan for the elderly and disabled, pays for the vast majority of power wheelchairs in the United States. Preliminary numbers provided by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services showed Medicare paid about $1.05 billion for wheelchairs in 2011, down from $1.4 billion in 2010, including manual chairs, power chairs and wheelchair accessories. Over the past two decades, however, fraud investigators have uncovered a number of significant wheelchair scams. A report by the Health and Human Services Offices of the Inspector General last year found that 61 percent of power wheelchairs sold in the first half of 2007 weren’t medically necessary or lacked the proper documentation. Those chairs accounted for $95 million of the $195 million Medicare spent on power wheelchairs in those six months. Fueled in part by the fraud, Medicare’s spending on power wheelchairs increased nearly 2,000 percent, from $59 million in 1995 to more than $1.2 billion in 2003, while the number of Medicare beneficiaries using wheelchairs grew only 10 percent. In response, Medicare implemented a number of anti-fraud and spending control measures, including implementing a new set of codes in 2004 for the most complex categories of wheelchairs. Power wheelchairs are now classified into different groups, each with a

Higher prices for visits to doctors, surgery and drugs were the main cause of higher health-care costs for privately insured Americans in 2010, when overall utilization of health-care services was down, says a report by the Health Care Cost Institute in Washington. The report, using data provided by Aetna, Humana and United Healthcare, analyzed 3 billion claims for 33 million individuals covered by employerbased health insurance from 2007 through 2010. “For the first time, we have comprehensive data on the privately insured. This lets us develop a clearer picture of what is truly driving health-

care spending in the United States,” said Martin Gaynor, chairman of the institute’s governing board and professor of economics and health policy at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh. The report found that per-capita spending for individuals under age 65 increased 3.3 percent in 2010, down from 6 percent in 2008 and 5.8 percent in 2009. However, the 2010 increase was still about twice as much as overall inflation, Gaynor said. By age group, the biggest percentage increase in 2010 per-capita expenditures — 4.5 percent — was for children 18 and under. The biggest price increases from

2009 to 2010 were for emergencyroom visits (11 percent), outpatient surgery (8.9 percent), and treatments for mental health and substance abuse (8.6 percent). But even the price of a visit to a primary-care physician was up 5.3 percent, to $86. “A provider increasing their price is not resulting in any patient attrition” because too few consumers know the prices for their health care, said Douglas Ghertner, president of Change Healthcare Corp., a Brentwood, Tenn., company that helps employers and health plans increase price transparency.

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Jim Palmer provides some manual assistance as his wife’s wheelchair slips on the wet grass in Hollinshead Park in Bend. Shelly Palmer says the chair allows her to enjoy the most important aspects of her life.

In the shop A recent study of individuals with spinal cord injuries who rely on power wheelchairs found that the rate of wheelchair breakdowns has increased in recent years. Nearly half of the wheelchair users reported experiencing an added consequence of their breakdown, such as being stranded or injured.

RATE OF WHEELCHAIR BREAKDOWNS

Current data (2006-11)

Need repair

53%

Historical data (2004-06) 45%

Mean number of repairs

1.43

1.03

Experienced a consequence

31%

22%

.47

.3

Mean number of consequences

CONSEQUENCES

Current data (2006-11)

Stranded

Historical data (2004-06)

22.31%

14.42%

4.1%

4.33%

Missing work/school

9.49%

3.4%

Missing medical appointment

9.74%

4.84%

Injured

Source: University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

specific code and a fixed payment amount. “If you sell a wheelchair of a certain code, you get a certain amount of money. If you sell the cheapest wheelchair in that code, you make more money,” Boninger said. “I think as dealers felt squeezed by the new set of regulations, it’s possible that their practice has changed and more of a lesser-quality wheelchair is out there.” The data supports that notion. Those who had wheelchairs paid for by Medicare or Medicaid had higher rates of breakdown than those covered by private insurance or other sources. David Taylor of United Seating & Mobility in Bend said he hasn’t seen a large increase in the number of wheelchair breakdowns, but he has noticed a difference in the type of products being sold since Medicare altered its payment structure. “I could definitely see a reduction in the design of the equipment when they made those code changes,” he said. “For the providers, in order to stay in business and make a profit, they need to increase their margins. Well, how do you increase your margins? You buy a cheaper chair.” Taylor said it’s often hard to find a chair that will suit an individual’s needs for the money Medicare is offering. At times, vendors can see if the individual is able to pay the difference out of pocket in order to get a more appropriate chair. “If you have a client you know is going to be a heavy user and is going to probably destroy that basic system that you are going to pursue, you educate them,” he said. “But most of these people don’t have the money to buy it, and you can’t get it for them be-

cause you can’t get the funding for it.” Ziggi Landsman, vice president of assistive technology with the National Spinal Cord Injury Association, said vendors’ hands are often tied by the reimbursement rates and the red tape involved in getting someone a wheelchair. “Like in any industry, you have dealers whose hearts and ethics are in the right places and they’ll try like hell to do the right thing for the client,” he said. “And other times, it’s all dollars. If I have something in the back room that I have money in and I need to get rid of, guess what works for you?” The problem of low-quality chairs is exacerbated, he said, by minimal funding for maintenance and repairs. “By the time you do the paperwork, you’ve probably blown any money you’re going to make,” he said. “It kind of precludes any regular maintenance being done.”

Heavy use Meanwhile, many owners are using wheelchairs in ways the chairs weren’t intended. “If they’ve lost their license and they have to get groceries or go see the doctor, and it is feasible for them to get there in their chair, they will use it as their vehicle,” said Ruth Little, an assistive technology practitioner with Norco in Bend. “That’s where you will really see the wear and tear. It’s not something the chairs are designed to be.” Medicare lumps even the most complex wheelchairs for severely disabled individuals in with walkers and hospitals beds in a category known as durable medical equipment. Technically, such products are designated for in-home use. “These laws were enacted

back in the days when people in wheelchairs didn’t leave the home,” Boninger said. “That’s an arcane rule and it causes weird design things, where the manufacturer can almost get away with designing a chair for in-the-home use knowing it’s going to go outside and not be good.” Wheelchairs have become more complex over the years, as new technology allows users to do more than ever before. While complexity leads to more parts that can break down, Boninger discounts the notion that it’s the complexity of today’s power wheelchairs that has caused the problem. “It’s not, it’s the quality that’s caused the issue,” Boninger said. “There’s no doubt that we could build a wheelchair that would be as reliable and durable as the best-made car. But we don’t.” At a minimum, Boninger believes wheelchair manufacturers should be required to have their products evaluated by an independent testing lab. (For full disclosure, Boninger said his institution also operates a wheelchair standards testing lab, but he personally does not profit in any way from it.) Currently, companies are allowed to test their own wheelchairs and certify that they meet established industry standards. “They can test as many as they want, so the one that passes could be the one that passes the test,” he said. Previous research has shown that many power wheelchairs don’t meet the standards when independently tested. When breakdowns do happen, it can be incredibly disruptive. Some wheelchair users keep an older wheelchair around as a backup, and can get by when their chair is in the shop. But Boninger said that’s becoming increasingly rare. “People are having a harder time getting a chair,” he said. “Therefore they’re in the current chair until it’s no longer functional.” From 2004-06, about twothirds of users reported having a backup wheelchair at home. But by the 2006-11 period, only one-third had a spare chair. In some cases, vendors may have a rental chair they can loan a client, particularly if a part needs to be specialordered, resulting in a long delay. But many users have unique needs and can’t always find an adequate replacement. Many, Landman said, wind up stuck at home, if not in bed. “We see it all the time,” he said. “It’s almost a traumatic experience — certainly psy-

— Harold Brubaker, The Philadelphia Inquirer

chologically, but even physically. You lay in bed, you tend to break down, you tend to get more atrophy. It’s not the best place for anybody to be for extended periods of time.” Taylor said he’s had to be creative at times, even taking parts from one chair to keep another running. “You don’t want a person stuck in bed, waiting a week and a half for the part to show up,” Taylor said. “So far, I’ve been able to avoid that scenario.” The stakes are even higher when kids need power chairs. It’s often tougher on children to be stuck in bed while waiting for a part, and pediatric wheelchairs often require parts to be special-ordered. Taylor keeps a couple of spare pediatric chairs around solely to scavenge their parts. Boninger and his colleagues are now working on an analysis that would show which of the wheelchairs on the market now are more likely to break down and which are more reliable. Arming wheelchair users with Consumer Reports-type data might help improve quality, but Boninger said the lack of a true consumer market for wheelchairs might mute the effect.

New category Wheelchair user advocacy groups, including the National Spinal Cord Injury Association, have been lobbying Congress to carve out complex power wheelchairs from the durable medical equipment category. A similar move was made several years ago for the custom braces or artificial limbs, known as orthotics and prosthetics. Legislation to create the separate benefit category was introduced in April by Rep. Joseph Crowley (D-N.Y.) and attracted eight additional co-sponsors. Medicare officials, however, indicated that the new set of codes implemented in 2004 for complex chairs has already accomplished much of what a separate category would do. These codes identify the complex chairs separately and were accompanied by increased payment rates. Complex chairs now account for about 2 percent of wheelchairs being used by Medicare beneficiaries, but about 22 percent of total Medicare wheelchair spending. Wheelchair advocates argue that having a separate category could further refine what Medicare pays for complex chairs and provide reimbursement for the extensive evaluation and fitting that is often required with more severely disabled individuals. The groups maintain the move could end up saving Medicare money by avoiding hospitalizations due to severe pressure sores and blood clots that can occur when chairs are improperly fitted or don’t operate as intended. Many power wheelchair users require power seating that can change the angle of the seating to shift pressure points on a regular basis. If such users are unable to shift body weight themselves, they are prone to developing painful pressure sores. “If you’re in a chair for 18 hours straight, you have to change your position,” Boninger said. “But those chairs were more likely to break and those are people who are less likely to be able to get out of the chair. They’re some of the most vulnerable patients we have.” — Reporter: 541-617-7814, mhawryluk@bendbulletin.com


THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, JUNE 7, 2012

F4

M Should you be taking cholesterol medication? By Sharon Begley Saturday Evening Post

Dr. Nortin Hadler refuses to let anyone measure his cholesterol. An avid cyclist who adheres to a healthy diet, does not smoke, and doesn’t have heart disease, Hadler, a professor of medicine at the University of North Carolina, knows that a reading above 200 for total cholesterol and/or above 130 for LDL (“bad”) cholesterol is likely to make his internist whip out the prescription pad

and send him to the pharmacy for a statin, one of the widely prescribed drugs that lower cholesterol. And that doesn’t sit well with Hadler. More than a dozen studies, he points out, have shown that in an otherwise healthy person with no history or symptoms of heart disease, taking statins provides zero benefit. That’s right. Zero. Statins — Lipitor, Crestor, Pravachol, Mevacor, Zocor, and their generic equivalents — reside in the pill dispensers

of one-fourth of the population 45 and older, according to the National Center for Health Statistics. But for the majority of heart-healthy patients, statins will not increase longevity, prevent a fatal heart attack, or avoid a life-ending stroke. So if taking statins won’t keep you alive and healthy any longer than not taking the pills, Hadler asks — especially when you consider possible side effects — what’s the point in knowing your cholesterol numbers?

Most general practitioners take their cue from cardiovascular specialists, and many of these experts believe that statins save lives, period. Theirs is a straightforward argument: Cholesterol is bad; therefore, lowering cholesterol is good. Here’s why that argument is so tricky: No one questions the power of statins to avert a heart attack or stroke in people who have already had one. Preventing a heart attack in someone who’s never had one is another matter, however. Here,

cholesterol numbers go down when a patient takes statins, but risk factors barely budge. For example, a 55-year-old non-smoking woman with total cholesterol of 240 (high enough to make most physicians reach for those prescription pads) and normal blood pressure readings has a 1 percent chance of having a heart attack over the next decade. A 65-year-old man with roughly the same numbers has an 11 percent chance of having a heart attack over the

next decade. Prescribed statins could lower their total cholesterol readings to 190. But the woman’s risk will not change — it stays at 1 percent — and the man’s risk declines only 2 percent. Whether it is meaningful to decrease your chance of having a heart attack by zero to 2 percent, like our hypothetical examples, depends on your perspective. Physicians note that no medication is without risk — and statins are no exception.

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THURSDAY, JUNE 7, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

F5

M Hands DID YOU KNOW?

Thinkstock

Safety measures lead men to take greater risks A theory known as “risk compensation” holds that when additional safety measures are implemented,” individuals feel safer to take greater risks, effectively keeping their overall risk the same. A study conducted in France suggested that could be true, at least for men. Researchers gave men and women cycling helmets and then measured how fast they were going. Women rode about 10.3 mph while wearing helmets and 10 mph without helmets. Men, on the other hand, rode 10.4 mph without helmets, but cranked it up to nearly 12 mph with helmets. Nonetheless, the researchers determined the increase in speed was not likely to offset the significant health benefit of wearing a helmet. — Markian Hawryluk, The Bulletin

Study: Childhood cancer survivors face new risks Women treated with chest radiation for cancer when they were girls have a higher risk of developing breast cancer than previously thought, doctors warn. Even lower doses of radiation therapy posed a risk for survivors of a childhood cancer — something not known before, researchers found. That means more women might need to be screened beginning at age 25 for breast cancer. “We find that by age 50, approximately 30 percent of women treated with radiation for Hodgkin lymphoma” as girls have developed breast cancer, said Chaya Moskowitz, a biostatistician at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York who led the study. That is far higher than the 4 percent rate for the general population, and is comparable to the rate in women who have mutations in inherited BRCA genes that increase risk. Among women who had chest radiation for any type of childhood cancer, 24 percent developed breast cancer by age 50. Guidelines currently urge annual screening with mammograms and MRI scans starting at age 25 for women who had radiation therapy totaling 20 Grays — a measure of how much radiation is absorbed. About 50,000 U.S. women are in that category. The new study finds higher risk even among women who received more moderate doses — 10 to 19 Grays — as girls. That means another 7,000 to 9,000 women also may need screening now, said Dr. Paula Ryan, a breast cancer specialist at Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia. — Marilynn Marchione, The Associated Press

Continued from F1 Dyer explains that traditional gardening tools and tasks often put hands and backs in less-than-ideal positions. “Tasks like gardening that are performed below our waist height puts us in more awkward and precarious positions, both for our backs and our hips, and also for wrists,” she said. Many people flex or tilt their hands at their wrists when using a garden trowel to dig. Dyer teaches them to use ergonomically designed tools that keep wrists in a neutral position, and to use the entire arm to create power and motion rather than just the wrist. “It’s using big muscles in stead of a wrist flipping motion, so we transfer the loads to those bigger muscles,” she said. Martita Marx, 68, loves to garden despite years of osteoarthritis. “I think what happens when you have chronic pain is you start adapting to it,” she said. “What I didn’t realize and what Trish had pointed out to me is that I had started doing things with my hands incorrectly and the repetitive nature of my incorrect movements and actions with my hands was damaging my hands even more than the arthritis.” Over time the compensation pushed the bottom of her thumb out until it was completely out of joint. Dyer helped Marx relearn the proper positioning of her hand and fitted her with plastic braces that cover the bottom of her thumb and top of her wrist. The braces help her keep proper hand position and add strength where she once had pain or weakness. “I’ve noticed so much differ-

Pre-gardening exercises The American Society of Hand Therapists recommends the following warm-up exercises before gardening. • Fold your hands together with fingers interlocked and turn your palms away from your body as you extend your arms forward. You should feel a stretch all the way from your shoulders to your fingers. Hold for 10 seconds and repeat eight times.

• Fold your hands together with fingers interlocked and turn your palms away from your body, but this time extend your arms overhead. You should feel the stretch in your upper torso and shoulders, and in your hands. Hold for 10 seconds and repeat eight times.

ence,” she said. “The first few weeks were miserable. I really had to adjust to wearing the braces. Now I run to get the braces on.” Dyer has a number of strategies to help patients keep gardening or doing other tasks with her hands. She suggests doing warm-ups or easy exercises before starting work in the garden, and then to ease into the workload in 20-minute segments. “If you reassess every 20 minutes, then maybe you won’t get to the point where you’ve totally overdone it,” she said. “I always advise people to try not to do new activities for more than up to two hours total (at a time).” Garden design can also help. Instead of digging at ground level, put in raised beds to keep the hands working above rather than below the waist. This also helps avoid lower back pain. Having a water supply near the garden can eliminate the need for dragging heavy buckets or hoses. Tools with large handles put less stress on hands than small handles, and ergonomic tools help keep the hands in the proper position. Plastic wraps

• Place your hand just above the back of the elbow and gently push your elbow across your chest toward the opposite shoulder. This is a stretch for the upper back and shoulder Stretch both the right and left arms. Hold for 10 seconds and repeat eight times.

can help to provide power and control over tools without having to squeeze as tightly. The Arthritis Foundation certifies gardening tools as arthritis-friendly, including gloves that are designed to fit over swollen knuckles or other hand deformities. Dyer also designs stretches and exercises that can help strengthen hands and correct some of havoc that arthritis has wreaked over time. Marx has been undergoing regular ultrasound treatment to loosen the hard fibers that have developed in her hand and gets relief by dipping her hands in hot paraffin wax. “My tendency is to ignore it,” she said. “I’ll push until I can’t push anymore.” Dyer has helped her understand that she’s doing more damage to her hands that way. “So it’s sort of reorienting my thinking to say, ‘OK, I have a chronic disease. It’s not going to get better,’” Marx said. “But I can do some things that are going to be better for me, and allow me to be more functional for a longer period to time.” — Reporter: 541-617-7814, mhawryluk@bendbulletin.com

• Raise one arm overhead. Bend the elbow. Place the opposite hand on the bent elbow and gently push the elbow back further. This is a stretch for the triceps. Stretch both the right and left arms. Hold for 10 seconds and repeat eight times.

• Extend an arm in front of you, making sure the elbow is completely straight. With your palm facing down, take the opposite hand and bend the hand downward at that wrist. Turn the hand palm up, and stretch the wrist backward. This stretches the forearm and wrist muscles. Hold for 10 seconds and repeat eight times.

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Martita Marx, of Bend, loves to garden despite osteoarthritis in her hands. She said occupational therapy helps with her arthritis.

A college student at 9, an M.D. at 21 • Sho Yano, who will graduate this week, is aiming for a career in pediatric medicine By Bonnie Miller Rubin Chicago Tribune

CHICAGO — Sho Yano has been a college student for 12 years, but it’s only recently that he looks as if he belongs, blending in with undergrad students in a local coffee shop. This week, the 21-year-old will complete the journey he began as a 9-year-old college freshman, becoming the youngest student in the University of Chicago’s history to receive an M.D. Yano was reading at age 2, writing by 3 and composing music by his fifth birthday. He graduated from Loyola University in three years — summa cum laude, no less. When he entered U. of C.’s prestigious Pritzker School of Medicine at 12, it was into one of the school’s most rigorous programs, where students get both their doctorate and medical degrees. Despite his gifts, success was not guaranteed. Several medical schools wanted no part of him because of maturity questions. Even at Pritzker, some faculty members worried they would be robbing him of a normal adolescence. On a college campus, he was a natural target for wisecracks. Some asked harsh questions about whether his mother was pushing him somewhere he didn’t belong. By all accounts now, though, Pritzker’s decision to admit Yano has been a success. He hopes his graduation at last silences the naysayers who predicted he’d be stunted socially and emotionally for daring to tackle such an accelerated track. “I never understood that,” Yano said. “Why would being allowed to challenge yourself be considered more damaging than being totally bored?”

‘Sweet’ and ‘humble’ Intelligence is not his only gift — though according to a test he took at age 4, his IQ is too high to accurately measure and is easily above genius level, his mother said she was told. Medicine is not his only passion, either.

He is an accomplished pianist who has performed at Ravinia, and he has a black belt in tae kwon do. Classmates and faculty described him as “sweet” and “humble,” a hardworking, Bach-adoring, Greek literature-quoting student. But he’d much rather talk about his upcoming residency in pediatric neurology, which will dominate the next five years of his professional life — and probably beyond. He became enamored of the field while doing a rotation at LaRabida Children’s Hospital in Chicago, caring for patients with cerebral palsy, shaken baby syndrome and other ailments. “I really liked not just taking care of kids, but the way the whole team worked together — the medical team, the social workers, nutritionists, DCFS workers ... the idea that you can do a lot for these patients, even if you can’t cure them.” He rejects the idea that embracing collaboration might run counter to the mold of scientific genius. “I’m very confused by that stereotype,” he said. “I may not be the most outgoing person, but I do like to be around people.”

Family values Yano’s family has been his harbor throughout his schooling. His sister, Sayuri, is his only sibling, also a prodigy and his closest confidante. After receiving a bachelor’s degree in biology from Roosevelt University in 2010, the 15-year-old is now at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, pursuing a second bachelor’s degree, this one in violin performance. Sayuri said the two fought incessantly until a few years ago. They bonded over their shared experiences as prepubescent college students. Yano sees himself as his sister’s protector; he persuaded her to put medicine on hold to concentrate on the violin. But there was never a question of priorities for the big brother. “I think his passion for medicine outweighed his love of music,” Sayuri said.

Sho Yano, 21, left — who is already a Ph.D. and soon will be an M.D. — and Darrel Waggoner, M.D., an associate professor of human genetics and pediatrics, check on a patient in the neonatal intensive care unit at Comer Children’s Hospital in Chicago on May 18.

Chris Walker Chicago Tribune


F6

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, JUNE 7, 2012

F Exercise EXERCISE TIPS Handle the kettlebell right In a weekly, threepart series, we share what the American Council on Exercise says are common exercise mistakes. The nonprofit fitness and training organization emphasizes the importance of safety while improving your fitness.

WEEK 2 Kettlebells: Kettlebell workouts are effective and can be performed in a short period of time. But many who use kettlebells — large weights with handles — don’t use proper mechanics. The kettlebell single arm swing is not a shoulder exercise but rather one that should be working the core. Tip: When performing the kettlebell single arm swing, avoid lifting with the back or the shoulders. The hips should always drive the movement. Contract the abdominal muscles and hinge at the hips. While exhaling, initiate an explosive upward movement to swing the kettlebell upward in front of the body while coming to a standing position. The momentum generated through the lower body and gluteal muscles should allow the arms to become parallel with the floor while wrists keep a neutral alignment. Source: American Council on Exercise

— Anne Aurand, The Bulletin

1

2

Pete Erickson The Bulletin

Train like a warrior Martin Rooney’s 12week diet and exercise program uses the language of combat — and models that look like ultimate fighters — to show you how to get that fierce, toned-up look, or at least a trimmer you. In “Warrior Cardio,” Rooney says the most effective way to burn fat and build muscle is interval training: sprints, free-weight circuits and exercises using your body weight, such as push-ups interspersed with claps. His program also includes a nutritional plan focused on a healthful balance of protein, vegetables, fruit and whole grains, complete with recipes. For those interested in just working out, there are lots of pictures. Each exercise — from the mini plyo hop (small, quick hops performed in a pattern similar to hopscotch) to the Zercher lunge (performed with a barbell in the crooks of your elbows) — is broken down and demonstrated by some very buff guys. — The Washington Post

Continued from F1 “It’s New York, and I think that everyone’s always just trying to look better and better,” said Alyson Organek, 32, a working mom who frequently completes the Barry’s/Flywheel double. “Some people think it’s crazy and it doesn’t make any sense. But you see so many other people doing it, you don’t feel crazy.” Indeed, on a recent Monday at Barry’s, two women greeted each other with squeals of “You’re so tiny!” while a third asked, “Don’t I see you at Flywheel, too?” Meredith Poppler, vice president for industry growth at the International Health, Racquet and Sportsclub Association, said multiple-gym membership is also popular in “affluent metro areas” like San Francisco and Boston, but the phenomenon of two or more separate, specialized gyms in one day “is definitely a Type-A New Yorker thing.” How is this different from, say, hitting an elliptical machine and following it up with weights — something Poppler (who said she is not and has never been a “fitness fanatic”) herself did in her 20s? For one, the boutique gym workouts may be tougher. “These gyms are expensive, but they’re a cheaper way of having a personal trainer all the time,” said Neda Talebian Funk, a veteran marathon runner and a founder of FITiST, a company set up last year to satisfy New Yorkers’ yen for mix-and-match workouts by offering class packages across a selection of studios. “They’re small groups and they push you hard.” Much-higher-than-expected demand for the all-studio, all-access option forced the company to raise the price from $760 a month to $1,000 within three months of opening, she said, though FITiST does not encourage doubles or “necessarily think they’re healthy.” Workout hopscotch is most viable in Manhattan, where the requisite mix of money, demand and fitness choice is packed into a compact 34 square miles. Charity Gonzalez, the chief executive of Urbanfit, which offers 16 classes a month at a selection of Chicago boutique studios, said there is no demand there for an all-access option. “By the time you did a class and got from one gym to another here, you’d need about five hours,” she said. It’s the same case in looksobsessed Los Angeles, where driving from Santa Monica to West Hollywood could take an hour. Joey Gonzalez (who is not related to Gonzalez), the chief executive of Barry’s, a recent import from the West Coast, last month even rejiggered the brand’s decade-old celebrity favorite formula to make it safer — not to be confused with easier — for Manhattan double-dippers. “New Yorkers are a rare breed,” he said, noting that he encourages cross-training though not extensive doubling. Many double-dippers work out six days a week, but most are careful to point out that not every day is a doubleheader. “You get such a high, and I feel like I’m missing something when I don’t, but I have responsibilities and a child and I have a life,” said Raina Seitel, a reporter for “New York Live” on NBC who would say only that she is “in my early 30s.” According to FitMapped, a website that went online in February to catalog the city’s exercise options, there are 517 gyms in Manhattan (about one for every 20 restaurants) and lately a new one opens every three days to a week, said Anita Mirchandani, a founder of the site. The Chelsea area technically has the most gyms (50), “but it’s a huge territory,” Mirchandani added. The area from 14th to 23rd streets, between Seventh Avenue and Broadway — a swath that includes chunks of Chelsea, the Flatiron district and Union Square — has both the highest end and greatest variety of specialized gyms, she said, noting that “every boutique fitness studio wants to be there, or expand there.” (Gym owners say this is thanks to good transport links, zoning and the availability of the required

Work muscles gently, intently

Raina Seitel works out in a hot yoga class, her first workout of the day. Some New Yorkers are spending an upward of $500 a month and fitting in two or three workouts a day at separate studios, despite having fulltime jobs.

By Marjie Gilliam Cox Newspapers

Photos by Deidre Schoo / New York Times News Service

Raina Seitel works out in a cardio sculpt class, her third workout of the day.

Kirsten Luce / New York Times News Service

Alyson Organek, center, a working mother, works out at Barry’s Bootcamp in New York.

1,000-to-2,000-square-foot spaces.) Proximity does not equal easy access, though. Doubleand triple-dipping is a feat of determination, endurance — and scheduling. Juggling multiple gym timetables and online booking windows takes Laura Smith, 28, an hour on some days. “I have all the booking windows in my calendar and I try to avoid scheduling meetings then,” said Smith, a hedgefund researcher for an investment bank. “If there is one, I’ll go a few minutes late, because otherwise all the classes are gone and then you have to figure out a different combo.” Catharine Grimes, 43, a foundation director, said she sticks to the same doubleheaders partly to avoid this. “I will practice to get a reservation at Momofuku Ko and I’ve gotten one, but that’s a level I won’t go to for exercise,” she said. Fans say the time and money they spend is worth it, for more reasons than just calorie burn. Lisa Gross, 37, a fashion designer, said her doubles are her relaxation. “Some women get facials and manicures and pedicures — I do this,” she said. “I feel like my day is more efficient when I double-dip,” Gross said. “I have better clarity and head space.” Deirdre Berne, 29, whose grab bag includes Barry’s, Yoga Vida and toning workouts at Physique 57 and Exhale’s Core Fusion, called boutique group fitness “my entertainment and part of my social life.” She said: “You see the same people and you’re like, ‘Oh, wow, I’m sore from yesterday.’ You have a common interest, you get to be friends, you go for coffee after class.” Rilinger — whose own hard-core training propelled her into playing pro basketball at 5-foot-4 — loves to say, “It’s not about calories, it’s about getting happy.” Her website bears the slogan: “Sweat. Breathe. Laugh,” and she said her camps “are about camaraderie, and people develop lasting friendships.” She sees the same thing at many boutique gyms, she said. Sleep, dining out and ex-

pensive shoes were the most commonly mentioned sacrifices (“I tell myself I don’t really need those heels because I’m working out all the time anyway,” said Michelle Weisz, 25), though two women interviewed hinted at a higher toll; their names are not used here because the frequency and expense of workouts were at issue in

contentious divorces. Meredith Greisman, 35, a legal assistant, spends more than $10,000 a year (“my entire social budget,” she said) on her weekday doubles and Saturday triples, which usually include pole dancing at Chelsea’s Body & Pole and strength and conditioning at Velocity Sports Performance in Midtown. She also has an Equinox membership. Greisman, who is single, said she often forfeits other social events for her workouts — “the gym is where my friends are,” she said — and does not make plans on Saturday apart from three of her favorite classes, which run from 11:45 a.m. to nearly 5 p.m. Dating, she mused, “would be challenging.” “I would need to date somebody who understands my workout schedule,” she said. “Hopefully they would have their own crazy workout schedule.”

DAYTON, Ohio — Resistance training is increasingly popular, thanks to a greater understanding of the many benefits that it provides, including muscular strength and endurance, a speedier metabolism, greater bone density and a greater sense of well-being. Using good judgment when you begin any new activity means starting out slowly and carefully, and above all, listening to your body. Getting clearance from your doctor is recommended if you have medical conditions, are overweight or unaccustomed to exercise. Warming up, stretching and cooling down will help your performance levels and produce better results, and can drastically decrease your risk of injury. When exercise is performed properly, it rarely causes injury or pain. Using improper form or lifting weights that are too heavy can lead to tearing and/or overstretching muscles and tendons, called strains. In severe strains, actual rupturing or complete tearing of the tendon from the bone occurs. Most acute injuries are treated with the R.I.C.E method, which stands for Rest, Ice, Compression and Elevation. Rest the joint for at least 24 to 48 hours. Ice should be applied as soon as possible, within minutes. Protect the skin with a towel and apply ice packs 20 to 30 minutes at a time throughout the first 24 hours. After the first 24 hours, alternating hot and cold packs is generally more effective to promote healing than either heat or ice alone. Compression elastic bandages help to reduce or prevent swelling. Elevating the injured limb while resting helps to reduce swelling. Try to elevate the area at least level with or even slightly above the heart.


THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, JUNE 7, 2012 G1

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B u l l e t i n :

ITEMS FOR SALE 201 - New Today 202 - Want to buy or rent 203 - Holiday Bazaar & Craft Shows 204 - Santa’s Gift Basket 205 - Free Items 208 - Pets and Supplies 210 - Furniture & Appliances 211 - Children’s Items 212 - Antiques & Collectibles 215 - Coins & Stamps 240 - Crafts and Hobbies 241 - Bicycles and Accessories 242 - Exercise Equipment 243 - Ski Equipment 244 - Snowboards 245 - Golf Equipment 246 - Guns, Hunting and Fishing 247 - Sporting Goods - Misc. 248 - Health and Beauty Items 249 - Art, Jewelry and Furs 251 - Hot Tubs and Spas 253 - TV, Stereo and Video 255 - Computers 256 - Photography 257 - Musical Instruments 258 - Travel/Tickets 259 - Memberships 260 - Misc. Items 261 - Medical Equipment 262 - Commercial/Office Equip. 263 - Tools

General Merchandise

200 202

Want to Buy or Rent WANTED: RAZORS, Double or singleedged, straight razors, shaving brushes, mugs & scuttles, strops, shaving accessories & memorabilia. Fair prices paid. Call 541-390-7029 between 10 am-3 pm. 208

Pets & Supplies The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to fraud. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Aussie Puppy, Blue Merle toy, blue eyes and family raised born 4/20/12 almost 8 weeks shots/worming $400 541-447-4854 Australian Shepherds Regd minis born 5/12/12 Champ lines & health clearances. True structure & temperament. (541)639-6263 or mountainviewminiaussies @yahoo.com

Barn cats/ mousers ready to work in your barn, shop or home in exchange for safe shelter, food & water. Altered, shots. We deliver! 541-389-8420 Border Collie/Kelpie cross working dog pups. 2 males left. Great dispositions & very cute. $150. 541-350-2824, 541-350-7813

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264 - Snow Removal Equipment 265 - Building Materials 266 - Heating and Stoves 267 - Fuel and Wood 268 - Trees, Plants & Flowers 269 - Gardening Supplies & Equipment 270 - Lost and Found GARAGE SALES 275 - Auction Sales 280 - Estate Sales 281 - Fundraiser Sales 282 - Sales Northwest Bend 284 - Sales Southwest Bend 286 - Sales Northeast Bend 288 - Sales Southeast Bend 290 - Sales Redmond Area 292 - Sales Other Areas FARM MARKET 308 - Farm Equipment and Machinery 316 - Irrigation Equipment 325 - Hay, Grain and Feed 333 - Poultry, Rabbits and Supplies 341 - Horses and Equipment 345 - Livestock and Equipment 347 - Llamas/Exotic Animals 350 - Horseshoeing/Farriers 358 - Farmer’s Column 375 - Meat and Animal Processing 383 - Produce and Food 208

208

Pets & Supplies

Pets & Supplies

Boston Terrier Pups, 6 females, 6 wks, $300, non papered, parents on site, 541-943-3366 Golden Retriever AKC Pups, Hunting & Competition lines, Excellent pedigree. 541-743-5998 , Boxer/ Bulldog (Valley lartho@q.com , Bulldog) new litter,CKC http://www.stoneflyreReg., taking deposits. trievers.com $700. 541-325-3376 Golden Retriever Pups, AKC reg, 6 males, 1 female, well socialized, $500 ea, ready 6/18, 541-447-2223. Hound Mix, 3/4 walker, 1/4 black & tan, 1 male, Chihuahua Pups, as1 female, 7 mo., $100 sorted colors, teacup, ea., 541-447-1323 1st shots, wormed, $250,541-977-4686 Kittens, new, available! Also great rescued Chihuahua Pups, toy, 3 cats. 65480 78th St., females, 1 male, Bend, Sat/Sun 1-5; $200, 541-678-0786. other days by appt. 541-647-2181. Altered, shots, ID chip, Chi-Pom mix pups, more. Info: 389-8420. Adorable fluffy, fuzzy Map, photos, more at & loving, 6 wks, 2 www.craftcats.org males, $200 each 541-480-2824 Lab/Heeler mix female, free to a good home. Dachshund AKC minis, We moved and can't short & longhair, B/tan keep her, she loves to & choc/tan, F $375; M swim and play ball $325. 541-420-6044 and frisbee! Call or 541-447-3060 541-290-9395 DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS? Non-commercial advertisers may place an ad with our "QUICK CASH SPECIAL" 1 week 3 lines, $12 or 2 weeks, $20! Ad must include price of single item of $500 or less, or multiple items whose total does not exceed $500. Call Classifieds at 541-385-5809

Labradoodles - Mini & med size, several colors 541-504-2662 www.alpen-ridge.com

Mini Aussie female, 1st shots, wormed $300 cash. 541-678-7599 Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809 Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com Papillon-mix with toy poodle, 1 male left. 8 wks. Black/white, will be pretty. $150. 541 350-1684

www.bendbulletin.com

Pit Bull puppies, (2) females, black with white chest & black Free adult female cat, with grey chest. spayed, shots current, Sweet natured parto loving home. ents. $100 each 541-550-0202 541-382-3751 German Shepherd AKC Pitbull Purebred Pups, blue’s & seal brindles, puppies, born March $200 OBO, call Polly, 27, 1st & 2nd shots, 541-280-8720 Emily 541-647-8803

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Pets & Supplies

Furniture & Appliances

Bicycles & Accessories

Misc. Items

Heating & Stoves

Gardening Supplies & Equipment

Entertainment Centers (1)1-piece,$150,(1) oak 4-piece, $400, pics avail., 541-208-5053.

Fridge, Amana side by side, with water / ice Poodle pups, toy, for dispenser, $300 obo. 2007 SALE. Also Rescued GT Downhill 541-389-9680 Poodle Adults for Racer Pro, all the adoption, to loving bells & whistles, $500, homes. 541-475-3889 541-408-4613. Queensland Heelers Cannondale R500 Road standard & mini,$150 & Bike, dk green, 54cm, converted to flat bar up. 541-280-1537 http:// Visit our HUGE rightwayranch.wordpress.com (drops incl), exc cond, home decor $400. 541-382-2259 consignment store. Redbone & Bloodhound New items cross, 2.5 yrs., great 246 arrive daily! house dog or kids dog, Guns, Hunting 930 SE Textron, $100, 541-447-1323 & Fishing Bend 541-318-1501 www.redeuxbend.com

Shetland Sheepdogs Registered, (Shelties), 2 females - $300 3 Males- $250 to loving homes 541-977-3982 Siberian Husky AKC! Black/white female,6 mo. $500. 541-977-7019

AR-15 Custom rifle .223 w/9 mags & ammo. GENERATE SOME ex$1200. 541-647-8931 citement in your neighborhood! Plan a Browning Citori 20 ga, garage sale and don't 3” 28” barrels, grade 1 forget to advertise in like new. $1400 OBO classified! 541-383-3029. 541-385-5809. CASH!! For Guns, Ammo & Loveseat Rocker, floral Reloading Supplies. earthtones, $50. 541-408-6900. 541-678-5605

Rocker Recliner, beauDO YOU HAVE tiful brown leather, Spay your mother cat SOMETHING TO for only $45, we will like new, $225. SELL alter her litter for free! 541-923-9867 FOR $500 OR Bend Spay & Neuter LESS? Project will spay/neu- Rocker/recliner,La-Z-Boy Non-commercial taupe fabric, was $65, ter the first four kitadvertisers may tens, aged 8-12 now $50 541-749-0024 place an ad weeks. Kittens MUST with our Table lamps, (2) 29” be at least 2 lbs. Ad"QUICK CASH matching , floral, $50 ditional kittens $5 SPECIAL" pair. 541-678-5605 each. Call today for 1 week 3 lines $12 appt. 541-617-1010. or The Bulletin 2 weeks $20! r ecommends extra Ad must caution when purinclude price of chasing products or single item of $500 services from out of or less, or multiple the area. Sending items whose total St. Bernard Puppies, cash, checks, or does not exceed dry mouth, 1st shots, credit information $500. dewormed, $400, may be subjected to 541-280-8069 Call Classifieds at FRAUD. For more 541-385-5809 information about an Yorkie AKC pups, small, www.bendbulletin.com advertiser, you may big eyes,shots,parents call the Oregon in home, 1 boy, 1 girl, State Attorney Ruger LC9 with Laser$950+, 541-316-0005. General’s Office Max, only 30 rounds Consumer Protec210 shot. $400. tion hotline at 541-408-3288 Furniture & Appliances 1-877-877-9392. Ruger Mini-14 tactical rifle w/8mags & ammo, A1 Washers&Dryers $900. 541-647-8931 $150 ea. Full warranty. Free Del. Also Smith & Wesson .44 212 wanted, used W/D’s Mag, leather holster, 541-280-7355 629 Classic, $600, Antiques & 541-410-0557. Collectibles Baker china cabinets, 2 S&W 357 mag combat all-glass fronts, 1 dry Antiques wanted: tools, Mdl 19-3 6” brl. Colbar, 81” H x 36” wide, furn., fishing, marbles, lector condition. $650. $890 obo. Other cabiold sports gear, cos541-312-2785. nets. 541-389-9680 tume jewelry, rock Wanted: Collector 541-389-1578 posters. Coffee Table, 27”x27”, seeks high quality clear glass,shelf below, fishing items. $199, 541-330-8774 Call 541-678-5753, or 503-351-2746 Compute desk, oak & TV stand, very nice. 255 $35 ea. 541-706-1051 Computers Dresser, solid oak $350; Beer “Pump”,1940, $500, made in England by THE BULLETIN reEntry table, $75; book Gaskell & Chambers, quires computer adcase $20; all exc. 541-408-4613 vertisers with multiple cond. 541-647-1333 ad schedules or those Pooley Armoire, 1 of a selling multiple syskind, pictures avail., tems/ software, to dis$900 OBO, must see, close the name of the 541-280-5053. business or the term "dealer" in their ads. The Bulletin reserves Private party advertisthe right to publish all ers are defined as ads from The Bulletin those who sell one newspaper onto The computer. Bulletin Internet website. 257 The Classiied Section Musical Instruments is easy to use. Every item is categorized Everett upright piano, and every category excellent cond, 48” tall 240 x 58” wide, $920 obo. is indexed on the Crafts & Hobbies 541-389-9680 section’s front page.

Where buyers meet sellers.

Easily.

Thousands of ads daily in print and online. To place your ad, visit www.bendbulletin.com or call 385-5809

Pottery studio: everything must go: clay, glazes, tools, raw materials, minerals, pumps, and more. Saturday from 10-4 p.m. or call: 541-480-0696. Some free items.45 NW Irving. Bend.

260

Misc. Items 9-pc full comforter with matching items, $60. 541-678-5605

Buying Diamonds /Gold for Cash Saxon’s Fine Jewelers 541-389-6655

BUYING Pellet Earth Stove, ivory Lionel/American Flyer color, 28” x 28”, pertrains, accessories. fect cond, $700 obo. 541-408-2191. 541-389-9680 BUYING & SELLING 267 All gold jewelry, silver Fuel & Wood and gold coins, bars, rounds, wedding sets, class rings, sterling silWHEN BUYING ver, coin collect, vinFIREWOOD... tage watches, dental gold. Bill Fleming, To avoid fraud, 541-382-9419. The Bulletin recommends payWanted- paying cash ment for Firewood for Hi-fi audio & stuonly upon delivery dio equip. McIntosh, and inspection. JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Heathkit, San- • A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’ sui, Carver, NAD, etc. • Receipts should Call 541-261-1808 include name, 262 phone, price and Commercial/Ofice kind of wood purchased. Equipment & Fixtures • Firewood ads MUST include speLegal size 4-drawer file cies and cost per cabinet, lt. gray metal, cord to better serve $60 . 541-678-5605 our customers. 265

Building Materials REDMOND Habitat Dry seasoned tamarack RESTORE red fir, $165 rnd, $185 Building Supply Resale split 541-977-4500 or Quality at 541-416-3677 LOW PRICES 1242 S. Hwy 97 Lodgepole Pine, 541-548-1406 dry rounds, $160/cord. Open to the public. Available now, 266 local delivery. 541-389-0322. Heating & Stoves 269 NOTICE TO Gardening Supplies ADVERTISER Since September 29, & Equipment 1991, advertising for used woodstoves has For newspaper been limited to moddelivery, call the els which have been Circulation Dept. at certified by the Or541-385-5800 egon Department of To place an ad, call Environmental Qual541-385-5809 ity (DEQ) and the fedor email eral Environmental classified@bendbulletin.com Protection Agency (EPA) as having met smoke emission standards. A certified woodstove may be Just too many identified by its certification label, which is collectibles? permanently attached to the stove. The BulSell them in letin will not knowingly accept advertis- The Bulletin Classiieds ing for the sale of uncertified 541-385-5809 woodstoves.

Check out OCANs online at classifieds.oregon.com!

Place, cancel, or extend an ad

T h e

Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Oregon Classified Advertising Network

SUPER TOP SOIL

www.hersheysoilandbark.com

Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949. 270

Lost & Found Found Rottweiler, female, 5/24, Alfalfa area, 541-771-9143. Found RX Glasses, on bench near footbridge on River trail, 5/30, 541-749-0464. LOST 36”x48” mtn landscape painting, vicinity of Baker Rd & Hwy 97. 541-382-6757 Lost precious 7lb Pomeranian female, all black, white face, microchipped, “Ebony,” 5/15, 78th St between Bend & Redmond. 541-639-3222 REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal, don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend 541-382-3537 Redmond, 541-923-0882 Prineville, 541-447-7178; OR Craft Cats, 541-389-8420.

Garage Sales

Garage Sales

Garage Sales Find them in The Bulletin Classiieds!

541-385-5809

YOUR AD WILL RECEIVE CLOSE TO 2,000,000 EXPOSURES FOR ONLY $250! Oregon Classified Advertising Network is a service of the Oregon Newspaper Publishers Association.

Week of June 4, 2012

541-385-5809

For Sale SAWMILLS from only $3997.00. Make/save money with your own bandmill. Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. Free info/DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com, 800-578-1363 ext. 300N.

Help Wanted: Drivers NEW TO TRUCKING? Your new career starts now! $0 tuition cost, no credit check, great pay and benefits. Short employment commitment required. Call 866-245-9199, www.joinCRST.com. DRIVERS: GREAT pay, quarterly safety bonus. Hometime choices. Steady freight, full or part-time. Safe, clean, modern trucks. CDL-A, 3 months current OTR experience. 800-414-9569, www.driveknight.com.

Services DIVORCE custody,

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Complete property

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children, No

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appearances. Divorced in 1-5 weeks possible. 503-772-5295. www.paralegalalternatives.com, divorce@usa.com.


G2 THURSDAY, JUNE 7, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

Edited by Will Shortz

PLACE AN AD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . .11:00 am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Starting at 3 lines

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

*UNDER $500 in total merchandise

OVER $500 in total merchandise

7 days .................................................. $10.00 14 days ................................................ $16.00

Garage Sale Special

4 days .................................................. $18.50 7 days .................................................. $24.00 14 days .................................................$33.50 28 days .................................................$61.50

4 lines for 4 days.................................. $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

PRIVATE PARTY RATES

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702

PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday. 325

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Farm Market

Hay, Grain & Feed

Horseshoeing/ Farriers

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

300

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 541-385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

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Farm Equipment & Machinery Kioti CK20 tractor w/bucket, backhoe & grader blade. 370 hrs. $13,900 Prineville, 541-416-0300

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads The Bulletin 325

Hay, Grain & Feed 1st quality grass hay for horses. Barn stored, no rain, 2nd cutting, $220/ ton. Patterson Ranch, Sisters, 541-549-3831

Call a Pro Whether you need a fence ixed, hedges trimmed or a house built, you’ll ind professional help in The Bulletin’s “Call a Service Professional” Directory

541-385-5809

Take care of your investments with the help from The Bulletin’s “Call A Service Professional” Directory 333

Poultry, Rabbits, & Supplies Eggs, farm fresh, extra large browns, $2.50/ dozen, 541-433-2112 341

Want to buy Alfalfa standing, in Central Ore. 541-419-2713

Horses & Equipment COLT STARTING We build solid foundations. Check us out. 541-419-3405

Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedding Straw & Garden Straw;Compost.546-6171 www.steelduststable.com

LARGE west side Bend equestrian center on 80 acres now boarding. Indoor/outdoor arena, indoor hot/cold showers, automated exerciser, extensive trail system. Call for info, 541-306-7507. Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale 358

Farmers Column 10X20 STORAGE BUILDINGS for protecting hay, firewood, livestock etc. $1496 Installed. 541-617-1133. CCB #173684. kfjbuilders@ykwc.net

Employment

400 421

Schools & Training

TRUCK SCHOOL

www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235 470

Domestic & In-Home Positions

Caregiver, live-in fulltime, housing & food included; salary nego. Compassionate, responsible, kind. References & back(15) Main line irrigation ground check req’d. pipe, 40’ x 5”, $1.80/ft. Contact Maureen, 541-604-4415 541-385-8906 or 541-480-1380 Want to buy Alfalfa standing, in Central Person needed to mow Ore. 541-419-2713 lawn in Redmond. Must have lawn mower. Call Sell an Item after 6 pm., leave msg. 541-923-1528.

FAST! If it's under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for: $10 - 3 lines, 7 days $16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only)

476

Employment Opportunities AV Tech - Swank Audio Visuals is seeking a PT Audio Visual Technician in Sunriver. For more information or to apply please visit www.swankav.com Become a Team Member. EOE

Caregiver – Night MANUFACTURING Shifts avail. Apply in Central Oregon mill is person. Interviews this accepting resumes for week. 1099 NE Watt a full time Way, Bend. Caregiver Prineville Senior care home looking for Care Manager for multiple shift, part-time to full-time. Pass criminal background check. 541-447-5773.

HELP WANTED! Immediate opening

No experience nec. Exc. training program. Opportunity for advancement, full or part time. Call 541-550-8801.

DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW?

Call The Bulletin before 11 a.m. and get an ad in to publish the next day!

541-385-5809. VIEW the Classifieds at:

www.bendbulletin.com

MAINTENANCE North Unit Irrigation District is accepting applications for a Damtender at Wickiup Reservoir. The Damtender is responsible for day-to-day operation and maintenance of Wickiup dam. See www.northunitid.com for job description and application, or contact (541) 475-3625.

Forklift Operator

with cabinet shop experience who can multi task. High energy for a fast paced environment needed. We offer an excellent benefits package. Pay is D.O.E. Please email your resume to: Employment.resumes@ ymail.com

Mechanic - small engine. High-production repair facility seeking qualified professional. who has exp. in lawn & garden equip. industry. People skills a must. Incl. benefits. FT or PT considered. 541-382-6769. Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin' s web site will be able to click through automatically to your site.

RV Tech

Big Country RV, Central Oregon's largest RV dealership is seeking an experienced RV Tech, top dollar & benefits. Great working environment. Apply in person at: 3111 N. Canal Blvd, Redmond

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Estate Sales

Sales Northwest Bend

Sales Northeast Bend

Sales Northeast Bend

Sales Redmond Area

Sales Redmond Area

Garage Sale - Great Acre Sale - June 7th, 8th The Annual $1 Sale! stuff! Collector knives, & 9th, Everything must Kearney St. Boutique swords, radial arm go! 25239 Cultous Ln, Sat., 6/9, 10am, no saw, gas cans, some Bend (Just off Alfalfa early birds please! Ford accessories, & Mkt. Rd), follow signs. 355 NE Kearney much, much more! Fri (same st. as Taco Bell) 6/8, 8-5; Sat 6/9, 8-4, 541-382-8131 A Mega Yard Sale 65530 78th St., Bend. To Support Youth 288 Missions! Antiques, Multi-Family Sale: Fri. Sales Southeast Bend furniture & other & Sat., 9-4, rain/shine, treasures! Sat., 6/9, Lots of household BARLEYCORN LANE 7:30-2:30 Eastmont items, vintage wicker neighborhood garage Church 62425 chairs, heavy iron pot sale in Nottingham Eagle Rd rack, bedding, dishes, Square off SE 15th 520 NW Riverside Just bought a new boat? Fri. 8-5, Sat. 8-? Blvd. Cash only. Sell your old one in the Bear Creek Village Cabinets, old DeWalt classiieds! Ask about our e-bayer empties storradial arm saw, tools, Our First Sale! Sat., 8-3, Super Seller rates! age! Multiple sellers, foosball table, clothes, 2 Households into 1! 541-385-5809 Fri. & Sat. 9-2. Signs stereo & spkrs, kitQuality items priced to up at 9! sell, Kitchen, garden, chen items, women’s ESTATE SALE fishing, camping...Too socks, etc. Sat. 8-4, Fri. & Sat., 8-5, 20611 Daisy Lane. much to list. 610 NW 6498 SE Nighthawk, HH FREE HH Portland Ave. Prineville SALE, MULTI-FAMILY. (Juniper Canyon) Garage Sale Kit Sat. only 8 - 3. 284 Kitchen Table/chairs, bar Place an ad in The 1158 SE Teakwood Dr. stools, entertainment Sales Southwest Bend Bulletin for your gaDon't miss it! center, bookcases, side rage sale and re290 tables, hutch, depres- Estate/Yard Sale Fri. 9-4 ceive a Garage Sale sion glass, butter & Sat. 9-3, to benefit Sales Redmond Area Kit FREE! churn, 2 sets china, Bend Junior Bowlers. vintage books, buttons, KIT INCLUDES: NO EARLY BIRDS! ESTATE SALE! handwork, baby Held rain or shine. To- • 4 Garage Sale Signs Beautiful home, imclothes, Christmas, Vitally enclosed. 60058 • $1.00 Off Coupon To maculate things! Anking sewing machine, Use Toward Your Cinder Butte Rd., tiques include maSinger serger, quilts, Next Ad DRW, follow signs, 1.3 hogany secretary quilting fabric,upholstry miles from Baker Rd. • 10 Tips For “Garage desk, small furn. & material, large air comSale Success!” Furniture, lamps, side tables, pictures, cranpressor, toys & more. tables, kitchen table w/ • And Inventory Sheet berry lamps, Rose Please no early sales! 4 chairs, small kitchen Chintz dishes, FostoPICK UP YOUR NANETTE’S ESTATE & appl., dishes, framed & ria, Oriental & CloiMOVING SALES unframed art, col- GARAGE SALE KIT at sonne, silver, jewelry & 1777 SW Chandler lectibles, books, 40 yrs watches, beautiful Ave., Bend, OR 97702 282 of Playboy. dining set, newer full Sales Northwest Bend Garage Sale:Fri. & Sat. bed, quality kitchenware, linens, ladies 9-4, 60976 Snow$$ BAG LADIES $$ clothing, tools, garage, berry Pl, books, tools, of Union St. yard sale. outdoor fountain, golf equip,much more! Garage Sale: Fri. & All table items shelving, health care Sat., 8-12, 3137 NE items, three bikes, ONE DOLLAR! Multi-Family Sale: Fri., Barrington Ct.(Provimuch more! Sat. 9-3, Sat., Sun., 8-6, Andence), furniture, kids Weather Permitting, tiques, furniture, camp toy elec. tractor, bal- 2257 NW Maple Ct., 1319 NW Union St. off 22nd & Maple gear, household, artance bikes/bike, toys, Friday & Saturday, 9-4. work, reloading equip., clothes,camping gear. Crowd control numBIG Yard Sale, Fri & 19032 Shoshone Rd bers Friday 8:00 a.m Sat, 9am-4pm, 18431 People Look for Information Pinehurst Rd. An- Pinebrook Blvd. NeigAttic Estates & AppraisAbout Products and borhood Sale:Sat. 8-4, tiques, household gds, als 541-350-6822 near Wal Mart, many Services Every Day through books, clothing, furatticestatesandappraisThe Bulletin Classifieds homes participating. niture, & lots more! als.com Big and Tall Men’s Estate Sale: Old skis, bikes, huge amount XXL clothes/ shoes, tools, household items, furniture, electronics, big screen TVs,too much to list! SATURDAY ONLY, June 9! 8-4 2802 N.E. Ocker St, Bend

EMPLOYMENT 410 - Private Instruction 421 - Schools and Training 454 - Looking for Employment 470 - Domestic & In-Home Positions 476 - Employment Opportunities 486 - Independent Positions 476

476

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Sales - Garden center Sales Person needed with 2-3 years experience required, including good knowledge of Central Oregon plants. Please Email your resume to melissa@schultzfa rmandgarden.com or fax to 541-923-2576.

Get your business

GROWIN

G

with an ad in The Bulletin’s “Call A Service Professional” Directory

The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to FRAUD. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Golf clubs, bags, sets Parking Lot Sale - loads of all kinds of great (Taylor Made, Callastuff in the Highland way & more), elecBaptist Church parktronics, furniture, ing lot Saturday, June tools. 35th & Rein9 8a to 4p. 3100 SW deer. Fri.-Sat., 9-3. Highland Ave., RedHUGE ANNUAL mond. 541-548-4161. Crooked River Ranch Proceeds support CAUTION READERS: Seniors Yard & Plant mission teams to Peru Sale Fri. & Sat. 9-5. and Moldova. Ads published in "EmSun. 9-2. (June 8, 9, ployment Opportuni10). Senior Center, World Famous Multities" include em6710 Ranch House Family Garage Sale ployee and Place, Crooked River Tetherow Crossing, independent posiRanch. Msg. Phone 4675 NW 62nd St. tions. Ads for posi541-504-8236 Sat., Jun. 9, 8am-4pm tions that require a fee Lots of quality items, June 8 and 9, 834 NW or upfront investment all priced to sell! ConNegus Lane. 8-4 on must be stated. With signment quality Friday, 8-1 on Sat., any independent job clothing, tools, BBQ, misc., boat, micro, TV opportunity, please Honda 4-wheeler, reel investigate thorlawnmower, trail bike, Kurt Kendrick Benefit RV car tow pkg, staoughly. Auction & Yard Sale, tionary bike, Sony surJune 9th, 9am-4pm, round system, 2 nice Use extra caution when Redmond Grange chairs, kayak loading applying for jobs onHall. Live music! Golf system, dozens of gift certificates, $300 line and never proflower pots, Meade tattoo, dairy heifer, 1 vide personal infortelescope, camp ton hay, 1.5 cords mation to any source stove, Hi-Lift jack, dog wood, wall tent wood you may not have rehouse, computer. stove, handcrafted searched and deemed AND much more!! Juniper jewelry box. to be reputable. Use Yard sale includes $4 extreme caution when 292 clothing bag sale, too responding to ANY Sales Other Areas much to list! online employment www.giveforward.com/ ad from out-of-state. CureKurt Huge Moving Sale. 40 yrs of treasures. 6/9 & We suggest you call Moving/Yard Sale, Sat 6/10, 9-4. 53346 Rivthe State of Oregon & Sun, Jun 9-10, 8-3, erview Dr., LaPine. Consumer Hotline at 4424 NE Walnut Ave, 541-536-1015. 1-503-378-4320 weather permitting. Multi-family Sale, Sat only, 8am-3pm, 1232 SW Rimrock Way. Kids clothes, tools, antiques, furniture, men’s & women’s clothes, household goods & decor. USE THE CLASSIFIEDS! Door-to-door selling with fast results! It’s the easiest way in the world to sell. The Bulletin Classiied

541-385-5809

FINANCE AND BUSINESS 507 - Real Estate Contracts 514 - Insurance 528 - Loans and Mortgages 543 - Stocks and Bonds 558 - Business Investments 573 - Business Opportunities

Finance & Business

500

Wastewater Operator I CITY OF MADRAS Operates and maintains the City’s utility systems, which include wastewater, water and stormwater. 528 Reports to the Utilities Supervisor. The Loans & Mortgages position requires the equivalent to an WARNING Associate’s Degree in The Bulletin recomchemistry, biology, or mends you use caua wastewater treattion when you proment discipline, plus vide personal one year of experiinformation to compaence in wastewater nies offering loans or treatment operations. credit, especially Certifications required those asking for adare Oregon Wastevance loan fees or water Treatment Level companies from out of I and Oregon Wastestate. If you have water Collections Levconcerns or quesel I. Additional industions, we suggest you try training or certificonsult your attorney cation may substitute or call CONSUMER for some higher eduHOTLINE, cation. Must possess 1-877-877-9392. valid Oregon commercial driver’s license with a Class B Reverse Mortgages rating, as well as by local expert tanker and air-brake Mike LeRoux endorsements. NMLS57716 Monthly salary range: Call to learn more. $2,797-$3,165 DOQ. 541-350-7839 Excellent benefit Security1 Lending package including NMLS98161 fully paid PERS. Send completed city appli573 cation form, letter of interest and resume to Business Opportunities “Wastewater Operator I Recruitment”, City of Madras, 71 SE Looking for your “D” Street, Madras, next employee? OR 97741-1685. For Place a Bulletin help a complete job de- wanted ad today and scription and applicareach over 60,000 tion go to readers each week. www.ci.madras.or.us Your classified ad Closing date: will also appear on June 20, 2012. bendbulletin.com Equal Opportunity which currently reEmployer ceives over 1.5 million page views Want to impress the every month at no extra cost. relatives? Remodel Bulletin Classifieds your home with the Get Results! Call help of a professional 385-5809 or place from The Bulletin’s your ad on-line at “Call A Service bendbulletin.com Professional” Directory

NOTICE

Remember to remove For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Buyour Garage Sale signs reau of Labor & In(nails, staples, etc.) dustry, Civil Rights after your Sale event Division, is over! THANKS! 971-673-0764 From The Bulletin and your local utility If you have any quescompanies. tions, concerns or comments, contact: Kevin O’Connell Classified Department www.bendbulletin.com Manager The Bulletin Find exactly what 541-383-0398 you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

541-385-5809


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, JUNE 7, 2012 G3

Real Estate For Sale RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - Roommate Wanted 616 - Want To Rent 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 630 - Rooms for Rent 631 - Condos & Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for Rent General 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space

Rentals

682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 730 - New Listings 732 - Commercial Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740 - Condos & Townhomes for Sale 744 - Open Houses 745 - Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest Bend Homes 747 - Southwest Bend Homes 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 749 - Southeast Bend Homes 750 - Redmond Homes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson County Homes 757 - Crook County Homes 762 - Homes with Acreage 763 - Recreational Homes and Property 764 - Farms and Ranches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land 634

659

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

Houses for Rent Sunriver

600

Alpine Meadows Townhomes

605

Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

Roommate Wanted

1, 2 & 3 bdrm apts. Starting at $625. 541-330-0719

In River Meadows a 3 bdrm, 1.5 bath, 1376 sq. ft., woodstove, brand new carpet/oak floors, W/S pd, $895. 541-480-3393 or 541-610-7803 687

Room for rent, Just bring Located by BMC/Costco, your tooth brush, 1 2 bdrm, 2 bath duplex, Commercial for bdrm, full bath, office, 55+,2350 NEMary Rose Rent/Lease kitchen use, fully Pl, #1, $795 no smoking stocked with utensils. or pets, 541-390-7649 Office/Warehouse loBeautiful home at The cated in SE Bend. Up SPRING IN FOR A Green Golf Course in to 30,000 sq.ft., comGREAT DEAL!! Redmond. $500/mo. + petitive rate, small utility bill. Own- $299 1st month’s rent! * 541-382-3678. 2 bdrm, 1 bath ers absent often. $530 & 540 541-279-9538. Carports & A/C incl! Warehouse - Industrial Need help ixing stuff? Fox Hollow Apts. unit for rent. 5600 Call A Service Professional (541) 383-3152 sq.ft., $2250/month, ind the help you need. Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co near Bend High. *Upstairs only with lease* www.bendbulletin.com 541-389-8794. 630

636

Rooms for Rent

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend

Studios & Kitchenettes Beautiful updated, cozy 1 bdrm, 2 bath 1100 Furnished room, TV w/ sq. ft. condo, 2 blocks cable, micro & fridge. from downtown, along Utils & linens. New banks of Deschutes, owners.$145-$165/wk A/C, 1 parking spot, 541-382-1885 indoor pool, hot tub & sauna, credit & ref. check, min. 1 yr. lease, no pets. $675, utilities included. St. Jude Novena. May Kerrie, 541-480-0325. the Sacred Heart of Jesus be adored, glo650 rified, loved and preserved throughout the Houses for Rent world, now and forNE Bend ever. Sacred Heart of Jesus, pray for us; St. A quiet newer 3 bdrm, Jude, worker of 2.5 bath, 1692 sq.ft., miracles, pray for us; mtn views. dbl. gaSt. Jude, helper of the rage w/opener. $1195 hopeless, pray for us. Say this prayer 9 times 541-480-3393,610-7803. a day. It has never 658 been known to fail. Houses for Rent Publication must be promised. Thank you, Redmond Jesus & St. Jude. M.L. St. Jude Prayer, May Spacious Country home in NE Redmond. 2 the Sacred Heart of master bdrm/bath Jesus be adored, glosuites, large living rm, rified, loved and prespacious kitchen/dinserved throughout the ing, $725, taking appliworld, now and forcations, 541-419-1917. ever. Sacred Heart of Jesus, pray for us; St. Have an item to Jude Worker of Miracles, pray for us; sell quick? Helper of the HopeIf it’s under less, pray for us. Say this prayer 9 times $500 you can place it in a day and by the The Bulletin eighth day,your prayer shall be answered. It Classiieds for: has never been known to fail. Publica$ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days tion must be prom$ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days ised. Thank you St. Jude for Granting me (Private Party ads only) my Petition, CVW.

personals

PUBLISHER'S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, marital status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women, and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-877-0246. The toll free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

700 732

Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale

749

773

860

870

Southeast Bend Homes

Acreages

Motorcycles & Accessories

Boats & Accessories

3 Bdrm, 1 level, approx. 4 yrs. old, like new, 1322 sq.ft., dbl. garage w/opener, nice open plan, A/C,media panel, quiet cul-de-sac, low maint. yard, on land lease, $68,000, 503-810-5661.

5 acres adjoins public land over Deschutes River. $79,900. MLS #201102328. Call Linda Lou Day-Wright, Broker, 541-771-2585 Crooked River Realty

800

5-Acre corner lot, flat & fully treed. $49,900. MLS#201109114, Call Nancy Popp, Principal Broker 541-815-8000 Crooked River Realty

Snowmobiles

756

Jefferson County Homes

½ acre in Prineville OR industrial park 24'x80' 1.05 Acres, Jefferson view, $149,900, shop with 40'x60' MLS#20120184 Call unfinished addition, Linda Lou Day-Wright $160,000. Call for *** 541-771-2585 more info; can send CHECK YOUR AD Crooked River Realty pics. 541-604-0344 Please check your ad Private nice area close on the first day it runs 740 in at Crooked River to make sure it is corCondo/Townhomes Ranch. 3 bdrm., 2 rect. Sometimes inbath, very nice DBL for Sale structions over the car garage, $116,900, phone are misunderMLS 201202001. stood and an error $125,900 townCall Julie Fahlgren can occur in your ad. house 2 bdrm/2 Broker 541-550-0098 If this happens to your bath. Near shops/ Crooked River Realty ad, please contact us hospital. Passive the first day your ad Price Reduced 1783 sq. solar heat, wood appears and we will ft. LOG HOME 1.49 stove, garage, pribe happy to fix it as acre rim lot. Double vate patio. HOA's soon as we can. garage. $259,000. $207/mo. Deadlines are: WeekMLS 201109591. 1953 NE Otelah Pl. days 11:00 noon for Call Nancy Popp BroCall 503-881-6540 next day, Sat. 11:00 ker 541-815-8000 a.m. for Sunday and Crooked River Realty Monday. 745 Price Reduced - Cus541-385-5809 tom home near CRR Homes for Sale Thank you! entrance and golf! In- The Bulletin Classified cludes garage, shop, 4270 sq ft, 6 bdrm, 6 ba, *** greenhouse. Re4-car, corner, .83 acre duced to $154,900. Nice mountain views, mtn view, by owner. 3.09 acres, $95,950 $590,000 541-390-0886 MLS 201200663. See: bloomkey.com/8779 MLS#201101554. Call Call Nancy Popp BroLinda Lou Day-Wright, ker 541-815-8000 BANK OWNED HOMES! Crooked River Realty Broker, 541-771-2585 FREE List w/Pics! Crooked River Realty 762 www.BendRepos.com bend and beyond real estate Homes with Acreage FIND IT! 20967 yeoman, bend or BUY IT! 1592 sq.ft., 3 bdrm, 2 COUNTRY LIVING SELL IT! bath, site-built, 2 car The Bulletin Classiieds NEAR SISTERS. attached heated ga17160 MOUNTAIN rage, 24x36 heated, Nice Smith Rock views, VIEW RD - SISTERS 5.3 Acres, near enfinished shop w/10’ $249,900. ceilings & 220V power, trance of The Ranch, This immaculate 3 bedall on 1.22 treed acre MLS#2710905 room home sits on lot in CRR, too much to Call Linda Lou just over one acre and list, $195,000. Call Day-Wright, Broker, has been beautifully 541-504-8730 541-771-2585 upgraded with many stone and tile fea- 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 30x48 Crooked River Realty tures. Tile over radiRV/Auto Garage, 1.66 775 ant floor heating proacre rim lot, $159,900, Manufactured/ vides very MLS#201202284 comfortable and effi- Call Nancy Popp, Princ. Mobile Homes cient warmth. This Broker 541-815-8000 single story home has Crooked River Realty 3 Bdrm., 2 bath, just a maple kitchen with under 2 fenced acres, 771 quality stainless steel 2001 manufactured in Lots appliances, 9 foot great cond., $79,900, ceilings and has been MLS#201201999, Call Mountain views. Drivebeautifully landJulie Fahlgren, Broway in place. 1.02 scaped. The living ker, 541-550-0098 acres. $53,900 room has a full stone Crooked River Realty MLS#201103466 wall with nooks and a Call Melody Curry, real wood fireplace. It Get your is nestled among the Broker, 541-771-1116 trees in an area of up- Crooked River Realty business scale homes. Great Mountain views. 1.22 affordable value, just acres $52,500 minutes to Sisters!! MLS#201105164. Gary Everett, CCIM Call Melody Curry, Principal Broker Broker, 541-771-1116 541-480-6130 Crooked River Realty With an ad in Remax 2.09 acres, huge Cascade Views, $99,900 Golf course home, 2363 The Bulletin's MLS#201104501 sq ft, 3 bdrm 3 bath + bonus room, Melody Curry, Broker, "Call A Service 541-771-1116 $299,000. Crooked River Realty MLS#201103975 Professional" Call Nancy Popp Owner will carry! fanBroker, 541-815-8000 Directory tastic 1/2 acre lot with Crooked River Realty views. $59,900. MLS 201008725 NOTICE: Call Julie Fahlgren, All real estate adverBroker 541-550-0098 tised here in is sub- Crooked River Realty ject to the Federal Price reduction! Fair Housing Act, $44,500 1.16 acre which makes it illegal MLS#201105165 to advertise any prefCall Melody Curry, erence, limitation or discrimination based Broker, 541-771-1116 on race, color, reli- Crooked River Realty gion, sex, handicap, 773 familial status or naAcreages tional origin, or intention to make any such preferences, limita- 13920 SW Commercial Loop. $20,000 tions or discrimination. MLS#201108857 We will not knowingly accept any advertis- Call Melody Curry, ing for real estate Broker, 541-771-1116 which is in violation of Crooked River Realty this law. All persons Over 7 acres private are hereby informed acres at CRR. that all dwellings ad$112,900 vertised are available MLS#201106739. on an equal opportu- Call Julie Fahlgren, nity basis. The BulleBroker 541-550-0098 tin Classified Crooked River Realty

GRO W

ING

Boats & RV’s

Piaggio LT50 Scooter 2003 , rarely driven in 9 yrs, only 660 miles, mint condition; plus 2 helmets, a Mote Tote tow bar and tie down accessories, all for only $1750. Call 541-389-3044

850

Polaris 2003, 4 cycle, fuel inj, elec start, reverse, 2-up seat, cover, 4900 mi, $2500 obo. 541-280-0514

865

ATVs

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500. 541-389-1413

860

Motorcycles & Accessories Yamaha YFZ450 2005 Sport Race quad, built 4-mil stroked to 470cc, lots of mods, $4950 obo Call 541-647-8931

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530

870

Harley Davidson Heritage Classic 2000, Softail, 7200 mi, many extras, $8000. Call 541-419-5634 Harley Davidson SoftTail Deluxe 2007, white/cobalt, w/passenger kit, Vance & Hines muffler system & kit, 1045 mi., exc. cond, $19,999, 541-389-9188. Harley Heritage Softail, 2003 $5,000+ in extras, $2000 paint job, 30K mi. 1 owner, For more information please call 541-385-8090 or 209-605-5537

Boats & Accessories

12’ Aluminum Boat, 5HP motor, $875, 503-319-5745.

Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classiieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 14’ Klamath Deluxe, 541-385-5809 2001,15hp Mercury, + electric trolling motor, GENERATE SOME exlow hours, trailer & citement in your neigseats included, borhood. Plan a ga$3250. 541-977-0903 rage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

HD FAT BOY 1996

Completely rebuilt/ customized, low miles. Accepting offers. 541-548-4807

18.5’ ‘05 Reinell 185, V-6 Volvo Penta, 270HP, low hrs., must see, $17,500, 541-330-3939

Used out-drive parts - Mercury OMC rebuilt marine motors: 151 $1595; 3.0 $1895; 4.3 (1993), $1995. 541-389-0435

19.5’ 1988 373V Ranger Bass Boat, Mercury 115 Motor, Ranger trailer, trolling elec. motor, fish finder 875 & sonor, 2 live wells & all accessories, new Watercraft batteries & tires, great Honda CB900 Custom, cond., $6500. Ads published in "Wa1981, exc. cond., 27K, 541-923-6555. tercraft" include: Kay50 mpg., tune-up, aks, rafts and motorready for summer, ized personal $1595, 541-279-7092 watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809 19-ft Mastercraft ProStar 190 inboard, 1987, 290hp, V8, 822 Honda Shadow Arrow hrs, great cond, lots of 2006, exlnt cond, low extras, $10,000 obo. mi, always garaged, 541-231-8709 $3900. 541-420-4869 HD FXST Softail 2003 Annv Edition 12200 mi: Inc. Extras Excl Cond; $8,900 541-504-6912

Honda VT700 Shadow 1984, 23K mi, many new parts, battery charger, good condition. Now for $1000, cash! 541-598-4351

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

19’ Glass Ply, Merc cruiser, depth finder, Reach thousands of readers! trolling motor, trailer, Call 541-385-5809 $3500, 541-389-1086 The Bulletin Classifieds or 541-419-8034. Advertise your car! Add A Picture!

Inflatable Raft,Sevylor Fishmaster 325,10’3”, complete pkg., $650 Firm, 541-977-4461.

Kayak, Eddyline Sandpiper, 12’, like new, $975, 541-420-3277.

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 (This special package is not available on our website)

Building/Contracting

Electrical Services

NOTICE: Oregon state Quality Builders Electric law requires any• Remodels one who contracts • Home Improvement for construction work • Lighting Upgrades to be licensed with the • Hot Tub Hook-ups Construction Con541-389-0621 tractors Board (CCB). www.qbelectric.net An active license CCB#127370 Elect means the contractor Lic#9-206C is bonded and insured. Verify the Need to get an contractor’s CCB liad in ASAP? cense through the You can place it CCB Consumer Website online at: www.hirealicensedcontractor. www.bendbulletin.com com or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recom541-385-5809 mends checking with the CCB prior to conExcavating tracting with anyone. Some other trades Levi’s Dirt Works: All also require additional licenses and your excavation needs: Small jobs for Homecertifications. owners - job or hr., Utility lines,Concrete, Public Computer/Cabling Install Works, Subcontracting, Custom pads, Driveway QB Digital Living grading - low cost-get rid •Computer Networking of pot holes & smooth out •Phone/Data/TV Jacks your drive,Augering,ccb# •Whole House Audio 194077, 541-639-5282 •Flat Screen TV & Installation Handyman 541-280-6771 www.qbdigitalliving.com ERIC REEVE HANDY CCB#127370 Elect SERVICES. Home & Lic#9-206C Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Check out the Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. On-time classiieds online promise. Senior Discount. Work guarwww.bendbulletin.com anteed. 541-389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Updated daily Bonded & Insured CCB#181595 Debris Removal I DO THAT! JUNK BE GONE Home/Rental repairs I Haul Away FREE Small jobs to remodels Honest, guaranteed For Salvage. Also work. CCB#151573 Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel, 541-389-8107 Dennis 541-317-9768

Landscaping/Yard Care

More Than Service Peace Of Mind

Spring Clean Up

•Leaves •Cones •Needles •Debris Hauling •Aeration •Dethatching Compost Top Dressing Weed free Bark & flower beds ORGANIC PROGRAMS

Landscape Maintenance

Full or Partial Service •Mowing •Edging •Pruning •Weeding Sprinkler Adjustments

Fertilizer included with monthly program Weekly, monthly or one time service. EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential

Free Estimates Senior Discounts

541-390-1466

Same Day Response Where can you ind a helping hand? From contractors to yard care, it’s all here in The Bulletin’s “Call A Service Professional” Directory

Landscaping/Yard Care

Landscaping/Yard Care

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Landscape Construction which includes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-features, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be licensed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be included in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before contracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

Call The Yard Doctor for yard maintenance, thatching, sod, sprinkler blowouts, water features, more! Allen 541-536-1294 LCB 5012 Need to get an ad in ASAP? Fax it to 541-322-7253 The Bulletin Classiieds Aeration / Dethatching BOOK NOW! Weekly / one-time service avail. Bonded, insured, free estimates!

COLLINS Lawn Maint. Call 541-480-9714 Maverick Landscaping Mowing, weedeating, yard detailing, chain saw work & more! LCB#8671 541-923-4324 Holmes Landscape Maint

• Clean-up • Aerate • De-thatch • Free Est. • Weekly / Bi-wkly Svc. call Josh 541-610-6011

Nelson Landscape Painting/Wall Covering Maintenance Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial

•Sprinkler Activation & Repair •Back Flow Testing •Thatch & Aerate • Spring Clean up

All About Painting

Interior/Exterior/Decks. Mention this ad get 15% Off interior or exterior job. Restrictions do apply. Free Estimates. CCB #148373 541-420-6729

•Weekly Mowing •Bi-Monthly & Monthly WESTERN PAINTING Maintenance CO. Richard Hayman, •Flower Bed Clean Up a semi-retired paint•Bark, Rock, Etc. ing contractor of 45 •Senior Discounts years. Small Jobs

Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458 LCB#8759

Welcome. Interior & Exterior. ccb#5184. 541-388-6910

www.bendbulletin.com

541-385-5809


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

G4 THURSDAY, JUNE 7, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

BOATS & RVs 805 - Misc. Items 850 - Snowmobiles 860 - Motorcycles And Accessories 865 - ATVs 870 - Boats & Accessories 875 - Watercraft 880 - Motorhomes 881 - Travel Trailers 882 - Fifth Wheels 885 - Canopies and Campers 890 - RV’s for Rent

AUTOS & TRANSPORTATION 908 - Aircraft, Parts and Service 916 - Trucks and Heavy Equipment 925 - Utility Trailers 927 - Automotive Trades 929 - Automotive Wanted 931 - Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 932 - Antique and Classic Autos 933 - Pickups 935 - Sport Utility Vehicles 940 - Vans 975 - Automobiles

880

880

880

Motorhomes

Motorhomes

Motorhomes

2002 Country Coach Intrigue 40' Tag axle. 400hp Cummins Diesel. Two slide-outs. 41,000 miles. Most options. $110,000 OBO 541-678-5712

Beaver Patriot 2000, Walnut cabinets, solar, Bose, Corian, tile, 4 door fridge., 1 slide, W/D. $75,000 541-215-5355

Coachman Freelander 2011, 27’, queen bed, 1 slide, HD TV, DVD player, 450 Ford, $49,000, please call 541-923-5754. People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through The Bulletin Classifieds CAN’T BEAT THIS! Look before you buy, below market value ! Size & mileage DOES matter, Class A 32’ Hurricane by Four Winds, 2007. 12,500 mi, all amenities, Ford V10, lthr, cherry, slides, like new, can see anytime, $58,000. 541-548-5216 Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 in. kitchen slide out, new tires,under cover, hwy. miles only,4 door fridge/freezer icemaker, W/D combo, Interbath tub & shower, 50 amp propane gen & more! $55,000. 541-948-2310

880

882

882

882

882

885

Motorhomes

Fifth Wheels

Fifth Wheels

Fifth Wheels

Fifth Wheels

Canopies & Campers

Winnebago Outlook 32’ 2008, Ford V10 eng, Wineguard sat, TV, sur- round sound stereo + more. Reduced to $49,000. 541-526-1622 or 541-728-6793

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $12,750. 541-923-3417.

881

Travel Trailers

Fleetwood 24’ Pioneer Spirit, 2007, good cond, minor dent on front saves you $$! $8000. 541-419-5634

Carri-Lite Luxury 2009 by Carriage, 4 slideouts, inverter, satellite sys, fireplace, 2 flat screen TVs. $60,000. 541-480-3923

Hunter’s Delight! Package deal! 1988 Winnebago Super Chief, 38K miles, great National Sea Breeze 2004 M-1341 35’, gas, Jayco Eagle 2000 26’ Check out the shape; 1988 Bronco II 2 power slides, up- $10,500 OBO. 14’ slide, classiieds online 4x4 to tow, 130K graded queen matawning, air, heat, gen- www.bendbulletin.com mostly towed miles, tress, hyd. leveling tly used. 541-595-2003 nice rig! $15,000 both. Updated daily system, rear camera 541-382-3964, leave & monitor, only 6k mi. msg. SPRINGDALE 2005 A steal at $43,000! 27’, has eating area Jamboree 24’ 1982, 541-480-0617 slide, A/C and heat, Chevy 350, 66K, all new tires, all connew: cam, lifters, trans, RV CONSIGNMENTS tents included, bedpaint, brakes, batteries, WANTED upholstery, tires, fuel We Do The Work, You ding towels, cooking pump. Large fridge/ and eating utensils. Keep The Cash, freezer, 4-burner stove/ Great for vacation, On-Site Credit oven, solar charging, fishing, hunting or Approval Team, $5250 OBO, 541-549living! $15,500 Web Site Presence, 1736 or 808-936-7426. 541-408-3811 1000 We Take Trade-Ins. Free Advertising. Legal Notices BIG COUNTRY RV Bend 541-330-2495 LEGAL NOTICE Jayco Greyhawk Redmond: 541-548-5254 IN THE CIRCUIT 2004, 31’ Class C, COURT OF THE 6800 mi., hyd. jacks, STATE OF OREGON new tires, slide out, FOR THE COUNTY OF exc. cond, $49,900, Springdale 29’ 2007, DESCHUTES 541-480-8648 slide,Bunkhouse style, Wells Fargo Bank, sleeps 7-8, excellent N.A., Plaintiff, vs. condition, $16,900, UNKNOWN HEIRS Southwind 35.5’ Triton, 541-390-2504 OF NELLIE M. 2008,V10, 2 slides, DuDEARING; KARpont UV coat, 7500 mi. LENE M. ADETUNJI; The Bulletin’s Avg NADA ret.114,343; BRENDA N. EDGER“Call A Service asking $99,000. TON; KERRY D. London Aire Motor Call 541-923-2774 Professional” Directory NEAL; KEVIN D. Home, class C, 28 ft. is all about meeting DEARING; 1990, in exc. shape, Tioga 30’ 2005, like new your needs. NI-LAH-SHA VILready to go. Sleeps 6, condition. E450 Super LAGE NO. 1 ASSOUpgrade your camping Duty, always garage Call on one of the CIATION, INC.; AND experience! $11,995. stored, 17,345 nonprofessionals today! OCCUPANTS OF Call 541-389-7955 smoker miles, awning, THE PREMISES, never cooked in, A/C, Defendants. No. sleeps 8. Motivated, Find exactly what 12CV0041. CIVIL now $39,500. For deyou are looking for in the SUMMONS. TO THE tails call 541-480-3217 CLASSIFIEDS DEFENDANTS: Unknown Heirs of Nellie M. Dearing. NOTICE TRADE? 2004 TO DEFENDANT: Sprinter 272RLS, 2009 Bounder by FleetREAD THESE PA29’, weatherized, like wood 35’ 3 slides, PERS CAREFULLY! new, furnished & loaded. 44k, very A lawsuit has been ready to go, incl Wineclean, reliable w/8.1 started against you in gard Satellite dish, Workhouse chassis, Monaco Dynasty 2004, the above-entitled $26,995. 541-420-9964 $45,000. loaded, 3 slides, Court by Wells Fargo 541-382-1853 $159,000, 541-923- 8572 Bank, N.A., Plaintiff. or 541-749-0037 (cell) Plaintiff's claim is stated in the written Say “goodbuy” Complaint, a copy of which is on file at the to that unused Weekend Warrior Toy Deschutes County item by placing it in Hauler 28’ 2007,Gen, Courthouse. You fuel station, exc cond. must "appear" in this The Bulletin Classiieds sleeps 8, black/gray case or the other side Monaco LaPalma 37’, interior, used 3X, will win automatically. 2004 w/ 2 slides, 25k $24,999. 541-385-5809 To "appear" you must mi., loaded, $42,500. 541-389-9188 file with the court a le541-923-3510. gal paper called a "motion" or "answer." The "motion" or "answer" must be given to the court clerk or administrator within 30 days along with the required filing fee. It must be in proper form and have proof of service on the plaintiff's attorney or, if the plaintiff does not have an attorney, proof of service on the plaintiff. The object of the complaint is to foreclose a deed of trust dated May 8, 2006 and recorded as Book 2006, Page 33597 given by Nellie M. Dearing on property commonly known as 1640 NE 6th Street, Redmond, OR 97756 and legally described as: Lot Twenty-three (23), NI-LAH-SHA, Deschutes County, Oregon. The complaint seeks to foreclose and terminate all interest of Unknown Heirs of Nellie M. Dearing and all other interests in the property. The "motion" or "answer" (or "reply") must be given to the court clerk or administrator within 30 days of the date of first publication specified herein along with the required filing fee. The date of first publication of the summons is May 17, 2012. If you have questions, you should see an attorney immediately. If you need help in finding an attorney, you may contact the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service online at www.oregonstatebar. org or by calling (503) 684-3763 (in the Portland metropolitan area) or toll-free elsewhere in Oregon at (800) 452-7636. /s/ Kelly D. Sutherland KELLY D. SUTHERLAND SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 1499 SE Tech Center Place, Suite 255 Vancouver, WA 98683 e-mail: ksutherland@logs.com Telephone: (360)260-2253 S&S 11-108563

To place your ad, visit www.bendbulletin.com or 541-385-5809 Hours: Monday - Friday 7:30am to 5:00pm Telephone Hours: Monday - Friday 7:30am - 5pm • Saturday 10am - 12:30pm 24 Hour Message Line: 541-383-2371: Place, cancel, or extend an ad after hours. 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702

Good classiied ads tell the essential facts in an interesting Manner. Write from the readers view - not the seller’s. Convert the facts into beneits. Show the reader how the item will help them in some way.

Lance 11.6 camper Mdl 1130, 1999. Ext’d cab, fully self-contained. Incl catalytic heater, TV/VCR combo. Very well taken care of, Fleetwood Wilderness Pilgrim 27’, 2007 5th clean. Hauls easily, 36’, 2005, 4 slides, wheel, 1 slide, AC, very comfortable. rear bdrm, fireplace, TV,full awning, excel$7300. 541-382-1344 AC, W/D hkup beaulent shape, $23,900. tiful unit! $30,500. 541-350-8629 541-815-2380 Take care of Need to get an your investments TURN THE PAGE ad in ASAP? Keystone Laredo 2009, For More Ads with the help from $30,000, 541-419-3301 You can place it or 541-419-4649 for The Bulletin The Bulletin’s online at: more info. “Call A Service www.bendbulletin.com Surge Guard protecProfessional” Directory tor 50 amp, like 541-385-5809 new, $200. Reese 16k 5th wheel hitch Lance-Legend 990 w/KwikSlide, $600. 11’3" 1998, w/ext-cab, 541-788-1974. exc. cond., generator, solar-cell, large refrig, Komfort 24’ 1999, 6’ AC, micro., magic fan, slide, fully loaded,never used since buying, bathroom shower, $8500, 541-923-0854. removable carpet, MONTANA 3585 2008, custom windows, outexc. cond., 3 slides, door shower/awning Call The Bulletin At Taurus 27.5’ 1988 king bed, lrg LR, Arcset-up for winterizing, Everything works, 541-385-5809 tic insulation, all opelec. jacks, CD/ste$1750/partial trade for tions $37,500. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail reo/4’ stinger. $8500. car. 541-460-9127 541-420-3250 At: www.bendbulletin.com Bend, 541.279.0458 Montana 34’ 2003, 2 slides, exc. cond. throughout, arctic winter pkg, new 10ply tires, W/D ready, price reduced, Now $18,000, 541-390-6531

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TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, JUNE 7, 2012 G5

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0030485593 T.S. No.: 12-01106-3 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust dated as of April 7, 2005 made by, JIM ATWOOD, JILL ATWOOD, as the original grantor, to DESCHUTES COUNTY TITLE, as the original trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICAN HOME MORTGAGE ACCEPTANCE, INC, as the original beneficiary, recorded on April 28, 2005, as Instrument No. 2005-25980 of Official Records in the Office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, Oregon (the "Deed of Trust"). The current beneficiary is: Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Indenture Trustee for American Home Mortgage Investment Trust 2005-2, (the "Beneficiary"). APN: 201012 D0 08000 LOT FORTY (40), BLOCK THIRTY-THREE (33), DESCHUTES RIVER RECREATION HOMESITES, INC., DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. APN: 201012 DO 08000 Commonly known as: 17020 GLENDALE RD, BEND, OR Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default(s) for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; and which defaulted amounts total: $4,743.95 as of May 16, 2012. By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $145,937.55 together with interest thereon at the rate of 3.58700% per annum from December 1, 2011 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all Trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as the duly appointed Trustee under the Deed of Trust will on September 26, 2012 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of the Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, Trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 135 Main Street, Suite 1900, San Francisco, CA 94105 415-247-2450 FOR SALE INFORMATION CALL: 714.730.2727 Website for Trustee's Sale Information: www.lpsasap.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: May 18, 2012 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Natalie Gold, Authorized Signature A-4250412 05/31/2012, 06/07/2012, 06/14/2012, 06/21/2012

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $ 500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for: $ $

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: LARSEN T.S. No.: 10-02352-5A Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust as of August 29, 2005 made by, GERHARD LARSEN AND CHRIS LARSEN, HUSBAND AND WIFE OR THE SURVIVOR THEREOF as the original Grantor to AMERITITLE, as the original trustee, in favor of WESTAMERICA BANK, CUSTODIAN FOR THE BENEFIT OF GEORGE S. SIMMONS ACCOUNT NO. 042575, AS TO AN UNDIVIDED ONE-THIRD INTEREST, AND, WESTAMERICA BANK, CUSTODIAN FOR THE BENEFIT OF EUGENE O. MICHELSON ACCOUNT NO. 042595, AS TO AN UNDIVIDED ONE-THIRD INTEREST, AND WESTAMERICA BANK, CUSTODIAN FOR THE BENEFIT OF JANET M. SIMMONS ACCOUNT NO. 042768, AS TO AN UNDIVIDED ONE-THIRD INTEREST, as the original Beneficiary, recorded on 09/02/2005, as Instrument No. 2005-59360 of Official Records in the Office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, Oregon (The "Deed of Trust"). The current beneficiary is: POLYCOMP TRUST COMPANY CUSTODIAN FBO GEORGE S. SIMMONS IRA AS TO AN UNDIVIDED ONE-THIRD INTEREST AND POLYCOMP TRUST COMPANY CUSTODIAN FBO FRANCES JEAN MICHELSON BENEFICIARY OF EUGENE O. MICHELSON IRA AS TO AN UNDIVIDED ONE-THIRD INTEREST AND POLYCOMP TRUST COMPANY CUSTODIAN FBO JANET M. SIMMONS IRA AS TO AN UNDIVIDED ONE-THIRD INTEREST, (the "Beneficiary"). APN: 20 10 31D0 06500 LOT FOUR (4), BLOCK EIGHT (8), FIRST ADDITION TO FALL RIVER ESTATES, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 54824 LONESOME PINE RD BEND, OR Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default(s) for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay the balance of the principal sum which became due; together with interest due thereon; failed to pay attorneys' fees and expenses; failed to pay insurance premiums; failed to pay advances made by the Beneficiary; and which defaulted amounts total: $228,349.82 Interest as of May 21, 2012. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $164,000.00 together with interest thereon at the rate of 9.00000% per annum from December 31, 2006 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on 10/3/2012 at the hour of 01:00 PM, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, At the front entrance to the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond St., Bend, OR, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 11000 Olson Drive Ste 101, Rancho Cordova, CA 95670 916-636-0114 FOR SALE INFORMATION CALL: 714-573-1965 Website for Trustee's Sale Information: www.priorityposting.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "Grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owning an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 6/3/2012 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Rachel Cissney, Authorized Signature P954933 6/7, 6/14, 6/21, 06/28/2012

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE The Trustee under the terms of the Trust Deed described herein, at the direction of the Beneficiary, hereby elects to sell the property described in the Trust Deed to satisfy the obligations secured thereby. Pursuant to ORS 86.745, the following information is provided: 1.PARTIES: Grantor: TONY ATKINSON, KELLY ATKINSON, and KATHY J. FISH. Trustee: FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON. Successor Trustee:NANCY K. CARY. Beneficiary:WORLD SAVINGS BANK, FSB. 2.DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: The real property is described as follows: Lot 25, RIDGEWATER II PUD, Deschutes County, Oregon. 3. RECORDING. The Trust Deed was recorded as follows: Date Recorded: November 6, 2006. Recording No. 2006-73533 Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 4.DEFAULT. The Grantor or any other person obligated on the Trust Deed and Promissory Note secured thereby is in default and the Beneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed for failure to pay: Monthly payments in the amount of $1,890.56 each, due the fifteenth of each month, for the months of September 2009 through March 2012; plus late charges and advances; plus any unpaid real property taxes or liens, plus interest. 5.AMOUNT DUE. The amount due on the Note which is secured by the Trust Deed referred to herein is: Principal balance in the amount of $431,624.50; plus interest at an adjustable rate pursuant to the terms of the Promissory Note from August 15, 2009; plus late charges of $2,469.02; plus advances and foreclosure attorney fees and costs. 6.SALE OF PROPERTY. The Trustee hereby states that the property will be sold to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed. A Trustee's Notice of Default and Election to Sell Under Terms of Trust Deed has been recorded in the Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 7.TIME OF SALE. Date:August 2, 2012. Time:11:00 a.m. Place:Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon. 8. RIGHT TO REINSTATE. Any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the Trustee conducts the sale, to have this foreclosure dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, by curing any other default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed and by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with the trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amount provided in ORS 86.753. You may reach the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at 503-684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be available if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.org. Any questions regarding this matter should be directed to Lisa Summers, Paralegal, (541) 686-0344 (TS #17368.30732). DATED: March 14, 2012. /s/ Nancy K. Cary. Nancy K. Cary, Successor Trustee. Hershner Hunter, LLP, P.O. Box 1475, Eugene, OR 97440. 1000

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx3255 T.S. No.: 1334213-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Robert E Smith and Susan G Smith Husband & Wife, as Grantor to Fidelity Title, as Trustee, in favor of First Horizon Home Loan Corporation, as Beneficiary, dated July 17, 2003, recorded August 14, 2003, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2003-55626 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 57 of Forest Hills Phase 1, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 1215 Northwest 18th Street Bend OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due January 1, 2010 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,419.96 Monthly Late Charge $54.30. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $126,832.17 together with interest thereon at 5.250% per annum from December 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on August 27, 2012 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: April 19, 2012. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-409229 05/24, 05/31, 06/07, 06/14 1000

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Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE STATE OF OREGON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES PROVIDENT FUNDING ASSOCIATES, LP, ITS SUCCESSORS IN INTEREST AND/OR ASSIGNS,, its successors in interest and/or assigns, Plaintiff, v. KAREN KASSY; and Occupants of the Premises, Defendants. Case No. 11CV1121 SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION TO THE DEFENDANTS: Karen Kassy; and Occupants of the Premises: In the name of the State of Oregon, you are hereby required to appear and answer the complaint filed against you in the above-entitled Court and cause on or before the expiration of 30 days from the date of the first publication of this summons. The date of first publication in this matter is May 24, 2012. If you fail timely to appear and answer, Plaintiff will apply to the above-entitled court for the relief prayed for in its complaint. This is a judicial foreclosure of a deed of trust in which the Plaintiff requests that the Plaintiff be allowed to foreclose your interest in the following described real property: IN TOWNSHIP SEVENTEEN (17) SOUTH, RANGE TWELVE (12), EAST OF THE WILLAMETTE MERIDIAN, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON: SECTION FOURTEEN (14): A TRACT OF LAND LOCATED IN THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER (SE1/4SW1/4), MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SAID SE1/4SW1/4; THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 15'59" WEST, 282.80 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 58'00" EAST, 686.35 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 15 DEGREES 44'00" WEST, 294.10 FEET; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 58'00" WEST, 605.18 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; EXCEPTING THEREFROM THE WESTERLY 30 FEET WHICH IS THE RIGHT OF WAY OF DESCHUTES MARKET ROAD. Commonly known as: 63210 Deschutes Market Road, Bend, Oregon 97701. NOTICE TO DEFENDANTS: READ THESE PAPERS CAREFULLY! A lawsuit has been started against you in the above-entitled court by Provident Funding Associates, LP, its successors in interest and/or assigns,, Plaintiff. Plaintiff's claims are stated in the written complaint, a copy of which was filed with the above-entitled Court. You must "appear" in this case or the other side will win automatically. To "appear" you must file with the court a legal paper called a "motion" or "answer." The "motion" or "answer" must be given to the court clerk or administrator within 30 days of the date of first publication specified herein along with the required filing fee. It must be in proper form and have proof of service on the Plaintiff's attorney or, if the Plaintiff does not have an attorney, proof of service on the Plaintiff. If you have any questions, you should see an attorney immediately. If you need help in finding an attorney, you may contact the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service online at www.oregonstatebar.org or by calling (503) 684-3763 (in the Portland metropolitan area) or toll-free elsewhere in Oregon at (800) 452-7636. This summons is issued pursuant to ORCP 7. ROUTH CRABTREE OLSEN, P.C. ByChris Fowler, OSB # 052544 Attorneys for Plaintiff 621 SW Alder St., Suite 800 Portland, OR 97205 (503) 459-0140; Fax 425-974-1649 cfowler@rcolegal.com

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE The trust deed to be foreclosed pursuant to Oregon law is referred to as follows (the "Trust Deed"): Grantor: Matthew D. Aamodt and Maria C. Aamodt. Trustee: AmeriTitle. Beneficiary: Rivermark Community Credit Union. Date: October 6, 2005. Recording Date: October 18, 2005. Recording Reference: 2005-70985. County of Recording: Deschutes County. The Trust Deed was reformed by a General Judgment entered in Deschutes County case number 11CV0781 to describe accurately the property intended by Rivermark Community Credit Union and Grantor to be encumbered and to clarify that JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A.'s lien recorded as document number 2007-16112 is subject, subordinate and inferior to the Trust Deed. TRUSTEE: The Successor Trustee is Miles D. Monson and the mailing address of the Successor Trustee is: Miles D. Monson, "TRUSTEE", Anderson & Monson, P.C., 8625 SW Cascade Avenue, Suite 450, Beaverton, Oregon 97008. The Trust Deed covers the following described real property in the County of Deschutes and State of Oregon, ("the Property"): See Exhibit "A" attached hereto and incorporated herein which describes the Property. Exhibit “A” - Lots Eight (8), Nine (9), Ten (10), Eleven (11) and Lots Twenty-two (22), Twenty-three (23), Twenty-four (24) and Twenty-five (25), all in Block One Hundred Noneteen (119), TOWNSITE OF HILLMAN, recorded August 1, 1918 in Cabinet A, Page 77, Deschutes County, Oregon. TOGETHER WITH those portions of vacated streets and avenues which inures to said Lots vacation ordinance dated November 8, 1971. The default for which foreclosure is made is: The Grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly installments of $1,306.77 beginning August 1, 2008 through the installment due January 1, 2009. The sum owing on the obligation that the Trust Deed secures (the "Obligation") is: $230,356.82 together with interest $6,129.33 through January 8, 2009, plus interest on the principal sum of $230,356.82 at the rate of 5.125 percent per annum from January 9, 2009 until paid, together with Trustee's fees, attorney's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the Trust Deed. The Property will be sold to satisfy the Obligation. The date, time and place of the sale is: Date: JULY 17, 2012. Time: 1:00 P.M. Place: DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, FRONT WEST ENTRANCE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, CITY OF BEND, COUNTY OF DESCHUTES AND STATE OF OREGON. RIGHT TO CURE: The right exists under ORS 86.753 to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by doing all of the following at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale: (1) Paying to the Beneficiary the entire amount then due (other than such portion as would not then be due, had no default occurred); (2) Curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the Trust Deed; and (3) Paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the Obligation and Trust Deed, together with Trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "Grantor" includes any successor in interest to the Grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by the Trust Deed, and the words "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. We are a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information we obtain will be used to collect the debt. Cashier's checks for the foreclosure sale must be made payable to Miles D. Monson, Successor Trustee. Bankruptcy Information: The personal liability of the grantors to pay the debt owed to Beneficiary was discharged in the grantors' chapter 7 bankruptcy case, however, the Trust Deed lien against the real property described above remains in existence and is in full force and effect. Beneficiary will not seek to enforce any debt obligation as a personal liability of the grantors as a discharge order was entered in their chapter 7 bankruptcy case. Beneficiary is merely foreclosing its lien which was not effected by any bankruptcy discharge. DATED: February 28, 2012. /s/ Miles D. Monson. Miles D. Monson, Successor Trustee, 8625 SW Cascade Avenue #450, Beaverton, Oregon 97008, (503) 646-9230.

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE The Trust Deed to be foreclosed pursuant to Oregon law is referred to as follows (the “Trust Deed”): Grantor: Mark A. Avery, a married man. Trustee: Western Title & Escrow Company. Beneficiary: Northwest Community Credit Union. Date: May 15, 2007. Recording Date: May 25, 2007. Recording Reference: 2007-29676. County of Recording: Deschutes County. The Successor Trustee is Patrick L. Stevens and the mailing address of the Successor. Trustee is: Patrick L. Stevens, Successor Trustee, Hutchinson, Cox, Coons, Orr & Sherlock, P.C., PO Box 10886, Eugene, OR 97440. The Trust Deed covers the following described real property in the County of Deschutes and State of Oregon, (“the Property”): LOT 8, WHEELER RANCH, PHASE 1, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as 16671 William Foss Road, La Pine, Oregon 97739. APN No. 244032. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: The monthly installment payments of $869.35 beginning July 1, 2011 and continuing through the installment due September 1, 2011; plus interest and late charges; real property taxes, plus interest and penalties; and other liens and penalties. Total default as of September 14, 2011 is $2,694.99. By reason of said default, the Beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, those sums being the following to wit: $137,190.96, together with the sum of $2,464.92, which represents unpaid contractual interest, fees and late charges through and including September 14, 2011, together with interest on the principal sum of $137,190.96 at the rate of 6.00% per annum from September 15, 2011 until paid, together with insurance paid by the Beneficiary on the property, late charges and penalties, trustee fees, attorney fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the trust deed. The date, time and place of the sale is: Date: May 30, 2012. Time: 11:00 o’clock a.m. Place: Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, OR 97701. NOTICE TO TENANTS - If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30-day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser’s requirement that you move out. To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the Trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you must give the Trustee a copy of the rental agreement. If you do not have a fixed term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the Trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is April 30, 2012. The name of the Trustee and the Trustee’s mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about your rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included in the next paragraph. There are government agencies and nonprofit organizations that can give you information about foreclosure and help you decide what to do. For the name and phone number of an organization near you, please call the statewide phone contact number at 1-800-SAFENET (1-800-723-3638). You may also wish to talk to a lawyer. If you need help finding a lawyer, you may call the Oregon State Bar’s Lawyer Referral Service at (503) 684-3763 or tollfree in Oregon at (800) 452-7636 or you may visit its Website at: http://www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be available if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs that provide legal help to individuals at no charge, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.org and http://www.osbar.org/public/ris/lowcostlegalhelp/legalaid.html. RIGHT TO CURE - The right exists under ORS 86.753 to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by doing all of the following at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale: (1) Paying to the Beneficiary the entire amount then due (other than such portion as would not then be due, had no default occurred); (2) Curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the Trust Deed; and (3) Paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the Obligation and Trust Deed, together with Trustee’s and attorney’s fees not exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word “Grantor” includes any successor in interest to the Grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by the Trust Deed, and the words “Trustee” and “Beneficiary” include their respective successors in interest, if any. We are a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information we obtain will be used to collect the debt. Cashier’s checks for the foreclosure sale must be payable to Northwest Community Credit Union. Dated: May 22, 2012 /s/ Patrick L. Stevens. Patrick L. Stevens, Successor Trustee. Hutchinson, Cox, Coons, Orr & Sherlock, P.C. Attorneys at Law PO Box 10886, Eugene, OR 97440, Phone: (541) 686-9160, Fax: (541) 343-8693. Date of First Publication: May 24, 2012. Date of Last Publication: June 14, 2012


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

G6 THURSDAY, JUNE 7, 2012 • THE BULLETIN Autos & Transportation

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933

935

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975

975

Trucks & Heavy Equipment

Antique & Classic Autos

Pickups

Pickups

Sport Utility Vehicles

Sport Utility Vehicles

Automobiles

Automobiles

900 908

Aircraft, Parts & Service

Peterbilt 359 potable water truck, 1990, 3200 gal. tank, 5hp pump, 4-3" hoses, camlocks, $25,000. 541-820-3724 925

Utility Trailers 1/3 interest in Columbia 400, located at Sunriver. $138,500. Call 541-647-3718 1/3 interest in wellequipped IFR Beech Bonanza A36, located KBDN. $55,000. 541-419-9510

Executive Hangar

at Bend Airport (KBDN) 60’ wide x 50’ deep, w/55’ wide x 17’ high bi-fold door. Natural gas heat, office, bathroom. Parking for 6 cars. Adjacent to Frontage Rd; great visibility for aviation bus. 1jetjock@q.com 541-948-2126

ONLY 3 OWNERSHIP SHARES LEFT! Economical flying in your own Cessna 172/180 HP for only $10,000! Based at BDN. Call Gabe at Professional Air! 541-388-0019 Where can you ind a helping hand? From contractors to yard care, it’s all here in The Bulletin’s “Call A Service Professional” Directory 916

Trucks & Heavy Equipment

1982 INT. Dump w/Arborhood, 6k on rebuilt 392, truck refurbished, has 330 gal. water tank w/pump & hose. Everything works, Reduced - now $5000 OBO. 541-977-8988

9’ DUMP BED with hydraulic lift, for 1-ton flatbed truck, + 2 aluminum tool boxes. $2700 obo. 541-410-6945

Big Tex Landscaping/ ATV Trailer, dual axle flatbed, 7’x16’, 7000 lb. GVW, all steel, $1400. 541-382-4115, or 541-280-7024. 931

Automotive Parts, Service & Accessories

Chevy 3/4 ton 4x4, 1995, extended cab, long box, grill guard, running boards, bed rails & canopy, 178K FIAT 1800 1978, 5-spd, miles, $4800 obo. door panels w/flowers 208-301-3321 (Bend) & hummingbirds, Chevy Silverado 1998, white soft top & hard top, Reduced! $5,500. black and silver, pro lifted, loaded, new 33” 541-317-9319 or tires, aluminum slot 541-647-8483 wheels, tow pkg., drop hitch, diamond plate tool box, $12,000, or possible trade for newer Tacoma. 541-460-9127 Ford Galaxie 500 1963, 2 dr. hardtop,fastback, 390 v8,auto, pwr. steer & radio (orig),541-419-4989 Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199

Tires (4) P215/70-R16, Goodyear Fortero, good cond $85. 928-581-9190 Traction Snow Tires (4), has Snowflake, 235/ 70R16, great shape, lots of tread, $250, 541-408-0531 We Buy Junk Cars & Trucks! Cash paid for junk vehicles, batteries & catalytic converters. Serving all of C.O.! Call 541-408-1090 932

Antique & Classic Autos

GMC ½ ton 1971, Only $19,700! Original low mile, exceptional, 3rd owner. 951-699-7171

restored. $13,500 obo; 541-504-3253 or 503-504-2764

Plymouth Barracuda 1966, original car! 300 hp, 360 V8, centerlines, (Original 273 eng & wheels incl.) 541-593-2597

The Bulletin

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $1950. 541-419-5480.

To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

Ford Excursion Chevy Silverado 2500 2005, 4WD, diesel, HD 2007 extra cab, exc. cond., $19,900, early model, grill call 541-923-0231. guard, side steps, tow pkg., 6L, 115,440 all hwy miles, exc. cond., Mazda B4000 2004 Infiniti QX56 Sport Utility 4x4 2006, 66,000 Cab Plus 4x4. 4½ yrs serviced regularly, miles, dark grey with or 95,000 miles left on white, $19,200, Call tan leather interior, ext’d warranty. V6, 541-419-3301 or Aux port for iPod, 5-spd, AC, studded 541-419-4649. DVD player, heated tires, 2 extra rims, Dodge 1500 2001, 4x4 front & back seats, tow pkg, 132K mi, all sport, red, loaded, backup camera, Bose records, exlnt cond, rollbar, AND 2011 Premium Sound Sys$9500. 541-408-8611 Moped Trike used 3 tem, navigation system, Bluetooth wiremonths, street legal. Need help ixing stuff? less, Extended call 541-433-2384 Call A Service Professional Platinum Warranty ind the help you need. Dodge 1500 STL Quad through Jan., 2015 or Cab Hemi 4x4, 21,000 www.bendbulletin.com 80,000 miles. Sepamiles, $16,500. rate full set of stud935 541-318-6185 ded snow tires & wheels. $26,000. Sport Utility Vehicles email kj@bje.bz or call 541-647-9611

Mercury Monterrey 1965, Exc. All original, Ford F-150 1995, 112K, 4-dr. sedan, in stor4X4, long bed, auto, age last 15 yrs., 390 very clean, runs well, High Compression new tires, $6000. engine, new tires & li541-548-4039. cense, reduced to $2850, 541-410-3425. Ford F150 XLT 1993, 164K, X-cab, $3100, 541-647-7415

Chevy Pickup 1951,

GMC ½-ton Pickup, 1972, LWB, 350hi motor, mechanically A-1, interior great; body needs some TLC. $4000 OBO. Call 541-382-9441

Chevy Tahoe LS 2001 4x4. 120K mi, Power seats, Tow Pkg, 3rd row seating, extra tires, CD, privacy tinting, upgraded rims. Fantastic cond. $7995 Porsche Cayenne 2004, 86k, immac, dealer Contact Timm at 541-408-2393 for info maint’d, loaded, now or to view vehicle. $17000. 503-459-1580

CHEVY SUBURBAN LT 2005, low miles., good tires, new brakes, moonroof Reduced to $15,750 541-389-5016.

Jeep Cherokee 1990, 4WD, 3 sets rims & tires, exlnt set snow tires, great 1st car! $1800. 541-633-5149

Ford F-350 XLT 2003, 4X4, 6L diesel, 6-spd manual, Super Cab, short box, 12K Warn winch, custom bumper & canopy, running boards, 2 sets tires, Chevy Tahoe, 1999, Jeep Willys 1947,custom, small block Chevy, PS, very clean, loaded, wheels & chains, many OD,mags+ trailer.Swap 23,600k on new motor; extras, perfect, ONLY for backhoe.No am calls new tires & battery, 29,800 miles, $27,500 $5000. 541-330-1151 please. 541-389-6990 OBO, 541-504-8316.

Range Rover 2005 HSE, nav, DVD, local car, new tires, 51K miles. $24,995. 503-635-9494

BMW 525i 2004,

New body style, Steptronic auto., cold-weather package, premium package, heated seats, extra nice. $14,995. 503-635-9494. Buick Lucerne CX 2006, 65K, 3.8 V6, cloth interior, 30mpg hwy, $7500. Buick Park Avenue 1992, leather, 136K, 28 mpg hwy. $2500. Bob, 541-318-9999 Ask me about the Free Trip to Washington, D.C. for WWII Veterans.

Range Rover, 2006 Sport HSE,

Toyota Camry Solara SLE 2007, V6 Convertible, 23,000 mi., exc. cond., loaded, extras, Blizzard Pearl with Ivory Leather. $22,800. 541-408-7830

Volkswagen Convertible, 2006, 55K mi, 2.5L eng, 5 spd, lots of extras, new tires. $11,900. 541-728-4355

Infiniti I30 Limited 1999, 4 dr. luxury car, Just too many leather & woodgrain collectibles? interior, power windows & seats, side Sell them in airbags, Bose sound system, sunroof, 3.0 L The Bulletin Classiieds V6, must see! $6000 obo. 541-350-4779 5 4 1 -3 8 5 -5 8 0 9 940 Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl Vans white, very low mi. VW GTI 2009 $9500. 541-788-8218. #056951. $18,995 Ford Windstar 1995,7 passenger, 140k, 3.8 Nissan Altima 2009, 47K miles, 30+ mpg, exc. V6, no junk. Drive it cond., 1 owner, exaway for $1750; tended warranty, snow Nissan Quest 1996, tires. $14,700. 7 passenger, 152k, 541-419-6057 3.0 V6, new tires, 541-598-3750 ready for next 152k, Porsche 911 Carrera aaaoregonautosource.com $4500. 541-318-9999, 1984, platinum metallic, ask for Bob. $14,900, looks & runs Looking for your great, custom sound next employee? system, 178K mi, 975 Place a Bulletin help 541-383-2440. Automobiles wanted ad today and PORSCHE 914 1974, reach over 60,000 Roller (no engine), readers each week. lowered, full roll cage, AUDI QUATTRO Your classified ad 5-pt harnesses, racCABRIOLET 2004, will also appear on ing seats, 911 dash & extra nice, low milebendbulletin.com instruments, decent age, heated seats, which currently reshape, very cool! new Michelins, all ceives over 1.5 mil$1699. 541-678-3249 wheel drive, lion page views $12,995 every month at 503-635-9494. Saab 9-3 SE 1999 no extra cost. Bulleconvertible, 2 door, tin Classifieds Navy with black soft Get Results! Call FIND IT! top, tan interior, very 385-5809 or place BUY IT! good condition. your ad on-line at $5200 firm. SELL IT! bendbulletin.com 541-317-2929. The Bulletin Classiieds nav, AWD, heated seats, moonroof, local owner, Harman Kardon, $23,995. 503-635-9494

Chevy Wagon 1957, 4-dr., complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453.

edit No Cration ApplicSED ... REFU ER!! EV

Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $9000 or make offer. 541-385-9350.

BBQ! AND SODAS

All proceeds from Saturday go to the Boys and Girls Club

Chrysler SD 4-Door 1930, CDS Royal Standard, 8-cylinder, body is good, needs some restoration, runs, taking bids, 541-383-3888, 541-815-3318

4 Cars to choose from with over…

35 MPG

REGISTER TO

WIN

iPad 3 (DRAWINGS MUST BE

EVERY DAY)

18 YEARS OF AGE AND OLDER

2012 HYUNDAI ELANTRA TOURING

$14,495 MSRP $16,755. Smolich Discount $1,266. Factory Rebate $1,000. Must Finance With HMF to Qualify. On approved credit. Vin:134574, Stk# H11188

Call 541-385-5809

1 at this price!

NEW 2012 CHRYSLER 200

1 at this price!

2012 SUZUKI SX4

*

$17,995

NEW 2012 JEEP PATRIOT 4X4

MSRP $22,775, Rebate $3000, Discount $1780. Vin:CN125492, Stk# C11051

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$18,995

MSRP $22,500, Rebate $1500, Discount $2005.

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FOR

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On approved credit. Must finance through ASFS. On select models.

Vin:CD604115, Stk# J12037

11212

2012 HYUNDAI SANTA FE

2012 NISSAN VERSA 1.6 SEDAN

$19,995

NEW 2012 JEEP COMPASS 4X4

MSRP $24,385. Smolich Discount $2,386. Factory Rebate $2,000. Must Finance With HMF to Qualify. On approved credit. Vin:92382, Stk# H11165

*

$19,995

$14,995 MSRP $16,050. Smolich Discount $1,055. Vin:908441

MSRP $23,500, Rebate $1750, Discount $1755. Vin:CD625455, Stk# J12067

BAD CREDIT? WE CAN HELP! Late Payments? Foreclosure? Repos, Collections?

NO PROBLEM! On approved Credit.

2250 NE Hwy 20 • Bend (Across from Costco)

541-749-4025 www.smolichmotors.com All sale prices after any dealer discounts, factory rebates & applicable incentives. Terms vary. See dealer for details. Limited stock on hand. Manufactures rebates and incentives subject to change. Art for illustration purposes only. Subject to prior sale. Not responsible for typos. Expires 6/10/12. Chrysler and Jeep are registered trademarks of DaimlerChrysler Corporation.

Bulletin Daily Paper 06/07/12  

The Bulletin Daily print edition for Thursday June 7, 2012

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