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For sale: home with a violent past • Properties that were once crime scenes pose special sales challenges By Sheila G. Miller The Bulletin

Chris Pries and Dave Conde had plenty to worry about in the months after their stepfather murdered their mother, then killed himself, in March 2011. Among their myriad concerns: selling Sandy and John Meyer’s house in the Mountain High subdivision in southeast Bend.

It wasn’t an easy process. When it comes to homes in which violent crimes have occurred, finding buyers who can ignore the grisly echoes can be a challenge. Such homes often stay on the market for a long time or sell below their estimated market value. State law does not require homeowners to disclose certain things about their property before selling it. Sellers and their agents don’t have to tell potential buyers that a sexual predator lives nearby, for instance. They don’t have to tell buyers about political or religious activities on

nearby properties unless these compromise the physical condition of the property for sale. And they don’t have to tell buyers that a violent death or suicide occurred on their property or on neighboring properties. But some real estate agents say it’s important to share this kind of information with potential buyers anyway. Karen Malanga, the listing agent and a friend of Sandy Meyer, chose to tell buyers about the violence that took place on the Mountain High property. See Property / A4

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

This home in southeast Bend was the scene of a grisly murder-suicide, information some real estate agents say is important to share with potential buyers, even though state law doesn’t require it.

NORTHWEST NAZARENE

A LESSON IN REMEMBRANCE

University considers Redmond campus By Erik Hidle The Bulletin

John Klicker / For The Bulletin

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pencer Holland, 7, of Salem, whose parents say they wanted him to learn about “what Memorial Day is all about, that freedom and what we believe in isn’t free and that we pray for the families of those that died,” touches Justin Wilkens’ name during a ceremony to add two new names to the Wall

of Honor in Salem — Marine Cpl. Adam J. Buyers and Air Force 1st Lt. Justin Wilkens of Bend, who died in February in Africa. The Memorial Day event was sponsored and presented by Oregon Department of Veterans Affairs. ALSO: Veterans gather in Bend, Page C1 • President Obama speaks at Arlington National Cemetery, Page A6

TOP NEWS SYRIA: Annan arrives to inspect situation, A3 TODAY’S WEATHER Mostly Clear High 67, Low 38 Page C6

INDEX Business E1-4 Calendar B3 Classified G1-6 Comics B4-5 Community B1-6 Crosswords B5, G2

Dear Abby B3 Editorials C4 Local News C1-6 Obituaries C5 Sports D1-6 TV & Movies B2

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“We are recognizing the queen more and more as the independent national figure that unites all of us.” — Robert Lacey, royal biographer

Britons embrace all things Windsor, eager for queen’s diamond jubilee By Anthony Faiola The Washington Post

LONDON — Stung by royal break-ups, relentless sniping over her tax-free status and a fire at Windsor Castle, Queen Elizabeth II famously dubbed 1992 her annus horribilis, or horrible year. Two decades later, the world’s highest profile monarch finds herself basking in the glow of something wholly different: an annus mirabilis. One. Marvelous. Year. Commemorating her 60th year on the throne, the queen’s “diamond jubilee” is drawing an estimated one million people to London for

a four-day fete starting Saturday that, in terms of sheer pageantry, Queen will dwarf last Elizabeth II year’s nuptials of her grandson Prince William and his now-famous bride, Catherine. Aboard a royal barge, the monarch will lead a 1,000-vessel flotilla down the Thames in a majestic scene inspired by a Canaletto painting. A network of 2,012 beacons will be lit in her honor from the Scottish Highlands to the Channel

Islands. Paul McCartney and Elton John will serenade her at a glittering concert outside Buckingham Palace. Yet the queen is observing more than a milestone that puts her just three years shy of becoming Britain’s longest reigning monarch. At a time when the missteps of King Juan Carlos has Spain seriously rethinking the wisdom of monarchy, she is also symbolically marking the revival of a British royal house that has defied the odds by bringing a nation — and a world — back under its spell. See Jubilee / A4

REDMOND — A four-year liberal arts university is considering Redmond as a destination for a satellite campus. Mayor George Endicott, who has long touted Redmond as a potential university site, said last week that the city is talking with Northwest Nazarene University about opening a campus at an undetermined location in town. According to its website, Northwest Nazarene is a Christian liberal arts college that serves about 2,000 undergraduate and graduate students and provides continuing education to about three times that number. Its main campus is in Nampa, Idaho, and it operates an education center in Boise. City Manager David Brandt said talks are preliminary, but encouraging. “At this point we aren’t talking specifics yet,” Brandt said. “One part they need to do is decide demand for particular programs. They need to see what has the high demand in this area.” Likely under consideration is the university’s nursing program, which the city has identified as a need in its effort to expand health care-related employment in the city. Redmond has a number of locations suitable for a branch campus. Brandt said the Evergreen building, located in the heart of downtown Redmond, is one obvious choice. The city is also working to develop a medical district on the north end of town, and planners have said a university could help anchor that development. See Nazarene / A5

Border Patrol roils Olympic Peninsula By William Yardley New York Times News Service

FORKS, Wash. — The Olympic Peninsula has always felt more like the edge of the world than a mere national boundary. Its ocean shoreline, the northwesternmost coast of the contiguous United States, is accessible by a single road, U.S. Highway 101, and it has long been traveled by a distinctive fleet: loud logging trucks rumbling out of the dark and wet woods, rusty pickups with windows pronouncing “Native Pride,” stray Subarus hauling surfboards and kayaks to the cold Pacific. Then the U.S. Border Patrol vehicles started showing up. Sometimes they respond unexpectedly to assist with mundane traffic stops con-

ducted by the local police. Sometimes they hover outside the warehouse where Mexican immigrants sell the salal they pick in the temperate rain forest. Sometimes they confront people whose primary offense, many argue, is skin tone. Those kinds of scenes might be common in towns that border Mexico in Texas, Arizona or California. But the border here is with Canada, which is separated from the peninsula by the Strait of Juan de Fuca. “What’s the purpose of the Border Patrol in a place that has no border problems?” asked Art Argyropoulos, who is from Greece and runs a restaurant on the peninsula with his wife, who is from Mexico. See Border / A5


THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, MAY 29, 2012

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5 dictators with mommy issues By Uri Friedman Foreign Policy

The Austrian neurologist Sigmund Freud, who was very close with his mother, once remarked that “people who know that they are preferred or favored by their mother give evidence in their lives of a peculiar self-reliance and an

unshakeable optimism which often seem like heroic attributes and bring actual success to their possessors.” Whether you subscribe to Freud’s theories or not, it’s certainly true that some of the world’s most powerful rulers have had fascinating relationships with their mothers

— some surprisingly loving, others ambivalent or just plain bitter. Alexander the Great’s power-hungry mother, Olympias, is thought to have been a driving force behind her son’s ascension to the throne of Macedonia. Napoleon Bonaparte’s mother, Letizia, taught her son discipline (“she

sometimes made me go to bed without supper,” he once recalled) and followed him to exile in Elba and then back to Paris before the Battle of Waterloo. Modern-day dictators have had their share of complicated mother-son relationships as well.

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Oregon Lottery results As listed at www.oregonlottery.org

MEGABUCKS

The numbers drawn Monday night are:

6 9 26 29 37 41 The estimated jackpot is now $2.6 million.

HAPPENINGS • Mitt Romney is expected to clinch the Republican nomination after Texas holds its primary. • Jurors enter their seventh day of deliberations in the trial of John Edwards, who is charged with illegally using campaign funds to cover up an affair. • Musician Bob Dylan, author Toni Morrison, former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright and retired Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens are among those being awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the highest civilian honor in the U.S.

IN HISTORY

OUR ADDRESS Street

It’s Tuesday, May 29, the 150th day of 2012. There are 216 days left in the year.

The Associated Press

The Associated Press

The Associated Press

Adolf Hitler

Joseph Stalin

Robert Mugabe

Country: Germany Mother: Klara Relationship: Although he often clashed with his father over his poor performance at school, the Führer adored his mother. Hitler left his home in 1907 as a teenager to try to make it as an artist in Vienna (Klara encouraged his artistic endeavors) but returned briefly after his mother died of cancer that same year, leaving him an orphan. In “Mein Kampf,” which Hitler wrote in the 1920s, he reflected on his reaction to her passing: “I am thankful for that period in my life because it hardened me and enabled me to be as tough as I now am. And I am even more thankful because I appreciate the fact that I was thus saved from the emptiness of a life of ease and that a mother’s darling was taken from tender arms and handed over to Adversity as to a new mother. Though I then rebelled against it as too hard a fate, I am grateful that I was thrown into a world of misery and poverty and thus came to know the people for whom I was afterwards to fight.” Eduard Bloch, the Jewish doctor who treated Klara, would later recall that while Hitler “was not a ‘mother’s boy’ in the usual sense,” he had “never witnessed a closer attachment.” He had also never witnessed “anyone so prostrate with grief as Adolf Hitler” as he sat by his mother’s deathbed, sketching her to “preserve a last impression.” Some have speculated that Bloch’s failure to save Klara contributed to Hitler’s hatred of Jews. But the Nazis permitted Bloch to leave Austria for the United States in 1940, and Bloch claimed that Hitler once remarked, “If all Jews were like him, there would be no Jewish question.”

Country: Soviet Union Mother: Ekaterina (“Keke”) Relationship: Stalin, like Hitler, was fond of his mother but had a tumultuous relationship with his father, an alcoholic who savagely beat him and Keke (“Soso,” as Stalin was called, once arrived at a police officer’s house in the Georgian village where he grew up with his face covered in blood, yelling “he’s killing my mother!”). Keke worked hard as a laundress to enroll Stalin in a church school and later a theological seminary — even fighting to send him back to school when his father, who had since left the home, briefly kidnapped Soso, and set him up as an apprentice cobbler. But she too meted out corporal punishment and grew angry with Stalin when he misbehaved at school. And while Stalin installed his mother in a palace in Georgia during his rise to power, he rarely visited her. His letters to her included lines such as “Dear mother, please live for 10,000 years. Kisses, Soso” and “I know you’re disappointed in me but what can I do? I’m busy and can’t write often.” When Stalin visited his mother in 1935, shortly before her death, a doctor who was treating Keke recalled a conversation that went something like this: “Why did you beat me so hard?” “That’s why you turned out so well. Joseph — who exactly are you now?” “Remember the tsar? Well, I’m like the tsar.” “You’d have done better to have become a priest.”

Country: Zimbabwe Mother: Bona Relationship: Mugabe doesn’t speak often about his mother, a devout Catholic who sank into depression after her husband abandoned the family and Mugabe’s two older brothers died. But he opened up to journalist Heidi Holland several years ago, noting that books were his main companions as a child. “I lived in my mind a lot,” he recalled. “I liked talking to myself.” Holland’s takeaway? “Although the family was desperately poor, it was the emotional deprivation of his childhood that scarred Robert for life. While his parental grandfather did his best to compensate for the absent father, teaching Robert how to catch birds for the family pot, it was to austere Bona that Robert looked forlornly for affection. . . . “As he grew up, Robert got his sense of who he was from Bona. She left him in no doubt that he was to be the achiever who rose above everyone else; the leader chosen by God Himself. She may also have viewed him as a substitute for her own failure to serve the Church as she and her parents had intended.” Bona’s lofty aspirations for her son make one anecdote in Peter Godwin’s recent biography of Mugabe particularly baffling. A former student of Mugabe’s told Godwin he was with Bona in 1980 when Mugabe was elected Zimbabwe’s first black prime minister. “Bona was not happy he had won,” the student explained. “We were at her house and she said, ‘He is not capable of doing it. He is not the kind of person who will look after other people.’”

The Associated Press

The Associated Press

Slobodan Milosevic

Jean-Claude Duvalier

Country: Yugoslavia Mother: Stanislava Relationship: Milosevic entered the world at a tumultuous time; he was born in a Serbian town during the Nazi occupation of Yugoslavia, and his father abandoned the family a few years afterward. Milosevic’s mother, a teacher and Communist activist, “became the center of her son’s childhood universe,” Adam LeBor writes in his biography of Milosevic. “Stanislava took care every day to send Slobodan out in a fresh white shirt, like a junior version of the Communist official she hoped he would be.” The New York Times described the young Milosevic as a “pudgy loner with few friends.” When Milosevic headed off to university in Belgrade, however, he began visiting home less frequently and started dating a fellow student named Mira Markovic, who did not get along with Stanislava. In 1974, an increasingly depressed Stanislava hanged herself at the family home, just over a decade after Milosevic’s father had committed suicide. Milosevic appears to have blamed himself for his mother’s death. “My mother never forgave me for Mira,” he reportedly told a friend.

Country: Haiti Mother: Simone Relationship: When “Baby Doc” Duvalier succeeded his father, François “Papa Doc” Duvalier, as the ruler of Haiti in 1971 at age 19, his mother, a voodoo enthusiast of humble origins, emerged as a major power behind the throne. But things began to change in 1980 when Baby Doc married Michele Bennett, the daughter of a wealthy Haitian businessman and the daughter-in-law of a man who led a failed coup against Papa Doc. “Since the marriage, Simone Duvalier, whose official title is Guardian of the Revolution, has apparently been edged almost completely out of the palace picture by her daughter-in-law and spends most of her time in Paris,” the Los Angeles Times reported in 1985. The mother-sondaughter-in-law triangle only got more bizarre. In 1986, when Baby Doc was ousted from power, Simone joined him and his wife in exile — first in the French Alps and then in Paris. “In recent years,” The New York Times noted in its 1997 obituary for Simone, “after Jean-Claude’s bitter divorce from Michele, Mrs. Duvalier was again said to be with her son in France, amid widespread reports they were living in a state of virtual poverty.” Baby Doc returned to Haiti in 2011 and is technically under house arrest and facing charges of crimes against humanity. “Was Jean-Claude Duvalier scary?” his lawyer asked recently. “Not Duvalier. But yes, the people around him, secret police, yes, some of them were very scary. But Jean-Claude is a nice guy, believe me.” A nice guy who loved his mother.

Babies’ hunger to learn shows ‘Goldilocks effect’ By Sindya N. Bhanoo New York Times News Service

Infants are constantly trying to make sense of the world around them, and they do this by seeking out situations that are neither too simple nor too complex. Writing in the journal PLoS One, a team of researchers from the University of Rochester call it the “Goldilocks effect.” Babies “are seeking out the type of learning material from the world that’s most efficient for them to learn from,” said the study’s lead author, Celeste Kidd, a cognitive scientist at the university. Her team measured the attention patterns of 72 infants,

FOCUS: SCIENCE ages 7 and 8 months, as they watched video animations while an eye-tracking device below the screen followed their gaze. The babies lost interest when the pattern of objects displayed on the screen became too predictable. And they also lost interest when the sequence became too surprising and random. The study suggests that infants are much more actively engaged in seeking out information from the world than previously thought, Kidd said. And that means that they do not need fancy toys to learn,

she said. A reasonably stimulating environment provides rich possibilities.

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Highlights: In 1942, the movie “Yankee Doodle Dandy,” starring James Cagney as George M. Cohan, premiered at a war-bonds benefit in New York. Bing Crosby, the Ken Darby Singers and the John Scott Trotter Orchestra recorded Irving Berlin’s “White Christmas” in Los Angeles for Decca Records. Ten years ago: FBI Director Robert Mueller said there may have been more missed clues before the September 11 terrorist attacks, and suggested for the first time that investigators might have uncovered the plot if they had been more diligent about pursuing leads. Five years ago: President George W. Bush ordered new U.S. economic sanctions to pressure Sudan’s government to halt the bloodshed in Darfur. Cindy Sheehan, the soldier’s mother who’d galvanized an anti-war movement with her monthlong protest outside President Bush’s ranch, announced her “resignation” as the public face of the movement. One year ago: A week after Joplin, Mo., was nearly leveled by the deadliest tornado to strike the U.S in decades, President Barack Obama visited the city to offer hope to survivors and promises of help. J.R. Hildebrand was one turn away from winning the Indianapolis 500 when he skidded high into the wall on the final turn and Dan Wheldon drove past to claim an improbable second Indy 500 win in his first race of the year.

BIRTHDAYS Actor Clifton James is 91. Former Baseball Commissioner Fay Vincent is 74. Race car driver Al Unser is 73. CBS News Correspondent Bob Simon is 71. Singer LaToya Jackson is 56. Actor Ted Levine is 55. Actress Annette Bening is 54. Cartoonist Aaron McGruder (“The Boondocks”) is 38. Singer Melanie Brown (Spice Girls) is 37. — From wire reports

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TUESDAY, MAY 29, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

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Annan arrives in Syria, seeking to salvage peace in March to honor the six-point plan, which included not only BEIRUT — International ef- a cease-fire, but also political forts to pressure Syria intensi- dialogue with the opposition fied Monday, as the U.N. special and freedom for Syrians to envoy Kofi Annan began ne- demonstrate. gotiations in Damascus “I urge the governand the chairman of the ment to take bold steps U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff to signal that it is serious warned that continued in its intention to resolve atrocities could make this crisis peacefully, military intervention and for everyone inAnnan more likely. volved to help create the Annan traveled to right context for a credSyria seeking to salvage ible political process,” his peace plan, which appeared Annan said. more precarious than ever after Creating the right climate for the massacre of at least 108 vil- progress was the responsibillagers in the Houla area of cen- ity of not only the government tral Syria. He urged the govern- but “everyone with a gun,” he ment to hold to its commitment added. By Neil MacFarquhar

New York Times News Service

Questions about the viability of the plan were thrown into sharp relief by the massacre in the villages that constitute Houla, near Homs, on Friday, whose victims included 49 children and 34 women by the United Nations’ count. The U.N. Security Council on Sunday unanimously condemned the massacre and, while not assigning blame, censured the Syrian government for using heavy artillery against the civilian population. The aftermath of the killings continued to reverberate inside Syria. Shops stayed shut as part of an opposition-lead call to observe three days of mourning, including the famous Hamadiyah bazaar of Damascus, ac-

cording to opposition activists and residents. Damascus has been a bastion of government support. They said government agents forced some stores to reopen, particularly in the nut and candy bazaar, by prying open their metal shutters. Annan, the envoy of both the United Nations and the Arab League and a former U.N. secretary-general, arrived with a new mandate from the Security Council — including Russia, which had usually blocked action against its ally in Damascus — to implement his plan. He was scheduled to hold talks Monday with Walid al-Moallem, the Syrian foreign minister, and with President Bashar Assad today.

In Afghanistan, patching troops together one ache at a time By Graham Bowley New York Times News Service

COMBAT OUTPOST RAHMAN KHEL, Afghanistan — Each week, Capt. Rachel Odom takes off in a helicopter to fly to yet another distant military outpost of this mountainous region of eastern Afghanistan to patch the troops in her care back together. One recent morning, 13 soldiers came to visit her in the small wooden medical hut of a 100-man camp near the village of Rahman Khel, cradled by the snow-tipped mountains of Paktia province near the Pakistani border. One after another, the soldiers told her of their twisted knees, back pains or shoulder strains — the increasingly familiar-sounding toll of a long war. After multiple deployments in Iraq and Afghanistan, some of these soldiers’ bodies are nearing the breaking point. It is up to Odom, 28, from Moselle, Miss. — the only physical therapist attached to the 3,500 men and women of the Fourth Brigade Combat Team of the 25th Infantry Division — to keep them together. “These bodies get a beating,” she said as she spent the next 12 hours stretching out legs, lifting arms or standing on a box to lean over and pummel pulled back muscles, accompanied by sighs, groans, thanks and the occasional curse. “They walk up and down mountains carrying a lot of gear, just a lot of weight, and that can result in daily aches and pains and also injuries,” she said. “I am keeping them doing their job, living their lives with as little pain as possible.” These soldiers are likely to be some of the last Americans to serve in Afghanistan, and as troops are beginning to withdraw ahead of the 2014 deadline, the war here can take on an end-of-the-race feel at times: The finish line is distant but finally in sight, and Odom is working just to keep her charges running till they can reach it. The action these days is rarely about face-to-face combat. Instead, it is an effort to keep up

Kuni Takahashi / New York Times News Service

Capt. Rachel Odom treats Staff Sgt. Dick Plank at Combat Outpost Rahman Khel in Aghanistan. Odom, the only physical therapist for the 3,500 men and women of the Fourth Brigade Combat Team of the 25th Infantry Division, flies to a different military outpost in eastern Afghanistan each week to treat troops.

with an elusive enemy that slips from the looming mountains this time of year and moves invisibly from village to village through the woods and fields, heading west for the fighting season. For the Army company based at this outpost, among the 19 on Odom’s rounds, it involves long bone-rattling journeys in armored vehicles protected against roadside bombs or suicide attacks. Or it is a fivehour slog encased in ever more elaborate body armor — designed to protect against a distant sniper shot or rocket. But it can add at least 35 pounds to a soldier’s load, even without his helmet, pistol, ammunition, water, medical kit and rifle. “When you carry all this stuff and then go climb one of those mountains, it definitely takes a toll on your body,” said Sgt. James Daoust, a company medic. Today’s protection is the IOTV, or improvised outer tactical vest, a bulky affair that involves heavy ceramic block plates, side plates, deltoid pro-

tectors and groin guards. Some soldiers even have Kevlar underwear. (At higher altitudes, soldiers are allowed to wear a slimmed down IOTV, called a platecarrier, but it is still heavy.) Around the bases in this region, sweating soldiers in shorts and sneakers run laps around the outer perimeter wearing the vests just to get used to them.

A new tactic Odom, who has broad rosy cheeks and a practical, considerate manner, represents a new kind of emphasis in the military on getting to these kind of injuries quickly, even mundane ones like twisted ankles or tweaked backs, before repeated strain can force soldiers out of the war altogether. Odom says Army Ranger units were the first to include physical therapists, rather than have them stay back at the hospital or in separate medical units. But now with their success, therapists have spread into mainstream combat units; Odom is the first her brigade has had. “They are becoming

more common,” she said. One of the biggest challenges for the therapists is dealing with an injury that has become all too common in a war defined by the Taliban’s roadside bombs: blast concussions. Back at Odom’s brigade base, Forward Operating Base Salerno, over the mountains amid the sweet-smelling eucalyptus trees of Khost province, there is a special center to treat them. The center is run by one of Odom’s friends and colleagues, Capt. Jamie Bell, 32, from Lancaster, Calif., and has been open only for the past couple of years. “A lot of the soldiers here have been deployed three, four, five times, so they are already coming with some PTSD, and then they get concussion,” said Bell, referring to post-traumatic stress disorder. “They might get blown up three or four times in a month, and that’s when you might have a high risk of permanent damage. But if they have proper treatment and rest, they can be returned to duty without long-term effects.”

Stark choices as Egypt heads to runoff By Aya Batrawy The Associated Press

CAIRO — A mob set fire late Monday to the campaign headquarters of one of the two Egyptian presidential politicians facing each other in a runoff that will decide a new leader after last year’s popular uprising, the first sign of unrest after the voting yielded divisive candidates. The attack on Ahmed Shafiq’s office came just hours after the country’s election commission announced that he would face the Muslim Brotherhood’s candidate, Mohammed Morsi, in a June 16-17 runoff. The second round pitting Shafiq, who was ousted President Hosni Mubarak’s last prime minister, against Morsi, backed by the country’s most powerful Islamist movement, is a nightmare scenario for the thousands of Egyptians who took to the streets last year to demand regime change, freedom and social equality. Many of the so-called revolutionaries say they want neither a return to the old regime nor religious rule. “The choice can’t be between a religious state and an autocratic state. Then we have done nothing,” said Ahmed Bassiouni, 35, who was sitting in Cairo’s downtown Tahrir Square in the midst of a growing protest. In an upscale neighborhood of Cairo, mobs of young men used bricks to smash the windows of Shafiq’s headquarters, tossing out campaign signs and tearing up his posters. Then they set fire to the building. There were no reports of injuries. Police arrested eight people. His campaign blamed supporters of leftist candidate Hamdeen Sabahi, who came in third in the race, and backers of another losing candidate, Khaled Ali, who was protesting the election results Monday evening in Tahrir Square.

THE HUNT FOR BIN LADEN

Doctor’s family calls trial a sham By Riaz Khan The Associated Press

PESHAWAR, Pakistan — The family of the Pakistani doctor sentenced to 33 years in prison for helping the United States track down Osama bin Laden said Monday the man is innocent and dismissed his trial as a sham. The conviction of Shakil Afridi last week added another pressure point in Pakistan’s already fractured relationship with the U.S. Senior American officials have urged Pakistan to release the doctor, regarding him as a hero who worked to stop the terrorist leader. Islamabad views Afridi as a traitor who colluded with a foreign intelligence agency in an illegal operation on Pakistani soil. Also Monday, two suspected U.S. missile strikes pounded militant hide-outs close to Afghan border, killing nine alleged insurgents, officials said. There have been five such attacks this week. The strikes have also raised tensions between the U.S. and Pakistan. Afridi ran a vaccination campaign on behalf of the CIA to collect blood samples of bin Laden’s family at a compound in Abbottabad where U.S. commandos killed the al-Qaida leader in May 2011. The samples were intended to help the U.S. match the family’s DNA to verify his presence in the garrison city. Afridi’s older brother Jamil and two lawyers representing the doctor said they will appeal the verdict, which was handed down last week in a tribal court whose proceedings were never made public. “This was a one-sided decision,” said Jamil. “All allegations against him are false. He didn’t do anything against the national interest.”

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North Korean farmers report drought; aid unlikely The Associated Press NAMPHO, North Korea — North Korea is reporting a serious drought that could worsen already critical food shortages, but help is unlikely to come from the United States and South Korea following Pyongyang’s widely criticized rocket launch. North Korea has had little rain since April 27, with the country’s western coastal areas particularly hard hit, according to a government weather agency in Pyongyang. The dry spell threatened to damage crops,

officials said, as the country enters a critical planting season and as food supplies from the last harvest dwindle. In at least one area of South Phyongan Province where journalists from The Associated Press were allowed to visit, the sun-baked fields appeared parched and cracked, and farmers complained of extreme drought conditions. Deeply tanned men, and women in sun bonnets, worked over cabbages and corn seedlings. Farmers cupped individual seedlings as they poured wa-

ter from blue buckets onto the parched red soil. It was not clear whether the conditions around Nampho were representative of a wider region. The U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization said it had not yet visited the affected regions to confirm the extent and severity of the reported drought. North Korea has suffered chronic food shortages for the past two decades because of economic and agricultural mismanagement as well as natural disasters. A famine in the 1990s

killed an estimated hundreds of thousands of people. North Korea state media has publicized the drought but hasn’t asked for international handouts. The country’s past appeals for food aid have been met with some skepticism, however, amid worries that aid would be diverted to the military and Pyongyang elite without reaching the hungry. The U.S. government suspended food handouts to North Korea in 2009 after Pyongyang expelled foreign food distribution monitors.

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THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, MAY 29, 2012

Property Continued from A1 In March 2011 John Meyer reported his wife, Sandy, missing. Bend Police launched a huge search after her car was found in the Old Mill parking lot. Under intense scrutiny from police, John Meyer killed himself in the crawl space under the home a few days later. And in April 2011, family members found Sandy Meyer’s body under a water feature in the couple’s back yard. Police believe John Meyer killed his wife because of money problems. Malanga and Michael Carroll, her partner in the sale, chose to disclose information about what she called the “overly tragic” crime to potential buyers. “If anyone put in the address on the Internet everything would have come up anyway,” she said. “And it’s such a nice neighborhood, the neighbors probably would have said something. It’s just better to disclose those facts.” Perhaps as a result, the

house spent 206 days on the market, well above average. In the midst of the process, the home went into a short sale. “It was hard to sell at a normal price because of what happened in the house,” she said. The Meyers bought the 4,000-square-foot home and an adjacent property in 2001 for $825,000. After the murder-suicide, the house and neighboring property eventually sold for $410,000. At the time of the sale, the home had a real market value of more than $555,000. Obviously, some of the decrease in price over the years can be attributed to the decline of Central Oregon’s real estate market. But Malanga said there simply wasn’t much interest in the home. “I think that because most people knew what had happened in it, we didn’t get the normal number of showings we would have garnered. And the market was worse then, too, so what can you really blame?” Malanga said. “In the beginning we got probably

more people coming because they wanted to check it out.” While the Meyers’ home sold at a large loss, such is not the case with other local properties that have seen tragedy. In 2010, 39-year-old Julie Still shot her two children, then herself in the family’s home on Fresca Street in northwest Bend. Still and one of her children died. The Stills bought the home in 2009 for $249,000. It sold in July 2011 for $239,250, just below its estimated real market value of $244,530. And then there’s the home on the Old Bend-Redmond Highway in which Barbara Thomas was killed by her son and four other teenagers in 2001. That year, the small manufactured home on a hill outside town sold for $125,000. Six years later, in 2007, it changed hands again, this time selling for $330,000. In March 2010, Jim Birtola with Prudential High Desert Realty was serving as the listing broker on a home on Hermosa Road in Sunriver when tragedy struck. A pass-

erby spotted Joachim Steffan hanging from a rope outside the home. Police found his wife, Dagmar, and his 7-yearold son, Pascal, inside. They’d been strangled. The family’s dog and two cats were also dead, their throats cut. “That was probably one of the most bizarre situations I’ve had in my career,” he said. “It was really, really disturbing and crazy. I had met the woman who was murdered and her little son and dog. The little boy was just incredibly cute. It took me back for a couple of days.” When television trucks and police showed up to the scene, his sign was on the front lawn. With the Steffans dead, Birtola said, the home went into a survivorship and Birtola’s contract was void. He said the family chose to take the home off the market for the time being. From his perspective, Birtola said, it’s important to disclose that something so ugly took place in a home. “If the seller says no, they do not want to disclose it, then it’s

By Martin Fackler New York Times News Service

Matt Dunham / The Associated Press

Women stand across the river as workers help to hang a giant image from a building on the south bank of the River Thames in London showing Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II, fifth left, and from left the royal family, Prince Charles, Prince Edward, Prince Andrew, Earl Mountbatten, Prince Phillip, Mark Phillips and Princess Anne standing on the balcony of Buckingham Palace during the queen’s 1977 silver jubilee. The giant canvas, measuring 100 meters by 70 meters and weighing nearly two tons, was officially unveiled on Friday and will be displayed until the end of June, in celebration of the diamond jubilee, marking the queen’s 60-year reign.

Lloyd Webber penned a song. Two national holidays have been declared. It is all in honor of a woman who at birth was a long shot for the throne. The daughter of George VI, who became king only after the abdication of his brother to marry a divorced American socialite, the queen was coronated on June 2, 1953. The powers of the monarchy long ago reined in, she would watch from the gilded sidelines as the sun well and truly set on the greatest empire of its day, with the 1997 return of Hong Kong completing the passage of Britain’s glory days. Yet, through it all, and with her husband and consort, Prince Philip, by her side, she would nevertheless stand as a regal symbol of state from the first icicles of the Cold War to the first moon landing, from the birth of the Beatles to the death of Amy Winehouse, from the once constant threat of Irish republican terrorism to the bombing of the London subway by homegrown Islamic extremists. “We look across the pond and we see America tearing itself apart over politics and over here, we’re thinking, there’s a lot to be said for a constitutional monarchy,” royal biographer Robert Lacey said. “We are recognizing the queen more and more as the independent national figure that unites all of us, and the one constant in our lives for the past 60 years.” In many ways, the royals have capitalized on the good

will engendered by last year’s royal wedding through a carefully orchestrated campaign. To herald the diamond jubilee, Buckingham Palace has launched a charm offensive, with the queen’s national tour over the past several months drawing crowds that would be the envy of any aging rock star. But royal watchers also say the palace has clearly been using this year to begin the process of passing the royal torch, with the queen dispatching younger royals on a blitz of domestic and international tours that have raised the family’s profile and spread the gospel of the House of Windsor. Prince Charles, next in line to the throne, is suddenly in danger of being cool after a hilarious turn as guest weatherman on the BBC and a stint playing DJ with urban youths in Toronto. Even Camilla, still an object of derision among Diana loyalists, scored points by yukking it up on the set of the international hit show “The Killers,” going gangsta by pointing a fake gun at Princess Mary of Denmark. Prince Harry, who once made tabloid headlines for donning a Nazi uniform at a party, sent seen-it-all Washington into a frenzy when he accepted an award there in early May. That came after the queen had sent him on his first major international tour, during which he stole the hearts of Brazilian schoolgirls after playing beach volleyball

on the shores of Rio de Janeirio. In the queen’s name, the palace’s real secret weapons — William and Catherine, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge — start their tour of Asia and the South Pacific this autumn. Though a stickler for tradition — in fact, the very definition of it — the queen has seen fit to bend the rules a bit this year, making an official public appearance aside both Catherine and Camilla in a hairline fracture of protocol. In making such a gesture, many here see a queen preparing her public for the future inhabitants of Buckingham Palace. A new poll released this week shows roughly 40 percent of Britons are eager to see the popular William leapfrog his father Charles to the throne, down from roughly 46 percent who felt that way about one year ago. Still, almost no one believes Charles will step aside, and few predict a succession crisis. Observers chalk that up to a queen who after six stalwart decades has somehow managed to endear the archaic notion of inherited monarchy to an otherwise progressive nation. “In my life, she has always been there,” said Sean Brushett, a 19-year-old aspiring lawyer who waited hours in the rain to see the queen during her recent visit to south London. “It’s hard to see her every really going away. The queen is the biggest celebrity in the world.”

Greek stocks soar on pro-bailout party’s poll gain The Associated Press ATHENS, Greece — Greek stock markets rebounded strongly on Monday from a 22year low on hopes a pro-bailout party will win crucial national elections next month, which would avoid a catastrophic rift with international creditors and keep the struggling country within the euro currency union. The main stock index in Athens soared to close up 6.9

County records, the Steffans’ house did sell eventually. The home, which the Steffans bought in 2005 for $145,000, sold in June 2011 for $52,800. That’s well below the estimated real market value of nearly $106,000. But for some family members, moving on is more important than maximizing the sale price of a house in which a tragedy has occurred. Sandy Meyer’s son, Chris Pries, said via email that “Bend’s depressed housing market played a part” in the length of time it took to sell the Mountain High home. However, he said, “We are ... happy it sold, and another difficult step is behind us.” Malanga said the buyers were perfect for the home and the neighborhood. They even had the home blessed. “Then it took on a whole new feeling for them,” Malanga said. “They took steps out of the realm of the norm to make themselves feel comfortable and turn it into their home.” — Reporter: 541-617-7831, smiller@bendbulletin.com

Japan’s former premier condemns nuclear power

Jubilee Continued from A1 For a family once described as Britain’s most dysfunctional, and where whispers of republicanism seemed to swirl with every new tabloid headline, the rising fortunes of the British royals amount to what observers call a public relation coup. Though support for the monarchy has always been strong, a new opinion poll by Ipsos Mori shows 8 out of every 10 Britons want to keep the monarchy — the highest level since surveys began in the 1980s. Many credit the supernova wedding that produced the global stars now known simply as “Will and Kate” for providing the House of Windsor with its undeniable boost. But in the year since the bunting came down from Westminster Abbey, the royals appear to have solidified those gains, with even the gangling Prince Charles and his second wife, Camilla, scoring fresh points with the public. Most importantly, the younger generation of Windsors — including those now associated by marriage, like Pippa Middleton — have emerged as de facto pop culture icons rivaling the likes of Lady Gaga and Rihanna. Their fame, royal watchers say, has given the British monarchy’s international image a lift not seen since the early years of another royal couple — Charles and the late Diana, Princess of Wales. Yet as Britain prepares for the queen’s diamond jubilee, the monarchy more than ever is all about Her. “At 86, the queen is having her star turn,” said Dickie Arbiter, the queen’s former spokesman. Though publicly criticized for her initial inaction following Diana’s death in 1997, the queen has almost always been seen as the glue of a nation and its living link to a commonwealth where she remains head of state and through which Britain enjoys outsize influence. The rare occasion of a 60th year on the throne — only Queen Victoria also made it this far — appears to have refocused Britain on a woman who has defined an era here. Newspapers on both the political right and left are running gushing tributes. British cities great and small are being festooned with Union Jacks for more than 10,000 street parties (about double the number held for last year’s royal wedding). Merchandisers are minting everything from diamond jubilee retro lingerie to vintage champagne. Andrew

really up to the broker. But in my situation with my reputation of doing business in Central Oregon for many years, I think I’d deny the listing,” he said. “I think I’d just say, ‘I think you might want to hire someone else to do the job.’ I wouldn’t feel comfortable doing that.” Birtola pointed to a condominium in the late 1990s that a client had bought as a rental investment. The client rented it out to people who cooked meth on the stove, prompting the county to shut down the property for eight months. Even though the client got a certificate of compliance stating the property wasn’t dangerous, it took Birtola nearly a year to sell the condo because he had to disclose it had once been a drug lab. Someone did buy that property, he said, because they were able to overlook the previous issues. It’s the same, he said, with a home that has been the scene of a violent crime. According to Deschutes

percent, with the battered bank sector chalking up solid gains. Four polls published Sunday reversed previous trends to indicate that conservative New Democracy could come first in the June 17 vote, slightly ahead of the anti-austerity radical left Syriza party. Although the conservatives would still fall short of a governing majority, the surveys suggested they could form a coalition government with socialist PASOK, which have

also pledged to stick to Greece’s austerity commitments. Debt-crippled Greece is being kept afloat by huge international rescue loans, granted on condition of harsh cutbacks and reforms that slashed living standards. The austerity, however, also caused huge popular resentment toward New Democracy and PASOK, the two parties that accepted the terms. Voters expressed that anger clearly in

May 6 elections, giving a boost to anti-bailout parties. But the election proved inconclusive, with none of the parties able to form a coalition government, leaving Greece to hold another ballot next month. Greece’s bailout creditors — the other countries in the 17nation eurozone and the International Monetary Fund — insist that if the country reneges on its austerity commitments, the rescue loans will stop.

TOKYO — In an unusually stark warning, Japan’s prime minister during last year’s nuclear crisis told a parliamentary inquiry Monday that the country should discard nuclear power as too dangerous, saying the Fukushima accident had pushed Japan to the brink of “national collapse.” In testimony to a panel investigating the government’s handling of the nuclear disaster, the former prime minister, Naoto Kan, also warned that the politically powerful nuclear industry was trying to push Japan back toward nuclear power despite “showing no remorse” for the accident. Kan’s was the most closely watched testimony in the six-month inquiry, which was started by lawmakers who felt an earlier internal investigation by the government had papered over problems. Kan used the appearance to criticize the

relatively pro-nuclear stance of the current prime minister, Yoshihiko Noda, who replaced him in August. Noda has called for restarting Japan’s undamaged nuclear plants, which have all been idled since the accident because of public safety concerns. He says the plants are needed to avoid economically crippling power shortages. In his testimony, Kan said Japan’s plant safety was inadequate because the energy policy had been hijacked by the “nuclear village” — a term for the power companies and pro-nuclear regulators and researchers that worked closely together to promote the industry. He said the only way to break their grip was to form a new regulatory agency staffed with true outsiders, like U.S. and European experts.


Cancer ruling could put strain on 9/11 fund By Anemona Hartocollis New York Times News Service

NEW YORK — About five years ago, Patricia Workman’s bones started breaking, and she was found to have multiple myeloma, a cancer of the bone marrow. At the same time, her skin cancer started to proliferate, leaving her face so scarred that she needed reconstructive surgery. Workman and others who believe their cancers were caused by toxic substances released by the fall of the World Trade Center are due to learn this week whether they may be treated and compensated from a $4.3 billion fund set aside by Congress. An advisory committee in March found justification for covering 14 broad categories of cancer, raising expectations that the fund would cover at least some of them. But such a decision would create a logistical quagmire, advocates

Michael Kirby Smith / The New York Times

Patricia Workman, ground zero volunteer for about two years after the Sept. 11 attacks, now has myeloma, a cancer of the bone marrow.

for patients and government officials conceded, and could strain the fund’s resources. “Depending on the numbers of cancers and the criteria for

those cancers, we would certainly be getting more and different claims than we were receiving previously,” said Sheila Birnbaum, the special master overseeing the Sept. 11 Victim Compensation Fund. The advisory committee found some evidence linking Sept. 11 to increased rates of cancer, but existing studies are far from conclusive. And since there is probably no way to distinguish those who developed cancer from ground zero from those who might have developed it anyway, anyone who can prove sustained exposure could potentially be eligible for payment. “There’s tens of thousands of people that are potentially eligible, so how do you sort through that?” said Dr. James Melius, administrator of the New York State Laborers’ Health and Safety Trust Fund, who has closely monitored the research. “Will it be ev-

erybody with lung cancer in Lower Manhattan who was there around Sept. 11?” After heavy lobbying by the Bloomberg administration, Congress in 2010 approved the James Zadroga 9/11 Health and Compensation Act, named after a police officer who died years after working at ground zero. It allocated $2.8 billion for compensation for those sickened by World Trade Center dust, smoke and fumes, or their survivors. It also set aside $1.5 billion for treatment and monitoring. Dr. John Howard, director of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, is expected to rule by Saturday on whether to accept the advisory committee’s recommendation. If he does, no one knows for sure how many more people will become eligible for the fund. So far, more than 5,000 people have registered for

Border Continued from A1 Since the terrorist attacks of 2001, the federal government has kept a more careful watch on the country’s northern border. Here on this remote peninsula over the past six years, the number of Border Patrol agents has risen tenfold, from four in 2006 to about 40. This month, the agency is completing construction of a $10 million office in Port Angeles, a city of 19,000. The one-story building, surrounded by a spiked security fence, can house as many as 50 officers. The Border Patrol says its priority is to address potential terrorism and smuggling threats from Canada (a ferry runs between Port Angeles and Victoria, British Columbia), but many people say the peninsula has instead become an unlikely new frontier in the effort to fight illegal immigration from Latin America. “Everybody’s scared,” said Benigno Hernandez, 38, who has lived in Forks, population 3,500, for more than a decade. “Everybody’s leaving.” In Forks, several hundred immigrants had long found winter work picking salal, a wild shrub whose branches are used in floral arrangements around the world. But now, schools are losing enrollment because students’ parents have been deported. Mobile home parks are half empty. At Thriftway, the main grocery store in the town, the weekend rush has slowed because the salal pickers who used to shop after getting paid on Saturdays have disappeared, sometimes because they were detained, sometimes because they were afraid. “It’s happened very much in the past couple of months,” Forks Mayor Byron Monohon said. “I think the Border Patrol has just put a lot of pressure on the situation.” Last month, the American Civil Liberties Union and the Northwest Immigrant Rights Project filed a class-action suit against the Border Patrol, claiming that its officers were illegally stopping and interrogating people on the basis of racial profiling. This month, the Rights Project filed another suit, alleging that Border Patrol agents sometimes asked to support other law enforcement as interpreters — Border Patrol agents are required to know Spanish — while intending instead to investigate

Nazarene Continued from A1 Messages left for university officials were not returned last week. Dave Lewis, a Deschutes Economic Alliance board member who attended Northwest Nazarene in the 1960s, helped make introductions for the city earlier this year. He said he has been encouraged by the results. “I think once the two sides met that (Northwest Nazarene) saw Redmond is a serious group,” Lewis said. “I think that propelled this situation into the area that this is real and this could happen. I think the next step now is a memorandum of understanding could be discussed. The two sides could look at what each expects.”

Photos by Matthew Ryan Williams / The New York Times

The town of Forks, Wash. In April, the American Civil Liberties Union and the Northwest Immigrant Rights Project filed a class-action suit against the U.S. Border Patrol, claiming it was illegally stopping and interrogating people based on racial profiling in Forks.

Ismael Ramos-Contreras says he was stopped and questioned by U.S. Border Patrol agents without cause.

for immigration violations. In the class-action suit, the three named plaintiffs are all minority members who said they were stopped and questioned without cause: Two were corrections officers, one was the student-body president of Forks High School, whose parents were born in Mexico. The student, Ismael Ramos-Contreras, who will be a freshman at Western Washington University in the fall, said the Border Patrol’s presence has become unnerving but also a source of dark humor, including when the school soccer team travels to away games. “If we see Border Patrol, it’s like, ‘Everybody hide!’” he said. “The majority of the soccer team is Hispanic.” The Border Patrol would not comment on the lawsuits and said it prohibited profiling

based on race or religion. “What they’re focused on up there are the same things that we’re focused on around the country,” said Ronald D. Vitiello, the deputy chief of the Border Patrol. “That’s, you know, the threat of terrorism, the criminal organizations that use the border for their own gain and being prepared to combat those threats, eliminate the vulnerabilities that we know about and mitigate the risk where we can.” Officials sometimes cite the 1999 arrest of Ahmed Ressam, an Algerian who became known as the “millennium bomber” for his plan to detonate explosives at Los Angeles International Airport. Ressam was convicted after he tried to enter the United States at Port Angeles with bomb components. In the six years since the Bor-

Brandt said he sees a Redmond-based university as a complementary offering to potential four-year university developments in Bend. “These are very different institutions,” Brandt said. “(Northwest Nazarene) is a liberal arts college. It doesn’t have much science or engi-

neering... which (Oregon State) has focused on.” Northwest Nazarene is accredited through the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities, the most common accrediting body in the northwest United States.

der Patrol began expanding its presence on the peninsula, the number of apprehensions has declined by 27 percent — from 811 in 2006 to 591 in 2011 — in the agency’s Blaine sector, which includes Western Washington, Oregon and Alaska. Border Patrol officials have said the decline is a success that validates their presence. Last year, however, a Border Patrol agent based in Port Angeles testified before Congress that he and other agents there considered it a “black hole” with “no purpose, no mission.” The agent, Christian Sanchez, said his supervisors told him “to just drive” around the peninsula during his shift. Critics speculate that boredom, and a need to justify their presence, has prompted agents to get involved with law enforcement beyond their usual duties. In some cases, their help has been welcomed. The U.S. Forest Service, responsible for law enforcement on the QUEEN Sets Pillowtop or Plush

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the fund, but fewer than 400 of them have actually submitted claims, according to Birnbaum, the special master. Many, she presumes, are still gathering documentation to prove they meet the eligibility rules. Federal officials have estimated that up to 35,000 people could ultimately sign up, even without cancer’s inclusion. The committee made its recommendations primarily by correlating substances found in the dust, smoke and fumes at ground zero with the types of cancer they are known to cause. The panel used reviews of evidence on carcinogenic substances from the International Agency for Research on Cancer in Lyon, France, part of the World Health Organization, and from the National Toxicology Program, under the Department of Health and Human Services..

peninsula’s 600,000 acres of national forest, has just three agents, and one of the positions is vacant. “They’re a resource, and we’re few and far between,” said Kim Kinville, the patrol captain for the Forest Service on the peninsula. Forest Service agents will sometimes request help from Border Patrol for interpreting, she said, and the encounters can lead to detentions of illegal immigrants. In May 2011, a Forest Service officer stopped a Mexican couple picking salal on forest land without a permit. A Border Patrol agent soon arrived, prompting the Mexican man to flee into the forest while, according to his girlfriend, the Forest Service officer held her by her hair. The Mexican man, Benjamin Roldan Salinas, was found three weeks later, drowned in the Sol Duc River. Like most pickers in the area, Salinas sold his salal to Hop Dhooghe, 72, who runs Olympic Evergreens. Dhooghe, whose parents immigrated from Belgium and Germany, said his business was about a fourth of what it was a few years ago because many good salal pickers have left the peninsula. In response to the Border Patrol’s actions, Dhooghe has joined the new Forks Human Rights Group. “I’ve lived all my life out here and never seen anything like this,” Dhooghe said. “Why don’t they do it to the white people, to see if they’re from Canada or something?” he said of the Border Patrol confrontations. “They just do it by skin color. If they did that to the white people, there’d really be an uproar.”

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TUESDAY, MAY 29, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

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THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, MAY 29, 2012

Obama highlights end of Iraq war By Kathleen Hennessey Tribune Washington Bureau

WASHINGTON — Paying tribute to dead soldiers and their families, President Obama said Monday that the nation had reached a “milestone” of relative peace, noting the end of the Iraq war and plans to end America’s role in the Afghan war. “After a decade under a dark cloud of war we can see the light of a new day on the horizon,” Obama told a crowd of military families gathered at Arlington National Cem-

U.S. winds down longer benefits for the jobless By Shaila Dewan New York Times News Service

Hundreds of thousands of out-of-work Americans are receiving their final unemployment checks sooner than they had expected, even though Congress renewed extended benefits until the end of the year. The checks are stopping for the people who have the most difficulty finding work: the long-term unemployed. More than 5 million people have been out of work for longer than half a year. Federal benefit extensions, which supplemented state funds for payments up to 99 weeks, were intended to tide over the unemployed until the job market improved. In February, when the program was set to expire, Congress renewed it, but also phased in a reduction of the number of weeks of extended aid and made it more difficult for states to qualify for the maximum aid. Since then, the jobless in 23 states have lost up to five months’ worth of benefits. Next month, an additional 70,000 people will lose benefits early, bringing the number of people cut off prematurely this year to close to half a million, according to the National Employment Law Project. That estimate does not include people who simply exhausted the weeks of benefits they were entitled to. Separate from the congressional action, some states are making it harder to qualify for the first few months of benefits, which are covered by taxes on employers. Florida, where the jobless rate is 8.7 percent, has cut the number of weeks it will pay and changed its application procedures, with more than half of all applicants now being denied. The federal extension of jobless benefits has been a contentious issue in Washington. Republicans worry that it prolongs joblessness and say it has not kept the unemployment rate down, while Democrats argue that those out of work have few alternatives and that the checks are one of the most effective forms of stimulus because most of the money is spent immediately. After the most recent compromise reached in February, another renewal seems unlikely. The expiration of benefits is one factor contributing to what many economists refer to as a “fiscal cliff,” or a drag on the economy at the end of this year when tax cuts and recession-related spending measures all will come to an end unless Congress acts. The Congressional Budget Office warned last week that the combination could contribute to another recession next year. Candace Falkner, 50, received her last unemployment check in mid-May, when the extended benefits were curtailed in eight states. Since then she has applied for food stamps and begun a commission-only, door-to-door sales job. Since losing her job two years ago, Falkner said, she has earned a master’s degree in psychology and applied for work at numerous social service agencies as well as places like Wal-Mart, but no offers came.

etery to commemorate Memorial Day. Obama made his remarks after laying a wreath laden with red and white roses at the Tomb of the Unknowns, a presidential tradition each Memorial Day. Under a bright, cloudless sky, the president was joined by first lady Michelle Obama, Vice President Joe Biden and his wife, Jill Biden, at the marble sarcophagus on a hill overlooking Washington. Obama was slated for a full day of Memorial Day ceremo-

ny. From the cemetery, he was headed to the Vietnam War Memorial for a commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the beginning of that war. In his remarks, the president connected that conflict to the current one, honoring soldiers who stepped forward to serve “from the jungles of Vietnam to the mountains of Afghanistan.” “They fought for a home they would never return to. They fought for buddies they would never forget,” Obama said.

“They rest here side by side, row by row because each of them loved this country and what it stands for more than life itself,” he added. But the president focused his tribute on the fallen in the Iraq War, a conflict he opposed as he ran for office and declared ended in December. The president and NATO allies last week ratified plans to withdraw most U.S. forces from Afghanistan by the end of the 2014, although the details and the pace of the withdrawal are unclear.

Carolyn Kaster / The Associated Press

President Barack Obama speak during a Memorial Day ceremony at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Wall in Washington, D.C., to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Vietnam War.


COMMUNITYLIFE

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SPOTLIGHT Library offers e-reader talks The Deschutes Public Library system will continue its series, “Know Coffee — Know eBooks,” today with discussions at the Bellatazza coffee shops in Bend and Sunriver. The series of chats about e-readers, such as Kindles and Nooks, will be from 1:30 to 2:30 p.m. Tuesdays through Aug. 29. Learn how to use your e-reader to access electronic library books, and check out a variety of e-readers library staff will have for patrons to try. In Sunriver, Bellatazza is located at 57257 Beaver Drive. In Bend, Bellatazza is at 869 N.W. Wall St. Contact: 541-617-7087.

Science Pub focuses on stress Oregon State University’s Science Pub series will feature the topic, “This is Your Brain on Stress” from 5 to 7 p.m. Tuesday at McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., in Bend. Sarina Saturn, assistant professor in the Department of Psychology at Oregon State University, will talk about the physical and chemical responses to stress and how it can benefit the human condition. Saturn is an Oregon native who started her career dissecting human and animal brains to map emotions at their source, according to OSU. She has a doctoral degree in neuroscience. The discussion is free; registration is required. Contact: 541-3223100 or info@osu cascades.edu.

Scout out woodpeckers Birders will be in Sisters from June 14 to 17, scouting out woodpeckers during Woodpecker Weekend, an event hosted by the East Cascades Audubon Society. The event features guided field trip tours around Sisters, in the Ochoco Mountains and at Summer Lake. “There are eleven species of woodpeckers that are regularly recorded here in Central Oregon, with the acorn woodpecker being a rare 12th … Last year, we found all the regulars,” said John Gerke, the event’s chairperson, in a news release. Half-day tours are $20, full-day tours are $30 and funds raised will support the ECAS programs. Early registration is encouraged. To register or for more information, contact: Jan Rising at jan rising58@hotmail.com or John Gerke at john gerke@msn.com, or visit: www.ecaudubon .org and click on “Woodpecker Weekend” under the “Projects” tab.

Contact us Have a story idea or submission? Contact us! • Community events: Email event information to communitylife@ bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” at www.bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Contact: 541-3830351. — From staff reports

Submitted photo

Ranger profiles historic cabins Photos by Joe Kline / The Bulletin

Chelsea Callicott, of Bend, holds an old wedding photo of her parents, Virginia Crane Brown and Naval Officer James L. Brown, outside the retirement home she recently helped moved her father into in Bend.

• Book highlights historic stations of Pacific Northwest By David Jasper

AGE WIDE

OPEN • New nonprofit strives to help adult children take care of their aging parents By Mac McLean The Bulletin

L

ast weekend, Chelsea Callicott picked her 78-year-old father up from the Portland International Airport, drove him halfway across the state, and moved him into an adult foster home that’s less than 12 miles away from where she, her husband and their two children live in southwest Bend. The trip from an assisted living facility in Pennsylvania to Bend’s Leisure Club, Inc., foster home marked the third time Callicott and her siblings have moved their father since August 2011 as they’ve struggled to deal with his worsening physical condition and dementia. “At the end of the day, as an adult child it’s about doing what you can live with,” Callicott said as she looked over a personal journey she’s made in finding her father adequate care. “For me, I want to do everything in my power to make sure my father’s last years are comfortable.” It also comes one year after Callicott and a former home health care agency manager incorporated a nonprofit dedicated to helping adults care for their parents. That group, Age Wide Open, is planning to formally launch its efforts with a free seminar Saturday (see “About the group”).

The journey Eight years ago, Callicott’s father, Jim Brown, was placed in the intensive care unit of a South Carolina hospital after complications from a recent knee surgery caused him to lose a tremen-

Victoria Johnson, owner of Leisure Club Lodge, shows James Brown a photo album on Monday in Bend. Brown’s daughter, Chelsea Callicott, recently moved her father to the care facility.

dous amount of blood and he developed hospital psychosis, a condition characterized by disorientation and anxiety. Callicott said the experience likely triggered or worsened her father’s Lewy body dementia, a disease that mirrors Alzheimer’s and can cause its sufferers to hallucinate. “I went to visit him and I could tell he was not the same,” she said, looking back on the moment when she started realizing her father needed advanced medical care. “When I went back there I knew something wasn’t right with my dad.” See Care / B6

About the group Age Wide Open is a new nonprofit dedicated to helping adult children take care of their parents. It is holding a special seminar, “Lifesavers for Adult Children: Making the Aging Journey Sweeter,” at East Bend Public Library from 10:30 a.m. to noon Saturday. For more information, www.agewideopen.com.

‘Preppers’ do their best to be ready for the worst By Erik Lacitis The Seattle Times

PUYALLUP, Wash. — Do you have 12 cases of peas and beans, seven pounds of powdered milk, 50 pounds of flour, 50 pounds of rice, 20 pounds of frozen chicken breasts, a 4,000-watt generator and some 35 gallons of gas in containers to run a freezer? That’s just a sampling of what Robert Sarnes has stored in his family’s home

— in the pantry, in the garage that’s stacked with metal and wood containers. Sarnes is prepared for a disaster, and you’re probably not. Especially you Seattle city slickers, says Sarnes, in wonderment at your naivete. “Seattle? Maybe 1 in 1,000 families could survive more than five days comfortably,” he said. By the way, in case the

thought crosses your marauding mind about breaking into Sarnes’ home, he also has “in excess of 17” pistols and rifles in a safe in his house. Plus, right now as he’s being interviewed, he’s packing a compact .45 in a holster under his T-shirt. Why pack heat around the house? “I mean, in an emergency, I’m not gonna tell somebody, ‘Wait a minute, I’m going to

get my gun.’ You want to be as prepared as you can be,” said Sarnes. Sarnes, 43, married, with two young daughters, is a prepper, part of an evergrowing group here in the Northwest and throughout the country who have decided that if they haven’t stocked up that pantry shelf for a long emergency, nobody else will. See Preppers / B6

The Bulletin

In 1995, Les Joslin, a retired wilderness ranger, published, “Uncle Sam’s Cabins: A Visitor’s guide to Historic U.S. Forest Service Stations,” an up-close look at historic U.S. Forest Service ranger stations across the West. Now, a revised and enlarged edition of the book has been issued by Wilderness Associates. Joslin founded Wilderness Associates as “a ‘private partner’ in the preservation and interpretation of America’s rich National Forest System and National Wilderness Preservation System,” according to its website. The 333-page book profiles more than 90 Forest Service ranger stations and guard stations, some of which are still in use while others are historic sites. Others serve as recreation rentals, “and all have fascinating stories,” Joslin said. Three of the stations in the book are in the Deschutes National Forest, including Cabin Lake Ranger Station (built in 1923), Elk Lake Guard Station (1929) and Paulina Lake Guard Station (1940). The book profiles a total of 22 stations in the Pacific Northwest, along with stations as far away as Alaska and New Mexico. Joslin’s interest in the buildings began in 1962, when he began his first season as a fire guard in Toiyabe National Forest, working out of the Bridgeport Ranger Station, a oneroom office built in 1933. The building was eventually moved to Nevada, where it fell into disuse, according to the book. Joslin would not see the Bridgeport Ranger Station again for 42 years, he writes. Largely through the efforts of Les Joslin and Bob Boyd, of the High Desert Museum, the building was moved to the museum in 2008, where it was restored and opened for display as a historic exhibit in 2009. The book retails for $20 and is available in Central Oregon at Paulina Springs Books in Redmond and Sisters, Lava Lands Visitor Center, the High Desert Museum, the Des Chutes Historical Museum, online at www.wildernessheritage .com and other online retailers. In addition, Joslin will present an illustrated talk about the book at 7 p.m. June 26 for the History Pub series at McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend. — Reporter: 541-383-0349, djasper@bendbulletin.com


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THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, MAY 29, 2012

TV & M

‘Looking’: An unflinching view of a wandering mind Gorewitz, who is in her 80s, is at a particularly heartbreaking stage of the disease: mobile and spry and By Neil Genzlinger cognizant enough to engage New York Times News Service in conversation but not in Perhaps years from now, control of the words that after a scientific break- come out of her mouth or through has turned Alzheim- the thoughts behind them. er’s disease into a memory Asked how old she was when as distant as polio wards are she married, she produces a to younger Americans to- jumble that seems coherent day, someone will stumble only to her: “Oh, it was a year upon Scott Kirschenbaum’s after this because I was, had hard-to-watch documentary, been doing the other things “You’re Looking at Me Like you see, what you could see I Live Here and I Don’t,� and there. But that’s the way he be stunned. “I’ve read about did it himself.� Alzheimer’s,� this person will A question about where she say, “but I had no idea what it was born elicits a long, indewas actually like.� cipherable answer, at the end A l zhei mer ’s of which she says, has been a trendy “Brooklyn.� You can TV topic for writers of feel her clearing the plays and television SPOTLIGHT mental debris out of scripts in recent the way to reach that years. But those stonugget of information. ries have often been primarily Gorewitz has a playful about the people surrounding side, occasionally dancing or the patient — family members, joking. But she has also lost friends — and the effect of the enough of her social filter that disease on their lives. a cruel streak comes out now Kirschenbaum, whose film and again. “That one looks will be broadcast nationally like it’s dead,� she tells the on PBS’ “Independent Lens� camera as she points out a felon Thursday, takes the simple low resident who is slumped but bold step of making Al- over. When another resident zheimer’s the only thing in his makes a harmless comment, tale. It’s not a plot point that she snaps: “Just keep your propels a narrative; it’s an in- mouth shut. Shut up.� escapable box. “You’re Looking at Me� The film zeroes in on one may seem like lazy filmmakwoman, Lee Gorewitz, in a ing, but this kind of minimalresidential care center in Dan- ism takes a certain amount of ville, Calif., and follows her courage and a faith that the through her daily routines. audience won’t switch over There are no talking heads to something with a happy describing current research ending. Many viewers will into the disease, no fam- certainly find it difficult to ily members waxing nostalgic resist bailing out, especially about Gorewitz’s life before when Kirschenbaum catches Alzheimer’s. Kirschenbaum glimmers of self-awareness in sprinkles in some unobtrusive Gorewitz, indications that she music and prods with an oc- recognizes her diminished cacasional question from behind pacity and knows there’s noththe camera, but that’s it. ing to be done about it.

L M T 

FOR TUESDAY, MAY 29 EDITOR’S NOTES: • Open-captioned showtimes are bold. • There may be an additional fee for 3-D movies. • IMAX films are $15. • Movie times are subject to change after press time.

BEND

“You’re Looking At Me Like I Live Here And I Don’t� 7 p.m. Thursday, OPB Plus

Regal Pilot Butte 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend, 541-382-6347

THE BEST EXOTIC MARIGOLD HOTEL (PG-13) 12:30, 3:30, 6:30 DARLING COMPANION (PG-13) 1:15, 4:15, 7:15 THE DEEP BLUE SEA (R) 1, 4, 7 THE HUNGER GAMES (PG-13) 12:45, 3:45, 6:45 MARVEL’S THE AVENGERS (PG13) 12:15, 3:15, 6:15 MEN IN BLACK 3 (PG-13) Noon, 3, 6

Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend, 541-382-6347

BATTLESHIP (PG-13) 11:35 a.m., 12:50, 2:50, 4:05, 6, 7:20, 9, 10:20 CHERNOBYL DIARIES (R) 1:10, 4:30, 7:50, 10:20 CHIMPANZEE (G) 1:15, 3:25 DARK SHADOWS (PG-13) 1:25, 4:40, 7:40, 10:25 THE DICTATOR (R) 12:10, 1:30, 3:20, 4:45, 6:45, 8, 9:25, 10:30 THE HUNGER GAMES (PG-13) 11:40 a.m., 3:05, 6:20, 9:40 THE LUCKY ONE (PG-13) 6:05, 9:10 MARVEL’S THE AVENGERS (PG13) 11:30 a.m., 12:30, 2:45, 3:45, 6:10, 7, 9:20, 10:10 MARVEL’S THE AVENGERS 3-D (PG-13) 11:45 a.m., 3, 6:40, 9:55 MEN IN BLACK 3 (PG-13) Noon, 3:15, 4:15, 6:30, 7:30, 9:30, 10:15

Sony via The Associated Press

MEN IN BLACK 3 (PG-13) 6:45 WHAT TO EXPECT WHEN YOU’RE EXPECTING (PG-13) 6:45

Will Smith, left, and Tommy Lee Jones star in “Men in Black 3.�

MADRAS MEN IN BLACK 3-D (PG-13) 12:20, 3:35, 6:50, 9:50 MEN IN BLACK 3 IMAX (PG-13) 12:40, 3:55, 7:10, 10:05 THE PIRATES! BAND OF MISFITS (PG) 1 WHAT TO EXPECT WHEN YOUR EXPECTING (PG-13) 11:55 a.m., 2:55, 6:15, 9:05

McMenamins Old St. Francis School 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend, 541-330-8562

THE RAVEN (R) 9 WRATH OF THE TITANS (PG-13) 6 After 7 p.m., shows are 21 and older only. Younger than 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.

Tin Pan Theater

REDMOND

Madras Cinema 5

Redmond Cinemas

1101 S.W. U.S. Highway 97, Madras, 541-475-3505

1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond, 541-548-8777

BATTLESHIP (PG-13) 3:30, 6:15, 9 DARK SHADOWS (PG-13) 4, 9 MARVEL’S THE AVENGERS (PG-13) 3:15, 6:15, 9:15 MEN IN BLACK 3 (PG-13) 4:30, 7, 9:30 WHAT TO EXPECT WHEN YOU’RE EXPECTING (PG-13) 6:30

BATTLESHIP (PG-13) 4, 6:50 DARK SHADOWS (PG-13) 4:50, 7:20 THE DICTATOR (R) 3:40, 5:40, 7:40 MARVEL’S THE AVENGERS 3-D (PG13) 3:30, 6:30 MEN IN BLACK 3 (PG-13) 4:40, 7

PRINEVILLE Pine Theater

SISTERS

214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

Sisters Movie House 720 Desperado Court, Sisters, 541-549-8800

BATTLESHIP (PG-13) 6:30 MARVEL’S THE AVENGERS (PG-13) 6:15

BATTLESHIP (UPSTAIRS — PG13) 6 MEN IN BLACK 3 (PG-13) 4, 7 Pine Theater’s upstairs screening room has limited accessibility.

869 N.W. Tin Pan Alley, Bend, 541-241-2271

As of press time, complete movie times for today were unavailable. Contact the theater for the schedule or visit www. tinpantheater.com.

7:30 AM - 5:30 PM MON-FRI 8 AM - 3 PM SAT.

Change your mind. Change your life.

541-382-4171 541-548-7707 (541) 728-0505 www.neurofloat.com

2121 NE Division Bend

641 NW Fir Redmond

www.denfeldpaints.com

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TUESDAY PRIME TIME 5/29/12

*In HD, these channels run three hours ahead. / Sports programming may vary. BD-Bend/Redmond/Sisters/Black Butte (Digital); PM-Prineville/Madras; SR-Sunriver; L-La Pine

ALSO IN HD; ADD 600 TO CHANNEL No.

BROADCAST/CABLE CHANNELS

BD PM SR L ^ KATU KTVZ % % % % KBNZ & KOHD ) ) ) ) KFXO * ` ` ` KOAB _ # _ # ( KGW KTVZDT2 , _ # / OPBPL 175 173

5:00 KATU News News News KEZI 9 News The Simpsons Electric Comp. NewsChannel 8 Meet, Browns Mexico/Bayless

5:30 World News Nightly News Evening News World News The Simpsons Fetch! With Ruff Nightly News Meet, Browns Hey Kids-Cook

6:00

6:30

KATU News at 6 (N) ’ Å NewsChannel 21 at 6 (N) Å Access H. Old Christine KEZI 9 News KEZI 9 News Two/Half Men Two/Half Men This Old House Business Rpt. NewsChannel 8 News King of Queens King of Queens New Tricks Dead Man Talking ’

7:00

7:30

Jeopardy! ‘G’ Wheel Fortune Jeopardy! ‘G’ Wheel Fortune How I Met 30 Rock ’ ‘14’ Entertainment The Insider ‘PG’ Big Bang Big Bang PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Ă… Live at 7 (N) Inside Edition Seinfeld ‘PG’ Seinfeld ‘PG’ Shiloh -- Fiery Trial ’ ‘PG’ Ă…

8:00

8:30

9:00

9:30

10:00

10:30

Cougar Town (N) ’ ‘PG’ Ă… 20/20 People close to the queen share stories. (N) ’ Ă… America’s Got Talent ‘PG’ Ă… America’s Got Talent (N) ’ ‘PG’ Grimm ’ ‘14’ Ă… NCIS Psych Out ’ ‘PG’ NCIS: Los Angeles Betrayal ‘14’ 48 Hours Mystery (N) ’ Ă… Cougar Town (N) ’ ‘PG’ Ă… 20/20 People close to the queen share stories. (N) ’ Ă… New Girl ’ ‘14’ New Girl ’ ‘14’ New Girl ‘14’ New Girl ‘14’ News TMZ (N) ’ ‘PG’ Civilization: The West and the Rest With Niall Ferguson (N) ‘PG’ Frontline Al Qaeda in Yemen (N) America’s Got Talent ‘PG’ Ă… America’s Got Talent (N) ’ ‘PG’ Grimm ’ ‘14’ Ă… The Catalina (N) ’ ‘14’ Ă… The L.A. Complex (N) ’ ‘14’ Cops ‘PG’ Ă… ’Til Death ‘PG’ Long Road Home ’ ‘PG’ Ă… World News Tavis Smiley ’ Charlie Rose (N) ’ Ă…

11:00

11:30

KATU News (11:35) Nightline News Jay Leno News Letterman KEZI 9 News (11:35) Nightline Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Moyers & Company ’ ‘G’ Ă… NewsChannel 8 Jay Leno ’Til Death ‘PG’ That ’70s Show PBS NewsHour ’ Ă…

BASIC CABLE CHANNELS

Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars *A&E 130 28 18 32 The First 48 10 Pounds ‘14’ Ă… CSI: Miami Raging Cannibal Murder in CSI: Miami Bombshell Horatio has CSI: Miami A crane crashes into a ››› “Space Cowboysâ€? (2000, Adventure) Clint Eastwood, Tommy Lee Jones, Donald Sutherland. NASA reunites ››› “Die Hard With a Vengeanceâ€? *AMC 102 40 39 the Everglades. ‘14’ Ă… concerns about Julia. ‘14’ Ă… Miami high rise. ’ ‘14’ Ă… four aging flyboys for an urgent mission. Ă… (1995) Bruce Willis. Ă… North Woods Law ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Wild Russia ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Wild Russia ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Stranger-Bears Stranger-Bears Stranger-Bears Stranger-Bears Wild Russia ’ ‘PG’ Ă… *ANPL 68 50 26 38 North Woods Law ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Housewives/NYC Bethenny Ever After Bethenny Ever After Orange County Social (N) Housewives/OC (10:01) Pregnant in Heels (N) What Happens Housewives/OC BRAVO 137 44 Dallas Cowboys Cheerleaders Dallas Cowboys Cheerleaders › “Bio-Domeâ€? (1996) Pauly Shore, Stephen Baldwin. ’ Ă… (10:15) “Whiskey Businessâ€? (2012) Pauly Shore. ’ ‘PG’ Ă… CMT 190 32 42 53 Dallas Cowboys Cheerleaders 60 Minutes on CNBC 60 Minutes on CNBC (N) Mad Money 60 Minutes on CNBC 60 Minutes on CNBC Paid Program Vacuum CNBC 51 36 40 52 Crime Inc. Illegal Gambling Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 Ă… Erin Burnett OutFront Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 Ă… Erin Burnett OutFront CNN 52 38 35 48 Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Ă… Always Sunny (5:55) 30 Rock (6:26) 30 Rock Colbert Report Daily Show Workaholics (8:28) Tosh.0 (8:59) Tosh.0 (9:29) Tosh.0 Tosh.0 (N) ‘14’ Workaholics (N) Daily Show Colbert Report COM 135 53 135 47 Always Sunny Dept./Trans. City Edition Desert Cooking Oregon Redmond City Council Get Outdoors Visions of NW The Yoga Show The Yoga Show Talk of the Town Local issues. COTV 11 Capitol Hill Hearings CSPAN 58 20 12 11 Capitol Hill Hearings Good-Charlie Shake It Up! ‘G’ Good-Charlie A.N.T. Farm ‘G’ Jessie ‘G’ Ă… Austin & Ally ’ “Radio Rebelâ€? (2012, Drama) Debby Ryan. ’ Ă… A.N.T. Farm ‘G’ (10:35) Jessie Phineas, Ferb Shake It Up! ‘G’ *DIS 87 43 14 39 Good-Charlie Deadliest Catch ’ ‘14’ Ă… Deadliest Catch ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Deadliest Catch The Aftermath The aftermath of the hurricane. ‘14’ The Devil’s Ride Bad Blood ‘14’ Deadliest Catch ’ ‘14’ Ă… *DISC 156 21 16 37 Deadliest Catch ’ ‘14’ Ă… Keeping Up With the Kardashians Keeping Up With the Kardashians E! News (N) E! Investigates (N) ‘14’ Mrs. Eastwood Mrs. Eastwood Keeping Up With the Kardashians Chelsea Lately E! News *E! 136 25 Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… ESPN 21 23 22 23 (4:00) MLB Baseball Detroit Tigers at Boston Red Sox (N) Ă… Super Bowl Super Bowl NFL Live Ă… SportsCenter Special Ă… Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) Ă… NBA Tonight (N) SportsNation Ă… NASCAR Now ESPN2 22 24 21 24 NFL Live (N) Ă… Bay City Blues Ă… SportsCentury Ă… IndyCar Racing Bay City Blues Ă… IndyCar Racing Ă… ESPNC 23 25 123 25 IndyCar Racing SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. ESPNN 24 63 124 203 SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… ››› “Aladdinâ€? (1992) Voices of Scott Weinger, Robin Williams. ››› “Freaky Fridayâ€? (2003) Jamie Lee Curtis, Lindsay Lohan. The 700 Club ‘G’ Ă… FAM 67 29 19 41 (4:30) ››› “Holesâ€? (2003) Sigourney Weaver, Jon Voight. Hannity (N) On Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Ă… Hannity On Record, Greta Van Susteren The Five FNC 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Ă… Home Cooking Chopped The Big Scoop ‘G’ Cupcake Wars Cupcake Champions Glee Chopped Gotta Grill! Chopped Grilltastic! (N) Chopped Step Right Up! *FOOD 177 62 98 44 Best Dishes How I Met How I Met How I Met How I Met Two/Half Men Two/Half Men ›› “S.W.A.T.â€? (2003, Action) Samuel L. Jackson, Colin Farrell, Michelle Rodriguez. ›› “S.W.A.T.â€? (2003, Action) Samuel L. Jackson. FX 131 Income Prop. Income Prop. Income Prop. Hunters Int’l House Hunters Celeb-Home Million Dollar Design Star (N) ‘G’ Ă… House Hunters Hunters Int’l Design Star ‘G’ Ă… HGTV 176 49 33 43 Income Prop. American Pickers ‘PG’ Ă… Hatfields & McCoys (Part 1 of 3) ‘14’ Ă… Hatfields & McCoys (N) (Part 2 of 3) ‘14’ Ă… (11:05) Hatfields & McCoys ‘14’ *HIST 155 42 41 36 American Pickers ‘PG’ Ă… Reba ‘PG’ Ă… Dance Moms ‘PG’ Ă… Dance Moms ‘PG’ Ă… Dance Moms ‘PG’ Ă… Dance Moms ‘PG’ Ă… Dance Moms: Miami (N) ‘PG’ Dance Moms: Miami ‘PG’ Ă… LIFE 138 39 20 31 Reba ‘PG’ Ă… The Rachel Maddow Show (N) The Last Word The Ed Show The Rachel Maddow Show The Last Word Hardball With Chris Matthews MSNBC 56 59 128 51 The Ed Show (N) True Life ’ Friendzone ‘PG’ Friendzone ‘PG’ 16 and Pregnant Lindsey ’ ‘14’ 16 and Pregnant Devon ’ ‘14’ 16 and Pregnant Kristina (N) ‘14’ Catching, Girls of Teen Mom MTV 192 22 38 57 True Life I Have a Hot Mom ’ SpongeBob Victorious ‘G’ Victorious ‘G’ Victorious ‘G’ How to Rock ‘G’ Yes, Dear ‘PG’ Yes, Dear ‘PG’ That ’70s Show That ’70s Show George Lopez George Lopez Friends ’ ‘PG’ Friends ’ ‘PG’ NICK 82 46 24 40 SpongeBob Prison Breaks Prison Breaks Prison Breaks Prison Breaks Prison Breaks Unusual Suspects ’ ‘14’ Ă… Unusual Suspects ’ ‘14’ Unusual Suspects ’ ‘14’ Unusual Suspects ’ ‘14’ Ă… OWN 161 103 31 103 Prison Breaks Mariners Post. MLB Baseball Seattle Mariners at Texas Rangers From Rangers Ballpark in Arlington, Texas. Dan Patrick ROOT 20 45 28* 26 MLB Baseball Seattle Mariners at Texas Rangers From Rangers Ballpark in Arlington, Texas. (N) (Live) Ways to Die Ways to Die (6:34) ›› “Alien vs. Predatorâ€? (2004, Science Fiction) Sanaa Lathan, Raoul Bova. ’ (8:47) ›› “Doomâ€? (2005, Science Fiction) The Rock, Karl Urban. ’ Ways to Die Ways to Die SPIKE 132 31 34 46 Ways to Die Fact or Faked: Paranormal Files Fact or Faked: Paranormal Files Fact or Faked: Paranormal Files Hollywood Treasure (N) Fact or Faked: Paranormal Files SYFY 133 35 133 45 (4:00) ››› “Casino Royaleâ€? (2006) Daniel Craig, Eva Green. Ă… Behind Scenes Joyce Meyer John Hagee Rod Parsley Praise the Lord Ă… ACLJ Life Head-On Full Flame Creflo Dollar Praise the Lord Ă… TBN 205 60 130 Seinfeld ‘PG’ Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Conan ‘14’ *TBS 16 27 11 28 Friends ’ ‘PG’ Friends ’ ‘PG’ King of Queens King of Queens Seinfeld ‘PG’ ››› “Carmen Jonesâ€? (1954, Musical) Dorothy Dandridge, Harry Belafonte. ›› “Bright Roadâ€? (1953, Drama) Dorothy Dandridge, ›› “The Decks Ran Redâ€? (1958, Crime Drama) James ›› “Tarzan’s ›› “The Harlem Globetrottersâ€? (1951, Drama) Thomas TCM 101 44 101 29 Two workers vie for love at an Army parachute plant. Philip Hepburn, Harry Belafonte. Ă… Gomez, Dorothy Dandridge. Premiere. Mason, Dorothy Dandridge. Perilâ€? (1951) What Not to Wear Angie ’ ‘PG’ What Not to Wear Julie ’ ‘PG’ What Not to Wear Beryl ’ ‘PG’ What Not to Wear (N) ‘PG’ Ă… Brooklyn Style Brooklyn Style What Not to Wear ’ ‘PG’ Ă… *TLC 178 34 32 34 What Not to Wear Emily ’ ‘PG’ NBA Basketball Oklahoma City Thunder at San Antonio Spurs (N) (Live) Ă… Inside the NBA (N) (Live) Ă… Falling Skies Prisoner of War ‘14’ Falling Skies Grace ‘14’ Ă… Bones ’ ‘14’ *TNT 17 26 15 27 NBA Pregame (N) (Live) Ă… MAD ‘PG’ Regular Show Regular Show Wrld, Gumball Adventure Time Wrld, Gumball Level Up ‘PG’ Adventure Time King of the Hill King of the Hill American Dad American Dad Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ *TOON 84 Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Mysteries at the Museum ‘PG’ Mysteries at the Museum (N) ‘PG’ Mysteries at the Museum ‘PG’ Off Limits St. Louis ‘PG’ Ă… *TRAV 179 51 45 42 Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Bourdain: No Reservations M*A*S*H ‘PG’ Ă… M*A*S*H ‘PG’ M*A*S*H ‘PG’ Home Improve. Home Improve. Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond TVLND 65 47 29 35 Bonanza Lady From Baltimore ‘G’ Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU CSI: Crime Scene Investigation USA 15 30 23 30 Law & Order: SVU Basketball Wives Finale ’ ‘14’ Single Ladies ’ ‘14’ Mob Wives Reunion ‘14’ Ă… Mob Wives Reunion ‘14’ Ă… Tough Love: New Orleans ’ ‘14’ Basketball Wives Finale ’ ‘14’ VH1 191 48 37 54 Basketball Wives ’ ‘14’ PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(6:10) ›› “Memphis Belleâ€? 1990 Matthew Modine. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… ››› “The Rockâ€? 1996, Action Sean Connery, Nicolas Cage, Ed Harris. ’ ‘R’ Ă… (10:20) ›› “Roninâ€? 1998 Robert De Niro. ‘R’ Ă… ENCR 106 401 306 401 (4:35) ›› “Teen Wolfâ€? 1985 › “What Happens in Vegasâ€? 2008 Cameron Diaz. ‘PG-13’ Ă… › “I Love You, Beth Cooperâ€? 2009 Hayden Panettiere. ‘PG-13’ Ă… ›› “Jawbreakerâ€? 1999 Rose McGowan. ‘R’ Ă… FXM Presents FMC 104 204 104 120 (4:00) “I Love You, Beth Cooperâ€? The Ultimate Fighter Live ’ ‘14’ UFC Unleashed UFC Tonight (N) UFC Insider Action Sports Thrillbillies ‘14’ Best of PRIDE Fighting UFC Unleashed UFC Tonight UFC Insider FUEL 34 Golf Central Feherty Big Break Atlantis Learning Center Inside PGA GOLF 28 301 27 301 Golf (N) Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Frasier ‘PG’ Frasier ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ HALL 66 33 175 33 The Waltons The Threshhold ‘G’ (3:15) “Hemingway & Gellhornâ€? 2012 REAL Sports With Bryant Gumbel The Fight Game ››› “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2â€? 2011 Daniel Radcliffe. Prometheus: 24/7 Pacquiao/ Veep Baseball ’ Game of Thrones Stannis’ fleet atHBO 425 501 425 501 Clive Owen. ’ ‘NR’ Ă… With Jim Harry may have to make the ultimate sacrifice. ‘PG-13’ HBO First Look Bradley ‘PG’ ‘MA’ Ă… tacks King’s Landing. ’ ‘MA’ ’ ‘PG’ Ă… ›› “Lucky Number Slevinâ€? 2006, Crime Drama Josh Hartnett. ‘R’ (7:15) ›› “Teethâ€? 2007, Comedy Jess Weixler, John Hensley. ‘R’ (9:15) ›› “Lucky Number Slevinâ€? 2006, Crime Drama Josh Hartnett. ‘R’ ›› Teeth ‘R’ IFC 105 105 (4:30) ›› “The Replacement Killersâ€? ››› “My Cousin Vinnyâ€? 1992, Comedy Joe Pesci, Marisa Tomei. An inept (11:40) Femme ››› “Beginnersâ€? 2010, Drama Ewan McGregor, Christo- Snow White and ››› “Unstoppableâ€? 2010, Action Denzel Washington, MAX 400 508 508 1998 Chow Yun-Fat. ‘R’ lawyer tries to free his cousin from a Dixie jail. ’ ‘R’ Ă… pher Plummer, MĂŠlanie Laurent. ’ ‘R’ Ă… the Huntsman Chris Pine. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… Fatales ’ ‘MA’ Amish: Out of Order ‘PG’ Amish: Out of Order (N) ‘PG’ American Colony: Hutterites American Colony: Hutterites Amish: Out of Order ‘PG’ Amish: Out of Order ‘PG’ Shark Men ‘14’ NGC 157 157 Odd Parents Odd Parents Odd Parents Odd Parents Dragonball GT Supah Ninjas SpongeBob SpongeBob Fanboy-Chum Fanboy-Chum Planet Sheen T.U.F.F. Puppy NTOON 89 115 189 115 Dragonball GT Supah Ninjas Ted Nugent Hunt., Country Most Wanted Hunting TV Workin’ Man West. Extremes Hal & Len Truth Hunting Hunt., Country Driven TV Steve’s Outdoor Whitetail Nation Hunter Journal OUTD 37 307 43 307 Driven TV (4:15) ››› “Drag- ›› “It’s About Youâ€? 2011 Singer John Mellencamp goes Bobcat Goldthwait: You Don’t Look ››› “The King’s Speechâ€? 2010, Historical Drama Colin Firth. England’s mon- ››› “Air Force Oneâ€? 1997, Suspense Harrison Ford, Glenn Close. A terrorist SHO 500 500 onslayerâ€? on tour and records an album. ‘NR’ Ă… the Same Either ‘MA’ Ă… arch strives to overcome a nervous stammer. ’ ‘R’ Ă… and his gang hijack the U.S. president’s plane. ’ ‘R’ Ă… Supercars Pimp My Ride Pimp My Ride My Ride Rules My Ride Rules NASCAR Race Hub Supercars Supercars Pimp My Ride Pimp My Ride My Ride Rules My Ride Rules SPEED 35 303 125 303 Supercars (7:20) ›› “Are We There Yet?â€? 2005 Ice Cube. ›› “Just Go With Itâ€? 2011 Adam Sandler. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… ›› “Step Up 3â€? 2010 ‘PG-13’ STARZ 300 408 300 408 (3:50) Step Up 3 (5:45) ›› “Mars Needs Momsâ€? 2011 Voices of Seth Green. ’ ‘PG’ (4:35) › “Route 666â€? 2001, Horror Lou (6:15) ›› “Believersâ€? 2007, Horror Johnny Messner, Jon Huertas. Paramed- ››› “The Cry of the Owlâ€? 2009, Suspense Paddy Consi- (9:40) “Forgedâ€? 2010 Manny Perez. An ex-con seeks ›› “Godzillaâ€? 1998 Matthew BroderTMC 525 525 Diamond Phillips. ‘R’ ics become captives of a doomsday cult. ’ ‘R’ Ă… dine, Julia Stiles. ’ ‘R’ Ă… redemption for the murder of his son’s mom. ick. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… Boxing Zab Judah vs. Vernon Paris Poker After Dark ‘PG’ Ă… Darts Poker After Dark ‘PG’ Ă… NBCSN 27 58 30 209 Boxing Maurice Byarm vs. Bryant Jennings Bridezillas Kera & Tifani ‘14’ Bridezillas Tifani & Johanne ‘14’ Bridezillas ‘14’ Ă… Bridezillas Johanne & Cristal ‘14’ Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Bridezillas Ayanna & Jenny ‘14’ *WE 143 41 174 118 Bridezillas Kim & Kera ‘14’ Ă…


TUESDAY, MAY 29, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

A  & A  

Bullied boy’s injuries should trigger police involvement Dear Abby: I am a retired New York City police officer and a resource officer at two high schools in Brooklyn. I must comment on the letter you printed from “Worried About My Boy in Tulsa� (March 29), whose 7-year-old is bullied. If a child hits another child so hard that medical attention is required, it is an assault. The police should have been notified and appropriate law enforcement action taken. The school then has cause to remove the violent child and have him/her placed in an education program better suited for violent children. The statute of limitations is not out, so the police can still be contacted as soon as possible by this parent. — Jim C. Dear Jim: Many readers pointed out that this incident went beyond bullying into assault, and offered advice to “Worried� on this troubling but prevalent issue. Their comments: Dear Abby: If “Worried’s� son is injured at school again, she needs to take him to an emergency room and have the injuries documented. While there, she should call 911 and report the assault to the police. She should start the report with this sentence: “I’d like to report an assault on my child.� If she says he is being “bullied,� they may not take her as seriously. — Concerned Gran in Oklahoma Dear Abby: I am an attorney practicing law in California and have been involved in several bullying cases. The first step should be to ensure the child’s safety. If the perpetrators are not being removed from the environment, the child needs to be. The cost of private schooling or the inconvenience of a school transfer would be part of a lawsuit for damages. Second, the police should be notified. Third, they should get a lawyer who knows how to put the school on notice.

DEAR ABBY A lawsuit in this case is warranted if the school has known about the bullying but has done nothing about it. — Mike in Newport Beach Dear Abby: My son was bullied in elementary school. I spoke at length to his teachers and found out that he was exhibiting behaviors that triggered the bullying. He simply did not know how to interact with his peers. It wasn’t my son’s “fault�; he needed help with social skills. It took several tries to find a counselor who connected — a wonderful man who taught him how to be a friend. The bullying stopped. Now my son is graduating from high school with many good friends. Kids can be cruel. They “smell� weakness and pick on those who are different. Sometimes the best we can do is help our children learn how to draw others to them, rather than be singled out as a victim or undesirable member of the team. — Been There in Charleston, W. Va. Dear Abby: My son was bullied during his entire year of kindergarten. That summer we enrolled him in a tae kwon do program. After a few months he was a different person! The confidence and direction he learned were vital. He gained the inner strength to be sure of himself in the face of bullies. Tae kwon do teaches perseverance, self-control, modesty and indomitable spirit — qualities from which we can all benefit. I urge “Worried� to look around in her community for a tae kwon do program with an instructor who specializes in teaching this art to children. — Montana Mom — Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

Horoscope: Happy Birthday for Tuesday, May 29, 2012 By Jacqueline Bigar This year you will be passionate about nearly everything you do. You are likely to express your anger loud and clear. In the same vein, you’ll express your appreciation for whom and what you love. Others will know where you are coming from. If you are single, the person you choose to be with this year could very well be a life mate, as this person is likely to reflect your emotional clarity. If you are attached, your sweetie initially might have strange reactions to this new phase. Be loving and accepting. VIRGO could be involved with your home and/or domestic life. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH You have a lot to get done, especially as new things keep dropping on your plate. You are able to gain new insight after the fact. Your high energy easily can switch to anger if you are frustrated. Dote on a child or loved one. Tonight: Catch up on errands. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHHH You seem to have one solution after another. You mean well, but someone could feel inferior to you. Downplay a great idea, and help build this person’s sense of security. Tonight: Playful, aren’t you? GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHH You actually might decide to stay home, if possible. You have plenty to do, and there’s no end in sight. A loved one could be delighted by your presence at home. On the other hand, you know you can indulge this person later if you cannot hang at home now. Tonight: Not going far, CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHHH Sometimes, when you try to express your frustration or uneasy feelings, you could come off as hostile. Observe someone or many people in the same situation. Note the different styles. Do you want to revive yours? A nice note or gesture touches you deeply. Tonight: Catch up on emails and calls. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHHH You could feel pressed for various financial reasons. You tend to go to excess and often find others’ reactions surprising. Understand your limits, and move forward in a more positive manner. A friend reveals his or her strong feelings. Do not let this person hang. Be open.

Tonight: Your treat. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH A newfound intensity might be difficult for even you to handle. If someone is not receiving your messages in the manner you would like, don’t worry — he or she also is getting used to a changing you. Tonight: Whatever makes you happy. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHH Know when to pull back. You might be evaluating the pros and cons of making a major change. You do not need to make a decision right now. Your instincts guide you well with a loved one at a distance. Tonight: Make nice. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHHH A meeting or get-together with a group of friends could be a pivotal part of your day. Do not take someone’s abruptness or sarcasm personally. Deflect this person’s energy for now. Good feelings will flow later in the day. Tonight: What would make you happy? Go off and do just that. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHH Tension could be high because of an unusual demand or heavy responsibilities. You might feel like you are racing through the day. Value your time, and delegate responsibilities to others. A partner would be only too happy to pitch in. Tonight: A late night. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHH Something that lands on your desk could force you to do something you normally would put off. An associate or acquaintances might be developing some very strong feelings. Be aware and honest about your emotions. Tonight: Escape the day by indulging in some mind candy. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHH You might want to duck when a partner, loved one or family member loses it. You will neutralize the situation quite quickly. Feelings will come up, but not until the end of the day when you are reminded how much you care. Tonight: Follow someone’s lead. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH You certainly have a mixed array of friends and associates. In some ways, you see similarities, with the exception of how they handle anger and frustration. Kick back and watch — you might be surprised. Tonight: Choose your company with care. Š 2011 by King Features Syndicate

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C C  Please email event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� at www.bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

WEDNESDAY WORDS WITHOUT WALLS STUDENT SHOWCASE: A reading of works from the 2012 The Nature of Words creative writing students; free; 6-8 p.m.; PoetHouse Art, 55 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-647-2233 or info@ thenatureofwords.org.

THURSDAY LET FREEDOM RING: The Bells of Sunriver perform music of America on handbells; free; 11:30 a.m.-12:15 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-593-1635. CONVERSATIONS ON BOOKS AND CULTURE: Read and discuss “Typical American� by Gish Jen; free; noon-1 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Campus Center, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; kroth1@cocc.edu. SHIFTING THE DISCOURSE: Tanya Golash-Boza talks about immigrant rights as human rights; free; 3 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Wille Hall, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-318-3726 or esandoval@cocc.edu. LEFT COAST COUNTRY: The Portland-based Americana band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www .mcmenamins.com. COMEDY NIGHT: Susan Rice performs; $10; 7:30 p.m., doors open 6 p.m.; The Original Kayo’s Dinner House and Lounge, 415 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-323-2520. JAZZ CONCERT: The Central Oregon Community College Big Band Jazz performs under the direction of Andy Warr; $5, free ages 11 and younger; 7:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Pinckney Center for the Arts, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-280-9371. JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLY GOATS: The Boise, Idahobased folk grass band performs; $3; 9 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; 541728-0879 or www.reverbnation .com/venue/thehornedhand.

FRIDAY BEAR CREEK CARNIVAL: Featuring games, bounce houses, dancers and more; $5 per child, free for adults; 5-8 p.m.; Bear Creek Elementary School, 51 S.E. 13th St., Bend; 541-355-1400. FIRST FRIDAY GALLERY WALK: Event includes art exhibit openings, artist talks, live music, wine and food in downtown Bend and the Old Mill District; free; 5-9 p.m.; throughout Bend. LIVES ON THE LINE: An interactive, multimedia art installation to empower women in the community; proceeds benefit Global Shine Project; free; 5-8 p.m.; The Oxford Hotel, 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-410-5513. MOMMY MINGLE: A gathering for mothers with vendors, photo sessions, local resources and more; proceeds benefit Family Access Network; free admission; 6-9 p.m.; Baby Phases Tot 2 Teen, 759 N.E. Greenwood Ave., Suite 1, Bend; 541-306-3942 or www.bendmomsformoms.com. PUSH: A skate deck art show and auction; proceeds benefit the Division Street Skatepark Project; free; 6-10 p.m.; old Boomtown location, 910 N.W. Harriman St., Bend; 503-475-8161 or www .divisionstreetskatepark.org. “BEGINNERS�: A screening of the R-rated 2010 movie; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541-475-3351 or www.jcld.org.

SATURDAY AGILITY TRIAL: Bend Agility Action Dogs presents a day of dogs navigating obstacle courses; free; 8 a.m.-4 p.m.; Crook County Fairgrounds, 1280 S. Main St., Prineville; 541-410-4646 or www .benddogagility.com. GARAGE SALE FUNDRAISER: Proceeds benefit the school’s Sparrow Club; free admission; 8 a.m.-1 p.m.; Seven Peaks School, 19660 S.W. Mountaineer Way, Bend; 541-788-8001. PLANT SALE: A sale of annual and perennial plants; proceeds benefit the Redmond Opportunity Center Foundation; free admission; 8:30 a.m.-2 p.m.; Zion Lutheran Church, 1113

Submitted photo

The Portland-based Americana band “Left Coast Country� will put on a free show at 7 p.m. Thursday at McMenamins Old St. Francis School in downtown Bend. S.W. Black Butte Blvd., Redmond; 541-382-7044. VFW BREAKFAST: A breakfast of pancakes; $7; 8:30-10:30 a.m.; VFW Hall, 1503 N.E. Fourth St., Bend; 541-389-0775. HIGH DESERT RHUBARB FESTIVAL: Dutch-oven cooks prepare a variety of rhubarb dishes; with live music, vendors, a car show and more; proceeds benefit S.C.O.O.T.R; free; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; L&S Gardens and Land Clearing, 50792 S. Huntington Road, La Pine; 541-536-2049. SADDLE UP FOR ST. JUDE: A nineor 14-mile trail ride; registration required; proceeds benefit St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital; donations accepted; 9 a.m.-noon; Sisters Cow Camp, F.S. Road 15, three miles west of State Highway 242; 541-815-9398 or hrsnarnd@ webformixair.com. CENTRAL OREGON SATURDAY MARKET: Featuring arts and crafts from local artisans; free admission; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; parking lot across from Bend Public Library, 600 N.W. Wall St.; 541-420-9015 or www .centraloregonsaturdaymarket.com. LARKSPUR FESTIVAL: Featuring a plant sale, family activities, games, craft sales, live music and more; free; 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; Larkspur Park, 1700 S.E. Reed Market Road, Bend; 541-388-1133. MOMMY MINGLE: A gathering for mothers with vendors, photo sessions, local resources and more; proceeds benefit Family Access Network; free admission; 10 a.m.4 p.m.; Baby Phases Tot 2 Teen, 759 N.E. Greenwood Ave., Suite 1, Bend; 541-306-3942 or www .bendmomsformoms.com. REDMOND SATURDAY MARKET: Vendors sell arts and crafts; free admission; 11 a.m.-4 p.m.; Ambiance Art Co-op, 435 Evergreen Ave.; 541-480-7197. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Phillip Margolin talks about his book “Capitol Murder�; RSVP requested; free; 5 p.m.; Sunriver Books & Music, Sunriver Village Building 25C; 541-593-2525 or www .sunriverbooks.com. BOOSTER CLUB LUAU: Featuring dancers, a live auction and a Hawaiian meal; proceeds benefit Redmond High School athletics and activities; $35, $60 per couple; 5-9 p.m.; Sam Johnson Park, Southwest 15th Street, Redmond; 541-419-5150. FUNDRAISING GALA EVENT: Featuring previews and readings of “The Dixie Swim Club,� and “The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged),� live music and more; $25; 6 p.m.; Innovation Theatre Works, 1155 S.W. Division St., Bend; 541-504-6721 or www.innovationtw.org. BENDFILM BASH: Learn about the upcoming BendFilm Festival; with live music, film clips and food; $40; 6:30-10 p.m.; The Workhouse at Old Ironworks, 50 S.E. Scott St., Bend; 541-388-3378 or www.bendfilm.org. KEITH GREENINGER: The singersongwriter performs; $15 suggested donation; 7 p.m., doors open 6:30 p.m.; The Barn in Sisters, 68467 Three Creeks Road; 775-2331433 or dooleysbarn@gmail.com. TUMALO HOUSE CONCERT: Featuring a performance by Bill Evans; preceded by a banjo workshop; call for Tumalo location; proceeds benefit the High & Dry Bluegrass Festival; $20, $30 for workshop; 7 p.m., dinner 6 p.m., workshop 3:30 p.m.; 541-306-0797 or musicmag@yahoo.com. TRIAGE: The comedy improvisational troupe performs; $5; 7:30 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803.

SUNDAY AGILITY TRIAL: Bend Agility Action Dogs presents a day of

dogs navigating obstacle courses; free; 8 a.m.-4 p.m.; Crook County Fairgrounds, 1280 S. Main St., Prineville; 541-410-4646 or www.benddogagility.com. HEAVEN CAN WAIT: 5K walk and run to benefit Sara’s Project; $20 in advance, $40 day of race; 9 a.m.; Drake Park, 777 N.W. Riverside Blvd., Bend; www.heavencanwait.org. NOTABLES SWING BAND: The big band plays favorites from the 1930s-50s; $5; 2-4 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-639-7734 or www.notablesswingband.com. FESTIVAL OF THE ARTS: Featuring displays of paintings, quilts, jewelry and more; with a Festival Musicale; free; 3 p.m.; Community Presbyterian Church, 529 N.W. 19th St., Redmond; 541-548-3367 or www.redmondcpc.org. JUNI FISHER: The Western music act performs; $20 or $10 ages 12 and younger in advance, $25 or $15 ages 12 and younger at the door; 6:30 p.m.; Faith, Hope and Charity Vineyards, 70455 N.W. Lower Bridge Way, Terrebonne.

TUESDAY June 5 GREEN TEAM MOVIE NIGHT: Featuring screenings of “Nourish� and “Food Forward,� which explore our relationships with food and agriculture; free; 6:30-8:30 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend; 541-815-6504.

WEDNESDAY June 6 SISTERS RODEO: Featuring an “Xtreme Bulls� bull-riding event, followed by a dance; $20-$50, $5 for dance; 6:30 p.m.; Sisters Rodeo Grounds, 67667 U.S. Highway 20; 541-549-0121 or www.sisters rodeo.com. FESTIVAL OF THE ARTS: Featuring displays of paintings, quilts, jewelry and more; with a performance by Mike Strickland; free; 7 p.m.; Community Presbyterian Church, 529 N.W. 19th St., Redmond; 541-548-3367 or www.redmondcpc.org. “SOCIAL SECURITY�: Preview night of Cascades Theatrical Company’s presentation of a comedy about a couple whose tranquility is destroyed by family members; $10; 7:30 p.m., doors open 6:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org.

THURSDAY June 7 SISTERS RODEO SLACK PERFORMANCE: Slack performance, with breakfast concessions; free; 8 a.m.; Sisters Rodeo Grounds, 67667 U.S. Highway 20; 541-549-0121 or www.sistersrodeo.com. “THE COMPLETE WORKS OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE (ABRIDGED)�: Preview night for Innovation Theatre Works’ presentation of 37 Shakespeare plays in 90 minutes; $10; 7:30 p.m.; Innovation Theatre Works, 1155 S.W. Division St., Bend; 541-5046721 or www.innovationtw.org. ASLEEP AT THE WHEEL: The Western swing band performs; $38$50; 8 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. LAST BAND STANDING: A battle of the bands competition featuring local acts; free; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Century Center, 70 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; www.lastbandstanding.net.

FRIDAY June 8 PATIO SALE FUNDRAISER: Proceeds benefit church activities; free admission; 8 a.m.-5 p.m.; Holy Redeemer Catholic Church, 16137 Burgess Road, La Pine; 541-536-3571. FRACTALS, PHYSICS AND ART: Richard Taylor talks about art and the use of fractal analysis and computers; $10, $8 Sunriver Nature Center members, $3 students; 6:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Hitchcock Auditorium, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-593-4394. SISTERS RODEO: A PRCA rodeo performance with roping, riding, steer wrestling and more; $12, free ages 12 and younger; 7 p.m.; Sisters Rodeo Grounds, 67667 U.S. Highway 20; 541-549-0121 or www.sistersrodeo.com. “SOCIAL SECURITY�: Opening night of Cascades Theatrical Company’s presentation of a comedy about a couple whose tranquility is destroyed by family members; with a champagne and dessert reception; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541389-0803 or www.cascades theatrical.org. “THE COMPLETE WORKS OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE (ABRIDGED)�: Innovation Theatre Works presents the humorous adaptation of 37 Shakespeare plays in 90 minutes; $15, $12 students and seniors; 7:30 p.m.; Innovation Theatre Works, 1155 S.W. Division St., Bend; 541-504-6721 or www.innovationtw.org. “THE IRON LADY�: A screening of the PG-13-rated 2011 movie; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541-475-3351 or www.jcld.org.

SATURDAY June 9 PATIO SALE FUNDRAISER: Proceeds benefit church activities; free admission; 8 a.m.-3 p.m.; Holy Redeemer Catholic Church, 16137 Burgess Road, La Pine; 541-536-3571. CENTRAL OREGON SATURDAY MARKET: Featuring arts and crafts from local artisans; free admission; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; parking lot across from Bend Public Library, 600 N.W. Wall St.; 541-420-9015 or www .centraloregonsaturdaymarket.com. CRUISE TO THE CENTER OF OREGON: See cars in a variety of makes and models; with vendors and train rides; free for spectators, donations of nonperishable food accepted; 10 a.m.-3 p.m., gates open 8 a.m.; Crook County Fairgrounds, 1280 S. Main St., Prineville; 541-8153320 or www.ccrodders.com. RUNNING ON FAITH: A 5K run, followed by kids mini run, live music and more; $20, free for kids; 10 a.m.; Troy Field, Bond Street and Louisiana Avenue, Bend; 541-3894854, grivera@saintfrancisschool .net or www.saintfrancisschool.net. SISTERS ART IN THE PARK: Featuring arts, crafts and a silent auction benefiting the Make-AWish Foundation of Oregon; free; 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Creekside Park, U.S. Highway 20 and Jefferson Avenue; 541-420-0279 or centraloregonshows@gmail.com. REDMOND SATURDAY MARKET: Vendors sell arts and crafts; free admission; 11 a.m.-4 p.m.; Ambiance Art Co-op, 435 Evergreen Ave.; 541-480-7197. SISTERS RODEO: Featuring a parade and a PRCA rodeo performance with roping, riding, steer wrestling and more; $12-$18; 9:30 a.m. parade, 1 and 7 p.m. rodeo; Sisters Rodeo Grounds, 67667 U.S. Highway 20; 541-549-0121 or www .sistersrodeo.com.


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THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, MAY 29, 2012

TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


TUESDAY, MAY 29, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

BIZARRO

B5

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively.

SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

DAILY BRIDGE CLUB

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THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, MAY 29, 2012

Preppers

“Be prepared” is the motto of Robert Sarnes, and in this case he’s talking about the meltdown of the U.S. government. His backpack contains food, water, ammo and enough additional supplies to last for three days. The flag hangs at his family’s Puyallup, Wash., home in March.

Continued from B1 We’ve gone through periodic bouts of preparing for looming disaster. Aging baby boomers might recall news stories about people putting fallout shelters in their backyards during the Cold War and especially around the time of the 1962 Cuban missile crisis. These days, the Internet instantly connects you with others who worry what disaster the future might bring. Tom Martin, 34, a long-haul truck driver based out of Port Angeles, Wash., is the founder of the American Preppers Network, or APN, as it likes to call itself. The website started in 2009, and now, he says, more than 16,000 people nationwide regularly take part on the site’s forums.

Photos by Alan Berner Seattle Times

Who are preppers? “Prepper” is a term that has become better known since the National Geographic Channel began airing a reality show last June called “Doomsday Preppers.” The show describes itself as exploring “the lives of otherwise ordinary Americans who are preparing for the end of the world as we know it.” The program has been a ratings bonanza, with a 60 percent male audience, with an average age of 44. Guys do like their tough reality shows. A recent topic of discussion on the prepper website was, “What do you fear/are you prepping for?” The responses included “economic collapse and the subsequent civil unrest,” an earthquake, and an “EMP attack,” the latter referring to an electromagnetic pulse burst that supposedly could cause a mass power-system collapse. Enough people have such worries that the prepper phenomenon has gone mainstream. Costco recently offered on sale for $3,199.99 a nine-month supply of emergency food to feed four people. The chain now has a “disasterpreparedness” section on its online catalog that sells everything from vegetable seeds for a one-acre garden ($42.99) to a powerful standby generator ($2,999.99). The tipping point for Martin in becoming a prepper spokesman, he says, began a few years ago, when the bad economy cut his $90,000-ayear earnings down to about $40,000 a year. Then he saw his mom in Idaho going through tough times as her home went financially underwater. Martin began blogging about preparing for tough times, and that led to forming

the national preppers group. He and other preppers are adamant about not being mistaken for survivalists, especially after the recent news stories about the North Bend, Wash., man who police say shot himself in a hillside bunker after killing his wife and teen daughter. Said Martin, “That guy sounded like a nut case, somebody who thinks everybody is out to get them.” On its website, Puget Sound Preppers says, “This group is NOT involved in: revolution, war, militia, political parties, religious activities, racism, or lobbying. This group is about skills and knowledge.” An upcoming meeting, for example, is on raising chickens. Preppers, says Martin, are not much different from Mormons who make sure they have food, water and other supplies in case of an emergency. He says preppers have no interest in toughing it out alone in the wilderness. They’d rather have that stocked-up pantry, which, they say, means not having to shell out thousands of dollars at once for a nine-month supply. You watch for sales and stock up over time. At his Puyallup home, Sarnes answers the obvious question about keeping guns around with two children in the home. His daughters, he says, have been well-trained in gun safety. One of them is home from school because she’s feeling buggy. She goes through the drill about gun safety, led by her dad: “What do you do when you see a gun? You tell a grown-up

Care

danger and pulled a fire alarm when there was no fire. Callicott said she and her brothers soon realized their father needed specialized care in a facility where the staff had been trained to care for people with dementia. Unable to find a place they liked in eastern Pennsylvania, they put him on a cross-country flight to Oregon.

Continued from B1 This experience was especially trying for Callicott because she admired her father and looked up to him. During his life, Jim Brown served as a captain with the U.S. Navy, an information officer with the U.S. Naval Academy, and an elementary school principal who had a PhD. It also put Callicott at odds with what she called the “WASPish North American culture” she grew up, wherein people don’t pry into each other’s personal lives and everyone at least pretends they can take care of themselves even when they desperately need help. Because of these sensibilities, Brown worked hard to mask his condition even as it was getting progressively worse, Callicott said. The full extent of his problems didn’t show up until Brown had to get gallbladder surgery and his wife asked Callicott and her brothers to put him in long-term care. Over this seven-year period, Callicott said, she and her brothers went from a position where they looked up to their father as his children, spoke honestly with him about his medical problems as his peers, and are now working as his advocates to find him the care he needs. “Stepping into that place was a real mind changer for us,” she said. “This whole process can tear a family apart.” Jim Brown’s family first moved him to eastern Pennsylvania, where he stayed with one of his sons for six weeks. He then moved into an assisted living facility and stayed there until recently, when he had a hallucination someone was in

The group Sitting in her office, Callicott starts playing a radio commercial advertising Age Wide Open and its upcoming seminar that’s been broadcast on local stations over the past week thanks to a donation from the Aspen Ridge Retirement Community and Whispering Winds. “How do I know if I’m making the best decisions (for my father?)” a woman’s voice asks as she tells the listener about her struggles finding care for her father in a somewhat frustrated and worried tone. “Who do I talk to about all of this?” Callicott considers herself lucky because she had plenty of people — a nurse in South Carolina, her brothers, her father’s wife, and a psychiatrist with the Deschutes County Department of Health who specializes in the aging population — she could talk to as her father’s condition got worse. She also came into contact with Ali Davidson, a Bend resident who ran a home health care business for nine years before she wrote a book — “It’s Between You and Me” — that’s designed to help adult children talk with their parents’ about their plans for long-term care. She’s also realized that while Central Oregon has several groups and organiza-

More information American Preppers Network: http://american preppersnetwork.com

or police officer. Don’t touch it. If you do handle it, muzzle to the ground, finger off the trigger, treat it like it’s loaded even if you know it’s not, never point it at anybody.” In agreeing to talk to a reporter, Martin and Sarnes are a bit unusual for preppers, who can be secretive. A Bothell, Wash.-area woman who goes by “Nurse Ellie” emails back about herself: “I believe in being prepared and self-reliant. I am now a First Class Marksman and have one year of food supply and 3 months of Bottled drinking water. A rain Barrel and live one block from a River (fresh water) and have a Swimming Pool (cleaned regularly) ... Safety first, so I will not give you anything further.” Martin says one reason for secrecy is that during a disaster, people who failed to prepare can “come knocking on the door.” Better to keep it a secret how much you have stored up. And there is the fear, he says, of being portrayed as

“crazy nut-jobs on the fringe of society.” The Preppers Network website answers, “Preppers are no crazier than those wacky people who have homeowners insurance. ...” When he talks, Sarnes uses plenty of military lingo, such as when showing off armor vests he has for himself; his wife, Jennifer; and their daughters, Hailey, 5, and Emma, 7. “These are Level IV vests, able to stop all commercial-grade ammunition,” he explained. Sarnes joined the Army at 19, and retired as a sergeant in 2004 after serving 18 years. He was in various air-defense artilleries and describes himself as a “typical grunt,” his record including medals for serving in Kuwait and Southwest Asia. His wife works at an office and is going to community college, eventually planning a career in nursing or something similar, Sarnes says. “Bug in, bug out,” is another term Sarnes likes to use, and

that is often used on prepper forums. Let’s say that disaster happens — and Sarnes believes that in the next decade, “there will be a failure of something, whether the economy fails or there is civil unrest.” First you bug in and stay in your house for a month with all those supplies you’ve stockpiled. But what happens if those unprepared neighbors do knock on your door? “Well, piss-poor planning on your part doesn’t constitute an emergency on my part,” said Sarnes. “It means I’m not going to sacrifice my family for them.” And? “If we have a snowstorm and we lose power for three weeks, I’ll share. But let’s say, for lack of a better term, that we have a civil war, something like that. My family’s life is more important than my neighbor’s life.” Next in the preppers’ disaster scenario comes the bug-out part. In that scenario, all those unprepared city slickers from places like Seattle will start heading out to the countryside to scavenge for supplies. That is when Sarnes and his family will bug out to a remote location accessible by side country roads, not the nowjammed freeways. And, says Sarnes, such a location actually exists for him, in Thurston County, Wash. He found a property through

tions devoted to meeting the needs of seniors, it doesn’t have any services that are specifically targeted to helping adult children take care of their parents in their homes or find them more advanced care. Davidson and Callicott hope to fill this void with Age Wide Open, and as part of their seminar have been conduct-

ing a survey on their website — www.agewideopen.com — to see what the region’s residents need the most. Their initial plans include starting a support group and a place where adult children can get one-on-one counseling with volunteer professionals. They’d also like to produce instructional videos dealing with situations someone might

encounter when caring for an older parent. Over the long run, the two hope to expand Age Wide Open to include an equipment depository where families in need can exchange medical equipment and other items they’ll use to care for a senior parent. They’d also like to start a fund to help pay travel expenses associated with medi-

Robert Sarnes has enough supplies at his home to keep a family of four going for two weeks, should there be civil insurrection.

the Prepper Network, he says, a place where three families have agreed to combine resources. With his military background, he said, “I’m an asset to them,” and he has given them basic firearms training. At the property, Sarnes says, he has a 12-foot metal shipping container with hardened locks. Inside the container he has stored food, sleeping bags and other camping equipment. “That would be basically to start a new standard of living. At that point, there won’t be any supermarkets, gas stations. You’ll have to provide for yourself with what you have on hand until crops start growing,” said Sarnes.

A brave new world Sarnes is told what a sociologist who spent 20 years interviewing survivalists has to say about preppers. He is Richard Mitchell, 69, of Corvallis, Wash., a professor emeritus in sociology at Oregon State University, and author of “Dancing at Armageddon: Survivalism and Chaos in Modern Times.” What Mitchell says about preppers is that for them, going through various disaster scenarios, stocking up with all that food, is a “compelling hobby” that gives them a sense of creativity and individuality. Much of the world is packaged these days, says Mitchell, and preppers want to feel that all their preparing really matters. Mitchell also says preppers don’t take their scenarios to their logical conclusions. Society has broken down; they’re bugging out in a remote area, and then what? “Nobody ever talks about forming a city or a town. ‘It’s only I and my family that can be trusted,’” said Mitchell. “But what distinguishes us from other species is working together cooperatively and sharing ideas and resources.” Sarnes responds that actually, what the preppers plan on doing is establishing new communities, each member contributing some kind of skill. But he does admit this postapocalypse world will be one in which stuff like the Internet will just be a memory. “There will be a new definition of normal,” Sarnes said. “Just being able to put food in your belly and not freezing may be the new norm.” Shake your head if you want, but for the preppers stocking their garages with canned goods, this is no movie treatment.

cal care, although Callicott said due to limited resources, it could be awhile until Age Wide Open has reached all of its goals. “If I can make that journey into aging more successful, then that’s exactly what I would like to help people do,” she said. — Reporter: 541-617-7816, mmclean@bendbulletin.com


LOCALNEWS

Reader photo, C2 Editorials, C4

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, MAY 29, 2012

LOCAL BRIEFING La Pine dispute ends peacefully It took a Deschutes County sheriff’s deputy 30 minutes on Monday morning to convince a La Pine man, who was allegedly armed, to surrender and come out of his garage, authorities said. The deputy was trained in crisis intervention, according a news release from the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office. Deputies responded to the La Pine-area home of Donnelly Kaeo, 54, at approximately 10 a.m. Monday after receiving a report that someone at the home was armed and threatening suicide. An investigation revealed that Kaeo had been in a dispute involving a handgun at a Wickiup Junction store, authorities said. While the deputy negotiated with Kaeo, the Oregon State Police and Sheriff’s Office blocked off traffic on Antler Road. After Kaeo came out of his garage, deputies and state police troopers took him to St. Charles Bend, where he was placed on a hold for a mental evaluation, according to the Sheriff’s Office.

www.bendbulletin.com/local

Building services targeted • Reduce services and raise fees, Deschutes budget panel urges By Hillary Borrud The Bulletin

Citizens on Deschutes County’s budget committee say it’s time to adjust building services to fit the “new reality” of a smaller development industry in Central Oregon. “Are we in a new reality situation, where it’s time to say ‘This is the year we need to be real?’” said Bruce Barrett, a citizen member of the committee. “Or do we continue to

hope for a better future and just stay where we are?” Layoffs and attrition have whittled down Deschutes County’s building and planning staff by two-thirds since the housing crash began in 2007. Yet there has been little impact on the public. Although there are fewer employees, the demand for building permits and other services is also much lower than it was five years ago.

WHATEVER HAPPENED TO ...

In the past, the county Community Development Department paid for its operations with fees. When fees were no longer sufficient to cover the department’s costs, county officials decided to use general fund dollars to keep satellite offices open and maintain regular hours at the main Bend office. The department’s Building Division alone received approximately $3 million from

the general fund in recent years, interim county administrator Erik Kropp said last week. Citizen members of the county budget committee say the county needs to do a couple of things: Consider reducing building service levels, increase fees to cover the actual cost of service and ask future budget officials to require the Building Division to repay some of the general fund money that kept its doors open during difficult times. See Building / C5

Following up on Central Oregon’s most interesting stories, even if they’ve been out of the headlines for a while. Email ideas to news@bendbulletin.com. To follow the series, visit www.bendbulletin.com/updates.

CRIME RING BUSTED; 9 SUSPECTS IN CUSTODY

Saxon’s heist was the last for brazen jewel thieves

Sheriff IDs driver in fatal accident The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office on Monday released the name of a man it identified as the driver who hit and killed a La Pine woman late Friday. The driver was Timothy Delwisch, of La Pine, according to a news release. The Sheriff’s Office is still investigating the incident and has not issued any citations or made any arrests. Cynthia Thorpe, 51, of La Pine, was crossing U.S. Highway 97 in La Pine late Friday when a Ford truck struck her. Thorpe was dead when deputies arrived on the scene just after midnight on Saturday, authorities said. — Bulletin staff reports Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Well shot!

Ron Henderson, owner of Saxon’s Fine Jewelers in the Old Mill District, says while last year’s robbery was a traumatic experience for his employees, he’s thankful nobody was hurt.

reader photos

j• Can you work a camera, and capture a great picture? And can you tell us a bit about it? Email your color or black and white photos to readerphotos@ bendbulletin.com and we’ll pick the best for publication. Submission requirements: Include as much detail as possible — when and where you took it, and any special technique used — as well as your name, hometown and phone number. Photos must be high resolution (at least 6 inches wide and 300 dpi) and cannot be altered.

By Scott Hammers The Bulletin

Cannon

Remor

C

Obituaries, C5 Weather, C6

Nine members of a crime ring that pulled off its final heist at a Bend jewelry store last May are in custody and facing charges related to nearly two dozen brazen robberies across the country. Over the course of a year, the suspects hit jewelers in five states, netting millions in diamonds and jewelry that are believed to have been sold to a jeweler in Philadelphia. Nearly all of the robberies were conducted in a fashion

similar to the robbery at Saxon’s Fine Jewelers in the Old Mill District on May 20, 2011. The man who robbed Saxon’s, believed to be 26-year-old Georgia resident Jack Cannon, was somewhat familiar to employees. Two weeks before the robbery, he’d visited the store, leaving behind a business card. The day the man returned to the store was the Friday before Pole Pedal Paddle, and the Old Mill District was unusually packed. While inspecting a diamond ring and loose diamonds, he pocketed them and

ran, climbing into a getaway vehicle parked a short distance away with a second man waiting in the driver’s seat. The van, which had been stolen in Tigard the day before, sped off and was abandoned about half a mile away. The two men escaped with goods valued at an estimated $151,200. Acting on tips provided by a former member of the gang, Portland police arrested Cannon less than two weeks later, and authorities began rounding up the rest of the group. See Saxon’s / C5

Wyden set to assume leadership role on key committee By Andrew Clevenger The Bulletin

WASHINGTON — While the November election is still months away, one outcome is almost certain: Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., will assume a leadership position in the influential Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee when the 113th Congress convenes in January 2013. In February 2011, Sen. Jeff Bingaman, D-N.M., the committee’s current chairman, announced he will not seek re-election after his term expires in 2012. In BinIN D.C. gaman’s absence, Wyden will be the most senior Democrat on the committee. Whether Wyden will Wyden serve as committee chairman or the ranking member depends on whether Democrats retain a majority of seats. They currently hold a slim, 53-47 edge, which includes two independents who caucus with the Democrats. Many of the Senate races are too close to call, but generally more seats held by Democrats are seen as vulnerable than those controlled by Republicans. There are 33 seats in play in November, including seven open seats vacated by outgoing Democrats or independents and four vacated by Republicans. Of the 22 incumbents running, 16 are Democrats or independents. Only six are Republicans. Whatever his official title might be, Wyden says that it is too early to discuss a specific legislative agenda for the committee. But during his many years on the committee — more than a decade and a half — Wyden has refined his policy priorities. “If you look historically, the committee focuses on how energy is produced, which is obviously very important,” he said. But Wyden also wants to consider how much it costs to produce and what the ultimate price is for American consumers. See Wyden / C2

“If you look historically, the committee focuses on how energy is produced, which is obviously very important,” — Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore.

STATE NEWS • Portland • Salem

Memorial Day service focuses on Vietnam veterans By Hillary Borrud

Ashland •

• Portland: Church’s plan to offer a haven for the homeless upsets its neighbors. • Salem: Conservative policy group includes 22 lawmakers. • Ashland: Chronic troublemakers may be barred from downtown. Stories on C3

The Bulletin

This year is the 50th anniversary of the start of the Vietnam War, a milestone recognized on Monday by President Barack Obama and by veterans gathered at Deschutes Memorial Gardens in Bend. The president wrote in an editorial published in several military news outlets Monday that Vietnam veterans did not always receive the respect they deserve. Vietnam veterans in Bend echoed that sentiment on Monday. Dennis Brown, 62, of Bend, was a corporal in the Marine Corps and

served in Vietnam. “It’s nice we did get recognized,” Brown said. “It took them long enough ... As long as they honor all veterans, that’s what matters.” At the memorial service Monday, Oregon Army National Guard Capt. Joseph Snyder recounted the brave actions of a soldier and a Marine from Oregon in the last hours before they died in Vietnam. In February 1967, 1st Sgt. Maximo Yabes, of Eugene, was providing security for a land clearing operation. Early in the morning, Yabes’ company came under fire by the Viet Cong. See Veterans / C5

Tony Jermaczonak, of Tumalo, a retired U.S.Marine and Vietnam vet, salutes as the flag is raised during a Memorial Day service at Deschutes Memorial Gardens in Bend. Joe Kline The Bulletin


C2

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, MAY 29, 2012

Well shot! R E ADE R PHOTOS Can you work a camera, and capture a great picture? And can you tell us a bit about it? Email your color or black and white photos to readerphotos@bendbulletin.com and we’ll pick the best for publication. Submission requirements: Include as much detail as possible — when and where you took it, and any special technique used — as well as your name, hometown and phone number. Photos must be high resolution (at least 6 inches wide and 300 dpi) and cannot be altered.

Wyden Continued from C1 For example, the Energy Information Administration released a report earlier this year that concluded that increasing the country’s natural gas exports would result in domestic prices increasing by more than 50 percent before the end of the decade. But that projection was based on exports of 12 billion cubic feet of liquefied natural gas per day, and the Department of Energy already has applications either pending or approved to export 17 billion cubic feet per day, meaning the impact could be much greater.

An eye toward business

WELCOME ABOARD THE OUTBOARD Carl Judish, of Bend, took this photo during a fishing derby at Detroit Lake. “The duck landed twice during the day on my motor,” said Judish, who used a Sony Cyber-shot 8.1.

P  O For The Bulletin’s full list, including federal, state, county and city levels, visit www.bendbulletin.com/officials.

CONGRESS

LEGISLATURE

U.S. Senate

Senate

Sen. Jeff Merkley, D-Ore.: 107 Russell Senate Office Building Washington, D.C. 20510 Phone: 202-224-3753 Web: http://merkley.senate.gov

Sen. Ted Ferrioli, R-District 30 (includes Jefferson, portion of Deschutes) 900 Court St. N.E., S-323 Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-986-1950 Email: sen.tedferrioli@state.or.us Web: www.leg.state.or.us/ferrioli

Bend office: 131 N.W. Hawthorne Ave., Suite 208 Bend, OR 97701 Phone: 541-318-1298 Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore. 223 Dirksen Senate Office Building Washington, D.C. 20510 Phone: 202-224-5244 Web: http://wyden.senate.gov Bend office: 131 N.W. Hawthorne Ave., Suite 107 Bend, OR 97701 Phone: 541-330-9142 U.S. House of Representatives

Rep. Greg Walden, R-Hood River 2182 Rayburn House Office Building Washington, D.C. 20515 Phone: 202-225-6730 Web: http://walden.house.gov/ Bend office: 1051 N.W. Bond St., Suite 400 Bend, OR 97701 Phone: 541-389-4408 Fax: 541-389-4452

STATE OF OREGON Gov. John Kitzhaber, Democrat 160 State Capitol, 900 Court St. Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-378-4582 Fax: 503-378-6872 Web: http://governor.oregon.gov Secretary of State Kate Brown, Democrat 136 State Capitol Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-986-1616 Fax: 503-986-1616 Email: oregon.sos@state.or.us Superintendent of Public Instruction Susan Castillo 255 Capitol Street N.E. Salem, Oregon 97310 Phone: 503-947-5600 Fax: 503-378-5156 Email: superintendent.castillo @state.or.us Web: www.ode.state.or.us Treasurer Ted Wheeler, Democrat 159 Oregon State Capitol 900 Court St. N.E. Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-378-4329 Email: oregon.treasurer @state.or.us Web: www.ost.state.or.us Attorney General John Kroger, Democrat 1162 Court St. N.E. Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-378-4400 Fax: 503-378-4017 Web: www.doj.state.or.us Labor Commissioner Brad Avakian 800 N.E. Oregon St., Suite 1045 Portland, OR 97232 Phone: 971-673-0761 Fax: 971-673-0762 Email: boli.mail@state.or.us Web: www.oregon.gov/boli

Sen. Chris Telfer, R-District 27 (includes portion of Deschutes) 900 Court St. N.E., S-423 Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-986-1727 Email: sen.christelfer@state.or.us Web: www.leg.state.or.us/telfer Sen. Doug Whitsett, R-District 28 (includes Crook, portion of Deschutes) 900 Court St. N.E., S-303 Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-986-1728 Email: sen.dougwhitsett@state.or.us Web: www.leg.state.or.us/whitsett

Prineville, OR 97754 Phone: 541-447-6555 Fax: 541-416-3891 Email: administration@co.crook.or.us Web: co.crook.or.us Crook County Judge Mike McCabe Phone: 541-447-6555 Email: mike.mccabe@co.crook.or.us County Court

Ken Fahlgren Phone: 541-447-6555 Email: ken.fahlgren@co.crook.or.us

ci.redmond.or.us Jay Patrick Phone: 541-508-8408 Email: Jay.Patrick@ci.redmond. or.us Ed Boero Phone: 541-604-5399 Email: Ed.Boero@ci.redmond.or.us Margie Dawson Phone: 541-604-5400 Email: Margie.Dawson@ ci.redmond.or.us

Seth Crawford Phone: 541-447-6555 Email: seth.crawford@co.crook.or.us

Shirlee Evans Phone: 541-604-5401 Email: Shirlee.Evans@ci.redmond. or.us

JEFFERSON COUNTY

Camden King Phone: 541-604-5402 Email: Camden.King@ci.redmond. or.us

66 S.E. D St. Madras, OR 97741 Phone: 541-475-2449 Fax: 541-475-4454 Web: www.co.jefferson.or.us

House

Wyden called for a “timeout” so that Congress could review its policy on exporting the nation’s natural gas surplus, which he said represents a strategic advantage for Oregon and American businesses. The U.S. also has increased its exports of refined oil products in recent years. According to the Energy Information Administration, overall refined oil products exports are up 8 percent since 2007, while gasoline exports have increased by 260 percent over the same period. Consequently, now is an opportune time to evaluate our policies on exporting energy resources, Wyden said. “You ought to really think through what this means for businesses that are trying to be competitive in a global market,” he said. Otherwise, he argued, business and innovation in energy-hungry countries like China and India could reap the benefits, rather than the U.S.

Shaping the committee Oversight of federal agencies, policies and laws will continue to be an important committee function, he said. “I have always believed that oversight is the part of congressional work that consistently, year in, year out, gets short shrift,” he said. “Laws, rules, all of the things that are on the books, consistently have to be scrutinized and examined and see if they work. And if they don’t work, you have to make adjustments.” Wyden sees a synergy in the interplay between the Energy Committee and his other legislative committee assignments, including the

Ed Onimus Phone: 541-604-5403 Email: Ed.Onimus@ci.redmond.or.us

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Finance Committee, which handles energy subsidies and incentives in the tax code. And as a member of the Select Intelligence Committee, Wyden understands the need to consider the national security implications of the country’s energy policies. “I see energy as a national security issue, and always have,” he said. The U.S. needs a broad portfolio of energy options, he said, because what makes economic sense in one part of the country — natural gas, bio fuels, hydro, solar — doesn’t necessarily work everywhere. “I’m a strong supporter of electric vehicles, (but) I don’t want us to put all our eggs in one basket,” he said.

Cooperation between governments ... Wyden said he also wants to create more innovative partnerships between federal government and the states. The federal government should spend less time telling states how to run things and more time listening, because states better understand regional differences, he said. As an example, Wyden cited his bill that would give states the ability to set the price that public utilities pay to buy the electricity produced locally by smallscale renewable projects, such as solar panels or wind turbines. Currently, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission sets one nationwide price. That can prevent individuals from trying to compete with power companies, which can mass produce electricity at a lower cost.

... and across the aisle One thing that will make the transition into committee leadership easier for Wyden is his good working relationship with Alaska Sen. Lisa Murkowski, the Energy Committee’s most senior Republican and its ranking member. “She is really easy to work with, well-informed, and (always) working to solve problems,” he said. Murkowski recently joined Wyden in Portland for meetings with energy concerns, and he plans to travel to Alaska this summer. “I want Sen. Murkowski to show me the energy concerns of her region,” he said. — Reporter: 202-662-7456, aclevenger@bendbulletin.com

Redmond School of Dance

County Commission

Rep. Jason Conger, R-District 54 (portion of Deschutes) 900 Court St. N.E., H-477 Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-986-1454 Email: rep.jasonconger@state.or.us Web: www.leg.state.or.us/conger Rep. John Huffman, R-District 59 (portion of Jefferson) 900 Court St. N.E., H-476 Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-986-1459 Email: rep.johnhuffman@state.or.us Web: www.leg.state.or.us/huffman Rep. Mike McLane, R-District 55 (Crook, portion of Deschutes) 900 Court St. N.E., H-385 Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-986-1455 Email: rep.mikemclane@state.or.us Web: www.leg.state.or.us/mclane Rep. Gene Whisnant, R-District 53 (portion of Deschutes County) 900 Court St. N.E., H-471 Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-986-1453 Email: rep.genewhisnant@state.or.us Web: www.leg.state.or.us/whisnant

DESCHUTES COUNTY 1300 N.W. Wall St. Bend, OR 97701 Web: www.deschutes.org Phone: 541-388-6571 Fax: 541-382-1692 County Commission

Tammy Baney, R-Bend Phone: 541-388-6567 Email: Tammy_Baney@ co.deschutes.or.us Alan Unger, D-Redmond Phone: 541-388-6569 Email: Alan_Unger@co.deschutes. or.us Tony DeBone, R-La Pine Phone: 541-388-6568 Email: Tony_DeBone@ co.deschutes.or.us

CROOK COUNTY 300 N.E. Third St.

Mike Ahern, John Hatfield, Wayne Fording Phone: 541-475-2449 Email: commissioner@co. jefferson.or.us

CITY OF BEND 710 N.W. Wall St. Bend, OR 97701 Phone: 541-388-5505 Web: www.ci.bend.or.us City Manager Eric King Phone: 541-388-5505 Email: citymanager@ci.bend.or.us City Council

Tom Greene Phone: 541-388-5505 Email: tgreene@ci.bend.or.us Jeff Eager Phone: 541-388-5505 Email: jeager@ci.bend.or.us Kathie Eckman Phone: 541-388-5505 Email: keckman@ci.bend.or.us Jim Clinton Phone: 541-388-5505 Email: jclinton@ci.bend.or.us Mark Capell Phone: 541-388-5505 Email: mcapell@ci.bend.or.us Jodie Barram Phone: 541-388-5505 Email: jbarram@ci.bend.or.us Scott Ramsay Phone: 541-388-5505 Email: sramsay@ci.bend.or.us

CITY OF REDMOND 716 S.W. Evergreen Ave. Redmond, OR 97756 Phone: 541-923-7710 Fax: 541-548-0706

520 E. Cascade Avenue P.O. Box 39 Sisters, OR 97759 Phone: 541-549-6022 Fax: 541-549-0561 City Council

David Asson Phone: 503-913-7342 Email: dasson@ci.sisters.or.us Wendy Holzman Phone: 541-549-8558 wholzman@ci.sisters.or.us Lon Kellstrom Phone: 541-480-9975 Email: lkellstrom@ci.sisters.or.us Pat Thompson Phone: 541-610-3780 Email: pthompson@ci.sisters.or.us Sharlene Weed Phone: 541-549-1193 Email: sweed@ci.sisters.or.us

CITY OF LA PINE P.O. Box 3055 16345 Sixth St. La Pine, OR 97739 Phone: 541-536-1432 Fax: 541-536-1462 City Council

Kathy Agan Phone: 541-536-1432 Email: kagan@ci.la-pine.or.us Ken Mulenex Phone: 541-536-1432 Email: kmulenex@ci.la-pine.or.us Don Greiner Phone: 541-536-1432 Email: dgreiner@ci.la-pine.or.us

City Council

Dan Varcoe Phone: 541-536-1432 Email: dvarcoe@ci.la-pine.or.us

Mayor George Endicott Phone: 541-948-3219 Email: George.Endicott@

Stu Martinez Phone: 541-536-1432 Email: smartinez@ci.la-pine.or.us

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TUESDAY, MAY 29, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

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Rick Bowmer / The Associated Press

The Moreland Presbyterian Church in Portland wants to take advantage of a pilot project that allows religious and nonprofit organizations to host homeless motorists in their parking lots at night. The church wants to open one parking space to female motorists who need a safe haven.

Plan for homeless haven upsets church’s neighbors The program was approved in December, but no churches participated until Moreland Presbyterian gave notice to its neighbors on May 2. The reaction was unexpectedly negative in a city that touts its progressiveness. “I think we’ve all been somewhat surprised by how many stereotypes about homeless people have become unleashed in this debate,” said City Commissioner Nick Fish, who led the effort to get the program passed. “I’m not critical of people for having their fears,” he said. “I’m just not sure they are well-grounded in fact.” Similar programs have been employed elsewhere without major problems. Eugene invented the overnight parking program in the 1990s and has almost two dozen parking sites. Fish and McKnight will meet with neighbors Monday to answer questions and try to ease concerns. Neighbors, however, say they know the facts and think they have been unfairly portrayed as not-in-my-backyard types.

Stacie Carney, a mother of two who lives across from the parking lot, said she feels conflicted in her opposition. She empathizes with the plight of women who have no place to call home, but feels she and her neighbors have been put in a tough spot because it will be their responsibility to keep an eye on the parking lot and call 911 if something happens. “I would just throw back at proponents: Would they feel the same way if this was right in their front yard?” she said. John Calhoun, who lives two houses away from the church, echoed that concern, noting that nobody from the church will be there to monitor the lot from 10 p.m. until 7:30 a.m., the hours in which car camping is allowed. Portland’s program allows up to four vehicles for overnight parking. McKnight says the church’s proposal is limited to one vehicle driven by a woman, with or without children, who is working with a social services agency to move into permanent housing.

Conservative group attracts controversy — and 22 lawmakers

Downtown Ashland may be off-limits to repeat offenders

By Steven DuBois The Associated Press

PORTLAND — Pastor Tom McKnight spoke with great apprehension when asked about the uproar over the parking space in the corner of the Moreland Presbyterian Church parking lot — the one next to the beige storage trailer. “I don’t want to be put in an adversarial position,” he said. It might be too late for that. The church wants to let homeless, female motorists use the parking space as a safe haven in the middle of the night, an offer that has created a dustup with neighbors in the verdant Sellwood section of southeast Portland. Though only a neighborhood controversy, the ramifications extend north toward City Hall. City commissioners and a still-to-be determined mayor will undoubtedly look at the situation when deciding whether to extend a one-year test program that allows religious and nonprofit organizations to host overnight homeless guests in their parking lots.

The Associated Press Unlike groups that hire lobPORTLAND — A group byists, ALEC operates as a regthat’s been the subject of Oc- istered charity in 37 states. It decupy protests, an Internal pends on the private sector for Revenue Service complaint most of its income. Lawmakers and calls for attorney general pay $50 per year for memberinvestigations lists a quarter ship. Corporate and individuals of the Oregon Legislature as pay $7,000 to $25,000. members. Common Cause A spokeswoman for asked the IRS to inthe American Legislavestigate whether the tive Exchange Council, group is a lobbying which works on stateorganization. level public policy is“It is a concern that sues, would not say how Whisnant ALEC’s corporate domany Oregon lawmaknors may have gotten ers are part of the group, undeserved tax credits,” but it’s Oregon chairman, Rep. said Janice Thompson, execuGene Whisnant, R-Bend, told tive director of Common Cause The Oregonian that 22 Republi- Oregon. ALEC corporate board can legislators are members. members contributed $2.2 milHe said the group often re- lion to Oregon legislative canferred to by its acronym, ALEC, didates between 2001 and 2010, is “a great resource” for a part- according to the group. time legislator whose staff conALEC attorney Alan Dye sists of his wife and an aide who described the IRS complaint works three days a week when as “frivolous” and an attack by the legislature is not in session. “liberal front groups.” “We have such limited staff ALEC legislation introthat this helps us look at things duced in Oregon includes bills and consider them,” he says. to privatize prisons, vehicle ALEC has been around for registration and parks adminnearly 40 years as a forum for istration. Another bill would business and conservative state have required state agencies to lawmakers. Discussions have report job openings that are not sometimes led to “model legis- filled for more than six months, lation” passed by legislators. and to explain why the posiThe group’s influence has tions are needed. made more headlines since 2010 Most of the bills never got a when Republicans and conser- hearing. vative Democrats made gains A “Stand Your Ground” bill, in state races and ALEC’s poli- which gives broad legal proteccies on public employee unions, tion to anyone who says they environmental regulation and used deadly force because they taxes came into question. The feared death or great bodily group also backed the “Stand harm, has not been introduced Your Ground” bill at the heart in Oregon. of the Trayvon Martin case in Whisnant said he does not Florida. The teenager was shot approve of all that ALEC does and killed by an armed com- and some of its proposed legismunity patrol volunteer. lation will not fit in Oregon.

The Associated Press ASHLAND — The city of Ashland is considering a three-strikes-and-you’reout policy that would prohibit repeat troublemakers from venturing downtown. Under the proposal to be considered at next month’s City Council meeting, people who commit three or more offenses in a six-month period could be banned from downtown for three months, the Ashland Daily Tidings reported . Those who return during the exclusionary period could be arrested for trespassing. Ashland police estimate that about a dozen people per year could be affected by the proposal. But information obtained by the Daily Tidings in a public records request shows at least 60 people were accused of three or more qualifying offenses in 2011. The data, however, did not reveal where the offenses occurred. To be excluded from downtown, the offenses must be committed there. Qualifying offenses include assault, harassment, prohibited camping, public urination, unnecessary noise and drinking alcohol in public. Police Chief Terry Holderness said many offenders ignore their citations because they have no intention of paying fines in Ashland Municipal Court.

Standoff ends in apparent suicide

The swimmer’s name has not been released.

COOS BAY — An armed man who barricaded himself in a motel room killed himself Monday afternoon, Coos Bay police said. KVAL.com reports that SWAT teams fired a concussion grenade and broke down the door to gain entry to the room at the Edgewater Inn after an eight-hour wait. Coos Bay police Capt. Cal Mitts said officers found the man dead from an apparent suicide and there were no hostages involved in the situation. The man’s name has not been released, and it’s not clear for how long he had been dead. Police told KCBY-TV that the man had been involved in a stalking complaint, and investigators went to the motel room to question him after spotting his vehicle in the parking lot.

Morrow juries to use video conferencing

Swimmer rescued at Hagg Lake GASTON — It did not take long for the Gaston Rural Fire District to put its new rescue boat into action. Completing its first official weekend of service, the boat and its crew came to the aid of a swimmer in distress at Washington County’s Hagg Lake on Monday. The crew pulled the swimmer into the boat and covered him with blankets until an ambulance took him to a local hospital.

PENDLETON — In an effort to save time and money, Morrow County is switching to a video conferencing system that allows law enforcement officers to make video appearances before grand juries. The East Oregonian newspaper reports that the change eliminates hourlong trips for officers commuting to the Heppner courthouse from Boardman and Irrigon. Boardman Police Chief Rick Stokoe says the use of video cuts down on travel time and the time an officer has to sit in the courthouse waiting to testify. That frees officers to take more calls. The system also cuts down on overtime pay and gasoline expenses.

Search resumes for missing pilot LAKEVIEW — Air and ground crews are again searching southeastern Oregon and northern Nevada in an effort to find a pilot who has been missing since Thursday. Sheriff Tim Evinger of Klamath County said Monday that an Oregon National Guard helicopter is joining the search. The pilot, 48-year-old Tony Nicholls, of Meridian, Idaho,

flew to Lakeview on Thursday afternoon to drop off two children. He then departed Lakeview on a return flight to Idaho. Evinger says radar and cellphone records indicate the last known location for the fourseat aircraft was near Hart Lake in the area of Plush.

UO study links water, healthy food choices EUGENE — A new study by researchers at the University of Oregon suggests a relatively easy way to get children to eat more vegetables — serve water with meals. The authors of the study say behavioral research has found people correlate a glass of water with healthy food, and sugary drinks with items from convenience stores and fastfood restaurants. The study found that preschool children consumed far more vegetables when coupled with a glass of water than a glass of soda. — From wire reports

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THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, MAY 29, 2012

E Bend Chamber sets right example for OSU-Cascades

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The Bulletin AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER

B  M C G B  J C  R  C

Chairwoman Publisher Editor-in-Chief Editor of Editorials

SU-Cascades is on its way to becoming the region’s only locally based, four-year university, though getting there will take time. It also will take support from

the community — OSU-Cascades has no large, wealthy donor base and the state Board of Higher Education might be reluctant to spend money on an institution that lacks community buy-in. Four-year schools, even relatively small ones, don’t come cheap. Current guessing is that it will cost at least $111 million simply to build and buy the buildings needed to house the new school. Most of that money will come from the state, no doubt, but a solid contribution by local businesses and residents will go far to showing our commitment to the idea. Thus the school’s supporters hope to raise $1 million by the end of June, and already they’re well on their way to meeting that goal. A week ago, at least 20 Central Oregonians had made commitments to the fundraising effort. This week the Bend Chamber of Commerce got into the act, pledging $50,000 to the campaign. Moreover, it set aside another $50,000 to be used to match smaller gifts, assuring that in all, the campus will receive at least $150,000 from the chamber and its members. The chamber’s gift is important, not only for the dollars it brings but for what it allows other would-be donors to do. Campus fundraisers are — and should — be concentrating on large gifts, in this case

Current guessing is that it will cost at least $111 million simply to build and buy the buildings needed to house the new school. ... A solid contribution by local businesses and residents will go far to showing our commitment to the idea. those of $25,000 or more. Yet there are many businesses in the region whose owners understand the value of OSU-Cascades and want to help it grow, though at a lower giving level. The chamber will help them do that. It will match the first gifts, of course, but it will also provide a means for smaller donors to give to the school by collecting those smaller gifts and passing them on to OSU-Cascades. Both are valuable services to the community and to the college. Getting the socalled little guys involved is important, and the chamber is providing a way to do that.

State energy program needs to be efficient

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he Oregon Secretary of State’s Office recently completed an audit of another state energy program. Just guess what the conclusion was. The program intended to help schools become more energy efficient hasn’t worked right. The state auditors reviewed 6,859 energy efficiency measures chosen under the program and found: • School districts didn’t pick the most energy-efficient or cost-effective alternative; • Because the program distributes money based on attendance rather than based on need, districts that have more serious problems don’t get the help they need and the program doesn’t give as much bang for the buck; • If school districts had made better choices under the program, auditors determined they could have saved $40 million more and gained another 70 percent in energy reduction. This program was passed by the Legislature in 1999. A bill tagged a 3 percent surcharge on to the

electric bills of Portland General Electric and PacifiCorp customers. Schools could tap into the funds to use them to first identify energy efficiency problems and then use them to help pay for solutions, such as better lighting, upgraded boilers or added insulation. To give you an idea of how big the program is, schools across the state got about $16 million for efficiency measures in 2009 and 2010. There are, of course, reasons why school districts wouldn’t always pick the most cost-effective or energy-efficient measure. Sometimes, those will not be the same thing. But the Legislature does need to require that the rules for this program are rewritten to better ensure that the millions spent on energy efficiency are used efficiently. This audit also once again reinforces how critical it is for the Legislature to require agencies to justify whether a program that the Legislature created should continue, be improved or be scrapped. This energy-efficiency program was created in 1999, and it’s going to be 2013 before its problems may be repaired.

Parenting is a tough job, but community resources can help By Vicki Ertle arenting is the hardest job there is, with the fewest instructions. When asked how a local parenting class provided some “on-the-job training� for his family, one father with young children did not hesitate: “Above all I learned to discipline myself first and to control my stress. They do what I do,� he said. Helpful tips for guiding adolescents? The mother of a 14-year-old told us: “Stop, think and listen before you react. They want you to listen rather than lecture.� Gov. John Kitzhaber recently declared May 20-26 as Oregon Parenting Education Week, to draw attention to the importance of parenting. Parenting does matter. Whatever the age, whatever the stage, all children and youth need stability, consistency, affection and guidance. Chances are, there are quality parenting education opportunities taking place in a convenient location where you live. Parents and caregivers, grandparents and foster parents are all coming together to expand their knowledge about child development, building parent-child relationships and how to reduce the normal stress and anger that come with intense 24/7 responsibilities. Parents from Prineville to La Pine, Madras to Bend, and Redmond to Sisters have multiple opportunities to build their confidence by gaining new skills for their child’s age group, and experiencing a network of parents facing similar challenges and joys. Family Resource Center has been

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IN MY VIEW Parent educators and organizations that serve families in Crook, Deschutes and Jefferson counties are working together to provide an expanded menu of opportunities that include parenting classes, workshops, family activity nights and community events, in both English and Spanish. providing parenting education to families for more than 22 years. We know that parenting is not instinctive, it is learned. We offer low- or no-cost parenting classes, and information and resources to strengthen and support family relationships. Over the years, we have served families from all walks of life. Today, we have more insights than ever before on how the brain works and what helps children thrive as they grow in to adulthood. Research consistently links parenting skills to improvements in school readiness, parental involvement, school retention and success for adolescents and teens. Parenting education in our community is supported by many public and private partnerships as well as generous individuals. Our local me-

dia provide frequent feature articles and tips we can easily access. Central Oregon is also home to one of 12 parenting education HUBs in Oregon supported through the Oregon Parenting Education Collaborative (OPEC). The HUBs are funded by four of Oregon’s largest foundations, with technical support from Oregon State University. Parent educators and organizations that serve families in Crook, Deschutes and Jefferson counties are working together to provide an expanded menu of opportunities that include parenting classes, workshops, family activity nights and community events, in both English and Spanish. We all stand ready to support families from the time a child is born through the teen years and beyond. We are with them in their journey during the first years of life, as they help their child enter school ready to learn, enjoy the middle school years and launch their teens as self-sufficient young adults. It’s never too late and it’s never too early to learn as parents. We celebrate all families and salute the job you do every day of every year. In Central Oregon, it’s always Parenting Education Week. Give us a call. Tell a friend, tell a neighbor. We will put you in touch with parenting education programs near you. Our programs offer child care and dinner. Join. Enjoy. Participate. Learn. Smile. Exhale. — Vicki Ertle is the executive director of Family Resource Center of Central Oregon.

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We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 550 and 650 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or email them to The Bulletin. Write: My Nickel’s Worth / In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 Fax: 541-385-5804 Email: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Technology tethers college students to Mom and Dad By Anne Michaud Newsday

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s college students return home this month for the summer break, their parents might not notice much of a difference. In a sense, for many of them, their kids never really left. That’s because some parents and college students keep in touch several times a day through cellphones, email, Skype and other technological marvels. A horrified English literature professor writes about this constant communication in a recent issue of The Chronicle of Higher Education, in “Don’t Pick Up: Why kids need to separate from their parents.� “One student — a delightful young woman whom I know to be smart and levelheaded — confesses that she talks to her mother on the cellphone

at least five, maybe six, even seven times a day,� writes Terry Castle, who teaches at Stanford University. The student says she calls her mom whenever she gets out of class to tell her about the professors, the exam — whatever’s going on at the moment. “I’m stunned; I’m aghast,� Castle writes. When she was an undergraduate, from 1971 to 1975, “all we wanted to do was get away from our parents! We only had one telephone in our whole dorm — in the hallway — for 50 people! If your parents called, you’d yell, ‘Tell them I’m not here!’� Castle never says whether her current students are different from those she taught in the past — more docile, perhaps? More obedient? But she does say that the willingness to defy or just disappoint one’s parents is essential to emotional and intellectual

freedom. Is the Class of 2012 at risk of remaining in mental chains? The online responses to her essay are fascinating. One says that with parents paying as much as $55,000 a year for college, you bet they are going to check in. Another says this is probably a problem only at elite universities — the implication being that you needed to be a helicopter parent in the first place to get your kid into a top school. Another says parents are anxious because of the recession and feel they need to try extra hard to help kids find their place in the world. Melissa Bares, who just finished her junior year at Stony Brook University, says she has friends with too-concerned parents whom she describes as “babied.� “They can’t even make their own

schedule without checking with their parents first,� she says in an email. Bares, a psychology major, speaks with her parents about school a couple of times a week — which seems normal to me. Both Bares and James Kim, another Class of 2013 student at SBU, defend parental involvement — but not over-involvement. “If a parent nags, it brings a lot of pressure,� says Kim, a double major in chemistry and Asian-American Studies. He calls home about once a week. “If it’s the right amount of nagging, you see students excel more.� He mentions a friend — a slacker — who could use a lot more parental oversight. Jenny Hwang, who heads up mental health services at SBU, says parental involvement is crucial and can protect against alcohol and drug abuse, as well as depression and even

suicide. But technology has made it so easy for parents to reach out that one of her roles is to counsel moms and dads about a healthy amount of communication. “Parents can remain available and help students problem-solve,� Hwang says, “without responding to that pull that’s always there to make it all better.� Castle, the English professor, cites fictional orphans — Dorothy Gale, Harry Potter, Frodo Baggins — who are heroes of their own stories, to argue that psychological distance from parents is essential for kids to grow up. That may be true, but distance, like many things, is better in moderation. — Anne Michaud is interactive editor for Newsday Opinion and a member of the Newsday editorial board.


TUESDAY, MAY 29, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

O Fencing champ won a record 39 Olympic and world medals By Douglas Martin New York Times News Service

ardo. Dario died in 2010. Edoardo Mangiarotti’s daughter, Carola, fenced in the Montreal Olympics in 1976. Edoardo’s first victory came at 14 when he won an event with the epee, a light sword that became his favorite weapon, along with the foil.

Edoardo Mangiarotti, who won more Olympic medals and world championships than any fencer, starting with the Berlin Games in 1936, died Friday at his home in Milan. He was 93. The Italian Fencing Federation announced the death. A fixture at the Games News reports said the cause Mangiarotti was 17 when he was probably a heart attack. competed in the 1936 Berlin In 2003, the International Olympics. Olympic Committee gave As part of the winning ItalMangiarotti its Platiian epee team, he benum Wreath, saying, FEATURED came the youngest medal winner in “Edoardo MangiarotOBITUARY gold those Games, which ti’s total of 39 gold, silHitler had hoped ver and bronze medals in Olympics and World would be a showcase for Fencing Championships not Aryan athletic prowess, only only earns him the distinction to see those hopes dashed by of being the greatest fencer the black U.S. runner Jesse in sports history, but also dis- Owens. tinguishes him as the most The Olympic Games were decorated athlete in all Olym- canceled during World War II, pic sports in the history of the when Mangiarotti was drafted Olympics.” into the Italian army. He was made an attack inMangiarotti, who came from a family of fencers, com- structor, allowing him to keep peted in five Olympics from practicing his sport. When he 1936 to 1960 and won 13 med- returned to competition after als: six gold medals in individ- the war, he honed a strategy ual and team events, five silver of striking early to get points, and two bronze. then dueling defensively the Over the same period, Ala- rest of the match. dar Gerevich, a Hungarian, Mangiarotti wrote about won the second-most med- fencing for an Italian sports als of any fencer, 10, seven of magazine and served on his which were gold, the most of national federation’s manageany fencer. ment committee. He carried Mangiarotti won his last the Italian flag in the Olympic Olympic medal in Rome in opening ceremonies in Mel1960, surpassing the previous bourne, Australia, in 1956 and record, 12, held by the Finnish in Rome in 1960. runner Paavo Nurmi. Mangiarotti’s total of 13 Olympic medals matches those Lifelong love of fencing of Boris Shakhlin, a Soviet Edoardo Mangiarotti was gymnast, and Takashi Ono, born on April 7, 1919, in Re- a Japanese gymnast. Those nate, Italy. athletes trail Larisa Latynina, His father, Giuseppe, was a Soviet gymnast, who won a fencing instructor who was 18 Olympic medals; Michael a 17-time national champion Phelps, an American swimwho participated in the Lon- mer, who has 16; and Nikolai don Olympics of 1908 and who Andrianov, a Soviet gymnast, was known for bringing varia- with 15. tions of the French approach Mangiarotti won 26 medals to fencing to Italy. in world fencing championHe encouraged Edoardo ships, 13 of them gold. The Inand his two other sons, Dario ternational Fencing Federation and Mario, to learn to fence as runs the world championships children. in the years when there are no Giuseppe emphasized the Olympics. importance of physical trainMangiarotti went to 17 ing like swimming, running Olympics altogether, as an and cycling. He encouraged athlete, administrator or Edoardo, who was naturally spectator. right-handed, to fence with He was determined to make his left in order to confuse it to the 2008 Games in Beijing opponents. even though he had a stroke Mario dropped out of the five months before, leaving sport to become a cardiologist, him temporarily unable to but Dario became a champion, speak. winning three Olympic med“While I’m still alive, I will als and seven medals in world go to the Olympic Games,” he championships. He often com- vowed. peted in team events with EdoHe was there.

Obituary policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, email or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. Deadlines: Death Notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. Phone: 541-617-7825 Email: obits@bendbulletin.com Fax: 541-322-7254 Mail: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708

D E 

 Deaths of note from around the world: Robert Finkel, 94: Emmy and Peabody Award-winning TV director and producer who, in his long career, produced TV series with Andy Williams, Jerry Lewis, Phyllis Diller and others, and directed sitcoms including “Barney Miller” and “The Bob Newhart Show.” Died April 30 of age-related complications at his home in Beverly Hills, Calif. Willie Andrew “Big Willie” Robinson, 69: Founding president of the National and International Brotherhood of Street Racers who promoted organized drag racing as a way to unite people of all races and classes and ease racial tensions. Died May 19 of an infection that led to heart failure at Sharon Care Center in Los Angeles. Steve Mendelsohn, 67: Communications director of the New York City Marathon for 36 years — as long as it has existed as a five-borough race — Mendelsohn was in charge of the roughly 400 ham radio operators who provide the communications system for the event. Died May 23 of pancreatic cancer at his home in Dumont, N.J. — From wire reports

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OREGON NEWS

Tsunami debris cleanup to rely on volunteers By Jeff Barnard The Associated Press

Volunteers will play a big role in picking up debris from last year’s tsunami in Japan when it starts hitting the beach in Oregon. “They do most of it now,” Mike Zollitsch, emergency response director for the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality, said of volunteers. “I would say the potential is they will be very involved in this cleanup.” The nonprofit group SOLVE organizes two massive volunteer beach cleanups a year on the state’s 362 miles of beach — all of it public. Beach visitors pick up a lot, and beach rangers for the Oregon Department of Parks and Recreation constantly pick up big tanks, tires, milk jugs, water bottles, bits of plastic rope and fishing nets. State and federal agencies and nonprofit groups meet today in Salem to start putting together a plan for dealing with the debris currently

“We are not going to wait for someone in authority to come and do it. We in Oregon have a long tradition of taking care of our beaches.” — Phillip Johnson, executive director, Oregon Shores Conservation Coalition

forecast to start washing up this winter. Zollitsch expects the plan to be ready this summer. So far, the big questions — how much is coming, what will it be, and when will it get here — remain unanswered, said Chris Havel, spokesman for the Parks and Recreation. “There’s not a lot of uncertainty about our capability to handle it,” Havel said. “What is uncertain is, is it really going to be an unusual volume.” Until they know more, no one has any idea how much it will cost the state. But it could add up quickly. Havel said Beverly Beach State Park already spends $35,000 a year to dispose of beach trash.

“It’s getting nibbled to death by ducks that’s the big concern,” said Havel. “It is unlikely to be the big thing that ends up being costly. It’s the constant stream of little things that will be costly. We can’t put a number on that now.” State Parks does not have a firm estimate on how much it collects, but has been noticing an increase in recent years, Havel said. While Oregon is relying on NOAA to keep track of the debris to let them know when it is coming, and how much, there is not much federal money available to help state cleanup efforts, said Zollitsch.

The state can tap federal funds for oil and hazardous materials cleanups, but that is not expected to make up much of the material, he said. “Even if it ends up being a small problem, we have to be prepared as if it were going to be a larger problem, just in case,” Zollitsch said. There could even be an economic boon for coastal areas, if a lot of people decided to go to the beach to see the tsunami debris, he added. Oregon Shores Conservation Coalition already monitors beach debris at several locations along the coast, and will be keeping an eye out for increases, said executive director Phillip Johnson. It is also preparing plans to turn out volunteers if a big cleanup effort is needed. “We are not going to wait for someone in authority to come and do it,” Johnson said. “We in Oregon have a long tradition of taking care of our beaches.”

Veterans Continued from C1 Grenades landed in the command post, and Yabes used his body as a shield to protect others, Snyder said. Although Yabes was injured, he continued fighting and killed several enemy soldiers before he was mortally wounded. In April 1967, Pfc. Gary Martini, of Portland, was with his company when they encountered a “firmly entrenched enemy force,” Snyder said. The Marines attacked across a rice paddy, but gunfire, mortar fire and hand grenades stopped them before they could reach the enemy trench line. With 14 Marines killed and another 18 wounded, the remainder of the platoon was pinned down behind a low rice paddy dike. Several of the wounded were lying helpless in the paddy, exposed to gunfire. One Marine had already been killed while attempting to move the wounded, but Martini ran into the exposed area and dragged two Marines to safety. The second time, Martini suffered a mortal wound, but still managed to move his comrade to a location from which other Marines could retrieve him, Snyder said.

Building Continued from C1 The budget committee, composed of three citizen members and the three county commissioners, will not decide until next year whether to reduce building service levels. The committee did suggest increasing some building and planning fees beginning in July, and members asked Kropp to memorialize their desire for general fund repayment. The budget committee’s request for repayment will be documented in meeting minutes, in Kropp’s written statement on the budget and in a letter to the Central Oregon Builders Association, Kropp wrote in an email Friday. The county plans to keep satellite offices in Redmond and La Pine open this year, but

Saxon’s Continued from C1 Ron Henderson, co-owner of Saxon’s, said it’s satisfying to know that the crime spree came to an end at his store. “To see this kind of thing continue and emotionally scar and damage other people, it’s a terrible thing, so we’re happy they were finally caught,” he said. “Certainly the FBI and the U.S. Marshal’s Office had been on their trail for a while. They’d just been kind of tightening the noose, I think. After the information that was provided by us and the Bend Police Department and previous robberies, that’s what helped dot the i’s and cross the t’s.”

Joe Kline / The Bulletin

Retired U.S. Navy Captain Roy Janiec, of Bend, places plastic poppies in a display in memory of fallen service members at ceremony on Monday at Deschutes Memorial Gardens in Bend.

“These two veteran heroes are men of Oregon and are only two examples of the heroic and selfless service our men and women in arms have always displayed,” Snyder said. Snyder, 29, of Bend, served twice in Iraq — in Mosul and Baghdad — while on active duty in the U.S. Army. A number of soldiers with whom he served were killed in Iraq. “We wouldn’t be here, we

wouldn’t live the life we have, without the guys here in the ground,” Snyder said. Terry Rasmussen, 66, of Bend, was a Navy Seabee in Vietnam from 1966 to 1968. Rasmussen, a member of the Vietnam Veterans of America, said that “when we did come home from the war, nobody liked us too much.” Rasmussen didn’t expect a parade, just a “fair shake.” Respect for Vietnam War

“We can’t keep doing business as usual and propping things up. ... My opinion is we’ve passed the mark where we need to do something different with (the Community Development Department).” — Bruce Barrett, Deschutes County budget panel member

Kropp said commissioners recently discussed the option of closing them in the future. A recent county fee survey shows that Deschutes County’s building fees are lower than those in many other cities and counties. For example, a Bend building permit is nearly 20 percent more expensive than a county building permit. “Personally, I think we ought to be higher on building if we’re not covering our costs,” said Mike Maier, a former county administrator

and citizen member of the budget committee. Commissioner Tony DeBone said it’s a matter of volume, and the building fees will cover services once the number of permits increases. Commissioner Tammy Baney said the county should continue to raise building fees. “I think we’ll probably be looking at another increase next year, probably 5 percent as well,” Baney said. “The building side is probably going to have to start standing on its own.”

Cannon is being held in Florida, where he is awaiting sentencing on a robbery carried out several months before the Saxon’s heist. He is expected to be transferred to Oregon to stand trial for multiple robberies in the state. The business card Cannon left behind at Saxon’s helped Bend police identify Ernest Remor, 36, believed to have been Cannon’s partner in the Bend robbery. Police traced the phone number on the card to a disposable cellphone that had recently been sold at the Bend ShopKo and were able to obtain surveillance video of a man they believe to be Remor buying the phone. Remor is being held at the

Multnomah County Detention Center in Portland and is due to go to trial on Dec. 4. A North Carolina woman associated with the crime ring pleaded guilty to charges of obstruction of justice this spring, becoming the first conviction in the case. Brittany Ladd, 23, offered to pay an undercover officer to assault Victor Lupis, a former gang member who had been providing information to investigators and was a likely witness in the diamond theft trial. Ladd is due to be sentenced in June and, like Remor and Lupis, is being held at the Multnomah County Detention Center. Henderson said while last

veterans has increased since then, Rasmussen said, but the focus on Vietnam veterans during Monday’s memorial service was somewhat new. “This is the first time in all the memorial services I’ve been involved in at Deschutes Memorial Gardens that the designated speaker has singled out two Vietnam veterans,” he said. — Reporter: 541-617-7829, hborrud@bendbulletin.com

Barrett, the most vocal proponent of a Bulding Division re-examination, said officials need to discuss next year how much tax money to spend on the division and consider whether to scale back service levels. “We can’t keep doing business as usual and propping things up,” Barrett said. It will take awhile for people to absorb the housing inventory that built up during the real estate boom, he said. As a result, officials should not expect new construction — and building permit revenue — to reach pre-bust levels any time soon. “My opinion is we’ve passed the mark where we need to do something different with (the Community Development Department),” Barrett said. — Reporter: 541-617-7829, hborrud@bendbulletin.com

year’s robbery was a traumatic experience for employees at Saxon’s, he’s thankful nobody was hurt. Security at the store is largely unchanged, he said — with such small and valuable merchandise, jewelers are an obvious target for theives. “There’s very little you can do for a grab-and-run theft unless you were to put someone in possible jeopardy, and that is not an option,” he said. “I think with every situation in life you learn from the positive and the negative experiences of life, so certainly we’ve learned a little bit, but there’s not a lot you can do to change the type of theft we had.” − Reporter: 541-383-0387, shammers@bendbulletin.com


THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, MAY 29, 2012

C6

W E AT H ER FOR EC A ST Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LP ©2012.

TODAY, MAY 29 Today: Mainly clear start, increasing cloudiness late, mild.

HIGH Ben Burkel

WEDNESDAY

67

Bob Shaw

HIGH LOW

38

Astoria 61/48

Seaside

56/49

Cannon Beach 56/49

Hillsboro Portland 68/51 68/47

Tillamook 64/47

Salem

57/46

71/47

72/50

Maupin

Corvallis Yachats

68/47

60/50

65/33

Oakridge

Cottage Grove

66/35

69/46

Coos Bay

Crescent

57/47

Chemult

72/48

Gold Beach

65/42

73/42

Vale

64/33

Riley

Jordan Valley

69/35

Silver Lake

64/30

72/44

58/48

Klamath Falls 71/44

Ashland

58/47

Yesterday’s state extremes

Rome

• 77° Ontario

70/43

79/52

Brookings

OREGON CITIES

73/48

Chiloquin

Medford

CENTRAL Partly cloudy skies across the region.

74/42

Paisley

77/48

66/42

Frenchglen

73/41

Grants Pass

WEST Areas of fog are likely to be ongoing along the coast in the morning.

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend 24 hours ending 4 p.m.*. . 0.00” High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64/36 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . 0.45” Record high . . . . . . . . 92 in 1983 Average month to date. . . 0.79” Record low. . . . . . . . . 24 in 1950 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.07” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 Average year to date. . . . . 4.92” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.29.97 Record 24 hours . . .0.61 in 1990 *Melted liquid equivalent

74/51

67/39

72/48

• 30°

Fields

Lakeview

McDermitt

74/47

69/46

Burns

64/45

-30s

-20s

-10s

0s

10s

Vancouver 61/51

Yesterday’s extremes

Calgary 59/40

Saskatoon 65/45

Billings 69/46

Portland 68/51

• 101°

Boise 73/47

Laredo, Texas

Craig Municipal Airport, Fla.

Las Vegas 93/73

Salt Lake City 81/55

Phoenix 100/70

Honolulu 87/73

Tijuana 71/54 Chihuahua 98/66

Anchorage 57/42

La Paz 91/61 Juneau 51/43

60s

70s

80s

Green Bay 71/47

90s

100s 110s

Quebec 73/61

Thunder Bay 53/37

St. Paul 63/44

Halifax 63/49

Portland 62/58 Boston 79/65 Buffalo 82/58 New York 87/67 Philadelphia 89/71 Washington, D. C. 90/70

To ronto 82/56 Detroit 84/58

Des Moines 75/51 Chicago 83/53 Columbus Omaha 85/59 73/50 St. Louis 87/59 Kansas City Louisville 80/56 87/64

Denver 76/46 Albuquerque 87/56

Los Angeles 69/58

Winnipeg 54/37

50s

Bismarck 56/37

Cheyenne 73/44 San Francisco 60/50

40s

Rapid City 65/45

• 20° • 2.69”

30s

Seattle 64/52

(in the 48 contiguous states):

Bryce Canyon, Utah

20s

Sunrise today . . . . . . 5:27 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 8:39 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 5:26 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 8:40 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 2:03 p.m. Moonset today . . . . 1:36 a.m.

Moon phases Full

Last

New

June 4 June 11 June 19 June 26

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX

Yesterday Tuesday Wed. City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Precipitation values are 24-hour totals through 4 p.m. Astoria . . . . . . . .57/48/0.06 Baker City . . . . . .67/32/0.01 Brookings . . . . . .57/49/0.01 Burns. . . . . . . . . .70/30/0.00 Eugene . . . . . . . 64/49/trace Klamath Falls . . .67/35/0.00 Lakeview. . . . . . .64/30/0.00 La Pine . . . . . . . .66/32/0.00 Medford . . . . . . .73/52/0.00 Newport . . . . . . .55/48/0.03 North Bend . . . . .57/48/0.12 Ontario . . . . . . . .77/40/0.00 Pendleton . . . . . .73/50/0.00 Portland . . . . . . 63/53/trace Prineville . . . . . . .64/56/0.00 Redmond. . . . . . 70/33/trace Roseburg. . . . . . .60/53/0.00 Salem . . . . . . . . .63/52/0.00 Sisters . . . . . . . . .70/35/0.00 The Dalles . . . . . .71/54/0.00

First

. . . .61/48/pc . . . . .67/53/sh . . . .66/41/pc . . . . .72/45/pc . . . .58/47/pc . . . . .62/52/pc . . . .69/41/pc . . . . .74/46/pc . . . .68/47/pc . . . . .73/52/pc . . . .71/44/pc . . . . .76/48/pc . . . .69/46/pc . . . . .74/50/pc . . . .65/32/pc . . . . .74/36/pc . . . .79/52/pc . . . . .85/56/pc . . . .55/49/pc . . . . . .56/52/c . . . .57/47/pc . . . . .62/52/pc . . . .75/51/pc . . . . . .78/52/s . . . .72/48/pc . . . . .77/51/pc . . . .68/51/pc . . . . .72/55/pc . . . .67/37/pc . . . . .78/44/pc . . . .72/41/pc . . . . .77/46/pc . . . .72/48/pc . . . . .77/52/pc . . . .68/48/pc . . . . .73/53/pc . . . .67/35/pc . . . . .74/42/pc . . . .72/50/pc . . . . .76/54/pc

SKI REPORT

The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

LOW 0

MEDIUM 2

4

7

HIGH 6

V.HIGH 8

PRECIPITATION

10

ROAD CONDITIONS Snow level and road conditions representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday. Key: T.T. = Traction Tires.

Ski report from around the state, representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday: Snow accumulation in inches Ski area Last 24 hours Base Depth Anthony Lakes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Hoodoo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Mt. Ashland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Mt. Bachelor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Mt. Hood Meadows . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Mt. Hood Ski Bowl . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Timberline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . . 153 Warner Canyon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Willamette Pass . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report

Pass Conditions I-5 at Siskiyou Summit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . No restrictions I-84 at Cabbage Hill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . No restrictions Aspen, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Hwy. 20 at Santiam Pass . . . . . . . . . . . . No restrictions Mammoth Mtn., California . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . .8-36 Hwy. 26 at Government Camp. . Carry chains or T. Tires Park City, Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Hwy. 26 at Ochoco Divide . . . . . . . . . . . No restrictions Squaw Valley, California . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Hwy. 58 at Willamette Pass . . . . . . . . . . No restrictions Sun Valley, Idaho. . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Hwy. 138 at Diamond Lake . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Taos, New Mexico. . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Hwy. 242 at McKenzie Pass . . . . . . . . Closed for season Vail, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report For links to the latest ski conditions visit: For up-to-minute conditions turn to: www.skicentral.com/oregon.html www.tripcheck.com or call 511 Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS -40s

68 41

TEMPERATURE

72/43

69/34

HIGH LOW

78 48

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . .5:36 a.m. . . . . . 9:06 p.m. Venus . . . . . .5:56 a.m. . . . . . 9:30 p.m. Mars. . . . . . .1:03 p.m. . . . . . 2:07 a.m. Jupiter. . . . . .4:52 a.m. . . . . . 7:31 p.m. Saturn. . . . . .4:22 p.m. . . . . . 3:40 a.m. Uranus . . . . .2:49 a.m. . . . . . 3:12 p.m.

EAST Partly cloudy skies Ontario are likely across 75/51 the region.

Juntura

Burns

HIGH LOW

79 48

Partly to mostly cloudy, slight chance of showers.

PLANET WATCH

Nyssa

Hampton

Mostly cloudy, slight chance of showers late, warm.

BEND ALMANAC

75/51

Christmas Valley

Port Orford 59/47

66/41

Unity

SATURDAY

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Baker City John Day

Brothers 66/32

Fort Rock 67/34

64/31

59/26

Roseburg

67/38

La Pine 65/32

Crescent Lake

58/47

Bandon

Spray 76/42

Prineville 67/37 Sisters Redmond Paulina 62/33 67/35 69/36 Sunriver Bend

Eugene

69/44

63/40

64/33

58/48

Florence

65/38

Union

Mitchell 68/38

69/39

Camp Sherman

71/48

65/38

Joseph

Granite

Warm Springs

Enterprise

Meacham 69/44

67/43

Madras

65/40

La Grande

Condon

71/41

Wallowa

61/33

71/44

73/45

71/40

69/48

72/48

Ruggs

Willowdale

Albany

Newport

Pendleton

75/48

71/44

68/48

55/49

Hermiston 74/46

Arlington

Wasco

Sandy

Government Camp 54/40

68/47

75/46

The Biggs Dalles 73/46

69/49

McMinnville

Lincoln City

Umatilla

Hood River

HIGH LOW

74 47

FORECAST: STATE

FRIDAY Partly cloudy and warm.

Partly to mostly cloudy, warmer.

Tonight: Partly to mostly cloudy, not as cold.

LOW

THURSDAY

Charlotte 84/68

Nashville 90/64 Atlanta 85/69

Little Rock 92/69 Oklahoma City 90/67 Birmingham Dallas 89/70 91/72 New Orleans 91/72 Houston 91/74

Orlando 92/74 Miami 87/75

Monterrey 101/73 Mazatlan 88/71

FRONTS

Yesterday Tuesday Wed. City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . . .97/72/0.00 . .96/72/pc . . 97/69/s Akron . . . . . . . . . .91/69/0.06 . . . 82/59/t . 74/50/pc Albany. . . . . . . . . .85/60/0.00 . . . 85/64/t . 81/55/pc Albuquerque. . . . .82/50/0.00 . . . 87/56/s . . 87/59/s Anchorage . . . . . .57/43/0.00 . .57/42/sh . 58/43/sh Atlanta . . . . . . . . .89/71/0.00 . . . 85/69/t . 90/67/pc Atlantic City . . . . .90/70/0.00 . . . 79/69/t . 75/64/pc Austin . . . . . . . . . .92/68/0.00 . .94/73/pc . 93/75/pc Baltimore . . . . . . .93/66/0.00 . . . 91/71/t . 88/65/pc Billings . . . . . . . . .58/40/0.00 . .69/46/pc . 68/47/pc Birmingham . . . . .93/74/0.00 . . . 89/70/t . . .89/68/t Bismarck. . . . . . . .58/43/0.00 . .56/37/pc . 57/40/sh Boise . . . . . . . . . . .76/47/0.00 . .73/47/pc . 74/50/pc Boston. . . . . . . . . .69/60/0.00 . . . 79/65/t . 79/64/sh Bridgeport, CT. . . .82/66/0.00 . . . 83/66/t . 77/60/sh Buffalo . . . . . . . . .86/62/0.00 . . . 82/58/t . 70/51/pc Burlington, VT. . . .82/55/0.00 . . . 84/63/t . 79/55/sh Caribou, ME . . . . .60/49/0.00 . . . 56/50/t . 63/49/pc Charleston, SC . . .86/72/0.24 . . . 83/71/t . 85/70/pc Charlotte. . . . . . . .87/70/0.00 . . . 84/68/t . 88/65/pc Chattanooga. . . . .93/68/0.00 . . . 90/66/t . 90/64/pc Cheyenne . . . . . . .68/44/0.00 . .73/44/pc . 72/43/pc Chicago. . . . . . . . .95/77/0.00 . . . 83/53/s . 66/50/pc Cincinnati . . . . . . .91/66/0.00 . . . 85/58/t . 79/55/pc Cleveland . . . . . . .92/69/0.00 . . . 81/62/t . 71/53/pc Colorado Springs .78/40/0.00 . .74/47/pc . 76/47/pc Columbia, MO . . .91/73/0.00 . . . 84/56/t . . .78/58/t Columbia, SC . . . .90/73/0.00 . . . 84/68/t . 89/68/pc Columbus, GA. . . .94/74/0.00 . . . 89/69/t . . .90/69/t Columbus, OH. . . .93/71/0.00 . . . 85/59/t . 76/53/pc Concord, NH. . . . .80/57/0.00 . . . 78/62/t . 86/54/sh Corpus Christi. . . .90/72/0.00 . . . 86/77/s . . 89/78/s Dallas Ft Worth. . .95/73/0.00 . .91/72/pc . 92/73/pc Dayton . . . . . . . . .92/71/0.00 . . . 84/59/t . . 76/53/s Denver. . . . . . . . . .77/48/0.00 . .76/46/pc . 79/50/pc Des Moines. . . . . .88/68/0.04 . .75/51/pc . 67/52/pc Detroit. . . . . . . . . .95/66/0.00 . . . 84/58/t . 69/50/pc Duluth. . . . . . . . . .74/44/0.74 . .52/39/sh . 58/43/pc El Paso. . . . . . . . . .93/57/0.00 . . . 99/75/s . . 96/72/s Fairbanks. . . . . . . .67/46/0.00 . .66/40/sh . 67/43/pc Fargo. . . . . . . . . . .66/52/0.04 . .55/42/sh . 64/45/pc Flagstaff . . . . . . . .73/27/0.00 . . . 75/37/s . . 78/41/s

Yesterday Tuesday Wed. City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . . .91/67/0.00 . . . 76/51/s . 64/45/pc Green Bay. . . . . . .87/70/0.12 . .71/47/pc . 60/42/pc Greensboro. . . . . .86/70/0.00 . . . 85/67/t . . .86/63/t Harrisburg. . . . . . .90/65/0.00 . . . 88/64/t . 85/59/pc Hartford, CT . . . . .88/66/0.00 . . . 88/66/t . 84/60/sh Helena. . . . . . . . . .58/35/0.04 . . . 60/41/t . 64/44/pc Honolulu. . . . . . . .84/74/0.01 . . . 87/73/s . . 87/74/s Houston . . . . . . . .94/70/0.00 . . . 91/74/s . 93/75/pc Huntsville . . . . . . .95/73/0.00 . . . 89/66/t . . .89/66/t Indianapolis . . . . .92/72/0.00 . . . 84/60/t . 74/55/pc Jackson, MS . . . . .95/70/0.00 . .93/69/pc . 94/67/pc Jacksonville. . . . . .83/71/1.53 . . . 88/72/t . . .92/72/t Juneau. . . . . . . . . .54/43/0.02 . .51/43/sh . 51/42/sh Kansas City. . . . . .91/75/0.00 . . . 80/56/t . . .75/58/t Lansing . . . . . . . . .92/65/0.00 . . . 79/51/s . 65/44/pc Las Vegas . . . . . . .90/63/0.00 . . . 93/73/s . . 95/77/s Lexington . . . . . . .90/70/0.00 . . . 85/62/t . . 80/59/s Lincoln. . . . . . . . . .82/60/0.30 . .74/50/pc . . .70/53/t Little Rock. . . . . . .94/72/0.00 . .92/69/pc . . .88/66/t Los Angeles. . . . . .72/59/0.00 . . . 69/58/s . . 72/60/s Louisville. . . . . . . .92/73/0.00 . . . 87/64/t . 82/60/pc Madison, WI . . . . .85/69/0.61 . .74/46/pc . 63/43/pc Memphis. . . . . . . .95/74/0.00 . . . 92/72/t . 89/68/pc Miami . . . . . . . . . .88/75/0.00 . . . 87/75/t . . .87/75/t Milwaukee . . . . . .89/72/0.00 . .73/50/pc . 60/46/pc Minneapolis . . . . .80/64/0.19 . .63/44/sh . 62/47/pc Nashville. . . . . . . .93/71/0.00 . . . 90/64/t . 88/66/pc New Orleans. . . . .94/75/0.00 . .91/72/pc . 89/73/pc New York . . . . . . .89/71/0.00 . . . 87/67/t . 78/64/pc Newark, NJ . . . . . .91/70/0.00 . . . 88/68/t . . .81/62/t Norfolk, VA . . . . . .87/72/0.00 . . . 86/71/t . . .83/67/t Oklahoma City . . .92/73/0.00 . . . 90/67/t . . .87/65/t Omaha . . . . . . . . .81/62/0.11 . .73/50/pc . . .69/52/t Orlando. . . . . . . . .88/73/0.36 . . . 92/74/t . . .91/74/t Palm Springs. . . . .96/66/0.00 . . . 95/66/s . . 97/70/s Peoria . . . . . . . . . .91/72/0.00 . . . 80/54/s . 70/53/sh Philadelphia . . . . .91/68/0.00 . . . 89/71/t . 87/63/pc Phoenix. . . . . . . . .94/66/0.00 . .100/70/s . 101/72/s Pittsburgh . . . . . . .90/69/0.00 . . . 86/61/t . 79/53/pc Portland, ME. . . . .71/56/0.00 . . . 62/58/t . 76/56/sh Providence . . . . . .81/62/0.00 . . . 85/65/t . 80/62/sh Raleigh . . . . . . . . .90/72/0.00 . . . 87/69/t . 85/65/pc

Yesterday Tuesday Wed. City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . . .66/39/0.00 . .65/45/pc . 57/43/sh Reno . . . . . . . . . . .77/44/0.00 . . . 80/51/s . 84/55/pc Richmond . . . . . . .89/72/0.00 . . . 89/70/t . 86/64/pc Rochester, NY . . . .92/59/0.00 . . . 87/60/t . 74/51/pc Sacramento. . . . . .73/52/0.00 . . . 85/55/s . 93/60/pc St. Louis. . . . . . . . .94/76/0.00 . . . 87/59/s . 80/61/pc Salt Lake City . . . .72/44/0.00 . .81/55/pc . 71/54/pc San Antonio . . . . .91/73/0.00 . .95/74/pc . . 95/75/s San Diego . . . . . . .69/59/0.00 . . . 67/59/s . . 67/60/s San Francisco . . . .63/52/0.00 . . . 60/49/s . 69/51/pc San Jose . . . . . . . .67/55/0.00 . . . 71/53/s . 82/54/pc Santa Fe . . . . . . . .79/41/0.00 . . . 77/48/s . . 78/51/s

Yesterday Tuesday Wed. City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Savannah . . . . . . .87/71/0.17 . . . 84/70/t . 88/71/pc Seattle. . . . . . . . . .62/51/0.00 . .64/52/pc . 62/53/pc Sioux Falls. . . . . . .70/55/0.00 . .65/42/pc . 60/49/sh Spokane . . . . . . . .68/45/0.00 . .67/45/pc . . 70/46/c Springfield, MO . .90/71/0.00 . . . 87/61/t . . .82/61/t Tampa. . . . . . . . . .89/75/0.11 . . . 90/74/t . . .90/74/t Tucson. . . . . . . . . .94/54/0.00 . .100/65/s . . 98/68/s Tulsa . . . . . . . . . . .94/74/0.00 . . . 88/66/t . . .84/65/t Washington, DC . .90/70/0.00 . . . 90/70/t . 88/65/pc Wichita . . . . . . . . .94/67/0.00 . . . 85/62/t . . .81/60/t Yakima . . . . . . . . .75/43/0.00 . .72/45/pc . 77/50/pc Yuma. . . . . . . . . . .95/63/0.00 . .100/69/s . 102/71/s

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . . .72/52/0.00 . .69/45/pc . 67/47/pc Athens. . . . . . . . . .75/60/0.00 . .80/60/pc . . 78/62/s Auckland. . . . . . . .61/55/0.00 . .58/46/pc . 59/45/pc Baghdad . . . . . . .100/68/0.00 . .102/76/s . 106/78/s Bangkok . . . . . . . .91/82/0.00 . . . 92/82/t . . .95/81/t Beijing. . . . . . . . . .91/61/0.00 . . .83/59/c . 81/59/pc Beirut . . . . . . . . . .86/68/0.00 . . . 86/72/s . . 79/65/s Berlin. . . . . . . . . . .75/55/0.00 . .70/42/pc . 63/46/pc Bogota . . . . . . . . .63/50/0.08 . .65/51/sh . 66/50/sh Budapest. . . . . . . .68/45/0.00 . .73/53/pc . 69/49/pc Buenos Aires. . . . .72/54/0.00 . .70/50/pc . . 60/47/s Cabo San Lucas . .86/72/0.00 . . . 92/68/s . . 95/69/s Cairo . . . . . . . . . . .99/72/0.00 . .95/68/pc . . 90/67/s Calgary . . . . . . . . .59/37/0.00 . .59/40/pc . 65/45/pc Cancun . . . . . . . . .84/73/0.00 . . . 86/74/t . . .85/74/t Dublin . . . . . . . . . .70/50/0.00 . . .63/50/c . 64/50/sh Edinburgh. . . . . . .70/45/0.00 . . .53/49/c . 61/45/sh Geneva . . . . . . . . .75/52/0.00 . .77/56/pc . . .73/53/t Harare. . . . . . . . . .68/46/0.00 . . . 69/46/s . . 69/47/s Hong Kong . . . . . .86/79/0.00 . . . 86/79/t . . .85/77/t Istanbul. . . . . . . . .68/61/0.00 . .71/64/pc . . 73/63/c Jerusalem . . . . . . .91/70/0.00 . .91/65/pc . . 79/59/s Johannesburg. . . .63/41/0.00 . . . 66/41/s . . 68/42/s Lima . . . . . . . . . . .75/66/0.00 . . . 71/64/s . . 71/65/s Lisbon . . . . . . . . . .77/57/0.00 . .72/58/pc . 76/59/pc London . . . . . . . . .79/57/0.00 . .72/58/sh . 71/59/sh Madrid . . . . . . . . .86/57/0.00 . . . 86/57/s . 89/59/pc Manila. . . . . . . . . .90/81/0.00 . . . 93/80/t . . .92/80/t

Mecca . . . . . . . . .111/86/0.00 . .112/89/s . 111/88/s Mexico City. . . . . .82/54/0.00 . .80/57/sh . . 82/51/s Montreal. . . . . . . .64/61/0.00 . . . 79/63/t . . .75/56/t Moscow . . . . . . . .64/52/0.00 . .71/55/sh . . .75/54/t Nairobi . . . . . . . . .73/59/0.00 . . . 74/59/t . . .74/60/t Nassau . . . . . . . . .88/77/0.00 . . . 87/76/t . . .85/76/t New Delhi. . . . . .109/82/0.00 . .114/90/s . 116/93/s Osaka . . . . . . . . . .82/64/0.00 . .77/59/pc . 78/61/pc Oslo. . . . . . . . . . . .63/45/0.00 . .57/38/pc . 58/39/pc Ottawa . . . . . . . . .73/55/0.00 . . . 83/61/t . . .75/49/t Paris. . . . . . . . . . . .79/55/0.00 . .78/55/sh . . .74/60/t Rio de Janeiro. . . .86/68/0.00 . .85/70/pc . . 87/70/s Rome. . . . . . . . . . .68/54/0.00 . .76/54/pc . 76/56/pc Santiago . . . . . . . .70/52/0.00 . . . 64/53/s . 63/52/pc Sao Paulo . . . . . . .79/64/0.00 . .80/65/pc . 81/64/pc Sapporo . . . . . . . .61/59/0.00 . .58/49/sh . 65/53/sh Seoul. . . . . . . . . . .79/59/0.00 . . .80/61/c . . .73/59/t Shanghai. . . . . . . .84/68/0.00 . .82/68/pc . . .74/66/r Singapore . . . . . . .88/79/0.00 . . . 87/81/t . . .88/81/t Stockholm. . . . . . .64/46/0.00 . .54/39/pc . . 61/45/c Sydney. . . . . . . . . .63/50/0.00 . .63/49/pc . 65/51/pc Taipei. . . . . . . . . . .79/73/0.00 . .88/77/pc . . .86/75/t Tel Aviv . . . . . . . . .99/68/0.00 . . . 91/69/s . . 82/64/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . . .75/64/0.00 . . . 72/59/t . 72/57/pc Toronto . . . . . . . . .88/61/0.00 . . . 82/56/t . 70/48/pc Vancouver. . . . . . .64/54/0.00 . .61/51/pc . 62/53/pc Vienna. . . . . . . . . .73/50/0.00 . .76/57/pc . 71/57/pc Warsaw. . . . . . . . .73/54/0.00 . .71/47/pc . 61/42/pc

ASTORIA

Students forge link with Coast Guard ship Mason Hoover, from left, McKailyn Rogers, Jaden Miethe, Spencer Fulton and Noah Gannaway, sixth-graders from Hilda Lahti Elementary School in Knappa, lug heavy lengths of buoy chain across the Tongue Point pier last week during a visit to the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Fir, which is stationed at Tongue Point.

By Edward Stratton The Daily Astorian

ASTORIA — The scene was surreal: a group of sixth-graders, each at a 45-degree angle, inching forward, dragging 600 pounds of buoy chains back and forth across the pier in front of the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Fir, rain pouring down on them from above while guardsmen timed their progress and cheered them on. At the end of the exercise, the students went back to their taskmaster to ask if they could do it again.

Alex Pajunas / The Daily Astorian

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Connecting with the community The lesson on the sometimes difficult, yet, fun life of a Coast Guard buoy tender was one of many during the culminating visit of two sixth-grade classes from Hilda Lahti Elementary School in Knappa to the Fir, part of the Adopt-A-Ship program that gives local students a firsthand look at what the Guardians of the Pacific do every day. “The chain-dragging event was something that showed you how hard it is to work in the rain,” said 12-year-old Spencer Fulton, who had won a firefighting challenge below deck by donning boots, a suit, gloves, a mask and a helmet in 50 seconds. “You can actually make competitions out of the simplest or hardest of jobs.” Lt. Cmdr. Jon Kreischer said his crew organized tours and demonstrations on navigation, buoy tending, firefighting and cooking for an entire crew. The experience, he added, is often completely new to the students. “Half the crew is directly involved today,” said Lt. Elaine Cherry, executive officer and second in command on the Cutter Fir. “It’s a chance for us Coasties to give back to the community. We couldn’t do our job without the help of the locals.” Betsey Ellerbroek, educational director for the Columbia River Maritime Museum, said the program started in 1998 with her predecessor, Patricia Custard. The program was tried first on the Cutter Steadfast, on which her husband, Capt. Norman Custard,

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was commanding officer from 1998 to 2000. “I think it’s a good fit, because we certainly interpret the Coast Guard as one of our major focuses,” said Ellerbroek. “Two cutters are tied up right next to our museum. They’re such a large presence in the community, that it’s important for the children to have an understanding of what they do.” Since its inception, the program has exposed thousands of local students to the Coast Guard. It was part of an award the museum won from the American Association of State and Local History.

Humanities teachers Madeline Lockwood and Erica Osorio said that a fellow science instructor told them about the Adopt-A-Ship program and helped set them up with

the Fir. Osorio said the Coast Guard visited her classroom in the fall and early spring, leading hands-on activities and teaching the students how to navigate.

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Getting to know the Fir This was the first time in more than three years that the Fir adopted classes. Cutters Alert and Steadfast adopted five classes of fifth-graders from Astoria earlier in the month. Ellerbroek said the Fir is better designed for sixth-graders, focusing more on mathematical concepts through navigation activities it uses to tend hundreds of aids to navigation. On the other two cutters, students came aboard for activities in knot-tying, heaving lines, donning survival suits and personal flotation devices, law enforcement and shipboard firefighting.

Highway Closes June 4-8


SPORTS THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, MAY 29, 2012

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

PREP BASEBALL

COLLEGE BASEBALL

Bend, Summit to play in semifinals

Ducks set to host, Beavs hit the road for NCAA regionals

Two teams from Bend will try today to advance to where no high school baseball team from Central Oregon has gone in 10 years: an Oregon School Activities Association state championship final. Class 5A Intermountain Conference champion Summit and 5A IMC runner-up Bend High play this afternoon in 5A state semifinal contests, both hoping to play again Saturday in the state final at Volcanoes Stadium in Keizer. Neither the Storm nor the Lava Bears figure to have an easy go of it, as they try to become the first Central Oregon team to reach a state baseball final since the Sisters Outlaws got to the 3A championship game in 2002. Summit (24-5) plays at home at 5 p.m. against reigning 5A state champion Sherwood (24-4). The Storm are coming off a 7-1 quarterfinal win over Putnam, while the Bowmen, champions of the Northwest Oregon Conference, advanced to the semifinals with a 4-3 extra-innings victory over Ashland. Bend (18-8) travels to face 5A Portland Interscholastic League champion Wilson (21-8) in a game set to start at 4:30 p.m. at Wilson High School. The Lava Bears edged North Eugene 3-2 in the quarterfinal round; the Trojans advanced with a 9-7 win at Pendleton. The last Central Oregon team to play for the state baseball championship in Oregon’s large-school classification was Bend High, which won the AAA title in 1987. That Lava Bear team remains the only Central Oregon squad ever to win an OSAA state baseball championship.

Jesse Skoubo / The Corvallis Gazette-Times via The Associated Press

From wire service reports The Oregon Ducks have been awarded a national seed, and the Oregon State Beavers will be the No. 2 seed in the Baton Rouge Regional for the 66th annual NCAA Division I college baseball tournament, the selection committee announced Monday. Florida, ranked No. 1 in every major preseason poll, was selected as the top seed in the 64-team field. Oregon is the No. 5 national seed. In addition to No. 1 Florida, the other national seeds are No. 2 UCLA, No. 3 Florida State, No. 4 Baylor, No. 6 North Carolina, No. 7 LSU, and No. 8 South Carolina, the two-time defending Col-

lege World Series champion. The Ducks (42-17), who dropped all three games of their series at Oregon State over the weekend, finished third in the Pac-12 Conference. They will host the Eugene Regional, one of 16 four-team, double-elimination regionals that begin Friday. Joining Oregon in the Eugene Regional will be Cal State Fullerton (3519) as the No. 2 regional seed, Indiana State (41-17) as No. 3, and Austin Peay (38-22) as No. 4. The Ducks will face Austin Peay, of Clarksville, Tenn., on Friday at UO’s PK Park. See Regionals / D5

Oregon State’s Kavin Keyes is tagged out by Oregon’s Aaron Payne on a steal attempt during Sunday’s game in Corvallis. Both Oregon and Oregon State will be playing in the NCAA regionals starting Friday.

Oregon and Oregon State at regionals For the full schedule for Oregon and Oregon State’s regionals, see D5; see Scoreboard, D2, for the rest of the NCAA regionals schedule (All times Pacific):

EUGENE REGIONAL SCHEDULE

BATON ROUGE REGIONAL SCHEDULE

At PK Park, Eugene Friday, June 1 (Day 1) 2 p.m. — Game 1: No. 2 Cal State Fullerton (35-19) vs. No. 3 Indiana State (41-17) 6 p.m. — Game 2: No. 1 Oregon (42-17) vs. No. 4 Austin Peay (38-22)

At Alex Box Stadium, Baton Rouge, La. Friday. June 1 (Day 1) Noon — Game 1: No. 2 Oregon State (38-18) vs. No. 3 Belmont (39-22) 5 p.m. — Game 2: No. 1 LSU (43-16) vs. No. 4 Louisiana-Monroe (31-28)

OLYMPICS

Before London, shooter serves in war zone By Barry Svrluga The Washington Post

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin file

Runners compete during the Hershey’s Track & Field Games in 2010 at Bend High School. The local Hershey’s meet, which is in its 35th year, allows competitors to qualify for the state meet at Hayward Field in Eugene.

COMMUNITY SPORTS

— Bulletin staff report

A sweet history

MLB AL

NL

Red Sox Tigers

7 4

Cardinals 8 Braves 2

Twins A’s

5 4

Phillies Mets

8 4

White Sox 2 Rays 1

Marlins 5 Nationals 3

Indians Royals

8 5

Pirates Reds

4 1

Blue Jays 6 Orioles 2

Cubs Padres

11 7

Rangers 4 Mariners 2

Rockies 9-7 Astros 7-6

Angels Yankees

Brewers Dodgers

3 2

Giants D’backs

4 2

9 8

Roundup, D4

NBA PLAYOFFS Heat take East finals opener

D

Scoreboard, D2 NHL, D3 NBA, D3 MLB, D4 Tennis, D3 Community Sports, D5, D6 Cycling, D3

• The local Hershey’s Track & Field Games will return for their 35th year in Central Oregon on Wednesday

M

itch Modin and Cole Thomas AMANDA squared off this past Friday during the MILES Class 5A state track and field championships in Eugene. Modin, a Mountain View High School junior, and Thomas, a Summit High senior, were matched in the same 200-meter preliminary heat. Modin advanced to the final — in which he placed third — but Thomas, who had tweaked a quadriceps muscle two days prior, did not. The state prelim race marked the final time the two Central Oregon standouts would

face each other in high school competition. But it was not the first time they had competed against one another. Not by a long shot. In fact, thanks to the Hershey’s Track & Field Games, they started squaring off when they were just kids. The local Hershey’s meet, part of a national youth track and field program founded in the 1970s by the renowned chocolate and confections company, returns to Bend High School for its 35th year on Wednesday. See Track / D5

Hershey’s Track & Field Games local meet When: Wednesday, field events start at 4 p.m., running events at 5:30 p.m. Where: Bend High School Who: Open to boys and girls born in the years 1998 through 2003; winners in each event advance to the state meet, scheduled for July 7 at Hayward Field in Eugene Cost: Free Registration: Available today at the Bend Park & Recreation District office, 799 S.W. Columbia St., and on-site Wednesday from 4 p.m. to 5:15 p.m.; birth certificate must be presented at time of registration More information: Call Rich Ekman at 541-706-6126, refer to the Bend Park & Recreation District’s spring/ summer program guide, or go to bendparksandrec.org or hersheystrackandfield.com

Josh Richmond didn’t have to ride silently in a convoy, creeping along the outskirts of Kabul, Afghanistan, with unknown explosions occasionally detonating in the distance. He did not have to be separated from his pregnant wife and their 2-year-old son. He did not have to subject himself to war. Someone else would have trained the Afghan natives. Someone else would have done his duty. Richmond could have stayed home. Except for this: “I’ve got to do it,” he said. “It’s your patriotic duty.” Richmond is a soldier, and Richmond is an Olympian. That is the order in his mind, and the order in which he wants others to consider him. This summer, he will represent the United States at the London Games, wielding his shotgun as a favorite for a gold medal in double trap shooting. But every day, Richmond represents the United States as a member of the U.S. Army Marksmanship Unit. It is in that capacity that last fall he flew to Kuwait and was bussed to Kabul for three months of training Afghani soldiers in the ins and outs of weaponry. His identity, then, is clear: Staff Sgt. Joshua Richmond, U.S. Army. “I’m a soldier who’s also an Olympian,” Richmond said. “I’m a soldier 24 hours a day. Being a good soldier is what’s also helped me become an Olympian. See Shooter / D5

LeBron James scores 32 to lead Miami past Boston, D3

In a tough economy, club members learn to swing more than just an iron By Bill Pennington New York Times News Service

Miami’s Dwyane Wade shoots over Boston’s Brandon Bass.

CHAPIN, S.C. — Slinging a pickax under a blazing sun as he dug a hole behind the ninth green at Timberlake Country Club, Michael Kletter, 68, conceded that this was not the golf course retirement life he had envisioned. “No, I didn’t dream of manual labor,” Kletter, a transplanted New Yorker who is a member of the club, not of its maintenance crew, said as he planted a 6-foot fern. “But

GOLF the recession changed everything. The golf course was in danger of closing. It’s not a golf community without a golf course. We had to do something.” So Kletter joined about 300 other Timberlake members in a consortium that bought the financially distressed country club outside Columbia, S.C. See Golf / D5

Julie Nelson, right, the president of Timberlake Country Club, plants flowers at the course in Chapin, S.C., earlier this month. Members own and operate the course. Mary Ann Chastain/ New York Times


D2

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, MAY 29, 2012

O  A

SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION Today

Wednesday

TENNIS 2 a.m.: French Open, first round, ESPN2. 6 a.m.: French Open, first round, ESPN2. 7 a.m.: French Open, first round, Tennis Channel. BASEBALL 4 p.m.: MLB, Detroit Tigers at Boston Red Sox, ESPN. 5 p.m.: MLB, Seattle Mariners at Texas Rangers, Root Sports. 7 p.m.: MLB, New York Yankees at Los Angeles Angels or Arizona Diamondbacks at San Francisco Giants, MLB Network. BASKETBALL 6 p.m.: NBA playoffs, Western Conference final, Oklahoma City Thunder at San Antonio Spurs, TNT.

TENNIS 2 a.m.: French Open, second round, ESPN2. 6 a.m.: French Open, second round, ESPN2. 7 a.m.: French Open, second round, Tennis Channel. SOCCER 10:55 a.m.: Men, Spain vs. South Korea, ESPN2. 4:50 p.m.: Men, United States vs. Brazil, ESPN2. HOCKEY 5 p.m.: NHL playoffs, Stanley Cup finals, Los Angeles Kings at New Jersey Devils, NBC. BASKETBALL 5:30 p.m.: NBA playoffs, Eastern Conference final, Boston Celtics at Miami Heat, ESPN. BASEBALL 5 p.m.: MLB, Seattle Mariners at Texas Rangers, Root Sports. 7 p.m.: MLB, New York Yankees at Los Angeles Angels, ESPN2.

ON DECK Tuesday Baseball: Class 5A state semifinals: Sherwood at Summit, 5 p.m.; Bend at Wilson, 4:30 p.m.

PREP SPORTS Baseball OSAA State Playoffs CLASS 6A Semifinals Today Oregon City at Roseburg, 4:30 p.m. Sheldon at Thurston, 5 p.m. Final Saturday, June 2 Semifinal winners at Volcanoes Stadium, Keizer, TBA CLASS 5A Semifinals Today Sherwood at Summit, 5 p.m. Bend at Wilson, 4:30 p.m. Final Saturday, June 2 Semifinal winners at Volcanoes Stadium, Keizer, TBA CLASS 4A Semifinals Today Ontario at North Valley, 3:45 p.m. Hidden Valley at Henley, 5 p.m. Final Saturday, June 2 Semifinal winners at Volcanoes Stadium, Keizer, TBA CLASS 3A Semifinals Today Bandon-Pacific at Cascade Christian, 5 p.m. Santiam Christian at Burns, 2:30 p.m. Final Friday, June 1 Semifinal winners at Volcanoes Stadium, Keizer, TBA

RADIO Today BASKETBALL 6 p.m.: NBA playoffs, Western Conference finals, Oklahoma City Thunder at San Antonio Spurs, KICE-AM 940. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

CLASS 2A/1A Semifinals Today Regis at Weston-McEwen, 4 p.m. Knappa at Kennedy, 4:30 p.m. Final Friday, June 1 Semifinal winners at Volcanoes Stadium, Keizer, TBA

S   B • USC’s Johnson wins second straight NCAA singles title: Steve Johnson of Southern Cal won his second straight NCAA singles title with a 6-4, 6-4 victory Monday over Kentucky’s Eric Quigley in Athens, Ga. Johnson, the tournament’s No. 1 seed, ended his college career with 72 consecutive victories, finishing the season 32-0. By leading Southern Cal past Virginia in last week’s team final, Johnson became the first men’s singles champion to help his school win four straight team titles. Nicole Gibbs beat Stanford teammate Mallory Burdette 2-6, 7-6 (5), 6-3 to win the women’s title. Later, the two paired to beat Georgia’s Chelsey Gullickson and Nadja Gilchrist for the doubles championship.

Baseball • Phillies sending Halladay to doctor: The Philadelphia Phillies say they will send pitcher Roy Halladay to see a doctor today, two days after he came out of a start due to a sore right shoulder. On Monday, the team was still determining where and when, exactly, their star right-hander will be examined. Halladay first started to feel discomfort in Tuesday’s start against Washington, but pitched through it. He cut back on throwing between starts, but it didn’t help and he left after two innings against St. Louis that included Yadier Molina’s grand slam.

Boxing • Five-time champ Tapia found dead: Johnny Tapia, the five-time boxing champion whose turbulent career was marked by cocaine addiction, alcohol, depression and run-ins with the law, was found dead Sunday at his Albuquerque, N.M., home. He was 45. Tapia won five championships in three weight classes, winning the WBA bantamweight title, the IBF and WBO junior bantamweight titles and the IBF featherweight belt. • Manager says former champ Williams paralyzed: Boxer Paul Williams was paralyzed Sunday after being involved in a motorcycle crash in the Atlanta suburbs and doctors said it is unlikely he will continue his career, his manager said Monday. Williams was scheduled to fight Saul “Canelo” Alvarez on Sept. 15 in Las Vegas but that event has been canceled. Williams won his first major welterweight title in July 2007 with a decision over Antonio Margarito. He struggled to land fights with the sport’s biggest stars because of his pronounced size advantages, a high-volume punching rate and his relative anonymity, but was considered one of the world’s top pound-for-pound fighters.

Lacrosse • Loyola men take title: Topseeded Loyola of Maryland beat

Maryland 9-3 Monday in Foxborough, Mass., to win the NCAA men’s lacrosse title behind Eric Lusby’s four goals. Lusby set a record with 17 goals in the tournament. The Greyhounds captured their first national lacrosse championship and finished the season at 18-1. Maryland (12-6) lost the title game for the second straight year.

Track and field • Ducks shine at regionals: A long list of Oregon Ducks and an Oregon State woman qualified for the NCAA Championships with their performances at the NCAA Outdoor Track and Field West Regional, which concluded Saturday in Austin, Texas. Oregon added 10 individuals and three relays to its lineup of NCAA qualifiers on Saturday, giving the Ducks a total of 31 entries in the NCAA Championships, set for June 6-9 in Des Moines, Iowa. For Oregon State, Laura Carlyle qualified in the 1,500 meters.

Cycling • Duggan wins U.S. road race title: Tim Duggan held off a chasing group of about a dozen riders Monday to win the USA Cycling Professional Road Race Championship in Greenville, S.C. Duggan broke away about 15 miles from the finish to win the four-lap, 112-mile race in a time of 4:17:40. Frank Pipp won the sprint for second, while Kiel Reijnen finished third on the course that started in downtown Greenville before climbing Paris Mountain on the outskirts of the city. On Saturday, Dave Zabriskie won his seventh national time trials title and second straight at the USA Cycling Pro Championship. Zabriskie covered the 20.7 mile course in 40 minutes, 41.22 seconds. • Canada’s Hesjedal wins Giro: Ryder Hesjedal became the first Canadian to win one of cycling’s three major tour races, capturing the Giro d’Italia on Sunday by overtaking Spain’s Joaquin Rodriguez in the final stage. Hesjedal started the 21st stage 31 seconds behind the leader, but finished 16 seconds ahead of Rodriguez in the overall standings. He completed the 17.5-mile individual time trial in 34 minutes, 15 seconds. That was good for sixth place — 20 spots ahead of Rodriguez in the 95th edition of the race. “It’s just been an unreal experience from day one, what the team was able to do. It’s unbelievable,” said Hesjedal, who finished the overall race in 91 hours, 39 minutes, 2 seconds. “This is incredible. It’s a dream come true.” The 32-year-old rider is only the third non-Italian to win the Giro in the past 15 years. Marco Pinotti of Italy won the final stage in 33:06. Taylor Phinney, who won the opening time trial in Denmark, took a wrong turn during the last stage and was forced to turn around. He finished the stage in 16th place. — From wire reports

HOCKEY NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE All Times PDT (x-if necessary) (Best-of-7) ——— STANLEY CUP FINALS Wednesday, May 30: Los Angeles at New Jersey, 5 p.m. Saturday, June 2: Los Angeles at New Jersey, 5 p.m. Monday, June 4: New Jersey at Los Angeles, 5 p.m. Wednesday, June 6: New Jersey at Los Angeles, 5 p.m. x-Saturday, June 9: Los Angeles at New Jersey, 5 p.m. x-Monday, June 11: New Jersey at Los Angeles, 5 p.m. x-Wednesday, June 13: Los Angeles at New Jersey, 5 p.m.

OSAA State Playoffs CLASS 6A Semifinals Today Clackamas at North Medford, 4 p.m. South Salem at Crater, TBA Final Saturday, June 2 Semifinal winners at OSU Softball Complex, TBA CLASS 5A Semifinals Today Pendleton at West Albany, 4:30 p.m. The Dalles Wahtonka at Silverton, 4:30 p.m. Final Saturday, June 2 Semifinal winners at OSU Softball Complex, TBA CLASS 4A Semifinals Today Cascade at Henley, 3 p.m. Banks at Mazama, 4 p.m. Final Saturday, June 2 Semifinal winners at OSU Softball Complex, TBA

SOFTBALL College

CLASS 3A Semifinals Today Dayton at Blanchet Catholic, 4:30 p.m. Rainier at Santiam Christian, 4:30 p.m. Final Friday, June 1 Semifinal winners at OSU Softball Complex, TBA CLASS 2A/1A Semifinals Today Heppner-Ione at Enterprise-Joseph, 4 p.m. Glendale at Gold Beach, 4:30 p.m. Final Friday, June 1 Semifinal winners at OSU Softball Complex, TBA

BASKETBALL NBA NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION NBA Playoff Glance All Times PDT (x-if necessary) (Best-of-7) ——— CONFERENCE FINALS EASTERN CONFERENCE Miami 1, Boston 0 Monday, May 28: Miami 93, Boston 79 Wednesday, May 30: Boston at Miami, 5:30 p.m. Friday, June 1: Miami at Boston, 5:30 p.m. Sunday, June 3: Miami at Boston, 5:30 p.m. x-Tuesday, June 5: Boston at Miami, 5:30 p.m. x-Thursday, June 7: Miami at Boston, 5:30 p.m. x-Saturday, June 9: Boston at Miami, 5:30 p.m. WESTERN CONFERENCE San Antonio 1, Oklahoma City 0 Sunday, May 27: San Antonio 101, Oklahoma City 98 Today, May 29: Oklahoma City at San Antonio, 6 p.m. Thursday, May 31: San Antonio at Oklahoma City, 6 p.m. Saturday, June 2: San Antonio at Oklahoma City, 5:30 p.m. x-Monday: June 4: Oklahoma City at San Antonio, 6 p.m. x-Wednesday, June 6: San Antonio at Oklahoma City, 6 p.m. x-Friday, June 8: Oklahoma City at San Antonio, 6 p.m. Monday’s Summary

Heat 93, Celtics 79 BOSTON (79) Pierce 5-18 0-0 12, Bass 4-11 0-2 8, Garnett 9-16 5-6 23, Rondo 8-20 0-0 16, Allen 1-7 3-7 6, Stiemsma 2-2 2-2 6, Pietrus 0-1 1-4 1, Dooling 1-3 0-0 3, Pavlovic 0-1 0-0 0, Hollins 1-1 0-0 2, Daniels 1-1 0-0 2, Moore 0-0 0-0 0, Williams 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 32-81 11-21 79. MIAMI (93) Battier 4-11 0-0 10, James 13-22 6-9 32, Turiaf 2-3 0-0 4, Chalmers 3-9 3-4 9, Wade 8-13 6-6 22, Anthony 1-2 1-4 3, Miller 3-5 0-0 8, Cole 0-1 0-0 0, Haslem 0-2 0-0 0, Jones 1-3 0-0 3, Howard 1-1 0-0 2. Totals 36-72 16-23 93. Boston 11 35 15 18 — 79 Miami 21 25 26 21 — 93 3-Point Goals—Boston 4-14 (Pierce 2-4, Dooling 1-3, Allen 1-4, Rondo 0-1, Pietrus 0-1, Pavlovic 0-1), Miami 5-25 (Miller 2-2, Battier 2-9, Jones 1-3, Cole 0-1, Wade 0-1, James 0-3, Chalmers 0-6). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Boston 48 (Garnett 10), Miami 54 (James 13). Assists—Boston 19 (Rondo 7), Miami 17 (Wade 7). Total Fouls—Boston 19, Miami 21. Technicals—Allen, Boston Coach Rivers, Rondo, Boston delay of game, Boston defensive three second. A—19,912 (19,600).

WNBA WOMEN’S NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION All Times PDT ——— Eastern Conference W L Pct Connecticut 3 0 1.000 Indiana 3 0 1.000 Chicago 1 1 .500 Washington 1 1 .500 Atlanta 1 2 .333 New York 0 4 .000 Western Conference W L Pct Minnesota 4 0 1.000 Los Angeles 3 1 .750 San Antonio 1 1 .500 Phoenix 1 2 .333 Seattle 0 3 .000 Tulsa 0 3 .000 ———

Monday’s Games No games scheduled Today’s Game Tulsa at Los Angeles, 7:30 p.m.

NHL

Softball

Tennis

IN THE BLEACHERS

GB — — 1½ 1½ 2 3½ GB — 1 2 2½ 3½ 3½

NCAA Division I World Series Glance At ASA Hall of Fame Stadium Oklahoma City All Times PDT Double Elimination x-if necessary Thursday, May 31 Game 1 — South Florida (50-12) vs. Oklahoma (508), 10 a.m. Game 2 — LSU (39-23) vs. California (56-5), 12:30 p.m. Game 3 — Tennessee (52-12) vs. Alabama (55-7), 4 p.m. Game 4 — Oregon (44-16) vs. Arizona State (51-9), 6:30 p.m. Friday, June 1 Game 5 — Game 1 winner vs. Game 2 winner, 4 p.m. Game 6 — Game 3 winner vs. Game 4 winner, 6:30 p.m. Saturday, June 2 Game 7 — Game 1 loser vs. Game 2 loser, 9 a.m. Game 8 — Game 3 loser vs. Game 4 loser, 11:30 a.m. Game 9 — Game 5 loser vs. Game 7 winner, 4 p.m. Game 10 — Game 6 loser vs. Game 8 winner, 6:30 p.m. Sunday, June 3 Game 11 — Game 5 winner vs. Game 9 winner, 10 a.m. Game 12 — Game 6 winner vs. Game 10 winner, 12:30 p.m. x-Game 13 — Game 11 winner vs. Game 11 loser, 4 p.m. x-Game 14 — Game 12 winner vs. Game 12 loser, 6:30 p.m. NOTE: If only one game is necessary, it will be played at 4 p.m. Championship Series (Best-of-3) Monday, June 4: Teams TBD, 5 p.m. Tuesday, June 5: Teams TBD, 5 p.m. x-Wednesday, June 6: Teams TBD, 5 p.m.

BASEBALL College Baseball America Top 25 DURHAM, N.C. — The top 25 teams in the Baseball America poll with records through May 27 and previous ranking (voting by the staff of Baseball America): Record Pvs 1. Florida 42-18 3 2. UCLA 42-14 9 3. Louisiana State 43-16 2 4. Baylor 44-14 6 5. Florida State 43-15 1 6. North Carolina 44-14 10 7. South Carolina 40-17 7 8. Rice 40-17 4 9. Texas A&M 42-16 8 10. Oregon 42-17 5 11. Kentucky 43-16 11 12. Cal State Fullerton 35-19 12 13. Arizona 38-17 13 14. Mississippi State 39-22 24 15. Purdue 44-12 18 16. Oregon State 38-18 23 17. Virginia 38-17 17 18. North Carolina State 39-17 15 19. Stanford 38-16 14 20. Central Florida 41-14 19 21. Arizona State 36-20 16 22. Vanderbilt 33-26 NR 23. Miami 36-21 NR 24. Pepperdine 34-21 NR 25. Stony Brook 46-11 NR Collegiate Baseball Poll TUCSON, Ariz. — The Collegiate Baseball poll with records through May 27, points and previous rank. Voting is done by coaches, sports writers and sports information directors: Record Pts Pvs 1. Louisiana St. 43-16 495 2 2. South Carolina 40-17 493 3 3. Florida 42-18 490 4 4. Florida St. 43-15 489 5 5. Baylor 44-14 487 6 6. North Carolina 44-14 486 7 7. UCLA 42-14 484 10 8. Arizona 38-17 483 8 9. Rice 41-16 481 9 10. Oregon 42-17 479 1 11. Texas A&M 42-16 476 11 12. Stanford 38-16 474 12 13. Kentucky 43-16 473 13 14. Cal St. Fullerton 35-19 471 15 15. N.C. State 39-17 469 16 16. Purdue 44-12 467 18 17. Mississippi St. 39-22 464 21 18. Oregon St. 38-18 461 28 19. Arkansas 39-19 459 14 20. Arizona St. 36-20 458 17 21. Central Florida 43-15 456 19 22. Miami, Fla. 36-21 454 23 23. Oklahoma 38-22 451 25 24. Virginia 38-17-1 448 24 25. Kent St. 41-17 446 27 26. New Mexico 36-22 445 —

27. San Diego 28. Vanderbilt 29. St. John’s 30. Georgia Tech

40-15 33-26 37-21 36-24

443 440 438 437

20 — — —

NCAA Division I Regionals Glance All Times PDT Double Elimination At Davenport Field Charlottesville, Va. Friday, June 1 Game 1 — Oklahoma (38-22) vs. Appalachian State (39-16), TBA Game 2 — Virginia (38-17-1) vs. Army (41-13), TBA At Boshamer Stadium Chapel Hill, N.C. Friday, June 1 Game 1 — East Carolina (35-22-1) vs. St. John’s (3721), 10 a.m. Game 2 — North Carolina (44-14) vs. Cornell (3115-1), 3 p.m. At Dail Park Raleigh, N.C. Friday, June 1 Game 1 — Vanderbilt (33-26) vs. UNC Wilmington (38-21), 11 a.m. Game 2 — N.C. State (39-17) vs. Sacred Heart (2530), 4 p.m. At Carolina Stadium Columbia, S.C. Friday, June 1 Game 1 — Clemson (33-26) vs. Coastal Carolina (41-17), 9 a.m. Game 2 — South Carolina (40-17) vs. Manhattan (33-25), 1 p.m. At Dick Howser Stadium Tallahassee, Fla. Friday, June 1 Game 1 — Mississippi State (39-22) vs. Samford (39-21), 9 a.m. Game 2 — Florida State (43-15) vs. UAB (32-28), 3 p.m. At Alfred A. McKethan Stadium Gainesville, Fla. Friday, June 1 Game 1 — Georgia Tech (36-24) vs. College of Charleston (37-20), 10 a.m. or 4 p.m. Game 2 — Florida (42-18) vs. Bethune-Cookman (34-25), 10 a.m. or 4 p.m. At Mark Light Stadium Coral Gables, Fla. Friday, June 1 Game 1 — UCF (43-15) vs. Missouri State (39-20), 11 a.m. Game 2 — Miami (36-21) vs. Stony Brook (46-11), 4 p.m. At US Steel Yard Gary, Ind. Friday, June 1 Game 1 — Kentucky (43-16) vs. Kent State (41-17), 1 p.m. Game 2 — Purdue (44-12) vs. Valparaiso (35-23), 5 p.m. At Alex Box Stadium Baton Rouge, La. Friday, June 1 Game 1 — Oregon State (38-18) vs. Belmont (39-22), noon Game 2 — LSU (43-16) vs. Louisiana-Monroe (3128), 5 p.m. Saturday, June 2 Game 3 — Game 1 loser vs. Game 2 loser, noon Game 4 — Game 1 winner vs. Game 2 winner, 5 p.m. Sunday, June 3 Game 5 — Game 3 winner vs. Game 4 loser, 11 a.m. Game 6 — Game 4 winner vs. Game 5 winner, 4:30 p.m. Monday, June 4 x-Game 7 — Game 4 winner vs. Game 5 winner, 4:30 p.m. At Reckling Park Houston Friday, June 1 Game 1 — Arkansas (39-19) vs. Sam Houston State (38-20), 11 a.m. Game 2 — Rice (40-17) vs. Prairie View (28-23), 4 p.m. At Baylor Ballpark Waco, Texas Friday, June 1 Game 1 — Dallas Baptist (39-17) vs. Texas-Arlington (36-23), 11 a.m. Game 2 — Baylor (44-14) vs. Oral Roberts (37-23), 4 p.m. At Olsen Field College Station, Texas Friday, June 1 Game 1 — TCU (36-19) vs. Mississippi (35-24), 10:35 a.m. Game 2 — Texas A&M (42-16) vs. Dayton (31-28), 4:35 p.m. At PK Park Eugene Friday, June 1 Game 1 — Cal State Fullerton (35-19) vs. Indiana State (41-17), 2 p.m. Game 2 — Oregon (42-17) vs. Austin Peay (38-22), 6 p.m. Saturday, June 2 Game 3 — Game 1 loser vs. Game 2 loser, 2 p.m. Game 4 — Game 1 winner vs. Game 2 winner, 6 p.m. Sunday, June 3 Game 5 — Game 3 winner vs. Game 4 loser, noon Game 6 — Game 4 winner vs. Game 5 winner, 4 p.m. Monday, June 4 x-Game 7 — Game 4 winner vs. Game 5 winner, 6 p.m. At Sunken Diamond Stanford, Calif. Friday, June 1 Game 1 — Pepperdine (34-21) vs. Michigan State (37-21), 1 p.m. Game 2 — Stanford (38-16) vs. Fresno State (30-26), 6 p.m. At Jackie Robinson Stadium Los Angeles Friday, June 1 Game 1 — San Diego (40-15) vs. New Mexico (3622), TBA Game 2 — UCLA (42-14) vs. Creighton (26-28), 7 p.m. At Hi Corbett Field Tucson, Ariz. Friday, June 1 Game 1 — New Mexico State (35-22) vs. Louisville (39-20), 4 p.m. Game 2 — Arizona (38-17) vs. Missouri (32-26), 8 p.m.

TENNIS Professional French Open

Monday At Stade Roland Garros Paris Purse: $23.47 million (Grand Slam) Surface: Clay-Outdoor Singles Men First Round Florent Serra, France, def. Feliciano Lopez (15), Spain, 5-0, retired. Martin Klizan, Slovakia, def. Frank Dancevic, Canada, 4-0, retired. Marcel Granollers (20), Spain, def. Joao Sousa, Portugal, 6-2, 3-6, 6-3, 6-4. Blaz Kavcic, Slovenia, def. Lleyton Hewitt, Australia, 7-6 (2), 6-3, 6-7 (4), 6-3. Malek Jaziri, Tunisia, def. Philipp Petzschner, Germany, 6-3, 7-5, 7-6 (7). Mikhail Kukushkin, Kazakhstan, def. Ernests Gulbis, Latvia, 6-4, 7-6 (4), 5-7, 2-6, 6-4. Andreas Seppi (22), Italy, def. Nikolay Davydenko, Russia, 6-3, 7-6 (5), 7-5. Roger Federer (3), Switzerland, def. Tobias Kamke, Germany, 6-2, 7-5, 6-3. Lukasz Kubot, Poland, def. Karol Beck, Slovakia, 7-5, 6-2, 7-5. Adrian Ungur, Romania, def. David Nalbandian, Argentina, 6-3, 5-7, 6-4, 7-5. Horacio Zeballos, Argentina, def. Eric Prodon, France, 6-7 (8), 6-3, 6-3, 6-2. Kevin Anderson (31), South Africa, def. Rui Machado, Portugal, 7-6 (2), 6-7 (6), 4-6, 6-1, 11-9. John Isner (10), United States, def. Rogerio Dutra Silva, Brazil, 6-3, 6-4, 6-4. Jesse Levine, United States, def. Benjamin Becker, Germany, 7-5, 6-2, 6-4. Novak Djokovic (1), Serbia, def. Potito Starace, Italy, 7-6 (3), 6-3, 6-1. Michael Llodra, France, def. Guillermo Garcia-Lopez, Spain, 7-6 (5), 6-2, 3-6, 6-3. Bernard Tomic (25), Australia, def. Andreas HaiderMaurer, Austria, 7-6 (5), 6-3, 6-3. Santiago Giraldo, Colombia, def. Alejandro Falla, Colombia, 5-7, 6-2, 6-4, 7-6 (4). Arnaud Clement, France, def. Alex Bogomolov Jr., Russia, 6-2, 3-6, 4-6, 7-6 (2), 5-4, retired. Viktor Troicki (28), Serbia, def. Thomaz Bellucci, Brazil, 4-6, 6-3, 5-7, 6-3, 6-2. Tomas Berdych (7), Czech Republic, def. Dudi Sela, Israel, 6-3, 6-4, 6-1. Milos Raonic (19), Canada, def. Ruben Ramirez Hidalgo, Spain, 6-4, 6-2, 6-2. Gilles Simon (11), France, def. Ryan Harrison, United States, 3-6, 7-5, 6-4, 6-1. Paul-Henri Mathieu, France, def. Bjorn Phau, Germany, 2-6, 4-6, 6-4, 6-3, 6-0. Philipp Kohlschreiber (24), Germany, def. Matthew Ebden, Australia, 6-4, 6-4, 7-6 (4). Leonardo Mayer, Argentina, def. Olivier Rochus, Belgium, 6-3, 6-4, 2-6, 6-4. Women First Round Dominika Cibulkova (15), Slovakia, def. Kristina Mladenovic, France, 6-2, 6-1. Lauren Davis, United States, def. Mona Barthel (30), Germany, 6-1, 6-1. Anabel Medina Garrigues (29), Spain, def. Laura Robson, Britain, 6-2, 6-1. Nadia Petrova (27), Russia, def. Iveta Benesova, Czech Republic, 6-3, 6-3. Vania King, United States, def. Galina Voskoboeva, Kazakhstan, 6-4, 6-2. Chan Yung-jan, Taiwan, def. Kateryna Bondarenko, Ukraine, 6-1, 7-6 (8). Victoria Azarenka (1), Belarus, def. Alberta Brianti, Italy, 6-7 (6), 6-4, 6-2. Jelena Jankovic (19), Serbia, def. Patricia MayrAchleitner, Austria, 1-6, 6-1, 7-5. Li Na (7), China, def. Sorana Cirstea, Romania, 6-2, 6-1. Zheng Jie (31), China, def. Alize Cornet, France, 6-4, 6-4. Sesil Karatantcheva, Kazakhstan, def. Timea Babos, Hungary, 6-1, 6-0. Christina McHale, United States, def. Kiki Bertens, Netherlands, 2-6, 6-4, 6-4. Petra Martic, Croatia, def. Michaella Krajicek, Netherlands, 6-2, 7-5. Chanelle Scheepers, South Africa, def. Laura PousTio, Spain, 6-4, 2-6, 6-1. Olga Govortsova, Belarus, def. Romina Oprandi, Switzerland, 6-4, 6-1. Bethanie Mattek-Sands, United States, def. Sabine Lisicki (12), Germany, 6-4, 6-3. Petra Cetkovska (24), Czech Republic, def. Simona Halep, Romania, 6-1, 6-3. Carla Suarez Navarro, Spain, def. Tamarine Tanasugarn, Thailand, 6-0, 6-3. Sloane Stephens, United States, def. Ekaterina Makarova, Russia, 6-4, 7-6 (6). Flavia Pennetta (18), Italy, def. Hsieh Su-wei, Taiwan, 6-7 (3), 6-4, 6-2. Varvara Lepchenko, United States, def. Ksenia Pervak, Kazakhstan, 6-2, 6-7 (6), 6-4. Sofia Arvidsson, Sweden, def. Roberta Vinci (17), Italy, 6-2, 4-6, 6-3. Yaroslava Shvedova, Kazakhstan, def. Mandy Minella, Luxembourg, 6-3, 6-4. Marion Bartoli (8), France, def. Karolina Pliskova, Czech Republic, 6-3, 6-3. Agnieszka Radwanska (3), Poland, def. Bojana Jovanovski, Serbia, 6-1, 6-0. Nina Bratchikova, Russia, def. Monica Niculescu (32), Romania, 0-6, 6-3, 6-3. Claire Feuerstein, France, def. Vera Dushevina, Russia, 6-4, 6-1.

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL Major League Baseball MLB—Suspended Miami RHP Juan Carlos Oviedo eight weeks for engaging in age and identity fraud. American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES—Activated INF Mark Reynolds from the 15-day DL. Placed RHP Stu Pomeranz on the 15-day DL, retroactive to May 26. BOSTON RED SOX—Activated OF Ryan Sweeney from the 7-day concussion DL. Optioned OF CheHsuan Lin to Pawtucket (IL). CLEVELAND INDIANS—Activated RHP Josh Tomlin from the 15-day DL. Recalled INF Lonnie Chisenhall from Columbus (IL). Placed INF Jack Hannahan on the 15-day DL, retroactive to May 27. Designated RHP Jairo Asencio for assignment. MINNESOTA TWINS—Announced RHP Jason Marquis cleared waivers and was unconditionally released. TAMPA BAY RAYS—Activated C Jose Lobaton from the 15-day DL. Optioned C Chris Gimenez to Durham (IL). TORONTO BLUE JAYS—Recalled LHP Aaron Laffey from Las Vegas (PCL). Optioned RHP Chad Beck to Las Vegas. National League CHICAGO CUBS—Activated RHP Carlos Marmol from the 15-day DL. Optioned RHP Rafael Dolis to Iowa (PCL). COLORADO ROCKIES—Recalled RHP Carlos Torres from Colorado Springs (PCL). HOUSTON ASTROS—Recalled RHP Jordan Lyles and RHP David Henderson from Oklahoma City (PCL). Optioned RHP Enerio Del Rosario to Oklahoma City. LOS ANGELES DODGERS—Placed LHP Ted Lilly on the 15-day DL, retroactive to May 24. Recalled LHP Michael Antonini from Albuquerque (PCL). PITTSBURGH PIRATES—Placed RHP Juan Cruz on the restricted list. Selected the contract of LHP Doug Slaten from Indianapolis (IL). SAN DIEGO PADRES—Activated OF Carlos Quentin from the 15-day DL. Optioned OF Blake Tekotte from Tucson (PCL). Claimed RHP Neil Wagner off waivers from Oakland and optioned him to Tucson. Transferred INF-OF James Darnell to the 60-day DL. WASHINGTON NATIONALS—Selected the contract of OF Corey Brown from Syracuse (IL). Placed INF Chad Tracy on the 15-day DL, retroactive May 27. Transferred OF Jayson Werth to the 60-day DL. Optioned INF Tyler Moore to Syracuse. HOCKEY National Hockey League MONTREAL CANADIENS—Named Scott Mellanby director of player personnel.

FISH COUNT Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Sunday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 1,144 84 58 15 The Dalles 1,027 115 16 0 John Day 858 87 7 1 McNary 1,465 139 8 2 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Sunday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 151,230 7,146 5,547 1,718 The Dalles 107,637 6,437 1,788 930 John Day 95,283 5,724 1,878 1,233 McNary 86,976 3,865 4,729 2,206


TUESDAY, MAY 29, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

TENNIS

NBA PLAYOFFS

NHL PLAYOFFS

No. 1 Azarenka overcomes terrible start to win at French

Almost out for the season, Devils’ Zajac in Cup finals By Tom Canavan The Associated Press

By Howard Fendrich The Associated Press

PARIS — Only 22, just recently a Grand Slam champion and ranked No. 1 for the first time, Victoria Azarenka is still learning to think like a top player. So trailing by a set and one point from being down 5-0 in the second at the French Open on Monday, Azarenka’s mind was filled with “a mix of things.” “Sometimes I felt it was not my day,” she explained. “Sometimes I thought, ‘Yeah, maybe I still fight, I still have a chance.’ Sometimes it was like, ‘You know what? Forget it. I don’t want to do it.’” And yet she did do it, listening to the most positive of those voices and beginning the climb back from a daunting deficit with a gutsy second-serve ace, of all things. Showing how far she’s come from the petulance of earlier in her career, Azarenka took 12 of the last 14 games to beat Alberta Brianti of Italy 6-7 (6), 6-4, 6-2. “Before, maybe I would just give up and go home. I was kind of thinking there was a flight straight to Minsk,” said Azarenka, who was born in the capital of Belarus. “But I didn’t want to leave too soon.” She most certainly did not want to become the only top-seeded woman to lose in the first round of the French Open since the tournament started allowing foreign entrants in 1925. But she needed every bit of fortitude to right things while overcoming a whopping 60 unforced errors, far more than her 32 winners — a terrible ratio for anyone, let alone a player who considers herself a title contender. “Bad days happen,” Azarenka said with a shrug. “Unfortunately, today I had way more mistakes than I usually do.” The top-seeded man, Novak Djokovic, limited his miscues to when he spoke to the crowd in French after a victory Monday, never even facing a break point while beating Potito Starace of Italy 7-6 (3), 6-3, 6-1. “It wasn’t that successful,” Djokovic said — referring to his on-court postmatch interview, not his play, as he began his bid to become the first man since Rod Laver in 1969 to win a fourth consecutive Grand Slam title. “I’m trying to take it slowly. I’m running out of words,” he said. “Who knows? Maybe (in the) next two weeks, I’ll learn something more.” It wouldn’t be much of a surprise if he’s around long enough to face 16-time major champion Roger Federer in the semifinals. They met in Paris at that stage a year ago, when Federer ended Djokovic’s 43-match winning streak. Federer dealt with a few blips, getting broken once in each set, including when serving for the match for the first time. But he defeated Tobias Kamke of Germany 6-2, 7-5, 6-3 to tie Jimmy Connors’ Open era record of 233 Grand Slam match wins. “They’re never easy, those first rounds, you know. Last thing you want is to go down a set or (get) in a tough situation, but I was able to stay ahead in the first set. Had bits of ups and downs on my serve,” Federer said. “But overall, I’m happy I’m through.” The sport’s other leading man, defending champion Rafael Nadal, starts his try for a record seventh French Open title today, facing Simone Bolelli of Italy. Other winners Monday included defending champion Li Na and No. 3 Agnieszka Radwanska, who next meets seven-time major champion Venus Williams.

David Vincent / The Associated Press

Victoria Azarenka returns a shot in her firstround match against Alberta Brianti at the French Open in Paris on Monday.

D3

Lynne Sladky / The Associated Press

Miami’s Ronny Turiaf (21) blocks a shot by Boston’s Brandon Bass (30) during the second half of Game 1 of the Eastern Conference finals on Monday in Miami.

James scores 32 as Heat run past Celtics in Game 1 By Tim Reynolds The Associated Press

MIAMI — The way LeBron James and Dwyane Wade are rolling right now, one bad quarter is hardly too much for the Miami Heat to overcome. And with that, the Heat are three wins away from another trip to the NBA finals. James scored 32 points and grabbed 13 rebounds, Wade scored 10 of his 22 points in the fourth quarter and the Heat beat the Boston Celtics 93-79 on Monday night in Game 1 of the Eastern Conference finals. “One down. And they still have an opportunity in Game 2 to accomplish what they want to,” Heat coach Erik Spoelstra said, referring to how Boston can still grab home-court advantage by winning Game 2. “At times it was a strange game. Some good runs, both teams. We felt we could have played better and I’m sure they felt the same thing. But we found a way to grind it.” Shane Battier, playing in the conference finals for the first time, had 10 points and 10 rebounds for the Heat, who wasted an early 11point first-half lead, then gave up 35 second-quarter points before running away to break a halftime tie — getting going with a 9-2 run early in the third. Miami outrebounded the Celtics 48-33, blocked 11 shots and didn’t trail at any time. “A block is like a dunk,” Wade said. “It gets your team going.” Kevin Garnett had 23 points and 10 rebounds for Boston, which got 16 points, nine rebounds and seven assists from Rajon Rondo and 12 points from Paul Pierce. Ray Allen shot just one for seven from the floor for Boston, which was outscored by 10 in the first quarter and 11 in the third. “On the road, you can’t have two quarters of lulls,” Celtics coach Doc Rivers said. Game 2 is Wednesday night in Miami. And while both sides would say there’s a long way to go in this series, Game 1 winners have a decided edge in any best-of-seven, the conference final being no exception. In the most recent 10 postseasons, teams with 1-0 leads in

Spurs still rolling heading into Game 2 with Thunder SAN ANTONIO — Gregg Popovich’s “I want some nasty!” is fast becoming the catchphrase of the NBA playoffs. It’s eminently quotable, brash and an overnight splash. In other words, it’s everything the San Antonio Spurs are not. They have also heard far worse in timeouts from the NBA Coach of the Year, who bellowed his now-famous and fuming marching orders that jumpstarted a fourth-quarter rally, extended a history-matching winning streak to 19 and left the Oklahoma City Thunder stunned heading into Game 2 of the Western Conference finals tonight. “You’ve got to watch Pop — he’s good at turning that microphone on and off,” Spurs forward Stephen Jackson said Monday. “You don’t hear some of the stuff he says.” All the Thunder mostly heard Monday were questions about their costly collapse down the stretch. Oklahoma City started the fourth quarter leading — a rare feat against the Spurs in the past 47 days, which is how long it’s been since their last loss. Going up 2-0 would put the Spurs among just three other teams in NBA history with winning streaks of 20 games or longer. It would also break the record for longest winning streak extended in the playoffs, a mark the Spurs now share with the 2001 Lakers. “We really don’t care,” guard Manu Ginobili said. “We are close — seven games — from accomplishing something way better than a streak. (The streak) is happening, it’s fine. But we always think about next time and how tough it’s going to be.” It’s the first time the Thunder have trailed in a playoff series since being down 1-0 in the West finals last season. — The Associated Press

conference finals have advanced 15 out of 20 times. James and Wade scored 197 points in the final three games of Miami’s second-round series with Indiana, all those games being Heat wins. The momentum carried over into Game 1 with the Celtics. “We get a lot of the press, we get a lot of the headlines,” James said. “But our teammates, they do everything to help us win ball games.” It’s the third straight year the Heat and Celtics have met in the playoffs, and the third straight year James has seen his postseason path go through Boston — the first of those matchups coming in 2010 in his final run with Cleveland. Each of those came in the first or second rounds, not this close to the NBA finals. And yes, the rivalry seems to be heating again. “They’re home, they’re comfortable and when you’re comfortable you do things like that,” Garnett said, suggesting that Miami was showboating at times down the stretch. “We have to show them to take them out of their comfort zone. We’ve got to fight a lot harder.”

Last season’s Miami-Boston series ended with James scoring the final 10 points of Game 5, and the start of this year’s matchup had him putting on another offensive display. He had 13 points in the first quarter — two more than the entire Celtics roster — and Miami ran out to a 21-11 lead after the opening period. Garnett made three of his four shots in the quarter, while everyone else in Boston green was two for 16 from the floor. “I thought they were ready to play,” Rivers said. “I’m talking about Miami. I thought we kind of joined the game.” After Boston rallied to tie the game at 50, Rondo missed three shots in a 31-second span early in the third quarter, the last of those getting blocked by Battier — who hit a three-pointer 11 seconds later. It started a 9-2 Miami burst, including a touchdown pass from Wade to James — Wade grabbed the rebound of a miss by Pierce, spun and delivered a 90-foot pass to the reigning MVP — for an easy score. And the Heat cruised from there.

NEWARK, N.J. — Most of the talk about the New Jersey Devils and their run to the Stanley Cup finals against the Los Angeles Kings has focused on Martin Brodeur, Ilya Kovalchuk, Zach Parise and Peter DeBoer. The 40-year-old goaltender, the team’s two big goal scorers and the new coach all have played major roles in getting the Devils back to the championship round just a year after they missed the playoffs for the first time since 1996. The guy who tends to get lost in all the talk is Travis Zajac. This was al- Next up most a lost sea- Stanley son for the Dev- Cup finals, ils’ No. 1 cen- Game 1, ter. He tore an Los Angeles Achilles tendon Kings at in August, had New Jersey surgery the next Devils day and tried • When: to come back Wednesday, in December. 5 p.m. He lasted eight • TV: NBC games before calling it quits. Over the next two months, there were times he thought his season was over as the injury and soreness wouldn’t go away. The 27-year-old continued his rehab and eventually came back in late March. It took him a couple of weeks to find his game but one can argue he has been the best player for the Devils in the postseason, which will start its final round on Wednesday as the Los Angeles Kings visit New Jersey. “He is the type of player who does a lot of things well, from the faceoff to the forcechecking, taking the body,” Brodeur said. “He does a lot of little things. A lot of people who are not watching him and who only look at the stats, miss a lot. He is an effective player. He logs a lot of important minutes. That’s what you have to look at, and who he plays against every single shift, and that tells you a lot about them.” His statistics aren’t shabby either. Zajac has seven goals — tied for the team high with Kovalchuk and Parise — and five assists. His 12 points are tied for eighth best in the postseason. He also played on New Jersey’s power play and kills off penalties averaging more than 20 minutes a game, third highest among the teams’ forwards. Not bad for player who appeared in 15 regular-season games. “Getting this far I’m sure it’s enjoyable for everyone but it really is for me,” Zajac said after the Devils practiced Monday for the first time since winning the Eastern Conference finals against the New York Rangers on Friday night. “Playing this late in the season really makes me feel like I didn’t miss the whole season. It’s really a fun time to play hockey.” If there has been a positive in terms of the injury, Zajac is fresh. While most of his teammates have played around 100 games, he has played in 33 and seemingly is rounding into midseason form.

CYCLING Report: U.S. player Fish undergoes heart procedure American tennis player Mardy Fish recently had a medical procedure to correct a heart problem. Fish hasn’t played since late March after being diagnosed with fatigue. He told USA Today he had a procedure called cardiac catheter ablation on Wednesday to deal with misfiring electrical pulses in his heart. He is recovering at his home in Los Angeles. “It has been so scary,” Fish told the newspaper for a story posted on its web site Monday. Fish, who at No. 10 is the highest-ranked American on the ATP Tour, told USA Today that at times he would wake up with his heart racing as if he’d been running sprints. Doctors described his condition as a form arrhythmia. It started afflicting him in February, he said. — The Associated Press

Stevens wins Boise race, stakes claim to U.S. Olympic berth By John Miller The Associated Press

BOISE, Idaho — Evelyn Stevens won the Exergy Tour following a final-stage breakaway, firmly cementing her claim to a berth on the U.S. Olympic team for the London Games. Stevens, of Boulder, Colo., took second place in a sprint with Germany’s Claudia Haeusler after the 46.7-mile stage. But the 29-yearold Stevens finished far enough ahead of the pack to beat American Amber Neben for the overall title. After Neben, Canada’s Clara Hughes finished in third place after five days of racing. Stevens, a former Wall Street

associate, bought her first racing bike in 2008 and then became a cycling phenomenon. “It’s an honor to race here and it’s an honor to represent the United States, hopefully,” Stevens said. “I’m a little bit later to the sport of cycling, so hopefully people can hear my story and realize it’s never too late or never too early.” The race had been anticipated as a showdown between three U.S. women: Stevens, the 2011 U.S. time trial champ; Neben, the 2008 world champion; and 2008 Beijing Olympics gold medalist Kristin Armstrong, from Boise. But Armstrong crashed on the first day, suffering a broken collarbone.

Stevens, 29, turned pro in 2009 after consulting with 1984 Olympic gold medalist Connie Carpenter. “She called me and asked me, ‘Should I quit my day job,” remembers Carpenter, who works as an analyst for the Exergy Tour. “I asked her, ‘Well, how much money are you making at your job now?’” Carpenter said. “But it turns out it was a good decision.” Stevens, Neben and Hughes all ride for the same team, Specialized-lululemon. Armstrong was relegated to watching her teammates on Exergy 2012, instead of racing for the title. After undergoing surgery Friday, Armstrong said she had al-

ready pedaled her bicycle around her Boise neighborhood and was planning to train in a wind tunnel in San Diego later this week. “I was going to take a break after the Exergy Tour, anyway,” Armstrong said, before Monday’s final stage. Armstrong believes her own Olympic time trial hopes are intact, after beating Stevens in three races earlier this year. “As far as selection criteria goes, I don’t have any worries in my mind,” Armstrong said. USA Cycling makes its selection on June 15. The United States will likely field a team of four riders, two of whom will ride the London time trial.


D4

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, MAY 29, 2012

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL STANDINGS, SCORES AND SCHEDULES

AL Boxscores Rangers 4, Mariners 2 Seattle Jaso dh Figgins lf I.Suzuki rf J.Montero c Smoak 1b Seager 2b Liddi 3b M.Saunders cf Ryan ss Totals

AB 4 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 32

R 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 2

H 0 1 1 2 0 0 1 1 1 7

BI 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 2

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

American League SO 1 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 1 5

Avg. .232 .181 .271 .253 .218 .255 .253 .226 .176

Texas AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Kinsler 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .283 Andrus ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .304 M.Young dh 4 0 1 0 0 1 .281 Beltre 3b 3 1 1 0 1 0 .318 Dav.Murphy lf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .260 N.Cruz rf 4 1 2 1 0 1 .276 Napoli c 3 1 1 3 0 2 .241 Moreland 1b 2 0 0 0 1 1 .296 Gentry cf 2 0 0 0 1 1 .284 Totals 30 4 7 4 3 8 Seattle 100 000 010 — 2 7 0 Texas 010 003 00x — 4 7 1 E—Andrus (5). LOB—Seattle 3, Texas 5. 2B—Figgins (4), Andrus (12). 3B—Ryan (2). HR—N.Cruz (7), off Millwood; Napoli (9), off Delabar. SB—N.Cruz (3). DP—Texas 1. Seattle IP H R ER BB SO NP Millwood 5 4 1 1 2 5 97 Delabar L, 1-1 1-3 2 3 3 1 1 17 Furbush 1 2-3 0 0 0 0 2 18 League 1 1 0 0 0 0 11 Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP M.Harrison W, 6-3 8 7 2 2 0 5 98 Nathan S, 11-12 1 0 0 0 0 0 13 T—2:33. A—41,384 (48,194).

ERA 3.56 5.18 3.57 4.22 ERA 4.41 2.18

Blue Jays 6, Orioles 2 Baltimore Avery lf a-N.Johnson ph Hardy ss Markakis rf Ad.Jones cf Wieters c Betemit 3b C.Davis 1b Mar.Reynolds dh Andino 2b Totals

AB 3 1 3 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 32

R 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 2

H 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 2 1 7

BI 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 2

BB 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 4

SO 3 0 1 0 1 1 1 2 0 1 10

Avg. .217 .183 .261 .258 .307 .233 .222 .306 .207 .260

Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg. K.Johnson 2b 4 2 3 3 0 0 .263 Rasmus cf 4 0 2 1 0 0 .234 Bautista rf 4 1 0 0 0 0 .224 Encarnacion dh 4 1 1 2 0 0 .274 Thames lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .243 Lawrie 3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .273 Cooper 1b 4 1 2 0 0 1 .286 Mathis c 4 0 1 0 0 1 .194 Vizquel ss 3 1 1 0 0 0 .206 Totals 35 6 12 6 0 3 Baltimore 000 000 002 — 2 7 1 Toronto 112 200 00x — 6 12 0 a-grounded out for Avery in the 9th. E—C.Davis (4). LOB—Baltimore 8, Toronto 6. 2B—Mar.Reynolds (8), K.Johnson 2 (5). HR—Encarnacion (16), off Tom.Hunter; K.Johnson (9), off Tom. Hunter. DP—Baltimore 1; Toronto 1. Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Tom.Hunter L, 2-3 3 9 6 5 0 0 69 5.59 Eveland 4 3 0 0 0 2 50 3.06 Gregg 1 0 0 0 0 1 16 4.20 Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hutchison W, 4-2 7 3 0 0 3 9 114 4.84 L.Perez 1 0 0 0 1 0 15 2.45 Cordero 1-3 4 2 2 0 1 26 6.63 Janssen S, 4-5 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 4 2.89 Tom.Hunter pitched to 2 batters in the 4th. T—2:48. A—16,575 (49,260).

Twins 5, Athletics 4 Oakland J.Weeks 2b Crisp cf Reddick rf J.Gomes dh Inge 3b K.Suzuki c Ka’aihue 1b Cowgill lf Rosales ss a-S.Smith ph Totals

AB 4 5 4 3 2 4 4 4 3 1 34

R 0 0 2 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 4

H 2 0 2 0 0 1 1 3 1 0 10

BI 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 3

BB 1 0 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 5

SO 0 0 0 2 0 1 1 0 1 0 5

Avg. .213 .156 .276 .227 .182 .211 .243 .234 .200 .227

Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Span cf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .306 Mastroianni rf 3 1 0 0 1 1 .120 Mauer c 3 2 2 0 1 0 .306 Willingham lf 3 1 1 1 1 0 .271 Morneau 1b 3 0 1 2 0 1 .240 Doumit dh 2 0 0 1 1 0 .260 Dozier ss 3 0 0 0 1 0 .238 Plouffe 3b 4 1 1 1 0 1 .160 J.Carroll 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .236 A.Casilla 2b 2 0 0 0 1 0 .244 Totals 27 5 6 5 6 3 Oakland 110 001 010 — 4 10 1 Minnesota 000 012 02x — 5 6 2 a-flied out for Rosales in the 9th. E—Blackley (1), Plouffe (4), A.Casilla (4). LOB— Oakland 9, Minnesota 6. 2B—Willingham (15), Morneau (8). 3B—Reddick (2). HR—Reddick (14), off Diamond; Ka’aihue (3), off Diamond; Plouffe (5), off Blackley. SB—Mastroianni (1), Mauer (3). DP—Oakland 2; Minnesota 4. Oakland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Blackley 5 3 1 1 1 3 72 0.82 Norberto BS, 1-2 2-3 1 2 2 2 0 24 4.07 Balfour 1 1-3 0 0 0 1 0 17 3.70 R.Cook L, 1-1 BS 1 2 2 2 2 0 27 0.75 Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Diamond 6 1-3 9 3 3 1 4 99 2.27 Gray 1 0 1 1 2 0 24 4.35 Al.Burnett W, 2-0 2-3 1 0 0 0 0 13 2.84 Capps S, 10-11 1 0 0 0 2 1 21 3.79 T—3:22. A—34,709 (39,500).

White Sox 2, Rays 1 Chicago De Aza cf Beckham 2b A.Dunn 1b Konerko dh 1-Fukudome pr-dh Rios rf Pierzynski c Viciedo lf Lillibridge lf Al.Ramirez ss O.Hudson 3b Totals

AB 3 4 3 4 0 4 3 4 0 3 3 31

R 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

H 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 5

BI 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

BB 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2

SO 1 1 1 2 0 3 1 0 0 2 0 11

Avg. .286 .224 .241 .395 .171 .274 .306 .268 .186 .216 .200

Tampa Bay AB R H BI BB SO Avg. S.Rodriguez 3b-2b 4 0 0 0 0 3 .235 B.Upton cf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .291 Zobrist rf 4 1 2 0 0 1 .213 Sutton 1b-3b 3 0 0 0 0 3 .273 a-Joyce ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .288 Lobaton dh 2 0 1 1 1 1 .250 b-Scott ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .235 E.Johnson ss 3 0 0 0 0 0 .255 Rhymes 2b 2 0 0 0 0 2 .277 C.Pena 1b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .207 J.Molina c 2 0 0 0 1 1 .175 Thompson lf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .071 Totals 30 1 3 1 2 15 Chicago 000 002 000 — 2 5 0 Tampa Bay 000 100 000 — 1 3 0 a-popped out for Sutton in the 9th. 1-ran for Konerko in the 9th. LOB—Chicago 5, Tampa Bay 4. HR—A.Dunn (16), off M.Moore. SB—Zobrist (5). DP—Tampa Bay 1. Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Sale W, 6-2 7 1-3 3 1 1 2 15 115 2.34 Crain H, 3 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 10 1.38 Reed S, 5-5 1 0 0 0 0 0 13 4.70 Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA M.Moore L, 1-5 7 4 2 2 1 10 104 4.76 W.Davis 2 1 0 0 1 1 37 1.93 T—2:34. A—22,227 (34,078).

Indians 8, Royals 5 Kansas City A.Gordon lf Falu 2b Butler dh Moustakas 3b Francoeur rf Hosmer 1b

AB 4 4 4 2 3 4

R 0 0 0 0 1 1

H 1 0 0 1 1 1

BI 0 0 0 0 0 2

BB 0 0 0 2 1 0

SO 1 2 2 0 1 0

Avg. .227 .326 .297 .267 .282 .202

Baltimore Tampa Bay New York Toronto Boston

W 29 29 26 25 24

L 20 20 22 24 24

Cleveland Chicago Detroit Kansas City Minnesota

W 27 27 23 19 16

L 21 22 25 28 32

Texas Los Angeles Oakland Seattle

W 31 25 22 21

L 18 25 27 30

East Division Pct GB WCGB .592 — — .592 — — .542 2½ 2½ .510 4 4 .500 4½ 4½ Central Division Pct GB WCGB .563 — — .551 ½ 2 .479 4 5½ .404 7½ 9 .333 11 12½ West Division Pct GB WCGB .633 — — .500 6½ 4½ .449 9 7 .412 11 9

Monday’s Games Boston 7, Detroit 4 Minnesota 5, Oakland 4 Chicago White Sox 2, Tampa Bay 1 Cleveland 8, Kansas City 5 Toronto 6, Baltimore 2 Texas 4, Seattle 2 L.A. Angels 9, N.Y. Yankees 8

National League

L10 4-6 5-5 6-4 4-6 6-4

Str Home Away L-3 14-13 15-7 L-1 17-8 12-12 L-1 14-11 12-11 W-1 13-10 12-14 W-1 11-13 13-11

L10 5-5 9-1 5-5 4-6 4-6

Str Home Away W-1 15-12 12-9 W-6 12-13 15-9 L-1 11-12 12-13 L-1 5-17 14-11 W-1 7-17 9-15

L10 7-3 7-3 2-8 4-6

Str Home Away W-4 15-9 16-9 W-7 12-10 13-15 L-6 10-15 12-12 L-5 9-13 12-17

Today’s Games Kansas City (W.Smith 0-1) at Cleveland (Masterson 2-3), 4:05 p.m. Baltimore (Arrieta 2-5) at Toronto (R.Romero 5-1), 4:07 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Humber 1-2) at Tampa Bay (Shields 6-2), 4:10 p.m. Detroit (Verlander 5-2) at Boston (Bard 4-5), 4:10 p.m. Seattle (Vargas 5-4) at Texas (Feldman 0-2), 5:05 p.m. Oakland (J.Parker 1-2) at Minnesota (De Vries 0-1), 5:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Pettitte 2-1) at L.A. Angels (Haren 2-5), 7:05 p.m.

Washington Miami New York Atlanta Philadelphia

W 29 27 27 26 26

L 19 22 22 24 24

Cincinnati St. Louis Pittsburgh Houston Milwaukee Chicago

W 27 27 24 22 20 16

L 21 22 24 27 28 32

Los Angeles San Francisco Arizona Colorado San Diego

W 32 26 22 19 17

L 16 23 27 29 33

East Division Pct GB WCGB .604 — — .551 2½ — .551 2½ — .520 4 1½ .520 4 1½ Central Division Pct GB WCGB .563 — — .551 ½ — .500 3 2½ .449 5½ 5 .417 7 6½ .333 11 10½ West Division Pct GB WCGB .667 — — .531 6½ 1 .449 10½ 5 .396 13 7½ .340 16 10½

Monday’s Games Philadelphia 8, N.Y. Mets 4 St. Louis 8, Atlanta 2 Miami 5, Washington 3 Pittsburgh 4, Cincinnati 1 Chicago Cubs 11, San Diego 7 Colorado 9, Houston 7, 1st game San Francisco 4, Arizona 2 Colorado 7, Houston 6, 10 innings, 2nd game Milwaukee 3, L.A. Dodgers 2

L10 6-4 6-4 6-4 1-9 5-5

Str Home Away L-1 15-8 14-11 W-1 14-10 13-12 L-1 15-10 12-12 L-8 10-11 16-13 W-1 11-13 15-11

L10 8-2 5-5 6-4 5-5 4-6 1-9

Str Home Away L-1 15-9 12-12 W-2 13-11 14-11 W-4 15-10 9-14 L-4 16-10 6-17 W-1 11-13 9-15 W-1 10-15 6-17

L10 7-3 6-4 5-5 4-6 3-7

Str Home Away L-1 21-6 11-10 W-2 13-10 13-13 L-1 10-15 12-12 W-2 11-14 8-15 L-4 12-16 5-17

Today’s Games San Diego (Stults 1-0) at Chicago Cubs (Samardzija 4-3), 11:20 a.m. Cincinnati (Bailey 3-3) at Pittsburgh (Morton 2-5), 4:05 p.m. Philadelphia (Blanton 4-4) at N.Y. Mets (Hefner 0-2), 4:10 p.m. St. Louis (Westbrook 4-3) at Atlanta (Delgado 2-5), 4:10 p.m. Washington (E.Jackson 1-2) at Miami (A.Sanchez 2-3), 4:10 p.m. Milwaukee (Fiers 0-0) at L.A. Dodgers (Eovaldi 0-0), 7:10 p.m. Arizona (J.Saunders 3-3) at San Francisco (Vogelsong 3-2), 7:15 p.m.

American League roundup

National League roundup

• White Sox 2, Rays 1: ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Chris Sale struck out a career-high 15, Adam Dunn hit a two-run homer and Chicago extended its winning streak to six games with a victory over Tampa Bay. Sale (6-2) gave up one run, three hits and walked two in 7 1⁄3 innings while finishing one strikeout shy of the team record Jack Harshman set against Boston on July 25, 1954. • Angels 9, Yankees 8: ANAHEIM, Calif. — Mark Trumbo hit a game-ending homer to left, and the Los Angeles Angels overcame Jered Weaver’s firstinning injury exit to beat New York for their seventh consecutive victory. Weaver left with an apparent lower-back injury after just 12 pitches. • Rangers 4, Mariners 2: ARLINGTON, Texas — Mike Napoli and Nelson Cruz both homered before combining on a big defensive play, and Matt Harrison pitched eight strong innings to lead Texas past Seattle. • Red Sox 7, Tigers 4: BOSTON — Felix Doubront pitched six innings of four-hit ball, and Jarrod Saltalamacchia homered as Boston topped Detroit. • Twins 5, Athletics 4: MINNEAPOLIS — Justin Morneau drove in two runs for Minnesota, including the tying double in the eighth, as the Twins sent Oakland to its sixth straight loss. • Indians 8, Royals 5: CLEVELAND — Jose Lopez had three RBIs and Jason Kipnis drove in two runs as Cleveland broke a three-game losing streak, beating Kansas City. • Blue Jays 6, Orioles 2: TORONTO — Edwin Encarnacion and Kelly Johnson each hit a two-run homer, Drew Hutchison struck out a career-high nine in seven shutout innings and Toronto beat Baltimore.

• Phillies 8, Mets 4: NEW YORK — Ty Wigginton drove in a career-high six runs with a homer and a pair of two-out hits and Cole Hamels won his eighth straight decision to lead Philadelphia past New York. Philadelphia won for the fifth time in six games following a season-long four-game losing streak. • Cardinals 8, Braves 2: ATLANTA — Lance Lynn (81) allowed two runs and five hits in seven innings as St. Louis stretched Atlanta’s losing streak to eight. • Marlins 5, Nationals 3: MIAMI — Giancarlo Stanton hit his 11th home run in May, one short of the Miami record for a month, in a win over Washington. • Cubs 11, Padres 7: CHICAGO — Alfonso Soriano hit a go-ahead homer and Chicago stopped its 12game losing streak with a victory over San Diego. • Giants 4, Diamondbacks 2: SAN FRANCISCO — Barry Zito outpitched Trevor Cahill in a matchup of former Oakland Athletics All-Stars, and Brandon Belt hit an RBI triple to help San Francisco beat Arizona. • Pirates 4, Reds 1: PITTSBURGH — James McDonald (4-2) scattered five hits over eight shutout innings and Pittsburgh climbed back to .500 with a win over Cincinnati. • Brewers 3, Dodgers 2: LOS ANGELES — Aramis Ramirez hit a tying homer and singled in the go-ahead run to help Milwaukee defeat Los Angeles. • Rockies 9-7, Astros 7-6: DENVER — Dexter Fowler capped a big day at the plate with a gameending triple in the 10th inning to give Colorado a doubleheader sweep of Houston. In the opener of the Astros’ first doubleheader since 2006, Jordan Pacheco blooped a tiebreaking, two-run single for the Rockies after an eighth-inning error by Houston shortstop Jed Lowrie.

B.Pena c Dyson cf A.Escobar ss Totals

4 3 4 32

1 1 1 0 0 2 1 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 5 7 4 4 8

.250 .252 .310

Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Choo rf 4 1 1 0 1 1 .268 Brantley cf 3 2 1 1 1 0 .273 Kipnis 2b 4 2 3 2 0 0 .285 Jo.Lopez 3b 4 0 2 3 0 0 .260 Kotchman 1b 4 0 1 1 0 0 .220 Damon lf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .152 Cunningham lf 1 0 1 0 0 0 .208 Chisenhall dh 4 1 2 1 0 0 .500 Carlin c 4 1 2 0 0 1 .500 J.Diaz ss 4 1 1 0 0 1 .273 Totals 35 8 14 8 2 3 Kansas City 020 020 100 — 5 7 3 Cleveland 005 010 20x — 8 14 1 E—Falu (2), Mijares (1), Moustakas (5), Kipnis (3). LOB—Kansas City 4, Cleveland 5. 3B—Dyson (2). HR—Hosmer (6), off Tomlin; B.Pena (1), off Tomlin; Chisenhall (1), off Adcock. SB—Dyson (7), Brantley (8), Kipnis (9). DP—Kansas City 3; Cleveland 2. Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Adcock L, 0-3 2 1-3 6 5 4 2 0 51 3.74 Mendoza 3 2-3 5 2 2 0 0 58 5.59 Mijares 2-3 2 1 1 0 1 17 2.61 G.Holland 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 2 23 6.23 Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Tomlin W, 2-2 5 4 4 4 2 4 81 4.99 J.Smith H, 8 2-3 1 0 0 0 1 9 3.86 Hagadone H, 1 1 1-3 1 1 1 1 0 20 2.35 Pestano H, 13 1 1 0 0 1 2 19 2.18 C.Perez S, 17-18 1 0 0 0 0 1 9 2.66 Mendoza pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. T—3:01. A—25,377 (43,429).

Red Sox 7, Tigers 4 Detroit Berry cf Raburn rf Mi.Cabrera 3b Fielder 1b D.Young dh Jh.Peralta ss Dirks lf Laird c Worth 2b Totals

AB 4 4 4 4 4 3 4 3 3 33

R 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 4

H 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 2 1 7

BI 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 1 0 4

BB 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1

SO 2 3 2 0 1 2 1 0 1 12

Avg. .360 .146 .306 .315 .252 .243 .318 .316 .182

Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Nava lf 5 1 1 1 0 0 .278 Pedroia 2b 3 0 1 1 0 0 .295 Punto 2b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .128 Ad.Gonzalez rf-1b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .268 Ortiz dh 4 0 2 1 0 0 .309 Youkilis 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .238 Byrd cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .264 Saltalamacchia c 4 2 2 1 0 0 .273 Sweeney cf-rf 4 2 3 0 0 0 .325 Middlebrooks 3b 3 0 1 1 1 1 .308 Aviles ss 4 1 2 2 0 1 .265 Totals 36 7 13 7 1 5 Detroit 010 010 002 — 4 7 0 Boston 131 001 01x — 7 13 0 LOB—Detroit 3, Boston 6. 2B—Fielder (11), Nava (5), Ortiz (16), Sweeney (15), Aviles (14). HR—D.Young (3), off Doubront; Laird (2), off Doubront; Jh.Peralta (3), off Aceves; Saltalamacchia (9), off Fister. DP—Detroit 1. Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Fister L, 0-3 5 11 6 6 1 2 89 3.15 L.Marte 3 2 1 1 0 3 35 3.00 Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Doubront W, 5-2 6 4 2 2 1 6 95 3.86 Atchison 2 1 0 0 0 4 30 0.93 Aceves 1 2 2 2 0 2 14 5.32 Fister pitched to 3 batters in the 6th. T—2:37. A—37,921 (37,067).

Angels 9, Yankees 8 New York Jeter ss Granderson cf Al.Rodriguez 3b Cano 2b

AB 5 5 5 5

R 1 2 1 1

H 1 2 1 1

BI 0 1 0 0

BB 1 0 0 0

SO 0 2 2 2

Avg. .335 .261 .277 .295

Teixeira 1b Ibanez lf Swisher rf Er.Chavez dh Martin c Totals

2 4 4 3 5 38

2 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 8 10

1 3 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 2 1 2 0 0 6 6 8

.263 .260 .242 .279 .186

Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Trout lf 5 2 2 1 0 0 .306 M.Izturis 3b 5 1 1 0 0 0 .233 Pujols 1b 4 1 2 0 1 2 .232 K.Morales dh 5 1 2 3 0 1 .294 Trumbo rf 5 3 3 2 0 1 .333 H.Kendrick 2b 3 0 2 3 0 0 .263 Aybar ss 4 0 1 0 0 0 .216 Bourjos cf 4 1 1 0 0 0 .207 Bo.Wilson c 2 0 1 0 1 1 .179 Totals 37 9 15 9 2 5 New York 310 010 300 — 8 10 1 Los Angeles 401 102 001 — 9 15 3 No outs when winning run scored. E—Swisher (1), Pujols (2), Aybar (6), Cassevah (1). LOB—New York 11, Los Angeles 8. 2B—Cano (18), Martin (6), K.Morales (6), Trumbo (12). 3B— Trumbo (1). HR—Granderson (15), off Cassevah; Teixeira (9), off Takahashi; Trout (5), off P.Hughes; Trumbo (8), off Wade. New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA P.Hughes 5 1-3 11 7 7 0 3 87 5.64 Eppley 1-3 1 1 1 1 0 10 3.72 Phelps 2 2 0 0 1 1 33 2.70 Logan 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 5 2.89 Wade L, 0-1 0 1 1 1 0 0 3 2.49 Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Weaver 0 2 3 0 0 0 12 2.61 Cassevah 3 1-3 1 1 1 3 2 59 2.70 Takahashi 1 2-3 2 1 1 0 3 32 4.80 D.Carpenter H, 2 1 1 2 2 2 1 23 5.65 Isringhausen BS, 1 1 2 1 1 0 0 18 2.55 Walden W, 2-1 2 2 0 0 1 2 32 2.70 Weaver pitched to 3 batters in the 1st. D.Carpenter pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. Wade pitched to 1 batter in the 9th. T—3:38. A—44,016 (45,957).

NL Boxscores Rockies 9, Astros 7 (First Game) Houston Schafer cf Altuve 2b Lowrie ss Ca.Lee 1b C.Johnson 3b Fe.Rodriguez p X.Cedeno p Bogusevic rf J.D.Martinez lf J.Castro c W.Rodriguez p a-Maxwell ph Lyon p W.Wright p M.Downs 3b Totals

AB 5 5 5 4 4 0 0 4 3 3 2 1 0 0 1 37

R 3 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7

H 3 2 2 3 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 12

BI 0 2 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 8

Avg. .260 .310 .276 .305 .289 ----.212 .224 .216 .000 .190 --.000 .148

Colorado AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Fowler cf 5 2 3 0 0 0 .252 Pacheco 3b 5 1 2 3 0 1 .295 R.Betancourt p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --C.Gonzalez lf 5 1 2 0 0 1 .305 Tulowitzki ss 4 2 3 2 0 0 .289 Helton 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .231 Cuddyer rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .265 W.Rosario c 4 2 2 2 0 0 .229 LeMahieu 2b-3b 4 0 1 1 0 0 .200 Nicasio p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .111 b-E.Young ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .233 Ottavino p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Belisle p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 c-Giambi ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .257 1-Guthrie pr 0 1 0 0 0 0 .000 Scutaro 2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .249 Totals 38 9 14 8 1 7 Houston 202 020 100 — 7 12 3 Colorado 501 010 02x — 9 14 1 a-grounded out for W.Rodriguez in the 6th. bgrounded out for Nicasio in the 6th. c-walked for Belisle in the 8th. 1-ran for Giambi in the 8th. E—Ca.Lee (2), Lowrie (5), C.Johnson (7), Cuddyer

(3). LOB—Houston 5, Colorado 6. 2B—C.Johnson (8), C.Gonzalez (11), Tulowitzki (7), LeMahieu (1). 3B—Schafer (1), Pacheco (2). HR—Lowrie (8), off Nicasio; W.Rosario (7), off W.Rodriguez; Tulowitzki (8), off W.Rodriguez. SB—Schafer (14), Fowler (4). DP—Houston 1; Colorado 1. Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA W.Rodriguez 5 10 7 4 0 5 107 2.49 Lyon 1 1 0 0 0 0 14 1.47 W.Wright 2-3 1 0 0 0 1 8 2.77 F.Rodriguez L, 1-5 1 2 2 1 1 1 24 4.08 X.Cedeno 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 6 0.00 Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Nicasio 6 9 6 5 1 5 97 5.11 Ottavino BS, 1-1 1 3 1 1 0 0 15 1.08 Belisle W, 2-2 1 0 0 0 0 1 7 2.49 Betancourt S, 9-10 1 0 0 0 0 2 11 2.50 T—3:06. A—34,546 (50,398).

Rockies 7, Astros 6 (10 innings, Second Game) Houston Schafer cf Altuve 2b Bogusevic rf Ca.Lee 1b T.Buck lf M.Downs 3b W.Lopez p X.Cedeno p Fe.Rodriguez p Lyon p d-Lowrie ph Myers p C.Snyder c M.Gonzalez ss Lyles p a-Maxwell ph R.Cruz p W.Wright p C.Johnson 3b Totals

AB 4 5 5 5 4 3 0 0 0 0 1 0 5 5 2 1 0 0 2 42

R 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 6

H 1 0 3 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 3 1 1 0 0 0 14

BI 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 6

BB 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 6

Avg. .260 .302 .225 .307 .216 .141 --------.280 --.183 .242 .143 .203 --.000 .286

Colorado AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Fowler cf 4 3 4 3 1 0 .276 Scutaro 2b 5 0 1 3 0 0 .247 C.Gonzalez lf 4 0 2 1 1 0 .309 Tulowitzki ss 4 0 1 0 1 0 .288 Helton 1b 5 0 1 0 0 1 .230 Pacheco 3b 5 1 1 0 0 0 .289 Colvin rf 4 1 0 0 0 1 .287 Roenicke p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Nieves c 5 1 2 0 0 0 .333 White p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .091 Outman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 b-E.Young ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .227 Ottavino p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Belisle p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 c-Giambi ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .257 1-LeMahieu pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .200 R.Betancourt p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Cuddyer rf 1 1 1 0 0 0 .270 Totals 40 7 13 7 4 4 Houston 002 211 000 0 — 6 14 2 Colorado 101 400 000 1 — 7 13 1 One out when winning run scored. a-homered for Lyles in the 6th. b-popped out for Outman in the 6th. c-walked for Belisle in the 8th. dsingled for Lyon in the 10th. 1-ran for Giambi in the 8th. E—C.Snyder (1), M.Downs (1), White (1). LOB— Houston 9, Colorado 11. 2B—Ca.Lee (8), Scutaro (7), C.Gonzalez (12). 3B—Fowler (4). HR—Bogusevic (2), off White; C.Snyder (3), off White; Maxwell (3), off White; Fowler (7), off Lyles. SB—Scutaro (4). DP—Colorado 1. Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lyles 5 6 6 4 2 3 81 5.73 R.Cruz 1 2 0 0 0 0 16 2.25 W.Wright 0 1 0 0 0 0 6 2.77 W.Lopez 1 2-3 2 0 0 1 0 25 2.28 X.Cedeno 0 0 0 0 1 0 4 0.00 Fe.Rodriguez 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 3 4.00 Lyon 1 0 0 0 0 1 7 1.40 Myers L, 0-2 1-3 2 1 1 0 0 5 2.08 Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA White 5 10 6 6 1 2 90 6.28 Outman 1 0 0 0 0 1 14 9.64 Ottavino 1 0 0 0 0 0 13 0.96 Belisle 1 1 0 0 0 2 15 2.39

R.Betancourt 1 1 0 0 0 0 6 2.37 Roenicke W, 1-0 1 2 0 0 0 1 22 2.30 White pitched to 1 batter in the 6th. W.Wright pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. X.Cedeno pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. T—3:34. A—35,786 (50,398).

Brewers 3, Dodgers 2 Milwaukee AB R Hart 1b 4 0 Aoki rf 4 1 Braun lf 2 1 Ar.Ramirez 3b 3 1 Kottaras c 3 0 R.Weeks 2b 3 0 Ransom ss 4 0 Morgan cf 4 0 Axford p 0 0 Marcum p 2 0 Fr.Rodriguez p 0 0 b-C.Gomez ph-cf 1 0 Totals 30 3

H 0 1 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

BI 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

BB 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 4

SO 2 1 0 0 0 2 3 0 0 1 0 0 9

Avg. .256 .310 .309 .246 .217 .156 .266 .216 --.100 --.246

Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Gwynn Jr. cf 5 1 1 0 0 2 .287 E.Herrera 2b 4 0 0 0 0 3 .310 Abreu lf 4 1 2 0 0 1 .339 Ethier rf 4 0 2 1 0 1 .318 Hairston Jr. 3b 3 0 2 1 1 0 .394 Loney 1b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .259 A.Ellis c 4 0 1 0 0 1 .315 D.Gordon ss 4 0 0 0 0 3 .222 Harang p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .048 Guerra p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Coffey p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-A.Kennedy ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .224 Belisario p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --J.Wright p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 c-De Jesus ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .273 Totals 34 2 8 2 3 12 Milwaukee 000 102 000 — 3 4 0 Los Angeles 100 000 010 — 2 8 1 a-struck out for Coffey in the 7th. b-grounded out for Fr.Rodriguez in the 9th. c-walked for J.Wright in the 9th. E—Harang (2). LOB—Milwaukee 6, Los Angeles 9. 2B—Ethier (15). HR—Ar.Ramirez (4), off Harang. SB—Gwynn Jr. (5), Abreu (1). DP—Los Angeles 1. Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Marcum W, 3-3 7 6 1 1 2 9 119 3.63 Fr.Rodriguez H, 9 1 2 1 1 0 2 28 4.71 Axford S, 8-9 1 0 0 0 1 1 24 3.63 Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Harang L, 3-3 5 4 3 1 3 4 96 4.14 Guerra 1 0 0 0 0 1 9 3.09 Coffey 1 0 0 0 1 2 18 7.36 Belisario 1 0 0 0 0 1 18 0.87 J.Wright 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 4.35 Harang pitched to 3 batters in the 6th. T—3:26. A—38,016 (56,000).

Giants 4, Diamondbacks 2 Arizona Bloomquist ss A.Hill 2b J.Upton rf Kubel lf Goldschmidt 1b C.Young cf M.Montero c R.Roberts 3b Cahill p Breslow p a-Jo.McDonald ph Collmenter p Totals

AB 4 4 4 4 3 4 4 4 2 0 1 0 34

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 2

H 1 0 1 1 2 2 0 0 1 0 1 0 9

BI 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2

BB 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 6

Avg. .268 .263 .255 .298 .257 .296 .248 .227 .053 --.328 .000

Marlins 5, Nationals 3 AB 4 4 4 3 4 4 4 4 2 0 0 0 1 34

R 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 3

H 3 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 7

BI 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 3

BB 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2

SO 0 0 0 1 2 2 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 9

Phillies 8, Mets 4 Philadelphia Rollins ss Polanco 3b Pence rf Victorino cf Wigginton 1b Mayberry lf Galvis 2b Schneider c Hamels p Papelbon p Totals

AB 5 5 3 4 3 5 5 4 3 0 37

R 1 1 2 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 8

H 1 1 1 0 3 2 0 0 1 0 9

BI 0 0 0 0 6 2 0 0 0 0 8

BB 0 0 2 1 2 0 0 1 0 0 6

SO 2 0 2 1 0 1 3 1 1 0 11

Avg. .224 .278 .264 .255 .256 .238 .236 .283 .227 ---

New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Turner ss 2 0 1 0 0 0 .269 Nieuwenhuis cf 2 1 1 0 0 0 .290 Acosta p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Egbert p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Dan.Murphy 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .297 D.Wright 3b-ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .373 Hairston cf-lf 4 1 1 2 0 1 .256 Duda rf 3 1 0 0 1 2 .250 Rottino lf-3b 4 1 1 2 0 1 .235 I.Davis 1b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .167 Ro.Johnson c 3 0 1 0 0 1 .321 Niese p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .077 R.Ramirez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Parnell p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Rauch p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-A.Torres ph-cf 1 0 1 0 0 0 .205 Totals 31 4 7 4 1 7 Philadelphia 002 002 103 — 8 9 0 New York 000 022 000 — 4 7 2 a-doubled for Rauch in the 8th. E—D.Wright (4), Dan.Murphy (6). LOB—Philadelphia 9, New York 2. 2B—Wigginton (4), A.Torres (2). HR—Mayberry (2), off Niese; Wigginton (4), off Acosta; Rottino (2), off Hamels; Hairston (5), off Hamels. DP—Philadelphia 1. Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hamels W, 8-1 8 7 4 4 1 6 109 2.43 Papelbon 1 0 0 0 0 1 22 2.21 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Niese 5 2 4 4 5 7 115 4.55 R.Ramirez 1 0 0 0 0 2 13 3.76 Parnell L, 1-1 1 2 1 1 1 1 29 3.05 Rauch 1 1 0 0 0 0 11 4.05 Acosta 1-3 4 3 3 0 1 20 11.86 Egbert 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 7 0.00 Niese pitched to 2 batters in the 6th. T—3:03. A—32,122 (41,922).

Cardinals 8, Braves 2

San Francisco AB R H BI BB SO Avg. G.Blanco rf 4 1 2 1 0 2 .290 B.Crawford ss 3 0 0 0 0 1 .229 Me.Cabrera lf 3 0 1 0 1 1 .368 Pagan cf 3 1 1 0 1 1 .309 H.Sanchez c 4 1 1 1 0 0 .284 Belt 1b 4 0 2 1 0 1 .240 Arias 3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .263 Burriss 2b 3 1 1 0 0 1 .212 Zito p 1 0 0 0 1 0 .111 Hensley p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --S.Casilla p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 29 4 9 3 3 7 Arizona 001 000 010 — 2 9 0 San Francisco 310 000 00x — 4 9 0 a-homered for Breslow in the 8th. LOB—Arizona 6, San Francisco 6. 2B—J.Upton (6), Kubel (13), Goldschmidt (12), G.Blanco 2 (8). 3B—Belt (2). HR—Jo.McDonald (3), off Zito. SB— G.Blanco (6), Pagan (9). DP—San Francisco 1. Arizona IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cahill L, 2-5 6 8 4 4 2 5 104 3.96 Breslow 1 0 0 0 1 2 21 2.22 Collmenter 1 1 0 0 0 0 12 6.75 San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Zito W, 4-2 7 7 2 2 1 3 93 3.41 Hensley H, 5 1 0 0 0 0 2 13 1.86 S.Casilla S, 13-14 1 2 0 0 0 1 19 1.23 Zito pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Cahill pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. T—2:42. A—42,295 (41,915).

Washington Lombardozzi lf Harper rf Zimmerman 3b LaRoche 1b Desmond ss Espinosa 2b Ankiel cf Maldonado c Zimmermann p a-Bernadina ph H.Rodriguez p Perry p b-Brown ph Totals

Watson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Hanrahan p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Barajas c 3 0 2 1 1 0 .231 Barmes ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .170 Ja.McDonald p 3 1 0 0 0 2 .100 McGehee 1b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .184 Totals 33 4 10 4 2 5 Cincinnati 000 000 001 — 1 6 0 Pittsburgh 211 000 00x — 4 10 0 a-popped out for Arroyo in the 5th. b-struck out for Simon in the 8th. LOB—Cincinnati 6, Pittsburgh 7. 2B—Hanigan (5), Walker (8), P.Alvarez 2 (9), Hague (1). DP—Cincinnati 1 ; Pittsburgh 1. Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Arroyo L, 2-3 4 8 4 4 1 1 79 3.59 Simon 3 2 0 0 1 3 39 1.74 Hoover 1 0 0 0 0 1 17 0.69 Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA McDonald W, 4-2 8 5 0 0 1 5 103 2.20 Watson 2-3 1 1 1 1 1 19 3.94 Hanrahan S, 12-13 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 2 2.50 T—2:42. A—14,792 (38,362).

Avg. .323 .286 .254 .289 .263 .213 .238 .000 .222 .224 ----.000

Miami AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Reyes ss 4 1 1 0 0 1 .262 Infante 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .321 H.Ramirez 3b 3 1 3 1 0 0 .259 Stanton rf 4 1 1 2 0 0 .291 Morrison 1b 4 2 2 1 0 0 .241 Petersen cf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .205 J.Buck c 4 0 1 0 0 1 .164 Coghlan lf 2 0 0 1 0 1 .133 Zambrano p 3 0 0 0 0 1 .105 Da.Jennings p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Mujica p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --H.Bell p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 32 5 9 5 0 4 Washington 001 020 000 — 3 7 1 Miami 000 103 10x — 5 9 1 a-walked for Zimmermann in the 7th. b-flied out for Perry in the 9th. E—Zimmerman (2), H.Ramirez (2). LOB—Washington 6, Miami 5. 2B—Zimmerman (9), Reyes (9), Morrison (5). HR—Zimmermann (1), off Zambrano; Morrison (3), off Zimmermann; Stanton (12), off Zimmermann. DP—Miami 1. Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Zimmermnn L, 3-5 6 8 4 4 0 4 98 2.80 H.Rodriguez 1 1 1 1 0 0 20 4.95 Perry 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 9.39 Miami IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Zambrano W, 3-3 6 7 3 3 2 5 111 3.00 Da.Jennings H, 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 6 0.00 Mujica H, 8 1 2-3 0 0 0 0 2 15 4.22 H.Bell S, 8-12 1 0 0 0 0 2 14 8.00 Zambrano pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. T—2:49. A—31,528 (37,442).

Pirates 4, Reds 1 Cincinnati Stubbs cf Valdez ss Hoover p Votto 1b B.Phillips 2b Bruce rf Heisey lf Cairo 3b Hanigan c Arroyo p a-Costanzo ph Simon p b-Cozart ph-ss Totals

AB 4 4 0 3 4 4 4 4 3 0 1 0 1 32

R 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

H 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 6

BI 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

BB 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2

SO 2 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 6

Avg. .235 .178 --.325 .272 .254 .276 .156 .320 .133 .077 --.242

Pittsburgh Tabata lf-rf Walker 2b A.McCutchen cf P.Alvarez 3b G.Jones rf G.Hernandez lf Hague 1b

AB 3 4 4 4 4 0 4

R 0 1 0 2 0 0 0

H 1 2 1 2 1 0 1

BI 0 1 0 1 1 0 0

BB 1 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 0 1 0 0 1 0 1

Avg. .227 .263 .339 .215 .226 .167 .227

St. Louis AB R H Furcal ss 5 2 3 Schumaker cf 3 2 2 b-Robinson ph-cf 1 0 0 Holliday lf 3 1 2 Beltran rf 3 0 0 Ma.Adams 1b 5 1 3 Y.Molina c 5 1 1 Descalso 3b 5 1 2 Greene 2b 5 0 1 Lynn p 4 0 0 Rzepczynski p 0 0 0 c-Chambers ph 1 0 0 E.Sanchez p 0 0 0 Totals 40 8 14

BI 1 0 0 0 0 3 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 7

BB 0 1 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

SO 1 1 0 1 1 1 2 0 0 3 0 1 0 11

Avg. .340 .329 .254 .274 .285 .382 .321 .227 .235 .120 --.143 ---

Atlanta AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Bourn cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .299 Prado lf 3 0 1 0 1 0 .326 McCann c 4 0 0 0 0 0 .246 Uggla 2b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .260 Heyward rf 4 1 1 0 0 2 .236 J.Francisco 3b 4 0 1 2 0 3 .236 Hinske 1b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .246 Pastornicky ss 2 0 0 0 1 0 .254 Hanson p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .063 Medlen p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .500 Durbin p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-M.Diaz ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .264 Venters p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --C.Martinez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 31 2 5 2 2 10 St. Louis 004 202 000 — 8 14 0 Atlanta 000 200 000 — 2 5 1 a-struck out for Durbin in the 7th. b-grounded out for Schumaker in the 8th. c-struck out for Rzepczynski in the 9th. E—Hanson (2). LOB—St. Louis 10, Atlanta 4. 2B—Ma.Adams (5), Heyward (7). 3B—Greene (2). HR—Descalso (2), off Hanson; Furcal (4), off Hanson. DP—St. Louis 1. St. Louis IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lynn W, 8-1 7 5 2 2 1 8 107 2.54 Rzepczynski 1 0 0 0 1 1 14 3.44 E.Sanchez 1 0 0 0 0 1 15 3.18 Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hanson L, 5-4 3 1-3 8 6 6 3 6 92 3.84 Medlen 2 2-3 4 2 2 0 2 41 3.49 Durbin 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 5.60 Venters 1 1 0 0 1 0 19 3.44 C.Martinez 1 1 0 0 0 2 15 4.05 T—3:10. A—42,426 (49,586).

Cubs 11, Padres 7 San Diego Venable cf Denorfia rf Alonso 1b Quentin lf Headley 3b Hundley c E.Cabrera 2b Parrino ss Suppan p Hinshaw p a-Guzman ph Gregerson p Mikolas p Totals

AB 5 4 5 4 5 5 5 4 1 0 1 0 0 39

R 1 1 0 1 2 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 7

H 2 2 0 1 4 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 12

BI 2 0 0 1 3 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 7

BB 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 3

SO 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 6

Avg. .273 .260 .292 .250 .259 .174 .195 .167 .100 --.254 -----

Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. DeJesus rf 5 1 2 0 0 0 .290 S.Castro ss 5 2 2 3 0 0 .315 Mather cf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .261 LaHair 1b 4 3 3 1 0 0 .312 A.Soriano lf 4 2 3 3 0 0 .272 Russell p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --C.Coleman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 I.Stewart 3b 4 1 2 3 0 1 .201 Barney 2b 4 1 1 1 0 0 .259 Lalli c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .133 T.Wood p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .500 R.Wells p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .333 Camp p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Re.Johnson ph-lf 2 1 1 0 0 1 .250 Totals 37 11 14 11 0 4 San Diego 101 221 000 — 7 12 0 Chicago 210 302 30x — 11 14 2 a-struck out for Hinshaw in the 7th. b-singled for Camp in the 7th. E—I.Stewart (4), S.Castro (9). LOB—San Diego 10, Chicago 3. 2B—Venable (12), Quentin (1), Headley (12), Hundley (5), Parrino (4), LaHair (10), A.Soriano (9). 3B—DeJesus 2 (4). HR—Venable (4), off T.Wood; Headley 2 (7), off T.Wood 2; E.Cabrera (1), off T.Wood; Barney (2), off Suppan; I.Stewart (5), off Suppan; A.Soriano (6), off Hinshaw; S.Castro (4), off Gregerson. SB—E.Cabrera (2), S.Castro (14), Re.Johnson (1). San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Suppan 5 6 6 6 0 2 75 5.28 Hinshaw L, 0-1 BS 1 2 2 2 0 1 19 5.19 Gregerson 2-3 4 3 3 0 0 18 4.71 Mikolas 1 1-3 2 0 0 0 1 18 3.75 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA T.Wood 5 7 6 6 3 4 85 5.94 R.Wells W, 1-1 1 2-3 3 1 1 0 0 34 4.41 Camp H, 3 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 3 2.81 Russell 1 1 0 0 0 1 16 1.66 C.Coleman 1 1 0 0 0 0 15 2.70 T—3:04. A—38,452 (41,009).


TUESDAY, MAY 29, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

Shooter Continued from D1 “So everything’s kind of around the root of being a soldier, just by the way I’ve trained, the lessons I’ve learned, what it’s taught me.” In Richmond’s mind, there is no end to what he has learned since he enlisted in the Army after finishing high school in his tiny home town of Hillsgrove, Pa. That was eight years ago. Now 26, he has spent anywhere from 180 to 200 nights a year on the road, touring with the marksmanship unit, conducting exhibitions in which he and others shoot from behind their heads, from their hips, from all sorts of angles. They serve, he said, as a connection between “America’s people and America’s Army.” The unit is also responsible for research and development and training. In that capacity, Richmond has been allowed to compete for USA Shooting, just as Glenn Eller, another member of the marksmanship unit and Richmond’s daily training partner, did en route to winning gold in Beijing four years ago. This is not, in any way, to suggest that Richmond is not a soldier. Because of his international success over the past two years — including winning the world championship in 2010 — he secured his spot on the Olympic team last summer. He then went to both his superiors in the army and his USA Shooting coaches with a plan: Deploy to Afghanistan that fall, abandoning stateside training for three months. “It absolutely scared me to death,” said Bret Erickson, USA Shooting’s national shotgun coach, a four-time Olympian and former member of the marksmanship unit himself. “Of course, it’s a very safe deployment, and it’s important. But here’s a kid that is No. 1 in the world. He already made the Olympic team. We’re really counting on him to go over there and win us a medal. And it’s like, ‘Oh, crap. What’s going on now?’ “ What was going on, it turns out, is a sort of cart-before-the-horse line of thinking. Rather than holding him back — while he was overseas, there was no formal way to train — Richmond believed his deployment would enhance his preparation.

Golf Continued from D1 But to make the arrangement work, the members did something that would have been unheard-of five years ago: They agreed to do much of the work to operate and maintain the club. On a recent hot weekday morning, about 35 members were on the course raking bunkers, planting grass, trimming tee boxes, weeding, digging holes for new bushes and even brandishing chain saws in a work crew that felled three ailing 50-foot trees. “I know the old golf community culture was a life of leisure,” said Jon Pierce, a retired professor leaning on his shovel after planting tee box grass. “But a lot of those golf courses are going bankrupt. Being leisurely has left people with a backyard of kneehigh weeds instead of a beautiful golf course. “The economic reality is that we had to protect our lifestyle and investment.” With dozens of golf courses closing nationwide because of failed real estate developments, the Timberlake club is an example of a new model in the industry. Rather than watch home values plummet as a lush golf course is abandoned, nearby residents are banding together to buy the course — even if it means running it themselves. In the wealthiest communities, this process often means that 10 or 20 of the most affluent member-residents write checks to save the course. In the case of another South Carolina golf community 35 miles from Timberlake, the WildeWood and Woodcreek clubs in Columbia, 574 members contributed an average of $4,700 to execute the purchase. Then

Regionals Continued from D1 Should Oregon and Cal State Fullerton meet, the game would pit fourth-year Ducks coach George Horton against the program for which he served as head coach for 11 seasons, including a 2004 run to the national championship. While the Ducks are playing in the NCAA tournament for the second time since baseball was revived at Oregon starting with the 2009 season, Oregon State is advancing for the fourth straight year and for the seventh time in the past eight years — a run that included national championships in 2006 and 2007. The Beavers (38-18) finished 18-12 in Pac-12 play, tied with Arizona State and Stanford for fourth place in the final conference standings. Oregon State will open regional play Friday in Baton Rouge, La., against Belmont, of Nashville, Tenn., the region’s No. 3 seed.

Toni L. Sandys / The Washington Post

United States Army Staff Sgt. Josh Richmond is a favorite for a gold medal at the London Games.

“The unit’s accomplishments in raising the proficiency of Afghan soldiers, coalition soldiers and U.S. soldiers are a source of pride for the unit,” said Lt. Col. David Hodne, who commands the group based at Fort Benning, Ga. “For Sgt. Richmond, I think he believed the broadening experience that he would gain would also be a personal source of pride that would also give him a competitive edge at the Olympics. ...He is the epitome of a professional soldier.” Richmond’s mission was to join six other instructors and three interpreters near Kabul, training top-of-the-line Afghan soldiers so they could, in turn, train their own men. The initial encounters were awkward, somewhat standoffish. But over days and weeks, the two sides began communicating better, Richmond said. They would train all morning, then sit in the dirt at lunchtime, sharing meals, as important an indication that the Americans had broken through, culturally, as there is. Richmond worked with roughly 300 men during his stay. When the training began,

scores of those members took on administrative duties that became like part-time jobs. And in the case of Timberlake Country Club and others like it in states flush with retirement golf communities — North Carolina, South Carolina, Florida, Arizona and Nevada — the members have donned work gloves and wielded hedge clippers and weed whackers to help keep the courses green and the clubs’ revenue ledgers in the black. “The members’ sweat equity cuts our maintenance budget in half,” said Timberlake’s general manager, David Madden, whose maintenance budget is about $250,000, or about one-sixth of annual revenue. Cutting down those three Timberlake trees, for example, would have cost about $1,800 if done professionally. Earlier this year, when it came time to construct a new fitness center, grill and card room in the clubhouse there, one member donated the wallboard and other members installed it. When the club decided it needed rolling bar stations for outside parties, two members built them by hand. In 2011, the club president, Julie Nelson, counted nearly 3,000 hours of members’ labor. The club does pay a small maintenance staff for mowing fairways and greens, and the heavy-duty labor performed by members is done under the supervision of the course superintendent. But the hands-on ownership attitude runs deep. With the Timberlake community about 70 percent retirees, it is common for four or five couples living on a particular hole to adopt the hole. They keep an eye on the flower beds around the tee boxes, cut

Regional host and No. 1 seed LSU and No. 4 seed LouisianaMonroe will face off in a firstround game later Friday. South Carolina’s Gamecocks (40-17) are trying to join the 1970-74 Southern California squads as the only teams to win three or more consecutive national titles. South Carolina and Florida are among a tournament field-leading eight Southeastern Conference teams, including Arkansas, Kentucky, LSU, Mississippi, Mississippi State and Vanderbilt. The Atlantic Coast Conference is second with seven teams: Clemson, Florida State, Georgia Tech, Miami, North Carolina, North Carolina State and Virginia. The Pac-12 has five with Arizona, Oregon, Oregon State, Stanford and UCLA. The 16 regional winners move on to the best-of-three super regionals. Those eight winners advance to the College World Series, which begins June 15 in Omaha, Neb., at TD Ameritrade Park Omaha.

the Afghans had a 22-percent pass/fail rate. When Richmond and his group left, it was up to 96 percent. “Marksmanship is a paramount soldier’s skill,” Hodne said. “And marksmanship is the key to an army’s combat readiness.” Richmond believed the work was important, even essential. The mission, though, wasn’t without its tense moments. Explosions would come from what seemed like the distance, but who or what was affected wouldn’t be known until the next day’s news. Rides to and from training grounds were often in silence. Soldiers, even those on the fringes of combat, are always aware. “You can’t really grasp it till you’re on the ground smelling it, breathing it, eating it,” Richmond said. So he smelled it, breathed it, ate it. When he returned to the U.S., by his own account, he had changed. There is no direct line to be drawn between serving his country during a war and representing it well in athletics. But he believes he is more suited to winning gold now than before he left. “Just the mental stability knowing — and the confidence going forward — that, ‘Hey, I deployed to a combat zone; I successfully made it home, and I achieved my mission over there,’” he said. “To have that confidence behind you, it turns you almost into a different person — in a very good way. If you’ve deployed to a combat zone, there’s not a whole lot more out there.” Since returning from his deployment, Richmond has competed in two World Cup events. He won both, including his most recent, in May in Lonato, Italy, against a field every bit as strong as that he will face in London. “That kind of put away any indecision or fears that he wouldn’t be ready,” Erickson said. He will be, he believes, even better prepared. When he thinks about those few moments of stepping onto the podium, of hearing the “Star-Spangled Banner” played, he pauses. The tears come quickly. He isn’t just an Olympian. “How much more patriotic can you get?” Richmond said. “An Olympian wearing the red white and blue, and oh by the way, he’s an active duty soldier.”

and trim the edges of sand traps, weed the fringe around the green and remove loose debris, tree limbs or trash from the fairways and rough. If they need a reminder of what is at stake, they look east toward the ocean, where 22 courses in the once-booming golf haven of Myrtle Beach have all but vanished in the last decade, with young trees sprouting through the old greens. “I hope the economy improves and the members might not have to do all this extra work,” Madden said. “But right now, it’s letting us survive and prosper.” The number of clubs being taken over by members may be a small percentage of America’s 16,000 courses — perhaps no more than 400 — but industry experts say it is a growing sector of the golf marketplace. And many of the clubs, like Timberlake, are open to the public as well. The members at the private WildeWood and Woodcreek bought the clubs in 2009 for $4.2 million. Bill McDougall, a retired airline pilot who spearheaded the purchase, said intensive member interest had forever changed the way his clubs, and other clubs, would do business. “Only the top 5 percent of clubs — the very most high-end clubs — will be able to run things as they did five or 10 years ago,” said McDougall, 65. “The members now want to be involved, they want to help set priorities and they want things streamlined.” Not every member takeover has been a success story, with dozens of failed ventures and abandoned golf courses. Northgate Golf Course, a top-rated layout in Reno, Nev., that closed in 2009, is now overgrown, more a home to bunnies than to bogeys.

Not far away, the developer of D’Andrea Golf Club in Sparks, Nev., lost money year after year without the revenue that a robust housing market was expected to provide. In March, Will Gustafson, the managing partner of the ownership group, asked the D’Andrea homeowners association for a $28 monthly maintenance fee to keep the golf course open. The homeowners voted against paying the fee. The next day, Gustafson closed the course. Within weeks, the fairways were burned from the heat. At night, bikers were doing wheelies on the greens and vandals invaded the majestic clubhouse set high on a bluff. Nick Oddo, a retired real estate executive who lives nearby, quickly organized a neighborhood group to raise $90,000 to pay for the temporary watering of the golf course. He brought in the local Guardian Angels at night for security. Oddo is still trying to come up with $5 million to keep D’Andrea afloat. “Not what I expected in retirement,” the 82-year-old Oddo said. “But the golf course is a jewel we shouldn’t let go. In life, things can’t always be about the money; otherwise, we would not have any museums, libraries or playgrounds.” Back in South Carolina, the Timberlake club member Linda Hamel, 68, replaced divots in the grass along the 17th hole and helped plant flowers near the tee box. “When it’s your golf course, it doesn’t feel like work,” Hamel said. “You know, late in life, we’ll sit on the porch in our rockers, look out at the fairways and say: ‘We did that. And it was worth it.’ ”

Regionals at a glance (All times Pacific) EUGENE REGIONAL

BATON ROUGE REGIONAL

At PK Park, Eugene Friday, June 1 (Day 1) 2 p.m. — Game 1: No. 2 Cal State Fullerton (35-19) vs. No. 3 Indiana State (41-17) 6 p.m. — Game 2: No. 1 Oregon (42-17) vs. No. 4 Austin Peay (38-22) Saturday, June 2 (Day 2) 2 p.m. — Game 3: Loser Game 1 vs. Loser Game 2 6 p.m. — Game 4: Winner Game 1 vs. Winner Game 2 Sunday, June 3 (Day 3) Noon — Game 5: Winner Game 3 vs. Loser Game 4 4 p.m. — Game 6: Winner Game 4 vs. Winner Game 5 Monday, June 4 (Day 4, if necessary) 6 p.m. — Game 7: Winner Game 4 vs. Winner Game 5

At Alex Box Stadium, Baton Rouge, La. Friday. June 1 (Day 1) Noon — Game 1: No. 2 Oregon State (38-18) vs. No. 3 Belmont (39-22) 5 p.m. — Game 2: No. 1 LSU (4316) vs. No. 4 Louisiana-Monroe (31-28) Saturday, June 2 (Day 2) Noon — Game 3: Loser Game 1 vs. Loser Game 2 5 p.m. — Game 4: Winner Game 1 vs. Winner Game 2 Sunday, June 3 (Day 3) 11 a.m. — Game 5: Winner Game 3 vs. Loser Game 4 4:30 p.m. — Game 6: Winner Game 4 vs. Winner Game 5 Monday, June 4 (Day 4, if necessary) 4:30 p.m. — Game 7: Winner Game 4 vs. Winner Game 5

D5

C S    B  Kickball • Adult league on tap: A meeting to plan for the Bend Park & Recreation District’s upcoming summer kickball league has been scheduled for 4:30 p.m. on Thursday. The meeting will take place at the park district office, 799 S.W. Columbia St. Prospective teams are encouraged to attend. The league is open to adults age 18 and older, who will play on coed teams. Teams will play a seven-game schedule, and games will be staged on weeknights from June 25 through Aug. 19. Cost is $125 per team. Registration deadline is June 12. To register, go to bendparksandrec.org or call 541-3897275.

Soccer • Rush home opener scheduled: The Oregon Rush Soccer Club’s Women’s Premier Soccer League team is slated to play its 2012 home opener this Saturday in Bend. The Rush, back for their second year in the WPSL, will take on the Spokane (Wash.) Shine at 1 p.m. at Summit High School, the site of all Rush home games. The rest of the Rush’s season schedule is expected to be announced shortly. Tickets, which can be purchased at the gate, cost $5 for adults and $2 for kids. For this Saturday’s game, spectators who wear an Oregon Rush jersey will receive free admission. The 2011 Rush, mainly made up of high school players and a few current college and post-college players, finished its inaugural WPSL season with a 5-7 record. The WPSL is a national women’s pro-am league with participants ranging from top high school players to current and former U.S. women’s national team members. For more information, go to wpsl.info or to oregonrush. com. —Bulletin staff reports

Track Continued from D1 The program, for boys and girls of elementary and middle school age, offers kids of all abilities and experience levels the chance to contest track races ranging from 50 meters to 1,600 meters, and to take part in the standing long jump and the softball throw. Field events Wednesday begin at 4 p.m., running events at 5:30 p.m. “I remember I really liked it,” Thomas says of competing in his first local Hershey’s meet when he was about 9. “With track, it’s just pure athleticism. … I really like that because it’s simple.” This year’s Hershey’s program is for boys and girls born in the years 1998 through 2003. Participants are divided by gender and compete in twoyear age groups, and the winner in each event advances to the state Hershey’s meet, slated for July 7 at Hayward Field in Eugene. “You see kids that have never participated in a track meet before, and then you have kids that are gung-ho and they’re into U.S. youth track and field,” says Rich Ekman, who in his role as a sports program coordinator with the Bend Park & Recreation District has been the local Hershey’s meet coordinator since 1991, of the participants. “We see the full gamut.” Ekman, 43, was one of those kids who had never before competed in a track meet when he attended the first local Hershey’s meet in Bend, staged on what was then a cinder track at Pilot Butte Middle School in 1978, the first year the program went national. He was 9 years old and advanced to the state Hershey’s meet by winning the 400, the softball throw and the 400 relay. “It was really my first introduction to track, which I think is common for most kids,” recalls Ekman, who has also been the state director for the Hershey’s program since 2006. “At least back in that day, there weren’t a lot of track meets in town.” The local Hershey’s meet happens to be how the track careers of Modin and Thomas began. Both young men won at the local and state levels and wound up advancing to the highest level of the program, the North American Final, which includes all of the United States and Canada. (State winners are pooled into regions, and the individual with the best mark in the region in each event qualifies for the North American Final.) Modin placed second in the boys age 9-10 50-meter dash in 2005, while Thomas finished seventh in the boys age 11-12 standing long jump in 2006. “At the time, I didn’t really realize the magnitude of the whole situation,” Thomas, who helped Summit repeat as Class 5A state champion, says of competing in the North American Final. “It’s kind of not until at least recently that I really realized what a huge opportunity that was and how great of an experience it was.” Last year, Bend resident Dawson Cockman became the first local Hershey’s participant to win at the North American Final — staged each year in Hershey, Pa. — where he took first place in the boys 11-12 100 meters. “I think he was more surprised than anyone that he won,” Ekman says. “He was really humble about it, which was neat to see. I think his parents in the stands were just as shocked as anybody else that he won it.” But although the Hershey’s program is competitive, it is not just about the kids who run the fastest, or jump or throw the farthest. “I think the real special thing about the Hershey, and the reason I continue to run it, is it is a grassroots program … that is not catered to those elite kids that know track and field and have coaches and compete in meets all over the United States,” Ekman observes. “It’s tailored towards anyone.” Maintaining that grass-roots approach, the meet is free for participants, who are not permitted to wear track spikes. And as Ekman points out, no specialized events, such as the hurdles or pole vault, are part of the meet program. And who knows where competing in the Hershey’s meet might lead a child? Not so many years ago, a young boy named Ashton Eaton took part in the local Hershey’s meet in Bend. And though he did not qualify for the state meet, he has gone on to some degree of success in track and field: Now 24, Eaton is the reigning world championship silver medalist and one of America’s top hopefuls in the decathlon for the 2012 Olympic Games in London. Says Ekman: “If you can run, jump or throw, you can participate in the Hershey.” — Reporter: 541-383-0393, amiles@bendbulletin.com.


D6

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, MAY 29, 2012

C S   C 

Please email Community Sports event information to sports@ bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� on our website at bendbulletin.com. Items are published on a spaceavailability basis, and should be submitted at least 10 days before the event.

AUTOS AUTOCROSS CLUB OF CENTRAL OREGON MONTHLY MEETING: Wednesday, June 20; 6 p.m. social, 6:30 p.m. meeting; Pappy’s Pizza Parlor, Bend; all welcome; autoxclub. org.

BASEBALL BEND WIFFLE BALL ASSOCIATION: Looking for players and team managers for the 2012 season, which starts in mid-June; teams are of eight players, with four on the field at a given time; can sign up as a team or be placed on one; $20 per person; managers meeting scheduled for 6 p.m. today; 541-977-1726; bendwiffle.info. SUMMER YOUTH BASEBALL LEAGUE: Open to boys and girls ages 6-12; Monday, June 18Thursday, Aug. 9; Bend; $54 park district residents, $73 otherwise; teams will meet twice per week; registration required; 541-7066126; rich@bendparksandrec.org; bendparksandrec.org. BEND ELKS BASEBALL CAMPS: Boys and girls ages 7-14; with Elks coaches and players; Monday, June 18-Wednesday, June 20; $63 for Bend Parks and Recreation District members, $82 otherwise; Monday, July 9-Thursday, July 12; $80 for Bend Park & Recreation District members, $108 otherwise; both sessions 8:30 a.m.-noon and at Vince Genna Stadium, Bend; bring baseball glove each day; bendparksandrec.org. COUGAR SUMMER BASEBALL CAMP: For boys entering grades four through eight; Tuesday, June 26-Thursday, June 28; 10 a.m.-1 p.m.; Mountain View High School varsity baseball field; camp will be coached by MVHS head coach Dave McKae and Cougars baseball players; $60; email Kory.bright@ gmail.com or call 541-420-6266 for registration forms. REDMOND PANTHERS BASEBALL CLUB: Now seeking players ages 7-14; emphasis is to prepare players for high school baseball; opportunities include camps and instructional training; players do not need to live in Redmond to participate; age is based as of April 30; 541-788-8520; derisman@ unitedplanners.com; leaguelineup. com/redmondbluesox. PRIVATE PITCHING INSTRUCTION: With Dave McKae; drills, techniques and exercises to increase arm strength and velocity; $35 per lesson plus a check on your Bend Fieldhouse card; 541-480-8786; pitchingperfection@gmail.com. PRIVATE LESSONS: With Ryan Jordan, a graduate of Bend High School and a former Bend Elk who played at Lane Community College and the University of La Verne; specifically for catching and hitting, but also for all positions; available after 3 p.m. on weekdays, open scheduling on weekends; at the Bend Fieldhouse or an agreed upon location; $30 per half hour or $55 per hour; discounts for multiple players in a single session, referrals or booking multiple sessions; cash only; 541-788-2722; rjordan@ uoregon.edu.

BASKETBALL PEE WEE HOOPS: Ages 3-5; learn to catch, dribble and shoot a basketball with RAPRD staff; Wednesdays, June 6-20; 11 a.m.-11:30 a.m.; RAPRD Activity Center; $17; 541548-7275; raprd.org. LITTLE HOOPSTERS: Ages 6-8; skills-based classes; learn to dribble, shoot and pass with RAPRD staff; Wednesdays, June 6-20; 2 p.m.2:45 p.m.; RAPRD Activity Center; $20; 541-548-7275; raprd.org. LADY LAVA BEAR BASKETBALL CAMP: For girls entering grades four through nine; Monday, June 18Thursday, June 21; noon-2:30 p.m.; Bend High School; instruction by Bend High staff and varsity players; $45, includes T-shirt; register on-site on June 18; Todd Ervin; 541-355-3828. MOUNTAIN VIEW GIRLS BASKETBALL SUMMER HOOPS CAMP: For girls in grades four through nine; Monday, June 18Thursday, June 21; 1 p.m.-4 p.m.; west gym, Mountain View High School, Bend; $45, includes T-shirt, prizes and snacks; Steve Riper, steve.riper@bend.k12.or.us, 541355-4527; registration form and waiver available at goladycougs.net. JR COUGAR BASKETBALL CAMP: For boys and girls entering grades three through nine; Monday, June 18-Wednesday, June 20; 9 a.m.-noon; Mountain View High School, Bend; instruction by MVHS boys program staff and current varsity players; $49 through June 1, $69 otherwise; Craig Reid; 541-318-8014. BEND LAVA BEARS BOYS BASKETBALL CAMP: Open to all boys in grades three through eight; Monday, June 18-Thursday, June

21; 8:30 a.m.-11:30 a.m.; Bend High School; presented by Bend High School coaching staff, and past and present varsity players; $60 through June 1, $65 after, or $50 per player for multiple participants from same family; Don Hayes; 541-948-5335. SUMMIT GIRLS YOUTH BASKETBALL CLINIC: For players in grades two through nine; Monday, June 18-Thursday, June 21; $30-$50 per player, depending on grade level; Ryan Cruz; email ryan. cruz@bend.k12.or.us for times and registration forms. COBO LITTLE DRIBBLERS FUNDAMENTAL BASKETBALL CAMPS: Grades two through five; Monday, June 25-Thursday, June 28; Mountain View High School, Bend; Monday, July 23-Friday, July 26; Pilot Butte Middle School, Bend; 9 a.m.-noon both sessions; $75 for Bend Park & Recreation District members, $101 otherwise; bendparksandrec.org. COBO MIDDLE SCHOOL BASKETBALL CAMPS: Grades five through nine; Monday, June 25Thursday, June 28; 10 a.m.-1 p.m.; Mountain View High School, Bend; Monday, July 23-Friday, July 26; Pilot Butte Middle School, Bend; 1 p.m.-4 p.m.; $75 for Bend Park & Recreation District members, $101 otherwise; bendparksandrec.org. TLS BASKETBALL CAMP: For grades two through eight; Monday, July 9-Thursday, July 12; Trinity School, 2550 N.E. Butler Market Road, Bend; 9 a.m.-noon grades two through five; 1 p.m.-4 p.m. grades six through eight; improve individual skills and team basketball concepts with Trinity Lutheran coaches Mike Polk and Hanne Krause; $68 for Bend Park & Recreation District residents, $92 otherwise; bendparksandrec. org. COBO ADVANCED MIDDLE SCHOOL BASKETBALL CAMP: Grades four through nine; Monday, Aug. 13Thursday, Aug. 16; Mountain View High School, Bend; 9 a.m.-noon for grades four through six, and 1 p.m.-4 p.m. for grades seven through nine; focus on advanced skill development in a competitive environment; campers should bring a snack; $75 for Bend Park & Recreation District members, $128 otherwise; bendparksandrec.org.

CLIMBING BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY CLIMBING: Competition team; ages 10-18; focuses on rope/sport climbing with opportunities to compete in USA Climbing’s Sport Climbing Series; 4-6 p.m.; Mondays through Thursdays through July 2; mike@bendenduranceacademy.org; www.BendEnduranceAcademy.org. BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY CLIMBING: Development team; ages 10-18; focuses on rope/sport climbing with trips to regional bouldering/climbing areas; 4 p.m.-6 p.m.; Mondays and Wednesdays through July 2; mike@bendenduranceacademy.org; BendEnduranceAcademy.org.

Instruction in basic footwork, blade work and tactics; ages 9-15; Tuesdays, June 5-July 24; ages 15 and older; Mondays, June 4-July 23; 6:30 p.m.-8 p.m.; Fencibles, 1620 N.E. Third St., Bend; equipment provided; $85; 541-548-7275; raprd. org. ACROVISION TAEKWONDO: Age 6 and older; Tuesdays and Thursdays, June 5-28; 7-8 p.m.; RAPRD Activity Center, Redmond; students will train in a complete martial arts system; uniforms are required and will be available for purchase; $69; 541548-7275 or raprd.org. ADAPTIVE ARCHERY: Ages 8-15; Wednesdays, June 13 and 27, July 11 and 25, and Aug. 8 and 22; 2 p.m.-3 p.m.; CentWise in Redmond; all equipment provided; registration deadline is June 7; $25; 541-5487275; raprd.org. JUNIOR TRAINING CAMPS: Grades eight through 12; training for endurance, functional and core strength, balance and other skills; weekly survivor team challenge will include rope course, mountain biking, disc golf and stand-up paddle boarding; sessions Mondays through Fridays, June 18-July 13 and July 23-Aug. 17; $195 per session; Powered by Bowen, 143 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-5851500; poweredbybowen.com. FELLOWSHIP OF CHRISTIAN ATHLETES NW SPORTS CAMP: Grades seven through 12; Monday, June 25-Friday, June 29; Northwest Nazarene University, Nampa, Idaho; all high school sports offered; transportation from Central Oregon to camp provided; $350, some scholarships available; Dennis Legg; DLegg@fca.org; 541-815-1274. BABY BOOTCAMP: Wednesdays at 10 a.m. at Fleet Feet Sports Bend, 1320 N.W. Galveston Ave; bridget. cook@babybootcamp.com. ADULT OPEN PLAY ROLLER HOCKEY: Sundays, 6:30 p.m.-8 p.m.; $5; Cascade Indoor Sports, Bend; www.cascadeindoorsports. com; 541-330-1183. OPEN ROLLER SKATING: For all ages and ability levels; $5 per skater (includes skate rental), children under 5 are free; Tuesdays, 12:30 p.m.-3:30 p.m.; Wednesdays, 1 p.m.-4 p.m.; Fridays, 2 p.m.-5 p.m. and 6 p.m.-9 p.m.; Saturdays, 1 p.m.-4 p.m. and 6 p.m.-9 p.m.; Sundays, 1 p.m.-4 p.m. 541-3301183; callie@cascadeindoorsoccer. com; www.cascadeindoorsports. com. BEND TABLE TENNIS CLUB: Evening play Mondays; 6 p.m.-9 p.m. (setup 30 minutes prior); beginner classes available, cost is $60; at Boys & Girls Club of Bend, 500 N.W. Wall St.; drop-in fee, $5 for adults, $3 for youths and seniors; Jeff at 541-4802834; Don at 541-318-0890; Sean at 267-614-6477; bendtabletennis@ yahoo.com; www.bendtabletennis. com. AMERICAN POOLPLAYERS ASSOCIATION LEAGUE: Nine-ball play Monday and Wednesday nights; eight-ball on Thursdays; 7 p.m.; amateurs of all ability levels encouraged; Randee Lee at rlee973@gmail.com or Marshall Fox at Fox’s Billiard Lounge, 937 N.W. Newport Ave., 541-647-1363; www. foxsbilliards.com.

MULTISPORT HIKING LEARN THE ART OF TRACKING ANIMALS: Guided walks and workshops with a professional tracker; ongoing; 8 a.m.-noon; learn to identify and interpret tracks, signs and scat of animals in the region; two or more walks per month; $35; 541-633-7045; dave@wildernesstracking.com; wildernesstracking.com.

MISCELLANEOUS RESTORE PROPER MOVEMENT YOGA: Restorative yoga for busy athletes such as cyclists, runners and triathletes already training; no strength poses, just restorative yoga for active recovery; Mondays; 5 p.m.; Powered by Bowen, 143 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 30 minutes; 5 points on Power Pass or $5 per class; 541-585-1500. REDMOND COMMUNITY YOGA: 7 p.m. on Mondays and Wednesdays; $49 per six weeks, drop-in available, beginner to intermediate levels; Rebound Physical Therapy, 974 Veterans Way, Suite 4, Redmond; 541-504-2350. OREGON STATE “WILD BUNCH� CHAMPIONSHIPS: Friday-Sunday; 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; watch gunfighters compete using 1911 semiauto pistols, 1897 pump shotguns, and rifles featured in the famous 1969 film; free; Central Oregon Sports Shooting Association range; U.S. Highway 20 at milepost 24 east of Bend; 541-385-6021; hrp-sass.com. BUILD-A-MOUNTAIN CAN AND BOTTLE DRIVE: Saturday; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Ray’s Food Place stores in Bend, Redmond, Prineville and Sisters; fundraiser for Special Olympics Oregon High Desert chapter; athlete participation encouraged; call 541-749-6517 or email soor503@gmail.com to volunteer. BEGINNING FOIL FENCING:

DUEL IN THE DESERT: Saturday; 10 a.m.; Bend; options of 5K run-18mile road bike ride-5K run or 5K run13-mile mountain bike ride-5K run; bendduel.com; also kids Mini Duel Run with age-appropriate distances; individual and team options; $10$55; bendduel.com. MINI DUATHLON SERIES: Third race in series is Wednesday, June 6; heats at 4:15 p.m., 5:15 p.m. and 6:15 p.m.; Bend; simulated 20K Pacific Crest bike course on CompuTrainer and 3K or 5K run outside; Powered by Bowen, 143 S.W. Century Drive; $15 adults, $10 juniors; poweredbybowen.com; 541-585-1500. PACIFIC CREST WEEKEND SPORTS FESTIVAL: Friday, June 22-Sunday, June 24; Sunriver; long course and Olympic triathlons/duathlons, Kid’s Splash, Pedal-n-Dash, marathon, half marathon, 10K, 5K, Kids’ Dash and Tour de Crest bike tours (26 and 55 miles); $12-$250, depending on event and time of registration; racecenter.com/pacificcrest. OYSTER OFF ROAD ADVENTURE RACE: Saturday, June 30; 8 a.m.; Bend; compete on teams of two to four members; race may include bikes, running, water and smart phones components; $75; www. oysterracingseries.com. RAT RACE TRAINING: For the Redmond Area Triathlon; Saturdays through August 4; 8 a.m.-9 a.m.; based out of Redmond’s Cascade Swim Center; RAT Race is 500meter swim, 12-mile bike ride and 5K run; all skill levels welcome; improve swimming skills and train with qualified instructors; drop-in fees apply.

PADDLING SUP MORNING SOCIALS: Mondays through June 11; 9:30 a.m.; Bend; group stand-up paddleboard excursions on the Deschutes River; $25 includes use of personal flotation device, board and light instruction for beginners; meet at Tumalo Creek Kayak & Canoe; tumalocreek.com. PICKIN’ & PADDLIN’ SUMMER MUSIC SERIES: Boat and standup paddleboard demos available 4-7 p.m. each day of series, as well as staff and manufacturer representatives; music begins at 7 p.m.; at Tumalo Creek Kayak & Canoe, Bend; June 13, The Pitchfork Revolution; July 25, Shook Twins; Aug. 28, Eight Dollar Mountain; Sept. 19, Polecat; fundraisers for the Bend Paddle Trail Alliance; 541-3179407; laurel@tumalocreek.com. MBSEF JUNIOR PADDLE BOARD PROGRAM: For juniors age 12 and older; main focus will be stand-up paddleboarding, but participants may also learn skills in outrigger and prone paddling, basic lifesaving and water safety; three session options, Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, June 18-29, July 9-20 and Aug. 13-24; 9:30-11 a.m.; Riverbend Park, Bend; $120, includes all equipment, 10 percent discount on multiple sessions; mbsef@mbsef. org; mbsef.org.

PICKLEBALL BEND PICKLEBALL CLUB: Multiple options for play each week with the club at locations in Bend, Sunriver and Redmond; go to oregonhighdesertpickleball. blogspot.com or email bendpickleballclub@hotmail.com for details; weekly play schedules also available at The Racquet Shoppe in Bend.

RUNNING HEAVEN CAN WAIT: Sunday; 9 a.m.; Drake Park, Bend; 5K run/ walk; benefit for Sara’s Project, which raises funds for breast health education; $20 online, $40 day of event; 541-706-6996; heavencanwait.org. NO BOUNDARIES 5K: Tuesdays, June 5-July 10; 5:30 p.m.; Fleet Feet, Bend; six-week program for those 40 and older who want to learn to run or walk a 5K; includes weekly coached group run and workout schedule, technical T-shirt and access to physical therapist and massage therapist; $65; 541-3891601; training@fleetfeetbend.com; fleetfeetbend.com/training. LIL’ PANTHERS TRACK CAMP: Monday, June 4-Wednesday, June 6; 4:15 p.m.-5:30 p.m.; Redmond High School track; for elementary school-age students during the 2011-12 school year; learn jumps, throws and sprints/hurdles/relays with RHS track and field members; $20 ($45 maximum per family); Scott Brown; scott.brown@ redmond.k12.or.us; 541-923-4800, ext. 2110. STORM THE STAIRS: Thursday, June 7; 5:30 p.m.; COCC track, Bend; 2-mile run/walk; free for COCC and OSU-Cascades students and staff, $5 participants age 18 and younger, $8 all others; registration 4:30 p.m.5:15 p.m. at the track; bdouglass@ cocc.edu. THREE SISTERS MARATHON: Saturday, June 9; 7 a.m.; Eagle Crest Resort, Redmond; marathon, two-person and five-person marathon relays, and 5K fun run/walk; $25-$225; threesistersmarathon.com. BIG PINE RUN/WALK/BIKE: Saturday, June 9; 8 a.m.; La Pine Community Park, 51390 Walling Lane, La Pine; 5K and 10K runs/ walks and 25-mile/50-mile bike rides; $20; bigpine.org. DIRTY HALF: Sunday, June 10; 8 a.m.; half-marathon race on singletrack trails has reached 800runner limit but transfers are allowed through May 31; 541-317-3568; superdave@footzonebend.com; footzonebend.com/dirty_half. DRY CANYON RUN: Saturday, June 16; 9 a.m.; American Legion Park, Redmond; 5K and 10K runs/walks; benefit for the Redmond High School cross-country and track and field programs; $25; information and registration available at time2race. com; scott.brown@redmond.k12. or.us. STORM TRACK CAMP: For boys and girls in grades four through eight; Monday, June 18-Thursday, June 21; 9 a.m.-noon; Summit High School, Bend; for all ability levels; with SHS coaching staff and team members; bring running shoes, appropriate clothing, snack and water bottle each day; $64 Bend Park & Recreation District residents, $84 otherwise; bendparksandrec. org. SPARK YOUR HEART 5K: Wednesday, July 4; 8 a.m.; Self Referrals Welcome

Local Service. Local Knowledge. 541-848-4444 1000 SW Disk Dr. • Bend www.highdesertbank.com

541-706-6900 EQUAL HOUSING LENDER

Riverbend Park, Bend; benefit for Children’s Heart Fund; $20 advance registration, $40 late, $10 Firecracker Dash (kids run); 541706-6996; sparkyourheartbend. com. REDMOND OREGON RUNNING KLUB (RORK): Weekly run/walk; Saturdays at 8 a.m.; all levels welcome; free; for more information and to be added to a weekly email list, email Dan Edwards at rundanorun@yahoo.com; follow Redmond Oregon Running Klub on Facebook. MOMS RUNNING GROUP: Tuesdays; 9:15 a.m.; contact lisa. nasr@me.com for more information. FOOTZONE WOMEN’S RUNNING GROUP: Sundays at 9 a.m.; distances and locations vary; paces between 7- and 11-minute miles can be accommodated; melanie@ footzonebend.com; 541-317-3568. GOOD FORM RUNNING LEVEL 1 AND 2 CLINICS: Level 1 is a free 90-minute clinic that uses drills and video to work on proper mechanics; see schedule online for Level 1 dates; Level 2 is offered the first Tuesday of every month with Dave Cieslowski of Focus Physical Therapy to help runners find their best form; clinic sizes limited; 541317-3568; sign up at footzonebend. com/events/clinics; teague@ footzonebend.com. PERFORMANCE RUNNING GROUP: 5:30 p.m. on Tuesdays; with Max King; locations will vary; max@ footzonebend.com; 541-317-3568. ASK THE EXPERTS: First four Tuesdays of each month; 6 p.m.; at FootZone; informal, drop-in Q-and-A session with a physical therapist; individual attention dependent on the number of attendees; teague@ footzonebend.com; 541-317-3568. NOON TACO RUN: Wednesdays at noon; meet at FootZone; order a Taco Stand burrito before leaving and it will be ready upon return; teague@footzonebend.com; 541-317-3568. LEARN TO RUN ALUMNI RUNNING GROUP: Wednesdays, 5:30 p.m.; meet at FootZone; easy, supportive and informal midweek running group; caters to slower paces and walkers/runners; free; marybel@ footzonebend.com; 541-317-3568. WEEKLY RUNS: Wednesdays at 6 p.m.; Fleet Feet Sports Bend, 1320 N.W. Galveston Ave.; 3 to 5 miles; two groups, different paces; 541-389-1601. YOGA FOR RUNNERS: Wednesdays at 7 p.m.; at Fleet Feet Sports Bend, 1320 N.W. Galveston Ave.; $5 per session or $50 for 12 sessions; focuses on strengthening and lengthening muscles and preventing running injuries; 541-389-1601. FUNCTIONAL FITNESS WORKOUT FOR RUNNERS: Thursdays starting at 6 p.m. at FootZone of Bend, 845 N.W. Wall St.; personal trainer Kyle Will will help participants strengthen muscle groups to help avoid common injuries; $5; 541-330-0985.

SNOW SPORTS BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY NORDIC SUMMER PROGRAMS: Twice weekly and five days weekly summer training programs for local skiers ages 13-23 and for summer visiting skiers ages 18-23; practices Mondays through Fridays, through August 14; $200 for twice weekly option, $500 for five times weekly option; 541-678-3864; ben@ bendenduranceacademy.org. MBSEF ALPINE, NORDIC AND FREERIDE SUMMER CAMPS: Friday, June 15-Friday, June 29; Mt. Bachelor ski area; 541-388-0002; mbsef@mbsef.org; mbsef.org. BEND ON-SNOW MINI CAMP: For outside skiers who want to join in on a block of skiing; Friday, June 15-Tuesday, June 19; Ben Husaby; 541-678-3864.

SOCCER OREGON RUSH IN WOMEN’S PREMIER SOCCER LEAGUE: Saturday vs. Spokane Shine; 1 p.m.; Summit High School, Bend; $5 adults, $2 children; spectators wearing Oregon Rush jerseys admitted free; oregonrush.com. PORTLAND TIMBERS YOUTH CAMP: For kids ages 5-13; 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; Monday, Aug. 20Wednesday, Aug. 22; Big Sky Park, Bend; learn technical skills, meet a Timbers player and learn from Timbers TREES life skills and life values program; registration deadline Aug. 16; Erik Lyslo; elyslo@ portlandtimbers.com; 503-5535575; portlandtimbers.com/youth/ portland-timbers-camp-program.

SOCCER OPEN PLAY (ADULT): Age 14 and older; no cleats, but shinguards required; $7; Friday nights; coed 7 p.m.-8:30 p.m., men 8:30 p.m.-10 p.m.; Cascade Indoor Soccer, Bend; 541-330-1183; callie@cascadeindoorsoccer.com; cascadeindoorsports.com.

SOFTBALL HIGH DESERT YELLOWJACKETS: Redmond-based 10-and-under ASA fast pitch girls softball team is looking for one or two more girls; prospective players must have turned 11 years old after Jan. 1, 2012, to be eligible; Jeremy; 541-325-3689. CASCADE ALLIANCE SOFTBALL: Forming girls teams at the 10-andunder, 12-and-under, 14-and-under, 16-and-under, and 18-and-under levels for tournaments in the spring and summer of 2012; visit website or Facebook for upcoming tryouts for the 12U and 14U teams, open gyms for all ages, upcoming clinics, and coaching opportunities; cascadealliance.org. SKILL INSTRUCTION: Age 10 and older; with Mike Durre, varsity softball coach at Mountain View High School; lessons in fielding, pitching and hitting; $30 per hour or $50 per hour for two players; mdurre@netscape.net; 541-480-9593.

SWIMMING COSMIC SWIM: For middle school students; Saturday, June 9; 8-10 p.m.; student ID required; Cascade Swim Center, Redmond; $2.50 dropin fee; 541-548-7275, raprd.org. REDMOND AREA PARK AND RECREATION DISTRICT FAMILY SWIM NIGHT: 7:25 p.m.-8:25 p.m., Tuesdays, Cascade Swim Center, Redmond; adult must accompany anyone under age 18; $10 per family; 541-548-7275, raprd.org.

TENNIS YOUTH CLINIC: For boys and girls ages 6-14; hosted by the Summit High School girls tennis program; Monday, July 9-Thursday, July 12; Summit tennis courts; two sessions will be offered, based on age, ages 6-9 and 10-14; $45; contact Ryan Cruz at ryan.cruz@bend.k12.or.us for registration forms. WOMEN’S DOUBLES TOURNAMENT: For most levels of players; Tuesday, July 10; Bend Golf and Country Club; sponsored by the Ladies Tennis Association at BGCC; tournament proceeds go to Bend, Mountain View and Summit high schools; $45, entry fee includes lunch and prizes; Joni, 541-322-5762.

VOLLEYBALL OREGON VOLLEYBALL ACADEMY CAMP: For players in grades five through eight; Wednesday, June 6-Thursday, June 7; 5 p.m.-7 p.m.; Cascade Indoor Sports, Bend; led by OVA director Turner Waskom and coaching staff; skills and drills about volleyball fundamentals and instruction for more advanced players; $40; 541-419-1187; turner@oregonvolleyballacademy. com; registration form and information available at oregonvolleyballacademy.com. TLHS VOLLEYBALL CAMP: For grades three through eight; Monday, July 16-Thursday, July 19; Trinity School, 2550 N.E. Butler Market Road, Bend; 9 a.m.-noon grades three through five; 1 p.m.-4 p.m. grades six through eight; improve skills by working on fundamentals through demonstration, guidance, repetition and correction; with Trinity Lutheran coaches; bring knee pads and wattle bottle; $68 for Bend Park & Recreation District residents, $92 otherwise; bendparksandrec.org. SAND VOLLEYBALL CAMP: For grades five through eight; Monday, July 30-Wednesday, Aug. 1; 9:30 a.m.-11:30 a.m.; outdoor courts in Old Mill District, Bend; staged by Bend High School coaching staff; passing, serving, setting, spiking and agility drills; $51 for Bend Park & Recreation District residents, $69 otherwise; bendparksandrec.org.

WALKING WALK “LIVE� CLASSES: Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays; 4:15 p.m.-4:45 p.m. Mondays, 10:15 a.m.-10:45 a.m. Wednesdays and Thursdays; Redmond Grange; indoor 2-mile walks; $5 per class; 541-993-0464; walklivecentraloregon.com.


B USINESS

E

Calendar, E4 Deeds, E4

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, MAY 29, 2012

IN BRIEF RIM losing senior executive Struggling Blackberry-maker Research In Motion Ltd. is losing another senior executive as its chief legal officer is retiring from the company after 12 years. RIM said Monday that Karima Bawa had been in discussions about her retirement for some time and plans to stay on to help with the transition once a replacement has been hired. The departure comes amid reports that RIM may announce a major restructuring that could result in thousands of job cuts. It also follows the departure last week of Patrick Spence, RIM’s head of global sales. A number of executives left earlier this year, including founder Mike Lazaridis and co-chief executive Jim Balsillie. Lazaridis remains on the board.

www.bendbulletin.com/business

Median Banks won’t need rescue, PM says CEO pay edged up to $9.6M last year FINANCIAL CRISIS IN SPAIN

By Ciaran Giles and Daniel Woolls

The Associated Press

MADRID — Conservative Spanish Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy insisted Monday that the country’s banking sector would not need an international rescue as concern over the bailout of nationalized lender Bankia sent its stock price plummeting while Spain’s borrowing

costs soared. “There will be no rescue of the Spanish banking sector,” Rajoy told a press conference. However, he added that the government had no choice but to bail out Bankia, which has been crippled by Spain’s real estate slump. “We took the bull by the horns because the alternative was collapse,” said Rajoy, stressing that Bankia clients’

savings were now safer than ever. Bankia, Spain’s fourthlargest bank, is estimated to have €32 billion in toxic assets and was effectively nationalized earlier this month when the government converted €4.5 billion in rescue funds it gave last June into shares. The lender’s shares fell 28 percent on opening in Ma-

drid on Monday — Bankia’s first day back on the stock exchange following its announcement Friday that it would need the €19 billion ($23.8 billion) in state aid to shore itself up against its bad loans, a far bigger bailout than expected. The shares, which recovered slightly in the afternoon, closed 13.4 percent lower at €1.36. See Spain/ E3

The Associated Press

EXECUTIVE FILE

Labor board member resigns The National Labor Relations Board announced Sunday that one of its five members, Terence Flynn, had resigned after the board’s inspector general found that Flynn, a Republican, leaked documents to GOP allies. The board’s chairman, Mark Gaston Pearce, said Flynn, who joined the board in January, had submitted his resignation Saturday evening by fax and email.

Kraft Foods names company Shareholders of Kraft Foods last week overwhelmingly approved Mondelez International as the name of the $35 billion snack foods company that will be created when the company finally splits sometime later this year. Coined by two of Kraft’s employees, the name is meant to evoke the global ambitions of the new snack business, which will take on the titan Frito-Lay, and pique the palate as well with its nod to the words for “world” and “delicious” in a variety of romance languages. — From wire reports

U.S. bank earnings According to the latest FDIC report, U.S. bank earnings rose during the first quarter of 2012 to their highest level in nearly five years despite the fact that lending remains depressed.

E A RNI NGS Latest improved earnings resulted mostly from loan profits and account fees • Quarterly earnings, in billions 1st qtr. 2012

$35.3

30 10 -10 -30

’06 ’07 ’08 ’09 ’10 ’11 ’12

Lending declines are due mainly to continued weakness in the housing industry • Total loans balances, in billions, at end of 1st quarter –$38.2 –19.2 –13.1 –11.7 Commercial Auto

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Jim McConnell, a polymer chemist and his wife, Lezlie McConnell, a former salon owner, formed Light Elegance Nail Products in 1999, bringing a home-brewed gel nail product into the market. Since 2010, the couple has been manufacturing at McConnell Labs in Redmond.

Couple has business model

nailed down

By Rachael Rees The Bulletin

W

hile painted or enhanced fingernails aren’t a necessity, women want to be beautiful, said Lezlie McConnell. To help them, she created Light Elegance Nail Products, a line of gels, hardeners, strengtheners and related products made in Redmond. For more than two decades McConnell has been in the nail business, and for the past 13 years she’s been manufacturing Light Elegance Nail Products with her husband, Jim McConnell, through McConnell Labs, Inc. “People ask me, how can anybody make money on nails?” she said. “I always call

Credit cards Mortgages Equity lines Construction 27.3 4.5

Source: U.S. Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation © 2012 McClatchy-Tribune News Service

The basics What: McConnell Labs Inc., Light Elegance Nail Products Employees: 11 Where: 406 S.W. Umatilla Ave., Redmond Phone: 541-526-1417 Website: www.light elegance.com

it the power of women.” A woman might need a mirror to see her hair or makeup, she said, but she can simply look down and see her fingernails. Since September 2010, Light Elegance has been

manufacturing nail gels, used to strengthen, lengthen and color nails; ultraviolet curing lights, to set and harden the gel; and nail cleansing wipes for licensed nail technicians, at 406 S.W. Umatilla Ave., on the south side of Redmond. Lezlie McConnell, a former salon owner, said the company formed when she asked her husband, a polymer chemist, to create a nail gel to cut costs at her Eugene salon. At the time, Jim McConnell was making two-part polyurethane wood repair materials for plywood, laminated beams and door jambs, but said he decided to take on the project. See Nails / E3

In a Redmond lab, Lezlie and Jim McConnell, the owners of Light Elegance Nail Products, have created about 120 different colors of nail gel polish to distribute to nail technicians throughout the world.

NEW YORK — Profits at big U.S. companies broke records last year, and so did pay for CEOs. The head of a typical public company made $9.6 million in 2011, according to an analysis by The Associated Press using data from Equilar, an executive pay research firm. That was up more than 6 percent from the previous year, and is the second year in a row of increases. The figure is also the highest since the AP began tracking executive compensation in 2006. Companies trimmed cash bonuses but handed out more in stock awards. For shareholder activists who have long decried CEO pay as exorbitant, that was a victory of sorts. That’s because the stock awards are being tied more often to company performance. In those instances, CEOs can’t cash in the shares right away: They have to meet goals first, like boosting profit to a certain level. The idea is to motivate CEOs to make sure a company does well and to tie their fortunes to the company’s for the long term. For too long, activists say, CEOs have been richly rewarded no matter how a company has fared — “pay for pulse,” as some critics call it. To be sure, the companies’ motives are pragmatic. The corporate world is under a brighter, more uncomfortable spotlight than it was a few years ago, before the financial crisis struck in the fall of 2008. Last year, a law gave shareholders the right to vote on whether they approve of the CEO’s pay. The vote is nonbinding, but companies are keen to avoid an embarrassing “no.” “I think the boards were more easily shamed than we thought they were,” says Stephen Davis, a shareholder expert at Yale University, referring to boards of directors, which set executive pay. In the past year, he says, “Shareholders found their voice.” The typical CEO got stock awards worth $3.6 million in 2011, up 11 percent from the year before. See CEOs / E3

Homebuilders see signs of a recovering market Goodbye to Windows Live (and whatever it meant) TECH FOCUS

By Brian Louis

L E NDI NG

By Bernard Condon and Christina Rexrode

Bloomberg News

NEW YORK — For the latest sign of a U.S. housing rebound, Toll Brothers Chief Executive Officer Douglas Yearley points to Hoboken, N.J.: A couple torn between two condos last month at the sales office for its Hudson Tea complex decided to think about it over lunch. When they returned an hour later, both units were gone. “People feel like now is the time to buy and they aren’t isolated to one building in Hoboken,” Yearley said in a conference call last week with

analysts after the Horsham, Pa.- based luxury homebuilder reported that quarterly orders for new homes surged 47 percent. “Confidence is up. The interest rates are there and they’ve been waiting so long to move on with their lives that they came out this spring.” U.S. homebuilders are reporting their most-improved spring selling season in seven years as record low mortgage rates, job gains, and shrinking inventories are drawing buyers to sales offices that have been quiet since the property market collapse. See Homebuilders / E2

By Randall Stross New York Times News Service

If you own a Windowsbased PC, you may like the operating system well enough. Or you may merely tolerate it, if you give it much thought at all. But whatever your feeling, “love” probably isn’t the word that immediately comes to mind to describe it. I bring this up because Microsoft acts as if its customers have a strong affection for all things Windows. For the past seven years, it has tried

to make Windows the anchor brand for software that is not an operating system. An array of products, with no natural connections to one another, have received the “Windows Live” moniker. Windows Live Essentials, for example, was the name for a suite of software products that could be installed on a PC, and included photo management, video editing and instant messaging. Windows Live Mesh provided file synchronization among one’s

personal computers, including Macs. And the list went on: Windows Live Mail, Windows Live Search, Windows Live Toolbar, Windows Live Family Safety and others. It was folly. Windows Live Essentials turned out to be less than essential after all. The company is effectively leaving behind the Windows Live brand name as it renames the products that currently feature that two-word phrase. See Microsoft / E3


E2

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, MAY 29, 2012

Startup airlines face big hurdles By Jad Mouawad New York Times News Service

Where are the startup airlines? With the big carriers cutting routes and raising fares, this would seem an ideal time for a new airline to take them on with cut-rate prices and service to smaller airports eager for more flights. That is the path, after all, taken by two of the industry’s success stories — Southwest Airlines, in 1971, and JetBlue Airways, in 2000. But getting an airline off the ground has become a lot more treacherous. High oil prices these days mean carriers must fly full planes to turn a profit, and smaller airports just do not provide enough passenger traffic. At the same time, the major domestic carriers are more entrenched than ever in their own hub airports, making it harder for a new entrant to wrangle gates there. And investors have become more cautious about lending to just any airline project. “Why would you ever want to start a new airline?” asked Michael Boyd, an aviation consultant with the Boyd Group International. “The business is very capital-intensive, the returns are rotten and the track record is terrible. Plus, there’s simply no market for a new carrier today.” Scores have tried and failed — Skybus Airlines, Independence Air, ATA Airlines and Maxjet Airways among the most recent examples. Even the most successful of the new carriers, Virgin America, has so far failed to turn a profit five years after its first flight. With the economy picking up last year, the top domestic airlines reported profits of $1.5 billion with revenue of $192 billion — a measly margin of 0.8 percent. Still, their combined market value is smaller than Starbucks’. Fuel has become one of the biggest barriers to entry into the business, accounting for 35 to 50 percent of costs as prices almost tripled in 10 years.

Trying for take-off Even so, there are still optimistic entrepreneurs and investors. There are 13 companies seeking a Part 121 air carrier certificate from the Federal Aviation Administration, the certificate required to operate a scheduled passenger airline, according to the agency. “If you have a niche, the rewards are great,” said Ted Vallas, the founder of California Pacific Airlines, one of the prospective carriers, which

Homebuilders Continued from E1 After dragging the economy into recession, housing is set to “contribute modestly” to growth, according to Vincent Foley, a credit analyst for Barclays in New York. Purchases of new homes in April increased 3.3 percent from the previous month to an annual pace of 343,000, according to the Commerce Department. The largest publicly-traded homebuilders reported an average 25 percent increase in purchase contracts in the first quarter, the biggest jump since 2005, according to Barclays. While demand for existing homes has been on the rise in recent months, the improvement in new home sales signals that the growing appetite for residential real estate goes beyond foreclosures and other distressed sales targeted by investors. Traditional homebuyers, including those who have to sell another property to upgrade, are coming off the fence, Stan Humphries, Zillow Inc.’s chief economist said. Mortgage rates for 30-year loans fell to 3.78 percent in the week ended Thursday, the lowest in Freddie Mac records dating back to 1971. The Federal Reserve has pledged to hold interest rates near zero through the end of 2014 and has bought home-loan bonds to lower borrowing costs. Rates for 30-year jumbo mortgages fell to 4.38 percent Thursday from 5.11 percent a year ago, according to data

Chasing online word of mouth • Retailers are trying to measure and manage the impact of social marketing By Natasha Singer New York Times News Service

Illustration by James Best Jr. New York Times News Service

has been seeking FAA certification since 2009 and plans on serving the small markets shunned by the big carriers in recent years. California Pacific has produced 32 manuals totaling 40,000 pages detailing all aspects of its operations to gain approval from the FAA. And it is not done yet. The carrier said that it expected its first plane — an Embraer 170 jet with about 80 seats — to be delivered next month and that it hoped to begin scheduled service by the fall. It plans to serve a handful of cities, including Oakland and Sacramento, from Carlsbad’s McClellan-Palomar Airport, 35 miles north of San Diego. Another hopeful, People Express, wants to revive a defunct brand known for its low-fare service to provide direct service between Newport News, Va., and places like Providence, R.I., and Pittsburgh on the East Coast, and Orlando in Florida. “The consolidation of the major airlines has virtually eliminated point-to-point service,” said Michael Morisi, its president. Morisi, who declined to comment on how much capital his airline had raised, said a new carrier needed about $100 million to start up. “What makes this very difficult are the huge barriers to entry and the ability to convince investors that this is the right time to make this a success,” he said. The company applied to the FAA to become a passenger airline in March. It hopes to be certified by October, which would be a record time. It was already fined $10,000 by the Department of Transportation this month, though, for advertising low fares on its website, which it is not permitted to do before it has a certificate to operate.

Bumblebee-striped or polkadotted, neon orange or neoargyle, socks of all types are selling out fast on Fab.com, a popular design e-tailer. Gungho for hosiery, its fans are even posting sock images on Pinterest and tagging them on Tumblr blogs. “It’s Happy Socks Day at Fab,” says Jason Goldberg, the company’s chief executive and founder, as he checks digital dashboards on his iMac screen that continually chart customer sharing and spending. “It’s socktastic!” Fab.com is a pioneer in social retailing, the kind of ecommerce site that encourages shoppers to discover and select products through crowdsourcing. It sends out emails daily, alerting design mavens to flash sales of whimsical, limited-edition items — like candy-colored typewriters or clear plastic coasters embedded with gummi bears — and offering a variety of ways to share their favorites with friends. Founded last June, Fab has already racked up more than 4.5 million members, who collectively shell out about $400,000 on a typical day, the company said. But behind that fast success is a new social media math. Goldberg is among a new generation of e-commerce executives determined to measure the impact of social marketing and act on it in nearly real time. He keeps constant track of how many people visit Fab.com from, say, Facebook, Pinterest and Google Plus. He gauges Twitter posts that mention the site’s newest items as harbingers of next-day sales. He regularly blogs about the company’s revenue, product trends, app use and leading sources of traffic. He has also hired two customer analytics start-ups to determine the current and potential value of Fab. com shoppers. “On typical e-commerce sites, every single piece of real estate is calculated to measure the return on investment of each pixel,” Goldberg says. “But social media marketing needs to be measured differently than traditional marketing. We need different ways to measure sharing.”

Instinct and analytics With headquarters in Manhattan that offer a sweeping view of the Hudson River, Fab

Hiroko Masuike / New York Times News Service

Jason Goldberg is the chief executive and founder of Fab.com, an e-commerce site that encourages crowd-sourcing and constantly monitors the impact of its social marketing.

.com is a marriage of instinct and analytics. Goldberg and a co-founder, Bradford Shellhammer, started the site last summer after an earlier joint project, a gay social network called Fabulis.com, failed to gain traction. Their subsequent plan was to build an e-commerce design powerhouse through word of mouth, a kind of seamlessly shareable Ikea. Shellhammer, the chief creative officer, is the tastemaker with a knack for identifying conversation pieces — like, say, Beardo, a knitted hat for beards — that can send thousands of people shopping and sharing daily. Goldberg, meanwhile, is the number cruncher who, at every stage of the company’s development, seeks metrics to expand sales and brand engagement. In fact, even before the pair introduced Fab.com, Goldberg began measuring the financial impact of online word of mouth.

Ripple effects To create an audience before the shopping site even went live, the company bought ads on Facebook, inviting “influencers” who liked certain flash-sale sites, design magazines, design blogs or designers to join. But rather than simply calculating how much it cost to acquire each new member, Goldberg set about examining the ripple effects. After seeing an ad, he says, each person who joined typically invited three friends to join as well — resulting in one additional membership, on average. “It was basically ‘Buy one, get one free,’” he says. “We were looking at the viral coefficient of the ad, so suddenly your costs went way down.” By the time Fab.com was

from Bankrate.com.

Rising rents In Hoboken, Toll Brothers increased prices six times since it began selling apartments last spring in the 157unit 1450 Washington at Hudson Tea, where prices now range from $450,000 to $1 million, said Todd Dumaresq, marketing manager for Toll’s City Living division. The company has sold 108 units in the building and is now selling about 12 homes a month, he said. The apartments overlook the Hudson River with views of Manhattan. The project has a fitness center and a rooftop terrace with an open-air fireplace and barbecue. Rising apartment rents also are driving Americans who have good credit and enough money for a down payment back into the housing market. Effective rents, which take into account such landlord concessions as a free month, climbed almost 1 percent in the first quarter from the previous quarter, the largest jump since the last recession began, according to REIS Inc. “There are signs that this is a broader-based recovery,” Humphries said. “It is really driven by affordability and buyers feeling more confident about the housing market.” Dennis and Sally Webert were renting when they decided to buy a home in PulteGroup Inc.’s Trailside at Huning Ranch development south of Albuquerque, N.M., for $140,000, prompted by a special promotion. “We’ve been

Stephen Hilger / Bloomberg News

Toll Brothers is selling about 12 units a month in its Hudson Tea Building in Hoboken, N.J.

eyeballing these homes for several years,” Dennis Webert said. “The timing was just right.” About 5,000 potential buyers showed up for the opening of nine model homes last weekend at The Bridges, a community in Delray Beach, Fla., built by GL Homes, said sales agent Robert Macias, 54. The company used eight golf carts to shuttle customers from their cars and sold 18 homes over the weekend and another handful this week, he said. The company, which sells homes in the community for about $500,000 to $1.5 million, has raised prices about 5 percent since preconstruction sales began in February, East Coast Division President Marcie DePlaza said. “There were times when you’d walk into one of the models and there would be 50 people in a room,” Macias

said. “This is not like the boom because they were buying here because they want to live here, not because they want to make an investment.”

Ramping up Homebuilders that stalled production during the crash are beginning to ramp up, said Metrostudy Chief Economist Brad Hunter. Housing starts in the first quarter jumped 20 percent from a year earlier, according to the Houston-based firm, which tracks new construction in 84 metropolitan areas. In Phoenix, starts jumped 58 percent and increased 30 percent in Northern California, he said. Inventory of finished new homes was down 13.4 percent from a year earlier and the supply at the current pace was 2.7 months, Hunter said. “Twenty percent is a huge percentage increase but we

Custora, which also works with sites like Etsy and Revolve Clothing, creates similar online dashboards. But its specialty is identifying the most valuable

customer segments and using algorithms to forecast their potential spending over time. Right now, for example, only 15 percent of Fab.com purchasers shop with the company’s iPad app. But a Custora forecast estimated that, over the next two years, a typical iPad customer would spend twice as much as a typical Web customer and that the iPad cohort would generate more than 25 percent of Fab.com’s revenue. In an era of online behavioral tracking, Fab.com has been more transparent than some other sites about a lot of its customer surveillance, data collection and analysis. Goldberg writes regularly about the company’s social marketing practices and metrics on his blog. Likewise, when Fab.com was seeking seed money last year, Goldberg gave several venture capital firms passwords to the RJMetrics’ dashboard so they could see the company’s revenue and customer trends for themselves. “VCs could see it every day,” he says. “They could come back and say, ‘How did Fab do today?’” Last December, Fab raised $40 million from Andreessen Horowitz, Menlo Ventures, First Round Capital and several other sources, including the actor Ashton Kutcher. Goldberg, meanwhile, is now an investor in and a board member at RJMetrics. Of course, techniques to calculate the financial impact of social marketing are still evolving. But, Goldberg says, trying innovative analytics helps give his firm an advantage. “It’s understanding that you can’t just look at sales orders,” he says. “You have to look at how you measure excitement.”

are coming off a very low level,” Hunter said. “It’s occurring because builders finally got rid of their inventory, and demand is starting to pick up.” Homebuyers are choosing to pay a premium for a new home because foreclosures often require repair, and short sales, where the property is sold for less than the amount owed, can take too long to complete, Hunter said. The jump in demand is encouraging, though the recovery in housing is fragile and faces economic headwinds, including Europe’s sovereign debt crisis and possible government budget cuts next year. While unemployment has dropped to 8.1 percent from 10 percent in October 2009, it’s still above the 10-year average of 6.6 percent. The pace of new home sales last month was less than half the average of the past 10 years, according to Commerce Department data. While property prices fell 3.5 percent in February, the smallest 12-month drop since February 2011, it extended the decline since the 2006 peak to 35 percent. Home sales are also limited by tight lending standards, as lenders require higher down payments and credit scores. Toll Brothers has the advantage of selling to wealthier buyers with better access to cash and debt. Potential acquirers also have better access to jumbo mortgages, including an “18- month lock option, which we haven’t had since Moby Dick was a guppy,” said Donald Salmon, who runs Toll Brothers’ mortgage company.

“While domestic and global headline risk remains a concern that could potentially undermine buyer confidence, with mortgage rates at historic lows and inventory supplies dropping in many markets, we are feeling better than we have at any time in the past five years,” Robert Toll, executive chairman of the builder, said during the call. “We would like to say we’re back, but we need a little more confirmation. Nonetheless, it sure feels good compared to the desert we’ve just crossed.” Publicly-traded homebuilders are taking market share from private firms because they have better access to financing and are able to buy land and build in the best locations, said Foley of Barclays. Toll shares have gained 37 percent this year, about the same as the 11-member Standard & Poor’s 1500 Homebuilding index. The top builders saw a 25 percent increase in orders in the first quarter, and first quarter level was the highest since 2008, Foley said. Orders declined in the first quarter of every other year since 2005 except for the first three months of 2010, which had a 5 percent increase because of a temporary federal government tax credit for homebuyers, Foley said. Homebuilders are raising prices in the strongest markets and have been able to cut back on incentives, he said. “There’s more light and less tunnel,” Foley said. “This is real demand that has come back into the market.”

up and running, it had signed up about 175,000 members. Of those, he says, 30,000 came from ads — at an acquisition cost of about $2.50 per member. Extrapolating from the company’s sales trajectory, Goldberg said Fab.com is on track to have revenue of about $140 million in the coming year. He declined to comment on sales for the company’s first year, which ends next month. In search of insights into user behavior that could bolster sales, Fab.com hired two customer analytics start-ups: Custora in Brooklyn and RJMetrics in Philadelphia. With access to Fab.com’s historical and current sales data — minus personal details like members’ names, addresses and credit card numbers — RJMetrics generates online dashboards displaying the company’s total gross revenue, revenue per day, orders per day and membership statistics, updated every few hours. RJMetrics’ system also segments Fab.com members into cohorts, depending on the week they joined the site, then shows the groups’ past spending and frequency of purchases. That system uncovered an interesting trend, Goldberg says. Of the 12 percent of members who made a first purchase, half returned within two weeks to make a second; one-third made a third purchase within 30 days. “We are building an addictive business here,” he says.

Potential spending


TUESDAY, MAY 29, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

Nails Continued from E1 “Fingernails are coatings,” she said. “I thought if he could make a product to coat nails I could improve my profit margin.” After nine months of development work in his garage, he said nail technicians at his wife’s salon were satisfied with the product and started using it on customers. Jim McConnell said about a year later, the home-brewed product flooded onto the national and international markets. We’re one of four manufactures in the U.S. making the nail gel product, Lezlie McConnell said, and the only U.S. manufacturer of the curing ultraviolet light. In addition to the products manufactured in Redmond, Light Elegance Nail Products also sells other nail technician tools. Lezlie McConnell said sales have increased 25 percent each year since the company started in 1999. The McConnells also plan to expand the Redmond manufacturing facility in the future to keep up with increasing demand. Last year, Jim McConnell said, the company produced about 4,400 gallons of ultraviolet nail gel, enough for more than 1 million containers packaged and sold throughout the world. While the company’s products have only been available through Light Elegance distributors and to private labels, it will start selling them directly to nail technicians in the next two to three months out of Redmond, she said. Why do you think your Q: business continued to grow through the economic downturn? Lezlie McConnell: Women get what they want, right? It’s a little bit of something for women to hold on to. The relationship between a

A:

CEOs Continued from E1 Cash bonuses fell about 7 percent, to $2 million. The value of stock options, as determined by the company, climbed 6 percent to a median $1.7 million. Options usually give the CEO the right to buy shares in the future at the price they’re trading at when the options are granted, so they’re worth something only if the shares go up. Profit at companies in the Standard & Poor’s 500 stock index rose 16 percent last year, remarkable in an economy that grew more slowly than expected. CEOs managed to sell more, and squeeze more profit from each sale, despite problems ranging from a downgrade of the U.S. credit rating to an economic slowdown in China and Europe’s never-ending debt crisis. Still, there wasn’t much immediate benefit for the shareholders. The S&P 500 ended the year unchanged from where it started. Including dividends, the index returned a slender 2 percent.

Lingering concerns Shareholder activists, while glad that companies are moving a bigger portion of CEO pay into stock awards, caution that the rearranging isn’t a cure-all. For one thing, companies don’t have to tie stock awards to performance. Instead, they can make the awards automatically payable on a certain date — meaning all the CEO has to do is stick around. Other companies do tie stock awards to performance but set easy goals. Sometimes, “they set the bar so low, it would be difficult for an executive not to trip over it,” says Patrick McGurn, special counsel at Institutional Shareholder Services, which advises pension funds and other big investors on how to vote. And for many shareholders, their main concern — that pay is just too much, no matter what the form — has yet to be addressed. “It’s just that total (compensation) is going up, and that’s where the problem lies,” says Charles Elson, director of the Weinberg Center for Corporate Governance at the University of Delaware. The typical American worker would have to labor for 244 years to make what the typical boss of a big public company

nail tech and a customer is a really intimate relationship.

Q: A:

To what do you attribute the rapid growth of Light Elegance Nail Products? Lezlie McConnell: Around the time we started selling the product, websites started forming, which enabled the company to access international markets. I think timing was on our side. It would have been harder to reach people overseas without the Internet. Your website says you Q: teach classes; what types of classes are they? Jim McConnell: We teach A: people the most cost-effective way to use our product. There’s value in us making money, but there’s value in them, as our customers, making money, too. We also teach new techniques on how to apply the product, how to make a more beautiful nail and keep customers happy. Classes are held at the facility in Redmond, as well as across the states and internationally. Our 22 international distributors each host about 100 classes a year, and as a company we do about 150 a year. How many different colQ: Lezlie ors do you have? McConnell: We A: have 120 different colors of gel polish, and we also do glitter polish for the toes. People love glitter toes. How do you pick the Q: Lezlie colors? McConnell: We A: have already manufactured our colors for fall, and have to know what the color palettes are going to be in the wintertime now. We follow the fashion industry. We spend a lot of time overseas seeing the different fashion and color trends. I’m in Redmond, Oregon, and I have to predict what is going to be the color for fall. — Reporter: 541-617-7818, rrees@bendbulletin.com

makes in one. The median pay for U.S. workers was about $39,300 last year. That was up 1 percent from the year before, not enough to keep pace with inflation. Tita Freeman, a senior vice president at the Business Roundtable, a group of chief executives of large U.S. companies, says that CEO compensation is driven by market forces. “I can’t tell you precisely what a specific CEO should make, any more than I can tell you what a top-performing Major League Baseball shortstop should make,” Freeman said in an emailed statement.

Other findings Since the AP began tracking CEO pay five years ago, the numbers have seesawed. Pay climbed in 2007, fell during the recession in 2008 and 2009 and then jumped again in 2010. To determine 2011 pay packages, the AP used Equilar data to look at the 322 companies in the S&P 500 that had filed statements with federal regulators through April 30. To make comparisons fair, the sample includes only CEOs in place for at least two years. Among the AP’s other findings: • David Simon, CEO of Simon Property, which operates malls around the country, is on track to be the highest-paid in the AP survey, at $137 million. That was almost entirely in stock awards that could eventually be worth $132 million, some of which won’t be redeemable until 2019. The company said it wanted to make sure Simon wasn’t lured to another company. He has been CEO since 1995; his father and uncle are Simon Property’s co-founders. This month, Simon Property’s shareholders rejected Simon’s pay package by a large margin: 73 percent of the votes cast for or against were against. But the company doesn’t appear likely to change the 2011 package. After the shareholder vote, it released a statement saying that “we value our stockholders’ input” and would “take their views into consideration as (the board) reviews compensation plans for our management team.” But it also said that Simon’s performance had been stellar and it needed to pay him enough to keep him in the job. Simon’s paycheck looks paltry compared with that of Ap-

Spain Continued from E1 Bank of Spain estimates show Spain’s lenders are sitting on some €180 billion ($233 billion) in assets that could cause them losses. The government fears the cost of rescuing the country’s vulnerable banks could overwhelm its own finances, which are already strained by a double-dip recession and an unemployment rate of nearly 25 percent, and force it to seek a rescue by the rest of Europe. Among the chief con-

Microsoft Continued from E1 This strange marketing episode originated in the success that Microsoft enjoyed with its Xbox Live service, which was introduced in 2001. It allowed players of Xbox games to use Internet connections to play one another in real time, so adding “Live” to “Xbox” made perfect sense. In 2005, however, Microsoft executives decided that “Live” could enliven its core Windows and Office brands, too. In a news briefing in 2005, Bill Gates said the goal of the company’s newly announced Live-branded services was to “make Windows, Office and Xbox further come alive for our customers at work, home and play.” What its customers were doing was spending more and more time using the Internet, and not giving much thought to the operating system that ran their PCs. But Microsoft executives apparently thought that “Live” was so powerful an adjective that it could make the Windows brand suitable for extension in all directions. In 2006, Microsoft unveiled

Top earners A sampling of the highest paid CEOs in the U.S.

DAVID SIMON Simon Property $137M

LESLIE MOONVES CBS $68M

DAVID ZASLAV Discovery Communications $52M

SANJAY JHA Motorola Mobility $47.2M

PHILIPPE DAUMAN Viacom $43M

ple CEO Tim Cook, whose pay package was valued at $378 million when he became CEO in August. That was almost entirely in stock awards, some of which won’t be redeemable until 2021, so the value could change dramatically. Cook wasn’t included in the AP study because he is new to the job. • Of the five highest-paid CEOs, three were also in the top five the year before. All three are in the TV business: Leslie Moonves of CBS ($68 million); David Zaslav of Discovery Communications, parent of Animal Planet, TLC and other channels ($52 million); and Philippe Dauman of Viacom, which owns MTV and other channels ($43 million). • About two in three CEOs got raises. For 16 CEOs in the sample, pay more than doubled from a year earlier, including Bank of America’s Brian Moynihan (from $1.3 million to $7.5 million), Marathon Oil’s Clarence Cazalot Jr. (from $8.8 million to $29.9 million) and Motorola Mobility’s Sanjay Jha (from $13 million to $47.2 million). • CEOs running health-care

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cerns surrounding Bankia’s request for state aid — the largest in Spanish history — is just how Spain plans to fund it. The country’s borrowing costs have risen sharply over the past few weeks. On Monday, Spain’s interest rate, or yield, for 10-year bonds on the secondary market — a key indicator of market confidence — rose 0.16 percentage points to close at 6.45 percent. Rajoy said this had more to do with broader concerns about Europe and Greece and dismissed suggestions

it had anything to do with Bankia. A rate of 7 percent is considered unsustainable over the long term and there is concern that Spain might soon be pushed join the ranks of Greece, Ireland and Portugal and seek an international bailout. The Prime Minister said that the government had not yet decided how it would proceed in funding the Bankia bailout. However, the Economy Ministry said earlier Monday that it is considering injecting government debt

into Bankia’s accounts. The bank could then turn to the European Central Bank and use those bonds as collateral to receive cash for the recapitalization. Analysts said that such a technique would only prove to investors that the country is having difficulties raising money on the international debt markets and would therefore make them even more reluctant to buy Spanish debt. “It sends a signal of a lack of confidence,” said Mark Miller of Capital Economics in London.

Windows Live Messenger, a new version of what had been MSN Messenger. The company said it was the first of more than 20 Windows Live services that were being beta-tested. The message of the new brand, however, was not easily understood. “‘Windows Live’ — what does it mean? I can’t figure it out,” says Susan Fournier, an associate professor of marketing at Boston University. “I see no evidence of planning around a brand strategy.” Fournier says Microsoft’s executives seem to have “assumed they had a brand” that could be extended to other products, “but you can’t extend something that doesn’t have resonance in people’s lives.”

ingly diverse set of unrelated products and services was a mistake, in his view. Even if the services had been closely tied to Windows, the public didn’t perceive the brand as having the attributes that would serve associated products well. Batra says, “Our brand-love research shows that loved brands reflect and symbolize deeply held personal values, such as Apple does for creativity,” he says. “Windows and Live each lack this type of brand strength.” After so many years of pushing the Windows Live brand in so many products, the company couldn’t easily drop the branding, even if executives had come around to the idea that it was misbegotten. But the imminent arrival of a new version of its flagship PC operating system, Windows 8, seems to provide cover for the change. Microsoft declined my request for an interview. But writing this month on a company blog, Chris Jones, Microsoft’s vice president overseeing the Windows Live group, said: “Windows Live services and apps were built on versions of Windows that were simply not

designed to be connected to a cloud service for anything other than updates, and as a result, they felt ‘bolted on’ to the experience.” With the new version of Windows, many of the Windows Live products and services that had been packaged separately will be installed as a part of the operating system. “There is no ‘separate brand’ to think about or a separate service to install,” Jones wrote. Most important, Windows 8 customers will be free to substitute non-Microsoft products and services in place of the re-branded Windows Live successors. “You’re welcome to mix and match them with the software and services you choose,” he says. “Windows Live” is disappearing. But “Live” will continue where it began, at Xbox — though the company has insisted on supersizing its rendering to “Xbox LIVE.” And if Microsoft executives wonder what kept the Windows brand extension from taking permanent hold, they should be told ever so gently that it’s a matter of the heart: the brand love just wasn’t there.

No brand love Rajeev Batra, a marketing professor at the University of Michigan and a co-author of a scholarly article titled “Brand Love,” says Microsoft failed to notice a basic principle: “When the same brand name is used on multiple new products, those new brands should be all similar in key ways,” he says. Trying to extend the “Live” from Xbox to Windows, with a bewilder-

companies made the most ($10.8 million). Those running utilities made the least ($7 million). • Perks and other personal benefits, such as hired drivers or personal use of company airplanes, rose only slightly, and some companies cut back, saying they wanted to align their pay structure with “best practices.” Military contractor General Dynamics stopped paying for country club memberships for top executives, though it gave them payments equivalent to three years of club fees to ease “transition issues” caused by the change.

and major shareholders, then threw out its old pay formula. New CEO Meg Whitman is getting $1 a year in salary and no guaranteed bonus for 2011. Nearly all her pay is in stock options that could be worth $16 million, but only if the share price goes up. Other companies took notice, too. Last year, shareholders rejected the CEO pay packages at Janus Capital, homebuilder Beazer Homes and construction company Jacobs Engineering Group. All won approval this year after the companies made the packages more palatable to shareholders.

Shifting to stock awards

Trial by fire

The typical pay of $9.6 million that Equilar calculated is the median value, or the midpoint, of the companies used in the AP analysis. In other words, half the CEOs made more and half less. To value stock awards and stock options, the AP used numbers supplied by the companies. Those figures are based on formulas the companies use to estimate what the stock and options will eventually be worth when a CEO receives the stock or cashes in the options. Stock awards are generally valued based on the stock’s current price. Stock options are valued using company estimates that take into account the stock’s current price, how long until the CEO can cash the options in, how the stock price is expected to move before then, and expected dividends. Estimates don’t generally take inflation into account. The shift to stock awards is at least partly rooted in what is known as the Dodd-Frank law, passed in the wake of the financial crisis, which overhauled how banks and other public companies are regulated. Beginning last year, DoddFrank required public companies to let shareholders vote on whether they approve of the top executives’ pay packages. The votes are advisory, so companies don’t have to take back even a penny if shareholders give them the thumbsdown. But shame has proved a powerful motivator. It got Hewlett-Packard to change its ways. After an embarrassing “no” vote last year on the 2010 pay packages, including nearly $24 million for ousted CEO Mark Hurd, the company huddled with more than 200 investment firms

To be sure, shareholders aren’t voting en masse against executive pay. Instead, they seem to be saving “no” votes for the executives they deem most egregious. Of more than 3,000 U.S. companies that held votes in 2011, only 43 got rejections, according to ISS. But the mere presence of the “say on pay” vote is triggering change, shareholder activists say. “Companies that have gone through that trial by fire don’t want to go through it again,” says McGurn, the ISS special counsel. Even Chesapeake Energy, a company perennially in the cross-hairs of corporate-governance activists, is bowing to pressure. The company has drawn fire for showering CEO Aubrey McClendon with assorted goodies. In addition to handing him big pay packages — $17.9 million for 2011 — Chesapeake in recent years has spent millions sponsoring the NBA’s Oklahoma City Thunder, which he partially owns, paying him for his collection of antique maps and letting him buy stakes in company wells. Last year, shareholders of the natural gas producer passed the proposed 2010 pay package but by a low margin: 58 percent. This year, with shareholder pressure mounting, the board has ended some of McClendon’s perks and stripped him of his title as chairman. A lawsuit settlement is forcing him to buy back his $12 million worth of maps. After losing the chairman job, McClendon issued a statement saying the demotion “reflects our determination to uphold strong corporate governance standards.” Chesapeake will seek shareholder approval

for McClendon’s 2011 pay at its annual meeting in June.

Claw-back provisions Another big change is that more companies are giving themselves the right to take back a top executive’s pay from previous years if they determine that the executive acted inappropriately to inflate the company’s financial results. The Dodd-Frank overhaul will eventually require public companies to include such broad “claw back” provisions, which will expand on narrowly written rules from a decade ago. But companies aren’t waiting. In a separate study, Equilar found that 84 percent of Fortune 100 companies now include claw backs in their executive pay packages, up from 18 percent in 2006. Last year, the former CEO of Beazer Homes agreed with regulators, who cited the older claw back rules, to turn over $6.5 million he had earned when profits were inflated. In February, UBS took back half of the previous year’s bonuses awarded to many investment bankers because of subsequent losses in the unit. Picking the right mix of incentives is partly just guesswork, and sometimes the results are simply a force of serendipity. Stocks can get swept up in rising or falling markets, so the fortunes of CEOs with well-designed pay packages can reflect luck — good or bad — not just managerial skills. Some shareholder groups doubt that ever-higher CEO pay, ingrained as it is in the corporate psyche, will ever be refashioned dramatically enough to satisfy shareholders and consumer groups who see the paychecks as too big, too disconnected from performance, and set by wealthy directors who are oblivious to the way that most of their shareholders live. “I hope we have seen the last of this,” says Rosanna Weaver of the CtW Investment Group, which works on shareholder issues with union-sponsored pension funds and has lobbied against CEO pay packages at a number of companies. “But I would be very surprised, just given what I know of human nature, let alone what I know of the financial markets.” Still, she’s encouraged by the change that has already been stirred. “It’s a very big task,” Weaver says. “I still believe it is worth trying.”


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THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, MAY 29, 2012

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If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact Ashley Brothers at 541-383-0323, email business@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� at www.bendbulletin.com. Please allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication.

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TODAY BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL HIGH DESERT CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7:15 a.m.; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541-420-7377. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit; registration required; contact 541447-6384 or www.happyhour training.com; $35; 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. BUILD A STRONG CREDIT HISTORY: Free; 6 p.m.; Mid Oregon Credit Union, 1386 N.E. Cushing Drive, Bend; 541-382-1795. LEVERAGING FACEBOOK FOR BUSINESS: Registration required; class continues June 5; $89; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu.

WEDNESDAY BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL BEND CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7 a.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-749-0789. WINNING IN THE SECOND HALF: Hosted by Mark Schang with Edward Jones, about long term care insurance; lunch provided; registration required; free; 1-2 p.m.; Greg’s Grill, 395 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-617-8861 or mark. schang@edwardjones.com.

THURSDAY BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL DESCHUTES BUSINESS NETWORKERS CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7 a.m.; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541610-9125. ETFS EXPLAINED: Registration required; free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St.,

Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794 or luiz.soutomaior@schwab.com. MAY GREEN DRINKS: Network, learn about local businesses and the sustainability efforts and have an eco-conscious drink; 5-7 p.m.; Office Spaces, 115 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-385-6908 or http://envirocenter .org/calendar/green-drinks-11.

FRIDAY CENTRAL OREGON REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT CLUB: Free; 11 a.m.; ServiceMaster Clean, 20806 Sockeye Place, Bend; 541-610-4006 or bobbleile@windermere.com. FREE TAX FRIDAY: Free tax return reviews; schedule an appointment at 541-385-9666 or www.myzoomtax. com; free; 2-4 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666.

SATURDAY June 2 CLEAN UP AND SPEED UP YOUR PC: Registration required; $59; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Redmond campus, 2030 S.E. College Loop, Redmond; 541-383-7270 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu. HOMEBUYERS WORKSHOP: Learn about finding, financing and owning a home; free; 1-3 p.m.; First American Title Insurance Co., 395 S.W. Bluff, Bend; 541-306-7455 or www.wellsfargo.com/events.

MONDAY June 4 EXCEL 2010 INTERMEDIATE: Registration required; $59; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

TUESDAY June 5 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL HIGH DESERT CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7:15 a.m.; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541-420-7377.

WINDOWS 7 TIPS AND TRICKS: For people age 50 and older; bring a laptop with Windows 7 on it to each class; $29 or $39; 10 a.m.-noon; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-388-1133.

WEDNESDAY June 6 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL BEND CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7 a.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541749-0789. NUTRITIONAL THERAPY PRACTITIONER TRAINING: Free information session; registration requested; 5:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Boyle Education Center, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu. NUTRITIONAL THERAPY PRACTITIONER TRAINING: Registration required; this is a 14 module 9 month course presented by the Nutritional Therapy Association, Inc; 5:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. BUSINESS START-UP WORKSHOP: Registration required, contact 541383-7290 or http://noncredit.cocc. edu; $15; 6-8 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7700.

THURSDAY June 7 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL DESCHUTES BUSINESS NETWORKERS CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7 a.m.; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541610-9125. DECISION MAKING AND PROBLEM SOLVING: Management seminar; registration required; $85; 8 a.m.noon; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7290 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu. GETTING THE MOST OUT OF SCHWAB.COM: Registration required; free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles

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Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794 or luiz.soutomaior@schwab.com.

FRIDAY June 8 MAIL MERGE USING WORD, OUTLOOK AND EXCEL: Registration required; $59; 9 a.m.-noon; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. CENTRAL OREGON REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT CLUB: Free; 11 a.m.; ServiceMaster Clean, 20806 Sockeye Place, Bend; 541-610-4006 or bobbleile@windermere.com. FREE TAX FRIDAY: Free tax return reviews; schedule an appointment at 541-385-9666 or www.myzoomtax. com; free; 2-4 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666.

SATURDAY June 9 FILE IT, FIND IT: Registration required; $59; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Madras Campus, 1170 E. Ashwood Road, Madras; 541-383-7270 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit; registration required; contact 541447-6384 or www.happyhour training.com; $35; 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. QUICKBOOKS PRO BEGINNING: Register by June 6; $59; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; COCC - Crook County Open Campus, 510 S.E. Lynn Blvd., Prineville; 541-383-7270 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu.

MONDAY June 11 FORECLOSURE CLASS: Call 541318-7506, ext. 309 to reserve a seat; 5:30-7:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 20310 Empire Ave., Suite A110, Bend; 541-318-7506.

DEEDS Deschutes County

Oregon Joy LLC to Hayden Homes LLC, Antler Ridge, Phase 2, Lots 39, 77 and 80, $198,600 Christine K. Difilippo trustee for Difilippo Family Revocable Trust to Ronald G. and Karen L. Cox, Ridge at Eagle Crest 27, Lot 54, $312,500 James D. and Susan C. Thompson to Gavin and Crista Lindberg, Golf Course Homesite Section Ninth Addition, Lot 132, $455,000 Toni A. Kinsey trustee for Epstein Family Survivors Trust to Wells Fargo Bank, Skyliner Summit at Broken Top, Phase 10, Lot 213, $467,471.52 Kondaur Capital Corporation to Evelyn G. Swan, Canal Crossings, Lot 22, $200,000 Pahlisch Homes Inc. to Jerry J. and Michelle M. Gross, Newport Landing, Lot 11, $296,000 Ken, Dee and Kevin Kongslie to Joel F. Slavonia and Susana E. Noles, Fairway Crest Village, Phase 2, Lot 5, Block 1, $871,000 Gary D. and D. K. Thomas Keown to Brian J. and Julie R. Satterwhite, Country House Condominium Section, Unit 31, $268,000 Michael Tennant to Todd A. and Leah B. Schock, Township 22, Range 9, Section 8, $285,000 Paul N. and Ellen Mandel to George A. and Julianne M. Powell, Township 16, Range 11, Section 14, $635,000 Federal National Mortgage Association to R. Derek and Dianne F. Jaros, Desert Skies, Phases 3, 4 and 5, Lot 58, $201,500 Tennant Family Limited Partnership to Stephen K. and Marla E. Hacker, NorthWest Crossing, Phase 12, Lot 565, $305,000 Combined Resources LLC to Angela P. Quail, Township 18, Range 12, Section 8, $189,900

Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation to Scott L. Boyer, RiverRim P.U.D., Phase 5, Lot 382, $172,000 Brian A. and Michelle L. Marquis to Ralph Swan and Dia S. Musgrove, Awbrey Park, Phase 3, Lot 116, $525,000 Samuel and Elizabeth L. Richardson to James P. and Kristi Kelly, Phoenix Park, Phase 2, Lot 52, $322,000 Melvin L. McDougal to R. Derek and Dianne F. Jaros, Desert Skies, Phases 3, 4 and 5, Lot 71, $211,900 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation to Wells Fargo Bank N.A. aka Wachovia Mortgage fka World Savings Bank FSB, Township 20, Range 10, Section 24, $566,576 Hayden Homes LLC to Robert M. Gregory, Aspen Rim, Lot 7, $174,990 Hayden Homes LLC to Michael K. Frede, Canyon Breeze, Lot 22, $237,211 Hayden Homes LLC to Shon Rae and Paul Lieto, Canyon Breeze, Lot 29, $203,524 Dick Robertson and James L. Ramsey trustees for Buddy L. Ramsey Trust and Lillian F. Ramsey Trust to Gaylen W. and Shirley J. Rettke, Cliffs, Lot 13, $256,000 Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation to Michael D. and Margaret M. Obert, Ahern Acres, Lot 33, Block 2, $181,500 Fidelity National Title Insurance Company to Jason Mendell, Deschutes, Lot 7, Block 3, $215,000 Home Federal Bank to Shin S. Nakato, Lot 6, Township 16, Range 13, Section 6, $475,000 Fannie Mae aka Federal National Mortgage Association to Walten E. Mildren Jr. and Laura Mildren, Oregon Water Wonderland Unit 2, Lot 5, Block 57, $240,410 Greg Welch to Renato J. and Cassie L. Cedolin, NorthWest Crossing, Phase 8, Lot 373, $635,000


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Food, F2-3 Home, F4

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THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, MAY 29, 2012

www.bendbulletin.com/athome

HOME

Protecting your fabric from stains and more By Linda Turner Griepentrog For The Bulletin

New furnishings are always fun to sit back and admire. But — before you let the dog on the new couch — you may want to take at look at the tags and see if it has any protective finishes on those cushion fabrics to help shed dirt and grime from everyday use, and shield them from unexpected spills. Many home decor pieces and carpeting come with factory-applied finishes to help protect them and keep them looking like new. Check labels for names like Scotchgard or Teflon fabric protectors. Some finishes are actually baked into the fibers before the fabric is made; others are applied after construction. Most fabric companies recognize homeowner concerns for durability. Bend Copper Leaf Interiors owner Julie Linker notes that the maker of Sunbrella, traditionally an outdoor fabric, is now making fabric lines for indoor furnishings and window coverings. Sunbrella is well known for its soil resistance, and it’s ideal for high-use furniture. According to Calico Corners, a home decor fabric retailer, most of its upholstery fabrics are factory-treated with Dupont Teflon, which provides an invisible molecular barrier around individual fibers. But what if you made those comfy throw pillows yourself and the thought of someone resting his or her head on them in front of the TV every night makes your stomach flip flop? See Fabric / F4

GARDEN

Burn off night’s chill

Home search Is your house, condo, townhouse or apartment spectacular or unique? How about your garden or landscaping? We want to know about it. Contact us at athome@bendbulletin.com or 541-617-7860.

Joe Kline / The Bulletin

Fire pits, such as this one on a backyard deck in Redmond, can provide table space, as well as a spot to get warm.

• Fire pits come in a variety of shapes and styles. Here’s a guide to selection, placement and use.

FOOD

By Marielle Gallagher • The Bulletin

Mayonnaise: oil, egg and a drop of magic

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By Melissa Clark

Some options ...

New York Times News Service

Don’t you know the mayonnaise trick?” My friend Dori and I were standing in front of Empire Mayonnaise in New York City, the city’s first and only artisanal mayonnaise shop, ogling its wares: flavors like lime pickle and, of course, bacon, when she asked me that. If there was a trick for making mayonnaise, I certainly did not know it. And what a trick — a potential gamechanger, the kind that turns homemade mayo from a special-occasion recipe into an everyday endeavor, ending our dependence on subpar, corn-syrup-filled commercial stuff. Because here’s the thing about mayo: While it’s easy to buy high-end mustard and ketchup, good-quality commercial mayonnaise is a rare thing indeed. See Mayo / F2

TODAY’S RECIPES

ven hot summer days in the High Desert are often followed by cool evenings. When the sun drops past the horizon, Central Oregonians are throwing on sweaters or heading indoors. One option to lengthen outside hours after dark is to incorporate a fire pit into a yard.

Local residents can choose from wood-burning or gas-fueled fire pit models with design features that provide table space or simpler ones that just offer a warm place to pull up a chair. “I think that on summer nights when it gets cooler here (fire pits) are great not just because they’re beautiful, they have heat output,” said Lori Ludwig, design consultant and salesperson at Patio World in Bend.

Gas vs. wood

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

LEFT: High Desert Fire Pit Tall, Stars and Moon design, $269. Sold at Fireside. TOP CENTER: High Desert Fire Pit, 40 inches in diameter, $349. Includes a cooking grid, poker and spark screen. Sold at Fireside. BOTTOM CENTER: Castelle 50-inch Sunburst Top fire pit in cast aluminum with amber glass and table top insert, $2,366. Sold at Patio World. RIGHT: Heat-N-Glo Patio Campfire, $359. Features a paintable surface. Sold at Patio World.

•Mayonnaise, F2 •Savory Gruyere-Olive Bread, F3

•Sweet Potato Salad with Lime Pickle Mayonnaise and Cashews, F3

•Easy Shrimp and Chicken Sausage Paella, F3 •New England Blueberry Pudding, F6

Fireside in Bend sells wood- and gas-burning fire pits, and Patio World sells gas-burning units. Gas and wood offer different benefits, and choosing a type depends on how you plan to use it and your budget. In general, gas-burning fire pits tend to be more expensive than wood-burning, with the least expensive fire pit at Patio World running $349 versus wood-burning units offered at Fireside ranging from $159 to $349. Gas-burning fire pits have a cleaner burning flame without any flying ash and may be popular “because of the convenience and that when you’re gathered around, no one is getting smoked out,” said Jerry Stevens, general manager of Fireside. See Fire pits / F5

•Okra, Corn and Tomatoes, F6 •Raspberry Jam, F6


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THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, MAY 29, 2012

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Next week: Garden peas

Mayo Continued from F1 If you want really delicious mayo, you have no choice but to make it yourself. Despite my deep and committed love of mayo, my success rate for making it had been about 50 percent. To make mayonnaise, you need to slowly beat oil into egg until an emulsion forms — that is, the oil molecules are uniformly dispersed in the egg and then hold there. Whether I used a food processor, blender or whisk, my mayonnaise often broke: the oil and egg separated, heartbreakingly deflating from a thick and attractive froth into a thin and oily puddle. Adding a teaspoon of water to the yolks before dripping in the oil helps create a stronger and more stable emulsion, Dori said. She picked up the secret in culinary school years ago, and her mayonnaises haven’t collapsed since. The first time I tried it, I achieved the lightest, most ethereal mayonnaise I’d ever made. It tasted deeply of the good olive oil I used, seasoned with lemon and mustard. We ate it with roasted asparagus, dunking the spears two, three and four times into the tasty sauce until we swabbed the bowl clean. The next day I whisked together another batch, stirring in minced anchovies at the end. It made some of the finest egg salad I’d ever had. Heady with success and inspired by the flavors on offer at Empire, I knew a mayonnaise spree was in the making. Dancing in my head were visions of sweet potato salad tossed with pungent lime pickle mayonnaise, moist pieces of swordfish slathered with garlicky aioli, and hot biscuits spread with bacon mayonnaise and topped with slices of ripe tomato. Why did a teaspoon of water make such a difference? And why hadn’t anyone told me this before? The only cookbook I knew

Mayonnaise Makes 1 cup. 1 lg egg yolk, at room temperature 2 tsp lemon juice 1 tsp Dijon mustard 1 ⁄4 tsp kosher salt 3 ⁄4 C neutral oil like safflower or canola In a medium bowl, whisk together the egg yolk, lemon juice, mustard, salt and 1 teaspoon cold water until frothy. Whisking constantly, slowly dribble in the oil until mayonnaise is thick and oil is incorporated. When the mayonnaise emulsifies and starts to thicken, you can add the oil in a thin stream instead of drop by drop.

Photos by Andrew Scrivani / New York Times News Service

LEFT: A dish of sweet potato salad tossed with homemade lime pickle mayonnaise and cashews. RIGHT, FROM TOP: Homemade mayonnaise, homemade mayonnaise with sriracha sauce and homemade black pepper and rosemary mayonnaise.

of that mentioned adding water to the yolk before whipping was published by the Culinary Institute of America, and so I called there and spoke with Tucker Bunch, a chef and

instructor. “A little water physically broadens the space between fat droplets, helping them stay separate,” Bunch said. If the oil droplets don’t stay

distinct from one another and Thus educated, I became evenly dispersed in the oil, the bolder, adding my oil even mayonnaise will break. He faster at the end while whiskexplained that while you need ing the heck out of it. Fiftynot add water for an emulsion eight seconds is my personal to form, just a teaspoon in- record from start to finish. creases the odds that it will. When I added the oil faster Lemon juice and vinegar than that, the mayonnaise accomplish the same thing, broke. but if you add too much you But given my newfound prorun the risk of ending up with ficiency, even a batch or two mayo that is too tart. A dol- of broken mayonnaise didn’t lop of mustard can help cre- bother me. I just substituted it ate and hold an emulsion, too, for the oil and egg in my favorwhich, beyond flavor, is why ite savory cake recipe, with olmany mayonnaise recipes ives and Gruyere. (The same call for it. cake recipe also works with Adding water also height- unbroken mayonnaise and is ens the fluffy factor. a great way to use up the last “Without any added water, of a batch of the homemade mayonnaise can be like petro- stuff, which has a fridge life of leum jelly,” Bunch said. “Wa- about a week.) ter gives you that nice, light Lime pickle was my first texture.” flavored mayonnaise experiAnother reason to add wa- ment, which I made by chopter is that it dilutes the yolk ping up the pickle, an Indian and opens up the complex ma- condiment sold at Middle trix of lecithin and Eastern and Asian proteins it conmarkets, and stirtains, said Richard “Without any ring it in at the D. Ludescher, the added water, end. The texture, dean of academic nubby and a little programs at the mayonnaise crunchy from the School of Environ- can be like pieces of pickle, mental and Bio- petroleum jelly. was a far cry from logical Sciences at the velvety mouth Rutgers. The leci- Water gives feel of the version thin binds the oil you that nice, by Empire Maydroplets and the light texture.” onnaise. That’s water in the yolk; because the own— Tucker Bunch, ers, Elizabeth Valthat’s the essence Culinary Institute of leau, a designer, of a mayonnaise America and chef Sam Maemulsion. As long as they are bound son, make their together, the emulmayonnaise using sion is stable. infused oils so there are no With a blender or food pro- particles to interfere with the cessor, a little cold water can smoothness. keep everything from overMy rustic version pleased heating as it whirls — another me nonetheless. Mixed with frequent emulsion buster. To soft cubed sweet potatoes, really bolster your chances crunchy cashews and cilanof creating and holding an tro, it was bright, barbecueemulsion, use a whisk. Al- ready fare. though mayonnaise can come I then played with all kinds together more easily in a food of mayonnaise flavorings, processor, Bunch said, it is stirring various ingredients in prone to breaking. Overbeat- at the end after the emulsion ing, along with overheating, had safely formed. I added can make the molecules come citrus zests, chili sauce, herbs, unglued. garlic, capers and olives. “This isn’t going to happen I also played with the variwhen you use a whisk,” he ety of oil, changing the ratio said. “We make students on of intense extra virgin olive campus make mayonnaise oil to a mellow neutral oil. The with a whisk first before they more olive oil I used, the better can use a machine so they I liked the resulting mayonunderstand what it takes to naise when eating it plain, but work.” using all neutral oil makes a The last piece of wisdom better canvas for adding flaBunch shared was that ini- vors. Safflower, canola, grapetially the oil should be added seed and peanut oil all do to the yolk drop by drop; the nicely. Just make sure the oil is emulsion should form when at the same temperature as the about a quarter of the oil is egg. You can use cold oil and beaten in. Once that happens cold eggs, but I found room you can go a lot faster, in- temperature eggs and oil to be creasing the drops to a steady the easiest to work with. stream. After dozens of happy ex-

Food Processor Mayo: In the bowl of a food processor, whip together the yolk, lemon juice, mustard, salt and 1 teaspoon cold water. With the motor running, slowly drizzle in the oil until mayonnaise is thick and oil is incorporated. This works best if you double the recipe. Electric Mixer Mayo: Double the ingredients for the mayonnaise and use an electric mixer instead of a whisk, dribbling the oil down the side of the bowl. Fluffy Whole Egg Mayo: Use a whole egg instead of just the yolk, and eliminate the water. This works best in the food processor or mixer. Olive Oil Mayo: Substitute extra virgin olive oil for all, or at least 1⁄2 cup, of the neutral oil. Garlic Aioli: Finely chop 2 garlic cloves and mash with a pinch of salt until they form a paste; mix with egg yolk before adding oil. Substitute extra virgin olive oil for at least half of the neutral oil. Rouille: Combine a large pinch of crumbled saffron threads with 2 teaspoons boiling water. Let mixture cool completely. Whisk saffron water with 1 egg yolk, 2 teaspoons lemon juice, 2 finely chopped garlic cloves, 1⁄2 teaspoon tomato paste, 1⁄4 teaspoon salt and a pinch of cayenne. Whisking constantly, dribble in 1⁄2 cup extra virgin olive oil and 1⁄4 cup neutral oil until mayonnaise is thick and oil is incorporated. Lime Pickle Mayo: Whisk in 2 tablespoons finely chopped lime pickle at the end. (Lime pickle can be found online.) Sriracha Mayo: Whisk in 11⁄2 teaspoons sriracha, or more to taste, at the end. Anchovy Mayo: Whisk in 4 minced anchovies at the end. Walnut Mayo: Substitute 1⁄3 cup walnut oil for an equal amount of the neutral oil. Olive Or Caper Mayo: Whisk in 2 tablespoons chopped olives or capers at the end. Spicy Chipotle Mayo: Whisk in 2 to 3 teaspoons chopped chipotle chili in adobo sauce at the end. Rosemary Black Pepper Mayo: Whisk in 2 teaspoons chopped rosemary leaves and 1⁄2 teaspoon freshly cracked black pepper at the end. If you like you can add 1⁄2 teaspoon grated lemon zest and a minced garlic clove, too. Smoky Chile Bacon Mayo: Fry 3 strips of bacon until crisp; chop and set aside. Pour the fat from the pan into a heatproof liquid measuring cup and add enough oil to make 3 ⁄4 cup total. Make mayonnaise, omitting mustard and using bacon fat-oil mixture. Stir in chopped bacon and 1⁄4 teaspoon hot smoked paprika at the end.

periments, my confidence was high and I felt ready to take on the mother of all flavored mayos: bacon mayonnaise. I had tried this before my self-researched seminar in mayonnaise making, and it broke every time, I think because I tried to use the bacon grease while it was still too warm, fearing that it would congeal if I let it cool. This time I mixed the warm grease into the oil. The oil cooled it down and kept it from solidifying, so it was easy to drip into the eggs. I added a pinch of smoked paprika and some chopped bacon at the end to intensify the smokiness. On the recommendation of Valleau, I whipped up what she called a “skinny BLT,” with lettuce, the first local greenhouse tomatoes and my homemade bacon mayonnaise on toast. It was crisp, juicy and lighter than the original — ideal for summer eating. Of course, I thought as I ate, it might be even better with both bacon and bacon mayonnaise. Or bacon and sriracha mayo. I’m sure I’ll get around to whipping it up.


TUESDAY, MAY 29, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

FOOD

ASK A COOK

Sweet Potato Salad with Lime Pickle Mayonnaise and Cashews

Can you freeze red wine?

Makes 6 servings. Salt 11⁄2 lbs sweet potatoes, peeled and diced into 1-inch pieces 6 TBS lime pickle mayonnaise (see recipe) 2 scallions, thinly sliced 2 TBS chopped cilantro plus whole cilantro leaves for garnish 1 ⁄2 C chopped roasted, salted cashews

By Kathleen Purvis McClatchy Newspapers

Can I freeze red wine? Q: I opened a bottle and only used 1 cup for a sauce,

Savory Gruyere-Olive Bread Makes 8 to 10 servings.

Heat the oven to 350 degrees. Grease an 8-inch loaf pan. In a large bowl, whisk together the flour, baking powder, salt and pepper. In a separate bowl, whisk together the mayonnaise, egg and milk. Fold the wet mixture into the dry until just combined. Fold in the cheese and olives. Scrape the batter into the loaf pan and smooth the top with a spatula. Bake until golden and firm, 40 minutes. Let bread cool in the pan for 5 minutes. Run a knife around the edge of the pan and turn onto a wire rack. Cool 20 minutes before slicing and serving.

Other mayo uses Knowing how to make mayonnaise and many variations of it can expand a home cook’s horizons. • Mayo-Marinated Steaks or Lamb Chops: Marinate steak or lamb chops in chipotle, olive or bacon mayonnaise for at least 3 hours, or in the fridge overnight. Grill and serve with more sauce on the side. Alternatively, grill steak or lamb naked and serve with a dollop of mayonnaise on top. (It will melt and turn into a piquant sauce, like a compound butter but lighter.) • Broiled or Grilled Fish with Aioli: Coat fish steaks or fillets with a thin layer of aioli or rouille and grill or broil until golden. Serve with more sauce on the side. Mayonnaise encourages browning and helps keep fish moist. • Pasta Salad Carbonara: Boil your favorite chunky pasta (fusilli, penne, etc.) and dress with bacon mayonnaise while still warm. Serve topped with Parmesan curls and lemon wedges.

Susan M. Selasky / Detroit Free Press

In paella, a Spanish rice dish, saffron not only flavors the food but provides color as well.

Saffronmakesapaellasing By Susan M. Selasky Detroit Free Press

Many, many years ago, my first experience with saffron turned into love at first scent. Saffron, although pungent at first, adds a wonderful floral note to dishes once cooked. It’s the world’s most expensive spice, and no wonder. Saffron comes from the dried stigmas of a purple crocus, and each flower has only three stigmas, which must be hand-picked. It takes more than 14,000 of those tiny stigmas to make an ounce of saffron. At Penzeys Spices in Beverly Hills, Calif., a half-gram jar of Spanish saffron runs $8.49-$9.59. Other varieties from India or Kashmir cost upward of $13 for a half-gram. It may be expensive, but it’s used sparingly. A pinch

goes a long way because saffron is so aromatic. A friend once told me how disappointed she was the first time she bought saffron at a major grocery store for a lobster bisque recipe. It was in an envelope, inside a jar. When she opened the envelope and saw what little was there, she thought she’d been short-changed considering the price. She hadn’t been. Saffron looks like a small, tangled mess of red threads. The redder the threads, the higher the quality, though sometimes there are a few yellow threads, too. You can crush the tiny threads and add them directly to what you’re making, or you can steep them first in a small amount of liquid. One well-known use of saffron is in the Spanish dish paella (pie-AY-uh). It’s used

Easy Shrimp and Chicken Sausage Paella Makes 8 servings. Use a wide, shallow saute pan with a lid for this recipe. 2 TBS olive oil, divided 1 lb large shrimp, peeled and deveined 1 lb chicken sausage, sliced in ½-inch rounds 1 lg sweet onion, finely chopped 1 red or green bell pepper, chopped 2 lg cloves garlic, minced 1½ C long-grain rice

¼ tsp sweet Spanish paprika Pinch of saffron 1 can (14.5 oz) no salt added diced tomatoes 2 cans (14.5 oz each) fatfree, reduced-sodium chicken broth Kosher salt and ground pepper 1 C frozen green peas, thawed

In a heavy 12-inch saute pan, heat 1 tablespoon oil over mediumhigh heat. Cook shrimp until just pink on both sides, 4 to 5 minutes (do not overcook). Transfer to a plate and set aside. Add remaining tablespoon oil and sausage to pan; cook over medium-high heat until beginning to brown, about 2 minutes. Add onion and bell pepper. Cook, stirring frequently, until translucent and softened, about 5 minutes. Add garlic and rice; cook, stirring to coat, until rice is translucent; about 2 minutes. Stir in paprika, saffron, tomatoes and broth, scraping up browned bits from bottom of pan with a wooden spoon. Season with salt and pepper. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat to a simmer. Cover, and cook until rice is tender and has absorbed almost all liquid, 20 to 25 minutes. Stir in peas; cook 1 minute. Stir in cooked shrimp; serve immediately. — Adapted from Everyday Food magazine, December 2003 issue

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but I hate to waste the rest. Wine purists may shriek, but yes, you can freeze wine. Some of the nuances will be lost, and you probably wouldn’t want to freeze wine and then drink it. But for cooking, it should be fine. The alcohol will keep it from freezing solid, so it may be more like wine slush. Freeze it in smaller amounts, like ½ to 1 cup or even in an ice cube tray. That’s partly for convenience, so you can pull out what you need, but also minimizes the problem of the alcohol separating out, leaving some areas that are higher in alcohol and some that are lower.

A:

Bring a pot of salted water to a boil. Add the sweet potatoes and cook until just tender, about 10 minutes. Drain and cool. In a large bowl, mix together the mayonnaise, scallions and cilantro. Add the sweet potatoes and cashews and gently stir to mix. Garnish with cilantro leaves and serve.

Olive oil, for greasing pan 210 g all-purpose flour (13⁄4 C) 2 tsp baking powder 1 ⁄4 tsp fine sea salt 1 ⁄4 tsp black pepper 3 ⁄4 C mayonnaise 1 lg egg 1 ⁄3 C milk 4 oz Gruyere cheese, grated (1 C) 3 TBS pitted, chopped calamata olives

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not only for flavor, but to tint the rice. Saffron also is used in risottos and seafood bisques. Paella typically has an array of ingredients: chicken (usually thighs), smoked sausage or Spanish chorizo, seafood (shrimp, clams, mussels) and vegetables. A paella pan is wide and shallow. But any large skillet with a lid that can hold all the ingredients will do. Paella seems like a lot of work, and many paella recipes have a laundry list of ingredients. But that’s what makes the dish great, especially for a party. It’s a huge mix of ingredients and flavors that meld

incredibly well. You can make paella with all seafood or all chicken, or add more of your favorite vegetables. Today’s recipe is adapted from Martha Stewart’s Everyday Food magazine. It goes together in less than an hour. Instead of using chicken thighs and Spanish chorizo, it calls for precooked chicken sausage. Use one that is plain without a lot of seasonings or cheese. I also used shrimp because that’s what I had on hand, but you can add clams, mussels or even lobster. Just be sure to add them toward the end so they don’t overcook.

I have a small bag of Q: basmati rice but don’t know what kinds of dishes to use it in. Like jasmine rice, basmati rice is valued for its lovely fragrance. In the Himalayas, the name translates to “queen of fragrance.” It’s used in India and the Middle East, particularly for dishes such as biranyi or pilaf. Unlike Thai jasmine rice, it’s not a sticky rice. It’s stays separate and firm when it cooked. Still, it is also a long-grain rice, similar to the domestic white rice you might know better. So you can use it the same way you would use any other long-grain rice.

A:

— Submit questions at www. charlotteobserver.com/food.

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F4

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, MAY 29, 2012

H

Next week: Retiring out west

Fabric Continued from F1 3M, the parent company of Scotchgard products, estimates that 2,750 hours are spent every year on the average American couch. That’s a lot of wear and tear plus opportunity for accidents that could potentially damage the upholstery fabrics. For fabrics that aren’t pretreated, or to add extra protection in high-wear areas, it’s easy to apply protectors yourself. Fabric finishes fall into five general function categories: stain and dirt resisters, moisture repellers, wrinkle removers, sun blockers and flame retardants.

Stain resisters

Slick tricks While not a spray-on fabric finish, a laminate helps protect fabrics from stains, water and UV rays. Therm-O-Web offers iron-on vinyl that can be simply pressed onto most fabrics for added protection. If you’re making placemats, pet feeding mats, chair seat covers, etc., where you need a bit of extra shielding, look for this product at fabric stores in both gloss and matte finishes.

How to apply

Photos by Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

Water pools on fabric sprayed with Scotchgard Fabric & Upholstery Protector at Hancock Fabrics in Bend.

Protector. It’s described by the company as a “fluorinated acrylic polymer to maximize repellency to both oil and water.” In addition to recommending it for upholstered furniture, the company also suggests using it on comforters, area rugs and mattresses.

No matter what brand of applied finishes you work with, there are some general principles for using them: • Thoroughly read the product directions. Not all products can be used on all surfaces. For example, water-based sprays should not be applied to silks, which can water spot. Carpet protectors may not be advisable to use on upholstery. The label should note proper use. • Test the product on an inconspicuous spot before applying it to the entire surface. On upholstery, this can be done on the back of a couch skirt; on carpets, choose a hidden corner, and on items you’ve made yourself, test on scrap fabric. When testing, look for any undesirable changes in color or feel of the fabric. • Let the applied product dry thoroughly before sitting on the upholstery or walking on carpet; recommended times are on the label. In most instances, it’s best to allow the product to dry naturally, without the use of fans or heat. • Check the suggested coverage and apply accordingly. For example, one ounce of a product may cover 8 to 10 square feet of fabric or carpet. Don’t apply too heavily or too sparsely for maximum protection, as more is not always better. • Apply finishes to clean and dry surfaces, unless otherwise directed. • Use products in a well-ventilated area. For solvent-based liquids, apply outside if possible. • Note when and if the finish needs to be reapplied after professional cleaning or long-term wear.

Probably the best known DIY stain resister is Scotchgard Fabric & Upholstery Protector. According to Denise Loxton, 3M service center manager, this spray-on finish creates a protective surface that repels liquids and blocks Water resisters stains from being abIf you have outdoor sorbed into the fibers. furniture with fabric She says it gives homeowners time to wipe coverings, a water-reup spills before they’re sister, such as Scotchabsorbed into the fabric gard’s Outdoor Water — Linda Turner Griepentrog Shield, can help those fibers. Interestingly, the cushions repel moisfinish doesn’t change ture, not only dur- and pillowcases as it’s avail- term flame retardant simthe look, feel or breathability of the Scotchgard Fabric ing use, but also able in several scents, includ- ply means that the flame is fabric in the protec- & Upholstery while in storage. In ing lavender to add a hint of slowed and won’t propagate. He notes that many interior doing so, the spray fragrance. tion process, and Protector. fabrics for upholstery and also helps prevent it’s safe to use on draperies come with some mildew from form- Sun blockers delicate and dryIn the heat of summer, factory applied finishes for clean-only fabrics, as well as ing on the cushion surfaces. outdoor fabrics on cushions, flame retardancy or that washable home decor items. chairs and table these finishes may actually Scotchgard is also ideal for Wrinkle removers There’s nothing more coverings can be impregnated into the fiprotecting light-colored tablethan really take the bers during the manufacturcloths, place mats and napkins discouraging heat, but of- ing process. to help with stain resistance hanging up new curten not without Medina explains that to add from hard-to-get-rid-of colo- tains or drapes only to spy damage and fad- flame retardancy to a fabric, rants like red wine, beets and unintended creases runing. A sun block- the fibers have to be porous, tomato juice, and it helps keep ning down the length ing finish, such so some manmade fibers do oil-based stains (think salad of the panels. Perhaps as Forcefield’s UV not accept applied finishes, dressing) from permanently you think they’ll come out if you just let them SunBlock for Fab- but natural fibers do. Natudamaging the fabrics. rics, can protect ral fibers include cotton, silk, If you’re needle-pointing or hang overnight, but fabrics from fad- wool and linen. embroidering a pillow, Loxton alas that’s often not ing and UV radiaTwo flame retardant prodrecommends Scotchgard Nee- the case. A spray-on tion damage, and it ucts on the market for do-itdlework & Sewing Protector product like De-Crease works on synthetics yourselfers: FireGuard for with the same attributes to Wrinkle Relaxer may and natural fibers. use on draperies, furniture, help keep the surface free of help straighten things According to The manufacturer carpets and rugs, and Firedirt and stains while you work out. Forcefield, the product’s recommends it for Tect, a water-based spray on it. not only previ- that the company recomForcefield also makes an maker, you spray it on Upholstery, Rug and Fabric and gently pull on the Mary Ellen’s ously unfinished mends for most porous fifabric to remove the Best Press. bers, or fabrics with fabrics, but also wrinkles, and it doesn’t as an exfactory applied change the fabric’s feel tra layer of coatings (like Tefor color. lon). Both of these protection for those If you’re making your own with factory finishes. products comply curtains and drapes, Mary If you’re applying with testing proceEllen’s Best Press removes multiple finishes, dures from the Nawrinkles and creases the fab- the company suggests tional Fire Protecric might have from being on using the UV SunBlock betion Association. a bolt at the store. This prod- fore any stain resisters. While Medina uct is used in conjunction In addition to outdoor notes that most with heat from an iron and furniture, sun blockers often flame readds a slight crispness to the can be applied to indoor tardant products fabric finish. It’s also perfect upholstery, draperies are used in comfor use when pressing sheets and curtains, rugs, carmercial settings, pets, leather furniture where strict regand to fabric artwork ulations exist for that might be subjected f lammability, they also can be to high sun exposure Forcefield through large expanses FireGuard. used residenof windows. tially if a need exists for them.

“Service You Can Depend On!”

20

By Felicia Feaster The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

ATLANTA — While a full-size swimming pool is lovely if you have the space and the money, there are plenty of other water features that will help you soak tired muscles, cool off and stay in shape. Compact, space-conserving hot tubs, lap pools and swim spas have expanded aquatic options for homeowners. Forget the cliche of the 1970s-era party animal hot tub. Today’s hot tub owner is more often an empty-nest baby boomer looking for decompression instead of action, architects and retailers said. “The No. 1 reason people own hot tubs is for relaxation and stress relief because from a physiological standpoint it actually does dilate the capillaries, lowers your blood pressure. It does relax you,” said Adam Burke, the owner of two locations of Atlanta Spa & Leisure in Cumming and Doraville. Burke carries a variety of hot tubs and jetted swim spas at his Georgia stores, including the Michael Phelps line of high-performance swim spas, which use propellers to create a current to swim against. “The swim spas have had a big uptick as the baby boomers have moved into retirement,” Burke said. “They have those aches and pains, hip replacement, knee replacement, old sports injuries,” making swim spas and hot tubs an ideal zeroimpact workout. Many older customers also are choosing water features to create a vacationworthy experience at home, said Moon Bros. architect and co-owner Mark Fosner. Fosner is installing a hot tub and enclosing a 20-foot long jetted swim spa in one home. “And that’s their retreat,” he said. Architect Michael Gamble of Gamble and Gamble Architecture said he has seen a definite increase in clients wanting lap pools or hot tubs, which are far more affordable than a traditional swimming pool. “You can build a small

Hot tub tips • Check local codes to see how to keep your hot tub or pool safe. Most areas require at least a 5-foot fence surrounding the pool. Locking safety covers also can help. Many covers are now placed down at the water level and disappear into a vault when not in use, to make them less obtrusive, and can support substantial weight if someone accidentally steps onto the tub cover. • Make sure that your deck or foundation can support the combined weight of the tub, water and occupants. That extends to any retaining walls built to support a tub or pool. • Some hot tubs feature built-in LED lights at the base of the tub to light your way to the tub. Also, consider how lighting can affect things like the view of the stars overhead.

Swim spa tips • Swim spas allow you to swim against a jet or propeller-created current or may include aerobic features like an underwater treadmill or bicycle. Some spas and hot tubs even integrate a DVD player or a built-in sound system to keep you entertained while you exercise.

water feature in the backyard for a very reasonable amount of money — less than $10,000,” Gamble said. Whether your hot tub or swim spa is placed inside or outside, architects and retailers recommend that you treat a water feature not just as an experience to enhance your quality of life, but as a design element within your home. Consider your view from the water, how much privacy you’ll have, when you will be most likely to use it, the angle of the sun and maintenance. “You’re using it to enhance the experience of the house,” Gamble said.

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Flame retardants

According to Larry Medina, a deputy fire marshal in Bend, it’s impossible to make anything totally flameproof, but there are finishes that can be applied to fabric to help make it flame retardant. The

What to treat While most often protective sprays are applied to upholstery, draperies and carpet, other items can benefit as well. Scotchgard recommends applying its finishes to pillows, bedspreads, comforters, area rugs, pet beds, lamp shades, tablecloths, napkins, tapestries, outdoor umbrellas and fabric awnings. — Reporter: gwizdesigns@aol. com

YouTube offering original home design channels New York Times News Service In addition to silly clips of family pets, cult-film trailers and practically every music video ever made, YouTube users can now watch a home design show called “Your Place Is

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a Deal Breaker.” In the first episode, a woman moves into her boyfriend’s apartment, which has a Barack Obama poster prominently displayed in the bedroom, and enlists the help of a designer to make the space reflect both their styles. “Obama has to go, baby,” she tells her partner. The show appears on Spaces, one of the new channels that YouTube has introduced as part of its push into original content. With a roster of programs — other shows include “Offbeat Spaces” and the self-explanatory “I Live With My Mom” — shown in three-to-five-minute episodes, most of which focus on young urbanites, Spaces aims to be a hipper HGTV. YouTube is selling ads that will be shown on the channel, with the revenue shared between YouTube and the content creator. Chris Young, the chief executive of DBG, the production company behind Spaces, said the channel plans to upload a new video every day. “We see ourselves as a broadcast network,” Young said. “Only we do it digitally.”


TUESDAY, MAY 29, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

F5

G Fire pits

you would a campfire,” said Stevens. Wood-burning fire pits can still get hot on the bottom and, for that reason, Stevens said not to place the unit on grass. Instead use it on stone, in dirt or sand. Gas-burning units do not burn hot on the base and can therefore be placed on grass, a wooden surface or patio, according to Ludwig.

Continued from F1 Ludwig also noted that some communities do not allow wood-burning fire pits. The city of Bend’s website addresses burning regulations for “commercially manufactured fire appliances,” which they specify as metal or stone chimineas, commercial fire pits or similar products, stating that they may be used as long as the user follows the safety precautions listed on the Bend website. Wood-burning fire pits are appealing because “often people have wood at their homes to begin with. They’ve already got a supply of wood,” said Stevens. And the simplicity of the woodburning units is appealing to people, according to Stevens. “They can pick them up and move them. It’s easy to take a freestanding wood-burning fire pit and plop it down anywhere that’s suitable. Whereas the gas you have to hook it up.”

Gas options

Cooking Both Ludwig and Stevens noted that marshmallow roasting with a gas-fueled fire pit, although possible, is not ideal because if the marshmallow were to fall into the media material — which could be imitation logs, cut glass or lava rock — it would not be easy to remove. “You can do marshmallows on the gas as long as it doesn’t fall off the end of the stick... Once you drop a marshmallow down on something hot you basically are going to remove the media and throw it out,” Stevens said.

Joe Kline / The Bulletin

The fire serves as the centerpiece to a table on the backyard porch of a Redmond home.

Two of the wood-burning fire pits at Fireside include a cooking grid and are ideal for converting into a grill. Some gas-burning units are constructed as the centerpiece of a table and offer a place to dine or converse at bar or table height. The OW Lee Santorini fire pit at Patio

World has the option of a lazy Susan attachment. And the Castelle fire pit has a table top insert to fit over the burner so if the fire is not in use there is more table space.

Placement Regardless of whether the fire pit is wood- or gas-burn-

ing, it should not be lit under any sort of overhang. “We don’t recommend any sort of overhang, including a semicovered porch or a gazebo,” Ludwig said. Stevens recommends that the consumer “be aware of the special considerations on any combustible surface. There’s a lot of

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A fresh crop of new gardening books By Kath y Van M ullek om Daily Press (Newport News, Va.)

Just like tomatoes and peppers, there’s always a seasonal crop of new gardening books. Here’s a peek at the best books you can check out for summer reading and gift giving: “Encyclopedia of Flowering Shrubs.” This 436-page hardback explores 1,700 seasonal plants, using 2,000 full-color images to showcase their flowers, fruits and foliage. You meet lesser-known shrubs like evergreen osmanthus, which can be used to create a privacy hedge with fragrant fall flowers, as well as kerria with yellow-f lowers and deutzia with clusters of small starlike white flowers, both in early spring. The book also covers soil and pruning requirements. $50, written by Jim Gardiner, a woody plants expert; Timber Press. “Fairy Gardens.” Betty Earl tells what fairy gardens are and how to make and care for them, relates fairy lore, introduces the plants associated with fairies, and describes miniature plants for fairy and mini gardens, indoors or out. There’s also information on building or buying accessories for these fantasy gardens. $20; Mackey Books. Note: If you have a fairy garden, we would like to visit it; contact Kathy at kvanmullekomaol.com. “Heirloom Fruits and Vegetables.” Arranged by season for growers and seasonally minded cooks, this book surveys heritage fruits and vegetables in rich, painterly photographers and text that tells where each plant originated with legends and beliefs attached to it. The 224-page hardback is written by Toby Musgrave, an expert on garden history. $50/ with 157 color illustrations; Thames and Hudson, available June 19. “Homegrown Harvest.” When you want fresh, homegrown tastes, you grow it yourself. That’s the main message in this season-by-season guide to a sustainable kitchen garden. The 304-page paperback with 300 full-color photo-

composite decks, and those are probably a little more sensitive to heat even than wood.” Before lighting a fire in a wood-burning unit, owners should place a layer of sand in the base “to insulate the bottom so that it doesn’t get quite as hot,” explained Stevens. Then build a fire “just like

graphs begins with the basics — how to prepare healthy soil and how to control weeds and pests with non-toxic methods. $19.99; American Horticultural Society. “Maria Rodale’s Organic Gardening Secrets.” This seasonal guide lists 10 things to plant every year, no matter what; 14 reasons to never, ever, use chemicals again; the only 10 gardening tools you’ll ever need; top five gardening mistakes; four steps to healthier soil; four steps to composting; three steps to designing your perfect garden; and three steps to making your garden beautiful. Written by organic gardening advocate Maria Rodale, the ebook helps you prepare for, plan and plant your garden to ensure a productive fourseason harvest. Recipes are included for extra enjoyment. $2.99; Amazon.com. “Rain Gardens.” A rain garden allows rainwater to follow the natural course of the water cycle — absorbed into the ground, taken up by plants and evaporated back into the atmosphere. In this backyard gardener handbook, you learn how take advantage of rain garden opportunities, using native flowers, shrubs and trees, thanks to the ideas of the book’s author, author hydrology scientist Robert Domm. Chapters in the 188-page softback include DIY designs and plant profiles. $24.99; Voyageur Press. “Slow Gardening.” This 240-page paperback by comedic gardener Felder Rushing was inspired by Slow Food, a worldwide movement that encourages a tempo of life more in keeping with natural systems. In much the same way, a slow-gardening approach helps you ease up on the plant and garden in a laid-back, thoughtful way. Forget plant perfection, stresses the author; if a plant doesn’t work out, compost it and buy something else. As Felder likes to say, “Life has lots of pressures — why include them in the garden?” $24.95;

Chelsea Green Publishing. “Small Green Roofs.” Claiming to be the first book to tackle small-scale green roofs, this paperback profiles more than 40 projects of all shapes and sizes — green roofs on sheds, garden offices, studios, garages, bike sheds and even a flythrough bird feeder. Each project features details on how to do it and care for it. $24.95; Timber Press. “The Anxious Gardener’s Book of Answers.” Gardening is often full of questions, and this new guide by gardening writer Teri Dunn Chace gives answers to the 100 most common: Which end of the bulb goes up? Why aren’t my tomatoes growing? When should I prune my lilacs? The 220-page book with 24 chapters tackles all sorts of gardening concerns relating to pruning, watering, composting, garden design and weeds. $12.95; Timber Press. “The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Small-Space Gardening.” Gardening guru Chris McLaughlin teaches you how to maximize the smallest spaces, like a windowsill, balcony or even a fire escape and turn bare soil into a rainbow of greenery — flowering shrubs, fruits and vegetables. You learn to work with containers and raised beds and how to maximize soil efficiency. Diagrams show how to attach materials like lattice to a wall for extra vertical gardening space in a way that doesn’t damage the structure. $19.95; idiotsguides.com. “The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Seed Saving & Starting.” Author Sheri Ann Richerson walks you through the techniques from harvesting, cleaning and drying to properly labeling and storing seeds. The book covers why store-bought seeds aren’t always the best options, and explains that soil temperature, not air temperature, is important to seed germination. $18.95; idiotsguides.com. “The Year-Round Vegetable Gardener.” Learn to make ev-

At Patio World, Ludwig explained the two gas-burning options as “natural gas that you’d have to hook up like you would a gas barbecue … the other option is a propane tank, which is self-contained.” Propane tanks are available in 2½- or 5-gallon sizes. “You can get six to 12 hours (burn time) out of a 5-gallon tank,” said Ludwig. The time depends on how hot the flame is set. Fireside carries gas-fueled fire pits and demonstrated a linear model with glass media material and an automatic shut-off. “If the wind were to blow the flame out, it shuts the gas off,” Stevens said. Stevens recommended the linear style for a more contemporary home. Fireside also sells the stainless steel burner and internal components that can be fitted for custom-built fire pits. The burners are 6 to 48 inches in diameter and are available in a variety of shapes, including circular, square, rectangular and linear. — Reporter: 541-383-0361 or mgallagher@bendbulletin.com

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ery month a vegetable-growing month — kale and scallions in frosty times and tomatoes and peppers in sweltering heat, no matter where you live. On 240 pages filled with color photographs, Author Niki Jabbour shares her secrets on how to make a temporary strawbase cold frame to protect winter crop, how to design and use “pocket plots” for year-round harvests and how to implement crop rotation. $19.95; Storey Publishing. “The 50 Mile Bouquet.” Seasonal, locally grown flower bouquets are trendy for everyday and special occasions. This hardback book is a storytelling project created by Debra Prinzing, a contributing garden editor to Better Homes & Gardens magazine; she and a photojournalist spent three years traveling the country to photograph and interview the flower farmers who grow them and the professional designers who use them. It’s also an organic flower-growing, gathering and design guide that will inspire you to grow freshcut flowers in your own yard. $17.95; St. Lynn’s Press.

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F6

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, MAY 29, 2012

RECIPE FINDER

Editor’s note: The Recipe Finder feature will return. If you are looking for a hard-to-find recipe or can answer a request, write Julie Rothman, Recipe Finder, The Baltimore Sun, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore, MD 21278, or email baltsunrecipefinder@gmail.com. Names must accompany recipes for them to be published.

Lock the lid, embrace the green By Jane Touzalin The Washington Post

The latest “green” cooking tool is 70 years old, and it used to explode. The pressure cooker is experiencing a revival of sorts, now that technology has blunted the risk involved in cooking with steam pressurized to 15 pounds per square inch. In the new millennium, its speed is touted as an environmental plus: Because it uses less gas or electricity, it’s “one of the most eco-friendly cooking methods available,” says the jacket of one of two new cookbooks that focus on the power of this pot. Authors Laura Washburn and Richard Ehrlich are both

American expats living in England, and their books — “The Pressure Cooker” and “80 Recipes for Your Pressure Cooker” — have much in common. Both reassure that the pressure cooker of today is safer than your grandmother’s volatile version. Both describe how pressure cookers get the job done. Both offer advice on how to choose one: Don’t buy cheap, and bigger is better. (Neither author, though, gives any guidance in the choice between stove top and electrical cookers — a small shortcoming.) Both have handy lists of average cooking times for a few specific ingredients. Both are clear and exacting in their cooking directions.

Johnny Miller / New York Times News Service

These jelly jars are practical as well as pretty. The rims on the rounded ones are used to tie down parchment covers.

Preserve some style with unusual jam jars MARTHA STEWART

Deb Lindsey / For The Washington Post

New England Blueberry Pudding, a pressure-cooker recipe, can also be made with blackberries or cranberries.

New England Blueberry Pudding Makes 6 servings. This moist cake can be made with blackberries or cranberries; if the latter, add an extra 1⁄2 cup sugar. You’ll need an 8-quart pressure cooker with a steamer basket insert that fits inside it, parchment paper and kitchen twine. 8 TBS (1 stick) unsalted butter, cut into small pieces, plus more for greasing 21⁄2 C flour 11⁄2 tsp baking powder 1 ⁄2 tsp kosher salt 1 ⁄4 C plain dried bread crumbs

1

⁄2 C sugar 1 lg egg, beaten 2 ⁄3 C whole or low-fat milk 1 pint fresh or frozen blueberries Creme fraiche or heavy cream, for serving

Use a little butter to grease the inside of a 1-quart mold or heatproof bowl, such as a metal mixing bowl. Sift the flour, baking powder and salt into a separate mixing bowl. Use a pastry cutter or two forks to cut the butter pieces into the sifted ingredients until the butter is well incorporated and no pieces are larger than pea-size. Add the bread crumbs and sugar, mixing well, then gently stir in the egg, milk and blueberries. Pour the mixture into the mold or heatproof bowl that will fit inside the steamer insert of your pressure cooker, making sure to fill the mold or bowl no more than three-quarters full. Fold over a piece of parchment paper to form a double-thick square that hangs over the edges of the mold or bowl by a few inches, creating a pleat to allow for the pudding’s rise. Use a little butter to grease the underside of the paper. Use kitchen twine to secure the paper just under the rim of the mold or bowl, making sure the twine is long enough to loop over the top and tie on the opposite side; this will create a handle you’ll use to lift out the pudding when it’s done. Fill the pressure cooker with at least 2 inches of water and bring it just to a boil over medium or medium-high heat. Place the mold or bowl in the steamer insert (or, alternatively, on a steamer rack that fits inside the pressure cooker), then lower it into the pressure cooker. Cover with the pressure cooker lid but do not clamp it on. Steam for 15 minutes; this step is necessary so the pudding will rise. Clamp on the lid; bring the cooker up to full pressure. Reduce the heat to medium, if needed. Cook for 35 minutes; when you peek under the parchment, the cake should look cooked through. Turn off the heat and carefully vent the pressure cooker right away. Use the twine handle to lift out the mold or bowl. Discard the twine and parchment paper. Use a table knife to run around the inside of the mold or bowl to loosen the pudding. Place a serving plate on top of the bowl, then invert the pudding. Serve warm or at room temperature, with creme fraiche or cream.

A

n ordinary object, used by generations of cooks throughout the world, can also be appreciated for its decorative qualities. I have been making jams and jellies ever since I was a child, but I did not develop an interest in jelly jars until I began to collect clear blown-glass objects and discovered many iterations of this everyday storage container. Of course, there are the mass-produced jars by Ball and Kerr, with screw or clamp tops, that are familiar throughout the United States. The screw tops in particular are a convenient way to top the jellies, eliminating the need for the melted and

poured paraffin toppers I was taught to use years ago. In England, I learned about the flared, faceted pressed-glass jam pots and the parchment-paper or cellophane “jam-pot” covers used by British women to cover their preserves. My favorite jars are the rounded blownglass pots from Sweden and France that have flared rims. A string is tied around a wet circle of parchment, and as the parchment dries and shrinks, it creates a tight seal over the contents. Traditionally, preserves are packaged in half- or quarter-pint sizes, which I like — any larger and an opened jar may languish in the refrigerator while other flavors are opened and tried. — Questions of general interest can be emailed to mslletters@ marthastewart.com. For more information on this column, visit www.marthastewart.com.

Raspberry Jam Makes about 1 cup. This recipe is one of my favorites for savoring the midsummer berry. 12 oz fresh raspberries (about 21⁄4 C) 1 C plus 2 TBS sugar 11⁄8 tsp fresh lemon juice

Pinch of coarse salt 1 ⁄2 tsp finely grated orange zest, divided

Place a few small plates in the freezer. Stir berries, sugar, lemon juice and half the orange zest in a large, heavy pot. Bring to a boil, stirring to dissolve sugar and mashing lightly with a potato masher. Skim foam from surface. Cook, stirring more frequently as jam thickens, until it has the consistency of very loose jelly, 8 to 9 minutes. Remove from heat. Remove a plate from freezer; drop a spoonful of jam on it. Return to freezer for 1 to 2 minutes; nudge edge of jam with a finger. It should hold its shape. If jam is too thin and spreads, return it to a boil, testing every minute, until jam holds its shape on a plate. Strain about half the jam through a fine sieve into a bowl; discard seeds. Return strained jam to pot; stir in remaining zest. Return to a boil, then remove from heat. Let cool before using or storing. (Jam will keep in an airtight container in the refrigerator up to 1 month. — Recipe reprinted from the book “Martha’s Entertaining: A Year of Celebrations,’’ by Martha Stewart. c.2011 Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia. Published by Clarkson Potter, an imprint of the Crown Publishing Group, a division of Random House, Inc.

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Okra, Corn and Tomatoes Makes 4 to 6 side-dish servings. This is a dish from Mississippi intended to be served with fried chicken. The recipe calls for bacon fat, which imparts nice flavor. But you can use vegetable oil instead. You’ll need a 6-quart pressure cooker for this recipe. 6 scallions, white and lightgreen parts, chopped 3 sm to med green bell peppers, stemmed and seeded, then coarsely chopped (about 14 oz total) 2 TBS rendered bacon fat (may substitute vegetable oil; see headnote)

1 lb whole okra (tops trimmed; preferably fresh; if frozen, then defrosted) Kosher salt Freshly ground black pepper 28 oz canned no-salt-added chopped tomatoes, with their juices 1 tsp sugar 1 heaping C frozen corn kernels

Combine the scallions, green bell peppers and bacon fat in the pressure cooker over low heat. Cook uncovered for about 5 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the scallions are soft and fragrant. Add the okra and stir to coat evenly and incorporate, then season with salt and pepper to taste. Add the tomatoes and their juices, and the sugar. Clamp down the lid. Bring up to full pressure over medium-high heat, then reduce the heat to medium and cook for 10 minutes. Reduce the heat to low, then carefully vent the pressure cooker right away. Test a piece of okra; if it���s still chewy, cook uncovered for another few minutes. Otherwise, add the corn and put the lid back on (without pressurizing). Cook for a minute or two, until the corn is heated through. Serve right away.

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A GREAT used woodstoves has EMPLOYEE been limited to modKIT INCLUDES: RIGHT NOW? els which have been • 4 Garage Sale Signs BULLETIN CLASSIFIEDS Call The Bulletin certified by the Or- • $1.00 Off Coupon To Search the area’s most before 11 a.m. and Use Toward Your egon Department of comprehensive listing of get an ad in to pubNext Ad Environmental QualOpportunity classiied advertising... lish the next day! ity (DEQ) and the fed- • 10 Tips For “Garage described at: real estate to automotive, 541-385-5809. Sale Success!” eral Environmental merchandise to sporting VIEW the Protection Agency • And Inventory Sheet heartcentercardiology.com goods. Bulletin Classiieds Classifieds at: (EPA) as having met appear every day in the PICK UP YOUR www.bendbulletin.com smoke emission stan- GARAGE SALE KIT at print or on line. dards. A certified Call 541-385-5809 1777 SW Chandler woodstove may be www.bendbulletin.com Ave., Bend, OR 97702 Advertising Account Executive identified by its certification label, which is permanently attached to the stove. The Bul345 letin will not knowingly accept advertisLivestock & Equipment Farm ing for the sale of uncertified Healthy Beef Feeder The Bulletin is looking for a professional Market woodstoves. and driven sales and marketing person to Steers. Wormed vaccinated ready for help our customers grow their businesses 267 pasture. Delivery with an expanding list of broad-reach avail for small fee. Fuel & Wood and targeted products. This full time 541-382-8393 or msg

Henry 22 lever action, NIB, $300. WinchesNew kittens available! Framed Print of Augustas Azalia Hole #13, by ter 22 auto w/scope, Also great rescued Nancy Raborn, $65 $150. 541-771-5648 cats. 65480 78th St., OBO, 541-548-8718 Bend, Sat/Sun 1-5; Kimber 1911 stainless other days by appt. 45acp, Ultra Carry II, 541- 647-2181. Al$900. 541-647-8931 tered, shots, ID chip, more. Info: 389-8420. Remington 700 BDL Map, photos, more at .223 w/sling, rings & Visit our HUGE www.craftcats.org ammo. $500 home decor 541-325-6928 Papillon mixed with tiny consignment store. bit of toy poodle. Cute New items Ruger LC9 pistol, $400. colors, $150 each 541 arrive daily! Ruger 9mm SS pistol, 350-1684 930 SE Textron, Baby Canaries (6), $35 $350. 541-647-8931 Bend 541-318-1501 each, baby Finches www.redeuxbend.com (4), $10 each, call S&W M&P, 9mm, 541-460-5018 box, 2 clips, like The Bulletin reserves new, all black, $450, Barn cats ready to work the right to publish all Call 541-604-5115 in your barn, shop or ads from The Bulletin home in exchange for newspaper onto The safe shelter, food & Poodle pups, toy, for Bulletin Internet web- Taurus 22LR semi-auto SALE. Also Rescued water. Altered, shots. pistol, case & ammo, site. Poodle Adults for We deliver! 389-8420 $200. 541-647-8931 adoption, to loving homes. 541-475-3889 Wanted: .22 Pump Rem Mod 121 or Win Mod Queensland Heelers Stamp Collection 61, 541-546-3330. standard & mini,$150 & US Mint cond., 1926-2000, up. 541-280-1537 http:// Wanted: Collector white Ace albums + rightwayranch.wordpress.com seeks high quality many Elvis stamps & Boxer/ Bulldog (Valley fishing items. record albums, $2000, Siberian Husky AKC! Bulldog) new litter,CKC Black/white fem, 6 mos Call 541-678-5753, or 541-447-4578 Reg., taking deposits. 503-351-2746 $500. 541-977-7019 $700. 541-325-3376 241 Winchester 12ga pump, Spay your mother cat Bicycles & Chihuahua Pups, toy, 3 $175. Ithaca 16ga for only $45, we will females, 1 male, pump, $325. Call Accessories alter her litter for free! $200, 541-678-0786. 541-771-5648 Bend Spay & Neuter Project will spay/neu- Cannondale R500 Road 247 Bike, dk green, 54cm, ter the first four kitconverted to flat bar tens, aged 8-12 Sporting Goods (drops incl), exc cond, weeks. Kittens MUST - Misc. $500. 541-382-2259 be at least 2 lbs. Additional kittens $5 each. Call today for Mtn Bike, 2011 Giant, 14’ Army tent w/arctic Chihuahua Teacup fepkg, all ropes incl, brand new off road appt. 541-617-1010. male pups, 6 wks, great cond, all set up, tires, must sell, great $300. 541-639-6974 ready to view. $400. cond., $300, or 541-318-7059. 541-923-5920/550-9225 541-480-2652. Yorkie Mix pups, tiny, 253 DO YOU HAVE 1st shots, $300 cash. TI Litespeed TusSOMETHING TO TV, Stereo & Video WHEN BUYING 541-678-7599 cany, 51cm, Ultegra SELL FIREWOOD... 6700. Ultegra FOR $500 OR Yorkie Poo male, 8wks TV, Sharp 32” w/remote wheels, 11-28 gears. To avoid fraud, old 6/6, blond, dewLESS? & manual, like new $1100. The Bulletin claws, tail docked, & Non-commercial $50 541-382-4657 541-389-0099 recommends pay1st shots. Will be advertisers may small, non-shedding, ment for Firewood 255 place an ad with $325. 541-433-5261 only upon delivery our 245 Computers and inspection. "QUICK CASH Golf Equipment 210 SPECIAL" THE BULLETIN re- • A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’ Furniture & Appliances Dynamis battery-oper1 week 3 lines, $12 quires computer ador 2 weeks, $20! vertisers with multiple • Receipts should ated remote control include name, Ad must include ad schedules or those walking golf cart w/ A1 Washers&Dryers phone, price and price of single item selling multiple sysnew battery & new $150 ea. Full warkind of wood purof $500 or less, or tems/ software, to discharger. $120. Call ranty. Free Del. Also chased. multiple items close the name of the 541-388-3193 wanted, used W/D’s whose total does business or the term • Firewood ads 541-280-7355 MUST include spenot exceed $500. 246 "dealer" in their ads. cies and cost per Private party advertisGuns, Hunting GENERATE SOME excord to better serve Call Classifieds at ers are defined as citement in your & Fishing our customers. 541-385-5809 those who sell one neighborhood! Plan a www.bendbulletin.com computer. garage sale and don't 22LR Heritage 6-shot revolver, 3” bbl, ammo. forget to advertise in 260 Free Cow Dog Pups, $200. 541-647-8931. classified! English Shepherd & Misc. Items 541-385-5809. McNab Cross, 1 male, Dry seasoned tamarack CASH!! red fir, $165 rnd, $185 1 female, red & white Like new reclining For Guns, Ammo & 40-ft Storage container, short haired, ready leather rocker, brown, split 541-977-4500 or Reloading Supplies. excellent condition, now, 541-493-2511. $275. 541-923-9867 541-416-3677 541-408-6900. $2800. 541-620-2135

Medical Assistant

300 308

Farm Equipment & Machinery

350

Horseshoeing/ Farriers

LARGE west side Bend equestrian center on 80 acres now boarding. Indoor/outdoor arena, indoor hot/cold showers, automated Just bought a new boat? exerciser, extensive Sell your old one in the trail system. Call for classiieds! Ask about our info, 541-306-7507. Super Seller rates!

John Deere 466 PTO Driven Twine Baler, $3250, take cattle on trade, 541-410-3425.

541-385-5809

358

Kioti CK20 tractor w/bucket, backhoe & grader blade. 370 hrs. $13,900 Prineville, 541-416-0300

Farmers Column 10X20 STORAGE BUILDINGS for protecting hay, firewood, livestock etc. $1496 Installed. 541-617-1133. CCB #173684. kfjbuilders@ykwc.net

Wanted Used Farm Equipment & Machinery. Looking to buy, or consign of good used quality equipment. Deschutes Valley Want to buy Alfalfa Equipment standing, in Central Ore. 541-419-2713 541-548-8385

position requires a background in consultative sales, territory management and aggressive prospecting skills. Two years of media sales experience is preferable, but we will train the right candidate.

The position offers a competitive compensation package including benefits, and rewards an aggressive, customer focused salesperson with unlimited earning potential. Please send your resume, cover letter and salary history to: Sean L. Tate Advertising Manager state@bendbulletin.com You may also drop off your resume in person or mail it to: 1777 SW Chandler, Bend, OR 97701. No phone inquiries please. EOE / Drug Free Workplace


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

G2 TUESDAY, MAY 29, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD Edited by Will Shortz

PLACE AN AD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . .11:00 am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Starting at 3 lines

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

*UNDER $500 in total merchandise

OVER $500 in total merchandise

7 days .................................................. $10.00 14 days ................................................ $16.00

Garage Sale Special

4 days .................................................. $18.50 7 days .................................................. $24.00 14 days .................................................$33.50 28 days .................................................$61.50

4 lines for 4 days.................................. $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

PRIVATE PARTY RATES

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702

PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday. 476

476

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650

745

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865

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Business Opportunities

Apt./Multiplex SE Bend

Houses for Rent NE Bend

Homes for Sale

Motorcycles & Accessories

ATVs

Medical

Wallowa Memorial Hospital Located in Enterprise, Oregon Director of Cardiopulmonary

Full-Time AA or BA in RT Sleep lab experience required. Competitive benefit package. Visit our website at wchcd.org or contact Linda Childers, (541) 426-5313 EOE

The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to FRAUD. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Rentals Get your business

G

GROWIN

with an ad in The Bulletin’s “Call A Service Professional” Directory Medical

Wallowa Memorial Hospital Located in Enterprise, Oregon

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Nursing Supervisor

USE THE CLASSIFIEDS!

Full-Time ACLS, TNCC, PALS, CPR Required.

Door-to-door selling with fast results! It’s the easiest way in the world to sell.

Competitive benefit package. Visit our website at wchcd.org or contact

The Bulletin Classiied

Linda Childers, (541) 426-5313 EOE Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin' s web site will be able to click through automatically to your site.

541-385-5809

Finance & Business

500 528

Loans & Mortgages

600 605

Roommate Wanted 1bdrm apt, utils inc, share kitch, must love dogs! Redmond. $525 1st/last. 541-280-4936 630

Rooms for Rent Studios & Kitchenettes Furnished room, TV w/ cable, micro & fridge. Utils & linens. New owners.$145-$165/wk 541-382-1885 634

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

Alpine Meadows Townhomes 1, 2 & 3 bdrm apts. Starting at $625. 541-330-0719

Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

Call for Specials! Limited numbers avail. 1, 2 and 3 bdrms. W/D hookups, patios or decks. MOUNTAIN GLEN, 541-383-9313 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

A Sharp Clean 2 bdrm, 1.5 bath apt., NEW CARPETS, neutral colors, great storage, private patio, no pets/ smoking, $530 incl. W/S/G, 541-633-0663 640

Apt./Multiplex SW Bend Spacious 2 bdrm 1½ bath townhouse, w/d hkup, fenced yd. NO PETS. Great loc! $565 & up. 179 SW Hayes 541-382-0162; 541-420-0133 648

Houses for Rent General PUBLISHER'S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, marital status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women, and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-877-0246. The toll free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 650

Houses for Rent NE Bend

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com, currently receiving over 1.5 million page views, every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 541-385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com 652

Houses for Rent NW Bend Broken Top gorgeous 3 BR 3BA furnished home, vaulted ceilings, $1950 / month, 1-yr lease. Call Melissa, 541-306-7039 Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily Clean small 2 bdrm. Large yard. Wood heat. $700+ last + dep. Local ref. No pets. 1015 NW Ogden. 659

Houses for Rent Sunriver In River Meadows a 3 bdrm, 1.5 bath, 1376 sq. ft., woodstove, brand new carpet/oak floors, W/S pd, $895. 541-480-3393 or 541-610-7803 687

Commercial for Rent/Lease Office/Warehouse located in SE Bend. Up to 30,000 sq.ft., competitive rate, 541-382-3678.

541-385-5809

Real Estate For Sale

700

773

Acreages

14 ACRES TALL PINES WARNING backs up to National The Bulletin recomA quiet newer 3 bdrm, Forest. paved Road. mends you use cau2.5 bath, 1692 sq.ft., Top recreational area. tion when you promtn views. dbl. gaSPRING IN FOR A Power at Property. vide personal rage w/opener. $1195 Furniture Outlet, GREAT DEAL!! Zoned for Residence. information to compa541-480-3393,610-7803. 732 12 miles north of Bly, part-time, expenies offering loans or $299 1st month’s rent! * 2 bdrm, 1 bath OR. $35,000. By COUNTRY LIVING! 2/1 Commercial/Investment rience is helpful. credit, especially $530 & 540 Owner. Call 541-892mobile, heat pump, those asking for adSerious appliProperties for Sale Carports & A/C incl! 2829 or 541-783-2829 A/C, gas range, refrigvance loan fees or cants with proFox Hollow Apts. 20% discount for cash! erator. No smoking. companies from out of (541) 383-3152 fessional apSmall pet? $600 mo.+ ½ acre in Prineville OR state. If you have industrial park 24'x80' Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co deposits, w/s/g inpearance apply concerns or quesshop with 40'x60' *Upstairs only with lease* Tick, Tock cluded. 541-382-1365 in person at: tions, we suggest you unfinished addition, consult your attorney Tick, Tock... $160,000. Call for or call CONSUMER more info; can send 1735 NE Hwy 20, ...don’t let time get HOTLINE, pics. 541-604-0344 Bend. 1-877-877-9392. away. Hire a Good classiied ads tell professional out the essential facts in an AVAILABLE BEND AREA RENTALS of The Bulletin’s Newspaper interesting Manner. Write •Spacious 2 Bdrm/1 Bath SE Duplexes - Sgl. ga- from the readers view - not “Call A Service Bulletin Advertising Department rage. Large fenced back deck. All new appl. carthe seller’s. Convert the Professional” pet, paint. W/D hook-ups. No pets. $675 WST. facts into beneits. Show Directory today! •2 Bdrm, 2.5 Bath at base of Pilot Butte - Bonus the reader how the item will Special Project Photographer/ room on 3rd level. 2 master Suites. Large closhelp them in some way. Editorial Assistant *** ets. W/D hookups. Single garage. $745 WS CHECK YOUR AD •3 Bdrm/1.5 Bath Close to River/Downtown The Bulletin is seeking a skilled photographer Please check your ad Townhome style in quad. Back deck + extra storand editorial assistant to join the Special on the first day it runs age. W/D Hook-ups. Prefer no pets. $750 WST. Projects team. to make sure it is cor•2 Bdrm/1.75 Bath Duplex. Great NW Location 1 rect. Sometimes inblock from river. Gas fireplace/GFA heat. Split Successful candidate will be responsible for structions over the level. Sgl. garage. W/D hookups. Screened in on-site and studio photography for advertising Existing lot, dwelling phone are misunderporch in rear. Lawn maintained. $775 WS products, including special magazines and and large shop + 2 stood and an error niche products as well as retail advertising. •3 Bdrm/2 Bath Country Home on 2.25 acresnew lots for developcan occur in your ad. Large front deck. Covered back deck. Triple gaEditorial assistant duties include some writing, ment, in fast-growing If this happens to your rage. Small shed. W/D hookups. $950. organization, editing, data base management. •Unique Boardman, OR. Duad, please contact us 3 bdrm/2 bath home in DRW on 1 acre Will also assist in some social media projects plex approved. Systhe first day your ad Lrg. shop + oversized sgl. garage. Fenced yard. and participate in local events sponsored by tem dev. fees waived. appears and we will Sun porch. Entertainment room. 2 woodburning The Bulletin. $199,500. For details be happy to fix it as fireplaces. W/D included. Must see. $1050. call 1-541-379-0362 soon as we can. Qualified employee will possess basic photoDeadlines are: WeekREDMOND AREA RENTALS 745 graphy skills, computer skills including days 11:00 noon for Microsoft Office Suite and Adobe Creative Homes for Sale next day, Sat. 11:00 Suite. Will require the use of a reliable 2 bdrm/1 bath Apt. 1st floor unit on end in quad. a.m. for Sunday and No thru traffic. on-Site laundry. nice rear deck. personal automobile, proof of insurance, lifting Monday. A/C unit. New carpet, paint. Large kitchen. $495 4270 sq ft, 6bd, 6ba, up to 40 lbs. 4-car, corner, .83 ac, 541-385-5809 WST. mtn view, by owner. Thank you! 4 Bdrm/2 Bath Sgl. Level Home on corner lot in To apply, send a resume, cover letter and any NE. 2400 sq. ft. Pets under 20#s considered. $590,000 541-390-0886 The Bulletin Classified appropriate work samples to: Martha Tiller at Fenced back yard. Landscaped w/Sprinklers. See: bloomkey.com/8779 *** mtiller@bendbulletin.com. No phone call Garden tub. Master separate from guest bdrms. Call The Bulletin At BANK OWNED HOMES! please. Nice LR window seat. Must see. $1250 FREE List w/Pics! 541-385-5809 *** FOR ADDITIONAL PROPERTIES *** www.BendRepos.com Place Your Ad Or E-Mail CALL 541-382-0053 &/or Stop By the Office at bend and beyond real estate At: www.bendbulletin.com 587 NE Greenwood, Bend 20967 yeoman, bend or

Retail Sales Design Oriented

Boats & RV’s

Honda 1500 Trike, 1994 with ‘08 Champion All real estate adverconversion, metallic tised here in is subred, always garaged, ject to the Federal low miles, lots of opFair Housing Act, tions $21,500. Call which makes it illegal Yamaha yfz450 2005 541-598-7718 to advertise any prefSport Race quad, built 850 erence, limitation or 4-mil stroked to 470cc, HONDA CRF 250X Snowmobiles discrimination based 2006, senior citizen lots of mods, $5000 obo on race, color, reliCall 541-647-8931 bought new in 2007, gion, sex, handicap, Polaris 2003, 4 cycle, trail riding only in fuel inj, elec start, refamilial status or naCamp Sherman, low verse, 2-up seat, 870 tional origin, or intenhours, not ridden last cover, 4900 mi, $2500 tion to make any such Boats & Accessories year, JD jetting kit, raobo. 541-280-0514 preferences, limitadiator & trans. guards, tions or discrimination. 860 exc. cond., $2800 12' Smokercraft We will not knowingly Motorcycles & Accessories OBO, 541-595-2559 2000 & trailer. 2007 accept any advertis9.9 HP Johnson ing for real estate Need to get an w/less than 5 hrs which is in violation of use, Exc. shape. this law. All persons ad in ASAP? $3200, Call are hereby informed You can place it 360-903-7873 to that all dwellings adonline at: view. In town. vertised are available on an equal opportu- Harley Davidson Heri- www.bendbulletin.com nity basis. The Bulletage Classic 2000 tin Classified Softail, 7200 mi, many 541-385-5809 13’ Smokercraft extras, $8000. Call 1997, Alaskan Fish 750 541-419-5634 Boat w/ 9.9 Merc & Redmond Homes elec. motor, swivel Harley Davidson Softseat, fish finder, anTail Deluxe 2007, chor, cover & top, Looking for your next white/cobalt, w/pastrailer, $2450, employee? senger kit, Vance & 541-977-2644. Place a Bulletin help Hines muffler system wanted ad today and & kit, 1045 mi., exc. Honda Shadow Arrow 2006, exlnt cond, low reach over 60,000 cond, $19,999, mi, always garaged, readers each week. 541-389-9188. $3900. 541-420-4869 Your classified ad Harley Heritage will also appear on Softail, 2003 bendbulletin.com $5,000+ in extras, which currently re$2000 paint job, ceives over 30K mi. 1 owner, Honda VT700 16’ Driftboat, like new 1.5 million page For more information Shadow 1984, 23K cond., lots of upgrades, views every month please call mi, many new parts, 6 HP LS motor, $6500, at no extra cost. 541-385-8090 battery charger, call/text, 541-480-8075. Bulletin Classifieds or 209-605-5537 good condition. Get Results! Now for $1000, Call 385-5809 or TURN THE PAGE cash! 541-598-4351 place your ad on-line For More Ads at The Bulletin bendbulletin.com Piaggio LT50 Scooter 2003 , rarely driven in 9 yrs, only 660 miles, 19-ft Mastercraft ProHD FAT BOY Garage Sales mint condition; plus 2 Star 190 inboard, 1996 helmets, a Mote Tote 1987, 290hp, V8, 822 Completely rebuilt/ Garage Sales tow bar and tie down hrs, great cond, lots of customized, low accessories, all for extras, $10,000 obo. Garage Sales miles. Accepting ofonly $1750. 541-231-8709 fers. 541-548-4807 Call 541-389-3044 Find them in The Bulletin Classiieds

NOTICE:

800

Advertise with a full-color photo in The Bulletin Classifieds and online.

Easy, flexible, and affordable ad packages are also available on our Web site. To place your Bulletin ad with a photo, visit www.bendbulletin.com, click on “Place an ad” and follow these easy steps:

1.

Choose a category, choose a classification, and then select your ad package.

2.

Write your ad and upload your digital photo.

3.

Create your account with any major credit card.

All ads appear in both print and online Please allow 24 hours for photo processing before your ad appears in print and online.

To place your photo ad, visit us online at www.bendbulletin.com or call with questions 541-385-5809

www.bendbulletin.com


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, MAY 29, 2012 G3

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Boats & Accessories

Watercraft

Motorhomes

Motorhomes

Fifth Wheels

Aircraft, Parts & Service

Antique & Classic Autos

Pickups

Vans

GMC ½-ton Pickup, 1972, LWB, 350hi motor, mechanically A-1, interior great; body needs some TLC. $4000 OBO. Call 541-382-9441

Ford Windstar 1995 7 pass., 140k, 3.8 V6, no junk. Drive it away for $1750; 1996 Nissan Quest 7 pass., 152k, 3.0 V6, new tires, ready for next 152k, $4500. Call 541-318-9999, ask for Bob.

Ads published in "Wa- Gulfstream Scenic COACHMAN 1997 tercraft" include: KayCruiser 36 ft. 1999, Catalina 5th wheel aks, rafts and motorCummins 330 hp die23’, slide, new tires, ized personal sel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 extra clean, below watercrafts. For in. kitchen slide out, book. $6,500. "boats" please see new tires,under cover, National Sea Breeze 541-548-1422 19’ Glass Ply, Merc Class 870. hwy. miles only,4 door 2004 M-1341 35’, gas, cruiser, depth finder, fridge/freezer ice541-385-5809 ONLY 3 OWNERSHIP FIAT 1800 1978 5-spd, 2 power slides, uptrolling motor, trailer, maker, W/D combo, door panels w/flowers SHARES LEFT! graded queen mat$3500, 541-389-1086 Escaper 29’ 1991, Interbath tub & & hummingbirds, Economical flying in tress, hyd. leveling or 541-419-8034. 2 slides, A/C, shower, 50 amp prowhite soft top & hard your own Cessna system, rear camera elec/gas fridge, walk pane gen & more! top, Reduced! $5,500. 172/180 HP for only & monitor, only 6k mi. around queen bed, $55,000. 541-317-9319 or $10,000! Based at A steal at $43,000! elec. front jacks, 541-948-2310 541-647-8483 BDN. Call Gabe at 541-480-0617 $4000 OBO, 20.5’ 2004 Bayliner Professional Air! 541-382-8939 or RV CONSIGNMENTS 205 Run About, 220 541-388-0019 541-777-0999. WANTED HP, V8, open bow, Inflatable Raft,Sevylor Hunter’s Delight! Pack- We Do The Work, You 916 exc. cond., very fast Fishmaster 325,10’3”, Keep The Cash, w/very low hours, age deal! 1988 WinTrucks & complete pkg., $650 On-Site Credit lots of extras incl. nebago Super Chief, Heavy Equipment Firm, 541-977-4461. Approval Team, tower, Bimini & 38K miles, great Ford Galaxie 500 1963, Web Site Presence, custom trailer, shape; 1988 Bronco II 2 dr. hardtop,fastback, We Take Trade-Ins. $19,500. 4x4 to tow, 130K 390 v8,auto, pwr. steer & Free Advertising. 541-389-1413 mostly towed miles, radio (orig),541-419-4989 Fleetwood Wilderness BIG COUNTRY RV nice rig! $15,000 both. 36’ 2005 4 slides, rear Bend 541-330-2495 Kayak, Eddyline Ford Mustang Coupe 541-382-3964, leave bdrm, fireplace, AC, Redmond: 541-548-5254 Sandpiper, 12’, like 1966, original owner, msg. W/D hkup beautiful new, $975, V8, automatic, great FIND IT! 1982 INT. Dump w/Arunit! $30,500. 541-420-3277. shape, $9000 OBO. CAN’T BEAT THIS! borhood, 6k on rebuilt BUY IT! 541-815-2380 20.5’ Seaswirl Spy530-515-8199 Look before you 392, truck refurbished, SELL IT! HIJACKER 24-HSK-21 der 1989 H.O. 302, 880 buy, below market has 330 gal. water 285 hrs., exc. cond., The Bulletin Classii eds 5th Wheel Hitch. value ! Size & miletank w/pump & hose. Motorhomes stored indoors for Minimal wear and age DOES matter, Everything works, life $11,900 OBO. use. Track bolts all inClass A 32’ HurriReduced - now $5000 541-379-3530 cluded. Asking $425. cane by Four Winds, OBO. 541-977-8988 541.610.9816 2007. 12,500 mi, all amenities, Ford V10, 20’ Tracker, Pontoon GMC ½ ton 1971, Only lthr, cherry, slides, Fisherman, 40HP $19,700! Original low like new, can see Southwind 35.5’ Triton, motor, great interior mile, exceptional, 3rd anytime, $58,000. 2008,V10, 2 slides, Du$8000, 541-912-9336 1996 Beaver Monterey owner. 951-699-7171 541-548-5216 pont UV coat, 7500 mi. 30' Diesel pusher, low Avg NADA ret.114,343; Need help ixing stuff? Peterbilt 359 potable miles, fully loaded, asking $99,000. Komfort 24’ 1999, 6’ water truck, 1990, Call A Service Professional good Toyo tires, tow Call 541-923-2774 slide, fully loaded,never 3200 gal. tank, 5hp ind the help you need. package, very clean. used since buying, pump, 4-3" hoses, www.bendbulletin.com $25,000. 541-604-0344 Jayco Greyhawk Tioga 30’ 2005, like new $8500, 541-923-0854. camlocks, $25,000. condition, E450 Super or 541-447-2175 2004, 31’ Class C, 541-820-3724 Duty, always garage 6800 mi., hyd. jacks, Lincoln Mark IV, 1972, Where can you ind a stored, 17,345 non- Montana 34’ 2003, 2 925 new tires, slide out, needs vinyl top, runs slides, exc. cond. smoker mi., awning, helping hand? exc. cond, $49,900, Utility Trailers good, $3500. throughout, arctic never cooked in, A/C, From contractors to 541-480-8648 541-771-4747 winter pkg, new 10sleeps 8, $42,500, for yard care, it’s all here ply tires, W/D ready, details call Advertise your car! Lazy Daze 26’ 2004, 25’ Catalina Sailboat price reduced, Now 541-480-3217 in The Bulletin’s Add A Picture! 11K mi., $46,000. 1983, w/trailer, swing $18,000, Reach thousands of readers! “Call A Service Big Tex Landscap619-733-8472. keel, pop top, fully 541-390-6531 Call 541-385-5809 ing/ ATV Trailer, loaded, $9500 call for Professional” Directory The Bulletin Classifieds dual axle flatbed, details, 541-480-8060 7’x16’, 7000 lb. Ads published in the GVW, all steel, "Boats" classification $1400. Winnebago Outlook 32’ include: Speed, fish541-382-4115, or Mercury Monterrey 2008, Ford V10 eng, ing, drift, canoe, 541-280-7024. 1965, Exc. All original, Wineguard sat, TV, surLondon Aire Motor house and sail boats. 4-dr. sedan, in storMONTANA 3585 2008, Home, class C, 28 ft. round sound stereo + For all other types of 2002 Country Coach age last 15 yrs., 390 exc. cond., 3 slides, more. Reduced to 1990, in exc. shape, Just too many Intrigue 40' Tag axle. watercraft, please see High Compression king bed, lrg LR, Arcready to go. Sleeps 6, $49,000. 541-526-1622 400hp Cummins DieClass 875. collectibles? engine, new tires & litic insulation, all opor 541-728-6793 Upgrade your camping sel. Two slide-outs. 541-385-5809 cense, reduced to tions $37,500. experience! $11,995. 881 41,000 miles. Most $2850, 541-410-3425. 541-420-3250 Sell them in Call 541-389-7955 options. $110,000 Travel Trailers The Bulletin Classiieds OBO 541-678-5712 Metal RV cover 14’x14x 41’long, 3 sided, walk-in GENERATE SOME exdoor, like new, $4000. citement in your neig541-385-5809 541-620-2135 borhood. Plan a garage sale and don't 931 forget to advertise in Pilgrim 27’, 2007 5th Plymouth Barracuda Automotive Parts, classified! 385-5809. wheel, 1 slide, AC, 1966, original car! 300 Fleetwood 24’ Pioneer Beaver Patriot 2000, TV,full awning, excel- Service & Accessories hp, 360 V8, centerSpirit, 2007, good Walnut cabinets, solent shape, $23,900. lines, (Original 273 cond, minor dent on ‘92-96 Ford F150, taillar, Bose, Corian, tile, 541-350-8629 eng & wheels incl.) front saves you $$! gate, maroon, exc cond, 4 door fridge., 1 slide, Monaco Dynasty 2004, 541-593-2597 $8000. 541-419-5634 $125. 541-382-8973 W/D. $75,000 Used out-drive loaded, 3 slides, 541-215-5355 parts - Mercury $159,000, 541-923- 8572 Jayco Eagle 2000 26’ 933 Polished cherrywood $10,500 OBO. 14’ slide, OMC rebuilt maGeorgetown 350, 2006, or 541-749-0037 (cell) steering wheel w/GT Pickups awning, air, heat, genrine motors: 151 11,000 mi, like new, horn & shift knob kit, The Bulletin tly used. 541-595-2003 $1595; 3.0 $1895; generator, rear cam$135. 541-918-1380 To Subscribe call 4.3 (1993), $1995. era, 2 slides, auto Space for rent In Tu- Regal Prowler AX6 Exleveling, awn. $50,000 541-385-5800 or go to 541-389-0435 treme Edition 38’ ‘05, Traction Snow Tires (4), malo. 30 amp + water, has Snowflake, 235/ Chevy 3/4 ton 4x4, www.bendbulletin.com 541-549-4203 4 slides,2 fireplaces, all no septic, level gravel 1995, extended cab, 70R16, great shape, maple cabs, king bed/ lot. $100 wk., $350 long box, grill guard, lots of tread, $250, bdrm separated w/slide mo. 541-419-5060 running boards, bed 541-408-0531 glass dr,loaded,always rails & canopy, 178K garaged,lived in only 3 SPRINGDALE 2005 We Buy Junk miles, $4800 obo. mo,brand new $54,000, 27’, has eating area Cars & Trucks! 208-301-3321 (Bend) still like new, $28,500, slide, A/C and heat, Cash paid for junk will deliver,see rvt.com, new tires, all conChevy S10 2002 ext vehicles, batteries & ad#4957646 for pics. Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 (This special package is not available on our website) tents included, bedcab, 69K mi., tonneau catalytic converters. Cory, 541-580-7334 ding towels, cooking cover, auto trans, exc. Serving all of C.O.! and eating utensils. cond. $8400 obo Call 541-408-1090 Sundance 29’ 2009, Great for vacation, Randy 541-504-1298 3 slides, quality Building/Contracting Handyman Landscaping/Yard Care fishing, hunting or 932 queen mattress, non Dodge 1500 2001 4x4 living! $15,500 Antique & smoking, elec. jacks, NOTICE: Oregon state I DO THAT! sport, red, loaded, Nelson Landscape 541-408-3811 upgrades, oak cabiClassic Autos law requires any- Home/Rental repairs rollbar, AND 2011 Maintenance nets, fully loaded, one who contracts Small jobs to remodels Serving Central Oregon Moped Trike used 3 $25,900 OBO; for construction work Honest, guaranteed Chevy 1951 pickup, months, street legal. Residential 541-610-5178 to be licensed with the work. CCB#151573 restored. $13,500 obo; call 541-433-2384 & Commercial Construction Con- Dennis 541-317-9768 541-504-3253 or •Sprinkler Taurus 27.5’ ‘88,all work, tractors Board (CCB). 503-504-2764 Activation & Repair $1750/partial trade for An active license car. 541-460-9127 means the contractor Landscaping/Yard Care •Back Flow Testing Springdale 29’ 2007, •Thatch & Aerate is bonded and in885 slide,Bunkhouse style, sured. Verify the • Spring Clean up sleeps 7-8, excellent Canopies & Campers contractor’s CCB li•Weekly Mowing condition, $16,900, Dodge 3500 2007 Quad cense through the •Bi-Monthly & Monthly 541-390-2504 Cab SLT 4x4, 6.7L For sale or trade toCCB Consumer Maintenance Chevy Wagon 1957, Cummins 6-spd AT, wards 24’-26’ trailer Website •Flower Bed Clean Up after-market upgrades, 4-dr., complete, with slide. Lance www.hirealicensedcontractor. superb truck, call for More Than Service •Bark, Rock, Etc. $15,000 OBO, trades, Squire 9’10” cabover, com details, $28,000 OBO. Peace Of Mind please call •Senior Discounts ‘96, elec. jacks, solar or call 503-378-4621. 541-385-5682 panel, 2-dr refrig, 541-420-5453. The Bulletin recomBonded & Insured freezer, awning, outmends checking with Spring Clean Up 541-815-4458 door shower, exc. Chrysler 300 Coupe •Leaves the CCB prior to conLCB#8759 Sprinter 272RLS, 2009 1967, 440 engine, cond, $7000 obo. •Cones tracting with anyone. 29’, weatherized, like auto. trans, ps, air, 541-549-1342 •Needles Some other trades new, furnished & frame on rebuild, re•Debris Hauling also require addiready to go, incl Wine- Lance 11.6 camper Mdl painted original blue, •Aeration tional licenses and 1130, 1999. Ext’d cab, gard Satellite dish, original blue interior, •Dethatching certifications. fully self-contained. $26,995. 541-420-9964 original hub caps, exc. Ford F-150 1995, 112K, Spring Clean up. Compost Top Dressing 4X4, long bed, auto, Incl catalytic heater, chrome, asking $9000 Bi-weekly & monthly very clean, runs well, TV/VCR combo. Very Computer/Cabling Install or make offer. maint., debris hauling, Weed free Bark new tires, $6000. well taken care of, 541-385-9350. property clean-up, & flower beds 541-548-4039. clean. Hauls easily, QB Digital Living bark decoration. very comfortable. •Computer Networking ORGANIC PROGRAMS Residential & Ford F-350 XLT 2003, $8995. 541-382-1344 •Phone/Data/TV Jacks Weekend Warrior Toy Commercial. 4X4, 6L diesel, 6-spd •Whole House Audio Hauler 28’ 2007,Gen, Lance-Legend 990 Free Estimates. manual, Super Cab, Landscape Chrysler SD 4-Door •Flat Screen TV & Infuel station, exc cond. 11’3" 1998, w/ext-cab, short box, 12K Warn 1930, CDS Royal Maintenance Call The Yard Doctor stallation sleeps 8, black/gray exc. cond., generator, winch, custom bumper Standard, 8-cylinder, Full or Partial Service for yard maintenance, 541-280-6771 interior, used 3X, & canopy, running solar-cell, large refrig, body is good, needs •Mowing •Edging thatching, sod, sprinwww.qbdigitalliving.com $24,999. boards, 2 sets tires, AC, micro., magic fan, some restoration, •Pruning •Weeding kler blowouts, water CCB#127370 Elect 541-389-9188 wheels & chains, many bathroom shower, runs, taking bids, Sprinkler Adjustments features, more! Lic#9-206C extras, perfect, ONLY removable carpet, 541-383-3888, Allen 541-536-1294 29,800 miles, $27,500 custom windows, outLooking for your 541-815-3318 Fertilizer included LCB 5012 OBO, 541-504-8316. door shower/awning Debris Removal next employee? with monthly program Aeration / Dethatching set-up for winterizing, Place a Bulletin help BOOK NOW! elec. jacks, CD/stewanted ad today and JUNK BE GONE Weekly, monthly / one-time service reo/4’ stinger. $9000. reach over 60,000 I Haul Away FREE or one time service. Weekly avail. Bonded, insured, Bend, 541.279.0458 readers each week. For Salvage. Also free estimates! Your classified ad Cleanups & Cleanouts EXPERIENCED COLLINS Lawn Maint. will also appear on Mel, 541-389-8107 Commercial Call 541-480-9714 bendbulletin.com Autos & & Residential which currently reUGLY YARD? Transportation Electrical Services ceives over 1.5 milRetired Master Free Estimates lion page views evGardener make-overs Senior Discounts Quality Builders Electric ery month at no Starting at $499. 541-390-1466 • Remodels extra cost. Bulletin 541-633-9895 Same Day Response • Home Improvement Classifieds Get ReOrganicscapes, Inc. • Lighting Upgrades sults! Call 385-5809 LCB#8906 • Hot Tub Hook-ups or place your ad NOTICE: OREGON 541.771.9441 541-389-0621 908 on-line at Landscape Contrac- www.bendorganiclandwww.qbelectric.net bendbulletin.com Aircraft, Parts tors Law (ORS 671) scaping.com CCB#127370 Elect & Service requires all busi- Maverick Landscaping Lic#9-206C 882 nesses that advertise Mowing, weedeating, to perform LandFifth Wheels yard detailing, chain Excavating scape Construction saw work & more! which includes: LCB#8671 541-923-4324 Levi’s Dirt Works: All planting, decks, your excavation needs: fences, arbors, Holmes Landscape Maint • Clean-up • Aerate Small jobs for Homewater-features, and owners - job or hr., Util1/3 interest in Columinstallation, repair of • De-thatch • Free Est. ity lines,Concrete, Public bia 400, located at irrigation systems to • Weekly / Bi-wkly Svc. call Josh 541-610-6011 Works, Subcontracting, Alpha “See Ya” 30’ Sunriver. $138,500. be licensed with the Custom pads, Driveway 1996, 2 slides, A/C, Call 541-647-3718 Landscape Contrac- Painting/Wall Covering grading - low cost-get rid heat pump, exc. cond. tors Board. This of pot holes & smooth out for Snowbirds, solid 1/3 interest in well4-digit number is to be equipped IFR Beech your drive,Augering,ccb# All About Painting oak cabs day & night included in all adverBonanza A36, lo194077, 541-639-5282 shades, Corian, tile, tisements which indi- Interior/Exterior/Decks. cated KBDN. $55,000. Mention this ad get hardwood. $12,750. cate the business has 541-419-9510 15% Off interior or 541-923-3417. a bond, insurance and Handyman exterior job. Executive Hangar workers compensation for their employ- Restrictions do apply. ERIC REEVE HANDY at Bend Airport Free Estimates. ees. For your protecSERVICES. Home & (KBDN) CCB #148373 tion call 503-378-5909 Commercial Repairs, 60’ wide x 50’ deep, 541-420-6729 or use our website: Carpentry-Painting, w/55’ wide x 17’ high www.lcb.state.or.us to WESTERN PAINTING Pressure-washing, bi-fold door. Natural CO. Richard Hayman, Carri-Lite Luxury 2009 check license status Honey Do's. On-time gas heat, office, batha semi-retired paintbefore contracting promise. Senior room. Parking for 6 by Carriage, 4 slideing contractor of 45 with the business. Discount. Work guarcars. Adjacent to outs, inverter, satelyears. Small Jobs Persons doing landanteed. 541-389-3361 Frontage Rd; great lite sys, fireplace, 2 Welcome. Interior & scape maintenance or 541-771-4463 visibility for aviation flat screen TVs. Exterior. ccb#5184. do not require a LCB Bonded & Insured bus. 1jetjock@q.com $60,000. 541-388-6910 license. CCB#181595 541-480-3923 541-948-2126

975

Automobiles International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $1950. 541-419-5480. Mazda B4000 2004 Cab Plus 4x4. 4½ yrs or 95,000 miles left on ext’d warranty. V6, 5-spd, AC, studded tires, 2 extra rims, tow pkg, 132K mi, all records, exlnt cond, $9500. 541-408-8611 935

AUDI QUATTRO CABRIOLET 2004, extra nice, low mileage, heated seats, new Michelins, all wheel drive, $12,995 503-635-9494.

BMW 525i 2004

New body style, Steptronic auto., cold-weather package, premium package, heated seats, extra nice. $14,995. 503-635-9494.

Sport Utility Vehicles

CHEVY SUBURBAN LT 2005, low miles., good tires, new brakes, moonroof Reduced to $15,750 541-389-5016.

Buick Lucerne CX 2006 65k, 3.8 V6, cloth int., 30 mpg hwy, $7500. Buick Park Avenue 1992, leather, 136k, 28 mpg hwy. $2500. Bob, 541-318-9999 Ask me about the Free Trip to Washington, D.C. for WWII Veterans. Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218.

Chevy Tahoe, 1999, very clean, loaded, 23,600k on new motor; new tires & battery, $5000. 541-330-1151

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $ 500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for:

Chevy Tahoe LS 2001 4x4. 120K mi, Power seats, Tow Pkg, 3rd $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days row seating, extra $ tires, CD, privacy tint16 - 3 lines, 14 days ing, upgraded rims. (Private Party ads only) Fantastic cond. $9500 Contact Timm at 541-408-2393 for info Nissan Sentra 4-dr 1997, fuel efficient, or to view vehicle. AT, FWD, CC, $1800. Call 541-420-8831 Ford Excursion 2005, 4WD, diesel, exc. cond., $19,900, call 541-923-0231.

Jeep Cherokee 1990, 4WD, 3 sets rims & tires, exlnt set snow tires, great 1st car! $1800. 541-633-5149 Jeep Compass 2009 #137390 $17,995

541-598-3750

aaaoregonautosource.com

Jeep Willys 1947 cstm, small block Chevy, PS, OD, mags + trlr. Swap for backhoe. No a.m. calls, pls. 541-389-6990

Porsche Cayenne 2004, 86k, immac, dealer maint’d, loaded, now $17000. 503-459-1580

Range Rover 2005 HSE, nav, DVD, local car, new tires, 51K miles. $24,995. 503-635-9494

Range Rover, 2006 Sport HSE,

nav, AWD, heated seats, moonroof, local owner, Harman Kardon, $23,995. 503-635-9494

900

541-385-5809

PORSCHE 914, 1974 Roller (no engine), lowered, full roll cage, 5-pt harnesses, racing seats, 911 dash & instruments, decent shape, very cool! $1699. 541-678-3249 Saab 9-3 SE 1999 convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

Looking for your next employee?

Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subject to FRAUD. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Take care of your investments with the help from The Bulletin’s “Call A Service Professional” Directory


G4 TUESDAY, MAY 29, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 1134019861 T.S. No.: 11-02103-6

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.: OR-12-504850-SH

Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust dated as of January 17, 2006 made by, DAVID R. WILKINS, REBECCA A. WILKINS, as the original grantor, to DESCHUTES COUNTY TITLE, as the original trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICAN HOME MORTGAGE ACCEPTANCE, INC, as the original beneficiary, recorded on January 27, 2006, as Instrument No. 2006-06370 of Official Records in the Office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, Oregon (the "Deed of Trust"). The current beneficiary is: U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee for MASTR Adjustable Rate Mortgages Trust 2006-0A1, Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2006-0A1, (the "Beneficiary"). APN: 136927 LOT SIX (6), BLOCK FOUR (4), SPRING RIVER ACRES, UNIT 2, RECORDED JANUARY 6, 1964 IN CABINET A, PAGE 114, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 17061 COOPER DRIVE, BEND, OR Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default(s) for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; and which defaulted amounts total: $26,603.29 as of May 9, 2012. By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $458,919.61 together with interest thereon at the rate of 2.94300% per annum from September 1, 2011 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all Trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as the duly appointed Trustee under the Deed of Trust will on September 19, 2012 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of the Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, Trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 1920 Main Street, Suite 1120, Irvine, CA 92614 949-252-4900 FOR SALE INFORMATION CALL: 714.730.2727 Website for Trustee's Sale Information: www.lpsasap.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "Trustee" and 'Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: May 15, 2012 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Michael Busby, Authorized Signature

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Reference is made to that certain deed made by MARK A HOWLETT, as Grantor to WESTERN TITLE & ESCROW COMPANY, as trustee, in favor Reference is made to that certain deed made by BENJAMIN L WILLIS, of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AND TERRY L WILLIS, HUSBAND AND WIFE, as Grantor to RECON("MERS") AS NOMINEE FOR COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS, INC., as TRUST COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC Beneficiary, dated 4/21/2006, recorded 4/28/2006, in official records of REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., ("MERS") AS NOMINEE FOR COUNDESCHUTES County, Oregon in book / reel / volume number fee / file / TRYWIDE BANK, FSB, as Beneficiary, dated 2/11/2008, recorded instrument / microfile / reception number 2006-29581, , covering the fol2/29/2008, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book / lowing described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: reel / volume number fee / file / instrument / microfile / reception number APN: 141930 2008-09114, , covering the following described real property situated in LOT 3 IN BLOCK 6, OF TIMBER HAVEN FIRST ADDITION, said County and State, to-wit: DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. APN: 109256 HUD LABEL ORE ORE 377284, FLEETWOOD BERKSHIRE, A PORTION OF THE EAST HALF OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER 1999, ORELW48AB52270BS13 " WHICH IS AFFIXED TO AND MADE (E1/2 SE1/4) OF SECTION 20, TOWNSHIP 17 SOUTH, RANGE 13 PART OF THE REAL PROPERTY." EAST OF THE WILLAMETTE MERIDIAN, Commonly known as: DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: 51991 CULTUS LANE, LA PINE, OR 97739 BEGINNING AT A POINT WHENCE THE SOUTHEAST CORNER Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real OF SECTION 20, TOWNSHIP 17 SOUTH, RANGE 13 EAST OF THE property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice WILLAMETTE MERIDIAN, BEARS SOUTH 23 DEGREES 16 EAST, has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantors: The 1661.3 FEET; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 52' 14' WEST 660.47 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 0 DEGREES 09' 46" EAST, 330 FEET installments of principal and interest which became due on 12/1/2011, and THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 52' 14" EAST, 660.47 FEET; all subsequent installments of principal and interest through the date of THENCE SOUTH 0 DEGREES 09' 46" WEST 330 FEET TO THE POINT this Notice, plus amounts that are due for late charges, delinquent propOF BEGINNING, EXCEPTING THEREFROM THE EASTERLY 25 FEET erty taxes, insurance premiums, advances made on senior liens, taxes WHICH US RESERVED FOR ROADWAY PURPOSES. APN# 109256 and/or insurance, trustee's fees, and any attorney fees and court costs Commonly known as: arising from or associated with the beneficiaries efforts to protect and pre62925 SANTA CRUZ AVENUE, BEND, OR 97701 serve its security, all of which must be paid as a condition of reinstateBoth the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real ment, including all sums that shall accrue through reinstatement or property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice pay-off. Nothing in this notice shall be construed as a waiver of any fees has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised owing to the Beneficiary under the Deed of Trust pursuant to the terms of Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantors: The the loan documents. Monthly Payment $859.11 Monthly Late Charge installments of principal and interest which became due on 8/1/2011, and $42.96 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obliall subsequent installments of principal and interest through the date of gations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said this Notice, plus amounts that are due for late charges, delinquent sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $124,903.07 together with property taxes, insurance premiums, advances made on senior liens, interest thereon at the rate of 6.5000 per annum from 11/1/2011 until paid; taxes and/or insurance, trustee's fees, and any attorney fees and court plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs arising from or associated with the beneficiaries efforts to protect costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of and preserve its security, all of which must be paid as a condition of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that Quality Loan Serreinstatement, including all sums that shall accrue through reinstatement vice Corporation of Washington, the undersigned trustee will on 9/7/2012 or pay-off. Nothing in this notice shall be construed as a waiver of any fees at the hour of 11:00:00 AM , Standard of Time, as established by section owing to the Beneficiary under the Deed of Trust pursuant to the terms of 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, At the front entrance of the Courtthe loan documents. Monthly Payment $2,466.71 Monthly Late Charge house, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR 97701 County of DESCHUTES, $123.34 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $397,604.77 together power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, with interest thereon at the rate of 5.8750 per annum from 7/1/2011 until together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obforeclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to ligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person Quality Loan Service Corporation of Washington, the undersigned trustee named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have will on 9/4/2012 at the hour of 11:00:00 AM , Standard of Time, as the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, At the front payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR 97701 portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curhighest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property ing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor prior to five days before the date last set for sale. For Sale Information or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust Call: 714-730-2727 or Login to: www.lpsasap.com In construing this nodeed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs tice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the sinand expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. gular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the perRevised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding formance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of 'beneficiary'" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Pursuthe entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as ant to Oregon Law, this sale will not be deemed final until the Trustee's would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, deed has been issued by Quality Loan Service Corporation of Washingtrustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in ton. If there are any irregularities discovered within 10 days of the date of the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the this sale, that the trustee will rescind the sale, return the buyer's money obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last and take further action as necessary. If the sale is set aside for any reaset for sale. For Sale Information Call: 714-730-2727 or Login to: son, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the www.lpsasap.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word This shall be the Purchaser's sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Benother persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by eficiary, the Beneficiary's Agent, or the Beneficiary's Attorney. If you have said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respecpreviously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been retive successors in interest, if any. Pursuant to Oregon Law, this sale will leased of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended not be deemed final until the Trustee's deed has been issued by Quality to exercise the note holders right's against the real property only. THIS Loan Service Corporation of Washington. If there are any irregularities OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMAdiscovered within 10 days of the date of this sale, that the trustee will resTION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by cind the sale, return the buyer's money and take further action as law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your necessary. If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: 4/27/12 Quality Loan Service a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser's Corporation of Washington, as trustee By: Brian Souza Assistant Secresole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse tary Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington c/o Quality Loan Service against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary's Agent, Corp. 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 or the Beneficiary's Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for A-4238484 05/15/2012, 05/22/2012, 05/29/2012, 06/05/2012 this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right's against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE Get your Sell an Item The Bulletin is your USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be business Employment submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: 4/23/2012 Quality Loan Service Corporation of Marketplace Washington, as trustee Signature By: Brooke Frank, Assistant Secretary Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington C/O Quality Loan Service Corp. Call 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 For Non-Sale Information: Quality If it's under $500 Loan Service Corporation of Washington c/o Quality Loan Service Corp. you can place it in 541-385-5809 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 Fax: 619-645-7716 With an ad in The Bulletin to advertise. A-4235889 05/08/2012, 05/15/2012, 05/22/2012, 05/29/2012 The Bulletin's Classiieds for:

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Reference is made to that certain deed made by CHRISTOPHER T SAUNDERS, AND ELIZABETH BARTHOLOMEW-SAUNDERS, HUSBAND AND WIFE, as Grantor to WESTERN TITLE AND ESCROW, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., ("MERS"), AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICA'S WHOLESALE LENDER, as Beneficiary, dated 7/27/2005, recorded 8/18/2005, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book / reel / volume number fee / file / instrument / microfile / reception number 2005-54602, , covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 118139 LOT 12, AWBREY MEADOWS, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 1940 NW BROGAN PL, BEND, OR 97701-5904 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantors: The installments of principal and interest which became due on 8/1/2011, and all subsequent installments of principal and interest through the date of this Notice, plus amounts that are due for late charges, delinquent property taxes, insurance premiums, advances made on senior liens, taxes and/or insurance, trustee's fees, and any attorney fees and court costs arising from or associated with the beneficiaries efforts to protect and preserve its security, all of which must be paid as a condition of reinstatement, including all sums that shall accrue through reinstatement or pay-off. Nothing in this notice shall be construed as a waiver of any fees owing to the Beneficiary under the Deed of Trust pursuant to the terms of the loan documents. Monthly Payment $2,013.94 Monthly Late Charge By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $326,051.13 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.3750 per annum from 7/1/2011 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that Quality Loan Service Corporation of Washington, the undersigned trustee will on 9/10/2012 at the hour of 11:00:00 AM , Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, At the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR 97701 County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. For Sale Information Call: 714-730-2727 or Login to: www.lpsasap.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Pursuant to Oregon Law, this sale will not be deemed final until the Trustee's deed has been issued by Quality Loan Service Corporation of Washington. If there are any irregularities discovered within 10 days of the date of this sale, that the trustee will rescind the sale, return the buyer's money and take further action as necessary. If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser's sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary's Agent, or the Beneficiary's Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right's against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: 5/7/12 Quality Loan Service Corporation of Washington, as trustee By: Brooke Frank, Assistant Secretary ' Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington c/o Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.: OR-11-482677-SH

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.. OR-12-497811-SH

A-4245505 05/22/2012, 05/29/2012, 06/05/2012, 06/12/2012 Legal Notices

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LEGAL NOTICE Skanska Invitation to Bid Redmond High School Remodel Bid Package No. 2 6/7/12 @ 2:00 p.m. (Pacific Time) Bid Packages 2.1 through 2.34 - This is the 2nd and Final Bidding Package for the Redmond High School Remodel Project. This 2nd Bid Package encompasses a New Entry Canopy, Administration, Classrooms, Exterior walls, and Windows, and Bathroom upgrades. The remodel will include new walls, mechanical, electrical, plumbing, ADA upgrades, low voltage, fire sprinklers, acoustical ceiling, lighting, paint, wood work, building accessories, and flooring among other finishes. We are requesting bid proposals for applicable material, equipment and labor for the above referenced project. The scope of work includes everything described in the bid documents for the Redmond HighSchool Remodel Project. Bid Package 2: Bids due 2pm (local time) Thursday, June 7th, 2012. Bids will be received by Skanska, 777 NW Wall St., Suite 300, Bend, OR 97701. Use the enclosed Proposal form (section 004100) for submissions. Bids may be delivered to the above mentioned address or by fax at 541.504.9529. Interested vendors and subcontractors are invited to attend the prebid meeting at 4:00 p.m. on Tuesday, May 29th at Redmond High School (675 S.W. Rimrock Way, Redmond, OR 97756). Attendance at the prebid meeting is mandatory for the following trades: Package 2.1 Demolition, 2.2 Concrete, 2/3 Clean and Seal Concrete, 2.6 Struct & Misc. Steel, 2/7 Metal Framing, GWB, Stucco, Weather Barriers, 2.26 Fire Suppression Sprinkler System, 2.27A Plumbing, 2.27B HVAC, 2.28 Electrical and Fire Alarm. Documents are available at the following locations: For Review: Skanska, 777 N.W. Wall St. Suite 300, Bend, OR 97701 (541) 504-9525 Skanska, 222 SW Columbia St., Suite 300, Portland, OR 97201 (503) 382-0900 Central Oregon Builders Exchange, 1902 NE 4th, Bend, OR 97701 (541) 389-0123 Online at GradeBeam.com (Contact Andy Larsen @ Skanska for an Invitation to Bid to access the Project Web Site). For Purchase: ARC, 1151 SE Centennial Court #3, Bend, OR 97702 (541) 749-2151 ARC, 1431 NW 17th, Portland, OR 97209 (503) 227-3424 Central Oregon Builders Exchange, 1902 NE 4th, Bend, OR 97701 (541) 389-0123 All bids are to be in strict accordance with the Contract Documents and all other related bid documents. We are also requesting all bidders actively solicit local, minority, woman owned, ESB contractors, suppliers and their organizations. All bidders must comply with the following requirements: BOLI Prevailing Wage Law, ORS 279.800-870, be licensed with Construction Contractors Board or State Landscapers Board, and resident status, ORS 279A.120. Skanska and/or the Redmond School District may reject a bid that does not comply with prescribed public contracting procedures, and/or may reject for good cause all bids after finding that doing so is in the public interest. We look forward to receipt of your proposal on or before bid day. If you have any questions or require further assistance, please contact Andrew Larsen (Andrew.Larsen@skanska.com)

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0030911861 T.S. No.: 12-00353-6

Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust dated as of March 16, 2006 made by, KAMERON K. DELASHMUTT AND LISA L. DELASHMUTT, as the original grantor, to AMERI-TITLE, as the original trustee, in favor of NEW CENTURY MORTGAGE CORPORATION, as the original beneficiary, recorded on April 6, 2006, as instrument No. 2006-23674 of Official Records in the Office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, Oregon (the "Deed of Trust"). The current beneficiary is: US Bank National Association as Trustee for Citigroup Mortgage Loan Trust, Inc. 2006-NC1, Asset-Backed Pass-Through Certificates Series 2006-NC1, (the "Beneficiary"). APN: 191601 LOT NINETEEN (19), CANYON POINT ESTATES PHASE 1, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 2447 N.W. CANYON DRIVE, REDMOND, OR Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default(s) for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; together with other fees and expenses incurred by the Beneficiary; and which defaulted amounts total: $32,714.83 as of May 2, 2012. By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $277,100.87 together with interest thereon at the rate of 4.87500% per annum from January 1, 2011 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all Trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as the duly appointed Trustee under the Deed of Trust will on September 13, 2012 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of the Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, Trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 1920 Main Street, Suite 1120, Irvine, CA 92614 949-252-4900 FOR SALE INFORMATION CALL: 714.730.2727 Website for Trustee's Sale Information: www.lpsasap.com TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: May 8, 2012 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Michael Busby, Authorized Signature

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TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, MAY 29, 2012 G5

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% LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.: OR-12-497808-SH

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.: OR-11-484369-SH

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.: OR-12-498084-SH

Reference is made to that certain deed made by RICHARD HENSLEY, REGAN HENSLEY, as Grantor to DESCHUTES COUNTY TITLE, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., ("MERS") AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICAN BROKERS CONDUIT, as Beneficiary, dated 3/15/2007, recorded 3/20/2007, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book / reel / volume number fee / file / instrument / microfile / reception number 2007-16457, , covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 208240 LOT THIRTY-SIX, CHESTNUT PARK, PHASE 1, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 20213 MORGAN LOOP, BEND, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantors: The installments of principal and interest which became due on 11/1/2011, and all subsequent installments of principal and interest through the date of this Notice, plus amounts that are due for late charges, delinquent property taxes, insurance premiums, advances made on senior liens, taxes and/or insurance, trustee's fees, and any attorney fees and court costs arising from or associated with the beneficiaries efforts to protect and preserve its security, all of which must be paid as a condition of reinstatement, including all sums that shall accrue through reinstatement or pay-off. Nothing in this notice shall be construed as a waiver of any fees owing to the Beneficiary under the Deed of Trust pursuant to the terms of the loan documents. Monthly Payment $1,095.92 Monthly Late Charge $54.80 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $223,839.99 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.8750 per annum from 10/1/2011 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that Quality Loan Service Corporation of Washington, the undersigned trustee will on 8/30/2012 at the hour of 11:00:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, At the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR 97701 County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. For Sale Information Call: 714-730-2727 or Login to: www.lpsasap.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Pursuant to Oregon Law, this sale will not be deemed final until the Trustee's deed has been issued by Quality Loan Service Corporation of Washington. If there are any irregularities discovered within 10 days of the date of this sale, that the trustee will rescind the sale, return the buyer's money and take further action as necessary. If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser's sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary's Agent, or the Beneficiary's Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right's against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: 4/23/2012 Quality Loan Service Corporation of Washington, as trustee Signature By: Brooke Frank, Assistant Secretary Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington C/O Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 For Non-Sale Information: Quality Loan Service Corporation of Washington c/o Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 Fax: 619-645-7716

Reference is made to that certain deed made by DAVID SUTHERLAND, AND PATRICIA SAMPSON, AS TENANTS IN COMMON, as Grantor to WESTERN TITLE & ESCROW COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., ("MERS") AS NOMINEE FOR COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 7/20/2006, recorded 7/26/2006, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book / reel / volume number fee / file / instrument / microfile / reception number 2006-51140, covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 161653 LOT 4, CULLEY, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 2423 SW 24TH ST, REDMOND, OR 97756 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantors: The installments of principal and interest which became due on 8/1/2011, and all subsequent installments of principal and interest through the date of this Notice, plus amounts that are due for late charges, delinquent property taxes, insurance premiums, advances made on senior liens, taxes and/or insurance, trustee's fees, and any attorney fees and court costs arising from or associated with the beneficiaries efforts to protect and preserve its security, all of which must be paid as a condition of reinstatement, including all sums that shall accrue through reinstatement or pay-off. Nothing in this notice shall be construed as a waiver of any fees owing to the Beneficiary under the Deed of Trust pursuant to the terms of the loan documents. Monthly Payment $753.02 Monthly Late Charge $37.65 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $165,521.60 together with interest thereon at the rate of 3.1250 per annum from 7/1/2011 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that Quality Loan Service Corporation of Washington, the undersigned trustee will on 9/4/2012 at the hour of 11:00:00 AM , Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, At the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR 97701 County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. For Sale Information Call: 714-730-2727 or Login to: www.lpsasap.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Pursuant to Oregon Law, this sale will not be deemed final until the Trustee's deed has been issued by Quality Loan Service Corporation of Washington. If there are any irregularities discovered within 10 days of the date of this sale, that the trustee will rescind the sale, return the buyer's money and take further action as necessary. If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser's sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary's Agent, or the Beneficiary's Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right's against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: 4/23/2012 Quality Loan Service Corporation of Washington, as trustee Signature By: Brooke Frank, Assistant Secretary Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington C/O Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 For Non-Sale Information: Quality Loan Service Corporation of Washington c/o Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 Fax: 619-645-7716

Reference is made to that certain deed made by RYAN L BLOEDEL AND, MARK E FARROW AND, LISA M FARROW AND RODGER L BLOEDEL AND BETTE LEA BLOEDEL, as Grantor to DESCHUTES COUNTY TITLE CPMPANY, as trustee, in favor of WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK, FA, as Beneficiary, dated 10/11/2006, recorded 10/19/2006, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book / reel / volume number fee / file / instrument / microfile / reception number 2006-70050,, covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 136722 LOT FOUR, BLOCK TEN OF OVERLOOK PARK II, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 57379 LOST LN, SUNRIVER, OR 977070000 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantors: The installments of principal and interest which became due on 11/1/2011, and all subsequent installments of principal and interest through the date of this Notice, plus amounts that are due for late charges, delinquent property taxes, insurance premiums, advances made on senior liens, taxes and/or insurance, trustee's fees, and any attorney fees and court costs arising from or associated with the beneficiaries efforts to protect and preserve its security, all of which must be paid as a condition of reinstatement, including all sums that shall accrue through reinstatement or pay-off. Nothing in this notice shall be construed as a waiver of any fees owing to the Beneficiary under the Deed of Trust pursuant to the terms of the loan documents. Monthly Payment $4,160.90 Monthly Late Charge $208.05 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $597,517.10 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.8500 per annum from 10/1/2011 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that Quality Loan Service Corporation of Washington, the undersigned trustee will on 9/5/2012 at the hour of 11:00:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, At the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR 97701 County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. For Sale Information Call: 714-730-2727 or Login to: www.lpsasap.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Pursuant to Oregon Law, this sale will not be deemed final until the Trustee's deed has been issued by Quality Loan Service Corporation of Washington. If there are any irregularities discovered within 10 days of the date of this sale, that the trustee will rescind the sale, return the buyer's money and take further action as necessary. If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser's sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary's Agent, or the Beneficiary's Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right's against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: 4-30-12 Quality Loan Service Corporation of Washington, as trustee Signature By: Brian Souza, Assistant Secretary Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington c/o Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 For Non-Sale Information: Quality Loan Service Corporation of Washington c/o Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 Fax: 619-645-7716

A-4235876 05/08/2012, 05/15/2012, 05/22/2012, 05/29/2012

A-FN4235884 05/08/2012, 05/15/2012, 05/22/2012, 05/29/2012

A-4239088 05/15/2012, 05/22/2012, 05/29/2012, 06/05/2012

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.: OR-12-498093-SH

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.: OR-12-498678-SH

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.: OR-11-484457-SH

Reference is made to that certain deed made by JOHN W. ELLIOTT AND TAMI K. ELLIOTT, HUSBAND AND WIFE AS JOINT TENANTS, as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE CAPITAL RESOURCE CORPORATION, A CALIFORNIA CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, dated 1/2/1998, recorded 1/9/1998, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book / reel / volume number in Book 476 Page 0424 fee / file / instrument / microfile / reception number 98-00983,, covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 101018 LOT 1 IN BLOCK 3 OF FIRST ADDITION, SELKEN SUBDIVISION, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 1863 NE 13TH ST, BEND, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantors: The installments of principal and interest which became due on 9/1/2011, and all subsequent installments of principal and interest through the date of this Notice, plus amounts that are due for late charges, delinquent property taxes, insurance premiums, advances made on senior liens, taxes and/or insurance, trustee's fees, and any attorney fees and court costs arising from or associated with the beneficiaries efforts to protect and preserve its security, all of which must be paid as a condition of reinstatement, including all sums that shall accrue through reinstatement or pay-off. Nothing in this notice shall be construed as a waiver of any fees owing to the Beneficiary under the Deed of Trust pursuant to the terms of the loan documents. Monthly Payment $678.77 Monthly Late Charge $33.94 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $78,258.22 together with interest thereon at the rate of 7.2500 per annum from 8/1/2011 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that Quality Loan Service Corporation of Washington, the undersigned trustee will on 9/10/2012 at the hour of 11:00:00 AM , Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, At the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR 97701 County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. For Sale Information Call: 714-730-2727 or Login to: www.lpsasap.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Pursuant to Oregon Law, this sale will not be deemed final until the Trustee's deed has been issued by Quality Loan Service Corporation of Washington. If there are any irregularities discovered within 10 days of the date of this sale, that the trustee will rescind the sale, return the buyer's money and take further action as necessary. If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser's sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary's Agent, or the Beneficiary's Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right's against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: 5/4/2012 Quality Loan Service Corporation of Washington, as trustee Signature By: Brooke Frank, Assistant Secretary Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington C/O Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 For Non-Sale Information: Quality Loan Service Corporation of Washington c/o Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 Fax: 619-645-7716

Reference is made to that certain deed made by STEVEN C PETERSEN, AND MARY M PETERSEN, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY, as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., ("MERS"), AS NOMINEE FOR COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS, INC, as Beneficiary, dated 9/21/2006, recorded 9/27/2006, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book / reel / volume number fee / file / instrument / microfile / reception number 2006-65282,, covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 249959 LOT 24 OF FOREST MEADOW, PHASE 1, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 19760 DARTMOUTH AVE, BEND, OR 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantors: The installments of principal and interest which became due on 5/1/2011, and all subsequent installments of principal and interest through the date of this Notice, plus amounts that are due for late charges, delinquent property taxes, insurance premiums, advances made on senior liens, taxes and/or insurance, trustee's fees, and any attorney fees and court costs arising from or associated with the beneficiaries efforts to protect and preserve its security, all of which must be paid as a condition of reinstatement, including all sums that shall accrue through reinstatement or pay-off. Nothing in this notice shall be construed as a waiver of any fees owing to the Beneficiary under the Deed of Trust pursuant to the terms of the loan documents. Monthly Payment $1,573.71 Monthly Late Charge $78.69 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $243,278.88 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.1250 per annum from 4/1/2011 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that Quality Loan Service Corporation of Washington, the undersigned trustee will on 9/7/2012 at the hour of 11:00:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, At the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR 97701 County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. For Sale Information Call: 714-730-2727 or Login to: www.lpsasap.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Pursuant to Oregon Law, this sale will not be deemed final until the Trustee's deed has been issued by Quality Loan Service Corporation of Washington. If there are any irregularities discovered within 10 days of the date of this sale, that the trustee will rescind the sale, return the buyer's money and take further action as necessary. If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser's sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary's Agent, or the Beneficiary's Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right's against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: 4-27-12 Quality Loan Service Corporation of Washington, as trustee Signature By: Brian Souza, Assistant Secretary Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington c/o Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 For Non-Sale Information: Quality Loan Service Corporation of Washington c/o Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 Fax: 619-645-7716

Reference is made to that certain deed made by RODOLFO I CRUZ, AND KIMBER L CRUZ, HUSBAND AND WIFE, as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., ("MERS") AS NOMINEE FOR COUNTRYWIDE BANK, N.A., as Beneficiary, dated 10/26/2006, recorded 11/1/2006, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book / reel / volume number fee / file / instrument / microfile / reception number 2006-72794, , covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 246256 LOT 17 OF BELLA VISTA, CITY OF REDMOND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 2535 NW 10TH ST, REDMOND, OR 97756 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantors: The installments of principal and interest which became due on 1/1/2011, and all subsequent installments of principal and interest through the date of this Notice, plus amounts that are due for late charges, delinquent property taxes, insurance premiums, advances made on senior liens, taxes and/or insurance, trustee's fees, and any attorney fees and court costs arising from or associated with the beneficiaries efforts to protect and preserve its security, all of which must be paid as a condition of reinstatement, including all sums that shall accrue through reinstatement or pay-off. Nothing in this notice shall be construed as a waiver of any fees owing to the Beneficiary under the Deed of Trust pursuant to the terms of the loan documents. Monthly Payment $1,166.61 Monthly Late Charge $58.33 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $181,487.02 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.1250 per annum from 12/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that Quality Loan Service Corporation of Washington, the undersigned trustee will on 9/4/2012 at the hour of 11:00:00 AM , Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, At the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR 97701 County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. For Sale Information Call: 714-730-2727 or Login to: www.lpsasap.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Pursuant to Oregon Law, this sale will not be deemed final until the Trustee's deed has been issued by Quality Loan Service Corporation of Washington. If there are any irregularities discovered within 10 days of the date of this sale, that the trustee will rescind the sale, return the buyer's money and take further action as necessary. If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser's sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary's Agent, or the Beneficiary's Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right's against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: 4/23/12 Quality Loan Service Corporation of Washington, as trustee Signature By Brooke Frank, Assistant Secretary Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington c/o Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 For Non-Sale Information: Quality Loan Service Corporation of Washington c/o Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 Fax: 619-645-7716

A-FN4241933 05/22/2012, 05/29/2012, 06/05/2012, 06/12/2012

A-FN4238494 05/15/2012, 05/22/2012, 05/29/2012, 06/05/2012

A-4235882 05/08/2012, 05/15/2012, 05/22/2012, 05/29/2012


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

G6 TUESDAY, MAY 29, 2012 • THE BULLETIN %

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-ALT-002402 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, JOHN BENNETT, as grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE, as Trustee, in favor of ARGENT MORTGAGE COMPANY, LLC, as beneficiary, dated 3/30/2005, recorded 4/6/2005, under Instrument No. 2005-20578, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE C-BASS MORTGAGE LOAN ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-MH1. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: THE SOUTH HALF OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 21 SOUTH, RANGE 10 EAST OF THE WILLAMETTE MERIDIAN, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 52665 RANCH DRIVE LA PINE, OR 97739 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as Of May 17, 2012 Delinquent Payments from March 01, 2010 3 payments at $946.70 each $2,840.10 6 payments at $910.50 each $5,463.00 18 payments at $913.72 each $16,446.96 (03-01-10 through 05-17-12) Late Charges: $721.53 Beneficiary Advances: $5,807.52 Suspense Credit: $-369.20 TOTAL: $30,909.91 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $104,729.22, PLUS interest thereon at 7% per annum from 02/01/10 to 5/31/2010, 6.45% per annum from 06/01/10 to 11/30/10, 6.5% per annum from 12/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on September 19, 2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS: The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for September 19, 2012. Unless the lender who is foreclosing on this property is paid, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. The following information applies to you only if you occupy and rent this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a residential tenant. If the foreclosure goes through, the business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out. The buyer must first give you an eviction notice in writing that specifies the date by which you must move out. The buyer may not give you this notice until after the foreclosure sale happens. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the buyer can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES YOU TO BE NOTIFIED IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERTY AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNDER A LEGITIMATE RENTAL AGREEMENT, FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING A CERTAIN NUMBER OF DAYS BEFORE THE BUYER CAN REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT. THE FEDERAL LAW THAT REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU THIS NOTICE IS EFFECTIVE UNTIL DECEMBER 31, 2012. Under federal law, the buyer must give you at least 90 days notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If you are renting this property under a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), you may stay until the end of your lease term. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 90 days left. STATE LAW NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS: IF THE FEDERAL LAW DOES NOT APPLY, STATE LAW STILL REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING BEFORE REQUIRING YOU TO MOVE OUT IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THE PROPERTY AS A TENANT IN GOOD FAITH. EVEN IF THE FEDERAL LAW REQUIREMENT IS NO LONGER EFFECTIVE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 2012, THE REQUIREMENT UNDER STATE LAW STILL APPLIES TO YOUR SITUATION. Under state law, if you have a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), the buyer must give you at least 60 days notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 30 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 30 days left. If you are renting under a month-to-month or week-to-week rental agreement, the buyer must give you at least 30 days notice in writing before requiring you to move out. IMPORTANT: For the buyer to be required to give you notice under state law, you must prove to the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale that you are occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The name and address of the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale is shown on this notice under the heading "TRUSTEE". You must mail or deliver your proof not later than 8/20/2012 (30 days before the date first set for the foreclosure sale). Your proof must be in writing and should be a copy of your rental agreement or lease. If you do not have a written rental agreement or lease, you can provide other proof, such as receipts for rent you paid. ABOUT YOUR SECURITY DEPOSIT Under state law, you may apply your security deposit and any rent you paid in advance against the current rent you owe your landlord. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from you rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe you current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENANCY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out. You should contact the buyer to discuss that possibility if you would like to stay. Under state law, if the buyer accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the buyer becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise, the buyer is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf and you must move out by the date the buyer specifies in a notice to you. YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A DEPOSIT YOU MADE OR PREPAID RENT YOU PAID AGAINST YOUR CURRENT RENT OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE AND OF ANY NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR DEPOSIT OR YOUR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar at 800-452-7636 and ask for lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer and are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance may be obtained through Safenet at 800-SAFENET. DATED: 5/17/2012 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By: ANGELIQUE CONNELL, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206)340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com A-4246790 05/29/2012, 06/05/2012, 06/12/2012, 06/19/2012

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.: OR-10-394583-NH Reference is made to that certain deed made by WILLIAM S GREENE & ELLEN R GREENE as Grantor to DESCHUTES COUNTY TITLE COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of FIRST HORIZON HOME LOANS CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, dated 11/16/2005, recorded 11/30/2005, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in book / reel / volume number fee / file / instrument / microfile / reception number 2005-82411,, covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 109865 LOT TWO IN BLOCK TWO, OF ARROWHEAD ACRES, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 61550 WARD ROAD, BEND, OR 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantors: The installments of principal and interest which became due on 2/1/11, and all subsequent installments of principal and interest through the date of this Notice, plus amounts that are due for late charges, delinquent property taxes, insurance premiums, advances made on senior liens, taxes and/or insurance, trustee's fees, and any attorney fees and court costs arising from or associated with the beneficiaries efforts to protect and preserve its security, all of which must be paid as a condition of reinstatement, including all sums that shall accrue through reinstatement or pay-off. Nothing in this notice shall be construed as a waiver of any fees owing to the Beneficiary under the Deed of Trust pursuant to the terms of the loan documents. Monthly Payment $2,454.94 Monthly Late Charge $105.76 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $398,172.16 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.3750 per annum from 1/1/2011 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that Quality Loan Service Corporation of Washington, the undersigned trustee will on 9/26/2012 at the hour of 1:00:00 PM , Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the front entrance to the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond St., Bend, OR County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. For Sale Information Call: 714-573-1965 or Login to: www.priorityposting.com. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Pursuant to Oregon Law, this sale will not be deemed final until the Trustee's deed has been issued by Quality Loan Service Corporation of Washington. If there are any irregularities discovered within 10 days of the date of this sale, that the trustee will rescind the sale, return the buyer's money and take further action as necessary. If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser's sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary's Agent, or the Beneficiary's Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holder's rights against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: 5/21/2012 Quality Loan Service Corporation of Washington, as trustee Signature By Timothy Donlon, Assistant Secretary Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington c/o Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 For Non-Sale Information: Quality Loan Service Corporation of Washington c/o Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 Fax: 619-645-7716 NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for 9/26/2012. The date of this sale may be postponed. Unless the lender that is foreclosing on this property is paid before the sale date, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. After the sale, the new owner is required to provide you with contact information and notice that the sale took place. The following information applies to you only if you are a bona fide tenant occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a bona fide residential tenant. If the foreclosure sale goes through, the new owner will have the right to require you to move out. Before the new owner can require you to move, the new owner must provide you with written notice that specifies the date by which you must move out. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the new owner can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. PROTECTION FROM EVICTION IF YOU ARE A BONA FIDE TENANT OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERTY AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING, YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO CONTINUE LIVING IN THIS PROPERTY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE FOR: o THE REMAINDER OF YOUR FIXED TERM LEASE, IF YOU HAVE A FIXED TERM LEASE; OR o AT LEAST 90 DAYS FROM THE DATE YOU ARE GIVEN A WRITTEN TERMINATION NOTICE. If the new owner wants to move in and use this property as a primary residence, the new owner can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even though you have a fixed term lease with more than 90 days left. You must be provided with at least 90 days' written notice after the foreclosure sale before you can be required to move. A bona fide tenant is a residential tenant who is not the borrower (property owner) or a child, spouse or parent of the borrower, and whose rental agreement: o Is the result of an arm's-length transaction; o Requires the payment of rent that is not substantially less than fair market rent for the property, unless the rent is reduced or subsidized due to a federal, state or local subsidy; and o Was entered into prior to the date of the foreclosure sale. ABOUT YOUR TENANCY BETWEEN NOW AND THE FORECLOSURE SALE: RENT YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD OR UNTIL A COURT TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE. SECURITY DEPOSIT You may apply your security deposit and any rent you paid in advance against the current rent you owe your landlord as provided in ORS 90.367. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from your rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe your current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENANCY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE The new owner that buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out after 90 days or at the end of your fixed term lease. After the sale, you should receive a written notice informing you that the sale took place and giving you the new owner's name and contact information. You should contact the new owner if you would like to stay. If the new owner accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the new owner becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise: o You do not owe rent; o The new owner is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf; and o You must move out by the date the new owner specifies in a notice to you. The new owner may offer to pay your moving expenses and any other costs or amounts you and the new owner agree on in exchange for your agreement to leave the premises in less than 90 days or before your fixed term lease expires. You should speak with a lawyer to fully understand your rights before making any decisions regarding your tenancy. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR DWELLING UNIT WITHOUT FIRST GIVING YOU WRITTEN NOTICE AND GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU SHOULD CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer and are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance is included with this notice. Oregon State Bar: (503) 684-3763; (800) 452-7636 Legal assistance: www.lawhelp.org/or/index.cfm P951847 5/29, 6/5, 6/12, 06/19/2012

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-119287 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, DANIEL D COOK AND TERRI L COOK, HUSBAND AND WIFE, as grantor, to WESTERN TITLE & ESCROW COMPANY, as Trustee, in favor of INDYMAC BANK, F.S.B., as beneficiary, dated 12/15/2005, recorded 12/20/2005, under Instrument No. 2005-87476, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by ONEWEST BANK, FSB. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: PARCEL I: LOT 30, BLOCK 24, DESCHUTES RIVER RECREATION HOMESITES, INC., UNIT 5, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. PARCEL II: LOT 29, BLOCK 24, DESCHUTES RIVER RECREATION HOMESITES, INC., UNIT 5, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 201012-B0-03400-03500 LLOYD WAY ALSO APPEARING OF RECORD AS 56646 LLOYD WAY BEND, OR 97707 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of May 16, 2012 Delinquent Payments from September 01, 2010 19 payments at $1,694.59 each $32,197.21 2 payments at $1,978.55 each $3,957.10 (09-01-10 through 05-16-12) Late Charges: $918.00 Beneficiary Advances: $4,231.30 Suspense Credit: $0.00 TOTAL: $41,303.61 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $236,577.75, PLUS interest thereon at 6.25% per annum from 08/01/10 until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on September 20, 2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performan ce of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS: The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for September 20, 2012. Unless the lender who is foreclosing on this property is paid, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. The following information applies to you only if you occupy and rent this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a residential tenant. If the foreclosure goes through, the business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out. The buyer must first give you an eviction notice in writing that specifies the date by which you must move out. The buyer may not give you this notice until after the foreclosure sale happens. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the buyer can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES YOU TO BE NOTIFIED IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERTY AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNDER A LEGITIMATE RENTAL AGREEMENT, FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING A CERTAIN NUMBER OF DAYS BEFORE THE BUYER CAN REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT. THE FEDERAL LAW THAT REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU THIS NOTICE IS EFFECTIVE UNTIL DECEMBER 31, 2012. Under federal law, the buyer must give you at least 90 days notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If you are renting this property under a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), you may stay until the end of your lease term. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 90 days left. STATE LAW NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS: IF THE FEDERAL LAW DOES NOT APPLY, STATE LAW STILL REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING BEFORE REQUIRING YOU TO MOVE OUT IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THE PROPERTY AS A TENANT IN GOOD FAITH. EVEN IF THE FEDERAL LAW REQUIREMENT IS NO LONGER EFFECTIVE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 2012, THE REQUIREMENT UNDER STATE LAW STILL APPLIES TO YOUR SITUATION. Under state law, if you have a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), the buyer must give you at least 60 days notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 30 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 30 days left. If you are renting under a month-to-month or week-to-week rental agreement, the buyer must give you at least 30 days notice in writing before requiring you to move out. IMPORTANT: For the buyer to be required to give you notice under state law, you must prove to the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale that you are occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The name and address of the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale is shown on this notice under the heading "TRUSTEE". You must mail or deliver your proof not later than 8/21/2012 (30 days before the date first set for the foreclosure sale). Your proof must be in writing and should be a copy of your rental agreement or lease. If you do not have a written rental agreement or lease, you can provide other proof, such as receipts for rent you paid. ABOUT YOUR SECURITY DEPOSIT Under state law, you may apply your security deposit and any rent you paid in advance against the current rent you owe your landlord. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from you rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe you current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENANCY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out. You should contact the buyer to discuss that possibility if you would like to stay. Under state law, if the buyer accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the buyer becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise, the buyer is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf and you must move out by the date the buyer specifies in a notice to you. YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A DEPOSIT YOU MADE OR PREPAID RENT YOU PAID AGAINST YOUR CURRENT RENT OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE AND OF ANY NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR DEPOSIT OR YOUR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar at 800-452-7636 and ask for lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer and are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance may be obtained through Safenet at 800-SAFENET. DATED: 5/16/2012 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By: ANGELIQUE CONNELL, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206)340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com A-FN4246616 05/29/2012, 06/05/2012, 06/12/2012, 06/19/2012


Bulletin Daily Paper 05/29/12