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Tooth trouble sends more to ER • F1 MARCH 15, 2012

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Serving Central Oregon since 1903 www.bendbulletin.com

COCC tuition could climb $8 per unit Timber payments clear one hurdle By Patrick Cliff The Bulletin

Central Oregon Community College must raise its tuition and fees by $8 a unit next year if it is going to offset dwindling state support and property tax revenues, President Jim Middleton said during a budget committee meeting Wednesday.

If the COCC Board of Directors approves the increase later in the spring, the college will have raised tuition for four consecutive years. For a full-time student, that means tuition and fees will cost just under $4,000 for a year of school — an annual increase of about $360. College officials believe that will still leave COCC as one of the

Rebuke of the culture at Goldman opens debate

three cheapest Oregon community colleges. The next two bienniums could bring more tuition increases, according to the budget. The budget assumes a $5-per-credit increase for the 2013-15 biennium, and a $4 increase the following biennium. Middleton pointed to several recent successes, including the

nearing completion of the Science Center and Health Careers buildings. College staff members, he said, had been creative as the school attempted to control costs and maintain COCC’s quality. “We’ve got a lot to be proud of, but we’ve got a lot to be tired from,” Middleton said. See COCC / A5

• The counties hurting the most, though, like Curry, still worry

ROCKIN’ THE CLIMBING WALL

By Lauren Dake The Bulletin

SALEM — The U.S. Senate approved a one-year renewal of county timber payments Wednesday, but the legislation might not be enough to help some of the state’s most financially strapped rural counties. Curry County Commissioner David Itzen said he’s thankful for any help the federal government can send the county’s way, but he doesn’t expect it to keep the county from going broke. Even if the legislation is approved by both chambers, Itzen fears the money would do little good by the time it trickled down to the county level. He compared the county’s situation to that of a ship moving slowly toward disaster. “In our case, it will be too little, too late,” he said. “We will have hit the iceberg.” The county timber payment bill was attached to a larger transportation measure. Upon approval, the bill would send $346 million to timberreliant counties across the nation. Oregon would receive a $102 million portion of the payments, according to information from the office of Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore. The amount represents a 5 percent decrease from 2011. “This is a real lifeline for rural dependent counties, and this one-year extension will give counties a year of breathing room while we try to find a more permanent solution,” said Wyden spokesman Tom Towslee. The legislation has yet to pass the House of Representatives, where its chances are uncertain. Rep. Greg Walden, R-Hood River, said in a statement that he believes it will receive the necessary support. “I have commitments from the highest levels in the House to fund a short-term extension of county payments, and whether it’s in this transportation bill or some other vehicle, we intend to get it done,” Walden said. Timber payments were created to help counties with large amounts of federal forestland. The federal government doesn’t pay taxes on its land, so the subsidies help counties pay for road improvements, schools and emergency services. The act that authorized the payments expired on Sept. 30. See Timber / A5

By Susanne Craig and Landon Thomas Jr. New York Times News Service

Until Wednesday morning, Greg Smith was a largely anonymous 33-year-old midlevel executive at Goldman Sachs in London. Now everyone at the firm — and on Wall Street — knows his name. Smith resigned in an email message to his bosses at 6:40 a.m. London time, laying out concerns that Goldman’s culture had gone haywire, putting its own interests ahead of its clients. What the email didn’t say was that about 15 minutes later, an Op-Ed article he had written detailing his criticisms was to be published in The New York Times. “It makes me ill how callously people still talk about ripping off clients,” he wrote in the Op-Ed article. The Op-Ed landed “like a bomb” inside Goldman, said one executive who spoke on the condition of anonymity. The article reignited a debate on the Internet and on cable television over whether Wall Street was corrupted by greed and excess. By noon, television crews crowded outside Goldman’s headquarters in Manhattan. More than three years after the financial crisis, the perception that little has changed on Wall Street — and that no one has been held accountable for the risk-taking that led to the crisis — looms large in the public consciousness. See Goldman / A5

HIGHER EDUCATION Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

TOP NEWS

Eight-year-old Jaden Haley looks for his next hold while attempting to make his way up the 40-foot climbing wall at the Boys & Girls Club of Bend on Wednesday. For more information on upcoming events and activities at the Boys & Girls Clubs of Central Oregon, visit www.bgcco.org.

GOP: Campaign shows no sign of slacking, A3 TODAY’S WEATHER Rain showers High 56, Low 32 Page C6

INDEX Business B1-4 Calendar E3 Classified G1-6 Comics E4-5 Crosswords E5, G2 Dear Abby E3 Editorials C4 Health F1-6

Horoscope E3 Local News C1-6 Obituaries C5 Oregon News C3 Outing E1-6 Sports D1-4 Stocks B2-3 TV & Movies E2

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A wave of thefts, stores on the defensive; at stake ... detergent? By Ben Nuckols The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — When police in suburban Washington raided the home of a suspected drug dealer last fall, they found the cocaine, all right, but also something unusual on the man’s shelves: nearly 20 large bottles of liquid Tide laundry detergent. It turns out his customers were paying for drugs not with cash but with stolen Tide, police said. Tide has become a hot commodity among thieves at supermarkets and drugstores in at least some parts of the country. For a variety of reasons, the detergent in the familiar flame-orange bottle is well-suited for resale on the black market: Everybody needs laundry detergent, and Tide is the nation’s most popular brand.

It’s expensive, selling for up to $20 for a large bottle at stores. And it doesn’t spoil. One Safeway supermarket in Prince George’s County, Md., was losing thousands of dollars’ worth of Tide a week before police made more than two dozen arrests. In West St. Paul, Minn., a man pleaded guilty to stealing more than $6,000 worth of the stuff from a Walmart and was sentenced to 90 days in jail. Police in Newport News, Va., and other cities around the country have reported a spike in thefts. In the Washington area, some CVS pharmacies have been attaching electronic anti-theft tags to bottles. One CVS in Washington’s well-to-do Dupont Circle neighborhood keeps Tide locked up behind glass. See Detergent / A4

The Associated Press file photo

Tide laundry detergent, the nation’s most popular brand and selling for up to $20 a bottle, has become a target of thieves.

How much do they learn? Answer unsettles colleges By Daniel de Vise The Washington Post

AUSTIN, Texas — Eight years ago, leaders of the University of Texas set out to measure something few in higher education had thought to question — how much their students learn before graduation. An unsettling answer emerged: arguably, not very much. That conclusion is based on results from a 90-minute essay test given to freshmen and seniors that aims to gauge gains in communications and critical-thinking skills. The Texas flagship and a few hundred other public universities have joined a growing accountability movement in higher education, embracing this test and others like it that attempt, for the first time, to quantify collegiate learning on a large scale. But the results have triggered a wave of rancor. Some college leaders are outraged that four years of learning might now be reduced to a single score. Lackluster results have seeded fresh doubts about America’s vaunted system of higher education. “Oh, it’s hit us in the gut,” said Andrew Hacker, a Queens College political scientist and authority on college teaching. See Colleges / A4


THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2012

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DISCOVERY

TODAY

Future mission to the sun is ‘a life’s dream’ for some

It’s Thursday, March 15, the 75th day of 2012. There are 291 days left in the year.

By Amina Khan Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — The chest-high rack of electronics Justin Kasper is assembling in a Massachusetts office park will fit in a shoe box before he’s done. It won’t be much to look at — a few inches across, shaped rather like a coffee cup attached to a Kindle — but to Kasper, it’ll serve as eyes across nearly 100 million miles of space. In less than seven years, that cup will be journeying to the center of the solar system to scoop up bits of the sun. “This really has been a life’s dream,” said Kasper, of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Mass. In 2018, NASA is scheduled to launch a spacecraft from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida to fly, Icaruslike, dangerously close to our star. Fitted with a select set of instruments, Solar Probe Plus will address two questions that solar physicists have tussled with for decades: How does the corona, that ghostly, spiked halo seen during a total solar eclipse, heat to more than a million degrees, far hotter than the sun’s surface? And what powers the solar wind, the stream of charged particles that flows from the corona? An up-close look at the sun may ultimately help scientists predict solar flares, as well as coronal mass ejections — “solar storms” like those launched at Earth last week. These events send a barrage of high-energy particles crashing against the Earth’s magnetic field, at times disabling satellites, wiping out power grids, forcing airlines to reroute flights and potentially exposing astronauts to fatal doses of radiation. Scientists have sent probes to the solar system’s edge, but never so near its heart. Coming within 3.7 million miles of the sun’s surface — 25 times closer than Earth — the 1,350pound unmanned spacecraft will heat to 2,600 degrees Fahrenheit and endure 512 times the sunlight of vessels orbiting Earth. The mission “will undoubtedly have impact on our ideas about how life operates throughout the universe — if life does operate throughout the universe — how our planet evolved and how we’re going to contend with the further exploration of space,” said Richard Fisher, director of NASA’s heliophysics division. Half a century in the making, with an estimated price tag of $1.2 billion and barely 88 pounds allotted to experimental hardware, the project spawned fierce competition among heliophysicists for a piece of the action.

As listed at www.oregonlottery.org

POWERBALL

The numbers drawn Wednesday night are:

1 8 41 46 59 24 The estimated jackpot was unavailable at 11:15 p.m.

MEGABUCKS

The numbers drawn Wednesday night are:

5 11 15 27 28 41 The estimated jackpot is now $8 million.

Mission to the sun In 2018, NASA plans to launch a spacecraft called Solar Probe Plus to study the sun’s outer atmosphere, or corona, and its expansion into space, known as the solar wind.

Probe will travel within 3.7 million miles of the sun at 125 miles per second during its closest pass

Faraday cup will gather solar wind particles

Solar Probe Plus will weigh about 1,350 pounds

Thermal shield is to be 8 feet in diameter and made of 4.5-inch thick ceramic-coated carbon composite to protect instruments from sun’s rays

High-gain antenna will communicate with Earth

Electromagnetic wave antenna will measure radio emissions of the sun and solar wind Solar panels will provide power; panels are liquid-cooled to protect them

Magnetometers will measure the sun’s electric and magnetic fields, radio emissions and shock waves

Venus orbit

Journey to the sun Probe will use seven Venus flybys, relying on the gravity of the planet to shrink its orbit each time it circles the sun

First close approach 2024

Sun Earth Launch 2018

Mercury orbit

Adjusting to the heat Probe will adjust to protect itself from temperatures approaching 2,600 degrees F: Solar panels extend when the probe is far from the sun

Near the sun, all instruments except the Faraday cup and tips of antennas will tuck behind the thermal shield

As the probe gets closer, the solar panels will retract

Shield

Solar panel

Earth’s size scaled to sun

How long does it take to reach Earth? Sunlight 8 minutes

Energetic particles 2 to 4 days

Solar wind 4 days

By Richard Fausset

ATLANTA — The bookstore at the Gettysburg National Military Park has decided that it’s not such a great idea to sell a bobblehead of John Wilkes Booth, the notorious Confederate sympathizer and assassin of President Abraham Lincoln. The dolls were on sale for about a week, then pulled from the shelf Saturday after Park Superintendent Bob Kirby and Gettysburg Foundation President Joanne Hanley considered criticisms of the doll and agreed that selling a wacky figurine of a guy who murdered one of the nation’s most revered public figures was more or less unbecoming. “After review, the superintendent and I agreed the item was inappropriate and that

HAPPENINGS • Rod Blagojevich, the convicted former governor of Illinois, is due to begin a 14-year prison sentence for corruption. • New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo and legislative leaders, seeking to limit the impact of pension costs on government budgets, are putting the finishing touches on a deal to reduce the retirement benefits promised to new city and state workers in New York. • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announce a three-month national advertising campaign against smoking. Billboards and print, radio and TV ads will show people whose smoking resulted in heart surgery, a tracheotomy, lost limbs or paralysis. • The U.S. Department of Agriculture announces it will offer schools choice in ground beef purchases in response to requests from districts. • Bo Xilai, a man recently seen as headed for the center of power in China, is reported removed from his office as the Chinese Communist Party chief of the mega-city of Chongqing.

IN HISTORY Highlights: In 44 B.C., Roman dictator Julius Caesar was assassinated by a group of nobles that included Brutus and Cassius. In 1493, Christopher Columbus returned to Spain, concluding his first voyage to the Western Hemisphere. In 1972, “The Godfather,” Francis Ford Coppola’s epic gangster movie based on the Mario Puzo novel and starring Marlon Brando and Al Pacino, premiered in New York. In 1985, the first Internet domain name, symbolics.com, was registered by the Symbolics Computer Corp. of Massachusetts. Ten years ago: A Houston jury spared Andrea Yates’ life after prosecutors stopped short of demanding the death penalty for the tormented mother who’d drowned her five children in the bathtub. (The 37-year-old Yates was sentenced to life in prison; however, she was later acquitted by reason of insanity in a retrial.) Five years ago: In the Senate, Republicans easily turned back Democratic legislation requiring a troop withdrawal from Iraq to begin within 120 days. One year ago: Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi’s forces overwhelmed rebels in the strategic eastern city of Ajdabiya, hammering them with air strikes, missiles, tanks and artillery.

BIRTHDAYS Sun Corona

Solar eruption and flare

Source: Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory, NASA Graphic: Julie Sheer, Lorena Iniguez Elebee, Los Angeles Times

© 2012 McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Gettysburg gift shop pulls John Wilkes Booth bobblehead Los Angeles Times

Oregon Lottery results

Discoveries, breakthroughs, trends, names in the news — things you need to know to start your day.

DID YOU HEAR? we should pull the item from the shelves, and our store manager of course agreed to do so,” Hanley said in a statement. If the bobblehead wasn’t brandishing a pistol — and standing on a pedestal featuring his name — it would be difficult for all but the most passionate Civil War buff to identify the thing as Booth: With its unkempt coif and droopy, vintage mustache, it could just as well be a likeness of some guy in Brooklyn who graduated from a second-tier indie rock band and now makes artisanal salumi. Still, it managed to rankle. The flames of the controversy were fanned by a report Saturday in the Evening Sun

of Hanover, Pa. In it, Lincoln scholar Harold Holzer opined that the doll must have been the brainchild of “an awfully sick marketing person.” Matt Powers, sales manager for The Bobblehead, LLC, the Kansas City, Mo., manufacturer of the doll, said that the company’s Lincoln doll, which is still for sale at Gettysburg, has always been a big seller. “And who’s more tied in with Lincoln than John Wilkes Booth? It just made sense from that standpoint,” Powers said in an interview Wednesday. “It’s not as if Booth is holding a gun up to Lincoln’s head or something. ... it’s an educational piece, too.” The Booth doll is sold out, Powers said, but the company is taking pre-orders for a new batch on its website. It’s available for $19.95,

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is 79. Model Fabio is 51. Actress Eva Longoria is 37. Rappermusician will.i.am (Black Eyed Peas) is 37. — From wire reports

along with dolls representing Kim Jong Il, Joe the Plumber, a chimpanzee and a Marie Curie that glows in the dark.

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THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

T S GOP battle stretches to Puerto Rico The Associated Press An upbeat Rick Santorum barreled into Puerto Rico on Wednesday in pursuit of another campaign-bending victory in a Republican presidential race where suddenly no primary is too minor and no delegate is conceded. Mitt Romney put nearly $1 million into television advertising in Illinois, the next big-state showdown.

“If we keep winning races, eventually people are going to figure out that Gov. Romney is not going to be the nominee,” said Santorum, eager to build on Tuesday’s unexpected victories in Alabama and Mississippi. Romney in turn dismissed Santorum as a “lightweight” as far as the economy is concerned.

He also rebutted suggestions that he can’t appeal to core conservatives. “You don’t win a million more votes than anyone else in this race by just appealing to high-income Americans,” he said on Fox News. “Some who are very conservative may not be in my camp, but they will be when I become the nominee, when I face Barack Obama.”

Romney travels to Puerto Rico on Friday, after two days in New York fundraising. But in a reflection of the importance of next week’s Illinois primary, aides announced he would make a previously unscheduled campaign stop in the Chicago area en route to San Juan. Newt Gingrich, despite losing twice in the South, a region

he hoped to own in the race, showed no sign of abandoning his fading campaign. That presumably suited Romney fine. But not so much Santorum, eager for a race in which he is the sole challenger on the right for Romney, the former Massachusetts governor. Romney won Tuesday caucuses in Hawaii and American Samoa.

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Swiss bus crash kills 28, including 22 children By John Heilprin and Don Melvin The Associated Press

Burhan Ozbilici / The Associated Press

One of two Syrian refugee camps in Yayladagi, Turkey. New York-based Human Rights Watch said Syrian troops have planted land mines near its borders with Turkey and Lebanon along routes used by people fleeing the violence and trying to reach safety in neighboring countries.

Emboldened Syrian army moves to quell southern city By Anne Barnard and Rick Gladstone New York Times News Service

BEIRUT — Gathering confidence after flushing rebels from strongholds in the north, the Syrian government Wednesday launched its biggest raid in months on the southern city of Daraa, where

the uprising against President Bashar Assad began a year ago, opposition activists said. The activists feared that the government was emboldened after having seized most of the northern city of Idlib on Tuesday amid faltering international efforts to stop the violence and had turned its

attention to crushing centers of the rebellion in the south as the symbolically important one-year mark of the uprising approached. Thursday is the anniversary of protests in Daraa that followed the killing of schoolchildren who had scrawled antigovernment graffiti. Those

Congolese warlord convicted; Kony still wanted by court By Marlise Simons New York Times News Service

PARIS — Thomas Lubanga, a rebel leader from the Democratic Republic of Congo, was found guilty Wednesday of recruiting and enlisting boys and girls under the age of 15 and using them in war, in the first ruling by the International Criminal Court since it began its work 10 years ago. The decision, which came after a halting, arduous threeyear trial, establishes as an international crime the use of children in war — a practice that still enslaves tens of thou-

sands of the young. The ruling adds to the rush of attention to another suspect wanted by the court, Joseph Kony, the leader of the dwindling Lord’s Resistance Army, which for years turned abducted children into vicious soldiers as it marauded through at least four central African countries. But it also underscores some of the failings and limits of the prosecution’s approach. The rebels under Lubanga’s command were known to have pillaged, raped and killed many civilians in enemy villages, but when he was handed to The Hague in

2006, prosecutors said they simply had the best evidence on child recruiting. The judges reprimanded the prosecution Wednesday, saying it had been negligent and delegated investigations to unreliable paid go-betweens who had encouraged witnesses to give false testimony. Two of the three judges wrote dissenting opinions, which were not immediately released. The United Nations estimates that tens of thousands of boys and girls, some only 8 years old, are involved in numerous conflicts in Africa, Latin America and Asia.

Lottery winner Obama, Cameron ordered to honor talk of Afghan shift the betting pool By Ben Feller

The Associated Press

By James Barron and Tim Stelloh New York Times News Service

There were some dark twists in the plot line, inevitable, perhaps, when friends fight over $38.5 million in lottery winnings. The friends, construction workers from New Jersey, said they had pooled their money for lottery tickets for years. Five of them relied on a member of their little group, Americo Lopes, to buy the tickets. In November 2009, he collected their money and bought a Mega Millions ticket that won, a fact he told no one except lottery officials. He cashed in the ticket as if it were his alone. The lottery deducted taxes and sent Lopes a check for $17,433,966. He quit his job, saying he needed foot surgery. “We believed him,” said one of the others, Jose Sousa — until several months later, when Lopes told another man in the group that he had won the lottery a week after he had stopped working. As word of his luck spread, yet another man checked a website, found Lopes’ name and discovered when he had hit it big. On Wednesday, a jury in Union County, N.J., ordered Lopes to share the winnings with the five former co-workers. Lopes did not sound happy; The Star-Ledger of Newark quoted him as saying, in Portuguese, “They robbed me.”

WASHINGTON — Determined to show momentum in a war marred by setbacks, President Barack Obama and British Prime Minster David Cameron said for the first time Wednesday that NATO forces would hand over the lead combat role to Afghanistan forces next year as the U.S. and its allies aim to get out by the end of 2014. The announcement added both clarity and urgency to the path of a war that has fallen into a demoralizing period, rocked by the burnings of Qurans at a U.S. base, deadly protests against Americans and a shooting rampage, alleged against a U.S. soldier, that left 16 Afghan civilians dead. Yet Obama made clear those incidents, and intensifying political pressure surrounding them, will not lead him to bring American troops home sooner. He said he still plans to gradually withdraw forces through 2014 as Afghan forces take on more responsibility. The news that NATO forces would shift to a support role next year was a natural fit into the allies’ timeline for ending the war by the end of 2014. In fact, it was Obama’s defense secretary, Leon Panetta, who caused a stir more than two months ago by suggesting that NATO allies might shift from a combat role to an advisory role by mid- to late 2013.

demonstrations turned what had been sporadic protests into a nationwide uprising. There have been regular clashes in Daraa, but “today the situation is different,” with about 150 tanks and many busloads of security forces sweeping the city from the west, said Anwar Fares, an anti-govern-

ment activist reached by telephone in the city. “It is the most violent military raid on Daraa since April 25,” Fares said. “It seems they want to have a situation similar to Idlib and Homs,” he added, referring to cities where the government forced armed rebels from their strongholds.

SIERRE, Switzerland — A tour bus carrying schoolchildren home from a class trip slammed head-on into a tunnel wall in the Swiss Alps, killing 22 Belgian students and six adults and instantly changing a joyous skiing vacation into a tragedy spanning two European nations. As authorities tried Wednesday to piece together what happened in the Tuesday night crash, parents, classmates and rescue workers struggled to grasp the awful turn of events. Only days earlier, the children had updated a lively blog about the highlights of their adventure: ravioli and meatball dinners, cable-car rides and sing-a-longs. Police said the bus was not speeding and everyone aboard had been wearing seat belts when it crashed late Tuesday inside the 1.5-mile Tunnel de Geronde on a highway near the southern town of Sierre, a gateway to the Val d’Anniviers tourist region. No other vehicles were involved. Investigators were still trying to determine how a modern bus, a rested driver and a seemingly safe tunnel could produce one of the deadliest highway crashes in Swiss history.


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THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2012

Colleges

Scott Olson / The Associated Press

Defense Secretary Leon Panetta is greeted by Col. John Shafer after arriving Wednesday at Forward Operating Base Shukvani, a remote combat outpost in western Helmand province, Afghanistan.

Panetta on tense visit to Afghanistan By Elisabeth Bumiller New York Times News Service

KABUL, Afghanistan — A tense visit to Afghanistan by Defense Secretary Leon Panetta got off to an alarming start Wednesday when a stolen pick-up truck sped onto a ramp alongside a runway at a British military airfield and crashed into a ditch as Panetta’s plane was landing. Panetta was unhurt but Pentagon officials said the Afghan driver emerged from the vehicle in flames. No explosives were found on the driver, a civilian, or in the truck, the officials said, and the Pentagon was not immediately considering the episode an attack on Panetta. But it reinforced the lack of security in Afghanistan at the beginning of his two-day visit, the first by a senior member of the Obama administration since a U.S. soldier reportedly killed 16 Afghan civilians, mostly children and women, in Kandahar province. The two-day visit had been planned months ago but took on new urgency after the Sunday massacre. Panetta, like President Barack Obama, has denounced the killings in Kandahar and vowed to bring the killer to justice, a message he is to deliver in person to President Hamid Karzai of Afghanistan and top Afghan defense and interior officials while he is in Afghanistan. The runway incident unfolded Wednesday morning as Panetta landed at Camp Bastion, a British airfield that adjoins Camp Leatherneck, a vast U.S. Marine base in Helmand province, next to Kandahar. Panetta and his aides were aware of the incident shortly after it happened, about 11 a.m., but the defense secretary continued as planned, meeting with local Afghan officials, delivering remarks to 200 Marines, other international troops and Afghan security forces at Camp Leatherneck, and then heading to a remote

Detergent Continued from A1 Charlene Holton, a clerk at a busy, 24-hour CVS in northwest Washington, has seen too many Tide thefts to count. “It’s a hot item! It’s gotten out of hand,” Holton said. “They usually take maybe four, whatever they can carry out the door. We have to fight for that. It’s rough!” The store has put electronic tags on its Tide, but that doesn’t stop the thieves, Holton said. They run out of the store with the detergent and remove the tags later with wire cutters. It’s not clear how new the Tide theft phenomenon is, but organized theft has been a growing problem for U.S. retailers, costing them $3.53 billion in 2010, according to the National Retail Federation. Other popular items for thieves include baby formula, razor blades and over-thecounter medication. “We’ve seen organized retail crime, or the theft of goods for profit, resale or barter, for many years now,” said Joseph LaRocca, senior adviser on asset protection for the NRF. LaRocca said that Tide had not shown up previously on lists of the most commonly targeted items, but that several retailers told him this week it has been a problem. Robert McCrie, a professor of security management at John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York, said Tide

Suspect in killings is flown to Kuwait WASHINGTON — The American staff sergeant suspected of killing 16 Afghan villagers was flown to Kuwait from Afghanistan on Wednesday, U.S. officials said. New evidence emerged to support the case that the sergeant acted alone, in the form of a surveillance video showing his return after the massacre to the remote American outpost where he surrendered. But he has not been named or formally charged, it is not clear where he will be held or tried and nothing has been disclosed about his state of mind or any reason for his actions. President Barack Obama reaffirmed at the White House, where he appeared after a meeting with the British prime minister, that the shooting spree and its aftermath would not lead to a sudden acceleration of the allies withdrawing, and Leon Panetta, the secretary of defense, said much the same thing during a tense visit to troops in Afghanistan.

Continued from A1 The Collegiate Learning Assessment, launched in 2000, has brought rare scrutiny to higher education. Until now, colleges have been largely exempt from the accountability movement sweeping through public elementary and secondary schools, yielding the No Child Left Behind law and other initiatives. In a landmark study published last year, sociologists Richard Arum and Josipa Roksa used the test to measure collegiate learning in the nation. Using data drawn from a sampling of colleges, they shook the academic world with a finding that 36 percent of students made no significant learning gains from freshman to senior year. “I think it’s extremely troubling,” said Margaret Spellings, the former U.S. education secretary and a longtime advocate of accountability in education. “And God bless Richard Arum for taking this on.”

Not everyone’s sold

combat outpost, Shukvani, in western Helmand. Panetta’s aides did not disclose the incident until nearly 10 hours later. Defense officials said Panetta’s plane had been diverted away from the truck that ended up in the ditch off the ramp. The Pentagon press secretary, George Little, said he did not know whether the truck reached the ramp parking area “while we were landing or before or slightly after.”

But a chorus of college leaders reject that this test — or any other— can affirm or refute the essential value of college. They view the CLA as a rough gauge of student learning, grossly inadequate to measure an entire institution. “I think it’s a very worthwhile attempt,” said Brit Kirwan, chancellor of the Maryland state university system. “I don’t think it should be seen as the final answer.” From time to time, accountability advocates have proposed requiring colleges to show the value they add to the quest for knowledge as a condition of receiving federal aid. But higher education lobbyists and their allies in Congress have “vigorously opposed” attempts to impose a No Childstyle system on academia, Spellings said. Perhaps the biggest fear among college presidents is that published test scores might be put to ill use by the collegiate ranking industry. Yet a voluntary system of accountability is under way. Two groups representing more than 500 public colleges have pledged to give the CLA or one of its rival tests, the Collegiate Assessment of Academic Proficiency and Proficiency Profile, and to publish results by the end of this year. So far, 144 schools have posted test results. Many schools have not participated in the testing, including the universities of Virginia

is an ideal target for thieves, in part because high demand makes it easy to resell. The flat economy is a factor, as is the relatively low risk to criminals, he said. “The idea of somebody making significant money as a drug pusher has been pretty much debunked on the streets. It’s risky and really low-profit,” he said. “Selling something like this represents little risk of physical danger.” Unlike nasal decongestants, which can be used to make methamphetamine, laundry detergent is generally used for its intended purpose after it is stolen, authorities and industry officials say. Many thieves are selling it on the street themselves at cutrate prices, sometimes outside coin-operated laundries. In Prince George’s County, police said they learned from informants, undercover officers and other sources that drug dealers encourage their customers to pay with shoplifted Tide instead of cash. “I’m out of marijuana right now, but when I get re-upped I’ll hook you up if you can get me 15 bottles of Tide,” one dealer was quoted as telling an informant, according to police. The drug dealers then often resell the detergent to unscrupulous retailers such as corner stores, barbershops, even a nail salon. Everybody gets something out of the arrangement: the addict, who doesn’t have to scrounge up cash; the dealer, who can double or tri-

ple his profit on the drugs; and the retailer, who can acquire Tide for less than wholesale. Tide shoplifters often work quickly. Surveillance videos from a Safeway in Bowie, Md., showed crews of two or three people entering the store, loading up shopping carts and rushing outside, where they loaded the detergent into a waiting car. Police made nearly 30 arrests when they broke up the theft ring last fall. Employees at a Duane Reade drugstore inside New York City’s Penn Station said that a few weeks ago, a man walked in with a suitcase and filled it up with bottles of Tide. He was caught on a security camera and detained. Several retailers were tightlipped about the problem. A Safeway spokesman said only that Tide thefts aren’t unique to the chain’s stores. A Target representative said the company is aware of the issue and encouraging stores to be vigilant. “Theft of Tide is not a new issue in the retail industry,” said CVS spokeswoman Carolyn Castel. The maker of Tide, Procter & Gamble, sounded baffled about why the brand has gotten so much attention from thieves. “We don’t have any insight as to why this has apparently happened,” P&G spokeswoman Sarah Pasquinucci said in an email, “but if so it is unfortunate.”

— New York Times News Service

and Maryland. Teresa Sullivan, president of the University of Virginia, said the University of Michigan gave the CLA when she was provost there. Freshmen scored so high, she said, there was no way for seniors to score higher. She believes Virginia students would hit the same ceiling. “If there is no way to improve, why would you invest your money in this?” she said. The CLA is an essay exam that tests students on skills colleges avow to teach. Responses are judged on use of language, organizational structure and persuasive heft. Students might be asked, for example, to assail the logic in this proposition: Couples should not wed in June, because many failed marriages begin as June weddings. The University of Texas, one of the nation’s top research universities, was among the first to give the CLA and is using the results to improve instruction. Testing began in 2004 in Austin, under a state mandate. Last year, UT freshmen scored an average 1,261 on the assessment, which is graded on a scale similar to that of the SAT. Seniors averaged 1,303. Both groups scored very well, but seniors fared little better than freshmen, according to score reports The Washington Post obtained through a public records request. “The seniors have spent four years there, and the scores have not gone up that much,” said Arum, a New York University sociologist and co-author of the 2011 book “Academically Adrift.” He reviewed UT’s results at the request of The Post. The school was not among the 24 unnamed colleges in Arum’s study. With about 51,000 students and nearly 3,000 faculty, the University of Texas is a veritable learning factory. Critics of the CLA, and there are many in Austin, say it is ab-

surd to judge an organization of this scale on the strength of one score. They note that the CLA is relatively brief and administered to a couple of hundred freshmen and seniors who have no stake in the results. University of Texas leaders share Sullivan’s concern that they look bad on the assessment because freshman scores are so high. That is why few highly selective institutions participate in the CLA, university officials say. The test “is aimed a bit low for the kind of students we get,” said Paul Woodruff, dean of undergraduate studies at UT. Thor Lund, 20, a senior, is dubious of the value of the CLA. Lund said he scored 34 out of 36 on the ACT college entrance exam. “How much better at critical thinking can you get?” he asked. But the test’s authors contend smart students at some other colleges show plenty of growth on the CLA over time. For learning gains from freshman to senior year, UT ranked in the 23rd percentile among like institutions. In other words, 77 percent of universities with similar students performed better.

Undergraduate focus In recent years, UT officials have sought to bolster undergraduate instruction through classes that place a greater emphasis on writing. Nicole Scallan, 19, is enrolled in one such course. “The Importance of Interest in Learning and Life,” an 18student seminar, is part of a series of “signature courses” introduced in 2007 and required of freshmen. One recent morning, instructor Mary Worthy told Scallan and her classmates that they would be sharing drafts of a protest song with each other. “Did any of you participate in writing workshops when you were in high school or middle school?” Worthy asked, to a collective shaking

of heads. “That’s kind of what the idea is.” By semester’s end, each student will have penned roughly 75 pages, mostly in two- and three-page assignments. The topics are tailored to engage: the sources of human motivation, the quest for an optimal state of consciousness. Students sit around an oval table and talk, a marked change from sitting in an auditorium and listening. A 2009 overhaul of the university’s basic education requirements stresses critical thinking and communication skills, qualities measured by the CLA. The UT curriculum lists those skills first among six overarching objectives. Administrators and faculty infuse courses with opportunities for writing and engagement. The university cannot afford to break up every 400-student lecture into tiny seminars. Instead, professors learn to teach large courses more effectively. One breakthrough is the electronic “clicker,” which enables professors to pose a question to hundreds of students in real time. Such exercises force students to engage and provides the instructor with a gauge of whether they are learning. Another innovation is “minimal marking,” an approach to grading that favors broad comments over line editing, a strategy for instructors who assign papers by the hundreds. “Instead of fixing every comma, you tell the student, ‘You’ve got a comma problem,’” said Woodruff, who became UT’s first undergraduate studies dean in 2006. Gretchen Ritter, vice provost for undergraduate education at UT, has reservations about the CLA. But she concedes the test has inspired the university to question whether students are learning to think. And that, she said, “is a very good thing to care about.”

Find Your Dream Home In Real Estate Every Saturday In


THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

Timber Continued from A1 Counties in Central Oregon, like those across the state, have watched timber payments decrease. In Deschutes County, timber payments shrank from $4 mil-

Goldman Continued from A1 While it was an unusual cry from the heart of a Wall Street insider, many questioned whether it would prompt any change. Goldman disagreed with the assertions in the Op-Ed article, saying that they did not reflect how the firm treated its clients. Top executives have previously said that despite some rough times of late, clients have stuck with the firm. Friends of Smith, who had a list of Goldman’s business principles taped on a wall by his computers in London, say they were not surprised by his public farewell. “He has a really high moral fiber and really cared about the culture of the firm,” said Daniel Lipkin, a Miami lawyer who went to Stanford with Smith. Lipkin learned about the Op-Ed on Wednesday from Smith. “He sounded confident and felt good about his decision to go public,” he said. Although he isn’t highly paid by Wall Street standards — earning about $500,000 last year, according to people briefed on the matter — Smith is part of what some Goldman staff members and alumni refer to as a sizable yet silent contingent within the investment bank. These people are increasingly frustrated with what they see as a shift in recent years to a profit-above-all mentality. Evidence of this shift, they say, can be seen in the accusations brought by the Securities and Exchange Commission in 2010 that the firm intentionally duped certain clients by selling a mortgage-security product that was designed by another Goldman client betting that the housing market would crash. More recently, a Delaware judge criticized Goldman over the multiple, and potentially conflicting, roles it played in brokering an energy deal. (In both cases, Goldman has denied any wrongdoing.)

Wall Street reaction The reaction on Wall Street to Smith’s resignation ranged from those cheering him to others criticizing him for resigning in such a public way. Some within Goldman sought to portray Smith as a lone wolf — he did not manage anyone — who had failed to become a managing director. (There are about 12,000 executive directors, the overseas equivalent of a vice president, but only about 3,000 managing directors among Goldman’s 33,300 employees.) Still, the ripple effects were felt beyond Wall Street. Shares of Goldman fell 3.4 percent. And media coverage was worldwide. “Goldman Boss: We Call Our Clients Muppets,” screamed the front page of The London Evening Standard. Others were less surprised. One Goldman client who spoke on the condition of anonymity called the letter “naive,” saying that the firm had been trading against its clients for years. “Come on, that is what they do and they are good traders,” the client said, “so I do business with them.” Another Wall Street executive said it was “unforgivable” for Smith to make his opinions so public and he should have taken them privately to the firm’s senior managers. While Smith may have tried to raise his concerns with his superiors in meetings, as a fairly junior employee, he did not have much of a voice. Goldman’s top two executives, Lloyd Blankfein and Gary Cohn, said in a letter to employees: “We were disappointed to read the assertions made by this individual that do not reflect our values, our culture and how the vast majority of people at Goldman Sachs think about the firm and the work it does on behalf of our clients. Everyone is entitled to his or her opinion. But it is unfortunate that an individual opinion about Goldman Sachs is amplified in a newspaper and speaks louder than the regular, detailed and intensive feedback you have provided the firm and

lion in 2008 to $1.9 million in 2011. Crook County’s payments dropped from $3 million to $2.3 million over the same time period, while Jefferson County’s shrank from $717,000 to $515,000. Curry County commissioners are scheduled today to de-

cide whether to place a sales tax measure on the May ballot. However, says Itzen, commissioners may place the tax proposal on the September ballot instead, even as the county heads for fiscal disaster. Itzen worries that more community dialogue may

be necessary to ensure the measure’s passage. He said he understands the need to move quickly, but wants to ensure that the measure has the best shot at passing. “There is no painless choice,” Itzen said. “Every choice we make will be painful.”

In any case, he said, the county can’t wait for the state or federal governments to act. “In my view, they are undependable partners,” he said. “They are both having financial difficulties. The federal government has partisan bick-

A5

ering, and the state government has financial problems of its own. We must have a Curry County solution going forward, and it has to be one to prevent this from happening again.” — Reporter: 541-419-8074, ldake@bendbulletin.com

Clampett to Clancy: You name it, and clients are probably called it Are you a Muppet or a Clancy? A bobblehead or a Clampett? You may be, even if you do not know it. All of these are less-than-flattering code names that companies in a variety of industries have used to describe some of their customers or clients. The topic of name-calling on Wall Street landed on the front burner Wednesday after an executive director from Goldman Sachs, on his last day at the company, wrote an Op-Ed column in The New York Times in which he said that the investment bank often derided its customers as “Muppets.” Goldman’s top executives said in a message to the company’s employees that the firm had a “client-driven” culture. Still, if some folks inside Goldman’s walls came up with uncomplimentary terms to refer to the company’s customers, they are hardly alone. Many industries and companies have their own secret codes or language that they use to tag others. Advertising executives call people “bobbleheads” if they approve of everything a boss says or does. In New York political circles, a “checkbook” is the wealthy client of a consultant who wants to run for office or start an issue campaign but whose only qualification is his wealth. Flight attendants are known to call the infrequent leisure traveler a “Clampett,” for the fictional family in the TV sitcom “The Beverly Hillbillies.” Some nicknames can obviously be harmless or even be viewed as a term of endearment, the way a parent would call a child a “rug rat.” When defense contractors call their customers “warfighters,” there is pride associated with that term.

independent, public surveys of workplace environments.” But questions about Goldman’s culture persist at a time when the firm — and the rest of Wall Street — are undergoing a transition as the post-financial crisis framework of regulations known as Dodd-Frank takes hold and as some profitable businesses show little sign of returning to their precrisis highs. It is not a hospitable environment for trading, yet Goldman remains very much a trading firm. Blankfein, a former gold salesman, comes from the trading business, as does the man who is seen as the most likely to succeed him as chief executive in the next year or two, Cohn. Smith started at Goldman in sales. Born in Johannesburg, he is a grandson of Lithuanian Jews who emigrated to South Africa. His father is a pharmacist and his mother is pursuing a career in social work. He won a full scholarship to Stanford and after graduating in 2001 landed a spot at Goldman, where he quickly worked his way up in the organization. A table tennis player, Smith won a bronze medal in the event at the Maccabiah Games in Israel. He was sent to London about a year ago to sell U.S. derivative products to European and Middle Eastern investment funds. What motivated Smith to come forward now? People close to him said he had high hopes for an internal report that came out after the SEC case, which Goldman settled. In 2010, Goldman embarked on an internal study that looked at the way it did business. The report reaffirmed the firm’s principles and outlined changes aimed largely at bolstering internal controls and disclosure. But Smith thought it fell on deaf ears among senior managers, his friends say. “I think this was the ultimate act of loyalty,” said Lex Bayer, a friend of Smith’s from high school in Johannesburg, who went to Stanford with him. “He has always been an advocate for the firm, but he wanted Goldman to do things the right way. In his mind, this was the only way that he could change

But nicknames in other contexts can have a much darker meaning, said Lindsay Thompson, an associate professor at the Johns Hopkins Carey Business School who studies the role of character and human values in business, society and corporate culture. “You could interpret an ugly side to this.” Thompson said. “Why would you call anybody a ‘Muppet’ unless it was to belittle them?” It certainly appeared as if Stratfor, an intelligence firm based in Texas, was poking fun at its clients when WikiLeaks released an internal glossary from the company this year that defined a “Clancy” as “somebody who has read a lot of Tom Clancy novels and thinks he knows the craft. Total moron.” Some railroad employees call train enthusiasts “foamers,” as in, they foam at the mouth, going on and on about old trains. But it is hard to top Wall Street for dark humor. In an email, a former Wall Street stockbroker, who is now independent and did not want to be identified, said clients were often described as “pikers” (small fish), “marks” (easy prey) or “pawns” (will do anything asked no matter how ridiculous). In the credit card industry, “deadbeats” are not customers who fail to pay their bills — they are customers who pay off their credit cards each month, thus depriving the banks and credit card companies of the hefty interest charges. A “Third Avenue guy” is someone on Wall Street who is not smart enough to work for a company with offices in a more upscale neighborhood, while a “duffel bag” is a person on Wall Street who is never going to move beyond carrying someone else’s bag. — New York Times News Service

the culture of the firm.” He may not be alone inside Goldman. At staff meetings, Goldman’s leadership has been peppered with questions about the firm’s public reputation, say people who have attended those meetings, but who spoke on the condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak on the record. Smith is making a considerable financial sacrifice in publicly criticizing Goldman. Most Wall Street employees sign nondisparagement and nondisclosure agreements before they join a firm. If Smith did, Goldman may take legal action and refuse to release stock options he has accumulated. Smith may also find it difficult to find work on Wall Street after such a public resignation. A spokesman said that Goldman tried to contact Smith on Wednesday. It is not known whether he responded.

Messages of support Smith did not speak publicly about his decision to leave Goldman. On Wednesday, he received messages of support from clients of Goldman. “You do not know me, but I am a client of Goldman Sachs,” one of them said. “We trade a lot with Goldman and we know that we have to be very careful when we do so. We understand your message.” People who have spoken to Smith said that he was flying back to New York on Wednesday night to see his family and friends. These people say he still has no concrete plan for what to do next. He tells friends that he wants to effect change in Goldman’s business practices, although it is unclear what that change would be. Recruiters say it may be tough slogging for Smith to find work again on Wall Street, at least in the near term. “There is a rule of thumb when interviewing — you don’t bad-mouth your old boss. No one wants to hear it,” said Eric Fleming, the chief executive of the Wall Street recruiting firm Exemplar Partners. “You can argue something like this needed to be said, but if you hire the guy who said it, you are taking the risk he will do it again.”

Photos by Charles Crowell / Bloomberg News

Two sailors secure cargo aboard a dhow in 2007 in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. These days, restrictions on trade with Iran, imposed by the United States and European Union to curb the Islamic republic’s nuclear program, mean that the dhows to Iran increasingly are laden with food.

Foodstuffs replace electronics, appliances on Iran-bound dhows By Tamara Walid Bloomberg News

ABU DHABI, United Arab Emirates — At the Dubai Creek port, sailors bound for Iran say they are loading their dhows with food, instead of their usual cargos of electronics and home appliances, as international sanctions lift prices. “Everything is more expensive these days and ordinary people, even merchants, won’t buy expensive goods,” said Reza Esmaeili, 44, an Iranian sailor. “Food is different because it’s essential to our lives.” He said typical cargoes include rice, tea, cooking oil and sugar. Restrictions on trade with Iran, imposed by the United States and European Union this year on the grounds they are required to curb the Islamic republic’s nuclear program, are hurting its economy. The rial has dropped 9.2 percent against the dollar at official rates this year, and posted steeper losses on the black market as Iranians rushed to buy hard currency and the government imposed exchange controls. That has increased the price

COCC Continued from A1 The tuition and fee increase, though, would not be enough to minimize the effect of funding drops. The recommended budget also calls for COCC to draw on some of its reserve funds and to cover only about half of its new staffing and technology needs. COCC, for instance, will use about $250,000 of its Public Employee Retirement System, or PERS, reserve to balance next year’s budget. Reserve transfers like that will be reviewed each year. Associate Chief Financial Officer David Dona said the fund has enough to cover several years of PERS payments, though he acknowl-

White boxes containing Whirlpool freezers were the usual cargo headed to Iran in 2007 on dhows in Dubai, United Arab Emirates.

Iranians pay for goods bought in Dubai and loaded onto some 2,000 ships that regularly ply the route across the Persian Gulf. Esmaeili said purchases in Dubai include rice and tea from India and Pakistan, and sugar from Germany and Italy. He said his cargo will cost 500 million rials ($41,000) and earn him a profit of 150 million rials. Iran was Dubai’s second biggest market for re-exports after India in the third-quar-

edged drawbacks to the move. “We’re pulling down the reserve, and that does take future flexibility off the table,” Dona said. COCC’s rapid enrollment growth, along with declining support, has exacerbated the pressure on the college. State funding will decline by 7 percent next year, and tax revenues are projected to slip 1 percent after falling nearly 2 percent for the current year, according to the proposed budget. Together, that translates to a year-to-year decline from about $17.5 million in public support to $17.1 million for the 2012-13 school year. COCC’s budget is more than $40 million. Those declines come as

ter of 2011. Sales of 8.8 billion dirhams ($2.4 billion) to the Islamic republic accounted for more than one-fifth of the total, Dubai Statistics Centre data show. Economic conditions in Iran are “worse than wartime,” said Abdolreza Ebrahimi, 60, a captain who is shipping spare parts for automobiles to Bushehr province in 12 40-foo containers. Inflation is above 20 percent, according to central bank figures.

the college must spend more to operate. The budget, for instance, includes a 3 percent salary increase required by labor agreements the college has with its employees’ unions. The college, Middleton said, is trying to do more with less. “Our total public resources are virtually the same as 2007, in spite of the fact we’ve almost doubled (enrollment) in that time period,” Middleton said. — Reporter: 541-6332161, pcliff@bendbulletin.com

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THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2012

THE BULLETIN’S BID-N-BUY ONLINE AUCTION EVENT RETURNS BRINGING QUALITY PRODUCTS AT LOW AUCTION PRICES TO CENTRAL OREGON Register to bid now! Bidding opens Sunday, March 25 at 9 a.m. and closes Tuesday, April 3 at 8 p.m. A complete auction catalog will be in The Bulletin on March 25. Shop, bid and save on hundreds of items from local retailers.

Beginning 9 a.m. on March 25, Browse, Bid And Buy These And Other Great Auction Items Online!

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BUSINESS

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Stock listings, B2-3 Calendar, B4 News of Record, B4

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2012

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S&P 500

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house some employees at its Region 4 offices in Bend, and in May, the agency expects to start erecting a new maintenance facility east of Sisters. Currently, 57 employees work in five buildings on ODOT’s Region 4 campus near Northeast Third Street and Northeast Empire Avenue in Bend. The state agency will consolidate the employees into a new two-story, 21,000-square-

By Jordan Novet The Bulletin

The Oregon Department of Transportation has started construction on the first of two projects in Central Oregon worth a combined value of more than $7 million. “That’s a pretty big boost for the economy,” ODOT spokesman Peter Murphy said. Work began earlier this winter on a new building to

foot building, according to documents on file with the city of Bend. The building, which should be completed this fall, will allow ODOT to save money by owning the property instead of paying rent on the buildings where the employees work now. The agency should break even in 17 years, according to information on its website. See ODOT / B4

Barclay Dr. 20

Areas the Forest Service is planning to sell competitively Existing 22.5-acre ODOT property

Adams Ave. 242

Current location of ODOT building

Sisters city limits

Rd.

Cascade Ave. Hood Ave.

ge Brid Log

Greek bailout formally passed After months of tortuous and tense negotiations, a second bailout for Greece finally became a reality Wednesday when eurozone nations formally approved the plan and authorized the release of the first multibillioneuro loan installment. In a statement, JeanClaude Juncker, who, as the president of the Eurogroup, leads the finance ministers of the 17 members of the eurozone, said the national governments had formally approved Greece’s second rescue, which is valued at 130 billion euros, or $170 billion. — Staff and wire reports

Ups and downs

126

To Redmond 20

To Bend Greg Cross / The Bulletin

Source: Oregon Department of Transportation

By Elon Glucklich The Bulletin

Deschutes County residents owing more on their homes than those properties are worth could soon find a new customer for their underwater mortgages: the state of Oregon. State housing officials are getting ready to unveil a new housing assistance program in Deschutes and Jackson counties. The program, known as the Loan Refinance Assistance Pilot Project, is backed entirely by federal dollars, allocated to the state as part of the federal Hardest Hit program aiding states disproportionately impacted by rising unemployment and foreclosures during the

4 3 2 1

2000 4.19

2000 2.13

2011 4.15

2011 2.07

0 ’00 ’02 ’04 ’06 ’08 ’10 Source: U.S. Department of Energy Graphic: Los Angeles Times © 2012 McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Inside • How to apply for assistance, B3

Great Recession. The program essentially encourages underwater homeowners to move forward with a short sale, said Ben Pray, spokesman for the Oregon Homeownership Stabilization Initiative, the state agency authorized to manage Oregon’s $220 million in Hardest Hit funds. But the homeowner never parts with his or her property. Instead of selling the home outright, the short sale is negotiated with the state’s housing finance agency, Oregon Housing and Community Services. See Aid / B3

Questions as banks increase dividends By J.B. Siler-Greenberg New York Times News Service

Christian Hansen / New York Times News Service

Workers sew T-shirts at the Campbellsville Apparel factory in Campbellsville, Ky. The company is worried about competition from Federal Prison Industries for a contract to make T-shirts for the military.

COMPETING WITH

PRISON LABOR • Companies, politicians scrutinizing Federal Prison Industries By Diane Cardwell New York Times News Service

As chief financial officer of a military clothing manufacturer, Steven Eisen was accustomed to winning contracts to make garments for the Defense Department. But in December, Eisen received surprising news. His company, Tennier Industries, which is in a depressed corner of Tennessee, would not receive a new $45 million contract. Tennier lost the deal not to a private

sector competitor, but to a corporation owned by the federal government, Federal Prison Industries. Federal Prison Industries, also known as UNICOR, does not have to worry much about its overhead. It uses prisoners for labor, paying them 23 cents to $1.15 an hour. Though the company is not allowed to sell to the private sector, the law generally requires federal agencies to buy its products, even if they are not the cheapest. Eisen, who laid off about 100 work-

ers after losing the new contract, said the system took sorely needed jobs from law-abiding citizens. “Our government screams, howls and yells (about) how the rest of the world is using prisoners or slave labor to manufacture items, and here we take the items right out of the mouths of people who need it,” he said. Though Federal Prison Industries has been around for decades, its critics are gaining more sympathy this year as jobs, competition and the role of government have become potent political issues. See Prison / B4

Many workers eyeing retirement with dread

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Annual U.S. oil imports and domestic oil production, in billions of barrels: Imports Production

SILVER

counties slated for housing aid

Bend median home price rises The median price for a single-family home in Bend reached $199,000 in February, its third monthly increase, according to figures released Wednesday by the Bratton Appraisal Group. Last month, 134 homes sold in Bend, according to the Bratton Report, and the inventory of single-family homes stood at three months as of Wednesday. In Redmond, the median price for a single-family home last month remained at $100,000, the same as in January, according to the report, which contains information from the Central Oregon multiple listing service through the Central Oregon Association of Realtors. Redmond had 43 single-family home sales in February, and its inventory stood at 2½ months, according to the report.

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Work begins on ODOT projects Deschutes 1 of 2

Willow Ln.

Mt. Bachelor ski area announced its springseason pass prices and reduced hours on Wednesday, with the adult pass going for $159, up $10 from last year. For teens and seniors, prices have fallen $20, to $129, according to a news release. And the pass price for kids ages 6 through 12 is $99, down $50 compared with the previous year. Starting April 16, the ski area will be open from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Beginning April 30, Mt. Bachelor will reduce operations to four days a week: Thursday through Sunday. Spring passes purchased before March 28 will be valid starting April 1; passes purchased after that date become valid April 9. The season should wrap up on May 27, according to the news release.

CLOSE 13,194.10 CHANGE +16.42 +.12%

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Bachelor releases spring prices

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www.bendbulletin.com/business

By Gail MarksJarvis

PERSONAL FINANCE

Chicago Tribune

A ruthless job market, suffocating household debt and a shocking decline in the stock market have left millions of Americans feeling fragile and with little confidence they will ever have the money to retire. Retirement confidence is at a historic low: Only 14 percent of Americans are very confi-

dent that they will be able to retire with adequate money, according to research released Tuesday by the Employee Benefit Research Institute. About 60 percent of workers say their household savings and investments total less than $25,000. EBRI has been surveying

retirement confidence for 22 years, and the number hasn’t improved since 2009. That’s when about 17 percent of workers were unemployed or underemployed, and when a 57 percent decline in the stock market left workplace 401(k) retirement savings accounts in ruins. Confidence hasn’t snapped back despite improving employment num-

bers and a 110 percent climb in the stock market since the devastation of the 2008-09 crash. “We were quite shocked,” said EBRI research director Jack VanDerhei. He had assumed people would be more optimistic after “a fairly decent rebound” in the stock market and economy in 2010. See Retire / B3

Emboldened by the Federal Reserve’s passing grades on stress tests of banks, some of the nation’s biggest financial firms are racing to dole out billions of dollars in dividends. But some industry analysts and academics say that it is too soon and could threaten to put banks on shaky ground. Such moves deplete the capital cushions of banks, potentially making them far more vulnerable to withstanding sudden market shocks. “It’s frankly irresponsible to allow banks to quickly empty their coffers,” said Neil Barofsky, the former inspector general for the Troubled Asset Relief Program. “They should be holding onto this money.” Another potential problem is that stress tests might overstate the health of banks, said Barofsky. On Tuesday, the Federal Reserve concluded that 15 of the 19 banks that they examined would be able to maintain a minimum capital level during a severe economic crisis. That cleared the way for those banks to bolster dividend payments to shareholders and initiate a round of share buybacks. It also set off a debate among economists and banking analysts about whether banks have actually achieved renewed strength. “The Fed has essentially appeased critics and proclaimed the banks healthy without doing real due diligence,” said Anat Admati, a professor of finance and economics at Stanford. The Fed has maintained that its examination of banks was extremely rigorous. On Tuesday, a senior Federal Reserve official countered any worries about the health of most banks, noting that despite dividend plans, the banks will all have more capital by the end of the year than they had at the start of the year. See Banks / B3


B2

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2012

Consolidated stock listings N m

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A-B-C-D ABB Ltd 0.71 ACE Ltd 1.64 ACI Wwde ADA-ES AES Corp AFLAC 1.32 AGCO AGIC Cv 1.08 AGL Res 1.84 AK Steel 0.20 AMC Net n AOL ASML Hld 0.59 AT&T Inc 1.76 ATMI Inc ATP O&G ATS Corp AU Optron 0.14 AVI Bio Aarons 0.06 Aastrom AbtLab 2.04 AberFitc 0.70 AbdAsPac 0.42 Abiomed Abraxas AcadiaPh AcadiaRlt 0.72 Accenture 1.35 AccoBrds AccretivH Accuray Achillion AcmePkt AcordaTh ActiveNt n ActivsBliz 0.18 Actuant 0.04 Actuate Adecaogro AdobeSy Adtran 0.36 AdvAmer 0.25 AdvAuto 0.24 AdvEnId AMD AdvSemi 0.11 AdvOil&Gs AecomTch Aegion Aegon 0.13 Aegon cap 1.59 AerCap Aeropostl AEterna g Aetna 0.70 Affymax Affymetrix Agenus rs Agilent 0.40 Agnico g 0.80 Agrium g 0.45 AirLease n AirProd 2.32 Aircastle 0.60 Airgas 1.28 AkamaiT Akorn AlskAir AlaskCom 0.20 Albemarle 0.80 AlcatelLuc Alcoa 0.12 AlexREE 1.96 AlexcoR g Alexion s Alexza h AlignTech AlimeraSci Alkermes AllegTch 0.72 Allergan 0.20 AlliData AlliancOne AlliBInco 0.48 AlliBern 1.14 AlliantEgy 1.80 AlliantTch 0.80 AlldNevG AlldWldA 1.50 AllosThera AllotComm AllscriptH Allstate 0.88 AlmadnM g AlonUSA 0.16 AlphaNRs AlpGPPrp 0.60 AlpTotDiv 0.66 AlpAlerMLP 1.00 AlteraCp lf 0.32 AlterraCap 0.56 Altria 1.64 Alumina 0.24 AlumChina 0.04 AmBev 1.23 Amarin Amazon Amdocs Amedisys Ameren 1.60 Amerigrp AMovilL s 0.28 AmApparel AmAxle AmCampus 1.35 ACapAgy 5.00 AmCapLtd ACapMtg n 1.90 AEagleOut 0.44 AEP 1.88 AEqInvLf 0.12 AmExp 0.72 AFnclGrp 0.70 AGreet 0.60 AmIntlGrp AIntGr62 1.93 AOriBio rs AmPubEd ARltyCT n 0.70 AmSupr AmTower AmWtrWks 0.92 Amrign Ameriprise 1.12 AmeriBrgn 0.52 AmCasino 0.50 Ametek 0.24 Amgen 1.44 AmkorT lf Amphenol 0.42 AmpioPhm Amylin Amyris AnacorPh Anadarko 0.36 Anadigc AnalogDev 1.20 Ancestry Anglgld 13 3.00 AnglogldA 0.49 ABInBev 1.16 Ann Inc Annaly 2.43 Anooraq g Ansys AntaresP AntheraPh Anworth 0.94 Aon Corp 0.60 A123 Sys Apache 0.68 AptInv 0.72 ApolloGrp ApolloInv 0.80 ApolloRM n 1.05 ApollSrFlt 1.26 Apple Inc ApldMatl 0.36 AMCC Approach ApricusBio Aptargrp 0.88 AquaAm 0.66 ArQule ArcelorMit 0.75 ArchCap s ArchCoal 0.44 ArchDan 0.70 ArchLearn ArcosDor n 0.18 ArenaPhm AresCap 1.48 AriadP Ariba Inc ArmHld 0.16 ArmourRsd 1.20 ArmstrWld ArrayBio Arris ArrowEl ArubaNet AsburyA AscenaRtl AshfordHT 0.40 Ashland 0.70 AsiaInfoL AspenIns 0.60 AspenTech AsscdBanc 0.20 AsdEstat 0.68 Assurant 0.72 AssuredG 0.36 AstexPhm AstoriaF 0.52 AstraZen 2.80 athenahlth AtlPwr g 1.15 AtlasAir AtlasEngy 0.96 AtlasPpln 2.20 Atmel ATMOS 1.38 AtwoodOcn AuRico g Aurizon g AuthenTec AutoNatn Autobytel h Autodesk Autoliv 1.88 AutoData 1.58 AutoZone AvagoTch 0.52 AvalnRare AvalonBay 3.88 AvanirPhm AveryD 1.08 AvisBudg

20.66 73.35 +.71 39.25 -.62 26.13 +.18 13.00 -.32 46.21 +.14 50.32 -.66 9.50 -.14 39.70 -.31 7.59 +.25 46.04 +.08 17.90 +.06 47.32 -.29 31.45 -.18 22.68 -.27 8.33 -.17 3.19 5.14 -.28 1.32 +.16 26.20 -.37 2.04 -.05 58.99 +.06 53.53 +1.92 7.52 -.08 22.19 -.29 3.72 -.11 1.99 -.05 21.97 -.21 62.61 +.20 12.50 +.16 24.47 -.27 6.82 +.19 10.78 +.11 27.03 -.48 25.52 +.03 17.34 -.40 12.33 +.31 29.09 +.12 6.17 +.01 10.33 +.03 33.77 -.45 31.17 -.13 10.45 -.02 89.17 +.69 12.60 -.30 7.76 5.05 +.11 3.67 -.06 22.90 -.01 18.86 -.49 5.45 +.24 23.48 +.04 11.72 +.04 20.45 +.12 1.71 -.07 45.70 -.16 11.11 -.11 4.44 +.03 5.45 +.40 44.97 -.14 33.67 -1.58 82.15 -1.10 24.10 -.25 91.14 +.40 12.72 -.08 83.97 +.20 36.66 -.81 11.94 69.24 -.78 3.18 -.01 63.91 +.25 2.39 +.02 10.28 -.03 72.81 -.46 7.10 -.27 89.17 -.34 .59 -.02 26.85 -.24 3.81 -.35 17.08 -.23 41.55 -.25 93.59 +.23 123.94 -.47 3.60 -.12 8.23 -.10 15.10 -.53 42.80 -.88 53.67 -.36 32.17 -1.94 70.89 -.07 1.58 +.16 20.78 +.04 17.97 -.70 32.50 -.06 2.67 -.12 9.01 -.18 15.77 -.43 6.58 -.09 4.77 -.03 16.73 -.17 38.85 +.79 23.52 -.24 29.95 -.15 5.18 -.19 13.01 -.26 41.23 -.44 8.02 +.87 182.26 -2.33 30.54 -.35 14.00 +.61 31.63 -.57 65.53 -.01 23.45 -.52 .92 -.10 11.61 +.02 43.61 -.31 29.41 -.45 8.96 -.06 21.50 -.97 16.68 +.13 38.30 -.75 12.40 +.03 56.15 +1.90 38.23 -.31 16.10 +.09 28.25 -.15 25.27 +.16 1.58 +.24 39.42 -.57 10.38 +.03 4.05 -.11 62.96 +1.06 33.99 -.40 17.26 +.24 56.75 -.85 38.24 +.22 20.93 +.54 48.68 -.19 68.26 -.65 6.26 -.07 57.32 -.68 2.97 -.23 15.68 -.16 5.30 -.28 5.77 +.18 83.09 -.55 2.71 +.09 39.05 -.37 22.49 -.49 43.59 -1.29 37.95 -1.54 71.43 -.26 27.76 -.34 16.20 -.20 .45 -.03 64.70 -.07 2.80 -.09 3.26 -.33 6.56 -.09 49.00 +.21 1.58 -.11 106.99 -1.07 25.93 -.11 42.03 -.38 7.13 -.04 19.32 -.16 17.82 -.12 589.58 +21.48 12.54 +.04 6.72 -.23 35.82 -.13 3.34 -.14 54.46 +.05 22.09 -.31 7.01 -.19 20.12 -.29 37.39 -.10 11.44 -.32 31.65 -.51 11.05 18.88 -.07 1.79 -.03 16.35 -.17 15.12 -.01 32.16 -.67 26.68 -.54 6.66 -.19 57.07 -.06 3.21 +.02 11.12 -.13 41.40 -.21 23.44 +.04 27.26 -.18 43.81 -.18 8.85 -.13 61.50 +.50 13.44 -.41 28.25 +.11 21.33 -.20 13.88 +.09 15.50 +.01 42.16 -.71 18.45 -.37 1.82 -.03 9.27 +.06 44.94 -.61 75.65 -2.18 14.05 -.28 45.59 -.75 26.21 +.67 37.17 +.05 9.62 -.19 31.11 -.35 45.65 -1.23 8.77 -.36 4.61 -.27 3.06 -.08 34.62 +.46 .94 -.04 39.35 +.68 68.56 +.31 55.19 +.12 379.92 +.29 37.11 -.52 2.77 -.06 138.82 -1.57 3.15 -.03 29.39 -.23 13.75 -.04

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Avista 1.16 Avnet Avon 0.92 Axcelis AXIS Cap 0.96 BB&T Cp 0.80 BB&T pfB 2.40 BBCN Bcp BCE g 2.17 BE Aero BGC Ptrs 0.68 BHP BillLt 2.20 BHPBil plc 2.20 BMC Sft BP PLC 1.92 BPZ Res BRE 1.54 BRFBrasil 0.42 BabckWil Baidu BakrHu 0.60 Balchem 0.18 BallCorp 0.40 Ballanty BallyTech BanColum 1.42 BcBilVArg 0.62 BcoBrad pf 0.81 BcoLatin 1.00 BcoSantSA 0.84 BcoSBrasil 1.50 BcpSouth 0.04 BkofAm 0.04 BkAm wtA BkAm wtB BkAML pfQ 2.16 BkHawaii 1.80 BkIreld rs BkMont g 2.80 BkNYMel 0.52 BkNova g 2.20 BkAtl A rs Bankrate n Banro g BarcGSOil BiPCop BiP10yTBear Barclay 0.39 Bar iPVix BarVixMdT Bard 0.76 BarnesNob Barnes 0.40 BarrickG 0.60 BasicEnSv Baxter 1.34 BaytexE g 2.64 BeacnRfg Beam Inc 0.82 BeazerHm BebeStrs 0.10 BectDck 1.80 BedBath Belo 0.32 Bemis 1.00 Berkley 0.32 BerkH B BerryPet 0.32 BestBuy 0.64 BigLots BBarrett Biocryst BioFuelE h BiogenIdc BioMarin BioMedR 0.80 BioMimetic BioSante h BioScrip BiostarP h BlkHillsCp 1.48 BlkRKelso 1.04 BlackRock 6.00 BlkBldAm 1.58 BlkDebtStr 0.32 BlkEEqDv 0.68 BlkGlbOp 2.28 BlkrkHigh 0.17 BlkIntlG&I 0.88 BlMunyNYQ 0.85 BlkMuniyQ3 0.86 BlkMuniyld 1.00 BlkRlAsst 1.09 Blackstone 0.88 BlockHR 0.80 Blyth 0.20 BdwlkPpl 2.12 Boeing 1.76 Boise Inc 0.48 BonTon 0.20 BookMill 0.20 BoozAllenH 0.36 BorgWarn BostPrv 0.04 BostProp 2.20 BostonSci BoydGm BradyCp 0.74 Brandyw 0.60 Braskem 1.05 BreitBurn 1.80 BridgptEd BrigStrat 0.44 Brightpnt BrigusG g Brinker 0.64 Brinks 0.40 BrMySq 1.36 Broadcom 0.40 BroadrdgF 0.64 BroadSoft BroadVisn Broadwd h BrcdeCm Brookdale BrkfldAs g 0.56 BrkfInfra 1.50 BrkfldOfPr 0.56 BrklneB 0.34 BrooksAuto 0.32 BrwnBrn 0.34 BrownShoe 0.28 Brunswick 0.05 Buckeye 4.15 Buckle 0.80 Buenavent 0.56 BuffaloWW BldrFstSrc BungeLt 1.00 C&J Egy n CA Inc 1.00 CBL Asc 0.88 CBOE 0.48 CBRE GRE 0.54 CBRE Grp CBS B 0.40 CBS 56cld 1.69 CF Inds 1.60 CH Robins 1.32 CIT Grp CLECO 1.25 CME Grp 8.92 CMS Eng 0.96 CNH Gbl CNO Fincl CPFL En s 1.60 CSX s 0.48 CTC Media 0.52 CVB Fncl 0.34 CVR Engy 0.32 CVS Care 0.65 CYS Invest 2.00 Cabelas CblvsNY s 0.60 Cabot 0.72 CabtMic s 15.00 CabotOG s 0.08 CACI CadencePh Cadence Caesars n CalDive CalaCvOp 1.14 CalaGDyIn 0.74 CalaStrTR 0.84 Calgon CalifWtr s 0.63 Calix CallGolf 0.04 Callidus CallonPet Calpine CamdenPT 2.24 Cameco g 0.40 CameltInfo Cameron CampSp 1.16 CIBC g 3.60 CdnNRy g 1.50 CdnNRs gs 0.42 CP Rwy g 1.20 CdnSolar Canon CapOne 0.20 CapitlSrce 0.04 CapFedFn 0.30 CapsteadM 1.84 CpstnTrb h CarboCer 0.96 Carbonite n CardnlHlth 0.86 CardiumTh Cardtronic CareFusion CareerEd CaribouC Carlisle 0.72 CarMax Carnival 1.00 CarnUK 1.00 CarpTech 0.72 Carrizo Carters Caseys 0.60 CatalystH Caterpillar 1.84 CathayGen 0.04 Cavium CedarF 1.32 CelSci Celanese 0.24 Celestic g Celgene CellTher rsh Cellcom 2.21 CelldexTh Celsion Cemex Cemig pf 1.78 CenovusE 0.88 Centene

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CenterPnt 0.81 CnElBras pf 0.03 CenElBras 1.56 CentEuro CEurMed CFCda g 0.01 CentAl CntryLink 2.90 Cenveo Cepheid Cerner s CerusCp ChRvLab ChrmSh ChartInds CharterCm ChkPoint Cheesecake ChelseaTh Chemtura CheniereEn CheniereE 1.70 ChesEng 0.35 ChesGran n 1.31 ChesMidst 1.56 Chevron 3.24 ChicB&I 0.20 Chicos 0.21 ChildPlace Chimera 0.48 ChinCEd h ChinaInf rs ChinaLife 0.91 ChinaMble 2.04 ChiNBorun ChinaTel 1.09 ChinaUni 0.12 ChipMOS Chipotle Chiquita ChrisBnk Chubb 1.64 ChungTel 1.91 ChurchD s 0.96 CienaCorp Cigna 0.04 Cimarex 0.48 CinciBell CinnFin 1.61 Cinemark 0.84 Cintas 0.54 Cirrus Cisco 0.32 Citigp pfJ 2.13 Citigrp rs 0.04 Citigp wtA CitiTdecs 7.50 CitzRpB rs CitrixSys CityNC 1.00 ClaudeR g CleanDsl CleanEngy ClearChOut 6.08 Clearwire ClevBioL h CliffsNRs 2.50 Clorox 2.40 CloudPeak CoStar Coach 0.90 CobaltIEn CocaCola 2.04 CocaCE 0.64 Coeur CoffeeH 0.12 CogdSpen 0.40 CognizTech CohStInfra 1.44 CohStQIR 0.72 Coinstar ColdwtrCrk ColemanC Colfax ColgPal 2.48 CollctvBrd ColonPT 0.72 ColumLb h Comcast 0.65 Comc spcl 0.65 Comerica 0.40 CmcBMO 0.92 CmclMtls 0.48 CmclVehcl CmwREIT 2.00 CmtyHlt CommVlt CBD-Pao 0.39 CmplGnom CompSci 0.80 Compuwre ComstkRs Comverse Con-Way 0.40 ConAgra 0.96 ConchoRes ConcurTch ConocPhil 2.64 ConsolEngy 0.50 ConEd 2.42 ConstantC ConstellA ContlRes Cnvrgys Convio CooperCo 0.06 Cooper Ind 1.24 CooperTire 0.42 CopaHold 1.64 Copart Copel 1.00 Corcept CoreLabs 1.12 CoreLogic CorinthC CornPdts 0.80 CorOnDm n Corning 0.30 CorpOffP 1.10 CorrectnCp Cosan Ltd 0.28 Cosi Inc CostPlus Costco 0.96 Cott Cp Cntwd pfB 1.75 CousPrp 0.18 Covance CovantaH 0.60 CoventryH 0.50 Covidien 0.90 CowenGp Credicp 1.95 CSVS3xInSlv CS VS3xSlv CSVS2xVxS CSVelIVSt s CredSuiss 1.40 CrSuiHiY 0.32 Cree Inc CreXus 1.13 CrimsnExp Crocs CrwnCstle CrownHold Ctrip.com CubeSmart 0.32 CubistPh CullenFr 1.84 Cummins 1.60 Curis CurEuro 0.30 CurAstla 4.06 CurJpn CypSemi 0.44 CytRx h Cytec 0.50 Cytokinet Cytori DCT Indl 0.28 DDR Corp 0.48 DHT Hldgs 0.12 DNP Selct 0.78 DR Horton 0.15 DST Sys 0.80 DSW Inc 0.60 DTE 2.35 DanaHldg 0.20 Danaher 0.10 Darden 1.72 Darling DaVita DeVry 0.30 DealrTrk DeanFds DeckrsOut Deere 1.84 DejourE g Delcath Delek 0.15 Dell Inc DelphiAu n DelphiFn 0.48 DeltaAir Deluxe 1.00 DemndMda DenburyR Dndreon DenisnM g Dentsply 0.22 Depomed DeutschBk 1.07 DeutBk pf 1.59 DeutBCT2 pf 1.64 DBGoldSh DBGoldDL DBGoldDS DevonE 0.80 Dex One h DexCom Diageo 2.68 DiamndF lf 0.18 DiaOffs 0.50 DiamRk 0.32 DianaCont 0.60 DianaShip DicksSptg 0.50 Diebold 1.14 DigitalGen DigitalRlt 2.92 DigRiver DigitalGlb Dillards 0.20 Diodes DirecTV A Dx30TBr rs DxEMBll rs 5.49 DxFnBull rs DrxTcBull 0.84 DirSCBear DrSOXBear 0.75

19.14 14.08 10.14 4.95 7.31 21.76 8.83 39.20 5.17 42.47 76.16 3.94 36.68 5.92 72.03 63.11 61.26 30.69 3.52 15.82 15.50 23.74 24.24 29.29 29.26 110.69 46.03 15.15 51.96 3.00 5.03 1.06 40.55 54.03 2.92 58.00 17.75 16.78 400.00 9.63 2.29 68.65 30.74 48.76 15.40 46.70 79.85 3.99 35.55 21.55 39.50 24.11 20.20 25.90 35.21 .39 100.85 14.39 78.24 49.86 1.07 4.14 19.73 13.95 2.19 3.12 69.50 68.41 16.79 65.50 78.77 30.29 70.22 27.52 24.82 11.92 4.24 75.31 17.90 9.72 63.28 1.17 10.02 35.17 95.15 17.88 21.15 .68 29.79 29.24 32.10 39.70 14.26 12.18 18.49 23.67 51.25 47.17 3.03 31.07 9.44 15.29 6.25 32.95 26.30 99.82 59.78 77.51 31.72 58.59 28.87 22.64 87.46 12.49 15.67 81.16 63.65 16.49 75.88 52.84 24.49 4.11 127.22 16.42 4.33 56.46 20.49 14.05 24.17 25.89 14.53 1.14 15.07 90.90 6.48 23.93 7.44 47.57 16.28 33.82 53.97 2.72 128.50 32.86 39.57 14.07 9.79 28.45 3.15 28.65 11.04 3.13 19.46 52.44 37.06 23.37 11.75 43.66 59.14 123.88 4.56 129.68 104.65 117.46 15.90 .31 61.78 1.20 2.52 5.82 14.55 1.11 11.13 15.83 55.00 55.63 55.26 16.06 54.48 52.51 17.44 87.92 34.61 30.48 12.29 68.56 81.59 .41 3.14 14.13 17.42 31.78 44.83 9.30 24.45 7.49 19.07 10.50 1.61 39.69 5.97 49.76 23.78 24.00 12.12 51.57 4.74 71.32 1.55 10.39 96.68 25.40 68.99 9.94 5.98 8.51 47.83 38.79 10.31 72.33 17.14 13.24 63.57 24.02 47.81 84.23 110.96 102.73 62.24 18.31 32.76

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7.23 10.40 37.62 29.10 27.57 47.36 114.68 49.88 162.65 71.54 1.80 34.20 10.47 7.72 23.67 50.33 51.52 4.65 50.37 28.65 11.17 13.02 10.63 16.65 14.23 9.65 8.99 11.36 13.19 23.76 59.82 60.25 43.13 10.62 69.69 3.86 28.51 35.44 12.86 13.44 16.50 2.36 30.63 51.72 10.30 31.30 38.59 19.72 12.38 9.26 35.88 5.89 14.01 39.17 7.16 51.23 77.25 2.31 42.38 46.44 36.13 4.52 23.23 20.11 35.11 55.63 9.34 67.80 28.20 50.86 .37 6.15 43.90 141.73 68.28 18.90 60.44 9.92 147.20 62.36 31.93 27.40 9.99 1.94 6.95 12.35 5.31 39.10 2.83 2.96 27.55 32.41 44.17 26.14 54.95 13.30 23.33 27.08 3.75 86.02 42.87 131.86 45.31 26.11 99.35 51.06 12.13 4.56 39.36 11.78 97.77 13.91 3.46 57.60 52.83 92.20 97.15 5.78 21.57 3.75 15.58 5.89 8.62 17.51 32.22 9.93 14.28 22.10 18.77 23.73 16.15 4.00 5.36 44.99 6.45 10.53 12.17 17.07 12.07 9.56 12.82 31.30 27.10 24.81 17.96 18.55 17.84 44.49 16.75 69.29 1.00 7.67 37.00 7.34 11.64 4.00 19.76 116.83 62.36 26.60 75.71 30.27 12.88 3.85 14.69 33.69 13.22 5.37 27.17 3.75 21.23 128.40 23.29 14.72 29.29 42.08 123.27 38.12 15.31 22.56 48.26 1.56

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4.32 5.49 25.76 5.32 1.78 31.05 10.24 7.92 32.05 43.02 23.64 1.58 33.25 18.18 8.23 3.45 16.21 5.82 5.79 1.54 35.78 15.94 23.50 14.93 25.44 69.58 47.88 41.84 .29 30.64 6.11 30.18 73.10 19.79 16.78 38.50 3.32 26.32 17.31 11.68 73.90 58.77 2.54 15.88 25.16 7.84 63.76 8.90 17.66 23.05 32.20 33.05 10.56 1.72 4.97 27.23 46.66 14.88 45.03 9.88 6.62 52.32 3.18 15.01 4.04 8.21 39.44 14.18 44.45 6.64 1.62 120.37 126.43 17.93 12.32 615.99 57.53 11.85 216.11 2.98 6.08 5.71 .78 2.30 19.85 5.29 23.91 51.80 10.76 21.77 44.17 13.78 7.25 16.88 16.79 20.90 36.70 21.38 51.79 23.20 30.04 2.54 32.36 25.76 31.16 40.58 34.60 30.86 45.07 42.86 10.00 34.18 12.04 35.40 28.93 9.85 1.36 49.76 48.97 5.61 11.08 43.83 13.97 23.47 20.80 22.12 7.75 35.46 28.63 25.47 5.16 3.86 54.56 53.00 25.03 6.69 20.97 38.99 20.68 14.90 29.30 4.44 4.62 52.82 4.63 18.36 58.81 75.65 69.90 4.71 10.72 5.98 5.17 60.32 14.92 61.77 24.34 24.64 52.48 16.45 32.09 34.99 1.72 52.37 35.18 21.31 49.47 27.01 13.56 60.03 25.91 19.50 38.17 60.52 28.65 41.20 11.28 36.81 25.69 15.88 10.15 5.96 2.83 7.12 7.52 87.30 52.80

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C

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D

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1.92 1.03 2.40 0.40 0.15 0.10 1.16 0.16 0.32 2.00 1.89 2.07 0.60 0.02 1.12

0.40

0.89 0.74 0.67 0.88 0.61 1.07 0.22 0.73 0.38 1.38 0.36 1.64 0.44 0.06 0.68 0.50 1.76 0.96 1.10 0.40 0.24

0.18 0.14

0.85 0.56 0.45 1.44 0.44 0.80 1.68

0.20 0.64 0.35 0.12

0.28 0.04 2.06 1.08 2.20 0.72 0.20 0.24 0.72 0.88 0.38 0.52 0.27 0.80 1.35 2.41 1.20 0.45 1.85 0.80 1.27 0.72 0.52 1.15 1.07 0.81 3.26 2.14 0.49 0.08 2.44 1.00 0.54 0.68

0.75 0.40 0.96 0.68 0.36 0.08 0.52 1.28 0.60 2.36

1.00 1.16 0.84 2.24 1.04 0.92 0.02 0.30

0.60 0.88 2.88 2.38 0.40 0.40 1.26 0.48 1.76

3.16 1.64 1.88

C 22.70 75.99 56.92 36.48 51.62 23.05 38.07 14.90 47.01 27.89 18.02 7.76 33.81 2.88 21.59 38.85 18.31 47.70 44.85 31.52 43.52 8.18 33.12 11.25 31.95 30.65 12.86 25.48 20.13 15.05 2.77 13.79 14.27 40.99 36.90 36.98 33.74 44.48 73.95 15.44 37.69 29.91 35.16 20.12 4.68 80.72 15.95 .94 3.90 52.68 56.44 20.86 44.88 27.76 14.84 8.87 1.07 87.00 8.98 9.68 5.80 36.94 12.92 30.79 6.35 54.23 6.87 6.86 7.71 5.96 22.75 14.40 32.96 2.46 39.80 37.56 5.28 7.25 7.67 9.34 3.06 23.61 29.09 19.81 6.12 9.61 30.47 11.60 3.16 17.86 11.03 32.15 30.43 2.05 18.99 1.07 30.19 36.78 24.55 11.45 19.70 35.88 17.72 .58 29.85 38.09 46.82 22.02 14.81 15.68 45.91 13.09 29.49 17.87 4.50 44.38 42.01 58.60 3.53 4.04 28.66 71.62 2.94 54.52 35.34 4.32 30.30 4.45 2.79 10.47 18.51 10.10 11.35 30.38 16.49 24.17 .17 3.88 57.14 16.49 9.93 82.30 40.41 5.43 39.61 67.60 16.48 25.04 23.98 35.29 29.41 16.29 23.92 9.42 43.80 34.68 32.01 16.44 27.51 18.26 57.76 72.00 7.03 28.79 32.90 33.77 22.82 88.87 6.99 30.18 1.43 54.18 70.19 53.05 80.60 35.98 53.16 24.65 13.68 11.26 24.39 3.85 49.59 71.66 83.28 54.63 22.65 .74 65.89 2.60 83.54 87.63 44.15 1.25 29.20 115.03 11.81 53.37 3.10 58.95 23.09 29.00 19.54 7.00 52.67

-.71 -.30 -.77 -1.01 -2.00 -.03 -.83 +.47 -.54 -.08 -.21 +.16 -.12 +.45 -.43 -.88 -.18 -.56 -.78 -.18 -.23 -.53 -.02 +.90 -.24 -.18 -.02 +.14 -.02 -.38 -.30 +.16 -.14 -.01 -.10 -.06 -.72 +.02 -.09 +.11 -.53 -.25 -.11 -.02 +.41 +.04 +.01 +.34 -.91 -.34 +1.01 -.64 +.09 -.25 -.03 -.86 -1.30 -.01 -.04 -.55 -.43 -.88 -.11 +.90 -.05 -.04 -.33 +.06 +.86 -.14 -1.42 -.17 -.31 -.79 -.07 -.17 -.17 -.07 +.10 +1.03 -.75 +.08 -.22 -.14 -.98 -.29 -.12 -.32 +.02 -.81 -.31 +.09 +.75 -.02 +.02 +.11 -.08 +.13 -.44 -.28 -.01 +.37 +.04 +.23 -.14 -.06 -.23 -.02 -.55 -.68 -.19 -.15 -1.33 -.89 +.12 -.17 -.08 +.05 +.65 +.09 -.43 -1.57 +.01 -.03 -.06 -.03 +.26 -.12 +.06 -.39 -.13 -.49 +.01 -.04 -.95 -.02 -.12 -1.12 -1.07 -.04 -.15 +.28 -.16 +.63 +.74 -.80 -.48 -.26 -.37 -.35 -.64 -.87 -.28 -.14 -.17 -.01 +.68 -.02 -.12 -.63 -.39 +.10 +.96 +.12 +.17 +.21 -.03 -1.59 -.25 -.60 -.40 -.54 +.20 -.06 -.21 -.29 -.27 +.05 +.12 +.93 -.89 -.62 +.13 +.02 -.15 -.09 -.43 -.66 -.83 -.01 -.05 -.45 -.34 -.18 +.09 +.54 -1.02 -.12 -.21 -.14 -.36

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THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

Aid Continued from B1 OHCS takes on the cost of the original loan, then works with the homeowner’s lender to negotiate a new loan with lower payment rates, using the Hardest Hit funds. OHCS and the agency’s contractor for the pilot project, Portland-based real estate company Further Development LLC, buy the new, more affordable mortgage for the home, based on its current value instead of the higher value at the time the homeowner bought it. The new mortgage is then passed back to the homeowner. It’s a complex, multi-step process, Pray said. But it could save homeowners hundreds per month on their mortgage payments. “It’s a brand-new idea,” Pray said of the pilot project. He added that it’s designed so that, after a year or so of lower monthly mortgage payments, homeowners could find themselves in a healthy enough financial situation where they could then refinance their mortgages once again, and the state could recover funds unused by the enrollee for another distressed homeowner.

Distressed regions Deschutes and Jackson counties were picked as locations for the pilot program because of their high unemployment and foreclosure rates. Deschutes County’s unemployment rate has held above 10 percent for 40 straight

Banks Continued from B1 That is because banks, even after increasing shareholder payouts this year, will still retain more profits since the dividends will be lower than they were before the financial crisis. Despite paying out dividends last year, they bolstered their capital by $52 billion in 2011. Healthy banks should be able to reward their shareholders with dividend payments, some banking ana-

funds going to an estimated 300 homeowners in the two counties. The pilot project could still be several months away from implementation, Pray said. Over the next several weeks, OHSI will finalize aspects of the program. Pray said a wider announcement about the program and its eligibility requirements could come in the next few weeks. The program has been in the works for 18 months, but it requires the state to work with banks to negotiate the new loans. The agency also first launched the mortgage payment assistance program, which provides help statewide. Pray said the Oregon Homeownership Stabilization Initiative had already secured agreements with several banks to take part in the program, and anticipated closing deals with more banks before it is unveiled. The program is a perfect fit for the region, said Deschutes County Commissioner Alan Unger, because it addresses one of the highestpriority issues for the county: keeping distressed homeowners in their homes and out of foreclosure. “I think it’s a great idea,” Unger said. “We have a serious problem here with the high inventory of (foreclosed) housing on the market. This would be a great place to have this kind of pilot project worked through.”

Central Oregon nonprofit NeighborImpact. In Central Oregon, “the (housing) market has lost so much value in the last four or five years, that at this point there are a lot of households that are in way over their heads,” Fritz said. The pilot project won’t come close to helping all of the county’s underwater homeowners. But Fritz called it a good start. “The need (for assistance) is so high these days,” she said.

How to apply Oregon housing officials could still be a few months away from unveiling a pilot program that would allow eligible Deschutes County homeowners to refinance their loans at more affordable rates. Oregon Homeownership Stabilization Initiative officials emphasized that there will likely be enough funds for just 300 homeowners, split between Deschutes and Jackson counties. When the program is ready, homeowners will be able apply at www .oregonhomeownerhelp .com by answering questionnaires to determine eligibility. The site also contains information about foreclosure prevention.

Helping homeowners

months. Many county homeowners have seen their property values shrink by as much as 50 percent over the last four years. In 2007, the median value of a home sold in Bend was $345,000, according to Central Oregon Association of Realtors data. In 2011, it was $190,000, a 45 percent loss. Many of the owners who bought when the market was booming between 2005 and 2007 face monthly mortgage payments they can no longer afford, said Laura Fritz, housing director with the

Hardest Hit funds were made available to Oregon and 17 other states, as well as Washington, D.C., starting in 2010, when the federal government allocated $7.6 billion in Troubled Asset Relief Program funds. With Oregon’s $220 million in funds, housing officials have unveiled several programs to aid distressed homeowners, including a mortgage payment assistance program that has provided $3 million in mortgage payments to 350 Central Oregon homeowners. This pilot program isn’t for everyone. Eligible enrollees have to have a current level of income high enough to make renegotiated mortgage payments, while showing that they’ve suffered recent financial difficulties, whether through a reduction in work hours, medical expenses or some other form of hardship. Between Deschutes and Jackson counties, $10 million will be made available, with

lysts said. “The scenarios were incredibly severe and the banks fared extremely well,” said Michael Scanlon, a senior equity analyst with Manulife Asset Management in Boston. First out of the gate, JPMorgan Chase announced Tuesday that it would buy back roughly $12 billion in stock this year and up its quarterly dividend payment by a nickel, to 30 cents. Others quickly followed suit, bolstered by passing

the Fed’s test. Wells Fargo increased its dividend by 10 cents, to 22 cents. John Stumpf, the bank’s chairman and chief executive said, “We are extremely pleased to reward our shareholders.” American Express, the credit card issuer, also announced it would increase its quarterly dividend by 2 cents, to 20 cents a share. Meanwhile, US Bancorp raised its quarterly dividend too, by 7 cents, to 19.5 cents. The latest tests were the third that banks have been

–Reporter: 541-617-7820 eglucklich@bendbulletin.com

subjected to in the wake of the financial crisis. While some complained that the tests were too harsh, forcing industry titans like Citigroup to shelve plans for a dividend payment, some economists, including Admati, have raised an alarm that the tests were not hard enough. “Why are we letting banks hand out dividend payments and encouraging risky behavior after they passed flimsy tests?” he said. “It’s frankly dangerous and the Fed should not allow it.”

Retire Continued from B1 On the other hand, behavioral research shows that sharp losses can leave people feeling vulnerable for years. Even teens who watch families struggle through recessions doubt their control over their careers, said Antonio Spilimbergo and Paola Giuliano in a National Bureau of Economic Research paper. EBRI also found that many people don’t trust their jobs or investments to provide the money they will need for retirement. Fewer than 3 in 10 are very confident that they will have paid employment for as long as they need it. And 42 percent identify job uncertainty as an immediate concern. Only 16 percent are very confident that their investments will grow, and a mere 8 percent of workers are very confident the economy will grow at least 3 percent a year for the next 10 years. Debt continues its stranglehold on households. Almost two-thirds of workers consider their current level of debt to be a problem. Under the pressures of the past few years, many have used up savings, and fewer people are stashing anything away. In the recent EBRI survey, 58 percent said either they or a spouse was saving money for retirement. That’s significantly less than 2009, when 65 percent were saving. “Workers are falling further behind, and they know it,” said Mathew Greenwald of Mathew Greenwald & Associates, who worked on the study with EBRI. About 67 percent say they are “behind schedule” with saving. In 2005, 12 percent thought they were lagging behind where they needed to be. Then, Greenwald said, people were overly optimistic. They were counting on the climbing stock market and equity in homes to make up for meager savings.

B3

Now, people are more realistic, Greenwald said. But without adequate savings, they will struggle in retirement. Although that will leave many with lifestyles different than they hoped or assumed, it also leaves the nation’s political leaders with a quandary. Social Security and Medicare will be more important than ever to generations that have inadequate savings. Yet, with the federal deficit looming at historic highs, there has been a push by some in government to make cuts in those programs. Much to the surprise of the researchers, though people realize they aren’t going to have enough for retirement, they are not saving more. Rather, many say they will work longer, and 26 percent say they plan to work until 70. Also, 70 percent plan to work for pay after retiring. But Greenwald said counting on working longer, or getting a job while retired, is a naive retirement plan. When EBRI surveyed current retirees, researchers found that half of them had to retire earlier than they expected because of health problems, disability or layoffs. Only 27 percent of current retirees say they have worked since retiring. Workers are also naive or ill informed, he said, about sources of money for retirement. About 56 percent are expecting to receive guaranteed pay in retirement from a traditional pension plan. Yet only 33 percent actually have such a plan. Although there is little time now to catch up for the 77 million baby boomers about to retire, VanDerhei said a longer-term solution could be more 401(k)-type plans in the workplace. Fewer than half of workers have retirement savings plans at work, and those who don’t have a workplace plan have sharply inferior savings compared with workers who do, according to EBRI.

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AlskAir Avista BkofAm BarrettB Boeing CascdeBcp CascdeCp ColSprtw Costco CraftBrew FLIR Sys HewlettP HmFedID Intel Keycorp Kroger Lattice LaPac MDU Res MentorGr Microsoft

Div PE ... 1.16f .04 .44 1.76f ... 1.00 .88 .96 ... .28f .48 .22 .84 .12 .46 ... ... .67 ... .80

12 15 ... 15 14 8 12 16 26 14 19 8 ... 11 8 26 10 ... 19 20 12

YTD Last Chg %Chg 69.24 25.25 8.84 18.77 75.23 5.64 54.80 49.41 90.90 6.55 26.11 24.34 10.27 27.46 8.49 24.34 6.22 9.37 22.02 15.47 32.77

-.78 -.39 +.35 -.23 +.92 -.28 +.05 -.70 +.92 +.14 -.17 -.23 -.18 -.03 +.23 +.12 -.08 -.16 -.46 -.07 +.10

-7.8 -1.9 +59.0 -6.0 +2.6 +28.8 +16.2 +6.1 +9.1 +8.8 +4.1 -5.5 -1.3 +13.2 +10.4 +.5 +4.7 +16.1 +2.6 +14.1 +26.2

Name NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstB rs Weyerhsr

Precious metals Metal NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

Price (troy oz.) $1637.00 $1642.50 $32.147

for appointments call 541-382-4900

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Market recap

Div PE 1.44 1.08f 1.78 ... .72a ... 1.68 .12 .58 .07 1.56f .89f .68 ... .28 .78f .32f .88f ... .60

1000 SW Disk Dr. • Bend www.highdesertbank.com

At The Center

Northwest stocks Name

Local Service. Local Knowledge. 541-848-4444

YTD Last Chg %Chg

24 110.30 -.46 +14.5 17 54.68 -.22 +10.0 19 45.91 -.49 -4.2 14 5.45 ... +20.0 17 47.35 +.23 +26.4 ... 2.22 +.07 +16.2 35 41.34 +.04 +13.1 22 175.73 -.07 +6.6 15 21.85 -.08 +3.8 11 43.23 -.96 +2.2 26 107.19 -.05 +20.1 14 40.99 +.16 +11.5 32 52.68 +.34 +14.5 22 6.52 +.03 +33.9 20 12.90 +.01 +4.1 13 31.48 +.47 +16.4 15 16.60 -.10 +18.7 12 33.37 +.04 +21.1 12 18.70 -.04 +19.9 34 21.86 -.21 +17.1

Prime rate

Pvs Day

Time period

Percent

$1680.00 $1693.70 $33.544

Last Previous day A week ago

3.25 3.25 3.25

NYSE

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

BkofAm RegionsFn S&P500ETF SPDR Fncl Citigrp rs

4631652 8.84 +.35 1325042 6.17 +.39 1317100 139.91 -.15 1279977 15.44 +.02 1077821 35.21 -1.24

Last Chg

Gainers ($2 or more) Name

Last

Chg %Chg

iP LXR1K FedSignl Guidewre n ChiMM rs Blyth

79.29 +22.29 5.78 +1.20 30.04 +4.39 4.66 +.61 78.77 +10.13

+39.1 +26.2 +17.1 +15.2 +14.8

Losers ($2 or more) Name

Last

FT EmMSC OxfordRes Xerium DirDGldBll STR Hldgs

31.09 7.23 6.77 17.09 5.62

Chg %Chg -15.50 -1.67 -1.48 -2.07 -.64

Amex

Nasdaq

Most Active ($1 or more)

Name

Name

Vol (00)

Last Chg

255547 15.50 85743 7.04 56296 9.65 33756 1.94 31251 1.62

-.51 -.32 -.31 ... -.13

Gainers ($2 or more) Name

Last

Chg %Chg

Cover-All 2.25 +.25 +12.6 NewConcEn 3.07 +.31 +11.2 SDgo pfB 21.70 +1.93 +9.8 Medgenic n 5.28 +.44 +9.1 ContMatls 20.00 +1.50 +8.1

Losers ($2 or more)

PwShs QQQ Apple Inc Intel Microsoft Cisco

Vol (00)

Last Chg

567181 489468 458905 415634 404275

66.49 +.23 589.58 +21.48 27.46 -.03 32.77 +.10 20.20 -.03

Gainers ($2 or more) Name

Last

Endocyte ZionsBc wt NuPathe SciClone Caesars n

5.89 5.10 3.97 6.34 12.88

Chg %Chg +2.17 +1.00 +.70 +1.10 +1.87

+58.3 +24.4 +21.6 +21.0 +17.0

Losers ($2 or more)

Name

Last

Chg %Chg

Name

Last

-33.3 -18.8 -17.9 -10.8 -10.2

Metalico VistaGold Nevsun g Rubicon g Banro g

4.10 3.11 3.50 3.39 5.00

-.47 -10.3 -.28 -8.3 -.26 -6.9 -.25 -6.9 -.36 -6.7

Zhongpin PacSunwr SterlCons CmtyWest BroadVisn

8.36 -2.16 -20.5 2.04 -.47 -18.7 8.98 -1.30 -12.6 2.20 -.28 -11.3 42.58 -4.92 -10.4

817 2,245 71 3,133 164 16

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Diary Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Indexes

Most Active ($1 or more) CheniereEn NovaGld g NwGold g Rentech GoldStr g

Diary

Chg %Chg

Diary 108 370 30 508 9 5

400 SW Bluff Dr Ste 200 Bend , OR 97702

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

798 1,737 90 2,625 153 20

52-Week High Low

Name

13,180.40 10,404.49 5,627.85 3,950.66 467.64 381.99 8,718.25 6,414.89 2,498.89 1,941.99 3,039.89 2,298.89 1,396.13 1,074.77 14,709.74 11,208.42 868.57 601.71

Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

Last

Net Chg

%Chg

YTD %Chg

52-wk %Chg

13,194.10 5,180.39 454.89 8,185.31 2,410.39 3,040.73 1,394.28 14,669.57 823.40

+16.42 -74.11 -6.29 -49.16 -27.46 +.85 -1.67 -39.68 -7.83

+.12 -1.41 -1.36 -.60 -1.13 +.03 -.12 -.27 -.94

+7.99 +3.20 -2.11 +9.47 +5.80 +16.72 +10.87 +11.22 +11.13

+13.61 +4.65 +14.52 +3.22 +8.59 +16.20 +10.93 +9.93 +5.31

World markets

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed Wednesday. Market Close % Change

Key currency exchange rates Wednesday compared with late Tuesday in New York. Dollar vs: Exchange Rate Pvs Day

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

333.20 2,328.56 3,564.51 5,945.43 7,079.42 21,307.89 37,971.53 16,850.32 3,498.99 10,050.52 2,045.08 3,026.40 4,375.64 5,773.19

+.52 +.36 +.40 -.18 +1.19 -.15 -.13 +.31 +.81 +1.53 +.99 +1.25 +.90 +.58

s s s t s t t s s s s s s s

1.0441 1.5675 1.0064 .002060 .1579 1.3024 .1288 .011945 .078630 .0338 .000883 .1457 1.0751 .0338

1.0502 1.5690 1.0086 .002056 .1580 1.3073 .1289 .012065 .079023 .0339 .000889 .1473 1.0835 .0339

Selected mutual funds YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 19.98 -0.04 +13.3 Amer Century Inv: EqInc 7.66 -0.02 +5.7 GrowthI 28.18 +14.7 Ultra 26.05 -0.03 +13.7 American Funds A: AmcpA p 21.08 -0.05 +11.9 AMutlA px 27.51 -0.25 +7.0 BalA p 19.63 -0.05 +7.8 BondA p 12.60 -0.06 +1.0 CapIBA p 51.57 -0.23 +4.8 CapWGA p 35.64 -0.13 +11.0 CapWA p 20.86 -0.15 +1.9 EupacA p 39.56 -0.21 +12.5 FdInvA p 39.16 -0.14 +10.7 GovtA p 14.29 -0.06 -0.6 GwthA p 32.54 -0.09 +13.3 HI TrA p 11.09 +0.01 +5.6 IncoA p 17.59 -0.05 +5.0 IntBdA p 13.62 -0.04 +0.3 ICAA px 29.79 -0.20 +10.4 NEcoA p 27.39 -0.11 +15.2 N PerA p 29.41 -0.13 +12.4 NwWrldA 52.11 -0.25 +13.0 SmCpA p 38.47 -0.22 +15.9 TxExA p 12.72 -0.05 +2.4 WshA p 30.47 -0.06 +7.3 Artisan Funds: Intl 22.75 -0.23 +14.7 IntlVal r 27.74 -0.13 +10.6 MidCap 39.44 -0.32 +19.8 MidCapVal 21.63 -0.11 +9.8 Baron Funds: Growth 55.45 -0.38 +8.7 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 13.78 -0.08 -0.1 DivMu 14.77 -0.05 +0.4 TxMgdIntl 13.98 -0.09 +12.0 BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 19.50 -0.07 +7.4 GlAlA r 19.58 -0.09 +7.8

BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 18.22 -0.09 BlackRock Instl: EquityDv 19.55 -0.07 GlbAlloc r 19.68 -0.09 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 53.32 -0.30 Cohen & Steers: RltyShrs 65.75 -0.24 Columbia Class A: DivrBd 5.08 -0.02 TxEA p 13.87 -0.05 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 31.62 -0.25 AcornIntZ 39.01 -0.27 LgCapGr 14.11 -0.10 ValRestr 49.40 -0.25 Credit Suisse Comm: ComRet t 8.41 -0.07 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 10.39 -0.07 USCorEq1 12.03 -0.05 USCorEq2 11.86 -0.05 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 36.04 +0.01 Davis Funds Y: NYVenY 36.43 +0.02 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.17 -0.07 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq 20.35 -0.15 EmMktV 31.18 -0.24 IntSmVa 15.79 -0.13 LargeCo 10.99 -0.01 USLgVa 21.47 -0.12 US Small 22.90 -0.20 US SmVa 26.06 -0.21 IntlSmCo 15.66 -0.13 Fixd 10.32 -0.01 IntVa 16.41 -0.09 Glb5FxInc 11.01 -0.04 2YGlFxd 10.11 Dodge&Cox: Balanced 74.24 -0.20

+7.6 +7.5 +7.9 +14.9 +8.1 +1.3 +2.5 +14.7 +13.7 +17.4 +11.1 +2.8 +12.4 +12.0 +12.2 +10.9 +11.0 +0.9 +18.0 +20.1 +16.3 +11.3 +12.5 +11.6 +12.5 +13.2 +0.3 +11.5 +0.9 +0.3 +10.1

Income 13.63 -0.05 IntlStk 32.80 -0.15 Stock 114.22 -0.30 DoubleLine Funds: TRBd I 11.20 TRBd N p 11.20 Dreyfus: Aprec 44.18 -0.05 Eaton Vance A: LgCpVal 18.73 -0.05 Eaton Vance I: FltgRt 8.98 GblMacAbR10.01 LgCapVal 18.78 -0.05 FMI Funds: LgCap p 16.75 +0.01 FPA Funds: NwInc 10.68 -0.01 FPACres 28.47 -0.02 Fairholme 30.01 +0.22 Federated Instl: TotRetBd 11.36 -0.04 StrValDvIS 4.88 -0.03 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 22.27 StrInA 12.35 -0.04 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 22.55 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 13.94 -0.05 FF2010K 12.89 -0.04 FF2015 11.65 -0.04 FF2015K 12.94 -0.04 FF2020 14.10 -0.05 FF2020K 13.37 -0.05 FF2025 11.76 -0.04 FF2025K 13.53 -0.05 FF2030 14.01 -0.05 FF2030K 13.69 -0.05 FF2035 11.63 -0.04 FF2035K 13.82 -0.05 FF2040 8.12 -0.02 FF2040K 13.87 -0.05 Fidelity Invest:

+2.5 +12.2 +12.4 NA NA +9.0 +9.6 +2.8 +2.7 +9.7 +9.8 +0.3 +6.3 +29.6 +1.5 +1.0 +12.9 +3.2 +13.0 +6.4 +6.5 +6.6 +6.7 +7.5 +7.6 +8.8 +8.8 +9.1 +9.2 +10.2 +10.3 +10.3 +10.3

AllSectEq 12.69 AMgr50 16.06 AMgr20 r 13.09 Balanc 19.71 BalancedK 19.71 BlueChGr 49.71 CapAp 28.47 CpInc r 9.23 Contra 76.37 ContraK 76.34 DisEq 24.04 DivIntl 28.60 DivrsIntK r 28.56 DivGth 29.97 Eq Inc 45.21 EQII 18.91 Fidel 35.24 FltRateHi r 9.80 GNMA 11.79 GovtInc 10.63 GroCo 95.81 GroInc 20.46 GrowthCoK95.75 HighInc r 9.02 IntBd 10.87 IntmMu 10.48 IntlDisc 30.80 InvGrBd 11.65 InvGB 7.71 LgCapVal 11.23 LowP r 40.39 LowPriK r 40.37 Magelln 72.62 MidCap 30.15 MuniInc 13.17 NwMkt r 16.69 OTC 63.37 100Index 9.84 Puritn 19.38 SAllSecEqF12.70 SCmdtyStrt 9.20 SrsIntGrw 11.36 SrsIntVal 8.74 SrInvGrdF 11.66

-0.02 -0.06 -0.05 -0.06 -0.06 -0.02 -0.04 +0.03 +0.03 -0.01 -0.15 -0.15 -0.13 -0.16 -0.05

-0.03 -0.06 -0.28 -0.01 -0.27 -0.05 -0.03 -0.08 -0.06 -0.04 -0.03 -0.15 -0.15 -0.03 -0.18 -0.05 -0.08 -0.05 -0.04 -0.02 -0.08 -0.07 -0.04 -0.06

+13.0 +6.9 +3.1 +8.4 +8.4 +17.2 +15.6 +7.7 +13.2 +13.2 +11.8 +12.1 +12.1 +15.8 +9.4 +8.7 +13.1 +2.3 +0.1 -1.0 +18.4 +12.2 +18.5 +5.7 +0.5 +0.9 +11.6 +0.3 +0.5 +11.5 +13.0 +13.1 +15.3 +13.1 +1.8 +6.8 +15.9 +11.6 +9.6 +13.1 +2.7 +12.4 +8.2 +0.3

STBF 8.52 -0.01 +0.6 StratInc 11.06 -0.03 +3.2 TotalBd 10.94 -0.05 +0.8 USBI 11.70 -0.06 -0.1 Value 72.04 -0.37 +13.5 Fidelity Selects: Gold r 41.64 -1.62 -1.4 Fidelity Spartan: 500IdxInv 49.56 -0.05 +11.4 500Idx I 49.56 -0.06 +11.4 Fidelity Spart Adv: ExMktAd r 40.28 -0.29 +13.6 500IdxAdv 49.56 -0.06 +11.4 TotMktAd r 40.38 -0.09 +11.8 First Eagle: GlblA 48.85 -0.24 +8.3 OverseasA 22.05 -0.16 +8.3 Forum Funds: AbsStrI r 11.05 +0.03 Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA p 12.34 -0.05 +2.3 FoundAl p 10.76 +8.9 GrwthA p 49.98 -0.08 +12.0 HYTFA p 10.52 -0.04 +3.3 IncomA p 2.17 -0.01 +5.0 RisDvA p 36.91 -0.05 +6.1 USGovA p 6.86 -0.02 -0.2 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv 13.18 -0.08 +7.4 IncmeAd 2.16 +5.6 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.19 -0.01 +4.8 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 21.58 -0.05 +8.9 Frank/Temp Temp A: GlBd A p 13.22 -0.08 +7.4 GrwthA p 18.33 +0.03 +12.5 WorldA p 15.51 +0.02 +12.9 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 13.24 -0.08 +7.3 GE Elfun S&S: US Eqty 43.86 -0.02 +13.2 GMO Trust III: Quality 23.84 -0.03 +8.2

GMO Trust IV: IntlIntrVl 20.38 -0.09 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 11.96 -0.05 Quality 23.85 -0.03 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 7.17 +0.01 MidCapV 37.54 -0.26 Harbor Funds: Bond 12.43 -0.07 CapApInst 43.24 -0.05 IntlInv t 59.71 -0.42 Intl r 60.27 -0.43 Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 33.36 -0.13 Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 42.87 -0.18 Div&Gr 21.14 -0.08 Hussman Funds: StrGrowth 11.64 +0.01 IVA Funds: Wldwide I r16.32 -0.07 Invesco Funds A: Chart p 17.65 -0.03 CmstkA 17.02 -0.09 EqIncA 8.92 -0.03 GrIncA p 20.25 -0.06 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 24.77 -0.12 AssetStA p 25.53 -0.12 AssetStrI r 25.76 -0.12 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 11.83 -0.06 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 11.82 -0.06 HighYld 7.93 +0.01 ShtDurBd 10.97 -0.01 USLCCrPls 22.33 -0.07 Janus T Shrs: OvrseasT r 39.45 -0.12 PrkMCVal T22.14 -0.11 John Hancock Cl 1: LSBalanc 13.24 -0.04 LSGrwth 13.21 -0.04

+7.8 +16.0 +8.2 +5.8 +11.8 +2.0 +17.2 +14.8 +14.9 +15.8 +15.3 +9.3 -6.4 +6.3 +10.0 +11.9 +7.2 +9.0 +14.5 +14.7 +14.7 +0.3 +0.4 +5.2 +0.4 +13.1 +25.6 +9.7 +8.4 +10.9

Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 19.93 -0.05 +18.6 Longleaf Partners: Partners 30.09 -0.06 +12.9 Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 14.62 -0.07 +5.8 StrInc C 15.19 -0.06 +5.8 LSBondR 14.56 -0.07 +5.7 StrIncA 15.11 -0.06 +6.0 Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdY 12.31 -0.07 +3.9 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 11.77 -0.05 +11.7 BdDebA p 7.96 -0.01 +5.6 ShDurIncA p4.60 +2.2 Lord Abbett C: ShDurIncC t 4.63 +2.1 Lord Abbett F: ShtDurInco 4.59 -0.01 +2.0 MFS Funds A: TotRA 14.87 -0.07 +6.5 ValueA 24.86 -0.10 +11.1 MFS Funds I: ValueI 24.97 -0.11 +11.1 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 7.60 -0.06 +14.6 MergerFd 15.78 +1.2 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.49 -0.05 +2.0 TotRtBdI 10.49 -0.04 +2.0 MorganStanley Inst: MCapGrI 38.12 -0.34 +15.8 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 29.31 -0.02 +8.0 GlbDiscZ 29.69 -0.01 +8.1 SharesZ 21.75 -0.05 +9.0 Neuberger&Berm Fds: GenesInst 49.29 -0.43 +6.2 Northern Funds: HiYFxInc 7.33 +0.01 +5.6 Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 29.01 -0.13 +7.2 Intl I r 19.43 -0.04 +17.4 Oakmark 47.18 -0.01 +13.2

Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 7.27 -0.02 GlbSMdCap15.18 -0.09 Oppenheimer A: DvMktA p 33.73 -0.20 GlobA p 60.56 -0.14 GblStrIncA 4.21 -0.01 IntBdA p 6.32 -0.04 MnStFdA 36.29 +0.09 RisingDivA 17.36 -0.05 S&MdCpVl32.19 -0.15 Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 15.71 -0.04 S&MdCpVl27.34 -0.13 Oppenheimer C&M: RisingDvC p15.65 -0.04 Oppenheimer Roch: RcNtMuA 7.19 -0.02 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 33.35 -0.20 IntlBdY 6.32 -0.04 IntGrowY 28.47 -0.20 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 11.04 -0.07 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AlAsetAut r 10.73 -0.08 AllAsset 12.25 -0.07 ComodRR 6.87 -0.10 DivInc 11.63 -0.04 EmgMkCur10.44 -0.08 EmMkBd 11.71 -0.03 HiYld 9.32 InvGrCp 10.57 -0.06 LowDu 10.38 -0.03 RealRtnI 11.93 -0.10 ShortT 9.78 TotRt 11.04 -0.07 PIMCO Funds A: RealRtA p 11.93 -0.10 TotRtA 11.04 -0.07 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 11.04 -0.07 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 11.04 -0.07

+7.2 +12.7 +15.0 +12.1 +4.6 +2.6 +12.8 +10.7 +8.6 +10.6 +8.4 +10.6 +6.3 +15.1 +2.8 +11.6 +2.2 +7.0 +6.2 +5.0 +4.2 +5.6 +5.0 +5.1 +3.0 +1.4 +1.4 +1.3 +2.2 +1.3 +2.2 +2.0 +2.2

PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 11.04 -0.07 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 48.41 -0.63 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 42.35 Price Funds: BlChip 44.94 +0.02 CapApp 22.45 EmMktS 32.76 -0.23 EqInc 25.47 -0.03 EqIndex 37.72 -0.04 Growth 37.12 -0.04 HlthSci 37.46 -0.09 HiYield 6.77 +0.01 IntlBond 9.71 -0.10 Intl G&I 12.84 -0.08 IntlStk 14.01 -0.10 MidCap 59.31 -0.39 MCapVal 23.74 -0.14 N Asia 15.96 -0.06 New Era 45.52 -0.64 N Horiz 35.68 -0.25 N Inc 9.67 -0.05 OverS SF 8.16 -0.04 R2010 16.14 -0.06 R2015 12.58 -0.05 R2020 17.45 -0.08 R2025 12.81 -0.06 R2030 18.43 -0.08 R2035 13.06 -0.06 R2040 18.60 -0.08 ShtBd 4.83 -0.01 SmCpStk 35.23 -0.22 SmCapVal 37.91 -0.38 SpecIn 12.65 -0.04 Value 25.11 -0.11 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 14.31 -0.05 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 12.06 -0.11 PremierI r 20.86 -0.19 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 39.48 -0.08

+2.2 +5.0 NA +16.3 +8.9 +14.9 +10.5 +11.3 +16.6 +14.9 +5.8 +0.2 +11.5 +14.0 +12.5 +11.0 +14.7 +8.3 +15.0 +0.5 +11.5 +7.5 +8.6 +9.7 +10.6 +11.4 +12.0 +12.3 +0.8 +12.7 +9.9 +3.6 +11.4 +13.1 +12.1 +12.6 +11.6

S&P Sel 21.79 -0.03 Scout Funds: Intl 31.35 -0.19 Sequoia 159.86 -0.54 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 18.85 +0.04 Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 26.75 +0.04 IntValue I 27.36 +0.04 Tweedy Browne: GblValue 23.83 +0.05 Vanguard Admiral: BalAdml 23.28 -0.08 CAITAdm 11.50 -0.05 CpOpAdl 74.67 -0.47 EMAdmr r 36.88 -0.26 Energy 120.90 -1.59 EqInAdm n 49.36 -0.15 ExtdAdm 44.72 -0.32 500Adml 128.98 -0.15 GNMA Ad 11.00 -0.03 GrwAdm 36.19 +0.01 HlthCr 57.41 -0.06 HiYldCp 5.87 InfProAd 27.88 -0.23 ITBdAdml 11.70 -0.09 ITsryAdml 11.53 -0.09 IntGrAdm 59.26 -0.40 ITAdml 14.11 -0.06 ITGrAdm 10.09 -0.06 LtdTrAd 11.16 -0.02 LTGrAdml 10.12 -0.16 LT Adml 11.49 -0.04 MCpAdml100.66 -0.53 MuHYAdm 10.91 -0.04 PrmCap r 69.89 -0.36 ReitAdm r 89.09 -0.34 STsyAdml 10.75 -0.02 STBdAdml 10.59 -0.02 ShtTrAd 15.94 STIGrAd 10.72 -0.02 SmCAdm 37.43 -0.31 TtlBAdml 10.91 -0.06 TStkAdm 35.00 -0.08

+11.3 +12.1 +9.9 +10.6 +11.2 +11.3 +9.1 +6.9 +1.8 +9.6 +16.5 +7.4 +7.5 +13.6 +11.4 +13.8 +5.7 +4.6 +0.6 +0.1 -1.2 +14.0 +1.2 +1.8 +0.4 -0.7 +2.2 +12.9 +2.6 +9.1 +8.4 -0.2 +0.1 +0.4 +1.3 +12.1 -0.2 +11.8

WellslAdm 57.19 WelltnAdm 57.78 Windsor 48.72 WdsrIIAd 50.80 Vanguard Fds: CapOpp 32.33 DivdGro 16.51 Energy 64.39 EqInc 23.54 Explr 81.01 GNMA 11.00 HYCorp 5.87 HlthCre 136.06 InflaPro 14.19 IntlGr 18.63 IntlVal 30.00 ITIGrade 10.09 LifeCon 16.94 LifeGro 23.08 LifeMod 20.48 LTIGrade 10.12 Morg 20.20 MuInt 14.11 PrecMtls r 20.32 PrmcpCor 14.62 Prmcp r 67.36 SelValu r 20.41 STAR 20.24 STIGrade 10.72 StratEq 20.91 TgtRetInc 11.93 TgRe2010 23.60 TgtRe2015 13.10 TgRe2020 23.32 TgtRe2025 13.30 TgRe2030 22.88 TgtRe2035 13.80 TgtRe2040 22.68 TgtRe2045 14.24 USGro 21.09 Wellsly 23.60 Welltn 33.45 Wndsr 14.44 WndsII 28.62

-0.31 -0.27 -0.15 -0.09

+2.9 +6.7 +13.1 +11.0

-0.21 -0.02 -0.85 -0.08 -0.55 -0.03

+9.6 +7.1 +7.4 +7.5 +13.4

-0.15 -0.12 -0.12 -0.17 -0.06 -0.08 -0.10 -0.10 -0.16 -0.02 -0.06 -0.55 -0.07 -0.35 -0.10 -0.10 -0.02 -0.14 -0.06 -0.12 -0.06 -0.10 -0.06 -0.09 -0.05 -0.09 -0.06 -0.01 -0.13 -0.16 -0.04 -0.05

+4.5 +5.7 +0.6 +13.9 +12.7 +1.8 +4.4 +9.4 +6.9 -0.7 +15.6 +1.2 +4.8 +8.4 +9.1 +9.8 +8.1 +1.3 +14.0 +3.5 +5.2 +6.5 +7.5 +8.4 +9.4 +10.3 +10.6 +10.6 +16.8 +2.9 +6.7 +13.1 +11.0

Vanguard Idx Fds: TotIntAdm r24.51 -0.17 TotIntlInst r98.00 -0.72 TotIntlIP r 98.02 -0.72 500 128.95 -0.15 MidCap 22.18 -0.12 SmCap 37.40 -0.31 TotBnd 10.91 -0.06 TotlIntl 14.65 -0.11 TotStk 34.98 -0.09 Vanguard Instl Fds: BalInst 23.28 -0.08 DevMkInst 9.35 -0.06 ExtIn 44.72 -0.32 FTAllWldI r 87.27 -0.62 GrwthIst 36.19 +0.01 InfProInst 11.36 -0.09 InstIdx 128.14 -0.15 InsPl 128.15 -0.15 InsTStPlus 31.69 -0.07 MidCpIst 22.23 -0.12 SCInst 37.43 -0.31 TBIst 10.91 -0.06 TSInst 35.01 -0.08 ValueIst 22.47 -0.08 Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl 106.54 -0.13 MidCpIdx 31.77 -0.16 STBdIdx 10.59 -0.02 TotBdSgl 10.91 -0.06 TotStkSgl 33.78 -0.08 Western Asset: CorePlus I 11.22 -0.06 Yacktman Funds: Fund p 18.64 -0.02 Focused 19.91 -0.02

+12.2 +12.2 +12.2 +11.4 +12.9 +12.0 -0.3 +12.2 +11.8 +6.9 +11.0 +13.7 +12.3 +13.8 +0.6 +11.4 +11.4 +11.9 +12.9 +12.1 -0.2 +11.9 +9.8 +11.4 +12.9 +0.1 -0.2 +11.8 +1.6 +6.5 +6.0


B4

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2012

M 

If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact Ashley Brothers at 541-383-0323, email business@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� at www.bendbulletin.com. Please allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication.

B C 

TODAY AARP TAX-AIDE: Provides free tax preparation for seniors and low- to moderate-income people; Monday through Friday; call to make an appointment; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541388-1133. AARP TAX-AIDE: Provides free tax preparation for seniors and low- to moderate-income people; Monday through Friday; call to make an appointment; Redmond Senior Center, 325 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; 541-548-6325. BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WEEKLY MEETING: Free; 7 a.m.; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541-610-9125. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain an alcohol server permit; preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. WINDHAVEN, INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT FOR AN UNPREDICTABLE WORLD: Registration required; free; noon1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794, luiz.soutomaior@ schwab.com or schwab.com. SOROPTIMIST INTERNATIONAL OF BEND: Nita Belles will speak on human trafficking in Central Oregon; registration required; contact 541728-0820 or www.sibend.org; $15 dinner includes beverage and tip; 5:30-7 p.m.; Boston’s, 61276 S. U.S. Highway 97, Suite 140. HOW TO START A BUSINESS: Registration required; $15; 6-8 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541383-7290 or http://noncredit.cocc .edu.

FRIDAY AARP TAX-AIDE: Provides free tax preparation for seniors and low- to moderate-income people; Monday through Friday; call to make an appointment; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541388-1133. AARP TAX-AIDE: Provides free tax preparation for seniors and low- to moderate-income people; Monday through Friday; call to make an appointment; Redmond Senior Center, 325 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; 541-548-6325. ENSURING A SUCCESSFUL CLOSING: Central Oregon Women’s Council of Realtors; registration required; contact 541-647-7836 or www.centraloregonwcr.org; $15 members, $20 for nonmembers; 9-10:30 a.m.; St. Charles Bend conference center, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-382-4321. CENTRAL OREGON REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT CLUB: Free; 11 a.m.; ServiceMaster Clean, 20806 Sockeye Place, Bend; 541-610-4006 or bobbleile@windermere.com. FREE TAX FRIDAY: Free tax return reviews; schedule an appointment at 541-385-9666 or www.myzoomtax .com; free; 2-4 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666.

preparation for seniors and low- to moderate-income people; Monday through Friday; call to make an appointment; Redmond Senior Center, 325 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; 541-548-6325. AARP TAX-AIDE: Provides free tax preparation for seniors and low- to moderate-income people; Monday through Friday; call to make an appointment; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541388-1133. BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL HIGH DESERT CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7:15 a.m. Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541-420-7377. NONPROFIT GRANT WRITING: Registration required; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Madras COIC Office, 243 S.W. Third St., Suite A; 541-383-7270 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain an alcohol server permit; preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. KNOW CRAIGSLIST: Reservations encouraged; free; 2 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-617-7050 or www .deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. KNOW MORE EMAIL: Reservations encouraged; free; 2 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7050 or www .deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. NETWORKING SOCIAL: For information, contact 541-923-2679; free; 5:30 p.m.; Laurie’s Gentle Pet Grooming, 8392 North Highway 97, Terrebonne; 541-548-0405. SMALL-BUSINESS COUNSELING: Free; 5:30-7:30 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1037. KNOW WORD III: Reservations encouraged; free; 6 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7050 or www .deschuteslibrary.org/calendar.

WEDNESDAY AARP TAX-AIDE: Provides free tax preparation for seniors and low- to moderate-income people; Monday through Friday; call to make an appointment; Redmond Senior Center, 325 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; 541-548-6325. AARP TAX-AIDE: Provides free tax preparation for seniors and low- to moderate-income people; Monday through Friday; call to make an appointment; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541388-1133. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Provided by The Partnership to End Poverty; learn about tax credits and access a free online tax-filing program; certified tax volunteers will be available for assistance; registration preferred; free; 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-504-1389 or www.take credit.org.

THURSDAY March 22

SATURDAY FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Provided by The Partnership to End Poverty; learn about tax credits and access a free online tax-filing program; certified tax volunteers will be available for assistance; registration preferred; free; noon-5 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-504-1389 or www.takecredit.org. OREGON ADDY AWARDS GALA: Tickets can be purchased at www .oregonaddys.com; ticket prices increase after March 9; $75 for professionals, and $50 for students; 5-9 p.m.; Sunriver Resort Great Hall, 17728 Abbott Drive.

MONDAY AARP TAX-AIDE: Provides free tax preparation for seniors and low- to moderate-income people; Monday through Friday; call to make an appointment; Redmond Senior Center, 325 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; 541-548-6325. AARP TAX-AIDE: Provides free tax preparation for seniors and low- to moderate-income people; Monday through Friday; call to make an appointment; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541388-1133. HOW TO BUILD A POWERFUL BUYERS PRESENTATION: Register at http://exitrealtybend.eventbrite .com; free; 10 a.m.-noon; Exit Realty Bend, 354 N.E. Greenwood Ave., #100; 541-480-8835. HOW TO START A BUSINESS: Reservations required; contact 541382-1795; free; 6 p.m.; COCC Crook County Open Campus, 510 S.E. Lynn Blvd., Prineville; 541-447-6228.

TUESDAY AARP TAX-AIDE: Provides free tax

AARP TAX-AIDE: Provides free tax preparation for seniors and low- to moderate-income people; Monday through Friday; call to make an appointment; Redmond Senior Center, 325 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; 541-548-6325. AARP TAX-AIDE: Provides free tax preparation for seniors and low- to moderate-income people; Monday through Friday; call to make an appointment; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541388-1133. BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WEEKLY MEETING: Free; 7 a.m.; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541-610-9125. CREATING RECORD-BREAKING RESULTS: Through Advertising Federation of Central Oregon; registration required; 541-385-1992 or director@adfedco.org; 25 for members, $45 for nonmembers; 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-382-4321. GETTING THE MOST OUT OF SCHWAB.COM: Registration required; free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794, luiz.soutomaior@schwab.com or www.schwab.com. HOW TO SELECT A FRANCHISE: Registration required; free; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541383-7700.

FRIDAY March 23 AARP TAX-AIDE: Provides free tax preparation for seniors and low- to moderate-income people; Monday through Friday; call to make an appointment; Redmond Senior Center, 325 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; 541-548-6325. AARP TAX-AIDE: Provides free tax

preparation for seniors and low- to moderate-income people; Monday through Friday; call to make an appointment; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541388-1133. CENTRAL OREGON REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT CLUB: Free; 11 a.m.; ServiceMaster Clean, 20806 Sockeye Place, Bend; 541-610-4006 or bobbleile@windermere.com. FREE TAX FRIDAY: Free tax return reviews; schedule an appointment at 541-385-9666 or www.myzoomtax .com; free; 2-4 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666. KNOW FACEBOOK: Reservations encouraged; free; 2 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-617-7050 or www .deschuteslibrary.org/calendar.

ODOT Continued from B1 East of Sisters on state Highway 126, ODOT will construct a maintenance facility to replace the one on the west edge of the city that’s located on land owned by the U.S. Forest Service. The Forest Service wants to sell the land. On Tuesday, ODOT started soliciting bids for the new project, which should cost between $2.7 million and $3.3 million. Construction of the 10,000square-foot building, on 22.5 acres of land where ODOT has a gravel pit, should start in May and finish in November or December, said Pat Creedican, ODOT’s Central

Oregon district manager. The building will include all the same elements as the current one: a large garage, a crew room, an office, a bathroom and storage space. The employee count for the facility — six in the summer, eight in the winter — will stay the same after the new building is open, Creedican said. “Most of it is just a garage for the equipment, to keep it out of the weather, safe from vandalism,� he said. Creedican said ODOT plans to heat and cool the building with a solar thermal heating system and a geothermal energy system, but costs will determine whether those technologies will be implemented. State legislators in 2008

considered consolidating the Sisters and Bend maintenance facilities when they heard that buying new land and constructing a building could cost $6.4 million. Then they found out about ODOT’s land east of Sisters, according to The Bulletin’s archives. The state agency wanted to keep the facility in Sisters because it’s closer than Bend to Santiam Pass, and the snowplows and sanding trucks that keep the road to the summit clear are stationed in Sisters. Locating the facility east of Sisters will require trucks and plows to travel along Main Street or other narrow roads through Sisters. — Reporter: 541-633-2117, jnovet@bendbulletin.com

SATURDAY March 24 YOUR BUSINESS BREAKTHROUGH: $45, $35 if you register with a friend; 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; Hawthorn Healing Arts Center, 39 N.W. Louisiana Ave., Bend; 541-330-0334. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Provided by The Partnership to End Poverty; learn about tax credits and access a free online tax filing program; certified tax volunteers will be available for assistance; registration preferred; free; noon-5 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-504-1389 or www.takecredit.org.

MONDAY March 26 AARP TAX-AIDE: Provides free tax preparation for seniors and low- to moderate-income people; Monday through Friday; call to make an appointment; Redmond Senior Center, 325 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; 541-548-6325. AARP TAX-AIDE: Provides free tax preparation for seniors and low- to moderate-income people; Monday through Friday; call to make an appointment; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541388-1133. FORECLOSURE CLASS: Call 541318-7506, ext. 309 to reserve a seat; 5:30-7:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 20310 Empire Ave., Suite A110, Bend; 541-318-7506. FORECLOSURE PREVENTION CLASS: Learn about NeighborImpact’s Housing Center tools and services, which can assist individuals struggling to pay their mortgages; free; 5:30-7:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 20310 Empire Ave., Suite A110, Bend; 541-318-7506, ext. 109, karenb@ neighborimpact.org or www.home ownershipcenter.org.

TUESDAY March 27 AARP TAX-AIDE: Provides free tax preparation for seniors and low- to moderate-income people; Monday through Friday; call to make an appointment; Redmond Senior Center, 325 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; 541-548-6325. AARP TAX-AIDE: Provides free tax preparation for seniors and low- to moderate-income people; Monday through Friday; call to make an appointment; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541388-1133. BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL HIGH DESERT CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; 7:15 a.m.; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541-420-7377. HOW TO ROCK WHILE EVERYONE ROLLS: Presentation by speaker and writer Alistair Paterson; registration required; contact 541-382-3221; $25 for chamber members and $45 for nonmembers; 11 a.m.; Bend Golf and Country Club, 61045 Country Club Drive; 541-382-7437. KNOW DIGITAL BOOKS: Reservations encouraged; free; 2 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-6177050 or www.deschuteslibrary .org/calendar. SMALL-BUSINESS COUNSELING: Free; 5:30-7:30 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1037.

WEDNESDAY March 28 AARP TAX-AIDE: Provides free tax preparation for seniors and low- to moderate-income people; Monday through Friday; call to make an appointment; Redmond Senior Center, 325 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; 541-548-6325. AARP TAX-AIDE: Provides free tax preparation for seniors and low- to moderate-income people; Monday through Friday; call to make an appointment; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541388-1133.

Christian Hansen / New York Times News Service

Sonya Reliford, a factory worker, sews collars onto T-shirts during her shift at Campbellsville Apparel in Campbellsville, Ky.

Prison Continued from B1 Recently, a clothing company complained that the government company had expressed interest in making Air Force windbreakers like one worn by the president. Last month, amid negative news reports and pressure from the Senate minority leader, Mitch McConnell, FPI said it would stop competing for the contract because it could damage the private company that makes the jackets, Ashland Sales and Service. In addition, a bipartisan coalition of lawmakers is resuscitating a bill to overhaul the way the prison manufacturing company does business, proposing to eliminate its preferential status. Under current practice — governed by intricate laws, regulations and policies — an agency must buy prisonermade goods if the company offers an item that is comparable in price, quality and time of delivery to that of the private sector, with certain exceptions. The company’s prices are not always the lowest, but it frequently has been able to underbid private companies, congressional aides say. The bill seeks to limit those advantages by putting a limit on FPI’s sales to the federal government, opening more product areas to private companies and strengthening requirements that the prices for prisoner-made products be competitive. The legisla-

tion would also impose federal work-safety standards and higher wages, starting at $2.50 an hour. Separately, McConnell has introduced a bill that would subject the Bureau of Prisons, including its manufacturing company, to greater congressional oversight.

The prisons’ view FPI has traditionally relied on office furniture, electronics and clothing manufacturing for the bulk of its business, but it has been moving into new industries like renewable energy. The company already has one factory each in New York and Oregon to build solar panels and is looking into making energy-efficient lighting and small wind turbines. According to the Bureau of Prisons, inmates who go through the program are 24 percent less likely to return to jail and 14 percent more likely to find employment upon release because of the skills and experience they receive. The program operates in a range of industries — including fleet management and data services — to lessen the effect on any particular one. The move into solar panels and other energy technologies is meant to help government agencies meet mandates for using energy from renewable sources and to “provide inmates with job skills in a new and growing market,� according to Julie Rozier, a spokeswoman for the company.

Across the country, some correctional facilities have begun preparing inmates for the green economy, offering training in solar panel installation and energy-efficient heating, ventilation and cooling systems. Inmates do not install solar panels, but assemble them; when fully operational, the plants in Otisville, N.Y., and Sheridan, Ore., can employ about 400 inmates and produce 75 megawatts worth of panels a year, Rozier said.

Pushing for action So far, response from the solar industry has been measured, with representatives saying that production is too small to pose a serious threat. A pool of trained solar workers might even be beneficial, says the Solar Energy Industries Association. But industries that have long been competing against the federal company, like the clothing and furniture industries, are leaning on lawmakers to do something. Chris Reynolds, president of Campbellsville Apparel in Kentucky, said he had contacted McConnell, R-Ky., to express concern about possible competition for his military T-shirt contract, a move that inspired McConnell’s bill. “My employees just cannot believe the fact that a prisoner who should be paying a debt to society is being promoted through the federal government to take a job from an American taxpaying citizen,� he said.

N  R

PERMITS City of Bend

River Shops LLC, 425 S.W. Powerhouse 304, $240,000 ML Bend U.S.A. Limited Partnership, 63211 N.E. Black Powder, $201,985 ML Bend U.S.A. Limited Partnership, 63207 N.E. Black Powder, $201,985 West Bend Property Company, 2327 N.W. Frazer, $170,757 Ridgeline LLC, 1203 S.W. McClellan, $212,523 Oregon Fir Supply Co. Inc., 1230 N.E. Third A180, $125,000 Cynthia Hass, 2322 N.W. High Lakes, $312,027 2001 Stephen B. Dandurand, 20278 Badger, $170,809

Stone Bridge Homes N.W. LLC, 2325 N.W. Dorion, $257,436 William H. Hull, 1011 N.W. 15th, $152,512 Greg Welch Construction Inc., 2628 N.W. Crossing, $296,519 Grant Leffler, 62084 N.E. Wolcott, $190,093 John E. Brunson, 1435 N.W. Newport, $253,827 West Bend Property Company LLC, 2339 N.W. Frazer, $247,822 Bank of America N.A., 63319 N.E. Kalamata, $189,115 Costco Wholesale Corporation, 2500 N.E. Highway 20, $324,750 Bruce L. Kemp, 2859 N.E. Aldrich, $215,847 Richard L. Carpenter, 2815 N.E. Spring Water, $178,959 Brookswood Bend LLC, 19725

S.W. Aspen Ridge, $201,479 Somerset Development LLC, 20289 S.E. Knightsbridge, $174,244 Solaire Homes Inc., 2334 N.W. Frazer, $217,643 City of Redmond

Fred Meyer Stores Inc., 855 S.W. Sixth St., $1,100,000 Deschutes County

W. Duncan Reid Revocable Living Trust, 64620 Jan Drive, Bend, $159,646.38 Scott H. Hunsdon, 884 Highland View Loop, Redmond, $536,286.57 James J. Filler, 61623 Hosmer Lake Drive, Bend, $602,800 Vern E. and Carole L. Heeren Family Trust, 20560 Lowe Lane, Bend, $384,751.76


LOCALNEWS

News of Record, C2 Editorials, C4

C

Obituaries, C5 Weather, C6

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2012

LOCAL BRIEFING $3,000 damage in Athletic Club fire A fire that broke out in the Athletic Club of Bend’s restaurant Tuesday night caused $3,000 worth of damage, the Bend Fire Department said. Firefighters determined it was a flue fire in the kitchen grill chimney, and the club was evacuated.

Resort developer decision delayed Deschutes County commissioners Tammy Baney and Alan Unger decided Wednesday to delay a decision on how to handle a resort developer who failed to build roads and sewers as promised. The commissioners were scheduled to decide on Wednesday whether to send a notice of default to developer TD Cascade Highlands LLC, which signed a 2008 agreement with the county promising to build infrastructure in a section of Tetherow resort west of Bend. That agreement allowed TD Cascade Highlands to subdivide the property into single-family home sites and build the infrastructure later. On Wednesday, Laurie Craghead, the county’s assistant legal counsel, said an attorney for the developer requested two weeks to provide information to the county. The attorney did not say what information will be provided, Craghead said.

www.bendbulletin.com/local

‘Grace’-less theft: Heron statue is stolen By Erik Hidle The Bulletin

REDMOND — An art thief targeted a bronze heron statue displayed in downtown Redmond this week, lopping off the $8,400 bird at its spindly legs and removing it from the city’s outdoor public art gallery. Redmond police believe the theft occurred late Monday night or early Tuesday morning. The statue weighs about 100 pounds and, when welded to its concrete pedestal along Northwest 6th Street, sat about 4 feet high. It changed color in the light, thanks to a patina containing trace amounts of silver. It appears the bird’s legs made it an easy target for a thief with a cutting implement. All that remains of the statue are a few long copper barbs protruding from the heron’s perch. Artist Kim Chavez, who crafted the statue named “Grace,” said it’s brutal for her to look at what is left behind. “It’s like having one of your children in the wrong hands,”

Man arrested in 2 Bi-Mart thefts A Metolius man was arrested Tuesday after Prineville police said he stole battery cores and broke into a storage shed at a Prineville Bi-Mart store. Douglas Michael Roofener, 54, was arrested on suspicion of burglary, theft, criminal trespass and criminal mischief following two separate incidents. Bi-Mart reported that an unknown person broke into a storage shed and later stole used battery cores on March 8 and on Monday. The theft and damage cost the store more than $400. More briefing and News of Record, C2

Bend urges salary tie-in • City wants to link pay raises to growth By Nick Grube The Bulletin

BEFORE

AFTER Pete Erickson / The Bulletin file photo

Erik Hidle / The Bulletin

“Grace,” by Kim Chavez, was unveiled and installed in Redmond last fall. The 100-pound, $8,400 bronze statue of a heron was lopped off at the legs and stolen this week.

Chavez said. “It’s really hard to look at it right now.” Chavez and her husband, Phil, are metal artists. He says the theft is personal because

“we do this for a living.” But Chavez isn’t letting the theft dampen her desire to participate in the city’s outdoor gallery.

“Redmond is just starting to collect its art,” she said. “I feel bad for Redmond right now.” See Statue / C5

100 years of Girl Scouts

Baney plans tourism council Deschutes County Commissioner Tammy Baney said on Wednesday that she plans to organize a “tourism council” composed of board members from tourism agencies throughout the county to promote better communication between the agencies. Local officials have discussed merging Visit Bend and the Central Oregon Visitors Association since the agencies’ recent competing bids for the Leadman and Ironman triathlons revealed a lack of coordination. Last week, the Bend Chamber of Commerce called for the county and city of Bend to discuss merging tourism agencies. “We believe having one organization representing the region would create a more consistent message and free up a significant amount of funding for working capital to bring more visitors to the area,” the chamber’s Executive Director Tim Casey wrote in a March 6 letter to city councilors and county commissioners.

FIRE UNION TALKS

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

Daisy Troop 50102 members Anna Pentland, 6, from left, Jilaina McConnell, 6, and Katie Zaw, also 6, make bead necklaces during the Girl Scouts’ 100-year anniversary celebration at the Moose Lodge in Bend on Wednesday. Girls from kindergarten to 12th grade can be members of the group. Girl Scout Daisies, like these girls, are the first step in the hierarchy of the organization and include kindergartners and first-graders. The next step up is Brownies, which is for second- and third-grade girls. Girls who are interested in joining the Girl Scouts can call the Bend service center at 541-389-8146.

A lack of funds has the city of Bend asking members of its firefighter union to gamble with their salaries. Instead of seeking a flat rate increase in pay, such as a 2 percent increase, the city wants the union to consider tying future raises to revenue growth. If revenue goes up, so do salaries. If it remains flat, then there’s a pay freeze. This plan was pitched to the Bend Firefighters Association on Wednesday as part of the first round of labor negotiations between the city and the union. And based on the reaction, salary will likely become a focal point in the upcoming negotiations. While union representatives said they were willing to work with the city on a new way to implement raises, they also pointed out that they were at least 5 percent behind their peers in other Oregon cities. “We’re still falling behind,” Bend Firefighter Association Vice President Patricia Connolly said during the open negotiations. “We just feel like the City Council just really needs to commit (to the idea) that public safety is a priority, and that’s something our body really needs to hear.” The city has been struggling to find ways to fund its police and fire departments for the past several years. During a recent budget forecasting meeting, Bend’s police and fire chiefs spoke of lagging response times and reductions in services. Hiring more staff is out of the question, they said, because the money isn’t there. Bend’s firefighter union has helped to cut personnel costs over the past couple of years by voluntarily switching to a high-deductible insurance plan. That has become a model for other employee associations in the city and so far has saved hundreds of thousands of dollars. Human Resources Manager Rob DuValle acknowledged this effort during the negotiations, but also said it’s hard for the city to promise raises it’s not sure it can afford. See Firefighters / C2

Redmond high school officials Redmond police arrest man, clarify course, transfer options 18, suspected in graffiti spree By Erik Hidle By Ben Botkin The Bulletin

REDMOND — Redmond high school students and parents have a double-barrelled challenge for the upcoming school year: Ridgeview High School is opening and a new state law provides more flexibility for picking a school. Redmond School District officials juggled the task of explaining the issues Wednesday night to parents and students at Redmond High School’s auditorium. The district is pitching Redmond High and Ridgeview as schools that are equals, but with different programs and courses. The event also included presentations about the International Baccalaureate program, which will be offered at Redmond High, and the Advanced Placement program at Ridgeview. Both programs provide

upper-level courses. “There’s a lot of rumors going around,” said Lee Loving, planning principal for Ridgeview. “What we wanted to do was give you accurate information.” For example, officials confirmed one question about a “rumor” — that no seniors will attend Ridgeview in its first year. That won’t start until the 2013-14 school year.

Academics The I.B. and A.P. programs have gained attention in recent months as some parents and students prefer one over the other, such as A.P. courses because they provide college credit. Loving said students taking I.B. courses still can take an A.P. test afterward and qualify for the college credit that way. See High schools / C2

The Bulletin

REDMOND — Police arrested an 18-year-old Redmond man Tuesday on investigation of criminal mischief stemming from a recent spate of graffiti. Redmond police arrested Derrick Evans on suspicion of criminal mischief in the first degree, a class C felony, and criminal mischief in the second degree, a class A misdemeanor. Police believe five recently painted tags in northwest Redmond are Evans’ work. City officials noticed an increase in graffiti activity over the past few months and city councilors were informed of the situation at a February work session. At that time, both Police

Chief Dave Tarbet and City Manager David Brandt said there was no indication that the tags were gang-related. Lt. Nathan Garibay confirmed that there were no ties to gang activity after Tuesday’s arrest. “It is very safe to say that in this case it is not related to any gang activity,” Garibay said. “It appears some will view this as art. But you need to have permission to paint someone’s wall for it to not be a crime.” Garibay said he was unsure how many graffiti tags are being investigated in the city, but police believe Evans is connected to most of the recent incidents. “It’s hard to count be-

cause these things kind of pop up all at once and then go away for awhile,” Garibay said. In 2011, the department investigated 144 cases of graffiti that caused an estimated $28,000 in damages. Police said it takes graffiti cases “very seriously” due to property damage and the way graffiti “contributes to a poor image of an otherwise safe and healthy community.” Police are asking residents to report graffiti immediately and remove it from property as soon as possible. The Redmond Police Department can be contacted at 541-504-3400. — Reporter: 541-617-7837, ehidle@bendbulletin.com


C2

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2012

Well shot! READER PHOTOS

LOCAL BRIEFING Continued from C1

County land use hearing draws 40 An audience of more than 40 people filled a Deschutes County hearing room Wednesday, when commissioners heard nearly 3 hours of testimony on a proposal to allow commercial events and agritourism on land zoned for farm use. County officials have sought a legal way to allow weddings and other activities on farmland for four years. On Wednesday, supporters of the county ordinance said it would help the local economy, while opponents said it would allow noisy events, create traffic problems and inhibit the breeding of livestock. After commissioners listened to public comments on Wednesday, they decided to accept written comments until 5 p.m. March 28.

Bend traffic stop leads to pot bust An Idaho man was arrested and two other Idaho residents were cited near Bend last week after police found $25,000 worth of marijuana in their car, the Oregon State Police said. Marcus George Heidenreich, 30, was arrested on suspicion of possession and distribution of a controlled substance after a traffic stop March 7. Shawn Lee Miller, 41, and Shanisy Loree Miller, 34, were cited for possession and distribution of a controlled substance.

Bachelor offering guided ski tours Starting Saturday, Mt. Bachelor will offer guided ski tours with volunteer forest rangers. The tours will take place on Mt. Bachelor alpine runs and nordic trails the next three Saturdays from 2 to 3 p.m. Participants should have at least an intermediate skill level of skiing or snowboarding. Those interested in an alpine tour should meet at the top of the Pine Marten ski lift at 2 p.m. For nordic tours, meet in front of the Nordic Center at Mt. Bachelor’s West Village at 2 p.m. A ski pass and ski equipment will be required to participate. — Bulletin staff reports

Firefighters Continued from C1 This is why the city wants to look at tying raises to revenue growth, he said, and it’s going to require a “leap of faith” by the union to help develop a plan that will work. “We realize we have a market discrepancy,” DuValle said. “(Now) we want to work on a new way of doing business.” There were no proposals for how a revenue-based raise system would work. One option could be to tie it to property tax revenues, which props up much of the city’s general fund. About 80 percent of the general fund is dedicated to public safety. That percentage is expected to rise over the next five years, according to city forecasts. — Reporter: 541-633-2160, ngrube@bendbulletin.com

Can you work a camera, and capture a great picture? And can you tell us a bit about it? Email your color or black and white photos to readerphotos@bendbulletin.com and we’ll pick the best for publication. Submission requirements: Include as much detail as possible — when and where you took it, and any special technique used — as well as your name, hometown and phone number. Photos must be high resolution (at least 6 inches wide and 300 dpi) and cannot be altered.

FINE FEATHERED FRIENDS

John Schwechten, of Bend, took this photo of a Townsend’s solitaire thrush outside his home with an iPhone 4S. Joan Nixon snapped this picture of a bald eagle perched in a willow tree in the front yard of her Powell Butte home on Super Bowl Sunday. She used a Nikon D5100.

Dave Adams, of Bend, took this photo of the imprint of a magpie that flew into his living room window. “Fortunately, the window did not break and the magpie immediately flew away, uninjured,” Adams said. He used a Nikon D5000.

Nancy Baldrick captured this image of a Cooper’s hawk in a tree next to her bedroom window. She used a Sony Super Steady Shot with a 12x zoom.

Margie O’Neill, of Bend, shot this photo of a great horned owl sitting on its fresh kill, a rabbit. She used a Pentax Optio 550 with 5x telephoto lens.

N  R POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Bend Police Department

Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and items stolen at 9:48 a.m. March 12, in the 300 block of Southeast Reed Market Road. Unauthorized use — A vehicle was reported stolen at 10:30 a.m. March 12, in the area of Northwest Federal Street and Northwest Galveston Avenue. Criminal mischief — Graffiti was reported at 11:30 a.m. March 12, in the 21300 block of Starling Drive. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and items stolen at 3:43 p.m. March 12, in the 100 block of Northwest Oregon Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at 3:52 p.m. March 12, in the 1600 block of Northwest Newport Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 3:53 p.m. March 12, in the 2500 block of Northeast U.S. Highway 20. Theft — A theft was reported at 5:42 p.m. March 12, in the 900 block of Southeast Third Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 5:47 p.m. March 12, in the 900 block of Northeast Butler Market Road. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 7:34 p.m. March 12, in the 600 block of Southeast Third Street.

Theft — A theft was reported at 8:27 p.m. March 12, in the 20000 block of Pinebrook Boulevard. Unauthorized use — A vehicle was reported stolen at 6:43 a.m. March 13, in the 2000 block of Northeast Cradle Mountain Way. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 9:55 a.m. March 13, in the area of Black Powder and Comet lanes. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 12:20 p.m. March 13, in the 200 block of Northeast Third Street. DUII — Michael Shumaker, 33, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 2:24 p.m. March 13, in the area of Northwest 13th Street and Northwest Milwaukee Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 4:46 p.m. March 13, in the 61500 block of South U.S. Highway 97. Theft — A theft was reported at 4:52 p.m. March 13, in the 1600 block of Northwest Vicksburg Avenue. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and items stolen at 7:04 p.m. March 13, in the 400 block of Southeast McKinley Avenue. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and items stolen at 7:06 p.m. March 13, in the 61000 block of Larkspur Loop. Redmond Police Department

Criminal mischief — Damage to a window was reported at 3:50 p.m. March 13, in the 3000 block of Southwest Peridot Avenue. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 1:40 p.m. March 13, in

the 3200 block of Southwest Lava Avenue. Criminal mischief — Graffiti was reported at 12:46 p.m. March 13, in the 1000 block of Northwest Canal Boulevard. Theft — A theft was reported at 10:07 a.m. March 13, in the 500 block of Southwest Sixth Street. Prineville Police Department

Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and an arrest made at 5:19 p.m. March 13, in the area of Northwest Third Street. Burglary — An attempted burglary and attempted unauthorized use of a vehicle were reported and an arrest made at 5:19 p.m. March 13, in the area of Northwest Third Street. Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

Theft — A theft was reported at 7:19 p.m. March 13, in the 1000 block of East Desperado Trail in Sisters. DUII — Frank Darnell, 50, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 2:22 p.m. March 13, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 near milepost 148 in Sunriver. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 10:09 a.m. March 13, in the area of state Highway 31 near milepost 1 in La Pine. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 7:50 a.m. March 13, in the 300 block of West Cascade Avenue in Sisters. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 7:27 a.m. March 13, in the area of West U.S. Highway 20 near milepost 8 in Cloverdale.

Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office

Burglary — A burglary and an act of criminal mischief were reported at 11:09 a.m. March 4, in the 1100 block of Southeast McTaggart Road in Madras. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 6:58 a.m. March 7, in the area of Chinook Drive and Mustang Road in Crooked River Ranch. DUII — Mollie Heth, 50, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 6:55 p.m. March 8, in the area of Northwest Boise Drive and Northwest Juniper Lane in Madras. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 6:55 p.m. March 8, in the area of Northwest Boise Drive and Northwest Juniper Lane in Madras. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported March 10, in the 100 block of C Street in Culver. Oregon State Police

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 8:50 a.m. March 13, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 near milepost 158.

BEND FIRE RUNS Friday 1 p.m. — Authorized controlled burning, 23420 Bear Creek Road. 4:37 p.m. — Brush or brush-andgrass mixture fire, 61735 Gosney Road. 4:51 p.m. — Brush or brush-and-

grass mixture fire, in the area of Northeast Boyd Acres Road. 16 — Medical aid calls. Saturday 3:14 a.m. — Brush or brush-andgrass mixture fire, 2100 Bear Creek Road. 4:05 p.m. — Authorized controlled burning, 237 N.W. Riverfront St. 8:34 p.m. — Unauthorized burning, 20536 Snow Cap Place. 10:03 p.m. — Chimney or flue fire, 2245 N.E. Division St. 20 — Medical aid calls. Sunday 4:39 p.m. — Unauthorized burning, 2121 N.E. Division St. 7:46 p.m. — Unauthorized burning, 330 S.E. Woodland Blvd. 17 — Medical aid calls. Monday 12:52 p.m. — Unauthorized burning, 60335 Arnold Market Road. 4:05 p.m. — Grass fire, 64040 Deschutes Road. 21 — Medical aid calls. Tuesday 6:50 p.m. — Building fire, $3,000 estimated loss, 61615 Athletic Club Drive. 9:38 p.m. — Smoke odor reported, 61615 Athletic Club Drive. 22 — Medical aid calls.

Find It All Online

bendbulletin.com

High schools Continued from C1 Still, A.P. courses are an attractive option for Amanda Kuhlman, a 16-year-old sophomore. Kuhlman said she likes Redmond High — where she’s assigned and attending — but will try to get a spot at Ridgeview because of the A.P. courses. There are other academic differences between the schools, primarily in technical courses and electives. Redmond’s courses will focus on business, construction, automotive, agriculture and Marine Corps Junior ROTC. For 14-year-old Garrett Severson, the ROTC program was

a draw that has sparked his interest in Redmond High over Ridgeview. Ridgeview High’s courses include engineering and technology, video production, health careers, culinary and early childhood education. Courses at both schools, though, can change if there’s a lack of demand. Students still have time to decide and weigh choices. Fourteen-year-old Jack McCue, an incoming freshmen this fall, likes Ridgeview’s engineering classes, but also has an interest in Redmond’s I.B. program.

Transfer process With the new transfer process, students have until

April 2 to apply to a school or district outside their designated school’s boundaries under the new state law. If they like the school they’re already assigned to, they don’t need to do anything and will be automatically accepted. The law allows students to transfer outside their home school without needing permission from the school or district they are leaving. School districts are allowed, however, to limit how many students they accept in each school or grade. Currently, the district estimates it will have 50 empty seats for each grade in both high schools for transfers. If there are more transfer appli-

cations than openings, the district will have to use a lottery system. By May, the district will notify students if their transfer application was accepted. After that, students and parents can still try to work with principals and try for a transfer through the process that was in place before the new law. Ridgeview High is estimated to have 635 students in total, while Redmond High’s projection is 1,077 students. Reporter: 541-977-7185, bbotkin@bendbulletin.com

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THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

C3

O N O  B 

Death row inmate challenges reprieve

WIND AND SNOW HIT THE COAST

Coast Guard rescues 3 men who capsized POWERS — The Coast Guard has rescued three men who were stranded on an island in southern Oregon’s Coquille River after their raft capsized during a boating trip. They were able to swim to the island south of Powers without injury on Wednesday. The World newspaper identified the men as 47-year-old Phillip Shullbarger, of Powers, 55-year-old Kurt Lively, of Coos Bay and 55-year-old Michael Shaw, of Powers. A helicopter crew from the Coast Guard station at North Bend was nearby and diverted to hoist the trio aboard. They were taken to the Coos County sheriff’s office.

NEW YORK — The president of an Oregon investment research firm has pleaded not guilty in New York to securities fraud charges. John Kinnucan entered the plea Wednesday in Manhattan, where he made his first appearKinnucan ance after he was arrested in Oregon. He was brought to New York by federal marshals after he failed to win release on $5 million bail. The president of Broadband Research LLC had bail set after he was recorded making obscenity-laced phone calls to federal agents and prosecutors. A prosecutor says he’ll turn over evidence to defense attorneys within a month. He says it will include recordings of thousands of phone calls and hundreds of thousands of documents. The next hearing was set for June 18.

State letting Portland skip water treatment PORTLAND — The Oregon Health Authority has confirmed plans to let Portland skip federally mandated water treatment for the Bull Run watershed. The decision is expected to save water ratepayers in the area more than $68 million. The decision was finalized Wednesday. Portland is the first of its kind ever granted under the federal Safe Drinking Water Act. The ruling means Portland is no longer on the hook for an ultraviolet treatment plant to eliminate cryptosporidium in Bull Run water. The city has argued that it doesn’t need to treat for the potentially lethal parasite, undetected in the watershed in almost a decade. State officials agreed. In exchange, the city must monitor for cryptosporidium and show it at low levels while also monitoring tributaries.

Brent Wojahn / The Oregonian

A lone snowman stands on the beach in front of Haystack Rock in Cannon Beach. High winds buffeted the Oregon Coast in the wake of an unusual snowstorm Wednesday. Meteorologist Jon Bonk says another storm is expected today with winds of 35 to 45 mph along the beaches and gusts of 65 to 75 mph in exposed areas of the central and north coast.

Wife’s tip led FBI to man in Congress threats The Associated Press VANCOUVER, Wash. — A Vancouver man accused of sending letters containing white powder to members of Congress fell under FBI scrutiny after his wife told an officer that he laced the envelopes with a mixture of celery salt and corn starch. The FBI focused on Christopher Lee Carlson, 39, after a Vancouver police officer told them about a March 4 interview she had with Carlson’s wife about Carlson’s recent emotional turmoil. On March 9, a federal

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Columbia Sportswear announces 80 layoffs

ered dozens of letters addressed to U.S. senators and representatives. The Seattle office of Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., said it also received one of the letters. Some letters were sent to Congress members’ district offices. The letters, which first came to light in late February, told the recipients that there is a “10 percent chance you have just been exposed to a lethal pathogen.” The sender wanted an “end to corporate money and ‘lobbying,’ ” and an end to corporate “personhood.”

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Forest Service worker finds missing family POWERS — A family of four that was reported missing for about one day was found by a U.S. Forest Service employee on Wednesday. David Johnson and his wife Laura, along with their children ages 5 and 3, spent the night in the China Flats area near Powers after their car got stuck in the snow. The family, of North Bend, was in good condition. A cellphone signal was recorded early Wednesday. Laura Johnson’s father called police after the family failed to arrive for a 5:30 p.m. engagement at his house.

grand jury in Portland indicted Carlson on charges that he mailed threatening letters to Republican House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio and Democratic Sen. Barbara Mikulski of Maryland. The two counts arose from an investigation into the mailing of about 100 envelopes containing white powder. The U.S. attorney’s office in Portland said the letters, postmarked in Portland, have tested negative for toxic substances. Carlson, a nurse, is expected to be arraigned this week. Investigators have recov-

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The Associated Press The state Supreme SALEM — An OreCourt upheld Haugon death row inmate gen’s conviction and who has agreed to be sentence in November executed is arguing 2010. The death row that the governor has Haugen inmate then wrote no legal basis to give a series of letters to him a reprieve. court officials calling In a letter released Tues- the state’s capital punishment day, an attorney for death system arbitrary and vindicrow inmate Gary Haugen tive. He indicated he wanted said Gov. John Kitzhaber’s to waive his further appeals indefinite postponement of and die to protest the system. Haugen’s execution fails to That led his attorneys to meet the legal basis for a question his competency. reprieve. After psychological reviews, A reprieve must be ac- the high court voted by a 4cepted by the recipient, and 3 margin on Nov. 21 to allow Haugen argues that a lawyer his execution to proceed. who accepted the reprieve on The next day, Kitzhaber his behalf did so without his canceled it. He called Oreconsent, making it “legally gon’s death penalty system ineffective and void.” “a perversion of justice,” sayHaugen’s attorney called ing the state only executes Kitzhaber’s reprieve a way to people who volunteer. skirt Oregon law,. In the letter, Haugen ar“Mr. Haugen hereby re- gues that Kitzhaber fails to jects the purported reprieve meet the legal standard for you have offered him,” at- a reprieve, which is different torney Harrison Latto wrote. from a pardon or commuta“An act of this importance tion of a sentence. A reprieve, cannot be legally accom- Haugen argues, is intended to plished by a lawyer unless he allow an inmate to take some acts according to the express kind of action, such as filing instructions of his client.” an appeal. Haugen was serving a life Kitzhaber was also wrong, sentence for the 1981 killing Haugen argues, because apof his ex-girlfriend’s mother, peals are supposed to be diMary Archer, when he killed rected at individual inmates another inmate in prison for a specific reason. “Your action, in contrast, and was sentenced to death. He waived his appeals and is more in the nature of an atagreed to be executed, and tempted nullification of a parhe called the governor a ticular Oregon law,” the letter coward for canceling the ex- states. “While you have every right, of course, to lead a camecution late last year. Kitzhaber said he won’t paign to repeal the death penoversee any more executions alty in Oregon, Mr. Haugen because he believes the state’s should not be forced to serve as a pawn in that effort.” death penalty is unfair.

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C4

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2012

E

The Bulletin

AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER

B  M C G B  J C  R  C

Chairwoman Publisher Editor-in-Chief Editor of Editorials

Oregon funding is translucent, not transparent

H

ow much money does Oregon really have? Legislators and Gov. John Kitzhaber said this past session that they needed to fill a $200 million

budget gap. We are as pleased as anyone that they did so. They made cuts and preserved reserve levels. But in this budget solution, as in years before, the state found money when it needed it. This year state leaders found some $29 million in accounts that the state could take for other purposes. They took $6 million from a trust fund for the disabled, $3 million from the Department of Environmental Quality’s vehicle testing plan and found another $20 million in other funds, as The Oregonian reported. This sort of “discovery� of money in state funds is a near-constant refrain in Oregon politics. Remember the tax Measures 66 and 67 that Oregonians passed in January 2010? After the vote, $50 million suddenly appeared, the bulk of it from a tax amnesty fund. Somehow nobody at the state was forthcoming about all that state money sitting in a state account before the vote. The state does have a website — in part thanks to a bill from State Rep. Gene Whisnant, RSunriver — that is supposed to make it easy for Oregonians to see where the state gets its money and what it does with it. It’s a partial success.

How much money Oregon has should not be a surprise every time the Legislature meets. The website is called “Oregon Transparency.� A more apt title might be “Oregon Translucency.� Before the $29 million showed up in the budget agreement, you would not have found the money the state found this year. State Sen. Chris Telfer, R-Bend, has long argued there is much more money in state funds available to be used for state needs. When she requested a state balance sheet, she found the state’s net assets — total assets minus liabilities — are some $660 million. It may be that not all of that money can simply be diverted to whatever purpose the Legislature chooses. But how much money Oregon has should not be a surprise every time the Legislature meets. When only a few lawmakers and state officials know the money the state has and what it can be used for, that’s Oregon’s government hiding from Oregon’s people.

Help for Bend’s roundabouts

B

end’s traffic roundabouts are showplaces for much of the public art in the city. Yet as municipal budgets have tightened, money to maintain those showplaces has disappeared, and the job has been turned over to volunteers. Results have been decidedly mixed. That’s not for lack of trying, of course. Civic groups, office groups and others have spent time weeding, raking and otherwise tidying roundabouts, but it’s a largely amateur effort that would improve with more guidance. Thanks to the generosity of two local development companies, Brooks Resources Inc. and William Smith Properties Inc., guidance and more is on the way. First, the two companies will combine efforts to give roundabouts a badly needed landscaping spruce-up. When the city ran short of the funds to maintain them itself nearly three years ago, such landscape efforts were left by the wayside. That’s about to change.

Soon, before the return of landscaping crews’ busy season, crews will attend to all roundabouts that contain art. That’s more than 20 of the two dozen or so roundabouts in the city, so most will get initial attention from professional crews. In addition to weeding and trimming overgrown plants, the crews will lay new bark dust. Also, they will tidy up the approaches to all the roundabouts in the city, including those that do not contain art. The effort doesn’t stop there, however. Landscapers will create a manual that will lay out plans for volunteers to use in future cleanups. Armed with professional direction about what needs to be done, volunteers should be able to keep the roundabouts looking as good as the artwork within them deserves. Volunteers have made clear through their efforts that they value the roundabouts that dot the city. Thanks to the generosity of Brooks Resources and William Smith Properties, they’ll be able to make the most of those efforts in the future.

My Nickel’s Worth Good article on Rapid Response Kudos to John Nangle on his Feb. 22 In My View article titled “St. Charles should keep Rapid Response Nurse post.� Having been in the Critical Care Float/Rapid Response Nurse position for 13 years, I appreciate his calling attention to misinformation in the original Jan. 30 article. Another point I would like to make is that there is no cost to the patients for the Rapid Response activations. We have responded to over a thousand of these activations in the past three years since the implementation of this life-saving intervention and hope to respond to thousands more. Kathy Lowery, Rapid Response RN Bend

Enforce immigration laws Victor Davis Hanson’s Feb. 19 column on illegal immigration cuts to the heart of the issue: Are we, or are we not, going to enforce American laws? There is nothing “racist� about arresting and deporting people who deliberately flout our laws. Any intelligent person, irrespective of race, knows breaking the law carries unpleasant consequences. If Hispanics choose to purposely violate American immigration laws, it doesn’t make those who refuse to condone or excuse criminal behavior racists. The United States has completely sealed the border between North and South Korea for 50 years, yet it hasn’t sealed our borders with Mexico. Twenty million American citizens couldn’t find jobs in February, but seven million illegal immigrants hold nonagricultural jobs. Could your spouse, your child, your friend, use one of those jobs?

The annual net cost to taxpayers of every low-skilled immigrant household is $19,588. The cost per year of illegal immigration to the American taxpayer is $113 billion. Would you prefer to subsidize millions of illegal immigrants, or see your tax dollars benefit American citizens? I support legal immigration. (My son-in-law is a legal immigrant.) I also believe in respect for the law, and in stiff penalties for violating the law. We need to enforce our laws and stop mollycoddling criminals, and that’s what illegal immigrants are. Julia Stapp Redmond

• Liability insurance: money • CCB license: money for the state The training was worthless; I could have easily passed the test with only the training manual. But the training is required: more money. About the test for a general contractor: First, you need to know nothing about construction; the test covers law and business practices. You have 4 hours and it is openbook. I took it closed-book, finished in 40 minutes and passed. With all the costs and investment, it was difficult to make a profit. Bruce Russell Bend

Frustration with contractor boards

Global warming panic

I understand Roger Phillips’ frustration with the various contractor boards. I am sure with 30 years’ experience as a general contractor, he knows how to change a sprinkler head! The state of Oregon is not worried about his ability, they just want the fees for state coffers. By the way, what are taxes for? A note about Oregon’s General Contractor License: I have operated farm equipment since I was 12 years old. I bought a backhoe to put on my tractor. Even though I have 50 years’ experience, I needed a contractor license to dig holes in the ground — actually, I started doing that when I was 3. So to be able to dig holes: • Required training: 16 hours and money • Licensing of training providers: money for the state • Testing providers: money for the state • Study materials: money • Test: money for the state • Business name filing: money for the state • Insurance bond: money

There seems to be a letter to the editor every week attempting to create panic about global warming. Here’s a letter I would like to see: All of the global warming alarmists have created a community where there is absolutely no fossil fuel used or any products used that are produced by the use of fossil fuels. No medicines, no computers, no food, nothing delivered by transportation using fossil fuels, no water, no electricity, no smartphones, nothing that has ever used a gram of fossil fuel. I guarantee I will never see that letter. The global warming hoax is not about the alarmists changing their lifestyles; it’s about changing the rest of our lives. The global warming alarmist patron saint is Al Gore, who gets in the news every day about how we need to stop using fossil fuels — while living in mansions and flying around the world in a private jet. I wish the next letter would explain how all the global warming crowd is now living in the woods subsisting on pine nuts and dandelion tea. Gary Montgomery Bend

Letters policy

In My View policy

How to submit

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 550 and 650 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or email them to The Bulletin. Write: My Nickel’s Worth / In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 Fax: 541-385-5804 Email: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Curry County’s payroll, benefits must be restructured By Thomas Huxley his letter is regarding the Feb. 22 guest editorial by The Bulletin, published in the Curry Coastal Pilot, titled “Curry must help itself with higher taxes.� The Bulletin was quite opinionated for a newspaper around 300 miles from Harbor, in Curry County, where I live. The editorial mentioned 19 recommendations from the Curry County Citizens’ Committee that included a sales tax. The Bulletin went on to say the county’s financial troubles are aggravated by forces beyond its control and in the closing paragraph says, “But, the county’s taxpayers need to step up to the plate as well, either with the new sales tax or by raising property taxes to a more reasonable level, or both.� The journalists’ code of ethics once encouraged “seeking truth and providing a fair and comprehensive account of events and issues.�

T

The remainder of this letter is from the perspective of a Citizens’ Advisory Committee member. Approximately three weeks after the committee first met on Nov. 30, 2011, and after review of information provided by the county, 18 written questions were submitted to county personnel along with an explanation and reason for each question. Fourteen questions were for county counsel and the finance director. County commissioners were asked if they would support hiring a county administrator and reducing their positions to part time if recommended by the Citizens’ Committee. The sheriff was asked for a breakdown of a 40 percent benefit figure used in his presentation to committee members Nov. 30. Not one question was answered. Note: The sheriff forwarded his question to finance and couldn’t get a response. The most honest point discussed

IN MY VIEW (finally) was during the third of four committee meetings Jan. 12, when an “adviser� was asked what was so magical about the Feb. 1 deadline. The reply: “I think one of the reasons for that time frame was that if there is something to be put on a ballot, that has to be done in March. That’s something the commissioners have said.� The time for final committee recommendations was then changed to Jan. 13. No serious discussions ensued regarding county benefit reductions. The most shocking point for me was determining, from the county master payroll, that the 40 percent benefit figure used in the presentation by the sheriff was actually 65 percent (average). A worksheet was provided and reviewed with the sheriff on Jan. 13. The following employer-paid ben-

efits are from the Curry County Master Payroll Fiscal Year 2011/2012 — August 2011. (Totals are rounded off. This includes all county employees.) • Gross pay: $597,000 per month, $7,164,000 per year • Health insurance: $151,000 per month, $1,812,000 per year (25 percent of gross wages) • PERS-County: $77,000 per month, $924,000 per year (13 percent of gross wages) • PERS-Employee: $35,000 per month, $420,000 per year (6 percent of gross wages) • Social Security-FICA: $46,000 per month, $552,000 per year (8 percent of gross wages) • Vacation, holiday and sick leave: 8 percent of gross wages • Total average benefits percent: 60 percent of gross wages • Expect a 5 percent (approximate) PERS increase July 1, 2013. Does The Bulletin know of any business in the private sector in Curry

County that provides similar benefits? Solution No. 1: The geese that for all these years laid the golden eggs have died and gone to heaven, never to return. Over the next several months, collective bargaining needs to be removed from the equation. Pending available funds, current employees may be offered jobs under a nonunion structure. Health insurance premiums paid by the employer must not exceed a generous $500 per month versus the current $1,000-plus per employee. PERS would not apply. An affordable, competitive and much less costly retirement alternative should be evaluated. Solution No. 2: Allow Curry County to do what the private sector has done under similar circumstances for the past century. Collapse, restructure and emerge a stronger, leaner entity with competent leadership and without the 1,000-pound gorilla (PERS) on its back. — Thomas Huxley lives in Harbor, Oregon.


THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

NORTHWEST NEWS

O    D N   Helen Maxine Barton O. Bainbridge, of Bend Nov. 21, 1929 - Mar. 9, 2012 Arrangements: Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home 541-382-2471 www.niswonger-reynolds.com

Services: Private family gathering at a later date.

Darrell Dee Collins, of Bend Nov. 28, 1929 - Mar. 13, 2012 Arrangements: Baird Funeral Home of Bend, (541) 382-0903 www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: A private memorial service will take place at a later date. Contributions may be made to:

Partners In Care Hospice 2075 NE Wyatt Court Bend, Oregon 97701 www.partnersbend.org

Inga Britta Modin, of Bend Mar. 28, 1934 - Mar. 12, 2012 Arrangements: Deschutes Memorial Chapel, 541-382-5592 www.deschutesmemorialchapel.com

Services: Memorial Service pending and later date.

Robert F. Flege, Jr., of Bend June 24, 1926 - Mar. 11, 2012 Arrangements: Deschutes Memorial Chapel, (541)382-5592; www.deschutesmemorialchapel.com

Services: 3:00 PM, Friday, March 23, 2012, Celebration of Life at Nativity Lutheran Church, 60850 Brosterhouse, Bend. Contributions may be made to:

Nativity Lutheran Church or Partners In Care Hospice, 2075 NE Wyatt Ct., Bend, OR 97701.

Sandra Lee Blauvelt, of Bend June 29, 1950 - Mar. 11, 2012 Arrangements: Deschutes Memorial Chapel, (541)382-5592; www.deschutesmemorialchapel.com

Services: 4:30 PM, Saturday, March 17, 2012 at Deschutes Mausoleum Chapel, 63875N. Hwy. 97, Bend.

Brewer

Esther Ann Lemke

June 22, 1924 - March 10, 2012

Jan. 14, 1915 - Mar. 11, 2012

Helen Maxine Gibson was born June 22, 1924, on the family farm in Phillips County, Kansas, to James and Gladys Gibson. She graduated from Phillipsburg High School and married her high school sweetheart, Helen Maxine Arden Brewer Mathew Brewer, on February 1, 1942, in Salem, Oregon. Helen’s passions in life were raising her children, being actively involved in her church and traveling extensively with her husband and family. A best-day for Helen was riding next to Arden in the cab of their pickup, cup of coffee in hand, destination unknown. She left this earth surrounded by her children and passed into the arms of Jesus. Her faith in Christ is her most valuable legacy to her children and grandchildren. Helen was preceded in death by her parents; her husband, Arden; and her brother, Dale. She is survived by her children, Gayle Brewer and wife, Janice of Powell Butte, Curt Brewer and wife, Jan of Bend and Janice Stevens and husband, Mark of Tigard; her grandchildren, Les, Matt, Josh, Chad, Kristen, Katie, Aubrey, Case, JonMarc, and Elijah; two great-grandchildren, Tyler and Jace; another grandchild and two great-grandchildren are soon-to-be. Her graveside service will be held at 11:00 a.m., March 17, 2012, at Fircrest Cemetery, Monmouth, Oregon. Memorial remembrances may be directed to either of the following: Foundry Flights Per the Foundry Community, P.O. Box 23159, Tigard, OR 97281-3159,

Esther Ann Lemke went to be with her Lord on Sunday, March 11, 2012, in Bend, Oregon. She was 97 years of age. Esther, the oldest of six children, was born in a Kansas farmhouse on January 14, 1915, to Matthew and Elizabeth Dickson. Following school teaching and bookkeeping, Esther spent the majority of her life as a homemaker. After 60 years of marriage, she was preceeded in death by her husband, Cloyce Dudley Lemke, in May 2008. Also preceeding in death were her 2 brothers, Thomas and Hiram Dickson, and a sister, Ruth Symmonds. Her two remaining sisters, Augusta Shepherd and Naomi Snyder, continue to live in Kansas. She is also survived by three children and their families, son, Carl Lemke; and wife, Sue of Bend, OR; son, Ed Lemke of Meridian, Idaho; and daughter, Elaine Westlake and husband, Steve of San Jose, CA. Esther also has 11 grandchildren and 32 great-grandchildren. Esther was a peaceful loving person who loved God and her family. She was loved and respected by her family and those who knew her. A funeral service will be held Friday, March 16, at 11:00 a.m., at Tumalo Community Church. A visitation will be held Thursday, March 15, from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., at Autumn Funerals Chapel. Memorial contributions may be made to Basin Bible Church, 500 Glendale Street, Tulelake, CA 96134 or to First Baptist Church, 60 NW Oregon Ave., Bend, OR 97701.

www.thefoundrycommunity.com

or Hospice Care of the Northwest, 1500 NE Irving St., Ste 200, Portland, OR 97232.

Obituary policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, email or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. Phone: 541-617-7825 Email: obits@bendbulletin.com Fax: 541-322-7254

Deadlines: Death Notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. Mail: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708

SeaWorld’s first veterinarian brought Shamu to San Diego Los Angeles Times David Kenney, SeaWorld’s first veterinarian, who played a key role in bringing the original Shamu to the San Diego park as well as a gray whale believed to be the first raised by humans, died Feb. 14 in Montrose, Colo. He was 77. The cause was cancer, said his sister, Meredith Maler. Kenney was hired by the park a few weeks before its 1964 opening and over the next several years displayed an ingenuity and dedication that helped the fledgling tourist attraction build and maintain an impressive collection of marine animals. “Even after 50 years, we continue to learn amazing things about animals — their biology, physiology and behavior. Dr. Kenney played a critical role in establishing that knowledge base with the work he did with animals that were part of the park’s zoological family in SeaWorld’s early years, including Shamu,� said SeaWorld

FEATURED OBITUARY spokesman Dave Koontz. Kenney had a veterinary practice in San Diego when he was called by SeaWorld to conduct necropsies on a couple of its whales and a dolphin. He urged park officials to retain a veterinarian capable of finding out why the animals were dying and preventing further deaths. He was hired. One of the first changes he made was the whales’ diet. They had been fed mackerel, and the fish bones had caused a blockage in their stomachs. He found that they thrived on a concoction of whipped cream and squid. Kenney went on animal collecting trips around the world and, despite the criticisms of animal-rights activists, believed that the wild species he brought to SeaWorld were better off there than in nature, where they died of diseases and injuries.

C5

Yvonne Angeline Meadows Oct. 13, 1944 - March 11, 2012 Yvonne Angeline Meadows passed away in Bend, OR, on March 11, 2012. Yvonne was born on Oct. 13, 1944, at Edwards Air Field, CA. She was a cook at Starlight Cafe in Crescent for years. She was preceded in death by her father, Leonard Hay; step-father, Woody McGlothern. She is survived by her mother, Edythe McGlothern of La Pine; her husband, Robert Ross; two brothers, Cordelane of Eugene, and Eugene of Eugene; sisters, Rose Marie of Sunny Valley and VanDella of Eugene; three sons, Scott, Carl and Danney of Crescent; two girls, Julie of Bend and Jeri Jo of Washington; and 11 grandchildren.

D E  Deaths of note from around the world: Pierre Schoendoerffer, 83: Celebrated French film director and novelist whose experience as a prisoner during the Indochina War fueled his cinematic quests for meaning, and even beauty, in the travails of those who fought. Died Wednesday near Paris. John “Clarkie� Souza, 91: A striker on the United States soccer team that upset England in the 1950 World Cup who made 16 appearances for the U.S. team from 1947-54, scoring his only two goals in consecutive games against Mexico and Cuba in September 1949. Souza and his 1950 World Cup teammates were inducted into the U.S. National Soccer Hall of Fame in 1976. Died Sunday. Timo Konietzka, 73: A German soccer legend who scored the first goal in the Bundesliga. Died Monday in Brunnen, Switzerland. Donald F. Smith, 79: A champion of high-style cabaret who founded both the Mabel Mercer Foundation and the New York Cabaret Convention. Died Tuesday in New York of congestive heart failure. — From wire reports

Appeals court allows wolf hunts to continue The Associated Press BILLINGS, Mont. — A federal appeals court on Wednesday rejected a lawsuit from conservation groups that want to block wolf hunting and trapping that have killed more than 500 of the predators across the Northern Rockies in recent months. The ruling from a threejudge panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals said Congress had the right to intervene when it stripped protections from wolves last spring. Lawmakers stepped in after court rulings kept wolves on the endangered list for years after they reached recovery goals. Wildlife advocates claimed in their lawsuit that Congress violated the Constitution’s separation of powers by interfering with the courts. But in an opinion authored by Judge Mary Schroeder, the court said Congress was within its rights. Schroder wrote that lawmakers changed the Endangered Species Act to deal with Northern Rock-

ies wolves, and did not directly interfere with the court’s prerogative to decide when the law is being followed. The amendment marked the first time Congress has forcibly removed a species’ endangered status. It was tacked onto a federal budget bill by Idaho Republican Rep. Mike Simpson and Montana Democratic Sen. Jon Tester. “This case has made it clear that those who persist in trying to manage wildlife through the courts, in spite of all scientific evidence that this species has recovered, no longer have a defensible position,� Simpson said Wednesday. Michael Robinson with the Center for Biological Diversity, one of the groups that sued to restore protections, said a Supreme Court appeal was possible but no decision had been made. “We’re very disappointed and very saddened,� Robinson said. “Hundreds of wolves have been hunted and trapped and snared, and they are essential to their ecosystem.� He called the congressional budget bill rider that lifted protections “undemocratic� and said that it set a precedent for

future political meddling with imperiled wildlife. Wolves once thrived across North America but were exterminated across most of the continental U.S. by the 1930s, through government sponsored poisoning and bounty programs. They were put on the endangered list in 1974. Over the last two decades, state and federal agencies have spent more than $100 million on wolf restoration programs across the country. The Northern Rockies is now home to more than 1,700 wolves in Montana, Idaho and Wyoming and expanding populations in portions of Eastern Oregon and Washington. That figure is up slightly from 2010, although Wyoming and Idaho saw slight declines. In the Northern Rockies wolf hunting is allowed in Montana and Idaho and could resume in Wyoming this fall. Wisconsin’s legislature on Wednesday approved a measure to establish a hunting and trapping season that would run from mid-October through the end of February. It still has to be approved by the governor.

Adults may face charges after boy, 3, kills self with gun in car By Stacey Mulick McClatchy Newspapers

TACOMA, Wash. — Pierce County prosecutors will be evaluating whether manslaughter or other charges can be filed after a 3-year-old boy found a loaded handgun inside a car and accidentally killed himself early Wednesday while his mother and her boyfriend were outside. Prosecutors will review police reports to determine whether the boyfriend or mother acted recklessly in connection with the death of the boy, Julio SeguraMcIntosh, prosecutor Mark Lindquist said. “It would be conduct that would be a gross deviation from what a reasonable person would do,� he said. “Based on what I have heard so far, this could constitute reckless conduct that is a gross deviation from a reasonable person would do.� Tacoma police called the boy’s death — the third shooting of a child in less than a month in Western Washington — an accident and a tragedy. The shooting happened about 12:30 a.m. after the boyfriend pulled into a gas station. Also in the car were the boy, his 1-yearold sister and their mother, police spokesman Naveed Benjamin said. The boyfriend put his loaded handgun under the driver’s side seat and got out to fill the car with gas. The mother went into the convenience store to buy snacks and the two children remained in the car, police said. Julio got out of his car seat, climbed into the front seat and found the gun, Benjamin said. The weapon fired, wounding the boy in the head. Paramedics took him to a local hospital, where he was pronounced dead, Benjamin

Statue Continued from C1 The statue was featured as part of the Art Around the Clock gallery introduced by the city last summer. Through the program, pieces of art are rented on a two-year basis and displayed downtown. People who like pieces may buy them. The city replaces the art at the end of each two-year cycle with new pieces. So far, the program has added four statues, a foun-

Dean J. Koepfler / The News Tribune

Balloons, stuffed animals and a toy gun are left as a memorial next to the Tacoma, Wash., gas station where a 3-year-old boy accidentally shot and killed himself early Wednesday.

said. The sister was not hurt. Detectives interviewed the mother and boyfriend and released them. The boy’s mother, Jahnisha McIntosh, told KOMO-TV that her son’s death was “just overwhelming.� “I just want my baby,� she said. “I’ll do anything to get my baby back.� McIntosh told KOMO her son was an energetic and loving child. “He was just always on the go,� she said. “He was happy, and he was telling me that he

loves me. He just was very caring. He was very smart. Very smart.� Many questions about the boy’s death remain unanswered. Police have not said why the adults and children were out late. They were in a car with Oregon license plates but police said they lived in Tacoma. Investigators also have not said why the boyfriend left the gun in the car or how Julio got out of his car seat — whether he was unbuckled or wriggled free from the harness.

“It’s heartbreaking that this happened, but we aren’t going to let it spoil the program.� — Heather Richards, Redmond’s community development director

tain and a wall hanging to locations across downtown Redmond. Heather Richards, Redmond’s community development director, said the city has taken out insurance on the art in the gallery and will be working with Chavez to add a new piece in the place of the stolen statue. “The community responded

really well to this program,� Richards said. “It’s heartbreaking that this happened, but we aren’t going to let it spoil the program.� The Redmond Police Department is investigating the theft and asks anyone with information to call 541-504-3400. — Reporter: 541-617-7837 ehidle@bendbulletin.com


THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2012

C6

W E AT H ER FOR EC A ST Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LP ©2012.

TODAY, MARCH 15 Today: Mostly cloudy, rain showers, windy, milder.

HIGH Ben Burkel

FRIDAY

56

Bob Shaw

HIGH LOW

32

Astoria 52/41

Seaside

49/42

Cannon Beach 50/41

Hillsboro Portland 53/43 52/41

Tillamook 54/41

Salem

51/41

51/38

54/38

Maupin

59/35

Corvallis Yachats

53/27

Prineville 56/31 Sisters Redmond Paulina 51/27 55/29 58/30 Sunriver Bend

50s

53/43

Eugene

Florence

54/40

51/43

55/29

55/38

Coos Bay

Roseburg

52/44

55/38

51/46

Baker City 53/36

John Day

Unity 50/36

56/37

Vale

50s

60/45

Hampton 53/27

Juntura

Burns Riley

Jordan Valley 53/36

Frenchglen 57/37

Yesterday’s state extremes

Rome

50/32

• 57°

60/39

Hermiston

53/34

Chiloquin

Medford

CENTRAL Breezy to windy with rain likely today. Rain continuing tonight.

EAST Ontario Rain becoming 59/45 likely today. Breezy to windy with rain Nyssa tonight. 59/46

54/33

53/29

WEST Breezy with rain likely today. Cloudy with rain continuing tonight.

58/42

53/28

Paisley 47/31

Klamath Falls 48/33

Ashland

51/45

Silver Lake

40s 58/39

Brookings

46/31

Christmas Valley

51/24

Grants Pass

54/38

Brothers 55/26

Fort Rock 56/28

51/25

Chemult

57/42

Port Orford Gold Beach

Crescent

48/20

Bandon

56/32

La Pine 53/26

Crescent Lake

51/43

49/43

52/27

Oakridge

Cottage Grove

51/34

Union

Mitchell 57/32

58/33

Camp Sherman

55/41

51/33

Joseph

Granite Spray 61/34

Enterprise

Meacham 55/38

52/35

Madras

50/35

La Grande

Condon

Warm Springs

Wallowa

50/33

57/38

56/37

59/34

55/40

59/40

Ruggs

Willowdale

Albany

Newport

Pendleton

58/39

53/35

54/41

52/43

Hermiston 59/41

Arlington

Wasco

Sandy

Government Camp 41/28

51/42

58/40

The Biggs Dalles 53/38

51/40

McMinnville

Lincoln City

Umatilla

Hood River

53/37

• 26°

Fields

Lakeview

McDermitt

59/38

51/36

Meacham

54/38

-30s

-20s

Yesterday’s extremes (in the 48 contiguous states):

• 89° Laredo, Texas

• 13° Crested Butte, Colo.

• 3.00” Richmond, Calif.

Honolulu 82/69

-10s

0s

Vancouver 50/41

10s Calgary 61/35

20s

30s

Saskatoon 56/41

Seattle 53/40

40s

Winnipeg 58/33

50s

60s

Thunder Bay 49/36

70s

80s

90s

100s 110s

Quebec 40/29

Halifax 31/24 P ortland Billings 45/31 Portland 70/46 St. Paul Green Bay 53/43 Boston 71/46 To ronto Buffalo 57/42 Boise 46/36 Rapid City 65/45 58/45 62/52 New York 72/46 60/46 Detroit Des Moines Cheyenne 71/53 Philadelphia Columbus Chicago 64/34 78/58 71/52 Omaha 74/49 75/58 San Francisco Salt Lake Washington, D. C. 80/55 60/51 City 80/59 Las Denver Louisville 67/48 Kansas City Vegas 74/40 79/60 81/62 St. Louis 77/62 Charlotte 85/60 84/59 Los Angeles Nashville Little Rock Albuquerque Oklahoma City 65/56 80/61 80/60 81/62 70/43 Phoenix Atlanta 85/53 83/59 Birmingham Dallas Tijuana 83/60 78/65 66/46 New Orleans 79/64 Orlando Houston 82/63 Chihuahua 80/68 83/43 Miami 81/69 Monterrey La Paz 90/64 80/53 Mazatlan Anchorage 83/54 31/23 Juneau 37/28 Bismarck 67/41

FRONTS

Seattle gets the street view on the quality of its lights By William Yardley New York Times News Service

SEATTLE — This city has a noble notion of itself at the leading edge. Its jets, coffee, computers, environmental activism and philanthropy have all been celebrated for remaking the globe. Now Seattle wants to change not just the world but its light bulbs, too. “I want to see what the future will be,” Steven Thompson said, carrying a questionnaire and a load of curiosity as he turned his eyes toward the sky above a normally busy but now silent thoroughfare in the city’s Ballard neighborhood one night last week, “and to have some voice in that future.” Enlisted by a consortium of power companies, consultants, the U.S. Department of Energy, the Seattle Department of Transportation and Seattle City Light, Thompson and about 300 other people were paid $40 each to spend an evening engaged in a civic version of the kind of debate that has taken place in households for some time now: What kind of light do you prefer: old and yellowy, or a new and cool white? In this case, they were judging the light provided by groups of new LED streetlights strategically interspersed among older high-pressure sodium bulbs. Unlike domestic disagreements over the glow of a bedside reading lamp, the surveys Thompson and others filled out consider public safety — respondents are asked to agree or disagree with statements like “It would be safe to walk here, alone, during darkness hours,” “I cannot tell the colors of things due to the lighting” and “The lighting enables safe vehicular navigation.” And their answers could affect how cities everywhere are illuminated. Utilities want to know whether LED streetlights, tens of thousands of which have already been installed in parts of many cities, including Seattle and Los Angeles, are a promising long-term technology that could shape large government contracts. Municipalities want

Mostly cloudy, mixed showers.

HIGH LOW

46 25

HIGH LOW

43 26

47 30

BEND ALMANAC

PLANET WATCH

TEMPERATURE

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . .7:17 a.m. . . . . . 8:03 p.m. Venus . . . . . .8:47 a.m. . . . . 11:19 p.m. Mars. . . . . . .5:22 p.m. . . . . . 7:05 a.m. Jupiter. . . . . .8:59 a.m. . . . . 10:56 p.m. Saturn. . . . . .9:43 p.m. . . . . . 8:47 a.m. Uranus . . . . .7:36 a.m. . . . . . 7:48 p.m.

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend 24 hours ending 4 p.m.*. . 0.00” High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46/32 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . 0.92” Record high . . . . . . . . 74 in 1934 Average month to date. . . 0.35” Record low. . . . . . . . -11 in 1977 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.55” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Average year to date. . . . . 2.97” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.29.82 Record 24 hours . . .0.90 in 1987 *Melted liquid equivalent

Sunrise today . . . . . . 7:16 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 7:12 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 7:15 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 7:13 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 3:02 a.m. Moonset today . . . 12:24 p.m.

Moon phases New

First

Full

Mar. 22 Mar. 30 April 6 April 13

OREGON CITIES

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX

Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Precipitation values are 24-hour totals through 4 p.m. Astoria . . . . . . . .48/36/0.70 Baker City . . . . . .45/29/0.05 Brookings . . . . . .49/42/0.09 Burns. . . . . . . . . .42/29/0.23 Eugene . . . . . . . .51/38/0.06 Klamath Falls . . .44/31/0.18 Lakeview. . . . . . .46/34/0.05 La Pine . . . . . . . .43/29/0.00 Medford . . . . . . .53/38/0.08 Newport . . . . . . 46/NA/0.17 North Bend . . . . .50/39/0.06 Ontario . . . . . . . .47/35/0.21 Pendleton . . . . . 56/29/trace Portland . . . . . . .43/36/0.25 Prineville . . . . . . .50/31/0.00 Redmond. . . . . . 52/32/trace Roseburg. . . . . . .56/40/0.01 Salem . . . . . . . . .51/35/0.26 Sisters . . . . . . . . .51/29/0.00 The Dalles . . . . . .43/31/0.02

Last

. . . . . 52/41/r . . . . .47/38/sh . . . .53/36/sh . . . . .48/31/sh . . . . . 51/45/r . . . . . .49/41/r . . . .56/36/sh . . . . . 49/27/rs . . . . . 54/40/r . . . . .49/36/sh . . . .48/33/sh . . . . . 42/29/rs . . . .51/36/sh . . . . .42/30/sh . . . .53/26/sh . . . . .43/23/sh . . . . . 58/39/r . . . . .56/34/sh . . . . . 52/43/r . . . . . .48/38/r . . . . . 51/43/r . . . . .49/40/sh . . . .59/45/sh . . . . .58/38/sh . . . .59/40/sh . . . . .58/34/sh . . . . . 53/43/r . . . . . .49/39/r . . . .56/31/sh . . . . .53/28/sh . . . .56/34/sh . . . . .52/28/sh . . . .57/42/sh . . . . .52/39/sh . . . . . 54/41/r . . . . .48/37/sh . . . .55/29/sh . . . . .47/27/sh . . . .54/38/sh . . . . .54/35/sh

SKI REPORT

The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

1

LOW 0

MEDIUM 2

4

HIGH 6

V.HIGH 8

PRECIPITATION

10

ROAD CONDITIONS Snow level and road conditions representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday. Key: T.T. = Traction Tires.

Ski report from around the state, representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday: Snow accumulation in inches Ski area Last 24 hours Base Depth Anthony Lakes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . . . 73 Hoodoo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . . . .75-95 Mt. Ashland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . . . .63-95 Mt. Bachelor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 . . . .132-143 Mt. Hood Meadows . . . . . . . . . . . 7 . . . . . . . 138 Mt. Hood Ski Bowl . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 . . . . . .76-81 Timberline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 . . . . . . . 170 Warner Canyon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Willamette Pass . . . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . . . .31-84

Pass Conditions I-5 at Siskiyou Summit . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires I-84 at Cabbage Hill . . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Aspen, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . .35-43 Hwy. 20 at Santiam Pass . . . . Chains or T.T. all vehicles Mammoth Mtn., California . . . . . . 2 . . . . . .40-60 Hwy. 26 at Government Camp. . Carry chains or T. Tires Park City, Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . .48-63 Hwy. 26 at Ochoco Divide . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Squaw Valley, California . . . . . . . 16 . . . . . .24-58 Hwy. 58 at Willamette Pass . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Sun Valley, Idaho. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 . . . . . .45-75 Hwy. 138 at Diamond Lake . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Taos, New Mexico. . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . .66-97 Hwy. 242 at McKenzie Pass . . . . . . . . Closed for season Vail, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . .25-41 For links to the latest ski conditions visit: For up-to-minute conditions turn to: www.skicentral.com/oregon.html www.tripcheck.com or call 511 Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS -40s

MONDAY Mostly cloudy, mixed showers.

HIGH LOW

47 27

FORECAST: STATE

SUNDAY Mostly cloudy, mixed showers.

Mostly cloudy, mixed showers, breezy.

Tonight: Mostly cloudy, mixed showers, breezy.

LOW

SATURDAY

to be sure that the significant savings in energy and costs LEDs can provide are sustainable enough to compensate for startup costs, but also that they do not threaten public safety or urban ambience. Seattle is the fourth city to participate in the survey, following Anchorage, San Diego and San Jose, but it is hard to imagine the others being as enthusiastic. “The big difference is, you’re talking not only about the efficiency of the change in technology, but also the quality of light,” said Scott Thomsen, a spokesman for Seattle City Light, which claims to be the nation’s first carbon-neutral utility, largely because most of its power comes from hydroelectric dams. As surveyors strolled the sidewalk, the 15-block stretch of 15th Avenue was closed to traffic so that a test car could drive up and down at 35 miles per hour, over and over, carrying passengers who pushed buttons whenever they saw certain markers placed in the street. The passengers, like the strollers, were gauging visibility in different lighting variations. Over the course of the night, lights were dimmed to test how low they could safely go. In one area, LEDs were angled slightly so that their light shined just ahead of where drivers were going, as opposed to straight down. That was an experiment intended to ad-

dress a concern that LEDs sometimes scatter light in wet conditions. Seattle was expected to be perfect for testing this solution, except that on this particular night the customary maritime mist gave way to gorgeous skies and a bright, full moon. “We made all kind of contingency plans for the exact opposite,” said Todd Givler, one of the consultants leading the testing. (Givler was among several people on site inclined to describe even the moon in terms of “foot-candles.” Some had been members of the influential Illuminating Engineering Society of North America, which is being watched closely to see if it will alter its recommendations for streetlights based on the LED testing.) The dry weather forced organizers to wet the street with tank trucks that the city usually uses to flush out downtown alleys. On Thursday night, the empty avenue became a shimmering blend of moonlight, different shades of streetlights and the occasional burst of neon emerging from the Love Zone, Sands Showgirls and the T-Bird Tavern. At one point a young man walked out onto an apartment deck overlooking the strangely silent street. He raised a beer to the light brigade below, and slurred, “On a scale of 1 to 10, can you see me?” “Yes,” everyone replied.

Matt Hererra gauges the visibility of LED street lighting along a Seattle thoroughfare. About 300 Seattle residents took part in a survey intended to help decide the future of city streetlights.

Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . . .72/63/0.00 . .79/62/pc . 81/63/pc Akron . . . . . . . . . .74/39/0.00 . . . 71/56/t . . .69/55/t Albany. . . . . . . . . .59/40/0.00 . .62/43/pc . . .57/44/t Albuquerque. . . . .70/38/0.00 . . . 70/43/s . . 73/44/s Anchorage . . . . . .28/22/0.13 . .31/23/sn . . 30/20/c Atlanta . . . . . . . . .81/60/0.00 . .83/59/pc . . .80/56/t Atlantic City . . . . .77/54/0.00 . .61/49/pc . . .57/51/t Austin . . . . . . . . . .80/66/0.00 . .81/66/pc . 80/65/pc Baltimore . . . . . . .79/52/0.00 . .77/54/pc . . .75/53/t Billings . . . . . . . . .57/34/0.00 . .70/46/pc . 71/42/pc Birmingham . . . . .81/60/0.02 . .83/60/pc . . .82/59/t Bismarck. . . . . . . .56/35/0.00 . .67/41/pc . 75/44/pc Boise . . . . . . . . . . .49/37/0.16 . .58/45/sh . 53/38/sh Boston. . . . . . . . . .53/41/0.00 . .46/36/pc . 50/44/sh Bridgeport, CT. . . .70/43/0.00 . .54/41/pc . 54/42/sh Buffalo . . . . . . . . .61/34/0.00 . . . 62/52/t . . .60/51/t Burlington, VT. . . .53/40/0.03 . .56/43/pc . 59/45/sh Caribou, ME . . . . .29/25/0.27 . .36/18/pc . .41/29/rs Charleston, SC . . .84/56/0.00 . . . 81/58/s . 78/59/pc Charlotte. . . . . . . .83/57/0.00 . .84/59/pc . . .80/57/t Chattanooga. . . . .83/51/0.00 . . . 82/56/t . . .82/57/t Cheyenne . . . . . . .67/30/0.00 . .64/34/pc . . 68/38/s Chicago. . . . . . . . .81/46/0.00 . . .74/49/c . 63/55/pc Cincinnati . . . . . . .79/43/0.00 . . . 76/59/t . . .77/57/t Cleveland . . . . . . .75/38/0.00 . . . 70/53/t . . .66/52/t Colorado Springs .71/36/0.00 . . . 70/35/s . . 76/38/s Columbia, MO . . .85/59/0.00 . . . 81/60/t . . .81/58/t Columbia, SC . . . .85/53/0.00 . .86/58/pc . . .81/56/t Columbus, GA. . . .82/56/0.00 . .82/60/pc . . .81/58/t Columbus, OH. . . .78/45/0.00 . . . 75/58/t . . .76/56/t Concord, NH. . . . .58/39/0.00 . .51/30/pc . 52/36/sh Corpus Christi. . . .85/71/0.00 . .80/68/pc . 85/68/pc Dallas Ft Worth. . .76/66/0.00 . .78/65/pc . 78/63/pc Dayton . . . . . . . . .77/50/0.00 . . . 76/59/t . . .76/56/t Denver. . . . . . . . . .72/34/0.00 . . . 74/40/s . . 78/43/s Des Moines. . . . . .81/57/0.00 . . . 78/58/s . . 76/58/s Detroit. . . . . . . . . .75/39/0.00 . . . 71/53/t . . 66/50/c Duluth. . . . . . . . . .68/40/0.00 . .53/36/pc . 55/45/pc El Paso. . . . . . . . . .80/48/0.00 . .82/53/pc . 83/52/pc Fairbanks. . . . . . . . 17/-5/0.00 . . 13/-10/c .12/-15/pc Fargo. . . . . . . . . . .58/44/0.00 . .64/41/pc . . 74/51/s Flagstaff . . . . . . . .58/19/0.00 . . . 60/24/s . . 59/31/s

Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . . .80/38/0.00 . . . 73/50/t . . 70/55/c Green Bay. . . . . . .75/36/0.00 . .57/42/pc . 60/48/pc Greensboro. . . . . .82/53/0.00 . .83/58/pc . . .78/57/t Harrisburg. . . . . . .69/49/0.00 . .75/52/pc . . .72/50/t Hartford, CT . . . . .68/41/0.00 . .58/41/pc . 56/43/sh Helena. . . . . . . . . .49/27/0.00 . . .62/40/c . . 54/33/c Honolulu. . . . . . . .80/70/0.00 . . . 82/69/s . . 82/70/s Houston . . . . . . . .81/66/0.00 . .80/68/pc . 83/66/pc Huntsville . . . . . . .82/55/0.00 . . . 80/58/t . . .81/57/t Indianapolis . . . . .81/53/0.00 . . . 78/61/t . 78/58/pc Jackson, MS . . . . .81/64/0.00 . .85/61/pc . 83/61/pc Jacksonville. . . . . .84/56/0.06 . . . 78/59/s . 80/58/pc Juneau. . . . . . . . . .40/26/0.00 . . 37/28/rs . .39/27/rs Kansas City. . . . . .82/62/0.00 . .81/62/pc . 80/61/pc Lansing . . . . . . . . .79/37/0.00 . . . 74/55/t . 71/55/pc Las Vegas . . . . . . .77/57/0.00 . . . 77/62/s . 77/61/pc Lexington . . . . . . .77/51/0.00 . . . 77/58/t . . .77/56/t Lincoln. . . . . . . . . .81/50/0.00 . . . 80/54/s . . 80/58/s Little Rock. . . . . . .82/59/0.00 . .81/62/pc . 82/59/pc Los Angeles. . . . . .62/49/0.00 . .65/56/pc . . 61/53/c Louisville. . . . . . . .82/53/0.00 . . . 79/60/t . . .78/57/t Madison, WI . . . . .78/42/0.00 . .68/50/pc . 72/54/pc Memphis. . . . . . . .82/63/0.00 . . . 83/64/t . 83/63/pc Miami . . . . . . . . . .81/68/0.02 . .81/69/sh . 82/70/pc Milwaukee . . . . . .78/39/0.00 . .59/41/pc . 59/51/pc Minneapolis . . . . .73/48/0.00 . .71/46/pc . . 74/54/s Nashville. . . . . . . .83/54/0.00 . . . 80/60/t . . .80/58/t New Orleans. . . . .82/67/0.00 . .79/64/pc . 80/64/pc New York . . . . . . .70/57/0.00 . .60/46/pc . . .58/48/t Newark, NJ . . . . . .73/56/0.00 . .60/44/pc . 58/46/sh Norfolk, VA . . . . . .80/60/0.00 . . . 80/57/s . . .78/58/t Oklahoma City . . .75/64/0.00 . .80/61/pc . . 81/62/c Omaha . . . . . . . . .80/53/0.00 . . . 80/55/s . . 78/59/s Orlando. . . . . . . . .83/60/0.00 . .82/63/pc . 83/61/pc Palm Springs. . . . .83/52/0.00 . .78/53/pc . 76/61/pc Peoria . . . . . . . . . .81/54/0.00 . . . 80/59/t . 77/57/pc Philadelphia . . . . .74/50/0.00 . .71/52/pc . . .65/52/t Phoenix. . . . . . . . .82/52/0.00 . . . 85/53/s . . 85/58/s Pittsburgh . . . . . . .75/41/0.00 . . . 74/56/t . . .72/53/t Portland, ME. . . . .45/35/0.00 . .45/31/pc . 48/37/sh Providence . . . . . .64/44/0.00 . .52/37/pc . 52/43/sh Raleigh . . . . . . . . .84/54/0.00 . .84/59/pc . . .79/57/t

Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . . .63/33/0.00 . .72/46/pc . 77/47/pc Reno . . . . . . . . . . 59/46/trace . .63/42/sh . 58/30/sh Richmond . . . . . . .83/54/0.00 . . . 84/58/s . . .82/58/t Rochester, NY . . . .63/36/0.00 . . . 69/51/t . . .69/49/t Sacramento. . . . . .58/52/0.94 . . . 64/52/r . . .58/43/r St. Louis. . . . . . . . .86/60/0.00 . . . 85/60/t . 80/60/pc Salt Lake City . . . .64/52/0.00 . . .67/48/c . . 67/47/c San Antonio . . . . .80/67/0.00 . .83/67/pc . 80/67/pc San Diego . . . . . . .62/56/0.00 . .63/57/pc . . 63/55/c San Francisco . . . .58/55/0.65 . . . 59/49/r . . .57/45/r San Jose . . . . . . . .62/55/0.03 . . . 65/52/r . . .61/46/r Santa Fe . . . . . . . .68/25/0.00 . . . 65/39/s . 66/39/pc

Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Savannah . . . . . . 83/59/trace . . . 81/57/s . 81/57/pc Seattle. . . . . . . . . .46/35/0.19 . . . 53/40/r . 49/39/sh Sioux Falls. . . . . . .70/39/0.00 . .74/47/pc . . 77/54/s Spokane . . . . . . . .42/28/0.00 . .47/38/sh . .48/34/rs Springfield, MO . .79/59/0.00 . . . 77/59/t . . .78/57/t Tampa. . . . . . . . . .87/64/0.00 . .83/64/pc . 82/64/pc Tucson. . . . . . . . . .82/45/0.00 . . . 82/50/s . . 82/53/s Tulsa . . . . . . . . . . .75/63/0.00 . .80/61/pc . 79/63/pc Washington, DC . .81/54/0.00 . .80/59/pc . . .76/58/t Wichita . . . . . . . . .80/60/0.00 . .80/60/pc . 81/61/pc Yakima . . . . . . . . .42/26/0.02 . .55/35/sh . 51/32/sh Yuma. . . . . . . . . . .82/50/0.00 . . . 86/55/s . 86/57/pc

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . . .46/36/0.00 . . . 60/46/s . 58/45/pc Athens. . . . . . . . . .55/42/0.00 . .60/44/pc . . 62/47/s Auckland. . . . . . . .70/57/0.00 . . . 70/59/s . 70/63/pc Baghdad . . . . . . . .82/59/0.00 . . . 70/51/s . 68/48/pc Bangkok . . . . . . . .93/82/0.00 . .99/83/pc . 98/82/pc Beijing. . . . . . . . . .54/32/0.00 . .58/32/pc . 61/28/pc Beirut . . . . . . . . . .63/54/0.00 . .60/50/sh . 60/51/sh Berlin. . . . . . . . . . .46/43/0.00 . .55/41/pc . . 67/45/s Bogota . . . . . . . . .68/48/0.00 . .66/50/sh . 65/52/sh Budapest. . . . . . . .54/39/0.00 . . . 55/33/s . . 63/38/s Buenos Aires. . . . .72/57/0.00 . . . 73/60/s . . 78/64/s Cabo San Lucas . .86/59/0.00 . . . 85/61/s . 86/61/pc Cairo . . . . . . . . . . .68/55/0.00 . .63/48/pc . 65/47/pc Calgary . . . . . . . . .41/21/0.00 . . . 61/35/s . 44/26/pc Cancun . . . . . . . . .84/73/0.00 . .81/71/pc . 81/72/pc Dublin . . . . . . . . . .50/30/0.00 . . .49/46/c . 51/37/sh Edinburgh. . . . . . .50/41/0.00 . . .52/44/c . 53/37/sh Geneva . . . . . . . . .64/34/0.00 . . . 69/42/s . . 69/44/s Harare. . . . . . . . . .86/61/0.00 . . . 75/57/t . . .76/60/t Hong Kong . . . . . .68/59/0.00 . . .72/66/c . 74/65/pc Istanbul. . . . . . . . .50/41/0.00 . .44/35/sh . 45/36/sh Jerusalem . . . . . . .54/46/0.00 . .56/43/sh . 54/42/sh Johannesburg. . . .81/55/0.00 . . . 73/59/t . . .68/53/t Lima . . . . . . . . . . .77/70/0.00 . . .79/72/c . 80/72/pc Lisbon . . . . . . . . . .77/50/0.00 . .70/51/pc . . 66/50/s London . . . . . . . . .55/39/0.00 . .64/41/pc . 60/46/pc Madrid . . . . . . . . .77/37/0.00 . . . 74/39/s . . 67/40/c Manila. . . . . . . . . .86/79/0.00 . .87/76/pc . 88/78/pc

Mecca . . . . . . . . . .99/77/0.00 . . . 92/69/s . . 90/66/s Mexico City. . . . . .77/45/0.00 . . . 78/45/s . 75/48/pc Montreal. . . . . . . .36/32/0.00 . .50/33/pc . 49/40/sh Moscow . . . . . . . .32/21/0.00 . . .23/12/c . . 20/10/c Nairobi . . . . . . . . .90/57/0.00 . . . 87/58/s . . 88/59/s Nassau . . . . . . . . .82/72/0.00 . . . 79/69/t . 80/69/sh New Delhi. . . . . . .77/54/0.00 . . . 81/57/s . . 84/59/s Osaka . . . . . . . . . .50/30/0.00 . . . 50/35/s . 53/44/sh Oslo. . . . . . . . . . . .48/32/0.00 . . . 53/34/s . . 50/34/c Ottawa . . . . . . . . .45/37/0.00 . .52/33/pc . 51/40/sh Paris. . . . . . . . . . . .59/37/0.00 . . . 68/45/s . . 68/50/s Rio de Janeiro. . . .97/77/0.00 . . . 88/73/t . . .85/72/t Rome. . . . . . . . . . .63/43/0.00 . . . 68/44/s . . 69/46/s Santiago . . . . . . . .97/55/0.00 . . . 93/66/s . . 89/63/s Sao Paulo . . . . . . .86/66/0.00 . . . 84/66/t . 79/67/pc Sapporo . . . . . . . .36/36/0.00 . .34/24/pc . . 33/20/c Seoul. . . . . . . . . . .43/27/0.00 . . . 49/38/s . . 53/38/c Shanghai. . . . . . . .63/41/0.00 . . . 54/45/r . 61/54/sh Singapore . . . . . . .79/73/0.00 . . . 87/78/t . . .83/79/t Stockholm. . . . . . .41/30/0.00 . .52/37/pc . 54/39/pc Sydney. . . . . . . . . .79/66/0.00 . .82/67/pc . . .81/67/t Taipei. . . . . . . . . . .64/59/0.00 . . .77/64/c . 73/67/pc Tel Aviv . . . . . . . . .64/54/0.00 . .62/50/sh . 61/46/sh Tokyo. . . . . . . . . . .50/39/0.00 . .50/38/pc . 50/40/pc Toronto . . . . . . . . .64/34/0.00 . .65/45/pc . 69/48/pc Vancouver. . . . . . .43/36/0.00 . . . 50/41/r . 46/39/sh Vienna. . . . . . . . . .50/45/0.00 . .56/40/pc . . 64/44/s Warsaw. . . . . . . . .43/28/0.00 . . .40/35/c . 57/38/pc

Street lighting, including LEDs, along a thoroughfare closed for a lighting test in Seattle last week. Utilities want to know whether LED streetlights are a promising long-term technology. Photos by Kevin P. Casey New York Times News Service


SPORTS

Scoreboard, D2 Prep sports, D3 NBA, D3 Hunting & Fishing, D4 NHL, D3

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2012

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

TRACK & FIELD Eaton honored by USATF Ashton Eaton, a multi-event track standout from Bend, has been named USA Track & Field’s athlete of the week after winning the heptathlon in record fashion at the IAAF World Indoor Championships in Istanbul. A 2006 graduate of Bend’s Mountain View High School, Eaton broke his own world record in the sevenevent heptathlon by 146 points with a total of 6,645 points in the twoday competition. Eaton placed first in five events to finish well ahead of Oleksiy Kasyanov of Ukraine (6,071). — Bulletin staff report

WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL

PREP BOYS TRACK AND FIELD: SEASON OUTLOOK

Mountain View’s Modin a multi-event threat • Summit is favored for boys, girls district titles By Elise Gross The Bulletin

He can run. He can sprint. He can jump. Mountain View junior Mitch Modin is multitalented when it comes to track and field. Modin placed third at the 2011 Class 5A state meet in the long jump, in addition to competing in the 1,600-meter relay and the high jump. “Mitch could be the next great decathlete to come out of Bend,” says Mountain View coach Dave Hood. “He is a really fine athlete.” While the decathlon is not an Oregon School Activities Association track event, Modin would not be the first Mountain View athlete to venture after high school into the decathlon

OSU women face UC Davis CORVALLIS — Oregon State will face UC Davis for just the second time ever in women’s basketball when the two teams meet tonight at OSU’s Gill Coliseum in the first round of the 2012 Women’s National Invitation Tournament. Tipoff time for the Beavers (18-12) and the Aggies (17-12) is 7 p.m. Oregon State is playing in the WNIT for the ninth time, and the Beavers are coming into the tournament having lost five of their past six games, including a 6556 decision to Washington State last week in the first round of the Pac-12 Conference tournament. Guard/forward Earlysia Marchbanks, a 5foot-11-inch senior from Salem, leads Oregon State into the postseason with a scoring average of 12.3 points per game and a rebounding average of 7.2 per game. The All-Pac-12 selection also leads the Beavers this season in assists (114) and steals (67). The winner of tonight’s game in Corvallis advances to play the winner between Saint Mary’s and UNLV in the second round of the 64team tournament.

— an event combining 10 track and field events. Ashton Eaton, a 2006 graduate of Mountain View, went on to star in the decathlon at the University of Oregon and is now one of America’s top multi-event athletes. This season, the Cougars return three members of the 1,600 relay team that finished sixth at state last year. Modin, along with Dimitri Dillard and Matt Murphy, should solidify the relay team. Blake Bosch is back for Mountain View after placing second in the high jump at state last year. Fifth-place state 800-meter runner Chris McBride should lead the Cougars in the distance events. And Hayden Czmowski will be one of Central Oregon’s

throwers to beat, according to Hood. While area coaches agree that reigning 5A state champ Summit is the favorite for another Class 5A Special District 1 title, second place could be a tossup between Mountain View and Bend High. Last year, the Lava Bears placed second at districts with 71 points and went on to place 14th at state. The Cougars settled for third at districts (63 points) but were better equipped than Bend for the state meet, where they finished eighth. Bend returns standout senior 400-meter runner Tom Steelhammer, as well as Danny Verdieck, who finished third in the 110 hurdles at state in 2011. The Lava Bears will also rely on J.C. Grim, who placed fifth in both the high jump and the triple jump at state last season. See Track / D4

Matthew Aimonetti / For The Bulletin

Summit’s Travis Neuman runs to victory in the Class 5A state cross-country meet in the fall. Neuman is the returning district champ in the 1,500 meters and the 3,000.

Inside • A look at all the teams in the area competing in boys track, D4

The salmon are coming • Spring chinook salmon run on Lower Deschutes should make for prime fishing By Mark Morical

HUNTING & FISHING

The Bulletin

This year’s run of spring chinook salmon on the Lower Deschutes could be one of the most substantial of the last 30 years. Biologists are predicting that some 14,500 hatchery spring chinook will return to the Warm Springs River or the Round Butte Fish Hatchery. That is more than enough to open a spring season for hatchery (adipose fin-clipped) chinook on the Lower Deschutes from Sherars Falls downstream to the mouth of the river. According to the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, the season will run

from April 15 to July 31. And judging from the projected size of the run, the fishing should be outstanding. The predicted run of hatchery spring chinook would be one of the largest returns since the hatchery program began on the Deschutes in the mid-1970s and more than double last spring’s return, said Rod French, a fish biologist for the ODFW in The Dalles.

“We have fairly good confidence that it should come in close to that (14,500),” French said. “Even if it’s only half that, it would still be a very good run. It should be one of the better years we’ve seen in recent history.” Spring chinook salmon returning from the Pacific Ocean must make their way east over Bonneville and The Dalles dams on the Columbia River before turning south into the Deschutes. Biologists are also predicting a robust run of 314,000 spring chinook (hatchery and wild) on the Columbia. See Salmon / D4

Below Mike Gauvin, of Madras, shows off a spring chinook he caught near Sherars Falls in 2008. Mike Gauvin / submitted to The Bulletin

— Bulletin staff report

NFL Lions, Megatron ink record deal EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. — Calvin Johnson got the biggest contract in NFL history Wednesday, and he wasn’t even a free agent. The All-Pro wide receiver’s eight-year deal through the 2019 season is worth $132 million, with $60 million guaranteed, surpassing the $120 million with $50 million guaranteed being paid to Arizona’s Larry Fitzgerald. Another All-Pro, guard Carl Nicks, left New Orleans for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers and a five-year contract. Considered one of the NFL’s best pass blockers, Nicks is a two-time Pro Bowl player and was a key on the Saints’ record-setting offense. Former 1,000-yard rusher Peyton Hillis is getting a fresh start in Kansas City after a drama- and injury-filled second season in Cleveland after rushing for 1,177 yards in 2010. For more NFL transactions, see Scoreboard, D2 — The Associated Press

D

PREP GIRLS GOLF

Summit freshman wins tourney at Crooked River Bulletin staff report CROOKED RIVER RANCH — Freshman Madison Odiorne won her first high school golf tournament Wednesday, leading the Summit girls to a team victory at Crooked River Ranch Golf Course. Odiorne shot a 6-over-par 78 to take

Inside • Prep roundup and prep notebook, D3

medalist honors, besting teammate Kristen Parr and Bend’s Heidi Froelich, who each posted an 80 to tie for second place.

The Storm won the meet with 334 strokes. The Lava Bears finished second with 341 strokes and Crook County placed third with a 370. Bend High’s Lili Bornio provided the highlight of the day with hole-in-one on the 106-yard, par-3 hole No. 11.

MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL

Beavs take opener in CBI The Associated Press CORVALLIS — Jared Cunningham had 22 points, eight rebounds and five assists, and Oregon State pulled away from Western Illinois in the second half for an 80-59 win in a College Basketball Invitational openinground game at Gill Coliseum. Ahmad Starks added 16 points and Devon Collier 12 for the Beavers (20-14), who will host TCU on Monday in the round of 16. The Horned Frogs defeated Milwaukee 83-73 in a Tuesday openinground game. Don McAvoy had a careerhigh 19 points for Western Illinois (18-15). Oregon State had no problem getting up to play in one of college basketball’s lower postseason tournament. “Once you tell us we’re back on the floor and can play basketball, we’re going to go at it hard,” Cunningham said. The Beavers won the CBI in 2009 in coach Craig Robinson’s first season. The victory gave Oregon State its first 20-win season since the Beavers won 22 games in the 1989-90 season. Western Illinois closed what had been a doubledigit deficit most of the game to nine at 46-37 on Ceola Clark’s three-pointer with 16:50 remaining. But Oregon State answered with six straight points, the last two on a Starks jumper to go up 15. The Leathernecks got no closer than 13 from there, and the Beavers went on to lead by as many as 25. Oregon State shot 30 of 46 overall (65.2 percent), while Western Illinois was 24 of 58 (41.4). Oregon State started fast, leading 16-2 after Angus Brandt’s three-pointer less than four minutes into the game. Western Illinois closed the gap back to nine at 23-14 on a Jack Houpt three-pointer. Oregon State led by as many as 16 three different times in the first half. But Western Illinois didn’t go away, scoring the last five points of the half to close within 44-34. Cunningham had 18 points at halftime. McAvoy, averaging 2.2 points per game, had 12 at halftime.


D2

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2012

O  A TELEVISION Today GOLF 6:30 a.m.: European Tour, Andalucia Open, first round, Golf Channel, Noon: PGA Tour, Transitions Championship, first round, Golf Channel. 3:30 p.m.: LPGA Tour, LPGA Founders Cup, first round, Golf Channel. WINTER SPORTS 9 a.m.: Winter X Games Europe, men’s skiing, slopestyle, snowboarding superpipe, (sameday tape), ESPN2. BASKETBALL 9:10 a.m.: Men’s college, NCAA tournament, second round, Colorado State vs. Murray State, CBS. 9:40 a.m.: Men’s college, NCAA tournament, second round, Southern Miss vs. Kansas State, truTV. 10:40 a.m.: Men’s college, NCAA tournament, second round, Davidson vs. Louisville, TBS. 11:10 a.m.: Men’s college, NCAA tournament, second round, Montana vs. Wisconsin, TNT. 11:45 a.m.: Men’s college, NCAA tournament, second round, BYU vs. Marquette, CBS. 12:10 p.m.: Men’s college, NCAA tournament, second round, UNCAsheville vs. Syracuse, truTV. 1:10 p.m.: Men’s college, NCAA tournament, second round, Long Beach State vs. New Mexico, TBS. 1:40 p.m.: Men’s college, NCAA tournament, second round, Harvard vs. Vanderbilt, TNT. 3:50 p.m.: Men’s college, NCAA tournament, second round, W. Kentucky vs. Kentucky, TBS. 4:15 p.m.: Men’s college, NCAA tournament, second round, VCU vs. Wichita State, CBS. 4:20 p.m.: Men’s college, NCAA tournament, second round, West Virginia vs. Gonzaga, TNT. 4:27 p.m.: Men’s college, NCAA tournament, second round, South Dakota State vs. Baylor, truTV. 6:20 p.m.: Men’s college, NCAA tournament, second round, UConn vs. Iowa State, TBS. 6:45 p.m.: Men’s college, NCAA tournament, second round, New Mexico State vs. Indiana, CBS. 6:50 p.m.: Men’s college, NCAA tournament, second round, Loyola (Md.) vs. Ohio State, TNT. 6:57 p.m.: Men’s college, NCAA tournament, second round, Colorado vs. UNLV, truTV. BASEBALL 7 p.m.: MLB, spring training, San Francisco Giants vs. Seattle Mariners, Root Sports.

Friday GOLF 6:30 a.m.: European Tour, Andalucia Open, second round, Golf Channel, Noon: PGA Tour, Transitions Championship, second round, Golf Channel. 3:30 p.m.: LPGA Tour, LPGA Founders Cup, second round, Golf Channel.

WINTER SPORTS 9 a.m.: Winter X Games Europe, women’s and men’s snowboard slopestyle finals, (same-day tape), ESPN2. BASKETBALL 9:15 a.m.: Men’s college, NCAA tournament, second round, Texas vs. Cincinnati, CBS. 9:40 a.m.: Men’s college, NCAA tournament, second round, North Carolina State vs. San Diego State, truTV. 10:40 a.m.: Men’s college, NCAA tournament, second round, Alabama vs. Creighton, TBS. 11:10 a.m.: Men’s college, NCAA tournament, second round, Virginia vs. Florida, TNT. 11:45 a.m.: Men’s college, NCAA tournament, second round, vs. Bonaventure vs. Florida State, CBS. 12:10 p.m.: Men’s college, NCAA tournament, second round, Belmont vs. Georgetown, truTV. 1:10 p.m.: Men’s college, NCAA tournament, second round, North Carolina vs. Vermont, TBS. 1:40 p.m.: Men’s college, NCAA tournament, second round, Norfolk State vs. Missouri, TNT. 3:50 p.m.: Men’s college, NCAA tournament, second round, Saint Louis vs. Memphis, TBS. 4 p.m.: NBA, Miami Heat at Philadelphia 76ers, ESPN. 4:15 p.m.: Men’s college, NCAA tournament, second round, Lehigh vs. Duke, CBS. 4:20 p.m.: Men’s college, NCAA tournament, second round, Ohio vs. Michigan, TNT. 4:27 p.m.: Men’s college, NCAA tournament, second round, Purdue vs. St. Mary’s, truTV. 5 p.m.: NBA, Portland Trail Blazers at Chicago Bulls, Comcast SportsNet Northwest. 6:20 p.m.: Men’s college, NCAA tournament, second round, LIU Brooklyn vs. Michigan State, TBS. 6:30 p.m.: NBA, San Antonio Spurs at Oklahoma City Thunder, ESPN. 6:45 p.m.: Men’s college, NCAA tournament, second round, Xavier vs. Notre Dame, CBS. 6:50 p.m.: Men’s college, NCAA tournament, second round, Temple vs. South Florida, TNT. 6:57 p.m.: Men’s college, NCAA tournament, second round, Detroit vs. Kansas, truTV. TENNIS 1 p.m.: ATP, BNP Paribas Open, men’s third quarterfinal, ESPN2. 8 p.m.: WTA, BNP Paribas Open, women’s second semifinal, ESPN2. HOCKEY 2 p.m.: College, Hockey East, first semifinal, NBC Sports Network. 5 p.m.: College, Hockey East, second semifinal, NBC Sports Network. 7 p.m.: Western Hockey League, Seattle Thunderbirds at Spokane Chiefs, Root Sports. BASEBALL 3:30 p.m.: MLB, spring training, San Francisco Giants vs. Seattle Mariners, Root Sports. BOXING 6 p.m.: Tim Coleman vs. Kendall Holt, ESPN2.

RADIO Friday BASEBALL 2:30 p.m.: College, Oregon State at Cal, KICE-AM 940. BASKETBALL 5 p.m.: NBA, Portland Trail Blazers at Chicago Bulls, KBND-AM 1110, KRCO-AM 690. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

SCOREBOARD ON DECK Today Baseball: Klamath Union at Bend, 4 p.m. Softball: La Pine at Bend, 4 p.m.; Sisters at Mountain View, 4:30 p.m.; Crook County at Madras, 4 p.m. Track and field: Crook County, Madras, Culver at Crook County Icebreaker, 3:30 p.m. Boys tennis: Madras at Crook County, 4 p.m. Girls tennis: Sisters at Bend, 4 p.m.; Crook County at Madras, 4 p.m. Friday Baseball: Sisters at Summit, 4:30 p.m.; Redmond at Crook County (DH), 2 p.m.; McLoughlin at Madras, TBA; Burns at Culver (DH), 1 p.m. Softball: Burns at Culver (DH), 1 p.m. Boys golf: Madras at The Dalles, 10 a.m. Boys tennis: Redmond at South Salem, 8 a.m. Girls tennis: Redmond at South Salem, 11 a.m.; Redmond at West Salem, 3:30 p.m.

BASEBALL MLB MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL Spring Training Wednesday’s Games Detroit 7, N.Y. Mets 6, 10 innings Toronto 7, N.Y. Yankees 5 Houston 4, St. Louis 3 Pittsburgh 11, Baltimore 5 Miami 4, Tampa Bay 2 Minnesota 6, Philadelphia 4 San Diego 9, Cincinnati 4 San Francisco 2, Cleveland 2, tie, 10 innings Milwaukee 10, Chicago Cubs 2 Colorado (ss) 6, Texas 1 Chicago White Sox 9, L.A. Angels 7 San Diego 8, Arizona (ss) 0 Atlanta 6, Washington 5 L.A. Dodgers 9, Cincinnati 1 Seattle 6, Kansas City 2 Colorado (ss) 7, Arizona (ss) 4

BASKETBALL Men’s college NCAA Tournament All Times PDT ——— FIRST ROUND At UD Arena Dayton, Ohio Tuesday, March 13 Western Kentucky 59, MVSU 58 BYU 78, Iona 72 Wednesday, March 14 Vermont 71, Lamar 59 South Florida 65, California 54 EAST REGIONAL Second Round Today, March 15 At The CONSOL Energy Center Pittsburgh Kansas State (21-10) vs. Southern Mississippi (258), 9:40 a.m. Syracuse (31-2) vs. UNC Asheville (24-9), 30 minutes following Gonzaga (25-6) vs. West Virginia (19-13), 4:20 p.m. Ohio State (27-7) vs. Loyola (Md.) (24-8), 30 minutes following At The Pit Albuquerque, N.M. Wisconsin (24-9) vs. Montana (25-6), 11:10 a.m. Vanderbilt (24-10) vs. Harvard (26-4), 30 minutes following Friday, March 16 At Bridgestone Arena Nashville, Tenn. Cincinnati (24-10) vs. Texas (20-13), 9:15 a.m. Florida State (24-9) vs. St. Bonaventure (20-11), 30 minutes following SOUTH REGIONAL Second Round Today, March 15 At The KFC Yum! Center Louisville, Ky. Kentucky (32-2) vs. Western Kentucky (16-18), 3:50 p.m. Iowa State (22-10) vs. UConn (20-13), 30 minutes following At The Pit Albuquerque, N.M. Baylor (27-7) vs. South Dakota State (27-7), 4:27 p.m. UNLV (26-8) vs. Colorado (23-11), 30 minutes following At The Rose Garden Portland Wichita State (27-5) vs. VCU (28-6), 4:15 p.m. Indiana (25-8) vs. New Mexico State (26-9), 30 minutes following Friday, March 16 At Greensboro Coliseum Greensboro, N.C. Duke (27-6) vs. Lehigh (26-7), 4:15 p.m. Notre Dame (22-11) vs. Xavier (21-12), 30 minutes following MIDWEST REGIONAL Second Round Friday, March 16 At Greensboro Coliseum Greensboro, N.C. Creighton (28-5) vs. Alabama (21-11), 10:40 a.m. North Carolina (29-5) vs. Vermont (24-11), 30 minutes following At Nationwide Arena Columbus, Ohio San Diego State (26-7) vs. N.C. State (22-12), 9:40 a.m. Georgetown (23-8) vs. Belmont (27-7), 30 minutes following At Bridgestone Arena Nashville, Tenn. Michigan (24-9) vs. Ohio (27-7), 4:20 p.m. Temple (24-7) vs. South Florida (21-13), 30 minutes following At CenturyLink Center Omaha, Neb. Saint Mary’s (Calif.) (27-5) vs. Purdue (21-12), 4:27 p.m. Kansas (27-6) vs. Detroit (22-13), 30 minutes following WEST REGIONAL Second Round Today, March 15 At The KFC Yum! Center Louisville, Ky. Murray State (30-1) vs. Colorado State (20-11), 9:15 a.m. Marquette (25-7) vs. BYU (26-8), 30 minutes following At The Rose Garden Portland Louisville (26-9) vs. Davidson (25-7), 10:40 a.m. New Mexico (27-6) vs. Long Beach State (25-8), 30 minutes following Friday, March 16 At Nationwide Arena Columbus, Ohio Memphis (26-8) vs. Saint Louis (25-7), 3:50 p.m. Michigan State (27-7) vs. LIU (25-8), 30 minutes following

At CenturyLink Center Omaha, Neb. Florida (23-10) vs. Virginia (22-9), 11:10 a.m. Missouri (30-4) vs. Norfolk State (25-9), 30 minutes following National Invitation Tournament All Times PDT ——— First Round Tuesday, March 13 UMass 101, Mississippi State 96, 2OT Seton Hall 63, Stony Brook 61 Iowa 84, Dayton 75 Tennessee 65, Savannah State 51 Northwestern 76, Akron 74 Middle Tennessee 86, Marshall 78 Oregon 96, LSU 76 Washington 82, Texas-Arlington 72 Stanford 76, Cleveland State 65 Wednesday, March 14 Minnesota 70, La Salle 61 Drexel 81, UCF 56 Northern Iowa 67, Saint Joseph’s 65 Miami 66, Valparaiso 50 Bucknell 65, Arizona 54 Nevada 68, Oral Roberts 59 Illinois State 96, Mississippi 93, OT College Basketball Invitational All Times PDT ——— First Round Tuesday, March 13 TCU 83, Milwaukee 73 Princeton 95, Evansville 86 Washington State 89, San Francisco 75 Wednesday, March 14 Pittsburgh 81, Wofford 63 Penn 74, Quinnipiac63 Butler 75, Delaware 58 Wyoming 78, North Dakota State 75 Oregon State 80, Western Illinois 59 Quarterfinals Monday, March 19 TCU (18-14) vs. Oregon State (20-14) Washington State (16-16) vs. Wyoming (21-11) Butler (21-14) vs. Penn (20-12) Princeton (20-11) vs. Pittsburgh (18-16) Wednesday’s summary

Oregon State 80, W. Illinois 59 W. ILLINOIS (18-15) Emegano 4-10 0-0 9, Houpt 2-7 0-0 6, Parks 3-8 0-0 6, Clark III 4-11 0-0 11, Roberts-Burnett 3-5 0-0 6, Packer 0-0 0-0 0, McAvoy 7-15 2-4 19, McDonald 1-2 0-0 2. Totals 24-58 2-4 59. OREGON ST. (20-14) Moreland 1-1 2-3 4, Collier 3-4 6-6 12, Brandt 4-5 1-1 10, Cunningham 9-14 3-3 22, Starks 6-12 2-2 16, Barton 1-2 0-0 2, Jones 0-0 0-0 0, Burton 4-4 0-0 8, Powers 0-0 0-0 0, Nelson 2-4 1-2 6. Totals 30-46 15-17 80. Halftime—Oregon St. 44-34. 3-Point Goals—W. Illinois 9-18 (McAvoy 3-5, Clark III 3-6, Houpt 2-5, Emegano 1-2), Oregon St. 5-12 (Starks 2-5, Brandt 11, Nelson 1-2, Cunningham 1-4). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—W. Illinois 15 (Parks 6), Oregon St. 37 (Burton, Cunningham 8). Assists—W. Illinois 13 (Clark III 5), Oregon St. 16 (Cunningham 5). Total Fouls—W. Illinois 17, Oregon St. 10. A—1,931. CollegeInsider.com Tournament All Times PDT ——— First Round Tuesday, March 13 Robert Morris 67, Indiana State 60 Mercer 68, Tennessee State 60 Old Dominion 68, Coastal Carolina 66 Georgia State 74, Tennessee Tech 43 Toledo 76, McNeese State 63 Weber State 72, Utah Valley State 69 Wednesday, March 14 Manhattan 89, Albany (NY) 79 Fairfield 68, Yale 56 Oakland 86, Bowling Green 69 Buffalo 78, American 61 Drake 70, North Dakota 64 Rice 68, La.-Lafayette 63 Idaho 86, UC Santa Barbara 83 Utah State 75, CS Bakersfield 69 Loyola Marymount 88, Cal State Fullerton 79 Today, March 15 Kent State (21-11) at SC-Upstate (20-12), 4 p.m.

Women’s college NCAA Tournament All Times PDT ——— DES MOINES REGIONAL First Round Saturday, March 17 At Allstate Arena Rosemont, Ill. Tennessee (24-8) vs. UT-Martin (23-8), 1:10 p.m. DePaul (22-10) vs. BYU (26-6), 30 minutes following Sunday, March 18 At Stroh Center Bowling Green, Ohio Ohio St. (25-6) vs. Florida (19-12), 9:15 a.m. Baylor (34-0) vs. UC Santa Barbara (17-15)), 30 minutes following At Carmichael Arena Chapell Hill, N.C. Georgetown (22-8) vs. Fresno St. (28-5), 9:20 a.m. Georgia Tech (24-8) vs. Sacred Heart (25-7), 30 minutes following At Jack Stephens Center Little Rock, Ark. Delaware (30-1) vs. UALR (20-12), 2:20 p.m. Nebraska (24-8) vs. Kansas (19-12) 30 minutes following FRESNO REGIONAL First Round Saturday, March 17 At Ted Constant Convocation Center Norfolk, Va. West Virginia (23-9) vs. Texas (18-13), 8:10 a.m. Stanford (31-1) vs. Hampton (26-4), 30 minutes following At Mackey Arena West Lafayette, Ind. South Carolina (23-9) vs. Eastern Michigan (23-8), 8:05 a.m. Purdue (24-8) vs. South Dakota St. (24-8), 30 minutes following Sunday, March 18 At Lloyd Noble Center Norman, Okla. St. John’s (NY) (22-9) vs. Creighton (20-12), 2:05 p.m. Oklahoma (20-12) vs. Michigan (20-11), 30 minutes following At Memorial Gymnasium Nashville, Tenn. Vanderbilt (22-9) vs. Middle Tennessee (26-6), 2:10 p.m. Duke (24-5) vs. Samford (20-12), 30 minutes following RALEIGH REGIONAL First Round Saturday, March 17 At Reed Arena College Station, Texas Arkansas (23-8) vs. Dayton (23-6), 1:05 p.m.

Texas A&M (22-10) vs. Albany (NY) (23-9), 30 minutes following At Comcast Center College Park, Md. Maryland (28-4) vs. Navy (18-13), 8:15 a.m. Louisville (22-9) vs. Michigan St. (20-11), 30 minutes following Sunday, March 18 At Joyce Center Notre Dame, Ind. California (24-9) vs. Iowa (19-11), 9:10 a.m. Notre Dame (30-3) vs. Liberty (24-8), 30 minutes following At Donlad L. Tucker Center Tallahassee, Fla. Georgia (22-8) vs. Marist (25-7), 9:05 a.m. St. Bonaventure (29-3) vs. Florida Gulf Coast (29-2), 30 minutes following KINGSTON REGIONAL First Round Saturday, March 17 At Webster Bank Arena Bridgeport, Conn. Kansas St. (19-13) vs. Princeton (24-4), 8:20 a.m. Connecticut (29-4) vs. Prairie View (17-15), 30 minutes following At McCarthey Athletic Center Spokane, Wash. Rutgers (22-9) vs. Gonzaga (26-5), 1:15 p.m. Miami (25-5) vs. Idaho St. (24-7), 30 minutes following At Hilton Coliseum Ames, Iowa Kentucky (25-6) vs. McNeese St. (26-7), 1:20 p.m. Green Bay (30-1) vs. Iowa St. (18-12), 30 minutes following Sunday, March 18 At Maravich Center Baton Rouge, La. Penn St. (24-6) vs. UTEP (29-3), 2:15 p.m. LSU (22-10) vs. San Diego State (25-6), 30 minutes following Women’s National Invitation Tournament All Times PDT ——— First Round Wednesday, March 14 Colorado 54, Northern Colorado 42 Washington 90, Cal Poly 71 Today, March 15 Miami (Ohio) (21-9) at Richmond (22-8), 3 p.m. Drexel (18-13) at Fairfield (24-8), 4 p.m. American (23-7) at Villanova (17-14), 4 p.m. Quinnipiac (22-9) at Temple (21-9), 4 p.m. Harvard (17-11) at Hofstra (19-11), 4 p.m. VCU (17-14) at Bowling Green (24-6), 4 p.m. Boston University (23-8) at Saint Joseph’s (21-10), 4 p.m. Appalachian State (25-6) at UNC Wilmington (20-12), 4 p.m. Howard (24-8) at Virginia (22-10), 4 p.m. Davidson (22-9) at James Madison (24-7), 4 p.m. Wake Forest (19-13) at Charlotte (16-13), 4 p.m. Stetson (23-10) at Florida International (22-10), 4 p.m. Florida Atlantic (17-12) at South Florida (17-15), 4 p.m. High Point (20-12) at N.C. State (18-15), 4 p.m. Eastern Illinois (22-8) at Texas Tech (19-13), 5 p.m. MVSU (18-13) at Tulane (22-10), 5 p.m. Drake (18-15) at South Dakota (22-7), 5 p.m. UMKC (22-11) at Missouri State (22-8), 5 p.m. Chattanooga (22-9) at Memphis (24-7), 5 p.m. Central Michigan (20-15) at Illinois State (18-12), 5:05 p.m. Utah State (21-9) at Utah (15-15), 6 p.m. UC Davis (17-12) at Oregon State (18-12), 7 p.m. UNLV (22-9) at Saint Mary’s (Cal.) (21-10), 7 p.m. Friday, March 16 Syracuse (18-14) at Hartford (19-12), 4 p.m. Detroit (20-13) at Toledo (21-9), 4 p.m. Duquesne (20-11) at Cincinnati (15-15), 4 p.m. Central Arkansas (24-6) at Oklahoma State (16-12), 5 p.m. Oral Roberts (20-10) at Wichita State (19-12), 5:05 p.m. Arizona State (20-11) at Pacific (17-130, 7 p.m. CS Northridge (17-13) at San Diego (22-8), 7 p.m.

TENNIS Professional BNP Paribas Open Wednesday At The Indian Wells Tennis Garden Indian Wells, Calif. Purse: Men: $5.55 million (Masters 1000); $5.44 million (Premier) Surface: Hard-Outdoor Singles Men Fourth Round Novak Djokovic (1), Serbia, def. Pablo Andujar, Spain, 6-0, 6-7 (5), 6-2. Nicolas Almagro (12), Spain, def. Tomas Berdych (7), Czech Republic, 6-4, 6-0. John Isner (11), United States, def. Matthew Ebden, Australia, 6-4, 7-5. David Nalbandian, Argentina, def. Jo-Wilfried Tsonga (6), France, 3-6, 7-5, 6-3. Rafael Nadal (2), Spain, def. Alexandr Dolgopolov (21), Ukraine, 6-3, 6-2. Roger Federer (3), Switzerland, def. Thomaz Bellucci, Brazil, 3-6, 6-3, 6-4. Gilles Simon (13), France, def. Ryan Harrison, United States, 7-6 (0), 5-7, 6-1. Women Quarterfinals Victoria Azarenka (1), Belarus, def. Agnieszka Radwanska (5), Poland, 6-0, 6-2. Angelique Kerber (18), Germany, def. Li Na (8), China, 6-4, 6-2.

SOCCER MLS MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT ——— Saturday’s Games Chicago at Montreal, 11 a.m. Houston at San Jose, 2 p.m. Portland at FC Dallas, 5:30 p.m. New England at Sporting Kansas City, 5:30 p.m. Toronto FC at Seattle FC, 7 p.m. New York at Real Salt Lake, 7 p.m. Vancouver at Chivas USA, 7:30 p.m. Sunday’s Games Colorado at Philadelphia, 1 p.m. D.C. United at Los Angeles, 4 p.m.

HOCKEY NHL NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE All Times PDT ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts N.Y. Rangers 69 44 18 7 95 Pittsburgh 68 42 21 5 89 Philadelphia 69 40 22 7 87 New Jersey 70 40 25 5 85 N.Y. Islanders 70 28 31 11 67 Northeast Division

GF 192 219 223 195 164

GA 150 173 197 182 211

GP W L OT Pts GF GA 69 40 26 3 83 223 170 71 36 25 10 82 218 209 71 33 29 9 75 178 201 70 30 32 8 68 202 217 71 28 32 11 67 188 198 Southeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Florida 69 33 23 13 79 171 193 Washington 70 36 28 6 78 189 197 Winnipeg 70 33 29 8 74 186 197 Tampa Bay 69 32 30 7 71 197 234 Carolina 70 26 29 15 67 183 211 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA St. Louis 71 45 18 8 98 186 139 Detroit 71 44 24 3 91 219 171 Nashville 69 41 21 7 89 200 179 Chicago 71 38 25 8 84 213 209 Columbus 70 22 41 7 51 161 226 Northwest Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Vancouver 70 42 20 8 92 219 177 Colorado 72 38 30 4 80 191 193 Calgary 70 33 25 12 78 176 193 Minnesota 70 29 31 10 68 150 194 Edmonton 70 27 36 7 61 185 209 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Dallas 71 39 27 5 83 188 188 Phoenix 71 35 25 11 81 187 182 San Jose 69 34 25 10 78 189 178 Los Angeles 70 33 25 12 78 159 154 Anaheim 71 30 30 11 71 177 196 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Wednesday’s Games Colorado 5, Buffalo 4, SO Montreal 3, Ottawa 2, SO Winnipeg 5, Dallas 2 Edmonton 3, Columbus 0 Phoenix 5, Vancouver 4 Anaheim 4, Detroit 0 Today’s Games Colorado at New Jersey, 4 p.m. Philadelphia at N.Y. Islanders, 4 p.m. Pittsburgh at N.Y. Rangers, 4 p.m. St. Louis at Carolina, 4 p.m. Toronto at Tampa Bay, 4:30 p.m. Boston at Florida, 4:30 p.m. Phoenix at Calgary, 6 p.m. Nashville at San Jose, 7:30 p.m. Boston Ottawa Buffalo Toronto Montreal

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES—Optioned INF Joe Mahoney to Norfolk (IL). CHICAGO WHITE SOX—Optioned RHP Gregory Infante to Charlotte (IL). Reassigned C Damaso Espino, RHP Brian Omogrosso, RHP Jacob Petricka, OF Brandon Short and OF Delwyn Young to their minor-league camp. Added INF Tyler Saladino to major-league camp. National League ATLANTA BRAVES—Optioned RHP Erik Cordier to Gwinnett (IL). Reassigned RHP Jason Rice, C Matt Kennelly, OF Todd Cunningham and OF Stefan Gartrell to their minor league camp. NEW YORK METS—Suspended C Eric Langill for seven days without pay after being charged in a drunken driving accident. ST. LOUIS CARDINALS—Optioned RHP Maikel Cleto, RHP Brandon Dickson and INF Pete Kozma to Memphis (PCL) and INF Zack Cox to Springfield (Texas). Reassigned RHP Joe Kelly, RHP Shelby Miller and LHP Kevin Siegrist to their minor league camp. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association CHICAGO BULLS—Signed G Mike James to a 10-day contract. NEW YORK KNICKS—Announced the resignation of coach Mike D’Antoni. Named Mike Woodson interim coach. FOOTBALL National Football League ARIZONA CARDINALS—Agreed to terms with OL Adam Snyder on a five-year contract. CHICAGO BEARS—Agreed to terms with KR-PR Eric Weems on a three-year contract. CLEVELAND BROWNS—Released G Eric Steinbach. DALLAS COWBOYS—Agreed to terms with CB Brandon Carr on a five-year contract and QB Kyle Orton on a three-year contract. Signed OL Mackenzy Bernadeau to a four-year contract and FB Lawrence Vickers to a two-year contract. DETROIT LIONS—Signed WR Calvin Johnson an eight-year contract. INDIANAPOLIS COLTS—Agreed to terms with WR Reggie Wayne on a three-year contract. Signed DE Cory Redding. Acquired OL Winston Justice and a 2012 sixth-round draft pick from Philadelphia for a 2012 sixth-round draft pick. JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS—Agreed to terms with DE Jeremy Mincey on a four-year contract and WR Laurent Robinson to a five-year contract. KANSAS CITY CHIEFS—Signed RB Peyton Hillis. MINNESOTA VIKINGS—Signed TE John Carlson to a five-year contract. NEW ORLEANS SAINTS—Named Henry Ellard wide receivers coach. NEW YORK GIANTS—Signed TE Martellus Bennett. NEW YORK JETS—Re-signed K Nick Folk. OAKLAND RAIDERS—Released G Cooper Carlisle and DT John Henderson. PHILADELPHIA EAGLES—Agreed to terms with DE Trent Cole on a four-year contract extension through 2017 and with WR DeSean Jackson on a fiveyear contract. ST. LOUIS RAMS—Traded their 2012 first-round draft pick to Washington for its 2012 first and secondround draft picks and its 2013 and 2014 first-round draft picks. Agreed to terms with CB Cortland Finnegan on a five-year contract. SAN DIEGO CHARGERS—Re-signed OT Jared Gaither to a four-year contract. Signed LB Jarret Johnson to a four-year contract. Agreed to terms with TE Kory Sperry on a one-year contract. TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS—Signed G Carl Nicks and CB Eric Wright to five-year contracts. Released C Jeff Faine. WASHINGTON REDSKINS—Signed WR Pierre Garcon and WR Joshua Morgan. HOCKEY National Hockey League MONTREAL CANADIENS—Recalled D Frederic StDenis from Hamilton (AHL). OTTAWA SENATORS—Signed F Cole Schneider to a two-year contract and assigned him to Binghamton (AHL). SAN JOSE SHARKS—Signed F Sebastian Stalberg to a two-year contract. SOCCER Major League Soccer NEW ENGLAND REVOLUTION—Signed D Florian Lechner. TENNIS ATP TOUR—Fined Michael Llodra $2,500 for verbal abuse during a match in the BNP Paribas Open. COLLEGE CENTRAL MICHIGAN—Fired basketball coach Ernie Zeigler. KENT STATE—Fired women’s basketball coach Bob Lindsay. VILLANOVA—Announced junior G Maalik Wayns will enter the NBA draft and will not hire an agent.

S   B Basketball • South Florida, Vermont advance in NCAAs: South Florida introduced the NCAA tournament to the Big East’s nastiest defense in the first round Wednesday night in Dayton, Ohio. The Bulls allowed only 13 points in the first half and cruised to a 65-54 victory over California. South Florida (21-13) plays No. 5 seed Temple in Nashville on Friday, a matchup of teams known for gritty defense. California (2410) didn’t score over the last 8:55 of the first half, missing 10 shots and turning it over twice while South Florida pulled ahead 36-13. In the earlier game in Day-

ton, Four McGlynn came off the bench to score 18 points and Vermont grabbed an early lead before hanging on to beat Lamar. The Catamounts (24-11) play top-seeded North Carolina on Friday in Greensboro, N.C.

Winter sports • Kroell wins downhill title: Austrian veteran Klaus Kroell won the World Cup downhill title Wednesday in Austria after holding on to his lead over Swiss rivals Beat Feuz and Didier Cuche in the final event of the season. Kroell finished the race seventh and edged Feuz by seven

points after the Swiss finished second in the race behind winner Aksel Lund Svindal. Cuche, who will retire after the season, placed 17th and failed to score points. • Vonn takes World Cup downhill: Lindsey Vonn won a downhill by nearly a second Wednesday in Austria for her 12th victory of the season, the second-highest total in World Cup history. It also was the American’s 17th top-three finish in a race this season, one short of the World Cup record. Vonn, who clinched her fourth overall title last week and her fifth consecutive downhill title last month, finished Wednesday’s race in 1 minute, 46.56

seconds. That was 0.92 ahead of Marion Rolland of France. Tina Maze of Slovenia was third.

Football • Bears WR Marshall accused of punching woman: Less than a day after the Chicago Bears traded for Brandon Marshall, the Pro Bowl receiver has been accused in yet another off-field incident. New York City police say a woman has filed a complaint alleging Marshall punched her in the face at a nightclub over the weekend. Marshall was traded from the Miami Dolphins to the Bears on

Tuesday for two third-round draft picks. Both teams said Wednesday that they knew about the alleged incident before the trade.

Tennis • Djokovic, Federer win: Top-ranked Novak Djokovic and No. 3 Roger Federer each needed three sets to reach the quarterfinals of the BNP Paribas Open on Wednesday in Indian Wells, Calif. , while No. 1 Victoria Azarenka improved to 21-0 on the season with a straight-set win on the women’s side. — From wire reports


THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

NBA ROUNDUP

Blazers lose by 42 to Knicks The Associated Press NEW YORK — Mike D’Antoni is gone, and the Knicks finally got his offense right. Amare Stoudemire made all seven shots in the first half, Carmelo Anthony passed and shot well, and the Knicks shook off the surprising departure of their coach to rout the Portland Trail Blazers 12179 on Wednesday night, snapping a six-game losing streak. D’Antoni resigned before the game. Stoudemire finished with 17 points and Anthony had 16 points before both stars sat out the fourth quarter while the Knicks rang up their highest point total of the season. LaMarcus Aldridge and Gerald Wallace each scored 15 points for the Trail Blazers, who were blown out for the second straight night and lost for the fourth time in five games. “Losing by 30, 40 points, that’s embarrassing,” center Marcus Camby said. “I haven’t been around anything like that since my first two years in the league when I was on an expansion team.” Also on Wednesday: Bulls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .106 Heat. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .102 CHICAGO — John Lucas III scored 24 points, and Chicago beat Miami without Derrick Rose in a charged showdown between the Eastern Conference’s top two teams. Dwyane Wade scored 36 and LeBron James finished with 35 points for the Heat. Clippers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .96 Hawks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .82 LOS ANGELES — Mo Williams scored 25 points, leading Los Angeles past Atlanta. Lakers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .107 Hornets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .101 NEW ORLEANS — Kobe Bryant scored 33 points, and Los Angeles won its fourth straight game and second straight in overtime. Spurs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .122 Magic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 SAN ANTONIO — Dwight Howard had 22 points and 12 rebounds while losing what could be his last game with Orlando before today’s trade deadline. Pacers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 76ers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .94 INDIANAPOLIS — Danny Granger scored 20 points and Indiana shot a season-high 57 percent from the field. Suns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .120 Jazz. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 PHOENIX — Channing Frye scored 26 points, Marcin Gortat had 25 and Phoenix overcame a 13point deficit. Nets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .98 Raptors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .84 NEWARK, N.J. — Kris Humphries had 16 points and a career-high 21 rebounds to lead New Jersey. Rockets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .107 Bobcats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .87 HOUSTON — Luis Scola scored 23 points, Goran Dragic had 14 points and 10 assists and Houston routed league-worst Charlotte. Bucks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 Cavaliers . . . . . . . . . . . . . .105 MILWAUKEE — Drew Gooden had 15 points, 10 rebounds and 13 assists for his second career tripledouble to lead Milwaukee. Pistons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .124 Kings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112 SACRAMENTO, Calif. — Rodney Stuckey scored 35 points and Greg Monroe had 32 for Detroit, who used a huge third-quarter effort to pull away from Sacramento. Celtics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .105 Warriors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .103 OAKLAND, Calif. — Kevin Garnett scored 12 of his 24 points in the fourth quarter, including a tiebreaking jumper with 5.1 seconds left that led Boston past Golden State.

NBA SCOREBOARD Standings NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION All Times PDT ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE W L Pct GB d-Chicago 36 9 .800 — d-Miami 31 11 .738 3½ Orlando 28 16 .636 7½ d-Philadelphia 25 18 .581 10 Indiana 25 16 .610 9 Atlanta 24 19 .558 11 Boston 23 19 .548 11½ Milwaukee 19 24 .442 16 New York 19 24 .442 16 Cleveland 16 25 .390 18 Detroit 16 27 .372 19 New Jersey 15 29 .341 20½ Toronto 14 29 .326 21 Washington 9 32 .220 25 Charlotte 6 35 .146 28 WESTERN CONFERENCE W L Pct GB d-Oklahoma City 32 10 .762 — d-San Antonio 28 13 .683 3½ d-L.A. Lakers 27 16 .628 5½ L.A. Clippers 24 17 .585 7½ Memphis 24 17 .585 7½ Denver 24 19 .558 8½ Dallas 24 20 .545 9 Houston 24 20 .545 9 Minnesota 22 21 .512 10½ Phoenix 20 22 .476 12 Utah 20 22 .476 12 Portland 20 23 .465 12½ Golden State 18 22 .450 13 Sacramento 14 29 .326 18½ New Orleans 10 33 .233 22½ d-division leader ——— Wednesday’s Games Indiana 111, Philadelphia 94 New Jersey 98, Toronto 84 New York 121, Portland 79 Houston 107, Charlotte 87 L.A. Lakers 107, New Orleans 101, OT Milwaukee 115, Cleveland 105 San Antonio 122, Orlando 111 Chicago 106, Miami 102 Detroit 124, Sacramento 112 Boston 105, Golden State 103 L.A. Clippers 96, Atlanta 82 Phoenix 120, Utah 111 Today’s Games Washington at New Orleans, 5 p.m. Charlotte at Dallas, 5:30 p.m. Oklahoma City at Denver, 6 p.m. Minnesota at Utah, 6 p.m. Phoenix at L.A. Clippers, 7:30 p.m. Friday’s Games New Jersey at Orlando, 4 p.m. Miami at Philadelphia, 4 p.m. Washington at Atlanta, 4:30 p.m. Indiana at New York, 4:30 p.m. Portland at Chicago, 5 p.m. Toronto at Memphis, 5 p.m. San Antonio at Oklahoma City, 6:30 p.m. Boston at Sacramento, 7 p.m. Detroit at Phoenix, 7 p.m. Milwaukee at Golden State, 7:30 p.m. Minnesota at L.A. Lakers, 7:30 p.m.

Summaries Wednesday’s Games

Knicks 121, Trail Blazers 79 PORTLAND (79) Wallace 6-12 3-4 15, Aldridge 5-15 5-6 15, Camby 1-1 0-0 2, Felton 2-10 5-6 9, Batum 3-9 2-4 9, Matthews 3-9 0-0 8, Przybilla 0-0 0-0 0, N.Smith 2-8 0-0 4, Babbitt 4-7 2-2 12, Thomas 1-1 0-0 2, Johnson 1-2 1-1 3, C.Smith 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 28-75 18-23 79. NEW YORK (121) Anthony 6-12 1-2 16, Stoudemire 8-10 1-3 17, Chandler 4-4 1-1 9, Lin 2-4 2-2 6, Fields 0-6 1-4 1, Davis 1-4 2-2 4, Jeffries 2-2 0-0 4, Shumpert 4-7 6-10 16, J.Smith 8-18 0-0 23, Novak 7-11 0-0 20, Harrellson 1-1 0-0 3, Bibby 0-1 0-0 0, Jordan 0-0 2-2 2. Totals 43-80 16-26 121. Portland 12 17 27 23 — 79 New York 25 30 23 43 — 121 3-Point Goals—Portland 5-17 (Babbitt 2-3, Matthews 2-4, Batum 1-3, Wallace 0-2, N.Smith 0-2, Felton 0-3), New York 19-38 (J.Smith 7-14, Novak 6-10, Anthony 3-6, Shumpert 2-3, Harrellson 1-1, Lin 0-2, Davis 0-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Portland 43 (Wallace 12), New York 56 (Stoudemire 8). Assists—Portland 11 (Wallace, Felton 3), New York 35 (Davis 10). Total Fouls—Portland 20, New York 19. Technicals—New York defensive three second 2. Flagrant Fouls—Camby. A—19,763 (19,763).

Suns 120, Jazz 111 UTAH (111) Howard 3-12 0-0 6, Millsap 8-16 2-3 18, Jefferson 8-18 2-2 18, Harris 2-4 1-2 7, Bell 3-4 0-0 7, Watson 0-1 0-0 0, Favors 6-8 2-4 14, Hayward 5-8 2-2 13, Miles 3-6 3-4 9, Kanter 4-5 0-0 8, Tinsley 5-8 0-0 11. Totals 47-90 12-17 111. PHOENIX (120) Hill 5-10 2-3 12, Frye 10-18 1-1 26, Gortat 1012 5-10 25, Nash 2-4 8-8 12, Dudley 6-13 5-7 21, Warrick 1-3 0-0 2, Brown 2-5 1-1 5, Redd 2-5 0-0 4, Lopez 2-3 1-1 5, Telfair 4-5 0-1 8. Totals 44-78 23-32 120. Utah 30 23 29 29 — 111 Phoenix 22 31 36 31 — 120 3-Point Goals—Utah 5-13 (Harris 2-3, Tinsley 1-1, Hayward 1-1, Bell 1-2, Millsap 0-1, Howard 02, Miles 0-3), Phoenix 9-19 (Frye 5-10, Dudley 4-6, Gortat 0-1, Telfair 0-1, Redd 0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Utah 49 (Millsap 10), Phoenix 42 (Frye 9). Assists—Utah 22 (Tinsley 8), Phoenix 29 (Nash 16). Total Fouls—Utah 23, Phoenix 14. Technicals— Utah Coach Corbin, Harris, Brown, Phoenix Coach Gentry. A—14,076 (18,422).

Clippers 96, Hawks 82 ATLANTA (82) J.Johnson 7-15 3-4 19, Smith 6-14 4-4 18, Pachulia 5-8 2-2 12, Teague 3-11 4-6 10, Hinrich 1-5 2-2 4, McGrady 3-6 1-2 9, Dampier 0-0 0-0 0, Stackhouse 1-4 0-0 2, Pargo 3-5 0-0 8. Totals 2968 16-20 82. L.A. CLIPPERS (96) Butler 5-9 2-3 13, Griffin 5-9 2-4 12, Jordan 4-4 0-0 8, Paul 5-9 0-0 13, Foye 2-3 0-0 5, M. Williams 9-18 4-4 25, Evans 3-4 0-1 6, Simmons 0-5 0-0 0, Bledsoe 5-8 2-3 14, Martin 0-1 0-2 0. Totals 38-70 10-17 96. Atlanta 27 15 20 20 — 82 L.A. Clippers 30 20 21 25 — 96 3-Point Goals—Atlanta 8-25 (McGrady 2-3, Smith 2-4, Pargo 2-4, J.Johnson 2-7, Hinrich 0-1, Stackhouse 0-2, Teague 0-4), L.A. Clippers 10-20 (Paul 35, M. Williams 3-5, Bledsoe 2-3, Butler 1-1, Foye 1-2, Simmons 0-4). Fouled Out—Simmons. Rebounds— Atlanta 41 (Pachulia 10), L.A. Clippers 41 (Griffin, Evans 10). Assists—Atlanta 21 (J.Johnson, Teague 5), L.A. Clippers 20 (Paul 9). Total Fouls—Atlanta 15, L.A. Clippers 19. Technicals—Bledsoe, L.A. Clippers defensive three second. A—19,060 (19,060).

Pistons 124, Kings 112 DETROIT (124) Prince 12-20 1-2 28, Maxiell 4-6 1-1 9, Monroe 15-20 2-3 32, Knight 5-10 0-0 10, Stuckey 10-18 1112 35, Gordon 2-4 1-2 6, Jerebko 2-4 0-0 4, Wilkins 0-2 0-0 0, Wallace 0-2 0-0 0. Totals 50-86 16-20 124. SACRAMENTO (112) Evans 9-17 5-5 23, Thompson 10-12 1-3 21, Cousins 5-15 4-6 14, Thomas 8-14 4-7 21, Thornton 3-9 1-1 9, Garcia 5-8 0-0 12, Hayes 2-3 2-2 6, Salmons 3-8 0-0 6, Fredette 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 45-87 17-24 112. Detroit 25 32 40 27 — 124 Sacramento 32 26 23 31 — 112 3-Point Goals—Detroit 8-13 (Stuckey 4-6, Prince 3-3, Gordon 1-1, Knight 0-3), Sacramento 5-19 (Garcia 2-4, Thornton 2-4, Thomas 1-5, Cousins 0-1, Fredette 0-1, Evans 0-1, Salmons 0-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Detroit 40 (Monroe 11), Sacramento 49 (Thompson 15). Assists—Detroit 29 (Knight 11), Sacramento 25 (Thornton 6). Total Fouls—Detroit 20, Sacramento 21. Technicals— Maxiell. A—12,173 (17,317).

Bulls 106, Heat 102 MIAMI (102) L.James 14-25 5-5 35, Bosh 3-15 6-6 12, Anthony 0-0 0-2 0, Chalmers 1-5 2-2 4, Wade 16-26 3-4 36, Haslem 1-5 0-0 2, Battier 0-3 2-2 2, Cole 1-4 0-0 3, Jones 2-2 0-0 6, Pittman 0-0 2-2 2. Totals 38-85 20-23 102. CHICAGO (106) Deng 4-13 0-0 11, Boozer 1-4 0-0 2, Noah 5-10 4-4 14, Watson 3-7 4-6 11, Brewer 5-10 1-1 12, Gibson 4-10 0-0 8, Butler 1-5 6-6 8, Korver 2-4 6-6 12, Asik 2-2 0-0 4, Lucas 9-12 3-3 24. Totals 36-77 24-26 106.

Miami 23 19 28 32 — 102 Chicago 19 34 28 25 — 106 3-Point Goals—Miami 6-12 (Jones 2-2, L.James 2-3, Cole 1-1, Wade 1-3, Chalmers 0-1, Battier 0-2), Chicago 10-19 (Lucas 3-5, Deng 3-6, Korver 2-4, Brewer 1-1, Watson 1-2, Butler 0-1). Fouled Out— None. Rebounds—Miami 40 (Wade 7), Chicago 53 (Gibson, Boozer 8). Assists—Miami 17 (L.James 4), Chicago 20 (Boozer 5). Total Fouls—Miami 23, Chicago 21. Technicals—Miami Coach Spoelstra, Deng, Noah, Chicago defensive three second. A—23,028 (20,917).

Pacers 111, 76ers 94 PHILADELPHIA (94) Iguodala 3-8 2-2 10, Brand 8-13 0-0 16, Hawes 3-6 0-0 6, Holiday 7-8 2-2 17, Turner 9-11 2-4 21, Vucevic 0-3 0-0 0, Williams 3-11 0-0 7, Young 5-13 2-2 12, Meeks 2-3 0-0 5, Allen 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 40-76 8-10 94. INDIANA (111) Granger 8-13 3-3 20, West 8-12 2-2 18, Hibbert 3-6 8-10 14, Collison 2-7 0-0 4, George 3-8 0-1 8, Hansbrough 6-9 2-2 14, Hill 7-10 0-0 17, Price 1-5 1-2 3, Amundson 3-3 0-0 6, Jones 2-3 2-2 7. Totals 43-76 18-22 111. Philadelphia 29 22 24 19 — 94 Indiana 24 30 29 28 — 111 3-Point Goals—Philadelphia 6-13 (Iguodala 2-5, Turner 1-1, Holiday 1-1, Meeks 1-2, Williams 1-4), Indiana 7-17 (Hill 3-3, George 2-4, Jones 1-2, Granger 1-4, Collison 0-2, Price 0-2). Fouled Out— None. Rebounds—Philadelphia 30 (Brand, Turner 5), Indiana 45 (Hibbert 9). Assists—Philadelphia 25 (Iguodala 9), Indiana 23 (Hibbert 5). Total Fouls— Philadelphia 21, Indiana 8. Technicals—Philadelphia defensive three second, Indiana defensive three second. A—13,081 (18,165).

Nets 98, Raptors 84 TORONTO (84) J.Johnson 6-10 4-4 16, Bargnani 4-13 2-2 10, A.Johnson 2-7 2-2 6, Bayless 6-11 4-4 16, DeRozan 5-15 2-4 12, Davis 2-3 4-4 8, Barbosa 5-11 0-1 11, Gray 0-2 0-0 0, Forbes 0-3 3-4 3, Kleiza 1-6 0-0 2. Totals 31-81 21-25 84. NEW JERSEY (98) Stevenson 0-1 0-0 0, Humphries 7-18 2-2 16, She.Williams 1-1 0-0 2, Farmar 3-9 4-4 10, Brooks 4-11 0-0 9, Morrow 6-10 0-0 15, Petro 4-6 2-2 10, Gaines 3-8 0-0 8, Green 9-13 7-9 26, J.Williams 1-2 0-0 2. Totals 38-79 15-17 98. Toronto 22 24 15 23 — 84 New Jersey 19 22 27 30 — 98 3-Point Goals—Toronto 1-10 (Barbosa 1-3, Kleiza 0-1, Bayless 0-1, DeRozan 0-1, Bargnani 0-2, Forbes 0-2), New Jersey 7-17 (Morrow 3-3, Gaines 2-5, Green 1-2, Brooks 1-3, Stevenson 0-1, Farmar 0-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Toronto 43 (A.Johnson 9), New Jersey 54 (Humphries 21). Assists—Toronto 22 (Bayless 10), New Jersey 20 (Brooks, Gaines 5). Total Fouls—Toronto 14, New Jersey 20. Technicals—Morrow. Flagrant Fouls— A.Johnson. A—10,701 (18,711).

Spurs 122, Magic 111 ORLANDO (111) Turkoglu 7-16 1-1 17, R.Anderson 8-15 1-1 19, Howard 9-16 4-10 22, Nelson 9-15 2-2 25, Redick 3-8 0-0 6, Q.Richardson 2-3 0-0 5, Duhon 2-3 2-2 7, Davis 2-6 0-0 4, Liggins 3-4 0-0 6. Totals 45-86 10-16 111. SAN ANTONIO (122) Jefferson 2-10 5-6 11, Duncan 7-12 7-10 21, Blair 2-4 0-0 4, Parker 12-21 5-5 31, Green 3-6 0-0 7, Splitter 4-5 4-4 12, Bonner 1-3 0-0 3, Leonard 4-5 2-2 12, J.Anderson 0-0 0-0 0, Ginobili 5-10 0-0 14, Neal 3-7 0-0 7. Totals 43-83 23-27 122. Orlando 35 23 26 27 — 111 San Antonio 36 23 30 33 — 122 3-Point Goals—Orlando 11-27 (Nelson 5-7, R.Anderson 2-5, Turkoglu 2-7, Q.Richardson 1-2, Duhon 1-2, Davis 0-1, Redick 0-3), San Antonio 13-26 (Ginobili 4-7, Leonard 2-2, Parker 2-4, Jefferson 2-7, Green 1-2, Neal 1-2, Bonner 1-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Orlando 42 (Howard 12), San Antonio 49 (Duncan 13). Assists—Orlando 20 (Nelson 7), San Antonio 27 (Parker 12). Total Fouls—Orlando 20, San Antonio 14. A—18,581 (18,797).

Lakers 107, Hornets 101 (OT) L.A. LAKERS (107) World Peace 3-7 0-2 7, Gasol 7-18 4-5 18, Bynum 10-17 5-7 25, Fisher 3-8 4-5 11, Bryant 10-23 11-11 33, Murphy 0-0 0-0 0, Blake 1-4 1-2 3, Barnes 3-5 3-3 10, McRoberts 0-0 0-0 0, Kapono 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 37-82 28-35 107. NEW ORLEANS (101) Ariza 4-13 1-1 9, Ayon 2-3 0-0 4, Kaman 9-20 3-4 21, Jack 13-21 4-4 30, Belinelli 4-10 0-0 10, Aminu 3-5 0-0 6, Thomas 3-3 0-0 6, Vasquez 6-7 2-2 15, Henry 0-2 0-2 0, Foote 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 44-85 10-13 101. L.A. Lakers 20 20 30 23 14 — 107 New Orleans 28 26 16 23 8 — 101 3-Point Goals—L.A. Lakers 5-19 (Bryant 2-8, Barnes 1-2, Fisher 1-3, World Peace 1-3, Gasol 0-1, Blake 0-2), New Orleans 3-10 (Belinelli 2-5, Vasquez 1-1, Jack 0-1, Ariza 0-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—L.A. Lakers 55 (Bynum 18), New Orleans 41 (Kaman 12). Assists—L.A. Lakers 24 (Bryant 5), New Orleans 25 (Vasquez, Jack 6). Total Fouls—L.A. Lakers 16, New Orleans 30. Technicals—L.A. Lakers defensive three second, Kaman, New Orleans defensive three second. A—17,272 (17,188).

Bucks 115, Cavaliers 105 CLEVELAND (105) Gee 8-16 2-2 19, Jamison 4-15 3-4 13, Hollins 1-2 0-0 2, Irving 11-16 4-4 28, Parker 1-3 0-0 3, Thompson 1-6 3-3 5, Sessions 0-8 2-4 2, Gibson 6-11 1-4 18, Samuels 4-6 3-4 11, Casspi 2-2 0-0 4. Totals 38-85 18-25 105. MILWAUKEE (115) Harris 3-6 0-0 6, Ilyasova 7-12 8-8 22, Gooden 7-12 0-0 15, Jennings 8-17 0-1 17, Delfino 7-13 0-0 17, Dunleavy 8-11 3-4 21, Udrih 1-5 1-2 3, Sanders 1-4 0-0 2, Mbah a Moute 4-6 4-6 12, Leuer 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 46-86 16-21 115. Cleveland 28 27 23 27 — 105 Milwaukee 23 34 27 31 — 115 3-Point Goals—Cleveland 11-24 (Gibson 5-8, Jamison 2-4, Irving 2-4, Parker 1-2, Gee 1-5, Sessions 0-1), Milwaukee 7-23 (Delfino 3-8, Dunleavy 2-4, Gooden 1-3, Jennings 1-5, Ilyasova 0-1, Harris 0-1, Udrih 0-1). Fouled Out—Ilyasova. Rebounds— Cleveland 43 (Gee, Jamison 5), Milwaukee 56 (Mbah a Moute 13). Assists—Cleveland 21 (Sessions 6), Milwaukee 38 (Gooden 13). Total Fouls—Cleveland 19, Milwaukee 20. A—15,319 (18,717).

Rockets 107, Bobcats 87 CHARLOTTE (87) Maggette 3-9 2-2 10, Thomas 3-8 1-2 7, Biyombo 1-4 2-2 4, Augustin 4-7 0-0 9, Henderson 4-11 2-2 10, Walker 3-13 0-0 6, Diaw 0-1 0-0 0, Brown 6-10 3-4 15, Mullens 3-6 4-4 10, R.Williams 4-7 1-1 10, White 2-5 2-2 6, Carroll 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 33-81 17-19 87. HOUSTON (107) Parsons 4-6 0-0 8, Scola 8-15 7-10 23, Dalembert 6-7 0-0 12, Dragic 6-11 1-2 14, Lee 3-8 1-2 9, Budinger 4-9 0-0 10, Patterson 4-6 0-0 8, Hill 6-11 2-3 14, Flynn 3-7 0-0 7, Morris 0-3 0-0 0, Smith 1-1 0-0 2, Thabeet 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 45-84 1117 107. Charlotte 18 22 17 30 — 87 Houston 30 20 36 21 — 107 3-Point Goals—Charlotte 4-12 (Maggette 2-2, Augustin 1-2, R.Williams 1-3, Henderson 0-1, Walker 0-4), Houston 6-9 (Budinger 2-2, Lee 2-4, Flynn 1-1, Dragic 1-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds— Charlotte 35 (Biyombo 5), Houston 60 (Dalembert 10). Assists—Charlotte 25 (Walker 8), Houston 27 (Dragic 10). Total Fouls—Charlotte 16, Houston 16. A—18,128 (18,043).

Celtics 105, Warriors 103 BOSTON (105) Pierce 5-17 5-6 15, Bass 8-18 6-6 22, Garnett 1115 2-3 24, Rondo 4-9 0-0 8, Allen 2-7 2-2 7, Stiemsma 2-2 4-4 8, Pietrus 5-6 0-0 15, Dooling 1-1 0-0 2, Bradley 2-3 0-0 4. Totals 40-78 19-21 105. GOLDEN STATE (103) D.Wright 5-9 4-4 16, Lee 8-17 6-6 22, Biedrins 01 0-2 0, Robinson 10-19 0-0 20, Thompson 9-16 5-5 26, McGuire 5-5 0-0 10, Jenkins 1-4 0-0 2, Rush 3-6 1-2 7, Tyler 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 41-78 16-19 103. Boston 21 34 26 24 — 105 Golden State 25 35 17 26 — 103 3-Point Goals—Boston 6-13 (Pietrus 5-6, Allen 1-3, Pierce 0-4), Golden State 5-21 (Thompson 3-7, D.Wright 2-5, Rush 0-2, Jenkins 0-2, Robinson 0-5). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Boston 43 (Bass 9), Golden State 37 (Lee 8). Assists—Boston 32 (Rondo 14), Golden State 25 (Robinson 11). Total Fouls— Boston 13, Golden State 18. Technicals—Pierce, Boston defensive three second, Golden State defensive three second. A—19,596 (19,596).

D3

Cowboys win baseball opener Bulletin staff report PRINEVILLE — Crook County won its baseball home opener Wednesday as starting pitcher Max Denton struck out six and walked none over four innings to lead the Cowboys to an 11-3 nonconference victory against La Pine. Reliever Cody Buss added five strikeouts and just one walk in three innings of work, while catcher Justin Cleveland recorded a double and a triple to lead the Crook County offense. “Our pitching was outstanding,” Cowboys coach Terry Larimer said. Crook County (1-0 overall) scored five runs in the bottom of the first inning to take an early 5-0 lead. The Hawks (0-1) scored three runs in the top of the third, but the Cowboys scored two runs each in the fourth, fifth and sixth innings to secure the win. Denton earned the win for Crook County. Gareth Dahlgren paced La Pine with a double. The Cowboys are back

PREP ROUNDUP on the field Friday with a home doubleheader against Redmond. The Hawks (0-2), who lost at Summit on Tuesday, host Henley on Saturday. In other prep events Wednesday: BASEBALL Summit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Madras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 MADRAS — The Storm picked up their second victory in as many days, knocking off the host White Buffaloes. Konner Reddick allowed just one run over four innings to earn the victory, while Nick Sweet picked up the save after pitching three scoreless innings. With his team ahead 2-1 in the top of the fourth inning, Max Lindsay hit a twoout, two-run double to put Summit up 4-1. Lindsay later scored to make it a 5-1 Storm advantage. Madras starter Kyle Palmer took the loss. Summit is back on the field Friday with a home game against Sisters. Madras hosts Milton-Freewater’s McLough-

lin High the same day. TRACK AND FIELD Hawk junior has big day at Icebreaker La Pine’s Jeremy Desrosiers and Dylan Seay each won multiple events for the Hawks at the Mountain View Icebreaker at Mountain View High School. Desrosiers, a junior, won the 100-meter (12.07 seconds) and 200-meter (24.21) dashes and the long jump with a mark of 19 feet, 5 inches. Desrosiers also ran a leg of the Hawks’ firstplace 400-meter relay (45.90). Seay won the triple jump (38-8 1⁄2) and cleared 13 feet, 9 inches in the pole vault to capture that event. Easton Curtis of Sisters performed well in the middle distances, winning the 800 (2:09.79) and 1,500 (4:35.45). Zoe Falk (800, long jump), Alicia Haken (triple jump, high jump), Chelsea Reifschneider (100 hurdles, 300 hurdles) and Frances Payne (1,500, 3,000) all won two events for the Sisters girls. The Outlaws also took first in the 400- and 1,600meter relays.

PREP SCOREBOARD Golf Wednesday’s Results ——— Girls ——— Crooked River Invitational at Crooked River Golf Course Team scores — Summit, 334; Bend, 341; Crook County, 390. Medalist — Madison Odiorne, Summit, 4038--78. Summit (334) — Madison Odiorne 40-38--78, Kristen Parr 40-40--80, Megan Mitchell 44-42--86, Shannon Patterson 44-46--90, Ashley Dolinar 5351--104. Bend (341) — Heidi Froelich 45-35--80, Kayla Good 41-43--84, Madeline Rice 44-43--87, Lili Bornio 47-43--90, Danae Walker 48-50--98. Crook County (390) — Kirsti Kelso 42-45-87, Kalie Solomon 49-45--94, Jaci McKenzie 5343--96, Caitlin Dalton 55-58--113, Sierra Morgan 59-56--115. Redmond (incomplete) — Cayla Lussier 5243--95, Emily Roundtree 48-47--95, Ann Williams 61-57--118, Chelsea Driggers WD. Mountain View (incomplete) — Haley Ostrom 42-46--88, Julia Woolhiser 63-63--126.

Baseball Wednesday’s results ——— Class 4A Nonconference La Pine 003 000 0 — 3 3 3 Crook County 500 222 x — 11 12 3 Page, Young (4) and Schneider; M. Denton, Buss (5) and Cleveland. W—M. Denton. L—Page. 2B— La Pine: Dahlgren; Crook County: M. Benton 2, Alexander, Cleveland. 3B—Crook County: Cleveland.

Track & field Wednesday’s Results ——— Boys ——— Mountain View Icebreaker at Mountain View High School 400-meter relay — 1, La Pine (Wilson, Kim-

mel, Desrosiers, Mock), 45.90; 2, La Pine (Seay, Neat, Link, Kriz), 47.50; 3, Sisters (Snyder, Gonzalez, Ford, Baldessari) 48.19. 1,500 — 1, Easton Curtis, Sisters, 4:35.45; 2, Brandon Pollard, Sisters, 4:35.87; 3, Shea Krevi, Sisters, 4:40.30. 3,000 — 1, Dakota Thornton, Mountain View, 10:07.48; 2, Jake McDonald, Mountain View, 10:34.08; 3, Austin Smith, La Pine, 10:45.04. 100 — 1, Jeremy Desrosiers, La Pine, 12.07; 2, Logan Riemhofer, Mountain View, 12.21; 3, Kole Kimmel, La Pine, 12.25. 400 — 1, Josh Smith, Mountain View, 55.51; 2, Ignacio Camcho, Mountain View, 1:01.65; 3, Ty Sahlberg, Sisters, 1:05.44. 800 — 1, Easton Curtis, Sisters, 2:09.79; 2, Mason Calmettes, Sisters, 2:13.08; 3, Gabe Wyllie, Mountain View, 2:13.21. 200 — 1, Jeremy Desrosiers, La Pine, 24.21; 2, Andrew Snyder, Sisters, 24.68; 3, Matt Murphy, Mountain View, 25.07. 300 hurdles — 1, Tanner Combs, Mountain View, 46.69; 2, Dantly Wilcox, Mountain View, 47.57; 3, Trinton Koch, Gilchrist, 49.51. 1,600 relay — 1, Sisters (Calmettes, Pollard, Curtis, Prescott), 3:45.88; 2, Mountain View (Wilcox, Myers, Combs, Welch), 4:00.06; 3, La Pine (Link, George, Seay, Mock), 4:14.09. High jump — 1 (tie), Brennan Miller, Sisters, 5-4; 1 (tie), Dantly Wilcox, Mountain View, 5-4; 3 (tie), Ian Baldessari, Sisters, 5-2; 3 (tie), Ty Sahlberg, Sisters, 5-2; 3 (tie), Trevor Ford, Sisters, 5-2. Discus — 1, Justin Warren, Mountain View, 129-6; 2, Travis Harrison, La Pine, 125-8; 3, Dylan Johnson, Mountain View, 125-8. Pole vault — 1, Dylan Seay, La Pine, 13-9; 2, Andrew Snyder, Sisters, 13-0; 3, Deion Mock, La Pine, 12-6. Shot — 1, Travis Harrison, La Pine, 43-11.5; 2, Zane Anderson, Gilchrist, 40-6; 3, Uriahs Smith, Mountain View, 39-10. Javelin — 1, Hayden Czrnowski, Mountain View, 150-0; 2, Justin Warren, Mountain View, 1414; 3, Taylor Lucas, Sisters, 126-6. Triple jump — 1, Dylan Seay, La Pine, 38-8.5; 2, Tim Hernandez, Sisters, 38-3; 3, Jacob Richerson, Sisters, 37-9.5. Long jump — 1, Jeremy Desrosiers, La Pine, 19-5; 2, Joshua Simpson, La Pine, 19-4; 3, Jacob Richerson, Sisters, 17-8.

Girls ——— Mountain View Icebreaker at Mountain View High School 400-meter relay — 1, Sisters (Bremer, Falk, Reifschneider, Small), 52.86; 2, Mountain View, 54.08; 3, La Pine, 55.61. 1,500 — 1, Frances Payne, Sis, 5:35.57; 2, Madison Boettner, Sis, 5:41.37; 3, Mikayla Cant, MV, 5:42.29. 3,000 — 1, Frances Payne, Sis, 12:32.52; 2, McKenzie Goeman, MV, 12:48.98; 3, Aria Blumm, Sis, 13:01. 100 — 1, Kristen Place, MV, 13.75; 2, Sara Small, Sis, 14.28; 3, Katie Murphy, MV, 14.38. 400 — 1, Chloee Zazma, LP, 1:08.17; 2, Katelyn Meeter, Sis, 1:11.04; 3, Callan Brick, MV, 1:12.96. 100 hurdles — 1, Chelsea Reifschneider, Sis, 18.48; 2, McKenna Boen, LP, 18.7; 3, Alicia Haken, Sis, 19.15. 800 — 1, Zoe Falk, Sis, 2:26.92; 2, Krysta Kroeger, MV, 2:51.13; 3, Mikayla Cant, MV, 2:56.42. 200 — 1, Macaulay Wilson, MV, 27.47; 2, Bailey Bremer, Sis, 28.98; 3, Cassandra Arruda, Sis, 29.96. 300 hurdles — 1, Chelsea Reifschneider, Sis, 51.31; 2, Tash Anderson, MV, 52.38; 3, Holli Glenn, LP, 52.98. 1,600 relay — 1, Sisters (Reifschneider, Falk, Payne, Boettner), 4:28.66; 2, La Pine, 4:31.66; 3, Mountain View, 4:52.32. High jump — 1, Alicia Haken, Sis, 4-10; 2, Bailey Bremer, Sis, 4-8; 2, Sara Small, Sis, 4-8. Discus — 1, Ashley Agenbroad, LP, 107-11; 2, Sara Andre, MV, 97-05; 3, Anna Roshak, MV, 94-04. Pole vault — 1, Sara Small, Sis, 9-6; 2, Olivia Chandler, Sis, 8-6; 3, Melanie Nachtmann, MV, 8-0. Shot — 1, Anna Roshak, MV, 34-04; 2, Alexis Tilman, LP, 31-06; 3, Brenna Gravitt, Gilchrist, 2903. Javelin — 1, Ashley James, Gilchrist, 93-09; 2, Katie Thompson, MV, 90-08; 3, Leanna McGregor, Gilchrist, 81-09. Triple jump — 1, Alicia Haken, Sis, 30-6; 2, Bailey Bremer, Sis, 29-0; 3, Brittnie Haigler, LP, 2805 1/2. Long jump — 1, Zoe Falk, Sis, 16-01; 2, Shaina Zollman, MV, 15-06; 3, Kristen Place, MV, 14-8.

Local players get all-state tourney awards Bulletin staff report Four area basketball players were picked as all-state tournament first-team selections this weekend. At the Class 4A championships, Sisters junior Eli Harrison was one of four unanimous first-team picks from the boys tournament. Madras senior Abby Scott was chosen for the 4A girls all-state first team. In 5A, Mountain View senior James Reid was the only player not from Corvallis or Milwaukie — the 5A boys finalists — selected for the boys first team. Bend junior Mekayla Isaak was named to the 5A girls first team.

Wilcox sisters end first season at Lane CC EUGENE — Twin sisters Kersey and Jordan Wilcox completed a successful first women’s basketball season at Lane Community College last week. The two Mountain View grads helped the Titans win the Northwest Athletic Association of Community Colleges (NWAACC) South Division with a 13-1 league mark. LCC’s season ended March 5 when the Titans fell to Skagit Valley Community College in the conference tournament. Kersey Wilcox averaged 15 points, 4.1 assists and 2.5 assists per game this season. Jordan Wilcox contributed 6.7 points, 2.5 rebounds and 1.4 steals a contest this year. Conditt earns track & field honor Oregon Institute of Technology’s Kassi Conditt, a graduate of La Pine High School, has been named the Cascade Collegiate Conference’s women’s outdoor field athlete of the week after winning the shot put at the Lane Preview this past Saturday in Eugene. Con-

PREP NOTEBOOK ditt, a sophomore, won the event with a toss of 41 feet, 10 3⁄4 inches. She also placed third in the discus. Three Grizzlies receive all-league recognition Two Gilchrist girls players and one Gilchrist boy have been awarded all-Mountain Valley League basketball honors. Junior Ashley James was selected to the all-MVL girls first team and teammate Brenna Gravitt was named to the all-MVL second team. Tyler Shuey, a senior, received all-MVL boys honorable mention. Mattox awarded NCAA scholarship Kimber Mattox, a former Bend High student who graduated from Willamette University in Salem after competing for the Bearcats in track, cross-country and women’s soccer, has received a $7,500 NCAA postgraduate scholarship for graduate school tuition. An exercise science graduate at Willamette, Mattox is now competing in cross-county and track and field at the University of Oregon while working on a master’s degree in human physiology. Culver alumni baseball game set for Saturday Culver High School will play a fundraiser baseball game against its own alumni Saturday. A barbecue is scheduled for 11 a.m. with the game set for noon. Admission is $5 for individuals and $20 for families, the cost of which includes lunch. For more information, email Culver baseball coach Shea Little at slittle@culver.k12.or.us.

Avalanche top Sabres in shootout, 5-4 The Associated Press BUFFALO, N.Y. — Jamie McGinn forced overtime by scoring with 2 seconds left in regulation, and Peter Mueller netted the lone shootout goal in the Colorado Avalanche’s 5-4 win over the Buffalo Sabres on Wednesday night. Also on Wednesday: Canadiens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Senators. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 MONTREAL — David Desharnais scored in regula-

NHL ROUNDUP tion and in a shootout, lifting Montreal past Ottawa. Jets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Stars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 WINNIPEG, Manitoba — Andrew Ladd scored twice to help Winnipeg snap Dallas’ six-game winning streak. Coyotes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Canucks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 VANCOUVER, British Co-

lumbia — Antoine Vermette had a goal and two assists as Phoenix beat Vancouver. Oilers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Blue Jackets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 EDMONTON, Alberta — Ryan Nugent-Hopkins had a goal and an assist for Edmonton against Columbus. Ducks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Red Wings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 ANAHEIM, Calif. — Jonas Hiller made 23 saves as Anaheim topped Detroit.


THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2012

—Reporter: 541-383-0305 egross@bendbulletin.com

Boys track and field, at a glance A look at the Central Oregon teams competing this spring:

CLASS 6A

CLASS 4A

Redmond Panthers Coach: Scott Brown (sixth season) 2011 finish: Second at Central Valley Conference district meet Returning state qualifiers: Jacob Crivellone, sr., (shot put); Tanner Manselle, sr., (javelin); Cody Simpson, soph., (pole vault) 2012 district meet: Central Valley Conference championships at McNary High in Keizer, May 16 and 18

Sisters Outlaws Coach: Nik Goertzen (second season) 2011 finish: Second at Sky-Em League district meet Returning state qualifier: Easton Curtis, sr., (800, 1,600 relay) 2012 district meet: Sky-Em League Championships at Sweet Home, May 17 and 19

CLASS 5A Bend Lava Bears Coach: Matt Craven (seventh season) 2011 finish: Second at Special District 1 championships Returning state qualifiers: Danny Verdieck, sr., (110 hurdles); J.C. Grim, sr., (400 relay, high jump, javelin, triple jump); Cody Maguire, soph., (400 relay); Gavin Gerdes, sr., (400 relay); Joel Johnson, soph., (pole vault) 2012 district meet: Special District 1 qualifier at Bend High, May 18-19 Summit Storm Coach: Dave Turnbull (11th season) 2011 finish: First at Special District 1 championships; first at Class 5A state meet Returning state qualifiers: Travis Neuman, jr., (1,500, 3,000); William Butler, jr., (triple jump); Luke Hinz, jr., (1,500); T.J. Peay, sr., (100, 400 relay); Cole Thomas, sr., (100, 200, 400 relay); Michael Wilson, jr., (400, 300 hurdles, 1,600 relay) 2012 district meet: Special District 1 qualifier at Bend High, May 18-19 Mountain View Cougars Coach: Dave Hood (fifth season) 2011 finish: Third at Special District 1 championships; eighth at Class 5A state meet Returning state qualifiers: Mitch Modin, jr., (long jump, high jump, 1,600 relay); Dimitri Dillard, sr., (1,600 relay); Matt Murphy, jr., (1,600 relay); Chris McBride, jr., (800); Riley Anheluk, sr., (800); Hayden Czmowski, sr., (discus); Blake Bosch, sr., (high jump) 2012 district meet: Special District 1 qualifier at Bend High, May 18-19

Crook County Cowboys Coach: Ernie Brooks (ninth season) 2011 finish: First at Greater Oregon League district meet; fourth at Class 4A state meet Returning state qualifiers: Grayson Munn, soph., (3,000); Hunter Bourland, sr., (high jump, 1,600 relay); Tyler Rockwood, sr., (1,600 relay) 2012 district meet: Greater Oregon League championships at La Grande, May 17-18 Madras White Buffaloes Coach: Donnie Alire (fourth season) 2011 finish: Seventh at TriValley Conference district meet Top returner: Miguel Vasquez, jr., (high jump, long jump) 2012 district meet: Tri-Valley Conference championships at Molalla, May 18 La Pine Hawks Coach: Brian Earls (fifth season) 2011 finish: Fourth at Sky-Em district meet Returning state qualifiers: Jeremy Desrosiers, jr., (400 relay); Deion Mock, sr., (pole vault, 400 relay); Kole Kimmel, jr., (400 relay); Travis Harrison, sr., (shot put); Dylan Seay, sr., (pole vault) 2012 district meet: Sky-Em League championships at Sweet Home, May 17 and 19

CLASS 2A Culver Bulldogs Coach: Mike Dove (fifth season) 2011 finish: Fourth at Tri-River district meet; fifth at Class 2A state meet

CLASS 1A Gilchrist Grizzlies Coach: James Anding (fifth season) 2011 finish: Seventh at Mountain Skyline district championships Returning state qualifiers: Zane Anderson, jr., (shot put); Dillon Link, jr., (discus) 2012 district meet: Mountain Skyline district championships at Grants Pass, May 12

The skinny on feral swine

W

herever Oregon hunters gather these days, the conversation works its way around to feral hogs — where to go, how to hunt them. Television shows like “Hogs Gone Wild� and “Pig Man� have raised the public consciousness, and everyone knows that the porcine predator is on the loose in our state. My answer to the oft-asked questions is, “If you want to hunt wild boar, you can do it in Oregon, but if you want to shoot one, your best bet is to head to California.� Still, I meet and talk to hunters every year that have bagged porkers on public or private land in Oregon. Feral swine are listed as one of the 100 most dangerous invasive species in Oregon. According to Rick Boatner, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife’s invasive species wildlife integrity coordinator, Oregon is at a crossroads relative to this animal classed as invasive predator. “There are two main populations of feral swine that we know of,� Boatner said. “One along the California border and another in Central Oregon, a little south of Madras, north up to Maupin and east to Condon, and back down roughly to the Prineville area.� Boatner thinks it may be hard to eradicate the pigs in Southern Oregon. They come in from California, a state that boasts between 200,000 and 500,000 feral hogs. California wildlife officials gave up trying to control them long ago. “Now, California has pigs in every county but one,� Boatner said. “In the 1950s they had about 5,000 pigs in eight counties.� Oregon is where California was then, at a pivotal point in preservation and conservation. Boatner is reluctant to estimate the number of wild hogs. “It’s hard to get estimates on them because they

acorns to alfalfa, to rattlesnake and bird eggs. And they multiply. Starting at 6 months old, a sow can produce piglets at the rate of two litters of up to 13 piglets, every year. “If hunters see damage or see pigs, I would like to have that information,� Boatner said. He can be reached at Rick. j.boatner@state.or.us. “Hunters want me to give them a place to hunt, I can’t help them though. And I used to keep a list, but it ran to over a thousand names,� Boatner said. “Most of the pigs we know of are on private property and right now we have no landowners seeking assistance from the public, but we are running into some trespass issues. The animals move on and off of the BLM land and some hunters have connected by being in the right place at the right time.� One place where hunters might find pigs on public land is in Central Oregon. “We believe there are populations in the northwest Ochoco National Forest, northwest of Prineville and southeast of Ashwood,� Boatner said. Landowners are obligated to keep watch. “If a landowner or manager knows there are pigs on the property, they are required by law to contact ODFW and start a removal plan. If we have funds, we loan traps out and implement other tools,� Boatner said. Too many Oregon oinkers have made the jump from farm to feral. Too many south-of-the-border swine have taken up residence in the Beaver State. Call them wild pigs, predators or pulled pork, they are cagey. Go ahead, hunt them year-round, they’ll make more.

GARY LEWIS go nocturnal and they’re so good at hiding and they don’t take pressure.� To keep track of the animals and find out where they go, a few pigs are radio-collared. “One pig with a collar on it heard us start our ATVs and ran 11 miles,� Boatner said. “Another pig we have collared, her home range is 10,000 acres. Hunters by themselves can’t shoot enough to make a difference.� But baiting is legal and dogs are legal. Hunters can help. In fact, the Oregon Hunters Association has provided money for trail cameras, trapping programs and other efforts. The OHA recently gave $3,060 to ODFW to provide traps and technical assistance to assist in removing feral swine from properties in Wasco, Jefferson, Sherman and nearby counties. ODFW is taking a multipronged approach: monitoring, trapping (currently on five properties in Central Oregon), aerial shooting and sport hunting. One of the best tools is a rifle in the hands of a good shot. “I would go with a 30-30, 30-06, 308 or 270,� Boatner recommended. “You want to use your deer gun. They will take a lot of lead and shot placement is critical on pigs. People can get hurt if they go after a wounded pig. “They are tearing up the riparian zones big time,� Boatner added. “That affects the forage for deer, elk and antelope, which reduces the carrying capacity of the land, and also promotes invasive weed growth. So far we haven’t found any, but pigs carry 35 known diseases, 13 of which can be transmitted to humans.� They eat everything from

— Gary Lewis is the host of “Adventure Journal� and author of “John Nosler — Going Ballistic,� “Black Bear Hunting,� “Hunting Oregon� and other titles. Contact Lewis at www. GaryLewisOutdoors.com.

FLY-TYING CORNER

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

CJ Rufus, courtesy Sunriver Fly Shop. When there is no visible hatch on the surface, try a searching fly. Where trout make a living on chubs and large nymphs like dragonflies, damsels and stoneflies, tie on the CJ Rufus. This pattern is made to sink fast and ride with the hook point up. Fish it with a start-stop retrieve. When the fly is paused, the heavy bead makes it dive headfirst like a leech, a dragonfly nymph, or a baitfish trying to get away. Tie this pattern with black thread on a No. 8 extra long streamer hook. Slide a tungsten 5/32 bead up to the eye. For the tail, use yellow marabou on top and root beer-colored marabou on bottom. Build the body with olive sparkle chenille wrapped with yellow hackle. Finish with a root beer marabou underwing and root beer Flashabou. — Gary Lewis

Salmon Continued from D1 “Any time it’s over 200,000, it’s a good run,� French said. The biologist said a number of factors make for healthy runs of salmon, including favorable ocean conditions and successful juvenile fish passage in the main-stem Columbia. “We’ve had some very wet springs in recent years, which have made for excellent downstream passage,� French said. He added that the last “big� return years for spring chinook on the Deschutes were from 2000 to 2003. “But even in those years, we weren’t approaching numbers close to this size,� French said. “It should be excellent fishing.� The Deschutes is closed to spring chinook salmon fishing by permanent rule, but in most years the ODFW opens the season by temporary rule if the predicted run is large enough. The last year the

Here is the weekly fishing report for selected areas in and around Central Oregon, provided by fisheries biologists for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife: CENTRAL ZONE BEND PINE NURSERY POND: The pond is open to fishing yearround but may be iced over in winter. CRESCENT LAKE: The lake is accessible at the resort only. CROOKED RIVER BELOW BOWMAN DAM: Anglers report catching good numbers of fish. Most fish are 8 to 12 inches long, mixed with some bigger trout. HAYSTACK RESERVOIR: Rainbow trout that were left over from the Central Oregon Sportsmen’s Show were recently stocked here. This includes about 6,000 legal-sized fish and a few trophy-sized fish ranging from 8 to 15 pounds. HOOD RIVER: Winter steelhead fishing on the Hood River is shifting into high gear as returns of both hatchery and wild fish are entering in good numbers. Anglers are reporting a few bright fish. LAKE BILLY CHINOOK: Fishing for bull trout has been fair. The majority of the fish caught were less than 24 inches but some keepers have been caught. There are a lot of legal-size bull trout in the reservoir, so fishing should be good this year. METOLIUS RIVER: Trout fishing has been good. Insect hatches should offer lots of opportunities for good dry fly fishing. OCHOCO CREEK UPSTREAM TO OCHOCO DAM: Anglers should start to see larger trout entering the creek from the Crooked River as they are getting ready to spawn.

Meets the third Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Redmond VFW Hall.

HIGH DESERT FRIENDS OF NRA: Annual banquet and auction at the Riverhouse Convention Center in Bend on Saturday, March 31, 5:30 p.m.; proceeds benefit the NRA Foundation, and will help promote such projects as youth firearms safety and education, hunter training, shooting range development, marksmanship training and conservation projects throughout Oregon; contact Jennifer Babcock at 541-369-5366; friendsofnra.org. ROCKY MOUNTAIN ELK FOUNDATION BIG GAME BANQUET: Central Oregon Chapter, Saturday, April 14, 4:30 p.m., at the Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center; raffles, live and silent auctions, games and dinner; contact Tom at 541383-8502 or www.rmef.org. LEARN THE ART OF TRACKING ANIMALS: Guided walks and workshops with a certified professional tracker; learn to identify and interpret tracks, sign and scat of the animals in Central Oregon; two or more walks per month all year; $35; ongoing, 8 a.m. to noon; 541-633-7045; dave@wildernesstracking.com; wildernesstracking.com. THE REDMOND CHAPTER OF THE OREGON HUNTERS ASSOCIATION:

FISHING

Mouth of the Deschutes River The Dalles Dam

Bonneville Dam er Columbia Riv

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Hood River

Cascade Locks The Dalles OREGON

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Portland

Government Camp

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Haystack recently stocked with rainbow trout

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Continued from D1 Pole vaulter Joel Johnson will also be a key contributor, according to Bend coach Matt Craven. “We tend to be a field-eventbased team with throwers and jumpers,� Craven notes. On the contrary, Summit will look to the running events to make a splash. The Storm return many of their top athletes, according to Summit coach Dave Turnbull. Travis Neuman, the reigning 5A cross-country state champion and returning district track champ in the 1,500 and 3,000, is ready for another shot at a state track title. “Travis has big goals after being ill last year at state,� Turnbull says. “He is hungry (for a state track title).� Luke Hinz, second in the 1,500 last year at state, is another Summit distance runner to watch, as well as 3,000meter runner Eric Alldritt. The Storm will also get a boost from freshman distance runner Matthew Maton. “He might be the most talented freshman in the state,� says Turnbull of Maton, whose older sister Ashley is a senior distance standout for the Summit girls. Cole Thomas, returning district champion in the 100 and 200, and T.J. Peay expect to lead Summit’s sprinters. “We have a great one-two punch with T.J.; he should be right behind Cole,� says Turnbull. Look for Mike Wilson to help round out the sprint and hurdle events for the Storm. Summit also returns several strong jumpers, including Will Butler, who was third in the triple jump at state last year. In Class 6A, Redmond will look to its veterans to lead the team. Throwers Jacob Criv-

ellone (shot put) and Tanner Manselle (javelin) should help bolster the team after qualifying for state in 2011, as could pole vaulter Cody Simpson. In Class 4A, Sisters returns mid-distance runner Easton Curtis, who finished fifth at state last year in the 800 and ran on the thirdplace 1,600 relay team. After placing second last season at the Sky-Em district meet, the Outlaws should be in contention for the district title this spring. Crook County hopes to improve upon last year’s fourth-place 4A state finish. The Cowboys return two members of their secondplace state 1,600 relay team: seniors Hunter Bourland and Tyler Rockwood. Grayson Munn will lead the distance events, according to Crook County coach Ernie Brooks, and Tevin Cooper should be solid in the throws. Miguel Vasquez, a high jumper and long jumper, is back to lead Madras, along with several promising newcomers. At La Pine, the Hawks are stacked with many returning state qualifiers, including pole vaulter Deion Mock, thrower Travis Harrison, and sprinter Jeremy Desrosiers. La Pine is looking to improve upon last season’s fourthplace district finish. Gilchrist thrower Zane Anderson, sixth at the Class 1A state meet last season, joins fellow thrower Dillon Link as athletes to watch this spring for the Grizzlies. Senior Tyler Shuey, who qualified for state as a freshman and sophomore but missed last year’s championships with an injury, also is expected to have a big season for Gilchrist in the sprints and shot put.

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Sherars Falls

Greg Cross / The Bulletin

agency did not open a spring chinook season on the Deschutes was 2009. The catch limit for spring chinook this year is two adult adipose fin-clipped salmon per day, and five adipose finclipped jack salmon per day. All non-adipose fin-clipped (wild) chinook must be released unharmed. Sherars Falls remains one of the best places in the state — and one of the most crowded — to catch a spring chinook

salmon from the bank. “It has some of the highest catch rates in the state,� French said of Sherars Falls. The biologist noted that salmon anglers should pay attention to the upstream passage of chinook on the Columbia on the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District website (www.nwp.usace. army.mil). He said it takes at least a couple weeks from when the chinook pass over The Dalles Dam to when they

DESCHUTES CHAPTER OF TROUT UNLIMITED: Meets on the first Monday of each month at the Environmental Center in Bend; meeting starts at 6:45 p.m. for members to meet and greet, and discuss what the chapter is up to; 541-306-4509; communications@ deschutestu.org; www.deschutestu. org. BEND CASTING CLUB: The Bend Casting Club is a group of local fly anglers from around Central Oregon who are trying to improve their casting technique; club meets on the fourth Wednesday of each month, from 6 to 8 p.m., at the Orvis Casting Course in Bend’s Old Mill District; 541-306-4509 or bendcastingclub@gmail.com. THE SUNRIVER ANGLERS CLUB: Meets on the third Thursday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Sunriver Fire Station; contact: www. sunriveranglers.org. THE CENTRAL OREGON FLYFISHERS CLUB: Meets on the third Wednesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Bend Senior Center, 1600 SE Reed Market Road; contact: www.coflyfishers.org.

arrive at Sherars Falls. “Generally, it’s around the first or second week of May when fishing gets red hot,� French said. Anglers use a variety of baits to land spring chinook, including worms, shrimp, eggs, tuna balls, and pieces of herring or sardine. “It all seems to work,� French said. Sherars Falls is a popular place to fish because the salmon congregate there in large numbers before navigating the falls, French explained. Deschutes spring chinook range in size from 7 to 12 pounds, relatively small for salmon. But they are known as some of the best-tasting fish. “People often say the Deschutes (chinook) are some of the better table fare,� French said. “Spring chinook in general are some of the finesttasting salmon to eat. They’re in prime shape. They still have lots and lots of fat.� — Reporter: 541-383-0318, mmorical@bendbulletin.com


OUTING

TV & Movies, E2 Calendar, E3 Dear Abby, E3

E

Horoscope, E3 Comics, E4-5 Puzzles, E5

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2012

www.bendbulletin.com/outing

TRAIL UPDATE Trail scene is ‘in between’ It’s may be an “inbetween-winter-andspring” kind of weekend for trail conditions, said Chris Sabo, U.S. Forest Service trails specialist. The high elevations are likely to have good snow conditions, but the mid-elevations are hit and miss, he said. Lower-elevation sno-parks, including Skyliner, Six Mile and Lower Three Creek, are likely to have marginal snow conditions. And the summer trails? Expect to find them “mushy,” especially with a chance of rain and snow this week, along with the expected warmer temperatures. The Great Nordeen ski race is being held Saturday and the course runs from Mt. Bachelor to Wanoga Sno-park. Some temporary closures will be in place on motorized use of snowmobile trails. Mt. Bachelor is still receiving new snow, with 28 inches in 72 hours this week, said Sabo. Warm weather and rain midweek, followed by snow expected over the weekend, means that there is potential for snow and ice layering. Rain is forecast Friday in the high country, followed by more snow, which may mean an increase in avalanche danger, said Sabo. “(The layers) may bond well or … may not bond well at all,” he said. There are numerous ice layers in the snowpack from the whole winter season, which can lead to potential instability, he said. “Err on the side of caution.” Experienced backcountry users, especially those with avalanche education, should have a good sense of what’s going on in the snowpack. “Mixed precipitation, snow mix, varied temperatures, strong winds ... can increase certain localized avalanche dangers,” Sabo said.

See Trails / E6

CHANGE OF SPOTLIGHT Llama hike on Saturday The Central Oregon Llama Association is holding its annual hike and barbecue at 10 a.m. Saturday at Halligan Ranch Llama Adventures, 9020 S. U.S. Highway 97, between Bend and Redmond. Guests will take a llama on a short guided hike, participate in an optional poker run and then have lunch. The association will provide burgers, hot dogs and side dishes. There is no charge for the event and it’s open to the public. Registration is required by the end of Friday. Contact: 541-4201334, halliganranch@ bendbroadband.com or www.halliganranch.com — From staff reports

Correction In a story headlined “Digging in to earn the title of Master Gardener,” which appeared on Tuesday, March 6, on Page F1, Pat Kolling’s name was misspelled. The Bulletin regrets the error.

SCENERY • Take a journey west and slide your skis on Hoodoo’s nordic trails By Anne Aurand The Bulletin

D

riving to the Hoodoo ski area’s nordic trails seemed somewhat ridiculous. It’s about 50 miles (one-way) from where I work in Bend to the groomed trail system. I didn’t want to spend my day driving. All I wanted to do was skate ski. There are closer options. Alas, it is my job, so I drove. Besides, after years of cross-country skiing in Central Oregon, it’s about time I discovered what this little-known nordic area at Hoodoo has to offer. Hoodoo crews groom the crosscountry ski trails in the wee morning hours on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays, and the crowds on weekdays are as thin as my dad’s hair. So if you can go on a Friday, do it. Tracy Lynn, who has many titles at the ski area (instructor, director of ski school, sales), said the trails are

busier on weekends, especially with classic skiers, but it never really gets overpopulated. “It’s vastly underused,” she said. “There’s just not a lot of people who come this far.” Sisters and Eugene seem to generate most of the visitors, she said. Hoodoo has two separate nordic trail systems: upper and lower. The 8.8-km upper system is accessed by a chairlift (Manzanita chair) and your nordic trail pass allows you a free ride up. It’s billed as a challenging set of trails that surrounds the backside base of the mountain, and touted as having breathtaking mountain views. Lynn prefers the upper trails because they’re quieter, more open to spectacular views and more challenging. But I skied the lower section last Friday, and the views down there were postcard quality, too. The lower system has 7.5 km of trails for a beginner or intermediate skier. The Hogg Meadow Trail, the backbone of the lower-trail network, begins along the slope under Easy Rider chairlift, just adjacent to the lodge and the parking lot. (You don’t need to ride the chair to get on the trail.) See Outing / E6

Three Fingered Jack as seen from Hogg Meadow Trail on Hoodoo ski area’s nordic trails. Anne Aurand The Bulletin

If you go Getting there: From Bend, drive west on U.S. Highway 20, through Sisters to Santiam Pass. After about 45 miles, turn left on Big Lake Road (signs indicate Hoodoo Ski Area). Difficulty: Easy to advanced options Cost: $14 for an adult, one-day trail pass on groomed days, FridaysSundays. Free Mondays-Thursdays when there’s no grooming. Contact: www.hoodoo.com or 541-822-3799 126

SANTIAM PASS

20 2690

Ray Benson Sno-park

Hoodoo Mountain Resort

Hoodoo’s lower nordic trails

Corbet Sno-park

Suttle Lake Madras

Black Butte 126

Area of detail

Black Butte Ranch

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To Sisters

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Sheep Springs Loop

Black Jack Loop Lodge

Hogg Meadow Trail

Hogg Meadow Loop

Hayrick Glade Greg Cross / The Bulletin


E2

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2012

TV & M Friends who take parody seriously

L M T  FOR THURSDAY, MARCH 15 EDITOR’S NOTES: • Open-captioned showtimes are bold. • There may be an additional fee for 3-D movies. • IMAX films are $15. • Movie times are subject to change after press time.

BEND

episode, and was more true in Season 2 than it has been so far in Season 3), but it also By Mike Hale serves as a kind of code, in New York Times News Service both the moral and the en“Community� returns to cryption senses. NBC’s schedule tonight, attiWhat’s really distinctive tude at least partly intact. about “Community� is that “It’s cool that Andre and it’s so consistently about Shirley are getwhat it’s about: Every episode is a miniature ting married again TV — there’s a whole essay on friendship generation of viewers SPOTLIGHT and belonging, and that didn’t get to see nearly every incident the original,� Abed (Danny and every obscure line of Pudi) said, deftly recasting dialogue works toward those the second marriage of one themes. of his community college As a corollary, the characstudy-group partners as a ters in “Community� are unHollywood sequel. His col- usually consistent and true to league in idiot-pop-culture themselves, partly because savantism, Troy (Donald they’re defined not so much Glover), smoothly extends by action — will they slip on the metaphor: “Let’s hope it’s a banana peel or sleep with more of a Bale than a Kilmer a friend’s wife? — as by how situation.� they react to and participate People, or TV shows, in the continuous contest of speaking in “Batman� refer- language, memory and adoences aren’t everyone’s glass lescent obsession of which of ginger ale, and it’s under- Abed and Troy are the game standable if you’d rather not masters. That interaction sit next to one at a bar or dial is both the glue that holds it in on your DVR. That’s one together this fellowship of reason “Community� was hopeful community-college a dead show walking in the retreads and the test that refirst place, pulled from the veals when someone is strayNBC lineup in December be- ing from absolute loyalty to fore being given its current the group. 12-episode reprieve. Playing such an elaborate But to dismiss “Communi- double game must be hard ty� as no more than the sum of work, and perhaps that’s its movie parodies, “Dr. Who� why the writers of “Commushout-outs and elaborate nar- nity� show unusual care and rative games would be unfair affection for their creations, and wouldn’t explain the pas- which in turn informs how sion of its advocates. the characters feel about Analyzing comedy is a no- one another. In Thursday’s toriously fruitless enterprise. episode two members of the But it seems safe to say that group find out why Shirley the web of allusions woven (Yvette Nicole Brown) someby the show’s creator, Dan times uses her “Miss Piggy Harmon, and his staff serves voice� — it’s also her sexy a double purpose. It’s poten- voice, it turns out — and tially funny in its own right beam at each other like (that varies from episode to proud parents. “Community� 8 tonight, NBC

Regal Pilot Butte 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend, 541-382-6347

THE ARTIST (PG-13) 2, 5, 7:10 THE DESCENDANTS (R) 1, 4, 6:40 THE GREY (R) 1:30, 4:30, 7 THE IRON LADY (PG-13) 1:45, 4:45, 7:20 A SEPARATION (PG-13) 1:15, 4:15, 6:50 THIN ICE (R) 2:15, 5:15, 7:30

Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend, 541-382-6347

ACT OF VALOR (R) 12:20, 3:20, 6:25, 9:05 DR. SEUSS’ THE LORAX (PG) 12:45, 1:50, 4:50, 6:30, 7:35, 9:50 DR. SEUSS’ THE LORAX 3-D (PG) 1:45, 3:45, 4:45, 7:30, 9, 9:45 GHOST RIDER: SPIRIT OF VENGEANCE (PG-13) 1:15, 4:15, 6:55 GONE (PG-13) 9:35 HUGO 3-D (PG) 12:05, 3, 6:15, 9:10 JOHN CARTER (PG-13) 3:15, 9:55 JOHN CARTER 3-D (PG-13) Noon, 6:45 JOHN CARTER IMAX (PG-13) Noon, 3:10, 6:35, 9:45 JOURNEY 2: THE MYSTERIOUS ISLAND (PG) 3:50, 10 JOURNEY 2: THE MYSTERIOUS ISLAND 3-D (PG) 1, 7:15 PROJECT X (R) 1:25, 4:05, 7, 9:30 SAFE HOUSE (R) 12:30, 3:55, 7:10, 9:55 SILENT HOUSE (R) 1:35, 4:35, 7:40, 10

Courtesy Gemma La Mana

Paul Rudd and Jennifer Aniston star in “Wanderlust.� THIS MEANS WAR (PG-13) 12:55, 3:35, 6:40, 9:25 A THOUSAND WORDS (PG-13) 1:10, 4:10, 7:25, 9:40 THE VOW (PG-13) 12:35, 3:05, 6:20, 9:20 WANDERLUST (R) 2, 4:40, 7:20, 9:50

McMenamins Old St. Francis School 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend, 541-330-8562

SHERLOCK HOLMES: A GAME OF SHADOWS (PG-13) 6 “Arctic Man: The Movie� will screen at 9 tonight (doors open at 8:30 p.m.). After 7 p.m., shows are 21 and older only. Younger than 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.

DR. SEUSS’ THE LORAX (PG) 4:45, 6:45 JOHN CARTER (PG-13) 3:45, 6:30 PROJECT X (R) 5:15, 7:15

DR. SEUSS’ THE LORAX 3-D (PG) 4:40, 6:50 JOHN CARTER (PG-13) 3:45, 6:40 JOURNEY 2: THE MYSTERIOUS ISLAND (PG) 4:50 PROJECT X (R) 5:20, 7:20 THE VOW (PG-13) 7:10

PRINEVILLE

SISTERS

Pine Theater

Sisters Movie House

214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

720 Desperado Court, Sisters, 541-549-8800

ACT OF VALOR (R) 6:30 DR. SEUSS’ THE LORAX (PG) 6 THE IRON LADY (PG-13) 6:15 JOHN CARTER (PG-13) 6

DR. SEUSS’ THE LORAX (UPSTAIRS — PG) 6 JOHN CARTER (PG-13) 4, 7 Pine Theater’s upstairs screening room has limited accessibility.

MADRAS 1101 S.W. U.S. Highway 97, Madras, 541-475-3505

Find It All Online

ACT OF VALOR (R) 4:25, 6:50

bendbulletin.com

Madras Cinema 5

REDMOND Redmond Cinemas 1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond, 541-548-8777

ACT OF VALOR (R) 4, 6:30

Hearing is Believing

Call 541-389-9690

L TV L   High definition and sports programming may vary BD-Bend/Redmond/Sisters/Black Butte (Digital); PM-Prineville/Madras; SR-Sunriver; L-La Pine

THURSDAY PRIME TIME 3/15/12 BROADCAST/CABLE CHANNELS

BD PM SR L ^ KATU KTVZ % % % % KBNZ & KOHD ) ) ) ) KFXO * ` ` ` KOAB _ # _ # ( KGW KTVZDT2 , _ # / OPBPL 175 173

5:00

5:30

KATU News World News News Nightly News 2012 NCAA Basketball Tournament KEZI 9 News World News The Simpsons The Simpsons Electric Comp. Fetch! With Ruff NewsChannel 8 Nightly News That ’70s Show That ’70s Show Cooking Class Ucook!-Bob

6:00

6:30

7:00

7:30

8:00

8:30

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9:30

10:00

10:30

KATU News at 6 (N) ’ Ă… Jeopardy! ‘G’ Wheel Fortune Missing Pilot (N) ’ ‘14’ Ă… Grey’s Anatomy (N) ’ ‘14’ Ă… (10:02) Private Practice (N) ‘14’ NewsChannel 21 at 6 (N) Ă… Jeopardy! ‘G’ Wheel Fortune Community ‘PG’ 30 Rock (N) ‘14’ The Office ‘PG’ Up All Night ‘14’ Awake Guilty (N) ’ ‘14’ 2012 NCAA Basketball Tournament New Mexico State vs. Indiana (N) (Live) Ă… Old Christine How I Met 30 Rock ‘PG’ Access H. KEZI 9 News KEZI 9 News Entertainment The Insider ‘PG’ Missing Pilot (N) ’ ‘14’ Ă… Grey’s Anatomy (N) ’ ‘14’ Ă… (10:02) Private Practice (N) ‘14’ Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Big Bang Big Bang American Idol 1 Voted Off ‘PG’ Touch Pilot ’ ‘PG’ Ă… News TMZ (N) ’ ‘PG’ Jonathan Bird Business Rpt. PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Ă… Money Smarts With Jonathan Pond ’ Legends of Folk: The Village Scene ’ ‘G’ Ă… NewsChannel 8 News Live at 7 (N) Inside Edition Community ‘PG’ 30 Rock (N) ‘14’ The Office ‘PG’ Up All Night ‘14’ Awake Guilty (N) ’ ‘14’ ’Til Death ‘PG’ King of Queens Seinfeld ’ ‘G’ Seinfeld ‘PG’ The Vampire Diaries 1912 (N) ‘14’ The Secret Circle Lucky (N) ‘PG’ Cops ‘14’ Ă… ’Til Death ‘PG’ Midsomer Murders ‘PG’ Ă… Independent Lens Senior citizen chorus. ’ ‘G’ Ă… World News Tavis Smiley Charlie Rose (N) ’ ‘PG’ Ă…

11:00

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KATU News (11:35) Nightline News Jay Leno News Letterman KEZI 9 News (11:35) Nightline Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ National Geographic Photos-2011 NewsChannel 8 Jay Leno King of Queens South Park ‘14’ PBS NewsHour ’ Ă…

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The First 48 Waterworld ‘14’ The First 48 Ă… The First 48 ‘PG’ Ă… The First 48 (N) Ă… The First 48: Missing Persons (N) The First 48: Missing Persons 130 28 18 32 The First 48 ‘14’ Ă… CSI: Miami Forensic investigators CSI: Miami Losing Face Horatio CSI: Miami Fishermen find a human ››› “Under Siegeâ€? (1992, Action) Steven Seagal, Tommy Lee Jones, Gary Busey. A Navy cook ››› “Under Siegeâ€? (1992) Steven Seagal. A Navy cook 102 40 39 solve crimes. ’ ‘14’ Ă… searches for a bomber. ‘14’ Ă… torso. ’ ‘14’ Ă… thwarts a plot to hijack a battleship. Ă… thwarts a plot to hijack a battleship. Ă… Ned Bruha River Monsters: Unhooked ‘PG’ Viking Wilderness ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Viking Wilderness ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Wild Russia ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Wild Russia ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Viking Wilderness ’ ‘PG’ Ă… 68 50 26 38 Ned Bruha Kandi Factory Shahs of Sunset The Real Housewives of Atlanta Interior Therapy With Jeff Lewis Million Dollar Listing New York Housewives/OC Housewives/OC What Happens Housewives/Atl. 137 44 ››› “A League of Their Ownâ€? (1992, Comedy-Drama) Tom Hanks, Geena Davis, Madonna. ’ Ă… ›› “Groundhog Dayâ€? (1993) ’ 190 32 42 53 ››› “The Rookieâ€? (2002) Dennis Quaid. A middle-aged pitcher makes it to the Major Leagues. ’ Mark Zuckerberg: Inside Face. 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(2008) Matthew Knight. ’ 87 43 14 39 Austin & Ally ’ Austin & Ally ’ Shake It Up! ‘G’ Good-Charlie Auction Kings Auction Kings Auction Kings Auction Kings Auction Kings Auction Kings Auction Kings Auction Kings Doomsday Bunkers ’ ‘14’ Ă… Auction Kings Auction Kings 156 21 16 37 American Chopper ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Khloe & Lamar Khloe & Lamar Khloe & Lamar Khloe & Lamar E! News (N) The Soup ‘14’ Ice Loves Coco Ice Loves Coco Ice Loves Coco E! News Chelsea Lately E! News 136 25 26 Yrs.: Dewey Bozella Baseball Tonight (N) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… 21 23 22 23 SportsCenter Magic Johnson SportsCenter Special (N) Ă… E:60 (N) MMA Live (N) College GameDay (N) (Live) Ă… Baseball Tonight (N) Ă… 22 24 21 24 The Announcement Friday Night Lights Swerve ‘14’ Friday Night Lights (N) ‘14’ Car Auctions Car Auctions Women’s College Basketball From April 3, 2011. (N) Women’s College Basketball 23 25 123 25 White Shadow Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. 24 63 124 203 SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… ››› “Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secretsâ€? (2002, Fantasy) Daniel Radcliffe. A malevolent force threatens the students at Hogwarts. The 700 Club ‘G’ Ă… 67 29 19 41 (3:30) ››› “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stoneâ€? (2001) Hannity (N) On Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Ă… Hannity On Record, Greta Van Susteren The Five 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Ă… Paula’s Cooking Chopped Squashed Chopped In a Pinch Chopped Get It Together! Chopped Leftovers Extravaganza! Sweet Genius Golden Genius (N) Sweet Genius Dark Genius 177 62 98 44 Best Dishes (4:00) ›› “Baby Mamaâ€? (2008) How I Met How I Met How I Met How I Met Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Archer (N) ‘MA’ Unsupervised Archer ‘MA’ Unsupervised 131 My First Place My First Place My First Place Hunters Int’l House Hunters Property Virgins Property Virgins Selling LA ‘G’ Selling NY House Hunters Hunters Int’l House Hunters Hunters Int’l 176 49 33 43 My First Place Swamp People ‘PG’ Ă… Swamp People ‘PG’ Ă… Swamp People Avenged ‘PG’ Swamp People (N) ‘PG’ Ă… Mudcats Walk of Shame (N) ‘PG’ Top Gear Supercars ‘PG’ Ă… 155 42 41 36 Swamp People ‘PG’ Ă… Dance Moms ‘PG’ Ă… Project Runway All Stars ‘PG’ Project Runway All Stars ‘PG’ Project Runway All Stars (N) ‘PG’ Project Runway 24 Hour Catwalk (N) ‘PG’ Ă… Prank My Mom 138 39 20 31 Dance Moms ‘PG’ Ă… The Rachel Maddow Show (N) The Last Word The Ed Show The Rachel Maddow Show The Last Word Hardball With Chris Matthews 56 59 128 51 The Ed Show (N) Jersey Shore ’ ‘14’ Ă… Jersey Shore Sharp Objects ‘14’ Jersey Shore ’ ‘14’ Ă… (8:45) Jersey Shore Deena faces a hard truth. ‘14’ Jersey Shore We Are Family ‘14’ I Want Pants Jersey Shore 192 22 38 57 Jersey Shore Kung Fu Panda iCarly ‘G’ Ă… Victorious ‘G’ SpongeBob SpongeBob Friends ’ ‘PG’ Friends ’ ‘PG’ Friends ’ ‘14’ Friends ’ ‘PG’ Friends ’ ‘14’ Friends ’ ‘14’ Friends ’ ‘PG’ Friends ’ ‘14’ 82 46 24 40 SpongeBob Behind Mansion Walls ‘14’ Ă… The Rosie Show (N) ’ ‘PG’ ››› “Kate & Leopoldâ€? (2001, Romance-Comedy) Meg Ryan, Hugh Jackman. ’ ››› “Kate & Leopoldâ€? (2001) Meg Ryan. ’ 161 103 31 103 Behind Mansion Walls ‘14’ Ă… The Game 365 Mariners MLB Preseason Baseball San Francisco Giants at Seattle Mariners From Peoria Stadium in Peoria, Ariz. Mariners UFC Insider The Dan Patrick Show 20 45 28* 26 MLB Baseball Jail ‘14’ Ă… Jail ‘14’ Ă… Jail ‘14’ Ă… Jail ‘14’ Ă… Jail ‘14’ Ă… Jail ‘14’ Ă… Jail ‘14’ Ă… iMPACT Wrestling (N) ’ Ă… MMA Uncensrd Jail ‘14’ Ă… 132 31 34 46 Jail ‘14’ Ă… ›› “Sawâ€? (2004) Cary Elwes. A doctor must kill his cellmate or his family will die. ››› “Dawn of the Deadâ€? (2004, Horror) Sarah Polley, Ving Rhames, Jake Weber. › See No Evil 133 35 133 45 (4:30) Face Off Monster Man Seeing Double Behind Scenes Joel Osteen Joseph Prince Hillsong TV Praise the Lord (Live). Ă… Live-Holy Land The Evidence Bible Prophecy Creflo Dollar Spring Praise-A-Thon 205 60 130 (6:15) 2012 NCAA Basketball Tournament Connecticut vs. Iowa State Second round. From Louisville, Ky. Conan ‘14’ Big Bang Big Bang Conan ‘14’ 16 27 11 28 2012 NCAA Tournament ››› “Drums Along the Mohawkâ€? (1939) Claudette Colbert. Colonial home›› “The Whole Town’s Talkingâ€? (1935, Comedy) Edward (8:45) ››› “Mary of Scotlandâ€? (1936, Historical Drama) Katharine Hepburn, Fredric March, Flor- ›››› “Stagecoachâ€? (1939) John 101 44 101 29 steaders contend with war and Indian raids. Ă… G. Robinson, Jean Arthur, Arthur Hohl. Ă… ence Eldridge. Rivalry erupts between Mary Stuart and Elizabeth I. Ă… Wayne, Claire Trevor. Ă… 48 Hours: Hard Evidence ’ ‘14’ Doctors Behind Bars ‘PG’ Ă… First Week In ’ ‘14’ Ă… First Week In Fresh Meat ’ ‘14’ First Week In ’ ‘14’ Ă… First Week In Fresh Meat ’ ‘14’ 178 34 32 34 48 Hours: Hard Evidence ’ ‘14’ (6:45) 2012 NCAA Basketball Tournament Loyola (Md.) vs. Ohio State (N) (Live) Ă… Supernatural ’ ‘14’ Ă… Las Vegas ’ ‘14’ Ă… Las Vegas Delinda’s Box ‘14’ 17 26 15 27 2012 NCAA Basketball Tournament Level Up ‘PG’ Regular Show MAD ‘PG’ Wrld, Gumball Adventure Time Adventure Time MAD ‘PG’ Regular Show King of the Hill King of the Hill American Dad American Dad Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ 84 Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Bourdain: No Reservations The Layover Singapore ‘PG’ 179 51 45 42 Bourdain: No Reservations M*A*S*H ‘PG’ M*A*S*H ‘PG’ M*A*S*H ‘PG’ M*A*S*H ‘PG’ Home Improve. Home Improve. Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond King of Queens King of Queens 65 47 29 35 Bonanza The Trap ‘PG’ Ă… NCIS Double Identity ‘PG’ Ă… NCIS Jurisdiction ’ ‘PG’ Ă… NCIS Guilty Pleasure ‘14’ Ă… NCIS Moonlighting ’ ‘14’ Ă… NCIS Obsession ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Suits A lawyer recruits a genius. 15 30 23 30 Burn Notice ‘PG’ Ă… Mob Wives Cabin Fever ’ ‘14’ Behind the Music ’ ‘14’ Ă… Behind the Music Jennifer Lopez. ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Behind the Music Pitbull (N) ‘PG’ Behind the Music T.I. T.I. ’ ‘14’ Behind the Music Pitbull ’ ‘PG’ 191 48 37 54 Stevie TV ‘14’ PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

›› “High School Highâ€? 1996 Jon Lovitz. ‘PG-13’ ›› “Country Strongâ€? 2010 Gwyneth Paltrow. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… ››› “The Social Networkâ€? 2010 Jesse Eisenberg. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… ENCR 106 401 306 401 ›› “Final Destination 2â€? 2003 Ali Larter. ‘R’ Ă… ››› “He Got Gameâ€? 1998, Drama Denzel Washington, Ray Allen. ‘R’ Ă… ››› “He Got Gameâ€? 1998, Drama Denzel Washington, Ray Allen. ‘R’ Ă… FMC 104 204 104 120 › “Crossoverâ€? 2006, Drama Wesley Jonathan. ‘PG-13’ Ă… UFC Tonight UFC Insider Best of PRIDE Fighting UFC Unleashed (N) Ă… Thrillbillies ‘14’ Built to Shred The Ultimate Fighter Live ’ ‘PG’ UFC Tonight FUEL 34 Golf Central (N) 19th Hole (N) LPGA Tour Golf RR Donnelley Founders Cup, First Round Top 10 GOLF 28 301 27 301 LPGA Tour Golf PGA Tour Golf Transitions Championship, First Round Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ HALL 66 33 175 33 The Waltons The First Day ‘G’ (4:15) › “The In Crowdâ€? 2000 Lori Real Sex Xtra: Cathouse: Come › “Big Mommas: Like Father, Like Sonâ€? 2011 Martin Lawrence. Malcolm and ››› “Cedar Rapidsâ€? 2011 Ed Helms. A naive insurance Life’s Too Short Game of Thrones Robb rallies his HBO 425 501 425 501 Heuring. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… his stepson go under cover at a girls school. Ă… agent has a wild time at a convention. ‘R’ Episode 4 ‘MA’ father’s allies. ’ ‘MA’ Ă… Pornucopia to, Party (5:05) ››› “House Partyâ€? 1990, Musical Comedy Kid ’N Play, Full Force. ‘R’ (7:20) ››› “House Partyâ€? 1990, Musical Comedy Kid ’N Play. ‘R’ (9:35) ››› “Layer Cakeâ€? 2004, Crime Drama Daniel Craig, Colm Meaney. ‘R’ IFC 105 105 (4:15) ››› “Bull Durhamâ€? 1988 Kevin (6:05) ›› “Unknownâ€? 2011, Suspense Liam Neeson, Diane Kruger. An ac- ›››› “Platoonâ€? 1986, War Tom Berenger, Willem Dafoe. A soldier embarks ›› “Knight and Dayâ€? 2010, Action Tom Cruise. A woman becomes the relucMAX 400 508 508 Costner. ’ ‘R’ Ă… cident victim finds a man using his identity. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… on a yearlong tour of duty in Vietnam. ’ ‘R’ Ă… tant partner of a fugitive spy. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… Warrior Graveyard (N) ‘14’ Warrior Graveyard (N) ‘14’ Warrior Graveyard (N) ‘14’ Warrior Graveyard ‘14’ Warrior Graveyard ‘14’ Warrior Graveyard ‘14’ Alaska State Troopers ‘14’ NGC 157 157 Odd Parents Odd Parents Odd Parents Odd Parents Dragonball GT Monsuno ‘Y7’ SpongeBob SpongeBob Fanboy-Chum Fanboy-Chum Planet Sheen T.U.F.F. Puppy NTOON 89 115 189 115 Dragonball GT Monsuno ‘Y7’ Whitetail Nation Wardens Operation Elk Dummy Bow Madness Ult. Adventures West. Extremes Wild Outdoors The Crush Bone Collector Wild Outdoors Ult. Adventures Speargun Hunt Trophy Quest OUTD 37 307 43 307 Furtakers (4:00) “Johnny (5:35) ›› “Extraordinary Measuresâ€? 2010, Drama Brendan Fraser. iTV. Two “The Hollywood Complexâ€? 2010 Parents bring their chil- Snoop Dogg Presents The Bad Girls Shameless Hurricane Monica Monica Inside Comedy Girls of Sunset SHO 500 500 Wasâ€? 2006 ‘R’ men join forces to develop a life-saving drug. ’ ‘PG’ Ă… dren to Hollywood to become stars. ‘NR’ Ă… of Comedy ‘MA’ Ă… returns. ’ ‘MA’ Ă… (N) ‘14’ Ă… Place (N) ‘MA’ Wrecked ‘PG’ Wrecked ‘PG’ Am. Trucker Drive! NASCAR Race Hub Dangerous Drives ‘PG’ Drive! Formula One Racing Australian Grand Prix, Practice SPEED 35 303 125 303 Dangerous Drives ‘PG’ (6:50) ›› “The Green Hornetâ€? 2011 Seth Rogen. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… ›› “Battle: Los Angelesâ€? 2011 Aaron Eckhart. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… › “Resident Evil: Afterlifeâ€? 2010 STARZ 300 408 300 408 (5:05) ›› “Astro Boyâ€? 2009 Voices of Freddie Highmore. ‘PG’ Ă… ››› “Personal Velocityâ€? 2002, Drama Voice of John Ven- ›› “Brother’s Justiceâ€? 2010, Comedy Dax Shepard, Tom ›› “The Mechanicâ€? 2011 Jason Statham. An elite hit-man (9:35) “Triangleâ€? 2009 Melissa George. Yacht passengers (11:15) “Clashâ€? 2009, Action Thanh TMC 525 525 timiglia, Kyra Sedgwick. ’ ‘R’ Ă… Arnold, Bradley Cooper. ‘NR’ Ă… teaches his deadly trade to an apprentice. encounter mysterious weather conditions. Van Ngo. ’ ‘R’ Ă… NBC Sports Talk (N) (Live) Costas Tonight ‘PG’ NHL 36 ‘G’ Poker After Dark ‘PG’ Ă… Darts NBC Sports Talk VS. 27 58 30 209 NHL Hockey: Penguins at Rangers Braxton Family Values (N) ‘PG’ Braxton Family Values ‘PG’ Ă… Braxton Family Values ‘PG’ Ă… Braxton Family Values ‘PG’ Ă… Ghost Whisperer Bad Blood ‘PG’ I Do Over ‘PG’ Ă… WE 143 41 174 118 Braxton Family Values ‘PG’ Ă…


THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

A  & A  

Wife’s respect for husband shrinks as tall tales grow Dear Abby: My husband, “Sam,� and I have been married for 32 years, and all these years he has lied continually. It has gotten so bad that I cringe every time we’re invited to family functions or get-togethers with friends. Sam uses these gatherings to be the star of the show, spilling out the most outrageous whoppers. My family knows when he’s lying or exaggerating about something. They roll their eyes and nudge me to let me know they know. Sam fabricates the most outlandish stories and never owns up to anything he has done wrong. Instead he blames me or others for his actions. If I confront or challenge him, he gets defensive and says I’m “always� belittling or challenging him in front of others. Abby, even though I still care for this man, I don’t have the respect I wish I had for him. What can I do? — Disenchanted in the Land of Enchantment Dear Disenchanted: After 32 years, there is nothing you can do about it. Your husband has a personality problem — probably related to insecurity — that causes him to lie to get attention. It’s pathetic, really. However, to embarrass him by pointing it out in front of others is cruel and unproductive. Until he’s ready to admit to himself that he has damaged his credibility, nothing will change. Dear Abby: My close friend “Kate� has just told me she’s getting a divorce. She confided that she cheated on her husband, “Phil,� and says she doesn’t want to try to work on her marriage, even though they have a baby together. Kate says that Phil is a great father and he’s not abusive — she just doesn’t love him anymore. This came as a shock to me, and I’m not sure how to be supportive. When I divorced, my husband was the one who cheated and left me, so I know

DEAR A B B Y how Kate’s husband feels. I know I should be sympathetic to her, but I don’t know what to say. Can you help? — Trying Not to Judge Dear Trying: Continue trying not to judge. It is understandable that you’d identify with Kate’s husband since his position is so similar to what you experienced. If you know and like him, befriend him. I’m sure he could use a friend right now. However, before you do, ask Kate if she would mind. As to your question about what to say to her, all you really need to do is acknowledge her announcement by saying, “I’m sorry to hear it. I hope you have given it careful consideration.� Period. Dear Abby: I’m 15. My father just started paying child support three years ago for my twin sister and me. He only pays a small amount each month, and he has never paid any medical or health bills for either of us in our lives. Recently we found out he lied about his monthly salary so he wouldn’t have to pay for us. I’m really hurt because I feel like he doesn’t care about us. How do I cope? Help! — Incredibly Hurt in the South Dear Incredibly Hurt: While I can understand your disappointment in your father’s lack of character, please do not allow his failures to make you think less of yourself. Now that you and your mother know he lied about his income, it’s possible the child support he didn’t pay can be collected retroactively. If your mother hasn’t discussed this with an attorney, she should do it now. — Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

Horoscope: Happy Birthday for Thursday, March 15, 2012 By Jacq u eline Bigar This year you open up to a different attitude at work and/or in your community. As a result, you feel more accepted and successful. Network to your heart’s content, and socialize all you want. On both fronts — professional and emotional — you will expand your inner circle. Be precise with your communication. If you are single, you could meet someone who knocks your socks off. Take your time getting to know this person. If you are attached, choose to share more of your life with your sweetie. You will become a happier couple. CAPRICORN is a true friend. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH You know that appearance counts. Today, it counts even more than you think. You have a directness that lets others know you mean business. They step back accordingly. Consider cramming in more than one day’s worth of plans, if possible. The Force is with you. Tonight: To the wee hours. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHHH You can only share some of your present flights of fancy with certain people. Others might be irritated that you are not more present in the moment. Confusion surrounds plans and creates a new possibility. Just keep confirming messages and ideas. Tonight: Try the unusual. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHH Work with a key person directly. This person asks more from you than many others do. Remain confident. Your energy mixed with his or her diligence creates quite the combination, and the end results will show it. Work through a disagreement. Tonight: Togetherness works. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHH Defer to others, knowing full well when enough is enough. Your sense of humor comes through when dealing with a difficult roommate or family member. Just don’t let this person know you have the giggles. Focus on the long term. Tonight: Plan the weekend, and maybe start it early. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHH Your relaxed pace might need to be tweaked if you want to clear your to-do list. You sense a profound difference in what is going on right now with others. The unexpected makes your day more interesting. Greet sudden change with a smile.

Tonight: Clear out as many errands as possible. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH Your imagination encourages you down a new trail and/ or adds a new dimension to a present project or emotional situation. A key person can be reactive. You might think you are used to this behavior by now, but you aren’t. Resist verbalizing your opinions immediately. Tonight: Get into weekend mode a little early. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH Your mind is on a parent or domestic matter. A significant other could be a tad bit reactive. Think in terms of gains. Perhaps you have been sitting on a feeling for too long. Choose a more appropriate time to express any pent-up emotions. Tonight: Homeward bound. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHHH Confusion could be an issue with someone at a distance or within an academic environment. Your attempt to gain clarity might simply alert this person to the issue. A meeting remains pivotal. Tonight: Return calls. Start thinking “weekend.� SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHH Be sensitive to your expenses and needs. Your creativity flows, and you can visualize a change. Staying grounded takes talent, but you can do it, especially if you keep an eye on your finances. You want to make good choices. Be willing to put in extra hours. Tonight: Your treat. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHH Despite momentary shocks and changes, you will head in the right direction, sure of yourself. You are able to integrate new information and situations immediately. Reach out for someone at a distance or an expert for more feedback. Tonight: Full steam ahead. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHH Listen to your inner voice. You might see that a course is carved out in front of you, yet your intuition tells you to go in another direction. Follow that voice. You will revise a judgment or two because of your observations. Count on your flexibility. Tonight: Head home. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH Follow through with a meeting. In this situation, you become clearer about which direction to go. You have the support of others. Know what it is you need to do, though you might not feel that you are quite ready. Tonight: Where people are. Š 2011 by King Features Syndicate

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C C  Please email event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� at www.bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

TODAY

Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-3828436 or www.oxfordhotelbend.com.

RINGING O’ THE GREEN: The Bells of Sunriver perform Irish music on handbells; free; 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-593-1635. “THE FAST RUNNER�: A screening of the 2002 film; free; 5-7 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Madras Campus, 1170 E. Ashwood Road, Madras; 541-318-3782. CREATIVITY UNLEASHED VIDEO NIGHT: Featuring three talks from Ken Robinson, Elizabeth Gilbert, and Adam Sadowsky; a preview to the TEDx conference; free; 6-7:30 p.m.; The Blacksmith Restaurant, 211 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-306-3351 or http://tedxbend.com/nights. ACORN PROJECT: The Bellingham, Wash.-based jam band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www .mcmenamins.com. “MR. MARMALADE�: Innovation Theatre Works presents the dark comedy about a young girl and her cocaineaddicted imaginary friend; $20, $18 students and seniors; 7:30 p.m.; Innovation Theatre Works, 1155 S.W. Division St., Bend; 541-504-6721 or www .innovationtw.org. “VOICES IN THE DARK�: Cascades Theatrical Company presents the thriller about a radio psychologist in a remote cabin, a mysterious caller and a storm; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org. “ARCHAEOLOGY SITES IN THE FIELD�: Dr. Mel Aikens, professor emeritus at the University of Oregon and coauthor of “Oregon Archaeology,� will present; $5 suggested donation; 7 p.m. Archaeological Society of Central Oregon general meeting; Central Oregon Association of Realtors, 2112 N.E. Fourth St., Bend; 541-382-3452. STAND-UP COMEDY: Live comedy; $10; 7:30-9 p.m.; The Original Kayo’s Dinner House and Lounge, 415 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-323-2520. “GINA GALDI AND GUEST�: A presentation of the play about a Boston native who moves in with her parents to start a wedding cake business; $20, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541312-9626 or www.2ndstreet theater.com. THE SUGGIES: The Bay Area-based indie-rock band performs; donations accepted; 8 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; 541-728-0879. AFROMASSIVE: The Oakland, Calif.-based Afrobeat band performs; $7 plus fees in advance, $10 at the door; 9 p.m.; Players Bar & Grill, 25 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-3892558 or www.p44p.biz.

ST. PATRICK’S DAY PARTY: Featuring a performance by Five Pint Mary and the Bend Fire Pipes and Drums; $5; 8 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-788-2989.

FRIDAY VFW DINNER: A dinner of corned beef and cabbage; $7; 5 p.m.; VFW Hall, 1503 N.E. Fourth St., Bend; 541-389-0775. DANCING UNDER THE STARS: Dinner and dancing featuring the Notables Swing Band; $12; 6 p.m. dinner, 7 p.m. dancing; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-388-1133. “MODOC — THE TRIBE THAT WOULDN’T DIE�: Featuring a presentation by author Cheewa James; free; 6:30-8:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Wille Hall, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-318-3782. A CELTIC JOURNEY: Featuring a performance by the DillonMoore Academy of Irish Dance, with live music; $5, $3 ages 17 and younger; 7 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-383-6290. AND THE BEAT GOES ON FUNDRAISER: With live music, a silent auction and refreshments; registration requested; proceeds benefit Bend Experimental Art Theatre; $20; 7 p.m.; The Old Stone, 157 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; 541-639-7712, beat@ bendbroadband.com or www .beattickets.org. JEFFERSON COUNTY COMMUNITY READ: Brian Doyle, author of “Mink River,� talks about Native American themes in his book; free; 7 p.m.; Warm Springs Library, 1144

ST. PATTY’S DAY BASH: Featuring a performance by Sagebrush Rock; free; 8 p.m.; Sandbagger Dinner House, 5165 Clubhouse Drive, Crooked River Ranch; 541-923-8655. ST. PATRICK’S DAY CONCERT: Featuring a performance by Broken Down Guitars, with Dream Symphony; $5; 8:30 p.m.; Astro Lounge, 939 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-388-0116. ST. PATRICK’S DAY PARTY: Featuring a performance by Emerald City; $2; 8:30 p.m.-midnight; Northside Bar & Grill, 62860 Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541-383-0889. JERRY JOSEPH & THE JACKMORMONS: The Portlandbased rock musicians perform; $10; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; Players Bar & Grill, 25 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-389-2558. Submitted photo

Acorn Project, of Bellingham, Wash., will put on a free concert at McMenamins Old St. Francis School in Bend at 7 tonight. Warm Springs St.; 541-553-1078 or www.jcld.org. “MR. MARMALADE�: Innovation Theatre Works presents the dark comedy about a young girl and her cocaine-addicted imaginary friend; $20, $18 students and seniors; 7:30 p.m.; Innovation Theatre Works, 1155 S.W. Division St., Bend; 541-5046721 or www.innovationtw.org. “VOICES IN THE DARK�: Cascades Theatrical Company presents the thriller about a radio psychologist in a remote cabin, a mysterious caller and a storm; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www .cascadestheatrical.org. AN EVENING WITH LEO KOTTKE: The Grammy-nominated acoustic guitarist performs; $35 or $45; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. “GINA GALDI AND GUEST�: A presentation of the play about a Boston native who moves in with her parents to start a wedding cake business; $20, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541312-9626 or www.2ndstreet theater.com. JAMES HUNNICUTT: The Port Orchard, Wash.-based roots-rock act performs, with Sumbitch; $2$5; 8 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; 541728-0879 or www.reverbnation .com/venue/thehornedhand. JAZZ AT THE OXFORD: Featuring a performance by saxophonist Bobby Watson, with the Mel Brown Sextet; $45 (plus fees in advance); 8 p.m.; The Oxford Hotel, 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-3828436 or www.oxfordhotelbend.com. PHIL JOHNSON AND GREG ASDURIAN: The nationally touring comedians perform; $5; 8 p.m.; The Summit Saloon & Stage, 125 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-639-2953 or www.philjohnsoncomedy.com. THE AUTONOMICS: The Portlandbased rock ‘n’ roll group performs, with Three Up Two Down and Grit and Grizzle; $10, $5 ages 20 and younger; 8 p.m.; PoetHouse Art, 55 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-728-0756.

SATURDAY TIRE COLLECTION: Dispose of used tires, both on and off rims; farm equipment, business, fleet or heavy equipment tires and those larger than 24.5 inches will not be accepted; free; 7 a.m.-4:30 p.m.; Knott Landfill Recycling & Transfer Station, 61000 S.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-317-3163 or www.deschutes .org/solidwaste. SENSATIONAL SATURDAY: Learn about the skin types of reptiles and amphibians; included in the price of admission; $10 adults, $9 ages 65 and older, $6 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. ST. PATRICK’S DAY CELEBRATION: Featuring live music by the Tune Dawgs, the Moon Mountain Ramblers, Tony Smiley, Five Pint Mary and Bend Fire Pipes and Drums; free; 1 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www .mcmenamins.com. SCHMOOZE WITH THE AUTHOR WINE TASTING: Speak with Brian Doyle, author of “Mink River,� and taste wines; part of Jefferson County Community Read; free admission; 2-4 p.m.; Great Earth

Natural Foods, 46 S.W. D St., Madras; 541-475-1500. ST. PATRICK’S DAY CONCERT: Featuring Celtic music by Rebecca Smith and friends; 3-5 p.m.; Strictly Organic Coffee Co., 6 S.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-330-6061. RINGING O’ THE GREEN: The Bells of Sunriver perform Irish music on handbells; free; 4-5 p.m.; La Pine Senior Activity Center, 16450 Victory Way; 541-593-1635. GAME NIGHT: Learn how to play games new and old, from “Pandemic� to “Empire Builder.� Come join your friends and neighbors, and bring the kids, to this evening of family fun and games and laughter. Refreshments will be served; free; 5-7 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 252 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-0866. JAZZ AT THE OXFORD: Featuring a performance by saxophonist Bobby Watson, with the Mel Brown Sextet; $45 (plus fees in advance); 5 p.m.; The Oxford Hotel, 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-3828436 or www.oxfordhotelbend.com. ST. PATRICK’S DAY CONCERT: Featuring performances by Hilst and Coffey and Wild Rye; 6 p.m.; River Rim Coffeehouse, 9570 Amber Meadow Dr. Suite 190 , Bend; 541-728-0095. ST. PATRICK’S DAY DINNER: A meal of corned beef, cabbage, potatoes and more; with live music; proceeds benefit veterans; $8; 6 p.m.; Eagles Lodge & Club, 235 N.E. Fourth St., Prineville; 541-447-7659. WINE IN THE PINES FUNDRAISER: Featuring wine, food, auctions, and entertainment by the Central Oregon Irish Dancers; proceeds benefit the Rotary Club of Sisters; $25, $5 raffle tickets; Tickets available at banks in Sisters; Brand 33, 16900 Aspen Lakes Drive, Sisters; 541-719-0478. JEFFERSON COUNTY COMMUNITY READ: Brian Doyle delivers a presentation on his book “Mink River�; free; 7 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541-4753351 or www.jcld.org. THE AUTONOMICS: The Portlandbased rock ‘n’ roll group performs a St. Patrick’s Day concert, with All You All and Eidolons; $6; 7 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; 541-728-0879. “MR. MARMALADE�: Innovation Theatre Works presents the dark comedy about a young girl and her cocaine-addicted imaginary friend; $20, $18 students and seniors; 7:30 p.m.; Innovation Theatre Works, 1155 S.W. Division St., Bend; 541504-6721 or www.innovationtw.org. “VOICES IN THE DARK�: Cascades Theatrical Company presents the thriller about a radio psychologist in a remote cabin, a mysterious caller and a storm; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www .cascadestheatrical.org. “GINA GALDI AND GUEST�: A presentation of the play about a Boston native who moves in with her parents to start a wedding cake business; $20, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www.2ndstreettheater.com. “U2, RATTLE AND HUM�: A screening of the 1988 music documentary; $9 plus $1 historic theatre restoration fee; 8 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www .towertheatre.org. JAZZ AT THE OXFORD: Featuring a performance by saxophonist Bobby Watson, with the Mel Brown Sextet; $45 (plus fees in advance); 8 p.m.; The Oxford Hotel, 10 N.W.

ST. PATRICK’S DAY PARTY: Featuring performances by Mosley Wotta and Blak Irish; free; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541388-8331 or www.silvermoon brewing.com. ST. PATRICK’S DAY SHAMROCK: Featuring performances by Kleverkill and Exfixia; free; 9:30 p.m.; Third Street Pub, 314 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-306-3017.

SUNDAY MIKE PUDDY MEMORIAL SKI RACE: Dual format race benefits the Mike Puddy Memorial Scholarship; $15, $10 children and students; 10:30 a.m.; Mt. Bachelor ski area, 13000 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-4109825 or www.mbsef.org. “MR. MARMALADE�: Innovation Theatre Works presents the dark comedy about a young girl and her cocaine-addicted imaginary friend; $20, $18 students and seniors; 2 p.m.; Innovation Theatre Works, 1155 S.W. Division St., Bend; 541-5046721 or www.innovationtw.org. “VOICES IN THE DARK�: Cascades Theatrical Company presents the thriller about a radio psychologist in a remote cabin, a mysterious caller and a storm; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 2 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www .cascadestheatrical.org. LA PHIL LIVE — DUDAMEL AND HANCOCK CELEBRATE GERSHWIN: A screening of the live concert, featuring the Los Angeles Philharmonic performing music by Gershwin; conducted by Gustavo Dudamel; $20, $16 children; 2 p.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347 or www .fathomevents.com. SKERIK’S BANDALABRA: The Seattle-based funk band performs; $7 plus fees in advance, $10 at the door; 9 p.m.; Players Bar & Grill, 25 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-3892558 or www.p44p.biz.

MONDAY “AMERICAN CULTURE AND THE VIETNAM EXPERIENCE�: Neil Browne discusses how the Vietnam War changed American culture; free; 6:30 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7040 or www .deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. TUESDAY “LITTLE-KNOWN OR LITTLEUSED RESOURCES FOR THE GENEALOGIST�: Bend Genealogical Society presents a program by Nancy Noble; free; 10 a.m.; Rock Arbor Villa, Williamson Hall, 2200 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541317-9553 or www.orgenweb .org/deschutes/bend-gs. VFW DINNER: A dinner of chicken strips; $5; 5 p.m.; VFW Hall, 1503 N.E. Fourth St., Bend; 541-389-0775.

WEDNESDAY “CASABLANCA�: A screening of the 1942 film; with an introduction by Robert Osborne; $12.50; 2 and 7 p.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347 or www .fathomevents.com. LEFT COAST COUNTRY: The Portland-based string band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com.


E4

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2012

TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

BIZARRO

E5

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively.

SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

DAILY BRIDGE CLUB

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

Seeking a friendly duplicate bridge? Find five games weekly at www.bendbridge.org.

CANDORVILLE

SAFE HAVENS

LOS ANGELES TIMES DAILY CROSSWORD

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN


E6

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2012

C D  

Datebook is a weekly calendar of regularly scheduled nonprofit events and meetings. Listings are free but must be updated monthly to continue to publish. Please email event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” at www.bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Contact: 541-383-0351.

O R G A N I Z A TI O N S

TODAY BINGO: 6 p.m.; Elks Lodge, Bend; 541-382-1372. COMMUNICATORS PLUS TOASTMASTERS: 6:30-7:45 p.m.; IHOP, Bend; 541-593-1656 or 541-480-0222. THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45-4 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752. TAKE OFF POUNDS SENSIBLY: 9-11 a.m.; Pilot Butte Retirement Center, Bend; 541-647-1124. THURSDAY AFTERNOON DANCE: 1:30-2:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-388-1133.

FRIDAY BEND KNIT-UP: $2; 10 a.m.-noon; Rosie Bareis Community Campus, Bend; 541-728-0050. BINGO: 6 p.m.; American Legion Post #44, Redmond; 541-548-5688. CASCADE DUPLICATE BRIDGE: 12:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-383-2326. THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45-4 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752.

CENTRAL OREGON SUBMARINE VETERANS: 2 p.m.; VFW Post 4108, Redmond; 541-504-1913. INTERCAMBIO SPANISH/ENGLISH CONVERSATION GROUP: 9:30-11:30 a.m.; Green Plow Coffee Roasters, Redmond; 541-504-9877. SATURDAY NIGHT FEVER: $5; 6 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-388-1133.

THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 2-5 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752. ORDER OF THE EASTERN STAR: 7:30 p.m.; Masonic Lodge, Redmond; 541-504-0444. SWEET ADELINES: 6:30 p.m.; Redmond Senior Center; 541-447-4756. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE: 7-9 p.m.; Sons of Norway Hall, Bend; 541-549-7311 or 541-848-7523.

SUNDAY

TUESDAY

BINGO: 12:30 p.m.; American Legion Post #44, Redmond; 541-548-5688. THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:30-4 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752.

BEND COIN CLUB: 6:30 p.m.; High Desert Community Grange, Bend;

SATURDAY

MONDAY CASCADE CAMERA CLUB: 7 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; www. cascadecameraclub.org or 541-312-4364. CASCADE DUPLICATE BRIDGE: 12:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-383-2326. CENTRAL OREGON RETIRED EDUCATORS ASSOCIATION: 11:30 a.m.; Zion Lutheran Church, Redmond; 541-382-7044.

Classic cross-country skiers enjoy a warm day last week on the Hogg Meadow Loop trail at Hoodoo. Anne Aurand The Bulletin

Outing Continued from E1 The Hogg Meadow Trail is flat and easy and offers many sneak peeks and direct views of Mount Washington. It starts through a forest of hemlock and fir, and then passes through an open burned area. It connects the other loop trails to add some distance and challenge to your ski. The Sheep Springs Loop is the only trail with hills of any significance, and the resort’s brochure calls that loop “intermediate.” In no time at all I skied the entire lower system and covered one trail twice, for something close to a five-mile ski, according to my iPhone app distance tracker. The grooming was impeccable — every bit as good as the trails I love at Virginia Meissner Sno-park or Mt. Bachelor Nordic Center. The weather was unseasonably warm that day, which made the snow a bit like mashed potatoes by the late-morning hour I arrived. But feeling the warmth of the sun and skiing without a jacket and hat was a springlike treat. Since then, storms have most certainly dumped more snow on the trails. Lynn said the season officially ends April 8, but the resort will stay open longer if there’s enough snow and attendance. I’m so glad I tried the trails network out this year. It was a refreshing change of scenery from my usual haunts. I recommend it for a sense of novelty if you’re one who likes to try new things. I might not get back again this spring, but only because it’s so much less of a drive for me to head up the Cascade Lakes Highway for an equally satisfying ski. But as far as that dreaded car time goes, I realized on the way

Trails Continued from E1 Expect continued snow loading and new fallen trees along trails throughout the high country from moderate winds. The Crescent area had reports of good snow conditions in the high elevations and some trail grooming is being done.

Groomed trails for skate skiing • The base elevation of Hoodoo Mountain Resort is 4,668 feet, where the lower trail system starts. About 16 km of trails get groomed before first runs on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays. Adult tickets are $14. But check this out: trail use is free Mondays through Thursday if you don’t need fresh grooming. • Meissner Sno-park and its popular trails start at 5,350 feet. Meissner has 40 km of trails that get groomed Tuesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays and Sundays. Donations are requested for the grooming. It takes me about 15 minutes to get there from Bend, which is why I ski there the most. www.meissnernordic.org. • Mt. Bachelor Nordic Center’s 56 km of trails range between 6,400 feet and 5,750 feet in elevation and get groomed daily. Day passes are $14 on weekdays and $17 on weekends. www.mtbachelor .com/winter/mountain/ nordic_ski_center. • Wanoga Sno-park, at 5,400 feet elevation, has 3.5 km of dog-friendly ski trails that are groomed Tuesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays and Sundays. Donations are requested for grooming. http://dog pac.org/wintertrails.html.

home from Hoodoo — as I drove through forests, passed mountains and lakes — there probably isn’t a prettier drive possible. — Reporter: 541-383-0304, aaurand@bendbulletin.com

New snow is expected at Newberry Crater. Sabo said the sno-park there was reported to be icy last week. The road to Tumalo Falls is still in poor condition for skiing and snowshoeing after being plowed earlier in the season for the now-completed slash removal project. — Lydia Hoffman, The Bulletin

bendcoinclub@hotmail.com or 541-693-3438.

WEDNESDAY

BINGO: 6 p.m.; Eagles Lodge & Club, Prineville; 541-447-7659.

BEND CHAMBER TOASTMASTERS: Noon-1 p.m.; The Environmental Center, Bend; 541-610-2308.

CRIBBAGE CLUB: 6:30 p.m.; Bend’s Community Center; 541-317-9022. HIGH DESERT RUG HOOKERS: 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-382-5337. HIGHNOONERS TOASTMASTER CLUB: Noon-1 p.m.; New Hope Church, Classroom D, Bend; 541390-5373 or 541-317-5052. LA PINE CHAMBER TOASTMASTERS: 8-9 a.m.; Gordy’s Truck Stop, La Pine; 541-536-9771.

BEND KNITUP: 5:30-8 p.m.; Barnes & Noble Booksellers, Bend; 541-728-0050. BEND SUNRISE LIONS CLUB: 7 a.m.; Jake’s Diner, Bend; 541-286-5466. BINGO: 6 p.m.; American Legion Post #44, Redmond; 541-548-5688. CASCADE DUPLICATE BRIDGE: 12:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center;

541-383-2326. THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45-4 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752. KIWANIS CLUB OF REDMOND: Noon-1 p.m.; Juniper Golf and Country Club, Redmond; 541-5485935 or www.redmondkiwanis. org. PRIME TIME TOASTMASTERS: 12:05-1 p.m.; Home Federal Bank, Prineville; 541-416-6549. REDMOND AREA TOASTMASTERS: Noon-1 p.m.; Ray’s Food Place, Redmond; 541-410-1758.


HEALTH

Health Events, F2 People, F2 Medicine, F2

F

Money, F3 Fitness, F4 Nutrition, F6

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2012

www.bendbulletin.com/health

All asked to get pertussis vaccine

MONEY

By Markian Hawryluk The Bulletin

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Prineville resident Tristen Reinhart, 14, ended up in the emergency room due to excruciating tooth pain. Dental issues are a common reason for an emergency room visit and were the No. 1 diagnosis in the Prineville emergency room in 2010.

A dental crisis • Lack of access to dental care driving more low-income patients to emergency rooms for tooth woes By Betsy Q. Cliff The Bulletin

T

errible tooth pain sent Carolyn Burch to Pioneer Memorial Hospital’s emergency room at least seven times in several months, she said. The 31-year-old Prineville woman does not have dental insurance and, as a summertime seasonal worker, she said she has no way to pay for dental care. So, when a crack in her tooth caused what she described as excruciating pain, she felt she had nowhere else to go. Most recently, she went in two months ago, she said, because the pain had kept her from sleeping for two days. Burch’s situation is common. In 2010, more patients visited Pioneer Memorial’s ER for dental issues than for any other reason, said the department’s medical director, Dr. Josh Cook. “Dental pain is ubiquitous,” said Cook.

“A lot of people can’t afford good dentistry. … Many of the people with (the Oregon Health Plan) or no ability to pay come to the (emergency room) as a place of last resort.” In this way, Pioneer Memorial is part of a nationwide trend. A national report by the Pew Center on the States found that dental conditions were the primary diagnosis for more than 830,000 emergency room visits across the country in 2009. The report found a 16 percent increase in dental visits to emergency rooms between 2006 and 2009. In Oregon, the Pew report found the number of dental-related emergency room visits by patients enrolled in OHP, the state’s Medicaid program that provides health and sometimes dental coverage for those with low incomes, increased 31 percent between 2008 and 2010. See Dental / F3

Percent of Oregonians without dental insurance The number of Oregonians without coverage for dental care exceeds the number without health insurance. Experts say access to dental care is a major public health issue. Without health insurance Without insurance that pays for routine dental care Ages 4-18 without routine dental coverage Ages 19-64 without routine dental coverage Ages 65-plus without routine dental coverage

Protein can help dieters • While losing pounds, maintain lean muscle mass

17% 34% 15%

By Anne Aurand The Bulletin

34% 60%

Source: Kaiser Family Foundation, Oregon Health Authority Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

Cross training makes for better fitness By Anne Aurand

In an attempt to protect the health of young children, public health officials are urging older Americans to get vaccinated. The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, a federal advisory panel, voted last month to recommend a booster shot of the pertussis vaccine for those older MEDICINE than 65. “As with many Inside diseases, • What you we’re need to concerned know about about herd whooping immunity, cough, F2 with who’s going to transmit the disease as well as who’s going to be at high risk once they get it,” said Dr. Paul Cieslak, acute and communicable disease prevention manager in the Oregon Public Health Division and a member of the ACIP panel. The move was made “mostly with an eye toward preventing and minimizing the likelihood that somebody with pertussis would transmit it to a baby who is too young to be vaccinated yet.” See Pertussis / F2

bodies in different ways.”

Mitchell Stevens times his mom, Joanne Stevens, as she practices the transition from wetsuit to bike. She works on shortening her triathlon transition times in the garage of her Bend home. Training for triathlons is the epitome of cross training.

The Bulletin

Cross training The typical Bendite might squeeze in a run before If a cyclist, for example, just work and a yoga class after. rides all the time, she’s going to end up with what Fecteau He could go for a long bike calls “postural deficits.” It ride on weekends, unless, of means her musculoskeletal course, there’s good snow, in which case he might crosssystem is overused in some country ski instead. places, weak in others, and unbalanced enough Call it the good life or call it fanatical, but exFITNESS to increase the risk of pain and injury. perts in physical fitness call it cross training, a Anyone whose exercise is dominated by one healthy approach to fitness activity, whether it’s cycling and exercise, whether the inor running or tennis, should tention behind it is recreation or competition in an event like offset their deficits with some cross training, Fecteau said. a triathlon. “If someone does a variety of A cyclist, for example, might do yoga to loosen up tight hips activities, they’re already cross and straighten the chronicaltraining,” said physical theraly-hunched back, or strength pist Andy Fecteau, the founder training for the upper body. of Rebound Physical Therapy See Cross / F4 in Bend. “They’re moving their

Andy Tulllis The Bulletin

To lose pounds and keep them off, it’s helpful to feel satiated within a finite number of calories. Highprotein foods are said to improve satiety, making it easier to NUTRITION eat less. Some studies Inside have sug• Example of a gested higher protein that diet, F6 higherprotein, • Grams of weightprotein in loss diets common also help foods, F6 maintain lean muscle mass. And, bodies with more muscle have a higher metabolism. Muscle burns eight calories per pound per day, compared to fat, which burns three calories per pound per day, according to personal trainer Sloane Anderson. It may sound like protein is key to losing weight, but it’s not that simple. Most research says what matters most is overall calorie consumption, not the balance of macronutrients (protein, carbohydrate, fat) in one’s diet. But considering protein intake is one tool to a healthier body. See Protein / F6

HEALTH HIGHLIGHTS MEDICINE: The growing popularity of genetic tests raises concerns, F2

MONEY: Hospitals are on a privatepractice buying spree, F3

FITNESS: Kids who feel left out may opt out of physical activity, F4

NUTRITION: Study suggests a link between overeating, memory loss, F6


F2

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2012

H E Editor’s note: Ongoing health classes and support groups now appear online only. See www.bendbulletin.com/ healthclasses and www .bendbulletin.com/ supportgroups. To submit an entry for either list, see instructions below.

CLASSES DARKNESS TO LIGHT TRAINING: Three-hour interactive training to advise adults on how to protect children from sexual abuse; registration required by Monday; $20; 6-9 p.m. Tuesday; KIDS Center, 1375 N.W. Kingston Ave., Bend; 541-3835958 or kbohme@kidscenter.org. NAMI-CO MARCH EDUCATIONAL MEETING: Mental Health Housing in Central Oregon; free; 7 p.m. Tuesday; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; whitefam@ bendcable.com. TOMANDO CONTROL DE SU SALUD: Living Well with Chronic Conditions class in Spanish; $5 for six classes; 11 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Saturdays; preregister; Mosaic Medical, 375 NW Beaver St., Suite 101, Prineville; call Sandy Rico at 541-475-4456, ext. 4212, or visit www.livingwellco.org.

How to submit Health Events: Email event information to healthevents@ bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” at www.bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing class listings must be updated monthly and will appear at www.bendbulletin.com/ healthclasses. Contact: 541-383-0358. People: Email info about local people involved in health issues to healthevents@ bendbulletin.com. Contact: 541-383-0358.

Easy winter makes for early allergy season By Carolyn Butler Special to The Washington Post

There were plenty of reasons to love this year’s “winter that wasn’t,” but now it’s payback time — at least for those of us with allergies. While the spring allergy season normally gets under way toward the end of March or beginning of April, some people have already been sniffling, sneezing and suffering with other symptoms for a while now. “It really is unusually early for patients to be this miserable,” says Derek Johnson, medical director of the Fairfax Allergy, Asthma and Sinus Clinic. “The mild winter has resulted in very high pollen levels in February and early March, when they’re typically very low or negligible.” The weather from here on out can change things, but experts say they expect the untimely effects to linger. “In past years, we’ve had a very compact, heavy-hitting allergy season, but this is shaping up to be a long slog,” says Gaithersburg, Md., allergist Jackie Eghrari-Sabet, who explains that while evergreen trees, such as cedar, cypress and juniper, have budded prematurely, other species will likely bloom at their regular pace, leading to “more of a slow, grand parade” between now and late April to early May, when pollen counts typically peak. “It’s not like because it started early it’s going to end early.” And, of course, trees are only the start: “As soon as the tree pollens are over, overlapping at the other end, probably, will be grass pollens, and if we’re really unlucky and it’s a hot, hot summer, weed pollens really thrive in the heat, and some molds thrive in the heat, especially when it’s dry,” Eghrari-Sabet says. “So this could be a constant buffet of pollens and mold” all the way through summer, at least.

M  Contrary to myth, sleep tends to improve with age

CELEBRITY MEDICINE

Nick Cannon’s condition puts lupus in spotlight Less than two months after singer Mariah Carey tweeted that husband Nick Cannon had “mild kidney failure,” Cannon told People magazine he is dealing with an autoimmune disorder similar to lupus. According to the Lupus Foundation of America, lupus is a chronic autoimmune disease that can affect any part of the body, including organs such as the kidneys. The condition occurs when the im-

mune system, which normally fights off viruses and bacteria, treats the body’s healthy tissue as a foreign invader. This can result in inflammation, pain or other damage to healthy tissue. Lupus symptoms can wax and wane over time, and can range from mild to life-threatening. With good medical care, most people diagnosed with lupus can live long, relatively healthy lives.

The Associated Press file photo

Pertussis Continued from F1 The recommendation builds on the panel’s decision last year to urge seniors in close contact with infants to get an additional dose of the combination tetanus-diphtheria-pertussis booster, known as Tdap. Now all adults fall under the recommendation, unless they have medical reasons they cannot be vaccinated. “This is one group of the population where there was not routine vaccination,” Cieslak said. Previous recommendations called for all adults to get the tetanus-diphtheria booster, known as Td, every 10 years. Now adults of all ages will be advised to replace one of those Td shots with a Tdap. Pertussis, commonly called whooping cough, is a highly contagious bacterial disease that causes uncontrollable, violent coughing. The coughing can make it hard to breathe, resulting in a tell-tale “whooping” sound as individuals gasp for air after a fit of coughing. Children are immunized for pertussis with five doses of childhood vaccine known as DTaP, starting at 2 months of age. The fifth dose is generally administered before starting school. In Oregon, students are required to receive the Tdap booster before entering seventh grade, unless they claim a religious exemption. The Tdap shot protects against the same three diseases as DTaP, but contains a reduced dose of diphtheria and pertussis to act as a booster. Marketed under the brand name Boostrix, it was originally approved for use in adolescents in 2005, and then for adults up to age 64 in 2008. The Food and Drug Administration approved it for use in seniors last year, based on studies that showed the antibody response in older individuals was comparable to that in younger adults. “Efficacy becomes a concern when older people get vaccinated,” Cieslak said. “They tend not to respond as well.” Traditionally, pertussis has been considered a children’s disease and while it can affect people of any age, it’s often less serious for adults. Many won’t even know they had anything more than a bad cold and a lingering cough. “Adults tend not to get the whoop so they don’t come in declaring themselves as having whooping cough,” Cieslak said. “Nevertheless in healthy adults, it can cause six, eight, 10 weeks of coughing. If you’ve had an illness that you thought was just a cold and everything but the cough went away, and you kept coughing for a long time after that, the odds aren’t bad that you had pertussis.” Health officials have made a concerted effort to vaccinate adults in response to a major outbreak of pertussis in California over the past three years. The epidemic peaked in the summer of 2010 and infection rates dropped last year, but still remained at higher than normal levels.

— Markian Hawryluk, The Bulletin

Source: Lupus Foundation of America

The myth that you sleep worse as you get older isn’t true, scientists argue in a new study. While older people may have more sleep disturbances than younger people, those problems are linked to illnesses and health issues and have little to do with aging, researchers said. The study, published in the journal Sleep, examined sleep quality in more than 150,000 Americans. The survey participants were asked about sleep quality, sleep disturbances and daytime fatigue as well as questions on race, income, education, mood and their general health.

Pertussis primer • Pertussis (whooping cough) is a highly contagious respiratory infection caused by bacteria. • It begins with a runny nose, sneezing, low-grade fever and mild cough. The cough gradually becomes more severe. • After a week or two, the second stage of the illness begins, characterized by fits of coughing ending with a gasp or “whoop” as the patient tries to get air. Sometimes the burst of coughing results in vomiting. This stage of the illness may persist for up to 10 weeks. • Pertussis is particularly dangerous — even fatal — for infants who are too young to be fully immunized. • Public health officials urge people in Oregon, especially those living or working with newborns, to get a pertussis booster. • Individuals age 2 months and older should receive regular DTaP vaccinations (for

children through age 6) as well as one routine Tdap booster (starting at age 11) to protect themselves and those around them from whooping cough. •Pertussis immunity from vaccination may wane over time, so it’s important that new parents and caregivers especially get another pertussis vaccination to protect their infants from whooping cough. It is also important for health care providers to make sure they are up-to-date on their pertussis immunizations. • A state rule beginning in 2008-09 requires a Tdap pertussis vaccination booster starting with seventh graders and adding a subsequent grade each year after that. • For more information on obtaining a pertussis vaccination, call your health care provider, local health department or SAFENET (800-723-3638).

Source: Oregon Public Health Division

In 2010 alone, there were more than 9,000 pertussis cases in California, resulting in 10 infant deaths. Oregon also saw a rise in pertussis cases, although not to the level of its neighbor to the south. According the Oregon Public Health Division, the state saw 281 pertussis cases in 2010 and 314 in 2011. Since 2003, four infants have died from pertussis in Oregon, ranging in age from 1 to 3 months. In Deschutes County, there were eight documented cases of pertussis reported in 2010. Of those, three were in infants, two in adolescents, two among working-age adults and one in a senior. In 2011, there were just two cases, one in a senior and one in an 18-year-old. Health officials in both states have tried to “cocoon” nonimmunized children by vaccinating those around them — parents, older siblings and grandparents. “I’ve heard from a few seniors, especially grandparents, who wanted this vaccine because they care for their infant grandkids or were around grandchildren,” said Heather Kaisner, immunization coordinator for the Deschutes County Health Department. “There was this frustration with ‘Why can’t I get it?’” State and local health officials are passing on the revised recommendations to physicians, but don’t have any immediate plans for a more targeted campaign. Although Medicare does cover the Tdap vaccine, many physicians don’t stock adult vaccines. Seniors may have to seek out pharmacies or immediate care clinics to get the booster shot. Officials are also making a push for pregnant women to get the Tdap vaccine in their third trimester, in hopes it will reduce the chances of a woman infecting a newborn. There’s also some evidence that getting the booster while pregnant will pass on maternal antibodies to the fetus, pro-

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viding at least some protection in the first months of life. “If you don’t do it then,” Kaisner said. “It’s highly recommended right after delivery.” The Family Birthing Center at St. Charles Bend offers the Tdap vaccine to eligible patients, and family members who would like the vaccine are referred to the Immediate Care clinic or to the county health department. — Reporter: 541-617-7814, mhawryluk@bendbulletin.com

The research showed that sleep quality tended to improve over one’s lifetime — except for an uptick in sleep problems reported in middle age, especially among women. People age 80 and older scored the highest on sleep quality. It’s not clear why older people reported fewer sleep disturbances and tiredness, the authors said. It could be that older people have more control over sleep duration while younger people experience more stressors (jobs, kids, socializing) that interfere with sleep. Nevertheless, “once you factor out things like

illness and depression, older people should be reporting better sleep,” the lead author of the study, Michael Grandner, a research associate at the Center for Sleep and Circadian Neurobiology at the University of Pennsylvania, said in a news release. “If they’re not, they need to talk to their doctor. They shouldn’t just ignore it.” Likewise, doctors should not accept the myth that their older patients will naturally complain of sleep problems and that there is little they can do to help, the authors said. — Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times

Genetic testing’s growth raises legal and ethical concerns By Chad Terhune Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — Spending on genetic tests has reached $5 billion annually and could top $25 billion within a decade, according to an insurance industry study published this week. The rise in spending is likely to intensify the debate over genetic testing as policymakers and employers struggle to contain health care costs. The growing availability of genetic and molecular diagnostic tests offers the promise of earlier detection of disease and more personalized treatments that could wring substantial savings from the nation’s $2.6 trillion-a-year health care tab. But many medical providers and other experts worry that those benefits may be outweighed by indiscriminate use of genetic testing, similar to what has occurred with some spending on popular prescription drugs and expensive imaging tests. The research arm of UnitedHealth Group Inc., the nation’s largest insurer, conducted the study as well as a survey of physicians and patients on their attitudes toward genetic testing. Researchers and patient advocates have raised questions about costs and ex-

pressed ethical and legal concerns about how genetic test results are used by families, insurers and physicians. More than half the 1,506 consumers surveyed by UnitedHealth were concerned about their physician’s ability to know when a genetic test is needed and interpret it, the confidentiality of test results and about possible discrimination. In 2008, the federal Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act strengthened consumer protections regarding genetic information as it relates to people’s employers and health coverage. Rapid advances in genetic testing have made it applicable for more people and decreased the average price. Genetic testing is currently available for about 1,800 conditions and three to five new tests become available monthly, the study found. Tom Bologna, chief executive of Response Genetics Inc. in Los Angeles, said his company is working on molecular diagnostic tests that help determine the appropriate drug therapy for cancer patients. “These can be $100,000 treatments, and for a few thousand dollars we can identify those patients where the drug has real value,” he said. “This has all changed very quickly.”


THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

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M CHANGE FROM 2010 TO 2011 FOR SELECT PROCEDURES Breast augmentation Up 4% — 307,180 total

VITAL STATS

Buttock implants Up 43% — 1,149 total

Nose jobs down, pectoral implants up

Eyelid surgery Down 6% — 196,286 total

The American Society of Plastic Surgeons recently released its annual report showing the number of people getting various cosmetic surgery procedures in 2011 and the change from 2010.

Liposuction Up 1% — 204,702 total

Facelift Up 5% — 119,026 total Hair transplantation Down 17% — 15,754 total

Nose reshaping (rhinoplasty) Down 3% — 243,772 total Pectoral implants Up 43% — 317 total Tummy tuck No change — 115,902 total Upper arm lift Down 1% — 14,998 total Source: American Society of Plastic Surgeons Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

Hospitals face more tests to access $14.6B in grants for e-records Hospitals would have to show they’ve amassed the vital statistics of more than 80 percent of their patients in digital form, among other targets, to continue collecting as much as $14.6 billion in federal grants for installing electronic records technology sold by General Electric and smaller suppliers. Awards of as much as $11.5 million are available to hospitals that demonstrate “meaningful use” of the equipment, under preliminary rules issued by the Obama administration. Doctors can apply for grants of $44,000 or $64,000, depending on whether they treat patients in Medicare or Medicaid. The rules continue carrying out an initiative in the economic stimulus law enacted in February 2009 as a step toward overhauling the U.S. health care system. Hospitals and doctors should gain “substantial benefits” from adopting digital

Dental Continued from F1 “Just like people are using the emergency room as their primary care, they are using the emergency room as their dentist,” said Dr. Jeff Timm, a Bend dentist who volunteers with a dental program through Volunteers in Medicine Clinic of the Cascades and Central Oregon Community College. “That isn’t the right place for it.” Emergency rooms in Central Oregon do not keep dentists on call and do not provide dental care. Doctors there do not routinely fix or extract teeth, and offer none of the preventive services to keep dental problems from happening again. They can temporarily help patients in pain with numbing shots or pills, and will drain an abscess or prescribe antibiotics for infection. For that, the charge is often several times the cost of being seen in a dentists’ office. “It’s a high price when we can’t address their treatment,” said Cook. In Prineville, efforts to address the problem began late last year. But, in other parts of Central Oregon, there are few resources or programs for people who cannot afford dental care and few solutions to the growing problem.

No coverage, no care People who use the emergency room for dental issues rarely have dental insurance, said Darin Durham, manager of the emergency department at St. Charles Bend, the area’s largest hospital. Most of the people they see are uninsured, he said, and have no ability to pay. Last year, he said, about 700 patients came to the emergency room for dental issues, compared with about 800 trauma patients. Durham said that the hospital budgets a certain amount each year to help patients without the ability to pay to get the treatment they need, typically tooth extraction from an oral surgeon. Last year, he said, they went through their budget in 10 months and he predicts a shortfall again this year. Dental insurance is less common than health coverage and, in Oregon, more than 1 in 3 people go without coverage for routine dental services. That’s almost twice the number of people without health insurance. Government insurance programs that guarantee health coverage often don’t include dental. Medicare, which provides health coverage for Americans ages 65 and older, does not provide for dental services. OHP provides coverage for routine dental care for children, but not for most adults. Adults in the program typically are only covered for emergency services, such as tooth extractions or infection treatment. Without coverage, most people skip routine dental care, even if they know they need it. “When you have people who can’t afford to buy gas, they’re not going to get their teeth fixed,” said Sharon Vail, coordinator for the Crook County Community Health Improvement Partnership, an effort of the Oregon Office of Rural Health. But that means people often develop severe problems before seeking help. Dr. Mike Shirtcliff, a local dentist who runs Advantage Dental, which ad-

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New rules on federal grant money may encourage hospitals to switch to digital records. records, the government said in the regulatory filing, including lower record-keeping costs, fewer medical errors and unnecessary tests, and shorter hospital stays. The proposed rules put the government “in a position to really move the industry and health care forward,” said Lauren Fifield, senior policy adviser at athenahealth Inc. of Watertown, Mass., which sells

Tristen Reinhart, 14, at home. Tristen went to the emergency room three times for terrible tooth pain. He’s now part of a new program in Prineville to help patients get better dental care. Rob Kerr The Bulletin

Resources for adult dental care • VOLUNTEERS IN MEDICINE CLINIC OF THE CASCADES Takes uninsured Deschutes County residents who have some income. Contact: 541-330-9001

• MOSAIC MEDICAL CLINIC Nonprofit clinic that seeks to help all patients, regardless of ability to pay. Limited dental services. Contact: Prineville, 541-4470707; Bend, 541-383-3005; Madras, 541-475-7800

ministers the dental coverage in the Oregon Health Plan and runs several area clinics, said he knew of one patient who developed a systemic infection that started in a tooth. The patient needed a heart valve transplant as a result of the dental infection, Shirtcliff said. At Volunteers in Medicine, a Bend clinic that treats people without insurance, 40 percent of those coming into the clinic have problems eating or sleeping because of dental issues, said director Kat Mastrangelo. “It just blows you away.”

Prineville coordinates care Tristen Reinhart, a 14-yearold who lives in Prineville, did have dental insurance through the Oregon Health Plan. So when the boy began to have horrible pain a couple of months ago, his mother, Treva Stahlman, called Advantage Dental, which takes OHP patients. But, she said, she couldn’t get an appointment for three months. Tristen said the pain was getting worse. He couldn’t concentrate at school, he said. One night, after he couldn’t sleep and was crying at 2 a.m., Stahlman took him to the emergency room where they gave him a shot to block the pain temporarily. It was at least the third time he’d been to the emergency room for pain in the same tooth, Tristen said. Then, the emergency department at Pioneer Memorial did something novel. They got him a dental appointment for the next day. Reinhart became part of a program, launched at the end of last year, to help Crook County patients coming to the emergency room get better dental treatment. The hospital partnered with Advantage Dental clinic, which has practices around the state and set up an office in Prineville last year. Now, when a patient comes into the emergency room with a dental issue, hospital staff offer a referral to the clinic and an appointment for the next day. Advantage Dental takes patients with the Oregon Health Plan and without insurance, who pay about $99 for basic

• ADVANTAGE DENTAL Dental clinics in Bend, Sisters and Prineville that accept Oregon Health Plan and will work out payment plans with low income patients. Contact: 888-468-0022

• REDMOND DENTAL GROUP Will work out payment plans for people without insurance and takes some Oregon Health Plan clients. Contact: 541-548-8175

treatment, and the clinic will work out payment plans with patients, said Shirtcliff. The hospital faxes the emergency records to Advantage Dental, which also faxes back information when they see the patient. “Now we have a cooperative team approach to the patient,” Cook said. “We know what treatment they’ve had.” At Advantage, dentists pulled the tooth that was causing Tristen pain. “They took care of it,” said Stahlman. Tristen said there’s a gap in the back of his mouth where his tooth used to be but he no longer has dental issues. He also said he’s planning to start brushing his teeth more often. Cook said the dental program is still new, so there is not much data on whether it’s reducing dental visits to the emergency room. Anecdotally, he said, he thought it was working. “We’re not seeing the repeat” patients, he said. Cook also said that having the program made the experience better for patients and the emergency room staff. “Before it was, ‘Hey man, I can alleviate your symptoms for the short term, but I can’t do anything else. Sorry, too bad.’ (Now), it’s the satisfaction of being able to say, ‘We can get you in to a dentist.’ It’s changing the whole nature of visits.”

Adult options limited The partnership with Advantage Dental is still limited to Prineville. In other areas of Central Oregon, many patients still struggle to get access to dental care. “We’ve seen fewer people with dental insurance,” said Timm, the Bend dentist. There are people that fall “in between (qualifying for) OHP and (having) traditional insurance. That’s a huge population.” Patients at Volunteers in Medicine are eligible for a low-cost clinic through COCC, where they can get an exam, X-rays and fillings or extractions. But, the clinic is not open for patients who do not qualify for VIM’s services, including those with health insurance or people without any income. That clinic uses volunteer dentists and sees about 30

patients a month, said Kristi Hammerquist, who coordinates the clinic. In addition, Mosaic Medical Clinic, a nonprofit health clinic that takes OHP and uninsured clients, coordinates with a dental van that takes appointments about once a month for adult patients and twice for kids, said Rosa Cendejas, an outreach worker at the Bend clinic. Cendejas organizes the dental van, an RV that utilizes volunteer dentists and offers free treatment to the uninsured. Currently, she said, there are about 200 adults on the waiting list for dental services. The van hosts an average of 10 to 14 patients a month. Cendejas coordinates dental care for both children and adults but said in Deschutes County, adults have a much harder time getting good care. OHP covers routine dental care for kids, and the number of pediatric dental practices in the county that will accept OHP insurance is higher than the number that will take it for adults. The issue, like so many others, comes down to money, said Timm. “There’s not access to care,” for many adult patients without insurance, said Timm, the Bend dentist. “But that access to care becomes one of lack of funding.” Timm said there just isn’t money to take care of everyone who needs it. “Fortunately or unfortunately, (dentists) are a small business. You have to be able to pay the employees and pay the bills.” — Reporter: 541-383-0375, bcliff@bendbulletin.com

the systems. “Keep the momentum and don’t sort of water the measures down,” she said, citing 2010 regulations that weakened some proposed rules for use. Many health providers still rely on paper records. Lawmakers have tried to prod hospitals and doctors into adopting electronic systems despite a lack of criteria. Preliminary benchmarks included using electronic systems to enter doctors’ medical orders, check drugs against lists of insurance company reimbursements and to store patients’ personal data. The percentage of U.S. hospitals that have adopted electronic records more than doubled from 2009 to 2011, to 35 percent, according to a survey by the American Hospital Association that the U.S. government reported Feb. 17. — Alex Wayne, Bloomberg News

A medical tradition fades as hospitals buy private practices COMMENTARY

By Manoj Jain Special to The Washington Post

Fifteen years ago, I proudly hung a sign outside my office with my name followed by “MD.” I had started my own business. Over the years, my practice has grown, but I may be an endangered species. Across the nation, hospitals are purchasing physician practices at an extraordinary pace. When a hospital buys out a practice and brings it into the institution’s system, it’s like Wal-Mart coming into town. Corporate decisions are made about purchasing and staffing as well as oversight of medical care and quality, all of which impacts a patient’s experience when he comes for an office visit. In essence, the doctors become hospital employees; they are paid fixed salaries based on productivity, which distances them from some of the unpredictable changes in health care. This can be a relief for a doctor who no longer has to fear a competing practice that has set up shop nearby or an insurance company that is cutting physician reimbursements. According to the Medical Group Management Association, a professional membership organization, in 2002 about 20 percent of U.S. physician practices were hospital-owned; in 2008, that figure was over 50 percent. Recently I asked a hospital chief financial officer why hospitals wanted to buy practices. He pointed out that private-practice doctors who join a hospital can be tremendously valuable: They bring in patients to fill the

beds and outpatient labs, and that gives the hospital greater market share. The merger can also help lower hospital costs for drugs and devices. One hospital saved a million dollars when the staff doctors and the hospital agreed to use a single vendor for pacemakers and defibrillators, the hospital’s CFO told me. Joining a hospital may be a sound business decision, but my heart aches at the prospect of losing my autonomy. My wife, also a doctor in private practice, says, “I didn’t become a doctor to be told what to do by an administrator.” Yet she grumbles at the time expended on managing accounts and collections for her practice. A surgeon friend tells me, “I may be the last man standing, but I am not going to be bought out by the hospitals.” Although pride and self-reliance run deep among private doctors, in the end, I suspect there will be only a few holdouts. As for me, the sign with my name still hangs outside my office, but I am keeping my options open. The prognosis for a private practice looks grim. — Manoj Jain is an infectiousdiseases doctor in Memphis who writes regularly for The Washington Post.

541-788-7537

APRIL 2012 EVENTS

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Hospice | Home Health | Hospice House | Transitions


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THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2012

F RESEARCH

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Obese doctors slow to address obese patients Is your doctor obese? If so, the condition might affect whether he or she discusses weight loss with patients. Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health reported recently that physicians with a normal body mass index (or BMI, a measurement of body fat based on height and weight) compared to overweight or obese physicians were more likely to discuss weight loss with obese patients (30 percent compared to 18 percent). Normal weight physicians were also more likely to diagnose a patient as obese if they perceived the patient’s BMI met or exceeded their own. Despite guidelines for physicians to counsel and treat obese patients, previous studies have found only one-third of these patients report receiving an obesity diagnosis or weightrelated counseling from their physicians. The results are featured in the January issue of Obesity. — Anne Aurand, The Bulletin Source: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Investors bet on Zumba’s future Two big investors are betting that Zumba Fitness, the Latin American dance-based workout, will have staying power. Insight Venture Partners, a New York-based venture capital firm, and the Raine Group, a media and entertainment investment firm, have poured tens of millions of dollars into the fitness company, a deal that values Floridabased Zumba Fitness at more than $500 million. Developed in the 1990s, Zumba has become a breakout hit in recent years. Now, the creators are capitalizing on the craze with media, merchandise and licensing deals. More than 100,000 instructors in 125 countries each pay $30 a month to be part of the company’s official network, giving them access to new music and choreography. Since 2002, the company has sold more than 10 million instructional tapes and DVDs. The Zumba video game, available on the Nintendo Wii and the Xbox Kinect, has sold more than 6 million copies. The Raine Group plans to use its extensive contacts in Asia and the Middle East to expand the brand internationally. In the United States, the firm is surveying potential partnerships with television executives and considering developing a regular show around Zumba. It is also preparing to offer its first smartphone app to help students and instructors communicate. — Evelyn M. Rusli, New York Times News Service

Cross

Mitchell Stevens times his mom, Joanne Stevens, as she practices the transition between swimming gear to biking gear.

Continued from F1 Cross training does not mean finding a different activity that stresses your body in similar ways, such as substituting hiking for running, he said. Mixing it up can help with mental fatigue or boredom that can come from repetitive training, Fecteau said, and it’s helpful in maintaining a balanced, healthy body as we age. “It’s difficult to be a healthy runner long term if you only run,” said Teague Hatfield, a runner and the owner of FootZone, a Bend running store. Many runners hesitate to diversify because they love and prefer running. But, throwing in some functional strength training, yoga or swimming will likely improve most runners’ performance, Hatfield said.

PERSONAL TRAINING Most gyms have personal trainers on staff who can help individualize a training regimen. Some trainers, such as Grant Bullock (www. grantbullock.blogspot. com), offer get-started consultations. Bullock charges anywhere from $20 and up for a consultation, or between $40-$70 an hour for personal training. Sports industry businesses such as Fleet Feet Sports, FootZone or Sports Performance Powered By Bowen offer classes to develop various skills. For example, Deschutes Dash triathlon training groups, led by Joanne Stevens start soon: www .poweredbybowen .com/sports-campsclinics/triathlon-camps.

RESEARCH Photos by Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Joanne Stevens, a competitive triathlete and triathlon coach, practices triathlon transitions in the garage of her home with the help of her son Mitchell Stevens. She said it’s easier to shave minutes off the transition periods than the swimming portion of the race. Above, Mitchell dumps water on her wetsuit to simulate actual race conditions. Below, Joanne peels off her wetsuit and prepares for the bike ride.

Training for a ‘tri’ It’s never too late to start cross training, but this is the time of year to be training for the upcoming seasons’ triathlons. Grant Bullock, a personal trainer and coach in Bend, said for the beginner, the first step is to set the goal. It needs to be specific. Not: I want to try a triathlon. Instead: I will do the Deschutes Dash sprint triathlon on July 15 (which Bullock said is a great local first-timer’s event). Then pay the entry fee, put it on the calendar, “and it’ll lock you in in a heartbeat,” he said. Depending on the athlete’s conditioning, it could take between eight and 16 weeks to get ready for a triathlon, Bullock said. People who have not been running or cycling or swimming will need more guidance and training time than competitors who are better conditioned. At first, a person just needs to build a base of fitness. If there’s too much snow on the ground to run or cycle outside, gyms and clubs offer spin (cycling), fitness and conditioning classes and have all the equipment you need to kick-start your training. As the triathlon date approaches, training gets more specific, to hone in on weaknesses. Joanne Stevens, a local triathlete, triathlon coach and personal trainer, said triathletes should plan on at least 10 hours of training a week for a sprint or Olympic distance triathlon (see “Typical triathlon distances”). Longer distances, a half Ironman or Ironman, will consume considerably more time. Specific training plans differ according to the length of the race and the condition of the person, but generally, a trainee should expect to be in the pool three times a week, on a bike twice a week, and running two or three times a week. Expect weekends to be dominated by a long workout. Coupling a swim and a run on the same day is usually recommended because it’s not as fatiguing as combining a bike and run in one day, she said. Bullock suggested riding a bike to the gym, swimming and lifting weights there, then riding back home. Someone whose weakness is swimming might need to swim four times a week, Stevens said. Both trainers said

There are plenty of resources available for anyone who needs help getting started with training for a triathlon.

TAKE A CLASS

Turning to triathlons Michelle White, a store manager at Fleet Feet Sports and a triathlete, said at 37, she can’t play competitive soccer the way she used to. To satisfy her need for competition, she has turned to triathlons, like many others in her age group. She doesn’t love any one sport enough to limit herself, she said. “Having three disciplines is fun, and it’s easier on my body,” she said. “A lot of people do (triathlons) because they can’t put in the amount of mileage, say, as a runner, that they have in the past. But they can do enough for a triathlon.” “Training for a triathlon is the epitome of cross training,” said personal trainer Shannah Werner of Bend. “You’re not just going to run, bike or swim, you have to do all three. Rather than just pounding on your knees running, a tri allows you to work upper, lower and core.”

Resources

If paying for help is not feasible, go to the Internet or the library. Michelle White, a triathlete and manager at Fleet Feet in Bend, recommends these resources: Books: “Your First Triathlon” or “The Triathlete’s Training Bible: A Complete Training Guide for the Competitive Multisport Athlete,” both by Joe Friel And, websites: http://beginner triathlete.com www.triathanewbie.com www.active.com/ triathlon www.deschutes multisport.com

Gear

Standard triathlon distances Sprint: 0.5-mile swim, 12.4-mile bike and 3.1-mile run Olympic: 0.9-mile swim, 24.8-mile bike and 6.2 mile run Half Ironman: 1.2-mile swim, 56-mile bike and 13.1-mile half marathon Ironman: 2.4-mile swim, 112-mile bike and 26.2- mile full marathon

Bend’s 2012 triathlons PACIFIC CREST

LEADMAN

Saturday, June 23 Long course triathlon, similar to a half-iron man course Sunday, June 24 Olympic distance triathlon www.racecenter.com/ pacificcrest

Saturday, Sept. 22 Not a standard triathlon distance www.leadmantri.com

a coaching session would be helpful since swimming is a technique-oriented sport. Proper form will help prevent pain and injury.

Transitions Finally, for the serious competitor who is trying to shave time off their race, consider the transitions. “Transitions, we call that the fourth sport,” Stevens said. The period between coming out of the swim and getting onto your bike can be tricky. “You can try to take two minutes off your swim. That takes work,” Stevens said. “(Taking time off) the transition, all it takes is practice.

DESCHUTES DASH Saturday, July 14 Olympic distance triathlon Sunday, July 15 Sprint distance triathlon www.deschutesdash.com

There’s a systematic way to take time off transitions and its easier than taking time off the swim. But people don’t practice the transitions enough. That could make or break your race.” She has figured out an effective way to lay out her clothes, for example. She practices a lot, sometimes in her garage. Pouring water over her body in a wetsuit, she’ll practice peeling off her wetsuit, getting into her biking gear, mounting the bike and pedaling down the street. She’ll turn around, dismount, and switch into her running shoes. “It’s a great way to practice,” she said.

A triathlete can invest as much as they want. To keep costs down, a person can rent a wetsuit instead of buying one, Stevens said. Fleet Feet Sports just launched a line of triathlon gear, including wetsuits (www.fleetfeet bend.com). Stevens suggests renting a wetsuit for a month to allow for practice time. A swimmer needs time to get used to how it feels to swim in a wetsuit and experience the open water. Bikes run the gamut. Casual sprint distance triathletes can get away with using the mountain bike in their garage. Longer races call for a road bike if not a triathlon bike, which is more expensive and aerodynamic angled, Stevens said. Running gear is probably the easiest to find and the least expensive investment. Bullock, who calls himself “old school,” said Bend athletes can “get hung up in gear. What kind of bike do you have and why don’t you wear compression socks and what kind of shorts or swim wear will you wear? Who cares! Get out and try. Borrow a bike. Who cares about your bathing suit, you’re floating down the river anyway (in the Deschutes Dash).” And while newbies may feel intimidated and insecure about their abilities and their gear, consider that everyone else is probably suffering the same self-doubt. “They’re focused on what they’re doing. You and your crusty bike, they don’t care, don’t notice,” he said. Overall, especially for the first timer, he said, remember this is supposed to be fun, and it’s all about being healthy — cross training. “It’s what our bodies were meant to do, is move.” — Reporter: 541-383-0304, aaurand@bendbulletin.com

Kids who feel left out may decide to opt out of exercise By Cheryl Powell Akron Beacon Journal

AKRON, Ohio — The kid who never gets the ball tossed to him on the playground could be more likely to pass on any type of exercise. A study led by a Kent State University researcher has found that children who were ostracized during a ball-toss computer game were subsequently less physically active. These findings — published recently in the American Academy of Pediatrics’ professional journal Pediatrics — could help shed light on contributing factors and potential solutions for the nation’s childhood obesity epidemic. “Ostracism appears to cause a reduction in physical activity,” said study co-author Jacob Barkley, an assistant professor in exercise science at Kent State. “It could create a scenario where if you’re an overweight or obese child, that ostracism could reduce your physical activity. As you get more ostracized, you get heavier, you get more ostracized because you got heavier and things get worse and worse.” According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than a third of children and adolescents are overweight. Barkley found other studies showing a link between ostracism or bullying and a decline in physical activity. But previous research didn’t show a clear cause and effect. In his study, Barkley and his colleagues observed 19 boys and girls ages 8 to 12 who completed two experimental sessions at Kent State. During one session, children playing a ball-toss computer game received the ball one-third of the time. During the other, the computer was programmed to exclude the children from receiving the ball most of the time. After playing the computer games, the participants were taken to a gym, where they were allowed to choose sedentary or physical activities. When they were excluded by the computer game, the study participants spent 41 percent more time with sedentary activities, such as reading books, coloring or playing matching games, the study found. When the children were included in the computer game, their physical activity level in the gym was 22 percent higher.

Kids, emotions and obesity The link between emotions and obesity is definitely strong, said Amy Stanford, a pediatric nurse practitioner in the Sports Medicine Center at Akron Children’s Hospital. Stanford works with the hospital’s Future Fitness Clinic, which provides medical management for morbidly obese children. The hospital also runs Future Fitness Club programs at recreational centers throughout the region to encourage children to get active. Patients in the clinic typically deal with a variety of self-image and self-esteem issues, she said. “We try to encourage the kids to find things that they enjoy doing,” she said. “That doesn’t always mean it has to be in a group. If there are things that get them moving and physically active that they can do with their families or with a best friend or even by themselves, we encourage that.” — Cheryl Powell, Akron Beacon Journal


THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

K S A A

F5

HEALTH PROFESSIONAL c/o The Bulletin • 1526 NW Hill St., Bend OR 97701

EYE CARE QUESTION: What are the symptoms of dry eye? ANSWER: The most common symptoms of dry eye include stinging and burning, watering, itch, and blurred vision. In our clinic, blurred vision seems to be the most significant and common symptom. Blurred Ida Alul, M.D. vision caused by dry eye is typically intermittent in nature, fluctuating between clear functional vision and streaked or “ghosted” vision. For people who spend a lot of time on the computer, the combination of a reduced blink rate and the closed, forced-air environment of many work places leads to rapid evaporation of the tear film. When the tear film evaporates, it’s analogous to driving in a rain storm with a bad set of windshield wipers. We need a nice, smooth tear film to see clearly. There are multiple treatment options for dry eye. Consult your eye care physician to see what is best for you.

IDA ALUL, M.D.

PERMANENT MAKEUP QUESTION: Living here in central Oregon, I experience such bad allergy problems. Would the pigments used in permanent makeup pose any allergy problems? ANSWER: The application of pigment is just deep enough to penetrate the minute capillaries in the dermal layer of the Susan Gruber, skin. Actually, permanent makeup can Certified Permanent be especially beneficial to people who Cosmetic Professional can’t wear other cosmetics due to allergies and skin sensitivities. Some doctors and optometrists even recommend that individuals with allergies have permanent cosmetic procedures, allowing them to discontinue the daily application of cosmetic products that cause them sensitivity problems. Call for your FREE consultation. Call for a FREE consultation or more information. 541 383-3387

QUESTION: My mother and grandmother had breast cancer in their 40s and I am concerned about my chances of getting breast cancer. Is there any way to know what my personal risk is? ANSWER: Breast cancer is certainly an inherited disease in many cases. Some factors that contribute to breast cancer risk include family history of breast cancer in first degree relatives, early start Jana Vanamburg, of menstruation in life and/or late menopause, M.D., FACS having no children or having children late in life, having previous breast biopsies, and exposure to radiation to the chest or estrogen hormones. Thanks to the Human Genome Project we have learned much about the heritability of this disease. There is a test for specific breast cancer genes known as BRCA 1 and 2. It is a simple blood test that can be done on a patient who has been diagnosed with breast cancer. There are many qualifiers that need to be met for insurance to cover this test, but being younger than 50, having immediate family members with breast cancer, having multiple breast cancers at once, or having certain aggressive breast cancers at younger than 60 years of age are some. If a test comes back positive for a genetic mutation in a woman with breast cancer, then her relatives can be tested for about 1/10 the cost of the original test. Men can carry the mutation too, so they can be tested if a mutation is found. Genetic testing of the actual breast cancer tumors is being done now to help design better chemotherapy treatment regimens and determine who needs chemotherapy or not.

Dr. Jana M. Vanamburg, MD VanAmburg Surgery Care 2400 NE Neff Suite B, Bend OR 97701 541-323-2790 • www.vanamburgsurgery.com Offices in Bend & Redmond

PHYSICAL THERAPY QUESTION: I was recently involved in a car accident, and I have neck pain. My doctor diagnosed me with whiplash, and suggested I go to physical therapy. I already see a massage therapist, so why would I add physical therapy?

ANSWER: When you have a whiplash injury, you not only over-stretch the muscles at the back of your neck, but you also strain all of the individual Zeyla Brandt, joints in the neck and may have some pre-existing PT postural and strength issues that can affect your ideal recovery. Massage is an excellent way to address the muscular component of your whiplash, but not the other components involved. A physical therapist can be of tremendous help—not only can a PT help get your joints moving properly, we can also address the soft tissue irritation, range of motion limitations, muscular weakness, and postural changes. You will also start you on a gentle and progressive exercise program that will help to maintain the gains you make in therapy, and reduce the likelihood of long term symptoms. At Healing Bridge Physical Therapy our hour-long individual treatment sessions are ideal for helping you recover from your accident.

ZEYLA BRANDT, PT WWW.HEALINGBRIDGE.COM

404 NE Penn Ave, Bend, OR 541-318-7041

QUESTION: I recently heard that professional athletes are receiving stem cell therapy and PRP for knee problems, including osteoarthritis. Can you elaborate? ANSWER:

Recent scientific research has shown the primary stem cells needed in tissue repair are most concentrated in the fatty tissue. These cells are harvested using a minimally invasive technique and combined with HD-PRP (high density platelet rich plasma), Payson Flattery, growth factors found in a patients blood. This mix is then injected under ultrasound guidance to the areas D.C. ND of injury or degeneration. Scientific research has shown that stem cells improve the overall health of cartilage and meniscus tissue in the knee, perhaps add better blood supply to certain areas, and modulate chronic inflammation. Although experimental, just like PRP injection and Prolotherapy, this technique is showing promise for getting players back on the field more quickly and reducing or eliminating the pain associated with tissue injury and degenerative arthritis. For more information of stem cell therapy or Regenerative Medicine please contact the Center for Integrative Medicine located in Bend or Redmond or visit us on the web at www.CenterforIntegrativeMed.com.

Permanent Makeup By Susan, CPCP 1265 NW Wall Street • Bend 541-383-3387 www.permanentmakeupbysusan.com

INFOCUS EYE CARE 24509 NE Mary Rose Pl, Ste 110 • Bend 541-318-8388 • www.infocus-eyecare.com

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D I V E R T I C U L O S I S PA R T I I Last month we discussed diverticulosis and uncomplicated diverticulitis. Now we will talk about complicated diverticulitis. Complicated diverticulitis is defined by symptoms of abdominal pain, fever and elevated white blood cell count with the additional presence of an abdominal abscess, fistula (connection of the large intestine to another organ), intestinal blockage or perforation. Small abscesses can resolve with IV and oral antibiotics. For larger abscesses, drainage is the first John C. Land, line of treatment with antibiotics as well. Patients who M.D., FACS cannot be drained and fail treatment with worsening symptoms should undergo surgery with resection of the diseased segment. Free perforation requires emergency surgery with resection of the diseased colon segment. Whether to remove the colon and hook it back up without a colostomy (or diverting bag) is based on clinical judgment and related to how ill the patient is at surgery. If a colostomy is performed, this can usually be taken down in 8-12 weeks. In patients with a fistula, 50% are a connection from the colon to the bladder. Treatment is with antibiotics and subsequent resection of the diseased segment of colon and repair of the organ involved (e.g. bladder). Bowel obstruction from diverticulitis usually responds with IV fluid resuscitation, nasogastric decompression, and IV antibiotics. Once the attack has resolved, then an elective resection with anastomosis and avoidance of a colostomy can be performed. The surgical technique for colon resection can be performed in the standard open route but in elective cases by the laparoscopic, minimally invasive approach.

916 SW 17th ST. • Suite 202 • Redmond • 541-504-0250 NEW CLINIC IN NW CROSSING - 745 NW Mt. Washington Dr., Suite 104, Bend • 541-323-3358 www.CenterforIntegrativeMed.com

COSMETIC DENTISTRY QUESTION: I am 81 years old and have had good teeth until recently. In the last six months I have lost several crowns and have had multiple chips in my front teeth. I am a retired school teacher and have a limited income. Should I spend my meager savings to fix my teeth ar just deal with them on an emergency basis? Kelley Mingus, D.M.D.

ANSWER: First of all you are not alone in your situation. I would encourage you to find out more information about the condition of your teeth. By having a thorough examination by a dentist you will be able to determine the true severity of your situation and the dentist will be able to give a detailed treatment plan. Through good communication and attention to details you and your dentist should be able to come up with multiple plans to help you overcome this challenge. It is possible to have a plan that allows you to correct your current situation without spending our entire savings. In general your problems with your teeth will only get worse, and the solutions to deal with the problems will only get bigger. Emergency treatment is always more costly than carefully planned treatments.

DISTINCTIVE DENTISTRY AT BROKEN TOP 1245 NW 4th Street #101 Redmond, Oregon

1475 SW Chandler Ave., Suite 201, Bend www.bendcosmeticdentist.com

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541-382-6565

MORBID OBESITY & DIABETES

PLASTIC SURGERY QUESTION: I am scared when I look at my bald family. How do I know if hair restoration is right for me?

QUESTION: How can I increase the circulation in my feet? I am 84 and I have Type 2 Diabetes. I am losing the feeling in my feet and I don’t like to walk much. I need to keep driving and would like to remain independent and do things for myself as long as I can. Can you help me? ANSWER: You likely have peripheral neuropathy related to your diabetes. Excessive sugar in the blood over an extended period of time impairs the Thuy Hughes, DO circulation of blood to the nerves causing nerve damage which can result in pain and numbness. Safe and appropriate exercises is one of the best tools for managing diabetic neuropathy. It helps keep blood sugar levels under control, manages your weight to reduce stress on joints, strengthens muscles and promotes circulation to enhance tissue health and healing. Beginning an exercise program can be difficult or painful once neuropathy is present. Choosing the right activity and appropriate footwear can help minimize potential problems and that don’t put excessive stress on the lower body are best, such as swimming or a stationary bike. Balance exercises are also important to maintain your quality of life. Consult a physical therapist with training in diabetes management for more information on an exercise program and foot care to improve your neuropathy symptoms. Any other questions contact Dr. Thuy Hughes at Cascade Obesity.

ANSWER: The genetic transmission of male pattern baldness is complex. Studies show that both maternal and Adam Angeles, paternal genetic influences contribute M.D. to baldness to varying degrees. Hair restoration has advanced substantially over the last 5 years. We are now transplanting individual hair follicles which creates a natural look without scars, with little down time and which is permanent. Men find it the single most rewarding cosmetic procedure that they can do for themselves.

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Medical Director, St. Charles Wound & Ostomy Care Center

Thuy Hughes, DO 1245 NW 4th St. #101, Redmond 541-548-7761

2460 NE Neff Rd., Suite B • Bend www.bendprs.com, drangeles@bendprs.com 541-749-2282

Adam Angeles, M.D. Bend Plastic Surgery

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F6

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2012

N RESEARCH Is overeating bad for memory? In older adults, overeating may be associated with memory problems. New research suggests that consuming between 2,100 and 6,000 calories per day doubles the risk of memory loss, or mild cognitive impairment, the stage between normal memory loss associated with aging and early Alzheimer’s disease. The study looked at 1,233 people between 70 and 89 who were free of dementia. Participants reported how many calories they ate or drank and were then divided equally into three groups: those who consumed between 600 and 1,526 calories per day, those who consumed between 1,526 and 2,143 calories daily and those who consumed between 2,143 and 6,000 calories daily. The odds of having mild cognitive impairment more than doubled for those in the highest calorie group, compared to the lowest calorie group. Results remained the same after adjusting for history of stroke, diabetes, education and other factors that can affect risk of memory loss. There was no significant difference in risk for the middle group. “Cutting calories and eating foods that make up a healthy diet may be a simpler way to prevent memory loss as we age,” said the study’s author, Dr. Yonas Geda, with the Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, Ariz. and a member of the American Academy of Neurology, in a news release. — Anne Aurand, The Bulletin Source: The American Academy of Neurology

Protein Continued from F1

Reasons for protein “Following a higher-protein, low-carbohydrate diet is associated with greater weight and fat loss than traditional reduced-calorie diets during the first six months (of a diet),” said Annie Williamson, a registered dietitian with Bend Memorial Clinic. “However, the difference in weight loss between higher-protein diets and traditional reduced-calorie diets is not significant after one year.” Generally speaking, maintaining weight loss over the long haul is less likely to work when people make radical changes to their diets. Dietary changes have to be sustainable for the long term. Low-calorie, higher-protein diets with 25 to 30 percent of calories coming from protein may be more satisfying, making it easier for people to stick to it, said Williamson. High-protein foods slow down the digestion process, which makes satiety last longer. Also, as compared to eating rapidly digesting carbohydrates, protein keeps bloodsugar levels steadier, averting the quick rise and drop in blood sugar that can trigger hunger, according to the Harvard School of Public Health. Finally, the body uses more energy to digest protein than it does to digest fat or carbohydrate. Coupled with exercise, protein consumption can also affect body composition. Protein contains amino acids, which are the building blocks for muscle. Exercise, especially strength training, causes tiny tears in muscle fibers. Amino acids from protein help repair these tears and make muscles stronger. That’s how eating protein helps maintain lean body mass — muscle — during weight loss, said Williamson. However, she noted, lean body mass won’t appear without exercise. A higher-protein, lower-carbohydrate diet may also promote better insulin control, which could lead to belly fat loss, she said. Uncontrolled insulin levels promote fat storage. A diet high in carbohydrates — especially refined carbohydrates — can increase insulin levels, which could promote belly fat storage, she said. Of all the mainstream higher-protein diets, the South Beach diet was the only one Williamson said she could endorse without concerns.

When to watch out Submitted photo

Greek yogurt stirs things up Greek yogurt is the Jeremy Lin of food products, launching out of nowhere into a stunning and sudden rise in fortune. Now comes the latest product — Ben & Jerry’s Frozen Greek Yogurt. The Vermont company recently debuted four flavors: Strawberry Shortcake, Raspberry Fudge Chunk, Banana Peanut Butter and Blueberry Vanilla Graham. Greek yogurt, overall, has had one of the fastest growth spurts the food and beverage industry has seen in recent history. In each of the last three years, sales of Greek yogurt have boomed more than 100 percent, while nonGreek yogurt has crept along at single-digit speeds, according to consumer data tracker Nielsen. Sales at yogurt maker Chobani Inc. — which claims nearly half of the Greek yogurt market share in the U.S. — soared 2,812 percent in 2008 alone, according to a report from UBS Investment Research. Greek yogurt now hauls in more than $1 billion in revenue a year in the U.S. — about a quarter of total yogurt sales. Yogurt of all types is the food trend of the decade, according to research firm NPD Group. — Los Angeles Times

There can be problems with eating too much protein, and some should consider the potential risks. People with high LDL, the so-called “bad,” cholesterol need to make sure they’re not eating too much high-fat protein. “A lot of people, when they go high-protein, it’s the Atkins Diet mentality: bacon, sausage. That’s garbage. It just raises cholesterol more.” Also, people with kidney disease shouldn’t eat too much protein because processing it can stress their kidneys. Also, “Protein can increase uric acid levels, which can cause kidney stones in some individuals,” Williamson said. People with kidney disease should limit their protein intake to less than 10 percent of their caloric intake, according to the University of Maryland Medical Center.

Calories matter most Upping the proportion of protein is not the magic bullet to a perfect body. In actuality, there is little evidence that macronutrient distribution makes much of a difference in straight-up weight loss, she said. When researchers tweak the macronutrient compositions of diets — testing dieters with higher vs. lower protein ratios — to see how it effects body weight and composition, studies conclude that it’s really caloric intake that matters most. One large study looked at how the proportions of various macronutrients affected weight, body fat, abdominal and liver fat, when part of weight-loss diets. Published recently in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, the study followed more than 400 participants who ate one of four prescribed diets that differed in fat, protein and carbohydrates over two years. In conclusion: Regardless of

Protein in common foods

Acceptable range for protein intake is:

Nutritional information per 3-ounce serving of select foods. Food

Calories

Protein

Carbohydrate

Saturated fat

Roasted chicken, white meat

130

23.1g

0g

0.9g

Cooked ground beef (85% lean)

197

20.9g

0g

4.5g

Baked coho salmon

151

20.7g

0g

1.7g

Boiled green soybeans

127

11.1g

10g

0.7g

61

10.5g

2.3g

0.6g

114

7.6g

20g

0.1g

Cottage cheese, 1% milk fat Boiled black beans Source: USDA National Nutrient Database

Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

AN ARGUMENT FOR PROTEIN:

“Protein promotes satiety which may reduce overall calorie intake. If you feel more satisfied by increasing protein intake, you are more likely to adhere to the diet that you have chosen. Protein also helps maintain lean body mass during weight loss, which may increase ones metabolic rate. An increase in metabolic rate, or metabolism, will promote weight loss.” — Annie Williamson, a registered dietitian with Bend Memorial Clinic

A macronutrient distribution for a higher protein diet would be:

25%-30%

25%-35%

Total calories from protein

Total calories from fat, with a focus on unsaturated fat

40%-50% Total calories from carbohydrate, with a focus on minimally processed, high fiber foods Source: Annie Williamson, registered dietitian, Bend Memorial Clinic Greg Cross / The Bulletin

the level of protein consumed, they all lost more fat than lean mass. The bottom line: Reducing caloric intake was more important to fat loss than the diet’s macronutrient content. But these types of studies are imperfect. They have some inherent limitations. It’s hard to get a true picture of a person’s longterm diet, according to Danish nutrition and obesity researcher Arne Astrup. In most studies, diets are closely controlled and don’t allow for a person’s natural satiation to influence their response to and consumption of foods. That’s not realistic in one’s daily life, over the course of months or years. Astrup and a cohort wrote: “If the aim is to examine whether calories from different macronutrients exert different effects on energy bal-

ance, then the study design must allow for the influence of effects of appetite sensations on caloric intake.” In other words, it’s hard to know from this study if protein consumption could encourage a person to eat less, since they didn’t have the option to eat however they wanted. But what about if you’re going to overeat, instead of restrict calories? That was the underlying question within a different, small study published recently in the Journal of the American Medical Association. It looked at 25 healthy people within a controlled setting who were divided into groups that overconsumed food containing different levels of protein. The point was to see if protein intake affected body composi-

tion or weight gain. With respect to body fat increases, the researchers wrote that “calories are more important than protein while consuming excess amounts of energy.” However, more protein consumption was associated with more lean body mass through the test period. Lean body mass decreased for the low-protein diet group and increased in the normal- and high-protein diet group. Protein consumption also affected energy expenditure, according to the study. Resting energy expenditure (how many calories the body needs for basic functioning during a 24-hour period) went from 160 calories per day for those with a normal-protein diet to 227 calories a day for those on the high-protein diet.

• 5 to 20 percent of total calories for ages 1-3 • 10 to 30 percent of total calories for ages 4-18 • 10 to 35 percent of total calories for adults older than 18 Proteins found in animal sources such as meat, poultry, fish, eggs, milk, cheese, and yogurt provide all nine indispensable amino acids and are referred to as “complete proteins.” Proteins found in plants, legumes, grains, nuts, seeds, and vegetables tend to be deficient in one or more of the indispensable amino acids and are called “incomplete proteins.” Source: Dietary Reference Intakes: The Essential Guide to Nutrient Requirements

Putting protein in your life If you’re trying to incorporate more protein into your diet, foods in solid form will keep you more satisfied than fluid sources such as protein shakes, said Williamson, of BMC. Regardless of weight loss, proteins are needed for the health of every cell in our bodies. Protein is a major component of skin, muscles, organs, glands and body fluids, according to the National Institutes of Health. Our bodies need it to repair cells and make new ones. Garrett Berdan, a registered dietitian and chef in Bend, said the most bioavailable — absorbed and effective in one’s body — proteins are from eggs, dairy, meat and seafood. When looking at animal fats, try to choose lean proteins. Animal products can contain saturated fat, which can be risky for some people’s cardiovascular health, Berdan said. Lean proteins can include poultry, seafood and nonfat dairy products such as milk or cottage cheese. Plant sources such as beans, seeds, nuts and some grains also are great sources, he said. A person should consume protein from a variety of foods because each food has a different combination of nutrients. Berdan recommends including at least three ounces of protein with every meal. He suggests tossing inexpensive cuts of beef into vegetable stews, roasting whole chickens, and topping breakfast and snacks with a dollop of low-fat Greek yogurt. — Reporter: 541-383-0304, aaurand@bendbulletin.com


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255

Computers

THE BULLETIN requires computer advertisers with multiple ad schedules or those selling multiple systems/ software, to disCVA 50.cal Blackpowder close the name of the percussion $400 Exc. business or the term cond. 541-788-5723 "dealer" in their ads. Private party advertisDO YOU HAVE ers are defined as SOMETHING TO those who sell one SELL computer. FOR $500 OR LESS? 260 Non-commercial Misc. Items advertisers may place an ad Buying Diamonds with our /Gold for Cash "QUICK CASH Saxon’s Fine Jewelers SPECIAL" 541-389-6655 1 week 3 lines $12 or BUYING 2 weeks $18! Lionel/American Flyer Ad must trains, accessories. include price of 541-408-2191. single item of $500 BUYING & SELLING or less, or multiple All gold jewelry, silver items whose total and gold coins, bars, does not exceed rounds, wedding sets, $500. class rings, sterling silver, coin collect, vinCall Classifieds at tage watches, dental 541-385-5809 gold. Bill Fleming, www.bendbulletin.com 541-382-9419. CASH!! For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Supplies. 541-408-6900.

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD... To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery and inspection. • A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’ • Receipts should include name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased. • Firewood ads MUST include species and cost per cord to better serve our customers.

Dry Juniper Firewood $190 per cord, split. 1/2 cords available. Immediate delivery! 541-408-6193 Dry Lodgepole: $175 cord rounds; $210 cord split.1.5 Cord Minimum 36 yrs service to Central OR. 541-350-2859 Green Juniper rnds $120 /cord. Dry Juniper: split $170/cord; rounds $150 /cord. 541-977-4500 or 541-416-3677

Weedeater, Ryobi 31cc 16” cut, great cond. $100. 541-706-1051 270

Lost & Found LOST: cream colored Stetson cowboy hat, Thurs, 3/8 Hwy 97 near Cindy’s Restaurant, Redmond. Call 541-410-1135 Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal, don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend 541-382-3537 Redmond, 541-923-0882 Prineville, 541-447-7178; OR Craft Cats, 541-389-8420.

Farm Market

300

Selling my Herd of Miniature Zebu Cattle (4) due to my health issues, They are said to be the World's Oldest Cattle Breed & originated in India. They are very popular in pee-wee rodeos and petting zoos. Will accept Best Offer from the Best Home that is available. Call (541) 389-2636 358

Farmers Column 10X20 STORAGE BUILDINGS for protecting hay, firewood, livestock etc. $1496 Installed. 541-617-1133. CCB #173684. kfjbuilders@ykwc.net WANTED Cattle Pasture. Please call 541-548-7123. Wanted: Irrigated farm ground, under pivot irrigation, in Central OR. 541-419-2713 375

Meat & Animal Processing

Labrador Pups, AKC 308 GENERATE SOME exSeasoned Juniper $150/ Chocolate / Yellow Farm Equipment ANGUS BEEF Quarter, cord rounds; $170/ citement in your Hips OFA guaranteed. Half or Whole. cord split. Delivered in & Machinery neighborhood! Plan a $300-$400. Grain-fed, no horCentral OR, since garage sale and don't 1-541-954-1727 mones $3/pound 1970! Call eves, Wanted Used Farm forget to advertise in hanging weight, cut & Dachshund AKC mini pup Lab, yellow, female, 6 541-420-4379 Equipment & Machinclassified! weeks, $300. wrapped incl. Bend, www.bendweenies.com ery. Looking to buy, or 541-385-5809. 541-405-0155. $350. 541-508-4558 541-383-2523. 269 consign of good used Moving Sale: Vintage quality equipment. Maltese, male, 1 yr. old, Gardening Supplies furniture, collectibles, Deschutes Valley AKC, $300, 541-536DO YOU HAVE The Bulletin is your & Equipment call 541-480-8372. Equipment 2181 or 541-728-8067 SOMETHING TO Employment Recliner/Lift Chair, like 541-548-8385 SELL Maltese Pups, AKC reg, new, $500 or make For Sale: Baikal MP153 Wanted- paying cash Flowmaster Backpack FOR $500 OR toy size, champion Weed Sprayer, 4 gal., Marketplace 325 offer. 541-604-5685 LESS? for Hi-fi audio & stusemi-auto shotgun, blood lines, $1200 $50, 541-706-1051. dio equip. McIntosh, Non-commercial Hay, Grain & Feed 12g, w/3 chokes females, 1 male for Second Hand & Call JBL, Marantz, Dyadvertisers may $1000, 541-233-3534 Rebuilt Mattresses $325. Yildiz 12g O/U SUPER TOP SOIL place an ad with naco, Heathkit, San- www.hersheysoilandbark.com Grass hay, barn stored, shotgun w/ 5 chokes, Sets & singles, most Maremma Guard Dog our sui, Carver, NAD, etc. Screened, soil & comby ton or bale, 541-385-5809 $325. 503-440-1333 sizes, sanitized pups, purebred, great 541-419-6280 Call 541-261-1808 "QUICK CASH post mixed, no & hygienitized. dogs, $300 each, HANDGUN SAFETY SPECIAL" rocks/clods. High huto advertise. Call 541-598-4643 265 Wanted: Irrigated farm 541-546-6171. CLASS for concealed 1 week 3 lines, $12 mus level, exc. for ground, under pivot irlicense. NRA, Police or 2 weeks, $18! Building Materials flower beds, lawns, Sofas (2), attractive, rigation, in Central www.bendbulletin.com Firearms Instructor, Lt. Ad must include gardens, straight matching, hardly OR. 541-419-2713 Gary DeKorte.Thur. price of single item REDMOND Habitat screened top soil. used, $190 each, Mar. 22nd, 6:30-10:30 of $500 or less, or RESTORE please call Bark. Clean fill. De- Wheat Straw: Certified & pm. Call Kevin Centmultiple items 541-639-8473 Building Supply Resale liver/you haul. Bedding Straw & Garden wise, for reservations whose total does Quality at 541-548-3949. Straw;Compost.546-6171 $40. 541-548-4422 not exceed $500. LOW PRICES Poodle pups, toy, for The Bulletin 1242 S. Hwy 97 SALE. Also Rescued r ecommends extra LC9 Ruger 9mm light Call Classifieds at 541-548-1406 Poodle Adults for carry pistol, NIB, caution when purregon 541-385-5809 Open to the public. adoption, to loving $350. 541-788-6365 chasing products or YOUR AD WILL RECEIVE CLOSE TO 2,000,000 www.bendbulletin.com homes. 541-475-3889 services from out of lassified EXPOSURES FOR ONLY $250! OREGON’S LARGEST the area. Sending Call a Pro Queensland Heelers GUN AND KNIFE ing rtis dve Oregon Classified Advertising Network is a service of the Oregon Newspaper Publishers Association. cash, checks, or English Bulldog, AKC standards & mini,$150 Whether you need a SHOW credit information male puppy $1300. & up. 541-280-1537 etwork Week of March 12, 2012 March 17 & 18 fence ixed, hedges may be subjected to 541-306-0372 http://rightwayranch. Sat 9-6 • Sun 9-4 FRAUD. For more trimmed or a house wordpress.com ADM: $9 information about an built, you’ll ind English Springer Redbone puppies (7) 9 Portland Expo Center advertiser, you may Spaniel Puppies professional help in weeks, great looks, I-5 Exit 306B call the Oregon AKC Field bred smart/sweet, $400 541-385-5809 For Info: 503-363-9564 State Attorney The Bulletin’s “Call a ready Mar. 28th. ea. 541-536-2099 General’s Office wesknodelgunshows.com Service Professional” $500 M, $600F, Consumer Protec- P-grip synthetic stock www.millerbeaverRescued adult comServices Directory tion hotline at creekkennels.com panion cats FREE to for Rem. shotgun, 1-877-877-9392. 541-385-5809 541-523-7951 seniors, disabled & $75. 541-647-8931 DIVORCE $135. Complete preparation. Includes children, veterans! Tame, alRem 12g 870 pump custody, support, property and bills division. No court tered, shots, ID chip, 266 Free barn/shop cats, shotgun, wood stock, more. Will always take fixed, shots, some Heating & Stoves appearances. Divorced in 1-5 weeks possible. 503-772$200. 541-647-8931 back if circumstances friendly, some not. 212 change. Photos, info 5295. www.paralegalalternatives.com, divorce@usa.com. We deliver! 389-8420 NOTICE TO Ruger M77/357 magat www.craftcats.org. Antiques & ADVERTISER num rifle, two 5 rd ro541-389-8420, 647German Shorthair Pup Drivers Wanted Collectibles Since September 29, tary mags, Lepould 2181. Sat/Sun 1-5, AKC champ lines, 1991, advertising for 2-7 scope, sling and other days by appt. Hunters/pets, female DRIVER: $0 TUITION CDL(A) training and a job. Top used woodstoves has soft case. $750 541 65480 78th St., Bend. Antiques wanted: Tools, $500. 541-330-0277, wood furn, fishing, been limited to mod788-5200 industry pay, quality training, stability and miles! Short 541-306-9958. Just bought a new boat? marbles, old signs, els which have been Sell your old one in the beer cans, costume Ruger New Model Suemployment commitment required. 855-746-8725, www. certified by the Orclassiieds! Ask about our jewelry. 541-389-1578 per Blackhawk .44 egon Department of Super Seller rates! JoinCRST.com. Mag 7-1/2" blue. InEnvironmental QualThe Bulletin reserves 541-385-5809 cludes leather holster. ity (DEQ) and the fedthe right to publish all DRIVERS: FLEXIBLE home time. Up to $.42/mile plus $485. 541-728-3860 Rescued kittens/cats. eral Environmental ads from The Bulletin 65480 78th St., Bend, Protection Agency newspaper onto The Ruger Single 6 SS rev, $.02/mile quarterly safety bonus. Daily pay. New trucks. 1-5 Sat/Sun, other (EPA) as having met HAVANESE puppies Bulletin Internet web$550.Colt 25 pistol, CDL-A, 3 months recent experience required. 800-414days by appt, 647smoke emission stanAKC, Dewclaws, UTD site. $400. 541-647-8931 2181. Fixed, shots, ID shots/wormer, nondards. A certified 9569, www.driveknight.com. chip, more. Info: 389S&W Howa 1500 25.06 shed, hypoallergenic. woodstove may be 8420. Map, photos at rifle, like new, $395, $850 541-460-1277. identified by its certifiHelp Wanted: Sales www.craftcats.org. 541-815-4901 cation label, which is 246 permanently attached HUSKY 2 yrs, black / Saltwater Reef Synthetic stock for WANTED: LIFE agents. Earn $500 a day. Great agent Guns, Hunting to the stove. The Bulaquarium 90 gal. white purebred male. Mossberg shotgun, & Fishing letin will not knowbenefits, commissions paid daily. Liberal underwriting. w/oak stand, metal haPapered / neutered. $60. 541-647-8931 ingly accept advertislide lights, skimmer, Great with children & Leads, Leads, Leads. Life insurance, license required. ing for the sale of live rock, corals, fish, 350 rounds of S&W 40 Taurus 9mm, $400. pets. $450. uncertified ball ammo, $75. 1911 Rock Island all equip. $895. Call 1-888-713-6020, Lincoln Heritage Life Co. 510-326-0626 woodstoves. $550. 541-647-8931 541-647-8931 (541) 548-7947.

Check out OCANs online at classifieds.oregon.com!

T h e

Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

O C A N


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

G2 THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

Edited by Will Shortz

PLACE AN AD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Starting at 3 lines

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

*UNDER $500 in total merchandise

OVER $500 in total merchandise

7 days .................................................. $10.00 14 days ................................................ $16.00

Garage Sale Special

4 days .................................................. $17.50 7 days .................................................. $23.00 14 days .................................................$32.50 28 days .................................................$60.50

4 lines for 4 days.................................. $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

PRIVATE PARTY RATES

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702

PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday. 476

476

636

648

654

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend

Houses for Rent General

Houses for Rent SE Bend

MEDICAL

EMPLOYMENT 410 - Private Instruction 421 - Schools and Training 454 - Looking for Employment 470 - Domestic & In-Home Positions 476 - Employment Opportunities 486 - Independent Positions

Employment

400 421

FINANCE AND BUSINESS 507 - Real Estate Contracts 514 - Insurance 528 - Loans and Mortgages 543 - Stocks and Bonds 558 - Business Investments 573 - Business Opportunities

476

476

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Development and Marketing Director, Family Kitchen non-profit, part time (1/2). Job description, specifics, online application: http://www.trinitybend.org

Job closes 3/23/2012

Schools & Training

TRUCK SCHOOL

www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235 476

Employment Opportunities ARBORIST for tree service. Current driver’s license req; CDL a plus. 541-447-8283. Dental Assistant Must be X-Ray certified, Tues. - Thurs. to start. Drop off resume at 2078 NE Professional Ct., Bend. 541-382-2281. Jack Miller, DMD Branden Ferguson, DDS

DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW?

Call The Bulletin before 11 a.m. and get an ad in to publish the next day!

541-385-5809. VIEW the Classifieds at:

www.bendbulletin.com

Get your business

GROWIN

G

with an ad in The Bulletin’s “Call A Service Professional” Directory

Food Service

The Hilton Garden Inn

in Bend, is presently seeking a

Kitchen/ Breakfast Attendant Benefits included.

Apply at 425 SW Bluff Dr., Bend, or send resume to: don.seaton@hilton.com

Inside Sales Associate position. See www.Monster.com #107150591 No phone calls please. Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809 Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin' s web site will be able to click through automatically to your site.

280

286

286

Estate Sales

Sales Northeast Bend

Sales Northeast Bend

Estate Sale! 1670 NW HOARDERS Hemlock Ave, RedESTATE mond. Furniture, household, women’s Phase 1 includes: antique oak file cabinets clothing, collectibles, & dressers, wooden car. Mar. 17, 9-4. Mar. trunk, lots of project 18, 9-1. Cash only. furniture pcs, loads of antique tools includESTATE SALE ing over 100 planes/ 771 NE Fieldstone Ct. draw knives/spoke Prineville • Fri-Sat, 8-5 shaves, over 50 old (see ad in Wed’s paper) knives, power & hand tools of all kinds, Indoor Sale - Quilters hardware, old cast Dream! 60 Years iron, antique bottles & worth of stuff! Lots of large garage full of all material, accessories, kinds antiques& colthreads, 8 ft. long lectibles, many dish crafters table w/drawsets, old cookie jars, ers, TV’s, misc. Fenton & all kinds of household items. Fri. glassware & china, & Sat., 8am-5pm. old magazines, post 63018 #3 Plateau cards & all kinds of Drive, Bend, (off Emcollectible paper, jewpire) 541-408-3364. elry, knick-knicks galore, collectible toys 286 and sports cards, 1000’s of items. Sales Northeast Bend Fri. and Sat. 9-4 numbers Fri., 7 a.m.; BIG Garage/Bake Sale! outside opens at 8 , Appliances, collectibles, garage at 9, housewares, & more! 1158 NE Norton Sat, 9-4 Butler Market to

HH FREE HH Garage Sale Kit Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE! KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet

PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT at

1777 SW Chandler Ave., Bend, OR 97702

Cardiology practice seeking experienced

Medical Assistant. Full-time position., Competitive wage; generous benefits.

E-mail cover letter & resume to: anne@ heartcentercardiology.com

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Restaurant

The Hilton Garden Inn

in Bend, is presently seeking a

Maintenance Engineer

Full time with benegits. Hotel/ hospitality experience preferred. Apply at 425 SW Bluff Dr., Bend, or send resume to: don.seaton@hilton.com

Need to get an ad in ASAP? You can place it online at: www.bendbulletin.com

541-385-5809

The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to FRAUD. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Where can you ind a helping hand? From contractors to yard care, it’s all here in The Bulletin’s “Call A Service Professional” Directory

Finance & Business

500 528

Loans & Mortgages WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392. LOCAL MONEY:We buy secured trust deeds & note,some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 ext.13.

Proceeds benefit the COBA Rampathon. 10x8 vendor booth for $50. You keep proceeds. Garage sale will be held Saturday, March 31, 8 am to 1 pm, Pilot Butte Middle School gymnasium.

Business Opportunities CAUTION READERS: Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never proFor more info call vide personal inforCOBA at mation to any source 541-389-1058 FIND YOUR FUTURE you may not have researched and deemed HOME IN THE BULLETIN 288 to be reputable. Use Your future is just a page extreme caution when Sales Southeast Bend responding to ANY away. Whether you’re looking 63180 Cole Rd. Estate Sale: 60881 online employment for a hat or a place to hang it, The Bulletin Classiied is ad from out-of-state. ATTIC ESTATES & Willow Creek Lp., your best source. APPRAISALS Mtn. High, Fri. March We suggest you call 541-350-6822 Every day thousands of 16th 8-4, Sat. March for pics & info go to the State of Oregon buyers and sellers of goods 17th, 9-4, furniture, www.atticestatesanConsumer Hotline at and services do business in household items, coldappraisals.com 1-503-378-4320 these pages. They know lectibles, antiques, 60 you can’t beat The Bulletin yrs. of living! For Equal Opportunity Classiied Section for Moving Sale: 63676 292 Laws: Oregon Bu- selection and convenience Ranch Village Dr., Fri, reau of Labor & InSales Other Areas - every item is just a phone March 16th, Sat, dustry, Civil Rights call away. March 17th, 9-3. Division, NOTICE The Classiied Section is 971-673-0764 Remember to remove easy to use. Every item USE THE CLASSIFIEDS! your Garage Sale signs If you have any quesis categorized and every (nails, staples, etc.) cartegory is indexed on the tions, concerns or after your Sale event section’s front page. Door-to-door selling with comments, contact: is over! THANKS! Kevin O’Connell Whether you are looking for fast results! It’s the easiest From The Bulletin Classified Department a home or need a service, and your local utility way in the world to sell. Manager your future is in the pages of companies. The Bulletin The Bulletin Classiied. 541-383-0398 The Bulletin Classiied

541-385-5809

www.bendbulletin.com

600 630

Rooms for Rent 1 Bdrm, own bath, W/D, garage. $400 mo. + electric; pet maybe? Call 541-420-5546

2 Bdrm, 2bath detached apt. Dbl gar, W/D hkup, no pets/smoking. 63323 Britta. $725/mo + $1000 dep. 541-390-0296 Good classiied ads tell the essential facts in an interesting Manner. Write from the readers view - not the seller’s. Convert the facts into beneits. Show the reader how the item will help them in some way.

Furnished rm, TV, Wifi, micro, fridge, w/d. $425 mo. Refs 541-389-9268 Studios & Kitchenettes Furnished room, TV w/ cable, micro & fridge. Utils & linens. New 640 owners.$145-$165/wk Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 541-382-1885

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads The Bulletin 634

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend !! NO APP FEE !!

573

Sign up now to be a vendor in the 2012 Central Oregon Builders Association's Indoor Garage Sale.

Rentals

2 bdrm, 1 bath $530 & 540

Spacious 2 bdrm 1½ bath townhouse, w/d hkup, fenced yd. NO PETS. Great loc! $565 & up. 179 SW Hayes 541-382-0162; 541-420-0133 642

Apt./Multiplex Redmond

W/D hook-ups & Heat 2 Bdrm, 1 bath, large upstairs unit, laundry Pump. Carports & Pet on site, no smkg/pets. Friendly W/S/G & gas pd; $500 Fox Hollow Apts. mo. 358 NW 17th St. (541) 383-3152 Gael, 541-350-2095

Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co.

PUBLISHER'S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, marital status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women, and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-877-0246. The toll free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

Brand New 1760 sq.ft., 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath, office, fenced yard, gas fireplace, huge master bdrm & closet, 20277 SE Knightsbridge Pl, $1195. 541-350-2206. 658

Houses for Rent Redmond Newly Remodeled 1200 sq.ft., 2 Bdrm 2 Bath,½ acre lot. Great views & room for RV. $800. 541-923-6513 Nice 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, lg fenced corner yd, auto sprinkler, $800/ mo + dep. Move-in special! $200 off 1st month’s rent. Small pet OK. *NO SMOKING* Call 541-408-1327 Nice 5 yr. old 3 bdrm 2 bath, new carpet and tile, sprinkler system, $790. No smoking, ref. req. 541-480-2543. 659

Houses for Rent Sunriver In River Meadows a 3 bdrm, 1.5 bath, 1376 sq. ft., woodstove, brand new carpet/oak floors, W/S pd, $795. 541-480-3393 or 541-610-7803

2210 NE Holliday,3bdrm, Triplex, 2 bdrm, 2 bath, 1100 sq.ft., w/d in 2 bath, w/garage, gas house, micro, fridge, heat, fireplace, quiet. dishwasher, w/s/g & No smoking. $750/mo. gardner pd. garage w/ 541-317-0867. 660 opener. $650/mo. + Look at: Houses for Rent 2 bdrm, 1 bath duplex, security dep. Very attached garage with Bendhomes.com clean. 541-604-0338. La Pine opener, $675 mo. for Complete Listings of lease. 1319 NE Noe. bdrm, 2 bath wood503-507-9182. Garage Sales Area Real Estate for Sale 3 stove, w/ garage on 1 acre, fenced. $750 Garage Sales 650 Alpine Meadows mo. 541-749-8912 Houses for Rent Townhomes Garage Sales RENT TO OWN, ulti1, 2 & 3 bdrm apts. NE Bend mate value, high-end Starting at $625. Find them Wildriver subdivision. 541-330-0719 in Newer 1700sf 3/2 + Looking for your next Professionally offc, 2 car + 28 ft RV managed by employee? The Bulletin Norris & Stevens, Inc. gar $1200/mo; $300/ Place a Bulletin help Classiieds mo cred. 541-598-2127 wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 Beautiful 2 Bdrms 541-385-5809 687 readers each week. in quiet complex, Your classified ad Commercial for park- like setting. No will also appear on smkg. Near St. Winter Specials Rent/Lease bendbulletin.com, Charles. W/S/G pd; 1 & 2 Bdrms Avail. currently receiving both W/D hkup + • Lots of amenities. Office/commercial, large over 1.5 million page laundry facil. • Pet friendly roll-up door, bath, views, every month $625-$650/mo; • W/S/G paid great location 1225 sq at no extra cost. 541-385-6928. THE BLUFFS APTS. ft, $600/ mo, 1st/last. Bulletin Classifieds 340 Rimrock Way, 541-480-7546; 480-7541 Duplex 2bdrm close to Get Results! Redmond Close to downtown. Hardwood, Call 541-385-5809 or Office/Warehouse loschools, shopping, gas fireplace, W/D, place your ad on-line cated in SE Bend. Up and parks! garage. W/G & yard at to 30,000 sq.ft., com541-548-8735 maint incl. No smokbendbulletin.com petitive rate, Managed by ing/pets. $725 + dep. GSL Properties 541-382-3678. 541-382-0088

To place your ad, visit www.bendbulletin.com or 541-385-5809


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2012 G3

Boats & RV’s RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - Roommate Wanted 616 - Want To Rent 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 630 - Rooms for Rent 631 - Condos & Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for Rent General 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space

Real Estate For Sale

700 745

Homes for Sale BANK OWNED HOMES! FREE List w/Pics! www.BendRepos.com bend and beyond real estate 20967 yeoman, bend or

NOTICE:

All real estate advertised here in is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or intention to make any such preferences, limitations or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of this law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. The Bulletin Classified 762

Homes with Acreage Blackstone Ranch, 105 acre horse/ cattle ranch, spectacular Crooked River and Cascade views. Stunning 4773 sq.ft. home in private setting, 4 yr. old 1700 sq.ft. managers home, covered arena and top quality horse barn, outdoor arena and cattle handling facilities, large shop/rv barn w/pull thru bays, extremely well designed and built. MLS 201107872. $3,900,000. Ron Davis, Broker, Cascade Sotheby’s International Realty. 541-480-3096

682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 730 - New Listings 732 - Commercial Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740 - Condos & Townhomes for Sale 744 - Open Houses 745 - Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest Bend Homes 747 - Southwest Bend Homes 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 749 - Southeast Bend Homes 750 - Redmond Homes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson County Homes 757 - Crook County Homes 762 - Homes with Acreage 763 - Recreational Homes and Property 764 - Farms and Ranches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land 762

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Homes with Acreage

Acreages

80 Acre Getaway Buck Springs Ranch 15,700 Acres (9000 Trout stream and irrigation, immaculate 2500 deeded), only one sq.ft. home, fruit trees, hour from Bend, three vineyard potential, inhomes on the propcome producing stone erty, large indoor quarry, Thompson area/barn w/guess Creek runs through, quarters. Huge shop expansive views. MLS and machine shed, 2812329. $425,000. covered large animal working pens, 9 land Ron Davis, Broker, Cascade Sotheby’s owner preference International Realty. (LOP) tags, Little Bear 541-480-3096 Creek runs thru property, borders National Forest, close to *** Prineville Reservoir. MLS #201007969. CHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad $5,500,000. on the first day it runs Ron Davis, Broker, to make sure it is corCascade Sotheby’s rect. Sometimes inInternational Realty. structions over the 541-480-3096 phone are misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. Row -Crop/Hay Farm. If this happens to your Productive 117 acre ad, please contact us farm, 116 acres irrigathe first day your ad tion., 2636 sq.ft. farm appears and we will house with 4 bdrm, 2 be happy to fix it as bath, easy access to soon as we can. town, feed lot and Deadlines are: Weekauction yard. Private, days 11:00 noon for mountain view setting, next day, Sat. 11:00 fenced and cross a.m. for Sunday and fenced. MLS Monday. #201100578. 541-385-5809 $499,500. Thank you! Ron Davis, Broker, Cascade Sotheby’s The Bulletin Classified *** International Realty. 541-480-3096 Tumalo View Acreage, 41 acres with 23 acres irrigation, CasSky Hawk Ranch, 217 cade Mountain view, acres, 176 acres irripossible owner terms, gated pasture and hay priced only $229,000. fields, spectacular MLS 201105774. Cascade Mt and Smith Rock views. Ron Davis, Broker, Cascade Sotheby’s Beautiful remodeled International Realty. 3449 sq.ft., 3 bdrm, 3 541-480-3096 bath home, event center included, indoor arena, 20 stalls, lounge, large confer- BULLETIN CLASSIFIEDS Search the area’s most ence center, 15 stall boarding barn, out- comprehensive listing of classiied advertising... door arenas and complete trail course, real estate to automotive, room to ride, borders merchandise to sporting government land. goods. Bulletin Classiieds MLS #201106108. appear every day in the print or on line. $2,450,000. Ron Davis, Broker, Call 541-385-5809 Cascade Sotheby’s www.bendbulletin.com International Realty. 541-480-3096

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 (This special package is not available on our website)

Building/Contracting NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website www.hirealicensedcontractor. com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications. E2 CONSTRUCTION • Framing • Siding • Decking • Painting • New & Remodel Summer’s coming -get your projects done now!

Guaranteed quality at an affordable price. Schedule a project now & receive a $50 McGrath’s or Zydeco Gift Card!! CCB #188520

541-306-7380 Debris Removal

JUNK BE GONE

Handyman

Landscaping/Yard Care

ERIC REEVE HANDY NOTICE: OREGON SERVICES. Home & Landscape ContracCommercial Repairs, tors Law (ORS 671) Carpentry-Painting, requires all busiPressure-washing, nesses that advertise Honey Do's. On-time to perform Landpromise. Senior scape Construction Discount. Work guarwhich includes: anteed. 541-389-3361 planting, decks, or 541-771-4463 fences, arbors, Bonded & Insured water-features, and CCB#181595 installation, repair of irrigation systems to BULLETIN CLASSIFIEDS be licensed with the Landscape ContracSearch the area’s most tors Board. This comprehensive listing of 4-digit number is to be classiied advertising... included in all adverreal estate to automotive, tisements which indimerchandise to sporting cate the business has goods. Bulletin Classiieds a bond, insurance and appear every day in the workers compensaprint or on line. tion for their employCall 541-385-5809 ees. For your protecwww.bendbulletin.com tion call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status Margo Construction before contracting LLC Since 1992 with the business. • Pavers • Carpentry Persons doing land• Remodeling • Decks scape maintenance • Window/Door do not require a LCB Replacement • Int/Ext license. Paint CCB 176121 • Aeration / Dethatching 541-480-3179 BOOK NOW! I DO THAT! Weekly / one-time service avail. Bonded, insured, Home/Rental repairs free estimates! Small jobs to remodels COLLINS Lawn Maint. Honest, guaranteed Call 541-480-9714 work. CB#151573 Dennis 541-317-9768 Painting/Wall Covering Home Improvement

All About Painting

Armstrong Home Re- Interior/Exterior/Decks. Mention this ad get I Haul Away FREE pair: 24 yrs. in Cen15% Off interior or For Salvage. Also tral OR.Remodels of exterior job. Cleanups & Cleanouts all types, windows, Mel, 541-389-8107 doors,kitchens, baths, Restrictions do apply. Free Estimates. interior & exterior CCB #148373 painting, natural wood 541-420-6729 restoration, siding & Excavating decks, CCB#65043 Mtn. High Painting: 541-815-5314 Levi’s Dirt Works, Interior/Ext & decks, RGC/CGC: For all your owner operated, free Kelly Kerfoot Const. dirt/excavation needs: estimates, refs., 28 yrs exp in Central OR! Small jobs for HomeCCB# 161131 Quality & honesty, from owners, Wet/dry utils, 541-390-6004 Concrete, Public Works, carpentry & handyman Subcontracting, Custom jobs, to expert wall cov- Picasso Painting:Paint ering install / removal. 2 rooms, 1 rm of = or pads,Driveway Grading, Sr. discounts CCB#47120 lesser value free. For this Operated rentals & auLicensed/bonded/insured great deal call 541-280gering,CCB#194077 9081. CCB#194351 541-389-1413 / 410-2422 541-639-5282

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Motorcycles & Accessories

Boats & Accessories

Boats & Accessories

Boats & Accessories

Harley Davidson Soft- Kawasaki Mean Streak 14’ Crestliner Sportsman 2007, with 30hp 1600 2007, special Tail Deluxe 2007, Honda, power T&T, white/cobalt, w/pasedition, stored inside, hvy duty trlr, SSC, 20.5’ 2004 Bayliner senger kit, Vance & custom pipes & jet bow mount trolling 205 Run About, 220 Hines muffler system pack, only made in mtr, fish finder, downHP, V8, open bow, & kit, 1045 mi., exc. 2007, no longer in Mastercraft rigger, dual batteries, 19-ft exc. cond., very fast cond, $19,999, production, exc. Pro-Star 190 inboard, many extras incl fishw/very low hours, 541-389-9188. cond., 1500 mi., 850 ing equip. $7500. 1987, 290hp, V8, 822 lots of extras incl. $7995, 541-390-0632. Snowmobiles Honda 650 1985 Night541-516-8695 hrs, great cond, lots of tower, Bimini & hawk, new tires/tuneextras, $10,000 obo. custom trailer, Polaris 2003, 4 cycle, up, 25K,showrm cond, 865 541-231-8709 17’ Seaswirl tri-hull, $19,500. fuel inj, elec start, re55 mpg $1650 obo. walk-thru w/bow rail, 541-389-1413 ATVs verse, 2-up seat, 541-548-3439 good shape, EZ load cover, 4900 mi, $2500 trailer, new carpet, obo. 541-280-0514 new seats w/storage, Just bought a new boat? motor for parts only, Sell your old one in the Need help ixing stuff? $1500 obo, or trade classiieds! Ask about our Honda VT700 for 25-35 electric start Call A Service Professional Super Seller rates! Shadow 1984, 23K, short-shaft motor. ind the help you need. 541-385-5809 many new parts, 19’ Glass Ply, Merc 541-312-3085 2007 Honda TRX 400ex www.bendbulletin.com battery charger, cruiser, depth finder, Sport Quad. All stock, good condition, trolling motor, trailer, pipe & jetted, runs Just too many $4000, 541-389-1086 $3000 OBO. great. $2850/poss Polaris XC700 or 541-419-8034. 541-382-1891 collectibles? trades. 541-647-8931 1998, 136” Track, 20.5’ Seaswirl Spypaddle track, sevder 1989 H.O. 302, eral aftermarket up- KAWASAKI 750 2005 FIND IT! Sell them in 285 hrs., exc. cond., like new, only 3400 Find It in grades, some seat The Bulletin Classiieds stored indoors for BUY IT! mi., new battery, damage, $1000, The Bulletin Classifieds! life $11,900 OBO. SELL IT! sports shield, shaft please call 541-385-5809 541-379-3530 drive, $2900 firm! The Bulletin Classiieds 541-504-1704. 541-385-5809 541-447-6552.

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0030762025 T.S. No.: 11-02964-6 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust dated as of September 28, 2005 made by, JAMES E. CARROLL, MERLE D. CARROLL , as the original grantor, to WESTERN TITLE AND ESCROW COMPANY, as the original trustee, in favor of MERS AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICAN BROKERS CONDUIT, as the original beneficiary, recorded on October 4, 2005, as Instrument No. 2005-67496 of Official Records in the Office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, Oregon (the "Deed of Trust"). The current beneficiary is: U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee for GSR Mortgage Loan Trust 2006-AR1, Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates Series 2006-AR1, (the "Beneficiary"). APN: 202882 LOT 29, TANGLEWOOD, PHASE V11, DESHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 751SE BRIARWOOD COURT, BEND, OR Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3} of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default(s) for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor{s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; and which defaulted amounts total: $15,144.06 as of February 2, 2012. By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $427,110.60 together with interest thereon at the rate of 2.00000% per annum from December 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all Trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as the duly appointed Trustee under the Deed of Trust will on June 15, 2012 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of the Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, Trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 1920 Main Street, Suite 1120, Irvine, CA 92614 949-252-4900 FOR SALE INFORMATION CALL: 714.730.2727 Website for Trustee's Sale Information: www.lpsasap.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words 'Trustee" and 'Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: February 14, 2012 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Michael Busby, Authorized Signature ASAP# 4199557 02/23/2012, 03/01/2012, 03/08/2012, 03/15/2012 1000

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Adam S. King, as grantor, whose address is 311 NW Wall Street, Bend, OR 97701, to Deschutes County Title Company, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for First Horizon Home Loan Corporation, as Beneficiary, dated May 3, 2005, recorded May 10, 2005, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2005, at Page 28696, beneficial interest having been assigned to EverBank, whose address is 8100 Nations Way, Jacksonville, FL 32256, as covering the following described real property: The North Half of Lots Five and Six in Block Sixteen of Deschutes Addition, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon.. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 311 N.W. Wall Street, Bend, OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $1,086.03, from April 1, 2011, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $197,400.00, together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.625% per annum from March 1, 2011, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on May 17, 2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 01/13/2012 By: /s/:Kelly D. Sutherland KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 1499 SE Tech Center Place, Suite 255 Vancouver, WA 98683 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 11-106704

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LEGAL NOTICE CITY OF REDMOND ROBERTS FIELD-REDMOND MUNICIPAL AIRPORT GA RAMP RECONSTRUCTION AND TAXIWAY C EXTENSION A.I.P. PROJECT No. 3-41-0052-034 INVITATION TO BID Sealed bids for Roberts Field-Redmond Municipal Airport, GA Ramp Reconstruction and Taxiway C Extension, A.I.P. Project No. 3-41-0052-034 will be received by the City Recorder at City of Redmond, City Hall, 716 SW Evergreen, Redmond, Oregon 97756, until the bid closing time of 2:00 p.m., local time based on the "Official Time" of the clock at the City Recorders office, at Redmond City Hall, on April 12, 2012, at which time the bids will be publicly opened and read. Bidders shall submit the required first-tier subcontractors disclosure form within two hours of the bid closing time. Bidders whose bids and/or disclosure statements are received after the stated times will be considered non-responsive and their bids will not be considered. The scope of work being considered is: 1.Excavation, Embankment, Earthwork and Grading 2.Asphalt Concrete Pulverization 3.Concrete Removal 4.Processing/Crushing of on-site rock 5.Pavement Subbase and Base Construction 6.Bituminous Surface Course Construction 7.Pavement Underdrain Construction 8.Storm Drain Construction 9.Construction of a New Taxiway Edge Lights 10.Miscellaneous Electrical and Signage Improvements 11.VASI, REIL, and PAPI power relocation 12.Pavement Marking The Contract Documents for the above project may be examined at the Airport Manager's office located at Robert's Field-Redmond Municipal Airport, 2522 SE Jesse Butler Circle #17, Redmond, Oregon 97756, or City of Redmond City Hall, 716 SW Evergreen, Redmond, Oregon 97756, on working days, between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. Copies of said documents may be obtained at a cost of $100.00 per set from Century West Engineering Corporation, 1020 SW Emkay Drive, Suite 100, Bend, Oregon, 97702, telephone (541) 322-8962. Technical questions shall be directed to Matt MacRostie, P.E., Century West Engineering Corporation, (503) 419-2130. Documents will only be mailed upon receipt of $100.00 per set to cover the document fee and postage/handling. The cost of the documents is non-refundable, and the documents do not need to be returned. Contractors must be qualified in accordance with the applicable parts of ORS 279C in order to enter into a contract with the City. The City will only consider contractors who are able to demonstrate prior experience with similar work. The City may investigate to determine the qualifications of the bidders as part of the evaluation of the bids. Bidders must submit qualification statements in accordance with the terms of Subsection 20-02 of the specifications with their Proposal. Proposals submitted without qualification statements will not be accepted. The proposed contract is under and subject to Executive Order 112456 of September 24, 1986, and to the Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) and Federal Labor Provisions. All labor on the project shall be paid no less than the minimum wage rates established by the U.S. Secretary of Labor or The State of Oregon BOLI, whichever is greater. Each Bidder must supply all information required by the bid documents and specifications. The EEO requirements, labor provisions, and wage rates are included in the specifications and bid documents. Each Bidder must complete, sign and furnish with his bid a "Certification of Nonsegregated Facilities" and a statement entitled "Bidders Statement on Previous Contracts Subject to EEO Clause," as contained in the Bid Proposal. A contractor having 50 or more employees and his subcontractors having 50 or more employees and who may be awarded a subcontract of $50,000 or more will be required to maintain an affirmative action program, the standards for which are contained in the specifications. To be eligible for award each Bidder must comply with the affirmative action requirements which are contained in the specifications. Disadvantaged Business Enterprises will be afforded full opportunity to submit bids in response to this invitation and will not be discriminated against on the grounds of race, color, or national origin in consideration for an award of any contract entered into pursuant to this advertisement. This contract will be funded in part by a grant from the Federal Aviation Administration. In accordance with federal requirements, the City has determined that this contract has subcontracting possibilities and encourages the participation of Disadvantaged Business Enterprises as prime contractors and subcontractors. No DBE contract goal has been established for this project. Based on the 9th Circuit Court Decision in Western States Paving Company v. Washington State Department of Transportation, the City has determined that it is appropriate to use a race/gender neutral goal. The City encourages all bidders to take active race/gender neutral steps to include DBE's in this contract. Race/gender neutral steps include: unbundling large contracts, subcontracting work the prime contractor may self-perform, providing bonding or financing assistance, providing technical assistance, etc. A MANDATORY pre-bid meeting to be held at 2:00 p.m., local time on March 29, 2012, at the office of the Airport Manager at Roberts Field Airport Terminal, Airport Administration Office. Interested Prime Contractors are required to attend. At this meeting, questions concerning the Contract Documents and the proposed work will be discussed. A tour of the project site will be conducted after the meeting. No bid shall be considered unless the bidder is registered with the Oregon Construction Contractors Board as required by ORS 701. Proposals must be submitted on the prescribed forms and must be accompanied by certified check, cashier's check, or bid bond executed in favor of the City in an amount equal to ten percent (10%) of the amount bid. The successful bidder will be required to furnish a performance bond and payment bond, each in the full amount of the contract price. No bid may be withdrawn after the scheduled time for the public opening of the bid as specified above. The City reserves the right to reject any and all bids, to waive any irregularities, and to accept the bid deemed in the best interest of the City. The City may reject any bid not in compliance with all prescribed public bidding procedures and requirements, and may reject for good cause any or all bids upon a finding by the City that it is in the public interest to do so. Published: Bend Bulletin Thursday, March 15, 2012 Thursday, March 22, 2012 Daily Journal of Commerce Thursday, March 15, 2012 Thursday, March 22, 2012 Redmond Spokesman Wednesday, March 21, 2012 Wednesday, March 28, 2012


G4 THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

BOATS & RVs 805 - Misc. Items 850 - Snowmobiles 860 - Motorcycles And Accessories 865 - ATVs 870 - Boats & Accessories 875 - Watercraft 880 - Motorhomes 881 - Travel Trailers 882 - Fifth Wheels 885 - Canopies and Campers 890 - RV’s for Rent

AUTOS & TRANSPORTATION 908 - Aircraft, Parts and Service 916 - Trucks and Heavy Equipment 925 - Utility Trailers 927 - Automotive Trades 929 - Automotive Wanted 931 - Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 932 - Antique and Classic Autos 933 - Pickups 935 - Sport Utility Vehicles 940 - Vans 975 - Automobiles

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Fifth Wheels

TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809 931

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Automotive Parts, Service & Accessories

Pickups

Vans

We Buy Junk Cars & Trucks! Cash paid for junk vehicles, batteries & catalytic converters. Serving all of C.O.! Call 541-408-1090 932

Antique & Classic Autos

Ford 2011 F250 King Ranch Crew Cab 4x4 Diesel V8, LOADED, Immaculate, 7800 miles. $51,000 obo. 541-475-7211

Ford F150 1983, only 67K original miles! $2600. 541-382-2899 Chevy Chevelle 1967, 283 & Powerglide, very clean, quality updates, $21,000, 541-420-1600

GMC ½-ton Pickup, 1972, LWB, 350hi motor, mechanically A-1, interior great; body needs some TLC. $4000 OBO. Call 541-382-9441

Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Airstream 28-ft Over- Komfort 23’ 1985, very lander, 1958. Project; clean, all amenities, Chevy Corvette Coupe Class 875. 2006, 8,471 orig solid frame, orig inteinterior gutted & re541-385-5809 miles, 1 owner, alrior, appls & fixtures. modeled, $2850, Flat ways garaged, red, 2 International $4000. 541-740-8480 Bobby, 541-948-5174 Bed Pickup 1963, 1 tops, auto/paddle ton dually, 4 spd. shift, LS-2, Corsa exGENERATE SOME ex- SPRINGDALE 2005 trans., great MPG, haust, too many opcitement in your neig27’, has eating area could be exc. wood tions to list, pristine borhood. Plan a gaslide, A/C and heat, hauler, runs great, car, $37,500. Serious rage sale and don't new tires, all connew brakes, $1950. only, call forget to advertise in tents included, bed- Laredo 29BH 2004, 13’ 541-419-5480. 541-504-9945 classified! 385-5809. ding towels, cooking slide, all-weather pkg, fiand eating utensils. berglass w/alum frame. Toyota 4x4 1989, 5spd, Great for vacation, Great shape, $15,000. 4-cyl, X-cab w/ bench fishing, hunting or 801-554-7913 (in Bend) seat, 68K miles on living! $15,500 engine, new util box & Used out-drive 541-408-3811 bedliner, 4 extra tires parts - Mercury w/rims, Kenwood CD, Montana 34’ 2003, 2 Chevy Wagon 1957, OMC rebuilt maAudioBahn speakers, slides, exc. cond. 4-dr. , complete, rine motors: 151 new paint, exc. cond. throughout, arctic $15,000 OBO, trades, $1595; 3.0 $1895; in & out, must see, winter pkg., new please call 4.3 (1993), $1995. $5000. 541-385-4790 10-ply tires, W/D 541-420-5453. 541-389-0435 ready, $25,000, 935 Chrysler 300 Coupe Sport Utility Vehicles 541-948-5793 Springdale 29’ 2007, 1967, 440 engine, 875 slide,Bunkhouse style, auto. trans, ps, air, 4-WHEELER’S OR Watercraft sleeps 7-8, excellent frame on rebuild, reHUNTER’S SPECIAL! condition, $16,900, painted original blue, Jeep 4-dr wagon, 1987 Ads published in "Wa541-390-2504 original blue interior, 4x4, silver, nice tercraft" include: Kayoriginal hub caps, exc. wheels, 183K, lots of aks, rafts and motorchrome, asking $9000 Pilgrim 27’, 2007 5th miles left yet! Off-road ized personal or make offer. wheel, 1 slide, AC, or on. Under $1000. watercrafts. For 541-385-9350. TV,full awning, excelCall 541-318-9999 or "boats" please see lent shape, $23,900. 541-815-3639. Class 870. 541-350-8629 Free trip to D.C. 541-385-5809 for WWII Vets! Sprinter 272RLS, 2009 Chrysler SD 4-Door 29’, weatherized, like 1930, CDS Royal new, furnished & Standard, 8-cylinder, ready to go, incl Wine880 body is good, needs gard Satellite dish, Motorhomes $26,995. 541-420-9964 some restoration, runs, taking bids, Chevy Suburban, 2001, Road Ranger 1985, 541-383-3888, runs great, fully loaded, 24’, catalytic & A/C, 4WD, 141K, lthr seats, 541-815-3318 Fully self contained, TV, new tires, lots more. $3000, 541-389-8315 $5800. 541-480-8283 885

Beaver Patriot 2000, Viking Legend 2465ST Canopies & Campers Walnut cabinets, soModel 540 2002, exc. 990 lar, Bose, Corian, tile, cond., slide dining, toi- Lance-Legend 11’3" 1998, w/ext-cab, 4 door fridge., 1 slide, let, shower, gen. incl., exc. cond., generator, W/D. $75,000 $5500. 541-548-0137 solar-cell, large refrig, 541-215-5355 AC, micro., magic fan, bathroom shower, Coachman removable carpet, Freelander 2011, custom windows, out27’, queen bed, 1 door shower/awning slide, HD TV, DVD Weekend Warrior Toy set-up for winterizing, Hauler 28’ 2007,Gen, player, 450 Ford, elec. jacks, CD/stefuel station, exc cond. $49,000, please reo/4’ stinger. $9500. sleeps 8, black/gray Bend, 541.279.0458 call 541-923-5754. interior, used 3X, $27,500. Gulfstream Scenic 541-389-9188 Autos & Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp dieTransportation Looking for your sel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 next employee? in. kitchen slide out, Place a Bulletin help new tires,under cover, hwy. miles only,4 door wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 fridge/freezer icereaders each week. maker, W/D combo, Your classified ad Interbath tub & 908 will also appear on shower, 50 amp probendbulletin.com Aircraft, Parts pane gen & more! which currently re$55,000. & Service ceives over 1.5 mil541-948-2310 lion page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get ReHunter’s Delight! Packsults! Call 385-5809 age deal! 1988 Winor place your ad nebago Super Chief, on-line at 1/3 interest in Colum38K miles, great bendbulletin.com bia 400, located at shape; 1988 Bronco II Sunriver. $138,500. 4x4 to tow, 130K Call 541-647-3718 882 mostly towed miles, nice rig! $15,000 both. 1/3 interest in wellFifth Wheels 541-382-3964, leave equipped IFR Beech msg. Bonanza A36, located KBDN. $55,000. 541-419-9510 Take care of

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your investments with the help from The Bulletin’s “Call A Service Professional” Directory

Executive Hangar

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $12,750. 541-923-3417.

Monaco Dynasty 2004, loaded, 3 slides, $129,999, 541-923- 8572 or 541-749-0037 (cell) Carri-Lite Luxury 2009 by Carriage, 4 slideouts, inverter, satellite sys, fireplace, 2 flat screen TVs. $60,000. 541-480-3923 Phoenix Cruiser 2001, 23 ft. V10, 51K. Large bath, bed & kitchen. Seats 6-8. Awning. exc. cond., $19,500. 541-923-4211

COACHMAN 1997 Catalina 5th wheel 23’, slide, new tires, extra clean, below book. $6,500. 928-345-4731

at Bend Airport (KBDN) 60’ wide x 50’ deep, w/55’ wide x 17’ high bi-fold door. Natural gas heat, office, bathroom. Parking for 6 cars. Adjacent to Frontage Rd; great visibility for aviation bus. 1jetjock@q.com 541-948-2126 916

Trucks & Heavy Equipment

$24,995. 541-593-6303

Winnebago Sightseer 2008 30B Class A, Fleetwood Wilderness 36’ 2005 4 slides, rear Top-of-the-line RV lobdrm, fireplace, AC, cated at our home in W/D hkup beautiful southeast Bend. unit! $30,500. $79,500 OBO. Cell # 541-815-2380 805-368-1575.

Dodge Transvan, 1978, 360, AT, licensed, runs great, tires like new, $2250. 541-362-5559 or 541-663-6046 Ford Windstar 1995, 132k; Chrysler Town & Country LX 2003 mini van, 152,000 miles; Nissan Quest GXE 1996, 150,000 miles. Your Choice! $2900! $3900! $4900! Bob at 541-318-9999, Sam at 541-815-3639 Free trip to DC for WWII vets. Mercury Monterey 2005 Maroon Mini-van/111k miles $5,000/OBO Very clean/runs great! More info? See Craig's list add or call Kathy 541-350-1956 or Jim 541-948-2029 to see/ test drive. 975

Automobiles AUDI QUATTRO CABRIOLET 2004, extra nice, low mileage, heated seats, new Michelins, all wheel drive, $12,995 503-635-9494.

BMW 323i convertible, 1999, sport package, low miles, priced under Blue Book at $8,000. Call 541-788-0231

BMW 525i 2004

Dodge pickup D100 classic, nal 318 wide push button straight, runs $1250 firm. 831-295-4903

1962 origiblock, trans, good, Bend,

CHEVY SUBURBAN LT 2005, low miles., good tires, new brakes, moonroof Reduced to $15,750 541-389-5016.

New body style, Steptronic auto., cold-weather package, premium package, heated seats, extra nice. $14,995. 503-635-9494.

People Look for Information About Products and Chevy Tahoe LS 2001 Services Every Day through 4x4. 120K mi, Power The Bulletin Classifieds seats, Tow Pkg, 3rd row seating, extra Buick Regal GS 2002, 4 dr, turbo, leather htd tires, CD, privacy tintFIAT 1800 1978 5-spd, pwr seats, PW, PDL, ing, upgraded rims. door panels w/flowers moonroof, auto A/C, Fantastic cond. $8000 & hummingbirds, traction control, pwr Firm. Contact Timm at white soft top & hard mirrors, tilt, cruise, 541-408-2393 for info premium sound, Black or to view vehicle. top, Reduced! $5,500. metallic. Kelly Blue Bk 541-317-9319 or $7500; reduced to 541-647-8483 $6000. 541-977-9971 Ford Mustang Coupe Ford Excursion 1966, original owner, BUICKS! 1995 Le2005, 4WD, diesel, V8, automatic, great Sabre Limited, alexc. cond., $24,000, shape, $9000 OBO. most perfect, $2900. call 541-923-0231. 530-515-8199 1999 Regal GS, 3.8 Litre V-6, supercharged, $2900; 2006 Lucerne CX, $7900; 2004 LeSabre, 40k. $7900. Bob, 541-318-9999 Sam, 541-815-3639. Lincoln Mark IV, 1972, Jeep Cherokee 1990, 4WD, 3 sets rims & needs vinyl top, runs tires, exlnt set snow Cadillac DeVille Segood, $3500. tires, great 1st car! dan 1993, leather in541-771-4747 $1800. 541-633-5149 terior, all pwr., 4 new tires w/chrome rims, dark green, CD/radio, under 100K mi., runs exc. $2500 OBO, 541-805-1342 Plymouth Barracuda 1966, original car! 300 hp, 360 V8, centerlines, (Original 273 eng & wheels incl.) 541-593-2597

VW BAJA BUG 1974 1776cc en-

Jeep Willys 1947 cstm, small block Chevy, PS, OD, mags + trlr. Swap for backhoe? No a.m. calls, pls. 541-389-6990 JEEP WRANGLER 1989 Chevy Corvette 1989, 350, AT, black, runs SAHARA $1999 auto, & drives good, 162K 68,493 mi. 4x4 runs miles, $3995, OBO. great 971-258-2192

541-408-2154

gine. New: shocks, tires, disc brakes, interior paint, flat black. $4900 OBO; over $7000 invested. 541-322-9529. 933

Pickups

Nissan Xterra S - 4x4 2006, AT, 76K, good all-weather tires, $13,500 obo. 858-345-0084

Kia Rio 2006, 4 dr, auto, 129K mi., 40 mpg, A/C, $3800, Please call 541-206-9654 for more information

1982 INT. Dump with Arborhood, 6k on rebuilt 392, truck refur- Chevy 4x4 1970, short Porsche Cayenne 2004, Mercury Cougar wide box, canopy, bished, has 330 gal. 86k, immac, dealer 1994, XR7 V8, 30K mi on premium water tank with pump maint’d, loaded, now 77K mi, exc. cond, 350 motor; RV cam, and hose. Everything $17000. 503-459-1580 REDUCED $4500 electronic ignition, tow works, $8,500 OBO. OBO. 541-526-1443 pkg, new paint/detail541-977-8988 ing inside & out, 1 Range Rover 2005 owner since 1987. HSE, nav, DVD, $4500. 541-923-5911 local car, new tires, 51K miles. Chevy Bonanza $24,995. 1978, runs good. 503-635-9494 1980 Classic Mini Price reduced to Cooper $5000 OBO. Call Chevy Silverado 1987, All original, rust-free, 541-390-1466. 1 ton, 2WD auto., tow classic Mini Cooper in Range Rover, pkg, king cab, pw, perfect cond. $8,000 925 2006 Sport HSE, $3500 OBO. Clean OBO. 541-408-3317 nav, AWD, heated Utility Trailers title, 541-740-8480. Mitsubishi 3000 GT seats, moonroof, 1999, auto., pearl local owner, HarDodge 250 Club Cab white, very low mi. man Kardon, 1982, long box, $9500. 541-788-8218. $23,995. canopy, tow pkg., a/c, Big Tex Landscap503-635-9494 rebuilt engine, new PORSCHE 914, 1974 ing/ ATV Trailer, tires and brake, autoRoller (no engine), dual axle flatbed, matic transmission w/ lowered, full roll cage, 7’x16’, 7000 lb. under drive, $2995. 5-pt harnesses, racGVW, all steel, 541-548-2731 ing seats, 911 dash & $1400. instruments, decent 541-382-4115, or shape, very cool! 541-280-7024. $1699. 541-678-3249 Subaru Outback 2005 2.5I AWD; 91K, one 931 Saab 9-3 SE 1999 owner; Exc. Cond.; All convertible, 2 door, Automotive Parts, weather pkg; AC; CD; Navy with black soft Dodge 3500 2007 Quad Service & Accessories 4 speed. auto. trans. Cab SLT 4x4, 6.7L top, tan interior, very w/sportshift; studded Cummins 6-spd AT, too good condition. tires & matching rims. Parts Car - 1981 Honda much to list, great for $5200 firm. Civic, $350, Call $12,500 OBO. towing, $30,000 OBO. 541-317-2929. 541-419-6540 541-447-4405. 541-385-5682

Truck with Snow Plow!

Winnebago Access 31J, Class C Top-selling Companion 26’ 5th Wheel 1992, deluxe motorhome, 1-owner, model, new water non-smoker, always heater, fridge, couch, garaged, only 7,900 mi, non-smoker, $3995, auto leveling jacks, rear 503-951-0447. camera/monitor, 4 KW Gas Generator, (2) slides, queen pillow top mattress, bunk beds, (3) flat screen TVs, lots of storage, sleeps 10! Well maint., extended warranty avail. Price 2010 Cougar 276RLS, lrg reduced! Must see at slide, loaded with amenities, like new, $69,995! 541-388-7179

Chrysler Mini Van 2005, V-6 engine, fully loaded, w/tow pkg., 57K miles, blue, great cond. $10,000. 541-876-5106 Dodge Ram conversion van, 2000. 92K mi, raised roof, leather seats, entertainment system, custom lighting, sunroof, many more extras. White exterior/gray int. Great condition! $11,999. 541-504-8568

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LEGAL NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Budget NOTICE OF SEIZURE Committee Meeting FOR CIVIL The Crooked River FORFEITURE TO ALL Ranch Rural Fire POTENTIAL Protection District CLAIMANTS AND TO ALL UNKNOWN VI-503 located in Jefferson County, Or- PERSONS READ THIS CAREFULLY egon will hold a Budget Committee If you have any intermeeting on Thursday, est in the seized March 29, 2012 at property described 6:00 PM. The meetbelow, you must claim ing will be held at the that interest or you will Crooked River Ranch automatically lose that Fire Station located at interest. If you do not 6971 SW Shad Rd., file a claim for the Terrebonne, Oregon. property, the property The purpose of the may be forfeited even meeting is to receive if you are not conthe budget message victed of any crime. and take public comTo claim an interest, ment on the proyou must file a written posed budget. This is claim with the forfeia public meeting ture counsel named where deliberation of below, The written the Budget Commitclaim must be signed tee will take place. by you, sworn to unAny person may apder penalty of perjury pear at the meeting before a notary public, and discuss the proand state: (a) Your posed budget with the true name; (b) The Budget Committee. A address at which you copy of the proposed will accept future budget may be obmailings from the tained or inspected on court and forfeiture or after Thursday, counsel; and (3) A March 15, 2012 from statement that you the Crooked River have an interest in the Ranch Fire Station seized property. Your between the hours of deadline for filing the 8:00 AM and 5:00 PM. claim document with forfeiture counsel Want to impress the named below is 21 relatives? Remodel days from the last day your home with the of publication of this help of a professional notice. Where to file from The Bulletin’s a claim and for more “Call A Service information: Daina Professional” Directory Vitolins, Crook County

y District Attorney Office, 300 NE Third Street, Prineville, OR 97754. Notice of reasons for Forfeiture: The property described below was seized for forfeiture because it: (1) Constitutes the proceeds of the violation of, solicitation to violate, attempt to violate, or conspiracy to violates, the criminal laws of the State of Oregon regarding the manufacture, distribution, or possession of controlled substances (ORS Chapter475); and/or (2) Was used or intended for use in committing or facilitating the violation of, solicitation to violate, attempt to violate, or conspiracy to violate the criminal laws of the State of Oregon regarding the manufacture, distribution or possession of controlled substances (ORS Chapter 475). IN THE MATTER OF: U.S. Currency in the amount of $2,596.00, Case #11-03-8649 seized 10/12/11 from Barrett Hamilton and Michelle Murray. IN THE MATTER OF: U.S. Currency in the amount of $1,167.00, Case #11-03-4233 seized 08/22/11 from Tina Delgado.

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE The Trustee under the terms of the Trust Deed described herein, at the direction of the Beneficiary, hereby elects to sell the property described in the Trust Deed to satisfy the obligations secured thereby. Pursuant to ORS 86.745, the following information is provided: 1.PARTIES: Grantor: NORMAN D STRALEY. Trustee:FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON. Successor Trustee:NANCY K. CARY. Beneficiary:WORLD SAVINGS BANK, FSB. 2.DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: The real property is described as follows: Lot One, Block Three, ALPINE MEADOW SUBDIVISION NO. 40, Deschutes County, Oregon. 3.RECORDING. The Trust Deed was recorded as follows: Date Recorded: December 21, 2007. Recording No. 2007-65247 Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 4.DEFAULT. The Grantor or any other person obligated on the Trust Deed and Promissory Note secured thereby is in default and the Beneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed for failure to pay: Monthly payments in the amount of $1,365.69 each, due the first of each month, for the months of November 2010 through January 2012; plus late charges and advances; plus any unpaid real property taxes or liens, plus interest. 5.AMOUNT DUE. The amount due on the Note which is secured by the Trust Deed referred to herein is: Principal balance in the amount of $295,652.94; plus interest at an adjustable rate pursuant to the terms of the Promissory Note from October 1, 2010; plus late charges of $1,080.63; plus advances and foreclosure attorney fees and costs. 6. SALE OF PROPERTY. The Trustee hereby states that the property will be sold to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed. A Trustee's Notice of Default and Election to Sell Under Terms of Trust Deed has been recorded in the Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 7. TIME OF SALE. Date:May 24, 2012. Time:11:00 a.m. Place:Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon. 8.RIGHT TO REINSTATE. Any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the Trustee conducts the sale, to have this foreclosure dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, by curing any other default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed and by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with the trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amount provided in ORS 86.753. You may reach the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at 503-684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be available if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.org. Any questions regarding this matter should be directed to Lisa Summers, Paralegal, (541) 686-0344 (TS #17368.30900). DATED: January 11, 2012. /s/ Nancy K. Cary. Nancy K. Cary, Successor Trustee, Hershner Hunter, LLP, P.O. Box 1475, Eugene, OR 97440. 1000

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE The Trustee under the terms of the Trust Deed described herein, at the direction of the Beneficiary, hereby elects to sell the property described in the Trust Deed to satisfy the obligations secured thereby. Pursuant to ORS 86.745, the following information is provided: 1.PARTIES: Grantor: DEWEY CUMMINS AND GWENDOLYN SUE CUMMINS; DEWEY CUMMINS AND GWENDOLYN SUE CUMMINS, TRUSTEES OF THE DEWEY CUMMINS AND GWENDOLYN SUE CUMMINS FAMILY TRUST, EXECUTED THE 8 DAY OF JUNE, 2006. Trustee:AMERITITLE. Successor Trustee:NANCY K. CARY. Beneficiary:SELCO COMMUNITY CREDIT UNION. 2.DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: The real property is described as follows: As described in the attached Exhibit A. EXHIBIT A: PARCEL 1: Being a portion of the Southwest One-Quarter of the Northwest One-Quarter (SW 1/4NW1/4) of Section Twenty-One (21), Township Seventeen (17) South, Range Thirteen (13), East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, being more particularly described as follows: Beginning at the West Quarter (W1/4) corner to Section Twenty-One (21), Township Seventeen (17) South, Range Thirteen (13), East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon; thence North 89°58’32” East, 390.00 feet along the East-West Midsection line of said Section 21, also the centerline of Nelson Road; thence North 00°12’42” East, 30.00 feet to the true point to the East line of the SW1/4NW1/4 of said Section 2; thence South 00°12’42” East, 651.15 feet; thence North 89°54’25” East, 928.74 feet to the East line of the SW1/4NW1/4 of said Section 21; thence South 00°08’34” West, 217.29 feet; thence South 89°58’32” West, 470.00 feet; thence South 00°08’34” West, 435.00 feet to the North right of way of Nelson Road; three (3) feet of said parcel as an easement for irrigation ditch purposes. Parcel 2: The Southwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter (SW1/4SE1/4NW1/4) located in Section Twenty-one (21), Township Seventeen (17) South, Range Thirteen (13) East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon. 3.RECORDING. The Trust Deed was recorded as follows: Date Recorded: May 23, 2007. Recording No.: 2007-29094 Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 4.DEFAULT. The Grantor or any other person obligated on the Trust Deed and Promissory Note secured thereby is in default and the Beneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed for failure to pay: Interest only payments due the twenty-fifth of each month, for June 25, 2011 in the amount of $571.19, July 25, 2011 in the amount of $552.77, August 25, 2011 in the amount of $571.19, September 25, 2011 in the amount of $571.19, October 25, 2011 in the amount of $552.77, November 25, 2011 in the amount of $571.25, and December 25, 2011 in the amount of $553.05; plus interest only payments due on the twenty-fifth of each month thereafter calculated at an adjustable rate as set forth in the loan documents; plus late charges and advances; plus any unpaid real property taxes or liens, plus interest. 5.AMOUNT DUE. The amount due on the Note which is secured by the Trust Deed referred to herein is: Principal balance in the amount of $192,251.67; plus interest at the rate of 3.500% from December 25, 2011; plus late charges of $60.00; plus advances and foreclosure attorney fees and costs. 6.SALE OF PROPERTY. The Trustee hereby states that the property will be sold to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed. A Trustee's Notice of Default and Election to Sell Under Terms of Trust Deed has been recorded in the Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 7.TIME OF SALE. Date:May 24, 2012. Time:11:00 a.m. Place:Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon. 8.RIGHT TO REINSTATE. Any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the Trustee conducts the sale, to have this foreclosure dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, by curing any other default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed and by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with the trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amount provided in ORS 86.753. You may reach the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at 503-684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be available if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.org. Any questions regarding this matter should be directed to Lisa Summers, Paralegal, (541) 686-0344 (TS #18316.30023). DATED: January 11, 2012. /s/ Nancy K. Cary. Nancy K. Cary, Successor Trustee, Hershner Hunter, LLP, P.O. Box 1475, Eugene, OR 97440.


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2012 G5

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Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Joshua R. Clawson and Alisha R. Clawson, as tenants by the entirety, as grantor to AmeriTitle, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, FA, as Beneficiary, dated June 19, 2006, recorded June 23, 2006, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2006, at Page 43348, beneficial interest now held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor in interest by purchase from the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver of Washington Mutual Bank, formerly known as Washington Mutual Bank, FA as covering the following described real property: Lot One (1), Block One (1), Diamond "A", Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 61210 Sarah Drive, Bend, OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $2,197.61, from March 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $359,979.22, together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.4% per annum from February 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on June 19, 2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 02/14/2012

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by R. Scott Dahlen and Ann R. Dahlen, as tenants by the entirety, as grantor, whose mailing address is 64585 Old Bend Redmond Highway, Bend, OR 97701, to First American Title, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, FA, as Beneficiary, dated January 29, 2007, recorded February 2, 2007, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2007, at Page 07117, beneficial interest now held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor in interest by purchase from the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver for Washington Mutual Bank, formerly known as Washington Mutual Bank, FA, whose address is 1111 Polaris Parkway, Columbus, OH 43240, as covering the following described real property: See complete Legal Description attached hereto as Exhibit "A". COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 63715 O B Riley Road, Bend, OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $3,047.97, from May 1, 2010, monthly payments in the sum of $3,863.20, from January 1, 2011, and monthly payments in the sum of $3,291.35, from January 1, 2012, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $380,290.63, together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.25% per annum from April 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on June 14, 2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt.

By: /s/:Kelly D. Sutherland KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 1499 SE Tech Center Place, Suite 255 Vancouver, WA 98683 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 10-105947 1000

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Lori Hill, as grantor, whose address is 7070 N.W. Grubstake Way, Redmond, OR 97756, to AmeriTitle, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, FA, as Beneficiary, dated September 10, 2007, recorded September 14, 2007, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2007, at Page 50018, beneficial interest now held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor in interest by purchase from the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver for Washington Mutual Bank, formerly known as Washington Mutual Bank, FA, whose address is 1111 Polaris Parkway, Columbus, OH 43240, as covering the following described real property: See complete Legal Description attached hereto as Exhibit "A". COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 7070 N.W. Grubstake Way, Redmond, OR 97756. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $1,985.43, from December 1, 2010, and monthly payments in the sum of $1,951.79, from March 1, 2011, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $264,844.25, together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.5% per annum from November 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on June 14, 2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Nathan M. Green, as grantor, whose address is 2684 N.E. Jones Road, Bend, OR 97701, to First American Title, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, FA, as Beneficiary, dated January 16, 2007, recorded January 22, 2007, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2007, at Page 03729, beneficial interest now held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor in interest by purchase from the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver for Washington Mutual Bank, formerly known as Washington Mutual Bank, FA, whose address is 1111 Polaris Parkway, Columbus, OH 43240, as covering the following described real property: See complete legal description attached hereto as Exhibit "A". COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 2684 N.E. Jones Road, Bend, OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $1,260.97, from June 1, 2010, monthly payments in the sum of $1,263.88, from August 1, 2010, and monthly payments in the sum of $1,254.10, from August 1, 2011, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $209,608.51, together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.125% per annum from May 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on June 18, 2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt.

Dated: 02/09/2012

Dated: 02/14/2012

By: /s/:Kelly D. Sutherland KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 1499 SE Tech Center Place, Suite 255 Vancouver, WA 98683 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 10-105181

By: /s/:Kelly D. Sutherland KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 1499 SE Tech Center Place, Suite 255 Vancouver, WA 98683 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 10-105297

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Kelly Kennedy, an unmarried individual, as grantor, whose mailing address is 1754 15th Street Apt#3, Santa Monica, CA 90404, to AmeriTitle, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, FA, as Beneficiary, dated May 24, 2007, recorded June 11, 2007, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2007, at Page 32694, beneficial interest now held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor in interest by purchase from the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver for Washington Mutual Bank, formerly known as Washington Mutual Bank, FA, whose address is 1111 Polaris Parkway, Columbus, OH 43240, as covering the following described real property: Lot 4, Block 7, of Deschutes, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon.. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 730 N.W. Colorado Avenue, Bend, OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $1,169.60, from October 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $199,577.79, together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.375% per annum from September 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on June 15, 2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Keith Leitz and Catherine Leitz, as tenants by the entirety, as grantor, whose address is 19965 Pinewood Road, Bend, OR 97702, to AmeriTitle, as Trustee, in favor of American General Financial Services (DE), Inc., as Beneficiary, dated February 9, 2007, recorded February 14, 2007, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2007, at Page 09447, beneficial interest now held by Springleaf Financial Services, Inc., formerly known as American General Financial Services, Inc., d/b/a American General Financial Services (DE), Inc., whose address is 601 NW Second Street, Evansville, IN 47708, as covering the following described real property: Lot Seven (7), Block (6), Woodriver Village, Deschutes County, Oregon.. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 19965 Pinewood Road, Bend, OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $659.47, from June 15, 2011, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $110,963.51, together with interest thereon at the rate of 2.25% per annum from May 15, 2011, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on May 22, 2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt.

Dated: 02/09/2012 By: /s/:Kelly D. Sutherland KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 1499 SE Tech Center Place, Suite 255 Vancouver, WA 98683 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 11-10634

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Dated: 02/10/2012

Dated: 01/19/2012

By: /s/:Kelly D. Sutherland KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 1499 SE Tech Center Place, Suite 255 Vancouver, WA 98683 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 11-106089

By: /s/:Kelly D. Sutherland KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 1499 SE Tech Center Place, Suite 255 Vancouver, WA 98683 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 10-104759

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by SYNERGY GLOBAL TRANSPORTATION, LLC (nka SG TRANSPORTATION, LLC), as Grantor, to WELLS FARGO FINANCIAL NATIONAL BANK, as Trustee, in favor of WELLS FARGO BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, as Beneficiary, dated June 12, 2006, recorded June 14, 2006, in the Records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Volume 2006 at page 41047, and as Instrument No. 2006-41047, covering the following described real property: Lot 8 in Block 26 of TOWNSITE OF REDMOND, Deschutes County, EXCEPT the South 2 inches of Lot 8, Commonly known as 341 SW 6th Street, Redmond, Oregon, 97756. The Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed, and Notice of Default was recorded pursuant to ORS 86.735(3). The default for which the foreclosure is made is the Grantor's failure to pay: 1. Monthly payments in the amount of $2,098.37 from November 2010 until present; 2. Accelerated balance upon demand in February 2011 based on monthly payment default, closing of business and letting premises to another party ($282,623.85 as of 2/25/2011); and 3. Real property taxes due to Deschutes County November 2010 ($3,392.24) and November 2011 ($2,564.77). Due to the default described above, the Beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: A. Principal = $273,568.13, plus interest at the rate of 12.960% per annum from 3/12/2011 until paid in full; B. Accrued Interest through 3/11/2011 = $10,008.95; C. Accrued Late Charges through 3/11/2011 = $314.75, together with monthly late charges on the 30th of each month at the rate of $104.92 per month; and D. Beneficiary's costs, expenses and attorney fees incurred enforcing the loan agreement with Grantor. NOTICE: The undersigned trustee, on March 29, 2012, at 11:00 a.m., in accordance with ORS 187.110, on the Front Steps of the RiverPointe One Building (Offices of Karnopp Petersen LLP), 1201 NW Wall Street, the City of Bend, the County of Deschutes, the State of Oregon, will sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the real property described above which the Grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of said trust deed, together with any interest that the Grantor or Grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of the sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. NOTICE: Any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee and attorney fees not exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753, and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under said trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter; singular includes the plural; the word "Grantor" includes any successor in interest to the Grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by the trust deed; and the words "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. DATED this 23RD day of November, 2011. /s/ Tamara MacLeod. Tamara MacLeod, Karnopp Petersen LLP, Successor Trustee, tem@karnopp.com, 1201 NW Wall Street, Bend, OR 97701, TEL: (541) 382-3011 FAX: (541) 383-3073. STATE OF Oregon, County of Deschutes ) ss. I, the undersigned, certify that I am the duly appointed Successor Trustee and one of the attorneys for the above-named Beneficiary and that the foregoing is a complete and exact copy of the original Trustee's Notice of Sale. /s/ Tamara MacLeod. Tamara MacLeod, Successor Trustee and Attorney for Beneficiary.

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Randal M. Gordon and Erica A. Gordon, as tenants by the entirety, as grantor, whose mailing address is 103 S. 2nd Avenue, Walla Walla, WA 99362, to AmeriTitle, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, FA, as Beneficiary, dated October 26, 2007, recorded November 5, 2007, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2007, at Page 58377, beneficial interest now held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor in interest by purchase from the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver for Washington Mutual Bank, formerly known as Washington Mutual Bank, FA as, whose address is 1111 Polaris Parkway, Columbus, OH 43240, covering the following described real property: Lot Thirty-Three (33), Block 6 (Six), LAZY RIVER SOUTH FIRST ADDITION, Deschutes County, Oregon.. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 53474 Bridge Drive, La Pine, OR 97739. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $2,300.67, from May 1, 2010, monthly payments in the sum of $2,393.53, from July 1, 2010, and monthly payments in the sum of $2,333.18, from July 1, 2011, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $417,000.00, together with interest thereon at the rate of 6% per annum from April 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on June 14, 2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 02/09/2012 By: /s/:Kelly D. Sutherland KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 1499 SE Tech Center Place, Suite 255 Vancouver, WA 98683 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 10-105194

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by H. Dean Ginn and Viola C. Ginn, as tenants by the entirety, as grantor, whose mailing address is 251 11th Avenue E., Seattle, WA 98102, to Western Title Company, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, FA, as Beneficiary, dated January 30, 2007, recorded February 5, 2007, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2007, at Page 07419, beneficial interest now held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor in interest by purchase from the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver for Washington Mutual Bank, formerly known as Washington Mutual Bank, FA, whose address is 1111 Polaris Parkway, Columbus, OH 43240, as covering the following described real property: Lot 16, Block 14, Oregon Water Wonderland Unit 2, Deschutes County, Oregon.. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 55693 Swan Road, Bend, OR 97707. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $772.77, from August 1, 2010, and monthly payments in the sum of $759.66, from February 1, 2011, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $120,000.00, together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.75% per annum from July 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on June 14, 2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 02/07/2012 By: /s/:Kelly D. Sutherland KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 1499 SE Tech Center Place, Suite 255 Vancouver, WA 98683 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 10-105893

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.: OR-11-484845-SH Reference is made to that certain deed made by MARSHA GROSS, AN UNMARRIED PERSON, as Grantor to FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE CO., as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., ("MERS") AS NOMINEE FOR COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 12/8/2004, recorded 12/17/2004, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book / reel / volume number fee / file / instrument / microfile / reception number 2004-75343, , covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 194470 LOT 35, SUNPOINTE, PHASE III, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 21378 PUFFIN DRIVE, BEND, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantors: The installments of principal and interest which became due on 5/1/2011, and all subsequent installments of principal and interest through the date of this Notice, plus amounts that are due for late charges, delinquent property taxes, insurance premiums, advances made on senior liens, taxes and/or insurance, trustee's fees, and any attorney fees and court costs arising from or associated with the beneficiaries efforts to protect and preserve its security, all of which must be paid as a condition of reinstatement, including all sums that shall accrue through reinstatement or pay-off. Nothing in this notice shall be construed as a waiver of any fees owing to the Beneficiary under the Deed of Trust pursuant to the terms of the loan documents. Monthly Payment $596.38 Monthly Late Charge $29.82 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $170,923.37 together with interest thereon at the rate of 2.0000 per annum from 4/1/2011 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that Quality Loan Service Corporation of Washington, the undersigned trustee will on 6/22/2012 at the hour of 11:00:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W. BOND STREET, BEND, OR County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. For Sale Information Call: 714-730-2727 or Login to: www.lpsasap.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Pursuant to Oregon Law, this sale will not be deemed final until the Trustee's deed has been issued by Quality Loan Service Corporation of Washington. If there are any irregularities discovered within 10 days of the date of this sale, that the trustee will rescind the sale, return the buyer's money and take further action as necessary. If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser's sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary's Agent, or the Beneficiary's Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right's against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: 2/14/2012 Quality Loan Service Corporation of Washington, as trustee Signature By: Brooke Frank, Assistant Secretary Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington c/o Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 For Non-Sale Information: Quality Loan Service Corporation of Washington c/o Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 Fax: 619-645-7716 ASAP# FNMA4199858 02/23/2012, 03/01/2012, 03/08/2012, 03/15/2012

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxx9084 T.S. No.: 1351275-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Darren J. Smith, A Married Man As His Sole and Separate Property, as Grantor to Amerititle, as Trustee, in favor of First Franklin A Division of Nat. City Bank Of In, as Beneficiary, dated June 08, 2005, recorded June 13, 2005, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2005-36699 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: The Southeast Quarter Of The Northwest Quarter Of The Southeast Quarter Of Section 20, Township 16 South, Range 12, East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 20295 Birdsong Lane Bend OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due January 1, 2009 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,944.33 Monthly Late Charge $.00. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $291,649.02 together with interest thereon at 8.000% per annum from December 01, 2008 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on June 18, 2012 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: February 09, 2012. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-404493 03/15, 03/22, 03/29, 04/05

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Gary L. Marlow And Maxine H. Marlow, not personally but as Trustees on behalf of Marlow Living Trust, as Grantor, to First American Title, as Trustee, in favor of NORTHRIM BANK, as Beneficiary, dated April 4, 2007, recorded April 5, 200711, in the Records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Volume # 2007 at Page 19699 and as Instrument No. 2007-19699, covering the following described real property: See Exhibit A, commonly known as 1050 Highway 97 South, Bend, Oregon. Exhibit “A” Real property in the County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, described as follows: PARCEL I: THAT PART OF TRACT 23 OF VIRGINIA PARK, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCING AT A POINT 350.16 FEET NORTHERLY ON THE WESTERLY LINE OF SAID TRACT FROM THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SAID TRACT AND RUNNING THENCE EAST AND PARALLEL TO THE NORTH LINE OF SAID TRACT TO THE EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF THE DALLES-CALIFORNIA HIGHWAY BEING THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING OF THE TRACT HEREIN CONVEYED; THENCE CONTINUING EAST AND PARALLEL TO THE NORTH LINE OF SAID TRACT, A DISTANCE OF 150.0 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE NORTH AT RIGHT ANGLES, A DISTANCE OF 125.0 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE WEST AT RIGHT ANGLES, TO AN INTERSECTION WITH THE EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF THE DALLES-CALIFORNIA HIGHWAY; THENCE SOUTHERLY ALONG THE EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF THE DALLES-CALIFORNIA HIGHWAY TO The TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING. EXCEPTING THEREFROM THAT PORTION OF THE HEREIN DESCRIBED PROPERTY DEEDED TO THE STATE OF OREGON, BY AND THROUGH ITS DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION, HIGHWAY DIVISION IN DEED RECORDED OCTOBER 2, 1978, IN BOOK 284, PAGE 459, DESCHUTES COUNTY DEED RECORDS. PARCEL II: THAT PART OF TRACT 23 OF VIRGINIA PARK, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCING AT A POINT 350.16 FEET NORTHERLY ON THE WESTERLY LINE OF SAID TRACT FROM THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SAID TRACT AND RUNNING THENCE EAST AND PARALLEL TO THE NORTH LINE OF SAID TRACT TO THE EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF THE DALLES-CALIFORNIA HIGHWAY; THENCE CONTINUING EAST AND PARALLEL TO THE NORTH LINE OF SAID TRACT, A DISTANCE OF 200 FEET TO The TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE NORTH AT RIGHT ANGLES A DISTANCE OF 125.0 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE EAST 50.0 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE SOUTH 125.0 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE WEST TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL III: THAT PART OF TRACT 23 OF VIRGINIA PARK, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCING AT A POINT 350.16 FEET NORTHERLY ON THE WESTERLY LINE OF SAID TRACT FROM THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SAID TRACT AND RUNNING THENCE EAST AND PARALLEL TO THE NORTH LINE OF SAID TRACT TO THE EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF THE DALLES-CALIFORNIA HIGHWAY; THENCE CONTINUING EAST AND PARALLEL TO THE NORTH LINE OF SAID TRACT A DISTANCE OF 150 FEET TO THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE NORTH AT RIGHT ANGLES A DISTANCE OF 125.0 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE EAST 50.0 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE SOUTH 125.0 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE WEST TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; RESERVING A NON-EXCLUSIVE EASEMENT FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS TO THE EASTERLY PORTION OF TRACT 23 OVER AND ACROSS THE NORTH 15 FEET OF THIS PROPERTY. NOTE: This legal description was created prior to January 1, 2008. Tax Parcel Number: 119593, 119592 and 119591. The Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed, and Notice of Default was recorded pursuant to ORS 86.735(3). The default for which the foreclosure is made is the Grantor's: 1.Failure to pay when due the monthly payments under Grantor's Loan Forbearance Agreement with Beneficiary dated August 16, 2010 (monthly payments in the amount of $3,000 from November 2010 to present); 2.Failure to pay when due the Late and Other Charges from November 2010 to present; and 3.Breach of the Loan Forbearance Agreement related to other loan obligations owing from Grantor to Beneficiary. Due to the default described above, the Beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: A. Principal = $271,308.45, plus interest at the rate of 13.0% per annum from 2/11/2011 until paid in full; B. Accrued Interest through 2/01/2011 = $51,900.03; C. Accrued Late and Other Charges through 2/10/2011 = $3,996.17, together with monthly late charges on the 20th of each month at the rate of $100.00 per month; and D. Beneficiary's costs and expenses incurred enforcing the loan agreement with Grantor, including reasonable attorney fees. NOTICE: The undersigned trustee, on March 29, 2012, at 11:00 a.m., in accordance with ORS 187.110, on the Front Steps of the RiverPointe One Building (Offices of Karnopp Petersen LLP), 1201 NW Wall Street, the City of Bend, the County of Deschutes, the State of Oregon, will sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the real property described above which the Grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of said trust deed, together with any interest that the Grantor or Grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of the sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. NOTICE: Any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee and attorney fees not exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753, and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under said trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter; singular includes the plural; the word "Grantor" includes any successor in interest to the Grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by the trust deed; and the words "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. DATED this 23rd day of November, 2011. /s/ Tamara MacLeod. Tamara MacLeod, Karnopp Petersen LLP, Successor Trustee, tem@karnopp.com, 1201 NW Wall Street, Bend, OR 97701, TEL: (541) 382-3011 FAX: (541) 383-3073. STATE OF Oregon, County of Deschutes ) ss. I, the undersigned, certify that I am the duly appointed Successor Trustee and one of the attorneys for the above-named Beneficiary and that the foregoing is a complete and exact copy of the original Trustee's Notice of Sale. /s/ Tamara MacLeod. Tamara MacLeod, Successor Trustee and Attorney for Beneficiary.


Bulletin Daily Paper 03/15/12