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FEBRUARY 8, 2012

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State bar to take over local lawyer’s office

Bend’s DMV is staying put 20

The Bulletin

Deschutes County Circuit Court has agreed to give the Oregon State Bar control of a Bend lawyer’s office following allegations by nearly 20 clients that he’s bilked them out of hundreds of thousands of dollars. Bryan Gruetter has offices in Portland and Bend, where he’s practiced since 1986. His

In Redmond, longtime effort to rezone land may pay off

office specializes in serious personal injury, insurance disputes, and fire loss and wrongful death cases. According to Oregon State Bar spokeswoman Kateri Walsh, the circuit court on Feb. 3 issued an order, requested by the bar, assuming custodianship of Gruetter’s firm and appointing the bar to handle the takeover. See Gruetter / A4

. Ri O.B le y R d.

By Sheila G. Miller

• The 16-month search for a new site was marked by controversy

97

Permanent location of Department of Motor Vehicles 20

Empire Ave.

Sherman Rd. Mervin 97 Sampels Rd. BUS

BEND

97 Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

By Nick Grube The Bulletin

Bend’s DMV isn’t going anywhere. After 16 months of sometimes heated debate, it’s staying right where it is. On Tuesday, the Oregon Department of Transportation announced the DMV would continue to operate at its northside location off U.S. Highway 97, which is the for-

mer site of the Bend Visitors Center. While the Highway 97 site wasn’t the state’s first option, ODOT Spokesman Dave Thompson said it became the best choice after considering everything from cost to community input. It’s also located next to other ODOT facilities, such as the agency’s Region 4 headquarters.

REDMOND

After crash, sorrow ... but few answers

By Lauren Dake The Bulletin

SALEM — One day last November, a pair of state senators boarded a bus and headed toward 465 acres of undeveloped land in Redmond. One of them was Bend Republican Chris Telfer, and the other was Springfield Democrat Lee Beyer, whose first thought upon seeing the property was, “Central Oregon is in a unique position and wellpositioned for growth.” Problem is, the juniper-spotted expanse near the IN city’s airport is SALEM zoned for open park and recreation use. Local officials have sought for more than a decade to rezone the land for light industrial use, an effort that’s consistent with a statewide push to increase the supply of industrial land. But the effort has been thwarted, in part, by costly state regulations. That might soon change thanks to Telfer and Beyer, who chairs the Senate Business, Transportation and Economic Development Committee. On Tuesday, his panel approved a measure that would rezone the property. See Redmond / A5

CAMPAIGN: Santorum’s wins shake up race, A3 TODAY’S WEATHER Mostly cloudy High 52, Low 27 Page C6

Battle over gay marriage heats up across U.S. By Ricardo Lopez Los Angeles Times

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

Redmond Proficiency Academy students Sierra Wideman, 17, and Josiah Sutphin, 15 (from left), Elton Gregory eighth-grader Cody Wideman, 13, Redmond High student Taylor Baca, 16, and Samantha Wideman, 19, share their grief during a visit to a makeshift memorial on U.S. Highway 97 in Redmond on Tuesday, marking the spot where Redmond teens Tara Goad, 16, and Tirisa Tucker, 15, were killed Monday morning.

• For now, the cause of a collision that killed 2 local teens remains a mystery By Scott Hammers The Bulletin

TOP NEWS

“We’ve come to the conclusion that it’s best under the guidelines of the state as well as the cost determinations to stay were we are,” Thompson said. “We really did our homework to see that this is not only the best deal in the long term, but that it meets the other goal the state has for trying to co-locate facilities.” See DMV / A4

It could be weeks before the cause of a Monday morning crash that killed two Redmond high school students and injured three others is known, Redmond Police said Tuesday. Lt. Nathan Garibay said his department was not yet prepared to release additional information about the crash that killed Tara Goad, a 16-year-old junior at the Redmond Proficiency Academy, and Tirisa Tucker, a 15-year-old freshman at

Redmond High School. Monday, police said Goad was driving north on U.S. Highway 97 in Redmond with Tucker in the passenger seat when she lost control and crossed the median into southbound traffic about 7 a.m. A southbound Ford Explorer driven by Tim Messner, 17, a junior at the high school, struck Goad’s Toyota Tercel on the passenger side. Both girls died at the scene. Messner and two 16-year-old boys riding in his vehicle were taken to St. Charles Redmond for treatment

of non-life-threatening injuries. The driver of a third vehicle struck by Goad’s and Messner’s vehicles was not injured. Garibay said Oregon State Police will help Redmond Police investigate the crash. At Redmond High School and at the Redmond Proficiency Academy, a district charter school next door, counselors from the Tri-County School Response Team worked Monday and Tuesday with students affected by the crash. See Crash / A4

LOS ANGELES — Gay marriage measures are moving forward in the states of Washington, New Jersey and Maryland, but neither activists for nor against same-sex unions are considering those outcomes to be done deals. And even as they brace themselves for ongoing fights Related in those states, • Appeals supporters and court opponents of strikes gay marriage down are preparing Califorfor other battles nia’s that are heating ban on up across the same-sex country. marriage, The battles A5 are occurring not just in statehouses, but also on the streets. With lawmakers considering expansions of the right to marry, activists are working to amend some state constitutions to define marriage as being between one man and one woman. Meanwhile, public opinion on the matter appears to be changing. In May, a Gallup poll showed that, for the first time, a majority of Americans approved of gay marriage. In that survey, 53 percent of respondents said they approved of same-sex marriages, while 45 percent disapproved. Here’s a national roundup of legislation and upcoming or pending ballot initiatives, according to the Human Rights Campaign, a gay marriage advocacy group that tracks legislation and related efforts nationally. See Marriage / A5

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Down but not out, sailor is determined to finish his odyssey By Dave Sheinin The Washington Post

By now, about 20,000 miles into this audacious odyssey, nearly everything onboard Matt Rutherford’s boat is either flat-out busted, rotted through, waterlogged beyond repair or otherwise reduced to ballast. He’s down to one pair of pants, the rest having fallen victim to a black mold infesta-

tion that also cost him every last book he had carried on board, way back in June 2011, when he set out from Annapolis, Md., on this half-crazy mission to circumnavigate the Americas alone and non-stop. The four solar panels he had hooked up to power his electronics? Busted, one by one. His freighter radar, which alerts him to any huge ships bearing down on his

little speck-in-the-ocean of a sailboat? Destroyed. His shotgun is half-rusted and may or may not be capable of shooting, but that’s not important anymore. The shotgun was for one purpose: fending off polar bears in the Northwest Passage, in the event he became iced in, marooned until the following summer’s thaw. See Sailor / A4

Sailor Matt Rutherfordset out from Annapolis, Md., in June 2011 on a quest to circumnavigate the Americas alone and non-stop. Courtesy of Matt Rutherford


THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2012

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• The Greek government will hold a meeting, which was postponed for two days, on the country’s new austerity measures. • A hearing is scheduled in a case against Pakistan’s Inter-Services Intelligence Directorate. • State economists release the latest revenue forecast, giving lawmakers a clearer picture of how much budget-cutting will be necessary. • Tibetan government-in-exile calls for a day of solidarity after recent violence in Tibetan areas.

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The dragon and tiger dance, celebrating the Lunar New Year, is performed at Hsi Lai Temple in Hacienda Heights, Calif., on Jan. 23.

The Year of the Dragon also the year of the baby • Many Asian communities have retained traditional belief that it’s an auspicious sign By Rosanna Xia Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — Taiko and Gemma Chen may not celebrate all 15 days of the lunar new year, nor do they believe they are sweeping away prosperity by cleaning the house. But there is one centuries-old tradition the AsianAmerican couple still swears by: having a baby in the Year of the Dragon, considered the most auspicious year in the 12-year zodiac cycle. “We’re both dragons ourselves,” said Gemma Chen, “so three dragons in the family would be really, really lucky. And we’re 36, so we can’t wait another 12 years.” In Chinese, Vietnamese and other Asian communities across the world, it is widely accepted as fact that each dragon year brings a new wave of dedicated families eager for a “dragon baby.” Every 12 years, media in China and southeast Asia report a surge in birthrates, with some maternity wards limiting the number of patients they accept for the year. Even in the United States,

the allure of the dragon baby still holds for many families. “We’ve had a 250 percent increase in Chinese, Vietnamese clients in the last two months,” said Kathryn Kaycoff Manos, co-founder of Global IVF and Agency for Surrogacy Solutions in Los Angeles.

A cultural trend Kaycoff Manos said she had never seen a cultural trend like this before. “When I met a client about a year ago, they told us, ‘We only want a baby in the Year of the Dragon,’ ” she said. “We sort of put that on the back burner, but suddenly we were getting all these phone calls from Asian clients. At first we thought it was because the economy was getting better. Now we understand.” Obstetricians and fertility centers in Greater Los Angeles, particularly in the San Gabriel Valley, have also noted an increasing number of Asian-American patients planning to have babies this year. Some centers have found ways to prepare specifically

for the dragon baby boom. Kaycoff Manos’ company created the Dragon Baby Special, a personalized service that helps Chinese clients deliver babies in time through in vitro fertilization or surrogacy, connecting with bilingual fertility clinics and hiring Chinese translators. Gemma Chen said she was at a good point in her career as a pharmacist and began planning in October for a child. The superstitious couple from Temple City asked that they be identified by their nicknames because they did not want to jinx the pregnancy. She hopes that her dragon baby, due in late fall, will be born with the brightest future possible. “A lot of times, when we look at successful people — co-workers, friends — they tend to be dragons,” her husband said. “Who knows if it’s coincidence?”

A unifying story Although most ancient superstitions have disappeared from the conscience of second- and third-generation Asian-Americans, the belief that the Year of the Dragon is lucky has persisted. The dragon legend has remained consistent and has

been passed down since early in Asian history, said Rick Chiu, a cultural presenter at the American Hakka Center in El Monte. “It’s one of the few unifying stories in all of Asia,” he said in Mandarin. “China, Vietnam, Korea — there are political and geographic differences today, but the deep cultural history is all the same.” According to legend, the wife of the earliest emperor could not carry a child. She finally gave birth to a son who was a descendant of the dragon, brought to Earth to rule mankind. From then on, all people in the ancient Chinese kingdom considered themselves children of the dragon. The dragon is the only mythical creature in the Asian zodiac, a cycle that features 12 animals that embody unique characteristics — a dog is shy but loyal; a tiger aggressive and difficult to get along with. The dragon can swim and fly, traversing the seas as well as heaven. This symbolizes a life with no obstacles. Parents hope a dragon baby will have a better chance of becoming a leader, a modernday emperor. The child’s success in turn brings good fortune to the entire family.

Highlights: On Feb. 8, 1587, Mary, Queen of Scots was beheaded at Fotheringhay Castle in England after she was implicated in a plot to murder her cousin, Queen Elizabeth I. In 1693, a charter was granted for the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg in the Virginia Colony. In 1942, during World War II, Japanese forces began invading Singapore, which fell a week later. In 1952, Queen Elizabeth II proclaimed her accession to the British throne following the death of her father, King George VI. In 1968, three college students were killed in a confrontation with highway patrolmen in Orangeburg, S.C., during a civil rights protest against a whites-only bowling alley. Ten years ago: The Winter Olympics opened in Salt Lake City with an emotional tribute to America’s heroes, from the pioneers of the West to past Olympic champions to the thousands who’d perished on Sept. 11. The Taliban’s foreign minister (Mullah Abdul Wakil Muttawakil) turned himself in to authorities in Afghanistan. Five years ago: Model, actress and tabloid sensation Anna Nicole Smith died in Florida at age 39 of an accidental drug overdose. Rival Palestinian leaders signed an agreement on a power-sharing government at Saudi-brokered talks in Mecca. One year ago: Wael Ghonim, a Google executive who’d helped ignite Egypt’s uprising, appeared before protesters in Cairo’s Tahrir Square for the first time after being released from detention; he told them, “We won’t give up.”

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NEWS Q&A

Teaching a computer to predict hit songs By Amina Khan Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — The anatomy of a hit song has remained a mystery to researchers looking to dissect what makes some songs soar to the top of the charts and others land with an embarrassing flop. Thus far, figuring out what qualities may link very different anthems — say, Adele’s “Rolling in the Deep” and LMFAO’s “Sexy and I Know It” — has been more a matter of alchemy than science. Now European researchers are challenging that notion. Using 50 years’ worth of hit songs on Britain’s top 40 charts, they’ve come up with a computer program that can predict whether a song will catch fire on the airwaves or fizzle out. They’ve even built an app that allows songwriters and music fans to gauge whether their favorites have hit potential. Project leader Tijl De Bie, a senior lecturer in artificial intelligence at the University of Bristol in England, discussed the group’s research, which was presented in Spain in December at the MML 2011 4th International Workshop on Machine Learning and Music: Learning from Musical Structure.

You used artificial intelliQ: gence to devise an equation that could predict which songs made it to the top of the charts. How does it work? To predict the hit potential of a given song, we used a computer to quantify how similar it is to previous “hits” and “flops.” Time frame is important: If you’re scoring a song from today, then we will consider the songs in 2011 more important than the songs in the ’60s. We represent each song using a set of 23 different features that characterize the audio. Some are very simple features — such as how fast it is, how long the song is — and some are more complex features, such as how energetic the song is, how loud it is, how danceable and how stable the beat is throughout the song. We also took into account the highest rank that songs ever achieved on the chart. The computer can combine a song’s features in an equation that can be used to score any given song. We can then evaluate how accurately the computer scored it by seeing how well the song actually did. Every single week now we’re updating our equation based on

A:

how recent releases have done on the chart. So the equation will continue to evolve, because music tastes will evolve as well.

Q: A:

Any good examples of the computer guessing correctly? Wiley’s “Wearing My Rolex” did well, strongly based on loudness. So that was an expected hit. It went to No. 2 in 2008. Gnarls Barkley’s “Crazy,” which went to No. 1 in 2006, scored well thanks to its danceability, among other things. Elvis Presley’s “Suspicious Minds,” which went to No. 2 in 1970, had a fairly simple harmonic movement, which at that time was a good thing if you wanted to score a hit.

Did you notice any trends Q: through the different musical eras, from the ’60s to now? Yes, I would say so. A: Danceability was not important in distinguishing top and bottom songs until the late ’70s. But from 1980 it became really important, maybe in relation to the rise of disco, electronic dance music and other later music. From the late 1980s, the songs at the top became rela-

tively harmonically more complex than songs at the bottom. Before that time, songs on the top tended to be harmonically simpler. That’s quite interesting, because somehow the opposite is true for rhythm. Nowadays (since the late ’80s), simple binary rhythms tend to give a better guarantee to success than complex rhythms, and before it was generally the other way around. Loudness is increasing, on average, for all songs on the chart. And it is relatively higher near the top compared with the bottom. Of course, this can’t continue — it must plateau or decrease at some point. Recently it seems that this loudness trend is perhaps even reversing, but it’s a bit early to tell that.

Today’s Birthdays: Newscaster Ted Koppel is 72. Actor Nick Nolte is 71. Comedian Robert Klein is 70. Actress Mary Steenburgen is 59. Author John Grisham is 57. Rock singer Vince Neil (Motley Crue) is 51. Actor Seth Green is 38. Rock musician Phoenix (Linkin Park) is 35. Actress Karle Warren (“Judging Amy”) is 20. — From wire reports

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WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

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Obama tries to ease ire over contraception rule Scores still missing in Philippines quake

MANILA, Philippines — Rescuers dug through debris and mud in the central Philippines on Tuesday in search of nearly 100 people missing a day after a 6.9-magnitude earthquake triggered landslides, collapsed houses and killed at least 48 people. More than 400 soldiers were dispatched to several villages in Negros Oriental, about 3,560 miles south of Manila. The province suffered the most damage from Monday’s quake, said army Col. Francisco Zosimo Patrimonio. He said up to 92 people were missing, mostly from Guihulngan City and La Libertad town in the province, where landslides buried a total of almost 100 houses in two villages.

By Helene Cooper and Katharine Q. Seelye New York Times News Service

Susan Walsh / The Associated Press

President Barack Obama has drawn criticism for a new rule that requires insurers to offer women free birth control.

WASHINGTON — The White House sought Tuesday to ease mounting objections to a new administration rule that would require health insurance plans — including those offered by Roman Catholic universities and charities — to offer birth control to women free of charge. As the Republican presidential candidates and conserva-

tive leaders sought to frame the rule as showing President Barack Obama’s insensitivity to religious beliefs, Obama’s aides promised to explore ways to make it more palatable to religious-affiliated institutions, perhaps by allowing some employers to make side insurance plans available that are not directly paid for by the institutions. But White House officials insisted the president would not back down from his deci-

sion last month that employees at institutions affiliated with religious organizations receive access to contraceptives. Even though Catholic bishops and some Catholic institutions have sounded vocal opposition to the law, recent polls show that a majority of Catholics favor the new rule, which Obama approved in January after heated debate in the White House. Nonetheless, Obama’s aides were concerned about being portrayed

After reversal, key official at breast cancer foundation steps down

Abbas chosen to head interim government JERUSALEM — The rival Palestinian factions Fatah and Hamas announced Monday they had agreed that Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas will head an interim unity government that will prepare for new elections, ending a prolonged stalemate over how to mend their bitter rift. The move drew a sharp response from Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, who warned Abbas that his alliance with Hamas would doom peace efforts. The deal announced Monday in Doha, Qatar, removes a major stumbling block to carrying out a reconciliation accord signed by the two Palestinian movements last year.

In Japan, a new threat from nuclear plant TOKYO — Tokyo Electric Power Co. was forced to use boric acid at its crippled Fukushima atomic plant to prevent an accidental chain reaction known as re-criticality after temperatures rose in a reactor in the past week. The temperature of the No. 2 reactor was 68.5 degrees Celsius (155.3 degrees Fahrenheit) as of 4 p.m. Tuesday, a decline from 72.2 degrees at 5 a.m., said Osamu Yokokura, a spokesman for the utility. A reactor temperature must be below 93 degrees to be classed as in cold shutdown, or safe state. Tepco and the government announced that the Fukushima plant reached cold shutdown on Dec. 16, nine months after an earthquake and tsunami wrecked the nuclear station.

Europe racked by persistent cold, winds PRAGUE — Blizzard conditions, record-low temperatures and high winds persisted Tuesday from Bulgaria to Baku, disrupting transportation and complicating efforts to respond to a calamity that has claimed hundreds of lives in central and eastern Europe in the last week. A mix of cold Siberian air from the north and winter snows from the Mediterranean Sea into the Balkans are expected to persist for at least a week from Russia to the German border, according to local forecasts.

as hostile to religious groups in an election year. Republicans were already running with the issue. Sen. Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, the Republican leader, called the law “abhorrent to the foundational principles” of the country. “No one in the United States of America should ever be compelled by their government to choose between violating their religious beliefs or be penalized for refusing,” he said.

By Jennifer Preston New York Times News Service

Jeff Roberson / The Associated Press

Republican presidential hopeful Rick Santorum speaks during a primary night party in St. Charles, Mo., on Tuesday. The former Pennsylvania senator won contests in Missouri and Minnesota and had a strong showing in Colorado.

Santorum’s wins shake up GOP presidential campaign By Philip Rucker and Nia-Malika Henderson The Washington Post

DENVER — Rick Santorum had a breakthrough night on Tuesday, winning presidential contests in Missouri and Minnesota and making a strong showing in Colorado, all of which is expected to breathe life into his struggling campaign and slow Mitt Romney’s march to the Republican presidential nomination. Early returns had Santorum running well ahead of Romney in Minnesota and Missouri, and the Associated Press projected he would win both contests. The vic-

tories provide fresh momentum to the former Pennsylvania senator’s campaign and boost his fundraising going into the next big contests a month away. Santorum was leading in Colorado as well, but it was unclear whether he could maintain his position as more precincts reported vote totals. Romney had hoped to extend his winning streak as he tries to strengthen his claim to the mantle of the presumptive nominee. But he was prepared for a loss in one or more states as Santorum made an aggressive run in all three contests Tuesday. In Minnesota, where Romney enjoyed strong establishment backing, early re-

turns showed him trailing not just Santorum but also Rep. Ron Paul of Texas. “Conservatism is alive and well,” Santorum told supporters at his election-night party in Missouri. “I don’t stand here and claim to be the conservative alternative to Mitt Romney. I stand here to be the conservative alternative to Barack Obama.” Paul, who has yet to secure a win in the 2012 sweepstakes, mobilized his loyal support networks in the three states and was banking on low turnout in the nonbinding contests to give him a win. But he finished a distant third in Missouri and was trailing in the other states as well.

Who’s paying for those election ads? Voters may never know More than a third of the advertising tied to the presidential race has been funded by nonprofit groups that will never have to reveal their donors, suggesting that a significant portion of the 2012 elections will be wrapped in a vast cloak of secrecy. The bulk of the secret money spent so far has come from conservative groups seeking to propel a Republican into the White House, advertising data

show. Millions of dollars in additional spending from both sides has poured into legislative races that could help determine which party controls Congress in 2013. The flow of funds is part of a wave of spending by outside groups that has come to dominate the 2012 presidential contest, particularly by “super PACs” that have few limits on their activities. But unlike super PACs, politically minded

nonprofit groups are under no obligation to disclose the corporations, unions or tycoons bankrolling their advertising. “I don’t think we’ve seen these kind of groups acting so aggressively in election-related activity as we see now,” said Richard Hasen, an election law expert at the University of California in Irvine. “This is pure secret money.... The goal is to avoid disclosure.”

Newt Gingrich did not compete in Missouri and spent limited time in Colorado and Minnesota. The former House speaker looked past Tuesday’s contests and instead campaigned in Ohio, one of several delegate-rich states voting March 6 on “Super Tuesday,” when he hopes to jump-start his struggling candidacy. By defeating Romney, Santorum believes, he could reset the race and help create the perception that he, and not Gingrich, is the conservative alternative to the establishment front-runner.

Karen Handel, a former Republican candidate for governor in Georgia who joined the Susan G. Komen for the Cure fou ndat ion last year, resigned Tuesday as senior vice president for policy just Handel days after the foundation reversed its decision to largely end its financial support for breast cancer screenings at Planned Parenthood affiliates amid an uproar. Handel, who opposes abortion, helped persuade Komen’s board to change its policy late last year. The change resulted in a halt of grants to 19 of Planned Parenthood’s 83 affiliates, which received nearly $700,000 from the Komen foundation last year. Handel noted in her letter of resignation to Nancy Brinker, Komen’s CEO and founder, that she was unhappy that she had been portrayed as single-handedly driving the decision because of her ideology. She noted that the decision was “fully vetted by every appropriate level within the organization,” and that the discussion about Komen’s terminating its relationship with Planned Parenthood predated her arrival at the organization in April.

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Russia envoys visit Syria in effort to defuse crisis New York Times News Service MOSCOW — Russia moved forcefully on Tuesday to show that it was seeking a peaceful resolution to the Syria crisis, sending its foreign minister to Damascus for talks that he called “very productive” and countering critics who said the Kremlin had endangered its standing in the Arab world because of its unbridled support for Syria’s embattled president, Bashar Assad. The diplomatic effort by Russia came as a growing number of Arab and European countries recalled their ambassadors from Damascus in outrage over Assad’s increasingly vio-

lent response to an 11-monthold popular uprising. The violence has escalated since Saturday, when Russia, seconded by China, vetoed an Arab League-backed resolution at the U.N. Security Council that called on Assad to give up some of his powers. The Russians insisted that the resolution amounted to outside interference in Syria’s affairs. On Tuesday, Sergey Lavrov, Russia’s foreign minister, and Mikhail Fradkov, the director of the Russian foreign intelligence service, were sent to Syria with what the Russians said was a proposal to end the crisis. Its substance was not divulged.

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THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2012

Sailor

Charting a course around the Americas

Continued from A1 But that leg of the journey was some six months, 15,000 miles and one continent ago. “At this point,” Rutherford said of the shotgun, “it’s just a clump of metal.” His satellite phone still works, and he can send and receive e-mail through his GPS service — which is how he is able to stay connected with a handful of Annapolis-based friends who provide support. It is also how it was that he came to be speaking to a reporter recently while pointed north, about 2,000 miles east of Argentina. Now roughly parallel to the southern tip of Brazil, he is within 5,000 miles of completing his journey, with a midApril return to Annapolis. “It does get incredibly lonely,” he said during an interview conducted partly by email and partly by satellite phone. “Lonely to the point where anything living is comforting. A bird, a fish, even a barnacle. I think I’m beyond lonely.” It is difficult to convey fully the audacity of what Rutherford is attempting to do: sailing approximately 25,000 miles, through some of the Earth’s most treacherous ocean, on a 36-year-old Albin Vega sailboat (which he christened the Saint Brendan, in honor of a sixthcentury explorer) best suited to weekend sailors who never venture beyond the Chesapeake Bay. Already, the Scott Polar Institute in Cambridge, England, has recognized him as the first person in recorded history to make it through the fabled Northwest Passage alone and non-stop on such a small sailboat.

Matt Rutherford, a 30year-old Ohio native, is attempting to sail around the Americas alone and non-stop.

‘Teetering on the edge’ But for the sake of context, allow Herb McCormick to tell you how incredible Rutherford’s odyssey is. In 2009-10, McCormick, a veteran sailor and a senior editor at Cruising World magazine, completed the same journey (though he did it in a clockwise direction, while Rutherford is going counterclockwise) — and it was grueling and mind-numbing and treacherous, testing both his skills and his fortitude on a daily basis. “There were times when I shook my head and said, ‘What am I doing?’ “ McCormick said. McCormick, however, made his journey around the Americas on a 64-foot steel boat loaded with wine and steaks and a huge reserve of diesel for motoring through the ice of the Northwest Passage and the windless expanses near the equator. Oh, and McCormick was part of a four-man crew, all of whom were experienced sailors — and none of whom ever had to take a 10-hour shift at the helm, for example, dodging icebergs in the fog of Baffin Bay off the coast of Greenland while clocking eight knots, as Rutherford did. They didn’t sleep nightly in a damp sleeping bag, or lay their heads on a damp, moldy pillow, as Rutherford does. They

Crash Continued from A1 The team, a service of the High Desert Education Service District, is activated at schools in Deschutes, Crook and Jefferson counties following the death of a student or staff member or other traumatic event. Jon Bullock, the Redmond School District’s strategic planning director, said team members set up a “safe room” where students can talk to a trained adult or grieve privately. Bullock said the district was not planning to have a safe room open at Redmond High School this morning and had not yet decided what would

DMV Continued from A1 The state will still need to spend about $1.5 million to renovate the current building and parking lot, but Thompson said this is cheaper than signing a long-term lease in a different location. He estimates the state would have spent that same amount in rent after only 12 to 15 years. Bend’s DMV field offices moved to the former Visitors Center site several years ago after the agency’s lease ran out on a building on Southwest

Pacific Ocean

Hawaii

Follow the voyage, in map and blog form, at solotheamericas.org.

RUSSIA Arctic Ocean Greenland (DEN.)

Alaska

ICELAND

U.S.

Aug. 4 After 50 days alone at sea, he begins his journey through the Northwest Passage.

June 11, 2011 Departs Annapolis

Atlantic Ocean

Sept. 19 Successfully navigates the Northwest Passage in the smallest boat in history.

Croker Bay Arctic Circle

CANADA

r Tropic of Cance

Nov. 13 Day 152 13,334 miles

Equator

Galapagos I. (ECUADOR)

BRAZIL Pacific Ocean rn prico f Ca pic o Tro

ARGEN.

Approximate location on Christmas Day

Atlantic Ocean

Jan. 26 Day 227 Over 20,000 miles sailed

CHILE Route shown is approximate.

Cape Horn

Jan. 5 Day 208 18,341 miles

Map projection source: Geocart Source: www.solotheamericas.org

Laris Karklis / The Washington Post

didn’t have to pump a manual desalinator for 30 minutes every time they wanted a cup of water. They almost certainly didn’t go walking around their boat wearing a paintball mask to do the job of a more suitable piece of waterproof headgear that they couldn’t afford. “What Matt is trying to do, I’m absolutely blown away by it,” McCormick said. “He’s doing this in a boat that, frankly, I’d be scared to sail from Newport to Bermuda. I’m in awe of the guy. This is such a mammoth undertaking, and to do it without stopping — alone — is mind-boggling. “It’s almost teetering on the edge of blood-insanity, frankly. When I heard what he was trying to do, I thought it was a suicide mission. I was fearful for him.”

Quest for self-knowledge What, then, would compel a 30-year-old Ohio native with a passion for the Cleveland Browns and the history of exploration to climb aboard an old sailboat, loaded with hand-medown equipment and freezedried food, and embark on a mission that more experienced and practical sailors equate to suicide? The simple answer is charity. Rutherford concocted his idea as a way to raise money for Chesapeake Region Accessible Boating (CRAB), an Annapolisbased organization that aims to provide sailing opportunities for physically and/or developmentally disabled persons. While Rutherford is about 80 percent done with his voyage,

he is only about 10 percent of the way to his fundraising goal of $250,000 for CRAB’s projects. But as one would expect, there is a larger mission at work here, a quest for self-knowledge and inner peace that Rutherford hasn’t always been able to find on dry land. He was born and raised, he says, in a cult, before becoming “angry and confused” as a youth and taking to street life, spending much of his teens going in and out of juvenile detention centers. The life of adventure that he chose in his 20s as a means of escape has led him, among other places, to a solo bicycle journey across Southeast Asia and a pair of trans-Atlantic sails. His latest adventure makes those seem like child’s play. “Ultimately,” he said, “I am trying to accomplish something that is greater than myself.” The payoff, when it chooses to reveal itself, is the occasional brush with nature’s overwhelming glory: seals, whales, walruses, narwhals, great albatrosses, penguins. In the Arctic (before his camera broke), he snapped pictures of icebergs the size of office buildings. “I have a strong bond with the ocean,” he said. “I feel like I can understand it, and in some ways it understands me.”

Perilous journeys The hardest parts of the voyage are over now — the treacherous ice of the Northwest Passage, the typhoons blowing off Japan and across the north Pacific, the unpredictable weather and currents around Cape

be available at the Redmond Proficiency Academy. RPA does not have its own counseling staff, Bullock said, but the district will make counselors available as needed. “I think any time you have an event like this, it’s difficult to estimate what people’s responses will be for a whole range of different factors,” he said. “There’s clearly some students here who lost close friends, and they struggle with that.” Oregon Department of Transportation spokesman Peter Murphy said there is no indication road conditions were hazardous at the time of the crash. An ODOT responder sent to the scene within min-

utes of the crash noted some light frost on the shoulders of nearby roads, Murphy said, but had no difficulty stopping or gaining traction. The highway makes a sweeping turn at the crash site a short distance south of the Northwest Canal Boulevard overpass, and the northbound and southbound lanes are separated by a concrete median a few inches tall and 6 to 8 feet wide, Murphy said. Bullock said the school district is not planning any kind of memorial or other event for Goad and Tucker, but will keep students informed of any plans made by the girls’ families.

Emkay Drive. Since then, the state has been searching for a new home for the DMV. In August 2010, the state announced the DMV would move into the Brookswood Meadow Plaza shopping center in southwest Bend. But that decision drew the ire of many neighbors and local politicians, who claimed the new location was inconvenient. Some had even more vitriolic reactions, spurring protests, boycotts and even a lawsuit. The state responded to this reaction by canceling its lease

agreement with the Brookswood Meadow Plaza and renewing its search for permanent DMV site. Among the locations it considered are the old location on Emkay Drive and the current offices. “This has been a difficult time just because people have thought we were acting either arbitrarily or insolently or stupidly,” Thompson said. “But believe me, the effort all along has been to do the best thing for the citizens and protect taxpayer money.”

— Reporter: 541-383-0387, shammers@bendbulletin.com

— Reporter: 541-633-2160, ngrube@bendbulletin.com

Horn — but Rutherford is hardly home free. McCormick noted the worst weather his crew encountered during their entire journey came around North Carolina’s Cape Hatteras. “The worst night of our entire trip. ... We got absolutely creamed off Cape Hatteras,” McCormick said. “It’s called the Graveyard of the North Atlantic for good reason.” Assuming Rutherford makes it, McCormick believes he should be listed among names such as Joshua Slocum, the first man to sail solo around the world; Robin Knox-Johnston, the first to do so non-stop; and Sir Francis Chichester, the first to do so by the southern “clipper route.” “His name belongs in the annals of history, alongside those men,” he said.

Gruetter Continued from A1 “The Oregon State Bar took this step — a relatively rare occurrence — out of concern for Mr. Gruetter’s clients,” Walsh said. “Among our first steps will be to attempt to notify all current clients of recent developments, refer them to the proper channels for guidance and conduct a thorough review of the practice’s records to establish an accurate accounting of the situation.” Walsh said that it is “very rare” for the bar to assume custody of a law practice. She said Gruetter, who did not respond to a request for comment, is cooperating with the bar’s investigation. The custodianship gives the bar control of all aspects of Gruetter’s practice, including “all of his files, all of his legal bank accounts, his records, his books, his client trust funds,” Walsh said. The takeover stems from a series of 19 bar complaints that have been filed against Gruetter since November, all of which have been forwarded to the disciplinary office for investigation. In total, those complaints allege that at least $590,000 has not been paid out to clients, insurance companies or other parties involved in cases. Two of the complaints have been approved for prosecution so far. If Gruetter is found to have violated state bar rules, he could face sanctions including disbarment. In a complaint summary sent to the bar’s state professional responsibility board on Jan. 9, Assistant Disciplinary Counsel Stacy Hankin wrote that Gruetter had been uncommunicative with both the bar’s office and his own attorneys. “Staff has spoken with two lawyers who are of counsel to Gruetter,” Hankin wrote. “They confirm that over the last year it has been virtually impossible to complete matters because Gruetter has not paid either clients or lienholders. They also confirm

“Among our first steps will be to attempt to notify all current clients of recent developments, refer them to the proper channels for guidance and conduct a thorough review of the practice’s records.” — Kateri Walsh, Oregon State Bar spokeswoman

that over the last six month(s) they have had difficulty getting in touch with Gruetter as he has been working out of his home. And, when they are finally able to reach him, he gives them the run around.” The complaint summary also noted that Gruetter had been receiving inpatient treatment at an addiction recovery facility. Walsh said it’s unclear how long the custodianship will last. For now, bar employees are going through files, contacting clients and asking local attorneys to help with active cases. The bar will also seek a temporary suspension of Gruetter’s law license while the ethics investigation moves forward. “It’s a step we take — to be able to temporarily suspend a lawyer while charges are pending — when there is a public protection element to the case,” Walsh said. Several Gruetter clients have brought their concerns to the state bar’s client security fund, which Walsh described as “a pool of money that is reserved specifically to refund to a client in the rare event that a lawyer misappropriates their funds.” The maximum claim available per client is $50,000. — Reporter: 541-617-7831, smiller@bendbulletin.com

Find It All Online bendbulletin.com


WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

Marriage

Lea Suzuki / San Francisco Chronicle

Supporters of gay marriage react outside the James R. Browning United States Courthouse in San Francisco on Tuesday after a federal appeals court declared California’s ban on same-sex marriage unconstitutional. The decision by the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals puts the bitterly contested, voter-approved law on track for possible consideration by the U.S. Supreme Court.

CALIFORNIA

Appeals court strikes down ban on gay marriage By Maura Dolan and Carol J. Williams Los Angeles Times

SAN FRANCISCO — A federal appeals court has declared California’s 2008 voterapproved ban on same-sex marriage unconstitutional, concluding the prohibition served no purpose other than to “lessen the status and human dignity of gays and lesbians.” The 2-1 ruling by the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals was narrowly written to limit its scope to California’s borders and possibly even avoid review by the U.S. Supreme Court, legal experts said. Nonetheless, gay-rights advocates hailed Tuesday’s decision as historic, while supporters of Proposition 8 immediately vowed to appeal. Instead of expanding the constitutional rights of gays and lesbians, the court based its decision on a 1996 U.S. Supreme Court precedent that said a majority may not take away a minority’s rights without legitimate reasons. “Proposition 8 operates with no apparent purpose but to impose on gays and lesbians, through the public law, a majority’s private disapproval of them and their relationships,” Judge Stephen Reinhardt wrote for the court. The ruling won’t take effect for about three weeks to give the sponsors of Proposition 8 time to appeal. Though divided on the constitutional question, the threejudge panel unanimously agreed that ProtectMarriage, the backers of Proposition 8, had the right or legal “standing” to appeal Chief U.S. District Judge Vaughn Walker’s 2010 ruling against the ballot

Redmond Continued from A1 “This means Redmond will now have the largest inventory of large-lot land in the state,” said Telfer, who pushed Senate Bill 1544. “That’s big.” The bill still needs to pass both chambers of the Legislature and receive the governor’s signature, of course. But Telfer, who believes it faces no opposition, is confident that it will become law this session. Even environmental nonprofit Central Oregon LandWatch supports it. The Redmond parcel is unique, Beyer said, because it was zoned for industrial use at one point. And the land — all publicly owned — is located within the city’s urban growth boundary. Owners include the Redmond School District, Central Oregon Irrigation District and Deschutes County. Redmond Mayor George Endicott says the land is useless with its current zoning, which was adopted nearly a decade ago when the county planned to build the fairgrounds there. That never happened, but the zoning never

measure. The panel also unanimously rejected a challenge by ProtectMarriage that Walker’s ruling should be set aside because he failed to disclose he was in a long-term same-sex relationship. Walker, who has since retired, ruled after an unprecedented, two-week trial that examined the meaning of sexual orientation and the history of marriage and gay rights. “It’s no surprise that the 9th Circuit’s decision is completely out of step with every other federal appellate and Supreme Court decision in American history on the subject of marriage,” said Andy Pugno, a lawyer for ProtectMarriage. “Ever since the beginning of this case, we’ve known that the battle to preserve traditional marriage will ultimately be won or lost not here, but rather in the U.S. Supreme Court.” But other lawyers and legal scholars said the 9th Circuit might have the final word on Proposition 8 because the ruling was so pointedly limited to California, a state where voters stripped a minority of a right that already existed and where the usual justification for a marriage ban, responsible parenting and procreation, is undercut by domestic partner laws. Proposition 8 passed as a constitutional amendment six months after the California Supreme Court struck down a state law that limited marriage to a man and a woman, and an estimated 18,000 same-sex couples married during that time. The initiative also did not affect parenting rights of gays and lesbians, which are protected under other state laws.

reverted to industrial use. As a result, he said, several businesses have expressed interest in the property, only to discover that developing it would be too difficult. Meanwhile, the state has adopted a transportation planning rule that requires cities and developers to identify money for road improvements before approving projects that would exacerbate traffic problems on state highways. When officials tried to rezone the Redmond property, Oregon Department of Transportation officials told them the project would first need a $250 million bypass to handle stress on nearby roads. During Tuesday’s committee hearing, Sen. Ginny Burdick, D-Portland, said she knows people are leery of “carve-out bills,” which are created for a specific purpose and do not generally benefit the entire state. For that reason, Burdick said, officials should “ensure this land really goes into industrial use that will produce jobs.” — Reporter: 541-419-8074, ldake@bendbulletin.com

Continued from A1 • Maryland: After a failed legislative attempt last year, a bill to legalize gay marriage is getting some traction this goround. A Senate committee held public debate last week on a bill introduced by Democratic Gov. Martin O’Malley, and a committee vote is expected in a couple of weeks. Opponents of the bill have indicated that they will try to put the issue to a referendum if it passes both chambers of the Legislature. • Washington: The Senate passed a bill legalizing gay marriage Wednesday, and the House is expected to advance it to Gov. Chris Gregoire, a Democrat, who has said she would sign the legislation. It’s expected to reach her desk this month. Opponents of gay marriage are working to schedule a referendum on the matter, probably on the November ballot. The outcome of that vote would determine whether same-sex marriages can actually take place.

• New Jersey: Lawmakers are working to lock down the number of votes needed to override Gov. Chris Christie’s expected veto of a bill permitting gay marriage. Democrats believe they have enough votes to pass a bill, but Christie, a Republican, has vowed to veto such a measure. He is urging lawmakers to leave the matter up to voters; lawmakers have said they have no intention of humoring the governor in such a way. • North Carolina: Voters in May will determine if the state’s constitution will be amended to define marriage. But unlike many other states’ existing constitutional amendments on the matter, the wording of North Carolina’s amendment would virtually outlaw same-sex civil unions and domestic partnerships as well, said Sarah Warbelow, state legislative director for the Human Rights Campaign. Of note, the May election is also a Republican primary, so Democratic turnout is expected to be light. • Minnesota: Conservative

A5

groups have placed on the November ballot a measure that could amend the state constitution to ban same-sex unions. Gay marriage is already prohibited in the state, but conservative groups hope that an amendment would stymie future legislative efforts or court decisions from permitting it. • Maine: Legislators passed a bill to legalize gay marriage three years ago, which the governor signed, but in November 2009 voters reversed that effort via referendum by a margin of 53 percent to 47 percent. Based on evolving public opinion and a conservative shift in the Capitol, gay marriage advocates are now counting on voters in November to decide whether to allow same-sex marriage. Equality Maine, a gay rights group, submitted signatures last month to place the referendum on the ballot. Same-sex marriage is legal in six states — New York, Connecticut, Iowa, Massachusetts, New Hampshire and Vermont — and the District of Columbia.


A6

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2012

IRAQ

POLICE JOIN PROTESTERS IN MALDIVES

U.S. planning sharp cuts to embassy staff By Tim Arango New York Times News Service

BAGHDAD — Less than two months after U.S. troops left, the State Department is preparing to slash by as much as half the enormous diplomatic presence it had planned for Iraq, a sharp sign of declining U.S. influence in the country. Officials in Baghdad and Washington said that Ambassador James Jeffrey and other senior State Department officials are reconsidering the size and scope of the embassy, where the staff has swelled to nearly 16,000 people, mostly contractors. The expansive diplomatic operation and the $750 million embassy building, the largest of its kind in the world, were billed as necessary to nurture a postwar Iraq on its shaky path to democracy and establish normal relations between two countries linked by blood and mutual suspicion. But the Americans have been frustrated by Iraqi obstructionism and are now largely confined to the embassy because of security concerns, unable to interact enough with ordinary Iraqis to justify the $6 billion annual price tag.

An about-face The swift realization among some top officials that the diplomatic buildup may have been ill-advised represents a remarkable pivot for the State Department, in that officials spent more than a year planning the expansion and that many of the thousands of additional personnel have only recently arrived. Michael McClellan, the embassy spokesman, said in a statement, “Over the last year and continuing this year the Department of State and the Embassy in Baghdad have been considering ways to appropriately reduce the size of the U.S. mission in Iraq, primarily by decreasing the number of contractors needed to support the embassy’s operations.” After the U.S. troops departed in December, life became more difficult for the thousands of diplomats and contractors left behind. Convoys of food that were previously escorted

by the U.S. military from Kuwait were delayed at border crossings as Iraqis demanded documentation that the Americans were unaccustomed to providing. The current configuration of the embassy is actually smaller than the original plans that were drawn up at a time when officials believed a residual U.S. military presence would remain in Iraq beyond 2011. For instance, officials once planned for a 700-person consulate in the northern city of Mosul, but that was scrapped for budgetary reasons. Iraq’s foreign minister, Hoshyar Zebari, met with Jeffrey last week to discuss, among other things, the size of the U.S. presence here. “The problem is with the contractors, with the security arrangements,” Zebari said. Jeffrey will leave the task of whittling down the embassy to his successor, as officials said he is expected to step down in the coming weeks. “We always knew that what they were planning to do didn’t make sense,” said Kenneth Pollack, of the Saban Center for Middle East Policy at the Brookings Institution. “It’s increasingly becoming clear that they are horribly overstaffed given what they are able to accomplish.”

U.S.-Iraq tensions U.S. officials believed that Iraqi officials would be far more cooperative than they have been in smoothing the transition from a military operation to a diplomatic mission led by U.S. civilians. The expansion has exacted a toll on Iraqi government ministries, which are keen to exert their sovereignty after nearly nine years of war and occupation, and aggravated long-running tensions between the two countries. The considerations to reduce the number of embassy personnel, U.S. officials here said, reflect a belief that a quieter and humbler diplomatic presence could actually result in greater leverage over Iraqi affairs, particularly in mediating a political crisis that flared just as the troops were leaving.

The Associated Press file photo

The U.S. Embassy is seen from across the Tigris River in Baghdad. The State Department is rethinking the size and scope of the embassy, which has a staff of 16,000.

Sunni ministers return to Cabinet after boycott By Tim Arango New York Times News Service

BAGHDAD — Iraq’s Sunni ministers returned to the Cabinet on Tuesday, an incremental step that eases the tensions of the country’s political crisis but does not end it, and sets the stage for a national conference to seek a durable solution to a sectarian drama that erupted just as U.S. troops left in December and raised the specter of a civil war. The decision by the ministers for Iraqiya, the parliamentary bloc that includes mostly Sunni lawmakers, to rejoin the government follows the recent decision by Iraqiya to end its boycott of Parliament. Together, the decisions represent what Sunni officials called goodwill gestures but notably did not come after any public concessions from the Shiite-dominated central government, which is led by Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki.

The two largest issues that precipitated the boycotts, and exacerbated sectarian tensions by fueling a sentiment of disenfranchisement among the country’s Sunni minority, have not been resolved. Those were an arrest warrant issued for Vice President Tariq alHashimi on terrorism charges, and al-Maliki’s attempt to fire Deputy Prime Minister Saleh al-Mutlaq for calling al-Maliki a dictator in the media. Both al-Hashimi and al-Mutlaq are Sunnis. But officials said Iraqiya has since distanced itself from al-Hashimi’s case, removing it from the center of the crisis by essentially agreeing with alMaliki to leave it to the courts rather than the political arena. With al-Mutlaq, Iraqiya continues to insist that he be allowed to return to Parliament, while officials from al-Maliki’s alliance have insisted that al-Mutlaq would first need to apologize.

A police officer, in blue, charges soldiers during a clash in Male, Maldives, on Tuesday. President Mohamed Nasheed agreed to step down on Tuesday after police joined antigovernment protesters and clashed with soldiers in the streets. Sinan Hussain The Associated Press


BUSINESS

B

Calendar, B4 News of Record, B4 Stock listings, B2-3

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2012

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NASDAQ

CLOSE 2,904.08 CHANGE +2.09 +.07%

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DOW JONES

CLOSE 12,878.20 CHANGE +33.07 +.26%

www.bendbulletin.com/business

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S&P 500

CLOSE 1,347.05 CHANGE +2.72 +.20%

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BONDS

10-year Treasury

CLOSE 1.98 CHANGE +3.66%

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State economic index climbs Oregon’s economy rebounded in December, with employment, manufacturing and other components showing growth, according to a statewide economic index released Tuesday. The University of Oregon Index of Economic Indicators rose 0.7 percent in December, to 89.4, reaching its highest level since July, according to UO economist Tim Duy, the report’s author. The improvement suggests a more optimistic forecast for this year, Duy wrote, which is a change from late summer and fall, when signs indicated potential for recession.

By Jordan Novet The Bulletin

The operators of six Pepsi-Cola distributing plants across the state have applied for state licenses to sell and distribute beer and wine in Oregon. MLF Group LLC, the franchise business that runs the distribution facilities, including the Pepsi-Cola Bottling Co. in Bend, is looking to diversify its offerings, said Betsy Skovborg, an owner based in Bend. MLF pays PepsiCo Inc. for the right to use the brand name, she said. “At the retail level — bars, restaurants, resorts — we’re everywhere that a beer company would be,” Skovborg said. “We figured (distributing beer) might be something that would be worth it.” Of all the approximately 500 products the company now distributes, including soft drinks and energy drinks, none is an alcoholic beverage, she said. See Pepsi-Cola / B3

Bend ranked as a top ski town National Geographic Adventure has named Bend one of the 25 best ski towns in the world — that’s right — world. Bend joined national and international ski destinations such as: Banff, Alberta, Canada; Kitzbühel, Austria; Park City, Utah; four Colorado cities: Aspen, Crested Butte, Steamboat Springs and Telluride; and Truckee, Calif. Bend was the only Oregon city listed among the 25 on National Geographic’s website. To get insider tips on where to eat, stay, etc., the authors questioned “local luminaries,” or well-known residents in each city. For Bend’s write-up, Hall of Fame surfer and 20-year resident Gerry Lopez got the call.

For better and for worse, consumers are starting to take on more debt. The Federal Reserve reported Tuesday that consumer credit outstanding surged in December at a 9.3 percent annual rate, thanks mostly to strong car sales and growing demand for student loans. The seasonally adjusted dollar gain from November was $19.3 billion. That was almost triple what analysts were predicting, and December marked the second straight month of 9 percent-plus growth.

BP back to big profits after spill Less than two years ago, the British oil company BP was worried about its very survival as a seemingly unstoppable oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico threatened to destroy its finances and reputation. But on Tuesday, BP expressed renewed confidence in its future, reporting strong quarterly profits and raising its dividend to shareholders. The company reported $7.7 billion in profit for the fourth quarter of 2011, a 38 percent increase from a year earlier. — Staff and wire reports

On the rise Price per gallon for regular gasoline in the U.S.:

5

$3.48

3 1 FMAM JJ A S O N DJ F Source: U.S. Energy Department Los Angeles Times © 2012 McClatchy-Tribune News Service

CLOSE $34.165 CHANGE +$0.443

Pepsi-Cola distributors may diversify into alcohol

IN BRIEF

Consumer credit up in December

$1746.40 s SILVER GOLD CLOSE CHANGE +$23.60

Bernanke: Jobs data misleading By Martin Crutsinger The Associated Press

Matthew Staver / Bloomberg News

A crew from Alpha Oil & Gas Services Inc. constructs a 10-inch gas pipeline outside of Watford City, N.D. Advances in production have pushed the United States closer to energy self-sufficiency than it has been in almost 20 years.

Energy independence within reach for U.S.

WASHINGTON — Ben Bernanke says the job market isn’t as strong as the steadily declining unemployment rate might suggest. Responding to questions at a Senate hearing Tuesday, he noted that the unemployment rate doesn’t capture the plight of millions of people who have stopped looking for work or part-timers who can’t find full-time jobs. His cautious view helps explain why the Federal Reserve plans to hold interest rates at record lows until late 2014. Many economists were looking to see if Bernanke might waver on that stance after Friday’s news that hiring surged in January and the unemployment rate dropped to a three-year low of 8.3 percent. See Bernanke / B3

• With natural gas and oil output soaring, 2-decade-long decline is reversing By Rich Miller, Asjylyn Loder and Jim Polson Bloomberg News

NEW YORK — The United States is the closest it has been in almost 20 years to achieving energy self-sufficiency, a goal the nation has been pursuing since the 1973 Arab oil embargo triggered a recession and led to lines at gasoline stations. Domestic oil output is the highest in eight years. The U.S. is producing so much natural gas that, where the government warned four years ago of a critical need to boost imports, it now may approve an export terminal. Methanex Corp., the world’s biggest methanol maker, said it will dismantle a factory in Chile and

AT WORK “For 40 years, only politicians and the occasional author in Popular Mechanics magazine talked about achieving energy independence. Now it doesn’t seem such an outlandish idea.” — Adam Sieminski, head of the U.S. Energy Information Administration

reassemble it in Louisiana to take advantage of low natural gas prices. And higher mileage standards and federally mandated ethanol use, along with slow economic growth, have curbed demand. The result: The U.S. has reversed a two-decade-long decline in energy independence, increasing the pro-

portion of demand met from domestic sources over the last six years to an estimated 81 percent through the first 10 months of 2011, according to data compiled by Bloomberg from the Department of Energy. That would be the highest level since 1992. See Energy / B3

Farms plan biggest crops since 1984 By Jeff Wilson and Whitney McFerron

Analysts predict farmers will plant the most acres in a generation this year, led by the biggest corn crop since World War II.

Bloomberg News

CHICAGO — Farmers will plant the most acres in a generation this year, led by the biggest corn crop since World War II, taking advantage of the highest agricultural prices in at least four decades. They will sow corn, soybeans and wheat on 226.9 million acres, the most since 1984, a Bloomberg survey of 36 farmers, bankers and analysts showed. The 2.5 percent gain means an expansion the size of New Jersey, as growers target fields left fallow last year and land freed up from conservation programs. Crop prices, some of which reached the highest averages ever in 2011, bolstered the economies of Midwest growing states, sent

Daniel Acker Bloomberg News

net farm income up 28 percent to $100.9 billion, and pushed the value of farmland to a record $2,350 an acre, the U.S. Department of Agriculture estimates. Global food costs

are down 11 percent from a peak a year ago as grain output rises from China to Canada, United Nations data show. See Crops / B4

To increase your pay, know your workplace worth By Cindy Krischer Goodman McClatchy Newspapers

When Mika Brzezinski of MSNBC’s “Morning Joe” discovered her salary was a mere 7 percent of what the network was paying co-host Joe Scarborough, she thought it was only fair that she get a raise. But her overtures to network executives to get a raise failed. What finally worked was asking in a confident, straightforward way and being ready to walk. “I went in there knowing I was valued and knowing it was up to me to get the network to value me, too,” Brzezinski writes in her new book, “Knowing Your Value: Women, Money and Getting What You’re Worth.” The whole concept of workplace worth is scary to many people. Yet it’s what separates the successful and well-paid from those who stagnate and remain undervalued. As the economy shows signs of rebounding, we all want 2012 to be the year we not only know our value, we increase it. Employers beware: 24 percent of workers plan to ask for a raise, bonus or promotion, and 41 percent expect to get one, an Adecco Staffing survey shows. Experts say there are myriad ways to get your employer and customers to give you deserved recognition and financial worth: • Come up with a plan. Lauren Zander, chairwoman of The Handel Group, an executive and life coaching firm, advises against waiting around for “the company” to recognize your worth. See Worth / B3


B2

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2012

Consolidated stock listings N m

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C

A-B-C-D ABB Ltd 0.64 ACE Ltd 1.50 ACI Wwde AES Corp AFLAC 1.32 AGCO AGIC Cv2 1.02 AGL Res 1.84 AK Steel 0.20 AMC Net n AOL ARCA bio ASML Hld 0.59 AT&T Inc 1.76 ATP O&G AU Optron 0.14 AVG Tch n AVI Bio h Aarons 0.06 AbtLab 1.92 AberFitc 0.70 AbdAsPac 0.42 Abiomed AbitibiB Abraxas AcadiaPh Accenture 1.35 AccoBrds AccretivH Accuray Accuride Achillion AcmePkt AcordaTh ActivePw h ActivsBliz 0.17 Actuant 0.04 Actuate Acxiom AdeonaPh AdobeSy Adtran 0.36 AdvAmer 0.25 AdvAuto 0.24 AdvEnId AMD AdvSemi 0.11 AdvOil&Gs Adventrx AecomTch Aegon Aegon42 n 2.00 Aeropostl AeroViron AEterna g Aetna 0.70 AffilMgrs Affymax Affymetrix Agilent 0.40 Agnico g 0.64 Agrium g 0.45 AirLease n AirProd 2.32 Aircastle 0.60 Airgas 1.28 Aixtron 0.84 AkamaiT Akorn AlskAir AlaskCom 0.20 AlbnyIn 0.52 Albemarle 0.70 AlcatelLuc Alcoa 0.12 Alere AlexBld 1.26 AlexREE 1.96 AlexcoR g Alexion s AlignTech AlimeraSci Alkermes AllegTch 0.72 Allergan 0.20 AlliData AlliBInco 0.48 AlliBern 1.44 AlliantEgy 1.80 AlliantTch 0.80 AlldNevG AlldWldA 1.50 AllosThera AllotComm AllscriptH Allstate 0.84 AlnylamP AlphaNRs Alphatec AlpGPPrp 0.60 AlpTotDiv 0.66 AlpAlerMLP 1.00 AlteraCp lf 0.32 AlterraCap 0.56 Altria 1.64 Alumina 0.28 AmBev 1.10 AmTrstFin 0.36 Amarin Amazon Amdocs Amedisys Ameren 1.60 Amerigrp AMovilL s 0.28 AmApparel AmAxle AmCampus 1.35 ACapAgy 5.00 AmCapLtd AEagleOut 0.44 AEP 1.88 AEqInvLf 0.12 AmExp 0.72 AFnclGrp 0.70 AGreet 0.60 AmIntlGrp AOriBio h AmSupr AmTower AVangrd 0.08 AmWtrWks 0.92 Ameriprise 1.12 AmeriBrgn 0.52 AmCasino 0.50 Ametek 0.24 Amgen 1.44 AmicusTh AmkorT lf Amphenol 0.42 Amylin Anadarko 0.36 Anadigc AnalogDev 1.00 Ancestry AngiesL n AngioDyn AnglogldA 0.45 ABInBev 1.16 Ann Inc Annaly 2.43 AntaresP Anworth 0.94 Aon Corp 0.60 A123 Sys Apache 0.60 AptInv 0.48 ApolloGM n 0.66 ApolloGrp ApolloInv 1.12 Apple Inc ApldIndlT 0.84 ApldMatl 0.32 AMCC Approach AquaAm 0.66 ArQule ArcelorMit 0.75 ArchCap s ArchCoal 0.44 ArchDan 0.70 ArcosDor n 0.18 ArenaPhm AresCap 1.44 AriadP Ariba Inc ArmHld 0.15 ArmourRsd 1.32 ArrayBio Arris ArrowEl ArtioGInv 0.24 ArubaNet AsburyA AscenaRtl AscentSol h AshfordHT 0.40 Ashland 0.70 AsiaInfoL AspenIns 0.60 AspenTech AsscdBanc 0.04 AsdEstat 0.68 Assurant 0.72 AssuredG 0.18 AstexPhm AstoriaF 0.52 AstraZen 2.80 athenahlth AtlPwr g 1.15 AtlasAir AtlasPpln 2.20 Atmel ATMOS 1.38 AtwoodOcn AuRico g Aurizon g AutoNatn Autodesk Autoliv 1.80 AutoData 1.58 Auxilium AvagoTch 0.48 AvalnRare AvalonBay 3.88 AvanirPhm AVEO Ph AveryD 1.08 AviatNetw AvidTch AvisBudg Avista 1.16 Avnet Avon 0.92 Axcelis AXIS Cap 0.96 B&G Foods 0.92 BB&T Cp 0.64 BBCN Bcp

21.53 74.20 35.64 12.88 49.28 52.44 8.67 41.65 8.78 42.38 17.80 1.03 45.13 30.04 6.89 5.67 13.01 1.11 28.73 55.71 44.72 7.60 22.70 15.94 3.99 1.78 57.96 11.16 25.38 6.19 8.09 10.38 34.97 26.44 1.00 12.44 27.57 6.12 13.56 2.41 32.28 37.11 8.23 77.23 10.64 7.13 4.97 3.78 .72 22.39 5.08 25.00 16.88 30.77 1.78 44.71 107.60 10.66 5.15 44.60 36.14 81.20 25.27 90.04 13.93 78.85 14.51 33.65 11.80 76.83 2.83 25.90 66.90 1.91 10.67 24.52 48.10 73.67 7.52 78.81 25.92 1.64 19.26 48.46 87.25 115.93 8.26 16.35 43.40 58.64 35.22 64.57 1.74 17.13 20.36 30.84 12.95 22.31 2.16 6.37 4.81 16.76 40.41 25.45 28.82 5.65 37.31 26.36 8.67 184.19 30.15 11.67 31.75 67.32 24.42 .77 12.49 44.03 29.74 8.55 13.88 39.88 12.12 52.13 37.48 15.26 26.70 .84 5.44 63.37 15.64 34.29 54.92 38.87 20.49 48.26 69.17 6.82 5.99 54.87 16.89 87.21 3.17 39.67 30.69 15.43 13.28 45.28 64.82 23.70 17.12 2.74 6.57 48.03 2.29 104.53 24.91 15.09 52.90 7.94 468.83 40.93 12.74 7.53 36.71 22.46 7.88 22.17 37.72 15.22 29.80 22.24 2.05 16.19 15.72 28.22 26.91 7.04 3.28 12.12 40.72 4.41 24.02 24.60 35.95 .81 9.73 65.37 11.56 28.10 20.41 12.90 16.56 43.02 16.72 2.19 8.62 47.60 62.45 14.48 52.11 36.94 10.06 32.87 45.64 9.24 5.35 37.18 38.34 65.20 54.87 20.06 34.58 3.16 136.99 3.17 14.47 29.44 2.39 9.98 15.27 25.84 35.89 18.20 1.78 32.48 22.50 29.52 10.63

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N m

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BCD Semi BCE g 2.17 BE Aero BGC Ptrs 0.68 BHP BillLt 2.02 BHPBil plc 2.02 BJsRest BMC Sft BP PLC 1.68 BPZ Res BRE 1.54 BRFBrasil 0.42 BabckWil BadgerMtr 0.64 Baidu BakrHu 0.60 BallCp s 0.40 BallyTech BanColum 1.42 BcBilVArg 0.62 BcoBrades 0.80 BcoMacro 2.08 BcoSantSA 0.84 BcoSBrasil 1.50 BcSanChile 3.29 BcpSouth 0.04 BkofAm 0.04 BkAm wtA BkAML pfL 1.02 BkHawaii 1.80 BkIreld rs BkMont g 2.80 BkNYMel 0.52 BkNova g 2.08 BkOzarks s 0.44 Bankrate n Banner rs 0.04 Banro g BarcUBS36 BarcGSOil BiPNG Barclay 0.36 Bar iPVix BarVixMdT Bard 0.76 BarnesNob Barnes 0.40 BarrickG 0.60 BasicEnSv Baxter 1.34 BeacnRfg Beam Inc 0.82 BeazerHm BebeStrs 0.10 BectDck 1.80 BedBath Belden 0.20 Belo 0.20 Bemis 1.00 BenchElec Berkley 0.32 BerkH B BerryPet 0.32 BestBuy 0.64 BigLots BBarrett BioRefLab BioDlvry lf BioLnRx n BioFuelE h BiogenIdc BioMarin BioMedR 0.80 BioMimetic BioSante BioScrip BlkRKelso 1.04 BlackRock 5.50 BlkBldAm 1.56 BlkCpHY VI 1.00 BlkCrAll4 0.94 BlkDebtStr 0.32 BlkEEqDv 0.68 BlkGlbOp 2.28 BlkrkHigh 0.17 BlkIntlG&I 1.36 BlkRsCmdy 1.40 Blackstone 0.88 BlockHR 0.80 BlueCoat BlueNile BdwlkPpl 2.11 BodyCentrl Boeing 1.76 Boise Inc 0.40 BonTon 0.20 BoozAllenH 0.36 BorgWarn BostPrv 0.04 BostProp 2.20 BostonSci BoydGm Brandyw 0.60 BrasilTele 0.55 Braskem 1.05 BreitBurn 1.80 BridgptEd BrigStrat 0.44 Brightpnt BrigusG g Brinker 0.64 Brinks 0.40 BrMySq 1.36 BristowGp 0.60 BritATob 3.86 Broadcom 0.40 BroadrdgF 0.64 BroadSoft BroadVisn Broadwd h BrcdeCm Brookdale BrkfldAs g 0.52 BrkfInfra 1.40 BrkfldOfPr 0.56 BrooksAuto 0.32 BrwnBrn 0.34 Brunswick 0.05 Buckeye 4.10 Buckle 0.80 Buenavent 0.56 BuffaloWW BldrFstSrc BungeLt 1.00 C&J Egy n CA Inc 1.00 CBL Asc 0.84 CBOE 0.48 CBRE GRE 0.54 CBRE Grp CBS B 0.40 CEVA Inc CF Inds 1.60 CH Robins 1.32 CIT Grp CLECO 1.25 CME Grp 8.92 CMS Eng 0.96 CNH Gbl CNO Fincl CPFL En s 1.60 CPI h 1.00 CSX s 0.48 CTC Media 0.88 CVB Fncl 0.34 CVR Engy CVR Ptrs n 1.57 CVS Care 0.65 CYS Invest 2.00 Cabelas CblvsNY s 0.60 Cabot 0.72 CabotOG s 0.08 CACI CadencePh Cadence CalDive CalmsAst 0.38 CalaCvHi 1.02 CalaCvOp 1.14 CalaGDyIn 0.74 CalaStrTR 0.63 Calgon Calix CallGolf 0.04 CallonPet Calpine CalumetSp 2.12 CAMAC En Cambrex CamdenPT 1.96 Cameco g 0.40 Cameron CampSp 1.16 CdnNRy g 1.50 CdnNRs gs 0.36 CP Rwy g 1.20 CdnSolar Canon CapOne 0.20 CapitlSrce 0.04 CapFedFn 0.30 Caplease 0.26 CapsteadM 1.82 CpstnTrb h CarboCer 0.96 CardnlHlth 0.86 Cardiom g CardiumTh Cardtronic CareFusion CareerEd Carlisle 0.72 CarMax Carnival 1.00 CarpTech 0.72 Carrizo Carters CashAm 0.14 CastleAM CatalystH Caterpillar 1.84 Cavium CedarF 1.00 CelSci Celanese 0.24 Celestic g Celgene CellTher rsh CelldexTh Celsion Cemex Cemig pf 1.78 CenovusE 0.80 Centene CenterPnt 0.81 CnElBras pf 0.03 CenElBras 1.56 CentEuro CEurMed CFCda g 0.01

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N m

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CentAl CntryLink 2.90 Cenveo Cepheid Cereplast Cerner s CerusCp Changyou ChRvLab ChrmSh ChartInds ChkPoint Cheesecake ChelseaTh Chemtura CheniereEn ChesEng 0.35 ChesGran n 0.58 ChesMidst 1.56 Chevron 3.24 ChicB&I 0.20 Chicos 0.20 ChildPlace Chimera 0.51 ChinBAK h ChinaInf h ChinaLife 0.91 ChinaMble 2.04 ChinaPet 3.55 ChinaUni 0.12 ChiValve Chipotle Chiquita Chubb 1.56 ChungTel 1.91 ChurchD s 0.96 CIBER CienaCorp Cigna 0.04 Cimarex 0.40 CinciBell CinnFin 1.61 Cinemark 0.84 Cintas 0.54 Cirrus Cisco 0.24 Citigp pfJ 2.13 Citigp pfN 1.97 Citigrp rs 0.04 CitrixSys CityNC 1.00 Clarcor 0.48 ClaudeR g CleanEngy CleanH s Clearwire ClickSft 0.32 CliffsNRs 1.12 Clorox 2.40 CloudPeak Coach 0.90 CobaltIEn CocaCola 1.88 CocaCE 0.64 Coeur CogdSpen 0.40 CogentC CognizTech CohStQIR 0.72 Coinstar ColdwtrCrk Colfax ColgPal 2.32 CollctvBrd ColonPT 0.72 ColonyFncl 1.36 ColBnkg 0.32 ColumLabs Comcast 0.45 Comc spcl 0.45 Comerica 0.40 CmcBMO 0.92 CmclMtls 0.48 CmwREIT 2.00 CmtyHlt CommVlt CBD-Pao 0.39 CompDivHd 1.44 CompssMn 1.80 CmplGnom CompPrdS Compugn CompSci 0.80 Compuwre ComstkMn ComstkRs Comtech 1.10 Comverge Comverse Con-Way 0.40 ConAgra 0.96 ConchoRes ConcurTch Conns ConocPhil 2.64 ConsolEngy 0.50 ConEd 2.42 ConstantC ConstellA ConstellEn 0.96 ContlRes Cnvrgys CooperCo 0.06 Cooper Ind 1.16 CooperTire 0.42 CopaHold 1.64 Copel 1.00 Corcept CoreLabs 1.12 CoreLogic CorinthC CornPdts 0.80 Corning 0.30 CorpOffP 1.10 CorrectnCp Cosan Ltd 0.28 Cosi Inc CostPlus Costco 0.96 Cott Cp CousPrp 0.18 Covance CovantaH 0.30 CoventryH Covidien 0.90 CSVS3xInSlv CS VS3xSlv CSVS2xVxS CSVelIVSt s CredSuiss 1.40 CrSuiHiY 0.32 Cree Inc CreXus 1.13 Crocs CrwnCstle CrownHold Ctrip.com CubeSmart 0.32 CubistPh CullenFr 1.84 Cummins 1.60 CumMed Curis CurEuro 0.30 CurAstla 4.06 CurJpn CyberDef h Cyberonics CybexIntl h Cyclacel h Cymer CypSemi 0.36 CytRx h Cytec 0.50 Cytokinet Cytori DARABio h DCT Indl 0.28 DDR Corp 0.48 DFC Glbl DHT Hldgs 0.12 DNP Selct 0.78 DR Horton 0.15 DST Sys 0.70 DSW Inc 0.60 DTE 2.35 DanaHldg Danaher 0.10 DaqoNwEn Darden 1.72 Darling DaVita DayStar h DeVry 0.30 DealrTrk DeanFds DeckrsOut Deere 1.64 DejourE g Delcath Delek 0.15 Dell Inc DelphiAu n DelphiFn 0.48 DeltaAir Deluxe 1.00 DemndMda DenburyR Dndreon DenisnM g Dennys Dentsply 0.22 Depomed DeutschBk 1.07 DBGoldDL DBGoldDS DevonE 0.68 Dex One h DexCom Diageo 2.63 DiamndF lf 0.18 DiaOffs 0.50 DiamRk 0.32 DianaShip DiceHldg DicksSptg 0.50 Diebold 1.12 DigitalRlt 2.72 DigRiver DigitalGlb Dillards 0.20 Diodes DirecTV A Dx30TBr rs DxEMBll rs 5.49 DxFnBull rs DrxTcBull 0.84 DrSCBr rs DirFnBr rs DirLCBr rs DirDGldBr 1.98

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0.61 1.60 1.96 2.13 1.13 0.80

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0.60 1.28 0.64 1.16 0.66 0.20

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29.54 9.60 1.79 8.37 23.02 43.22 22.72 1.60 28.64 18.37 9.30 5.97 15.94 5.53 6.11 1.01 35.20 16.53 23.73 14.72 21.68 79.48 43.74 37.71 .21 29.75 8.23 5.45 28.44 34.36 71.30 19.18 16.58 39.39 3.92 26.22 12.00 43.40 64.68 63.87 26.57 2.24 15.83 26.78 7.53 64.57 8.95 18.53 32.95 33.55 10.65 1.99 4.25 1.36 21.17 55.08 14.68 15.71 44.80 10.35 5.44 10.83 50.55 10.39 .68 14.66 3.95 7.59 41.69 16.58 47.76 2.06 115.98 15.28 125.44 17.98 14.01 606.77 54.82 48.56 17.25 201.85 2.62 5.87 17.10 5.05 2.10 1.06 6.42 2.64 20.57 30.17 66.27 11.89 25.54 48.25 6.97 55.97 24.19 7.24 19.88 32.51 25.68 21.76 3.32 36.11 28.82 29.25 42.38 33.37 34.12 27.81 44.46 35.72 41.36 37.00 11.37 34.09 17.82 26.42 9.00 37.71 3.68 1.82 45.91 46.23 6.62 12.46 42.09 .88 12.00 23.73 19.12 7.17 36.41 27.84 26.32 6.17 57.31 19.00 6.95 21.41 35.25 20.12 17.00 24.75 5.27 5.28 51.82 18.30 60.98 .33 72.58 59.21 5.01 10.61 5.56 24.41 60.44 14.43 61.18 28.95 26.39 10.59 49.03 18.02 33.25 34.40 1.73 55.56 33.15 20.83 45.46 29.75 60.71 21.23 36.14 60.16 16.13 29.08 35.56 11.27 35.27 24.99 17.12 2.88 74.40

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WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

Pepsi-Cola Continued from B1 Once the distribution facilities obtain wholesale malt beverage and wine licenses from the Oregon Liquor Control Commission, the idea is to start small, Skovborg said. The OLCC doesn’t grant that license every day. Since 2006, the state agency has given out just nine wholesale malt beverage and wine licenses for a current tally of 154 statewide, spokeswoman Christie Scott said. Of those 154, some sell and distribute products in addition to wine and beer, such as soft drinks or T-shirts, Scott said, but specific statistics aren’t available. It’s fairly common for a beer and wine distributor to start carrying nonalcoholic beverages, but taking the reverse route is rare, said Jeff Lyons, market manager for the Bend branch of Portland-based Columbia Distributing.

Worth Continued from B1 Create a plan with your boss that outlines how to move up or get a bonus. “The one getting the promotion is the one generating that conversation.” Your strategy should be to know who the decision-makers are at your company and include in your plan how to impress them. • Learn a skill that’s in demand. As we have learned, value is about supply and demand. Personal branding expert Dan Schawbel said you want to become the expert in a specific skill or topic that coworkers and managers need to tap. “You get bonus points if it’s a skill that is important to the company and you are known for it within the organization,” Schawbel said. • Go beyond your job description. I watched a colleague of mine tell her editor to think of her if he ever needed a hand with editing. She also asked other editors if she could shadow them. Pretty soon, she was spending time with editors who were above her in rank and they were giving her work to edit. It wasn’t long

Brad Wales, one of four partners in Bend-based 10 Barrel Brewing Co. and a former partner in the now-defunct High Desert Beverage Distributors LLC, of Bend, said it’s a wise and aggressive move for Pepsi-Cola distributors to look to beer. Trucking and stocking processes are the same, regardless of the drink in question, Wales said. “(When the profit) margin’s being squeezed down a little bit, obviously you need to look for some more revenue sources,” he said. The move makes sense to Paul Romain, executive director of the Portland-based Oregon Beer and Wine Distributors Association. “There’s lot of brewpubs out there,” he said. “Maybe they think there’s an opportunity to get some microbeers or something. Everybody’s looking to make sure the truck is full.” — Reporter: 541-633-2117, jnovet@bendbulletin.com

before she got the title and salary, too. • Expand your circle. Most of us don’t care for office politicking. We also don’t want to spend gobs of our free time schmoozing. But to be valued, you need friends in every department of your company and in the business community. • Be a rainmaker. There’s nothing that speaks louder than a contribution to the bottom line. It starts with thinking bigger, and it comes with the advantage of having more control over your work life. • Make people see you differently. That may mean dressing better, moving your desk to a different location, losing weight and increasing your energy level or giving yourself a new title. Just like a “new and improved” household product, give the impression that you’ve become new and improved — and worth more. • Know the market and be bold: Zander said you should not be making the same salary for more than six years or charging the same hourly rate for more than three years. “You’re a bad business person if your rates never go up.”

Energy Continued from B1 “For 40 years, only politicians and the occasional author in Popular Mechanics magazine talked about achieving energy independence,” said Adam Sieminski, who has been nominated by President Barack Obama to head the U.S. Energy Information Administration. “Now it doesn’t seem such an outlandish idea.”

Broad implications The transformation, which could see the country become the world’s top energy producer by 2020, has implications for the economy and national security — boosting household incomes, jobs and government revenue; cutting the trade deficit; enhancing manufacturers’ competitiveness; and allowing greater flexibility in dealing with unrest in the Middle East. U.S. energy self-sufficiency has been steadily rising since 2005, when it hit a low of 70 percent, the data compiled by Bloomberg show. Domestic crude oil production rose 3.6 percent last year to an average 5.7 million barrels a day, the highest since 2003, according to the Energy Department. Natural gas output climbed to 22.4 trillion cubic feet in 2010 from 20.2 trillion in 2007, when the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission warned of the need for more imports. Prices have fallen more than 80 percent since 2008. At the same time, the efficiency of the average U.S. passenger vehicle has helped limit demand. It increased to 29.6 miles per gallon in 2011 from 19.9 mpg in 1978, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. The last time the U.S. achieved energy independence was in 1952. While it still imported some petroleum, the country’s exports, including of coal, more than offset its imports.

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... 1.16f .04 .44f 1.76f ... 1.00 .88 .96 ... .24 .48 .22 .84 .12 .46 ... ... .67f ... .80

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The expansion in oil and natural gas production isn’t

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Price (troy oz.) $1748.00 $1746.40 $34.165

Stepped-up oil output and restrained consumption will lessen demand for imports, cutting the nation’s trade deficit and buttressing the dollar, said Sieminski, who is currently chief energy economist at Deutsche Bank in Washington. With the price of a barrel of oil at about $100, a drop of 4 million barrels a day in oil imports — which he said could happen by 2020, if not before — would shave $145 billion off the deficit. Through the first 11 months of last year, the trade gap was $513 billion, according to the Commerce Department. Crude for March delivery settled at $96.91 a barrel yesterday on the New York Mercantile Exchange. The impact on national security also could be significant as the U.S. relies less on oil from the Mideast. Persian Gulf countries accounted for 15 percent of U.S. imports of crude oil and petroleum products in 2010, down from 23 percent in 1999. “The past image of the United States as helplessly dependent on imported oil and gas from politically unstable and unfriendly regions of the world no longer holds,” former Central Intelligence Agency Director John Deutch told an energy conference last month. That dependence was underscored in October 1973, when Arab oil producers declared an embargo in retali-

Environmental concerns

Northwest stocks Div PE

Impact on trade deficits and national security

A ‘new normal’ Today, signs of what former North Dakota senator Byron Dorgan says could be a “new normal” in energy are proliferating. The U.S. likely became a net exporter of refined oil products last year for the first time since 1949. And it will probably become a net exporter of natural gas early in the next decade, said Howard Gruenspecht, the acting administrator of the EIA, the statistical arm of the Energy Department. Cheniere Energy Partners may receive a construction and operating permit as early this month from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission for the first new plant capable of exporting natural gas by ship to be built since 1969 in the U.S. Houston-based Cheniere said it expects the $6 billion plant to export as much as 2.6 billion cubic feet of gas per day. The growth in oil and gas output means the U.S. will overtake Russia as the world’s largest energy producer in the next eight years, said Jamie Webster, senior manager for the markets and country strategy group at PFC Energy, a Washington-based consultant. While U.S. consumers would still be susceptible to surges in global oil prices, “we’d end up sending some of that cash to North Dakota” rather than to Saudi Arabia, said Richard Schmalensee, a professor of economics and management at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge.

Bend Redmond 541.388.2333 541.548.9159

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2.19 -.60 -21.5 32.60 -6.85 -17.4 22.85 -3.42 -13.0 2.14 -.30 -12.3 2.25 -.31 -12.1

Diary 1,722 1,301 104 3,127 157 1

Continued from B1 The Fed chairman stuck with the three-year time line. None of the senators asked Bernanke whether the encouraging job figures were reason enough for the Fed to rethink holding interest rates low for that long. And Bernanke didn’t tout the hiring data during the two-hour hearing. If anything, Bernanke maintained the Fed’s position: The economy is improving at a frustratingly slow pace and low rates are necessary to boost growth. Bernanke agreed with Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas, that an unemployment rate of 8.3 percent is understating the jobs problem. “It’s very important to look not just at the unemployment rate, which reflects only people who are actively seeking work,” Bernanke said. “There are also a lot of people who are either out of the labor force because they don’t think they can find work. … There are also a lot of people who are working part-time, and they’d like to be working full-time but they can’t find full-time work.” The Fed has kept its benchmark interest rate near zero for the past three years. In its policy statement in January, the Fed said it would probably not increase that rate until late 2014 at the earliest — a year and a half later than it had previously said. The Fed last month set an annual inflation target of 2 percent. Inflation in October-December quarter was below that target. “Given that inflation is close to target, I don’t think we would be doing radically different things at this point in time with a single mandate,” Bernanke said.

Indexes

Losers ($2 or more)

Name

Diary Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Last Chg

66338 12.68 -.46 60182 4.40 -1.94 55517 8.87 -.04 28372 12.02 +.01 26494 1.94 +.10

Name

Bernanke

Bob Schumacher 541.280.9147 www.schumacherconstructioninc.com

Market recap

Div PE 1.44f .92 1.78 ... .72a ... 1.68 .12 .58 .07 1.46 .89f .68 ... .28 .50 .32f .48 ... .60

ation for U.S. help for Israel in the Yom Kippur war. The U.S. economy contracted at an annualized 3.5 percent rate in the first quarter of the next year. Stock prices plunged, with the Standard & Poor’s 500 Index dropping more than 40 percent in the year following the embargo. Car owners were forced to line up at gasoline stations to buy fuel. President Richard Nixon announced in December that because of the energy crisis the lights on the national Christmas tree wouldn’t be turned on.

desertorthopedics.com

Local Service. Local Knowledge. 541-848-4444

856 NW Bond • Downtown Bend • 541-330-5999 www.havenhomestyle.com

Name

without a downside. Environmentalists say hydraulic fracturing, or fracking — in which a mixture of water, sand and chemicals is shot underground to blast apart rock and free fossil fuels — is tainting drinking water. The drop in natural gas prices is also making the use of alternative energy sources such as solar, wind and nuclear power less attractive, threatening to link the U.S.’s future even more to hydrocarbons to run the world’s largest economy. Still, those concerns probably won’t be enough to outweigh the benefits of greater energy independence.

B3

Chg %Chg

Diary 271 187 38 496 21 4

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

1,194 1,328 131 2,653 91 5

52-Week High Low

Name

12,876.00 10,404.49 5,627.85 3,950.66 467.64 381.99 8,718.25 6,414.89 2,490.51 1,941.99 2,908.13 2,298.89 1,370.58 1,074.77 14,562.01 11,208.42 868.57 601.71

Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

Last

Net Chg

%Chg

YTD %Chg

52-wk %Chg

12,878.20 5,323.33 452.06 8,069.70 2,432.84 2,904.08 1,347.05 14,246.75 827.37

+33.07 -10.92 +2.11 +21.67 +15.56 +2.09 +2.72 +21.19 -1.00

+.26 -.20 +.47 +.27 +.64 +.07 +.20 +.15 -.12

+5.41 +6.05 -2.72 +7.93 +6.78 +11.47 +7.11 +8.01 +11.67

+5.27 +4.69 +9.25 -3.70 +7.28 +3.83 +1.70 +1.48 +1.68

World markets

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed Tuesday. Market Close % Change

Key currency exchange rates Tuesday compared with late Monday in New York. Dollar vs: Exchange Rate Pvs Day

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

325.97 2,286.26 3,411.54 5,890.26 6,754.20 20,699.19 38,065.84 16,491.71 3,315.14 8,917.52 1,981.59 2,957.78 4,344.90 5,585.07

+.28 -.09 +.18 -.03 -.16 -.05 -.07 +.62 +.09 -.13 +.43 +.60 -.45 +.17

s t s t t t t s s t s s t s

1.0790 1.5893 1.0042 .002089 .1587 1.3248 .1290 .013027 .078826 .0336 .000893 .1501 1.0958 .0338

1.0733 1.5827 1.0036 .002080 .1586 1.3125 .1290 .013057 .078898 .0333 .000892 .1488 1.0881 .0338

Selected mutual funds YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 19.19 +0.03 +8.8 Amer Century Inv: EqInc 7.55 +3.9 GrowthI 27.00 +0.05 +9.9 Ultra 25.17 +0.02 +9.8 American Funds A: AmcpA p 20.61 +0.03 +9.5 AMutlA p 26.99 +0.05 +4.4 BalA p 19.19 +0.02 +5.4 BondA p 12.67 -0.03 +1.3 CapIBA p 50.52 +0.13 +2.6 CapWGA p 34.64 +0.12 +7.8 CapWA p 21.15 +0.02 +3.3 EupacA p 38.65 +0.17 +9.9 FdInvA p 38.18 +0.10 +7.9 GovtA p 14.40 -0.03 +0.1 GwthA p 31.63 +0.04 +10.1 HI TrA p 11.01 +0.01 +4.1 IncoA p 17.32 +0.04 +3.3 IntBdA p 13.69 -0.02 +0.6 ICAA p 29.01 +0.07 +7.1 NEcoA p 26.49 +0.02 +11.4 N PerA p 28.71 +0.09 +9.7 NwWrldA 50.91 +0.13 +10.4 SmCpA p 37.39 -0.06 +12.7 TxExA p 12.80 -0.01 +2.6 WshA p 29.67 +0.10 +4.5 Artisan Funds: Intl 21.81 +0.09 +10.0 IntlVal r 27.08 +0.11 +7.9 MidCap 37.79 -0.06 +14.8 MidCapVal 21.20 +0.03 +7.6 Baron Funds: Growth 54.44 +0.10 +6.7 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 13.92 NA DivMu 14.91 NA BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 18.98 +0.06 +4.6 GlAlA r 19.39 +0.02 +6.8 BlackRock B&C:

GlAlC t 18.06 +0.02 BlackRock Instl: EquityDv 19.02 +0.06 GlbAlloc r 19.48 +0.02 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 51.71 +0.05 Cohen & Steers: RltyShrs 65.70 -0.11 Columbia Class A: DivrBd 5.10 TxEA p 13.97 -0.01 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 31.11 AcornIntZ 38.06 +0.07 LgCapGr 13.43 ValRestr 49.35 +0.11 Credit Suisse Comm: ComRet t 8.50 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 10.29 +0.04 USCorEq1 11.71 +0.01 USCorEq2 11.58 +0.02 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 35.10 +0.01 Davis Funds Y: NYVenY 35.46 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.21 -0.02 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq 19.98 +0.01 EmMktV 30.84 +0.01 IntSmVa 15.52 +0.03 LargeCo 10.61 +0.02 USLgVa 20.85 +0.04 US Small 22.87 -0.01 US SmVa 26.03 -0.05 IntlSmCo 15.53 +0.03 Fixd 10.33 IntVa 16.32 +0.07 Glb5FxInc 11.01 -0.01 2YGlFxd 10.10 Dodge&Cox: Balanced 72.67 +0.04 Income 13.58 -0.02

+6.7 +4.6 +6.8 +11.5 +8.0 +1.3 +2.8 +12.9 +10.9 +11.7 +11.0 +3.9 +11.1 +8.8 +9.3 +8.0 +8.0 +0.9 +15.9 +18.8 +14.3 +7.2 +8.9 +11.5 +12.4 +12.2 +0.3 +10.7 +0.9 +0.2 +7.7 +2.1

IntlStk 32.30 +0.20 Stock 111.17 +0.13 DoubleLine Funds: TRBd I 11.15 TRBd N p 11.15 Dreyfus: Aprec 42.58 +0.16 Eaton Vance A: LgCpVal 18.21 +0.05 Eaton Vance I: FltgRt 8.96 GblMacAbR10.00 -0.01 LgCapVal 18.27 +0.05 FMI Funds: LgCap p 16.33 +0.03 FPA Funds: NwInc 10.69 FPACres 28.10 +0.01 Fairholme 26.96 +0.01 Federated Instl: TotRetBd 11.39 -0.03 StrValDvIS 4.80 +0.02 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 21.26 +0.09 StrInA 12.33 -0.01 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 21.52 +0.09 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 13.75 +0.01 FF2010K 12.70 FF2015 11.49 +0.01 FF2015K 12.75 +0.01 FF2020 13.87 +0.01 FF2020K 13.14 +0.01 FF2025 11.53 +0.02 FF2025K 13.26 +0.02 FF2030 13.72 +0.03 FF2030K 13.40 +0.02 FF2035 11.35 +0.02 FF2035K 13.49 +0.03 FF2040 7.92 +0.02 FF2040K 13.53 +0.03 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 12.17 +0.04

+10.5 +9.4 NA NA +5.1 +6.3 +2.1 +2.2 +6.4 +7.1 +0.4 +4.9 +16.5 +1.3 -1.1 +7.8 +2.5 +7.8 +5.0 +5.0 +5.1 +5.1 +5.7 +5.7 +6.7 +6.6 +6.9 +6.9 +7.6 +7.7 +7.6 +7.6 +8.4

AMgr50 15.85 AMgr20 r 13.06 Balanc 19.21 BalancedK 19.21 BlueChGr 47.07 CapAp 27.44 CpInc r 9.09 Contra 72.79 ContraK 72.75 DisEq 23.15 DivIntl 28.04 DivrsIntK r 28.00 DivGth 29.13 Eq Inc 43.83 EQII 18.34 Fidel 33.52 FltRateHi r 9.80 GNMA 11.86 GovtInc 10.75 GroCo 91.15 GroInc 19.58 GrowthCoK91.08 HighInc r 8.96 IntBd 10.95 IntmMu 10.55 IntlDisc 30.11 InvGrBd 11.75 InvGB 7.77 LgCapVal 10.84 LowP r 39.30 LowPriK r 39.28 Magelln 69.08 MidCap 29.47 MuniInc 13.26 NwMkt r 16.28 OTC 61.82 100Index 9.42 Puritn 18.79 SAllSecEqF12.17 SCmdtyStrt 9.30 SrsIntGrw 11.11 SrsIntVal 8.67 SrInvGrdF 11.75 STBF 8.54

+0.01 +5.5 +2.7 +0.02 +5.6 +0.02 +5.7 +0.04 +10.9 +0.04 +11.5 +0.01 +5.5 +0.29 +7.9 +0.30 +7.9 +0.10 +7.6 +0.12 +9.9 +0.12 +9.9 +0.06 +12.6 +0.10 +6.1 +0.06 +5.4 +0.10 +7.6 +2.0 -0.01 +0.4 -0.03 +12.7 +0.05 +7.3 +0.01 +12.7 +0.01 +4.4 -0.02 +0.9 -0.01 +1.3 +0.12 +9.1 -0.03 +0.9 -0.02 +1.0 +0.02 +7.6 +0.11 +10.0 +0.12 +10.0 +0.09 +9.7 +0.06 +10.5 +2.1 -0.01 +3.4 -0.19 +13.0 +0.01 +6.8 +0.01 +6.2 +0.04 +8.4 +0.02 +3.8 +0.04 +9.9 +0.07 +7.3 -0.03 +0.8 +0.7

StratInc 11.04 -0.01 +2.5 TotalBd 11.01 -0.02 +1.2 USBI 11.81 -0.03 +0.5 Value 70.30 +0.11 +10.8 Fidelity Selects: Gold r 46.53 -0.14 +10.2 Fidelity Spartan: ExtMkIn 39.75 +0.01 +12.1 500IdxInv 47.73 +0.10 +7.3 500Idx I 47.74 +0.10 +7.3 IntlInxInv 32.58 +0.20 +9.5 TotMktInv 39.08 +0.07 +8.2 Fidelity Spart Adv: 500IdxAdv 47.74 +0.10 +7.3 TotMktAd r 39.08 +0.07 +8.2 First Eagle: GlblA 47.96 +0.10 +6.3 OverseasA 21.78 +0.06 +7.0 Forum Funds: AbsStrI r 10.96 -0.01 -0.8 Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA p 12.42 +2.6 FoundAl p 10.57 +0.04 +7.0 HYTFA p 10.56 -0.01 +3.2 IncomA p 2.16 +4.0 RisDvA p 36.40 -0.03 +4.6 USGovA p 6.91 +0.2 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv 13.21 +0.05 +7.2 IncmeAd 2.15 +0.01 +4.5 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.18 +3.9 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 21.01 +0.03 +6.1 Frank/Temp Temp A: GlBd A p 13.24 +0.04 +7.1 GrwthA p 18.04 +0.12 +10.7 WorldA p 15.26 +0.08 +11.1 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 13.27 +0.04 +7.1 GE Elfun S&S: US Eqty 42.49 +0.14 +9.7 GMO Trust III: Quality 22.95 +0.13 +4.1

GMO Trust IV: IntlIntrVl 20.29 +0.14 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 11.80 +0.05 Quality 22.95 +0.12 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 7.10 MidCapV 36.80 +0.11 Harbor Funds: Bond 12.46 -0.03 CapApInst 40.74 +0.09 IntlInv t 58.69 +0.41 Intl r 59.22 +0.41 Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 32.62 -0.04 Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 41.79 Div&Gr 20.56 +0.05 TotRetBd 11.76 -0.02 Hussman Funds: StrGrowth 11.95 -0.01 IVA Funds: Wldwide I r16.28 +0.05 Invesco Funds A: Chart p 17.35 +0.03 CmstkA 16.50 +0.01 EqIncA 8.75 +0.02 GrIncA p 19.66 +0.06 HYMuA 9.66 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 24.14 -0.03 AssetStA p 24.86 -0.03 AssetStrI r 25.07 -0.03 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 11.92 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 11.91 HighYld 7.86 ShtDurBd 11.00 USLCCrPls 21.59 +0.02 Janus T Shrs: PrkMCVal T21.81 +0.02 John Hancock Cl 1: LSBalanc 13.00 +0.01

+7.3 +14.5 +4.1 NA +9.6 +2.2 +10.4 +12.9 +12.9 +13.2 +12.3 +6.3 +1.1 -3.9 +6.0 +8.1 +8.5 +5.2 +5.9 +3.4 +11.6 +11.7 +11.7 NA NA NA NA +9.4 +8.0 +6.5

LSGrwth 12.88 +0.02 +8.1 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 19.37 +0.07 +15.3 Longleaf Partners: Partners 29.31 +0.06 +10.0 Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 14.59 +0.01 +5.1 StrInc C 15.12 +0.02 +4.9 LSBondR 14.53 +0.01 +5.0 StrIncA 15.04 +0.02 +5.0 Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdY 12.35 -0.01 +3.8 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 11.45 +0.01 +8.6 BdDebA p 7.92 +0.01 +4.4 ShDurIncA p4.59 +1.6 Lord Abbett C: ShDurIncC t 4.62 +1.5 Lord Abbett F: ShtDurInco 4.58 -0.01 +1.3 MFS Funds A: TotRA 14.63 +4.6 ValueA 23.96 +0.05 +7.1 MFS Funds I: ValueI 24.06 +0.04 +7.1 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 7.36 +0.05 +11.0 MergerFd 15.64 +0.01 +0.3 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.51 -0.01 +1.8 TotRtBdI 10.51 -0.01 +1.8 MorganStanley Inst: MCapGrI 36.69 +0.04 +11.5 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 28.68 +0.06 +5.7 GlbDiscZ 29.03 +0.06 +5.7 SharesZ 21.16 +0.03 +6.1 Neuberger&Berm Fds: GenesInst 49.57 +0.07 +6.8 Northern Funds: HiYFxInc 7.26 +0.01 +3.9 Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 28.57 +0.05 +5.6 Intl I r 18.69 +0.07 +12.9

Oakmark 45.52 +0.09 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 7.18 +0.01 GlbSMdCap14.85 -0.01 Oppenheimer A: DvMktA p 32.90 -0.06 GlobA p 58.76 +0.17 GblStrIncA 4.21 IntBdA p 6.42 MnStFdA 34.53 +0.06 RisingDivA 16.86 +0.04 S&MdCpVl31.83 +0.08 Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 15.27 +0.04 S&MdCpVl27.06 +0.08 Oppenheimer C&M: RisingDvC p15.21 +0.04 Oppenheimer Roch: RcNtMuA 7.12 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 32.52 -0.06 IntlBdY 6.42 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 11.09 -0.03 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AlAsetAut r 10.70 -0.01 AllAsset 12.19 -0.01 ComodRR 6.93 -0.01 DivInc 11.56 -0.01 EmgMkCur10.54 +0.04 EmMkBd 11.50 HiYld 9.27 InvGrCp 10.59 -0.03 LowDu 10.41 -0.02 RealRtnI 12.01 -0.04 ShortT 9.77 +0.01 TotRt 11.09 -0.03 PIMCO Funds A: RealRtA p 12.00 -0.05 TotRtA 11.09 -0.03 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 11.09 -0.03 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 11.09 -0.03

+9.2 +5.9 +10.2 +12.2 +8.7 +4.0 +3.8 +7.4 +7.5 +7.4 +7.5 +7.3 +7.5 +4.6 +12.3 +4.0 +2.3 +6.7 +5.6 +6.0 +3.1 +6.5 +2.6 +3.9 +2.8 +1.5 +2.0 +1.1 +2.4 +1.9 +2.3 +2.3 +2.3

PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 11.09 -0.03 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 49.36 +0.12 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 41.42 -0.02 Price Funds: BlChip 42.41 +0.07 CapApp 21.83 +0.02 EmMktS 32.04 -0.04 EqInc 24.78 +0.05 EqIndex 36.34 +0.08 Growth 35.00 +0.03 HlthSci 36.87 -0.17 HiYield 6.71 +0.01 IntlBond 10.04 +0.02 Intl G&I 12.59 +0.08 IntlStk 13.65 +0.03 MidCap 57.85 -0.01 MCapVal 23.24 -0.01 N Asia 15.29 -0.01 New Era 46.41 -0.09 N Horiz 34.66 -0.02 N Inc 9.72 -0.03 OverS SF 8.01 +0.05 R2010 15.87 +0.01 R2015 12.33 +0.01 R2020 17.07 +0.02 R2025 12.50 +0.01 R2030 17.95 +0.02 R2035 12.70 +0.01 R2040 18.08 +0.02 ShtBd 4.84 SmCpStk 34.74 -0.01 SmCapVal 38.10 -0.08 SpecIn 12.63 Value 24.57 +0.03 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 13.88 +0.01 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 11.95 PremierI r 20.65 -0.04 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 38.11 +0.07

+2.4 +7.1 +7.3 +9.7 +5.9 +12.4 +7.5 +7.3 +10.0 +13.1 +4.2 +3.3 +9.3 +11.1 +9.7 +8.6 +9.9 +10.4 +11.7 +0.7 +9.4 +5.7 +6.5 +7.3 +7.9 +8.5 +8.9 +9.1 +0.8 +11.2 +10.5 +3.0 +9.0 +9.4 +11.1 +11.5 +7.7

S&P Sel 20.99 +0.04 Scout Funds: Intl 31.01 +0.21 Sequoia 153.98 +0.14 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 18.59 +0.14 Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 26.36 +0.02 IntValue I 26.95 +0.02 Tweedy Browne: GblValue 22.84 +0.07 Vanguard Admiral: BalAdml 22.89 CAITAdm 11.60 -0.01 CpOpAdl 74.65 -0.08 EMAdmr r 36.28 +0.04 Energy 121.63 +0.36 ExtdAdm 44.09 500Adml 124.23 +0.26 GNMA Ad 11.08 -0.01 GrwAdm 34.70 +0.06 HlthCr 56.31 +0.16 HiYldCp 5.85 +0.01 InfProAd 28.12 -0.10 ITBdAdml 11.85 -0.05 ITsryAdml 11.70 -0.04 IntGrAdm 58.21 +0.12 ITAdml 14.26 -0.01 ITGrAdm 10.15 -0.03 LtdTrAd 11.20 LTGrAdml 10.34 -0.07 LT Adml 11.57 MCpAdml 98.38 +0.15 MuHYAdm 10.96 PrmCap r 69.45 +0.07 ReitAdm r 89.30 -0.12 STsyAdml 10.80 -0.01 STBdAdml 10.65 -0.01 ShtTrAd 15.95 STIGrAd 10.74 SmCAdm 37.23 -0.02 TtlBAdml 11.02 -0.03 TStkAdm 33.87 +0.06 WellslAdm 56.82 -0.05

+7.3 +10.9 +5.8 +9.1 +9.6 +9.6 +4.5 +5.1 +2.4 +9.5 +14.6 +8.0 +12.0 +7.3 +0.4 +9.2 +3.7 +3.5 +1.5 +1.0 +0.2 +12.0 +2.0 +2.0 +0.6 +1.0 +2.5 +10.4 +2.7 +8.4 +8.7 +0.2 +0.5 +0.3 +1.2 +11.5 +0.5 +8.2 +2.3

WelltnAdm 56.80 Windsor 47.27 WdsrIIAd 48.89 Vanguard Fds: CapOpp 32.33 DivdGro 16.13 Energy 64.79 EqInc 22.83 Explr 79.86 GNMA 11.08 GlobEq 17.57 HYCorp 5.85 HlthCre 133.46 InflaPro 14.31 IntlGr 18.30 IntlVal 29.51 ITIGrade 10.15 LifeCon 16.84 LifeGro 22.63 LifeMod 20.22 LTIGrade 10.34 Morg 19.36 MuInt 14.26 PrecMtls r 22.19 PrmcpCor 14.45 Prmcp r 66.94 SelValu r 19.94 STAR 19.93 STIGrade 10.74 StratEq 20.48 TgtRetInc 11.89 TgRe2010 23.42 TgtRe2015 12.95 TgRe2020 22.98 TgtRe2025 13.08 TgRe2030 22.43 TgtRe2035 13.49 TgtRe2040 22.16 TgtRe2045 13.92 USGro 20.04 Wellsly 23.45 Welltn 32.89 Wndsr 14.01 WndsII 27.54

+0.04 +4.9 +0.06 +9.8 +0.11 +6.9 -0.03 +0.07 +0.19 +0.08 -0.01 +0.06 +0.01 +0.37 -0.06 +0.04 +0.17 -0.03 -0.01 +0.03 +0.01 -0.07 +0.04 -0.01 -0.33 +0.06 +0.11 +0.01 +0.04 -0.02 -0.01 +0.01 +0.02 +0.02 +0.03 +0.02 +0.04 +0.03 +0.04 -0.02 +0.03 +0.02 +0.06

+9.6 +4.6 +8.0 +4.2 +11.8 +0.4 +10.4 +3.5 +3.7 +1.4 +11.9 +10.8 +2.0 +3.8 +7.3 +5.5 +1.0 +10.8 +2.0 +14.4 +7.1 +8.4 +7.3 +6.4 +1.2 +11.7 +3.1 +4.4 +5.3 +5.9 +6.6 +7.2 +7.8 +8.1 +8.2 +11.0 +2.3 +4.9 +9.7 +6.8

Vanguard Idx Fds: TotIntAdm r24.22 +0.10 TotIntlInst r96.85 +0.38 TotIntlIP r 96.86 +0.38 500 124.21 +0.25 MidCap 21.68 +0.03 SmCap 37.21 -0.02 STBnd 10.65 -0.01 TotBnd 11.02 -0.03 TotlIntl 14.48 +0.06 TotStk 33.86 +0.06 Vanguard Instl Fds: BalInst 22.89 DevMkInst 9.24 +0.06 ExtIn 44.08 FTAllWldI r 86.26 +0.37 GrwthIst 34.70 +0.06 InfProInst 11.45 -0.05 InstIdx 123.42 +0.25 InsPl 123.43 +0.26 InsTStPlus 30.65 +0.05 MidCpIst 21.73 +0.03 SCInst 37.23 -0.02 TBIst 11.02 -0.03 TSInst 33.87 +0.05 Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl 102.61 +0.21 MidCpIdx 31.05 +0.05 STBdIdx 10.65 -0.01 TotBdSgl 11.02 -0.03 TotStkSgl 32.69 +0.06 Western Asset: CorePlus I 11.25 -0.02 Yacktman Funds: Fund p 18.41 Focused 19.63

+10.9 +10.9 +10.9 +7.3 +10.3 +11.5 +0.5 +0.5 +10.9 +8.2 +5.1 +9.7 +12.0 +11.0 +9.2 +1.4 +7.3 +7.3 +8.2 +10.4 +11.5 +0.5 +8.2 +7.3 +10.4 +0.5 +0.5 +8.2 +1.6 +5.1 +4.5


B4

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2012

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If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact Ashley Brothers at 541-383-0323, email business@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� at www.bendbulletin.com. Please allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication.

B C 

TODAY AARP TAX-AIDE: Provides free tax preparation for seniors and low- to moderate-income people; Monday through Friday, call to make an appointment; Redmond Senior Center, 325 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; 541-548-6325. AARP TAX-AIDE: Provides free tax preparation for seniors and low- to moderate-income people; Monday through Friday, call to make an appointment; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541388-1133. HIGH DESERT GREEN INDUSTRY CONFERENCE: Registration required at http://extension. oregonstate.edu/deschutes/hdgi/ home. $30-$175; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-5482711. PUTTING FUN BACK IN THE WORKPLACE: Program to give managers and executives tips, tools and trade secrets for motivating employees through humor and fun; free; 7:30-9 a.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain an alcohol server permit. Registration required; $35; 9 a.m.; Abby’s Pizza, 1938 S. U.S. Highway 97, Redmond; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Provided by The Partnership to End Poverty. Learn about tax credits and access a free online tax-filing program. Certified tax volunteers will be available for assistance. Registration preferred; free; 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-504-1389 or www.takecredit.org. MAKING SENSE OF RETIREMENT: Registration required; contact 541330-4329; free; noon-12:30 p.m.; Anna Robbins’ office at Edward Jones, 1444 N.W. College Way, Suite 2, Bend; 541-330-4329. HOMEBUYING CLASS: Registration required; free; 5:30-9:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 2303 S.W. First St., Redmond; 541-318-7506, ext. 109.

THURSDAY AARP TAX-AIDE: Provides free tax preparation for seniors and low- to moderate-income people; Monday through Friday, call to make an appointment; Redmond Senior Center, 325 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; 541-548-6325. AARP TAX-AIDE: Provides free tax preparation for seniors and low- to moderate-income people; Monday through Friday, call to make an appointment; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541388-1133. BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WEEKLY MEETING: Starts at 7 a.m.; free; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541-610-9125. HIGH DESERT GREEN INDUSTRY CONFERENCE: Registration required at http://extension. oregonstate.edu/deschutes/hdgi/ home. $30-$175; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-5482711. WINDHAVEN, INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT FOR AN UNPREDICTABLE WORLD: Registration required; free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794, luiz.soutomaior@ schwab.com or schwab.com. EXCEL 2010 AUTOMATION: Six Thursday evening classes. Registration required; $99; 6-8 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

FRIDAY AARP TAX-AIDE: Provides free tax preparation for seniors and low- to moderate-income people; Monday through Friday, call to make an appointment; Redmond Senior Center, 325 N.W. Dogwood Ave.;

541-548-6325. AARP TAX-AIDE: Provides free tax preparation for seniors and low- to moderate-income people; Monday through Friday, call to make an appointment; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541388-1133. POWERPOINT 2010: Registration required; $59; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. CENTRAL OREGON REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT CLUB: Free; 11 a.m.; ServiceMaster Clean, 20806 Sockeye Place, Bend; 541-610-4006 or bobbleile@windermere.com. KNOW INTERNET SEARCHING: Reservations encouraged; free; 23:30 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-6177050 or www.deschuteslibrary.org.

SATURDAY 5 YEARS TO RETIREMENT: Develop a game plan with action steps and time lines for a successful retirement. Registration required; $39; 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. EXCEL 2007 BEGINNING: Registration required; $59; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Sisters High School, 1700 W. McKinney Butte Road; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. KNOW RÉSUMÉS: Reservations encouraged; free; 10-11 a.m.; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-617-7050 or www.deschuteslibrary.org. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Provided by The Partnership to End Poverty. Learn about tax credits and access a free online tax-filing program. Certified tax volunteers will be available for assistance. Registration preferred; free; noon-5 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-504-1389 or www.takecredit.org.

MONDAY AARP TAX-AIDE: Provides free tax preparation for seniors and low- to moderate-income people; Monday through Friday, call to make an appointment; Redmond Senior Center, 325 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; 541-548-6325. AARP TAX-AIDE: Provides free tax preparation for seniors and low- to moderate-income people; Mondays; call to make an appointment; Bend’s Community Center, 1036 N.E. Fifth St.; 541-312-2069. AARP TAX-AIDE: Provides free tax preparation for seniors and low- to moderate-income people; Monday through Friday, call to make an appointment; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541388-1133. WORD 2010, BEYOND THE BASICS: Registration required; $59; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc. edu. CAI-CENTRAL OREGON REGIONAL COUNCIL KICKOFF: Food, fun and “Are You Smarter than the Experts?�; free; 5:30 p.m.; The Oxford Hotel, 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-382-8436. FORECLOSURE PREVENTION CLASS: Learn about NeighborImpact’s Housing Center tools and services which can assist individuals struggling to pay their mortgages; free; 5:30-7:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 20310 Empire Ave., Suite A110, Bend; 541-318-7506, ext. 109, karenb@neighborimpact.org or www.homeownershipcenter.org. BEGINNING QUICKBOOKS PRO: Two Monday evening classes. Registration required; $59; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. LAUNCH YOUR BUSINESS: Working with a business adviser and classroom peers, class participants learn how to start their businesses and develop a working plan. Class combines four one-hour coaching sessions and three threehour Wednesday evening classes. Registration required; $79; 6-9

p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu. BURNING FLAGS WON’T CREATE JOBS: Seminar on job creation; free; 6:30 p.m.; Highland Baptist Church, 3100 S.W. Highland Ave., Redmond; 541-548-4161.

TUESDAY AARP TAX-AIDE: Provides free tax preparation for seniors and low- to moderate-income people; Monday through Friday, call to make an appointment; Redmond Senior Center, 325 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; 541-548-6325. AARP TAX-AIDE: Provides free tax preparation for seniors and low- to moderate-income people; Monday through Friday, call to make an appointment; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541388-1133. BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL HIGH DESERT CHAPTER WEEKLY MEETING: Starts at 7:15 a.m. Visitors are welcome and first two visits are free; Bend Honda, 2225 N.E. U.S. Highway 20; 541-420-7377. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain an alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. KNOW EXCEL BUDGETS: Reservations encouraged; free; 2-3:30 p.m.; Deschutes Library Administration Building, 507 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-617-7050 or www.deschuteslibrary.org. KNOW DIGITAL BOOKS: Reservations encouraged; free; 2:30-4:30 p.m.; East Bend Public Library, 62080 Dean Swift Road; 541-617-7050 or www. deschuteslibrary.org. SMALL BUSINESS COUNSELING: Individuals who operate or wish to start small businesses can discuss business planning, organization and start-up, finance, marketing and other business issues with SCORE volunteers in private sessions. No appointments needed; free; 5:30-7:30 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 514-617-7083 or www.scorecentraloregon.org.

Chapter 7 Filed Jan. 31

Nicholas R. Olson, 642 N.W. Eighth St., Redmond Timothy B. Morrow, 21342 Pecoraro Loop, Bend James L. McIntyre, 61592 Fargo Lane, Bend Filed Feb. 1

Justin E. Tomlinson, 3391 N.W. Knob Hill Road, Prineville Paul B. Heatherman, P.O. Box Eight, Bend Norman E. Forgey, 16137 Elkhorn Lane, La Pine

Filed Feb. 2

Brian K. Hanson, 20575 Conifer Ave., Bend Jennifer R. Brassfield, 3122 N.W. Craftsman Drive, Bend William L. Siers Jr., 427 S.W. Fifth Place, Prineville Filed Feb. 3

Cheryl D. Kissler, 1476 S.W. Bear Drive, Madras Charles P. Horton, 740 N.E. Larch Ave., Redmond Terra S. C. Torres, 1443 S.W. 11th St., Redmond Kimberly C. Turner, 60990 Woods Valley Place, Bend Deborah L. Scott, P.O. Box 172,

By Rachel Donadio New York Times News Service

ATHENS, Greece — As thousands of Greeks walked off the job in a general strike Tuesday to protest stringent new austerity measures, there was a growing sense that the country was reaching a critical point in its efforts to survive the debt crisis. Greek political leaders postponed for yet another day a decision on an austerity package — including 20 percent cuts to base pay for workers in private companies and a loosening of public sector job pro-

Crops Continued from B1 “There is unlikely to be any ground that won’t be planted this year,� said Todd Wachtel, a 40-year-old who farms about 5,700 acres in Altamont, Ill., and plans to expand his corn fields by 21 percent when seeding begins in early April. “Farmers know that they have to plant more when prices are high because they may not last.� A bigger harvest in the United States, the world’s largest exporter of all three crops, will help compensate for shortages in the current crop year. Drought damage in Brazil and Argentina will probably spur the USDA to cut its global and U.S. grainsupply forecasts for the current season on Feb. 9, a separate Bloomberg survey of as many as 25 analysts showed. The USDA’s first forecast for

tections — in exchange for the billions in loans Athens needs to prevent a default in March. With elections looming as soon as April, the parties fear that they are essentially being told to commit political suicide to save the country. If that indeed is the case, analysts here say, it is not clear what will replace them, making Greece a potential laboratory for a volatile mix of austerity, populism and social unrest. Not that the old order, widely derided as corrupt and inefficient, is likely to be

deeply mourned. For most Greek voters, the two larger parties participating in the fragile tripartite coalition of Prime Minister Lucas Papademos — the Socialist Party and the center-right New Democracy — were already drained of political capital before the debt crisis by decades of selfinterest and corruption. That has now been capped by two years of unrelenting austerity that has hurt most Greeks but has ultimately failed to revive the system, or even change it in any significant way.

the year 2012-2013 crop year will be Feb. 23. Farmers will sow corn, used to feed livestock and make ethanol, on 94.329 million acres this year, up 2.6 percent from last year and the most since 1944, according to the Bloomberg survey. Soybean fields may expand 0.4 percent to 75.309 million acres, the fifth-most ever. Both crops are harvested after the current season ends on Aug. 31. Wheat in the season that begins June 1 will reach a three-year high of 57.233 million acres, up 5.2 percent, the survey showed. Corn may rise 7.1 percent to $6.90 a bushel in six months because of the damage in South America, before dropping to $5.25 in a year as U.S. farmers increase supply, Goldman Sachs said in a Feb. 2 report. Wheat may tumble 18 percent to $5.50 by July and

soybeans may drop 17 percent to $10.20 a bushel, analysts at commodity broker Allendale Inc. in McHenry, Ill., said Jan. 21. “The area is available to have huge crops this year,� said Paul Meyers, a vice president at Foresight Commodities Services Inc. in Long Valley, N.J., and the former head of grain-market analysis at the USDA from 1974 to 1983. “We are headed for a surplus-supply situation.� Corn, soybean and wheat futures are down at least 15 percent since the end of August, helping to send the Standard & Poor’s GSCI Agriculture Index to a 16 percent decline. The MSCI All-Country World Index of equities gained 4.7 percent during the period, touching a six-month high Feb. 3, while Treasuries returned 2.5 percent, a Bank of America Corp. index shows.

WEDNESDAY Feb. 15 AARP TAX-AIDE: Provides free tax preparation for seniors and low- to moderate-income people; Monday through Friday, call to make an appointment; Redmond Senior Center, 325 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; 541-548-6325. AARP TAX-AIDE: Provides free tax preparation for seniors and low- to moderate-income people; Monday through Friday, call to make an appointment; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541388-1133. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Provided by The Partnership to End Poverty. Learn about tax credits and access a free online tax-filing program. Certified tax volunteers will be available for assistance. Registration preferred; free; 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-504-1389 or www.takecredit.org. ROTH IRAS CAN BE LESS TAXING: Registration required; contact 541330-4329; free; noon-12:30 p.m.; Anna Robbins’ office at Edward Jones, 1444 N.W. College Way, Suite 2, Bend; 541-330-4329. MASTERING THE LAW OF ATTRACTION WITH NETWORK OF ENTREPRENEURIAL WOMEN: Registration required at www .networkwomen.org; $30; 5 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-382-4321. YOUNG PROFESSIONALS NETWORK: Network and bring donations for KIDS Center; $5 for members, $12 for non-members; 5 p.m.; Jones & Roth CPAs and Business Advisors, 300 SW Columbia St., Suite 201, Bend.

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N  R

BANKRUPTCIES

Greek leaders again delay austerity plan amid strike

Warm Springs

Limited time offer. Total donation announced on Earth Day, April 22, 2012!

Filed Feb. 4

Michael O. Zekmeister, 55830 Black Duck Road, Bend Filed Feb. 6

Ramona A. Carrasco, 318 E. Mint Lane, Culver Matthew G. Lathrop, 61645 Thunder Road, Bend Chapter 13 Filed Feb. 1

Daniel J. Baker, 2090 N.E. Hollow Tree Lane, Bend Paul Sakasegawa, 20463 Ahha Lane, Bend

*41% of our current subscribers use the Auto-Renewal Program. If the other 59% switched, that would be almost $180,000 back into our community. Let’s make that happen. DID YOU KNOW... The Bulletin uses soy-based inks. The Bulletin prints on recycled newsprint. The Bulletin donates paper roll ends to local nonprofits.

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LOCALNEWS

Reader photo, C2 Editorials, C4

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2012

LOCAL BRIEFING Bend hosts free citizens academy The city of Bend is offering a free citizens academy to help residents understand where tax dollars go and why. Classes will be held from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. in the City Council Chamber at Bend City Hall over the course of four days in March and April. On March 13, members of the Deschutes County Historical Society will discuss Bend’s history. On March 20, there will be an introduction to city government, along with information about the budget and city finance. Public safety will be the topic during the class on April 2, and the Public Works Department will be the topic on April 10. Reservations are required and can be made by calling 541-3885516 or emailing jfinestone@ci.bend .or.us. Residents are welcome to attend as few or as many sessions as they like.

www.bendbulletin.com/local

BendSisters enrollment drops 6.9% La Pine OKs transfer policy OREGON DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION REPORT

By Patrick Cliff and Ben Botkin The Bulletin

Sisters School District’s enrollment fell more over the past year than enrollment at any other district in Central Oregon, according to data released today by the Oregon Department of Education. Sisters’ decline comes as districts across the state saw minimal enrollment changes. State K-12 enrollment slipped .07 percent, losing 382 students. In Sisters, however, enrollment fell by 6.9 percent, or 91 students.

The state’s data provide a snapshot of enrollment each fall, and the changes are year-to-year comparisons. Enrollment is critical for districts because the state distributes funding on a per-student basis. Sisters School Board Chairwoman Christine Jones attributed the enrollment drop, in part, to the down economy and the difficulty of earning a living and supporting a family in Sisters. See Enrollment / C2

Local school district enrollment District

2010-2011 total enrollment

Bend-La Pine Schools Black Butte SD

2011-2012 total enrollment

16,157

16,275

17

15

2,932

3,010

636

642

Jefferson County SD

2,803

2,806

Redmond SD

7,003

6,962

Sisters SD

1,302

1,211

Crook County SD Culver SD

Source: Oregon Department of Education

By Patrick Cliff The Bulletin

Musicians from TAO: The Art of the Drum perform for students at The Tower Theatre in downtown Bend on Tuesday morning.

5 candidates on primary ballot The Oregon Secretary of State’s Office yesterday announced which presidential candidates will appear on Oregon’s primary ballot in May. President Barack Obama will be the sole Democratic candidate on the ballot. Newt Gingrich, Ron Paul, Mitt Romney and Rick Santorum will appear as the Republican candidates. The last day to register to vote in the primary election is April 24.

Photos by Rob Kerr The Bulletin

An education in rhythm

The Bend-La Pine School Board unanimously approved a policy Tuesday that could allow more students from outside the district to transfer to its schools. A new state law requires each district in Oregon to decide by March 1 how many student transfers it will accept. Bend-La Pine’s new policy sets guidelines for transfers, giving preference to transfer students already attending district schools and their siblings. Bend-La Pine Deputy Superintendent John Rexford said Sisters, Redmond and Bend-La Pine districts will have similar transfer policies. The three districts generally have allowed students to transfer freely to neighboring districts. See Transfers / C5

DESCHUTES

Officials discuss priority bills this session

— Bulletin staff reports

News of Record, C2

Have a story idea or submission? Contact us!

By Hillary Borrud The Bulletin

The Bulletin Call a reporter: Bend ................541-633-2160 Redmond ........ 541-617-7837 Sisters............. 541-617-7837 La Pine ........... 541-383-0348 Sunriver ......... 541-383-0348 Deschutes ...... 541-617-7829 Crook ............. 541-504-2336 Jefferson ....... 541-504-2336

Above, Buckingham Elementary School fifth-grader Xavier Judson gets a highfive from a TAO performer Tuesday morning, following a special performance for students at The Tower Theatre in downtown Bend.

Salem ..............541-419-8074 D.C. .................202-662-7456 Education .......541-633-2161 Public Lands ....541-617-7812 Public Safety ....541-383-0387 Projects .......... 541-617-7831

Left, members of TAO: The Art of the Drum perform for students at The Tower Theatre in downtown Bend on Tuesday morning. TAO combines Japanese taiko-style drumming with martial arts and elaborate costumes. TAO performed Tuesday night for a paid audience at The Tower Theatre.

Submissions: • Civic Calendar notices: Email event information to news@bendbulletin.com, with “Civic Calendar” in the subject, and include a contact name and phone number. Contact: 541-383-0354

• Births, engagements, marriages, partnerships, anniversaries: Details: The Milestones page publishes Sunday in Community Life. Contact: 541-383-0358

C

Obituaries, C5 Weather, C6

Deschutes County officials are worried that legislation designed to combat gang violence will divert money from services for local at-risk youth. The shift, they fear, will treat the symptoms of delinquency rather than the cause. “This is a sticking point for us,” said Hillary Saraceno, executive director of the Deschutes County Commission on Children and Families. “Funding in the state for youth would primarily be used in areas that have gang violence.” Saraceno expressed her concerns Tuesday as Deschutes County commissioners discussed the county’s top priorities for the current state legislative session. The bill Saraceno referred to, House Bill 4165, would implement changes to Oregon’s education system and children’s programs sought by Gov. John Kitzhaber and approved by the Legislature last year. See Priorities / C5

Bend junior works hard at acting out

Clarification

By Megan Kehoe

A story headlined “Foreclosures: Salem works to ease housing troubles,” which appeared Tuesday, Feb. 7, on page C1, mischaracterized the status of Dave Kaiser’s Madras farm. Kaiser continues to work with the bank to save his property from foreclosure.

On any given day, Marlee Norr, 16, is one of two people. There’s the Marlee who is quiet. Who spends hours alone writing fiction. Who loves to bury herself in a book. Who does well in school. Then, there’s the Marlee who loves to get up in front of large crowds

The Bulletin

OUR SCHOOLS, OUR STUDENTS Educational news and activities, and local kids and their achievements. • School Notes and submission info, C2

and become someone else. “I consider myself an introvert,” Marlee said. “But for some reason, when I get up on stage, I’m not. It gives me a chance to express myself.” Marlee is involved in a variety of activities, but the one she loves above everything else is acting. The Cascades Academy of Central Oregon junior

has been involved in productions since she was in sixth grade. She is currently working on a oneact play titled “Painted Closet,” which she wrote with some friends. Marlee, a student through Innovation Theatre Works for young adult actors, says that she hopes to act at a professional level someday. See Norr / C2

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Junior Marlee Norr, 16, stands by her painting in the art classroom at The Cascades Academy of Central Oregon in Bend on Tuesday.


C2

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2012

Norr Continued from C1 “I heard once that if you want to act, don’t. But if you need to act, do,” Marlee said. “I’m the kind of person who needs to act.” Marlee’s also the kind of person who needs to write. She has attended writing classes at the Nature of Words’ Storefront Project since she was a freshman and enjoys writing fiction and poetry. She says she’s drawn to writing for much the same reason she’s drawn to acting — because it allows her to express herself and, perhaps, make a lasting impression on someone. Though much of her spare time is dedicated to fostering her own creativity, Marlee also makes an effort to help others. When she was a freshman, Marlee helped design a program called Teen Elder Computer Help through the Central Oregon Council on Aging — the organization Marlee’s mom works for. The program allows teenagers to mentor elderly people on how to use technology like iPods, iPads and social media sites like Facebook. The idea behind the program was to help seniors stay in touch with their families, Marlee said. She spends several hours a week working as a mentor in the program. “It’s so much fun to help them,” Marlee said. Marlee works hard to maintain her 3.9 grade point average. Initially, Marlee attended Bend High School, but she

Well shot! READER PHOTOS Can you work a camera, and capture a great picture? And can you tell us a bit about it? Email your color or black and white photos to readerphotos@ bendbulletin.com and we’ll pick the best for publication. Submission requirements: Include as much detail as possible — when and where you took it, and any special technique used — as well as your name, hometown and phone number. Photos must be high resolution (at least 6 inches wide and 300 dpi) and cannot be altered.

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Marlee Norr, 16, second from right, talks with some of her schoolmates while relaxing in the student lounge at The Cascades Academy of Central Oregon in Bend on Tuesday. From left, Reid Weber, 15, Amei Pratt, 16, and Kassandra Rajewski, 15.

Marlee Norr, 16 Junior at The Cascades Academy of Central Oregon Favorite Movie: “Fried Green Tomatoes” Favorite TV Shows: “Lost,” “Bones” Favorite Book: “Les Misérables” Favorite Subject: English Least Favorite Subject: math Activities: acting, writing, Teen Elder Computer Help mentor

transferred to Cascade Academy last year for its smaller class sizes and tight-knit atmosphere. “It’s like one big family

there,” Marlee said. “And I like how it’s tailored to the individual student’s needs.” This summer, Marlee will finish up her high school requirements and graduate a year early. She plans to attend Central Oregon Community College next year and wants to transfer eventually to Southern Oregon University in Ashland — home of the Oregon Shakespeare Festival. Marlee plans to major in drama at the school and, hopefully, act in the festival. After that, she has ambitions of pursuing acting as a career. “I’m motivated to do well because I want to do great things one day,” Marlee said. “I try to keep my eyes on the future.” — Reporter: 541-383-0354, mkehoe@bendbulletin.com

S  N  REUNIONS USS Iwo Jima (LPH2/LHD7) Shipmates; for all related ship’s company and embarked Navy and Marine Corps personnel; June 610, Crowne Plaza Hotel, McLean, Va.; for information or to register, contact: Robert McAnally, 757-7230317 or email: yujack@megalink .net.

MILITARY NOTES Army Pfc. Jeremy Sechler graduated from basic infantry

training at Fort Benning, Columbus, Ga. Sechler is the son of Dianne Hecht, of La Pine.

COLLEGE NOTES Hillary Christen graduated with an associate of arts degree in fashion design from the Fashion Institute of Design and Merchandising in Los Angeles. Christen is a 2010 graduate of Mountain View High School and the daughter of Rick and Mary Christen, of Bend. Isaac Harris graduated with a bachelor’s degree in business

marketing from the University of Houston-Victoria in Victoria, Texas. He is a 2006 graduate of Mountain View High School and the son of Wade and Janet Harris, of Bend.

YOUTH NOTES Jordan Payne, of Redmond, was named the 2012 Crooked River Roundup Queen. She will represent the event at rodeos, parades and civic events throughout Oregon. Payne is a graduate of Redmond High School.

How to submit

Story ideas

Teen feats: Kids recognized recently for academic achievements or for participation in clubs, choirs or volunteer groups. (Please submit a photo.) Phone: 541-383-0358 Email: youth@bendbulletin.com Mail: P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708

School briefs: Items and announcements of general interest. Phone: 541-633-2161 Email: pcliff@bendbulletin.com

Other school notes: College announcements, military graduations or training completions, reunion announcements. Phone: 541-383-0358 Email: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Student profiles: Know of a kid with a compelling story? Phone: 541-383-0354 Email: mkehoe@bendbulletin.com

N  R POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Bend Police Department

Theft — Thefts were reported and arrests made at 1:35 p.m. Jan. 27, in the 3100 block of North U.S. Highway 97. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 4 p.m. Feb. 1, in the 19500 block of Meadowbrook Drive. Theft — A theft was reported at 12:02 p.m. Feb. 5, in the 2600 block of Northeast U.S. Highway 20. Theft — A theft was reported at 1:16 p.m. Feb. 5, in the area of Northeast Division Street. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and items stolen at 7:44 a.m. Feb. 6, in the 600 block of Southeast Glenwood Drive. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 8:14 a.m. Feb. 6, in the 2700 block of Northeast Faith Drive. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 8:33 a.m. Feb. 6, in the 800 block of Northwest Saginaw Avenue. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 8:54 a.m. Feb. 6, in the 1600 block of Northeast Meadow Lane. Criminal mischief — Damage to lights was reported at 9:51 a.m. Feb. 6, in the 100 block of Northwest Oregon Avenue. Theft — A bicycle and a bicycle lock were reported stolen at 10:26 a.m. Feb. 6, in the 900 block of Northwest Wall Street. Burglary — A burglary was

reported at 11:20 a.m. Feb. 6, in the 600 block of Northeast Savannah Drive. Theft — Gasoline was reported stolen at 12:02 p.m. Feb. 6, in the area of Southeast Third Street and Southeast Reed Market Road. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported damaged, entered and items stolen at 12:02 p.m. Feb. 6, in the 3000 block of North U.S. Highway 97. Theft — A theft was reported at 1:33 p.m. Feb. 6, in the 1900 block of Northeast Third Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 3:22 p.m. Feb. 6, in the 1900 block of Northeast Third Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 4 p.m. Feb. 6, in the 300 block of Southwest Columbia Street. Theft — A purse was reported stolen at 4:30 p.m. Feb. 6, in the 800 block of Northwest Wall Street. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 9:10 p.m. Feb. 6, in the 1600 block of Northeast Lotus Drive. Prineville Police Department

Theft — A theft was reported at 12:34 p.m. Feb. 6, in the area of Northwest Third Street. Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

Theft — A theft was reported at 2:21 p.m. Feb. 6, in the 64400 block of McGrath Road in Bend. Theft — A theft was reported at 12:28 p.m. Feb. 6, in the 500 block of East Tyee Drive in Sisters. Oregon State Police

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported Jan. 31, in the area of U.S. Highway 20 and Plainview Drive in Tumalo.

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 1:29 p.m. Feb. 3, in the area of West U.S. Highway 20 near Couch Market Road in Bend. DUII — Ashley Nicole Turk, 19, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 11:35 p.m. Feb. 3, in the area of Knott Road and Tall Pine Avenue in Bend. DUII — Angela Jamie Sweetman, 33, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 12:51 a.m. Feb. 4, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 and milepost 128.

BEND FIRE RUNS Friday 21 — Medical aid calls. Saturday 11:34 a.m. — Authorized controlled burning, 19601 Manzanita Lane. 2:12 p.m. — Unauthorized burning, in the area of Kelsey Butte. 4:28 p.m. — Building fire, $20,000 loss, 19470 Lone Cow Drive. 16 — Medical aid calls. Sunday 1:31 p.m. — Brush or brush-andgrass mixture fire, 63140 Cole Road. 1:37 p.m. — Chimney or flue fire, 19508 Cherokee Road. 22 — Medical aid calls. Monday 16 — Medical aid calls.

Find It All Online bendbulletin.com

BLANKETED BUTTE Charlie Baughman snapped this photo from Cline Falls Road of fog on Cline Butte.

Enrollment Continued from C1 “All you have to do is drive through Sisters and see the empty stores to know our economy has suffered like elsewhere,” she said, adding she was optimistic the city would recover. The enrollment changes varied at each of Sisters’ three schools. Sisters Elementary School had the steepest decline, falling from 360 students to 311 — a 13.6 percent drop. The other two schools

had enrollment drops of less than 5 percent. Sisters Middle School’s enrollment slipped by 20 students, or 4.7 percent. Sisters High School lost 22 students, for a 4.1 percent drop.

A growing district Bend-La Pine continued to grow at a modest rate, increasing 0.7 percent over last year. In 2010-11, the district had 16,157 students. It added 118 students this year. District projections were within “a handful of students,” said spokeswoman Julianne Repman. Since 1985-86, the district has experienced just one year

— 2009-10 — in which enrollment dropped, according to Repman. Districts use enrollment projections to make major staffing decisions. “When you have projections that are close to the number of students who walk through the doors, it really helps you with staffing ratios,” Repman said. After Sisters, the largest drop occurred in the Redmond School District, which lost 41 students. Crook County, Jefferson County and Culver school districts all added students. — Reporter: 541-633-2161, pcliff@bendbulletin.com


WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

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O N State Senate OKs marine reserves with 25-5 vote

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Man wounded in Eugene shootout EUGENE — Eugene police say that a 31-yearold man wounded in an exchange of gunfire with officers is hospitalized in critical condition. That man was identified at a Tuesday news conference as Mark Richard Jones. Officer Ryan Molony has been identified as the officer who wounded Jones. Officers responded Monday to a report of a man running around and waving a gun at the Briarwood Mobile Home Park. Police say gunfire was exchanged when they confronted the man. No officers and no one at the mobile home park were injured. Molony is on paid leave pending an investigation by the Interagency Deadly Force Investigation Team.

By Jeff Barnard The Associated Press

Slain intruder had just been released EUGENE — An intruder shot dead by a Eugene resident during a reported burglary had just been released from jail the day before. Police say 44-year-old Shawn Connelly of Springfield was one of two intruders Thursday at the home. KVAL reports that on Monday he had been booked into the Lane County Jail on heroin charges and was released the same day. The second intruder was found in the neighborhood by a police dog. Thirtynine-year-old Darrin George Dubouch of Coburg is held in the Lane County Jail for investigation of robbery and burglary.

Terror suspect trial postponed till fall PORTLAND — The federal trial of a young man charged with attempting to detonate a weapon of mass destruction at a Portland holiday tree-lighting ceremony in 2010 has been postponed from May to Oct. 2. The Oregonian reports that U.S. District Judge Garr King recently approved changes to the trial schedule for Mohamed Mohamud. Lawyers are sparring over evidence that the defense wants the prosecution to turn over as part of the unusual process of discovery in a national security case. The newspaper said a defense motion filed Tuesday raises questions about the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, in Washington, D.C. Judges there approve surveillance of suspects in terrorism and espionage cases. Mohamud’s lawyers seek documents that government agents submitted to the surveillance court to get permission to eavesdrop on their client. The government has objected to the disclosure.

10 protesters held in Occupy march PORTLAND — Portland police say they have arrested at least 10 of an estimated 175 protesters who marched Monday night in what was billed as a demonstration to support Occupy Oakland. Police say some demonstrators broke a glass door at a restaurant, threw garbage and vandalized several cars. Lt. Robert King said those arrested are accused of disorderly conduct and interfering with officers. They included a 15-yearold boy. The Oregonian reports that dozens of officers responded at the peak of the demonstration in southeast Portland. Several protesters said they were upset about the damage caused by a small faction in the crowd. — From wire reports

Courtesy Oregon State Police

An undated photo shows Jared Townsley. Search and rescue teams found the body of Townsley, an experienced mountaineer, on Tuesday. Townsley had apparently died in a severe fall during icy conditions on Mount Hood, authorities said.

Experienced climber’s body found on Mount Hood By Kimberly A.C. Wilson The Oregonian

Searchers Tuesday found the remains of the experienced mountain climber who vanished early Monday while descending Mount Hood. Authorities located the body of Jared Townsley, a 32-yearold married father of two from Tigard. A helicopter with the Oregon Army National Guard has airlifted the climber’s body off the mountain. Volunteers with two major search and rescue organizations — Mountain Wave Search & Rescue and Portland Mountain Rescue — headed up the mountain toward Crater Rock on Tuesday, the area Townsley was last seen. The area has been perilous recently, authorities said. Three climbers have fallen in the area in the past four days, Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office officials said. A crew of searchers followed tracks just after dawn and found Townsley’s remains. Townsley had fallen into the White River Canyon, an area at the 9,000-foot level. He was injured in the fall but searchers do not know if the fall itself was fatal. “It’s very windy and icy,” said Deputy Scott Meyers, incident commander with the Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office. “Once you get sliding on ice, it’s hard to self-arrest.”

Puzzling location Authorities said they’re puzzled by Townsley’s location. Given his route, they assumed he would have descended to the west of Crater Rock. His body was found to the east. Searchers could not locate his cellphone. He was not equipped with a mountain locator unit, a device that helps searchers pinpoint a climber’s location. Townsley left Timberline Lodge on Sunday night and was expected to return by 9 a.m. Monday. When he didn’t join a work-related telephone conference call, his brother

“This is the second fall we have responded to this weekend — fortunately, the first climber was uninjured. Climbers should exercise extreme caution while descending.” — Joseph Rabinowitz, paramedic, Reach and Treat

alerted authorities. On a climbing registry kept at Timberline Lodge, Townsley wrote that he was equipped to be on the mountain through Monday night. Sgt. James Rhodes, a sheriff’s spokesman, said Townsley was last seen by other climbers about 8:30 a.m. Monday in the area of Crater Rock. He was descending the mountain at the time. Rhodes said the sighting is consistent with what authorities believe was Townsley’s timeline for summiting and descending the mountain. They think he planned to be off the mountain by 9 a.m. and planned to attend a work conference call two hours later. Gregg Townsley, Jared Townsley’s father, thanked searchers in a statement released by the Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office. Gregg Townsley declined to say much more about his son, other than he was a skilled climber who had scaled the mountain at least a dozen times, including a half-dozen solo climbs. His older brother, Joshua Townsley, posted the following message on his Facebook page this morning: “It is with great sadness that we learned this morning that Jared took a tremendous and final fall on Mt Hood. We will miss him as we know you will. Thank you for all of your prayers.” Joshua Townsley, who lives in Portland, is executive director of Habitat for Humanity in

Vancouver, Wash. His sister, Rachel Stramel of Cornelius, is pastor of the Orenco Presbyterian Church. Overnight weather conditions on the mountain were challenging. Miles Higa, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service, said wind gusts reached 40 mph at the 7,000-foot level. Temperatures overnight were about 27 degrees at that elevation.

Other rescues Just a day before Townsley’s death, another climber was rescued from Mount Hood. Megan Coker, 35, of Southwest Portland, suffered leg and rib injuries in a 300-foot tumble on glacial ice near Crater Rock around 11:30 a.m. Sunday. Rescue teams mobilized quickly, reaching Coker around 3 p.m. in an area above Palmer Lift. Coker, who was climbing with a group, was brought to safety by late afternoon. “It’s very icy, especially below Crater Rock,” said Reach and Treat paramedic Joseph Rabinowitz, one of the rescuers. “This is the second fall we have responded to this weekend — fortunately, the first climber was uninjured. Climbers should exercise extreme caution while descending.” Rescuers included Clackamas County Sheriff’s Search and Rescue, AMR’s Reach and Treat team, Mt. Hood Ski Patrol and Portland Mountain Rescue. Meanwhile, CCSO Search and Rescue deputies and Mountain Wave Emergency Communications volunteers set up a base at Timberline Lodge, and coordinated the entire operation. Townsley was the first person to die while climbing Mount Hood since Robert Dale Wiebe, 58, of Langley, British Columbia, died in a fall on Coe Glacier in June of 2010. The last person to die on the mountain was Taylur DeWolf, 17, of Sandy, who died while snowboarding in January at Mt. Hood Meadows.

LAKE OSWEGO

2 teens arrested in vandalism spree The Oregonian LAKE OSWEGO — Police arrested two Lake Oswego High School students in connection with a Sunday-night vandalism spree that damaged more than 20 cars, an elementary school and a home. The two 16-year-olds were

booked into the Donald E. Long Juvenile Detention Home on felony charges that include first-degree attempted arson and several counts of first-degree criminal mischief. Capt. Dale Jorgensen, Lake Oswego police spokesman, said police received a tip that

led them to the suspects but still have not been able to determine a motive for the vandalism or why they seemed to target a home in on Fifth Street. The home was heavily tagged with black spraypaint and a Dodge Charger and a pickup were painted.

The Oregon Senate on Tuesday overwhelmingly supported a proposal adding three marine reserves to state waters. If the bill, which advanced on a 25-5 vote, also passes the House, it would bring the total to five areas protecting marine habitat within state waters. It also would end a decade of fighting in Salem over the idea of protecting coastal waters from intense fishing to assure fish and crabs will thrive. Despite misgivings, Sen. Betsy Johnson, D-Scappoose, urged passage, saying creating the reserves would “serve as an inoculation” against the prospects for a ballot measure that would be even tougher on the economies of coastal communities struggling from longstanding cutbacks in commercial fishing.

2009 pilot reserves In 2009 the Legislature created two pilot reserves and set up an intense process for fishermen, conservation groups, and coastal communities to find agreement. The bill was made up of recommendations from the Ocean Policy Advisory Council based on those negotiations. The new areas are off Cape Perpetua, Cape Falcon, and Cascade Head, and cover 5 percent of state waters. The areas have core areas where fishing is outright banned, surrounded by areas where trolling and crab pots are allowed. Bot-

tom trawling is not allowed. “This is simply a way of tying up the seas in much the same way we did the forest,” said Sen. Fred Girod, R-Stayton, before casting a no vote.

Protects economies Sen. Jeff Kruse, R-Roseburg, said the bill took pains to protect the economies of coastal communities, while leaving room to change course if scientific evidence points a different way in the future. Brad Pettinger, a commercial fishing boat owner and member of the Oregon Trawl Commission, said trawlers, which drag heavy nets on rollers along the ocean bottom, are already relegated by federal regulations to deeper waters. The biggest impacts would be on crab fishing, which is Oregon’s biggest single commercial fishery, and commercial and recreational hook-and-line fishing for groundfish, he said. Oregon is the last of the three West Coast states to create a network of marine reserves. Both California and Washington have more extensive networks. Ben Enticknap, Pacific project manager for the conservation group Oceana, said the science was clear that marine reserves increase the size and diversity of marine species, and that abundance spreads outside the boundaries of the reserves. The Oregon network will show whether a network of reserves, connected by ocean currents, will help coastal waters survive the changes from global warming and the acidification of ocean waters that warming waters bring, he said.

Bonamici sworn in The Associated Press PORTLAND — Swearing to uphold the Constitution, Suzanne Bonamici took the oath of office Tuesday and officially became a member of the U.S. House of IN Representatives. Speaker John Boehner administered the oath in the House chamber in Washington D.C., one week after Bonamici won a special election to replace former Rep. David Wu, who resigned in a sex scandal. Bonamici, a Democrat, becomes the only woman in Oregon’s five-member congressional delegation. She was greeted by hugs from her colleagues from Oregon and numerous standing ovations from the rest of the House. “I’m excited to begin,” Bonamici told her new colleagues. “I’m humbled by the tremendous responsibility and very appreciative of the trust that the people of Northwest Oregon have placed in me.” Her congressional staff said Bonamici’s first act was to sign on as a co-sponsor of a bill lifting the cap on the amount credit unions can lend to member businesses. Proponents say it would provide more capital for small business expansion. She also had meetings scheduled with representatives of a credit union lobbying group and a work-

force development program based in Astoria, her office said in a news release. Bonamici has previously said some her first priorities will be hiring staff and helping constituents who haven’t had a representative to resolve D.C. problems with the federal government. “We are delighted to have you as part of this team,” Oregon Republican Rep. Greg Walden said to Bonamici in a speech in the House. “I can speak for the entire delegation and say we look forward to working with you. Thank you and welcome to the Congress.” Bonamici defeated Republican business owner Rob Cornilles on Jan. 31. She’ll finish out Wu’s term, which ends in January, and must be re-elected in November.

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Value-added trials in schools a positive step

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he new Value-Added Model has the potential to address a long-standing frustration in judging the effectiveness of our K-12 education system.

For decades, we’ve heard educators say it’s hard to evaluate their efforts because so much depends on what happens in a child’s home. If parents don’t parent and kids aren’t ready to learn, they’ve said, there’s only so much a teacher or school can do. The free- or reduced-price lunch roster has been the blunt instrument for measuring how many kids are disadvantaged. But with nearly half of students in the Bend-La Pine schools in that program, it’s an approach that can provide the reasoning — some might say excuse — for any failure. But now Bend-La Pine, Redmond, Sisters and Crook County schools are working with the nonprofit Chalkboard Project to devise a new way to compensate for those effects. It’s called the Value-Added Model, or VAM, and it could provide a more accurate way to look at our schools’ methods. The idea is to identify factors that affect a student’s ability to learn — both positive and negative — and to determine what an average student with one or more of those factors might be expected to accomplish. The “value-added� is the amount they accomplish above what might be expected. That is presumed to be the measure of the school or district’s effectiveness. The idea is explored in the Oak Tree Analogy (http://varc.wceruw .org/tutorials/Oak/index.htm). Factors being considered for

There are thousands of details to be worked out and results to be compiled before we’ll know just how helpful VAM can be, but it’s a promising start in pursuit of an effective method to evaluate what works in education. the Bend-La Pine VAM, for example, include previous test score, free/reduced lunch, gender, independent education plan, talented and gifted, race/ethnicity, English language learner, attendance, grade level, age and repeated/ skipped grade. Students with similar factors could be compared across the district. If similar groups were doing better at one school than another, educators could examine what was working better and implement it elsewhere. Experiments with VAM are going on across the state and nation, so ultimately, it’s possible comparisons could be made nationally. However, early VAM results aren’t intended to evaluate individual teachers, and designers aren’t making any promises that they ever will. There are thousands of details to be worked out and results to be compiled before we’ll know just how helpful VAM can be, but it’s a promising start in pursuit of an effective method to evaluate what works in education.

Art Central’s exit raises questions about safety

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hat’s wrong with downtown Bend? Not much at all. But if people believe it’s not safe, the issues of downtown parking, dredging Mirror Pond or flower baskets along the streets will be less meaningful. People have been troubled about safety at night downtown and in Drake Park for years. That’s not at all unusual for towns the size of Bend. For Bend, it should not be enough to let the matter pickle. Last week, the nonprofit arts education group Arts Central pulled out of a prime piece of real estate downtown, the historic Goodwillie-Allen-Radmacher House. The rent was only $1 a year. Arts Central left because patrons and staff felt unsafe stepping out into Riverfront Plaza. Bend Police say there’s not much substance to the worst of the worries — prostitution and large-scale drug dealing. There’s

some underage drinking, smoking, and some possession of pot. Young people hang out in the plaza. That’s not a crime. But when there’s a concentration of people, there can be a concentration of problems. The police review enforcement every year. It has been stepped up downtown, police say. More police walking through downtown can help. With Bend’s budget, it means taking police from somewhere else. There is also a sign in the plaza warning about surveillance, but there is no camera. Police Chief Jeff Sale is thinking about actually putting in cameras. Downtown Bend is a place where people want to go to shop, eat, work and live. Arts Central’s exit doesn’t change that. It raises questions. If police and the city don’t take them seriously, downtown could change.

My Nickel’s Worth Hang up and drive I am writing about people talking on their cellphones and texting while they are driving. I think it is OK to pull over for a few minutes to do those things. I think you can easily double or triple the fine to help people think about what can happen if they break the law. Here is a very good reason not to talk on your cellphones: I heard that a kid got hit by a trailer and died because someone was texting and driving. I live on the west side, so I have biked a lot of places in Bend. This issue is really important to me and my friends, so I hope everyone using their phones while driving will change. Cyrus Tadjiki Bend

Heed tree well warning Mt. Bachelor has posted a warning on its website about the dangers of tree wells and a caution to always ski with a buddy. I had never given that warning much consideration until Jan. 23, when I nearly lost a good friend. Four of us were skiing the trees in an area between Ed’s Garden and the Down Under runs. We were all experienced skiers and were stopping every few hundred yards to regroup. On the next leg I took off first, followed by Dick, who fell and totally disappeared, skis and all, into a tree well. He was trapped feet down and totally covered by snow. He could only move his head and one hand. Fortunately Bob and Mike were only a distance above, and — after about 45 minutes of frantic digging — they were able to pull him out. Dick was unhurt but significantly shaken up by his ordeal. There is no way he could have dug himself out and no one would have seen or heard him, even from

only a few feet away. The tree that created this tree well was a small sapling, barely above the surface of the snow, and there was no well or depression showing at the surface. I developed a whole new appreciation for the dangers of tree wells that day, and I encourage everyone who loves to ski the trees, as I do, to heed Mt. Bachelor’s warning and use extra caution when the snow is soft and deep. Don Pederson Bend

Don’t lift ban at Waldo I write to express my dismay upon hearing that the Oregon State Marine Board is considering changing and/or lifting the ban on gas motors now in place for Waldo Lake. There are many lakes available for motorized boat use east of the Cascades, and it seems entirely unnecessary to jeopardize — in any way — the “Gem of the Cascades,� where the purity of the water is greater than that of distilled water. The surrounding wilderness and old growth forest, and the serenity and purity of the lake are what make it unique and deserving of protection. The current motor ban was created after more than 10 years of work with representation of all the major stakeholders. The public was hugely in favor of the ban. There is no reasonable argument to support changing the current agreement. Nearby lakes are available for motorized use. Allowing recreational use for motorized boats or aircraft on Waldo Lake would be unconscionable, with irreparable consequences lasting far beyond any perceived economic advantage for recreational businesses wanting to expand. Changing the ban even slightly would be like opening the proverbial can of worms, with more and

more demands being made. To the marine board: To stand firmly upon what has already been duly investigated and decided upon is the only decision that makes any sense. Putting Waldo Lake and the surrounding area in any danger is unthinkable. Dorothy Sayward Bend

Siltation fix is upstream What to do about the silt in Mirror Pond seems to be a hot topic for discussion, if not action. Here’s my two cents’ worth. Anyone who has floated the Deschutes River upstream from Bend knows that the river passes through miles of loose soil — volcanic ash? — which is scoured from the banks and carried downstream as silt when river levels fluctuate. The water released into the river below Wickiup Reservoir is totally controlled by the irrigation companies, and varies from almost zero — which devastates trout habitat — to very high levels, which scours great quantities of silt from the erosive banks. That silt is dropped in slow-flowing sections downstream, with a large percentage of it ending up in Mirror Pond, which was formed by the PP&L dam. There have been attempts to stabilize the loose soil of the river banks by placing and tying down logs on the banks and by planting willows. That kind of treatment should be continued on a larger scale — state and federal agencies would have to be involved. Also, the irrigation companies could better regulate water releases from Wickiup that would reduce the scouring effect on the banks, and incidentally, improve the trout habitat. To slow future silting of Mirror Pond, look upstream and act there. Jack Remington Bend

Letters policy

In My View policy

How to submit

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 550 and 650 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or email them to The Bulletin. Write: My Nickel’s Worth / In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 Fax: 541-385-5804 Email: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Payoff of sustainable Portland building worth the price By J. Clayton Hering s a Portland commercial real estate broker and an Oregon Republican, I was sorry to see that the usually reliably sound Bulletin took such a dim view of the proposed Oregon Sustainability Center. I have no hesitation in urging the Legislature to approve the $37 million in bonding for the OSC. The editorial’s chief focus is on the OSC as a downtown office space that would provide “classroom� space for Portland State University and notes that it will cost more than other Class A office space in downtown Portland. But, of course, the OSC is much more than a downtown office building and much more than a building to provide simple classrooms. The OSC

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will be a cutting-edge, ultra-efficient building that will be a living laboratory and a showcase for Oregon’s ultraefficient building sector. It will also be a university research center with faculty offices, labs and a larger lecture hall — in addition to traditional classrooms. Those who insist on comparing the OSC to the downtown Class A office space really ought to make an applesto-apples comparison. Comparing the cost to average is inappropriate. A more fitting comparison would be to new Class A space — that is, if it were simply an office building. Not unlike the first generation of LEED building, this new building will attract companies that want to observe and test the effectiveness of the build-

IN MY VIEW ing’s technologies, work alongside other like-minded companies and realize the marketing benefits of operating out of one of the most innovative buildings in the world. The $434-per-square-foot cost — $474 with land — seems high to some. But it lines up with similar private and public sector Platinum LEED buildings in Oregon. The building at Rogue Community College and Southern Oregon University’s Medford campus cost $323 per square foot to put up in 2003 and would cost $386 per square foot to build today in Portland. The more comparable Collaborative Life Sci-

ence Building now being built at the Oregon Health & Science University will average about $464 per square foot. The OSC is the kind of public-private, industry-university partnership that other states have used to nurture and advance their regional strengths from Massachusetts to Texas. One of Oregon’s well-known strengths is construction, design and sustainabletechnologies innovation. We should build on this. A preliminary analysis reported that the OSC will create 780 jobs and $100 million in economic benefits. What’s key is that these jobs and economic benefits will reach far beyond Portland. To Bend, for example. PV Powered in Bend is well-positioned

to manufacture the building’s industry-leading inverters on the photovoltaic panels that will be built in Salem. Sun Storage, in Joseph, could make the racking system for mounting the OSC’s solar panels. Orenco Systems in Sutherlin might work in developing its net-zero water system. It’s hard to say if all these Oregon companies will find work on this project, but I’m sure they would like a chance to bid. I hear so many legislators, Republicans and Democrats, talk about the need to do something to create jobs. The OSC is one of those “somethings.� The price is right. The payoff is huge. — J. Clatyon Hering is chairman of the board of Norris Beggs & Simpson Co.


WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

NORTHWEST NEWS

O    D N   Stephen F. Ada Marrie Simpson, of Prineville Feb. 23, 1917 - Feb. 3, 2012 Arrangements: Sweeney Mortuary of Heppner, 541-676-9600 Services: A graveside service will be held at 11 a.m. Saturday, February 11, 2012 at the Spray Cemetery in Spray, Oregon.

Judy Mae Dmytryk, of Madras Feb. 6, 1939 - Jan. 31, 2012 Arrangements: Bel-Air Funeral Home, 541-475-2241 Services: Visitation will be held on Friday, February 10, 2012, between the hours of 10:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m., at Bel-Air Chapel. Funeral Services will be held on Saturday, February 11, 2012, at 10:30 a.m., at Madras United Methodist Church. Burial will follow at Mount Jefferson Memorial Park. Contributions may be made to:

American Diabetes Association.

Mary J. Adams, of Redmond Feb. 7, 1928 - Feb. 3, 2012 Arrangements: Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home, 541-382-2471, www.niswonger-reynolds.com

Services: A memorial service will be held Saturday, February 11, 2012 at 2:00 PM in the Kingdom Hall of Jehovah Witnesses, 851 NW Canal Blvd., Redmond, OR 97756.

Donna Lee Kenshol, of Redmond Sept. 5, 1935 - Feb. 6, 2012 Arrangements: Redmond Memorial Chapel 541-548-3219 please sign our guestbook www.redmondmemorial.com

Services: A visitation from 10-12 Friday Feb. 10 and a graveside service to follow at 1 pm at Redmond Memorial Cemetery.

Victoria May Lind, of Sherwood, Oregon Dec. 21, 1922 - Feb. 4, 2012 Arrangements: Baird Funeral Home of Bend, (541) 382-0903 www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: A Celebration of the Life of Victoria M. Lind will take place on Friday, February 10, 2012 at 2:00 PM at Liferoads Fellowship (formerly Neighborhood Church), located at 21065 SW Stafford Road in Tualatin, OR. Contributions may be made to:

Any missions outreach program of ones choosing or to Partners In Care Hospice House, 2075 NE Wyatt Court Bend, Oregon 97701, www.partnersbend.org

Sept. 5, 1935 - Feb. 6, 2012

Nov. 29, 1948 - Jan. 23, 2012

Donna was the only child of Hazel and Clifford Piper. She was born and raised in Owaneco, Illinois. After high school, she followed a friend to Caribou, Maine, where she met her husband of 56 years, Charles ‘Chuck’ Kenshol. Chuck and Donna were married in Donna Kenshol 1953, and started their life, family, and travels together that led them across the United States. Donna was a loving wife, wonderful mother and homemaker. She enjoyed ceramics, crafts, camping, cooking and decorating for the holidays. Donna is survived by her daughter, Debbie Kenshol of Goldendale, WA; son, Colton Kenshol and his wife, Kayte of Hermiston, OR; and her daughter, Cheryl Sugano and her husband, Dale of Redmond, OR; four grandchildren, four great-grandchildren and her four-legged companion, Angel. There will be a viewing between 10:00 a.m. and 12 noon, Friday, February 10, 2012, at Redmond Memorial Chapel; graveside service to follow at 1:00 p.m., at Redmond Memorial Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to the Redmond Humane Society. Please visit and sign our guest book at www.redmondmemorial.com.

Betty Rose Lerwill Nov. 20, 1929 - Jan. 15, 2012 Betty Rose Lerwill was born in Cut Bank, Montana, to parents, Dora and Oliver Bratten. She passed away in Redmond, Oregon, after complications from a broken hip. The family moved to Oregon when Betty was two years old. She graduated from Days Betty Lerwill Creek High School. She married Walt Lerwill, February 14, 1948, in Roseburg, Oregon. They moved to Central Oregon in 1956. They had two children, Linda Lerwill Kentner and Marvin Lerwill; five grand-children, seven great-grandchildren, and one greatgreat-grandchild. Betty loved spending time with her family, traveling and enjoyed playing cards.

Pat Dixon

Photos by Tyler Hicks / New York Times News Service

Lt. Cmdr. Kelsey Martin successfully frees himself during training at the Aviation Survival Training Center in Whidbey Island, Wash.

Navy pilots take a dip in Washington’s ‘dunker’ By C.J. Chivers New York Times News Service

NAVAL AIR STATION WHIDBEY ISLAND, Wash. — The pilot sat strapped to a chair, held in place as if he were in the backseat of a helicopter. Beside him, on a mock wall, was a window. The window was closed. The pilot wore opaque goggles. He could not see the window, or anything else. The chair was attached to a rotating stand in the chest-deep water of a swimming pool. A petty officer spun a large wheel, flipping the chair backward with a gentle whoosh. The pilot was now underwater, upside down. Another exercise in the test had begun. The pilot — feet near the surface, head near the bottom, sightless — was to disconnect himself from the buckled straps, wiggle free, open the window and pull himself through and out, a series of movements intended to simulate what he might need to do in an aircraft that had struck the sea at night. Every four years, the Navy requires its pilots and those who fly with them to renew their skills in escaping from downed aircraft or surviving an ejection and parachute descent into water. The refresher class, depending on where each student is based, is held in one of several schools like this one, the Aviation Survival Training Center on this Navy base in coastal Washington state. In the peculiar way that demanding and slightly frightening training is often viewed by those who undergo it, the course is simultaneously appreciated

A participant buckles in during a water training exercise in the so-called “dunker� at the Aviation Survival Training Center.

and loathed. The pilot who was flipped upside down on this day, Lt. Cmdr. Kelsey Martin, struggled briefly with the buckle that held the straps across his torso. He soon broke free and swam through the window without the assistance of the rescue swimmer watching alongside. Later, he offered the common sentiment. “I was not looking forward to this,� he said, before adding: “This training is actually very valuable. I say that because I know four guys who have ejected over water, and all of them lived.�

Drilling reactions The ordeal with the chair that flips upside down — known as the Modular Shallow Water Egress Trainer — was one exercise of several. The final exercise, the socalled “dunker,� involved being seated wearing opaque goggles in a simulated helicopter as it was dropped into 12 feet of water and rotated upside down. Several pilots and crew members would have to escape at once, while safety divers watched, ready

to rescue anyone who became stuck. The course, which lasts two days, seeks to drill reactions into aircrews for surviving the most likely dangers they might face. Martin is an E/A-18G pilot. Though jet pilots do not fly helicopters, they sometimes are carried as passengers within them, and are required to complete the helicopter training, too. Two journalists from The New York Times were also required to complete a recent course before receiving permission to fly inside carrier-based F/A-18s for coverage of the Afghan war. Cmdr. Richard Folga, the school’s director, said the reasoning behind the training is locked in aviation math. Every year, no matter how much attention aviation squadrons pay to maintenance and safety, naval aircraft experience catastrophic failures. Pilots and aircrews end up in the sea. He added: “No one plans for this kind of mishap. People don’t go to work one day expecting that they will have to eject. But it happens. And when it happens, they have to be ready.�

Feb. 15, 1919 - Jan. 28, 2012

Obituary policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, email or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825.

Deadlines: Death Notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details.

Phone: 541-617-7825 Email: obits@bendbulletin.com Fax: 541-322-7254

Mail: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708

Hollister was one of Nike’s 1st execs The Associated Press PORTLAND — Geoff Hollister, who ran track for the Oregon Ducks and went on to become one of Nike’s first executives, has died after a long battle with cancer. He was 66. A number of athletes at last weekend’s New Balance Indoor Grand Prix in Boston wore patches in support of Hollister, who died on Monday. Hollister opened a Blue

Donna Kenshol

O'Connell Steve was born in Fullerton, CA, to Hazel (Rife) and Dr. Raymond O'Connell. In 1962, his family moved to Coos Bay, OR, where he graduated from Marshfield High School in 1966. He served in the US Marine Steve Corp. O’Connell from 1966-1970, including a tour of duty in Vietnam and was a lifetime member of the VFW. After completing his tour of duty, Steve earned a BS degree in Biology from Portland State University in 1974, and a second BS in Medical Technology from Oregon Health Sciences University in 1976. He met his wife, Denise Taylor, while attending OHSU, and they were married on April 30, 1977. In 1986, he completed a Masters program at Central Michigan University, earning a Masters degree in Health Services Administration. Steve started his laboratory career at Bay Area Hospital in Coos Bay, OR, in 1976. Throughout his career, he worked in supervisory capacities in the laboratories at Bay Area Hospital, Salem Hospital ('87-'89) in Salem, OR, Central Oregon District Hospital ('89-'96) in Redmond, OR, and eventually St. Charles Medical Center in Bend, OR. Steve loved life, family, coaching his children in soccer, and the beach. He was an avid Duck fan and also enjoyed jogging, fishing with his family, elk hunting with his friends, reading, and walking later in life. He is survived by his wife, Denise; daughter, Rebecca; son, Matthew and his wife, Kara; brother, Dr. Dennis O'Connell and his wife, Sandy; sister, Sharon VanElsberg and her husband, George; sister-inlaw, Claudia O'Connell, and numerous nieces and nephews. Steve passed peacefully in his home in Redmond. He was preceded in death by his parents, brother, Ron, and two nephews, John and Michael O'Connell. A private Celebration of Life will be held at a later date. His family requests that any contributions in his name be made to the O'Connell Soccer Memorial Fund, and mailed to Redmond Area Park and Recreation District., PO Box 843, Redmond, OR 97756.

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FEATUR ED OBITUARY Ribbon Sports store in Eugene in 1968. The fledgling company founded by Oregon track coach Bill Bowerman and alum Phil Knight later became Nike. He was also close to Oregon track star Steve Prefontaine. Hollister retired from the company in 2002 but remained active as a consultant.

Pat Dixon passed away in St. George, Utah, on January 28, after a long and extraordinary life. Pat will be lovingly remembered by her many friends -animal Pat Dixon and human. For more information, go to metcalfmortuary.com

D E  Deaths of note from around the world: Florence Green, 110: The world’s last known veteran of World War I. Died Saturday in King’s Lynn, England. Harry Keough, 84: Captain of the U.S. soccer team that famously upset England at the 1950 World Cup. Died Tuesday in St. Louis. Sam Coppola, 79: Character actor from New Jersey who gave John Travolta sage but salty advice in the 1977 film classic “Saturday Night Fever.� Died Sunday of aneurysm complications. — From wire reports

Priorities Continued from C1 Among other things, the bill would eliminate the state Commission on Children and Families and the county’s Children & Families Commission at the end of June. While members of the county Children & Families Commission have concerns about parts of the bill, said Saraceno, the legislation has momentum. Thus, she and her colleagues believe, the most effective strategy to preserve funding for the programs they value is to change the bill, not to oppose it entirely. County officials and their lobbyist

Transfers Continued from C1 “We really don’t think there’s going to be a lot of earth-shattering changes in north county,� Rexford said. However, students who live south of the county line have been prohibited from transferring to BendLa Pine. Under previous state law, a student could transfer from one district to another only with the approval of

will push to eliminate the focus on funding gang violence programs. If this effort fails, local programs could lose money. These include the mentor program Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Oregon and the Cascade Youth & Family Center’s outreach program, which works with kids who drop out of school and often end up homeless. These programs target problems such as a lack of supervision, substance abuse and failure at school, which research has shown can lead to kids committing crimes, Saraceno said. “Gang behavior is a symptom,� Saraceno said. “The focus really needs to be on the causes of delinquency.�

The county’s other top legislative priority is to gain passage of a bill that would rezone 465 acres of land in Redmond for industrial use. The county owns some of that land, and a state transportation rule has made it difficult for the county and other property owners to develop it. Susan Ross, the county’s property and facilities director, said the county land that would be rezoned is currently a shooting range used by the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office and the Redmond Rod and Gun Club. “We’re very strongly in support of this House bill,� Ross said.

both districts. As of the 201213 school year, districts will no longer be able to prevent students from transferring elsewhere. During Tuesday’s meeting, board member Peggy Kinkade said she had heard that some districts believed they could block outgoing transfers by not accepting any incoming students. Rexford said districts have no power over outgoing transfers. “This is very much a one-

way valve,� he said. The new law does allow districts to control how many transfers they accept, either by blocking all incoming students or setting the number of students their schools are capable of absorbing. Bend-La Pine has not yet determined the capacity of each of its schools, though board members are expected to consider those numbers during their next meeting in late February.

— Reporter: 541-617-7829, hborrud@bendbulletin.com

— Reporter: 541-633-2161, pcliff@bendbulletin.com


THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2012

C6

W E AT H ER FOR EC A ST Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LP ©2012.

TODAY, FEBRUARY 8

52

Bob Shaw

LOW

HIGH LOW

27

Astoria 52/43

50/46

Cannon Beach 53/43

Hillsboro Portland 50/42 53/33

Tillamook 54/39

Salem

54/40

46/33

49/33

Maupin

50/32

Corvallis Yachats

47/24

Prineville 51/28 Sisters Redmond Paulina 45/24 50/26 52/27 Sunriver Bend

53/44

Eugene

Florence

52/41

56/43

49/26

55/36

Coos Bay

48/24

Oakridge

Cottage Grove

Crescent

Roseburg

58/41

58/35

42/24 40/18

45/29

Vale 44/28

Juntura

Burns Riley

45/23

41/25

43/21

Jordan Valley 49/25

Yesterday’s state extremes

Rome

• 61°

50/21

Medford

49/23

Klamath Falls 49/26

Ashland

57/45

CENTRAL Mostly cloudy skies today. Partly cloudy skies tonight.

50/26

Chiloquin

59/34

Brookings

44/23

Frenchglen

WEST Mostly cloudy skies today. Partly cloudy skies tonight.

EAST Ontario A few rain and 45/28 snow showers today. Partly Nyssa cloudy skies 45/28 tonight.

Unity

Paisley

Medford

57/44

Baker City John Day

50/25

Grants Pass

Gold Beach

47/24

43/26

Silver Lake

48/21

Port Orford 57/42

39/24

Christmas Valley

Chemult

57/37

Hampton

Fort Rock 50/25

48/22

42/17

Bandon

42/30

Brothers 49/23

La Pine 49/23

Crescent Lake

58/44

52/27

41/25

Union

Mitchell 51/29

50/30

Camp Sherman

55/35

41/25

Joseph

Granite Spray 48/29

Enterprise

Meacham 43/28

44/32

Madras

37/26

La Grande

Condon

Warm Springs

Wallowa

39/26

46/30

50/30

50/31

56/36

48/29

Ruggs

Willowdale

Albany

Newport

Pendleton

49/32

46/30

50/44

54/49

Hermiston 47/29

Arlington

Wasco

Sandy

Government Camp 41/30

54/34

47/30

The Biggs Dalles 47/33

52/38

McMinnville

Lincoln City

Umatilla

Hood River

55/34

• 12°

Fields

Lakeview

McDermitt

49/28

49/22

Rome

47/23

-30s

-20s

Yesterday’s extremes (in the 48 contiguous states):

• 83° Kendall, Fla.

• -17° Crane Lake, Minn.

• 2.76” Opa Locka, Fla.

Honolulu 77/63

-10s

0s

Vancouver 45/43 Seattle 53/42

10s

20s

Calgary 41/19

30s

Saskatoon 21/3

40s Winnipeg 28/9

50s

60s

70s

80s

90s

100s 110s

Quebec 18/12

Thunder Bay 27/19

Halifax 21/21 Portland To ronto Portland 32/20 34/25 50/42 St. Paul Green Bay Boston 29/18 30/17 Boise 35/28 Buffalo Rapid City Detroit 45/27 32/26 New York 37/20 34/24 39/30 Des Moines Cheyenne Philadelphia Columbus 25/10 Chicago 36/16 35/21 41/31 35/25 San Francisco Omaha Salt Lake Washington, D. C. 61/48 24/9 City 38/36 Las Denver Louisville Kansas City Vegas 44/30 41/20 40/28 33/18 St. Louis 66/45 Charlotte 36/24 56/35 Albuquerque Los Angeles Oklahoma City Nashville Little Rock 51/31 70/52 41/26 47/31 Atlanta 52/29 Phoenix 60/37 70/50 Birmingham Dallas Tijuana 61/35 50/33 63/50 Bismarck 38/17

Billings 41/20

Houston 62/43

Chihuahua 60/41

La Paz 79/54 Anchorage 34/21

Juneau 39/32

Mazatlan 74/64

SUNDAY Mostly cloudy.

Mostly cloudy, very slight chance of showers, mild.

Mostly cloudy, chance of showers, cooler.

HIGH LOW

54 24

HIGH LOW

49 25

47 25

BEND ALMANAC

PLANET WATCH

TEMPERATURE

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . .7:30 a.m. . . . . . 5:30 p.m. Venus . . . . . .8:51 a.m. . . . . . 9:01 p.m. Mars. . . . . . .7:49 p.m. . . . . . 8:54 a.m. Jupiter. . . . .10:06 a.m. . . . . 11:44 p.m. Saturn. . . . .11:11 p.m. . . . . 10:10 a.m. Uranus . . . . .8:54 a.m. . . . . . 9:00 p.m.

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend 24 hours ending 4 p.m.*. . 0.00” High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36/22 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . trace Record high . . . . . . . . 63 in 1987 Average month to date. . . 0.29” Record low. . . . . . . . -16 in 1929 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.15” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Average year to date. . . . . 1.82” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.29.96 Record 24 hours . . .1.01 in 1938 *Melted liquid equivalent

Moon phases

Sunrise today . . . . . . 7:15 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 5:25 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 7:13 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 5:26 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 6:55 p.m. Moonset today . . . . 7:17 a.m.

Last

New

First

Feb. 14 Feb. 21 Feb. 29

OREGON CITIES

Mar. 8

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX

Yesterday Wednesday Thursday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Precipitation values are 24-hour totals through 4 p.m. Astoria . . . . . . . .55/43/0.00 Baker City . . . . . .43/19/0.00 Brookings . . . . . .60/50/0.15 Burns. . . . . . . . . .40/26/0.00 Eugene . . . . . . . 47/27/trace Klamath Falls . . .45/36/0.00 Lakeview. . . . . . .45/19/0.00 La Pine . . . . . . . .42/22/0.00 Medford . . . . . . .61/43/0.00 Newport . . . . . . 54/46/trace North Bend . . . . .54/45/0.00 Ontario . . . . . . . .46/18/0.00 Pendleton . . . . . .31/26/0.00 Portland . . . . . . .48/40/0.00 Prineville . . . . . . .34/22/0.00 Redmond. . . . . . .37/25/0.00 Roseburg. . . . . . .54/32/0.01 Salem . . . . . . . . .53/31/0.00 Sisters . . . . . . . . .34/26/0.00 The Dalles . . . . . .41/33/0.00

Full

. . . . . 52/43/r . . . . .59/42/pc . . . . 42/24/rs . . . . . .47/25/s . . . .57/45/pc . . . . . .60/46/s . . . .42/19/pc . . . . . .45/21/s . . . . .52/41/c . . . . .60/38/pc . . . .49/26/pc . . . . . .54/26/s . . . .49/22/pc . . . . . .50/23/s . . . .49/23/pc . . . . . .49/22/s . . . .59/34/pc . . . . .63/33/pc . . . . .54/49/c . . . . .61/44/pc . . . . .58/45/c . . . . . .61/46/s . . . .45/28/pc . . . . . .49/26/s . . . . .48/29/c . . . . .49/29/pc . . . . .50/42/c . . . . .55/38/pc . . . .51/28/pc . . . . . .53/26/s . . . . .53/28/c . . . . . .54/27/s . . . . .57/37/c . . . . .62/37/pc . . . . .50/44/c . . . . .57/40/pc . . . .50/26/pc . . . . .48/25/pc . . . . .49/33/c . . . . .51/30/pc

SKI REPORT

The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

1

LOW 0

MEDIUM 2

HIGH

4

6

Ski report from around the state, representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday: Snow accumulation in inches Ski area Last 24 hours Base Depth Anthony Lakes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . . . 66 Hoodoo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . .22-57 Mt. Ashland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . .43-67 Mt. Bachelor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . .94-100 Mt. Hood Meadows . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . . . 98 Mt. Hood Ski Bowl . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . .45-52 Timberline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . . 119 Warner Canyon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . .9-10 Willamette Pass . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . .24-65

V.HIGH 8

PRECIPITATION

10

ROAD CONDITIONS Snow level and road conditions representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday. Key: T.T. = Traction Tires.

Pass Conditions I-5 at Siskiyou Summit . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires I-84 at Cabbage Hill . . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Aspen, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 . . . . . .28-34 Hwy. 20 at Santiam Pass . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Mammoth Mtn., California . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . .40-60 Hwy. 26 at Government Camp. . Carry chains or T. Tires Park City, Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . . . 50 Hwy. 26 at Ochoco Divide . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Squaw Valley, California . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . .31-38 Hwy. 58 at Willamette Pass . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Sun Valley, Idaho. . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . .45-63 Hwy. 138 at Diamond Lake . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Taos, New Mexico. . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 . . . . . .57-80 Hwy. 242 at McKenzie Pass . . . . . . . . Closed for season Vail, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . .22-32 For links to the latest ski conditions visit: For up-to-minute conditions turn to: www.skicentral.com/oregon.html www.tripcheck.com or call 511 Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS -40s

SATURDAY

HIGH LOW

55 27

FORECAST: STATE Seaside

FRIDAY Partly cloudy and mild.

Tonight: Partly to mostly cloudy.

Today: Light mixed showers very early, otherwise mostly cloudy, warmer.

HIGH Ben Burkel

THURSDAY

New Orleans 66/47

Orlando 77/56 Miami 80/68

Monterrey 60/48

FRONTS

Yesterday WednesdayThursday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . . .57/34/0.00 . .48/30/pc . . 54/36/c Akron . . . . . . . . . .37/30/0.00 . . .35/20/c . 36/25/pc Albany. . . . . . . . . .44/31/0.00 . . .32/22/c . . 38/23/s Albuquerque. . . . .46/28/0.00 . .51/31/pc . . 54/33/c Anchorage . . . . . .27/14/0.00 . .34/21/sn . 33/25/sn Atlanta . . . . . . . . .62/39/0.00 . . . 60/37/s . . 55/38/s Atlantic City . . . . .55/33/0.00 . .45/31/sh . . 46/34/s Austin . . . . . . . . . .64/37/0.00 . .59/39/pc . . 52/40/c Baltimore . . . . . . .55/32/0.00 . .38/35/sh . . 47/33/s Billings . . . . . . . . .25/19/0.04 . . . 41/20/s . 43/24/pc Birmingham . . . . .62/36/0.00 . . . 61/35/s . 54/35/pc Bismarck. . . . . . . . .24/4/0.00 . . . 38/17/s . . 29/6/pc Boise . . . . . . . . . . .50/26/0.00 . . .45/27/c . 49/26/pc Boston. . . . . . . . . .46/36/0.00 . . .35/28/c . . 41/31/s Bridgeport, CT. . . .50/32/0.00 . . .36/28/c . . 43/30/s Buffalo . . . . . . . . .36/27/0.00 . .32/26/pc . . 37/29/s Burlington, VT. . . .39/20/0.00 . . . 29/18/s . 36/22/pc Caribou, ME . . . . . .29/6/0.00 . . . . 15/1/s . . 25/5/pc Charleston, SC . . .60/48/0.00 . .69/43/pc . . 61/40/s Charlotte. . . . . . . .59/28/0.00 . .56/35/pc . . 54/34/s Chattanooga. . . . .59/33/0.00 . .56/33/pc . 53/30/pc Cheyenne . . . . . . .23/16/0.00 . .36/16/pc . . 38/14/s Chicago. . . . . . . . .36/30/0.01 . .35/25/pc . . 37/28/s Cincinnati . . . . . . .42/25/0.00 . .36/21/sn . . 40/26/s Cleveland . . . . . . .36/32/0.00 . . .34/27/c . . 40/27/s Colorado Springs .27/20/0.02 . .35/12/pc . 40/16/pc Columbia, MO . . .50/32/0.00 . . . 35/20/s . . 43/26/s Columbia, SC . . . .60/34/0.00 . .62/36/pc . . 58/36/s Columbus, GA. . . .65/45/0.00 . . . 66/39/s . . 59/38/s Columbus, OH. . . .36/29/0.00 . .35/21/sn . . 38/25/s Concord, NH. . . . .42/23/0.00 . .34/17/pc . . 39/20/s Corpus Christi. . . .67/53/0.00 . .61/48/sh . 60/50/sh Dallas Ft Worth. . .60/48/0.00 . . . 50/33/s . . 54/39/c Dayton . . . . . . . . .35/28/0.00 . .35/20/sn . . 38/25/s Denver. . . . . . . . . .23/10/0.02 . .41/20/pc . 42/16/pc Des Moines. . . . . .35/24/0.01 . .25/10/pc . . 32/13/s Detroit. . . . . . . . . .37/29/0.00 . .34/24/pc . . 40/26/s Duluth. . . . . . . . . . .23/4/0.00 . . . 27/14/s . . 26/1/pc El Paso. . . . . . . . . .61/38/0.00 . .54/38/pc . 57/38/sh Fairbanks. . . . . . . . 20/-9/0.00 . .22/10/pc . . 26/0/sn Fargo. . . . . . . . . . . .19/2/0.00 . . . 27/13/s . .22/-1/pc Flagstaff . . . . . . . .38/24/0.00 . . .47/27/c . 44/21/pc

Yesterday WednesdayThursday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . . .35/32/0.00 . . . 34/23/s . 40/23/sn Green Bay. . . . . . .34/23/0.00 . . . 30/17/s . 34/15/pc Greensboro. . . . . .57/28/0.00 . .50/32/pc . . 53/33/s Harrisburg. . . . . . .50/30/0.00 . .35/28/sn . 42/27/pc Hartford, CT . . . . .48/25/0.00 . . .36/24/c . . 42/25/s Helena. . . . . . . . . .31/21/0.00 . .39/21/pc . 41/20/pc Honolulu. . . . . . . .78/63/0.28 . .77/63/pc . . 74/66/s Houston . . . . . . . .65/49/0.00 . . . 62/43/s . 60/44/pc Huntsville . . . . . . .59/33/0.00 . .54/31/pc . 49/32/pc Indianapolis . . . . .37/29/0.00 . . 37/23/sf . . 39/26/s Jackson, MS . . . . .65/38/0.00 . . . 61/37/s . 56/36/pc Jacksonville. . . . . .70/55/0.00 . .72/45/pc . 65/45/pc Juneau. . . . . . . . . .38/25/0.00 . . .39/32/c . . .44/38/r Kansas City. . . . . .41/35/0.01 . . . 33/18/s . . 43/22/s Lansing . . . . . . . . .34/24/0.00 . . . 34/22/s . . 38/23/s Las Vegas . . . . . . .58/46/0.00 . .66/45/pc . . 65/47/s Lexington . . . . . . .49/27/0.00 . . 37/26/sf . 41/26/pc Lincoln. . . . . . . . . .33/25/0.00 . . . . 25/9/s . . 36/11/s Little Rock. . . . . . .55/35/0.00 . . . 52/29/s . 52/32/pc Los Angeles. . . . . .63/55/0.02 . .70/52/pc . . 74/53/s Louisville. . . . . . . .52/29/0.00 . . 40/28/sf . . 43/28/s Madison, WI . . . . .33/23/0.00 . . . 32/16/s . . 36/23/s Memphis. . . . . . . .57/34/0.00 . . . 50/34/s . 50/34/pc Miami . . . . . . . . . .79/70/1.71 . .80/68/sh . 78/67/sh Milwaukee . . . . . .36/26/0.00 . . . 34/23/s . . 39/28/s Minneapolis . . . . .32/23/0.00 . . . 29/18/s . . 32/7/pc Nashville. . . . . . . .55/27/0.00 . .47/31/pc . 47/30/pc New Orleans. . . . .68/52/0.00 . . . 66/47/s . 60/48/pc New York . . . . . . .49/39/0.00 . . .39/30/c . . 46/31/s Newark, NJ . . . . . .51/33/0.00 . .39/28/sh . . 46/30/s Norfolk, VA . . . . . .53/44/0.00 . .55/35/pc . . 51/32/s Oklahoma City . . .54/40/0.00 . .41/26/pc . . 49/32/c Omaha . . . . . . . . .32/24/0.00 . . . . 24/9/s . . 35/12/s Orlando. . . . . . . . .70/64/0.00 . .77/56/pc . 74/55/pc Palm Springs. . . . .66/50/0.00 . .75/53/pc . . 79/52/s Peoria . . . . . . . . . .34/22/0.00 . .35/21/pc . . 38/24/s Philadelphia . . . . .52/31/0.00 . .41/31/sh . . 45/32/s Phoenix. . . . . . . . .74/50/0.00 . .70/50/pc . 70/47/pc Pittsburgh . . . . . . .40/28/0.00 . .35/19/sn . . 37/23/s Portland, ME. . . . .43/25/0.00 . .32/20/pc . . 40/22/s Providence . . . . . .48/26/0.00 . . .37/27/c . . 43/28/s Raleigh . . . . . . . . .57/32/0.00 . .53/31/pc . . 55/34/s

Yesterday WednesdayThursday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . . .22/16/0.00 . .37/20/pc . . 41/20/s Reno . . . . . . . . . . .43/32/0.01 . .51/25/pc . . 55/29/s Richmond . . . . . . .59/34/0.00 . . .49/31/c . . 52/31/s Rochester, NY . . . .37/27/0.06 . .31/25/pc . . 37/27/s Sacramento. . . . . .59/47/0.25 . .64/39/pc . . 65/39/s St. Louis. . . . . . . . .50/29/0.00 . . 36/24/sf . . 42/27/s Salt Lake City . . . .48/23/0.00 . . .44/30/c . 44/26/pc San Antonio . . . . .62/39/0.00 . .58/42/pc . 50/42/sh San Diego . . . . . . .62/57/0.10 . .66/50/pc . . 70/51/s San Francisco . . . .59/53/0.08 . . . 58/48/s . . 58/48/s San Jose . . . . . . . .62/54/0.06 . . . 63/42/s . . 68/42/s Santa Fe . . . . . . . 41/20/trace . .46/24/pc . . 48/28/c

Yesterday WednesdayThursday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Savannah . . . . . . .61/44/0.00 . .71/43/pc . . 63/43/s Seattle. . . . . . . . . .60/49/0.00 . . . 53/42/r . 56/41/pc Sioux Falls. . . . . . .29/21/0.00 . . . 34/15/s . . 39/10/s Spokane . . . . . . . .44/28/0.00 . . .40/26/c . 42/28/pc Springfield, MO . .46/26/0.00 . . . 37/21/s . . 45/28/s Tampa. . . . . . . . . .70/66/0.06 . .77/59/pc . 74/58/pc Tucson. . . . . . . . . .76/39/0.00 . .70/45/pc . 69/42/pc Tulsa . . . . . . . . . . .52/35/0.00 . .41/23/pc . . 47/29/c Washington, DC . .56/42/0.00 . .38/36/sh . . 47/32/s Wichita . . . . . . . . .46/33/0.10 . .35/19/pc . 46/27/pc Yakima . . . . . . . . .50/30/0.00 . . .45/28/c . 44/30/pc Yuma. . . . . . . . . . .71/49/0.00 . .72/51/pc . . 75/50/s

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . . . .27/7/0.00 . .30/18/pc . 34/13/pc Athens. . . . . . . . . .48/39/0.67 . . . 48/36/r . . 46/35/c Auckland. . . . . . . .75/57/0.00 . . . 74/61/s . 74/62/pc Baghdad . . . . . . . .63/46/0.00 . .61/48/pc . 68/50/pc Bangkok . . . . . . not available . .97/76/pc . 92/76/sh Beijing. . . . . . . . . . .30/9/0.00 . . . 32/16/s . 34/17/pc Beirut . . . . . . . . . .72/54/0.00 . . . 59/52/r . 59/51/sh Berlin. . . . . . . . . . . .21/3/0.00 . . .22/8/pc . . 28/4/sn Bogota . . . . . . . . .66/52/0.00 . . . 66/51/r . . .65/53/r Budapest. . . . . . . . .28/1/0.00 . . . . 23/8/s . . . 20/5/c Buenos Aires. . . . .95/73/0.00 . . . 84/61/t . . 78/59/s Cabo San Lucas . .79/55/0.00 . .78/58/pc . 69/57/sh Cairo . . . . . . . . . . .64/48/0.00 . .57/47/pc . 62/47/pc Calgary . . . . . . . . . .28/9/0.00 . . . 41/19/s . 36/20/pc Cancun . . . . . . . . .81/64/0.00 . . . 79/71/r . . .79/72/r Dublin . . . . . . . . . .45/34/0.00 . . .41/30/c . . 42/36/c Edinburgh. . . . . . .43/23/0.00 . .37/32/pc . .38/28/rs Geneva . . . . . . . . .19/12/0.00 . .28/12/pc . . 32/7/pc Harare. . . . . . . . . .81/64/0.00 . . . 76/58/r . . .76/60/r Hong Kong . . . . . .73/54/0.00 . . . 57/55/r . . .63/62/r Istanbul. . . . . . . . .50/37/0.00 . .38/33/sn . 38/33/sn Jerusalem . . . . . . .58/42/0.00 . . . 50/39/s . . 53/40/s Johannesburg. . . .75/61/0.00 . . . 77/62/t . . .78/62/t Lima . . . . . . . . . . .81/70/0.00 . .79/71/pc . 82/70/pc Lisbon . . . . . . . . . .57/52/0.00 . .56/33/pc . . 50/36/s London . . . . . . . . .39/27/0.00 . . .34/24/c . 35/21/pc Madrid . . . . . . . . .48/34/0.00 . . . 44/25/s . . 45/24/s Manila. . . . . . . . . .88/73/0.00 . .88/74/pc . 84/74/pc

Mecca . . . . . . . . . .95/75/0.00 . . . 94/72/s . 90/73/pc Mexico City. . . . . .61/46/0.00 . . . 63/42/r . 65/47/sh Montreal. . . . . . . .36/18/0.00 . .23/19/pc . . 28/21/c Moscow . . . . . . . . . 9/-2/0.00 . . . 8/-6/pc . . . .5/-7/c Nairobi . . . . . . . . .81/57/0.00 . . . 80/56/s . . 81/56/s Nassau . . . . . . . . .84/72/0.00 . .79/70/pc . . .81/70/r New Delhi. . . . . . .64/48/0.00 . .64/41/pc . . 64/41/s Osaka . . . . . . . . . .50/46/0.00 . .43/33/pc . 43/31/pc Oslo. . . . . . . . . . . .27/21/0.00 . . . 26/11/s . . . 24/8/s Ottawa . . . . . . . . .34/16/0.00 . .27/19/pc . . 30/19/c Paris. . . . . . . . . . . .28/14/0.00 . .31/14/pc . 34/19/pc Rio de Janeiro. . . .93/72/0.00 . . . 94/75/t . . .92/74/t Rome. . . . . . . . . . .41/32/0.00 . . .47/32/c . . 47/30/s Santiago . . . . . . . .88/59/0.00 . . . 87/65/s . . 89/63/s Sao Paulo . . . . . . .91/73/0.00 . .85/68/sh . . .82/68/r Sapporo . . . . . . . .34/30/0.00 . . 25/13/sf . .24/13/sf Seoul. . . . . . . . . . .30/10/0.00 . . .25/15/c . . 31/8/pc Shanghai. . . . . . . .39/27/0.00 . . . 39/28/s . . 40/32/c Singapore . . . . . . .90/77/0.00 . . . 86/74/t . . .85/74/t Stockholm. . . . . . .28/12/0.00 . . .23/16/c . . . 24/7/c Sydney. . . . . . . . . .73/66/0.00 . . . 72/65/r . . .71/64/r Taipei. . . . . . . . . . .68/52/0.00 . .61/53/sh . 63/57/sh Tel Aviv . . . . . . . . .70/50/0.00 . .60/49/pc . . 62/48/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . . .63/41/0.00 . .45/32/pc . 44/31/pc Toronto . . . . . . . . .36/25/0.00 . . . 34/25/s . 37/25/pc Vancouver. . . . . . .46/30/0.00 . . . 45/43/r . . 50/43/c Vienna. . . . . . . . . .16/12/0.00 . .24/12/pc . 25/10/pc Warsaw. . . . . . . . . .18/7/0.00 . . . . 15/3/c . . .16/-5/c

MUSLIM CIVIL RIGHTS

Libyan-Americans barred from returning to Oregon By Matthew Barakat The Associated Press

McLEAN, Va. — A Muslim civil rights group wants the Justice Department to investigate the tactics of FBI agents in Portland after two LibyanAmericans from the area were recently barred from returning to the United States. The two men — Jamal Tarhuni, 55, of Tigard, and Mustafa Elogbi, 60, of Portland — traveled separately to Libya following the overthrow of Moammar Gadhafi. Tarhuni delivered humanitarian supplies with the group Medical Teams International, while Elogbi went to visit family. Last month, though, both Libyan-born U.S. citizens were barred from return flights to the U.S. and told the FBI wanted to question them. The Washington-based Council on American-Islamic Relations said that it has now received three reports of Portland FBI agents’ involvement in travel restrictions for Muslim U.S. citizens in the past six months. Tarhuni was stopped in Tunisia, where he says he was

questioned by a Portlandbased FBI agent. Tarhuni said he initially agreed to the questioning that delved into his religious practices, but stopped the interview after he was strapped to a lie detector and asked to waive his Miranda rights. Elogbi got as far as a connecting flight in London before being sent back to Tunisia. He was held in a British jail for two days and told by British authorities that the U.S. government was preventing him from flying home.

Detainment ‘humiliation for an American citizen’ Elogbi said his situation is especially insulting because he went to Libya to celebrate the demise of a regime that quashed citizens’ liberty. “Now I find myself like in the times of Gadhafi, put in jail for no reason,” Elogbi said in a telephone interview from Tripoli. “That is humiliation for an American citizen. I cannot accept it.” It is not clear why the FBI wants to question either man. Beth Anne Steele, a spokes-

woman for the FBI’s Portland office, declined comment. Both men are members of the Islamic Center of Portland, which has drawn scrutiny from law enforcement. Elogbi has been a naturalized U.S. citizen for more than 30 years. His wife, Annie Petrossian, said her husband has never been especially political, but when mass protests began to rock the Gadhafi regime, he participated in antiGadhafi rallies in the U.S. and traveled several times to the border between Libya and Tunisia to help at refugee camps. While he sometimes faced extensive questions at customs when he returned to the U.S., he never had any serious difficulties traveling until last month. CAIR attorney Gadeir Abbas, who has represented dozens of Muslims who have had their travel to the U.S. restricted, said the tactics used by the Portland FBI have been especially brazen. Elogbi’s case is particularly troublesome because it appears he was detained by British authorities at U.S. request.

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SPORTS

Scoreboard, D2 NHL, D2 College basketball, D2

D

Prep sports, D3 NBA, D3 Tee to Green, D4

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2012

CHEERLEADING Summit cheer bound for state A team representing Bend’s Summit High School will compete this weekend in Portland in the state cheerleading championships. The Oregon School Activities Association’s 2012 Cheer State Championships are set for Saturday at Memorial Coliseum. Summit is one of 13 teams scheduled to compete Saturday afternoon in the Class 6A/5A Large Division (for teams with 13 to 20 members). Members of the all-girls Summit squad are Lauren McFarlane, Rachael Maguire, Katie Gallagher, Alaina Hall, Sabra Shaw, Tarryn Allen, Ashley Dolinar, Marcia Espinoza, Shae Himsworth, Caroline Nyberg, Trinadee Pruett, Haylee Hansen, Liz Clark, Sydney Bevando, Macey Connors, Morgan Stewart and Sierra Till. The team is coached by Sarah Devereaux. Joining Summit in the 6A/5A Large Division are Aloha, Barlow, Century, Clackamas, David Douglas, Grant, Gresham, Lebanon, McNary, South Salem, Tualatin and West Albany. Summit is the only Central Oregon school represented in the daylong state event, which includes more than 70 teams competing in seven divisions. In qualifying for state, Summit competed in three events this season, placing second in both the Springfield Invitational and the Oregon Elite Pre-State Classic in Salem, and placing third at the Emerald Classic in Springfield. —Bulletin staff report

NBA Goaltending call said to be wrong PORTLAND — The NBA said a goaltending call in the final seconds of regulation in the Portland Trail Blazers’ overtime loss to the Oklahoma City Thunder on Monday night was incorrect. Blazers forward LaMarcus Aldridge was called for goaltending on Kevin Durant’s attempted layup with six seconds left. The call tied the game at 103 and it went to overtime. The Thunder went on to win 111-107. Fans at the Rose Garden booed the officials as they left the court, and debate over the call raged on the Internet and on local sports talk radio. “With the benefit of slow motion replay following the game, it has been determined that Aldridge made contact with the ball just before the ball hit the backboard. Therefore, this should have been ruled a good block and goaltending was the incorrect call,” according to a statement posted on NBA.com on Tuesday. Referees cannot use instant replay on goaltending calls. After the game, coach Nate McMillan said: “I thought it was a good block. That game should have been over.” Aldridge, who finished with a season-best 39 points, also maintained the block was clean. “The ref who called it was the furthest one from the basket, so that’s pretty interesting,” he said. — The Associated Press

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

Belly putter could lift golf-equipment sales By Adam Schupak New York Times News Service

ORLANDO, Fla. — Had Heath Martin not been lodging the butt-end of a Titleist Scotty Cameron putter against his paunchy midsection, he might have sounded as if he were reciting his jacket size. “I’m a 39 short,” he said. “When you’re low to the ground and got a gut like mine, it’s not going to be very long.” Martin, a club professional at Deerwood Club in Kingswood, Texas, was among the thousands of PGA pros and golf shop merchandisers at the PGA Merchandise Show here last week, who

TEE TO GREEN sought out what many consider will be the hottest product in golf equipment this year — the belly putter. Following the lead of a growing number of touring pros, many recreational golfers are clamoring for a putter with an extended handle that sticks into the stomach, sternum or, as some prefer, the chin. See Putter / D4

Inside • Tiger Woods among those in favor of banning the use of long putters, D4

Tina Fineberg / The New York Times

Andrew Gurewitsch, 16, has a belly putter tucked under his sternum as he takes practice strokes at a shop in New York. Following the lead of a growing number of touring pros, many recreational golfers are clamoring for a putter with an extended handle that sticks into the stomach, sternum or, as some prefer, the chin.

PREP GIRLS BASKETBALL

PREP GIRLS BASKETBALL

Madras wins again • The White Buffs top Gladstone to improve to 6-0 in league and 12-0 against 4A teams Bulletin staff report MADRAS — Madras continued its dominance of the TriValley Conference and Class 4A girls basketball in general Tuesday, defeating Gladstone 48-45 to improve to 6-0 in league play and 17-2 overall. Abby Scott led the White Buffaloes, who are 12-0 against other 4A teams this season, with 16 points, 10 rebounds, three steals and two blocks. Rosey Suppah added 12 points and Mariah Stacona contributed 10 points, four assists and five steals for Madras, which is the No. 1 team in the Oregon School Activities Association 4A rankings. “Rosey’s been battling through some injuries, but she had a breakthrough tonight,” White Buffalo assistant coach Butch David said about Suppah, who hit a pair of threepointers in Madras’ victory. The Buffs blew open the game early, outscoring the Gladiators 15-3 in the first quarter. Madras led 26-14 at halftime and held on for its 11th consecutive victory despite being outscored 31-22 in the second half. “We talked to the girls about grinding it out,” David said. “It was ugly, but it was a win.” Amber Jensen and McKenna Hopkins scored 10 points apiece to lead Gladstone (13-4, 3-4 Tri-Valley). The Gladiators made 18 field goals but went just seven of 15 from the foul line. The White Buffaloes host Estacada on Friday.

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Madras’ Abby Scott shoots over a Gladstone defender to score during the first quarter of Tuesday night’s game in Madras. Scott had 16 points and 10 rebounds to lead Madras.

BACK IN THE BIG APPLE

Bend High gets ninth straight victory Bulletin staff report Bend High relied on endurance to help secure a 43-32 Intermountain Hybrid girls basketball victory over Crook County on Tuesday night. “It was a close game the whole way,” said Lava Bear coach Todd Ervin. “I think we might have worn (Crook County) down a little bit in the fourth quarter.” Bend High led 18-14 at halftime after the two teams were tied 10-10 after the opening period. The Lava Bears (15-5 overall) held a 27-24 advantage on their home court after three quarters before outscoring the Cowgirls 16-8 in the fourth. Bend High junior post Mekayla Isaak scored a gamehigh 18 points to pace the Bears. Ally McConnell added nine points for Bend, and Heidi Froelich and Delaney Crook scored six points apiece. The Bears have now won nine consecutive games. Brooke Buswell led Crook County with 12 points. Kelsi Martin, Makayla Lindburg and Kaylee Solomon all added four points apiece for the Cowgirls. Crook County was without one of its leading scorers, Kayla Morgan, who did not play because of a concussion. Bend is back on the floor Friday with an Intermountain Conference road game at Summit. The Lava Bears can clinch the 5A IMC title outright with a win over the Storm. The Cowgirls (13-9 overall), who last week secured a berth in the Class 4A play-in round with a win over Special District 1 rival Roosevelt, plays at Redmond on Friday in another IMC Hybrid matchup.

PREP BOYS BASKETBALL

Mountain View completes season sweep of Redmond

Julio Cortez / The Associated Press

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo, left, holds the Halas Trophy, while New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg, center, holds the Vince Lombardi Trophy as New York Giants quarterback Eli Manning, right, waves to the crowd during a tickertape parade celebrating the team’s Super Bowl XLVI championship, Tuesday in New York. The Giants beat the New England Patriots 21-17 on Sunday in Indianapolis.

Bulletin staff report REDMOND — Facing Intermountain Hybrid opponent Redmond on the road, Mountain View outscored the Panthers 19-8 in the first quarter and never looked back, winning 52-40 on Tuesday night while improving its record to 3-0 against Redmond this season. The Cougars (16-5 overall) outrebounded the Panthers 27-17 and recorded 14 assists on 19 made field goals, mitigating the effects of 23 turnovers. Mountain View led 34-22 at halftime and held steady in the second half — each team scored 18 points, making seven field goals apiece.

The win marks the Cougars’ third in a row and the 10th in their past 12 games. Redmond (9-13 overall) has now lost its past five games, and 11 of its last 13. Mountain View wing Mitch Modin led all scorers with 14 points. The trio of James Reid, Erik Siefken and Blake Bosch added eight points apiece for the Cougars in the winning effort. Tanner Manselle led the Panthers with 13 points, with Kyle Reed chipping in 10 points. The Cougars host Summit on Tuesday, while Redmond plays Crook County in Prineville on Friday.


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THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2012

O  A

SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION Today

Thursday

SOCCER 3 p.m.: English Premier League, Chelsea vs. Manchester United (taped), Root Sports. HOCKEY 4:30 p.m.: NHL, Boston Bruins at Buffalo Sabres, NBC Sports Network. BASKETBALL 5 p.m.: Men’s college, Rice at Houston, Root Sports. 6 p.m.: Men’s college, Duke at North Carolina, ESPN. 6 p.m.: Men’s college, Seton Hall at Rutgers, ESPN2. 7 p.m.: NBA, Houston Rockets at Portland Trail Blazers, Comcast SportNet Northwest.

GOLF 1:30 a.m.: European Tour, Dubai Desert Classic, first round, Golf Channel. 9:30 a.m.: LPGA Tour, Women’s Australian Open, first round, Golf Channel. Noon: PGA Tour, Pebble Beach National Pro-Am, first round, Golf Channel. BASKETBALL 4 p.m.: Men’s college, Wisconsin at Minnesota, ESPN. 4 p.m.: Men’s college, Mississippi at Mississippi State, ESPN2. 5 p.m.: NBA, Los Angeles Lakers at Boston Celtics, TNT. 6 p.m.: Men’s college, Colorado at Arizona, ESPN. 6 p.m.: Men’s college, Virginia Tech at Miami, ESPN2. 6 p.m.: Women’s college, Southern Cal at Stanford, Root Sports. 7:30 p.m.: NBA, Oklahoma City Thunder at Sacramento Kings, TNT. 8 p.m.: Men’s college, St. Mary’s at Gonzaga, ESPN2. 8 p.m.: Men’s college, Washington at Oregon, Root Sports.

ON DECK Thursday Boys basketball: Culver at Western Mennonite, 6:30 p.m.; Central Christian at Ione, TBA. Girls basketball: Culver at Western Mennonite, 5 p.m.; Central Christian at Ione, TBA. Wrestling: La Pine at Lakeview, 6:30 p.m. Friday Boys basketball: Redmond at Crook County, 7 p.m.; Bend at Summit, 7 p.m.; Madras at Estacada, 7 p.m.; Junction City at La Pine, 7:15 p.m.; Sisters at Cottage Grove, 7:15 p.m.; Gilchrist at North Lake, 7 p.m. Girls basketball: Bend at Summit, 5:15 p.m.; Junction City at La Pine, 5:45 p.m.; Sisters at Cottage Grove, 5:45 p.m.; Estacada at Madras, 7 p.m.; Gilchrist at North Lake, 5:30 p.m. Wrestling: Redmond at Class 6A Special District 4 regional meet in Grants Pass, TBA; Mountain View, Bend, Summit at Class 5A Special District 4 regional meet in Eagle Point, TBA Swimming: Redmond Central Valley Conference district meet in Salem; Bend, Mountain View and Summit at Class 5A Special District 1 meet at Juniper Swim & Fitness Center; Madras hosts Class 4A/3A/2A/1A Special District 2 meet, TBA; Sisters at Class 4A/3A/2A/1A Special District 3 meet in Albany, TBA Saturday Wrestling: Redmond at Class 6A Special District 4 regional meet in Grants Pass, TBA; Mountain View, Bend, Summit at Class 5A Special District 4 regional meet in Eagle Point, TBA; Culver, Gilchrist at pre-district tournament in Culver, 9 a.m. Swimming: Redmond Central Valley Conference district meet in Salem; Bend, Mountain View and Summit at Class 5A Special District 1 meet at Juniper Swim & Fitness Center ; Madras hosts Class 4A/3A/2A/1A Special District 2 meet, TBA; Sisters at Class 4A/3A/2A/1A Special District 3 meet in Albany, TBA Noric skiing: OHSNO Meissner Pursuit at Virginia Meissner Sno-park, 11 a.m.; OISRA Southern Division league final and biathlon demo at Wal Haring Sno-park, 11:30 a.m. Alpine skiing: OSSA giant slalom on Ed’s Garden at Mt. Bachelor, TBA

HOCKEY

RADIO

NHL

Today

Thursday

BASKETBALL 7 p.m.: NBA, Houston Rockets at Portland Trail Blazers, KBNDAM 1110, KRCO-AM 690.

BASKETBALL 7 p.m.: Men’s college, Washington State at Oregon State, KICE-AM 940, KRCO-AM 690. 8 p.m.: Men’s college, Washington at Oregon, KBNDAM 1110.

Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

S   B Football • Big Ten exploring fourteam playoff: The Big Ten, which helped squash the notion of a four-team playoff to crown a national champion in college football several years ago, is taking another look. BCS Executive Director Bill Hancock said Tuesday night that’s good news. “Our process is working perfectly,” Hancock said. “One of good things about our process is that there’s no timetable so that a deliberate and thoughtful decision can be reached. The tricky part is our 11 conference commissioners and the Notre Dame AD may have 12 different opinions about the direction we should go over the next six to eight months.” Hancock, who still expects a conclusion in July, said the group of BCS decisionmakers will meet again at the end of this month. • Memphis to join Big East: Memphis is the latest school to sign up for a spot in the new Big East. A person familiar with the decision says Memphis is joining the Big East. The person spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because an official announcement was pending. Memphis Athletic director R.C. Johnson said the school is holding a conference call followed by a news conference today to discuss the university’s athletic affiliation. The Tigers will join the league for the 2013-14 season and compete in all sports, becoming the fourth Conference USA team to move to the Big East in the last two months, along with Houston, Central Florida and SMU.

Basketball • Billups lost for season with torn Achilles tendon: Clippers guard Chauncey Billups will miss the remainder of the season after tearing his left Achilles tendon during Los Angeles’ 107102 victory over the Magic in Orlando on Monday night. The team says an MRI on Tuesday confirmed Billups’ injury. Billups will return to Los Angeles on Thursday for further evaluation. The Clippers say a date for surgery hasn’t been determined.

College athletics • Organizers state Fighting Sioux nickname is back: Supporters of the University of North Dakota’s Fighting Sioux nickname say they have enough petition signatures to force the university to start using the name again. Secretary of State Al Jaeger still has to count the

names before the nickname is restored. Nickname backers turned in petitions to Jaeger’s office Tuesday night. They say they have 17,213 signatures, well above the 13,542 they needed to put the issue on North Dakota’s ballot in June. Jaeger will count the names today. If there are more signatures than the minimum needed, the Fighting Sioux nickname will be restored.

Baseball • A’s agree to extend GM through 2019: Billy Beane is planning to stay in the Bay Area for the long haul. Oakland Athletics owner Lew Wolff said Tuesday that the team has agreed to extend the contracts of the general manager as well as team President Michael Crowley through the 2019 season. Wolff, confirming comments first made on Bloomberg Television, wrote in an email to The Associated Press that the deals are in the process of being finalized. • Kershaw and Dodgers agree to $19M, 2-year deal: NL Cy Young Award winner Clayton Kershaw and the Los Angeles Dodgers avoided a salary arbitration hearing next week, agreeing to a $19 million, twoyear contract. Tuesday’s deal for the 23-year-old left-hander calls for a $500,000 signing bonus and salaries of $7.5 million this year and $11 million in 2013. It covers all but his final year of arbitration eligibility. The agreement mirrors that of San Francisco’s Tim Lincecum, who in his first time eligible for arbitration two years ago agreed to a $23 million, two-year deal. Kershaw was 21-5 with a 2.28 ERA and 248 strikeouts last year, winning the NL pitching triple crown. After making $500,000, he had asked for $10 million in arbitration and had been offered $6.5 million.

Cycling • Contador may still appeal doping ban, won’t retire: Alberto Contador vowed Tuesday in Madrid to return to the pinnacle of cycling, maintaining his innocence in the face of a twoyear doping ban that stripped the Spanish star of his 2010 Tour de France title. He said his lawyers are considering whether to appeal the ban handed down by sport’s highest court and insisted that even if the punishment stands he will return to challenge for more Tour titles. The penalty is retroactive and will expire in August. — The Associated Press

China, 6-1, 7-5. Tamarine Tanasugarn, Thailand, def. Galina Voskoboeva (6), Kazakhstan, 6-3, 4-2, retired. Vania King (8), United States, def. Heather Watson, Britain, 6-4, 6-2. Chang Kai-chen, Taiwan, def. Eleni Daniilidou, Greece, 7-5, 6-1. Anne Keothavong, Britain, def. Dominika Cibulkova (2), Slovakia, 6-4, 6-1. Kimiko Date-Krumm, Japan, def. Nicha Lertpitaksinchai, Thailand, 6-1, 6-1. Akgul Amanmuradova, Uzbekistan, def. Laura Robson, Britain, 5-2, retired. Daniela Hantuchova (3), Slovakia, def. Nugnadda Wannasuk, Thailand, 6-2, 6-0. Sania Mirza, India, def. Ayumi Morita, Japan, 3-6, 6-1, 6-2. Hsieh Su-wei, Taiwan, def. Zheng Jie (5), China, 6-3, 6-2. Urszula Radwanska, Poland, def. Anastasia Pivovarova, Russia, 6-4, 6-1. Maria Kirilenko (4), Russia, def. Casey Dellacqua, Australia, 4-6, 7-6 (6), 6-3.

IN THE BLEACHERS

NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE All Times PST ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA N.Y. Rangers 51 33 13 5 71 141 103 Philadelphia 53 30 16 7 67 173 157 New Jersey 53 31 19 3 65 150 148 Pittsburgh 54 30 19 5 65 163 141 N.Y. Islanders 52 22 22 8 52 126 150 Northeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Boston 51 33 16 2 68 180 111 Toronto 54 28 20 6 62 168 157 Ottawa 56 27 22 7 61 162 174 Montreal 54 21 24 9 51 140 147 Buffalo 52 22 24 6 50 126 154 Southeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Washington 53 28 21 4 60 149 149 Florida 52 24 17 11 59 131 149 Winnipeg 55 25 24 6 56 131 151 Tampa Bay 52 23 24 5 51 148 176 Carolina 54 20 25 9 49 137 165 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Detroit 54 35 17 2 72 172 129 St. Louis 52 31 14 7 69 129 106 Nashville 54 32 17 5 69 152 140 Chicago 54 29 18 7 65 171 163 Columbus 53 15 32 6 36 123 175 Northwest Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Vancouver 53 33 15 5 71 171 133 Minnesota 53 25 20 8 58 122 136 Colorado 55 27 25 3 57 140 153 Calgary 53 24 22 7 55 126 144 Edmonton 53 21 27 5 47 141 158 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA San Jose 50 29 15 6 64 145 117 Los Angeles 54 26 18 10 62 118 117 Phoenix 54 25 21 8 58 143 143 Dallas 52 27 23 2 56 137 148 Anaheim 52 20 24 8 48 135 156 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Tuesday’s Games N.Y. Islanders 1, Philadelphia 0, SO Montreal 3, Pittsburgh 2, SO

Open Gaz de France Tuesday At Stade Pierre de Coubertin Paris Purse: $637,000 (Premier) Surface: Hard-Indoor Singles First Round Mona Barthel, Germany, def. Barbora Zahlavova Strycova, Czech Republic, 6-3, 6-2. Petra Cetkovska, Czech Republic, def. Alberta Brianti, Italy, 6-3, 6-3. Tsvetana Pironkova, Bulgaria, def. Li Na (3), China, 7-6 (5), 3-2, retired. Angelique Kerber (9), Germany, def. Lucie Safarova, Czech Republic, 6-2, 7-6 (3). Julia Goerges (6), Germany, def. Shahar Peer, Israel, 6-1, 6-3. Chanelle Scheepers, South Africa, def. Polona Hercog, Slovenia, 6-2, 6-2. Petra Martic, Croatia, def. Greta Arn, Hungary, 64, 6-4.

DEALS Vancouver 4, Nashville 3, SO New Jersey 1, N.Y. Rangers 0 Washington 4, Florida 0 Columbus 3, Minnesota 1 St. Louis 3, Ottawa 1 Los Angeles 3, Tampa Bay 1 Winnipeg 2, Toronto 1 Phoenix 4, Dallas 1 Colorado 5, Chicago 2 Today’s Games Boston at Buffalo, 4:30 p.m. Edmonton at Detroit, 4:30 p.m. Carolina at Anaheim, 7 p.m. Calgary at San Jose, 7 p.m. Thursday’s Games St. Louis at New Jersey, 4 p.m. Montreal at N.Y. Islanders, 4 p.m. Tampa Bay at N.Y. Rangers, 4 p.m. Toronto at Philadelphia, 4 p.m. Winnipeg at Washington, 4 p.m. Dallas at Columbus, 4 p.m. Nashville at Ottawa, 4:30 p.m. Los Angeles at Florida, 4:30 p.m. Vancouver at Minnesota, 5 p.m. Calgary at Phoenix, 6 p.m.

BASKETBALL Men’s college Tuesday’s Games ——— EAST Hartford 76, UMBC 70 Villanova 74, Providence 72 SOUTH Alabama 68, Auburn 50 Campbell 81, Coastal Carolina 75 E. Kentucky 59, Mid Continent 41 Kentucky 78, Florida 58 Maryland 64, Clemson 62 MIDWEST Chicago St. 63, IPFW 57 Evansville 65, Creighton 57 Kansas St. 65, Texas Tech 46 Ohio St. 87, Purdue 84 SOUTHWEST Oklahoma St. 69, Iowa St. 67 FAR WEST Idaho 70, Seattle 69 Pacific-12 Conference All Times PST ——— Conference All Games W L W L Washington 9 2 16 7

California Colorado Oregon Arizona Stanford UCLA Oregon St. Washington St. Arizona St. Utah Southern Cal

8 3 18 8 3 16 7 4 16 7 4 16 6 5 16 6 5 13 5 6 15 4 7 12 3 8 7 2 9 5 1 10 6 ——— Thursday’s Games Utah at Arizona State, 5:30 p.m. Colorado at Arizona, 6 p.m. Washington State at Oregon State, 7 p.m. California at Southern Cal, 7:30 p.m. Stanford at UCLA, 8 p.m. Washington at Oregon, 8 p.m. Saturday’s Games Utah at Arizona, 11 a.m. California at UCLA, 1 p.m. Washington State at Oregon, 2 p.m. Colorado at Arizona State, 3:30 p.m. Sunday’s Games Washington at Oregon State, 2:30 p.m. Stanford at Southern Cal, 4:30 p.m.

6 7 7 8 7 10 8 11 16 18 18

Women’s college Tuesday’s Games ——— EAST Cincinnati 60, Providence 56 Notre Dame 74, Syracuse 55 SOUTH UConn 56, Louisville 46 SOUTHWEST Texas Southern 54, Houston Baptist 44

TENNIS Professional Pattaya Women’s Open Tuesday At Dusit Resort Pattaya, Thailand Purse: $220,000 (Intl.) Surface: Hard-Outdoor Singles First Round Vera Zvonareva (1), Russia, def. Varatchaya Wongteanchai, Thailand, 6-2, 7-5. Misaki Doi, Japan, def. Noppawon Lertcheewakarn, Thailand, 6-1, 6-3. Alla Kudryavtseva, Russia, def. Zhou Yi-Miao,

Transactions BASEBALL American League LOS ANGELES ANGELS—Named Adam Chodzko media relations representative. NEW YORK YANKEES—Agreed to terms with INF Bill Hall on a minor league contract. OAKLAND ATHLETICS—Agreed to terms with general manager Billy Beane and president Michael Crowley on contract extensions through the 2019 season. National League LOS ANGELES DODGERS—Agreed to terms with LHP Clayton Kershaw to a two-year contract. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association MIAMI HEAT—Waived C Mickell Gladness. PHILADELPHIA 76ERS—Assigned F Craig Brackins to Maine (NBADL). WASHINGTON WIZARDS—Waived C Hamady Ndiaye. FOOTBALL National Football League BALTIMORE RAVENS—Announced the retirement of RB Ricky Williams. BUFFALO BILLS—Re-signed K Rian Lindell. Named Pete Metzelaars tight ends coach. CHICAGO BEARS—Named Jeremy Bates quarterbacks coach. PITTSBURGH STEELERS—Named Todd Haley offensive coordinator. HOCKEY National Hockey League BOSTON BRUINS—Assigned F Zach Hamill to Providence (AHL). NEW JERSEY DEVILS—Assigned C Brad Mills to Albany (AHL). SAN JOSE SHARKS—F Owen Nolan announced his retirement. TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING—Recalled D Evan Oberg from Norfolk (AHL). SOCCER Major League Soccer LA GALAXY—Announced MF Juninho was loaned to the team from Brazilian club Sao Paulo. Signed D Leonardo. COLLEGE AUBURN—Announced cornerbacks coach Phillip Lolley will move into an administrative role in the football program. SOUTH ALABAMA—Named Jerry Mack wide receivers coach. SOUTH CAROLINA—Named Chris Rogers compliance director. UNLV—Announced tight ends coach Brent Myers will serve as offensive coordinator and secondary coach J.D. Williams as defensive coordinator.

MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL ROUNDUP

Canucks need shootout to overtake Predators Kentucky The Associated Press NASHVILLE, Tenn. — The Vancouver Canucks keep finding ways to win no matter how long it takes. Alex Edler scored in the sixth round of a shootout, and Vancouver beat the Nashville Predators 4-3 Tuesday night for its fifth win in six games. The Canucks improved to 2-1 in the season series against the team they ousted in the Western Conference semifinals last season, when they won all three games in Nashville, including the series-clinching sixth game. They did it by playing beyond regulation for a fifth straight game and the eighth in 10 games. “We’re obviously not a team that gives up, and we expected a close game with these guys,” Canucks center Ryan Kesler said. “We’ve been in a lot of overtime games and shootout games lately, so we’re accustomed to this now. And we’re getting on the right end of these so we’re doing something right.” Edler beat Nashville goalie Pekka Rinne through his pads with a shot he wasn’t sure would work. Colin Wilson tried to extend the shootout for Nashville, but was stopped by goalie Roberto Luongo, who stopped 37 shots for the win. Luongo said he’s been working on making saves in shootouts as he improved to 6-5 this season. “It’s a tight league. Not a lot of separation, and we’re going to be involved in a lot of tight games,” Luongo said. “It’s the

NHL ROUNDUP

type of hockey we’re going to be involved in especially coming down the stretch.” Alex Burrows had the only other goal in the third round of the shootout. Byron Bitz had a goal and an assist, and Kesler and Daniel Sedin each scored goals for the Canucks. Henrik Sedin had two assists. In other Tuesday games: Capitals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Panthers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 WASHINGTON — Mathieu Perreault scored with 13 seconds elapsed, Alex Ovechkin had two goals and Washington beat Florida to take over first place in the Southeast Division. Devils . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Rangers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 NEW YORK — Martin Brodeur stopped 30 shots for his first shutout of the season and the record 117th of his NHL career, and New Jersey beat the Eastern Conferenceleading New York Rangers for its fifth consecutive win. Canadiens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Penguins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 MONTREAL — Tomas Plekanec scored on Montreal’s eighth attempt in the shootout to lead the Canadiens over Pittsburgh. Coyotes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Stars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 DALLAS — Radim Vrbata scored his 25th goal, former Dallas backup Mike Smith made 28 saves and Phoenix improved its playoff positioning with a victory over the Stars.

Islanders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Flyers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 PHILADELPHIA — Evgeni Nabokov made 45 saves and Frans Nielsen and John Tavares scored on Ilya Bryzgalov in a shootout, helping New York beat Philadelphia. Blue Jackets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Wild . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 COLUMBUS, Ohio — Rookie defenseman David Savard scored his first career goal and added an assist to lift the Blue Jackets past Minnesota and give Columbus’ Todd Richards a win in his first game as coach against his former team. Kings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Lightning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 TAMPA, Fla. — Kyle Clifford and Dustin Penner had second-period goals to lead Los Angeles past Tampa Bay. Blues. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Senators. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 OTTAWA — David Perron scored twice and Brian Elliott made 28 saves in his regularseason return to Ottawa as St. Louis handed the Senators their seventh straight loss. Avalanche . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Blackhawks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 DENVER — Gabriel Landeskog broke a tie 38 seconds into the third period and David Jones added two goals, helping Colorado snap a fivegame skid with a win over struggling Chicago. Jets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Maple Leafs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 WINNIPEG, Manitoba — Bryan Little scored the goahead in the second period and Winnipeg earned a win over Toronto.

rolls to win over Florida The Associated Press LEXINGTON, Ky. — Freshman Michael Kidd-Gilchrist had 13 points and 13 rebounds and top-ranked Kentucky easily passed its toughest Southeastern Conference test to date with a 78-58 victory over No. 8 Florida on Tuesday night. The Wildcats (24-1, 10-0) have won 49 straight at home and matched their best start in league play since 2005. Doron Lamb scored 18 points and freshman Anthony Davis added 16 for Kentucky, which won its 16th straight overall and ended Florida’s run of seven consecutive wins. Kenny Boynton led the Gators (19-5, 7-2) with 18 points, but the team with the nation’s most three-pointers this season went six of 27 from behind the arc. Also on Tuesday: No. 3 Ohio State . . . . . . . . . . . .87 Purdue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .84 COLUMBUS, Ohio — William Buford scored a careerhigh 29 points and capped his night with a pivotal dunk in the final minute to power Ohio State past Purdue. Evansville. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65 No. 17 Creighton. . . . . . . . . . . .57 EVANSVILLE, Ind. — Colt Ryan gave Evansville the lead for good by making a 17-footer with 3:08 to play and the Purple Aces closed the game on a 13-1 run.


WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

D3

Redmond girls top Mountain View on road Bulletin staff report Playing Mountain View for the third and final time this season, Redmond held off the host Cougars 38-36 in Intermountain Hybrid girls basketball action Tuesday. Jesslyn Albrecht scored 11 points, grabbed five rebounds, dished five assists and recorded three steals to help the Panthers improve to 10-13 overall with the victory at Mountain View High School. Cassidy Edwards added 10 points and Margo Capps contributed eight points and seven rebounds as Redmond took the season series against Mountain View, 2-1. The Cougars (9-12) had a chance to tie the game with no time left on the clock when Mountain View guard Maddy Booster was fouled on a threepoint shot as time expired. Booster hit the first free throw but missed the second, brining the game to an end. “Everyone remembers the last play, but we lost that game in the first quarter when four minutes in we had six turnovers and two points,” Cougar coach Steve Riper said. Megan McCadden paced Mountain View with 12 points and Booster ended the night with nine points. Redmond hosts Crook County on Friday while the

PREP ROUNDUP Cougars are off until Tuesday, when they host Summit. Also on Tuesday: BOYS BASKETBALL Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Crook County . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 PRINEVILLE — Connor Scott scored a game-high 24 points and David Larson added 15 as the Lava Bears rallied back to defeat the Cowboys in Intermountain Hybrid play. Crook County led 20-11 after the first quarter, but Bend outscored the Cowboys 15-2 in the second period to battle its way back into the game. The Bears (12-7) trailed 5048 entering the fourth quarter but outscored Crook County 18-10 in the final period. Bend went 10 of 10 from the freethrow line in the fourth quarter. Peyton Seaquist led Crook County (3-18 overall) with 18 points. Jacob Mahurin added 12. Bend is at Summit on Friday and the Cowboys host Redmond. Gladstone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 Madras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 GLADSTONE — Jhaylen Yeahquo led the White Buffaloes with 17 points, but Madras fell to Gladstone in a Class 4A Tri-Valley Conference game after trailing 30-28 at the half. Bobby Ahern contributed 14

MADRAS ROLLS Madras’ Mariah Stacona (10) attempts a shot around Gladstone’s Amber Jensen during the second quarter of Tuesday night’s game in Madras. The White Buffaloes won the game, 48-45; see story, D1. Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

points for Madras, and teammate Andrew McConnell added nine points. Madras (14-5 overall, 5-1 Tri-Valley) will play at Estacada on Friday. Elmira . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70 La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 LA PINE — The Falcons

built a 34-23 halftime lead on the Hawks and held on to win the Class 4A Sky-Em League contest. Isaac O’Casey led La Pine with 14 points and recorded seven rebounds, four assists and four steals. Tyler Parsons scored 13 points for

the Hawks, and Chance Syres added 11 points. La Pine (615 overall, 1-6 Sky-Em) hosts Junction City on Friday. Kennedy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71 Culver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27 CULVER — The Trojans outscored the Bulldogs 40-13 in the first half en route to a Class 2A Tri-River Conference victory. Clay Gibson scored 12 points for Culver, and Gerson Gonzalez added 10 points. The Bulldogs (8-15 overall, 2-11 Tri-River) visit Western Mennonite in Salem on Thursday. Horizon Christian . . . . . . . . . .80 Central Christian. . . . . . . . . . .26 PRINEVILLE — The Hawks of Hood River defeated the Tigers in Class 1A Big Sky League play. Coughling Wang scored nine points for Central Christian (1-17 overall, 0-13 Big Sky), which travels to Ione on Thursday. GIRLS BASKETBALL Elmira . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42 La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39 LA PINE — The Hawks forced two turnovers in the final 20 seconds but could not convert a last-second three-point attempt against Class 4A Sky-Em League foe Elmira. Katie Mickel scored 13 points for La Pine, and Katie Ebner contributed six points and nine rebounds. The Hawks (7-11 overall, 2-5

Sky-Em) host Junction City on Friday. Kennedy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38 Culver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26 CULVER — The Trojans outscored the Bulldogs 11-2 in the fourth quarter en route to the Class 2A Tri-River Conference victory. Cassandra Fulton scored 10 points and grabbed nine rebounds for Culver (13-10 overall, 5-8 Tri-River), which visits Western Mennonite in Salem on Thursday. North Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38 Trinity Lutheran . . . . . . . . . . . 29 SILVER LAKE — Gator Aubrey scored 15 points and grabbed 11 rebounds and Lesley Dark added 14 points and 14 boards as the Cowgirls topped the Saints of Bend in nonleague play. Katie Murphy paced Trinity Lutheran with seven points, eight rebounds and three blocks. North Lake (10-12 overall) hosts Gilchrist on Friday. The Saints play Gilchrist’s junior varsity on Saturday. Horizon Christian . . . . . . . . . .44 Central Christian. . . . . . . . . . .29 PRINEVILLE — The Tigers fell to the Hawks of Hood River in Class 1A Big Sky League play. Desiree Duke had 13 points for Central Christian (4-16 overall, 1-12 Big Sky), which visits Ione on Thursday.

MOUNTAIN VIEW (36) — Megan McCadden 12, Booster 9, Platner 7, Waldrup 5, Reeves 3, Johnson, Cant, Warren. Totals 12 9-16 36. Redmond 12 10 8 8 — 38 Mountain View 7 16 8 5 — 36 Three-point goals — Redmond: Edwards, Dollarhide; Mountain View: Platner, Booster, Reeves.

Sky-Em League ——— ELMIRA (42) — Sarah Kessling 10, Allison Boytz 10, Stolle 8, Lay 8, Ingram 5, Messman 3, Gabica 2, Robbins 2, Palmer 2. Totals 13 15-36 42. LA PINE (39) — Katie Mickel 13, Wieber 9, Glenn 6, Ebner 6, Fogel 5, Porter, Boen, Huddleston. Totals 16 6-19 39. Elmira 8 12 7 15 — 42 La Pine 8 13 4 14 — 39 Three-point goals — Elmira: Lay; La Pine: Ebner. ——— Class 2A Tri-River Conference ——— KENNEDY (38) — Bridget Donohue 11, Jordan Susee 11, Kliewer 10, Unrein 4, Barth 2. Totals 15 6-12 38. CULVER (26) — Cassandra Fulton 10, Sandy 6, Seehawer 6, Anglen 4, Retano, McKinney. Totals 11 4-9 26. Kennedy 10 10 7 11 — 38 Culver 7 7 10 2 — 26 Three-point goals — Kennedy: Susee, Donohue.

PREP SCOREBOARD Boys basketball Tuesday’s results ——— Intermountain Hybrid ——— MOUNTAIN VIEW (52) — Mitch Modin 14, Reid 8, Bosch 8, Siefken 8, Lannin 7, C. Hollister 5, Carroll 2, Bachman, Teitgen, McNelis, Dattke, Haugen, Gentry, Logan, J. Hollister. Totals 19 10-14 52. REDMOND (40) — Tanner Manselle 13, Reed 10, Dahlen 5, Genz 5, Powell 3, Brown 2, Jackson 2, Lau, Bowman, Rodby, Tavita, Bordges. Totals 15 9-13 40. Mountain View 19 15 9 9 — 52 Redmond 8 14 9 9 — 40 Three-point goals — Mountain View: Modin 2, Reid, C. Hollister; Redmond: Powell. ——— Intermountain Hybrid ——— BEND (56) —Connor Scott 24, Larson 15, Beaumarchais 7, Connell 6, Torkelson 4, Kramer, Grim, C. Johnson. Totals 23 12-13 56.

CROOK COUNTY (50) — Peyton Seaquist 18, Mahurin 12, Dees 11, Benton 5, Washachek 4, A. Cooper, Brewer. Totals 19 NA. Bend 11 15 12 18 — 56 Crook County 20 2 18 10 — 50 Three-point goals — Not available. ——— Class 4A Sky-Em League ——— ELMIRA (70) — Travis Boggs 17, Long 12, Fay 10, Deleon 8, Admire 6, Reed 6, Messman 4, Tena 4, Westlund 3, Larkin, Ota, Thilberg. Totals 28 12-16 70. LA PINE (56) — Isaac O’Casey 14, Parsons 13, Syres 11, Hanna 4, Boen 4, Pierce 4, Wieber 2, Smith 2, Kraft 2, Gacke, Ramirez. Totals 21 12-16 56. Elmira 18 16 19 17 — 70 La Pine 13 10 16 17 — 56 Three-point goals — Elmira: Westlund, Long; La Pine: Syres 3, Parsons. ——— Class 4A Tri-Valley Conference

——— MADRAS (57) — Jhaylen Yeahquo 17, Ahern 14, McConnell 9, Zacarias 6, Haugen 5, Quintana 4, Fracasso 2, Mitchell. Totals 23 2-13 57. GLADSTONE (62) — Ryan Shephard 20, Webster 13, Stoutt 9, Highland 9, Moe 6, Ferrara 2, Orr 3, Jeffery. Totals 24 12-15 62. Madras 21 7 16 13 — 57 Gladstone 19 11 16 16 — 62 Three-point goals — Gladstone: Stoutt, Orr; Madras: Haugen, Zacarias. ——— Class 2A Tri-River Conference ——— KENNEDY (71) — Doug Pomeroy 22, Postma 14, Hammer 10, Moreno 6, Traeger 6, Ciappi 5, Jaeger 5, Hernandez 3, Stokley, Unrein, Susee, Taede. Totals 29 9-17 71. CULVER (27) — Clay Gibson 12, Gonzalez 10, Bolton 2, Fritz 2, Slaght 1, Leeper, Martinez, Lequieu. Totals 8 10-13 27. Kennedy 18 22 16 15 — 71 Culver 6 7 12 2 — 27

Three-point goals — Kennedy: Pomeroy 3, Ciappi; Culver: Gibson.

Girls basketball Tuesday’s results ——— Intermountain Hybrid ——— CROOK COUNTY (32) — Brooke Buswell 12, Martin 4, Lindburg 4, Solomon 4, Loper 2, Walker 2, McKenzie 2, Johnston 2, Apperson, Ovens. Totals 14 4-4 32. BEND (43) — Mekayla Isaak 18, McConnell 9, Froelich 6, Crook 6, Maloney 2, Lundy 2, Jones, Kramer. Totals 17 9-10 43. Crook County 10 4 10 8 — 32 Bend 10 8 9 16 — 43 ——— Intermountain Hybrid ——— REDMOND (38) — Jesslyn Albrecht 11, Edwards 10, Capps 8, Dollarhide 5, Baker 2, Benson 2. Totals 17 8-18 38.

NBA ROUNDUP

NBA SCOREBOARD

Wade leads Heat over Cavaliers The Associated Press MIAMI — One stingy defensive stretch was enough to carry the Miami Heat past LeBron James’ former team once again. It might have gotten the Heat prepped for a daunting road stretch as well. Dwyane Wade scored 26 points, James added 24 and the Heat said farewell to their home floor for nearly two weeks by beating the Cleveland Cavaliers 107-91 on Tuesday night. Miami’s lead was only a point late in the third quarter, before the Cavaliers missed 17 of their next 19 shots and the Heat finally pulled away. “It was definitely going to be necessary,” James said of the late defensive push, one that ensured Miami would beat Cleveland for the fifth time in six meetings since the two-time MVP left the Cavaliers for the Heat. “And that’s how we want to close out games.” Chris Bosh finished with 15 points for the Heat, who have won 11 of their past 13 games and stayed within a game of Chicago in the Eastern Conference race, both teams tied in the loss column with six. Mario Chalmers and Udonis Haslem each scored 14 for Miami, which starts a stretch of five road games in seven nights at Orlando on Wednesday, then caps the six-game trip with a visit to Cleveland on Feb. 17. The Heat are 19-6, the best 25-game start in team history. “We just had to grind it out, grind it out — until it was our time to pull away,” Wade said. Antawn Jamison scored 25 points and had nine rebounds for Cleveland, which got 17 from Alonzo Gee, and 16 points, six rebounds and six assists from Kyrie Irving. Anderson Varejao had 11 points and 11 rebounds for the Cavaliers, who were outscored 29-19 in the fourth and got a four for 23 shooting

Alan Diaz / The Associated Press

Miami Heat’s Dwyane Wade scores against the Cleveland Cavaliers in the first half of Tuesday’s game in Miami. Wade finished with 26 points.

night from their reserves. “I thought we competed,” Cavaliers coach Byron Scott said. “I thought our starters played pretty well. Our second unit just couldn’t make baskets, couldn’t throw anything in the ocean. You’re not going to win a lot of games when you’re not get any contributions but again a lot of it had to do with the injuries. I’m not trying to make any excuse. You’ve got to give them a lot of credit. They’re a good basketball team.” Facing a number of injury issues, Cleveland had only 11 players in uniform for the game. Daniel Gibson (neck infection), Tristan Thompson (sprained left ankle) and Anthony Parker (strained lower back) were not with the club, and earlier this week the team waived Mychel Thompson — who had started the Cavs’ past three games and scored six points in their win over Dallas on Saturday.

Class 4A Tri-Valley Conference ——— GLADSTONE (45) — Amber Jensen 10, McKenna Hopkins 10, Cronin 9, Bradshaw 8, Webster 4, Beykovsky 3, Simone 1, Hermansen. Totals 18 7-15 45. MADRAS (48) — Abby Scott 16, Suppah 12, M. Stacona 10, Frank 4, I. Jones 4, R. Jones 2, Simmons, Kaltukis, Adams. Totals 17 12-18 48. Gladstone 3 11 18 13 — 45 Madras 15 11 10 12 — 48 Three-point goals — Gladstone: Webster, Cronin; Madras: Suppah 2. ——— Class 4A

Short-handed or not, the Cavs gave the Heat all they wanted — just as they did in Miami two weeks ago. Jamison had 20 points in the first half, his best opening half since March 6, 2010. And whenever it seemed like Miami was about to take off on a run, like when it had a quick 15-8 lead early or a 4333 edge midway through the second quarter, Cleveland had an answer. That trend continued in the third. “We did a good job,” Varejao said, “until the fourth quarter.” Also on Tuesday: Celtics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .94 Bobcats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .84 BOSTON — Paul Pierce passed Larry Bird for No. 2 on the Celtics’ career scoring list, finishing with 15 points as Boston increased its winning streak to five with a victory over Charlotte. Suns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .107 Bucks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .105 MILWAUKEE — Steve Nash hit a driving layup with 5 seconds left, giving Phoenix a victory over Milwaukee. Timberwolves. . . . . . . . . . . . .86 Kings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .84 MINNEAPOLIS — Nikola Pekovic had 23 points and 10 rebounds, and Michael Beasley added 17 points and 14 boards to lead Minnesota over Sacramento in its first game without the suspended Kevin Love. Pacers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .104 Jazz. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .99 INDIANAPOLIS — Danny Granger scored 12 of his 16 points in the fourth quarter and Darren Collison had 25 points to lead Indiana past Utah. Thunder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119 Warriors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116 OAKLAND, Calif. — Kevin Durant hit a go-ahead bank shot with 14.2 seconds remaining, and the NBAleading Oklahoma City Thunder overcame career performances by Monta Ellis and David Lee to beat Golden State.

Summaries

Eastern Conference

Tuesday’s Games

Heat 107, Cavaliers 91 CLEVELAND (91) Casspi 2-5 1-2 6, Jamison 11-22 1-2 25, Varejao 4-6 3-4 11, Irving 5-15 4-5 16, Gee 6-11 4-6 17, Sessions 2-8 4-4 9, Eyenga 0-4 0-0 0, Hollins 1-1 3-7 5, Harangody 1-9 0-0 2, Samuels 0-1 0-0 0, Erden 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 32-82 20-30 91. MIAMI (107) James 9-16 6-7 24, Bosh 6-10 3-4 15, Anthony 1-4 0-0 2, Chalmers 5-11 0-0 14, Wade 9-17 8-8 26, Battier 1-4 0-0 2, Haslem 4-6 6-7 14, Miller 3-9 0-0 8, Cole 1-7 0-0 2. Totals 39-84 23-26 107. Cleveland 25 23 24 19 — 91 Miami 28 26 24 29 — 107 3-Point Goals—Cleveland 7-19 (Irving 2-3, Jamison 2-5, Gee 1-1, Sessions 1-2, Casspi 1-4, Harangody 0-4), Miami 6-17 (Chalmers 4-9, Miller 2-5, James 0-1, Battier 0-1, Wade 0-1). Fouled Out— None. Rebounds—Cleveland 51 (Varejao 11), Miami 57 (Miller, Bosh 9). Assists—Cleveland 17 (Irving 6), Miami 19 (Wade, James 6). Total Fouls—Cleveland 22, Miami 22. Technicals—Varejao, Miami defensive three second. A—20,078 (19,600).

Celtics 94, Bobcats 84 CHARLOTTE (84) Thomas 1-6 0-0 2, Diaw 2-6 0-0 4, Biyombo 15 1-2 3, Walker 5-13 5-5 16, Williams 6-15 7-8 21, Mullens 5-11 1-2 11, Brown 10-10 0-1 20, Higgins 0-2 0-0 0, White 1-2 2-2 4, Carroll 0-0 0-0 0, Najera 1-1 0-0 3. Totals 32-71 16-20 84. BOSTON (94) Pierce 6-18 1-1 15, Garnett 10-15 2-2 22, O’Neal 1-3 0-0 2, Rondo 4-8 2-2 10, Allen 8-14 0-0 17, Bass 5-8 3-3 13, Wilcox 2-3 0-0 4, Pietrus 2-7 0-0 5, Bradley 2-2 0-0 4, Pavlovic 0-1 0-0 0, Stiemsma 1-1 0-0 2, Moore 0-0 0-0 0, Johnson 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 41-81 8-8 94. Charlotte 22 16 24 22 — 84 Boston 27 18 24 25 — 94 3-Point Goals—Charlotte 4-16 (Williams 2-8, Najera 1-1, Walker 1-4, Diaw 0-3), Boston 4-23 (Pierce 2-10, Allen 1-5, Pietrus 1-5, Rondo 0-1, Pavlovic 0-1, Garnett 0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Charlotte 39 (Walker 7), Boston 44 (O’Neal, Pierce 8). Assists—Charlotte 19 (Williams 5), Boston 31 (Rondo 14). Total Fouls—Charlotte 11, Boston 15. Technicals—Thomas, O’Neal, Pierce. A—18,624 (18,624).

Pacers 104, Jazz 99 UTAH (99) Hayward 4-8 3-4 11, Millsap 5-7 8-8 18, Jefferson 6-17 4-5 16, Harris 4-9 2-2 11, Bell 3-5 0-0 7, Watson 0-3 0-0 0, Howard 2-6 4-4 8, Miles 5-9 0-0 12, Favors 5-8 0-0 10, Kanter 3-6 0-0 6. Totals 37-78 21-23 99. INDIANA (104) Granger 6-14 4-4 16, West 3-9 2-2 8, Hibbert 713 3-3 17, Collison 10-14 4-4 25, George 5-10 2-2 14, Stephenson 4-7 0-4 8, Hansbrough 3-8 2-2 8, Amundson 0-1 0-0 0, Price 2-5 0-0 5, Jones 1-6 1-1 3. Totals 41-87 18-22 104. Utah 23 23 31 22 — 99 Indiana 27 30 27 20 — 104 3-Point Goals—Utah 4-10 (Miles 2-4, Bell 1-2, Harris 1-3, Hayward 0-1), Indiana 4-14 (George 26, Collison 1-1, Price 1-3, Jones 0-1, Granger 0-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Utah 49 (Millsap 10), Indiana 44 (Hibbert 10). Assists—Utah 23 (Watson 7), Indiana 18 (Collison 5). Total Fouls—Utah 20, Indiana 20. A—11,006 (18,165).

Suns 107, Bucks 105 PHOENIX (107) Hill 5-12 1-1 13, Frye 6-12 0-0 14, Gortat 8-12 5-5 21, Nash 8-13 0-0 18, Dudley 7-9 2-2 19, Redd 7-14 0-0 14, Morris 1-7 0-0 2, Childress 0-4 0-0 0, Telfair 0-2 0-0 0, Lopez 3-9 0-0 6, Price 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 45-94 8-8 107. MILWAUKEE (105) Delfino 3-6 0-0 7, Mbah a Moute 2-4 3-3 7, Gooden 12-21 1-2 25, Jennings 1-4 0-0 3, Livingston 4-6 1-2 9, Dunleavy 5-7 3-3 17, Udrih 3-6 0-0 6, Ilyasova 4-9 8-8 17, Leuer 0-2 0-0 0, Harris 0-0 0-0 0, Jackson 4-11 2-2 12, Sanders 1-5 0-0 2. Totals 39-81 18-20 105.

d-Chicago d-Miami d-Philadelphia Indiana Atlanta Orlando Boston Milwaukee New York Cleveland New Jersey Toronto Detroit Washington Charlotte

W 21 19 18 17 16 15 14 10 10 9 8 8 6 5 3

L 6 6 7 7 9 10 10 14 15 14 18 18 20 20 22

W 20 15 17 15 14 14 14 14 13 13 12 11 8 9 4

L 5 7 9 10 11 11 11 11 11 12 13 14 14 16 21

Pct .778 .760 .720 .708 .640 .600 .583 .417 .400 .391 .308 .308 .231 .200 .120

GB — 1 2 2½ 4 5 5½ 9½ 10 10 12½ 12½ 14½ 15 17

L10 7-3 8-2 7-3 7-3 5-5 4-6 9-1 5-5 4-6 3-7 4-6 4-6 3-7 3-7 0-10

Str W-3 W-3 W-2 W-1 L-3 L-1 W-5 L-3 W-2 L-1 L-3 L-2 W-2 W-1 L-12

Home 9-1 12-2 13-3 7-2 8-4 8-5 10-6 7-4 6-7 4-5 3-8 3-6 5-8 4-10 2-8

Away 12-5 7-4 5-4 10-5 8-5 7-5 4-4 3-10 4-8 5-9 5-10 5-12 1-12 1-10 1-14

Conf 15-4 14-3 13-4 12-6 13-5 10-6 13-6 6-6 8-8 6-10 6-13 5-13 4-14 4-15 2-18

Away 11-4 5-4 4-8 8-5 3-9 4-8 5-6 3-9 2-7 6-4 5-9 6-8 2-6 3-12 2-9

Conf 15-4 9-6 15-7 7-10 11-5 8-9 10-8 10-8 9-8 10-5 8-11 5-9 3-9 6-12 2-17

Western Conference d-Oklahoma City d-L.A. Clippers d-San Antonio Denver L.A. Lakers Houston Dallas Portland Utah Minnesota Memphis Phoenix Golden State Sacramento New Orleans d-division leader

Pct .800 .682 .654 .600 .560 .560 .560 .560 .542 .520 .480 .440 .364 .360 .160

GB — 3½ 3½ 5 6 6 6 6 6½ 7 8 9 10½ 11 16

L10 7-3 7-3 7-3 5-5 4-6 6-4 6-4 5-5 4-6 6-4 3-7 5-5 4-6 4-6 1-9

Str W-2 W-2 W-5 L-3 L-2 W-1 L-3 L-1 L-2 W-3 L-3 W-3 L-2 L-1 L-6

Home 9-1 10-3 13-1 7-5 11-2 10-3 9-5 11-2 11-4 7-8 7-4 5-6 6-8 6-4 2-12

——— All Times PST Tuesday’s Games Indiana 104, Utah 99 Boston 94, Charlotte 84 Miami 107, Cleveland 91 Minnesota 86, Sacramento 84 Phoenix 107, Milwaukee 105 Oklahoma City 119, Golden State 116

Today’s Games L.A. Clippers at Cleveland, 4 p.m. Milwaukee at Toronto, 4 p.m. Miami at Orlando, 4 p.m. New York at Washington, 4 p.m. San Antonio at Philadelphia, 4 p.m. Indiana at Atlanta, 4:30 p.m. Detroit at New Jersey, 4:30 p.m. Chicago at New Orleans, 5 p.m. Minnesota at Memphis, 5 p.m. Dallas at Denver, 6 p.m. Houston at Portland, 7 p.m.

Phoenix 34 33 21 19 — 107 Milwaukee 30 20 31 24 — 105 3-Point Goals—Phoenix 9-25 (Dudley 3-4, Hill 24, Nash 2-4, Frye 2-6, Childress 0-1, Telfair 0-1, Morris 0-1, Redd 0-4), Milwaukee 9-20 (Dunleavy 4-5, Jackson 2-4, Jennings 1-3, Delfino 1-3, Ilyasova 1-4, Gooden 0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Phoenix 48 (Childress 12), Milwaukee 45 (Ilyasova 12). Assists—Phoenix 28 (Nash 11), Milwaukee 25 (Udrih, Jackson, Delfino, Jennings 4). Total Fouls—Phoenix 16, Milwaukee 13. Technicals—Lopez, Jackson. Flagrant Fouls—Gooden. A—13,203 (18,717).

Timberwolves 86, Kings 84 SACRAMENTO (84) Salmons 1-4 0-2 2, Thompson 3-5 1-2 7, Cousins 3-13 4-6 10, Evans 5-13 0-0 11, Thornton 7-16 5-7 22, Hayes 0-3 0-0 0, Hickson 4-6 0-0 8, Thomas 0-5 0-0 0, Greene 3-8 4-4 11, Fredette 5-8 0-0 13, Garcia 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 31-82 14-21 84. MINNESOTA (86) Johnson 3-6 0-0 7, Williams 5-10 3-8 14, Pekovic 9-12 5-5 23, Rubio 2-9 2-4 6, Ridnour 4-12 0-0 8, Miller 1-2 0-0 3, Beasley 7-21 2-3 17, Tolliver 0-3 2-4 2, Barea 1-4 4-4 6. Totals 32-79 18-28 86. Sacramento 16 20 24 24 — 84 Minnesota 31 17 21 17 — 86 3-Point Goals—Sacramento 8-23 (Fredette 3-5, Thornton 3-7, Evans 1-2, Greene 1-4, Salmons 0-1, Hayes 0-1, Thomas 0-3), Minnesota 4-14 (Miller 11, Williams 1-2, Johnson 1-2, Beasley 1-2, Ridnour

Thursday’s Games L.A. Lakers at Boston, 5 p.m. Golden State at Denver, 6 p.m. Houston at Phoenix, 6 p.m. Oklahoma City at Sacramento, 7:30 p.m.

0-1, Rubio 0-1, Barea 0-2, Tolliver 0-3). Fouled Out— None. Rebounds—Sacramento 60 (Hickson, Cousins 11), Minnesota 55 (Beasley 14). Assists—Sacramento 20 (Thomas, Evans 4), Minnesota 21 (Rubio 14). Total Fouls—Sacramento 26, Minnesota 20. A—14,073 (19,356).

Thunder 119, Warriors 116 OKLAHOMA CITY (119) Durant 13-27 5-6 33, Ibaka 2-6 3-3 7, Perkins 00 2-2 2, Westbrook 12-21 6-6 31, Cook 6-8 0-0 17, Harden 6-13 4-4 19, Collison 1-1 0-0 2, Mohammed 4-5 0-0 8, Jackson 0-3 0-0 0. Totals 44-84 20-21 119. GOLDEN STATE (116) D.Wright 3-8 2-4 9, Lee 9-19 7-7 25, Biedrins 0-0 0-0 0, Curry 7-9 1-2 16, Ellis 18-29 9-10 48, Udoh 3-8 0-0 6, Rush 3-5 0-0 9, Thompson 1-1 0-0 3, McGuire 0-1 0-0 0, Jenkins 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 44-80 19-23 116. Oklahoma City 29 30 32 28 — 119 Golden State 35 22 36 23 — 116 3-Point Goals—Oklahoma City 11-26 (Cook 5-6, Harden 3-8, Durant 2-7, Westbrook 1-4, Jackson 01), Golden State 9-21 (Rush 3-5, Ellis 3-6, Thompson 1-1, Curry 1-2, D.Wright 1-6, Lee 0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Oklahoma City 40 (Durant 10), Golden State 41 (Lee 11). Assists—Oklahoma City 24 (Westbrook, Harden, Durant 7), Golden State 28 (Lee, Curry 10). Total Fouls—Oklahoma City 25, Golden State 22. A—17,971 (19,596).


D4

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2012

GW PGA Tour PEBBLE BEACH NATIONAL PRO-AM Site: Pebble Beach, Calif. Schedule: Thursday-Sunday. Courses: Pebble Beach Golf Links (6,816 yards, par 72), Monterey Peninsula Country Club, Shore Course (6,900 yards, par 72) and Spyglass Hill Golf Club (6,833 yards, par 72). Purse: $6.4 million. Winner’s share: $1,152,000. Television: Golf Channel (Thursday, noon-3 p.m., 5:30-8:30 p.m.; 9:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m.; Friday, noon-3 p.m., 5:30-8:30 p.m.; Saturday, 10-11:30 a.m., 6:30-9:30 p.m.; Sunday, 10-11:30 a.m., 6:309:30 p.m.) and CBS (Saturday, noon-3 p.m.; Sunday, noon-3:30 p.m.). Last year: D.A. Points won his first PGA Tour title and teamed with Bill Murray to win the pro-am competition. Last week: Kyle Stanley rebounded from a devastating loss at Torrey Pines with a victory in the Phoenix Open. Notes: Tiger Woods is making his first PGA Tour start of the season after opening play two weeks ago with a third-place tie in Abu Dhabi. He won the last of his 71 PGA Tour titles in September 2009. ... The Northern Trust Open is next week at Riviera in Los Angeles, followed by the World Golf Championships-Accenture Match Play Championship in Marana, Ariz.

LPGA Tour WOMEN’S AUSTRALIAN OPEN Site: Melbourne, Australia. Schedule: Thursday-Sunday. Course: Royal Melbourne Golf Club, Composite Course (6,505 yards, par 73). Purse: $1.1 million. Winner’s share: $165,000. Television: Golf Channel (Thursday-Friday, 9:30-11:30 a.m.; Saturday-Sunday, 7-9:30 a.m.). Last year: Taiwan’s Yani Tseng successfully defended her title, winning by seven strokes at Commonwealth Golf Club. Last week: The Netherlands’ Christel Boeljon won the Australian Ladies Masters, birdieing the final hole for a onestroke victory. Notes: The tournament opens the LPGA Tour season. ... The topranked Tseng tops the field along with No. 2 Suzann Pettersen, No. 4 Cristie Kerr, No. 7 Jiyai Shin, No. 9 Brittany Lincicome, No. 10 Stacy Lewis, four-time winner Karrie Webb and 16-year-old Lexi Thompson... The LPGA Thailand is next week, followed by the HSBC Women’s Champions in Singapore.

T EE T O GR EEN

CENTRAL OREGON COURSE UPDATE

Quail Run Golf Course By Zack Hall The Bulletin

The Bulletin continues a weekly Tee To Green feature in which we check in via email with golf professionals at Central Oregon courses for an offseason update. This week we contacted Todd Sickles, general manager at Quail Run Golf Course in La Pine. Sickles came to Central Oregon in 2007 as Quail Run’s head pro and became the course’s general manager in 2010. A pro since 1989, Sickles had this to say about the current business of golf and about Quail Run, La Pine’s only golf course:

Q: A:

How was business in 2011? The golf season started slow with the poor spring weather, but we showed an increase from the previous year in rounds played during the summer months.

Q: A:

Were any changes of note made to the facility during the last year? We are continually making changes on a yearly basis. Last year we began a program of removing dozens of our pine trees in order to get more circulation and sunlight on our turf.

Q:

Are any changes and/or improvements to the facility scheduled for 2012? We will continue our program of removing some trees to prevent too much shading, which should help Quail Run maintain a healthier and better playing surface.

A:

Q:

Has the Central Oregon golf industry started to bounce back from the economic struggles that have gripped the region since 2007? It is too early to say. … I am feeling a little

A:

Quail Run Golf Course Number of holes: 18 Status: Open seasonally Location: 16725 Northridge Drive, La Pine Tee times: 541-5361303 or 800-895-GOLF Course stats: Par 72, 6,897 yards Director of golf: Todd Sickles Course designer: Jim Ramey (original nine, 1991; second nine, 2006) Extras: Driving range, putting and chipping area, practice bunkers, snack bar, pro shop Website: www. golfquailrun.com

more optimistic after seeing some positive indications for 2012. All indications show a degree of recovery, but I think this recovery will be a slow one.

Q: A:

What more can be done to bring new golfers to the course? I think implementing the PGA of America’s Golf 2.0 program and being aware of today’s economic realities and family needs will be key to bringing in new golfers. We have been offering a local resident special ($49, including cart during the summer months) for the past couple years, which has been very successful. We are working on adult and junior clinics that will hopefully bring in new and returning golfers to our facility. With families so limited with their time together, we need to have an inexpensive solution to get them on the course for at least a nine-hole outing. — Reporter: 541-617-7868, zhall@bendbulletin.com

GOLF SCOREBOARD

Champions Tour ALLIANZ CHAMPIONSHIP Site: Boca Raton, Fla. Schedule: Friday-Sunday. Course: The Old Course at Broken Sound Club (6,807 yards, par 72). Purse: $1.8 million. Winner’s share: $270,000. Television: Golf Channel (Friday, 3:30-5:30 p.m., 9:30-11:30 p.m.; Saturday, 3:30-6:30 p.m., 10 p.m.midnight; Sunday, 4-6:30 p.m., 10 p.m.-midnight). Last year: Tom Lehman won the first of his three 2011 titles, birdieing the final hole for a onestroke victory over Jeff Sluman and Rod Spittle. Last event: Dan Forsman won the season-opening Mitsubishi Electric Championship in Hawaii on Jan. 22, beating Jay Don Blake by two strokes. Notes: The tournament is the first full-field event of the year. ... The tour will remain in Florida next week for the ACE Group Classic in Naples.

European Tour DUBAI DESERT CLASSIC Site: Dubai, United Arab Emirates. Schedule: Thursday-Sunday. Course: Emirates Golf Club, Majlis Course (7,301 yards, par 72). Purse: $2.5 million. Winner’s share: $416,670. Television: Golf Channel (Thursday-Friday, 1:30-5:30 a.m., 7:30-9:30 a.m.; Saturday, 1-5 a.m., noon-2 p.m.; Sunday, 1-5 a.m., noon-3:30 p.m.). Last year: Spain’s Alvaro Quiros won by a stroke, making a hole-inone in a final-round 68. Last week: Scotland’s Paul Lawrie won the wind-shortened Qatar Open, beating Jason Day and Peter Hanson by four strokes. Notes: Rory McIlroy, the 2009 winner, is in the field along with Quiros, Lawrie, John Daly, Lee Westwood, Martin Kaymer, Fred Couples, Mark O’Meara and 2010 champion Miguel Angel Jimenez. ... The Avantha Masters is next week in India. ——— All Times PST

The Bulletin welcomes contributions to its weekly local golf results listings and events calendar. Clearly legible items should be faxed to the sports department, 541-385-0831, emailed to sports@ bendbulletin.com, or mailed to P.O. Box 6020; Bend, OR 97708.

Club Results AWBREY GLEN Super Bowl XLVI Shamble, Feb. 5 Double Loop Shamble Offense Flight — 1, Ken Waskom/Bill Long. 2 (tie), Jeff Keller/Len McCulley; Ron Seals/John Murphy. Defense Flight — 1, Don Fellows/Mary Fellows. Special Teams Flight — 1, Linda Weinstock/Anne Goldner. Most Points Scored — Jeff Keller/Len McCulley, 8 points. EAGLE CREST Men’s Club, Feb. 1 Chapman at Ridge Course 1, Tim Swope/Bill Carey, 57. 2, Peter O’Reilly/ Jerry Decoto, 60. 3, John Boynton/Eric Webber, 61. 4, Tom Johnson/Sam Puri, 62. 5, Mike Narzisi/Steve Gould, 64. 6 (tie), Ray Schadt/Michael Mooberry, 65; Bill Olson/Jerry Rogers, 65. MEADOW LAKES Central Oregon Winter Series, Feb. 3 Triple Six First Flight — Gross: 1, Zach Lampert/Jim Montgomery, 66. 2, Dwight Hietala/Pat Woerner, 68. 3 (tie), Tim Cecil/Charlie Rice, 70; Brandon Kearney/Brad Patrick, 70; Bob Garza/Mont Green, 70. Net: 1, Tim McCabe/Rob Dudley, 64. 2, Paul Nemitz/Fred Johnson, 64.5. 3 (tie), Les Bryan/Pat O’Gorman, 65; Roger Ruth/Denny Kampfer, 65; Dave Barnhouse/Britton Coffer, 65. Second Flight — Gross: 1, Craig Johannesen/Allan Kellogg, 73. 2 (tie), Steve Heckart/Allen Heinly, 75; Daniel Hostetler/Ronald Hostetler, 75. 4, Joe Jezukewicz/Steve Priborsky, 76. 5 (tie), Todd Goodew/Steve Spangler, 78; Tom MacDonaldJim MacDonald, 78. Net: 1, Steve Wienke/ Mark Howard, 58.5. 2, Paul Adams/John Mitchell, 59. 3, Kory Callantine/Dave Ratzlaff, 64. 4, Franklin Earls/Jerry Harris, 66.5. 5 (tie), Joe Perry/Jim Kelly, 67; Clay Smith/Kim Bradshaw, 67. KPs — Mark Payne, No. 8; Steve Priborsky, No. 17. Skins — Gross: Johnson/Nemitz, No. 5; Hendricks/Cleveland, No. 9. Net: Howard/ Weinke, Nos. 8, 11; Hendricks/Cleveland, No. 9; Glender/Glender, No. 10; Goodew/Spangler, No. 15; Adams/Mitchell, No. 17.

Hole-In-One Report Jan. 31 EAGLE CREST CHALLENGE Paul Quinn, Redmond No. 7. . . . . . . . . . . 92 yards. . . . . . .sand wedge

Calendar The Bulletin welcomes contributions to its weekly local golf events calendar. Items should be mailed to P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708; faxed to the sports department at 541-385-0831; or e-mailed to sports@bendbulletin.com. ——— LEAGUES Central Oregon Golf Tour — The Central Oregon Golf Tour, a competitive golf series held at courses throughout Central Oregon, is holding an early membership drive. The discounted rate is $50 for the entire year. After Feb. 16, an annual membership costs $70. Tournaments are gross

and net competitions open to amateur golfers of all abilities. Prize pool awarded weekly. Membership allows golfers to play in events, though each tournament charges additional green fees. For more information or to register: 541-633-7652, 541-318-5155, 541-350-7605, or www.centraloregongolftour.com. CLINICS OR CLASSES Saturdays — Winter and spring group lesson series at the indoor PGA Tour Academy facility at Pronghorn Club. Each lesson is taught by PGA professionals Mike Palen and Todd Cover and includes two hours of instruction with video analysis, a nine-hole playing lesson, and lunch at Pronghorn’s Trailhead Grill. Short-game classes (chipping, pitching and bunker shots) are scheduled for Feb. 25, March 24, and April 21. Fullswing classes (irons, hybrids, woods, and driver) are scheduled for Feb. 11, March 10, and April 7. Cost is $199 per class, but discounts apply for multiple sessions. For more information or to register call Cover at 541-306-9296 or email him at epicgolfadventures@gmail.com, or call Palen at 541-788-4249 or email him at mpalen@ touracademy.com. ——— TOURNAMENTS Feb. 24 — Central Oregon Winter Series better ball at Crooked River Ranch. Two-person teams with no more than one professional allowed per team. Cost is $30 for professionals, $50 for amateurs. Cost includes gross and net skins competitions. Cart costs extra. All players must sign up by noon on the Thursday before the event. To register or for more information, call Pat Huffer, head pro at Crooked River Ranch, at 541-923-6343 or email him at crrpat@crookedriverranch.com. Feb. 25 — Rotary Club of Jefferson County’s Cherry Tree Open is a four-person scramble tournament held at Kah-Nee-Ta High Desert Resort & Casino near Warm Springs. Shotgun start at 10 a.m. Cost is $35 per person and includes net and gross prizes and hole-in-one contest. Field limited to 120 golfers. Registration deadline: Feb. 20. For more information or to register, call KahNee-ta at 1-800-831-0100. March 3 — Polar Bear Open is an individual stroke-play tournament at Meadow Lakes Golf Course in Prineville. Event tees off with a 10 a.m. shotgun start. For more information or to register, call the Meadow Lakes pro shop at 541447-7113. March 10-11 — The Kah-Nee-Ta Spring Invitational at Kah-Nee-Ta High Desert Resort & Casino on the Warm Springs Indian Reservation is a pro-amateur tournament presented by the Oregon Chapter of the PGA. Admission is free to spectators. For more information, call 541553-4971 or visit www.orpga.com. March 16 — Central Oregon Winter Series scramble at Juniper Golf Course in Redmond. Two-person teams with no more than one professional allowed per team. Cost is $30 for professionals, $50 for amateurs. Cost includes gross and net skins competitions. Cart costs extra. All players must sign up by noon on the Thursday before the event. To register or for more information, call Pat Huffer, head pro at Crooked River Ranch, at 541-923-6343 or email him at crrpat@crookedriverranch.com. March 17 — St. Patrick’s Day Green Ball Bash Scramble at Meadow Lakes Golf Course in Prineville. Event tees off with a 10 a.m. shotgun start. For more information or to register, call the Meadow Lakes pro shop at 541-447-7113. March 23 — Central Oregon Winter Series aggregate shamble at Pronghorn Club’s Jack Nicklaus Course near Bend. Two-person teams with no more than one professional allowed per team. Cost is $30 for professionals, $50 for amateurs. Cost includes gross and net skins competitions. Cart costs extra. All players must sign up by noon on the Thursday before the event. To register or for more information, call Pat Huffer, head pro at Crooked River Ranch, at 541-923-6343 or email him at crrpat@crookedriverranch.com.

Woods offers long putter solution PGA TOUR

By Doug Ferguson The Associated Press

PEBBLE BEACH, Calif. — Tiger Woods has a solution to long putters — make them no longer than the shortest club in the bag. Woods said Tuesday at the Pebble Beach National Pro-Am he has “never been a fan” of long putters that players either anchor into their belly or the broom-style putters that are pressed against the chest. “I believe it’s the art of controlling the body and club and swinging the pendulum motion,” Woods said. “I believe that’s how it should be played. I’m a traditionalist when it comes to that.” Woods said he has spoken to Royal & Ancient chief executive Peter Dawson the last several years about how the language could be written in the Rules of Golf that effectively would ban such putters. “My idea was to have it so that the putter would be equal to or less than the shortest club in your bag,” Woods said. “And I think with that, we’d be able to get away from any type of belly anchoring.” He said the putter still could be anchored to the forearm, as two-time Masters champion Bernhard Langer once did. Keegan Bradley became the first major champion to use a belly putter when he won the PGA Championship. Bill Haas used the same style when he won the Tour Championship to capture the FedEx Cup. The belly putters gained momentum late last

Putter Continued from D1 Golfers are making the switch because it promotes a more consistent setup and removes the wrists from the stroke while still allowing for a pendulum motion. The potential for gangbuster sales has those in the golf business jumping for joy. Sales of putters have decreased for the past nine years, according to the research firm Golf Datatech. In 2003 putter sales in onand off-course shops were about $200 million. In 2011, that figure had dropped to $141.3 million, down 4.1 percent from the previous year. But those in the golf-equipment industry say belly putter sales could invigorate the category. “The belly putter is the great white hope,” said Steve Boccieri, the maker of the Heavy Putter. He noted that early last summer, he struggled to sell his belly putter models to major retailers, who deemed the club “inventory poison” for its tendency to sit on shelves for months. Then the belly putter boom began in earnest in August when Keegan Bradley won the PGA Championship, becoming the first golfer to win a men’s major while using a belly putter. Odyssey Golf, the maker of Bradley’s 43-inch White Hot XG Sabertooth belly model, reported belly putter sales skyrocketed more than 400 percent last year. A combined nine tour victories with belly or long putters legitimized the clubs in the eyes of many. The veterans Ernie Els, Jim Furyk and Phil Mickelson also experimented with belly models in tournament play. Suddenly, Boccieri found himself writing orders in October for 800 putters from the golf retailer Golfsmith and 1,000 from Golf Town, Canada’s largest golf-specialty store. “That’s more bellies than I had sold in a year,” he said. The consumer frenzy caught equipment-makers and retailers flat-footed. Larry Hirsch of

year with Bradley and Webb Simpson, who won twice late in the year and who nearly captured the PGA Tour money title. Both considered themselves good putters who felt as though anchoring the club to their stomach made them even better. For years, most players believed only players who were desperate to improve used such putters. Ernie Els once criticized the use of belly putters, but switched to one late last year and said: “As long as it’s legal, I’ll keep cheating like the rest of them.” Phil Mickelson also experimented with a belly putter during the FedEx Cup playoffs last year. He since has gone back to a more conventional putter. The R&A and USGA, while making no formal announcement, have said they would review such putters. While it would seem simple to ban long putters, it can help recreational players stay interested in the game, and any ban might also affect the equipment companies. “If you look back at the interest in it, it really never changed for over 20 years,” USGA executive director Mike Davis said Saturday at its annual meeting. “Then all of a sudden in 2011 ... this has become a much bigger topic. So the R&A and USGA have been talking about this at length, and we’re looking at it from the perspective as ... what is good for the game for all golfers long term.”

Villanova, Pa., an avid golfer fiddling with a Scotty Cameron belly model at the Titleist booth, said he shopped at several stores before he located a belly putter, then bought the only model on the shelf. To match the growing demand, the leading shaftmaker True Temper has increased its production of belly and long putter shafts to 120,000 last year from 60,000 in 2010. The company says it expects to produce more than 500,000 shafts this year. Chris Koske, the global director of Odyssey Golf, said the company sold 8,000 belly putters in 2010 and more than 34,000 units last year. He has high hopes for this season. “I’d like to get to 100,000,” he said. “I think it is completely doable.” When Paul Azinger notched the first win with a belly putter in 2000, demand for the club surged temporarily. The putter-maker Scotty Cameron recalled inserting a chopstick in the grip hole of Azinger’s putter as a practice device. Soon after, while browsing at a pro shop, Azinger toyed with lodging a long putter cut down for a shorter man in his belly button. After holing a string of putts, he bought the club, changed the grip, got it approved by the U.S. Golf Association, and rolled to a seven-stroke victory at the Sony Open. Sales spiked again in 2003 when Vijay Singh, dogged by a balky putter, conquered his woes and won several events wielding a belly putter. Recreational golfers often avoided the belly or long putter because they were considered

an old-man’s crutch, an act of desperation for a golfer with a bad back, or a case of the yips. But when younger players like Adam Scott, Webb Simpson and Bill Haas won on tour with a long or belly putter, the stigma disappeared. Dave Pelz, a renowned short-game coach, said he had used long and belly putters for instruction purposes for more than 20 years and coordinated trials involving students from his six teaching schools to try and determine which putter generated the most accurate stroke. Pelz found that 60 percent of his students putted better with a belly model. “I’m not endorsing it,” he said. “I’m saying test it.” A lingering question is whether the long and belly putter should be allowed. The USGA considered a proposal limiting the length of a putter in 1989, but decided longer putters were not detrimental to the game. But to many golf purists, using a belly or long putter is akin to cheating. “My best friend said he wouldn’t play with me anymore if I used one,” Hirsch said. While equipment-makers and golf retailers attempt to capitalize on consumer interest, a bigger question than legality is whether the belly putter craze will last this time. Tim Reed of Adams Golf introduced several belly putters under the company’s Yes! Putter brand at the PGA show. How convinced is he that the belly putter is here to stay? “Well, I named one of the belly models after my wife,” he said.

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TV & Movies, E2 Dear Abby, E3 Comics, E4-5 Puzzles, E5

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2012

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IN BRIEF Annual sale at FootZone today FootZone in downtown Bend kicks off its annual running sale today featuring 20 percent off all things running. This includes shoes, clothing, socks, insoles and nutrition and hydration items. The sale will continue through Sunday. Brands featured in the store include Asics, Brooks, Mizuno, Saucony and Nike. FootZone, located at 845 N.W. Wall St., is open 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Mondays through Fridays, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturdays, and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Sundays. Contact: www .footzonebend.com or 541-317-3568.

Pop-up store comes Thursday Downtown Bend boutique Hot Box Betty is teaming up with Tetherow resort for a pop-up store, which will show off the latest fashions for spring. The free event will take place from 4 to 7 p.m. Thursday in the lobby of Tetherow’s clubhouse. It will showcase new arrivals such as denim from Dutch brand Maison Scotch, knits and other pieces from Acrobat, and scarves and jewelry by Chan Luu. Tetherow is located at 61240 Skyline Ranch Road. Its entrance is just off Southwest Century Drive in Bend. Contact: www .hotboxbetty.com or 541-383-0050.

LivingSocial comes to Bend LivingSocial, which offers deals on merchandise and services, recently launched a website for Bend. The site is expected to post daily offers for the Bend area, a LivingSocial spokeswoman said. Examples so far include a manicure and pedicure for $29 and a Cycle Pub outing for four for $42. Here’s how it works: LivingSocial offers each deal for several days. After customers purchase a deal, they receive a voucher via email the next business day, to be redeemed at the participating business. LivingSocial also sends a link after buying the deal. If a customer shares it and three other people buy the deal, then the deal is free to the original customer. Contact: www.living socialites.

Cracking the

egg code • Learn what the labels on the cartons mean By Heidi Hagemeier The Bulletin

ow do you like your eggs? Cage-free with a side of lutein? Or vegetarianfed Grade A with an extra dash of omega-3? Perusing the eggs at the local grocery store these days is a lot like scanning a menu. Egg cartons are labeled with numerous choices, but it can be difficult to know whether the ones stamped “natural” are similar to those marked “no hormones, no antibiotics.” For some labels, producers must meet a list of requirements set by the federal government. Others have a generally understood meaning in the egg industry but perhaps no regulatory definition or third-party inspection of their claims. Also, the intent behind egg carton labels spans from promoting animal welfare standards to touting nutritional benefits. “It’s a hot topic,” said Justice Hoffman, whose family sells fresh eggs from its Powell Butte farm through the business Great American Egg. He said he gets questions from customers regularly, whether they’re placing direct orders or buying from the stand at Bend Farmers Market. Yet your mind need not be scrambled. There are a few tips to understanding what egg cartons say about their content.

H

Learning about labels One of the biggest categories of egg carton labels deals with the living conditions of laying hens. These catchphrases include “free range,” “cage-free” and “pastured.” These are voluntary labels without defined meanings, as federal standards don’t mandate disclosure of how hens are housed, said Mitch Head, spokesman for the industry group United E`gg Producers. See Eggs / E6

Egg essentials What the labels on egg cartons mean: meaning there’s no possibility CAGE-FREE an egg eventually would hatch This label conventionally a chick. But fertile eggs mean means that laying hens aren’t the hens have at least been kept in cages, although the around roosters. The USDA term isn’t regulated by the USDA. The Humane Society of says there is no nutritional difference or other difference in the United States says these eating fertile eggs. birds are likely indoors, but can engage in natural behaviors like spreading their wings, NATURAL walking and nesting. The USDA says this label means that nothing was added to the eggs after they were laid. FERTILE It doesn’t tell shoppers anyMost eggs consumed in thing about how the hens were the U.S. are from hens that raised or what they were fed. have no contact with roosters,

Illustration by Jennifer Montgomery The Bulletin

NO ANTIBIOTICS The U.S. Poultry and Egg Association says all eggs produced in the U.S. are free of antibiotics, in part because when hens are ill they typically stop laying eggs. But hens may be given antibiotics when ill. The USDA’s take on the label is it may be included on poultry products if the producer provides sufficient documentation. The label doesn’t require thirdparty certification.

LUTEINENRICHED Some cartons now tout lutein-enriched eggs, meaning the laying hens were fed a diet supplemented with the carotenoid. Lutein is found naturally in leafy green plants like spinach and kale. According to the federal Agricultural Research Service, people who don’t get enough lutein

in their diets are at greater risk of developing age-related macular degeneration, the leading cause of vision loss in older Americans. Thus when studies within the last decade showed that humans better absorb lutein from eggs than from other sources, so grew the interest in lutein-enriched eggs.

See Labels / E6

Shoppers use cellphone as tool When considering a purchase this past holiday season, shoppers more than ever turned to their cellphones for advice. That’s the finding released recently by the Pew Internet and American Life Project, part of the nonpartisan Pew Research Center. The survey, which included 1,000 Americans contacted just after the new year, found that in the 30 days before and after Christmas, more than half had used their cellphones in stores while considering whether to buy something. Thirty-eight percent called a friend to get advice. While in stores, 24 percent went online to look up product reviews, and 25 percent did so to see if they could find a better price somewhere else. The survey has a 4 percent margin of error. Contact: http://pew research.org. — Heidi Hagemeier, The Bulletin

The guilt-free handyman shopping spree Take care of • With the right tools winter wear on hand, home projects

• Keep seasonal garments, shoes looking good for years to come

become less of a hassle By Bob Tedeschi New York Times News Service

By Cristina Bolling

Put a new tool in the hands of some people, guys especially, and they become giddy at the prospect of all the jobs they can now do. For me, it means one more thing to feel stupid about, and one less excuse to blow off a project that surely could wait another week. Part of me would like to become that other guy, but such a conversion requires a bit of cash and a bigger measure of wisdom. The basic set of tools I own is good for home repairs and maintenance, and some simple work, like installing shelves or a shower head. But are there other tools — better tools — that would inspire me to chase down ambitious projects instead of fleeing them? I put the question to three home

McClatchy Newspapers

Tony Cenicola New York Times News Service

Winter fashions can mean big investments. Slick leather jackets, cozy cashmere scarves and sleek tall boots aren’t like the bikini you bunch up and toss in the drawer at the end of the summer. So why not take a little time — and in some cases, a little money — to treat those investments right? After all, if properly cared for, some of those favorites could last a decade or more. We asked local experts for their best tips in caring for wool, leather, fur and more.

Leather jackets and pants: improvement specialists: Gordon Bock, former editor in chief of Old House Journal; Duo Dickinson, an architect and the author of “Staying Put,” a manual on home remodel-

ing; and Bob Vila, whose syndicated home improvement series jumpstarted a genre, and whose videos can now be seen at BobVila.com. See Tools / E3

• Apply a waterproofing conditioner as soon as you buy a leather jacket or pants. •Blot any dirt or stains on your garment as soon as possible with a warm, damp sponge. See Winter / E6


E2

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2012

TV & M 200th episode of ‘NCIS’ a reward for loyal fans

L M T  FOR WEDNESDAY, FEB. 8

by revealing more about the characters bit by bit. “NCIS� nowadays is “like By Brian Stelter a supernova,� she said, netNew York Times News Service ting 22.7 million viewers for Oh, the lament of a thriv- new episodes this season, ing television show executive. up slightly from last seaYou’re responsible for a billion- son, which was its highest dollar franchise that draws 20 rated to date. It has been the million viewers a week. Yet most-watched scripted teleyou see much smaller vision show in the shows suck up all the United States since TV attention. the 2009-10 season, Still, it can be a SPOTLIGHT when it surpassed struggle to get a qui“CSI,� another CBS etly successful show noticed franchise. by the wider television world, The show had a humble which may explain why CBS beginning with about 12 milhas turned episode No. 200 lion viewers on average, midof “NCIS� into a cause for dling by CBS standards at celebration. the time. “We were not good Its producers and publi- enough to be paid attention cists have been planning for to and not bad enough to be tonight’s milestone episode canceled,� Harmon said. of this criminal drama since As a spin-off of “JAG,� spring. The network has been which ran between 1995 promoting the big round num- and 2005 and totaled 227 ber in commercials and on episodes, it was allowed Facebook in recognition that to grow slowly, and it did, so few one-hour dramas ever flouting most of the trends make it this far. of network television. “The fact that we hit this (Oddly, “JAG� itself did the number at the same time that same — it was canceled by we’re No. 1 with viewers is ex- NBC after one season, but traordinary, and there isn’t a revived by CBS and made single person here who takes into a hit show.) it for granted,� said Gary GlasFor Glasberg, there is a berg, the executive producer. lesson embedded in “NCIS� Tonight’s episode is a kind of about slow, steady characreward for longtime fans, bring- ter-building. “You can give ing back some past characters people a little bit and it satifor cameos and setting up some ates them and leaves them what-if scenarios for Leroy Je- wanting more,� he said. thro Gibbs, the Naval Criminal Earlier in the winter one Investigative Service special of the lighting technicians agent Mark Harmon has played came up to him and said: “ since the show’s inception, in fall ‘Gunsmoke,’ right? We’re 2003. “It’s all about the ripple ef- going for ‘Gunsmoke?’ � fects of decisions and choices he That series lasted on televihas made throughout the years,� sion for 20 seasons and 635 Glasberg said. episodes, albeit at a time Nina Tassler, president of in television history when entertainment for CBS, praised viewers had far fewer the producers for being “very choices than today. mindful of the fans that have Glasberg said he anbeen there since the beginning� swered, “I’ll do my best.� ‘ N C IS ’ 8 tonight, CBS

BEND Regal Pilot Butte 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend, 541-382-6347

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Alex Russell, left, Michael B. Jordan and Dane DeHaan discover a strange crystalline object in “Chronicle.�

EDITOR’S NOTES: • Open-captioned showtimes are bold. • There may be an additional fee for 3-D movies. • IMAX films are $15. • Movie times are subject to change after press time.

The Associated Press

A DANGEROUS METHOD (R) 2:15, 7:10 THE DESCENDANTS (R) 1, 4, 6:30 THE GIRL WITH THE DRAGON TATTOO (R) 1:45, 5:15 THE IRON LADY (PG-13) 2, 5, 7:20 TINKER TAILOR SOLDIER SPY (R) 4:30

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rating) 6:30 MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE — GHOST PROTOCOL (PG-13) Noon, 3:05, 6:10, 9:15 ONE FOR THE MONEY (PG-13) 12:30, 2:55, 5:25, 9:10 RED TAILS (PG-13) 12:45, 4:45, 7:40 SHERLOCK HOLMES: A GAME OF SHADOWS (PG-13) 12:05, 3:15, 6:15, 9:15 UNDERWORLD AWAKENING IMAX (R) 12:20, 3:20, 5:40, 8:30 WAR HORSE (PG-13) 1:05, 4:30, 7:50 WE BOUGHT A ZOO (PG) 12:10, 3:10 THE WOMAN IN BLACK (PG-13) 12:25, 2:50, 5:15, 8:05

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THE GREY (R) 12:40, 5, 7:55 HUGO 3-D (PG) Noon, 2:55, 5:55, 9 MAN ON A LEDGE (PG-13) 12:20, 3, 5:45, 8:35 THE METROPOLITAN OPERA: THE ENCHANTED ISLAND (no MPAA

IMMORTALS (PG-13) 9 THE MUPPETS (PG) 3 THE TWILIGHT SAGA: BREAKING DAWN — PART 1 (PG-13) 6

After 7 p.m., shows are 21 and older only. Younger than 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.

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MADRAS Madras Cinema 5 1101 S.W. U.S. Highway 97, Madras, 541-475-3505

CHRONICLE (PG-13) 5, 7:05 THE GREY (R) 4, 6:30 ONE FOR THE MONEY (PG-13) 4:50, 7

CHRONICLE (PG-13) 5:15, 7:15 THE GREY (R) 4, 6:30 MAN ON A LEDGE (PG-13) 4, 6:15 RED TAILS (PG-13) 4:15, 6:45

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8:00

8:30

The Middle ‘PG’ Suburgatory (N) Whitney (N) ‘14’ Are You There Person to Person (N) ’ Ă… The Middle ‘PG’ Suburgatory (N) American Idol (N) ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Nature Raccoon Nation (N) ’ ‘G’ Whitney (N) ‘14’ Are You There One Tree Hill (N) ’ ‘14’ Ă… Midsomer Murders ‘PG’ Ă…

9:00

9:30

Modern Family Happy Endings Rock Center With Brian Williams Criminal Minds Snake Eyes ‘14’ Modern Family Happy Endings Mobbed (N) ’ ‘PG’ Ă… NOVA Separating Twins (N) ‘PG’ Rock Center With Brian Williams Remodeled (N) ’ ‘PG’ Ă… World News Tavis Smiley (N)

10:00

10:30

Revenge Perception (N) ’ ‘PG’ Law & Order: SVU CSI: Crime Scene Investigation Revenge Perception (N) ’ ‘PG’ News TMZ (N) ’ ‘PG’ Inside Nature’s Giants (N) ‘PG’ Law & Order: SVU Cops ‘PG’ Ă… ’Til Death ‘PG’ Charlie Rose (N) ’ ‘G’ Ă…

11:00

11:30

KATU News (11:35) Nightline News Jay Leno News Letterman KEZI 9 News (11:35) Nightline Family Guy ‘PG’ Family Guy ‘14’ History of Science ’ ‘G’ Ă… NewsChannel 8 Jay Leno King of Queens South Park ‘14’ PBS NewsHour ’ Ă…

BASIC CABLE CHANNELS

A&E AMC ANPL BRAVO CMT CNBC CNN COM COTV CSPAN DIS DISC E! ESPN ESPN2 ESPNC ESPNN FAM FNC FOOD FX HGTV HIST LIFE MSNBC MTV NICK OWN ROOT SPIKE SYFY TBN TBS TCM TLC TNT TOON TRAV TVLND USA VH1

The First 48 Life Snatched ‘14’ Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Dog the Bounty Hunter ‘PG’ Dog the Bounty Hunter (N) ‘PG’ Bounty Hunter Bounty Hunter 130 28 18 32 The First 48 ‘14’ Ă… CSI: Miami Murder leads the team to CSI: Miami Ambush Julia has Horatio CSI: Miami All In The team races to ›› “Pet Semataryâ€? (1989, Horror) Dale Midkiff, Fred Gwynne, Denise Crosby. ›› “Pet Semataryâ€? (1989, Horror) Dale Midkiff, Fred Gwynne, Denise Crosby. 102 40 39 a strip club. ’ ‘14’ Ă… arrested for murder. ’ ‘14’ An ancient burial ground holds a secret for a family. Ă… An ancient burial ground holds a secret for a family. Ă… save Calleigh. ’ ‘14’ Ă… Hillbilly Handfishin’ ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Hillbilly Handfishin’ ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Hillbilly Handfishin’ (N) ’ ‘PG’ Hillbilly Handfishin’ ’ ‘PG’ Ă… 68 50 26 38 Operation Wild Operation Wild River Monsters: The Most Bizarre Hillbilly Handfishin’ ’ ‘PG’ Tabatha Takes Over Tabatha Takes Over Tabatha Takes Over Top Chef: Texas Block Party Top Chef: Texas Top Chef: Texas Mentors (N) ‘14’ What Happens Top Chef 137 44 ›› “Kindergarten Copâ€? (1990, Comedy) ’ Ă… 190 32 42 53 Extreme Makeover: Home Edition Extreme Makeover: Home Edition Extreme Makeover: Home Edition ›› “Kindergarten Copâ€? (1990, Comedy) Arnold Schwarzenegger. Premiere. ’ Ă… American Greed American Greed (N) Mad Money American Greed American Greed Brazil Butt Lift Better H20 51 36 40 52 Marijuana USA Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 Ă… Erin Burnett OutFront Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 Ă… Anderson Cooper 360 Ă… 52 38 35 48 Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Ă… South Park ‘14’ Daily Show Colbert Report 30 Rock ’ ‘14’ 30 Rock ’ ‘14’ Futurama ‘14’ Futurama ‘14’ South Park ‘MA’ South Park ‘MA’ South Park ‘MA’ South Park ‘MA’ Daily Show Colbert Report 135 53 135 47 Always Sunny Dept./Trans. City Edition Bend City Council Work Session Bend City Council Get Outdoors Visions of NW The Yoga Show The Yoga Show Talk of the Town Local issues. 11 Capitol Hill Hearings 58 20 12 11 Capitol Hill Hearings Wizards-Place Good-Charlie Jessie ‘G’ Ă… A.N.T. Farm ‘G’ Jessie ‘G’ Ă… Austin & Ally ’ Wizards-Place Wizards-Place Good-Charlie Shake It Up! ‘G’ 87 43 14 39 Austin & Ally ’ Austin & Ally ’ Shake It Up! ‘G’ Good-Charlie When Fish Attack 3 ‘PG’ Ă… American Guns ’ ‘14’ Ă… American Guns ’ ‘14’ Ă… American Guns ’ ‘14’ Ă… American Guns ’ ‘14’ Ă… American Guns ’ ‘14’ Ă… 156 21 16 37 Man vs. Wild ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Keeping Up With the Kardashians The E! True Hollywood Story ‘14’ E! News (N) Kourtney & Kim Take New York Kourtney & Kim Take New York The Soup ‘14’ Kourt & Kim Chelsea Lately E! News 136 25 College Basketball Duke at North Carolina (N) (Live) ‘PG’ SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… 21 23 22 23 College Basketball College Basketball Seton Hall at Rutgers (N) (Live) NFL Live (N) Ă… Basketball NBA Tonight (N) NFL Live Ă… SportsNation Ă… 22 24 21 24 College Basketball Stories of... (N) Stories of... White Shadow Sudden Death Long Way Down (N) Stories of... Stories of... College Basketball 1990 Georgia Tech at North Carolina State 23 25 123 25 Jack Johnson: The Later Years SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. 24 63 124 203 SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… ›› “Miss Congenialityâ€? (2000, Comedy) Sandra Bullock, Michael Caine. ›› “Practical Magicâ€? (1998, Comedy-Drama) Sandra Bullock, Nicole Kidman. The 700 Club ‘G’ Ă… 67 29 19 41 Gilmore Girls Kiss and Tell ‘PG’ Hannity (N) On Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Ă… Hannity On Record, Greta Van Susteren The Five 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Ă… Home Cooking Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Restaurant: Impossible ‘G’ Guess Who Diners, Drive Restaurant: Impossible ‘G’ Restaurant: Impossible (N) Restaurant: Impossible ‘G’ 177 62 98 44 Best Dishes (3:00) ››› “Iron Manâ€? (2008) How I Met How I Met Two/Half Men Two/Half Men › “When in Romeâ€? (2010) Kristen Bell, Josh Duhamel. Premiere. › “When in Romeâ€? (2010) Kristen Bell, Josh Duhamel. 131 My First Place My First Place My First Place Hunters Int’l House Hunters Property Brothers ‘G’ Ă… Income Prop. Kitchen Cousins House Hunters Hunters Int’l Property Brothers ‘G’ Ă… 176 49 33 43 My First Place Modern Marvels ‘PG’ Ă… American Pickers Ă… Restoration Restoration Larry the Cable Guy Restoration Restoration Larry the Cable Guy 155 42 41 36 Modern Marvels Grease ‘PG’ Wife Swap Jones/Martinson ‘G’ Wife Swap Baur/Fine ‘PG’ Ă… Wife Swap ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Wife Swap ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Wife Swap ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Wife Swap Fuentes/Lawson ‘PG’ 138 39 20 31 Wife Swap Harris/Weasel ’ ‘PG’ The Rachel Maddow Show (N) The Last Word The Ed Show The Rachel Maddow Show The Last Word Hardball With Chris Matthews 56 59 128 51 The Ed Show (N) Teen Mom 2 Jenelle decides to go to rehab. ‘PG’ The Challenge: Battle The Challenge: Battle The Challenge: Battle 192 22 38 57 That ’70s Show That ’70s Show That ’70s Show Teen Mom 2 ’ ‘PG’ SpongeBob Victorious ‘G’ Victorious ‘G’ House, Anubis How to Rock ‘G’ That ’70s Show That ’70s Show Friends ’ ‘PG’ Friends ‘PG’ George Lopez George Lopez Friends ‘PG’ Friends ’ ‘PG’ 82 46 24 40 SpongeBob Oprah Behind the Scenes The Rosie Show (N) ’ ‘PG’ 48 Hours: Hard Evidence ’ ‘14’ 48 Hours: Hard Evidence ’ ‘14’ 48 Hours: Hard Evidence ’ ‘PG’ 48 Hours: Hard Evidence ’ ‘14’ 161 103 31 103 Oprah Behind the Scenes Beavers Cougars Huskies Mark Few Show Runnin’-PAC The Game 365 Action Sports World Champion The Dan Patrick Show 20 45 28* 26 College Basketball Rice at Houston (N) (Live) Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die 132 31 34 46 Ways to Die Face Off Rock Your Body Face Off Night Terrors Ghost Hunters A Shot in the Dark Ghost Hunters (N) ’ Ă… Face Off Dangerous Beauty (N) Ghost Hunters ’ Ă… 133 35 133 45 Face Off Water World ‘14’ Behind Scenes Turning Point Joseph Prince End of the Age Praise the Lord (Live). Ă… Easter Exper. Jesse Duplantis Thru History Creflo Dollar Praise the Lord TBN Classics 205 60 130 Friends ‘PG’ King of Queens King of Queens Seinfeld ‘PG’ Seinfeld ‘PG’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Big Bang Big Bang Conan (N) ‘14’ 16 27 11 28 Friends ‘14’ ›› “State Fairâ€? (1933) Will Rogers. Premiere. A family trip (6:45) ››› “Bye Bye Birdieâ€? (1963) Dick Van Dyke. A songwriter sees (8:45) ››› “The Music Manâ€? (1962, Musical Comedy) Robert Preston, Shirley Jones, Buddy Hackett. A glib traveling “One Potato, Two 101 44 101 29 to the state fair has romantic rewards. chance when a teen idol prepares to join the Army. Ă… salesman works his charm on an Iowa town. Potatoâ€? Untold Stories of the E.R. ’ ‘14’ Untold Stories of the E.R. ’ ‘14’ Untold Stories of the E.R. ’ ‘14’ Untold Stories of the E.R. ’ ‘14’ My 600-lb Life (N) ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Untold Stories of the E.R. ’ ‘14’ 178 34 32 34 Untold Stories of the E.R. Ă… Law & Order Vendetta ’ ‘14’ Law & Order True North ’ ‘14’ Law & Order Positive ’ ‘14’ Law & Order Judge Dread ’ ‘14’ Law & Order Pledge ’ ‘14’ Southland Identity ’ ‘MA’ Ă… 17 26 15 27 Law & Order Rubber Room ‘14’ Johnny Test ’ Regular Show MAD ‘PG’ Wrld, Gumball Adventure Time Johnny Test (N) NinjaGo: Mstrs Level Up King of the Hill King of the Hill American Dad American Dad Family Guy ‘PG’ Family Guy ‘PG’ 84 Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Fast Foods Gone Global ‘G’ Amazing Eats Amazing Eats Vegas Stripped Vegas Stripped Barbecue Paradise ‘G’ Ă… 179 51 45 42 Bourdain: No Reservations M*A*S*H ‘PG’ M*A*S*H ‘PG’ M*A*S*H ‘PG’ M*A*S*H ‘PG’ Home Improve. Home Improve. Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Hot, Cleveland Hap. Divorced King of Queens King of Queens 65 47 29 35 Bonanza Mountain Girl ‘G’ Ă… NCIS Head Case ’ ‘PG’ Ă… NCIS: Los Angeles Fame ’ ‘14’ NCIS Patriot Down ’ ‘14’ Ă… NCIS Rule Fifty-One ’ ‘14’ Ă… Royal Pains Bottoms Up (N) ‘PG’ Covert Affairs ‘PG’ Ă… 15 30 23 30 NCIS Light Sleeper ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Love & Hip Hop ’ ‘14’ Love & Hip Hop ’ ‘14’ Love & Hip Hop Finale ’ ‘14’ Love & Hip Hop ’ ‘14’ Mob Wives Hell on Heels ’ ‘14’ ›››› “GoodFellasâ€? (1990) ’ 191 48 37 54 Love & Hip Hop ’ ‘14’ PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(6:05) ›› “Alice in Wonderlandâ€? 2010 Johnny Depp. ’ ‘PG’ Ă… ››› “8 Mileâ€? 2002, Drama Eminem, Kim Basinger. ’ ‘R’ Ă… ››› “The American Presidentâ€? 1995 Michael Douglas. ’ ‘PG-13’ ENCR 106 401 306 401 (4:00) ››› “Slap Shotâ€? 1977 ›› “Aliens vs. Predator: Requiemâ€? 2007 Steven Pasquale. ‘R’ Ă… ››› “Joy Rideâ€? 2001, Suspense Steve Zahn. ‘R’ Ă… ›› “Aliens vs. Predator: Requiemâ€? 2007 Steven Pasquale. ‘R’ Ă… FMC 104 204 104 120 (4:00) ››› “Joy Rideâ€? 2001 ‘R’ UFC Reloaded UFC 136: Edgar vs. Maynard III Edgar vs Maynard and Aldo vs Florian. Strangers Action Sports Best of PRIDE Fighting UFC Tonight UFC Insider UFC Unleashed FUEL 34 On the Range On the Range Inside PGA Golf Central On the Range On the Range School of Golf Learning Center GOLF 28 301 27 301 On the Range (N) (Live) Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ HALL 66 33 175 33 The Waltons The Inspiration ‘G’ (4:30) › “D.O.A.: Dead or Aliveâ€? 2006 On Freddie › “Vampires Suckâ€? 2010, Comedy Matt Lanter, Jenn Angry Boys ’ Angry Boys ’ Luck Pilot Ace Bernstein is released Luck Ace meets with a potential inves- Real Time With Bill Maher Former HBO 425 501 425 501 Devon Aoki. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… Roach ’ ‘PG’ Proske, Chris Riggi. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… ‘MA’ Ă… ‘MA’ Ă… from prison. ’ ‘MA’ Ă… tor. ’ ‘MA’ Ă… Rep. Rick Lazio (R-N.Y.). ’ ‘MA’ ›› “Hostelâ€? 2006, Horror Jay Hernandez, Derek Richardson. ‘R’ ›› “Hostel Part IIâ€? 2007, Horror Lauren German, Roger Bart. ‘R’ ›› “Hostelâ€? 2006, Horror Jay Hernandez, Derek Richardson. ‘R’ ›› “Hostel Part IIâ€? 2007 ‘R’ IFC 105 105 (3:40) ››› “Gladiatorâ€? 2000, Historical Drama Russell (6:20) ››› “The Devil’s Ownâ€? 1997, Suspense Harrison (8:15) ›› “The Losersâ€? 2010, Action Jeffrey Dean Morgan. Elite commandos ›› “Hatchet IIâ€? 2010 Kane Hodder. A woman seeks Co-Ed ConfidenMAX 400 508 508 Crowe, Joaquin Phoenix. ’ ‘R’ Ă… Ford, Brad Pitt. ’ ‘R’ Ă… hunt the man who betrayed them. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… revenge on a maniacal, swamp-dwelling killer. tial 3 Marijuana Gold Rush Drugs, Inc. Pill Nation Drugs, Inc. Hash Marijuana Gold Rush Drugs, Inc. Pill Nation Drugs, Inc. Hash Wild Justice ‘14’ NGC 157 157 Odd Parents Odd Parents Odd Parents Odd Parents Dragonball GT Supah Ninjas SpongeBob SpongeBob Fanboy-Chum Fanboy-Chum Planet Sheen T.U.F.F. Puppy NTOON 89 115 189 115 Dragonball GT Supah Ninjas Shooting Gallery Brazil Amer. Rifleman Border Battles Impossible Best Defense Shooting USA Ă… Amer. Rifleman Shooting Gallery Brazil Best Defense OUTD 37 307 43 307 Shooting USA Ă… › “Cabin Boyâ€? 1994 Chris Elliott. iTV. Hawaii-bound snob Sebastian Maniscalco: What’s Wrong With People Shameless Fiona lies about her back- Inside the NFL (iTV Season Finale) Californication ’ House of Lies Inside the NFL (iTV) ’ ‘PG’ Ă… SHO 500 500 boards fishing boat. ’ ‘PG-13’ ground at a wedding. ‘MA’ (N) ’ ‘PG’ Ă… ‘MA’ Ă… Utah ‘MA’ Ă… (iTV) The comic performs. ’ ‘14’ Ă… Dumbest Stuff Pimp My Ride Pimp My Ride My Ride Rules My Ride Rules Dumbest Stuff Dumbest Stuff Pimp My Ride Pimp My Ride Pimp My Ride Pimp My Ride Pass Time ‘PG’ Pimp My Ride SPEED 35 303 125 303 Dumbest Stuff (6:40) ›› “Hulkâ€? 2003, Fantasy Eric Bana, Jennifer Connelly. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… ›› “Priestâ€? 2011 Paul Bettany. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… (10:35) ›› “Final Destination 2â€? 2003 Ali Larter. STARZ 300 408 300 408 (4:45) ›› “The Last Songâ€? 2010 Miley Cyrus. (4:45) ››› “The Company Menâ€? 2010, Drama Ben Af- ››› “Paranoid Parkâ€? 2007 Gabe Nevins. A teen is silent ›› “Rubberâ€? 2010, Comedy Stephen Spinella. A murder- “Rock Slydeâ€? 2009 Patrick Warburton. A private detective “Finding Blissâ€? 2009, Comedy Leelee TMC 525 525 fleck, Chris Cooper. ’ ‘R’ Ă… about his role in a security guard’s death. ous tire springs to life. ’ ‘R’ Ă… contends with the leader of a religious cult. Sobieski. ’ ‘R’ Ă… NHL Hockey Calgary Flames at San Jose Sharks From the HP Pavilion at San Jose, Calif. (N) ’ (Live) NBC Sports Talk (N) NHL Overtime NHL Overtime VS. 27 58 30 209 (4:30) NHL Hockey Boston Bruins at Buffalo Sabres (N) (Live) ››› “Unfaithfulâ€? 2002, Drama Richard Gere, Diane Lane, Olivier Martinez. ‘R’ Ă… Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Secret Lives of Women ‘14’ WE 143 41 174 118 ››› “Unfaithfulâ€? 2002, Drama Richard Gere, Diane Lane. Premiere. ‘R’ Ă…


WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

A  & A  

Man’s ex-girlfriend has warning for his fiancee Dear Abby: My boyfriend, “Brady,� broke up with me in November. Five weeks later he became engaged to someone else. I found out after that I have genital warts. My yearly exams never showed any problems before, so I know I got them from Brady. I’m getting treatment now, but I’ll be contagious for the rest of my life. I have been unable to tell Brady about this because he won’t respond to my attempts to contact him. I’m now trying to decide if I should tell his fiancee. I know he wants children, and this disease can have some serious repercussions if she gets pregnant. Do I leave this woman in the dark, or should I give her the medical information she and her doctors should have? — Needs to Do the Right Thing Dear Needs to Do the Right Thing: Five weeks into a relationship is a whirlwind courtship, unless Brady was cheating on you. If that’s the case, the fiancee may have infected Brady. Since he won’t respond to you, send him a registered letter informing him of your diagnosis, and any other information about genital warts you feel is relevant. If you’re worried that the fiancee is in the dark about this, send her a copy — also by registered mail. That way you’ll know it was received. Dear Abby: I am the product of an interracial relationship from the late ’60s. My maternal grandmother wanted nothing to do with me and made my teenage mother give me up for adoption. Before my biological mother passed away a few years ago, her dying wish was for my grandmother and me to form a relationship. She didn’t want her mother to be alone in her final years. I made an attempt to forge a relationship with my grandmother only to be told that she didn’t like me because of the color of my skin. Since then, I have been having bad dreams

of my mother being disappointed in me because I didn’t fulfill her wish. — Unaccepted in North Carolina Dear Unaccepted: It takes two people to form a relationship. By reaching out to your grandmother, you did the best you could to fulfill your mother’s wish — which, from your description of your grandmother, was an unfair burden to try to place on you. There’s no reason for you to court another round of rejection and, for your sake, I’m advising you not to. It may help to write a letter to your mother, explaining to her what happened when you reached out to your grandmother and how it felt, then read it at her grave. But please, stop blaming yourself for your grandmother’s inability to love. Dear Abby: While going through pictures on my girlfriend’s computer, I discovered that she had posed nude for a drawing by her artist daughter. For some reason, I am really bothered by her posing nude and doing it for her daughter. How can I bring this up, which will let her know that I was snooping on her computer? — Saw Way too Much Dear Saw Way too Much: Why would you be “really bothered� by a mother posing nude for her daughter who is an artist? Most mothers and daughters have seen each other in states of undress. My advice is to first figure out what you think is “wrong� with it, then admit that you snooped. After that, she can determine if she wants to continue being involved with a man who is as nosy and prudish as you appear to be. — Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

Horoscope: Happy Birthday for Wednesday, Feb. 8, 2012 By Jacq u eline Bigar This year you unravel a long-term issue by remaining gentle and caring. Others feel safer with you, no matter what type of relationship you have. Openness nearly becomes a way of life. If you are single, you might see a change in a major relationship, waving on more of what you want. If you are attached, don’t test your sweetie’s patience. Let him or her have his or her way more often. VIRGO understands you perhaps far too well. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH Of course effort counts, but having some charisma on your side can only help. Show your concern as well when dealing with an associate who might not be doing what you want. Listen to your sixth sense with a friend. You might not be completely right, but you have a strong sense of direction. Tonight: As you like. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHHH The only mistake you can make is holding yourself back. You know what works well for you. Let your imagination come forward. The ideas that follow — yours and others’ — are quite unusual. Do test them out. Romance could get spicy. Tonight: Some matters are best kept a secret. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHH Understand what is happening within your immediate domestic circle. You hear news that doesn’t feel quite complete. You don’t need to comment —the less said the more that will come forward. Tonight: Vanish while you can. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHH Keep conversations moving, and realize where you want to go with a situation. Others might not be as grounded as you would like. You might have to go over certain points, not once, but several times. Stay centered, if possible. Tonight: Meet up with a friend. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH Curb a need to be possessive or to overspend. You will be a lot happier if you use some self-discipline. Detach and try to understand where another person is coming from. Tonight: Relax with friends. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH The way you perk up in another person’s company makes

C C  Please email event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� at www.bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

TODAY DEAR ABBY

this person feel great. Relating to another person as well takes you to a new level of mutuality. Discuss a long-term desire. You could be delighted by the end results. Tonight: Make sure a favorite piece of music is on. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HH You might want to express a certain amount of consternation about a situation but then decide otherwise. Others don’t appear to be receptive to a conversation of this nature, or of any nature, for that matter. Tonight: Be yourself. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHHH A meeting helps you realize just what is needed to have a situation manifest as you might like. You have a lot of fun within this group or with a key person. Someone makes you an offer that you barely can say no to. Tonight: A force to be dealt with. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHH Your softer side emerges with a child or loved one. You express your dynamic energy and upbeat manner in a conversation. When you hear a vague statement, try to build on it. You find an associate upbeat and cooperative. Seize the moment. Tonight: Highly visible. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHHH Keep reaching out for others. Share an unusually mellow mood. Some of you might opt to stay close to home. Use care with your finances, as a mistake can happen all too easily, especially in the next few weeks. Recognize your limitations while honoring who you are. Your creativity and confidence grow. Tonight: Touch base with a loved one at a distance. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHHH Remain sensitive to a partner or associate. Relate one-onone with key people if you want to make an impact. Keep reaching out for someone at a distance who might be closed off. You cannot change this person, but you can encourage him or her to look at his or her behavior. Tonight: Visit over a meal. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH Let others show their hand. You might wonder which is the best way to handle a key issue. Listen to opinions. If you don’t feel comfortable with what you hear, hold off on making a decision. Find a respected adviser first. Tonight: The only answer is yes. Š 2011 by King Features Syndicate

E3

“THE METROPOLITAN OPERA, THE ENCHANTED ISLAND�: Starring Danielle de Niese, Lisette Oropesa, Joyce DiDonato, David Daniels, Anthony Roth Costanzo, Placido Domingo and Luca Pisaroni in an encore presentation of Handel and Vivaldi’s masterpiece; opera performance transmitted in high definition; $18; 6:30 p.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347. DEAD WINTER CARPENTERS: The California-based roots-rock band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www .mcmenamins.com. “THE ANGELS OF LEMNOS�: Innovation Theatre Works presents the urban drama about a man who finds a baby in a trash can; $15; 7:30 p.m.; Innovation Theatre Works, 1155 S.W. Division St., Bend; 541-504-6721 or www.innovationtw.org. “THE SPITFIRE GRILL�: Cascades Theatrical Company presents the musical about a young parolee who starts her life anew in rural Wisconsin; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www .cascadestheatrical.org.

THURSDAY GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society� by Mary Ann Shaffer; free; noon; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1055 or www.deschuteslibrary .org/calendar. GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “The Big Burn� by Timothy Egan; free; noon; Downtown Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7089 or www .deschuteslibrary.org/calendar.

Portlandbased acoustic string band, Fruition, will put on a free concert 7 p.m. Thursday at McMenamins Old St. Francis School in Bend. Submitted photo

ARMCHAIR TRAVELER: Larry Weinberg talks about hiking and history in the Dolomite Mountains; free; 2 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-4663, ruthh@uoregon.edu or http://osher .uoregon.edu. “FLOW — FOR THE LOVE OF WATER�: A screening of the 2008 documentary about dwindling water resources; followed by a discussion; free; 3:30-5:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Hitchcock Auditorium, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7786 or awoodell@ cocc.edu. RELAY FOR LIFE KICK-OFF CELEBRATION: Learn about the fundraiser for the American Cancer Society; with refreshments and music; free; 6 p.m.; Central Oregon Association of Realtors, 2112 N.E. Fourth St., Bend; 541-948-0447 or www.bendrelay.com. WHITE OUT?: Emily Drew talks about the future of racial diversity; free; 6:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Wille Hall, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7412. “THIS WAY OF LIFE�: A screening of the film about a Maori family and their relationships with their horses and each other; followed by a Q&A with the directors; $12; 7 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org.

FRUITION: The Portland-based acoustic string musicians perform; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www .mcmenamins.com. “THE ANGELS OF LEMNOS�: Innovation Theatre Works presents the urban drama about a man who finds a baby in a trash can; $15; 7:30 p.m.; Innovation Theatre Works, 1155 S.W. Division St., Bend; 541504-6721 or www.innovationtw.org. “THE SPITFIRE GRILL�: Cascades Theatrical Company presents the musical about a young parolee who starts her life anew in rural Wisconsin; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www .cascadestheatrical.org.

FRIDAY HEART WALK: Pick up a passport at Design & Consign and visit destinations throughout downtown; free; 5-8 p.m.; downtown Redmond; redmondartwalk@gmail.com. SPAY-GHETTI BENEFIT DINNER: Spaghetti dinner and pastry auction; reservations recommended; proceeds benefit the Humane Society of Redmond’s spay and neuter program; $15 or $12 ages 12 and younger in advance, $20 or $15

Tools

Tools that get the job done

Continued from E1 What I needed, they told me, was a good set of aspirational tools. But a set like that leans heavily on the power-tools category, and could therefore make your bank account tilt. Though, as Bock put it, “good tools don’t cost — they pay for themselves in improved work and long service.� If a set of basic tools (hammer, handsaw, jigsaw, drill, screwdriver, level, tape measure, pliers, ViseGrips, adjustable wrench and socket wrenches) costs around $150, the next step up costs roughly double that. Nevertheless, within hours of adding the 10 other items they recommended to my workshop, I had taken on a door-modification project that I’d ignored for a full decade, and I completed it in two hours. Had I paid a carpenter for the work, it might have cost as much as buying all of those tools.

From left: A wet-dry vacuum, a spline, wire strippers, earplugs, a portable workbench, earmuffs, a poser drill multipiece accessory kit, an 18-volt toolkit and an auger.

Here’s the drill At Bock’s recommendation, the first item on my list of new tools was an 18volt cordless drill. “It’s almost de rigueur,� he said, and the tools have improved in recent years. “It used to be that 24 volts was the sweet spot for a tool with power and durability,� Bock said. “But now you can get the same thing in a smaller package. They’re just incredible.� You can buy one for around $60, but my panelists strongly advised me to get one with a spare battery, so I wouldn’t have to worry about losing power midway through a project. Extra rechargeable batteries cost about $30. What’s the best way to shop for a drill? Vila said that most builders and carpenters choose the major brands carried at home improvement specialty stores and local hardware retailers. Bosch, DeWalt, Hi-

Tony Cenicola / New York Times News Service

tachi, Makita, Skil and Craftsman, he said, are good ones to consider. A battery-powered circular saw is another good thing to have, Bock said, “especially if you’re outside working on a fence or up on a roof, where you don’t want to drag a cord.�

Saws to seek Like cordless drills, batterypowered circular saws start at around $60 for models with 5½-inch blades, which will handle most basic tasks. The least expensive 6½-inch models sell for about $100. Bock’s next recommendation was slightly more controversial. He suggested buying the cordless version of a tool I’d long coveted for its destructive potential: a reciprocating saw. Also known by one of its brand names, a Sawzall, it’s good for demolition and for cutting through walls. Envisioning my next creditcard statement, I felt a good sweat coming on. But Vila said I could buy a combination cordless kit with a drill and circular and reciprocating saws for $200. It was the first time someone from the construction industry gave me an estimate that was actually high. An 18-volt tool kit from Ryobi, with a flashlight, drill, 5½-inch circular saw and reciprocating saw costs about $150. The kit

even includes a spare battery.

Get set Dickinson, who runs a firm in Connecticut, chose as his top tool recommendation a multipiece drilling-and-driving set, which vastly expands the utility of a cordless drill. “This thing has changed my life,� he said. “I can be fearless when I attack a job, because no matter what I might need, it’s all here.� His set is a DeWalt 80-piece drill-and-drive set, which sells for about $30 and includes nutsetters, roughly 20 drill bits and more than 50 screw-driving tips. For those with more specialized woodworking needs, Ryobi sells a 90-piece drill-anddrive set that includes tools for boring and circular cuts. With a multipiece kit, Dickinson said, you can choose bits of different sizes and shapes that come in handy if, for instance, you are trying to remove a screw that someone stripped as it was put in place. In other words, I’ll be able to deal with all of the screws I previously wrecked, for lack of the proper screwdriver. It will also help replace some of the driver bits that mysteriously disappeared the last time my teenage son used them.

Other must-haves If I’m going to embark on more ambitious home im-

ages 12 and younger at the door; 5-8 p.m.; The View Restaurant, Juniper Golf Course, 1938 S.W. Elkhorn Ave., Redmond; 541-923-0882. “MAYHEM IN MAYVILLE�: Children’s Theater Company presents a murder mystery dinner theater; registration requested; $15; 6-9 p.m.; The Bridge Church of the Nazarene, 2398 W. Antler Ave., Redmond; 541-460-3024, childrenstheater@me.com or www .childrenstheatercompany.net. PRINEVILLE FOLLIES: Local entertainers perform “Make a Sweet Sound�; $8, $5 students, $20 families; 7 p.m.; Crook County High School, Eugene Southwell Auditorium, 1100 S.E. Lynn Blvd.; 541-420-2049. SISTERS FOLK FESTIVAL WINTER CONCERT SERIES: Featuring a performance by Martyn Joseph; $15 or $10 students in advance, $20 or $12 students at the door; 7 p.m., doors open 6:30 p.m.; Sisters High School, 1700 W. McKinney Butte Road; 541-549-4979 or www.sistersfolkfestival.org. TRIVIA BEE: The Education Foundation for the Bend-La Pine Schools holds a trivia competition between three-person teams; with hors d’oeuvres; ages 21 and older only; proceeds benefit the foundation; $21; 7 p.m., doors open 6 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org.

provement projects, I should resign myself to making a mess of the workspace. On this front, Bock made a nice recommendation: a wetdry vacuum, more commonly known as a Shop-Vac. They’re far less expensive than I’d previously imagined (a Ridgid sixgallon model is $47), and they’ll suck up substances that would destroy a typical vacuum. “You don’t think of it as a tool,� he said, “but you get addicted to it.� Also on the list of low-tech tools were a few that can help save homeowners from writing big checks to contractors. Vila suggested an auger for unclogging toilets or drains. “Plumbers charge such enormous amounts that for $15 you might be able to do a serious unclogging that saves you a lot of dough,� he said. I found none for $15, but I did find a three-foot Ridgid toilet auger that cost about $34, and a six-foot model that was $50. Both would pay for themselves in the time it would take a plumber to walk from his truck to your front door. Another of Vila’s favorite money-saving gadgets is a spline ($5 for a Home Depot brand), which is a specialty tool for replacing screens. “Once you get the hang of it, it’s easy,� he said. “And if you have someone else do it for you, it triples the cost.� Vila suggested a set of wire strippers as well ($16 for Klein Tools wire strippers). “If you’ve ever tried to rewire an old lamp, they’re very handy,� he said. He also recommended a hatchet. But as I studied a shelf filled with shiny, expensive blades, I backed into a display for a Workmate portable workbench ($30) and got that instead. I can’t count the number of times I’ve tried to fix a bike as it squirms atop a garbage can, or pushed a circular saw within centimeters of the pavement, simply for lack of a proper work surface. I also can’t count the number of jobs I’ve avoided for the same reason. I grabbed a Workmate and the rest of my new tools, and headed home for my long-overdue doormodification project.


E4

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2012

TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

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E5

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E6

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2012

Eggs Continued from E1 Most shoppers buy the cheapest eggs at the store, Head said. These eggs come from hens raised in cages about the size of a dog crate containing five to six hens each. But producers are apt to add labels when possible to their cartons to capture that other growing segment of the market interested in how the hens were raised. The price per dozen can be $1 to $3 higher than for standard eggs, according to data from the U.S. Department of Agriculture. “They tend to label them voluntarily,” Head said of egg producers. “They’ll get a higher price for them typically.” However, this might change within the next several years. Democratic and Republican congressional representatives two weeks ago jointly introduced legislation that would improve living standards for laying hens and create four distinct egg carton labels describing those living conditions. The bill is backed by two organizations that haven’t always seen eye-to-eye on these issues: the United Egg Producers and the Humane Society of the United States. Head and Josh Balk, spokesman for the Humane Society, said they expect such consensus will allow for broad support among legislators. “Our efforts are focused on eliminating the worst practices in factory farming,” Balk said. The labels would be “eggs from caged hens,” “eggs from hens in enriched cages,” “eggs from cage-free hens” and “eggs from free-range hens.” They would start appearing a year after the bill passes. The first label, eggs from caged hens, would be phased out as farmers introduce new, enriched cages over 15 to 18 years. The enriched cages would be larger and contain perches as well as scratching and nesting areas. “We’re progressive and proactive on this,” Head said. “We think that’s what con-

Winter Continued from E1 • Spring is a good time to take a garment to a cleaner experienced with treating leather for a cleaning, reconditioning and touch-up, says Jimmy Lee, owner of Jones Dry Cleaning in Charlotte, N.C. • Never store leather in a plastic dry-cleaning bag, Lee warns. • Keep your leather at a moderate temperature yearround — never in the attic or a damp basement — and away from light or heat sources like radiators. Most any hanger is fine, as long as it is strong enough to hold the weight of the jacket.

Wool: • Make sure it is well-cleaned before packing it up at the end of the winter, says Tom Hilker, owner of Brothers Cleaners in the Raleigh, N.C., area. “What people don’t realize is that there are 12 different kinds of bugs besides moths that damage your clothes,” Hilker said. Bugs go after sweet spills, and

Labels Continued from E1

FREE RANGE OR FREE ROAMING Any eggs that are USDAcertified organic will also, by definition, be cage-free and vegetarian fed. All eggs are hormone-free.

Eggshell colors are specific to the breed of hen. There is no nutritional difference between brown- and white-shelled eggs, according to the USDA.

The USDA regulates this term for poultry but not for eggs. What it generally means for egg production, according to the Humane Society of the United States, is the hens live uncaged inside barns or warehouses. They have access to the outdoors but without any definition of quality. Since they aren’t caged, the hens can act like hens, nesting and foraging. The label doesn’t address what the birds can be fed.

NO HORMONES This label is about the marketing. The USDA prohibits the use of hormones for laying hens, so all commercial egg production in the United States is hormonefree, according to the U.S. Poultry and Egg Association.

OMEGA-3 ENRICHED Photos by Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Cartons labeled vegetarian fed tell you about the hens’ diet but not about their living conditions.

Omega-3 fatty acids are healthy polyunsaturated fats found largely in seafood. Their health benefits, research has

shown, range from improving heart health to reducing depression. But since omega-3s come from sources not consumed often enough by Americans, egg producers began feeding their hens a diet rich in ingredients like kelp, rapeseed or flax to introduce more omega-3s. Eggs from these hens are labeled on cartons as omega-3 enriched. The term has no federal definition, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 2009 denied egg producers the right to label cartons with the claim that egg consumption could reduce risk of heart disease. Also, the Center for Science in the Public Interest, a consumer advocacy organization, notes that the amount of omega-3s found in enriched eggs is much less than found in a serving of salmon.

ORGANIC To earn the certified organic label, egg producers must meet standards defined by the USDA. The agency requires that all feed be 100 percent organic. The hens may not be given hormones or antibiotics. They must be cage-free and have access to the outdoors year-round,

although the quality of that access isn’t specified. The USDA also has the power to monitor and enforce these standards.

PASTURED HENS This term is unregulated by federal agencies, but a USDA research paper on poultry and eggs says it generally refers to a modified free-range system. Birds are raised outside on fields but are provided temporary shelters. The hens and shelters are then rotated regularly among pastures. The USDA estimates these hens can get up to 20 percent of their feed from forage.

VEGETARIAN-FED This is another unregulated label. It generally means the feed given to the birds by humans doesn’t contain any animal byproducts. Of course, if these hens forage outside they might be consuming traditional chicken fare like worms and insects. But there’s nothing in the label that says these hens are doing just that.

How did the chicken lay the Grade A egg?

Egg certifications

Among the egg carton labels are those referring to egg size — small, medium, large and extra large — and quality. These labels are defined by the USDA. Labels that seem to be about size actually reveal the net weight of the dozen eggs in the carton. So while extra large eggs logically are larger than small eggs, the label doesn’t say anything about each individual egg. Most recipes, according to the USDA, are based on large eggs. The grades, which are AA, A and B, denote quality. Grade AA eggs have thick, firm whites and high, round yolks. The shells are clean and unbroken. Grade A’s definition is similar. Grade B’s whites might be thinner and yolks might be flatter. The shells might show slight strains. Most of the eggs found in stores are Grade AA and A, the USDA says. They are best for instances when egg appearance matters.

Various private organizations also have established their own standards and offer certification for egg production. Here are a few more labels shoppers might see on egg cartons: treatment of animals in film and television. It says on • Certified humane. This is a program of Humane its website that it bases its supervision on scientific Animal Farm Care, a nonprofit that focuses on data. The Humane Society says the label allows for the treatment of farm animals. These eggs are cage confinement and cage-free systems. uncaged, allowed to behave naturally and raised with density limits. Compliance is audited. • Food Alliance certified. The Portland-based Food Alliance launched this label. The birds are • Animal welfare approved. The Animal cage free and access to the outdoors is required. Welfare Institute, another nonprofit focused on Compliance is audited. livestock living conditions, created this label. Its program was dubbed the “highest animal welfare • United Egg Producers certified. The United Egg standards of any third-party auditing program” by Producers is a national industry group associated the Humane Society. with this label. It sets standards for caged hens, including feed and daylight. The Humane Society • American Humane certified. This label was says the birds can’t behave naturally in these established by the American Humane Association, environments. which in addition to farm animals, monitors the

sumers want.” The bill wouldn’t address other carton labels, like those dealing with nutritional content or what hens are fed. A few labels are more marketing than anything. For instance, the USDA doesn’t allow hormone use on laying hens. So a label boasting “no

hormones” means little. Perhaps the most defined is the USDA organic label, which sets standards for both living conditions and feed.

Finding local eggs Not all eggs are labeled, however. The only catchphrase Great

American Egg uses to describe its product is “factory free.” Hoffman said to them that means the chickens lived out in fields, like on a traditional farm, without climate control or forced molting. That means there aren’t many fresh eggs as the day length shortens. “Most people don’t know

UGG lovers, have the boots waterproofed as soon as you buy them and keep them fresh with an UGG care kit ($20, uggaustralia.com). in the process, eat the garment’s fibers. • Periodically inspect your white wool garments carefully, because spills oxidize and turn brown over time. • Taking wool to the dry cleaner for a professional cleaning is usually your safest bet, but if the care label says it’s OK, you can often clean items yourself at home. Just be sure to use as little agitation as possible, Hilker says — it shrinks the fibers. And drying with heat can cause shrinkage. • As for pills on wool sweaters and other clothing, Hilker recommends using a sweater razor or even an old-fashioned double-edged straight razor.

wife Holly. • Store your shoes on a shoe tree to keep their shape and prevent cracking. • Shine your shoes often. Frequent polishing — every month or two is usually good — keeps the leather moisturized and supple. A monthly waterproofing during a wet season is a good idea, too. • Wear a sole guard in winter. The thin rubber sole covers the bottom of the shoe (it is invisible from the side), keeping the leather sole from getting soft and wearing down. A sole guard is especially important for those who frequently walk on wet, hard surfaces like parking lots and sidewalks.

Men’s shoes:

Boots:

There are three keys to keeping your leather shoes in top shape, says Mohamed Mahfoze, who owns Dean’s Shoe Repair in Charlotte with

• For tall boots, a boot tree is a must for keeping them from developing creases or cracks from bending over in the closet.

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• Waterproof and keep your boots polished as you would any leather shoes, to keep the leather supple. •For high-heeled boots, pay attention to the condition of the heel. If it gets worn down to the nail, it could become a major fall hazard. Mahfoze says it’s always a good idea to replace a plastic heel with a rubber one that will last much longer and be far safer. It’s a $10 repair. • UGG lovers, have the boots waterproofed as soon as you buy them and keep them fresh with an UGG care kit ($20, ugg australia.com). Or do it yourself by making a solution of equal parts Woolite and water, then gently scrubbing in small circles. This is especially important if the boots are exposed to salt from a winter storm. Once the boots are cleaned, put them on a shoe tree or stuff them with paper

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the chicken is as seasonal as a tomato,” Hoffman said. In addition to Great American Egg, there are other small farms selling eggs in Central Oregon, like Pine Mountain Ranch and those listed on the website for Central Oregon Locavore, centraloregon locavore.com.

In the end, eggs are one of the most local farm products around, Head said. Forty-nine of the 50 U.S. states have a large egg producer. “Almost all eggs are local and at the store the day after they were laid,” he said.

towels while they dry. Don’t put them in the sun, or near a fire or radiator or they’ll crack. If they smell inside, put a couple of tablespoons of baking soda and leave overnight. Use a brush to restore the pile.

bags, because fur requires air circulation to keep its leather side from drying out. • Don’t consistently carry a purse, because it will cause a bald spot. • Watch out for sharp necklaces or bracelets that could snag the fur. • It’s a good idea to send your fur away into cold storage in the summer to extend its life. • Faux fur is far simpler to clean. A solution of equal parts Woolite and water lifts most dirt and stains.

Fur: • Real furs require cold conditions, plenty of space, no chemicals and professional cleanings from an experienced furrier. •Don’t store them in garment Weekly Arts & Entertainment Inside

— Reporter: 541-617-7828, hhagemeier@bendbulletin.com

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Want to Buy or Rent Wanted: $Cash paid for vintage costume Jewelry Top dollar paid for Gold/Silver.I buy by the Estate, Honest Artist Elizabeth,541-633-7006 208

Pets & Supplies The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to fraud. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Alaskan Malamute Hybrids, 2 male, 6 female, $300, 541-771-8255. Bichon-Poodle pups, 2 males, 1 female, 8 weeks, kennel trained, weaned, loving, playful, $350 ea., 541-788-2060.

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Antiques & Collectibles

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Lost & Found

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

The Bulletin reserves the right to publish all ads from The Bulletin newspaper onto The Bulletin Internet webI'm Stitch. I was abansite. doned & had a hard life before being rescued, & some injuries after someone tried to 241 give me a trim (thus Bicycles & my name!), & had to be shaved. I'm not Accessories pretty like some other cats, but I am super Giant Talon1 29’er 2011, loving & will happily size small, bought new be your friend forever. in 2011, at Hutch’s Fixed, shots, ID chip, Eastside bike shop, more. Visit Stitch 1-5 hardly ridden, great Sat/Sun, other days cond., $750, by appt. Map/info: 541-408-1676 www.craftcats.org 246 541-389-8420. Guns, Hunting & Fishing

Lab pups, AKC yellows & blacks. Dewclaws removed, first shots. $400. Call Bob, 541-948-3076 LABRADORS, AKC, IMPECCABLE BLOODLINES Perfect family dogs with amazing award winning personalities and hunting abilities. Field trial Sunnyview lines. Started on birds, 7 weeks old. $400 541-704-5652

Poodle pups, toy, for SALE. Also Rescued Poodle Adults for adoption, to loving homes. 541-475-3889

BostonsBend@yahoo.com

541-385-3863.

Queensland Heelers standards & mini,$150 & up. 541-280-1537 http://rightwayranch. wordpress.com

20g H&R shotgun, 18” bbl, single shot, $130. 541-647-8931 Boat Trailer Tires, 8” wheels, 4-hole rims, $15 ea, 541-408-4528 CASH!! For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Supplies. 541-408-6900. For sale, older CVA mountain rifle 50 cal., percussion, Douglas BBL., excellent+ $300 call Steve @ 541-315-0861 Ithaca 12 Ga., Model 37 2 chokes, never fired, $650, 541-526-1723 Remington 700 7mm, $485. Marlin 30-30 $285. 541-647-8931 Ruger LC9, light carry 9mm, new in box, $375, 541-633-7113 Smith & Wesson Model 60 .357, 2-1/8” barrel, bought new at Sportsman’s, 1 owner, only 14 rounds shot, great cond., $480, 541-408-1676. S&W 12ga pump, $150. Springfield 12ga pump, $150. Revelation 20ga pump, $175. Call 541-771-5648

Wanted- paying cash Found Keys, 2/2/12, Fir & 6th, Redmond, odd for Hi-fi audio & stushaped, dio equip. McIntosh, 541-420-9879 JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Heathkit, San- Found: large amount of sui, Carver, NAD, etc. money in Foxborough Call 541-261-1808 neighborhood. Contact Greg, at 261 541-593-8699. Medical Equipment Found Nike Rx Eyeglasses, in snow, corMedical patient lift & ner of Solar/Milky sling, like new, paid Way, N. of Sunriver, $750; sell $475. 2/6, 541-593-0114 Walker chair & wheelchair, like new, paid Lost Chainsaw Powell $150; sell $75. All, Butte Hwy/Nelson Rd, $495. 541-383-3928 Sat., Feb 4. Call: evenings 541-382-5193/388-2254 265 Lost Kindle, NE Bend/ Parkway, morning of Building Materials 1/31, 541-382-8941 La Pine Habitat REMEMBER: If you RESTORE have lost an animal, Building Supply Resale don't forget to check Quality at The Humane Society LOW PRICES in Bend 541-382-3537 52684 Hwy 97 Redmond, 541-536-3234 541-923-0882 Open to the public . Prineville, 541-447-7178; 266 OR Craft Cats, Heating & Stoves 541-389-8420. 290 NOTICE TO ADVERTISER Sales Redmond Area Since September 29, 1991, advertising for GIANT GARAGE SALE! used woodstoves has bikes, skis, outdoor been limited to modsporting goods & apels which have been parel, baby & toddler certified by the Oritems. Fri.-Sat., 9-3, egon Department of at Gear Peddler, 825 Environmental QualSW 7th St. ity (DEQ) and the federal Environmental Protection Agency Farm (EPA) as having met Market smoke emission standards. A certified woodstove may be identified by its certification label, which is permanently attached to the stove. The Bulletin will not know308 ingly accept advertisFarm Equipment ing for the sale of & Machinery uncertified woodstoves.

300

267

Fuel & Wood

Boxer Pups, AKC/CKC WHEN BUYING reg, taking deps, $500- Rescued kittens/cats to FIREWOOD... adopt! A few small S&W, Model 29, 44 $650, 541-325-3376 kittens, some 'teen' To avoid fraud, mag, 6.5” barrel, new, kittens & great adult Can't adopt a cat/kitten The Bulletin unfired, in presentacats. Low adoption but want to help those recommends paytion case, $700 Cash, fee, & cat fee waived that have been resment for Firewood 541-990-0515. for seniors & vetercued? Local nonprofit only upon delivery Wanted: Collector ans. 65480 78th St., group needs YOUR and inspection. seeks high quality Bend, 1-5 Sat/Sun, hep! Consider a do• A cord is 128 cu. ft. fishing items. other days by appt, nation to go towards 4’ x 4’ x 8’ 541-647-2181. Fixed, Call 541-678-5753, or food, vet care, ads & • Receipts should 503-351-2746 shots, ID chip, carrier. more, one time or oninclude name, Info: 389-8420. Map, going. Tax deductible. phone, price and photos of many at WANTED: Honor a former pet or Ruger kind of wood purwww.craftcats.org loved one in this way, SR9C, chased. or sponsor a specific 541-604-5115. Call Shih Tzu puppy, $375. • Firewood ads cat. Photos, info: and ask for George MUST include spewww.craftcats.org, or www.shihtzushowdogs.com 541-788-0090/788-0326 cies and cost per call 541 598 5488. 255 cord to better serve Shih Tzu Puppy, beautiCorgi/Aussie Puppies! our customers. Computers ful female, shots, 4 males born 1-1-12 $350, 541-788-0326. Family raised. THE BULLETIN re$250. 541-792-0808 Show your love this quires computer adValentine's Day thru a vertisers with multiple Dachshund AKC mini pup gift of a great comad schedules or those Cedar and or Juniper, www.bendweenies.com panion cat or kitten! avail. $180 a cord deselling multiple sys$350. 541-508-4558 Many available at lolivered. Heart of Ortems/ software, to discal rescue sanctuary. egon 541-633-7834. Dachshund, long-haired, close the name of the Low adoption fee, female, 2 yrs., housebusiness or the term Dry Juniper Firewood waived for seniors/ broke, great with little "dealer" in their ads. veterans. Gift certifi$190 per cord, split. kids, must go to lovPrivate party advertiscates avail. All cats 1/2 cords available. ing home, $200, ers are defined as altered, vaccinated, ID Immediate delivery! 541-905-1180. those who sell one chipped, carrier incl. 541-408-6193 computer. 541-389-8420 or visit Green Juniper rnds $135 www.craftcats.org. USE THE CLASSIFIEDS! 257 Door-to-door selling with fast results! It’s the easiest way in the world to sell. The Bulletin Classiied

541-385-5809

English Mastiff AKC, pup for sale, one male left. 9 weeks old. Please call 541-820-4546 or 541-206-2421 or visit my website aT www.arudedog.com English Springer Spaniel male puppy, DOB 1/22/12. $300. Prineville, OR. Call (541) 325-9252. Great family pets/ hunting dogs. Expert rodent control specialists seek work in exchange for safe shelter, food & water. FREE barn/shop cats, we deliver! 389-8420. French Bulldog puppies, AKC, 8 wks, Champ lines, shots, health checks, $1800. 541-382-9334 www.enchantabull.com German Shepherd, pure black, purebred AKC, 3-yr intact male, $800. 541-792-0032 German Shorthair Pups AKC champ lines, proven Hunters/Pets Males, $450, females $550. 541-306-9958

Heidi is one of 4 gorgeous Siamese or Burmese-mix cats/1 kitten thru local rescue. Adoption fee just $25 adult, $50 kitten. Altered, shots, ID chip, more. Open 1-5 Sat/Sun, other days by appt., 647-2181. www.craftcats.org, 541-389-8420.

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Border Collie purebred male puppy, 4 mos., $75. 541-260-7077

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Wolf Husky male pups, 4 wks old on Feb 8th $400. 541-977-7019 Yorkie Pups (2), docked, 1st shots, ready now, $500, 541-536-3108

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/cord. Dry Juniper: split $175/cord; rounds $155 /cord. 541-977-4500 or 541-416-3677

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Fire Chief - Crook County Fire & Rescue located in Prineville Oregon is currently accepting applications for the position of Fire Chief. Application period runs February 1, 2012 to February 29, 2012. Position description and application can be downloaded on our website at crookcountyfireand rescue.com

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The Hilton Garden Inn

in Bend, is presently seeking a

Guest Services Agent/Manager. Hotel-Hilton experience preferred. Full-time position with benefits. Apply at 425 SW Bluff Dr., Bend, or send resume to: don.seaton@hilton.com

business

G

GROWIN

with an ad in The Bulletin’s “Call A Service Professional” Directory

Seasoned Juniper $150/ cord rnds, $170/cord split. Delivered in Central OR. Call 210 eves, 541-420-4379 Rare 1984 Chickering Caregiver Furniture & Appliances Player Piano. Solid 269 Prineville Senior care oak construction. Exc. home looking for Care Gardening Supplies cond., 70+ piano rolls A1 Washers&Dryers Manager for day & Equipment plus accessories. $150 ea. Full warshift/part-time. Pass Asking $4300 OBO. ranty. Free Del. Also criminal background Call Tom at wanted, used W/D’s check. 541-447-5773. For newspaper 541-410-2662 541-280-7355 delivery, call the COLLECTIONS Circulation Dept. at 260 Telephone Collector FREEZER apt. size 7 541-385-5800 Misc. Items needed for busy colcu.ft., 6 mo., $100. To place an ad, call lection agency, full 541-350-4656 541-385-5809 Buying Diamonds time, Mon-Fri, 8amor email GENERATE SOME ex5pm. Need profes/Gold for Cash classified@bendbulletin.com citement in your Saxon’s Fine Jewelers sional, upbeat person neighborhood! Plan a with excellent com541-389-6655 garage sale and don't munication skills and 341 BUYING forget to advertise in bilingual English/ Lionel/American Flyer Honda Harmony HRBHorses & Equipment classified! Spanish. Must be detrains, accessories. 541-385-5809. 215 Mower, $150 pendable team player. 541-408-2191. OBO, Black & Decker Pay DOE + commisWANTED: Horse or GLOSTER outdoor fur- BUYING & SELLING cordless weed eater, sion w/benefits. utility trailers for niture: 2 club chairs, 2 All gold jewelry, silver $25, Home-Lite edger, Fax resume to consignment or pursettees, 4 lounges, and gold coins, bars, $60, 541-306-7145. (541)330-1481 or email chase. KMR Trailer and 1 coffee table in ccci@bendbroadband.com rounds, wedding sets, Sales, 541-389-7857 good cond. with covPrompt Delivery class rings, sterling silwww.kigers.com ers. Dark brown 5” ver, coin collect, vin- Rock, Sand & Gravel Concierge and thick cushions. $28K tage watches, dental Multiple Colors, Sizes Property Manager new; asking $2,500. 345 Instant Landscaping Co. gold. Bill Fleming, wanted for luxury desti541-633-7307. Email 541-389-9663 541-382-9419. nation club. Hospitality Livestock & Equipment saksofsuccess@gmail background required, Combination safe, 27” SUPER TOP SOIL .com for photos. must be available nights W x 33.5” H x 16” D, www.hersheysoilandbark.com and weekends. Send Hand-made log bed. Screened, soil & com- RV Space - Close in $30. 541-389-7161 Redmond in exyour resume to Queen size $400 OBO post mixed, no change for part-time jlee@quintess.com. No Vacuum, Dyson DC-17, 541-923-7519 rocks/clods. High huphone calls. work caring for minAsthma & Allergy, like mus level, exc. for iature Donkeys. 18 or Mattress, King size, latex, new, $300 OBO, flower beds, lawns, over, 541-548-5216. 2 yrs old, non- smoke, Just bought a new boat? 541-389-9268 gardens, straight no bugs, very clean, Sell your old one in the screened top soil. Wanted diabetic test $700, 541-548-5516. classiieds! Ask about our 358 Bark. Clean fill. Destrips - will pay up to Super Seller rates! liver/you haul. Farmers Column $25/box. Sharon, 541-385-5809 541-548-3949. 503-679-3605. 10X20 STORAGE Local Bend BUILDINGS BEND’S HOMELESS NEED OUR HELP company looking for protecting hay, The cold weather is upon us and sadly there to expand! firewood, livestock are still over 2,000 folks in our community Roomy corner comImmediate opening etc. $1496 Installed. without permanent shelter, living in cars, puter desk. $125 available - Cus541-617-1133. makeshift camps, getting by as best they can. Good Condition. tomer service -Sales CCB #173684. The following items are badly needed to 541-382-4071 - Management opkfjbuilders@ykwc.net help them get through the winter: portunities. No exSecond Hand & 375 perience necessary. d CAMPING GEAR of any sort: d Rebuilt Mattresses we provide full trainUsed tents, sleeping bags, tarps, blankets. Meat & Animal Processing Sets & singles, most ing. $1600 mo. to d WARM CLOTHING: Rain Gear, Boots d sizes, sanitized start plus bonuses, ANGUS BEEF Quarter, & hygienitized. company vehicle Drop off your tax-deductible donations at the Half or Whole. Call 541-598-4643 provided, and paid BEND COMMUNITY CENTER, 1036 NE 5th Grain-fed, no horvacation to those St., Bend, Mon.-Sat. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. mones $3/pound Washer/Dryer, Kenwho qualify. Call to (541-312-2069). For special pick-ups call hanging weight, cut & more, matching, 5 yrs, set up an interview, 541-389-3296. You can make a difference! wrapped incl. Bend, exc. cond., $350, 541-617-6109. 541-383-2523. 541-350-4656

Office/Lab Assistant: Umpqua Research Company, an independent, small drinking water and environmental laboratory has an immediate opening for a full time clerical person. Duties include phone & office reception, data entry, filing, shipping, receiving & other laboratory functions as assigned. Candidates must have good teamwork skills, experience interacting with the public, strong familiarity with common computer programs, the ability to multitask & work independently. This entry-level position requires a person who is willing & eager to help out wherever needed. Some background in the sciences would be beneficial in support of our chemical and microbiological analyses. Salary is $10/ hour with benefits. Please email your resume to: tmireles@urcmail.net. EEO Employer.

Housing Consultant Established & growing company seeks proven, hardworking sales professional. The ideal candidate will be energetic, outgoing and client-focused with an emphasis on customer service. Applicants are required to have at least 5 years of successful sales experience in a major product category. No benefits. 100% commission. E-mail a cover letter and resume with references, detailing your sales experience to: Remember.... joboffers@inbox.com Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Maintenance Tech.Bulletin' s web site Successful wood rewill be able to click manufacturer lookthrough automatically ing for Maint. Tech to your site. Benefits: Medical, Vacations, & Bonus. Where can you ind a Must have experihelping hand? ence in Preventative From contractors to Machine & F/L maint, with knowledge of yard care, it’s all here electrical. Salary in The Bulletin’s DOE. Please send “Call A Service resume to: Attn: Matt Professional” Directory 3800 Crates Way The Dalles OR 97058 RESTAURANT Seeking experienced

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please FIREFIGHTER investigate thor- Crook County Fire and oughly. Rescue is accepting applications for Use extra caution when Firefighter/Paramedic applying for jobs onfrom February 6 line and never prothrough February 17, vide personal infor2012. The examinamation to any source tion announcement you may not have reand application form searched and deemed are on the district’s to be reputable. Use web site: extreme caution when crookcountyfireanderscue.com If you are a certified responding to ANY Firefighter/Paramedic online employment and wish to apply, it is ad from out-of-state. to your advantage to promptly access the We suggest you call web site so you can the State of Oregon file a complete appliConsumer Hotline at cation and prepare for 1-503-378-4320 the examination process. For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & InNeed to get an dustry, Civil Rights ad in ASAP? Division, You can place it 503-731-4075 Call The Bulletin At online at: If you have any ques541-385-5809 www.bendbulletin.com tions, concerns or Place Your Ad Or E-Mail comments, contact: At: www.bendbulletin.com 541-385-5809 Kevin O’Connell Classified Department Manager CIRCULATION CUSTOMER SERVICE The Bulletin AND PROCESSING REP 541-383-0398

1992 Case 580K 4WD, 5500 hrs, cab heat, extend-a-hoe, 2nd owner, clean & tight, tires 60% tread. $24,900 or best offer. Call 541-419-2713 Wanted Used Farm Equipment & Machinery. Looking to buy, or Automotive consign of good used Lube Tech/Customer Relation Specialist quality equipment. No experience necesDeschutes Valley sary! Oil Can Equipment Henry’s NOW HIR541-548-8385 ING IN REDMOND! 325 Motivated, friendly people to fill lubricaHay, Grain & Feed tion/customer relation specialist positions. 1.5 Ton Cow Hay, TuOur comprehensive malo Area, $225, training program in541-617-9835 or cludes advancement 541-410-5970. opportunities, comBeautiful green grass petitive pay & bonus hay, barn stored, no program. Apply in rain, small bales, $240/ Redmond, 2184 S. ton, large bales,700 lb., Hwy. 97. $82 ea., 541-549-3831 No phone calls please! Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedding Straw & Garden Straw;Compost.546-6171 Get your

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 541-385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW?

The Bulletin has an immediate opening in the Circulation department for a Customer Service /Processing Representative.

Responsibilities include: Days-end processing of The Bulletin, The Redmond Spokesman, The Central Oregon Marketplace, Postage Statement and other processing related elements, as well as making outbound calls to customers to ensure customer satisfaction of newspaper delivery, to secure payments and overall customer retention. This position includes providing customer service to Bulletin subscribers over the phone and entering transactions into the Circulation software for running reports. Also, assisting our subscribers and delivery carriers with account questions and delivery concerns. We are looking for someone with a positive and upbeat attitude, strong service/team orientation. Must have accurate typing, data entry experience, 10-key totaling, and the ability to multi-task. Most work is done via telephone so strong communication skills are a must! Work shift is: Saturday and Sunday 6:00 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.; Monday, Tuesday, and Friday 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Hourly pay plus commission and full benefits package.

Send resume to:

PO Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708 Attn. Circulation Customer Service Manager or via e-mail: ahusted@bendbulletin.com

Advertising Account Executive - Health & Medical

The Bulletin is looking for a professional Sales and Marketing person to manage our Health and Medical accounts. The Health industry and its related fields are very dynamic and growing rapidly in Central Oregon, offering excellent potential for growth to the right person. The position plays a key role in several niche and core publications related to the field, which are widely read by the public and helpful in connecting advertisers with their target audiences. Our capabilities and offerings continue to grow - bring your expertise to the table and help us grow business for our clients! This full time position requires creativity, a passion for helping, a background in consultative sales, time management and prospecting skills. 2-4 years outside advertising sales experience is preferable but we will train the right candidate. Experience managing both local direct and agency clients a plus. The position offers a competitive compensation package including benefits, and rewards an aggressive, solutionfocused salesperson with excellent earning potential. Please send your resume, cover letter and salary history to: Sean L. Tate Advertising Manager state@bendbulletin.com You may also drop off your resume in person or mail it to: 1777 SW Chandler, Bend OR 97701. No phone inquiries please. EOE / Drug Free Workplace

Quick Service General Manager Responsibilities: • Lead restaurant team with integrity. • Provide exceptional customer service to each guest • Achieve operational excellence • Achieve cost control goals • Team development and training • HR & legal compliance • Facilities maintenance Qualifications: • 2-5 yrs restaurant management exper. • Exceptional people skills • Strong math, verbal & written communication skills • Great track record in cost control mgmt. • Ability to inspire & motivate others • Available all hours restaurant is open • Thrives in a fast-paced environment • Proven operational achievement Fax resume to: 949-988 3233

Finance & Business

500 528

Loans & Mortgages WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392. BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200. LOCAL MONEY:We buy secured trust deeds & note,some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 ext.13. 573

Business Opportunities Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

F2 WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

880

882

916

932

Motorhomes

Fifth Wheels

Trucks & Heavy Equipment

Antique & Classic Autos

Edited by Will Shortz Hunter’s Delight! Package deal! 1988 Winnebago Super Chief, 38K miles, great Companion 26’ 1992, Done RV’ing, nonshape; 1988 Bronco II smoker, exc. cond, 4x4 to tow, 130K some extras incl., mostly towed miles, $4500, 503-951-0447, nice rig! $15,000 both. Redmond 541-382-3964, leave msg.

Chevy Bonanza 1978, runs good. $5900 OBO. Call 541-390-1466.

Fleetwood Wilderness 36’ 2005 4 slides, rear bdrm, fireplace, AC, W/D hkup beautiful unit! $30,500. 541-815-2380

VW BAJA BUG 1974 1776cc en-

gine. New: shocks, tires, disc brakes, interior paint, flat black. $4900 OBO; over $7000 invested. 541-322-9529. 933

925

Utility Trailers

Need help ixing stuff? Call A Service Professional ind the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com Itasca Spirit Class C 2007, 20K mi., front entertainment center, all bells & whistles, extremely good cond., 2 slides, 2 HDTV’s, $52,000 OBO, 541-447-5484

Truck with Snow Plow!

Big Tex Landscaping/ ATV Trailer, dual axle flatbed, 7’x16’, 7000 lb. GVW, all steel, $1400. 541-382-4115, or 541-280-7024.

Pickups

ToyotaTundra 2000 SR5 4x4 perfect cond., all scheduled maint. completed, looks new in & out. $9800 541-420-2715

931

Automotive Parts, Service & Accessories

Phoenix Cruiser 2001, 23 ft. V10, 51K. Large bath, bed & kitchen. Seats 6-8. Awning. $30,950. 541-923-4211

Komfort 24’ 1999, 6’ slide, fully loaded,never used since buying, 4 tires on rims + 1 extra rim, 225/60R-16, Chevy 4x4 1970, short $9700, 541-923-0854. 70% tread, $500 obo. wide box, canopy, 541-489-6150 30K mi on premium 350 motor; RV cam, We Buy Junk electronic ignition, tow Montana 34’ 2003, 2 Cars & Trucks! pkg, new paint/detailslides, exc. cond. Cash paid for junk ing inside & out, 1 throughout, arctic vehicles, batteries & owner since 1987. winter pkg., new catalytic converters. $4500. 541-923-5911 10-ply tires, W/D Serving all of C.O.! ready, $25,000, Call 541-408-1090 541-948-5793 932

Rentals

600 605

Roommate Wanted 3/2 house in Redmond, no pets, $275.+util.+ dep. Jim,541-280-4185

642

687

Apt./Multiplex Redmond

Commercial for Rent/Lease

Winter Specials

Large 3-bay shop plus 3 bdrm, 2 bath home on 4 acres, small area w/ horse fence - can be THE BLUFFS APTS. enlarged. House has new wood floors & 340 Rimrock Way, paint front to back. End Redmond Close to of road, quiet, borderschools, shopping, ing BLM. Small inand parks! house pet and/or out541-548-8735 door animals on apManaged by proval. $900 + dep., GSL Properties 541-252-7170. 1 & 2 Bdrms Avail. • Lots of amenities. • Pet friendly • W/S/G paid

630

648

Rooms for Rent

Houses for Rent General

Studios & Kitchenettes Furnished room, TV w/ cable, micro & fridge. Utils & linens. New owners.$145-$165/wk 541-382-1885 634

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend !! NO APP FEE !! 2 bdrm, 1 bath $530 & 540

W/D hook-ups & Heat Pump. Carports & Pet Friendly Fox Hollow Apts. (541) 383-3152

Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co.

2 Bdrm 2½ bath townhse, gas frplc, 1 car gar, W/D hkup quiet, no smkg/pets,$675 mo 1st/last + $750 sec dep. 541-420-0579 or 541-389-6188

$525

Very clean 1 bdrm. w/private patio in quiet area no smoking/pets, 1000 NE Butler Mkt. Rd. 541-633-7533, 382-6625

Alpine Meadows Townhomes 1, 2 & 3 bdrm apts. Starting at $625. 541-330-0719

Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

Call for Specials! Limited numbers avail. 1, 2 and 3 bdrms. W/D hookups, patios or decks. MOUNTAIN GLEN, 541-383-9313 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

PUBLISHER'S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, marital status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women, and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-877-0246. The toll free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

Office/commercial,

Boats & RV’s

800 850

Snowmobiles

large

roll-up door, bath, great location 1225 sq ft, $600/ mo, 1st/last.

541-480-7546; 480-7541

Arctic Cat 800, 2004. 151” track, 2” lugs, EFI. Runs excellent, $2595. 541-620-2135

Office/Warehouse located in SE Bend. Up Polaris 2003, 4 cycle, fuel inj, elec start, reto 30,000 sq.ft., comverse, 2-up seat, petitive rate, cover, 4900 mi, $2500 541-382-3678. obo. 541-280-0514 693

Ofice/Retail Space for Rent An Office with bath, various sizes and locations from $200 per month, including utilities. 541-317-8717

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads The Bulletin

Real Estate For Sale

700 745

Homes for Sale BANK OWNED HOMES! FREE List w/Pics! www.BendRepos.com bend and beyond real estate 20967 yeoman, bend or

Polaris XC700 1998, 136” Track, paddle track, several aftermarket upgrades, some seat damage, $1000, please call 541-504-1704. 860

Motorcycles & Accessories Harley Davidson SoftTail Deluxe 2007, white/cobalt, w/passenger kit, Vance & Hines muffler system & kit, 1045 mi., exc. cond, $19,999, 541-389-9188.

Harley Davidson Ultra Classic 2008 Too many upgrades to list, immaculate cond., clean, 15K miles. $14,900 541-693-3975

748

Northeast Bend Homes OWNER CARRY! Move in ready, 4 bdrm, 2 bath, dbl. car garage, vaulted ceilings, fenced back yard, quiet neighborhood, $149,900, 541-880-4224.

Large 3-bay shop plus 3 bdrm, 2 bath home on 4 acres, small area w/ horse fence - can be enlarged. House has new wood floors & paint front to back. End 753 of road, quiet, bordering BLM. Small in636 Sisters Homes house pet and/or outApt./Multiplex NW Bend door animals on ap- FSBO: Townhouse, 4 proval. $900 + dep., bdrm 2.5 bath, 1736 sq Fully furnished loft Apt 541-252-7170. ft., fireplace, garage, all on Wall Street in appl, HOA, $185,950, Bend, with parking. All 652 916-316-0374 utilities paid. Call Houses for Rent 541-389-2389 for appt 773 NW Bend 638 Acreages Apt./Multiplex SE Bend Like New, 4 bdrm, 2 *** bath, fenced yard, dbl. car garage, $1100/mo CHECK YOUR AD Affordable, newly remodeled inside/out + dep., no pets, call Please check your ad 2BR 1.5 BA apt/ on the first day it runs 541-281-9891. townhome! Available to make sure it is cor2/13. New kitch cabs/ 654 rect. Sometimes incounters/appls, lots of structions over the Houses for Rent storage & fenced pvt phone are misunderSE Bend patio. $565/mo, w/s/g stood and an error incl. No smkg/pets. can occur in your ad. 1/2 off 1st mo. rent Brand New 1760 sq.ft., 3 If this happens to your bdrm, 2.5 bath, office, with 1-yr lease. Rosie, ad, please contact us fenced yard, gas fire541-678-8449 8a-7p. the first day your ad place, huge master appears and we will 640 bdrm & closet, 20277 be happy to fix it as SE Knightsbridge Pl, Apt./Multiplex SW Bend soon as we can. $1195. 541-350-2206 Deadlines are: WeekSpacious 2 bdrm 1½ days 11:00 noon for bath townhouse, w/d Gorgeous! 1 bed/bath next day, Sat. 11:00 $950/mo + dep Call hkup, fenced yd. NO a.m. for Sunday and David (541)815-7758 PETS. Great loc! Monday. for details or appt. $565 & up. 179 SW 541-385-5809 Hayes 541-382-0162; Thank you! 656 541-420-0133 The Bulletin Classified Houses for Rent *** 642 SW Bend Apt./Multiplex Redmond 775 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1300 sq. Manufactured/ Cottage-like lrg. 1 bdrm ft, all new carpet/paint. in quiet 6-plex, well Mobile Homes .92 acre lot, dbl. gakept & friendly. rage w/opener, $995, Hardwoods, W/D. 2200 NE Highway 20/ 480-3393, 610-7803 Ref., $550 + $500 Rock Arbor Villa dep., util., Avail now! #17--$9,500-'76 Mo659 541-420-7613 bile Home w/2 BdrmHouses for Rent 1 large bath--924 sqft. Sunriver plus covered front Just too many porch, enclosed rear collectibles? porch & 3 sheds. In River Meadows a 3 More info? Drop by for bdrm, 1.5 bath, 1376 Sell them in flyer or see Craig's list sq. ft., woodstove, The Bulletin Classiieds ad. Call Kathy @ brand new carpet/oak 541-350-1956 or Jim floors, W/S pd, $795. @ 541-948-2029 to 541-480-3393 541-385-5809 see it! or 541-610-7803

Honda VT700 Shadow 1984, 23K, many new parts, battery charger, good condition, $3000 OBO. 541-382-1891

Winnebago Access 31J 2008, Class C, Near Low Retail Price! One owner, non- smoker, MONTANA 3585 2008, garaged, 7,400 miles, exc. cond., 3 slides, auto leveling jacks, (2) king bed, lrg LR, Arcslides, upgraded tic insulation, all opqueen bed,bunk beds, tions $37,500. microwave, 3-burner 541-420-3250 range/oven, (3) TVs, and sleeps 10! Lots of storage, maintained, and very clean! Only 870 $76,995! Extended Boats & Accessories warranty available! Call (541) 388-7179. 17’ Seaswirl tri-hull, Pilgrim 27’, 2007 5th walk-thru w/bow rail, wheel, 1 slide, AC, good shape, EZ load TV,full awning, exceltrailer, new carpet, lent shape, $23,900. new seats w/storage, 541-350-8629 motor for parts only, $1500 obo, or trade for 25-35 electric start Winnebago Sightseer short-shaft motor. 2008 30B Class A, 541-312-3085 Top-of-the-line RV located at our home in southeast Bend. Road Ranger 1985, $79,500 OBO. Cell # catalytic & A/C, Fully 805-368-1575. self contained, $3400, 541-389-8315 881 19-ft Mastercraft Travel Trailers 885 Pro-Star 190 inboard, 1987, 290hp, V8, 822 Komfort 27’ 2006, Like Canopies & Campers hrs, great cond, lots of new,used 4x,fiberglass, Lance-Legend 990 extras, $10,000 obo. 14’ slide-out,2 TV’s,CD/ 11’3" 1998, w/ext-cab, 541-231-8709 DVD surround sound. exc. cond., generator, 21” awning, couch w/ solar-cell, large refrig, queen hideabed, AC, AC, micro., magic fan, heavy duty hitch, night/ bathroom shower, daylight shades, pwr 20.5’ 2004 Bayliner removable carpet, front jack, & more! 205 Run About, 220 custom windows, out$19,000 541-382-6731 HP, V8, open bow, door shower/awning exc. cond., very fast set-up for winterizing, SPRINGDALE 2005 w/very low hours, elec. jacks, CD/ste27’, has eating area lots of extras incl. reo/4’ stinger. $9500. slide, A/C and heat, tower, Bimini & Bend, 541.279.0458 new tires, all concustom trailer, tents included, bed$19,500. ding towels, cooking 541-389-1413 and eating utensils. Great for vacation, fishing, hunting or living! $15,500 When ONLY the BEST 541-408-3811 20.5’ Seaswirl Spywill do! der 1989 H.O. 302, 2003 Lance 1030 De285 hrs., exc. cond., luxe Model Camper, stored indoors for loaded, phenomenal life $11,900 OBO. condition. $17,500. 541-379-3530 2007 Dodge 6.7 Cummins Diesel 3500 4x4 long bed, 58K mi, Boat motor mounting $34,900. Or buy as bracket, to mount Springdale 29’ 2007, slide,Bunkhouse style, unit, $48,500. kicker to boat, $40, sleeps 7-8, excellent 541-331-1160 541-408-4528. condition, $16,900, 541-390-2504

Used out-drive parts - Mercury OMC rebuilt marine motors: 151 $1595; 3.0 $1895; 4.3 (1993), $1995. 541-389-0435

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

Autos & Transportation

Sprinter 272RLS, 2009 29’, weatherized, like new, furnished & ready to go, incl Winegard Satellite dish, $27,995. 541-420-9964

900

Antique & Classic Autos Dodge 3500 2007 Quad Cab SLT 4x4, 6.7L Cummins 6-spd AT, too much to list, great for towing, asking $32,000. 541-385-5682

Chevy Chevelle 1967, 283 & Powerglide, very clean, quality updates, $21,000, 541-420-1600 Ford 2011 F250 King Ranch Crew Cab 4x4 Diesel V8, LOADED, Immaculate, 7800 miles. $51,000 obo. 541-475-7211 Ford F150 1983, only 67K original miles! $2600. 541-382-2899

1950 CHEVY CLUB COUPE, Cobalt Blue, Great condition, runs well, lots of spare parts. $9995. Call 541-419-7828 FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classiieds

Ford F150 1993, 4WD, X-C, long bed, tow Chevy Corvette Coupe pkg, 129k mi., $4250. 2006, 8,471 orig Call 541-317-5843 miles, 1 owner, always garaged, red, 2 tops, auto/paddle shift, LS-2, Corsa exhaust, too many options to list, pristine car, $37,500. Serious only, call Ford F150 XLT 4x4, 2000 541-504-9945 nice truck, ext cab w/canopy, loaded, 5.4L, AT, 200K mainly hwy miles, tow pkg, $6750. 541-815-9939

Chevy Wagon 1957, 4-dr. , complete, Ford F-250 1986, Lariat, x-cab, 2WD, $15,000 OBO, trades, auto, gas or proplease call pane, 20K orig. mi., 541-420-5453. new tires, $5000, Chrysler 300 Coupe 541-480-8009. 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $9000 Ford F350 2001 crew or make offer. cab 4x4, manual, V10, 541-385-9350. 107K, gd cond, minor dent on bed, $7900 obo. 541-914-2287 Chrysler SD 4-Door 1930, CDS Royal Standard, 8-cylinder, body is good, needs some restoration, runs, taking bids, 541-383-3888, 541-815-3318

908

Aircraft, Parts & Service

880

Motorhomes

KAWASAKI 750 2005 Viking Legend 2465ST like new, 2400 miles, 1/3 interest in ColumModel 540 2002, exc. stored 5 years. New bia 400, located at cond., slide dining, toibattery, sports shield, Sunriver. $138,500. let, shower, gen. incl., shaft drive, $3400 1998 Rexhall Aerbus, Call 541-647-3718 $5500. 541-548-0137 firm. 541-447-6552. 29’, 31K miles, in1/3 interest in wellcludes Towmaster tow Kawasaki Mean Streak equipped IFR Beech bar, clean, $24,500. 1600 2007, special Bonanza A36, lo541-401-9963 edition, stored inside, cated KBDN. $55,000. custom pipes & jet 541-419-9510 pack, only made in Weekend Warrior Toy 2007, no longer in Hauler 28’ 2007,Gen, Executive Hangar production, exc. at Bend Airport fuel station, exc cond. cond., 1500 mi., (KBDN) sleeps 8, black/gray $7995, 541-390-0632. 60’ wide x 50’ deep, interior, used 3X, Beaver Patriot 2000, w/55’ wide x 17’ high $27,500. 865 Walnut cabinets, sobi-fold door. Natural 541-389-9188 lar, Bose, Corian, tile, ATVs gas heat, office, bath4 door fridge., 1 slide, room. Parking for 6 882 W/D. $75,000 cars. Adjacent to Fifth Wheels 541-215-5355 Frontage Rd; great visibility for aviation bus. 1jetjock@q.com 2004 Honda TRX400 Coachman Freelander 2011, 541-948-2126 sport quad red & 27’, queen bed, 1 black, piped & jetted, 916 slide, HD TV, DVD title in hand, $2800/ Trucks & poss trade. Call or player, 450 Ford, text: 541-647-8931 $49,000, please Alpha “See Ya” 30’ Heavy Equipment 1996, 2 slides, A/C, call 541-923-5754. ATV trailer, 9x7, hauls 2 heat pump, exc. cond. quads easily, spare tire for Snowbirds, solid incl, attached side load oak cabs day & night ramps, great cond, shades, Corian, tile, $750, 541-480-3884 hardwood. $12,750. 541-923-3417. 1982 INT. Dump with Arborhood, 6k on reDodge Transvan, 1978, Polaris Phoenix, built 392, truck refur360, AT, licensed, runs 2005, 2+4 200cc, bished, has 330 gal. great, tires like new, like new, low hours, water tank with pump $2250. 541-362-5559 runs great, $1600 or and hose. Everything or 541-663-6046 best offer. works, $8,500 OBO. Call 541-388-3833 Gulfstream Scenic Carri-Lite Luxury 2009 541-977-8988 by Carriage, 4 slideCruiser 36 ft. 1999, outs, inverter, satellite Cummins 330 hp diesys, fireplace, 2 flat sel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 screen TVs. $60,000. in. kitchen slide out, 541-480-3923 new tires,under cover, GMC Ventura 3500 hwy. miles only,4 door 1986, refrigerated, fridge/freezer iceCOACHMAN 1997 w/6’x6’x12’ box, has maker, W/D combo, Yamaha Grizzly Catalina 5th wheel 2 sets tires w/rims., Interbath tub & Sportsman Special 23’, slide, new tires, 1250 lb. lift gate, 2000, 600cc 4-stroke, shower, 50 amp proextra clean, below new engine, $4,500, push button 4x4 Ulpane gen & more! book. $6,500. 541-389-6588, ask tramatic, 945 mi, $55,000. 928-345-4731 for Bob. $3850. 541-279-5303 541-948-2310

Dodge pickup D100 classic, nal 318 wide push button straight, runs $1250 firm. 831-295-4903

1962 origiblock, trans, good, Bend,

GMC ½-ton Pickup, 1972, LWB, 350hi motor, mechanically A-1, interior great; body needs some TLC. $4000 OBO. Call 541-382-9441

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $1950. 541-419-5480. 935

Sport Utility Vehicles FIAT 1800 1978 5-spd, door panels w/flowers & hummingbirds, white soft top & hard top, Reduced! $5,500, 541-317-9319 or 541-647-8483 Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199

Lincoln Mark IV, 1972, needs vinyl top, runs good, $3500. 541-771-4747

4-WHEELER’S OR HUNTER’S SPECIAL! Jeep 4-dr wagon, 1987 4x4, silver, nice wheels, 183K, lots of miles left yet! Off-road or on. Under $1000. Call 541-318-9999 or 541-815-3639. Free trip to D.C. for WWII Vets!

CHEVY SUBURBAN LT 2005, low miles., good tires, new brakes, moonroof Reduced to $15,750 541-389-5016.

Mercury Monterrey 1965, Exc. All original, 4-dr. sedan, in storage last 15 yrs., 390 Chevy Tahoe 2003 pwr. High Compression drs, windows, driver's engine, new tires & liseat; CD; tow pkg; cense, reduced to upgraded wheels; 3rd $2850, 541-410-3425. row seats; cloth; 1 owner;166K;exc.cond, $9900. 360-701-9462

Plymouth Barracuda 1966, original car! 300 hp, 360 V8, centerlines, (Original 273 eng & wheels incl.) 541-593-2597

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

Chevy Tahoe LT 2001, Taupe, very clean, 102K miles, 1 owner, garaged, maint. records provided, new brakes, new battery, extra tires incl., lots of extras, $9500, 541-504-4224 Explorer 1998, V-8, 150k $3,800 or make offer. 541-549-1544


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2012 F3

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Sport Utility Vehicles

Automobiles

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Automobiles

Ford Excursion 2005, 4WD, diesel, exc. cond., $24,000, call 541-923-0231.

AUDI QUATTRO CABRIOLET 2004, extra nice, low mileage, heated seats, new Michelins, all wheel drive, $12,995 503-635-9494.

Chevy Corvette 1988 4-spd manual with 3-spd O/D. Sharp, loaded, 2 tops, (tinted & metal. New AC, water pump, brake & clutch, master cylinder & clutch slave cyl. $6500 OBO. 541-419-0251.

Honda Ridgeline RTS, 2010 4WD, Like new, 15,000 miles, Priced below KBB. $26,500, 541-480-2076

Nissan Xterra S - 4x4 2006, AT, 76K, good all-weather tires, $13,500 obo. 858-345-0084

Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227

Toyota FJ-40 Landcruiser

1966, 350 Chev, Downey conversion, 4-spd, 4” lift, 33’s, three tops! $6500 OBO. 541-388-2875. 940

Vans CHEVY ASTRO EXT 1993 AWD mini van, 3 seats, rear barn doors, white, good tires/wheels. Pretty interior, clean, no rips or tears. Drives exc! $2950. Free trip to D.C. for WWII Vets! (541) 318-9999 or (541) 815-3639

BMW 323i convertible, 1999, sport package, low miles, priced under Blue Book at $8,000. Call 541-788-0231 Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

BMW 525i 2004

New body style, Steptronic auto., cold-weather package, premium package, heated seats, extra nice. $14,995. 503-635-9494.

Buick Regal GS 2002, 4 dr, turbo, leather htd pwr seats, PW, PDL, moonroof, auto A/C, traction control, pwr mirrors, tilt, cruise, premium sound, Black metallic. Kelly Blue Book $7500; sell $6500. 541-977-9971 Dodge Transvan, 1978, 360, AT, licensed, runs great, tires like new, BUICKS! 1995 LeSabre Limited, al$2250. 541-362-5559 most perfect, $2900. or 541-663-6046 1999 Regal GS, 3.8 Litre V-6, superTake care of charged, $2900; 2006 Lucerne CX, your investments $7900; 2004 LeSawith the help from bre, 40k. $7900. The Bulletin’s Bob, 541-318-9999 Sam, 541-815-3639. “Call A Service Professional” Directory Cadillac DeVille Sedan 1993, leather interior, all pwr., 4 new Ford Windstar 1995, tires w/chrome rims, 132k; Chrysler Town dark green, CD/radio, & Country LX 2003 under 100K mi., runs mini van, 152,000 exc. $2500 OBO, miles; Nissan Quest 541-805-1342 GXE 1996, 150,000 miles. Your Choice! $2900! $3900! $4900! Bob at 541-318-9999, Sam at 541-815-3639 Cadillac SedanDeVille 2002, loaded, NorthFree trip to DC for star motor, FWD, exWWII vets. lnt in snow, new tires, Champagne w/tan Mercury Monterey 2005 leather, Bose stereo. Maroon Mini-van/111k Looks / runs / drives miles $4,800/OBO perfect, showroom Very clean/runs great! condition!!$7100 OBO More info? See 206-458-2603 (Bend) Craig's list ad or call Kathy 541-350-1956 Chevy Classic 2005, or Jim 541-948-2029 low mi., good on gas, to see/ test drive. $6500, 541-382-5249

CALL A SERVICE PROFESSIONAL Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service

Building/Contracting

Handyman

NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website

ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES. Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. On-time promise. Senior Discount. Work guaranteed. 541-389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded & Insured CCB#181595

I DO THAT! Home/Rental repairs www.hirealicensedcontractor. Small jobs to remodels com Fall jobs before Winter or call 503-378-4621. CB#151573 The Bulletin recom- Dennis 541-317-9768 mends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Home Improvement Some other trades also require addi- Kelly Kerfoot Const. tional licenses and 28 yrs exp in Central OR! Quality & honesty, from certifications. carpentry & handyman jobs, to expert wall covComputer/Cabling Install ering install / removal. Sr. discounts CCB#47120 QB Digital Living •Computer Networking Licensed/bonded/insured •Phone/Data/TV Jacks 541-389-1413 / 410-2422 •Whole House Audio Landscaping/Yard Care •Flat Screen TV & Installation NOTICE: OREGON 541-280-6771 Landscape Contracwww.qbdigitalliving.com tors Law (ORS 671) CCB#127370 Elect requires all busiLic#9-206C nesses that advertise to perform LandDebris Removal scape Construction which includes: JUNK BE GONE planting, decks, I Haul Away FREE fences, arbors, For Salvage. Also water-features, and Cleanups & Cleanouts installation, repair of Mel, 541-389-8107 irrigation systems to be licensed with the Domestic Services Landscape Contractors Board. This Professional houseclean4-digit number is to be ing: 25 yrs. exp, refs, Seincluded in all advernior discounts! 420-0366 tisements which indicate the business has Drywall a bond, insurance and workers compensaComplete Drywall Sertion for their employvices, remodels & reees. For your protecpairs. No Job Too tion call 503-378-5909 Small. Free Exact Quotes. 541-408-6169 or use our website: CAB# 177336 www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status Electrical Services before contracting with the business. Quality Builders Electric Persons doing land• Remodels scape maintenance • Home Improvement do not require a LCB • Lighting Upgrades license. • Hot Tub Hook-ups 541-389-0621 Painting/Wall Covering www.qbelectric.net CCB#127370 Elect WESTERN PAINTING Lic#9-206C CO. Richard Hayman, a semi-retired paintGEC ELECTRICAL ing contractor of 45 CONTRACTORS Reasonable, prof’l svc, years. Small Jobs res & comm’l, since Welcome. Interior & 1999. CCB 136471 Exterior. ccb#5184. Call 541-639-2113 541-388-6910

Chevy Corvette 1989, 350, AT, black, runs & drives good, 162K miles, $4295, OBO. 541-408-2154

Looking for your next employee?

Mazda 2007 MazdaSpeed6. Perfect for snow! AWD, turbo. Titanium gray, 27,500 mi, located in Bend. $16,750. Call 503-381-5860

1980 Classic Mini Cooper All original, rust-free, classic Mini Cooper in perfect cond. $10,000 OBO. 541-408-3317

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Want to impress the relatives? Remodel your home with the help of a professional from The Bulletin’s “Call A Service Professional” Directory Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218.

Chrysler PT Cruiser ‘08, $9170, 53k+ mi., auto, A/C, cruise, PDL/PW, tilt, CD, moon wheels & caps, all weather tires, great cond., 541-504-1197. Say “goodbuy” to that unused item by placing it in The Bulletin Classiieds

541-385-5809

Mazda Speed 3, 2007, black, orig owner, garaged, non-smoker. Great cond, 77K mi, $12,500. 541-610-5885

Mercury Cougar 1994, XR7 V8, 77K mi, exc. cond, REDUCED $4500 OBO. 541-526-1443

PORSCHE 914, 1974 Roller (no engine), lowered, full roll cage, 5-pt harnesses, racing seats, 911 dash & instruments, decent shape, very cool! $1699. 541-678-3249 Saab 9-3 SE 1999 convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subject to FRAUD. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705, et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by: David W. Dove and Teni K. Dove, husband and wife, as grantor, to First American Title Insurance, as trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as beneficiary, solely as nominee for Eagle Home Mortgage, Inc., a Washington corporation, as lender, dated December 7, 2004, and recorded December 9, 2004, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, under File No. 2004-73623. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by Oregon Housing and Community Services Department, State of Oregon by assignment of deed of trust recorded on September 9, 2011, in the Mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, under File No. 2011-31715. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT 2 OF RAILEY'S PLACE, CITY OF REDMOND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON; The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 275 Southwest 25th Street, Redmond, Oregon 97756. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3). The default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: 5 Monthly payments of $917.05 due from 8/1/2010 through 12/1/2010:$4,585.25. 5 Late charges of $36.00 due on payments past due from 8/1/2010, through 12/1/2010:$180.00. 10 Monthly payments of $893.34 due from 1/1/2011, through 10/1/2011:$8,933.40. 10 Late charges of $36.00 due on payments past due from 1/1/2011, through 10/1/2011:$360.00. Advances by Lender: Property Inspection Fees:$36.00. Trustee's Fees and Costs for Prior Foreclosure Action:$3,637.90. Trustee's Fees and Costs for related Bankruptcy Action:$802.20. Sub-Total of Monthly Payments, Late Charges, and Advances in arrears:$18,534.75. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $116,686.64, AS OF JULY 1, 2010, PLUS, FROM THAT DATE UNTIL PAID, ACCRUED AND ACCRUING INTEREST AT THE RATE OF 5.4500% PER ANNUM, PLUS ANY LATE CHARGES, ESCROW ADVANCES, FORECLOSURE COSTS, TRUSTEE'S FEES, ATTORNEYS' FEES, SUMS REQUIRED FOR PROTECTION OF THE PROPERTY AND ADDITIONAL SUMS SECURED BY THE TRUST DEED. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will, on March 2, 2012, at the hour of 10:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the front entrance of Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees. Notice is also given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right to bring a court action to assert the nonexistence of a default or any other defense to acceleration and sale. NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS: The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for March 2, 2012. The date of this sale may be postponed. Unless the lender that is foreclosing on this property is paid before the sale date, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. After the sale, the new owner is required to provide you with contact information and notice that the sale took place. The following information applies to you only if you are a bona fide tenant occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The in-formation does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a bona fide residential tenant. If the foreclosure sale goes through, the new owner will have the right to require you to move out. Before the new owner can require you to move, the new owner must provide you with written notice that specifies the date by which you must move out. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the new owner can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. PROTECTION FROM EVICTION: IF YOU ARE A BONA FIDE TENANT OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERTY AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING, YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO CONTINUE LIVING IN THIS PROPERTY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE FOR: "THE REMAINDER OF YOUR FIXED TERM LEASE, IF YOU HAVE A FIXED TERM LEASE; OR "AT LEAST 90 DAYS FROM THE DATE YOU ARE GIVEN A WRITTEN TERMINATION NOTICE. If the new owner wants to move in and use this property as a primary residence, the new owner can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even though you have a fixed term lease with more than 90 days left. You must be provided with at least 90 days' written notice after the foreclosure sale be-fore you can be required to move. A bona fide tenant is a residential tenant who is not the borrower (property owner) or a child, spouse or parent of the borrower, and whose rental agreement: "Is the result of an arm's-length transaction; " Requires the payment of rent that is not substantially less than fair market rent for the property, unless the rent is reduced or subsidized due to a federal, state or local subsidy; and "Was entered into prior to the date of the foreclosure sale. ABOUT YOUR TENANCY: BETWEEN NOW AND THE FORECLOSURE SALE: RENT YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD OR UNTIL A COURT TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE. SECURITY DEPOSIT: You may apply your security deposit and any rent you paid in advance against the cur-rent rent you owe your landlord as provided in ORS 90.367. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from your rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe your current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENANCY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE: The new owner that buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out after 90 days or at the end of your fixed term lease. After the sale, you should receive a written notice informing you that the sale took place and giving you the new owner's name and contact information. You should contact the new owner if you would like to stay. If the new owner accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the new owner becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise: " You do not owe rent; "The new owner is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf; and "You must move out by the date the new owner specifies in a notice to you. The new owner may offer to pay your moving expenses and any other costs or amounts you and the new owner agree on in exchange for your agreement to leave the premises in less than 90 days or before your fixed term lease expires. You should speak with a lawyer to fully understand your rights before making any decisions regarding your tenancy. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR DWELLING UNIT WITHOUT FIRST GIVING YOU WRITTEN NOTICE AND GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU SHOULD CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is listed below. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer and are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. For free legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the Legal Aid Services. OREGON STATE BAR CONTACT INFORMATION: Oregon State Bar, P.O. Box 231935, Tigard, OR 97281-1935, Tel (in Oregon): (800) 452-8260, Tel (outside Oregon): (503) 620-0222, E-mail: info@osbar.org, Website: www.osbar.org. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. THIS COMMUNICATION IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. UNLESS YOU NOTIFY US WITHIN 30 DAYS AFTER RECEIVING THIS LETTER THAT YOU DISPUTE THE VALIDITY OF THE DEBT, OR ANY PORTION OF IT, WE WILL ASSUME THE DEBT IS VALID. IF YOU NOTIFY US, IN WRITING WITHIN 30 DAYS AFTER RECEIPT OF THIS LETTER THAT YOU DO DISPUTE THE DEBT OR ANY PORTION OF IT, WE WILL PROVIDE VERIFICATION BY MAILING YOU A COPY OF THE RECORDS. IF YOU SO REQUEST, IN WRITING, WITHIN 30 DAYS AFTER RECEIPT OF THIS NOTICE, WE WILL PROVIDE YOU WITH THE NAME AND ADDRESS OF THE ORIGINAL CREDITOR IF DIFFERENT FROM THE CURRENT CREDITOR. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Sale status may be accessed at http://ts.hcmp.com. DATED this 24th day of October, 2011. SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE: JULIE B. HAMILTON, Oregon Bar #092650, c/o Hillis Clark Martin & Peterson P.S., 1221 Second Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, Washington 98101-2925, Telephone: (206) 623-1745.

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applications beginning Friday, February 16, 2012 and ending Friday, March 16, 2012. You can find copies of these applications and directions for submitting comments at http://www.ode.state .or.us/search/results/?id=260 or by calling Rae Ann Ray at (503) 947-5722.

children and youth with disabilities. In the 2010-2011 school year, IDEA funds helped support special education services for more than 83,000 children with disabilities.

PUBLIC NOTICE Public Notice and Comment - Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) As required by federal law, the Oregon Department of Education (ODE) announces its annual applications for IDEA funds are open for public review for sixty days, beginning Thursday, February 9, 2012, and ending Sunday, April 8, 2012. ODE will accept public comment on these

IDEA is a federal law governing special education services and federal funding for eligible infants, toddlers,

Need to get an ad in ASAP? Fax it to 541-322-7253 The Bulletin Classiieds

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE The Trustee under the terms of the Trust Deed described herein, at the direction of the Beneficiary, hereby elects to sell the property described in the Trust Deed to satisfy the obligations secured thereby. Pursuant to ORS 86.745, the following information is provided: 1.PARTIES: Grantor: VALERIE L. EVANS. Trustee:CHICAGO TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON. Successor Trustee:NANCY K. CARY. Beneficiary:WASHINGTON FEDERAL SAVINGS. 2.DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: The real property is described as follows: Lot Ten (10), EMILY ESTATES, recorded November 20, 2006, in Cabinet H, Page 127, Deschutes County, Oregon. 3.RECORDING. The Trust Deed was recorded as follows: Date Recorded: August 21, 2009. Recording No.: 2009-36073 Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 4.DEFAULT. The Grantor or any other person obligated on the Trust Deed and Promissory Note secured thereby is in default and the Beneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed for failure to pay: Monthly payments in the amount of $774.00 each, due the first of each month, for the months of July 2011 through October 2011; plus late charges and advances; plus any unpaid real property taxes or liens, plus interest. 5.AMOUNT DUE. The amount due on the Note which is secured by the Trust Deed referred to herein is: Principal balance in the amount of $108,489.19; plus interest at the rate of 4.740% per annum from June 1, 2011; plus late charges of $363.84; plus advances and foreclosure attorney fees and costs. 6.SALE OF PROPERTY. The Trustee hereby states that the property will be sold to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed. A Trustee's Notice of Default and Election to Sell Under Terms of Trust Deed has been recorded in the Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 7.TIME OF SALE. Date:April 5, 2012. Time:11:00 a.m. Place:Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon. 8.RIGHT TO REINSTATE. Any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the Trustee conducts the sale, to have this foreclosure dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, by curing any other default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed and by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with the trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amount provided in ORS 86.753. You may reach the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at 503-684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be available if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.org. Any questions regarding this matter should be directed to Lisa Summers, Paralegal, (541) 686-0344 (TS #15148.30701). DATED: November 10, 2011. /s/ Nancy K. Cary. Nancy K. Cary, Successor Trustee, Hershner Hunter, LLP, P.O. Box 1475, Eugene, OR 97440. 1000

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE The Trustee under the terms of the Trust Deed described herein, at the direction of the Beneficiary, hereby elects to sell the property described in the Trust Deed to satisfy the obligations secured thereby. Pursuant to ORS 86.745, the following information is provided: 1.PARTIES: Grantor: ROBERT E LUCAS AND PATRCIA L LUCAS. Trustee:TRANSNATION TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY. Successor Trustee:NANCY K. CARY. Beneficiary:WASHINGTON FEDERAL SAVINGS. 2.DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: The real property is described as follows: Lot Forty ( 40), Block Q, DESCHUTES RIVER WOODS, recorded March 22, 1962, in Plat Book 6, Deschutes County, Oregon. 3.RECORDING. The Trust Deed was recorded as follows: Date Recorded: October 16, 2007. Recording No.: 2007-55349 Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 4.DEFAULT. The Grantor or any other person obligated on the Trust Deed and Promissory Note secured thereby is in default and the Beneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed for failure to pay: Monthly payments in the amount of $2,617.00 each, due the first of each month, for the months of August 2011 through October 2011; plus late charges and advances; plus any unpaid real property taxes or liens, plus interest. 5.AMOUNT DUE. The amount due on the Note which is secured by the Trust Deed referred to herein is: Principal balance in the amount of $342,369.30; plus interest at the rate of 7.000% per annum from July 1, 2011; plus late charges of $371.28; plus advances and foreclosure attorney fees and costs. 6.SALE OF PROPERTY. The Trustee hereby states that the property will be sold to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed. A Trustee's Notice of Default and Election to Sell Under Terms of Trust Deed has been recorded in the Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 7.TIME OF SALE. Date:April 5, 2012. Time:11:00 a.m. Place:Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon. 8.RIGHT TO REINSTATE. Any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the Trustee conducts the sale, to have this foreclosure dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, by curing any other default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed and by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with the trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amount provided in ORS 86.753. You may reach the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at 503-684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be available if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.org. Any questions regarding this matter should be directed to Lisa Summers, Paralegal, (541) 686-0344 (TS #15148.30700). DATED: November 10, 2011. /s/ Nancy K. Cary. Nancy K. Cary, Successor Trustee, Hershner Hunter, LLP, P.O. Box 1475, Eugene, OR 97440. 1000

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE The Trustee under the terms of the Trust Deed described herein, at the direction of the Beneficiary, hereby elects to sell the property described in the Trust Deed to satisfy the obligations secured thereby. Pursuant to ORS 86.745, the following information is provided: 1.PARTIES: Grantor: GARRY S. ZIMMERMAN AND MOLLY L. MINTON. Trustee:AMERITITLE. Successor Trustee:NANCY K. CARY. Beneficiary:OREGON HOUSING AND COMMUNITY SERVICES DEPARTMENT, STATE OF OREGON, as assignee of BANK OF THE CASCADES MRTG. CENTER. 2.DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: The real property is described as follows: Lot Six (6) in Block Fifteen (15) of ROMAINE VILLAGE UNIT 8, Deschutes County, Oregon. 3.RECORDING. The Trust Deed was recorded as follows: Date Recorded: October 28, 2004. Recording No.: 2004-64634 Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 4.DEFAULT. The Grantor or any other person obligated on the Trust Deed and Promissory Note secured thereby is in default and the Beneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed for failure to pay: Monthly payments in the amount of $961.00 each, due the first of each month, for the months of June 2011 through October 2011; plus late charges and advances; plus any unpaid real property taxes or liens, plus interest. 5.AMOUNT DUE. The amount due on the Note which is secured by the Trust Deed referred to herein is: Principal balance in the amount of $113,717.55; plus interest at the rate of 4.9500% per annum from May 1, 2011; plus late charges of $172.15; plus advances and foreclosure attorney fees and costs. 6.SALE OF PROPERTY. The Trustee hereby states that the property will be sold to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed. A Trustee's Notice of Default and Election to Sell Under Terms of Trust Deed has been recorded in the Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 7.TIME OF SALE. Date: April 5, 2012. Time:11:00 a.m. Place:Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon. 8.RIGHT TO REINSTATE. Any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the Trustee conducts the sale, to have this foreclosure dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, by curing any other default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed and by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with the trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amount provided in ORS 86.753. You may reach the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at 503-684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be available if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.org. Any questions regarding this matter should be directed to Lisa Summers, Paralegal, (541) 686-0344 (TS #07754.30429). DATED: November 11, 2011. /s/ Nancy K. Cary. Nancy K. Cary, Successor Trustee, Hershner Hunter, LLP, P.O. Box 1475, Eugene, OR 97440.


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

F4 WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2012 • THE BULLETIN %

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LEGAL NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON The Trustee under the terms of the Trust Deed described herein, at the diDESCHUTES COUNTY rection of the Beneficiary, hereby elects to sell the property described in Home Federal Bank, a federal savings bank the Trust Deed to satisfy the obligations secured thereby. Pursuant to chartered under the laws of the United States of America ORS 86.745, the following information is provided: 1.PARTIES: Grantor: Plaintiff, KELLY D. WARD AND TABITHA THOMPSON. Trustee:FIRST AMERIv. CAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON. Successor Trustee: Elmer R. "Max" Mills and Angela M. Mills, NANCY K. CARY. Beneficiary:WORLD SAVINGS BANK, FSB. 2.DEDefendants. SCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: The real property is described as follows: Lot Seven (7), Block Four (4), FIRST ADDITION TO MEADOWVIEW ESCase No.: 10CV1224ST TATES, Deschutes County, Oregon. 3.RECORDING. The Trust Deed was recorded as follows: Date Recorded: July 14, 2006. Recording No.: NOTICE OF SALE 2006-48329 Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 4.DEFAULT. UNDER WRIT OF EXECUTION The Grantor or any other person obligated on the Trust Deed and PromisREAL PROPERTY sory Note secured thereby is in default and the Beneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed for failure to pay: Monthly payments in the amount Notice is hereby given that I will on March 1, 2012 at 11:00 a.m.in the of $Biweekly payments of $578.10 each, due the biweekly of each month, main lobby of the Deschutes County Sheriff's Office, 63333 W. Highway for the months of May 2010 through November 2011; plus late charges 20, Bend, Oregon, sell, at public oral auction to the highest bidder, for and advances; plus any unpaid real property taxes or liens, plus interest. cash or cashier's check, the following real property, known as 1034 NE 5.AMOUNT DUE. The amount due on the Note which is secured by the 11th Street, Bend, Oregon 97701, to wit, Trust Deed referred to herein is: Principal balance in the amount of $240,914.38; plus interest at an adjustable rate pursuant to the terms of Lots 9 through 18, inclusive, in Block 109 of FIRST ADDITION TO the Promissory Note from May 3, 2010; plus late charges of $1,044.51; BEND PARK, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. Excepting plus advances and foreclosure attorney fees and costs. 6.SALE OF therefrom the North 10 feet of Lot 18, lying Easterly of the Central OrPROPERTY. The Trustee hereby states that the property will be sold to egon Irrigation Lateral A-1, in Block 109 of FIRST ADDITION TO BEND satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed. A Trustee's Notice of PARK, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. Default and Election to Sell Under Terms of Trust Deed has been recorded in the Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 7.TIME OF Tax Identification No. 17 12 33 AC 01100 & 17 12 33 AC 01000. SALE. Date:April 12, 2012. Time:11:00 a.m. Place:Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon. 8.RIGHT TO REINSaid sale is made under a Writ of Execution issued out of the Circuit STATE. Any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that Court of the State of Oregon for the County of Deschutes, dated Januis not later than five days before the Trustee conducts the sale, to have ary 16, 2012, to me directed in the above-entitled action wherein Home this foreclosure dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to Federal Bank, as plaintiff, recovered General Judgment and Money the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of Award on November 30, 2011, against Elmer R. "Max" Mills and Angela the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, by curing M. Mills, as defendant/s. any other default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed and by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, BEFORE BIDDING AT THE SALE, A PROSPECTIVE BIDDER SHOULD INDEPENDENTLY INVESTIGATE: together with the trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amount provided in ORS 86.753. You may reach the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer (a)The priority of the lien or interest of the judgment creditor; Referral Service at 503-684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be (b)Land use laws and regulations applicable to the property; available if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. (c)Approved uses for the property; For more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to (d)Limits on farming or forest practices on the property; http://www.oregonlawhelp.org. Any questions regarding this matter should (e)Rights of neighboring property owners; and (f)Environmental laws and regulations that affect the property. be directed to Lisa Summers, Paralegal, (541) 686-0344 (TS #17368.30869). DATED: December 1, 2011. /s/ Nancy K. Cary. Nancy K. LARRY BLANTON Cary, Successor Trustee, Hershner Hunter, LLP, P.O. Box 1475, Eugene, Deschutes County Sheriff OR 97440. 1000

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Steven Binstock, Reserve Deputy Date: January 23, 2012

Published in Bend Bulletin LEGAL NOTICE Date of First and Successive TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Publications:February 1, 2012; February 8, 2012; February 15, 2012 The Trustee under the terms of the Trust Deed described herein, at the diDate of Last Publication February 22, 2012 rection of the Beneficiary, hereby elects to sell the property described in the Trust Deed to satisfy the obligations secured thereby. Pursuant to Attorney:John A. Berge, OSB #871663 ORS 86.745, the following information is provided: 1.PARTIES: Grantor: Bryant, Lovlien& Jarvis, PC KYLE T. BURGES AND REBECCA L. BURGES. Trustee:DESCHUTES 591 SW Mill View Way COUNTY TITLE. Successor Trustee:NANCY K. CARY. Beneficiary:ORBend, Oregon 97702 EGON HOUSING AND COMMUNITY SERVICES DEPARTMENT, (541)382-4331 STATE OF OREGON, as assignee of BANK OF THE CASCADES MORTGAGE CENTER. 2.DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: The real Conditions of Sale:Bidder's funds will be reviewed by Deschutes County property is described as follows: Lot Nine in Block Twenty-three of DESSheriff's Office prior to the auction. Only U.S. currency and/or cashier's CHUTES RIVER RECREATION HOMESITES. 3.RECORDING. The checks made payable to Deschutes County Sheriff's Office will be acTrust Deed was recorded as follows: Date Recorded: May 20, 2008. Recepted. Payment must be made in full immediately upon the close of cording No.: 2008-22038 Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. the sale. 4.DEFAULT. The Grantor or any other person obligated on the Trust Deed and Promissory Note secured thereby is in default and the Beneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed for failure to pay: Monthly pay- BULLETIN CLASSIFIEDS Call a Pro Tick, Tock ments in the amount of $1,633.00 each, due the first of each month, for Search the area’s most the months of June 2011 through October 2011; plus late charges and ad- comprehensive listing of Whether you need a Tick, Tock... vances; plus any unpaid real property taxes or liens, plus interest. 5. fence ixed, hedges classiied advertising... AMOUNT DUE. The amount due on the Note which is secured by the real estate to automotive, ...don’t let time get trimmed or a house Trust Deed referred to herein is: Principal balance in the amount of merchandise to sporting away. Hire a $246,185.39; plus interest at the rate of 5.4500% per annum from May 1, goods. Bulletin Classiieds built, you’ll ind 2011; plus late charges of $435.18; plus advances and foreclosure attor- appear every day in the professional out professional help in ney fees and costs. 6.SALE OF PROPERTY. The Trustee hereby states print or on line. The Bulletin’s “Call a of The Bulletin’s that the property will be sold to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Call 541-385-5809 Deed. A Trustee's Notice of Default and Election to Sell Under Terms of Service Professional” “Call A Service www.bendbulletin.com Trust Deed has been recorded in the Official Records of Deschutes Directory Professional” County, Oregon. 7.TIME OF SALE. Date:April 5, 2012. Time:11:00 a.m. 541-385-5809 Directory today! Place:Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon. 8.RIGHT TO REINSTATE. Any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the Trustee 1000 1000 1000 conducts the sale, to have this foreclosure dismissed and the Trust Deed Legal Notices Legal Notices Legal Notices reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no LEGAL NOTICE default occurred, by curing any other default that is capable of being cured TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed T.S. No.: OR-11-470257-SH and by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with the trustee's and attorney's fees Reference is made to that certain deed made by RONALD E WELLS AND not exceeding the amount provided in ORS 86.753. You may reach the SARA L WELLS, HUSBAND AND WIFE, as Grantor to KEY TITLE COMOregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at 503-684-3763 or toll-free in PANY, as trustee, in favor of AMERICA'S WHOLESALE LENDER, as Oregon at 800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. Beneficiary, dated 5/13/1998, recorded 5/19/1998, in official records of Legal assistance may be available if you have a low income and meet DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book / reel / volume number in Book 494 federal poverty guidelines. For more information and a directory of legal Page 298 fee / file / instrument / microfile / reception number 98-20813, , aid programs, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.org. Any questions regardcovering the following described real property situated in said County and ing this matter should be directed to Lisa Summers, Paralegal, (541) State, to-wit: 686-0344 (TS #07754.30426). DATED: November 8, 2011. /s/ Nancy K. APN: 125385 Cary. Nancy K. Cary, Successor Trustee, Hershner Hunter, LLP, P.O. Box LOT 13, BLOCK 47, OREGON WATER WONDERLAND, UNIT 2, 1475, Eugene, OR 97440. DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: Check out the People Look for Information Find exactly what 17454 EGRET DRIVE., BEND, OR 97707 classiieds online About Products and you are looking for in the Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real Services Every Day through www.bendbulletin.com property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice CLASSIFIEDS The Bulletin Classifi eds Updated daily has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantors: The 1000 1000 1000 installments of principal and interest which became due on 5/1/2011, and all subsequent installments of principal and interest through the date of Legal Notices Legal Notices Legal Notices this Notice, plus amounts that are due for late charges, delinquent property taxes, insurance premiums, advances made on senior liens, taxes LEGAL NOTICE and/or insurance, trustee's fees, and any attorney fees and court costs TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE arising from or associated with the beneficiaries efforts to protect and preLoan No: 0031195662 T.S. No.: 11-04577-6 serve its security, all of which must be paid as a condition of reinstatement, including all sums that shall accrue through reinstatement or Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust dated as of June 8, 2006 pay-off. Nothing in this notice shall be construed as a waiver of any fees made by, JUANITA ALBIN, OWEN ALBIN, WIFE AND HUSBAND, as the owing to the Beneficiary under the Deed of Trust pursuant to the terms of original grantor, to WESTERN TITLE AND ESCROW COMPANY, as the the loan documents. Monthly Payment $597.46 Monthly Late Charge original trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION $29.87 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obliSYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICAN BROKERS CONDUIT, gations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said as the original beneficiary, recorded on June 15, 2006, as Instrument No. sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $67,305.51 together with in2006-41418 of Official Records in the Office of the Recorder of Deschutes terest thereon at the rate of 7.8750 per annum from 4/1/2011 until paid; County, Oregon (the "Deed of Trust"). The current beneficiary is: Citibank, plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure N.A., as Trustee for American Home Mortgage Assets Trust 2006-3, Mortcosts and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of gage-Backed Pass-Through Certificates Series 2006-3, (the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that QUALITY LOAN "Beneficiary"). SERVICE CORPORATION OF WASHINGTON, the undersigned trustee APN: 247796 will on 5/7/2012 at the hour of 11:00:00 AM, Standard of Time, as estabLOT THIRTY-SIX (36), VILLAGE POINTE PHASES 2 & 3, lished by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, FRONT ENTRANCE RECORDED MARCH 11, 2005, IN CABINET G, PAGE 632, OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W. BOND STREET, BEND, OR County DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidCommonly known as: der for cash the interest in the said described real property which the 3077 SW DESCHUTES AVENUE, REDMOND, OR grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the said real the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his sucproperty to satisfy the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust and notice cessors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to sathas been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised isfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and exStatutes: the default(s) for which the foreclosure is made is that the penses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised charges due; and which defaulted amounts total: $10,126.64 as of JanuStatutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and ary 20, 2012. By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $313,249.64 together then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's with interest thereon at the rate of 4.21300% per annum from July 1, 2011 and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Nountil paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all Trustee's fees, tice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIFor Sale Information Call: 714-730-2727 or Login to: www.lpsasap.com In DELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as the duly apconstruing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the pointed Trustee under the Deed of Trust will on June 5, 2012 at the hour neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any sucof 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Orcessor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obegon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. ligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described if any. Pursuant to Oregon Law, this sale will not be deemed final until the real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of Trustee's deed has been issued by QUALITY LOAN SERVICE CORPOthe execution of the Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the RATION OF WASHINGTON. If there are any irregularities discovered grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of the within 10 days of the date of this sale, that the trustee will rescind the sale, Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the return the buyer's money and take further action as necessary. If the sale costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Ortitle, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the egon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser's sole and excludismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of sive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary's Agent, or the would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, Beneficiary's Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through Trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obin which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right's ligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLset for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FILECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED DELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 1920 Main Street, FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a Suite 1120, Irvine, CA 92614 949-252-4900 FOR SALE INFORMATION negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to CALL: 714.730.2727 Website for Trustee's Sale Information: www.lpa credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligasasap.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the tions. Dated: 1/3/2012 QUALITY LOAN SERVICE CORPORATION OF feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" WASHINGTON, as trustee Signature By: Brooke Frank, Assistant Secreincludes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other pertary Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington c/o Quality Loan Service sons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Corp. 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 For Non-Sale Information: Deed of Trust, the words "Trustee" and 'Beneficiary" include their respecQUALITY LOAN SERVICE CORPORATION OF WASHINGTON c/o tive successors in interest, if any. Dated: February 1, 2012 FIDELITY NAQuality Loan Service Corp. 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 TIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Michael Busby, Autho619-645-7711 Fax: 619-645-7716 rized Signature ASAP# 4191118 02/08/2012, 02/15/2012, 02/22/2012, 02/29/2012

ASAP# 4171402 01/18/2012, 01/25/2012, 02/01/2012, 02/08/2012

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, etseq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-ALT-001358 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, JUVENAL CASTANEDA-SALINAS, A MARRIED MAN AS HIS SOLE AND SEPARATE PROPERTY, as grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE, as Trustee, in favor of FIRST FRANKLIN FINANCIAL CORPORATION, as beneficiary, dated 10/16/2002, recorded 10/21/2002, under Instrument No. 2002-58091, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by WELLS FARGO BANK MINNESOTA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE FOR FIRST FRANKLIN MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2002- FF4 ASSET BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2002-FF4 . Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT 22 OF VISTA RIDGE, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 63329 BRODY LANE BEND, OR 97701 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of January 27, 2012 Delinquent Payments from August 01, 2008 4 payments at $1,444.09 each $5,776.36 6 payments at $1,431.30 each $8,587.80 6 payments at $1,337.36 each $8,024.16 12 payments at $1,303.36 each $15,640.32 6 payments at $1,303.37 each $7,820.22 6 payments at $1,303.36 each $7,820.16 2 payments at $1,303.37 each $2,606.74 (08-01-08 through 01-27-12) Late Charges: $458.56 Beneficiary Advances: $10,110.92 Suspense Credit: $-182.44 TOTAL: $66,662.80 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $140,873.08, PLUS interest thereon at 9.625% per annum from 07/01/08 to 12/1/2008, 9.5% per annum from 12/01/08 to 06/01/09, 8.5% per annum from 06/01/09 to 12/01/09, 8.125% per annum from 12/01/09 to 12/01/10, 8.125% per annum from 12/01/10 to 06/01/11, 8.125% per annum from 06/01/11 to 12/01/11, 9.625% per annum from 12/1/2011, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on May 31, 2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS: The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for May 31, 2012. Unless the lender who is foreclosing on this property is paid, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. The following information applies to you only if you occupy and rent this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a residential tenant. If the foreclosure goes through, the business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out. The buyer must first give you an eviction notice in writing that specifies the date by which you must move out. The buyer may not give you this notice until after the foreclosure sale happens. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the buyer can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES YOU TO BE NOTIFIED IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERTY AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNDER A LEGITIMATE RENTAL AGREEMENT, FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING A CERTAIN NUMBER OF DAYS BEFORE THE BUYER CAN REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT. THE FEDERAL LAW THAT REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU THIS NOTICE IS EFFECTIVE UNTIL DECEMBER 31, 2012. Under federal law, the buyer must give you at least 90 days notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If you are renting this property under a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), you may stay until the end of your lease term. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 90 days left. STATE LAW NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS: IF THE FEDERAL LAW DOES NOT APPLY, STATE LAW STILL REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING BEFORE REQUIRING YOU TO MOVE OUT IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THE PROPERTY AS A TENANT IN GOOD FAITH. EVEN IF THE FEDERAL LAW REQUIREMENT IS NO LONGER EFFECTIVE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 2012, THE REQUIREMENT UNDER STATE LAW STILL APPLIES TO YOUR SITUATION. Under state law, if you have a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), the buyer must give you at least 60 days notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 30 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 30 days left. If you are renting under a month-to-month or week-to-week rental agreement, the buyer must give you at least 30 days notice in writing before requiring you to move out. IMPORTANT: For the buyer to be required to give you notice under state law, you must prove to the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale that you are occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The name and address of the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale is shown on this notice under the heading "TRUSTEE". You must mail or deliver your proof not later than 5/1/2012 (30 days before the date first set for the foreclosure sale). Your proof must be in writing and should be a copy of your rental agreement or lease. If you do not have a written rental agreement or lease, you can provide other proof, such as receipts for rent you paid. ABOUT YOUR SECURITY DEPOSIT Under state law, you may apply your security deposit and any rent you paid in advance against the current rent you owe your landlord. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from you rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe you current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENANCY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out. You should contact the buyer to discuss that possibility if you would like to stay. Under state law, if the buyer accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the buyer becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise, the buyer is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf and you must move out by the date the buyer specifies in a notice to you. YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A DEPOSIT YOU MADE OR PREPAID RENT YOU PAID AGAINST YOUR CURRENT RENT OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE AND OF ANY NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR DEPOSIT OR YOUR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar at 800-452-7636 and ask for lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer and are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance may be obtained through Safenet at 800-SAFENET. DATED: 1/27/2012 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By: KAREN GREAGOR, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206)340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 4188739 02/08/2012, 02/15/2012, 02/22/2012, 02/29/2012


Bulletin Daily Paper 02/08/12