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MENINGOCOCCAL DISEASE

Oregon’s wandering wolf crosses into California

3 infections cause Crook County to take precautions

By Dylan J. Darling

By Duffie Taylor The Bulletin

An abnormal influx of bacterial meningococcal disease cases in Crook County this past year has prompted the county’s public health department to acquire more vaccines to prevent further infection. This year, three victims in the county have been infected with the C subgroup of the disease, a strain that can be prevented by vaccination. “It appears there is a higher rate of transmission of this bacteria in our community,” said Karen Yeargain, Crook County communicable disease coordinator. “A single strain circulating in the community is worrisome. The fact that the three cases were not clustered closely in time is more worrisome.” Colbey Coultier, a 16-yearold Crook County High School student, contracted the disease in March. A second case of the same strain sickened 24-yearold Michael Hodnett weeks later. Then in November, 20year-old Prineville resident Stephany Mullen was also hospitalized with the disease. All three survived, and there is no indication they contracted the contagious disease directly from one another. But Yeargain said this raises the likelihood that the bacteria has circulated within the community. Before 2011, the county had only reported two cases of the disease within a 10-year period. The concern has encouraged county health department employees to widen their vaccination coverage beyond the targeted at-risk groups, which include children ages 11 to 18 and people with certain medical risks, Yeargain said. See Meningococcal / A4

The Bulletin

Less than two months after crossing through Central Oregon, a wandering wolf is now the first to tread on California

soil in nearly 90 years. Known as OR-7 — the designation given him by state scientists along with his global positioning collar in February — the 2 1/2-year-old gray wolf

was tracked at noon Wednesday a few miles south of the California-Oregon border in eastern Siskiyou County, said Mark Stopher, environmental program manager for the Cali-

fornia Department of Fish and Game in Redding. “The day before he had been in Oregon,” he said. The collar had put the wolf south of Keno, a small Oregon

$10 MILLION SUMMER PROJECT

Road to Bachelor to be repaved

Interpreters in Iraq left in tense limbo

EGYPT: Security forces raid multiple offices, A3 Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

INDEX Business Calendar Classified Comics Crosswords Dear Abby Editorials Family

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Horoscope E3 Local News C1-6 Movies GO! 30 Obituaries C5 Oregon News C3 Sports D1-6 Stocks B4-5 TV E2

The Bulletin An Independent Newspaper Vol. 108, No. 364, 66 pages, 7 sections

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U|xaIICGHy02329lz[

By Michael Barbaro and Ashley Parker

DES MOINES, Iowa — Jonathan Gabhart, a 21-year-old college student from Spencer, Iowa, is leaning toward voting for Ron Paul because of the Texas lawmaker’s unpolished speaking style — a “high-pitched Inside squirrelly voice,” • Two tiers as he put it. in Iowa, “He seems A3 like a real person because of his eccentricities.” Andy Schwaegler, a 45-yearold tree farmer from Orford, N.H., is drawn to Mitt Romney because the well-coiffed candidate reminds him of his father, a business executive. “It’s something about the way he carries himself,” Schwaegler said. Nancy Weaver, a 60-yearold retiree in Grinnell, Iowa, favors Rep. Michele Bachmann because the congresswoman raised 23 foster children. “That’s a huge endeavor for any man or woman,” she said. By virtually all accounts, the 2012 presidential race was to hinge on a restless electorate’s overriding worry, the troubled U.S. economy. But in three dozen interviews across Iowa and New Hampshire over the past few days, voters readily acknowledged that their decision would be driven as much by personal chemistry and biography as by political positions and policy. See Candidates / A4

SAUDI ARABIA: U.S. to sell $30B in weapons, A3

Mixed showers High 44, Low 20 Page C6

Examining candidates — often to a fault New York Times News Service

TOP NEWS

TODAY’S WEATHER

town about eight miles north of California, on Tuesday, said Michelle Dennehy, spokeswoman for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. See Wolf / A5

A car passes a pothole Thursday evening while traveling toward Bend on Century Drive. The Oregon Department of Transportation received $10 million to repave Century Drive from the Bend city limits to Mt. Bachelor ski area this summer. By Hillary Borrud The Bulletin

The highway that leads to the Mt. Bachelor ski area and other outdoor recreation spots is scheduled for a major overhaul this summer when Oregon’s transportation agency will begin a $10 million repaving project. The highway was last paved in 1991 and is rutted, cracked and falling apart. Oregon Department of Transportation officials learned earlier this month that it had been awarded $10 million in federal funds for the project. The highway is also a popular location for sports events, and there are 13 planned there in 2012, including the Pole Pedal Paddle and the Cascade Cycling Classic. Molly Cogswell-Kelley, events director for Mt. Bachelor Sports Education Foundation, said potholes on

Paving on Cascade Lakes Highway This section of Century Drive was last paved 20 years ago, and the pavement between Bend and Mt. Bachelor ski area is cracked, rutted and crumbling.

BEND

46

Cascade Lakes Hwy. Mount Bachelor

45

97 46 41

Source: ODOT Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

the crumbling road are “like death” for bicyclists riding downhill at 20 to 30 mph. The Pole Pedal Paddle and Cascade Cycling Classic benefit the foundation. “That’s going to help our events a lot, because the potholes are just horrendous,” Cogswell-Kelley said. “I think it’s going to make the race much safer.”

The transportation department says it will work around the events, and the paving project will not affect them. Jay Davenport, ODOT’s construction project manager for Century Drive, said it makes financial sense to repave the highway before it falls apart. See Repaving / A4

By David Zucchino Los Angeles Times

BAGHDAD — He rarely leaves his house. He’s been shot at by gunmen in a passing car. He gets death threats over the phone. “Traitor,” the callers say. “American agent.” Tariq, 27, is a quick-witted, tech-savvy Iraqi who tosses off idiomatic American English phrases such as “I’m outta here” and “That’s cool.” When he served as an interpreter for the U.S. military, Tariq lived on a secure base, safe from fellow Iraqis determined to kill him because of his service to America. But when the unit he served pulled out of Iraq on Oct. 13, he was dismissed and escorted off the base. The U.S. government promised Tariq and thousands of other former interpreters that they would be first in line for special visas to the United States. See Interpreters / A5


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2011

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Discoveries, breakthroughs, trends, names in the news — things you need to know to start your day.

TODAY

FOCUS: CRIME

Central Park at night: once shunned, now ‘boringly safe’ • As crime declines, it has become a hub of after-dark activity By Lisa W. Foderaro New York Times News Service

NEW YORK — For as long as most New Yorkers can remember, the rules have been clear: Enjoy Central Park by day. Keep out at night. Someone, however, forgot to tell Fleur Bailey, a Wall Street trader who was walking her two Dalmatians in the park after 10 the other night. “I can’t remember the last time I came across something that made me uncomfortable,” said Bailey, who lives on the Upper West Side and takes her dogs into the park as late as midnight. “Some people say, ‘You walk your dogs where at night?’ But I tell them that it’s perfectly fine.” And she is hardly alone. On any given evening, the park now hums with life. Couples stroll under pools of lamplight, while the park drive pulses with the footfalls of runners, the whir of cyclists and the desultory clop of horse-drawn carriages. Men and women jog happily around the reservoir. “It’s boringly safe,” said Christopher Moloney, 34, who cuts through the park at night to get from his job in the Time Warner Center to his home on East 70th Street.

Security measures Crime statistics for the park show a steady decline in menace. This year through midDecember, according to the police, 17 robberies had been reported in the park, down from 37 in 2001 — and 731 in 1981. Rapes, too, are down sharply, with only two reported this year. The last homicide occurred in 2002. Many parkgoers these days have never heard of the 1989 attack on the so-called Central Park jogger, who was raped and left for dead while running in the park one evening. Efforts to tamp down crime have been so successful that the park’s own police precinct has lately taken to planting pocketbooks on benches to lure would-be thieves. More than

It’s Friday, Dec. 30, the 364th day of 2011. There is one day left in the year.

HAPPENINGS • Michael Plumadore, the 39year-old Indiana man accused of killing and dismembering a 9-year-old girl, is back in court. • Syrian activists plan a massive protest in an apparent test of the authorities’ response to an Arab League monitoring mission, which faces mounting criticism. A3 • New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie will be in Iowa to campaign for former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, who faces surging campaigns from former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum and Texas Rep. Ron Paul. A3

IN HISTORY

Robert Caplin / New York Times News Service

Women walk along the reservoir in New York’s Central Park earlier this month. A rule that many New Yorkers once followed zealously — to avoid the park after dark— has become obsolete to many strollers, runners and cyclists.

Getting to know Central Park • The 843-acre park opened in 1857; it was the first landscaped public park in the U.S. • In 1858, Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux won a design competition to improve and expand the park. The project, called the Greensward Plan, started that year and was finished in 1873. • Designated a National Historic Landmark in 1963, the park is managed by the nonprofit Central Park Conservancy, which contributes 85 percent of its $42.4 million annual budget. Source: /www.centralparknyc.org/

three-quarters of the 68 grand larcenies in the park reported through mid-December resulted from leaving belongings unattended, itself a sign of the comfort level of park visitors. The Central Park Conservancy, which manages the park for the city, initiated a late shift — from 1:30 to 10 p.m. — in the late 1990s, as the park became safer. In the past year, four more workers were added to that shift, for a total of 40. They do the usual tasks — picking up litter, inspecting bathrooms — but, armed with cellphones and walkie-talkies, they also supplement the police as an official presence. The Central Park police say that a main reason crime has fallen is the stricter enforcement of the park’s 1 a.m. curfew. The installation of 30 sur-

veillance cameras around the perimeter of the park has also enhanced security. “We can view all these cameras from the desk,” said Capt. Philip Wishnia, the commander of the Central Park Precinct. “That’s a deterrent.”

Changing perceptions The park conservancy’s own surveys show a marked rise in the proportion of women and older New Yorkers using the park, regardless of the hour. From the early 1980s to today, the percentage of adult parkgoers over age 50 climbed to 40 percent, from 12. During the same period, the representation of women in the park rose to 52 percent, from 32. In a study of Central Park usage released this year, nearly 80 percent of the visitors who were

interviewed reported that there was no part of the park they avoided out of safety concerns. Only 3.4 percent cited “safety concerns” as a major issue. Park use has tripled since the 1980s, when the conservancy took over its management and began a hugely successful fundraising effort. The private money the conservancy raises has helped cover the cost of meticulous restoration work across the park’s 843 acres. “A lot of people take the park for granted, but 25 years ago, the lights were broken, the benches were broken,” said Douglas Blonsky, the conservancy’s president. Some veteran parkgoers, like Dianne Montague, say their fear of Central Park after dark had become so ingrained that changing their conception was a slow process. Montague, a native New Yorker, walks her four dogs there every night. As the years have passed, she has ventured into the park later and later. These days, a final pit stop at 11:30 is not unusual. “I’m a little more cautious than my children, because they grew up in a safer New York,” said Montague. “I’m old-school. It took me a while to realize that the park is safe.”

Highlight s: In 1936, the United Auto Workers union staged its first “sit-down” strike at the General Motors Fisher Body Plant No. 1 in Flint, Mich. (The strike lasted until Feb. 11, 1937.) In 1922, Vladimir Lenin proclaimed the establishment of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics. Ten years ago: Argentina’s interim president, Adolfo Rodriguez Saa, resigned after seven days in office, charging that his Peronist party had abandoned him. Five years ago: Iraqis awoke to news that Saddam Hussein had been hanged; victims of his three decades of autocratic rule took to the streets to celebrate. One year ago: Republican Lisa Murkowski was officially named winner of Alaska’s U.S. Senate race following a period of legal fights and limbo that had lasted longer than the write-in campaign she waged to keep her job.

BIRTHDAYS Baseball Hall-of-Famer Sandy Koufax is 76. Singer-musician Michael Nesmith is 69. Singer Davy Jones is 66. Singer Patti Smith is 65. “Today” show co-host Matt Lauer is 54. Actress-comedian Tracey Ullman is 52. Radio-TV commentator Sean Hannity is 50. Golfer Tiger Woods is 36. Actress Eliza Dushku is 31. NBA player LeBron James is 27. — From wire reports

DID YOU HEAR?

In Samoa, a week with no Friday New York Times News Service The Pacific island nation of Samoa and its even tinier neighbor Tokelau are skipping Friday this week, jumping westward in time across the international dateline and into the shifting economic balance of the 21st century. The time change, officially decided in June, is meant to align Samoa with its Asian trading partners. In this giant-step version of daylight saving time, the island’s 186,000 citizens, and the 1,500 who live in Tokelau, went to sleep Thursday and woke up on Saturday. The government has decreed that those who miss a day of work today will be paid all the same. Samoa has been out of alignment with its Asian-Pacific neighbors since 1892, when U.S. traders persuaded it to shift from the western side to the eastern side of the international dateline to facilitate business with the West Coast of the United States. That earlier shift took place on the U.S. Independence Day — so the Samoans could celebrate July 4 twice.

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FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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Charles Dharapak / The Associated Press

Volunteers for Ron Paul hand out campaign lawn signs at the Hotel Pattee in Perry, Iowa.

Charlie Neibergall / The Associated Press

A sign for Rick Santorum advertises his presence at a town hall meeting in Fort Dodge, Iowa.

Chris Carlson / The Associated Press

Patrons of Homer’s Deli and Bakery have coffee while they wait for Mitt Romney to speak in Clinton, Iowa.

U.S., Saudi Arabia reach a $30 billion arms deal By Jason Ukman

2 tiers of GOP candidates in Iowa By David Lightman, William Douglas and Steven Thomma McClatchy-Tribune News Service

DES MOINES, Iowa — The volatile struggle for votes in next Tuesday’s Iowa Republican presidential caucuses featured two different fights Thursday. One involved a top tier of candidates with clear momentum in these final days before the nation’s first caucuses. Mitt Romney and Rick Santorum were beaming with optimism Thursday about their prospects, while no-nonsense Texas U.S. Rep. Ron Paul delivered his somber message to big, devoted audiences. Romney, a former Massachusetts governor, was confident enough to beef up his Iowa schedule, including a

stay in Des Moines on Tuesday night to await results. He, Paul and Santorum, a former Pennsylvania U.S. senator and the favorite of Iowa’s influential evangelical community, all hosted jam-packed, enthusiastic rallies. The other squabble featured three other candidates who are struggling to stay viable: former House of Representatives Speaker Newt Gingrich, who has fallen sharply since his brief time as a front-runner earlier this month, Minnesota U.S. Rep. Michele Bachmann and Texas Gov. Rick Perry. Perry unleashed a radio ad featuring an announcer, “Wink Tax-and-Spend,” who hosts a “Wheel of Washington” game show and compares Santorum to a pig because he supported

Ryan J. Foley / The Associated Press

Jim Knapp leaves after an event featuring Michele Bachmann in Iowa City, Iowa.

federal budget earmarks for local projects. Bachmann had to convince voters that her campaign is still alive after Iowa state Sen. Kent Sorenson, who had chaired her state campaign, abruptly defected to the Paul camp Wednesday. Gingrich continued to push for votes on a last-ditch bus tour around the state. He defended himself against rivals’ claims that he’d lobbied in support of the 2003 Medicare prescription drug law, according to news reports from Sioux City. Despite all the news media attention to the latest polls, Tuesday’s outcome remains difficult to predict, since many voters are still candidate-shopping. Lyn Watson, an Ames home-

maker, voted for Romney in the 2008 caucus but is considering Paul this time. “He feels so strongly about his views,” she said, “and he has a good base of people following him.” Still, she won’t rule out Romney: “Maybe he could work better in Washington,” she said. About 100 of Paul’s followers jammed a small meeting room at the historic Hotel Pattee in Perry, where they heard their candidate reiterate his pet themes of slashing government and reining in U.S. intervention abroad. He also denounced sanctions against Iran’s nuclear program, saying the Iranian people could interpret the measures as “an act of war.” “I think we’re looking for trouble, because we’re putting these horrendous sanc-

Eric Gay / The Associated Press

Caedyn Sylvan, 3, waits for Newt Gingrich to arrive at his campaign office in Sioux City, Iowa.

tions on Iran,” Paul said. Iran threatened this week to close the Strait of Hormuz in the Persian Gulf, through which much of the world’s oil trade ships, if the West tightens sanctions against it. The U.S. Navy has vowed to keep the strait open. At the eastern end of the state, Santorum basked in a late-campaign surge that’s moved him into third place in some polls. At a town hall meeting in Muscatine, Santorum warned that America would be severely weakened militarily under a Paul presidency. Paul advocates bringing back most U.S. troops and military assets to American soil. Former Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman has forgone Iowa to campaign in New Hampshire.

Chris Carlson / The Associated Press

Attendees listen to Rick Perry during an event at the Copper Cup Coffee Shop in Cherokee, Iowa.

Syria observers only spur Offices of democracy groups raided in Egypt violence, activists say By Kareem Fahim and Hwaida Saad New York Times News Service

BEIRUT — Syrian security forces opened fire on demonstrators in a Damascus suburb Thursday morning, activists said, killing several people and dashing hopes that Arab League observers might help stem the bloodshed. One activist in the Damascus suburb of Douma said that protesters gathered early in the morning to greet what they thought was a delegation of the observers arriving on several buses. Instead, members of the security forces disembarked. “We lost six people, the price of seeing this cursed mission,” said the activist, who did not want to be quoted by his full name. “Their presence has raised the killing, in fact.” Deaths were reported in several cities that the observ-

ers were supposed to visit, including Idlib and Hama. Government loyalists and troops also clashed with protesters in the Damascus neighborhood of Midan, residents said, and the Syrian government reported that opposition gunmen killed two soldiers. Adding to the mounting criticisms of the Arab League mission, a prominent Syrian dissident, Haytham Manna, who has supported the observers, called for the leader of the mission to be replaced or have his powers reduced. The leader, Lt. Gen. Muhammed al-Dabi of Sudan, has become a lightning rod for complaints about the team. Human rights activists say his credentials — including time as the chief of a military intelligence branch in Sudan that has been accused of atrocities — make him a particularly poor candidate for the job.

In a statement, Manna said he was “surprised” by the choice of al-Dabi for the Arab League mission, though he did not refer to him by name. “We know his history and his shallow experience in this area,” Manna said. “I call for the Secretariat of the Arab League to work quickly to save the observers’ mission.” The observers are supposed to monitor promises by the government of President Bashar Assad to withdraw its forces from populated areas and release political prisoners. A surge of violence in recent days has almost completely eclipsed the observers’ work. Instead, activists have complained that attacks by the government have accelerated and security forces have tried to trick the observers by dressing soldiers in police uniforms and using other subterfuges.

New York Times News Service

CAIRO — Security forces shut down three U.S.-financed democracy-building groups and as many as six other nonprofit organizations on Thursday, in a crackdown on foreign financing that signaled a new low in relations between Washington and Egypt’s military rulers. Two of the organizations, the National Democratic Institute and the International Republican Institute, had been formally authorized by the Egyptian government to monitor the parliamentary elections set to resume next week. Critics said the surprise raids contradicted the military’s pledge to hold a fair and transparent vote. The other U.S.-financed pro-democracy group whose offices were closed,

the advocacy group Freedom House, had completed its application for official recognition just three days ago. A U.S. group that helps train Egyptian journalists was among the other nonprofit groups raided. Human rights activists said security forces barging into the offices of respected international organizations was unprecedented, even under the police state of President Hosni Mubarak, who was ousted this year. The state news media said that the raids were part of an investigation into what it described as illegal foreign financing. The raids are the latest and most forceful effort yet by the country’s ruling generals.

The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — The Obama administration on Thursday announced an arms deal with Saudi Arabia valued at nearly $30 billion, an agreement that will send 84 F-15 fighter jets and assorted weaponry to the kingdom. The administration notified Congress last year of its intent to sell the advanced jets to Saudi Arabia, a key U.S. ally in the Middle East and a strategic bulwark against Iran. The final agreement — which also includes the modernization of 70 existing aircraft as well as munitions, spare parts, training and maintenance — comes at a time of increased tensions in the Persian Gulf. “This sale will send a strong message to countries in the region that the United States is committed to stability in the Gulf and broader Middle East,” Andrew Shapiro, assistant secretary of state for political-military affairs, told reporters. Saudi Arabia, which has a predominantly Sunni Muslim population, and Iran, mostly Shiite, have competed for regional influence for decades, and the Obama administration has sought to bolster its security relationship with Riyadh, despite their differences over the response to the Arab Spring. Tehran, meantime, has increasingly engaged in saber-rattling with Washington. This week, Iran threatened to block the strategically vital Strait of Hormuz if the West imposed an oil embargo. The U.S. Navy’s Fifth Fleet, based in nearby Bahrain, responded by warning against the disruption of vessels’ travel along the route. “Clearly, one of the threats that (the Saudis) — that they face, as well as other countries in the region — is Iran,” Shapiro said. “But … this is not solely directed toward Iran. This is directed toward meeting our partner Saudi Arabia’s defense needs.”

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Huseyin Celik, a spokesman for Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s ruling party, said authorities were still trying to identify the dead, but that most were youngsters from an extended family in the mostly Kurdish-populated area that borders Iraq. All of the victims were under age 30, and some were the sons of village guards who have aided Turkish troops in their fight against rebels, he said. “According to the initial information, these people were not terrorists but were engaged in smuggling,” Celik said, adding that Turkey was ready to compensate the victims.

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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2011

Candidates Continued from A1 Voters were hard-pressed to recall details of the candidates’ plans to reduce taxes, create jobs and shrink the government. Yet voters knew about the marriages and mannerisms, the faith and careers of the candidates, and they brim with unvarnished opinions about any trait that strikes them as admirable — or just as likely, annoying. “It drives me crazy,” Rose Williams, a retired teacher in Bridgewater, N.H., said of Romney’s voice. “When he’s on TV or on a commercial, I put it on mute.” Gut reactions have long guided how voters select their president, but the strong responses provoked by the large, disparate Republican field help explain why voters seem to flirt with one candidate after another, hunting for a comfortable fit in a time of uncertainty. “Personality does matter,” said Michael Dee, a lawyer in West Des Moines. “Because this person is going to be on TV all the time as president.” The emphasis on character and personality is not accidental; to some degree, candidates deliberately play up elements of their lives that appeal to conservative voters, especially when compared to the personal lives of their rivals. Romney has rolled out a series of television commercials narrated by Ann, his wife of 42 years. Bachmann rarely misses a chance to talk about raising her foster children. And Rick Santorum, the former senator from Pennsylvania, has put photographs of his seven children on political brochures, with this detail: “Rick and his wife, Karen, have home-schooled each of their

Repaving Continued from A1 “We spend approximately $200,000 to $300,000 a year trying to maintain that road,” Davenport said. “There was a concern that if we didn’t repave the whole project, that the integrity



Josh Haner / New York Times News Service

A crowd listens to former House Speaker Newt Gingrich speak earlier this week at Pizza Ranch in Le Mars, Iowa. Voters interviewed in Iowa and New Hampshire say their decisions will likely be as much about personal stories as political positions.

children.” That last fact was wellknown to Dwayne Kriegel, a postal carrier in Grinnell, who is backing Santorum in the caucus on Tuesday. “He’s passionate about his dedication to family values,” Kriegel said. “The others say what they think the voters want to hear, while he lives it.” Those interviewed were equally as outspoken about what qualities repel them. Phil Dillingham, 62, a retired manager at Ford Motor Co. who lives in Moultonborough, N.H., said he could never vote for Gov. Rick Perry of Texas, because of what he called the candidate’s swagger. “He strikes me as too Bushlike, too strutty, too Texan,” Dillingham said. Eva Dunn, 60, a retired lieutenant colonel in the Air Force, has no patience for Jon Huntsman, the former governor of

Utah. Her objection: his demeanor in the debates. “He comes across as a preacher, and I just want to take his hands and tie them behind his back because he’s always pleading,” she said. “Holier-than-thou,” Dunn added. Several voters said they were heavily influenced by a single strand of the candidates’ lives that they felt had illuminated their character and values. Harry Spain, 85, who lives in Belmont, N.H., said he was moved by the story of how Romney and his sons had rescued a family whose boat sank on the state’s Lake Winnipesaukee. “It tells me he would get done what needs to be done at any moment,” Spain said. After watching 13 debates and nearly a year of campaigning in Iowa and New Hampshire, many voters

described the candidates’ personalities in remarkably similar terms. They viewed Romney, for instance, as the handsome, strait-laced businessman; Newt Gingrich as a brilliant but volatile politician with “baggage”; Santorum as a deeply moral family man; and Paul as refreshingly blunt yet oddly out of sync. Ann Szot, of Keene, N.H., said her husband “thinks Ron Paul looks like he should be sitting on a park bench feeding pigeons.” Yet he still plans to vote for him, she said. With the exception of Paul’s views on foreign policy, voters tend not to see huge differences on major issues between the Republican candidates. That may encourage them to zero on finer distinctions. Again and again, voters pointed to the candidates’ personal lives as a guide to how they would lead the country.

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Gingrich’s two divorces, and his admission of adultery, gave pause to a number of people. “You wonder in times if it will affect his judgment,” said Zack Pickard, 36, a software salesman in New Sharon, Iowa. “Are we going to be distracted by his social missteps? It’s a distraction. Your leader should not be distracted.” Kimber Harmon, 54, who described herself as a homemaker in Hollis, N.H., favors Huntsman, a long-married father of seven, explicitly contrasting his personal life with that of Gingrich. “I’ve been married for 32 years,” she said. “It bothers me.” Huntsman’s brood, she said, feels like a natural first family. “You’ve got to think of who you want to see greeting guests at the front door of the White House,” she said. For candidates who have sometimes labored years over policy books and memoirs, stump speeches and sales pitches, campaigning for president means accepting seemingly whimsical judgments and serendipitous connections. Lawrence Flint, of Newport, N.H., supports Huntsman, because of his family’s longtime financial support of the Senior Games, an Olympics-style event for those over 50, a favorite of Flint’s. “He is a very generous man,” said Flint, 65. “You can tell that he is concerned about people.” Perry, meanwhile, has found a kindred spirit in William Borrebach, 64, a retired lawyer who lives in Center Sandwich, N.H. After Perry’s memory lapse at one of the debates, Borrebach said that he could relate to the governor. “Man, I’ve had those myself all the time.” Perry, he concluded, “is one of us.”

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in 2013. Some guardrails and signs will be upgraded. The project will also improve the road for trucks hauling logs from U.S. Forest Service timber sales, Davenport said.

Continued from A1 Those groups can already receive the vaccine through the department with the help of public funding. The department has worked with Oregon State Immunization Program officials in recent months to obtain 60 additional vaccine doses for those outside of these at-risk groups that cannot afford to obtain vaccines through a doctor. “We’re looking at the people without insurance that can’t typically afford the vaccine,” said Yeargain. “As of now, we have no additional cases, but the concern is still there.” The additional doses came from other health clinics across the state that were unlikely to use them before their expiration, Yeargain said. She said an increase in vaccinations is needed, especially since upper respiratory illnesses — which play a critical role in causing the infection — are also on the rise in the county. In most instances, the bacteria that causes meningococcal disease, which is estimated to be present in 15 to 25 percent of the population’s throat or nasal passages, doesn’t enter the bloodstream and cause infection. But a break in the protective mucous membrane barrier, brought on by upper respiratory illnesses like the cold or flu, can cause the bacteria to invade the bloodstream. When that occurs, illness is rapid and severe and causes swelling and irritation of the membranes covering the brain and spinal cord. Between 10 and 15 percent of infected people die from the disease, according to The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Yeargain said Crook County residents between the ages of nine months and 55 are able to receive vaccinations, which will be available for the next two months. The usual cost of the vaccine is about $180, but the health department’s fee for the vaccine will depend on a person’s ability to pay, she said. For more information on how to acquire the vaccine, contact the Crook County Health Department at 541-447-5165.

— Reporter: 541-617-7829, hborrud@bendbulletin.com

— Reporter: 541-383-0376, dtaylor@bendbulletin.com

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FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Wolf Continued from A1 His journey started months ago and hundreds of miles away in Eastern Oregon. There are no known photos of OR-7 despite his crossing several major highways during his trek. “In all the distance he’s traveled, no one has seen him,” Stopher said. “He’s a fairly elusive animal.”

Return of the wolf The last time a wild wolf was confirmed to be in California was 1924 — 87 years ago — when a hunter in Lassen County shot a scraggly three-legged wolf that weighed about 55 pounds, Stopher said. Like Oregon and other states around the West, California offered bounties for wolves in the first half of the 1900s. The last wolf in Oregon was shot in the 1940s. Wildlife managers started reintroducing wolves to Idaho in the 1990s, and in 2008 the animals returned to Oregon’s northeastern corner. Now ODFW officials say there are more than 20 wolves known to live in the state, and four packs established in Eastern Oregon. OR-7, which weighed 90 pounds when the state collared him, was once a member of one of these packs — the Imnaha pack. In September he struck out on his own. Scientists aren’t sure why he left, but said he’s likely looking for new territory or a mate. While it looked like he might stay in the woods between Upper Klamath and Crater lakes earlier this month, his wanderlust returned recently as he started to move south again. So far he’s gone about 300 miles in a straight line from home, Stopher said, but in his zigzag path he’s covered more than 700 miles. “He’s gone west. He’s gone east. He’s gone north,” Stopher said. The lingering question now is whether he’ll keep going south, deeper into California. “There is just no way of knowing,” Stopher said. For now ODFW will continue to track OR-7’s GPS signal, he said, in case he makes a quick return to Oregon. “He could easily be back in Oregon already,” Stopher said late Thursday afternoon. Whether he stays in California or returns to Oregon, OR-7 will be a protected animal. Gray wolves are listed under federal endangered species laws in California and the western two-thirds of Oregon. They’re also protected under state laws in California and the eastern third of Oregon.

Wolf fund to compensate ranchers, but counties must form committees By Dylan J. Darling The Bulletin

Oregon lawmakers this year established a $100,000 fund to compensate ranchers for livestock and working dogs attacked or killed by wolves. But to be eligible for the funds, ranchers must be in a county that has an established wolf committee — consisting of a county commissioner, two livestock owners and two supporters of wolf conservation or coexistence, according to the Oregon Department of Agriculture. “Once formed, these committees must establish procedures that allow producers to come forward, demonstrate their losses and/or demonstrate the costs for prevention techniques, and apply for compensation,” Don Hansen, the state veterinarian with the department, said in a written statement. So far Wallowa County is closest to having such a committee formalized, said Rod Childers, a rancher near Enterprise and chairman of the wolf task force for the Oregon Cattlemen’s Association. “We have the people picked for it,” he said. Committees are potentially in the works in Jefferson and Crook counties, commissioners in the two Central Oregon counties said. Mike Ahern, chairman of the Jefferson County commission, said a naturalist has been in contact with him about talking to the commission about forming a committee. A committee may be established early next year in Crook County, County Commissioner Seth Crawford said. Two wolves from Eastern Oregon wearing tracking collars passed through there in the past year. Word of the wolves has Crook County ranchers concerned about their cattle. “They are worried that … wolves are going to come in and affect their businesses and their livelihoods,” he said.

October. But environmental groups sued to stop the hunt. The lawsuit is still pending in the Oregon Court of Appeals. Since the court issued a stay on the hunt on Oct. 5, the pack has killed five more domestic animals, according to ODFW. The most recent kills have been of yearlings and adult cows, a departure from the calves the pack used to target. “Our wildlife managers expect the killing of livestock is going to continue,” Dennehy said. Oregon Wild, a Portlandbased conservation group among those involved in the lawsuit, is also leading an effort to give OR-7 a name that’s more than a number. In early November, Oregon Wild announced a naming contest for the wolf. In December it trimmed the list of possible names from 250

suggestions to five finalists — Arthur (Arttu), Journey, Lupin, Max and Takota. Oregon Wild is tallying votes using a Facebook page, at www.facebook.com/OregonsWolves. The winner will be announced early next month. Like many who have followed the wolf’s travels, Rob Klavins, wildlife advocate for the group, said he was amazed to see him cross into California. “It is all at once astounding and bittersweet to see this adventurous young wolf leave the state of Oregon,” Klavins said in a written statement. “We hope that the Pacific Northwest population of wolves can overcome obstacles and continue to recover. For now, OR-7 can know that he’s always got a place to call home in Oregon.”

Interpreters Continued from A1 But with the pace of visa approvals having slowed to a crawl, that promise rings hollow to Tariq, who stays locked in his parents’ home, working the phones and the Web to track his application. For the first time since his work as an interpreter ended, Tariq left his home one day this month and drove through Baghdad to meet a reporter. He brought along his brother, a tall, burly fellow who literally watched Tariq’s back with each step. Tariq asked that his surname not be published. “I served the Americans very well, but now they’ve left me on my own, with no security,” he said in nearly flawless English. “They’ve expelled us all from the only places in Iraq that were safe for us — U.S. bases.” The visa process, always slow and cumbersome, has bogged down further since two Iraqi refugees were arrested in Kentucky in May on terrorism charges that included providing material support in the U.S. for al-Qaida. With empty hours to fill each day, Tariq has become an expert on U.S. immigration policy toward Iraq. He can quote legislation and recite testimony from congressional hearings and obscure federal documents. Three words from U.S. legislation are imprinted on his brain: “special immigrant visa.” The Refugee Crisis in Iraq Act, passed in 2008, provided fast-track status for Iraqis who had worked for the U.S. government or military. The law authorized 5,000 special visas per year — 20,000 through 2011. But through October, just 3,415 had been issued to Iraqis, according to the Iraqi Refugee Assistance Project. The State Department says

Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

A former translator for U.S. forces, Tariq has been hiding in his home because of threats on his life.

7,362 Iraqis who worked for the U.S. have received special visas over that period, but that total includes family members. Through July, 62,500 Iraqis had applied through the special visa program, though many have given up and dropped out. Applicants have been told to expect waits of at least eight months. Tariq applied two years ago, then filed an amended application in October 2010. A U.S. Embassy official in Baghdad, speaking on condition he not be identified, acknowledged “unfortunate delays” in issuing special visas, the result of enhanced security clearance procedures, some instituted after the Kentucky arrests. But he said recent changes would speed the process. The State Department’s National Visa Center has been ordered to flag special visa applications for expedited action, the official said. And a requirement that Iraqi applicants provide an original signature on certain forms sent to the U.S. has been dropped after Iraqis complained of logistical difficulties. “We are making changes, ordered at the very highest levels, that will help shave time off the application pro-

— Reporter: 541-617-7812, ddarling@bendbulletin.com

cess,” the official said. In the meantime, thousands of former interpreters have been cast adrift, threatened by insurgents as they wait for the federal bureaucracy to act. Interpreters provided vital support to American forces, offering valuable insights into Iraqi customs and tribal rivalries. They accompanied U.S. troops on combat patrols, braving the same roadside bombs and insurgent attacks. Many were killed in combat, or executed after leaving their military jobs. Qasaim, 42, who served as a U.S. military interpreter for seven years, quit in May to deal with a family crisis: His 15-year-old daughter had been kidnapped by her middle-aged teacher and forced to marry him. When he contacted the U.S. Embassy about a visa application for his family, he said, he was instructed to bring his daughter in for an interview. “I said: ‘How can you ask me such a question? I don’t even know where my daughter is,’ ” he recalled. He fears his daughter is dead or has been taken out of Iraq. Qasaim said her kidnapper has called several times, saying, “Don’t bother to look for her — you’ll never find her.” Qasaim said threats have been made against him, his wife and seven children. The U.S. Embassy finally agreed to forgo his daughter’s interview and remove her from the family’s application, Qasaim said. But consular officers will not say when or if the family will be able to immigrate to the U.S. “All the embassy can tell me is that we have to wait our turn,” Qasaim said. Providing unparalled service across a variety of industries since 1983.

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Kim Jong Un is fully declared supreme leader of North Korea New York Times News Service SEOUL, South Korea — The declaration on Thursday that Kim Jong Un is now the “supreme leader” of North Korea was an emotional turning point for the hermetic country — reaffirming support for the young heir after nearly two weeks of national mourning for his father, Kim Jong Il. The naming of Kim as supreme leader was partly a formality — all signals have pointed to his taking over both the military and the Workers’ Party — but it was also an important step in the push to strengthen his position in any power struggles that might follow. Kim is young — believed to be in his 20s — and untested, making him more vulnerable to challenges. The announcement of Kim’s elevation was made by Kim Yong Nam, the president of the North Korean Parliament, who is considered the ceremonial head of state.

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BEIJING — At least eight people were killed in a western China farming town fraught with ethnic tension in what authorities said was an attempt to foil a kidnapping by members of a “terror gang.” As is often the case in China, the accounts of who did what to whom were maddeningly contradictory, with police divulging few details and activists for the Uighur minority largely in the dark about what transpired. The incident took place late Wednesday night in Pishan, an impoverished cottongrowing county about 200 miles from China’s border with Pakistan. Chinese authorities said that the deaths occurred

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move, it might be hurt more than its adversaries. Bloomberg News Iran’s economy is shaky, as is NEW YORK — It would be popular support for its clerical relatively easy for Iran to make rulers, Nader said. The country good on its threat to close the is facing new Western efforts strategic waterway that carries to halt its suspected nuclear oil tankers from the Persian weapons program, including Gulf — and it would U.S. sanctions that probably hurt itself ANALYSIS are awaiting Presimost by taking such dent Barack Obama’s action. signature and a pos“Iran is as reliant, if not more sible European Union ban on reliant, on the Strait of Hormuz imports of Iranian oil. than any other country,” said According to the U.S. Energy Ali Nader of the RAND Corp. Information Administration, research institute in a tele- Iran’s net oil export revenues phone interview. were approximately $73 billion Iran has threatened to halt in 2010; crude oil and its derivatraffic through the strait if the tives account for nearly 80 perWest moves to toughen sanc- cent of Iran’s total exports; and tions including an oil embargo oil exports provide half of the to pressure Iran to abandon nation’s government revenue. its nuclear program. The strait Moreover, according to the was the passageway for about EIA, Iran’s best customer is a third of the world’s seaborne- China, which took about 22 traded oil last year, according percent of Tehran’s oil exports to Department of Energy data. during the first half of this year “Iran has total control over and is a member of the United the strategic waterway,” Ira- Nations Security Council nian Naval Commander Ad- and one of the few nations on miral Habibollah Sayari told friendly terms with the Islamic Iran’s Press TV Wednesday as Republic. the Iranian navy conducted a China gets 11 percent of its 10-day exercise in internation- crude oil imports from Iran, al waters. “Closing the Strait according to the EIA, while of Hormuz is very easy for Ira- Turkey, a NATO member that nian naval forces.” shares both a border and an“The free flow of goods and tipathy toward Kurdish sepaservices through the Strait of ratist groups with Iran, got 51 Hormuz is vital to regional and percent of its imported crude global prosperity,” Lt. Rebecca oil from the Islamic Republic Rebarich, a U.S. Navy spokes- from January to June of this woman in Bahrain, site of the year. 5th Fleet headquarters, said in In August, Iran’s Press TV an email. “Any disruption will reported that Iranian security not be tolerated.” forces killed three Kurdish rebU.S. officials and outside ex- els suspected of blowing up a perts concede that Iran could major pipeline that carries Irablock the strait, at least tempo- nian natural gas to Turkey on rarily. Testifying to Congress July 29. in March, Defense Intelligence While closing the Strait of Agency Director Army Lt. Hormuz, even briefly, would Gen. Ronald Burgess said that hurt Saudi Arabia, Iraq and Iran is expanding its Persian other Gulf oil exporters, the Gulf naval bases, allowing it to Saudis also ship oil via the Red “attempt to block the Strait of Sea. All of Iran’s exports and Hormuz temporarily” during many of its imports of gasoline, a crisis. food and consumer goods are Were Iran to make such a shipped through the strait. By Peter S. Green and Mark Shenk

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By Alex Rodriguez

PESHAWAR, Pakistan — The death squad shows up in uniform: black masks and tunics with the name of the group, Khorasan Mujahedin, scrawled across the back in Urdu. Pulling up in caravans of Toyota Corolla hatchbacks, dozens of them seal off mud-hut villages near the Afghan border, and then scour markets and homes in search of tribesmen they suspect of helping to identify targets for the armed U.S. drones that routinely buzz overhead. Once they’ve snatched a suspect, they don’t speed off, villagers say. Instead, the caravan leaves slowly, a trademark gesture meant to convey that they expect no retaliation. Militant groups lack the ability to bring down the drones, which have killed senior al-Qaida and Taliban commanders as well as many foot soldiers. Instead, a collection of them have banded together to form Khorasan Mujahedin in the North Waziristan tribal region to hunt for those who sell information about the location of militants and their safe houses. Pakistani officials and tribal elders maintain that most of those who are abducted this way are innocent, but after being beaten, burned with irons or scalded with boiling water, almost all eventually “confess.” And few ever come back. One who did was a shop owner in the town of Mir Ali, a well-known hub of militant activity. A band of Khorasan gunmen strode up to the shop owner one afternoon last fall, threw him into one of their cars and drove away, said a relative who spoke on condition of anonymity for fear of reprisal. They took him to a safe house being used as a lockup for others the group suspected of spying for the drone program. For the next eight weeks, they bludgeoned him with sticks, trying to get him to confess that he was a drone spy. He wasn’t, said the relative. Unable to determine whether he was guilty, his captors released him to another militant group, which set him free 10 days later. “In the sky there are drones, and on the ground there’s Khorasan Mujahedin,” said the relative. “Villagers are extremely terrorized. Whenever there’s a drone strike, within 24 hours Khorasan Mujahedin comes in and takes people away.” Most of them are killed. The group, named after an early Islamic empire that covered a large part of Central Asia, dumps the bodies on roadsides, usually with scraps of paper attached to their bloodied tunics that warn others of the consequences of spying for the U.S. Executions are often videotaped and distributed to DVD kiosks in Peshawar, northwestern Pakistan’s largest city, to hammer home the message. In one video, an old man with a bruised and swollen face says he was paid $1,300 for information that led to a drone strike in a North Waziristan village last year. “I was misguided by the devil,” says the man, who identifies himself as Subedar. “Khorasan Mujahedin never pressured me or used force against me. They showed me respect. May God give them victory.” Near the end of the video, he is shown with a bag over his head as a gunman first shoots him to death at point-blank range with an AK-47 assault rifle, then pumps more than 30 rounds into his corpse.

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BUSINESS THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2011 CLOSE 2,613.74 CHANGE +23.76 +.92%

Verizon adds fee for card payment Verizon Wireless is about to make paying your monthly cellphone bill a little more expensive. Starting Jan. 15, the nation’s leading mobile carrier will charge customers $2 each time they pay their bills with a credit or debit card. The fee applies to so-called “single payments,” when a customer is paying for an individual month, but will not apply for users who set up automated monthly billing. The carrier, which has more than 90 million retail cellular subscribers, said it was adding the fee to help cover the costs of the many credit card transactions it processes. Card companies such as Visa and MasterCard charge businesses a fee each time they perform a credit card transaction. Verizon will offer several other ways to avoid the charge, including paying by electronic check and paying electronically from your bank’s website. — Staff and wire reports

Central Oregon fuel prices Price per gallon for regular unleaded gas and diesel, as posted Thursday at AAA Fuel Price Finder (www.aaaorid.com).

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Region’s beer makers Deschutes brewmaster to form brewers guild expected to announce • Group’s goals likely to include marketing and lobbying efforts By Jordan Novet The Bulletin

The region’s beer makers are brewing a new organization to market and represent themselves. Next month, representatives of Central Oregon breweries plan to meet and choose board members for a new brewers guild. About $12,000 in federal stimulus money will help fund the new organization, said Andrew Spreadborough, community and economic development manager at the Central Oregon Intergovernmental Council. COIC is administering the grant on behalf of the Albany-based Oregon Consortium and Or-

ing LLC’s brewer, Chad Kennedy, formerly of Portland’s Laurelwood Brewing Co. Garrett Wales, one of four owners of 10 Barrel Brewing Co. in Bend, has been leading efforts to form the guild, which he said could help bring the attention the region’s brewing scene deserves. He said brewers in Central Oregon have kicked around the idea of establishing a more local organization than the state guild “for a long time.” Representatives of the breweries met in October to discuss the formation and purposes of a regional association. See Guild / B2

egon Workforce Alliance. “COIC saw this as an opportunity, and we worked with (Economic Development for Central Oregon) to identify an appropriate sector that is more or less coalescing together and might need some seed funding to help bring them together,” Spreadborough said. The Central Oregon Brewers Guild will likely be independent of the Oregon Brewers Guild, which counts nine of Central Oregon’s 12 operational breweries as members. Two people affiliated with Bend breweries sit on the state guild’s board: Deschutes Brewery President Gary Fish and Worthy Brew-

new artisanal brewery By Rachael Rees The Bulletin

Larry Sidor, Deschutes Brewery brewmaster for eight years, is expected to announce plans today to open an artisanal brewery and tasting room near Northwest Colorado Avenue and the Bend Parkway. The yet-to-be-named brewery will focus on complex, barrel-aged and experimental brews, according to a news release. Joining Sidor in the venture will be Dave Wilson, vice president of sales and marketing for San Francisco-based 21st Amendment Brewery, and Paul Evers, president and chief creative director of tbd, a Bend advertising agency

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Clear Catheter Systems Inc., a Bend-based medical-device maker, has picked up $4 million in its first institutional financing round, according to a news release issued Thursday. The company, which won the top investment prize in the 2006 Bend Venture Conference, will use the latest funding to meet demand and help commercialize its PleuraFlow Active Tube Clearance System, which keeps chest tubes clear after heart and lung surgery. Two venture capital funds with experience backing medical technology companies, Aphelion Capital and California Technology Ventures, led the latest funding round, according to the news release. The managing directors of both funds, Ned Scheetz and Alexander B. Suh, respectively, will join Clear Catheter’s board, according to the news release.

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that has created packaging and other material for several craft brewers. See Brewery / B5

U.S. MANUFACTURING

Jobs increase as wages retreat • Unions settling for less as the need for jobs outweighs contracts of the past By Louis Uchitelle New York Times News Service

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — Manufacturers are hiring again in the U.S., softening a long slide in factory employment. But for a new generation of bluecollar workers, even those protected by unions, the price of employment is likely to be lower wages stretching to retirement. That is particularly true of global manufacturers like General Electric. With labor costs moving down at its appliance factories here, the company is bringing home the production of water heaters as well as some refrigerators, and expanding its workforce to do so. The wages for the new hires, however, are $10 to $15 an hour less than the pay scale for hourly employees already on staff — with the additional concession that the newcomers will not catch up for the foreseeable future. Such union-endorsed contracts are also showing up in the auto industry, at steel and tire companies, and at manufacturers of farm implements and other heavy equipment, according to Gordon Pavy, president of the Labor and Employment Relations Association and, until re-

Angela Shoemaker / New York Times News Service

The assembly area is prepared for an expanding workforce at GE’s Appliance Park in Louisville, Ky. Manufacturers like GE are hiring again, but wages are likely to be in the $12 to $19 an hour range versus $21 to $32 an hour for longtime employees.

cently, the AFL-CIO’s director of collective bargaining. “Some companies want to keep work here, or bring it back from Asia,” Pavy said, “but in order to do that they have to be competitive in the final prices of their products, and one way to be competitive

is to lower the compensation of their American workers.” The shrunken pay scale for newcomers — $12 to $19 an hour versus $21 to $32 an hour for longtime workers — threatens to undo the middle-class status of even the best-paid blue-collar jobs still

left in manufacturing. A similar contract limits the wages of new hires at a nearby Ford Motor Co. stamping plant, but neither GE’s 2,000 hourly workers nor Ford’s 2,900, nor their unions nor the mayor, Greg Fischer, have objected. Quite the contrary, all

argue that job creation must take precedence over holding the line on wages, given that the unemployment rate in this Ohio River city is above 9 percent and several thousand people apply for every unfilled, $13-an-hour factory job. See Wages / B5

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By William Neuman New York Times News Service

There is a shortage of organic milk across the U.S., and it has gotten so bad in areas like the Southeast that some stores have put up signs in dairy cases anticipating the shopper’s frustrated refrain: “Where’s my organic milk?” The answer is that there is not enough to go around, and starting next month consumers can expect to see a sharp jump in price as well. The main reason for the shortage is that the cost of organic grain and hay to feed cows has gone up dramatically while the price that farmers received for their milk has not. See Milk / B5

DIESEL • Chevron, 1210 U.S. Highway 97, Madras . . . . . . . . . $4.00 • Chevron, 398 N.W. Third St., Prineville . . . . . . $4.00 Evan Sung / New York Times News Service Marla Polenz / The Bulletin

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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2011

M   B   C  TODAY EDWARD JONES COFFEE CLUB: Current market and economic update including current rates; free; 9 a.m.; Ponderosa Coffee House, 61292 S. U.S. Highway 97, Suite 105, Bend; 541-617-8861.

WEDNESDAY OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain an alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhour training.com.

THURSDAY HOLDING EMPLOYEES AND OTHERS ACCOUNTABLE: Learn to ensure that team members do their jobs well and take responsibility for contributing to a common goal; $85; 8 a.m.noon; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7290 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu.

FRIDAY Jan. 6 CENTRAL OREGON REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT CLUB: Free; 11 a.m.; ServiceMaster Clean, 20806 Sockeye Place, Bend; 541-610-4006 or bobbleile@windermere.com.

SATURDAY Jan. 7 HOMEBUYING CLASS: Registration required; free; 5:309:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 20310 Empire Ave., Suite A110, Bend; 541-318-7506, ext. 109.

MONDAY Jan. 9 FORECLOSURE PREVENTION CLASS: Learn about NeighborImpact’s Housing Center tools and services which can assist individuals struggling to pay their mortgages; free; 5:30-7:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 20310 Empire Ave., Suite A110, Bend; 541-318-7506, ext. 109, karenb@neighborimpact.org or www.homeownershipcenter.org.

TUESDAY Jan. 10 OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain an alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhour training.com.

WEDNESDAY Jan. 11 BUSINESS SUCCESS PROGRAM, THE BOTTOM LINE, UNDERSTANDING FINANCIAL STATEMENTS: Brian Newton, with Jones & Roth CPAs will present the basics of reading financial statements including: understand the four basic financial statements, review key ratios and financial measurements, discuss key cash flow considerations and exploring the difference between cash and income. Reservations are highly encouraged; free; 7:30-9 a.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3823221 or www.bendchamber.org. HOME PRESERVATION WORKSHOP: Learn about budgeting, debt management, refinancing, property taxes, energy conservation techniques, home maintenance issues, insurance, safety tips and community involvement; free; 5:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 20310 Empire Ave., Suite A110, Bend; 541-318-7506, ext. 109 or www.homeownershipcenter.org.

FRIDAY Jan. 13 CENTRAL OREGON REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT CLUB: Free; 11 a.m.; ServiceMaster Clean, 20806 Sockeye Place, Bend; 541-610-4006 or bobbleile@windermere.com.

TUESDAY Jan. 17 VISIT BEND BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING: RSVP requested to valerie@visitbend.com; free; 8 a.m.; Bend Visitor Center, 750 N.W. Lava Road; 541-382-8048 or valerie@visitbend.com.

FINANCIAL PLANNING AND MONEY MANAGEMENT: Registration required; free; 5:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 20310 Empire Ave., Suite A110, Bend; 541-318-7506, ext. 109.

If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact Marla Polenz at 541-617-7815, email business@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� at www.bendbulletin.com. Please allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication.

Federal judge accuses SEC of misleading court By David S. Hilzenrath

WEDNESDAY Jan. 18 2012 CENTRAL OREGON FORECAST: Financial journalist Andrew Ross Sorkin, author of “Too Big to Fail,� will speak at the 2012 Central Oregon Forecast presented by the California Lutheran University Center for Economic Research and Forecasting. Also speaking are Tim Boyle, president and chief executive officer of Columbia Sportswear, Martin Regalia, chief economist of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, and Bill Watkins, executive director of the California Lutheran University Center for Economic Research and Forecasting; $75 until Jan. 13; 7 a.m.; The Riverhouse Convention Center, 2850 N.W. Rippling River Court, Bend; 541322-6130 or http://oregon .clucerf.org.events. BASICS OF SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT: The first of five modules for people working toward the certified in production and inventory management designation. Ten Wednesday evening sessions; $641; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu. HOW TO START A BUSINESS: Registration is required; $15; 6-8 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7290 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu.

THURSDAY Jan. 19 OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain an alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhour training.com. MASTER OF PLANNING RESOURCES: The second of five modules for people working toward the certified in production and inventory management designation. 8 Thursday evening sessions; $780; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu.

FRIDAY Jan. 20 TOWN HALL FORUM, EXTRA STRENGTH, A CHANGE TO THE CHARGE: City of Bend representatives explain the methodology behind the new sewer extra-strength charge and how it will impact businesses’ bottom lines in 2012; $30 for Bend Chamber members, $40 for others; 7:30 a.m.; Bend Golf and Country Club, 61045 Country Club Drive; 541-382-3221 or www.bendchamber.org. BOOKKEEPING FOR BUSINESS: Class begins Jan 20 and is every Friday morning through March 16. Registration required; $229; 9 a.m.-noon; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. CENTRAL OREGON REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT CLUB: Free; 11 a.m.; ServiceMaster Clean, 20806 Sockeye Place, Bend; 541-610-4006 or bobbleile@windermere.com.

MONDAY Jan. 23 OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain an alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhour training.com.

TUESDAY Jan. 24 MID-OREGON CONSTRUCTION SAFETY SUMMIT: Designed for residential and commercial construction workers, attendees may choose from several classes such as fall protection and managing risk, advanced electrical safety, and work zone flagging; $50 or $60 after Jan 19. There is an additional $15 fee for the flagging certification; The Riverhouse Convention Center, 2850 N.W. Rippling River Court, Bend; 503947-7428 or www.orosha.org/ conferences.

The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — A federal judge who has accused the Securities and Exchange Commission of negotiating weak settlements in Wall Street cases on Thursday accused the agency of misleading a federal appeals court. U.S. District Court Judge Jed Rakoff said the SEC also withheld from him important information that he needed to do his job. Rakoff spelled out his allegations in an order that he said was intended to inform the appeals court and prevent anything similar from happening in the future. Meanwhile, the SEC took the dramatic step of asking the U.S. Court of Appeals for

the 2nd Circuit to overrule a recent Rakoff decision by issuing a special writ generally reserved for cases in which a judge has grossly overstepped his bounds. Called a writ of mandamus, such a direct and personal challenge to a judge is far from a routine gambit. The judge and the SEC are locked in an extraordinary battle over how the government should police financial fraud. Rakoff, who presides over major Wall Street cases from his bench in Manhattan, has been pushing the SEC to stop negotiating settlements in which firms accused of securities fraud neither admit nor deny wrongdoing. In a recent case involving a Citigroup mortgage deal in which investors allegedly lost more than

$700 million, he rejected a settlement under which Citigroup would pay $285 million, saying it was “neither fair, nor reasonable, nor adequate, nor in the public interest.� The SEC says that instead of admitting wrongdoing, defendants would fight the agency all the way to trial, tying up resources that regulators need to investigate other cases. The SEC has asked an appeals court to throw out Rakoff’s ruling, and on Tuesday it filed an “emergency� motion asking the appeals court to freeze Rakoff’s hand in the Citigroup case while the appeal is pending. In his order Thursday, Rakoff accused the SEC of misleading the appeals court and leaving him in the dark when it made its emergency request.

The cable guy gets an upgrade

D Jim and Judy Duncan have opened Collins Orchard Wellness Center at the Collins Orchard building in Bend at 2930 OB Riley Road. The Wellness Center is an executive suite for alternative medicine practices, such as acupuncture, counseling and nutrition, and massage. A new addition to the Collins Orchard Wellness Center is Ana Lani Massage.

Complaint filed over subsidies in China, Vietnam By Matthew L. Wald and Keith Bradsher New York Times News Service

By Amy Chozick New York Times News Service

The cable guy is becoming sleeker and more sophisticated, just like the televisions and computers he installs. Long depicted as slovenly cranks who dodged growling dogs and tracked mud on the living room carpet, cable guys (and gals) these days often have backgrounds in engineering and computer science. That kind of training is now required — along with a new dress code for some, calling for button-down dress shirts and slacks — as cable companies and their telephone rivals try to lure customers and increase revenue with a suite of products like cloud-based cable boxes and iPad apps that let subscribers set recording times remotely. All that means added pressure for installers and new requirements for a job that traditionally appealed to high school graduates looking for reliable blue-collar work. “Back in my day, you called the phone company, we hooked it up, gave you a phone book and left,� said Paul Holloway, an area manager based in Denton, Texas, and a 30year employee of Verizon, which offers phone, Internet, television and home monitoring services through its FiOS fiber optic network. “These days people are connecting iPhones, Xboxes and 17 other devices in the home.� Robert Kolb, a 33-year-old installation and service supervisor for Comcast’s Xfinity television, phone and Internet service, has a one-year certi-

Guild Continued from B1 Setting up a regional guild in addition to a state guild isn’t unprecedented. The California Small Brewers Association operates alongside guilds in Northern California, San Francisco and San Diego. Now members of the Central Oregon brewing establishment could get their own local group. The closest thing it has to a body that binds the businesses together is the Bend Ale Trail, which the tourismpromotion agency Visit Bend started in 2010. But the trail does not include all the breweries in the region, and the breweries aren’t in charge of it. Wales said the new guild’s activities could include promoting member breweries, bringing in guest speakers and advocating on brewers’

Sabina Louise Pierce / New York Times News Service

Robert Kolb, an installation and service supervisor for Comcast’s Xfinity television, phone and Internet service, shows Kathleen Hassinger her new cable installation in Philadelphia.

fication in network engineering. He wore pressed slacks and a sporty fleece jacket on an Internet upgrade job in a Philadelphia suburb recently. He was checking the family’s existing Internet service, which had been spotty, strained by the home’s six computers and multiple iPhones. The surge in high-tech offerings comes at a critical time for cable companies competing in an increasingly Internet-based marketplace. Today, more than 90 percent of the 115.9 million U.S. homes with televisions subscribe to basic cable, either from a cable operator or a satellite or phone company, according to Nielsen. The nearly saturated marketplace means growth for cable companies must come from all the extras like highspeed Internet service, home security, digital recording

behalf when legislative issues arise. To cover expenses, the guild will ask members to pay dues and possibly also hold events such as beer festivals, Wales said. Bringing representatives of the breweries together could also enable them to get lower prices for goods all the brewers need, such as hops, Wales said. Spreadborough said he has been involved to make sure the guild’s plans for the stimulus money — which originally came from the U.S. Department of Labor — fit within the grant’s parameters. Brian Butenschoen, executive director of the Oregon Brewers Guild, said he isn’t sure how much his guild and the regional guild will work together. He said he’s waiting to see what the regional guild intends to do. — Reporter: 541-633-2117, jnovet@bendbulletin.com

Get A Taste For Food, Home & Garden Every Tuesday In AT HOME

devices and other high-tech upgrades. In 2011 Comcast introduced 16 products, more than the previous two years combined. “We think the consumer wants a state-of-the-art experience,� Brian Roberts, Comcast’s chairman and chief executive, said as he showed off the company’s forthcoming partly cloud-based cable box. Remote control in hand, he added: “We have to factor in Androids, iPhones, tablets and any other device in your life.� But despite their enhanced stature and additional responsibilities, technicians haven’t benefited much financially. The median hourly income in 2010 for telecommunications equipment installers and repairers was $26.30, or about $52,850 annually. That was up only 0.4 percent from 2008, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

WASHINGTON — Four domestic companies that make most of the steel towers for wind turbines in the United States filed a trade complaint against China and Vietnam on Thursday, seeking tariffs in the range of 60 percent. The action is a significant new skirmish in an emerging green energy trade war. The allegations are much like the ones that solar panel manufacturers made in a similar case filed against Chinese manufacturers in October, namely that government subsidies are allowing foreign manufacturers to sell below cost in the United States, damaging the domestic industry. The filing is likely to increase the already escalating trade frictions between the United States and China. Chinese officials were not immediately available for comment. Imports of towers from Vietnam and China roughly doubled in 2011, according to Alan Price, a lawyer at the firm that filed the case, Wiley Rein, which also filed the solar panel case. The complaint seeks duties of more than 64 percent on Chinese imports, and more than 59 percent for Vietnamese imports.

HOLIDAY DEADLINES Wishes you a Safe and Happy New Year! The Bulletin will be closed on Monday, January 2 Retail & Classified Display Advertising Deadlines PUBLICATION ............................................. DEADLINE Monday 1/2/12 ....................................... Wednesday 12/28 4 p.m. At Home 1/3/12...................................... Wednesday 12/28 4 p.m. Tuesday 1/3/12 ........................................... Thursday 12/29 Noon Wednesday 1/4/12 ........................................... Friday 12/30 Noon

CLASSIFIED LINE AD DEADLINES Sunday 1/1/12 - Deadline is 4 p.m. Friday 12/30 Monday 1/2/12 - Deadline is 4 p.m. Friday 12/30 Tuesday 1/3/12 - Deadline is 4 p.m. Friday 12/30

Classifieds • 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Circulation Telephone Service at 541-385-5800 will be open 1/1 from 6:30 am to 10:30 am to help with your delivery needs.


FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

A N Driving a parade float isn’t for the faint of heart By Ronald Ahrens New York Times News Service

PASADENA, Calif. — How hard can it be to travel five and half miles at 2.5 mph? Difficult enough: If you’re the pilot of a 22-wheel, 120foot-long vehicle that weighs 110,000 pounds, even a simple right turn can have profound consequences. Yet a small cadre of drivers finds the experience of blinddriving a balky Rose Parade float so satisfying that they come back new year after new year. Wes Hupp, for example, has driven (or served as an observer, acting as the eyes for the driver tucked under the platform) in 34 Rose Parades. A resident of Weston, Vt., he is paying his own airfare to take part in the 123rd annual parade — to be held Monday in keeping with the Pasadena Tournament of Roses’ neveron-Sunday rule. This time, Hupp, a 51-yearold pharmaceutical chemicals buyer, will serve as observer for Greg Hill, a 46-year-old health care technology project manager from Huntington Beach, Calif., who will be at the wheel. It will be their 17th consecutive year as teammates, and their assignment is literally the biggest challenge yet for Rose Parade drivers: They will maneuver the longest and heaviest single float ever to follow the parade’s 5.5-mile route. The float, called Surf’s Up, was conceived by Dick Van Patten’s Natural Balance Pet Foods to fit the 2012 parade theme of “Just Imagine.” What the float imagines is a canine surfing paradise. An onboard wave machine will send seven actual dogs, riding 8-foot surfboards, down a 66-foot-long pool filled with 6,600 gallons of heated water. Powering the massive Surf’s Up float is a gasoline-burning

Natural Balance via New York Times News Service

Natural Balance Pet Foods’ 2011 float, called “Havin’ a Splash,” takes part in the 122nd annual Rose Parade. The float weighed a record 84,300 pounds. The company’s 2012 float, called “Surf’s Up,” will be even bigger, featuring a pool with a wave machine that actual dogs will surf in.

Ford V-10 truck engine mated to a six-speed automatic transmission. A transfer case further increases the gear ratio for continuous low-speed travel in first gear. The first significant landmark on the parade route is the Tournament House on Orange Grove Boulevard. Just beyond that is the first big challenge, a 107-degree right turn onto Colorado Boulevard that makes drivers sweat. Known as “camera corner,” this is the prime viewing spot for broadcast crews and thousands of grandstand spectators. To Hupp, who grew up in nearby Monrovia, the turn is “wicked.” In his observer role, Hupp will sit in the lifeguard tower on the float’s nose. He will relay instructions by intercom to Hill in the driver’s compartment, nestled beside the engine bay underneath the front

end of the pool. “Greg doesn’t have a clue what he’s doing unless I tell him,” Hupp said recently by telephone from Vermont. “A wrong decision can get you some real excitement.” The two men endure this pressure and discomfort neither for glory nor a fat paycheck. Each receives $250 from Fiesta Parade Floats, the company that Natural Balance hired to build and operate Surf’s Up.

A tradition of discomfort The appeal of driving a float certainly doesn’t lie in plush accommodations within the driver’s compartment. Despite the advanced design and engineering of the elaborate, moving displays, the floats are in some respects nearly as primitive as their earliest predecessors. For example, on Jan. 2, 1905, The Pasadena Daily News

reported: “Harry Zier’s automobile was a dream of beauty. The scheme was a barge and the striking effect was made by covering the big touring car entirely with a frame, boatshaped, so that not a bit of running gear was visible.” Three years later, the Redondo Beach Chamber of Commerce entered a 41-foot automotive whale that wagged its tail and flapped its flippers. If anyone could be called the Harley Earl of parade floats, it would be Isabella Coleman, a local woman who, over six decades, made the motorized displays not only lower, longer and sleeker, but also more ornate, with well-integrated floral designs. While the aesthetics improved markedly throughout the 20th century, the mechanical underpinnings evolved relatively little. The chassis of today’s float typically has no

suspension whatsoever. In the austere driver’s compartment, there is a single seat of bare plywood. “We usually bring a stadium seat cushion, or we bring hemorrhoid donuts,” Hupp said. “The problem with those is, they always end up getting punctured or ripped. It’s like going to San Francisco, blindfolded, on a piece of wood.” In close proximity to the big engine, the driver can also expect temperatures of up to 120 degrees. A small electric fan is provided, but it does not offer much relief. Decorating the floats with flowers, seeds and other natural elements leaves debris in odd places. “Every time you turn the fan on, you get a face full of seeds,” Hupp said. “I don’t care if you’ve been driving an hour. You turn on the fan again, you’re always going to get something in the face.” It was ever thus. In the official 1949 parade program, an essay addressed the plight of “the forgotten man” who drives the float: “He breathes in dust and fumes which are impossible for him to avoid. On a hot day he is drenched with perspiration. On un-California-like days he enjoys his own series of chills. Doing a fine job, lacking any applause, appreciated by but a few, he works for varying amounts and a ticket to the Rose Bowl game. The line for those who want to drive floats next year forms to the right, and please don’t crowd.” But Hupp may not line up for 2013. Last week, he phoned the president of Fiesta Parade Floats and announced his intention to retire. “The stress is almost too much,” he said, referring to the challenge of negotiating the course in everlarger floats. “They’re pushing the limits, and this is as far as I

Even floats aren’t exempt from regulations IRWINDALE, Calif. — Tim Estes, the president of Fiesta Parade Floats, remembers when the Rose Parade rulebook ran 20 pages. Now, as his company puts the final touches on 11 floats it is building for the 2012 parade, it has to be mindful of 140 pages of regulations and stipulations governing everything from dimensions to propulsion systems to evacuation procedures. Like many people with parade connections, Estes, a native of nearby Altadena, started young: He was only 8 when he began helping on the decorating crews that cover the floats with flowers, seeds and other natural materials. As he stayed involved, he has seen the floats expand in size and complexity. Five municipalities, as well as Cal Poly University, build their own floats. All entries conform to the same basic specifications and standards. For example, in a fire drill the driver must be able to stop the float and exit, along with all of the riders, within 45 seconds. The temperature in the driver’s compartment isn’t supposed to exceed 120 degrees. And although diesel engines are much cleaner than they once were, they’re still not allowed. The rules also require the observer, who usually communicates with the driver by intercom, to have a 180-degree field of vision to the front of the float. — Ronald Ahrens, New York Times News Service

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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2011

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A-B-C-D AAON s ABB Ltd ABM ACE Ltd AES Corp AFLAC AGCO AGIC Cv AGIC Cv2 AGL Res AK Steel AMC Net n vjAMR AOL API Tech ASML Hld AT&T Inc ATP O&G AU Optron AVI Bio h AXT Inc Aarons AbtLab AberFitc AbdAsPac Abraxas AcaciaTc AcadiaRlt Accenture Accuray Accuride AcmePkt ActivePw h ActivsBliz Actuant Acuity Acxiom AdamsEx AdobeSy Adtran AdvAmer AdvAuto AdvEnId AMD AdvSemi AdvOil&Gs Adventrx AdvActBear AecomTch AegeanMP Aegion Aegon Aeropostl AEterna g Aetna AffilMgrs Affymax Affymetrix Agilent Agnico g Agrium g AirProd Aircastle Airgas AkamaiT Akorn AlskAir AlaskCom Albemarle AlcatelLuc Alcoa Alere AlexREE AlexcoR g Alexion s Alexza AlignTech Alkermes AllegTch Allergan Allete AlliData AlliBGlbHi AlliBInco AlliBern AlliantEgy AlldNevG AlldWldA AllosThera AllotComm AllscriptH Allstate AlmadnM g AlonUSA AlphaNRs AlpGlbDD AlpGPPrp AlpTotDiv AlpAlerMLP AltairNano AlteraCp lf AlterraCap Altria Alumina AlumChina Alvarion AmBev Amarin Amazon Amdocs Amedisys Ameren Ameresco Amerigrp AMovilL s AmApparel AmAxle AmCampus ACapAgy AmCapLtd AEagleOut AEP AEqInvLf AmExp AFnclGrp AGreet AmIntlGrp AOriBio h AmSupr AmTower AmWtrWks Amrign Ameriprise AmeriBrgn AmCasino Ametek Amgen AmkorT lf Amphenol Amylin Amyris Anadarko Anadigc AnalogDev Ancestry AngiesL n AnglogldA ABInBev Ann Inc Annaly AntaresP Anworth Aon Corp A123 Sys Apache AptInv ApolloGrp ApolloInv ApolloRM n ApolSFlt n Apple Inc ApldIndlT ApldMatl AMCC Approach AquaAm ArcelorMit ArchCap s ArchCoal ArchDan ArcosDor n ArcticCat ArdeaBio ArenaPhm AresCap AriadP Ariba Inc ArkBest ArmHld ArmourRsd ArmstrWld Arris ArrowEl ArtioGInv ArubaNet AscenaRtl AscentSol h AshfordHT Ashland AsiaInfoL AspenTech AsscdBanc AsdEstat Assurant AssuredG AstexPhm AstoriaF AstraZen athenahlth AtlPwr g AtlasPpln Atmel ATMOS AtwoodOcn AuRico g Aurizon g AuthenTec AutoNatn Autobytel h Autodesk Autoliv AutoData Auxilium AvagoTch AvalnRare AvalonBay AvanirPhm AveryD AvidTch AvisBudg Avista Avnet Avon Axcelis AXIS Cap B&G Foods BB&T Cp BBCN Bcp BCE g

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FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Wages Continued from B1 “The trade-off is absolutely worth it,” Fischer said, arguing that while the city is actively subsidizing GE’s expansion here, mainly through tax rebates, that is not enough. “You must have a globally competitive wage to create jobs,” the mayor insisted.

The new normal The generational setback implicit in a “globally competitive wage” is evident at GE’s Appliance Park, the complex of factories where GE makes refrigerators, washing machines, dishwashers and other household appliances. Six years into the adoption of lower wages for new hires, half of the hourly workers are paid at the reduced scale. In an earlier era, that would have been a source of friction, perhaps protest. Now it isn’t. In an interview, William Masden, 62, earning $31.78 an hour after 42 years at Appliance Park, attempted an explanation. The younger workers still get annual raises, he noted, and by the time they top out, he and his peers — the oldest baby boomers — “won’t be here any longer to remind them of what they are missing.” Linda Thomas, 37, one of the first to be hired in 2005 under the new arrangement, amends that explanation. Her hourly wage, $18.19, has almost topped out, although it is nearly $14 an hour less than Masden’s. But she keeps silent. Too many unemployed people, she explained, would clamor for her job and her wage if she were to protest. “You don’t want to rock the boat,” Thomas said. “You take a chance on losing everything you have if you do.” Masden’s final years at GE, doing safety checks, and Thomas’ willingness, however reluctant, to do equivalent work as a forklift driver at a much lower wage illustrate a big reason that General Electric decided to expand production here. A new hybrid electric water heater will be manufactured in Louisville in a factory now being renovated, rather than in China, where GE makes its current model. And some production of refrigerators is being repatriated, mainly from Mexico. “We have gotten to a point where making things in America is as viable as making things anyplace in the world,” said James Campbell,

AlskAir Avista BkofAm BarrettB Boeing CascdeBcp CascdeCp ColSprtw Costco CraftBrew FLIR Sys HewlettP HmFedID Intel Keycorp Kroger Lattice LaPac MDU Res MentorGr Microsoft

Div PE ... 1.10 .04 .44f 1.76f ... 1.00 .88 .96 ... .24 .48 .22 .84 .12 .46f ... ... .67f ... .80

12 15 ... 12 15 6 11 17 25 13 19 8 ... 10 8 13 14 ... 17 20 9

president and chief executive of GE’s appliances and lighting division, citing the drop in labor costs as a crucial reason. “They are significantly less with the competitive wage,” he said, “and that is a big help.”

Early stages The revival is in an early stage. By 2005, GE’s employment in Louisville had fallen to 2,300 hourly workers from a high of 17,000 in the 1970s. At that point, with the company insisting on concessions, Local 761 of the IUE-CWA union, representing the hourly factory workers, agreed to the lower wage scale for new hires. The union has ratified it in subsequent contracts. Employment, in turn, has finally stopped falling and is beginning to inch up from a low of 2,000 early this year as new hires start to come aboard faster than older workers leave. But the new people are always at the lower wage scale, except for some specialists — like machinists, who earn up to $26 an hour. “We are getting from the company an $800 million investment in Appliance Park over the next two years, and what we had to do for that investment was accept the ‘competitive wage,’ ” said Jerry Carney, president of Local 761. Partly as a result, GE’s employment remains slightly greater in the U.S. than abroad. Nearly 80 percent of those in the U.S. are in manufacturing, reflecting GE’s origins and still its greatest strength. It has 219 factories in this country, and 16 more are being built or renovated, including two in Louisville. An additional 230 GE plants are overseas, which helps to explain why 60 percent of the company’s $147 billion

YTD Last Chg %Chg 75.94 26.03 5.46 19.99 74.11 4.54 48.58 46.51 84.34 6.02 25.50 25.62 10.42 24.55 7.77 24.45 5.98 8.21 21.57 13.61 26.02

+1.09 +.16 +.18 +.22 +.85 +.30 +1.83 +.88 +.16 +.09 +.25 +.42 +.13 +.33 +.14 +.12 +.14 +.30 +.36 +.27 +.20

+34.0 +15.6 -59.1 +28.6 +13.6 -46.3 +2.7 -22.9 +16.8 -18.5 -14.3 -39.1 -15.1 +16.7 -12.2 +9.3 -1.3 -13.2 +6.4 +13.4 -6.8

Name NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstB rs Weyerh

Precious metals Metal NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

Continued from B1 That means that farmers feed their cows less, resulting in lower milk production. At the same time, fewer farmers have been converting from conventional dairying to organic. Through it all, the demand for organic milk has been growing. “It’s a double whammy to have higher sales than you expect and less milk,” said George Siemon, chief executive of Cropp, the farmers co-op that produces Organic Valley milk and much of the milk sold as supermarket store brands. “We’re sweating bullets over it.” The shortages have been most noticeable on the East Coast, but most areas of the country have seen short supplies in recent months. Target said that it has had difficulty keeping organic milk on shelves nationwide. Wegmans, a chain with 79 stores from Massachusetts to Virginia, said it has seen shortages of milk from Horizon, a major national brand. And Publix, with 1,048 stores in five Southeastern states, said shortages started showing up in November in both its store brand and national brands like Horizon and Organic Valley. “Supplies are sporadic,” said Kimberly Jaeger, a Publix spokeswoman. “We are working with our suppliers to secure as much organic milk as we can.” Dairy industry executives predicted that the shortage, along with plans by processors to increase the amount paid to farmers, mean that retail prices will rise in the next several weeks by as much as 10 percent. That means that a half gallon of organic milk that typically sells for $3.99 today may go as high as $4.39. Some chains have already started to

Angela Shoemaker New York Times News Service

‘An inflection point’ Neither the nation’s unions nor the government has tracked the number of jobs downgraded to the equivalent of a lower-tier wage scale, or the number of people who, like Thomas, have gone through the experience of a downgrade: in her case, from $19 an hour at the Ford auto body stamping plant — until she was laid off in 2005 — to a starting wage at GE a few months later of $12 an hour. “At the time I was very angry about the comedown,” she said, “but then I asked a couple of others who had gone through the same experience how they felt and they

Price (troy oz.) $1545.00 $1539.90 $27.274

Brewery Continued from B1 Located on a section of Southwest Division Street in the former AAMCO transmission shop, the nearly 6,000square-foot building will house an operation expected to produce, at maximum, about 10,000 barrels annually, according to the news release. First-year capacity is predicted to be about 700 barrels. The partners expect to offer small volumes of draft and packaged brews in the

Market recap

Div PE 1.44f .92 1.78f ... .72a ... 1.68 .12 .58 .07 1.46 .89f .68f ... .28 .50 .32f .48 ... .60

said, ‘We’re thankful to have a job.’ ” The decline in unit labor costs is striking. In manufacturing, the wages and benefits invested in each unit of production have fallen in eight of the past 10 years, a net decline of 13.6 percentage points, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reports. Productivity played a role — modern factories require fewer workers. Still, the decline is the greatest in such a short time since the statistic was first tracked in 1951. In China, in sharp contrast, unit labor costs in manufacturing have risen in recent years, which means the gap between the U.S. and China, while still great, is nevertheless narrowing slightly — one reason that GE is making its new water heater here instead of there. “We are at an inflection point in manufacturing in terms of relative cost structures,” said Mark Zandi, chief economist for Moody’s Analytics. “Ten years ago, it was a no-brainer to locate in China, and now it isn’t so clear whether China is the low-cost place to produce.” The downshift in wages, however, is not GE’s only explanation for the rise in domestic production. In interviews, GE executives put almost as much emphasis on “lean manufacturing.” Production workers on a lean factory floor are encouraged to point out inefficiencies in assembly line routines and to participate in altering the routines. Given the productivity gains implicit in lean practices, GE envisions a growing hourly workforce at Appliance Park, but one that is nowhere near its size in the 1970s. “The trade-off is absolutely worth it; the alternatives are $15 an hour or zero dollars an hour,” Fischer said.

in annual revenue — from all sources — is generated abroad, up from 35 percent a decade ago. Carney’s competitive wage — a euphemism that GE officials also use — is really, as both sides acknowledge, the price of halting or at least slowing this migration. It is the lower tier of a two-tier system first introduced in the 1980s. That system limited those consigned to the lower tier to 20 percent of a company’s workforce. In addition, new hires eventually advanced to the higher tier. Bonuses and profit sharing eased the pain, and they still do, but for a new generation of workers, graduation to the upper tier is disappearing, and the lower tier is becoming a new hire’s lifetime wage scale. “My hope is that we will rebuild wages to their old levels over time as the economy strengthens and the demand for workers rises,” said Thomas Kochan, a management expert at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. “But that is by no means a certainty.”

Northwest stocks Name

Milk

Appliance Park worker William Masden, 62, left, earns $31.78 an hour — more than younger workers can hope for. Jerry Carney is the president of Local 761 of IUE-CWA, which represents plant workers.

YTD Last Chg %Chg

21 97.46 +1.03 +14.1 16 50.03 +.12 +18.1 20 48.66 +.47 +4.7 7 4.34 +.03 -75.5 16 37.46 +.63 -34.7 ... 1.85 -.02 -10.6 31 37.05 +.43 -1.1 22 166.82 +3.26 +19.8 12 21.18 +.04 -5.8 10 42.43 +1.28 -36.1 19 89.64 +.43 +7.0 11 36.54 +.58 -19.1 29 46.45 +.67 +44.6 9 4.82 +.08 -58.8 23 12.59 +.27 +3.4 12 27.30 +.42 +1.2 14 14.02 +.15 -17.1 10 27.76 +.65 -10.4 18 15.96 +.17 +13.2 22 18.88 +.40 -.3

Prime rate

Pvs Day

Time period

Percent

$1556.00 $1562.90 $27.192

Last Previous day A week ago

3.25 3.25 3.25

NYSE

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

BkofAm S&P500ETF GenElec SPDR Fncl FordM

1619983 1013361 407345 357552 336929

Last Chg 5.46 126.12 18.07 13.07 10.68

+.18 +1.29 +.24 +.21 +.16

Gainers ($2 or more) Name

Last

Chg %Chg

ColGrEqSt 28.00 +4.19 Amrep 6.74 +.89 ChiCBlood 2.40 +.24 MSSPBw12 5.86 +.56 CS VS3xSlv 28.00 +2.35

+17.6 +15.2 +11.1 +10.6 +9.2

Losers ($2 or more)

Amex

Name

Name

Last Chg

27641 8.71 -.19 26710 1.32 -.02 21996 19.34 +.58 21272 9.92 +.29 20398 8.33 +.38

Gainers ($2 or more)

Vol (00)

PwShs QQQ Intel Microsoft FrontierCm SiriusXM

Gainers ($2 or more)

Last

Chg %Chg

Name

Last

NewConcEn Aerosonic AlmadnM g CoastD SparkNet

2.35 2.98 2.47 2.20 3.83

+.54 +.38 +.31 +.20 +.27

AtlCstFn h Napco Cardiom g Hollysys StratusPrp

2.49 +.79 +46.5 2.51 +.40 +19.0 2.61 +.38 +17.0 8.42 +1.20 +16.6 8.26 +1.08 +15.0

+29.9 +14.6 +14.4 +10.0 +7.6

Losers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

Name

Last

ETrSPlat CSVS3xInSlv ProUSSlv rs QuantNomo ProSUltNG

29.10 59.94 15.81 23.01 21.00

-5.40 -15.7 -5.74 -8.7 -1.39 -8.1 -1.99 -8.0 -1.37 -6.1

Flanign HeraldNB HKN Aerocntry PacGE pfD

6.62 -.80 -10.8 3.41 -.32 -8.6 2.26 -.21 -8.5 6.50 -.58 -8.2 25.38 -1.34 -5.0

Diary

Chg %Chg

Name

Last

Chg %Chg

MSB Fin CrescntF AmIndep GuarFBc ChiNuokng

4.29 3.82 3.61 5.50 2.60

-.58 -11.9 -.49 -11.3 -.38 -9.5 -.51 -8.5 -.23 -8.1

Diary Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Chg %Chg

Losers ($2 or more)

Last

2,390 652 94 3,136 109 33

Last Chg

243689 55.99 +.40 219817 24.55 +.33 219567 26.02 +.20 216506 5.01 +.20 195752 1.82 +.01

Name

Name

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Nasdaq

Most Active ($1 or more)

Vol (00)

Diary 271 179 34 484 17 21

raise prices. Organic milk sales are growing, even though organic milk costs significantly more than conventional milk. Sales of whole organic milk increased 17 percent from January through October, measured by volume, compared with the same period last year, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Reduced-fat organic milk sales rose by 15 percent. At the same time, total conventional milk sales decreased 2 percent. While the shortage may be frustrating for consumers, it reveals a bitter truth for organic dairy farmers, who say they simply need to be paid more for their milk. “If it doesn’t happen, the milk’s not going to be there,” said Tony Azevedo, an organic dairy farmer in Stevinson, Calif., and the president of the Western Organic Dairy Producers Alliance, a farmers group. The alliance sent a letter to major milk processors like Organic Valley and Horizon this month, spelling out the economic difficulties facing organic dairy farmers. The letter cited the sharp rise in the cost of hay and grain fed to cattle, which is partly due to increasing demand for corn for ethanol. It said that to make organic dairy farms profitable, processors would have to increase the amount paid to farmers by $5 for every 100 pounds of milk. That amounts to an increase of about 20 percent. The alliance calculated that such an increase, if passed on to consumers, would lead to a retail price increase of about 22 cents a half gallon. “We need at least $5 in order to stop the bleeding,” Azevedo said. “I’ve got farmers that can’t pay their bills. The wolf’s knocking at the door.”

summer, and they plan to offer visitors a selection of beers including guest brews from other craft beer makers in a 1,000-square-foot tasting room. “Our vision is to take the Northwest craft beer culture into some new territories,” Sidor said in the news release. “We’ll focus on small-volume brews that challenge beer lovers with complex flavors that push the boundaries of convention.” — Reporter: 541-617-7818, rrees@bendbulletin.com

Indexes

Most Active ($1 or more) CheniereEn Rentech CFCda g NwGold g NovaGld g

B5

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

1,881 718 106 2,705 33 73

52-Week High Low

Name

12,876.00 10,404.49 5,627.85 3,950.66 467.09 381.99 8,718.25 6,414.89 2,490.51 1,941.99 2,887.75 2,298.89 1,370.58 1,074.77 14,562.01 11,208.42 868.57 601.71

Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

Last

Net Chg

%Chg

YTD %Chg

52-wk %Chg

12,287.04 5,042.29 467.12 7,485.63 2,266.13 2,613.74 1,263.02 13,242.43 744.98

+135.63 +68.28 +3.84 +88.64 +16.68 +23.76 +13.38 +141.47 +9.77

+1.12 +1.37 +.83 +1.20 +.74 +.92 +1.07 +1.08 +1.33

+6.13 -1.26 +15.34 -6.01 +2.61 -1.48 +.43 -.88 -4.93

+6.20 -1.30 +15.41 -5.86 +3.22 -1.85 +.41 -.98 -5.67

World markets

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed Thursday. Market Close % Change

Key currency exchange rates Thursday compared with late Wednesday in New York. Dollar vs: Exchange Rate Pvs Day

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

310.76 2,067.09 3,127.56 5,566.77 5,848.78 18,397.92 37,185.73 14,863.04 3,246.25 8,398.89 1,825.74 2,672.78 4,123.10 5,309.59

+1.30 +1.15 +1.84 +1.08 +1.34 -.65 +1.48 +.45 +.29 -.29 +.03 +.24 -.45 +.09

s s s s s t s s s t s s t s

1.0132 1.5395 .9792 .001916 .1582 1.2938 .1287 .012878 .071426 .0311 .000864 .1448 1.0621 .0330

1.0094 1.5455 .9767 .001915 .1581 1.2941 .1286 .012835 .071563 .0314 .000864 .1447 1.0612 .0329

Selected mutual funds YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 17.70 +0.21 -2.4 Amer Century Inv: EqInc 7.30 +0.07 +4.0 GrowthI 24.67 +0.24 -0.5 Ultra 23.00 +0.22 +1.5 American Funds A: AmcpA p 18.87 +0.20 +0.6 AMutlA p 25.93 +0.24 +5.1 BalA p 18.26 +0.14 +4.1 BondA p 12.54 +0.02 +6.2 CapIBA p 49.21 +0.37 +2.8 CapWGA p 32.10 +0.38 -7.6 CapWA p 20.43 +0.04 +3.6 EupacA p 35.06 +0.38 -13.8 FdInvA p 35.47 +0.36 -1.7 GovtA p 14.40 +0.02 +7.7 GwthA p 28.78 +0.29 -4.7 HI TrA p 10.66 +0.01 +1.8 IncoA p 16.78 +0.12 +5.7 IntBdA p 13.61 +0.01 +3.6 ICAA p 27.14 +0.30 -1.6 NEcoA p 23.82 +0.22 -5.5 N PerA p 26.14 +0.28 -7.7 NwWrldA 46.04 +0.44 -14.3 SmCpA p 33.13 +0.33 -14.5 TxExA p 12.51 +0.01 +10.1 WshA p 28.50 +0.30 +7.4 Artisan Funds: Intl 19.72 +0.22 -7.8 MidCap 33.11 +0.30 -1.5 MidCapVal 19.77 +0.18 +6.8 Baron Funds: Growth 51.22 +0.47 +1.7 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 13.85 +0.01 +6.7 DivMu 14.79 +0.01 +7.0 TxMgdIntl 12.45 +0.16 -18.9 BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 18.20 +0.19 +5.9 GlAlA r 18.15 +0.13 -3.8 BlackRock B&C:

GlAlC t 16.92 +0.13 BlackRock Instl: EquityDv 18.23 +0.18 GlbAlloc r 18.23 +0.14 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 46.58 +0.45 Cohen & Steers: RltyShrs 61.05 +0.56 Columbia Class A: DivrBd 5.04 TxEA p 13.64 +0.02 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 27.63 +0.33 AcornIntZ 34.11 +0.33 LgCapGr 12.06 +0.10 ValRestr 44.56 +0.45 Credit Suisse Comm: ComRet t 8.14 -0.03 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 9.09 USCorEq1 10.80 +0.12 USCorEq2 10.64 +0.13 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 32.62 +0.34 Davis Funds Y: NYVenY 32.95 +0.35 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.14 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq 17.26 +0.18 EmMktV 25.76 IntSmVa 13.33 LargeCo 9.94 +0.11 USLgVa 19.19 +0.24 US Small 20.65 +0.28 US SmVa 23.31 +0.33 IntlSmCo 13.59 Fixd 10.30 IntVa 14.44 Glb5FxInc 10.89 +0.01 2YGlFxd 10.08 Dodge&Cox: Balanced 67.48 +0.68 Income 13.28 +0.01

-4.5 +6.2 -3.5 -8.7 +6.6 +6.3 +11.8 -4.4 -14.6 -2.9 -10.6 -12.7 NA -0.3 -1.6 -4.4 -4.2 +6.1 -20.6 NA NA +2.5 -2.9 -2.5 -6.9 NA +0.6 NA +4.3 +0.8 -1.6 +4.6

IntlStk 29.09 +0.44 Stock 101.76 +1.35 DoubleLine Funds: TRBd I 11.12 TRBd N p 11.12 Dreyfus: Aprec 40.66 +0.39 Eaton Vance A: LgCpVal 17.20 +0.18 Eaton Vance I: FltgRt 8.80 GblMacAbR 9.82 LgCapVal 17.25 +0.19 FMI Funds: LgCap px 15.31 +0.03 FPA Funds: NwInc 10.65 FPACres 26.81 +0.16 Fairholme 23.21 +0.17 Federated Instl: TotRetBd 11.36 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 19.79 +0.16 StrInA 12.06 +0.01 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 20.03 +0.17 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 x 13.10 -0.34 FF2015 x 10.93 -0.28 FF2015K x 12.13 -0.32 FF2020 x 13.12 -0.36 FF2020K x 12.43 -0.32 FF2025 x 10.82 -0.29 FF2025K x 12.44 -0.32 FF2030 x 12.84 -0.36 FF2030K x 12.55 -0.32 FF2035 x 10.56 -0.27 FF2040 x 7.36 -0.19 FF2040K x 12.57 -0.30 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 11.26 +0.11 AMgr50 15.01 +0.08 AMgr20 r 12.72 +0.03 Balanc 18.21 +0.12

-16.4 -4.0 +9.5 +9.3 +8.0 -4.1 +2.3 -0.4 -3.8 +1.0 +2.2 +3.1 -32.2 NA -0.7 +4.4 -0.4 -0.3 -0.3 -0.3 -1.4 -1.2 -2.6 -2.5 -3.1 -3.0 -4.5 -4.6 -4.6 -2.5 -0.7 +2.6 +1.8

BalancedK 18.21 BlueChGr 42.57 Canada 49.67 CapAp 24.71 CpInc r 8.66 Contra 67.70 ContraK 67.65 DisEq 21.61 DivIntl 25.44 DivrsIntK r 25.40 DivGth 25.89 Eq Inc 41.45 EQII 17.48 Fidel 31.29 FltRateHi r 9.64 GNMA 11.83 GovtInc 10.76 GroCo 81.16 GroInc 18.32 GrowthCoK81.09 HighInc r 8.63 IntBd 10.86 IntmMu 10.44 IntlDisc 27.48 InvGrBd 11.67 InvGB 7.71 LgCapVal 10.11 LowP r 35.75 LowPriK r 35.72 Magelln 63.24 MidCap 26.76 MuniInc 13.02 NwMkt r 15.83 OTC 54.81 100Index 8.85 Puritn 17.72 SAllSecEqF11.26 SCmdtyStrt 8.93 SrsIntGrw 10.06 SrsIntVal 8.03 SrInvGrdF 11.67 STBF 8.49 StratInc 10.80 TotalBd 10.90

+0.12 +0.40 +0.64 +0.23 +0.01 +0.57 +0.57 +0.24 +0.27 +0.27 +0.31 +0.45 +0.19 +0.33 +0.01 +0.01 +0.01 +0.77 +0.24 +0.78 +0.01 +0.01 +0.27 +0.01 +0.12 +0.36 +0.36 +0.68 +0.35 +0.01 +0.01 +0.50 +0.09 +0.12 +0.11 -0.02 +0.08 +0.10 +0.01 +0.01 +0.01

+1.9 -2.4 -13.3 -2.3 -2.1 +0.2 +0.3 -2.7 -14.0 -13.9 -8.4 -4.4 -2.3 -1.9 +1.7 +7.8 +7.8 +1.0 +1.8 +1.2 +3.2 +5.9 +7.8 -15.6 +7.6 +7.7 -5.6 +0.1 -11.2 -2.0 +10.5 +7.9 -0.2 +3.3 +0.8 -2.3 -14.2 -9.8 -17.0 +7.7 +1.8 +4.5 +7.2

USBI 11.77 +0.01 +7.6 Value 63.60 +0.83 -6.5 Fidelity Selects: Gold r 41.85 +0.64 -17.1 Fidelity Spartan: ExtMkIn 35.59 +0.44 -3.5 500IdxInv 44.68 +0.47 +2.5 500Idx I 44.68 +0.47 NS IntlInxInv 29.57 +0.37 -12.7 TotMktInv 36.27 +0.40 +1.4 Fidelity Spart Adv: 500IdxAdv 44.68 +0.47 +2.5 TotMktAd r 36.27 +0.39 +1.4 First Eagle: GlblA 45.01 +0.27 -0.4 OverseasA 20.21 +0.08 -6.3 Forum Funds: AbsStrI r 11.06 +2.7 Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA p 12.19 +0.02 +12.1 FoundAl p 9.87 +0.08 -2.0 HYTFA p 10.27 +0.01 +12.2 IncomA p 2.10 +0.01 +2.8 RisDvA p 34.95 +0.36 +7.7 USGovA p 6.93 +6.7 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv 12.38 -0.01 -2.1 IncmeAd 2.08 +0.01 +2.5 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.12 +0.02 +2.3 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 19.84 +0.18 -1.6 Frank/Temp Temp A: ForgnA p 5.88 +0.04 -13.3 GlBd A p 12.41 -0.01 -2.4 GrwthA p 16.24 +0.15 -6.7 WorldA p 13.71 +0.12 -5.7 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 12.44 -0.01 -2.8 GE Elfun S&S: S&S PM 38.85 +0.39 -1.9 GMO Trust III: Quality 22.12 +0.20 +12.2 GMO Trust IV:

IntlIntrVl 18.81 +0.27 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 10.32 +0.11 Quality 22.13 +0.20 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 6.86 MidCapV 33.73 +0.38 Harbor Funds: Bond 12.16 +0.02 CapApInst 37.04 +0.34 Intl r 52.32 +0.61 Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 28.87 +0.35 Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 37.27 +0.44 Div&Gr 19.42 +0.22 TotRetBd 11.62 +0.01 Hussman Funds: StrGrowth 12.48 -0.04 IVA Funds: Wldwide I r15.34 +0.13 Invesco Funds A: Chart p 16.06 +0.13 CmstkA 15.26 +0.19 EqIncA 8.34 +0.07 GrIncA p 18.63 +0.20 HYMuA 9.40 +0.01 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 21.55 +0.14 AssetStA p 22.18 +0.15 AssetStrI r 22.36 +0.15 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 11.87 +0.01 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 11.86 +0.01 HighYld 7.66 +0.01 ShtDurBd 10.96 USLCCrPls 19.79 +0.21 Janus T Shrs: OvrseasT r 31.70 +0.27 PrkMCVal T20.26 +0.21 John Hancock Cl 1: LSBalanc x 12.22 -0.18 LSGrwth x 11.93 -0.20

-10.7 -16.9 +12.3 +2.4 -5.8 +3.2 +1.0 -11.3 -15.1 -11.2 +1.8 +6.9 +1.5 -2.1

-1.6 -1.0 -1.8 +11.2 -8.7 -8.0 -7.8 +7.1 +7.3 +2.5 +1.6 -3.6 -32.2 -2.2 -2.0 -4.7

Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 16.79 +0.15 -17.8 Longleaf Partners: Partners x 26.77 +0.16 -2.4 Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 13.91 +0.04 +3.6 StrInc C 14.43 +0.06 +2.4 LSBondR 13.85 +0.04 +3.3 StrIncA 14.34 +0.06 +3.1 Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdY 11.92 +0.02 +4.9 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 10.61 +0.13 -7.6 BdDebA p 7.63 +0.01 +3.8 ShDurIncA p4.54 +3.1 Lord Abbett C: ShDurIncC t 4.57 +2.4 Lord Abbett F: ShtDurInco 4.54 +0.01 +3.2 MFS Funds A: TotRA 14.10 +0.11 +2.1 ValueA 22.48 +0.25 +0.2 MFS Funds I: ValueI 22.58 +0.26 +0.5 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 6.61 +0.07 -16.4 MergerFd x15.58 -0.43 +1.6 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.36 +0.01 +5.1 TotRtBdI 10.36 +0.01 +5.4 MorganStanley Inst: MCapGrI 33.02 +0.23 -6.6 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 27.15 +0.22 -3.0 GlbDiscZ 27.47 +0.21 -2.7 SharesZ 19.99 +0.19 -1.3 Neuberger&Berm Fds: GenesInst 46.74 +0.56 +5.6 Northern Funds: HiYFxInc 7.02 NA Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 27.09 +0.21 +0.8 Intl I r 16.41 +0.11 -14.8 Oakmark 41.81 +0.47 +2.1

Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 6.77 +0.01 GlbSMdCap13.44 +0.12 Oppenheimer A: DvMktA p 29.25 +0.20 GlobA p 54.05 +0.65 GblStrIncA 4.06 IntBdA p 6.19 -0.08 MnStFdA 32.29 +0.33 RisingDivA 15.74 +0.15 S&MdCpVl29.79 +0.31 Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 14.27 +0.14 S&MdCpVl25.35 +0.27 Oppenheimer C&M: RisingDvC p14.21 +0.14 Oppenheimer Roch: RcNtMuA x 6.87 +0.01 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 28.91 +0.20 IntlBdY 6.19 -0.08 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 10.84 +0.01 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AlAsetAut r 10.00 +0.02 AllAsset 11.51 +0.02 ComodRR 6.50 -0.03 DivInc 11.25 +0.01 EmgMkCur 9.90 HiYld 8.98 +0.01 InvGrCp 10.33 +0.01 LowDu 10.28 +0.01 RealRtnI 11.79 -0.02 ShortT 9.68 TotRt 10.84 +0.01 PIMCO Funds A: RealRtA p 11.79 -0.02 TotRtA 10.84 +0.01 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 10.84 +0.01 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 10.84 +0.01 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 10.84 +0.01

-7.2 -8.0 -18.3 -8.7 +0.6 -2.0 +0.2 +2.8 -7.0 +1.9 -7.8 +2.0 +11.7 -18.0 -1.8 +3.6 +2.7 +2.2 -8.1 +4.2 -5.1 +3.9 +6.6 +1.6 +11.6 +0.3 +3.8 +11.1 +3.4 +2.7 +3.6 +3.7

Perm Port Funds: Permannt 45.89 +0.07 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 38.74 +0.39 Price Funds: BlChip 38.81 +0.34 CapApp 20.65 +0.13 EmMktS 28.44 +0.23 EqInc 23.15 +0.26 EqIndex 34.02 +0.36 Growth 31.95 +0.27 HlthSci 32.57 +0.35 HiYield 6.49 +0.01 IntlBond 9.70 +0.02 Intl G&I 11.45 +0.18 IntlStk 12.26 +0.15 MidCap 52.86 +0.54 MCapVal 21.43 +0.22 N Asia 13.91 +0.12 New Era 41.91 +0.43 N Horiz 31.11 +0.30 N Inc 9.66 +0.01 OverS SF 7.28 +0.11 R2010 15.03 +0.10 R2015 11.58 +0.08 R2020 15.92 +0.13 R2025 11.59 +0.10 R2030 16.56 +0.16 R2035 11.67 +0.11 R2040 16.59 +0.17 ShtBd 4.81 SmCpStk 31.40 +0.38 SmCapVal 34.70 +0.50 SpecIn 12.30 +0.03 Value 22.61 +0.25 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 12.74 +0.16 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 10.82 +0.17 PremierI r 18.58 +0.29 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 35.51 +0.38 S&P Sel 19.65 +0.20 Scout Funds:

+1.7 -4.3 +1.9 +3.3 -19.0 -0.3 +2.3 -0.6 +10.9 +3.1 +2.2 -11.3 -12.5 -1.0 -4.6 -12.1 -15.4 +6.9 +6.0 -10.6 +0.6 -0.3 -1.1 -2.0 -2.6 -3.2 -3.4 +1.4 +0.4 +4.0 -1.7 -4.5 -3.6 -0.5 +1.7 +2.5

Intl 27.82 +0.26 Selected Funds: AmShD 39.59 +0.40 Sequoia 146.04 +1.00 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 16.93 +0.13 Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 23.91 +0.10 IntValue I 24.43 +0.10 Tweedy Browne: GblValue x 21.78 -0.88 Vanguard Admiral: BalAdml 21.82 +0.15 CAITAdm 11.37 +0.01 CpOpAdl 68.44 +0.75 EMAdmr r 31.72 +0.33 Energy 112.44 +1.22 ExtdAdm 39.50 +0.50 500Adml 116.29 +1.24 GNMA Ad 11.06 -0.12 GrwAdm 31.90 +0.31 HlthCr 54.41 +0.49 HiYldCp 5.69 +0.01 InfProAd 27.70 -0.04 ITBdAdml 11.74 +0.02 ITsryAdml 11.68 -0.47 IntGrAdm 51.81 +0.54 ITAdml 14.02 +0.01 ITGrAdm 9.97 -0.11 LtdTrAd 11.15 LTGrAdml 10.27 -0.05 LT Adml 11.32 MCpAdml 89.52 +1.01 MuHYAdm 10.71 +0.01 PrmCap r 64.25 +0.65 ReitAdm r 82.51 +0.76 STsyAdml 10.78 -0.05 STBdAdml 10.60 +0.01 ShtTrAd 15.92 STFdAd 10.84 -0.09 STIGrAd 10.63 SmCAdm 33.56 +0.45 TtlBAdml 10.99 +0.01 TStkAdm 31.43 +0.35

-12.8 -3.7 +13.6 -11.5 -13.8 -13.5 -4.4 +4.5 +10.2 -5.7 -18.5 -1.8 -3.2 +2.5 +7.7 +2.2 +11.7 +7.2 +13.2 +10.4 +9.7 -13.9 +9.6 +7.4 +3.7 +17.0 +10.6 -1.6 +10.9 -1.4 +9.1 +2.3 +3.0 +1.7 +2.9 +1.9 -2.2 +7.6 +1.5

WellslAdm 55.58 WelltnAdm 54.21 Windsor 43.24 WdsrIIAd 45.96 Vanguard Fds: CapOpp 29.64 DivdGro 15.50 Energy 59.90 EqInc 22.01 Explr 71.77 GNMA 11.06 GlobEq 15.91 HYCorp 5.69 HlthCre 128.97 InflaPro 14.10 IntlGr 16.29 IntlVal 26.54 ITIGrade 9.97 LifeCon 16.22 LifeGro 21.13 LifeMod 19.17 LTIGrade 10.27 Morg 17.55 MuInt 14.02 PrecMtls r 19.21 PrmcpCor 13.54 Prmcp r 61.93 SelValu r 18.71 STAR 18.75 STIGrade 10.63 StratEq 18.44 TgtRetInc 11.53 TgRe2010 22.44 TgtRe2015 12.31 TgRe2020 21.71 TgtRe2025 12.28 TgRe2030 20.94 TgtRe2035 12.52 TgtRe2040 20.53 TgtRe2045 12.89 USGro 18.12 Wellsly 22.94 Welltn 31.39 Wndsr 12.82

+0.28 +0.44 +0.54 +0.51

+9.8 +4.1 -3.6 +3.2

+0.33 +0.17 +0.66 +0.24 +0.95 -0.12 +0.18 +0.01 +1.18 -0.03 +0.17 +0.32 -0.11 -0.09 -0.11 -0.16 -0.05 +0.17 +0.01 +0.26 +0.14 +0.62 +0.23 -0.18

-5.8 +10.0 -1.9 +11.2 -1.4 +7.6 -8.9 +7.1 +11.7 +13.2 -14.0 -14.9 +7.3 +1.8 -2.1 +0.3 +16.9 -2.1 +9.5 -22.4 -0.5 -1.5 +1.5 +0.9 +1.8 +1.7 +5.2 +3.4 +1.8 +0.7 -0.3 -1.2 -2.2 -2.4 -2.4 -0.3 +9.7 +4.0 -3.6

+0.21 -0.09 -0.50 -0.24 -0.36 -0.19 -0.28 -0.16 -0.23 -0.15 +0.18 +0.11 +0.26 +0.16

WndsII 25.90 +0.29 Vanguard Idx Fds: TotIntAdm r21.76 +0.28 TotIntlInst r87.01 +1.10 TotIntlIP r 87.02 +1.10 500 116.29 +1.23 MidCap 19.73 +0.22 SmCap 33.54 +0.44 STBnd 10.60 +0.01 TotBnd 10.99 +0.01 TotlIntl 13.01 +0.16 TotStk 31.42 +0.35 Vanguard Instl Fds: BalInst 21.82 +0.15 DevMkInst 8.39 -0.20 ExtIn 39.49 +0.50 FTAllWldI r 77.48 +0.98 GrwthIst 31.90 +0.31 InfProInst 11.28 -0.02 InstIdx 115.53 +1.23 InsPl 115.53 +1.22 InsTStPlus 28.44 +0.31 MidCpIst 19.77 +0.22 SCInst 33.55 +0.44 TBIst 10.99 +0.01 TSInst 31.43 +0.35 Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl 96.06 +1.02 MidCpIdx 28.25 +0.32 STBdIdx 10.60 +0.01 TotBdSgl 10.99 +0.01 TotStkSgl 30.33 +0.33 Western Asset: CorePlus I 11.10 Yacktman Funds: Fund px 17.57 -0.04 Focused x 18.83 -0.02

+3.2 -14.8 -14.8 -14.8 +2.4 -1.7 -2.3 +2.9 +7.4 -14.9 +1.4 +4.5 -12.8 -3.2 -14.5 +2.2 +13.3 +2.5 +2.5 +1.5 -1.6 -2.2 +7.6 +1.5 +2.5 -1.6 +3.0 +7.6 +1.5 +6.6 +7.7 +7.7


B6

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2011

Live. Work. Play.

Prineville: WHY WE LOVE

PRINEVILLE EMBRACES ITS HISTORY WHILE EMBRACING GROWTH AND INDUSTRY. REALTORS® know what makes Prineville, Oregon special, and they will help you find the home that’s perfect for you. Prineville has been home to growing businesses more than once. Les Schwab made Prineville the epicenter of his tire stores in 1952, and most recently, Facebook constructed its Prineville data center. When the work day is done, residents enjoy a multitude of activities such as golf, horseback riding, water sports and camping to name just a few. Visit Prineville, and you’ll see why so many love to call it home.

ook r C / e l l i v e n i r Current P i s t ic s t a t S l a i t n e d County, Resi .........306 .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. s: .... Active Listing

Pending/ ............. 52 .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ct: Under Contra Homes Sold .............369 .. .. .. .. .. .. : ) s th (past 12 mon

2112 NE 4th St. Bend, Oregon 97701 541-382-6027 | E-mail: info@coar.com | www.coar.com ABOUT COAR AND MLS OF CENTRAL OREGON

The Central Oregon Association of REALTORS® is the voice of the real estate industry in Crook, Deschutes, Jefferson and Harney Counties. COAR serves REALTORS® by maintaining ethical standards, providing continuing education, promoting the value of REALTORS®, and advocating on behalf of the real estate industry. Central Oregon REALTORS® believe we can build better communities by supporting quality growth and seeking sustainable economies and housing opportunities that embrace the environmental qualities we cherish, while protecting a property owner’s ability to own, use, buy, and sell property.


LOCALNEWS

Reader photo, C2 Editorials, C4

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2011

www.bendbulletin.com/local

LA PINE WATER, SEWER

LOCAL BRIEFING

Fiscal inquiry continues; new controls implemented

La Pine man, dog die in crash A La Pine man and his dog died after the driver crashed his vehicle into a tree off of Cottonwood Road near Sunriver on Thursday morning, the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office said. Jerome Krohn, 57, was westbound with his Labrador retriever when he lost control of his Chevy Blazer for an unknown reason around 7:20 a.m. Krohn’s car went off the right side of the roadway and traveled for about 200 feet before running into a tree. Krohn was pronounced dead at the scene. Krohn’s dog died while being taken to a veterinarian’s office. The Sheriff’s Office is investigating the cause. Anyone with information is asked to call 541-6936911.

Bend business fined by city Bend Plating Inc. will receive a $750 fine from the city of Bend for dumping about 400 percent more nickel into the municipal sewer system than it’s currently allowed to discharge. The company is one of more than a dozen that are a part of the city’s Industrial Pretreatment Program, which requires certain businesses to treat effluent before it enters the sewer system. A goal of the program is to keep potentially hazardous and burdensome materials out of the wastewater treatment plant that could impact the equipment at the facility or eventually seep into the environment. Other businesses involved in the city’s pretreatment program include Deschutes Brewery, bullet-maker Nosler Inc., pesticide-producer Suterra LLC and semiconductor manufacturer Microsemi. The $750 fine is only the second the city has given out under its current Industrial Pretreatment Program, which officially began in 2005. The other fine, of $900, was imposed on Deschutes Brewery in October 2009.

Public works director resigns Chris Doty has resigned as director of Redmond’s public works department to take a management position with Deschutes County’s road division. Redmond City Manager David Brandt said Doty will stay on with the city until the end of January. Doty’s position as the top administrator for Redmond public works made him the overseer of almost all infrastructure in the city, including water, sewer and maintenance. He also played a major role in the development of the city’s parks. Doty’s salary with the city is $8,652 per month, or $103,824 annually, not including benefits.

By Hillary Borrud The Bulletin

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Drops of precipitation gather on a handrail outside Mt. Bachelor’s West Village Lodge late Thursday morning. Today may bring the end of warmer-than-average weather on the slopes.

Weather may take a turn for winter today • Warm, wet conditions have hampered activities on the slopes and ice rink By Scott Hammers

Redmond Park & Recreation maintenance worker Darren Kosanke prepares the city’s rink ice for refreezing. The city hopes to reopen the rink this weekend.

The Bulletin

I

f forecasts hold, today could mark the turning point in what’s been a difficult start to the season for Oregon’s ski resorts. After several days just above the freezing mark at Mt. Bachelor, temperatures are expected to dip today, bringing an end to the rain that has been threatening to eat into the resort’s meager snowpack. Spokesman Inside Andy Goggins said • Central Mt. Bachelor could see Oregon’s as much as a foot of forecast, snow today, a welcome C6 change after a month that’s seen only trace amounts. Because of limited natural snow, Mt. Bachelor moved its snowmaking machinery to the top of the Skyliner Express lift last week, stringing more than half a mile of hoses from the Pine Marten area where the machines are normally located. Wednesday, weather at the mountain was so poor that the resort’s on-

Pete Erickson The Bulletin

line report recommended would-be skiers and snowboarders pass on hitting the slopes, and should instead go shopping or visit a brewery. “That was one of those brutally honest days,� said Goggins. “It was one of those days it was raining on the mountain, on the terrain we had open, and it wasn’t the best experience. See Weather / C2

Power line A 46-mile, 230-kilovolt power line planned to connect to wind power developments near Steens Mountain recently passed environmental review by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management.

“For those die-hards that love a good onmountain adventure, the skiing was actually pretty good, but it was really wet.� — Andy Goggins, Mt. Bachelor spokesman

The Bulletin

To Burns 205

Planned power line

Malheur Lake

Cooperative Management and Protection Area

Echanis Wind Project

MALHEUR N ATION A L WILDLIFE REFUGE

205

Riddle Mountain Wind Project

78

Frenchglen

The Bureau of Land Management approved plans Thursday for a 46-mile power line, linking proposed wind turbines on the flanks of Steens Mountain to the power grid near Crane. Interior Secretary Ken Salazar, who oversees the BLM, signed the approval along with separate plans for a power line connecting the grid to a solar plant in California. The projects are part of President Obama’s renewable energy initiative. “As we continue to move thoughtfully and quickly toward a clean energy future,� Salazar said in a written statement, “these projects are strengthening local economies by generating good jobs and reliable power.�

40 to 60 turbines More briefing and News of Record, C2

Steens Mountain STEENS MOUN TAIN WILDERNESS AREA

MILES 0

10

STATE NEWS OREGON Bend

292

Allvord Alvord La ake Lake

• Coos Bay

Stories on C3

Sources: Bureau of Land Management, Columbia Energy y Partners, Oregon Natural Desert Association

Burns

AREA OF DETAIL

Crane

Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

A month after the La Pine sewer and water districts launched an investigation into possible fiscal mismanagement, it is unclear how long it will take to complete the inquiry. The districts’ commissioners said Thursday they did not know when investigator Bob Murch would finish his work. The commissioners voted to extend until Jan. 31 a contract with temporary employee Carol Zettel, who was hired in November to handle accounts payable and receivable and other work after the commissioners placed Operations Manager Donna Zigler on paid administrative leave during the investigation. Meanwhile, the districts are in the process of adopting financial controls in response to problems revealed in recent audits. The investigation is supposed to explore in greater depth the mismanagement and possible misuse of district funds outlined in the financial audits. See La Pine / C2

Winner of PPP logo contest announced Bulletin Staff Report Bend graphic designer Paul Leighton has been selected as the winner of the annual Pole Pedal Paddle logo contest. Leighton’s illustration depicts a cyclist, a runner, a kayaker and both Nordic and downhill skiers, the five events of the multisport race. The event serves as a fundraiser for the Mount Bachelor Sports Education Foundation. MBSEF, organizers of the PPP, announced its selection of Leighton’s design Thursday. As the winner of the contest, he will receive $500, a commemorative plate, and official PPP gear printed with his logo. Now in its 35th year, the PPP has attracted more than 3,000 participants in recent years. The 2012 race is scheduled for May 19.

Wind farm power line OK’d By Dylan J. Darling

Crane

— Bulletin staff reports

• Portland • Salem • Springfield

C

Obituaries, C5 Weather, C6

Already approved by Harney County in 2007, the proposed $300 million Echanis wind project now has a way to carry its energy to consumers. The 40 to 60 wind turbines in the project would be on private land and produce 104 megawatts of power, or enough to supply about 30,000 homes, according to Columbia Energy Partners. Chris Crowley, president of the Vancouver, Wash., energy development company, declined a Thursday interview request.

The company is also proposing to build a similar wind project on Riddle Mountain northeast of Steens Mountain while it scrapped plans for two other wind projects on Steens Mountain itself in mid-November. Critics of wind development on Steens Mountain say wind turbines, roads and power

lines could harm wildlife and wreck views. Protected by the Steens Mountain Cooperative Management and Protection Act of 2000, there are 170,000 acres of designated wilderness on the broad 9,733-foot mountain. See Power / C2

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C2

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2011

LOC AL BRIEFING Continued from C1

Small fire put out at Bethlehem Inn A minor fire occurred at one of the Bethlehem Inn homeless shelter units early Thursday morning, the Bend Fire Department said. About 2:30 a.m., a smoke detector awakened the two adults and three children in one of the units. They noticed flames coming from the bathroom ceiling and called 911. While the others

La Pine Continued from C1 The districts are paying Zettel $25 an hour. Zigler’s pay is approximately $24 an hour, according to figures Zigler provided in March.

Cash handling changes The recent audits cited a lack of segregation of duties as one of the major problems at the sewer and water districts, since both office employees collected cash payments, posted them to the billing system and wrote off some of the charges. Auditors had no way to check whether an employee collected cash, pocketed the money and wrote off the bill. Wayne Kovacs, the recently elected president of the La Pine Water District and chairman of the La Pine Special Sewer District, said some of the recent cash handling improvements were based on Zettel’s suggestions, and others came from

Weather Continued from C1 “For those die-hards that love a good on-mountain adventure, the skiing was actually pretty good, but it was really wet.” The wet weather and warm temperatures have also complicated grooming efforts at the resort, forcing mountain management to steer clear of soft, unfrozen snow during the afternoon grooming shift, saving such runs for the overnight shift. Goggins said that despite weather challenges, skier visits have not been significantly down from past years, and aside from lift operators who might otherwise be running the still-closed Summit and Northwest Express lifts, the resort has not had to cut staff.

More snow near summit The past few days of difficult weather may still include one bright spot, Goggins said. While the lower mountain has seen rain, snow has been falling on terrain served by the Summit lift. Once the storms pass, ski patrol will be heading up to assess opening the chair to the top of the mountain. At lower-elevation ski areas, the season has gotten off to an even rockier start. Willamette Pass has yet to open,

Power Continued from C1 While the proposed wind project is on private land away from the wilderness, it still shouldn’t be on the mountain because of the potential impacts on wildlife, said Liz Nysson, energy policy coordinator for the Bend-based Oregon Natural Desert Association. While the conservation group has supported wind projects elsewhere, it is opposed to wind development on Steens Mountain. “We believe this is an example of the right idea in the wrong place,” Nysson said. While Columbia Energy Partners pulled two of its four wind project plans for Steens Mountain earlier this year, she said the BLM approved a 230-kilovolt power line that could support more projects than just the Echanis project. “That is a major concern of ONDA and other conservation groups,” Nysson said. The groups also question the job creation claims connected to the project. In its

evacuated the unit, the adult male occupant used a fire extinguisher to put out the fire. The adjoining units were evacuated by a Bethlehem Inn staff member. The fire, caused by an overheated exhaust fan, caused about $600 in damage. The fire department says the working smoke alarm played a crucial role in minimizing damage and preventing injuries.

Well sh t! R E ADE R PHOTOS Can you work a camera, and capture a great picture? And can you tell us a bit about it? Email your color or black and white photos to readerphotos@bendbulletin.com and we’ll pick the best for publication. Submission requirements: Include as much detail as possible — when and where you took it, and any special technique used — as well as your name, hometown and phone number. Photos must be high resolution (at least 6 inches wide and 300 dpi) and cannot be altered.

— Bulletin staff report

the auditors and the district’s longtime attorney, Christy Monson. Ashley Williams, an administrative assistant, said that under the new procedures, one employee receives payments and the other employee enters them into the billing system and deposits them at the bank. Customers also leave payments in a drop box, and that box can only be emptied now by two employees, both of whom must sign receipts for any cash, Williams said. Kovacs said this is an improvement. “At least for the short haul, considering how few employees we have, this segregated the duties to give checks and balances with the payments,” Kovacs said. Commissioners will likely vote in January on whether to adopt a resolution that will spell out financial controls and a policy on waiving fees. — Reporter: 541-617-7829, hborrud@bendbulletin.com

while Hoodoo was closed Thursday and today, but is scheduled to reopen Saturday for the resort’s annual New Year’s Eve party.

Redmond ice rink Unseasonable temperatures have also hampered Redmond’s plans to open a newly constructed downtown ice skating rink. City Manager David Brandt said warm weather and rain have created problems with keeping the ice hard. On opening night the rink’s ice was too soft, and now high temperatures coupled with rain will keep the rink shuttered for a few more days. Colder temperatures are expected this weekend, and the city plans to reopen the rink then. Regardless of the weather, the rink has been a success as far as the city is concerned. “When we first opened we projected to see about 100 skate rentals per day,” Brandt said. “But we’ve been getting around 300 rentals on most days. It’s been very popular and very successful.” Brandt said the plan is to leave the rink up through February, but user demand could change that date. — Reporter: 541-383-0387, shammers@bendbulletin.com. Bulletin reporter Erik Hidle contributed to this report.

Thursday announcement, the BLM said the Echanis wind project would support 235 jobs. But most of those jobs would only last as long as construction, Nysson said. “It’s only a small fraction of that that are permanent,” she said.

Around the refuge Columbia Energy Partners initially proposed a 29mile power line to connect wind development on Steens Mountain to the grid, said Skip Renchler, a real estate specialist in the BLM’s Burns office. “It was a more direct, probably less expensive route,” he said. However, it crossed through the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge, which raised concerns about its impacts on wildlife. The approved 46-mile route passes about three miles from the refuge and crosses mostly private land, with 12 miles of it over public land. — Reporter: 541-617-7812, ddarling@bendbulletin.com

LEVELS OF HEAVEN Pilot Steve Wright, of Bend, took this picture of stacked lenticular clouds from above 10,000 feet while taking his sister-in-law on a scenic flight about 15 miles west of Bend. The photo was taken with a Motorola smartphone.

N  R POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Bend Police Department

Burglary — A burglary was reported at 9:44 a.m. Dec. 27, in the 61300 block of Brosterhous Road. Criminal mischief — Graffiti was reported at 10:06 a.m. Dec. 27, in the 100 block of Northwest Oregon Avenue. Criminal mischief — Damage to three stop signs was reported at 10:06 a.m. Dec. 27, in the area of Blue Lake and Davis Lake loops. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and items stolen at 10:48 a.m. Dec. 27, in the 61500 block of Tam McArthur Loop. Theft — A bicycle was reported stolen at 11 a.m. Dec. 27, in the 1400 block of Northwest Newport Avenue. Theft — A wallet was reported stolen at 2:43 p.m. Dec. 27, in the 600 block of Northwest Wall Street. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 3:42 p.m. Dec. 27, in the 61000 block of South Queens Drive. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 4:10 p.m. Dec. 27, in the 600 block of Northeast Revere Avenue. Criminal mischief — Graffiti was reported at 5:07 p.m. Dec. 27, in the 100 block of Northwest Oregon Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 11:12 p.m. Dec. 27, in the 1700 block of Southeast Tempest Drive. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and items stolen at 12:51 a.m. Dec. 28, in the 20300 block of Klahani Drive. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 8:15 a.m. Dec. 28, in the 2200 block of Northeast U.S. Highway 20. Criminal mischief — Graffiti was reported at 10:31 a.m. Dec. 28, in the 100 block of Northwest Oregon Avenue. Criminal mischief — Graffiti was reported at 11:39 a.m. Dec. 28, in the 100 block of Northeast Greenwood Avenue. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and items stolen at 2:02 p.m. Dec. 28, in the 1200 block of Northwest Stannium Road. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 3:18 p.m. Dec. 28, in the 2300 block of Northeast Fourth Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 3:39 p.m. Dec. 28, in the 2600 block of Northeast Conners Avenue. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 5:06 p.m. Dec. 28, in the 400 block of Southwest Garfield Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at 9:27 p.m. Dec. 28, in the 61200 block of South U.S. Highway 97. Redmond Police Department

Unauthorized use — A vehicle was reported stolen at 1:42 p.m. Dec. 28, in the area of Northwest Eighth Street and Northwest Kingwood Avenue. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 1:31 p.m. Dec. 28, in the 800 block of

Southwest Veterans Way. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 12:52 p.m. Dec. 28, in the 2700 block of Northwest Greenwood Avenue. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 12:32 p.m. Dec. 28, in the 2500 block of Northwest Elm Avenue. Prineville Police Department

Theft — A theft was reported at 12:52 a.m. Dec. 28, in the area of Southeast Juniper Street. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 8:52 a.m. Dec. 28, in the area of Northeast Third Street.

Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

DUII — Georg Olden, 43, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 11:12 p.m. Dec. 28, in the 64200 block of Deschutes Market Road in Bend. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 7:42 p.m. Dec. 28, in the 16000 block of Buena Vista Drive in La Pine. Theft — A wallet was reported stolen from a vehicle at 5:37 p.m. Dec. 28, in the 8700 block of Seventh Street in Terrebonne. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 2:44 p.m. Dec. 28, in the 4600 block of West state Highway 126 in Redmond.

Theft — A bicycle was reported stolen at 2:06 p.m. Dec. 28, in the 16600 block of Willow Lane in La Pine. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and items stolen at 1:18 p.m. Dec. 28, in the area of Deschutes Market Road and U.S. Highway 97 in Bend. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 10:02 a.m. Dec. 28, in the area of Sacramento and Upland roads in La Pine.

BEND FIRE RUNS Wednesday 18 — Medical aid calls.

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FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

C3

O N I B 

Car lock sought before fatal crash SPRINGFIELD — Lane County prosecutors had been seeking to install an alcohol interlock device on the car of a Veneta man before he crashed the vehicle on Christmas night, killing himself and seriously injuring three others. The Eugene RegisterGuard newspaper reported that 22-year-old Jonathan Arthur Golz had been arrested four days before the wrong-way crash for failing to appear at a Dec. 1 court hearing on a Lane County District Attorney’s Office motion to require the driving lock device on his car. Court records show Springfield police transported Golz to the Lane County Jail after arresting him Dec. 21, but he was released Dec. 22 after signing an agreement to appear at a Jan. 10 hearing.

Cop makes arrest on coffee break SPRINGFIELD — A Springfield police detective who ducked into a coffee shop for, well, a cup of coffee, ended up making an arrest in the case of a robbery at another coffee stand. Detective George Crolly spotted a man Tuesday who looked a lot like a security camera photo of a robber who held up a Dutch Bros. coffee outlet on Dec. 7. Crolly approached the man when he left the shop and asked him to come to the police station. The man declined to ride with the detective, but said he’d grab a bus and meet him there. The Register-Guard reports that’s exactly what happened. A police report says the man told Crolly he committed the robbery. The newspaper says Joshua Alan Webb was given a citation to appear in court on a third-degree robbery count and was released.

Man strangled in Salem motel ID’d SALEM — Oregon authorities have identified a 61-year-old man fatally strangled at a Salem-area motel. A 22-year-old man arrested at the scene has been arraigned on murder and burglary charges. The Marion County District Attorney’s Office identified the victim Wednesday as Jeffrey Stow. His body was found Monday night after police responded to a report of a disturbance at the Holiday Lodge. Hugh Edward Crow II remains in the county jail. — From wire reports

Fishermen dismayed by weak crab catch

STATE PRISON SYSTEM

Panel looks at sentencing costs • Commission on Public Safety says cost-benefit analysis should drive policy

The Associated Press COOS BAY — This season’s catch of Dungeness crab off the Oregon Coast is expected to be down, which could mean higher prices after the holidays. The fishing weather since the season began has been good, and crabbers believe they already have hauled in much of the catch that’s reached legal size, according to The World newspaper in Coos Bay. “Initially, everyone was happy,” said Nick Furman, executive director of the Oregon Dungeness Crab Association. “Then they went out and started fishing.” Demand for live crab is high in Asia, but California and Washington coasts are closed to crabbers as wildlife officials wait for crab to reach a legal size. Oregon crabbers negotiated with processors for a locked-in price during the early part of the season, when Dungeness crab is a holiday delicacy. The agreement contained a price bump for the crabbers. Furman said the situation strains a 9-year-old system in Oregon in which fishermen’s associations and processors negotiate a crucial opening price for the season, with the Oregon Department of Agriculture overseeing the process. Near Coos Bay, about 70 percent of the fishermen in Charleston belong to a fishing association bound to this year’s agreement — the rest would be free to sell to independent “live buyers,” who are showing up along the Oregon Coast earlier than usual, said Furman. The locked-in price expires Wednesday.

By Nigel Duara The Associated Press

PORTLAND — A draft report by Gov. John Kitzhaber’s Commission on Public Safety says ballot measures instead of business principles have come to dominate prison sentencing in Oregon and that needs to change. “Public safety demands a shift from using the heart to guide our investments to using rational business-like approaches,” according to the report, which is to be submitted to the governor today. The commission has been charged with examining longterm planning efforts on sentencing and public safety, specifically the felony sentencing system. It will require balancing the will of the voters, who have twice approved expensive mandatory minimum sentencing ballot measures, with scarce state dollars. Costs have risen significantly in the prison system, what the report calls “Oregon’s most expensive resource.” The state Department of Corrections has been allotted $1.3 billion by the state general fund for the 20112013 budget, outpacing all other departments except schools and human services. The report sets forth principles it hopes the Legislature adopts in the next biennium, including a greater reliance on cost-benefit analysis when considering sentencing reforms and giving judges more discretion when they hand down sentences. The report contains few specific recommendations. The commission comprises the chief justice of the state Supreme Court, two Republican legislators, two Democratic state legislators, former Gov. Ted Kulongoski — a Democrat — and a Salem business executive.

Minimum sentences pushing up costs Prison costs have ballooned in recent years due in part to mandatory minimum sentences for some crimes, which have kept offenders in prison longer, and to higher health care costs for an aging prison population, the commission said. Taxpayers spend on average more than $30,000 per year for each Oregon prisoner. The state Office of Economic Analysis released a prison forecast this year projecting that the number of prisoners will increase by 2,000 by the end of the decade, to nearly 16,000.

The Bulletin file photo

Razor wire tops a fence at the Deer Ridge Correctional Institution in Madras in April. A state commission says business principles should regulate sentences, not ballot measures.

Prison costs have spiked since voters approved Measure 11 in 1994, which created mandatory minimum sentences for some violent crimes. Subsequent ballot measures — including one passed last year — have added stiff sentences for other crimes and are forecast to cost the state more money. In response to the draft report, the Oregon District Attorneys Association said the state’s sentencing policies are working, and said the commission’s focus solely on sentencing is an error. “We believe that the Commission has missed the mark by focusing on only one aspect of the criminal justice system: sentencing,” according to the statement issued Thursday. Clatsop County District Attorney Josh Marquis said the commission’s proposed guide-

lines could affect the length of time offenders serve in prison. Marquis said he wants to see offenders serve the sentences given them without reductions. “The most important single value is truth in sentencing, not necessarily severity,” Marquis said.

Crime falling When it comes to public safety in Oregon, perception is reality, the commission report said: Voters pass statewide ballot measures enforcing mandatory minimums, believing crime is on the rise. The opposite is true, the report argues. The crime rate has fallen in Oregon during the past 20 years and continues to fall. Shannon Wright, associate director of the Partnership for Safety and Justice, said the commission rightly focused

on alternatives to mandatory minimum sentences. “It’s been almost two decades since Oregon began its experiment with mandatory minimums, and they are a huge cost driver,” said Wright, whose group opposes mandatory minimum sentences. The commission must balance its work with the will of the voters and the Legislature, which the report notes, but goes on to argue, “Neither the Legislature, nor the ballot initiative can adequately craft a ‘one size fits all’ sentence.” “Appropriate sentencing law requires individual application,” the report says. “The new sentencing guidelines must empower the court by better distributing and structuring discretion between the executive and judicial branches of state government than does our current system.”

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Oregonians say postal centers shouldn’t close The Associated Press EUGENE — The impact of paring the U.S. mail system would fall most heavily on the poor and the elderly, Oregonians told the U.S. Postal Service at a hearing. The Postal Service, after heavy losses, is considering closing regional processing centers in Springfield, Salem, Bend and Pendleton, consolidating the work in Portland and Medford. It also has 26 rural post offices on the chopping block, the Eugene Register-Guard reported. The changes would make next-day first-class delivery a thing of the past and mean that crosstown letters in Eugene would first be trucked 100 miles from and to Eugene on Interstate 5 before they could be delivered, the paper reported. At a hearing Wednesday night at Lane Community College, Oregonians worried about the impact on people who rely on mail-order prescriptions, small businesses that need prompt delivery, weekly newspapers and the Oregon system of mail-in ballots. Hospital nurse Libby Bottero said more and more peo-

“We know this is an aggressive plan. But we believe it’s a change that would go fairly unnoticed by our average customer.” — Lisa Shear, manager of Portland processing center

ple are relying on medication in the mail. “They can’t wait more days to get (it),” she said. “It’s the poorest and neediest people who are going to suffer the most.” Becky Holm, publisher of the Douglas County News, said the changes would be a killer for weekly newspapers and other periodicals. “I implore you not to reduce service and expect people to use you more, because it won’t happen,” she said. Oregon has excess processing capacity, said Lisa Shear, manager of the Portland center. The six centers are open only six hours a day, and trucks often arrive and leave half-empty. “We know this is an aggressive plan,” she said. “But we

believe it’s a change that would go fairly unnoticed by our average customer.” Under questioning from the audience, Shear said the cost of fuel for increased trucking to the consolidated centers hadn’t been figured into the projected savings from closing the centers. According to postal officials, 42 percent of first-class mail is currently delivered the next day and 27 percent is delivered in two days. If the processing centers are closed next spring, just over 50 percent all firstclass mail would be delivered in two days, with most of the rest arriving in three days. Postal Service officials

said union contracts would protect employees from layoffs, and union officials questioned whether there would be enough vacancies elsewhere to absorb the displaced processing center workers. The Postal Service has piled up losses because of competition from electronic mail and billing, as well as a 2006 law that requires it to fund future health care benefit payments for retirees. U.S. Rep. Peter DeFazio of Oregon told the audience the Postal Service should have “more rate-setting authority” to stay competitive and that the health care payments requirement should be eliminated.

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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2011

E

The Bulletin

AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER

B  M C G B  J C  R  C

Chairwoman Publisher Editor-in-Chief Editor of Editorials

Don’t hold Malheur down

M

alheur County could use some good economic news. Unemployment has been at 10 percent. The county had the lowest per capita income in Or-

egon in the 2010 Census. And while Oregon was growing in population from 2000 to 2010, Malheur shrank. But what Malheur does have is the potential for a multimilliondollar uranium mine. An environmental group is mobilizing to shut it down before it starts. Shutting down the mine, shutting down jobs and shutting down economic potential is not what the county needs. Oregon Energy LLC hopes to mine 18 million pounds of yellowcake, also called uranium oxide. The Aurora site in Malheur may be one of the largest sources in the U.S., as reported by the Willamette Week. Once yellowcake is refined, it can be used to fuel nuclear reactors and even processed for use in nuclear weapons. Yellowcake is now selling for about $52 per pound. It will likely be years before any mining would start. Company officials got an exploration permit for the site. They appeared before a state board on Sept. 13 to summarize exploration progress and present their business plan. Uranium is naturally occurring. It’s in almost all rock, dirt and water. It’s radioactive. The concern about a uranium mine is that it may poison the area. The ore that comes out of the ground is often partly refined on site. Piles of dirt are left behind. The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality is still monitoring contamination from two ura-

nium mines near Lakeview that closed in the 1960s. A Portland environmental group, the Center for Environmental Equity, also disputes that a mine would bring as many jobs to the area as Oregon Energy claims. The groups says many workers would be hired from elsewhere. Whether many of the employees come from elsewhere or are hired locally, they will still need places to live and to buy goods. That money will be good for Malheur. As for the environmental concerns, uranium mines have caused contamination. Oregon passed a law in 1991 specifically to prevent it from happening again. Oregon law allows surprise inspections. It allows the state to assess fees to cover the additional costs of regulating the mine. The state’s policy is to protect people, wildlife and habitat. And on top of all the state requirements, there are federal laws that the mine must comply with to protect people and the environment. Larry Tuttle, director of the Center for Environmental Equity, told the Willamette Week he is confident he can make the case to regulators that the mine should not proceed. If the company obeys the law, if it brings jobs, if it can help supply energy to the country, it’s not something that should be stopped.

A bonus for children

O

regon is one of 23 states receiving bonuses from the federal government because of its success in providing health insurance to children. The state will get $22.5 million of the total of $296 million distributed. The real winners, of course, are the children who have access to health care, and their families, which won’t go broke trying to provide it. According to a report from the Oregon Health Authority, the state has cut the percentage of children without insurance from 11.3 percent in 2009 to 5.6 percent in 2011. Oregon’s program provides nocost or low-cost insurance to children under age 19. The federal bonuses ranged from $1.3 million for Idaho to $28.3 million for Maryland. Oregon was among the 16 “Tier 2� states that have exceeded their enrollment targets by more than 10 percent. Oregon was also among only five states that have implemented at least six of the recommended eight features designed to simplify their programs and make them more efficient.

The bonuses were authorized by the Children’s Health Insurance Program Reauthorization Act, which became law in 2009. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported last week that 1.2 million more children nationwide have insurance since that law passed. Oregon has received the bonus twice before, although it had to return roughly $4.6 million of its 2010 bonus after an audit found errors in enrollment numbers. In a news release about the bonuses, the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services said the “performance bonuses help offset the costs states incur when they enroll lower income children in Medicaid. By ensuring that states streamline their enrollment and renewal procedures, the bonuses also give states the incentive to adopt long-term improvements in their children’s health insurance programs.� Although we often chafe at the requirements that federal programs impose on states, Oregon did well to improve the health of its children while benefiting from available federal rewards.

My Nickel’s Worth Mission accomplished? Sunday, Dec. 18, 2011 ‌ The Iraq War is finished. Today in Iraq there is less oil production, more electricity nationwide, 288 times more Iraqis with cellphones, twice as many people with access to potable water, 3.5 times as many people with sanitation systems, more internal refugees, and emigration to other countries has doubled. The U.S. spent $800 billion to $1 trillion — and that is just the money that is accounted for. Most importantly, there were 4,485 U.S. military deaths, 2,100 civilian contractor deaths, 32,000 U.S. soldiers wounded, and 104,000 Iraqi civilian deaths. And do not forget the rightful obligation of our country to cover the cost of helping our honorable wounded veterans regain some semblance of a normal — or at least functional — life. Mission accomplished? I would love an answer from anyone that can justify or even explain why the United States went to war in Iraq and just what benefit our country has gained. Was it worth the cost of human life and ruined lives to bring better cellphone service, electrical service and sanitation to Iraq? Although money pales in comparison to the loss of life and limb to most, $800 billion to a $1 trillion could have been quite a deficit reduction, wouldn’t you say? We should form another deficit reduction supercommittee before the next war and maybe they could accomplish something next time. Or keeping with tradition, maybe not. Mark Parchman Bend

Alternative A is better Protecting the First Street Rapids must be our primary goal. Your

suggestion that bridge Option B-2 is better because it is cheaper fails to price in what the cheaper option really costs us. That is “penny wise and pound foolish.� I live up well away from the bridge, so it is not a question of what I will see from my home. It is a question of what the “cheap� option will do to this remarkable spot. B-2 is an arrow into the area of the river that is an extraordinary amenity used by many: kayakers, swimmers, picnickers, walkers and those who just want to look at the rapids. B-2 would, as Bend Park & Recreation District board member Ruth Williamson eloquently stated, destroy the “feng shui� of this amenity. Alternative A mostly leaves it be. If this amenity of beach, rocks, accessibility and overlook did not already exist, it would cost millions to create. We are so lucky to have it without spending a dime. The socalled “savings� of some $250,000 that B-2 “saves� over A comes at the additional huge “cost� of terrible degradation of this priceless existing amenity. Even Alternative A comes at some visual cost to the rapids area. Downstream views will be impacted. No bridge alternative saves both the existing amenity’s use as well as all downstream views. If a bridge is to be built, Alternative A leaves this natural, invaluable, existing amenity functionally intact and causes far less adverse impact on views. Cheap is not frugal. Gerald H. Itkin Bend

Capell should stop Bend City Councilor Mark Capell has stated at several City Council meetings that he may have a con-

flict of interest with consideration of the ongoing SWIP (surface water improvement project) because his brother works for HDR, the consulting firm that has the contract for design and construction of the project. Capell has recused himself from voting on issues related to HDR, but apparently not from discussing and promoting the arguments in favor of this chosen course of action. Perception of conflict of interest becomes reality the more he speaks out in favor of the conclusions HDR has reached. In light of the fact that the city of Bend has paid HDR more than $3 million over the last 18 months, I would argue that perception is coming closer to reality with each passing day. The city is currently sending HDR in the range of $600,000 per month for contracted services, which works out to about $20,000 per day (weekends and holidays included). It’s time for Capell to stop participating in ongoing discussions, both public and private, regarding SWIP. Eileen Woodward Bend

Save the pond I disagree with The Bulletin editorial of Dec. 21 regarding The Bend Park & Recreation District: â€œâ€Ś it would be hard to argue that pond upkeep is part of its mission.â€? The district’s parks line the banks of the river. The cost of just one of its proposed footbridges would cover the cost of dredging the pond. It is all taxpayer money that the park district spends on buying property, building bridges and erecting buildings. I see saving the pond as a more important use of our taxpayer money. Barbara Buxton Bend

Letters policy

In My View policy

How to submit

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 550 and 650 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or email them to The Bulletin. Write: My Nickel’s Worth / In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 Fax: 541-385-5804 Email: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

We must demand better from our nation’s leaders By Kirstin Berwald Johnson grew up an all-American, smalltown girl, in a very conservative area. Because of this, my dad thought I had better expand my horizons, so he sent me to the University of Oregon. I got my degrees in political science and economics and fell deeply in love with Oregon. However, I did not fall in love with the rain! It took 10 years and a housing crisis, but I finally made it to Central Oregon. This is the place where you can be who you are and people accept it, no questions. I made my career choice — stay-at-home mom — and no one here says, “Oh but you are wasting your degrees.� Being a good wife and mother will always be my top priorities, and people here understand that, so it was quite sur-

I

prising to find myself in Washington, D.C., for a grass-roots political organization! No, it wasn’t Occupy, it was No Labels. This was not a plan, not a career move, not a step toward becoming a politician. It was something that just happened to me. It started in 2004 when my son was diagnosed with autism. I had to learn how to fight just for him to be treated just like any other child just so he could have the opportunities other parents take for granted. I became a fighter! What I have come to realize is that my son is not the only child that needs to be fought for. In fact, it isn’t just the kids that need to be fought for; it is all of us. Families in debt because of medical bills, bloated government agencies that serve politicians not

IN MY VIEW citizens, an education system unable to produce the workers we need, people unable to get jobs because of the horrible practices of credit reporting agencies, bankers interested in profit over people, single moms fulfilling both parenting roles. As I stood at George Washington’s Tomb at Mt. Vernon, at the Jefferson Memorial, at the Lincoln Memorial, in the Capitol building among the statues of the great leaders of our nation, all I could think was, Where are the great leaders of our time? Where are our statesmen? So I joined No Labels, because we the people are the only ones who can demand better from our leaders.

So that is what brought me to Washington, D.C., this December. To make Congress work in the form of 12 proposals, some that are as simple as rule changes that Congress can simply adopt. It was exciting to finally hear talk about really fixing Congress from senators and representatives from both parties. Legislation that would enact the first proposal, “No budget, no pay for Congress,� has already been introduced by Sen. Dean Heller, R-Nev., and Rep. Jim Cooper, D-Tenn. We know, as everyday people, if we don’t work, we don’t get paid. Our leaders should live by the same rules. The other 11 commonsense, nonpartisan proposals are available at www. nolabels.org. This is not about being a Democrat, Republican, independent, moderate, liberal or conservative. It

is about having a government that works for us, the people. I urge everyone, no matter your political belief, to contact Rep. Greg Walden, Sen. Jeff Merkley and Sen. Ron Wyden to tell them we want change. We want a Congress that works! As Thomas Jefferson said, “We in America do not have government by the majority. We have government by the majority who participate.� It is time for us, the voters, to take government back from the special interests, the lobbyists, the extremists. It is time to make Congress work! We are the teeth of democracy. With congressional approval ratings below 10 percent, perhaps our leaders are starting to listen. — Kirstin Berwald Johnson lives in Redmond.


FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

NORTHWEST NEWS

O    D N   Alethia LaVere Aulie, of Redmond

Jerry Harold Newton, of Culver

Oct. 10, 1916 - Dec. 27, 2011 Arrangements: Autumn FuneralsRedmond 541-504-9485 www.autumnfunerals.net Services: Private services Friday December 30, 2011.

Mar. 23, 1928 - Dec. 25, 2011 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals, Redmond, 541-504-9485 www.autumnfunerals.com Services: A service will be held at a later date.

Daniel Lee Gienger, of Prineville

Melburn ‘Mel’ C. Wright, of Medford (Formerly of La Pine)

Aug. 31, 1946 - Dec. 27, 2011 Arrangements: Whispering Pines Funeral Home, 541-416-9733 Services: A memorial service will be held at a later date. Contributions may be made to:

American Cancer Society, 2350 Oakmont Way, Suite #200, Eugene, OR 97401.

Janice Herrin Ean, of Bend

Feb. 7, 1913 - Dec. 23, 2011 Arrangements: Baird Memorial Chapel, La Pine, 541-536-5104 www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: There will be a private urn committal at Eagle Point National Cemetery, to be held at a later date.

Wanda V. Westbrook, of Redmond

Oct. 6, 1924 - Dec. 25, 2011 Services will be held: Saturday, December 31, 11 a.m., at Trinity Episcopal Church, 469 NW Wall St. Bend, OR Contributions may be made to: any organization that promotes wildlife preservation or animal welfare.

Aug. 26, 1934 - Dec. 25, 2011 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals, Redmond, 541-504-9485 www.autumnfuneral.net Services: Memorial service will be held at 11:00 am, Sat., Dec. 31, 2011, at Highland Baptist Church, 3100 Highland Ave., Redmond.

Juanita Norris Doll, of Redmond

Wayne Osmond MacAskill, of Bend

Nov. 28, 1926 - Dec. 24, 2011 Arrangements: Autumn Funeral, Redmond, 541-504-9485 www.autumnfunerals.net Services: A private service will be held at a later date. Contributions may be made to:

Hospice of Redmond-Sisters, 732 SW 23rd St., Redmond, OR 97756

Jan. 12, 1926 - Dec. 25, 2011 Arrangements: Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home, 541-382-2471 www.niswonger-reynolds.com

Services: A memorial service will be held at a later date. Contributions may be made to:

Partners In Care Hospice, 2075 NE Wyatt Ct., Bend, OR 97701.

Obituary policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, email or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825.

Deadlines: Death Notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details.

Phone: 541-617-7825 Email: obits@bendbulletin.com Fax: 541-322-7254

Mail: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708

Ethel Conway May 29, 1905 - Dec. 19, 2011 Ethel Conway, long time resident of Prineville, passed away at age 106 in Roseburg, Oregon, December 19, 2011. She was born in Portland, Oregon, May 29, 1905, moved to an Ontario homestead at Ethel Conway the age of 12, and graduated from Ontario High School in l924. After graduation from the University of Oregon, she was employed with the U.S. Forest Service for 30 years. In retirement, she built or remodeled four homes around Prineville and was active in community affairs and charities. She is survived by nephew, Dennis Michel of Roseburg, and Morrison Conway of Wilsonville; nieces, Aileen Conway of Colorado, and Carol Gregoire of Arizona. She will be remembered for her Irish wit and cheerful attitude plus charitable help for family and friends. Burial Mass was held Tuesday, December 27, 2011, at Mercy Hospital Chapel in Roseburg. Interment will be at Juniper Haven Cemetery in Prineville, January 6 at 2:00 p.m. Memorial contributions may be made in Ethel’s name to St. Vincent DePaul Society at PO Box 545, Prineville, 97754

D E  Deaths of note from around the world: Adrienne Cooper, 65: American-born singer, teacher and curator of Yiddish music who was a pioneer in the effort to preserve the language. Died Sunday in New York City of adrenal cancer. Sean Bonniwell, 71: Lead singer and songwriter of the Music Machine, a 1960s Los Angeles band regarded as one of the most original of the garage-punk era. Died Dec. 20 in Visalia, Calif., of lung cancer. Leopold Hawelka, 100: Iconic owner of Cafe Hawelka — which played host to celebrities, princes, paupers, playwrights, poets and untold thousands for whom a visit to Vienna was unthinkable without a cup of steaming brew served by the bow-tied little man. Died Thursday in Vienna. Samuel Logan Jr., 78: Publisher of the prominent African-American newspaper The Michigan Chronicle. For decades he was known for his dedication to news coverage of the black community. Died Wednesday in Detroit. Stephen Schlossberg, 90: Former general counsel of the United Automobile Workers and a top official in the Labor Department under President Ronald Reagan. Died Dec. 10, in Sarasota, Fla. Louis Silverstein, 92: Former assistant managing editor for The New York Times who helped to update the look of the Times, which influenced the redesign of newspapers from coast to coast. Died Dec. 1. — From wire reports

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Ader’s experiments revealed the mind’s effect on physiology The Associated Press file photo

protocols and guessed that New York Times News Service the drugs used in the injecRobert Ader, an experi- tions might have had some mental psychologist who bearing on the deaths. They was among the first scien- could have used any drug that tists to show how mental caused stomach pain without processes influence the doing serious harm. But the body’s immune system, a researchers discovered that finding that changed mod- they had unwittingly picked ern medicine, died Dec. 20 Cytoxan, which besides causin Pittsford, N.Y. He ing stomachaches was 79. suppresses the imFEATURED His death folmune system. At lowed a long illness OBITUARY first they suspected and complications that the rats had died of a fracture suffered in a from an overdose of Cytoxan. fall, his daughter Deborah Then they determined that the Ader said. dosage the rats received had Ader, who spent his en- been too low to support that tire career as a professor of explanation. psychiatry and psychology So they developed a theory, at the University of Roches- which became a landmark ter School of Medicine and of medical science as further Dentistry, conducted some experiments proved it corof the original experiments rect: The rats died because the in a field he named himself, mere taste of saccharine-laced psychoneuroimmunology. water was enough to trigger His initial research, in neurological signals that did the 1970s, became a touch- indeed suppress their immune stone for studies that have systems — exactly as if they since mapped the vast had been overdosed with Cycommunications network toxan. The rats succumbed to among immune cells, hor- bacterial and viral infections mones and neurotransmit- they were unable to fight off. ters. It introduced a field of It was an example of the soresearch that nailed down called placebo effect, only the science behind notions in this case it did not fool the once considered magi- brain into thinking it had been cal thinking: that medita- given something beneficial but tion helps reduce arterial rather the opposite. plaque; that social bonds improve cancer survival; The placebo effect The findings were “inconthat people under stress catch more colds; and that trovertible,� Anne Harrington, placebos work not only on a Harvard professor of the the human mind but also history of science, wrote in on supposedly insentient the 1997 book “The Placebo Effect.� cells. “The fact that he had At the core of Ader’s breakthrough research achieved this in rats rather was an insight already ob- than humans was a further vious to any grandmother blockbuster,� she continued, who ever said, “Stop wor- “because it undermined the rying or you’ll make your- frequent assumption that plaself sick.� He demonstrated cebo effects were a product scientifically that stress of peculiarly human interperworsens illness — some- sonal processes.� Robert Ader was born on times even triggering it — and that reducing stress Feb. 20, 1932, in New York City, the older son of Mae and is essential to health care. That idea, now widely Nathan Ader. His father, who accepted among medical owned a liquor wholesale comresearchers, contradicted pany, died in a car accident in a previous principle of bio- 1945 when Robert was a teenchemistry, which said that ager. After graduating from the immune system was the Horace Mann School, he autonomous. As late as received his bachelor’s degree 1985, the idea of a connec- from Tulane University and, in tion between the brain and 1957, his Ph.D. in psychology the immune system was from Cornell. Soon after, he became an asdismissed in an editorial in The New England Journal sistant professor in the department of psychology at the Uniof Medicine as “folklore.� “Today there is not a versity of Rochester, where he physician in the country went on to hold many teaching who does not accept the and research posts. He retired science Bob Ader set in mo- in July as a professor emeritus tion,� said Dr. Bruce Rabin, of psychosocial medicine. Besides his daughter Debofounder of the Brain, Behavior and Immunity Cen- rah, he is survived by his wife, ter at the University of Pitts- Gayle; three other daughters, burgh Medical Center, who Janet, Rini and Leslie Ader; considered Ader a mentor. and a grandson. Since he inaugurated the “He attracted interest in the field and made it possible study of psychoneuroimmuto prove that ‘mind-body’ nology (usually referred to as PNI), Ader had to defend its is real.� Ader said his break- premise against doubters in through began in 1975 with the medical establishment and what he called “scientific later to disassociate it from New Age therapies that he serendipity.� called “flaky� because they Experiment with rats had not been grounded in solid He and a fellow research- scientific experimentation. er, Dr. Nicholas Cohen, were Deborah Ader, a psycholconducting an unrelated ogy researcher, said a sense of experiment about taste modesty had been at the core aversion involving rats and of her father’s curiosity as a saccharine-sweetened wa- scientist. ter when they stumbled on “My father used to say, ‘I a mysterious phenomenon. just didn’t know any better,’ � In the experiment, one she said, recounting how he group of rats was given had described his pioneering sweetened water accom- research. panied by an injection that He told her, she recalled, caused stomachaches. (A “I didn’t know the immune control group got only the system wasn’t supposed to be sweetened water.) When connected to the brain.� the injections stopped, and the rats that had experienced stomachaches refused to drink the water, researchers force-fed them with eye-droppers in order to complete the experiment’s protocols. Ader and Cohen had expected the conditioned rats to refuse the drink. They had not anticipated that forcing them to drink would eventually kill them, however, which it did, some time afterward. The two reviewed their By Paul Vitello

Get a taste of Food, Home & Garden In

AT HOME

Birds land on an abandoned pier, with the Simpson Tacoma Kraft pulp mill in the background, in Commencement Bay in Ruston, Wash.

States struggle to regulate toxic chemicals By Jim Malewitz Stateline.org

WASHINGTON — In Commencement Bay, a slice of Puget Sound just outside Tacoma, Wash., environmental officials haven’t found it easy to purge the toxic remnants of more than a century of chemical-belching industry. Washington state and Tacoma have spent almost $100 million trying to clean up pollutants discharged by the lumberyards and processing plants that once thrived along the waterfront. The efforts have made progress. Recent studies have shown improved fish life along with a decrease in levels of such toxic metals as mercury, arsenic and lead. But that research has also shown an increase in levels of another group of other troublesome chemicals common in consumer product packaging and even children’s toys: plasticizers called phthalates that enter the bay through stormwater runoff. The chemicals are considered endocrine disruptors, meaning that they may cause birth defects or developmental problems in animals and people, including, in rare cases, the feminization of males. With hopes of decreasing such potential dangers, Washington state has passed some of the most comprehensive chemical regulations in the country, including rules that classify 66 chemicals as “of high risk to children.� Companies are required to disclose whether the chemicals are in their products. But identifying and eliminating such toxic substances from everyday products is a tall — if not impossible — order for a resource-strapped state. “When (toxic) chemicals come from a pipe or a smokestack, we have the tools and the knowhow to do our job,� Ted Sturdevant, director of Washington’s Department of Ecology, said last month at a legislative hearing before Congress. “But when they come from ubiquitous products like the plastic casing of a television, or the foam in our furniture, we haven’t had the tools or the know-how to do our job.� States across the country are trying to bear the burden left by what many people — from environmental health advocates to chemical manufacturers — have

“When (toxic chemicals) come from ubiquitous products like the plastic casing of a television, or the foam in our furniture, we haven’t had the tools or the know-how to do our job.� — Ted Sturdevant, director, Washington State Department of Ecology

described as a gaping hole in federal law. The uneven nature of state regulation leaves virtually no one satisfied. Advocates of change now hope the increased awareness in state legislatures will translate into a sense of urgency in Congress, as it considers the latest attempt to overhaul the 35-year-old and never-updated Toxic Chemicals Safety Act. Much has changed in chemical manufacturing since 1976, when Congress passed the Toxic Chemicals Safety Act, and science continues to add volumes of new information about chemical hazards every year. Charlotte Brody, of the BlueGreen Alliance, a coalition of labor unions and environmental groups, cites the much-evolved understanding of Agent Orange, the code name for the herbicide the U.S. dumped on enemy forests during the Vietnam War. For hazardous chemicals with less dramatic and immediate effects, EPA has lacked the tools to take action. In the past decade, at least 18 states have adopted more than 71 chemical policies — largely with bipartisan support. The policies range from compiling comprehensive lists of hazardous chemicals, as in Washington, California, Maine and Minnesota, to more piecemeal prohibition of chemicals used in manufacturing. But state environmental officials say such regulations are burdensome to enact, because, like EPA, state agencies have trouble compiling necessary information on each chemical. In Washington state, Sturdevant says “it’s a lot of work for a lot of folks� to research chemical hazards — a process that can take years for just one chemical. The inconsistency of policing substances has led many in the chemical industry to call for more federal oversight. One federal policy would be easier to navigate than a “complex maze of regulations across the country,� says Robert Matthews, who represents the Consumer Specialty Products Association.

New Year’s Holiday Deadlines PAID OBITUARIES .......DEADLINE Sunday 1/1/12 .................. Friday 12/30 10 a.m. Monday 1/2/12 .................. Friday 12/30 10 a.m. Tuesday 1/3/12 ................. Friday 12/30 10 a.m.

DEATH NOTICES..........DEADLINE Sunday 1/1/12 .................. Friday 12/30 3 p.m. Monday 1/2/12 .................. Friday 12/30 3 p.m. Tuesday 1/3/12 ................. Friday 12/30 3 p.m.

Every Tuesday

Obituary Dept. 541-617-7825


WE AT H ER FOR EC A ST

C 6 THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2011

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LP ©2011.

TODAY, DECEMBER 30 Today: Mainly cloudy, rain changing to mixed showers, windy, cooler.

HIGH Ben Burkel

44

Bob Shaw

SATURDAY Tonight: Mostly cloudy, showers ending, much colder.

LOW

20

Astoria 46/37

51/45

Cannon Beach 48/39

Hillsboro Portland 48/34 46/32

Tillamook 50/32

Salem

48/33

47/29

49/31

Maupin

43/25

46/34

30s

41/19

46/31

Coos Bay

Crescent Lake

49/37

Roseburg

50/38

44/20

Gold Beach 53/39

46/28

John Day

Unity 44/26

45/27

Vale

40s

50/30

Juntura 48/28

38/18

Ontario EAST 50/29 Breezy with showers likely today. Nyssa Rain and snow 50/30 tonight.

44/25

Jordan Valley Frenchglen

CENTRAL Rain and higher elevation snow today. Rain and snow showers tonight.

47/25

Yesterday’s state extremes

49/26

• 60°

Paisley

Hermiston

42/23

Chiloquin

Medford

40/21

Klamath Falls 41/25

Ashland

51/41

Baker City

WEST Breezy with rain likely today. Rain tapering to showers tonight.

43/24

47/30

Brookings

39/22

Burns Riley

40/19

Silver Lake

39/14

Grants Pass 47/30

39/17

41/19

45/27

Christmas Valley

Port Orford 49/39

Hampton

Fort Rock 42/18

39/15

Chemult

49/35

Union

Brothers 41/16

La Pine 40/16

Crescent

34/10

Bandon

43/23

39/17

Oakridge

Cottage Grove

Joseph

44/28

Mitchell 43/22

Prineville 41/21 Sisters Redmond Paulina 37/17 42/19 44/20 Sunriver Bend

Eugene

53/41

Spray 49/24

Enterprise 41/18

La Grande Granite

39/17

40s

51/36

Florence

46/25

Madras

Camp Sherman

47/32

42/22

Condon

Warm Springs

Corvallis Yachats

49/29

47/25

44/24

47/32

Wallowa

47/31

Ruggs

Willowdale

Albany

Newport

Pendleton

50/33

45/27

49/34

47/35

Hermiston 47/29

Arlington

Wasco

Sandy

Government Camp 30/8

46/34

46/32

The Biggs Dalles 44/29

45/33

McMinnville

Lincoln City

Umatilla

Hood River

48/26

• 33°

Fields

Lakeview

McDermitt

50/28

43/25

Baker City

46/24

-30s

-20s

Yesterday’s extremes

-10s

0s

Vancouver 45/32 Seattle 46/35

10s

Calgary 41/22

20s

30s

Saskatoon 31/19

40s

Winnipeg 28/22

50s

60s

Thunder Bay 28/17

70s

80s

90s

100s 110s

Quebec 19/17

Halifax 30/26 P ortland To ronto Portland 36/32 39/31 48/34 St. Paul Green Bay Buffalo Boston • 83° 33/27 Boise 42/33 Detroit 35/24 48/40 Rapid City 53/30 41/30 Paso Robles, Calif. New York 53/33 51/42 Des Moines • -5° Cheyenne Philadelphia 46/31 Chicago 53/37 Saranac Lake, N.Y. 51/40 Columbus 43/36 Omaha San Francisco Salt Lake 50/35 Washington, D. C. 51/32 • 2.90” City 58/47 53/41 Las Denver Brookings, Ore. Louisville 53/31 Kansas City Vegas 58/32 54/36 55/34 St. Louis 69/44 57/38 Charlotte Nashville 59/42 Oklahoma City Los Angeles 60/35 Little Rock 61/37 66/52 64/40 Phoenix Albuquerque Atlanta 72/46 Honolulu 54/33 60/42 Birmingham 80/67 Tijuana 66/42 Dallas 73/48 67/43 New Orleans 71/55 Orlando Houston 72/50 Chihuahua 72/53 69/33 Miami 75/63 Monterrey 80/51 La Paz 78/49 Mazatlan 79/49 Anchorage 11/-1 Juneau 25/22

(in the 48 contiguous states):

Billings 51/31

Bismarck 40/27

FRONTS

Enterprise ice rink aspires to year-round operations By Katy Nesbitt The La G rande O bserver

ENTERPRISE — On a bright, shiny afternoon the week before Christmas, Enterprise Elementary School students took to the ice at the Wallowa Valley Community Ice Rink. Fitted with figure or hockey skates, kids got tips on skating from Rink Manager Heather Risseeuw. “There’s a Wayne Gretzky or Nancy Kerrigan out there,” Risseeuw said. Board member and rink volunteer Bill Oliver said the conditions were optimal. “It’s a great season,” Oliver said, “as good as ice as we’ve had by Christmas.” The rink has been a source of winter fun for several years, but Risseeuw wants to expand the opportunities for skaters of all ages.

TUESDAY

Mostly cloudy.

HIGH LOW

Mostly cloudy.

Mostly cloudy, slight chance of showers.

HIGH LOW

HIGH LOW

46 24

HIGH LOW

46 27

49 28

BEND ALMANAC

PLANET WATCH

TEMPERATURE

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . .6:09 a.m. . . . . . 3:12 p.m. Venus . . . . . .9:44 a.m. . . . . . 7:21 p.m. Mars. . . . . .10:24 p.m. . . . . 11:23 a.m. Jupiter. . . . .12:36 p.m. . . . . . 2:07 a.m. Saturn. . . . . .1:46 a.m. . . . . 12:44 p.m. Uranus . . . .11:28 a.m. . . . . 11:30 p.m.

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . 0.07” High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46/36 Record high . . . . . . . . 62 in 1956 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . 0.16” Average month to date. . . 1.66” Record low. . . . . . . . -18 in 1990 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.92” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Average year to date. . . . 11.61” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.29.87 Record 24 hours . . .0.44 in 2003 *Melted liquid equivalent

Sunrise today . . . . . . 7:40 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 4:36 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 7:40 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 4:37 p.m. Moonrise today . . . 10:47 a.m. Moonset today . . . 11:31 p.m.

Moon phases First

Full

Dec. 31

Jan. 8

Last

Jan. 16 Jan. 22

OREGON CITIES City

Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

Astoria . . . . . . . .51/43/0.55 Baker City . . . . . 50/33/trace Brookings . . . . . .52/50/2.90 Burns. . . . . . . . . .47/35/0.10 Eugene . . . . . . . .55/47/0.64 Klamath Falls . . .50/42/0.02 Lakeview. . . . . . .43/37/0.00 La Pine . . . . . . . .43/35/0.15 Medford . . . . . . .52/46/0.16 Newport . . . . . . .52/46/0.43 North Bend . . . . .55/48/0.46 Ontario . . . . . . . 53/33/trace Pendleton . . . . . .57/40/0.12 Portland . . . . . . .56/46/0.42 Prineville . . . . . . .48/33/0.01 Redmond. . . . . . .48/35/0.35 Roseburg. . . . . . .55/48/0.29 Salem . . . . . . . . .56/48/0.43 Sisters . . . . . . . . .50/41/0.05 The Dalles . . . . . .57/44/0.23

Friday Hi/Lo/W

New

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX Saturday Hi/Lo/W

. . . . . 46/37/r . . . . .43/36/sh . . . .46/28/sh . . . . .36/19/pc . . . . . 51/41/r . . . . .55/44/pc . . . . 47/22/rs . . . . .34/15/pc . . . . . 46/34/r . . . . .41/34/pc . . . . 41/25/rs . . . . .37/25/pc . . . . . 43/25/r . . . . .38/25/pc . . . . 40/16/rs . . . . . .37/18/c . . . . . 47/30/r . . . . . .44/29/c . . . . . 47/35/r . . . . .45/37/sh . . . . . 49/38/r . . . . .49/39/pc . . . .50/29/sh . . . . .38/21/pc . . . .47/31/sh . . . . . .43/25/c . . . . . 48/34/r . . . . .40/34/sh . . . . 41/21/rs . . . . . .42/20/c . . . .48/23/sh . . . . . .42/22/c . . . .49/35/sh . . . . . .40/40/c . . . . . 49/34/r . . . . .42/33/pc . . . . 42/19/rs . . . . . .36/24/c . . . .49/31/sh . . . . . .43/26/c

SKI REPORT

The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

0 0

LOW

MEDIUM 2

4

HIGH 6

V.HIGH 8

PRECIPITATION

10

ROAD CONDITIONS Snow level and road conditions representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday. Key: T.T. = Traction Tires.

Ski report from around the state, representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday: Snow accumulation in inches Ski area Last 24 hours Base Depth Anthony Lakes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . .30-32 Hoodoo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Mt. Ashland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . .21-32 Mt. Bachelor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 . . . . . . . . 32 Mt. Hood Meadows . . . . . . . . . . . 2 . . . . . . . . 41 Mt. Hood Ski Bowl . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . . . .21-30 Timberline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 . . . . . . . . 51 Warner Canyon . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . no report Willamette Pass . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report

Pass Conditions I-5 at Siskiyou Summit . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires I-84 at Cabbage Hill . . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Aspen, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . .16-20 Hwy. 20 at Santiam Pass . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Mammoth Mtn., California . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . .18-24 Hwy. 26 at Government Camp. . Carry chains or T. Tires Park City, Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . . . 18 Hwy. 26 at Ochoco Divide . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Squaw Valley, California . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . . . 12 Hwy. 58 at Willamette Pass . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Sun Valley, Idaho. . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . . . 20 Hwy. 138 at Diamond Lake . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Taos, New Mexico. . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . .45-53 Hwy. 242 at McKenzie Pass . . . . . . . . Closed for season Vail, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . . . 18 For links to the latest ski conditions visit: For up-to-minute conditions turn to: www.skicentral.com/oregon.html www.tripcheck.com or call 511 Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS -40s

MONDAY

Mostly cloudy and cooler.

40 21

FORECAST: STATE Seaside

SUNDAY

Risseeuw said, “Getting kids out skating is good exercise and good camaraderie.” The trouble with kids is they are always growing, so Risseeuw devised a plan she calls, “Kids on Ice are Kool,” to help kids and parents. She wants to start a lease program with 40 pairs of skates. Each year a child can be fitted for a pair of skates and pay a yearly fee of $25. Each year, as they grow, they can lease a bigger pair. Risseeuw — who has seven years’ experience working at the Inn at the Seventh Mountain’s rink — said she is writing grants to the Wildhorse Foundation and Pacific Power and Light to kick-start the lease program, but is also seeking donations. To expand the rink’s ample opportunities for open skating, hockey and broomball, Ris-

seeuw would like to add hockey tournaments and figure skating exhibitions in the future, but she and Oliver want to reconstruct the rink to ensure more stable skating conditions. Because the rink is not refrigerated or shielded from the sun’s rays, it has a short season, Oliver said. “It’s unique because it’s the only all-natural cold rink; there’s no other in Oregon,” Risseeuw said. Oliver said the city has plans to replace the park’s bathrooms. In addition, he said, there is a long-term plan to level ground, pour a concrete slab, possibly with refrigeration, and build an open-air cover or roof to shield the ice from the sun. He said he sees the slab being used for outdoor weddings and possibly as a basketball court so it can be used year-round.

Yesterday Friday Saturday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . . .69/33/0.00 . . . 66/37/s . . 70/39/s Akron . . . . . . . . . .40/22/0.00 . .47/30/sh . 42/37/pc Albany. . . . . . . . . .28/16/0.00 . .41/32/sh . .41/26/rs Albuquerque. . . . .56/27/0.00 . . . 54/33/s . . 57/30/s Anchorage . . . . . . .11/4/0.00 . . 11/-1/sn . . 10/2/pc Atlanta . . . . . . . . .57/31/0.00 . .60/42/pc . . 61/44/s Atlantic City . . . . .40/24/0.00 . . .55/43/c . 47/39/pc Austin . . . . . . . . . .71/33/0.00 . . . 71/45/s . . 71/54/s Baltimore . . . . . . .41/25/0.00 . . .52/40/c . 50/34/pc Billings . . . . . . . . .51/41/0.00 . . .51/31/c . 40/23/pc Birmingham . . . . .59/31/0.00 . .66/42/pc . . 66/46/s Bismarck. . . . . . . .36/27/0.04 . .40/27/pc . 40/22/sn Boise . . . . . . . . . . .57/44/0.00 . .53/30/sh . 40/23/pc Boston. . . . . . . . . .33/23/0.00 . . .48/40/c . 48/32/sh Bridgeport, CT. . . .34/23/0.00 . . .47/37/c . 47/31/sh Buffalo . . . . . . . . .32/16/0.01 . .42/33/sh . 38/34/pc Burlington, VT. . . . .23/7/0.00 . .32/30/sn . .37/23/rs Caribou, ME . . . . . .16/7/0.00 . .17/14/pc . 29/12/sn Charleston, SC . . .60/32/0.00 . . . 65/47/s . . 69/45/s Charlotte. . . . . . . .53/25/0.00 . .59/42/pc . . 60/39/s Chattanooga. . . . .56/28/0.01 . .60/38/pc . . 61/39/s Cheyenne . . . . . . .50/41/0.00 . .53/37/pc . . 42/21/c Chicago. . . . . . . . .48/31/0.01 . . 43/36/rs . 49/42/pc Cincinnati . . . . . . .54/31/0.00 . . .52/36/c . . 52/38/s Cleveland . . . . . . .42/27/0.00 . .47/31/sh . . 42/41/s Colorado Springs .58/39/0.00 . .54/31/pc . 53/23/pc Columbia, MO . . .59/32/0.06 . . . 54/34/s . . 58/37/s Columbia, SC . . . .60/27/0.00 . . . 65/42/s . . 67/40/s Columbus, GA. . . .61/31/0.00 . . . 66/45/s . . 67/48/s Columbus, OH. . . .46/28/0.00 . .50/35/sh . 48/37/pc Concord, NH. . . . .29/16/0.00 . . .35/26/c . .43/23/rs Corpus Christi. . . .77/38/0.00 . . . 71/55/s . 74/57/pc Dallas Ft Worth. . .67/34/0.00 . . . 67/43/s . . 72/41/s Dayton . . . . . . . . .47/30/0.00 . .47/35/sh . 48/36/pc Denver. . . . . . . . . .56/37/0.00 . .58/32/pc . 48/27/pc Des Moines. . . . . .54/33/0.00 . .46/31/pc . . 57/33/c Detroit. . . . . . . . . .38/25/0.04 . . 41/30/rs . . 38/37/s Duluth. . . . . . . . . .25/21/0.09 . .32/24/pc . .35/23/rs El Paso. . . . . . . . . .62/28/0.00 . . . 62/37/s . . 65/38/s Fairbanks. . . . . . -13/-32/0.02 . .-30/-35/c . -20/-35/c Fargo. . . . . . . . . . .35/18/0.00 . . . 33/28/s . .41/21/rs Flagstaff . . . . . . . .61/19/0.00 . . . 58/19/s . . 54/17/s

Yesterday Friday Saturday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . . .40/27/0.04 . . 40/28/rs . .40/34/rs Green Bay. . . . . . .36/23/0.02 . .35/24/sn . 39/32/sh Greensboro. . . . . .52/26/0.00 . .60/40/pc . . 59/36/s Harrisburg. . . . . . .34/21/0.00 . .47/34/sh . 47/29/pc Hartford, CT . . . . .33/22/0.00 . . .47/37/c . 49/28/sh Helena. . . . . . . . . .50/31/0.00 . .44/25/sh . 33/17/sn Honolulu. . . . . . . .82/74/0.00 . . . 80/67/s . . 80/66/s Houston . . . . . . . .63/43/0.00 . . . 72/53/s . 73/58/pc Huntsville . . . . . . .58/30/0.00 . .61/37/pc . . 62/41/s Indianapolis . . . . .51/33/0.00 . . .49/34/c . 48/39/pc Jackson, MS . . . . .64/31/0.00 . .70/45/pc . . 72/47/s Jacksonville. . . . . .63/38/0.00 . . . 68/50/s . . 70/53/s Juneau. . . . . . . . . .34/29/0.03 . .25/22/sn . 29/24/sn Kansas City. . . . . .55/32/0.00 . . . 55/34/s . 61/35/pc Lansing . . . . . . . . .37/25/0.06 . . 39/27/rs . .38/33/rs Las Vegas . . . . . . .63/41/0.00 . . . 69/44/s . . 67/44/s Lexington . . . . . . .50/31/0.00 . .54/36/pc . 52/39/pc Lincoln. . . . . . . . . .57/26/0.00 . . . 52/28/s . 59/33/pc Little Rock. . . . . . .63/32/0.00 . .64/40/pc . . 66/41/s Los Angeles. . . . . .69/49/0.00 . . . 66/52/s . . 71/53/s Louisville. . . . . . . .56/33/0.00 . .54/36/pc . . 58/43/s Madison, WI . . . . .44/28/0.00 . .37/26/sn . 42/29/pc Memphis. . . . . . . .59/35/0.00 . .64/41/pc . . 65/47/s Miami . . . . . . . . . .76/58/0.00 . . . 75/63/s . . 78/66/s Milwaukee . . . . . .44/28/0.00 . . 37/29/rs . 43/36/pc Minneapolis . . . . .37/30/0.00 . .33/27/pc . 47/26/sh Nashville. . . . . . . .55/28/0.00 . .60/35/pc . . 61/41/s New Orleans. . . . .70/42/0.00 . . . 71/55/s . . 72/56/s New York . . . . . . .35/24/0.00 . . .51/42/c . 49/36/sh Newark, NJ . . . . . .35/24/0.00 . . .50/40/c . . 49/33/c Norfolk, VA . . . . . .52/28/0.00 . .61/45/pc . . 59/38/s Oklahoma City . . .65/31/0.00 . . . 61/37/s . . 67/33/s Omaha . . . . . . . . .52/32/0.02 . . . 51/32/s . 58/33/pc Orlando. . . . . . . . .66/42/0.00 . . . 72/50/s . . 74/54/s Palm Springs. . . . .76/42/0.00 . . . 74/49/s . . 74/50/s Peoria . . . . . . . . . .53/33/0.00 . .49/31/sh . 51/37/pc Philadelphia . . . . .39/26/0.00 . . .51/40/c . 49/33/pc Phoenix. . . . . . . . .70/42/0.00 . . . 72/46/s . . 72/48/s Pittsburgh . . . . . . .40/19/0.01 . .48/35/sh . 44/33/pc Portland, ME. . . . .29/18/0.00 . . .36/32/c . .44/29/rs Providence . . . . . .33/22/0.00 . . .49/39/c . 51/30/sh Raleigh . . . . . . . . .56/26/0.00 . .61/42/pc . . 61/36/s

Yesterday Friday Saturday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . . .51/29/0.03 . . .53/33/c . . 43/24/c Reno . . . . . . . . . . .61/37/0.00 . . .59/25/c . 44/28/pc Richmond . . . . . . .49/25/0.00 . .61/41/pc . . 60/36/s Rochester, NY . . . .27/10/0.00 . .42/32/sh . 36/30/pc Sacramento. . . . . .56/36/0.00 . .58/37/sh . 59/36/pc St. Louis. . . . . . . . .61/38/0.00 . .57/38/pc . 60/42/pc Salt Lake City . . . .56/30/0.00 . . .53/31/c . 38/25/pc San Antonio . . . . .71/35/0.00 . . . 73/48/s . . 73/57/s San Diego . . . . . . .70/45/0.00 . . . 67/49/s . . 69/51/s San Francisco . . . .56/46/0.00 . .57/44/sh . 58/44/pc San Jose . . . . . . . .63/44/0.00 . . .60/41/c . 61/41/pc Santa Fe . . . . . . . .50/22/0.00 . . . 50/26/s . . 48/24/s

Yesterday Friday Saturday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Savannah . . . . . . .62/34/0.00 . . . 66/48/s . . 70/48/s Seattle. . . . . . . . . .47/44/0.39 . . . 46/35/r . 43/34/sh Sioux Falls. . . . . . .42/26/0.00 . .44/28/pc . 50/27/pc Spokane . . . . . . . .41/35/0.23 . .45/28/sh . 34/21/pc Springfield, MO . .60/33/0.00 . . . 56/33/s . . 60/37/s Tampa. . . . . . . . . .68/47/0.00 . . . 71/51/s . . 76/55/s Tucson. . . . . . . . . .72/38/0.00 . . . 75/42/s . . 73/43/s Tulsa . . . . . . . . . . .68/34/0.00 . . . 61/37/s . . 65/38/s Washington, DC . .44/31/0.00 . . .53/41/c . 52/35/pc Wichita . . . . . . . . .60/27/0.00 . . . 59/33/s . 61/33/pc Yakima . . . . . . . . .53/30/0.01 . .43/24/sh . . 34/23/c Yuma. . . . . . . . . . .75/46/0.00 . . . 75/46/s . . 76/48/s

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . . .46/37/0.00 . .42/39/pc . 48/44/sh Athens. . . . . . . . . .51/37/0.00 . .54/44/sh . 51/42/sh Auckland. . . . . . . .72/66/0.00 . . . 71/64/r . . .73/64/t Baghdad . . . . . . . .61/45/0.00 . . . 63/39/s . . 64/43/c Bangkok . . . . . . not available . .88/72/pc . 90/74/pc Beijing. . . . . . . . . .27/18/0.00 . .40/19/pc . 37/18/pc Beirut . . . . . . . . . .63/52/0.00 . . . 66/54/s . 64/54/sh Berlin. . . . . . . . . . .45/39/0.00 . . 38/32/rs . . 39/32/c Bogota . . . . . . . . .70/50/0.00 . .67/51/sh . 70/52/sh Budapest. . . . . . . .37/34/0.00 . .35/30/sn . 34/25/pc Buenos Aires. . . . .88/72/0.00 . .88/65/pc . . 87/64/s Cabo San Lucas . .79/55/0.00 . . . 80/56/s . 80/59/pc Cairo . . . . . . . . . . .64/48/0.00 . . .70/53/c . 66/50/pc Calgary . . . . . . . . .45/27/0.00 . .41/22/pc . . 28/9/pc Cancun . . . . . . . . .79/61/0.00 . . . 79/68/t . 81/70/pc Dublin . . . . . . . . . .46/41/0.00 . .52/48/sh . 52/44/sh Edinburgh. . . . . . .41/36/0.00 . .40/38/sh . 48/43/sh Geneva . . . . . . . . .45/30/0.00 . . 36/31/rs . . .45/41/r Harare. . . . . . . . . .79/64/0.00 . . . 75/61/t . . .73/60/t Hong Kong . . . . . .72/61/0.00 . . .69/61/c . 71/61/pc Istanbul. . . . . . . . .45/36/0.00 . .48/35/pc . . .49/43/r Jerusalem . . . . . . .58/36/0.00 . . .63/48/c . 61/44/pc Johannesburg. . . .72/59/0.00 . . . 75/59/t . . .78/61/t Lima . . . . . . . . . . .79/66/0.00 . .77/68/pc . 76/66/pc Lisbon . . . . . . . . . .61/41/0.00 . . . 60/43/s . . 61/45/s London . . . . . . . . .50/41/0.00 . .48/45/sh . . 54/50/c Madrid . . . . . . . . .52/30/0.00 . . . 51/28/s . 56/32/pc Manila. . . . . . . . . .88/77/0.00 . . . 85/75/t . . .86/74/t

Mecca . . . . . . . . . .91/68/0.00 . . . 92/69/s . . 93/70/s Mexico City. . . . . .73/45/0.00 . .75/45/pc . 76/44/pc Montreal. . . . . . . . . .7/0/0.00 . . .23/21/c . .24/16/sf Moscow . . . . . . . .32/23/0.00 . . 32/29/sf . 30/26/sn Nairobi . . . . . . . . .73/61/0.00 . .76/58/pc . . 77/56/s Nassau . . . . . . . . .77/66/0.00 . .81/69/pc . 82/71/pc New Delhi. . . . . . .70/45/0.00 . . . 68/43/s . . 70/45/s Osaka . . . . . . . . . .52/28/0.00 . .45/30/pc . . 48/34/s Oslo. . . . . . . . . . . .39/30/0.00 . .30/20/pc . 30/28/sn Ottawa . . . . . . . . . . 3/-6/0.00 . . .24/22/c . .25/18/sf Paris. . . . . . . . . . . .48/37/0.00 . .46/43/sh . 53/47/sh Rio de Janeiro. . . .79/72/0.00 . .81/71/pc . . 80/71/c Rome. . . . . . . . . . .52/37/0.00 . .55/37/pc . 56/39/pc Santiago . . . . . . . .90/55/0.00 . . . 90/59/s . . .85/58/t Sao Paulo . . . . . . .70/61/0.00 . .80/64/pc . . 78/65/c Sapporo . . . . . . . .30/27/0.00 . .32/29/sn . .31/22/sf Seoul. . . . . . . . . . .34/19/0.00 . . . 36/22/s . 35/21/pc Shanghai. . . . . . . .52/43/0.00 . .50/42/pc . 51/42/pc Singapore . . . . . . .82/77/0.00 . . . 87/76/t . . .89/77/t Stockholm. . . . . . .45/37/0.00 . . .33/27/c . . 29/23/s Sydney. . . . . . . . . .72/64/0.00 . .70/64/sh . . 72/64/s Taipei. . . . . . . . . . .68/63/0.00 . .70/59/sh . 70/58/sh Tel Aviv . . . . . . . . .66/41/0.00 . . .68/50/c . 65/50/sh Tokyo. . . . . . . . . . .50/36/0.00 . .49/37/pc . 48/35/pc Toronto . . . . . . . . .30/10/0.00 . . 39/31/rs . . 33/29/s Vancouver. . . . . . .46/41/0.00 . . . 45/32/r . . .41/36/r Vienna. . . . . . . . . .45/28/0.00 . . 37/31/rs . . 36/31/c Warsaw. . . . . . . . .41/34/0.00 . . 37/31/rs . .33/26/sf


SPORTS

Scoreboard, D2 Prep sports, D3 College football, D3 NBA, D4

D

NHL, D4 College basketball, D5 Adventure Sports, D6

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2011

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

LOCALLY

MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL

Late registration for girls hoops

Ducks win Pac-12 opener; Beavers lose

Late registration for the Bend Park & Recreation District’s 2012 middle school girls basketball program is currently being accepted. The program is open to all girls who are in grades 6 through 8 and are living within the Bend-La Pine Schools district. The registration fee is $54; registration is available online at https://register. bendparksandrec.org or in person at the park district office, 799 S.W. Columbia St. The program begins during the week of Jan. 9 and continues through March 1. Team rosters for some grades at some schools may already be full. For more information, call the park district office at 541-389-7275. — Bulletin staff report

• Transfer Olu Ashaolu scores 23 to lead Oregon past Washington State

• Oregon State falls to Washington on the road as its rally comes up short

By Nicholas K. Geranios

The Associated Press SEATTLE — Tony Wroten thought this was the going to be the game with zero turnovers. Then, he slipped and threw a pass away on Washington’s first possession. “The very first play, I was like, ‘Oh no, here we go again Tony,’” Wroten said. Wroten turned it over just once more, powering Washington past Oregon State 95-80 with 26 points, nine rebounds and four assists in the Pac12 opener for both teams Thursday night. Joe Burton scored 18 points to lead the Beavers. It was Wroten’s most efficient night in college. Wroten, a true freshman, entered the game with 49 turnovers and 35 assists. Thursday was just his second game with more assists than

The Associated Press

SPOKANE, Wash. — Washington State wasn’t too worried about Oregon’s Olu Ashaolu going into Thursday’s game. The Cougars should have been. Ashaolu, a transfer from Louisiana Tech, scored 23 points and grabbed 10 rebounds as the hot-shooting Ducks beat Washington State 92-75 in the Pac-12 Conference opener for both teams. Ashaolu, who was nine of 11 from the field, said the difference in this game was moving down low after spending more time on the perimeter in previous games. “That’s what I call home on the basketball court,” Ashaolu said. Oregon shot 69 percent from the field and never trailed in blowing out the Cougars.

Young Kwak / The Associated Press

Oregon’s Olu Ashaolu (5) dunks against Washington State’s D.J. Shelton during Thursday night’s game in Spokane, Wash.

“We are playing like it’s conference time,” Ashaolu said. “Things just took off.” See Ducks / D5

Elaine Thompson / The Associated Press

Oregon State’s Angus Brandt shoots over Washington’s Terrence Ross in the first half of Thursday night’s game in Seattle.

turnovers. “Tony was very good,” Washington head coach Lorenzo Romar said. See Beavers / D5

SKIING Teen gets World Cup podium LIENZ, Austria — Teenager Mikaela Shiffrin used to watch skiers Marlies Schild and Lindsey Vonn on television when she was a kid. On Thursday, the 16-year-old high school student was standing alongside Schild on a World Cup slalom podium, leaving U.S. teammate Vonn more than a second and a half behind. Shiffrin skied a stunning second run to finish third in a race won by her Austrian idol, becoming the youngest female racer to make the podium in a slalom since American Tamara McKinney in 1978. “I have been working so hard for this moment,” said the teen from Vail, Colo. “Schild, Zettel, Hosp, Vonn; I have been watching all these top girls for the past 10 years. And now I am here myself, it really feels crazy.” Shiffrin started her eighth World Cup event as No. 40 and ended the opening run in 12th position before posting the fastest time of the second leg. She finished 1.30 behind Schild, who lost 0.24 to Shiffrin on the second run. Tina Maze of Slovenia was second. Vonn finished 18th and retained the lead in the overall World Cup standings on a memorable day for her American teammate. While Shiffrin scored a breakthrough, her U.S. teammate and oldest racer at 32, Sarah Schleper, retired after 15 years on the circuit. Schleper’s 186-race career on the World Cup circuit started in 1995 — the year Shiffrin was born.

PREP WRESTLING

Redmond takes fourth place at tourney in Nevada • Panthers shine at 97-team event as Chance Lindquist wins at 132 pounds

Cool cinema • The Banff Mountain Film Festival, which is coming to Bend in the spring, highlights extreme activities around the globe place — to take a sample of molten lava from the bowels of a volcano. Adventure, humor, awareness The films feature all sorts of outand awe, plus a good dose of pucker door pursuits, including climbing, factor, are coming to many of the wildlife, pedaling and paddling. region’s cities in the World Tour And there’s always a good dose road show of top outdoor adventure ADVENTURE of human interest in flicks such as films. “Ski Bums Never Die” (switchbackSPORTS The cream of the crop from the 31st entertainment.com), the whimsical annual Banff Mountain Film Festival look at formerly young Canadian will be traveling from Alberta to Bend and powderholics from Nelson’s Whitewater Ski other venues for the next nine months. Area who eventually got jobs, had careers The shows will take the audience to ex- — and then became ski bums again into tremes, from ascending to one of the coldest their 70s. See Cinema / D6 places on earth to rappelling into the hottest

By Rich Landers

The (Spokane) Spokesman-Review

— The Associated Press

Banff Mountain Film Festival in Bend When: Sunday, April 22, 2012 Where: Rimrock Expeditionary Alternative Learning Middle School (REALMS) Contact: rwhite@ realmschool.org or 541-322-5323

ABOVE: A scene from the film “Cold,” which is featured in the Banff Mountain Film Festival. Photo courtesy Banff Mountain Film Festival

NBA

Bulletin staff report RENO, Nev. — Chance Lindquist of Redmond found himself down 2-0 after the first period of the 132-pound championship match Thursday at the Sierra Nevada Classic wrestling tournament. Starting in the bottom position in the second period, Lindquist executed a reversal to tie the score 2-2 against Adam Paine of Rodriguez High School (Fairfield, Calif.). Lindquist built on his momentum and went on to defeat Paine, 6-2, for the 132pound championship.“It was a really good match for him,” Redmond coach Nathan Stanley said. Lindquist’s championship and Ryan Haney’s runner-up finish at 126 pounds propelled the Panthers to fourth place overall in the field of 97 teams at the Classic, scoring a total of 142 points. Henley of Klamath Falls won the team title with 154.5 points. Folsom (Calif.) High took second place (145 points), and Lowry High of Winnemucca, Nev., finished the meet in third (143.5 points). See Redmond / D5

Inside • More prep coverage, D3

COLLEGE FOOTBALL: THE ROSE BOWL

Denver’s Andre Miller drives against Portland’s Wesley Matthews.

Trail Blazers defeat Nuggets Portland improves to 3-0 to start the season with a 111-102 win, D4

Oregon’s defense revolves around a lot of substitutions By Chris Dufresne Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — ick Aliotti has done a nice job coordinating Oregon’s defense if you consider he has to plot each week against two offenses — the opponent’s and his. Aliotti is presently prepping Oregon for Monday’s 98th Rose Bowl game against Wisconsin.

N

The Badgers average 44.6 points per game and appear to be playing downhill, against you, on a slanted field. Wisconsin has a running back, Montee Ball, who has scored 38 touchdowns and a quarterback, Russell Wilson, who can run, pass and probably belt out the national anthem. This is different than Oregon preparing for Cam Newton in last year’s national title game. See Rose / D6

Jason Redmond / The Associated Press

Oregon defensive coordinator Nick Aliotti speaks at a news conference in Los Angeles, Wednesday. Wisconsin and Oregon are scheduled to play in the Rose Bowl on Monday.


D 2 THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2011

O  A

SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION Today FOOTBALL 9 a.m.: College, Armed Forces Bowl, BYU vs. Tulsa, ESPN. 12:30 p.m.: College, Pinstripe Bowl, Iowa State vs. Rutgers, ESPN. 3:40 p.m.: College, Music City Bowl, Mississippi State vs. Wake Forest, ESPN. 7 p.m.: College, Insight Bowl, Iowa vs. Oklahoma, ESPN. BASKETBALL 4 p.m.: Men’s college, Western Michigan at Duke, ESPN2. 6 p.m.: Men’s college, West Virginia at Seton Hall, ESPN2.

Saturday SOCCER 4:30 a.m.: English Premier League, Manchester United vs. Blackburn Rovers, ESPN2. BASKETBALL 9 a.m.: Men’s college, Louisville at Kentucky, CBS. 9 a.m.: Men’s college, Virginia Tech at Oklahoma State, ESPN2. 11 a.m.: Men’s college, Providence at Georgetown, ESPN2. 11 a.m.: Women’s college, Arizona at Arizona State, Root Sports. 1 p.m.: Men’s college, Illinois at Purdue, ESPN2. 1 p.m.: Men’s college, UCLA at Cal, Root Sports. 3 p.m.: Men’s college, Ohio State at Indiana, ESPN2. 3 p.m.: Men’s college, Oregon State at Washington State, Root Sports. 5 p.m.: Men’s college, Gonzaga at Xavier, ESPN2.

5:30 p.m.: Men’s college, Utah at Colorado (same-day tape), Root Sports. 7 p.m.: Men’s college, Oregon at Washington, ESPN2. FOOTBALL 9 a.m.: College, Meineke Car Care Bowl, Texas A&M vs. Northwestern, ESPN. 11 a.m.: College, Sun Bowl, Georgia Tech vs. Utah CBS. 12:30 p.m.: College, Liberty Bowl, Cincinnati vs. Vanderbilt, ABC. 12:30 p.m.: College, Kraft Fight Hunger Bowl, Illinois vs. UCLA, ESPN. 4:30 p.m.: College, Chick-Fil-A Bowl, Auburn vs. Virginia, ESPN. HOCKEY 10 a.m.: NHL, Winter Classic Alumni Game, Versus network. 4 p.m.: College, Boston U. at Notre Dame, Versus network. WINTER SPORTS 2 p.m.: U.S. Snowboard Cup (same-day tape), NBC.

Sunday FOOTBALL 10 a.m.: NFL, San Francisco 49ers at St. Louis Rams, Fox. 10 a.m.: NFL, New York Jets at Miami Dolphins, CBS. 1 p.m.: NFL, San Diego Chargers at Oakland Raiders, CBS. 1 p.m.: NFL, Seattle Seahawks at Arizona Cardinals, Fox. 5:15 p.m.: NFL, Dallas Cowboys at New York Giants, NBC. BASKETBALL 6:30 p.m.: NBA, Portland Trail Blazers at Los Angeles Clippers, Comcast SportsNet Northwest.

RADIO Today FOOTBALL 9 a.m.: College, Armed Forces Bowl, Tulsa vs. BYU, KICE-AM 940. 12:30 p.m.: College, Pinstripe Bowl, Rutgers vs. Iowa State, KICE-AM 940. 7 p.m.: College, Insight Bowl, Oklahoma vs. Iowa, KICE-AM 940.

Saturday FOOTBALL 9 a.m.: College, Meineke Car Care Bowl, Texas A&M vs. Northwestern, KICE-AM 940. 12:30 p.m.: College, Liberty

Bowl, Cincinnati vs. Vanderbilt (left in progress for Oregon State basketball), KICE-AM 940. 5 p.m.: College, Chick-Fil-A Bowl, Virginia vs. Auburn (joined in progress after Oregon State basketball), KICE-AM 940. BASKETBALL 3 p.m.: Men’s college, Oregon State at Washington State, KICE-AM 940, KRCO-AM 690. 7 p.m.: Men’s college, Oregon at Washington, KBND-AM 1110.

Sunday BASKETBALL 6:30 p.m.: NBA, Portland Trail Blazers at Los Angeles Clippers, KBND-AM 1110, KRCO-AM 690.

Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

S   B Skiing • Defago wins World Cup downhill: Olympic champion Didier Defago won the grueling World Cup downhill on the bumpy Stelvio course in Italy Thursday, showing that the Swiss racer has fully recovered from a knee injury that kept him out all last season. Defago had a nearly flawless run and clocked 2 minutes, 1.81 seconds, with fellow Swiss Patrick Kueng 0.29 seconds behind and Klaus Kroell of Austria in third. American Bode Miller was fifth, moving him atop the downhill standings.

Football • Miami repaying $83K in Shapiro donations: The University of Miami is giving back $83,000 it says it received “directly and indirectly” from Nevin Shapiro, the former Hurricanes booster and convicted Ponzi scheme architect whose claims of giving athletes and recruits extra benefits for nearly a decade sparked an NCAA investigation. Court records show the agreement between the school and bankruptcy trustee Joel Tabas was filed last week. • Steelers’ Roethlisberger says he’ll try to play Sunday: Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger doesn’t want his sprained left ankle to keep him out of Pittsburgh’s regularseason finale Sunday against the Cleveland Browns. “As long as I can deal with pain, I’ll be out there,” Roethlisberger said Thursday. “I don’t want to let the guys down, so I’ll do what I can to be out there.” Roethlisberger, who sat out the Steelers’ win last Sunday against the St. Louis Rams, fully participated

in practice again Thursday. There’s plenty at stake against the Browns as the Steelers (114) remain in the hunt for the AFC North championship. To win it, they need a win vs. Cleveland and hope the Cincinnati Bengals beat the Baltimore Ravens on Sunday. • Pats’ Brady returns to practice after report of injury: Tom Brady participated in practice Thursday on a limited basis because of a left shoulder injury. The New England Patriots quarterback had missed Wednesday’s session, but the team said his absence was not injury-related. Comcast SportsNet reported that same day that Brady had Xrays to check for a separated left shoulder and was told he was “all set.” Patriots spokesman Stacey James said Thursday: “If there was an injury then it would be on the injury report.”

Basketball • Jordan gets engaged: Michael Jordan is engaged to longtime girlfriend Yvette Prieto, a Cuban-American model he’s been dating for three years. Publicist Estee Portnoy confirmed the news on Thursday. The Bobcats owner got engaged over the Christmas weekend. No wedding date has been set; this will be Jordan’s second marriage.

Baseball • White Sox, Danks agree to $65M deal: The Chicago White Sox and starting pitcher John Danks have agreed on a five-year, $65 million contract through 2016. The deal was announced Thursday. A 15-game winner in 2010, Danks slumped last season and was 8-12 with a 4.33 ERA. —From wire reports

ON DECK Today Boys basketball: Bend at Churchill, 5:45 p.m.; Summit vs. Phoenix at Summit Holiday Tournament, 1:15 p.m.; Mountain View vs. Sandy at Summit Holiday Tournament, 9:45 a.m.; Madras vs. Sentinal Secondary School (West Vancouver, British Columbia) at Cactus Jam in Phoenix, Ariz., 10:30 a.m. (MST); Culver vs. TBA at Heppner Tournament, TBA. Girls basketball: Mountain View vs. Evergreen (Vancouver, Wash.) at Interstate Tournament in Lake Oswego, 5 p.m.; Bend vs. TBA at Summit Holiday Tournament, 11:30 a.m.; Summit vs. TBA at Summit Holiday Tournament, 8 a.m.; Madras vs. Grants Pass at Coos Bay Holiday Tournament, 5:15 p.m.; Culver vs. TBA at Heppner Tournament, 4 p.m.

10), Washington St. 22 (Motum 5). Assists—Oregon 20 (Joseph 7), Washington St. 18 (Ladd, Moore 4). Total Fouls—Oregon 22, Washington St. 22. A—9,889.

IN THE BLEACHERS

Washington 95, Oregon St. 80 OREGON ST. (10-3) Burton 9-12 0-2 18, Collier 3-6 2-4 8, Brandt 7-12 1-2 16, Cunningham 6-9 2-3 15, Starks 5-15 2-2 14, McShane 0-0 0-0 0, Barton 0-1 0-0 0, Moreland 0-3 0-2 0, Nelson 3-8 2-2 9. Totals 33-66 9-17 80. WASHINGTON (7-5) Gant 3-6 0-0 6, N’Diaye 5-7 0-0 10, Gaddy 6-10 0-0 13, Wroten 10-16 5-7 26, Ross 4-11 2-3 10, Breunig 0-0 0-0 0, Wilcox 4-13 6-6 15, Simmons 5-9 2-2 13, Kemp Jr. 0-0 2-2 2. Totals 37-72 1720 95. Halftime—Washington 50-39. 3-Point Goals—Oregon St. 5-17 (Starks 2-7, Cunningham 1-2, Nelson 1-3, Brandt 1-4, Barton 0-1), Washington 4-18 (Simmons 1-3, Gaddy 1-3, Wroten 1-3, Wilcox 1-5, Gant 0-1, Ross 0-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Oregon St. 33 (Burton, Nelson 7), Washington 38 (Wroten 9). Assists—Oregon St. 13 (Burton, Collier 3), Washington 15 (Gaddy 6). Total Fouls—Oregon St. 18, Washington 19. A—9,592.

FOOTBALL NFL NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE All Times PST ——— AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF y-New England 12 3 0 .800 464 N.Y. Jets 8 7 0 .533 360 Buffalo 6 9 0 .400 351 Miami 5 10 0 .333 310 South W L T Pct PF y-Houston 10 5 0 .667 359 Tennessee 8 7 0 .533 302 Jacksonville 4 11 0 .267 224 Indianapolis 2 13 0 .133 230 North W L T Pct PF x-Baltimore 11 4 0 .733 354 x-Pittsburgh 11 4 0 .733 312 Cincinnati 9 6 0 .600 328 Cleveland 4 11 0 .267 209 West W L T Pct PF Denver 8 7 0 .533 306 Oakland 8 7 0 .533 333 San Diego 7 8 0 .467 368 Kansas City 6 9 0 .400 205 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF N.Y. Giants 8 7 0 .533 363 Dallas 8 7 0 .533 355 Philadelphia 7 8 0 .467 362 Washington 5 10 0 .333 278 South W L T Pct PF x-New Orleans 12 3 0 .800 502 x-Atlanta 9 6 0 .600 357 Carolina 6 9 0 .400 389 Tampa Bay 4 11 0 .267 263 North W L T Pct PF y-Green Bay 14 1 0 .933 515 x-Detroit 10 5 0 .667 433 Chicago 7 8 0 .467 336 Minnesota 3 12 0 .200 327 West W L T Pct PF y-San Francisco 12 3 0 .800 346 Seattle 7 8 0 .467 301 Arizona 7 8 0 .467 289 St. Louis 2 13 0 .133 166 x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division ——— Sunday’s Games Chicago at Minnesota, 10 a.m. Carolina at New Orleans, 10 a.m. Detroit at Green Bay, 10 a.m. San Francisco at St. Louis, 10 a.m. Tennessee at Houston, 10 a.m. Buffalo at New England, 10 a.m. N.Y. Jets at Miami, 10 a.m. Indianapolis at Jacksonville, 10 a.m. Washington at Philadelphia, 10 a.m. San Diego at Oakland, 1:15 p.m. Kansas City at Denver, 1:15 p.m. Seattle at Arizona, 1:15 p.m. Tampa Bay at Atlanta, 1:15 p.m. Baltimore at Cincinnati, 1:15 p.m. Pittsburgh at Cleveland, 1:15 p.m. Dallas at N.Y. Giants, 5:30 p.m. End of regular season

PA 321 344 385 296

Women’s college

PA 255 295 316 411 PA 250 218 299 294 PA 383 395 351 335 PA 386 316 318 333 PA 322 326 384 449 PA 318 342 328 432 PA 202 292 328 373

Today, Dec. 30 Armed Forces Bowl Byu 2.5 PK Tulsa Pinstripe Bowl Rutgers 2 1 Iowa St Music City Bowl Mississippi St 6.5 6.5 Wake Forest Insight Bowl Oklahoma 15.5 13.5 Iowa Saturday, Dec. 31 Texas Bowl Texas A&M 9.5 10 Northwestern Sun Bowl Georgia Tech 3 2.5 Utah Fight Hunger Bowl Illinois 3 3 Ucla Liberty Bowl Vanderbilt 2.5 2 Cincinnati Chick Fil-A Bowl Auburn 1 3 Virginia

Oklahoma St

Monday, Jan. 2 Ticket City Bowl 6 7 Outback Bowl 2.5 3.5 Capital One Bowl 1 2 Gator Bowl 2 2 Rose Bowl 4.5 6 Fiesta Bowl 3.5 3.5

Michigan

Tuesday, Jan. 3 Sugar Bowl 1 (V) 2.5

Houston Georgia S. Carolina Florida Oregon

Clemson

Bowl Glance Subject to Change All Times PST ——— Thursday, Dec. 29 Champs Sports Bowl At Orlando, Fla. Florida State 18, Notre Dame 14 Alamo Bowl At San Antonio Baylor 67, Washington 56 ——— Today, Dec. 30 Armed Forces Bowl At Dallas Tulsa (8-4) vs. BYU (9-3), 9 a.m. (ESPN) Pinstripe Bowl At Bronx, N.Y. Rutgers (8-4) vs. Iowa State (6-6), 12:30 p.m. (ESPN) Music City Bowl At Nashville, Tenn. Mississippi State (6-6) vs. Wake Forest (6-6), 3:40 p.m. (ESPN) Insight Bowl At Tempe, Ariz. Oklahoma (9-3) vs. Iowa (7-5), 7 p.m. (ESPN) ——— Saturday, Dec. 31 Meinke Car Care Bowl At Houston Texas A&M (6-6) vs. Northwestern (6-6), 9 a.m. (ESPN) Sun Bowl At El Paso, Texas Georgia Tech (8-4) vs. Utah (7-5), 11 a.m. (CBS) Liberty Bowl At Memphis, Tenn. Vanderbilt (6-6) vs. Cincinnati (9-3), 12:30 p.m. (ABC) Fight Hunger Bowl At San Francisco UCLA (6-7) vs. Illinois (6-6), 12:30 p.m. (ESPN) Chick-fil-A Bowl At Atlanta Virginia (8-4) vs. Auburn (7-5), 4:30 p.m. (ESPN) ——— Monday, Jan. 2 TicketCity Bowl At Dallas Penn State (9-3) vs. Houston (12-1), 9 a.m. (ESPNU) Capital One Bowl At Orlando, Fla. Nebraska (9-3) vs. South Carolina (10-2), 10 a.m. (ESPN) Outback Bowl At Tampa, Fla. Georgia (10-3) vs. Michigan State (10-3), 10 a.m. (ABC) Gator Bowl At Jacksonville, Fla. Florida (6-6) vs. Ohio State (6-6), 10 a.m. (ESPN2) Rose Bowl At Pasadena, Calif. Oregon (11-2) vs. Wisconsin (11-2), 2 p.m. (ESPN) Fiesta Bowl At Glendale, Ariz. Stanford (11-1) vs. Oklahoma State (11-1), 5:30 p.m. (ESPN)

Betting Line NFL (Home teams in Caps) Favorite Opening Current Underdog Sunday’s Games EAGLES 9 8 Redskins FALCONS 13 11.5 Bucs 49ers 11 10.5 RAMS VIKINGS PK 1 Bears Lions PK 3.5 PACKERS GIANTS 3 3 Cowboys SAINTS 9.5 8.5 Panthers Titans 2.5 3 TEXANS Ravens 2.5 2.5 BENGALS Steelers 7 7 BROWNS JAGUARS 5 3.5 Colts DOLPHINS 1 2 Jets PATRIOTS 12.5 11 Bills RAIDERS 3 3 Chargers BRONCOS 3 3.5 Chiefs CARDS 3 3 Seahawks College

Michigan St Nebraska Ohio St Wisconsin Stanford

Virginia Tech

Wednesday, Jan. 4 Orange Bowl 2.5 3 West Virginia

Arkansas

Friday, Jan. 6 Cotton Bowl 7 8

Pittsburgh

Saturday, Jan. 7 Compass Bowl 5.5 3.5

Arkansas St

Sunday, Jan. 8 Go Daddy.com Bowl 1 1.5

College

Penn St

Monday, Jan. 9 BCS Championship Game Alabama 1.5 (L) 1 V-Virginia Tech opened as the favorite L-LSU opened as the favorite

Kansas St

Smu

N. Illinois

Lsu

HOCKEY NHL NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE All Times PST ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA N.Y. Rangers 35 22 9 4 48 103 76 Philadelphia 36 22 10 4 48 123 106 Pittsburgh 37 21 12 4 46 120 97 New Jersey 36 20 15 1 41 100 104 N.Y. Islanders 35 12 17 6 30 80 112 Northeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Boston 34 24 9 1 49 121 64 Toronto 37 18 14 5 41 116 122 Ottawa 37 17 15 5 39 113 128 Buffalo 36 17 16 3 37 97 106 Montreal 38 14 17 7 35 97 107 Southeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Florida 37 19 11 7 45 99 101 Winnipeg 37 18 14 5 41 101 105 Washington 35 18 15 2 38 104 106 Tampa Bay 36 16 17 3 35 99 120 Carolina 39 13 20 6 32 101 130 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Chicago 37 23 10 4 50 122 105 Detroit 36 23 12 1 47 118 81 St. Louis 36 21 11 4 46 94 80 Nashville 37 19 14 4 42 98 104 Columbus 37 10 22 5 25 91 124 Northwest Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Vancouver 38 24 12 2 50 128 92 Minnesota 39 21 12 6 48 93 91 Colorado 39 20 18 1 41 104 113 Calgary 38 18 16 4 40 93 102 Edmonton 36 15 18 3 33 99 100 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA San Jose 34 19 11 4 42 99 83 Los Angeles 38 18 14 6 42 82 89 Dallas 36 20 15 1 41 96 105 Phoenix 38 18 16 4 40 98 101 Anaheim 36 10 20 6 26 85 120 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Thursday’s Games N.Y. Islanders 3, Calgary 1 Philadelphia 4, Pittsburgh 2 Carolina 4, Toronto 3, OT Tampa Bay 4, Montreal 3 Minnesota 4, Edmonton 3 Winnipeg 1, Los Angeles 0, OT Columbus 4, Dallas 1 Colorado 3, Phoenix 2 Vancouver 5, Anaheim 2 Today’s Games Buffalo at Washington, 4 p.m. Calgary at Ottawa, 4:30 p.m. N.Y. Rangers at Florida, 4:30 p.m. Nashville at St. Louis, 5 p.m. Detroit at Chicago, 5:30 p.m. Saturday’s Games Edmonton at N.Y. Islanders, 10 a.m. Pittsburgh at New Jersey, noon Carolina at Tampa Bay, 2 p.m. Phoenix at Minnesota, 3 p.m. Montreal at Florida, 4 p.m. Ottawa at Buffalo, 4 p.m. Toronto at Winnipeg, 4 p.m. St. Louis at Detroit, 4 p.m. Washington at Columbus, 4 p.m. Boston at Dallas, 5 p.m. Colorado at Anaheim, 5 p.m.

Vancouver at Los Angeles, 7 p.m.

BASKETBALL Men’s college Thursday’s Games ——— EAST Fordham 72, Georgia Tech 66 Harvard 67, Boston College 46 Hofstra 83, Iona 75 La Salle 70, Boston U. 53 Mount St. Mary’s 49, American U. 42 Rutgers 85, Florida 83, 2OT Sacred Heart 77, New Hampshire 59 St. Francis (NY) 66, Brown 49 SOUTH Alabama 72, Jacksonville 55 Belmont 79, Marshall 74 Davidson 75, Penn 70 E. Kentucky 67, Austin Peay 65 East Carolina 84, NC Central 76 Florida Gulf Coast 84, Maine 72 LSU 69, Grambling St. 37 Louisiana Tech 69, Spring Hill 41 Memphis 64, Robert Morris 47 Middle Tennessee 71, FIU 66 NC State 87, Campbell 81 North Carolina 100, Elon 62 Southern Miss. 80, Alcorn St. 49 Southern U. 73, Loyola NO 68 Tennessee 86, The Citadel 55 Tennessee St. 83, UT-Martin 67 W. Kentucky 76, Louisiana-Monroe 71, OT Wake Forest 72, Yale 71 MIDWEST Butler 53, Green Bay 49 Cincinnati 56, Oklahoma 55 Evansville 78, S. Illinois 60 Ill.-Chicago 63, Detroit 59 Illinois St. 65, N. Iowa 61 Kansas 89, Howard 34 Miami (Ohio) 73, William & Mary 69 Michigan 71, Penn St. 53 Milwaukee 57, Valparaiso 55 SIU-Edwardsville 83, Tennessee Tech 68 VCU 76, Akron 75, OT Vanderbilt 74, Marquette 57 Wright St. 64, Loyola of Chicago 48 SOUTHWEST Kent St. 69, Arkansas St. 54 Texas A&M 76, Arkansas Tech 58 Texas-Arlington 83, Texas-Pan American 56 UALR 69, North Texas 66 FAR WEST Cal Poly 67, Hope International 61 Cal St.-Fullerton 65, UC Davis 64 California 53, Southern Cal 49 Denver 79, Troy 62 Fresno St. 55, Pacific 47 N. Arizona 73, Sacramento St. 64 Oregon 92, Washington St. 75 Pepperdine 77, San Francisco 61 Saint Mary’s (Cal) 98, BYU 82 San Jose St. 81, Coppin St. 66 Seattle 91, Nebraska-Omaha 72 Stanford 60, UCLA 59 UC Irvine 71, CS Northridge 62 Washington 95, Oregon St. 80 Weber St. 78, Idaho St. 64 TOURNAMENT Cable Car Classic First Round Santa Clara 75, E. Michigan 55 Wagner 72, Air Force 61 Don Haskins Sun Bowl Invitational Championship Colorado St. 79, Jacksonville St. 56 Third Place UTEP 79, Ark.-Pine Bluff 58 Dr Pepper Classic First Round Chattanooga 85, Longwood 50 Utah Valley 42, Hampton 40 UCF Holiday Classic First Round Rhode Island 79, James Madison 60 UCF 80, Stetson 70 Pacific-12 Conference All Times PST ——— Conference All Games W L W L Stanford 1 0 11 2 California 1 0 11 3 Oregon 1 0 10 3 Washington 1 0 7 5 Arizona 0 0 9 4 Colorado 0 0 8 4 Arizona St. 0 0 4 8 Utah 0 0 3 9 Oregon St. 0 1 10 3 Washington St. 0 1 8 5 UCLA 0 1 7 6 Southern Cal 0 1 5 9 ——— Thursday’s Games Washington 95, Oregon St. 80 California 53, Southern Cal 49 Oregon 92, Washington St. 75 Stanford 60, UCLA 59 Saturday’s Games UCLA at California, 1 p.m. Arizona State at Arizona, 2:30 p.m. Utah at Colorado, 3 p.m. Oregon State at Washington State, 3 p.m. USC at Stanford, 3:30 p.m. Oregon at Washington, 7 p.m. Thursday’s summaries

Oregon 92, Washington St. 75 OREGON (10-3) Singler 5-10 2-2 13, Woods 2-3 0-1 4, Sim 4-4 3-4 12, Loyd 2-4 0-0 4, Joseph 6-9 2-2 17, Lucenti 0-0 0-0 0, Ashaolu 9-11 5-12 23, Kingma 3-4 0-0 9, Jacob 1-2 0-0 2, Emory 2-2 3-4 8. Totals 34-49 15-25 92. WASHINGTON ST. (8-5) Motum 3-8 6-7 12, Enquist 0-0 0-0 0, Capers 2-4 0-0 4, Moore 4-12 5-6 14, Lacy 7-9 0-2 19, Ladd 1-2 2-4 4, DiIorio 0-0 0-0 0, Aden 2-10 0-0 4, Shelton 34 1-1 7, Lodwick 2-5 0-0 6, Kernich-Drew 1-2 0-0 2, Simon 1-1 0-0 3. Totals 26-57 14-20 75. Halftime—Oregon 54-34. 3-Point Goals—Oregon 9-16 (Joseph 3-4, Kingma 3-4, Sim 1-1, Emory 1-1, Singler 1-5, Loyd 0-1), Washington St. 9-21 (Lacy 5-6, Lodwick 2-5, Simon 1-1, Moore 1-3, Ladd 01, Kernich-Drew 0-1, Aden 0-2, Motum 0-2). Fouled Out—Capers, Lacy. Rebounds—Oregon 34 (Ashaolu

Thursday’s Games ——— EAST Colgate 75, Iona 50 Georgetown 65, Vermont 53 Hartford 72, Harvard 61 Kansas St. 57, Marist 56 La Salle 60, Dartmouth 47 Lehigh 67, Rhode Island 56 Penn 47, UNC-Greensboro 36 Princeton 74, Hofstra 69 Rider 53, Mount St. Mary’s 44 Saint Joseph’s 74, Boston College 57 Siena 78, Maine 51 Syracuse 81, Niagara 30 Towson 56, Loyola (Md.) 54 UConn 93, Fairfield 40 SOUTH Coastal Carolina 61, SC-Upstate 56 Georgia Tech 74, NC A&T 57 Jacksonville 68, SC State 67 Kennesaw St. 61, Alabama St. 51 LSU 66, Louisiana Tech 55 Louisiana-Monroe 53, W. Kentucky 49 Mississippi 72, SE Louisiana 52 NC State 85, Alcorn St. 70 North Carolina 74, Savannah St. 21 Richmond 74, James Madison 66 Tennessee St. 95, Austin Peay 81 UNC Wilmington 59, Xavier 52 Vanderbilt 81, W. Carolina 36 Wake Forest 77, Md.-Eastern Shore 45 MIDWEST Detroit 72, Butler 60 E. Illinois 72, N. Illinois 62 Missouri St. 79, Bradley 70 N. Dakota St. 77, IPFW 70 Ohio 75, George Mason 59 S. Dakota St. 62, Oakland 52 UMKC 81, S. Utah 61 Wichita St. 67, N. Iowa 40 SOUTHWEST FAU 57, Arkansas St. 44 Texas Tech 81, CS Bakersfield 63 FAR WEST Bowling Green 60, Wyoming 53 Brown 66, Dominican (CA) 45 CS Northridge 55, UC Irvine 49 E. Washington 79, Montana St. 73 Florida Gulf Coast 72, Hawaii 52 Gonzaga 80, Portland 65 Idaho 53, North Dakota 50 Long Beach St. 70, UC Riverside 59 Montana 79, Southern Miss. 64 N. Colorado 72, Black Hills St. 35 Oregon St. 60, Washington 55 Pacific 72, Cal St.-Fullerton 67 Pepperdine 85, San Francisco 69 Sacramento St. 91, N. Arizona 85, 2OT Saint Mary’s (Cal) 82, Loyola Marymount 72 Stanford 61, Southern Cal 53 UCLA 60, California 55 Washington St. 75, Oregon 47 TOURNAMENT Cyclone Challenge First Round Buffalo 66, NJIT 53 Iowa St. 71, New Hampshire 57 FIU Sun & Fun Classic First Round Auburn 68, Charlotte 58 FIU 69, Albany (NY) 56 Fordham Holiday Classic First Round Coppin St. 59, Boston U. 44 Fordham 47, Navy 43 Hawk Holiday Classic First Round Monmouth (NJ) 69, Norfolk St. 62 Villanova 55, St. Bonaventure 44 Hilton Garden Inn Hokie Classic Championship High Point 62, Cincinnati 40 Third Place Virginia Tech 57, UMBC 52 Marriott Cavalier Classic Championship Virginia 53, UMass 38 Third Place Elon 60, Wagner 57 Miami Holiday Tournament Championship Miami 91, VCU 61 Third Place Morgan St. 73, Holy Cross 66, OT Peppermill Holiday Classic First Round LIU 67, Nevada 51 Oklahoma St. 78, Mississippi St. 71 Saint Peter’s Holiday Classic First Round Binghamton 70, St. Peter’s 63 Dayton 73, South Florida 63 Terrapin Classic Championship Maryland 85, Delaware 76 Third Place East Carolina 64, Lafayette 57 Tulane/DoubleTree Classic Championship Tulane 66, Hampton 53 Third Place Cent. Michigan 72, Coll. of Charleston 69, OT Washington Dental Holiday Hoops First Round E. Michigan 66, Saint Louis 55 Seattle 74, St. Francis (Pa.) 70

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL American League CHICAGO WHITE SOX—Agreed to terms with LHP John Danks on a five-year contract. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association MILWAUKEE BUCKS—Assigned G Darington Hobson to Fort Wayne (NBADL). PHOENIX SUNS—Signed G Michael Redd to a one-year contract. FOOTBALL National Football League NFL—Fined New Orleans RB Pierre Thomas $12,500 for a uniform violation and a touchdown celebration. JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS—Claimed OT Will Robinson off waivers from New Orleans. Released CB Robert McClain. NEW YORK JETS—Signed LB Ricky Sapp from the practice squad. Signed WR Eron Riley to the practice squad. HOCKEY National Hockey League CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS—Recalled F Jimmy Hayes from Rockford (AHL). Assigned F Brandon Pirri to Rockford. DETROIT RED WINGS—Recalled F Gustav Nyquist from Grand Rapids (AHL). Placed F Tomas Holmstrom on injured reserve. NEW JERSEY DEVILS—Assigned D Alexander Urbom to Albany (AHL). NEW YORK RANGERS—Returned D Tim Erixon to Connecticut (AHL). OTTAWA SENATORS—Signed F Stefan Hoesen and F Matt Puempel to three-year, entry-level contracts. TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING—Recalled D Evan Oberg from Norfolk (AHL). Signed F Pierre-Cedric Labrie to a two-year contract and assigned him to Norfolk. WINNIPEG JETS—Recalled F Patrice Cormier from St. John’s (AHL).


FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

D3

Baylor wins wild Alamo Bowl

Darren Abate / The Associated Press

Baylor quarterback Robert Griffin III, left, is brought down by Washington’s Josh Shirley during the first half of the Alamo Bowl, Thursday in San Antonio.

The Associated Press SAN ANTONIO — Heisman Trophy winner Robert Griffin III wasn’t dazzling — and didn’t need to be — as No. 15 Baylor pulled out a thrilling Alamo Bowl victory in the highest-scoring bowl game in history, beating Washington 67-56 in a record-smashing shootout Thursday night. If this was RG3’s final showcase before jumping to the NFL, it was a gripping goodbye to watch. One of the nation’s most electrifying players was upstaged by an even more exciting game that shattering the previous record for points in regulation set in the 2001 GMAC Bowl. Griffin had an unremarkable night, throwing just one touchdown

COLLEGE FOOTBALL ROUNDUP pass and running for another. But Terrance Ganaway starred ably in his place, rushing for 200 yards and five touchdowns. His last was a 43yard run with 2:28 left to seal Baylor’s first 10-win season since 1980. The previous bowl record for a regulation game was 102 total points set in the 2001 GMAC Bowl between Marshall and East Carolina. That game went to double overtime and ended with a combined 125 points — which still stands as the overall bowl record. Baylor and Washington (7-6) also set a bowl record for total offense in

PREP ROUNDUP

a game with 1,377 yards. Washington quarterback Keith Price outplayed his Heisman counterpart, going 23 for 27 with 438 yards and four touchdowns. He also ran for another three scores. Also on Thursday: Champs Sports Bowl No. 25 Florida State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Notre Dame . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 ORLANDO, Fla. — Florida State rallied from a 14-point second-half deficit and used a pair of touchdown passes by E.J. Manuel and two field goals from Dustin Hopkins to slip past Notre Dame. The victory was FSU’s fourth straight bowl win. FSU receiver Rashad Greene, who caught one of Manuel’s touchdown passes, was named the game’s MVP.

PREP WRESTLING ROUNDUP

Cougars roll in boys hoops at Summit tournament Cowboys Bulletin staff report A day after a disappointing boys basketball loss, Mountain View roared back Thursday to throttle Ashland 82-59 in a consolation game at the Summit Holiday Tournament. Senior guard James Reid scored a career-high 39 points and dished out 11 assists to lead the Cougars, who lost 69-66 to West Albany in Wednesday’s first round of play in the eight-team tourney at Bend’s Summit High School. “Last night, we really had a lethargic performance,” said Mountain View coach Craig Reid of the loss to West Albany. “We just didn’t bring the energy. In the first half today we did a good job playing hard, but it was a bit frantic, like we were trying to make up for last night. But in the second half we played with a lot more poise — at both ends of the floor. Defensively, as a group, we played with the intensity we needed.” The Cougars (7-3) led 19-10 after the first quarter, but the Grizzlies closed the margin to 38-34 by halftime. Mountain View owned the second half, though, and rolled into today’s 9:45 a.m. consolation final game against Sandy. James Reid made 12 of 19 shots from the floor, including four of nine from three-point range. He also made 11 of 12 free throws, gathered six rebounds and was credited with a game-high four steals. Junior post Erik Siefken had a solid game for the Cougars, scoring 10 points to go with a team-high seven rebounds and two blocked shots. Mitch Modin added nine points and Blake Bosch seven for Mountain View. Also on Thursday: BOYS BASKETBALL Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55 North Eugene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44 EUGENE — Hayden Crook scored 20 points and Connor Scott and David Larson combined for 23 more as Bend High claimed a nonconference road victory. Crook’s scoring included three three-point field goals, and the senior point guard also was credited with five assists. Scott had a team-high seven rebounds to go with his 12 points, and Larson’s stat line included five rebounds and four blocked shots. The Lava Bears (5-4 overall) play another nonconference game in Eugene today at 5:45 p.m. against Churchill. Issaquah (Wash.) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71 Summit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61 Down by 19 points at halftime, Summit charged back to get with-

in six points in the fourth quarter before Issaquah pulled away in a semifinal game at the Summit Holiday Tournament. Dylan Cramer fueled the Storm rally with three three-point baskets in the fourth quarter; he finished with four threepointers and 14 points for the game. Brad Laubacher and Austin Peters scored 15 points apiece for Summit (5-5 overall), which will meet Phoenix today at 1:15 p.m. for third place in the eight-team tourney. Issaquah advances to face West Albany in the championship final at 4:45 p.m. Sisters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65 Crook County . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37 SISTERS — John Erickson led the Outlaws to a win over Crook County with 15 points and five assists in the consolation final of the Sisters Holiday Tournament. Eli Harrison added 14 points for the Outlaws, who finished third in the tourney. Sisters led 39-19 at the half and stayed in the lead the entire game. Peyton Seaquist led Crook County in scoring with 12 points, and Tevin Cooper added 11 points for the Cowboys. Crook County (27 overall) will host Bend High on Tuesday. The Outlaws (7-3 overall) will play at Stayton on Tuesday. Burns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47 La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38 SISTERS — La Pine led by two points at halftime and regained the lead early in the fourth quarter, but Burns outpaced the Hawks in the closing minutes to win the consolation final of the Sisters Holiday Tournament. Isaac O’Casey scored 12 points and grabbed 12 rebounds for La Pine, and Austin Pierce had 16 rebounds and seven points. Tyler Parsons also had 12 points for the Hawks, including a three-point basket that put his team up 34-33 in the opening moments of the fourth period. That was the last lead of the game for La Pine (4-7), which plays the Hilanders again Tuesday in a nonleague game at Burns. Prairie (Wash.) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50 Redmond. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36 COEUR D’ALENE, Idaho — Redmond held an 11-9 lead after one quarter against Prairie High (Vancouver, Wash.) but fell victim to cold shooting and lost in the consolation final of the Coeur D’Alene Inn-Vitational Tournament. The Panthers, who managed only 12 field goals for the game, were led by Tanner Manselle with 17 points. Mason Rodby added six points on two three-point baskets for Redmond, which finished with one win and two losses for the tournament. The Panthers (7-3 overall) host Mountain View on Tuesday

night. Grant Union. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .77 Culver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 HEPPNER — Four Bulldogs players scored in double figures in a loss to the Prospectors in the Heppner Tournament. Grant Union led Culver 39-27 at halftime and effectively iced the game with a 23-11 third quarter. Ryan Fritz led the Bulldogs with 16 points, and Clay Gibson added 14. Culver (5-4 overall) plays in the tournament third-place game at 2:30 p.m. today. GIRLS BASKETBALL Redmond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Lapwai (Idaho). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 COEUR D’ALENE, Idaho — The Panthers overcame a 16point deficit to win in consolation play at the Coeur d’Alene Inn-Vitational. Redmond coach Nathan Covill said his team made effective adjustments at halftime, including a switch to a zone defense that slowed down the Wildcats’ Nathanee Spencer, who scored 32 points but just 12 in the second half. Redmond outscored Lapwai 16-5 in the final quarter to push ahead for the victory. Jesslyn Albrecht scored 24 points and grabbed nine rebounds to lead the Panthers (46). Mandy Dollarhide had 13 of her 15 points in the second half, while Margo Capps added six points, nine rebounds and five assists for the winners. Redmond plays at Mountain View Tuesday in an Intermountain Hybrid contest. Mountain View. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Sherwood. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 LAKE OSWEGO — Mountain View outlasted Sherwood in a ragged consolation contest for its first victory in three games at the Interstate Shootout. In a game in which the two teams combined to shoot 56 free throws, the Cougars outscored the Bowmen in all four quarters. Mountain View was led by Maddy Booster, who had 11 points and six assists, and Ciera Waldrup, who added 10 points and a team-high four steals. Hannah Johnson was the Cougars’ rebounding leader with six. Mountain View (5-6 overall) concludes play in the tournament today with a consolation game against Evergreen (Vancouver, Wash.) at 5 p.m. Summit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Newberg. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Trailing 12-6 after one quarter against Class 6A Newberg, host Summit erupted for 24 points in the second period behind Raja Char and Sarah Edwards en route to victory in a consolation semifinal game in the Summit Holiday

Tournament. Char scored 10 of her game-high 25 points in the second quarter, and Edwards added nine of her 15 in the period as the 5A Storm built a 30-23 halftime lead. Summit made 16 of 21 foul shots in the game, led by Char’s perfect nine-of-nine shooting. The Storm (5-5 overall) play today at 8 a.m. in the consolation final of the eightteam tourney. Willamette . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Mekayla Isaak led the Lava Bears with 11 points, but Bend fell to Willamette High of Eugene in the semifinal round of the Summit Holiday Tournament. Bend trailed 13-11 at the half and stayed behind the rest of the game. Other scorers for Bend included Ally McConnell with four points and Delaney Crook with three. Bend (6-4 overall) will play in the consolation final today at 11:30 a.m. Crook County . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Sisters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 SISTERS — The Cowgirls ended the Sisters Holiday Tournament with a 2-1 record, winning their final match against Sisters. Crook County, up 26-14 at the half, was led by Makayla Lindburg, who logged 20 points, eight rebounds and one block. Brooke Buswell added 13 points and five steals. Taylor Nieri and Carissa Kernutt led Sisters in scoring with 12 points apiece. Crook County (6-3 overall) will play at Bend on Tuesday. Sisters (2-7 overall) will play at Stayton on Tuesday. Madras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Ashland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 COOS BAY — Abby Scott scored 22 points and grabbed seven rebounds for the White Buffaloes en route to a victory over the Grizzlies at the South Coast Holiday Invitational tournament. Madras held a one-point halftime lead before outscoring Ashland 26-17 in the second half. Mariah Stacona contributed 16 points and six steals on the night, giving her 15 steals in two tournament games. The White Buffaloes (8-2 overall) play Grants Pass in the tournament championship game today at 5:15 p.m. Culver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Grant Union . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 HEPPNER — Cassandra Fulton logged 17 points to lead Culver to a win over Grant Union in the semifinal round of the Heppner Tournament. Sara McKinney scored nine points for the Bulldogs. Culver led 26-19 at the half and stayed ahead the rest of the game. The Bulldogs (7-2 overall) will play in the tournament final today at 4 p.m.

take title at Pendleton

Bulletin staff report PENDLETON — Crook County captured first place in the Free-Berry Classic wrestling tournament Thursday, scoring 234.5 points in the team standings to hold off tournament host Pendleton (181 points). Willamina took third place with 125 points. Culver finished in a tie for fourth place with Burns (116.5 points each), while Madras finished in seventh place (92.5 points). Crook County’s junior varsity squad took eighth place with 87 points, 5.5 behind the White Buffaloes. The Cowboys had four individual champions for the tournament in McKennan Buckner (120 pounds), Collbran Meeker (126), Mason Harris (182) and Rhett Smith (195). Trinton Libolt (106) and Dean Smith (170) finished runner-up in their respective weight classes, as did JV wrestlers Grayson Munn (126) and Dylan Blasius (195). “The (most fun) part of the tournament was seeing the second-string guys step up,” Crook County coach Jake Huffman said. “The young guys did a lot today.” Noe Gonzalez (113) was Culver’s lone champion at the tournament, and the Bulldogs’ Jesus Retano finished second at 152. Gonzalez pinned his opponent in the championship match in 1 minute, 5 seconds. “Noe had a couple of rough weekends,” Culver coach J.D. Alley said. “It’s good to see him get on top of the podium.” Crook County hosts Culver on Wednesday in the Cowdog Classic dual meet. Also on Thursday: Three Lava Bears go undefeated PORTLAND — Three Bend High wrestlers finished with perfect records, and the Lava Bears won one of four dual meets on the final day of the Northwest Duals at Westview High School. Willy Abt (6-0 at 160 pounds), Gunner Crawford (7-0 at 170) and Kenny Dailey (7-0 at 195) were unbeaten for Bend during the two-day tournament, and Gavin Gerdes went 6-1 at 182 pounds. In Thursday’s dual matchups, Bend lost 57-21 to Glencoe to drop out of the championship bracket, then in consolation action the Bears lost 40-26 to McNary, beat Newberg via tiebreaker criteria after a 44-44 deadlock, and fell to Tigard 45-36. A highlight of the tournament for the Bears came in their final match against Newberg, when freshman 220-pounder David O’Connor came back from a two-point deficit to pin his opponent to account for the 4444 tie. Next up for Bend is a dual meet next Thursday at La Pine.

PREP SCOREBOARD Boys basketball Thursday’s games Summit Holiday Tournament Mountain View 82, Ashland 59 Issaquah (Wash.) 71, Summit 61 West Albany def. Phoenix (OT, score not available) Thursday’s summaries ——— Coeur d’Alene Inn-Vitational ——— PRAIRIE (WASH.) (50) — Preston Brooks 18, Cherzan 14, McDonald 10, Burnett 4, D. Brooks 3, Denny 1, Hak, Phillips. Totals 16 13-20 50. REDMOND (36) — Tanner Manselle 17, Rodby 6, Lau 3, Dahlen 2, Genz 2, Tavita 2, Jackson 2, Reed 2. Totals 12 8-10 36. Prairie (Wash.) 9 15 13 13 — 50 Redmond 11 9 5 11 — 36 Three-point goals — Prairie: McDonald 2, Brooks 2, Brooks; Redmond: Rodby 2, Lau, Manselle. ——— Summit Holiday Tournament ——— ASHLAND (59) — James Skinner 15, Hansen 13, Schlecht 10, Finch 8, Flynn 5, Sager 3, LimeMa 3, Palagio 2, Carroll, Smeenk, Keigi, Hodge. Totals 20 16-26 59. MOUNTAIN VIEW (82) — James Reid 39, Siefken 10, Modin 9, Bosch 7, Lannin 5, C. Hollister 4, McNelis 2, Dattke 2, Carroll 2, Thompson 2, Bachman, Teitgen, Haugen, Gentry, Logan, J. Hollister. Totals 28 21-27 82. Ashland 10 24 10 16 — 59 Mountain View 19 19 22 22 — 82 Three-point goals — Ashland: Hansen 2, Skinner; Mountain View: Reid 4, Bosch. ——— Summit Holiday Tournament ——— ISSAQUAH (WASH.) (71) — Nick Price 15, Gibson 11, Sexton 8, Nevin 8, Danner 6, Martin 7, Blair 5, Henke 4, Watson 2, Witte 1, Westcover, Bichfel. Totals 26 12-17 71. SUMMIT (61) — Brad Laubacher 15, Austin

Peters 15, Cramer 14, Moyer 8, Evans 6, Cattell 3, Bishop, Hester, Frost. Totals 18 19-28 61. Issaquah (Wash.) 19 23 15 14 — 71 Summit 10 13 15 23 — 61 Three-point goals — Issaquah: Sexton 2, Gibson 2, Price, Blair, Danner; Summit: Cramer 4, Peters. ——— Sisters Holiday Tournament ——— LA PINE (38) — Isaac O’Casey 12, Tyler Parsons 12, Pierce 7, Ramirez 3, Kraft 2, Boen 2, Hanna, Smith. Totals 14 7-13 38. BURNS (47) — Austin Feist 15, Colahan 13, Gardner 7, Ridenour 5, Pierce 4, Heinz 3, Crafts, Martin, Cooper. Totals 19 8-16 47. La Pine 6 10 9 13 — 38 Burns 10 4 15 18 — 47 Three-point goals — La Pine: Parsons 2, Ramirez; Burns: Colahan. ——— Sisters Holiday Tournament ——— SISTERS (65) — John Erickson 15, Harrison 14, Boswell 11, Alderman 5, Miller 4, Moore 3, Hemingway 3, Cummins 2, Ridley, O’Neil, Pollard, Rickards. Totals 28 6-9 37. CROOK COUNTY (37) — Peyton Seaquist 12, Cooper 11, Mahurin 4, Washachek 3, Benton 3, Sutfin 2, Dees 2. Totals 10 13-15 65. Sisters 8 11 10 8 — 65 Crook County 24 15 15 11— 37 Three-point goals — Sisters: Harrison, Hemingway, Erickson; Crook County: Cooper 3, Washachek. ——— Nonconference ——— BEND (55) — Hayden Crook 20, Scott 12, Larson 11, Connell 6, Grim 6, Kramer, Torkelson, Beaumarchais. Totals 20 9-12 55. NORTH EUGENE (44) — Moore 29, Sand 7, Giubbini 2, Ferrenberg 2, Ingram 2, Delaney 1, Heath 1. Totals 11 18-22 44. Bend 18 11 12 14 — 55 North Eugene 12 11 8 13 — 44 Three-point goals — Bend: Crook 3, Connell 2,

Larson; North Eugene: Moore 3, Sand. ——— Heppner Tournament ——— CULVER (50) — Ryan Fritz 16, Gibson 14, Bolton 10, Gonzales 10, Lequieu, Leeper, Slaght. Totals 19 7-12 50. GRANT UNION (77) — Trevor Gill 26, Bremner 12, Nordstrom 8, Nelson 7, Legg 7, N. Wilson 7, Averett 6, Thompson 4, Belter, T. Wilson. Totals 31 9-13 77. Culver 12 15 11 12 — 50 Grant Union 18 21 23 15 — 77 Three-point goals — Culver: Gibson 3, Gonzales 1; Grant Union: Legg 2, Gill 1, Nordstrom 1, Nelson 1, N. Wilson 1.

Girls basketball Thursday’s games Summit Holiday Tournament Summit 55, Newberg 50 Willamette 33, Bend 20 Thursday’s summaries ——— Coeur d’Alene Inn-Vitational ——— LAPWAI (IDAHO) (54) — Nathanee Spencer 32, Shawl 9, Ramsey 6, Mills 3, Cunningham 2, Ellenwood, Andrews. 18 12-15 54. REDMOND (57) — Jesslyn Albrecht 24, Dollarhide 15, Capps 6, Benson 4, Williams 3, Edwards 3, Current 2, Bergum, Simmons, Baker. Totals 23 9-12 57. Lapwai (Idaho) 18 18 13 5 — 54 Redmond 12 12 17 16 — 57 Three-point goals — Lapwai: 6 (not available); Redmond: Dollarhide, Edwards. ——— Interstate Shootout, Lake Oswego ——— SHERWOOD (26) — Mikaela Doherty 6, Long 5, Muller 5, Birch 4, Thiel 4, Shields 1, Stobie 1, Jedan, Harris. Totals 8 10-24 26.

MOUNTAIN VIEW (44) — Maddy Booster 11, Waldrup 10, Cant 6, Platner 5, McCadden 5, Johnson 4, Reeves 2, Bailey 1, Warren. Totals 13 17-32 44. Sherwood 8 9 5 4 — 26 Mountain View 14 11 8 11 — 44 Three-point goals — Sherwood: none; Mountain View: Platner. ——— Summit Holiday Tournament ——— NEWBERG (50) — O’Halloran 12, Steelie 11, Vurchett 7, Bukel 6, Albo 6, Green 4, Stadeli 2, Wagonrich 2, Hamilton. Totals 18 10-13 50. SUMMIT (55) — Raja Char 25, Edwards 15, Patterson 7, Trejo 4, Hasenoehrl 2, Wettig 2, Cuniff, Powers. Totals 18 16-21 55. Newberg 12 11 10 17 — 50 Summit 6 24 13 12 — 55 Three-point goals — Newberg: Bulek 2, Albo 2; Summit: Char 2, Patterson. ——— Summit Holiday Tournament ——— WILLAMETTE (33) — Robertson 9, Bando 8, Osborne 7, Glassow 6, Van Sant 2, Kast 1, Josh. Totals 10 10-16 33. BEND (20) — Mekayla Isaak 11, McConnell 4, Crook 3, Maloney 2, Jones, Lundy, Kramer, Sylvester, Burnham. Totals 7 5-12 20. Willamette 7 4 10 12 — 33 Bend 9 4 4 3 — 20 Three-point goals — Willamette: Osborne 2 Bando; Bend: Crook. ——— Sisters Holiday Tournament ——— CROOK COUNTY (47) — MaKayla Lindburg 20, Buswell 13, Ovens 5, Walker 3, McKenzie 2, Solomon 2, Loper 2, Martin, Saenz, Johnston. Totals 13 2133 47. SISTERS (37) — Taylor Nieri 12, Carissa Kernutt 12, Kaiser 3, Herron 3, Spear 2, Rowe 1, Vogel, Peterson, Henson. Totals 12 13-22 37. Crook County 14 12 11 10 — 47 Sisters 2 12 10 13 — 37

——— South Coast Holiday Invitational ——— ASHLAND (41) — Sarah Pavlich 14, Shulenberger 9, Williams 7, Sad. Kasiah 6, Sar. Kasiah 5, Minor, Cochrane, Zehren, Thornton. Totals 14 1218 41. MADRAS (51) — Abby Scott 22, M. Stacona 16, Frank 4, Suppah 4, R. Jones 3, Adams 2, K. Stacona, I. Jones, Kaltsukis, Simmons. Totals 21 9-17 51. Ashland 10 14 8 9 — 41 Madras 15 10 12 14 — 51 Three-point goals — Ashland: Pavlich 1; Madras: None. ——— Heppner Tournament ——— CULVER (54) — Cassandra Fulton 17, McKinney 9, Seehawer 8, Donnelly 8, Anglen 6, Sandy 5, Retano. Totals 19 14-16 54. GRANT UNION (43) — Rawling 10, Mosley 6, Kodegh 6, Donahue 5, T. Smith 5, Wright 5, Houser 4, M. Smith 2. Totals 19 4-8 43. Culver 16 10 16 12 — 54 Grant Union 9 10 14 10 — 43 Three-point goals — Culver: McKinney 2; Grant Union: Wright.

Wrestling Thursday’s results Sierra Nevada Classic, Reno, Nev. ——— Team scores — 1, Henley, 154.5; 2, Folsom (Calif.), 145; 3, Lowry (Winnemucca, Nev.), 143.5; 4, Redmond, 142; 5, Paso Robles (Calif.), 138; 6, Shadow Ridge (Las Vegas, Nev.), 137; 7, Clovis West (Fresno, Calif.), 136; 8, Sprague, 135.5; 9, Madera (Calif.), 131; 10, Ponderosa (Shingle Springs, Calif.), 125.5; 43, Mountain View, 56. Mountain View results 106 — J.T. Ayers 4-2. 113 — Wyatt Slaght 2-2. 120 — Tracy Pitcher 1-2. 126 — Jake McDonald 0-2. 132 — Kyler Ayers 2-2. 138 — Anthony Oli-

ver 1-2. 145 — Forrest Samples 2-2. 152 — Mack Amodeo 1-2. 160 — Andrew Bright 1-2. 170 — Matt Miller 1-2. 182 — Austin Beebe 2-2. 195 — Trevor Roberts 3-2. 220 — No competitor. 285 — No competitor. Redmond results 106 — Brandon Short 5-2. 113 — No competitor. 120 — Calvin Rodman 2-2. 126 — Ryan Haney 5-1, 2nd. 132 — Chance Lindquist 6-0, champion. 138 — Ryan Newman 2-2. 145 — Jon Hickey 0-2. 152 — Sarek Shields 4-2. 160 — Tanner Barichio 3-2. 170 — Brock Lash 3-2. 182 —Gunnar Sigado 4-2. 195 — Casey Gates 3-2. 220 — Jacob Crivellone 2-2. 285 — Jacob Breitling 1-2. Free-Berry Classic, Pendleton ——— Team scores — 1, Crook County, 234.5; 2, Pendleton, 181; 3, Willamina, 125; T-4, Culver, 116.5; T-4, Burns, 116.5; 6, Riverside, 93.5; 7, Madras, 92.5; 8, Crook County JV, 87; 9, McLoughlin, 82.5; 10, McMinnville, 74.5; 11, Walla Walla (Wash.), 61; 12, Baker, 54; 13, Nestucca, 48.5; 14, Heppner, 36; 15, The Dalles Wahtonka, 31. Crook County results 106 — Trinton Libolt 3-1, 2nd. 113 — No placer. 120 — McKinnon Buckner, 4-0, 1st. 126 — Collbran Meeker, 4-0, 1st. 132 — No placer. 138 — Dawson Barber, 3-1, 3rd. 145 — Brennan Harkey, 3-1, 3rd. 152 — Alex Urrea, 3-1, 5th. 160 — Tyler Rockwood, 3-1, 3rd. 170 — Dean Smith, 3-1, 2nd. 182 — Mason Harris, 4-0, 1st. 195 — Rhett Smith, 4-0, 1st. 220 — No placer. 285 — Jason Williams, 3-1, 2nd. Culver results 106 — No placer. 113 — Noe Gonzalez, 4-0, 1st. 120 — Tucker Davis, 3-1, 3rd. 126 — Jared Kasch, 2-1, 3rd. 132 — Josue Gonzalez, 2-2, 4th. 138 — No placer. 145 — No placer. 152 — Jesus Retano, 3-1, 2nd. 160 — Miguel Gutierrez, 2-2, 4th. 170 — No placer. 182 — Mitch Adams, 2-2, 6th. 195 — No placer. 220 — No placer. 285 — No placer.


D4

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2011

NBA ROUNDUP

NHL ROUNDUP

Trail Blazers improve to 3-0

FormerPenguins help Philly defeat Pittsburgh

The Associated Press PORTLAND — Raymond Felton was less concerned about showing up his old team than he was with helping his new one pull out a win. Felton had 23 points, including a key three-pointer down the stretch, and the Portland Trail Blazers beat the Denver Nuggets 111-102 on Thursday night to remain undefeated after three games. “We showed some guts,” said Felton, who spent time last season with the Nuggets. “We showed we could get a tough win.” Wesley Matthews had 25 points, including five threepointers in the second half, and Jamal Crawford finished with 22 points, 14 in the fourth quarter. Portland, which opened the season with wins over Philadelphia and Sacramento, led by as many as 13 points in the first half, but the team was plagued by 25 turnovers. Ty Lawson had 25 points and eight steals for the Nuggets. His three-pointer midway through the fourth quarter tied it at 98 before the Blazers pulled away. It was the season’s first loss for Denver, which was coming off a 117-100 victory over Utah on Wednesday night. While the Nuggets had just seven turnovers, they couldn’t hit from beyond the arc, making just four of 20 three-point attempts. “We had a lot of open shots and we didn’t knock them down — simple as that,” Lawson said. “I don’t know how many threes we missed, and most of them were wide-open shots.” The teams traded point guards on NBA draft night in June. The Blazers got Felton, now a starter, while the Nuggets got Andre Miller, who backs up Lawson. The Nuggets also have former Blazers player Rudy Fernandez on their roster. The Spanish shooter was traded to Dallas on draft night, then sent

Greg Wahl-Stephens / The Associated Press

Denver Nuggets’ Danilo Gallinari shoots against Portland Trail Blazers’ Marcus Camby (23) and Gerald Wallace during the first half of Thursday night’s game in Portland.

to Denver in a deal earlier this month. Nuggets coach George Karl noted Denver’s many connections with the Blazers, including his own friendship with Portland coach Nate McMillan. “Your enemies motivate you,” Karl said. “But your friends really motivate you.” Felton hugged Karl on the court just before the game started, and Miller was greeted with hearty applause when he came into the game midway through the first quarter. Afterward, Felton said his motivation wasn’t to beat Denver, with whom he played in 21 games last season after starting the season with the Knicks. “The city was good to me. The fans were good to me. Nothing against them,” he said. “Just trying to get the win.” The Blazers jumped out to a 30-17 lead in the first quarter after Nicolas Batum’s pass to Kurt Thomas for a layup under the basket. The 13-point lead came despite eight turnovers in the opening period. Denver closed to 44-41 on Danilo Gallinari’s dunk with just over four minutes to go before the break. Al Harrington

hit a driving layup to pull the Nuggets even at 53 at halftime. Lawson pulled the Nuggets in front 57-55 early in the second half, but Matthews made four three-pointers. The Blazers went back up 69-63 midway through the third quarter. The Blazers clung to the lead until former teammate Fernandez made a layup and a threepointer to tie it at 84 early in the fourth. After Lawson hit a threepointer to make it 98-all midway through the final period, Jamal Crawford hit a free throw — for his 14th point of the quarter — and Matthews sunk a jumper and a threepointer to give Portland a 10498 lead. Arron Afflalo made a pair of free throws to narrow it for Denver, but following some sloppy play by both sides, Felton hit his three-pointer to give the Blazers a 107-100 lead with 1:45 left. LaMarcus Aldridge, the Blazers’ leading scorer, was held to 13 points. He blamed “heavy legs.” “It’s tough out there, but definitely happy to see the guards carry us,” Aldridge said. “They made some big shots. I was trying to do my job and force

NBA SCOREBOARD Summaries

Eastern Conference

Thursday’s Games

Trail Blazers 111, Nuggets 102 DENVER (102) Gallinari 4-15 8-8 16, Nene 4-12 2-2 10, Mozgov 0-0 0-0 0, Lawson 10-16 3-4 25, Afflalo 6-12 7-7 19, Harrington 3-9 2-4 8, Miller 4-13 4-6 13, Fernandez 28 2-2 7, Andersen 2-2 0-0 4, Brewer 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 35-87 28-33 102. PORTLAND (111) Wallace 5-7 3-3 13, Aldridge 6-14 1-2 13, Camby 1-2 0-0 2, Felton 10-16 2-2 23, Matthews 9-15 2-2 25, Crawford 6-16 9-9 22, Thomas 3-3 1-2 7, Batum 1-6 3-3 6. Totals 41-79 21-23 111. Denver 17 36 26 23 — 102 Portland 30 23 30 28 — 111 3-Point Goals—Denver 4-20 (Lawson 2-3, Miller 1-2, Fernandez 1-5, Afflalo 0-1, Harrington 0-4, Gallinari 0-5), Portland 8-20 (Matthews 5-8, Felton 1-3, Batum 1-3, Crawford 1-5, Wallace 0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Denver 39 (Nene 9), Portland 58 (Camby 12). Assists—Denver 17 (Miller 8), Portland 20 (Felton, Aldridge 6). Total Fouls—Denver 20, Portland 25. Technicals—Denver defensive three second 3, Portland defensive three second. A—20,531 (19,980).

Lakers 99, Knicks 82 NEW YORK (82) Anthony 8-14 9-10 27, Stoudemire 4-17 6-6 15, Chandler 1-3 11-14 13, Douglas 2-8 1-1 5, Fields 2-7 0-0 5, Bibby 1-4 0-0 2, Walker 0-3 1-2 1, Harrellson 1-6 1-2 3, Balkman 0-1 3-4 3, Novak 2-3 0-0 6, Jordan 0-0 0-0 0, Lin 0-1 2-2 2. Totals 21-67 34-41 82. L.A. LAKERS (99) Ebanks 0-1 0-2 0, McRoberts 4-7 2-2 10, Gasol 7-12 2-2 16, Fisher 2-7 0-2 5, Bryant 10-17 7-10 28, World Peace 3-7 2-3 9, Murphy 2-4 0-0 4, Blake 4-9 0-0 11, Kapono 3-3 1-1 9, Barnes 3-6 0-0 7, Walton 0-0 0-0 0, Goudelock 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 38-73 1422 99. New York 24 27 21 10 — 82 L.A. Lakers 31 32 17 19 — 99 3-Point Goals—New York 6-22 (Novak 2-3, Anthony 2-4, Stoudemire 1-1, Fields 1-3, Harrellson 0-2, Walker 0-2, Bibby 0-3, Douglas 0-4), L.A. Lakers 916 (Blake 3-5, Kapono 2-2, World Peace 1-1, Fisher 1-2, Bryant 1-3, Barnes 1-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—New York 43 (Chandler 11), L.A. Lakers 53 (Gasol 10). Assists—New York 15 (Douglas, Anthony 5), L.A. Lakers 23 (Bryant 6). Total Fouls—New York 20, L.A. Lakers 28. Technicals—Anthony, Chandler, Stoudemire, New York defensive three second, L.A. Lakers defensive three second 2. A—18,997 (18,997).

Bulls 108, Kings 98 CHICAGO (108) Deng 4-9 4-4 12, Boozer 8-16 0-0 16, Noah 3-5 3-4 9, Rose 7-14 5-6 19, Hamilton 7-15 1-1 16, Asik 1-3 2-2 4, Brewer 5-5 0-0 12, Gibson 3-4 0-1 6, Watson 3-7 1-2 8, Korver 2-2 0-1 6. Totals 43-80 16-21 108. SACRAMENTO (98) Salmons 4-10 2-2 12, Hayes 3-8 1-2 7, Cousins 416 7-8 15, Evans 7-14 5-12 19, Thornton 8-17 0-2 20, Hickson 2-4 3-6 7, Fredette 5-10 2-2 14, Thompson 12 0-0 2, Greene 1-1 0-0 2, Outlaw 0-1 0-0 0, Thomas 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 35-83 20-34 98. Chicago 30 30 25 23 — 108 Sacramento 24 29 22 23 — 98 3-Point Goals—Chicago 6-12 (Brewer 2-2, Korver 2-2, Hamilton 1-2, Watson 1-2, Rose 0-2, Deng 0-2), Sacramento 8-17 (Thornton 4-6, Fredette 2-4, Salmons 2-4, Outlaw 0-1, Evans 0-2). Fouled Out— Cousins, Hayes. Rebounds—Chicago 53 (Boozer 15), Sacramento 51 (Cousins 12). Assists—Chicago 25 (Watson 9), Sacramento 13 (Fredette, Hayes 3). Total Fouls—Chicago 27, Sacramento 19. Technicals— Chicago Coach Thibodeau, Sacramento defensive three second. A—17,317 (17,317).

Thunder 104, Mavericks 102 DALLAS (102) Marion 4-11 0-0 8, Nowitzki 9-17 10-10 29, Haywood 4-7 0-1 8, Kidd 1-3 0-0 3, West 5-10 4-4 15, Terry 6-17 0-0 16, Odom 2-11 0-0 4, Williams 1-2 0-0 2, Carter 3-8 0-2 8, Mahinmi 3-4 3-4 9. Totals

d-Miami d-Indiana Atlanta d-Toronto Orlando Chicago Charlotte Cleveland Milwaukee Philadelphia New Jersey New York Detroit Washington Boston

W 3 2 2 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0

L 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 3

W 4 3 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0

L 0 0 0 1 1 1 2 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 3

Pct 1.000 1.000 1.000 .500 .667 .667 .500 .500 .500 .500 .333 .333 .000 .000 .000

GB — ½ ½ 1½ 1 1 1½ 1½ 1½ 1½ 2 2 2½ 2½ 3

L10 3-0 2-0 2-0 1-1 2-1 2-1 1-1 1-1 1-1 1-1 1-2 1-1 0-2 0-2 0-3

Str W-3 W-2 W-2 L-1 W-2 W-1 L-1 W-1 W-1 W-1 L-2 L-2 L-2 L-2 L-3

Home 1-0 1-0 1-0 0-1 2-0 0-0 1-1 0-1 1-0 0-0 0-1 1-0 0-1 0-1 0-0

Away 2-0 1-0 1-0 1-0 0-1 2-1 0-0 1-0 0-1 1-1 1-1 0-2 0-1 0-1 0-3

Conf 2-0 2-0 2-0 1-1 1-0 0-0 1-1 1-1 0-1 0-0 1-2 1-0 0-2 0-2 0-2

Away 2-0 0-0 1-0 0-0 1-1 0-1 0-1 0-1 1-1 0-1 0-1 0-1 0-0 0-2 0-1

Conf 3-0 2-0 1-0 0-1 2-1 2-1 1-1 1-0 1-1 1-1 0-2 0-1 0-1 0-2 0-2

Western Conference d-Oklahoma City Portland d-New Orleans d-Golden State Denver San Antonio L.A. Lakers Houston L.A. Clippers Sacramento Memphis Minnesota Phoenix Utah Dallas d-division leader

Pct 1.000 1.000 1.000 .667 .667 .667 .500 .500 .500 .333 .000 .000 .000 .000 .000

GB — ½ 1 1½ 1½ 1½ 2 2 2 2½ 3 3 3 3 3½

L10 3-0 3-0 2-0 2-1 1-1 1-1 2-2 1-1 1-1 1-2 0-2 0-2 0-2 0-2 0-3

Str W-4 W-3 W-2 W-2 L-1 L-1 W-2 W-1 L-1 L-2 L-2 L-2 L-2 L-2 L-3

Home 2-0 3-0 1-0 2-1 1-0 2-0 2-1 1-0 0-0 1-1 0-1 0-1 0-2 0-0 0-2

——— All Times PST Thursday’s Games Orlando 94, New Jersey 78 Houston 105, San Antonio 85 Oklahoma City 104, Dallas 102 Chicago 108, Sacramento 98 Portland 111, Denver 102 L.A. Lakers 99, New York 82

Today’s Games Orlando at Charlotte, 4 p.m. Toronto at Dallas, 5:30 p.m. Cleveland at Indiana, 4 p.m. Washington at Milwaukee, 5:30 Detroit at Boston, 4:30 p.m. p.m. New Jersey at Atlanta, 4:30 p.m. Philadelphia at Utah, 6 p.m. Phoenix at New Orleans, 5 p.m. Chicago at L.A. Clippers, 7:30 Miami at Minnesota, 5 p.m. p.m. Houston at Memphis, 5 p.m.

38-90 17-21 102. OKLAHOMA CITY (104) Durant 10-16 7-9 30, Ibaka 6-9 4-8 16, Perkins 2-2 3-3 7, Westbrook 6-15 4-6 16, Sefolosha 0-0 0-0 0, Harden 4-8 6-6 15, Collison 4-4 0-0 8, Maynor 2-4 0-0 5, Cook 2-4 0-0 5, Mohammed 1-1 0-0 2. Totals 37-63 24-32 104. Dallas 29 23 24 26 — 102 Oklahoma City 28 28 22 26 — 104 3-Point Goals—Dallas 9-26 (Terry 4-8, Carter 2-3, West 1-2, Kidd 1-3, Nowitzki 1-4, Marion 0-2, Odom 0-4), Oklahoma City 6-14 (Durant 3-5, Maynor 1-1, Cook 1-3, Harden 1-4, Westbrook 0-1). Fouled Out— None. Rebounds—Dallas 45 (Nowitzki 10), Oklahoma City 45 (Durant 11). Assists—Dallas 25 (Terry 9), Oklahoma City 19 (Durant 6). Total Fouls—Dallas 24, Oklahoma City 19. Technicals—Carter, Nowitzki, West, Williams, Harden, Ibaka. A—18,203 (18,203).

Rockets 105, Spurs 85 SAN ANTONIO (85) Jefferson 2-10 0-1 5, Duncan 1-8 2-2 4, Blair 8-17 6-8 22, Parker 6-15 0-1 12, Ginobili 4-8 0-0 8, Leonard 3-7 2-4 8, Anderson 1-3 1-2 3, Splitter 4-8 2-2 10, Bonner 1-5 0-0 3, Ford 1-1 0-0 2, Green 3-7 0-0 6, Joseph 1-4 0-0 2. Totals 35-93 13-20 85. HOUSTON (105) Budinger 1-3 0-0 2, Scola 9-12 0-0 18, Hill 2-4 2-3 6, Lowry 5-10 4-4 16, Martin 10-17 1-2 25, Dalembert 1-3 2-2 4, Dragic 3-10 0-0 6, Lee 4-10 0-0 9, Williams 2-4 0-0 6, Parsons 2-5 1-2 5, Flynn 0-0 0-0 0, Morris 1-4 0-0 2, Thabeet 3-3 0-0 6. Totals 43-85 10-13 105. San Antonio 18 17 24 26 — 85 Houston 23 30 25 27 — 105 3-Point Goals—San Antonio 2-17 (Bonner 1-3,

Jefferson 1-5, Parker 0-1, Anderson 0-1, Green 0-2, Ginobili 0-2, Leonard 0-3), Houston 9-26 (Martin 4-8, Williams 2-2, Lowry 2-4, Lee 1-5, Budinger 0-2, Parsons 0-2, Dragic 0-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—San Antonio 59 (Blair 12), Houston 51 (Lowry 9). Assists—San Antonio 12 (Splitter 3), Houston 21 (Lowry 8). Total Fouls—San Antonio 10, Houston 17. Technicals—Houston defensive three second. A—18,267 (18,043).

Magic 94, Nets 78 NEW JERSEY (78) James 2-2 0-0 4, Humphries 3-5 3-5 9, Okur 4-9 0-0 9, D.Williams 2-12 6-8 10, Gaines 3-9 2-4 8, Stevenson 3-4 0-0 9, Morrow 2-10 0-0 4, Petro 1-2 0-0 2, Farmar 1-1 0-0 2, Sha.Williams 1-4 0-0 2, Brooks 7-15 1-2 17, She.Williams 0-4 2-2 2. Totals 29-77 14-21 78. ORLANDO (94) Turkoglu 5-14 0-0 11, Anderson 7-14 5-6 22, Howard 7-9 2-9 16, Nelson 0-3 0-0 0, J.Richardson 6-14 4-6 16, Davis 2-8 1-2 5, Redick 6-11 1-2 15, Duhon 3-6 0-0 9, Hughes 0-2 0-0 0, Harper 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 36-81 13-25 94. New Jersey 16 28 18 16 — 78 Orlando 28 22 25 19 — 94 3-Point Goals—New Jersey 6-17 (Stevenson 3-4, Brooks 2-2, Okur 1-1, Gaines 0-2, Sha.Williams 0-2, Morrow 0-3, D.Williams 0-3), Orlando 9-21 (Duhon 34, Anderson 3-5, Redick 2-3, Turkoglu 1-4, Hughes 01, Nelson 0-1, J.Richardson 0-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—New Jersey 53 (Humphries 10), Orlando 59 (Howard 24). Assists—New Jersey 17 (D.Williams 7), Orlando 25 (Turkoglu 7). Total Fouls—New Jersey 26, Orlando 19. Technicals—New Jersey defensive three second 2. A—18,954 (18,500).

two to play me, and find the guy who was open.” Also on Thursday: Thunder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 Mavericks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102 OKLAHOMA CITY — Kevin Durant scored 30 points and hit a three-pointer at the final buzzer to lift Oklahoma City past Dallas in a rematch of last season’s Western Conference finals. The Thunder let Dallas wipe away a five-point deficit in the final 46 seconds to go ahead on Vince Carter’s three-pointer with 1.4 seconds remaining. Dirk Nowitzki had 29 points and 10 rebounds to lead the Mavericks, whose title defense is off to an 0-3 start. Rockets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 Spurs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 HOUSTON — Kevin Martin scored 25 points, Luis Scola added 18 and Kyle Lowry had 16 points, nine rebounds and eight assists for Houston. DeJuan Blair scored 22 points and grabbed 12 rebounds for San Antonio, which shot 38 percent (35 of 93) and went two for 17 from three-point range. Magic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 Nets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 ORLANDO, Fla. — Ryan Anderson scored 22 points, Dwight Howard had 16 points and 24 rebounds and Orlando had little trouble handling New Jersey. It was the 49th career 20-rebound game for Howard. Lakers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 Knicks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 LOS ANGELES — Kobe Bryant scored 28 points as Los Angeles pulled away in the fourth quarter for its ninth straight victory over New York. Pau Gasol had 16 points, 10 rebounds and five assists for the Lakers, who have won two straight after a 0-2 start to the compressed season. Bulls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 Kings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 SACRAMENTO, Calif. — Derrick Rose had 19 points and eight assists and Chicago earned a victory over Sacramento. The Bulls ran off 15 straight points early in the game and never trailed again.

The Associated Press PITTSBURGH — Jaromir Jagr and Max Talbot both scored in their return to Pittsburgh, leading the Philadelphia Flyers to a 4-2 win over the Penguins on Thursday night. Kimmo Timonen and Matt Read also scored for the Flyers, and Claude Giroux added two assists as Philadelphia ended the Penguins’ four-game winning streak. Sergei Bobrovsky stopped 24 shots for the Flyers, who improved to 4-0 at Pittsburgh’s Consol Energy Center since the arena opened a year ago. Tyler Kennedy had a goal and an assist for Pittsburgh, and Jordan Staal scored his 15th of the season, but the Penguins spent most of the night being dominated by their cross-state rivals. Jagr and Talbot helped lead Pittsburgh to Stanley Cup titles during their careers, but they signed with the hated Flyers as free agents during the summer. Also on Thursday: Islanders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Flames . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 UNIONDALE, N.Y. — John Tavares scored a goal and added an assist, and Evgeni Nabokov made 29 saves to lead the New York Islanders over Calgary. Hurricanes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Maple Leafs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 RALEIGH, N.C. — Eric Staal scored a power-play goal 3:09 into overtime to lift Carolina to a comeback win over Toronto. Lightning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Canadiens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 TAMPA, Fla. — Vincent

Lecavalier scored a tiebreaking goal midway through the third period, Steven Stamkos netted his NHL-leading 23rd of the season, and Tampa Bay beat Montreal. Wild . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Oilers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 ST. PAUL, Minn. — Dany Heatley scored his third goal in four games to help Minnesota snap an eight-game losing with a victory over Edmonton. Blue Jackets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Stars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 DALLAS — Rick Nash scored twice, Steve Mason made 36 saves, and Columbus earned its first regulation road win of the season. Jets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Kings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 WINNIPEG, Manitoba — Evander Kane scored the only goal of the game 69 seconds into overtime, and Chris Mason made 31 saves in Winnipeg’s win over Los Angeles. Avalanche . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Coyotes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 DENVER — Semyon Varlamov made 25 saves, Gabriel Landeskog had a goal and an assist, and Colorado beat Phoenix. Canucks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Ducks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 ANAHEIM, Calif. — Daniel Sedin scored two goals, twin brother Henrik had a goal and two assists, and Vancouver also got goals from Cody Hodgson and Mason Raymond in a victory over Anaheim.

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FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

D5

MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL ROUNDUP

Cal edges USC in Pac-12 opener

Photos by Young Kwak / The Associated Press

Oregon’s E.J. Singler, left, attempts a layup against Washington State’s D.J. Shelton during Thursday night’s game in Spokane, Wash.

Ducks Continued from D1 Devoe Joseph scored 17 points for Oregon (10-3), which won its fourth straight game. E.J. Singler added 13 points and Garrett Sim had 12 for the Ducks. DaVonte Lacy scored 19 points for Washington State (8-5), which shot 46 percent from the field and saw a six-game winning streak snapped. Washington State fell behind by 20 at halftime as Oregon shot 71 percent in the first half. “We are better than that,” Cougars coach Ken Bone said. “We know it. Our guys know it.” But Oregon’s fast start and hot shooting left the Cougars frustrated, he said. “That first half, they put on a clinic on offense,” Bone said. “There were times when there was no real (defensive) pressure,” he added. “We were not scoring at a very good rate and that translated into poor defense.” Bone said he expected more trouble from Oregon’s guards, who lead the team in scoring. For the game, Oregon was 34 of 49 from the field, including nine of 16 on three-pointers. The Ducks outrebounded the Cougars 34-22. Joseph scored three consecutive baskets as Oregon built a 71-50 lead midway through the second half. At that point the Ducks were shooting 72 percent for the game. The Cougars could not get within single digits the rest of the way. In the first half, the Ducks jumped to an 18-9 lead behind seven points by Singler. Washington State made just four of its first 14 shots. Lacy, who had 15 points in the first half, sank three consecutive three-pointers to get Wash-

Oregon’s Devoe Joseph (34) attempts to get around a double team by Washington State’s Abe Lodwick (31) and Reggie Moore (1) during Thursday night’s game.

ington State within 25-18. But Oregon kept up its hot shooting, and a dunk by Ashaolu gave the Ducks a 37-25 lead. Three late three-pointers by Brett Kingma lifted Oregon to a 54-34 halftime advantage. Ashaolu had 19 points in the first half as the Ducks made 20 of 28 shots, including seven of 11 three-pointers. Washington State made just 43 percent of its first-half shots.

The Associated Press BERKELEY, Calif. — Allen Crabbe controlled the ball, stole a quick glance at the expiring shot clock and tossed up a prayer. He got fouled, and how fortunate that his feet were behind the three-point line. Crabbe converted all three free throws with 8.4 seconds left as California earned a hard-fought 53-49 victory over Southern California on Thursday night in the Pac-12 Conference opener for both schools. Crabbe retrieved the rebound after USC 7-footer Dewayne Dedmon blocked Jorge Gutierrez’s layup attempt. Crabbe was fouled by Eric Strangis on the left side of the three-point arc as he heaved the ball up with the shot clock expiring. “I just knew he blocked the shot, and it came right to me. I just threw it up, I didn’t even know they called a foul on him,” Crabbe said. “There was a second left. I just caught it and looked at the shot clock.” Cal didn’t count on it being so close at the end after leading by 16 points with 13:36 to play. Gutierrez had 13 points, seven assists, seven rebounds and four steals and Harper Kamp and Crabbe added 12 points apiece for the Golden Bears

(11-3, 1-0), who shot 46.7 percent and improved to 10-0 on its home floor in Haas Pavilion this season by holding off Maurice Jones. Jones scored 13 of his 17 points in the second half and knocked down three late three-pointers to keep the Trojans (5-9, 0-1) close in the waning minutes. He also had four assists and four steals. Also on Thursday: No. 5 North Carolina . . . . . . .100 Elon. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .62 CHAPEL HILL, N.C. — Tyler Zeller had 19 points and 13 rebounds to help North Carolina cruise past Elon. Harrison Barnes added 18 points for the Tar Heels (12-2). Rutgers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .85 No. 10 Florida . . . . . . . . . . . . . .83 PISCATAWAY, N.J. — Freshman Eli Carter scored a career-high 31 points and hit the go-ahead basket in the second overtime as Rutgers rallied to stun Florida (11-2). The Scarlet Knights (8-5) came back from a seven-point deficit late in regulation. Vanderbilt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 No. 14 Marquette . . . . . . . . . . .57 MILWAUKEE — Jeffery Taylor scored 19 points to help Vanderbilt steamroll Marquette for the Commodores’ first win in three games against ranked opponents this season. Lance Goulbourne

had 13 points and 16 rebounds for the Commodores (9-4). No. 17 Kansas. . . . . . . . . . . . . .89 Howard. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34 LAWRENCE, Kan. — Tyshawn Taylor and Connor Teahan scored 13 points each, and Kansas (9-3) emptied its bench during a blowout of overmatched, undersized Howard. No. 18 Michigan . . . . . . . . . . . .71 Penn State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53 ANN ARBOR, Mich. — Tim Hardaway Jr. scored 26 points, and Trey Burke added 13 points and seven assists to lead Michigan (11-2, 1-0) over Penn State in the Big Ten opener for both teams. No. 24 Harvard . . . . . . . . . . . . .67 Boston College. . . . . . . . . . . . .46 BOSTON — Reserve Laurent Rivard scored 18 points to help give Harvard a win over Boston College. It was the fourth straight season Harvard (11-1) has beaten BC on the Eagles’ home court. Stanford . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60 UCLA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59 STANFORD, Calif. — Josh Huestis blocked a potential go-ahead jumper by Lazeric Jones with three seconds remaining, lifting Stanford (112, 1-0 Pac-12) to victory. Jones scored a career-high 26 points for UCLA (7-6, 0-1). Aaron Bright had 16 points for the Cardinal.

Redmond

into Thursday; Ayers and Roberts both went 1-1 in consolation matches. Ten of the 11 participants for Mountain View won at least one match in the tournament. “It gives them a lot of confidence,” Cougars coach Les Combs said of the team results. “It shows a lot of prom-

ise for this year and next.” Redmond will host Mountain View in a dual meet next Thursday.

Continued from D1 “The reason we placed so high was (our) overall team effort,” Stanley said. “It’s a good day for the program.” Four Panther wrestlers won at least four matches over the tournament’s two days: Lindquist, Haney, Sarek Shields (152 pounds) and Gunnar Sigado (182). Mountain View finished with 56 points for the tournament, standing alone in 43rd place. Two Cougars — J.T. Ayers at 106 pounds and Trevor Roberts at 195 — stayed alive

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Beavers Continued from D1 “He rebounded the ball, he scored the ball, and he took care of the ball. He did a nice job for us.” After controlling the start of the game, things became tight toward the end for Washington (7-5, 1-0). Oregon State’s Ahmad Starks cut Washington’s lead to 83-80 when he hit a deep three-pointer. Following an Oregon State (10-3, 0-1) miss, Wroten baited a defender into thinking he was merely walking the ball up the court. Instead, he blew past a defender and scored while being fouled by Jared Cunningham. His free throw put Washington up 88-80 with 2:12 to go. “When we cut the lead to three I thought we were a couple of hustle plays away from making them nervous, but then they made a couple of really good plays and that opened it up again,” Oregon State coach Craig Robinson said. C.J. Wilcox and Desmond Simmons made four consecutive free throws to put Washington up 93-80 with 51.4 seconds remaining. Wilcox finished with 15 points for Washington. Cunningham, the Pac-12’s leading scorer, finished with 15 points. Cunningham was held to just two second-half points. Roberto Nelson hit a threepointer to shave Washington’s lead to 66-60 earlier in the half. Wroten answered with a drive to the basket and a score while being fouled. Wroten’s free throw lengthened Washington’s lead to 69-60 with 11:57 remaining. The game was more lopsided in the first half, as Washington had a 20-point

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Washington’s Abdul Gaddy, front, tries to keep control of the ball in front of Oregon State’s Devon Collier in the first half of Thursday night’s game in Seattle.

lead at one point. “They got to the basket whenever they wanted to, and they are probably the first team to do that to us on a consistent basis,” Robinson said. “To our guys, (on) defense, we got off to our first bad start, and then I thought that we played them pretty evenly the whole game. We had every reason to close shop and move on, but these guys have no quit in them, and I was happy about that.” Washington took excellent care of the ball against the Beavers’ defense. Oregon

State came into the game ranked fifth in the nation in steals (10.4). But the Huskies had committed just one turnover, which came on Wroten’s first foray, while building the 20-point lead. Washington finished with nine turnovers and also connected on 17 of 20 free throws. The Beavers were able to get back into the game when Washington became sloppier with the ball at the end of the first half. Lay-ins from Burton and a turnover that led to a layup for Nelson left Washington up 50-39 at the half.

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Award is non-transferable, non-refundable, not redeemable for cash and may not be sold. Travel over holidays and other peak periods is restricted. Airline fuel surcharge plus all airline taxes (Federal Excise & Hawaii ticket taxes), optional insurance and any upgrades are the responsibility of the recipient. The trip winner is responsible for paying any resort taxes and fees, parking fees, room service charges and any other incidentals assessed directly from the hotel and/or not directly specified above. Travel is subject to availability and some restrictions may apply. We regret that extensions to this certificate cannot be given. A $250 change fee applies to all changes once the itinerary is confirmed; a $200 fee will be charged for all cancellations. Trips are valid for two adults ONLY per room and do not include any special promotions. NO room upgrades. Winner must be at least 21 years old. Employees of participating companies and its properties, sponsors, vendors and their immediate families are not eligible to win. The Bulletin reserves the right to deem entries ineligible. One coupon per edition. For all rules and regulations visit www.bendbulletin.com/vacationrules. Email addresses will not be sold but individuals who enter this contest may receive emails from THE BULLETIN, GETAWAYS TRAVEL and PLEASANT HOLIDAYS. The Bulletin reserves the right to deem entries ineligible. One coupon per edition.


D6

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2011

Rose

A S  C  

Continued from D1 “The offense truly ran through him,” Aliotti explained during a news conference Wednesday. “It was Cam left, Cam right, Cam over there and Cam over there. I think Russell Wilson is the leader of that offense, but he has a lot of supporting cast.” Aliotti also has to account for his own offense. Oregon’s up-tempo style is so unconventional and explosive it has changed the way Oregon plays defense. Oregon’s offense averages 46 points per game while ranking last in the country, No. 120, in time of possession. “We go so fast we score in less than a minute or we can be out in less than a minute,” Aliotti said. Oregon’s defense has logged 1,005 plays this season, 329 more than Alabama’s top-ranked unit. Aliotti keeps his defense fresh with a substitution system that makes the Oregon Ducks look more like the NHL’s Anaheim Ducks. “We’re a lot like a hockey team,” he said. “We’ve got guys flying over the bench into the rink.” Aliotti rotates a largely anonymous brigade of nine defensive linemen, six linebackers and seven or eight defensive backs. This is not the kind of operation designed to make a defensive coordinator look like Buddy Ryan. Aliotti, in a perfect world, would recruit SEC-type talent and look to suffocate opposing offenses. He could grumble if not for the fact Oregon is playing in its third straight Bowl Championship Series bowl game. “We do what we do, so we’ve learned to live with it,” Aliotti said. “So I don’t want to stand up here and be negative. That’s why we play so many players. But it’s nice when the offensive team stays on the field and has a six- or sevenminute drive. It’s even nice if they don’t score, believe it or not, because you get a chance to rest a little bit.” In Eugene, it’s head coach Chip Kelly’s way or the highway. “We know going in this is Chip’s philosophy,” Aliotti said. Oregon’s defensive numbers are deceivingly ordinary. The Ducks rank No. 59 nationally in total defense and are No. 48 in scoring defense. Aliotti’s reputation, as a result, probably suffers. You never hear his name bandied about for head coaching positions. He’s 57 now and approaching lifer status as an assistant. Yet, for what he’s asked to do, which is to surrender fewer points than Oregon’s offense scores, Aliotti is vastly underappreciated. Paul Chryst, Wisconsin’s offensive coordinator, has spent a month studying Oregon’s revolving-Ducks defense. He loves the hockey analogy and joked he’d like to put a few players in the penalty box. “We need to get some power plays,” Chryst said. “Offensively what they do is impressive,” Chryst added, “but defense has a lot to do with where they’re at.” Aliotti’s career lacks a signature moment. It would have been last year had Oregon defeated Auburn, 22-19, instead of the other way around. Aliotti would have left University of Phoenix Stadium with the crowning achievement of curtailing Newton and the mighty Auburn offense. Lost in defeat was Oregon holding Auburn to 19 points until the game-winning kick on the game’s final play. Aliotti’s defense limited Newton to 265 passing yards, with two touchdown passes and one interception. Newton rushed for “only” 64 yards. “I was really proud of our effort,” Aliotti said. “... If somebody would have asked me a month before we played that game they were going to score 22 points I would have signed my name and said we’ll take it.”

Cinema Continued from D1 Of more than 300 films from numerous countries entered in the 2011 competition, judges winnowed them to about 50, which were publicly screened in Banff in the competition for $50,000 in prizes. The final selections of films to be shown change from venue to venue, at the discretion of the sponsors. But staffers from Mountain Gear, which sponsors the World Tour’s Spokane, Wash., stop, traveled to see the films in Banff. And they have some favorites in the pack. “We have to show ‘Cold,’ ” said show coordinator Phil Bridgers. “It’s the festival grand prize winner and it’s 19 minutes of amazing raw video filmed by three climbers without a film crew.” “Cold” (forgemotionpictures.com) revolves around the hand-held camera of Cory Richard, who learned during the expedition why no other American had climbed an 8,000-meter peak during winter. The film captures the pain, fear and doubt of high-stakes extreme mountaineering, complete with a harrowing descent that amplifies the trio’s isolation and exposure. “I’ve seen this film three times and I look forward to seeing it again,” Bridgers said, noting that Richards introduced the film to the audience in Banff and gave insights. “He told us that after the three of them survived an avalanche, he got really upset with his teammates. He put away his camera, made sure they were all roped up and told them he was going

Please email Adventure Sports event information to sports@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Items are published on a space-availability basis, and should be submitted at least 10 days before the event.

CLIMBING

Jason Redmond / The Associated Press

The new reflective Oregon football helmet is displayed at a news conference in Los Angeles, Wednesday.

COMPETITION ROCK CLIMBING: Through Feb. 16 with the Bend Endurance Academy; Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays from 4 to 6 p.m. at the Bend Rock Gym; ages 10 to 18; intermediate to advanced; www. BendEnduranceAcademy.org or bendclimbingteam@gmail.com.

CYCLING Oregon player performs Heimlich at restaurant BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. — An Oregon football player helped a choking diner during the traditional Beef Bowl, which brings the teams playing in the Rose Bowl to Lawry’s in Beverly Hills for prime rib. City News Service says Paul Diamond began choking a bit while eating Wednesday. Oregon guard Mark Asper performed the Heimlich maneuver on Diamond, helping him cough the meat up. Diamond says he was breathing throughout and not in too much distress, describing it as “not a big deal.” Diamond’s son Tom is an Oregon senior. The Beef Bowl traditionally brings the teams to the restaurant on separate nights for a dinner before the game. Oregon’s opponent, Wisconsin, was scheduled to visit Lawry’s Thursday. — The Associated Press

This is Aliotti’s fourth shot at winning a Rose Bowl, the game he dreamed about growing up in Northern California, watching Jan.1 telecasts at his grandmother’s house after big Italian meals. Aliotti was euphoric when he got to coach Oregon’s defense against Penn State in the 1995 game. Then Ki-Jana Carter raced 83 yards for a touchdown on Penn State’s first play from scrimmage en route to a 38-20 win. Aliotti’s one year as UCLA’s coordinator in 1998 is still a painful blot. A lost month started in December with Miami torching Aliotti’s defense in a game that cost the Bruins a berth in the first BCS title game. “We had a nightmare game in Miami; I’ll never forget that,” he said. UCLA’s defense retreated to the Rose Bowl game and allowed 38 in a loss to Wisconsin. “I remember Ron Dayne running all over the place,” Aliotti recalled of Dayne’s 246 rushing yards. Two years ago, Aliotti’s defense held Ohio State to 26 points, but Oregon’s offense only scored 17. Buckeyes’ quarterback Terrelle Pryor had to pick that Rose Bowl game for his breakout performance. Aliotti cherishes each trip to Pasadena and really isn’t asking for much. “It would be nice to win one,” he said. “I don’t say that with any extra added pressure or anything like that. It is what it is. One team is going to win and one team is going to lose, last time I checked. But it would be nice to win one.”

WEEKLY ROAD RIDE: Saturdays, noon; weekly group road rides starting from Nancy P’s Baking Co., 1054 Milwaukee Ave. in Bend; Glen Bates, glenbates@bendcable. com, 541-382-4675.

DOWNHILL SKIING AND SNOWBOARDING MINI WORLD CUP ALPINE RACE TRAINING: MBSEF is now accepting enrollments for ages 7-14, and high school winter term athletes age 13-19; program runs through March with free winter and spring break camps; 541-3880002, mbsef@mbsef.org, www. mbsef.org. FREERIDE SNOWBOARD TRAINING: For ages 13-19 through MBSEF; program runs through mid-April; 541-388-0002, mbsef@ mbsef.org, www.mbsef.org. FREERIDE SKIING AND SNOWBOARD COMPETITION TRAINING: MBSEF is now accepting enrollments for ages 1019; program runs through March; 541-388-0002, mbsef@mbsef. org, www.mbsef.org. FREERIDE SKIING AND SNOWBOARD DEVELOPMENT TRAINING: For ages 8-14 through

MBSEF; program runs from January to mid-March; 541-3880002, mbsef@mbsef.org, www. mbsef.org. NEW YEAR’S EVE AT HOODOO SKI AREA: Enjoy games, activities, and skiing from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.; live music and a special dinner menu in the lodge; professional-style fireworks on the mountain; www. hoodoo.com. TELE-FEST AT HOODOO SKI AREA: Saturday, Jan. 14; billed as the largest annual Telemark ski festival on the West Coast; www.hoodoo. com.

NORDIC SKIING TOUR DU CHOCOLATE: Dec. 31, noon to 2 p.m.; ski a 6-mile or 3mile loop at Virginia Meissner Snopark; treats at several chocolatethemed “aid” stations; proceeds benefit Meissner trail grooming; $10 per person or $20 per car; www.meissnernordic.org. WINTER TRAILS DAY: Jan. 7, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Wanoga Sno-park; free event featuring snowsports demos; offers children and adults new to snowsports the chance to try snowshoeing and cross-country skiing; 541-3850594; rleveri@rei.com; www.rei. com. “SHE’S ON SKIS” WOMEN’S NORDIC SKI CLINIC: Through Feb. 18; 10-week women’s nordic ski clinic on trails of the Mt. Bachelor Nordic Center; fee based on membership; Wednesdays at 9:30 a.m. or Saturdays at 9:30 a.m. or 12:30 p.m.; 541-693-0909; sfoster@mtbachelor.com; www. mtbachelor.com. YOUTH NORDIC SKI SYP TRAINING: For ages 7-11 through MBSEF; the program runs from January through mid-March with free winter and spring break

SOLAR & RADIANT HEATING SYSTEMS

Local Service. Local Knowledge. 541-848-4444

541-389-7365 CCB# 18669 www.bobcatsun.com

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On the web

trailer in an attempt to break away from the mainstream and live a simple life of climbing. Action junkies will find this a bit slow in places, but audiences have rated it high. “Seasons,” a series of 4minute films about kayaking in each of the four seasons. Each film is simple but with extraordinary moments such as the winter toboggan-style snow-slope launch the kayaker completes with astounding ease. The fall season is filmed on Washington’s White Salmon River. “The Freedom Chair” chronicles a former competitive skier’s comeback from tragedy and paralysis to become a top sit-skiing athlete. “Blue Obsession” features stunning photography of an ice climber as he documents the receding glaciers near Juneau, Alaska, with a skillful journey through a treacherous turquoise world. “Broken Tail,” voted the best film on natural history, follows a leading photographer documenting the last wild tigers on his personal pilgrimage through India to piece together the last journey of Broken Tail, a charismatic tiger cub. “Man vs. Volcano,” a National Geographic Explorer film in which a scientist chickens out of rappelling down and taking a lava sample from deep in the bowels of an active volcano. But then he’s shamed by a cameraman into going back and doing it anyway.

RUNNING 5K AND 10K TRAINING PROGRAMS: No Boundaries 5K running program and Run Happy 10K program through Fleet Feet in Bend; cost for six-week program is $65 through Dec. 31, $75 after; register by Jan. 7; 541-389-1601; training@fleetfeetbend.com; www. fleetfeetbend.com. REDMOND RUNNING GROUP: Meets at 8 a.m. on Saturdays for a 4- to 8-mile run; contact Dan Edwards at rundanorun1985@gmail.com or 541-419-0889. FOOTZONE NOON RUNS: Noon on Wednesdays at FootZone, 845 N.W. Wall St., Bend; seven-mile loop with shorter options; free; 541-317-3568. TEAM XTREME’S RUNNING CLUB IN REDMOND: Meets at 8 a.m. on Saturdays at Xtreme Fitness Center, 1717 N.E. Second St.; 2- to 5-mile run; free; 541-923-6662.

get a room

3RD ST. & EMPIRE BLVD. EQUAL HOUSING LENDER

New Year’s Eve

Get information on the World Tour films and the show schedules at www.banffcentre.ca/mountainfestival/worldtour.

to take charge and lead them out of danger. Then he walked about 50 feet and fell into a crevasse. That humbled him pretty fast.” The Banff Mountain Film Festival is famous for fostering films chronicling the passions and obsessions — tragedies as well as victories — of mountaineers, endurance and extreme athletes, and environmental and cultural efforts around the world. Cutting edge? You bet. Leo Houlding won acclaim last year for “The Asgard Project,” a film about his ambitious expedition to Baffin Island to make the first free ascent of one of the most difficult and remote big walls in the world. “This year he got up on stage to show the summons he’d just received (a year later) to appear in court in Calgary because the film showed paragliding off the summit,” Bridgers said. “That’s illegal in Canada. The crowd roared with laughter.” A timely environmental issue is tackled this year by “Spoil,” a documentary (epfilms.tv) that deals with a controversial proposed oil pipeline across British Columbia and through the range of the rare white grizzlies known as the spirit bears. Among the other films on the Banff World Tour are: “23 feet,” a light, fun youngpeople story of two women and a man who take off towing a 23-foot 1970 Airstream

camps; 541-388-0002, mbsef@ mbsef.org, www.mbsef.org. YOUTH NORDIC SKI RACE TRAINING FOR MIDDLE SCHOOL ATHLETES: MBSEF is now accepting enrollments for athletes ages 11-14; program runs through mid-March with free winter and spring break camps; 541-388-0002, mbsef@ mbsef.org, www.mbsef.org. HIGH SCHOOL NORDIC SKI RACE TRAINING: For ages 14-19 through MBSEF; program runs through March; 541-388-0002, mbsef@ mbsef.org, www.mbsef.org. BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY PROFESSIONAL COACHING AND DEVELOPMENT TEAMS: For participants age 7 through adult; activities at the Virginia Meissner Sno-park; www. BendEnduranceAcademy.org or 541-678-3864.

Open Late, Special Entrees and Dessert in addition to Regular Menu Special Entrees include: • Filet Oscar • Sea Bass Oscar • Baked Oysters on the halfshell

New Year’s Day Closed

Reservations Recommended

541-317-0727 • 594 NE BELLEVUE DR. (Behind the Starbucks Eastside) •

www.thephoenix.biz


FAMILY

TV & Movies, E2 Calendar, E3 Dear Abby, E3

E

Horoscope, E3 Comics, E4-5 Puzzles, E5

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2011

www.bendbulletin.com/family

IN BRIEF Acting workshop offered to kids Actors Realm/Volcanic Theatre will offer a new workshop for kids starting Jan. 21. This is the second Actors Realm workshop for kids. It will take place at The Safe Room, 1005 N.W. Galveston Ave., Suite 225. The class is for children age 8-12. It will be taught by Jeanne Sitter, an elementary school teacher and actress with professional training, and Derek Sitter, founder of the actors group. The workshop will focus on teaching literacy through drama and helping students learn basic acting techniques. The workshop is from 2 to 4 p.m. Saturdays from Jan. 21 to Feb. 11. Registration is limited to eight students and cost is $75. Contact: www.actors realm.com or 541-2150516.

S Y E K O N

Bu Andy Zeigert / The

Giving up the wheel

More kids born out of wedlock A new research brief from Child Trends, “Childbearing Outside of Marriage: Estimates and Trends in the United States,” shows that the number of women having children out of wedlock has increased from 11 percent of all births in 1970 to 41 percent in 2009. White women and Hispanic women experienced the most dramatic increase. Most of the babies born out of wedlock were born to women age 20-29, with 62 percent, compared with 21 percent born to teenagers. In 1970, women age 25 and older accounted for 18 percent of all children born out of wedlock; in 2009 women age 25 and older accounted for 41 percent of babies born out of wedlock. Most of the births out of wedlock in 2009 were not first children; 59 percent were second born or other higher birth order. The brief points out that the increase can also be linked to the increase in cohabitation among nonmarried adults.

By Mac McLean The Bulletin

L

ike many people who move to Central Oregon, Christine H. Jones realized the car she purchased when she lived in a warmer climate no longer met her needs and traded it in for a brand-new Subaru as quickly as she could. “I went through one winter with my sedan from Texas and realized I needed something with all-wheel drive,” Jones said as she described what led her to buy a 1997 Subaru Forester. “It was the greatest car, I loved it to death.” But Jones, a 66-year-old resident of the Aspen Ridge retirement community in Bend who was diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer’s disease about 10 years ago, came across situations in which driving the Subaru around town wasn’t as much fun as it had been when she first got it. There were even moments, she said, when it was uncomfortable for her to be behind the wheel. When she talked about these moments with her doctor, he gave her some bad

— Alandra Johnson, The Bulletin

BEST BETS FOR FAMILY FUN

news: “He said I really shouldn’t be driving any more,” Jones said, recalling ISSUES IN the moment she gave up her drivAGING ing privileges. Last year, the Oregon Driver and Motor Vehicle Services Division suspended the licenses of 1,141 drivers because they were diagnosed with a “severe and uncontrollable impairment” and deemed unsafe to drive. More than half of these people were 70 or older (see “By the numbers”). Beyond this statistic lies an even greater number of drivers, DMV officials estimate, who — like Jones — have willfully surrendered their driving privileges without forcing the government to get involved.

Warning signs Most of the people who attend the AARP Driver Safety Programs that Gary Grimm teaches at local senior centers do so because they want to brush up their driving skills or qualify for a discounted rate some insurance agencies offer

• The decision to stop driving is not easy, but it’s one many seniors feel they have to make their older drivers. But there are a few students, Grimm said, who worry about what impact their hearing or vision problems, delayed reaction times or declining physical fitness and flexibility can have on their ability to drive. “A lot of older drivers have arthritis and may not be able to look over their shoulder,” he said, adding that these people often miss things hidden by their blind spots and sometimes back into objects like trash cans or curbs. Grimm’s class touches on ways people can improve their driving skills by better positioning their mirrors or using the three-second rule to make sure they aren’t following other vehicles too closely. But it also stresses the importance of talking with one’s doctor the second somebody starts having problems behind the wheel. These problems can manifest themselves in different ways, some of which can be treated and some of which cannot (see “Warning signs for senior drivers”). See Senior drivers / E6

lletin

By the numbers • Health care providers reported 1,563 drivers with severe and uncontrollable cognitive or functional impairments through the Oregon DMV’s at-risk program in 2010. Fourteen of these drivers were from Crook County, 47 were from Deschutes County and nine were from Jefferson County. • While the ages of those drivers ranged from 15 to 95, 60 percent of them were 70 or older and 41 percent of those were 80 or older. People above the age of 70 make up only 11 percent of the state’s 3 million licensed drivers, while those over 80 make up only 4.1 percent. • The DMV suspended the licenses of 73 percent of the at-risk drivers who were reported through its mandatory reporting program in 2010. Less than 13 percent of these individuals were able to pass the DMV’s driving tests and get their driving privileges back. • The agency also received 2,832 reports through its voluntary at-risk driver reporting program in 2010. Eighty-two percent of these individuals were able to keep their driving privileges by either passing the DMV’s tests or getting a medical clearance to drive from their doctor.

Details, E3

New Year’s Yes, the start of the new year can be about adult parties and clinking champagne glasses, but it’s also a great time for families to start their own traditions. Maybe start the year with a trip to a sledding hill, a pot of black-eyed peas or watching a favorite movie. The idea is to start the new year right — and that means quality time with family.

Polar Bear Plunge Feeling adventurous? Kids and adults alike are welcome to take a plunge into the chilly waters of the pool at the Sunriver Resort on Sunday. The event is free. Hot chocolate will be served.

Matsiko World Orphan’s Choir This choir, made up of children from Peru and Liberia, will perform at several locations throughout Central Oregon starting Tuesday.

FAMILY PROFILE

KID CULTURE

Groups lend support to parents Creative books for parents and kids

Editor’s Note: Once a month, The Bulletin’s Family section profiles a local organization designed to help families. To suggest an organization, contact Alandra Johnson at ajohnson@bendbulletin. com or 541-617-7860.

Kid Culture features fun and educational books and toys for kids. “Nursery Rhyme Comics: 50 Timeless Rhymes from 50 Celebrated Cartoonists” Introduction by Leonard S. Marcus, edited by Chris Duffy (First Second, 128 pgs., $18.99)

By Alandra Johnson The Bulletin

Is throwing fits like this a stage or should I be concerned? What should I do if my husband and I have different parenting styles? These are just a few of the many topics parents discuss in groups led by the local nonprofit Together for Children. A group of eight to 10 parents, plus their young children, gather each week to learn about parenting and engage with their kids. The group has been operating for more than two decades in Central Oregon, aimed at families of children walking age up to age 4. A new group session begins the week of Jan. 9. Parents throughout Central Oregon are invited to join. Program manager Linda Gilpin has been working with parents in Together for Children for years. She enjoys offering parents tools to

Submitted photo

Sarah Schmoeller, at right, a staff member for Together For Children, leads a group at Bend’s Summit High School in December.

help them get through some tough toddler phases. “We all need a little support,” said Gilpin. She says many nonprofits in town are focused on high-need and high-risk families. Together for Children is more focused on everyday problems facing everyday families. “Anyone who has a kid is stressed,” said Gilpin. “We’re all high-need when we have a kid.”

During the first hour, an early childhood educator leads the parents and kids in an activity together. Then, during the second hour, parents and kids split up. The kids go with the specialist to play more games, while parents get to talk about concerns, troubleshoot and learn research-based parenting tips. See Groups / E3

“Nursery Rhyme Comics” is a unique collection of your favorite nursery rhymes illustrated with comics. From “Itsy Bitsy Spider” to “Hey, Diddle Diddle,” each one will bring a smile to your face. The bright illustrations are eye-catching, clever and filled with joy and movement. In “One, Two, Buckle My Shoe,” the shoe is a customized shoe with Velcro, steel toe and painted no-slip feather grip. In “Pat A Cake,” illustrated by Dave Roman, robots are the main characters. Both of these traditional nursery rhymes are examples of the cartoon version with a modern twist. In “The Old Woman Who Lived in a Shoe,” illustrated by Lucy Knisley, the old woman is Ruth the Rock and Roll Baby Sitter. “She didn’t know what to do” with all of the children so they formed a rock band. The format is clever and whimsical. See Books / E3


E2

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2011

TV & M   Highs and lows of TV in 2011 By Ellen Gray

TV SPOTLIGHT

Philadelphia Daily News

Man didn’t walk on the moon and the Berlin Wall did not fall in 2011. No one even shot J.R. — who’ll be back in TNT’s “Dallasâ€? update next summer. And if Janet Jackson had a wardrobe malfunction, I’m happy to say I missed it. Still, more happened on TV than could fit in a Top 10 list.Here’s how I’ll remember it. Spoiler warning: • Word of the year: Vagina. (Runner-up: penis.) Not since Eve Ensler’s “The Vagina Monologuesâ€? have so many actors had so much to say about a body part possessed by 51 percent of the population. From CBS’ “2 Broke Girlsâ€? to ABC’s “Suburgatory,â€? broadcast TV was apparently on a mission in 2011 to educate Americans in basic anatomy. • “Badâ€? guy we’ll miss: Gus Fring. The “Breaking Badâ€? fried chicken-and-meth entrepreneur played by Giancarlo Esposito was evil’s suave face — while he still had one — as well as a character whose backstory probably deserved its own TV series. • Bait-and-switch that left us howling: AMC’s “The Killing.â€? Not just that infamous season finale, in which we learned that the case against mayoral candidate Darren Richmond (Billy Campbell) rested on evidence that couldn’t actually exist, but a good chunk of the season. Adapted by Veena Sud from a Danish series titled “Forbrydelsen,â€? “The Killingâ€? started out promisingly with the story of a young girl’s murder in atmospheric Seattle but quickly turned into a weekly exercise in frustration, thanks to a plot that owed its movement to a veritable school of red herrings. • Creepy cable trend: Incest. It started with the Lan-

nister twins (Lena Headey and Nikolaj Coster-Waldau) on HBO’s “Game of Thrones� and ended — one hopes — with that twisted near-declaration in the season finale of Showtime’s “Dexter.� “Shore� embarrassment: Snooki in Florence. Not content with marring the reputation of the actual Jersey shore, MTV exported its trash to Italy. Which, let’s face it, has enough problems. Daytime departures: “The Oprah Winfrey Show� ended its 25-year run in national syndication, ABC’s “All My Children� was yanked after 31 years — and will not, it seems, be resuming as an online soap — and the network canceled “One Life to Live,� whose last episode is scheduled to air Jan. 13. Dumbest new name in daytime: “The Chew.� Food-focused replacement for “All My Children� on ABC, its title rhymes, of course, with “The View.� Eeew. Disconnects between hype and ratings: Oprah’s OWN and Fox’s “Terra Nova.� Disconnect between anger and ratings: NBC’s “Playboy Club,� which wasn’t hounded to death by the Parents Television Council but died — as it deserved to — of viewer neglect. Other shows whose viewership made protests unnecessary: MTV’s “Skins� and TLC’s “All-American Muslim.� Real estate “Horror� story: FX and “Glee� creator Ryan Murphy stuck an already troubled couple and their daughter in an oversize house so haunted “The Addams Family� wouldn’t have lasted a week, and millions tuned in to watch the blood flow.

So what if you owe more on your mortgage than your house is worth? At least you’re not those poor slobs on “American Horror Story.� Taking one — maybe more — for the team: Rob McElhenney, creator and one of the stars of FX’s “It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia,� packed on 50 pounds — with advice from a nutritionist — to make the point that his isn’t one of those sitcoms where the cast gets better-looking as the show goes on. Civics lesson: The verdict in the Casey Anthony trial demonstrated that while people who get picked for juries might not be paid as much as HLN’s Nancy Grace, they wield actual power. Something to think about the next time you’re summoned. Royal wedding we didn’t wake up for: Prince William and Kate Middleton were married in April in a DVR-friendly ceremony that was more interesting to television news than it was to most of the viewers in this former British colony. I caught the “Today Show� recap and was in and out in four minutes. Another snorer: Katie Couric was replaced by Scott Pelley as anchor of “The CBS Evening News� with, blessedly, far less fanfare than accompanied her original hiring. — Ellen Gray is a columnist for the Philadelphia Daily News.

Find local movie times inside today’s GO! Magazine.

P ’ G  M   This guide, compiled by Orlando (Fla.) Sentinel film critic Roger Moore, should be used along with the Motion Picture Association of America rating system for selecting movies suitable for children. Films rated G, PG or PG-13 are included in this weekly listing, along with occasional R-rated films that may have entertainment or educational value for older children with parental guidance.

WAR HORSE RATING: PG-13 for intense sequences of war violence WHAT IT’S ABOUT: A young thoroughbred and the teenage boy who loves him must prove themselves on the farm and then on the battlefields of World War I. THE KID ATTRACTOR FACTOR: A boy and his horse, maybe the prettiest horse ever to grace the screen. GOOD LESSONS/BAD LESSONS: In life, “There are big days, and there are small days.� You get to decide what kind of day to make it. VIOLENCE: Quite a bit of combat, some of it reasonably graphic. LANGUAGE: Disney clean. SEX: None. DRUGS: Alcohol is consumed and abused. PARENTS’ ADVISORY: A violent history lesson about “The Great War� seen through the eyes of a horse, this is too intense for the very young — suitable for 12-and-up.

WE BOUGHT A ZOO RATING: PG for language and some thematic elements WHAT IT’S ABOUT: An adventureprone widower uproots the kids when they buy and take over a small rural zoo. THE KID ATTRACTOR FACTOR: Cute kids, cuter critters, children living in and trying to save the family zoo.

20th Century Fox

Matt Damon, right, is shown in a scene from “We Bought a Zoo.�

GOOD LESSONS/BAD LESSONS: “Bad things happen, you just keep going.� “You do something for the right reasons, nothing can stop you.� VIOLENCE: A couple of off-camera deaths. LANGUAGE: A scattering of profanity, with some of it coming from the kids.

SEX: A little young teen romance, a little adult flirtation. DRUGS: Alcohol is consumed, sometimes in excess. PARENTS’ ADVISORY: Despite the presence of cute kids and critters, this is too slow and adult in theme for younger children. OK for 10-and-up.

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L TV L  BD-Bend/Redmond/Sisters/Black Butte (Digital); PM-Prineville/Madras; SR-Sunriver; L-La Pine; * Sports programming may vary

FRIDAY PRIME TIME 12/30/11 BROADCAST/CABLE CHANNELS

BD PM SR L ^ KATU KTVZ % % % % KBNZ & KOHD ) ) ) ) KFXO * ` ` ` KOAB _ # _ # ( KGW KTVZDT2 , _ # / OPBPL 175 173

5:00 KATU News News Paid Program KEZI 9 News The Simpsons Electric Comp. News That ’70s Show Ciao Italia ‘G’

5:30 World News Nightly News Evening News World News The Simpsons Fetch! With Ruff Nightly News That ’70s Show Hubert Keller

6:00

6:30

KATU News at 6 (N) ’ Ă… NewsChannel 21 at 6 (N) Ă… Access H. Old Christine KEZI 9 News KEZI 9 News Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Travelscope ‘G’ Business Rpt. News News ’Til Death ‘PG’ King of Queens Time Goes By Time Goes By

7:00

7:30

8:00

8:30

9:00

9:30

10:00

10:30

Jeopardy! ‘G’ Wheel Fortune ››› “The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobeâ€? (2005) Tilda Swinton. ’ Jeopardy! ‘G’ Wheel Fortune Chuck (N) ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Grimm Bears Will Be Bears ‘14’ Dateline NBC (N) ’ Ă… How I Met 30 Rock ’ ‘14’ A Gifted Man ’ ‘PG’ Ă… CSI: NY To What End? ‘PG’ Ă… Blue Bloods Family Ties ’ ‘14’ Entertainment The Insider ‘PG’ ››› “The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobeâ€? (2005) Tilda Swinton. ’ Big Bang Big Bang Kitchen Nightmares ‘14’ Ă… Fringe Subject 9 ’ ‘14’ Ă… News TMZ (N) ’ ‘PG’ PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Ă… Washington W’k BBC Newsnight ››› “Do It Againâ€? (2010) Great Performances ‘PG’ Ă… Live at 7 (N) Inside Edition Chuck (N) ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Grimm Bears Will Be Bears ‘14’ Dateline NBC (N) ’ Ă… Seinfeld ‘PG’ Seinfeld ‘PG’ The Secret Circle Bound ’ ‘PG’ The Secret Circle Loner ’ ‘PG’ Cops ‘14’ Ă… ’Til Death ‘PG’ Masterpiece Mystery! ’ ‘PG’ Ă… (DVS) Ebert at Movie World News Tavis Smiley Charlie Rose (N) ’ Ă…

11:00

11:30

KATU News (11:35) Nightline News Jay Leno News Letterman KEZI 9 News (11:35) Nightline Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ American Masters ’ ‘PG’ Ă… News Jay Leno King of Queens South Park ‘14’ PBS NewsHour ’ Ă…

BASIC CABLE CHANNELS

A&E AMC ANPL BRAVO CMT CNBC CNN COM COTV CSPAN DIS DISC E! ESPN ESPN2 ESPNC ESPNN FAM FNC FOOD FX HGTV HIST LIFE MSNBC MTV NICK OWN ROOT SPIKE SYFY TBN TBS TCM TLC TNT TOON TRAV TVLND USA VH1

Criminal Minds Cults. ‘PG’ Ă… Criminal Minds Demonology ‘14’ Criminal Minds Omnivore ’ ‘14’ Criminal Minds Corazon ’ ‘14’ Criminal Minds ’ ‘14’ Ă… Criminal Minds House on Fire ‘14’ 130 28 18 32 Criminal Minds The Fox ’ ‘PG’ (3:30) ›› “Chris- › “Wild Wild Westâ€? (1999, Action) Will Smith, Kevin Kline, Kenneth Branagh. Secret agents fight ›› “The Addams Familyâ€? (1991, Comedy) Anjelica Huston, Raul Julia. ›› “Addams Family Valuesâ€? (1993, Comedy) Anjelica Huston, Raul Julia. A 102 40 39 tineâ€? Ă… to stop a presidential assassination. Ă… Gomez’s long-lost brother, Uncle Fester, returns. Ă… greedy nanny plots to marry and murder Uncle Fester. Infested! ’ ‘PG’ Infested! ’ ‘PG’ Infested! ’ ‘PG’ Infested! Dirty Wars (N) ’ ‘PG’ Confessions: Animal Hoarding (N) Infested! Dirty Wars ’ ‘PG’ 68 50 26 38 Fatal Attractions ’ ‘14’ The Millionaire Matchmaker ‘14’ The Millionaire Matchmaker ‘14’ The Millionaire Matchmaker ‘14’ The Millionaire Matchmaker ‘14’ ››› “The Bourne Supremacyâ€? (2004, Suspense) Matt Damon, Franka Potente. Bourne Suprm. 137 44 › “Son-in-Lawâ€? (1993, Comedy) Pauly Shore, Carla Gugino, Lane Smith. ’ ›› “Ace Ventura: Pet Detectiveâ€? (1994) Jim Carrey. ’ Ă… Ron White: They Call Me Tater Salad ’ ‘14’ Ă… Ron 190 32 42 53 Trading 60 Minutes on CNBC American Greed Raffaello Follieri Mad Money 60 Minutes on CNBC Biography on CNBC Sam Walton Can’t Sleep? Paid Program 51 36 40 52 Biography on CNBC Sam Walton Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 Ă… Erin Burnett OutFront Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 Ă… Anderson Cooper 360 Ă… 52 38 35 48 Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Ă… Tosh.0 ‘14’ 30 Rock ’ ‘14’ 30 Rock ’ ‘14’ Tosh.0 ‘14’ Tosh.0 ‘14’ ›› “Jackass: Number Twoâ€? (2006, Comedy) Ă… (10:45) “Jackass 2.5â€? (2007) Ă… Always Sunny 135 53 135 47 South Park ‘MA’ South Park ‘14’ Tosh.0 ‘14’ Dept./Trans. City Edition Talk of the Town Local issues. Desert Cooking Oregon Joy of Fishing Journal Get Outdoors Visions of NW The Yoga Show The Yoga Show Talk of the Town Local issues. 11 The Contenders: They Changed Political History Politics & Public Policy Today 58 20 12 11 Politics & Public Policy Today Jessie ‘G’ Ă… Shake It Up! ‘G’ Good-Charlie Good-Charlie Jessie ‘G’ Ă… Jessie ‘G’ Ă… Austin & Ally ’ A.N.T. Farm ’ ‘G’ Ă… Good-Charlie Good-Charlie Austin & Ally ’ Austin & Ally ’ 87 43 14 39 Jessie ‘G’ Ă… Gold Rush Family Feud ’ ‘PG’ Gold Rush Slippery Slope ’ ‘PG’ Gold Rush Drill or Die ‘PG’ Ă… Gold Rush Aftershow Special ‘PG’ (10:01) Flying Wild Alaska ‘PG’ Gold Rush Aftershow Special ‘PG’ 156 21 16 37 Gold Rush Virgin Ground ’ ‘PG’ (4:00) ››› “Knocked Upâ€? (2007) Seth Rogen. The Soup ‘14’ E! News (N) Kourtney & Kim Take New York E! Special ‘14’ The Soup ‘14’ Fashion Police Chelsea Lately E! News 136 25 College Football Insight Bowl -- Iowa vs. Oklahoma From Tempe, Ariz. (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) ‘14’ Ă… College Football 21 23 22 23 College Football: Franklin American Mortgage Music City Bowl College Basketball West Virginia at Seton Hall (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) ‘14’ Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) ‘14’ Ă… SportsCenter NFL Kickoff (N) Ă… SportsCenter 22 24 21 24 College Basketball Friday Night Lights ‘14’ “Into the Cold: A Journey of the Soulâ€? (2010) Ă… (8:45) “Into the Cold: A Journey of the Soulâ€? (2010) Ă… 30 for 30 Ă… 23 25 123 25 Friday Night Lights ‘14’ SportsCenter (N) (Live) ‘14’ Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) ‘14’ Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) ‘14’ Ă… H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. 24 63 124 203 SportsCenter (N) (Live) ‘14’ Ă… ››› “Greaseâ€? (1978, Musical) John Travolta, Olivia Newton-John. The 700 Club (N) ‘G’ Ă… 67 29 19 41 That ’70s Show That ’70s Show ››› “Dirty Dancingâ€? (1987, Romance) Jennifer Grey, Patrick Swayze, Jerry Orbach. Hannity: Frank Luntz Focus On Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Ă… Hannity On Record, Greta Van Susteren The Five 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor Ă… Diners, Drive Bama Glama (N) Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Best Dishes Best Dishes Best Dishes Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Iron Chef America 177 62 98 44 Paula’s Cooking Paula’s Cooking Diners, Drive Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men How I Met How I Met ››› “The Curious Case of Benjamin Buttonâ€? (2008, Fantasy) Brad Pitt, Cate Blanchett, Taraji P. Henson. ››› Jarhead 131 Property Brothers ‘G’ Ă… Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l House Hunters Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l 176 49 33 43 Property Brothers ‘G’ Ă… Real Deal ‘PG’ Real Deal ‘PG’ American Pickers ‘PG’ Ă… American Pickers ‘PG’ Ă… American Pickers ‘PG’ Ă… American Pickers Fast Eddie ‘PG’ Abandoned ‘PG’ Amer. Pickers 155 42 41 36 American Pickers ‘PG’ Ă… America’s Most Wanted ‘14’ America’s Most Wanted ‘14’ America’s Most Wanted ‘14’ America’s Most Wanted (N) ‘14’ America’s Most Wanted ‘14’ Starving Secrets 138 39 20 31 Unsolved Mysteries ‘14’ Ă… The Rachel Maddow Show (N) Lockup: Holman Lockup: Holman Lockup Wabash The Squeeze High and Low The Squeeze All or Nothing 56 59 128 51 The Ed Show (N) Jersey Shore ’ ‘14’ Ă… Jersey Shore One Shot ‘14’ Ă… Jersey Shore ’ ‘14’ Ă… Jersey Shore Goin’ South ’ ‘14’ Jersey Shore The Hangover ‘14’ Jersey Shore Creepin’ ‘14’ Ă… 192 22 38 57 Jersey Shore ’ ‘14’ Ă… SpongeBob Kung Fu Panda That ’70s Show That ’70s Show George Lopez George Lopez Friends ’ ‘14’ Friends ’ ‘PG’ 82 46 24 40 Kung Fu Panda Kung Fu Panda Kung Fu Panda Kung Fu Panda Kung Fu Panda SpongeBob The Rosie Show ’ ‘PG’ Dr. Phil ’ ‘PG’ Ă… ›› “A Walk in the Cloudsâ€? (1995) Keanu Reeves, Aitana SĂĄnchez-GijĂłn. ’ Walk in Clouds 161 103 31 103 (3:00) ›› “The Weddingâ€? (1998, Drama) Halle Berry. ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Football Pr. Football Weekly College Basketball Oregon State at Washington Seahawks Seahawks The Dan Patrick Show 20 45 28* 26 Boxing Top Rank: Roberto Marroquin vs. Carlos Valcarcel UFC 141 Prelims (N) ’ (Live) Best of PRIDE Fighting Best of PRIDE Fighting Best of PRIDE Fighting Gangland Brown Pride. ‘14’ Ă… Gangland Crip or Die ‘14’ Ă… 132 31 34 46 UFC Unleashed ’ ‘14’ WWE Friday Night SmackDown! (N) ’ Ă… Sanctuary Sanctuary for None (N) Sanctuary ‘14’ Ă… 133 35 133 45 (4:30) Sanctuary ›› “House of Waxâ€? (2005, Horror) Elisha Cuthbert, Chad Michael Murray. Behind Scenes Hal Lindsey Bible Prophecy Manna-Fest › “Left Behind: World at Warâ€? (2000) Kirk Cameron, Brad Johnson. Frederick Price No More Tears Creflo Dollar Six 205 60 130 Seinfeld ‘PG’ House of Payne House of Payne House of Payne House of Payne ››› “Pretty Womanâ€? (1990) Richard Gere, Julia Roberts. Ă… 16 27 11 28 Friends ’ ‘PG’ Friends ’ ‘PG’ King of Queens King of Queens Seinfeld ‘PG’ ›››› “Tootsieâ€? (1982, Comedy) Dustin Hoffman, Jessica Lange. An unem- ››› “Oklahoma!â€? (1955, Musical) Gordon MacRae, Shirley Jones, Rod Steiger. An adaptation of ››› “Shaftâ€? (1971) Richard Roundtree. A detective (11:15) Jammin’ “Night of the Liv101 44 101 29 ployed actor poses as a woman to land a soap role. Ă… the Rodgers and Hammerstein Broadway hit. Ă… searches for a drug dealer’s daughter. Ă… the Blues ing Deadâ€? Say Yes, Dress Say Yes: Bliss Four Weddings (N) ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Say Yes, Dress Say Yes: Bliss 178 34 32 34 Say Yes: Bliss Say Yes: Bliss Say Yes: Bliss Say Yes: Bliss Say Yes: Bliss Say Yes: Bliss Top 10 Weddings of 2011 ‘PG’ Law & Order Savages ’ ‘PG’ Law & Order Girlfriends ’ ‘PG’ ››› “Transformersâ€? (2007, Action) Shia LaBeouf. Two races of robots wage war on Earth. Ă… ›› “Deep Impactâ€? (1998) Ă… 17 26 15 27 Law & Order ‘14’ Ă… (DVS) Regular Show Secret Mountain Generator Rex Young Justice Batman: Brave Ben 10 Ult. Star Wars Thundercats King of the Hill King of the Hill American Dad American Dad Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ 84 21 Sexiest Beach Bars ‘14’ Ă… 21 Sexiest Beaches ‘PG’ Ă… Ghost Adventures ‘PG’ Ă… Ghost Adventures ‘14’ Ă… The Dead Files ‘PG’ Ă… Ghost Adventures ‘14’ Ă… 179 51 45 42 Florida’s Top Ten Beaches ‘G’ M*A*S*H ‘PG’ M*A*S*H ‘PG’ M*A*S*H ‘PG’ M*A*S*H ‘PG’ Home Improve. Home Improve. Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Hot, Cleveland The Exes ‘PG’ King of Queens King of Queens 65 47 29 35 Bonanza The Unwanted ‘G’ Ă… CSI: Crime Scene Investigation CSI: Crime Scene Investigation CSI: Crime Scene Investigation CSI: Crime Scene Investigation CSI: Crime Scene Investigation CSI: Crime Scene Investigation 15 30 23 30 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation 40 Funniest Fails 2 Internet and television clips. ’ ‘PG’ Saturday Night Live Skits and sketches featuring Jimmy Fallon. ‘14’ Saturday Night Live in the 2000s: Time and Again ’ ‘14’ Ă… 191 48 37 54 Saturday Night Live in the 2000s PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(6:10) ›››› “Young Frankensteinâ€? 1974 Gene Wilder. ‘PG’ Ă… ››› “Bigâ€? 1988, Fantasy Tom Hanks, Robert Loggia. ’ ‘PG’ Ă… (9:50) ›› “Rumble in the Bronxâ€? 1995 ‘R’ Ă… Taxi Driver 1976 ENCR 106 401 306 401 (4:20) ›› “Last Man Standingâ€? Fox Legacy (7:07) ››› “Bigâ€? 1988 Tom Hanks. ‘PG’ Ă… Fox Legacy (9:07) ››› “Bigâ€? 1988 Tom Hanks. ‘PG’ Ă… Fox Legacy ›››› “Young Frankensteinâ€? FMC 104 204 104 120 (5:07) ››› “Bigâ€? 1988 Tom Hanks. ‘PG’ Ă… Thrillbillies ‘14’ Ellismania Shark Fights 2011 Lubbock, TX Shark Fights 2011 Lubbock, TX The Daily Habit Punk Payback Shark Fights 2011 Lubbock, TX Shark Fights 2011 Lubbock, TX The Daily Habit Punk Payback FUEL 34 Golf Central Golf Central Golf Chevron World Challenge, Final Round From Sherwood Country Club in Thousand Oaks, Calif. Ă… GOLF 28 301 27 301 (4:00) Golf ›› “The Ultimate Giftâ€? (2006) Drew Fuller, James Garner. Ă… “Debbie Macomber’s Trading Christmasâ€? (2011) Tom Cavanagh. ‘G’ “Annie Claus Is Coming to Townâ€? (2011) Maria Thayer. ‘G’ Ă… HALL 66 33 175 33 (4:00) “November Christmasâ€? ‘G’ (4:00) ››› “The Blind Sideâ€? 2009 (6:15) ›› “Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Rodrick Rulesâ€? 2011 Zachary Gordon. 24/7 Flyers/Rangers: Road to the The Life & Times True Blood Alcide helps Sookie look (10:20) True Blood Me and the Devil (11:20) True HBO 425 501 425 501 Sandra Bullock. ‘PG-13’ Ă… Wimpy Greg deals with torment from his older brother. NHL Winter Classic ’ Ă… of Tim for Eric. ’ ‘MA’ Ă… Sookie nurtures Eric. ‘MA’ Blood ’ ‘MA’ Arrested Dev. Arrested Dev. Arrested Dev. Arrested Dev. Todd Margaret Todd Margaret › “Venomâ€? 2005, Horror Agnes Bruckner. ‘R’ Whitest Kids Todd Margaret Todd Margaret ››› “Zodiacâ€? 2007 ‘R’ IFC 105 105 (4:40) ›› “The Book of Eliâ€? 2010, Action Denzel Washing- (6:40) › “Little Fockersâ€? 2010, Comedy Robert De Niro, Ben Stiller. The whole (8:20) ››› “Unstoppableâ€? 2010, Action Denzel Washing- Strike Back The agents trail two sui- Lingerie ’ ‘MA’ Ă… Life on Top LaMAX 400 508 508 ton, Gary Oldman, Mila Kunis. ’ ‘R’ Ă… clan arrives for the Focker twins’ birthday. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… ton, Chris Pine. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… cide bombers. ’ ‘MA’ Ă… dies Night ‘MA’ The Whale That Exploded ‘PG’ The Whale That Ate Jaws ‘PG’ Whale Hunters ‘PG’ The Whale That Exploded ‘PG’ The Whale That Ate Jaws ‘PG’ Whale Hunters ‘PG’ Border Wars ‘14’ NGC 157 157 Adventures of Jimmy Neutron Adventures of Jimmy Neutron Odd Parents Odd Parents Odd Parents SpongeBob Fanboy-Chum Fanboy-Chum Planet Sheen T.U.F.F. Puppy NTOON 89 115 189 115 Jimmy Neutron: Boy Genius Zona’s Show Match Fish. Strike King Pro Bassmasters From Tavares, Fla. Hook-N-Look Big Water Buccaneers Outdoors Project West. Extremes Hunter Journal OUTD 37 307 43 307 Guide/Outdoors Spanish Fly (4:30) ››› “The Italian Jobâ€? 2003, Crime Drama Mark (6:25) ››› “Inglourious Basterdsâ€? 2009, War Brad Pitt, MĂŠlanie Laurent, Christoph Waltz. iTV. ››› “The Company Menâ€? 2010, Drama Ben Affleck, Chris Cooper. iTV. Cor- Boxing Jesse Nicklow vs. Jermain SHO 500 500 Wahlberg, Charlize Theron. iTV. ‘PG-13’ Soldiers seek Nazi scalps in German-occupied France. ’ ‘R’ porate downsizing throws three men into turmoil. ‘R’ Taylor (iTV) (N) (Live) ‘PG’ Pumped ‘14’ Pumped ‘14’ Pumped ‘14’ Pumped ‘PG’ Pumped Pumped ‘PG’ Pumped Pumped ‘14’ Pumped ‘14’ Pumped ‘14’ Pumped ‘PG’ Pumped Pumped ‘PG’ SPEED 35 303 125 303 Pumped (6:20) ›› “Are We There Yet?â€? 2005 Ice Cube. ››› “The Other Guysâ€? 2010, Comedy Will Ferrell. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… Spartacus: Blood and Sand ‘MA’ Spartacus: Blood and Sand ‘MA’ STARZ 300 408 300 408 (4:35) ››› “Saltâ€? 2010 Angelina Jolie. ‘PG-13’ (4:45) ››› “The Myth of the American Sleepoverâ€? 2010, (6:25) ››› “Day Night Day Nightâ€? 2006, Drama Luisa ›› “The Twilight Saga: New Moonâ€? 2009 Kristen Stewart. Bella finds herself (10:10) ›› “The Twilight Saga: Eclipseâ€? 2010 Kristen Stewart. Bella must TMC 525 525 Comedy-Drama Jade Ramsey. ‘NR’ Williams, Josh P. Weinstein. ’ ‘NR’ Ă… drawn into the world of werewolves. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… choose between Edward and Jacob. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… Buck Gun It w/Spies Whitetail Rev. NFL Turning Point NBC Sports Talk NFL Turning Point Game On! World of Adventure Sports ‘PG’ Gun It w/Spies VS. 27 58 30 209 Elk Fever ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘G’ Frasier ‘PG’ Frasier ‘G’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘G’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Amazing Wedding Gowns ‘G’ WE 143 41 174 118 Frasier ’ ‘G’


FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

A & A 

Daughter yearns to break free from needy mother Dear Abby: I’m a 25-year-old woman with no future. I am the youngest of three daughters. My parents are divorced and my sisters are both married. Mom has no income of her own, so it’s mainly me. I have come to realize that I’ll never be able to have an apartment of my own or fully live my life because of her. She’s controlling and always finds a way to make me feel guilty about going out or enjoying myself. I have never had a relationship because she has always found a way of sabotaging any relationship I’m in. I think she’s bipolar, but she doesn’t believe in medication or that it’s even real. I feel as if I’m being forced to take care of her, and when I finally have a chance to have a real life, it will be too late. I have discussed this with my sisters, but they haven’t helped. I’m very depressed and don’t know what to do. If I bring this up with Mom, she gets angry and won’t talk to me for days. Please help me find a way out. — Trapped in Chicago Dear Trapped: Your umbilical cord was supposed to have been severed 25 years ago, at birth. You are an adult individual who deserves happiness and freedom from this attachment to your mother. She may not believe in doctors and therapists — and that’s her privilege as long as she’s not a danger to herself and others. But that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t talk with a mental health professional about this unhealthy situation. Your sisters haven’t helped you because they have their freedom and don’t want to share the responsibility you have been carrying alone. And your mother doesn’t want to let go of you because if she does, she’ll have to assume responsibility for herself. Please act now. Your escape hatch is the door to a therapist’s office. You deserve a life, so go there and get one. Dear Abby: I recently found

DEAR ABBY out that my boyfriend of three years — the only man I have ever been with — cheated on me with a woman I thought was a good friend. I love him and have decided to take him back. He assured me that he wants to be only with me, that what he did was “stupid� and he has learned his lesson. Abby, although I have forgiven him, I can’t bring myself to forgive her. I have never been someone who holds a grudge, but I have so much hate for her that it scares me. I did get professional help, but it didn’t work. This is not who I am. I’m worried about how I might react when I see her. I can’t avoid her since we work in the same industry. Why can I forgive him but not her? — Moving Forward in Texas Dear Moving Forward: Probably because having invested three years in the “only man you have ever been with,� you don’t want it to have been for nothing — so you’re directing the anger you still feel toward him at the woman you would like to imagine seduced him. Remember, it takes two to tango. Also, you may still regard her as a threat. While you may have forgiven your boyfriend, do not forget what happened. A man who cheats and blames it on “stupidity� may do it again with someone else. You need to understand why he did what he did. Is he someone who lives only in the moment? Did he not consider how it would affect you? Is he capable of fidelity in the long run? From my perspective, you need answers to these questions because you may only now be getting to know who he really is. — Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

Horoscope: Happy Birthday for Friday, Dec. 30, 2011 By JACQUE LIN E BIGAR HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Friday, Dec. 30, 2011: This year you often find yourself confused or in situations where misunderstandings cause a problem. Learn better ways of communicating. Learn to confirm appointments as well as what you thought you heard. Much of the stress you experience will be between you and others. Relationships will become an important issue. If you are single, move in a new direction as far as meeting people. Don’t count on a bond being forever at this time. If you are attached, the two of you should consider a weekend workshop in communicating. Your relationship will bond more tightly as a result. PISCES draws you out. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HH Rest up for the next hurdle. You have a unique sense of what works and what you want. Honor yourself accordingly. Tonight: Work on your resolutions. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHHH No one needs to tell you anything. You are determined. You feel you have destiny behind you. You easily toss off a misunderstanding or disagreement. Don’t count on a child or loved one agreeing with you. Tonight: You are master of your night. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHH Take charge of what has been neglected and needs handling. Others might have slacked off or might not see the importance of a key task like you do. Be willing to stand up for what you believe. Don’t worry about some flak here or there. Tonight: A must appearance. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHH Reach out for someone you care about. How you feel and what goes on could be subject to change. Sometimes you can change the current. Is this what you want to do at this point? Resolve a conflict rather than hold back. Tonight: Speak your mind. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHHH Realize the power and strength of teaming up with the right person. Though you are strong by yourself, together you are a force to behold. Be careful with a

difference of opinion. Respect your differences. Tonight: Avoid a money discussion. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH You might want to think before you speak. Who wants to go into the new year riding a wave of disruption and arguments? Sometimes postponing a talk might feel like the right way to go. Tonight: Move through an issue. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH Stay even and direct. Your ability to move forward despite an underlying distraction or frustration could be a problem. Confusion surrounds motives and choices. Let it all go. You could argue into next year otherwise. Tonight: Easy works. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHHH Your playfulness emerges as sensuality, causing a disruption in a partnership, especially if you’re flirting with someone else. Do use caution, as you want to avoid a problem rather than allow it to develop. Prioritize, Scorp. Tonight: Let your hair down. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHH Tension builds on the home front. A deadline of sorts weighs on you. Investigate several ways to let go of the issues. How much do you need to handle now? “Now� means just that. Clear them out if need be. Tonight: Close to home. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHH A conversation cannot be postponed much longer. A talk or get-together won’t be as rough as you might think. A misunderstanding weaves into the problem. Tonight: Why not let the party begin? AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHH Don’t use finances or another person’s ire as a reason not to do something. If you can clear up a misunderstanding, do. Respect each other’s point of view, and use both perspectives to grow and gain. Work through your differences. Tonight: On a roll. Think “resolutions.� PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHH You cannot seem to convince others of your rightness. Perhaps that is because it is only right for you. Give others the space they need. Once they have their way, they could become more compliant. Tonight: Go with another person’s suggestion. Š 2011 by King Features Syndicate

F  C 

E3

A weekly compilation of family-friendly events throughout Central Oregon.

Please email event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� at www.bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

Find a full community events calendar inside today’s GO! Magazine.

TODAY ANIMAL ENCOUNTERS — TALES FROM THE WILD: See an actor portray an explorer while introducing live animals; $7 plus museum admission ($10 adults, $9 seniors, $6 ages 5-12), $5 for members; 11 a.m. and 1:30 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www .highdesertmuseum.org.

SATURDAY ANIMAL ENCOUNTERS — TALES FROM THE WILD: See an actor portray an explorer while introducing live animals; $7 plus museum admission ($10 adults, $9 seniors, $6 ages 5-12), $5 for members; 11 a.m. and 1:30 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www .highdesertmuseum.org. TOUR DU CHOCOLATE: Ski a six- or three-mile loop, with chocolate-themed aid stations; registration required; proceeds benefit trail grooming at the park; $10 or $20 per car; noon2 p.m.; Virginia Meissner Snopark, milepost 14 Southwest Century Drive, Bend; 541-3503790 or www.meissnernordic. org. ROCKIN’ NEW YEAR’S EVE: Featuring cardboard instruments, singing and more; reservations requested; $70; 6:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m.; Fort Funnigan, 17600 Center Drive, Sunriver; 800486-8591 or www.sunriver-

Ryan Brennecke/The Bulletin

Dozens of participants jump into the pool during the Polar Bear Plunge at Sunriver Resort on Jan. 1, 2011.

resort.com/traditions. NEW YEAR’S EVE BONFIRE ON THE SNOW: Wanderlust Tours leads a short snowshoe hike to a bonfire and hand-carved snow amphitheater in the forest; a naturalist shares facts about the forest, animals and the night sky; reservations required; trips depart from Sunriver and Bend; $85; 9 p.m.-1:30 a.m.541-3898359 or www.wanderlusttours. com.

SUNDAY POLAR BEAR PLUNGE: Take an icy plunge into the Lodge Village’s outdoor pool; hot chocolate served; free; 10 a.m.; Sunriver Resort, 17600 Center Drive; 800486-8591 or www.sunriver-resort .com/traditions.

TUESDAY GREEN TEAM MOVIE NIGHT:

Featuring a screening of “Whaledreamers,� which explores the connection between whales and humanity; free; 6:30-8:15 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend; 541-815-6504. MATSIKO WORLD ORPHANS’ CHOIR: The choir of orphaned children from Peru and Liberia performs; free; 7 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend; 541-548-1299 or www .icnchildren.net.

S  T  L   Y   E  For the week of Dec. 30 to Jan. 5, 2012 Story times are free unless otherwise noted. Barnes & Noble Booksellers 2690 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-318-7242

ONCE UPON A STORY TIME: All ages; 11 a.m. Friday. Between the Covers 645 N.W. Delaware Ave., Bend; 541-385-4766

STORY TIME: 2 p.m. Thursday. C.E. Lovejoy’s Brookswood Market 19530 Amber Meadow Drive, Bend; 541-388-1188

STORY TIME: All ages; 11 a.m. Thursday. Crook County Public Library 175 S.W. Meadow Lakes Drive, Prineville; 541-447-7978

PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Ages

Books Continued from E1 Each comic is a different style, which makes for an entertaining reading experience page after page, nursery rhyme after nursery rhyme. Nursery Rhyme Comics will bring back fond memories of saying nursery rhymes out loud and add new visuals and interpretations. For new readers of nursery rhymes, each nursery rhyme comic will pop off the page and fill

Groups Continued from E1 Gilpin says the group has a curriculum, but it is flexible, depending on the needs and interests of each group. Gilpin is able to help parents sort out what is a typical toddler phase and what is not. She also helps parents navigate some tricky young child behavior — like saying “no� to every-

3 and older; 6:30 p.m. Tuesday and 11 a.m. Thursday. WEE READ: Ages 0-3; 10 a.m. Monday and Wednesday. Downtown Bend Public Library 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7097

BABY STEPS: Ages 0-18 months; 1:30 p.m. Wednesday. TODDLIN’ TALES: Ages 18-36 months; 10:15 a.m. Tuesday and Wednesday and 11 a.m. Tuesday. PRESCHOOL PARADE: Ages 35; 10:30 a.m. Friday, 1:30 p.m. Tuesday. East Bend Public Library 62080 Dean Swift Road; 541-330-3760

FAMILY FUN: Ages 0-5; 9:30 a.m. Wednesday. SATURDAY STORIES: Ages 0-5; 10 a.m. Saturday. ANIMAL ADVENTURES WITH THE HIGH DESERT MUSEUM: Ages 3 and older; meet a new animal every month and create a craft; 9:30 a.m. Tuesday. High Desert Museum 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; www

the reader with laughter. This inspired collection is a wonderful way to introduce nursery rhymes to young readers. Read it aloud! This may become your favorite book to read and reread.

.highdesertmuseum.org; 541-382-4754; unless noted, events included with admission ($10 adults, $9 ages 65 and older and ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger)

10:30 a.m. Thursday. Redmond Public Library 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1054

WILD WEDNESDAYS: Ages 7-12; treasure hunt; 12:30 p.m. to close Wednesday. BACKPACK EXPLORERS: Ages 3-4; explore museum’s animal habitat, share stories and songs; 10 to 11 a.m. Thursday; $15 per child nonmembers, $10 per child members. TOTALLY TOUCHABLE TALES: Ages 2-5; storytelling about animals and people of the High Desert; 10:30 a.m. Tuesday.

BABY STEPS: Ages 0-18 months; 11 a.m. Thursday. PRESCHOOL PARADE STORY TIME: Ages 3-5; 10:15 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. Wednesday. TODDLIN’ TALES: Ages 18 to 36 months; 10:15 a.m. Thursday. PAJAMA PARTY: Ages 3-5; 6:45 p.m. Tuesday. CRAFT PROGRAM: Shrinky Dinks; ages 12-17; 3 to 4:30 p.m. Thursday.

Jefferson County Public Library

Sisters Public Library

241 S.W. Seventh St., Madras; 541-475-3351

PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Ages 35; 10:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Tuesday. SPANISH STORY TIME: All ages; 1 p.m. Wednesday. TODDLERS STORY TIME: Ages 0-2; 10:10 a.m. Tuesday. La Pine Public Library 16425 First St.; 541-312-1090

FAMILY STORY TIME: All ages;

110 N. Cedar St.; 541-312-1070

FAMILY FUN STORY TIME: Ages 05; 10:30 a.m. Thursday. Sunriver Area Public Library 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1080

FAMILY FUN STORY TIME: Ages 05; 10:30 a.m. Tuesday. TEEN TERRITORY GAME DAY: Grades 6-12; 1:30 to 3 p.m. Wednesday.

“I’m Here� By Peter H. Reynolds (Atheneum Books for Young Readers, 32 pgs., $15.99) “I’m here And you’re there. Maybe you don’t notice me. That’s okay.� The creator of “The Dot and Ish� has once again brought

us a simple story that makes the reader think beyond the page. “I’m Here� follows a young boy who observes everyone else around him and feels alone. “Boom� is the only sound he hears for everyone. The boy’s imagination creates a gigantic paper airplane that flies him into the sky. Everyone helps him, showing us a beautiful recognition that he’s here. The words show each expression. The movement actually moves up the page and the clouds

move higher and higher to the stars. Each illustration flows with a clear picture of a boy. The language is soft and precise, allowing us to experience Reynolds and his magical touch. “I’m Here� is written for everyone, especially those appreciating and supporting children with autism. Reynolds brings us a touching poetic story that reminds us that we’re all here, here together.

thing — and how to set limits effectively and avoid engaging in power struggles. She helps parents learn “how to give children power and keep our own.� Gilpin says the group isn’t like a parenting class, because it isn’t so rigid, but it is more organized and orchestrated than a playgroup. One of the best aspects of the groups, she says, is parents gaining the “sense of not being alone.�

What it is: Together for Children, an independent nonprofit helping families of young children connect. Details: Two groups are starting in Bend the week of Jan. 9 — one in the morning, one midday — on Fridays at Summit High School. A third group will meet in Sisters on Wednesday mornings. Gilpin says she is also open to starting a group for parents of infants if there is enough inter-

est. Each group will run for 10 weeks. Cost: $150 per family; the group also partners with the Early Intervention program and offers free enrollment to families who qualify for EI services. Contact: www.togetherfor-children.org or linda@ together-for-children.org or 541-389-9317.

— Paige Bentley-Flannery, community librarian with the Deschutes Public Library system

— Reporter: 541-617-7860, ajohnson@bendbulletin.com


E 4 THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2011

TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

BIZARRO

E5

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively.

SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

DAILY BRIDGE CLUB

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

Seeking a friendly duplicate bridge? Find five games weekly at www.bendbridge.org.

CANDORVILLE

SAFE HAVENS

LOS ANGELES TIMES DAILY CROSSWORD

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN


E6

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2011

Senior drivers Continued from E1 Jones noticed a few of these warning signs when she was behind the wheel. She started to feel overwhelmed in traffic; paying attention to all the other cars on the road proved to be “more than my brain could handle,” she said, especially when there were cyclists on the road. She also started telling herself “It’s red, it’s red, it’s red,” or “It’s green, it’s green, it’s green,” when she came across traffic lights for fear she might forget what color it was and either drive straight into traffic or stop too early at an intersection and get rear-ended. Jones knew her medical condition might progress to the point where it was no longer safe for her to drive. She started to suspect that the time had come when she sat down with her doctor last summer and his diagnosis confirmed her fears. It also prompted Jones to take the next step on her own. “I have always been a responsible person,” she said. “It was my responsibility to say I could not drive.”

A slim percentage Last year, health professionals reported 1,563 individuals to the Oregon Driver and Motor and Motor Vehicle Services Division who they claimed had developed a “severe and uncontrollable impairment” that could not be treated and greatly interfered with their ability to drive safely. A DMV medical adviser reviewed each of these reports on a case-by-case basis and immediately suspended the driving privileges for almost 75 percent of the people they involved, according to a summary of the program’s actions The Bulletin obtained from the agency earlier this month. Less than 13 percent of the people who lost their driving privileges through the process last year were able to get them back by obtaining a medical clearance, retaking their driving tests or appealing the decision through a hearing process. The summary also shows 66 percent of the drivers who received a medical suspension in 2010 were ages 70 or older,

“I have always been a responsible person. It was my responsibility to say I could not drive.”

Warning signs for senior drivers The AARP, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and the United Services Automobile Association recommend senior citizens ask themselves the following questions when determining whether it is still safe for them to drive:

— Christine Jones, 66, Bend

VISION: • Do I have problems reading highway or street signs or recognizing someone I know across the street? • Do I have trouble seeing lane lines and other pavement markings, curbs, medians, etc., especially at dawn, dusk and at night? • Do I experience more discomfort at night from the glare of oncoming headlights?

PHYSICAL FITNESS:

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

Christine Jones, 66, stands in a carless garage in Bend, where she once kept the 1997 Subaru Forester she bought after her first Central Oregon winter. Jones sold her Subaru after she decided to stop driving because of problems associated with early-onset Alzheimer’s disease.

while 46 percent were 80 or older. The two age groups respectively make up 11 percent and 4.1 percent of the state’s total licensed drivers, according to the DMV’s records, a statistic that could lead some to think senior citizens are more likely to have their licenses suspended for medical reasons than anybody else. But DMV spokesman David House said it’s also a statistic that needs to be considered in terms of a much broader picture. “Fifteen-hundred people sounds like a lot, but it’s really not, percentage-wise,” he said, adding that the state was home to more than 3 million licensed drivers in 2010. About 11 percent of these licensed drivers — or 330,951 of them — were 70 years old or older that year, according to DMV records. House said these relatively small percentages lead his agency to reach one conclusion: “The vast majority of people who can’t drive anymore know they can’t drive,” he said. “So they willingly turn themselves in (and give up their driving privileges).” The DMV offers a special

Quit Driving Identification Card for drivers who have come to the point where they no longer want to drive but want to have some form of a free stateissued photo ID that they can use in place of their licenses. According to the DMV’s estimates, the agency issues 1,500 of these identification cards each year. “We know that about 20 percent (of these ID cards) — about 300 a year — are issued to people facing medical-based suspensions,” he said. “The other 80 percent are making the exchange by their own initiative.” His agency has no records concerning the people who keep their driver’s licenses even though they’ve significantly scaled back their driving on their own accord or stopped doing it all together.

Living with a choice Jones said her doctor could easily have reported her to the DMV — a move that would’ve meant she’d likely have to give up her license and have her driving privileges taken away — but decided not to when she agreed to stop driving on her own accord.

“I didn’t want to give up my driver’s license,” Jones said, adding that having a valid driver’s license means a lot to her even though she no longer needs it because she doesn’t drive. “I’ve had one since I was 14 years old.” Jones also kept her Forester, in part hoping she’d be able to drive it again or that her friends could use it when they drove her from place to place. But after six months, she realized neither would happen and she sold it. Her garage has felt empty since then, Jones said. Since last summer, Jones has been relying on public transportation and her friends to get where she needs to go. There’s also a shuttle service offered by Aspen Ridge that takes its residents to the doctor and on special outings. “We just went to the Olive Garden for lunch, and we’ll be going to the movies next week,” said Sandie Nowell, the community’s activities director, who is responsible for deciding where the shuttle service goes. Nowell said it’s very difficult for senior citizens to give up their driving privileges because they give up a sense of freedom

• Do I have trouble looking over my shoulder to change lanes or looking left and right to check traffic at intersections? • Do I have trouble moving my foot from the gas to the brake pedal or turning the steering wheel? • Have I fallen down — not counting a trip or stumble — once or more in the previous year? • Do I walk less than one block

that comes with being able to get where they need to go on their own. Many have had that freedom since they started driving 60 or 70 years ago, which makes parting with those privileges especially hard. But there’s a second problem that comes when people decide to stop driving. They often lose the ability to simply get out of the house and socialize with others, even if all they previously managed to do was drive themselves to a grocery to buy a few things for dinner. “The world can get very small for older folks, especially the ones who don’t have family up here,” said Eve Nazarian, services coordinator for Interfaith Volunteer Caregivers of Central Oregon. “We get plenty of requests for people who need our help getting around town.” Nazarian said most of these requests are from people who need help getting to a doctor’s appointment or going to the

per day? • Can I raise my arms above my shoulders? • Do I feel pain in my knees, legs or ankles when going up or down a flight of 10 or more stairs?

ATTENTION, REACTION TIME: • Do I feel overwhelmed by all of the signs, signals, road markings, pedestrians and vehicles at intersections? • Is it harder to judge gaps in traffic, making it more difficult to turn left at intersections or merge with traffic? • Do I take medications that make me sleepy? • Do I often get lost or become confused? • Do I experience dizziness, seizures or loss of consciousness? • Am I confident that I can handle the demands of high speeds or heavy traffic? • Am I slow to see cars coming out of driveways and side streets or to realize that another car has slowed or stopped ahead of me? Source: “Driving safely while aging gracefully,” a booklet the AARP, NHTSA and USAA Educational Foundation published in Oct. 2003

store. But, as many of her volunteers have learned, these trips quickly become social outings and can take longer than one might expect. “Some people will spend four hours at the market,” she said, adding that while her agency’s volunteers understand how important it is for someone to get out of the house, they sometimes have to rush things along so they can make another commitment. Jones counts her blessings that she’s got friends who will give her a ride, Aspen Ridge’s activity shuttle service, a public bus line that runs past her house and a shopping center within walking distance. “It hasn’t been easy (since I quit driving),” she said. “I regret (the fact I had to do that), but I’m also happy I’m not going out there and putting other people at risk.” — Reporter: 541-617-7816, mmclean@bendbulletin.com


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2011 F1

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Mini-Aussie. Red merle with blue eyes. GorItems for Free geous!! Male. Very sweet, loving, smart & Boxes & Packing Mateobedient. Shots, and rials - FREE, Call papers. 20 weeks old. 541-633-7243. $450. 541-279-0241 TV, Insignia 22”, Color, Quality Entertainment works great, FREE, Center, $500. Fits 541-318-0316. 40" flat screen. Perfect for all media & 208 storage needs. Like Pets & Supplies new. Looks great. Call 541-385-6700 Poodle pups, toy, for SALE. Also Rescued The Bulletin recomSecond Hand & Poodle Adults for Rebuilt Mattresses mends extra caution adoption, to loving when purchasSets & singles, most homes. 541-475-3889 ing products or sersizes, sanitized vices from out of the & hygienitized. Queensland Heelers area. Sending cash, Standards & mini,$150 Call 541-598-4643 checks, or credit in& up. 541-280-1537 formation may be http://rightwayranch. The Bulletin subjected to fraud. wordpress.com/ r ecommends extra For more informacaution when purtion about an adver- Rott/Shepherd & Pomechasing products or ranian mix puppies, 9 tiser, you may call services from out of wks, 1 male & 1 fethe Oregon State the area. Sending male left, $300. Attorney General’s cash, checks, or 503-358-9386 Office Consumer credit information Protection hotline at may be subjected to Find exactly what 1-877-877-9392. FRAUD. For more you are looking for in the information about an CLASSIFIEDS advertiser, you may call the Oregon Scottish Terrier AKC State Attorney Cavalier King Charles puppies ready now, General’s Office puppy, adorable male, Males, $300; females, Consumer Protecweaned and almost $400. 541-317-5624 tion hotline at housebroke, $400, no 1-877-877-9392. papers, 541-480-5077 Scottish Terrier female puppy, ready Jan 19, Just bought a new boat? $500. 541-517-5324 Sell your old one in the Shih Tzu pups, males & classiieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! females, champ sired, 541-385-5809 1 very small girl, $600 & less, 541-788-0326. Dachshund AKC mini pup www.bendweenies.com Want to help local nonprofit animal rescue $325. 541-508-4558 group? Able to do small construction projects? Seeking someone to donate their time & expertise to build cubicles in an outside enclosure & a Dinah needs a sponsor few other small jobs. for ear surgery. We will provide mateYoung, super friendly, rials. Probably a day's just rescued, needs work that would make 212 ear polyps removed. a big difference for the Surgery is scheduled, Antiques & cats. 541-389-8420. but this is a big $ hit Collectibles 210 for a small rescue group. She will likely Furniture & Appliances The Bulletin reserves lose some hearing, so the right to publish all needs a safe, insideads from The Bulletin only home once !Appliances A-1 Quality& newspaper onto The Honesty! healed. Spayed, vacBulletin Internet webA-1 Washers & cinated & ID chipped. site. Dryers $125 each. Cat Rescue, AdopFull Warranty. Free tion & Foster Team, Del. Also W/D’s PO Box 6441, Bend wanted dead or 97708, for info/to visit Dinah, call 541-389alive. 541-280-7355. 215 8420 or 598-5488. Coins & Stamps www.craftcats.org

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Private collector buying postage stamp albums & collections, world-wide and U.S. 573-286-4343 (local, cell #) 242

Exercise Equipment Eliptical Nordic Track 990 Audiostrider $500 541-419-6436 Eden Pure Heaters available at $397

246

Guns, Hunting & Fishing Near Costco in the Forum Center 2660 NE Hwy. 20 541-330-0420

12ga Boito O/U shotgun, 28” ribbed bbl, $200. 541-647-8931

CASH!! GENERATE SOME exFor Guns, Ammo & citement in your Reloading Supplies. neighborhood! Plan a 541-408-6900. garage sale and don't forget to advertise in Compound Bows! Bow tech! Martin! Diaclassified! mond! New & like new 541-385-5809. demos, $195 & up. Microwave, over range, Lots of new releases! white, like new, also Fiber-optic Sights! Ar19” Color TV, both rows! Cases! up to FREE, 541-389-6380 50% off!541-280-5006

DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS? Non-commercial advertisers may place an ad with our "QUICK CASH SPECIAL" 1 week 3 lines $12 or 2 weeks $18! Ad must include price of single item of $500 or less, or multiple items whose total does not exceed $500. Call Classifieds at 541-385-5809

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Fuel & Wood

Henry .44 Mag Carbine, like new $650/offer 541.410.8029 Kahr PM9 9mm, 6 rnd mag, 7 rnd mag, 300 rnds ammo, Galco ankle holster, box & papers, like new, $500. 541-647-9518

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Remington 22LR pump rifle, wood stock, $200. 541-647-8931 Ruger 9mm LC9, $400. Taurus 45acp, $400. Marlin 30-30, $400. 541-647-8931

The Bulletin Offers Free Private Party Ads • 3 lines - 3 days • Private Party Only • Total of items advertised must equal $200 or Less • Limit 1 ad per month • 3-ad limit for same 253 item advertised within TV, Stereo & Video 3 months Call 541-385-5809 Toshiba 32”, exlnt picFax 541-385-5802 ture, great color, $75 obo. 541-388-0865 Wanted diabetic test strips Smith & Wesson M&P 9mm, like new, w/4 boxes of ammo, soft holster, extra mag, hard case, $450, 541-385-1179.

255

NOTICE TO ADVERTISER Since September 29, 1991, advertising for used woodstoves has been limited to models which have been certified by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as having met smoke emission standards. A certified woodstove may be identified by its certification label, which is permanently attached to the stove. The Bulletin will not knowingly accept advertising for the sale of uncertified woodstoves.

- will pay up to $25/box. Sharon, 503-679-3605.

To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery and inspection. • A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’ • Receipts should include name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased. • Firewood ads MUST include species and cost per cord to better serve our customers.

Dry Juniper Firewood $190 per cord, split. 1/2 cords available. Immediate delivery! 541-408-6193

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Lost & Found

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Found men’s gold orFor More Ads nate ring/band, with initials, call to identify, 341 The Bulletin 541-350-2869 Horses & Equipment Found men’s wedding band at Summit High Farm WANTED: Horse or School. Call to idenMarket utility trailers for tify, 541-410-9076 consignment or purFound prescription eyechase. KMR Trailer glasses, Fred Meyer Sales, 541-389-7857 parking lot in Redwww.kigers.com mond. 541-475-3195 Found: Soft Cabella’s bag Look at: Bendhomes.com w/clothes, sled dog 308 for Complete Listings of harness, mile marker 8, Farm Equipment on Hwy 20 E 12/27, Area Real Estate for Sale 541-410-8877 & Machinery 347 Lost Black Cat in Drake Park Area. Very old, Llamas/Exotic Animals fragile, loved. Please call (541) 389-4272 Lost Cat - white female “Lucy” 13 yrs old, de- 1992 Case 580K 4WD, clawed, ran from car 5500 hrs, cab heat, crash 8/11/11, on Hwy extend-a-hoe, 2nd 97 at Highland, Redowner, clean & tight, mond. If seen, please tires 60% tread. Miniature Zebu cattle (1 bull, 2 cows & 7 mo call 541-504-4194. $24,900 or best offer. male calf. Make offer $100 REWARD. Call 541-419-2713 for all. Popular at peeLost Diamond Ring, wee rodeos & petting 12/23, N. Albertsons or zoos. 541-389-2636 Cash & Carry, Grandma’s Wedding ring, $100 Reward, 541-480-1013. Twinstar 2027 Hay LOST: Red Golden Rake, electric conRetriever Age 8.Last trols, $13,500. 30’ seen in The Parks by folding roller harrow, Broken Top on Dec. double row of S-tines, 17th. She may have heavy duty, $15,500. a choke collar on but 541-419-2713 no id. Her name is Wanted Used Farm Molly. 541-480-6312. Equipment & Machinery. Looking to buy, or 280 consign of good used Estate Sales 358 quality equipment. Deschutes Valley Farmers Column Look What I Found! Equipment You'll find a little bit of 541-548-8385 10X20 STORAGE everything in BUILDINGS 325 The Bulletin's daily for protecting hay, garage and yard sale Hay, Grain & Feed firewood, livestock section. From clothes etc. $1496 Installed. to collectibles, from Wheat Straw: Certified & 541-617-1133. housewares to hard- Bedding Straw & Garden CCB #173684. ware, classified is Straw;Compost.546-6171 kfjbuilders@ykwc.net always the first stop for cost-conscious consumers. And if NIKON PHOTO PACKAGE you're planning your own garage or yard USED – EXCELLENT CONDITION sale, look to the classifieds to bring in the buyers. You won't find a better place for bargains! Call Classifieds: 541-385-5809 or email

Computers Wanted- paying cash Green Juniper, rounds, $135/cord. Dry Junifor Hi-fi audio & stuTHE BULLETIN reper: split $185/cord; dio equip. McIntosh, quires computer adrounds, $165/cord. JBL, Marantz, Dyvertisers with multiple Call 541-416-3677 naco, Heathkit, Sanad schedules or those sui, Carver, NAD, etc. selling multiple sysSeasoned Tamarack Call 541-261-1808 tems/ software, to disfirewood, split & delivclose the name of the ered, $200/cord. 263 business or the term Call 541-977-2040 "dealer" in their ads. Tools Private party advertisers are defined as Chainsaws new & like Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. those who sell one new demos. Stihl! Place Your Ad Or E-Mail computer. Husqvarna! & Echo! Starting at $99 & up. At: www.bendbulletin.com 260 541-280-5006 SPLIT DRY LODGEMisc. Items POLE, $150/cord 265 541-390-6897, Building Materials 10" Craftsman table PLEASE leave saw $50, 10 gal air message. compressor,20 gal air compressor, $80 ea 269 541-548-0694 CRR Gardening Supplies & Equipment Authentic Persian hand-woven silk rug, SUPER TOP SOIL beautiful multi-colored, www.hersheysoilandbark.com deep red border, silk Screened, soil & comfringe on 2 ends, 5x7. post mixed, no Valued at $15,000, rocks/clods. High huselling for $8250. mus level, exc. for Cabinet Refacing Call only if serious! flower beds, lawns, & Refinishing. 541-382-0036. gardens, straight Save Thousands! screened top soil. Buying Diamonds Bark. Clean fill. DeMost jobs /Gold for Cash liver/you haul. completed in Saxon’s Fine Jewelers 541-548-3949. 5 days or less. classified@bendbulletin.com 541-389-6655 Best Pricing BUYING in the Industry. BEND’S HOMELESS NEED OUR HELP Lionel/American Flyer 541-647-8261 The cold weather is upon us and sadly there trains, accessories. are still over 2,000 folks in our community 541-408-2191. without permanent shelter, living in cars, La Pine Habitat BUYING & SELLING makeshift camps, getting by as best they can. RESTORE All gold jewelry, silver Building Supply Resale The following items are badly needed to and gold coins, bars, help them get through the winter: Quality at rounds, wedding sets, LOW PRICES d CAMPING GEAR of any sort: d class rings, sterling sil52684 Hwy 97 ver, coin collect, vinUsed tents, sleeping bags, tarps, blankets. 541-536-3234 tage watches, dental d WARM CLOTHING: Rain Gear, Boots d Open to the public . gold. Bill Fleming, 541-382-9419. Please drop off your tax-deductible donations Prineville Habitat at the BEND COMMUNITY CENTER ReStore Check out the 1036 NE 5th St., Bend, Building Supply Resale classiieds online Mon.-Sat. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. (541-312-2069). 1427 NW Murphy Ct. www.bendbulletin.com Please help -You can make a difference! 541-447-6934 Updated daily Open to the public.

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• Nikon D100 6MP Digital SLR • Nikon 80-200mm f/2.8D ED AF Lens • Nikon 14mm f/2.8 ED AF Ultra Wide Angle Lens • Nikon 17-35mm f/2.8D-IF AF-S Zoom Lens • Nikon 60mm f/2.8G ED AF-S Micro Lens • Nikon TC-14E II (1.4x) Teleconverter AF-S Boxed with original cases. Includes charger and extra battery plus instructional manuals.

Price reduced to $3200 for quick sale! Call Martha Tiller at 541-633-2193 or 541-408-2913


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

F2 FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Starting at 3 lines

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

*UNDER $500 in total merchandise

OVER $500 in total merchandise

7 days .................................................. $10.00 14 days ................................................ $16.00

Garage Sale Special

4 days .................................................. $17.50 7 days .................................................. $23.00 14 days .................................................$32.50 28 days .................................................$60.50

4 lines for 4 days.................................. $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

PRIVATE PARTY RATES

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702

PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday.

Employment

400 421

Schools & Training Oregon Medical Training PCS Phlebotomy classes begin Jan 2. Registration now open: www.oregonmedicaltraining.com 541-343-3100

TRUCK SCHOOL

www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235 454

Looking for Employment I provide in-home caregiving. Experienced; Sunriver/Bend/Tumalo Redmond, Terrebonne, CRR. 541-508-6403

Senior care in YOUR home. Housekeeping, errands, cooking. Also very exp’d in small pet & horse care. Judy, 541-388-2706.

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Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Finance & Business

Condo/Townhomes for Rent

Houses for Rent SE Bend

Northwest Bend Homes

ATVs

Food Service: Bartender w/cooking & serving exp. Position in Chemult, OR. Valid Food Handler’s & OLCC permit req. Call for interview, 541-365-4496, ask for Phil or Ray.

500

View Unit at The Plaza! (Old Mill

CAD Drafter Pahlisch Homes is looking for an experienced CAD drafter with a lot of experience in 3D renderings. Must be proficient in AutoCAD, detailed, and work well in a team. E-mail resume to coryb@pahlisch.com

Chiropractic Tech $12-15hr. Full-time Chiropractic Tech Are you determined & decisive? Are you inspired to help others? Do you enjoy solving problems that deal with people? Skills req'd: Excel, Email, 10 key, Spelling, Math (no calculator), & No Chiropractic exp. req’d. Applicants will be tested on their technical skills. Email cover letter & resume (doc or pdf only) to chirotechcareer@gmail.com You will receive info automatically.

Local Bend company looking to expand!

476

Employment Opportunities

Immediate opening available - CusAdministrative/ tomer service -Sales Operations Assistant - Management opfor a Bend based portunities. No exwealth management perience nec. we firm, Ascent Capital provide full training. Management, LLC. $1200 mo. to start 2+ years experience plus bonuses, comin financial services pany vehicle proindustry preferred, vided, and paid vastrong organization cation to those who and computer skills qualify. Call to set up required. Competian interview, tive salary, paid holi541-323-3368. days and personal leave time, profit Dental Assistant sharing and 401k, Must be X-Ray certified, Tues. - Thurs. to start. health, life and disDrop off resume at 2078 ability insurance, NE Professional Ct., Bend. flexible spending plan. 541-382-2281. Please email salary Jack Miller, DMD requirements and reBranden Ferguson, DDS sume to jobs@ascentcap.com. Full job DO YOU NEED description at A GREAT www.ascentcap.com.

EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW?

Call The Bulletin before 11 a.m. and get an ad in to publish the next day!

541-385-5809.

541-385-5809

VIEW the Classifieds at:

Hotel/Motel-Front Desk full-time position Apply in person at Sugarloaf Mountain Motel, 62980 N Hwy 97, Bend. Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin' s web site will be able to click through automatically to your site. Staff Wrtiter The Source Weekly is seeking someone to join our staff who is capable of writing feature stories, music & arts profiles and other content for the paper. Candidate should be familiar with blogging, basic web formatting, contributing story ideas and keeping a finger on the pulse of the culture of Central Oregon. Send clips & resume to info@tsweekly.com No Phone Calls Please. The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to FRAUD. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

www.bendbulletin.com

Independent Contractor

H Supplement Your Income H

Operate Your Own Business

FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF

Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor Join The Bulletin as an independent contractor!

& Call Today & We are looking for independent contractors to service home delivery routes in:

H Madras and Prineville H Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours.

Must have reliable, insured vehicle. Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 during business hours apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com

528

Loans & Mortgages

District) Move in this month and receive 1 month free. $1725/mo. Shari Abell 541-743-1890.

Brand New 1760 sq.ft., 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath, office, fenced yard, gas fireplace, huge master bdrm & closet, 20277 SE Knightsbridge Pl, $1195. 541-350-2206 RENT OWN, $845/mo, 3 bdrm, 2 bath fresh paint, new carpet, nice, easy qualify, $39,900, $2000 down, 10.99% rate, 240 mo. 541-548-5511

WARNING 634 The Bulletin recomApt./Multiplex NE Bend mends you use caution when you pro!! NO APP FEE !! vide personal 2 bdrm, 1 bath information to compa$530 & 540 656 nies offering loans or W/D hook-ups & Heat credit, especially Houses for Rent Pump. Carports & Pet those asking for adFriendly SW Bend vance loan fees or Fox Hollow Apts. companies from out of (541) 383-3152 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1300 sq. state. If you have Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co. ft, all new carpet/paint. concerns or ques.92 acre lot, dbl. gations, we suggest you rage w/opener, $995, Alpine Meadows consult your attorney 480-3393, 610-7803 Townhomes or call CONSUMER 1, 2 & 3 bdrm apts. HOTLINE, An Older 2 bdrm, 2 Starting at $625. 1-877-877-9392. bath, mfd, 938 sq.ft., 541-330-0719 woodstove, quiet .5 People Look for Information Professionally acre lot in DRW, on About Products and Services managed by canal. $795. Norris & Stevens, Inc. Every Day through 541-480-3393 or The Bulletin Classifieds 541-610-7803. Need help ixing stuff BANK TURNED YOU around the house? 659 DOWN? Private party Call A Service Professional Houses for Rent and ind the help you need. will loan on real esSunriver www.bendbulletin.com tate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity Duplex close to downIn River Meadows a 3 is all you need. Call town, 2 bdrm, hardbdrm, 1.5 bath, 1376 now. Oregon Land wood, gas fireplace, sq. ft., woodstove, Mortgage 388-4200. W/D, garage, storage, brand new carpet/oak W/G, yard incl. No floors, W/S pd, $795. smoking/ pets. $700+ FREE 541-480-3393 dep. 541-382-0088. BANKRUPTCY or 541-610-7803 $99 Move in Special! EVALUATION 675 1, 2 & 3 bdrms visit our RV Parking w/d hookups, website at patios or decks. www.oregonfreshstart.com RV Space all utils, complete hookup, Mountain Glen $550 mo., Bend near 541-383-9313 Professionally managed Old Mill, references by Norris & Stevens, Inc. req., 541-389-9268 636

687

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend

Commercial for Rent/Lease

Small 1 bdrm, $430, 1st, last+$200 dep, all utils Office/Warehouse lopaid,362 NW Riverside, cated in SE Bend. Up Near downtown, Drake LOCAL MONEY:We buy to 30,000 sq.ft., compark, 541-382-7972. secured trust deeds & petitive rate, note,some hard money 541-382-3678. 642 loans. Call Pat Kelley 693 541-382-3099 ext.13. Apt./Multiplex Redmond 541-382-3402

A West Side “FIXER UPPER” super location, 796 sq.ft., single garage, $149,900, Randy Schoning, Principal Broker, John L. Scott. 541-480-3393 750

Redmond Homes Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Boats & RV’s

800 860

Motorcycles & Accessories

Polaris 330 Trail Bosses (2), used very little, like new, $1800 ea. OBO, 541-420-1598

CRAMPED FOR CASH?

Use classified to sell those items you no longer need. Call 541-385-5809

HARLEY CUSTOM 2007 Dyna Super Glide FXDI loaded, all options, bags, exhaust, wheels, 2 helmets, low mi., beautiful, Must sell, $9995. 541-408-7908

Polaris Phoenix, 2005, 2+4 200cc, like new, low hours, runs great, $1700 or best offer. Call 541-388-3833

Yamaha Grizzly Sportsman Special 2000, 600cc 4-stroke, push button 4x4 Ultramatic, 945 mi, $3850. 541-279-5303

773

Acreages

Harley Davidson Ultra Classic 2008 Too many upgrades to list, immaculate cond., clean, 15K miles. $14,900 541-693-3975

***

870

Boats & Accessories

17’ Seaswirl tri-hull, CHECK YOUR AD walk-thru w/bow rail, Please check your ad good shape, EZ load on the first day it runs trailer, new carpet, to make sure it is cornew seats w/storage, rect. Sometimes inmotor for parts only, structions over the $1500 obo, or trade phone are misunderfor 25-35 electric start stood and an error short-shaft motor. can occur in your ad. 541-312-3085 If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will Price Reduced - 2010 be happy to fix it as Custom Harley soon as we can. DNA Pro-street swing Deadlines are: Weekarm frame, Ultima 19-ft Mastercraft days 11:00 noon for 107, Ultima 6-spd Pro-Star 190 inboard, next day, Sat. 11:00 over $23,000 in parts 1987, 290hp, V8, 822 a.m. for Sunday and alone; 100s of man hrs, great cond, lots of Monday. hours into custom fabextras, $10,000 obo. 541-385-5809 rication. Priced for 541-231-8709 Thank you! quick sale, now, The Bulletin Classified $15,000 OBO The Bulletin *** 541-408-3317 To Subscribe call 775

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes

541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

Honda VT700 Ofice/Retail Space Shadow 1984, 23K, Need someone to help 1/2 Off 1st mo. OR New & Used: Private many new parts, me with refinancing for Rent $400 Off w/ 9 mo. Owned, Bank owned, my farm of 22 years. battery charger, lease. Studio $399, 2 homes start at $9999, Judy, 541-388-2706 good condition, bdrm $559. W/S/G An Office with bath, We can finance, deliver & $3000 OBO. various sizes and lo+ cable pd. No smokset up. Call J & M 573 541-382-1891 cations from $200 per Homes, 541-548-5511 ing or pets. Business Opportunities month, including utili- www.jandmhomes.com 541-598-5829 till 6pm KAWASAKI 750 2005 ties. 541-317-8717 We buy, sell & finance 648 like new, 2400 miles, Looking for your Approximately 1800 manufactured homes! stored 5 years. New Houses for next employee? sq. ft., perfect for ofCall 541-548-5511 or battery, sports shield, Place a Bulletin help Rent General fice or church. South visit: shaft drive, $3400 wanted ad today and end of Bend. Ample www.jandmhomes.com firm. 541-447-6552. reach over 60,000 Rented your propparking. $575. readers each week. erty? The Bulletin 541-408-2318. Your classified ad Classifieds will also appear on has an "After Hours" bendbulletin.com Line. Call Real Estate which currently re541-383-2371 24 For Sale ceives over 1.5 milhours to lion page views cancel your ad! every month at 650 no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Houses for Rent Get Results! Call NE Bend 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at 745 A Nice 3 bdrm, 1.75 bath, bendbulletin.com Homes for Sale 1428 sq.ft.,wood stove, fenced yard, RV parkBANK OWNED HOMES! ing, 2.5 acres, $995, FREE List w/Pics! 541-480-3393, 610-7803. www.BendRepos.com Rentals When buying a home, bend and beyond real estate 20967 yeoman, bend or 83% of Central Oregonians turn to

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500. 541-389-1413

HOLIDAY DEADLINES

700

The Bulletin will be closed on Monday, January 2

600 630

Rooms for Rent Studios & Kitchenettes Furnished room, TV w/ cable, micro & fridge. Utils & linens. New owners.$145-$165/wk 541-382-1885 631

Condo/Townhomes for Rent 1653 NE Lotus #2 2 bdrm, 2½ bath 1057 sq.ft., fully appl. kitchen, W/D, patio, garage with opener $675 mo. + $675 dep. incl. w/s/yard care. Call 541-480-4824.

Wishes you a Safe and Happy New Year!

NOTICE:

Call 541-385-5809 to place your Real Estate ad. Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com, currently receiving over 1.5 million page views, every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 541-385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

All real estate advertised here in is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or intention to make any such preferences, limitations or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of this law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. The Bulletin Classified

Retail & Classified Display Advertising Deadlines PUBLICATION ............................................. DEADLINE Monday 1/2/12 ....................................... Wednesday 12/28 4 p.m. At Home 1/3/12...................................... Wednesday 12/28 4 p.m. Tuesday 1/3/12 ........................................... Thursday 12/29 Noon Wednesday 1/4/12 ........................................... Friday 12/30 Noon

CLASSIFIED LINE AD DEADLINES Sunday 1/1/12 - Deadline is 4 p.m. Friday 12/30 Monday 1/2/12 - Deadline is 4 p.m. Friday 12/30 Tuesday 1/3/12 - Deadline is 4 p.m. Friday 12/30

Classifieds • 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Circulation Telephone Service at 541-385-5800 will be open 1/1 from 6:30 am to 10:30 am to help with your delivery needs.


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2011 F3

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Boats & Accessories

Motorhomes

Travel Trailers

Fifth Wheels

Fifth Wheels

Canopies & Campers

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530 Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classiieds

Used out-drive parts - Mercury OMC rebuilt marine motors: 151 $1595; 3.0 $1895; 4.3 (1993), $1995. 541-389-0435 875

Gulfstream Scenic Komfort 27’ 2006, Like new,used 4x,fiberglass, Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, 14’ slide-out,2 TV’s,CD/ Cummins 330 hp. dieDVD surround sound. sel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 21” awning, couch w/ in. kitchen slide out, queen hideabed, AC, new tires,under cover, heavy duty hitch, night/ Komfort 24’ 1999, 6’ Pilgrim 27’, 2007 5th hwy. miles only,4 door slide, fully loaded,never daylight shades, pwr wheel, 1 slide, AC, fridge/freezer iceused since buying, front jack, & more! TV,full awning, excelmaker, W/D combo, $9700, 541-923-0854. $19,000 541-382-6731 lent shape, $23,900. Interbath tub & 541-350-8629 shower, 50 amp. proMontana 30’ 2006, 2 pane gen & more! SPRINGDALE 2005 slides, exc. cond., Blue Advertise your car! 27’, has eating area $55,000. book $24,000, asking Add A Picture! $23,000, 503-406-2334 Reach thousands of readers! slide, A/C and heat, 541-948-2310 new tires, all conCall 541-385-5809 tents included, bedThe Bulletin Classifieds ding towels, cooking and eating utensils. Montana 34’ 2003, 2 Hunter’s Delight! Packslides, exc. cond. Great for vacation, age deal! 1988 Winthroughout, arctic fishing, hunting or nebago Super Chief, winter pkg., new living! $15,500 38K miles, great 10-ply tires, W/D 541-408-3811 shape; 1988 Bronco II ready, $25,000, 4x4 to tow, 130K Road Ranger 1985, 541-948-5793 mostly towed miles, catalytic & A/C, Fully nice rig! $15,000 both. self contained, $3400, 541-382-3964, leave 541-389-8315 msg. Itasca Spirit Class C 2007, 20K mi., front entertainment center, all bells & whistles, extremely good cond., 2 slides, 2 HDTV’s, $52,000 OBO, 541-447-5484

Springdale 29’ 2007, slide,Bunkhouse style, MONTANA 3585 2008, exc. cond., 3 slides, sleeps 7-8, excellent king bed, lrg LR, Arccondition, $16,900, tic insulation, all op541-390-2504 tions $37,500. 541-420-3250

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads Jayco Greyhawk 2004, 31’ Class C,

6800 mi., hyd. jacks, new tires, slide out, exc. cond, $54,000, 541-480-8648

Sprinter 272RLS, 2009 29’, weatherized, like new, furnished & ready to go, incl Winegard Satellite dish,

The Bulletin

Lance-Legend 990 11’3" 1998, w/ext-cab, exc. cond., generator, solar-cell, large refrig, AC, micro., magic fan, bathroom shower, removable carpet, custom windows, outdoor shower/awning set-up for winterizing, elec. jacks, CD/stereo/4’ stinger. $9500. Bend, 541.279.0458

Autos & Transportation

900

908

916

Aircraft, Parts & Service

Trucks & Heavy Equipment

T-Hangar for rent at Bend airport. Call 541-382-8998. 916

908

Aircraft, Parts & Service

Trucks & Heavy Equipment

GMC Ventura 3500 1986, refrigerated, w/6’x6’x12’ box, has 2 sets tires w/rims., 1250 lb. lift gate, new engine, $4,500, 541-389-6588, ask for Bob.

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

1982 INT. Dump with Arborhood, 6k on rebuilt 392, truck refurbished, has 330 gal. water tank with pump and hose. Everything works, $8,500 OBO. 1/3 interest in well541-977-8988 equipped IFR Beech Bonanza A36, located KBDN. $55,000. 541-419-9510 MUST SELL GMC 6000 dump Executive Hangar truck 1990. 7 yard at Bend Airport bed, low mi., good (KBDN) condition, new tires! 60’ wide x 50’ deep, ONLY $3500 OBO. w/55’ wide x 17’ high 541-593-3072 bi-fold door. Natural gas heat, office, bathroom. Parking for 6 Just bought a new boat? cars. Adjacent to Sell your old one in the Frontage Rd; great classiieds! Ask about our visibility for aviation Super Seller rates! bus. 1jetjock@q.com 541-385-5809 541-948-2126 1/3 interest in Columbia 400, located at Sunriver. $138,500. Call 541-647-3718

When ONLY the BEST will do! 2003 Lance 1030 Deluxe Model Camper, 885 loaded, phenomenal Canopies & Campers condition. $17,500. 2007 Dodge 6.7 Cummins Diesel 3500 4x4 long bed, 58K mi, 1978 Dynacruiser 9½’ $34,900. Or buy as camper, fully selfunit, $48,500. contained, no leaks, 541-331-1160 clean, everything works, must see! Will Look at: Bendhomes.com fit 65” tailgate opening. $2500 firm. for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale 541-420-6846

Truck with Snow Plow!

Chevy Bonanza 1978, runs good. $5900 OBO. Call 541-390-1466.

925

Utility Trailers

12 ft. Hydraulic dump trailer w/extra sides, dual axle, steel ramps, spare tire, tarp, excellent condition. $6500 firm. 541-419-6552

$28,800. 541-420-9964

Watercraft Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For Phoenix Cruiser 2001, Viking Legend 2465ST Model 540 2002, exc. "boats" please see 23 ft. V10, 51K. Large cond., slide dining, toiClass 870. bath, bed & kitchen. let, shower, gen. incl., Seats 6-8. Awning. 541-385-5809 $5500. 541-548-0137 $30,950. 541-923-4211 880

Motorhomes Weekend Warrior Toy 2007 Winnebago Tour Hauler 28’ 2007,Gen, FD40, 4 slides,400hp fuel station, exc cond. Cummins, like-new Winnebago Access 31J sleeps 8, black/gray 2008, Class C, Near condition, 5900 miles, interior, used 3X, Low Retail Price! One fireplace, $189,000 $27,500. owner, non- smoker, 541-408-2367 541-389-9188 garaged, 7,400 miles, auto leveling jacks, (2) A-Class Hurricane by slides, upgraded Looking for your Four Winds 32’, queen bed,bunk beds, next employee? 2007, 12K mi, cherry microwave, 3-burner Place a Bulletin help wood, leather,queen, range/oven, (3) TVs, wanted ad today and sleeps 6, 2 slides, 2 and sleeps 10! Lots of reach over 60,000 TVs, 2 roof airs, jacks, storage, maintained, readers each week. camera, new cond., and very clean! Only Your classified ad non-smoker, new $76,995! Extended will also appear on lower price, $54,900 warranty available! bendbulletin.com OBO. 541-548-5216. Call (541) 388-7179. which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 Winnebago Sightseer or place your ad Beaver Patriot 2000, 2008 30B Class A, on-line at Walnut cabinets, soTop-of-the-line RV lobendbulletin.com lar, Bose, Corian, tile, cated at our home in 4 door fridge., 1 slide, southeast Bend. W/D. $85,000 882 $79,500 OBO. Cell # 541-215-5355 Fifth Wheels 805-368-1575. 881

Travel Trailers

Beaver Santiam 2002, 40’, 2 slides, 48K, immaculate, 330 Cummins diesel, $63,500 OBO, must sell.541-504-0874

Kit Sportsman 26ft. 1997, camp trailer, solar panel, catalytic heater, furnace, sleep Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, 6-7, self contained, heat pump, exc. cond. good cond., a must for Snowbirds, solid see. $4500. oak cabs day & night 541-388-6846. shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $12,750. 541-923-3417.

CALL A SERVICE PROFESSIONAL Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service

Building/Contracting

NOTICE: Oregon state Margo Construction law requires anyLLC Since 1992 one who contracts • Pavers • Carpentry for construction work • Remodeling • Decks • to be licensed with the Window/Door Construction Con- Replacement • Int/Ext tractors Board (CCB). Paint CCB 176121 • An active license 541-480-3179 means the contractor I DO THAT! is bonded and insured. Verify the Home/Rental repairs contractor’s CCB li- Small jobs to remodels Carri-Lite Luxury 2009 cense through the Fall jobs before Winter by Carriage, 4 slideCB#151573 CCB Consumer outs, inverter, satelDennis 541-317-9768 Website lite sys, frplc, 2 flat www.hirealicensedcontractor. scrn TVs. $60,000. com Landscaping/Yard Care 541-480-3923 or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recom- NOTICE: OREGON mends checking with Landscape Contracthe CCB prior to contors Law (ORS 671) tracting with anyone. requires all busiSome other trades nesses that advertise also require addito perform Landtional licenses and scape Construction certifications. which includes: planting, decks, Debris Removal fences, arbors, water-features, and JUNK BE GONE COACHMAN 1997 installation, repair of Catalina 5th wheel HAPPY irrigation systems to 23’, slide, new tires, be licensed with the NEW YEAR!!! extra clean, below Landscape ContracMel, 541-389-8107 book. $6,500. tors Board. This 541-548-1422. Excavating 4-digit number is to be included in all adverLevi’s Dirt Works: tisements which indiResidential/Commercial cate the business has General Contractor: a bond, insurance and For all your dirt & workers compensaexcavation needs. tion for their employ• Snow Removal ees. For your protec• Subcontracting tion call 503-378-5909 Companion 26’ 1992, • Public Works • Concrete or use our website: Done RV’ing, non• Small & large jobs for www.lcb.state.or.us to smoker, exc. cond, contractors/home owncheck license status some extras incl., ers by job or hour. before contracting $4500, 503-951-0447, • Driveway grading (low with the business. Redmond cost-get rid of pot holes Persons doing land&smooth out your drive) scape maintenance • Custom pads large/small do not require a LCB • Operated rentals & aulicense. gering • Wet/dry utils. CCB#194077 541-639-5282 2010 Cougar 276RLS, lrg slide, loaded with amenities, like new, $24,995. 541-593-6303

ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES

Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. 541-389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded & Insured CCB#181595

Tile/Ceramic Steve Lahey Construction

Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate 541-977-4826 CCB#166678

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Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES PROBATE DEPARTMENT Estate of ERMA M. SHOEMAKER, Deceased. Case No. 11PB043 NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative. All persons having claims against the Estate are required to present them, with vouchers attached, to the undersigned Personal Representative at Karnopp Petersen LLP, 1201 NW Wall Street, Suite 300, Bend, Oregon 97701-1957, within four months after the date of first publication of this notice, or the claims may be barred. All persons whose rights may be affected by the proceedings may obtain additional information from the records of the court, the Personal Representative or the attorneys for the Personal Representative, who are Karnopp Petersen LLP, 1201 NW Wall Street, Suite 300, Bend, Oregon 97701-1957. DATED and first published December 16, 2011.

Handyman

Handyman

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Fleetwood Wilderness 36’ 2005 4 slides, rear bdrm, fireplace, AC, W/D hkup beautiful unit! $30,500. 541-815-2380

Carl J. Shoemaker Personal Representative FAX: (541) 388-5410 PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE:

Carl J. Shoemaker 312 NE 5th Street Bend, OR 97701 TEL: (541) 382-3704 ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE: KARNOPP PETERSEN LLP Erin K. MacDonald, OSB# 024978 ckm@karnopp.com 1201 NW Wall Street, Suite 300 Bend, OR 97701-1957 TEL: (541) 382-3011 FAX: (541) 388-5410 Of Attorneys for Personal Representative LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF CROOK JUVENILE DEPARTMENT IN THE MATTER OF: PARRAS, Atlas DOB: 08-26-11 Child (1108PARRA)) Case No. 11-JV-0130 SUMMONS To: Robert Clemings IN THE NAME OF THE STATE OF OREGON, you are directed to appear before the above entitled Court at 300 NE 3rd Street, Prineville, Oregon on January 9, 2012 at 2:30 p.m. in connection with the above entitled matter. A hearing will be held upon a Petition filed on August 26, 2011, concerning child Atlas Parras.

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Legal Notices y 2011. The order directs this summons be published once a week for circulation in Bend, Oregon.

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0173106048 T.S. No.: 11-02115-6

Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust dated as of October 18, 2007 made by, RICK JACOBSEN AND KIMBERLY JACOBSEN, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY, as the original grantor, to FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as the original trustee, in favor of Wells Fargo Bank, NA., as the original beneficiary, recorded on October 30, 2007, as Instrument No. 2007-57479 of Official Records in the Office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, Oregon {the "Deed of Trust"). The current beneficiary is: Wells Fargo Bank, NA., (the "Beneficiary"). APN: 192873 LOT THIRTY-THREE, RED HAWK UNIT FIVE, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 1947 NW JACKPINE PLACE, REDMOND, OR Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86-735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default(s) for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; together with other fees and expenses incurred by the Beneficiary; and which defaulted amounts total; $24,408.98 as of December 8, Date of 1st publication: 2011. By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obliDecember 16, 2011 gations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $259,207.25 together with Date of 2nd publication: interest thereon at the rate of 6.00000% per annum from December 1, December 23, 2011 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all Trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuDate of 3rd publication: ant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that December 30, 2011 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as the duly appointed Trustee under the Deed of Trust will on April 24, 2012 at the hour Dated this 13th day of of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, OrDecember, 2011. egon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public Aaron Brenneman auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described Chief Deputy real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of District Attorney the execution of the Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of the Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, Trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 1920 Main Street, Suite 1120, Irvine, CA 92614 949-252-4900 FOR SALE INFORMATION CALL: 714.730.2727 Website for Trustee's Sale Information: www.lpsasap.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: December 21, 2011 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Michael Busby, Authorized Signature You have a right to be represented by counsel at every stage of the proceedings. If you are financially unable to retain an attorney, the court will appoint one to represent you. Telephone (541) 447-6451 if you wish assistance in obtaining a court appointed attorney. If you have questions about these matters, you should contact an attorney immediately.

ASAP# 4163054 12/30/2011, 01/06/2012, 01/13/2012, 01/20/2012

This summons is published pursuant to the order of the Honorable Ahern, Circuit Judge of the Juvenile Court, dated the 13th day of December,

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0031712847 T.S. No.: 11-03816-6

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Reference is made to that certain deed made by David L Noah and Rose M Noah Husband And Wife, as Grantor to First American, as Trustee, in favor of National City Mortgage A Division of National City Bank, as Beneficiary, dated December 12, 2008, recorded December 24, 2008, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2008-49955 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lots 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19 and 20 in block 55, Hillman, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 8120 NW 6th St. Terrebonne OR 97760. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due April 1, 2010 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $2,051.54 Monthly Late Charge $82.06. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $294,006.14 together with interest thereon at 5.500% per annum from March 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on March 23, 2012 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: November 16, 2011. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust dated as of March 2, 2007 made by, DANNETTE WEEKS, as the original grantor, to DESCHUTES COUNTY TITLE, as the original trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICAN HOME MORTGAGE ACCEPTANCE, INC., as the original beneficiary, recorded on March 13, 2007, as Instrument No. 2007-14983 of Official Records in the Office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, Oregon (the "Deed of Trust"). The current beneficiary is: Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee for American Home Mortgage Assets Trust 2007-5, Mortgage-Backed Pass-Through Certificates Series 2007-5, (the "Beneficiary"). APN: 109927 LOT NINE IN BLOCK ONE, DOBBIN ACRES, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 61900 DOBBIN RD, BEND, OR Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default(s) for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; together with other fees and expenses incurred by the Beneficiary; and which defaulted amounts total: $58,407.43 as of December 8, 2011. By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $414,176.57 together with interest thereon at the rate of 4.50000% per annum from November 1, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all Trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as the duly appointed Trustee under the Deed of Trust will on April 24, 2012 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of the Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due {other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, Trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 1920 Main Street, Suite 1120, Irvine, CA 92614 949-252-4900 FOR SALE INFORMATION CALL: 714.730.2727 Website for Trustee's Sale Information: www.lpsasap.com TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "Trustee" and 'Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: December 21, 2011 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Michael Busby, Authorized Signature

R-398540 12/16, 12/23, 12/30, 01/06

ASAP# 4163028 12/30/2011, 01/06/2012, 01/13/2012, 01/20/2012

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx5024 T.S. No.: 1344637-09.


F4 FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

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Utility Trailers

Antique & Classic Autos

Antique & Classic Autos

Pickups

Sport Utility Vehicles

Vans

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Big Tex Landscaping/ ATV Trailer, dual axle flatbed, 7’x16’, 7000 lb. GVW, all steel, $1400. 541-382-4115, or 541-280-7024. 931

Automotive Parts, Service & Accessories (4) Honda Civic 13” wheels, w/ beauty rims, chrome lugnuts, $50. 541-480-5950.

Chevy Corvette Coupe 2006, 8,471 orig miles, 1 owner, always garaged, red, 2 tops, auto/paddle shift, LS-2, Corsa exhaust, too many options to list, pristine car, $37,500. Serious only, call 541-504-9945

Tires/Wheels: 4 Nokian Hakka Pelitta 2 (205/ 55R16 91T M&S) Chevy Wagon 1957, Studded/siped, on 4 4-dr. , complete, OEM Factory VW Alloy $15,000 OBO, trades, wheels, like new, only please call used 2 mo. last year. 541-420-5453. Fits 99 & Newer VW (5x100 Bolt pattern) Must SEE! $550, Mike 541-383-9367 We Buy Scrap! Auto & Truck Batteries, up to $10. Buying junk cars & trucks, up to $500, & scrap metal! Call 541-408-1090 932

Antique & Classic Autos

Chevrolet Corvette 1967 Convertible with removable hard top. #'s matching, 4 speed, 327-350 hp, black leather interior. $58,500 541-306-6290

MUST SELL

For Memorial 70 Monte Carlo All original, beautiful, car, completely new suspension and brake system, plus extras. $4000 OBO. 541-593-3072

Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $9000 or make offer. 541-385-9350.

Chrysler SD 4-Door 1930, CDS Royal Standard, 8-cylinder, body is good, needs some restoration, runs, taking bids, 541-383-3888, 541-815-3318

Chevy 4x4 1970, short wide box, canopy, 30K mi on premium 350 motor; RV cam, electronic ignition, tow pkg, new paint/detailing inside & out, 1 owner since 1987. $4500. 541-923-5911

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Ford F150 XLT 4x4, 2000 nice truck, ext cab w/canopy, loaded, 5.4L, AT, 200K mainly hwy miles, tow pkg, $6750. 541-815-9939 1962

Ford F-250 1986, Lariat, x-cab, 2WD, auto, gas or propane, 20K orig. mi., new tires, $5000, 541-480-8009.

Vans

CHEVY SUBURBAN LT 2005, low miles., good tires, new brakes, moonroof Reduced to $15,750 541-389-5016.

"Wheel Deal"! for private party advertisers 541-385-5809 Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

Cadillac SedanDeVille NEW YEAR’S SPECIAL 2002, loaded, NorthBMW 323i Convertible, star motor, FWD, ex1999. 91K mi (just 7K lnt in snow, new tires, per year), great winter Champagne w/tan Mazda Speed 3, 2007, tires, beautiful car! black, orig owner, galeather, Bose stereo. Blue Book $9100, sell raged, non-smoker. Looks / runs / drives $7000. 541-419-1763. Great cond, 77K mi, perfect, showroom $12,500. 541-610-5885 condition!!$7100 OBO 206-458-2603 (Bend) Chevy Corvette 1988 4-spd manual with Mercedes 190E 3-spd O/D. Sharp, loaded, 2 tops, (tinted 4-door, gas, 2.3L 4 cyl., 57k orig. miles, & metal. New AC, leather seats, liwater pump, brake & censed for 2013. clutch, master cylinder & clutch slave cyl. Runs good. $6500 OBO. $2,500! 541-419-0251. Call 541-280-6611

PORSCHE 914, 1974 Roller (no engine), lowered, full roll cage, 5-pt harnesses, racing seats, 911 dash & instruments, decent shape, very cool! $1699. 541-678-3249

BMW 525i 2004

4-WHEELER’S OR HUNTER’S SPECIAL! Jeep 4-dr wagon, 1987 Porsche Cayenne 2004, 86k, immac.,loaded, 4x4, silver, nice dealer maint, $19,500. wheels, 183K, lots of 503-459-1580. miles left yet! Off-road or on. Under $1000. Call 541-318-9999 or Toyota FJ-40 541-815-3639. Landcruiser Free trip to D.C. 1966, 350 Chev, for WWII Vets! Downey conversion, 4-spd, 4” lift, 33’s, three tops! $6500 OBO. 541-388-2875.

The Bulletin Classifieds

origiblock, trans, good, Bend,

541-389-9188. Cadillac DeVille Se- Ford Taurus Wagon ‘00, dan 1993, leather in105K,seats 7,exc cond, terior, all pwr., 4 new $3900, 541-617-3847 tires w/chrome rims, dark green, CD/radio, Lexus ES330 2004, 74K mi, FWD, auto, under 100K mi., runs handles well in winter, exc. $2500 OBO, heated lthr front seats, 541-805-1342 dual temp controls front & rear , automatic Check out the windows / doorlocks, classiieds online sunroof; keyless enwww.bendbulletin.com try, new tires, chrome wheels, non-smkrs, Updated daily gray int/ext, $14,000 obo. 541-389-4037

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Sport Utility Vehicles

People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

Chevy Chevelle 1967, 283 & Powerglide, very Dodge pickup D100 classic, clean, quality updates, nal 318 wide $21,000, 541-420-1600 push button straight, runs $1250 firm. 831-295-4903

Buick Regal Grand Sport Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, 140k, loaded with 1999, auto., pearl it all for the persnickety white, very low mi. fun-car lover. This car $9500. 541-788-8218. in perfect condition is worth $6000, I’m askNeed to sell a ing $3000 to allow you Ford Mustang ConVehicle? to bring it up to perfecvertible LX 1989, V8 Call The Bulletin tion or drive it to NYC engine, white w/red and place an ad toas is! Call Bob, interior, 44K mi., exc. 541-318-9999 or Sam, day! cond., $5995, 541-815-3639. Ask about our

Ford F350 2005, 4X4, Crew Cab, Lariat, new Chevy Tahoe LT 2001, Taupe, very tires, batteries, extras, clean, 102K miles, 1 Dodge Grand Cara48K mi., perfect cond., owner, garaged, van SXT 2005: asking $29,500, Mercury Monterrey maint. records pro541-419-4890 StoNGo, 141k miles, 1965, Exc. All original, vided, new brakes, power doors/trunk 4-dr. sedan, in stornew battery, extra $7850. age last 15 yrs., 390 Ford Ranger XLT tires incl., lots of exCall 541-639-9960 High Compression 2002, 4WD, exc. tras, $9500, engine, new tires & licond., tow pkg, PW, 541-504-4224 cense, reduced to Nissan Quest 1996 camper shell, good $2850, 541-410-3425. 150k, $4900; Ford studded tires, 100K Windstar 1995 138k, mi., $7150, Explorer 1998, V-8, 150k $3,800 or make you will like what you 541-280-7910 offer. 541-549-1544 see, bring money, $1900. Close to Costco. Phone Bob, Find exactly what Sr. 541-318-9999, or you are looking for in the Sam, son Plymouth Barracuda GMC ½-ton Pickup, CLASSIFIEDS 541-815-3639. 1966, original car! 300 1972, LWB, 350hi Free trip to DC for hp, 360 V8, centermotor, mechanically WWII vets. lines, (Original 273 A-1, interior great; eng & wheels incl.) 975 body needs some 541-593-2597 TLC. $4000 OBO. Ford Excursion Automobiles Call 541-382-9441 2005, 4WD, diesel, exc. cond., $24,000, VW BAJA BUG AUDI QUATTRO call 541-923-0231. 1974 1776cc enCABRIOLET 2004, gine. New: shocks, extra nice, low miletires, disc brakes, Jeep Grand Cherokee age, heated seats, International Flat interior paint, flat 1994, 4WD, black w/ new Michelins, all Bed Pickup 1963, 1 black. $4900 OBO; grey leather, loaded, wheel drive, ton dually, 4 spd. over $7000 invested. auto, 5.3L, 65% tread $12,995 trans., great MPG, 541-322-9529. on tires w/2 extras, 503-635-9494. could be exc. wood great cond., 153K+ hauler, runs great, mi., $3000, 933 new brakes, $1950. 541-550-7328. Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Pickups 541-419-5480. Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & Toyota 4x4 1989, 5spd, winter wheels & 4-cyl, X-cab w/ bench tires, Bilstein seat, 68K miles on shocks, coil over engine, new util box & springs, HD anti bedliner, 4 extra tires Nissan Xterra S - 4x4 sway, APR exhaust, w/rims, Kenwood CD, Chevy 1988, 3/4-Ton 2006, AT, 76K, good K40 radar, dolphin AudioBahn speakers, 4X4, X-Cab, longbed, all-weather tires, gray, ext. warranty, new paint, exc. cond. extra tires/rims, $13,500 obo. 56K, garaged, in & out, must see, $3200, 541-389-8315. 858-345-0084 $30,000. $5700. 541-385-4790 541-593-2227

CHEVY ASTRO EXT 1993 AWD mini van, 3 seats, rear barn doors, white, good tires/wheels. Pretty interior, clean, no rips or tears. Drives exc! $2950. Free trip to D.C. for WWII Vets! (541) 318-9999 or (541) 815-3639

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EVERY FRIDAY IN THE BULLETIN • DECEMBER 30, 2011

Happy New Year! Find a party that suits your style, PAGE 10

INSIDE: Five Pint Mary CD-release show, PAGE 3 • Roger Ebert’s best movies of 2011, PAGE 24


PAGE 2 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2011

inside

C O N TAC T U S

Cover design by Althea Borck / The Bulletin; Thinkstock images

EDITOR Ben Salmon, 541-383-0377 bsalmon@bendbulletin.com

REPORTERS

GAMING • 9

RESTAURANTS • 19

Heidi Hagemeier, 541-617-7828 hhagemeier@bendbulletin.com Breanna Hostbjor, 541-383-0351 bhostbjor@bendbulletin.com David Jasper, 541-383-0349 djasper@bendbulletin.com Alandra Johnson, 541-617-7860 ajohnson@bendbulletin.com Jenny Wasson, 541-383-0350 jwasson@bendbulletin.com

• A review of “Trine 2” • What’s hot on the gaming scene

• A review of King Buffet

COVER STORY • 10 • Saturday is New Year’s Eve. Here’s where to party!

MUSIC • 3

DESIGNER Althea Borck, 541-383-0331 aborck@bendbulletin.com

SUBMIT AN EVENT GO! MAGAZINE is published each Friday in The Bulletin. Please submit information at least 10 days before the edition in which it is printed, including the event name, brief description, date, time, location, cost, contact number and a website, if appropriate. Email to: events@bendbulletin.com Fax to: 541-385-5804, Attn: Community Life U.S. Mail or hand delivery: Community Life, The Bulletin 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

• Five Pint Mary celebrates its new album with M&J show • Terrible Buttons bring dark folk to The Horned Hand • RasCue returns to town • Hopeless Jack visits Bend • Sisters Folk Fest: discount 2012 passes, winter concert series lineup

FINE ARTS • 12 • Buckboard Mysteries presents “Murder on the Menu” • Arts Central gets OCF grant • Call for Art in the High Desert • Art Exhibits lists current exhibits

MOVIES • 24

• Great ways to enjoy the outdoors

• Roger Ebert picks his top 20 movies for 2011 • No new movies open this week in Central Oregon • “Apollo 18” and “Final Destination 5” are out on Blu-ray and DVD • Brief reviews of movies showing in Central Oregon

GOING OUT • 7 • Even more New Year’s options • Guide to area clubs

CALENDAR • 16

MUSIC RELEASES • 8

PLANNING AHEAD • 18

• The Black Keys, T-Pain, Snoop Dogg, Robin Thicke and more

• A listing of upcoming events • Talks and classes listing

• A week full of Central Oregon events

Central Oregon’s Newest Magazine

AgeLESS

Central Oregon’s

• Sierra Hull headlines the RiverCity Music Festival • A guide to out of town events

OUTDOORS • 15

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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2011

GO! MAGAZINE •

PAGE 3

music Five Pint Mary is, from left, Michael Holmes, Sarah Holmes, Dave Fuller, Elizabeth Harman, Casey Holloway, Alyson Farquhar and Kevin Newton. Submitted photo

Good cheer for your ears • Local Celtic-rock band Five Pint Mary celebrates its new album tonight at M&J Tavern By Ben Salmon The Bulletin

T

he self-titled new album from local Celtic-rock band Five Pint Mary is split down the middle: five original songs penned by co-founder Michael Holmes, and five traditional numbers. Please note: The word “traditional” here doesn’t exactly mean what you might think it means. You won’t find much in the way of easygoing acoustic guitars, gentle tin whistles and fluttery melodies among these 10 tracks. Certainly there are guitars,

whistles and melodies throughout “Five Pint Mary,” but they’re amped up a notch and more appropriate for a blue-collar bar than a pristine performance hall. “They’re traditional songs,” Holmes said, “but we sort of run ‘em through the meat grinder of rock ’n’ roll.” Indeed, Five Pint’s grinder is fueled by a long-brewing love of Irish and Scottish sounds, but also plenty of punk-rock spirit and maybe a pint (or five … or more) of beer. And it’s operated by a fleet of musicians who came together a couple of years ago through “a series of

If you go What: Five Pint Mary CD release, with Harley Bourbon When: 8 tonight Where: M&J Tavern, 102 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend Cost: Free Contact: www.reverbnation.com/ fivepintmary

fairly miraculous events,” Holmes said, not least of which was the response to an ad on Craigslist looking for like-minded players. “Literally at the next rehearsal, our violin player, banjo player and mandolin player all showed up at once,” he said. “Don’t ask me how it happened, but it did.” Continued Page 5


PAGE 4 • GO! MAGAZINE

music

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2011

ON THE DARK SIDE

Submitted photo

The septet Terrible Buttons, based in Spokane, Wash., will perform its unique brand of folk Sunday at The Horned Hand in Bend.

• Terrible Buttons head to The Horned Hand for a high-energy show By David Jasper The Bulletin

A

little more than two and a half years ago, Spokane, Wash.-based boyfriend and girlfriend Kent Ueland and Sarah Berentson went busking in Portland “for food money and stuff like that,” as Ueland puts it. Playing the Portland streets went “really well,” he said. “We made 70 to 80 bucks a night, and we decided, ‘Hey, we should keep doing this.’ We got our friends in on it, and the rest is history.” They began jamming with their house mates, fellow students (and graduates and dropouts) at Whitworth University in Spokane. Before long, this assemblage consolidated into Terrible Buttons, whose sound is sometimes described as folk. However, this is nobody’s Joan Baez, as another label affixed to the band, “horror folk,”

clearly indicates. In fact, the name Terrible Buttons hints at the darker tendencies. Explained Ueland: “It’s from a short story I read. It’s immigrant literature about a Japanese factory worker who sews buttons on clothes from dawn till dusk, so she never really sees America in the daylight. As she’s walking to and from work, she sees these people walking in the dark, and she just sees them as these terrible buttons … because that’s all she knows of America: buttons and darkness.” That’s kind of heavy. “Yeah, a little bit,” he agreed. Over the past couple of years, Terrible Buttons has played mostly regionally, venturing farther afield — as far as Colorado — over the course of four two-week tours. On Sunday, the band will play a New Year’s Day show at The Horned

Hand in Bend (see “If you go”). Ueland described the Buttons’ live show as “raucous.” “For a fairly new band, we’ve slowly become heavier, and that’s kind of seen in the live show. It’s really high-energy and we’re all just really happy to be there. We hope that that comes across,” he said. Terrible Buttons now tops out at seven members, although Ueland said there may soon be an eighth member joining the ranks. The band has made two EPs, “Brute Neighbors” (2010) and this year’s “Plates of Ether” (check out www .reverbnation.com/terriblebuttons to hear samples). Influences including David Bazan (of Pedro the Lion), Will Oldham (aka Bonnie “Prince” Billy) and Fleet Foxes can be heard, but there’s one that springs to mind even faster: Tom Waits.

If you go What: Terrible Buttons, with Willy Tea Taylor When: 8 p.m. Sunday Where: The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend Cost: $5 at the door Contact: www.reverbnation. com/venue/thehornedhand or 541-728-0879

Ueland himself mentioned Waits first when asked about his songwriting influences. “He’s a genius,” he said of Waits. “He’s a big one.” The song “Smoke Around the Lamps,” with its disquieting, funhouse-from-hell atmosphere could be a lost Waits track: “Stumbling through the haze/ I come upon an empty grave/ And it meets my empty gaze.” Creepy, and it gets even more haunting when Berent-

son jumps in with her backup wail. Speaking of hell, Ueland and Berentson duet on “Teams,” a Crooked Fingers-esque ballad whose protagonists seem on the verge of death. Ueland sings that he hopes his partner is right: “I’ll take that fiery lake/ If you get the pearly gates/ And we’ll both get just what we deserve.” However, new songs from the band’s forthcoming full-length recording, slated for release sometime next year, are the ones that seem to be going over best live, Ueland said. He credits the band’s tightness and improved songwriting, forged by many hours playing together. “All the new tracks that aren’t on any of the records, I’m really excited about,” he said. “They seem to get a better response from the crowd than any of our old stuff. So I’m excited to share (them).” — Reporter: 541-383-0349, djasper@bendbulletin.com


music

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2011

GO! MAGAZINE •

THE BEST MUSIC OF 2011, ALL IN ONE SPOT! Here on GO! Magazine’s music desk, we’ve taken great pains to put all our coverage of 2011’s best sounds — local and beyond — in one place online. There, you’ll find: • 36 of the year’s best songs for free, legal download • Bulletin music writer Ben Salmon’s favorite albums and local concerts of 2011. • Tons of Top 5 lists from folks throughout Central Oregon’s music scene • Did we mention the free music? Steer your favorite Internet-surfing device to:

WWW.BENDBULLETIN .COM/NEARFAR

PAGE 5

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From Page 3 Here’s the Five Pint Mary roster, as it stands today: • Michael Holmes, guitar, accordion, vocals • Sarah Holmes, vocals, tin whistle • Alyson Farquhar, vocals • Elizabeth Harman, fiddle/violin • Casey Holloway, mandolin • David Fuller, bass • Kevin Newton, drums • Rick Havern, banjo • Matt Gwinup, guitar The first seven on that list have been part of the Five Pint Mary family for a while and play on the album, which was made at Scott Wyatt’s Zanityblue Recordings studio in Bend. Havern and Gwinup are newer members who are being “thrown into the fire,” Michael Holmes said, at tonight’s CD-release show at M&J Tavern (see “If you go” on Page 3). “It started out with me, my wife, Sarah, and our friend Alyson sitting around … strumming guitars and singing harmonies,” said Holmes, who cited many of the genre’s greats — The Pogues, Flogging Molly, Dropkick Murphys — as influences. “We were just really drawn to all the possibilities of Celtic music, especially vocally because the melodies are just so pretty, and when you get the girls together singing harmonies, it’s just really beautiful.” That was in 2009. After a debut gig (on St. Patrick’s Day, no less), a number of club shows and a busy summer on the festival circuit, Five Pint’s live show is a finely tuned, rollicking good time that also incorporates distantly related sounds. (Recent sets have included a cover of the popular Gypsy-punk band Gogol Bordello, for example.)

“With a group … this large and diverse you also get other kinds of influences coming into the group,” Holmes said. “We found it was almost impossible to keep them out.” That said, the centerpiece of Five Pint Mary’s sound is Celtic music, which Holmes calls “infectious.” It’s a style built on storytelling and the oral tradition, so the band frequently comes across folks in the audience for whom a traditional tune is a trip back in time. “A lot of these old songs were really meant to tell the history of a battle or something, so they’ve been repeated for centuries and they just kind of take on a life of their own,” Holmes said. “People have been singing along with them for hundreds of years, and a lot of people have heard these songs since they were little kids. So we have people who come to our shows and they’re singing the lyrics right back to us. Which is really the intent of a lot of the songs.” He continued: “In the days before jukeboxes and recorded music, you went to the pub and you sang along with the band. It was just something

that you did, and that’s really still happening today. And when you go to a show like that … it’s like you can’t sit still. It’s more like something you’re actually doing rather than something you’re sitting there listening to.” As just about any musician will tell you, that’s what it’s all about: connection with the audience. “Whenever people ask us for a request, it really makes us feel good because a lot of the songs … (are) near and dear to their hearts for whatever reason,” Holmes said. “It’s like this person’s favorite song since they were a kid, so it feels good.” Of course, connecting with the audience is a bit easier when you have an irresistible elixir like Celtic music in your arsenal. “I think there are a lot of kinds of music that have been influenced by Celtic music, like bluegrass or Appalachian mountain music,” Holmes said. “A lot of people from Ireland and Scotland, when they immigrated to America, that’s where they wound up, so that kind of music has found its way into country, bluegrass, even American pop and rock. “I just think the melodies are so singable,” he continued. “You just listen to it and you start getting happy. It’s hard not to raise a pint and start dancing and having a good time when that music comes on.”

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PAGE 6 • GO! MAGAZINE

music

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2011

RasCue visits The Astro Lounge

Sisters Folk discount, winter concerts

Upcoming Concerts

Old-time Bend scenesters (where “old-time” = mid2000s) may remember Oakland, Calif., DJ/MC/allaround cool cat RasCue, who used to come through The Grove on occasion. Since then, he’s been doing big things as part of all kinds of cliques, including Urban Umpires, Various Blends, Cali Agents and the Bay Area club scene in general. RasCue is known for his diverse style — roots, reggae, rap and beyond — and an enormous record collection that reflects his omnivorous tastes. He has collaborated with some of the biggest names in underground hip-hop (Hieroglyphics, DJ Shadow, Mos Def among them), but tonight, he’ll bring Emcee Belief to town for a performance at The Astro Lounge that crafty promoter MC Mystic is touting as a New Year’s Eve’s Eve party. And that’s as good a reason to party as any, right? RasCue, with Emcee Belief; 9:30 tonight; free; The Astro Lounge, 939 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-388-0116.

The 2012 Sisters Folk Festival is eight months away, but thrifty fans of the three-day folkstravaganza should act quickly to take advantage of the event’s special holiday pricing. Today and Saturday, an All-Event Pass to the 2012 festival — usually $95 — will be available for $75 at www .sistersfolkfestival.org. The pass provides access to all shows and all venues, and the purchase will also include a 2012 SFF poster signed by artist Dennis McGregor. In other news, the Sisters Folk Festival recently announced the lineup for its seventh annual winter concert series. Zydeco dance band Jeffrey Broussard & the Creole Cowboys will kick off the series Jan. 23, followed by SFF favorite Martyn Joseph on Feb. 10 and female vocal trio Red Molly on March 10. Tickets cost $15 (or $10 for students) in advance or $20 ($12 students) at the door, and are also available as a package for all three shows. Order them or get more info at www.sistersfolkfestival.org, info@sistersfolkfestival.org or 541-549-4979.

Jan. 6 — Left Coast Country (roots-rock), Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, Bend, www.silvermoonbrewing. com. Jan. 6 — Feeding Frenzy (alt-folk), The Horned Hand, Bend, www.reverbnation. com/venue/thehornedhand. Jan. 7 — Matt Hopper (poprock), Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, Bend, www. silvermoonbrewing.com. Jan. 10 — The Galt Line (Americana), The Horned Hand, Bend, www.reverbnation. com/venue/thehornedhand. Jan. 11 — Cas Haley (rock), McMenamins Old St. Francis School, Bend, www. mcmenamins.com. Jan. 12 — Polyrhythmics (Afro-funk), Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, Bend, www.silvermoonbrewing. com. Jan. 12 — Pickwick (indiesoul), McMenamins Old St. Francis School, Bend, www. mcmenamins.com. Jan. 13 — Special Consensus (bluegrass), The Sound Garden, Bend, www. thesoundgardenstudio.com. Jan. 13-14 — Mel Brown’s B-3 Organ Group (jazz), The Oxford Hotel, Bend, www. oxfordhotelbend.com. Jan. 14 — LJ Booth and Chris Kokesh (folk), HarmonyHouse, Sisters, 541-549-2209. Jan. 17 — Dick Dale Band (guitar hero), Domino Room, Bend, www.randompresents. com. Jan. 19 — Anthony B (reggae), Domino Room, Bend, www.randompresents. com. Jan. 19 — Archeology (indie rock), McMenamins Old St. Francis School, Bend, www. mcmenamins.com.

RASCUE Submitted photo

Hopeless Jack plays The Horned Hand Fluttery folk artists and glossy indie-rock bands get lots of the attention paid to Portland’s music scene, but make no mistake: There is a murky undercurrent that flows through the town’s dive bars, outside the spotlight du jour. Hopeless Jack & The Handsome Devil is a part of that scene, where low-down and dirty blues collides with gritty bootstrap rock ‘n’ soul in a shower of fuzz, sweat and booze. Like Bend fave

Hillstomp, HJ&THD is a duo that knows how to ride a hillcountry trance until you’re hypnotized, then snap you out of it in a crash of cymbals and yelps. If that all reads like it’ll make the perfect soundtrack to The Horned Hand’s creepy, infernal hunting lodge motif, well, you read it right. Now hear it at www .hopelessjack.com. Hopeless Jack & The Handsome Devil; 8 p.m. Thursday; $2-$5; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; www.reverbnation .com/venue/thehornedhand.

Looking for New Year’s Eve music? Saturday night is New Year’s Eve, and there are a ton of terrific options for live-music lovers in town, including several local favorites such as Larry and His Flask, Mosley Wotta, Empty Space Orchestra and Eric Tollefson. Be sure to check out our cover story on Page 10 for all the details you’ll need before you head out. — Ben Salmon

Custom Sausage & Game Processing of your boneless meats.

Taylor’s Sausage Deli and Pub Corner of 3rd & Greenwood • Bend • 541-383-1694


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2011

GO! MAGAZINE •

PAGE 7

going out HIGHLIGHTS

Looking for something to do? Check out our listing of live music, DJs, karaoke, open mics and more happening at local nightspots. Find lots more at www.bendbulletin.com/events.

TODAY LIVE TEXAS HOLD’EM OR OMAHA: 3 p.m.; Millennium Cafe, 445 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-350-0441. TEXAS HOLD’EM OR OMAHA: 6 p.m.; Rivals Sports Bar, Grill & Poker, 2650 N.E. Division St., Bend; 541-550-7771. PETE HERZOG: Blues; 6:30 p.m.; Crave Eclectic Fine Dining, 614 N.W. Cedar Ave., Redmond; 541-504-6006. SCOTT FOXX TRIO: Bluegrass, folk and blues; 6:30 p.m.; River Rim Coffeehouse, 9570 Amber Meadow Dr. Suite 190 , Bend; 541-728-0095. ANASTACIA BETH SCOTT: Folk; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174. BOBBY LINDSTROM: Rock and blues; 7 p.m.; Brassie’s Bar at Eagle Crest Resort, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; 541-548-4220. JAZCRU: Jazz; 7 p.m.; Green Plow Coffee Roasters, 436 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-516-1128. PAT THOMAS: Country; 7 p.m.; Tumalo Feed Co., 64619 U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-382-2202. DJ CHRIS: Live DJ; 8 p.m.; Checkers Pub, 329 S.W. 6th St., Redmond; 541-548-3731. KARAOKE: 8 p.m.; Rivals Sports Bar, Grill & Poker, 2650 N.E. Division St., Bend; 541-550-7771. FIVE PINT MARY: CD release, w/ Harley Bourbon; 8 p.m.; M&J Tavern, 102 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend. (Page 3) HOT TEA COLD: Blues; 8:30 p.m.; Northside Bar & Grill, 62860 Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541-383-0889. TRUE BLUE: Blues; 8:30 p.m.; Fox’s Billiard Lounge, 937 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend; 541-647-1363. BLACKSMITH AFTER DARK: Live DJ; 9 p.m.; The Blacksmith Restaurant, 211 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-318-0588.

Submitted photo

NO SHORTAGE OF NEW YEAR’S OPTIONS

DJ STEELE: Live DJ; 9 p.m.; The Summit Saloon & Stage, 125 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-749-2440. THE REPUTATIONS: Rock and funk; 9 p.m.; Crossings Lounge, 3075 N. U.S. Highway 97; 541-617-8880. RASCUE: Hip-hop, with Emcee Belief; 9:30 p.m.; The Astro Lounge, 939 N.W. Bond St., Bend; www.astroloungebend. com. (Page 6)

SATURDAY LIVE TEXAS HOLD’EM OR OMAHA: noon; Millennium Cafe, 445 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-350-0441. HOLD’EM TOURNEY: 1 p.m.; Rivals Sports Bar, Grill & Poker, 2650 N.E. Division St., Bend; 541-550-7771. THE OXFORDS: New Year’s Eve party on East Coast time; 6 p.m.; River Rim Coffeehouse, 9570 Amber Meadow Dr. Suite 190 , Bend; 541-728-0095. “FRESH START” NEW YEAR’S EVE PARTY: Electronica with R/D, Weird Science, G.A.M.M.A. and more; $10 before 9 p.m., $15 after; 7 p.m.-4 a.m.; Midtown Ballroom, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; www.slipmatscience.com. JUSTIN LAVIK: 7 p.m.; portello winecafe, 2754 N.W. Crossing Drive, Bend; 541-385-1777. PAT THOMAS: Country; 7 p.m.; Tumalo Feed Co., 64619 U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-382-2202. CHRIS BELAND: Folk-pop; 7 p.m.; Parrilla Grill, 635 N.W. 14th St., Bend; 541-617-9600. HANGAR 52: Classic rock; 8 p.m.; Checkers Pub, 329 S.W. 6th St., Redmond; 541-548-3731. KARAOKE W/ ROCKIN’ ROBIN: 8 p.m.; Kelly D’s, 1012 S.E. Cleveland Ave., Bend; 541-389-5625. POOR MAN’S ROSES: Rockabilly; $5; 8 p.m.; Three Creeks Brewing, 721 Desperado Court, Sisters; 541-549-1963.

On Page 10, we’ve detailed several of the biggest New Year’s Eve happenings in Central Oregon this weekend. But below, you’ll find there’s a whole lot more to do Saturday night than just the crowded parties in downtown Bend. And there’s something for everyone. Want to be take in an evening of mellow, folksy pop and still be home relatively early? Try Chris Beland, left, at Parrilla Grill, Justin Lavik at portello winecafe or The Oxfords at River Rim Coffeehouse. Looking to classic-rock the

RED SOLO CUP NEW YEAR’S PARTY: Live music; 8 p.m.; Maverick’s Country Bar and Grill, 20565 Brinson Blvd., Bend; 541-325-1886. HOT TEA COLD: Blues; 8:30 p.m.; Northside Bar & Grill, 62860 Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541-383-0889. NEW YEAR’S EVE PARTY: Rock ‘n’ roll with Out of the Blue Band; $60; 8:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m.; Pronghorn Resort, 65600 Pronghorn Club Drive, Bend; 541-693-5300. BELLAVIA: Jazz and blues; 9 p.m.; Crave Eclectic Fine Dining, 614 N.W. Cedar Ave., Redmond; 541-504-6006. BLACKSMITH AFTER DARK: Live DJ; 9 p.m.; The Blacksmith Restaurant, 211 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-318-0588. BOBBY LINDSTROM: Rock and blues; 9 p.m.; Brassie’s Bar at Eagle Crest Resort, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; 541-548-4220. NEW YEAR’S EVE BASH: 9 p.m.; The Summit Saloon & Stage, 125 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-749-2440. NEW YEAR’S EVE CELEBRATION: Hiphop ‘n’ rock with Mosley Wotta and the Eric Tollefson Band; free, $10 for Mosley Wotta; 9 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; www.mcmenamins.com. NEW YEAR’S EVE CONCERT: Featuring performances by Subliminal and Broken Down Guitars; $5 suggested donation; 9 p.m.-2 a.m.; M & J Tavern, 102 N.W. Greenwood, Bend; 541408-2599 or www.reverbnation. com/subliminaltribute. NEW YEAR’S EVE CONCERT: Featuring a performance by The Pitchfork Revolution; $10; 9 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; 541-728-0879. NEW YEAR’S EVE CONCERT: Rock with Empty Space Orchestra, Oh Sugoi! and Your Birthday; $5-$7; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W.

night away? Consider Hangar 52 at Checkers Pub in Redmond or The Reputations at Crossings Lounge. Maybe crusty punk and metal is your thing? You want the five-band thrashgasm at Big T’s in Redmond. And you Sisters folks who don’t want to drive a long distance at the end of the night should hit Three Creeks Brewing Co. for the rootsy rockabilly of Poor Man’s Roses. “OK,” you say, “now you’re done telling me about New Year’s Eve options. Right?” Wrong. Find even more below.

Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www.silvermoonbrewing.com. NEW YEAR’S EVIL 2012: Punk/metal with High Desert Hooligans, Bloodlust, Open Defiance, Shovelbelt and Open Fate; $3; 9 p.m.; Big T’s, 413 S.W. Glacier Ave., Redmond. THE REPUTATIONS: Rock; 9 p.m.; Crossings Lounge, 3075 N. U.S. Highway 97; 541-617-8880. WILD 80S NEW YEAR’S EVE PARTY: $5; 9 p.m.; Seven Nightclub, 1033 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-760-9412. NEW YEAR’S EVE CONCERT: Reggae with Strive Roots; free admission for women, $5-$10 men; 10 p.m.; Astro Lounge, 939 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-388-0116.

SUNDAY TERRIBLE BUTTONS: The Washingtonbased folk band performs, with Willy Tea Taylor; $5; 8 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; 541-7280879 or www.reverbnation.com/venue/ thehornedhand. (Page 4)

MONDAY TEXAS HOLD’EM OR OMAHA: 4 p.m.; Rivals Sports Bar, Grill & Poker, 2650 N.E. Division St., Bend; 541-550-7771.

TUESDAY HOLD’EM BOUNTY TOURNEY: 6 p.m.; Rivals Sports Bar, Grill & Poker, 2650 N.E. Division St., Bend; 541-550-7771.

WEDNESDAY LIVE TEXAS HOLD’EM OR OMAHA: 3 p.m.; Millennium Cafe, 445 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-350-0441. TEXAS HOLD’EM OR OMAHA: 6 p.m.; Rivals Sports Bar, Grill & Poker, 2650 N.E. Division St., Bend; 541-550-7771. OPEN MIC/ACOUSTIC JAM: 6:30-9 p.m.; Taylor’s Sausage Deli & Pub, 913 N.E.

— Ben Salmon, The Bulletin

3rd St., Bend; 541-383-1694. KARAOKE W/ ROCKIN’ ROBIN: 7 p.m.; Kelly D’s, 1012 S.E. Cleveland Ave., Bend; 541-389-5625. THE STUNT POETS: 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174. KARAOKE: 8 p.m.; Sidelines Sports Bar, 1020 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-385-8898. REGGAE NIGHT W/ MC MYSTIC: Music; 9 p.m.; Astro Lounge, 939 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-388-0116.

THURSDAY LIVE TEXAS HOLD’EM OR OMAHA: 3 p.m.; Millennium Cafe, 445 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-350-0441. OPEN MIC: 6-8 p.m.; Strictly Organic Coffee Co., 6 S.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-330-6061. TEXAS HOLD’EM OR OMAHA: 6 p.m.; Rivals Sports Bar, Grill & Poker, 2650 N.E. Division St., Bend; 541-550-7771. LEROY NEWPORT’S BANJO JAM: 6:30 p.m.; River Rim Coffeehouse, 9570 Amber Meadow Dr. Suite 190 , Bend; 541-728-0095. TONY SMILEY: One-man band; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. HOPELESS JACK & THE HANDSOME DEVIL: Dirty blues; $2-$5; 8 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; 541-728-0879 or www.reverbnation.com/venue/ thehornedhand. (Page 6) OPEN MIC: 8:30 p.m.; Northside Bar & Grill, 62860 Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541-383-0889. DJ STEELE: Live DJ; 9 p.m.; The Summit Saloon & Stage, 125 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-749-2440. n TO SUBMIT: Email events@bendbulletin.com. Deadline is 10 days before publication. Please include date, venue, time and cost.


PAGE 8 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2011

music releases T-Pain

Robin Thicke

“REVOLVER” RCA Records Of the great experimental pop musicians of the 2000s, the widest gap between initial expectation and lasting influence belongs to TPain, who sang through a machine about strippers and nightclubs. But those machines let T-Pain try things that people wouldn’t accept from a human, and as he became more successful, he opened up turf for followers: to fully synthesize hip-hop and R&B; to accept that emotion can sometimes be best expressed by means of computer manipulation; to understand that for every rowdy nightclub reveler, someone’s there to drown sorrows. Sound like Drake? Without T-Pain it might have been much tougher for Drake to turn his hybrid style into the sound of mainstream hip-hop. And yet T-Pain has been all but absent lately. Until “rEVOLVEr,” he hadn’t released an album in three years, since before Drake’s breakthrough “So Far Gone” mixtape polished and codified this sound. “rEVOLVEr” is T-Pain’s fourth album, and by definition lacks sui generis charm and shock. It’s hard and probably unwise to stay the course once you’ve been assimilated, praised and parodied, but that’s largely what T-Pain is doing here.

“LOVE AFTER WAR” Interscope Records Robin Thicke has always done well to remember that seduction is mostly playacting, the fluid mastery of a role and a set of rules. His career as a crossover R&B heartthrob has flourished on the basis of tight execution and a suspension of disbelief. And throughout his cheerful jumble of a fifth album, “Love After War,” he pushes both of those buttons, asking you to admire his tasteful slickness without delving much deeper than the surface. Thicke, 34, wears his classicsoul literacy like a merit badge, offering loose, untroubled emulations of Marvin Gaye (“I Don’t

The Black Keys “EL CAMINO” Nonesuch Records This is a straight-ahead rock ‘n’ roll album, and an excellent one. Last year’s “Brothers” was the Black Keys’ breakthrough, garnering the Akron, Ohio, duo its best sales and several Grammys on the strength of the single “Tighten Up” (not coincidentally

The single “5 O’Clock” is a notable exception, a lonely-sounding love song with pitch-perfect, smoky vocals by Lily Allen, and a clunky lovelorn verse by Wiz Khalifa. If that marked a change in direction for T-Pain, that would be a thrill, but he mainly revisits old tropes without a wink. “Boatloads of cash/ Bitch, I’m overboard,” he sings on “Bang Bang Pow Pow,” which would have been less hilarious — maybe differently hilarious — had it come out before “I’m On a Boat,” his collaboration with the comedy troupe Lonely Island. T-Pain also makes implicit arguments for himself in the lineage of R&B superhits: “Best Love Song” nods to Rihanna’s “Umbrella,” and “Bang Bang Pow Pow,” with its drunken strings, feels like homage to Sisqo’s “Thong Song.” — Jon Caramanica, The New York Times

the sole track produced by Danger Mouse) and the album’s diverse, soulful intensity. For “El Camino,” the duo’s seventh full-length album, guitarist/ vocalist Dan Auerbach and drummer Patrick Carney decamped to Nashville, brought back Danger Mouse as songwriting partner, keyboard player and producer for the whole record, and dialed up the volume. Although garage-band blues is still the bedrock, these tracks share DNA with the riff-happy best of T. Rex (“Lonely Boy”), Led Zeppelin (“Little Black Submarines”), and the Clash (“Hell of a Season”). There’s nothing subtle here: “El Camino” is pure high-octane rock and, as the title implies, perfectly calibrated to be heard at maximum volume on a road trip. — Steve Klinge, The Philadelphia Inquirer

Know How It Feels to Be U”); Otis Redding (“Angel on Each Arm”); Stevie Wonder (“Lovely Lady”); and even Prince, in vintage slowjam mode (“Mission”). What, then, to make of the handful of moments that evoke the physiologically accurate but idiomatically loaded subgenre known as blue-eyed soul? Thicke has bristled at the term, but he makes it harder than ever to ignore here, especially on the rhythmically ecstatic tunes in the album’s early stretch. Thicke fares better when you can see the twinkle in those baby blues, as on “Pretty Lil’ Heart,” the latest notch in his collaborative history with Lil Wayne, or “Tears on My Tuxedo,” which has a suavely comic potential even be-

Carl Thomas “CONQUER” Verve Forecast Carl Thomas thrives on tormented love. “I Wish,” the 1999 single that helped give him a million-selling debut album in 2000, agonized over falling for a married woman. And the grainy melancholy in his voice — which suggests John Legend and R. Kelly looking over their shoulders at Marvin Gaye — often signals deep misgivings, even when his romances are going more comfortably. Thomas, a neo-soul singer who got his start in Chicago, had patchy success with his next two albums, which generally took a

Snoop Dogg & Wiz Khalifa “MAC & DEVIN GO TO HIGH SCHOOL: MUSIC FROM AND INSPIRED BY THE MOVIE” Atlantic Records Like any rebel child, hip-hop has had its drug phases: There was the weed haze of the early 1990s, various periods of cocaine obsession, the slow roll of syrup in the early 2000s, even a brief embrace with ecstasy. In the past couple of years, though, hip-hop has come back around to a full-fledged weed high, thanks to the rise of Curren$y and Wiz Khalifa.

more optimistic tone. “Conquer” returns, wisely, to brooding, amid productions that juggle the retro and the futuristic. Its first single, “Don’t Kiss Me,” reaches directly back to plush, or-

That Wiz Khalifa would find kinship with Snoop Dogg, a survivor of marijuana’s first breakthrough, is no surprise. The playful collaboration album “Mac & Devin Go to High School” plays like the late hours of a family reunion: comfortable, uncomplicated, a little blurry. This album is a companion piece to a movie of the same title that won’t be released until next year; it, from a hazy distance, bears at least some resemblance to “How High,” the Method Man and Redman stoner comedy from 2001. Snoop Dogg and Wiz Khalifa may or may not be great actors,

yond the title. And then there’s “Dangerous,” in which Thicke issues grave disclaimers in his breathiest voice, over a twinkling lounge-pop groove. “I’m a pterodactyl/ And you’re a wandering dove,” he coos. Don’t say he didn’t warn you. — Nate Chinen, The New York Times

chestral 1970s soul while Thomas stays wary. “Don’t you kiss me,” he sings, “unless those lips that you kiss me with will say I love you, love you for life.” The songs often mingle elements of R&B and hip-hop with a spacious, keyboard-laden sound and rock beat. Both the title song of “Conquer,” in which Thomas vows to “fight you and make you mine just to keep you alive,” and “Running,” which applies sports advice to life, have the billowing pomp of MTV anthems by Seal or Phil Collins. Those songs might have been overbearing, but instead, remembered wounds and self-doubt make them soulful. — Jon Pareles, The New York Times

but they’ve both honed rapping personae that show different sides of the toking life. — Jon Caramanica, The New York Times


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2011

GO! MAGAZINE •

PAGE 9

gaming

‘Trine 2’ a perfect 2011 dessert • Slick puzzle design and whimsical tone make sequel a winner

TOP 10 ON THE PC The editors of Game Informer Magazine rank the top 10 PC games for December: 1. “The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim” (Bethesda) 2. “Star Wars: The Old Republic” (Electronic Arts/LucasArts) 3. “Battlefield 3” (Electronic Arts)

By Matt Miller Game Informer Magazine

I

t’s always gratifying to see a good game make the changes it needs to become great in a sequel. That’s the happy scenario with “Trine 2,” one of this year’s most beautiful, rewarding and downright fun downloadable titles. With online or local cooperative play, slick puzzle design and a whimsical fairy-tale tone, “Trine 2” is a year-ending treat you shouldn’t miss. Like its predecessor, “Trine 2” stars three fantasy archetypes as they platform and puzzle their way through a lush fantasy storybook. The knight, wizard and thief are called upon to save the kingdom once again, and the lighthearted banter between McClatchy-Tribune News Service the characters keeps the other- “Trine 2” makes some important changes to become a great downloadable sequel. wise cliched story rolling. The game’s greatest strength lies in the distinct abilities of each of the Combat is infrequent and borders ‘TRINE 2’ Though “Trine 2” characters. The simple-minded on being overly simplistic, but as 8.75 (out of 10) knight’s sword-waving fends off brief exclamations in the midst of shoots for humor and the most dangerous monsters, a longer puzzle level, the battles storybook simplicity in while his hammer smashes walls. fit the bill. PlayStation 3, Xbox 360, PC its storytelling, there’s The clever thief’s grappling hook Though the levels are identiAtlus, Frozenbyte sends her hurtling up to hard to cal in single- and multiplayer, the nothing funny about the ESRB rating: E10+ reach places, while her bow hits game experience is drastically breathtaking visuals. distant spear-throwers. The cow- different, and well worth playing “Trine 2” embraces ardly wizard conjures new both ways. The pace is REVIEW slower and the challenge is always near at hand. platforms and boxes out of pure fantasy, filling the thin air, or levitates nasty higher in single-player, Though “Trine 2” shoots for goblins out of reach. where every puzzle must humor and storybook simplicity world with oversized With such varied movesets, be solved with only a single char- in its storytelling, there’s noth- snails, phosphorescent “Trine 2’s” central gameplay con- acter onscreen (pressing a but- ing funny about the breathtaking mushrooms and lush, ceit concerns figuring out when ton cycles between your options). visuals. “Trine 2” embraces pure to use which abilities to solve a Two- or three-person cooperative fantasy, filling the world with luminous forests. puzzle. Often, there are multiple play makes it easier to fudge your oversized snails, phosphorescent answers to the question, most way through difficult puzzles, but mushrooms and lush, luminous of which reward creative think- the fun of juggling all three char- forests. From spider-filled caves the equally viable local multiing and cooperation. Perhaps acters more than makes up for the to wave-wracked beaches, the player, Frozenbyte gives players you can reach that high platform loss. wide variety of environments the feature most requested after with a well-timed grapple? Or The physics-based interactions keeps the levels from fading to the original game’s release, and maybe the wizard can just create and appropriately floaty jump- background visual noise. On- every other element of the frana pile of boxes to reach the elu- ing add some big laughs as you screen characters hit the sweet chise moves forward in meaningsive ledge? and your buddies stumble ahead. spot between realism and car- ful ways. Coming as it does at the Puzzle design is clever, but Multiplayer can rapidly devolve toon exaggeration, so both fights tail end of a roaring holiday game stops short of frustration. The into a comedy of errors filled with and level navigation play out as season, “Trine 2” is the dessert most elusive puzzles are reserved misplaced boxes and tumbling dynamic thrill rides. you deserve to close out your year for optional pick-ups that can be boulders, but it only adds to the By adding in well-implemented of gaming, or a great appetizer to bypassed in favor of a faster pace. fun, especially since a checkpoint online cooperative options to join set the stage for next year.

4. “Minecraft” (Mojang Studios) 5. “Batman: Arkham City” (Warner Bros. Interactive) 6. “Saints Row: The Third” (THQ) 7. “Trine 2” (Atlus) 8. “Assassin’s Creed Revelations” (Ubisoft) 9. “FIFA 12” (EA Sports) 10. “Bastion” (Warner Bros.) McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Weekly download ‘MARVEL PINBALL: VENGEANCE AND VIRTUE’ Reviewed for: Xbox 360 (via Xbox Live Arcade; requires free Pinball FX 2 download) and PlayStation 3 (via PlayStation Network; requires Marvel Pinball) From: Zen Studios ESRB Rating: Everyone (mild fantasy violence) Price: $10 The past year wasn’t great for video games bearing the Marvel name — unless you prefer pinball to other genres, in which case it was the best year ever. “Marvel Pinball: Vengeance and Virtue” adds four more tables to the roster, and they fit in perfectly in terms of personality and use of their respective licenses. The Thor table will appeal to those who love highscoring tables, and in true “Marvel Pinball” fashion, Thor himself appears on the table to do battle with Loki (among other enemies) as you indirectly guide the action via pinball. The X-Men table presents the stiffest challenge via devious ramp designs that are harder to hit and unapologetically shift the ball’s speed when you do hit them. Like the tables that preceded it, “Vengeance’s” selections are extremely visually lively and reasonably authentic with regard to pinball physics. — Billy O’Keefe, McClatchy-Tribune News Service


PAGE 10 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2011

cover story

Ring in the new year with an array of party options By Breanna Hostbjor • The Bulletin

T

he new year is looming.

town, listen to local bands and indulge into the wee hours of the new

And when 2012 arrives, we’ll be faced with the relative (and sometimes disappointing) strength of our resolve. Can we

commit to the time and effort it will take to make ourselves healthier, smarter and otherwise better? That makes Saturday the perfect opportunity to head out on the

Continued next page

make your pledge to imbibe less seem all the easier. Just be sure to make — and keep — a resolution to call a cab once the night is done.

The answer is that it doesn’t matter. Not until Sunday.

“MURDER ON THE MENU”: Buckboard Mysteries presents an interactive murder mystery dinner theater event; followed by a DJ, who will perform through midnight; reservations recommended; SOLD OUT; 6 p.m.; Deschutes Brewery Mountain Room, 901 S.W. Simpson Ave., Bend; 541-3500018 or www.buckboardmysteries.com. ROCKIN’ NEW YEAR’S EVE: Featuring cardboard instruments, singing and more; reservations requested; $70; 6:30 p.m.12:30 a.m.; Fort Funnigan, 17600 Center Drive, Sunriver; 800-486-8591 or www. sunriver-resort.com/traditions. “FRESH START” NEW YEAR’S EVE PARTY: Featuring performances by R/D, Weird Science, G.A.M.M.A. and more; $10 before 9 p.m., $15 after; 7 p.m.-4 a.m.; Midtown complex, The Annex, Midtown Ballroom and Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; www.slipmatscience.com. NEW YEAR’S EVE PARTY: Featuring performances by Larry and His Flask, Willy Tea Taylor and more; $8 plus fees in advance, $12 at the door; 7 p.m.; The Old Stone, 157 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; www. bendticket.com.

year. After all, waking up in the morning with a throbbing head will

See The at Centu Show ry Cente r The Sho w,

with sin non Bex ger S ( her from you may recog hannize M T V’s “ Band”), will play Making the Center. the Centu Th ing outd is one’s happe ry noors, th o prepare d to dre ugh, so be ss warm dance a ly lo flowing t to keep the blo and to your to od es. The $3 you par 5 entrance fee ty ge pagne to favors, food, a ts c a And per st and a balloo hamn drop. haps mo re impo it gets y rta o home fr u a safe and fre ntly, e ride om Sob er Dude s. Submit

ted pho

to

The following is a list of New Year’s Eve events submitted to The Bulletin.


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2011

cover story

GO! MAGAZINE •

‘Fresh S tart’

PAGE 11

wi

th DJ G. DJ G.A A.M.M.A of techn .M.M.A., a Cali . fo o New Yea , dubstep and m rnia-based arti st who’l r’s Eve P ore, is p l spin a b is that th erformin arty at th le is g Ballroom show will be r e Midtown com at the “Fresh S nd ocking a plex. Wh ta , the Do ll three r mino Ro at that m rt” G.A.M.M o o o eans m m .A s a : the Mid nd The A ., along Weird S with town nne c pect ple ience and other Los Angeles-b x. as s n own bea ty of other acts will be playing th ed R/D, Freak F to fill the ts. un e r est of th ballroom, but e k, You’ll ne e xe b d u il to ding wit b For the 2 h their 1 and old ring ID to get in , a er crowd s , two ba it’s an 18 and o rs will b e servin lder event. g libatio ns. Photo c ou rtesy B

From previous page NEW YEAR’S EVE BASH: Featuring a performance by The Show, refreshments and more; proceeds benefit the Heart of Oregon Corps; $35; 8 p.m.; Century Center, 70 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; www.bendliveandlocal.com. NEW YEAR’S EVE PARTY: Featuring a performance by the Out of the Blue Band, with refreshments; $60; 8:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m.; Pronghorn Resort, 65600 Pronghorn Club Drive, Bend; 541-693-5300. NEW YEAR’S EVE PARTY: Featuring a performance by Bobby Lindstrom; free; 8:30 p.m.-midnight; Niblick and Greene’s, 7535 Falcon Crest Drive #100, Redmond; 541-548-4220. NEW YEAR’S EVE BONFIRE ON THE

SNOW: Wanderlust Tours leads a short snowshoe hike to a bonfire and handcarved snow amphitheater in the forest; a naturalist shares facts about the forest, animals and the night sky; reservations required; trips depart from Sunriver and Bend; $85; 9 p.m.-1:30 a.m.541-3898359 or www.wanderlusttours.com. NEW YEAR’S EVE CELEBRATION: Featuring a performance by Mosley Wotta and the Eric Tollefson Band; free, $10 for Mosley Wotta; 9 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. NEW YEAR’S EVE CONCERT: Featuring performances by Subliminal and Broken Down Guitars; $5 suggested donation; 9 p.m.-2 a.m.; M & J Tavern,

Mosley Wotta

Mosley theater a Wotta will play t Francis McMenamins O the School. ld St. Th hop act, led by J e funky hipa is a corn son Gra e h music s rstone of the lo am, cene an d you ca cal them pe ns r is also a form for $10. G ee ra p prepare oet and artist, s ham to o well as y engage your m our ears ind as . And if th cup of te at’s not quite y o a Father L , you can head to ur uke’s Ro om, whe Tollefso n re You can will be ruling the Eric get in to stage. s tic, blues y music ee the acousian play for free. Courte sy Dav id D ornbus chPhoto Dornbusch graphy. com

102 N.W. Greenwood, Bend; 541408-2599 or www.reverbnation.com/ subliminaltribute. NEW YEAR’S EVE CONCERT: Featuring a performance by The Pitchfork Revolution; $10; 9 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend. NEW YEAR’S EVE CONCERT: Featuring performances by Empty Space Orchestra, Oh Sugoi! and Your Birthday; $5 plus fees in advance, $7 at the door; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3888331 or www.silvermoonbrewing.com. NEW YEAR’S EVE CONCERT: Featuring a performance by Strive Roots; free admission for women, $5-$10 for men; 10 p.m.; Astro Lounge, 939 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-388-0116.

SEE PAG FOR MO E 7 NEW YE RE AR’S EVENTS EVE !

arr y M

. Peters

on

ld Stone night. It’s no O e th t a k e morrow His Flas ld Stone to ost notably with th Larry and Flask will rock the Oro m ir t, e lo th a f o d un one

a His sh Larry and se guys have toured opportunity to reli eir music. th d e o n o th a g t th a a s th this is e on the raucou secret urphys, so are possibly more f punk, and you’ll b ylor M k ic k p o Dro ich a Ta with plenty hows, wh d, Willy Te local live s ericana tricked out Tom VandenAvon s m astburn usician Think A Joseph E ericana m w. Courtesy m A . k c a e sho right tr will open th and more

Empty Sp ace Orche stra Silver Mo on Bre

wing & Ta ring in the proo n tunes of E ew year with the sp m will mpty Spa ace-rock ce venue can get full fas Orchestra. This definitely t, and ESO dra c for some s w a crowd. Prepare an erious dec yourself serious dru ib mming, if els, and some one of Ben you head out to see d’s Sharing th strongest local acts e s ta g e will be loc . Your Birth al d mation po ay and Oh Sugoi! (T bands in h but we’re t is part of the band e exclapretty exc ited, too.) name, Submitted

photo


PAGE 12 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2011

fine arts

Murder is served! • Buckboard Mysteries welcomes the new year with a ‘Murder on the Menu’ By David Jasper The Bulletin

O

n Saturday night, Buckboard Mysteries will kill off the old year and ring in the new one with all the holiday trappings, and then some: celebrity chef competition, dinner, murder, dancing and, of course, a midnight toast. Yes, we’re being deadly serious about the murder part. Along with appetizers, pork shank, vegetables and desserts, there will be “Murder on the Menu,” an interactive whodunit by Jennifer Jenkins, at Buckboard’s sold-out New Year’s Eve Bash at the Deschutes Brewery in Bend (see “If you go”). Call it your last meal … of 2011. Steve Meyer, managing partner of Buckboard Mysteries, explains the company’s approach to dinner theater: “It’s unique. You go to one place for your entertainment without breaking the bank for the whole night out,” he said. Meyer is an Oregon native who acted and did improv in Los Angeles and Phoenix before he moved back to Oregon in 2005. Not wanting his acting chops to decay, he climbed aboard the Crooked River Dinner Train for a couple of seasons. Continued next page

If you go What: Buckboard Mysteries’ New Year’s Eve Bash, with “Murder on the Menu” When: 6 p.m. Saturday Where: Deschutes Brewery Mountain Room, 901 S.W. Simpson Ave., Bend Cost: SOLD OUT Contact: 541-350-0018

Judi Van Houweling stars as Katie Katie the Cupcake Lady in “Murder on the Menu,” a dinner theater whodunit being served Saturday in Bend. Submitted photo


Call to artists for Art in the High Desert Preparations are being made for the fifth annual Art in the High Desert festival, scheduled for Aug. 24-26, and organizers have opened the application process up to artists. Art in the High Desert, held in the Old Mill District along the banks of the Deschutes River, is a juried fine arts and craft festival produced by artists for artists and for the community. Each year a new group of jurors selects 110 artists to participate in the threeday event. Art in the High Desert uses the ZAPP application system at www.zapplication.org; registration for ZAPP is free. Contact: www.artinthehigh desert.com or info@artinthe highdesert.com.

“our take on the Food (Network) and the chefs and shows that are on that. The premise is Chef Geoff is a TV chef, and he’s looking for the next celebrity chef that he can mentor.” Theoretically, that chef would get some mentoring and a show of his or her own. But the business we call show being a rough one, “In reality, (Geoff) doesn’t care about them, because he’s looking for someone to make him look good. Because he’s an arrogant chef,” Meyer said. About 15 audience members will be given props and lines to recite; hence the interactive part of the night. “At different times during the show, our actors will go to these people in the audience and actually go back and forth with them on a couple of lines,” explained Meyer, who

“It’s unique. You go to one place for your entertainment without breaking the bank for the whole night out.” — Steve Meyer, managing partner, Buckboard Mysteries

plays the arrogant Chef Geoff. “They are different characters for the show, and for this show, the audience members are different contestants for celebrity chef.” Along with Meyer, “Murder on the Menu” also features Judi Van Houweling as Katie Katie the Cupcake Lady, Holly Hamilton as Anna Siciliana and Craig Simi as Butch Porterhouse. At the end of the show, the audience not only figures out whodunit, they also vote on

who they think should be the celebrity chef. Meyer said that “Murder on the Menu” has been popular, partly because “there are an awful lot of foodies around here.” Count yourself lucky if you’re a foodie in the audience: Prior to all the theatrical fun, “We’re going to pull three people out of the audience … and they’re going to have to make an appetizer or a dish using mystery ingredients in a basket. They’ll have 10 or 15 minutes to do that, and then the audience will judge which dish they liked the best,” Meyer said. After the dinner and all the murder business is sorted out, a DJ will provide music for dancing until the midnight toast. — Reporter: 541-383-0349, djasper@bendbulletin.com

Find It All Online bendbulletin.com

Get a taste of Food, Home & Garden In

AT HOME Every Tuesday

—David Jasper

$

5 Buffet 00

With Purchase of Beverage

One coupon per customer. Not valid with any other offer, promotion or discount. Valid through 1/15/12 at listed locations.

DINE-IN, CARRY-OUT OR DELIVERY

BEND • 541-389-2963 1552 NE Third Street (At Highway 97)

Mention or bring in this coupon. Offer expires Jan 6, 2012. Not valid with any other offers.

PAGE 13

Oregon

Arts Central has received a $25,000 grant from the Oregon Community Foundation for operational support aimed at increasing earned and donated income with a focus on individual donors. The regional arts and culture council for Central Oregon, Arts Central provides arts services to the communities, artists and arts organizations in Deschutes, Jefferson and Crook counties. The OCF seeks to improve life in Oregon and promote effective philanthropy, working with individuals, families and organizations to create charitable funds that support community causes they care about. The OCF awards more than $60 million annually in grants and scholarships. Those interested in setting up a fund should contact the Bend OCF office at www .oregoncf.org or 541-382-1170.

From previous page “(I) saw where there was a market for dinner theater here,” he said. “So I wanted to start a dinner theater where it’s a slightly different model than the dinner train.” Rather than a troupe where the actors serve dinner, tend bar and perform, a la the train, “I wanted to put a troupe together that (let) the actors just do the acting,” he said. “That way the restaurant or the caterer does what they do well, which is serving and bartending, and we do what we do well, which is performing.” The formula has proven successful, said Meyer, whose troupe is in its seventh season of doing public events such as the New Year’s Eve Bash, as well as private gigs for birthdays, corporate events and other functions, which constitute the majority of its business. Buckboard offers a selection of several dinner theater shows, three of which feature murder in the title. (The other two use “shot” and “deadly” in theirs.) Meyer explained that “Murder on the Menu” is

GO! MAGAZINE •

Bend, February 18 • PlungeOregon.com

Arts Central receives OCF grant

fine arts

Benefiting

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2011


PAGE 14 • GO! MAGAZINE

fine arts

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2011

ART EXHIBITS

When You Give To The Red Cross, You Help Our Community.

www.mountainriver.redcross.org

AMBIANCE ART CO-OP: Featuring gallery artists; 435 S.W. Evergreen Ave., Redmond; 541-548-8115. ARBOR MORTGAGE GROUP: Featuring photographs by Tom Rice; through Jan. 6; 210 N.W. Irving Ave., Suite 101, Bend; 541-323-0422. ART BY KNIGHT: Featuring oil paintings by Laurel Knight and bronze sculpture by Steven L. Knight; 236 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend; 541-633-7488 or www. ArtbyKnight.com. ARTISTS’ GALLERY SUNRIVER: Featuring works by gallery artists; through Saturday; new exhibit featuring woodwork, metal art, watercolor and more opens Sunday; 57100 Beaver Drive, Building 19; 541-593-4382. ATELIER 6000: Featuring “On and Off the Wall,” works showcasing imagination; through Jan. 27; 389 S.W. Scalehouse Court, Suite 120, Bend; 541-330-8759 or www. atelier6000.com. BEND CITY HALL: Featuring “BONDING::WALLS,” works exploring Bend’s downtown and community; through March 29; 710 N.W. Wall St.; 541-388-5505. BEND MOUNTAIN COFFEE: Featuring works by Shelli Walters; through January; 180 N.W. Oregon Ave.; 541-317-4881. CAFE SINTRA: Featuring “3 Points of View,” a continually changing exhibit of photographs by Diane Reed, Ric Ergenbright, and John Vito; 1024 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-8004. CANYON CREEK POTTERY: Featuring pottery by Kenneth Merrill; 310 N. Cedar St., Sisters; 541-549-0366 or www. canyoncreekpotteryllc.com. DES CHUTES HISTORICAL MUSEUM: Featuring rugs from the High Desert Rug Hookers; through Sunday; 129 N.W. Idaho Ave., Bend; 541-389-1813. DON TERRA ARTWORKS: Featuring more than 200 artists; 222 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-1299 or www.donterra.com.

Submitted photo

“Highlights,” by Rob Bingham, will be on display through Jan. 27 at Sunriver Area Public Library. DOWNTOWN BEND PUBLIC LIBRARY: Featuring “Art of Photography”; through Feb. 6; 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1037. FRANKLIN CROSSING: Featuring “Art in the Atrium,” works by Snake River Correctional Institution inmates; proceeds benefit Otino Waa Children’s Village orphans; also featuring paintings by gallery artists; through Jan. 29; 550 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; 541-382-9398. FURNISH.: Featuring works by Marjorie Wood Hamlin; 761 N.W. Arizona Ave., Bend; 541-617-8911. GHIGLIERI GALLERY: Featuring

FREE BANKRUPTCY EVALUATION Available on our website at

www.oregonfreshstart.com Oregon Mountain River Chapter

541-382-3402 Dale L. Smith, Attorney 622 NE 4th St., Bend, OR 97701 We are a debt relief agency. We proudly help people file for bankruptcy relief under the Bankruptcy Code.

original Western-themed and African-inspired paintings and sculptures by Lorenzo Ghiglieri; 200 W. Cascade Ave., Sisters; 541-5498683 or www.art-lorenzo.com. THE GOLDSMITH: Featuring pastel art by Nancy Bushaw; 1016 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-647-2676. HIGH DESERT GALLERY: Featuring “Teeny Tiny Art Show,” a variety of small works; through Tuesday; also featuring “Balance,” works by Holly and Randal Smithey; through Feb. 15; 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-388-8964. HIGH DESERT MUSEUM: Featuring “The Owl and the Woodpecker,” images by Paul Bannick; through Jan. 8; 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754. HOME FEDERAL BANK: Featuring Christmas-themed work by nine artists; through Saturday; 821 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-548-9977. JENNIFER LAKE GALLERY: Featuring paintings by Jennifer Lake; 220 W. Cascade Ave., Sisters; 541-549-7200 or www. jenniferlakegallery.com. JILL’S WILD (TASTEFUL) WOMEN WAREHOUSE: Featuring works

by Jill Haney-Neal; 20512 Nels Anderson Place, Building 3, Bend; 541-617-6078 or www.jillnealgallery. com. JUDI’S ART GALLERY: Featuring works by Judi Meusborn Williamson; 336 N.E. Hemlock St., Suite 13, Redmond; 360-325-6230. KAREN BANDY DESIGN JEWELER: Featuring “A Horse of a Different Color”; through Saturday; new exhibit, “Blue Note,” opens Tuesday; 25 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Suite 5, Bend; 541-388-0155. LAHAINA GALLERIES: Featuring paintings and sculptures by Frederick Hart, Robert Bissell, Alexi Butirskiy, Aldo Luongo, Dario Campanile, Hisashi Otsuka, David Lee, Mollie Jurgenson, Katherine Taylor, Donna Young and more ; 425 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Suite 307, Old Mill District, Bend; 541-3884404 or www.lahainagalleries.com. LA PINE PUBLIC LIBRARY: Featuring works by Toni Lynde and Blanch M. Vila; through Jan. 12; 16425 First St.; 541-312-1090. LONE PINE COFFE ROASTERS: Featuring “Fables of What Happened Next,” collages by Kaycee Anseth; through January; 845 Tin Pan Alley, Bend; 541-306-1010. LUBBESMEYER FIBER STUDIO: Featuring fiber art by Lori and Lisa Lubbesmeyer; 450 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Suite 423, Old Mill District, Bend; 541-330-0840 or www.lubbesmeyerstudio.com. MARCELLO’S ITALIAN CUISINE AND PIZZERIA: Featuring several local artists; 4 Ponderosa Road, Sunriver; 541-593-8300. MOCKINGBIRD GALLERY: Featuring “Heaven & Nature,” landscape paintings by Troy Collins and Bart Walker; through Saturday; 869 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-388-2107 or www.mockingbird-gallery.com. MOSAIC MEDICAL: Featuring mixedmedia collage paintings by Rosalyn Kliot; 910 S. U.S. Highway 97, Suite 101, Madras; 541-475-7800. MUSEUM AT WARM SPRINGS: Featuring the Tribal Member Art Show; through Jan. 8; 2189 U.S. Highway 26, Warm Springs; 541-553-3331. THE NATURE OF WORDS STOREFRONT: Featuring “Peace, Love, Literature,” works by John Hillmer; through Saturday; 224 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-647-2233. PATAGONIA @ BEND: Featuring photography by Mike Putnam; 920 N.W. Bond St.; 541-382-6694. QUILTWORKS: Featuring quilts by Sandy Feigner, and a group show of quilts based on “The Elegance of the Hedgehog”; through Feb. 2; 926 N.E. Greenwood Ave., Suite B, Bend; 541-728-0527. RED CHAIR GALLERY: Featuring “RED,” works by gallery artists; through Saturday; 103 N.W. Oregon

Ave., Bend; 541-306-3176. REDMOND PUBLIC LIBRARY: Featuring the Winter 2011 Art Exhibit; through today; 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1064. RUUD GALLERY: Featuring works by local and regional contemporary artists; 50 S.E. Scott St., Suite 2, Bend; www.ruudgallery.com or 541-323-3231. SAGEBRUSHERS ART SOCIETY: Featuring “Small Works for Giving and Getting”; through Saturday; 117 S.W. Roosevelt Ave., Bend; 541-617-0900. SAGE CUSTOM FRAMING AND GALLERY: Featuring pastels by Laura Jo Sherman; through Jan. 28; 834 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-382-5884. SISTERS AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE: Featuring fiber art by Rosalyn Kliot; 291 E. Main Ave.; 541-549-0251. SISTERS GALLERY & FRAME SHOP: Featuring landscape photography by Gary Albertson; 252 W. Hood Ave.; 541-549-9552 or www.garyalbertson.com. SODA CREEK GALLERY: Featuring originals and prints of Western, wildlife and landscape paintings; 183 E. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-0600. ST. CHARLES BEND: Featuring works by the High Desert Art League; through Jan. 13; 2500 N.E. Neff Road, Bend; 541-382-4321. SUNRIVER AREA PUBLIC LIBRARY: Featuring “Gems of Nature”; through Jan. 27; 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1080. SUNRIVER LODGE BETTY GRAY GALLERY: Featuring a holiday fine art exhibition, works by Joanne Donaca, Vicki Shuck and Barbara Slater; through January; 17600 Center Drive; 541-382-9398. TBD LOFT: Featuring “Community Portrait: We Need,” an evolving exhibit by various artists; subtheme is “Transcendence”; through Saturday; 856 N.W. Bond St., Suite 2, Bend; 541-388-7558. THUMP COFFEE: Featuring works by the children of the Vima Lupwa Home in Luanshya, Zambia; through Saturday; new exhibit, “Vision of Peace,” the River Song Montessori School Student Art Show, opens Sunday; 25 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-388-0226. TOWNSHEND’S BEND TEAHOUSE: Featuring “After the Flood” photographs from Thailand and Cambodia by Janet Harris; through Saturday; 835 N.W. Bond St.; 541312-2001 or www.townshendstea. com. TUMALO ART CO.: Featuring “Small Treasures = Big Joy,” small artwork by gallery artists; through Saturday; 450 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Suite 407, Bend; 541-385-9144 or www. tumaloartco.com.


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2011

GO! MAGAZINE •

PAGE 15

outdoors Outing shorts are trimmed versions of stories published in The Bulletin in the past several weeks. For the complete stories, plus more photos, visit www.bendbulletin.com/outing.

Horse Ridge bike and hike

Middle Mountain and Windy Point

A

s Central Oregon Trail Alliance says, Horse Ridge Recreation Area southeast of Bend

“is Central Oregon’s winter riding spot.” The 40square mile area is laced with trails fit for riders, equestrians, runners and hikers. Ascend the 4,900-foot ridge or check out the views from the relatively flat Skeleton Fire burn area. — Bulletin staff

If you go Getting there: From 27th Street in Bend, take U.S. Highway 20 east approximately 10 miles to the Old Highway 20 (the turn is about 1½ miles past Rickard Road; if you miss it, there will be another about

five miles ahead on 20) Difficulty: Depending on the trail you take, moderate to difficult by mountain bike, moderate by foot Cost: Free Contact: 541-416-6700

Markian Hawryluk / The Bulletin file photo

19

26

MILES

Route 0 suggested

1

Deschutes National Forest Source: BLM

Horse Ridge trailhead

Trails Horse Ridge Research Natural Area

20

Old Highway 20 Greg Cross / The Bulletin

Greg Cross / The Bulletin

finding challenges.

If you go

But it’s all worth it

Getting there: From Prineville, drive east on U.S. Highway 26 past Mitchell. Turn left on state Highway 19 and drive about four miles. Park in a pullout on the right just before a bridge crossing

— Bulletin staff

Sheep Rock

Prineville

with some route-

geology on display.

China Hat Rd. 18

Route taken (not trail)

OCHOCO NATION AL FOREST

Monument is rough

to see the amazing

Windy Peak 4,578 ft.

20

. Rd

of the John Day Fossil Beds National

Sheep Rock unit Mitchell 26

Peak 3,493 ft.

rd Fo

Sheep Rock district

19

Badlands Wilderness Area Private land

Stookey Flat Rd.

Windy Point in the

Painted Hills unit

Middle Mountain 3,389 ft.

Old Highway 20

Trails

. Rd

Middle Mountain and

John Day River

the hike up

John Day Fossil Beds National Monument

BLM land

Horse Ridge Recreation Area

rd Fo

W

ith no trail,

Rickard Rd.

Gosney Rd.

Sheep Rock looms high above the John Day River in the western portion of the John Day Fossil Beds National Monument.

the John Day River. Difficulty: Strenuous Cost: Free Contact: John Day Fossil Beds National Monument, 541-987-2333

Buy One Entree, Get the Second for 1/2 off *off equal or lesser value, not valid on 2 for $20 There’s No Place Like The Neighborhood™

New Healthy Choices under 550 calories menu! Like our Signature Sirloin with Garlic Herb Shrimp! Available only at Bend and Redmond locations.

Bend 541-318-5720 • Redmond 541-923-4777

FREE KIDS MEAL!! One Free Kids Meal, per Adult Entree with this coupon. We would also like to mention that Tuesdays are Kid’s Night, where kids eat for only $.99!! from 5pm to 9pm


PAGE 16 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2011• FRIDAY THE BULLETIN

event calendar d TODAY ANIMAL ENCOUNTERS — TALES FROM THE WILD: See an actor portray an explorer while introducing live animals; $7 plus museum admission ($10 adults, $9 seniors, $6 ages 5-12), $5 for members; 11 a.m. and 1:30 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. NATURE AND THE PERFORMING ARTS: Jim Anderson leads an evening of storytelling, with live music and poetry; $20 or $15 nature center members in advance, $25 at the door; 7-9 p.m.; Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory, 57245 River Road; 541-593-4394. “LIKE THERE’S NO TOMORROW”: A screening of the Warren Miller film about skiing and snowboarding on peaks from India to New Hampshire; $10; 7:30 p.m.; Sunriver Resort, 17600 Center Drive; 800-486-8591 or www.sunriverresort.com/traditions. RASCUE: The California-based hip-hop act performs, with Emcee Belief; free; 9:30 p.m.; Astro Lounge, 939 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-388-0116. (Story, Page 6)

SATURDAY Dec. 31 ANIMAL ENCOUNTERS — TALES FROM THE WILD: 11 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. at High Desert Museum; see Today’s listing for details. TOUR DU CHOCOLATE: Ski a six- or threemile loop, with chocolate-themed aid stations; registration required; proceeds benefit trail grooming at the park; $10 or $20 per car; noon-2 p.m.; Virginia Meissner Sno-park, Milepost 14 Southwest Century Drive, Bend; 541-350-3790 or www.meissnernordic.org. “MURDER ON THE MENU”: Buckboard Mysteries presents an interactive murder mystery dinner theater event; reservations recommended; SOLD OUT; 6 p.m.; Deschutes Brewery Mountain Room, 901 S.W. Simpson Ave., Bend; 541-350-0018 or www.buckboardmysteries.com. (Story, Page 12) ROCKIN’ NEW YEAR’S EVE: Featuring cardboard instruments, singing and more; reservations requested; $70; 6:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m.; Fort Funnigan, 17600 Center Drive, Sunriver; 800-4868591 or www.sunriver-resort.com/traditions. “FRESH START” NEW YEAR’S EVE PARTY: Featuring performances by R/D, Weird Science, G.A.M.M.A. and more; $10 before 9 p.m., $15 after; 7 p.m.-4 a.m.; Midtown complex, The Annex, Midtown Ballroom and Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; www.slipmatscience.com. NEW YEAR’S EVE PARTY: Featuring performances by Larry and His Flask, Willy Tea Taylor and more; $8 plus fees in advance, $12 at the door; 7 p.m.; The Old Stone, 157 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; www. bendticket.com. IMPROV SHOW: Improv comedy in the style of “Whose Line Is It Anyway?”; $8; 8-10 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-

728-1237 or www.bendimprovgroup.com. NEW YEAR’S EVE BASH: Featuring a performance by The Show, refreshments and more; proceeds benefit the Heart of Oregon Corps; $35; 8 p.m.; Century Center, 70 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; www.bendliveandlocal.com. ONE STOP ALE TRAIL TOUR: Taste samples of local beers and rate them; proceeds benefit The Shepherd’s House and Bethlehem Inn; $30; 8-10 p.m.; Old Mill Brew Werks, 384 S.W. Upper Terrace Drive, Bend; 541-633-7670. NEW YEAR’S EVE PARTY: Featuring a performance by the Out of the Blue Band, with refreshments; $60; 8:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m.; Pronghorn Resort, 65600 Pronghorn Club Drive, Bend; 541-693-5300. NEW YEAR’S EVE PARTY: Featuring a performance by Bobby Lindstrom; free; 8:30 p.m.midnight; Niblick and Greene’s, 7535 Falcon Crest Drive #100, Redmond; 541-548-4220. NEW YEAR’S EVE BONFIRE ON THE SNOW: Wanderlust Tours leads a short snowshoe hike to a bonfire and hand-carved snow amphitheater in the forest; a naturalist shares facts about the forest, animals and the night sky; reservations required; trips depart from Sunriver and Bend; $85; 9 p.m.-1:30 a.m.; 541-389-8359 or www. wanderlusttours.com. NEW YEAR’S EVE CELEBRATION: Featuring a performance by Mosley Wotta and the Eric Tollefson Band; free, $10 for Mosley Wotta; 9 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www. mcmenamins.com. NEW YEAR’S EVE CONCERT: Featuring a performance by Bellavia and a champagne toast; 9 p.m.-midnight; Crave Eclectic Fine Dining, 614 N.W. Cedar Ave., Redmond; 541-504-6006. NEW YEAR’S EVE CONCERT: Featuring performances by Subliminal and Broken Down Guitars; $5 suggested donation; 9 p.m.-2 a.m.; M & J Tavern, 102 N.W. Greenwood, Bend; 541-4082599 or www.reverbnation.com/subliminaltribute. NEW YEAR’S EVE CONCERT: Featuring a performance by The Pitchfork Revolution; $10; 9 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; 541-728-0879. NEW YEAR’S EVE CONCERT: Featuring performances by Empty Space Orchestra, Oh Sugoi! and Your Birthday; $5 plus fees in advance, $7 at the door; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541388-8331 or www.silvermoonbrewing.com. NEW YEAR’S EVE CONCERT: Featuring a performance by Strive Roots; free admission for women, $5-$10 for men; 10 p.m.; The Astro Lounge, 939 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-388-0116.

SUNDAY Jan. 1 POLAR BEAR PLUNGE: Take an icy plunge into the Lodge Village’s outdoor pool; hot chocolate served; free; 10 a.m.; Sunriver Resort, 17600

Center Drive; 800-486-8591 or www.sunriverresort.com/traditions. TERRIBLE BUTTONS: The Washington-based folk band performs, with Willy Tea Taylor; $5; 8 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; 541-728-0879 or www. reverbnation.com/venue/thehornedhand. (Story, Page 4)

MONDAY Jan. 2 NO EVENTS LISTED.

TUESDAY Jan. 3 GREEN TEAM MOVIE NIGHT: Featuring a screening of “Whaledreamers,” which explores the connection between whales and humanity; free; 6:30-8:15 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend; 541-815-6504. MATSIKO WORLD ORPHANS’ CHOIR: The choir of orphaned children from Peru and Liberia performs; free; 7 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend; 541-548-1299 or www. icnchildren.net.

WEDNESDAY Jan. 4 “THE METROPOLITAN OPERA: RODELINDA”: Starring Renee Fleming, Stephanie Blythe, Andreas Scholl, Iestyn Davies, Kobie van Rensburg and Shenyang in an encore presentation of Handel’s masterpiece; opera performance transmitted in high definition; $18; 6:30 p.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347.

THURSDAY Jan. 5 CLASSICAL FORM TO ROMANTIC INTENTIONS: Michael Gesme talks about how Beethoven took a simple idea and elevated it with “Pathetique Sonata”; free; 6:30 p.m.; East Bend Public Library, 62080 Dean Swift Road; 541-312-1032 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. TONY SMILEY: The Portland-based looping rocker performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. HOPELESS JACK & THE HANDSOME DEVIL: The Portland-based blues band performs; $2-$5; 8 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; 541-728-0879 or www. reverbnation.com/venue/thehornedhand. (Story, Page 6) n SUBMIT AN EVENT at www.bendbulletin.com/submitinfo or email events@bendbulletin.com. Deadline is 10 days before publication. Questions? Contact 541-383-0351.


THE BULLETIN Y, DECEMBER 30, 2011• FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2011

GO! MAGAZINE •

dec. 30 - jan. 5 DON’T MISS ... NATURE AND THE PERFORMING ARTS TODAY If we get to see Romeo and Juliet as literal lovebirds, this will rock our world. Jim Anderson speaks at the 2009 event.

Courtesy Sue Anderson

SATURDAY Tour du Chocolate: Who wants to tow us to the aid stations?

ONE STOP ALE TRAIL TOUR SATURDAY Is it a trail if it only has one stop? Will it matter after your third pint? We ask the journalisty questions for you. Pete Erickson / The Bulletin file photo

SATURDAY New Year’s Eve events: The world may end in 2012. Here’s to not facing it sober.

POLAR BEAR PLUNGE SUNDAY That water’s too cold to bear. Participants dive in at last year’s event. Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin file photo

MATSIKO WORLD ORPHANS’ CHOIR TUESDAY Sounds good to us. The kids perform earlier this month in Easton, Wash. Submitted photo

THURSDAY Classical Form to Romantic Intentions: Our intentions are pure!

PAGE 17

LIVE MUSIC & MORE See Going Out on Page 7 for what’s happening at local night spots.


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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2011

planning ahead JAN. 6-12 JAN. 6 — FIRST FRIDAY GALLERY WALK: Event includes art exhibit openings, artist talks, live music, wine and food in downtown Bend and the Old Mill District; free; 5-9 p.m.; throughout Bend. JAN. 6 — “SECONDHAND LIONS”: A screening of the PG-rated 2003 film; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541-475-3351 or www.jcld.org. JAN. 6 — FEEDING FRENZY: The Fairbanks, Alaska-based folk rock band performs, with Blackflowers Blacksun; $5; 8 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend. JAN. 6 — LEFT COAST COUNTRY: The Portland-based string band performs; $7; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3888331 or www.silvermoonbrewing.com. JAN. 7-8 — “A. LINCOLN”: Steve Holgate presents a one-man show about Abraham Lincoln’s life; $15, $10 students; 7:30 p.m. Jan. 7, 2 p.m. Jan. 8; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www. cascadestheatrical.org. JAN. 7 — POLAR BEAR WALK/RUN: 5K and 10K races; proceeds benefit St. Thomas Academy; $15 in advance, $25 day of race; 10 a.m.; Sam Johnson Park, Southwest 15th Street, Redmond; 541548-3785 or www.redmondacademy. com. JAN. 7 — MATSIKO WORLD ORPHANS’ CHOIR: The choir of orphaned children from Peru and Liberia performs; free; 11 a.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.icnchildren.net. JAN. 7 — “PINK FLOYD, THE WALL”: A screening of the film based on the 1979 album; $10; 8 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. JAN. 7 — MATT HOPPER: The Boise, Idaho-based psychedelic rocker performs, with Eric Tollefson; $7 plus fees in advance, $10 at the door; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www.silvermoonbrewing.com. JAN. 8 — MATSIKO WORLD ORPHANS’ CHOIR: The choir of orphaned children from Peru and Liberia performs; free; 10:15 a.m.; First Baptist Church, 60 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-382-3862 or www.icnchildren.net. JAN. 8 — FIDDLERS JAM: Listen or dance at the Oregon Old Time Fiddlers Jam; donations accepted; 1-3:30 p.m.; VFW Hall, 1836 S.W. Veterans Way, Redmond; 541-447-7395. JAN. 8 — LET’S TALK ABOUT IT KICK OFF: Begin the reading and discussion series “Let’s Talk About It — Making Sense of the Civil War” with music, previews and presentations; free; 2 p.m.;

Courtesy Ken Howard / Metropolitan Opera

Rene Pape stars as Mephistopheles in “The Metropolitan Opera: Faust.” Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1032 or www. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. JAN. 10 — MATSIKO WORLD ORPHANS’ CHOIR: The choir of orphaned children from Peru and Liberia performs; free; 11 a.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-382-4321 or www.icnchildren. net. JAN. 10 — THE GALT LINE: The Poolesville, Md.-based Americana band performs; $2-$5; 8 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; www.reverbnation. com/venue/thehornedhand. JAN. 11 — “THE METROPOLITAN OPERA: FAUST”: Starring Marina Poplavskaya, Michele Losier, Jonas Kaufmann, Russell Braun and Rene Pape in an encore presentation of Gounod’s masterpiece; opera performance transmitted in high definition; $18; 6:30 p.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347. JAN. 11 — CAS HALEY: The Austin, Texas-based singer songwriter performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. JAN. 12 — GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “Slaughterhouse-five” by Kurt Vonnegut; free; noon; Downtown Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7089 or www. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. JAN. 12 — GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “The Sun Also Rises”

by Ernest Hemingway; bring a lunch; free; noon; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1055 or www. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. JAN. 12 — PICKWICK: The Seattle-based indie-soul band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com.

JAN. 13-19 JAN. 13-15, 18-19 — “THE WHO’S TOMMY”: 2nd Street Theater presents the rock opera about a catatonic boy who becomes a pinball superstar; $20 via website, $22 at the door; 7:30 p.m. Jan. 13-14 and Jan. 18-19, 3 p.m. Jan. 15; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626, 2ndstreettheater@ gmail.com or www.2ndstreettheater.com. JAN. 13-14 — JAZZ AT THE OXFORD: Featuring a performance by drummer Mel Brown and his band; $30 plus fees in advance; 8 p.m. both days and 5 p.m. Jan. 14; The Oxford Hotel, 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-382-8436 or www. oxfordhotelbend.com. JAN. 14-15 — NIGHT SKY VIEWING: View the night sky; with a slide presentation; $6, $4 ages 2-12, free nature center members; 8-10 p.m.; Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory, 57245 River Road; 541-593-4394. JAN. 14 — “PERVASIVE INVASIVES” EXHIBIT OPENS: Explore plants, animals and insects brought to the High Desert and how they affect the environment;

Talks & classes AWARENESS TRAINING: Develop awareness of who and what you are; donations requested; 9 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Saturday and noon-5:30 p.m. Sunday; Rosie Bareis Community Campus, 1010 N.W. 14th St., Bend; 541-389-4523 to RSVP. KIDS IN THE KITCHEN COOKING CLASS: Children learn to make macaroni and cheese, salad and baked apples; registration required by Jan. 6; $65 for adult and child, $25 per additional child; 11 a.m. Jan. 8; register for Bend location; www.welltraveledfork.com or 541-312-0097. ENGRAVING ON PLEXIGLASS: Learn to prepare plates, select imagery and more; $60 plus $35 studio fee; 12:30-3 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays, Jan. 9-18; Atelier 6000, 389 S.W. Scalehouse Court, Suite 120, Bend; 541-330-8759. exhibit runs through June 30; included in the price of admission; $10 adults, $9 ages 65 and older, $6 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www. highdesertmuseum.org.

JAN. 14 — “THIS IS SPINAL TAP”: A screening of the hard rock mockumentary; $10; 8 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. JAN. 14 — LJ BOOTH AND CHRIS KOKESH: The folk musicians perform; $15 suggested donation; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; HarmonyHouse, 17505 Kent Road, Sisters; 541-548-2209. JAN. 16 — GALA AT THE RIVERHOUSE: Featuring a meal, silent auction and a presentation by Olympic gold medalist Rulon Gardner; proceeds benefit Grandma’s House; $125; 5:30 p.m.; The Riverhouse Hotel & Convention Center, 3075 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-3833515 or www.riverhouse.com/gala. JAN. 17 — HIGH DESERT CHAMBER MUSIC — HIGHLAND QUARTET: String musicians play selections of chamber music; $35, $10 children and students; 7:30 p.m.; The Oxford Hotel, 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-306-3988, info@highdesertchambermusic.com or www.highdesertchambermusic.com. JAN. 17 — DICK DALE BAND: The surf guitar musician performs, with Shade 13; ages 21 and older; $20 plus fees in advance, $25 at the door; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; www. randompresents.com. JAN. 19 — ANTHONY B: The reggae act performs; $20 plus fees in advance, $25 at the door; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; www.randompresents.com.


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2011

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PAGE 19

restaurants

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

King Buffet in Bend has multiple buffet counters with a wide variety of food.

It’s a royal disappointment • Uneven quality plagues King Buffet’s Chinese-American cuisine By John Gottberg Anderson For The Bulletin

“I

don’t need to eat any more,” said my dining companion after her second plate of food at King Buffet. “But I could hardly call it satisfying.” My reaction to the all-you-can-eat Chinese-American restaurant, on Third Street in northeast Bend, was much the same. There’s always a lot of food here, and it’s easy to fill up at a low price — but the quality is very uneven. In general, it’s mediocre; some dishes can be tasty, but others I will never try again. The problem with buffet restaurants is the difficulty of keeping food fresh in the tray pans, which often sit atop a reservoir of simmering

water. The food may be good when prepared, but the longer it sits on the buffet, the more it continues to cook. The lesson here is to look for food that has been freshly delivered to the buffet from the kitchen. A case in point at the King Buffet was a tray of steamed salmon presented in the dinner selection of more than 50 items. When I tried to cut a piece off with a serving fork, I wasn’t even able to penetrate the fish. So I passed on it. But steamed sole offered at a subsequent lunch was pretty good.

Lunch and dinner Dinners at King Buffet are priced at $11.99, with reduced rates for children. Lunches cost $7.99. Having re-

cently dined once at each mealtime, I didn’t notice a lot of difference between the two. When I asked the hostess if she could tell me the difference, she indicated that the evening meal offered more seafood. But that wasn’t evident. Even at midday, the buffet featured rubbery squid, mussels cloaked in heavy cheese, unexceptional clams and steamed baby octopi with their heads intact. One item that should have been constant at both meals was rice — steamed white rice and seasoned fried rice. At dinner, however, the small grains were dry and overcooked. Both were better at my lunchtime visit. Continued next page

King Buffet

Contact: 541-388-2988

Location: 2000 N.E. Third St., Bend Hours: 10:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. Sunday to Thursday, 10:30 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday Price range: Adult lunch $7.99, dinner $11.99; reduced prices for children Credit cards: Discover, MasterCard, Visa Kids’ menu: Same buffet at lower prices Vegetarian menu: Salads and various Chinese dishes Alcoholic beverages: No Outdoor seating: No Reservations: No

Scorecard OVERALL: C+ Food: C. Dishes are rapidly overcooked in buffet trays, and fresh quality is inconsistent. Service: B+. Servers offer beverages and quickly clear plates when diners rise for more food. Atmosphere: C. Dining room is large, bright and lacking in any particular character. Value: B. The all-you-caneat price would be very reasonable if the meal were of higher quality.


PAGE 20 • GO! MAGAZINE

SCREAMIN’ DEALS! KILLER COUPONS!

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EACH WEEK

From previous page A half-dozen young servers provide service at the alcoholfree restaurant, cheerfully offering hot tea and soft drinks, and quickly clearing used plates when diners rise for a second (or third) helping from the buffet. The dining room is large, bright and lacking in any particular character. It seats nearly 100 people at booths and tables, with a large mirror along one wall making it look even bigger than it is.

Soup and salad I knew I was in for a dining adventure when I surveyed the salad bar and discovered that a clump of packaged peas and carrots were still

restaurants frozen together. But that salad bar, with a centerpiece of crispy iceberg lettuce, was one of the better offerings at King Buffet. Many of the items were fresh and in no danger of overcooking. Servings of coleslaw and artificial crab salad (with green peppers) were decent. I found the small, chilled peel-and-eat shrimp to be mushy, however, and a macaroni salad was too heavy with mayonnaise. Hot-and-sour soup — with tofu, fungi, bean sprouts and carrots — was one of my favorite items. And the crab Rangoon puffs, filled with artificial crab and cream cheese, were only lightly fried and were very tasty.

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2011

Hot dishes

Next week: Red Rooster Restaurant Visit www.bendbulletin .com/restaurants for readers’ ratings of more than 150 Central Oregon restaurants.

But spring rolls (filled with cabbage) and pot stickers (with minced pork) both were very doughy and not items I’d recommend. And a small choice of dim sum was abominable, particularly “shu mai” pork dumplings, which clearly were not freshly made.

There were several hot dishes that I liked. Long green beans were perfectly seasoned and properly cooked at both of my meals. Fresh button mushrooms were served in a tangy sauce. Skewered peanut chicken was tender and good. A chicken-and-shrimp stirfry with mixed vegetables was excellent. A sign designated it as “spicy,” and there was truth in advertising. Sliced pepper steak, with green peppers and onions, was fine. But a portion of barbecued pork with sweet-andsour sauce was as chewy as jerky. Sweet-and-sour chicken was decent, as the batter was not too heavy. But another chicken dish, a stir-fry with broccoli, was fatty and overcooked. And fried chicken wings, normally one of my guilty pleasures, were so badly overdone that I threw them aside after one attempted bite. They were better the second time around, at lunch, but only just barely. A crab casserole contained large chunks of cheese that were almost indistinguishable from the seafood. The buffet also carried a few items for the kids: decent pepperoni pizza, for instance, and a tray of frozen french fries.

Dining options Off to the side of the buffet were a Mongolian grill and a sushi bar. But on neither of my visits did I see anyone attending them, nor did I see anyone asking for service there. I did try one bit of sushi, which I pulled out from under a sheet of plastic wrap. It was

made with tuna salad rolled into dry rice and was nearly inedible. A large dessert table offered eight kinds of fruit, some of it fresh, much of it (including sliced peaches and pears) from a can. The tapioca pudding was pretty good, especially with macaroons. Several cakes were also offered, as well as warm apple pie and hot malasadas, Portuguese pastries popular in Hawaii. If you want to dine at King, I’d suggest having a late lunch, calling it dinner, and saving $4 per person. If you do visit during the dinner hour, try to make it an early dinner. After 8 p.m., the buffet trays are likely to be left without fresh replacements. But keep in mind the parting words of my dining companion: “It feels like the most unhealthy meal I’ve had in ages,” she said. “And I’ve been to McDonald’s.” — Reporter: janderson@ bendbulletin.com

SMALL BITES The Ale House by Brother Jon’s is planning a January opening in downtown Bend. John Machell, co-owner of Brother Jon’s Public House on Northwest Galveston Avenue, said the new restaurant will occupy the corner of Bond Street and Greenwood Avenue previously held by the Bond Street Grill and the Decoy Bar & Grill. He said it will offer live music and a different menu than the Galveston location, which opened in mid-2009. www.brotherjons publichouse.com.

FIND YOUR FAVORITE BLEND LOCALLY AT THESE FINE STORES:

A Sustainable Cup Drink it up!

www.strictlyorganic.com Café & Roastery– 6 SW Bond @ Arizona Coffee Bar – 450 Powerhouse Dr. @ the Old Mill


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2011

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PAGE 21

out of town The following is a list of other events “Out of Town.”

Bluegrass princess Mandolin virtuoso, singer and songwriter Sierra Hull is scheduled to perform at the RiverCity Music Festival. Courtesy Gregg Delman

• Mandolinist Sierra Hull headlines RiverCity Music Festival By Jenny Wasson The Bulletin

A

s a mandolin virtuoso, singer and songwriter, Sierra Hull is a triple threat in the bluegrass world. Already a seasoned veteran at the tender age of 20, Hull is currently on tour promoting her new album, “Daybreak.” Accompanied by her band Highway 111, Hull is one of the headliners at the RiverCity Music Festival. Held at the Red Lion On the River, the festival runs Jan. 6-8 in the Jantzen Beach area of Portland. A child prodigy on the mandolin, Hull began gaining recognition in bluegrass circles at the age of 10 with her first instrumental album “Angel Mountain,” according to a news release. At 11, she performed with Alison Krauss at the iconic Grand Ole Opry. She released her first album with Rounder Records at the age of 16, titled “Secrets.” Her second album with Rounder, “Daybreak,” features 12 tracks including seven originals written by Hull. According to Country Weekly, “Sierra Hull’s latest offering showcases a voice that combines the

sweet, pristine phrasing of Carrie Underwood with the ethereal vocal quality of Alison Krauss and a fleet-fingered mandolin style reminiscent of Rhonda Vincent’s.” At RiverCity, Hull is scheduled to perform at 3 p.m. Jan. 7 and noon Jan. 8 on the main stage. She will also teach a workshop at 11:30 a.m. Jan. 7. Now in its seventh year, the RiverCity Music Festival features 14 national acts, two large stages, workshops and abundant opportunities for jamming. The 2012 lineup includes Tommy Emmanuel, Steep Canyon Rangers, Hot Club of Cowtown and The Travelin’ McCourys. Weekend passes for the festival are $130. Daily tickets are also available: $35 for Friday, $55 for Saturday and $45 for Sunday. Children under 12 are admitted free and tickets for youth (ages 12 to 17) are $12 per day. To purchase tickets, visit www.brown papertickets.com or contact 800-838-3006. For more information on the RiverCity Music Festival, visit www.rivercitybluegrass.com. — Reporter: 541-383-0350, jwasson@bendbulletin.com

CONCERTS Through Dec. 31 — Leftover Salmon, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* Dec. 30 — Floater, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; CT* Dec. 30 — Jerry Joseph & Jackmormons/The Minus 5, Mississippi Studios, Portland; www.mississippistudios.com or 503-288-3895. Dec. 31 — Marv Ellis & The Platform/ Reeble Jar, McDonald Theatre, Eugene; TW* Dec. 31 — Quarterflash, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Dec. 31 — Reverend Horton Heat, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; CT* Jan. 6-8 — RiverCity Music Festival, Jantzen Beach; www.brownpaper tickets.com, 800-838-3006. Jan. 7 — Ace Hood, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* Jan. 13 — VibeSquaD/Kraddy, McDonald Theatre, Eugene; TW* Jan. 14 — Appetite for Deception, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Jan. 14 — Hell’s Belles, McDonald Theatre, Eugene; TW* Jan. 14 — Infected Mushroom, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* Jan. 14 — Ray Charles Tribute, The Ross Ragland Theater, Klamath Falls; www.rrtheater.org or 541-884-5483. Jan. 17 — The Wailers, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; CT* Jan. 21 — Alasdair Fraser & Natalie Haas, The Shedd Institute, Eugene; www.theshedd.org or 541-434-7000. Jan. 21 — Jake Shimabukuro, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Jan. 23 — NoFX, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* Jan. 24 — Fitz and the Tantrums, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* Jan. 25 — Beats Antique, McDonald Theatre, Eugene; TW* Jan. 26 — Judy Collins, Craterian Ginger Rogers Theater, Medford; www. craterian.org or 541-779-3000. Jan. 27 — Beats Antique, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; CT* Jan. 27 — Martin Sexton, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Jan. 27 — The Sugar Beets, The Shedd Institute, Eugene; www. theshedd.org or 541-434-7000. Jan. 27 — Three 6 Mafia, Roseland Theater, Portland; DATE CHANGE FROM DEC. 16; TW* Jan. 27-28 — Martin Sexton, Aladdin

Theater, Portland; TM* Jan. 28 — The Coats, The Ross Ragland Theater, Klamath Falls; www. rrtheater.org or 541-884-5483. Jan. 28 — moe., McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; CT* Jan. 29 — Danny Barnes, Lola’s Room, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; CT* Jan. 29 — moe., McDonald Theatre, Eugene; TW* Jan. 31 — Hieroglyphics, WOW Hall, Eugene; www.wowhall.org or 541-687-2746. Feb. 1 — In Flames, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* Feb. 1 — O.A.R., McDonald Theatre, Eugene; TW* Feb. 2 — O.A.R., Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* Feb. 2 — Soul Salvation: Featuring Ruthie Foster and Paul Thorn; Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Feb. 2 — Wood Brothers, WOW Hall, Eugene; www.wowhall.org or 541-687-2746. Feb. 2, 5 — The Emerald City Jazz Kings, The Shedd Institute, Eugene; www.theshedd.org or 541-434-7000. Feb. 3 — Mark Hummel’s Blues Harmonica Blowout, The Shedd Institute, Eugene; www.theshedd.org or 541-434-7000. Feb. 3 — Wilco, Hult Center, Eugene; www.hultcenter.org or 541-682-5000. Feb. 3 — The Wood Brothers, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Feb. 4 — John Cruz, The Shedd Institute, Eugene; www.theshedd.org or 541-434-7000. Feb. 4 — Excision, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* Feb. 4 — Mark Hummel’s Blues Harmonica Blowout, Craterian Ginger Rogers Theater, Medford; www. craterian.org or 541-779-3000. Feb. 6 — Excision, McDonald Theatre, Eugene; TW* Feb. 7 — The Jayhawks, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* Feb. 8 — The Jayhawks, McDonald Theatre, Eugene; TW* Feb. 8 — Wilco, Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; SOLD OUT; TM* Feb. 8 — Willie K, The Shedd Institute, Eugene; www.theshedd.org or 541-434-7000. Feb. 9 — Judy Collins, The Shedd Institute, Eugene; www.theshedd.org or 541-434-7000. Feb. 10 — Brad Paisley/The Band Perry/Scotty McCreery, Matthew Knight Arena, Eugene; TW*

Continued next page


PAGE 22 • GO! MAGAZINE From previous page Feb. 11 — Matthew Good/Emily Greene, Mississippi Studios, Portland; www.mississippistudios. com or 503-288-3895. Feb. 13 — Dr. Dog, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; CT* Feb. 14 — Chali 2na/Miss Erica Dee, Lola’s Room, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; CT* Feb. 14 — Hot Buttered Rum, WOW Hall, Eugene; www.wowhall. org or 541-687-2746.

out of town Jan. 13 — Suzanne Westenhoefer, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Jan. 14 — “Kabuki Workshop”: Led by Laurence R. Kominz; in correlation with the exhibit, “The Artist’s Touch, The Craftsman’s Hand’; Portland Art Museum, Portland; www. portlandartmuseum.org or 503-226-2811. Jan. 18 — Jeff Ross, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM*

LECTURES & COMEDY

Jan. 21 — Mythbusters — Behind the Myths: Live stage show starring Jamie Hyneman and Adam Savage; Keller Auditorium, Portland; TM*

Jan. 7 — Stephanie Miller, Newmark Theatre, Portland; TM* Jan. 12 — Gabriel Iglesias, Hult Center, Eugene; www.hultcenter. org or 541-682-5000. Jan. 13 — Gabriel Iglesias, Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; TM*

Jan. 22 — “Claiming a Place in the Modern World: Japanese Prints in the 20th Century”: Lecture by Donald Jenkins; in correlation with the exhibit, “The Artist’s Touch, The Craftsman’s Hand’; Portland Art Museum, Portland; www.portlandartmuseum.org or 503-226-2811.

Jan. 27 — Demetri Martin, Newmark Theatre, Portland; TM* Jan. 28 — Demetri Martin, McDonald Theatre, Eugene; TW* Jan. 28 — Paula Poundstone, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Feb. 3 — Paula Poundstone, Rogue Theatre, Grants Pass; TM* Feb. 7 — The Moth, Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; TM* Feb. 11 — Sinbad, Craterian Ginger Rogers Theater, Medford; www. craterian.org or 541-779-3000.

SYMPHONY & OPERA Through Dec. 30-31 — “Carmen”: Eugene Opera; Hult Center, Eugene; www.hultcenter.org or 541-682-5000. Jan. 7 — “Passing the Baton — Kelly Kuo Conducts”: Oregon Mozart Players; Hult Center,

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2011

Eugene; www.hultcenter.org or 541-682-5000. Jan. 14-16 — Joshua Bell: With the Oregon Symphony; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; www.orsymphony.org or 800-228-7343. Jan. 19 — “Piazzolla’s Four Seasons”: Eugene Symphony; Hult Center, Eugene; www.hultcenter. org or 541-682-5000. Jan. 21-22 — “Haydn’s Creation”: Oregon Symphony; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; www.orsymphony.org or 800-228-7343. Jan. 22 — “Disney in Concert — Magical Music From the Movies”: Eugene Symphony; Hult Center, Eugene; www.hultcenter. org or 541-682-5000. Jan. 27 — “The Music of ABBA”: Oregon Symphony; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; www.orsymphony.org or 800-228-7343.

Feb. 4, 6 — “Jackiw Plays Bruch”: Oregon Symphony; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; www.orsymphony.org or 800-228-7343. Feb. 11-12 — “A Tribute to Benny Goodman”: Oregon Symphony; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; www.orsymphony.org or 800-228-7343. Feb. 14 — “A Natalie Cole Valentine”: Oregon Symphony; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; www.orsymphony.org or 800-228-7343. Feb. 18-19 — “Kahane Plays Mozart”: Oregon Symphony; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; www.orsymphony.org or 800-228-7343. Feb. 26 — “Castles and Wizards”: Children’s Concert; Oregon Symphony; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; www.orsymphony.org or 800-228-7343. March 3-5 — “Dvorak’s Slavonic Dances”: Oregon Symphony; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; www.orsymphony.org or 800-228-7343.

THEATER & DANCE Through Dec. 31 — “The Santaland Diaries”: Portland Center Stage; Gerding Theater at the Armory, Portland; www.pcs. org or 503-445-3700. Jan. 3-8 — “West Side Story,” Keller Auditorium, Portland; TM* Jan. 7-8 — “My Fair Lady,” Hult Center, Eugene; www.hultcenter. org or 541-682-5000. Jan. 10-Feb. 5 — “The North Plan”: World premiere of comedy by Jason Wells; Portland Center Stage; Gerding Theater at the Armory, Portland; www.pcs.org or 503-445-3700. Jan. 13-Feb. 4 — “The Real Thing”: Comedy by Tom Stoppard; Lord Leebrick Theatre, Eugene; www.lordleebrick.org or 541-465-1506. Jan. 15 — “ZooZoo,” Craterian Ginger Rogers Theater, Medford; www.craterian.org or 541-779-3000. Jan. 19-29 — Fertile Ground: A city-wide festival of new works; featuring 17 fully produced theatrical world premieres and 14 dance world premieres as well as workshops, staged readings, readings and other events; Portland; www.fertilegroundpdx. org. Jan. 20 — Disney’s Phineas and Ferb LIVE, Memorial Coliseum, Portland; www.rosequarter.com or 877-789-7673.


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2011

Jan. 28 — Hal Holbrook as Mark Twain Tonight!, Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; TM* Jan. 31-April 8 — “Shakespeare’s Amazing Cymbeline”: A new adaptation by Chris Coleman featuring five actors and a pianist; Portland Center Stage; Gerding Theater at the Armory, Portland; www.pcs.org or 503-445-3700. Feb. 3 — New Shanghai Circus, The Ross Ragland Theater, Klamath Falls; www. rrtheater.org or 541-884-5483. Feb. 8 — Drum Tao, Craterian Ginger Rogers Theater, Medford; www.craterian.org or 541-779-3000. Feb. 14-19 — “Beauty and the Beast,” Keller Auditorium, Portland; TM* Feb. 15 — “Damn Yankees”: Tony Award winner; Craterian Ginger Rogers Theater, Medford; www.craterian.org or 541-779-3000. Feb. 21-March 18 — “Red”: Intense biodrama of the renowned modern artist Mark Rothko; Portland Center Stage; Gerding Theater at the Armory, Portland; www.pcs. org or 503-445-3700. March 3 — “Man 1, Bank 0”: Patrick Combs’ award-winning, off-Broadway show; The Ross Ragland Theater, Klamath Falls; www. rrtheater.org or 541-884-5483. March 14-April 8 — “Wicked,” Keller Auditorium, Portland; TM* March 15 — “Rain: A Tribute to the Beatles”: A multi-media tribute to the Beatles; Craterian Ginger Rogers Theater, Medford; www.craterian.org or 541-779-3000..

EXHIBITS Through Dec. 31 — Museum of Natural and Cultural History: The following exhibits are currently on display: “Face to Face with Masks from the Museum Collections” (through Dec. 31), “SQ3Tsya’yay: Weaver’s Spirit Power” (through Jan. 29) and “We are Still Here — Gordon Bettles and the Many Nations Longhouse” (through June 2012); University of Oregon, Eugene; http://natural-history. uoreong.edu or 541-346-3024. Through Dec. 31 — “Project Mah Jongg”: Exhibit on the game of mah jongg; Oregon Jewish Museum, Portland; www.ojm.org or 503-226-3600. Through Dec. 31 — Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art: The following exhibits are on display: “Xiaoze Zie: Amplified Moments, 1993-2008” (through Dec. 31), “East-West, Visually Speaking” (through Jan. 15), “Beyond the Demos VI: Oregon Artists Who Teach” (through Jan. 30), “Selections from Joe Sacco’s Safe Area Gorazde: The War in Eastern Bosnia 1992-1995” (through Feb. 5) and “Birds and Flowers” (through April 1); Eugene; jsma.uoregon.edu or 541-346-3027. Through Dec. 31 — “The Forest Through the Eye of a Forester”: Featuring 65 photographs of Croatian forests; World Forestry Center Discovery Museum, Portland; www. worldforestry.org or 503-228-1367. Through January — “I Dig Dinosaurs!”: Featuring hands-on cast specimens; Science Factory, Eugene; www.sciencefactory.org or 541-682-7888.

out of town

Through Jan. 1 — Portland Art Museum: The following exhibits are currently on display: “APEX: Adam Sorensen” (through Jan. 1), “The Artist’s Touch, The Craftsman’s Hand: Three Centuries of Japanese Prints From the Portland Art Museum” (through Jan. 22), “The Fragrance of Orchids” (through Feb. 12) and “Manuel Izquierdo: A Marvelous Bequest” (through March 4); Portland; www.portlandartmuseum.org or 503-226-2811. Through Jan. 1 — ZooLights, Oregon Zoo, Portland; www.oregonzoo.org or 503-226-1561. Through Jan. 22 — “LEGO Castle Adventure,” Portland Children’s Museum, Portland; www.portlandcm.org or 503-223-6500. Through Jan. 29 — “Titian’s La Bella”: Painting by one of the most celebrated artist of Renaissance Venice; Portland Art Museum, Portland; www.portlandartmuseum.org or 503-226-2811. Through Feb. 25 — Museum of Contemporary Craft: The following exhibits are on display: “Studio H: Design. Build. Transform.” (through Feb. 25), “75 Gifts for 75 Years” (through Feb. 25) and “Northwest Modern: Revisiting the Annual Ceramic Exhibitions of 1950-64” (through Feb. 25); Museum of Contemporary Craft: Portland; www.museumofcontemporarycraft.org or 503-223-2654. Through March 4 — “Gunther von Hagens’ BODY WORLDS & The Brain”: Featuring more than 200 authentic human specimens; Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, Portland; www.omsi.edu or 800-955-6674. Jan. 17-March 24 — Xylor Jane and B. Wurtz, Pacific Northwest College of Art, Portland; www.pnca.edu or 503-226-4391. Jan. 27-28 — “Stitches in Bloom” Quilt Show, The Oregon Garden, Silverton; www. oregongarden.org or 503-874-8100.

MISCELLANY Through Jan. 1 — Winter Whale Watch Week, various locations on Oregon Coast; www.whalespoken.org or 800-551-6949. Dec. 31 — New Year’s Eve at the Oregon Garden Resort, Oregon Garden Resort, Silverton; www.oregongardenresort.org or 503-874-2500. Jan. 20-22 — ChocolateFest, Oregon Convention Center, Portland; www. chocolatefest.org or 503-228-1367. Jan. 21-22 — Chemult Sled Dog Races, Walt Haring Sno-Park, Chemult; www. sleddogchemult.org or 541-593-9884. Feb. 23-26 — Newport Seafood and Wine Fest, Newport; www.newportchamber.org or 800-262-7844. Feb. 25 — Harlem Globetrotters, Rose Garden, Portland; www.rosequarter.com or 877-789-7673. March 22-24 — Northwest Horse Fair and Expo, Linn Co. Fair & Expo Center, Albany; www.equinepromotions.net or 765-655-2107. March 24 — Nuclear Cowboys: Cast of freestyle motocross riders; Rose Garden, Portland; www. rosequarter.com or 877-789-7673.

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PAGE 24 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2011

movies

BEST FILMS OF 2011 “HUGO”

“A SEPARATION”

“THE TREE OF LIFE” The Associated Press

The Associated Press

Courtesy Paramount Pictures

Film critic Roger Ebert names his top 20 movies of the year, but do you agree with his choices?

M

aking lists is not my favorite occupation. They inevitably inspire only reader complaints. Not once have I ever heard from a reader that my list was just fine and they liked it. Yet an annual Best 10 List is apparently a statutory obligation for movie critics. Here’s mine. It is actually a Best 20 List. My best guess is that between six and 10 of these movies won’t be familiar. Those are the most useful titles for you, especially in these days when they are all available via On Demand, or soon will be. The best use for Best Lists is to get viewing ideas.

1. ‘A Separation’ This Iranian film won’t open in Chicago until Jan. 27. It won the Golden Bear at Berlin and was just named the year’s Best Foreign Language Film by the New York Film Critics Circle. It is specifically Iranian, but I believe the more specific a film is about human experience, the more universal it is. On the other hand, movies “for everybody”

seem to be for nobody in particular. This film combines a plot worthy of a great novel with the emotional impact of a great melodrama. It involves a struggle for child custody, the challenge of a parent with Alzheimer’s, the intricacies of the law and the enigma of discovering the truth. In its reconstruction of several versions of a significant event, it is as baffling as “Rashomon.” A modern Iranian couple considers emigrating to Europe to find better opportunities for their daughter. The mother wants to leave quickly. The father delays because his father has Alzheimer’s and needs care. “Your father no longer knows you!” his wife says during a hearing in divorce court. “But I know him!” says her husband. A caregiver is hired but cannot come, and his wife secretly substitutes for him. It’s against her religious principles for her to touch any man not her husband, but her family needs the money. This leads to events that create a deep moral tangle. Asghar Farhadi’s real subject is truth, when it is disagreed about by

people we respect even though we know most of the facts. “A Separation” will become one of those enduring masterpieces watched decades from now. (PG-13)

ROGER EBERT

2. ‘Shame’ Michael Fassbender’s brave, uncompromising performance is at the center of Steve McQueen’s merciless film about sex addiction. He’s a loner with a good job who avoids relationships because of his obsession with sex. He is driven to experience multiple orgasms every day. His shame is masked in privacy. He wants no witnesses to his hookers, his pornography, his masturbation. Does he fear he is incapable of ordinary human contact? There isn’t the slightest suggestion he experiences pleasure. Sex is his cross to bear. The film opens with a close-up of Fassbender’s face showing pain, grief and anger. His character is having an orgasm. He is enduring a sexual function that has long since stopped giving him any pleasure and is self-abuse in the most profound way.

Carey Mulligan co-stars as his sister. She is as passionate and uninhibited as he is the opposite. She needs him desperately. He fears need. He flies at her in a rage, telling her to get out. She has nowhere to go. He doesn’t care. Childhood has damaged them. “Shame” is a great act of filmmaking and acting. I don’t believe I would be able to see it twice. (NC-17)

3. ‘The Tree of Life’ A film of vast ambition and deep humility, attempting no less than to encompass all of existence and view it through the prism of a few infinitesimal lives. Terrence Malick’s film begins with the Big Bang that created our universe, and ends after the characters have left the realm of time. In between, it zooms in on a moment,

surrounded by infinity. Scenes portray a childhood in a town in the American midlands, where life flows in and out through open windows. There is a father who maintains discipline and a mother who exudes forgiveness, and long summer days of play and idleness and urgent unsaid questions about the meaning of things. Three boys in the 1950s American Midwest are browned by the sun, scuffed by play, disturbed by glimpses of adult secrets, filled with a great urgency to grow up and discover who they are. Listen to an acute exchange of dialogue between the son, Jack (Hunter McCracken), and his father (Brad Pitt). “I was a little hard on you sometimes,” Mr. O’Brien says, and Jack replies: “It’s your house. You can do what you want to.” Jack is defending his father against himself. That’s how you grow up. And it all happens in this blink of a lifetime, surrounded by the realms of unimaginable time and space. (PG-13) Continued next page


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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2011

“THE DESCENDANTS”

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“THE ARTIST”

“HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: PART 2”

From previous page

4. ‘Hugo’ In the guise of a delightful 3D family film, Martin Scorsese makes a love letter to the cinema. His hero, Hugo (Asa Butterfield), had an uncle who was in charge of the clocks at a Parisian train station. His late father’s dream was to complete an automated man he found in a museum. Rather than be treated as an orphan, the boy hides himself in the maze of ladders, catwalks, passages and gears of the clockworks themselves, feeding himself with croissants snatched from station shops, and begins to sneak off to the movies. His life in the station is complicated by a toyshop owner named Georges Melies. Yes, this grumpy old man, played by Ben Kingsley, is none other than the immortal French film pioneer, who was also the original inventor of the automaton. Hugo has no idea of this. The real Melies was a magician who made his first movies to play tricks on his audiences. Without our quite realizing it, Hugo’s changing relationship with the old man becomes the story of the invention of the movies, and the preservation of our film heritage. Could anyone but Scorsese have made this subject so magical and enchanting? Although I believe that 3-D is usually an unnecessary annoyance, the way Scorsese employs it here is quite successful; in calling attention to itself, 3-D subtly calls attention to film itself. (PG)

5. ‘Take Shelter’ Curtis LaForche (Michael Shannon) appears to be a stable

The Associated Press

The Associated Press

husband and father with a good job in construction, but he also can evoke by his eyes and manner a deep unease. Curtis has what he needs to be happy. He fears he will lose it. His dreams are visited by unusually vivid nightmares: The family dog attacks him, or storms destroy his home. They live on the outskirts of town, in an area that is swept from time to time with tornadoes. Director Jeff Nichols builds his suspense carefully. Curtis is tormented but intelligent; fearing the family’s history of mental illness, he visits his schizophrenic mother (Kathy Baker) to ask if she was ever troubled by bad dreams. He turns to the area’s obviously inadequate public health facilities. And he also acts as if his warnings should be taken seriously. He borrows money from the bank and equipment from work to greatly expand an old storm shelter in his backyard. His wife (Jessica Chastain) is frightened by his behavior. His job and health insurance are threatened. People begin to talk. And then a storm comes. It leads to a searing scene in which the man and his wife must confront their fears about the weather — and about each other. (R)

rector, a Jamaican named Alrick Brown, establishes a vivid group of characters. A young couple from different tribes who are in love. The female head of a military unit trained in Uganda, hoping to bring peace. A Catholic priest. The Mufti of Rwanda. Most memorable, a small boy named Ishmael. Their personal stories are entangled in the ancient conflict between tribes, while the U.N. regards the genocide from afar. The title may put some people off. It is the name of the language both tribes speak, although the film is largely in English. (No MPAA rating.)

6. ‘Kinyarwanda’ I was moved by “Hotel Rwanda” (2004), but not really shaken this deeply. After seeing “Kinyarwanda,” I have a different kind of feeling about the genocide that took place in Rwanda in 1994. The film approaches it not as a story line but as a series of intense personal moments. In an independent film of great emotional impact, the film’s di-

7. ‘Drive’ The Driver drives for hire. He has no other name and no other life. When we meet him, he’s the wheelman for a getaway car, who runs from police pursuit not by speed, but by coolly exploiting the street terrain and outsmarting his pursuers. By day, he’s a stunt driver for action movies. The two jobs represent no conflict for him: He drives. He has no family, no history and seemingly few emotions. Whatever happened to him drove any personality deep beneath the surface. Played by Ryan Gosling, he is an existential hero, defined entirely by his behavior. The director, Nicolas Winding Refn, peoples his story with characters who bring lifetimes onto the screen — in contrast to the Driver, who brings as little as possible. Ron Perlman is a big-time operator working out of a pizzeria in a strip mall. Albert Brooks plays a producer of the kinds of B movies the Driver does stunt driving for; he also has a sideline

McClatchy-Tribune News Service

in crime. These people are ruthless. “Drive” looks like one kind of thriller in the ads, and it is that kind of thriller, but also another and a rebuke to most of the movies it looks like. (R)

8. ‘Midnight in Paris’ A fabulous daydream for American lit majors, Woody Allen’s charming comedy opens with a couple on holiday in Paris. Gil (Owen Wilson) and Inez (Rachel McAdams) are officially in love, but what Gil really loves is Paris in the springtime. He’s a hack screenwriter from Hollywood who still harbors the dream of someday writing a good novel and joining the pantheon of American writers whose ghosts seem to linger in the very air he breathes: Fitzgerald, Hemingway and the other legends of Paris in the 1920s. By (wisely) unexplained means, each midnight he finds himself magically transported back in time to the legendary salon presided over by Gertrude Stein. He meets Scott and Zelda, Ernest, Picasso, Dali, Cole Porter, Luis Bunuel and, yes, “Tom Eliot.” He even gives Bunuel the idea for his film “The Exterminating Angel.” Kathy Bates makes an authoritative Miss Stein, and Marion Cotillard plays Adriana, who has already been the mistress of Braque and Modigliani, is now Picasso’s lover, and may soon — be still, my heart! — fall in love with Gil. (PG-13)

9. ‘Le Havre’ Aki Kaurismaki is a Finnish director who makes dour, deadpan comedies about people who shrug their way through misfor-

tune. They have a hypnotic fascination for me. “Le Havre” is the sunniest film of his I’ve seen. Set in the French port city, it involves young Idrissa (Blondin Miguel), an illegal immigrant from Gabon, solemn, shy, appealing. The hero, Marcel Marx (Andre Wilms), fishing near a pier, sees the boy hiding waist-deep in the water. He leaves out some food and finds it gone the next day. And so, with no plan in mind, Marcel becomes in charge of protecting the boy from arrest. The whole neighborhood gets involved in hiding the boy from the port inspector. This involves low-key comedy that occasionally shifts into high, as with a local rock singer named Little Bob (Roberto Piazza), whose act is unlike any you have ever seen. Young Idrissa finds himself in the center of a miraculous episode between Marcel and his wife, which may not be believable but is certainly satisfying. (No MPAA rating.)

10. ‘The Artist’ What audacity to make a silent film in black and white in 2011, and what a film Michel Hazanavicius has made! Jean Dujardin won the best actor award at Cannes for his work as a silent star who is cast aside with the advent of the talkies. His career is rescued by a young dancer (Berenice Bejo) he was kind to when he was at the top. This wonderful film is many things: comedy, pathos, melodrama. For many people, this will be their introduction to silent movies and cause them to reconsider if they really dislike black and white. Continued next page


PAGE 26 • GO! MAGAZINE “TAKE SHELTER”

The Associated Press

From previous page It’s an audience pleaser, and many in the audience won’t be expecting that. It also seems to be leading the year-end lists of award nominees, and it could become the first silent film to win an Oscar as Best Picture since “Wings” (1927). (PG-13)

11. ‘Melancholia’ This film about the end of the world is, Lars von Trier assured us, his first with a happy ending. I think I see what he means. At least his poor characters need suffer no longer. If I were choosing a director to make a film about the subject, von Trier the gloomy Dane might be my first choice. The only other name that comes to mind is Werner Herzog’s. Both understand that at such a time, silly little romantic subplots take on a vast irrelevance. That’s even the case in “Melancholia,” which actually takes place at a wedding party for newlyweds. In the sky, another planet looms ever larger, but life carries on all the same here below. Kirsten Dunst is the new bride, and Charlotte Gainsbourg plays her sister. The two seem to exchange personalities. The details matter less than the grand overarching mood. (R)

12. ‘Terri’ Tells the story of a fat kid who is mocked in high school. Terri (Jacob Wysocki) is smart, gentle and instinctively wise. His decision to wear pajamas to school “because they fit” may be an indication that later in life he will amount to a great deal. He has character. He’s been missing a lot of school and is called in by the assistant principal

movies

“MARTHA MARCY MAY MARLENE”

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2011

“MIDNIGHT IN PARIS”

“DRIVE”

Courtesy Jody Lee Lipes

(John C. Reilly), a school administrator unlike those we usually see, offering kindness, anger and hardwon lessons learned in his own difficult life. He and Terri slowly begin to communicate person to person. Chad (Bridger Zadina) is another of the administrator’s problem children, a morose, slouching outsider driven to pluck hairs from his head. Heather (Olivia Crocicchia) is a pretty young student who is threatened with expulsion; Terri steps up and defends her in a way that shows he respects her and empathizes. He may be a kid who is fat and weird, but he’s much more than fat and weird. (R)

13. ‘The Descendants’ George Clooney in one of his best performances as a descendant of one of Hawaii’s first white land-owning families, who must decide whether to open up a vast tract of virgin forest on Kauai to tourist and condo development. This decision comes at the same time his wife has a boating accident and is in a coma. Having devoted most of his attention to business, he now must learn to be a single parent of two daughters while also dealing with the King family’s urgent desire to close the multimillion-dollar land deal. Leading the push for the King family is Cousin Hugh (Beau Bridges). As affable as Bridges can be, he doesn’t want to listen to any woo-woo Green nonsense about not selling. The film follows Clooney’s legal, family and emotional troubles in careful detail, until director Alexander Payne shows us, without forcing it, that they are all coiled together. We get VESTED in the lives of the

Courtesy Sony Pictures Classics

characters. We come to understand how they think, and care about what they decide about the substantial moral problems underlying the plot. (R)

14. ‘Margaret’ Kenneth Lonergan’s film begins with a young woman (Anna Paquin) thinking she may have contributed to a fatal bus accident through her own foolishness. She decides the bus driver (Mark Ruffalo) should also be held accountable, and makes it her business to see that he is. This story crosscuts with others, including Jean Reno and J. Smith-Cameron in a sweet midlife romance. The film inspired an online conspiracy theory when Fox Searchlight was accused of being shy about its 9/11 material. Actually, 9/11 figures only marginally; what’s important is the conflict between the young woman’s perfectionism and things as they are. (R)

15. ‘Martha Marcy May Marlene’ Those are four names that apply at various times in the life of a young woman played by Elizabeth Olsen. “Martha” is her name. “Marcy May” is the name given to her by the leader of a cult group she falls into. “Marlene” is the name all the women in the group use to answer the telephone. The cult leader is an evil and mesmeric figure played with great effect by John Hawkes. Her experience in the cult causes her confusion about her identity after she escapes into the relative safety of the home of her sister (Sarah Paulson). Sean Durkin’s film builds on the strong Elizabeth Olsen to

show how easily groups can control their members. (R)

16. ‘Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2’ The second installment in the last chapter of the legendary saga comes to a solid and satisfying conclusion, conjuring up enough awe and solemnity to serve as an appropriate finale and a dramatic contrast to the lighthearted (relative) innocence of “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone” all those magical years ago. (PG-13)

17. ‘Trust’ The bravest thing about David Schwimmer’s “Trust” is that it doesn’t try to simplify. It tells its story of a 14-year-old girl and a predatory pedophile as a series of repercussions in which rape is only the first, and possibly not the worst, tragedy to strike its naive and vulnerable victim. Liana Liberato stars as a “good girl” who isn’t advanced, who feels uncomfortable at a party where “popular girls” fake sophistication. She’s never had a boyfriend when she meets Charlie (Chris Henry Coffey) in an online chat room. Charlie is in high school. Like her, he plays volleyball. He’s a nice kid, too. He understands her. She grows closer to Charlie. They talk for hours on the phone. But Charlie is not what he seems. (R)

18. ‘Life, Above All’ This South African feature centers on a 12-year-old named Chanda (Khomotso Manyaka), who takes on the responsibility of holding her family together after her baby sister dies. Continued next page

Courtesy Bold Films

A few more cinematic delights There were many other excellent films in 2011, some fully the equal of some of these. Alphabetically: “13 Assassins” (no MPAA rating) “Beginners” (R) “Boy Wonder” (R) “Certified Copy” (no MPAA rating) “The Future” (R) “The Guard” (R) “Higher Ground” (R) “I Will Follow” (no MPAA rating) “J. Edgar” (R) “The Last Rites of Joe May” (no MPAA rating) “Le Quattro Volte” (no MPAA rating) “Margin Call” (R) “Meek’s Cutoff” (PG) “Moneyball” (PG-13) “Mysteries of Lisbon” (no MPAA rating) “My Week With Marilyn” (R) “The Princess of Montpensier” (no MPAA rating) “Rango” (PG) “Queen to Play” (no MPAA rating) “A Screaming Man” (no MPAA rating) “Silent Souls” (no MPAA rating) “Tyrannosaur” (no MPAA rating) “Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows” (PG-13) “The Whistleblower” (R) “Young Adult” (R)


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2011

From previous page Family members are suspected of having AIDS; the community ostracizes them, until a courageous neighbor finally steps in. An opening scene shows Chanda choosing a coffin for her baby sister. The seriousness and solemnity with which she performs this task is heartrending and heartwarming. Directed by Oliver Schmitz. (PG-13)

20. ‘Another Earth’ Joins “Melancholia” as a second 2011 film about a new planet hanging in our sky. This one doesn’t presage the end of the world, but represents perhaps the very same Earth, in another universe that has now become visible. Stars Brit Marling as Rhoda, a young woman who has been accepted into the astrophysics program at MIT. She hears the news about Earth 2. Peering out her car window to search the sky, she crashes into another car, killing a mother and child and sending the father into a coma. A few years pass. She’s released from prison and learns that the father, a composer named John Burroughs (William Mapother), has emerged from his coma. Rhoda is devastated by the deaths she caused and wants to apologize or make amends or … what? She doesn’t know. She presents herself at the shabby rural house where Burroughs lives as a depressed recluse. They grow closer. Did the accident not occur on Earth 2? (PG-13) — Roger Ebert is a film critic for The Chicago Sun-Times.

GO! MAGAZINE •

PAGE 27

Don’t waste an hour of your life • ‘The Darkest Hour’ is unimaginative and lazy — and you’ll end up rooting for the aliens

19. ‘The Mill and the Cross’ Any description would be an injustice. It opens on a carefully composed landscape based on a famous painting, “The Way to Calvary” (1564), by the Flemish master Pieter Bruegel the Elder. Within the painting, a few figures move and walk. We might easily miss the figure of Christ among the 500 in the vast landscape. Others are going about their everyday lives. The film is an extraordinary mixture of live action, special effects, green screen work and even an actual copy of the painting itself (by Lech Majewski, the film’s Polish director). Set not in the biblical lands but in Flanders, it uses Belgians as Jews and the Spanish as Romans, in an allegorical parallel that also breaks down into fragments of lives. It is a film before which words fall silent. (No MPAA rating.)

movies

B

ased on the admittedly flimsy evidence of films like “The Darkest Hour,” the best defense against invading aliens is to be as attractive as possible. Being one-dimensional doesn’t hurt, either, even if that particular character flaw can be safely blamed on whoever is responsible for the screenplay — in this case, Jon Spaihts. Given that he is also one of two writers credited on Ridley Scott’s much anticipated 2012 film (and possible “Alien” prequel) “Prometheus,” it is to be hoped that his lazy ideas were not equally apportioned between the two projects. Because, really, how slovenly is it to use invisible aliens? If you’re going to tease us with nothing but pinwheels of light for threequarters of the film, you’d better have one heck of a reveal up your sleeve. But if all you have is the equivalent of exploding garden gnomes, then your problems are greater than a disposable cast and a filming style as flat as the color palette. As one cement-gray scene follows another, audiences may find

ON LOCAL SCREENS Here’s what’s showing on Central Oregon movie screens. For showtimes, see listings on Page 30.

JEANNETTE CATSOULIS No star rating provided. “The Darkest Hour” 89 minutes. PG-13, for action, horror and sci-fi sequences This film opened last week.

themselves rooting for the aliens, if only because their sparkly cloaking devices at least offer visual stimulation. Working from a story that has been knocking around for years, Spaihts and his director, Chris Gorak, send two Internet entrepreneurs (Emile Hirsch and Max Minghella) to Moscow to finish a business deal. When they learn that a Swedish opportunist (Joel Kinnaman) has stolen their idea, our lads head to a nightclub to lick their wounds and distract themselves with perky female tourists (namely Olivia Thirlby and Rachael Taylor). There the four — and the scheming Swede — will remain for the next few days as fireballs from outer space transform most of humanity into untidy piles of cremains. While we wait for the core cast to be reduced to the requisite breeding pair, we have time to ponder the pointlessness of the Moscow setting, chosen primar-

the world. The opera was originally transmitted on Dec. 3. The encore screening begins at 6:30 Wednesday at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. Tickets are $18. (no MPPA rating) — Synopsis from The Metropolitan Opera

WHAT’S NEW Reviews by Roger Ebert unless otherwise noted.

HEADS UP The Metropolitan Opera: Rodelinda — Sensational in the 2004 Met premiere of Stephen Wadsworth’s much-heralded production, Renée Fleming reprises the title role. She’s joined by Stephanie Blythe and countertenor Andreas Scholl, and Baroque specialist Harry Bicket conducts. “The Metropolitan Opera: Live in HD” series features 11 opera performances transmitted live in high definition to movie theaters around

No new movies this week.

STILL SHOWING “The Adventures of Tintin” — Steven Spielberg’s lively 3-D adventure was inspired by the popularity of the comic book hero Tintin. He’s successful in bringing the artistry of Herge, Tintin’s creator, into a third dimension and evoking the charm of the original, although there’s more violence than you might expect. The tale involves a search for a lost treasure. Providing voice and motion-capture performances are Jamie Bell, Andy Serkis, Daniel Craig,

Courtesy Rico Torres

Emile Hirsch stars in “The Darkest Hour.”

ily to allow the filmmakers access to stock Russian characters — like the crazy inventor and the band of armed-to-the-teeth partisans — and exotic architecture. “The audience will enjoy it and will feel it’s something new,” Timur Bekmambetov, one of the film’s producers, assures us in the publicity notes, but I wouldn’t be so confident. The audience is more likely to be wondering why Bekmambetov, the sometimes inspired mind behind the supernatural pictures “Night Watch” and its sequel, “Day Watch,” proved unable to inject life into this one.

Also a mystery is the apparent evaporation of Gorak’s freshman promise. When, in 2006, he wrote and directed the electrifying no-budget thriller “Right at Your Door,” you wondered what he might accomplish with more cash and greater resources. Now we know: Despite a title grandiosely borrowed from Winston Churchill, “The Darkest Hour” is yet another depressing failure of imagination. Even with a technological gold mine at his disposal, all Gorak can conceive of is destruction.

Nick Frost, Simon Pegg and Toby Jones. This film is available locally in IMAX and 3-D. Rating: Three and a half stars. 107 minutes. (PG)

and the Chipmunks” work, at least for its intended audience. Rating: One and a half stars. 87 minutes. (G)

“Alvin and the Chipmunks: Chipwrecked” — A Sarah Palin joke? A Charlie Sheen wisecrack? Is this a Chipmunks movie or a Letterman monologue? As current as a Lady Gaga cover, if not quite as relevant, Alvin and the Chipmunks “Munk Up” for their third digitally animated turn on the big screen — “Alvin and the Chipmunks: Chipwrecked,” a “Cast Away” take-off that parks the three chipmunks, their three Chipette counterparts and their human family on a deserted island. But for captive parents in need of a reference point, “Chipwrecked” is twice as funny at their last film, 2009’s “The Squeakquel.” And the return of Jason Lee as Dave Seville, the rodent wrangler who keeps our pop-singing ground squirrels in line, gives the picture a hint of the heart that made 2007’s “Alvin

“Arthur Christmas” — “Arthur Christmas” is a spirited, comically chaotic and adorably anarchic addition to the world’s over-supply of holiday cartoons. It’s very British, in other words — from its producers (Aardman, the folks who gave us “Wallace & Gromit”) to its voice casting to the slang slung by the assorted Santas in this 3-D computer-animated farce. The movie’s energy flags at about the onehour mark, but we kind of need that break to catch our breath. In a genre — the animated holiday film — already overflowing with the sentimental, the silly “Arthur Christmas” is a most welcome treat to find stuffed into the cinema’s stockings this holiday season. Rating: Three stars. 97 minutes. (PG)

— Jeannette Catsoulis is a film critic for The New York Times.

— Roger Moore, The Orlando Sentinel

— Roger Moore, The Orlando Sentinel

Continued next page


PAGE 28 • GO! MAGAZINE

movies

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2011

From previous page

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“The Darkest Hour” — Working from a story that has been knocking around for years, screenwriter Jon Spaihts and his director, Chris Gorak, send two Internet entrepreneurs (Emile Hirsch and Max Minghella) to Moscow to finish a business deal. When they learn that a Swedish opportunist (Joel Kinnaman) has stolen their idea, our lads head to a nightclub to lick their wounds and distract themselves with perky female tourists (namely Olivia Thirlby and Rachael Taylor). There the four — and the scheming Swede — will remain for the next few days as fireballs from outer space transform most of humanity into untidy piles of cremains. Despite a title grandiosely borrowed from Winston Churchill, “The Darkest Hour” is yet another depressing failure of imagination. Even with a technological gold mine at his disposal, all Gorak can conceive of is destruction. “The Darkest Hour” is available locally in 3D. This film was not given a star rating. 89 minutes. (PG-13) — Jeannette Catsoulis, The New York Times

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“The Descendants” — One of George Clooney’s best performances, as a member of one of the old landowning families of Hawaii, whose wife is in a coma after a boating accident, and who must deal with family pressure to sell off a vast tract of virgin forest for commercial development. At the same time, having essentially left the raising of his family to his wife, he now finds himself as a single dad, raising Alexandra (Shailene Woodley) and Scottie (Amara Miller). With strong support from Nick Krause, Beau Bridges, Robert Forster, Judy Greer and Matthew Lillard. Another great film by Alexander Payne (“Sideways”). Rating: Four stars. 115 minutes. (R) “The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo” — David Fincher’s American remake of the popular 2009 thriller, based on the first of Stieg Larsson’s trilogy of best sellers. Rooney Mara stars effectively as the troubled Lisbeth Salander, a Goth girl who teams with an investigative journalist (Daniel Craig) to solve a 40-year-old murder case. They find themselves deep in the secrets of a corrupt family. Rating: Three and a half stars. 158 minutes. (R) “Hugo” — Unlike any other film Martin Scorsese has ever made, and yet possibly the closest to his heart: a big-budget 3-D family epic, and in some ways a mirror of his own life. The young hero (Asa Butterfield) lives secretly in a cavernous Parisian train station, where his late father maintained the clockworks. Now he maintains the clocks and dreams of completing his father’s project, a mechanical man. With Chloe Grace Moretz as a young girl also living in the station; Ben Kingsley as her guardian, a toy shop owner; Sacha Baron Cohen as the Station Inspector and Jude Law as Hugo’s father. The use of 3-D is controlled and effective. This film is available locally in 3-D. Rating: Four stars. 130 minutes. (PG) “J. Edgar” — Clint Eastwood’s biopic of “America’s top cop,” possibly a repressed homosexual, who maintained a buttoneddown facade and focused his passion on the burnishing of his public image. By maintaining secret FBI files on those in

Courtesy Patrick Wymore

Kermit the Frog tries to talk Rowlf the Dog into returning to show biz so they can save the Muppet Theater. With Kermit is Amy Adams, back left, Jason Segel and Walter. power, he kept his job from 1924 until 1972, under eight presidential administrations, during most of those years living with the handsome bachelor agent Clyde Tolson (Armie Hammer). Leonardo DiCaprio’s performance is fully realized, subtle and persuasive. Rating: Three and a half stars. 136 minutes. (R) “Mission: Impossible — Ghost Protocol” —Tom Cruise stars as Ethan Hunt in a terrific entry in the long-running franchise, which centers on the MI team’s attempt to stop a snaky genius from starting a nuclear war. Astonishing action sequences, including one with Ethan climbing the side of the Burj Khalifa in Dubai, the world’s tallest building. With Jeremy Renner as Brandt, an “analyst” with a gift for action, Simon Pegg as the goofy and petulant computer genius Benji, and Paula Patton as beautiful and competent team member Jane. Very capably directed by Brad Bird, who usually does animation (“The Incredibles,” “Ratatouille”). This film is available locally in IMAX. Rating: Three and a half stars. 132 minutes. (PG-13) “Moneyball” — An uncommonly intelligent movie about a showdown in Major League Baseball between human instinct and abstract statistics. Based on the true story of the 2002 Oakland Athletics, it stars Brad Pitt as the team’s general manager, Jonah Hill as a nerdy Yale statistician, and Philip Seymour Hoffman as the hostile manager. Not a traditional sports movie, but one about big business and courage in management. The dialogue is smart and witty. Spellbinding. Rating: Four stars. (PG-13) “The Muppets” — The Muppets have retired and almost been forgotten, when Walter, his human pal, Gary (Jason Segel), and Gary’s girlfriend, Mary (Amy Adams), take a trip to visit the old Muppet Studios. They find them derelict, threatened by a millionaire who wants to level the ground and drill for oil. So, yes, hey, kids! Let’s put on a show! The Muppets and some human friends stage a telethon to save the studios. This is a funny and wickedly self-aware musical that explains by its very premise

why some younger viewers may not be up-to-date on Muppet lore. Rating: Three stars. 98 minutes. (PG) “My Week With Marilyn” — Based on the diaries of a young man named Colin Clark, who talked his way into a lowly job on a Marilyn Monroe movie. For one troubled week, while her husband, the playwright Arthur Miller, was absent in Paris, she asked the worshipful 23-yearold kid to join her at a hideaway cottage. She was 30. They were alone. One night they went skinny-dipping in the moonlight. That’s about it. It wasn’t about sex. It was about her gift of her wonderfulness to a kid who stirred her sympathy. Michelle Williams evokes all the Marilyns, public and private, real and make-believe. We’re probably looking at one of this year’s Oscar nominees. Rating: Three and a half stars. 101 minutes. (R) “New Year’s Eve” — How is it possible to assemble more than two dozen stars in a movie and find nothing interesting for any of them to do? What sins did poor Hilary Swank commit that after winning two Oscars she has to play the role of the woman in charge of the New Year’s Eve ball in Times Square? And if you don’t think there’s dialogue about getting her ball to drop, you’re barking up the wrong movie. Rating: One star. 118 minutes. (PG-13) “Puss in Boots” — DreamWorks’ cunning casting of the silky Spaniard Antonio Banderas as a swashbuckling Puss in Boots pays off, brilliantly, in “Puss in Boots,” a star vehicle for the nursery rhyme kitty cat from the “Shrek” movies. Thanks to Banderas and his Corinthianleather purr and writers who know how to use it, “Puss” is the best animated film of 2011. This is no mere “Shrek” sequel. There is sex appeal in every syllable, swagger in every line. And even kids get the joke of a voice that sensual and grand coming out of a kitty so small. Rating: Three and a half stars. 89 minutes. (PG) — Roger Moore, The Orlando Sentinel

Continued next page


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2011

NEW DVD & B L U - R AY RELEASES

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Courtesy Warner Bros. Pictures

Nicholas D’Agosto and Emma Bell star in the horror film “Final Destination 5.” Audio commentary, alternate endings and deleted/alternate scenes. (PG-13) — Billy O’Keefe, McClatchy-Tribune News Service

“Final Destination 5” — One of those rare movies where the title itself is a spoiler. Yes, everyone in the movie dies, except for Coroner Bludworth. But you knew that because of the previous four films. The increasingly challenging task of the filmmakers is to devise ever more horrible and gruesome methods for them to be slaughtered. They do. DVD Extras: One featurette; Blu-ray Extras: Three additional featurettes. Rating: Two stars. 92 minutes. (R) — Roger Ebert, The Chicago Sun-Times

COMING UP: Movies scheduled for national release Jan. 3 include “I Don’t Know How She Does It,” “Contagion,” “The Guard” and “Don’t Be Afraid of the Dark.” Check with local video stores for availability. — “DVD and Blu-ray Extras” from wire and online sources

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life. But the animals aren’t used in a very exciting way, and the plot is mechanical. A disappointment from director Cameron Crowe (“Almost Famous”). Rating: Two and a half stars. 124 minutes. (PG) “Young Adult” — In high school, Mavis (Charlize Theron) was the ruling queen bitch. Now she’s pushing 40, still single, drinking too much, and devastated that her high school BF (Patrick Wilson) is married and just had a baby. Planning to turn back the clock, she returns to inform him he must leave his family and marry her. The only old small-town acquaintance who’s nice to her is the misfit Matt (Patton Oswalt, in a wonderful performance). Director Jason Reitman teams with writer Diablo Cody for the first time since “Juno.” Rating: Three and a half stars. 93 minutes. (R)

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childbirth in memory, rated PG13? Rating: Two and a half stars. 117 minutes. (PG-13) “War Horse” — Steven Spielberg’s epic follows the fortunes of a handsome horse named Joey as it begins life on a farm in Devon and then finds itself embroiled on both sides of World War I. Young Jeremy Irvine stars as the farm boy who is Joey’s first and last master, and there are strong performances by Peter Mullan and Emily Watson as his parents. Battle sequences of extraordinary effect, consequences that are deeply moving, but perhaps too sentimental, especially in an ending that depends on surely impossible coincidence. Rating: Three and a half stars. 146 minutes. (PG) “We Bought a Zoo” — Matt Damon plays a newspaperman whose wife dies. He’s having trouble raising two kids and decides to move the family to a farm that includes a private zoo. Here the staff, led by Scarlett Johansson, teach him about animals and also something about

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“The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn — Part 1” — After defending her virginity for the previous three movies in the series, Bella Swan (Kristen Stewart) allows the vampire Edward Cullen (Robert Pattinson) to take her to the altar, after which they have an idyllic Brazilian honeymoon and she quickly gets preggers, leading to distressing problems. Absorbing, if somewhat slow-paced, and Stewart is affecting in her performance. But why is this film, with the most blood-curdling scene of live

McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Jude Law, left, and Robert Downey Jr. reprise their starring roles in “Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows.”

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“The Rum Diary” — Inspired by a little-known early novel by Hunter S. Thompson, the film’s hero (Johnny Depp) is young, alcoholic and working as a newspaper reporter in San Juan, Puerto Rico. A rich cast of supporting characters includes Richard Jenkins as his long-suffering editor, Michael Rispoli as a raffish photographer, Giovanni Ribisi as a rum-soaked former reporter, Aaron Eckhart as a corrupt land speculator and Amber Heard as his mistress, who is offered to Depp as a bribe. The materials for rich comedy, but the lead character’s alcoholic haze slows things down and fogs them in. Rating: Two and a half stars. 119 minutes. (R) “Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows” — Robert Downey Jr. and Jude Law are Holmes and Watson, teaming again with director Guy Ritchie in a sequel to their 2009 hit. Holmes’ archenemy, professor Moriarty (Jared Harris), figures heavily in an anarchist plot to bring war to Europe. It’s much more of an action picture than work in the Sherlockian tradition, but it’s great fun. With Rachel McAdams and Noomi Rapace, the original Girl With the Dragon Tattoo. Rating: Three and a half stars. 129 minutes. (PG-13)

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GO! MAGAZINE •

From previous page

The following movies were released the week of Dec. 27.

“Apollo 18” — Like the tag line says, there’s a reason we stopped going to the moon after Apollo 17, and it had nothing to do with the national budget. As it turns out, there was a top-secret 18th Apollo mission — so secret, the astronauts’ families were told it was a training mission and the astronauts themselves (Warren Christie, Ryan Robbins) had no idea what the Department of Defense knew was waiting for them on the moon. “Apollo 18” represents the faux-public unveiling of the fauxmission footage that mysteriously resurfaced decades later. And like the (too) many other recent movies that are assembled completely from mock found footage, it’s bound to a rhythm that makes it elementarily predictable for most of the way. Mockumentarystyle introductions give way to mundanity designed as character development, which steps aside for a false alarm or two and some poorly filmed teases before the bus finally hits the highway. Fortunately, “Apollo 18’s” premise is more novel than yet another zombie or ghost invasion, and the predictable cycle gets more mileage simply by setting itself on the moon. Consequently, when things really get going, the cause of the bedlam (without spoiling with specifics) is pretty legit in its bedlam-causing prowess. That, and the ensuing concerns about returning home, give “18’s” second half a level of tension and creep factor that runs counter to the steam-seeping boredom most found-footage movies undertake at around the same period. Given the genre’s oversaturation and suffocating limitations, that’s good enough. DVD and Blu-ray Extras:

movies


PAGE 30 • GO! MAGAZINE

movies

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2011

M O V I E T I M E S • For the week of Dec. 30

EDITOR’S NOTES: • No open-captioned showtimes this week. • There may be an additional fee for 3-D movies. • IMAX films are $15. • Movie times are subject to change after press time.

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Soroptimist Holiday Home Tour Are you holiday house proud? Would you like to show off your home in the 2012 Soroptimist Int’l of Bend Holiday Home Tour? Join us in a fun sharing project to raise educational award funds for financially needy women. Please contact info@sibend.org or link to www.sibend.org or call 541-728-0820

Regal Pilot Butte 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend, 541-382-6347

THE DESCENDANTS (R) Fri: 12:20, 3:20, 6, 9:20 Sat: 12:20, 3:20, 6, 9 Sun: 12:20, 3:20, 6 Mon-Thu: 3:20, 6 THE GIRL WITH THE DRAGON TATTOO (R) Fri: Noon, 3:10, 6:20, 9:30 Sat: Noon, 3:10, 7 Sun: Noon, 3:10, 6:20 Mon-Thu: 3:10, 6:20 J. EDGAR (R) Fri: 12:10, 9:10 Sat: 12:10, 8:50 Sun: 12:10 Mon-Thu: 3 MONEYBALL (PG-13) Fri-Sun: 3, 6:10 Mon-Thu: 6:10 MY WEEK WITH MARILYN (R) Fri: 12:40, 3:40, 6:40, 9:40 Sat: 12:40, 3:40, 6:40, 8:45 Sun: 12:40, 3:40, 6:40 Mon-Thu: 3:40, 6:40 NEW YEAR’S EVE (PG-13) Fri: 12:30, 3:30, 6:30, 9 Sat: 12:30, 3:30, 6:30, 8:55 Sun: 12:30, 3:30, 6:30 Mon-Thu: 3:30, 6:30 YOUNG ADULT (R) Fri: 12:50, 3:50, 6:50, 9:50 Sat: 12:50, 3:50, 6:50, 9:05 Sun: 12:50, 3:50, 6:50 Mon-Thu: 3:50, 6:50

Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX BAR & GRILL EST. 1943

Celebrating Judie’s 26th Year!

$

95

29

16 oz. Porterhouse Steak Choice of Potato or Rice Pilaf Soup or Salad Dessert • Glass of Wine

Live Music

$5.00 cover charge to go to LAURIE WOOD who has inoperable lung cancer + a percentage of gross sales 927 NW Bond St. 541-382-4592

BAR & GRILL

680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend, 541-382-6347

THE ADVENTURES OF TINTIN IMAX (PG) Fri-Thu: 12:45 THE ADVENTURES OF TINTIN (PG) Fri-Thu: 3:30, 9:35 THE ADVENTURES OF TINTIN 3-D (PG) Fri-Thu: 3:25, 9:20 ALVIN AND THE CHIPMUNKS: CHIPWRECKED (G) Fri-Thu: 12:35, 1:20, 4, 4:30, 7, 9:10 ARTHUR CHRISTMAS (PG) Fri-Thu: 11:35 a.m., 3:05 THE DARKEST HOUR 3-D (PG13) Fri-Thu: 1, 4:40, 7:45, 10:05

WAR HORSE (PG-13) Fri-Sat: 1, 4:15, 7:30 Sun: 3, 6:30 Mon-Thu: 3:30, 6:45 WE BOUGHT A ZOO (PG) Fri-Sat: 2:15, 5, 7:45 Sun: 2, 4:30, 7 Mon-Thu: 3:45, 6:30

MADRAS Madras Cinema 5 1101 S.W. U.S. Highway 97, Madras, 541-475-3505

The Associated Press

Richard Jenkins, left, and Johnny Depp star in “The Rum Diary.” THE GIRL WITH THE DRAGON TATTOO (R) Fri-Thu: 12:05, 3:50, 6:15, 7:35, 9:50 HUGO (PG) Fri-Thu: 11:55 a.m., 6:40 HUGO 3-D (PG) Fri-Thu: 11:50 a.m., 6:25 THE METROPOLITAN OPERA: RODELINDA (no MPAA rating) Wed: 6:30 MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE — GHOST PROTOCOL IMAX (PG-13) Fri-Thu: 3:35, 6:45, 9:50 MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE — GHOST PROTOCOL (PG-13) Fri-Thu: 12:30, 3:40, 6:55, 10:20 THE MUPPETS (PG) Fri-Tue, Thu: 11:40 a.m., 3:10, 6:20, 9:05 Wed: 11:40 a.m., 3:10 SHERLOCK HOLMES: A GAME OF SHADOWS (PG-13) Fri-Thu: 11:25 a.m., 12:25, 3:15, 4:10, 6:15, 7:10, 9:15, 10:10 THE TWILIGHT SAGA: BREAKING DAWN — PART 1 (PG-13) Fri-Thu: 6:50, 10

Get A Taste For Food, Home & Garden Every Tuesday In AT HOME

WAR HORSE (PG-13) Fri-Thu: 11:30 a.m., 12:15, 3, 3:45, 6:30, 7:15, 9:45 WE BOUGHT A ZOO (PG) Fri-Thu: 12:10, 1:10, 3:20, 4:20, 6:35, 7:30 930 1025

McMenamins Old St. Francis School 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend, 541-330-8562

MONEYBALL (PG-13) Fri, Sun, Tue-Thu: 6 THE RUM DIARY (R) Fri, Sun, Tue-Thu: 9 PUSS IN BOOTS (PG) Fri, Sun: Noon, 3 No movies Saturday (due to McMenamins’ New Year’s Eve celebration) and Monday (due to the Rose Bowl and Fiesta Bowl). After 7 p.m., shows are 21 and older only. Younger than 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.

REDMOND Redmond Cinemas 1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond, 541-548-8777

ALVIN AND THE CHIPMUNKS: CHIPWRECKED (G) Fri-Mon: 11:15 a.m., 1:15, 3:15,

5:15, 7:15, 9:15 Tue-Thu: 3:15, 5:15, 7:15 MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE — GHOST PROTOCOL (PG-13) Fri-Mon: 12:30, 3:30, 6:30, 9:30 Tue-Thu: 3:30, 6:30 SHERLOCK HOLMES: A GAME OF SHADOWS (PG-13) Fri-Mon: 12:45, 3:30, 6:15, 9 Tue-Thu: 3:30, 6:15 WAR HORSE (PG-13) Fri-Mon: 11:15 a.m., 2:30, 5:45, 9 Tue-Thu: 2:30, 5:45

SISTERS

THE ADVENTURES OF TINTIN 3-D (PG) Fri-Sun: 1:50, 4:20, 6:50, 9:15 Mon: 1:50, 4:20, 6:50 Tue-Thu: 4:20, 6:50 ALVIN AND THE CHIPMUNKS: CHIPWRECKED (G) Fri-Sun: 1:05, 3:10, 5:15, 7:20, 9:20 Mon: 1:05, 3:10, 5:15, 7:20 Tue-Thu: 5:15, 7:20 THE GIRL WITH THE DRAGON TATTOO (R) Fri-Sun: Noon, 3:10, 6:20, 9:30 Mon: Noon, 3:10, 6:20 Tue-Thu: 3:10, 6:20 MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE — GHOST PROTOCOL (PG-13) Fri-Sun: 1, 3:50, 6:40, 9:25 Mon: 1, 3:50, 6:40 Tue-Thu: 3:50, 6:40 SHERLOCK HOLMES: A GAME OF SHADOWS (PG-13) Fri-Sun: 1:20, 4:10, 7, 9:45 Mon: 1:20, 4:10, 7 Tue-Thu: 4:10, 7

Sisters Movie House 720 Desperado Court, Sisters, 541-549-8800

THE ADVENTURES OF TINTIN (PG) Fri-Sat: 12:45, 3 Sun: 2:30, 4:45 Mon-Thu: 3:45 THE GIRL WITH THE DRAGON TATTOO (R) Fri-Sat: 3:30, 7 Sun: 3, 6:30 Mon-Thu: 6:15 HUGO (PG) Fri-Sat: 12:45 SHERLOCK HOLMES: A GAME OF SHADOWS (PG-13) Fri-Sat: 5:15, 8 Sun: 7 Mon-Thu: 4, 6:45

PRINEVILLE Pine Theater 214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

SHERLOCK HOLMES: A GAME OF SHADOWS (UPSTAIRS — PG-13) Fri: 4:15, 7:15 Sat-Sun: 1:10, 4:15, 7:15 Mon-Thu: 6 WE BOUGHT A ZOO (PG) Fri, Mon-Thu: 4, 7 Sat-Sun: 1, 4, 7 Pine Theater’s upstairs screening room has limited accessibility.


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2011

GO! MAGAZINE •

PAGE 31


PAGE 32 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2011

Enter as many times as you wish ... Ente

r and win The Bulletin’s

5TH ANNUAL V ACATION GETAW AY ..

ED BY ..

PROVID

SWEEPSTAKES!

WIN A VACATION

TO MAUI! FOR MORE INFORMATION OR TO SUBSCRIBE, CALL THE BULLETIN AT

541-385-5800 For complete rules and regulations, visit www.bendbulletin.com/vacationrules or stop by The Bulletin at 1777 SW Chandler Ave., Bend. Additional entry forms are available in newspapers for sale across Central Oregon and in the lobby of The Bulletin. Last day to enter noon on January 31, 2012. Winner will be drawn February 1, 2012. Enjoy a spectacular 7-night Hawaiian vacation courtesy of Pleasant Holidays, Getaways Travel and The Bulletin. This fabulous trip for two includes: roundtrip air from Portland to Maui; seven nights’ accommodation at The Westin Ka’anapali Ocean Resort Villas and a seven-day economy car rental from Hertz.

Don’t Wait! Enter Today! OFFICIAL BULLETIN GETAWAYS TRAVEL VACATION GETAWAY SWEEPSTAKES ENTRY FORM Sign me up to win The Bulletin’s Fifth Annual Subscriber Vacation Getaway Sweepstakes! Official entry form only. No other reproductions are accepted. GETAWAYS TRAVEL 563 SW 13th St., Bend, OR 97702 • 541-317-1274 • www.getawaystravel.net

NAME: __________________________________________________________________ PHONE: ____________________________ ADDRESS: E-MAIL (required): _____________________________________________ BULLETIN SUBSCRIBER: ___YES ___ NO 1777 SW Chandler Ave., Bend, OR 97702 RULES: All vacations are approved on a promotional basis and are subject to availability. Blackout dates apply. Trip is valid through 12/15/12. Hotel reservations are accepted 60 days in advance of travel. Award is non-transferable, non-refundable, not redeemable for cash and may not be sold. Travel over holidays and other peak periods is restricted. Airline fuel surcharge plus

all airline taxes (Federal Excise & Hawaii ticket taxes), optional insurance and any upgrades are the responsibility of the recipient. The trip winner is responsible for paying any resort taxes and fees, parking fees, room service charges and any other incidentals assessed directly from the hotel and/or not directly specified above. Travel is subject to availability and some restrictions may apply. We regret that extensions to this certificate cannot be given. A $250 change fee applies to all changes once the itinerary is confirmed; a $200 fee will be charged for all cancellations. Trips are valid for two adults ONLY per room and do not include any special promotions. NO room upgrades. Winner must be at least 21 years old. Employees of participating companies and its properties, sponsors, vendors and their immediate families are not eligible to win. The Bulletin reserves the right to deem entries ineligible. One coupon per edition. For all rules and regulations visit www.bendbulletin.com/vacationrules. Email addresses will not be sold but individuals who enter this contest may receive emails from THE BULLETIN, GETAWAYS TRAVEL and PLEASANT HOLIDAYS. The Bulletin reserves the right to deem entries ineligible. One coupon per edition.


Bulletin Daily Paper 12/30/11  

The Bulletin Daily print edition for Friday December 30, 2011

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