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FAN BUSES: Next stop, football D1 •

OCTOBER 4, 2011

Jane Goodall will visit • E1

TUESDAY 75¢

Serving Central Oregon since 1903 www.bendbulletin.com

September is hottest recorded yet in Bend By Dylan J. Darling The Bulletin

This September was the warmest on record in Bend, thanks to the absence of rainstorms and a 12-day string of high temperatures at or above 84 degrees. “Most of the days were sunny,” said Dennis Hull, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Pendleton. The average temperature for the month was 62.5 degrees, about 6 degrees above normal and the highest such average in the 110 years the agency has been keeping records in Bend. The weather service started record-keeping in Bend in January 1901, and the previous warmest September was in 1938, when the average temperature was 61.6 degrees. A high pressure system over Central Oregon boosted temperatures from Sept. 4 to Sept. 15, said Marilyn Lohmann, a forecaster at the weather service’s Pendleton office, which forecasts for Bend. “So those were 10 to 15 degrees above normal,” she said. The high temperature for the month was 90 and hit on five days — Sept. 4, 6, 10, 11 and 25 — according to weather service data. The lowest temperature was 34 and recorded on four days — Sept. 1, 2, 29 and 30. A half an inch of rain typically falls on Bend in September, according to the weather service, but this year there was only one day, Sept. 15, with a trace of rain. Redmond also had a warm, dry September, according to data collected at Roberts Field. See Heat / A5

“I kept thinking, ‘Oh my God, he is going to kill me. I’m his prey.’” — Kent Baer

Fisherman faces off with a cougar

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Kent Baer, 46, of Redmond, stands where he first had a run-in with a cougar Saturday after fishing in the Deschutes River near Steelhead Falls. Baer was climbing out of the canyon to his truck when he saw the big cat, which growled at him. Baer said he dropped his rod and threw rocks at the cougar, which threatened to charge. As Baer shuffled to get to his truck, the cat followed, pawed the ground and got within six or seven feet of him. By Dylan J. Darling The Bulletin

97 To Madras

Steelhead Falls

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Crooked River Ranch

“terrifying” close encounter with a cougar near Crooked River Ranch

this weekend, state fish and wildlife officials

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are warning trail users to exercise caution. “It’s kind of a scary one,” said Steven George, wildlife biologist with the Oregon

Lower Bridge Way

Terrebonne Deschutes River

To Redmond 97

Department of Fish and Wildlife. The department is posting advisories at trailheads leading to Foley Waters and at Steelhead Falls, west of Crooked River Ranch off Highway 97 between Bend and Redmond. Kent Baer says the big cat stalked him as he hiked out of the canyon Saturday. Not only did it refuse to run when he threw rocks at it, but it threatened to charge.

Greg Cross / The Bulletin

“It was horrible,” said Baer, 46. “It was completely terrifying.” Baer said he regularly fishes at Foley Waters, a stretch of the Deschutes passing through land overseen by the Bureau of Land Management, but he usually has a fishing buddy with him. See Cougar / A5

Inside • The highs and lows for September in Bend, A5

Schools push carrot snacks, but it’s a tough sale so far By Winnie Hu New York Times News Service

COMMACK, N.Y. — The new vending machine sat unnoticed as students rushed past its baby carrots, yogurt smoothies and hummus to neighbors dispensing Snapple, Doritos, Goldfish and Cheez-It. The lunch period was nearly over before a potential customer stopped to check out its offerings.

No sale. “This is way too healthy for a snack,” said John Achnitz, 15, a 10th grader. “Kids want healthy stuff like baked Doritos, but not an apple that they can get at home free.” Like many schools across the nation, Commack High School on Long Island is stepping up its war on junk food this year. See Vending / A4

The Bulletin An Independent Newspaper Vol. 108, No. 277, 42 pages, 7 sections

TODAY’S WEATHER

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Chance of showers High 61, Low 37 Page C6

Deadly driver may face 120 days in jail By Duffie Taylor The Bulletin

MADRAS — A 28-year-old Madras woman involved in a fatal crash near Culver last November could face 120 days behind bars after pleading guilty to one felony and three misdemeanor charges in a plea deal Monday. Andrea Orozco and attorOrozco ney Angela Lee reached an agreement with the Jefferson County District Attorney’s Office after a two-hour settlement conference with Judge Gary Lee Williams in Jefferson County Circuit Court. As part of the agreement, Orozco pleaded guilty to one third-degree assault charge and three counts of reckless endangerment. The prosecution dropped the six remaining charges. In February, a grand jury indicted Orozco on 10 charges that stem from a Nov. 20 collision that killed one man and injured others. Orozco was carrying eight passengers in her Ford Expedition when she drove through a stop sign at the intersection of Southwest Culver Highway and Southwest Highland Lane and crashed into a four-door Toyota sedan carrying Leonard and Linda Ross of Metolius. At the time of the crash, Orozco was driving on a suspended license, because she had received eight citations in four years. Though Leonard Ross, 73, died of injuries from the crash, the charges brought against Orozco did not relate to his death, but to five injured minors riding in her vehicle. See Orozco / A5

As justices return, old pro talks shop that reticence, and he was in an expansive and reflective mood WASHINGTON the other day as he — Justice John Paul greeted a visitor to his Stevens was always Stevens chambers. courtly, but he could He has come full be a little terse and circle, he explained, wary in interviews while he returning to the quarters was on the Supreme Court. first assigned to him when Since his retirement last he joined the court in 1975. See Stevens / A4 year, he has shed some of

By Adam Liptak

New York Times News Service

Kirsten Luce / New York Times News Service

Fruits and vegetables go largely unnoticed in vending machines at Commack High School in Commack, N.Y.

What’s new, what’s moved in your paper Page A2: Smart Start, a way to begin your day with the most fascinating and useful news and graphics we can find. Top news from around the world still begins on A3. Public Officials directory: Contacts for all levels of government will appear inside a revamped Local News section from time to time. Today, turn to C2 for a partial list. Community Life: The inside has been repackaged to better focus on three topics: TV & Movies (E2), the Community Calendar (E3) and Advice & Astrology (Dear Abby and Horoscope, E3). Daily Bridge Club has moved to a puzzles and comics page (E5).

Where you’ll find everything else: Business B1-6 Local News C1-6 Classified G1-6 Obituaries C5 Community E1-6 Oregon News C3 Crosswords E5, G2 Sports D1-6 Editorials C4 Stocks B4-5

TOP STORIES KNOX: Italian court clears her of murder, A3 WALL STREET: Protests spread across U.S., A3


THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2011

A2

The Bulletin How to reach us STOP, START OR MISS YOUR PAPER?

S S There’s no crying in football — or is there?

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By Jeannine Stein

DID YOU HEAR?

Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — Men aren’t supposed to cry in our culture, and football players are really not supposed to cry. But a study finds that football players who see crying after a game as appropriate had higher levels of self-esteem. In the study, published in the October issue of the journal Psychology of Men & Masculinity, researchers surveyed 150 collegiate football players about their perceptions of crying after they were randomly assigned to read four different scenarios about a player who

cried. In the first scenario the player, named Jack, teared up after losing a critical game; in the second, he sobbed after losing, with “tears flowing continuously down his face;” in the third, he teared up after winning; and in the fourth, he sobbed after winning. Those who read the vignettes in which the player teared up after losing saw Jack’s actions as more appropriate than when he sobbed after winning or losing. Tearing up after winning was viewed as more suitable

than sobbing after winning or losing. Tearing up after losing was seen as more typical of football players’ behavior than sobbing after winning. Football players who didn’t hold on as strongly to the masculine standard of emotional control and who viewed Jack’s crying as OK had higher levels of self-esteem compared with other players. However, those who perceived Jack’s crying as inappropriate but who thought they might do the same thing in his situation had lower levels of self-esteem. “Overall, college football players who strive to be stron-

ger and are emotionally expressive are more likely to have a mental edge on and off the field,” said co-author Jesse Steinfeldt of Indiana University-Bloomington, in a news release. Seeing football players and coaches cry isn’t always well received by the public, let alone by other players. Tim Tebow’s crying episode caught on camera in 2009 drew negative reactions, including the criticism that he was crying like a baby or a little girl. One commenter on an online news story simply said, “Stop crying, you big baby.”

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Did you know that yawning among tortoises is not contagious? The Ig Nobel Awards committee did: Researchers who studied the subject were awarded a prize at this year’s ceremony.

It may be weird, but it’s still science • Ig Nobels aim to make people ‘laugh and then think’ By John Bohannon ScienceNOW

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. — A full bladder can be maddening, especially if you’ve got to go in the middle of a complex psychological experiment. But that’s just what a team of researchers was counting on when it measured the impact of urination urgency on human decision-making. The study hasn’t changed the world, but it was one of several honored Sunday night at Harvard University as part of the 2011 Ig Nobel Awards. The annual honors are meant to make people “laugh and then think,” says Marc Abrahams, the Ig Nobel master of ceremonies and editor of the Annals of Improbable Research. Other winners discovered that yawning among tortoises, unlike in humans and other social mammals, is not contagious; invented a wasabi-based fire alarm that can rouse deaf people from sleep; and made (incorrect) predictions that the world would end every few decades for the past century. The study of urination urgency, which won the medicine Ig Nobel, revealed seeming contradictions about the mind. In the first of two experiments, an Australian and U.S. team revealed that a full bladder affected short-term memory and attention span as powerfully as 24 hours of sleep deprivation. But a second experiment, conducted by a team in the

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Netherlands, found that for some mental abilities, a full bladder is sometimes a boon. When offered the choice between receiving $16 tomorrow or $30 in 35 days, people tend to grab the smaller reward, even though it makes more sense to delay gratification. But subjects who needed to go were better able to control that impulse and choose the larger, later reward. That supports the aptly named theory of “inhibition spillover,” the idea that inhibiting one impulse helps you control other, unrelated impulses. On the theme of impulse control, a study of why male Buprestid beetles try to mate with a certain brand of Australian beer bottle netted the Ig Nobel biology prize for Darryl Gwynne and David Rentz, entomologists at the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation in Canberra. They found that the color and shape of the bottle was a turn-on for the beetles and that the series of bumps along the side of the glass seal the deal. The reason remains a mystery. The ceremony had a somber moment as two longtime Ig Nobel participants were memorialized. Mathematician Benoît Mandelbrot, 85 and pioneer of fractal geometry, and Harvard University chemist William Lipscomb, 91 and winner of a real Nobel Prize, both passed away since last year’s ceremony. They were frequent participants in the traditional Ig Nobel “Win a Date With a Nobel Laureate” contest. This year, the prize was a date with Lou Ignarro (Nobel Prize for physiology or medicine 1998).

NEWS Q&A

MEGABUCKS

The numbers drawn Monday night are:

It’s Tuesday, Oct. 4, the 277th day of 2011. There are 88 days left in the year.

HAPPENINGS • Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab, who is accused of trying to blow up a plane in 2009 with a bomb hidden in his underwear, goes on trial in Detroit. • Elizabeth Warren debates five lesser-known Democratic opponents in the race for the late Ted Kennedy’s former Massachusetts Senate seat. • Amanda Knox, whose murder conviction was reversed by an Italian court, is scheduled to fly home to Seattle, A3 • Apple unveils its highly anticipated new version of the iPhone amid increased competition from Google’s Android, B6

IN HISTORY

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Cox News Service Who paid the ransoms for the three hikers held by the Iranians? — Margaret Thomson, Marietta, Ga. The government of Oman, a U.S. ally in the Gulf, paid the $1 million bail ($500,000 each) for American hikers Shane Bauer and Josh Fattal, who were released on Sept. 21 from an Iranian prison. Oman also paid the $500,000 bail for Sarah Shourd, who

Q: A:

Do you have a question about nation or world news? Submit it to Cox News Service editors in Atlanta at q&a@ajc.com. Include name, phone and city.

was released in September 2010. Payment of bail must be arranged through third parties, such as Oman, due to U.S. economic sanctions on Iran, The Associated Press reported.

When a representative of But Nobel Prizes cannot be the Nobel Foundation could awarded posthumously. And so not reach Dr. Ralph Steinman the Nobel committee, which had by telephone Monday to deliver believed Steinman to be alive, the thrilling news that he had faced a quandary. been awarded a Nobel Prize in The foundation’s nineMedicine for his breakthrough member board of directors met work in immunology, Monday afternoon he sent him an email and consulted lawyers about the honor. concerning the interpreBut Steinman would tation of the statutes of never see the message or the Nobel Foundation learn of the prize. He died issued in 1974. of pancreatic cancer on The statutes hold that Steinman: Friday, three days before the Nobel Prize is not to Obit, C5 the phone call from the be given posthumously. Nobel committee. He had But if a person who is been battling the deadly disease announced as a prize winner dies for four years. before receiving it at the Nobel On Monday morning, one of ceremonies on Dec. 10, the Steinman’s daughters, Alexis, award remains valid. saw the email from the Nobel Because Steinman’s award Foundation and contacted Rock- was made in good faith on the efeller University, where her faassumption that he was alive ther had worked. The president at the time of his election, he of the university immediately should receive it, the directors called the chairman of the Nobel decided. Prize committee to inform him. — New York Times News Service

Highlight: In 1861, during the Civil War, the United States Navy authorized construction of the first ironclad ship, the USS Monitor. Ten years ago: Barry Bonds of the San Francisco Giants hit his 70th home run to tie Mark McGwire’s 1998 record in a 102 win over the Houston Astros. Five years ago: The domain name wikileaks.org was registered (the website began publishing in December 2006). One year ago: The Supreme Court began a new era with three women serving together for the first time as Elena Kagan took her place on the bench.

BIRTHDAYS Author Jackie Collins is 74. Author Anne Rice is 70. Actress Susan Sarandon is 65. Actor Liev Schreiber is 44. Actress Alicia Silverstone is 35. — From wire reports


TUESDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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TransCanada pipeline foes Italian appeals court allege bias in U.S. emails clears Knox of murder By Elisabeth Rosenthal New York Times News Service

A State Department official provided Fourth of July picnic invitations, subtle coaching and cheerleading, and inside information about Secretary Hillary Clinton’s meetings to a Washington lobbyist for a Canadian company seeking permission from the department to build a controversial pipeline that would carry crude from the oil sands of Canada to the Gulf of Mexico. Emails released Monday in response to a Freedom of Infor-

mation Act request filed by the environmental group Friends of the Earth paint a picture of a sometimes warm and collaborative relationship between the lobbyist for the pipeline company, TransCanada, and officials in the State Department, the agency responsible for evaluating and approving the billion-dollar project. The written exchanges provide a rare glimpse into how Washington works and the access familiarity can bring. The 200 pages are the second batch of documents and emails re-

leased so far. “You see officials who see it as their business not to be an oversight agency but as a facilitator of TransCanada’s plans,” said Damon Moglen, the director of climate and energy projects for Friends of the Earth. While the emails refer to multiple meetings between TransCanada officials and assistant secretaries of state, he said, such access was denied to environmentalists seeking input, who only had one group meeting at that level.

Wall Street protests spread nationwide By Chris Hawley The Associated Press

NEW YORK — Protests against Wall Street spread across the country Monday as demonstrators marched on Federal Reserve banks and camped out in parks from Los Angeles to Portland, Maine, in a show of anger over the wobbly economy and what they see as corporate greed. In Manhattan, hundreds of protesters dressed as corporate zombies in white face paint lurched past the New York Stock Exchange clutching fistfuls of fake money. In Chicago, demonstrators pounded drums in the city’s financial district. Others pitched tents or waved signs at passing cars in Boston, St. Louis and Kansas City, Mo. The arrests of 700 protesters on the Brooklyn Bridge over the weekend galvanized a slice of discontented America, from college students worried about their job prospects to middleage workers who have been recently laid off. Some protesters likened themselves to the tea party movement — but with a liberal bent — or to the Arab Spring demonstrators who brought down their rulers in the Middle East. “I’ve felt this way for a long time. I’ve really just kind of been waiting for a movement to come along that I thought would last and have some resonation within the community,” said Steven Harris, a laid-off

Charles Rex Arbogast / The Associated Press

Protesters gather Monday on the corner of LaSalle and Jackson during an Occupy Chicago protest near the Federal Reserve Bank and Chicago Board of Trade.

truck driver in Kansas City. The Occupy Wall Street protests started on Sept. 17 with a few dozen demonstrators who tried to pitch tents in front of

the New York Stock Exchange. Since then, hundreds have set up camp in a park nearby and have become increasingly organized.

Obama, GOP push, CLEAN ENERGY Emails show pull on economy White House loan concerns

The Associated Press WASHINGTON — Seeking to gain political advantage, President Barack Obama insisted Monday that Congress vote on his entire $447 billion economic plan this month, a step promptly rejected by Republicans who called for both sides to find common ground in their competing proposals to stimulate growth. Obama demanded that Republicans spell out their objections to his plan, expressing confidence that the public supports his call for more spending on public works projects and on job security for teachers and police officers. Republicans have already specified which pieces of Obama’s plan they could support, and House Majority Leader Eric Cantor said Monday that some of those measures would get a vote this month. But he said the Republicancontrolled House would not act on the president’s jobs bill in its entirety.

Obama claims underdog tag WASHINGTON — President Obama says he’s “absolutely” the underdog in his bid for re-election, embracing the findings of a new survey that shows most Americans expect he’ll be a one-term president. Among the factors Obama said are weighing on his campaign is his own concession that the economy has not sufficiently recovered. “I don’t think (Americans are) better off than they were four years ago,” Obama told ABC’s George Stephanopoulos in an interview Monday. “What we’ve seen is that we’ve been able to make steady progress. ... But the unemployment rate is still way too high.” — McClatchy-Tribune News Service

New York Times News Service Some White House officials were so concerned last year about the financial health of Solyndra, a solar equipment manufacturer that had received federal loans, that they warned that a presidential trip to the company’s California factory could prove a major embarrassment, newly disclosed emails show. The emails, gathered as part of a congressional investigation into the Energy Department loan program, offer new insight into just how worried administration officials were about the $528 million loan to Solyndra, which is now in bankruptcy, as well as other government efforts, amounting to $16 billion in loan guarantees, to promote clean energy. The warnings came from both inside the White House — an official in the Office of Management and Budget wrote that the visit could be “embarrassing in the not too distant future” — as well as from private investors, including one Democratic campaign contributor who wrote to the White House the day before President Barack Obama’s May 2010 visit to Solyndra to urge officials to reconsider the trip. “I just want to help protect the president from anything that could result in negative or unfair press,” Steve Westly, a venture capitalist and an Obama contributor, wrote in May 2010. “If it’s too late to change/postpone the meeting, the president should be careful about unrealistic/optimistic forecasts that could haunt him in the next 18 months if Solyndra hits the wall, files for bankruptcy, etc.”

By Alessandra Rizzo and Colleen Barry

Amanda Knox cries after hearing the verdict overturning her conviction and acquitting Monday in Italy.

The Associated Press

PERUGIA, Italy — Amanda Knox left prison Monday, a free woman for the first time in four years, after an Italian appeals court threw out the young American’s murder conviction in the sexual assault and stabbing death of her British roommate. Knox, 24, collapsed in tears after the verdict was read, her lawyers draping their arms around her in support. Her co-defendant and former boyfriend, Italian Raffaele Sollecito, also was cleared of killing 21year-old Meredith Kercher in 2007. “We’re thankful that Amanda’s nightmare is over,” her younger sister, Deanna Knox, told reporters outside the courthouse. “She suffered for four years for a crime she did not commit.” The eight-member jury acquitted both Knox and Sollecito of murder after a court-ordered review of the DNA evidence cast serious doubts over the main DNA evidence linking the two to the crime. While the court won’t release its reasons for clearing the two for weeks, the discrediting of the DNA evidence was believed to have been the fatal blow to the prosecution’s case in the absence of a clear motive. The jury had two options to acquit: determining there wasn’t enough evidence to uphold the conviction or that the pair simply didn’t commit the crime. The jury determined the latter, clearing Knox and Sollecito completely. Even if prosecutors appeal the acquittal to Italy’s highest court, nothing in Italian law would prevent her from returning home to Seattle. An Italian lawmaker who has championed her

The Associated Press

case, Rocco Girlanda, said she could fly out as early as today from Rome. About 90 minutes after the verdict was handed down a black Mercedes carrying Knox was seen leaving the prison. The jury upheld Knox’s conviction on a charge of slander for accusing bar owner Diya “Patrick” Lumumba of carrying out the killing. But he set the sentence at three years, meaning for time served. Knox has been in prison since Nov. 6, 2007, five days after the murder. The Kercher family looked on grimly and a bit dazed as the verdict was read out by the judge after 11 hours of deliberations. Outside the courthouse, some of the hundreds of observers shouted, “Shame! Shame!” “We respect the decision of the judges but we do not understand how the decision of the first trial could be so radically overturned,” the Kerchers said in a statement. “We still trust the Italian justice system and hope that the truth will eventually emerge.” The victim’s sister, Stepha-

nie Kercher, who was in Perugia with her mother and brother for the verdict, lamented that Meredith “has been nearly forgotten.”

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THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2011

Supreme Court hears arguments in Medicaid case By Adam Liptak New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court started its new term on Monday with arguments in a difficult and consequential case over California’s attempt to cut Medicaid payment rates. The justices were not focused on the ultimate question of whether state officials were entitled to address the budget crisis there by lowering payments to medical providers. Rather, they considered the threshold question of whether the providers and Medicaid recipients were entitled to sue over the move. The answer was obscured by a tangle of legal doctrines and practical concerns. Medicaid is a joint federal-state program that provides health care to poor and disabled people. States are not obligated to participate. If they do, they receive federal money and in exchange agree to pay rates “sufficient to enlist enough providers” to ensure that care available under Medicaid is similar to that available to other local residents. There is no question that federal authorities can enforce the

Stevens

The Supreme Court asked the Obama administration to weigh in on a clean-air dispute along California’s coast and take a stand on whether the state can force ocean-going vessels to switch to more costly, low-sulfur fuel when they come within 24 miles of shore. The California Air Resources Board adopted the rule two years ago for ships bound for California’s ports. — McClatchy-Tribune News Service

law and that states that fail to comply with their obligations face the loss of federal money. Almost as soon as the argument was under way, though, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg said such enforcement standing alone was problematic. “That’s a very drastic remedy that’s going to hurt the people that Medicaid was meant to benefit,” she said of the potential loss of federal funds.

Kirsten Luce / New York Times News Service

Student Josh Rosen, 16, selects baked potato chips from a vending machine last month at Commack High School in Commack, N.Y. Across the nation, schools that have banned candy and soda and trimmed trans fat from their lunch menus are now restocking their vending machines with healthier choices to encourage students to eat better.

“Dietary change happens over time. I worked 10 years to get schools to go from candy bars to granola bars and baked chips.” — Margo Wootan, Center for Science in the Public Interest

helped prompt a niche industry: one company designed a machine with a digital LCD screen streaming video messages like, “Hey, looking for a sustained energy snack to get you through practice? Try this,” alongside a picture of a Kashi granola bar and its nutrition facts. “Having these healthy snacks is a far cry better than what the schools were selling before,” said Kelly Brownell, a Yale psychology professor and director of the Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity. Margo Wootan, director of nutrition policy at the Center for Science in the Public Interest, also praised healthful vending machines. “Dietary change happens over time,” she said. “I worked 10 years to get schools to go from candy bars to granola bars and baked chips. But when you look at the whole mix, it really does help to reduce calories, saturated fats and sugar.” While 27 states have adopted policies regulating nutritional content in elementary schools’ vending machines — typically limiting fat, sugar, calories and portion size — some of those policies have lacked teeth, said Elizabeth Walker, a project director for the National Association of State Boards of Education. Under a 2010 law, however, the federal Agriculture Department must set national nutrition standards for school

Healthy effort spreads Philadelphia schools, which were among the first to embrace healthful vending, with five machines selling organic tea, flavored water and Clif bars in 2009, will soon expand to 21 machines. And in Florence, Ariz., high school administrators have seen a spillover effect from two healthful vending machines installed last year, with lowercalorie options like Popchips and Pirate’s Booty being added to other machines. These efforts have drawn praise from many parents and nutrition experts, who say putting healthier food in front of children makes them more likely to eat it. And they have

vending machine foods and drinks by the end of next year.

Vending shift Of the nation’s nearly 5.4 million vending machines, 6.8 percent were in elementary, middle and high schools in 2010, up from 5 percent the year before, according to a survey by Automatic Merchandiser Magazine. Another 5.9 percent were at colleges. Jackie Clark, a spokeswoman for the National Automatic Merchandising Association, which represents the vending industry, said it had embraced healthier options in recent years with the Fit-Pick program, in which orange stickers can be affixed to trays holding one of 400 products meeting the industry’s nutritional guidelines. Revolution Foods, a company that creates healthymeal programs for schools, is expanding its operations to vending machines in response to requests from principals; its first 10 machines were to go into Denver area schools in October, with dozens more coming to Colorado and Northern California in the next six months, Kirsten Tobey, a founder of the company, said. Fresh Healthy Vending, whose chief executive likes to describe its machine as a “miniversion of Whole Foods,” introduced 800 of them to schools and colleges in the past year and adds 150

new machines a month. Another company, Vend Natural, has installed 400 school machines since 2007, most recently in Montclair, N.J. Sean Kelly, chief executive officer of Human Healthy Vending, which designed the machine with the digital message screen, said that promotions like digital messages, free samples and contests helped to increase monthly sales to an average of about $1,500 per machine, up from $1,000 last year. “You cannot just take a standard vending machine, throw graphics on it, put some healthier options in there and expect everything to work out perfectly,” he said. In Commack, some students complained that items in the new machine were either unappealing or expensive: hummus is $3; yogurt smoothies, $2; and a pair of hard-boiled eggs, $1.50, compared with the more typical $1 for a bag of chips. John, the 10th grader who walked away, said he mistakenly bought a grape-raspberry twist for $1 last week — he was aiming for the baked barbecue chips — and “it just tasted really bad.” But 10 minutes later, the new vending machine finally had a customer. Zach Auster-Mehr, a junior, dropped in $1.25 for the baby carrots with ranch dressing. “It’s a good idea,” he said. “I usually buy potato chips.” Marissa Gibaldi, 17, a senior, said she had become a regular on days when she did not bring lunch from home. “My mom will ask, ‘What did you have for a snack?’” she said. “And I can actually tell her, instead of saying, ‘Don’t worry about it.’”

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many as frivolous or pompous or both. Roberts, by contrast, combines the best qualities of his predecessors, Stevens said. “He’s generally across the board a very competent and personable guy,” Stevens said. “Burger was a fine representative of the court — handsome guy, and he spoke well, and he could be very gracious. I really think John Roberts combines all those virtues — he’s very, very smart, and he’s very, very fair. “The chief is conscious of granting more time to advocates,” Stevens said of Roberts’ courtesy in occasionally allowing lawyers extra time to respond to the barrage of questions from the justices. “He didn’t put stripes on his robe.” In his years on the Roberts court, Stevens was the most senior justice, which meant he had the power to assign opinions when he was in the majority and the chief justice was not. He admitted to a little strategic behavior of his own. “Basically it was who would do the best job writing it,” he said. But he was also savvy enough to know that keeping an interesting case to himself meant that he would avoid being assigned a boring and complicated one from the same batch. “I have to confess,” he said, “that now and then I would take an assignment because I wanted not to be eligible for something that I didn’t want to write.” And then there was the important task of locking in the crucial vote of Justice Anthony M. Kennedy, the current court’s swing justice. “There were cases I think that I may have asked Tony to write,” Stevens said, “because I thought if he wrote it out himself he was more sure to stick to his first vote.” A majority is important, Stevens said; unanimity less so. He said the court erred in moving too slowly in the Brown case in order to speak with one voice. The court ended up instructing the states to move toward integration with “all deliberate speed” in a 1955 sequel. “A more decisive, prompt decision might have avoided some of the resistance that developed,” Justice Stevens said. “I don’t think the world would have come to an end if there had been members of the court who disagreed.” Stevens said he spends much of the year in Florida now, but he keeps up. “I remain very much interested in the court,” he said. “I’ve read all their opinions, which I wasn’t sure I would do.” He added that he is not eager to serve on appeals court panels, a common practice among retired members of the court, who also include Justices Sandra Day O’Connor and David Souter. “David and Sandra have enjoyed it,” Stevens said. “I kind of like not having to read a lot of briefs and get reversed by my former colleagues.”

Continued from A1 Its new cafeteria vending machine — a lighted panel on the front shows sliced apples and oranges against a backdrop of lettuce — is part of a pilot program intended to encourage students who skip lunch or stay late for sports to make better choices. “By fostering healthy snack vending options, we support the lessons that are taught in the classroom and at home,” said Donald A. James, the superintendent of schools. But so far, potato chips are winning. Commack’s healthy machine sold 296 items totaling $388.75 from Sept. 1 to Sept. 19, less than one-third of the sales made by a nearby machine that offers less nutritious fare. Moreover, the topselling item from the new machine was baked potato chips — less fat than fried chips, but less than ideal — with almost no takers for peach smoothies, roasted edamame or fresh pineapple chunks. Around the country, schools that have banned candy and soda and trimmed trans fats from their lunch menus are now restocking their vending machines with whole-grain, reduced-fat snacks or fresh fruits and vegetables. These efforts have been fueled by renewed concerns about childhood obesity, as well as growing state and federal legislation regulating the content of food and beverages sold in school. Fourteen New York City high schools are testing vending machines that offer fresh mango, watermelon and pineapple chunks or raw carrots and celery. Last month, Jon Corto of the Buffalo Bills recruited four of his teammates to promote six healthy vending machines in the district in Orchard Park, a Buffalo suburb, where he attended school. “I’ve always been healthconscious,” he said. “You eat Doritos and it’s not going to help your performance.”

sM ou

Continued from A1 His old chambers, now occupied by Justice Elena Kagan, were perhaps a little grander, but there are worse offices in Washington than his current one, which overlooks the plaza in front of the courthouse and has a striking view of the Capitol. In time for the start of a new term Monday, Stevens has just published an engaging and candid memoir. It is called “Five Chiefs,” for the five chief justices he has known — as a law clerk, lawyer, judge and justice. Perhaps its most surprising element is the high praise Stevens has for Chief Justice John Roberts, who was often his ideological adversary in the five terms the two men served together. In the interview, Stevens also offered behind-the-scenes glimpses of how opinions are assigned, and he criticized aspects of Brown v. Board of Education, the 1954 decision requiring the integration of public schools. The book is not a series of puff-piece profiles. Chief Justice Warren Burger, who was appointed by President Richard M. Nixon and served from 1969 to 1986, gets fairly rough treatment, for instance, coming off as vain, insecure and in some ways incompetent. Burger was, Stevens wrote, not very careful in assigning majority opinions. “A lot of people assumed he was making strategic assignments and that sort of thing,” Stevens said. “I think he was just not as careful a scholar as he should have been, and he didn’t do a careful job keeping track of exactly how everyone voted and the reasons why. “Burger would sometimes assign an opinion to someone who really didn’t have a majority on every issue,” Stevens continued, leading to confusion, inefficiency and frustration. Burger was strategic in one sense, though. Alert to the attention paid to First Amendment decisions, he would assign opinions ruling in favor of free speech to himself, hoping for good press. “If you look through his First Amendment cases, I think you’ll find that when the First Amendment claim was upheld, he might well write it,” Stevens said. “But where it was denied, Byron White would get it.” Justice Byron White, who served from 1962 to 1993, did indeed gain a reputation of hostility to the First Amendment. Chief Justice William Rehnquist, who led the court from 1986 to 2005, gets better reviews in the book. Stevens called him able and fair, if at times a little peremptory, cutting off lawyers the moment their time at the Supreme Court lectern expired. And Stevens did not approve of the chief justice’s decision to add gold stripes to the sleeves of his robes, a move that struck

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TUESDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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Contraceptive in Africa Report on Medicare cites may double risk of HIV prescription drug abuse may make women and men more vulnerable to HIV infection is particularly troubling.

By Pam Belluck New York Times News Service

The most popular contraceptive for women in eastern and southern Africa, a hormone shot given every three months, appears to double the risk the women will become infected with HIV, according to a large study published Monday. And when it is used by HIV-positive women, their male partners are twice as likely to become infected than if the women had used no contraception. The findings potentially present an alarming quandary for women in Africa. Hundreds of thousands of them suffer injuries, bleeding, infections and even death in childbirth from unintended pregnancies. Finding affordable and convenient contraceptives is a pressing goal for international health authorities. But many countries where pregnancy rates are highest are also ravaged by HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. So the evidence suggesting that the injectable contraceptive has biological properties that

“If it is now proven that these contraceptions are helping spread the AIDS epidemic, we have a major health crisis on our hands.” The study, which several experts said added significant heft to previous research while still having some limitations, has prompted the World Health Organization to convene a meeting in January to consider if evidence is now strong enough to advise women that the method may increase their risk of getting or transmitting HIV. “We are going to be re-evaluating WHO’s clinical recommendations on contraceptive use,” said Mary Lyn Gaffield, an epidemiologist in the World Health Organization’s department of reproductive health and research. Before the meeting, scientists will review research concerning hormonal contraceptives and women’s risk of acquiring HIV, transmitting it to men, and the possibility (not examined in the new study) that hormonal contraceptives accelerate HIV’s severity in infected women.

Popular treatment Injectable hormones are very popular. About 12 million women between the ages of 15 and 49 in sub-Saharan Africa, roughly 6 percent of all women in that age group, use them. In the United States, it is 1.2 million, or 3 percent of women using contraception. While the study involved only African women, scientists said biological effects would probably be the same for all women. But they emphasized that concern was greatest in Africa because the risk of HIV transmission from heterosexual sex was so much higher there than elsewhere. “The best contraception today is injectable hormonal contraception because you don’t need a doctor, it’s longlasting, it enables women to control timing and spacing of birth without a lot of fuss and travel,” said Isobel Coleman, director of the women and foreign policy program at the Council on Foreign Relations.

September 2011 weather for Bend DAILY HIGHS AND LOWS DAY

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Average temperature: 62.5° (5.9° above normal) 8

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Historical average precipitation for the month: .41”

INCH

T = Trace

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ALMANAC Highest 90° temperature

Lowest 34° temperature

Average high

Highest recorded temperature Highest for therecorded month:

Lowest recorded temperature for the month:

Monthly average high temperature through the years:

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16°

73.8°

38.4°

maximum for the month 102° on Sept. 2, 1998

84.5°

Average low

44.6°

on Sept. 24, 1970

* Monthly averages calculated from 1928 through 2005, Western Regional Climate Center Sources: NOAA, Western Regional Climate Center, Bend Public Works Department

Heat Continued from A1 Redmond had its fourthwarmest September on record, Hull said. The warmest happened in 1998, when temperatures averaged 64.8 degrees. The city experienced only a trace of rain on Sept. 5 and 14. The hot September followed a warmer than normal August, but June and July were a

Cougar Continued from A1 On Saturday, his friend wasn’t available. So he went by himself. Baer said he caught some trout during the late afternoon, then at dusk began the roughly half-mile trek out of the canyon back to his truck. Walking in his waders, wearing his fishing vest and carrying his rod, Baer neared the top of the canyon. He’d heard nothing, he said, but he had an urge to turn around. When he did, he saw a cougar crouching about 10 feet away. “It was huge,” he said. The big cat growled. Sensing that it might pounce, Baer laid his rod down, grabbed a large rock with both hands and chucked it at the cougar. The rock hit the cat, which backed off some, but didn’t lose interest. As Baer shuffled sideways

Orozco Continued from A1 Jose Orozco, Christian Burgos, Derek Salgado, Brandon Salgado and Mark Anthony Salgado were identified as Orozco’s victims, and her charges included

Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

couple of degrees cooler than normal. “So it took a long time to get the summer going, and it was kind of short,” Lohmann said. Less than a week into October, the weather has turned colder and wetter. Light rains spattered Bend on Monday, and more rain was expected Monday night. There then should be a reprieve today, said Mary Wis-

ter, meteorologist with the weather service in Pendleton. “It looks like it will return (this) evening,” she said. Along with the rain, the early October storm systems are bringing lower temperatures. Today’s high should be 61. Wednesday and Thursday should have highs in the mid 50s before a return to sun and a high in the 60s Friday.

over the 75 feet between the top of the canyon and his truck, the cougar kept following him — coming as close as six or seven feet, pawing toward him and growling. The cougar’s crawl reminded Baer of a house cat stalking a toy. “I kept thinking, ‘Oh my God, he is going to kill me,’” Baer said. “‘I’m his prey.’” In an effort to convince the cougar otherwise, Baer hit it with another rock and yelled, clapped and swung his fishing rod. “I just kept walking as fast as I could without running,” he said. The fish and wildlife department recommends that people who encounter cougars make noise, try to appear large and avoid succumbing to the urge to run. While there are usually three or four encounters reported each year, not all prompt warnings like Baer’s.

George said the department is now posting signs at trailheads because the cougar showed signs of being aggressive. The agency last posted such signs in May, when a cougar was spotted several times in Deschutes River Woods south of Bend over a two week period and even was shot by Deschutes County sheriff’s deputies. Wildlife officials eventually trapped and killed that cat. On Monday, Baer and a Department of Agriculture trapper returned to the site of the encounter, checking for signs of the animal. Neither saw him. But because the cougar may still be prowling the area near Foley Waters, George urges hikers and anglers to heed the trailhead warnings. “This would be a good time that if you have a fishing buddy to go with (them),” he said.

third-degree assault, seconddegree assault and reckless endangerment. Judge Williams said thirddegree assault, a class-C felony, carries a maximum sentence of 30 days in jail, 36 months of supervised probation and five years of license

suspension. Orozco also faces a maximum jail sentence of 30 days for each count of reckless endangerment. Sentencing for Orozco is slated for Oct. 24 at 10:30 a.m.

— Reporter: 541-617-7812, ddarling@bendbulletion.com

— Reporter: 541-617-7812, ddarling@bendbulletion.com

— Reporter: 541-383-0376, dtaylor@bendbulletin.com

By Robert Pear New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — Medicare is subsidizing drug abuse by thousands of beneficiaries who shop around for doctors and fill prescriptions for huge quantities of painkillers and other narcotics far exceeding what any patient could safely use, congressional investigators say in a new report. The investigators, from the Government Accountability Office, said Medicare officials had been slow to recognize and act on the evidence of abuse, which is to be presented at a Senate hearing today. “Our analysis found that about 170,000 Medicare beneficiaries received prescriptions from five or more medical practitioners” for 14 types of drugs that are frequently abused, said Gregory D. Kutz, director of audits and special investigations at the accounting office. The medications were obtained through Part D of Medicare, which provides coverage for prescription drugs. The drugs most commonly abused by Medicare beneficiaries included powerful prescription painkillers like oxycodones and hydrocodone products. Oxycodones include OxyContin and Percocet. In one case described in the report, a Medicare beneficiary in Georgia received a 150-day supply of oxycodone in just 27 days by obtaining seven prescriptions from four doctors. Over the course of a year, the woman received prescriptions for a total of 3,655 oxycodone pills (a 1,679-day supply) from 58 different prescribers, and she filled them at

more than 40 pharmacies. In another case, a California man received prescriptions for a total of 1,397 fentanyl patches and pills (a 1,758-day supply) from 21 different prescribers in a year. In a third case, a Texas beneficiary received prescriptions for a total of 4,574 hydrocodone pills (a 994-day supply) from 25 different doctors. Sen. Thomas Carper, D-Del., said: “Federal dollars intended to address the health needs of the elderly and the poor are instead being used to feed addictions or to pad the wallets of drug dealers. This is clearly unacceptable.” Carper called the hearing as

chairman of a Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs subcommittee. The accounting office said prescription drug abuse threatened the health of beneficiaries and increased costs to taxpayers. “Medicare beneficiaries may be seeking several medical practitioners to support and disguise an addiction” or to obtain drugs that they can sell to others, the report said.

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THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2011

W  B Dozens arrested in restive Syrian area BEIRUT — The Syrian government said Monday that it had arrested dozens of people in a central Syrian region that has become a flashpoint in fighting between defectors and security forces waging a brutal crackdown on a sixmonth uprising. The military said this weekend that it had retaken Rastan, a restive town on the corridor between Homs and Hama, two of Syria’s largest cities. It reportedly deployed more forces Monday in Talbiseh, near Homs, another town that has defied government authority for months in a revolt that has shaken the four-decade rule of the Assad family. Since the summer, residents say, both Rastan and Talbiseh have appeared virtually occupied, with tanks and soldiers guarding the towns’ entrances. “The defectors were the main reason behind the war on Rastan,” said a resident there who gave his name as Hassan. “Only women were allowed to leave their homes. The men were detained immediately.”

Thief rattles China’s Forbidden City BEIJING — On the night of May 8, a pint-size thief broke into an exhibit hall in the Forbidden City and made off with $1.5 million worth of gold-andjewel-encrusted boxes, eluding a vaunted security system designed to protect the longago emperors of China from barbarian invaders. Shi Bokui, 28, a migrant worker with a sixth-grade education was caught three days later. Not the brightest of criminals, he’d left fingerprints on a glass display case and then went to an Internet cafe nearby and registered under his own name. Most of the loot, which was on loan from a Hong Kong museum, was recovered. Restoring the reputation of the Forbidden City, the 180-acre compound that was home to China’s emperors for 500 years, is proving more difficult. “The Forbidden City is a symbol of China,” said Jia Yinghua, a historian who has worked in the compound staging exhibits about the imperial family. “If anybody steals from there, the foundation of the nation is shaken.”

Mosque hit; Jewish extremists suspect JERUSALEM — Jewish extremists are suspected of torching a mosque in a northern Israeli town on Monday, the latest in a string of anti-Arab attacks that have enraged Palestinians and alarmed Israeli security officials. After setting the mosque in the Bedouin village of TubaZangariya on fire, vandals spray-painted the words “revenge” and “price tag” on the walls. Similar messages have been left in other violent incidents in the West Bank, where attackers have burned mosques, cars belonging to Palestinians and olive trees. They’ve also vandalized an Israeli army base and the Jerusalem home of an Israeli anti-settlement activist. Extremist groups say such attacks are in retaliation for efforts to dismantle Jewish settlements that Israel has deemed to be illegally built, or for incidents of Palestinian violence against settlers.

Algerian floods kill at least 10, hurt 30 ALGIERS, Algeria — Severe floods caused by torrential rains have killed 10 people and injured around 30 in Algeria’s north-central El Bayadh region since the weekend, local authorities said Monday. Around 150 families had to flee their homes in El Bayadh, and vast tracts of farmland were destroyed after torrential rains fell on the area and caused rivers to burst their banks. Several people have also been reported killed in other parts of the vast north African country affected by the storms, including Ghardaia, about 300 miles south of Algiers; Laghouat in the north; and Batna in the northeast. — From wire reports

NYPD’s Muslim surveillance raises dichotomy By Matt Apuzzo The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Civil rights lawyers on Monday raised the first opposition to New York Police Department efforts to spy on Muslims, an operation that politicians have been reluctant to even discuss. The lawyers asked a federal judge in Manhattan to force the NYPD to turn over records about clandestine police programs that monitored all aspects of daily life

in Muslim neighborhoods. The request represents the first official action against the NYPD since The Associated Press revealed how the police intelligence programs operate. A small number of Capitol Hill and New York lawmakers have called for greater oversight and controls over the police department’s intelligence unit. But most in politics, including President Barack Obama, have shown

no interest in even talking about what the NYPD is doing, much less saying whether they support it. That reluctance shows how, a decade after the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, the nation still isn’t sure how it wants police to prevent terrorism. Despite speeches, policy papers and press releases about cooperating with Muslim communities, most politicians see only political risk in speaking for or against programs that

singled out Muslims for investigations aimed at preventing another attack. In speeches, Obama has spoken out against casting suspicion of Muslims. He has equated discrimination against Muslims with the racial inequities that led to the civil rights era. Obama also has said that the war against terrorism must not be seen as a war against Islam. Obama has been silent, however, about whether he

supports the NYPD surveillance programs that, as the AP’s investigation revealed, used plainclothes officers to eavesdrop inside businesses. Restaurants serving Muslims were identified and photographed. Hundreds of mosques were investigated. Dozens were infiltrated. Police also maintained a list of 28 countries that, along with “American Black Muslim,” were labeled “ancestries of interest.”


BUSINESS

Calendar, B2 News of Record, B2

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2011

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NASDAQ

CLOSE 2,335.83 CHANGE -79.57 -3.29%

IN BRIEF State economic index declines Oregon’s economy declined in August for the fifth straight month, according to a statewide economic index released Monday. The University of Oregon Index of Economic Indicators dropped 1.3 percent, to 89, in August, according to UO economist Tim Duy, the report’s author. In the past, declines of this length have foreshadowed labor market recessions in Oregon, Duy wrote. Consumer confidence dropped sharply in August, according to the report, and the financial markets became more cautious. While the index might be overstating concerns about recession, Duy wrote, “the economy is clearly very fragile … .”

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Tech Focus, B3 Stock listings, B4-5

www.bendbulletin.com/business CLOSE 10,655.30 CHANGE -258.08 -2.36%

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CLOSE 1,099.23 CHANGE -32.19 -2.85%

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$1656.00 s SILVER GOLD CLOSE CHANGE +$35.60

Warm Springs dealt setback Stocks in push to host drone testing close By Jordan Novet The Bulletin

The Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs hit a snag recently in a drive to test aerial drones on the reservation when it found out it does not meet a major requirement. The Federal Aviation Administration said it does not consider the tribes to be a

public entity, said Jeff Anspach, CEO of Warm Springs Ventures, the reservation’s economic development division. But Anspach said Monday he’s not discouraged. He said he and others behind the push to start a testing area on the reservation will now seek to partner with a known public entity — such as a university, a county or even a federal agency — which

can act as the sponsor and help apply for a certificate of authorization, the official FAA approval for unmanned aerial testing. The initiative at Warm Springs is one of numerous efforts around the region, state and nation to create testing areas for unmanned aerial vehicles as a way to increase jobs and industry. See Drones / B5

Starbucks pushes jobs program PORTLAND — Starbucks hopes customers will pay at least $5 more when they stop in for a cup of Joe. Starting Nov. 1, Starbucks will begin collecting donations of $5 or more to stimulate U.S. job growth through its “Jobs for USA” program. The Seattle-based chain is collaborating with the Opportunity Finance Network, a nonprofit that works with nearly 200 community development financial institutions to provide loans to small businesses and community groups. Starbucks says all of the donations will go toward loans for organizations that can add jobs or stem job losses.

EXECUTIVE FILE

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Ruff Wear owner Patrick Kruse and Max, a 2-year-old black Labrador mix and product tester, display a variety of Ruff Wear products on Wednesday at the company’s store in NorthWest Crossing.

Ruff Wear keeps the tails wagging By Ed Merriman The Bulletin

Patrick Kruse founded Bend-based Ruff Wear in response to a friend’s challenge to invent something less cumbersome than a metal or plastic bowl to provide water for dogs on the trail. His solution: a foldable dog bowl made out of waterproof tent fabric. Kruse decided to take 15 of the fabric bowls to the Outdoor Retailer Trade Show in 1994. He came away with 8,000 orders, mostly from the L.L Bean company, and decided to incorporate the business that year, he said. Since then, Ruff Wear’s product line has

grown to dozens of outdoor gear products for dogs, such as life jackets, coats, harnesses, boots, packs and apparel, along with the original “Quencher Bowl.” Kruse, 50, said all of the products are designed to solve problems reported by dog owners who take their K-9 friends on outdoor adventures like hiking, biking and kayaking. The business, which now employs 23, has distribution and product sales across the United States and 25 countries, Kruse said. He founded the company in Seal Beach, Calif., and relocated to Bend in 1996 for the outdoor lifestyle and recreational opportunities. See Ruff Wear / B6

The basics Who: Patrick Kruse, owner, founder, research and development director Company: Ruff Wear Employees: 23 Address: 561 N.W. York Drive, Bend Phone: 541-388-1821 Website: www.ruffwear. com

U.S. auto sales rise 9.9 percent DETROIT — Auto sales defied a downcast economy in September, climbing 9.9 percent to their highest level in five months. All three Detroit automakers reported gains, led by a 27.2 percent year-over-year increase for Chrysler. — Staff and wire reports

Manufacturing Purchasing Managers’ Index readings of greater than 50 indicate growth in the manufacturing economy.

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Report: Fannie Mae knew of foreclosure abuses in ‘03 By Gretchen Morgenson New York Times News Service

Fannie Mae, the mortgage finance giant, learned as early as 2003 of extensive foreclosure abuses among the law firms it had hired to remove troubled borrowers from their homes. But the

company did little to correct the firms’ practices, according to a report issued today. Only after news reports in mid-2010 began to describe the dubious practices, like the routine filing of false pleadings in bankruptcy

courts, did Fannie Mae’s overseer start to scrutinize the conduct. The report was critical of that overseer, the Federal Housing Finance Agency, and was prepared by the agency’s inspector general. See Fannie / B6

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Falling wages pose real economic threat By Shobhana Chandra and Steve Matthews

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Bloomberg News OND J FMAMJ J AS 2011

Source: Institute for Supply Management AP

sharply lower By Joshua Brustein and Eric Dash New York Times News Service

Bend beers win festival awards Three Bend breweries each won at least one medal at the 30th annual Great American Beer Festival, held Thursday through Saturday at the Colorado Convention Center in Denver, according to a list released by the Brewers Association, which organizes the event. Deschutes Brewery won three medals, including the gold for wood- and barrel-aged strong stouts. Silver Moon Brewing won two, including the gold for foreign-style stouts. Bend Brewing Co. won the bronze medal for American-style sour ales.

CLOSE $30.750 CHANGE +$0.709

WASHINGTON — Ninetyone percent of people in the U.S. labor force have a job. That may be the extent of the good news for these Ameri-

ANALYSIS cans, whose incomes tell a darker story. Take-home pay, adjusted for prices, fell 0.3 percent in August, and personal income dropped for the first time in

two years, the Commerce Department reported last week. The declines followed news from the Census Bureau that median household income in 2010 fell to $49,445, the lowest in more than a decade. See Wages / B5

From banks to airlines, stocks in every major sector spiraled downward Monday as the market dropped to its lowest point in more than a year amid anxiety over the European debt crisis and the struggling United States economy. Shares of the nation’s biggest banks were once again hard hit, with Citigroup and Bank of America plunging almost 10 percent while regional and community banks also saw their stock prices plummet. American Airlines fell by almost a third to just below $2 amid speculation it could fall into bankruptcy. The sharp sell-off Monday brought Wall Street to the edge of a bear market — generally a fall of 20 percent from recent high — as the Standard & Poor’s 500-stock index marked a 19.4 percent decline since its April 29 high. That, in turn, could unleash yet another wave of negative news that could spook investors and push stocks even lower. “People are really panicked, so any more incremental news in that direction, bad headlines if you will, are certainly things that may spur momentum to the downside,” said Jeffrey Kleintop, chief market strategist for LPL Financial. On Monday, the S&P 500 was down 2.85 percent, or 32.19 points. The Dow Jones industrial average was off 258.08 points, or 2.36 percent, to close at 10655.30, and the Nasdaq composite index dropped 3.29 percent. Major stock markets in Europe and Japan also closed lower Monday. Desperately seeking safer assets, investors flocked to U.S. Treasury bonds. Yields fell to 1.75 percent from 1.92 percent late Friday. See Stocks / B5


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THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2011

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If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact Marla Polenz at 541-617-7815, email business@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� at www.bendbulletin.com. Please allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication.

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TODAY BEND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ADVISORY BOARD MEETING: Monthly meeting held in the board room. For additional information contact Jon Skidmore; free; 7 a.m.; City Hall, 710 N.W. Wall St.; 541350-3783. YOU ON YOUR BEST DAY: Michael Allosso will discuss how he believes everyone is a leader and leadership is how you interact with and treat others. Allosso will offer tools to improve communication style and make conversations and meetings more productive. Buffet breakfast included and registration required; $59; 7-11:30 a.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Campus Center, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. SOCIAL SECURITY UPDATES FOR 2011: Presented by Anna Robbins, Edward Jones Financial Advisor, and includes Tim Nein of Genworth Financial and Micah Smith, Social Security Administration claims representative. RSVP to Lynn Hobson; free; noon-1 p.m.; Humane Society of Central Oregon, 61170 S.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-330-4329.

WEDNESDAY BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WEEKLY MEETING: Starts promptly at 7 a.m.; free; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-550-6603. HOW TO START A BUSINESS: Registration is required; $15; 6-8 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7290 or http://non credit.cocc.edu.

THURSDAY BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WEEKLY MEETING: Starts promptly at 7 a.m.; free; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541-610-9125. BBG BEND BUSINESS GROUP: Weekly meeting. Guests please preregister with Matt Bassitt; free; 7:30 a.m.; Phoenix Inn Suites Bend, 300 N.W. Franklin Ave.; 541-323-7000. LEADERSHIP SERIES: Ninemonth seminar series held the first Thursday of each month; $645 for the series or $85 for each individual seminar; 8 a.m.noon; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-83-7290 or http://non credit.cocc.edu. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happy hourtraining.com.

SUSTAINABLE BUILDING ADVISOR COURSE INFORMATIONAL MEETING: Learn about Central Oregon Community College’s nine-month program for building professionals looking for training to apply sustainable concepts; free; 5:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Boyle Education Center, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu/build ing/default.aspx. THE ART OF SELLING YOUR ARTS AND CRAFTS: Four-evening class. Registration required; $49; 6:30-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

FRIDAY TOWN HALL BREAKFAST, THE FUTURE OF EDUCATION IN CENTRAL OREGON: Bend-La Pine Schools Superintendent Ron Wilkinson, OSU-Cascades Campus Vice President Becky Johnson and Central Oregon Community College President Jim Middleton present a state of the schools address, discuss budgeting strategies and share plans for the future; $30 for Bend Chamber members, $40 for others; 7:30 a.m.; Bend Golf and Country Club, 61045 Country Club Drive; 541-382-3221 or www.bend chamber.org. EDWARD JONES COFFEE CLUB: Current market and economic update including current rates; free; 9 a.m.; Ponderosa Coffee House, 61292 S. U.S. Highway 97, Suite 105, Bend; 541-617-8861. WORK ZONE FLAGGER CLASS: Covers the fundamentals of traffic safety and meets the requirements of ODOT’s construction specifications. Registration required; $79; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. STRATEGIC MARKETING: Three Friday morning classes. Registration required; $59; 10 a.m.-noon; COCC - Crook County Open Campus, 510 S.E. Lynn Blvd., Prineville; 541-383-7270 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu. FREE TAX FRIDAY: Tax return reviews. Call to schedule an appointment; free; 3-4 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666 or www.facebook.com/Zoomtax.

MONDAY FORECLOSURE PREVENTION CLASS: Learn about NeighborImpact’s Housing Center tools and services which can assist individuals struggling to pay their mortgages; free; 5:30-7:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 20310 Empire Ave., Suite A110, Bend; 541-3187506, ext. 109, karenb@neighbor

impact.org or www.homeowner shipcenter.org. WORRIED ABOUT MAKING HOUSE PAYMENTS?: Learn what to do if you fall behind. Registration required; free; 5:30-7:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 20310 Empire Ave., Suite A110, Bend; 541-3187506, ext. 109.

TUESDAY Oct. 11 OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541447-6384 or www.happyhour training.com. HOMEBUYING CLASS: Registration required; free; 5:30-9:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 2303 S.W. First St., Redmond; 541-318-7506, ext. 109. BEGINNING QUICKBOOKS PRO: Two-evening class. Registration required; $59; 6-9 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-383-7270 or http://non credit.cocc.edu. DREAMWEAVER, INTERMEDIATE: Three-evening classes. Registration required; $89; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit .cocc.edu. EXCEL 2010 BEGINNING: Two-evening class. Registration required; $59; 6-9 p.m.; La Pine High School, 51633 Coach Road; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit .cocc.edu. BUILDING A BETTER BEND LECTURE: Mary Bosch, principal with Marketek and an economic development consultant and planner will discuss: “Drawing People to Neighborhood Shopping Districts and Creating Value;�; $8; 7-9 p.m.; Bend Park & Recreation District Office, Community Room, 799 S.W. Columbia St.; 541-389-7275 or www.buildingabetterbend.org.

WEDNESDAY Oct. 12 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WEEKLY MEETING: Starts promptly at 7 a.m.; free; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-550-6603. BUSINESS SUCCESS PROGRAM, HIRING THE RIGHT EMPLOYEES: JD Mowlds and Nancy GammondMoody with BBSI will discuss best practices for hiring the right employees; free; 7:30-9 a.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3823221 or www.bendchamber.org.

SBA LOAN BRIEFING: Briefing on financing for small business. Registration required; free; noon-1 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Redmond campus, 2030 S.E. College Loop, Redmond; 541-3837290 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. CROOKED RIVER RANCH-TERREBONNE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE NETWORKING SOCIAL: Free; 5:30 p.m.; Home Federal Bank, 8222 N. U.S. Highway 97, Suite 2110,; 541923-2679 or www.crrchamber.com. HOMEBUYING CLASS: Registration required; free; 5:30-9:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 2303 S.W. First St., Redmond; 541-318-7506, ext. 109. ACCESS 2010, BEGINNING: Two-evening class. Registration required; $59; 6-9 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. INTERMEDIATE PHOTOSHOP: Two-evening class. Registration required; $69; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. SBA LOAN BRIEFING: Briefing on financing for small business. Registration required; free; 6-7 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7290 or http://non credit.cocc.edu.

THURSDAY Oct. 13 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WEEKLY MEETING: Starts promptly at 7 a.m.; free; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541-610-9125. BBG BEND BUSINESS GROUP: Weekly meeting. Guests please pre-register with Matt Bassitt; free; 7:30 a.m.; Phoenix Inn Suites Bend, 300 N.W. Franklin Ave.; 541323-7000. 2011 SUSTAINABILITY AWARDS: The Environmental Center presents its second annual sustainability awards to businesses, organizations and individuals. Registration required; $20 per person; 4:306:30 p.m.; The Oxford Hotel, 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541385-6908, nikki@envirocenter.org or http://envirocenter.org/get-involved/2010-sustainability-awards. RECRUITING AND ENGAGING DYNAMIC BOARD MEMBERS: Registration required; $39; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://non credit.cocc.edu. THE ALMOST PAPERLESS OFFICE: Three-evening course. Learn how to work toward eliminating paper piles and files. Registration required; $59; 6:30-8 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu.

Deschutes County

Green Holdings LLC to Maegan Zornado, Forum Meadow, Lot 13, $163,000 Richard Clyde Higgins trustee of the Higgins Survivor Trust of the Higgins Revocable Trust, Rexford W. Bolling and Michael R. Bolling to Rodney D. Stuve and Karen L. Stuve, Forest Meadow, Phase 1, Lot 27, $227,000 William W. Huggin and Tricia Huggin to Ryan B. Baldwin and Wendy F. Norris, Campbell Road, Lot 4, $527,500 Northwest Trustee Services Inc. to Federal National Mortgage Association, Lake Parke Estates, Lot 1, Block 2, $158,647.67 Alexis N. Archer to Linda A. Blake, Arthur L. Dickson and Margaret E. Dickson, Township 18, Range 13, Section 4, $180,000 Charles Simak and Bentley Morgan to Treehouse Properties LLC, Boulevard Addition to Bend, Lot 1, Block 21, $270,000 Fidelity National Title Insurance Co. to Loyal Land LLC, Township 15, Range 12, Sections 20, 21, 29, 30, $8,000,000 Gary F. Wallace and Jeanne L. Wallace trustees of Wallace Family Revocable Living Trust to HBP LLC, Township 14, Range 10, Section 24, $275,000 Douglas F. Lyle and Pamela E. Lyle to David M. Burke, Lisa L. Burke and Betty J. Arnold, Deer Park 2, Lot 2, Block 14, $305,000 Fannie Mae aka Federal National Mortgage Association to Todd Layport, Cascade View Estates, Phase 4, Lot 249, $210,000 Doug Steakley and Jacqueline L. Steakley to Laureen Dunning, Parks at Broken Top, Phase 2, Lot 75, $215,000 Judith E. Massolo to David A. Fiocchi II, Ridgepointe, Lot 22, $150,000 Lorne Martin and Mary Martin to Thomas A. Leland and Renee M.

Leland, Deschutes River Woods, Lot 23, Block H, $265,000 Vergent LLC to Gail M. Lewis, Shevlin Ridge, Phase 4, Lot 77, $566,000 Herman F. Ebster Jr. and Shirley J. Ebster to Joby D. Renfro, Atop the Summit Phases 1 and 2, Lot 8, $235,000 Robert N. Sweeney and Shirley M. Sweeney trustees of Sweeney Living Trust to James P. Noble and Anita J. Noble, First Addition River Forest Acres, Lot 12, Block 2, $300,000 David L. Parker and Carol A. Parker trustees of Parker Living Trust to David J. Cummings and Tammy E. Cummings, Aspen Rim, Lot 41, $249,000 Lambert B. Neighbour to Zachary Critchett, Deschutes River Woods, Lot 2, Block TT, $174,900 Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. to Laura M. Aaland, Highland Addition, Lot 1, Block 17, $168,000 Wells Fargo Bank N.A. to Ryan McNulty and Jill Trekell, Crest Ridge Estates, Lot 20, Block 3, $400,000 Ray E. Clarno and Clarno Cattle Company to United States of America, Township 18, Range 14, Section 16, $279,000 Shirley M.W. Champlin trustee of Peter G. and Shirley M.W. Champlin Trust Fund A and Fund B to David L. Dewey and Joann V. Dewey trustees of Dewey Family Revocable Trust, Mountain High, Lot 1, Block 16, $350,000 Redmond Commuity Ventures LLC to Edmund J. Bartholemy and Katherine L. Bartholemy, Township 15, Range 13, Section 19, $400,000 Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. receiver for Liberty Bank to Bend Development Associates I LLC, Township 18, Range 12, Section 9, $1,400,000 Citimortgage Inc to Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp., Tillicum Village Third Addition,

Lot 5, Block 16, $160,174.68 Northwest Trustee Services Inc. to Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp., RiverRim P.U.D., Phase 1, Lot 32, $186,500 Recontrust Company N.A. to Davidson Family Trust, Highlands at Broken Top, Phase 1, Lot 4, $319,501 Robert L. Smith and Charlotte A. Smith to William L. Wilson and Penny A. Wilson trustees of Wilson Family Revocable Trust, Oregon Water Wonderland Unit 2, Lot 45, Block 31, $375,000 Vergent LLC to David A. Crowfoot and Hilma A. Crowfoot, Rockwood Estates,

The Associated Press SALINAS, Calif. — A California farm that issued a voluntary lettuce recall over listeria contamination concerns said its notice has gone out to 19 states and Canada. True Leaf Farms of Salinas initially announced a recall of 90 cartons of romaine lettuce shipped to an Oregon food service distributor, which shipped the produce to Washington and Idaho. But the chief executive of Church Brothers, which sells and markets the farm’s produce, clarified Saturday that the recall involved nearly 2,500 cartons. Only 90 cartons went to retail sales, said CEO Steve Church, and those were the ones mentioned in the initial announcement. The rest of the cartons, Church said, went to institutions such as restaurants and cafeterias, which were notified about the recall. The company recalled the 33,000 pounds of lettuce after a check by federal officials found that a sample from one bag tested positive for listeria. No illnesses have been reported. The chopped and bagged lettuce, grown in Watsonville and processed in San Juan Bautista, was shipped Sept. 12 and 13. The recall covers

products with a “use by date� of Sept. 29. The bag and box code is B256-46438-8. The states covered by the recall include Oregon, Alaska, Alabama, Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Illinois, Kentucky, Maryland, Minnesota, Missouri, Nevada, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee and Vermont. Lettuce currently picked at the Salinas farm is safe to eat, Church said. A listeria outbreak linked to cantaloupes from a Colorado farm has caused at least 72 illnesses, including up to 16 deaths, in 18 states. The Salinas Valley is known as the “Salad Bowl of the World� for its production of lettuce and numerous other crops. The Food and Drug Administration, which is investigating the contamination, has not yet identified the source of listeria, said FDA spokeswoman Stephanie Yao. The lettuce recall, Yao said, is not related to the recall of cantaloupes due to listeria. Listeria rarely shows up in produce, but federal health officials say they’ve gotten better at detecting the germs that cause food poisoning, so they are seeing them in produce more often.

A Magazine Highlighting The Variety Of Organizations That Connect Your Community.

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Listeria prompts recall of lettuce from California

Phase 4, Lot 17, $315,000 Robert W. Phillips and Lisa L. Phillips to Robert T. Cary trustee of Robert Todd Cary 2005 Trust and Corol A. Fontana trustee of Corol Ann Fontana 1996 Trust, Parks at Broken Top, Phase 2, Lot 86, $395,000 Recontrust Company N.A. to East Coast Properties LLC, Highland Addition, Lot 6, Block 17, $192,000 Crook County

Marion L. Coffman to Robert L. Dunn and Theresa L. Dunn trustees of the Dunn Family Community Property Trust, Partition Plat 2010-02, Parcel 3, $280,000

Publishing Sunday, December 11, 2011 in The Bulletin Central Oregon communities continue to grow due to a nationallyrecognized appreciation for the region’s quality of life. From providing the most basic needs of food, shelter and security, to creating and maintaining positive social, educational, recreational and professional environments, Central Oregon’s nonprofit community is a foundation for our area’s success and sustainability. Hundreds of organizations and thousands of volunteers make up this nonprofit network. Through the publication of Connections, The Bulletin will both define and profile the organizations that make up this network. Connections will provide readers with a thorough look at nonprofit organizations in Deschutes, Jefferson, and Crook Counties.

CALL 541.382.1811 TO RESERVE YOUR SPACE TODAY.

ATTENTION CENTRAL OREGON NONPROFIT GROUPS The Bulletin is in the process of verifying and compiling a comprehensive list of nonprofit entities in Central Oregon. Please fill out this form to verify information in order to be considered for publication in Connections. Mail back to: The Bulletin, Attn: Nicole Werner, P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708. E-mail information to nwerner@bendbulletin.com or call 541-382-1811 ext. 871

Name of Nonprofit Group ______________________________________ Contact Person ______________________________________________ Phone _______________ E-mail ________________________________ Nonprofit Mission Statement/Purpose_____________________________ __________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________


TUESDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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An annoying piece of fruit Rhapsody to buy may be ripe for prime time music rival Napster By Ben Fritz

By Brooks Barnes

Los Angeles Times

New York Times News Service

LOS ANGELES — In a sign that Best Buy Co.’s digital music ambitions have fizzled, the retail giant is selling its subscription online music service Napster to Rhapsody in exchange for an undisclosed equity stake in the combined company. The deal comes just three years after Best Buy acquired Napster for $121 million in cash with the aim of building a vibrant digital music business to supplant plummeting CD sales. But Napster, which does not disclose its user base, has failed

LOS ANGELES — There is little doubt that Dane Boedigheimer has created an online sensation that struck a pop cultural nerve. The “Annoying Orange” Web videos he’s been rolling out for the past two years have racked up more than 800 million views on You Tube, where the threshold for a runaway hit is about 50 million. Sprint and Dole have paid to use his wise-cracking cartoon creation in marketing campaigns, and Toys R Us, Radio Shack and J.C. Penney are rolling out related merchandise for the Christmas season. But TV channels and movie studios have yet to bite on Boedigheimer’s videos, which feature the kitchen adventures of an animated orange with a sinister smile and his buddies from the fruit and vegetable bins. And Boedigheimer, 31, isn’t waiting for their courtship. After receiving lukewarm responses to his informal overtures for an “Annoying Orange” television show, he opted for an alternative route: He’s made his own pilot, financed not by a studio or network, but by the management company representing him. “The reaction is always, ‘I see why it resonates in a bitesized way on the Web, but how is this a full-blown TV show?’” said Dan Weinstein, one of Boedigheimer’s managers.

Monica Almeida / New York Times News Service

Dane Boedigheimer, the creator of “Annoying Orange,” produces his hit YouTube videos in his Los Angeles home.

New York Times News Service

A screen grab shows a scene from an “Annoying Orange” video.

The creaky TV mill Maybe it isn’t. There’s certainly no guarantee that a cartoon orange can become the next SpongeBob SquarePants. But Web video was supposed to be Hollywood’s greatest laboratory ever, a place to incubate ideas on the cheap and take some of the stomachchurning guesswork out of selecting concepts for shows and movies — instead of spending millions to develop entertainment that more often than not flops straight out of the gate. Six years after the proliferation of Web video, the number of entertainment concepts that have moved from Internet shorts to successful television shows is extremely low. Hollywood still largely relies on its time-tested methods of finding hits: scripts funneled through agencies, young comedians, books, magazine articles. Part of the problem, at least in the eyes of Boedigheimer and his managers, involves TV’s systemized development process. When network or studio teams do find something online with potential, they push it through the same creaky mill — focus groups, executive scrutiny — that they have

relied on for decades to refine raw ideas into great entertainment (or at least commercially viable entertainment). It’s a process that can take two years, a delay during which the online spark could easily blow out. A new YouTube sensation could steal your thunder. “You get pushed around for months on end and so many voices get involved that the original voice — what was special — gets diluted or ruined,” said Gary Binkow, a partner at The Collective, the management company that represents Boedigheimer.

DIY programming So Boedigheimer and The Collective are making the pilot themselves, with the managers picking up the bill. Aside from speed, the costs are lower. Making a 30-minute animated pilot through Hollywood channels (the route “SpongeBob” took) costs about $1 million. The “Annoying Orange” pilot will cost a few hundred thousand dollars. Conrad Vernon, one of the directors of “Shrek 2” and other DreamWorks Animation movies, is producing the pilot,

which was co-written by Tom Sheppard, an Emmy winner for “Pinky and the Brain.” The Collective plans to shop it to networks starting next week. The target audience is children 6 to 12. Trying to buck the industry’s deeply entrenched systems is a risk, but one The Collective thinks it is worth taking. “Annoying Orange” has a lot going for it, including pun-strewn dialogue and the kind of sophomoric humor that is catnip to young boys and looped college students; episodes typically showcase a guest food getting chopped to bits. (In “Annoying Orange: A Cheesy Episode,” a talking chunk of Parmesan gets shredded with a grater. “That looks really degrading,” Orange quips.) It has tonal similarities to both “Beavis and Butt-Head” and “South Park” and features celebrity cameos. (James Caan voiced a jalapeno.)

What the audience wants But there are also liabilities. The crude animation that looks charming online would look cheap on TV. The “Annoying Orange” setting is ex-

tremely confining — a kitchen counter. And YouTube success itself can be off-putting. The entertainment industry’s senior ranks are still populated with people who, deep down, believe that the audience doesn’t tell them what it wants; they tell the audience. The goal of the “Annoying Orange” pilot is to prove to skeptical television executives that “Annoying Orange” can “embrace the biggest audience possible,” Boedigheimer said, while “maintaining the attitude and charm.” It relocates Orange and his buddies (Grandpa Lemon, Midget Apple) to a magical fruit cart that can travel in time. One segment features a knight who kidnaps Orange’s love interest, Passion Fruit, while another is set during the Revolutionary War. Even if Hollywood remains unpersuaded, “Annoying Orange” is about to become ubiquitous at the mall. The Collective on Monday plans to announce that it has secured a wide-ranging merchandise deal for the fruit. Themed Tshirts will arrive at Penney’s stores nationwide in October; Toys R Us will “prominently position” talking plush Oranges and related backpack adornments, among other items, in its stores, according to Richard Barry, a vice president of the chain. “We think the irreverent humor is right on trend,” Barry said.

to gain much ground against industry giant iTunes despite promotions in Best Buy’s retail locations. Gartner analyst Michael McGuire estimated that Napster has 200,000 to 300,000 subscribers, down from 700,000 when Best Buy acquired the company in 2008. Rhapsody, based in Seattle, has more than 800,000 subscribers. The market for online music has become much more competitive in the U.S. recently with the launch of ad-supported service Spotify and cloud offerings from Google and Amazon.com.

Company to help authors capitalize on e-book market By Julie Bosman New York Times News Service

The Perseus Books Group has created a distribution and marketing service that will allow authors to self-publish their own e-books, the company said on Sunday. The new service will give authors an alternative to other self-publishing services and a favorable revenue split that is unusual in the industry: 70 percent to the author and 30 percent to the distributor. Traditional publishers normally provide authors a royalty of about 25 percent for e-books. The service arrives as authors are increasingly looking for ways to circumvent the traditional publishing model, take advantage of the infinite shelf space of the ebook world and release their own work. That’s especially the case for reviving out-ofprint books whose rights have reverted back to the author. Bloomsbury, a publisher based in Britain, said on Wednesday it had created

a new publishing arm that would release digital-only titles. Companies like Open Road Integrated Media have successfully published digital editions of backlist books whose rights were not held by a publisher. The new Perseus unit, called Argo Navis Author Services, will be available only to authors who are represented by an agency that has signed an agreement with Perseus. David Steinberger, the president and chief executive of the Perseus Books Group, said that the company had made an agreement with one major literary agency: Janklow & Nesbit Associates, whose authors include Ann Beattie, Anne Rice and Diane Johnson. Curtis Brown Ltd., which represents Karen Armstrong and Jim Collins, is also close to signing an agreement to make Argo Navis available to their authors. Perseus is in discussions with more than a dozen other agencies.

Local Service. Local Knowledge. 541-848-4444 1000 SW Disk Dr. • Bend www.highdesertbank.com

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Consolidated stock listings C

A-B-C-D AAR 0.30 ABB Ltd 0.64 ABM 0.56 ACE Ltd 1.36 ACI Wwde AES Corp AFLAC 1.20 AGCO AGL Res 1.80 AK Steel 0.20 AMC Net n AMR AMR Cp 39 1.97 AOL APACC ASML Hld 0.58 AT&T Inc 1.72 ATP O&G AU Optron 0.14 AVI Bio AXT Inc Aarons 0.05 AbtLab 1.92 AberFitc 0.70 AbdAsPac 0.42 AbitibiB n Abraxas AcaciaTc AcadiaPh AcadiaRlt 0.72 Accenture 1.35 AccoBrds AccretivH Accuray Accuride n Achillion AcmePkt AcordaTh ActivePwr ActivsBliz 0.17 Actuant 0.04 Actuate Acuity 0.52 Acxiom AdobeSy Adtran 0.36 AdvAmer 0.25 AdvAuto 0.24 AdvATech AdvBattery AdvEnId AMD AdvSemi 0.11 AdvOil&Gs Adventrx AdvActBear AecomTch AegeanMP 0.04 Aegon AerCap Aeropostl AEterna g Aetna 0.60 AffilMgrs Affymax Affymetrix AgFeed Agilent Agnico g 0.64 Agrium g 0.11 AirLease n AirProd 2.32 Aircastle 0.50 Airgas 1.28 Aixtron 0.84 AkamaiT Akorn AlskAir AlaskCom 0.86 Albemarle 0.66 AlcatelLuc Alcoa 0.12 Alere AlexREE 1.88 AlexcoR g Alexion s AlignTech Alkermes AllegTch 0.72 Allergan 0.20 Allete 1.78 AlliData AlliancOne AlliBInco 0.48 AlliantEgy 1.70 AlliantTch 0.80 AlldNevG AllosThera AllscriptH Allstate 0.84 AlonUSA 0.16 AlphaNRs Alphatec AlpGPPrp 0.60 AlpTotDiv 0.66 AlpAlerMLP 0.99 AlteraCp lf 0.32 AlterraCap 0.56 Altria 1.64 Alumina 0.28 AlumChina 0.04 AmBev s 1.16 Amarin Amazon Amdocs Amedisys Ameren 1.54 Amerigrp AMovilL s 0.41 AmAxle AmCampus 1.35 ACapAgy 5.60 AmCapLtd AEagleOut 0.44 AEP 1.84 AEqInvLf 0.10 AmExp 0.72 AFnclGrp 0.70 AGreet 0.60 AmIntlGrp AmSupr AmTower AVangrd 0.08 AmWtrWks 0.92 Ameriprise 0.92 AmeriBrgn 0.46 Ametek s 0.24 Amgen 1.12 AmkorT lf Amphenol 0.06 Amylin Anadarko 0.36 Anadigc AnalogDev 1.00 Ancestry AnglogldA 0.22 ABInBev 1.16 Anixter 3.25 Ann Inc Annaly 2.59 Ansys AntaresP Anworth 0.95 Aon Corp 0.60 A123 Sys Apache 0.60 AptInv 0.48 ApolloGM n 0.46 ApolloGrp ApolloInv 1.12 Apple Inc ApldIndlT 0.76 ApldMatl 0.32 AMCC Approach AquaAm 0.66 ArcelorMit 0.75 ArchCap s ArchCh 0.80 ArchCoal 0.44 ArchDan 0.64 ArcosDor n 0.12 ArenaPhm AresCap 1.40 AriadP Ariba Inc ArkBest 0.12 ArmHld 0.15 ArmourRsd 1.32 ArrayBio Arris ArrowEl ArtioGInv 0.24 ArubaNet AsburyA AscenaRtl AshfordHT 0.40 Ashland 0.70 AsiaInfoL AspenIns 0.60 AspenTech AsscdBanc 0.04 AsdEstat 0.68 Assurant 0.72 AssuredG 0.18 AstexPhm AstoriaF 0.52 AstraZen 2.70 athenahlth AtlPwr g 1.09 AtlasEngy 0.88 AtlasPpln 1.88 Atmel ATMOS 1.36 AtwoodOcn AudCodes Augusta g AuRico g Aurizon g AutoNatn Autodesk Autoliv 1.80 AutoData 1.44 AutoZone Auxilium AvagoTch 0.44 AvalRare n AvalonBay 3.57 AvanirPhm AveryD 1.00 AvisBudg Avista 1.10 Avnet Avon 0.92 Axcelis AXIS Cap 0.92 B&G Foods 0.84 BB&T Cp 0.64 BCE g 2.07

15.17 16.42 17.85 59.11 25.26 9.44 33.57 32.39 39.00 5.77 31.46 1.98 13.05 11.40 8.51 33.50 28.16 6.65 3.77 .98 4.61 24.37 50.15 59.65 6.40 14.06 2.30 32.78 .92 17.85 51.62 4.46 19.78 3.62 4.53 4.01 40.15 18.71 1.15 11.95 18.40 5.15 33.97 9.51 23.26 25.99 7.12 56.30 4.21 .99 8.01 4.53 4.05 3.76 .88 29.92 16.84 3.73 3.83 9.19 10.19 1.43 34.33 72.88 4.24 4.74 .40 29.40 58.32 64.09 17.96 73.87 8.83 62.47 13.47 18.65 7.55 51.32 5.91 39.00 2.42 8.90 18.51 57.19 6.42 60.87 14.26 13.98 33.75 79.63 35.95 88.08 2.31 8.00 37.97 53.49 34.83 1.68 16.99 22.71 5.47 16.04 1.91 5.06 4.38 15.00 30.87 18.21 26.56 5.49 10.65 29.92 8.37 211.98 26.01 13.40 29.01 38.00 21.50 7.01 36.15 25.89 6.36 11.32 37.15 8.17 43.48 30.26 17.83 20.46 3.42 52.86 11.00 29.27 37.34 35.74 31.43 53.90 4.27 39.80 8.26 60.53 1.93 31.07 21.98 40.70 52.56 45.10 21.68 15.84 46.52 2.14 6.39 40.62 3.02 76.50 20.71 9.61 38.38 7.10 374.60 25.98 9.85 4.81 15.30 20.73 15.50 31.93 46.88 13.22 24.16 22.00 1.30 13.26 8.03 26.49 15.01 24.82 5.91 1.77 9.91 25.98 7.21 20.58 15.52 25.34 6.59 42.79 6.40 22.16 14.67 9.15 14.57 34.07 10.35 1.80 7.33 43.86 56.03 13.57 17.20 28.30 7.45 30.97 31.98 2.29 2.73 9.20 5.00 31.54 25.45 46.14 46.47 311.88 14.49 31.89 2.42 110.78 2.67 23.97 8.89 23.64 24.77 18.97 1.08 25.32 16.00 20.58 36.99

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BE Aero BGC Ptrs 0.68 BHP BillLt 2.02 BHPBil plc 2.02 BJsRest BMC Sft BP PLC 1.68 BPZ Res BRE 1.50 BRFBrasil 0.35 BabckWil Baidu BakrHu 0.60 BallCp s 0.28 BallyTech BanColum 1.36 BcBilVArg 0.61 BcoBrades 0.80 BcoMacro 2.08 BcoSantSA 0.82 BcoSBrasil 1.65 BcSanChile 3.29 BcpSouth 0.04 BkofAm 0.04 BkAm pfH 2.05 BkAm wtA BkAML pfQ 2.16 BkHawaii 1.80 BkIrelnd BkMont g 2.80 BkNYMel 0.52 BkNova g 2.08 Bankrate n BarcUBS36 BarcGSOil BiPCop BiPGrain Barclay 0.36 Bar iPVix rs BarVixMdT Bard 0.76 BarnesNob BarrickG 0.48 BasicEnSv Baxter 1.24 BaytexE g 2.40 BeaconP rs BeacnRfg Beam wi BeazerHm BebeStrs 0.10 BectDck 1.64 BedBath Belden 0.20 Belo 0.20 Bemis 0.96 BenchElec Berkley 0.32 BerkH B BerryPet 0.32 BestBuy 0.64 BigLots BigBandN BBarrett BioDlvry lf Biodel BiogenIdc BioMarin BioMedR 0.80 BioSante BioScrip BlkHillsCp 1.46 BlkRKelso 1.04 Blkboard BlackRock 5.50 BlkBldAm 1.42 BlkEEqDv 0.68 BlkGlbOp 2.28 BlkIntlG&I 1.36 Blackstone 0.40 BlockHR 0.60 Blount BlueCoat BdwlkPpl 2.10 Boeing 1.68 Boise Inc 0.80 BorgWarn BostPrv 0.04 BostProp 2.00 BostonSci BoydGm BradyCp 0.74 Brandyw 0.60 Braskem 1.05 BreitBurn 1.69 BridgptEd BrigStrat 0.44 BrigExp Brightpnt Brigus grs Brinker 0.64 Brinks 0.40 BrMySq 1.32 BristowGp 0.60 BritATob 3.86 Broadcom 0.36 BroadrdgF 0.64 BroadSoft Broadwd h BrcdeCm Brookdale BrkfldAs g 0.52 BrkfInfra 1.40 BrkfldOfPr 0.56 BrklneB 0.34 BrooksAuto 0.32 BrwnBrn 0.32 BrownShoe 0.28 BrownFB 1.28 BrukerCp Brunswick 0.05 BuckTch 0.24 Buckle 0.80 Buenavent 0.49 BuffaloWW BungeLt 1.00 C&J Egy n CA Inc 0.20 CB REllis CBL Asc 0.84 CBOE 0.48 CBRE GRE 0.54 CBS B 0.40 CF Inds 1.60 CGI g CH Robins 1.16 CIGNA 0.04 CIT Grp CLECO 1.12 CME Grp 5.60 CMS Eng 0.84 CNH Gbl CNO Fincl CNOOC 6.42 CNinsure CPFL En s 1.60 CSX s 0.48 CTC Media 0.91 CVB Fncl 0.34 CVR Engy CVR Ptrs n 0.41 CVS Care 0.50 CYS Invest 2.20 Cabelas CblvsNY s 0.60 Cabot 0.72 CabotO&G 0.12 CACI Cadence CalDive CalaGDyIn 0.60 CalaStrTR 0.63 Calgon CalifWtr s 0.62 CaliperLSc Calix CallGolf 0.04 CallonPet Calpine CalumetSp 1.98 CAMAC En CamdenPT 1.96 Cameco g 0.40 CameltInfo Cameron CampSp 1.16 CIBC g 3.60 CdnNRy g 1.30 CdnNRs gs 0.36 CP Rwy g 1.20 CdnSolar Canon CapOne 0.20 CapProd 0.93 CapitlSrce 0.04 CapFdF rs 0.30 CapsteadM 1.78 CpstnTrb h CarboCer 0.96 CardnlHlth 0.86 Cardiom g Cardtronic CareFusion CareerEd CaribouC Carlisle 0.72 CarMax Carnival 1.00 CarpTech 0.72 Carrizo Carters Caseys 0.60 CashAm 0.14 CatalystH Caterpillar 1.84 CathayGen 0.04 Cavium CelSci Celanese 0.24 Celestic g Celgene CellTher rsh Cellcom 3.49 Celsion Cemex Cemig pf 1.89 CenovusE 0.80 Centene CenterPnt 0.79 CnElBras pf 0.03 CnElBras lf 1.56 CentEuro CEurMed CFCda g 0.01 CentAl CntryLink 2.90 Cenveo Cephln Cepheid Ceradyne Cerner s

C 30.70 5.75 64.42 51.30 42.32 37.71 35.22 2.70 40.66 16.85 19.45 105.16 44.47 30.22 25.15 54.70 7.63 14.41 18.74 7.68 7.08 68.50 8.34 5.53 20.90 2.55 20.93 35.03 .95 54.08 17.72 48.45 14.32 41.63 19.26 39.81 43.03 9.30 56.84 75.21 84.66 10.93 46.21 13.14 53.68 39.63 .44 15.34 43.25 1.45 6.42 70.84 55.26 23.93 4.45 28.23 12.13 28.65 70.06 32.60 22.12 33.33 1.24 34.28 .99 .56 88.96 30.07 15.80 2.02 5.75 29.57 7.03 44.64 141.77 20.13 6.74 13.25 7.21 11.31 13.12 13.02 13.30 24.81 58.25 4.71 56.14 5.65 84.72 5.53 4.48 25.55 7.19 15.43 16.40 16.52 12.66 23.19 8.96 1.08 20.07 21.85 31.49 41.11 85.05 32.12 19.18 28.69 .29 4.15 11.54 26.37 23.01 13.41 7.41 7.52 17.00 6.59 67.27 12.52 13.50 24.00 38.60 37.36 56.30 55.51 14.67 18.99 13.09 10.91 24.05 6.38 18.95 120.98 17.91 66.27 39.98 29.12 33.06 248.50 19.18 23.60 4.98 153.06 6.18 22.21 18.39 8.51 7.34 19.69 20.25 32.97 11.36 19.66 15.02 23.27 58.58 46.81 9.00 1.64 6.86 7.65 13.76 17.00 10.40 7.20 4.73 3.27 13.37 16.57 .50 53.09 17.32 2.56 40.12 32.66 67.64 64.89 27.59 46.05 3.20 44.59 37.75 6.28 5.75 10.36 10.81 .86 94.18 39.88 3.01 20.58 23.15 12.57 10.51 30.52 23.41 29.61 41.32 19.33 30.48 42.63 49.04 55.20 70.55 10.69 25.40 .34 31.61 6.94 60.70 .98 19.13 2.48 2.60 14.46 29.44 26.54 19.18 11.50 8.56 6.08 6.72 20.85 7.90 32.11 2.74 80.52 37.84 26.32 65.56

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Changyou ChRvLab ChrmSh ChartInds CharterCm ChkPoint Cheesecake ChelseaTh Chemtura n CheniereEn ChesEng 0.35 Chevron 3.12 ChicB&I 0.20 Chicos 0.20 ChildPlace Chimera 0.57 ChinaCEd ChinaLife 0.91 ChinaMble 2.04 ChinaPet 3.55 ChinaUni 0.12 Chipotle Chiquita Chubb 1.56 ChurchD s 0.68 CIBER CienaCorp Cimarex 0.40 CinciBell CinnFin 1.61 Cinemark 0.84 Cintas 0.49 Cirrus Cisco 0.24 Citigp pfJ 2.13 Citigrp rs 0.04 Citigp wtA CitrixSys CityNC 0.80 Clarcor 0.48 CleanEngy CleanH s Clearwire CliffsNRs 1.12 Clorox 2.40 CloudPeak Coach 0.90 CobaltIEn CocaCola 1.88 CocaCE 0.52 Coeur CoffeeH 0.12 CognizTech Cohen&Str 0.60 CohStQIR 0.72 Coinstar ColdwtrCrk Colfax ColgPal 2.32 CollctvBrd ColonPT 0.60 ColumLabs Comcast 0.45 Comc spcl 0.45 Comerica 0.40 CmcBMO 0.92 CmclMtls 0.48 CmclVehcl CmwREIT 2.00 CmtyBkSy 0.96 CmtyHlt CommVlt CBD-Pao s 0.39 CompssMn 1.80 CompPrdS CompSci 0.80 Compuwre ComScore ComstkRs Comtech 1.10 Comverse Con-Way 0.40 ConAgra 0.96 ConchoRes ConcurTch ConmedH ConocPhil 2.64 ConsolEngy 0.40 ConEd 2.40 ConstantC ConstellA ConstellEn 0.96 ContlRes Continucre Cnvrgys CooperCo 0.06 Cooper Ind 1.16 CooperTire 0.42 CopaHold 1.64 Copart Copel 1.00 CoreLabs 1.00 CoreLogic CorinthC CornPdts 0.64 Corning 0.20 CorpOffP 1.65 CorrectnCp Cosan Ltd 0.28 Costco 0.96 Cott Cp Cntwd pfB 1.75 CousPrp 0.18 Covance CovantaH 0.30 CoventryH Covidien 0.90 CowenGp CrackerB 1.00 Credicp 1.95 CSVS2xVxS CSVelIVSt s CredSuiss 1.40 CrSuiHiY 0.32 Cree Inc CreXus 1.00 Crocs CrosstexE 0.40 CrwnCstle CrownHold Ctrip.com CubeSmart 0.28 CubistPh CullenFr 1.84 CumbldPh Cummins 1.60 CumMed Curis CurEuro 0.22 CurAstla 3.84 CurrCda 0.12 CurJpn CurtisWrt 0.32 Cyclacel h CypSemi 0.36 CytRx h Cytec 0.50 Cytori DCT Indl 0.28 DDR Corp 0.24 DFC Gbl s DG FastCh DHT Hldgs 0.40 DNP Selct 0.78 DPL 1.33 DR Horton 0.15 DST Sys 0.70 DSW Inc 0.60 DTE 2.35 DanaHldg Danaher 0.10 Darden 1.72 Darling Datalink DaVita DeVry 0.24 DeanFds DeckrsOut Deere 1.64 DejourE g Delcath Delek 0.15 Dell Inc DelphiFn 0.48 DeltaAir Deluxe 1.00 DemandTc DenburyR Dndreon DenisnM g Dennys Dentsply 0.20 Depomed DeutschBk 1.07 DB AgriDL DBGoldDL DBGoldDS DevonE 0.68 Dex One h DexCom Diageo 2.63 DiamondF 0.18 DiaOffs 0.50 DiamRk 0.32 DianaShip DiceHldg DicksSptg Diebold 1.12 DigitalRlt 2.72 DigRiver Dillards 0.20 Diodes DirecTV A DrxTcBull 0.84 DrSCBr rs DirFnBr rs DirLCBr rs DirDMBr rs DirDGldBr DirDGldBll DrxEMBull 1.10 DrxTcBear DRE Bear DrxEnBear DrxSOXBll DirEMBear DrxFnBull Dir30TrBear Dir30TrBull 1.28 DrxREBull 0.05 DirxSCBull DirxLCBull DirxEnBull Discover 0.24 DiscCm A DiscCm C DishNetwk Disney 0.40 DolbyLab DoleFood DollarGen

C 24.41 -.89 28.03 -.59 2.42 -.18 37.35 -4.83 43.67 -3.17 51.70 -1.06 23.96 -.69 3.37 -.27 9.14 -.89 4.00 -1.15 23.96 -1.59 89.88 -2.71 26.68 -1.95 10.80 -.63 45.80 -.73 2.62 -.15 2.58 -1.11 33.52 -1.99 47.68 -1.03 95.79 -.01 19.36 -1.04 292.70 -10.25 8.11 -.23 58.12 -1.87 42.71 -1.49 2.78 -.25 10.28 -.92 53.37 -2.33 2.96 -.13 25.06 -1.27 18.25 -.63 26.88 -1.26 13.74 -1.00 15.19 -.31 24.80 -.30 23.11 -2.51 .39 -.05 52.95 -1.58 36.01 -1.75 39.90 -1.48 10.01 -1.11 47.83 -3.47 2.42 +.09 48.30 -2.87 64.55 -1.78 16.29 -.66 50.58 -1.25 7.06 -.65 65.42 -2.14 23.61 -1.27 20.90 -.54 7.39 -.10 61.35 -1.35 26.91 -1.84 7.28 -.39 40.63 +.63 1.15 -.10 19.07 -1.19 88.30 -.38 12.48 -.48 16.82 -1.34 1.91 -.04 20.36 -.44 20.17 -.43 22.19 -.78 33.69 -1.06 8.69 -.82 6.10 -.47 17.24 -1.73 22.04 -.65 15.29 -1.35 34.66 -2.40 30.68 -.10 64.80 -1.98 16.97 -1.88 26.60 -.25 7.17 -.49 15.95 -.92 14.14 -1.32 27.21 -.88 6.65 -.41 21.13 -1.00 24.02 -.20 67.25 -3.89 34.93 -2.30 3.77 -.01 60.99 -2.33 31.70 -2.23 56.48 -.54 16.32 -.97 17.54 -.46 36.67 -1.39 45.43 -2.94 6.35 -.03 8.61 -.77 74.01 -5.14 44.38 -1.74 10.13 -.76 58.52 -2.75 37.93 -1.19 17.80 -.41 85.69 -4.14 10.38 -.29 1.40 -.15 37.74 -1.50 11.88 -.48 20.50 -1.28 21.87 -.82 9.08 -.39 81.63 -.50 6.66 -.15 18.88 -.32 5.41 -.44 43.86 -1.59 13.92 -1.27 26.85 -1.96 42.45 -1.65 2.55 -.16 38.56 -1.47 90.11 -2.09 100.90 +11.47 5.12 -.36 24.23 -2.01 2.80 -.15 23.39 -2.59 8.30 -.58 22.00 -1.68 12.14 -1.34 40.30 -.37 29.30 -1.31 30.71 -1.45 8.05 -.48 34.05 -1.27 44.29 -1.57 5.55 -.03 81.01 -.65 2.61 -.23 2.89 -.27 131.55 -1.88 95.65 -1.12 94.58 -.28 128.64 +.84 27.39 -1.44 .39 -.05 14.08 -.89 .31 -.03 32.76 -2.38 2.58 -.37 4.11 -.28 10.17 -.73 20.44 -1.38 15.85 -1.10 1.60 -.44 9.90 -.10 30.08 -.06 8.45 -.59 41.23 -2.60 45.00 -1.18 48.06 -.96 9.95 -.55 40.42 -1.52 41.53 -1.22 11.69 -.90 7.08 +.28 60.64 -2.03 35.21 -1.75 8.30 -.57 88.11 -5.05 61.72 -2.85 .24 -.02 3.14 -.20 10.82 -.45 13.91 -.23 20.38 -1.14 6.65 -.85 18.05 -.55 6.27 -.27 10.86 -.64 8.08 -.92 .94 -.12 3.18 -.15 29.09 -1.60 5.00 -.40 32.83 -1.78 10.55 -1.02 54.44 +1.92 5.07 -.21 53.34 -2.10 .42 -.14 11.36 -.64 75.15 -.78 71.57 -8.23 52.90 -1.84 6.52 -.47 6.93 -.49 7.58 -.24 31.50 -1.96 26.09 -1.42 53.57 -1.59 19.46 -1.27 41.52 -1.96 16.97 -.95 40.60 -1.67 28.49 -2.20 61.29 +8.32 74.80 +8.83 50.67 +4.39 51.91 +3.79 40.76 +1.04 28.35 -.77 12.21 -1.11 24.91 +1.62 16.71 +2.06 25.26 +2.28 20.45 -2.56 35.00 +2.21 9.35 -1.27 14.18 -1.29 77.95 +5.93 33.39 -5.51 27.89 -5.11 42.13 -4.24 28.16 -3.27 22.26 -.68 36.73 -.89 34.13 -1.02 23.62 -1.43 29.00 -1.16 26.28 -1.16 9.37 -.63 36.82 -.94

N m

D

DollarTh DollarTree DomRescs Dominos Domtar g Donldson DonlleyRR DoralFncl DEmmett Dover Dow30Enh DowChm DrPepSnap DragonW g DrmWksA DresserR DryHYSt Dril-Quip DryShips DuPont DuPFabros DukeEngy DukeRlty DunBrad Dunkin n DyaxCp Dycom Dynavax Dynegy DynexCap

1.97 1.40 0.60 1.04 0.52 1.26 0.92 1.00 1.28

0.52 0.12 1.64 0.48 1.00 0.68 1.44

1.08

C 54.17 73.68 49.84 26.00 65.01 52.35 13.27 1.01 15.92 44.64 9.03 21.51 37.24 2.86 16.93 39.62 4.19 49.38 2.02 38.49 19.22 19.71 9.70 59.25 26.59 1.20 14.27 1.82 3.50 7.51

-2.13 -1.46 -.93 -1.25 -3.16 -2.45 -.85 -.08 -1.18 -1.96 -.49 -.95 -1.54 -.44 -1.25 -.91 -.08 -4.53 -.32 -1.48 -.47 -.28 -.80 -2.01 -1.11 -.06 -1.03 -.04 -.62 -.55

0.20 1.38 0.64 0.88 3.04 0.40 0.75 0.20 0.20 2.08 1.36 0.72 1.29 1.16 1.14 1.21 0.16 0.70 1.39 1.28 0.28 0.04 0.88 1.92 0.12 0.72

1.38

2.13 0.98 0.80

1.20 0.54

2.50 3.58 2.16 0.79 1.40 3.32 2.42 2.80 0.64 0.88 1.47 0.37 4.16 0.75

1.92

0.16 2.10 0.28 0.50

0.56 1.88

0.24 0.60 0.48 1.08 0.08 0.72 0.52 0.52 2.76 0.24 0.96

0.48 0.20 1.28 0.32

0.20 0.24 0.12 0.48 0.04

0.04 0.64 0.05 0.06 0.05 0.61 0.40 2.20 0.64

0.60 1.28 0.50 1.16 0.66

0.76 2.02 1.00 0.76 0.20 1.00 0.75 0.47 0.30 0.20 1.16 0.20

0.96 0.58 1.68 0.29 1.32

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N m

D

PSEG PubStrg PulteGrp PPrIT

1.37 32.33 -1.04 3.80 105.78 -5.57 3.54 -.41 0.52 5.26 -.09

C

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N m

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M w W mW m M M

C 29.16 7.58 106.50 67.90 6.95 .80 1.45 40.12 25.79 12.98 3.59 13.13 3.10 10.51 16.96 5.61 2.35 30.43 1.44 18.81 71.40 42.45 46.39 29.12 47.42 21.05 48.17 11.91 10.47 6.78 27.34 2.05 18.11 25.84 9.41 25.21 42.01 24.03 39.65 7.35 35.01 32.30 11.60 3.68 24.13 7.07 14.88 17.28 2.73 14.35 14.30 7.20 13.13 26.09 28.53 30.72 29.23 33.84 56.52 11.28 28.40 23.07 32.82 2.25 48.25 12.79 2.02 36.20 36.90 16.40 30.38 20.67 9.34 6.14 78.70 27.77 8.85 28.36 5.54 24.38 8.21 15.55 3.94 45.35 24.63 21.23 5.41 2.26 22.77 9.90 24.00 30.13 7.14 6.51 4.21 5.07 1.70 17.15 23.84 6.40 1.98 5.44 9.07 8.04 21.81 5.68 3.78 13.38 15.74 7.67 23.22 50.14 25.27 23.47 .98 42.98 1.74 .81 25.72 23.29 14.62 8.79 14.05 27.25 16.57 8.05 1.57 7.52 24.19 54.00 31.58 8.84 15.57 11.31 12.25 2.49 24.30 11.44 24.73 3.51 14.93 47.80 2.43 4.21 15.00 48.27 18.94 41.61 27.18 21.43 3.87 5.70 3.17 9.07 17.54 9.68 10.58 25.77 18.38 14.73 19.88 4.01 31.33 9.19 48.69 24.08 3.59 23.90 50.82 10.55 9.61 19.90 23.73 18.21 11.27 17.53 6.99 36.44 30.46 26.46 12.49 16.72 19.02 49.10

-.29 -.33 -3.48 -3.71 -.22 -.07 -.06 -2.29 -1.93 -1.05 -.02 -1.00 -.15 -1.00 -1.00 -.29 -.17 -1.60 -.08 -.69 -1.49 -1.95 -1.42 -3.93 -.78 -.97 -2.33 -.94 -.32 -.29 -.89 -.11 -.89 -1.73 -.77 -1.55 -.36 -.96 -.92 -.69 -1.16 -1.03 -.62 -.45 -.40 -.56 -1.07 -.67 -.31 +.45 +.27 -.60 -.74 -1.48 -.83 -1.01 -.43 -1.02 -1.99 -.53 -.82 -.53 -.80 -.22 -.85 -.51 -.29 -1.09 -1.92 -.76 -1.78 -.88 -.58 -.17 -2.02 -1.50 -.36 -1.74 -.41 -2.18 -.29 -.66 -.37 -1.78 -1.35 -1.76 -.06 -.44 -1.02 -1.10 -1.44 -.88 -.95 -.84 -.42 -.62 -.61 -.80 -2.40 -.26 -.02 +.06 -.03 -2.53 -.76 -.27 -1.57 -.56 -.48 -.68 -1.73 -.93 -.89 -.09 -.21 +.01 -.06 -.18 -1.65 -.96 -.37 -.66 -.89 -.56 -.08 -.16 -.65 +.63 -1.47 -1.15 -.67 -.95 -.12 -.47 -.21 -1.42 -.83 -1.28 -.08 -.07 -1.24 -.12 -.10 -.38 -2.04 -1.40 -1.62 -2.01 -1.18 -.73 -.34 -.28 -.46 -1.09 -.20 -.23 +.19 -.74 -.22 -1.37 -.28 -.04 -.26 -3.92 -1.37 -.52 -1.71 -2.71 -.46 -.65 -.93 -.66 -1.26 -.67 -1.21 -.73 -.78 -1.28 -.19 -.73 -.92 -1.12 -1.54

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TUESDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

COV ER ST OR I ES

Stocks Continued from B1 Fears that the problems in Europe might spread across the Atlantic and push an extremely fragile economy back into a recession have been looming for more than a year. With the job market still weak and confidence of businesses and consumers in tatters, investors seem to be lurching from one piece of bad news to another. Even glimmers of hope — like a report Monday showing stronger-than-expected manufacturing data — were overshadowed by the great unknowns about what will

Drones Continued from B1 Officials in Central Oregon in recent months have been looking into using the Juniper military operations area southeast of Bend when the military is not using it, which caused some pilots to question the idea. And in August, Oregon State University and Economic Development for Central Oregon signed an agreement to work together in launching research projects with unmanned aerial vehicles. The effort to start a testing area on the Warm Springs reservation has been going on for months. Anspach had wanted to see drone testing there by the end of 2011, but he now doubts it will happen by then. “We certainly want to start establishing this as quick as possible,” he said. About 15 companies have expressed interest in testing on the reservation, said Eric Strobel, EDCO’s business development manager. Collins Hemingway, EDCO’s aviation recruitment committee chairman, said having one or more small testing areas permitted with certificates of authorization could be a first step to establishing a larger and longer-lasting testing area the FAA could designate as a result of federal legislation. “What we hope to do is to use the (certificate of authorization) process … to develop

happen in Europe. “That uncertainty has the markets completely shellshocked, in jitters,” said Nariman Behravesh of HIS Global Insight. Those fears again weighed heavily on the major U.S. banks, whose shares have fallen more than 35 percent since the beginning of the year. “It’s just painful. Every day seems like it is the worst,” said Frederick Cannon, the chief equity strategist at Keefe Bruyette Woods in New York. “As long as U.S. financials are tied to the comings and goings of Europe, it is going to be roller coaster ride without an end to it.”

the expertise and procedures and processes and all of that to make it more likely that we would be given serious consideration for a formal test area somewhere down the road,” Hemingway said. He said the Warm Springs reservation is the first organization in Central Oregon to announce intent to be a sponsor for drone testing. For him, it doesn’t matter that part of the reservation lies in Wasco County, which is not one of the three counties EDCO promotes. “If (the reservation) can get through the FAA hurdles, we’re all for it,” Hemingway said. “It would be the first step.” Anspach said the tribes had identified a few areas on the reservation where drones could be tested. But now that Warm Springs will seek a known public entity to sponsor the certificate of authorization, it will have to work with the needs and wants of the public entity. “We are looking more at, you know, kind of another blank slate again (in terms of) what would the potential public entity need, and we would try to accommodate that,” he said. The FAA did not respond to a written request for information on the reservation’s inquiry about whether it qualifies as a public entity. — Reporter: 541-633-2117, jnovet@bendbulletin.com

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Continued from B1 The poverty rate jumped to 15.1 percent, a 17-year high. Salary and benefit growth “has been going nowhere,” said Mark Zandi, chief economist at Moody’s Analytics Inc. in West Chester, Pa. “One of the key reasons the recovery has stalled is that real incomes have fallen.” While policy makers from Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke to President Barack Obama focus on cutting unemployment stuck near or above 9 percent since April 2009, the widespread stagnation in wages may offer a better explanation for the failure of economic growth to accelerate two years after the end of the recession. Workers’ ability to negotiate higher earnings won’t return until the job market strengthens, and flagging confidence has raised the risk that consumers may retrench. Inflation-adjusted weekly earnings have fallen for six consecutive months, dropping 1.8 percent in August from a year earlier, a pace not seen since the 18-month economic slump ended in June 2009. “Those who are employed are worried about their income and are seeing real purchasing power get squeezed, therefore they’re set to retrench a bit,” said Julia Coronado, chief economist for North America at BNP Paribas in New York, who has served on the Fed board’s forecasting team. “That’s the danger right now. It means the recovery remains very fragile.”

AlskAir Avista BkofAm BarrettB Boeing CascdeB rs CascdeCp ColSprtw Costco CraftBrew FLIR Sys HewlettP HmFedDE Intel Keycorp Kroger Lattice LaPac MDU Res MentorGr Microsoft

Div PE ... 1.10 .04 .36 1.68 ... 1.00f .88 .96 ... .24 .48 .22 .84 .12 .46f ... ... .65 ... .80f

7 13 ... 9 12 7 9 19 26 12 19 5 ... 9 6 11 11 ... 14 16 9

YTD Last Chg %Chg

NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

The stalled labor market and stagnant wages are easing one source of concern for Fed officials watching inflation. “The painfully high unemployment rate is consistent with considerable slack or excess capacity in the economy, which tends to constrain wage growth,” Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta President Dennis Lockhart said during a Sept. 27 speech in Jacksonville, Fla. “You are familiar with the term wage-price spiral. I don’t see any prospect of such a development in the foreseeable future, as long as unemployment remains high and longer-term inflation expectations remain well-anchored,” he said. The worsening outlook for incomes will cause “continued pressure on home prices and on the stock market,” said Malcolm Polley, who oversees $1 billion as chief investment officer at Stewart Capital in Indiana, Pa. Corporate sales may be hurt as demand cools, and there may be more withdrawals from retirement plans and higher use of 401(k) loans, he said. Sales at some luxury stores may be hurt because “at the margin, the upper end of the middle class will probably feel less inclined to spend extra money,” he said. Among chains catering

Companies including United Parcel Service say they have flexibility to hold down employee earnings, given uncertain demand and an excess supply of labor. Retailers such as Kohl’s report that elevated food and fuel prices have cut into paychecks, restraining shoppers. “The biggest issue is that labor income is soft at a time when we’re getting no offset” from other sources, said Michael Feroli, chief U.S. econ-

51.32 -4.97 -9.5 23.64 -.21 +5.0 5.53 -.59 -58.5 13.50 -.44 -13.2 58.25 -2.26 -10.7 4.95 -.88 -41.4 32.61 -.78 -31.0 43.24 -3.16 -28.3 81.63 -.50 +13.0 5.10 -.51 -31.0 24.46 -.59 -17.8 22.20 -.25 -47.3 7.17 -.65 -41.6 20.62 -.72 -1.9 5.72 -.21 -35.4 21.74 -.22 -2.8 4.90 -.35 -19.1 4.63 -.47 -51.1 18.42 -.77 -9.1 9.21 -.41 -23.3 24.53 -.36 -12.1

Price (troy oz.) $1855.00 $1856.40 $41.573

to “the lower end of the earnings totem pole,” discounters including Wal-Mart Stores and Target may fare better as shoppers trade down. “Perception is reality from the standpoint of consumers and investors,” Polley said. “We need people to start feeling good about themselves.”

‘Things are tight’ Tamra Loomis, a graphic designer and single mother of two boys, uses the Internet at her parents’ home, grows vegetables to trim grocery bills and takes advantage of coupons to shop. She makes $17 an hour and hasn’t had a raise since September 2008, three months after she started working at a sign company in Antioch, Calif., about 40 miles northeast of San Francisco. The owner has twice denied her request for higher wages and in January cut the hours for her and the company’s other employee to 30 a week from 40, she said. “My boss says because of the economy, things are tight, business is slow,” so “at this point, I’m paycheck to paycheck,” said Loomis, 32. “A lot of people aren’t hiring, and when they are, they offer even less than what I make. It’s really difficult.” The jobless rate held at 9.1 percent in September for a third consecutive month, while payrolls grew by 50,000 after no change in August, according to the median forecast in a Bloomberg News survey of economists ahead of Labor Department figures due Friday. Consumer spending rose at a 0.7 percent annual rate in the second quarter, less than half the 2.1 percent pace in January- March, the Commerce Department reported last week. Gross domestic product expanded less than 1 percent on average in January-June, the worst six months of the recovery. “The economy isn’t growing fast enough to boost job growth to increase incomes,”

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NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstB rs Weyerh

1.24 .92 1.74 ... .72f ... 1.68 .12 .58 .07 1.46 .86f .52 ... .28f .50 .24 .48 ... .60

YTD Last Chg %Chg

18 83.05 -2.46 -2.8 15 45.37 -.31 +7.1 18 43.30 -.80 -6.8 7 4.00 -.85 -77.4 17 32.63 -1.19 -43.1 ... 1.90 -.09 -8.2 32 33.75 -.96 -9.9 20 148.33 -7.13 +6.6 10 16.32 -.31 -27.4 10 33.78 -3.02 -49.1 16 73.85 -.47 -11.8 7 26.09 -1.48 -42.2 24 36.20 -1.09 +12.7 4 4.74 -.28 -59.5 20 8.51 -.28 -30.1 11 22.65 -.89 -16.0 15 12.48 -.26 -26.2 9 23.18 -.94 -25.2 15 13.75 -.25 -2.5 4 15.25 -.30 -19.4

Prime rate

Pvs Day

Time period

Percent

$1865.00 $1854.40 $42.479

Last Previous day A week ago

3.25 3.25 3.25

said Omair Sharif, an economist at RBS Securities in Stamford, Conn. “Most workers don’t have a lot of sway in demanding higher wages unless they have very specialized skills.” Werner Enterprises Inc., an Omaha, Neb.-based truck operator, has “been able to hold the line on our salary, wages and benefits costs,” John Steele, chief financial officer, said on a Sept. 8 analyst conference call. In today’s “uncertain” economic environment, “there’s a little less pressure on driver pay than there was a couple of months ago.” UPS, the Atlanta-based package-delivery company whose shipments make it an economic bellwether, has “a very reasonable contract in place that will show modest, below- inflation increases in wages” for drivers, Chief Financial Officer Kurt Kuehn said in July. “We’ve got a good outlook for the cost structure.” Employees cannot hope for more bargaining power anytime soon, said Harry Holzer, a professor of public policy at Georgetown University in Washington and former chief economist at the Labor Department. Through August, the United States had recovered only about 1.89 million of the 8.75 million jobs lost as a result of the recession. “There is so much slack, it will keep earnings from rising very much,” he said. “It will take most of this decade” to repair the damage “unless there is a big spurt in hiring.”

70 Years of Hearing Excellence

Market recap

Name

Precious metals Metal

Little risk of spiral

No offsets

Northwest stocks Name

omist at JPMorgan Chase in New York. Unlike in the early part of the recovery, stockmarket losses are eroding wealth and home prices continue to decline, he said. Support from the government may shrink if Congress fails to extend payroll-tax cuts and unemployment benefits set to expire at the end of the year, and limited access to borrowing means Americans have few means to fund their purchases, said Feroli, a former Fed economist. “It’s hard to see where consumers are going to get a lot of wherewithal to sustain strong spending,” he said. “It’s certainly a concern that, rather than sluggish consumption growth, we see flat or declining consumption.”

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Wages

B5

NYSE

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

BkofAm S&P500ETF SPDR Fncl iShR2K SprintNex

3556179 5.53 -.59 3325898 109.93 -3.22 1550619 11.28 -.53 1056890 60.99 -3.31 962723 2.73 -.31

Last Chg

Gainers ($2 or more) Name

Last

Chg %Chg

C-TrCVOL ETrSPlat DrxAgBear DrSCBr rs PrUPShR2K

86.81 +12.22 31.09 +4.37 62.79 +8.69 61.29 +8.32 30.18 +3.98

+16.4 +16.4 +16.1 +15.7 +15.2

Losers ($2 or more)

Amex

Most Active ($1 or more) Name VirnetX NthgtM g NwGold g GoldStr g CheniereEn

Vol (00)

Last Chg

54887 12.38 -2.61 53219 3.26 -.04 50234 10.21 -.08 44760 1.69 -.17 36073 4.00 -1.15

Gainers ($2 or more) Name

Last

Chg %Chg

HaderaPap SCEd pfD Vicon CPI Aero ExeterR gs

42.70 +2.59 22.73 +1.13 3.35 +.15 9.83 +.33 3.75 +.12

+6.5 +5.2 +4.7 +3.5 +3.3

Losers ($2 or more)

Last

Chg %Chg

Name

Last

ET2xIntIPO AMR Cp 39 Dirx Airl iP LXR2K ZaleCp

8.48 13.05 24.16 25.36 2.26

-5.75 -7.99 -6.84 -6.96 -.59

-40.4 -38.0 -22.1 -21.5 -20.7

CheniereEn GenMoly VirnetX Quepasa TravelCtrs

4.00 -1.15 -22.3 2.37 -.53 -18.3 12.38 -2.61 -17.4 2.87 -.57 -16.6 3.01 -.52 -14.7

283 2,814 36 3,133 14 837

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Diary

Nasdaq

Most Active ($1 or more) Name SiriusXM Intel PwShs QQQ Cisco Microsoft

Vol (00)

Last Chg

961762 939736 927859 769339 621070

1.45 -.06 20.62 -.72 51.14 -1.35 15.19 -.31 24.53 -.36

Gainers ($2 or more) Name

Last

IntriCon PharmPdt GlobTcAd h MediCo OlScCTrI pf

4.14 +1.07 +34.9 32.28 +6.62 +25.8 3.67 +.50 +15.8 16.60 +1.72 +11.6 3.90 +.31 +8.6

Chg %Chg

Losers ($2 or more)

Name

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Indexes

Chg %Chg

Name

Last

Gentiva h ChinaCEd SangBio AudCodes SifyTech

3.68 -1.84 -33.3 2.58 -1.11 -30.1 3.04 -1.31 -30.1 2.29 -.83 -26.6 3.13 -.86 -21.6

Diary

Chg %Chg

Diary 96 380 24 500 4 118

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

242 2,382 49 2,673 4 637

52-Week High Low

Name

12,876.00 10,597.14 5,627.85 4,095.81 449.09 381.99 8,718.25 6,641.30 2,490.51 1,992.77 2,887.75 2,331.65 1,370.58 1,101.54 14,562.01 11,570.57 868.57 634.71

Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

Last

Net Chg

%Chg

YTD %Chg

52-wk %Chg

10,655.30 4,038.73 423.58 6,571.45 2,000.62 2,335.83 1,099.23 11,459.36 609.49

-258.08 -150.64 -9.80 -220.20 -49.86 -79.57 -32.19 -382.76 -34.67

-2.36 -3.60 -2.26 -3.24 -2.43 -3.29 -2.85 -3.23 -5.38

-7.97 -20.91 +4.59 -17.49 -9.41 -11.95 -12.60 -14.23 -22.22

-.89 -9.32 +6.19 -9.64 -.97 -.37 -3.32 -4.27 -8.96

World markets

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed Monday. Market Close % Change

Key currency exchange rates Monday compared with late Friday in New York. Dollar vs: Exchange Rate Pvs Day

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

275.64 2,096.74 2,926.83 5,075.50 5,376.70 16,822.15 33,142.47 14,642.52 3,315.74 8,545.48 1,769.65 2,621.40 3,960.70 4,970.13

-1.62 -1.62 -1.85 -1.03 -2.28 -4.38 -1.08 -1.31 -.83 -1.78 +.02 -2.01 -2.69 -.73

t t t t t t t t t t s t t t

.9577 1.5471 .9522 .001902 .1568 1.3225 .1284 .013047 .072046 .0307 .000839 .1447 1.0893 .0326

.9704 1.5626 .9581 .001910 .1567 1.3424 .1285 .012974 .072611 .0311 .000842 .1464 1.1048 .0328

Selected mutual funds YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 15.57 -0.51 -16.0 Amer Century Inv: EqInc 6.49 -0.14 -8.3 GrowthI 22.51 -0.67 -12.9 Ultra 20.24 -0.56 -10.6 American Funds A: AmcpA p 16.64 -0.47 -11.3 AMutlA p 22.97 -0.50 -7.6 BalA p 16.67 -0.30 -5.5 BondA p 12.54 +0.04 +5.4 CapIBA p 46.19 -0.70 -4.8 CapWGA p 29.54 -0.76 -15.6 CapWA p 20.46 -0.02 +2.8 EupacA p 33.28 -0.92 -19.6 FdInvA p 31.07 -0.97 -14.5 GovtA p 14.74 +0.07 +7.5 GwthA p 25.90 -0.77 -14.9 HI TrA p 10.27 -0.09 -3.8 IncoA p 15.38 -0.26 -4.3 IntBdA p 13.64 +0.02 +3.3 ICAA p 24.07 -0.62 -13.3 NEcoA p 21.66 -0.69 -14.5 N PerA p 24.20 -0.68 -15.4 NwWrldA 43.50 -1.32 -20.3 SmCpA p 30.25 -1.20 -22.2 TxExA p 12.38 NA WshA p 24.97 -0.68 -6.6 Artio Global Funds: IntlEqI r 22.42 -0.69 -25.6 IntEqII I r 9.31 -0.30 -25.3 Artisan Funds: Intl 17.81 -0.56 -17.9 IntlVal r 22.89 -0.55 -15.6 MidCap 29.88 -1.26 -11.2 MidCapVal 18.31 -0.57 -8.8 Baron Funds: Growth 44.03 -2.15 -14.1 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 14.24 +0.08 +6.6 DivMu 14.65 +5.1 TxMgdIntl 12.08 -0.38 -23.2

BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 16.01 -0.40 GlAlA r 17.47 -0.30 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 16.28 -0.28 BlackRock Instl: EquityDv 16.05 -0.40 GlbAlloc r 17.56 -0.30 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 43.83 -1.58 Cohen & Steers: RltyShrs 51.07 -2.49 Columbia Class A: DivrBd 5.16 +0.03 TxEA p 13.50 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 24.48 -1.19 AcornIntZ 32.57 -1.06 LgCapGr 10.98 -0.37 ValRestr 38.08 -1.27 Credit Suisse Comm: ComRet t 8.18 +0.01 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 8.78 -0.28 USCorEq2 8.98 -0.37 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 28.58 -0.86 Davis Funds C & Y: NYVenY 28.93 -0.87 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.30 +0.02 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq 16.04 -0.58 EmMktV 24.67 -0.98 IntSmVa 13.40 -0.40 LargeCo 8.67 -0.25 USLgVa 16.32 -0.63 US SmVa 19.16 -1.13 IntlSmCo 13.74 -0.39 Fixd 10.35 IntVa 13.98 -0.46 Glb5FxInc 11.31 +0.02 2YGlFxd 10.23 Dodge&Cox:

-7.8 -9.4 -9.8 -7.7 -9.1 -17.9 -11.5 +5.6 +9.6 -17.9 -18.4 -11.6 -24.0 -12.4 -20.3 -17.4 -16.8 -16.6 +4.3 -26.7 -30.9 -20.9 -11.3 -18.0 -24.9 -18.7 +0.6 -21.9 +5.1 +0.9

Balanced 61.08 -1.50 Income 13.28 +0.02 IntlStk 27.86 -0.93 Stock 88.85 -2.99 DoubleLine Funds: TRBd I 11.23 +0.03 Dreyfus: Aprec 35.96 -0.85 Eaton Vance A: LgCpVal 15.04 -0.46 Eaton Vance I: FltgRt 8.65 -0.01 GblMacAbR 9.85 +0.01 LgCapVal 15.08 -0.46 FMI Funds: LgCap p 14.00 -0.31 FPA Funds: NwInc 10.74 -0.10 FPACres 24.74 -0.42 Fairholme 22.89 -1.13 Federated Instl: TotRetBd 11.44 +0.06 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 17.78 -0.52 StrInA 12.12 -0.05 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 17.98 -0.53 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 12.71 -0.17 FF2015 10.59 -0.15 FF2015K 11.76 -0.16 FF2020 12.63 -0.21 FF2020K 11.94 -0.20 FF2025 10.30 -0.21 FF2025K 11.83 -0.24 FF2030 12.20 -0.26 FF2030K 11.89 -0.25 FF2035 9.91 -0.25 FF2040 6.90 -0.18 FF2040K 11.76 -0.30 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 10.64 -0.35 AMgr50 14.25 -0.22 AMgr20 r 12.58 -0.06

-11.5 +3.5 -22.0 -16.5 NA -5.8 -16.7 -0.5 -1.0 -16.5 -10.3 +2.1 -6.8 -35.7 +5.9 -10.8 +1.2 -10.6 -6.1 -6.3 -6.2 -8.1 -8.0 -10.2 -10.2 -11.0 -11.0 -13.3 -13.5 -13.5 -13.9 -6.8 -0.4

Balanc 16.98 BalancedK 16.98 BlueChGr 38.20 Canada 46.67 CapAp 21.83 CpInc r 8.34 Contra 60.60 ContraK 60.63 DisEq 18.87 DivIntl 24.00 DivrsIntK r 24.01 DivGth 22.37 Eq Inc 35.90 EQII 14.80 Fidel 28.27 FltRateHi r 9.44 GNMA 11.92 GovtInc 10.92 GroCo 74.84 GroInc 15.84 GrowthCoK74.88 HighInc r 8.22 Indepn 18.94 IntBd 10.88 IntmMu 10.35 IntlDisc 26.12 InvGrBd 11.93 InvGB 7.72 LgCapVal 9.30 LowP r 31.65 LowPriK r 31.63 Magelln 56.61 MidCap 23.47 MuniInc 12.90 NwMkt r 15.34 OTC 49.35 100Index 7.84 Puritn 16.51 SCmdtyStrt 8.92 SrsIntGrw 9.23 SrsIntVal 7.72 SrInvGrdF 11.93 StIntMu 10.78 STBF 8.50

-0.31 -0.31 -1.37 -1.59 -0.86 -0.12 -1.79 -1.79 -0.63 -0.79 -0.79 -0.96 -1.29 -0.53 -0.84 -0.02 +0.05 +0.06 -2.86 -0.49 -2.85 -0.08 -0.99 +0.03 -0.94 +0.05 +0.03 -0.36 -1.15 -1.15 -1.97 -1.08 -0.04 -2.10 -0.20 -0.31 +0.01 -0.29 -0.26 +0.05

-6.1 -6.0 -12.5 -19.7 -13.9 -7.8 -10.4 -10.3 -16.2 -20.4 -20.3 -21.1 -18.2 -18.3 -11.9 -1.6 +7.2 +7.7 -10.0 -12.8 -9.9 -3.7 -22.2 +5.5 +6.1 -20.9 +6.9 +7.0 -18.9 -11.8 -11.7 -20.9 -14.5 +8.4 +2.1 -10.2 -10.3 -7.0 -14.3 -18.2 -22.3 +7.0 +3.4 +1.5

StratInc 10.84 -0.04 +1.3 StrReRt r 9.21 -0.03 -2.5 TotalBd 11.05 +0.03 +5.8 USBI 11.86 +0.05 +7.1 Value 54.91 -2.23 -20.1 Fidelity Selects: Gold r 44.80 -0.72 -12.3 Fidelity Spartan: ExtMkIn 30.42 -1.58 -19.3 500IdxInv 39.09 -1.15 -11.3 IntlInxInv 28.71 -0.95 -18.1 TotMktInv 31.67 -1.06 -12.8 Fidelity Spart Adv: 500IdxAdv 39.10 -1.14 -11.3 TotMktAd r 31.67 -1.06 -12.8 First Eagle: GlblA 43.27 -0.65 -6.7 OverseasA 20.89 -0.29 -7.8 Forum Funds: AbsStrI r 11.09 +0.03 +2.5 Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA px 12.05 -0.04 +10.0 FoundAl p 9.08 -0.22 -11.9 HYTFA p 10.20 +0.01 +10.1 IncomA px 1.94 -0.04 -6.2 USGovA px 6.92 +5.8 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv 12.58 -0.07 -3.9 IncmeAd x 1.92 -0.05 -6.6 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC tx 1.95 -0.05 -7.0 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 17.73 -0.41 -13.3 Frank/Temp Temp A: GlBd A p 12.62 -0.07 -4.0 GrwthA p 15.01 -0.43 -15.6 WorldA p 12.70 -0.34 -14.4 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 12.64 -0.07 -4.4 GMO Trust III: Quality 19.74 -0.41 -0.8 GMO Trust IV: IntlIntrVl 18.16 -0.46 -15.2 GMO Trust VI:

EmgMkts r 10.39 -0.39 Quality 19.75 -0.41 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 6.57 -0.06 Harbor Funds: Bond 12.08 +0.02 CapApInst 33.49 -1.00 Intl r 48.81 -1.32 Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 26.02 -1.11 Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 33.09 -1.30 Div&Gr 17.07 -0.49 TotRetBd 11.56 +0.06 Hussman Funds: StrGrowth 13.24 +0.07 IVA Funds: Wldwide I r15.51 -0.22 Invesco Funds A: Chart p 14.58 -0.36 CmstkA 13.21 -0.42 EqIncA 7.52 -0.17 GrIncA p 16.12 -0.52 HYMuA 9.36 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 19.88 -0.49 AssetStA p 20.56 -0.52 AssetStrI r 20.77 -0.51 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 11.89 +0.04 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 11.88 +0.04 HighYld 7.42 -0.07 IntmTFBd 11.14 ShtDurBd 10.99 +0.01 USLCCrPls 17.51 -0.52 Janus T Shrs: OvrseasT r 32.22 -1.72 PrkMCVal T19.34 -0.59 John Hancock Cl 1: LSBalanc 11.50 -0.22 LSGrwth 11.04 -0.30 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 16.70 -0.47

-23.2 -0.7 NA +1.8 -8.8 -19.4 -24.9 -21.9 -12.4 +6.3 +7.7 -7.2 -9.8 -15.2 -11.3 -15.4 +9.2 -16.2 -15.8 -15.6 +6.4 +6.6 -3.9 +5.9 +1.4 -15.3 -36.4 -14.3 -9.8 -14.0 -23.0

Legg Mason A: WAMgMu p16.06 -0.02 +10.2 Longleaf Partners: Partners 23.82 -1.02 -15.7 Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 13.77 -0.12 +0.3 StrInc C 14.12 -0.17 -1.8 LSBondR 13.71 -0.12 +0.1 StrIncA 14.04 -0.17 -1.2 Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdY x12.07 -0.06 +3.3 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 9.03 -0.32 -21.3 BdDebA p 7.26 -0.07 -2.7 ShDurIncA p4.51 +1.3 Lord Abbett C: ShDurIncC t 4.54 +0.8 Lord Abbett F: ShtDurInco 4.51 +1.4 MFS Funds A: TotRA 12.99 -0.19 -6.3 ValueA 19.59 -0.56 NA MFS Funds I: ValueI 19.67 -0.57 NA Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 6.76 -0.21 -21.0 MergerFd 15.51 -0.08 -1.7 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.49 +0.02 +4.5 TotRtBdI 10.49 +0.02 +4.7 MorganStanley Inst: MCapGrI 32.33 -1.32 -13.4 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 24.73 -0.51 -13.1 GlbDiscZ 25.08 -0.52 -12.9 SharesZ 17.90 -0.42 -13.1 Neuberger&Berm Inv: GenesInst 41.11 -1.62 -10.6 Northern Funds: HiYFxInc 6.77 NA Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 25.07 -0.55 -9.6 Intl I r 15.72 -0.41 -19.0 Oakmark 36.77 -1.10 -11.0

Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 6.87 -0.08 GlbSMdCap12.59 -0.39 Oppenheimer A: DvMktA p 28.02 -0.72 GlobA p 50.05 -1.73 GblStrIncA 4.04 -0.01 IntBdA p 6.27 -0.02 MnStFdA 28.22 -0.81 RisingDivA 13.79 -0.34 S&MdCpVl25.75 -1.01 Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 12.49 -0.32 S&MdCpVl21.95 -0.86 Oppenheimer C&M: RisingDvC p12.45 -0.31 Oppenheimer Roch: RcNtMuA 6.91 -0.04 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 27.78 -0.71 IntlBdY 6.27 -0.02 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 10.80 +0.01 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AlAsetAut r 10.04 -0.05 AllAsset 11.44 -0.06 ComodRR 7.43 +0.04 DivInc 10.98 -0.04 EmgMkCur 9.89 -0.08 HiYld 8.53 -0.08 InvGrCp 10.51 +0.03 LowDu 10.28 RealRtnI 12.10 +0.12 ShortT 9.76 -0.01 TotRt 10.80 +0.01 PIMCO Funds A: LwDurA 10.28 RealRtA p 12.10 +0.12 TotRtA 10.80 +0.01 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 10.80 +0.01 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 10.80 +0.01 PIMCO Funds P:

-9.8 -17.1 -23.2 -17.1 -1.4 -1.7 -12.9 -10.3 -19.6 -11.0 -20.2 -10.9 +10.3 -23.0 -1.5 +1.8 NA NA -9.1 +0.1 -5.5 -3.1 +4.3 +0.6 +9.8 -0.1 +2.0 +0.3 +9.5 +1.7 +1.1 +1.8

TotRtnP 10.80 +0.01 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 45.34 -0.26 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 33.85 -0.99 Price Funds: BlChip 34.08 -1.04 CapApp 18.67 -0.39 EmMktS 26.31 -0.92 EqInc 20.12 -0.58 EqIndex 29.60 -0.87 Growth 28.09 -0.85 HlthSci 29.26 -1.47 HiYield 6.14 -0.06 IntlBond 9.95 -0.05 Intl G&I 10.86 -0.35 IntlStk 11.37 -0.36 MidCap 50.16 -2.02 MCapVal 19.97 -0.74 N Asia 15.53 -0.58 New Era 38.19 -1.56 N Horiz 29.88 -1.45 N Inc 9.71 +0.03 OverS SF r 6.87 -0.21 R2010 14.26 -0.24 R2015 10.85 -0.22 R2020 14.73 -0.34 R2025 10.62 -0.28 R2030 15.03 -0.43 R2035 10.53 -0.32 R2040 14.94 -0.45 ShtBd 4.82 SmCpStk 28.07 -1.38 SmCapVal 29.48 -1.41 SpecIn 11.93 -0.06 Value 19.68 -0.66 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 10.96 -0.39 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 9.41 -0.44 PremierI r 17.30 -0.70 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 32.63 -1.03 S&P Sel 17.37 -0.51

+1.9 -1.0 -16.7 -10.6 -8.1 -25.4 -13.9 -11.5 -12.6 -3.4 -4.3 +2.0 -18.4 -20.1 -14.3 -15.8 -19.0 -26.8 -10.8 +5.0 -17.6 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA -18.5 -18.4 NA -15.7 -18.4 -19.2 -15.0 -12.2 -11.2

Scout Funds: Intl 25.90 -0.76 Sequoia 126.48 -3.51 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 16.31 -0.45 Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 22.53 -0.61 IntValue I 23.03 -0.62 Tweedy Browne: GblValue 21.28 -0.32 Vanguard Admiral: BalAdml 19.99 -0.36 CAITAdm 11.20 CpOpAdl 62.88 -2.22 EMAdmr r 29.51 -1.07 Energy 98.58 -3.98 ExtdAdm 33.31 -1.73 500Adml 101.23 -2.95 GNMA Ad 11.19 +0.03 GrwAdm 27.94 -0.82 HlthCr 51.99 -1.59 HiYldCp 5.42 -0.04 InfProAd 27.77 +0.32 ITBdAdml 11.90 +0.07 ITsryAdml 12.19 +0.06 IntGrAdm 48.53 -1.64 ITAdml 13.83 -0.01 ITGrAdm 10.07 +0.03 LtdTrAd 11.13 LTGrAdml 10.43 +0.15 LT Adml 11.21 MCpAdml 77.25 -3.33 MuHYAdm 10.60 PrmCap r 58.83 -1.86 ReitAdm r 68.59 -3.49 STsyAdml 10.84 +0.01 STBdAdml 10.67 +0.01 ShtTrAd 15.93 STFdAd 10.94 +0.01 STIGrAd 10.65 -0.01 SmCAdm 27.91 -1.51 TtlBAdml 11.07 +0.04 TStkAdm 27.17 -0.90 WellslAdm 52.61 -0.25

-19.6 -2.2 -18.4 -18.8 -18.6 -10.7 -4.9 +7.6 -18.1 -26.0 -18.5 -19.3 -11.3 +6.9 -10.8 +1.4 +0.4 +11.7 +9.7 +9.5 -21.1 +7.2 +6.0 +3.0 +16.5 +8.5 -16.2 +8.7 -13.8 -10.3 +2.1 +2.7 +1.4 +2.6 +1.4 -19.7 +7.1 -12.7 +2.9

WelltnAdm 49.59 Windsor 37.47 WdsrIIAd 39.83 Vanguard Fds: AssetA 22.11 CapOpp 27.21 DivdGro 13.61 Energy 52.48 EqInc 18.94 Explr 59.93 GNMA 11.19 GlobEq 14.75 HYCorp 5.42 HlthCre 123.16 InflaPro 14.14 IntlGr 15.24 IntlVal 25.35 ITIGrade 10.07 LifeCon 15.50 LifeGro 19.37 LifeMod 18.01 LTIGrade 10.43 Morg 15.54 MuInt 13.83 PrecMtls r 20.27 PrmcpCor 12.02 Prmcp r 56.67 SelValu r 16.01 STAR 17.55 STIGrade 10.65 StratEq 15.55 TgtRetInc 11.16 TgRe2010 21.66 TgtRe2015 11.71 TgRe2020 20.43 TgtRe2025 11.45 TgRe2030 19.32 TgtRe2035 11.45 TgtRe2040 18.72 TgtRe2045 11.76 USGro 16.05 Wellsly 21.71 Welltn 28.71 Wndsr 11.10

-0.83 -5.6 -1.34 -17.2 -1.23 -11.6 -0.39 -0.96 -0.31 -2.12 -0.46 -3.17 +0.03 -0.49 -0.04 -3.78 +0.16 -0.51 -0.80 +0.03 -0.17 -0.48 -0.31 +0.15 -0.52 -0.01 -0.64 -0.35 -1.79 -0.66 -0.31 -0.01 -0.75 -0.06 -0.25 -0.20 -0.40 -0.26 -0.49 -0.32 -0.54 -0.34 -0.48 -0.11 -0.49 -0.40

-9.0 -18.1 -4.4 -18.5 -5.1 -17.8 +6.8 -17.4 +0.3 +1.4 +11.7 -21.2 -21.2 +5.9 -3.9 -11.6 -7.2 +16.4 -13.8 +7.2 -24.1 -12.7 -13.9 -14.7 -7.2 +1.4 -15.1 +0.7 -2.9 -5.7 -7.6 -9.3 -10.9 -12.5 -12.9 -12.9 -12.1 +2.8 -5.6 -17.3

WndsII 22.44 -0.69 Vanguard Idx Fds: TotIntAdm r20.97 -0.65 TotIntlIP r 83.92 -2.60 500 101.22 -2.96 MidCap 17.00 -0.74 SmCap 27.86 -1.50 SmlCpGth 17.81 -0.98 SmlCpVl 12.65 -0.67 STBnd 10.67 +0.01 TotBnd 11.07 +0.04 TotlIntl 12.53 -0.39 TotStk 27.16 -0.91 Vanguard Instl Fds: BalInst 20.00 -0.35 DevMkInst 8.16 -0.24 ExtIn 33.31 -1.73 FTAllWldI r 74.68 -2.32 GrwthIst 27.94 -0.82 InfProInst 11.31 +0.13 InstIdx 100.54 -2.95 InsPl 100.55 -2.94 InsTStPlus 24.58 -0.82 MidCpIst 17.07 -0.73 SCInst 27.91 -1.51 TBIst 11.07 +0.04 TSInst 27.17 -0.91 Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl 83.62 -2.44 MidCpIdx 24.38 -1.05 STBdIdx 10.67 +0.01 TotBdSgl 11.07 +0.04 TotStkSgl 26.22 -0.87 Western Asset: CorePlus I 11.06 +0.03 Yacktman Funds: Fund p 15.89 -0.38

-11.7 -20.4 -20.4 -11.4 -16.3 -19.8 -18.7 -21.0 +2.7 +7.0 -20.5 -12.8 -4.8 -18.2 -19.3 -20.4 -10.8 +11.8 -11.3 -11.3 -12.7 -16.1 -19.7 +7.1 -12.7 -11.3 -16.2 +2.7 +7.1 -12.8 +5.4 -3.9


B6

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2011

COV ER ST OR I ES

Can a new iPhone overcome Android’s growing popularity? By Nick Wingfield and Jenna Wortham New York Times News Service

SAN FRANCISCO — Assuming that Apple unveils its highly anticipated new version of the iPhone today, millions of people are likely to start plotting how to be among the first to buy it. But millions more may be considering a competitor — an Android phone. Despite all the hoopla surrounding the Apple announcement, more people buy smartphones running Google’s Android operating system than

buy Apple phones. Android’s share of new smartphone sales is now more than double Apple’s share, a striking change from a year ago, when the two were roughly even, and a reflection of how Android phones have improved and become more broadly available. In this altered competitive landscape, any new phone from Apple will have to stack up favorably against the most popular Android phones. Even app developers, many of whom once devoted all their energy to building for the iPhone, now

have more divided loyalties. “The more the Android platform matures, the more it becomes a real competitor,” said Mike Novak, an Android engineer at GroupMe, a group messaging service that has over a million users. Yet Apple, by many measures, still remains the smartphone player to beat, with better profits from the business, huge influence among mobile app makers and innovations that rivals scramble to copy. Apple is expected to introduce a new iPhone with a va-

riety of slick new features, but the product could also get a lift from a distribution deal. Apple has struck a deal with Sprint Nextel to offer the new iPhone to its customers, according to a person with knowledge of the deal who was not authorized to speak about the arrangement. The agreement could help blunt some of the distribution advantages that have helped propel Android into more and more smartphones. Until now, Apple phones have been available in the United States only on AT&T and Verizon.

ABC News, Yahoo News team up for Web content By Mike Swift

ABC News’ Diane Sawyer, left, and Katie Couric flank ABC News President Ben Sherwood, background left, and Ross Levinsohn, Yahoo’s Executive Vice President of Americas, at a news conference in New York.

San Jose (Calif.) Mercury News

SAN JOSE, Calif. — Yahoo News has a powerful new partner — ABC News, which will produce original Web content to be distributed on Sunnyvale, Calif.-based Yahoo’s online and mobile platforms under an alliance announced by the two companies Monday. The partnership, launched with a live interview by ABC’s George Stephanopoulos of President Obama Monday that was played on Yahoo’s home page the rest of the day, will initially reach an audience of more than 100 million viewers in the United States, the two companies said. “This is an audience the size of the Super Bowl audience,” said Ben Sherwood, the president of ABC News, at a news conference in New York. “That is true today and it is going to be even more true tomorrow

Ruff Wear Continued from B1 Ruff Wear is not Kruse’s first business venture. He founded his first company, Mariner Marine Works, which made sailing gear, in Seal Beach in 1977 when he was 26 years old. About five years later he founded Salamander Paddle Gear in the same area, with two partners. For a short time Kruse had all three businesses going at once. He sold the first business when he moved to Bend. He sold the second after Ruff Wear sales took off. He said all three businesses grew out of the recreational activities he was passionate about and the challenges he and other outdoor enthusiasts faced in taking their dogs along. Besides being the owner and founder of Ruff Wear, Kruse is also the director of research and development. He still spends most of his work days doing research, talking to people about problems they face sharing outdoor recreation activities with their dogs and then helping design products that solve them. “We are constantly improving our line of products and introducing new designs, even at the expense of cannibalizing sales from an existing product,” said Kruse. Despite being the founder and owner, Kruse is not the highest-paid employee, said Will Blount, president of Ruff Wear. “Some of our commissioned sales staff are paid more than Patrick or me,” Blount said. “We reinvest our profits to fuel growth.” The privately held company, which began with a $33 investment in material for 15 foldable dog bowls sewn in Kruse’s garage, has seen sales growth every year since its inception, Blount said, and has operated debt free since 2003. Ruff Wear sells its products through specialty outdoor pet retailers, chain stores like REI, Eastern Mountain Sports and Cabela’s, distributors in Europe and Internet sites such as Zappos, Backcountry.com and Altrec, said Susan Strible, director of marketing. The company also sells directly to

Richard Drew The Associated Press

as we expand” the offerings of both companies. Yahoo and ABC News will retain editorial control over their individual news products, but they will co-produce

the public at its retail store in Bend. Kruse agreed to answer some additional questions from The Bulletin. What was the secret to Q: your success at the Outdoor Retailer Trade show in 1994? I took a dog product into A: a channel — the outdoor industry — that no one else was selling to. So instead of competing for dollars, we were actually creating a whole new market now known as outdoor dog gear. How much do you spend Q: We on advertising? spend zero in paid A: advertising. Instead we focus on grass roots marketing activities, public relations, sponsored ambassadors, events, social media, product training and ski patrol. Does Ruff Wear donate Q: to nonprofit groups that work to save or enhance wild places or wildlife? We are a member of The Conservation Alliance, which is a group of outdoor businesses that work together to protect wild places throughout North America where wildlife thrives and customers recreate. We also have a donation program that supports organizations and events that support outdoor space where wildlife thrives and people and dogs recreate.

A:

Did you make a ton of Q: money when you sold your first two businesses after you built them up? I would have made more money if I had bought a house and sold it 10 or 12 years later than I did from the sale of Mariner Marine Works and Salamander Paddle Gear. The greatest value was in what I learned from running those businesses.

A:

is the long-term Q: InWhat plan for Ruff Wear? Europe there are busiA: nesses that have been around hundreds of years. I think that kind of longevity is something that is something that is important. — Reporter: 541-617-7820, emerriman@bendbulletin.com

Find It All Online bendbulletin.com

coverage for major news events. They also will share news bureaus in New York and other cities. ABC News anchors and journalists, including Chris-

tiane Amanpour, Diane Sawyer and Katie Couric said at the joint ABC-Yahoo news conference in New York that the Web collaboration would allow for more in-depth journalism.

Fannie Continued from B1 In one notable lapse, even after the agency reported problems to Fannie Mae in late 2010 about some of the approved law firms, it did not request a response from the company, the report said. “American homeowners have been struggling with the effects of the housing finance crisis for several years, and they shouldn’t have to worry whether they will be victims of foreclosure abuse,” said Steve Linick, inspector general of the finance agency. “Increased oversight by FHFA could help to prevent these abuses.” The report is the second in two weeks in which the inspector general has outlined lapses at both the Federal Housing Finance Agency and the companies it oversees — Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. The agency has acted as conservator for the companies since they were taken over by the government in 2008. Its duty is to ensure that their operations do not pose additional risk to the taxpayers who now own them. The companies have tapped the taxpayers to cover mortgage losses totaling about $160 billion. Elijah Cummings, the Maryland Democrat who is the ranking member of the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform and who requested the inspector general’s report, said in a statement: “As a member of Congress and an attorney, I find the systemic failures by FHFA and Fannie Mae to adequately oversee these foreclosure law firms to be a breach of the public trust and an assault on the integ-

SOLAR & RADIANT HEATING SYSTEMS 541-389-7365 CCB# 18669 www.bobcatsun.com

rity of our justice system.” The new report from the inspector general tracks Fannie Mae’s dealings with the law firms handling its foreclosures from 1997, when the company created its retained attorney network. At the time, Fannie Mae was a highly profitable and powerful institution, and it devised the legal network to ensure that borrower defaults would be resolved with efficiency and speed. The law firms in the network agreed to a flat-rate fee structure and pricing model based on the volume of foreclosures they completed. The companies that serviced the loans for Fannie Mae were supposed to monitor the law firms’ performance and practices, the report noted. After receiving information from a shareholder in 2003 about foreclosure abuses by its law firms, Fannie Mae assigned its outside counsel to investigate, according to the report. That law firm concluded in a 2006 analysis that “foreclosure attorneys in Florida are routinely filing false pleadings and affidavits,” and that the practice could be occurring elsewhere. The inspector general’s report said it could not be determined whether Fannie Mae had alerted its regulator, then the Office of Federal Housing Enterprise Oversight, to the legal improprieties identified by its internal investigation. Amy Bonitatibus, a Fannie Mae spokeswoman, declined to comment on the inspector general’s report but said the 2006 legal analysis identified a specific issue with the practice of filing lost note affidavits, which the company immediately addressed.


LOCALNEWS

C

Editorials, C4 Obituaries, C5 Weather, C6

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2011

www.bendbulletin.com/local

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Well sh t!

FIELD TRIP: MCKENZIE PASS

Last Tuesday we asked readers to submit their best photos from McKenziePass. Follow the series at www.bendbulletin.com/wellshoot Coming up: Oct. 18: Behind the scenes • Nov. 1: Virtual field trip to the backyard • Nov. 8: Temperature • Nov. 22: Virtual field trip to Tumalo Falls • And more ...

District grows by 141 students By Patrick Cliff The Bulletin

Submitted by user M.A.

“White Branch Falls: This falls is just a short hike from the highway. The image was taken in low light near dusk, so long exposure smoothed out the water.�

Submitted by user Alastair

“Dee Wright�

Enrollment in Bend-La Pine Schools has increased by 141 students since fall 2010, according to the district. As of Monday, 16,302 students were enrolled in district schools and programs. This marks the district’s second consecutive year of growth. Over that time, Bend-La Pine has enrolled a total of 468 more students. That short trend comes after the district experienced its first yearto-year decline in enrollment for more than two decades. In 2009, the district lost 117 students. The district pointed to the recession as a cause of that decline. That two-year increase is equivalent to almost 20 classrooms of students, according to the district. When setting the budget last spring, the district projected it would have about 100 fewer students than it now does. As the school year approached, district and school officials gathered information from parents and late enrollees to refine the projections. See Bend-La Pine / C2

LA PINE

Submitted by user Willis R.

“Picture I took while biking the McKenzie River Trail with Cog Wild.�

Former water official gets 24 months probation

LOCAL BRIEFING Sisters power outages planned Several power outages will occur in the Sisters area on Oct. 10, 11 and 12 while crews work to upgrade service to the western portion of Central Electric Cooperative’s service area. The first outage will occur Oct. 10 between 10 a.m. and noon. The outage will last 10 to 30 minutes and will affect roughly 1,100 Central Electric Co-op members in the Tollgate, Buck Run and Crossroads subdivisions. The second outage will take place Oct. 11 and 12 and affect about 1,800 customers in the Black Butte Ranch, Camp Sherman and Suttle Lake areas. This outage will start at 10 p.m. Oct. 11 and last until 6 a.m. Oct. 12. All customers affected by the outages have been notified by mail.

Prescribed burns planned this week Two prescribed burns are scheduled to occur in the Ochoco National Forest and in the Crescent Ranger District this week. The first burn will occur in the Maury Mountains east of Prineville. About 280 acres will be burned in order to reduce the number of juniper and improve elk habitat. The second burn will take place in a 150-acre stretch east of Crescent Lake today. Smoke may be visible from nearby subdivisions in the Diamond Lake, Two Rivers North, Cresdale and Cascade Estates areas, and from U.S. Highway 58 and U.S. Highway 31. — Bulletin staff reports

News of Record, C2

By Hillary Borrud The Bulletin

Submitted by user Jeff

“Sahalie Falls No. 1�

Submitted by user Lynn Mohr

“Three Sisters Mtns.�

Former La Pine Water District Commissioner BarbeAnn Nelson-Dodson was sentenced to 24 months of monitored probation on Monday and will repay thousands of dollars she took from a jailed La Pine woman. The probation and restituNelsontion are part Dodson of a plea deal under which Nelson-Dodson pleaded no contest to four counts of second-degree theft in late September. Prosecutors alleged that Nelson-Dodson stole more than $60,000 from Margot Gaddis while Gaddis was serving 10 months last year at Coffee Creek Correctional Facility for felony DUII and attempted arson. See Plea / C2

STATE Stories from: • Portland

• North Bend

FreemontWinema forest •

Oregon News, C3

Correction In an editorial headlined “Thanks, Senator Durbin,� which appeared Monday, Oct. 3, on Page B4, the political party of Sen. Dick Durbin was incorrect. He is a Democrat. The Bulletin regrets the error.

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Submitted by user Nils

“McKenzie Pass snowbank, June 2011, from a bicycle.�

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Submitted by user Kristin Wolter Submitted by user BillMcD

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“A rainy day called for a drive in the country with my boyfriend. We went along the McKenzie Pass and saw a lot of lava beds. Among some very rough areas, there to my amazement was clusters of wildflowers beautifully draping the rocks, like diamonds in the rough. When you think it’s not possible...there it is right in front of you.�

Well, shot! heading in a new direction These photos were submitted to www.bendbulletin.com/wellshoot, and we’ve chose the best to publish. Your Photos: Can you work a camera, and capture a great photo? And can you tell us a little bit about it? Start emailing your own photos to readerphotos@bendbulletin.com and we’ll pick the best for publication inside this section. Include as much detail as possible — when and where you took it, and any special technique used — as well as your name, hometown and phone number.

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THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2011

Have a story idea or a submission? Contact us! Call a reporter: Bend ................541-633-2160 Redmond ........ 541-617-7837 Sisters............. 541-617-7837 La Pine ........... 541-383-0348 Sunriver ......... 541-383-0348 Deschutes ...... 541-617-7829 Crook ............. 541-504-2336 Jefferson ....... 541-504-2336 Salem ..............541-419-8074 D.C. .................202-662-7456 Education .......541-633-2161 Public Lands ....541-617-7812 Public Safety ....541-383-0387 Projects .......... 541-617-7831

Submissions: • Letters and opinions: Mail: My Nickel’s Worth or In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 Details inside on the Editorials page. Contact: 541-383-0358, bulletin@bendbulletin.com.

B end airport awarded FAA grant Bulletin staff report The Federal Aviation Administration recently awarded the city of Bend a $3,425,000 grant to move and widen a taxiway at the municipal airport. According to the city, the

project will bring the taxiway up to current FAA design standards. The total project cost is $3.6 million, and local funds will be used to cover the remaining balance. The work is expected to be completed in the summer

of 2012. It’s one of several upgrades at Bend’s municipal airport over the past few years, which include the construction of a new runaway completed in 2008 and a parallel taxiway finished in 2011.

Bend-La Pine

“To see even more enrollment growth than we expected, it’s a great thing.�

of about five full-time teachers just before the 2011-12 began, according to Jim Widsteen, the district’s human resources executive director. Finding qualified employees is not a problem, he said. When the district posted the equivalent of about three full-time jobs at elementary schools, roughly 150 applicants responded. “We just went through the hiring process,� Widsteen said. “We try to hire as quickly as possible.�

Continued from C1 “We have a good idea of what to expect when doors open. To see even more enrollment growth than we expected, it’s a great thing,� said district spokeswoman Julianne Repman. Even with two years of increased enrollment, the district’s employee roster is smaller than it was before the recession hit. The district employs 1,477 full-time workers this year, a decline of 140 from two years ago. Similar

— Julianne Repman, spokeswoman, Bend-La Pine Schools

cuts have been made in districts across Oregon. This year’s enrollment jump mitigated those cuts just a bit. The higher-than-expected enrollment meant Bend-La Pine could hire the equivalent

• School news, Teen Feats: Email news items and notices of general interest to pcliff@bendbulletin.com. Email announcements of academic achievements to youth@bendbulletin.com. Details: The Local Schools page publishes Wednesday inside this section.

• Obituaries, Death Notices: Details inside this section. Contact: 541-617-7825, obits@bendbulletin.com.

• Community events: Details: The Community Calendar appears on Page 3 in the Community Life section. Email event information to communitylife@bend bulletin.com or click on “Submit an Eventâ€? at www. bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Contact: 541-383-0351.

• Births, engagements, marriages, anniversaries: Details: The Milestones page publishes in Sunday’s Community Life section. Contact: 541-383-0358.

Continued from C1 Gaddis, who has had four DUIIs, met Nelson-Dodson in Alcoholics Anonymous. Under the plea deal, Nelson-Dodson agreed to pay $39,684 in restitution to Gaddis, to complete 240 hours of community service and to attend gamblers anonymous, according to court documents. Nelson-Dodson could be taken off probation early if she successfully completes 16 months of probation. If Nelson-Dodson violates the conditions of her probation, she could receive a 16-month prison sentence. In Deschutes County Circuit Court on Monday morning, Deputy District Attorney Beth Bagley told Presiding Judge Michael Sullivan that Nelson-Dodson admitted to police that she took at least $50,000 of Gaddis’ money. “She essentially gambled all the stolen money away,� Bagley said. Nelson-Dodson did not have a prior criminal history, Bagley said.

Nelson-Dodson’s attorney, Jamie Gerlitz, told Sullivan that her client had already repaid Gaddis approximately $13,000. Gaddis said she just wanted to put the situation behind her. “I just want to get my money back and get out of here,� Gaddis said to Sullivan on Monday. Gerlitz said her client already paid the $39,684 restitution to the court before the Monday sentencing hearing. “I just think given the nature of the case, it was a fair resolution for everyone,� Gerlitz said. Nelson-Dodson resigned in March from the water district’s board. She and other water and sewer district commissioners faced allegations of conflict of interest and nepotism from city of La Pine officials, who wanted to annex the districts into the city government. In April, La Pine businessman Art Uecker filed a complaint with the Oregon Ethics Commission against Nelson-Dodson and two other district commissioners. The Oregon Ethics Commission is still reviewing the complaint. — Reporter: 541-617-7829, hborrud@bendbulletin.com.

N  R

• Civic Calendar notices: Contact: 541-383-0354, news@bendbulletin.com. In emails, please write “Civic Calendarâ€? in the subject line and include a contact name and daytime phone number.

— Reporter: 541-633-2161, pcliff@bendbulletin.com.

Plea

POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Redmond Police Department

Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 7 p.m. Sept. 30, in the area of Northeast Larch Avenue and U.S. Highway 97. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 6 p.m. Sept. 30, in the 300 block of Northwest Oak Tree Lane. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 5 p.m. Sept. 30, in the area of Southwest 23rd Street and Southwest Salmon Avenue. Theft — A bicycle was reported stolen at 9:01 a.m. Sept. 30, in the 2200 block of Southwest 19th Street. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 8:20 a.m. Sept. 30, in the area of Southwest Sixth Street and Southwest Evergreen Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at 4:09 a.m. Sept. 30, in the 1500 block of Southwest Odem Medo Road. Theft — A theft was reported at

10:06 p.m. Oct. 1, in the 1200 block of Southwest Highland Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at 4:50 p.m. Oct. 1, in the 600 block of Southwest Rimrock Way. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 9:49 a.m. Oct. 1, in the 2700 block of Southwest Glacier Avenue. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 9:28 a.m. Oct. 1, in the 600 block of Northwest Fir Avenue. Theft — An iPod was reported stolen at 1:23 p.m. Oct. 2, in the 900 block of Southwest 11th Street. DUII — Dawn Denise Smith, 40, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 3:26 a.m. Oct. 2, in the 1400 block of Southwest Evergreen Avenue. Prineville Police Department

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 3:48 p.m. Sept. 30, in the area of Southeast Second Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 9:11 p.m. Sept. 30, in the area of Southeast Garner Street. Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 2:56 p.m. Sept. 30, in the area of North U.S.

Highway 97 and Northwest Lower Bridge Way in Terrebonne. Theft — A theft was reported at 2:01 p.m. Sept. 30, in the 15600 block of Sunrise Boulevard in La Pine. Theft — Solar lights were reported stolen at 10:30 a.m. Sept. 30, in the 17100 block of Upland Road in La Pine. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 8:20 p.m. Oct. 1, in the area of Day Road and Northwood Drive in La Pine. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 6:59 p.m. Oct. 1, in the area of Hamby Road and U.S. Highway 20 in Bend. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 4:04 p.m. Oct. 1, in the 63300 block of Chaparrel Drive in Bend. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported and an arrest made at 2:41 p.m. Oct. 1, in the area of 19th Street and Deschutes Market Road in Bend. Theft — A theft was reported at 10:02 a.m. Oct. 1, in the 55600 block of Coffey Road in Brothers. DUII — Andrew M. Hancuff, 21, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 2:46 a.m. Oct. 1, in the 2100 block of Northeast Third Street in Bend. Burglary — An attempted burglary

was reported and an arrest made at 7:20 p.m. Oct. 2, in the 60100 block of Crater Road in Bend. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 1:16 p.m. Oct. 2, in the area of First and Morson streets in La Pine. DUII — Brittany Jo North, 22, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 3:54 a.m. Oct. 2, in the area of Southwest Rimrock Way and West Antler Avenue in Redmond.

Find It All Online bendbulletin.com

Oregon State Police

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 4:24 p.m. Sept. 29, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 near milepost 159. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 8:45 p.m. Sept. 30, in the 6800 block of Northwest 11th Street in Terrebonne.

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P  O    For The Bulletin’s full list, including federal, state, county and city levels, visit www.bendbulletin.com/officials.

CONGRESS U.S. Senate

Sen. Jeff Merkley, D-Ore.: 107 Russell Senate Office Building Washington, D.C. 20510 Phone: 202-224-3753 Web: http://merkley.senate.gov Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore. 223 Dirksen Senate Office Building Washington, D.C. 20510 Phone: 202-224-5244 Web: http://wyden.senate.gov U.S. House of Representatives

Rep. Greg Walden, R-Hood River 2182 Rayburn House Office Building Washington, D.C. 20515 Phone: 202-225-6730 Web: http://walden.house.gov/

STATE OF OREGON Gov. John Kitzhaber, Democrat 160 State Capitol, 900 Court St. Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-378-4582 Fax: 503-378-6872 Web: http://governor.oregon.gov Secretary of State Kate Brown, Democrat 136 State Capitol Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-986-1616 Fax: 503-986-1616 Email: oregon.sos@state.or.us Superintendent of Public Instruction Susan Castillo 255 Capitol Street N.E. Salem, Oregon 97310 Phone: 503-947-5600 Fax: 503-378-5156 Email: superintendent.castillo @state.or.us Web: www.ode.state.or.us Treasurer Ted Wheeler, Democrat 159 Oregon State Capitol 900 Court St. N.E. Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-378-4329 Email: oregon.treasurer @state.or.us Web: www.ost.state.or.us Attorney General John Kroger, Democrat 1162 Court St. N.E. Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-378-4400

Fax: 503-378-4017 Web: www.doj.state.or.us Labor Commissioner Brad Avakian 800 N.E. Oregon St., Suite 1045 Portland, OR 97232 Phone: 971-673-0761 Fax: 971-673-0762 Email: boli.mail@state.or.us Web: www.oregon.gov/boli

LEGISLATURE Senate

Sen. Ted Ferrioli, R-District 30 (includes Jefferson, portion of Deschutes) 900 Court St. N.E., S-323 Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-986-1950 Email: sen.tedferrioli@state.or.us Web: www.leg.state.or.us/ferrioli Sen. Chris Telfer, R-District 27 (includes portion of Deschutes) 900 Court St. N.E., S-423 Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-986-1727 Email: sen.christelfer@state.or.us Web: www.leg.state.or.us/telfer Sen. Doug Whitsett, R-District 28 (includes Crook, portion of Deschutes) 900 Court St. N.E., S-303 Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-986-1728 Email: sen.dougwhitsett@state.or.us Web: www.leg.state.or.us/whitsett House

Rep. Jason Conger, R-District 54 (portion of Deschutes) 900 Court St. N.E., H-477 Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-986-1454 Email: rep.jasonconger@state.or.us Web: www.leg.state.or.us/conger Rep. John Huffman, R-District 59 (portion of Jefferson) 900 Court St. N.E., H-476 Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-986-1459 Email: rep.johnhuffman@state.or.us Web: www.leg.state.or.us/huffman Rep. Mike McLane, R-District 55 (Crook, portion of Deschutes) 900 Court St. N.E., H-385 Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-986-1455 Email: rep.mikemclane@state.or.us Web: www.leg.state.or.us/mclane Rep. Gene Whisnant, R-District 53

(portion of Deschutes County) 900 Court St. N.E., H-471 Salem, OR 97301 Phone: 503-986-1453 Email: rep.genewhisnant@state.or.us Web: www.leg.state.or.us/whisnant

DESCHUTES COUNTY 1300 N.W. Wall St. Bend, OR 97701 Web: www.deschutes.org Phone: 541-388-6571 Fax: 541-382-1692

CROOK COUNTY 300 N.E. Third St. Prineville, OR 97754 Phone: 541-447-6555 Fax: 541-416-3891 Email: administration@co.crook.or.us Web: co.crook.or.us

JEFFERSON COUNTY 66 S.E. D St. Madras, OR 97741 Phone: 541-475-2449 Fax: 541-475-4454 Web: www.co.jefferson.or.us County Commission

Mike Ahern, John Hatfield, Wayne Fording Phone: 541-475-2449 Email: commissioner@co. jefferson.or.us

CITY OF BEND 710 N.W. Wall St. Bend, OR 97701 Phone: 541-388-5505 Web: www.ci.bend.or.us

CITY OF PRINEVILLE 387 N.E. Third St. Prineville, OR 97754 Phone: 541-447-5627 Fax: 541-447-5628 Email: cityhall@cityofprineville.com Web: www.cityofprineville.com

CITY OF MADRAS 71 S.E. D Street Madras, OR 97741 Phone: 541-475-2344 Fax: 541-475-7061

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TUESDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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A jumbo learning opportunity • Students hone their technology skills during football games By Jessie Higgins The (Coos Bay) World

NORTH BEND — Lights — camera — touchdown Bulldogs! “Wow.” North Bend senior Andy Huber took a moment to clap — but just a moment. “Alright, Bailey, you look at the goal posts. No, no, no, Dusty, you look at the kicker,” Huber paused. The instant replay he had just recorded finished playing across the scoreboard. “Dusty, you’re live.” North Bend High School’s Jumbo-tron displayed a skycam close up of the kicker, lining up for a field goal. Once the kick was away, Huber quickly switched the video to the ground-cam, which showed the football flying perfectly between two goal posts. While its installation in spring 2009 was controversial at first, the Jumbo-tron has fans. Paid for through a $250,000 anonymous donation, the video scoreboard at the south end of the football field was put in place amid district-wide cuts that at one point were forecasted as high as $3 million. “To me personally, that is a huge slap in the face of every one of the 31 employees,” Jim Rose, a North Bend accountant, said in an April 2009 school board meeting. “That project should be stopped immediately.” The money was donated to the district under the stipulation it would be used to buy the Jumbo-tron. The video scoreboard went up, and North Bend School District’s technology specialist, Suzy Callery, immediately saw the potential for student learning. “Here’s a state-of-the-art tool we have access to,” Callery said. “Can we use it for curriculum?” North Bend High School technology teacher Shelly

Benjamin Brayfield / The (Coos Bay) World

North Bend senior Thomas Capps directs his cameramen from the tricaster station at a football game in North Bend. Capps chooses which of the two live videos will be displayed on the Jumbo-tron based on which camera has the better angle.

Tilden volunteered to teach students to run the Jumbotron, incorporating live video feeds from two cameras with animated graphics and pre-recorded commercials. She asked for volunteers out of her various technology classes, trained them each how to operate the cameras and the computer system, then turned them loose at the first home football game. “This is such a great experience for them,” Tilden said as she watched her current students work at the tricaster station. “They can go out and get jobs in the real world. They could get jobs at a television station.” With the program now entering its third year, students who have manned the Jumbotron in previous years train incoming students in the three stations: the sky camera, the ground camera, and the tricaster station. The student who mans the tricaster station is in control of the Jumbo-tron. He or she decides which video feed to display when, and whether to put up

an advertisement or a graphic. The student also chooses when to record brief segments of the video for the instant replay. Cameramen shooting live feeds for the Jumbo-tron receive direction from the tricaster via headsets. “At the last football game, we lost all communication in our headsets,” said North Bend senior Thomas Capps. “Then we had to use walkie-talkies and run people back and forth.” The whole Jumbo-tron team remembered the incident. “The dull games are where nothing goes wrong,” junior Bailey Swieck said from his position next to the field. A half hour later, when the game began, he hustled up and down the sidelines shooting the live video. “I will be the guy down here walking back and forth right next to the action, getting knocked over, getting hit with everything imaginable,” Swieck said. This includes footballs, water bottles, helmets and 180-pound football players. Up at the sky camera, the Jumbo-tron team shares a box

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Eugene approves disc golf course EUGENE — The city of Eugene has approved a new disc golf course. The Eugene Register-Guard reports that the course will be located at the Alton Baker Park, in what officials say is a compromise between disc golf enthusiasts and runners. The course will be 15 acres, which is smaller than the 22 acres originally proposed. The initial proposal had the disc golf course crossing a jogging trail. The Oregon Track Club, which helps maintain the trail, was concerned about disc golfers crossing the trail. Backers of the course are happy with the compromise. City officials plan to seek a vendor to run a pay-to-play course, a solicitation that will likely not take place until early next year.

Sewage dumped in Willamette River PORTLAND — A pump station in the Portland suburb West Linn lost power, leading to the release of about 300,000 gallons of sewage into the Willamette River. Clackamas County officials said the pumps were back in operation Sunday after two hours, and signs were up to warn the public against contact with the water near the pump station.

Missing hunter found near Forest Grove FOREST GROVE — A hunter missing overnight in Washington County has been found near Hagg Lake southwest of Forest Grove. He was identified as Jesus Jiminez. KGW-TV reports the driver of a log truck found him Monday morning. His family notified authorities after he called during the

day Sunday but didn’t return in the evening. His vehicle was found in a parking spot that hunters use.

Fossil digger banned from national parks PORTLAND — A Longview, Wash., man accused of digging up the skull of a hog-like animal that predated humans by 20 million years has been banned from national park lands for a year. The Oregonian reports that 48-year-old David Wixon also must pay $4,500 in restitution for the misdemeanor crime of depredation of government property. The fossil was from an oreodont, one of a number of hooved, plant-eating animals now extinct. Court records say an offduty interpretive ranger saw Wixon using a rock hammer at a site at the John Day Fossil Beds National Monument in May 2007, leading to an investigation by federal agents. They searched his house, and he returned the skull. Prosecutors said the penalties were imposed Friday.

Bicyclist assaults driver after collision MEDFORD — Police say a bicycle rider involved in a collision with a car punched the driver several times in the face. Police say the 20-year-old man was responsible for the Saturday afternoon accident when he failed to stop at an intersection on his bike. A 19year-old woman was also riding on the bike. The Mail Tribune reports the woman had minor injuries. The driver of the car suffered minor injuries to his face. The 20-year-old bike rider was cited for assault, unsafe operation of a bicycle and unlawfully having a passenger on his bicycle.

TriMet driver kicks crying baby off bus PORTLAND — TriMet says it’s investigating a complaint that a driver kicked a woman and crying baby off a bus in Hillsboro, saying, “I can’t drive with that noise.” A spokeswoman for the transit agency, Mary Fetsch, says drivers can take steps if they believe safety is in jeopardy. TriMet officials will meet this week with the driver. Another passenger on the bus told The Oregonian the baby wasn’t that loud and all the other passengers got off the bus in protest.

Hunter discovers homicide victim MYRTLE CREEK — The Douglas County sheriff’s office has identified a homicide victim whose body was found by a hunter near Myrtle Creek as a 39-year-old Roseburg man. In a statement Monday night, Sheriff John Hanlin said the victim was Jeffrey Scott Benison. He was found dead just off a Bureau of Land Management road. Initial reports said the man had an apparent head wound, but the sheriff’s office did not provide additional details on how he was killed. The sheriff’s major crimes unit is investigating.

Climber found safe on Mount St. Helens STEVENSON, Wash. — A climber missing on Mount St. Helens has been found safe. The Skamania County sheriff’s office says a Forest Service ranger found her Monday. The sheriff’s office says 55-year-old Lori Williams of Aloha was reported overdue Sunday night. She had decided to continue after her climbing party turned around because of bad weather and a sick climbing member. — From wire reports

with the opposing coaches. They must remain silent. They follow the action constantly, working as a backup for the ground camera in case their view is obstructed. “We try to catch as much of the action as possible,” senior JT Wilson said, staring at the camera pointed out the window. Like most of the students in the Jumbo-tron team, Wilson anticipates a career in technology. “Since technology is a growing thing in our world,” Wilson said, “it is never a bad thing to know more about technology.”

Logging industry warns of wildfire in U.S. forest land The Associated Press PORTLAND — A “red zone” of about 300,000 acres in Klamath and Lake counties appears to have gotten through another fire season without a catastrophe in lodge pole pine forests devastated by pine bark beetles. Cooler, wetter weather has arrived in the southern Oregon region east of the Cascade Range. But foresters say there’s a long-term danger that fire will sweep through the dead trees. The Oregonian reports that industry groups are pressing state officials to intervene with federal agencies to get more trees removed. The Oregon Board of Forestry toured the area last month, and industry groups have appealed to it and to Gov. John Kitzhaber. The industry argues that the area is an indictment of a federal policy hobbled by legal gridlock. The infestation could have been stopped years ago, it says, and timber now useless could have been salvaged. Private timber owners worry that a big fire on federal land will

get a room

jump into their holdings. “That situation down there is just a tinderbox waiting to explode,” said Jim Geisinger, executive vice president of Associated Oregon Loggers. Environmentalists say nature should be allowed to take its course. “Bugs in lodge pole, that’s kind of what they do,” said Sean Stevens, spokesman for Oregon Wild. “The public looks at it and gasps, but in 50 years there will be a new lodge pole forest growing up in its place.” The Forest Service is clearing “safety corridors” along roads and has long-range plans to reduce the fuel load of dead trees, said Rick Newton, deputy supervisor in the Fremont-Winema National Forest.

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THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2011

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he U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs expects to open a new outpatient clinic for military veterans in Bend in December 2012. The facility will be more

than twice as large as the one it replaces and will offer something the current clinic cannot: specialty care. Currently, veterans can receive routine outpatient care and some specialty care in a roughly 10,000 square-foot clinic near St. Charles Bend. The new clinic will be some 25,500 square feet. And all that additional space means more specialists can be brought in to better serve area vets. For now, area veterans who need specialty care must drive to Portland to receive it. They may take a van that routinely crosses the mountains to the VA hospital in Portland, but that can be both time consuming and downright dangerous in the worst of winter weather. The van, by the way, is driven by volunteers. Much of that should change when the new clinic opens. According to Mike McAleer, public information officer at the Portland hospital, planners are working to decide just what specialties should

The end result ... will be a dramatic improvement in local services for local veterans. be added to the new clinic. When they’re done, those most in demand most likely will find a home in the Bend clinic. Some specialties, those less frequently used, still may be available only in Portland, he said. The van will still be needed. The next year will be spent remodelling two floors of the former Clear One Health Plans building on Courtney Drive. When that is done, the clinic — complete with new specialists — will open. The end result, while it won’t be as convenient as a housecall from the family physician, will be a dramatic improvement in local services for local veterans.

Smarter regulation needed from EPA

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cement plant in Oregon’s Baker County was dumping a lot of mercury into the air five years ago. In 2008, it reached a voluntary agreement with the state and proceeded to spend $20 million on technology to cut those emissions by at least 75 percent. At the time, there were no EPA regulations that applied. But then the EPA set new rules, to take effect in 2013, that require the plant to cut emissions even more. Ash Grove Cement Co. says it’s using the most advanced technology possible at its Durkee plant, which has cut emissions by 90 percent, but the EPA wants 98 percent. The plant is challenged by local limestone that is abnormally high in naturally occurring mercury. There are 100 jobs at stake in a county with a population of 16,000. And that doesn’t include the associated jobs. The company is also the county’s biggest taxpayer. It’s the kind of story that government critics cite when complaining that regulations — and uncertainty about regulations — are threatening jobs and job creation. If a company can’t be reasonably certain what requirements it must meet, it can’t make good decisions. It can’t protect owners, investors or employees. And so it is discouraged from making investments that preserve and create jobs.

If a company can’t be reasonably certain what requirements it must meet, it can’t make good decisions ... And so it is discouraged from making investments that preserve and create jobs. Rep. Greg Walden, R-Hood River, has taken up the Ash Grove cause, and is co-sponsoring legislation — the EPA Regulatory Relief Act and the Cement Sector Regulatory Relief Act — that would postpone implementation of the new EPA standards for more than three years. It’s important to consider the impact of this type of regulation, he said, noting that if this plant were forced to close, those jobs most likely would move to China. Ironically, pollution from China can end up drifting across the Pacific Northwest. We don’t for a moment discount the importance of clean air. The evidence is overwhelming that the nation breathes better because of cleanups that EPA regulations have required. The issue is reasonableness and balance during hard times. And jobs, jobs, jobs.

Bend re-route a bad idea By Geraldine Margrave ecently there have been some articles for and against the reroute of the parkway — U.S. Highway 97 and Third Street. The In My View by Toby Bayard on Sept. 9 brings a wake-up call to what is really happening. I have lived in Bend for 13 years and have seen so much waste by the city of Bend — a build-it-and-tear-itup-a-few-years-later attitude. This reroute is not needed and will have a tremendous impact on our city and Third Street. The traffic will be unmanageable at Butler Market and with no exit at Empire Avenue or Cooley Road. Revere Avenue would also be impacted. The businesses on Empire Avenue and Boyd Acres will surely suffer dearly with no easy access. The large trucks that deliver good and products to them will have to go down Third Street for deliveries to those areas, creating even more traffic at Empire Avenue and Third Street. The traffic will greatly increase on Third Street and it will be even harder to get to where we want to go. I would hope that the traffic study and environmental impact analysis reflects this issue. The traffic on the north end of the Bend parkway moves just fine now and there are not that many accidents. The only major traffic problems are during the holiday shopping season. This is due to too many islands blocking entrances to stores. A little widening in this area would help drivers get easier access to the Cascade Village Shopping area. Maybe a frontage parking lot road so shoppers don’t have to drive in

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IN MY VIEW The parkway was poor planning from the beginning by the city of Bend and now they are trying to tell us we need this reroute now. Why is the city worrying about the year 2035 when we have no growth and are not expected to have any growth for many years? front of five stores to get to the one at the end of the shopping center. This reroute is a horrible plan with two roads right next to each other. This is just going to ruin the area for all of us locals. This is just a ploy to help the city of Bend get high paying renters to the Juniper Ridge area. The parkway was poor planning from the beginning by the city of Bend and now they are trying to tell us we need this reroute now. Why is the city worrying about the year 2035 when we have no growth and are not expected to have any growth for many years? This project could wait and maybe be thought out more by the planners before approval. The city is trying to push this project down our throats just so they can get funding from the federal government. This project would ruin a lot of businesses in Bend along the Third Street corridor and in the industrial areas in Northeast Bend. Moving a

historic building is wrong. The 51 businesses would have to find other places to go. Some of these businesses have been here 30 years or more and a lot of them will have no way to move without funds. The rent is reasonable in these areas and most will not be able to relocate to the high rent areas, therefore many will just go out of business. I hope the city plans to pay all these business and people to relocate. This is not the time to displace so many people and businesses. The city of Bend is using this reroute to promote their own interests in Juniper Ridge and not for the greater good of Bend. I think the city should work on improvements at Empire and Third Street, Reed Market Road and the neighborhoods on the west side that have no curbs or sidewalks. Since they have no builders to do this for them, they have just let the older parts of Bend go without. Meanwhile they make contractors put in curbs on empty lots just to be torn out again in a few years. They have put ADA access on corners in places where they do not need it and will never be used. No common sense in government! Take a look at the northeast corner of Robal Road and Third Street — what a waste of our tax dollars at this time. No disabled person will ever use it. I urge the citizens and businesses of Bend to wake up and see what is going on. Write letters to the city of Bend and the Oregon Department of Transportation to stop this madness and not to approve any funding at this time. — Geraldine Margrave lives in Bend.

Letters policy

In My View policy

How to submit

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 550 and 650 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or email them to The Bulletin. Write: My Nickel’s Worth / In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 Fax: 541-385-5804 Email: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Radio the answer to grand-standing at debates By Michael Smerconish The Philadelphia Inquirer

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he staging and format of the GOP debates thus far is robbing viewers of substantive dialogue and will pose a long-term problem for the Republican Party. I have a prescription. First, 60 seconds is not enough time to address the serious problems we face, and 30 seconds is insufficient to offer a rebuttal to another candidate’s plan. Moreover, when complex issues are reduced to sound bites in front of a live audience, there is a natural tendency to solicit the crowd’s instantaneous response. Trouble is, when the audience reacts inappropriately, an impression is formed of both the candidates and their supporters that may turn off voters needed to win a general election. In this month’s debate at the Rea-

gan Library, the mention by moderator Brian Williams of the number of individuals executed on Texas Gov. Rick Perry’s watch received thunderous applause even before Perry started his response to the question. Five days later, at a debate in Tampa, Fla., CNN’s Wolf Blitzer posed a hypothetical question to Texas Rep. Ron Paul about a man who shows up in an ER with a catastrophic injury and no health insurance. Audience members shouted that the patient should be left to die. And last week in Orlando, some in the audience booed a soldier who asked the candidates, via video, for their positions on the repeal of “don’t ask, don’t tell.� The debates have been good spectacle, but not all that valuable. The cheapening of the process makes it difficult for candidates who wish to offer substance to emerge on a crowded stage. This week I asked

former Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman what it feels like to participate when the subject matter strays. “Here is the deal that becomes very frustrating,â€? Huntsman said. “You spend 15 minutes on vaccinations. You spend 15 minutes on what your book said and how you spin it ‌ and I’m looking out at that camera thinking that 15 million folks are unemployed, millions and millions beyond who are so dispirited they have just given up trying. This nation has an economy that is sucking wind and we’re wasting time on vaccines? It’s all drama.â€? At Politico.com, veteran pundit Jeff Greenfield offered a list of proposals to improve debates: • Lose the live audiences and hold the debates in a TV studio. • Rely on journalists for the questions, not the public. • Do away with the videotaped

candidate introductions and scenesetting taped packages that are better suited to “Monday Night Football� than a presidential debate. In a conversation with me, Greenfield noted that there “wasn’t a debate in the presidency — ever — until a radio debate in 1948 between Tom Dewey and Harold Stassen. And there wasn’t a television debate until (Hubert) Humphrey and (John) Kennedy faced off in West Virginia. After 1960, we went three cycles without debates and now they’re institutionalized, and on the whole, I think that is a good thing.� I like his proposal, but with a twist. If the goal is to improve the level of discourse and dampen the tendency toward posing, then why not an oldfashioned radio debate? Instead of debating under klieg lights, how about having the candidates in the same soundproof room, with extended

time for responses to questions from individuals well-versed in the issues? It would be healthy to watch the debate without having to think about Michele Bachmann’s acrylic French manicure or how Perry’s shoulders fill his suit or who’s wearing what color tie. Such is the different perspective between radio and television that it’s often been said that individuals who heard Richard Nixon debate Kennedy in 1960 believed Nixon won, while those who watched gave the debate victory to JFK. Maybe the 2012 race would benefit from more of a listening experience. Ban the cameras and the crowds and just turn on the microphones. It’s time to really listen to the candidates instead of being distracted by everything else. — Michael Smerconish writes a weekly column for The Philadelphia Inquirer.


TUESDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

O D N  Leon Gilbert Cushman, of Prineville Oct. 14, 1955 - Sept. 27, 2011 Arrangements: Autumn FuneralsRedmond 541-504-9485 www.autumnfunerals.net Services: 1pm Fri. Oct. 14 at Forest Lawn Cemetery, 400 SW Walters Rd., Gresham.

Helen M. Gillaspy, of Bend Sept. 23, 1915 - Sept. 30, 2011 Arrangements: Baird Funeral Home of Bend, (541) 382-0903 www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: No services will be held per Helen's request. Contributions may be made to:

Partners In Care Hospice 2075 NE Wyatt Court Bend, Oregon 97701 www.partnersbend.org

Judy Lou Gregory, of Madras Sept. 11, 1942 - Sept. 27, 2011 Arrangements: Bel-Air Funeral Home, 541-475-2241 Services: Memorial services will be held on Saturday, October 15, 2011 at 11:00 AM at the Madras Conservative Baptist Church.

Ramon Garcia, of Redmond June 23, 1926 - Oct. 1, 2011 Arrangements: Redmond Memorial Chapel 541-548-3219 www.redmondmemorial.com

Services: Rosary Thursday October 6, 2011 at 7:00pm at Redmond Memorial Chapel. Funeral Mass at St. Thomas Catholic Church on Friday, October 7, 2011 at 10:00am.

Thelma Ann Drasbek, of Redmond April 3, 1925 - Sept. 29, 2011 Arrangements: Autumn FuneralsRedmond 541-504-9485 www.autumnfunerals.net Services: A private service will be held at a later date.

Carolyn "Carol" Ronlov Michota, of Bend Jan. 12, 1944 - Oct. 1, 2011 Arrangements: Baird Funeral Home of Bend (541) 382-0903 www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: A private gathering of family and friends will take place at a later date. Contributions may be made to:

Partners In Care-Hospice House, 2075 NE Wyatt Court, Bend, Oregon 97701 www.partnersbend.org

Obituary policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, email or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825.

Deadlines: Death Notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details.

Phone: 541-617-7825 Email: obits@bendbulletin.com Fax: 541-322-7254

Mail: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708

FEATURED OBITUARY

Newest Nobel laureate discovered that cells were key to the immune system Steinman’s research extended the insights made posDr. Ralph Steinman, a cell sible by Hoffmann’s discovery, biologist who was named one in 1996, of cell receptors in of three winners of the Nobel fruit flies that are activated by Prize in Medicine on Monday pathogenic bacteria or fungi, for his work on the human im- and Beutler’s identification mune response, died Friday of cell receptors in mice, gein New York, a fact unknown netically similar to the recepto the prize committee tors in fruit flies, that when it made its ancan cause septic shock nouncement. He was when stimulated. 68. The receptors studied The cause was panby Hoffmann and Beucreatic cancer, his tler act as a first line of Steinman daughter Lesley said. defense in the immune Steinman, the direcresponse by recogniztor of the Laboratory ing potentially harmful of Cellular Physiology and bacteria and other microorImmunology at Rockefeller ganisms. Steinman focused University and a senior phy- on the dendritic cells that play sician at the Rockefeller Uni- a critical role in adaptive imversity Hospital, shared the munity, activating T-cells that award with Dr. Bruce Beutler help the body mount a defense and Dr. Jules Hoffmann. The against infections that breach three scientists were honored the first line of defense. for discovering the essential Ralph Marvin Steinman steps in the immune system’s was born Jan. 14, 1943, in response to infection. Montreal. He received a bachIn 1973, Steinman and Dr. elor of science degree from Zanvil Cohn discovered a new McGill University in 1963 and class of cell, known as den- a degree from Harvard Medidritic cells, that play a critical cal School in 1968. role in activating the body’s After completing an internadaptive immune system, and ship and residency at Massahis subsequent research led to chusetts General Hospital, he a new understanding of how joined Rockefeller University they function. in 1970 as a postdoctoral felSteinman, who had been low in the Laboratory of Celsuffering from pancreatic can- lular Physiology and Immucer for four years, had been nology. Working with Cohn, undergoing treatment using he began researching the ima pioneering immunotherapy mune system. based on his own research. Steinman lived in WestDendritic cells from his body port, Conn. He is survived by were deployed to mount an as- his wife, mother, children and sault on his cancer. grandchildren. By William Grimes

New York Times News Service

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OREGON NEWS

How did our fashion industry fall behind? By Laura Gunderson The Oregonian

PORTLAND — Designer Anna Cohen is a pioneer of the fashion industry here, which has been heralded on the glossy pages of national magazines and the catwalk on “Project Runway.� With a prestigious New York education and experience from fashion work in Italy, Cohen’s company and its earth-friendly designs soared like the yellow canary that became her signature. Yet within three years — and not long after gracing the cover of Women’s Wear Daily — she shuttered her business. The 2008 collapse came even as orders piled in and before most shoppers were even aware that a recession had taken hold. Yet the struggles she faced hold true today, even as metroarea designers are generating national buzz and luring tourists to town: No real infrastructure. With little in the way of manufacturing capabilities, textile offerings or production consultants, bankers or investors versed in the fashion business, designers are struggling to make clothes at affordable prices and often burn out attempting to fit fashion around a day job. Or, they leave. Three of the six Portland designers featured on TV’s “Project Runway� competition have left for hotspots such as New York, where it’s relatively easier to do the job. To fill the industry’s huge gaps, a number of designers have launched businesses offering sewing, marketing and selling services. Or, equally as important, provide regular critiques or occasional tutorials that for many designers amount to a narrowly focused, on-thefly business degree.

Industry in its infancy Organizers of Portland Fashion Week, once simply a venue for designers to show off their work, have begun lobbying the city to recognize an industry in its infancy. It could generate more business investment and shopping tourism, they say, as well as attract services crucial to the supply chain. In a presentation to Mayor Sam Adams, the organizers pointed to the 4,500 fashion retail jobs in the metro area in 2009 and then, to all the work and money spent a year later

“We have up-and-coming designers here with fresh ideas and, at the other end, designers entrenched at major corporations, who don’t even speak the same language. We need that infrastructure in the middle because we’re really sitting on a gold mine here.� — Anna Cohen, fashion pioneer in Portland

To prevent that, the designer created Fashion Forward, a program for emerging designers at her year-old school, Portland Sewing. The program’s first student was Portlander Bryce Black, who debuted on this season’s Project Runway and will be part of Fashion Week’s Saturday show.

Draining inspiration to retain the Danish wind-turbine maker Vestas and its 400 jobs. Although matching New York’s long-established fashion scene is impossible, industry supporters say a fraction of its success is alluring — and attainable. In New York last year, the fashion industry generated $9 billion in wages and $1.7 billion in tax revenues. “We have up-and-coming designers here with fresh ideas and, at the other end, designers entrenched at major corporations, who don’t even speak the same language,� said Cohen, who serves on the board of the 7-year-old fashion event that kicks off Wednesday. “We need that infrastructure in the middle because we’re really sitting on a gold mine here.� Seth Aaron Henderson knows the area’s design struggles well. The Vancouver, Wash., man taught himself to sew seven years ago. As his vision took shape, he had a difficult time finding professionals to help with production or investors willing to take a chance on fashion. That changed a bit when the father of two with blackpolished fingernails beat out 15 other designers last year to win the seventh season of “Project Runway.� He’s a big part of next week’s Fashion Week, having teamed to create a line for Earthtec, a New Hampshire that creates clothing from fabric spun from recycled plastic bottles. Fashion Week producer Tito Chowdhury had helped persuade Earthtec head Dennis Randall to come to Portland, a prime destination of sorts for the chief executive who’s struggled to find a reliable source of recyclables. Now Randall, who with the fashion event’s organizers met with the mayor and economic development leaders, is considering situating a West Coast manufacturing plant here. The partnership spotlights the benefits of sustainable-minded manufacturing — Henderson’s edgy line debuts Friday night — but also illustrates the relief an experienced manufacturer can provide an independent designer. Instead of the usual struggle of taking an idea from paper to

pattern, tracking down fabrics and sewing the line himself, Henderson was able to create pieces featuring graphics he designed on fabrics that Earthtec then printed and produced. “It’s a dream,� said Henderson, who hopes his and others’ Runway acclaim will bring more resources here. “This is the ticket to a mass market retailer. That type of access is the whole thing.�

Mass market Mass market manufacturers often produce tens of thousands of a particular piece, which allows them to buy fabric at cheaper bulk rates, for national distribution. That allows them to keep prices in check. A local designer might produce, say, 50 pieces, and in some cases hand deliver those creations to the limited number of boutiques that can handle such small batches. “In some ways, it’s just not worth being in business at that rate,� said Britt Howard, who operates 3-year-old Portland Garment Factory with partner Rosemary Robinson. In a whitewashed warehouse tucked off Southeast Stark Street, the designers share their experience in the trade’s nuts and bolts to provide their counterparts fabricbuying, pattern-making and sewing. Soon they’ll add online marketing and graphics. They, like the few others who’ve begun offering such services in Portland, say they sometimes butt against the do-it-yourself culture that’s become a religion of sorts for local artisans. Stories abound of creatives who have amazing ideas but can’t sew a zipper into a dress. Designers with established labels have been known to create one size, then another “a little bigger,� instead of using pattern grades to produce traditional sizes. Though most designers plan a season ahead, many local artists deliver an idea in early September for a fall line. Some designers worry that handing over any part of their work will compromise their vision. Yet holding on can lead to what Sharon Blair sees as the five-year burnout.

Alice Dobson understands how work that’s supposed to be based in inspiration can became a drain. The Oregon native sold her Sofada label at a store in Southeast Portland of the same name. This year would have been the store’s 10th anniversary, but in April she cleared out the shop and rented out the space. Although she still designs for longtime clients, Dobson has shifted more toward helping other designers. Her seamstresses now also sew jobs for other designers. And in May, she and her longtime sales rep, Jaimi Martin, launched Fashion Republic, a business that helps other designers sell their work to retailers here and nationwide. Getting retail buyers’ attention is a tough job. Although Fashion Week provides a spotlight for designers’ work, the city has only a handful of other such events and only one full-time showroom. Big national retailers have pulled buyers out of more and more cities. Macy’s consolidated its buying operations as has The Kroger Co., meaning fewer decisions on what to stock at Fred Meyer are being made in Portland. Blair, who works to foster relationships with apparel buyers, has regular conversations with Nordstrom folks and hopes to persuade them to make the trip from Seattle. “My goal is to show these buyers it’s worth their while coming here,� she said. “Portland can be a market center for clothing that feels good and is sustainable — the opposite of that immediate obsolescence.� Indeed, Cohen’s most recent work aims to connect fashion with its roots. She’s created a piece made with wool from the 140-year-old Imperial Stock Ranch in Eastern Oregon and thread from Earthtec’s recycled bottles — the design serves as the dramatic finale for Fashion Week’s Thursday night show. “We’ve come such a long way, and now we have a perfect combination of elements: the timing, the sustainability, the attention,� Cohen said. “All of us are learning and stretching and trying to make this work.�

D E 

 Deaths of note from around the world: Barbara Welles, 83: Former head of Colorado’s weather-modification programs (cloud seeding), which was highly controversial in the 1970s. Died Sept. 26. Michael Drake, 65: A planetary scientist who worked on many NASA space missions in his lifetime. Devoted to sending a spacecraft to an asteroid, taking rock samples from the surface and bringing them home for study. Died Sept. 21 in Tuscon, Ariz. He had been undergoing treatment for liver cancer. Alexander Grant, 86: Member of England’s Royal Ballet whose portrayal of childlike suitors, muddled husbands, English eccentrics, pirate chiefs and Shakespearean rustics made him one of British ballet’s most beloved

stars. Died Friday in London. He had been hospitalized with infections and pneumonia after a hip operation. Gregg Miller, 57: Led the art department at the Los Angeles Daily News, where he worked for almost 20 years. Died Saturday in Woodland Hills, Calif. Robert Whitaker, 71: Photographer who shot some of the most famous — and infamous — images of The Beatles. Died Sept 20 in Sussex, England. He had been undergoing treatment for cancer. Peter Terpeluk, 63: Powerhouse fundraiser for the Republican Party who served as U.S. ambassador to Luxembourg and as finance chairman of the Republican National Committee. Died Aug. 23 in Chevy Chase, Md., of a heart attack. — From wire reports

Find It All Online bendbulletin.com

Partners In Care and Hospice The Greene family wishes to thank Partners In Care and Hospice for the compassionate care given to our father, and for the assistance given us in coping with the grieving process. Your staff was truly wonderful and we will remember always the kindness they have shown us. Special thanks to our Hospice caregivers: Hanna, Lydia, Debbie, Sharon, Tammy, Vanessa, Shelly, and Chaplain Noah - You always put a smile on our father’s face and treated him with friendship and dignity. Words cannot express how much we appreciate all you did for him and for us. The Greene Family

In Memorium

Valory Roberts Morris 1945 - 2010 On October 4, 2010, Valory Morris quietly and gently passed away and entered into a realm of eternal joy and peace. Valory was born on August 26, 1945, in New York City. She graduated from High School in 1963 and was awarded an athletic scholarship to Long Island University. While in college, she was captain of the women’s basketball team. She played volleyball, field hockey, and softball. After graduation she spent two years coaching high school girl’s basketball at a private school on Long Island. In June of 1969, she joined TWA as a flight attendant. In 1972, she met John Morris in San Francisco, California and they were married in February of 1973. Over the next 37 and a half years they lived in San Francisco, Marin County, Hawaii, Hilton Head, South Carolina, Sunriver and Bend, Oregon. She and her husband, John, traveled together to almost 40 countries over the course of their lives together. Her son, John III, was born in 1977. Valory was a loving wife, mother, and grandmother to two grandchildren, Christian and Savannah Morris. She was a gourmet cook and avid tennis player. She had a tremendous lust for life, and she both gave and received love from all who knew her. She is greatly missed. Contributions in Valory’s memory may be sent to Partners In Care Hospice in Bend, Oregon, who gave her such loving care in her final months.


THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2011

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W E AT H ER FOR EC A ST Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LP ©2011.

TODAY, OCTOBER 4 Today: Mainly cloudy, chance of rain showers, cool, afternoon breezes.

HIGH Ben Burkel

61

Bob Shaw

WEDNESDAY Tonight: Mainly cloudy, moderate rainfall overnight, breezy.

LOW

37

Astoria 62/50

58/52

Cannon Beach 53/50

Hillsboro Portland 62/52 61/46

Tillamook 57/46

Salem

58/49

64/45

67/47

Maupin 69/44

68/42

64/48

Yachats

62/46

60/36

Oakridge

Cottage Grove

61/39

65/43

Coos Bay

61/37

Crescent

Gold Beach

64/40

John Day

Chemult

65/48

Unity 61/39

68/43

Vale 69/49

Hampton 64/41

69/49

Juntura

Burns

68/42

64/41

Riley 61/39

Jordan Valley

61/41

Silver Lake

53/35

EAST Ontario Chance of showers 69/49 and isolated thunderstorms today. Nyssa

Christmas Valley

Port Orford 59/53

Baker City

Brothers 61/38

Fort Rock 60/38

52/35

51/34

Roseburg

61/53

Spray 71/42

La Pine 61/33

Crescent Lake

63/49

Bandon

55/41

Prineville 65/37 Sisters Redmond Paulina 67/37 62/39 64/38 Sunriver Bend

Eugene

61/49

67/40

Mitchell 67/43

65/41

61/40

Union

WEST Chance of showers today, with heavier rain expected near the coast. CENTRAL Mostly cloudy skies with scattered showers possible today.

Joseph

Granite

59/40

53/47

Florence

64/42

Madras

Camp Sherman

Enterprise 62/40

67/45

Condon

Warm Springs

Corvallis

65/43

La Grande

68/44

67/42

63/49

Wallowa

68/44

Ruggs

Willowdale

Albany

Newport

Pendleton

70/48

68/46

63/49

54/49

Hermiston 70/48

Arlington

Wasco

Sandy

Government Camp 48/38

62/48

69/48

The Biggs Dalles 70/48

59/47

McMinnville

Lincoln City

Umatilla

Hood River

65/41

Frenchglen 63/40

Yesterday’s state extremes

60/38

Grants Pass

Paisley

65/46

57/39

66/47

Brookings

Klamath Falls 58/39

Ashland

58/52

61/40

Chiloquin

Medford

58/53

63/44

Fields

Lakeview

• 83° Ontario • 28° Burns

McDermitt

63/43

58/38

51/36

-30s

-20s

-10s

0s

10s

Vancouver 61/52

Yesterday’s extremes

• 1.29”

Salt Lake City 77/56 Las Vegas 74/60

Honolulu 87/72

St. Paul 80/56

Los Angeles 67/59

Denver 82/55

Albuquerque 76/55

Phoenix 93/68

Kansas City 83/53 Oklahoma City 84/58

80s

90s

Houston 88/62

Chihuahua 85/53

La Paz 94/73 Juneau 50/38

Mazatlan 90/76

To ronto 66/46

Green Bay 73/50

St. Louis 82/53

100s 110s

Louisville 75/51 Nashville 77/49

New Orleans 81/63

Halifax 61/54

Boston 63/51 New York 64/54 Philadelphia 65/52 Washington, D. C. 67/52

63/48

Columbus 69/46

Birmingham 79/53

Portland 60/47

Buffalo

Detroit 70/49

Little Rock 80/50

Dallas 88/63

Tijuana 65/56

Anchorage 45/34

70s

Des Moines 82/52 Chicago 74/58 Omaha 87/56

Cheyenne 77/47

Brookings, Ore.

60s

Quebec 57/41

Rapid City 88/61

• 28° San Francisco 65/56

50s

Bismarck 86/59

Billings 84/51

Boise 68/45

Phoenix, Ariz.

40s

Thunder Bay 70/43

Portland 62/52

• 100°

30s

Saskatoon 76/45 Winnipeg 77/57

Calgary 63/41

Seattle 63/50

(in the 48 contiguous states):

Burns, Ore.

20s

HIGH LOW

FRIDAY Mostly cloudy, slight chance of showers, chilly.

55 33

SATURDAY Partly to mostly cloudy and warmer.

Partly to mostly cloudy and cool.

HIGH LOW

HIGH LOW

62 34

68 37

BEND ALMANAC

PLANET WATCH

TEMPERATURE

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . .7:34 a.m. . . . . . 6:53 p.m. Venus . . . . . .8:18 a.m. . . . . . 7:12 p.m. Mars. . . . . . .1:40 a.m. . . . . . 4:21 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . .7:39 p.m. . . . . . 9:29 a.m. Saturn. . . . . .7:42 a.m. . . . . . 7:04 p.m. Uranus . . . . .6:13 p.m. . . . . . 6:23 a.m.

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59/48 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . 0.01” Month to date . . . . . . . . . . 0.01” Record high . . . . . . . . 86 in 1952 Record low. . . . . . . . . 21 in 1973 Average month to date. . . 0.03” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.74” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Average year to date. . . . . 7.90” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.29.86 Record 24 hours . . .0.58 in 1967 *Melted liquid equivalent

Sunrise today . . . . . . 7:06 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 6:41 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 7:08 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 6:39 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 2:59 p.m. Moonset today . . . . . . . .none

Moon phases Full

Last

New

Oct. 11 Oct. 19 Oct. 26

OREGON CITIES City

Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

Astoria . . . . . . . .62/54/0.30 Baker City . . . . . .80/46/0.00 Brookings . . . . . .58/53/1.29 Burns. . . . . . . . . .72/28/0.00 Eugene . . . . . . . .62/54/0.34 Klamath Falls . . 53/47/trace Lakeview. . . . . . .61/34/0.00 La Pine . . . . . . . .59/48/0.01 Medford . . . . . . .57/53/0.17 Newport . . . . . . .59/54/0.33 North Bend . . . . .64/54/0.22 Ontario . . . . . . . .83/49/0.00 Pendleton . . . . . .69/42/0.00 Portland . . . . . . .65/56/0.12 Prineville . . . . . . .61/49/0.01 Redmond. . . . . . .60/49/0.07 Roseburg. . . . . . .60/54/0.46 Salem . . . . . . . . .65/54/0.21 Sisters . . . . . . . . .56/48/0.10 The Dalles . . . . . .67/56/0.01

First

Nov. 2

FIRE INDEX

Tuesday Hi/Lo/W

Wed. Hi/Lo/W

Bend, west of Hwy. 97....High Bend, east of Hwy. 97....Mod. Redmond/Madras ......Mod.

. . . . . 60/50/r . . . . .60/46/sh . . . .64/40/sh . . . . .53/36/sh . . . . . 58/52/r . . . . .56/49/sh . . . .64/41/sh . . . . .54/35/sh . . . .62/46/sh . . . . .56/44/sh . . . . .58/39/c . . . . .50/31/sh . . . .58/38/sh . . . . .48/33/sh . . . .57/33/sh . . . . .50/26/sh . . . .66/46/sh . . . . .61/44/sh . . . . . 54/49/r . . . . .54/47/sh . . . .62/51/sh . . . . .59/48/sh . . . .69/49/sh . . . . .58/44/sh . . . . .68/45/c . . . . .61/41/sh . . . .62/52/sh . . . . . .57/49/r . . . .58/38/sh . . . . .56/34/sh . . . . .62/37/c . . . . .56/34/sh . . . .64/48/sh . . . . .60/46/sh . . . .63/49/sh . . . . .60/45/sh . . . .59/36/sh . . . . .51/35/sh . . . . .67/47/c . . . . .62/45/sh

Mod. = Moderate; Ext. = Extreme

PRECIPITATION

WATER REPORT Sisters .............................Mod. La Pine..............................High Prineville.........................High

The following was compiled by the Central Oregon watermaster and irrigation districts as a service to irrigators and sportsmen.

Reservoir Acre feet Capacity Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . . 34,923 . . . . . . 55,000 Wickiup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108,779 . . . . . 200,000 Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . 78,408 . . . . . . 91,700 Ochoco Reservoir . . . . . . . . 25,540 . . . . . . 47,000 Prineville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100,800 . . . . . 153,777 The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is River flow Station Cubic ft./sec Deschutes RiverBelow Crane Prairie . . . . . . . 379 for solar at noon. Deschutes RiverBelow Wickiup . . . . . . . . . . 1,010 Crescent CreekBelow Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . 69 LOW MEDIUM HIGH V.HIGH Little DeschutesNear La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 0 2 4 6 8 10 Deschutes RiverBelow Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 Deschutes RiverAt Benham Falls . . . . . . . . . 1,360 Crooked RiverAbove Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . 25 Crooked RiverBelow Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . 257 Updated daily. Source: pollen.com Ochoco CreekBelow Ochoco Res. . . . . . . . . . 9.58 Crooked RiverNear Terrebonne . . . . . . . . . . . 189 Contact: Watermaster, 388-6669 LOW MEDIUM HIGH or go to www.wrd.state.or.us

To report a wildfire, call 911

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX 3

POLLEN COUNT

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS -40s

Mainly cloudy, light to moderate rainfall, very chilly, breezy.

54 32

FORECAST: STATE Seaside

HIGH LOW

THURSDAY

Charlotte 75/47

Atlanta 78/49

Orlando 87/67 Miami 87/76

Monterrey 84/66

FRONTS

Yesterday Tuesday Wed. City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . . .88/60/0.00 . . . 89/57/s . 85/64/pc Akron . . . . . . . . . .55/43/0.19 . .66/46/pc . . 70/43/s Albany. . . . . . . . . .63/52/0.03 . . . 61/45/r . . 64/37/s Albuquerque. . . . .76/55/0.00 . . . 76/55/t . . .72/52/t Anchorage . . . . . .49/33/0.00 . .45/34/pc . 46/38/sh Atlanta . . . . . . . . .68/45/0.00 . . . 78/49/s . . 82/53/s Atlantic City . . . . .59/44/0.06 . .65/53/sh . . 66/54/s Austin . . . . . . . . . .87/51/0.00 . . . 90/58/s . . 90/64/s Baltimore . . . . . . .56/43/0.02 . . .67/51/c . . 73/48/s Billings . . . . . . . . .86/52/0.00 . .84/51/pc . 80/51/pc Birmingham . . . . .76/42/0.00 . . . 79/53/s . . 80/54/s Bismarck. . . . . . . .79/41/0.00 . .86/59/pc . 84/60/pc Boise . . . . . . . . . . .84/58/0.00 . .68/45/sh . 56/40/sh Boston. . . . . . . . . .68/56/0.03 . . . 63/51/r . 64/43/pc Bridgeport, CT. . . .60/52/0.00 . .65/51/sh . . 69/42/s Buffalo . . . . . . . . .63/49/0.02 . .63/48/pc . . 66/44/s Burlington, VT. . . .59/50/0.03 . .59/45/sh . 58/34/pc Caribou, ME . . . . .58/48/1.08 . .53/36/sh . 48/28/sh Charleston, SC . . .74/47/0.00 . . . 78/56/s . . 80/59/s Charlotte. . . . . . . .71/39/0.00 . . . 75/47/s . . 78/50/s Chattanooga. . . . .76/40/0.00 . . . 78/49/s . . 81/51/s Cheyenne . . . . . . .81/51/0.00 . .77/47/pc . 70/43/pc Chicago. . . . . . . . .69/44/0.00 . . . 74/58/s . . 77/57/s Cincinnati . . . . . . .71/40/0.00 . . . 72/48/s . . 76/49/s Cleveland . . . . . . .56/45/0.36 . .67/49/pc . . 68/51/s Colorado Springs .81/52/0.00 . .78/48/pc . 72/47/pc Columbia, MO . . .77/40/0.00 . . . 82/52/s . . 83/55/s Columbia, SC . . . .76/41/0.00 . . . 78/48/s . . 80/52/s Columbus, GA. . . .73/47/0.00 . . . 80/52/s . . 82/52/s Columbus, OH. . . .57/42/0.07 . .69/46/pc . . 75/47/s Concord, NH. . . . .66/53/0.11 . . . 60/44/r . 61/32/pc Corpus Christi. . . .86/60/0.00 . . . 81/73/s . 85/78/pc Dallas Ft Worth. . .87/56/0.00 . . . 88/63/s . . 88/65/s Dayton . . . . . . . . .68/41/0.00 . . . 71/48/s . . 76/48/s Denver. . . . . . . . . .84/56/0.00 . .82/55/pc . 74/53/pc Des Moines. . . . . .80/45/0.00 . . . 82/52/s . . 82/56/s Detroit. . . . . . . . . .69/49/0.00 . . . 70/49/s . . 71/52/s Duluth. . . . . . . . . .65/45/0.00 . . . 77/50/s . . 72/57/s El Paso. . . . . . . . . .84/61/0.00 . .88/66/pc . 85/62/pc Fairbanks. . . . . . . .53/32/0.00 . .45/25/pc . . 45/20/c Fargo. . . . . . . . . . .85/58/0.00 . .85/60/pc . . 86/59/s Flagstaff . . . . . . . .69/39/0.00 . . . 65/42/t . 62/42/pc

Yesterday Tuesday Wed. City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . . .72/38/0.00 . . . 71/47/s . . 76/50/s Green Bay. . . . . . .70/43/0.00 . . . 73/50/s . . 73/53/s Greensboro. . . . . .66/43/0.00 . .74/48/pc . . 78/50/s Harrisburg. . . . . . .52/45/0.04 . . .65/45/c . . 71/45/s Hartford, CT . . . . .63/54/0.08 . .62/48/sh . . 65/41/s Helena. . . . . . . . . .85/42/0.00 . .70/44/sh . 65/38/sh Honolulu. . . . . . . .90/78/0.00 . . . 87/72/s . . 87/73/s Houston . . . . . . . .85/55/0.00 . . . 88/62/s . . 88/65/s Huntsville . . . . . . .78/38/0.00 . . . 77/47/s . . 80/50/s Indianapolis . . . . .74/40/0.00 . . . 74/49/s . . 78/51/s Jackson, MS . . . . .76/43/0.00 . . . 82/49/s . . 84/54/s Jacksonville. . . . . .79/47/0.00 . . . 79/61/s . . 81/65/s Juneau. . . . . . . . . .49/28/0.00 . .50/38/sh . . 49/40/c Kansas City. . . . . .81/46/0.00 . . . 83/53/s . . 81/57/s Lansing . . . . . . . . .68/38/0.00 . . . 70/47/s . . 75/48/s Las Vegas . . . . . . .90/75/0.05 . . . 74/60/t . 76/59/sh Lexington . . . . . . .68/41/0.00 . . . 71/49/s . . 74/50/s Lincoln. . . . . . . . . .85/39/0.00 . . . 87/51/s . . 83/59/s Little Rock. . . . . . .80/46/0.00 . . . 80/50/s . . 82/55/s Los Angeles. . . . . .71/62/0.00 . . .67/59/c . . .65/56/r Louisville. . . . . . . .75/44/0.00 . . . 75/51/s . . 77/52/s Madison, WI . . . . .75/40/0.00 . . . 75/50/s . . 77/52/s Memphis. . . . . . . .78/45/0.00 . . . 81/54/s . . 83/53/s Miami . . . . . . . . . .87/78/0.00 . .87/76/sh . 86/76/pc Milwaukee . . . . . .63/46/0.00 . . . 69/54/s . . 70/56/s Minneapolis . . . . .83/50/0.00 . . . 80/56/s . . 83/57/s Nashville. . . . . . . .74/41/0.00 . . . 77/49/s . . 81/55/s New Orleans. . . . .78/55/0.00 . . . 81/63/s . . 85/65/s New York . . . . . . .58/48/0.05 . .64/54/sh . . 67/48/s Newark, NJ . . . . . .60/48/0.00 . .65/52/sh . . 72/48/s Norfolk, VA . . . . . .63/49/0.00 . .69/55/pc . . 73/56/s Oklahoma City . . .88/51/0.00 . . . 84/58/s . 84/60/pc Omaha . . . . . . . . .83/48/0.00 . . . 87/56/s . . 84/59/s Orlando. . . . . . . . .85/61/0.00 . . . 87/67/s . . 86/68/s Palm Springs. . . . .97/73/0.00 . .76/60/pc . 71/62/sh Peoria . . . . . . . . . .78/41/0.00 . . . 78/51/s . . 80/53/s Philadelphia . . . . .56/48/0.00 . .65/52/sh . . 71/47/s Phoenix. . . . . . . .100/79/0.00 . .93/68/pc . 87/69/pc Pittsburgh . . . . . . .54/44/0.10 . .62/45/pc . . 69/43/s Portland, ME. . . . .63/55/0.03 . . . 60/47/r . 60/37/pc Providence . . . . . .67/52/0.00 . .64/49/sh . 65/42/pc Raleigh . . . . . . . . .68/42/0.00 . .74/48/pc . . 78/51/s

Yesterday Tuesday Wed. City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . . .87/52/0.00 . . . 88/61/s . 82/56/pc Reno . . . . . . . . . . .77/52/0.00 . . .66/50/c . 58/38/sh Richmond . . . . . . .60/48/0.02 . .70/50/pc . . 78/49/s Rochester, NY . . . .61/51/0.30 . . .62/48/c . . 65/41/s Sacramento. . . . . 69/50/trace . . .68/56/c . . .62/50/r St. Louis. . . . . . . . .78/47/0.00 . . . 82/53/s . . 82/57/s Salt Lake City . . . .84/63/0.00 . . . 77/56/t . 70/56/sh San Antonio . . . . .85/58/0.00 . . . 89/64/s . 89/68/pc San Diego . . . . . . .73/65/0.00 . . .68/61/c . 66/60/sh San Francisco . . . .66/55/0.14 . . .66/56/c . . .64/54/r San Jose . . . . . . . .70/51/0.01 . . .71/57/c . . .68/52/r Santa Fe . . . . . . . .75/45/0.00 . . . 71/45/t . . .68/41/t

Yesterday Tuesday Wed. City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Savannah . . . . . . .73/47/0.00 . . . 79/57/s . . 80/60/s Seattle. . . . . . . . . .62/54/0.04 . .63/50/sh . . .59/48/r Sioux Falls. . . . . . .82/52/0.00 . . . 84/57/s . . 85/58/s Spokane . . . . . . . .68/53/0.00 . .61/47/sh . 59/40/sh Springfield, MO . .77/43/0.00 . . . 80/48/s . . 79/53/s Tampa. . . . . . . . . .83/62/0.00 . . . 87/67/s . . 88/69/s Tucson. . . . . . . . . .92/68/0.00 . .92/63/pc . 85/61/pc Tulsa . . . . . . . . . . .83/52/0.00 . . . 86/53/s . . 85/57/s Washington, DC . .53/47/0.00 . .67/52/pc . . 74/49/s Wichita . . . . . . . . .90/55/0.00 . . . 89/54/s . . 83/61/s Yakima . . . . . . . . 65/50/trace . . .64/43/c . 60/40/sh Yuma. . . . . . . . . .100/77/0.01 . .89/62/pc . 86/63/pc

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . . .72/57/0.00 . . .66/56/c . 61/54/sh Athens. . . . . . . . . .77/66/0.00 . . . 78/65/s . . 78/63/s Auckland. . . . . . . .64/61/0.00 . .61/51/sh . 60/51/sh Baghdad . . . . . . . .90/59/0.00 . . . 94/66/s . . 92/64/s Bangkok . . . . . . . .88/77/0.00 . . . 87/77/t . . .88/77/t Beijing. . . . . . . . . .72/37/0.00 . .72/52/pc . 73/52/sh Beirut . . . . . . . . . .84/72/0.00 . . . 82/73/s . . 82/72/s Berlin. . . . . . . . . . .72/52/0.00 . .73/52/pc . 65/53/sh Bogota . . . . . . . . .68/45/0.00 . .64/51/sh . 62/50/sh Budapest. . . . . . . .75/43/0.00 . . . 79/49/s . . 78/50/s Buenos Aires. . . . .63/46/0.00 . .66/50/sh . 74/53/pc Cabo San Lucas . .93/79/0.00 . . . 92/75/s . . 91/75/s Cairo . . . . . . . . . . .86/70/0.00 . . . 85/68/s . . 86/70/s Calgary . . . . . . . . .63/34/0.00 . .63/41/sh . . 65/45/c Cancun . . . . . . . . .82/72/0.00 . . . 86/71/t . . .87/71/t Dublin . . . . . . . . . .68/48/0.00 . . .63/55/c . 64/55/sh Edinburgh. . . . . . .64/50/0.00 . . .56/49/c . 60/49/sh Geneva . . . . . . . . .75/50/0.00 . . . 76/50/s . . 75/49/s Harare. . . . . . . . . .82/61/0.00 . . . 82/61/t . . .82/59/t Hong Kong . . . . . .77/70/0.00 . . . 81/75/r . 81/73/sh Istanbul. . . . . . . . .73/57/0.00 . . . 74/55/s . . 75/54/s Jerusalem . . . . . . .79/62/0.00 . . . 82/62/s . . 83/62/s Johannesburg. . . .70/48/0.00 . . . 68/48/s . 65/46/sh Lima . . . . . . . . . . .68/61/0.00 . . . 67/59/s . . 67/58/s Lisbon . . . . . . . . . .86/64/0.00 . .88/64/pc . . 87/62/s London . . . . . . . . .79/59/0.00 . .68/58/pc . . 70/56/c Madrid . . . . . . . . .86/48/0.00 . . . 82/52/s . . 83/50/s Manila. . . . . . . . . .88/77/0.00 . . . 87/78/t . . .86/77/t

Mecca . . . . . . . . .100/84/0.00 . .108/83/s . 109/84/s Mexico City. . . . . .75/54/0.00 . . . 74/55/t . . .75/54/t Montreal. . . . . . . .55/50/0.00 . .59/48/sh . . 55/37/s Moscow . . . . . . . .52/39/0.00 . .54/46/sh . 53/43/sh Nairobi . . . . . . . . .81/63/0.00 . .83/60/pc . 83/59/pc Nassau . . . . . . . . .90/77/0.00 . . . 87/79/t . . .86/77/t New Delhi. . . . . . .91/72/0.00 . .92/74/pc . 91/74/pc Osaka . . . . . . . . . .70/59/0.00 . . . 73/57/s . . 73/61/c Oslo. . . . . . . . . . . .55/46/0.00 . .57/42/pc . 55/44/sh Ottawa . . . . . . . . .55/52/0.00 . .59/45/sh . . 57/36/s Paris. . . . . . . . . . . .82/52/0.00 . . .74/53/c . 71/53/pc Rio de Janeiro. . . .77/70/0.00 . .74/66/sh . 78/66/pc Rome. . . . . . . . . . .81/57/0.00 . . . 83/59/s . . 82/59/s Santiago . . . . . . . .66/50/0.00 . .70/44/pc . 75/45/pc Sao Paulo . . . . . . .72/59/0.00 . .69/56/pc . . .75/56/t Sapporo . . . . . . . .46/43/0.00 . .61/47/pc . 63/48/sh Seoul. . . . . . . . . . .68/43/0.00 . . . 66/46/s . 68/49/pc Shanghai. . . . . . . .68/63/0.00 . . .71/62/c . 74/65/sh Singapore . . . . . . .90/79/0.00 . . . 86/77/t . . .86/78/t Stockholm. . . . . . .59/52/0.00 . .59/45/pc . 55/42/pc Sydney. . . . . . . . . .61/50/0.00 . . . 65/54/s . 67/53/pc Taipei. . . . . . . . . . .82/70/0.00 . .81/75/sh . . .80/74/t Tel Aviv . . . . . . . . .84/70/0.00 . . . 83/70/s . . 83/71/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . . .72/61/0.00 . .70/56/pc . . .68/58/r Toronto . . . . . . . . .57/50/0.00 . .66/46/pc . . 61/41/s Vancouver. . . . . . .61/54/0.00 . .61/52/sh . 57/48/sh Vienna. . . . . . . . . .75/46/0.00 . . . 75/51/s . . 71/52/s Warsaw. . . . . . . . .72/41/0.00 . .72/53/pc . 61/49/sh

FOREST PAYMENT PROGRAM EXPIRATION

GOP pushing for more logging in U.S. forests By Kyung M. Song The Seattle Times

WASHINGTON — A century-old federal program that compensates counties straddling huge tracts of nontaxable national forests has expired, and House Republicans are using its reauthorization to push for opening the land to more logging and mining. The GOP wants to shift the forest-payment program closer to its 1908 origin, when the federal government directly split revenue from timber, mining and other activities to pay for local schools and roads in Washington state and around the country. Currently, logging in national forests produces about 3 billion board feet of timber annually, a 75 percent drop from its peak 20 years ago. The legislative debate will resume this week when Congress returns from recess. Lawmakers were unable to reconcile several versions of the reauthorization bill in the House and the Senate before the legislation expired Friday. House Republicans, led by Rep. Doc Hastings, R-Wash., chairman of the Natural Resources Committee, are using the reauthorization to push two of the issues that have dominated their agenda this year: cutting federal spending and rolling back environmental regulation. Among other things, they would set minimum requirements on timber sales and annual revenue for each national forest. They also want to speed up environmental reviews of logging, grazing, drilling and mining, blaming the reviews for hindering projects on federal lands. In addition, Republicans have called for paying counties 75 percent instead of the historical 25 percent of revenue from federal forests, handing local officials a tempting financial motive to support cutting more trees. “This is a sinister attempt to

“This is a sinister attempt to go back to the days when logging was the dominant use of national forests. The American people like their forests green and they like it clean.” — Michael Francis, director of the national forests program, The Wilderness Society

go back to the days when logging was the dominant use of national forests,” said Michael Francis, director of the national forests program for The Wilderness Society. “The American people like their forests green and they like it clean. You can’t turn back the clock.” The math behind federal forest payments worked for the first 80 years. Wide-scale logging generated enough revenue that the 25 percent share for counties was enough to help sustain rural communities dominated by federal lands. But that formula fell apart after the legal battles that pitted loggers against the northern spotted owl and the environmental movement in the 1980s and 1990s. Suffering from drastically reduced timber harvests, the counties in 2000 persuaded Congress to pass a new Security Rural Schools act that uncoupled the payments from the annual logging haul and other revenue. The forest payments morphed into an entitlement program paid directly out of the U.S. Treasury. In 2010, those payments totaled $412 million to 729 counties around the country. Washington received $34.6 million, more than any other state besides Oregon and California. Anna Morrison was among those who helped to enact the change into an entitlement program. Morrison, 64, had watched

her hometown of Florence, which is hemmed by the Pacific Ocean and the Siuslaw National Forest, become devastated when the saws fell silent. She and her husband shut down their business building logging roads in 1989. Morrison believed the revised federal program would provide a temporary financial reprieve for counties while federal officials worked to revive logging. But the logging never really returned. Morrison blames that on environmental restrictions, the threat of lawsuits and sheer bureaucratic inertia. Secure Rural Schools was meant to shore up depleted county coffers while communities diversified their economies away from timber. The reality, she says, is that towns like hers have few alternatives. “Florence is surrounded on three sides by a national forest,” said Morrison, legislative chairwoman for Oregon Women in Timber, an industry-advocacy group. “You are not going to get any other kind of economic activity.” Hastings, whose National Resources Committee has jurisdiction over the legislation, echoes that. He contends the Forest Service has failed to manage the forests vigorously. He complains federal timber sales are too small and too infrequent. Hastings believes the forests can sustainably withstand much more logging — and at the same time generate jobs and help strapped counties. The Forest Service, however, supports renewing Secure Rural School largely as is. Harris Sherman, undersecretary with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, which oversees the agency, has warned that Republicans’ proposals “would do more harm than good” by increasing logging and mining on protected lands, reducing recreational opportunities and inviting more lawsuits.

A magazine for your mind, body, and self. How would you describe the Central Oregon lifestyle? Are we professionals, artists, athletes, homemakers ... some of each? How do we view ourselves, our family life, health or professional and personal relationships? What inspires us? There’s simply no right answer. Central Oregonians are as diverse as they are inspiring. This environment allows us to create and experience a lifestyle that is as unique as our individual personalities. U Magazine was created to celebrate this lifestyle. From health, style, and professional success to personal goals and relationships, U Magazine will provide readers with stories and information that educate, empower, and inspire.

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Publishes: Saturday, November 5


SPORTS

D

MLB Playoffs Tigers take 2-1 lead over Yankees in ALDS, D3

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2011

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

RODEO

COMMUNITY SPORTS

Area contestants qualify for rodeo national finals The chutes for the bareback competition figure to be loaded with Central Oregon cowboys at the 2011 National Finals Rodeo. Four bareback riders from Central Oregon, including four-time world champion Bobby Mote, have qualified for the NFR based on their top15 rankings in the unofficial final Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association regular-season standings, which were released Monday. The 2011 National Finals Rodeo is scheduled for Dec. 1-10 at the Thomas & Mack Center in Las Vegas. Despite suffering a broken rib and a lacerated pancreas at a rodeo in California that ended his regular season in late August, Mote, the two-time defending world bareback champion from Culver, ranks ninth in 2011 bareback earnings with $74,999. Other area bareback riders whose earnings rank in the top 15 are Culver’s Brian Bain (fifth, $90,027), Redmond’s Steven Peebles (seventh, $79,627) and Prineville’s Jason Havens (eighth, $79,174). Two other Central Oregonians have finished the regular season with top-15 rankings in their event: Terrebonne’s Brenda Mays, a barrel racer (fourth, $87,961), and Powell Butte’s Brandon Beers, a teamroping header (10th, $74,666). Complete 2011 PRCA final standings in Scoreboard, Page D2. —Bulletin staff report

NFL

Submitted photos

Riding in style Central Oregon Duck, Beaver fans can take the bus on game day

F

or Oregon and Oregon State football fans who live in Central Oregon, watching home games in person can be a big commitment. First, it’s a roughly threehour drive over mountain passes to get to Eugene or Corvallis. Perhaps even a hotel — either the night before the game or the night of, depending on game time. And of course, fans still have to drive back to Central Oregon after all that, possibly at night and in potentially difficult weather conditions. But now, thanks to the Oregon Football Fan Bus and Bea-

AMANDA MILES ver Bus, pigskin enthusiasts — while they still must travel to the Willamette Valley for games — don’t have to worry about the actual driving. For a fee, both charter bus services carry Central Oregon fans to and from their respective stadiums on one-day trips. “I think people really enjoy getting together with other Duck fans and making that trip over,” says Amanda Gow, the organizer of the Oregon

BEAVER BUS Oct. 15 (Brigham Young) Nov. 19 (Washington) Nov. 26 (at Oregon) Cost: $49 Pickup: Available at Albertsons/Rite Aid parking lot in Redmond, Target parking lot in Bend and Ray’s Food Place parking lot in Sisters Reservations: Call Journey Coaches at 541-419-3085

OREGON FOOTBALL FAN BUS Oct. 6 (California) Oct. 15 (Arizona State) Oct. 29 (Washington State) Nov. 19 (Southern California) Nov. 26 (Oregon State) Cost: $50 ($45 for Duck Athletic Fund members) Pickup: Available at Sidelines Sports Bar & Grill in downtown Bend and Three Creeks Brewery in Sisters Reservations: Call Amanda Gow at 541-610-5826 or go to www.oregonduckclub.org to register online or to print out a registration form

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

Tampa Bay Buccaneers quarterback Josh Freeman

Buccaneers knock off Colts Quarterback Josh Freeman, above, throws for 287 yards and a touchdown in a 24-17 victory, D4

Beavers QB Mannion still hopeful despite 0-4 start

COLLEGE SPORTS Unofficial visits draw concern NCAA officials state that unofficial visits to college campuses are often manipulated, D4

NHL Penguins’ Crosby to miss opening Concussion to Pittsburgh star brings out new rules on hits at the start of 2011-12 season, D5

INDEX Scoreboard Major League Baseball Football NBA NHL Community Sports

bus. “It kind of adds an extra element of fun to being a Duck fan in Central Oregon.” The service is a relatively simple one: On the game days for which bus service is offered, a charter bus picks up riders at predetermined locations — in Bend and Sisters for the Oregon bus, and in Redmond, Bend and Sisters for the Beaver bus — and deposits them at Autzen Stadium in Eugene or Reser Stadium in Corvallis approximately two to three hours before kickoff, allowing plenty of time for tailgating activities. See Style / D5

If you go

D2 D3 D4 D5 D5 D6

Matt York / The Associated Press

Oregon State QB Sean Mannion completed 40 passes on 66 attempts for 341 yards and a touchdown, but also threw four interceptions against Arizona State on Saturday.

The Associated Press CORVALLIS — Redshirt freshman quarterback Sean Mannion is doing his best to remain positive despite Oregon State’s 0-4 start. “We have four tough losses, but within that there is a lot of good stuff that we can build on,” he said. “We are going to keep working. These past five weeks we have been working real hard and it is going to pay off eventually.” Mannion has also had a bumpy start to his young college career. He wasn’t even the official starter for the first two games of the season, but came out on top of a surprising quarterback controversy. Last weekend in the Beavers’ 35-20 loss at Arizona State, Mannion completed 40 of 66 passes for 341 yards and a touchdown, but he was intercepted four times. His attempts and completions set new Oregon State records, surpassing Erik Wilhelm, who went 39 for 64 in 1986 against Michigan. It was Mannion’s third game with at least 200 passing yards. See Beavers / D4

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Redmond player Francisco Camacho Terrores, center, works to control the ball as Summit’s Michael Wilson, in white, gives chase, and Redmond player Chase Bennett, right, watches the action during the first half of Monday’s match in Bend.

PREP BOYS SOCCER

Summit tops Redmond Bulletin staff report Dan Maunder scored twice as Summit rolled to a 3-1 Intermountain Hybrid boys soccer victory over Redmond on Monday. Maunder recorded goals in the fourth and 49th minutes for the Storm, who improved to 5-2-2 with the victory. Jacob Fritz scored the other goal

for Summit, which has won four of its past five games. Maunder scored in the fourth minute to give the Storm a 1-0 lead at Summit High before Fritze made it 20 before halftime. The Storm are at Crook County on Thursday. Redmond is at Bend High on Friday.


D2

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2011

O  A

SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION Today

Wednesday

BASEBALL 11 a.m.: MLB Playoffs, AL Division Series, Texas Rangers at Tampa Bay Rays, TBS. 2 p.m.: MLB Playoffs, NL Division Series, Philadelphia Phillies at St. Louis Cardinals, TBS. 5:30 p.m.: MLB Playoffs, AL Division Series, New York Yankees at Detroit Tigers, TBS. 6:30 p.m.: MLB Playoffs, NL Division Series, Milwaukee Brewers at Arizona Diamondbacks, TNT. SOCCER 3 p.m.: UEFA Champions League, Arsenal vs. Olympiacos (taped), Root Sports. 5 p.m.: MLS, Los Angeles Galaxy at New York Red Bulls, ESPN2. VOLLEYBALL 6:30 p.m.: High school, Bend at Mountain View, COTV.

BASEBALL 3 p.m.: MLB Playoffs, NL Division Series, Philadelphia Phillies at St. Louis Cardinals, TBS. 6:30 p.m.: MLB Playoffs, NL Division Series, Milwaukee Brewers at Arizona Diamondbacks, TBS. BASKETBALL 5 p.m.: WNBA playoffs, championship series, Atlanta Dream at Minnesota Lynx, ESPN2. VOLLEYBALL 7 p.m.: Women’s college, Texas A&M at Texas (same-day tape), Root Sports.

RADIO Today

Wednesday

BASEBALL 11 a.m.: MLB Playoffs, AL Division Series, Texas Rangers at Tampa Bay Rays, KICE-AM 940. 2 p.m.: MLB Playoffs, NL Division Series, Philadelphia Phillies at St. Louis Cardinals, KICE-AM 940.

BASEBALL 6:30 p.m.: MLB Playoffs, NL Division Series, Milwaukee Brewers at Arizona Diamondbacks, TBS.

Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

S   B Motor sports • Line gets rain-delayed NHRA win: Jason Line collected his sixth win of the season and the second in NHRA’s playoffs during a rain-delayed final round at the NHRA Nationals at Maple Grove Raceway on Monday. Spencer Massey (Top Fuel), Robert Hight (Funny Car) and Arana Jr. (Pro Stock Motorcycle) also collected victories at the NHRA Full Throttle Drag Racing Series Event. The Top Fuel final round was the quickest side by side run in NHRA history. Del Worsham took his Al-Anabi dragster to the quickest run in NHRA history when he laid down a 3.735 at 323.81, but it was in a losing effort. In Funny Car, Robert Hight took his Ford Mustang to the winner’s circle for the first time in the Countdown since 2009. The 2009 Funny Car champ’s 4.065 at 302.62 was too much for Johnny Gray’s Dodge Charger as he struck the tires and recorded a 9.836, 73.91. Rookie Lucas Oil rider Hector Arana, Jr. collected his second victory of the season in Pro Stock Motorcycle in a rematch of the semifinals in Dallas against Matt Smith. Arana Jr. ran a 6.781 at 195.82 to beat veteran Smith’s 6.795, 194.24. The NHRA Full Throttle Drag Racing Series will head to Phoenix for the NHRA Arizona Nationals Oct. 14th16th.

Tennis • Roddick loses in first round at China Open: Andy Roddick lost to South Africa’s Kevin Anderson 4-6, 5-7 in the first round of the China Open on Monday, a defeat the sixth-seeded American called “unacceptable.” Roddick then walked out of his news conference when asked about any retirement plans. Roddick managed to handle Anderson’s huge serve but struggled with his own and was broken in the seventh game to go one set down. The second set brought more of the same. While Roddick evened things up at 5-5, Anderson’s momentum carried him through. On the women’s side, top-ranked Caroline Wozniacki rallied from a set down to beat Lucie Hradecka, of the Czech Republic, 3-6, 6-0, 7-5.

Olympics • Scientists back improved HGH test: A new test that can detect the use of human growth hormone for up to 21 days has been endorsed by international anti-doping officials, moving a step closer to a potential breakthrough against doping at next year’s London Olympics. U.S. Anti-Doping Agency CEO Travis Tygart told The Associated Press on Monday the “biomarker” test for HGH won strong consensus among doping scientists and experts from around the world who attended a London sympo-

sium on detecting growth factors. The test, which still needs final validation by the World Anti-Doping Agency, widely extends the detection window from the current “isoform” test, which can only identify HGH use going back 12 to 72 hours. The new test, which also uses blood samples, can go back “anywhere from 10 days to 21 days” and could be a significant deterrent against one of the most potent performance-enhancers in sports, Tygart said.

Football • ESPN pulls intro after Williams’ Obama comments: ESPN pulled Hank Williams Jr.’s classic intro song from its broadcast of Monday night’s NFL game after the country singer famous for the line “Are you ready for some football?” used an analogy to Adolf Hitler in discussing President Barack Obama. In an interview Monday morning on Fox News’ “Fox & Friends,” Williams, unprompted, said of Obama’s outing on the links with House Speaker John Boehner: “It’d be like Hitler playing golf with (Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin) Netanyahu.” Asked to clarify, Williams said, “They’re the enemy,” adding that by “they” he meant Obama and Vice President Joe Biden. • Roethlisberger’s status uncertain with foot injury: Ben Roethlisberger’s preference would be to play next Sunday when the Pittsburgh Steelers host Tennessee. His body might have other ideas. The quarterback was scheduled to undergo an MRI on his left foot on Monday after injuring the foot on Pittsburgh’s final drive in Sunday’s 17-10 loss to Houston. Roethlisberger remained in the game but walked out of the locker room afterward on crutches with the foot in a protective boot. Roethlisberger isn’t the only Steeler whose status is uncertain. Defensive end Aaron Smith (foot) and running back Rashard Mendenhall (hamstring) also left the game early. Roethlisberger played the second half of last season with a minor foot injury and is hopeful he can do the same this time. He hasn’t missed a game due to injury since 2009. • Saints: Superdome gets new name: The home of the New Orleans Saints is getting a new name. Greg Bensel, a spokesman for the team, confirmed Monday that the Louisiana Superdome soon will be known as the Mercedes-Benz Superdome. Bensel says the automaker is signing on for a 10-year naming rights deal that the team was allowed to pursue under the terms of its current lease that runs through 2025. The deal, to be formally announced this afternoon, marks the first time the stadium is being called anything other than the Louisiana Superdome. Details of the value of the deal have not been released. — From wire reports

ON DECK Today Boys soccer: Mountain View at Crook County, 4 p.m.; Madras at Molalla, 6 p.m.; Sweet Home at Sisters, 4:30 p.m.; Culver at Umatila, 4 p.m. Girls soccer: Redmond at Summit, 4 p.m.; Mountain View at Crook County, 4 p.m.; Molalla at Madras, 4 p.m.; Sisters at Sweet Home, 4:30 p.m.; La Pine at Cottage Grove, 7 p.m. Volleyball: Bend at Mountain View, 6:30 p.m.; Summit at Crook County, 6:30 p.m.; Madras at Molalla, 6 p.m.; La Pine at Sweet Home, 7:15 p.m.; Sisters at Junction City, 6:45 p.m.; Gilchrist at Prospect, 5 p.m.; Central Christian at North Lake, 4 p.m.

(6), United States, 6-4, 7-5.

IN THE BLEACHERS

WTA WOMEN’S TENNIS ASSOCIATION ——— China Open Results Monday At The Beijing Tennis Centre Beijing Purse: Men, $3.337 million (WT500); Women, $4.5 million (Premier) Surface: Hard-Outdoor Singles Women First Round Zheng Jie, China, def. Alberta Brianti, Italy, 4-6, 6-1, 7-5. Maria Kirilenko, Russia, def. Julia Goerges, Germany, 7-6 (9), 6-3. Caroline Wozniacki (1), Denmark, def. Lucie Hradecka, Czech Republic, 3-6, 6-0, 7-5. Klara Zakopalova, Czech Republic, def. Nadia Petrova, Russia, 6-3, 6-7 (3), 6-1. Virginie Razzano, France, def. Gisela Dulko, Argentina, 6-2, 6-3. Flavia Pennetta, Italy, def. Peng Shuai, China, 7-6 (6), 7-5. Second Round Tamira Paszek, Austria, def. Petra Cetkovska, Czech Republic, 1-6, 6-4, 6-2. Dominika Cibulkova, Slovakia, def. Francesca Schiavone (7), Italy, 6-2, 6-2. Ana Ivanovic, Serbia, def. Svetlana Kuznetsova (16), Russia, 6-2, 6-3. Sofia Arvidsson, Sweden, def. Petra Kvitova (5), Czech Republic, 7-6 (8), 4-6, 6-3.

Wednesday Volleyball: East Linn Christian at Culver, 6 p.m.

FOOTBALL NFL NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE All Times PDT ——— AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PA Buffalo 3 1 0 .750 133 96 New England 3 1 0 .750 135 98 N.Y. Jets 2 2 0 .500 100 95 Miami 0 4 0 .000 69 104 South W L T Pct PF PA Houston 3 1 0 .750 107 70 Tennessee 3 1 0 .750 88 56 Jacksonville 1 3 0 .250 39 85 Indianapolis 0 4 0 .000 63 108 North W L T Pct PF PA Baltimore 3 1 0 .750 119 57 Cincinnati 2 2 0 .500 80 74 Cleveland 2 2 0 .500 74 93 Pittsburgh 2 2 0 .500 64 72 West W L T Pct PF PA San Diego 3 1 0 .750 91 85 Oakland 2 2 0 .500 111 113 Denver 1 3 0 .250 81 111 Kansas City 1 3 0 .250 49 126 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PA Washington 3 1 0 .750 83 63 N.Y. Giants 3 1 0 .750 102 87 Dallas 2 2 0 .500 99 101 Philadelphia 1 3 0 .250 101 101 South W L T Pct PF PA Tampa Bay 3 1 0 .750 84 77 New Orleans 3 1 0 .750 127 98 Atlanta 2 2 0 .500 90 105 Carolina 1 3 0 .250 89 102 North W L T Pct PF PA Green Bay 4 0 0 1.000 148 97 Detroit 4 0 0 1.000 135 76 Chicago 2 2 0 .500 94 98 Minnesota 0 4 0 .000 77 96 West W L T Pct PF PA San Francisco 3 1 0 .750 94 75 Seattle 1 3 0 .250 58 97 Arizona 1 3 0 .250 86 87 St. Louis 0 4 0 .000 46 113 ——— Monday’s Game Tampa Bay 24, Indianapolis 17 Sunday’s Games Arizona at Minnesota, 10 a.m. Oakland at Houston, 10 a.m. Kansas City at Indianapolis, 10 a.m. Philadelphia at Buffalo, 10 a.m. New Orleans at Carolina, 10 a.m. Cincinnati at Jacksonville, 10 a.m. Tennessee at Pittsburgh, 10 a.m. Seattle at N.Y. Giants, 10 a.m. Tampa Bay at San Francisco, 1:05 p.m. San Diego at Denver, 1:15 p.m. N.Y. Jets at New England, 1:15 p.m. Green Bay at Atlanta, 5:20 p.m. Open: Baltimore, Cleveland, Dallas, Miami, St. Louis, Washington Monday’s Game Chicago at Detroit, 5:30 p.m. Monday’s Summary

Indianapolis Tampa Bay

3 7 7 0 — 17 0 7 10 7 — 24 First Quarter Ind—FG Vinatieri 45, 10:26. Second Quarter Ind—Garcon 87 pass from Painter (Vinatieri kick), 8:47. TB—Freeman 1 run (Barth kick), 3:54. Third Quarter TB—FG Barth 46, 9:43. Ind—Garcon 59 pass from Painter (Vinatieri kick), 7:10. TB—Parker 13 pass from Freeman (Barth kick), :14. Fourth Quarter TB—Blount 35 run (Barth kick), 3:15. A—63,972. ——— Ind TB First downs 13 25 Total Net Yards 318 466 Rushes-yards 18-62 36-192 Passing 256 274 Punt Returns 2-0 3-17 Kickoff Returns 2-36 1-24 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 0-0 Comp-Att-Int 13-30-0 25-39-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 4-25 2-13 Punts 6-44.3 5-44.0 Fumbles-Lost 1-1 0-0 Penalties-Yards 6-50 14-106 Time of Possession 21:00 39:00 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Indianapolis: Addai 11-41, Carter 7-21. Tampa Bay: Blount 25-127, Freeman 6-27, Graham 2-24, Johnson 1-8, Benn 1-3, Williams 1-3. PASSING—Indianapolis: Painter 13-30-0-281. Tampa Bay: Freeman 25-39-0-287. RECEIVING—Indianapolis: Wayne 4-59, Clark 3-46, Garcon 2-146, Collie 2-16, Addai 1-7, Eldridge 1-7. Tampa Bay: Parker 5-70, Williams 5-66, Winslow 5-33, Graham 3-27, Lumpkin 3-25, Stocker 2-9, Benn 1-43, Blount 1-14. MISSED FIELD GOALS—Indianapolis: Vinatieri 43 (WL). Tampa Bay: Barth 46 (WR).

College Schedule All Times PDT (Subject to change) Thursday’s Games SOUTH W. Kentucky at Middle Tennessee, 4:30 p.m. FAR WEST California at Oregon, 6 p.m. ——— Friday’s Game FAR WEST Boise St. at Fresno St., 6 p.m.

Betting Line

COLTS VIKINGS Eagles TEXANS Saints JAGUARS STEELERS GIANTS 49ERS PATRIOTS Chargers Packers LIONS

OREGON MID TENN ST Boise St d-Oklahoma Illinois

NFL (Home teams in Caps) Opening Current Underdog Sunday NL NL Chiefs 3 3 Cardinals 3 3 BILLS 7 6 Raiders 6.5 6 PANTHERS 2.5 2.5 Bengals NL NL Titans 10 10 Seahawks NL NL Buccaneers 9.5 9.5 Jets 5 4.5 BRONCOS 4 5 FALCONS Monday 6 6 Bears College Thursday 23.5 23.5 9 11 Friday 20.5 21 Saturday 9 9.5 16 15

MLS

ALABAMA CLEMSON W. VIRGINIA Mississippi St PENN ST Pittsburgh PURDUE N. CAROLINA NC STATE RICE Army W. MICHIGAN Temple Arizona St BYU TOLEDO Ohio U N. ILLINOIS ARKANSAS GEORGIA TECH STANFORD Georgia VIRGINIA TECH NOTRE DAME NAVY NEVADA C. FLORIDA La Tech Arizona OKLAHOMA ST Michigan HOUSTON BAYLOR S. CAROLINA Florida St Texas A&M Missouri Syracuse UTAH ST LSU NEBRASKA UCLA Tcu Florida Int’l Troy Arkansas St N. TEXAS

29 21 20 17 2 8.5 NL 13.5 12.5 20.5 PK 11 10.5 3.5 12 20 8 17 10 15 27 1 7.5 16 PK 20 15 4 2 32.5 5 12.5 16 18.5 NL 6 3 9.5 10 NL 10 3.5 4 19.5 4.5 3.5 4.5

29 Vanderbilt 21 Boston College 19.5 Connecticut 17 UAB 3.5 Iowa 7 RUTGERS NL Minnesota 14.5 Louisville 13 C. Michigan 21 Memphis 1 MIAMI-OHIO 10 Bowling Green 9.5 BALL ST 3.5 UTAH 13 San Jose St 20.5 E. Michigan 8 BUFFALO 17 Kent St 10 Auburn 14.5 Maryland 29 Colorado 1 TENNESSEE 7 Miami-Florida 16 Air Force 2 Southern Miss 20.5 Unlv 17 Marshall 4 IDAHO 1 OREGON ST 32.5 Kansas 6 NORTHWESTERN 10 E. Carolina 16 Iowa St 20.5 Kentucky NL WAKE FOREST 7.5 TEXAS TECH 3 KANSAS ST 10 Tulane 10 Wyoming NL Florida 11 Ohio St 3.5 Washington St 4 SAN DIEGO ST 20 AKRON 6 UL-LAFAYETTE 2.5 UL-MONROE 4.5 Fla. Atlantic

RODEO

Buccaneers 24, Colts 17

Favorite

SOCCER

California W. Kentucky FRESNO ST Texas INDIANA

Pro Rodeo Leaders Final All-Around 1. Trevor Brazile, Decatur, Texas, $239,505 2. Shane Proctor, Grand Coulee, Wash., $119,044 3. Bobby Mote, Culver, Ore., $87,246 4. Steven Dent, Mullen, Neb., $85,154 5. Cody Ohl, Hico, Texas, $84,064 6. Jim Ross Cooper, Monument, N.M., $77,900 7. Ryan Jarrett, Comanche, Okla., $76,414 8. Josh Peek, Pueblo, Colo., $73,831 9. Russell Cardoza, Terrebonne, Ore., $65,738 10. Rhen Richard, Roosevelt, Utah, $65,614 11. Stan Branco, Chowchilla, Calif., $56,743 12. Curtis Cassidy, Donalda, Alberta, $55,481 13. Landon McClaugherty, Tilden, Texas, $52,959 14. Jake Hannum, Plain City, Utah, $49,003 15. Jess Tierney, Hermosa, S.D., $47,412 16. Clayton Hass, Terrell, Texas, $47,176 17. Clint Robinson, Spanish Fork, Utah, $46,268 18. Steve Woolsey, Payson, Utah, $39,763 19. Paul David Tierney, Oral, S.D., $39,468 20. Jesse Sheffield, Delta, Colo., $38,613 Bareback Riding 1. Kaycee Feild, Payson, Utah, $140,660 2. Will Lowe, Canyon, Texas, $137,634 3. Steven Dent, Mullen, Neb., $99,472 4. Ryan Gray, Cheney, Wash., $92,738 5. Brian Bain, Culver, Ore., $90,027 6. Tilden Hooper, Carthage, Texas, $83,130 7. Steven Peebles, Redmond, Ore., $79,627 8. Jason Havens, Prineville, Ore., $79,174 9. Bobby Mote, Culver, Ore., $74,999 10. Casey Colletti, Pueblo, Colo., $73,118 11. Matt Bright, Azle, Texas, $72,791 12. Wes Stevenson, Lubbock, Texas, $70,820 13. Cody DeMers, Kimberly, Idaho, $65,429 14. Clint Cannon, Waller, Texas, $65,399 15. Royce Ford, Briggsdale, Colo., $60,880 16. Tom McFarland, Wickenburg, Ariz., $55,910 17. Chris Harris, Itasca, Texas, $52,443 18. Caine Riddle, Vernon, Texas, $51,909 19. Bo Casper, Fort Scott, Kan., $50,778 20. J.R. Vezain, Cowley, Wyo., $47,845 Steer Wrestling 1. Dean Gorsuch, Gering, Neb., $100,511 2. Billy Bugenig, Ferndale, Calif., $96,838 3. Luke Branquinho, Los Alamos, Calif., $87,740 4. Jason Miller, Lance Creek, Wyo., $83,705 5. Shawn Greenfield, Lakeview, Ore., $79,622 6. Sean Mulligan, Coleman, Okla., $74,546 7. Trevor Knowles, Mount Vernon, Ore., $73,245 8. Todd Suhn, Hermosa, S.D., $71,905 9. Blake Knowles, Heppner, Ore., $69,731 10. Olin Hannum, Malad, Idaho, $69,116 11. Casey Martin, Sulphur, La., $61,621 12. Jake Rinehart, Highmore, S.D., $59,123 13. Seth Brockman, Wheatland, Wyo., $57,686 14. Stockton Graves, Newkirk, Okla., $55,243 15. Mickey Gee, Wichita Falls, Texas, $54,776 16. Stan Branco, Chowchilla, Calif., $53,118 17. Wade Sumpter, Fowler, Colo., $52,049 18. Darrell Petry, Beaumont, Texas, $48,200 19. Dru Melvin, Ponca City, Okla., $47,969 20. Ethen Thouvenell, Napa, Calif., $47,592 Team Roping (header) 1. Derrick Begay, Seba Dalkai, Ariz., $118,754 2. Clay Tryan, Billings, Mont., $116,668 3. Erich Rogers, Round Rock, Ariz., $88,534 4. Matt Sherwood, Pima, Ariz., $87,590 5. Chad Masters, Cedar Hill, Tenn., $85,541 6. Luke Brown, Stephenville, Texas, $83,248 7. Spencer Mitchell, Colusa, Calif., $79,950 8. Brady Tryan, Huntley, Mont., $79,157 9. Jake Barnes, Scottsdale, Ariz., $77,163 10. Brandon Beers, Powell Butte, Ore., $74,666 11. Colby Lovell, Madisonville, Texas, $73,434 12. Trevor Brazile, Decatur, Texas, $70,328 13. Turtle Powell, Stephenville, Texas, $69,782 14. Kaleb Driggers, Albany, Ga., $67,643 15. Riley Minor, Ellensburg, Wash., $65,210 16. Travis Tryan, Billings, Mont., $60,119 17. Joel Bach, Millsap, Texas, $58,266 18. Charly Crawford, Prineville, Ore., $56,970 19. Arky Rogers, Lake City, Fla., $55,166 20. Keven Daniel, Franklin, Tenn., $54,822 Team Roping (heeler) 1. Cesar de la Cruz, Tucson, Ariz., $118,754 2. Travis Graves, Jay, Okla., $116,668 3. Cory Petska, Marana, Ariz., $98,357 4. Kory Koontz, Sudan, Texas, $91,368 5. Jade Corkill, Fallon, Nev., $88,505 6. Martin Lucero, Stephenville, Texas, $83,248 7. Broc Cresta, Santa Rosa, Calif., $79,950

8. Jake Long, Coffeyville, Kan., $79,157 9. Walt Woodard, Stephenville, Texas, $77,179 10. York Gill, Memphis, Tenn., $72,582 11. Jim Ross Cooper, Monument, N.M., $72,260 12. Jhett Johnson, Casper, Wyo., $71,487 13. Patrick Smith, Midland, Texas, $70,328 14. Brad Culpepper, Poulan, Ga., $67,643 15. Brady Minor, Ellensburg, Wash., $65,210 16. Allen Bach, Weatherford, Texas, $58,266 17. Rich Skelton, Llano, Texas, $53,097 18. Russell Cardoza, Terrebonne, Ore., $52,448 19. Chase Tryan, Helena, Mont., $50,096 20. Justin Wade Davis, Cottonwood, Calif., $47,957 Saddle Bronc Riding 1. Taos Muncy, Corona, N.M., $155,443 2. Cody Wright, Milford, Utah, $147,940 3. Wade Sundell, Boxholm, Iowa, $113,782 4. Bradley Harter, Weatherford, Texas, $87,990 5. Jesse Wright, Milford, Utah, $80,413 6. Cody DeMoss, Heflin, La., $78,891 7. Jesse Bail, Camp Crook, S.D., $76,859 8. Heith DeMoss, Heflin, La., $68,136 9. Jacobs Crawley, College Station, Texas, $58,133 10. Chad Ferley, Oelrichs, S.D., $54,607 11. Tyler Corrington, Hastings, Minn., $54,544 12. Ty Atchison, Jackson, Mo., $53,432 13. Chuck Schmidt, Keldron, S.D., $46,478 14. Sam Spreadborough, Snyder, Texas, $45,017 15. Jesse Kruse, Great Falls, Mont., $44,141 16. Jake Wright, Milford, Utah, $44,056 17. Rusty Allen, Eagle Mountain, Utah, $43,663 18. Tyrell Smith, Great Falls, Mont., $41,968 19. Troy Crowser, Whitewood, S.D., $41,393 20. Samuel Kelts, Millarville, Alberta, $41,002 Tie-down Roping 1. Tuf Cooper, Decatur, Texas, $145,311 2. Hunter Herrin, Apache, Okla., $114,946 3. Trevor Brazile, Decatur, Texas, $92,014 4. Shane Hanchey, Sulphur, La., $88,867 5. Clint Cooper, Decatur, Texas, $84,688 6. Cody Ohl, Hico, Texas, $80,340 7. Tyson Durfey, Colbert, Wash., $80,044 8. Cory Solomon, Prairie View, Texas, $73,722 9. Scott Kormos, Teague, Texas, $70,748 10. Timber Moore, Aubrey, Texas, $70,344 11. Matt Shiozawa, Chubbuck, Idaho, $67,622 12. Adam Gray, Seymour, Texas, $65,288 13. Jerrad Hofstetter, Portales, N.M., $65,109 14. Ryan Jarrett, Comanche, Okla., $64,327 15. Clif Cooper, Decatur, Texas, $64,070 16. Justin Macha, Needville, Texas, $62,425 17. Houston Hutto, Tomball, Texas, $60,516 18. Cimarron Boardman, Stephenville, Texas, $55,318 19. Monty Lewis, Hereford, Texas, $54,607 20. E.J. Roberts, Stephenville, Texas, $53,498 Steer Roping 1. Trevor Brazile, Decatur, Texas, $77,162 2. Rocky Patterson, Pratt, Kan., $66,257 3. Vin Fisher Jr., Andrews, Texas, $65,272 4. Cody Lee, Gatesville, Texas, $61,627 5. Will Gasperson, Decatur, Texas, $36,444 6. Scott Snedecor, Fredricksburg, Texas, $36,158 7. Bryce Davis, Abilene, Texas, $35,557 8. Chet Herren, Pawhuska, Okla., $35,552 9. Cody Scheck, Kiowa, Kan., $33,978 10. Ralph Williams, Skiatook, Okla., $33,524 11. Kim Ziegelgruber, Edmond, Okla., $31,111 12. Mike Chase, McAlester, Okla., $29,924 13. Chance Kelton, Mayer, Ariz., $26,886 14. Jess Tierney, Hermosa, S.D., $26,775 15. J.P. Wickett, Sallisaw, Okla., $25,520 16. Shay Good, Midland, Texas, $24,433 17. J. Tom Fisher, Andrews, Texas, $22,094 18. Dan Fisher, Andrews, Texas, $22,081 19. Walter Priestly, Robstown, Texas, $21,295 20. Shandon Stalls, McLean, Texas, $20,703 Bull Riding 1. Shane Proctor, Grand Coulee, Wash., $171,778 2. J.W. Harris, Mullin, Texas, $131,044 3. Wesley Silcox, Santaquin, Utah, $100,250 4. Jacob O’Mara, Prairieville, La., $94,879 5. Clayton Foltyn, El Campo, Texas, $94,221 6. Trevor Kastner, Ardmore, Okla., $84,760 7. Cody Whitney, Asher, Okla., $76,089 8. Seth Glause, Cheyenne, Wyo., $75,473 9. Bobby Welsh, Gillette, Wyo., $73,314 10. Chandler Bownds, Lubbock, Texas, $72,972 11. Tyler Willis, Wheatland, Wyo., $71,125 12. Steve Woolsey, Payson, Utah, $70,221 13. Clayton Savage, Cheyenne, Wyo., $69,154 14. L.J. Jenkins, Porum, Okla., $67,853 15. Tate Stratton, Kellyville, Okla., $67,420 16. Allen Helmuth, Ellensburg, Wash., $62,670 17. Travis Atkinson, Lehi, Utah, $61,174 18. Bryan Richardson, Dallas, Texas, $59,562 19. John Jacobs, Timber Lake, S.D., $56,741 20. Cody Teel, Kountze, Texas, $53,060 Barrel Racing 1. Brittany Pozzi, Victoria, Texas, $114,800 2. Lindsay Sears, Nanton, Alberta, $104,885 3. Sherry Cervi, Marana, Ariz., $90,241 4. Brenda Mays, Terrebonne, Ore., $87,961 5. Carlee Pierce, Stephenville, Texas, $85,505 6. Lisa Lockhart, Oelrichs, S.D., $80,380 7. Sue Smith, Blackfoot, Idaho, $78,819 8. Jody Sheffield, South Weber, Utah, $68,314 9. Angie Meadors, Blanchard, Okla., $66,594 10. Jeanne Anderson, White City, Kan., $64,300 11. Jane Melby, Backus, Minn., $63,139 12. Britany Fleck, Bismarck, N.D., $63,133 13. Christina Richman, Glendora, Calif., $61,714 14. Jill Moody, Letcher, S.D., $61,421 15. Tammy Fischer, Ledbetter, Texas, $60,588 16. Sydni Blanchard, Albuquerque, N.M., $58,004 17. Tana Poppino, Big Cabin, Okla., $55,275 18. Lee Ann Rust, Stephenville, Texas, $52,970 19. Sammi Bessert, Loma, Colo., $52,479 20. Kim Schulze, Elbert, Colo., $52,111

TENNIS ATP ASSOCIATION OF TENNIS PROFESSIONALS ——— China Open Results Monday At The Beijing Tennis Centre Beijing Purse: Men, $3.337 million (WT500); Women, $4.5 million (Premier) Surface: Hard-Outdoor Singles Men First Round Marin Cilic, Croatia, def. Wu Di, China, 6-2, 6-0. Feliciano Lopez, Spain, def. Marsel Ilhan, Turkey, 6-2, 7-6 (6). Fernando Verdasco, Spain, def. Michael Llodra, France, 6-2, 6-4. Florian Mayer, Germany, def. Albert Ramos, Spain, 6-2, 6-4. Flavio Cipolla, Italy, def. Alexandr Dolgopolov, Ukraine, 6-1, 1-6, 6-0. Kevin Anderson, South Africa, def. Andy Roddick

MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT ——— Today’s Game Los Angeles at New York, 5 p.m. Thursday’s Game Real Salt Lake at Vancouver, 6:30 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 8 San Jose at New England, 4:30 p.m. Philadelphia at Seattle FC, 7 p.m.

BASKETBALL WNBA WOMEN’S NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION All Times PDT ——— CHAMPIONSHIP Best of five x-if necessary Minnesota 1, Atlanta 0 Sunday, Oct. 2: Minnesota 88, Atlanta 74 Wednesday, Oct. 5: Atlanta at Minnesota, 5 p.m. Friday, Oct. 7: Minnesota at Atlanta, 5 p.m. x-Sunday, Oct. 9: Minnesota at Atlanta, 1 p.m. x-Wednesday, Oct. 12: Atlanta at Minnesota, 5 p.m.

HOCKEY NHL NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE NHL Calendar Oct. 5 — Opening day rosters set. Oct. 6 — Regular season begins. Oct. 7, 8 — NHL Premiere Games in Stockholm, Berlin, and Helsinki (featuring the New York Rangers, Buffalo Sabres, Los Angeles Kings and Anaheim Ducks).

MOTOR SPORTS Auto-Plus Nationals Results Monday At Maple Grove Raceway Mohnton, Pa. Final Finish Order Finals Results Top Fuel — Spencer Massey, 3.770 seconds, 323.12 mph def. Del Worsham, 3.735 seconds, 323.81 mph. Funny Car — Robert Hight, Ford Mustang, 4.065, 302.62 def. Johnny Gray, Dodge Charger, 9.836, 73.91. Pro Stock — Jason Line, Pontiac GXP, 6.484, 212.79 def. Ronnie Humphrey, GXP, 6.530, 212.16. Pro Stock Motorcycle — Hector Arana Jr, Buell, 6.781, 195.82 def. Matt Smith, Buell, 6.795, 194.24. Top Alcohol Dragster — Mike Kosky, 5.285, 265.59 def. Joey Severance, 5.324, 269.24. Top Alcohol Funny Car — Frank Manzo, Chevy Monte Carlo, 5.419, 264.60 def. Andy Bohl, Ford Mustang, 5.520, 259.51.

DEALS Transactions HOCKEY National Hockey League CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS—Assigned G Alexander Salak, F Jimmy Hayes, F Marcus Kruger, F Peter LeBlanc, F Brandon Pirri and D Dylan Olsen to Rockford (AHL). Agreed to terms with G Ray Emery on a one-year contract. DETROIT RED WINGS—Signed F Fabian Brunnstrom to a one-year contract. PITTSBURGH PENGUINS—Placed C Sidney Crosby on the injured list. SAN JOSE SHARKS—Assigned D Justin Braun, F Benn Ferreiro and LW John McCarthy to Worcester (AHL). TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING—Reassigned F Alex Hutchings and G Pat Nagle to Florida (ECHL). TORONTO MAPLE LEAFS—Assigned F Mike Zigomanis and D Keith Aulie to Toronto (AHL). Waived F Darryl Boyce, F Joey Crabb and D Matt Lashoff. WINNIPEG JETS—Agreed to terms with C Mark Scheifele on an entry-level contract. Acquired P Jamie Boreham from Saskatchewan for future considerations. LACROSSE National Lacrosse League WASHINGTON STEALTH—Re-signed D Kyle Sorensen and D Mike Grimes to one-year contracts. SOCCER Major League Soccer MONTREAL IMPACT—Signed D Nelson Rivas. COLLEGE NCAA—Extended the suspensions of Ohio State RB Daniel Herron and WR DeVier Posey one additional game and suspended Ohio State OL Marcus Hall one game for being overpaid for summer work. BOISE STATE—Announced the NCAA has reinstated WR Geraldo Boldewijn to the football team. GEORGE WASHINGTON—Named Brian Sereno executive director for athletics communications. ILLINOIS—Suspended LB Jonathan Brown one game after he appeared to intentionally knee a Northwestern player during Saturday’s game against Illinois. IOWA—Suspended QB A.J. Derby two games after an incident outside a bar on Saturday night. LOYOLA (MD)—Named Omari Isreal director of men’s basketball operations. MEMPHIS—Named Heather Mosser assistant softball coach. NYU—Named Kacey McCaffrey acting women’s swimming and diving coach. OKLAHOMA—Reinstated WR Trey Franks to the football team. SAINT JOSEPH’S—Promoted Renie Shields to associate athletic director/senior women’s administrator. Named Dan Keating and Mike Keating men’s assistant lacrosse coaches. SHENANDOAH—Named Becca Watkins women’s assistant lacrosse coach.

FISH COUNT Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Sunday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 2,687 903 549 129 The Dalles 1,731 785 1,813 565 John Day 1,851 841 3,498 971 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Sunday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 647,487 176,330 360,601 126,570 The Dalles 414,997 141,932 283,248 98,013 John Day 336,898 130,445 229,562 80,013 McNary 301,235 91,201 200,314 63,611


TUESDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

MLB SCOREBOARD MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL Postseason Glance All Times PDT ——— DIVISION SERIES (Best-of-5; x-if necessary) American League Detroit 2, New York 1 Friday, Sept. 30: Detroit 1, New York 1, 1½ innings, susp., rain Saturday, Oct. 1: New York 9, Detroit 3, comp. of susp. game Sunday, Oct. 2: Detroit 5, New York 3 Monday, Oct. 3: Detroit 5, New York 4 Today, Oct. 4: New York (Burnett 11-11 or Hughes 5-5) at Detroit (Porcello 14-9), 5:37 p.m. x-Thursday, Oct. 6: Detroit at New York, 5:07 or 5:37 p.m. Texas 2, Tampa Bay 1 Friday, Sept. 30: Tampa Bay 9, Texas 0 Saturday, Oct. 1: Texas 8, Tampa Bay 6 Monday, Oct. 3: Texas 4, Tampa Bay 3 Today, Oct. 4: Texas (Harrison 14-9) at Tampa Bay (Hellickson 13-10), 11:07 a.m. x-Thursday, Oct. 6: Tampa Bay at Texas, 2:07 or 5:07 p.m. National League Philadelphia 1, St. Louis 1 Saturday, Oct. 1: Philadelphia 11, St. Louis 6 Sunday, Oct. 2: St. Louis 5, Philadelphia 4 Today, Oct. 4: Philadelphia (Hamels 14-9) at St. Louis (Garcia 13-7), 2:07 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 5: Philadelphia at St. Louis, 3:07 or 5:07 p.m. x-Friday, Oct. 7: St. Louis at Philadelphia, 5:07 or 5:37 p.m. Milwaukee 2, Arizona 0 Saturday, Oct. 1: Milwaukee 4, Arizona 1 Sunday, Oct. 2: Milwaukee 9, Arizona 4 Today, Oct. 4: Milwaukee (Marcum 13-7) at Arizona (Collmenter 10-10), 6:37 p.m. (TNT) x-Wednesday, Oct. 5: Milwaukee at Arizona, 5:07 or 6:37 p.m. x-Friday, Oct. 7: Arizona at Milwaukee, 2:07 or 5:07 p.m. Monday’s Summaries

Rangers 4, Rays 3 Texas Kinsler 2b Andrus ss J.Hamilton lf Mi.Young dh A.Beltre 3b Napoli c N.Cruz rf Moreland 1b Gentry cf Totals

AB 4 4 4 4 4 3 4 4 3 34

R 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 4

H 1 2 1 0 1 2 0 0 2 9

BI 0 0 2 0 0 2 0 0 0 4

BB 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 4

SO 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 4

Avg. .250 .182 .364 .167 .091 .400 .091 .143 .400

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL PLAYOFFS

Phillies lean on Hamels for Game 3 By R.B. Fallstrom The Associated Press

Paul Sancya / The Associated Press

Detroit Tigers starting pitcher Justin Verlander throws during the first inning of Game 3 of an American League division series against the New York Yankees on Monday in Detroit.

Verlander, Young lead Tigers over Yankees

Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA C.Lewis W, 1-0 6 1 1 1 2 6 93 1.50 D.Oliver H, 2 1-3 3 1 1 0 0 12 6.75 Ogando H, 2 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 8 0.00 M.Adams H, 2 1-3 1 1 1 3 0 26 6.75 M.Gonzalez H, 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 3 0.00 Feliz S, 2-2 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 1 25 0.00 Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Price L, 0-1 6 2-3 7 3 3 1 3 102 4.05 B.Gomes 0 0 1 1 2 0 9 7.71 Howell 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 J.Cruz 1 1-3 0 0 0 1 1 21 0.00 Jo.Peralta 1 1 0 0 0 0 16 0.00 B.Gomes pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. Howell pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored—Ogando 3-1, M.Gonzalez 2-0, Feliz 2-0, B.Gomes 1-0, Howell 3-2, J.Cruz 2-0. WP—C.Lewis, Feliz, Price. T—3:51. A—32,828 (34,078).

Next up

ter only 1½ innings. While Sabathia didn’t DETROIT — Justin • New York at make it through the sixth Verlander struck out 11 in Detroit Monday, Verlander was eight gritty innings and • When: Today, still hitting 100 mph on Jose Valverde stopped a 5:30 p.m. the stadium radar gun in New York Yankees rally • TV: TBS the eighth. for the second straight “There’s so much night, whiffing Derek Jeter adrenaline in a situation with two on to close out the like this,” he said. “I was Detroit Tigers’ 5-4 victory Monday. a little out of rhythm in the first, Delmon Young hit a tiebreaking and then found it, and then lost it homer in seventh off Rafael Soria- for three batters, and it shows what no and the Tigers took a 2-1 lead in this lineup can do. I lost my rhythm the best-of-five American League for three batters and they scored playoff, pushing the Yankees to the (two) runs to tie the game. But this brink of elimination. team has a never-say-die attitude. Their hopes ride tonight on A.J. We’ve done it all year. Come from Burnett, the $82.5 million pitcher behind. We’ve held leads. We’ve who was so unreliable this season done everything we’ve had to do, that he wasn’t supposed to get a and tonight’s another example of start in this series. A rainstorm that.” changed all that when Game 1 was Valverde took over in the ninth suspended Friday night, forcing — and another dramatic ending both teams to alter their pitching followed. The All-Star closer, who plans. was perfect in 49 save chances “Trust me, they’re not going to this season, walked two and got a go away,” Tigers manager Jim Ley- warning-track flyout before strikland said. “We’ve put ourselves in ing out Jeter to end it. a decent position, but we’ve still “It’s not very comfortable with a got more to accomplish. So this is a guy that’s got over 3,000 or so hits long way from being over.” up there in that situation,” Leyland Verlander and New York ace CC said. Sabathia were back on the mound Trailing by four in the ninth on after their series-opening matchup Sunday, the Yankees scored twice at Yankee Stadium was halted af- against Valverde before he got

By Noah Trister

Tampa Bay AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Jennings lf 4 2 2 2 0 0 .364 B.Upton cf 2 0 0 0 2 1 .400 Longoria 3b 3 0 0 0 1 3 .250 Joyce rf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .182 Damon dh 4 1 1 0 0 2 .308 Zobrist 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .231 Kotchman 1b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .167 Jaso c 2 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-Rdrgz ph-ss 2 0 1 1 0 0 .100 Brignac ss 1 0 0 0 1 0 .000 b-Fuld ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Shoppach c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .429 Totals 31 3 6 3 5 8 Texas 000 000 400 — 4 9 0 Tampa Bay 000 100 110 — 3 6 0 a-grounded out for Jaso in the 7th. b-grounded out for Brignac in the 7th. LOB—Texas 7, Tampa Bay 6. 2B—Kinsler (2). HR—Napoli (1), off Price; Jennings (1), off C.Lewis; Jennings (2), off M.Adams. RBIs—J.Hamilton 2 (2), Napoli 2 (4), Jennings 2 (2), S.Rodriguez (1). SB—Kinsler (1), Napoli (1), Gentry 2 (2), B.Upton (1). CS—Gentry (1), B.Upton (2). Runners left in scoring position—Texas 5 (Mi. Young 3, Moreland, Andrus); Tampa Bay 5 (Damon, Fuld 2, Zobrist 2). Runners moved up—J.Hamilton 2, S.Rodriguez. GIDP—Shoppach. DP—Texas 1 (A.Beltre, Kinsler, Moreland).

The Associated Press

Robinson Cano to ground out with two on to close out a 5-3 victory in Game 2. “Every now and again he does that, but we’ve got the utmost faith in him,” Verlander said. “He’s done it all year long. What a job he did, especially after throwing 30-some pitches last night. You know, that’s not easy.” After two games in New York that took three rainy days to finish, Comerica Park was dry on Monday, with the exception of the fountains beyond center field. The Yankees managed two quick runs off Verlander in the first, but the 24-game winner settled down. He appeared to be laboring at times, allowing four runs, six hits and three walks, but he stayed in for 120 pitches and Detroit produced just enough offense. Brett Gardner tied it for the Yankees with a two-run double in the seventh, but Young answered with a line drive that barely cleared the wall in right field to give the Tigers a 5-4 lead. “Amazing,” Verlander said. “What an acquisition he’s been. He’s been such a great teammate, such a great acquisition for us and this lineup. It just extends our lineup even farther. What a stud. What an at-bat.”

Rangers beat Rays, take 2-1 lead By Fred Goodall

Tigers 5, Yankees 4 New York Jeter ss Granderson cf Cano 2b Al.Rodriguez 3b Teixeira 1b Swisher rf Posada dh 1-E.Nunez pr R.Martin c Gardner lf Totals

AB 5 4 4 2 4 4 2 0 3 3 31

R 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 4

H 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 6

The Associated Press BI 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 4

BB 0 0 0 2 0 0 2 0 0 1 5

SO 2 1 2 1 2 1 1 0 1 1 12

Avg. .267 .273 .308 .000 .091 .182 .500 --.111 .333

Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg. A.Jackson cf 1 1 0 0 2 1 .000 R.Santiago 2b 4 0 2 2 0 0 .333 D.Young lf 3 1 2 1 1 0 .333 Mi.Cabrera 1b 2 0 0 0 2 0 .333 V.Martinez dh 4 0 0 0 0 1 .182 Ordonez rf 1 0 0 0 1 0 .375 Kelly rf 2 1 1 0 0 1 .500 Jh.Peralta ss 3 0 1 1 0 0 .273 Avila c 3 0 0 0 0 2 .000 Inge 3b 4 2 2 0 0 0 .500 Totals 27 5 8 4 6 5 New York 200 000 200 — 4 6 0 Detroit 002 011 10x — 5 8 0 1-ran for Posada in the 9th. LOB—New York 6, Detroit 7. 2B—Gardner (1), R.Santiago (1), Jh.Peralta (1), Inge (1). 3B— Granderson (1). HR—D.Young (2), off R.Soriano. RBIs—Granderson (2), Al.Rodriguez (2), Gardner 2 (4), R.Santiago 2 (2), D.Young (2), Jh.Peralta (1). SB—E.Nunez (1). S—A.Jackson, Avila. Runners left in scoring position—New York 2 (Jeter 2); Detroit 5 (V.Martinez 3, A.Jackson, Inge). Runners moved up—Al.Rodriguez, Avila. GIDP— Jeter, R.Martin, R.Santiago, Mi.Cabrera, Jh.Peralta. DP—New York 3 (Al.Rodriguez, Cano, Teixeira), (Jeter, Cano, Teixeira), (Jeter, Cano, Teixeira); Detroit 2 (Jh.Peralta, R.Santiago, Mi.Cabrera), (Mi.Cabrera, Jh.Peralta, Mi.Cabrera). New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Sabathia 5 1-3 7 4 4 6 3 106 6.14 R.Soriano L, 0-1 1 2-3 1 1 1 0 1 22 5.40 Robertson 1 0 0 0 0 1 14 0.00 Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Verlander W, 1-0 8 6 4 4 3 11 120 5.00 Valverde S, 1-1 1 0 0 0 2 1 19 9.00 Inherited runners-scored—R.Soriano 1-0. IBB— off Sabathia (Mi.Cabrera). HBP—by Robertson (Jh. Peralta), by Verlander (R.Martin). WP—Sabathia. T—3:14. A—43,581 (41,255).

D3

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Back on the road in the playoffs, the Texas Rangers won again. Colby Lewis outpitched All-Star David Price, Mike Napoli hit a goahead two-run homer and the defending AL champions survived a shaky night from the bullpen to hold off the Tampa Bay Rays 4-3 Monday night in Game 3 of their postseason series. The Rangers’ fourth straight division series road win matches the third-longest streak in major league history and gives Texas a 21 lead heading into Game 4 today. Texas won three ALDS games here a year ago, when it eliminated Tampa Bay in five games. Playing in front of the first sellout at Tropicana Field since opening day, Desmond Jennings hit a pair of solo homers for the Rays. Tampa Bay kept it interesting by scoring twice off Rangers relievers before Neftali Feliz got four outs for his second save of the series. “It was three of the toughest innings that we experienced all year,” Rangers manager Ron Washington said of the late-game drama. Texas third baseman Adrian Beltre, playing deep and guarding the line to prevent a double in the ninth, started an around-the-horn double play on Kelly Shoppach’s grounder to end it. Price was the losing pitcher in two of Tampa Bay’s playoff losses in 2010 and welcomed the opportunity to try to redeem himself against the only AL opponent he’s yet to beat in his career. The left-hander shrugged off a poor outing in his last regularseason start to take a 1-0 lead into

Lynne Sladky / The Associated Press

Texas Rangers Mike Napoli (25) hits a two-run home run against the Tampa Bay Rays in the seventh inning during Game 3 of an American League division series, Monday in St.Petersburg, Fla.

Next up • Texas at Tampa Bay • When: Today, 11 a.m. • TV: TBS

the seventh, thanks to Desmond Jennings’ fourth-inning homer off Lewis. Beltre singled leading off the seventh against Price and took second on a wild pitch. A crowd of 32,828 fell silent when Napoli lifted a 2-2 pitch into the seats in left-center for a 2-1 advantage. Josh Hamilton extended the lead with a tworun single off reliever J.P. Howell. “Napoli has just been — this is the year of the Napoli, man,” Rays manager Joe Maddon said. “He is just hot. And he got a pitch.” As good as Price was early, Lewis was better in limiting the Rays to

one hit over six innings. Jennings’ first homer was the only hit off the right-hander, who had worked 16 consecutive scoreless innings against the Rays up to that point — a stretch that began with a five-inning stint in last year’s ALDS and continued with an eight-inning performance to beat Price and the Rays on June 1. But the Rangers bullpen nearly let a three-run lead slip away. Johnny Damon, Ben Zobrist and Casey Kotchman singled to load the bases against reliever Darren Oliver in the seventh. Damon scored when pinch-hitter Sean Rodriguez grounded out, and the Rangers escaped further damage when the second pitcher of the inning, Alexi Ogando, induced pinch-hitter Sam Fuld to hit a roller to second base.

ST. LOUIS — Favorites to win it all, the Philadelphia Phillies are banking on Cole Hamels’ big-game background in St. Louis. The 27-year-old lefty was the 2008 World Series MVP and has six career postseason victories heading into a Game 3 matchup today against the Cardinals and Jaime Garcia. With the best-of-five NL division series tied at one apiece, this is not a stage likely to rattle Hamels. “He’s got that instinct when he gets on the mound, that put-’em-away instinct,” teammate Hunter Pence said Monday. “The big-moment pitcher.” The youngest member of an all-world Phillies rotation, Hamels seemed pretty calm going into his pivotal start. Besides all that postseason experience, half of his 14 victories came on the road this year. “Every time I go out I try to win, no matter what the circumstance is — five games, seven games, three games or one game,” Hamels said. “It’s just going out there. I know I have a job to do.” Phillies manager Charlie Manuel expects a loose, confident team behind Hamels. Philadelphia must win at least one of the two games in St. Louis to bring the series back home. “This is supposed to be a lot of fun,” Manuel said. “It’s up to us to get it done, but at the same time play nice and relaxed.” His players, at least most of them, can lean on their extensive October experience. The Phillies have won the NL East the past five years. “It makes it a lot easier on me, this being my first playoff series,” Pence said. “All these guys have been through it and everyone’s very poised. “This team has a lot of poise, a lot of confidence and a lot of calmness.” A potential red flag for Hamels: a spotty September in which he allowed nine home runs in 38 innings. He said some were poor pitches and some were the result of good hitting, and realizes it’s time to dial it in. “Anytime in the postseason, one pitch can really decide the fate of a game,” Hamels said. “But at the same time, I’m going to be aggressive.”

D’backs looking to play better at home in Game 3 By John Marshall The Associated Press

PHOENIX — Down in the standings or down to their last out, the Arizona Diamondbacks found a way to rally all season, riding their comebacks into the playoffs. After two lackluster games in Milwaukee, the Diamondbacks need another big comeback or it’s going to be a short return to the postseason. Trailing the bashing-and-bunting Brewers 2-0 in the NL division series, Arizona returns home for Game 3 tonight, sending out rookie right-hander Josh Collmenter to face Milwaukee righty Shaun Marcum in what should be a raucous atmosphere at Chase Field. “I think it’s good that we came from behind all year,” Diamondbacks third baseman Ryan Roberts said Monday. “There’s no panic mode here.” There at least has to be some concern. Arizona put up a monster May after falling behind by 6½ games in April and mastered the art of the comeback, rallying to win a major league-high 48 times on its way to the NL West title. Unable to catch the Brewers in the regular season to secure home-field advantage in the first round, the Diamondbacks opened the NLDS with two games in Milwaukee. They return to the desert searching for answers after two deflating losses. Playing like the team to beat in the National League, the Brewers put the Diamondbacks on their heels with a tough-tobeat combination of good pitching, power and some small ball mixed in. Milwaukee touched up Arizona’s two best pitchers to start the series, getting to 21-game winner Ian Kennedy for four runs to win the opener 4-1, and 16-game winner Daniel Hudson for five in a 9-4 victory in Game 2. The Brewers’ brawn of Prince Fielder and Ryan Braun have been brutally effective, combining to go 9 for 16 with two homers, six RBIs and six runs. Milwaukee also has done the little things right, including Jonathan Lucroy’s deftly placed safety squeeze that triggered a fiverun sixth inning in the Brew Crew’s Game 2 win on Sunday. It’s been just two games, but the Brewers have been monsters, their “Beast Mode” celebrations against the Diamondbacks putting a scare into the rest of the playoff field. “We’ve done a really good job of staying in the moment, embracing the moment and trying to accomplish as much as we can every day,” Braun said.


D4

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2011

No living up to the hype for some NFL teams

NFL

Buccaneers rally to beat Colts By Mark Long

By Barry Wilner

The Associated Press

The Associated Press

TAMPA, Fla. — Josh Freeman and LeGarrette Blount reversed roles Monday night against Indianapolis. Freeman picked up the tough yards, and Blount had the highlight play. Together, they helped the Tampa Bay Buccaneers win their third consecutive game. Freeman threw for 287 yards and a touchdown, Blount ran for 127 yards and a score and the Buccaneers beat the Colts 24-17 in prime time. Freeman, who ran for a touchdown early in the game, scrambled for a huge first down on the winning drive. Two plays later, Blount found a gaping hole, bounced to the outside and scampered 35 yards for a touchdown. He carried defensive back David Caldwell the final few yards before diving for the pylon. Freeman wasn’t done with the dirty work, though. Needing a yard to move the chains, extend the drive and deny the Colts a chance to tie the game, Freeman picked up the first down on a fourth-and-1 play. “It really wasn’t pretty the whole time, but that’s us,” Freeman said. The Buccaneers (3-1) kept pace with New Orleans in the NFC South. The Colts fell to 0-4 for

When Eagles players, the Jets coach and the Cowboys owner ramped up the expectations for their teams, it seemed reasonable. All had the talent to challenge for a championship. Turns out, through the first month of the NFL season, all that bluster was just that — all hype. None of those teams has shown much substance through the first four games. Throw in the Falcons, a fashionable pick to represent the NFC in next February’s Super Bowl, and defending AFC champ Pittsburgh, and the opening quarter of the schedule has been full of surprises — and disappointments — for some ballyhooed teams. No one has been more disappointing than the heavily hyped Eagles, who quickly have driven their fans to concentrating on the Phillies in the playoffs. The squad backup quarterback Vince Young dubbed a “Dream Team” after all its offseason acquisitions is keeping folks in Philadelphia up all night trying to figure out what has gone wrong. The Eagles have lost three straight and are at the bottom of the NFC East. Their latest flop was the worst, as they blew a 23-3 second-half lead and fell to San Francisco — despite a sensational performance by Michael Vick. But Vick doesn’t play in the secondary, which, despite some hefty price tags for Nnamdi Asomugha and Asante Samuel, has been a sieve. And Vick isn’t a linebacker — in fact, some in Philly wonder if anyone on the roster actually is one. He doesn’t placekick, although Vick might have made one of the two field goals from inside 40 yards that rookie Alex Henery missed in the fourth quarter fold Sunday. What’s going on in Philadelphia is anything but dreamy, and the problems are drawing an even brighter spotlight because of preseason proclamations that the Eagles were going to be something special. “We’ve got the people to do it, but we’re just not doing it,” said defensive tackle Cullen Jenkins, one of several high-priced additions through free agency or trades. “Maybe having this label of having so many good people is hurting us, because maybe people are standing around waiting for someone else to do it. Or expecting that someone else is going to come in and make the play instead of people going out and manning up and making it themselves.” Sounds a lot like the Jets, whose recent success — trips to the AFC title game the past two years — has faded under the ugliness of being brutalized by the Raiders and Ravens. With AllPro center Nick Mangold sidelined by a high right ankle sprain, the Jets (2-2) as a whole forgot how to block. Their defense played decently in the loss to the Ravens, but it has been mediocre in a lucky win over Dallas in the opener, and was miserable in the defeat at Oakland. Quarterback Mark Sanchez was supposed to take the next big step in his development in his third pro season. Instead, he’s regressed as the offensive line has collapsed. All of which has made Rex Ryan’s boastful declarations nothing more than ... hype. “We’ve had some ups and downs before,” Ryan said. “We’ve had one worse than this one, believe it or not. We’re just the men for the job; we’ll get this thing fixed.” Better do so soon, Rex — next up is a visit to New England. Dallas fell apart in similar fashion to its NFC East rival Eagles on Sunday. While Philadelphia couldn’t hold a 20-point second-half lead, the Cowboys (2-2) were up 27-3 over the Lions. Then they reverted to recent woes, getting sloppy in pass coverage and sloppier with the ball. Tony Romo has rightly been praised for his courage in playing hurt, and for his leadership skills. He also needs to be lambasted for his penchant to turn over the ball, with both Dallas losses directly attributable to his interceptions or fumbles. And maybe, just maybe, the Cowboys have been overrated, in great part thanks to their front-and-center owner’s willingness to cast them as something more than they really are. Not that Jerry Jones should be downgrading the roster he has put together. But asking this group, which would have trouble covering Jones himself on a pass route, to be exceptional might be nothing more than, well, hype. Regardless, Jones isn’t abandoning his quarterback and longtime pet project. “I view the success we have, I view what he does well and I put the mistakes right in with what he does well and don’t in any way get discouraged about our future with Tony,” Jones said. “There’s no issue about faith in Romo, any place in this organization, period. ... If you’re going to try to make plays, then you’ve got a chance to have some bad plays. But however we go, we’ll go with Tony. As Tony goes, we’ll go.” There’s no such angst over the quarterback in Atlanta, where Matt Ryan is a lot steadier than Romo. What has been the problem in the ATL is too much average football, and in a division with the Saints and Buccaneers, that’s treading dangerous waters. With the monster trade to move up for playmaking receiver Julio Jones on draft day, the Falcons dived headfirst into the hype machine. Jones would be the missing link in the NFL’s most competitive division, and would keep the Falcons at the top of the conference, a Super Bowl favorite. Jones had a breakout game at Seattle with 11 catches for 127 yards in Atlanta’s 30-28 win. But the Falcons (2-2) had to sweat out a last-minute 61-yard field goal try to win against an inferior opponent. Finally, there are the struggling Steelers (2-2), who don’t look anything like the club that lost to Green Bay in February’s Super Bowl. All that talk about veteran outfits with well established regimens surviving the lockout best has, in Pittsburgh’s case, been a bunch of hype, compounded by injuries. Considering the Steelers’ blue collar history, that’s strange. Of course, it’s already been a strange season.

Margaret Bowles / The Associated Press

Tampa Bay Buccaneers running back LeGarrette Blount (27) dives in the end zone to score the winning touchdown on a 35-yard run past Indianapolis Colts safety David Caldwell (30) during the second half of Monday’s game in Tampa, Fla. The Buccaneers defeated the Colts 24-17.

the first time since 1998, Peyton Manning’s rookie season. Manning has watched all four losses, unable to play because of a neck injury. Curtis Painter started this one,

filling in for injured backup Kerry Collins, who’s out because of a concussion, and played better than most expected. “It’s always a little easier when you know you’re going to get

Beavers

COLLEGE SPORTS

Unofficial visits draw concern, not scrutiny By Pete Thamel New York Times News Service

The report last week that an assistant football coach at Tennessee, Willie Mack Garza, paid $1,500 for a top-rated tailback, Lache Seastrunk, and his mother to take an unofficial visit to Tennessee sent reverberations throughout college sports. Just weeks after Southern California Coach Lane Kiffin, who was the coach at Tennessee when the transaction is said to have occurred, appeared to have escaped NCAA scrutiny from his tumultuous tenure as the Volunteers’ coach, the Yahoo Sports report pulled him back into the NCAA crosshairs. Perhaps more important, the report portrays Garza and the Tennessee staff flagrantly disobeying NCAA rules on unofficial visits. (An unofficial visit is one in which the prospect and his family must pay their way to campus.) Yahoo said Garza paid a third party the money for Seastrunk and his mother to make the trip in July 2009 using a MoneyGram, even providing the receipt. Coaches, recruiting analysts and an NCAA official said in interviews that illegal payment for a prospect’s unofficial visit was one of the most commonly manipulated NCAA rules. While the importance of unofficial visits has increased because of the speeded-up recruiting calendar with unofficial commitments, there is little scrutiny of how prospects and their families pay for the visits. “It seems to be a real concern,” said Rachel Newman Baker, an NCAA managing director of enforcement, who said the NCAA had been studying the issue in both football and basketball. She added, “As we’ve been doing our outreach and meeting with folks, it seems like this has been on top of the list.” On an official recruiting visit, a prospect’s travel, hotel and meals can be paid for by universities while the prospect visits campus, according to NCAA regulations. Those visits cannot be taken until the start of the prospect’s senior year of high school. There are so few perks allowed on an unofficial visit that a university cannot pick up a prospect at the airport or pay for a hotel stay. The NCAA rulebook has four pages on official visits and one and a half on unofficial visits. “Behind the scenes in college basketball, people will tell you that the unofficial visit is one of the bigger problems facing recruiting right now,” ESPN basketball recruiting analyst Dave Telep said. “It’s a place where things can be easily manipulated by third parties. At the same time, I have no idea how you can fix it.” The problem appears to be as pervasive in college football as it is in basketball. Former coach

Big 12 presidents approve revenue sharing The Big 12 Conference says school leaders have agreed to equally share first- and second-tier television money if its members agree to give the league their TV rights for at least six years. Interim commissioner Chuck Neinas says the vote should be seen as a positive sign for Missouri, which is reportedly considering whether to stay in the conference or join Texas A&M in the Southeastern Conference. Neinas says he plans to visit with Missouri officials this week to state the league’s case for staying put, but not before the school’s curators meet today. The revenue-sharing model had been proposed by Texas several weeks ago, but was waiting for a vote by league presidents. — The Associated Press

Urban Meyer said that in the later part of his six-year tenure at Florida, he heard about abuses elsewhere of the unofficial visit rule. “I’d ask my assistants, ‘Why is this kid not visiting us?’ ” Meyer said. “They’d say, ‘Coach, we’re not paying for his trip.’ ” According to Drew Cannon, a Duke student who does research for Telep, 51 of Telep’s top 100 senior basketball prospects had already unofficially committed to universities by Sept. 1. Nearly all of the top 100 had made unofficial visits. Brad Stevens, the Butler men’s basketball coach, said that 90 percent of the official visits during his tenure had been players who had already made commitments to the Bulldogs. Because prospects cannot make official visits until the start of their senior year of high school, the official visit has become more of a ceremonial showcase of campus than a critical part of the recruiting calendar. “It’s totally changed, I would say, in the last five years,” said Dan Dakich, a former college head coach and assistant who now coaches travel basketball and hosts an Indianapolis radio show. “Kids are committing so much earlier, and parents totally understand the process. The people I deal with say, ‘Can you help us get him on campus?’ ” And that is where problems can occur, especially in a time when unemployment, gas prices and airfares are high. “I see guys flying across the country or regionally like it’s a rock star tour,” Telep said. “Knowing what I know about some of those situations, I don’t know the means of where this is coming from.” Steve Donahue, the Boston College men’s basketball coach, said, “I think it’s very prevalent. It’s curious to me how all this gets done in such a speedy fashion if you’re going to abide by the rules.” Donahue is one of many coaches who favor an NCAA rule change that will be discussed this month by NCAA leadership that would allow universities to fly juniors to campus the spring before their senior year. “Kids are making choices so

some playing time,” Painter said. “We got off to a good start and put some points on the board. But obviously we have to find a way to put more points on the board and move the ball a little bit better.”

quickly of who they can visit, they make the decision before you can even have a shot,” Donahue said. Telep said one of the problems with unofficial visits is that their unofficial nature gave coaches an element of plausible deniability in knowing how the prospect got there and who paid for the trip. Meyer, now an ESPN analyst, stressed that paying, directly or indirectly, for a prospect’s visit is a significant breach of NCAA rules. “That is a major violation,” he said. “That’s not secondary.” Newman Baker said she was skeptical of coaches who claim they have no idea how prospects paid their way to campus. “The thought or concept that coaches don’t really know what’s going on isn’t an accurate reflection of reality,” she said. “I’m not buying that.” Newman Baker said the NCAA had been looking at the problem for the past year as part of a broader focus on recruiting reforms. She said the problems with unofficial football and basketball visits appear different. In football, she said, the unofficial visits appear to include packing a group of prospects in a van and touring universities. She said the NCAA had found in some cases that the operators of those tours, which include seven-on-seven teams, could be classified as boosters of an institution. “What we’re hearing and being told are that these individuals are being compensated for these caravan tours, driving multiple elite prospects, loading them up and taking them around,” she said. In basketball, Newman Baker said, it is more likely for individual players to fly directly to campus with “a handler” like a mentor or coach. Dan Hawkins, a former Colorado football coach, said the Yahoo report about violations like those alleged at Tennessee did not surprise him. There need to be more specific and harsher penalties for such violations, said Hawkins, now an ESPN analyst. “If you break rules in a blatant fashion, you need to be banned for life,” he said. “You’re out of coaching, you’re done. If there’s illegal contact or a phone call, you lose a scholarship.”

Continued from D1 “Sean had some great plays and some very rough ones,” Beavers coach Mike Riley said after the loss. “You are responsible for the ball as a quarterback but he was really, really, really rushed in there.” Mannion’s passing yards contrasted to a poor performance on the ground by the Beavers, who rushed just 14 times for 47 yards. Oregon State was without promising true freshman running back Malcolm Agnew, who missed his third straight game. Agnew rushed for 223 yards in his debut, the Beavers’ season-opening loss to Sacramento State, and was hailed as the heir apparent to Jacquizz Rodgers. He pulled his hamstring three days later and aggravated it last week. Fellow freshman tailback Terron Ward gained 30 yards on five carries against the Sun Devils, including a 10-yard touchdown run. Oregon State had Arizona State off balance early, going up 13-0 early in the second quarter. The Sun Devils bounced back with three unanswered touchdowns to lead 21-13 at the break. The Beavers pulled within 21-20 on James Rodgers’ 5-yard touchdown reception but ultimately couldn’t tackle Cameron Marshall on a pair of late touchdown runs. The Beavers (0-4, 0-2) are the only BCS team in the nation without a win. The start is their worst since 1996. At the start of the season, junior Ryan Katz was Oregon State’s starter and Mannion was his backup. But Katz only played a half of the opening loss to the lower-division Hornets, and he was in for only a limited number of plays in the 35-0 blanking by then-No. 8 Wisconsin. Afterward, Katz said he was surprised by the shift, while Riley said the coaching staff had been closely watching Mannion’s progress since the annual Spring Game and felt that the change was in order. Overall this season, Mannion has thrown for 1,015 yards and completed 62.2 percent of his passes. He has thrown two touchdowns but he has five interceptions. The Beavers are back home in Corvallis this Saturday to host Arizona (1-4, 0-3 Pac-12). The Wildcats have lost four straight, including a 48-41 defeat by USC this past Saturday. The game figures to feature lots of passing, given the matchup between Mannion and Wildcats quarterback Nick Foles. Against the Trojans, Foles completed 41 of 53 passes for 425 yards and four touchdowns. Mannion says all the Beavers can do is keep trying. “You can’t feel good about too much,” he said after the latest loss. “You just have to learn from the bad, pull off the good, and we are all just going to keep working. That’s all we can do now. Keep working and become a better team.”


TUESDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

NHL

NBA COMMENTARY

As season nears, Crosby is changed, and different NHL By Jeff Z. Klein New York Times News Service

DETROIT — It has been said that the NHL season beginning Thursday is about Sidney Crosby. But it is also about ideas, about vast changes in perception and philosophy across the league, both among the people who run the game and those who play it. And that, too, is largely about Sidney Crosby. The 2011-12 season will be very different from any season played before, even if Crosby will not be on the ice for the start of it. It is a season that will be watched closely to see whether the NHL will continue to enforce its new, rigorously applied rules against boarding and checks to the head, which resulted in nine suspensions in the preseason through Saturday. “I’m not surprised, to be honest with you,” Crosby said of the new regulations. “That’s kind of where everything’s going.” Crosby, the youngest team captain to raise the Stanley Cup, the scorer of the goal that won an Olympic gold medal and by common agreement the sport’s best player, had just darted and glided through an hourlong practice at Joe Louis Arena ahead of the Penguins’ preseason game Sunday, looking terrific. He skated wide circles and joked with Penguins coach Dan Bylsma, defenseman Deryk Engelland and forward Joe Vitale. He skated through heavy traffic behind the net and, suffused with the abundant joy of playing shinny, sprayed snow on goalie Marc-Andre Fleury. Crosby, 24, seemed ready to play hockey in earnest. But there was his black helmet, the only one among the Penguins’ white helmets, designating that Crosby was not to be hit. He is still not ready.

Fighting a concussion Afterward Crosby sat in the cinder block confines of the visitors’ dressing room, talking about his long recovery from the concussion that has kept him sidelined him since January, saying there is no way he can even consult his doctors about being cleared for contact in practice until at least a week after the season starts in Vancouver on Thursday. “It’s going great, but at this point I just want to make sure that things keep going well,” Crosby said, indicating just how far he still has to go. “Even being lightly involved in scrimmages, it’s different, it takes a little more energy. Just trying to get used to all that. You have to learn that stuff again.” Crosby’s earliest conceivable return to play would be mid-October, but will almost certainly be later, perhaps much later. As he and Penguins general manager Ray Shero said Saturday, there is “no date” for his return. But ever since Crosby went out, his injury has animated a discussion that was already under way about head trauma in hockey, the team sport that trails only football for frequency of concussions. The discussion — including Crosby’s own pointed advocacy of stronger rules governing checks to the head — has been ubiquitous in hockey circles.

New rules A few feet away from where Crosby was speaking, Matt Cooke, suspended five times since January 2009 for boarding and illegal checks to the head, was talking about the adjustments he is finding difficult but necessary to make under the

D5

JIM LITKE

There’s very little interest in watching NBA play chicken

I

Gene J. Puskar / The Associated Press

Pittsburgh Penguins’ Sidney Crosby, left, skates with Matt Cooke during the first day of NHL hockey training camp on Sept. 17. The NHL season begins on Thursday.

new, more stringent rules. “I never, ever thought of things that I think of now when I’m going in to make a hit,” Cooke said about his effort to relearn the game and avoid a long-term suspension for his next offense. “My thought process is completely different. Now there’s just too much risk. A situation that looks harmless can go bad so quick. I’ve made a lot of changes.” Down the hallway, a Penguins team official spoke with reporters about a recent essay by Ken Dryden, the Hall of Fame goalie and chronicler of the game, that has become required reading around the league. Dryden, writing on the website Grantland, called on NHL Commissioner Gary Bettman to lead a complete “head smart” rethinking of the game to bring down the number of concussions. “The common explanations,” Dryden wrote of hits to the head, “‘Because he deserved it’ or ‘Because I can’ — are not good enough in this age of concussions and dementia.” Such ideas, and the rapid evolution of the league office under its strict new on-ice disciplinarian, Brendan Shanahan, are attributable in large part to reaction to Crosby’s injury. Shanahan, now enforcing rules that penalize most contact to the head, has said he is open to a discussion in which all head contact would be banned for 2012-13. Such a statement would have been unthinkable from an NHL official just a handful of years ago. “As we evolve, we learn more and more about head trauma and brain trauma,” Shanahan said in an interview with CBC on Saturday. “We’re definitely very serious about making advancements

Style Continued from D1 A specified amount of time after the game ends, the bus leaves to return riders to the same Central Oregon pickup spots from which they departed hours earlier. The Oregon bus, for example, always leaves Autzen 40 minutes after the game clock expires, according to Gow. (See “If you go” for pricing, dates and reservation information. Advance registration is required.) “It’s so nice being able to come home and sleep in your own bed and wake up and have all of Sunday,” says Gow, 30, who graduated from the University of Oregon in 2003 with a business degree and is president of the Central Oregon chapter of the UO Alumni Association.

and studying blows to the head.” Crosby’s concussion resulted from two hits: the first a glancing blow to the head from Washington’s David Steckel on Jan. 1, the second from being hit into the boards by Tampa Bay’s Victor Hedman on Jan. 5. For the next several months, he was bothered by headaches, dizziness, problems with balance and sensitivity to light. Crosby said he talks with doctors monitoring his recovery “every few days.” He will be with the team in Vancouver, he said, but he will not play. Other NHL players are trying to return from long-term concussions. Toronto’s Matt Lombardi was cleared for contact last week after being sidelined for almost a year. St. Louis’ David Perron, out since November, announced last week that he would begin light workouts with the team. Colorado’s Peter Mueller, sidelined for one year until returning to action this preseason, is wearing a special helmet with extra padding, but remains somewhat skeptical. “Let’s be real: If you want to take out hits to the head, why are we wearing ‘Terminator’-sized shoulder pads?” Mueller told reporters in Denver. On the ice here, during a stretch of mucking along the corner boards, Crosby was looking down at the puck with his back turned to defenseman Alexandre Picard. Picard would have shoved any other player up against the boards, but he refrained from hitting Crosby — he simply stood behind him while Crosby continued to dig. “You see him out there, and he’s in a jostling mode, basically,” Shero said of Crosby. “He’s participated in every part of camp except intrasquad games and ex-

In the case of the Oregon bus, charter service will be offered for all five of the Ducks’ Pac-12 home games this season, starting with California this Thursday. The Beaver bus will carry riders to Corvallis for contests on Oct. 15 (Brigham Young) and Nov. 19 (Washington). For the Nov. 26 Civil War game against Oregon in Eugene, the Beaver bus will take riders to Autzen Stadium. “The folks that I have talked to said that (the bus is) a great experience,” says Carol Connolly, president of the Central Oregon Beaver Athletic Student Fund. “It provides a great service to Central Oregon, especially during … the later months of football season when the roads become bad. It’s a great alternative for those who don’t like to drive over the mountain pass or maybe can’t

hibition games. Knock on wood, everything’s progressing for him.”

A greater good? In the dressing room, Crosby was asked whether his concussion might have served a greater good because of the awareness it raised. “It was already starting to become a topic,” Crosby said, referring to some high-profile hits that put concussions on the NHL’s agenda. “And then a lot of other guys after me got concussions, so I think that was just kind of a snowball effect.” Crosby said he had seen players adjust the way they play because of the new rules, and the increased awareness of how serious head injuries can be. “I’ve seen a lot of examples of guys pulling up who have seen numbers,” he said, meaning the numbers on the back of a player about to be checked. “Last night I saw Cookie coming around the net, and one of the defensemen was turned the other way, and he saw his numbers, and he let up and bumped him. Could’ve hit him pretty good, would’ve been blind side. He showed some pretty good control to let up.” Cookie is Crosby’s teammate Cooke. At least one of the highprofile concussions that preceded Crosby’s was delivered by Cooke, whose 2010 head shot on Boston’s Marc Savard, ruled legal at the time, led to the first round of rule-tightening by the NHL. League executives, physical players like Cooke, commentators and fans all seem to be coming around to Crosby’s way of thinking about a new kind of hockey. But it may still be some time before Crosby gets to play it.

drive at night.” Jeannie Adkisson, a Bend resident and a Ducks season-ticket holder, says that sometimes she and her husband, Scott, take their motor home to games in Eugene. But they also have ridden the Oregon bus about four or five times since Gow got the service up and running in 2009. They typically ride the bus later in the season and to attend night games. “I like the camaraderie of the other fans and talking football or talking about family,” Adkisson, 55, says of the bus-ride experience. “It feels to me like I’m with friends when we ride over. By the time you get there, you’re kind of a big group of Bend Duck fans. And I like that. I like going into the stadium all revved up and ready to roll.” Besides being enjoyable, the ser-

t’s about time the wristbands came off in the NBA lockout. Losing money will put anyone in a bad mood, and that begins in earnest this week unless the league’s players and owners agree to a new contract. With the Nov. 1 start to the regular season threatened, labor talks that have been simmering for months finally picked up some sizzle — overheated Miami star Dwayne Wade reportedly yelled at Commissioner David Stern across the bargaining table at one point — only to fizzle just as quickly. Heading into the weekend, the commissioner was at his stern best, warning of “enormous consequences” unless real progress was made. Coming out of it, though, he sounded like Yogi Berra: “We’re not near anything, but wherever that is, we’re closer than we were before.” After meetings broke up Monday, when training camps were supposed to open, both sides suggested today could be the big day. “We can only say we’re running out of time so many times,” deputy commissioner Adam Silver said. The notion that things don’t get interesting in the NBA until the fourth quarter could be tested in a way the league’s players and owners did not envision. Fans have been paying precious little attention to the lockout until now and more than a few of them won’t care that a week’s worth of preseason games already have swirled down the drain. As it is, too many NBA fans don’t tune into the regular season with any regularity until the jockeying for playoff spots gets serious. Players have been staging exhibition games here and there throughout the summer, churning out enough highlight clips to keep hard-core hoops fans content, and they may have to make do with little else. The 5,000 or so tickets available for Saturday’s planned South Florida All-Star Classic — essentially a charity pickup game being hosted by the Miami Heat trio of Wade, LeBron James and Chris Bosh at Florida International University, with appearances by a few of their superstar friends — sold out in only two hours. But think back to last season, when James’ defection from Cleveland to Miami made just about every Heat game a sellout, wherever they played. Even with a new labor deal already in place, the NBA wasn’t going to generate that kind of momentum-building start to the season. But there’s zero interest in watching wealthy players and wealthier owners play chicken. The league’s owners dug in their heels, claiming they lost a combined $300 million last year and need to end a salary structure that with its soft cap and guaranteed contracts resembles baseball’s system. That may turn out to be a relevant example, as baseball’s owners didn’t get the cost-certainty they shut down the 1994 season to get, but they got all the ill will that fans accumulated after staying away from the ballparks. It turned out to be a lose-lose situation — complicated further by a decade of “supersized” players — that MLB needed years to recover from. The NBA similarly tested fans’ patience by sacrificing the first half of the 1998-99 season to labor wars, but they appear more than willing to let history repeat itself. Those who remember that fiasco have good reason to dread the next few days. Players returned from their furlough out of sorts as well as shape. Some straggled in late after wriggling out of commitments to overseas teams. Scoring and shooting percentages were down across the board; turnovers were up. More than a few games were difficult to watch. About the only consolation this time around is that between the exhibition games and all the videos they’ve made demonstrating they’re working out, the players will be in better shape whenever they actually get around to real games. The bigger question is whether the fans will still care enough by then to notice, or whether, like baseball’s fans, they’ll bear a grudge. Real harm will be felt first by the people who eke out a living on game days — vendors, ushers and parking lot attendants — and soon enough start rippling up the scale. “We’re going to continue to work at this until we can either figure it out in a way that will spare us all a lot of collateral damage and games missed, or not,” players association president Derek Fisher of the Lakers said, “but we’re going to put the effort and the time in as we have been doing and see if we can come to a resolution.” Stay tuned. Jim Litke is a national sports columnist for The Associated Press. Write to him at jlitke@ap.org.

vice is also cost-efficient: The fee to ride the Beaver bus is $49 per person, per game; for the Oregon bus, the cost is $45 for Duck Athletic Fund members, $50 otherwise. Plus, the buses have restrooms on board, and bring-your-own food and drink — including alcohol — is permitted. Given the alcohol allowance, only fans age 21 and older may ride the buses. However, according to a representative from Journey Coaches, the charter company that supplies the buses, can book additional alcohol-free buses on which minors are allowed if the demand exists. Riding the bus can also enhance the experience of attending a game. “It takes the stress off of worrying about having too much fun at the game and not being able to drive home, getting a hotel room,” says

Gavin Hepp, 28, who rode the Duck bus once in 2010 and plans to do so again for at least one game this season. “It makes it very carefree, and you don’t have to worry about anything.” Except, perhaps, riding with fans of the opposing team. Adkisson has vague recollections of sharing the Duck bus with some USC fans once. And a couple of years ago, some Oregon State fans took the opportunity to ride the Oregon bus to the Civil War. “I’m happy to say that all our Duck fans were super supportive and they only moderately were heckling them,” Gow recalls. “But it was actually very friendly, and I was very proud of my Duck fans.” — Reporter: 541-383-0393, amiles@ bendbulletin.com.


D6

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2011

C S   C 

C S   I B  Auto racing • Club meeting scheduled: The annual awards banquet for the Autocross Club of Central Oregon will be held Wednesday, starting at 6 p.m. at Pappy’s Pizzeria in south Bend. Drivers who earned the highest number of season championship points during the club’s competitive events will be honored. During the meeting, the club will also conduct planning for the upcoming 2011 Oregon Shootout Invitational — which will be staged Oct. 15 and 16 in Coburg, near Eugene — and elect officers for 2012. Those interested in serving as club officers or nominating prospective officers are encouraged to attend.

Miscellaneous • Kids camps on tap: Two youth sports camps are planned for next week on nonschool days at the Athletic Club of Bend. A soccer camp for boys and girls ages 6 to 10 will be held on Thursday, Oct. 13. Campers should bring a soccer ball, lunch and a swimsuit. Cost is $50 for club members for a full day of camp (9 a.m. to 3 p.m.), $60 otherwise. The cost for a half day is $27. The following day, Oct. 14, a racquetball camp for kids in elementary school and middle school will take place. Equipment will be provided, and campers should bring court shoes, lunch and a swimsuit. Cost is $54 for club members for a full day of camp (9 a.m. to 3 p.m.), $64 otherwise. The cost for a half day is $30. Registration forms are available at www.athleticclubofbend.com and at the club, 61615 Athletic Club Drive. For more information,

contact Susan Brown, 541-3225800, ext. 120.

Rugby • Roughriders win big: Cruising to a 45-7 win against the Portland Rugby Club’s B squad on Saturday at Bend’s High Desert Middle School, the Bend Rugby Club upped its season record to 4-1 overall and 2-0 in the Pacific Northwest Rugby Football Union Division III standings. Ryan Brown led the Roughriders with three tries and two conversions. Mike Hunter added two tries and three conversions, while Ben Becker and Mic Dunston added a try apiece for Bend. This Saturday, the Roughriders will play host to the Oregon Sports Union B squad. The match begins at 1 p.m. at High Desert Middle School.

Skiing • Central Oregon skiers receive national recognition: Two nordic skiers from Bend, Max Millslagle and Emily Hyde, have been selected for the Elite Developmental Pipeline of the United States Ski Team. A total of 73 skiers were chosen for the pipeline, ranging from 14-year-old junior skiers to world championship medalists and Olympians. Millslagle and Hyde, who ski for the Mt. Bachelor Sports Education Foundation, recently attended a national talent camp in Sun Valley, Idaho, where they trained with about four dozen other elite junior skiers under the guidance of members of the U.S. Ski Team coaching staff. — Bulletin staff reports

COMMUNITY SPORTS SCOREBOARD BOWLING

RUNNING

League Standings and High Scores Lava Lanes, Bend Sept. 19-25 Casino Fun — Pin Crazy; Ray Camacho, 278/731; Krystal Highsmith, 182/527. His And Hers — Fire Dancers; Josh Williams, 280/616; Carolyn Wirth, 213/563. Guys And Gals — The Weakest Link; Ray Smith, 226/597; Michelle Smith, 247/646. Early Risers — Banana Splits, Edie Roebuck, 195/519. Rejects — Two And Two; Vic Johnson, 215/597; Lois Gruver, 214/540. Lava Lanes Classic — Dirty Pony’s; Jayme Dahlke, 245/689; Amy Anderson, 198/519. Wednesday Inc — At Your Site Storage; Richie Carr, 280/689; Jarel Wilhelmsen, 264/707. Tea Timers — Split Ends; Shari Hamel, 237/625. Afternoon Delight — Team 5; Leo Hernandez, 193/542; Shauna Larsen, 189/542. Latecomers — High Country Disposal; Pam Sloan, 183/479. TNT — Top Notch Talent; Andrew Walters, 289/781; Deanna Olsen, 223/578. Progressive — Hills Horseshoeing; J.J. Lassan, 224/617. Free Breathers — Limp-n-Along; Cecil Mann, 257/709; Sue Snedden, 192/509. T.G.I.F. — Shock and Awe; Steve Wilson, 289/740; Deanna Olsen, 253/663.

Bend Marathon Oct. 1, Bend Marathon 1, Scott Wolfe, Bend, 2:59:32. 2, Sean Meissner, Sisters, 3:13:58. 3, Tony White, Redmond, 3:19:42. 4, Sabine Pullins, Fort Lewis, Wash., 3:21:26. 5, Ashley Nordell, Sisters, 3:27:57. 6, Scott Gatherum, Corvallis, 3:29:23. 7, David Robinson, Bend, 3:35:29. 8, Kean Mihata, Page, Ariz., 3:37:07. 9, Amee Koch, Bend, 3:47:43. 10, Tim Carpenter, Redmond, 3:47:49. 11, Matt Franke, Redmond, 3:48:10. 12, Tony Massie, Sisters, 3:49:27. 13, Shon Rae, Bend, 3:52:58. 14, Kyle Harbick, Sisters, 3:58:52. 15, Terri Libert, Eugene, 4:00:51. 16, Joe Bruner, Bend, 4:04:20. 17, Milton Scholl, Portland, 4:06:33. 18, Wendy Gibson, Portland, 4:13:11. 19, Brian Louchis, Clayton, Calif., 4:13:26. 20, Casey Somsel, Welches, 4:13:32. 21, Rebecca Newman, Welches, 4:14:19. 22, Kathy Lein, Bend, 4:14:25. 23, Suzanne Wolfenden, Bend, 4:18:12. 24, Sean Rodgers, Sweet Home, 4:19:35. 25, Kyle Dimond, Sweet Home, 4:20:19. 26, Katie Banks, Bend, 4:20:25. 27, Bob Reininger, Bend, 4:21:42. 28, Moises Lucero, Eugene, 4:21:42. 29, Jackie Debruler, Bothell, Wash., 4:22:09. 30, Kim Dinan, Portland, 4:24:52. 31, Lindsay Dance, Portland, 4:24:53. 32, Clint Coleman, Corvallis, 4:25:33. 33, Belit Stockfleth, Gresham, 4:25:34. 34, Todd Debruler, Bothell, Wash., 4:26:10. 35, Elizabeth Scanlon, Portland, 4:27:07. 36, Leilani Smith, Bothell, Wash., 4:27:41. 37, Joe Gould, Portland, 4:28:18. 38, Ty Hurl, Silverton, 4:29:27. 39, Eric Canady, Bend, 4:30:51. 40, Jessica Smith, Bend, 4:33:33. 41, John Allen, Bend, 4:41:51. 42, Cynthia Brown, Bend, 4:42:23. 43, Samuel Corliss, Bend, 4:48:29. 44, Beth Bagley, Bend, 4:50:16. 45, Julie Presas, Columbus, Ohio, 4:51:02. 46, Donna Hournon, Ellensburg, Wash., 4:51:45. 47, Michael Afentoulis, Portland, 4:51:52. 48, Jen Hammond, Bend, 4:55:00. 49, Kimberlee Johnson, Bend, 4:55:35. 50, Christopher Taylor, Tuolumne, Calif., 4:55:36. 51, Kiana Berrey, Corvallis, 4:56:15. 52, Albert Vanderhoeven, Bend, 4:56:17. 53, Bob Jordan, Lake Oswego, 4:58:23. 54, Dana Pabst, Jacksonville, 5:03:07. 55, Irlan Hebner, Los Angeles, 5:05:32. 56, Robert Sanchez, Bend, 5:06:08. 57, James Scheer, Vancouver, Wash., 5:08:06. 58, Jonathan Starr, Bend, 5:11:37. 59, Jeff Mudrow, Klamath Falls, 5:13:55. 60, Laura Kantor, Bend, 5:17:57. 61, Jana Boitz, Portland, 5:18:58. 62, Gary Voorhies, Eugene, 5:22:02. 63, Heather Romito, Eugene, 5:22:02. 64, Don Adrian, Donnelly, Idaho, 5:23:21. 65, Chris Hasselman, Aloha, 5:26:40. 66, Anne Farrell, Bend, 5:26:49. 67, Arden Dettwyler, Bend, 5:28:44. 68, Michael Widler, Redmond, 5:28:51. 69, Sara Rufener, Bend, 5:33:30. 70, Laural Lee Pond, Portland, 5:35:11. 71, Cyndie Merten, Corvallis, 5:35:18. 72, Jessica Zibnack, Bend, 5:44:28. 73, Aleta Fullenwider, Portland, 6:01:10. 74, Tiffany Tucker, Portland, 6:02:17. 75, Sarah Szabo, Gladstone, 6:09:19. 76, Lenora James, Bend, 6:29:53. 77, Cindy McGrath, Bend, 6:31:33. 78, Heather Baeckel, Portland, 7:29:22. 79, Rayna Rogowsky, Portland, 7:29:22. Half marathon 1, Chris Manfredi, Bend, 1:25:50. 2, Matt Weisbard, Portland, 1:30:09. 3, Greg Gibson, Eugene, 1:33:45. 4, Michael Allen, Hillsboro, 1:37:02. 5, Dru Carpenter, Redmond, 1:38:28. 6, Timothy Hahn II, Spokane, Wash., 1:43:58. 7, Brian Massie, Gresham, 1:46:22. 8, Eric Foussat, Bend, 1:46:47. 9, Elizabeth Thompson, Redmond, 1:49:17. 10, Steve Walters, Beaverton, 1:49:31. 11, Trina Grube, Bend, 1:49:47. 12, Emily Armstrong, Portland, 1:51:21. 13, Shellie Heggenberger, Bend, 1:51:51. 14, Stavros Kalafatis, Portland, 1:54:52. 15, Leann Gurney, Albany, 1:54:56. 16, Adrian Murphy, Bend, 1:56:10. 17, Gina Lucero, Eugene, 1:56:26. 18, Stephanie Christie, Salinas, Calif., 1:57:49. 19, Dave Bridgeman, Cle Elum, Wash., 1:58:24. 20, Scott Wallace, Bend, 1:58:50. 21, Catalina Conger, Bend, 1:59:24. 22, Karen Tonsfeldt, Portland, 2:02:03. 23, Jared Matson, Bellevue, Wash., 2:03:20. 24, Karen Mello, Bend, 2:04:23. 25, Sara Hobin, Bend, 2:05:02. 26, Sunny Bliss, Bend, 2:05:02. 27, Meghan Matson, Bellevue, Wash., 2:05:48. 28, Laura Lopez, Medford, 2:06:02. 29, Ron Lopez, Medford, 2:06:02. 30, Jerry Williams, Bend, 2:07:31. 31, Katie Brandow, Bend, 2:08:13. 32, Alexandra Lykins, Portland, 2:09:16. 33, Kevin Bauer, Redmond, 2:09:27. 34, Kathryn Greisen, Portland, 2:09:33. 35, Megan Gibson, Scottsdale, Ariz., 2:11:00. 36, Erin Bartsch, Pendleton, 2:12:09. 37, Charles Owen, Bend, 2:12:51. 38, Lola Hagman, Madras, 2:13:07. 39, Ella Jewell, Eugene, 2:13:19. 40, April Meissner, Aberdeen, Wash., 2:18:51. 41, Raymond Colliver, Calgary, Alberta, Canada, 2:19:17. 42, Alyssa Cassavant, Beaverton, 2:20:08. 43, Lesley Nelson, 2:20:51. 44, Steve Yost, Clatskanie, 2:20:58. 45, Jacoba Aldersebaes, Warren, 2:22:00. 46, Molly Mayes, Sisters, 2:22:09. 47, Sam Jewell, Eugene, 2:26:53. 48, William Sharp, Eugene, 2:26:54. 49, Sarah Holtzclaw, Bend, 2:28:13. 50, Jean Hestley, Portland, 2:28:13. 51, Sandi Hull, Sisters, 2:30:14. 52, Juliette Oase, Beaverton, 2:33:51. 53, Shanti Murphy, Bend, 2:33:51. 54, Beth McCann, Bend, 2:36:39. 55, Angela Jordan, Bend, 2:37:39. 56, Erin Bevando, Bend, 2:43:46. 57, Margie McGreevy, Sunriver, 2:43:46. 58, Charlotte Brady, Bend, 2:44:34. 59, Linda Cronk, Terrebonne, 2:46:38. 60, Jennifer Warner, Bend, 2:47:21. 61, Steven Koski, Bend, 2:47:22. 62, Heidi Bauer, Redmond, 2:51:00. 63, Bruce Koch, Vida, 2:54:19. 64, Laurie Swenson, 3:18:23. 65, Angela Keeling-Garcia, Covington, Wash., 3:38:16. 66, Kale Garcia, Covington, Wash., 3:38:16.

Rimrock Lanes, Prineville Week 3 Team Standings 1, Edwards Ins. 2, Mchams. 3, Two-Steppers. 4, Band-Aids. 5, Left Overs. 6, Right Stuff. 7, Low Rollers. 8, Remax. Top Scores Scratch game: Band-Aids, 704. Scratch series: Band-Aids, 2,005. Handicap game: Band-Aids, 987. Handicap series: Band-Aids, 2,854. Men Scratch game: Robert Johnson, 205. Scratch series: Robert Johnson, 536. Handicap game: Leonard Zierlein and Robert Johnson, 276. Handicap series: John Hammer Sr, 772. Women Scratch game: Joyce Lee, 214. Scratch series, Joyce Lee, 580. Handicap game: Joyce Lee, 303. Handicap series: Joyce Lee, 847.

CYCLING Cyclocross Cross Crusade Oct. 2, Portland Central Oregon finishers Men Category A 8, Brennan Wodtli. 13, Damian Schmitt. 18, Matt Fox. 37, Bruce Cole-Baker. 39, Brian Jorgensen. 60, Colin Dunlap. 63, Gabriel Linn. Category B 17, Matt Hickey. 23, Chuck Meyer. 52, Nathan Hilmer. 59, Brent Mattison. Category 3 5, Sean Eslinger. Masters 35+ A 1, Andrew Sargent. 11, Matt Williams. 12, Tim Jones. 15, John Rollert. 17, Mike Brown. 30, Doug LaPlaca. 38, Sean Haidet. 39, Wade Miller. 40, Robert Uetrecht. 65, Doug Smith. Masters 35+ B 7, Seth Graham. 8, Darren Smith. 12, Todd Sprague. 35, Robert DeClerk. 44, Rob Angelo. 57, Scott Peterson. 81, David Sjogren. 91, Drew Holmes. 99, Ryan Altman. Masters 35+ C 31, Bradley Pfeiffer. 52, Juan Ramirez. 54, Rob Kerr. 76, David Anderson. 150, Mike Taylor. 151, Tim Beard. 155, Colonel Reynolds. Masters 50+ 14, Gary Klingler. 15, Doug Smith. 23, Doug Perrin. 31, Dan Davis. 33, Rich Wolf. Masters 60+ 2, Don Leet. 5, Ralph Tolli. 6, Amory Cheney. Clydesdale 2, David Taylor. 10, Matthew Lasala. Juniors 2, Lance Haidet. 5, Dawson Stallings. 7, Javier Colton. 9, Mitchell Stevens. 21, Keenan Reynolds. 32, Zach Colton. 39, Jake Perrin. Women A 3, Serena Bishop Gordon. 4, Heather Clark. 5, Brenna Lopez-Otero. 25, Lindsay Kandra. B 20, Aimee Furber. Masters 35+ A 3, Renee Scott. 16, Gina Miller. Masters 35+ B 3, Mary Ramos. 15, Kate Dunning. 29, Cary Schwarz. Masters 45+ 4, Karen Kenlan. 13, Cary Schwartz. Beginners 21, Holly Pfeiffer. 55, Amber Linn. 58, Meaghan Bull. 67, Amy Mitchell. Juniors 8, Ivy Taylor. Singlespeed 17, Steven Chapruka. 25, Cole Sprague. 39, Mark Campbell. 60, Jeff Merwin. 65, Sean Wilson. 67, Kevin Ziemke. 111, Henry Abel.

Please email Community Sports event information to sports@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� on our website at bendbulletin.com. Items are published on a space-availability basis, and should be submitted at least 10 days before the event.

BASEBALL BEND ELKS FALL BALL PROGRAM: For players ages 14-18; workouts on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays in October; 3:30 p.m.; $279; 541-312-9259 or www.bendelks.com.

BASKETBALL SUMMIT GIRLS BASKETBALL CLINIC: For girls in grades three through eight; Sundays, Oct. 9-23; 4-6 p.m.; Summit High School, Bend; skills clinic to get ready for COBO/ Bend Park & Recreation District season; $25; ryan. cruz@bend.k12.or.us. COBO OCTOBER SKILLS CAMP: Sundays, Oct. 9-23; 6-8 p.m.; Summit High School, Bend; $40 for all three sessions or $15 for individual sessions; 541-6104626; jdfrazier@gmail.com. ADULT OPEN GYM: Age 18 and older; Mondays and Wednesdays, through Dec. 14; 7-9:30 p.m.; Obsidian Middle School; $3 drop-in fee; 541-5487275; www.raprd.org. BITTY BALL: For boys and girls kindergarten through second grade; all games and practices on Saturdays, Nov. 5-Dec. 17 (except Nov. 26); Sky View Middle School, Bend; focus on skills, teamwork and fun; play will be 5 vs. 5 on a short court with 8-foot baskets; $42 park district residents, $56 otherwise; register at www.bendparksandrec.org or in person at park district office, 799 S.W. Columbia St.; 541-389-7275.

BIKING MOUNTAIN AND ROAD BIKE RIDES: Join Trinity Bikes in Redmond Mondays or Wednesdays for evening rides; road bike ride from shop on Mondays and mountain bike ride at Peterson Ridge in Sisters or Phil’s Trail complex in Bend on Wednesdays; all riding levels welcome; bring own bike or rent from the shop; Trinity Bikes; 541-9235650; www.trinitybikes.com.

HIKING HIKING THE OCHOCO MOUNTAINS: COCC Community Learning program; starts with one classroom session at COCC, 5:30-7:30 p.m. today; field sessions, featuring hikes ranging from 7 to 10 miles, set for 9 a.m.-3 p.m. on three consecutive Sundays, Oct. 9, 16 and 23; to register or for more information, call 541-383-7270 or go to http://noncredit.cocc.edu/. ADULT DAY HIKE: Age 18 and older; Wednesday; Chimney Rock; 10:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m.; participants should carry backpacks with water, sack lunch and sunscreen; transportation provided from RAPRD Activity Center in Redmond; $22; 541-5487275; www.raprd.org. MUSHROOM HIKE: Sunday; 9 a.m.; Marion Fork; with Linda Gilpin, a mushroom identification expert from COCC; $35; register by Friday; 541-383-8077; strideon@ silverstriders.com.

HORSES TRAIL COURSE PRACTICE: Saturday, Oct. 15; 10 a.m.- 3 p.m. at the posse clubhouse, 65432 Deschutes Pleasant Ridge Road, east of U.S. Highway 97 and north of Deschutes Market Road; includes acres of obstacles set into natural terrain and numerous man-made challenges; $15 per horse to ride all day; Sandra Tow; 541-610-2484.

MISC. FILM SCREENING: “One for the Road� ski film; Wednesday; 8 p.m.; Tower Theatre, Bend; $13; www. tetongravity.com/tour. OLD SCHOOL P.E.: Dodge ball, kickball, floor hockey, tug of war and other P.E. and recess favorite games; Tuesdays, through Oct. 25; 6:30-7:45 p.m.; Bend Fieldhouse; $35 district residents, $47 otherwise; www.bendparksandrec.org. KIDS SPORTS CAMPS: Soccer, Thursday, Oct. 13, kids 6-10; $27-$60; racquetball, Friday, Oct. 14, kids in elementary and middle schools; $30$64; Susan Brown; 541322-5800, ext. 120; www. athleticclubofbend.com.

FLAG FOOTBALL CAMP: For boys and girls in grades two through five; Thursday and Friday, Oct. 13-14; 8:3011:30 a.m.; Bend Fieldhouse; $40 district residents, $54 otherwise; 541-389-7275; www.bendparksandrec.org. SPORTS CONDITIONING LECTURE: “Sport Conditioning & Fitness Considerations for the Aging Athlete� by physical therapist and fitness authority Peter H. Mollo, 7 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 20; at Redmond Athletic Club, 1717 N.E. Second St.; for more information, call 541-504-2350 or visit www.reboundoregon.com. LITTLE TUMBLERS: Ages 2-4; Thursdays, Oct. 6-27; introduction to fundamental tumbling skills with parental assistance; 11-11:30 a.m.; $22; RAPRD Activity Center, Redmond; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org. MARTIAL ARTS SEMINAR: With Brazilian jiujitsu instructor Marcelo Alonso; 6-9 p.m. on Friday, Oct. 21, and 9 a.m.-noon on Saturday, Oct. 22; $50 for one day or $80 for both; High Desert Martial Arts, Bend; 541-647-1220; www. bendhighdesertmartialarts.com. ACROVISION TAEKWONDO: For those age 6 and up; Tuesdays and Thursdays, Oct. 4-27; 7-8 p.m. at the RAPRD Activity Center in Redmond; students will train in a complete martial arts system; uniforms are required and will be available for purchase; $69; 541-548-7275 or www.raprd.org. FENCING: Elementary foil; ages 11-adult; Tuesdays, Oct. 4-Nov. 22; 6:30-8 p.m.; training provided by Fencibles in Bend; 6:30-8 p.m.; $85; 541548-7275; www.raprd.org. BEND TABLE TENNIS CLUB: Evening play Mondays; 6-9 p.m. (setup 30 minutes prior); beginner classes available, cost is $60; at Boys & Girls Club of Bend, 500 N.W. Wall St.; drop-in fee, $5 for adults, $3 for youths and seniors; Jeff at 541-480-2834; Don at 541-3180890; Sean at 267-614-6477; bendtabletennis@yahoo.com; www.bendtabletennis.com.

PADDLING KAYAKING: For all ages; weekly classes and open pool; equipment provided to those who preregister, first come, first served otherwise; Sundays, 4-6 p.m., Cascade Swim Center, Redmond; $3; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org.

PICKLEBALL BEND PICKLEBALL CLUB: Multiple options for play each week in a number of locations with the club; go to oregonhighdesertpickleball. blogspot.com or email bendpickleballclub@ hotmail.com for details.

RUNNING COCC BOBCAT CROSS-COUNTRY TEAM: Meets start in early October; new and returning students interested in competing on the team during the fall should contact coach Matt Plummer at mplummer@cocc.edu or director of sports Bill Douglass at bdouglass @cocc.edu. FALL FUN SCAVENGER RUNS: Thursdays, Oct. 6 and Oct. 27; 6 p.m.; team scavenging competition; raffle prizes; refreshments; registration required; www. footzonebend.com. FOOTZONE GIRLS NIGHT OUT: Thursday, Oct. 13; 6:30-9 p.m.; FootZone of Bend; $5 ticket good for champagne, wine, chocolates and cheeses, and entry into a prize raffle; free chair massage; discount off running and casual apparel; Q-and-A session on clothing and winter running; proceeds benefit the Bend-La Pine Schools Education Foundation; limited to first 150 tickets, which are available at FootZone, 845 N.W. Wall St. in downtown Bend. I MADE THE GRADE FITNESS RUN AND WALK: 5K trail run/walk and kids run/walk to top of Ochoco State Scenic Viewpoint ; Saturday, Oct. 29; Rebound Physical Therapy, Prineville; 9:30 a.m.; $15 adults, $10 kids; 541-416-7476. LORD’S ACRE RUN/WALK: 10K run and 5K run/walk; Saturday, Nov. 5; 9 a.m.; Powell Butte; $15$35; Dave Pickhardt; 541-9773493; pickhardt5@yahoo.com. PERFORMANCE RUNNING GROUP: 5:30 p.m. on Tuesdays; with Max King; locations will vary; max@footzonebend. com; 541-317-3568. ASK THE EXPERTS: first four Tuesdays of each month; 6 p.m.; at FootZone; informal, drop-in Q-and-A session with a physical therapist; individual attention dependent on the number of attendees; teague@ footzonebend; 541-317-3568.

LEARN TO RUN ALUMNI RUNNING GROUP: Wednesdays, 5:30 p.m.; meet at FootZone; easy, supportive and informal midweek running group; caters to slower paces and walk/runners; free; marybel@footzonebend. com; 541-317-3568. WEEKLY RUNS: 6 p.m. Wednesdays, at Fleet Feet Sports Bend, 1320 N.W. Galveston Ave.; 3 to 5 miles; two groups, different paces; 541-389-1601. YOGA FOR RUNNERS: Wednesdays at 7 p.m.; at Fleet Feet Sports Bend, 1320 N.W. Galveston Ave.; $5 per session or $50 for 12 sessions; focuses on strengthening and lengthening muscles and preventing running injuries; 541-389-1601. WEEKLY RUNS: 8 a.m. on Saturdays at Drake Park in Bend; location and run to be determinded at the park; free; runsmts@gmail.com.

SCUBA DIVING WHAT’S BREWING?: With Walt Bolton; discussion of Bolton’s scuba diving adventures around the planet; Wednesday; 7 a.m.; Meadow Lakes Restaurant, Prineville. BASIC BEGINNER SCUBA CLASSES: Central Oregon Scuba Academy at Cascade Swim Center in Redmond, ongoing. Scuba certification available for adults and kids age 12 and older; refresher and dive industry career classes for certified divers; cost varies; Rick Conners, 541-312-2727 or 541-287-2727.

SNOW SPORTS BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY NORDIC FALL TRAINING: Ages 14-23; development program to prepare for upcoming ski season; rollerskiing, hiking, running, bounding, strength and agility exercises; TuesdaysSaturdays through Nov. 20; Ben Husaby; 541-678-3864. BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY NORDIC FALL LADIES: Tuesdays through Nov. 8; 9:15 a.m.; coached dryland training sessions to prepare for cross-country ski season; all ages and abilities; $125; Ben Husaby; 541-678-3864; www. bendenduranceacademy.org. ALPINE AND NORDIC SKI TRAINING: Sport-specific training class to improve muscular and aerobic fitness; Tuesdays and Thursdays, through Nov. 10; 5:30-6:45 p.m.; Athletic Club of Bend; $9.50 if paid in full or $12 drop-in for members, $12.50 if paid in full or $15 drop-in for nonmembers; registration required; 541-3068448; timothypgibbons@yahoo. com; www.athleticclubofbend. com/default.aspx. MBSEF SKYLINERS WINTER SPORTS SWAP: Saturday, Oct. 15; 8 a.m.-5 p.m.; Mt. Bachelor Bus Barn, 115 S.W. Columbia Avenue, Bend; gear check-in on Thursday and Friday, Oct. 13-14. MT. BACHELOR SPORTS EDUCATION FOUNDATION FREERIDE SKI AND SNOWBOARD PROGRAMS: Fall dryland training now through November, ages 11-18; freeride snowboard full-time training, ages 1319, mid-November through mid-April; freeride skiing and snowboard competition training, ages 10-19; December through March; freeride ski and snowboard development training; ages 8-14; January to midMarch; 541-388-0002; mbsef@ mbsef.org; www.mbsef.org. MT. BACHELOR SPORTS

EDUCATION FOUNDATION NORDIC SKIING PROGRAMS: Fall dryland training now through November; ages 11-18; youth nordic ski SYP training, ages 7-11, January through mid-March, free winter and spring break camps; youth nordic ski race training for middle school skiers, ages 11-14; midNovember through mid-March, free winter and spring break camps; full-time and high school nordic ski race training, ages 14-19; mid-November through March; 541-388-0002; mbsef@ mbsef.org; www.mbsef.org.

SOCCER PEE WEE SOCCER: Ages 3-5; dribbling, passing, scrimmages; shin guards and gym shoes recommended (no cleats on indoor court surface); Wednesdays, Oct. 5-19; 1111:30 a.m. or 11:45 a.m.- 12:15 p.m.; $15; RAPRD Activity Center, Redmond; 541-5487275; www.raprd.org. SOCCER OPEN PLAY (ADULT): Age 14 and older; no cleats, but shinguards required; $7; Friday nights; coed 7-8:30 p.m., men 8:30-10 p.m.; Cascade Indoor Soccer, Bend; 541-330-1183; callie@cascadeindoorsoccer.com; www.cascadeindoorsports.com.

SWIMMING PRE-COMP KIDS: Grades 1-8: advanced swim-lesson program that serves as a feeder for Cascade Aquatic Club; children must be able to swim one length of crawl stroke with side breathing and one length of backstroke in a level position; Tuesdays and Thursdays, Oct. 4Nov. 3; 5:30-6:15 p.m.; Cascade Swim Center, Redmond; $28.80; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org. SPRINGBOARD DIVING: For participants of all ages and abilities who can swim at least one length of the pool; Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, Oct. 17-28; 7:25-8:25 p.m.; Cascade Swim Center, Redmond; $19.20; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org. ADULT SWIM LESSONS: Age 18 and older; learn to build confidence, basic water adjustment skills, enhance technique and swim laps; Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, Oct. 24-Nov. 11; 5:30-6:15 p.m.; $32; Cascade Swim Center, Redmond; 541548-7275; www.raprd.org.

VOLLEYBALL BEND PARK & RECREATION DISTRICT/BEND HIGH SCHOOL VOLLEYBALL CAMP: For girls in grades three through eight; instruction by Bend High School coaches, Friday, Oct. 14 (noschool day), Pilot Butte Middle School; 8:30-11:30 a.m., grades three through five; noon-3 p.m., grades six through eight; participants should bring knee pads and water bottle; $22 park district residents, $30 otherwise; www.bendparksandrec.org.

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MEMORIAL

In our effort to provide dental care to children in Deschutes County who can’t afford it, the Kemple Memorial Children’s Dental Clinic wishes to thank the following dentists for their volunteered services in August. DENTISTS THAT VOLUNTEERED AT KEMPLE CLINIC

Dr. Duke Aldridge DENTISTS WHO PROVIDED SERVICES IN THEIR OWN OFFICES

Dr. Susan Armstrong Dr. Scot Burgess Dr. Robert Burnside Dr. David Cauble Dr. Blake Drew Dr. Greg Everson Dr. Phillippe Freeman Dr. David Fuller Dr. Rex Gibson Dr. David Gobeille Dr. Brad Hester Dr. Dennis Holly Dr. Brad Johnson

Dr. Jeff Johnson Dr. Emine Loxley Dr. Casey O’Neil Dr. Catherine Quas Dr. Daniel Radatti Dr. Thomas Rheuben Dr. Brian Rosenzweig Dr. Ken Shirtcliff Dr. Blair Struble Dr. Andrew Timm Dr. Jeff Timm Dr. Ryan Timm

At the Kemple Memorial Children’s Dental Clinic, our mission is to improve the health and well-being of children in Deschutes County by facilitating urgent dental services for children (K-12) whose families cannot access basic dental care.


COMMUNITYLIFE

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TV/Movies, E2 Calendar, E3 Horoscope, E3 Comics, E4-5 Puzzles, E5

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2011

www.bendbulletin.com/community

Goodall’s captive audience • Primatologist to speak at local Chimps Inc. benefit By David Jasper The Bulletin

Submitted photo

Primatologist Jane Goodall will speak about conservation and chimpanzees Saturday at the Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center in Redmond.

Renowned primatologist Jane Goodall will visit Redmond on Saturday to speak about conservation issues and her chimpanzee research over 50 years at Gombe, Tanzania. The event (see “If you go”) is a benefit for the Jane Goodall Institute and the nonprofit Chimps Inc., a Tumalo

YOUR PETS

sanctuary for captive chimpanzees, in its 16th year of operation. Perhaps the most famous of Goodall’s discoveries at Gombe: the fact that chimps can make and use tools; prior, it was believed humans were the only species with a knack for invention. “It was hard for me to believe,” she told The Guardian newspaper in 2010. See Goodall / E6

If you go What: Dr. Jane Goodall When: 1:30 p.m. Saturday Where: Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond Cost: $35, $20 students and seniors, $75 preferred seating Contact: www.chimps-inc.org or 541-548-2711

PETS

Little calf Brama delivers big hello Say hello to Brama, a 3-month-old miniature Zebu calf. The Zebu breed is among the smallest cattle breeds and was developed in India. Brama is about 24 inches tall and weighs about 25 pounds. He lives in Bend with his mother and other Zebu cattle, several Ibizan hounds and owner Dean O’Neal. Brama loves to run around his mom and tries to get her to run with him. To submit a photo for publication, email a highresolution image along with your animal’s name, age and species or breed, your name, age, city of residence and contact information, and a few words about what makes your pet special. Send photos to pets@bendbulletin.com, drop them off at 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. in Bend, or mail them to The Bulletin Pets section, P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708. Contact: 541-383-0358.

BIRDS on the brain

Tarah retrieves a “bumper” while working with her owner, trainer Doug Koellermeier at his home in Bend. Ryan Brennecke The Bulletin

Submitted photo

ADOPT ME Lady will be your running buddy Meet Lady, a female pointer mix. She came to the shelter as a stray over a year ago. Lady is a great dog that seems to get overlooked. She is very athletic, seemingly with endless energy and stamina. A marathon runner or someone who is looking for a running partner would find a great one in Lady. She looks forward to long runs with volunteers, and when the weather is bad she is trained to get on the treadmill and would run half the day if you let her. Lady is spayed, current on vaccinations and available for adoption at the Humane Society of Redmond. If you’d like to meet Lady or any other animal available for adoption at the Humane Society of Redmond, visit 1355 N.E. Hemlock Ave. Contact: 541-923-0882.

Submitted photo

Parents welcome to autism forum The Autism Society of Oregon will host its fall conference at the Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center on Friday. Online registration ends at 5 p.m. today. Walk-ins are also welcome. The conference is called “Life Planning: Tools, Suggestions and Perspectives.” It will focus on the transitions people with autism make into their teen years and beyond. The conference is designed for parents, students, educators and other interested parties and will focus on how to help prepare for the transitions of middle and high school and adulthood. There will be four break-out sessions on person-centered planning, effective transitions from middle to high school, transition services, and an overview of the system for those receiving adult support services. The conference will also include two panels — one with parents of adults with autism and another featuring adults who are on the autism spectrum. Cost is $35 for parents, $5 plus two cans of food for students, $75 for professionals. Canned food will be donated to the Oregon Food Bank. Half-day prices are also available. Some scholarships are available. Contact: www .oregonautism.com or info@oregon autism.com or 888-AUTISM1.

Local dietitian’s book available

• Longtime trainers share the making of a good bird-hunting dog By Tom Olsen For The Bulletin

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t’s bird hunting season on the High Desert. Once again, hunters and their dogs take to the fields in the time-honored effort to place some savory game on the dinner table. Bird dogs find, flush and retrieve downed game for the hunter. The two basic types of bird dogs are pointers, which are trained to locate and point at the game without flushing it, and retrievers, which find and then flush the game on command. Both types of gun dogs retrieve downed birds. So how do the dogs know what to do? Bird dogs have been bred for hundreds of years to sharpen their hunting instincts, but instinct alone is not enough. They must also be trained into their partnership with the hunter, often by professionals who know the breeds intimately. Two of Central Oregon’s pre-eminent bird-dog trainers agree on the fundamental principles of training bird dogs but differ on many of the details. Tim Curry, owner of Central Oregon Sporting Dogs of Tumalo, is the only Orvis-certified bird dog trainer in the Pacific Northwest and specializes in training pointers, particularly his own purebred German shorthairs. Doug Koellermeier owns Tarah Kennels of Bend and judged retriever field trials for the American Kennel Club and hunting tests for the North American Hunting Retriever Association for more than 20 years before he decided to focus exclusively on breeding and training his purebred Labrador retrievers in 2009. And just what makes a good bird dog? See Training / E6

SPOTLIGHT

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Dog trainer Tim Curry watches a pointer, Legend, left, looking at a bird while a yellow lab, Goose, flushes the bird out of a trap hidden in the grass.

Ryan Brennecke /The Bulletin

Doug Koellermeier, posing with several of his dogs, has been training retrievers for more than 30 years.

Lori Brizee, a local dietitian, will be available to sell, answer questions about and sign copies of her new book, “Healthy Choices, Healthy Children: A Guide to Raising Fit, Happy Kids,” at two upcoming events. The first will be at 6 p.m. Thursday at Barnes & Noble Booksellers, in The Forum at 2690 N.E. Highway 20, Bend. The second will be from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Monday at the Athletic Club of Bend, 61615 Athletic Club Drive, and will include a presentation about nutrition for kids and prevention of obesity and disordered eating, plus light appetizers by Scanlon’s. The book, by Brizee with Sue Schumann Warner, is aimed at parents who worry about how to raise kids who make good nutritional choices. “Healthy Choices, Healthy Children” includes tips, recipes, questions and answers. Brizee is a registered dietitian and certified specialist in pediatric nutrition. She works in private practice with patients of all ages. — From staff reports


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THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2011

TV & M

‘American Horror Story’ gets its freak on

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FOR TUESDAY, OCT. 4

TV SPOTLIGHT

RISE OF THE PLANET OF THE APES (PG-13) 12:50, 3:55, 6:50, 9:20 WHAT’S YOUR NUMBER? (R) 1:40, 4:35, 7:20, 9:55

BEND

“American Horror Story,� 10 p.m. Wednesday, FX

Regal Pilot Butte 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend, 541-382-6347

By Chuck Barney Contra Costa Times

“American Horror Story,� a very scary and wickedly erotic freak show from the producers of “Glee,� is the kind of series that you’ll watch while peeping through your fingers — if you dare to watch at all. And no, that wasn’t a misprint. Ryan Murphy and Brad Falchuk, the same guys who inject the sunshiny sweetness into “Glee,� have indeed gone all dark and perverse on us for this “psychosexual thriller� about a family living in a haunted house. It doesn’t make sense until you recall that they also created the dark and perverse “Nip/Tuck.� Apparently, this is what they mean by writing from different sides of the brain. “American Horror Story� is about the Harmons, a messedup little family of three. There’s Ben (Dylan McDermott), a psychiatrist, his wife Vivien (Connie Britton), and their misfit teen daughter Violet (Taissa Farmiga). They’ve had a rough go of it lately. Vivien caught Ben doing the nasty with one of his students not long after Viv suffered a horrible miscarriage. As you might expect, their relationship has become as cold as graveyard dirt. Meanwhile, Violet has taken to cutting herself. Seeking a fresh start, the Harmons move from Boston to Los Angeles, where they settle into a stately old Victorian. The house is a real bargain because, well, a murder-suicide went down there — and possibly some other ghastly stuff as well. Never known for their subtlety, Murphy and Falchuk bolt into overkill mode, cramming the pilot with an array

CONTAGION (PG-13) 2:20, 4:50, 7:10 THE GUARD (R) 2:50, 5:20, 7:40 THE HELP (PG-13) 2, 6:40 LIFE, ABOVE ALL (PG-13) 2:10, 4:40, 7:20 MIDNIGHT IN PARIS (PG-13) 2:30, 5, 7:30 MONEYBALL (PG-13) 2:40, 7 Ann Johansson / New York Times News Service

Brad Falchuk and Ryan Murphy, creators of “American Horror Story,� team up on the new series following a family who have moved into a Gothic mansion and must deal with infidelity.

Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend, 541-382-6347

of odd characters and weird plot devices. A creepy neighbor (deliciously played by Jessica Lange) shows up out of the blue. So does a creepy old housekeeper (Frances Conroy). Then there’s a creepy psychotic teen (Evan Peters), who has morbid thoughts and wears a T-shirt that says, “Normal People Scare Me.� (Actually, he scares the heck out of me). And if that’s not enough bad juju, we eventually meet an older guy (Denis O’Hare) with a mangled face and brain cancer who claims to have killed his family in the Harmon house. It doesn’t take long, of course, for all hell to break loose. Something very terrifying (an evil spirit?) makes its presence known in the basement. There’s also a bit of kinky sex involving a rubber fetish suit (Don’t ask). And then, the Harmons are plagued by crazy visions. For example, when Ben gazes at the housekeeper, he doesn’t see a wrinkly old lady, but a smokin’ hot, garter-snapping young redhead with lustful urges. Soon, your brain starts

to throb as you wonder just what is real and what isn’t. Yes, it’s one hot mess of a show and some horrified viewers will run for their lives. Others, however, will find themselves absolutely spellbound by all the sudden jolts, the visual verve and shivery thrills. And let’s give Murphy and Falchuk some credit. Despite their penchant for excess, this isn’t a slasher-fest fueled by rampant blood lust. No limbs are lopped off (Not yet, at least). Much of the “horror� in the show is instead derived from the tension created by the Harmons’ existential struggles. It’s disturbing and unnerving. Of course, these producers have been known to get reckless, often weaving plot lines that careen out of control and taking things to pointlessly provocative extremes.

50/50 (R) 1:45, 4:55, 7:40, 10:25 ABDUCTION (PG-13) 12:10, 3, 4:25, 6:15, 9, 10:05 CONTAGION (PG-13) 12:30, 3:05, 6:45, 9:15 COURAGEOUS (PG-13) 12:40, 3:35, 6:30, 9:25 THE DEBT (R) 1:30, 7:30 DOLPHIN TALE (PG-13) Noon, 3:45, 7, 9:40 DOLPHIN TALE 3-D (PG-13) 1:10, 4:15, 7:35, 10:10 DREAM HOUSE (PG-13) 1:20, 4:10, 6:35, 9:05 DRIVE (R) 1:55, 4:45, 7:55, 10:20 THE HELP (PG-13) 12:05, 3:15, 6:20, 9:45 I DON’T KNOW HOW SHE DOES IT (PG-13) 1, 4, 7:15, 9:35 KILLER ELITE (R) 2, 5:05, 7:50, 10:30 MONEYBALL (PG-13) 12:20, 3:25, 7:10, 10:15

EDITOR’S NOTES • Open-captioned showtimes are bold. • There may be an additional fee for 3-D movies.

McMenamins Old St. Francis School 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend, 541-330-8562

MONEYBALL (PG-13) 6:30

FRIENDS WITH BENEFITS (R) 9 CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE FIRST AVENGER (PG-13) 6 After 7 p.m., shows are 21 and older only. Younger than 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.

MADRAS Madras Cinema 5 1101 S.W. U.S. Highway 97, Madras, 541-475-3505

ABDUCTION (PG-13) 4:50, 7:05 COURAGEOUS (PG-13) 4, 6:40 DOLPHIN TALE 3-D (PG) 6:35 DOLPHIN TALE (PG) 4:05 KILLER ELITE (R) 4:10, 6:35 WHAT’S YOUR NUMBER (R) 4:50, 7:10

REDMOND Redmond Cinemas 1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond, 541-548-8777

ABDUCTION (PG-13) 4:30, 6:45, 9 DOLPHIN TALE (PG-13) 4:15, 6:45, 9:15 THE HELP (PG-13) 5:30, 8:30 WHAT’S YOUR NUMBER (R) 4:15, 6:30, 8:45

SISTERS Sisters Movie House 720 Desperado Court, Sisters, 541-549-8800

CONTAGION (PG-13) 7 THE DEBT (R) 6:45 DOLPHIN TALE (PG) 6:30

PRINEVILLE Pine Theater 214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

THE HELP (PG-13) 4, 7:30 DOLPHIN TALE (UPSTAIRS — PG13) 6 Pine Theater’s upstairs screening room has limited accessibility. Weekly Arts & Entertainment Inside

Every Friday

desertorthopedics.com

Bob Schumacher 541.280.9147 www.schumacherconstructioninc.com

Bend Redmond 541.388.2333 541.548.9159

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BD-Bend/Redmond/Sisters/Black Butte (Digital); PM-Prineville/Madras; SR-Sunriver; L-La Pine; * Sports programming may vary

TUESDAY PRIME TIME 10/4/11 BROADCAST/CABLE CHANNELS

BD PM SR L ^ KATU KTVZ % % % % KBNZ & KOHD ) ) ) ) KFXO * ` ` ` KOAB _ # _ # ( KGW KTVZDT2 , _ # / OPBPL 175 173

5:00

5:30

KATU News News News KEZI 9 News The Simpsons Electric Comp. News That ’70s Show Christina Cooks

World News Nightly News Evening News World News The Simpsons Fetch! With Ruff Nightly News That ’70s Show Lidia’s Italy ‘G’

6:00

6:30

KATU News at 6 (N) ’ Ă… NewsChannel 21 at 6 (N) Ă… Access H. Old Christine KEZI 9 News KEZI 9 News Two/Half Men Two/Half Men This Old House Business Rpt. News News ’Til Death ‘PG’ King of Queens Doc Martin ’ ‘PG’ Ă…

7:00

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Jeopardy! ‘G’ Wheel Fortune Jeopardy! ‘G’ Wheel Fortune How I Met 30 Rock ’ ‘14’ Entertainment The Insider ‘PG’ Big Bang Big Bang PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Ă… Live at 7 (N) Inside Edition Seinfeld ‘PG’ Seinfeld ‘PG’ Weaving Worlds ‘G’ Ă… (DVS)

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Dancing With the Stars (N) ‘PG’ Dancing With the Stars (N) ‘PG’ (10:01) Body of Proof Missing ‘14’ The Biggest Loser Contestants get an NFL-style workout. (N) ’ ‘PG’ Parenthood (N) ’ ‘PG’ Ă… NCIS The Penelope Papers ‘PG’ NCIS: Los Angeles (N) ’ ‘14’ Unforgettable (N) ’ ‘14’ Ă… Dancing With the Stars (N) ‘PG’ Dancing With the Stars (N) ‘PG’ (10:01) Body of Proof Missing ‘14’ Glee Asian F (N) ’ ‘14’ Ă… (9:01) New Girl Raising Hope News TMZ (N) ’ ‘PG’ History Detectives ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Prohibition (N) ’ (PA Part 3 of 3) ‘PG’ Ă… (DVS) The Biggest Loser Contestants get an NFL-style workout. (N) ’ ‘PG’ Parenthood (N) ’ ‘PG’ Ă… 90210 Let the Games Begin ‘14’ Ringer (N) ’ ‘14’ Ă… Cops ‘14’ Ă… ’Til Death ‘14’ Latinos ’08 ’ ‘PG’ Ă… World News Tavis Smiley (N) Charlie Rose (N) ’ Ă…

11:00

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KATU News (11:35) Nightline News Jay Leno News Letterman KEZI 9 News (11:35) Nightline Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ In the Life ‘PG’ In the Life ‘PG’ News Jay Leno King of Queens South Park ‘14’ PBS NewsHour ’ Ă…

BASIC CABLE CHANNELS

A&E AMC ANPL BRAVO CMT CNBC CNN COM COTV CSPAN DIS DISC E! ESPN ESPN2 ESPNC ESPNN FAM FNC FOOD FX HGTV HIST LIFE MSNBC MTV NICK OWN ROOT SPIKE SYFY TBN TBS TCM TLC TNT TOON TRAV TVLND USA VH1

Family Jewels Gene Simmons Family Jewels Gene Simmons Family Jewels Gene Simmons Family Jewels Gene Simmons Family Jewels (N) Gene Simmons Family Jewels Gene Simmons Family Jewels 130 28 18 32 Family Jewels (3:00) “Single › “Cold Creek Manorâ€? (2003, Suspense) Dennis Quaid, Sharon Stone, Stephen Dorff. An ex-con ››› “The Othersâ€? (2001, Suspense) Nicole Kidman, Christopher Eccleston, Alakina Mann. A ››› “The Othersâ€? (2001, Suspense) Nicole Kidman, 102 40 39 White Femaleâ€? plagues a family in their new mansion. Ă… devout woman believes ghosts inhabit her darkened island mansion. Christopher Eccleston, Alakina Mann. The Blue Planet Open Ocean ‘G’ Wild Amazon ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Polar Bear: Spy on the Ice ‘PG’ Viking Wilderness (N) ’ ‘PG’ Viking Wilderness (N) ’ ‘PG’ Polar Bear: Spy on the Ice ‘PG’ 68 50 26 38 Blue Planet: Seas of Life ’ ‘G’ The Rachel Zoe Project ‘14’ The Rachel Zoe Project ‘14’ Real Housewives/Beverly The Rachel Zoe Project ‘14’ (9:01) The Rachel Zoe Project (N) Mad Fashion (N) Fashion Hunters (11:01) The Rachel Zoe Project 137 44 Extreme Makeover: Home Edition Extreme Makeover: Home Edition ›› “Hidalgoâ€? (2004) Viggo Mortensen. A Westerner races a horse across the Arabian desert. ’ Trick My Truck Trick My Truck 190 32 42 53 Nanny 911 Maid-like mother. ‘PG’ 60 Minutes on CNBC American Greed Richard Scrushy. Mad Money 60 Minutes on CNBC American Greed Richard Scrushy. Sexy Face Paid Program 51 36 40 52 The Truth About Shoplifting Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 Ă… OutFront Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 Ă… Anderson Cooper 360 Ă… 52 38 35 48 Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Ă… South Park ‘14’ Daily Show Colbert Report 30 Rock ‘PG’ 30 Rock ‘PG’ Workaholics Tosh.0 ‘14’ Tosh.0 ‘14’ Tosh.0 ‘14’ Tosh.0 (N) Ă… Workaholics (N) Daily Show Colbert Report 135 53 135 47 Always Sunny Desert The Yoga Show The Yoga Show Get Outdoors Redmond City Council Epic Conditions Word Travels Paid Program Visions of NW Ride Guide ‘14’ Girls HS Soccer 11 Capitol Hill Hearings 58 20 12 11 Capitol Hill Hearings A.N.T. Farm ‘G’ Shake It Up! ‘G’ Good-Charlie So Random! ‘G’ Good-Charlie A.N.T. Farm ‘G’ ››› “Halloweentown Highâ€? (2004) ‘G’ Ă… So Random! ‘G’ Good-Charlie A.N.T. Farm ‘G’ My Babysitter 87 43 14 39 Phineas, Ferb Cash Cab ‘G’ Auction Kings Auction Kings Dirty Jobs ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Auction Kings Auction Kings Auction Kings Auction Kings Carfellas ‘PG’ Carfellas ‘PG’ Auction Kings Auction Kings 156 21 16 37 Cash Cab ‘G’ (4:00) “Mean Girls 2â€? (2011) ‘PG’ E! Special ‘PG’ E! Special ‘PG’ E! News (N) Sex & the City Sex & the City Dirty Soap Starting Over ‘PG’ Dirty Soap All My Family ‘PG’ Chelsea Lately E! News 136 25 2011 World Series of Poker 2011 World Series of Poker SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… 21 23 22 23 Renee (N) NFL Live (N) Ă… SportsCenter Football Live Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) Ă… NFL Live Ă… 2011 World Series of Poker 22 24 21 24 MLS Soccer Los Angeles Galaxy at New York Red Bulls (N) (Live) Golf Ă… 1984 British Open Film Ă… Golf Ă… AWA Wrestling Ă… Boxing Boxing: Camacho-Sigurani 23 25 123 25 Boxing: Camacho-Goossen SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. 24 63 124 203 SportsCenter ›› “The Prince & Meâ€? (2004) Julia Stiles. A collegian and a Danish prince fall in love. The 700 Club (N) ‘G’ Ă… 67 29 19 41 That ’70s Show That ’70s Show ››› “Dirty Dancingâ€? (1987, Romance) Jennifer Grey, Patrick Swayze, Jerry Orbach. Hannity (N) On Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Ă… Hannity On Record, Greta Van Susteren The Five 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Ă… Cupcake Wars Kentucky Derby Cupcake Wars Chopped Nopales, No Problem Chopped Time & Space (N) Chopped High Hopes ‘G’ 177 62 98 44 B’foot Contessa B’foot Contessa Chopped My Way ‘G’ How I Met How I Met How I Met Two/Half Men Two/Half Men ›› “I, Robotâ€? (2004, Science Fiction) Will Smith, Bridget Moynahan. Sons of Anarchy Brick (N) ‘MA’ (11:03) Sons of Anarchy ‘MA’ 131 Yard Crashers Property Virgins Property Virgins Hunters Int’l House Hunters House Hunters My First Place Property Virgins Property Virgins House Hunters Hunters Int’l Property Virgins Property Virgins 176 49 33 43 Yard Crashers Top Shot Ramp It Up ‘PG’ Ă… American Pickers ‘PG’ Ă… American Pickers Hobo Jack ‘PG’ American Pickers ‘PG’ Ă… Top Shot Stacked (N) ‘PG’ Ă… Top Shot Stacked ‘PG’ Ă… 155 42 41 36 Top Shot Tricked Out ‘PG’ Ă… Unsolved Mysteries ‘14’ Ă… Unsolved Mysteries ‘PG’ Ă… Unsolved Mysteries ‘14’ Ă… “Amanda Knox: Murder on Trial in Italyâ€? (2011) ‘14’ Ă… Beyond the Headlines: The 138 39 20 31 Cold Case Files ’ ‘PG’ Ă… The Rachel Maddow Show (N) The Ed Show (N) The Last Word The Rachel Maddow Show The Ed Show Hardball With Chris Matthews 56 59 128 51 The Last Word Teen Mom ‘PG’ Ă… Teen Mom (N) ‘PG’ Ă… Teen Mom (N) ’ Ă… 192 22 38 57 That ’70s Show That ’70s Show That ’70s Show That ’70s Show The Substitute Teen Mom Pros & Cons ’ ‘PG’ Ă… SpongeBob Victorious ‘G’ Victorious ‘G’ SpongeBob SpongeBob That ’70s Show That ’70s Show My Wife & Kids My Wife & Kids George Lopez George Lopez Friends ’ ‘PG’ Friends ’ ‘14’ 82 46 24 40 SpongeBob Dr. Phil Sleep disorders. ’ ‘PG’ Dr. Phil ’ ‘PG’ Ă… OWN Behind the Scenes Turning Point Kids Recant ’ ‘14’ Turning Point ’ ‘14’ Ă… OWN Behind the Scenes 161 103 31 103 Supersize vs Superskinny ‘PG’ Timbers in 30 Seahawks World Poker Tour: Season 9 Timbers in 30 MLS Soccer Portland Timbers at Vancouver Whitecaps FC Seahawks After-Jay Glazer The Dan Patrick Show 20 45 28* 26 UEFA Soccer 132 31 34 46 Auction Hunters Auction Hunters Auction Hunters Auction Hunters Auction Hunters Auction Hunters King of Queens King of Queens Auction Hunters Auction Hunters Repo Games ’ Repo Games ’ Repo Games ’ Repo Games ’ ››› “Starship Troopersâ€? (1997, Science Fiction) Casper Van Dien, Dina Meyer. Premiere. ››› “Serenityâ€? (2005) Ă… 133 35 133 45 Ice Spiders ‘14’ ››› “Arachnophobiaâ€? (1990, Suspense) Jeff Daniels, Harley Jane Kozak. Behind Scenes Joyce Meyer John Hagee Rod Parsley ‘G’ Praise the Lord Ă… ACLJ Life Head-On Full Flame Creflo Dollar Praise the Lord Ă… 205 60 130 MLB Baseball Milwaukee Brewers at Arizona Diamondbacks (N) ’ (Live) Ă… Inside MLB (N) Conan ‘14’ 16 27 11 28 (4:00) MLB Baseball New York Yankees at Detroit Tigers (N) ’ (Live) Ă… ››› “Knock on Any Doorâ€? (1949) Humphrey Bogart, John Derek. An attorney ››› “In a Lonely Placeâ€? (1950, Drama) Humphrey Bog- (8:45) ››› “They Live by Nightâ€? (1949) Cathy O’Donnell, Farley Granger. ›› “Born to Be Badâ€? (1950, Drama) Joan Fontaine, Rob101 44 101 29 leads the defense of a Chicago guttersnipe. Ă… art, Gloria Grahame, Frank Lovejoy. Ă… Two young lovers flee the long arm of the law. Ă… ert Ryan, Zachary Scott. Ă… Toddlers & Tiaras ’ ‘G’ Ă… Little Couple Little Couple Extreme Cou Extreme Cou 19 Kids-Count 19 Kids-Count Little Couple Little Couple Extreme Cou Extreme Cou 178 34 32 34 Ultimate Cake Off ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Bones The Bone That Blew ‘14’ Bones ’ ‘14’ Ă… Bones The Girl in the Mask ‘14’ Bones ’ ‘14’ Ă… Bones ’ ‘14’ Ă… Bones The Bond in the Boot ‘14’ 17 26 15 27 Law & Order Ego ’ ‘14’ Regular Show Wrld, Gumball Wrld, Gumball Johnny Test ’ Squirrel Looney Tunes Looney Tunes Wrld, Gumball King of the Hill King of the Hill American Dad American Dad Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ 84 Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Made/ America Made/ America Mysteries at the Museum (N) ‘PG’ Off Limits (N) ‘PG’ Ă… Bizarre Foods/Zimmern 179 51 45 42 Bourdain: No Reservations Dick Van Dyke Dick Van Dyke (7:08) The Dick Van Dyke Show Dick Van Dyke Dick Van Dyke Scrubs ’ ‘14’ Scrubs ’ ‘14’ Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond 65 47 29 35 Bonanza The Mission ‘PG’ Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU 15 30 23 30 Law & Order: SVU Basketball Wives LA ’ ‘14’ Tough Love: Miami ’ ‘PG’ Tough Love: Miami ’ ‘PG’ 100 Greatest Songs of the ’00s 100 Greatest Songs of the ’00s Pop Up Video Greatest Songs 191 48 37 54 The New Virginity ’ PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(6:20) ›› “The Forgottenâ€? 2004 Julianne Moore. ›› “Passenger 57â€? 1992 Wesley Snipes. ‘R’ Ă… ››› “Hellboyâ€? 2004, Fantasy Ron Perlman. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… › Money Train ENCR 106 401 306 401 (4:35) ›› “Under Siege 2: Dark Territoryâ€? 1995 ››› “The War of the Rosesâ€? 1989 Michael Douglas. ‘R’ Ă… ››› “Cinderella Libertyâ€? 1973, Comedy-Drama James Caan. ‘R’ Star Chamber FMC 104 204 104 120 ››› “The Verdictâ€? 1982, Drama Paul Newman, Charlotte Rampling. ‘R’ Ă… (4:30) ›› “The Legend of Drunken Masterâ€? (1994) Jackie Chan. Action Sports Strangers The Daily Habit Master Debater Thrillbillies ‘14’ Thrillbillies ‘14’ Action Sports Strangers The Daily Habit Master Debater FUEL 34 Big Break Ireland (N) Big Break Ireland Golf Central Inside PGA Big Break Ireland Feherty Golf Central Inside PGA GOLF 28 301 27 301 Feherty (N) Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ HALL 66 33 175 33 The Waltons The Hostage ‘G’ (4:30) ››› “How to Train Your (6:15) ›› “The Lost World: Jurassic Parkâ€? 1997, Adventure Jeff Goldblum. Premiere. An expedi- ›› “The A-Teamâ€? 2010, Action Liam Neeson, Bradley Cooper. Former Special The Latino List ’ ‘14’ Ă… Boardwalk EmHBO 425 501 425 501 Dragonâ€? 2010 ’ ‘PG’ Ă… tion returns to monitor dinosaurs’ progress. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… Forces soldiers form a rogue unit. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… pire ‘MA’ Ă… Malcolm, Middle Malcolm, Middle Malcolm, Middle Malcolm, Middle Onion News Arrested Dev. Arrested Dev. Malcolm, Middle Malcolm, Middle Malcolm, Middle Onion News “Doghouseâ€? 2008 Danny Dyer. Premiere. ‘NR’ IFC 105 105 “My Big Fatâ€? (5:45) ››› “Back to the Futureâ€? 1985, Comedy Michael J. Fox. A boy travels (7:45) ››› “The Blind Sideâ€? 2009, Drama Sandra Bullock, Tim McGraw, Quinton Aaron. A well- › “I Know What You Did Last Summerâ€? 1997, Horror Jen- (11:45) Skin to MAX 400 508 508 through time to his parents’ teenage years. ’ ‘PG’ Ă… to-do white couple adopts a homeless black teen. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… nifer Love Hewitt. ’ ‘R’ Ă… the Max ‘MA’ Cowboys of the Sea: Long Haul Frontier Force (N) ‘14’ Frontier Force ‘14’ Cowboys of the Sea: Long Haul Frontier Force ‘14’ Frontier Force ‘14’ Border Wars Last Defense ‘PG’ NGC 157 157 Supah Ninjas Supah Ninjas Avatar: Air. Avatar: Air. Avatar: Air. Dragon Ball Z Supah Ninjas Supah Ninjas Odd Parents Fanboy-Chum Fanboy-Chum Dragon Ball Z Supah Ninjas NTOON 89 115 189 115 Dragon Ball Z Ted Nugent Hunt., Country Outdoors TV Wildlife Workin’ Man Hunting TV Michaels MRA Truth Hunting Wildlife Bow Madness Steve’s Outdoor Legends of Fall Trophy Quest OUTD 37 307 43 307 The Hit List (5:05) ›› “Star Trek: Nemesisâ€? 2002, Science Fiction Patrick Stewart. iTV. (7:15) “All Good Thingsâ€? 2010, Mystery Ryan Gosling. iTV Premiere. The wife Homeland Pilot Carrie Mathison is Dexter Debra becomes an unexpected Homeland Pilot Carrie Mathison is SHO 500 500 Capt. Picard faces his Romulan-engineered clone. ‘PG-13’ of a New York real estate scion suddenly goes missing. ‘R’ suspicious of a hero. ‘MA’ Ă… hero. ’ ‘MA’ Ă… suspicious of a hero. ‘MA’ Ă… Dumbest Stuff GT Academy (N) My Ride Rules My Ride Rules Dumbest Stuff Dumbest Stuff GT Academy NASCAR Race Hub SPEED 35 303 125 303 My Ride Rules My Ride Rules Dumbest Stuff (5:25) › “I Know What You Did Last Summerâ€? ‘R’ (7:15) ›› “Austin Powers in Goldmemberâ€? 2002 Mike Myers. Ă… ›› “Tron: Legacyâ€? 2010, Science Fiction Jeff Bridges. ’ ‘PG’ Ă… (11:10) ›› “Little Black Bookâ€? STARZ 300 408 300 408 About Schmidt (4:30) › “Boat Tripâ€? 2003, Comedy (6:05) ›› “Creationâ€? 2009, Biography Paul Bettany. Darwin grapples with is- ›› “White Irish Drinkersâ€? 2010, Drama Nick Thurston. Premiere. A teen hopes “Fifty Dead Men Walkingâ€? 2008, Action Ben Kingsley, Jim Sturgess. A young TMC 525 525 Cuba Gooding Jr. ‘R’ sues of grief, science and faith. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… art school will be his ticket out of Brooklyn. ‘R’ man infiltrates the IRA until being exposed. ’ ‘R’ Ă… UFC Live 5: Hardy vs. Lytle Sports Talk UFC Live 5: Hardy vs. Lytle Sports Talk World of Adventure Sports ‘PG’ VS. 27 58 30 209 WEC WrekCage ‘14’ Ă… Downsized (N) ‘PG’ Ă… Downsized Run for Your Life ‘PG’ Downsized ‘PG’ Ă… Downsized ‘PG’ Ă… Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Joan & Melissa: Joan WE 143 41 174 118 Downsized ‘PG’ Ă…


TUESDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

A  & A  

Reflective wife yearns to be loved and appreciated Dear Abby: I wonder how many women feel just like me. I spent the best years of my life married to an abuser and cheater, raising three children who were my world. Now, as I approach my twilight years, I have a sick husband who needs my care and three children who are self-sufficient, successful and self-serving. I feel used by all of them. I hear from them only when they need me to baby-sit, provide a shoulder to cry on during breakups, etc. My husband is a sick old man who appears to be headed toward dementia, and I can’t find the courage to walk away. I don’t know what you can do for me because I know I’m only one of millions of women in the same position: We can’t afford a divorce; we want to remain a part of our children’s lives; yet we yearn to give our love to those who can return it and appreciate the loving, competent women we are. What are your thoughts on this? — Left Behind Dear Left Behind: Your family is not going to change. If you want change in your life, you will have to create it for yourself. Accept that you have been partly to blame for your current situation. You tolerated the abuse and cheating and focused so much attention on your children that they grew up thinking you would jump when they snapped their fingers. If you want to be appreciated, stop acting like a martyr and make yourself less available to all of them. Talk to a lawyer and find out what your options are. You may find you’re not as trapped as you think. Dear Abby: Our three grandchildren have come to live with us because their mother got mixed up with drugs and their father died. The middle boy,

C C  Please email event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� at www.bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

TODAY DEAR ABBY “Clay,� is such a picky eater, it borders on an eating disorder. He is 11, weighs 60 pounds and is skeletal to look at. We have caught him making himself vomit after we have insisted he eat something. We have tried not making a big issue about it, saving his plate for the next meal, making him sit at the table until he has eaten everything and had him see a psychologist for a year. Clay is a sweet, engaging child who has convinced two psychologists there is nothing wrong. We know this is the way he has some control over his life, but we are fearful for his health and happiness. We have tried counseling in this community of limited mental health resources. Any suggestions? — In a Food Fight In Arkansas Dear In A Food Fight: Yes. Stop turning mealtime into a battleground. Take Clay back to his pediatrician and find out whether or not his physical development falls into the range of normal. Explain that the boy is living on protein, starches and carbs and ask what supplemental vitamins he should take for his health. So far, all you have accomplished has been to make your grandson associate mealtime with punishment, and that isn’t conducive to anyone’s health and happiness — not his and not yours. If the doctor says Clay is developing normally, then accept it, as well as the advice of the two psychologists. If he isn’t, consult an expert in eating disorders. — Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 9006.

Horoscope: Happy Birthday for Tuesday, Oct. 4, 2011 By Jacqueline Bigar This year, you could experience considerable stress but not be aware of the impact of that tension. Stop, slow down and become more aware of yourself and your reactions. Don’t let negativity or defeatism get the best of you. Your good intentions often go to extremes, and you find yourself overindulging. Sometimes you seem to lack self-discipline, yet other times you are very rigid about what must be done. Opt for a balance. If you are single, meeting someone could cause extra stress. Only you can determine if this is worthwhile. If you are attached, share more of your feelings with your loved one. Once you share more, you will tend to swing less from one side of the pendulum to the other. Be careful with CAPRICORN. They often test your endurance. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH Your ability to communicate what is relative could fall to the wayside right now. You could try to communicate with a different attitude, but that procedure might not work. Just be indulgent and understanding, as you are not the only person with this issue. Tonight: Energizing a little late. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHHH Keep heading in your chosen direction. You might have a lot to accomplish. What is dependent on others might be best left for another day, another moment. Think positively, understanding your liabilities. Tonight: Try exotic! GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHHH Deal directly with a friend or loved one. You know when you have had enough, but extricating yourself might be difficult. All the creativity, savoir-faire and directness make no difference today! Tonight: A calm conversation. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHHH Let others understand what is happening behind the scenes. Realize what is needed to make a situation work. Laughter could be the outcome of an incredibly awkward moment. Hopefully the giggles occur immediately. Tonight: Say “yes.� LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH You might want to rethink a decision rather carefully, but don’t decide just yet. What you are seeing

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around you might not be reflective of what could be. Communication seems inordinately difficult. Tonight: Play it easy. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH Frustration could mark your decisions. You wonder why. Don’t focus on this issue; move along. A child or loved expresses his or her need for some friendly feedback and attention. Make the time. Tonight: Let your mind wander. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHH With confusion and changes, security remains a high priority. A domestic issue keeps popping into your mind. The wise move would be to try to handle it and stop being haunted by the situation. You do have your hands full. Tonight: Happy at home. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHH Keep communication moving. If you hit a brick wall, know that there is another path around it. Listen to your inner voice when dealing with a loved one and a potentially hurtful situation. Detach and don’t personalize. Tonight: Talking up a storm. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHH Remain sensitive to what is happening. You could find that someone is very difficult or testy in a meeting. Resist walking out; just look at this situation as a passage. The odds are against a duplication. Tonight: Treat a loved one to dinner. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHH Of all signs, you seem the most together. What others don’t see is the questioning and the processes you go through internally. An opportunity comes through a woman or someone you care about. Tonight: All smiles. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHH Listen to others and take a greater interest than in the past. Even though you don’t agree, you see validity in what someone is saying. Understand that both of you could be right, but how to honor and work with that information could be up for grabs — for now. Tonight: Vanish. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH Examine possibilities that come through a meeting. You don’t need to agree with someone. You do need to work with this person. Open up to the possibility that he or she might have a unique concept. Tonight: Hook up with your friends. Š 2011 by King Features Syndicate

GREEN TEAM MOVIE NIGHT: Featuring a screening of “Chemerical� which explores the toxicity of common household cleaners; free; 6:30-8:30 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend; 541-815-6504. THE SPEAKEASY: An open mic storytelling event; those born in the 1930s or whose parents or grandparents lived through the Depression can speak about surviving the downturn; donations accepted; 7 p.m.; Innovation Theatre Works, 1155 S.W. Division St., Bend; 541-977-5677.

WEDNESDAY “IT’S IN THE BAG� LECTURE SERIES: Julie Ann Elston presents the lecture “Bamboo Capitalism: The Economic Rise of China in the 21st Century,� which explores China’s economic prowess; free; noon-1 p.m.; OSU-Cascades Campus, Cascades Hall, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-3223100 or www.osucascades. edu/lunchtime-lectures. BEND FARMERS MARKET: Free; 3-7 p.m.; Mirror Pond parking lot, eastern end of Drake Park; 541-408-4998 or www. bendfarmersmarket.com. RAILROAD DAY CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION: Celebrate local railroad history, with games, train rides, tours, displays, reenactments and more; free; 3:30-6:30 p.m.; Art Station, 313 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-389-1813 or www. deschuteshistory.org. SPEAKNOW: High-school students compete in a spoken word competition; $3, free to participate; 7 p.m., registration at 6:30 p.m.; PoetHouse Art, 55 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-728-0756 or programs@ thenatureofwords.org. THE NORTHSTAR SESSION: The California-based roots-rock band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www. mcmenamins.com. “HARD TIMES�: Innovation Theatre Works presents an adaptation of Studs Terkel’s book about people who lived through the Great Depression; $20, $18 students and seniors, $10 ages 75 and older; 8 p.m.; Innovation Theatre Works, 1155 S.W. Division St., Bend; 541-5046721 or www.innovationtw.org. “ONE FOR THE ROAD�: A screening of the Teton Gravity Research film about snow sports athletes and their lives on the road; $13 in advance, $15 day of show; 8 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-3170700 or www.towertheatre.org.

THURSDAY CENTRAL OREGON COLLEGE FAIR: The tenth annual event showcases more than 100 higher-education institutions; free; 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-383-0527 or cplatt@bendcable.com. JOURNEY TO THE GALAPAGOS: A naturalist, biologist and physicist share perspectives and photos of the Galapagos Islands; free; 2 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-617-4663, ruthh@uoregon. edu or http://osher.uoregon.edu. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Thor Hanson talks about his book “Feathers: The Evolution of a Natural Miracle�; with a slide show; free; 5 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 422 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-526-1491. BENDFILM: The eighth annual independent film festival features films at McMenamins Old St. Francis School, the Tower Theatre, Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, Sisters Movie House and the Oxford Hotel; $175 full festival pass, $110 full film pass, individual tickets $11 in advance, $12 at the door; 6 p.m.; 541388-3378, info@bendfilm.org or www.bendfilm.org. THE NORTHSTAR SESSION: The California-based roots-rock band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www. mcmenamins.com. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Thor Hanson talks about his book “Feathers: The Evolution of a Natural Miracle�; with a slide show; free for members of museum, $5 for non-members; 7:30 p.m.; High Desert Museum,

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin file photo

An Eastern Cascades Model Railroad Club member Bob Barkman runs trains on an HO-scale track at the clubhouse last year. The club will be hosting its annual open house Saturday.

59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754. “HARD TIMES�: Innovation Theatre Works presents an adaptation of Studs Terkel’s book about people who lived through the Great Depression; $20, $18 students and seniors, $10 ages 75 and older; 8 p.m.; Innovation Theatre Works, 1155 S.W. Division St., Bend; 541504-6721 or www.innovationtw.org. THE CHANGING COLORS: The Colorado-based folk musicians perform, with Rural Demons; $5; 8 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend.

FRIDAY “THE OWL AND THE WOODPECKER� EXHIBIT OPENS: New exhibit features photographs by Paul Bannick; exhibit runs through Jan. 8; included in the price of admission; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. BENDFILM: The eighth annual independent film festival features films at McMenamins Old St. Francis School, the Tower Theatre, Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, Sisters Movie House and the Oxford Hotel; $175 full festival pass, $110 full film pass, individual tickets $11 in advance, $12 at the door; 10 a.m.11:15 p.m.; 541-388-3378, info@ bendfilm.org or www.bendfilm.org. FIRST FRIDAY GALLERY WALK: Event includes art exhibit openings, artist talks, live music, wine and food in downtown Bend and the Old Mill District; free; 5-9 p.m.; throughout Bend. VFW DINNER: A dinner of Polish sausage and sauerkraut; $7; 5 p.m.; VFW Hall, 1503 N.E. Fourth St., Bend; 541-389-0775. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Rosemarie Ostler will give a talk based on her new book “Slinging Mud: Rude Nicknames, Scurrilous Slogans, and Insulting Slang from Two Centuries of American Politics.�; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 252 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-0866. AUTHOR READINGS: Author Suzanne Burns reads from her book, “Misfits and Other Heroes�; Author Jim Churchill-Dicks will read from his book, “Beyond Telling.�; free; 7 p.m.; The Nature of Words, 224 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-647-2233. CHAMPAGNE AND ACES: A casino night, with, a silent auction, raffle, and appetizers; proceeds benefit the community center; $25; 7-10 p.m.; Bend’s Community Center, 1036 N.E. Fifth St.; 541-389-0046. HAUNTED HOUSES: Featuring three haunted houses; “Dark Intentions� and “The Haunt at Juniper Hollow� are recommended for ages 12 and older; “Distortions� 3-D haunt is all ages; proceeds benefit the Oregon Athletic & Educational Foundation; $12, $20 two haunts, $30 all haunts; 7 p.m.; old Parr Lumber buildings, 443 S.W. Evergreen Ave., Redmond; www.scaremegood.com. “BREAKING AWAY�: A screening of the PG-rated 1979 film; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541-475-3351 or www. jcld.org. “HARD TIMES�: Innovation Theatre Works presents an adaptation of Studs Terkel’s book about people who lived through the Great Depression; $25; 8 p.m.; Innovation Theatre Works, 1155 S.W. Division St., Bend; 541-504-6721 or www.

innovationtw.org. RICHIE SPICE: The reggae superstar performs, with Subliminal; $18 in advance, $20 at the door; 8 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-788-2989. POLYRHYTHMICS: The Seattlebased funk group performs; $7; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331.

SATURDAY BENDFILM: The eighth annual independent film festival features films at McMenamins Old St. Francis School, the Tower Theatre, Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, Sisters Movie House and the Oxford Hotel; $175 full festival pass, $110 full film pass, individual tickets $11 in advance, $12 at the door; 10 a.m.10:30 p.m.; 541-388-3378, info@ bendfilm.org or www.bendfilm.org. MODEL RAILROAD OPEN HOUSE: Ride an outdoor railroad and view a scale layout at the open house hosted by the Eastern Cascades Model Railroad Club and the Central Oregon Area Live Steamers; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Eastern Cascades Model Railroad Clubhouse, 21520 Modoc Lane, Bend; 541-317-1545 or www.ecmrr.org. SISTERS HARVEST FAIRE: The 36th annual event features vendors selling pottery, metal art, photography, jewelry and more; with live music, kids activity area and more; free admission; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; downtown Sisters; 541-5490251 or www.sisterscountry.com. RED DOG GOLF TOURNAMENT: A day of golf, with dinner, and auction and more; registration requested; proceeds benefit the Humane Society of Redmond; $100; noon-8 p.m.; Juniper Golf Course, 1938 S.W. Elkhorn Ave., Redmond; 541-350-7605 or http:// redmondhumane.org. WRITE NOW!: Brainstorm, play word games and more in a casual setting, to help creative writing; free; 1 p.m.; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541312-1081 or www.deschuteslibrary. org/calendar.

Self Referrals Welcome

541-706-6900

JANE GOODALL LECTURE: Primatologist and conservationist Jane Goodall speaks about her experiences in the field and reflections on conservation issues; $35, $20 students and seniors, $75 preferred; 1:30-2:30 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-548-2711 or www. chimps-inc.org. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Johan Mathiesen, author of “Mad as the Mist and Snow: Exploring Oregon Through Its Cemeteries,� talks about Oregon cemeteries; free; 3 p.m.; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-617-7050. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Rosemarie Ostler will give a talk based on her new book “Slinging Mud: Rude Nicknames, Scurrilous Slogans, and Insulting Slang from Two Centuries of American Politics.�; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 422 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-526-1491. BEND COMMUNITY CONTRADANCE: Featuring caller Ron Bell-Roemer and music by the High Country Dance Band; $7; 7 p.m. beginner’s workshop, 7:30 p.m. dance; Boys & Girls Club of Bend, 500 N.W. Wall St.; 541-330-8943. HAUNTED HOUSES: Featuring three haunted houses; “Dark Intentions� and “The Haunt at Juniper Hollow� are recommended for ages 12 and older; “Distortions� 3-D haunt is all ages; proceeds benefit the Oregon Athletic & Educational Foundation; $12, $20 two haunts, $30 all haunts; 7 p.m.; old Parr Lumber buildings, 443 S.W. Evergreen Ave., Redmond; www.scaremegood.com. TRIAGE: Local comedy improvisational troupe puts on a fun show in the style of “Whose Line is it Anyway?�; appropriate for the whole family; $5; Doors open at 7 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3890803 or www.bendimprov.com.

• Weight Loss & Weight Management • Nutritional Counseling • Hormone Balancing • Age Management

AGEWISEMD.COM 541.678.5150


E4

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2011

TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


TUESDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

BIZARRO

E5

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively.

SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

DAILY BRIDGE CLUB

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

Seeking a friendly duplicate bridge? Find five games weekly at www.bendbridge.org.

CANDORVILLE

SAFE HAVENS

LOS ANGELES TIMES DAILY CROSSWORD

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN


E6

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2011

COV ER ST OR I ES

P C GENERAL PET LOSS GROUP: Drop-in support group for anyone experiencing or anticipating the loss of a pet; free; 6-7:30 p.m. Tuesdays; Partners in Care, 2075 N.E. Wyatt Court, Bend; Sharon Myers at 541-382-5882.

DOGS BEHAVIORAL TRAINING: Cost by quotation; times by appointment; Wednesdays; Lin’s School for Dogs, 63378 Nels Anderson Road, Suite 7, Bend; Lin Neumann at 541-536-1418 or www.linsschoolfordogs.com. AKC RING-READY COACHING: Cost by quotation; times by appointment; Wednesdays; Lin’s School for Dogs, 63378 Nels Anderson Road, Suite 7, Bend; Lin Neumann at 541-536-1418 or www.linsschoolfordogs.com. CLICKER TRAINING: Solve behavior problems; 6 p.m. Wednesdays and Thursdays; Bend Pet Resort, 60909 S.E. 27th St.; Chris at 541-633-0446 or www .DeschutesRiverDogs.com. PUPPY 101: Puppies ages 8 to 13 weeks may join any week; $85; 6-7 p.m. Thursdays; Dancin’ Woofs, 63027 N.E. Lower Meadow Drive, Suite D, Bend; Mare Shey at 541-3123766 or www.dancinwoofs.com. PUPPY KINDERGARTEN CLASSES: Ongoing training, behavior and socialization classes for puppies 10 to 16 weeks; $80 for four weeks; 6:30-7:30 p.m. Thursdays; Pawsitive Experience, 65111 High Ridge Drive, Tumalo; Meredith Gage, 541-318-8459, trainingdogs123@ bendbroadband.com or www .pawsitiveexperience.com. OBEDIENCE CLASSES: Six-week, drop-in classes; $99.95; 6 and 7 p.m. Mondays, 6 and 7 p.m. Fridays, and 1 and 2 p.m. Saturdays; Petco, 3197 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; Loel Jensen at 541-382-0510. OBEDIENCE FOR AGILITY: $95; 4 p.m. Saturdays; Desert Sage Agility, 24035 Dodds Road, Bend; Stephanie Morris at 541-633-6774 or www.desertsageagility.com. PUPPY MANNERS CLASS: Social skills for puppies up to 6 months; $110 for seven-week class, cost includes materials; 6-7 p.m. Mondays; preregister; Friends for Life Dog Training, 2121 S.W. Deerhound Ave., Redmond; Dennis Fehling, 541-350-2869 or www .friendsforlifedogtraining.com. GRAB BAG CLASS: Basic manners, nose work, agility, Tellington T Touch, exerball and more; $15 per session; 6-7 p.m. Fridays; preregister; Friends for Life Dog Training, 2121 S.W. Deerhound Ave., Redmond; Dennis Fehling, 541-350-2869 or www .friendsforlifedogtraining.com. PRIVATE TRAINING: Cost by quotation; times by appointment; Friends for Life Dog Training, 2121 S.W. Deerhound Ave., Redmond; Dennis Fehling, 541-350-2869 or www .friendsforlifedogtraining.com. SATURDAY CONFIDENCE CLASS: Combination of agility, Tellington T Touch, games, and more; $15 per session; 10-11 a.m. Saturdays; Friends for Life Dog Training, 2121 S.W. Deerhound Ave., Redmond; Dennis Fehling, 541-350-2869 or www.friendsforlifedogtraining.com. PRIVATE BEHAVIORAL COUNSELING: Cost by quotation; times by appointment; Dancin’ Woofs, 63027 Lower Meadow Drive, Suite D, Bend; Mare Shey, www. dancinwoofs.com or 541-312-3766. CLICKER TRAINING: Learn tools for positive training with your dog; $135 for six weeks; Thursdays or Saturdays; call to register; Chris Waggoner, 541-633-0446; www .DeschutesRiverDogs.com.

PRIVATE TRAINING: Cost by quotation; times by appointment; Chris Waggoner, 541-633-0446; www .DeschutesRiverDogs.com. TELLINGTON TTOUCH: Learn effective relaxation techniques and positive solutions to behavior issues, bring your own mat and comfortable clothes; $15 per session; 6-7 p.m. Wednesdays; preregister; Friends for Life Dog Training, 2121 S.W. Deerhound Ave., Redmond; Dennis Fehling, 541-350-2869 or www .friendsforlifedogtraining.com. NOSE WORK: Catch dogs having fun with using their noses; $15 per session; 6-7 p.m. Fridays; preregister; Friends for Life Dog Training, 2121 S.W. Deerhound Ave., Redmond; Dennis Fehling, 541-350-2869 or www.friends forlifedogtraining.com. MUTTS ABOUT YOU: Positive methods for basic training, all age groups; $115 for five weeks; class size limited; call for class hours; The Dog Patch Boutique, info@thedogpatchboutiqueinc .com or 541-678-5640. SOLVE CHALLENGING BEHAVIOR: S.A.N.E. solutions for challenging dog behavior, private lessons; cost by quotation; times by appointment; Kathy Cascade, 541-516-8978 or kathy@ sanedogtraining.com. TELLINGTON TTOUCH: Learn tools to reduce stress and reactivity, help your dog become more confident and improve social skills; cost by quotation; times by appointment; Kathy Cascade, 541-516-8978 or kathy@sanedogtraining.com. RECALL WORKSHOP: Owner and dog course for dependable recall; $52 for four weeks; 4-5 p.m. Oct. 4; register by Oct. 3; La Pine Training Center; Diann Hecht at 541-536-2458, diannshappytails@msn.com or www.oregondoglady.com. PUPPY MANNERS: Learn good social skills with people and other puppies, basic rules and commands, two sets of vaccinations required, for puppies 10-16 weeks; $52 for four weeks; starts 1-2 p.m. Oct. 15; register by Oct. 14; La Pine Training Center; Diann Hecht at 541-536-2458, diannshappytails@msn.com or www.oregondoglady.com. DELTA SOCIETY PET PARTNERS TEAM WORKSHOP: Learn skills needed to visit safely with your animal in hospitals, nursing homes, classrooms and other facilities; $90 includes book; 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Oct. 22, 6-8 p.m. Oct. 25 and 27; register by Oct. 12; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541312-8663 or pwittnberg@cs.com.

HORSES ROLLING RANCH IN SISTERS: Open for trail-course practice and shows; $10 per horse; 69516 Hinkle Butte Drive, Sisters; Shari at 541-549-6962. TRAIL COURSE PRACTICE: Hosted by Deschutes County Sheriff’s Posse; $15 per horse; 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Oct. 15; 65432 Deschutes Pleasant Ridge Road, Bend; Sandra at 541-610-2484. OREGON TRAIL APPALOOSA HORSE CLUB: Dinner and a preview of upcoming horse events in Central Oregon; 6 p.m. Oct. 14; Jake’s Diner, 2210 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; for information visit: www.otahc .org or call 541-306-9957.

Photos by Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

ABOVE AND RIGHT: Doug Koellermeier works on basic obedience training with Elle, a 7-month-old Lab.

Training Continued from E1 Curry and Koellermeier agree: Breeding is the critical first ingredient for both pointers and retrievers. “You can’t insert instinct that isn’t there,” Curry said. “You can take an averagebred dog and make it OK, but if you want an excellent bird dog, blood lines are key.” Curry likes to breed dogs with championship blood lines going back five generations, but Koellermeier feels three generations are enough. “It’s like a person saying, ‘My great-great-great grandfather was president of the United States,’” Koellermeier said. “Great! So how much of those presidential qualities did you inherit?” Both look for the exceptional dogs in every litter. But even with five generations’ breeding, Curry says, “Out of a whole litter, two might be kennel or field trial dogs. The rest will be good family companions as well as good bird dogs.” Both agree: Dogs have unique personalities and temperaments that trainers need to consider when training them. “Bird dogs are just like people; they’re all different,” Koellermeier said. “There’s not just one way to train a dog. You need to get inside the dog’s head to see what it’s made of.” Commands for obedience training should be taught apart from commands for hunting, as the dogs may get confused and be reprimanded for the wrong action at the wrong time, both said. “We never want dogs to think birds are a bad thing,” Curry said. Food rewards are counterproductive in training bird dogs, they said. Hunters need their dogs to follow their commands in the field by sight and sound without expecting a treat every time they do their job properly.

Resources Tim Curry, Central Oregon Sporting Dogs, www. oregonsportingdog.com. Doug Koellermeier, Tarah Kennels, 541-419-7315.

expected to mentally “mark” where individual birds fall, to make multiple retrieves in a single outing and to make a “blind retrieve” guided only by the hunter’s signals when the dog doesn’t know where the bird has fallen. There has been a recent movement to train pointing retrievers, the “all in one dog,” Koellermeier says. But unless a retriever shows a natural tendency to point on its own, trying to train the dog to point is “going against the genetic make-up of that particular dog.” Curry goes even further. As a hunting-dog purist, he believes training retrievers to

Goodall Continued from E1 “I had been told from school onwards that the best definition of a human being was man the toolmaker — yet I had just watched a chimp toolmaker in action. I remember that day as vividly as if it was yesterday.” While here in Central Oregon, Goodall, who sits on the advisory board of Chimps Inc., will tour its grounds, meet with staff and board members and engage with the sanctuary’s residents, according to a press release announcing her Central Oregon visit. Chimps Inc. says it is “dedicated to overcoming exploitation and cruelty that (chimps) and other captive wild animals can face through advocacy, education, and conservation.” Its website (www.chimpsinc.org) says the Tumalo facility is providing lifetime care “free from human exploitation and abuse to seven chimpanzees and one Siberian lynx.” Better make that two lynxes. Founder Lesley Day said Monday that she was in the process of introducing a Canadian lynx to the Siberian in order to make its life a little less lonely.

— Reporter: 541-383-0349, djasper@bendbulletin.com.

But how does the training of pointers and retrievers differ? “All dogs have a ‘pause before they pounce’ instinct,” Curry said. “That’s all a point is. Some dogs (are bred to) have more than others.” “The most important command (a pointer) is ever going to learn is ‘whoa,’” Curry said, which is meant to keep the dog on point when it locates a bird until the hunter flushes it. Curry uses a “launcher,” which conceals a live pigeon in the grass that can be remotely released by the trainer. “Untrained pointers will point a bird for a certain amount of time, then rush it and flush it, which is normal,” he said. “If they keep rushing, I keep launching (as many times as it takes) until they self-train to point and hold.” This is the most intense aspect of training pointers, he said. In contrast, “sit” is single most important command to retrievers, but for essentially the same reason. It is the prelude to flushing the bird or making the retrieve. Training dogs to retrieve birds, especially waterfowl, can be extensive. Dogs can be

Andy Tullis The Bulletin

point produces a mediocre dog in both dimensions. In the end, the trainers agree: Rewards of praise and affection are much more effective than food bribes or punishment. “It’s been said there’s only one thing two bird-dog trainers can agree about and that’s that the third trainer doesn’t know what he’s talking about,” Curry said with a smile. — Reporter: tom.olsen71@gmail.com.

541-388-4418

Pick up a copy of the most comprehensive visitor’s guide in Central Oregon: • The Bulletin • Chambers of Commerce • Oregon Border Kiosks • Central Oregon Visitor’s Association • Bend Visitor and Convention Bureau • Deschutes County Expo Center • Other Points of Interest

The point is ... “It just arrived (Sunday) from Southern California, and they’re both about the same age, so we’re working on introducing them,” Day said. Staff there are moving them back and forth between separate enclosures. “We’ll switch them around like that for probably a couple of weeks, and then we’ll see how they do together,” says Day, who’s had a few opportunities to get acquainted with Jane Goodall over the years. “She’s just amazing. She’s so personable, so gracious. You’re just in awe being in the same room with her,” Day effuses. “She’s totally the most gracious woman I’ve ever known.” She’s also funny, Days says. “She’s out there giving inspirational talks, but she’s so funny when you get her by herself. She’s hysterical.” Day says Goodall’s appearance should not to be missed. She’s spoken here just once before, “she’s 77 right now, and so I don’t think this caliber of person comes to the area very often.”

Tim Curry holds a 9-week-old German shorthair puppy.

This guide features a wide variety of informative maps, points of interest, spring and summer events and recreational opportunities. The Fall/Winter edition publishes October 21 Advertising Deadline: Wednesday, October 5 Call your advertising representative today.

541-382-1811 PRESENTED BY:

IN COOPERATION WITH:


ATHOME

Food, F2-3 Home, F4

F

Garden, F5 Ask Martha, F6

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2011

www.bendbulletin.com/athome

AT THE MARKET

GARDEN

HOME

Bring autumn colors indoors By Leon Pantenburg For The Bulletin

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Parsnips.

Root, root, root for the, um ... roots? At the Market is a weekly look at produce available at local farmers markets. By Alandra Johnson The Bulletin

It’s root vegetable time! OK, maybe not everyone is as excited about the arrival of these veggies as I am, but to me, seeing parsnips, rutabagas and turnips arrive at local farmers markets is a welcome reminder about the bounty of fall. These veggies may look a little strange and may seem intimidating to cook, but get beyond the tough exterior and most are actually easy to cook and have mild flavors. Parsnips, for instance, which resemble funky white carrots, taste like mild, creamy carrots. Root vegetables can be stored for quite a while because they are so low in moisture. According to “The Science of Good Food” by David Joachim and Andrew Schloss, root vegetables should be stored in a dark area because light can cause off flavors. Root vegetables such as these are extremely nutritious and can also be comforting when cooked the right way. Parnsips can be boiled and mashed just like potatoes. Or you can cut root vegetables (be sure to include some sweet potatoes) into chunks, toss with olive oil, salt and pepper (and maybe some rosemary) and roast in the oven at 400 degrees. Remove once they are soft and you have a great side dish — a perfect colorful, healthy substitute for oven fries. — Reporter: 541-617-7860, ajohnson@bendbulletin.com

TODAY’S RECIPES • Apple-Horseradish Mayonnaise, F2 • Cory Schreiber’s Applesauce, F2 • Nectarine Salad with Haricots Verts and Cured Ham, F3 • Wild Mushroom Salad with Quinoa, Goat Cheese and Caramelized Shallot Marmalade, F3 • Caramelized Shallots, F3 • Corn and Zucchini Salad, F3 • September Salad, F3 • Grape Focaccia, F6

Photos by Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

Terrie and Jim Gattey had custom displays with custom lighting built to house all their art.

ART HOUSE The Gatteys’ collection shines in their Bend home By Penny Nakamura • For The Bulletin

T

errie Gattey jokes that some people bring baggage into a

Married seven years, Terrie and her

husband, Jim Gattey, were avid art Two custom glass chairs and a matching table offer guests a place to sit, though many visitors are afraid to try them even when assured of their sturdiness.

brought to their marriage now makes their

two things they had in common: fine art

west-side Bend home look like a private

and fine wine.

art gallery. Terrie, 63, a former high school

At its core, a sweet recollection For The Bulletin

and color” into her marriage.

Calif. The combined collection they

FOOD

By Jan Roberts-Dominguez

marriage, but she brought “art

collectors before they met in San Diego,

The first hard frosts usually signal the end of the gardening season. There may be some fall activities that will help keep some dirt under your fingernails, such as mulching, composting and attending to your irrigation system, but for the most part, that’s about it. But your garden can be a source of materials for interior and exterior decorating for the next couple of months, and the investment is minimal. Just about everything you need to make a fall wreath, centerpiece, outdoor decoration or mantle arrangement can come from your garden or nearby natural areas. Some area gardeners plant decorative gourds, squash and pumpkins with the idea of integrating them into decorative arrangements later on in the fall. “Anything with fall colors can be used for decorations,” says Cindy Lillegard, assistant retail manager at Landsystems Nursery in Bend. “You just need to look around.” Get started by putting together a kit for decorating. Some of the tools you will use include scissors, a wire cutter, a tape measure, pliers, a hot glue gun, tacks and hammer, garden clippers, floral wire, pencils and felt protector circles. If wreaths are part of your decorating plan, you’ll need a wire wreath frame, stem wire, clippers and soft, 24-gauge floral wire. If you keep these items together in a toolbox or some sort of carrier, it will be easier to work on a project later. Most of these items can be useful for many holiday decorating projects. With the tools gathered, go out into your garden or take a walk outdoors. Some of the items needed for decorations will be in your garden or landscaping, Lillegard said, and don’t overlook vegetables, which might add eye appeal to an arrangement. See Fall / F5

Jim’s pristine bachelor pad in San Diego had panoramic views of Mission Bay, and

principal, and Jim, 74, a retired labor

as a lifelong collector, he had filled his

relations lawyer, immediately found the

home with art. See Art / F4

Do you have an interesting home or garden? Is your house, condo, townhouse or apartment spectacular or unique? How about your garden or landscaping? We want to know about it. Contact us at athome@bendbulletin.com or 541-617-7860.

She trotted into our lives the summer of 1960 while my family and I were vacationing in Yosemite National Park. We called her Limpy, and, as deer go, she was beautiful — even with the limp. Nobody knew just how she had acquired the bum hip — probably from a close encounter with a tourist’s automobile, said my dad — but she seemed to get along fine in spite of the obvious discomfort. Every morning she would show up at our campsite in time for a late breakfast, and then again, right before dinner. On her first visit my cousin Bonnie and I wanted to feed her marshmallows, but our parents explained that wouldn’t be good for her. Then my brother Don and Bonnie’s brother Jim hit on carrots and apples. She took the carrots because they weren’t disagreeable and filled that empty void in her stomach, but it was the hastily cut-up chunks of apple that really tickled her fancy. See Apples / F2


F2

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2011

F

Next week: Yummy soups in a flash

Apples Continued from F1 She would take one in her mouth, roll it around until it settled toward the back where it created an unladylike bulge from within her slender cheek, and would then give it several good chomps without even a droplet of juice escaping. From that point on, we four set out to fill Limpy’s life with apples. With an old, abandoned apple orchard less than half a mile away, her meals were free for the picking, as long as the rangers didn’t catch us. None of us knew what would happen to kids caught picking apples in a national park and feeding them to wild animals, but the idea fired our young and fertile imaginations. Bonnie and I would perch high up in the branches, our eyes peeled for the law while our older brothers harvested the tiny green fruit. When a ranger car did cruise by we would freeze flat against the gnarled limbs of the 100 yearold trees, holding tight until the coast was clear. Exciting stuff. This went on for six days. Early on the morning of the seventh I awoke to the sound of hooves coming towards camp. Not just Limpy’s hooves. This sound belonged to several large animals, and when I peeked out from within my warm sleeping bag, I was startled by the sight of Limpy leading a small herd of deer that included two gangly fawns and a buck. As they approached the camp site, most of the herd hung back. But our old friend, flanked by her scampering fawns and the handsome buck, calmly walked into camp, business as usual. We took the bag of apples collected from the evening before, moved to within five feet of her and, as quietly as possible, poured them onto the ground. From the pile I took the last apple I would ever feed her and held it out. Even at arm’s length, you could smell its crisp, clean aroma. She came forward and took it, her velvety lips caressing my fingertips and palm. We all stepped away to give Limpy and her family room to feed. The fawns were too busy gawking at the spectacle of us, but her mate bowed his graceful neck and ate two or three of the offerings. Then they turned and were gone. The story is Limpy’s story. But each time it’s shared around the dinner table it’s the apple orchard scenes that are most vividly described. It wouldn’t have been nearly the adventure without that. When Yosemite Valley settlers planted their orchard, they were preparing for the future, although they couldn’t possibly have dreamed that a century later their trees would be the center of such delight for four young campers. During the last bountiful months of the year, I encourage you to celebrate the harvest. But I also want to remind you that there would be no harvest without the growers. And so, I salute them, the growers of all that’s green — and red, and yellow and purple, and beautiful, and delicious. Like the Yosemite settlers, they are stewards of the land’s ability to nurture our descendants. As we head reticently into

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Apple-Horseradish Mayonnaise can accompany a hearty meat dish such as prime rib, or, as it does above, corn and roasted pepper soup.

Freezing apples packed in syrup Put ½ cup cold medium syrup (4 cups water and 3 cups sugar) with ascorbic acid added into each pint container. Pare and core apples, then slice them directly into the syrup. Press slices down firmly and add syrup to cover the fruit. Leave about half-inch head space. It will take 1¼ to 1½ pounds of apples to yield 1 pint.

Freezing apples packed in sugar Prepare a solution of 3 tablespoons lemon juice to 1 gallon cold water. Wash, peel and core apples. Slice the apples directly into the lemon juice solution and let stand for 3 minutes. Remove the slices and place on paper towels to drain. Mix together 1 part sugar with 4 parts apples. Store slices in plastic freezer bags or rigid freezer containers. Leave half-inch head space. It will take 1¼ to 1½ pounds of apples to yield 1 pint.

Apple-Horseradish Mayonnaise

Cory Schreiber’s Applesauce Makes about 2 cups (recipe can be made in larger batches for the freezer).

I worked my way through graduate school by waitressing at a terrific steakhouse. The chef made a popular mayonnaise-based horseradish sauce for the prime rib. When I asked him about it, he told me the secret was apple sauce. Years later, I discovered that it’s a classic preparation called sauce suedoise. James Patterson discusses it in his book “Sauces.” You’ll be amazed at how easy this is to make, and I encourage you to do so. Like I said, it’s a wonderful condiment for prime rib, plus, as you’ll discover, a whole lot more, including sandwiches and hearty soups. Here’s Patterson’s method, in his own words: “Although this may sound like a bizarre juxtaposition, the combination of apple puree, mayonnaise and prepared horseradish makes an excellent sauce for cold meats, especially pork and game. It is best to use sour baking apples, such as Granny Smiths or similar tart varieties. “Prepare the apple puree by first peeling, coring and slicing the apples. Coat the sliced apples with a few drops of lemon juice to prevent them from turning brown, as well as to add a note of acidity to the finished sauce. “Cook the apples in a covered saucepan with 1 tablespoon of white wine. This may seem like a small amount of liquid, but the apples themselves will release liquid as soon as they are heated by the steaming wine. “As soon as the apples are soft, usually after about 10 minutes, puree them in a food processor or food mill. Return the puree to the saucepan, and reduce it until it is still and no liquid remains. Be careful to stir the mixture constantly with a wooden spoon and not allow it to burn. “The proportion of apple puree to mayonnaise will vary depending on the apples’ flavor; anywhere from one part apple puree and three parts good quality mayonnaise will work. (Note from Jan: do not use reduced fat mayonnaise, Miracle Whip or other “salad dressing.”) Flavor the apple mayonnaise with grated horseradish, about 1 tablespoon per cup.” (Note from Jan: I use Beaver Brand Extra Hot Horseradish, which is simply prepared grated horseradish root, and is available in the condiment aisle of most supermarkets.)

This recipe is from Portland chef and cookbook author Cory Schreiber’s wonderful cookbook, “Wildwood — Cooking from the Source in the Pacific Northwest.” He states that “Applesauce is one of my favorite toppings for pork chops or roasted game birds. Over the years, I’ve tried many different kinds of apples when making this sauce and tend to prefer the tart and firm varieties. However, this recipe leaves a lot of room for experimentation. The final flavor and consistency will vary depending on the type of apples you choose, so have fun with it.” If you have a good source for fresh, seasonal apples, consider making large batches of this wonderful sauce and storing in the freezer. And although this recipe produces a puree, I’ve also left the sauce chunky by not putting it through a blender at the end of the cooking process. 2 C apple juice ¼ C undiluted orange juice concentrate 3 whole cloves 2 TBS sugar 2 star anise pods 1 cinnamon stick

¼ tsp fennel seeds 3 lg flavorful apples, such as Braeburn, McIntosh or Golden Delicious (or a combination), peeled, cored and chopped ½ tsp vanilla extract

In a medium saucepan, combine the apple juice, orange juice concentrate, cloves, sugar, star anise, cinnamon and fennel seeds. Bring to a boil, reduce heat and simmer for about 20 minutes to reduce the liquid by half. Strain the liquid to remove the spices. Return the liquid to the pan and add the apples. Simmer for 15 minutes, or until the apples are tender. Remove from the heat and stir in the vanilla extract. Let cool. In a food processor, process the apples until they are smooth. Serve warm, or let cool and store in a covered container in the refrigerator for up to a week. For long-term storage, pack into freezer containers and freeze (for up to 12 months without the sauce suffering in quality).

fall, with the Northwest’s apple crop mirroring the tantalizing harvests of this year’s berries, peaches, peppers and so much more, take a moment to reflect on the wonder of it all. And then gather your bushel of apples and preserve their humble goodness so that this winter you can savor autumn memories as warm as a Yosemite deer. — Jan Roberts-Dominguez is a Corvallis food writer, cookbook author and artist. Contact: janrd@proaxis.com. Thinkstock

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Pickled beets loaded with sweet By Kath leen Purvis McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Are the pickled beets Q: that come in a jar good for you, or are all the nutrients gone? Any food has some nutrition, even starch-based packing peanuts. It’s a question of what kind and what fits into your diet. The nutrition analysis of commercial products, or even of homemade versions, differs widely depending on the recipe. In general, 1 cup of pickled beets has about 75 calories, 18 to 20 grams of carbohydrates and 2 grams of protein. It would also contain vitamin C, iron, magnesium, potassium, folate and manganese. Unfortunately, all of that comes with a high amount of sodium — 350 to 500 mil-

A:

ligrams, depending on the brand — and around 16 grams of sugar, about the same amount as four teaspoons of sugar. So if you eat pickled beets, keep the quantity small. What’s the best way to Q: Apples freeze apples? for pies can be A: frozen by boiling them in water for 2 minutes, then cooling them in ice water and packing them into freezer bags. You also can make apple filling to freeze: Combine about 6 pounds of peeled, cored and sliced apples with 2 cups sugar, ¼ cup flour, 1 ½ teaspoons of cinnamon and ¼ teaspoon of nutmeg. Let stand about 30 minutes, until the mixture is juicy. Add 2 tablespoons lemon juice and cook over medium heat until

thickened. Cool and package it in freezer containers and freeze. Sliced apples should be frozen in a heavy syrup of equal parts sugar and water. Add 1 teaspoon fruit protector per cup of syrup. Ladle ½ cup into each freezer container and add apple slices. Add more syrup if needed, leaving ½ inch at the top of the container. Cover, label and freeze. The easiest way to freeze apples, though, is to make applesauce. Just peel and core the apples and cook them with a little water and sugar to taste. Cook, covered, until the apples are falling apart. Mash and taste, adding more sugar if needed. Then package the sauce in freezer bags and freeze. — Submit questions at www.charlotteobserver.com/food.


TUESDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

F OOD

Arugula with heirloom melon slices, ripe figs and prosciutto makes for a tasty seasonal salad. Mark DuFrene / Contra Costa Times

Season’s greenings Fall’s produce creates robust, dazzling salads By Jackie Burrell San Jose Mercury News

The calendar may call for autumnal fare, but in many places, Indian summer has a different agenda. And our dinner tables seek a compromise. We’re not quite ready for the heartier fare of fall, but simple greens don’t cut it either. No, what we need is something transitional, a series of salads that celebrates the harvest, but offers a little more heft — arugula tossed with heirloom melon slices, prosciutto and ripe figs, for example, or last-of-theseason nectarines with haricots verts, cured ham and watermelon radishes. Salads are perfect seasonal dinner fodder any time of year, says Oakland, Calif., food writer and pastry chef Romney Steele, author of two cook-

book-memoirs about life at Big Sur and Nepenthe, the iconic restaurant owned by her family. She’s a self-described “big salad person,” because salads are all about texture, color and flavor, and offer an anything-goes palette for the palate. But great food means matching what’s on your plate to what’s in the garden, she says. In other words, leave the spring peas for April and turn instead to September’s abundant bounty. This is peak time for melons, late-season figs and wild greens. Tomatoes are bursting off the vine, and fresh herbs are abundant. So Steele combines those vibrant purples, greens and reds in a composed September Salad, adding paper-thin slices of prosciutto and drizzles of olive oil and oloroso sherry.

Nectarine Salad with Haricots Verts and Cured Ham Makes 3-4 servings ½ lb haricots verts 1 sm shallot, finely chopped ¼ C extra virgin olive oil 1 TBS sherry vinegar 2 tsp Champagne or rice wine vinegar Salt, pepper

Pinch sugar, optional Few leaves each of basil and mint, finely slivered 1 bunch watercress, rinsed and trimmed 2-3 nectarines, pitted and sliced into wedges

2 watermelon radishes, halved and thinly sliced Several thin slices cured ham, such as serrano or Niman Ranch’s Jambon Royale ¼ C Marcona almonds

Blanch the haricots verts in boiling salted water until tender to the bite, 2-3 minutes. Drain and rinse under cool water, then spread on a plate to cool. Whisk together the shallot, olive oil and vinegars; add the herbs and season with salt and pepper. Whisk in 1 tablespoon of water and a pinch of sugar, if needed, to soften the vinaigrette. Place the green beans in a bowl with the watercress, nectarines and radishes; gently toss with the vinaigrette. Arrange the salad on plates, tucking a couple of slices of ham into each. Scatter the almonds on top and serve. — Romney Steele, “Plum Gorgeous” (Andrews McMeel, 178 pages, $25)

September Salad Wild Mushroom Salad with Quinoa, Goat Cheese and Caramelized Shallot Marmalade

Makes 4-6 starter servings

Makes 4 servings ½ lb cremini mushrooms, thinly sliced ½ lb oyster mushrooms, coarsely chopped 3 shiitake mushrooms, stemmed, halved and thinly sliced crosswise ½ C plus 2 TBS extra virgin olive oil ¼ C balsamic vinegar 2 tsp finely chopped fresh thyme

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Place mushrooms in a roasting pan, toss with 2 tablespoons olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Roast, stirring a few times, until golden brown, 25 minutes. Whisk together the remaining ½ cup oil, vinegar, thyme and parsley. Season with salt and pepper. Reserve 3 tablespoons of the vinaigrette. Add the warm mushrooms to remaining vinaigrette, season with salt and pepper, and stir to combine. Let marinate at room temperature for at least 30 minutes. Rinse the quinoa in a fine-mesh strainer under cold running water for 1 minute. Drain well. Transfer to a medium saucepan. Add 2 cups cold water and 1 teaspoon salt; cover and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to low; cook until quinoa is tender and water has evaporated, 18 minutes. Turn off heat and let stand for 10 minutes, without lifting the cover. Stir quinoa into the marinated mushrooms. Toss the greens with the reserved vinaigrette. Divide among 4 large plates. Top with the quinoa-mushroom salad. Drizzle with truffle oil, if using, season with pepper and garnish with parsley leaves. Spread some of the caramelized shallots over the toasted bread. Top with a slice of cheese. Place 3 around the perimeter of each plate.

Caramelized Shallots 1 TBS butter 1 TBS olive oil 8 lg shallots, thinly sliced 2 TBS light muscovado sugar

1 ripe heirloom melon 1 ⁄3 lb thinly sliced prosciutto 8-12 ripe figs, halved Handful of arugula leaves Opal basil leaves Spearmint leaves Handful of almonds, sliced and lightly toasted ½ C vine-ripened cherry tomatoes ¼ C oloroso sherry (see note below) Extra virgin olive oil Coarse sea salt Freshly ground black pepper

¼ C finely chopped flat-leaf parsley Kosher salt, black pepper 1 C quinoa 4 oz mesclun greens 2 tsp white truffle oil, optional Caramelized shallots (see below) 12 ¼-inch slices French baguette, toasted 6 oz log aged goat cheese, cut into 12 slices

½ C red wine vinegar 2 tsp finely chopped fresh thyme Kosher salt, black pepper

Melt butter with oil in a saute pan over medium heat. Add shallots and cook, stirring occasionally, until softened and golden brown, 20-25 minutes. Add sugar and vinegar; cook until the mixture becomes jam-like, about 15 minutes. (If it gets too thick, stir in a tablespoon or so of water.) Add thyme and season with salt and pepper. Let cool to room temperature. Will keep for 2 days in a tightly sealed container in the refrigerator. — Bobby Flay, “Bobby Flay’s Bar Americain Cookbook” (Clarkson Potter, 262 pages, $35)

Corn and Zucchini Salad Makes 6-8 servings 5 ears corn, shucked 1 TBS unsalted butter 2 C zucchini, cut in ¼-inch dice ½ tsp kosher salt ¼ C finely chopped red onion

1½ TBS apple cider vinegar 2 TBS extra virgin olive oil ½ tsp ground black pepper ½ C chopped fresh cilantro or basil

Prepare a large bowl of ice water and set aside. Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Add the corn to the boiling water, cover and remove from heat. Let stand 3-5 minutes. Drain and immerse the corn in the ice water to stop the cooking. When cool, cut the kernels from the cob, cutting close to the cob. Place the kernels in a large bowl. In a small skillet over medium heat, melt the butter. Add the zucchini and a pinch of salt and cook, stirring, until tender, about 4 minutes. Add the zucchini to the bowl with the corn. Add the red onion, vinegar, oil and remaining salt and pepper. Just before serving, toss in the herbs. Taste, adjust the seasoning as needed, and serve cold or at room temperature. — Eva Longoria, “Eva’s Kitchen” (Clarkson Potter, 224 pages, $29.99)

Peel, seed and thinly slice the melon (use just half, if it’s substantial), then arrange the slices on a large platter. Drape the prosciutto over the top and scatter with the figs, arugula and a few leaves of basil and spearmint, torn or slivered if they are large. Sprinkle with the almonds and tomatoes. Warm the sherry in a small pan over low heat for just a minute. (Tip: If you do not have sherry wine, you may substitute goodquality sherry vinegar, although less of it, and a pinch of sugar.) Transfer to a small bowl, and swirl in olive oil to taste. Drizzle over the salad. Season with salt and pepper. — Romney Steele, “Plum Gorgeous” (Andrews McMeel, 178 pages, $25)

F3


F4

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2011

H Art Continued from F1 But there was one thing Terrie didn’t like about his decorating: “Everything was white and black in there. He had white walls and white carpet. I brought the color into his life.” When the Gatteys decided to retire to Bend four years ago, their combined art collection had to be custompacked, custom-crated and heavily insured. Then it was all carefully packed onto an 18-wheeler moving truck. They moved their coveted wine collection themselves in their cars.

Have a seat A large portion of the couple’s art collection revolves around glass art — so when they say it had to be professionally packed and crated carefully, that would be an understatement. Jim’s favorite pieces of art are two custom-made glass chairs and a matching table that he commissioned in 1981 from artist Joan Irving. The set is named “Seat Du Verre.” Terrie said she invites guests to use the glass chairs, but many are too afraid to actually use them as seats, though she assures guests they’re sturdy and “not just for looking at.” “I first bought that Irving piece on the mantel there, and really loved her work, so I commissioned her to make the glass seats. It was something she had never done before with her art,” explained Jim. “These seats have actually been featured in numerous magazines, and some people who have never been to the house always ask to see the glass chairs when they first come here. (Irving) was able to have light come through the seats, and then she sandblasted and etched color onto them. And I think they came out perfectly.”

Photos by Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

Art, much of it glass, fills the living room in the Bend home of Terrie and Jim Gattey. “We have pieces from Sweden, from Slovakia, even some from Northwest glass artists, including Pilchuck glass, from Seattle,” Jim says. “With glass art, it’s big heat, it’s dangerous and it’s exciting when the artist is making it.”

On display The Gatteys’ 3,500-squarefoot home is a single story they’ve recently expanded to a three-bedroom, four-anda-half-bath home, which also includes two small offices for the couple. Though both are still very physically active, Terrie says prudence dictated they buy a single-story home, given their age. However, adding an extra bedroom, bathroom and hallway was not the first priority for these art aficionados. Terrie says the first thing they did was to have custom display cases built and custom lighting installed to properly display their art collection throughout the house. “The first three months we were here, we had Design Lighting come in here and help us wire and put in all the lights, because that makes such a difference for the art, especially the glass art,” explained Terrie. To prove her

A glass shelf, one of the first things to catch visitors’ eyes, projects its colors on the wall in the Gattey home.

“We can almost always agree about the art we love,” says Terrie Gattey.

artist Yoshi Aoki, who created a piece with a fused-together metal frame with interlacing smooth wood and rock pieces. “We just saw him at the Old Mill, and we both loved this piece. And we invited him over to see his art displayed here, and he rode his bike over to our home,” said Terrie, who was impressed and amused with the artist making a house call on his bicycle.

Custom-made glass tiles are set in the Gatteys’ purposely muted kitchen backsplash.

point, she moved one of the marble frosted glass vases away from the light. “When it’s not lit properly you can’t see all the details of this glass; it just sort of looks blah, but when you put it

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under the light, you can see the translucent and opaque qualities.”

Other spaces

Glass art Walking into the Gatteys’ immaculate home in the evening is a feast for the eyes. The extensive display of colorful glass art around the living room gives subtle shimmering sparkles as only glass art can do. The effect is simply breathtaking. The first eye-catching piece you’ll see is a glistening glass shelf that projects a colorful three-dimensional rectangular box figure onto the wall. Terrie pointed out that the lighting had to be exact to get the “projection reflection” just right. Jim, quoting a glass artist, explained it like this: “The idea of taking a hot, honey-like substance and changing it, transforming it, to make it into a beautiful object is amazing.” Terrie also commissioned her former husband, Tumalo master cabinetmaker Gordon Pennock, to build the special display shelving and cases for their vast art collection. Besides the impressive display in the living room, the master bedroom also has custom built black shelving that nearly reaches the ceiling, as it frames the queen-size bed. This display case shelving holds glass objects from all over the world. “We have pieces from Sweden, from Slovakia, even some from Northwest glass artists, including Pilchuck glass, from Seattle,” said Jim. “With glass art, it’s big heat, it’s dangerous and it’s exciting when the artist is making it.”

A moving metal statue graces the Gatteys’ backyard.

Other art Terrie pointed to an oil painting by Barbara Weldon in her master bedroom that she bought more than 30 years ago and explains she has never bought art as an investment. “I’ve always bought art, because it spoke to me, because I loved it,” said Terrie, standing in front of the painting that has only appreciated over the decades. Terrie’s favorite piece of art is an oversized paper cast of a woman’s face called “Concetta” by Frank Gallo, which hangs in her living room. “This paper cast was done in the early ’80s, and at that time there was nothing to stop the oxidation of the paper, so they encased it in this case filled

with nitrogen. It’s a very heavy piece,” explained Jim. While each brought their own private art collection into this marriage, there are pieces that the two have purchased and collected together, as they try to support local Northwest artists. “We can almost always agree about the art we love,” said Terrie, pointing to a metal art piece hanging above the fireplace. “We commissioned this piece by Dan Rider when he was living in Bend. We wanted something that represented the area.” This twisted, woven metal artwork is called “Clouds 9.” It coordinates well with glass art around the room because it shines in the light. Recently the couple also discovered Portland mixed media

Shimmering glass sparkles also make their way into the Gatteys’ kitchen, where streams of iridescent light come from the glass art displayed above the cabinets. To tie it all in, with an edge of elegance, the Gatteys bought small custom-made glass art tiles for the backsplash along the counters. The Gatteys chose to use black tile as the background tile to give the colorful art tiles a chance to really pop under the lights. The Gatteys have a beautiful, large courtyard in the back of their home, and have a half-acre of land that backs up to a common open space. Even here, the Gatteys have decorated, with large, whimsical metal art that playfully moves. The Gatteys say they enjoy their art and their lifestyle in Bend. The glass art may be safer here than it was in California, where the occasional earthquake can make glass art collectors a little nervous. “After one earthquake, this Murano piece from Italy had fallen out of its wishbone base and it was just leaning against the wall. If it had been freestanding without that wall, it probably would’ve shattered,” said Terrie. The Gatteys look around their living room and nod with satisfaction. “We’ve always had the same vision for art; we never tire looking at them,” says Terrie. “When I’m home, the gallery is open,” says Jim with a hearty laugh. — Reporter: halpen1@aol.com


TUESDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

G Fall Continued from F1 “You can use corn stalks, dried vines, bunches of wheat and dried grasses, squash, pumpkins and gourds for many decorations,� she added. “And don’t forget onions, dried corn and garlic.� Another colorful addition, Lillegard said, is Oregon grape, a shrub that turns colors and also has berries. Some of the common herbs planted for cooking, such as cilantro, bay leaf and rosemary, she added, can be dried and added for texture in an arrangement. While dried flowers can add a nice accent, not all blooming plants can be used. “You might be able to dry some flowers, such as roses or

chrysanthemums, that have a solid head,� she said, “but some types, such as blackeyed Susans, won’t work because the petal will separate from the stem.� After assessing the garden plants, Lillegard recommends taking a walk in the woods. Take a big basket or bucket along, she said, and use your imagination. “You can use just about anything that grows, and look to nature for arrangements,� she said. “Collect broken tree branches, dried grasses, rocks, pieces of wood, cattails, pinecones or seed pods.� Other natural materials might include dried berries and curly willow and other local flora. “Manzanita twigs and leaves dry nicely,� she said.

F5

Next week: Learn about grow bags

“Central Oregon is not known for its native fall colors. You may be able to find bright-colored deciduous leaves from planted trees and shrubs such as autumn blaze and vine maples, rosehips from rosebushes and leaves from burning bush.� As in any decoration that is based on a natural theme, Lillegard said, chose the materials with an eye for how they will all combine and work together. In some instances, garden and native materials can make a uniquely Central Oregon arrangement. While winter will soon be upon us, there is no reason why you can’t stretch the gardening season while bringing some fall color to your home. — Reporter: survivalsenselp@ gmail.com.

Gravel – friendly to your budget and to the Earth By Stacy Downs

Rock shopping

McClatchy-Tribune News Service

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — If you’re looking for solutions to landscaping challenges, decorative rock and gravel just might be the ticket. Drainage issues? Budgetfriendly alternative to a paved patio? Interesting edging for your flower beds? Check, check, check. The dilemma for Pam Messick was that nothing grew under the linden tree in her front yard, one of those giant trees with the dramatic canopies you see lining the streets of Prairie Village, Kan. Not grass, not ivy, not even hostas. “My husband and I’d sit on my front porch, and it would look like a dust bowl,� she says. “It wasn’t pretty.� Working with Sharp Landcaping this year, Messick selected cobblestone reminiscent of summers in Colorado. She wanted the spot to feel Asian, so a Japanese maple was added among the stone. Neighbors walking their dogs frequently stop and talk to Messick about her new rockscaping. “They tell me they love my rock garden,� Messick says. “When the rocks get wet from the rain, they’re especially beautiful. Vibrant color veins pop out. Sure, I could have added just mulch, but this is so much more interesting. It feels natural and perfect. To make the tree-canopied spot a sitting garden, Messick plans to add another strong stone statement, a boulder bench. So far, she has chosen the decorative gravel from House of Rocks in Kansas City, Kan. Owner Jack Robinson says in recent years, interest has grown in xeriscaping, using plants and other

• Measure the length and width of the area. “So many people have to come back because they didn’t measure; they try to use their arms and hands as estimates,â€? says Jack Robinson, owner of House of Rocks. Signs typically spell out how much footage a ton of rock covers — employees can help, too. • Take pictures of the spots where you want rock. Plotting your house and yard on graph paper helps, too. “Think of rock shopping like buying furniture,â€? Robinson says. “You want to make sure it fits size-wise and style-wise.â€? • Remember other materials. For example, say you’re going to edge a flower bed with salt-and-pepper-colored, gooseegg-shaped granite river cobbles. First, you’ll need two parallel strips of metal edging to outline the bed. Between the strips, fill in with landscape gravel before placing the cobbles on top. • Be mindful of environmental ethics. Jamie Durie of HGTV says rocks from Third World countries are a bad idea. “You’ll see inexpensive rock from India and Indonesia that’s from their rivers. Fish need those rocks for silvering. People really depend on those rocks as part of their food chain.â€? But, he says, manmade rock “can look great.â€? — McClatchy-Tribune News Service

materials that help reduce water use. “They want less maintenance,� Robinson says. “Not all the mowing.� Adding rock or gravel is one of the best ways to create a permeable landscape, says Jamie Durie, the Australian designer and host of HGTV’s “The Outdoor Room.� “It absorbs water and melted snow rather than them running off into the street,� he says. With all the benefits, using decorative rock requires thoughtful planning and requires upkeep, says Kristopher Dabner, landscape designer and owner of the Greensman in Kansas City. For example, Dabner designed a series of pea-gravel backyard patios and pathways for a Lawrence home. First it needed a level of aggregate, then breathable landscape fabric as a weed barrier before a final layer of

pea gravel. With any stonescaping project, Dabner says, you need to “stay ahead of weeds.� “Herbicide needs to be sprayed when the weeds are small. If you let them sprout for a few weeks, you’ll have a huge mess on your hands. “ Because of the major weed patrol it would require, Dabner says people should not use decorative rock instead of mulch in most cases — especially around the perimeter of a house. But Dabner likes rock for a dramatic, modern statement — like creating a square, circular or triangular gravel patio instead of the usual concrete rectangle.

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AFTER

Mower maintenance: Mulching leaves adds stress By John Shultz McClatchy-Tribune News Service

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — That first taste of fall means the beginning of a big run of goodbyes: so long to summer vacation, goodbye grilling season and farewell to football-free weekends. But before you give a hasty send-off to the mowing season, be aware that there’s a pretty decent checklist of prescribed fall lawn-mower maintenance tasks you might want to tackle. Sure, most people may equate lawn-mower maintenance with early spring, but experts say fall is a fine time to do upkeep on the old reliable walk-behind. A bit of work now will save you quite a bit of time and money when it comes time to roll the mower back out of the garage next year. “Maintenance makes equipment easier to start,� said Roy Berendsohn, senior home editor at Popular Mechanics. “That may or may not result in direct cost savings, but it certainly reduces the wear and tear on you. Few things are as frustrating as trying to start a cranky piece of outdoor power equipment. Nobody needs that frustration on a busy weekend.� When it comes to maintaining machinery, clean is important. Before you even put the mower away for the season, one particular aspect of fall presents its own challenges for mowers: leaves. “The best thing to do during

fall use is to double-check your air filters,� said Ryan Hays, manager at Rick’s Lawnmower in Blue Springs, Mo. “The air filters get dirtier faster when you mulch leaves. If they get stopped up, they have to suck air from somewhere, and then they’ll suck unfiltered air, and you can damage the motor. Also, some manufacturers tell you to change the oil in the fall because the dirtier and dustier conditions from leaves can impact the oil faster.�

Sharp and clean Another key through-theseason task: Keep a sharp blade, particularly with the added strain of leaf mulching. “You can use better than 20 percent more fuel with a dull blade,� said Peter Sawchuk, program leader for home improvement with Consumer Reports. “I always recommend people buy a second blade for the mower. It’s usually under $10.� Keeping the mower deck clean is also an important task — certainly before you stow away the mower for the year. “Having clippings and debris build up on the underside cuts the air flow and dramatically impacts the effectiveness of the mower,� Sawchuk said. At the end of the season, Sawchuk recommends turning the mower on its side with the carburetor facing up and cleaning the undercarriage with a hose. “If you leave clippings under there at the end of the season, it can start to rust and corrode.� Changing the oil is more of

a judgment call. Most experts recommend changing the oil frequently during the mowing season — as often as every 25 hours of mowing time. As for prior to storage, though, mower maestros are split. “That’s a tough call,� said Popular Mechanics’ Berendsohn. “Some people recommend an oil change at the end of the season because it prevents dirty oil and sludge from sitting around in the engine’s crankcase over the winter. “I think it’s better to change the oil in the spring before beginning the next mowing season. That ensures that the oil is as fresh and clean as possible at the beginning of the season.� So far, so good. It’s all pretty much the same advice passed down from dad, granddad, and, quite possibly, great-granddad. One topic your predecessors may not have worried about — but that you absolutely need to keep in mind — is alternative fuel. Explains Rick Muscoplat, contributing editor at the Family Handyman magazine: “Oxygenated gas only has a 30-day shelf life. After that, the ethanol starts to separate.� That ethanol falls to the bottom of the tank, he said. And ethanol will absorb any moisture present in the air into the gas tank. That water can work its way into the carburetor, leading to corrosion. “If you leave that gas in all winter, your carburetor can be toast by next spring,� Muscoplat said.

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F6

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2011

RECIPE FINDER

Editor’s note: The Recipe Finder feature will return. If you are looking for a hard-to-find recipe or can answer a request, write Julie Rothman, Recipe Finder, The Baltimore Sun, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore, MD 21278, or email baltsunrecipefinder@gmail.com. Names must accompany recipes for them to be published.

Focaccia worth the extra effort By Melissa Clark New York Times News Service

Schiacciata con l’uva, a rustic, focaccialike flatbread enriched with olive oil and studded with grapes, is the kind of harvest snack traditionally baked in Tuscany when the wine grapes are inky purple on the vines and the people hungry in the fields. I’ve experienced only American iterations (usually just

Preserving an era when wildlife might be viewed on the wall Men have been stuffing animal skins for hundreds of years, yet the art of taxidermy — mounting or reproducing dead animals for display or for other sources of study — was not perfected until the early 20th century.

T

called focaccia, though they’re much sweeter), made either with our native wine grape, the Concord, or with sweet seedless red grapes. The Concords, with their musky, spicy skins, condense into intense jammy mouthfuls all over the savory, oily, rosemary-flecked bread. The seedless grapes bake up sweet, juicy and tasty, but not nearly as complex or seductive.

Grape Focaccia Makes 6 to 8 servings 6 TBS extra virgin olive oil, more for drizzling 1 TBS, plus 1 tsp, fresh rosemary leaves 2 tsp active dry yeast 12⁄3 C all-purpose flour, more as needed

2

⁄3 C fine cornmeal 5 TBS granulated sugar 11⁄2 tsp salt 21⁄4 C Concord, black or red grapes 1 ⁄2 C pine nuts, optional Flaky sea salt, for sprinkling

In a small skillet over medium heat, warm the oil. Stir in 1 tablespoon rosemary leaves. Remove the pan from the heat and let it cool. Place 3⁄4 cup lukewarm water in a large bowl. Sprinkle the yeast over it. Let it stand until foamy, about 5 minutes. Stir in the olive oil mixture, 12⁄3 cups flour, cornmeal, 3 tablespoons sugar, and salt to the yeast mixture. Stir until a soft dough forms. Turn the dough out onto a floured surface. Knead until it is smooth and elastic, about 10 minutes, or knead in a stand mixer with a dough hook attached, for about 5 minutes. If using the stand mixer, finish the dough by hand, on a floured surface, for 1 minute. Add more flour; it could need as much as another 1⁄4 cup if the dough feels very sticky (you want damp but not unworkable dough). Oil a large bowl. Place the dough in the bowl, and turn to coat it lightly with the oil. Cover the bowl with a dish towel. Place the bowl in a warm place, and let it rise until the dough has doubled, about 1 hour. Halve the grapes if they are large. If using Concord, seed them. Heat the oven to 400 degrees. Oil a large cookie sheet or baking pan (11by-17-inch) with some olive oil. Punch down the dough, then pat it into the pan, stretching into an oval about 3⁄8- to 1⁄2-inch thick — it should not fill the entire pan. Dimple the dough with your fingertips. Scatter the grapes and pine nuts, if using, over the dough, pressing them in lightly. Sprinkle the remaining 2 tablespoons sugar, 1 teaspoon rosemary, and flaky sea salt over the grapes. Drizzle all over with plenty of oil. Bake until golden brown, 25 to 30 minutes.

MARTHA STEWART

Paul Costello / New York Times News Service

Martha Stewart has collected quite a few examples of fine taxidermy from shops, auctions and garage sales.

axidermy used to be one of the few ways to see wildlife up close. That era has passed, but the beauty of these vintage specimens lives on. Ever since I was a schoolgirl, when I would spend long afternoons in the Newark Museum, in New Jersey, and the American Museum of Natural History, in New York City, I have loved the examples of taxidermy more than anything else on display. The great museums and institutions of higher learning often incorporate into their exhibits lifelike dioramas of animals in order to excite, teach, inspire and inform. In the process, they have preserved certain animals and environments that have since become extinct or threatened. The opportunity to study the creatures and their habitats in that detail fostered my interest in all animals at a very early age. Men have been stuffing animal skins for hundreds of years, yet the art of taxidermy — mounting or reproducing dead animals for display or for other sources of study — was not perfected until the early 20th century. That is when the proper materials and methods for artistic preservation were discovered and developed by a small group of talented naturalists. In my East Hampton house, I have hung all types of old mounts of stuffed fish on the walls — tarpon, sailfish, salmon and snappers, among others. In Maine, where we photographed this article, I have amassed quite a few examples of fine

old taxidermy that I found in shops, at auctions and at local garage sales. In anticipation of Halloween, I decided to have a bit of fun with my many animals and took them to the Playhouse on the property for an adventurous photo shoot. An old house like Skylands, and its outbuildings, can be made more interesting with the addition of these mounts. Since Mount Desert Island was home to many artists and naturalists, such as the incomparable Carroll Tyson, who painted from nature his extraordinary “Birds of Mount Desert Island” series, I decided to find and display many examples of the real birds and mammals one might see in our locale. I have never had any animals mounted, and I own very little new taxidermy, but I certainly appreciate the time and effort it takes to prepare an animal realistically and naturally. I did a bit of research to learn more about the best taxidermists, who attempted to ensure attractive results without artifice and silliness. There is a kind of taxidermy called rogue taxidermy, which might represent unrealistic hybrids — species that do not exist in nature, such as unicorns and dragons — and another called anthropomorphic taxidermy, in which stuffed animals are posed in human activities and are often dressed in clothing (Peter Rabbit style). I much prefer to appreciate the beauty of these animals in their naturalistic forms. That is the best way to admire and learn from these impressive specimens. — Questions of general interest can be emailed to mslletters@ marthastewart.com. For more information on this column, visit www.marthastewart.com.


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LABRADOR PUPPIES 2 black males www.3sislabs.com 541-504-8550 or 541-788-4111 Lhasa Apso/Shih Tzu pup, gorgeous, $300. Linda, 503-888-0800 Madras. Mini Aussies 1 females & 4 males, $250 ea. Ready to go! 541-420-9694.

ENGLISH BULLDOG PUPPY Last one, born July 3rd. Pomeranian puppy. AKC registered male. Female wolf-sable. Shots up to date Beautiful thick double & microchipped. $2000 coat, cute face, $400 541-416-0375 Call (541) 480-3160. Free Wirehaired Terrier, Pomeranian puppy feneutered male, male. She is sweet housebroke, very and playful with a loving, to loving home, party coloring. $400. 541-241-0202 Call (541) 480-3160 Poodle Pups, AKC toys for sale. Adults, rescued toys, for free adoption. 541-475-3889

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Yorkie-Chihuahua male puppy, looks Yorkie, 30-06 Winchester tiny, $250 cash. Model 70 Rifle, 541-546-7909 pre-’64, 4x scope, wood stock, leather sling, exclnt shape, $900. 541-548-3301 40cal Taurus SS semi-auto pistol, w/4mags & ammo, YORKIES, AKC fe$375. 541-647-8931 males. Excellent temperaments. 7 wks now. 7.62x39 SKS with wood $850. Call for Details: stock and bayonet, 541-388-3322 one thirty round mag., Chinese?? $375 210 OBO. 541-977-3091. Furniture & Appliances Bend local, !Appliances A-1 Quality&Honesty! CASH PAID for GUNS! 541-526-0617 A-1 Washers &Dryers $125 each. Full WarCASH!! ranty. Free Del. Also For Guns, Ammo & W/D’s wanted dead or Reloading Supplies. alive. 541-280-7355. 541-408-6900. Bed, Serta Perfect DO YOU HAVE Sleeper, pillowtop, SOMETHING TO king, mattress, box SELL springs, $800, FOR $500 OR 541-923-6760 LESS? GENERATE SOME exNon-commercial citement in your advertisers may neighborhood! Plan a place an ad garage sale and don't with our forget to advertise in "QUICK CASH classified! SPECIAL" 541-385-5809. 1 week 3 lines $12 or Maytag room A/C, 2 weeks $18! 34x19x13, exc. condiAd must tion. Paid $545, askinclude price of ing $250 obo, cash single item of $500 only. 541-318-8668. or less, or multiple items whose total Second Hand does not exceed Mattresses, $500. sets & singles, call

541-598-4643 The Bulletin r ecommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to FRAUD. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

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HANDGUN SAFETY CLASS for concealed license. NRA, Police Firearms Instructor, Lt. Gary DeKorte Wed., Oct. 12th 6:30-10:30 pm. Call Kevin, Centwise, for reservations $40. 541-548-4422

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H&K USP 45 cal in excellent condition. Only 100 rounds fired thru barrell. Comes with extra magazine, nylon holster and 200 rounds. $750 Firm. Call (541) 504-3333.

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Visit our HUGE home decor consignment store. New items arrive daily! 930 SE Textron, Bend 541-318-1501

AKC White German Shepherds, $550; re- PUREBRED BOXER Bulldog/Boxers - Val- serve yours for $100. PUPPY Brindle male ley Bulldog puppies. 4 Ready to go October 2. 8 weeks on 9/27/11 males, 3 females, $500. Call 541-536-6167 www.redeuxbend.com CKC Reg. Brindle & snowywhiteshepherds.com (541) 815-9157 white. $800. German Shepherd 541-325-3376 pups, 8 wks, papers, Queensland Heelers The Bulletin reserves the right to publish all 6 F, 2 M, blk & tan & Standards & mini,$150 ads from The Bulletin & up. 541-280-1537 sable, $350. newspaper onto The http://rightwayranch. 541-389-8447 Bulletin Internet webwordpress.com/ Guinea Pigs, 6-week site. old sisters. Free (to- Redbone Puppy, Reggether) to good home istered, 12 wks old, Chihuahua Pups, asonly. 541-317-2827 great looks, smart & sorted colors, teacup/ sweet, $400. toy, 1st shots, Kittens/cats avail from 242 541-815-7868 wormed, $250, rescue group, 1-5 Exercise Equipment 541-977-4686 Sat/Sun, other days Rodents? by appt. 65480 78th FREE barn/shop cats, NordicTrack Cockatiels: 2 males, 2 RecumSt, Bend. Altered, females, w/large cage we deliver! Altered, bent Bike, #SL728, shots, ID chip, carrier, & accessories, $150 shots. Some friendly, like new, $250 or best more. Kittens just $40 for all. 541-350-9713 some not so much, offer. 541-389-9268 for 1, $60 for 2; adult but will provide expert Dove, white, adult male, cats just $25, 2 for 246 rodent control in exhealthy and good $40, free as mentor change for safe shelGuns, Hunting breeder. $10. cat if kitten adopted! ter, food & water. 541-382-2194 & Fishing Adult companion cats 541-389-8420. free to seniors, disCheck out the abled & veterans! Wolf hybrid dogs, nice 12g Moss. 8+1 pump, classiieds online 541-389-8420. Map, $250. Win. 30-06, & big! 1 male, 1 fewww.bendbulletin.com photos at $350. Savage 30-06, male, 1 year old, $400 Updated daily www.craftcats.org $350. 541-647-8931 each. 541-408-1115

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I buy boots, buckles, jewelry, and more! 924 Brooks Street Downtown Bend 541-678-5162 Wanted: Collector Ferragamo Shoe Lovseeks high quality • Laminate from ers: Size 8½, 20+ fishing items. .79¢ sq.ft. pairs, heels, flats, caCall 541-678-5753, or sual, dressy, new & • Hardwood from 503-351-2746 used, starting at $49. $2.99 sq.ft. 541-312-2972 Winchester Model 12, 12-ga, excellent con541-322-0496 INDIAN dition, $450 or best SUMMER offer. 541-593-7474 266 A refreshWinchester Model 50 ing and Heating & Stoves Auto, 12/20-gauge, affordable excellent cond, $425 selection 3 large zero-clearance OBO. 541-593-7474 of gifts & goods fireplaces, showroom inspired by nature models, 1 right corner, Winchester Model 70 for you, your home 2 flat wall, $500 ea, 30-06, pre-64, and garden. OBO. 1 newer woodpre-WWII, beautiful, 1900 NE Division St. stove, $1200 firm. 85-90%, must see, Bend • Tue-Sat 10-4 Several gas & pellet $800, 541-977-8393. www.indiansummerhome.com stoves, $800 each OBO. All warrantied 248 for 1 season. Call Health & 541-548-8081 Beauty Items NOTICE TO ADVERTISER Since September 29, 1991, advertising for used woodstoves has been limited to models which have been certified by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and the fedBelly Fat A eral Environmental Problem? Protection Agency (EPA) as having met FREE DVD Reveals smoke emission stanweight loss myths. dards. A certified Get ANSWERS to woodstove may be lasting weight loss. identified by its certification label, which is Call permanently attached 866-700-2424 to the stove. The Bulletin will not know249 ingly accept advertising for the sale of Art, Jewelry Over 40 Years uncertified Experience in & Furs woodstoves. Carpet Upholstery & Rug Cleaning Wanted: Gas freeCall Now! standing heater in 541-382-9498 good condition. Call CCB #72129 541-508-0916. www.cleaningclinicinc.com

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Horse Sculture, by J. Toilets (2), Eljer, water savers,white,like new, Chester Armstrong, one of Central OR’s $100 OBO 541-389-9268 most famous artists, cherry wood, 57” Wanted- paying cash for Hi-fi audio & stuwide, 35” high, pridio equip. McIntosh, vate owner, $10,000, JBL, Marantz, Dy541-593-7191. naco, Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, NAD, etc. 253 Call 541-261-1808 TV, Stereo & Video 265

Mitsubishi 52” HD-ready flat screen TV & Mossberg 12g 500 matching stand, $500 pump shotgun, syn obo. 541-504-1470 stock, 28” bbl, $200. 541-647-8931 255

Building Materials Bend Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 740 NE 1st 541-312-6709 Open to the public.

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WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD... To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery and inspection. • A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’ • Receipts should include name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased. • Firewood ads MUST include species and cost per cord to better serve our customers.

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Lost & Found Found: 3 young chihuahua mix pups, SE Bend, call to ID, 541-771-0831. Found: 9/29, Women’s Sweater & top, Redmond on Helmholtz, Phil, 541-923-6908. Found: Boys shirt, “Stop Snitching” 9/29, Catlow Rd, Redmond, 541-923-6908. Found:Pendant watch, on Simpson Ave, 10/1 call to ID, 541-330-6097 Lost Cat - white female named Lucy, 13 yrs old, declawed, ran from car crash on 8/11/11, on Hwy 97 at Highland, Redmond. If seen, please call 541-504-4194. REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal, don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend 541-382-3537 Redmond, 541-923-0882 Prineville, 541-447-7178; OR Craft Cats, 541-389-8420.

Rem. 12g 870 pump, Computers 292 $250. Rem. 22LR pump rifle, $250. THE BULLETIN reSales Other Areas 541-647-8931 quires computer adMoving Sale - Everyvertisers with multiple Remington 1100 12 thing must go! All inad schedules or those GA , 3” chambers, doors. Free coffee selling multiple sysvented rib, recoil pad, and cookies. 2000 tems/ software, to disexc. cond., call Hank, Suzuki Vitara 4WD, close the name of the 541-548-1775. Kubota L175 tractor business or the term All Year Dependable w/blade and utility "dealer" in their ads. Ruger 44 Magnum, Firewood: Dry , split scoop. Lots of misc. Private party advertis$475; Pre-64 30-30 lodgepole, 1 for $155 Everything half price ers are defined as Winchester; $375; or 2 for $300. No limit. or lower on Sunday! those who sell one 30-40 Craig, $175; Cash, check, or credit. 144444 Birchwood computer. 410 Shotgun, $125; Bend 541-420-3484 Rd. Sunforest Es22 Mag Derringer, Cabinet Refacing tates, 8.25 mi. south Dry Lodgepole: $165 258 $150; misc. ammo & & Refinishing. on Hwy 31. Fri-Sun cord rounds; $200 cord hunting knives, Travel/Tickets Save Thousands! Oct. 7-9, 9am-4pm. split.1.5 Cord Minimum 503-830-6564 36 yrs service to CenDuck Tickets vs AriMost jobs Sturgeon Gear: 10’, 12’ tral OR. 541-350-2859 zona State, Sat., Oct completed in & 15’ Ugly Stik rods. 15, 35-yd line, 12 269 5 days or less. Penn Level Wind & rows behind Duck Best Pricing spin reels. Tailer pole Gardening Supplies bench. 2 @ $150 ea. in the Industry. holder, pocket belt. & Equipment 541-390-4115 541-647-8261 Line, weights & many new hooks, other 260 tackle, tackle box, 2 Sisters Habitat ReStore BarkTurfSoil.com Misc. Items pole holders for bank Building Supply Resale Instant Landscaping Co. fishing. Also collecQuality items. Bulk Garden Materials Buying Diamonds tion of knives, $500 LOW PRICES! Wholesale Peat /Gold for Cash for all, or part reason150 N. Fir. Moss Sales ably priced. Saxon’s Fine Jewelers 541-549-1621 541-389-9663 541-420-0306 Open to the public. 541-389-6655


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1992 Case 580K 4WD, 5500 hrs, cab heat, extend-a-hoe, 2nd owner, clean & tight, tires 60% tread. $24,900 or best offer. Call 541-419-2713 Ford Model 640 Tractor, circa 1954. Front loader hydraulic system totally rebuilt. 7-ft 454 scraper blade; PTO; chains; new battery. Looking for Employment Oldie but goodie! $3750. 541-382-5543 Family Helper - Senior Care - Cooking - ErPaying Cash for Sheep rands Etc., & Goats, Please call 541-419-8648. 509-520-8526 for more info. I provide Senior In-home Care 325 (basic care services). Hay, Grain & Feed Please call Judy, 541-388-2706. CLEAN AND GREEN 2nd cutting alfalfa, 476 and grass hay, 200 Employment ton 3x4 bales, $200 ton. 541-475-3324. Opportunities CAUTION READERS:

Premium orchard grass 3x3 mid-size bales, no rain, no weeds. $100 per bale. 541-419-2713. Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; Compost. 541-546-6171. 341

Horses & Equipment Horse Boarding In Bend City Limits, Heated indoor arena, stalls with paddocks, price depends on care level. 541-385-6783 or 541-788-9512 Picking up unwanted horses, cash paid for some, 509-520-8526. 358

Farmers Column 10X20 STORAGE BUILDINGS for protecting hay, firewood, livestock etc. $1496 Installed. 541-617-1133. CCB #173684. kfjbuilders@ykwc.net A farmer who does it right and is on time. Power no-till seeding, disc, till, plow & plant new/older fields, haying services, cut, rake, bale, Gopher control. 541-419-4516

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Kevin O’Connell Classified Department Manager The Bulletin 541-383-0398

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476

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Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Education - Montessori Medical Billing Mental Health: school located in the Specialist/ Medical Children's Mental Old Mill District is Assistant Health Wrap Coordiseeking an afternoon Full time position with nator/Supervisor: respected primary toddler class assisCommunity mental care office in Bend. tant and substitute health agency in JefPrevious billing expeteachers. Potential ferson County seekrience required. Succandidates should ing a bachelor or cessful candidate will have a minimum of master's level indihave full knowledge of either one year of vidual with expericlaim submission, college level study in ence working in a secondary and terearly childhood edumental health setting tiary insurance claims, cation or one year of with high needs chilcharge posting and experience working dren/families. Facilipayment posting, folwith toddlers or pretates wraparound low-up of denials, unschoolers in a Certiteams, works closely paid accounts and fied Child Care Cenw/ mental health clinicollections. Medical ter. Please call cians, community Assistant skills must 541-633-7299 or partners and case include: vitals, phone email emay@drmmanagement. Must triage, acquisition of skids.com. have excellent interpatient history, assist personal skills, reFabricator minor procedures/inspect for diverse culManual Machinist, Hyjections and medicatures, be organized draulics Person, & tion refill. Previous and be strong at Field Mechanic. Need eCW experience a documentation. Salright fit for family plus. Ability to work ary is competitive and Just bought a new boat? business. Must have well as part of a team. based on experience Sell your old one in the experience, ability to Excellent salary and classiieds! Ask about our & education level. think & able to work Super Seller rates! benefit package. Fax Qualified applicants 541-385-5809 independently. Wage resume Attn: Nita, may call (541) DOE. Will help relo541-389-2662. 475-6575 for an applicate right person to Cab Driver needed cation & job descripMid-Willamette Valley. for night shift. tion. E-mail resumes Send resume to Apply at: cindip@bestcaretreatment.org mdi@peak.org 1919 NE 2nd, Bend 541-967-3514. Remember.... Chiropractic Tech Full Add your web adTime $12-15hr DOEdress to your ad and Professional, team readers on The player, leader, ready Bulletin' s web site for a career, want to will be able to click change lives? Our through automatically Chiropractic office is to your site. looking for you! (pdf/doc/docx) Email Cover Letter and Resume to dionne.appliThe Bulletin cant@gmail.com De- Field Mechanic: Exp. Recommends extra Medical Billing tails will be auto caution when purSpecialist/ w/Logging & heavy emailed. Fax chasing products or Receptionist equip. repair, long (541)388-0839 No services from out of hours & weekends. Full time position with Calls respected primary the area. Sending Extensive travel in care office in Bend. cash, checks, or Central OR. & N. CA. Previous billing expeCOLLECTOR - Eugene credit information Wages DOE, rience required. Succollection agency may be subjected to 541-330-1930 cessful candidate will needs Full-time debt FRAUD. have full knowledge of For more informacollectors.Email reLot Attendant claim submission, sume teri@pacifiction about an adversecondary and tercoastcredit.com or fax tiser, you may call tiary insurance claims, 541-689-1632. Must the Oregon State charge posting and relocate to the EuAttorney General’s payment posting, folgene area by DecemOffice Consumer low-up of denials, unber 1 2011. Protection hotline at Immediate opening paid accounts and 1-877-877-9392. for Lot Attendant at collections. Previous Toyota-Scion of DO YOU NEED eCW experience a Bend. Full time, year A GREAT plus. Ability to work round position. Must EMPLOYEE well as part of a team. be motivated and Excellent salary and RIGHT NOW? ready to work. Must Call The Bulletin benefit package. Fax pass drug test, good before 11 a.m. and resume Attn: Nita, driving record, and get an ad in to pub541-389-2662. be insurable. Apply lish the next day! in person @ Toyota of Bend, (Ask for Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Casey Cooper) VIEW the 541-385-5809. 61430 S. Hwy 97, Classifieds at: Place Your Ad Or E-Mail www.bendbulletin.com Bend. At: www.bendbulletin.com Accounting KEITH Mfg Company is looking to fill a CFO position. BS in Accounting or Finance, MBA or CPA preferred. Ten plus years experience, preferably in a manufacturing environment. Working knowledge of Excel, Exact and FAS. Lean Accounting and/or Lean Mfg knowledge preferred. Please send resume with cover letter including salary requirements to Brenda Jones, HR Manager @ bjones@keithwalkingfloor.com

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Angus Beef, No hormones or chemicals, locally grown, all natural, USDA inspected, whole or half, $2.95/lb. hanging weight, incl. cut & wrap, 541-390-1611.

FINANCE AND BUSINESS 507 - Real Estate Contracts 514 - Insurance 528 - Loans and Mortgages 543 - Stocks and Bonds 558 - Business Investments 573 - Business Opportunities

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Employment Opportunities Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

528

Finance & Business

Loans & Mortgages

500

FREE BANKRUPTCY EVALUATION

528

visit our website at

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Loans & Mortgages WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

541-382-3402 LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 ext.13.

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BANK TURNED YOU 573 DOWN? Private party will loan on real es- Business Opportunities tate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity Looking for your is all you need. Call next employee? now. Oregon Land Place a Bulletin help Mortgage 388-4200. wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

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EMPLOYMENT 410 - Private Instruction 421 - Schools and Training 454 - Looking for Employment 470 - Domestic & In-Home Positions 476 - Employment Opportunities 486 - Independent Positions

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TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2011 G3 642

648

650

Apt./Multiplex Redmond

Houses for Rent General

Houses for Rent NE Bend

870

Real Estate For Sale

Boats & RV’s

700 800

PUBLISHER'S Avail. Now,2 bdrm, new NOTICE carpet & paint, nice All real estate adverdeck & storage shed, RENTALS 682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage Studios $400 tising in this newspaW/D hookup, garbage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 603 - Rental Alternatives 1 Bdrm $425 per is subject to the paid, no pets, $800 + • Lots of amenities. 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent 604 - Storage Rentals Fair Housing Act dep., 541-420-1650, 850 • Pet friendly 745 REAL ESTATE 605 - Roommate Wanted which makes it illegal 541-382-5723. • W/S/G paid Snowmobiles Homes for Sale to advertise "any 616 - Want To Rent 705 - Real Estate Services THE BLUFFS APTS. preference, limitation Looking for your next 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 713 - Real Estate Wanted 340 Rimrock Way, or discrimination BANK OWNED HOMES! employee? 630 - Rooms for Rent 719 - Real Estate Trades Redmond Close to FREE List w/Pics! based on race, color, Place a Bulletin help schools, shopping, 631 - Condos & Townhomes for Rent 726 - Timeshares for Sale religion, sex, handi- wanted ad today and www.BendRepos.com and parks! bend and beyond real estate 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 730 - New Listings cap, familial status, reach over 60,000 20967 yeoman, bend or 541-548-8735 Yamaha 600 Mtn. marital status or na634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 732 - Commercial Properties for Sale readers each week. Managed by Max 1997 Now only tional origin, or an inYour classified ad 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 738 - Multiplexes for Sale NOTICE: GSL Properties $850! Sled plus tention to make any will also appear on All real estate adver638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 740 - Condos & Townhomes for Sale trailer package such preference, bendbulletin.com, tised here in is sub640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 744 - Open Houses $1550. Many Extras, limitation or discrimicurrently receiving ject to the Federal call for info, 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 745 - Homes for Sale nation." Familial staover 1.5 million page Fair Housing Act, 541-548-3443. tus includes children 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 746 - Northwest Bend Homes views, every month which makes it illegal under the age of 18 at no extra cost. 648 - Houses for Rent General 747 - Southwest Bend Homes to advertise any pref860 living with parents or Bulletin Classifieds erence, limitation or 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 748 - Northeast Bend Homes legal custodians, Get Results! discrimination based Motorcycles & Accessories 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 749 - Southeast Bend Homes pregnant women, and Call 541-385-5809 or on race, color, reli654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 750 - Redmond Homes people securing cusplace your ad on-line gion, sex, handicap, 12’ Klamath, 9.5hp gas tody of children under 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 753 - Sisters Homes at motor, electric trolling familial status or na18. This newspaper bendbulletin.com 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes motor, fishfinder, w/ tional origin, or intenwill not knowingly actrailer. $950 OBO. tion to make any such 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 756 - Jefferson County Homes cept any advertising 541-385-5980. Need help ixing stuff preferences, limita660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 757 - Crook County Homes for real estate which is around the house? tions or discrimination. 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 762 - Homes with Acreage in violation of the law. Call A Service Professional We will not knowingly Our readers are 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 763 - Recreational Homes and Property and ind the help you need. accept any advertishereby informed that www.bendbulletin.com 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 764 - Farms and Ranches ing for real estate HARLEY CUSTOM all dwellings adverwhich is in violation of 2007 Dyna Super 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 771 - Lots Duplex, very clean & 652 tised in this newspathis law. All persons pvt, lrg 1300sf 2 Bdrm 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 773 - Acreages Glide FXDI loaded, per are available on Houses for Rent are hereby informed 2 Bath, garage w/ all options, bags, 675 - RV Parking 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes an equal opportunity that all dwellings adNW Bend opener, fenced bkyd, exhaust, wheels, 2 basis. To complain of 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land vertised are available deck, in-house launhelmets, low mi., discrimination call on an equal opportudry space, DW, micro, beautiful, Must sell, 634 634 HUD toll-free at Adorable home in THE nity basis. The BullePARKS , 2 bdrm, 2 extra parking spaces, $9995. 1-800-877-0246. The Apt./Multiplex NE Bend Apt./Multiplex NE Bend tin Classified W/S/G paid, $710 + bath, mtn. views, 541-408-7908 toll free telephone Rentals dep. 541-604-0338 W/D, corner lot, number for the hearFIND IT! 2 bdrm., 1.5 bath townCall for Specials! $1345, Please call Advertise your car! ing impaired is house, just remod- Limited numbers avail. BUY IT! 541-408-0877 Add A Picture! 1-800-927-9275. eled, new paint & 1, 2 and 3 bdrms. SELL IT! Reach thousands of readers! flooring, patio, W/D W/D hookups, patios or 654 The Bulletin Classii eds Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin is now ofhookup, W/S paid, decks, The Bulletin Classifieds Houses for Rent fering a LOWER, $625+ dep., MOUNTAIN GLEN 746 MORE AFFORDSE Bend 2940 NE Nikki Ct., 541-383-9313 Northwest Bend Homes ABLE Rental rate! If Professionally 541-390-5615. 630 you have a home to A 2 bdrm, 1 bath, 866 managed by Hot West Side Harley Davidson rent, call a Bulletin sq.ft., wood stove, Rooms for Rent A/C, Clean, 2 bdrm Norris & Stevens, Inc. Properties! Ultra Classic 2008 Classified Rep to get new paint, inside util., apt. in quiet 8 plex. FREE List w/Pics & Maps Too many upyour ad started ASAP! fenced yard, extra Bend, 8th/Hawthorne, W/S/G & cable TV Large 2 bdrm., 2 bath, BendHomeHunter.com grades to list, imw/garage & patio, W/S 648 541-385-5809 storage building, bend laundry & cable incl., paid. Pets w/approval. and beyond real estate maculate cond., /G paid, W/D hookup, $795, 541-480-3393 parking, no smoking No application fee. Houses for 20967 yeoman, bend or clean, 15K miles. no pets/smoking,$695 650 ,541-610-7803 $385. 541-317-1879 $650, 541-389-2249, Rent General $14,900 +dep, 541-382-4739 748 or 541-410-1386. Houses for Rent AVAIL. NOW 3 bed541-693-3975 STUDIOS & Northeast Bend Homes NE Bend 3 BDRM, 2 bath, dbl. room, 1 bath, appliKITCHENETTES Look at: Bendhomes.com garage, fenced yard, ances, wood stove, Alpine Meadows Furnished room, TV for Complete Listings of gourmet kitchen, A Nice 3 bdrm, 1.75 garage, yard, deck. Move-in Ready! 4 BedTownhomes w/cable, micro. & room, 2 bath, double bath 1428 sq.ft., appl., dishwasher, Area Real Estate for Sale No pets/ smoking. 1, 2 and 3 bdrm fridge. Util. & linens. car garage, fenced woodstove, fenced (Sunriver area). No $725 month + deapts. New owners, $145 to yard, quiet neighboryard, RV parking, 2.5 pets/smoking. $795 posits. 541-389-7734. Starting at $625. $165 week. hood, $149,000. Rent a Resort! acres, horse OK. month + dep. 541-330-0719 541-382-1885 Owner may carry. Call 3 bdrm, 2 Bdrm, 2 bath, $775 $895/mo. 541-480- Spacious 541-550-6097, Professionally Price Reduced - 2010 541-281-9891 w/study/den, 2.5 bath $200 off 1st month on 3393, 541-610-7803 593-3546 managed by Custom Harley 632 on 1/2 acre, lease, 1st select units! Norris & Stevens, Inc. DNA Pro-street swing & last, small pet conApt./Multiplex General Come home and enjoy arm frame, Ultima sidered, no smoking 2 sparkling pools, A/C, 107, Ultima 6-spd $1200, 352-304-1665. The Bulletin is now of- Attractive 2 bdrm. in W/D in each apt. over $23,000 in parts 4-plex, 1751 NE fering a MORE AFPaid W/S/G. 656 alone; 100s of man Wichita, W/S/G paid, FORDABLE Rental Covered Parking hours into custom fabon-site laundry, small 2 Recreation Centers Houses for Rent rate! If you have a New Construction, rication. Priced for pet on approval. $525 24-hour fitness, comhome or apt. to rent, SW Bend 3 bdrm, 2 bath, dbl. quick sale, now, /mo. 541-389-9901. call a Bulletin Classiputer labs with intergarage, Close to $15,000 OBO fied Rep to get your Quail Pines Home for net & more! parks, hospital, 541-408-3317 ad started ASAP! Beautiful 2 Bdrms in lease, $1295/month. schools, slab granquiet complex, park- STONEBRIAR APTS. • Unique basement apartment near Bend HS 541-385-5809 available immediately ite counters, hard541-330-5020 like setting. No pets/ 2 Bdrm/1 Bath. Large brick fireplace. Daylight 61324 Sparrow Court wood floors, landsmoking. Near St. stone.briar.apts@gmail.com windows on all sides. Large entry area. No pets. 541-280-1427, Julie 634 Professionally managed scape w/sprinkler Charles.W/S/G pd; $375 WST by Norris & Stevens systems, starting at Apt./Multiplex NE Bend both w/d hkup + laun658 • NW Redmond Apts. - Very nice bright 2 Bdrm/1 $152,900. dry facil. $625- $650/ Bath units with A/C and private balconies or pa638 Houses for Rent Bend River Realty 1/2 Off 1st mo. rent! mo. 541-385-6928. Honda 750 Ace 2003 tios. On-site laundry. Quiet street. $495 WST. Rob Marken, Apt./Multiplex SE Bend Redmond 2210 NE Holliday, 3 w/windscreen and • 2 Bdrm/ 1 Bath Upper unit near Kiwanis Park Broker/Owner bdrm., 2 bath, w/gaLeatherLyke bags. Coin-op laundry facilities on site. Balcony. 541-410-4255. 1 Mile from Old Mill - 2 Small Home, 1 bdrm, 1 rage, gas heat, fireOnly 909 miles, orig Off-street parking. Newly painted. $525 WST More photos: Bdrm, 1 bath, garage, bath on ranch propplace, quiet. No owner, $4000 OBO. www.RobMarken.com • NW Duplex 2 Bdrm/1 Bath. Woodstove. W/D security dep. $600 erty, 8 mi. W. of Tersmoking. $725/mo. 541-771-7275. Hookups. Single car garage. Covered front mo. No pets. 560 SE rebonne on Lower 541-317-0867. deck. Natural yard on huge lot. $550 mo. Wilson, Bridge, refs. req., no 750 541-385-0844; or se • Nice 2 Bdrm/1 Bath SE Bend Unit - Mostly smoking, $650, $500 Redmond Homes hardwood floors. New carpet in living room. W/D habla espanol: dep., 541-419-6542 Honda VT700 Hookups. Private back patio looks out on huge 714-227-3235 Shadow 1984, 23K, $224,000- FSBO, unob659 maintained shared back yard. Pets considered. Seeking witness to rollmany new parts, structed city light views $560 WST Houses for Rent over auto accident battery charger, 3 bdrm, 2 bath, crafts• Nice, bright SE townhome - vaulted ceilings. Sunriver Whether you’re 9/23/11 on Hwy 26, 6 good condition, man 1 level, triple gaW/D included. 2 bdrm/2 bath - one set upstairs looking for a home miles N of Madras, in$3000 OBO. rage, .23 acre, and one set down. Off-street parking. $595 WS volving light blue 541-382-1891 541-350-2496. • Furnished Studio Condo at Bend Riverside - A 3 bdrm, 1.5 bath, or need a service, 1376 sq.ft., wood Camry. Please call V. Next to the river @ $595 - includes all Utilities. your future is in stove, brand new car755 Jackson, Allstate Ins, KAWASAKI 750 2005 • Lovely park-like setting in Nottingham Sq. pet, brand new oak Sunriver/La Pine Homes these pages. 1-888-442-6219, ext like new, 2400 miles, Large 2 bdrm/2 bath home with office area. W/D floors, W/S paid, rear 4434034, regarding stored 5 years. New Hookups. Large patio off master and living deck, $850. With an ad in claim #0220134761. battery, sports shield, room. Very open. Pets considered. $850 mo. 541-480-3393,541-61 Verbal statement shaft drive, $3400 • 3 Bdrm/2 Bath Homes in Tillicum Village. 0-7803 The Bulletin's greatly appreciated. firm. 541-447-6552. Older but nice and quite spacious with laundry rooms & dbl. garages. One has fireplace, rock To The Person who 687 Thousands of ads daily walls and built-in china hutches for $850 mo.; bought tools at Cash Commercial for in print and online. One has large wood stove, formal dining room, Connection in RedRent/Lease New Custom Finbreakfast nook, kitchen pull-outs, office, all natumond. Please bring To place your ad, visit Kawasaki KLR650 ished home, 1000’ ral yard & more for $895 mo. receipt and pickup www.bendbulletin.com river frontage,5+/Office / Warehouse Dual Sport, 2005, ***** FOR ADDITIONAL PROPERTIES ***** items by Oct. 10th. Directory or call 541-385-5809 1792 sq.ft., 827 Busiacres Mtn views. low miles, $4200. CALL 541-382-0053 and/or Stop By Office 541-923-6501. ness Way, Bend. Gourmet kitchen, 4 541-350-3921 30¢/sq.ft.; 1st mo. + large bdrms with $300 dep. walk-in closets. 3.5 541-678-1404 baths, large bonus rm, ready to move Office/Warehouse loin! Bank owned. cated in SE Bend. Up Yamaha XT225 Reduced, now to 30,000 sq.ft., comDual Sport, 2006, $324,500. Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 (This special package is not available on our website) petitive rate, low miles, $3700. Bend River Realty, 541-382-3678. Rob Marken, Call 541-350-3921 Broker/Owner Office/Warehouse 541-410-4255. Accounting/Bookkeeping Domestic Services Handyman Landscaping/Yard Care Landscaping/Yard Care Space 6000 sq ft., 865 More photos (3) 12x14 doors, on ATVs www.RobMarken.com Ser- Margo Construction NOTICE: OREGON BANKRUPTCY - $399 Housekeeping Collins Lawn Boyd Acres Rd. vices: Residential & Landscape ContracLLC Since 1992 Maintenance Reasonable rates. offices, 15 years extors Law (ORS 671) • Pavers • Carpentry Weekly Services 541-382-8998 773 perience. Reason- • Remodeling • Decks • requires all busiAvailable Everything! Acreages The Bulletin offers a able rates. Call BerAeration, One-time nesses that advertise Window/Door 541-815-9256 LOWER, MORE tha, 541-788-6669 Replacement • Int/Ext to perform LandJobs Bonded AFFORDABLE Rental 14 acres of tall pines refs. avail. scape Construction & Insured Free Paint CCB 176121 • bordering Fremont Polaris 330 Trail rate! If you have a which includes: Estimate. 541-480-9714 541-480-3179 Adult Care Bosses (2), used National Forest, fronts home to rent, call a planting, decks, Drywall I DO THAT! very little, like new, Call The Yard Doctor on paved road, power Bulletin Classified fences, arbors, Home Repairs, RemodHeritage House AFH $1800 ea. OBO, for yard maint., at property. Zoned for Rep to get your ad water-features, and ALL PHASES of eling, Deck RefinishQuality care for the 541-420-1598 thatching, sod, hydroresidence. 12 miles started ASAP! installation, repair of Drywall. Small patches ing Time! Rental Reelderly. Private rooms, seeding, sprinkler sys, north of Bly, OR. 541-385-5809 irrigation systems to to remodels and pairs. CB#151573 set rates, no add-ons! water features, walls, $35,000 Easy terms be licensed with the Dennis 541-317-9768 1227 South Egan Rd, garages. No Job Too 693 more! Allen owner 541-892-2829, Landscape ContracSmall. 25 yrs. exp. in Burns.541-573-1845 541-536-1294 LCB or 541-783-2829. tors Board. This Ofice/Retail Space CCB#117379 Landscaping/Yard Care Polaris Phoenix, 5012 4-digit number is to be Dave 541-330-0894 for Rent 2005, 2+4 200cc, *** included in all adverBuilding/Contracting like new, low hours, tisements which indi- People Look for Information An Office with bath, CHECK YOUR AD Excavating runs great, $1700 or Please check your ad cate the business has About Products and Services NOTICE: Oregon state various sizes and lobest offer. on the first day it runs Every Day through a bond, insurance and law requires anycations from $200 per Levi’s Dirt Works: Call 541-388-3833 to make sure it is corworkers compensa- The Bulletin Classifieds one who contracts month, including utiliResidential/ rect. Sometimes intion for their employfor construction work ties. 541-317-8717 Commercial General structions over the ees. For your protecto be licensed with the Take these steps for Contractor Masonry phone are misundertion call 503-378-5909 Approximately 1800 Construction ConFor all your dirt and HEALTHY TURF stood and an error or use our website: sq. ft., perfect for oftractors Board (CCB). excavation needs. Chad L. Elliott Next Spring can occur in your ad. POLARIS PHOENIX www.lcb.state.or.us to fice or church. South An active license •Subcontracting Construction If this happens to your 2005, 2X4, 200cc, check license status end of Bend. Ample means the contractor •Public Works MASONRY Fall Aeration ad, please contact us new rear end & tires, before contracting parking. $675. is bonded and in- • Small & large jobs for •Improve turf health Brick * Block * Stone the first day your ad runs excellent, $1350 with the business. 541-408-2318. sured. Verify the contractors & home Small Jobs/Repairs •Improve root growth appears and we will OBO. Tilt bed trailer Persons doing landcontractor’s CCB liowners by the job - or •Enhance fertilizer Welcome L#89874. be happy to fix it as for (2) 4-wheelers, scape maintenance cense through the hour. 388-7605, 410-6945 soon as we can. $400. Buy both for do not require a LCB CCB Consumer • Driveway grading (low Fall Fertilizer Deadlines are: Week$1600. 541-932-4919 license. Website cost - get rid of pot Your most important Painting/Wall Covering days 11:00 noon for www.hirealicensedcontractor. holes & smooth out fertilizer application next day, Sat. 11:00 com your driveway) HHH a.m. for Sunday and WESTERN PAINTING or call 503-378-4621. Monday. CO. Richard Hayman, Standard and organic The Bulletin recom- • Custom pads large & small a semi-retired paintoptions 541-385-5809 mends checking with Nelson • Operated rentals & Thank you! ing contractor of 45 the CCB prior to conLandscape augering The Bulletin Classified Yamaha years. Small Jobs tracting with anyone. Compost Application Grizzly • Wet & dry utils. Maintenance *** Welcome. Interior & •Use less water Some other trades Sportsman Special • Concrete Serving Central Oregon Exterior.541-388-6910 also require addi$$$ SAVE $$$ 2000, 600cc 4-stroke, Powell Butte: 6 acres, CCB#194077 Residential & ccb#5184. tional licenses and •Improve soil push button 4x4 Ul360° views in farm 541-639-5282. Commercial certifications. tramatic, 945 mi, fields, septic apPicasso Painting • Sprinkler Fall Cleanup $3850. 541-279-5303 proved, power, OWC, Interior/Exterior. Ask Winterization Handyman Don't track it in Russ Peterson 10223 Houston Lake about our 10%discount, & Repair 870 all Winter Builder / Contractor Rd., $114,900, Affordable, Reliable. 25 • Sprinkler ERIC REEVE • leaves • needles 40 years experience Boats & Accessories 541-350-4684. yrs exp. CCB# 194351 Installation HANDY SERVICES • debris Home Repairs & Bruce Teague • Trimming Home & Commercial H gutters and more H Remodels 775 541-280-9081. • Fall Clean up Repairs, Carpentry541-318-8789 • Manufactured/ • Weekly Mowing & Painting, PressureCCB 50758 EXPERIENCED Edging Mobile Homes washing, Honey Do's. Tile/Ceramic Commercial •Bi-Monthly & monthly Small or large jobs. & Residential maint. Debris Removal On-time promise. Steve Lahey 2 bdrm, 2 bath, 1380 •Flower bed clean up Senior Discount. Construction Mastercraft sq. ft., decks. Nice 19-ft Free Estimates •Bark, Rock, etc. JUNK BE GONE All work guaranteed. Tile Installation Pro-Star 190 inboard, location in Romaine Senior Discounts •Senior Discounts l Haul Away FREE 541-389-3361 or Over 20 Yrs. Exp. 1989, 290hp, V8, 822 Village w/park views. 541-390-1466 For Salvage. Also Bonded & Insured 541-771-4463 Call For Free Estimate hrs, great cond, lots of $8,800 cash. Same Day Response Cleanups & Cleanouts extras, $10,000. Bonded & Insured 541-977-4826 1-949-338-7139 541-815-4458 Call Today! 541-231-8709 CCB#181595 CCB#166678 Mel 541-389-8107 efhsez@gmail.com LCB#8759

Autumn Specials

Summer Price

600

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Boats & Accessories

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500. 541-389-1413

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530

25’ Catalina Sailboat 1983, w/trailer, swing keel, pop top, fully loaded, $10,000, call for details, 541-480-8060

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

Used out-drive parts - Mercury OMC rebuilt marine motors: 151 $1595; 3.0 $1895; 4.3 (1993), $1995. 541-389-0435 875

Watercraft

Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

880

Motorhomes A-Class Hurricane by Four Winds 32’, 2007, 12K miles, cherry wood, leather, queen, sleeps 6, 2 slides, 2 TVs, 2 roof airs, jacks, camera, new condition, nonsmoker, $59,900 OBO. 541-548-5216.

Alfa See Ya 40 2005. 2 slides, 350 CAT. Tile. 2 door fridge with ice-maker. $98,000. 541-610-9985

Beaver Santiam 2002, 40’, 2 slides, 48K, immaculate, 330 Cummins diesel, $63,500 OBO, must sell.541-504-0874

541-385-5809

Four Winds Chateau M-31F 2006, 2 power slides, back-up camera, many upgrades, great cond. $43,900. 541-419-7099 Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp. diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 in. kitchen slide out, new tires,under cover, hwy. miles only,4 door fridge/freezer icemaker, W/D combo, Interbath tub & shower, 50 amp. propane gen & more! $55,000. 541-948-2310

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only)


G4 TUESDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809 Autos & Transportation

BOATS & RVs 805 - Misc. Items 850 - Snowmobiles 860 - Motorcycles And Accessories 865 - ATVs 870 - Boats & Accessories 875 - Watercraft 880 - Motorhomes 881 - Travel Trailers 882 - Fifth Wheels 885 - Canopies and Campers 890 - RV’s for Rent

AUTOS & TRANSPORTATION 908 - Aircraft, Parts and Service 916 - Trucks and Heavy Equipment 925 - Utility Trailers 927 - Automotive Trades 929 - Automotive Wanted 931 - Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 932 - Antique and Classic Autos 933 - Pickups 935 - Sport Utility Vehicles 940 - Vans 975 - Automobiles

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Travel Trailers

Fifth Wheels

Skyline Layton 25’ 2008, Model 208 Hunter’s Delight! Package deal! 1988 Winnebago Super Chief, 38K miles, great shape; 1988 Bronco II 4x4 to tow, 130K mostly towed miles, nice rig! $15,000 both. 541-382-3964, leave msg.

Itasca Winnebago Sunrise 1993, 27’ Class A, exc. cond., see to appreciate, 38K mi., 4K gen. w/59 hrs on it, walk around bed, tires like new - 3 yrs old, $11,500, 541-536-3916.

Jayco Greyhawk 2004, 31’ Class C, 6800 mi., hyd. jacks, new tires, slide out, exc. cond, $54,000, 541-480-8648

LTD. Like brand new. Used 4x Bend to Camp Sherman. Winterized, in storage. Carri-Lite Luxury 2009 3855 lbs Sleeps 5. by Carriage, 4 slideQueen walk around outs, inverter, satelbed w/storage, full lite sys, frplc, 2 flat bathroom, full kitchen scrn TVs. $60,000. & lrg fridge. Dual 541-480-3923 batteries & propane tanks, COACHMAN 1997 awning,corner-levelCatalina 5th wheel ing jacks, Easylift Elite 23’, slide, new tires, load hitch w/ bars, extra clean, below furnace, AC, AM/FM book. $6,500. stereo. Couch & din541-548-1422. ing table fold out for extra sleeping. $11,795 OBO. 760-699-5125.

SPRINGDALE 2005 27’ eating area slide, A/C and heat, new tires, all contents included, bedding towels, cooking and eating utensils. Great for vacation, fishing, hunting or living! $15,500 541-408-3811

Companion 26’ 1992, Done RV’ing, nonsmoker, exc. cond, some extras incl., $4500, 503-951-0447, Redmond

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

541-385-5809

Marathon V.I.P. Pre- Springdale 20’ 179RD vost H3-40 Luxury 2007, new tires, dinette Coach. Like new afw/rear window, 3-burner Fleetwood Wilderness ter $132,000 pur36’ 2005 4 slides, rear stove, oven, micro, tub chase & $130,000 in bdrm, fireplace, AC, /shower, A/C, outside renovations. Only W/D hkup beautiful shower, cover, $9200, 503-639-3355 129k orig. mi. unit! $30,500. 541-601-6350. Rare 541-815-2380 bargain at just $89,400. Look at : Need to get an ad www.SeeThisRig.com in ASAP?

Fax it to 541-322-7253 The Bulletin Classifieds Phoenix Cruiser 2001, 23 ft. V10, 51K. Large bath, bed & kitchen. Seats 6-8. Awning. $30,950. 541-923-4211 Springdale 29’ 2007, slide,Bunkhouse style, sleeps 7-8, excellent condition, $16,900, 541-390-2504

Mobile Suites, 2007, 36TK3 with 3 slideouts, king bed, ultimate living comfort, quality built, large kitchen, fully loaded, well insulated, hydraulic jacks and so much more.$56,000. 541-317-9185

Winnebago Access 31J Tent Trailer 1995 Viking, sleeps 6-8. Aw- MONTANA 3585 2008, 2008, Class C, Near ning, screened room, exc. cond., 3 slides, Low Retail Price! One 2-yr tags, extras. king bed, lrg LR, Arcowner, non- smoker, Great cond!$3950 tic insulation, all opgaraged, 7,400 miles, obo. 541-549-8747 tions $37,500. auto leveling jacks, (2) 541-420-3250 slides, upgraded queen bed,bunk beds, microwave, 3-burner range/oven, (3) TVs, and sleeps 10! Lots of storage, maintained, Weekend Warrior Toy and very clean! Only Hauler 28’ 2007,Gen, $76,995! Extended Pilgrim 27’, 2007 5th fuel station, exc. warranty available! wheel, 1 slide, AC, cond. sleeps 8, Call (541) 388-7179. TV,full awning, excelblack/gray interior, lent shape, $23,900. used 3X, $27,500. 541-350-8629 541-389-9188.

Winnebago Sightseer 2008 30B Class A, Top-of-the-line RV located at our home in southeast Bend. $79,500 OBO. Cell # 805-368-1575.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

881

882

Travel Trailers

Fifth Wheels

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS 885

Canopies & Campers Alpenlite 2002 8.5” FSC camper, good shape, $6900. 541-388-7909

Hunters, Take a Look at This! 1978 Dynacruiser 9½’ camper, fully self-contained, no leaks, clean, everything works, will fit 1988 or older pickup. $2500 firm. 541-420-6846

Forest River 26’ Surveyor 2011, Echo Lance-Legend 990 light model, alumi11’3" 1998, w/ext-cab, num construction, exc. cond., generator, used 1 time, flat solar-cell, large refrig, screen TV, DVD & CD AC, micro., magic fan, player, outside bathroom shower, 29’ Alpenlite Riviera speakers, 1 slide out, removable carpet, 1997 1 large slide-out. cherry cabinets, custom windows, outNew carpeting, solar power awning, power door shower/awning panel, AC & furnace. tongue lift, can be set-up for winterizing, 4 newer batteries & towed by most autos, elec. jacks, CD/steinverter. Great shape. $19,500, call now at Reduced from $13,900, reo/4’ stinger. $9500. 541-977-5358. Bend, 541.279.0458 to $10,900 541-389-8315 People Look for Information 541-728-8088 About Products and Services Every Day through

The Bulletin Classifieds

Find Your Future Home Here! Thousands of ads daily in print and online. To place your ad, visit www.bendbulletin.com or call 541-385-5809

WANT TO BUY: 4-Wheeler Eagle Camper for 2002 Alpha “See Ya” 30’ Tundra Toyota pickup, 1996, 2 slides, A/C, 541-388-0007. heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $14,900. 541-923-3417. Cardinal 34.5 RL (40’) When ONLY the BEST will do! 2009, 4 slides, convection oven + micro., 2003 Lance 1030 Deluxe Model Camper, dual A/C, fireplace, loaded, phenomenal extra ride insurance (3 condition. $17,500. yr. remaining incl. 2007 Dodge 6.7 tires), air sleeper sofa Cummins Diesel 3500 + queen bed, $50,900 4x4 long bed, 58K mi, OBO, must see to ap$34,900. Or buy as preciate, unit, $48,500. 406-980-1907, Terre541-331-1160 bonne

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Utility Trailers

Antique & Classic Autos

Pickups

Sport Utility Vehicles

Automobiles

Towmaster Equipment Trailer, 14,000 lb capacity. Tandemn axle, 4-wheel brakes, 18’ bed, heavy duty ramps, spare tire mounted, side mounted fork pockets, all tires in good condition. $3995. Call 541-420-1846. 931

Automotive Parts, Service & Accessories

Mercury Monterrey 1965, Exc. All original, 4-dr. sedan, in storage last 15 yrs., 390 High Compression engine, new tires & license, reduced to $2850, 541-410-3425.

GMC ½-ton Pickup, 1972, LWB, 350hi motor, mechanically A-1, interior great; body needs some TLC. $4000 OBO. Call 541-382-9441

Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 38K mi., exc. Chrysler La Baron Convertible 1990, cond, meteor gray, 2 Good condition, sets of wheels and $3200, 541-416-9566 new tires, fully loaded, $59,750 firm. Dodge Durango 1999 541-480-1884 126K mi. 4X4 Great cond. 7 passenger 940 $4200. 541-475-2197 Vans

GMC Z71 1993 4X4 CHEVY ASTRO EXT 1/3 interest in Colum1993 AWD mini van, 350, 71K mi, Auto AC bia 400, located at (4) Hankook Winter I Plymouth Barracuda 3 seats, rear barn PW PL 1 Owner, AlSunriver. $138,500. 1966, original car! 300 Pike studded tires on doors, white, good ways garaged, PRISCall 541-647-3718 hp, 360 V8, centersteel rims, tires/wheels. Pretty Ford Mustang ConTINE $6995. lines, (Original 273 185/65R14, 90T, vertible LX 1989, V8 interior, clean, no Executive Hangar 602-418-9981, Bend eng & wheels incl.) $300. 541-647-4232 engine, white w/red rips or tears. Drives at Bend Airport 541-593-2597 interior, 44K mi., exc. exc! $2500. Free (KBDN). Set of 4 studded cond., $5995, Triumph TR-6, 1974, trip to D.C. for WWII 60’ wide x 50’ deep, tires on rims, for 84K, partial engine 541-389-9188. Vets! (541) with 55’ wide x 17’ Honda Odyssey, rebuild, rollbar, nice International 318-9999 or Flat high bi-fold door. 225/ 60R16, $250. hobby car, runs great. Bed Pickup 1963, 1 (541) 815-3639 Natural gas heat, of$9900 OBO, No Fri night or Sat ton dually, 4 spd. fice & bathroom. 541.788.1416 trans., great MPG, Parking for 6 cars. calls. could be exc. wood Chevy Gladiator Adjacent to Frontage 541-504-8963 VW BAJA BUG hauler, runs great, 1993, great shape, Rd; great visibility for new brakes, $1950. 1974 1776cc engreat mileage, full Kia Rhondo 2009, aviation bus. $235K We Buy Scrap Auto & Truck Batteries, $10ea loaded,USB & aux 541-419-5480. gine. New: shocks, pwr., all leather, 541-948-2126 Also buying junk cars & ports, satellite radio, tires, disc brakes, auto, 4 captains T-Hangar for rent trucks, (up to $500), & DVD, 3rd row brand interior paint, flat chairs, fold down at Bend airport. scrap metal! Call new snows, 52K, black. $5900 OBO. bed, fully loaded, Call 541-382-8998. $15,500, 541-912-1467 partial trades con$3950 OBO, call 541-280-4875. sidered. 541-536-6223. 916 932 541-322-9529. Trucks & Antique & Heavy Equipment Classic Autos ToyotaTundra 2000 SR5 4x4 perfect cond., all scheduled Dodge Grand CaraWillis Jeep 1956, maint. completed, van SXT 2005: new rebuilt motor, looks new in/out. Mercury Cougar StoNGo, 141k miles, no miles, power take $10,000 1994, XR7 V8, 77K power doors/trunk off winch, exc. tires, 541-420-2715 mi, excellent cond. $7850. asking $3999, $4695. Call 541-639-9960 1982 INT. Dump with Cadillac Eldorado Con935 541-389-5355. 541-526-1443 vertible 1976 exc Arborhood, 6k on reSport Utility Vehicles cond, 80K, beautiful, built 392, truck refurJust bought a new boat? Dodge Ram AC, cruise, power evbished, has 330 gal. Sell your old one in the 4-WHEELER’S OR Van 1990 erything, leather intewater tank with pump classiieds! Ask about our HUNTER’S SPECIAL! Customized to carry rior, fuel inj V8, and hose. Everything Super Seller rates! Jeep 4-dr wagon, 1987 livestock such as $7500. 541-815-5600 works, $8,500 OBO. 541-385-5809 4x4, silver, nice Alpacas, Sheep, 541-977-8988 wheels, 183K, lots of Goats etc. Runs 933 Chevrolet 3500 Service miles left yet! Off-road Great, Needs a Pickups Truck, 1992, 4x4, auor on. $1400. Call paint job. tomatic, 11-ft storage 541-318-9999 or 78K miles, $2,000. Chevrolet 2001 crew bed. Liftgate, com541-815-3639. (541) 447-4570 cab dually. 3500 Silpressor & generator Free trip to D.C. verado LT leather, all Chevrolet Corvette shelf inside box, for WWII Vets! power, 8.1 litre gas 1967 Convertible Call The Bulletin At locked storage boxes with Allison transmiswith removable hard both sides of bed, 541-385-5809. sion. 82K miles, extop. #'s matching, 4 new tires, regular Place Your Ad Or E-Mail cellent cond. $15,495. speed, 327-350hp, All British Car maintenance & serAt: www.bendbulletin.com 541-408-0386 black leather interior. Cruise-in! vice every 3K miles, $58,500 set up for towing FORD Windstar Mini Every Thurs, 5-7pm at 541-306-6290 McBain’s British Fish heavy equip. $3995. Van, 1995, 138K, nice Chevy Suburban LT & Chips, Hwy 97 541-420-1846 inside & out, only half 2004 , 90K, 1-owner, Redmond, OR. MUST SELL worn out! Seats 7, soccer/ski trip ready, Check out the 541-408-3317 For Memorial Michelins, nice leather, cruise, Onclassiieds online 70 Monte Carlo wheels, drives excelstar, $15,000, Chevy S10, 1997, 6-cyl, www.bendbulletin.com All original, beautiful, lent 1 look is worth 541-389-7365 5-spd AT, 4WD, AC, car, completely new Updated daily 1000 words! $1800. 111K mi, bedliner, resuspension and brake 541-318-9999 or ally good cond,$3500 system, plus extras. 541-815-3639. Free 541-788-0087; $4000 OBO. Trip to D.C. for WWII 541-382-0214 1980 Classic Mini 541-593-3072 Vets! Cooper All original, rust-free, 975 classic Mini Cooper in CHEVY SUBURBAN LT Automobiles Chevy 18 ft. Flatbed perfect cond. $10,000 2005 72,000 miles, Ford F-250 1986, 1975, 454 eng., 2-spd OBO. 541-408-3317 new shocks, rear Lariat, x-cab, 2WD, trans, tires 60%, brakes, one owner, Audi S4 2005, 4.2 auto, gas or proRuns/drives well, $16,995, pane, 20K orig. mi., Avant Quattro, tipmotor runs great, Chevy Camaro Z28 541-480-0828. new tires, $5000, tronic, premium & I-ROC 1989, 22K mi, $1650. 541-771-5535 541-480-8009. winter wheels & T-Top, almost show tires, Bilstein room cond, 5.7L, alChevy Tahoe LT shocks, coil over MUST SELL ways garaged, $9995. 2001, Taupe, very, springs, HD anti GMC 6000 dump 541-389-5645 very clean, 102K sway, APR exhaust, truck 1990. 7 yard miles, 1 owner, gaK40 radar, dolphin bed, low mi., good raged, maintenance gray, ext. warranty, condition, new tires! records provided, 56K, garaged, ONLY $3500 OBO. new brakes, new Ford F250 1997 X-cab $30,000. 541-593-3072 battery, lots of ex4x4 , 112K, 460, AC, 541-593-2227 tras, $10,000, PW, PL, Split window, 1950 CHEVY CLUB 541-504-4224 factory tow pkg, reCOUPE, Cobalt Blue, ceiver hitches, front & Great condition, runs rear, incl. 5th wheel Mini Cooper Clubman well, lots of spare platform & Warn GMC Ventura 3500 S, 2009, 24Kmi, 6-spd parts. $9995. Call winch. Unit incl. cloth 1986, refrigerated, manual, heated 541-419-7828 Excursion interior, exc. cond. Ford w/6’x6’x12’ box, has leather seats, loaded. 2005, 4WD, diesel, BMW 323i convertible, $7,000. call: 2 sets tires w/rims., Avg 30+mpg, exlnt exc. cond., $24,000, 541-546-9821, Culver 1250 lb. lift gate, cond, must see! 1999. 91K miles. call 541-923-0231. new engine, $4,500, $23,500. Great condition, 541-389-6588, ask 541-504-7741 beautiful car, incredfor Bob. ibly fun ride! $9300. Mitsubishi 3000 GT Chevy Corvette Coupe Jeep CJ-7 1984 541-419-1763 FORD F250 4x4 1999, auto., pearl 2006, 8,471 orig 4WD. New Mac Mid Liner 1991, 1994 white, very low mi. miles, 1 owner, alSnow/Mud tires, with cabin chassis, air 460 engine, cab and $9500. 541-788-8218. ways garaged, red, 2 runs Great and has brakes, power steera half, 4-spd stick tops, auto/paddle a custom installed ing, auto transmisshift,5th wheel hitch, shift, LS-2, Corsa exSaab 9-3 SE 1999 2nd rear axle. Great sion, diesel, near new 181K miles. $2100. haust, too many opconvertible, 2 door, for hunting and recap rear tires, 30% Call 541-389-9764 tions to list, pristine Navy with black soft fishing. Soft Top, front tires, new starter, car, $37,500. Serious top, tan interior, very Clean $5,500 BMW 325i convertible PTO & hydraulic only, call good condition. (541) 447-4570 2003 in exc cond, Ford F250 XLT 4x4, pump. Will take Visa 541-504-9945 $5200 firm. 54,500 mi. Silver, 1985, 4-speed, or Mastercard, $2500, 541-317-2929. black top, great hangooseneck hitch, 541-923-0411. dling, fun car! good work truck! JEEP GRAND $15,400. $1450 or best offer. SUBARUS!!! CHEROKEE 541-788-4229 Call 541-923-0442 Nice clean and fully LIMITED 2001 Pette Bone Merserviced . Most 4x4, 90k, leather. A cury Fork Lift, 6000 Chevy Wagon 1957, FORD F350 2003, come with 3 year, cream puff! One nice lb., 2 stage, pro4-dr. , complete, 36,000 mile crew cab 4x4 V-10, lady’s car. Only pane, hardrubber $15,000 OBO, trades, warranty. Call The great tires, towing $7,900 tires, $4000, please call Guru: 382-6067 or pkg, power windows, 541-815-3639, 541-389-5355. 541-420-5453. visit us at locks and seats, CD. 318-9999 BMW 330 CI 2002 www.subaguru.com 132,621 miles, CarChrysler 300 Coupe great cond., Newer fax avail. $9995. 1967, 440 engine, tires. Harmon/Kardon See craigslist auto. trans, ps, air, stereo system. Ask255692031 for pics. frame on rebuild, reing $10,950. 541-390-7649. painted original blue, 541-480-7752. Volvo 780 1990, exoriginal blue interior, tremely rare car, Beroriginal hub caps, exc. Buicks 1995 LeSabre Chevy Bonanza FORD Pickup 1977, tone designed & built, chrome, asking $9000 Limited, 113K, $2950; 1978, runs good. Jeep Ltd Wagoneer step side, 351 WindVolvo reliability & or make offer. 1998 LeSabre, 93k, $6500 OBO. Call 4WD, 1989 runs sor, 115,000 miles, safety, Italian el541-385-9350. $3900; 1999 Regal 541-390-1466. great, exc cond, MUST SEE! egance, all parts GS V-6 supercharged leather seats, full pwr, The Bulletin $3800 OBO. avail., Italian leather, $3500; 2002 LeSabre, winch, brushgrd, tow 925 541-350-1686 To Subscribe call Burl Wood, drives 102k, $4950; 2006 pkg, 96K, perfect beautifully, $5500, 541-385-5800 or go to Utility Trailers Lucerne CX, stun2nd car/hunting rig, 541-593-4016. www.bendbulletin.com ning black, 70k, $3850. Steve, $7900; 2006 Lucerne 541-815-5600 Looking for your CXL 58k, white, $12,500. Bob next employee? 12 ft. Hydraulic 541-318-9999 or Place a Bulletin help dump trailer w/extra Chrysler SD 4-Door Sam 541-815-3639. wanted ad today and sides, dual axle, 1930, CDS Royal Ford Sport Trac Ltd reach over 60,000 steel ramps, spare Standard, 8-cylinder, Ed. 2007 4x4, many Cadillac El Dorado readers each week. tire, tarp, excellent body is good, needs extras incl. new tires, 1994, Total cream Your classified ad condition. $6500 some restoration, 107k, perfect winter Nissan Xterra S - 4x4 puff, body, paint, trunk will also appear on firm. 541-419-6552 runs, taking bids, SUV, $14,995. as showroom, blue bendbulletin.com 2006, AT, 76K, good 541-383-3888, 541-306-7546 leather, nicely which currently reall-weather tires, 541-815-3318 2005 7’x14’ Interstate patina-ed gorgeous ceives over 1.5 mil$13,500 obo. Cargo Trailer, used light blue, $1700 lion page views 858-345-0084 very little, $3000. wheels w/snow tires every month at 541-536-4115 although car has not no extra cost. Bullebeen wet in 8 years. tin Classifieds 24-ft Wells Fargo On trip to Boise last Get Results! Call trailer, winch, many week avg. 28.5 mpg., 385-5809 or place extras, $5500 or best Dodge pickup 1962 $5700, 541-593-4016. your ad on-line at offer. 541-548-7126 D100 classic, origibendbulletin.com nal 318 wide block, Porsche Cayenne 2004, push button trans, 86k, immac.,loaded, straight, runs good, dealer maint, $19,500. The Bulletin recom$1250 firm. Bend, 503-459-1580. Chevy Corsica Big Tex Landscapmends extra caution 831-295-4903 1989, Attractive5-dr., ing/ ATV Trailer, when purchasing hatchback, V-6 auto, dual axle flatbed, Ford Mustang Coupe products or services A/C, retiree’s ve7’x16’, 7000 lb. 1966, original owner, from out of the area. hicle, well mainGVW, all steel, V8, automatic, great Sending cash, tained, great cond., $1400. shape, $9000 OBO. checks, or credit in$2000 OBO, 541-382-4115, or 530-515-8199 formation may be 541-330-6993. 541-280-7024. subject to FRAUD. Porsche Cayenne S For more informa2008 Nearly every tion about an adveroption: 20" wheels, Chevy Corvette 1988 tiser, you may call 4-spd manual with navigation, Bi-Xenon the Oregon State 3-spd O/D. Sharp, lights, thermally insuAttorney General’s loaded, 2 tops, (tinted lated glass, tow pkg, Office Consumer & metal. New AC, stainless steel nose Interstate West En- Ford T-Bird 1955, White Protection hotline at soft & hard tops, new water pump, brake & trim, moonroof, Bose closed Trailer, 20’ 1-877-877-9392. paint, carpet, upholclutch, master cylinsys, heated seats. Car hauler, cabinets, stery, rechromed, der & clutch slave cyl. 66K mi. MSRP was tile floor, $4995, nice! $30,000. $6500 OBO. over $75K; $34,900. 541-595-5363. 541-548-1422 541-419-0251. 541-954-0230

Truck with Snow Plow!


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

G5 TUESDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2011 • THE BULLETIN %

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE DBE NOTICE The Central Oregon Intergovernmental Council hereby announces the goal of 1.72% participation by Disadvantaged Business Enterprises in all COIC federally funded contracting projects, exclusive of federal funding to purchase transit vehicles, in federal fiscal years 2012-14. A description of the goals and methodology are available for inspection at 334 NE Hawthorne Ave, Bend between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, for 30 days following publication of this notice. Central Oregon Intergovernmental Council and U.S. Department of Transportation will accept comments on these goals for 45 days from the date of this notice. Comments should be addressed to: U.S. DOT, Federal Transit Administration, 915 Second Ave., Suite 3142, Seattle, WA 98174. LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES In the Matter of the Estate of LAURENCE R. SERRURIER, Deceased. No. 11PB0101 NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed personal representative of the above estate. All persons having claims against the estate are required to present them to the undersigned personal representative within four (4) months after the date of first publication of this notice, at 900 SW Fifth Avenue, Suite 2600, Portland, Oregon 97204-1268 or such claims may be barred. All persons whose rights may be affected by the proceedings in the estate may obtain additional information from the records of the court, the personal representative or the attorneys for the personal representative. DATED and first published this 27th day of Sept., 2011. Patricia R. Serrurier 41 SW Allen Road Bend, OR 97702 Personal Representative Pendleton H. Serrurier, OSB No. 91511 STOEL RIVES LLP 900 SW fifth Avenue, Suite 2600 Portland, OR 97204-1268 Telephone: (503) 294-9440 Fax: (503) 220-2480 Email:

phserrurier@stoel.com

Of Attorneys for Personal Representative LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF SALE John A. Berge, Successor Trustee under the Trust Deed described below, hereby elects to sell, pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes Sections 86.705 to 86.795, the real property described below at 11:00 a.m. on December 8, 2011, in the lobby of the offices of Bryant, Lovlien & Jarvis, 591 SW Mill View Way, Bend, Oregon. All obligations of performance which are secured by the Trust Deed hereinafter described are in default for reasons set forth below and the beneficiary declares all sums due under the note secured by the trust deed described herein immediately due and payable. GRANTOR: 4784 Highway 97 Property, LLC, an Oregon limited liability company. BENEFICIARY: Home Federal Bank TRUST DEED RECORDED: October 5, 2006 at 2006-67237 of Official Records, Deschutes County, Oregon. PROPERTY COVERED BY TRUST DEED: The Northerly 124.00 feet of the South 418.00 feet of that portion of the North Half of the Northeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter(N1/2NE1/4NW1/4) of Section Thirty-two (32), Township Fifteen (15) South,

Range Thirteen (13), East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, lying on the East side of Highway 97; EXCEPT the Easterly 593.70 feet thereof. ALSO EXCEPTING that portion conveyed to State of Oregon, by and through its Department of Transportation, Highway Division, recorded November 6, 1990. in Book 222, Page 1729, Deschutes County Records. This property is commonly known as 4784 South Highway 97, Redmond, Deschutes County, Oregon 97756. DEFAULT: Failure to pay: 1. Regular installment payments due October 2010 through May 2011 at $3,063.58 each for a total of $25,240.92, plus interest through June 1, 2011, in the amount of $16,904.73; 2. Late charges of five percent (5%) of the monthly payment amount for installments more than 16 days delinquent for a total amount of $2,232.28; 3. Pay-off Fees in the amount of $90.00; 4. Other - Trustee's Sale Guarantee: $1,056.00. SUM OWING ON OBLIGATION SECURED BY TRUST DEED: Principal balance of $347,561.63 with interest at 18 percent per annum from June 2, 2011, until paid. Notice is given that any person named pursuant to Section 86.753, Oregon Revised Statutes, has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by curing the abovedescribed defaults, by payment of the entire amount due (other than such portions of principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), and by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale. JOHN A. BERGE, Successor Trustee LEGAL NOTICE On October 8, 2011, at 10:00 am at 257 SE 2nd St., Alliance Storage, LLC, will handle the disposition of the entire contents of Units #46 10x10 Victoria Pearce, #206 10x20 Meranda Holmes, #223 5x10 Emil Kelly, #250 5x5 Susan C. Steves, #278 5x10 Tina Delgado, #309 5x10 Brad Simpson, #553 8x10 Mary Johnson, Katie Herbert, to satisfy said lien of the above named.

LEGAL NOTICE REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL The Redmond School District Board of Directors requests proposals from experienced Construction Managers/General Contractors to construct a Major Remodel of Redmond High School located at 675 SW Rimrock in Redmond, Oregon. It is the intent of the School Board to enter into a contract with the selected Construction Manager/General Contractor (CM/GC) which will include a Fixed Fee and a Guaranteed Maximum Price for the entire scope of the work. CM/GC's responding to this request will be evaluated based upon their qualifications, prior experience, proposed schedule and plan for completing the work, associated fees, and other relevant factors. The project will include, but not limited to, replacement of main electrical switch gear; ADA upgrades to interior and exterior; exterior window and door replacement; remodel of administration area; various reconfigurations to classrooms; and library/media center. Copies of the Request for Proposal document may be obtained by calling the District's office (541) 923-8938 or in person at 145 SE Salmon, Redmond, OR 97756. Proposals are due prior to 3:00 P.M. PDT, October 27, 2011. Proposals received after the specified time will not be considered. The District plans to interview one or more of the top finalists. Interviews are tentatively scheduled for Wednesday November 9, 2011.

All proposers must be registered with the Oregon Construction Contractors Board prior to submitting proposals. Failure to register will be sufficient cause to reject proposals as non-responsive. For this project, the provisions of ORS 279C.800 through 279C.870, relative to prevailing wage rates, shall be complied with by the Contractor and subcontractors. This solicitation does not obligate the Redmond School District to pay any costs incurred in preparation or presentations, or to select any proposer who responds. The District reserves the right to reject any proposal not in compliance with all prescribed requirements and may reject for good cause any or all proposals upon a written finding that it is in the public interest to do so. LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0071655286 T.S. No.: 11-02628-6 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust dated as of January 25, 2007 made by, CASEY A. CRISLER, A SINGLE PERSON, as the original grantor, to FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INS CO, as the original trustee, in favor of WELLS FARGO BANK NA. as the original beneficiary, recorded on January 26, 2007, as Instrument No. 2007-05267 of Official Records in the Office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, Oregon (the "Deed of Trust"). The current beneficiary is: Bank of America, National Association, (the "Beneficiary"), APN: 209604 A parcel of land located in the Northwest Quarter (NW1/4) of Section 5, Township 18 South, Range 12 East, Willamette Meridian, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon, described as follows: Adjusted Lot 17 of Lot Line Adjustment LLA 04-513 and a portion of Lot 16 of the Plat of Otter Run, described as follows: Commencing at the Northwest corner of Lot 16 of said Plat of Otter Run; thence Southeasterly along a 300.00 foot radius curve, concave Northeasterly, an arc length of 17.04 feet, through a central angle of 03 degrees 35' 16", the chord of said curve bears South 75 degrees 21' 08" East, 17.04 feet to the true point of beginning of this description; thence Southeasterly along a 300.00 foot radius curve, concave Northeasterly, an arc length of 6.55 feet, through a central angle of 01 degrees 15' 01", the chord of said curve bears South 77 degrees 36' 16" East, 6.55 feet; thence South 11 degrees 22' 38" East along the Northeast line of said Lot 17, a distance of 23.74 feet; thence South 46 degrees 25' 15" East, a distance of 6.33 feet; thence South 46 degrees 00' 39" West, 67.14 feet; thence North 43 degrees 57' 48" West, 31.78 feet; thence North 46 degrees 00' 39" East, 76.03 feet to the point of beginning of this description known as: 680 SOUTHWEST OTTER WAY, BEND, OR Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default(s) for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; together with other fees and expenses incurred by the Beneficiary; and which defaulted amounts total: $23,462.42 as of September 14, 2011. By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit; The sum of $547,453.91 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.12500% per annum from February 1, 2011 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all Trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice

hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as the duly appointed Trustee under the Deed of Trust will on January 31, 2012 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of the Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, Trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 1920 Main Street, Suite 1120, Irvine, CA 92614 949-252-4900 FOR SALE INFORMATION CALL: 714.730.2727 Website for Trustee's Sale Information: www.lpsasap.com TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "Trustee" and 'Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: September 27, 2011 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Michael Busby, Authorized Signature ASAP# 4099867 10/04/2011, 10/11/2011, 10/18/2011, 10/25/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0030995922 T.S- No.: 11-03124-6 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust dated as of February 16, 2006 made by, AMANDA M ALLEN, as the original grantor, to DESCHUTES COUNTY TITLE, as the original trustee, in favor of MERS AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICAN BROKERS CONDUITS, as the original beneficiary, recorded on February 27, 2006, as Instrument No. 2006-13293 of Official Records in the Office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, Oregon (the "Deed of Trust"). The current beneficiary is: Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee for American Home Mortgage Assets Trust 2006-1, Mortgage-Backed Pass-Through Certificates Series 2006-1, (the "Beneficiary"). APN: 189786 LOT SEVENTY-SIX OF EASTBROOK ESTATES, PHASE FOUR, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 2447 NE MOONLIGHT DR, BEND, OR Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default(s) for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; and

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Legal Notices g which defaulted amounts total: $4,131.54 as of August 30, 2011. By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $206,150.36 together with interest thereon at the rate of 2.90700% per annum from April 1, 2011 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all Trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as the duly appointed Trustee under the Deed of Trust will on January 20, 2012 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of the Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, Trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 1920 Main Street, Suite 1120, Irvine, CA 92614 949-252-4900 FOR SALE INFORMATION CALL: 714.730.2727 Website for Trustee's Sale Information: www.lpsasap.com TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "Trustee" and 'Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 09/20/2011 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Michael Busby, Authorized Signature ASAP# 4094556 09/27/2011, 10/04/2011, 10/11/2011, 10/18/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 1218028836 T.S. No.: 11-02049-6 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust dated as of May 27, 2004 made by, JOEL A. DEWOLF, A MARRIED MAN, as the original grantor, to DAVID FENNELL, ATTORNEY, as the original trustee, in favor of UNION FEDERAL BANK OF INDIANAPOLIS, as the original beneficiary, recorded on June 1, 2004, as Instrument No. 2004-32288 of Official Records in the Office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, Oregon (the "Deed of Trust"). The current beneficiary is: US Bank National Association, as Trustee for Bear Stearns Asset Backed Securities Trust 2004-AC4, (the "Beneficiary"). APN: 164740 Description of a parcel of land situate in a portion of the Southeast Quarter of

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Legal Notices the Southeast Quarter (SE1/4SE1/4) of Section Eight (8), Township Fifteen (15) South, Range Thirteen (13), East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, more particularly described as follows: Commencing at a brass cap in a monument case monumenting the Southeast comer of Section Eight (8), Township Fifteen (15) South, Range Thirteen (13), East of the Willamette Meridian, the Initial Point; thence North 00º21'37" East along the East line of the Southeast Quarter (SE1/4) of said Section 8 and along the centerline of N.W. 19th Street, a 60 foot wide county road, 30.00 feet each side of said centerline 661.11 feet to the South line of the Northeast Quarter of the Southeast Quarter of the Southeast Quarter (NE1/4SE1/4SEI/4); thence South 89º51'05" West along said South line 30.00 feet to a 5/8" rebar on the West right of way of said street; thence North 00º21'37" East along said West line 188.53 feet to a 1/2" pipe and the true point of beginning; thence North 89º38'23" West normal to said West line 470.00 feet to a 1/2" pipe; thence North 00º21'37" East parallel with said West line 185.00 feet to a 1/2" pipe; thence South 89º38'23" East normal to said West line 470.00 feet to a 1/2" pipe on the West right of way of said street; thence South 00º21'37" West along said West line 185.00 feet to the point of beginning. Commonly known as: 345 NW 19TH STREET, REDMOND, OR Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default(s) for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; together with other fees and expenses incurred by the Beneficiary; and which defaulted amounts total: $38,451.45 as of August 18, 2011. By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $188,000.00 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.62500% per annum from November 1, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all Trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as the duly appointed Trustee under the Deed of Trust will on January 4, 2012 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of the Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, Trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by ten-

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Legal Notices y dering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 1920 Main Street, Suite 1120, Irvine, CA 92614 949-252-4900 FOR SALE INFORMATION CALL: 714.730.2727 Website for Trustee's Sale Information: www.lpsasap.com in construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: September 2, 2011 Michael Busby, Authorized Signature ASAP# 4084347 09/13/2011, 09/20/2011, 09/27/2011, 10/04/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0031365422 T.S. No.: 11-02714-6 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust dated as of September 1, 2006 made by, STEVEN L HAINES, as the original grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as the original trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICAN BROKERS CONDUIT, as the original beneficiary, recorded on September 7, 2006, as Instrument No. 2006-61124 of Official Records in the Office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, Oregon (the "Deed of Trust"). The current beneficiary is: HSBC Bank USA, National Association, as Trustee for Luminent Mortgage Trust 2006-7, Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2006-7, (the "Beneficiary"). APN: 195148 LOT

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104 OF ELKHORN ESTATES, PHASE 8, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 20008 POWERS RD, BEND, OR Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default(s) for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; together with other fees and expenses incurred by the Beneficiary; less unapplied funds held on account thereof; and which defaulted amounts total: $8,620.09 as of August 30, 2011. By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $296,032.15 together with interest thereon at the rate of 3.21800% per annum from February 1, 2011 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all Trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as the duly appointed Trustee under the Deed of Trust will on January 20, 2012 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, self at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his suc-

g cessor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of the Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, Trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 1920 Main Street, Suite 1120, Irvine, CA 92614 949-252-4900 FOR SALE INFORMATION CALL: 714.730.2727 Website for Trustee's Sale Information: www.lpsasap.com TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: September 20, 2011 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Michael Busby, Authorized Signature ASAP# 4094531 09/27/2011, 10/04/2011, 10/11/2011, 10/18/2011

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LEGAL NOTICE OREGON TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No: D528263 OR Unit Code: D Loan No: 115226642/MARTIN Min No: 100186300000142222 AP #1: 126025 Title #: 5534546 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by HOLLEY A MARTIN as Grantor, to FIDELITY SERVICE CORPORATION as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC. ACTING SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR STERLING SAVINGS BANK as Beneficiary. Dated April 19, 2007, Recorded April 26, 2007 as Instr. No. 2007-23933 in Book --- Page --- of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of DESCHUTES County; OREGON covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: LOT 29, BLOCK 19, OREGON WATER WONDERLAND UNIT 2, DEDCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: 5 PYMTS FROM 02/01/11 TO 06/01/11 @ 1,630.42 $8,152.10 5 L/C FROM 02/16/11 TO 06/16/11 @ 58.61 $293.05 IMPOUND/ESCROW DEFICIT $1,811.92 MISCELLANEOUS FEES $632.14 Sub-Total of Amounts in Arrears:$10,889.21 Together with any default in the payment of recurring obligations as they become due. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Trust Deed, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. The street or other common designation if any, of the real property described above is purported to be : 55994 WOOD DUCK DR, BEND, OR 97707 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street or other common designation. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: Principal $201,764.13, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from 01/01/11, and such other costs and fees are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. WHEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on October 31, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 A.M. in accord with the Standard Time, as established by ORS 187.110, INSIDE THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND, BEND , County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, (which is the new date, time and place set for said sale) sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor had or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S.86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation of the Trust Deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. It will be necessary for you to contact the undersigned prior to the time you tender reinstatement or payoff so that you may be advised of the exact amount, including trustee's costs and fees, that you will be required to pay. Payment must be in the full amount in the form of cashier's or certified check. The effect of the sale will be to deprive you and all those who hold by, through and under you of all interest in the property described above. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. The Beneficiary may be attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained may be used for that purpose. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If available, the expected opening bid and/or postponement information may be obtained by calling the following telephone number(s) on the day before the sale: (714) 480-5690 or you may access sales information at www.tacforeclosures.com/sales DATED: 06/23/11 CHRISTOPHER C. DORR,LLC, OSBA # 992526 By CHRISTOPHER C. DORR, ATTORNEY AT LAW DIRECT INQUIRIES TO: T.D. SERVICE COMPANY FORECLOSURE DEPARTMENT 1820 E. FIRST ST., SUITE 210 P.O. BOX 11988 SANTA ANA, CA 92711-1988 (800) 843-0260 TAC# 945878 PUB: 09/23/11, 09/27/11, 10/04/11, 10/11/11


TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2011 G6

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. #: OR-11-445261-NH Reference is made to that certain deed made by, KIM KOLANDER as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., ("MERS"), AS NOMINEE FOR FIRST HORIZON HOME LOAN CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, dated 6/7/2006, recorded 6/8/2006, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/ reel/ volume number XXX at page number XXX fee/ file/ instrument/ microfile/ reception number 2006-39719,, covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 188625 LT 5 OF STONEBROOK, PHASE III, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 2235 NE EDGEWATER DR BEND, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantors: The installments of principal and interest which became due on 2/1/2011, and all subsequent installments of principal and interest through the date of this Notice, plus amounts that are due for late charges, delinquent property taxes, insurance premiums, advances made on senior liens, taxes and/or insurance, trustee's fees, and any attorney fees and court costs arising from or associated with the beneficiaries efforts to protect and preserve its security, all of which must be paid as a condition of reinstatement, including all sums that shall accrue through reinstatement or pay-off. Nothing in this notice shall be construed as a waiver of any fees owing to the Beneficiary under the Deed of Trust pursuant to the terms of the loan documents. Monthly Payment $1,753.97 Monthly Late Charge $87.70 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $317,700.00 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.6250 per annum from 1/1/2011 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on 1/23/2012 at the hour of 11:00:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W. BOND STREET, BEND, OR County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. For Sale Information Call: 714-730-2727 or Login to: www.lpsasap.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Pur suant to Oregon Law, this sale will not be deemed final until the Trustee's deed has been issued by FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY. If there are any irregularities discovered within 10 days of the date of this sale, that the trustee will rescind the sale, return the buyer's money and take further action as necessary. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee's Attorney. NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for 1/23/2012. Unless the lender who is foreclosing on this property is paid, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. The following information applies to you only if you occupy and rent this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a residential tenant. If the foreclosure goes through, the business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out. The buyer must first give you an eviction notice in writing that specifies the date by which you must move out. The buyer may not give you this notice until after the foreclosure sale happens. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the buyer can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES YOU TO BE NOTIFIED IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERTY AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNDER A LEGITIMATE RENTAL AGREEMENT, FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU A NOTICE IN WRITING A CERTAIN NUMBER OF DAYS BEFORE THE BUYER CAN REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT. THE FEDERAL LAW THAT REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU THIS NOTICE IS EFFECTIVE UNTIL DECEMBER 31,2012. Under federal law, the buyer must give you at least 90 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If you are renting this property under a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), you may stay until the end of your lease term. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 90 days left. STATE LAW NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS IF THE FEDERAL LAW DOES NOT APPLY, STATE LAW STILL REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING BEFORE REQUIRING YOU TO MOVE OUT IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THE PROPERTY AS A TENANT IN GOOD FAITH. EVEN IF THE FEDERAL LAW REQUIREMENT IS NO LONGER EFFECTIVE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 2012, THE REQUIREMENT UNDER STATE LAW STILL APPLIES TO YOUR SITUATION. Under State law, if you have a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), the buyer must give you at least 60 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 30 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 30 days left. If you are renting under a month-to-month or week-to-week rental agreement, the buyer must give you at least 30 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. IMPORTANT: For the buyer to be required to give you a notice under state law, you must prove to the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale that you are occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The name and address of the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale is shown on this notice under the heading "TRUSTEE". You must mail or deliver your proof not later than 12/24/2011 (30 days before the date first set for the foreclosure sale). Your proof must be in writing and should be a copy of your rental agreement or lease. If you do not have a written rental agreement or lease, you can provide other proof, such as receipts for rent paid. ABOUT YOUR SECURITY DEPOSIT Under state law, you may apply your security deposit and any rent you paid in advance against the current rent you owe your landlord. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from your rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe your current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENANCY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out. You should contact the buyer to discuss that possibility if you would like to stay. Under state law, if the buyer accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the buyer becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise, the buyer is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf and you must move out by the date the buyer specifies in a notice to you. YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A DEPOSIT OR RENT YOU PREPAID AGAINST YOUR CURRENT RENT OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE AND OF ANY NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR DEPOSIT OR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer or are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance is included with this notice. Oregon State Bar: (503) 684-3763; (800) 452-7636 Legal assistance: www.lawhelp.org/or/index.cfm Dated: 9/16/11 FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as trustee 3 First American Way Santa Ana, CA 92707 Signature By: Timothy Donlon, Assistant Secretary Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington as agent for FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 For Non-Sale Information: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 Fax: 619-645-7716 If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right's against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. ASAP# FNMA4093047 10/04/2011, 10/11/2011, 10/18/2011, 10/25/2011

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-ALT-000287 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, JANICE M. POOLE, WHO ACQUIRED TITLE AS JANICE M. DALE, as grantor, to LANDAMERICA COMMONWEALTH, as Trustee, in favor of QUICK LOAN FUNDING INC., as beneficiary, dated 9/29/2005, recorded 11/10/2005, under Instrument No. 2005-77623, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by HSBC BANK USA, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR THE REGISTERED HOLDERS OF NOMURA HOME EQUITY LOAN, INC., ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-HE1. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: That portion of the Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter (SW1/4SW1/4) of Section Nineteen (19), Township Fifteen (15) South, Range Thirteen (13), East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon described as follows: Commencing at the Southeast corner of the SW1/4SW1/4 of said Section 19, as the initial point; thence North 89º59' West a distance of 30 feet; thence North 0º0' West a distance of 30 feet to the point of beginning; thence North 89º59' West on a line parallel to and 30 feet North of the South line of said SW1/4SW1/4 a distance of 290 feet; thence North 0º0' West a distance of 150 feet; thence South 89º59' East a distance of 290 feet; thence South 0º0' East along a line parallel to and 30 feet West of the East line of said SW1/4SW1/4 a distance of 150 feet to the point of beginning. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 4741 SOUTHWEST WICKIUP AVENUE REDMOND, OR 97756 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of September 1, 2011 Delinquent Payments from January 01, 2011 3 payments at $927.13 each $2,781.39 6 payments at $935.89 each $5,515.34 (01-01-11 through 09-01-11) Late Charges: $136.20 Beneficiary Advances: $825.63 Suspense Credit: $0.00 TOTAL: $9,358.56 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $193,100.09, PLUS interest thereon at 2.730% per annum from 12/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on January 4, 2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS: The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for January 4, 2012. Unless the lender who is foreclosing on this property is paid, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. The following information applies to you only if you occupy and rent this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a residential tenant. If the foreclosure goes through, the business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out. The buyer must first give you an eviction notice in writing that specifies the date by which you must move out. The buyer may not give you this notice until after the foreclosure sale happens. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the buyer can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES YOU TO BE NOTIFIED IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERTY AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNDER A LEGITIMATE RENTAL AGREEMENT, FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING A CERTAIN NUMBER OF DAYS BEFORE THE BUYER CAN REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT. THE FEDERAL LAW THAT REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU THIS NOTICE IS EFFECTIVE UNTIL DECEMBER 31, 2012. Under federal law, the buyer must give you at least 90 days notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If you are renting this property under a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), you may stay until the end of your lease term. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 90 days left. STATE LAW NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS: IF THE FEDERAL LAW DOES NOT APPLY, STATE LAW STILL REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING BEFORE REQUIRING YOU TO MOVE OUT IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THE PROPERTY AS A TENANT IN GOOD FAITH. EVEN IF THE FEDERAL LAW REQUIREMENT IS NO LONGER EFFECTIVE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 2012, THE REQUIREMENT UNDER STATE LAW STILL APPLIES TO YOUR SITUATION. Under state law, if you have a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), the buyer must give you at least 60 days notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 30 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 30 days left. If you are renting under a month-to-month or week-to-week rental agreement, the buyer must give you at least 30 days notice in writing before requiring you to move out. IMPORTANT: For the buyer to be required to give you notice under state law, you must prove to the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale that you are occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The name and address of the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale is shown on this notice under the heading "TRUSTEE". You must mail or deliver your proof not later than 12/5/2011 (30 days before the date first set for the foreclosure sale). Your proof must be in writing and should be a copy of your rental agreement or lease. If you do not have a written rental agreement or lease, you can provide other proof, such as receipts for rent you paid. ABOUT YOUR SECURITY DEPOSIT Under state law, you may apply your security deposit and any rent you paid in advance against the current rent you owe your landlord. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from you rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe you current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENANCY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out. You should contact the buyer to discuss that possibility if you would like to stay. Under state law, if the buyer accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the buyer becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise, the buyer is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf and you must move out by the date the buyer specifies in a notice to you. YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A DEPOSIT YOU MADE OR PREPAID RENT YOU PAID AGAINST YOUR CURRENT RENT OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE AND OF ANY NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR DEPOSIT OR YOUR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar at 800-452-7636 and ask for lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer and are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance may be obtained through Safenet at 800-SAFENET. DATED: 9/1/2011 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By: KAREN JAMES, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206)340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 4083628 09/13/2011, 09/20/2011, 09/27/2011, 10/04/2011

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. #: OR-11-445338-NH Reference is made to that certain deed made by, JOE BRUNER as Grantor to WESTERN TITLE & ESCROW COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., ("MERS"), AS NOMINEE FOR SIERRA PACIFIC MORTGAGE COMPANY, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 7/22/2005, recorded 7/29/2005, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/ reel/ volume number xxx at page number xxx fee/ file/ instrument/ microfile/ reception number 2005-49238,, covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 105162 THE NORTH 69 FEET OF LOT 1 AND THE NORTH 69 FEET OF THE WEST 48 FEET OF LOT 2, BLOCK 21, WIESTORIA, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 1254 NE 6TH ST BEND, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantors: The installments of principal and interest which became due on 2/1/2011, and all subsequent installments of principal and interest through the date of this Notice, plus amounts that are due for late charges, delinquent property taxes, insurance premiums, advances made on senior liens, taxes and/or insurance, trustee's fees, and any attorney fees and court costs arising from or associated with the beneficiaries efforts to protect and preserve its security, all of which must be paid as a condition of reinstatement, including all sums that shall accrue through reinstatement or pay-off. Nothing in this notice shall be construed as a waiver of any fees owing to the Beneficiary under the Deed of Trust pursuant to the terms of the loan documents. Monthly Payment $846.68 Monthly Late Charge $42.33 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $134,767.04 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.3750 per annum from 1/1/2011 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on 1/23/2012 at the hour of 11:00:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W. BOND STREET, BEND, OR County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. For Sale Information Call: 714-730-2727 or Login to: www.lpsasap.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Pursuant to Oregon Law, this sale will not be deemed final until the Trustee's deed has been issued by FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY. If there are any irregularities discovered within 10 days of the date of this sale, that the trustee will rescind the sale, return the buyer's money and take further action as necessary. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee's Attorney. NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for 1/23/2012. Unless the lender who is foreclosing on this property is paid, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. The following information applies to you only if you occupy and rent this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a residential tenant. If the foreclosure goes through, the business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out. The buyer must first give you an eviction notice in writing that specifies the date by which you must move out. The buyer may not give you this notice until after the foreclosure sale happens. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the buyer can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES YOU TO BE NOTIFIED IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERTY AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNDER A LEGITIMATE RENTAL AGREEMENT, FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU A NOTICE IN WRITING A CERTAIN NUMBER OF DAYS BEFORE THE BUYER CAN REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT. THE FEDERAL LAW THAT REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU THIS NOTICE IS EFFECTIVE UNTIL DECEMBER 31, 2012. Under federal law, the buyer must give you at least 90 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If you are renting this property under a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), you may stay until the end of your lease term. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 90 days left. STATE LAW NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS IF THE FEDERAL LAW DOES NOT APPLY, STATE LAW STILL REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING BEFORE REQUIRING YOU TO MOVE OUT IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THE PROPERTY AS A TENANT IN GOOD FAITH. EVEN IF THE FEDERAL LAW REQUIREMENT IS NO LONGER EFFECTIVE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 2012, THE REQUIREMENT UNDER STATE LAW STILL APPLIES TO YOUR SITUATION. Under state law, if you have a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), the buyer must give you at least 60 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 30 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 30 days left. If you are renting under a month-to-month or week-to-week rental agreement, the buyer must give you at least 30 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. IMPORTANT: For the buyer to be required to give you a notice under state law, you must prove to the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale that you are occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The name and address of the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale is shown on this notice under the heading "TRUSTEE". You must mail or deliver your proof not later than 12/24/2011 (30 days before the date first set for the foreclosure sale). Your proof must be in writing and should be a copy of your rental agreement or lease. If you do not have a written rental agreement or lease, you can provide other proof, such as receipts for rent paid. ABOUT YOUR SECURITY DEPOSIT Under state law, you may apply your security deposit and any rent you paid in advance against the current rent you owe your landlord. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from your rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe your current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENANCY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out. You should contact the buyer to discuss that possibility if you would like to stay. Under state law, if the buyer accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the buyer becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise, the buyer is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf and you must move out by the date the buyer specifies in a notice to you. YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A DEPOSIT OR RENT YOU PREPAID AGAINST YOUR CURRENT RENT OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE AND OF ANY NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR DEPOSIT OR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer or are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance is included with this notice. Oregon State Bar: (503) 684-3763; (800) 452-7636 Legal assistance: www.lawhelp.org/or/index.cfm Dated: 9/16/11 FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as trustee 3 First American Way Santa Ana, CA 92707 Signature By: Timothy Donlon, Assistant Secretary Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington as agent for FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 For Non-Sale Information: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 Fax: 619-645-7716 If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right's against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. ASAP# FNMA4092955 10/04/2011, 10/11/2011, 10/18/2011, 10/25/2011


CENTRAL OREGON MARKETPLACE

C

C

THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

SAVE SOME MONEY & TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE GREAT DEALS OFFERED BY OUR LOCAL BUSINESSES!!

with new patient exam, cleaning and x-rays if necessary *call for details

MINIMUM SAVINGS OF

It’s the best thing you can do for your Audi, BMW, Volkswagen, or Porsche. Our trained techs will inspect, adjust and replace parts according to manufacture recommended specifications, time and mileage intervals. Includes labor, part & fluids.

360

$

(541 ) 548-5105

Build this super affordable home on your lot, and for a limited time, get Granite and Cement Lap Siding…FREE!

4 BRANDS, A THOUSAND POSSIBILITIES

M O T O R S

HIDDEN IN RED OAK SQUARE 1230 NE 3RD • BEND, OR

$

00 1300

Fish House LUNCH 11:30–2:30, MON–FRI DINNER 4–9, MON–SAT

Must present coupon at time of cleaning. An area is defined as any room up to 300 square feet. Baths, halls, large walk-in closets and area rugs are priced separately. Offer does not include protector. Residential only. Valid at participating locations only. Not valid with any other coupon. Some restrictions may apply. $99 minimum service order. Expires 10/31/11.

®

ES CARD IAL SERVIC FINANC

WE ALSO OFFER YOU PEACE OF MIND AT NO ADDITIONAL CHARGE THROUGH:

Customer Appreciation Month

- OCTOBER -

STEAKLOBSTERPRAWNS

$

• SPOT TREATMENT & TOUGH STAIN REMOVAL • NO HIDDEN CHARGES • LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED

$10 OFF

All Breeds, Dogs/Cats New & Existing Clients! Offer Expires 10-31-2011

GROOMING

1895

Deschutes Dog Salon

served with choice of soup or salad and baked potato, french fries or rice.

FULL SERVICE PET GROOMING

541-749-4001

Not valid with other offers or take-out. Please present coupon. Expires 10/31/11

1835 NE 2nd, Bend

OFFERS VALID WITH COUPON ONLY. EXPIRES 10/31/11.

www.bendoregondoggrooming.com

20% OFF Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning 541-388-7374 Bend 541-923-3347 Redmond Offer valid with coupon only. Excluding RVs & stairs. Not valid with other offers. Minimums apply. Payment due at time of service. Expiration date: October 31, 2011

Expires October 31, 2011

DOUBLE YOUR MAIL-IN REBATE UP TO

$

160

when you make the purchase on the Goodyear Credit Card.2 See this ad for more details.3

• Receive a 25 VISA Gift Card when you schedule an in-home consultation with one of our expert estimators. $

Special Oil Change Price!

AND

00

• Receive another $2500 VISA Gift Card with your new equipment purchase before November 15, 2011.

Up to $1250 in Rebates from Carrier on qualified Greenspeed™ systems Up to $1900 from electric utilities (utility rebates from PPL, Midstate Electric and CEC vary) Up to $1040 in State and Federal Energy Tax Credits!

GOODYEAR AUTO CARE • 61343 S. HWY 97 • BEND • 541-388-4189

As a trade ally contractor of Energy Trust of Oregon, we can help with incentives and Oregon Residential Energy Tax Credits to improve the energy efficiency of your home.

Standard Rate $109 Chimney Coupon Discount Rate Only $ Per

89!

Standard Clean Includes: Single Story House • Wood Stove • Fireplace Insert • Natural Gas • Dryer & Dryer Vent Cleaning

Licensed • Bonded • Insured CCB# 183596 www.mastertouchbend.com

Special Oil Change Price!

98

19 OIL CHANGES! CUSTOM LOYALTY KEY TAGS ARE HERE!

murrayandholt.com

541-382-2222

3 Oil Changes (Gas)

Bend. d Street and Franklin in Right on the Corner of Thir Right on the Price.

S SERVICE HOUR 5:30pm M–F 7:45am to

Special Oil Change Price!

ALPINE DENTAL

$20 OFF any Dryer Vent Cleaning

$

Covers most vehicles. Diesels extra. Coupon expires 10/30/11.

541-382-1231 • www.BendHeating.com

Chimney Cleaning

Special Oil Change Price!

OR

on purchases of $250 or more made form September 17, 2011 to December 3, 2011. Interest will be charged to your account from the purchase date if the purchase balance is not paid in full within 6 months or if you make a late payment. Minimum payment required. See this ad for details.

Expires 11/15/11

Schedule Online at www.stanleysteemer.com

• ARRIVAL TIMES SCHEDULED AT YOUR CONVENIENCE • SAME DAY SERVICE • CAREFUL MOVING OF FURNITURE

NO INTEREST IF PAID IN FULL WITHIN 6 MONTHS*

20 Off

Must present coupon at time of cleaning. An area is defined as any room up to 300 square feet. Baths, halls, large walk-in closets and area rugs are priced separately. Offer does not include protector. Residential only. Valid at participating locations only. Not valid with any other coupon. Some restrictions may apply. $99 minimum service order. Expires 10/31/11.

Chem-Dry of Bend

2. Subject to credit approval. Offers valid 09/17/11 – 12/03/11. One Mail-In Rebate Check per qualifying purchase. Allow 6 to 8 weeks for Rebate Check delivery. See Retailer for complete details.

$

ANY 5 AREAS CLEANED

ANY 2 AREAS & HALL CLEANED & PROTECTED

Includes 5 quarts of oil, (blend of synthetic oil) replace oil filter, 21-point inspection, discounts up to 10%, roadside assistance, 12/12 warranty.

The key tag includes 3 lube, oil & filters. The cost in only $ 5995 per tag.

$

1998 each

Special Oil Change Price! 3 Rooms Cleaned

Fall l! Specia

$

Jack R. Miller D.M.D. Branden Ferguson D.D.S.

WINTER SPECIAL! Get ready for the winter driving season with our SIGNATURE DELUXE MAINTENANCE SERVICE. Includes lube, oil & filter service (up to 5 qts of oil). Bumper to bumper factory inspections and adjustments. Tune check and computer check. *Diagnosis not included* www.stevesautomotiveofbend.com

Only

$

*

47.95

*Present coupon at time of service. Expires 10/31/2011

902 SE Textron Dr • Bend • 541.382.7911

99

With Coupon. Room is Considered 250 Sq. Ft. One Coupon per Customer. Fuel surcharge may apply. Expires 10/31/2011

BW1011

2 Rooms Cleaned

$

74

Family & Cosmetic Dentistry Modern, State of the Art Facility

Special Oil Change Price!

by Mail-In Rebate when you purchase a set of four select Goodyear® or Dunlop® tires.

195

156

Serving Deschutes, Crook & Jefferson Counties • Independently Owned & Operated

GET UP TO

80

$

$

$

541-382-3173 DINNER

OCTOBER ENDLESS SHRIMP FEST

Coupon limited to parties of six guests. Not valid with other discounts, offers or take-out. Expires 10/31/11

www.pink.chemdry.com

SAVE SOME MONEY & TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE GREAT DEALS OFFERED BY OUR LOCAL BUSINESSES!!

MORE SPECIALS Call for Free Estimate 541-706-9390 • 1-800-STEEMER ON THE BACK

1045 SE 3rd St • Bend • OR 541-382-1711 www.carreramotors.com

served mesquite grilled or panko fried with choice of soup or salad and baked potato, rice or fries.

Chem-Dry’s World Famous® Professional Strength Spot Remover has a new look… Pink! With the purchase of each can, $1 is donated to the National Breast Cancer Foundation to help fund educational programs and mammograms. Get your can today and help improve the lives of women everywhere.

Interior: Clean carpets & trim Refresh fabric protection on seats (when applicable) & Deodorize Exterior: Wash, wax & buff & Detail wheels

*Please present offer at time of write up. Not to be combined with other offers. Not redeemable for advertised specials, previous purchases, or cash. Offer good through October 31, 2011.

Gentle Dentistry FREE Granite and Cement Lap Siding!

$100 OFF COMPLETE D E TA I L I N G SPECIAL

$50 OFF ANY SCHEDULED MAINTENANCE

Free Bleach*

Dr. Brandon L. Turley D.M.D., P.C.

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2011

With Coupon. Room is Considered 250 Sq. Ft. One Coupon per Customer. Fuel surcharge may apply. Expires 10/31/2011

BW1011

Whole House Cleaning

$

OXI Fresh of Central Oregon 541-593-1799

144

Up to 5 Rooms Cleaned

With Coupon. Room is Considered 250 Sq. Ft. One Coupon per Customer. Fuel surcharge may apply. Expires 10/31/2011 BW1011


TUESDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2011

THE BULLETIN ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT

C

C

THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

SAVE SOME MONEY & TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE GREAT DEALS OFFERED BY OUR LOCAL BUSINESSES!!

Free Bleach*

with new patient exam, cleaning and x-rays if necessary *call for details

MINIMUM SAVINGS OF

Chem-Dry’s World Famous® Professional Strength Spot Remover has a new look… Pink! With the purchase of each can, $1 is donated to the National Breast Cancer Foundation to help fund educational programs and mammograms. Get your can today and help improve the lives of women everywhere.

360

$

Gentle Dentistry

Chem-Dry of Bend Serving Deschutes, Crook & Jefferson Counties • Independently Owned & Operated

20% OFF Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning 541-388-7374 Bend 541-923-3347 Redmond

(541 ) 548-5105

Dr. Brandon L. Turley D.M.D., P.C.

Offer valid with coupon only. Excluding RVs & stairs. Not valid with other offers. Minimums apply. Payment due at time of service. Expiration date: October 31, 2011

www.pink.chemdry.com

GET UP TO

DOUBLE YOUR MAIL-IN REBATE UP TO

80

$

OR

by Mail-In Rebate when you purchase a set of four select Goodyear® or Dunlop® tires.

$

00 1300

541-382-3173 DINNER HIDDEN IN RED OAK SQUARE 1230 NE 3RD • BEND, OR

STEAKLOBSTERPRAWNS

$

served mesquite grilled or panko fried with choice of soup or salad and baked potato, rice or fries. Coupon limited to parties of six guests. Not valid with other discounts, offers or take-out. Expires 10/31/11

Fish House LUNCH 11:30–2:30, MON–FRI DINNER 4–9, MON–SAT

$

1895

served with choice of soup or salad and baked potato, french fries or rice. Not valid with other offers or take-out. Please present coupon. Expires 10/31/11

OFFERS VALID WITH COUPON ONLY. EXPIRES 10/31/11.

$

195

156

160

ANY 5 AREAS CLEANED

ANY 2 AREAS & HALL CLEANED & PROTECTED Must present coupon at time of cleaning. An area is defined as any room up to 300 square feet. Baths, halls, large walk-in closets and area rugs are priced separately. Offer does not include protector. Residential only. Valid at participating locations only. Not valid with any other coupon. Some restrictions may apply. $99 minimum service order. Expires 10/31/11.

when you make the purchase on the Goodyear Credit Card.2 See this ad for more details.3

NO INTEREST IF PAID IN FULL WITHIN 6 MONTHS*

Schedule Online at www.stanleysteemer.com

Must present coupon at time of cleaning. An area is defined as any room up to 300 square feet. Baths, halls, large walk-in closets and area rugs are priced separately. Offer does not include protector. Residential only. Valid at participating locations only. Not valid with any other coupon. Some restrictions may apply. $99 minimum service order. Expires 10/31/11.

®

ES CARD IAL SERVIC FINANC

MORE SPECIALS Call for Free Estimate 541-706-9390 • 1-800-STEEMER ON THE BACK

on purchases of $250 or more made form September 17, 2011 to December 3, 2011. Interest will be charged to your account from the purchase date if the purchase balance is not paid in full within 6 months or if you make a late payment. Minimum payment required. See this ad for details.

WE ALSO OFFER YOU PEACE OF MIND AT NO ADDITIONAL CHARGE THROUGH: • ARRIVAL TIMES SCHEDULED AT YOUR CONVENIENCE • SAME DAY SERVICE • CAREFUL MOVING OF FURNITURE

GOODYEAR AUTO CARE • 61343 S. HWY 97 • BEND • 541-388-4189 AND 00

• SPOT TREATMENT & TOUGH STAIN REMOVAL • NO HIDDEN CHARGES • LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED

3 Rooms Cleaned

Fall l! p S ecia

• Receive another 25 VISA Gift Card with your new equipment purchase before November 15, 2011. $

OCTOBER ENDLESS SHRIMP FEST

$

2. Subject to credit approval. Offers valid 09/17/11 – 12/03/11. One Mail-In Rebate Check per qualifying purchase. Allow 6 to 8 weeks for Rebate Check delivery. See Retailer for complete details.

• Receive a $2500 VISA Gift Card when you schedule an in-home consultation with one of our expert estimators.

SAVE SOME MONEY & TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE GREAT DEALS OFFERED BY OUR LOCAL BUSINESSES!!

$

99

With Coupon. Room is Considered 250 Sq. Ft. One Coupon per Customer. Fuel surcharge may apply. Expires 10/31/2011

BW1011

WINTER SPECIAL!

2 Rooms Cleaned

$

74

Up to $1250 in Rebates from Carrier on qualified Greenspeed™ systems Up to $1900 from electric utilities (utility rebates from PPL, Midstate Electric and CEC vary) Up to $1040 in State and Federal Energy Tax Credits!

With Coupon. Room is Considered 250 Sq. Ft. One Coupon per Customer. Fuel surcharge may apply. Expires 10/31/2011

BW1011

Whole House Cleaning

$

144

As a trade ally contractor of Energy Trust of Oregon, we can help with incentives and Oregon Residential Energy Tax Credits to improve the energy efficiency of your home.

541-382-1231 • www.BendHeating.com

OXI Fresh of Central Oregon 541-593-1799

Up to 5 Rooms Cleaned

With Coupon. Room is Considered 250 Sq. Ft. One Coupon per Customer. Fuel surcharge may apply. Expires 10/31/2011 BW1011

Get ready for the winter driving season with our SIGNATURE DELUXE MAINTENANCE SERVICE. Includes lube, oil & filter service (up to 5 qts of oil). Bumper to bumper factory inspections and adjustments. Tune check and computer check. *Diagnosis not included* www.stevesautomotiveofbend.com

Only

$

*

47.95

*Present coupon at time of service. Expires 10/31/2011

902 SE Textron Dr • Bend • 541.382.7911

ALPINE DENTAL Family & Cosmetic Dentistry Modern, State of the Art Facility

Jack R. Miller D.M.D. Branden Ferguson D.D.S.

$

FREE Granite and Cement Lap Siding!

20 Off

Chimney Cleaning $20 OFF any Dryer Vent Cleaning

Standard Rate $109 Chimney Coupon Discount Rate Only $

Build this super affordable home on your lot, and for a limited time, get Granite and Cement Lap Siding…FREE!

Per

89!

Standard Clean Includes: Single Story House • Wood Stove • Fireplace Insert • Natural Gas • Dryer & Dryer Vent Cleaning

Expires 11/15/11

Expires October 31, 2011

Licensed • Bonded • Insured CCB# 183596 www.mastertouchbend.com

$

Special Oil Change Price!

98

19 OIL CHANGES! CUSTOM LOYALTY KEY TAGS ARE HERE!

murrayandholt.com

541-382-2222

3 Oil Changes (Gas)

Bend. d Street and Franklin in Right on the Corner of Thir Right on the Price.

S SERVICE HOUR 5:30pm M–F 7:45am to

Covers most vehicles. Diesels extra. Coupon expires 10/30/11.

Special Oil Change Price!

The key tag includes 3 lube, oil & filters. The cost in only $ 5995 per tag.

Includes 5 quarts of oil, (blend of synthetic oil) replace oil filter, 21-point inspection, discounts up to 10%, roadside assistance, 12/12 warranty.

$

1998 each

Special Oil Change Price!

Customer Appreciation Month Special Oil Change Price!

Special Oil Change Price!

Special Oil Change Price!

- OCTOBER -

$10 OFF

$50 OFF ANY SCHEDULED MAINTENANCE

All Breeds, Dogs/Cats New & Existing Clients! Offer Expires 10-31-2011

It’s the best thing you can do for your Audi, BMW, Volkswagen, or Porsche. Our trained techs will inspect, adjust and replace parts according to manufacture recommended specifications, time and mileage intervals. Includes labor, part & fluids.

GROOMING

Deschutes Dog Salon 1835 NE 2nd, Bend

www.bendoregondoggrooming.com

Interior: Clean carpets & trim Refresh fabric protection on seats (when applicable) & Deodorize Exterior: Wash, wax & buff & Detail wheels

*Please present offer at time of write up. Not to be combined with other offers. Not redeemable for advertised specials, previous purchases, or cash. Offer good through October 31, 2011.

FULL SERVICE PET GROOMING

541-749-4001

$100 OFF COMPLETE D E TA I L I N G SPECIAL

M O T O R S

4 BRANDS, A THOUSAND POSSIBILITIES 1045 SE 3rd St • Bend • OR 541-382-1711 www.carreramotors.com


C THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

C THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

SAVE SOME MONEY & TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE GREAT DEALS OFFERED BY OUR LOCAL BUSINESSES!! $

150

SAVE SOME MONEY & TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE GREAT DEALS OFFERED BY OUR LOCAL BUSINESSES!!

$

15 OFF

SOFA & LOVESEAT CLEANED

UPHOLSTERY CLEANING

Must present coupon at time of cleaning. Sectional sofas may not be separated. Sofas over 7 feet and certain fabrics may incur additional charges. Offer does not include protector. Residential only. Valid at participating locations only. Not valid with any other coupon. Some restrictions may apply. $99 minimum service order. Expires 10/31/11.

Must present coupon at time of cleaning. Sectional sofas may not be separated. Sofas over 7 feet and certain fabrics may incur additional charges. Offer does not include protector. Residential only. Valid at participating locations only. Not valid with any other coupon. Some restrictions may apply. $99 minimum service order. Expires 10/31/11.

Schedule Online at www.stanleysteemer.com

FREE INSPECTION

Deschutes Dog Salon FULL SERVICE PET GROOMING

• All Breed Dog and Cat Grooming • Full Service Grooming and Bathing • Hydro-Surge Massage Bathing • Monthly Breed Specials • Weekly & Biweekly Discounts • All Natural Shampoos • Over 20 Years Experience • Open Mon.-Sat. Call For Hours • Gift Certificates Available!

541-749-4001 1835 NE 2nd, Bend www.bendoregondoggrooming.com

New Patients & Emergencies Welcome

1045 SE 3rd St • Bend • OR • 541-382-1711 w w w. c a r r e r a m o t o r s . c o m

OCTOBER ENDLESS SHRIMP FEST $

13

541-382-3173 DINNER HIDDEN IN RED OAK SQUARE 1230 NE 3RD • BEND, OR

served mesquite grilled or panko fried with choice of soup or salad and baked potato, rice or fries. Coupon limited to parties of six guests. Not valid with other discounts, offers or take-out. Expires 10/31/11

$

Fish House LUNCH 11:30–2:30, MON–FRI DINNER 4–9, MON–SAT

646 S.W. RIMROCK • REDMOND, OR

HURRY! Limited Time Offer!

CCB#181069

FREE Granite Kitchen Countertops! FREE Fiber Cement Lap Siding!

STEAKLOBSTERPRAWNS

00 00

541-548-5105

Dr. Brandon L. Turley D.M.D., P.C.

4 BRANDS, A THOUSAND POSSIBILITIES

M O T O R S

• SPOT TREATMENT & TOUGH STAIN REMOVAL • NO HIDDEN CHARGES • LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED

Pet Grooming Services

• Cosmetic: - Fillings - Crowns - Veneers - Dentures - Partials - Teeth Whitening • Extractions Including Wisdom Teeth

Friday Appointments Available

WE ALSO OFFER YOU PEACE OF MIND AT NO ADDITIONAL CHARGE THROUGH:

THE BEST GROOMING FOR YOUR PETS

• Complete Family Dentistry • Insurance Billing • We Offer Nitrous Oxide • We Place & Restore Implants • Root Canals

*Please present offer at time of write up. Not to be combined with other offers. Not redeemable for advertised specials, previous purchases, or cash. Offer good through October 31, 2011.

Call for Free Estimate 541-706-9390 • 1-800-STEEMER • ARRIVAL TIMES SCHEDULED AT YOUR CONVENIENCE • SAME DAY SERVICE • CAREFUL MOVING OF FURNITURE

We Cater to Cowards

We will visually inspect and report on: C.V. Joint Boots • Exhaust System • Fluid Levels • V-Belts Exterior Lights • Ball Joints & Tie Rods • Tire Wear & Air Pressure • Cooling System & Hoses FREE Estimate provided on needed Service & Parts

FREE!

Call now for your FREE info kit!

95

18

served with choice of soup or salad and baked potato, french fries or rice. Not valid with other offers or take-out. Please present coupon. Expires 10/31/11

OFFERS VALID WITH COUPON ONLY. EXPIRES 10/31/11.

• • • •

Guaranteed Build Time! Price Look Guarantee! Customizable Floor Plans! Serving All of Central & Eastern Oregon!

1.888.400.6165

www.HiLineHomes.com

Model Home: 1454 Maple Rim Court, Redmond, OR 97756

*Free granite and cement lap siding good with purchase of new home. Good only at participating HiLine Offices. Not good with any other offer. Prices subject to change without notice. © 2011 HiLine Homes • CCB #181069

Superior Carpet and Tile & Stone Cleaning

Our Hot Carbonating Truck Mount Extraction cleans deep!We use one-fifth the amount of water compared to steam cleaners so carpet dries in 1 to 2 hours. Our cleaner, The Natural®, is green certified, non-toxic, so it’s safe for your family and pets who are allergy sensitive! Leaves no sticky residue! Using Chem-Dry resists re-soiling so your carpet fibers stay cleaner, longer! Don’t forget your area rugs & upholstery too!

Chem-Dry of Bend 541-388-7374 Bend • 541-923-3347 Redmond Serving Deschutes, Crook & Jefferson Counties • Independently Owned & Operated

We here at Murray & Holt Motors understand how costly it can be to keep your vehicle maintained. So we have come up with the perfect solution.

It’s called the Customer Loyalty Program murrayandholt.com

541-382-2222

d Street and Fran Right on the Corner of Thir Right on the Price.

klin in Bend.

S SERVICE HOUR 5:30pm M–F 7:30am to

This program is full of great benefits & savings.

MONEY-SAVING COUPONS!

AND

• Receive a $2500 VISA Gift Card when you schedule an in-home consultation with one of our expert estimators.

• Receive another $2500 VISA Gift Card with your new equipment purchase before November 15, 2011.

• Up to $1250 in Rebates from Carrier on qualified Greenspeed™ systems • Up to $1900 from electric utilities (utility rebates from PPL, Midstate Electric and CEC vary) • Up to $1040 in State and Federal Energy Tax Credits!

See front page for details

SPECIAL IICRC Certiied Technician

$

49

(541) 382-2281

am so

t.

nR d.

FALL SPECIAL!

Oil Change for $27.95 *Includes up to 5 qts of Napa Oil and Safety Inspection www.stevesautomotiveofbend.com

Air Duct Cleaning! $

20 Off Dryer Vent or Chimney

Irritation • Headaches • Allergic Reactions • Respiratory Problems 27th St.

illi

NE Pro

al C fession

NE Williamson Blvd.

W

Offer expires 10/31/11

75 OFF

DID YOU KNOW? Poor Indoor Air Quality can: Result in Illness • Including Nausea Eye & Skin

Alpine Dental

NE

New customers only

• Chassis Lube • Wash Exterior Front • New Oil Filter Window • Up to 5 Qts of 5W30 • Vacuum Front Kendall Synthetic Blend Floorboards • Tire Rotation • Top off most Fluids under the hood

Most cars & light trucks. 3/4 & 1 Ton may require extra fee. Expires 10/31/11

$

(541) 389-8715

NE Neff Rd.

with this coupon $170 value!

29

We Use Synthetic Oil Blend Motor Oil

you can breathe better air

2078 NE Professional Ct.

SAVE $120

99

ALLERGIES…

ALPINE DENTAL

95

99

119

Comprehensive Exam Includes: • X-rays • Oral Cancer Screening • Tooth and Gum Evaluation

NEW PATIENTS

541-593-1799

$

$

GOODYEAR AUTO CARE | 61343 S. HWY 97 • BEND • 541-388-4189

541-382-1231 • www.BendHeating.com

of Central Oregon

Install new disc pads/shoes, resurface drums/rotors. Most cars per axle. Ceramic or carbon metallic pads extra if required. Starting at

Bearing Repack Extra Most cars & light trucks. Expires 10/31/11

As a trade ally contractor of Energy Trust of Oregon, we can help with incentives and Oregon Residential Energy Tax Credits to improve the energy efficiency of your home.

Lube, Oil, Filter & Tire Rotation

BRAKE MAINTENANCE

*Present coupon at time of service. Expires 10/31/2011

902 SE Textron Dr • Bend • 541.382.7911

EXPIRES 11/15/11

Call today for your FREE ESTIMATE! *Video Inspection Available 541-389-8715 | LICENSED • BONDED • INSURED | www.masterstouchblend.com


C THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

C THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

SAVE SOME MONEY & TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE GREAT DEALS OFFERED BY OUR LOCAL BUSINESSES!! 541-382-3173 DINNER

OCTOBER ENDLESS SHRIMP FEST $

SAVE SOME MONEY & TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE GREAT DEALS OFFERED BY OUR LOCAL BUSINESSES!!

HIDDEN IN RED OAK SQUARE 1230 NE 3RD • BEND, OR

1300

served mesquite grilled or panko fried with choice of soup or salad and baked potato, rice or fries. Coupon limited to parties of six guests. Not valid with other discounts, offers or take-out. Expires 10/31/11

Fish House LUNCH 11:30–2:30, MON–FRI DINNER 4–9, MON–SAT

STEAKLOBSTERPRAWNS

$

95

18

served with choice of soup or salad and baked potato, french fries or rice. Not valid with other offers or take-out. Please present coupon. Expires 10/31/11

OFFERS VALID WITH COUPON ONLY. EXPIRES 10/31/11.

$

150

We Cater to Cowards

Superior Carpet and Tile & Stone Cleaning

• Complete Family Dentistry • Insurance Billing • We Offer Nitrous Oxide • We Place & Restore Implants • Root Canals

Our Hot Carbonating Truck Mount Extraction cleans deep! We use one-fifth the amount of water compared to steam cleaners so carpet dries in 1 to 2 hours. Our cleaner, The Natural®, is green certified, non-toxic, so it’s safe for your family and pets who are allergy sensitive! Leaves no sticky residue! Using Chem-Dry resists re-soiling so your carpet fibers stay cleaner, longer!

Friday Appointments Available

Don’t forget your area rugs & upholstery too!

New Patients & Emergencies Welcome

Chem-Dry of Bend

541-548-5105

Dr. Brandon L. Turley D.M.D., P.C.

541-388-7374 Bend • 541-923-3347 Redmond

646 S.W. RIMROCK • REDMOND, OR

Serving Deschutes, Crook & Jefferson Counties • Independently Owned & Operated

MONEY-SAVING COUPONS!

$

15 OFF

SOFA & LOVESEAT CLEANED

UPHOLSTERY CLEANING

Must present coupon at time of cleaning. Sectional sofas may not be separated. Sofas over 7 feet and certain fabrics may incur additional charges. Offer does not include protector. Residential only. Valid at participating locations only. Not valid with any other coupon. Some restrictions may apply. $99 minimum service order. Expires 10/31/11.

Must present coupon at time of cleaning. Sectional sofas may not be separated. Sofas over 7 feet and certain fabrics may incur additional charges. Offer does not include protector. Residential only. Valid at participating locations only. Not valid with any other coupon. Some restrictions may apply. $99 minimum service order. Expires 10/31/11.

Schedule Online at www.stanleysteemer.com

• Cosmetic: - Fillings - Crowns - Veneers - Dentures - Partials - Teeth Whitening • Extractions Including Wisdom Teeth

BRAKE MAINTENANCE Install new disc pads/shoes, resurface drums/rotors. Most cars per axle. Ceramic or carbon metallic pads extra if required. Starting at

$

99

119

Bearing Repack Extra Most cars & light trucks. Expires 10/31/11

Call for Free Estimate 541-706-9390 • 1-800-STEEMER

Lube, Oil, Filter & Tire Rotation

$

99

29

We Use Synthetic Oil Blend Motor Oil

• Chassis Lube • Wash Exterior Front • New Oil Filter Window • Up to 5 Qts of 5W30 • Vacuum Front Kendall Synthetic Blend Floorboards • Tire Rotation • Top off most Fluids under the hood

Most cars & light trucks. 3/4 & 1 Ton may require extra fee. Expires 10/31/11

WE ALSO OFFER YOU PEACE OF MIND AT NO ADDITIONAL CHARGE THROUGH: • ARRIVAL TIMES SCHEDULED AT YOUR CONVENIENCE • SAME DAY SERVICE • CAREFUL MOVING OF FURNITURE

GOODYEAR AUTO CARE | 61343 S. HWY 97 • BEND • 541-388-4189

• SPOT TREATMENT & TOUGH STAIN REMOVAL • NO HIDDEN CHARGES • LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED

FALL SPECIAL!

Oil Change for $27.95

AND

• Receive a $2500 VISA Gift Card when you schedule an in-home consultation with one of our expert estimators.

• Receive another $2500 VISA Gift Card with your new equipment purchase before November 15, 2011.

of Central Oregon

541-593-1799

• Up to $1250 in Rebates from Carrier on qualified Greenspeed™ systems • Up to $1900 from electric utilities (utility rebates from PPL, Midstate Electric and CEC vary) • Up to $1040 in State and Federal Energy Tax Credits!

IICRC Certiied Technician

*Includes up to 5 qts of Napa Oil and Safety Inspection www.stevesautomotiveofbend.com

As a trade ally contractor of Energy Trust of Oregon, we can help with incentives and Oregon Residential Energy Tax Credits to improve the energy efficiency of your home.

*Present coupon at time of service. Expires 10/31/2011

541-382-1231 • www.BendHeating.com

902 SE Textron Dr • Bend • 541.382.7911 Comprehensive Exam Includes: • X-rays • Oral Cancer Screening • Tooth and Gum Evaluation

NEW PATIENTS

SPECIAL $

ALPINE DENTAL

95

49

2078 NE Professional Ct.

(541) 382-2281

SAVE $120

NE Neff Rd.

illi am so

nR d.

Offer expires 10/31/11

NE Pro

fession

al Ct.

27th St.

W

New customers only

NE Williamson Blvd.

Alpine Dental

NE

with this coupon $170 value!

ALLERGIES…

HURRY! Limited Time Offer!

CCB#181069

FREE Granite Kitchen Countertops! FREE Fiber Cement Lap Siding!

you can breathe better air $

75 OFF

FREE!

Air Duct Cleaning! (541) 389-8715

$

20 Off Dryer Vent or Chimney

DID YOU KNOW? Poor Indoor Air Quality can: Result in Illness • Including Nausea Eye & Skin Irritation • Headaches • Allergic Reactions • Respiratory Problems

EXPIRES 11/15/11

Call today for your FREE ESTIMATE! *Video Inspection Available 541-389-8715 | LICENSED • BONDED • INSURED | www.masterstouchblend.com

THE BEST GROOMING FOR YOUR PETS

FREE INSPECTION We will visually inspect and report on: C.V. Joint Boots • Exhaust System • Fluid Levels • V-Belts Exterior Lights • Ball Joints & Tie Rods • Tire Wear & Air Pressure • Cooling System & Hoses FREE Estimate provided on needed Service & Parts *Please present offer at time of write up. Not to be combined with other offers. Not redeemable for advertised specials, previous purchases, or cash. Offer good through October 31, 2011.

M O T O R S

Deschutes Dog Salon FULL SERVICE PET GROOMING

Call now for your FREE info kit!

Pet Grooming Services • All Breed Dog and Cat Grooming • Full Service Grooming and Bathing • Hydro-Surge Massage Bathing • Monthly Breed Specials • Weekly & Biweekly Discounts • All Natural Shampoos • Over 20 Years Experience • Open Mon.-Sat. Call For Hours • Gift Certificates Available!

4 BRANDS, A THOUSAND POSSIBILITIES

541-749-4001

1045 SE 3rd St • Bend • OR • 541-382-1711 www.carreramotors.com

www.bendoregondoggrooming.com

1835 NE 2nd, Bend

• • • •

Guaranteed Build Time! Price Look Guarantee! Customizable Floor Plans! Serving All of Central & Eastern Oregon!

1.888.400.6165 www.HiLineHomes.com

Model Home: 1454 Maple Rim Court, Redmond, OR 97756

*Free granite and cement lap siding good with purchase of new home. Good only at participating HiLine Offices. Not good with any other offer. Prices subject to change without notice. © 2011 HiLine Homes • CCB #181069

We here at Murray & Holt Motors understand how costly it can be to keep your vehicle maintained. So we have come up with the perfect solution.

It’s called the Customer Loyalty Program murrayandholt.com

541-382-2222

Bend. d Street and Franklin in Right on the Corner of Thir Right on the Price.

S SERVICE HOUR 5:30pm M–F 7:30am to

This program is full of great benefits & savings. See front page for details


Bulletin Daily Paper 10/04/11